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Full text of "A history of the Juniata Valley and its people;"



NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES 

11 mil mil mil II III 



3 3433 08044017 9 






A HISTORY 



OF THE 



JUNIATA VALLEY 



AND ITS PEOPLE 



UNDER THE EDITORIAL SUPERVISION OF 

JOHN W. JORDAN, LL.D. 

Librarian of Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 



' "v 



VOLUME III 



ILLUSTRATED 



;"',1^EW-.¥0RK'.' '• 
LEWIS HISTORICAL- P^XOtlSHliSTG COMPANY 






THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ASTOR, LENOX AND 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS. 

R 191+ , L 



r 




HISTORY OF THE JUXIATA VALLEY 945 

fare of his cily. and is there held in esteem as an honorahle bnsiness 
man and good eitizcn. 

lie married ( lirst ) in Jnly, 1879, Elizahetli, daughter of Alexander 
Campbell of Huntingdon. She died December 20, 1886; issue: i. Elmer 
N., born January 18, 1881, now a bookkeeper for the Bayer-Beaver 
Company ; he married Mabel Isenberg ; children : Frederick Allen, 
Geneveive Isenberg. 2. Florence, deceased. 3. Herbert, deceased. Mr. 
Rupert married (second) May 30, 1889, Laura C. Carver, daughter of 
George Carver, died January 14, 1913, and his wife, Anna Bare, who 
survives him; children: 4. J. Lillian, born December 17, 1893, graduate 
of Huntingdon high school, class of 191 1, and the Business Department 
of Juniata College, 1913. Both Mr. and Mrs. Rui)ert and their daugh- 
ter, J. Lillian, are members of the Church of the Brethren, which he 
serves as deacon. 



\\'illiam Emmert Swigart, son of \\'^illiam J. and Carrie 
SWIGART M. (Miller) Swigart, was born June 5, 1883, in Hunt- 
ingdon, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. He de- 
scends from German-Swiss ancestors, the first of whom emigrated to 
the United States when the country was yet young. The family has 
for generations been closely identified with the best interests of Penn- 
sylvania, and particularly Huntingdon county, and the Juniata Valley 
section. 

He obtained his early mental discipline in the common schools of 
the borough, and later matriculated at Juniata College. He entered the 
teachers' department, and graduated with distinction in 1900. In 1906 
he graduated, after having taken a classical course. Previous to leaving 
the halls of learning he entered pedagogy as a profession, and for one 
year engaged with signal success in teaching. He had in the meantime 
acted as special agent for the Penn IMutual Life Insurance Company, 
and in 1907 he, with John W. Harshbarger as partner, engaged in the 
insurance business on a large scale, representing many of the most 
important and soundest companies in the United States. His patrons 
declare that he has one of; ti'i.e be^t„''can'cl.uct?d ;Agencies in the Juniata 
Valley. Mr. Swigart is regarded as one _of the foremost citizens of 
Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, wh<;re. he-Tfsicl'es, In his business dealings 
he is scrupulously exact and fair, anxl.. hfts '.wOn' a success which is most 



946 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

creditable, as it has come to him as the result of his own business 
acumen and personal merit. In politics he is a Progressive, aiding that 
youngest of political parties in every manner in his power, but he has 
never held nor aspired to office. He has been a member of the Board 
of Health of Huntingdon, on which he did faithful work for the public 
sood. He and his wife are members of the Church of the Brethren, 
supporting it generously. He married, June 6, 1907, Eva Workman, 
daughter of Mrs. Jemima Workman, formerly of Ohio, but who now 
makes her home in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. She is of straight Eng- 
lish and German descent. Children: i. John, born August 30, 1908. 
2. Dorothy, born July i, 1912. 



Wilfred Osborn Neff, a well-known citizen and public offi- 
NEFF cial of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, is a descendant of a 

family with a most interesting history. The Neff family, 
now so numerous in various parts of Pennsylvania and in some localities 
in the west, had its origin in Switzerland, where there are very many 
of the name, especially in Canton Zurich. There they belong, as their 
descendants in America take pleasure in pointing out, to the most sub- 
stantial class, whose lot in life is neither poverty nor riches, but useful 
activity with consequent prosperity. They are said to be among the 
most prosperous and best educated artisans of Europe, and that traits 
of heroism and intellectual aspirations are still latent is clearly proved 
by incidents of family history which are handed down from genera- 
tion to generation. The Neffs in America are able to trace their 
ancestry to the earlier half of the sixteenth century. In the struggles 
for liberty in the little land of Switzerland they bore their share bravely, 
and have transmitted their admirable qualities to their descendants. 
The earliest known ancestor, Adam Neff, with his trusty sword, rescued 
the standard of Zurich from the hands of the invaders at the battle 
of Cappel, October 11, 1531. In the next century Barbara Neff lent 
new luster to the name by the martyrdom she suft'ered for her devotion 
to the Reformed faith. In later times Felix Neff, the "pastor of the 
high Alps," is fondly bsmhmbe^ed'Apr: htS; sJiort life of Christian zeal 
and fidelity to his flock,' scattered m^i iijg-' Alpine heights, and for his 
missionary labors in spreadirig tif-pj^l^i among the destitute and igno- 
rant dwellers in remote httmlets! .'!]^a'ul 'Neff, a celebrated publisher of 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 947 

Stuttgart, Germany, is another of this famous family. The picture of 
St. Isaac of Dalmatia, in the catiicdral at St. Petersburg, is by the cele- 
brated painter, Timoleon Carl von Neil, who died in Russia in 1879. 
Representatives of three generations of the Neff family came to 
this country about 1717 — Francis Neff, his sons, Francis Jr., Henry and 
Daniel, and the sons of Daniel, also named Henry and Daniel. They 
settled near Little Conestoga creek, in Lancaster county. Hans Hein- 
rich, or John Henry Neif, brother of Francis Neff, the first regularly 
educated physician in Lancaster county, appears to have settled here 
somewhat earlier. He was widely known throughout the country and 
spoken of with respectful affection as the "old doctor." The descend- 
ants of Franz or Francis Neff" are spread throughout Lancaster and 
Huntingdon counties, and in Ohio, Virginia, and other parts of the 
United States. The family has become allied by marriage with some 
of the most prominent families in the country. The early settlers of 
this name were generally Mennonites, or members of the Reformed 
church. Governor Gordon, of Pennsylvania, says of them (Colonial 
Records, Vol. Ill, page 296) : "That they came into the province 
under a particular agreement with the late Honourable Proprietor, Wil- 
liam Penn, at London," under whom they took up lands, and that they 
"have generally so good a character for honesty and industry as de- 
serves the esteem of this government, and a mark of regard for 
them." 

(I) Isaac Neff, grandfather of Wilfred Osborn Neff and a descend- 
ant of the Francis Neff mentioned above, lived near Petersburg, Penn- 
sylvania, where Neff's Mills now stands. He was a merchant and a 
miller. In political matters he gave his allegiance to the Republican 
party, and he and his wife were members of the Presbyterian church. 
He married Susan Neff, who was his first cousin, and they had chil- 
dren: Edwin John, see forward; William A., died in Cleveland, Ohio; 
Frances M., married John McMulIin, and died in Iowa; Isaac, is a vet- 
eran of the civil war and now lives in Ohio; Susan, married John Mor- 
ton, and resides in Philadelphia ; Lizzie, who died in infancy. 

(II) Edwin John, son of Isaac and Susan (Neff) Neff, was born in 
Petersburg, Pennsylvania, February 6, 1825, at Neff's Mills, Hunting- 
don county, and died on his farm at Warriors Mark, in the same county. 
May 27, 1893. He was a miller by trade, but was obliged to abandon 



948 HISTORY OF THE JUNL\TA VALLEY 

this occupation, as the constant inhalation of the mill dust seriously 
affected his health. In place of this he engaged in agriculture, of which 
he made a decided success. During the civil war he was in service for 
nine months, enlisting in 1864 in the Ninety-first Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers. He participated in no actual engagements, but was almost in 
danger of starvation at Appomattox. He was a Republican in his 
political views, and he and his wife were members of the Presbyterian 
church. 

He married Mary Ellen Harris, born in Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania, and died at Warriors Mark in 1894. Her parents were 
both natives of Ireland and settled at Manor Hill, Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania, where he was a distiller. They were members of the 
Catholic church, and he was a Democrat. Their children were : John, 
a distiller, died unmarried at Monroe Furnace, Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania ; Catherine, married John Isenburg, at Petersburg ; Charles, 
a farmer of Manor Hill, Pennsylvania, was in service four years during 
the civil war ; Mary Ellen, mentioned above ; William, in the provision 
business, died at Harrisburg ; Reuben, a farmer living in Tyrone, Penn- 
sjdvania. Mr. and Mrs. Neff had children: i. Wilfred Osborn, see 
forward. 2. Frances, never married. 3. A\'illiam A., was a farmer and 
married (first) Lettie Beck, (second) Laura Beck. 4. Edwin J., mar- 
ried Annie Fetterhoof, of Huntingdon county. 5. Carrie May, married 
H. L. Grazier, a farmer of Huntingdon county. 6. Susan E., married 
Ernest Addleman, a veteran of the Spanish-American war. 

(Ill) Wilfred Osborn, son of Edwin John and Mary Ellen (Har- 
ris) Neff, was born at Warriors Mark, Huntingdon county. Pennsyl- 
vania, January 17, 1859. He was educated in the public schools of War- 
riors Mark, and at the Birmingham Seminary, from which he was 
graduated in 1874. For some years he was engaged in farming, aban- 
doning this occupation in 1891 in favor of work on the railroad for 
the period of one year. He then received an appointment to an official 
position in the Pennsylvania State Reformatory at Huntingdon, which 
he filled very acceptably for twenty-one years, but in May, 1912, was 
obliged to take a leave of absence on account of illness. He took up 
his residence in Huntingdon in 1891, and has resided there since that 
time. He is Republican in political matters and has held a number of 
township offices. He is a member of Warriors Mark Presbyterian 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLF.Y 949 

Clnirch, antl of Lodge No. 152, TndepL'iKk'iU Order of Otld Fellows of 
Tyrone, Pennsylvania. Mr. Neff has never niarrietl. 



William D. Kinsloe, M.D., of Huntingdon county, 
KINSLOE Pennsylvania, descends from a family long established 

in the Keystone state. He is the son of H. C. and 
Elizabeth Kinsloe, and was born July 30, 1872, at Newton Hamilton. 
He was educated in the public schools, Bucknell University and Hahne- 
mann Medical College, from which he graduated with distinction in 
1895. He moved to Denver, Colorado, where he entered upon the prac- 
tice of medicine, remaining two years. At the expiration of that time 
he went to Alaska and again took up his profession. He returneil to 
Pennsylvania and entered the mercantile business at Newton Hamilton, 
in which he continued for six or seven years, or until 19 10. He next 
entered a partnership with A. B. Galbraith, under the firm name of The 
Huntingdon Milling Company. They leased the old Isenberg IMill oppo- 
site the city of Huntingdon, in Smithfield township, and have conducted 
an eminently successful business since its inauguration. Besides doing a 
general milling business, they handle all kinds of grain, hay, coal, flour 
and feed. In addition to local business they ship their produce to many 
places. They have five or six competent men in their employ. Dr. 
Kinsloe has in charge the disposing of their products. He is a Repub- 
lican, an Elk and was a member of the Greek letter fraternity Sigma Chi 
at college and still holds his membership. 



The history of this branch of the Hall family begins in 
HALL Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, with Laban Hall, of Eng- 
lish parentage, who came into the county from Marvland 
when a young man. He there became a farmer and stock raiser, living 
in both Penn and Tod townships. He was a Whig in politics, and both 
he and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. He 
died in 183 1 in Tod town.ship. He married Jemima Antha Clark, who 
died in Henderson. Children: i. Antha, married Jacob Fink, a farmer. 
2. James, a blacksmith, 3. Thomas L., born in Penn township, died 
January 6, 1866, a stonemason and farmer. He enlisted in the nine 
months' service men; went to the front with the 125th Regiment, Penn- 
sylvania Volunteer Infantry, Company I ; was wounded in the left arm 



950 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

at the battle of Antietam, September, 1862, and honorably discharged. 
He married Catherine Harker. 4. Elijah, a farmer. 5. Laban (2) (of 
whom further). 6. Mary, married John Sparr. 7. Sarah, twin of 
Mary. 

(II) Laban (2), son of Laban and Antha (Clark) Hall, was born in 
Penn township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, in 1831, died June, 
1882. He was educated in the public schools and all his life was a 
farmer of Huntingdon county. He enlisted in the Union army in 
1864 in Company L, 13th Pennsylvania Cavalry, and was in service in 
North Carolina at the time of the surrender of General Johnston. He 
was honorably discharged at the close of the war and returned to his 
Huntingdon county farm. He was a Democrat in politics, serving as 
school director and in other township offices. He was a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and both he and his wife belonged 
to the Lutheran church. He married in 185 1 Christina, daughter of 
Jacob and Mary (Focht) Hettrick, both born in Blair county, Penn- 
sylvania — he a blacksmith and farmer, both he and his wife belonging 
to the Lutheran church. Their children were: George; Christina; 
Philip; Jacob, a soldier of the civil war, serving in Company I, 13th 
Pennsylvania Cavalry ; Samuel ; John L. ; Catherine, married William 
Hern; Elizabeth, married John Hall; and Solomon, married. Children 
of Laban (2) Hall: Josiah C, of whom further; Jacob, born in 1854, 
a farmer; George, born 1856, died 1863; William, born 1862, now an 
employee of the Pennsylvania railroad; Harry, born in 1864, now a 
retired merchant; Alice, born 1866, married Henry Musser and resides 
in West Virginia. 

(III) Josiah C, eldest son of Laban (2) and Christina (Hettrick) 
Hall, was born in Blair county, Pennsylvania, June 6, 1852, He was 
educated in the public schools and spent his early life on the home 
farm. He then learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed in 
Huntingdon county for about five years. He then entered the employ 
of the Pennsylvania railroad as bridge carpenter, later moving to Hunt- 
ingdon, where he has since been engaged in contracting and building. 
He is well established as an honorable, capable builder and has erected 
manv of the residences and blocks in Huntingdon and vicinity. Mr. 
Hall is a Democrat in politics, serving in the city council and as school 
director. He is a member of Mount Moriah Lodge, Free and Accepted 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 951 

Masons, and has taken all the degrees of Scottish Rite Masonry np 
to and including the thirty-second. In religious faitii he is a Presby- 
terian. 

Ele married, in 1874, Anna, daughter of John and Eva Nunier, the 
former a carpenter and builder. Children: i. John Herbert, born June 
25, 1876; graduate of Huntingdon high school; graduate of Juniata 
College, class of 1895 ; graduate of University of Pennsylvania, class 
of 1899; now an architect, residing in Huntingdon. He married, in 
190 1, Ada Moore, and has Hilda and Beatrice. 2. George, born 1878; 
graduate of Huntingdon high school; engaged for several years as a 
clerk in Pittsburgh, Johnstown and Altoona, Pennsylvania ; now engaged 
in business with his father ; married Freda Hess, and has a daughter 
Virginia. 3. Edith, born 1883 ; graduate of Huntingdon high school, 
and spent one year at Juniata College, two years at Wilson College. 4. 
Loyce, born 1886; graduate of Huntingdon high school; spent one year 
at Juniata College, then five years at Wilson College, whence ishe was 
graduated. 



This branch of the Reed family descends from James Reed, 
REED of Scotch descent, who came from Lancaster county, Penn- 
sylvania, to the Buffalo Valley. 

(II) William, son of James and Jane (Ogleby) Reed, was born in 
Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, about 1775. He settled in Union 
county, Pennsylvania, where he became a prominent farmer and a lead- 
ing member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He married Jane Gil- 
lespie, and reared a large family. Both he and his wife died at the 
Union county farm. 

(III) James, son of William and Jane (Gillespie) Reed, was born 
in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, died in Hartleton, Pennsylvania. 
He spent his active years on the paternal farm in Union county, and 
after the death of his father purchased a part of the homestead from 
the heirs. Later he bought the remaining portion and there lived 
until sixty years of age. then moved to Hartleton, where he lived retired 
until his death. He was a very pious man. and for forty-five years 
was an elder of the Presbyterian church, bringing up his children in 
strict acccirdance with his own rigid faith. In political faith he was a 
Whig, warmly supporting the anti-slavery movement, and uniting with 



952 HISTORY OF THE JUNL\TA VALLEY 

the Republican party when that organization was first formed. He 
took an active part in civic affairs; served as school director, and by 
his influence aided in all progressive movements. He married Mar- 
garet Wiley, whose grandparents came from Scotland, settling in Union 
county, Pennsylvania. Grandfather Wiley was a well-educated man, a 
school teacher, and served as an officer in the revolutionary army. 
Both were rigid Presbyterians. Children of James and Margaret Reed : 

I. Uriah, a practicing physician, died at Jersey shore, Pennsylvania. 2. 
Jane, married (first) Paschal Chambers, (second) David Kleckner, and 
died in Davis, Illinois. 3. Harriet, died in Jersey Shore, Pennsylvania, 
unmarried. 4. Catherine, died in Jersey Shore, unmarried. 5. John, 
died in youth. 6. Robert, married Caroline Bergstresser, of Selinsgrove, 
Pennsylvania, and settled in Tiffin, Ohio, where he died, a farmer. 7. 
Sarah, married Joseph Richard, whom she survives, a resident of Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa. 8. Mary Ann, married Alexander Clemens, and resides 
in Rocky Ford, North Dakota. 9. William, of whom further. 10. 
Susan, married George Hicks, and resides in Mifilintown, Pennsylvania. 

II. George, a retired druggist of Vineland, New Jersey. 12. David, a 
farmer of Waterford, Colorado. 

(IV) William, ninth child of James and Margaret (Wiley) Reed, 
was born near Laurelton, Union county, Pennsylvania, February 21, 
1839. He obtained his early education in the township schools, then 
attended Mifflinburg Academy two terms, finishing his studies at New 
Columbia (Pennsylvania) Normal School, which he attended two terms. 
He taught several terms in the public schools, but the call to arms in 
1861 found him ready to march to the defense of the imperilled Union. 
He enlisted in June, 1861. in Company H, 8th Regiment Missouri Vol- 
unteer Infantry, being at that time in Illinois, and crossing to Missouri 
to enlist. He served three years, and saw war in all its horrors. He 
fought at Fort Donelson, Russell's House, Chickasaw Bayou, Arkansas 
Post, Vicksburg, Missionary Ridge, Resaca, siege of Corinth, Jackson, 
and in many other engagements between the armies of the north and 
south. At Vicksburg he ' was one of the immortal one hundred and 
fifty men who, forming a "forlorn hope," by a desperate charge cap- 
tured an important point and made the capture of a line of breastworks 
possible. This charge ranks in military annals as one equalling any 
made at Gettysburg, even that of Pickett, in the final effort to dislodge 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX AND 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS. 





^^^ 



Lswis UistoTical Fuh.Co. 





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'^yjiy 'J/A^rW-eyT 



' '.yLe-e^o^ 



/ ^~,s /^i,/^r,CM/ ^r^- ^''- 



THli i\L vv fORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX AND 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 953 

the Union forces. The survivors of tlie charge were awarded a Ijronze 
nied.il for their bravery, and in 191 1 those still surviving received in its 
place a gold medal, attesting the high honor in which they are held. 
Mr. Reed values this as one of his greatest treasures, and nothing he 
possesses has a higher value to him than the mute testimonial of the 
part he bore in defense of a united country. 

After receiving an honorable discharge at the expiration of his three 
years of service, Mr. Reed returned to Pennsylvania, locating in Hartle- 
ton, where for two years he engaged in mercantile life as senior member 
of Reed & Lucas. He next located in Clearfield, Pennsylvania, where 
for eleven years he was a drygoods merchant. In 1879 he located in 
Huntingdon, opening a drygoods store on Penn street. His business 
soon outgrew the Penn street store and was moved to more suitable 
quarters in the Opera House block, where for six years a successful 
business was conducted. In 1892, a still larger store being needed, Mr. 
Reed erected a four-story brick block fifty by ninety-two feet on the 
ground, to which he moved on its completion in that year, and where he 
yet remains in successful business operation. In 1903 the firm name 
became William Reed & Sons Company, its present style and title. A 
wise, careful, vet progressive man of afifairs, Mr. Reed has not only 
founded but has carried to success one of the strong, reliable commer- 
cial houses of Huntingdon. While the burden has been largely shifted 
to younger shoulders, he is yet the guiding master spirit. Xor has he 
been simply a worker for personal gain. The city of his adoption has 
profited by his public spirit, and no movement for the betterment of 
Himtingdon, either in civic or in industrial advancement, but has had 
his active support. He served nine years as a member of council, and 
for many years as a member of the board of trade, using his best efiforts 
in both bodies to further the cause of progress. He is a member of the 
Presbyterian church, and in politics is a Republican. 

Mr. Reed was one of the founders of the "Huntingdon Home for 
Orphan and Friendless Children," a philanthropy with w'hich he has 
been actively connected since its foundation, over a quarter of a century 
ago, and he is president of its board of managers. The direct impulse 
that led to the establishment of this home came from his wife, Mrs. 
Margaret Ellen (Glover) Reed, whose tender sympathy, extending be- 
yond her own household, urged her husband to go in tlie early dawn 



954 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

of a bitter cold day in January, 1881, to look after a family of poor 
children on the outskirts of the town, and from which act, so remindful 
of the "Good Samaritan," grew the commendable charity above men- 
tioned. This seed, sown by a tender-hearted woman, has brought forth 
a harvest the value of which cannot be overestimated, although she did 
not live to see the full fruition of her hopes, and the editor of this 
work takes a genuine pleasure in reproducing (and entirely without 
solicitation) from a contemporary publication the history of "The 
Home," as a tribute to the memory of its inspirer, and as an incentive 
toward charitable deeds : 

"A Bit of History. — Whatever may have been the preliminary 
thought with reference to an institution for the care of poor children in 
Huntingdon, the direct impulse to the movement was given by a woman 
whose tender sympathies extended beyond her own immediate house- 
hold. 

"When Mrs. Ellen (Glover) Reed urged her husband, Mr. William 
Reed, to go in the early dawn of a bitter cold day to look after a family 
of poor children on the outskirts of the town, she set moving a combi- 
nation of activities which resulted in what is now known as the 'Hunt- 
ingdon Home for Orphan and Friendless Children' and all its branches. 
It was in the evening of that same day, in the store of Mr. Reed, after a 
discussion of the experience of the morning that a 'Home' or a place of 
temporary care for these children was suggested. 

"This event occurred in the early days of January, 1881. Such re- 
lief as was possible was given the family in its uncomfortable C|uarters 
at the time, and an effort was made to enlist the town in the establish- 
ment of a home, or an association for the care of these and other cases. 
There was no lack of sympathy, but the question that stood in the way 
of progress was one of finance. 

"Hearing of the movement to do something for children, a good 
woman in another county gave twenty cents, and another in an adjoin- 
ing state offered $25. A collection amounting to $4.25 v^^as taken up in 
a prayer meeting. A small house was rented, and across the crackling 
snow crust, at sunset, March i, the first little girl, sick with pneumonia, 
was carried into the little brown house on Sixteenth street, and the 
'Home' was a reality. 

"Funds came from unexpected sources in unexpected ways. Then 
the children of the county were taken on contract, leaving a large amount 
to be raised from private sources. To the credit of public sentiment it 
may be said that for twenty-five years never passed a month when all 
bills for current expenses were not met, and when at the completion of 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 955 

the group of buildings and the eciuipnient of the grounds a debt of $800 
remained, a "Thanksgix-ing Offering' brouglit in $1,546.06. 

"The influence of this movement did not stop at Huntingdon. Not 
to speak of several other similar institutions that developed indepen- 
dently under its inspiration, at Hagerstown, Maryland, in 1883, was 
started a home which tluplicated the Huntingdon work, and for ten 
years continued jointly under the same superintendence. This institu- 
tion found in Mr. B. F. Newcomer, of Baltimore, a generous benefac- 
tor, who through his life and at his death gave in all nearly $40,000. 

"The Huntingdon Home for Orphan and Friendless Children was 
chartered in January, 1883. The board of managers are elected by the 
churches of the town, giving it an undenominational character." 

Mr. Reed married (first) September 10, 1868, Margaret Ellen, 
daughter of Andrew Glover, of Hartleton, Pennsylvania; she died De- 
cember 7, 1888. He married (second) February 5, 1890, Mary Alice 
Pellman, of Mifflinburg, Pennsylvania. Children, all by first wife: 
Jessie, born September 29, 1869, died aged four years; Margaret, born 
July I, 1871, died aged two years; Charles Lincoln, born February 8, 
1873, now a partner of William Reed & Sons Company, married Mar- 
garet, daughter of R. M. Speer; Arthur Wiley, December 3, 1874, now a 
partner of William Reed & Sons Company, married Elsie Smith; James 
Craig, born October 12, 1878, now a practicing physician of Saxon, 
Pennsylvania, married Annie, daughter of Dr. Rohrer; William Glover, 
born December 5, 1881, now a clerk in his father's store, married Marion 
F. Kline; Robert Bruce, born June 6, 1883. 

Now aged seventy-four years, Mr. Reed has realized the three great 
aims of his life — "to be proprietor of a good store, to own and have a 
good home, to be a good citizen." In attaining these, many other good 
things have come to him. not the least of which are temporal prosperity 
and the unbounded respect of his townsmen. 



Than the Miller family there is none better known nor 
MILLER more respected in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
where the immigrant ancestor located soon after his ar- 
rival in this country. It has been established in the Juniata Valley since 
1700. has prospered and grown exceedingly numerous. 

(I) Benjamin Miller was born in Huntingdon county, lived and died 
there. He was a merchant and did a large business. Both he and his 



956 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

wife were members of the Presbyterian church, and were active in 
their work for it. He married EHzabeth AUison, also of Huntingdon 
county, and of English descent. Children: i. R. Allison. 2. Harry E., 
of whom further. 3. Mary, married Dr. Neff. 4. Died young. 5. Died 
young. 6. Died young. 

(II) Harry E. Miller, son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (AUison) Mil- 
ler, was born in Huntingdon county, and there died, July, 1892. At- 
tending fine private schools and, being of a studious disposition, he 
acquired an unusually thorough education. In 1861 he enlisted in the 
125th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served out his enlistment. 
After peace was declared between the North and South, he returned to 
Huntingdon county and resumed his former mode of life. He re- 
entered the mercantile world, doing a successful general merchandise 
business for years; he later relinquished it and accepted a position as 
bookkeeper in the First National Bank of Huntingdon, which place he 
retained for years. He and his wife were members of the Presbyterian 
church. They lived a quiet life, doing good to their fellowmen in an 
unostentatious way. He married Mary B. Miller, daughter of Henry 
and Mary (Hofifman) Miller, she a daughter of Dr. Jacob Hoffman, of 
Huntingdon county. Henry Miller was the son of Jacob and Harriet 
(Ashman) Miller, early settlers in Huntingdon county. For a time he 
did a large general merchandise business, and later various kinds of 
clerical work. Children of Jacob and Harriet (Ashman) Miller: Henry, 
, father of Mrs. Harry E. Miller; Ashman; Elliott. Henry Miller, son 
of Jacob and Harriet (Ashman) Miller, was born in Huntingdon county, 
on the Miller homestead. He was well educated and taught school for 
years. Later he was county commissioner's clerk for Huntingdon 
county. He was a Republican, and a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. He married Mary Hoffman. Children : William Ash- 
man, a veteran of the civil war, resides in Florida ; Nannie, married 
Dr. E. J. Greene, of Peoria, Illinois; Harriet: an infant: Mary B. (Mrs. 
Harry E. Miller) ; Rose, married Irvin Hatterman, of Washington, 
D. C. ; Lilian, unmarried ; iNIargaret, married J. C. Campbell, of New 
York City, deceased, she resides in Huntingdon. Children of Harry E. 
and Mary B. (Miller) Miller: i. Elizabeth, unmarried. 2. Clyde, died, 
aged twenty-six. 3. Edwin, died, aged four. 4. Mary, died young. 
5. R. Allison, of whom further. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 957 

(III) R. Allison Alillcr, son of Harry E. and Mary B. (Miller) 
Miller, was born January 6, 1884, in Huntingdon county. After com- 
pleting his education he learned plumbing and engaged in that occupa- 
tion for some time. In 1906 he entered the New York Trade School 
and perfected himself in that line, learning the latest applied methods 
of the trade. He established a shop in Huntingdon, where he did a 
thriving business, commanding at once a large patronage. He next 
added a complete line of hardware, and at the present time (1913) has 
one of the best equipped and most up-to-date stores in Huntingdon 
county and the Juniata Valley. He takes great pride in giving satis- 
faction to his customers, does his work thoroughly and expeditiously. 
His wife is a member of the Reformed church, but he has no church 
affiliations. He is a member of Mt. Moriah Lodge, No. 200, Free and 
Accepted Masons. Huntingdon; Royal Arch Chapter, No. 201; Stand- 
ing Stone Commandery, Knights Templar; Mountain Council. No. 9, 
R. and S. M. ; also Jaffa Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. In politics he is a 
progressive, reserving the right to vote for the man he thinks Ijest suited 
for the office. He has never held, nor desired, office. 

On February 22, 1902, he married Dora E. Adams, daughter of 
John ^^'. and Anna E. (Hull) Adams, natives of Center county, where 
he was a painter. He came to Huntingdon in 1900, and is now instruc- 
tor of painting in the Reformatory in Huntingdon. 



In 1848 Francis Otto Beaver, a German boy of sixteen 
BEAVER years of age, came to the United States, founding the 
family of which George D. Beaver, of Huntingdon, 
Pennsylvania, is a representative. 

Francis O. Beaver was born in Wiirtemberg, Germany, November 
18, 1835, one of a large family of children, of whom William, Fred- 
erick and Sophia, wife of Jacob Reichley, were also members. Francis, 
the fourth child, came to the L^nited States alone in 1848, and for a 
few years labored at whatever his hands found to do. He secured an 
education prior to coming to this country, to which he added in this 
country the English branches and a knowledge of drawing, which he 
turned to account as a draughtsman. Later he learned marble cutting, 
which he followed in Fredericksburg, Maryland, York, Pennsylvania, 
finally settling in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in 1864 



958 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

in the same business, continuing about two years. He then entered the 
employ of James Greene, who was the owner of a marble yard at 
Huntingdon. After working for Mr. Greene several years as journey- 
man, he was admitted to a partnership, later becoming sole owner by 
purchasing Mr. Greene's interest. He conducted a prosperous business 
alone until 1902, when he admitted his son, George D. Beaver, to a 
partnership. In 1909 he retired from business and two years later, in 
191 1, died, after a successful life of seventy-six years, sixty-three of 
which had been spent in the United States, and for nearly a half a cen- 
tury Huntingdon had been his home. He was an untiring worker, pos- 
sessing all the sturdy, admirable characteristics of his race, rising to suc- 
cess through his own energy and business ability. He was a trustee and 
an elder of the Lutheran church, which he served with devotion and 
zeal. He took little active part in public affairs, but was affiliated with 
the Democratic party. He married Elizabeth Flenner, daughter of 
David Flenner, of Scotch descent, a farmer and a Lutheran. He had 
children: Jonathan; David; Samuel; William; Stewart, a soldier of 
the civil war — these five deceased ; Elizabeth, Alfretta and Margaret. 
Children of Francis and Elizabeth Beaver: Stewart, born 1865, died in 
infancy; Charles, died in early boyhood; Ida, married A. B. Baker, no 
issue; George David, of whom further; and a child, died unnamed. 

(II) George David, only son of Francis O. and Elizabeth (Flenner) 
Beaver to survive boyhood, was born in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, 
November 30, 1878. He was educated in the public schools and in 
Juniata College, where he spent one year in the commercial department. 
He then began working in his father's marble yard, and as the years 
passed became an expert engraver and worker in stone. Later he was 
admitted to a partnership, and in 1909 he purchased the entire busi- 
ness, his father retiring to a well-earned rest. Since 1909 Mr. Beaver 
Jr. has conducted the business alone. He cuts and engraves stone for 
whatever use intended, either for building purposes or monumental. 
He carries a large assortment of rough material of the various stone 
used and executes any design submitted or will both design and execute. 
He transacts a large and profitable business, ranking among the sub- 
stantial men of his city. He is a member of the council, elected as a 
Republican to represent the second ward. Both he and his wife are 
members of the Presbyterian church, and he of the Masonic order, be- 



HISTORY OF THI-: JUNIATA VALLEY 959 

longing to Mount jMoriah Lodge, No. 300, Free and Accepted Masons ; 
Standing Stone Chapter, No. 201, Royal Arch Masons; Huntingdon 
Conimandery, No. 65, Knights Templar; and Java Temple, A. A. O. 
N. M. S. 

He married, in 190J, Daisy P. Castner, daughter of James and 
Mary (Hassinger ) Castner. James Castner served in the civil war until 
its close, and was engaged in many battles fought during the struggle 
between the states. Children of George D. and Daisy P. Beaver: 
Francis, born September 27, 1903; Elizabeth, died in infancy. 



From Germany came the Fetterhoofs. settling in 
FETTERHOOF Lebanon county, Pennsylvania, where the first rec- 
ord is found of Michael Fetterhoof. He left Le- 
banon county at an early date, settling in Spruce Creek Valley in Hunt- 
ingdon county, where he owned a tract of four hundred acres, which 
he partly cleared and cultivated until his death. He married Elizabeth 
Rinehart, also of German birth. They were both members of the 
Lutheran church — quiet, industrious, thrifty Germans, prosperous and 
respected; children: John; Joseph; Samuel; George; Michael (2), of 
whom further; Lydia, married Michael Lowe; Margaret, married John 
Shafifer; Elizabeth, married Jacob Shaffer; Susanna, married Charles 
Merriman. 

(II) Michael (2), son of Michael and Ehzabeth (Rinehart) Fet- 
terhoof, was born in York, Pennsylvania, in 1802, and spent his early 
life at the farm. He moved to Huntingdon county with his father, 
assisted in clearing and cultivating the Spruce Creek Valley home- 
stead, and on the death of his father inherited that propertv. He 
brought the whole tract under cultivation and there lived the remainder 
of his life a prosperous, contented, respected farmer. He was active 
in the Whig and Republican parties, holding several township otSces. 
He clung to the religion of his fathers and was a pillar of strength to 
the Lutheran church of his neighborhood. He married Eliza Beghel, 
daughter of George and Elizabeth Beghel, both born in Germany. 
George Beghel was a mason by trade and a strict member of the 
Lutheran church. He had five children: Eliza, married Michael (2) 
Fetterhoof (of previous mention) ; Nancy, married David iNIyers; Mar- 
garet, married John Matson; Mary, married James Riley. Children of 



96o HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Michael and Eliza Fetterhoof : Samuel, deceased; Mary, married Wil- 
liam Shaffer; Jesse, a farmer, deceased; Elizabeth, yet living, married 
Thomas K. Henderson ; Daniel, a farmer, deceased ; George, a farmer, 
yet living; John, a farmer, yet living; William Beghel (of whom fur- 
ther) ; Margaret, deceased; Francis, died in infancy. 

(HI) William Beghel, son of Michael (2) and Eliza (Beghel) Fet- 
terhoof, was born at the original Fetterhoof homestead in Spruce Creek 
Valley, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, June 18, 1843. He attended 
public school and spent his early life on a farm. Later he learned the 
tanner's trade and engaged in business with his father-in-law, David 
Mong, also conducting farming operations. He married in 1870, and 
in 1889 moved to Huntingdon, where he was appointed guard at the 
State Industrial Reformatory,, a position he yet occupies. He is a 
Republican in politics, and a member of the Presbyterian church. He 
married ^Margaret, daughter of David Mong — he born in Clarion county, 
but resided in Huntingdon county from boyhood until death ; he owned 
the tannery located about one mile from Warriors Mark, which he 
operated until his death; he was a Democrat in politics, and in religion 
a Lutheran; two of his nine children yet survive. Children of AVilliam 
B. Fetterhoof: Harry Burkett, of whom further; Edith, died 1903, 
aged twenty years; Lois, resides at home; Virginia, died in infancy. 

(IV) Harry Burkett, only son of William Beghel and Margaret 
(Mong) Fetterhoof, was born at Warriors Mark, Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania, July 28, 1871. He was educated at a private school in 
Warriors Mark and at Juniata College, whence he was graduated, class 
of 1895. He then began the study of medicine at Hahnemann Homeo- 
pathic Medical College in Philadelphia, whence he was graduated, M.D., 
class of 1899. He at once began the practice of his profession in Hunt- 
ingdon, where he is firmly established in honorable, successful general 
practice. He is a member of the medical stafif of Blair Memorial Hos- 
pital ; belongs to the Pennsylvania State and Huntingdon County Home- 
opathic Societies, and is actively interested in the work of both. His 
skill in diagnosis and treatment of baffling diseases is recognized by his 
brethren of the profession, by whom he is often called in consultation. 
His private practice is large and he is held in highest esteem by a large 
circle of personal friends and by all who know him. In political belief 
he is a Republican, and in religious connection a Presbyterian. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 961 

Dr. Fetterhoof married, in January, 1906, Mary J\I. Orr, born in 
Philadelphia, daughter of Smiley and Martha Orr, of that city. 



Mrs. Margaret (White) Grimison, whose 
WHITE-GRIMISON well-located millinery parlors in Huntingdon 

are so well known, is a granddaughter of 
Anthony \Vhite, a Scotchman and early settler of Huntingdon county. 
He married Elizabeth Fox, and both were devout members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church; children: William; Simon, a farmer; 
James, a blacksmith; Anthony (2) (of further mention) ; David; Sarah; 
Martha, married Ferdinand Corbin; Elizabeth, and others. 

(II) Anthony (2), son of Anthony (i) and Elizabeth (Fox) White, 
was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, in 1825, died aged sev- 
enty-nine. He was educated in the public school, and on arriving at 
suitable age learned the mason's trade and until 186 1 followed his trade, 
making a specialty of the bricklaying branch of the business. He en- 
listed in 1 86 1 in Company B, 49th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, and for three years and three months did a soldier's duty. 
He saw hard service with the Army of the Potomac; was engaged in 
many of the historic battles that were fought during the war between 
the states, but, surviving all the perils of war, returned in safety, bear- 
ing that prized possession of every true soldier, an honorable discharge. 
He resumed his bricklaying trade, located in Huntingdon, and was 
until his death almost continuously employed in bricklaying operations. 
He was an expert mechanic, a good soldier, and a true, loyal citizen, 
highly respected. He was a Democrat in politics, and in religious faith 
a Methodist. He married EmmeHne Focht, daughter of Jacob and 
Barbara Focht, of German parentage. Jacob Focht was a mason by 
trade, and resided in Big Valley, Pennsylvania. Both he and his wife 
were thrifty, industrious Germans and members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. They were parents of : Susan, married David Lantz ; 
Catherine, married Isaac Steeley; Emmeline, married Anthony (2) 
White, of previous mention; Lee, twin of Emmeline, a merchant; Silas, 
and others. Children of Anthony (2) White: r. Alice, married Wil- 
liam Black ; child, Richard. 2. Margaret, of whom further. 3. Katha- 
rine, married Howard C. Hartley, a travelling salesman for I. S. Custer 
& Company, of Philadelphia. 



962 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(III) Margaret, second daughter of Anthony (2) and Emmehne 
(Focht) White, was born in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, February 4, 
1873. She was educated in the pubHc schools and began her business 
life with the firm of William Reed & Sons, with whom she remained 
twelve years. She became well known as one of the leading sales ladies, 
and, when she opened her own parlors in Huntingdon, at once secured 
a generous patronage, which has grown to most satisfactory propor- 
tions. She is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and a 
woman of most kindly, generous impulse. 

Miss White married, in 1901, William A. Grimison, a wholesale 
and retail confectioner of Huntingdon, an efficient, enterprising and 
prosperous merchant of that thriving city; a Republican in politics, and 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Huntingdon, and of 
the Royal Arcanum. Mr. Grimison had by a former marriage two chil- 
dren : Lewis, now engaged with his father in business ; Anna, educated 
in the public school, and a graduate of Juniata College, now residing at 
home. 



From distant Germany came John Morning- 
MORNINGSTAR star, a blacksmith. He settled in Huntingdon 

county, Pennsylvania, and there followed his 
trade until death. He possessed the German attributes of industry and 
thrift, prospered in his alien home, and left a large family to perpetu- 
ate his name and many virtues. His wife, Mary Rufif. was also of Ger- 
man parentage ; children : Maria, married a Mr. Hufi^man, and moved 
west ; Teeny, deceased ; Margaret, deceased ; Rachel, deceased ; Eliza- 
beth, deceased; John; Adam, of whom further; Matilda; Sarah. 

(II) Adam, son of John and Mary (Rufif) Morningstar, was born 
February 23, 1819, died in 1856. He learned the blacksmith's trade 
with his father and followed that occupation all his life. He was a 
Democrat in politics, and was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Henry Hefright, who came 
to this country from Germany, in 1832, settling first in Huntingdon, 
later moving to Pittsburgh, where he was proprietor of a hotel. He 
was a member of the Roman Catholic church, married and left issue : 
George, deceased, a soldier of the civil war ; Frank, deceased, a contrac- 
tor and builder; Louis, deceased, an employee of the Pennsylvania rail- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 963 

road ; Henry, deceased, also a railroad employee ; Catherine, married 
August Letherman, a merchant; Mitty, married a Mr. Davis; Alary, 
married Thomas Westbrook; Elizabeth, married Adam Alorningstar ; 
their children: Mary M., born March 31, 1S45, married Solomon Os- 
walt, a lumberman; Annie E., born November 29, 1846, married John 
R. Hershey, an engineer on the Pennsylvania railroad ; John Henry, 
born November 27, 1848, deceased, a teamster and quarryman; Emma, 
died in childhood; George P., born December 8, 1851, an employee of 
the Pennsylvania railroad; Thomas, died in infancy; Louis Adam, of 
whom further. 

(Ill) Louis Adam, son of Adam and Elizabeth (Hef right) Morn- 
ingstar, was born in Huntingdon, October 22, 1855. He was educated 
in the public schools of Huntingdon, and first began as a wage-earner, 
working in a brick yard, continuing five years. For the next ten years 
he worked in a planing mill. Leaving the mill he entered the employ 
of the Pennsylvania railroad as engine cleaner, being promoted brake- 
man in 1882, holding that position five years. He was then raised to 
the rank of assistant conductor on local trains, serving as such eleven 
years. He was then promoted to conductor, a position he now fills, 
having worked his way upward from the very bottom of the ladder to 
his present important position. He has proved faithful and capable in 
every position held, and ranks as one of the company's most trusted 
employees. In political faith Air. Alorningstar is a Prohibitionist, and 
both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
He belongs to the Knights of the Golden Eagle, and to Broad Top 
Lodge, No. 158, Order of Railway Conductors; and is also a member 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad Relief Association, Pennsylvania railroad 
veterans. 

He married, in 1887, Flora V., daughter of John and Margaret 
Apger; child: Mabel Gertrude, born March 17, 1888, graduate of 
Huntingdon high school, and of Juniata College, now residing at home. 



This name, honored wherever found, was originally 

CHISOLM Chisholm, borne by a numerous and powerful Scottish 

clan from a period remote in Scotch history, known 

first as the Clan Siosal. or the Chisholms. Many of the clan fought 

under A\'allace and Bruce, and as a clan they warmly espoused the 



964 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY ■ 

cause of "Prince Charlie" in his attempt to wrest the thrones of Eng- 
land and Scotland from the House of Hanover. A claymore used by 
a Chisholm at the battle of Bannockburn is yet treasured as a priceless 
memento of the loyalty of their race and of their valor on the field of 
battle. At CuUoden the chief of the clan was slain in one of the des- 
perate charges of the Highlanders against the solid columns of English 
troops, and when the battle was lost, Prince Charles, trusting his person 
to their honor and devotion, was guided from the field by three of the 
Chisholm clan and secreted until opportunity was ripe for his escape. 
Although a reward of £30,000 was offered by the English crown for 
his capture, these men were true, and safely they conveyed him to the 
coast. One of these men, Hugh Chisholm, on shaking hands with the 
Prince, vowed he would never again offer his right hand to another, a 
vow he religiously kept. After the battle of Culloden the great-great- 
grandfather of Dr. Henry Clay Chisolm, of Huntingdon, escaped from 
the field, and, with others of "Prince Charlie's" defeated adherents, 
came to America. He was twenty-three years of age when the party 
landed in South Carolina and settled at Charleston. His son dropped 
the second "h" from the name, and in this branch it is still written 
Chisolm. The emigrant married and founded a family that has always 
been a prominent one in the South and wherever found. 

The grandfather of Dr. Chisolm was William J. M. Chisolm. a 
grandson of the founder. He was born about the year 1800, and died 
in Kemper county, Mississippi, in March, 185 1. He settled in the state 
of Georgia after his marriage, residing there, a wealthy planter and 
slave owner, until 1846, when he located in Kemper county, Mississippi, 
on a large plantation which was his home until death. I-Cemper county 
was then infested by a body of lawless men who by their deeds of vio- 
lence and disregard for human life had seriously retarded the growth 
and development of the county. With the coming of the Chisolms and 
others of similar temper, a better condition was brought to pass, 
although many years have entirely obliterated the evil name given that 
district by these evil men. William J. M. Chisolm and his wife were 
both members of the Baptist church, active supporters and workers for 
the good of their community. In purchasing the Kemper county plan- 
tation the father incurred a heavy obligation which would in time have 
been discharged, but his death five years after the removal there left 



HISTORY OF THE JUXIATA VALLEY 965 

the family with a large estate heavily encumbered by debt. Ere his 
death lie exacted a promise from his eldest son, William Wallace 
Chisolm, that he would stay with his mother, discharge the debt, and 
educate and provide for his three younger sisters. William J. M. Chis- 
olm married Dorothy L. Swanson, born in Georgia, in 1802, died in 
1882, daughter of a cultured, wealthy family of that state. She was a 
woman of rare force of character, thoroughly imbued with love and 
devotion to the Southland, but outspoken in her sentiments of loyalty 
when the disruption of the union of states was attempted. Of their 
ten children, two are yet living: Leonard Marbrey Chisolm, of Rio, 
Mississippi ; and Mrs. India Calvert, now living in Texas. 

(IV) William Wallace, eldest son of William J. M. and Dorothy L. 
(Swanson) Chisolm, was born in Morgan county, Georgia, December 
6, 1830, died at the hands of the "Ku Klux Klan," April 29, 1877, o"^ 
of the last victims of that lawless band that had so long terrorized Kein- 
per county, Mississippi. He was as well educated as was possible in 
his native county, which he left at the age of sixteen years, going with 
the family to the new plantation in Kemper county. He was barely 
of legal age when in 185 1 the death of his father left him the head of 
the family. Bound not only by his promise to his dying father but by 
his natural inclination and devotion, he assumed the burden of clearing 
the debt from the estate and the education of his younger sisters, a task 
that after years of toil was faithfully performed. In 1S56 he married, 
and from that year dates the beginning of an eventful, prosperous life, 
tragic only in its ending. With the assistance of his wife, an educated 
Southern woman, he began a course of study and reading that broad- 
ened and deepened his outlook on life, preparing for the higher posi- 
tions he was destined to occupy. At the same time he entered with 
zest into the development of the agricultural resources of his planta- 
tion, and soon became marked as one of the leaders in his county. On 
January 30, 1858, he was chosen magistrate at a special election, and the 
following October was again chosen at the general election to fill the 
same office for a term of two years. He filled this important office with 
honor, and two years later, in November, i860, was elected probate 
judge of the county, an office he held through successive reelections until 
1867, when he resigned in favor of John McRea, the appointee of the 
provisional governor of Mississippi. At each of his three elections to 



966 . HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

the office of probate judge his opponent was Judge Gill, an older man, 
and next to Judge Chisolm the most popular official ever elected in 
Kemper county. In all these years, while enjoying in so high a degree 
the respect and confidence of his fellows, Judge Chisolm was a pro- 
nounced Union man, and an uncompromising foe of the party of dis- 
union. He was a Whig in sympathy, and himself a slave owner, son of 
a slave-owning father, yet the property interest did not overbalance his 
love of country. There being no Lincoln ticket in Mississippi, he voted 
for Bell and Everett, the nominees of the Southern Unionists against 
the Breckinridge ticket nominated by the seceding Democrats to oppose 
Douglas, the regular Democratic nominee. Both as a citizen and as a 
civil officer, Judge Chisolm was steadily opposed to secession, and re- 
fused to lend to it any personal aid. He never bore arms except in 
the third days' militia, and then under protest. Yet, Whig and Unionist 
as he was, young and inexperienced in politics as he was, his strong 
character and open defiance of the strong sentiment of the county so 
impressed and won the respect and hearts of the voters that he was con- 
tinued in an elective office all through the war period and early recon- 
struction days. A greater tribute never was paid mortal man than this 
voluntary homage of his political enemies. After resigning his position 
as judge he filled other offices in Kemper county, and strove with all 
his mighty influence to bring order out of the chaos which the changed 
relations between the races had left the South. Ku Klux bands rode 
the neighborhood and under cover of the movement to control the 
negroes many of the lawless characters of Kemper county committed 
their awful crimes of violence to property and person. In the fall of 
1876 Judge Chisolm was elected to congress, and, on April 27 following 
was foully murdered in his own home at De Kalb, Mississippi, together 
with his eldest child, Cornelia J., a beautiful young lady of nineteen 
}'ears of age, who bravely defended her father until stricken down by 
the cruel blows of human fiends. A son of Judge Chisolm, a lad of 
fourteen years, John Mann Chisolm, was also killed in the brave fight 
against overpowering numbers. In his death. Judge Chisolm not only 
proved the strength of his devotion to law and order, but in dying won 
a victory for his cause, as the wave of horror that swept over North 
and South at the brutal murders aroused such a feeling that this was 
the last lawless outbreak of the reconstruction period. A wonderful 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 967 

life was his — duty, its guiding star — and, as son, husjjand, father, citi- 
zen and patriot, full of honor from earliest manhood to its tragic end. 
He was tried by every test, and found "not wanting." Surely an in- 
spiration, this life lived for a decade among political enemies, at a time 
when men's worst passions ran rampant, yet honored and so loved that, 
over his bier passion and hate were swept away and man's better nature 
revived. 

Judge Chisolm married, October 29, 1856, Emily S. Mann, born in 
Alabama, who survived him until October, 1904. Children: i. Cor- 
nelia Josephine, born in Kemper county, Mississippi, February 11, 1858, 
died in De Kalb, Mississippi, April 29, 1877, while defending her father 
from attack. "Her young life yielded up on the altar of filial love and 
devotion cannot have been lived in vain. The lesson taught by her 
example will live long after the generation and spirit that prompted 
those inhuman acts shall have been forgotten or numbered with the 
things of the past." The following lines are from a poem to her mem- 
ory, written by Stephen S. Harding, on the first anniversary of her 
death : 

Cornelia Chisolm : 

Hadst thou but died in classic Rome, 

Where thy great namesake died. 

Thou wouldst have lived in Parian stone. 

Supreme in excellence alone; 

Through the long ages dim, 

Thy very name the poet's synonym 

For filial love and courage deified. 

2. Henry Clay, of whom further. 3. Julia August, born October 13, 

1861, died November 21 following. 4. John Mann, born October 5, 

1862, shared the fate of his father and sister, April 29, 1877. 5. Ida 
May, born October 16, 1865, died January 11, 1866. 6. William Wal- 
lace (2), born October 19, 1866; now a practicing lawyer of Hunt- 
ingdon, Pennsylvania. 

Emily S. (Alann) Chisolm, mother of the foregoing children, was 
a daughter of John W. Mann, of Amelia Island, Florida, a prominent 
lawyer and a gentleman of high literary and social standing. She was 
a granddaughter of Thomas Mann, a soldier of the revolution, born in 
Virginia, of the third generation from the founder in America, a Scotch- 



968 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

man and merchant from Edinburgh, owning the ship in which he trans- 
ported his goods and family to America. Thomas Mann early entered 
the revolutionary army, and served through the entire struggle that fol- 
lowed ere liberty was gained. He was shot through the knee at the 
battle of Cowpens; was again wounded by a party of Tories and left 
for dead, a ball entering the left side of his chest, passing through into 
the shoulder, where it remained to his death, aged eighty- four years. 
He was captured during the battle of Brandywine, and for some time 
held captive on a British prison ship. The Manns were prominent in 
the early settlement of Florida, where Thomas Mann held a Spanish 
grant and was an early settler where Fernandino now stands, being cred- 
ited with the erection of the first house on the site of the present city. 
John W. Mann, son of Thomas Mann, married Nancy Gresham, daugh- 
ter of Rev. Wheeler Gresham, a minister of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, ordained by Bishops Asbury and Coke, of the early church. 
After marriage, Mr. Mann moved to Montgomery, Alabama, where his 
wife died. Later he moved to Columbus, Mississippi, where he prac- 
ticed law. During the war he left home on a journey and was never 
again heard from. He had three children, including Emily S., wife of 
Judge William Wallace Chisolm. 

(V) Henry Clay, eldest son of Judge William Wallace and Emily 
S. (Mann) Chisolm, was born in Kemper county, Mississippi, October 
3, 1859. His boyhood was spent in De Kalb, Mississippi, where his 
early education was obtained in the city schools and under private 
tutors. Later he entered Vanderbilt University, Tennessee, but was 
compelled to leave that institution in 1877 on the death of his father. 
From March, 1878, until September 8 he held a position in the office 
of the surgeon-general at Washington, D. C, then resigning and enter- 
ing a commercial college at Williamsport, Pennsylvania, whence he was 
graduated in 1879. From that year until 1883 he was a clerk in Gov- 
ernor Hoyt's office at Harrisburg. In 1883 he spent a few months in 
Idaho, then returned east and spent a term at Columbia College, Wash- 
ington, D. C. He had previously spent some time in the study of medi- 
cine, and in 1885 determined to complete his course and settle down to 
permanent professional work. In 1885 he entered Hahnemann Medi- 
cal College in Philadelphia, whence he was graduated M. D., class of 
1888. He at once began practice in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, in asso- 



HISTORY OF THE JUXTATA VALLEY 969 

ciation witli Dr. Hugh I'ilcairn, l)ut after eighteen months in lliat city 
removed to Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. He (|uickly built up a good 
practice, and there remains well established and prosperous. He ranks 
high in his profession, both in medicine and surgery, possessing the 
confidence of his people and the respect of his brethren of the medical 
profession. He is a member of the Pennsylvania State Homeopathic 
[Medical Society, the State Aledical Society, Huntingdon County Medi- 
cal Society, the Alumni Association of Hahnemann College; serves on 
the Huntingdon Board of Health, and is a member of the medical staf¥ 
of Blair Memorial Hospital, which he also serves as trustee. Both the 
doctor and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to ■Mount Moriah 
Lodge, No. 300, Free and Accepted Masons ; Standing Stone Chapter, 
No. 201, Royal Arch Masons; Huntingdon Commandery, Xo. 65, 
Knights Templar; also Jafifa Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine, of Altoona, Pennsylvania. He also is a member 
of the Knights of Pythias. In political faith he is an ardent Republican, 
and takes lively interest in public affairs. He was elected state senator 
in 1896, receiving the largest majority ever given a candidate for that 
office in the thirty-third district. 

Dr. Chisolm married, in Harrisburg, April 28, 1883, Lillian, daugh- 
ter of John and Catherine Gross. Children: Cornelia, born February 
13, 1886, died February 8, 1887; Anna Gresham, born December 31, 
1887, married Ellsworth C. Dunkle, and resides in Erie, Pennsylvania; 
Emily Mann, born February 22, 1892, residing at home; William Wal- 
lace (3), born March 8, 1894, now a student at Hahnemann Homeo- 
pathic Medical College, Philadelphia. 

John McCahan, of Huntingdon, Huntingdon county, 
McCAHAN Pennsylvania, descends from Protestant Irish stock. 

The immigrant founder of the family in America, 
John McCahan, was born in the north of Ireland. In 1792 he came to 
the L^nited States, first locating in Baltimore, Mar}dand, where he was 
apprenticed to Steele & McClain, printers. In 1795 the firm failed, and 
he went with another firm. Later he settled in Huntingdon county, 
Pennsvlvania. At that time there was no postoffice, and few comforts 
in that section of Pennsylvania. In 1801 he established a business in 



970 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Huntingdon county, which continued until 1833. He also dealt in real 
estate, in which venture he was successful. When he died, in March, 
1857, he was one of the wealthy men of the county, in the upbuilding 
of which he did his part. He was a large landowner, a man of local 
prominence, though leading a quiet and unostentatious life. He was a 
Presbyterian in faith, and was a Whig in politics. He married Martha 
Anderson, in May, 1803, a native of Pennsylvania, and of Scotch-Irish 
ancestry. Children: i. John K., born August i, 1804. 2. James An- 
derson, born Alarch 6, 1807, died in infancy. 3. James, born August, 
1809. 4. Mary, born August 21, 1812. 5. Thomas, of whom further. 
6. Jane, born March 31, 1819. 

(II) Thomas McCahan, son of John and Martha (Anderson) 
McCahan, was born October 14, 1815, in Huntingdon county, and died 
December 15, 1869, in Walker township, Huntingdon county, Pennsyl- 
vania. He was reared on his father's farm, received his education in 
the common school, and became a farmer on reaching his majority. 
After his father's death, as well as before, he managed the estate, Avisely 
and well. He was also connected with the Mill Creek furnace. He was 
a Whig during the life of that party, afterward becoming a Republican. 
Both he and his wife were members of the Baptist church. Before his 
death he had acquired a large land holding. He married (first) Rachel 
Higgins, born in 1816, in Blair county, Pennsylvania, died January 20, 
1854, in Smithfield township, Huntingdon county, a daughter of a 
family long resident in Blair county. He married (second) Sarah 
Peightal. Children by first marriage: i. John, of whom further. 2. 
Mary, married Howard Smith, ticket agent at Duncannon, Pennsyl- 
vania. 3. Rachel, died in infancy. Children by second marriage : 4. 
Jennie, lives in Huntingdon. 5. Harry, lives in Missouri. 6. Minnie, 
married G. B. Rex, an attorney in Huntingdon. 

(III) John McCahan, son of Thomas and Rachel (Higgins) Mc- 
Cahan, was born November 6, 1S48, in W^alker township, Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania. His education was received in the common 
schools of the township, and was necessarily limited. He left the farm 
when quite j-oung and entered the railroad world, serving in various 
capacities. He later returned to farming, in AValker township, and 
purchased three hundred and forty-two acres of land. Here he farmed 
for years, bringing the land to an unexcelled fertility, and producing a 



HISTORY OF TUB JUXIATA VALLEY 971 

heavy yield of grain, corn, and utlier farm products. Until 1905 he 
continued on this place, when he sold it for a large sum, and moved to 
Huntingdon. In 1908 and 1909 he erected a handsome lilock of com- 
mercial buildings, which he rents and the management of which is his 
care. Air. McCahan is a Republican, aiding his party in every manner 
in his power, and when a resident of Walker township he was prevailed 
upon to accept township offices, in each discharging his duties satisfac- 
torily to his constituency. 

He married. August 17, 1871, Maria Nash, of Huntingdon, who 
died April 16, 1909, daughter of John and Sarah (Lutman) Nash, of 
Huntingdon: he died in 1896. Mr. Nash was the editor and proprietor 
of the Huntingdon Journal. Mrs. McCahan was a devout and consis- 
tent member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Children of John and 
Maria (Nash) AlcCahan : i. Thomas, born in 1872, an engineer on 
the H. & B. T. Railway. 2. John, born in 1874. employed by a con- 
tracting firm. 3. Mary, born in 1876; married Charles Pennell, of Dun- 
cannon, Pennsylvania. 4. Richard, born in 1878; superintendent of 
bridge and structural concern in Greensburg, Pennsylvania; married 
Naomi Maxwell. 5. Frank, born in 1880; is foreman in shops at 
Greensburg, Pennsylvania, under his brother Richard. 



This branch of the Jacobs family is of true German and 
JACOBS Scotch descent, the grandparents of Roy Warren Jacobs, 

of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, on both sides, being born 
in Germany and Scotland, respectively. The paternal grandfather, 
John Jacobs, married and lived in the province of Omstadt, Germany, 
until after the death of his wife. In 1840. being then advanced in 
vears, he came to the United States with three children, settling: in 
Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, where he died. He was a shoemaker by 
trade, and a member of the Presbyterian church. His eldest son, Bar- 
ney, became a farmer of the state of Illinois, married and left five 
children. Alargaret, the only daughter of John Jacobs, married Adam 
Homan, and died in Black Log Valley, Huntingdon county. John (2), 
the second son, is of further mention. 

(II) John (2), son of John (i) Jacobs, was born in Omstadt, Ger- 
many, in 1832, and in 1840 was brought by his father to this country. 
Two years later he was bound out to serve without pay until eighteen 



9/2 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

years of age to Edward Zerner, who taught him the tanner's trade. 
At an early age he married and settled in Shirleysburg, having as near 
nothing upon which to start married life as was possible. He secured 
work upon the Pennsylvania railroad, then in course of construction, 
receiving as wages eighty cents daily. He only worked one day at this 
figure, his immediate boss taking an instant liking to the boy and pro- 
moting him to the position of camp steward at a dollar per day. He 
worked sixty-one days at this job, then with sixty dollars and eighty 
cents in his pocket walked home, carrying his shoes in order to save 
the wear the long walk would subject them to, travelling in his bare 
feet. Reaching home he decided to begin the butchering business, and 
a day later walked to a neighboring farmer and purchased a calf, paying 
therefor five dollars. He then tied the calf's legs together, slung him 
over his back, and in that manner carried the animal to his home in 
Shirleysburg. By the aid of his wife the calf was killed and dressed, 
after which he peddled the meat about town in a basket. This was his 
first start in a business that was destined to grow to large proportions. 
He continued his basket peddling of meat for one month, then was 
able to purchase a horse and wagon, paying therefor the sum of ten 
dollars and fifty cents, the quality probably being on a par with this 
low price. Little by little he expanded, until within ten years he was 
proprietor of a dressed meat business supplying the towns of Shirleys- 
burg, :\It. Union, Mapleton, Alill Creek, Orbisonia and Shade Gap, 
employing on the road four teams and three single horses. He later 
purchased a low-lj'ing farm of one hundred and eight acres, adjoining 
Shirleysburg borough, principally a duck and frog pond. He cut one 
load of swamp grass the first year, also sowing a field of buckwheat. 
When ready to harvest he bargained with a neighbor to cut and flail 
it out for him, agreeing to give him eleven bushels of the yield. When 
measured up there was only nine bushels of the grain, but Mr. Jacobs 
paid up. He then began a systematic plan of drainage and fertilization, 
with the result that in 1888 he had one of the best farms in the county, 
selling it in that year for $13,000 cash. In 1889 he retired from busi- 
ness, living in Shirlej'sburg until his death, April 24. 1913, aged eighty 
years nine months sixteen days. His career was a most remarkable 
one, and again proves that industry and courage can overcome all obsta- 
cles. He was an elder of the Presbyterian church, and a liberal con- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 973 

tributor to church support. He was always interested in public affairs, 
but held no otitices, and was not a strict party man. His business affairs 
were well conducted, and all concernctl in it felt the inspiration of the 
owner's example. He was a hard worker, but after his retirement gave 
himself up to well-earned ease. At the age of eighteen years he mar- 
ried (first) Isabel Peterson, born in Shade Valley, in 1834, died in Sep- 
tember, 1892. He married (second) Mrs. Susan Dotsom, of Blair 
county, Pennsylvania, who survives him. Children by first wife: 
George E., died in Altoona, in 191 1 ; Lowry R., now living in Hunting- 
don, retired; Albert, now a farmer of Mifflin county, Pennsylvania; 
Mary, died in childhood; John, an employee of the Pennsylvania rail- 
road, residing in Altoona; Joseph, died in infancy; Elmer, now a hotel 
keeper and farmer of Huntingdon; Annie, married W. H. Lightner, a 
merchant and farmer, now living in Shirleysburg ; Roy \\'arren, of 
whom further; Harry, an employee of the "East Broad Top" railroad, 
and a resident of Shirleysburg. Isabel (Peterson) Jacobs was a daugh- 
ter of Robert and Ellen Peterson, both born in Scotland. On coming 
to the LTnited States, Robert Peterson settled in Huntingdon county, 
purchasing a farm in Shade Valley. He built a sawmill on his farm 
and in time worked off the timber, converting it into lumber, for which 
he found a ready sale. He cultivated this farm after clearing it, con- 
tinuing his residence there until his death at the age of eighty-four 
years. He and his wife were original members of the Shade Gap Pres- 
byterian Church, which Robert served as an elder. He lived a quiet, 
retired life, but was a man of deep piety, widely known for the honesty 
and purity of his life. He died about 1876, his wife about twenty years 
prior to that date. He married (second) Susanna Morrow. Children 
of Robert and Ellen Peterson: John, a farmer, died in Cambria county; 
David, a farmer, died in Shade Valley; Mary Ellen, married George 
Cree, and died in Cambria county ; Jesse, a carpenter and farmer, died in 
Shade Valley; Isabel (of previous mention), married John (2) Jacobs; 
Anna, married John Mathews, and died in Cambria county ; Belle, mar- 
ried Daniel Matthews, and died in Cambria county; Reed, died aged 
nine years; James, a farmer, died in Shade Valley; Elizabeth, married 
James Dever, and died in Shade Valley. 

(Ill) Roy Warren, son of John (2) and Isabel (Peterson) Jacobs, 
was born in Shirleysburg, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, August 25, 



974 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

1866. He was educated in the public schools, and spent his early years 
on the farm. At the age of sixteen years he began business life as a 
merchant, opening a grocery novelty store and meat market under his 
own name. He prospered and a year later opened a meat market at 
Mt. Union, and the same year bought and sold fifty-six horses, shipped 
three carloads of cattle and fourteen hundred sheep to a market in 
Philadelphia, an amount of business that was worthy of a much older 
and more experienced dealer. He continued this place for two years, 
then sold out his Shirleysburg business and located in Altoona, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he established a grocery store, and a month later married. 
He purchased a home in Altoona, but two and a half months later his 
bride died. He then sold his home and business in Altoona and returned 
to his father's home in Shirleysburg, where for seven weeks he was 
seriously ill with typhoid fever, the same disease that carried off his 
wife. On his recovery he located in Scranton, Pennsylvania, where he 
entered the employ of the Scranton Steam Heat and Supply Company 
as an apprentice. He won the confidence of his employers, who at the 
end of his first year promoted him to be outside superintendent over 
thirty-seven men. A year and a half later he was admitted to 'the firm, 
purchasing a one-third interest that in two years Avas increased to a 
half interest. The firm name was then changed to Evans & Jacobs, so 
continuing one year, when Mr. Jacobs sold his interest and removed to 
Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania, where he established in the same business 
as at Scranton. Nine months later, in 1889, he located in Huntingdon, 
still continuing in the heating and supply business. He opened a store 
on Penn street, in Huntingdon, where he continued in successful busi- 
ness until 1897. During this period he had perfected and patented an 
improved boiler and radiator, known to the trade as the "Keystone." 
The demand for these led to the formation of the Kej^stone Boiler and 
Radiator Company, of which Mr. Jacobs was vice-president and man- 
ager until 1902, when he retired from the company. He then engaged 
in the coal and real estate business, and has attained the same success 
in that as in his other business enterprises. He is president of the Broad 
Top Coal and Mineral Company, president of the Possum Hollow Coal 
and Coke Company, and a director and large stockholder in the Kishaco- 
quillas Valley railroad. He was the founder and promoter of the Hunt- 
ingdon, Lewistown & Juniata Valley Traction Company, and controls 



HISTORY OV THE JUNIATA VALLEY 975 

and practically owns the entire road, which when completed will com- 
prise fifty-one miles; the organization was effected in 1906. Mr. Jacobs 
is also the founder of Jacobs" Addition, just across the river from Hunt- 
ingdon, in Smithfield township; and is a large owner of farm land 
(about sixteen hundred acres) just outside Huntingdon, and consider- 
able other property in that borough, and other lands that he rents to 
more than fifty tenants. This record of a busy life, although started 
under more favorable circumstances, compares favorably with that of 
his honored father. It is a record extending from boyhood to mature 
years, and is one of constant progress during the thirty years he has 
been in active business. Now, in the prime of life, Mr. Jacobs can 
review the past with satisfaction, and from it the young man of to-day 
can gather an inspiration that will help him to do likewise. Industry 
and integrity are the mainsprings of success, and no better illustration 
of the truth of this can be found than in the lives of John and Roy 
Warren Jacobs, father and son. 

Air. Jacobs is a Republican in politics, since 1908 has been chief 
burgess of Huntingdon, and it is generally conceded by his constituents 
that his has been the most efficient adnfinistration in the history of the 
borough. Outside his business associations, he is regarded as the most 
liberal and public-spirited citizen the borough has ever had, and as an 
evidence is presented the fact that at the present time (1913) he is 
ofifering free a tract of fifty acres to be used for manufacturing purposes. 

Mr. Jacobs married (first) in Altoona, Pennsylvania, Kate, daughter 
of Rev. J. H. Bradford, of Baltimore, Maryland, who only survived 
her wedding day about two and a half months. He married (second) in 
1891, Emma Gipple, of Huntingdon, who died in 1892. He married 
(third) in 1897, Minnie G. Taylor. Children by third wife are Roy 
^\'arren, Walter T., and Robert S. Jacobs. Mr. and Mrs. Jacobs are 
members of the Presbyterian church, and he is a member of the Royal 
Arcanum and the Order of Heptasophs. 



There is no record found that positively identifies the Sears 
SEARS family of Maryland with the early New England settler, 

but the belief is well founded that Robert Sears, the revo- 
lutionary soldier of Fauquier and Loudon counties, Virginia, was a 
descendant of Richard Sares. who died in Plymouth colony, and was 



976 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

buried August 26, 1676. He was survived by his wife Dorothy and 
sons Paul and Silas. There were, however, several families of the name 
Sears found in Virginia about the year 1750, all claiming English origin, 
except the family of Sears in Prince George county, Virginia, who 
claimed French descent. 

(I) The earliest definite record of this branch is of Robert Sears, 
of Fauquier and Loudon counties, Virginia, who was a soldier in the 
revolutionary army for seven years. About the year 18 12 he emigrated 
to Ohio, where he died. He married Eleanor Dallas, said to have been 
a relative of Vice-president Dallas, and had issue : John, born in Loudon 
county, Virginia, September 2"], 1764; Robert (2), of whom further; 
Sarah, married Presby Harding; Elizabeth, married John Luke; Mar- 
garet, married Henry Harding ; Thomas ; Samuel, settled in Kentucky ; 
Mildred, died in Ohio. 

(II) Robert (2), son of Robert and Eleanor (Dallas) Sears, was 
born in Loudon county, Virginia, in 1766. He inherited lands from 
his father in the state of Maryland and moved to that state, where for 
several years he was a resident of the city of Baltimore. He married 
and left male issue. 

(III) Thomas, son of Robert (2) Sears, was born in Baltimore, 
Maryland, where he was educated, married, lived and died. His busi- 
ness life was spent in the employ of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad in a 
clerical capacity. He was a leading member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, which he served as trustee. He married Violet Lilly, also of 
Maryland birth. They had sons: George, Samuel Wesley, W^illiam; and 
three other children, whose names are not recorded. 

(IV) Rev. Samuel Wesley Sears, son of Thomas and Violet (Lilly) 
Sears, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, died in Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, June 3, 1896. He was educated in divinity, and became an or- 
dained minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, a profession fore- 
shadowed by his good Methodist name, bestowed by a Methodist father 
in honor of the great founder of Methodism, John Wesley. Rev. Sam- 
uel W. Sears was a member of the old Baltimore Conference that had 
jurisdiction over a large number of churches in southern and central 
Pennsylvania. Later the conference was divided, and the East Balti- 
more and Central Pennsylvania conferences created. Rev. Sears joined 
the Central Pennsylvania body, and thereafter spent his life in the ser- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 977 

vice of several of the churches governed by that conference. Under the 
itinerant system employed by the Methodist church, his removals were 
frequent, but in all his charges he was deeply appreciated and beloved. 
He was pastor of churches at Bedford, Lewistown, Altoona, Harrisburg, 
Chambersburg, Bloomsburg in Pennsylvania, and at Cumberland, Fred- 
erick and Hagerstown in Maryland. In the spring of 1896 he retired 
from active work in the ministry and three months later was called to 
his reward. His work as a minister of the Gospel covered a continuous 
period of forty-four years, and they were years of earnest, faithful ser- 
vice for the cause he loved. He is remembered with affection and re- 
spect in the many churches he served and many men and women now 
bearing honors in both church and state date their christian experience 
from his teachings or kindly words of advice. He was also an honored 
member of the Alasonic order. Rev. Sears married Elizabeth R. ]\IcCa- 
han, died in December, 1891, daughter of John McCahan, a farmer of 
the Juniata Valley, well-to-do landowner, and devoted Methodist. Chil- 
dren of Rev. Samuel W. Sears: i. George, died in childhood. 2. Eliza- 
beth Sarah, died aged twenty-three years, of yellow fever, in the city of 
Panama, where she was a teacher in the American College. 3. Margaret 
A., now residing in Huntingdon county, unmarried. 4. Dr. William 
Hardin, of whom further. 5. Edgar R., now residing in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, a clerk in the offices of Baltimore & Ohio railroad. 6. Irene L., 
married J. W. Barbour, and resides in Chambersburg. 7. Samuel Wes- 
ley (2), now organist, choirmaster and director of the choir school of 
St. James Protestant Episcopal Church, Philadelphia. 8. Murray C, 
now a jeweler, of \\'alla Walla, Washington. 

Mrs. Elizabeth R. (McCahan) Sears was a descendant of Patrick 
McCahan, who came from Ireland, settling in Juniata county, where he 
married a Quakeress and had issue. John, son of Patrick McCahan, 
was born in Juniata county, where he resided until 1856, then moved to 
Huntingdon county, where he resided until death, a farmer in both 
counties. He married Sarah Reynolds, also born in Juniata county, 
daughter of Stephen Reynolds, of English ancestry, granddaughter of 
Benjamin Reynolds, one of the twelve sons of Henry Reynolds, a 
preacher of the Society of Friends, who came from Nottingham, Eng- 
land, at an early date, settling in Cecil county, Maryland. He was twice 
married and besides his twelve sons had two daughters. Benjamin 



978 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Reynolds married May Job, and had six sons, of whom Stephen was 
the eldest. A grandson of Benjamin, Dr. John Reynolds, was one of 
the heroes of the Alamo, who perished at its capture, March 6, 1836. 
Stephen Reynolds had three wives and sixteen children. His second 
wife, Elizabeth Ricketts, bore him six, of whom Sarah was the fifth; 
she married John McCahan. Their children were: Jacob S., a farmer; 
Stephen R., a freight conductor, killed in a collision on the Huntingdon 
& Broad Top railroad; Jane A., married E. B. Crum, a one-time editor 
of the Altoond Tribune; Elizabeth R., of previous mention, married Rev_ 
Samuel W. Sears, and died in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania; Mary, who 
became second wife of her brother-in-law, E. B. Crum; J. Fletcher, died 
in the Union army during the siege of Vicksburg; Deborah, married 
George A. Black; and David, the last survivor, born January 27, 1830, 
and from 1856 in the employ of the Pennsylvania railroad. 

(V) Dr. William Hardin Sears, son of Rev. Samuel W. and Eliza- 
beth R. (McCahan) Sears, was born in Cumberland, Maryland. He was 
educated in the public schools of the different towns his father served 
as pastor, including the Bedford high school and Lewistown Academy, 
being a graduate of both. Deciding upon a medical profession, he en- 
tered Medico-Chirurgical Medical College at Philadelphia, from whence 
he was graduated M.D., class of 1898. For two years thereafter he 
was resident surgeon at Philadelphia General Hospital, and in 1900 
did post-graduate work at the Polyclinic and other hospitals of Phila- 
delphia. In that year he located in Huntingdon, where he is now 
well established in practice as a specialist in diseases of the eye, ear, 
nose and throat. Well equipped and thoroughly prepared as he was 
before beginning practice as a specialist in these diseases. Dr. Sears has 
not depended upon past learning, but for at least two months in each 
year studies the different phases presented in large hospitals of the 
country, particularly Philadelphia, and thus keeps in touch with all 
modern discovery, thought or treatment. He is a member of the Amer- 
ican Medical Association, the Pennsylvania State Medical and Hunting- 
don County medical societies, the American Academy of Ophthalmology 
and Laryngolog3% taking an active interest in the work of all. He 
is a member of the staff of Blair Memorial Hospital, and surgeon in 
charge of the eye, ear, nose and throat department; also is ophthalmolo- 
gist at the Lewistown Hospital. He has served as trustee of Blair 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 979 

Memorial Hospital since its organization, and with Drs. Frontz and 
Chisolni formed the medical representation on the building commission 
in charge of its erection and equipment. He is highly regarded by his 
brethren of the profession, who recognize his ability in his specialties, 
while as a man and citizen he is held in high esteem wherever known. 
Both he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. 

Dr. Sears married, May 3, 1893, Ethel Maude Odiorne, also born 
in Alaryland; children: William Odiorne; Walter Coffin, died aged 
seven years; and Philips Shirley. 



The Culbertson family of Pennsylvania, of which 
CULBERTSON William Wilson Culbertson, of Huntingdon. Penn- 
sylvania, is a member, is of Scotch-Irish origin, 
and came to this country a number of generations ago. 

(I) William Culbertson, grandfather of William Wilson Culbertson, 
was born in Juniata county, Pennsylvania; most of his life was spent 
in Mifflin county. He was occupied as a laborer and a farmer, and was 
a member of the Lutheran church. He married Rebecca Kohill, and 
had children: Joel, a carpenter, who resided in Allenville, Mifflin 
county, Pennsylvania ; Samuel, a laborer ; Nancy, married David John- 
son ; Ezra, a farmer in Clarion county, Pennsylvania ; John, a saddler by 
trade; James, see forward: William, a farmer of Clarion county, Penn- 
sylvania ; Polly, married Edward Wheaton : Patty, married Charles 
Crownover: one child died in childhood and another died in infancy. 

(II) James, son of William and Rebecca (Kohill) Culbertson, died 
in Alifflin county, Pennsylvania, in the year 1903. His education was 
acquired in the common schools, and his entire life was passed in Mif- 
flin county, where he was occupied as a farmer and laborer. He was a 
stanch supporter of the Democratic party, and a devout member of the 
Lutheran church. He married Rachel Jenkins, of Stone Valley, Hunt- 
ingdon county, Pennsylvania, also a member of the Lutheran church, 
who had brothers : Ira, engaged in track contract work for the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad Company ; John, deceased : and Matthias, who died in 
1878: her sister, Harriet, married Joel Culbertson. Mr. and ^Nlrs. Cul- 
bertson had children : William Wilson, see forward : Oliver, born in 
1849, "^^'^s a carpenter by trade, and died unmarried: Miles, born in 
1852, was a farmer, married Mary Steely, and had: Mary and Emma: 



98o HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Oscar; William, a farmer; James, a farmer; Harry, a farmer; Rachel, 
died in infancy. 

(Ill) William Wilson, son of James and Rachel (Jenkins) Culbert- 
son, was born in Allenville, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, April 17, 
1847. The public schools of his native town afforded him the oppor- 
tunity of gaining a sound, practical education, and upon its completion 
he was apprenticed to learn the carpenter's trade. He followed this 
occupation for a number of years, then engaged with the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company, March 12, 1872, contracting to do their carpenter 
bridge work, and this connection has now been in force for about forty 
years. He and his wife are members of the Lutheran church. 

- He married, 1869, Sarah, born February 10, 1850, daughter of 
Henry and Chestina (Hufford) Brindle, of Belleville, Mifflin county, 
Pennsylvania, where Mr. Brindle followed his calling of coopering. 
They have had children: i. Anna Tawanda, born October 30, 1870; 
married James B. Sleeman, a mechanic in the employ of the J. C. Blair 
Company, and they have had children: Sarah, born in May, 1893; 
Elizabeth, December 6, 1894; Helen, January, 1896. 2. Harry James, 
born March 10, 1873, <i'^d ^^ 19 10, was a carpenter by trade. 3. Rachel, 
born April 18, 1876; married William King, and had children: Cleo; 
Frederick; William, died in infancy. 4. Chestina, born December 8, 
1879; married Stewart Lynton, and has one son: William Richard. 5. 
William John, born August 8, 1889, is a tinner in the employ of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company ; unmarried. 



The name of Harshbarger is of German origin, 
HARSHBARGER and the family now bearing it in the state of 

Pennsylvania has been richly endowed with the 
admirable traits which were so characteristic of their forbears who were 
among the earty settlers of the state. Horatio C. Harshbarger, of Hunt- 
ingdon, Pennsylvania, who has failed a number of public positions, is 
a representative of this famity. 

(I) Jacob Harshbarger, his grandfather, was born in the state of 
Pennsylvania, of German descent, and was occupied as a cooper during 
all the active years of his life. He was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. He married Hannah ; children: Abram, de- 
ceased : David, also deceased, was a well-known physician ; Bud. see 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 981 

forward; William, engaged in farming; Sarah, married Nicholas Con- 
roy; ]\Iary, died unmarried. 

(II) Bud, son of Jacob and Hannah Harshbarger, was born May 7, 
1826, and died February 7, 191 1. He was educated in the public schools 
and at a suitable age was apprenticed to learn the carpenter's trade, an 
occupation he followed for some time and then abandoned in favor 
of a farming life. Prior to the civil war he had enlisted as a member 
of Jackson's Artillery. His political affiliations were with the Demo- . 
cratic party, and he held a number of public offices, among them being 
those of supervisor and school director. He and his wife were members 
of the Brethren church. Mr. Harshbarger married, August 29, 1848, 
Martha, born October 3, 1825, died January 23, 1869, daughter of 
Stephen and Hannah Curwin. Mr. Curwin, who was born in America 
of German parentage, was a shoemaker by trade. He and his wife 
were members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and had children: 
Isabella, married David Barree; Martha, mentioned above; Lettie, mar- 
ried William Fagen ; Joseph, in the employ of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road Company ; Stephen, engaged as a drayman in the west ; James, 
with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. Mr. and Mrs. Harshbarger 
have had children: Jacob, born November 4, 1849, is a farmer and 
carpenter; Horatio C, see forward; Joshua, born May 5, 1854, is a car- 
penter and cabinetmaker; Agnes Mary, born June 26, 1856, married 
Miller Graffie; William, born June 15, 1858; George, born July 15, 1859, 
died August 23, 1861 ; Winfield, born July 25, 1861, has been a farmer 
all his life; Henry, born January 17, 1863, is a miller; James, born 
August 9, 1868, is a farmer and also a fruit agent of Mifflin county. 

(III) Horatio C, son of Bud and Martha (Curwin) Harshbarger, 
was born at McAlevys Fort, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, October 
II, 1853. He was educated in the public schools of his township, and 
for twenty years was closely identified with farming, and then engaged in 
wagon building and blacksmith work. In 1883 he established himself 
in business as a carpenter and general contractor, and has continued in 
this up to the present time. He has been a strong supporter of Demo- 
cratic principles, and has served the public as township supervisor two 
terms, as postmaster, and as steward of Juniata College. 

He married (first), 1876. Hannah, who died August 10, 1889, 
daughter of William and Leah Miller, the former being a miller by 



982 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

occupation; (second), 1901, Effie L., daughter of James and Adeline 
(Shipton) Hoover, the former a cabinetmaker and lumberman in 
Clearfield. Children by the first marriage: i. Bud, born March 17, 
1877; educated in public schools and at Juniata College, from which he 
was graduated with the degree of Civil Engineer, and is now engaged in 
the practice of that profession; married Dora Heffright. 2. Mary, born 
January 24, 1S81, died in infancy. 



The family which bears the name of Africa is well repre- 
AFRICA sented in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and it has 

been connected with important public matters for several 
generations. The name is of German origin, and the spelling is almost 
identical with the German form. 

(I) Andrew Jackson Africa, a lineal descendant of the emigrant 
ancestor, Christopher Africa, was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsyl- 
vania, 1S22, and died March 2, 1904. During the earlier portion of his 
life he was engaged in the trade of shoemaking, but later became the 
railway agent at Cove Station, a post he occupied for a period of thir- 
teen years. Returning to Huntingdon, he was made a car inspector, in 
which position he served very efficiently tmtil he lost one of his arms, 
when he was appointed to the position of night caller, in which he served 
until incapacitated by old age. He was retired, and was "on relief" for 
a period of twelve years. He was Republican in his political views, and 
a member of the Baptist church. He was married by the Rev. Jesse 
Williams, October 28, 1852, to Maria Dufiield Peebles King, born Jan- 
uary 19, 1827, died January 28, 1892 (see King line forward). Chil- 
dren: I. Martha Belle, married, April 13, 1875, William C. Bartol; 
children: Mary, married, June 5, 1903, Lewis E. Theiss; Belle; William 
A.; Helen King; they live in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania. 2. William 
Carey, resides in Huntingdon, where he is a hardware merchant and also 
manager and part proprietor of the store operated by Africa Brothers. 
3. Thomas Edgar, see forward. 4. Vinton Zimmerman, hardware mer- 
chant. 

(II) Thomas Edgar, son of Andrew Jackson and Alaria Duffield 
Peebles (King) Africa, was born at Cove Station, Perry county, Penn- 
sylvania, February 3, 1858. He acquired a sound, practical education 
in the public schools of his township, and supplemented this by assidu- 




(m^. & 




c^i^ 



HISTORY OF THI-: JUXIATA VALLEY 983 

ous study at home, so that he was easily enabled to pass the necessary 
examination for admission to the eligible list of those who desired to 
become members of the clerical force of the postoffice. May 11, 1874, 
he entered upon the duties of his position as a clerk in the Huntingdon 
postolfice, and the following October he was appointed assistant post- 
master. He was railway postal clerk from 1879 to 1882 on the trip 
from New York City to Pittsburgh, a very important section of the 
road. He resigned from this position, returning to Huntingdon, and 
assuming the duties of his former position as assistant postmaster, and 
is still engaged in this at the present time (1913)- During his tenure 
of these various offices Mr. Africa has seen a great revolution in post- 
office methods. The local postoffice has been brought up to a high 
state of efficiency. Rural Free Delivery has been added to the service, 
and the parcels post and the postal savings have been introduced. Mr. 
Africa takes an active part in a number of other business enterprises, 
among them being: Director in the L'nion National Bank and the 
Franklin Building and Loan Association. He is also the junior partner 
in the firm of Africa Brothers. He affiliates with the Republican party 
in politics, and is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and the Improved Order of Heptasophs. He and his wife are members 
of the Baptist church. 

Mr. Africa married, May 15, 1884, Anna E., daughter of Henry 
Snare, of Huntingdon. Children: i. Henry, graduated from Bucknell 
College, took a post-graduate course at Columbia University, New York 
City, and is now studying sociology in Berlin, Germany; he is a very 
fine musician, and is considered an artist in his performances on the 
pipe organ and piano. 2. Walter T., educated at Bucknell College and 
the Banks Business College of Philadelphia ; he is now bookkeeper for 
the Colonial Pine Lumber Compan}', Wilson, North Carolina. 

(The King Line). 

(I) Alexander King, from whom the Kings of Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania, trace their descent, is described by those who knew him 
as a Scotch-Irishman, a strict Scotch Presbyterian, in personal appear- 
ance a man of medium height and weight. He came from Ireland to 
America in 1773 or 1774. On January 10, 1776, he enlisted at New 
London Crossroads, Chester county, Pennsylvania, as a soldier of the 



984 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

revolutionary war, under Captain Henry Darby, in the Delaware regi- 
ment commanded by Colonel Haslett. He was then a young man, pre- 
sumably twenty- five years of age, and served under these officers for 
one year, during which time he was in the disastrous battle of Long 
Island, after which, retreating with his regiment, he fought at White 
Plains, under Washington. Here he received a slight wound in the hand 
from a Hessian's bayonet. He continued with his regiment in the peril- 
ous flight through New Jersey, and was at the taking of the Hessians 
at Trenton, after the famous crossing of the ice-filled Delaware river. 
The time of his enlistment having expired, Alexander King remained at 
home for one month, and then, February 10, 1777, re-enlisted in Cap- 
tain Benjamin Fishborne's company of the Fourth Pennsylvania Regi- 
ment, commanded by Colonel William Butler. Under Fishborne and 
under Captain Thomas Church, in whose company in the Fourth Penn- 
sylvania he also fought, he served with some distinction, being promoted, 
February 11, 1780, from corporal to sergeant of his company. He 
fought in the battles of Brandywine and Germantown, and afterward 
at Monmouth on the memorable sultry day in June. Marching with 
his regiment to Schoharie, New York, where the winter was passed, he 
was ordered the following summer to join the expedition under General 
Sullivan against the Indians in Genesee county, same state, and upon 
his return he, together with his company, joined the main army. He 
remained in the service until the month of January, 1781, when he was 
discharged by Colonel Butler on account of sickness, and returned to 
his home. His application for a pension states that he had been 
wounded in the hand by a Hessian bayonet and was afterward injured 
in the foot. He made his application for a pension April 14, 1818, at 
which time he was residing in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and 
was sixty-four years of age. His pension was allowed for five years' 
actual service as corporal and sergeant during the period of the revoki- 
tionary war. 

Family tradition says that he came to America from the north of 
Ireland, where he and his wife, Nancy Jackson, were married. In the 
first United States census, taken in 1790, Alexander King is listed as 
living in New London township, Chester count}-, Pennsylvania. He 
came to Huntingdon not later than 1796, a proof of this being an entry 
on the county records which gives Alexander King, of Huntingdon, as 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 985 

the purcliaser of Lot No. 181, on January 30, 1797. He probably re- 
moved directly from Chester county to Huntingdon county. He died 
August 8, 1826, and was buried in the Rivervicw cemetery, Huntingdon, 
his younger son, Thomas, being buried in the plot with him. The 
graves are unmarked at the present time, but the exact location is 
known to members of the family. Alexander King's watch fob, his 
cane, and a thimble which had belonged to Thomas are in the posses- 
sion of members of the King family. Alexander King was admitted to 
membership in Lodge No. 56, Free and Accepted Ancient York Masons, 
at Huntingdon, Pennsylvania June 24, 1800, and was buried with the 
usual Masonic honors. Alexander King married, in Ireland, Nancy 
Jackson, who died in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, June 30, 1825, and is 
buried beside her husband. They had sons: i. John, probably born at 
London Crossroads, Chester county, Pennsylvania, settled in Bedford 
county, Pennsylvania ; married Christine Berkstresser ; children : Wil- 
liam R., James, Harry S., Caroline, John, Margaret, Thomas, Nancy, 
Alexander and Elizabeth. 2. Thomas, see forward. 

(II) Thomas Sr., son of Alexander and Nancy (Jackson) King, was 
probably born at London Crossroads, Chester county, Pennsylvania, in 
1779. He removed to Huntingdon county with his father and spent the 
remainder of his life there. Like his father, he was a tailor by occupa- 
tion, and was also a member of the Presbyterian church and a member 
of the Masonic fraternity. He served a short three months' time in 
the War of 1812, under Captain Robert Allison. Thomas King was 
married in Huntingdon, 1803, to Martha Norris, by the Rev. John 
Johnston, and their children were: i. William Henderson, born August 
22, 1803, married Mary Ann Dobbins. 2. Ann, born March 29, 1806, 
died October 17, 1871 : married George Glazier. 3. Margaret, born May 
14, 1808, died July, 1878: married Joseph Hayes, of Wilmington, Dela- 
ware. 4. John, born July i, 1810, died May 8, 18 18. 5. Mary, born 
August 5. 1S18, died August. 1880: married Christian Long. 6. Martha, 
died December, 1822, in childhood. 7. Elizabeth, born November 6, 
1820, died January 28, 1896: married William Johnston. 8. Sarah, born 
July 18, 1823; married Peter Shaver. 9. Maria Duffield Peebles, see 
forward. 

(III) ]\Iaria Duffield Peebles, daughter of Thomas Sr. and Martha 
(Norris) King, married Andrew Jackson Africa (see Africa I). 



986 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

The Wright family herein recorded was founded in 
WRIGHT Huntingdon county at an early day by John Wright, 

who was of the Maryland family of Wrights, a promi- 
nent family of Eastern Shore. They stood at the head of political affairs 
in Maryland from the time of their first arrival from England, and 
served their state faithfully in peace and in war. The ancestor, Solomon 
Wright, emigrated to Maryland in 1673. He was a justice, member of 
the legislature, 1709-1 1 ; vestryman of "Old Chester Church," and deputy 
of the province. His wife's name was undoubtedly Hynson, daughter 
of Thomas Hynson, also an early settler. Solomon Wright had issue, 
Thomas Hynson, Nathaniel, Charles, John, Edward, Fauclough, Ann 
and Rachel. From these sprang the numerous Wright family of Mary- 
land, ever illustrious in church and state. Nathaniel Wright in 1694 
was one of the vestry of "Old Wye," and with other members of the 
family ordered a "pulpit and reading desk" to be placed in the church. 
In 1727 Solomon and Solomon Wright Jr. were the "only members 
present at a meeting of the vestry of Old Chester Church." In 1722 
Thomas Hynson Wright was vestryman at both "Old Wye" and "Old 
Chester churches." Solomon Wright was present at a court held in 
Queenstown in 17 14, and General Samuel Turbutt Wright was chosen 
as the best Cjualified person in his county to take charge of the public 
magazine and to lead the troops of his country in the event of military 
operations. In 1771 Thomas T. and Solomon Wright represented their 
company. In 1774 the delegates were Turbutt and Solomon Wright, 
who were also appointed to try all persons for treason on the Eastern 
Shore, and many Wrights fought in the army of independence. Since 
revolutionary days the Maryland family has been prominent in every 
walk of life. This record follows the branch that shortly after the 
revolution settled in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, where in busi- 
ness, church and public life they have maintained the high reputation 
of their ancestors. 

(I) Some time prior to the formation of Huntingdon county, 1787, 
John, Abraham and William Wright, three brothers, settled in what is 
now Clay township, coming from Baltimore township, Maryland. Abra- 
ham lived for many years in Hare's Valley, northeast of Saltillo, where 
he was a well-known justice of the peace; later he moved to the west. 
John Wright brought with him his wife, a Miss Hendon, or Hynson, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 987 

whom he had married in Baltimore. He settled on a tract lying along 
Three Springs Creek, in L^iion township, where he resided several years. 
Later he purchased from Samuel Lilly a tract of about three hundred 
acres, lying on both sides of Trough creek, between the Dean and Chil- 
cott farms, which had been improved in 1773 by Samuel Dean. Children 
of John Wright: Thomas (2), married a daughter of Joshua Gosnell, 
and moved to Ohio ; Temperance, married John Shaw ; Betsey, married 
Robinson Chilcote; Jemima and Amelia, who married Estep brothers; 
Abraham, of whom further. 

(II) Abraham, son of John Wright, was born September 7, 17S5, in 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and there died September 28, 1866. 
After his marriage he bought a farm in Trough Creek valley, which he 
cultivated until his retirement on account of old age. He was a man of 
honorable character, industrious and prosperous. Both he and his wife 
^v'ere devoted Methodists and active workers in the church. He mar- 
ried, in 1810, Catherine Mireley, born in Baltimore, Maryland, Septem- 
ber 6, 1792, died on the home farm, in Trough creek valley, March 16, 
1881. Children: i. Isabel, born April 2, 181 1. married David Swope, 
a farmer, of Trough creek valley, but late in life moved to Mapleton, 
where she died. 2. Jordan H., born September 28, 1812; lived and died 
in L'nion township, a farmer. 3. Michael, born August 28, 1814, died 
in Union township: was a farmer. 4. Levi, born July 4, 1816; was a 
farmer of Union township, and hotel keeper at Mapleton; married 
Rachel Chilcott. 5. Simeon, born April 28, 1818, died in LInion town- 
ship, a fanner. 6. Eliza, born October 16, 1821 ; married Richard Chil- 
cott, and died at their farm in Trough creek valley. 7. Catherine, born 
September 7, 1823; married Samuel Foust, a farmer of Henderson 
township, where both died. 8. Elizabeth, born December 29, 1825; 
married George W. Pheasant, and died in Trough creek valley. 9. 
Matilda, born January 25, 1828; married John S. Pheasant, and died 
near Mill Creek, Union township. 10. Abraham W., of whom further. 
II. James C, born April 19, 1839; died at the W'right homestead. 

(III) Abraham W., son of Abraham and Catherine (Mireley) 
Wright, was born in Trough creek valley, Huntingdon countv. Pennsyl- 
vania, February 4, 1835. ^^ there was educated and grew to manhood 
and married. After his marriage he still continued farming in the 
valley, but in 1870 moved to a farm aliout two miles away, where he 



988 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

yet resides. He has been a landowner ever since he was a young man, 
having bought and sold several farms in Huntingdon county, near his 
present home. From 1876 to 1879 he was a commissioner of Hunting- 
don county and has served as school director several 3'ears. Both he 
and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and for 
many years Mr. Wright was a steward and trustee. He has prospered 
in his undertakings, and now is enjoying an honored old age at his farm 
on and near which his entire life has been passed. He married Mary 
Matthias, born in Huntingdon county, January 11, 1834, and now, 
after passing a happy married life of over fifty years, she resides in good 
health and contentment at the old farm with her aged husband. She 
is the daughter of Henry and Margaret (Taylor) Matthias, early settlers 
of Huntingdon county and of Trough creek valley. He was a farmer 
during his life, which ended while still a young man, his widow mar- 
rying (second) Abraham Elias, whom she also survived, spending her 
last years with her son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham W. 
Wright. By first husband she had three children : Henry, died young ; 
Catherine, married James Kirkpatrick, who lost his life in the Union 
army; and Mary, wife of Abraham W. Wright. Children of Abraham 
W. Wright and wife : Hutchison H., died in infancy ; Watson W., born 
March 24, 1857, now a farmer of Trough creek valley; Margaret, born 
April 27, i860, married W. T. Boring, and resides at the Wright home- 
stead; George Wilson, of whom further; William L., born January 15, 
1865, now a farmer of Trough creek valley. 

(IV) George Wilson, son of Abraham Wesley and Mary (Mat- 
thias) Wright, was born in Trough creek valley, April 27, 1862. He 
was educated in the public schools and spent his early life at the home 
farm. He early began teaching in the public schools, continuing for 
thirteen terms, the last three years being spent as principal of the schools 
of Mapleton borough. In 1884 he married, and soon afterward estab- 
lished a mercantile business in Mapleton, which he successfully con- 
ducted until 191 1, when he retired, having been elected prothonotary 
of Huntingdon county. During the administration of President Har- 
rison he was appointed postmaster of Mapleton, serving a term of four 
years. During his mercantile life he engaged in other activities, includ- 
ing the organization of the First National Bank of Mount LTnion, of 
which later he became a director. His term as prothonotary began 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 989 

January i, 1912, and will continue for a term of four years. He has 
always been an active worker in the Republican party, and has held the 
offices of school director, chief burgess, councilman and justice of the 
peace, resigning the latter office when elected prothonotary. In all these 
positions he has served with honor and fidelity, holding to an unusual 
degree the confidence of the electors of his borough, regardless of poli- 
tics. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church ; Mount Moriah 
Lodge No. 300. Free and Accepted Masons ; the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows ; and the Patriotic Order Sons of America. 

Mr. Wright married, March 14, 1884, Mary A. Dell, born in Union 
township, daughter of Jonathan and Emmeline (Chilcote) Dell, of an 
old county family (see Dell). The only child of George Wilson and 
Marv A. Wright is Myrtle, married William A. Foster, resides at 
Columbus, Ohio, and has a son, George David Foster. 

The Steel family, of which Harry E. Steel is a represen- 

STEEL tative in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, at the present time 

( 1913), have been identified with the history of that section 

of the country almost from the time of its first settlement. They have 

frequently filled public positions with credit to themselves and benefit 

to the community. 

(I) Samuel Steel, the American progenitor of the family, was born 
in Ireland about the year 1770, and came to America in his early youth. 
He was among the very early settlers in Huntingdon, where he achieved 
a position of influence in the community, and where his death occurred 
in 1853. For many years he was engaged in a mercantile line of busi- 
ness, and his name appears on early receipts in 1795. From 1800 until 
1825. a quarter of a century, he was the postmaster in Huntingdon, and 
under his regime everything was conducted in a most systematic and 
satisfactory manner. He married and had several children. 

(II) George, son of Samuel Steel, was born in Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania, and there his entire life was spent. He was a Republican 
in his political ideas, and at one time filled the office of postmaster. He 
married Elizabeth McMurtrie Steel, and both he and his wife were con- 
sistent members of the Presbyterian church. Children : Elizabeth, 
married ]\Iilton S. Lytle, and now resides in Philadelphia ; INIartha, mar- 
ried (first) Howard Cruitt, (second) E. T. Swain; Mary Ellen, married 



990 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

J. C. Carroll, deceased; Samuel A., see forward; George G., now retired, 
was prothonotary. 

(III) Samuel A., eldest son and fourth child of George and Eliza- 
beth (McMurtrie) Steel, was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
April II, 1843, ^nd died December 20, 1903. During the civil war he 
was employed in a storehouse in Louisiana, and upon its close he re- 
turned to his home and was engaged in farming for a period of two 
years. He then established himself in the lumber business, operating a 
saw mill, and this concern was known as the Samuel A. Steel Lumber 
Company of Huntingdon County. He kept one mill constantly busy 
and the company was in a most flourishing condition. He served as a 
commissioner's clerk from 1887 until 1893, and he held the office of 
prothonotary from 1896 until 1902. When he was succeeded by his 
brother he served in the office for one year as a clerk. In 1903 he was 
made a member of the board of managers of the Pennsylvania Indus- 
trial Reformatory, and was still filling this office at the time of his death. 
He was a member of the Improved Order of Heptasophs, and he and 
his wife were members of the Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Steel married Elizabeth A., daughter of Jacob and Mary Landis, 
both natives of Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, where his death occurred, 
while his wife died in Huntingdon cotmty. Mr. Landis was a miller 
and merchant at Middletown, and at one time represented his section 
in the legislature. They had children : Minnie F., married J. C. Fezell, 
and lives in Grand Island, Nebraska ; Robert, who was a soldier in active 
service during the civil war, was a machinist, and is now living retired 
in Middletown, Pennsylvania; William, is a cabinet maker and lives 
in Toledo, Ohio ; Elizabeth A., mentioned above. Mr. and Mrs. Steel 
have had children: George L., is in the employ of the J. C. Blair Com- 
pany, and lives in Huntingdon; Harry E., see forward; Samuel McCul- 
lock, born September, 1869, and died June 25, 1872; Robert M., lives 
in Huntingdon, where he is the proprietor of a grocery store, and is a 
veteran of the Spanish- American war; Chalmers A., is a druggist in 
Tyrone ; Mary, married Fay E. Colony, a civil engineer, at present en- 
gaged in state highway construction work; Elizabeth, married Elias G. 
Phillips, and lives in Huntingdon; Cora, married Frederick D. Bayer, 
resides in Huntingdon. 

(IV) Harry E., second son and child of Samuel A. and Elizabeth 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 991 

A. (Landis) Steel, was born in lluntingdnn county, Pennsylvania, Sep- 
tember II, i8(j7. The public schools of his section of the country 
supplied him with a sound, practical education, and he left them at the 
age of fifteen years. At this time he commenced to learn the drug 
business, and, in the course of years, acquired a very thorough and 
satisfactory knowledge of this profession. In 1896 he established him- 
self in this line of business, purchasing the store and good will of H. W. 
Leister, of No. 418 Penn street, and has been identified with this since 
that time. Mr. Steel is very careful and painstaking in his methods of 
doing business, and so successful has he been that, in 1904, he was 
enabled to remodel the entire place, which has greatly added to its 
attractiveness. By many this is now considered the finest store of its 
kind in the place, and the town is justly proud of it and its courteous 
and capable proprietor. Mr. Steel is active in all that concerns the 
public welfare of the community, and politically is identified with the 
Republican party. He has served very ably as a member of the school 
board, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. The fraternal affiliations of Mr. Steel are with the Improved 
Order of Heptasophs and the Patriotic Order of Sons of America, 
and the Royal Arcanum. 

Mr. Steel married, September 9, 1890. Lola C, born in Huntingdon, 
daughter of Simon P. and Martha J. Wensel, and they have children : 
Gaynelle and Max Wensel. Mr. Steel is a director of the Juniata Val- 
ley Street Railway Company. 



The Bergan family of Huntingdon county, Pennsyl- 
BERGAN vania, is represented in the present generation by Patrick 

H. Bergan, superintendent of the Huntingdon Water 
Supply Company, and came to this country originally from Ireland. 
They belong to that class who have brought to the L^nited States the 
numerous traits of industry, energy, frugality and perseverance, which 
have been main factors in building up the prosperity of the country. 

(I) Kiren Bergan, grandfather of the Mr. Bergan mentioned above, 
w'as born in Queens county. Ireland, and his entire life was spent in 
his native land. He married and had a number of children, of whom 
the four mentioned here came to this country : John, who made his home 
in Carbondale, Pennsylvania, where his death occurred ; Ann, who 



992 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

married John Whalen, and now resides in Wayne county, Pennsyl- 
vania; Susan, married Patrick Banks, and died in Carbondale, Pennsyl- 
vania; Patrick, see forward. 

(II) Patrick, son of Kiren Bergan, was born in Ireland in the year 
1830, and died in Mayfield Boro, Pennsylvania, December 22, 1900. 
At the age of seventeen years he emigrated to the United States, settling 
at Waymart, Pennsylvania, and found employment as a railway en- 
gineer on the old Delaware & Hudson Gravity railroad. After his 
marriage he removed to a suburb of Carbondale, Pennsylvania, and 
there formed a connection with the Hillside Coal & Iron Company, his 
position being that of superintendent of their supply house. Some years 
prior to his death he retired from active employment. He was a stanch 
supporter of the Democratic party, was of considerable prominence in 
politics locally, and served for many years as tax collector of the dis- 
trict. He married Mary Farley, born in Ireland in 1842. She is the 
daughter of Patrick and Ann (Caffery) Farley, both natives of county 
Cavan, Ireland, who emigrated to America in 1848, and settled at Way- 
mart, Wayne county, Pennsylvania, where he became a prosperous 
farmer, retiring with a considerable fortune. All the male members of 
his wife's family were wheelwrights in Ireland. They had children: 
Thomas, was a canal man and later a farmer, died at South Canaan, 
Wayne county, Pennsylvania; Mary, mentioned above; Elizabeth, mar- 
ried Charles Ouinn, and resides in Mayfield, Pennsylvania ; Andrew, is 
a railroad man, and now lives retired at Carbondale, Pennsylvania. Mr. 
and Mrs. Bergan had children: William J., died at Scranton, Penn- 
sylvania, where he was the superintendent of the Temple Iron Com- 
pany of Scranton; Patrick H., see forward; Anna, married P. F. 
Hughes, and died at Carbondale, Pennsylvania ; Elizabeth, deceased, 
sister of the Immaculate Heart, was an instructor at Mount St. Mary's, 
of which she was one of the seven organizers; Kiren C, is the man- 
ager of an ice plant at Ithaca, New York; Thomas F., died in Phila- 
delphia ; Mary, died unmarried ; John, lives at Dunkirk, New York, 
where he holds the position of inspector for the Pennsylvania railroad 
at the American Locomotive Works; Andrew, died in childhood; Nel- 
lie, also died in childhood ; Gerald, died in infancy. 

(Ill) Patrick H., son of Patrick and Mary (Farley) Bergan, was 
born in Wayne county, Pennsylvania, March 30, 1865. He acquired a 





f 'f 



Otyt.yt_^^ 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 993 

reasonably good education in ihc public schools of his district when 
one takes into account the fact that at the early age of ten years he 
was obliged to commence to assist in contributing to the family sup- 
port. His first position was as a mail boy in the employ of the Hillside 
Coal and Iron Company, and he remained with them until January 15. 
1901, having in these years risen to the responsible position of engineer. 
The general manager of the company was also the president of the 
Huntingdon Water Supply Company and, having formed a clear judg- 
ment of the value of the services of Mr. Bergan from personal observa- 
tion, he offered him the position of superintendent in the Huntingdon 
Water Supply Company, an offer which was accepted, and ^Ir. Bergan 
has had an opportunity since that time to show his true metal. His 
executive ability is of an unusually high order, and he has a grasp of 
detail which is truly remarkable. The company whose work he superin- 
tends furnishes its water from Standing Stone creek, and they now 
(1913) have about thirteen hundred customers. The officers of the 
company are as follows : James D. Stocker, of Jermyn, Pennsylvania, 
president ; Frank R. Stocker, secretary and treasurer ; Albert J. Walker, 
chief engineer. The pohtical affiliations of Mr. Bergan are with the 
Democratic party, and he has served as a member of the common 
council of Alayfield, Pennsylvania. Both he and his wife are members 
of the Holy Trinity Catholic Church, and he is a member in the fourth 
degree of the Knights of Columbus, also of the Huntingdon Club, the 
Royal Arcanum and the Improved Order of Heptasophs. 

Mr. Bergan married, June 20, 1899, Margaret J., born in Jermyn, 
Pennsylvania, a daughter of Patrick Collins. They have had children : 
Raymond; Mary; Frank, deceased; Anna. 



The Dorris family, distinguished in the business and pro- 

DORRIS fessional life of Huntingdon for several generations, 

springs from Thomas Dorris. who came from Ireland in 

1809 with wife and children. He made settlement at Alexandria in 

Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and there lived and died, leaving an 

only son and five daughters, all born in Ireland. 

(II) William (i), oldest child of Thomas Dorris, was born in Ire- 
land, prior to the year 1800, died in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, in 1867. 
He came with his parents in 1809 and spent his early life on the home 



994 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

farm near Alexandria, Huntingdon county. After attaining his ma- 
jority he entered the mercantile business, first at Hollidaysburg, but 
soon after moved to Huntingdon, locating at the northwest corner of 
Fourth and Penn streets, where in 1826 he erected the building yet 
standing on that corner. There he remained in successful business until 
his retirement about 1855, his last years being spent in full enjoyment 
of the fruits of his years of labor as a merchant. He was a Presbyterian 
and taught his family according to the tenets of that faith. He affiliated 
with the Democratic party until the war between the states, then 
transferred his allegiance to the Republican party. He was a notary 
public for many years, but sought no political office. He married Nancy 
Stitt, who bore him a large family of children, only three, however, 
surviving infancy: i. Margaret, married Zachariah Gemmill, and moved 
to Philadelphia, where both died. 2. William (2), of whom further. 
3. Anna, married Robert Dorsey, and died in Spruce Creek township, 
Huntingdon county. 

(Ill) William (2), only son of William (i) and Nancy (Stitt) 
Dorris to survive infancy, was born in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, Sep- 
tember 10, 1822, died there September 2, 1904. He was educated in the 
public schools and academy of Huntingdon, then entered Lafayette Col- 
lege, whence he was graduated, class of 1840. He then began the study 
of law in the offices of Miles & Taylor, of Huntingdon, at the same 
time acting as clerk in the office of the prothonotary of Huntingdon 
county. After passing required examination, he was admitted to the 
Huntingdon county bar, August 15, 1843. Six years after his admis- 
sion, Judge Taylor, of the law firm of Miles & Taylor, was appointed 
president judge of the newly created twenty-fourth judicial district 
and withdrew from the iirm, ]\'Ir. Dorris taking his place, the new firm 
practicing as Miles & Dorris. This association continued many years, 
until the removal of the senior partner, John G. Miles, to Peoria, Illi- 
nois, about 1870, Mr. Dorris continuing in practice alone, having his 
offices and residence at the northwest corner of Fourth and Washington 
streets, within two hundred feet of his birthplace. He continued to 
practice imtil 1887, when he was joined by his son, John D., the firm 
name then changing to W. & J. D. Dorris. In 1895, after continuously 
practicing in Huntingdon for over half a century, the old veteran re- 
tired to a well-earned rest which covered a period of nine years before 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 995 

he entered upon an eternal rest. The hrm of Miles & Dorris had been 
resident attorneys for the Pennsylvania railroad during the time of its 
construction, and until the dissolution of the firm, Air. Dorris continued 
in that capacity until his retirement, the same position now being 
held by his son, John D. William Dorris was a learned lawyer, honor- 
able and upright in his practice, never lowering the dignity of his pro- 
fession nor violating its ethics for a temporary advantage. He was 
highly honored by the members of the bar, who chose him as president 
of the Huntingdon County Bar Association. He was one of the oldest 
practitioners in the county, and his long career but shed lustre upon the 
profession he adorned. During the war between the states he was 
appointed, in 1862, colonel of the Third Regiment, Pennsylvania Militia, 
and as such served during the threatened invasion of Pennsylvania that 
was repelled at Antietam. where his regiment was held in reserve. He 
was a Republican in politics, but never accepted public ot^ce, the law 
being to him all in all. Both he and his wife were members of the 
Presbyterian church, which he served as an elder. Colonel Dorris mar- 
ried (first) Elizabeth Davidson, born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, 
October i, 1818, married, at "Locust Hill Farm," near Greencastle, 
Pennsylvania, died in Huntingon, September 3, i860. She was the only 
daughter of Elias Davidson, a farmer near Greencastle, in the Cumber- 
land Valley, Pennsylvania. She had two brothers : \A'i!liam \V., a whole- 
sale dry goods merchant of Philadelphia, who died in 1867; and John, 
who died in youthful manhood. After the marriage the young couple 
resided on Third street, Huntingdon, in a stone house once owned by 
Governor Porter. Colonel Dorris married (second) Julia jNIiles. Chil- 
dren of first marriage: i. William W., born in Huntingdon, March i, 
1852; admitted to the bar April 12, 1876, practiced many years; now 
living in Huntingdon, retired. 2. John Davidson (of whom further). 
Children by second marriage: 3. Anne, married W. W. Chisolm, and 
resides in Huntingdon. 4. Julia, resides in Huntingdon. 5. Mary H., 
married Herbert Miller, and resides in Huntingdon. 

(IV) John Davidson, second son of Colonel William Dorris and 
his fiirst wife, Elizabeth Davidson, was born in Huntingdon, Pennsyl- 
vania, October 14, 1858. He was educated at the Huntingdon Academy 
and Lafayette College, graduating from the latter institution, class of 
1878. He studied law with his honored father, and in 1880 was ad- 



996 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

mitted to the bar. In 1887 he was admitted to a partnership with his 
father, practicing as W. & J. D. Dorris, until the retirement of the 
senior partner in 1895. John D. Dorris then formed a partnership with 
Judge Austin O. Furst, a former judge of the forty-ninth judicial 
district of Pennsylvania, then comprising, the counties of Centre and 
Huntingdon. The firm of Furst & Dorris continued in successful prac- 
tice until dissolved by the death of Judge Furst in November, 1906. 
Since then Mr. Dorris has practiced alone. He makes a specialty of 
the law of corporations, and is local counsel for the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road Company; general counsel for the East Broad Top Railroad and 
Coal Company, and general counsel for the Rock Hill Iron and Coal 
Compan}^ He is learned in the law, and his opinions carry the weight 
of authority on points of law. He is a director of the First National 
Bank of Huntingdon ; director of the East Broad Top Railroad Com- 
pany; director of the Shade Gap Railroad Company; and has other 
business connections of importance. He is a member of the American 
Bar Association, of the executive committee of the Pennsylvania State 
Bar Association, and member of the Huntingdon County Bar Asso- 
ciation, taking active interest in the work of each. In December, 1903, 
he was appointed a member of the board of managers of the Pennsyl- 
vania Industrial Reformatory at Huntingdon, a position he yet holds. 
His college fraternity is Sigma Chi (Lafayette) ; his political faith is 
Republican, and his religious belief, Presbyterian. He is a member of 
the Art Club of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Altoona Cricket Club; 
Spruce Creek Rod and Gun Club ; and the Pennsylvania Society of New 
York. 

He married (first), in June, 1895, Eva Shedd, of Boston, who died 
July 19, 1896. He married (second), March 15, 1901, Anne Rea, born 
in Danville, Pennsylvania, daughter of Alexander and Anne Rea. 



Among the prominent old families of Dickinson township, 
WOODS Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, was the Woods famil}^ 
There was a large family of that name in the central part 
of the township, owning in the aggregate about one thousand acres 
"square." Richard Woods was prominent in his day, as was Captain 
Samuel Woods, who was a large man, weighing over two hundred 
pounds, always walked with a stoop, was quiet and almost forbidding 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 997 

in his manner, but in reality was one of the kindest and most benevolent 
of men. He is said to have been the determined juror who held out 
for the acquittal of Professor McClintock, who was tried for inciting 
the riots in Carlisle. 

(I) Rev. James Sterrett Woods, D.D., the first of whom definite 
record can be given, was born in Dickinson township, Cumberland 
county, Pennsylvania, April 18, 1792. He obtained his literary and 
collegiate education at Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, then 
entered Princeton Theological Seminary at Princeton, New Jersey, 
where he pursued studies in divinity and was graduated. He was 
licensed to preach by the Presbytery of New Brunswick, New Jersey, 
in October, 18 18, and was received as a licentiate by the Presbytery of 
Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, November 24, 1819, having accepted a 
call from the Presbyterian congregation at Waynesburg (now IMcVey- 
town) for one-half his time at a salary of $400 annually. He was 
ordained and installed as pastor April 5, 1820. In April, 1823, he was 
appointed stated supply to the congregation at Lewistown, and was 
installed pastor there for one-half his time, April 28, 1824, at a salary of 
$300 yearly. He served these congregations jointly until 1837, when 
both gave him a call for his full time. He accepted the call of the First 
Presbyterian Church of Lewistown at a salary of $600 and continued 
the faithful pastor of that church until his sudden death, June 29, 1862. 
In 1850 the College of New Jersey (Princeton College, now University) 
conferred upon him the degree of D.D. His term of service at ]McVey- 
town and Lewistown covered a period of forty-two years. For thirty- 
eight years he served Lewistown church and for thirty-five years gave 
the First Church his entire time. Dr. Woods was a sound, clear and 
practical preacher; his ministry was a successful one, and he built up a 
strong, useful church in Lewistown. He excelled in pastoral work, and 
was deeply interested in young people, not alone those of his own church, 
but of the whole community. He was very fond of children, with whom 
he was very popular, and was careful with their religious training. He 
was very hospitable and generous, and to all who knew him he was a 
valued friend. He was entirely honored by the entire citizenship of 
Lewiston for his holy, zealous, christian life and sterling, manly 
qualities. On the day of his funeral, as a mark of respect to his mem- 
ory, all business places in the town were closed. Rev. Woods married 



998 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Marianne Witherspoon, of Princeton, New Jersey, who died July lo, 
1846; she was a daughter of Rev. John Witherspoon, a president of the 
College of New Jersey (Princeton University), and one of the Signers 
of the Declaration of Independence from New Jersey. A clock pre- 
served as a priceless heirloom in the Woods family was brought from 
Scotland by a Witherspoon in 1768, was formerly the property of John 
Knox, and is now over three hundred years old. Children of Rev. 
James S. Woods: i. John Witherspoon, died January 7, 1839. 2. Sam- 
uel S., president judge of the twentieth judicial district of Pennsylvania, 
died February 5, 1873. 3. David W., a lawyer. 4. James S. (2), a 
lieutenant in the United States regular army, killed in the Mexican war, 
at the battle of Monterey, September 21, 1846. 5. William H., a grad- 
uate of Princeton, class of 1848, principal of Lewistown Academy, and 
from 185 1 to 1855 with his brother Alexander M. was in charge of the 
preparator}^ department of Lafayette College, then principal at ]\Iiln- 
wood Academy until 1862, then entered the law, for which he had pre- 
viously prepared, moving to Huntingdon in 1863, and there continued 
in practice for many years ; married Frances T. Williamson. 6. Alex- 
ander M., of whom further. 

(II) Rev. Alexander M. Woods, son of Rev. James S. and Marianne 
(Witherspoon) Woods, was born in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, July 12, 
1831, died in Mahanoy City, Penns3dvania, in 1897. He was a graduate 
of Princeton College and of Princeton Theological Seminary, becoming 
a regularly ordained minister of the Presbyterian church. After leaving 
college and before entering regular ministerial work, he was with his 
brother, William H., in charge of the preparatory department of Lafay- 
ette College, at Easton, Pennsylvania, 185 1 to 1855. His first pastorate 
was at Hartsville, Bucks county, Pennsylvania, where he remained until 
1869. He then accepted a call from the church at Mahanoy City, Schuyl- 
kill county, Pennsylvania, where he labored faithfully until his death 
in 1897, a period of twenty-nine years. He was a man of holy life, a 
devoted minister of the gospel, held in high esteem by his brethren of 
the ministry and by the congregations he served. His talents were of a 
high order, and his work for the cause of christian living productive of 
abundant results. He married, in Washington, D. C, Mary D. Ritten- 
house, born in that city, daughter of Benjamin Franklin and Henrietta 
(Davidson) Rittenhouse, both of whom died in Washington. Benjamin 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 999 

F. Rittenhouse entered the service of the register of the treasury of 
the United States as a clerk at the age of fourteen years, and was contin- 
uously an employee of that office for sixty-two years, retiring the last 
two years uf his life, which covered the long period of seventy-eight 
years. 

Children of Rev. Alexander M. Woods: Henrietta, a resident of 
Washington, D. C, unmarried; James Sterrett, of further mention; 
Franklin Rittenhouse, a civil engineer, now of New Castle, Pennsyl- 
vania; and two who died in infancy. 

(Ill) James Sterrett (2), son of Rev. Alexander M. and Mary D. 
(Rittenhouse) ^^■oods, was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, August 
8, 1863. He was educated in the public schools, finishing his studies in 
Mahanoy City high school. He then began the study of law, and 
from 18S3 until 1885 was a student in the law offices of William H. 
Woods, of Huntingdon, his paternal uncle. In December, 1885, he 
was admitted to the Huntingdon county bar, and at once became a 
partner of his preceptor, then practicing as W. H. & J. S. W'oods, and 
so continuing until 1910; since that year Mr. Woods has practiced 
alone. He has been successful in his profession, and ranks with the 
leaders of the Huntingdon county bar. He is a member of the state 
and county bar associations, and since February 19, 1891, has served 
as secretary of the county organization. He is a member of the Masonic 
order, belonging to Mount Moriah Lodge, No. 300, Free and Accepted 
Masons: Standing Stone Chapter, No. 201, Royal Arch Masons; and 
Huntingdon Commandery, No. 65, Knights Templar. His other orders 
are the Patriotic Order Sons of America, and the Royal Arcanum. 
Both he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. 

He married, January 18, 1899, Lenore, daughter of Joseph G. and 
Lucretia (Duffey) Isenberg — he an ex-sherifif of Huntingdon county; 
child: Joseph Blair, born October 31, 1899. 



The Read family of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, herein re- 

RE.-\D corded, date in the United States from the year 18 18, the 

first American residence being in Philadelphia, where the 

first American born child of the family first saw the light. The founder 

of this branch was Thomas Read, born in county Armagh, Ireland. 

He married in his native land, in the year 1818, and at once set sail 



6'^ 



looo HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

for the United States with his bride. They settled in Philadelphia, 
where their first child, a son, was born. A few years later Thomas 
Read located in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, where he established a gen- 
eral store. In 1829 he engaged in the drug business, at what is now 
No. 410 Penn street, a location occupied by his grandson, Harry W. 
Read, also a druggist. This site from time immemorial has been occu- 
pied as a drug store. Two years before Thomas Read opened his 
drug store Kitty Westbrook there sold "yarbs"' and told fortunes. After 
her came Dr. Hoffman, who continued in business until 1829, when he 
sold out to Thomas Read. Dr. Hoffman, a professor of the University 
of Pennsylvania, was a pioneer in the field, and one of the successful 
men of his profession. On this old site Thomas Read continued in 
successful business until his death in 1855, well and favorably known 
in business and public life. He ever cherished the warmest affection 
for the "old sod," and every Irishman was a welcome guest at his home. 
He was prominent in public affairs, and was one of the commis- 
sioners appointed by the government to represent the United States at 
the Crystal Palace Exposition, held in London, England. In religious 
faith he was a devoted member of the Episcopal church. His wife was 
.a woman of spirit, active in the church and helpful in all forms of 
village life; children: John, of whom further; James S., died in Texas, 
a schoolmaster; Richardson, died in Iowa, a farmer; Thomas (2), died 
in Salem, Ohio, an optician and jeweler; Anna Mary, deceased, mar- 
ried Miles J. Saunders. None of these five children died in bed; all 
died suddenly of heart failure. 

(II) John, eldest son of Thomas Read, the emigrant, was born in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 29, 18 19, died in Huntingdon, Penn- 
sylvania, January 19, 1890. When a boy he was brought to Huntingdon 
by his parents. He was educated for the ministry of the Episcopal 
church, and was a graduate of Washington and Jefferson College, one of 
his classmates being the later famous statesman, James G. Blaine. On 
his return from college he decided that his duty la}^ at home as his 
father's business assistant. Abandoning his ministerial ambition, he at 
once entered heartily into the drug business, which Avith his advent 
entered upon a new era of expansion and prosperity. The building was 
enlarged, new departments added, and, although temporarily retarded by 
a fire in the building, great advancement was made. During the latter 




a. 



oL 



HISTORY Ol'" THE JUNIATA VALLEY looi 

years of the father's life the greater l)urclen fell upon the son, who 
later became sole owner. In 1865 he erected a new building especially 
adapted to his business, the first modern store building in Huntingdon. 
He continued in successful business until his death, and then passed to 
his son a business founded upon the solid basis of fair dealing. He 
was a man of culture and, although engrossed in business, never lost 
his love of scholarly pursuits, but kept in close touch with the world of 
learning. He was a member of the Presbyteran church, which he served 
for several years as trustee. He served in the Home Guard during the 
war between the states, and was called out to repel invasion. In political 
faith he was a Republican. John Read married Anna M. Hagey, born 
in 1820, in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, the family home being 
on the Raystown branch of the Juniata river. She died in Huntingdon 
July 28, 1912, a devoted member of the Presbyterian church: children: 
Charles, died at Huntingdon, a druggist: Thomas R., now a retired 
druggist, living in New York City ; James, Bessie and Chalmers, died in 
childhood, their deaths all occurring within the same week ; Harry Wil- 
cox, of whom further : Margaret, now residing in Huntingdon, un- 
married : two other children died in infancy. 

(Ill) Harry Wilcox, son of John and Anna M. (Hagey) Read, was 
born in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, June 6, 1855. He was educated in 
private schools at Huntingdon and at the Iron City Business College, 
Pittsburgh, whence he was graduated, class of 1876. The latter course 
was taken after a course of law study continuing one year and a short 
experience in the insurance business. During the Centennial Exposition 
held in Philadelphia in 1876 he was in charge of an exhibit, and after 
the close of the exposition remained in Philadelphia as a bookkeeper. 
On account of his brother Charles' illness, he returned home in 1877, 
and on his recovery became manager of the drug business founded by 
his grandfather and continued by his father. Later he purchased the in- 
terests of the other heirs, and became sole owner of the old business and 
of the branch store in Huntingdon, established several years prior to 
the death of John Read. This business, the oldest in Huntingdon under 
one name, he continues under the same prosperous conditions that have 
ever attended the Read fortunes. He was one of the organizers, direc- 
tor and present vice-president of the Grange Trust Company of H^unt- 
ingdon, a prominent and prosperous financial institution of Huntingdon. 



I002 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Mr. Read is prominent in the Masonic order, being a past master of 
Mount Moriah Lodge, No. 300, Free and Accepted Masons; past high 
priest of Standing Stone Chapter, No. 201, Royal Arch Masons; past 
eminent commander of Huntingdon Commandery, No. 65, Knights 
Templar; and a thirty-second degree Mason of Philadelphia Consistory, 
Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite. He is a member of Syria Temple 
(Pittsburgh), Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; and 
of the Patrons of Husbandry. 

Mr. Read married Isabella McCormick Cunningham, born in Hunt- 
ingdon county, daughter of Robert and Agnes (Oaks) Cunningham. 
Robert Cunningham died in Philadelphia in 1876. Children: i. Dr. 
John, a graduate of the medical department. University of Pennsylvania, 
now a practicing physician of McKeesport, Pennsylvania. 2. Agnes C, 
residing at home. <; 3. Robert James, a graduate of Princeton LIniversity, 
now engaged in the drug business with his father, the fourth generation 
in that business in the same town and on the same site. 4. Thomas 
Preston, graduate of University of Pennsylvania, A. B. ; graduate of 
School of Pharmacy, at Philadelphia, M. D. He is also engaged in the 
drug business with his father, and is pharmacist at Blair Hospital. 5. 
Isabella, residing at home. 6. Harry Wilcox (2), a graduate of Hunt- 
ingdon high school and Mercersburg Academy; died at age of nineteen 
years. 7. Richard, died in infancy. 8. Margaretta, graduate of Hunt- 
ingdon high school, class of 1913. 



The Waite family, originally settled in Berks count}', Penn- 
WAITE sylvania, moved at an early day to that part of Bedford 
county later set off as Blair county. The earliest record is 
of Jacob and Mary Waite, who lived in Tyrone township, Blair county, 
until late in life, when they moved to Franklin township, Huntingdon 
county, where both died. He was a stone mason, a trade he followed 
all his active life. Both were members of the Presbyterian church ; 
Jacob, a Whig in politics; children: i. Joseph H. (of whom further). 
2. John, died in Ohio. 3. Benjamin, died in Ohio. 4. Caspar, died in 
Blair county, Pennsylvania. 5. Rebecca, last survivor of the family, 
now living in York county, Pennsylvania, aged over ninety-four years, 
widow of James Fisher. 6. Mary, died unmarried at age of forty. 7. 
Abraham, died in Ohio. 8. Catherine, married Andrew McKee, and 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1003 

died in Clarion county, Pennsylvania. W ilh llie exception of Mary, all 
of them lived to be over eighty-five years of age. 

(II) Joseph H., son of Jacob and Mary Waite, was born in Tyrone 
township, Blair county, Pennsylvania, in 1820, died in Warriors Mark 
township, Huntingdon county, in January, 1908. He spent his early 
years in Blair county, but in 1869 purchased a farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres in Warrior's Mark township, on which he resided until his 
death. He was a successful farmer and a well-known auctioneer, hav- 
ing cried at public sale many thousands of dollars worth of farm land 
and farm property in that section. He was a Republican in politics, and 
a member of the Presbyterian church; his wife a Methodist. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Keith, born in Spruce Creek township, Huntingdon 
countv, Pennsylvania, in 182 1, died in Warriors Mark township, in 
1893, daughter of Andrew and Mary (McPherran) Keith, of Scotch- 
Irish descent, early settlers in Lancaster county, later of Spruce Creek 
township, Huntingdon county, where they died; both were members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church; children: i. Elizabeth, married Joseph 
H. \\^aite. 2. John, died in Blair county, Pennsylvania. 3. Samuel E., 
died in Iowa, a real estate dealer. 4. Mary, married Dr. Wishart, and 
died in Martinsburg, Blair county, Pennsylvania. 3. Andrew, died in 
Spruce Creek township, a teacher. 6. Adam, died in Huntingdon county^ 
a mine manager. Children of Joseph H. Waite: i. Theodore, a mer- 
chant of Huntingdon county, died in 1908. 2. Alvin, accidentally killed 
at age of twelve. 3. Andrew, resides in Warrior's Mark, a clerk. 4. 
Mary, married J. H. Mattern, and resides in Warrior's Mark. 5. 
Hayes H., of whom further. 6. George, resides in Tyrone, Pennsyl- 
vania, an auctioneer. 7. S. Blair, resides in Tyrone township, a farmer. 
8. Joseph L., now superintendent of mines in Georgia. 9. Lillie, mar- 
ried I. S. Buck, and resides in Warrior's Mark. 

(III) Hayes H., son of Joseph H. and Elizabeth (Keith) Waite, 
was born in Tyrone township, Blair county, Pennsylvania, January 27, 
1852. He obtained a good education in the public schools and in private 
schools of Warrior's Mark, and from 1874 until 1879 taught in the 
public schools. Deciding upon the legal profession, he pursued the 
study of law under Hon. George B. Orlady, and was admitted to the 
Huntingdon county bar at the January term, 1883. He at once began 
practice in Huntingdon, where he is well established in general court 



1004 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

practice, largely civil. In 1893 he was elected district attorney of 
Huntingdon county, serving with credit a term of three years. He is a 
member of the Huntingdon County Bar Association; Mount Moriah 
Lodge, No. 300, Free and Accepted ilasons; Standing Stone Chapter, 
No. 201, Royal Arch Masons; Huntingdon Commandery, No. 65, 
Knights Templar; the Patriotic Order Sons of America; and both he 
and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

He married, in 1874, Jennie Burkett, born in Warrior's Mark town- 
ship, daughter of Peter H. Burkett, deceased. Children: i. Alvin 
Burkett, graduate of Huntingdon high school, Dickinson College and 
Medico-Chirurgical College of Philadelphia, a graduate M.D. of the 
latter institution, class of 1902; now physician in charge at the Penn- 
sylvania Industrial Reformatory of Huntingdon; married Kate Wil- 
loughby ; children : Maurice and Kenneth. 2. Clarence, educated in the 
public schools; married Dorothy Kauffman, and resides in Huntingdon, 
Pennsylvania. 3. Adeline, residing at home. 



This branch of the Bayer family came to the Juniata Val- 
BAYER ley of Pennsylvania from Maryland, from whence came 
John Bayer when a young unmarried man. He was born in 
Washington county, Maryland, where he grew to youthful manhood, 
learning the trade of miller. He later settled in Franklin county, Penn- 
sylvania, married, and there resided until his death, February 27, 1875. 
He was a Republican in politics, and both he and his wife were members 
of the German Reformed church. He married Mary Ann Miller, born 
in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, died May 25, 1880; children: John, 
died aged four years; Sarah Ann, died aged sixteen years; David B., 
now a tile manufacturer of Bellefontaine, Ohio; Joseph M., died at 
Tyrone, Pennsylvania, 191 1; Adam, now a farmer of Bellefontaine, 
Ohio ; Henry, now a farmer of Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania ; Mar- 
garet J., now proprietor of a ladies' notion store in Huntingdon, un- 
married; Theodore F., of further mention. 

(II) Theodore Franklin, youngest child of John and Mary Ann 
(Miller) Bayer, was born in Antrim township, Franklin county, Penn- 
sylvania, April I, 1863. He was educated in the public schools of 
Antrim, and began business life as a clerk in a store at Hagerstown, 
Maryland. After five years spent as clerk his ability was recognized 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1005 

and his service rated so highly that he was admitted to a partnership 
in the business. He continued as such live additional years, then in 
partnership with his cousin, B. F. Greenawalt, established the Cumber- 
land Dry Goods House at Cumberland, Maryland. Later Mr. Bayer 
sold his interest and returned to Hagerstown, where for two years he 
was engaged in business with Abner \V. Barnhart. In 1894 he located 
in Huntingdon and in partnership with L. M. Keplar established the 
wholesale grocery house of Bayer & Keplar. In 1896 Mr. Keplar sold 
his interest to John G. Beaver, and the firm became Bayer & Beaver. 
The business prospered to such an extent under the wise guidance of 
its owners and so expanded that in 1903 it was incorporated as the 
Bayer-Beaver Company, with a capital stock of $125,000. Started 
originally in a store in the opera house block on Washington street, 
the firm moved in 1900 to a three-story building, Third and Allegheny 
streets, which has since been enlarged to one of five stories and base- 
ment, with a ground area seventy by eighty feet. A force of sixteen 
men is kept constantly employed, four of these being traveling salesmen, 
covering the retail grocery trade in the counties of Huntingdon, Bed- 
ford, Blair, Mifiiin, Juniata, and a part of Fulton. This most satisfac- 
tory business has been built up since 1894, when Messrs. Bayer & Kep- 
lar first began in a modest way, acting as their own traveling salesmen. 
The progress has been gradual but continuous, the conservative and 
honorable course the house has always followed winning and holding 
the trade that appreciates, supports and stays. The officers of the cor- 
poration are: T. Frank Bayer, president; Edwin A. Beaver, vice-presi- 
dent; M. W. Isenberg, secretary; Fred D. Bayer, treasurer. Mr. Bayer 
is also a director of the Grange Trust Company of Huntingdon. His 
nearly twenty years of successful business life in Huntingdon mark 
him as a merchant of ability and progress, while his merits as a citizen 
have been also recognized by his selection to civic posts of honor and 
trust. For six years he has served as a member of the city council, and 
in 1908 he was chosen delegate to the Republican National Convention 
held in Chicago. He is a prominent member of the Masonic order, 
belonging to Mount Moriah Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; Hunt- 
ingdon Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Standing Stone Chapter, Royal 
Arch ]\Iasons; Commandery of Huntingdon, Knights Templar; and to 
Java Temple, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, Altoona, Pennsylvania. 



ioo6 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Other fraternal orders with which Air. Bayer is connected are the Royal 
Arcanum and the Heptasophs. In religious faith both he and his wife 
are members of the Reformed church. 

He married (first), December 2, 1885, May Elizabeth Barnhart, 
born in Washington county, Maryland, died in 1889; children: i. Fred 
B., now treasurer of Bayer-Beaver Company; married Cora E. Steele. 
2. Elizabeth, a teacher in the William Penn Girls' High School of Phila- 
delphia. Mr. Bayer married (second), in 1892, Miss Mary E. Shaffer, 
of Cumberland, Maryland. 



There is little or no connected record of the Smucker 
SMUCKER family in Pennsylvania before Jacob Smucker, a far- 
mer, landowner and pump maker of Mifflin county, 
famous for his skill in the manufacture of the wooden hand pumps, 
which were the forerunners of our present metal and power pumps. He 
was a member of the Lutheran church ; in politics he was a Republican. 
He married Catherine Lee, a native of Mifflin county, and resided near 
Belleville, Mifflin county. Children: Barbara, married Jacob Focht; 
Margaret, married John Ealy; Jemima, married David Long; Felix, a 
farmer, died at Lewistown; Amos (of further mention). 

(II) Amos, son of Jacob and Catherine (Lee) Smucker, was born 
in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, died at Ardenheim, Pennsylvania, May 
20, 1898. He obtained an education in the public schools, and early in 
life learned his father's trade, which he followed for many years, main- 
taining the reputation for high excellence and efficiency gained by his 
father's work. He purchased a farm in Brady township, Huntingdon 
county, of about eighty acres, on which he resided, later moving to 
Ardenheim, where both he and his wife died. Both were members of 
the Lutheran church, while in political belief he was a Republican. He 
married Elizabeth Focht, a native of Germany, who came to this country 
with her parents when a child, died at Ardenheim, Pennsylvania, May 
15, 1893, daughter of Jacob and Catherine Focht, born in Germany, 
who settled in Huntingdon county, where both died ; they had two 
children — Jacob, died in Allensville, Pennsylvania; and Elizabeth (of 
previous mention), married Amos Smucker. Children of Amos and 
Elizabeth Smucker: i. Infant, died unnamed. 2. Infant, died unnamed. 
3. Louisa, died young. 4. Miles, died young. 5. Jacob, a drayman. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1007 

(lied at Huntingdon, February, 1913. 6. J. E., of further mention. 
7. Martlia, married Andrew Mason, and lives in Wadsworth, Ohio. 8. 
William, a laborer, lives in Huntingdon. 9. Amos, a guard at Pennsyl- 
vania Industrial Reformatory, lives at Huntingdon. 10. Alfred, an 
employee of Grange Trust Company; lives in Huntingdon, Pennsyl- 
vania. II. Eva M., married G. G. Harman, M. D., and lives in Hunt- 
ingdon. 12. Amanda, married Charles Croft (deceased), and lives in 
Huntingdon. 

(Ill) J. E., son of Amos and Elizabeth (Focht) Smucker, was born 
near Belleville, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, May 3, 1843. He obtained 
his education at Lewistown Academy, and for six months held a posi- 
tion as a mercantile clerk in the same town. At the time of Lee's invas- 
ion of the north he enlisted, July 10, 1863, in Company C, 46th Regi- 
ment Volunteer INIilitia, and until August of the same year was sta- 
tioned at Philadelphia on duty quelling the rioting and disturbances 
attendant upon the drafting operations. He was discharged from this 
duty that month, and on April i, 1864, re-enlisted in Company C, 45th 
Regiment Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, serving until June 14, 1865, 
when he was discharged because of disability resulting from a wound 
received at Cold Harbor, June 3, 1864. The efifects of this injury kept 
him in the hospital until December 25 of the same year. He saw a 
great deal of active service, and was in the campaign of the Wilderness 
under Grant, and was slightly wounded, ]\Iay 6, 1864. His regiment was 
also actively engaged in the following encounters : Spottsylvania, May 
12, 1864; Ny river. May 10; Po river, May 21; North Anna river, 
]\Iay 24, 26; Totopotomy, May 27; Bethesda, May 31. 1864; Cold 
Harbor, June 1-3: Petersburg, December 25, 1864, to April 3, 1865; 
Fort Hill, April 2, 1865; Appomattox, April 9, 1865. After the war 
was over he returned to Pennsylvania and settled in Huntingdon county 
with his parents until his marriage in December, 1865. In November, 
1866, he moved to Huntingdon, and December i, 1866, assumed the 
duties of recorder and clerk of the orphans' court. He was re-elected 
in 1869 for another three years' term and served until 1872. In that 
year he entered the firm of Smucker, Brown & Company, furniture 
dealers, from which he withdrew two years later. He then moved to 
a farm of three hundred and thirteen acres in Wayne township, Mif- 
flin county, which he had purchased, but after four years of farm 



ioo8 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

life he moved to Huntingdon, where he has accepted positions at various 
times as executor, trustee, or guardian of forty-one estates, many of 
which he still administers. As one of the prominent business men of 
the town he was largely instrumental in the organization of the Rays- 
town Water Power Company, of which he has been president since its 
organization in 1906. He is interested in many other of Huntingdon's 
institutions ; was the organizer, director and trust officer of the Grange 
Trust Company; a trustee of the Orphans' Home; a commissioner of 
Blair Park; and for twenty-five years has been vice-president of the 
Franklin Building and Loan Association. He is a member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic, and with his wife a member of the 
Presbyterian church, in which organization he is president of the board 
of trustees. He bears a reputation of merit and honor among Hunting- 
don people, and is noted for his integrity in business dealings and for 
his deep and active interest in church affairs. 

He married (first), December 28, 1865, Sarah Lane, a native of 
Mill Creek, died February 1897; (second) Carrie Moore, daughter of 
Porter Moore, June 23, 1897. Children of first wife: Mary, died aged 
two years; Florence, died aged three years; Lawrence, died in infancy; 
Blanche, died aged twenty-four years ; Mary, married Walter R. Myton, 
an architect, and lives in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. Child of second 
wife : John Moore, born March 8, 1903. 



The Etniers of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, descend from 
ETNIER French ancestors, the emigrant settling in Germany Val- 
ley, Huntingdon county, where lived Peter Etnier, the 
first of whom there is record. From France the family settled in Eng- 
and and in Ireland, from whence came the emigrant to America about 
the time of the revolution. 

(II) Peter Etnier was born in Germany Valley, Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania, June 23, 1788, died October 30, 1870. He became a 
farmer of Path Valley, where he owned land and prospered. He later 
in life sold his farm and moved to Shirleysburg, where his last years 
were spent. Both husband and wife were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. He married Martha Elizabeth Smalley, born in 
Huntingdon county, on the farm at the mouth of Augwick creek, April 
4, 1791, died February 2"/, 1862. Children: Hannah, born December, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1009 

1810, married William Pollard, of Philadelphia; Oliver, of whom fur- 
ther; jMartha, born February 2, 1814, married Samuel Miller; David; 
Lewis; Sarah; Devan B. ; Eliza; Margaret; Jane; Harriet; Julia, died 
young; Julia (2), married Benjamin R. Foust, a member of the Penn- 
sylvania legislature of 1878; twins, who died in infancy. Of these 
children, Oliver, Lewis, Harriet, Julia, Devan, Eliza and Jane remained 
in Pennsylvania, the others settled in Ohio and other western states. 

(III) Oliver, son of Peter and Martha E. (Smalley) Etnier, was 
born on the farm in Path Valley, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
August 16. 1812. He there grew to manhood a farmer, later learning 
the cabinetmaker's trade and operating a saw mill which he owned. He 
was a prosperous resident of Shirley township, and is remembered as a 
most hospitable man at whose home every caller was made welcome 
and entertained with that freehanded hospitality that one so long re- 
members with pleasure. He was a Whig and a Republican, serving 
nearly all his adult years as a member of the school board of Shirley 
township. He was a devoted Methodist, and served as trustee. He 
married Catherine, daughter of Abraham Long, a minister of the 
German Baptist church, probably the first of his peculiar sect (Dunkard) 
to preach in Huntingdon county. He was a farmer as well as a 
preacher, and owned several farms in the valley. He organized a 
congregation and built the old stone church near Shirleysburg, in which 
he preached, and generations of Dunkards since have worshipped. 
Children of Oliver and Catherine Etnier: i. David, lived and died in 
Mount Union, Pennsylvania, a merchant. 2. Abraham, died in Phila- 
delphia, a wholesale shoe dealer. 3. Elizabeth, married S. M. Wood- 
cock, and died in Mount Union, Pennsylvania. 4. Alfred, of whom 
further. 5. Wilson, died in Asheville, North Carolina, a fruit farmer. 
6. Henry, now living in Mount Union, a retired farmer. 7. John, died 
at I\Iill Creek, Pennsylvania, in November, 1912, a merchant. 

(IV) Alfred, son of Oliver and Catherine (Long) Etnier, was 
born in Shirley township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, July 21, 
1836, died in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, March 11, 1903. He was 
educated in the public schools, and at the age of seventeen years be- 
gan teaching, continuing until 1861, when he enlisted in the famous 
"Bucktail" regiment, serving four years, and participating in the many 
battles in which the "Bucktails," as part of the Army of the Potomac, 



loio HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

bore a heavy and honorable part. On his return from the war he re- 
sumed teaching, later entering mercantile life with much success. His 
first store was at Otelia, moving from there to State College, then to 
Huntingdon, then back to the farm, then to Lewistown, thence to 
Armagh, finally settling in Huntingdon, where he spent his last two 
years of life. He is buried in Mount Union cemetery, and will long 
be remembered as a quiet, Christian gentleman, less interested in the 
accumulation of dollars than in the welfare of his many friends. He 
was a Republican in politics, a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and a faithful worker for all that was good. Alfred Etnier 
married, February 2, 1870, Frances Johnston. Children: i. Edith 
Hunter, died aged twenty-one years ; a music teacher. 2. Charlotte 
pjelle, born September 16, 1873, died November 6, 1912; a trained 
nurse; she began training for her profession in the Presbyterian Hos- 
pital in Philadelphia, later taking a post-graduate course in the Wom- 
an's Hospital in New York City. After the Spanish-iVmerican war 
she was second head nurse in the first American hospital in Havana, 
later returning to New York, where she continued her profession until 
death. 3. Fred Guy, of whom further. 4. Douglass, died aged two 
years. 

Frances (Johnston) Etnier is the daughter of John Lowry and 
Elizabeth Hunter (Bell) Johnston, granddaughter of Dr. Alexander 
Macbeth and Elizabeth (Lowry) Johnston, and great-granddaughter 
of Rev. John Johnston and his wife, Jeannie McBaithe, he a native of 
Ireland, she of Scotland. Rev. John Johnston came to America in 
1774, settling in Hart's Log Valley, in Huntingdon county. He was 
installed as a minister in 1787. He married his wife Jeannie in this 
country, and left sons, Alexander, Andrew J., Thomas and John. Dr. 
Alexander M. Johnston was born at Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania, and 
there practiced medicine for fifty-seven years. His wife, Elizabeth 
Lowry, was a daughter of Lazarus and Elizabeth (Holliday) Lowry. 
Dr. Johnston was an eminent physician, noted in consultation cases, and 
lived to the great age of ninety-seven j^ears. 

John Lowry Johnston was born in Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania, 
and after a commercial course in Spencer's Business College in Phila- 
delphia, became a bookkeeper for his father-in-law Bell, although mar- 
ried later. A few years after his marriage he moved to Indiana county, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY ion 

Pennsylvania, later returning to his former position. After the death 
of his wife he moved to Baltimore with a daughter, and there died, 
aged eighty-seven years. He married Elizabeth Hunter Bell, eldest 
daughter of Samuel and Margaret (Alorrison) Bell, and granddaugh- 
ter of Edward and Elizabeth Bell, natives respectively of Scotland and 
Ireland, coming to this country unmarried. After their marriage they 
settled in Blair county, at what is now Bellwood, named in his honor. 
There he built two large mills, a general store and a blacksmith's shop, 
also acquiring large farming interests. He discovered coal underneath 
his land, and was one of the early ironmasters of that section, operat- 
ing a charcoal furnace in connection with his other interests. He left 
six sons and two daughters : Samuel, James M., David, Richard, Mar- 
tin, Adie K., Elizabeth and JNIary Ann. 

Samuel, son of Edward Bell, was born in Blair county, later set- 
tling in Huntingdon county, where he became a prominent iron manu- 
facturer and leading man of business. He was a Democrat in poli- 
tics, and was a member of the Pennsylvania legislature. About the 
year 1830, and while a member, he delivered the first speech ever de- 
livered in the house in favor of prohibition of the liquor traffic. He 
married Elizabeth Morrison, and had issue : William ; Elizabeth 
Hunter, who married John Lowry Johnston ; Hannah, Annie and 
Robert. 

Frances, daughter of John Lowry and Elizabeth Hunter (Bell) 
Johnston, married Alfred Etnier, of previous mention. 

(V) Fred Guy, only son of Alfred Etnier to survive infancy, was 
born in Armagh, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, December 6. 1877. He 
was educated in the public schools, finishing his studies at Mount Union 
high school, from which he graduated. He began business life with 
his father, with whom he was associated in mercantile life until the 
latter retired from business. In 1901 he entered the government employ 
as clerk in the railway mail service, and so continues. His run is now 
from New York to Pittsburgh, one of the most important of the railway 
postoffices in the country. Mr. Etnier is a Republican in politics, and 
connected with various organizations, social and fraternal. He married, 
!May I, 1907, Mrs. Gertrude (Carothers) Eby. Children by her first 
husband: Edith G., Harold M. ; and Hazel, who is the wife of J. H. 
McClure. 



IOI2 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

The Etnier home is at No. 821 Washington street, Huntingdon, 
although much of Mr. Etnier's time is necessarily spent on the road. 



The first member of this branch of the Wilson family 
WILSON of whom there is record is Joseph Wilson, a native of 

Baltimore, Maryland, who died in Centreville, Mary- 
land. His early life was spent in Hagerstown, Maryland, but in 1846 
he moved to Martinsburg, Blair county, Pennsylvania, where he fol- 
lowed the coachmaker's trade, specializing in the building of the Cones- 
toga wagons, used so extensively in the teaming of that day. In poli- 
tics he was a Whig. He and his wife were communicants of the Lu- 
theran church. He married Miss Jennings, who died at Martinsburg. 
After her death he moved to Cumberland, Maryland. Children: i. 
Sarah, died in Cumberland, Maryland; married (first) Amos Chil- 
cott, (second) Thomas Growden. 2. Thomas, a Methodist Protestant 
minister, died in Southern Maryland. 3. Jane, died at Greensburg, 
Pennsylvania; married Thomas McQuaid, who died at Salem, Penn- 
sylvania. 4. Elias, twin of Jane, of further mention. 5. Rachel, mar- 
ried George Hampson (deceased), and lives in Greensburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. 6. David, twin of Rachel; a minister of the Methodist Protes- 
tant church, died at Denver, Colorado, March, 1907, and is buried in 
Frederick City, Maryland. 

(II) Elias, son of Joseph Wilson, was born in Hagerstown, Mary- 
land, May 20, 1S20, died in Cassville, Pennsylvania, April 25, 1899. 
When he was eight years of age his parents moved to Martinsburg, 
Pennsylvania. After learning his father's trade, that of coachmaker, 
he settled in Cassville, where for the rest of his life he resided. He 
enlisted in Company I, 12th Regiment Pennsylvania Reserves, and 
after serving for four months as drum major was honorably dis- 
charged for disability. While in the service he also had charge of a 
wagon train. He was a Republican in politics, and for twenty-five 
years held the office of justice of the peace, as well as other local posi- 
tions. He married Sarah, born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, 
March i. 1824, died January 23, 1906, daughter of Peter Wolfkill, a 
native of Franklin count}^ Pennsylvania, who moved to Huntingdon 
county. Peter Wolfkill for a time followed the blacksmith's trade, 
later abandoning this to engage in teaming on the National Pike be- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1013 

tween Baltimore and Pittsburgh. He and his wife were members of 
the Lutheran church ; he was a Whig in pohtics. Children of Peter 
Wolfkill: I. Leali, died at Mill Creek, Pennsylvania; married John 
Ritter. 2. Catherine, married David Ritter, and lives in Canton, Ohio. 

3. Julia, died in Mill Creek, Pennsylvania; married Robert ]\Iorgan. 

4. Sarah, of previous mention, married Elias Wilson. 5. Name un- 
known. Children of Elias and Sarah (W'olfkill) Wilson: i. Joseph, 
a coachmaker of Cassville, Pennsylvania, died April, 19 12. 2. David 
C, of further mention. 3. Alice, married Martin Stever, and lives 
near Cassville. 4. Laura, married Alfred Smucker, and lives in Hunt- 
ingdon. 5. Mary. 6. William, a skilled worker in both wood and iron; 
lives in Dobbin, West Virginia. 7. John, a railroad contractor, of 
San Antonio, Texas. 8. Samuel Graham, of further mention. 9. 
Harry, a coachsmith and undertaker, of Broad Top, Pennsylvania. 

(Ill) David Cunningham, second son and child of Elias and Sarah 
(Wolfkill) Wilson, was born at Cassville, Pennsylvania. October 8, 
1848. He obtained his education in the Cassville Seminary, later learn- 
ing the coachsmith's trade, which he followed in his native town for 
twenty-five years. In 1906 he was engaged as instructor in black- 
smithing at the Pennsylvania Industrial Reformatory, a position he 
still fills. He is a member of the Sons of Veterans, a Progressive in 
politics, and with his wife is a member of the ^Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

He married Elizabeth Steele, daughter of Charles Calvin Steele, 
a native of Huntingdon county. Children: i. Robert L., educated at 
■Millersville State Normal School, Williamsport Normal School, Med- 
ico-Chirurgical College of Philadelphia, whence he was graduated 
M. D., 1904: now practicing at Jeannette, W'estmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania. 2. Ada, married Dr. Lawrence Smith ; lives in Pitcairn, 
Pennsylvania ; children : Elizabeth and Emma. 

(Ill) Samuel Graham, eighth child and fifth son of Elias and 
Sarah (Wolfkill) Wilson, was born in Cassville, Pennsylvania, Sep- 
tember 8, 1863. He obtained his education in the public schools, and 
later learned the coachsmith's trade, which he followed for eight years 
in Cassville. The lumber business then claimed his attention, and this 
he followed in Huntingdon county for eighteen years, during which 
time it is estimated that he cut about eight million feet of lumber. 



IOI4 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Then for three years he engaged in general farming, abandoning this 
to learn automobile repairing, which he followed in Philadelphia and 
Greensburg. In 19 lo he moved to Huntingdon county, opening a 
garage in Smithfield, doing general repair work, as well as handling 
an agency for the Buick Motor Car Company and for the Martin 
Truck Company. His business has grown steadily, and has become a 
lucrative source of income. His fraternal affiliations are with the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks; politically he is a Progressive. He is unmarried. 



Located on the eastern shore of the Schuylkill river, in 
ROYER Montgomery county, distant from Philadelphia thirty- 
two miles and from Norristown sixteen miles, is the bor- 
ough of Royers Ford. The name is derived from an ancient ford over 
the Schuylkill at this point, which took its name from a family by name 
Royer, who are said to have owned the land many years ago and prior 
to the use of the stream for purposes of navigation. Subsequent to the 
erection of dams and the consecjuent destruction of the fords in com- 
mon use, a bridge was constructed here, but the name Royers Ford 
was still retained by the villagers, and, when a borough was formed, 
the ancient name was retained. 

The Royers were originally from Alsace-Lorraine, and were early 
settlers at Trappe, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania. There were 
several of the name in Providence township and all were men of more 
than average ability and ambition. There is little known of the foreign 
history of the family. Tradition says they were of German origin, 
and there is good grounds for the belief that the ancestors were French, 
driven into Germany as Protestants, and finally settling in Alsace-Lor- 
raine, a province peopled by both French and Germans. 

(I) The emigrant ancestor, Sebastian Royer (originally Reyer), 
came to Pennsylvania about 1718, with four sons, the two elder set- 
tling on the Schuylkill, at or near Royer's Ford. 

(II) John, son of Sebastian Royer, was a farmer of Schuylkill 
county, where his life was spent after coming to this country. He 
married Anna Catherine Apfel, and had nine children. 

(III) Joseph, son of John and Anna Catherine (Apfel) Royer, 
was born in February, 1784, two miles west of Trappe, in Providence 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1015 

lowiibhii), in llie then county of Philadelphia. He was a man of broad 
intellect, earnest purpose and superior social qualities. Though a man 
of limited education, he was widely read and able to converse fluently 
on the various subjects of his day. His ability and high character 
brought him into prominence in the Democratic party, which in 182 1 
and 1S22 elected him to the state legislature. In 1837 he was appointed 
associate judge of Schuylkill county, a position he did not solicit, but 
which he tilled with dignity and honor. He was several times the can- 
didate of his party for congress, but never gained a favorable verdict 
at the polls. He married, in 1818, Elizabeth, daughter of David and 
Mary Catherine Dewees. Children: i. Francis. 2. J. Warren, born 
July 21. 1820, in Trappe; graduate of Lafayette College; entered 
Princeton College, whence he was graduated, class of 1842; entered 
medical department of the University of Pennsylvania, whence he was 
graduated M. D., 1845. He practiced all his life at Trappe, became 
eminent in his profession, and prominent in his town; he married, in 
1863, Anna, daughter of Henry Herbert, of Frankford, Philadelphia; 
children: May. Ralph, Carl, Joseph, Warren, Jessie and Henry. 3. 
Lewis, of whom further. 4. J. Dewees, died in early manhood. 5. 
C. John. 6. Horace, state senator in 1865, and a man of prominence. 
7. Henrv, a graduate of Yale; an attorney-at-law, and a colonel in the 
civil war. 8. Josephine, married Martin Luther Kohler, a lawyer and 
real estate dealer of Philadelphia. 

(IV) Lewis, third son of Judge Joseph and Elizabeth (Dewees) 
Royer, was born in Trappe, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania. March 
31, 1822, died in October, 1905. He obtained a good English education 
at public school and under a private tutor. For three years he taught 
school in Berks county. Pennsylvania, at the expiration of which time 
he entered the office of Dr. Jacob Tryon, of Rehrsburg. that county, 
there beginning the study of medicine. Subsequently he attended lec- 
tures at the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania, 
whence he was graduated M. D. in the spring of 1843. He began the 
practice of his profession in Rehrsburg, and some years later removed 
to Schuvlkill Haven, Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, remaining there 
for ten vears. In 1859 he located in Philadelphia and engaged in the 
wholesale drug business. In 1867 Dr. Rover returned to Trappe, re- 
siding there until 1884, when he moved to Norristown. Dr. Royer 



ioi6 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

was largely interested in the manufacture of iron and the mining of 
coal in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, in connection with the Rock 
Hill Iron & Coal Company, in which he was personally active until his 
death. At one time he was president of the Tradesmen's National 
Bank, of Conshohocken. Dr. Roj^er's political associations were for- 
merly with the old-line Whig party, having cast his first vote for Henry 
Clay, but in later life he became a Republican. For one term he was 
coroner of Schuylkill county, and in 1878 was elected to the state 
senate, and served on various important committees. His religious 
views were in accord with the doctrines of the German Reformed 
church, of which he was a faithful member. He represented the best 
type of the professional man, active in practice and in public affairs, 
as well as a valuable member of any community. He married, in 1841, 
Isabella, daughter of Dr. Jacob Tryon, of Berks county. Children : 
Emma, deceased, married Dr. William Jansen, of Cincinnati, Ohio; 
Isabella, married Dr. William Ashenfelter, of Pottstown, Pennsyl- 
vania; Henrietta, married Jacob V. Gotwalts, of Norristown, Pennsyl- 
vania; Horace T., married Katherine, daughter of Henry W. Kratz; 
Grace, deceased; Alice, deceased; Louis CoUard, of whom further; 
Joseph W., deceased; child, died in infancy. 

(V) Louis Collard, son of Lewis and Isabella (Tr3'on) Royer, was 
born in Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, February 2, 1859. He ob- 
tained a preliminary public school education and entered Ursinus Col- 
lege, Collegeville, Pennsylvania, whence he was graduated, class of 
1878. After his graduation he engaged in mercantile business with 
his father for fifteen years, during this time establishing in the mer- 
cantile line at Shade Gap in partnership with John C. Taylor and with 
his father, Lewis Royer, under the style of Royer & Taylor. This 
connection continued, but Mr. Royer moved to Huntingdon, opening 
an insurance agency, a business in which he was successfully engaged 
at the time of his death. His other business interests were in coal 
lands and with the Rock Hill Coal & Iron Company. A Republican in 
politics, he had never been very active therein, although he held the 
office of school director. He was a member of the Masonic Order, 
belonging to lodge, chapter, commandery and shrine, also to the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. Both he and his wife belonged to the 
Presbyterian church. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1017 

He married, November 3, 1S78, Elizabeth, daughter of Rev. Henry 
and Anna (Musser) Graybill. Henry (iraybill was a minister of the 
Brethren church. Children of Henry and Anna Graybill: James, a 
broker; Christopher (deceased), a banker, of Kansas; Martha, mar- 
ried Harry Kaufman; Mary, married John Freeman; Sarah, married 
Abram Fetterolf; Elizabeth, of previous mention, married Louis Col- 
lard Royer; Magdeline, died in infancy; Amanda; Rebecca and Henry, 
all deceased ; Jacob, a professor in an engineering school at Seattle, 
Washington. Children of Louis CoUard and Elizabeth (Graybill) 
Royer: i. Edna Bell, born August 30, 1879; graduate of Huntingdon 
high school; did special work in Juniata College, 1900, and also did 
special work in Boston; graduate in music in Philadelphia Conserva- 
tory; taught in the public schools, 1900 to 1906; superintendent of 
music in schools of Columbia, Pennsylvania, 1907 to 191 1; student at 
University of Washington, at Seattle, during the summer of 1909, and 
at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, in 191 1. 2. Martha, born 
1883, died in infancy. 3. Roberts Dale, born November 2, 1884; 
graduate of Huntingdon high school, class of 1901 ; Bucknell Uni- 
versity, 1905, C. E. ; connected with engineering department of a west- 
ern railroad, 1905 to 1909; with the East Broad Top Railroad, 1909 
to 191 1, and from that date until the present, general manager of the 
Tuscarora Valley Railroad; married, in 1905, Rebecca Carpenter, of 
Lewisburg, Pennsylvania. 4. Lillian, born 1886 ; graduate of Hunt- 
ingdon high school; married Matthew Thomson Dill, D. D. S., now 
practicing at Biglerville, Pennsylvania ; children : Jean, born June 2, 
1907; Elizabeth, September 23, 1910. 



Although Robert Barber, head of the Lan- 
BARBER-TAYLOR caster county branch of the Barbers of 

Pennsylvania, is the progenitor of the Bar- 
ber family herein recorded, the family history in Pennsylvania properly 
begins with his uncle, Robert Barber, of Chester, Pennsylvania, who 
came to the province in 1687. He was a member of the Society of 
Friends and soon became prominent in the Chester Meeting. He was 
one of the committee appointed to supervise the building of the first 
meeting house in Chester, and was married in that meeting, in i6go. 
He was cordwainer (shoemaker) and worked at his trade for several 



ioi8 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

years, also cultivated land which he purchased from time to time in and 
around Chester. He married Hannah Ogden, and died without issue 
in 1709, his will being probated October 2, of that year. By its pro- 
visions much of his property was left to his nephew, Robert Barber, 
son of his brother, John, whom he had brought from England and 
taught his trade. 

(I) Robert Barber, son of John Barber, of Yorkshire, England, 
and nephew of Robert Barber, of Chester, came to Pennsylvania to 
join his uncle about the year 1699, as an apprentice to the shoemaking 
trade. He inherited a large share of his uncle's estate and soon took 
the latter's place in public and religious affairs. He actively entered 
politics at an early day. He was defeated for the office of sheriff' in 
1719, but in 1721 was elected coroner of Chester county. In 1724 he 
was elected a member of the board of assessors of the county, and, 
while acting in this capacity, and on duty in Conestoga township, he 
discovered an attractive tract of land on the Susquehanna that he after- 
ward purchased. In 1726 he took up five hundred acres on the eastern 
bank of the river, above where the city of Columbia now stands. This 
tract was conveyed to him by purchase, August 19, 1726, by the agent 
of the proprietors. In 1728 he settled on this tract and built his resi- 
dence just below the present site of Columbia, and on May 8, 1729, 
he was appointed first sheriff of Lancaster county. He was reap- 
pointed in October of that year, but was not a candidate the following 
year, Lancaster having been made a county seat, much to his disap- 
pointment. He was for many years prominent in Lancaster county 
affairs, warmly espoused the cause of the Penns in Cresap"s war, 
although he did not bear arms, being a member of the Society of 
Friends. In his latter years he dropped out of public notice, and was 
occupied in the support and care of his large family. He died in Co- 
lumbia, September, 1749, aged about fifty-seven years. He is buried 
in the old Columbia cemetery, which was called in early days the 
"Brick graveyard," because enclosed by a wall built with bricks 
brought from England. Being a Friend, his grave was unmarked, and 
now all trace is lost. 

He married, in Chester Meeting, 5 mo. 17, 1718, Hannah, daughter 
of William Tidmarsh. Children: Eleanor, born 11 mo. i, 17 19, mar- 
ried John Wright; John, 8 mo. 13, 1720, married Mary ; Robert, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1019 

of whom further; Thomas, 10 mo. 20, 1724, died a minor; Nathaniel, 
9 mo. 9, 1727, married Mary Connor; EUzabeth, i mo. 24, 1729, died 
a minor; Mary, 3 mo. 8, 1732, married Thomas Minshall; Sarah; 
James, married Martha Henry. 

(II) Lieutenant Robert (2) Barber, son of Sheriff Robert (i) 
Barber, of Cohmibia. was born in Chester, Pennsylvania, 10 mo. 10, 
1722, died October 4, 1782. He was lieutenant of the first company 
formed in Hempfield townshii), Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, in 
1775. This company was captained by James Barber. Samuel Bar- 
ber was second lieutenant, and John Barber private, all brothers. Lieu- 
tenant Robert Barber took the oath of allegiance to the state of Penn- 
sylvania in Hempfield township, July i, 1777. He received sixty acres 
from his mother and built the brick house in Columbia on the same plot 
on which his father's house formerly stood. This house was built in 
1763, and it was there that the "Paxtang Boys" stopped on their re- 
turn from their crime of murdering inoffensive, friendly Indians. 
In i8go the house was occupied as an office by the Susquehanna Iron 
Company and by the superintendent as a dwelling. 

Lieutenant Barber married, 9 mo. 26, 1746, Sarah, daughter of 
Samuel and Elizabeth (Wright) Taylor, of Tinicimi Island, Pennsyl- 
vania. She was born 12 mo. 3, 1729. died October 6. 1793. Children; 
I. Hannah, born 9 mo. 17, 1747, died 9 mo. 28, 1747. 2. Eleanor, 
born I mo. 24, 1749. 3. Hannah, born 9 mo. 25, 1750, died 10 mo. 
19, 1750. 4. Robert, of whom further. 5. John, a soldier of the revo- 
lution, born October 26, 1753, died November 2, 1806, unmarried. 
6. Samuel, born in Philadelphia, February 26, 1756, died February 26, 
1801, unmarried. 7. Hannah, born November 12, 1758, died Sep- 
tember 9. 1803. 8. Thomas, born October 14, 176 — , died in Union 
cotmty, Pennsylvania, February 5, 1827; married, January 8, 1783. 
Mary, daughter of Dr. Samuel Boude. 9. Elizabeth, born July 13, 
1762, died October 25, 1838; married James (2) Wright. 10. James, 
died in infancy. 11. Sarah, born May 21, 1766, died June 3, 1841, un- 
married. 12. Susan, born July 13, 1769, died June 28, 1824, unmar- 
ried. 13. Rhoda, born March 17, 1775, died March 14, 1849, nnmar- 
ried. 

(III) Robert (3), eldest son of Lieutenant Robert (2) Barber, 
was born in Columbia, Pennsylvania, August 28, 175 1, died in Union 



I020 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

county, Pennsylvania, November 2^, 1841. He took the oath of allegi- 
ance to the state of Pennsylvania in Hempfield township, July i, 1777. 
In 1785 he moved, in company with his brother Thomas, to Northum- 
berland (now Union) county, Pennsylvania, and in that year was 
taxed on four horses, two cows and five hundred acres of land. He 
had owned this land prior to coming to take possession and it is likely 
it was purchased for him and his brothers by their father, Lieutenant 
Robert Barber. "In the fall (of 1772) Robert Barber, Esq. built the 
first house on the White Springs tract of which we have any knowl- 
edge, as he recites — in a lease dated August 9, 1773, to John Scott, 
that he leased him the house he had built last fall at the head of White 
Springs, for seven years. It was on the Edward Lee warrantee which 
Barber had purchased in August from Reuben Haine." This was the 
tract upon which Robert (3) Barber settled in 1785. The old log 
house, built in 1772, was the first built in Buffalo Valley, and is still 
standing, although it has been moved from its original position about 
one hundred yards, and has been covered with weather boards. It is 
about twenty by twenty-five feet in size, with a large stone chimney 
that occupies nearly the entire width of one end. In 1791 Robert (3) 
Barber built a saw mill on his farm on White Spring Run, and in 1797 
he built a grist mill on the same stream. In 1805 and 1806, in part- 
nership with Solomon Heise, of Columbia, he built the largest flouring 
mill in the country on Penn's creek and also a saw mill. He occupied 
his farm for fifty-six years and served as justice of the peace for Buf- 
falo township many years, having been commissioned November 29, 
1792. "Squire" Barber was a man of great force of character and 
exercised a strong influence among the first settlers. 

He married, September 23, 1775, Sarah, born in Columbia, Penn- 
sylvania, May 19, 1754, daughter of Dr. Samuel and Mary (Bethel) 
Boude. Children: i. John, died in infancy. 2. Samuel, died aged 
five years. 3. Sarah Boude, born January 10, 1779, died November 2, 
1869 ; married Benjamin Chambers. 4. Mary Boude, born November 13, 
1780, died May i, 1852; married Joseph Chambers. 5. Eleanor, died 
in infancy. 6. Robert, born May 28, 1783, died November 16, 1862; 
married, December 16, 1804, Esther Shively, and moved in 1838 to 
Stephenson county, Illinois. 7. Thomas, born February 20, 1785, died 
April 14, 1856; married, March 26, 1812, Elizabeth Clingan. 8. Sam- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 102 1 

uel, of whom further. 9. EHza!)eth, Ijorn February 28, 1789, died 
unmarried July 5, 1867. 10. Hannah, born March 9, 1791, died un- 
married July 26, 1826. II. Eleanor, born April 21, 1793, died un- 
married August 25, 1872. 12. James Wright, born August 5, 1795, 
died May 30, 1877; married, February 5, 1823, Susan, born July 16, 
1801, daughter of Thomas and Mary (Boude) Barber; they settled in 
Stephenson county, Illinois, in 1843. 

(IV) Colonel Samuel Barber, eighth child of "Squire"' Robert (3) 
and Sarah (Boude) Barber, was born in BulYalo Valley, Union 
county, Pennsylvania, June 21, 1787, died March 2, 1846. He was 
an influential politician, an ardent Democrat, and a member of the 
first general assembly that met west of the Allegheny mountains. He 
was elected colonel of the Forty-third Regiment, Pennsylvania ]\Iilitia, 
in 1825; was a splendid swordsman and horseman, and very popular 
with the soldiers. He was a man of position, convictions, well in- 
formed and possessing a splendid voice that commanded attention at 
all times. He was an active member of the Presbyterian church, 
although the family had been Friends hitherto. He married, Febru- 
ary 14, 1811, ]\Iary, born January 22, 1791, daughter of Dr. Robert 
Van Valzah (see Van Valzah family in this work). Children: i. 
Robert B., born February 3, 1812, graduate of JeiTerson College, 
1833, member of Union county bar, deputy attorney-general of Penn- 
sylvania with rank of colonel : married Mary Jane Foster. 2. James 
Wright, born June 11, 1814, died August 11, 1858; married Margaret 
Park Chamberlain; in 1847 moved to Stephenson county, Illinois. 3. 
Elizabeth Sutherland, born October 11, 1816; married James Dale 
Chamberlain; moved to Toledo, Ohio. 4. Samuel S., born January 13, 
1819, died November 28, 1880; married Emmeline Miles Foster. 5. 
Thomas Van Valzah, born August 10, 182 1 ; married Gertrude Wool- 
sey. 6. John Van Valzah, born May 19, 1824; married Elizabeth 
Ochiltree Rezner; became a merchant of Mifflinburg, Pennsylvania. 7. 
Sarah Hannah Boude, born November 3, 1826; married Samuel Dale 
Chamberlain ; resided in Toledo, Ohio. 8. William Edward, born 
April 21, 1829, died in infancy. 9. William Benjamin, of whom fur- 
ther. 10. Ellen Mary, born May 8, 1830; married John Hayes, a mer- 
chant of Mifflinburg. 11. Joseph Chambers, born December 25, 1832, 
died in Monroe county, Wisconsin, September 22, 1880; married 



I022 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Louise Rittenhouse. 12. Edward Sutherland, born May 5, 1835, died 
February 20, 1846. 

(V) William Benjamin, ninth child of Colonel Samuel and Mary 
(Van Valzah) Barber, was born in Buffalo Valley, Union county, 
Pennsylvania, May 8, 1830. He married and lived on the old Barber 
homestead at White Springs, owning other land in the valley, and 
was a prosperous farmer. Both he and his wife were members of the 
Cross Roads Presbj'terian Church. He married, February g, 1854, 
Mary Agnes Rezner, born January 2, 1835, daughter of James Rezner. 
Children: i. Spencer Finney, born January 22, 1855; married Ada 
Byron Rutherford; moved to near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 2. Su- 
san Clark, of whom further. 3. Marianna Bonnell, born September 
II, 1858. 4. Fannie Jane, June 4, i860. 5. Henrietta Chambers, May 
17, 1863; married, December 26, 1889, James E. Cardwell, of Chester, 
Pennsylvania. 6. Eleanor, born August 8, 1865, died August 17, 1867. 
7. James Wright, born June 6, 1867. 8. Hannah M., born March 7, 
1869, died in infancy. 9. Elizabeth O., born July 22, 1871, died in 
infancy. 10. John V., born November 23, 1873, ^^^^ May 6, 1876. 
II. Grace Rezner, born February 9, 1877. 12. Eva Schuyler, born 
October 27, 1879. 

(VI) Susan Clark, eldest daughter of William Benjamin and 
Mary Agnes (Rezner) Barber, was born in Buffalo Valley, Union 
county, Pennsylvania, November 4, 1856. She married, February 19, 
1880, in Mifflinburg, Thomas Brainard Taylor, born in Mifflinburg, 
Pennsylvania, November 12, 1844, son of John M. and Isabella (Sil- 
verwood) Taylor, and grandson of William and Mary (Harvey) Tay- 
lor. William Taylor was a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, a 
shoe dealer by occupation, a Democrat in politics, and a Quaker in 
religion. He and his wife were the parents of four children : John 
M., Andrew, Margaret, Susan. John M. Taylor was born in Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, 1818, a merchant by occupation, held the posi- 
tion of postmaster in 1850, a Democrat in politics, and a Friend in 
religion. He married, in 1842, Isabella, born in Mifflinburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, 1822, daughter of Thomas and Mary (Smith) Silverwood, the 
former named born in England, and the latter in Mifflinburg, Penn- 
sylvania. Children : James Edwin, born 1842 ; Thomas Brainard, 
1844; Henry A., 1846; John Newton, 1848; Mary E., 1849; William 




>-^ /^3^^^>^, '^^'^^. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1023 

Henry, 1850. Tliomas Brainard Taylor attended the public schools 
of Mifllinburg, receiving a practical education. From 1868 to 1872 
he was engaged in the mercantile business, firm of Taylor & Van Val- 
zah, after which he began the manufacture of buggies and carriages, 
continuing until 1910, when he retired from active business pursuits, 
and he is now enjoying the fruit of his labor. He is a Presbyterian 
in religion. Children of Thomas Brainard and Susan Clark (Barber) 
Taylor: i. William Silverwood, of whom further. 2. Mary Isabel, 
born September 3, 1885, unmarried. 3. Spencer Barber, born August 
30, 1887; superintendent of cold storage department of Armour Pack- 
ing Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

(VII) William Silverwood, eldest son of Thomas Brainard and 
Susan Clark (Barber) Taylor, was born in Mifflinburg. Pennsylvania, 
July 10, 1881. He was educated in the public school, graduate of Mif- 
flinburg high school, class of 1897. He then entered Philadelphia 
Dental College, whence he was graduated D. D. S., class of 1901. He 
practiced his profession in one of the leading dental offices of Pitts- 
burgh for one year, and in January, 1902, located in Lewistown, where 
he established dental offices and is now well established. He is well 
versed in modern dentistry and its kindred subjects, the dentist of to- 
day requiring as intimate a knowledge of human anatomy as a physi- 
cian. Dr. Taylor and his wife are both members of the Presbyterian 
church; he is a Republican in politics. 

He married, in 1907, Florence R. Rutherford, born in Union 
county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Samuel and Bertha Rutherford. 
Child, William Silverwood Jr. The family home is at No. 23 North 
Main street, Lewistown, where Dr. Taylor built in 1908 a two-story 
brick residence and office. 



The Sheaffer family, of Huntingdon county, de- 
SHEAFFER scends from one of the Palatines of the same name, 

who emigrated from Germany about 1672, coming 
to the New ^^'orld with a number of his neighbors. It is thought that 
he married the daughter of a comrade, perhaps from his part of their 
native land. His numerous descendants are among the first citizens 
of Pennsylvania, the colony in which the immigrant Sheaffer elected 
to try his fortune in the new country. 



1024 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(I) William Sheaffer, a descendant of the immigrant, lived and 
died in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. There is little that this gen- 
eration knows of him except that he was a prosperous farmer and 
lived and died on his farm. Among his children was William Sheaf- 
fer, of whom further. 

(II) William Sheaffer, son of William Sheaffer, was born in 1809, 
in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and died in 1851. He left Lan- 
caster county when a young man and went to Bellville, Pennsylvania, 
and engaged in the wool business with a Mr. Gibbony, he being the 
buyer for the firm. Here he remained seven years. At the expiration 
of that time he bought a farm in Shirley township, Huntingdon county, 
and remained on it until his death. He was a good farmer, energetic, 
industrious and frugal, and accumulated a competency. He married 
Mary Anne Hinds, born October 25, 1807, in Decatur township, Mif- 
flin county, Pennsylvania, and died May 12, 1879; she was the daugh- 
ter of Stephen and Mary (Lee) Hinds, who were married November 
4, 1793. He was of straight English descent, and was born in Little 
Britain, Bucks county, Pennsylvania, and when a young man moved 
to Mifflin county, where his wife was born. She was a member of 
the famous Lee family of New England, and was distantly connected 
with the Lee family of Virginia. After the death of her husband, 
April 7, 1838, she continued to live on the farm. Children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Hinds: James, born June 11, 1795, died August 7, 1795; Ra- 
chel, born August- 1, 1796, died 1850, married Mr. Sigler; William, 
born December 17, 1798, died March 28, 1820; Elizabeth, born De- 
cember 29, 1800, died February 25, 1840, married Mr. Miller, of Mif- 
flin county; John, born January 30, 1803, died April 16, 1845; Sarah, 
born October 30, 1805, died November 17, 1806; Mary Anne, married 
William Sheaffer; Sarah, born November i, 1810, married Mr. Sims, 
of Lewistown, Pennsylvania; Stephen Andrew, born November 30, 
1812, died October 31, 1867, lived in Mifflin county; Isabella, born 
September 24, 1816, died in Ohio, married Mr. Hamilton. Children 
of William and Mary Anne (Hinds) Sheaffer: i. Alexander, de- 
ceased, a physician in Lewistown, Pennsylvania. 2. Catherine, mar- 
ried Felix Norton, lives in Pennsylvania. 3. John, died, a farmer in 
Illinois. 4. William T., of whom further. 5. Mary A. J., married 
Henry Black, and died in Newton Hamilton, Pennsjdvania. 6. Emma, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1025 

deceased, married T. C. Van Zant, of Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. 

(Ill) William T. Sheatter, son of William and ]\Iary Anne (Hinds) 
Sheaffer, was born March 7, 1845, in Shirley township, Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania. He was reared on his father's farm, and 
attended the public schools in Germany Valley, after which he ma- 
triculated at the Shirleysburg Academy, receiving instruction from 
Rev. ]\Ir. Sheaffer. His father died when he was four years old, and 
after he left school the home farm was sold. Mr. Sheaffer decided 
on dentistry as his profession, and entered the Philadelphia Dental 
College, from which he graduated with degree of D. D. S. His first 
trial at dentistry was in HoUidaysburg, Pennsylvania, where he was 
assistant to Dr. Roher for a short while. Looking over the field he 
decided to try 'Mt. L'nion, Pennsylvania, and there established an office, 
where from the first he had a large and increasing practice for twenty- 
five years. The sedentary life impaired his health, and after much 
thought, pro and con, he relinquished his practice, and gave up his 
oflice and began contracting on a large scale. In this line of endeavor 
he contracted for the building of railroads, public highways, etc. Be- 
fore giving up his profession of dentistry he had bought the River 
Bottom farm near Mt. Union, and is now the owner of four farms, 
while his wife owns two, in all aggregating over one thousand highly 
fertile acres. On April i, 1913, he added the old Fretchy place, in 
Smithfield township, Huntingdon county, to his land holdings. There 
are two hundred and twenty acres in it. He has improved it wonder- 
fully and at the present time makes his home on it. It is one of the 
handsomest country places in Huntingdon county, and here he enter- 
tains lavishly his friends, with the assistance of his wife, in true Penn- 
sylvania style. 

Both Dr. Sheafifer and his wife are members of the Pres- 
byterian church. He is a Democrat and has served as school 
director. He assisted in organizing the Grange Trust Company of 
Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, and was elected its first vice-president, 
and at the present time he is president of that financially sound insti- 
tution. He is connected with the Mt. Union Land Company, and has 
other important moneyed interests. Dr. Sheaffer is one of the first 
citizens of Huntingdon county, ranking among the leading representa- 
tives of its industrial interests and commercial strength. In his busi- 



I026 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

ness dealings he is scrupulously exact, and his merited success has 
come to him as the result of foresight, executive ability and keen dis- 
crimination, combined with a courtly, polished manner, which won for 
him many patrons in the days when he practiced dentistry. 

He married, February 25, 1875, Narcissa Shaver, born March 15, 
1845, at Mt. Union, Pennsylvania, daughter of William and Catherine 
(Wallace) Shaver. Children: i. Mary, born January 10, 1876, mar- 
ried Thomas Kurtz. 2. Alexander Hinds, born September 17, 1877, 
married Hattie Yokum; dealer in real estate in Spokane, Washington. 
3. Elsie Cobert, born September 25, 1879, died unmarried, August 10, 
1905. 4. Narcissa Frances, born April 19, 1882, married George 
Gearhart, of Lockhaven, Pennsylvania, where he is superintendent of 
highway construction. 5. William Wilson, born March 4, 1884; in 
construction business as contractor in Mt. Union; married Edith An- 
derson. 

(The Shaver Line). 

Narcissa (Shaver) SheafTer descends from a long line of splendid 
colonial ancestry on both the paternal and distaff sides. The immi- 
grant ancestor of the Shaver family came from Germany to the Prov- 
ince of Virginia while that colony was yet in its swaddling clothes. 
He settled on the James River, some distance from the colonial capital, 
Jamestown, became a tobacco planter, and accumulated a large amount 
of this world's goods. He was a highly edvicated man and used his 
knowledge for the benefit of his neighbors as well as himself in turn- 
ing to account the natural resources of the country, especially his 
botanical lore. Among his descendants was Nicholas, of whom fur- 
ther. 

(I) Nicholas Shaver, a descendant of the immigrant of the name, 
was born in the Shenandoah Valley, Virginia, and here lived and died. 
Among his children was Nicholas Jr., of whom further. 

(II) Nicholas Shaver Jr., son of Nicholas Shaver, was born in the 
Shenandoah Valley, Virginia. He moved from his native colony to 
Pennsylvania, before 1785, as he purchased. May 24, 1785, a farm in 
Shirley township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, where he located, '~|n 
lived and died. He was the earliest settler in the township and had 
no neighbors except those miles distant. He bought part of his land 
from the original owners, the Indians, giving them a fair price for 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1027 

their lioldings. He died in 18 10, and his sons Peter and John were 

appointed administrators of his estate. He married EHzabeth , in 

Virginia, and she came with him and their children to Pennsylvania. 
Children: i. Peter. 2. John, of whom further. 3. Jacob, lived in 
Westmoreland count)', Pennsylvania. 4. Leonard, married Rachel 
Ricketts; lived in Mercer county, Pennsylvania. 5. Phoebe, married 
Caspar Booher. 6. Catherine, married Joseph Cochenour. 7. Susan- 
nah, married Peter Snyder. 8. A daughter, name unknown, married 
Mr. Ripple. 

(Ill) John, son of Nicholas and Elizabeth Shaver, was born Sep- 
tember II, 1762, in the Shenandoah Valley, Virginia, and died Octo- 
ber 16, 1829, in Shirley township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
and is buried in the family cemetery at Mt. Union. He was reared on 
his father's tobacco plantation, in the chivalrous atmosphere of his 
native colony, and was there educated. It is said of him that he was 
a most perfect type of a southern gentleman. He moved to Pennsyl- 
vania about 1784 and located at Oughwick Mills, Shirley township, 
Huntingdon county. In 1802 he changed his place of abode to what is 
now known as Mt. Union, the same county. He was one of the larg- 
est land owners in the county and one of its most progressive men. 
He erected a large store house on the present site of Mt. Union. At 
one time the Shavers and their relatives, about seventy in number, 
counting the children, and their connections through marriages with 
IMessrs. Booher, Snyder and Ricketts, owned one continuous line of 
farms about five miles in length, extending from the Juniata river at 
the bend, where the creosoting plant is now located, up through Hill 
Valley, very near where the Brewster tannery stood. He married 
Mary Glass, also of Virginia. Children: i. Samuel, born 1795, died 
1870; married Catherine Vandewater, and lived on farm adjoining his 
father's. 2. Jacob, born 1796, died 1878: married (first) Jane Morri- 
son; (second) Julia Morrison, sister of first wife; lived near Newton 
Hamilton, Pennsylvania. 3. Henry, born 1797, died 1870; married 
Hannah Morrison; lived at mill near father. 4. John, born 1798, died 
1863; married (first) Jane Hanawalt; (second) Sarah King; he was 
once sherifif of Huntingdon county. 5. Nicholas, born 1801, died 
1884; married Keziah Etnier; lived in what is now Mt. L'nion. 6. 
Ann, born 1803, died 1878: married John Morrison; lived on Shirley 



1028 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Road. 7. AVilliam, of whom further. 8. Catherine, born 1808, died 
1863; married Joseph Lankton; lived and died on farm near Lewis- 
town, Pennsylvania. 9. George, born 18 10, died 1880; married Mar- 
garet Mcllhenney, lived near Ipavia, Fulton county, Illinois. 10. 
Peter, born 1813, died 1894; married Margaret Morrow; lived on farm 
adjoining his father. 

(IV) A\'illiam, son of Major John and Mary (Glass) Shaver, was 
born October 10, 1804, in a log house where the Shaver store house 
now stands at Mt. Union, Pennsylvania, and died August 10, 1855. 
He was a farmer, living near Mt. L'nion, and was a prominent and 
influential man in his township. He was a strong Whig, and always 
voted the ticket; and was captain of militia. Both he and his wife 
were members of the Presbyterian church. He married Catherine 
Wallace, born September i, 1818, near Granville, Mifflin county, Penn- 
sylvania, and died March 19, 1900; she was daughter of Robert and 
Ann (Wilson) Wallace. After the death of Mr. Shaver his widow 
married John D. Stewart, in 1863. Robert Wallace, father of Cath- 
erine (Wallace) Shaver, was born in Belfast, Ireland; he ran away 
from home when a small lad and came to the United States, landed 
in Virginia, and eventually moved to Philadelphia, and while there he 
engaged extensively in the mercantile business. Later he moved to 
Mifflin county on a farm that he had purchased. While in Philadel- 
phia he married Ann Wilson, daughter of James Wilson, one of the 
framers of the Declaration of Independence, which he signed; he also 
assisted in framing the constitution of the L^nited States; he was a 
federal jiidge imder President Washington; was a trustee of Prince- 
ton L'niversity, and one of the noted jurists of his day. At the pres- 
ent time his decisions .are quoted as authority. He had two daughters : 
Ann, who married Robert AA'allace, and Mary Jane, who married Mr. 
Crossett, and died in Philadelphia. After the death of Judge Wilson's 
wife he married a widow with several children; these children took 
the name of Wilson, and on the death of Judge AA^ilson took many of 
his important papers, which are in the possession of their descendants 
at the present time. Children of Robert and Ann (Wilson) Wallace: 
Catherine, married William Shaver; and others. Children of W'illiam 
and Catherine (Wallace) Shaver: i. Mary Ann, deceased; married 
Luther Sidel, of Philadelphia. 2. Amanda, deceased ; married Jacob 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1029 

Covert, of Trenton, New Jersey. 3. Narcissa, married William T. 
Sheaffer. 4. Elsie J., married John S. Bayer, of Huntingdon, Penn- 
sylvania ; he was formerly a merchant, and is now in the planing mill 
business ; was register and recorder, also served as representative of his 
district two terms. 5. John B., died in infancy. 6. Robert, died in 
infancy. 7. Catherine, married Robert Heller; resides in Altoona, 
Pennsylvania. 8. William, died in infancy. 



William Henry Pennell, of Duncannon, Pennsylvania, 
PENNELL descends from straight Irish ancestry on the paternal 

side, the race that has done so much to develop the vast 
latent resources of this country. His father, Andrew Pennell, was 
born in Ireland, and upon coming to America first resided in Norris- 
town, Pennsylvania, in 1836, and he engaged in contracting for quar- 
rying stone. He married Margaret Horneth, born in Norristown, 
Pennsylvania, of German ancestry. After their marriage they moved 
to \Mieatfield township, Perry county, Pennsylvania, where he bought 
four hundred and fifty acres of land partially improved. He erected 
a new barn, remodelled the dwelling house and made other improve- 
ments. Later he built a new house and other barns, making it one of 
the model farms of that section of the state. He was a Republican, 
voting with and upholding the tenets of that party at all times. Both 
he and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
actively supported it. In 1858 he built a church for that demonination 
on a portion of his farm, donating church and land to the members 
of that creed in the community. This edifice is still standing and is 
known as the Pennell church, a monument to his religious zeal and his 
pious life. Children: i. John, a railway foreman: died in Harris- 
burg, Pennsylvania : he was a member of the Bucktail Regiment from 
Pennsylvania, which did such valuable service for the L^nion : he was 
wounded at Grangeville, was honorably discharged, but on recovery 
he reenlisted in the 21st Pennsylvania Cavalry, and served until the 
close of the civil war. 2. Robert, makes his home in Williamstown, 
Pennsylvania : he served three years in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry 
during the civil war. 3. George, a prominent citizen of Duncannon, 
Pennsvlvania : he enlisted in the 133d Pennsylvania Volunteer Infan- 
try at the outbreak of the civil war, and served out the time of his 



1030 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

enlistment; later he entered the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry Regiment; 
is now president of the Bank of Duncannon. 4. William Henry Pen- 
nell, of whom further. 5. Thomas, a farmer in Wheatfield township. 
6. Andrew, died in Newport, in 1910. 7. Hanson, an upholsterer in 
Newport, Pennsylvania. 8. Mary, unmarried; makes home with her 
brother James, on the Pennell homestead. 9. James, unmarried; lives 
on homestead. 

(II) William Henry, son of Andrew and Margaret (Horneth) 
Pennell, was born March 23, 1842, in Wheatfield township. Perry 
county, Pennsylvania. He attended the public schools of the town- 
ship and was reared on the Pennell homestead. He grew to man's 
estate in the quiet surroundings of the farm and home life, and was 
about to decide on following the occupation of his father when the 
war cloud of 1861 burst over the country. In 1861, at the age of 
nineteen, he enlisted in the 20th Pennsylvania Cavalry Regiment 
for six months' service, but served seven. On being discharged he re- 
enlisted in the 21st Regiment of Pennsylvania Cavalry and remained 
with it until the close of the war. He saw much active service, and 
was in the battles of Petersburg and Fort Hell, went through the 
bloody Wilderness campaign, and reached Gettysburg the day follow- 
ing the decisive battle which gave the field and victory to the Union 
troops. He was in about fifty engagements, great and small. At 
Petersburg he lived for days in a mine underground, and did notable 
service at that crucial time. After peace was declared he returned to 
Pennsylvania to take up again the broken threads of life. On look- 
ing around he decided on oil speculation, as that business was then 
claiming a large share of public attention, and went to the oil fields 
of Pennsylvania. Here he remained one year, and at the expiration of 
that time he went to Duncannon and opened a livery stable, combining 
with it a butcher's shop. Disposing of this dual business, he was 
offered and accepted the position of nail shipping clerk at Duncannon 
for the Steel Company. In 1870 or thereabouts he received the appoint- 
ment of postmaster at Duncannon, and retained the position for eight 
years. Owing to a change in party and administration at AVashington 
he resigned this position and engaged in selling farm machinerj^ In 
1897, after the inauguration of President McKinley, Mr. Pennell was 
a second time appointed postmaster, which post he holds at the present 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1031 

time (1913), and is the oldest postmaster in length of service in this 
part of the state. Since his first appointment as postmaster the office 
has been raised from the fourth to the third class, and there have been 
established four rural routes which are served from Duncannon. Over 
95,000 pieces of mail are handled monthly. He is a Republican, and 
at one time was tax assessor for the borough. Both he and his wife 
are members of the Presbyterian church. He is commander of Lieu- 
tenant \Villiam Allison Post, Grand Army of the Republic, and has 
been for the past fifteen years, and is a bright member of the Knights 
of Pythias. 

He married Jane Brown, born in Duncannon. Children: i. Sa- 
rah C, married H. A. Birmingham, and lives in Kansas City, Mis- 
souri; one son, Herbert. 2. William Henry Brown, assistant post- 
master; married Margaret Smith. 3. Maggie, died aged fourteen 
months. 



The records of Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, while 
HARMAN frequently mentioning the name Harman, give no 

clue to the ancestor of the family or when they came 
into the county. The first member of the family named is Jacob, an 
old resident of Belleville, where he plied the shoemaker's trade and 
where he and his wife died. He married and had issue: Isaac, Sam- 
uel: Lewis, of further mention; Jackson; Mary; Catherine and Eliza. 
(II) Lewis, son of Jacob Harman, was born in Mifflin county, 
Pennsylvania. January 24, 1826, died in Belleville, same county, De- 
cember 23, 1895. He was a farmer all his life, and with his wife be- 
longed to the Lutheran church, of which he was a deacon. Politically 
he was a Democrat, never holding public office. He married Mary 
Jane Gable, born in Brady township, Huntingdon county, Pennsyl- 
vania, January 30, 1828, died near Belleville, August 4, 1880, daughter 
of George, born in Lancaster county, March 14, 1796, died in Hunting- 
don county, November 3, 1833, a shoemaker, and Elizabeth (Weaver) 
Gable, born in Lancaster county, September 5, 1810, died at Allens- 
ville. May 9, 1877. George Gable was a member of old Mount Mo- 
riah Lodge, No. 178 (now No. 300), Free and Accepted Masons. 
Children of George and Elizalieth Gable: Mary Jane, of previous 
mention, married Lewis Harman; \\'illiam M. ; Catherine and Martha. 



1032 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Children of Lewis and Mary Jane Harman: i. Melissa E., married 
James Harman, deceased, and lives in Yeagerstown. 2. William M., 
a butcher of Harrisburg. 3. George G., of further mention. 4. Jacob 
E., postmaster at Yeagerstown. 5. Martha J., died in infancy. 6. 
Philip M., a farmer, died near Belleville, aged forty-seven years. 7. 
Martha Catherine, married Charles Yingling, and lives at McKeesport, 
Pennsylvania. 8. John Lewis, a contracting drayman of Pittsburgh. 
9. Mary J., died aged forty-three years; married Frank Haffly. 10. 
Isaac Thomas, a postman of Helena, Ohio. 

(Ill) Dr. George G. Harman, second son and third child of 
Lewis and Mary Jane (Gable) Harman, was born at the cross roads, 
about two miles below Belleville, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, May 16, 
1854. Deciding upon the medical profession as his walk in life, he 
entered Jefferson Medical College, of Philadelphia, after preparatory 
Study at Kishacoquillas Seminary, in Mifflin county, and Susquehanna 
College, at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania. Before entering the medical 
college he read medicine with Dr. M. F. Hudson. After receiving his 
degree of M. D. from Jefferson College with the class of 1880, he be- 
gan to practice at Allensville, where he continued for two years, mov- 
ing thence to Reedsville, remaining there five years. In 1887 he came 
to Huntingdon, where he has since remained, having built up a large 
practice among the best people of the city. He is a member of the 
County Medical Association, of which he is president; Pennsylvania 
State Medical Association, of which he has been vice-president, and a 
member of the judicial council of the state board of trustees and the 
American Medical Association, to whose annual congress he has sev- 
eral times been sent as representative from Pennsylvania. He is ex- 
aminer for a number of life insurance companies, and for three terms 
served as coroner of Huntingdon county. For five years he was assis- 
tant surgeon of the Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania National Guard, and 
belongs to the Military Surgeons' Association and the National Society 
of Aneesthetists. He also holds the responsible position of president 
of the medical and surgical stafif of the J. C. Blair Memorial Hospital, 
where he does much practical work, as well as exercising supervision 
of that of others, he being one of the most skilled anesthetists on the 
stafif. In politics he is a Republican; he has been president of the 
council for seven years; a member of the board of education, acting as 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1033 

secretary for tlic past four years; and by virtue of his office as coroner, 
became acting slierifY for one montli following the death of Sheriff 
Wilson. The only organization with which he is connected in a purely 
business relation is the Grange Trust Company, in which he is a direc- 
tor. He holds high rank in the Masonic fraternity, being a member 
of Lewistown Lodge, No. 203, Free and Accepted Masons; Standing 
Stone Chapter, No. 201, Royal Arch Masons, in which he is a past 
high priest; Huntingdon Commandery, No. 65, Knights Templar, in 
which he is past commander; and Jai¥a Temple, Ancient Arabic Or- 
der Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of Altoona. He also holds member- 
ship in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Both he and his wife 
are members of the Lutheran church, in which he has served for twenty 
years as elder and deacon. Dr. Harman's life, since he has been a 
resident of Huntingdon, has been one of ceaseless activity, embracing 
all phases of professional, fraternal and political existence, and in all 
he has won honors. 

Dr. Harman married, October 25, 1882, Eva M. Smucker, daugh- 
ter of Amos and Eliza1;)eth (Focht) Smucker, a native of Brady town- 
ship, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. Children: i. Earl S., city 
passenger agent of the Northern Pacific Railroad at Pittsburgh; mar- 
ried Ethel M. Chaney, and has a daughter, Helen. 2. Jay Lewis, nowr 
employed in an architect's office in Clifton, Arizona. 3. George Blair, 
a graduate of Huntingdon high school. 



The branch of the Fisher family of which this sketch 
FISHER treats has been resident in Huntingdon county, Pennsyl- 
vania, for a number of generations, and has been promi- 
nently identified with a variety of activities in that section of the 

country. 

(I) Isaac Fisher, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was 
well known as a stage driver in the early days of this county, 
driving the stage coach which plied between Huntingdon and Holli- 
davsburg until the construction of the Pennsylvania railroad put an 
end to this form of business. For some time he was busy as a canal 
man, then handled the mail for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company 
for a number of years. He married (first) Anna Lindsay, by whom 
he had three children: James, William Henry and Deranda. Name 



I034 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

of second wife not known. His third wife was Rhoda Africa, by 
whom was a child, Edmond. 

(II) William Henry, son of Isaac and Anna (Lindsay) Fisher, was 
born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, where he was educated in 
the public schools. At a suitable age he was apprenticed to learn the 
printer's trade, and while doing this he spent all of his spare time in 
acquiring learning of every nature, and worked on the Huntingdon 
Monitor, and so continued until the building of the Huntingdon & 
Broad Top Railroad, when he accepted a position as conductor in its 
service. A few years later he established himself in the restaurant 
business, with which he was connected until his retirement in 1890, a 
period of twenty-five years. His political affiliations were with the 
Republican party, for which he did excellent service, notably while he 
was still employed on the above-mentioned paper. He and his wife 
were both members of the Presbyterian church. He married Rebecca 
Long, who had sisters: Alice, married a Mr. Potter; and Sadie, mar- 
ried George Martin, and has one child, Frank, and a brother, Chris- 
tian Garber. Mr. and Mrs. Fisher had children : Harrv, engaged in 
business as a barber; Anna, married John Swivel, also a barber, and 
has one child, Charlie; George Weistling, see forward; Leberta, mar- 
ried William H. Lang, a painter, now deceased, and had two chil- 
dren, Lawrence Fisher and George Lewis Lang. 

(III) George Weistling, son of William Henry and Rebecca 
(Long) Fisher, was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, May 
16, 1871. He received a thorough and practical education in the public 
schools of his native township, and at a suitable age established him- 
self in business, dealing in newspapers and cigars, and also conducting 
a barber shop until 1890, in which year he purchased the restaurant 
managed for a quarter of a century by his father. The following 
year he rebuilt this, putting in all the most modern improvements in 
this line, and also operated a bakery whose daily output in bread was 
three thousand loaves. He employs now in all, for the restaurant and 
bakery combined, a force of ten men and five women, and his patron- 
age is widespread. Mr. Fisher takes pleasure in providing for the 
comfort and health of those in his employ, and the most sanitary ar- 
rangements are to be found in both places. He is activeh^ connected 
with a number of other important business enterprises, among them 





1/^/s^^^^^ 



THE 

D 1 1 P i 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1035 

being a director in the Grange Trust Company, director in the Juniata 
Street Railroad Company, and treasurer of the Huntingdon Hosiery 
Company. He has played an important part in the politics of the 
section, giving his support to the Independent Republicans, and has 
served six years as a member of the town council and three years as 
chief burgess. His fraternal affiliations are with the Knights, of Pyth- 
ias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Mr. Fisher is 
president of the Association of Master Bakers of Pennsylvania, 1912- 

1913- 

Mr. Fisher married, June 2, 1892, Gertrude, daughter of David and 

Elizabeth (Foust) Decker, the former a merchant of Mill Creek, Penn- 
sylvania. Children: Paul Russell, born April 7, 1894: and George 
Donald, born April 8, 1900. Both Mr. and IMrs. Fisher attend the Pres- 
byterian church. 



The first member of this branch of the Davis family of 
DAVIS whom there is record is William Davis, born in Blair 

county, Pennsylvania. He was left an orphan at an early 
age and was brought to Penn township, Huntingdon county, by his 
paternal aunt, Mrs. Jane Geissinger, who made the journey across the 
mountains on horseback to bring the child to her own home. He 
grew up at the Geissinger farm and at a suitable age learned the car- 
penter's trade, becoming an expert mechanic. After his marriage he 
located at Marklesburg, where he worked at his trade, later becoming 
a contractor, many buildings in that locality yet standing as mute wit- 
nesses of his industry and skill. After several years as a successful 
builder, his health failed, compelling a change of occupation. He pur- 
chased a farm in the neighborhood, spending the years 1870 to 1875 
thereon, then retired to a home in Huntingdon, where he died in 1876. 
He was a Democrat in politics, and both he and his wife were mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church. He married (first) Mary Grove, who 
died 1869. (second) Mary Moyer, wdio survives him. Children by 
first wife: John C, now living in Huntingdon, retired: George, died 
in Iowa: Henry H., of whom further; William, now a merchant of 
Mount Union, Pennsylvania ; Maurice, of W'aynesboro, Pennsylvania, 
employed in a farm implement manufactory: Susan, married James 
Coy, whom she survives, a resident of iNIill Creek, Pennsylvania: 



1036 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Annie, married George W. Rupert, and resides in Huntingdon. Chil- 
dren of second wife: Frank, a lumberman, resides near Huntingdon; 
Irvin, with J. C. Blair Company, resides in Huntingdon. 

i\Iary (Grove) Davis was a daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth 
(Beightel) Grove, both born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, where 
they married. Later they came to Huntingdon county, where Daniel 
purchased a farm of over two hundred acres in Woodcock Valley, near 
Grafton, on which they lived the remainder of their lives, quiet, indus- 
trious, prosperous Mennonites. Children: John and Jacob, died 
young; Isaac, died in Penn township, Huntingdon county, a farmer; 
David, the last survivor of eight children, now residing with his son 
Daniel on the old Grove homestead; Elizabeth, married Thomas 
Hamer, of McConnelstown ; Susan, married Abraham Johnson, a car- 
penter, and lived at Marklesburg, where she died ; Mary, of previous 
mention, first wife of William Davis ; Martha, died in ]\Iarklesburg, 
married George Brumbaugh, and was the mother of Dr. M. G. Brum- 
baugh, superintendent of the Philadelphia schools. 

(II) Henry H., son of William Davis and his first wife, Mary 
Grove, was born in Marklesburg, Pennsylvania, August 28, 1859. He 
was educated in the public schools of Penn township and at Juniata 
College, then for eight years was a teacher in the public schools. He 
then spent three years in the government railway mail service as clerk, 
running between New York and Pittsburgh. He then engaged in the 
lumber business near Grafton, Pennsylvania, then was a mercantile 
clerk until 1895, when he established and until 1909 successfully con- 
ducted a general store at Grafton. In that year he closed out his Graf- 
ton interests and located at No. 420 Washington street, Huntingdon, 
where he opened and now conducts a prosperous general store. Mr. 
Davis is a Democrat in politics, serving from 1906 until 1908 as county 
commissioner. Both he and his wife are members of the Reformed 
church. He is a capable business man, and interested in all that per- 
tains to the welfare of his community. 

He married Nannie, daughter of John and Catherine (Van De- 
vender) Householder, of Marklesburg, Pennsylvania. Children: May, 
now and for the past five years cashier for the firm of William Reed; 
Carrie, resides at home, a dressmaker; Charles, an employee of the 
W^estinghouse Electric Company, married Alice Kurtz, and resides in 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1037 

W'ilkinsburg, Pennsylvania; Grace, resides at home; Cora, resides in 
Wilkinsbnrg, with her brother Charles; Lena, resides at home, a high 
school student; Harry, a high school student; John. 



Dr. Howard Clinton Frontz, of Huntingdon, Pennsyl- 
FROX TZ \ania, descends from Swiss forbears, seated for several 

generations in Lycoming county, Pennsylvania. His 
father, George Clinton Frontz, was born in Lycoming county, Penn- 
sylvania, December 7, 1841, died there July 22, 1880. He spent the 
greater part of his business life in Hughesville, engaged as a merchant. 
He enlisted on August 14, 1862, as a private in Company H, 131st 
Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry ; was promoted corporal, 
January i, 1863, and mustered out with his company, May 23, 1863. 
He married Sarah Emma Kistner, born September 15, 1845, died July 
17, 1883. Children: Harry Kistner, a practicing dentist of Rollins- 
ville, Colorado: Cyrus Benjamin, a practicing dentist of Denver, Colo- 
rado ; Howard Clinton, M. D., see forward ; Chalmers Eugene, Lutheran 
minister at Tiffin, Ohio; Jacob Arthur, private secretary to president 
of the International Correspondence Schools, Scranton, Pennsylvania. 
Dr. Howard Clinton Frontz, third son of George Clinton and Sarali 
Emma ( Kistner ) Frontz, was born at Hughesville. Lycoming county, 
Pennsylvania, September 8, 1871. He obtained his early education in 
the public schools at Hughesville, Pennsylvania, and in 1887 entered the 
preparatory school of Pennsylvania College, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
remaining there and in the college until December, 1889. He then en- 
tered the employ of the Williamsport & North Branch Railroad Com- 
pany, continuing until 1S91. He then entered the medical department 
of the University of Pennsylvania, whence he was graduated M. D. in 
June, 1894. From July i until December 31. 1894, he was resident phy- 
sician at the City Hospital, Williamsport. Pennsylvania. From Janu- 
ary I. 1805, ""til April I, 1908, he was physician in charge at the Penn- 
sylvania Industrial Reformatory at Huntingdon. He then resigned and 
at once established in private medical and surgical practice in Hunting- 
don, where he is highly esteemed as an honorable, skilful physician. 
He is a member of the American Medical Association; the Medical So- 
ciety of the State of Pennsylvania and the Huntingdon County Medical 
Society, taking active interest in the work of each, keeping in close 



1038 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

touch with the latest thought and discovery in medicine, or surgery, 
through the medium of these societies and their pubUcations. He is a 
trustee and surgeon of the J. C. Blair Memorial Hospital; is surgeon 
for the Pennsylvania railroad, the Huntingdon & Broad Top Railroad ; 
the East Broad Top Railroad; also county medical inspector of Hunt- 
ingdon county, physician in charge of Tuberculosis Dispensary No. 47, 
Pennsylvania Department of Health, and medical examiner for several 
leading insurance companies. He is prominent in the Alasonic fra- 
ternity and holds past official honors in lodge, chapter and commandery. 
He is past master of Mount Moriah Lodge, No. 300, Free and Accepted 
Masons; past high priest of Standmgstone Chapter, No. 201, Royal 
Arch Masons; past eminent commander of Huntingdon Commandery, 
No. 65, Knights Templar; member of Mountain Council, No. 9, Royal 
and Select Masters, of Altoona; member of Harrisburg Consistory, 
thirty-second degree, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite ; member of Jaffa 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; and is 
district deputy grand master of the thirty-fourth district. Grand Lodge 
of Pennsylvania, Free and Accepted Masons. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican; in religious faith a Lutheran. 

Dr. Frontz married (first), in Hughesville, Pennsylvania, December 
5, 1895, Agnes Montgomery, who died March 16, 1900, daughter of 
Christian and Sarah (Zarr) Springer. He married (second), June 10, 
1903, Jessie Rachel, daughter of Timothy H. and Martha (Mills) 
Akers. Children of first marriage: Alice Louise, born May 2, 1898; 
Maurice Clinton, March 7, 1900; child of second marriage: Richard 
Akers, born November 21, 1906. 



Jacob Harshbarger, of Center county, Pennsyl- 
HARSHBARGER vania, descended from honorable German stock 

long planted in Pennsylvania. He was a farmer 
and cooper of considerable means, and was highly esteemed in the com- 
munity in which he lived. He married Hannah Palmer, daughter of 
Budd and Polly Palmer, natives of Berks count}', who early moved to 
Center county and settled at Spring Mills, and there died, he in 1842, 
and his wife in 1864. Their, children: Joseph, a cooper, died at Pot- 
ter's Bank, Pennsylvania ; Phoebe, died unmarried ; Catherine, died un- 
married; Hannah, married Jacob Harshbarger. Children of Jacob and 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1039 

Hannah (Palmer) Harshbarger: i. Abraham, died aged twenty years. 
2. Budd, a cooper and farmer, died in December, 1912, aged eighty- 
four, at Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. 3. David, a physician, died in 
Bradford county, Pennsylvania. 4. Sarah, married Nicholas Conroy, 
died at Manor Hill, Pennsylvania. 5. Mary, died in childhood. 6. 
William, of whom further. 

(II) William Harshbarger, son of Jacob and Hannah (Palmer) 
Harshbarger, was born April 24, 1838, in Center county, Pennsylvania. 
He received his education in the common schools of the county, and, on 
reaching manhood engaged in farming, which he continued for fifty 
consecutive years. He retired some time ago, and at the present time 
(1913) resides in Alexandria, Pennsylvania. At the call to arms in 
1861 he enlisted in Company I, 205th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 
and served one year. He was in the battles of Petersburg, Fort Sted- 
man and Wcldon Railroad. Both he and his wife are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and he is a strong Republican. He mar- 
ried, April 5, i860, Anna Matilda Claybaugh, born in Blair county, 
daughter of John and Nancy Claybaugh. Children: Sarah Jane; Nancy 
Rebecca; Mary; John \V., of whom further; William; David; Elsie; 
Emma, deceased. 

(III) John W. Harshbarger, son of William and Anna Matilda 
(Claybaugh) Harshbarger, was born December i, 1868, in West town- 
ship, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. After receiving his prepara- 
tory education in the public schools of the township he attended Juniata 
College from 1888 to 1889. Leaving school he engaged in teaching, 
and continued it for three years with unqualified success. In 1891 
he entered the firm of R. A. Miller & Son, remaining with them seven 
years. Wishing to enter the business world in his own behalf, he formed 
in 1907 a partnership with W. Emmert Swigart, in fire and general 
insurance and real estate. The firm has met with unbounded success, 
and stands high in the commercial and industrial world. ]\Ir. Harsh- 
barger is one of the most highly esteemed citizens of Huntingdon, Penn- 
sylvania, where he makes his home. He has established for himself a 
name for sobriety, honor, fair dealing. His word is as good as another 
man's bond. He is an ardent Republican, voting with and working for 
the party. He and his wife are members of the First Baptist Church of 
Huntingdon. 



I040 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

On April 5, 1892, he married IMary Elizabeth Harris, born January 
I, 1871, daughter of William and Catherine (Shires) Harris, he a tan- 
ner and a native of Franklin county, Pennsylvania. Children: i. 
Vanelado H., born May 26, 1893. 2. May, born December 12, 1894. 
3. Martha, born October i, 1900. 4. Catherine Ann, born April 13, 
1904. 



The Gerlock family, of Huntingdon county, is a com- 
GERLOCK paratively new one on this continent, since the iirst 

member to come to America did not emigrate until the 
time of the civil war. This was Frank Gerlock (2), who settled in 
Huntingdon, and there opened a blacksmith shop. He died in 1870. 
There were three brothers to come — Frank (i), Frank (2) and Conrad. 
It was a German custom to name two children by the same baptismal 
name. Frank Gerlock (2) married Elizabeth Stang, who emigrated 
from German}^ at about the same time her husband did, and died in 
1907. Children of Frank (2) and Elizabeth (Stang) Gerlock: i. 
Lewis, a machinist, died in Harrisburg. 2. Frank G., retired machinist, 
lives in Harrisburg. 3. Louisa, married Richard R. Lutz, and lives in 
Harrisburg. 4. Charles, died young. 5. Philip, died young. 6. An- 
drew, drowned when about nine years of age. 7. Edward, a machinist, 
died in Huntingdon, 1907. 8. Harry \\'illiam, of whom further. 

(II) Harry William, youngest child of Frank (2) and Elizabeth 
(Stang) Gerlock, was born in Huntingdon, Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania, July 18, 1869. He obtained his education in the public schools 
of his native city, and after leaving school learned the machinists' trade, 
which he followed for several j^ears. For several years he was an in- 
structor in the Pennsylvania Industrial Reformatory. In 1890, in part- 
nership with his brother Edward, he opened a foundry and machine 
shop, doing repair work as a specialty. In 1907, upon the death of his 
brother Edward, he purchased ground and erected a spacious shop 
which, although it has been enlarged and the finest machinery installed, 
is rapidly being outgrown, and plans have been submitted for a new 
foundry, larger and better equipped than the present. His product, in 
which he has specialized, is brick plant equipment, and he has acquired 
a continent-wide reputation for excellence of workmanship and for the 
high standard of machines shipped. He is an active member of Mount 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1041 

Moriah Lodge, No. 300, Free and Accepted Masons; also of Juniata 
Lodge, No. 117, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He and his wife 
are members of the Reformed church. 

He married, February 15, 1903, Lillian Pearl, daughter of John and 
Harriet Edelblute. Children of Harry W. and Lillian Pearl (Edel- 
blute) Gerlock: Joshua Richard and Harry William. 



The American ancestor of this branch of the Sellers 
SELLERS family was Jacob Sellers, born in Germany. On coming 

to America he settled on a farm in Cumberland, now 
Juniata county, Pennsylvania, and in 1763 moved to Sellers Mills, in 
that county. He married Barbara Pile, who bore him sons and daugh- 
ters, including a son Harrison. 

(II) Harrison, son of Jacob and Barbara (Pile) Sellers, was born in 
Juniata county, Pennsylvania, about the year 1800, and all his business 
life was identified with the iron industry in Reading, Pennsylvania. 
Both he and his wife were members of the Lutheran church. He mar- 
ried Mary Williams. Children: i. Lemon H., of whom further. 2. 
William, a railroad employee; married Molly Derrick. 3. Frederick, 
married, living in Coatesville, Pennsylvania. 4. Mary, married Samuel 
Riefine, a railroad employee of Duncannon. 5. Emma, married John 
Heller, of ]\Iarysville, Pennsylvania. 6. Esther, married Robert Ham- 
ilton, and lives in Duncannon, Pennsylvania. 

(III) Lemon H., eldest child of Harrison and Mary (Williams) Sel- 
lers, was born in Reading, Pennsylvania, May i, 1846. He obtained his 
education in the public schools, and all his life followed the calling of his 
father, that of an iron worker, first in Coveallen, until 1883, when he 
moved to ]\Iarysville, Pennsylvania. At the age of seventeen he enlisted 
in Company B, 205th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, serving for 
ten months. He is a member of the Evangelical church, while his wife 
belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican. He married (first) Rachel White, who died without issue. He 
married (second) Ellen Beaver, widow of Samuel Beaver, a blacksmith, 
and daughter of David Swartz, a farmer and land owner of Elliottsburg, 
Pennsylvania, where he died in 1885. Children of David Swartz: 
Jane ; Emma ; Catherine ; Ellen, of previous mention, married Lemon 
H. Sellers; Daniel, who went to war in the L'nion army. Children of 



I042 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Lemon H. and Ellen Sellers: i. Elmer J., of whom further. 2. Henry 
S., born December 24, 1871; married Elizabeth Nauss. 3. Charles B., 
born October 3, 1873; married Emma Dick. 4. Thomas LeRoy, born 
October 18, 1875, died August 2, 1877. 5. Harvey, born December 25, 
1877; married Catherine Wellhouse. 6. Bessie, born November 2, 1879; 
married Edward Brown. 7. Emma, born January 22, 1882 ; married 
Charles Williamson, a contractor of Yonkers, New York. 8. Mabel, 
born July 2, 1885. 9. Jennie, born December 2, 1887; married Joseph 
Beers, a plumber and electrician of Marysville, Pennsylvania. 10. Mary, 
died in infancy. 11. Nellie, born Alay 7, 1892. 

(IV) Elmer J., eldest child of Lemon H. and Ellen (Beaver) Sel- 
lers, was born in Duncannon, Perry county, Pennsylvania, February 14, 
1870. He obtained his early education in the public schools of Coveal- 
len and Marysville, and, as a young man, nineteen years of age, entered 
the railway mail service, in which he has since continued, on the New 
York and Pittsburgh route. He is a member of Lodge No. 458, Free 
and Accepted Masons, of Perry county, and the Modern Woodmen of 
America, of Marysville. In politics he is an Independent. He is a 
member of the Evangelical church, his wife belonging to the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

He married, June 15, 1899, Ada Garnett, daughter of John, a boat 
builder of Buffalo, Pennsylvania, and Susan (Jackson) Garnett. Child 
of Elmer J. and Ada (Garnett) Sellers: Jeanette Elma, born June 30, 
1901. 



The Sanderson family, of Huntingdon county, 
SANDERSON Pennsylvania, as the name would indicate, came to 

this country from Scotland. The earliest member 
of the family of whom we have record was drowned while still in mid- 
dle age, and his descendants are scattered all over the state. 

(II) John Sanderson died at New Bloorafield, Perry county, Penn- 
sylvania, November 23, 1875. Immediately after the untimely death of 
his father, John Sanderson was taken by Catherine Thuma, and lived 
there until he had attained young manhood. He was a half-brother of 
Samuel S. Saul, who went to Illinois and later to Oakland, California. 
He was apprenticed to learn the trade of plastering, with which he was 
occupied until a few years prior to his death, when he was engaged in 




-^j^^j. J^r. jS^t^L. c^Cc^^^ 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1043 

fanning, having become the owner of a farm in Center township, Perry 
county, Pennsylvania. He was a Republican in his political opinions, 
and he anil his wife were members of the Lutheran church. lie mar- 
ried Sarah Rice, daughter of Samuel and l-^lizabeth ( Shull ) Rice, and 
granddaughter of Conrad Rice. Samuel Rice was born in Saville town- 
ship, where he was occupied as a millwright until his death. They had 
children : 

Samuel H., who went to Nebraska, where he was a farmer and 
never married; Josiah W., a school teacher and farmer; Conrad S., 
married Sarah Hartman ; Sarah, mentioned above ; Catherine ; Mary, 
married (first) John Robinson, (second) Isaiah Corl; Fannie, married 
Washington Hench, a farmer in Perry county; Phoebe, married John 
Peck, a blacksmith of Perry county; Elizabeth, married Samuel Orris, a 
farmer of Saville township; Elinor, married James jMeminger, a 
farmer of Saville township; Susan, married Joseph Kell, a farmer in 
Saville township. John and Sarah (Rice) Sanderson had children: 
George \\' ashington, see forward ; Samuel K., deceased, was a weigh- 
master at Saxton, and married Lizzie Clemson; Theodore C, deceased, 
was a trainmaster, and married Jennie Fickes, also deceased ; Catherine 
S., married (first) John Eberly, (second) John Heston, both deceased; 
Mary, deceased, married Thomas Sutch, a printer; Elmer, married 
(first) Lillian Raine, (second) Maud Crum, and is a merchant at Sax- 
ton; a child, which died in infancy; John M., married (first) Fannie 
Hazzard, (second) Alice Yohn, was a railroad engineer and a farmer. 
All of these children, except one, taught school for several terms. 

(Ill) George Washington, son of John and Sarah (Rice) Sander- 
son, was born in Saville township. Perry county, Pennsylvania. October 
31, 1844. He was educated in the public schools of Ickesburg, and later 
was a student at the Bloomfield Academy, which was under the super- 
vision of Professor Stephens. He also attended a higher school in 
Huntingdon county, and was then engaged in teaching for a period of 
ten years, after which he established himself in the mercantile business, 
with which he has been identified since that time. He is also connected 
with several other business enterprises, and has been a director of the 
Standing Stone National Bank since the organization of that institution. 
He and his wife are members of the Lutheran church. His political 
af^liations are with the Republican party, and he has held the office of 



I044 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

school director for many years. He is a member of Huntingdon Lodge, 
No. 976, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Mr. Sanderson married, April 19, 1884, Harriet E., a daughter of 
George Ashman and Hannah (Garretson) Miller, residents of Hunting- 
don, where he was a furniture dealer. He also served as county treas- 
urer and postmaster of Huntingdon. Children: i. Georgiana, 'married 
Cloyd A. Shuss, and has daughters : Virginia Elliott and Harriet Eli- 
nor. 2. Harriet, was graduated from Dickinson College in 1910, and 
was a teacher of German in the high school in Huntingdon; married 
J. C. Poffenberger, a civil engineer, of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 



The Mierleys, of Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
MIERLEY are of German descent. In this branch the first record 

obtainable is of John Mierley, born in Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania. He was a man of good education, and spent his 
adult life engaged in teaching, alternating his profession with the opera- 
tion of his farm. He was a one-time commissioner of the county; a 
member of the Baptist church and highly respected in his community. 

uTune Srii>-i- He married (first) . Children: Bruce, died in boyhood; Solomon, 

deceased; George, of whom further; Barton, deceased. Pie married 
Xfl-Htha (second) Sai»afitfear Clarkson. Children: Joanna, married William 
Miller; Calvin, a farmer; Benjamin, deceased; 'Dr. Monroe, now a 
practicing physician in Montana; Laura, now residing in Huntingdon 
county. 

(II) George, son of John Mierley and his first wife, was born 
in Huntingdon county. He was educated in the public and nor- 
mal schools of the county, and for fourteen years was a teacher in 
the public schools, tie then purchased a farm of one hundred and 
fifty acres, in Wayne township, Mifflin county, where he successfully 
conducted farming and stock-dealing operations. Recently, however, he 
rented his farm to a fruit-growing company, and, except for occasion- 
ally dealing in real estate, is now retired from business. He is a Demo- 
crat in politics, and served in Wa3'ne township as assessor. He and his 
wife are both members of the Church of The Brethren. He married, 
in 1876, Nancy Lane, daughter of James R. Lane, a farmer, minister 
and ordained elder of the Church of The Brethren, in Huntingdon 
county. His wife, a Miss Myers, bore him: Sarah, married B. F. Gar- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1045 

ber; Nellie, died in infancy; Anna, married (first) Daniel Bechtel, (sec- 
ond) Benjamin Grove; Nancy, married George Mierley; Virginia, mar- 
ried Theodore Hollenberger ; Dr. Samuel, deceased; Frank, now living 
in Wisconsin; Alice, deceased, married John Kiner; James G., now a 
dentist of Philadelphia, married Mary E. Bartholomew. Children of 
George and Nancy Mierley : i. Clyde Vernon, of whom further. 2. 
Beulah, born in iS8£| a graduate nurse, now connected in her profes- 
sional capacity with the Spence (or Spencer) school in New York City. 
(Ill) Dr. Clyde Vernon Mierley, only son of George and Nancy 
(Lane) Mierley, was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, Janu- 
ary 17, 1878. He obtained his preparatory education in the public 
schools, then entered Juniata College, finishing a three years' course. 
In 1898 he entered the dental department of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, whence he was graduated D. D. S., class of 1901. He at once 
began the practice of his profession in Huntingdon, where he is well 
established in public favor. He keeps in close touch with all recent 
advance or discovery in care or treatment of the teeth by post-graduate 
courses at the university and through his memberships in the societies 
of his profession. He is a member of the Pennsylvania State Dental 
Society, the Central Pennsylvania Dental Society (of which he is an 
ex-president), and the Edward C. Kirk Dental Society, in which he 
served on the board of censors. He is an active, interested member 
of these societies, and has contributed timely articles to their literature. 
He is fraternally connected with the leading orders of his city, be- 
longing to Mount Moriah Lodge, No. 300, Free and Accepted Masons ; 
Standing Stone Chapter, No. 201, Royal Arch Masons; Huntingdon 
Commandery, No. 65, Knights Templar; Jaffa Temple, Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine (Altoona) ; is past chancellor of Blue Cross Lodge, No. 
295, Knights of Pythias; captain of the Uniform Rank, Knights of 
Pythias, and has served as district deputy grand chancellor. In reli- 
gious faith he is a Presbyterian. He married, in 1902, Florence E., 
daughter of John Kersey, deceased ; one child, James Kersey. 



The \\'ible family, of Pennsylvania, is now in the fifth 
WIBLE generation in this country, and the original settlement was 
made in the state of Maryland. David Wible, the Ameri- 
can progenitor of this family, was born in Germany, from whence he 



1046 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

emigrated to America. He purchased a considerable tract of land in 
Maryland, where he led an active and useful life. 

(II) John, son of David Wible, was born in Maryland, in which 
state his death also occurred. He and his brother, David Jr., took up 
a tract of land, consisting of about three hundred acres, and engaged 
in farming on an extensive scale. Their home was in Springfield town- 
ship, and both were members of the Lutheran church. In their earlier 
years they were strong supporters of the Whig party in politics, but 
upon the formation of the Republican party they joined its ranks. John 
Wible married Susan Glunt, and had children: William, was a farmer, 
and his entire life was spent on the homestead farm ; Jacob H., was a 
farmer in Springfield township; Mary, married Jonathan Anderson and 
lived in Tyrone; Martha Ann, married Everett Brown, a farmer of 
Springfield township; David, died at an early age; John G., see for- 
ward. 

(III) John G., son of John and Susan (Glunt) Wible, was born 
July 3, 1839, in Springfield township, Huntingdon county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and died in Three Springs, Pennsylvania, December 11, 1909. 
He followed the occupation of farming all of his life, and was the 
owner of a farm of one hundred acres in Springfield township. His 
religious afiiliations were with the Baptist church, and he gave his en- 
tire support to the Republican party. His activity was not unrewarded, 
and he held a number of township offices many years. Mr. Wible 
married Evaline, born August 28, 1842 (now living with some of her 
children at Three Springs, Huntingdon county), daughter of Richard 
and Elizabeth (Betsey) (Locke) Madden, the former born in Clay 
township, Huntingdon county, a son of James Madden, whose grand- 
father came to this country from Ireland and acquired a farm of sev- 
eral hundred acres in extent in Cla}' township. Richard Madden was a 
farmer, an ardent supporter of first the Whig and later of the Demo- 
cratic party, and filled a number of local offices. They were of the 
Baptist faith. Their children were: Jehu, a farmer and merchant in 
Three Springs, married Jane Starr; Jane, deceased, married Jacob 
Park, also deceased, who was a farmer and land owner; Charlotte, 
married Daniel Swartz, a farmer of Three Springs; Margaret, married 
Benjamin ]Morris, deceased, an Englishman, who was a printer in Phila- 
delphia ; Enoch, engaged in the meat business in Mount Union, married 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1047 

Mary Book; Evalinc, mentioned above; Amelia, married John Mat- 
thews, engaged in the provision business in Altoona, Pennsylvania; 
Richard Jr., deceased, was a farmer in Fulton county, Pennsylvania, 
married Nancy Miller; Wealthy, deceased, married B. T. Rinker, who 
is in the meat business in Mount Union, Pennsylvania; Anion, died in 
service during the civil war. John G. and Evaline (Madden) Wible 
had children: Allison A., see forward; Edward, living on a farm in 
Springfield township, married Melissa Brown ; Ella, died at the age of 
three years; John Wesley, died at the age of thirteen years; Frank, 
formerly a school teacher, now engaged in farming, married Luetta 
Kirkpatrick : Scott, unmarried, was at one time a school teacher and is 
now a farmer: Charles, is a farmer on the old homestead, and married 
Rosa Fleck : Jesse, is a clerk in the store of B. F. Goddard, in ]\Iaple- 
ton, married Nellie Heeter; Lillian F., unmarried. 

(IV) Allison A., son of John G. and Evaline (Madden) Wible, 
was born in Springfield township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
August 22, 1863. His education was acquired in the public schools of 
his section of the country and at the select school at Orbisonia, Hunt- 
ingdon county. He supplemented this by close observation and dili- 
gent study at his own home, and later taught school for a period of 
fourteen years, while he spent all his spare time during his years of 
study in assisting in the cultivation of the home farm. He next went 
west to California, where he was in the employ of the West Coast 
Lumber Company, and returned to the east in 1888. For a time he 
was employed in the city of Pittsburgh, where he worked for the West- 
inghouse IManufacturing Company for one year, then returned to Hunt- 
ingdon county, where he was engaged in the lumber business for a 
period of five years, and since that time has filled the office of com- 
mission clerk in the court house. He owns a farm of thirty-four acres 
in Three Springs borough, and he and his wife are of the Baptist faith. 
His political affiliations are with the Washington party, and he is a 
member of Court No. 512, Patriotic Order of Sons of America, of 
Three Springs. 

Mr. Wible married (first), July 20, 1884, Ada B., who died Octo- 
ber 18, 1902, a daughter of Abraham and Rebecca J. (Stevens) Corbin, 
the former at one time a school teacher and later a farmer, and is now 
deceased. Mr. Wible married (second), April 7, 1906, Cora May, 



I048 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

born in Middlesex county, New Jersey, a daughter of Alexander and 
Sadie (Ashley) Randolph, the former a farmer and speculator. Chil- 
dren by the first marriage: i. Idessa Beatrice, born July 27, 1885; 
married Ray VV. Gutshall, a clerk for the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany at Mount Union ; they have four children : Melvin Wayne, Clar- 
ence Dean, James Norman and Sylvia May. 2. Leona Maud, born De- 
cember II, 1887, died June 25, 1888. 3. John Lloyd, born May 10, 
1889. 4. Lester Lowell, born September 5, 1893, died at the age of 
eleven years. 5. Forest Bryant, born August 14, 1895, now lives in 
Iowa. 



There are many branches of the Gibson family scattered 
GIBSON throughout the United .States, some of them coming 
from England and some from Ireland. This particular 
branch had its origin in Ireland. 

(I) Abraham Gibson, of Irish descent, was born in Blair county, 
Pennsylvania, in the year 1827, and the greater part of his life was 
spent in Altoona, Pennsylvania. He was a mechanical engineer and 
was in the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company for a period 
of twenty years. He and his wife were members of the Presbyterian 
church. He married Sarah Hamor, born in 1839, died February 2, 
1874, and they had children: Orlando, see forward; Harry, who lives 
in Altoona, Pennsylvania, is a carpenter in the employ of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Company; George, who was a boiler maker by trade, 
was killed in Sacramento, California; Mary, married Charles C. Allen, 
of Huntingdon, and now lives in Philadelphia ; Orphia, married George 
Shoemaker, and lives in Sacramento, California; Elizabeth, married 
Harry Clark, also of Sacramento. 

(II) Orlando, son of Abraham and Sarah (Hamor) Gibson, was 
born in Duncansville, Blair county, Pennsylvania, July 18, 1852. He 
was educated in the public schools of Altoona, Pennsylvania, and at a 
very early age entered the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany, with which he has been connected in various capacities since that 
time. He was placed in charge of the locomotive boiler washing de- 
partment November i, 1867, and on June 12, 1868, he commenced 
learning the special work of a machinist in the machine shop. From 
this department he was transferred to the Altoona yards and became a 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1049 

fireman there, June i, 1869. Faitlifnl attention to all the details of his 
work has always heen one of his characteristies, and in January, 1870, 
he drew the premium offered to liremen for economy in the use of the 
company's stores and fuel while discharging their duties. After the 
erection of the new car shops at Altoona, Mr. Gibson was placed in 
charge of the steam heat department, January 4, 1870. On April 2 of 
the same year he was sent on the road as a fireman, and held this posi- 
tion until September i, 1872, when he was advanced to the post of 
engineer, served until August i, 1887, when he was appointed foreman 
of the car department and master mechanic of the machinery depart- 
ment of the shops at Huntingdon. In 1906 he was transferred to the 
shops at Hollidaysburg, and is now (1913) in charge of the air-brake 
department. In many directions Mr. Gibson has made his influence felt 
in a beneficial manner. He is the inventor and patentee of the Africa 
& Gibson car replacer, now used by the Pennsylvania railroad system, 
and also has a patent on a mechanical device known as a train con- 
troller. He was one of the organizers of the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Department of the Young Men's Christian Association in Huntingdon, 
and was president of this branch for one year. He was also the or- 
ganizer of the Veteran Employees' Association, Middle Division, Penn- 
sylvania Railroad, and filled the ofiice of vice-president for some time. 
He is a past chief of Standing Stone Castle, No. 176, Knights of the 
Golden Eagle, and of Juniata Commandery, No. 66, of the same order. 
In his political views Mr. Gib$on entertains independent opinions, and 
he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

j\Ir. Gibson married, in Altoona, July 18, 1872, Annie C, born in 
New Bloomfield, Perry county, Pennsylvania, July 8, 1854, a daughter 
of Joseph and Charity Marshall, and a sister of Helen Marshall, who 
married Calvin Etter, a merchant of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Mrs. 
Gibson is a member of the Presbyterian church. Children: i. Harriet 
Flora Belle, born August 13, 1873, c''^^ May 13. 1912; married John 
Kaylor, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, now deceased; one son: John, 
born in 1900. 2. William Albert, see forward. 3. Blanche C, born 
February 10, 1877; married Ernest M. Newell, who died October 26, 
1912: children: Dorothy and Ernest. 4. James Marshall, a machinist 
at Altoona, born October 24, 1879: married Pearl Weaver; children: 
Donald and Anna. 5. Mary M., born February 16, 1883; married 



1050 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Jerry Foster, manager and proprietor of a restaurant. 6. Oliver Eld- 
win, born June 25, 1889; is a machinist at Altoona; married Myra 
Fluke. 

(HI) William Albert, second child and eldest son of Orlando and 
Annie C. (Marshall) Gibson, was born in Altoona, Pennsylvania, De- 
cember 24, 1874. He lived in Altoona until he was nearly thirteen 
years of age, when the family moved to Huntingdon. He acquired a 
good practical education in the public schools of Huntingdon, and, at 
the age of fifteen years, became a fireman in the employ of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad Company. Two years later, 1901, he was advanced 
to the position of engineer, in which responsible office he is actively en- 
gaged at the present time. He has been commended for the faithful 
manner in which he has discharged the duties which fall to his share, 
and there is every reason to believe that still further advancement is in 
store for him. He is a member of Lakemont Division, No. 730, Broth- 
erhood of Locomotive Engineers, and also of Standing Stone Con- 
clave, No. 134, Improved Order of Heptasophs, of Huntingdon, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Mr. Gibson married, June 14, 1899, Etta C. Hertzler, a daughter of 
Daniel and Mary Hertzler, of Huntingdon. Mr. Hertzler is a mail 
carrier at Huntingdon, and was in service during the civil war; he 
enlisted in 1865 in Company E, loist Regiment Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers, and served until the close of the war. Mrs. Gibson has one sister, 
Mrs. Lloyd T. McClellan, of Huntingdon. Mr. and Mrs. Gibson have 
had children: Floretta Hertzler, born July 4, 1900, attends school; an 
infant daughter, born September 24, 1902, died September 26, 1902; 
William Albert Jr., born October 17, 1904, also attends school. 



The Starr family, of Penns3dvania, was largely if not 
STARR wholly descended from James Starr, the immigrant men- 
tioned below. The New England family is descended 
from Dr. Comfort Starr, who was born at Ashford, county Kent, Eng- 
land, where he practiced his profession before coming to xA-merica in 
March, 1634, in the ship "Hercules." He had brothers, Jehosophat and 
Joyful Starr, a sister Suretrust and sister Constant, both of whom 
married and came to Charlestown, Massachusetts. Comfort Starr set- 
tled at Cambridge, Massachusetts, removed to Duxbury, returned to 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 105 1 

Boston, near the Charlestown ferry. His descendants were especially 
numerous and prominent in Connecticut. 

(I) James Starr, the immigrant ancestor, was born, according to 
records of the Friends, December 28, 1676, son of John and Mary 
Starr, of Coot Hill, province of Ulster, Ireland. Another record gives 
the birthplace of John Starr, presumably John, son of James, as county 
Cavan, Ireland. James Starr married, August 22, 1705, Rachel Lay- 
bourne, who was born in October, 1686, daughter of Joseph Laybourne, 
of Blake Hadley, county Durham, England, and his wife Rachel, now 
of Ardnahue, county Carlow, Ireland. James Starr was a farmer in 
county Cavan. He came in 1712 and settled in New Garden township. 
He was a Quaker. In 17 14 he was clerk of the Newark monthly meet- 
ing, and overseer of the New Garden meeting. L'pon the establish- 
ment of the latter as a monthly meeting, he served as clerk from 1718 
to 1726. and was elder in 1727. In 1731 with his family he removed 
to Charlestown township, the present site of Phoenixville, Pennsylvania. 
Children : Joseph, mentioned below ; John, had son Jeremiah, born 
1725, married Hannah Sharpless, born 1726-7 (p. 188, Sharpless Gene- 
alogy) ; James. Rachel, Moses, Samuel, Susanna. 

(II) Joseph, son of James Starr, was born in county Cavan, Ire- 
land, December 19, 17 10, and came with his father to Pennsylvania. 
He married. May 16, 1739, at Goshen meeting, Rebecca Lewis, daugh- 
ter of Griffith Lewis, of Whiteland. and wife Mary. They lived in 
Charlestown. Children : Joseph, Samuel : James, mentioned below ; 
Isaac, married Elizabeth Longstreth, daughter of Bartholomew and 
Ann. 

(III) James (2), son of Joseph Starr, was born June 28, 1744. at 
Charlestown. Pennsylvania, and died at Middletown, in that state, May 
20, 1812. He married Sarah Minshall, daughter of Sarah (Smedley), 
Thomas (2). George Smedley (i). Children: Ann, born January 18, 
1770; Aquilla. July 29. 1771, lived at Chester; Sarah, October 16, 1772; 
James, August 21. 1774: Joseph, August 21, 1774, twin; Rebecca, 
March i, 1776; Beulah, September 11, 1778; Mary, August 13, 1780; 
John Minshall, November 30, 1783. 

(IV) The names of all the heads of families in Pennsylvania, ac- 
cording to the first federal census, taken in 1790. included those men- 
tioned above, and doubtless all are descendants of James Starr (i). 



1052 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

The}^ are: George, John (2), Martin, Ann, Arthur, Christopher, Con- 
rad, Ehjah, George, Henry, Isaac, Jacob (2), James (4), Jeremiah, 
John (10), Joseph, Moses (2) and Thomas Starr (2). Moses was 
then hving in Northumberland county. He was doubtless son of Moses, 
grandson of James (i). 

(V) The grandfather of John McCuUoch Starr, descendant of 

James, through his son Moses, married Nancy . Among their 

children were Amos, James, Moses, Richard and others. 

(VI) Amos Starr was born May 5, 1819. He married Nancy 
Ellen, daughter of James and Nancy (Brown) Hight. Her parents 
were also early settlers in Henderson township, Huntingdon county. 
Her father was a farmer and owned large tracts of land. He farmed 
in what is now West Huntingdon. He was a soldier in the Mexican 
war. Both parents were members of the Baptist church. Mrs. Starr is 
their only surviving child. She is now (1913) eighty-four years old. 
Mr. Starr was a butcher, residing in Huntingdon during most of his 
active life. In politics he was a Republican, and both he and his wife 
were devoted members of the Baptist church. Children: i. Ada E., 
born July 29, 1859, resides at Wabash, Indiana; married Alexander 
Mills. 2. John McCulloch, mentioned below. 3. Ella, born February 
14, 1863, lives at Tyrone, Pennsylvania; married Moses Hamer. 4. 
Asahel James, born December 18, 1865, a butcher by trade, now re- 
tired, living at Huntingdon. 

(VII) John McCulloch Starr, son of Amos and Nancy Ellen 
(Hight) Starr, was born January 18, 1861. 



The name of Kenyon is of English origin, and has 
KEN YON been familiarly known in the state of Pennsylvania for 

a number of generations. The members of this family 
have always been earnest in showing their patriotism and devotion to 
their country, and when war demanded the sacrifice of even life itself 
they were always among the foremost to offer themselves. James Oli- 
ver Kenyon, of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, represents the family in 
that section at the present time. 

(I) James Kenyon, grandfather of James Oliver Kenyon, is the 
first of whom we have detailed information. He was born and raised 
in Big Valley, and died at the age of fifty-six years, in Huntingdon 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1053 

county, Penns3'lvania, where his entire life had been spent. He was 
a shoemaker by trade. He married Mary Hall and had children: i. 
Alfred, a farmer by occupation, who took an active part during the 
civil war as a member of a cavalry regiment; he was also active in the 
public affairs of his section, and served one term as county treasurer. 
2. Delilah, married \\'illiam Eckley. 3. Harriet, married Samuel Steel. 
4. Matthew, see forward. 5. John, died in early manhood. 6. Amanda, 
deceased. 

(II) Matthew, son of James and Mary (Hall) Kenyon, spent all 
his life, with the exception of the years of the civil war, in Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania. He was educated in the public schools of the 
district, and devoted himself to a life of farming. He enlisted as a 
private in Company C (afterward transferred to Company B), 49th 
Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. His actual participation in 
the conflict was from the time of his enlistment, August 25, 1S61, until 
his honorable discharge, September 10, 1864, and during this period he 
was in thirteen battles, among these being Yorktown, Williamsburg, 
White Oak Swamp, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Antie- 
tam, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, and others, and also a 
number of skirmishes. Upon his return from the war he resumed the 
peaceful avocation of farming, and was also prominent in the public 
afifairs of the community and held a number of local offices. Both he 
and his wife were members of the Lutheran church. He married Susie 
Hetrick and had eight children. She is the daughter of Michael and 
Susan (Acker) Hetrick, of Blair county, Pennsylvania, whose other 
children were: John, a farmer; Michael, a farmer and carpenter; 
Jacob, a carpenter and farmer ; Mary, married David Clapper ; Sarah, 
deceased ; Eliza, deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Kenyon have had children : 
James Oliver, see forward; Florence, born in 1868, married Harry 
Jackson, a farmer; a child, died in infancy; Harriet, born in 1874, mar- 
ried William Overnour, a farmer; Alfred, born in 1876, is a plumber 
in the employ of his brother; John Sidney, born in 1878, is in the em- 
ploy of the J. C. Blair Company, in Huntingdon: Samuel, born in 1882, 
is a brakeman on the Pennsylvania railroad. 

(III) James Oliver, eldest child of Matthew and Susie (Hetrick) 
Kenyon, was born in Henderson township, Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania, June 8, 1866. He was educated in the public schools of the 



1054 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

township, spending his leisure hours in assisting his father in the cul- 
tivation of the farm, and devoting his entire time to this occupation 
until he had attained his majority. He then removed to Huntingdon, 
where he entered the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. 
Upon leaving them he was with the Steel Car Company for about one 
year, and then for a time supervised the heating and plumbing depart- 
ments of the Huntingdon Tile Works. His next position was with 
William McPeak, of Hickory, Pennsylvania, a contractor and carpenter, 
and when he left his employ Mr. Kenyon returned to Huntingdon and 
resumed his occupation of plumbing. He established himself in busi- 
ness independently in 1896, and has been successfully identified with this 
since that time. He is a member of the Baptist church, while his wife 
gives her religious allegiance to the Methodist Episcopal church. He 
is a member of Court No. 321, Patriotic Order of Sons of iVmerica; 
Modern Woodmen of the World; also of Camp No. 79, Sons of Vet- 
erans. 

Mr. Kenyon married, February 25, 1892, Matilda, daughter of 
Joshua and Rebecca (James) Bard, the former a stone mason. They 
have had children: Cecil, born October 2, 1892, is in the employ of 
his father; Edna, born August i, 1894, was graduated from the high 
school, and is now at home; Alfretta, born March 14, 1896, is a student 
at the high school; Luther, born May 26, 1899, attends school; Martha, 
born January 28, 1901, is at school; Helen, born August 12, 1902, at- 
tends school; Alice, born [March 11, 1907, is also at school. 



Originally residents of North Carolina and Georgia, this 
ELLIS branch of the Ellis family of the L'nited States settled in 
the state of Indiana, from whence they came to Hunting- 
don, Pennsylvania. The earliest member of the family was John Ellis, 
a farmer of South Carolina, and also of the states of Georgia and 
North Carolina. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Both he and his wife Lucinda died in the South. Children : \A^illiam 
Curtis, of whom further; John, a farmer; Lucinda, deceased; Hamil- 
ton, now a farmer of the state of Nevada; Joseph, now a farmer in 
Texas; Franklin, a soldier in the war between the states; Lovic P., a 
farmer and merchant of the state of Georgia; Willis M., also a farmer 
and merchant of Georgia. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1055 

(II) William Curtis, son of John and Lucinda l^llis, was born in 
Georgia, October i, 1835. He obtained a good common school educa- 
tion in his. native state, and for several terms taught in the Georgia 
schools. He then learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed sev- 
eral years. Abandoning his trade, he began the study of medicine 
under Dr. Lowry, and after obtaining the required proficiency engaged 
in the manufacture of medicine several years in the state of Indiana. 
Later he moved to Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, where he opened a store 
for the sale of drugs, medicines of his own compounding, and notions. 
He is a successful business man, stands well in his community, and both 
he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Dur- 
ing the civil war he served for eighteen months in Company C, 40th 
Regiment Georgia Infantry. 

He married Serepta S. Rucker, born January 27, 1834. Children: 
I. William Virdes, of whom further. 2. James, was last heard from in 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 3. Mary, married Elmer Hemphill, of Huntingdon, 
Pennsylvania. 4. Arabella, died in childhood. 5. John, deceased. 6. 
Homer, deceased. 

(III) William Virdes, son of William Curtis and Serepta S. (Ruck- 
er) Ellis, was born in Switzerland county, Indiana, May 29, 1866. He 
was educated in the public schools, then for a few years worked at car- 
pentering with his father, and at other employments. In 1890 he moved 
to Huntingdon, where he entered the employ of the J. C. Blair Com- 
pany, first as general workman, soon, however, winning promotion to 
a foremanship of the receiving department. He is a Republican in 
politics, and is affiliated with Huntingdon Camp, No. 321, Patriotic 
Order of Sons of America, and his wife is a member of the Lutheran 
church. 

For twelve years Mr. Ellis was a member of the Pennsylvania Na- 
tional Guard, in which he was enrolled June 29, 1891, first as a private, 
then as sergeant, was soon promoted to second lieutenant, and later 
resigned. He enlisted in the national army service during the Spanish- 
American war: was mustered into service May 11, 1898, and was mus- 
tered out with his regiment, November 7, of the same year, and holds 
an honorable discharge. 

He married, in November, 1907. Mintie, daughter of Michael and 
Nancy Shultz, of Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. 



J 056 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

John Woolf Jordan, LL.D., eldest son of Francis and 
JORDAN Emily (Woolf) Jordan, was born in Philadelphia, Sep- 
tember 14, 1840. He received his education in private 
schools of that city, and graduated from Nazareth Hall in 1856. Lafa- 
yette College conferred upon him the degree of LL.D. in 1902. He is 
librarian of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania; editor of the Penn- 
sylvania Magazine of History and Biography ; president of the Penn- 
sylvania Federation of Historical Societies; vice-president of the 
Colonial Society of Pennsylvania; registrar of the Pennsylvania Soci- 
ety Sons of the Revolution; vice-president of the Swedish Colonial 
Society; honorary member of Pennsylvania Society of the Cincinnati; 
and connected with many learned societies. He is also a commissioner 
of Valley Forge Park; a commissioner for the preservation of the pub- 
lic records of Pennsylvania, etc. During the "Emergency" of 1863 he 
served in Starrs' Battery, attached to the 32d Regiment Pennsylvania 
Militia. 

Dr. Jordan's contributions to local and general history are numer- 
ous. He edited "Extracts from the Diary of Jacob Hiltzheimer, of 
Philadelphia, 1765-98," and among his other contributions are, "A Red 
Rose from the Olden Time, 1752-72," "Friedensthal and its Stockaded 
Mill," "Narrative of John Heckwelder's Journey to the Wabash in 
1792," "John Heckwelder's Notes of Travel to Ohio, 1797," "Bishop 
A. G. Spangenberg's Journey to Onondaga in 1747," "Military Hospi- 
tals at Bethlehem and Lititz During the Revolution," "Revolutionary 
History of Bethlehem, 1775-83," "Franklin as a Genealogist," etc. 

Dr. Jordan was twice married, and has three sons and one daughter. 



The Hoover family, of Huntingdon county, Pennsyl- 
HOOVER vania, has been resident in that state for a number of 

generations, and they have as a general thing been 
engaged in agricultural occupations. They came to this country from 
Germany. 

(I) Ludwig Hoover, the first of whom we have recorded infor- 
mation, owned an extensive piece of property in Huntingdon county, 
and cultivated this in a model manner. He and his wife were mem- 
bers of the German Reformed church. They had children: Jacob G., 
also a farmer of Huntingdon county; Benjamin, see forward; Cath- 







-zr-zr-zrt^^-?^ 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1057 

erine, married Washington Norris; Elizabeth, married AUiston Norris, 
a farmer. 

(II) Benjamin, son of Ludwig Hoover, died in 1893. He was 
successfully engaged in cultivating the homestead farm, during the 
greater part of his life. This farm consisted of two hundred and 
fifty acres of land, a good part of which was planted in fruit trees. 
He was a popular man in the community in which he resided, and, as 
a representative of the Democratic party, held a number of local public 
offices. He was a member of the Reformed church, whose principles 
he strictly upheld. He married Mary, daughter of Theobald Fouse, 
who was born in America, of German descent. He was a farmer and 
a member of the Reformed church, and became the father of: Adam, 
a farmer: Christopher: John, a farmer; Frederick, deceased, was in 
active service during the civil war; De Walt, a soldier during the civil 
war; Samuel, was a farmer, and is now living retired in ]Marklesburg, 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania; Mary, who became the wife of Ben- 
jamin Hoover. Mr. and Mrs. Hoover have had children: Sarah, de- 
ceased : Reuben, a farmer, married Annie Fenstermaker, deceased ; Cath- 
erine, married Frank Fink, engaged in the hardware business, in Hunt- 
ingdon. Pennsylvania; Nancy, married William Heffner, a farmer; 
Elizabeth, married J. K. Brumbaugh; and Benjamin Franklin, see for- 
ward. 

(III) Benjamin Franklin, son of Benjamin and Mary (Fouse) 
Hoover, was born in Penn township, Huntingdon county, Pennsyl- 
vania, July 18, 1873. He was educated in the public schools, from 
which he was graduated with a very creditable record, and then stud- 
ied for one term in Juniata College. Upon the conclusion of his edu- 
cation he became associated with his father in farming interests, and 
has alwavs been occupied along this line. Educational matters have 
always engaged a goodly share of his time and attention, and it has 
been his pleasure to further the cause of education in every manner 
that lay in his power. In conformity with this idea he is serving as 
a school director at the present time. The Democratic party has his 
strong support in political matters, and he has held a number of local 
offices, filling them to the entire satisfaction of the community. He 
is a consistent member of the Reformed church. 

Mr. Hoover married, in 1894, Lucy Hellyer, a daughter of Ed- 



1058 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

ward and Elizabeth (Putt) Hellyer; her father, a miller of Penn 
township, Huntingdon county. One year after his marriage he pur- 
chased one hundred and fifty-four acres of land, and is now also 
engaged as a dairy farmer. They have had children : Charles Ed- 
ward, born August 31, 1905, attends school; Reuben Merle, born No- 
vember 27, 1906, also attends school; Benjamin Carl, died in infancy. 



James Grubb sailed from London, England, in the stout 
GRUBB ship "Fortune," John Green, master, in 1647, ^'"^^ landed 

on the shores of Massachusetts Bay, after a long and 
tempestuous voyage, during which time the vessel was given up by 
those who were awaiting the arrival of friends on her. James Grubb 
settled first at Salem, Massachusetts, and worked for his board and 
clothes, as he was almost destitute, having lost everything of value 
while on the voyage. He later left Massachusetts and went into the 
colony of Delaware, where he located, married and lived the rest of his 
life. He became known as an Indian fighter. He was expert with a 
gun, and possessed a keen and accurate eye, both of which requisites 
were a necessity in his continual warfare with the savages who abode 
in Delaware. Among his children was James Jr., of whom further. 

(II) James Grubb Jr., son of James Grubb, the immigrant, was 
born in Delaware and lived there all of his life. He was noted as a 
hunter of game and Indians, having a special antipathy toward the 
latter. He was one of a scouting party out to locate a band of In- 
dians on the warpath, when they were surprised and made captives. 
They were held by the foe several months, Grubb making his escape 
one night as his captors slept. He never saw any one of his fellow 
prisoners again, the supposition being that they were killed and scalped 
out of revenge because of his escape. He had a large family of 
children, among them being James, Isaac; and Abraham, of whom 
further. 

(III) Abraham, son of James Grubb Jr., was born in Delaware 
about 1680. He began early to fight the Indians, and he was one of a 
party of men who stood the savages off until a company of soldiers 
arrived from the nearest garrison to the relief of the small settle- 
ment. At the sound of the drum and fife the red men broke for 
cover, but were pursued by the besieged, when they ran into the arms 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1059 

of the soldiers and were externiinateil to the last warrior. Among 
his ehildren was Isaac, of whom further. 

(IV) Isaac, son of Abraham Gruhb, was born in Delaware. He 
lived a quiet life, and farmed when permitted by his red neighbors. 
He had a large family, among them being William, of whom further. 

(V) William, son of Isaac Grubb, was a native of Pennsylvania, 
where it is thought that his father moved about 1746. His name ap- 
pears on the roster of one of the companies furnished by the colony 
to the Continental army. Among his children was Samuel, of whom 
further. 

(VI) Samuel, son of William Grubb, was born in Pennsylvania, 
about 1780. He was a farmer by occupation, following it until his 
death. He married Hannah Boyer, in 1805. He was among the first 
to enlist in the war of 1812. On his return to his home in Pennsyl- 
vania he again took up farming. Among his children was Abraham, 
of whom further. 

(VII) Abraham, son of Samuel and Hannah (Boyer) Grubb, was 
born May 15, 1818, in Hopewell township. He was a farmer of Berks 
county for many years. He owned at the time of his death about 
three hundred acres. He was reared in the Lutheran faith, as was his 
wife. He married Mary Norris, daughter of an old pioneer family 
of Berks county. Her parents, Isaac and Martha Norris, lived on the 
farm on which the former was born, and which his grandfather had 
cleared while the Indians were still inconvenient and dangerous neigh- 
bors. Among the children of Abraham and Mary (Norris) Grubb 
was Joseph, of whom further. 

(VIII) Joseph, son of Abraham and Mary (Norris) Grubb, was 
born in Berks county, Pennsylvania. He was educated in the schools 
of the township, and on reaching his majority decided that he would 
follow the family occupation of farming. He remained with his 
father, and after the death of the latter he remained on the homestead. 
He was a Republican in politics, and a member of the Lutheran church. 
He married Rebecca Bowers, who was born on the farm on which her 
son, Isaac Bowers Grubb, now lives. Children : Mary, now Mrs. 
J. R. Schell; Isaac Bowers, of whom further; Sherman, of whom 
further; Martha. 

(IX) Isaac Bowers Grubb, son of Joseph and Rebecca (Bowers) 



io6o HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Grubb, was born October 8, 1866, in Penn township, Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania. He received his early education in the com- 
mon schools of the township, and began farming very early after leav- 
ing the school room. He has one hundred and forty-three acres of 
cleared land and some woodland, which comprise a valuable farm. He 
is one of the foremost farmers of his section, being up-to-date in every 
particular. He does a succesS'ful general farming. He is a member 
of the Lutheran church, like all of his family; and gives his political 
support to the Republican party. 

He married, December 26, 1895, Rachel Schultz, born in Lincoln 
township, Huntingdon county, a daughter of Martin Schultz, of that 
township. Children: Joseph Carl, Martha Lena, Catherine, Harold, 
Gertrude. 

(IX) Sherman Grubb, son of Joseph and Rebecca (Bowers) 
Grubb, was born March 25, 1869, in Penn township, on his father's 
farm. He received his education in the public schools, and became a 
farmer on reaching maturity. He purchased one hundred and forty 
acres of land, which he brought to a high state of productiveness, and 
where he was a general farmer. On April i, 19 10, he purchased a 
home in Marklesburg, Pennsylvania, and moved to it. He was en- 
gaged one summer in the sand cparry northeast of Marklesburg, and 
at the present time (1913) is employed, for the second summer, in 
the stone quarry near Marklesburg. He is a member of the Lutheran 
church; is a Republican, and has served as school director. 

He married, June 15, 1890, Maud S. G. Garner, daughter of Sam- 
uel Garner. Children: Earl Sorick, Pearl S. 



The records of the lives of individuals are of interest 
SCHELL to the modern citizen, not alone for their historical value, 

but for the example and the inspiration they afford. 
Yet we need not look altogether to the past. The records of the lives 
of men of the present generation afford examples which will be an in- 
spiration to generations yet to come. And in this connection it may 
be said that it is not alone the men who are in the public eye who 
mold the fortunes of a nation. The men who carry on successfully the 
daily and more homely operations of life are no less to be valued for 
their efforts in those directions. Among the most useful, and least to 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1061 

be spared of these lines of industry, is that of farming, and it is of a 
family whose members have been farmers for generations that this 
sketch treats. 

(I) George Schell, a miner, is the earliest progenitor of George W. 
Schell, of Aitch, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, of whom record 
is found. He was a member of the Lutheran church, married and had 
issue. 

(II) Samuel, son of George and Mary Schell, died in 1907. He 
was educated in the public schools, and until he was twenty-one years 
of age followed the occupation of a collier, abandoning this to engage 
in farming. He was ver}^ successful in this imdertaking and, from 
renting ground to cultivate, became the owner of eight hundred acres 
of excellent farm land. He was a Republican in politics, and was ac- 
tively interested in all local affairs. He and his wife were members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. He married Mary Richardson, who 
died in 1909. Chiklren: i. Blair, a lumberman. 2. Scott W., a farmer 
of Huntingdon county. 3. William, died aged seventeen years. 4. Cath- 
erine, married Jeremiah Keith, formerly a farmer, now proprietor of a 
general store at Marklesburg. 5. Susan, married Martin Donelson, a 
farmer. 6. Martha, married W. S. Fouse, a farmer. 7. George W., 
of further mention. 8. Jonah R., a farmer. 9. Ann, married Benjamin 
Franklin Fouse, a merchant. 10. Horatio L., a farmer and merchant. 

(III) George W., son of Samuel and INIary (Richardson) Schell, 
was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, November 26, i860. 
He attended the public schools of Lincoln township, Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, later studying in Michigan, thus obtaining an 
excellent education. L'pon returning home he cultivated his father's 
farm until the latter's death, when he purchased one hundred and 
seventy acres of land and at the present time conducts fruit raising and 
dairy operations thereon. In both of these lines he has been very suc- 
cessful, his fruit being noted for its size and lusciousness, and his 
dairy a model of cleanliness. Politically he is a Progressive Republi- 
can, and both he and his wife are members of the ]Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

He married (first) November 25, 1884, Lilly May IMoore, (second) 
Cora Gill. Children of first marriage: i. Samuel, born July 26, 1885; 
attended Juniata College, followed the teacher's profession, now pro- 



io62 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

prietor of a store in Altoona, Pennsylvania. 2. Frederick Morrow, of 
whom further. 3. Robert, born 1888, died in infancy. 4. Eliza, born 
May 5, 1889, lives at home. 5. Jessie, born March 27, 1892, lives at 
home. Mr. Schell's second wife bore him a son who died in infancy. 

(IV) Frederick Morrow, son of George W. and Lilly May (Moore) 
Schell, was born in Hmitingdon county, Pennsylvania, December 21, 
1887. After the completion of his education, which he acquired at 
the common schools in his district, he commenced to assist his father 
in the cultivation of the farm, and thus became familiar Avith every 
detail of the work to be done in the most practical manner. He is now 
the owner of a fine farm, which is largely planted with fruit trees, and 
has a young orchard, which is now in fine bearing condition. He affili- 
ates with the Republican party in politics, and is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Schell married, June 11, 1908, Lizzie B., a daughter of Jacob S. 
and Anthy (Black) Hoover, the former a farmer. They have had 
children: Lillie Marie, born April 25, 1909; Beulah, born March 20, 
191 1. In 1909 Mr. Schell purchased a farm of two hundred and twenty- 
five acres in Huntingdon county. He is very energetic and systematic 
in his methods, and keeps well apace of the times in current events in 
the agricultural world. This enables him to take advantage of all new 
discoveries in this field, greatly to his benefit. 



Daniel L. Grove, of Grafton, Pennsylvania, is a member 

GROVE of the old Grove family of that state, which has long 

been established in the Juniata Valley. Than the Grove 

family there is none better known or more highly respected in that 

section of the commonwealth. 

(I) Daniel Grove descended from Jacob Grove and his wife, Mar- 
garet Summers, who were people of prominence in the early days of 
Huntingdon county. Daniel came from Lancaster county with his 
parents, and finally located on the place now owned by his grandson, 
Daniel L. Grove, in Penn township, Huntingdon county. He pur- 
chased wild land, cleared it and erected the first house on it, which 
stood the wear and tear of time for many years. He married Mary 
Peightal, also of Lancaster county. Among their children was David, 
of whom further. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1063 

(II) David Grove, son of Daniel and Mary (Peightal) Grove, was 
born on his fatlier's farm in Penn township; reared on the homestead, 
and educated in the pubHc schools. He early entered upon an agricul- 
tural life, and lie fore the close of his career he established a reputation 
for success in everything that he undertook, which was the result of 
discriminating judgment, and not good luck. He takes an active in- 
terest and a large part in the affairs of the township, and his advice is 
sought by many. He was drafted during the Civil W^ar, but his father 
paid a sum of money and he was released from serving. He, with his 
wife, is a member of the Reformed church. He is unremitting in his 
interest in it, and aids it generously. He still lives on the homestead. 
He married Emeline Lininger, born in McConnellstown, Huntingdon 
county, a daughter of Jacob and Mary (Speck) Lininger. Mr. Lin- 
inger was born in Germany, and early in life came to this country and 
located in Huntingdon county, where he farmed and later died. His 
wife was born in McConnellstown, there reared on her father's farm. 
Among their children are: Daniel L., of whom further; Martin, of 
whom further: and David. 

(III) Daniel L. Grove, son of David and Emeline (Lininger) 
Grove, was born October 25, 1863, on the Grove homestead. He re- 
ceived an unusually good education in the public schools of his native 
township, has farmed all of his life, and at the present time (1913) is 
living on his own place of sixty fertile and highly cultivated acres. Be- 
sides farming he makes a specialty of raising thoroughbred horses and 
cattle, especialh- the former. At this time he has a long-pedigreed 
colt, the sire of which was imported from England. He also takes 
great pride in his hogs, breeding only the best. He ranks as one of the 
progressive farmers, not only of his township, but the state of Penn- 
sylvania. He, with his family, belongs to the Reformed church, and he 
to the Democratic party, for which he works and uses his influence. 
He has never asked for nor held office, devoting all of his time to his 
business interests. 

He married, in 1883, Anna Myers, born in Penn township, the 
daughter of Abraham and Catherine (Garner) Myers. He was the 
son of Daniel and Mary (Grubb) Myers. Phillip Garner, the father of 
Mrs. JNIyers, was an old resident of Pennsylvania. Abraham ]\Iyers 
was educated in the public schools, was a member of the Refonned 



io64 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

church, a good citizen and an upright man. His children: Reuben; 
Ehzabeth Ann; Mihon; Jane; Sarah Catherine: William: Alice: Ida; 
Benjamin; Maggie; Frank; Anna, married Daniel L. Grove. Children 
of Daniel L. and Anna (Myers) Grove: i. Emma Catherine, died 
young. 2. Mary Alice, at home. 3. Carrie Elizabeth, at home. 4. 
Charles Andrew, at home. 

(Ill) Martin Grove, son of David and Emeline (Lininger) Grove, 
was born December 24, 1865, on the Grove homestead. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools, reared on the farm, and early began farm- 
ing on the home place, and now operates sixty-five acres to great ad- 
vantage. He is a staunch Democrat, voting with and using his influ- 
ence for that party; and is a member of the Reformed church. He 
wields much influence for good in his township. He married, Decem- 
ber 29, 1886, Sarah Catherine Myers, born in Penn township, a daugh- 
ter of Abraham and Catherine (Garner) Myers. Children: i. David 
H., born March 4, 1888, a farmer in Penn township; he married Grace 
Boyer. 2. Clara May, born September i, 1891, at home. 3. Lloyd 
Myers, born August 24, 1894. 



The immigrant ancestor of the Leininger family, of 
LEININGER Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, was Frederick, 

who came to this country from Germany, in 1832, 
being the first of the name to settle in Pennsylvania. His wife Mary 
came to the United States at the same time, they making their first 
home in Canoe Valley, later moving to McConnellstown, where he cul- 
tivated a farm of one hundred acres. They Avere both members of the 
Reformed church, and he a Democrat in politics. His wife was like- 
wise of German descent. Their children: Jacob, a shoemaker; Isaac, 
a carpenter; Peter, died in early manhood; John, a farmer: George, of 
further mention; Emily; Maria. 

(II) George, fourth son and child of Frederick and Alary Lein- 
inger, was born in Germany, in 18 19, and there attended school until 
he was thirteen years of age, when he came to this country with his 
parents. He became a farmer of Huntingdon county, owning at his 
death two hundred and seventy-five acres of the finest land in the valley. 
He was a member of the Reformed church, and politically was a Demo- 
crat. He married Sarah Grubb, of German descent. Children : Solo- 



HlSTOK\' Ol- THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1065 

nion, of further mention; Samuel, a retired farmer, horn 1852; Harry 
S., a farmer and owner of the old homestead in Walker tnwnship, 
Huntingdon county. 

(HI) Solomon, eldest child of George and Sarah (Grubh) Leinin- 
ger, was born in Walker township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
December 18, 1847. He obtained a public school education and engaged 
in farming as his life occupation, a pursuit he has followed on a one 
hundred and fifty-acre farm in his native township since 1878. He is 
a strong supporter of the Prohibition party, conducting his own habits 
in accordance with the principles he so stoutly defends, and has been 
elected to many local offices, including auditor and school director. His 
religious affiliation is with the Reformed church. 

He married. May 25, 1871, Mary M. Yocum, daughter of Isaac 
and Mary Yocum. Children: i. Emma Grace, married David Sum- 
mers; children: Marion, Lola, Elizabeth, Henry S., Ella, Alice, Char- 
lotte. 2. IMary B., married Elmer Grove; children: Edward, Walter, 
Ralph and Mary. 3. Sarah Alice, a seamstress, lives at home. 4. Lot- 
tie B. 5. Ella M., employed in a tailor shop at Huntingdon. 6. Frank 
Y., educated in the public schools and at the ^Mission Institute, a minis- 
ter at Prattsville, New York ; married !Maud Palmer ; they have no 
children. 



The Richardson family, of Huntingdon county, 
RICHARDSON is of Irish descent, and is but three generations 

old in this country. The first member of the 
family of whom record remains is William Richardson, who died at 
Spruce Creek, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, in 1837. He ob- 
tained his education in the public schools of the place of his birth, and 
in later life conducted auction sales for the Blair & Bedford Company, 
as well as being the proprietor of a hotel. He was a Democrat in poli- 
tics, and extremely active in local afifairs, being captain of the company 
of militia. 

He married Catherine Kyper of German descent, who died in 
1898. Children: i. Thomas, a farmer, carpenter and cabinetmaker, 
a veteran of the Mexican and civil wars, in the latter receiving a dis- 
abling wound. 2. Margaret, deceased; married William Enyeart. 3. 
]\Iary, married Samuel Schell. 4. Rebecca, married a Mr. Jones. 5. 



io66 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Rachel, married Sn3'der. 6. Eliza, deceased. 7. Harris, of fur- 
ther mention. 8. William, a retired farmer. 9. Catherine Anne, mar- 
ried David Wiley, a farmer, who served in the civil war, receiving a 
commission. 

(II) Harris, son of William and Catherine (Kyper) Richardson, 
was born in McConnellstown, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, Sep- 
tember 4, 1833. He was educated in the public schools and spent his 
early life farming, owning a farm at Mount Airy of one hundred acres, 
with modern buildings thereon, and another one of one hundred and 
eighteen acres in Lincoln township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. 
He is a Republican in politics, and has alwaj's been extremely active in 
local and county affairs. He has held numerous offices, among them 
director of the poor, county treasurer, jury commissioner, county audi- 
tor, and for ten years associate judge of Huntingdon county, a position 
he still fills. Among the local offices to which the confidence and re- 
spect of his fellow citizens have raised him are the following: Con- 
stable, justice of the people for thirteen years, school director, assessor 
for twelve years, and judge of election for one term. He has been 
one of the most faithful of public servants, and has been allowed to re- 
linquish any of his offices only under vigorous protest by his friends 
and admirers, who realize that the honorable qualities embodied in Mr. 
Richardson are rarely coupled with executive ability such as he pos- 
sesses, and that in his renunciation of public office they lose a most ca- 
pable, upright and high-minded official. He belongs to the Lutheran 
church. 

He married, December 31, 1854, Sarah Hendershot. Children: i. 
Susan. 2. John T., a farmer; married Emma Detwiler. 3. Sarah, mar- 
ried H. J. Boyer, a farmer. 4. Isabel, married David Fredericks, a 
farmer. 5. [Mary, married L. B. Garner, a passenger conductor on the 
Huntingdon & Broad Top Railroad. 6. Isaiah, a farmer, owning a 
farm of one hundred and fifty acres; married Sadie Shultz. 7. Martha, 
married Elsworth Dell, an employee of the Huntingdon & Broad Top 
Railroad; lives at Grantsville. 8. Margaret, married George Emeigh, 
a car inspector at Altoona. 9. Ida, married Thomas Gosnell, an em- 
ployee of the Huntingdon & Broad Top Railroad. The home of Mr. 
Richardson is upon a farm of one hundred and twenty-five acres at 
James Creek Mills. 




^c^y^ ^ c^/W^^^?^^ ^3^^/i^^ 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1067 

The Schirni family of Pennsylvania is descended from 
SCHIRAI the Schirm family of Stuttgart, Germany, where it has 

heen located for untold generations. A member of it is 
Herman Schirm. the writer on political economy : and Gustav Schirm, 
the popular poet of the Fatherland, belongs to it. The immediate an- 
cestor of the American branch lived and died in Germany, as did the 
distafif progenitor. They were members of the Lutheran church, and 
were prominent people in their native city. 

(I) George Schirm was born in Germany, and there received a 
careful education. At the age of eighteen he emigrated to the United 
States and finally located at Huntingdon Furnace, Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania, where he was employed at the furnace for many years. 
He gave this up and took charge of the hack horses for Mr. Hamilton, 
and through his care and knowledge the stock increased its earning 
capacity wonderfully. He relinquished this position and became a 
farmer in Carrol \^alley, where he remained several years. Later he 
mo\Td to Alexandria, Huntingdon county, and there died. He was a 
Lutheran, and supported the Republican party with his franchise. He 
married Dora Rabold, like himself, of German extraction. Children: 
I. Frederick. 2. David. 3. John. 4. Maggie. 5. George. 6. Hays H., 
of whom further. 7. Christina. 8. Caroline. 

(II) Hays H. Schirm, son of George and Dora (Rabold) Schirm. 
was born August 29, 1863, at Huntingdon Furnace, Huntingdon county. 
Pennsylvania. He received his education in the public schools, and on 
leaving decided that he would become a farmer, in which vocation he 
has met with unbounded success. He purchased five hundred and twen- 
ty-eight acres in Porter township, Huntingdon county, and does an ex- 
tensive general farming. He also breeds registered Holstein cattle. 
About 1906 he established a portable saw mill business, and has since 
operated it with distinct success. He had accjuired valuable experience 
at this work, and knew how to handle it to the best advantage, and in 
consequence it has been a paying proposition from the beginning of the 
venture. He is a member of the Lutheran church, as are the other 
members of his family. He votes the Republican ticket, but has never 
held office, as his business enterprises preclude time given to outside 
afifairs. He ranks with the honest, upright and progressive citizens of 
Porter township, where his largest interests lie. 



io68 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

He married, March 3, 1883, Jennie Goodwin, daughter of David 
Goodwin, an earl}^ settler in the township, whose family has long 
been established in Huntingdon county. Children: Ella, deceased; 
George, in partnership with father; Thomas and John, live in Alex- 
andria; Dora, David, Hays, Lewis, Wilson, Theodore and Walter — 
all these at home. 



James B. McMeen, of East Waterford, Juniata county, 
McMEEN Pennsylvania, is descended on the paternal side from 

fine old Irish stock which was transplanted to the New 
World in the latter part of the seventeenth century; and, which, find- 
ing a congenial soil for its activities, has grown like the proverbial green 
ba,y tree, its branches spreading in many directions. The history of the 
INIcMeen family is inseparably connected with that of Juniata county, 
as well as of the state of Pennsylvania. It has done its part, through 
succeeding generations, toward the upbuilding of the state. 

(I) William McMeen was probably born in county Derry, Ireland, 
about 1670, and after reaching adult age came to America, then a vast 
wilderness. He probably landed in New York, drifted to Pennsylvania, 
and located in Cumberland county. He took up wild land, cleared it, 
and on it erected houses for his family, crops and stock, meanwhile 
fighting Indians, who were both vicious and numerous at that time. 
He was a Presbyterian in faith, a heritage he has left to his descend- 
ants. He was probably buried at Silver Spring. He was a man of 
means and was highly respected by his neighbors. Among his children 
were two sons — Josiah, of whom further, and Robert. 

(II) Josiah, son of William McMeen, the immigrant, was probably 
born in Cumberland county, in old Pennsboro township. He grew up 
there amid the dangers of Indian warfare, receiving the education that 
the time and place afi^orded. On June 7, 1750, he took out a warrant 
from the Penns for a tract of land, about three hundred acres and al- 
lowances. This tract he cleared, improved, and lived on it until his 
death in 1784. He was a Presbyterian by inheritance and predilection, 
an honorable friend and a good neighbor. He married Grizella Elliott, 
of Pennsboro, who was a member of a family that was at that time 
prominent, and which has since become more so. Children : Grizella, 
married David William Martin; John, married Miss Naylor, of Lan- 



HISTORY OF THE JUxXIATA VALLEY 1069 

caster county; William, married ALary Elliutt; Robert, of whom fur- 
ther. 

(HI) Robert, son of Josiah and Grizella (Elliott) McMeen, was 
born about 1760. in Pennsboro, on the jMcMeen homestead. At the 
death of his father he inherited one-third of the homestead, and in 1790, 
with his two brothers, he conveyed his rights to Daniel Shelley. John 
and his wife moved to Bufifalo Valley in (now) Union county. Wil- 
liam and his wife, accompanied by Robert, then unmarried, moved to 
what is now Juniata county. William and his wife located in Turbett 
township, west of Juniata river. Robert crossed the river and settled 
in Lost Creek Valley, where he purchased and made his home upon 
Epenetus Hart's warrant. In 179.2 he married Margaret Curran, and 
they lived and died, he in 1828. on the Hart land. Like his forbears, 
he was a member of the Presbyterian church. Robert McMeen was 
a lieutenant of militia in old Cumberland county. On his farm in Lost 
Creek Valley he built a substantial log house which has since been 
"pebble-dashed." He was a leader in his community, and one of its 
most prominent men. Children: i. Josiah, born in 1793, lived and 
died in Juniata county. 2. William, of whom further. 3. Eleanor, 
born in 1799; died unmarried. 4. Samuel, born in 1803: moved to Por- 
tage county, Ohio, and there died : married Elizabeth Wilson. 5. Mar- 
garet, born in 1805; married Jacob Adams, in 1827; lived and died in 
Juniata county. 

(IV) William, son of Robert and Margaret (Curran) McMeen, 
was born on the Lost Creek McMeen homestead in 1795. He was 
reared on the farm and was given the best education that the era per- 
mitted. In 1840 he purchased the Thomas Boal farm in the same town- 
ship, w'hich was known as the Edward Armstrong survey, taken origi- 
nally by Lieutenant Edward Armstrong, who was in command of Fort 
Granville when it was besieged and the garrison destroyed and himself 
murdered by the French and Indians in 1756. W^illiam McMeen mar- 
ried, in 1826, Margaret Banks, a daughter of James and Catherine 
(Nelson) Banks, of the old and prominent families of Banks and Nel- 
son. William and his wife w^ere members of the Presbyterian church 
and were among the prosperous people of the community. Children : 
I. Charles, born in 1826; died in his twenty-eighth year. 2. Josephine, 
born 1828, died about 1900; married (first) Samuel Brown, to whom 



I070 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

one daughter was born, Margaret, widow of John A. Robinson, of Tus- 
carora, by whom she had six children: John A., Josephine Bratton, 
Sarah, Thomas A., Margaret and Annie Parker. Josephine married 
(second) Lewis Burchfield; no children. 3. Chiliom, born 1830; died 
in Ma)^ 1912, near Coffeyville, Kansas, leaving sons and daughters; 
married Frances Kurtz. 4. John, born in 1S32; died in 1899; mar- 
ried Amanda Rogers. Children : Charles, William Andrew and Ruth, 
who is the wife of William Wallace, a steel maker of Pittsburgh. 5. 
]\Iary, died in childhood. 6. Catherine, born in 1836; died in 191 1; 
married (first) J. Dorrance Allen, of Bradford county, Pennsylvania, 
and their children are : Margaret Mooers, of Elmira, New York ; John 
Allen, of Pittsburgh. Catherine married (second) James McCabe. 7. 
David, died in infancy. 8. Thomas, died in infancy. 9. Robert, born 
November 20, 1842, a practicing attorney in Miffiintown; married Ann 
Eliza Parker; one son, Andrew Parker. 10. James Nelson, of whom 
further. 11. William Banks, born in 1852, and who died of sunstroke 
in 1857. 

(V) James Nelson, son of William and IMargaret (Banks) Mc- 
Meen, was born November 8, 1844, in Juniata county, Pennsylvania, 
and here grew up. He married Catherine S. Watts, born in 1844, a 
daughter of Samuel and Mary Ann (Kauffman) Watts. After mar- 
riage James Nelson and his wife settled on the old McMeen homestead, 
comprised at that time of one hundred and fifty acres. Here they lived, 
and he died March 26, 1883. His wife died in the old home, also. 
Both were members of the Presbyterian church, and were regarded as 
among the good, progressive citizens of the township. Children: i. 
Mary Ellen, living in Lewistown, unmarried. 2. John A., unmarried; 
makes home in Coffeyville, Kansas, on his farm. 3. William C, a tin- 
ner at Newcastle, Pennsylvania; married Hattie Forest; two children: 
Irene and Katherine. 4. Hugh, a merchant in Lewistown, Pennsyl- 
vania; married Lydia Lesh; two children: James Noll and Margaret. 
5. Anna Lou, married John Graham, a farmer in Spruce Hill town- 
ship, Juniata county; children: William and Katherine. 6. James B., 
of whom further. 7. Katherine S., married Guy McCoy, of Lewis- 
town; two children: Adelaide and Mary. 

(VI) James B., son of James Nelson and Catherine S. (Watts) 
McMeen, was born on the old McMeen homestead in Juniata county, 



HISTORY 01- THI-: JUNIATA VALLEY 1071 

October 7, 1880. He was educated in the Oakland puljlic schools and 
Airy View Academy. Leaving school he began his business life as a 
clerk in the E. E. jMcMeen store at Mifflin, from which he was trans- 
ferred at the end of three months, to a store owned by the same tirm 
at Lewistown, where he remained four years. In 1905 he moved to 
Waterford, and established a general mercantile business for himself. 
The stock has more than doubled since the lieginning, and the volume 
of business is constantly increasing. Besides the mercantile business, 
Mr. ]\IcMeen is engaged in other lucrative enterprises. He is a Demo- 
crat in politics, and a member of the Presbyterian church. He is es- 
teemed as one of the most progressive men of his section. 

He married, February 14, 1907, Mabel S. Loudon, a native of 
Juniata county, and a daughter of James Loudon (see Loudon, this 
work). Mr McMeen has three children: Ruth Loudon, Naomi Ray, 
and Pauline Ida. 

Samuel Watts, father of Mrs. James Nelson McMeen, and his wife, 
Mary Ann Kauffman, were probably natives of Greenwood township, 
and moved to Lost Creek soon after marriage. They were among the 
prosperous and substantial families of the township. Children: i. Cath- 
erine S., married James Nelson McMeen (see McMeen V). 2. Lizzie, 
died in infancy. 3. Calvin Blythe. 4. Wesley W. 5. Samuel D. 6. 
Addison. The family is widely scattered over the United States and 
also appears in Canada. 



The Peightal family, of Pennsylvania, of which 
PEIGHTAL James Peightal, of McConnellstown, Huntingdon 

county, is a member, has been resident in the state 
for a number of generations, and have borne their share bravely in the 
upbuilding of its prosperity. 

(I) John Peightal catne from Berks county, Pennsylvania, with his 
family, about 1822, and settled near Grafton, Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania, where he bought a considerable amount of land. In those 
early days traveling was done by wagon, and the journey was a long 
and fatiguing one. He engaged in farming, and also opened and con- 
ducted a hotel, which was considered a very fine one for those days. 
He was still very young when he died, his death being the result of in- 
juries he had received at a barn raising. He married Sarah , who 



10/2 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

died shortly after their arrival in Huntingdon county. They had four 
sons and two daughters. 

(II) Samuel, son of John and Sarah Peightal, was born in Berks 
county, and came to Huntingdon with his parents. He married Mar- 
garet Fink, a daughter of Valentine and Elizabeth (Fuke) Fink, who 
came to this country in the early thirties and settled at Yellow Creek, 
Bedford county, Pemisylvania. They had children: Elizabeth, mar- 
ried Andrew Smith; Margaret, married Mr. Peightal; Sarah, married 
Daniel Grove; John, was murdered in 1869; Isaac, lived to an advanced 
age; Henry, reached old age in Walker township; Samuel, died in 
McConnellstown. Mr. and Mrs. Peightal had children: Sarah, mar- 
ried William Kyper; John F., died in Nashville, Tennessee, of disease 
contracted while in service as a member of Company K, 78th Regiment 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry ; James, see forward ; Calvin, of Hunt- 
ingdon; I. N., of Greencastle; H. R., of McConnellstown; Elizabeth, 
married Thomas Davis; Mary E., married J. W. Loyd; Maggie, mar- 
ried John S. Loyd, of Walker township; W. M., a merchant of McCon- 
nellstown. 

(III) James, son of Samuel and Margaret (Fink) Peightal, was 
born in Woodcock Valley, Pennsylvania, April 26, 1847. He was edu- 
cated in the district schools near his place of residence and, at the age 
of seventeen years, enlisted in the Union army, in August, 1864, in Com- 
pany H, 208th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and was 
honorably discharged June i, 1865. He engaged in general farming in 
Walker township, and removed to McConnellstown in 1892, where he 
is still active in the same occupation. His political opinions are inde- 
pendent as far as local matters are concerned, but Republican in what- 
ever concerns the national situation. For a period of twenty-five years 
he has served as a justice of the peace, and has also held a number of 
minor offices. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows of Huntingdon, of the Knights of the Golden Eagle, of McCon- 
nellstown, and of the Grand Army of the Republic. 

He married, November 29, 1870, Sarah A. Flenner, of Indiana 
county, and had children: Elsie, married C. A. Shock; Ira S., in the 
banking business at Leslie, Missouri; J. C, is a banker of Sejanour, 
Missouri; Stewart, died at the age of eighteen years; Marjorie, died 
in her third year. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLF.Y 1073 

The Wolfe family, of Pennsylvania, is of direct German 
WOLFE origin, and is probably connected with the famous Ger- 
man family of the same name in Heidelberg, from which 
have descended so many illustrious men. The first of the Wolfe family 
came from the Fatherland in 1771, and located in Berks county, Penn- 
sylvania, Tulpehocken township. At the call to arms to fight the 
English, in 1776, he was among the first to enlist. He was of vast 
assistance to his different commanders in interpreting for them and the 
Hessian soldiers who had been sent by the king of England against the 
Colonials. After the war of the revolution was over he returned to 
Pennsylvania and resumed farming. Among his children were : An- 
thony, of whom further; Leonard, moved to New York and there died; 
a third son became a citizen of Baltimore, Maryland ; and a fourth set- 
tled in Ohio, when that country was yet young. 

(II) Anthony \\'olfe. son of the German immigrant, was born in 
Soppota, Berks county, Pennsylvania, probably soon after the revolu- 
tionary war. He received such education as was obtainable at that 
time, but was taught German by his father. He became a farmer, took 
up much wild land, cleared and improved it, and was one of the wealthy 
men of his day. He settled in Center county, and there established 
\\'olfe's store, known far and wide as the one place where all kinds 
of useful articles could be bought; also operated a saw and grist mill. 
It more nearly approximated the present-day department store than any 
of its competitors, in that the line of goods carried were those in de- 
mand at that time. He also erected a mill, which proved a blessing, not 
only to himself, but to his neighbors, and people in adjoining counties. 
He was the parent of a large family, among them being Henry, Jacob, 
and John, of whom further. 

(III) John, son of Anthony Wolfe, was born in Center county, 
Pennsylvania. He was reared on his father's farm in Center county, 
Pennsylvania. He became a farmer on reaching maturity, and lived in 
the county of his birth until his death. He was a Democrat, voting the 
ticket all of his life. He was also a member of the Lutheran church. 
He married Barbara Wise, the daughter of a neighboring farmer, also 
of German extraction. There were many children in the Wise family, 
but a brother, Thomas, is the only one of v.'hom there is any 
definite knowledge. Children of John and Barbara (Wise) Wolfe: i. 



I074 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Samuel. 2. William. 3. Daniel. 4. Israel, of whom further. 5. Su- 
san (Mrs. Joseph Hoy), of State College. 6. John. 7. EHzabeth (Mrs. 
Peck). 8. Allie (Mrs. Harvy Gorman). 9. An infant, died soon after 
birth. 10. Frank, killed in the battle of Pool River, during the civil 
war. II. Charles. 

(IV) Israel, son of John and Rebecca (Wise) Wolfe, was born 
February 12, 1831, in Center county, Pennsylvania, and died in 1907, 
at Madisonburg, Pennsylvania. He was one of the best educated men 
of his day, attending both public and private schools, and besides an 
English education he was also educated in German. He became a mer- 
chant tailor, which occupation he followed with great success during 
his active life at Madisonburg. He was a staunch Democrat, and held 
many elective offices in his township. He was a devout member of the 
Reform church, and was active in its support and upbuilding. He 
married Sophia Frazier, born January 24, 1833, in Center county, 
daughter of Jacob and Rebecca (Bender) Frazier, residents of Center 
county many years, where he was a millwright. Children, besides 
Sophia: Sarah (Mrs. BHnt) ; Susan (Mrs. George Frederick); Eliza- 
beth (Mrs. WiUiam Rockey), moved to Nora, Illinois; Daniel, a farmer 
in Center county, later moved west; William, a dealer in stock in Iowa; 
Lewis, a farmer in Iowa. Children of Israel and Sophia (Frazier) 
Wolfe: I. Emma, died, aged four years. 2. George, rural route agent 
at Spring Mills, Center county. 3. Lewis Elry, of whom further. 4. 
Thomas, deceased, was in employ of The Osborn Implement Company. 
5. Anna B., married Charles Brown, of Center county, a blacksmith. 

(V) Lewis Elry Wolfe, M. D., son of Israel and Sophia (Frazier) 
Wolfe, was born April 9, 1866, in Madisonburg, Center county, Penn- 
sylvania. He received a liberal education in the public schools of his 
native town, after which he matriculated at the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, Baltimore, Maryland, graduating with distinction in 
1891. He began the practice of medicine in Snyder county, Pennsyl- 
vania, remaining eighteen months. He was offered a lucrative practice 
in Millmont, Union county, Pennsylvania, where he stayed three years ; 
after which time he was in Beavertown, Snyder county, with a year in 
Freeburg and two years in Lancaster county. He next located in Mar- 
klesburg, Huntingdon county, remaining there until the present time 
(1913). He ranks as one of the most expert surgeons in that section 



HISTORY OF THE JUNL\TA VALLEY 1075 

of the state, and one of the most careful and conscientious practitioners. 
He has Iniiit up a large and exceedingly lucrative practice, and is a part 
of the professional, social and religious life of Marklesburg. He was 
a Democrat until the question of free silver was injected into the party, 
when he became a Republican, holding what he deemed the public good 
was above all party lines. Since the organization of the Progressive 
party he has given to it his allegiance. He has held many local political 
ofifices, but has never sought or electioneered for them. He was for- 
merly a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and was 
connected with the Knights of the Golden Eagle. He is a member of 
the county, state and national medical associations. His wife and 
elder children are members of the Lutheran church. 

He married (first) in 1888, Alice Snmll, born in Center county, 
Pennsylvania; died in 1905; married (second), in 1906, Grace Grove, 
of Marklesburg. Children by first marriage: i. John, born in 1889; 
educated in the public schools; attended the Valparaiso University; after 
his vacation did not return to school, owing to an urgent ofifer of a posi- 
tion with the Huntingdon & Broad Top Railway Company: after sever- 
ing his conhection with the railway he accepted a position with the 
Western LJnion Telegraph Company, at Newark, New Jersey. 2. 
Blanche, born in 1892: educated in the public schools, graduated with 
honors in spring of 1913 from Millersville Normal School. 3. Charles, 
born in 1894: an employee of the Western Union Telegraph Company, 
at Newark, New Jersey. 4. Helen, born in 1897, at home. 5. Lewis, 
born in 1899, at home. Children by second marriage: 6. !\lildred, born 
in 1907. "J. Benjamin, born 1909, died aged two weeks. 8. Evelyn, born 
1912. 



The ancestor of this branch of the Phillips family is 
PHILLIPS James Phillips, who came to Virginia early in the 
eighteenth century from the south of Wales. He mar- 
ried a Miss Griffin and settled in the county of Stafford. 

(II) William, only son of James Phillips, was born in Stafford 
county, Virginia, in 1746, and died about the year 1800. He married 
Elizabeth Fowke, who bore him twelve children, many of them living 
to old age. 

(III) John Hilton Phillips, son of William Phillips, was born in 



1076 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Alexandria, Virginia, in 1797, died in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
in 1840. He was a man of good education, and was an expert carpen- 
ter and cabinetmaker. He came to Pennsylvania when young, settling 
first in York county, where he married, then lived in Middletown until 
1839, when he moved to Huntingdon county, settling at Alexandria, 
where he died two years later. He taught school during his latter years 
and was so engaged at the time of his death in Alexandria. He was a 
Democrat in politics, and a man of influence in his different homes. He 
married Mary Ann Shope, born in York county, Pennsylvania, January 
I, 1805, who survived him and married (second) James Ross of Ebens- 
burg, Pennsylvania; she died December 31, 1886. 

(IV) William Malcolm, only child of John Hilton and Mary Ann 
(Shope) Phillips, was born in York county, Pennsylvania, June 15, 1826. 
He was educated in the public schools of Middletown, Pennsylvania, 
and at the age of thirteen years accompanied his parents to Alexandria, 
Huntingdon county, where his father died two years later. He worked 
at different employments, obtaining a good business training, and about 
1845 started a small confectionery store in Alexandria, which he con- 
ducted a few years, then purchased a tannery, which he also operated as 
successfully. He continued both store and tannery, and as prosperity 
came he added a line of jewelry and enlarged the store. In 1861 he 
built a large store building, which he opened as a general store, and suc- 
cessfully conducted until 1895, when he retired to a well-earned com- 
petency. At this time he was one of the oldest merchants in the town, 
having been in continuous business for half a century. During those 
years and since his retirement he has been actively interested in many 
enterprises, but perhaps his closest connection has been with the First 
National Bank of Huntingdon, of which he has been a director for thir- 
ty-two years, or since its organization as a national bank. He also 
served many years as vice-president and on the death of its president, 
William Dorris, he was elected to succeed him as president, an office he 
now holds. He is a wise, conservative banker, and as a business man 
has been enterprising, upright and successful. He is held in high 
esteem in the town which has been his home since boyhood and where 
his life has ever been known to all men. He has also stood for upright- 
ness in business, as well as private life, while his hand has ever been 
extended to help the less fortunate. He was strongly opposed to sla- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALT.F.Y 1077 

very, and \varinl_\- supported the L'ninn cause during the eivil war. He 
was a Republican lor many years, tlien transferred his allegiance to the 
Prohibition party, taking an active interest in both. He was the Pro- 
hibition canditlate for associate judge of Huntingdon county, and has 
in every way used his best efforts in behalf of the cause of legal prohi- 
bition of the liquor traffic. He is a member of the Presbyterian church, 
as was also his wife. 

Mr. Phillips married, November 20, 1849, Susan Moore, who died 
April 4, 1897, aged sixty-nine years, daughter of Major William Moore, 
an old resident of Alexandria. Children: i. Anne ]M., born October 
25, 1S50, died September 13, 191 1; married Samuel Hatfield; no chil- 
dren. 2. Mary, born August 10, 1852, died November 10, 191 1; mar- 
ried James Dysart ; children : Paul and Susan. 3. John, born May 3, 
1854; niarried Eliza Bucher; children: Walter, Susan, George Irvin, 
JMarion, John (deceased), Eliza, William C. and David. 4. William 
Moore, born February 7, 1857, died 1873. 5. Caroline, born January 
27, 1859; married John L. Porter, and resides in Tyrone. Pennsyl- 
vania; one child, Susan, deceased. 6. George, born November 14, i860, 
died June 7, 1899, at Boulder Springs, Montana; married Susan Bu- 
cher; children: \\'illiam 'SI. and Robert S. 7. Charles, born June 5, 
1865; now a salesman, residing at Tyrone; married Nora DeLong; 
they have one child, Harry M. 



The founder of the American branch of the Knode fam- 
KNODE ily, of Pennsylvania, was born in Germany, but was of 
Swiss descent. He emigrated to Maryland, where he set- 
tled, lived and died. He was a farmer, and gave attention to stock 
raising, and it was he who first imported Swiss cattle into this country. 
He was a soldier in the War of the Revolution. Among his children 
was Jacob, of whom further. 

(H) Jacob Knode, son of the German-Swiss emigrant, was born in 
^Maryland, on his father's extensive plantation. He was probably edu- 
cated in Maryland, though it was the custom before and after the revo- 
lutionary war to send the children back to the Fatherland of their 
parents to acquire learning. He was a farmer, married in Maryland, 
and lived and died there. Among his children was Henry, of whom 
further. 



lO/S HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(III) Henry, son of Jacob Knode, was born in Washington county, 
Maryland. He was a farmer, like his forbears. He moved, in Septem- 
ber, 1810, to Porter township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and 
here died. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and served as lieuten- 
ant. On his nine hundred acres of land in Huntingdon county he raised 
all kinds of farm products. He also devoted a part of his time to stock, 
of which he made an unqualified success. He was a Democrat during 
his younger days, but voted the Republican ticket after the organization 
of that party. He erected a barn in 1825 on his place, which is still 
standing. He was one of the progressive men of his day. He was ex- 
ceedingly loyal to the Union, and at the outbreak of the civil war he saw 
many of his descendants enlist. He married Mary Huyett, of Mary- 
land, of German descent. Both lived to be very old, he dying at the age 
of eighty-seven years, in Porter township. Children : Lewis, of whom 
further ; and Daniel P., Jacob, Joseph, William, and daughters Maria 
and Amelia. 

(IV) Lewis, son of Henry and Mary (Huyett) Knode, was born in 
Washington county, Maryland, in 1810, and moved with his parents 
when quite young to Porter township, Huntingdon county, Pennsjd- 
vania. He was educated in the common schools of the township. He 
purchased a portion of the Knode estate, and later acquired the rest. 
He has remained a farmer all of his life, devoting his time to tilling the 
soil and raising stock. At the time of his death he resided in Hartslog 
Valley. 

He married Sarah Roller, born in 18 18, near Spruce Creek, in 
Canoe Valley, Huntingdon county. Children: i. Mary Jane, now Mrs. 
Neff. 2. Anna M. 3. Calvin. 4. Roller, deceased. 5. Lewis Good, of 
whom further. 6. Jacob N. 7. Amelia, deceased. 

(V) Lewis Good Knode, son of Lewis Henry and Sarah (Roller) 
Knode, was born November 19, 1849, ^^ Hartslog Valley, Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania. He received his preparatory education in the 
public schools, and then attended a preparatory school. Finishing his 
course, he taught three terms successfully, but, preferring a less sedentary 
life, he engaged in farming. He purchased land, and now has one 
hundred and ten acres of highly fertile cleared land on which he farms 
and raises Polled cattle, Cotswold sheep, Berkshire hogs and Percheron 
horses. He is one of the advanced farmers in his district, progres- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1079 

sive and up-to-date. He voted the Republican ticket until reccntl}-. 
when he became a Progressive. 

He married, in 1887, Ada Work, who died December 24, 1899; 
married (second) Ellen Miller, in May, 1904; she died in February, 
1906. Children by first marriage: Allen; Harry, at home. 



The Hoover family, of Huntingdon county, Penns)'!- 
HOOVER vania, is of direct German descent. The immigrant 

progenitor came with a group of Palatines about 1760. 
Landing in Philadelphia, they made their way into the interior, and 
there at once began to contribute to the wealth of the province of Penn- 
sylvania by becoming farmers. Hoover most probably located in what 
is now known as Huntingdon county, as the family has lived in that 
vicinity for generations. Among his descendants was Ludwig, of 
whom further. 

(I) Ludwig Hoover, the first of whom there is any definite knowl- 
edge, was born on the Hoover farm, near Grafton, Penn township, 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and there lived and died. It was 
a large and fertile place, and, with the aid of his numerous sons he did 
general farming. He was a Democrat when that party was in the 
zenith of its political power. He and his family were members of the 
Lutheran church, many of the latter in time becoming adherents of 
the Reformed church. He married twice: by the first marriage 
there were four children, while by the last the issue was three children. 
Among the children of the first marriage was Jacob G., of whom fur- 
ther mention follows. 

(II) Jacob G.. son of Ludwig Hoover, was born in 1S31, in the 
Hoover homestead, near Grafton, Huntingdon county. He received 
a limited education in the common schools of Penn township, Hunt- 
ingdon county, and was reared on the farm, remaining a farmer all 
of his life. He was one of the able men of his township, and greatlv 
respected. He was a Democrat by conviction, voted with and worked 
indefatigably for the party. At one time he was supervisor, in which 
capacity he gave the utmost satisfaction to the township. He and his 
family were members of the Reformed church, in which he was an 
active participant. He married Antha Ellen Black, born in 1841, near 
Broad Top City, Pennsylvania. Like her husband she was reared on 



io8o HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

a farm, and descended from an old and important family in that sec- 
tion. Children: Henry; George, of whom further; Joseph, Lewis, El- 
mer, Anna, Orbison, Alice, Oscar, Elizabeth and Frederick. 

(Ill) George Hoover, son of Jacob G. and Antha Ellen (Black) 
Hoover, was born Februar}' 26, 1863, on the Hoover homestead, in 
Penn township, near Grafton, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. He 
received his mental training in the township schools, and was reared 
on the farm. On reaching maturity he entered the lumber business, 
which he pursued with great success until his retirement five years 
ago from active participation in it. He is a strong Democrat, support- 
ing that party and its principles in every manner whatsoever. He is one 
of the representative, progressive citizens of Grafton, and is held in 
high regard. 

"A truly great life," says Webster, "when Heaven 
LOWRIE vouchsafes so rare a gift, is not a temporary flame, 
burning bright for a while and then expiring, giving 
place to returning darkness. It is rather a spark of fervent heat, as 
well as radiant light, with power to enkindle the mass of human mind ; 
so that, when it glimmers in its own decay, and finally goes out in 
death, no night follows, but it leaves the world all light, all on fire, 
from the potent contact of its own spirit." A truly great life, lived 
in the unconsciousness of true nobility, was that of J. Roberts Lowrie, 
for many years a prominent business man and an honored citizen of 
Warriors Mark, Pennsylvania, where his demise occurred December 
10, 1885, at the age of sixty-three years. 

The founder of the Lowrie family in America was John Lowrie, 
a native of Scotland, whence he emigrated to Pennsylvania in the 
pioneer period of this commonwealth. He settled in Sinking Valley, 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and there was engaged in farming 
and milling enterprises for a number of years, eventually removing to 
Butler county, where he passed to eternal rest. Lie had a sturdy con- 
stitution and a Godly heritage to give his children. Prior to coming 
to America he married Amelia Cameron, of the clan Cameron, in Scot- 
land, and several children were born to this union, among them being 
three sons, namely: Matthew, at one time mayor of Pittsburgh; Wal- 
ter, mentioned below; and John, who died young. Mr. and Mrs. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1081 

Lowrie were devout members of the Presbyterian church and in its 
faith they reared their children. 

WaUer Lowrie was born in Scotland and was brought to America 
by his parents when he was a child of but eight years of age. After 
reaching man's estate he began to study under the tutelage of the Rev. 
John H. McPherrin. At various times he taught school in order to 
defray his expenses for a higher education. He established his home 
at Butler, Pennsylvania, and from that district was elected to the state 
senate. In 1818 he became a member of the United States senate and 
he served in that capacity with the utmost efficiency for a period of two 
terms, at the expiration of which he was secretary of the senate for 
some years. He resigned the latter position in 1836 in order to accept 
the office of secretary of the board of foreign missions on its organiza- 
tion, and immediately removed to New York City, which metropolis 
represented his home until his demise, in 1868. He was wonderfully 
eifted as a lina;uist and as an orator, and after entering the mission 
work of the church all his energies were devoted to bettering condi- 
tions in that department. He gave three sons to foreign mission work 
and also one grandson, Rev. J. Walter Lowrie, D.D. His life was one 
of broad understanding and zealous adherence to duty. He exercised 
a commanding influence over men, not as the result of a conscious am- 
bition or of a studied purpose, but rather from an instinctive homage 
the world awards men of exalted character and incorruptilile princi- 
ples. Possibly if he had cherished more personal ambition he would 
have filled a broader place than that which he occupied, for, in the 
requisites of mental gifts and wide attainments and high moral con- 
ceptions, he had few superiors, and was fitted to adorn any place within 
the gift of his fellow-citizens. But he chose a sphere more congenial 
to his tastes than dizzy elevation would have given. Hon. Walter 
Lowrie was a man swayed by a conscience enlightened by the truth 
and spirit of God. His ambition to be right and do right was the para- 
mount incentive, and he counted not the cost in the attainment of so 
noble an end. 

Hon. Walter Lowrie was twice married ; first to Amelia IMcPher- 
rin, and second to Mary King Childs. The following children were 
the outcome of the first union : John C, a missionary in India and 
later secretary of the board of foreign missions, his entire service in 



io82 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

this field aggregated sixty years; Matthew, a lawyer of Butler county, 
Pennsylvania, died young; Mary, became the wife of a Mr. Baird, and 
died in Pittsburgh; Walter Macon, a missionary to China, was mur- 
dered by Chinese pirates in the China sea; Eliza, died young; J. Rob- 
erts, the immediate subject of this review; and Reuben, who became a 
missionary to China and died after six years' service. There were 
no children born of the second union, and Mrs. Lowrie survived her, 
honored husband only a few months. 

Jonathan Roberts Lowrie, whose name forms the caption for this 
article, was born at Butler, Pennsylvania, March i6, 1823. He was the 
fourth son of Hon. AValter Lowrie and Amelia (McPherrin) Lowrie. 
He was reared to the age of eight years in the place of his nativity, 
and after the death of his mother, March 5, 1832, the family home 
was established in Washington, D. C, where the father was then sec- 
retary of the senate. The ensuing four years of Mr. Lowrie's life 
were passed in the national capital, and there he formed the founda- 
tion for the splendid education he afterward obtained. In 1836, when 
the father was appointed secretary of the Presbyterian board of for- 
eign missions, the family removed to New York City. In the latter 
city, with his brother Reuben, the young J. Roberts attended the L^ni- 
versity of New York. In 1838 he entered the freshman class of Lafay- 
ette College and in the following year was matriculated as a student 
in Jefiferson College, in which excellent institution he was graduated 
as a member of the class of 1842, with valedictory honors. At Jef- 
ferson College he was a valued member of the Franklin Literary So- 
ciety and a charter member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity. He selected 
the legal profession as his life work, and immediately after leaving 
college began the study of law in the city of Pittsburgh, under the 
able preceptorship of his cousin, Hon. Walter H. Lowrie. He was 
admitted to the Blair county bar, July 27, 1846, being one of its origi- 
nal members, and he initiated the active practice of his profession at 
Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania. He was thus launched forth in his busi- 
ness career at the comparatively early age of twenty-three years, and 
ere the span of his life covered many more years he had won consider- 
able renown as a brilliant young attorney. While in the midst of his 
legal success, however, he was overtaken with ill health, and was 
obliged to give up the active practice of law, for which he was so emi- 




J. a c/Cl. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOP, LFMOX AND 
riLO^N FOUNDATIONS. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1083 

nently well fitted by nature and training. In this connection the fol- 
lowing statement has been made concerning him : "One especial gift, 
useful in any walk of life, invaluable in the law, was his in unusual de- 
gree: he had a native power of persuasion which compelled others to 
look from his point of view, to see things as he saw them. This must not 
be confounded with plausibility — the art of making the worse appear 
the better reason; on the contrary, it arises from logical powers, belief 
in self, earnestness, and sincerity." 

We shall pass over the period of his withdrawal from the practice 
of law, it being filled with fierce and chafing regret, not unmixed, how- 
ever, with cheerful resignation. In the spring of 1854 he removed 
from Hollidaysliurg to Warriors Mark, Pennsylvania, in which latter 
place he became legal adviser to the firm of Lyon. Shorb & Company, 
at that time the largest iron manufacturing firm in the United States. 
Its possessions embraced valuable properties in Pittsburgh and St. 
Louis, and it also held about twenty thousand acres of land and ore 
rights in central Pennsylvania. His work at first lay chiefly in per- 
fecting the surveys of its lands and establishing more firmly the titles 
thereto, this line of work keeping him in the open air and rapidly im- 
proving his health. With the passage of time his position in connection 
WMth this firm became of vast importance. The financial crisis of 1873 
bore heavily upon the business interests of Pennsylvania and particu- 
larly afTected the affairs of the above iron manufacturing concern. 
Only by the most skillful management was insolvency avoided. Disso- 
lution, however, was necessary, and Mr. Lowrie was appointed trustee 
of the assets of the firm, with the herculean task of rescuing the proper- 
ty from embarrassment. An enormous indebtedness, pressing creditors, 
and no immediate relief in sight were the difficulties of the situation. 
For seven long years Mr. Lowrie devoted himself to the work of 
rehabilitation, with the satisfaction, at the close of that period, of sur- 
rendering his trust with every dollar of indebtedness of the estate paid 
in full and of restoring to its owners a large property entirely unen- 
cumbered. This has been recognized as a triumph of honest, faithful 
and intelligent business management, which has scarcely a parallel. 
The arduous and confining work made heavy inroads upon Mr. Low- 
rie's health, however, and it was not with such astonishing success that 
he carried on the work of recuperation in this connection. He had 



io84 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

the best medical attention afforded in this country and even went 
abroad to the celebrated Carlsbad Springs for relief. All was in vain 
— he finall}' returned home to pass his remaining days among his dear 
ones. His demise occurred in his residence at Warriors Mark, De- 
cember 10, 1885, at the age of sixty-three years. His remains are in- 
terred at Warriors Mark. 

While in Hollidaysburg, Mr. Lowrie was united in marriage to 
Miss Mary Lyon, the ceremony having been performed February 15, 
1848. She was a daughter of John Lyon, of the firm of Lyon, Shorb 
& Company. Mrs. Lowrie was called to the life eternal March 7, 1863. 
She is survived by three children : Sarah Roberts, who is living with 
her stepmother in the beautiful family home in Warriors Mark; Wil- 
liam Lyon, a prominent physician and surgeon at Tyrone, Pennsyl- 
vania; and Roberts Jr., a lawyer of note in Philadelphia. December 
27, 1866, Mr. Lowrie married Miss Matilda Hamill Nassau, daughter 
of Rev. Charles W. Nassau, D.D., of Lawrenceville, New Jersey. This 
union was prolific of five children, as follows : Charles Nassau, a 
landscape architect in New York City; Matilda, died in youth; W'alter, 
a Presbyterian minister in New York, where he died in 1901 ; Cal- 
houn Stewart, died at the age of seventeen years ; and Matthew, a law- 
yer in the city of Pittsburgh. The widely renowned Lowrie home in 
Warriors Mark is surrounded by lawns and many rare species of trees 
and plants. Mr. Lowrie was a botanist of note and collected speci- 
mens of plant culture from different sections in order to further beau- 
tify his home grounds. Where once was a potato patch is now a lawn 
and where there was a cornfield is now a grove. Following are some 
paragraphs, bearing on Mr. Lowrie's character, taken from an article 
written by Hon. J. M. SuUivan at the time of Mr. Lowrie's demise. 
The same appeared in the Butler Citizen: 

"The fidelity of Mr. Lowrie's friendships will be attested by all 
who were honored with his confidence. He was an undemonstrative 
man; he did nothing for show. He would rather be right than popu- 
lar. He shrank from public observation, except where duty called. 
Among the most prominent traits of his character were manly inde- 
pendence, unflinching firmness, calm, cool self-reliance in business mat- 
ters, always regulated by the strictest integrity. His large business ex- 
perience brought him in contact with every phase of character. He 
was a close observer, and was rarely deceived in the men with whom 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1085 

he dealt. He was an earnest, inflexible, upright business man. But, 
underlying these strong qualities, and only fully discovered by those 
who knew him best, were the gentlest and tenderest affections. No 
husband or father had a more loving heart. His sympathies went out 
to those in suffering and want, and he never turned from an appeal of 
sorrow. With his own hand he ministered to every case of distress 
within his reach, and there is many a poor mountaineer today mourn- 
ing in Mr. Lowrie's death the loss of his last earthly friend. Mr. 
Lowrie was liberal in his charities, but was always best satisfied when 
none knew of them but the receivers. Home was his earthly paradise. 
In its sunlight he gathered strength and inspiration for the weighty 
business duties of the world. . . . 

"Mr. Lowrie, naturally gifted with talents of a high order, was a 
scholar and a gentleman of refined and highly cultivated tastes. His 
ample library was an attractive resort to him among the other pleasures 
of his home. There he enjoyed the companionship of the best authors. 
He was much interested in geological research, and many fine geo- 
logical specimens enriched his cabinet. He was almost an enthusiast 
in the study of botany. His own botanical collection was one of the 
largest in the state, and was frequently referred to by distinguished 
botanists for aid in their researches. . . . 

"Mr. Lowrie took a deep interest in the affairs of the nation. He 
was a close observer of current events, and was thoroughly patriotic 
in all his convictions. He was fearless in declaring his opinions on 
all questions affecting national or state policy, and always ready to 
give a reason for his political faith. But he had an innate aversion to 
the methods of modern politics, and his manly nature shrunk from 
contact or association with the selfish political tricksters and schemers 
who have so offensively obtruded themselves into the management of 
public affairs. He never held nor desired to hold any political position 
himself, and discouraged his friends from seeking promotion through 
any of the corrupt channels in these days leading to political prefer- 
ment. His learning and ability, his manly courage, his broad, well- 
balanced mind, hiscalm, cool, intelligent judgment under other aus- 
pices might have been invoked to render the state valuable service." 

From a brief article, written by Rev. Robert Hamill, D.D., 
who was a college classmate of Mr. Lowrie, the following is here in- 
corporated : 

"Mr. Lowrie's crowning grace was his unpretending modesty. This 
gave emphasis to all his other excellencies. While possessed of a de- 
gree of intelligence which rendered him competent to be an instructor, 
he preferred to take the position of a learner. While he had pro- 



io86 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

nounced views, intelligently formed, he was ready to defer to others 
rather than to thrust his own into the front. With attainments and 
qualities of mind and heart which fitted him to be a leader, he was 
disposed to shrink from, rather than to court, prominence; ever de- 
preciative of, rather than disposed to magnify, himself. Developing 
such characteristics, it is not strange that he should have been uni- 
versally held in high esteem. He was justly honored and beloved by 
all: 

None knew him but to love him, 

None named him but to praise him. 

Those who were associated with him in all the different walks of life 
— the community in which he dwelt, the church in which he was a faith- 
ful office-bearer, as well as those in closer relations — all loved him. 
While they cherish sacredly his memory, they have never ceased to 
feel and mourn his loss. May they have grace to emulate his bright 
example." 

Mr. Lowrie was reared in the faith of the Presbyterian church and 
he was elected and ordained a ruling elder in the church of that denomi- 
nation in Birmingham and Warriors Mark. He was a careful student 
of the doctrines and history of the great denomination to which he be- 
longed, and tried as best he could to glorify Christ through the love 
and devotion of his individual life. His place in the home and in the 
church is vacant, but a mansion has been filled in Heaven. 



This branch of the Wilson family descends from John 
WILSON Wilson, born September 26, 1751, at Newtown, Lima- 

vaddy county Londonderry, Ireland, emigrated to the 
United States in September, 1770, landing at New Castle, Delaware. 
One month later he settled in the Kishacoquillas Valley, two miles west 
of Reedsville, in then Cumberland (now Mifflin) county, Pennsylvania. 
He soon afterward moved ten miles farther west in the same valley to 
what is now Menno township, where he engaged in farming and lived 
for sixty-one years, dying September 11, 1832, aged nearly eighty-one 
years. He joined the Presbyterian church in his native land, and on 
coming to America brought a church letter or certificate of member- 
ship, which he deposited with the West Kishacoquillas Presbyterian 
Church, of which he was ruling elder for about forty years. He mar- 
ried, in 1782, Margaret Fleming, born at Faggs Manor, Chester county, 



HISTORY Ol- THE JL'XTATA VALLFA' 1087 

Pennsylvania, Uecfnibcr 17, 1764, died June 2, 1829, daughter of Juhn 
and Mary (Hayes) Fleming. Children: i. David, burn September 11, 
1783, died unmarried, June 11, 1822. 2. Mary, born September 30, 
1785, died October 8, 1852; married Richard Allison. 3. Ann, born 
August 28, 1787, died December 29, 1837; married William Hazlett. 
4. Sarah, born July 17, 1789, died August 14, 1850; married Robert 
Reed. 5. John, born July 3, 1791, died March 12, 1870; married Mary 
Scott, died September 22, 1878, aged seventy-one years. 6. James, 
born August 22, 1793, died January 6, 1837; he married (first) Jane, 
died May 26, 1829, sister of Rev. Matthew B. Hope, D.D., missionary 
to China, later secretary of General Assembly Board of Education, and 
still later a professor at Princeton College; he married (second) Isa- 
bella Stewart. 7. George, of whom further. 8. Margaret, born July 
2, 1797, died February 18, 1848; married, March 20, 1825, James Wil- 
son, of Dauphin county, Pennsylvania; their eldest son, James, a caval- 
ryman, was killed at Hartsville, Tennessee, in the ci\il war; another 
son, Samuel R.. was wounded at Fort Blakeley, Alabama, while lead- 
ing his men, dying eight hours after the amputation of his leg; he was 
a graduate of Princeton, and preparing for the ministry; John F., an- 
other son, was a graduate of Princeton, captain in the civil war, was 
seriously wounded at Vicksburg, and left for dead on the field of bat- 
tle; he revived, walked from the field, and eventually recovered his 
health, losing one eye and one arm, permanently disabled ; he was com- 
missioned judge advocate in Virginia under President Lincoln, and 
was postmaster at Lynchburg, Virginia, eight years under President 
Grant. 9. William, born August 28, 1799, died March 14. 1881 ; he 
was a major of militia, and a member of the Pennsylvania legislature; 
he married (first) January 21, 1823, Eleanor Bailey, died October 13, 
1848, aged forty-six years; he married (second) Mrs. Rebecca Gon- 
zalis, died January i, 1875, in her fifty-eighth year. 10. Thomas Jef- 
ferson, born November 18, 1801, married Margaret Fleming; children: 
John F., Joseph C, Thomas J., Elizabeth, Margaret, Sarah and Ma- 
tilda. II. Rev. Samuel, D.D., born September 24, 1804, graduate Jef- 
ferson ]\Iedical College, Philadelphia, but later studied at Princeton 
Theological Seminary and became a minister of the Presbyterian 
church; later opened a female seminary and boys' school, but later 
returned to the ministry, serving churches in Fayette county and in Illi- 



io88 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

nois, and in 1886 was living in Fairfield, Iowa; he married Anna Maria 
Rodgers, of Mount Pleasant, Pennsylvania. One of his sons, Captain 
John P. Wilson, was shot through both arms at Gettysburg. Later was 
wounded in the thigh, while serving under General Sheridan, had the 
leg amputated, but died at the hospital at City Point, April 15, 1865, 
five hours before President Lincoln was assassinated. Another son, 
•James G. Wilson, became a banker at Streator, Illinois; his brother. 
Rev. Joseph R. Wilson, D.D., was a professor at Parsons College, 
Fairfield, Iowa. 12. Robert Fleming, born February 9, 1808, began 
study for the ministry, but died September 30, 1824. John Wilson, 
father of the foregoing children, was accompanied to America by his 
brother David, and two sisters w'ho intermarried with the Black, Get- 
tys, Fleming and McNitt families of the Juniata Valley. 

(II) George, fourth son and seventh child of John and Margaret 
(Fleming) Wilson, was born in Menno township, Mifflin county, Penn- 
sylvania, May 28, 1795, died there, August 19, 1862. He grew to 
manhood at the homestead farm, which was his home luitil his mar- 
riage at the age of twenty-five years. He then became the owner of 
one of his father's farms in Menno township, known as the "Three 
Spring Farm," and moved thereon with his bride. He was a man of sub- 
stance and followed agriculture as an occupation, living from marriage 
until death on the Three Spring Farm. Both George Wilson, his wife 
and family were members of the Presbyterian church, belonging to 
the West Kishacoquillas congregation, except one daughter-in-law, 
Mrs. Robert Fleming Wilson, who was a member at Canonsburg. He 
married, February 22, 1821, Mary (Nancy), born in the Kishacoquil- 
las Valley, November 27, 1802, died November 3, 1877, daughter of 
Robert Taylor. Children: i. Jefferson Taylor, a wealthy farmer, 
owning, besides the homestead, lands in Kansas, Iowa and Nebraska ; 
married Sarah Ann Gonzales; children: Henry G., Rebecca G., George 
T., Robert ]\I. and Nannie T. 2. John Williamson, of whom further. 
3. Rev. Robert Fleming, graduate of JefTerson College and Princeton 
Theological Seminary, ordained a minister of the gospel, November 29, 
1856, and served many Presbyterian churches of the Juniata Valley as 
pastor; he married, September 24, 1856, Elizabeth C, second daugh- 
ter of James McCullough, of Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; children: 
Nannie E., James M., Anna M., and Mary Josephine. 4. Margaret 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1089 

Jane, married Andrew W. Campbell; their daughter, Lizzie M., was 
the only child to reach adult years. 5. Rev. Miles Cooper, graduate of 
Jefferson College and Princeton Theological Seminary, spent many 
years in teaching and preaching, being a regularly licensed minister of 
the Presbyterian church; at the time of his death, June 15, 1870, he 
was pastor of the church at Sidney, Iowa; unmarried. 6. Henry Smith, 
a farmer of Mifilin county, owning, beside his line home farm, lands in 
Kansas and Nebraska; he married Sarah Elizabeth Fleming; children: 
George T., Annie, Jennie T., James M., Richard and Joseph F. 7. 
Nancy Ann, died unmarried. 8. Rhoda Mary, married Joseph W. 
Fleming, a farmer, merchant, and one time sheriff of Mifflin county; 
children; Nannie T., George, John, Mary, Stella and another. 9. 
Sarah Reed, married John A. Campbell, a farmer. 

(Ill) John Williamson, second son of George and Mary (Nancy) 
(Taylor) Wilson, was born on "Three Spring Farm," Menno town- 
ship, ]\Iifflin county, Pennsylvania, June 23, 1823, died in Belleville, 
Pennsylvania. July 6, 1900. He attended the public school of his day. 
but he and his elder brother were early drafted into farm service as 
their father's assistants. He continued on the home farm until his 
marriage in 1847, then in 1848 rented a farm in Menno township from 
his uncle, John Wilson, and there remained fourteen years. His wife 
then failing in health, he was persuaded to give up the farm and take 
up his residence with her parents, remaining there until the death of 
Mrs. Wilson soon afterward. Some years prior to his death, George 
Wilson had purchased a farm adjoining, which with the home farm, 
he left his sons Jefferson T., John W. and Henry S. John W. sold 
his interest to his brothers and purchased a farm a mile distant, ad- 
joining the mill and farms of the McClelands. On this farm, which 
in early days was the site of a fort, he spent nineteen years, selling 
out in 1884 and moving to Belleville, where he lived retired until his 
death, except for the care of his farm properties in Mifflin county, 
(Pennsylvania), Iowa and Nebraska. He was a wealthy, prominent 
farmer, but always interested in military affairs. He was an officer 
of a Mifflin county cavalry company, and subsequently commissioned 
by the governor as major. During the civil war he volunteered for 
state defense and materially aided the L^nion cause. He was a Repub- 
lican in politics, and held many local offices, including justice of the 



I090 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

peace, an office he held for twelve years prior to his death. He was 
interested in the local grange, Patrons of Husbandry, and a director 
of the Kishacoquillas Turnpike Company. In religious faith a Pres- 
byterian, he was for many years an active member of the West Kisha- 
coquillas congregation. It is said of him that he never used intoxi- 
cants or tobacco in any form, but always was an earnest worker for 
the cause of temperance. He married (first) in 1847, Margaret N., 
daughter of "Squire" James Willis, of the adjoining township of 
Union; he married (second) December 6, 1866, Elizabeth A., daugh- 
ter of Benjamin Carver, a farmer of the Kishacoquillas Valley. Chil- 
dren of Major John W. Wilson by his first wife: i. Rachel Matilda, 
married James C. Fleming, and resides in Tama county, Iowa. 2. 
Ida, married M. F. Kenyon, now residing in Oregon. 3. George T., 
deceased. 4. James I. 5. An infant. Children of Major Wilson by 
second wife : 6. Bettie L., married W. J. McNabb, and resides in Belle- 
ville, Pennsylvania. 7. John Taylor, of whom further. 

(IV) John Taylor, only son of Major John W. W'ilson and his 
second wife, Elizabeth A. Garver, was born in Union township, Mif- 
flin county, Pennsylvania, March 13, 1874. He obtained his early edu- 
cation in the public school, prepared at Indiana State Normal, and en- 
tered the L-niversity of West Virginia, whence he was graduated A.B., 
later LL.B. After a year spent in the office of T. F. Newlin, of Pitts- 
burgh, he was admitted to Allegheny county bar in 1897, and in 1898 
was admitted to the Mifflin county bar, locating at Belleville, where he 
is well established in general practice. In 1900 he was elected district 
attorney of Mifflin county, serving with credit until 1904. He vi^as 
then appointed county solicitor, which office he now holds. He has no 
criminal practice, but confines his practice largely to the orphan and 
probate courts. He has been admitted to all state and federal courts 
of his district, his practice extending to all. He is a Republican in poli- 
tics, and besides those mentioned has held several public offices, includ- 
ing that of auditor of Mifflin county 1898 to 1901. After his father's 
death he succeeded him as justice of the peace, but later resigned. Mr. 
Wilson is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
and the Royal Arcanum, of Lewistown; the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, of Belleville; and both he and his wife are members of the 
Presbyterian church. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1091 

He married, May 12, 1898, Minnie M. Simpson, born in Hunting- 
don county, daughter of David R. and Hannah Simpson. Child : John 
\V. (2), born January 20, 1899. The family residence erected by 
Mr. Wilson in 1900 stands on the "hill" in Belleville, and bespeaks the 
tine taste and culture of its owners. ]Mr. Wilson also owns a farm of 
one hundred and thirteen acres in ]\Ienno township, which is devoted 
to general farming purposes. 



An essentially representative citizen of W'arriors 
RUMBERGER ]\Iark township, in Huntingdon county, Pennsyl- 
vania, is George Edwin Rumberger, \vho is here 
most successfully engaged in the great basic industry of agriculture. 
His finely improved farm of eighty acres is eligibly located one mile 
distant from Warriors I\Iark and on it he is engaged in diversified agri- 
culture, stock raising and dairying. A native of the old Keystone com- 
monwealth, his birth occurred on the farm on which he now resides, 
April I, 1870. He is a son of Oliver S. and Elvira (Rider) Rum- 
berger, concerning whom a sketch appears on other pages of this work, 
and as easy access can be had to it further details in regard to the 
family history are not deemed essential at this point. 

To the common schools of W^arriors Mark township, George E. 
Rumberger is indebted for his early educational training. He famil- 
iarized himself with farming on his father's estate, a part of which he 
himself now owns. His farm comprises eighty acres and it is splen- 
didly improved, with spacious, modern buildings. He makes a specialty 
of dairy work, marketing considerable butter every week. He is a 
fine business man and a loyal and public-spirited citizen. In politics 
he is an unswerving Republican and he has served for several terms as 
school director. He is affiliated with the Grange, and in religious mat- 
ters is a zealous member of the Methodist Episcopal church, while his 
wife is a Lutheran. 

January 29, 1895, Mr. Rumberger married Miss Luella Rebecca 
Wilson, a native of Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and a daughter 
of Christopher and Mary (Wheeland) Wilson, the former of whom is 
deceased and the latter of whom resides in Warriors Mark. Mr. and 
Mrs. Wilson were both born and reared in Huntingdon county. The 
paternal grandparents of Mrs. Rumberger were Thomas and Chris- 



I092 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

tina Wilson and her maternal grandparents were John and Susan 
Wheeland. Four children have come to bless the union of Mr. and 
Mrs. Rumberger, namely: Ethel j\Iae, born April 29, 1896; Calvin 
Lee, born September i, 1898; Almeda Wilson, born May 12, 1906; 
and Verna Elizabeth, born March 28, 1908. 



Edwin J. Neff, of \\'arriors Mark, Huntingdon county, 
NEFF Pennsylvania, descends from German ancestry. The first 

of the family to leave the Fatherland to try his fortunes 
in the Xew \\'orld accompanied a body of Palatines, who crossed the 
iVtlantic ocean in 1752. Like his companions he settled in Pennsyl- 
vania, and his name, Andrew Nefif, is on the list of incoming immi- 
grants during that year, in the Historical Department of the State of 
Pennsylvania. He was a farmer by occupation, which he followed 
after reaching America; and a member of the Lutheran church, which 
faith is still that of the majority of his numerous descendants. 

(I) Isaac Neff was a direct descendant of Andrew Neff, the Ger- 
man immigrant. He was born in Pennsylvania and there lived and 
died. He settled in Huntingdon county and became the proprietor of 
the Petersburg House, which he conducted with great ability. He 
married Susan Neff, probably a cousin, who was also born in Penn- 
sylvania. He was one of the popular hotel keepers of his day, and had 
a large acquaintance, not only in his immediate vicinity, but also over 
the state. He was ably seconded by his wife, who was famous for 
her cooking and the dainty and tempting meals that she prepared for 
the guests of the Petersburg House. Children: i. Edwin J., of whom 
further. 2. William, died in Cleveland, Ohio. 3. Isaac, last heard of 
in Cleveland, Ohio. 4. Susan, married John Morton, of Philadelphia. 
5- Anna ]\Iary, died in youth. 6. Fannie, married John McMillan, and 
died in Iowa. 

(II) Edwin J. Neff, son of Isaac and Susan (Neff) Neff, was born 
in Stone Valley, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. He received his 
education in the common schools, and on reaching maturity began farm- 
ing. After his marriage he located in Warriors Mark, Huntingdon 
count3^ and purchased one hundred -and eleven acres of land, which he 
soon converted into one of the finest farms in the township. Here 
he lived and died, an influential man, and a good one. He and his wife 



HISTORY 01' TIIK JUNIATA VALLEY 1093 

were members of the Presbyterian church, and he was a Republican 
and held township offices under that parly, lie married Alary Ellen 
Harris, born in Stone Valley, where her family had long been settled, 
and ranked among the prominent ones of the community. Children: 
I. Wilfred, a turnkey at Pennsylvania Industrial Reformatory. 2. 
Fannie, unmarried; lives on homestead. 3. William, lives on home- 
stead. 4. Edwin J. Jr., of whom further. 5. Carrie, married Harry 
Grazier, of Warriors Mark township. 6. Sue, widow of Ernest Addle- 
man, lives at Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

(Ill) Edwin J. Neff Jr., son of Edwin J. and Mary Ellen (Harris) 
Neff, was born March 6, 1865, in Warriors Mark township, Hunting- 
don county, Pennsylvania. He was reared on his father's farm and re- 
ceived his education in the public schools of the township. On reach- 
ing maturity he decided on farming as his vocation; and for several 
years he rented various farms in Center county, Pennsylvania, where 
he met with success. He farmed in Buffalo Run Valley, Center county, 
for a time; after which he moved, in 1900. to Franklin township, Hunt- 
ingdon county, and leased land from Clark Grazier, since deceased. 
He immediately began improvements on the land and buildings, and 
has by keen judgment made it a financial success. He does general 
farming along scientific lines, and is one of the progressive agricul- 
turists of his section. He is a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and belongs to the Encampment. He is a staunch Pro- 
gressive in politics. His wife is a member of the Lutheran church; but 
he has no church affiliations. 

He married, September iS, 1889, Anna Fetterhoof. daughter of 
Daniel Fetterhoof, the descendant of an old and distinguished German- 
American familv. Children: Eugene and Stewart. 



The Lehman family, of Huntingdon county, Pennsyl- 
LEHMAN vania, is of direct German extraction. The German 
immigrant, Gustav Lehman, who founded the Ameri- 
can branch, probably landed in America about 1789-1790, and settled 
in Pennsvlvania. Among his children was John, of whom further men- 
tion is made below. 

(II) John Lehman, son of Gustav Lehman, was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, and there lived and died. He was a farmer by occupation, and 



1094 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

owned a good deal of land, which was divided among his heirs after 
his death. Among his children was Henry, of whom further. 

(III) Henry Lehman, son of John Lehman, was born in York 
county, Pennsylvania. Like his forbears he followed farming as his 
vocation. He was one of the progressive men of his day, and his place 
was a model. Among his children was Henry, of whom further. 

(IV) Henry (2), son of Henry (i) Lehman, was born in York 
county, Pennsylvania, on his father's farm. He died while yet in the 
prime of life. Children by his wife Mary: i. Daniel. 2. Henry. 3. 
Joseph, died young. 4. John, died young. 5. Samuel, of whom fur- 
ther. 6. Mary (Mrs. Sipe). 7. Elizabeth (Mrs. Sipe). 8. 

(Mrs. Daron). 

(V) Samuel Lehman, son of Henry (2) Lehman, was born in 1818, 
in York county, Pennsylvania, and died in Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1885. He was reared on the farm and received his edu- 
cation in the common schools. In 1839 he moved to Huntingdon 
county and was employed for a time in Neff's mill, near Petersburg. 
After marriage he engaged in farming, and became the possessor of 
a farm of seventy-two acres, which he increased to eighty-two acres 
before his death. He erected substantial buildings and remained on the 
place until his death. He was a Republican and was active in local 
politics. Both he and his wife were members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, and he was a trustee. He married Mary Ann Llutchi- 
son, born in Warriors Mark township, Pennsylvania, in 1819, and died 
near the place of her birth, on the land that she inherited from her 
father, in 1877. She was the daughter of Archibald and Mary (Hys- 
kell) Hutchison. He was the son of William Hutchison, who came 
over from Ireland before 1798, and settled first in Tyrone, Pennsyl- 
vania, afterward going to Muskingum county, Ohio, where he died. 
Archibald married and remained in Pennsylvania, where he died in 
1851. He married Mary Hyskell, born in Germany, daughter of Ben- 
jamin and Margaret (Spensard) Hyskell. Children: John; Benja- 
min ; William ; Eliza ; Margaret ; Mary Ann, married Samuel Lehman ; 
and John. Children of Samuel and Mary Ann (Hutchison) Lehman: 
I. Amanda, unmarried, makes home with her brother, Frank Scott 
Lehman. 2. William, died in infancy. 3. Samuel, died in infancy. 
4. Mary, married George Schubert, of Altoona. 5. John R., lives at 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1095 

\\ arridrs Mark, employee of the State Internal Department. 6. l'"rank 
Scott, of whom further. 

(VI) Frank Scott Lehman, son of Samuel and Mary Ann (Flutch- 
ison ) Lehman, was born August 27, 1859, at Warriors Mark, on the 
farm he now lives on. He received his mental training in the common 
schools of the township, and early took up farming. He managed 
the homestead before his father's death, and after that event he pur- 
chased the interests of the other heirs and remained on it, doing gen- 
eral farming and specializing in dairying. He keeps a large number 
of thoroughbreds of high pedigrees. His dairy, which is conducted 
along modern lines, is supplied by twelve or fifteen cows, which give 
an unusual yield of milk. Mr. Lehman is one of the up-to-date farm- 
ers in his section, and uses the latest methods to produce desired results. 
He owns one hundred and sixty-five acres of land. He is a Republican 
and has been school director three times; both he and his wife are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is a trustee 
of many years' standing. He is a member of the Modern W'^oodmen 
of America and of the Grange. 

He married, in 1892, Zula Rumberger, a daughter of O. S. Rum- 
berger, mentioned elsewhere. Children: i. Frances, born May 23, 
1893, graduated in class of 1913 at Warriors Mark high school. 2. 
Pauline, born April 3, 1900. a student in high school. 



The history of the Isett family in Huntingdon county be- 
ISETT gins in 1787 with Jacob Isett, born in Bucks county, Penn- 
sylvania, February 16, 1769, of German Lutheran parents. 
He was a shoemaker, and in 1787 came to Sinking Valley, working at 
the lead mine fort at his trade. There was no money to be had, his serv- 
ices being paid for in wheat at fifty cents per bushel. He accumulated 
two hundred bushels, that, when the price advanced to one dollar and fif- 
ty cents per bushel, he sold, thus giving him a capital on which he built 
his future fortunes. He bought the Arch Spring property, and in 1787 
built a saw and grist mill. The mill was a crude affair, the stones for 
grinding being brought from nearby mountains, and for those who 
wished their flour bolted, a rude bolter was used, turned by hand. He 
later bought what was known as the L^nion Furnace power, intending 
to build a merchant and grist mill. In 1798 he built on the Little Juni- 



1096 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

ata river the foundation for a dam, dug part of a mill-race and put 
in head-gates, but saw all his labor washed away by floods the follow- 
ing spring. His millwright, after an inspection of the x-\rch Spring 
power, gave him so favorable a report that in 1799 he built there a 
stone grist mill, forty by forty-five feet, three stories high. Here he 
conducted a prosperous business in connection with mill and store un- 
til his death in 1852. He married, in 1795, Eleanor Stockdale, born 
of Presbyterian parents, in county Down, Ireland, died in Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1827, coming to this country wath her pa- 
rents, settling in Baltimore, where the father died two years later. Her 
mother married again, and later the family settled in Canoe Valley, 
Huntingdon county. 

(II) John S., one of the seven children of Jacob and Eleanor 
(Stockdale) Isett, was born in Franklin township, Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania, October 14, 1799, died in 1883. He was given a good 
education, attending school until 18 14 at Alexandria. He was of- 
fered by his father the choice of a college education at Carlisle or a 
position with the clearing gang, choosing the latter. The following 
fall he became clerk in the store of Cyrus Cartwright, but after five 
months returned home and began learning the miller's trade in his 
father's mill. In 1817 he was placed in charge of the mill, receiving 
the same share of the profits as the other millers. When he had saved 
$400 he determined to go to St. Louis, Missouri, then considered an 
Eldorado. His father consented to his going, telling him, however, 
that when his money was gone he could return and have his old posi- 
tion. In company with John Wray he went to Pittsburgh, where they 
bought a skifif in which they made their way down the Ohio to Cincin- 
nati. They continued their journey to Louisville by raft, thence by 
boat to Shawneetown, thence by foot to St. Louis. He did not there 
find employment to his liking, and went to Carthage, Missouri, where 
he entered into partnership with Dr. J. H. Lambert, starting a small 
store. He was taken ill, but finally reached home minus all he started 
Avith, but far richer in experience. After a j^ear spent on the farm he 
returned to the mill. In 1824 his father built the stone mill at Arch 
Spring, which the son managed, as well as a store, which he operated 
in partnership with a brother-in-law. In 1826 his father, Jacob Isett. 
purchased of ex-Governor Heister the Spruce Creek property, and in 



HISTORY OF THE JUXIATA VALLEY 1097 

1S2- the family moved to the new purchase. In 1828 John S. Isett 
Ijuilt the Spruce Creek mill, which he managed in connection with a 
mercantile business. In 183 1 he built a large residence at Spruce Creek 
and continued in successful business until his retirement. He owned 
and conducted several farms, built in 1836 a small bloom forge, with 
one hammer and two refining fires, which he operated until 1861, and 
for twenty-six years from January, 1839, had charge and control of the 
Huntingdon-Cambria & Indiana Turnpike Company, having been ap- 
pointed sequestrator in the former year by Thomas Burnside, presi- 
dent judge of Huntingdon county. In 1844, with his son John H. he 
visited Hot Springs, Arkansas, thence by wagon traveled through Ar- 
kansas. ^Missouri, Illinois and Iowa. In 1845 he again visited ^Missouri 
with his son Edward B., purchasing a tract of land on which he in- 
tended to settle, but never carried out his intention. He continued in 
business until a few years prior to his death, residing at the old home 
in Spruce Creek, quiet and retired. He was a Democrat in politics, 
liberal in his religious views, just to all, honorable and upright in all 
his dealings. He married. July 19, 1825, Mary Ann. daughter of Ed- 
ward Bell, of Antis township, Blair county, Pennsylvania, and they had 
twelve children: i. Edward B., of whom further. 2. Jacob, died in 
Spruce Creek, a farmer. 3. Mary I. 4. Annie, married Chauncey Sar- 
gent, whom she survives, residing in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and To- 
ronto, Canada. 5. John H. 6. Lucetta. 7. Frank, died in Hollidays- 
burg, Pennsylvania, while still a young man. Five children died in 
infancy. 

(Ill) Edward B.. son of John S. and Mary Ann (Bell) Isett, was 
born Tulv 24. 1826. at Spruce Creek. Huntingdon county. Pennsylvania. 
He obtained his education in the public schools and was trained in busi- 
ness methods at his father's various business plants. After his marriage 
he settled at Cold Spring Forge, where for several years he was en- 
gaged in the manufacture of iron. From 1861 to 1864 he operated the 
Elizabeth Furnace, in Blair county, then returned to Spruce Creek, 
where he engaged in mercantile business and conducted a farm in part- 
nership with his father. As the latter advanced in years he surrendered 
more and more of the burdens of business to Edward B.. especially in 
the milling department, which latter business he conducted many years 
until his retirement. In 1912 he moved to Bellwood, where he yet resides. 



& 



1098 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

He was during his active life one of the leading business men of his 
section; was for a quarter of a century president of the Altoona Bank, 
of Altoona, Pennsylvania, and has been for many years a director of 
the First National Bank of Huntingdon. He engaged extensively in 
lumbering in Clearfield, Cambria and Jefferson counties, also operating 
for several years in coal enterprises. His mercantile business he con- 
ducted alone for some time, then as Isett & Thompson. His various 
enterprises were well conducted and uniformly successful. He is a 
Democrat in politics, a member of the Presbyterian church, and is the 
oldest living member of Mountain City Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Altoona. 

He married Elizabeth B. Dysart, daughter of Joseph Dysart, an 
old resident of Eden Hill, who spent his last years in Tyrone, Penn- 
sylvania, who married and had issue: Elizabeth B., deceased, mar- 
ried Edward B. Isett; Sarah, deceased, married McClain; Annie, 

deceased, married Dr. Conrad ; John, died in Dixon, Illinois ; James, 
died in Altoona, Pennsylvania ; William, died in Dixon, Illinois. Chil- 
dren of Edward B. and Elizabeth B. Isett: John Bell, of whom fur- 
ther ; Samuel, died aged thirteen years ; Mary, died aged seventeen 
years ; Alice, married Louis Henderson, and resides in Nachusa, Illi- 
nois; Sarah, married J. G. Humer, and resides at Altoona; Sidney T., 
of Avhonl further; Eleanor, married Dr. Edmund Owens, and resides 
in Dixon, Illinois ; Lusetta and Wilson, died in infancy. 

(IV) John Bell, eldest son of Edward B. and Elizabeth B. (Dy- 
sart) Isett, was born at Cold Spring Forge, January 14, 1853. He 
was educated at Bellwood Academy, Lititz Academy, and State Col- 
lege. After finishing his studies he engaged with his father at milling 
for several years, then bought the mill and operated it until 1885. He 
then moved to Indianapolis, where he erected and for five years oper- 
ated a factory devoted to the manufacture of corn goods. He sold 
out his factory interest in Indianapolis, then located in Maryland, where 
he leased a flour mill at Conococheague, located on a creek of the same 
name. After running the mill for one year the dam was destroyed by 
a flood, when he moved to Hagerstown, Maryland, spending a year 
there. In 1893 he returned to Spruce Creek, settling on one of the 
Isett farms, but after one year bought a farm in Hanover county, Vir- 
ginia, which he operated for seven years. He then became agent for 





'^ 




(/ O^de^^ 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1099 

the Western Maryland Railroad Company at Hagerstown, Maryland, 
and also owned and operated a coal and grain business, but, after 
eighteen months, returned again to Spruce Creek, renting the old Isett 
mill of his brother, and operating it for five years. He then retired, but 
still manages his own farm and those belonging to his father. He re- 
sides in the old brick house of the Isetts, which he purchased on his 
last return to Spruce Creek. He is a Democrat in politics, and a mem- 
ber of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 

Mr. Isett married, September 5, 1878, Lusetta Banks, born April 
30, 1856, died April 29, 1912, daughter of Ephraim Banks, of Wilkes- 
Barre, Pennsylvania. 

(IV) Sidney T., son of Edward B. and Elizabeth B. (Dysart) 
Isett, was born February 18, 1867, at Spruce Creek, Pennsylvania. He 
was educated in the public schools, Muhlenberg College, and Millers- 
ville State Normal School. After completing his studies he entered 
the Altoona Bank, at Altoona, later becoming manager of his father's 
lumber interests in Jefferson county, twelve miles from Punxsutaw- 
ney. He then engaged in farming until 1901, when he became pro- 
prietor of the Isett mill at Spruce Creek, where he conducts a general 
milling business. He ships to various points, also supplying a large 
local demand : also owning and operating three farms in the township, 
thereon conducting general farming operations. Both he and his wife 
are members of the Presbyterian church. He is a Knight of Pythias, 
and a Democrat in politics. He married, June 9, 1904, Edith B., 
daughter of John Waite, of Eden Valley. Children : IMuriel, Edward, 
Mary and Elizabeth. 



For many generations the Henderson family has 
HENDERSON been in Pennsylvania, contributing by their in- 
dustry and initiative to the wealth and general 
prosperity of that commonwealth. The immigrant ancestor came from 
England in the days when the English crown colonies in America were 
attracting some of the brightest minds, indomitable spirits and far- 
seeing men of the Mother Country. David Henderson, the immigrant, 
located in Pennsylvania, having drifted into the colony from New 
York, where he landed in 1680. His descendants are today among 
the highly respected citizens of the Keystone state. 



1 100 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(I) Robert Henderson, a descendant of David Henderson, was born 
about 1797 in Bald Eagle Valley, Center county, Pennsylvania. He 
was a farmer and owned the land that he tilled. He married Isabella 
Lindsey, bom in Bald Eagle Valley, the daughter of a neighbor. 
Among their children was David, of whom further mention is made 
below. 

(II) David Henderson, son of Robert and Isabella (Lindsey) Hen- 
derson, was born in Center county, Pennsylvania. He was a farmer 
and owned his farm, besides holding other real estate. When quite a 
young man he married Margaret, daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth 

' (Shank) Conrad, who came from Lancaster county, settled near Hunt- 
ingdon Furnace, Huntingdon county, and there lived and died on his 
farm. Among the children of David and Margaret (Conrad) Hender- 
son was Samuel Conrad, of whom further. 

(III) Samuel Conrad Henderson, son of David and Margaret 
(Conrad) Henderson, was born April 22, 1832, on his fathers farm in 
Huntingdon county, and died near the place of his birth in 1895. He 
received his education in the common schools and was reared on the 
farm, and on reaching maturity engaged in the family vocation. In 
1864 he moved to one of his father's places and there established him- 
self, and later bought the property of his parent. He was one of the 
able men of his township and was accorded the highest respect by his 
neighbors and friends. He was actively interested in politics, voting 
the Democratic ticket, and was at one time chosen to the office of 
school director. 

He married, in i860, Julia A. Wilson, born in Huntingdon county, 
the daughter of Samuel and Martha (Stephens) Wilson, both of whom 
descended from straight English ancestry. He was a large mining 
man, his interests extending through many branches of that industry. 
He lived near Huntingdon Furnace, and died in Warriors Mark town- 
ship. Both he and his wife were consistent members of the Baptist 
church. Children of Samuel Conrad and Julia A. (Wilson) Hender- 
son: I. Frank, drowned in 1892, at Sioux City, Iowa, with his wife 
and child, Edna, an infant in arms. 2. Martha. 3. George, died of 
pneumonia. 4. James. 5. Walter. 6. Robert, married Elizabeth Hal- 
lead; children: Lillian, Robert, Gerald. 7. Jesse. 8. Mary, 9. Clara. 
10. Lucy. II. Died unnamed. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY iioi 

Andrew William Oliver, of Graysville, Huntiugchju 
OLIVER county, Pennsylvania, descends from ancient and hon- 
orable Irish stock. James Oliver, his grandfather, was 
born in Londonderry, Ireland, and never left his native land. He was 
the oldest son, and according to the laws of primogeniture he inherited 
the family estate. He had a younger brother, John, who came to 
America in 1828, learned the saddler's trade, in Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania, and settled in Covington, Kentucky, and eventually located in 
Pembroke, Kentucky, married and died there in 1S72. James Oliver 
married Sarah McCurdy, in Ireland. Among their children was James, 
of whom further. 

(II) James Oliver, son of James and Sarah (McCurdy) Oliver, was 
born in Londonderry, Ireland, and there educated. While yet a youth he 
accompanied his brother John when he emigrated to the United States 
in 1828. He located first in Mifflin county, I'ennsylvania, where he 
married. He moved to Center county, Pennsylvania, and from there 
to Huntingdon county, in 1844. He purchased the Thomas Ewing 
place of one hundred and fifty acres, to which he soon added forty 
more acres, and there lived until his death, March 6, 1891. He was 
a prosperous and successful farmer, and was exceedingly ambitious, 
especially for his children. With John Archey he bought the James 
Ewing farm and later the Thomas Lyon estate, making his land hold- 
ings large. He was a Republican after the organization of that party 
and held local offices. Both he and his wife were members of the Pres- 
byterian church. He married Margaret Campbell, born in Mifflin 
county, and died in Huntingdon county in 1880. She was the daugh- 
ter of John and Rachel (Oliver) Campbell, both of whom were of 
Scotch-Irish descent and old residents of Mifflin county. Their ances- 
tors were in Mifflin county more than one hundred and forty years 
ago, and some of them were soldiers in the War of the Revolution. 
The entire estate still bears the Campbell name, and now numbers four 
farms. Children of James and Margaret (Campbell) Oliver: i. James, 
died in infancv. 2. Sarah Rachel, unmarried, makes home with her 
brother. Andrew William. 3. John, a prominent and noted Presbyter- 
ian minister in Irvine, Pennsylvania. 4. Andrew William, of whom 
further. 5. Sidnev Ellen, married Dr. Thomas C. Van Tries, died in 
Bellefonte, Pennsylvania. 



II02 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(III) Andrew William Oliver, son of James and Margaret (Camp- 
bell) Oliver, was born September 14, 1848, in Graysville, Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania. He received his education in the common 
schools and then attended the Airy View Academy. Leaving school 
he became manager of his father's farm, at the age of fourteen. He 
proved a careful, painstaking manager of affairs, and continued in that 
position until his father's death in 1891. He purchased a portion of 
the homestead and added it to that which he had inherited and contin- 
ued to farm. In 1887 he moved onto the present home place of one 
hundred and sixty-seven acres, south of Graysville. Here he erected 
comfortable, substantial houses, still in use, and did general farming. 
He has one of the model, up-to-date farms in Huntingdon county, and 
is both progressive and original in his methods of tilling the soil. He 
is a Republican, actively supporting and working for that party, and 
has been supervisor of the county, elected on the Republican ticket. 
Like his forbears in Ireland and the L^nited States, he is a Presbyterian, 
as is his wife. Mr. Oliver stands for all that is high toned and upright 
in the community. He is an advanced man in his views and methods, 
but adheres strictly to the right in all cases and on all questions. No 
man in his county ranks higher than he, and he commands universal 
respect. He married, December 16, 1885, Jennie Cummins, born in 
Pennsylvania, near McAlevy's Fort. She is the daughter of Sterrett 
and Agnes Cummins, both of whom descend from old and important 
families in Pennsylvania. Mrs. Oliver is the cousin of Agnes Cum- 
mins, mentioned elsewhere. Children: i. Agnes, born February 24, 
1888, died aged fifteen years. 2. James Sterrett, born September 4, 
1 89 1, educated in Juniata College and Mercersburg Academy; farms 
at home. 3. Stanley Campbell, born March 16, 1895 ; being educated 
in Juniata College. 



Traced through a long line of German ancestors, who, in 
BUSH their varied walks of life, bore the name with credit and 
honor, the Bush family is found in Huntingdon county, 
where planted by the emigrant, Augustus, in the year 1852. He was a 
member of the German Reformed church, as was his wife, Catherine 
Rudolph, likewise a native of Germany. Children: i. Valentine, a 
retired farmer of Juniata township, married Harriet Garner. 2. Wil- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1103 

Ham, a farmer, married Ada Yocum, of Walker township, and lives in 
Juniata township. 3. Silas, a farmer of Juniata township, married 
(first) Anna Garner, died Sei)tember 29, 1891, (second) Jennie Parks. 
4. Christian, of further mention. 5. John, married Jennie Shenefelt, 
employed in Huntingdon. 6. Elizabeth, married Lincoln David. 7. 
Jennie, twin of Elizabeth, married Amos Kelly. 8. JMary, married 
John M. Heffner. a farmer of Juniata township. 9. Rudolph, a farmer. 
10. George, died in infancy. 11. Caroline, died in infancy. 

(II) Christian, son of Augustus and Catherine (Rudolph) Bush, 
was born in Juniata township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, Au- 
gust 5, 1862. He obtained his education in the public schools of his 
native township and early in life began to work on the farm, an occu- 
pation in which he continued until 1903. He then abandoned general 
farming operations and began to specialize in the raising of fruit, and 
at the present time ( 1913) owns a fine fruit farm near Huntingdon. 
Politically he is a Republican, and from 1906 to 1908 was county com- 
missioner. Both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. He married, in 1881, Sadie Ridenour, born April 7, 
1862, daughter of Levi and Nancy (Foster) Ridenour, natives of Ger- 
many, who settled in Huntingdon county. Children of Levi and Nancy 
Ridenour: Missouri, Alice, Annie, all three deceased; and Sadie, of 
previous mention, married Christian Bush. Children of Christian and 
Sadie (Ridenour) Bush: Ralph Luther, of further mention: Elsie, 
born in May, 1887, lives at home; and Gladys, who was born January 
26, 1894. 

(III) Ralph Luther, first child and only son of Christian and Sadie 
(Ridenour) Bush, was born in Juniata township, Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania, December 31, 1882. He was educated in the public 
schools of Huntingdon, and until 1903 was employed on his father's 
farm. In this year he entered the employ of the J. C. Blair Company, 
and has from one of the lowest positions on the force risen steadily 
until at the present time he is shipping clerk. He is a Republican in 
politics, and is associated fraternally with the Knights of Pythias. 
Both he and his wife are members of the Lutheran church. 

He married, August 31, 1910, Mary Katherine Raymond, daughter 
of Augustus Ravmond, a railroad employee, who was killed on the 
Pennsylvania railroad in 1894. 



1 104 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

The McAteer family has been identified with the early 
McATEER history of Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and has 
been distinctly prominent in promoting the industrial 
and financial conditions of that section. The various members have 
also been prompt in showing their devotion to their country in times 
of trouble, and more than one has sacrificed his life in defense of the 
rights of the country. 

(I) Patrick ]\IcAteer, who was a native of county Antrim, Ireland, 
emigrated to America when he had attained manhood, in 1795, and set- 
tled within the present limits of West township, Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania. Subsequently he removed to Cambria county, in the 
same state, where the remainder of his life was spent. He was en- 
gaged in agriculture and the lumbering industry, and, in association 
with j\Iichael McGuire, built the first saw mill in West township. 
Among his children were: Jonathan, see forward; James; William; 
Patrick; and several others. 

(II) Jonathan, son of Patrick McAteer, was born in Emmitsburg, 
Maryland, 1793, and died at Altoona, Pennsylvania, January 16, 1868. 
He was occupied with farming in Huntingdon county until i860, when 
he removed to Altoona, Pennsylvania, and there lived in retirement. In 
political matters he was a Whig, and in religious, a Catholic. At one 
time he held the rank of captain of the militia. Mr. McAteer married 
Mary Noble, born in Porter township, Huntingdon county, in 1799, 
died in Altoona, Pennsylvania, in 1871. She was the daughter of 
Samuel and Elizabeth (Spencer) Noble, and the granddaughter of 
John Spencer, a native of Ireland. John Spencer settled in what is 
now known as Porter township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
prior to the revolution. He served in the Continental army and at- 
tained the rank of major. His home was near Alexandria, where his 
death occurred about the year 1820. He had a number of children, 
among them being: John Jr., who went to Ohio in 1805, and was 
captain of a company in the war of 1812; William, twin of John Jr., 
removed to Ohio in 1816; Robert, who moved to Ohio in 1824; Eliza- 
beth, who married Samuel Noble, lived where Altoona now stands, and 
became the mother of Mrs. McAteer; Margaret, married John Agle, 
of Alexandria, and later removed to Ohio; Mary, married William 
McElroy, of the vicinity of Barree Forge; IMartha, married Jeremiah 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1105 

Cunningham, of Shaver's Creek Valley, and had children: David and 
Mrs. George Wilson. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan McAteer: 
I. Patrick H., who served in the Union army during the civil war. 
Company C, 12th Pennsylvania Cavalry, was promoted to a captaincy, 
and died in 1869. 2. Samuel A., was a farmer until the year 1865, 
when he removed to Altoona, Pennsylvania, entered the employ of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company, and died at his post as conductor of 
a passenger train, January 17, 1886. 3. Matthew, was also in the 
employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Compan}', and died in Hunting- 
don. 4. Henry J., see forward. Martha, Mary, Elizabeth, Ellen and 
another child died very young. 

(Ill) Henry J., son of Jonathan and Mary (Noble) McAteer, was 
born in Logan township (formerly West township), Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, January 4, 1838. He received a common school 
education in the schools of his native township and at the Mooresville 
Academy, and then entered the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company as a passenger brakeman in 1859. In due course of time he 
was advanced to the position of conductor, retaining this position until 
1869, at which time he was elected to the legislature, served one term, 
and was re-elected to succeed himself. He then engaged in coal opera- 
tions in Clearfield county, Pennsylvania, and has been connected with 
this and with farming since that time. He resides in Alexandria, and 
for the past quarter of a century has owned and managed two farms 
of two hundred and eighteen acres and one hundred and sixty-five 
acres of land, respectively. In 1884 he was elected to the senate of 
Pennsylvania for a term of four years, and during this time served 
on the committees of appropriations, banks and education. He also 
frequently represented his district in the national and state conventions. 
From 1893 until 1897 he was deputy surveyor of the port of Philadel- 
phia. Prior to this time he was a member of the World's Columbian 
Commission, having been appointed to this post by Governor Patter- 
son. He is a member of the Presbyterian church, and of the Mount 
Maria Lodge, No. 300, Free and Accepted Masons. 

Mr. ]\IcAteer married. October 26. 1865, Clara Porter Houtz, 
bom in Alexandria, a daughter of Dr. Daniel and Susan (Bucher) 
Houtz, and had children: i. An infant, deceased. 2. Mary Clare, 
died at the age of ten months. 3. Dorothy Bucher, married John E. 



iio6 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Black, a dealer in glass sand, who lives in Pittsburgh; they have no 
children. 



William Lower, a well-known farmer of Petersburg, 
LOWER Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, represents a family 
which has been identified with various trades and call- 
ings for many years in the state. 

(I) John Lower, his paternal grandfather, located in Williams- 
burg, Blair county, Pennsylvania, after his marriage, and there the 
remainder of his life was spent. His trade was that of shoemaking, at 
which he was successful. He married Isabella Laney, a native of Ire- 
land, who was brought to this country by her parents in her early 
youth and settled in Pennsylvania. They had children : James ; Ben- 
jamin; Mary Jane; Isabella; Henry, see forward; Joseph, a preacher 
in the Presbyterian church, and the only one of these children now 
(1913) living; Margaret. 

(II) Henry, son of John and Isabella (Laney) Lower, was born 
in Blair county, Pennsylvania, and died in Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1875. After his marriage he settled in Williamsburg, 
Blair county, and was engaged in work as a bricklayer, and subse- 
quently removed to Huntingdon, where he followed the same calling. 
He married Susan Swope, who died in 1907 at the age of eighty-two 
years. She was a daughter of John and Mary Martha Swope, and a 
granddaughter of William Swope, who was one of the early settlers of 
Huntingdon county. John Swope settled at McConnellstown, Pennsyl- 
vania, after his marriage, where he was for a time an ironmaster, and 
later a merchant and miller. He had children : Elizabeth ; Louisa ; 
i\Iary; Susan, mentioned above; Henry; Peter. Henry and Susan 
(Swope) Lower had children: i. Mary E., married William Miller, 
now deceased, and lives at Petersburg with her two children : Walter 
L. and Ada E. 2. John, is a bricklayer, and resides in Huntingdon with 
his daughter Annie. 3. William, see forward. 4. Harry, a farmer 
living in Petersburg. 5. Annie C, married Frederick D. Neff, has one 
son, Roy, and lives in Steelton, Pennsylvania. In political matters Mr. 
Lower was a Democrat. He was a member of the Presbyterian church, 
while his wife was a member of the Reformed church. 

(III) William, second son and third child of Henry and Susan 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1107 

(Swopc) Lower, was born in Huntingdon, Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania, Feliruary 11, 1852. His education was acquired in the public 
schools of his native township, and during his spare time he was of 
great assistance to his father in the cultivation of the homestead farm. 
In 1872 he engaged in farming in Henderson township, and resided 
there for a period of twehe years. Four years were spent in Shaver's 
Creek Valley, and he then purchased a farm of two hundred and eight- 
een acres in Logan township, outside of Petersburg, on which he still 
resides. He occupies himself with general farming, and has improved 
this property in every possible direction. He erected a number of new 
buildings, and is a progressive farmer in every sense of the word. He 
sold a strip of his property to the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, so 
that the extent of his property at the present time is two hundred and 
eleven acres. Mr. Lower has never married. He is broad minded and 
liberal in his ideas, and takes an active interest in whatever concerns 
the welfare of the community. 



Gustav Altman, of Alexandria, Huntingdon county, 
ALTALAN Pennsylvania, descends from German ancestry, and is 

of the first generation born in the United States. His 
grandparents were Wilhelm and Ida (Fritsche) Altman. He was born 
September 28, 1819, probably in Dessau, Germany; was a goldsmith 
and jeweler, and served in the German army. His wife died in 1858 
and he married again, and was living with his second wife when his 
death occurred, on July 17, 1875. Children by first marriage: i. Franz, 
deceased. 2. Gustav, of whom further. 3. Wilson, a merchant in 
Rochester, New York. 4. Carl, railway employee in Bremen, Germany. 
5. Matilda (Mrs. Buzzard), of Staten Island. 6. Emil, died in New 
York. 7. Ida, died in Germany. 

(II) Gustav Akman, son of Wilhelm and Ida (Fritsche) Altman, 
was born at Dessau, on the Elbe river, in Central Prussia, July 11, 
1839. He attended school in his native town of Dessau, until he was 
fifteen, when he went to Bremen and sought a berth on a sailing vessel 
without success. \\'hile in Bremen he was told of the wonderful oppor- 
tunities in the United States, and he sailed, alone, for New York. The 
passage occupied fifty-two days; the vessel was becalmed twice, which 
lengthened the voyage. Reaching New York he went immediately to 



rio8 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

his uncle's home in New Jersey, and remained with him a year and a 
half, working on the farm for $4 per month. At the expiration of that 
time his uncle exchanged his farm for property in New York, and 
young Altman accompanied him to that state, and found work in a ma- 
chine shop, where he labored for a year. Being young and adventurous, 
he decided that he would like to try whaling as a means of gratifying 
his love of traveling. With a companion he started for New Bedford, 
going by boat as far as Newport and the rest of the trip by rail. On 
applying for a position on a whaling vessel he was refused employment, 
and, very much disappointed, the two began to retrace their steps, walk- 
ing to Newport, as they had no money to pay their fare. He offered 
in payment of transportation from Newport to New York his coat, in 
which was a book that he had brought from Germany, and in which 
were the pictures of his parents and some souvenirs from the Father- 
land. He asked, after he had delivered the garment, to be permitted to 
take the pictures, but was refused this simple and just recjuest. Reach- 
ing New York he was too proud to seek his uncle and let him know of 
his circumstances, and went to Honesdale, Pennsylvania, where he 
found employment in the coal mines of the Pennsylvania railroad. 
When he had saved forty or fifty dollars he went on foot to New York, 
for the purpose of redeeming his coat and securing the pictures, but was 
unable to find the man who had taken them in pledge of the future 
payment of one dollar. He then returned to Pennsylvania and was 
employed in threshing for a few days. He went on foot to Porter 
township, Huntingdon county, and solicited work, and obtained it on 
various farms. He worked for Samuel Nefl^ the following winter for 
board and schooling, and remained with him until 1859. Later he was 
employed by Benjamin L. Nefif. He then rented the Neff mill from 
Mr. Neff, on shares, with Mark Bodley. He continued this until the 
breaking out of the civil war, when he enlisted at Petersburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, in Company H, Fifteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, Captain Jo- 
seph Johnson, for three months. The company went to Harrisburg, 
then to Carlisle, then to Lancaster, Pennsylvania, when the regiment 
was assigned to Negley's brigade, under General Pattison. They were 
ordered to Martinsburg, Virginia, and were in the fight at Falling 
Waters. They were sent back to Carlisle, where they were paid off and 
discharged. Mr. Altman resumed charge of the mill temporarily, after 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1109 

which he went to Ohio and worked in ■\lassillon in a mill. From there 
he wx'nt to Cincinnati, Ohio, antl from there to I'aducah, Kentucky, and 
to Huntsville, Alabama, where he was assigned to the Twelfth Indiana 
Artillery to take charge of the ammunition wagons. Here he had camp 
fever, and was sent to Nashville, Tennessee, where he was honorably 
discharged. He returned to Pennsj-lvania, where he became temporarily 
connected with the Home Guards. He later joined a company in the 
Forty-sixth State Militia. On February 29, 1864, he enlisted in Com- 
pany C, Captain Lawson, of the Seventy-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, 
and w^ent to the front. He was with Sherman when he went through 
Tennessee, Georgia and South Carolina. He fought at Tunnel Hill, 
Georgia, May 7, 1864. He was badly wounded, September 5, 1864, by 
a bursting shell, and was in the hospital at Nashville, Tennessee, when 
he was discharged, June 13, 1865. He went at once to Petersburg, 
Pennsylvania, where he resumed milling. In 1866 he was made head 
miller. He next rented a mill in Alexandria, Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania, from James Dysart, and where he lived until his death, March 
6, 1913. He was a Republican and was actively interested in politics. 
He was reared in the Lutheran church in the Fatherland, and reinained 
a member to the last day of his life. He married Margaret Guisler, a 
daughter of Michael and Rosanna Guisler. Children: i. Ida, married 
Frank Fouse, and lives in Alexandria. 2. Bertha, married George 
Lloyd; lives in Alexandria. 3. Sarah, died in infancy. 4. John, died 
in infancy. 5. Gustav, of whom further. 6. William, died in infancy. 
(Ill) Gustav Altman Jr., son of Gustav and Margaret (Guisler) Alt- 
man, was born September 20, 1879, in Alexandria, Pennsylvania. He 
received an excellent education in the public schools of his native place, 
afterward attending the Lebanon Business College. Leaving college 
he entered his father's mill and became its manager for three years 
while it was still under the firm name of Phillips & Altman. He, with 
Mr. Barrick, purchased the mill from Phillips & Altman. and Gustav 
Altman Jr. managed it alone for two years. His next venture was the 
purchase of his partner's interest, leaving him sole proprietor, and for 
the past three years he has been owner and manager, during wdiich 
time he has greatlv increased the volume of business, added to the ca- 
pacity of the mill and does general milling, shipping to all points in 
Central Pennsylvania. He has bought a handsome residence on ]\Iain 



mo HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

street, in Alexandria, and here makes his home. He is a RepubHcan, 
working actively for the interests of the party. He is a member of the 
Reformed church, as is his wife. He is also a member of the Sons of 
Veterans. Mr. Altman is regarded as one of the up-to-date business 
men of his section, and through his efforts has contributed to the indus- 
trial growth and wealth of Alexandria. 

He married, in 1903, Ida Pearl Miller, born at Spruce Creek, Hunt- 
ingdon county. Children: i. Seward Earl. 2. Kermit. 



The Stover family, of which John Stover, of Spruce 
STOVER Creek township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, is a 

member, is one of the oldest in point of residence in 
Juniata Valley, where it has been established for many succeeding gen- 
erations. The founder of the American branch, David Stover, came 
from England about the year 1738, and probably landed on Manhattan 
Island, New York. He was from Derbyshire, and was a farmer and 
horse breeder. With him came his family, a wife, four sons and two 
daughters. He located in New Jersey, but later went into Pennsyl- 
vania, took up wild land, improved and farmed it until his death. 
Among his children was David Jr., of whom further. 

(I) David Stover, son of David Stover, the English emigrant, was 
born in England, and came with his parents to America when he was 
two years old. He grew to manhood in New Jersey, and there married 
Ann Janes, or Jaynes. When his father decided to go to Pennsyl- 
vania he and his family accompanied him. As they were journeying 
through the vast wilderness they were attacked by a roving band of 
Indians and renegade white men, and the children and wife of David 
Jr. were killed. Later he married Mary Hunter, and among their chil- 
dren was Daniel, of whom further. 

(II) Daniel Stover, son of David and Mary (Hunter) Stover, was 
born in Pennsylvania. He was a farmer and a member of the company 
of home guards, organized for the purpose of keeping watch on the In- 
dians. He entered the Continental army from Pennsylvania and served 
the entire time of the revolutionary war. At the close of the war, after 
articles of peace had been signed between England and the colonies, he 
returned to Pennsylvania, began farming, and married Susan Holmes. 
Among their children was Jacob, of whom further. 



HISTORY OF TIIR JUNIATA VALLEY iiii 

(III) Jacob Stover, son of Daniel and Susan (Holmes) Stover, was 
born in Pennsylvania about 1800. He was a farmer and a carpenter, 
and assisted in erecting many of the most substantial buildings in the 
Juniata Valley. At this dual occupation he amassed quite a handsome 
fortune. Among his children was Daniel, of whom further. 

(IV) Daniel Stover, son of Jacob Stover, was born near Markles- 
burg, Pennsylvania. He received a meager education in the common 
schools of the township in which his parents lived, and on reaching 
man's estate he followed the family vocation and became a farmer, and 
acquired much land. He was a man of great influence in his com- 
munity, upholding the law and assisting in its enforcement. He died 
near Marklesburg, and was there buried in the family cemetery. His 
children, all of whom are dead: i. Jonathan. 2. Daniel. 3. Jacob, of 
whom further. 4. Catherine, married John Walls. 5. Nancy, died un- 
married. 6. Fannie, married Augustus McDermott, of Scotland, who 
settled in Pennsylvania. 7. Mrs. Hamer. 

(V) Jacob Stover, son of Daniel Stover, was born in Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, and there was reared on the family homestead. 
He attended the common schools in his vicinity, and on leaving selected 
farming as his vocation. He married the daughter of a neighboring 
farmer, rented a place on Spruce Creek, in the township of the same 
name. In 1850 he moved with his family to Warriors Mark township, 
where he purchased one hundred and twenty-five acres of land, which 
he soon converted into a producing farm. He erected comfortable 
houses for himself and stock, and made a model place for those times. 
He prospered greatly and later purchased a nearby place of almost equal 
acreage. He became, through his progressiveness, conspicuously iden- 
tified with the best interests of his community, and was one of its promi- 
nent and most highly respected citizens; and when he died, in 1888, he 
was greatly mourned by his friends and neighbors. He was an ardent 
Republican, working for the party; and held several local offices, to his 
credit and the satisfaction of his constituency. He and his wife were 
devout members of the United Brethren congregation, supporting the 
church generously. He married Mary Waite, born in Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, and died in 1893, ^ daughter of Casper and Es- 
ther Waite. both of whom were of English extraction, and who were 
early settlers of Sinking Valley, where he owned much property, such 



1 1 12 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

as farming lands and cattle, and where they both died. They lived quiet, 
retired lives, doing good among their less fortunate neighbors, by whom 
they were highly esteemed. Besides Mrs. Stover, who was their eldest, 
their children were: Esther, married Augustus Weekland; Eve, mar- 
ried George Walter; Daniel; Henry; Abram; John, all of whom are 
dead. Children of Jacob and Mary (Waite) Stover: i. Susannah, 
married John ^^'allace, and died in Sinking Valley. 2. Esther, married 
D. P. Henderson, of Spruce Creek Valley. 3. Fannie, deceased; mar- 
ried George Bridenbaugh. 4. John, of whom further. 5. Miles, a 
farmer in Warriors Mark Valle)^ 6. Mary, married Pierce Gray, of 
Center county, Pennsylvania. 7. Emory J., farms homestead. 

(VI) John Stover, son of Jacob and Mary (Waite) Stover, was 
born on the farm he now owns in Spruce Creek township, Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, December 6, 1849. He was reared in the free 
life of his father's farm and attended the public schools of the town- 
ship. He remained at home with his father until he reached the age 
of twenty-seven, when he married and took charge of one of his 
father's farms on Eden Hill. After the death of Mr. Stover Sr., John 
Stover purchased the interest of the other heirs, and since that time 
has made many notable improvements in the buildings, erectings others, 
and bringing the land up to a high state of productiveness. In 1907 he 
bought two hundred and thirty-nine acres, making his land holdings 
three hundred and eighty-six acres, upon which he does successful 
general farming. He is one of the prosperous, substantial men of his 
section, and wields an influence for good, right living and thinking. 
In politics he has followed in the footsteps of his father and is a Re- 
publican. He has served as school director and supervisor; and both 
he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Than 
Mr. Stover there is no more highly respected citizen in Huntingdon 
county. 

He married, in Februar}^, 1879, Mary C. Gray, born in Center 
county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of John W. Gray, a prosperous farmer 
of that county. Children of John and Mary C. (Gray) Stover: i. 
Blanche, at home with parents. 2. Edwin, unmarried, assists father in 
managing the farm. 3. Victor, a farmer in ]Mifflin county, Pennsyl- 
vania ; married Virginia Ayers ; one child : Dorothy. 4. Agnes, at 
home. 5. Harold, assists father on farm. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1113 

George Fetterhoof, of Spruce Creek, Ilunting- 
FETTERHOOF don county, Eennsylvania, descends on both the 

paternal and distaff sides from honorable German 
ancestr}-, the founders of both American Ijranches having come to 
America before the revolutionary war. The paternal immigrant pro- 
genitor probably reached Philadelphia in 1760, or thereabout. In the 
Pennsylvania records of the soldiers of the revolution George Fetter- 
hoof is named several times, and he participated in many of the most 
notable battles. After the cessation of hostilities he returned to Penn- 
sylvania and engaged in farming. Among his children was Michael, 
of whom further. 

(II) Michael Fetterhoof, son of the German immigrant, George 
Fetterhoof, was born in December, 1802, in Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania, and died in Spruce Creek township, same state, in December, 
1858, on his birthday. He received his education in the common schools 
and on reaching his majority followed the family vocation of farming. 
After his marriage he moved to Morris (now Spruce Creek) township, 
and continued to till the soil. He purchased two hundred and fifty- 
four acres of wild land, cleared and cultivated it, and erected thereon 
substantial buildings for himself and cattle. Here he lived until his 
death. He was a Whig in politics, but had decided to give his allegiance 
to the Republican party, which had just come into existence, when he 
died. He held many township offices, in each case giving satisfaction 
to his constituency. Like his wife he was a devout member of the Lu- 
theran church, and aided it in every way possible. He was one of the 
highly respected and influential men of Morris township, and was 
famous for the sound advice that he gave to those who asked of him 
counsel. He married Eliza Beighel, born in Huntingdon county, in 
1812. She was the daughter of George and Mary (Rhinehart) Beighel, 
who were early residents of Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Fetterhoof 
died in Huntingdon county, in 1874, surviving her husl)and many years. 
George Beighel, the German immigrant, came to America about 1760 
from Stuttgart, Germany. He was a saddler, and worked at his trade 
after reaching Philadelphia. He later moved into the interior and be- 
came an agriculturist. ;\mong his children was Michael, the father of 
Mrs. Fetterhoof. The father was a saddler by vocation in Carlisle, but 
after marriage he moved to Huntingdon county and located near Spruce 



1 1 14 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Creek. He engaged in farming and became an extensive land owner. 
He was a soldier in the war of 1812, bearing arms for two years, and 
made a gallant record. He was a member of the Lutheran church, and 
led a quiet, unostentatious life. Besides Mrs. Fetterhoof, he was the 
parent of ten or twelve other children, all of whom are dead, but whose 
descendants live in the state of Pennsylvania. Children of Michael and 
Eliza (Beighel) Fetterhoof: i. Samuel, a farmer; deceased. 2. Mary, 
deceased; married William Shaffer. 3. Elizabeth, married Thomas 
Henderson; lives at Warriors Mark, Pennsylvania. 4. Jesse, a farmer; 
deceased. 5. Daniel, a farmer and soldier in the civil war; deceased. 
6. George, of whom further. 7. John, resides in Tyrone, Pennsylvania. 
8. William, an official of the Pennsylvania Industrial Reformatory at 
Huntingdon. 9. Margaret, twin of William; died at age of twenty. 
10. Frances, died when a child. 

(Ill) George Fetterhoof, son of Michael and Eliza (Beighel) Fet- 
terhoof, was born May 7, 1838, in Morris (now Spruce Creek) town- 
ship, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. He was reared on his father's 
farm and educated at the common schools of the township. Reaching 
manhood he decided to follow farming as his vocation, and after the 
death of his father in 1858, he, with his brother Daniel, purchased the 
interests of the other heirs and ran the homestead in partnership until 
the death of the brother. Since which time Mr. Fetterhoof has man- 
aged the place alone, meeting with imbounded success, which was in- 
sured by his systematic and modern methods of farming. In 1875 
he erected a handsome and commodious residence on the place and has 
lived in it since that time. He does general farming and stock raising, 
and is known in his section of the township as an advanced farmer and 
an honorable and upright citizen. He votes the Republican ticket; and 
has been supervisor and school director for many years. He and his 
family are members of the Lutheran church, and at one time he was 
an elder and deacon. He ranks high in the local lodge of the Knights 
of the Golden Eagle, with which he has been actively connected for 
many years. 

He married, in 1878, Margaret Chamberlain, born in Huntingdon 
county, a daughter of James and Susan (Ginter) Chamberlain, old 
residents of Pennsylvania, who are descended from English stock. 
Children: i. Ada C, unmarried, at home. 2. James Jesse, died aged 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1115 

two. 3. Rosa, at home, a teacher ; educated at Juniata College. 4. 
Lewis, died aged two years. 



One of the most numerous families in Pennsylvania, or 
YOUNG in all of the eastern part of the United States, is that 
bearing the name Young. Some branches of the family 
claim English descent, but those of the name in Center county, Penn- 
sylvania, trace their lineage to German forbears. The family has been 
long seated in Pennsylvania, and times without numlicr the surname ap- 
pears in the public records of the state, but never with sufficient fullness 
to establish a clear line to the emigrant. 

David H. Young was born in Center county, Pennsylvania, died 
November 23, 191 1, in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. He there 
spent his entire youth, obtaining his education in the public schools. 
Upon reaching man's estate he began a pedagogical career, abandoning 
this to engage in farming, an occupation he followed in Center county 
until 1887, and in West township, Huntingdon county, on the old 
McFarland farm, until 191 1. He took a great interest in and was an 
active member of the Patrons of Husbandry. Both he and his wife 
were members of the Lutheran church. Politically he was a Democrat, 
and was extremely active in local afTairs. On August 28, 1862, in 
answer to the president's call for troops, he enlisted in the Union army, 
serving as a private in Company D, 148th Pennsylvania Volunteer In- 
fantry. He took part in the battle of Chancellorsville, where he was 
twice wounded, and in his helpless state, narrowly escaped burning to 
death, when the woods to which he had been carried were set afire by 
exploding shells. An honorable discharge was granted him soon after 
this battle, on account of disability. In this conflict between the states, 
two of his brothers, Samuel and William, met their death on the field 
of battle. He married Catherine Carper, daughter of Philip Carper, a 
miller and farmer of State College, Pennsylvania. Children of David 
H. and Catherine (Carper) Young: i. William B., a carpenter of 
West Virginia. 2. Charles H., lives on the homestead near Markles- 
burg. 3. J. Elmer, of further mention. 4. Catherine, married William 
Boyer, and lives near Marklesburg, Pennsylvania. 5. Mary, married 
James Isett and lives in Ashcom, Pennsylvania. 

J. Elmer Young, third son and child of David H. and Catherine 



iii6 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(Carper) Young, was born at Pine Grove Mills, Center County, Pennsyl- 
vania, January 31, 1873. He obtained his education in the public schools 
and spent his early life on the farm. When a young man he learned the 
miller's trade and followed that occupation for nine years with unvary- 
ing success. In December, 1901, he purchased the store and stock of 
E. W. Laird, a general merchant of Petersburg, a business he still con- 
ducts. Here he has by constant attention and deference to the desires 
and needs of his patrons organized a business at once flourishing and 
lucrative. 

A Democrat in politics, his worth and sterling qualities have been 
recognized by his townsmen, who have elected him to the office of 
president of the borough council, an organization he governs with great 
satisfaction to the constituency which elected him, and with no less 
satisfaction to the opponents of his party. He was a director of the 
Shaver's Creek Bank at the time when that institution was chartered 
as the First National Bank, and continued in the same capacity in the 
latter organization. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, Modern Woodmen of America and Knights of 
the Maccabees. 

He married, March 23, 1897, Mary Guisler, daughter of Martin 
and Susan Guisler, natives of Petersburg, members of a family old in 
the annals of the state. Children: Frances and x\lma. Mr. Young 
and family are members of the Lutheran church, taking a prominent 
part in the affairs of that body, he being an officer in the church and 
teacher in the Sunday school. 



Of pure and honorable Irish stock is the Archey family, 
ARCHEY of Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, of which Francis 

Wallace Archey, of Pennsylvania Furnace, Pennsyl- 
vania, is a worthy member. The members of it were petty farmers in 
Ireland for many generations, adding by their industry, thrift and 
economy to the wealth of their native land. The family also had the 
distinction of being Protestant, adhering firmly to the Presbyterian 
church, and rearing their children in that austere faith. The founder 
of the American branch of the family was Frank Archey, of whom 
further. 

(I) Frank Archey was born in county Tyrone, Ireland, about 1790. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1117 

He was reared there by Christian parents, and received such educational 
advantages as were afforded Ijy tlie time, place and circumstances. He 
followed the family occupation of farming, and must have been success- 
ful, as he was able to pay the passage of himself, wife and four chil- 
dren when he emigrated to the United States in 1847. He did not live 
long to enjoy the pleasures and comforts of his new home in Grays- 
ville, Franklin township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. He left 
to his descendants an unstained name for integrity and honesty which 
they cherish until this day. His children were: i. John, of whom 
further. 2. Francis, was one of the earliest employees of the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad, at Altoona, Pennsylvania, and died there. 3. George, 
makes his home in Graysville, where he is a nuich respected citizen. 
4. Ellen, married and moved to Illinois with her husband. 

(II) John Archey, son of Frank Archey, was born in 1825, in 
county Tyrone, Ireland, and died in 1890, in Graysville, Pennsylvania. 
He emigrated with his parents from the land of his nativity in 1847, 
and, being the eldest of the family of children, it devolved upon him 
to assist his father. He worked as a day laborer and by the month ; was 
thrifty, energetic and economical, and finally saved enough money to 
purchase one hundred and sixty acres of land in Franklin township, at 
the rear of the village of Graysville, and east of the mountain. Here he 
made a comfortable home and farmed successfully until his death. He 
was noted in his section for his excessive industry and close attention 
to the smallest detail on his farm, and by this method he overcame all 
obstacles, such as confront the recently arrived immigrant, or those of 
the first generation. His life was unpretentious and quiet, but is an 
object lesson of real value to the observing and thoughtful. It brings 
out prominently the characteristics that win, offers encouragement to 
young men who are willing to work with their hands and heads, and 
proves that there is rarely a road to a competence in this country other 
than by work. He was a very staunch Republican after that party 
came into being, and he worked for its interests to the end of his life. 
He served as school director and road supervisor, and in both offices 
gave entire satisfaction. As were his people before him, he was a de- 
vout Presbyterian, the faith fitting his character perfectly. He was a 
trustee of the church in Graysville for many >-ears. He married Cath- 
erine Brett, born in county Tyrone, Ireland, August 18, 1839, and died 



iii8 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

in Graysville, Pennsylvania, January 4, 19 13, aged seventy-three. She 
was one of thirteen children. With her brothers, Thomas and George, 
the first going to Wisconsin and the latter to the state of New York, she 
emigrated, in 1850, when only a girl of twenty-one, to Montreal, Can- 
ada, where they lived a short while, coming then to Huntingdon county, 
where she met and married John Archey. Like her husband, she was a 
devout Presbyterian, attending that church until her death. Children : 
I. Francis Wallace, of whom further. 2. John, a carpenter in Grays- 
ville; married Olive Woomer. 3. Harry, a dentist in Plymouth, Lu- 
zerne county, Pennsylvania; married Sarah Armstrong. 4. Mary Jane, 
married W. C. Baker, of Chester, Pennsylvania. 5. Ella, died aged 
sixteen years. 

(Ill) Francis Wallace Archey, son of John and Catherine (Brett) 
Archey, was born April 13, 1858, in Graysville, Franklin township, 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, on his father's farm. He received 
his preparatory education in the common schools of the township, and 
then attended the Selins Grove Academy two terms. As a boy he 
worked on his father's farm during vacations, and he early entered ag- 
ricultural life after leaving school. In 1883 he went to Houtzdale, 
Pennsylvania, where he mined coal in Clearfield county for eight years. 
He saved his money, as had done his father before him, and in 1891 
he moved to Pennsylvania Furnace, Pennsylvania, where he purchased 
the implement store of W. E. McWilliams. On April 2, 1891, he was 
appointed postmaster, and has served in that capacity continuously since 
that time, running at the same time his implement business. He has 
dispensed the Lnited States mail to the inhabitants of Pennsylvania 
Furnace with zealous care, and has not had in all these years a single 
complaint registered against him. He has erected a commodious build- 
ing, which he uses for his store and the postoffice, besides which he has 
purchased a comfortable home for himself and family. He is a strong 
Republican, working for and using his influence in behalf of that party; 
and has served as township auditor most acceptably. He was reared 
in the Presbyterian faith and gives his adherence to that church. He 
is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He is a thirty-second degree 
Mason, member of Tyrone Lodge, No. 194; the chapter at Altoona, 
and commandery; Mountain Council, No. 10; Harrisburg Consistory; 




ff i^A^/^.J<y 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1119 

and a member of the Alystic Shrine, Jaffa Temple, Altoona. He ranks 
as one of the influential and progressive citizens of his town, township, 
county and section. 

He married, April 9, 1891, Nina J. Patton, born in Mifllin county, 
Pennsylvania, a daughter of William Patton, of English descent. Chil- 
dren : I. Harry, died at the age of sixteen months. 2. Wallace, born 
March, 1895. 3- Catherine, born May, 1897. 

The American branch of the ancient Irish family of Irvin 
IRVIN was established in the United States by Andrew Irvin, the 
immigrant, who left Ireland about 1812, and located in 
Cecil county, Maryland. He lived there for several years before he 
migrated to Center county, Pennsylvania, where he farmed, led a quiet 
and retired life, and where he and his wife eventually died. He mar- 
ried in Ireland before emigrating, and his wife Rachel and young chil- 
dren accompanied him to the United States. Rachel Irvin was an ex- 
cellent wife, was of fine Scotch-Irish descent, and proved a helpmeet in 
every way. They were the parents of fourteen children, among whom 
was Patterson, of whom further. 

(II) Patterson Irvin, son of Andrew and Rachel Irvin, was born 
in 1829, in Center county, Pennsylvania, after his parents had migrated 
from Maryland; and died in 1897 in the county of his nativity. He 
was reared on his father's farm, and on reaching maturity began farm- 
ing. This he followed for some time; later he contracted for making 
charcoal for the numerous furnaces in that section. He finally located 
at, or near, Curtin's Iron Works in Bald Eagle Valley, Center county. 
and there passed the remainder of his days. He was a man of great 
integrity and energy and as such was much respected. He was a devout 
Presbyterian, as was his wife, and has been his family before him, both 
in Ireland and the United States. He married Susan Garrett, born in 
1842, in Snyder county, Pennsylvania, and died in Center county, in 
19 1 2. She was the daughter of Daniel and Susan Garrett, natives of 
Snyder county, where their families had resided for generations. They 
later moved to Bellefonte, Center county, where they died. Daniel Gar- 
rett was a contracting teamster and was an exceedingly busy man during 
the early days when there were fewer railroads. Both were members 
of the Presbyterian church, and he was active in local politics. Chil- 



II20 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

dren of Daniel and Susan Garrett : William, a blacksmith, killed by an 
automobile in 1910; Solomon, forgeman in Bellefonte; Charles, forge- 
man in Bellefonte; Frank, lives at State College, Pennsylvania; Susan, 
married Patterson Irvin; Ellen, married William Bell, of Kansas; Kate, 
died unmarried, in 1910, in Bellefonte. Children of Patterson and Su- 
san (Garrett) Irvin: i. William, a teamster in Huntingdon county. 2. 
Daniel, a farmer in Center county. 3. Julia, married William Gates, 
of Center county. 4. Laura, married William Mountz, of Franklin- 
ville, Pennsylvania. 5. James Barnhart, of whom further. 6. Harvey 
J., a blacksmith in Altoona, Pennsylvania. 7. Oscar G., a plumber in 
Altoona. 

(Ill) James Barnhart Irvin, son of Patterson and Susan (Garrett) 
Irvin, was born April 25, 1861, at Curtin's Iron Furnace Works, in 
Bald Eagle Valley, Center county, Pennsylvania. He received his edu- 
cation in the public schools in Center county, and was reared on the 
farm. He decided, on reaching his majority, that he would enter the 
industrial world for himself, and rented a farm in Center county. For 
fourteen years he rented farms in Center and Huntingdon counties. 
In 1905 he moved to his present location in Warriors Mark township, 
Huntingdon county, bought eighty acres, where he has since lived, doing 
general farming. He has brought his land to a high state of fertility 
through intensive farming. He is a Republican, supporting the party 
by his franchise and working for it in a quiet way. He and his wife 
are members of the Presbyterian church; he is an M. W. A. 

He married, August 9, 1882, Virginia Geist, born in Huntingdon 
county, a daughter of William Geist. Children of James Barnhart and 
Virginia (Geist) Irvin: i. Kent, an employee of the Pennsylvania 
railroad, at Warriors Mark ; married Ethel Buck ; one child, Chalmer. 
2. Andrew G., a machinist, an employee of the Pennsylvania railroad, at 
Juniata, Pennsylvania; married Bertha Harris; one child, Isabel. 3. 
Fern M. 4. Susie, a graduate of Warriors Mark high school. 



It is always pleasing to the biographer or student of human 
DAVIS nature to enter into an analysis of the character and career 

of a successful tiller of the soil. Of the many citizens 
gaining their own livelihood, he alone stands preeminent as a totally 
independent factor, in short, "monarch of all he surveys.'' His rugged 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1121 

honesty and sterling worth are the outcome of a close association with 
nature, and in all the relations of life he manifests that generous hospi- 
tality and kindly human sympathy, which beget comradeship, and which 
cement to him the friendship of all with whom he comes in contact. 
Successfully engaged in diversified agriculture and the raising of high- 
grade cattle and horses, Mr. Henry Davis is decidedly a prominent anil 
popular citizen in West township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. 
where he has resided during the greater part of his long and successful 
career and where he is the owner of a large estate of five hundred and 
six acres. 

The farm on which he now resides, in West township, Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, is the birthplace of Henry Davis, the date of his 
nativity being April 5, 1842. He is a son of Henry Davis Sr., a native 
of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, where he was born in the year 1820. 
The maiden name of his mother was Catherine Walheter, born at Water 
Street, Morris township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, in 1822. 
The paternal grandfather of the subject of this review was Louis 
Davis, a native of Germany, where he was reared and educated, and 
where was solemnized his marriage prior to his immigration to Lan- 
caster county, Pennsylvania, in 181 5. Louis Davis became the father 
of a large family of children, three of whom are mentioned here: 
Henry Davis Sr. ; Mrs. Elizabeth Kinch, formerly a resident of War- 
riors ]\Iark, Pennsylvania; and Samuel, who made his home with his 
brother Henry, and who was a blacksmith by trade ; he never married. 

Henrv Davis Sr. grew to maturity in Lancaster county, and there 
availed himself of such educational advantages as were afforded in 
that early day. As a young man he came to Huntingdon county and 
here entered upon an apprenticeship to learn the trade of blacksmith. 
He purchased ten acres of land in West township, on the banks of 
Shaver's creek, from a Mr. Innis, and on that property erected a black- 
smith shop. Part of this old log house still stands. Subsequently he 
purchased a hundred-acre farm adjoining this plot and the same was 
managed by his sons. He was active in his trade until within ten years 
of his demise, which occurred in 1900, at the venerable age of eighty 
years. In his young manhood he was a stalwart Democrat, but in 
due time became an ardent Abolitionist, casting his vote for Abraham 
Linculn. After the war until his death he was a radical Republican, 



1 122 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

unswerving from party lines. He served with the utmost efficiency 
as county commissioner of Huntingdon county, and for several terms 
was director of the poor. His religious faith coincided with the tenets 
of the Presbyterian church. He married Catherine Walheter, a 
daughter of Henry Walheter, of German descent. Henry ^^^alheter 
was a saddler by trade and at one time had a shop in \A'ater Street, 
Morris township, Huntingdon county. Later in life he purchased a 
farm in Porter township, this county, and there resided until his re- 
tirement from active business, when he removed to Alexandria, where 
he died. He had several children, concerning whom the following 
brief data are here incorporated: John, died in the civil war; George 
passed to eternal rest in the state of New Jersey; Catherine married 
Henry Davis Sr., as already noted; Mary became the wife of David 
Edmiston; Caroline is single and maintains her home in Alexandria, 
Pennsylvania; and two other children died young. Henry and 
Catherine (Walheter) Davis became the parents of six children, as 
follows: I. Samuel T., married Elizabeth Fenstinar, and for many 
years was a prominent physician and surgeon in Lancaster, Pennsyl- 
vania; he died while on a hunting trip to old Mexico. 2. William M., 
married Ellen Foster, and he is engaged in his trade of blacksmith at 
Cottage, Pennsylvania. 3. Henry Jr., is the immediate subject of this 
review. 4. Miles L., is a civil war veteran; he is a doctor by profes- 
sion, and resides in Lancaster, Pennsylvania ; he married Laura E. 
Wilson, who is now deceased. 5. Mary Catherine, wife of W. S. Liv- 
ingston, a prominent citizen of Altoona, Pennsylvania. 6. John Wal- 
heter, is postmaster and druggist at Burlington, New Jersey; he mar- 
ried Marjory Grundaker. 

Henry Davis Jr. was reared to adult age on the old homestead 
farm, in the work and management of which he early began to assist 
his father. His education was obtained in the neighboring district 
schools. He was very ambitious as a youth and before he had reached 
his legal majority was most successfully engaged in raising and sell- 
ing horses. In due time he became a prosperous farmer and a well- 
known breeder of horses and cattle. He has continued to buy and sell 
stock of all descriptions up to the present time and never has less than 
forty head on his estate. He makes a specialty of breeding Jersey 
cattle, and has also dealt extensively in sheep. Shortly after his mar- 



HISTORY OF TTTE JUNIATA VALLEY 1123 

riage, in 1864, he bought <i tract of one hundred and fifteen acres of 
land on Warriors Ridge, where he resided for the ensuing three years. 
In 1869 he bought the old homestead on which he was reared and that 
place has since represented the family home. He erected a spacious 
barn in 1876 and has since remodeled the house. In recent years he 
purchased a neighboring tract of one hundred and forty acres and he 
has also acquired one hundred and twelve acres of woodland and one 
hundred and four acres of improved farming land on the ridge. His 
farming property now aggregates five hundred and six acres, all of 
which is in splendid condition, the same yielding up fine crops each 
year. Time and growing prosperity have proved Mr. Davis's innate 
talent and ability as an agriculturist. All his business dealings have 
been conducted in a fair and straightforward manner and his friends 
are legion throughout Huntingdon county. Although seventy-one 
years of age, he is still hale and hearty and is well able to care for his 
farming and stock interests. Mr. Davis served in the civil war as a 
member of Company G, 46th Pennsylvania Militia, which was used 
mainly to repel local invasions. In politics he is a stalwart Republican, 
and although often urged to run for public ofiice the only capacity in 
which he would serve was as a member of the township school board. 
October 4, 1864, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Davis and 
Miss Mary Anne Wilson, who was born in Logan township, Hunting- 
don county, Pennsylvania, June 28, 1844. She is a daughter of David 
C. and Jane (Henry) Wilson, the former of whom was born and 
reared in West township and the latter in Barree township, Hunting- 
don county. Mr. Wilson was a farmer all his life, was a Republican 
in his political affiliations, and for many years served as elder in the 
Manor Hill Presbyterian Church. Mary Anne was the only child of 
the Wilsons to grow to maturity. Another daughter, Eliza Jane, died 
in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Davis became the parents of nine children: 
I. Elmer Miles, born October i, 1865; married Ella K. Koher, bom 
January 19, 1866, in Jackson township, Huntingdon county, a daugh- 
ter of Henry and Mary Ann (Thompson) Koher, the former for manv 
years a merchant in Columbia county, Pennsylvania. Elmer Davis 
lives on a hundred and forty acre farm adjoining his father's place. 
He is a Republican, and is now serving his third term as school direc- 
tor ; he is likewise an elder in the Presbyterian church. He and his 



1 124 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

wife have three children: Floyd K., born December 30, 1893; Elmer 
Earl, December 26, 1894; and Ernest Thompson, February 27, 1898. 
2. Harry Alvin, born July 4, 1867; is an attorney in Altoona, Pennsyl- 
vania; married Roberta Clark. 3. John Wallace, born June 27, 1868; 
lives at Center Square, Pennsylvania, where he is engaged in buying 
and shipping cattle; married Catherine McCall. 4. Nancy Jane, born 
August 7, 1869, died June 27, 1886. 5. Ada Caroline, born August 
10, 1871, died November 14, 1905; married Herbert Mateer. 6. Calim 
Wilson, born July 29, 1875, died December 10, 1875. 7. Anna Cath- 
erine, born September 13, 1879, died October 31, 1879. 8. Herman 
Cloyd, born November 5, 1882, died June 21, 1886. 9. Efhe Claire, 
born August i, 1884, died October 7, 1884. 



Tempted by the promise that in the crown colony 
THOMPSON of Maryland, America, he could worship God ac- 
cording to the manner that had been taught him 
by his parents, John Thompson, a Catholic subject of England, left his 
home in Kirkfenton, Yorkshire, and sailed for America about 1680. 
He settled near Baltimore, where he remained until his death. He was 
a farmer, and in the new country pursued the occupation that had en- 
grossed the time of his forefathers for generations. Among his chil- 
dren was John, of whom further. 

(II) John Thompson, son of John Thompson, the immigrant, was 
born in Maryland, there grew to manhood, and followed farming. He 
became a large landed proprietor and had slaves, like all planters in 
the colony. Among his children was Peter, of whom further. 

(III) Peter Thompson, son of John Thompson, was born in Mary- 
land, and became a prominent planter and politician. He was one of 
the men who spoke in favor of the colonies breaking with the mother 
country, and was among the first to enlist in the Continental army, 
despite the fact that one of his brothers advocated remaining under 
the domination of England. At the successful termination of the war 
of the revolution he returned to Maryland to resume the occupation of 
planting. He had a large family, among whom was Peter, of whom 
further. 

(IV) Peter Thompson, son of Peter Thompson, of Maryland, was 
born on his father's plantation, and there grew up, a country gentle- 



HISTORY OF THE JUXL\TA VALLEY 1125 

man. Owing to religious feeling he left his native state, moved to 
Pennsylvania, and settled at Raystown Branch, on the historic Juniata 
river, where he continued to live until his death, a gentleman farmer. 
He was considered an advanced man at that time, and successfully 
managed his land, it is thought with the help of negro slaves. Among 
his children was John, of whom further. 

(V) John Thompson, son of Peter Thdmpson, was probably born 
at Raystown Branch. Huntingdon county, in the Juniata \'alley, where 
he grew to maturity, married and became a successful farmer, known 
for his enterprise. He was a strong Democrat, and, like his wife, was 
a life-long Roman Catholic. He married Eleanor Burke, probably of 
Scotch-Irish descent, the daughter of a neighboring farmer. Chil- 
dren: I. Edward, of whom further. 2. John, lived and died in Juni- 
ata township. 3. Peter, born in Juniata township, died in Blair county, 
Pennsylvania. 4. Eleanor, married Abram Speck; died at INIill Creek, 
Pennsylvania. 

(VI) Edward Thompson, son of John and Eleanor CBurke) 
Thompson, was born January 15, 1815, in Juniata township. Plunting- 
don county, Pennsylvania, on his father's farm, and died there June 
30, 1901. He grew to man's estate, received his education and began 
to farm in his native township. He entered into partnership with his 
brother John, and purchased land for farming purposes. Soon there- 
after there was a dissolution of the partnership and a division of the 
land, the buildings falling to Edward. He immediately began to reno- 
vate and remodel them, and lived in the dwelling-house until his death. 
He was a consistent member of the Roman Catholic church, though 
not bigoted. He married Mary Forshey, a daughter of Obadiah and 
Sarah (Kvler) Forshey. Mrs. Thompson was a devout member of 
the Baptist church until her death, April 9, i860. Five or six years 
after her death Mr. Thompson married a second time. Children by 
first marriage: i. John Andrew, of whom further. 2. Sarah Ann, 
widow of Calvin Corbin ; lives in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. 3. Wil- 
liam, a farmer in Juniata township, now deceased ; married Jane Heff- 
ner. 4. Ellen, married John Bagshaw : both dead. 5. Isaiah Griffith, 
a retired business man of Pittsburgh : married Catherine IMcCann. 6. 
George W., died soon after reaching his majority. 7. Henry, died in 
infancy. Children by second marriage: 8. Mary Jane, married Rob- 



1 126 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

ert McCann, of Pittsburgh. 9. Rachel, married Truman Speck, of 
Huntingdon county. 10. Ada, married Clement Speck, of Huntingdon 
county. 

(VII) John Andrew Thompson, son of Edward and Mary (For- 
shey) Thompson, was born June 29, 1847, '^^ Juniata township, Hunt- 
ingdon county, Pennsylvania. He received his preparator}' education 
in the common school of the township, finishing at the Millersville 
State Normal, and entered at once into the profession of pedagogy, 
which he has followed with success since. He taught four years in 
Blair county, and since that time has devoted his time to the instruc- 
tion of the 3'outh of Huntingdon county. In all he has taught forty- 
one winters and five summers, and only for two years did he cease in 
his labors of imparting knowledge to the young, when he claimed a 
well-earned vacation. He is a prominent member of the Pennsylvania 
State Teachers' Association, having on many occasions read before 
that intellectual body papers on teaching. A few years after he began 
his life work he purchased one hundred and forty-two acres of land 
in Morris township, where he does general farming along scientific 
lines. He is an Independent Democrat, and has served in several town- 
ship offices of more or less importance. Both he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Reformed church, in which they are prominent workers. 
He is a member in high standing of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. Mr. Thompson is one of the best known and most generally 
esteemed men in Huntingdon county. All of his former pupils are 
still warm friends and admirers of him. He married, November 18, 
1875, Frances Harnish, born in Huntingdon county, a daughter of 
Peter and Catherine (Hommer) Harnish. Children: i. Blanche Ro- 
berta, died aged three years. 2. Alberta K., a graduate of Millersville 
State Normal School, after which she taught several terms ; married 
Walter A. Geesey, of Altoona, Pennsylvania ; no children. 3. Bruce 
Harnish, graduated from Millersville State Normal ; entered the Wade 
Business College, in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and died while yet a 
student. 

(The Forshey Line). 

L'nder pressure of religious bigots and cardinals of the Roman 
Catholic church, Louis XIV of France revoked in 1685 the Edict of 
Nantes. Before this last disgraceful measure and crowning injustice. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1127 

great numbers of French Protestants (known by the specific name of 
Huguenot ) had escaped from their inhospitable country, and over a 
milHon of the best and thriftiest subjects of the oppressed kingdom had 
sought refuge elsewhere, and more than half the commercial and 
manufacturing industries of France were crushed, resulting in busi- 
ness stagnation and utter distress on every hand, except, of course, 
for those Catholics in high places, who were given the property of 
the Huguenots. In 1680, Andre Fourche, of the landed gentry of 
France, foreseeing the inevitable, moved with his wife, Marie de Foix, 
and children. Antoine, Andre, Jean and Jeanne Marie, to Mannheim, 
at that time tlie headquarters of the Huguenot refugees. Here he 
was associated with Count Antoine Pintard, David de Marest, Ma- 
these Blanchan. Frederic de Vaux, Abraham Hasbroucq, Cretien Du- 
yon, Meynard Journeay, Bourgeon Broucard, and others whose names 
have since become indelibly linked with the progress of this country, 
since all of them emigrated later to America, seeking a place where 
they could enjoy religious freedom. In 1688 Andre Fourche sailed 
with his family for America in company with other French families 
and coreligionists. He located in New York, later going to New Jer- 
sey. His son Antoine (Anthony) moved to Pennsylvania, where he 
established himself, and from him descend the Forshey (as it has 
come to be written) families of the state. He married Sara de Vaux, 
a daughter of a Huguenot, and among their children was Jean. 

(II) John Forshey (to give the anglicized form), son of Antoine 
and Sara (de Vaux) Fourche, was born in Pennsylvania, and there 
reached his majority. He married the daughter of a neighbor, like 
himself a tiller of the soil. He was the parent of a large number of 
sons, among them being Andrew, of whom further. 

(III) Andrew Forshey, son of John Forshey, was born in Penn- 
sylvania, and there lived and died. He was an Indian fighter, and was 
with the Royal Americans when they met General Montcalm. He 
married Nancy Hastings, the daughter of Henry Hastings, an Eng- 
lishman who had but recently arrived in America. They were the 
parents of five sons and two daughters. One of their sons was An- 
thony, of whom further. 

(IV) Anthony Forshey, son of Andrew and Nancy (Hastings) ^or- 
shey, was born on his father's farm in Pennsylvania. He entered he 



1 128 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Continental army from Pennsylvania in 1777, and served until peace 
was declared between the Colonies and England. He returned to his 
farm, and there died, a very old man. He had several sons, one of 
whom was Jonathan, of whom further. 

(V) Jonathan Forshey, son of Anthony Forshey, was born about 
1800. He was a farmer and lived a quiet, retired life. He moved 
to Huntingdon county, while in the prime of life and there died. 
Among his children was Obadiah, of whom further. 

(VI) Obadiah Forshey, son of Jonathan Forshey, was born in 
Huntingdon county, and reared in Penn township. He was a pros- 
perous farmer and a man of great influence, though he lived quietly 
and unostentatiously on his place. He married Sarah Kyler, who had 
great strength of character, and who was known for her charities. 
Children: i. William, died in southern part of Huntingdon county; 
married Rebecca Taylor. 2. Anthony, died in Penn township; mar- 
ried Mary Jane McCall. 3. John, died unmarried. 4. Nancy, married 
Jacob Boyer. 5. Mary, married Edward Thompson (see Thompson 
VI). 6. Rebecca, married Samuel Kyle. 7. Elizabeth, became the 
second wife of Edward Thompson after the death of her sister. 



It is not necessary that the man who achieves success must 
BUCK be of sterner stuff than his fellow-man, but there are certain 

indispensable characteristics that contribute to the prosper- 
ity of the individual; these are energy, enterprise and determination and 
the ability to recognize and improve opportunities. These qualities have 
been cardinal elements in the character of Isaac Scott Buck, and they 
have accompanied him from a humble station in life to one of promi- 
nence and affluence. Although raised a comparatively poor farmer boy, 
he is now recognized as one of the prominent and successful agricul- 
turists of Warriors Mark township, where he is the owner of three 
farms, aggregating three hundred and fifty-seven acres. 

Mr. Buck was born in Warriors ]\Iark township, Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania, August 22, 1852. He is a son of Isaac and Lydia (Kri- 
der) Buck, the former of whom passed to the life eternal at Warriors 
Mark, in 1902, and the latter of whom died in 1865. He lived to the 
venerable age of eighty-four years. Isaac Buck's parents, John and 
Catherine (Longenecker) Buck, were natives of Dauphin county, Penn- 



HISTORY OF THE jLNIATA VALLEY 1129 

sylvan ia. and there they were reared to maturity and married. They 
came to Huntingdon county prior to the year 1830 and settled in War- 
riors Mark townshi]), where he purchased a farm of two hundred acres 
of timber land, which he proceeded to clear, and on wliich he erected 
good, substantial buildings. Tlie residence was plastered on the outside 
and has since been replaced by a nn)re modern jjuilding, but the old barn 
is still doing service on this land. John Buck was a \Miig in his political 
affiliations, and he was the popular and efficient incumbent of a number 
of important offices of trust in his home community, where he was rec- 
ognized as a man of mark in all the relations of life. He and his wife 
were both members of the Dunkard church. He died in 1868 and she 
passed away in 1875. When they came to Huntingdon county they 
were accompanied by Mr. Buck's aged parents, both of whom are in- 
terred in the family cemetery on the present Ross farm. Their graves 
are marked, but their names are unknown. John and Catherine Buck 
became the parents of nine children, as follows: Jacob was a farmer by 
occupation, and he died near Eldorado, Pennsylvania ; Isaac, likewise 
a farmer, was the father of the subject of this review and a brief sum- 
mary of his life will be contained in a following paragraph; John Jr. 
was a merchant at Ironsville during his active career and he died in 
Huntingdon county ; Christian was a tanner by trade and his demise 
occurred at L^nionville, Pennsylvania ; Nancy married David Grazier 
and died at Tyrone, this state ; Benjamin died in Center county, where 
he was engaged in farming operations during his active career ; Samuel 
died at the age of sixteen years ; David is still living and a brief sketch 
of his life will be found in the following paragraph: and Catherine mar- 
ried Jeremiah Buck and passed to eternal rest at W'arriors ]Mark. 

David Buck was born in W^arriors Mark township, Huntingdon 
county, Pennsj-lvania, October 10, 1833. He is a son of John and 
Catherine (Longenecker) Buck, as noted above. He was raised on his 
father's pioneer farm in this section and attended the early subscrip- 
tion schools in Huntingdon and Center counties. He assisted in the 
work of the home farm until he had reached his twentv-third \Tar, when 
he married and purchased a farm of one hundred and thirty-nine 
acres in W^arriors Mark township. He resided on this estate and won 
success as an intelligent tiller of the soil, operating it for a period of 
forty-three years. In 1908 he retired from active business life and 



II30 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

since that time has maintained his home at Tyrone. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Christina Beck, died in 1892. David Buck is the 
only Hving member in a family of nine children. Although eighty 
years of age he is still hale and hearty, and is popular among his fellow- 
citizens by reason of his genial good nature and kindly spirit. 

Isaac Buck, second in order of birth in the family of nine children 
born to John and Catherine (Longenecker) Buck, was born probably 
in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, the year of his nativity being 1818. 
He was about twelve years of age at the time of his parents' removal 
to Huntingdon county and here he grew up and was educated. After 
his marriage he purchased a farm of one hundred and eighteen acres, 
on which he erected good buildings and on which he resided until about 
1886, when his son Isaac Scott Buck bought him out. He retired to the 
village of Warriors Mark about 1890 and there died in 1902, aged 
eighty-four years. His first wife, Lydia Krider by name, died in 1865. 
Her father was a farmer and land owner near Warriors Mark, and he 
died in young manhood, although his wife lived to be old and blind. 
Mrs. Buck had two brothers, Henry and Joseph. For his second wife 
Isaac Buck married Hannah Elder. He was a Republican in his politi- 
cal convictions and he held various township offices. In religious faith 
he was a devout member of the United Brethren church. Isaac and 
Lydia (Krider) Buck had six children, as follows: Mary is the widow 
of Martin Beck, and lives at Warriors Mark ; Jane died at the age of 
sixteen years ; Diller married Lydia Goodman, and they reside at War- 
riors Mark; Isaac Scott is the immediate subject of this sketch; Anna 
married John Bell, of Warriors Mark; and Sarah Sabina is the wife of 
John Dougherty, of Altoona. 

Isaac Scott Buck passed his boyhood and youth on the farm he now 
owns and operates and he obtained a good elementary education in the 
neighboring district schools. He is a general farmer and has won 
marked success as a breeder of high-grade cattle, keeping many head on 
hand constantly for butter purposes. The estate on which he lives com- 
prises one hundred and eighteen acres, and he likewise owns two other 
farms, of one hundred and twenty-one and one hundred and eighteen 
acres, respectively. He is strictly a self-made man, owing his splendid 
success in life to his own inherent ability and energy. Although a stal- 
wart Republican in matters of national import, in local politics he main- 



HISTORY OF TIIK JUNIATA VALLEY 1131 

tains an independent attitude, giving his vote to men and measures of 
wliicii lie approves, regardless of party creed. He has served for many 
terms on the local school board, and his religious faith is in harmony 
with the teachings of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

In 1880 Mr. Buck was united in marriage to Miss Lily Waite, a 
native of Warriors Mark township, and a sister of H. H. Waite, who 
is mentioned on other pages of this book. Mr. and Mrs. Buck became 
the parents of eight children: Edith married Rev. Frank Fisher, of 
Petersburg, and they have one son, Frank Jr. ; George married Verna 
Conrad, and he is a farmer at Warriors Mark, Pennsylvania, and has 
one child, Wilfred: Irma is at the parental home; Alma is the wife of 
Ernest Nearhooff, of Warriors Mark township, and has two children, 
Scott and George : Hazel, Walter and Donald are all at home : and Isaac, 
twin of Donald, died in infancy. 



Oliver Wilson Stevens, of Spruce Creek, Pennsylvania, 
STEVENS descends from an honorable. Irish family that has con- 
tributed by its valiant deeds and steadfast adherence to 
the Protestant religion much to the history of the Emerald Isle. There 
is scarcely a battle of note, since the first Irish kings, that a Stevens was 
not in the forefront, fighting for the cause that he deemed just. There 
was a Theodore Stevens, from Ireland, among the Crusaders, and a 
John Stevens waged war in France under Henry V. When he was 
complimented by Henry and called a "redoubtable Englishman," he 
modestly disclaimed being an Englishman, and said proudly that he was 
a native of Ireland. From this John Stevens descends the Stevens fam- 
ily of Pennsylvania, of which Oliver W^ilson Stevens is a member. 

(I) David F. Stevens was born in Ireland, April 6, 1808, and died 
in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, January 15, 1883. He immi- 
grated with his family to the L'nited States, and after locating in vari- 
ous sections finally settled at Saltillo, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. 
He was a man of means before leaving Ireland, and on selecting Penn- 
sylvania as his place of abode he purchased two hundred and ten acres 
of land, which he cleared, improved, erected a dwelling and out houses 
thereon, and cultivated until the day of his death. After reaching the 
L'nited States he became a naturalized American citizen, and thereafter 
took a keen interest in politics and all matters pertaining to the general 



1 132 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

welfare, not only of his own community, county and state, but the 
country as well. He held the office of justice of peace for many years, 
and became famous in that section for administering justice impartially 
to all who came before him for petty misdemeanors. He was one of the 
influential men of his neighborhood, and was much esteemed by those 
who knew him. He married, in Ireland, Elizabeth Fisher, born June 
21, 1817, died in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, June 28, 1888. 
Like her husband she was of a distinguished Irish family whose deeds 
are recorded in history. The great-grandfather of Mrs. Stevens origi- 
nally went from Scotland to Ireland, where he hoped to live a more 
peaceful life than it was possible to do at that time in England or Scot- 
land. Scotland was torn asunder by clan feuds and England was in the 
throes of political revolution. In Ireland only, at that time, could peace 
be found for those who did not mingle in politics nor take part in the 
ever-recurring changes in the other two countries. Children of David 
F. and Elizabeth (Fisher) Stevens: i. Jesse P., a butcher in Montana, 
where he died. 2. James H., a retired farmer in Illinois. 3. Allan, a 
miner, living at Six Mile Run, Bedford county, Pennsylvania. 4. Har- 
riet, married W. P. Grissinger, and lives at Mt. Union, Pennsylvania. 
5. Joseph, a carpenter in Orbisonia. 6. David, a veterinary surgeon in 
Illinois. 7. Kate, married Benjamin Horton, deceased ; lives at Broad 
Top City, Pennsylvania. 8. Fletcher, lives at Rockford, Illinois. 9. 
Oliver Wilson, of whom further. 10. Elizabeth, died in infancy. 11. 
Martha, twin of Elizabeth, died in infancy. 

(II) Oliver Wilson Stevens, son of David F. and Elizabeth (Fisher) 
Stevens, was born September 2y, 1857, in Saltillo, Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania. He received a fair education in the public schools in 
Cla}'' township, Huntingdon county, and on reaching adult age engaged 
in farming on the homestead, which he managed for his father. In 
1890 he changed his place of abode to Spruce Creek township, where 
he purchased forty acres of land, afterward adding to it two hundred 
and sixty acres. He erected new and modern buildings and continued 
his improvements until he has today one of the model farms of that 
section. He does a highh^ successful general farming, having brought 
his tillable acreage to a remarkable state of productiveness. He sup- 
ports the Republican party with his franchise, and has served as school 
director. He is a member of the Presbyterian church, as is his wife. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1133 

and gives it substantial suppurt. He ranks as one of the leading men 
of his community, is progressive, generous, honorable and thorough- 
going and esteemed by his neighbors. He married, February 19, 1885, 
Lillie May Jamison, born December 2, 1865, in Center county, Penn- 
sylvania, a daughter of John and Catherine (Carter) Jamison. Chil- 
dren of Oliver Wilson and Lillie May (Jamison) Stevens: i. Neva 
Ethel, born July 3, 1886; married Clair Stewart; lives in Juniata, Penn- 
sylvania; no children. J. Luki Catherine, born August i, 1888; married 
Harry Batiiurst, lives in Birmingham, Pennsylvania ; children : Gladys 
May, Martha Elizabeth. 3. Oliver, born November 17, 1892; died June 
17, 1894. 4. John Stewart, born November 29, 1894, lives at home. 
5. Franklin Beck, born August 21, 1897. 6. Thelma Virginia, born 
January 13, 1901. 7. Alice Daisy, born September 20, 1903. 

(The Jamison Line). 

John Jamison, father of Lillie May (Jamison) Stevens, was born 
in Center county, Pennsylvania, March i, 1832. He was educated in 
the public schools of the day, and descending from a scholarly Scotch 
family he absorbed easily the knowledge atiforded him in the primitive 
schools of that time. He engaged in farming at an early age in Center 
county; and in 1875, with his family he moved to Saltillo, Huntingdon 
county, where he engaged in the same occupation, continuing it until 
five years before his death, which occurred in November, 1898. During 
the last five years of his life he was the proprietor of a hotel, which he 
ran successfully. He married (first) Elizabeth IMarkle, by whom he 
had nine children. He married (second) Catherine (Carter) Bathurst, 
widow of Reuben Bathurst, by whom she had two children. Catherine 
(Carter) Jamison was born in Center county. May 22, 1838. She was 
a daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth ( Bathurst) Carter. John and Cath- 
erine (Carter) Jamison were the parents of nine children, of whom 
Lillie May (Jamison) Stevens was the eldest. 

Joseph Carter, maternal grandfather of Mrs. Stevens, while of 
straight English descent, was born and reared in Center county, Penn- 
sylvania. He was a man of wealth and influence, and was an iron- 
master in Center county, where he lived and died at a ripe old age. He 
married Elizabeth Bathurst. born in Center county, and who died at 
Pine Grove Mills, where she was interred. Her father was Sir Law- 



1 134 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

rence Bathurst, who came from England to America in the early part 
of last century, located in Pennsylvania, and became a gentleman 
farmer. It is related of him that he grew disgusted with the manner in 
which the laws were administered in England and decided to try the 
new country across the Atlantic. He became so imbued with the idea 
of democracy as he saw it in the United States that he returned to 
England, disposed of his property, except that which was entailed, and 
sailed soon thereafter with his family and servants to America. He 
was an educated, cultured gentleman, and soon after he established him- 
self in Pennsylvania his neighbors recognized him as their leader. In 
taking out his naturalization papers he gave up his title and thereafter 
was known as Mr. Bathurst. He reared his children in a democratic 
manner, although furnishing them with means for exceptionally fine 
educations, which distinguished them from their neighbors. His de- 
scendants are among the prominent citizens in man}' portions of the 
state today. 



The name of Kenaga is one which occurs in the annals 
KENAGA of the state of Pennsylvania for many years, although 
some of the members wandered into Ohio and made 
their homes in that state for a time. 

(I) John Kenaga was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and 
from thence went to Tuscarawas county, Ohio, where he was engaged 
in the occupation of farming until his death. He married Eva Seese, 
of German descent. 

(II) William O., son of John and Eva (Seese) Kenaga, was born 
in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, June 22, 1837. He was the owner of con- 
siderable landed property, and cultivated a large tract of it. He gave 
his political support to the Republican party, and filled very acceptably 
a number of local offices. He married in Ohio, Sarah Ann, born Au- 
gust 6, 1842, daughter of William and Harriet (Shekels) Burris, both 
born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and who had removed to a 
farm in Tuscarawas county, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Kenaga had one 
child : 

(III) William Grant Kenaga was born in Odon, Indiana, Oc- 
tober 2, 1868. He was educated in the public schools, and at Mount 
Union College, Ohio, from which he was graduated. Having served 





/fV 



4^ 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1135 

an apprenticeship at brickmaking at Canal Dover, he went to Clovekmd, 
Ohio, in 1890, and became connected with a firm in the manufacture 
of brick. He remained in Cleveland until 1901, and the next three years 
were spent in looking after the branch plants of the same concerns in 
various parts of the Union. In 1904 he came to Alexandria, Pennsyl- 
vania, and the result was the estal)lishment of the Federal Refractories 
Company, which has been in existence since that time under his man- 
agement. That this is an exceedingly responsible position is attested 
by the following figures : The daily capacity of the plant is forty-five 
thousand bricks; they employ two hundred and forty men: and they 
have a monthly payroll of $13,000. They manufacture three kinds of 
brick — magnesite, chrome and silica. The raw material for the first of 
these products is received from Austria, and for the second from Japan, 
Turkey and South Africa. The finished output is sent to all parts of 
the United States and Canada. Mr. Kenaga is secretary of this corpo- 
ration, and in addition to this has connections with a number of other 
enterprises. He is a director and holds other office in the National Fire 
Brick Company, the Minor Fire Brick Company, the Lockha\en Fire 
Brick Company, and several others. He is a strong supporter of Re- 
publican principles, and is a member of the following named organiza- 
tions : r\Iount Moriah Lodge, No. 300, Free and Accepted Masons ; 
Standing Stone Chapter, No. 201, Royal Arch Masons; Huntingdon 
Commandery, No. 65, Knights Templar ; Jaffa Temple, Ancient Ara- 
bic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, Altoona, Pennsylvania, and 
Harrisburg Consistory; also the Royal Arcanum, Modern Woodmen of 
the World, and Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the latter of 
Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Kenaga married, December 20, 1891, Clara E.. born in Ohio, a 
daughter of Judius Gleitsman. They have no children. 



The Harencane family of Huntingdon county, 
HARENCANE Pennsylvania, has long been established in .Amer- 
ica. It is not definitely known when tlie immi- 
grant ancestor landed in the New ^^^orld, but it is thought to l)e about 
1752-1753. He probably settled in the British Crown Colony of New 
York, as Henry Harencane enlisted in the Continental army from 
Westchester county in 1777, served for five years unremittingly, and 



1 136 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

was finally retired because of a dangerous wound received in a sharp 
skirmish with a company of Hessian soldiers near New York City. He 
eventually recovered and devoted the rest of his life to farming. 
Among his descendants was Jacob, of whom further. 

(I) Jacob Harencane, a direct descendant of the revolutionary war 
hero, was born in the state of New York, at that time the province of 
New York. He was a farmer by vocation, pursuing it until his death 
in Pennsylvania, to which state he moved in early manhood. He was 
the parent of several sons and daughters, among whom was Jacob S., 
of whom further. 

(II) Jacob S., son of Jacob Harencane, was born in Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, and died in the county of his birth, at the home 
of his son, William S. Harencane, in April, 1909. After his mar- 
riage he settled at Hill Valley, Huntingdon county, and continued farm- 
ing on his father's land, with great success. Later, tempted by more 
fertile land, he moved to near Huntingdon, and from there to the farm 
of an uncle, where he remained for several years. He later retired 
from active business life and made his home with his son. He and his 
wife were members of the German Reformed church, actively partici- 
pating in all of its work ; and he was a member of the Knights of the 
Golden Eagle. He married Catherine Idinger, born in Huntingdon 
county, who still survives him, making her home with her son, William 
S. Harencane. Jacob S. and Catherine (Idinger) Harencane were 
the parents of fourteen children: Ann Elizabeth, died aged six years; 
Rufina Brisbin, married Scott Prough; Samuel Reed, deceased: Henry; 
Clara Jane, married John Feaster : George, deceased ; Euna Mary, de- 
ceased; Nora Susan, married John E. Snyder; WilHam; Marjorie Ellen, 
deceased ; Ida May, married Emanuel Parks, who is now deceased ; 
Florrance, deceased; Julia Catherine, deceased; Nellie Irene, deceased. 

(III) William S., son of Jacob S. and Catherine (Idinger) Haren- 
cane, was born April 6, 1871, at Warriors Ridge, Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania. He was reared on a farm and received his education in 
the public schools. He chose the family occupation of farming as his 
vocation and while yet a youth entered upon it. For several years he 
worked rented land, in which he was very successful. Giving this up he 
was engaged in various capacities on public works for seven or eight 
years, where he gave the greatest satisfaction to his employers. As his 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1137 

father advanced in years it was his most cherished desire to see his sun 
established on a farm of his own. To meet this wish of his parent, 
and also to insure his future independence, he purchased ninety acres of 
land in Porter township, Huntingdon county, which he improved in 
every wa_\-. remodeling the buildings and bringing the land to a high 
state of productiveness, and where he does general farming along ap- 
proved scientilic lines. He is considered one of the substantial and 
progressive men of Porter township. He is a Democrat, but has never 
held, nor asked for office. Mr. Harencane is unmarried, his mother 
looking after his household. 



The Grove family of Pennsylvania may justly be said to 
GROVE be American, in that the ancestor of it was in America in 
1730, and since which time the members of it have 
espoused every cause dear to the hearts of true Americans. Many of 
the name fought the Indians, the French, the English, in both the revo- 
lutionary war and that of 181 2, and in the civil war. Behind them is a 
long line of unstained patriotic record. 

(I) Jacob Grove, a direct descendant of the emigrant Grove, was 
born in Penn township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. He was 
reared on his father's farm and educated in the common and private 
schools of the day. He early turned his attention to farming, lived and 
died a cultivator of the soil. He spent the greater part of his life in 
Penn township, where he owned two hundred acres of land, forty of 
which were under cultivation, the other hundred and sixty being fine 
timbered land. Because of his known honesty he was selected by dying 
parents and the courts to act as guardian to many orphan children. He 
married Margaret Summers, like himself of colonial stock. Their chil- 
dren w^ere Andrew F., of whom further; Mary, Elizabeth, Margaret, 
Jacob Jr., Samuel S. and Benjamin. 

(II) Andrew F. Grove, son of Jacob and Margaret (Svnnmers) 
Grove, was born on his father's farm in Penn township, Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania. He received his education in the public schools 
of the township and in the Tuscarora Academy at Academia, which was 
one of the best at that time in the state. He prepared himself for teach- 
ing, and on leaving school he became an instructor of the young, which 
occupation he followed with great success. He was not only a thorough 



1 138 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

scholar, and knew how to impart his knowledge to his pupils, but he was 
also a strict disciplinarian. He next engaged in surve3'ing, and was in 
great demand, as at that time the land lines were not well defined. In 
1865 he established a general merchandise store in Grafton, Pennsyl- 
vania, which he conducted until the time of his death, in 1890. In this 
last venture he was very prosperous, and accumulated a handsome for- 
tune. He married (first) Ann Corbin, born in Penn township, Hunt- 
ingdon county, Pennsylvania, daughter of David and Nancy (Engle- 
hart) Corbin. David Corbin accompanied his father, two brothers and 
a sister from England to Virginia, where they located, and later came 
to Pennsylvania, settling in Huntingdon county. Children of Andrew 
F. and Ann (Corbin) Grove: Gaird Corbin, of whom further; Maude 
T. and Ford J. He married (second) Annie Sprankle; by her had two 
children, Frank and Harry. 

(Ill) G. C. Grove, son of Andrew F. and Ann (Corbin) Grove, 
was born October 16, 1868, in Penn township, Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania. He received an excellent education in the township 
public schools, and on leaving entered the store of his father. He 
eventually became manager of the mercantile business, and in 1890 he 
became proprietor. Besides dealing in general merchandise he handles 
wood, ties, bark, etc. He is one of the most up-to-date men in his 
vicinity, and is regarded as a leading citizen. He is a Prohibitionist in 
his political affiliations, sustaining the tenets of that party on all occa- 
sions by argument and influence, and belongs to the Missionary Alliance 
church. 

He married, in Januar}^, 1898, Unity May Rickeard, born in Dudley 
township. Children: i. Grace Naomi. 2. G. C. Jr. 3. Sarah Esther. 
4. Maude Theresa. 5. Elijah Rickeard. 



George Russell was the first member of this branch of 
RUSSELL the Russell family to settle in Huntingdon county, 
whither he came in 1795 from Berks county, the immi- 
grant ancestor of the name having there made his home. He became 
the owner of six hundred acres of land in Hopewell township, where 
the family home remains. He married and had issue. 

(II) Jacob, son of George Russell, was born in Hopewell township, 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, where he died September 22, 1869, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1139 

in his seventy-seventh year. He conducted extensive farming opera- 
tions on his farm of five iiundred acres, also raising horses for tiie mar- 
ket. He was a Democrat in politics and filled the office of tax collector 
of Hopewell township. He was a member of the Reformed church. 
He married Catherine, daughter of Christian Weaver, of Hopewell 
townshij), born 1808, died November 17, 1873. Children of Christian 
Weaver, all deceased: Jacob, John A., James Christian, Catherine (of 
previous mention) married Jacob Russell. Children of Jacob and Cath- 
erine (W^eaver) Russell: i. Susannah, born in 1830, died December 
22, 1876; married William Fisher, and lived in Bedford county. 2. 
David Russell, a veteran of the civil war; deceased. 3. Mary, married 
Thomas Keith, and lived in Martinsburg. 4. Isaac Russell, a veteran 
of the civil war, lived in Hopewell township; deceased. 5. John W. 
Russell, born April 30, 1844, died April 10, 1898; lived in the resi- 
dence now occupied by James W. Russell. 6. Abram, deceased, a vet- 
eran of the civil war, lived in Hopewell township. 7. Samuel, a resi- 
dent of Hopewell township. 8. Daniel, deceased. 9. James W. Rus- 
sell, of further mention. 10. Rosanah, died May 15, 1879. married 
Philip Brumbaugh. 

(Ill) James W., ninth child and seventh son of Jacob and Cather- 
ine (Weaver) Russell, was born in Hopewell township, Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1847. He obtained his education in the public 
schools of his native township, and recalls with pleasant memory the 
roughly hewn desks and the long, backless benches of slab pine. For a 
time, until his father's death, he worked on the home farm, then ac- 
cepting a position with the Huntingdon and Broad Top railroad, which 
he held for six years. He then engaged as his brother's assistant on the 
old homestead, assuming entire charge of the farm of one hundred and 
ten acres, upon his brother's death. This he successfully cultivates at 
the present time and is noted throughout the locality for the high grade 
of Holstein cattle he has upon his farm. He is a Democrat in politics, 
and, while he takes no active part in public affairs, as executive or office- 
holder, nevertheless he is prominently connected with all the township 
movements and improvements, his advice and counsel being constantly 
sought and gratefully received. 

He married, January 7, 1892, Margaret Dreece, born in Hopewell 
township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, daughter of \\'illiam, a 



II40 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

veteran of the civil war, and Mary Dreece. Child, Walter Scott, born 
November 24, 1892, died aged ten years. 



Harry Cresswell Miller, of Huntingdon county, Penn- 
MILLER sylvania, a leading citizen and man of prominence in his 

count}', descends from Irish and German stock long set- 
tled in Pennsylvania. The emigrant, Matthew Miller, most probably 
came to America in 1790, located in Pennsylvania, there farmed, lived 
and died. Among his descendants was Jacob Corell, of whom further. 

(I) Jacob Corell Miller was born on the Miller homestead, in Hunt- 
ingdon county, and there farmed until his death, June 9, 1898. He 
received his education in the schools of the township, at that time Barree 
township. He purchased one hundred and thirty acres of land which 
he improved, erected houses, and converted into a fine farm. He was 
active in the social, political and religious affairs of the township. He 
was a lifelong Democrat, voting with the party, and under it held vari- 
ous local offices. He married Caroline Greene, born on the Greene 
homestead in Huntingdon county. Children: i. John S., deceased. 
2. Mary. 3. Charlotte. 4. Robert G. 5. Nancy P. 6. Ella, deceased. 
7. Harry Cresswell, of whom further. 8. James Guinn. 

(II) Harry Cresswell Miller, son of Jacob Corell and Caroline 
(Greene) Miller, was born February 2, 1866, in Miller township, Hunt- 
ingdon county, Pennsylvania. After receiving his education in the 
public school he purchased in 1895 the Miller homestead place of two 
hundred and thirty-eight acres, in Huntingdon county, where he does 
general farming on a large scale. Mr. Miller is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church and of the Grange; and supports the Demo- 
cratic party with his vote. He was school director sixteen years, and 
was supervisor and treasurer for supervisors several years. He is ac- 
tively interested in the affairs of the township and always stands for 
the public good on all questions. He is one of the substantial farmers 
of Pennsylvania, and has contributed his share toward maintaining the 
high standard of citizenship for which the state is justly famous. 

On November 28, 1894, he married Anna Thomas Bell, daughter 
of Thomas and Mary Ann (Stewart) Bell, both of whom were reared 
in Barree township. Through this marriage Mr. Miller is connected 
with a large number of families in the Juniata Valley, besides being 





O^-iv-rxjc^flk,^^ 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1141 

related to many families throutjh both his mcither and father. Thomas 
Bell was the son of Alexander and Elizabeth (Moore) Bell. The Bells 
are long residents of Pennsylvania, while the Moores are pioneers of 
New Jersey. The father of Alexander Bell, Captain Jack Bell, was the 
pioneer of Barree township, Huntingdon county, and to this day his 
feats with gun and rod are related. Children of Harry C. and Anna 
Thomas (Bell) Miller: i. Jacob Clarence, born October 15, 1895. -■ 
Thomas Bell, born October 6, 1897. 3. Robert Stewart, born June i, 
1900. 4. Richard James, born December 22,. 1906. 5. Donald Franklin, 
twin of Richard James, born December 23, 1906. 



James ]\Iurray Africa, civil engineer, of Huntingdon, 
AFRICA Pennsylvania, was born in the borough of Huntingdon, 

April II, 1863, and is a son of J. Simpson and Dorothea 
C. (Greenland) Africa. J. Simpson Africa was born in the town of 
Huntingdon, September 15. 1832: his wife was a daughter of the late 
Joshua and Elizabeth (Wright) Greenland, and was born in Cassville, 
Huntingdon county, September 29, 1834. Mrs. Africa died in Novem- 
ber, 1886. J. Simpson Africa died in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, 
in 1900. 

During the childhood of James Murray Africa his parents removed 
to Philadelphia and afterwards to Atsion, Burlington county, New Jer- 
sey, where he attended a private school for a short time. In 1870 the 
family removed to Huntingdon, where James Murray pursued his studies 
in private and public schools, and at Juniata College. His education 
was finished at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York, 
where he took a thorough course in civil engineering, was graduated 
June 13, 1888, and at once entered upon the practice of his profession, 
making the town of Huntingdon his headquarters. In 1873 he entered 
an engineer's office as student; in 1881 was appointed member of the 
commission to determine the lines of Jackson, Miller and Barree town- 
ships, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania: in 1882-83 was in charge of 
the topographical and boundary surveys of coal and ore lands of R. H. 
Powell & Company in Huntingdon and Clearfield counties, Pennsvl- 
vania : also lands of Huntingdon & Broad Top railroad: in 1884 and 
189 — ■ was elected city engineer of Huntingdon, and designed and con- 
structed the sewerage system of the borough of Huntingdon; in June, 



1 142 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

1888, graduated at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York; 
the same year he designed the water works for Palmyra and Riverton, 
New Jersey, and was consulting engineer for the Union Trust 
Company, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, furnishing funds for the 
Westmoreland county water w^orks; October 20, 1888, was elected 
a member of the Engineers' Club of Philadelphia; in December, 1888, 
became assistant engineer of the Chautauc[ua Lake railroad, Jamestown, 
New York, of which he was made chief engineer in January, 1889; in 
July of that year the office of general manager of the Chautauqua Lake 
railroad was added to that of chief engineer, and he also became general 
manager of the Chautauqua Steamboat Company; in 1890 was chief 
engineer and general manager of the Etowah Iron Company, Carters- 
ville, Georgia, and constructed twelve miles of railroad ; also designed 
and erected a mill for the concentration of manganese ore; this office, 
in February, 1891, he was obliged to resign on account of ill health, and 
was until June of that year at the University Hospital in Philadelphia. 
From July to December of that year he was in charge of the survey of 
the lands pertaining to the Rockhill Iron and Coal Company of Hunting- 
don county; 1892-93 was engaged in designing and superintending the 
street improvements of the borough of Huntingdon; and in 1894 he was 
elected chief engineer of the Pennsylvania Midland railroad, at the 
general office, at Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. During the past twelve 
years Mr. Africa has designed and erected six Howe truss wooden 
bridges and a number of steel highway bridges not included in the 
above enumeration of his engagements, and has been employed on 
important surveys by Eckley B. Coxe, Drifton, Pennsylvania; William 
Thaw, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania ; the Lehigh Valley Coal Company, 
Pennsylvania; the Pennsylvania Railroad Company; the Pennsylvania 
Canal Company; Cresson Springs Company, of Cresson, Pennsylvania; 
Cambria Steel Company, of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and the Tyrone 
Mining and Manufacturing Company, Tyrone, Pennsylvania. He holds 
at present the position of city engineer of Huntingdon. On September 
2, 1896, he was elected a member of the American Society of Civil 
Engineers. He designed the sewerage system for Lewistown, Penn- 
sylvania, also that of Danville and Mt. Union, Pennsylvania, and was 
engineer in charge of construction of the additions of the Standard 
Steel Plant at Burnham, Pennsylvania, for the Baldwin Locomotive 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1143 

Works of Philadelphia. This increased the plant from seven hundred 
to four thousand five hundred men. He designed and superintended 
construction of roads, waterworks, sewers, etc., of the Masonic Home 
at Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, and has just completed (1913) a reser- 
voir and filter system for the Pennsylvania Industrial Reformatory at 
Huntingdon; is also constructing (1913) a filter plant for the water 
system of Huntingdon. He has erected many of the bridges on the 
Huntingdon & Broad Top railroad, supplanting the old wooden trestles 
with the more modern stone and concrete bridges, and has made surveys 
on over two thousand properties in thirty-seven counties of Pennsyl- 
vania, also surveys in twelve different states, varying in size from one 
hundred to twenty-one thousand acre tracts. 

Mr. Africa is past master of Mount Moriah Lodge, No. 300, F. and 
A. M., of which he has always been an active member; past high priest 
of Standing Stone Chapter, No. 201, R. A. M; past eminent commander 
of Huntingdon Commandery, No. 65, K. T., and a member of the Im- 
proved Order of Heptasophs. Mr. Africa's political opinions are Demo- 
cratic. 

J. Murray Africa was married at Reading, Pennsylvania, June i, 
1893, to Eleanor, daughter of Charles B. and Elizabeth jMcKnight, of 
that city, both now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Africa have children : J. 
Murray, Jr., born May 21, 1895; Charles McKnight, September 3, 1896, 
and Hunter, June 2;^. 1900. The family attend the Presbyterian 
church. 



In Cromwell township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
STARR near Orbisonia, is located the splendidly improved farm of 

H. A. Starr, the same comprising three hundred acres. On 
this beautiful rural estate Mr. Starr was born and reared, the year of his 
nativity being i860. He is a son of Michael and Clara (Krugh) Starr, 
the former of whom was born in Germany and the latter in Franklin 
county, Pennsylvania. The mother was a daughter of Michael and Mary 
Krugh, both natives of Germany, whence they immigrated to America 
in their youth, settling in Dublin township, Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania, where they gained prestige as farmers. 

]\Iichael Starr passed his boyhood and youth in Franklin county, 
where he was given the advantages of a public school education. As a 



1 144 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

young man he came to Huntingdon county and began farming on a tract 
of land in Cromwell township. He devoted all his time and attention 
to diversified agriculture, and at the time of his demise, he was the owner 
of two hundred and fifty acres of well cultivated soil. He served his 
community as poor director and for many years was likewise school 
director. He was twice married; first, to Mary Hoagland, and (second) 
to Mary Krugh. The first union was blessed with five children : Simon, 
Elizabeth, Jacob, Ann and John. Of the second marriage were born: 
James, Francis, H. A., of whom further; Amanda, John and Samuel. 

After completing the curriculum of the public schools of his home 
place, H. A. Starr turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. He has 
always resided on the old homestead, and his present holdings amount 
to three hundred acres, all of which is under cultivation. In 1897 he 
erected a fine, modern barn, and he has since remodeled the residence. 
He is a staunch Democrat in politics, and while he has never nm for 
public office of any description he is ever alive to the issues of the day 
and does all in his power to advance the progress and prosperity of his 
community. He is held in high esteem by his fellow citizens, and is 
known as a man of his word and as one who is strictly reliable and 
honorable in all his business dealings. In religious faith he and his 
family are devout communicants of the Catholic church. 

In the year 1884 Mr. Starr married Miss Jennie McGarvey. Mr. 
and Mrs. Starr had six children : Amanda, Hilda, Lawrence, Lea, 
Herbert and Dallas. Mrs. Starr is deceased. 



Sprung from Irish stock, the Henderson family of 
HENDERSON Huntingdon county has been in this country for 

a number of generations. Robert Henderson, the 
immigrant ancestor, came from County Derry, Ireland, to this country 
during the revolutionary war. He reared a family of nine sons and 
one daughter. He settled first in Chester county, and later moved to 
what is now Center county. 

(I) David Henderson, the first of the family of whom we have more 
detailed information, was born in Taylor township, Center county, 
Pennsylvania, in Bald Eagle Valley. Like his father he learned the 
trade, of shoemaking, and followed this successfully for a long period 
of time. For a while he was located in Franklin township, and lived 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1145 

in various otiier places. He supplied the eniplnyes of neighboring forges 
with their footwear, which was an ini[)()rtant contract at a time when all 
work had to be done by hand. He llnally abandoned this business in 
favor of farming and retired to his farm near Spruce Creek. Later he 
removed to Spruce Creek, where he died, October 7, 1882, at the age of 
eighty-six years. In 182 1 he married Margaret Jane, daughter of 

■ — and Elizabeth Conrad, who died April 10, 1877. They 

had children: i. Elizabeth, married Daniel Waite. 2. Robert L., was 
a farmer, and died in Spruce Creek township, Huntingdon county, at 
the age of seventy-four years. 3. Isabella, died at Tyrone; married 
John G. Waite. 4. Mary A., never married, and died in May, 191 1, at 
the age of eighty-nine years. 5. Thomas K., a farmer, and at one time 
sheriff of Huntingdon county, died at Warriors j\Iark, aged seventy- 
four years. 6. Samuel C, a farmer, died near Birmingham, Huntingdon 
county. 7. Margaret Jane, married the Hon. Samuel Dysart, and both 
died in Lee county, Illinois. He was commissioner of agriculture, and 
in 1900 represented the L^nited States Agricultural Department in Paris, 
France. 8. John, died in infancy about 1842. 9. David Porter, see 
forward. 

(II) David Porter, son of David and Margaret Jane (Conrad) 
Henderson, was born in the house in which he has since lived, in Frank- 
lin township, now Spruce Creek township, Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania, April 8, 1839. He was educated in the public school in the 
vicinity, and from his early years devoted himself to agricultural inter- 
ests. He enlisted, August 7, 1862, in Company C, One Hundred and 
Twenty-fifth regiment, and was honorably discharged May 18, 1863. 
The battles in which he participated were those of Antietam and Chan- 
cellorsville. Because of his civil war record he is a member of the 
Grand Arm)- of the Republic. After his marriage he rented the home 
farm for one year, and purchased it in 1S67. This consisted of one 
hundred and sixty-five acres in Spruce Creek township, and he has 
added to it, so that it now consists of one hundred and eighty acres. 
He has kept the old buildings in an excellent state, and has had the barn 
remodeled. He is a supporter of the Democratic party, and has filled 
very acceptably a number of local ofifices. He and his wife are memljers 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he has been a trustee since 
about 1875. 



1 146 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Mr. Henderson married, February 15, 1865, Esther Jane Stover, 
born on Eden Hill, Spruce Creek township, December 28, 1848. She 
is the daughter of Jacob Stover, born in Blair county, Pennsylvania, 
who later engaged in farming in Huntingdon county, where his death 
occurred. He married Mary Waite, who was born and died in Hunting- 
don county. Jacob and Mary (Waite) Stover were members of the 
jNIethodist Episcopal church, and had children : John, Miles and Emory, 
all living in Huntingdon county; Susan, deceased, married John H. 
Wallace ; Frances, deceased, married George Bribenbaugh ; Esther Jane, 
mentioned above; Mary, married F. Pierce Gray, and lives in Center 
county, Pennsylvania. Children of David Porter and Esther Jane 
(Stover) Henderson: i. Mary Belle, married (first) Oscar L. Borst, 
of Spruce Creek, Huntingdon county; (second) Newton Neidigh, a 
farmer, and they live near State College, Center county, Pennsylvania. 
2. Charles Milton, a farmer near Meringo, Center county, Pennsyl- 
vania, married Cynthia Rider. 3. Warren M., see forward. 4. Eliza- 
beth, married Rush Horrell, and lives in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 5. 
John S., is a farmer on the old homestead; he married (first) Dora 
Houtz, and (second) Edith Miller. 6. Cora Ella, married Wilson 
Gramling, a farmer, and lives at Ashley, Indiana. 7. Esther, married 
Walter L. Scultz, a merchant and farmer of Spruce Creek. 8. William 
Wallace, a clerk ; he is unmarried. 

(Ill) Warren M. Henderson, son of David Porter and Esther Jane 
(Stover) Henderson, was born in Spruce Creek township, Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, July 3, 1869. His early life was spent on the 
homestead farm, and his education was commenced in the public schools 
of that locality. Later he took up sttidies in Juniata College and West 
Chester State Normal School. AVhen seventeen years of age he began 
teaching, following that profession four years in Franklin and Warriors 
Mark townships. He entered the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company in 1890, at Pittsburgh. In 1901 he entered the Dickinson 
Law School at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, also studying under John W. 
Wetzel, of the bar of Cumberland county. He was graduated from the 
law school, June 4, 1894, and was admitted to the Cumberland county 
bar. On July 2, of the same year, he was admitted to the bar of Hunting- 
don county, beginning to practice there the following month. He has 
been practicing there constantly since that time, and by his honorable 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1147 

and upright course in his legal dealings, has won for himself the respect 
of the court and the trust and conhdence of a large clientele. He is a 
member of the Huntingdon County Bar Association, and politically a 
Democrat. He has served as borough attorney and as sheriff's attorney, 
and for a time was chairman of the Democratic County Committee. 
He is a member of the Mount Moriah Lodge, No. 300, Free and Ac- 
cepted ]\Iasons; Standing Stone Chapter, No. 201, Royal x\rch Masons; 
Juniata Lodge, No. 117, of Huntingdon, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

Mr. Henderson married, June 22, 1897, Elizabeth, daughter of Abra- 
ham and Susan HefTner, natives of Huntingdon, and they have children: 
Robert HefYner, born July 13, 1898; and Elizabeth, born July 5, 1907. 



The Noltes of the Juniata Valley came to the United States 
NOLTE from Germany, the emigrant ancestor being George (i) 

Nolte, who came with wife and family in 1848, settling in 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, about 1850. Lie was a cooper by 
trade, an honorable, industrious man, who spent his quarter century 
of American life in Huntingdon county, and there died prior to 1870. 
He had children: George (2) of further mention; John, whose inter- 
esting and successful career is traced in another Nolte sketch in this 
work : Nicholas, and Mary. 

(II) George (2), son of George (i) Nolte, was born in Germany, 
in 1820, there was educated, and learned the trade of cooper. He came 
to the Linited States with his father, and settled in Huntingdon county, 
where he followed his trade of cooper, learned the trade of stone mason 
and worked in a brewery. He was accidentally killed on the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad at Tipton, Blair county, Pennsylvania, and is buried in 
Huntingdon. Both he and his wife were members of the Lutheran 
church. He married Elizabeth Cough; children: Martha, never mar- 
ried; Henry, died October 27, 1912, in Harrisburg, a Pennsylvania rail- 
road conductor, married and left issue Ella and Hughes; John, now a 
train dispatcher for the Pennsylvania railroad, located at Altoona, Penn- 
sylvania, he married Laura Wharton; George (3), of whom further. 

(III) George (3), son of George (2) and Elizabeth (Cough) Nolte, 
was born at Lewistown, Pennsylvania, May 23, i860. He was educated 
in the public schools of Huntingdon, and when a young man was em- 



1 148 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

ployed in the Cambria Steel Works at Johnstown, Pennsylvania. In 1880 
he entered the employ of the Pennsylvania railroad, serving six years 
as assistant conductor and for the past twenty-four years as conductor. 
He is an old and trusted employee of the company and has fairly won 
the respect and confidence of his official superiors and of those who 
are under his orders. He is a member of the Lutheran church; the 
order of Pennsylvania Railroad Conductors, the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Relief Association, the Pennsylvania Railroad Old Veterans' Associa- 
tion, and the Patriotic Order Sons of America. He married, June 21, 
1888, Flora May, daughter of Samuel and Rachel (Ayres) Dickson. 
Samuel Dickson is a fireman on the Pennsylvania railroad. 



The Bayers came to the United States from Germany, 
BAYER where for many generations they had been seated. The 

emigrant ancestor settled in Maryland, from whence came 
John Bayer when a young man. His father was a farmer of Maryland 
and reared a large family including sons : John, Joseph, Daniel, Henry, 
and George ; and daughters : Mary, Susan, Nancy, Katherine, Hannah, 
and Barbara. 

John Bayer, born in Washington, Maryland, there was educated and 
learned the trade of miller. On coming to Pennsylvania he settled in 
Franklin county, where he married and lived until his death, February 
27, 1875. He married, in Franklin county, Mary Ann Miller, born 
there and died May 25, 1880, daughter of Daniel and Margaret Miller, 
both of German parentage — he a farmer of Franklin county: she had 
brothers Adam and Levi, and sisters Katherine, Eve. Elizabeth and 
Margaret. Children of John and Mary Ann (Miller) Bayer: i. John, 
died aged four years. 2. Sarah, died aged sixteen years. 3. David B., 
a tile manufacturer of Bellefontaine, Ohio. 4. Joseph M., died in 191 1, 
at Tyrone, Pennsylvania, a wholesale grocer. 5. Adam M., a farmer 
of Bellefontaine, Ohio. 6. Henry, a farmer of Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania. 7. Margaret Jane, born in Franklin county, Pennsyl- 
vania, March 29, 1859. She was educated in the public schools, and 
for several years resided at home after reaching womanhood. In 1897 
she opened a ladies" drygoods and notion store in Huntingdon, where 
she proved an eminently capable, enterprising and successful business 
woman. In 1907 she erected her present store building, a structure fifty 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1149 

by fifty feet, three stories in height. She is a member of the Reformed 
church, and interested in the woman's department of church and social 
hfe. Miss Bayer is unmarried. 8. Theodore F., of whom further notice 
will be found in this work. 



Ireland herein records another contribution to the com- 
STEEL monwealth of Pennsylvania in the Steel family of Hunting- 
don county. The member of the family who first came 
to America was Samuel Steel, a merchant. He located in Huntingdon 
county at an early date and there founded the present family. Both he 
and his wife were members of the United Presbyterian church. He 
married Jane McCartney, also a native of Ireland. Children: i. Peggy, 
married David Blair, a minister of the Presbyterian faith. 2. Betsey, 
married John Williamson, a lawyer. 3. John, a physician of Hunting- 
don. 4. George, of whom further. 5. David. 

(II) George, son of Samuel and Jane (McCartney) Steel, was born 
in Huntingdon, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, in 18 14, died there 
April 23, 1872. He obtained his education in the public schools of the 
place of his birth and early in life engaged in mercantile dealing, later 
entering the lumber business, which he followed all his life. He was 
a Republican in politics, and served one term as postmaster. Both he 
and his wife were members and regular attendants of the Presbyterian 
church. He married Elizabeth McMurtie, born September 25, 18 14, 
died November 9, 1891, daughter of James and Elizabeth (Elliott) 
McMurtie, natives of England, he a farmer, who came to America about 
the last of the eighteenth century. They were married in 1791, and 
were both members of the Presbyterian church. Politically he was a 
sympathizer with the Tory party. Children of James and Elizabeth 
(Elliott) McMurtie: Sarah, married a Mr. Garmer; Martha, mar- 
ried Jesse ^March: Elizabeth (of previous mention), married George 
Steel; Ellen, married Robert McCoy; Mary, married Dr. John McCul- 
len, a physician of Huntingdon; David, a farmer; William, a farmer of 
Shavers Creek, Pennsylvania ; Charles, a farmer of Shavers Creek : 
Elliott (deceased), a farmer. Children of George and Elizabeth 
(McMurtie) Steel: i. Elizabeth Jane, born October 3, 1843, married 
Milton Libel, a historian. 2. Samuel Aston (deceased), born 1844. 
for six years prothonotary of Huntingdon. 3. Mar}' E., Ijorn Feb- 



I ISO HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

ruary 25, 1846, married J. C. Carroll (deceased). 4. Martha, born 
]\Iarch 17, 1848, married E. T. Swain, a druggist of Renovo, Pennsyl- 
vania. 5. George Given, of whom further. 

(Ill) George Given, youngest child of George and Elizabeth 
(McMurtie) Steel, was born in Huntingdon, Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania, April 17, 1856. He was educated in a private school taught 
by Mr. Welch, and later attended the academy for several years. His 
entire life has been spent in Huntingdon, where he has successfully 
engaged in lumber dealing with his father, the grocery business, and 
the wholesale distribution of ice cream, from all of which he has retired 
and at the present time (1913) is serving as solicitor for the Huntingdon 
National Bank, a position he ably and efficiently fills. He is a Re- 
publican in politics, and for six years served the county as prothonotary. 
Both he and his wife are members of the Baptist church, while fra- 
ternally he is affiliated with the Order of Heptasophs. 

He married, February 17, 1876, Ida T., daughter of John W. Mat- 
terson, a lawyer, and Harriet (Snyder) IMatterson. Children of George 
Given and Ida T. Steel: i. Harriet, born December, 1876; married 
Theodore Humphreys, an engineer in the employ of the H. B. Smith 
Company; children: George E. and Theodore Frank. 2. Mary Cath- 
erine, born May i, 1878. 3. John Matterson, born June 26, 1880, a 
physician of Huntingdon. 4. Addie, died in childhood. 5. Carlotto, 
born February 4, 1884, died in childhood. 6. Irene, born August 2, 
1885; married W. B. Fretchey, a commercial salesman of Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. 7. Letta J., born January 18, 1887; married Earl B. 
Swoope, a railroad crew checker at Altoona, Pennsylvania. 8. James 
Richard, born May 16, 1891, employee of Equitable Life Insurance 
Company. 9. Edmina, born June 28, 1893, ^ graduate of the normal 
course, Juniata College; a school teacher. 10. Virginia, born March 
5, 1900, died in infancy. 11. David Elliott, born April 2, 1901, attends 
school. 



Baldwin is an old name and appears as early as 672 
BALDWIN A. D. It appears on the "Roll of Battle Abbey" and 

has been a common name in both England and America 
for many years. The founder of the family to which this branch be- 
longs was John Baldwin, who came from Oxfordshire, England, about 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1151 

1682, settling in Aston township. Chester (now Delaware) county, 
Pennsylvania. He followed his trade of carpenter there for many 
years, then moved to Chester, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in mer- 
cantile life, acquiring a large and valuable estate. He was a member 
of the Society of Friends, as was his wife, Catherine Carter, who, when 
married to John Baldwin. 4 mo. 4, 1689. was the "widow Turner." The 
line of descent was through John (2) Baldwin, who married 4 mo. 11, 
1719, Hannah Johnson. Their son, John (3) Baldwin, married 9 mo. 
9, 1743, Ann Pierce, and in 175 1 settled in East Cain township, Chester 
county, on a tract of land (five hundred acres) purchased by his grand- 
father in 1702. 

(V) Robert, a grandson of John (3) Baldwin, was born in Chester, 
Delaware county. Penns_\-lvania. He purchased a farm there when 
tw^enty-two years of age and there lived until his death at age of ninety 
years. He left three sons: Francis H., died unmarried in Delaware 
county, a carpenter; Robert Porter, of whom further; William, a ser- 
geant of artillery, serving in thirty engagements during the war between 
the states, died in the state of Washington. 

(VI) Robert Porter, son of Robert Baldwin, was born in Delaware 
county, Pennsylvania, on the Baldwin homestead, there grew to man- 
hood and learned the miller's trade. When a young man he moved to 
Mifflin county, where he followed his trade, operating a mill near Mif- 
flintown. He married about 1859. and two years later enlisted in the 
Union army, serving in Company I, in a regiment of Pennsylvania volun- 
teer infantr}' until the close of the war, when he was honorably dis- 
charged. After the war he again engaged in milling at Mifflintown, 
but finally returned to the old home in Delaware county, where he pur- 
chased a part of the old homestead and there lived until his death. He 
was independent in politics and a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He married (first) Martha Warner, who died in 187 1. He 
married (second) Mary Knisely, of Lewistown, Pennsylvania. Chil- 
dren by first marriage : George B. McClellan, a bricklayer and con- 
tractor of Westchester, Pennsylvania ; Francis, of whom further ; James, 
died aged twenty-seven years ; a child, died in infancy. 

(VII) Francis, son of Robert Porter and Martha (Warner) Bald- 
win, was born at Mifflintown. Pennsylvania. September 29. 1866. He 
was educated in the public schools there and at "Thornbury Western" 



1 152 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

in Delaware county. x\t about the age of seventeen years he began 
learning the tailor's trade in Westchester and after becoming proficient 
worked as a journeyman tailor in several Pennsylvania towns. In the 
fall of 1892 he moved to Huntingdon and there started in business for 
himself. He was first located on Penn street, but later moved to his 
present place of business on Fifth street, where he is well established and 
successful. He is a member of Mount Moriah Lodge No. 300, Free 
and Accepted Masons; Standing Stone Chapter No. 201, Royal Arch 
Masons; Huntingdon Commandery No. 65, Knights Templar; Jafi:a 
Temple, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine ; Patriotic Order Sons of America ; 
the Royal Arcanum; and is a communicant of St. John's Protestant 
Episcopal church. 

He married, in February, 1889, Bertha, daughter of Jacob Taylor, 
of Westchester, Pennsylvania; children: Edna M., resides at home; 
Anna T., now studying kindergarten systems in a training school for 
teachers at Baltimore, Maryland; Francis (2), graduate of Huntingdon 
high school, class of 1914. 



The Stryker family, of which William Shaw Stryker, 
STRYKER of Alexandria, Pennsylvania, is a representative, is 

descended from two brothers, who came over from 
Holland more than two and a half centuries ago and settled in New 
York. One was Peter, the lineal ancestor of William Shaw Stryker, 
and the other was John, who settled in New Jersey. Peter located in 
Long Island, where his descendants may still be found. The Strykers 
were actively patriotic in revolutionary times. One of the famil}-. 
General William S. Stryker, was adjutant-general of New Jersey during 
the civil war. 

(I) John Stryker was born, reared and married in New Jersey. 
He was a poor man at the time of his marriage and, some time after 
this event, with all his worldly property in an old wagon, which was 
drawn by two blind horses, he moved to Huntingdon county and made 
his home at Shavers Creek. So industrious and energetic a man was 
he that, at the time of his death, he was able to give each of his sons a 
fine farm, with the exception of Joseph, who preferred to take the value 
of it in a fine education. For some years prior to his decease John 
Stryker lived in Logan township. He married Elizabeth Thompson, of 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1153 

New Jersey, and they had cliildren: i. Thompson, died in Blair county. 
2. Peter, see forward. 3. Samuel, a farmer, died in California. 4. 
Mahlon, died at Shavers Creek Valley. 5. Joseph, studied law and was 
engaged in legal practice in Washington, District of Columbia, for a num- 
ber of years. For six years he held the office of consul at rernambuco, 
Brazil, and he died in Washington. 6. William, died on the home- 
stead near Petersburg. 7. Eliza, married Adam Lightner, and died at 
Grafton, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. 8. Mary, married Adam 
Leffard, and died at McVeytown, Pennsylvania. 9. Amelia, married 
Judge Perry, and died in ]\Iissouri. 10. Caroline, married Lewis Light- 
ner, and died in Illinois. 

(II) Peter, son of John and Elizabeth (Thompson) Strj'ker, was 
born at Shavers Creek, West township, Pennsylvania, in 1820, and died 
March 9, 1858. He grew up on the farm, attending school during the 
winter months. About 1841 he purchased a farm in Porter township 
from the heirs of his father, and resided on that until his death. He 
was an influential citizen, and active in the interests of the Whig party, 
and was selected to fill a number of local public offices. As a member 
and elder of the Presbyterian church, he did good service in the cause 
of religion, and his loss was deeply felt by the entire community. He 
contracted a cold while engaged in active work, and succumbed to this 
at the end of one week. Mr. Stryker married Jane Newell, who died 
March 7, 1886, and is buried beside her husliand in the cemetery at 
Alexandria. She was the daughter of Andrew and Margaret (Dorris) 
Newell, both natives of Ireland, who came to America in 18 12 and 
settled in Huntingdon county. He engaged in farming, of which he 
made a decided success. They were both members of the Presbyterian 
church. They had children: William, a farmer, who died in Illinois; 
Thomas, in the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, died in 
Huntingdon; Dorris, a physician, who died in Chicago; John, a car- 
penter, died in Iowa ; Alexander, lives in Mercer county, Pennsylvania ; 
Jane, mentioned above ; Mary, married J. E. Harper, and died in Hunt- 
ingdon county; Ellen, married R. M. Hewitt, and died in Huntingdon 
countv, Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Stryker had children: Mary, 
died in infancy; John, died in infancy; William Shaw, see forward; 
Alice, died in infancv; Lizzie, died at the age of sixteen years; Mar- 



1 154 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 



t5 



garet, unmarried, lives with her brother, WilHam Shaw ; Lydia, married 
John Huyett, and Hves in Philadelphia. 

(Ill) William Shaw, son of Peter and Jane (Newell) Stryker, was 
born in Porter township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, December 
28, 1851. He was educated in the public schools of Porter township 
and of Alexandria, and for one term was a student at the Millersville 
State Normal School. He was not yet seven years of age at the time 
of the death of his father, and, upon leaving the normal school, at once 
engaged in teaching, an activity he continued for a period of two }'ears. 
He then took charge of the homestead farm, on which he lived until 
1913, when he sold this property and retired to private life in Alex- 
andria. October 12, 1892, his barn was destroyed by fire, together with 
one thousand bushels of wheat, thirty tons of hay, and a considerable 
amount of other property; the barn was rebuilt the following spring. 
For many years he has served as an elder of the Presbyterian church, 
of which his wife is also a member. He has been active in the ranks of 
the Republican party, and has served a number of terms as school 
director and as supervisor. 

Mr. Stryker married in Porter township, January 19, 1882, Mary, 
daughter of Samuel and Eliza Hatfield, he an old iron master. Chil- 
dren: I. Mabel, taught music for three j'cars at Bellevue, New Jersey; 
married Chalmers Brumbaugh, and lives in Baltimore, Maryland. 2. 
Annie, taught school one year; married Edward Black, and lives in 
Brooklyn, New York. He is a missionary, and they have one son: 
Robert. 3. Ella, has been a teacher in Mississippi for the last three 
years, making a specialty of music and physical culture. 4. Eliza, un- 
married, lives with her parents. 5. Mary, was graduated from the 
music department of the Indiana Normal School. 



Allen Cutshall, of Three Springs, Huntingdon county, 
CUTSHALL Pennsylvania, descends from an old German family 

of the same name, long established in Maryland and 
Pennsylvania. Caspar Cutshall emigrated from his native place, Wiir- 
temberg, Germany, to the province of Maryland in America about 1700. 
He was a learned man, and was quite an acquisition to the colony at 
that time. He married in Maryland, reared a large family, and died in 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1155 

Frederick county, a highly respected nienilior of the community. Among 
his descendants was Conrad, of whom further. 

(I) Conrad Cutshall was horn ahout 1740, in Frederick county, 
Maryland. His name appears on the roster of the soldiers furnished 
by Frederick county to the Continental army in 1776, thus it is known 
that he espoused the cause of the colonies against Great Britain. In 
1800 he moved from Maryland to Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
and located in what is now known as Springfield township. He either 
took up or purchased from the state a large body of wild land. He 
cleared, fenced, erected houses of logs, and planted grain the first year, — 
a feat in those days. Later he acquired more land, and when he died 
he was able to betiueath to each of his children a farm. He married 
Hannah Morrison, daughter of John Morrison, of Frederick county, 
Maryland, where she was born. John Morrison was also a soldier of 
the revolution, and was wounded in the battle of Brandywine. He was 
an important man. owning much land and many slaves. Among the 
children of Conrad and Hannah (Morrison) Cutshall was Peter, of 
whom further. 

(II) Peter, son of Conrad and Hannah (Morrison) Cutshall, was 
born in Frederick county, Maryland, in 1790, and died in Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, when a very old man. He was ten years old when 
he accompanied his parents from the state of his nativity, and he later 
conversed interestingly of their adventures while on their way to their 
new home. He had many thrilling incidents to relate of attacks of wild 
beasts and wilder Indians. Reaching his majority he settled on land 
that was afterward the old Niles and Bird survey. He married Charlotte 
Lane, born at Lane's mill, Kishacoquillas Valley, daughter of Abraham 
Lane, a rich farmer and miller, who supplied the county with flour, and 
ground the wheat of the farmers. Their first three children were 
Union soldiers in the civil war — Button, Albaugh and Abraham ; 
the last named was killed in the battle of Sailor's Creek, April 6, 1865 — 
one of the last battles of the war. Other children were : Jeremiah 
Morris, Samuel, Mary, Susan, Caroline and Anna T. 

(III) Jeremiah Morris Cut.shall, son of Peter and Charlotte (Lane) 
Cutshall. was born in Springfield township, Huntingdon county, on his 
father's farm. He was reared on the farm, and like all of his forbears 
engaged in farming on reaching maturity. He also raised stock with 



1 156 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

great success. He was one of the best known and most thoroughly Hked 
men in that section of the state, and always threw his great influence 
on the side of right. For years he was justice of peace, and every one 
knew that his rulings were just, and according to law. If he erred it 
was on the side of mercy, and was prompted by his kind and generous 
heart rather than cold and acute reason. He was a Whig, as had been 
his progenitors since the organization of that party; and he and his 
wife were members of the Church of God. He married Mary A. Brown, 
born in Springfield township, daughter of John and Susan Brown. The 
brother of John Brown was with General Washington during the winter 
at Valley Forge, and is buried in the Baptist cemetery in Springfield 
township. Children of J. M. and Mary A. (Brown) Cutshall: i. J. 
B., born December 21, 1835, in Springfield township; married Mary E. 
Bolinger. 2. Peter B. 3. Allen, of whom further. 4. Aley F. 5. Rush. 
6. Alice. 7. Rachel. 8. Laura. 9. Charles R., who died in infancy. 
(IV) Allen Cutshall, son of Jeremiah Morris and Mary A. (Brown) 
Cutshall. was born July 12, 1861, in Springfield township, Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania. He received his preparatory education in the 
public schools of the township, and later attended the Milnwood Acad- 
emy at Shade Gap, Pennsylvania. Leaving school he taught three years 
in the Huntingdon county public schools. He gave up teaching and en- 
tered the mercantile bvisiness, opening a general merchandise store at 
Dublin Mills, prospering greatly. March 17, 1892, he moved to Three 
Springs and again established himself in a general merchandise business, 
duplicating his former successes. He ran this for fifteen years, then 
was a huckster for two years. He was offered and accepted the position 
of assistant cashier of the National Bank of Orbisonia, Pennsylvania. 
In August, 1912, he was appointed cashier of the National Bank of 
Three Springs, which position he holds at this time (1913). He was 
the original promoter of the latter, and was active in its organization. 
He has various interests throughout the state; has a fine farm near 
Mapleton, Pennsylvania, and is a stockholder in the Juniata White Sand 
Company, at Mapleton, Pennsylvania. He is a Republican, and has 
held various township offices. With his wife, he is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church; and he is a member of Cromwell 
Lodge No. 572, Free and Accepted Masons; the Independent Order of 




{Zc6u< 4>^oa^^^€aey 



THE 
PUC 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1157 

Odd Fellows; Patriotic Order Sons of America; and was formerly 
connected with the Grange and the Knights of the Maccabees. He 
married, December 2^, 1884, Anna Evans. 



The Chilcotes came to America from England, where 
CHILCOTE John Chilcote was a land owner. He became involved 

in the political disturbances of the day, lost his prop- 
erty by confiscation, and either fled or was banished from England. He 
caine to this country, where he was soon after joined by his brother 
James. They settled in the province of Maryland, purchasing from 
Lord Baltimore one hundred acre tracts of land, now covered by the 
streets and buildings of Baltimore. In the second, third and fourth 
generations the name is variously spelled Chilcoat, Chilcott and Chilcote. 

(II) John (2), son of John (i) Chilcote, married and had sons: 
Robinson, of whom further; John (3), Joshua, and Humphrey. 

(III) Robinson, son of John (2) Chilcote, was the founder 
of the family in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. He moved with 
his family from Maryland to near Shirleysburg, where he engaged in 
farming. Just prior to the revolution the Indians became so numerous 
and so warlike that he sold his farm and moved to North Carolina. 
When the struggle for independence began he was loyal to the king, 
but later becoming convinced of the justice of the colonial cause, he 
joined the revolutionary army, was captured by the British, and died of 
swamp fever while a prisoner. He had sons: Nicodemus, who died of 
paralysis in Huntingdon county; John, settled in Tennessee, there found- 
ing a family; Hethcote, died in Licking county, Ohio; Humphrey, set- 
tled in Cromwell township, Huntingdon county, where he died; Benja- 
min, of whom further ; James, died in Cassville, Huntingdon county, 
about 1838. 

(IV) Benjamin, son of Robinson Chilcote, settled on a farm in 
Clayton township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, near Three 
Springs. He was a farmer and miller, conducting for several years a 
mill at Saltillo. He married Comfort McLain, who died in Cromwell 
township, March 4, 1844. Benjamin Chilcote died July 31, 1854, aged 
about ninety-six years. Children : Elizabeth, died unmarried ; Nancy, 
married Christian Moore ; Mary, married Samuel Hicks, and died March 
29. 1868; William McLain, of whom further; Sarah, married Henry 



1 158 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Huntsman; John, died in Orbisonia, Huntingdon county; Susan, mar- 
ried (first) John Cornelius, (second) Joshua Kelly. 

(V) William McLain, son of Benjamin and Comfort (McLain) 
Chilcote, was born in Clay township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
June lo, 1797, died April 12, 1880. He was a practical, prosperous 
farmer, moving after his marriage to Cromwell township, where he 
spent his after life. In September, 1835, he immigrated with his family 
and some of his relatives to what was then the "West," Licking county, 
Ohio, making the journey with a four-horse team in thirteen days. He 
rented a farm four miles from Granville, but in March, 1836, he re- 
turned to Huntingdon county. He was an earnest Christian, and a class 
leader of the Methodist Episcopal church. He married (first) in Clay- 
ton township, near Saltillo, Keziah Long, who died October 3, 1847. 
He married (second) Permelia Martin, born in Perry county, Penn- 
sylvania. Children by his first wife: i. James S. 2. John W. 3. 
Sarah, married Daniel Heck, and died in 1865. 4. B. F., born July 
14, 1829; married Ruhama Miller; he was a soldier in the Union army. 
5. Thomas L., of whom further. 6. Mary E., married Thomas Webb. 
Children by his second wife: 7. Margaret J., married (first) Laurence 
Hagbloom!^ (second) George Doughman. 8. Rebecca E., married 
George Numer. 

(VI) Thomas L., son of William McLain Chilcote and his first 
wife, Keziah Long, was born in Cromwell township, Huntingdon county, 
in 1830, died August 11, 1900. He was educated in the public schools, 
in after life engaging in agriculture, becoming the owner of a small 
farm and spending his entire life in that pursuit. In politics he was 
a Republican, and held several local offices. Both he and his wife were 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. He married Susan Whit- 
sel, daughter of Powell and Amelia Whitsel, of Huntingdon county, 
both of German descent. Children : Mary Catherine, died aged eigh- 
teen years; Mary E., married William C. Huntsman, a farmer; Permelia, 
married George M. Schenfelt, a carpenter; William Henry, of whom 
further; Sarah M., married John E. Stuart, a carpenter; Mattie, married 
W. C. McCoUum, an engineer on the Pennsylvania railroad; Rebecca, 
married E. M. Schenfelt, a farmer; Abraham, an employee of the East 
Broad Top railroad; Philip, a minister of the Methodist Episcopal 



HISTORY OF THK JUNIATA VALLEY 1159 

church, now stationed at New Florence ; Tliomas F., a minister of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, stationed at l<"ayette City, I'ennsylvania. 

(VII) William Henry, son of Thomas L. and Susan (Whitsel) 
Chilcote, was born October 20, i860. He was educated in the township 
schools, learned the carpenter's trade, then entered the employ of the 
East Broad Top Railroad Company, continuing twenty years in their 
wood-working department. After leaving the employ of the railroad 
company he became a contractor and builder, a business which he has 
successfully conducted up to the present time. He is interested in the 
First National Bank of Orbisonia; is a Republican in politics; has served 
as secretary of the school board, return judge, constable, and in 1903 
was elected treasurer of Huntingdon county. Mr. Chilcote has taken 
a deep interest in the system of road improvement adopted by Penn- 
sylvania, and since 1912 has been foreman of construction on the Hunt- 
ingdon county state roads. In all the public offices he has filled Mr. 
Chilcote has displayed a conscientious regard for the trust placed in 
him, and has served the county with loyalty and integrity. He is a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Lodge No. 640, in 
which he has passed all the chairs. Both he and his wife are memliers 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

He married, April 27, 1893, Charlotte, daughter of William and 
Ellen Ott. Children of William and Ellen Ott : Charlotte, of previous 
mention; Mary W., married Philip Wilson; Stuart, Annie, Wesley, Hugh 
M. Children of William Henry and Charlotte (Ott) Chilcote: One, 
died in infancy; Margaretta, born in 1897. 



John Wall, the English immigrant, who sailed from London 
WALL for America in 1770, was of Devonshire descent, the family 

having been located there for centuries. It is a name that 
has been borne by many notable men, — warriors, statesmen, men of 
letters, artists, members of both houses of parliament, as well as by a 
host of lesser lights and yeomanry. John landed in Philadelphia and 
later found his way into Huntingdon county, where he purchased land 
and converted it into a farm. It is probable that he was a soldier in the 
war of the revolution, as John Wall served for three years, 1778-79-80, 
under General Anthony Wayne. He was in the battle at Stony Point, 
and the records report that he was slightly wounded. He lived and 



ii6o HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

died a farmer in Huntingdon county. Among his children was John, 
of whom further. 

(II) John (2), son of John (i) Wall, was born on his father's 
farm in Huntingdon county, immediately after the revolutionary war. 
He grew up to the family occupation of farming, bought land, and 
converted it into a fine farm, and there died. He was a member of the 
Presbyterian church, as was his wife. He married Catherine Stoflfer, 
daughter of a Palatine neighbor. Children: Jonathan, of whom 
further; Samuel; and others whose names could not be learned. 

(III) Jonathan, son of John (2) and Catherine (Stoffer) Wall, 
was born August 28, 1828, and died February 11, 1897, on the home- 
stead. He was a prosperous farmer, and a prominent man in his com- 
munity. He enlisted in the civil war, from Pennsylvania, and served 
through his enlistment. He returned home and again farmed his one 
hundred and sixtj'-eight acres. In politics he was a Whig until the or- 
ganization of the Republican party, when he supported that with his 
franchise. He and his wife were Lutherans, and were consistent Chris- 
tians at all times. He married, in 1856, Lavina Shock, born July 24, 
1830, daughter of John Shock, a German farmer. He was the father 
of thirteen children, all of whom were born in Huntingdon county. Like 
Mr. Wall, he was supervisor of the township and a school director at 
various times. Children of Jonathan and Lavina (Shock) Wall: i. 
John Miles, of whom further. 2. Molly, born August, 1865, married 
Lewis Sanks, a farmer; six children. 3. Samuel, born July 12, 1873, 
a farmer on old homestead; married Bertha Kocher. 

(IV) John Miles, son of Jonathan and Lavina (Shock) Wall, was 
born July 13, 1859, in Barree township, Huntingdon county, Pennsyl- 
vania. He received a fair education in the public schools of the town- 
ship. Reaching maturity he engaged in farming, first on the homestead, 
afterward for himself. October i, 1897, he purchased one hundred and 
sixty-five acres which he has improved both in soil and the buildings on 
it. Besides general farming he has a large peach and apple orchard from 
which he reaps a rich harvest, both in delicious and improved fruit and 
golden ducats. He is a strong Republican, but has never held office. 
With his wife he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He 
ranks as one of the progressive farmers of his township. He married 
Minerva White, daughter of Samuel and Mary (Termen) White. Chil- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1161 

dreii : i. Charlotte, l)oni July 23. 1886; graduated from high school, 
and lias taught several terms in Huntingdon county. 1. Blanche, bf)rn 
April 17, 1888; educated in public schools; at home. 3. Arthur, born 
September i, i8yo; employee in steel plant in Altoona, Pennsylvania. 
4. Harry B., born November 4, 189J ; attending school. 5. John W., 
born November 13. 1894; at home. 6. Ethel, born December 3, 1897; 
attending school. 7. Mary Maude, born January 22, 1899. 



The Appleby family is one of old standing in Pennsyl- 
APPLEBY vania, three brothers of the name having emigrated to 

this state in the early part of the eighteenth century. 
They were John, William and Alexander, natives of England. Wil- 
liam and Alexander subsequently settled in Georgia, but John Appleby 
remained in the Keystone commonwealth, locating in the vicinity of 
Shippensburg, whence he later removed to Huntingdon county. Before 
taking up a permanent home in the latter section, however, he again 
lived for two years in Shippensburg. Eventually he settled in Dublin 
township, Huntingdon county, on the place now owned by Thomas 
Roddy, the same comprising three hundred acres. On this large farm 
Mr. Appleby passed the remainder of his life, as did also his wife, who 
was born in Ireland. Mr. and Mrs. Appleby had the following children : 
Margaret, became the wife of Mr. Stitt, of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania; 
Jane, married Gilbert Kennedy, and died in Huntingdon county; Nancy, 
married George McGee, and died in Beaver county, this state ; Martha, 
married Adam McGee, and died in Franklin county, Pennsylvania ; John, 
mentioned in the following paragraph; and Alexander, married a Mrs. 
McGee, and they both died in Preble county, Ohio. John B. Appleby, 
grandson of one of John Appleby's brothers, was living in )>Iaryland at 
the time of the war of the rebellion. He was enlisted for service in 
the Union army, served all through the war, and was several times 
promoted for bravery. Later he settled in Centralia, Illinois. 

John Appleby Jr., fifth in order of birth of the children born to John 
Appleby Sr., was a native of Duljlin township, Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania, the year of his birth being 1776. He grew to maturity in the 
strenuous period following the revolution, and after reaching his legal 
majority settled on a part of the old homestead, which he farmed during 
the rest of his active career. He filled a number of township offices 



ii62 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

of important trust and responsibility, and was an old line Whig in his 
political views. He married Mary Moreland, a native of Belfast, Ireland, 
and to them 'were born nine children, namely : Margaret ; Thomas, 
who died at the age of twenty years ; William, married Elizabeth Spear, 
and died in Dublin township at the venerable age of eighty years ; John, 
married Priscilla Montague, and he died in Dublin township and she in 
Mt. Union, Pennsylvania ; Alexander, mentioned below ; Eliza, mar- 
ried John Taylor, and with her husband removed from Huntingdon 
county to Iowa, whence they later returned to Mount Union, Pennsyl- 
vania ; Margaret Ellen, was for many years a resident of Shade Gap, 
Pennsylvania; Mary Jane, married Henry Likely, and died in Dublin 
township ; and Rosanna, died in early youth. John Appleby was a devout 
Presbyterian, and was an elder in the church of that denomination in 
Dublin township. He died in October, 185 1, and his devoted wife 
passed away in 1877, aged eighty-seven years. 

Alexander Appleby, father of him to whom this sketch is dedicated, 
was born on the old Appleby homestead in Dublin township, Hunting- 
don county, Pennsylvania, March 29, 1817, a son of John and Mary 
(Moreland) Appleby. He was educated in the subscription schools of 
his native township, and he assisted his father in the work and manage- 
ment of the home farm until 1842, when he rented a place owned by 
his father. Subsequently he purchased a tract of one hundred acres 
from his father and at the time of the latter's death inherited another 
tract of one hundred and eight acres. Still later he purchased forty 
additional acres of land, and he also owned considerable valuable real 
estate in Shade Gap. He was unusually successful as an agriculturist 
and stock raiser, and his citizenship was ever characterized by a desire 
to promote all measures and enterprises tending to better the general 
welfare. He was a stalwart Republican in his political affiliations, and 
for nine consecutive years he was a member of the Dublin township 
school board. November 10, 1842, was solemnized his marriage to 
Miss Ann Eliza Jeffries, a daughter of David and Elizabeth (^Vilson) 
Jeffries. Children: John McGinley, the immediate subject of this 
sketch; Elizabeth, wife of George Doran, of Burnt Cabins, Pennsyl- 
vania ; David, a prominent physician and surgeon at Tyrone, Pennsyl- 
vania, married Martha Collins; Mary Jane, wife of William Thompson, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1163 

resides in Barree, I'ennsylvania ; Lavinia. wife of George Elliot, of 
Akron, Ohio; and Rosanna. a resitlenl of Pasadena, California. 

John McGinley Appleby was born in Dublin township, Huntini,'don 
county, September 23, i(S43, son of Alexander and Ann Eliza (Jeffries) 
Aiipk'bv. After conijileting- the curriculum of the ])ul)lic schools of Dub- 
lin township he was matriculated as a student in the Milnwood Academy 
at Shade Gap, which excellent institution he attended one term. In 
1862 he served in the Lee invasion emergency as a uunil>er uf the Miln- 
wood Rangers, of which William H. Wood was captain, and AIcKnight 
Williamson first lieutenant. In 1864 he enlisted as a regular in Com- 
pany C, 209th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving until 
the close of the civil war. He saw considerable hard service during 
the closing year of the war but escaped without any serious injury. 
After the war he engaged in teaching school and he was identified with 
that line of v.'ork for three terms. In 1868 he engaged in the general 
mercantile business at Orbisonia. with 1). S. Baker as a partner. Mr. 
Baker died in 1870, and in that year Mr. Appleby settled on his present 
farm in Dublin township, where he has since resided. He is the (jwner 
of a fine estate of one hundred and ninety-one acres, the same being im- 
proved with excellent barns and a fine residence which he erected him- 
self. He devotes his attention to general farming and has met with 
marked success in all his ventures. Although not an active participant 
in public affairs, Mr. Appleby has long been staunch in his allegiance to 
the principles and policies for which the Repul)lican party stands sponsor. 
His religious views coincide with the tenets of the Presbyterian church, 
in which faith he was reared. Mr. .\ppleby has lived a life of useful- 
ness such as few men know. God-fearing, law-al)iding, progressive, 
his life is as truly that of a Christian gentleman as any man"s can well 
be. Unwaveringly, he has done the right as he has interpreted it. His 
life history is certainly worthy of commendation and of emulation for 
along honorable and straightforward lines he has won the success which 
crowns his efiforts and which makes him one of the sul)stantial residents 
of Dublin township. 

September 3, 1867, Mr. Appleby married Aliss Anna Mary Blair, 
a native of Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, lliere were three chil- 
dren Ijorn of this union : Alexander Blair, Cora Irene and Amanda 



ii64 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Blanche, the latter two of whom are deceased. Alexander Blair Ap- 
pleby was born February 27, 1871 ; was educated in the neighboring 
district schools, and is now engaged in running the old home farm in 
Dublin township. He married Isabella Miller; they have no children. 



The Stricklers of Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
STRICKLER trace their descent to the old pioneers who settled in 

this country in the early part of the seventeenth cen- 
tury, a branch of which located in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, in Co- 
lonial days. 

(I) Peter Strickler, the first member of the branch herein recorded 
of whom we have definite information, was born in the year 1760. 
He served in the war of 1812. He was a man of influence in his com- 
munity, active in all matters pertaining to its general welfare. He 
married a daughter of Thomas Groom, who came from England and 
settled in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, along the New Jersey line. 
Children: John, Jacob, Lydia, Isaac, Peter, of whom further; Nancy, 
Thomas, Sirrich, David, Elizabeth. 

(II) Peter (2), son of Peter (i) Strickler, was born December 11, 
1791. He was a man of public spirit and energy, performing well his 
part in every walk of life. He married Catherine Grubb, born Septem- 
ber 27, 1793. They were early settlers in York county, Pennsylvania, 
where the following children were born: Thomas Grubb, July 16, 
1820; David B., March 11, 1822; Elizabeth, October 3, 1824, married 
Silas Lang; William Roberts, of whom further; Peter, July 24, 1830, 
a farmer in the west. 

(III) William Roberts, son of Peter (2) and Catherine (Grubb) 
Strickler, was born August 12, 1827, in York county, Pennsylvania. 
He obtained a practical education in the schools of the neighborhood, 
and as a young man engaged in farming. Later he relinquished farming 
and came to McConnellstown, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, hav- 
ing to travel overland and by Pennsylvania canal to reach his destination, 
where he joined his brother, Thomas Grubb, who was engaged in the 
plastering business. In 1868 he moved his family to Huntingdon and 
became a member of the firm of T. G. Strickler & Company, con- 
tracting plasterers and decorators, this connection continuing until his 
retirement from active pursuits several years previous to his decease. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1165 

July 3, 1901. He enlisted in the Union army, becoming a meml)cr of 
Company F, 125th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, being 
mustered into service August 12, 1862, and served until May 18, 1863, 
when he was mustered out. He participated in the battle of Antietam, 
September 17, 1862, in whicli engagement his regiment played a ])romi- 
nent part, and received a bullet wound through his left thigh which 
unfitted him for further service. In politics he was a staunch Republi- 
can, and with his wife was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

He married, September 23, 1852, Eliza J., daughter of Squire John 
and Nancy (Hastings) Vandevander, granddaughter of Isaac Vande- 
vander, who was born December 16, 1783, whose parents settled in Penn- 
sylvania before the county of Huntingdon was established in 1787, 
and a descendant from the early settlers of Vandevander-Enyearts. 
Squire John Vandevander was born October 13, 1813; he resided all 
his life at McConnellstown, where he conducted an extensive wagon- 
making business; in his later years he filled the office of United States 
ganger for his district, and was serving as postmaster at the time of 
his death in 1889. His wife, who was born in Ireland, August 6, 1835, 
bore him the following named children : Harriet B., married Judge 
W. B. \\'atson; Rebecca, married L. S. Kensinger; Eliza J., afore- 
mentioned as the wife of William R. Strickler ; Ann, married Alin Lloyd ; 
John Given, married Mary Smith; Elizabeth, married Albert Snare; 
Mary; all these children are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Strickler 
were the parents of eleven children, four of whom are now deceased, 
namely: John V., George W., David E., Grace. The living children 
are ; Nancy J., married Thomas De Arment ; Juniata A., married Charles 
O. Hollinger; William Watson, of whom further; Martha Alice, mar- 
ried Howard C. Wishart ; Harriet M., married William McNaight ; 
Florence B., married James M. States; Fannie B., married Clyde E. 
Logan. 

(IV) William Watson, son of William Roberts and Eliza J. (Van- 
devander) Strickler, was born at McConnellstown, Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania, March 19, 1864. He obtained an education in the public 
schools of Huntingdon. He engaged in newspaper work as an appren- 
tice in 1881 on the Huntingdon Monitor under the editorship of Mr. 
S. E. Fleming, Esq., where he remained until 1883, when he accepted a 
position as compositor on the Huntingdon Globe, but resigned from 



ii66 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

this position some months later, and in 1884 accepted a position with 
Mr. J. C. Blair, a manufacturing stationer, in the job printing depart- 
ment, where he worked and mastered the different branches of the art, 
such as pressman, die stamper and embosser. The business prospered 
exceedingly and it was incorporated later as the J. C. Blair Company, 
and by efficiency and steady application to his work, Mr. Strickler was 
promoted to the position of foreman of the stock printing department, 
in which is executed the beautiful colored designs which appear upon 
the writing and other tablets manufactured by this well known estab- 
lishment, which now have a world-wide reputation, they being pioneers 
in that line of work, and the largest manufacturing stationers in the 
business at the present time. Mr. Strickler is a stockholder in the com- 
pany, this proving a double incentive for increasing the efficiency and 
earning capacity of his department. Mr. Strickler is a past chancellor 
of Blue Cross Lodge, No. 295, Knights of Pythias; past president of 
Washington Camp, No. 321, Patriotic Order Sons of America; past 
archon of Standing Stone Conclave, No. 134, Improved Order of Hep- 
tasophs, and is also ex-district deputy supreme archon of the same order. 
Mr. Strickler married, July 16, 1885, Laura Jeanette, daughter of 
Jackson and Delilah (Bell) Mcllroy. Children; i. Harry William, 
born May 2, 1887; he attended the public schools and Juniata Business 
College, graduating from the latter named institution, December 22, 
1904; until 191 1 he was assistant production manager of the J. C. Blair 
Company, when he resigned his position to accept one Avith the American 
Multigraph Sales Organization, of Chicago, where he remained for about 
one year, then accepted a position as house salesman with the Neidich 
Process Company, of Burlington, New Jersey, in which he is serving 
at the present time; he married, in 1908, Irma, daughter of Thomas and 
Annie (Martin) Gahagan, and they have one son, Richard Gahagan, 
born April 27, 1909. 2. Gracie Jeanette, born January 7, 1889, died 
November 10, 1896. 



The first member of this family of whom we have 
WILLOUGHBY definite information is William Willoughby, who 

was born in England, emigrated to America, and 
made his home in Juniata county, Pennsylvania. He became the owner 
of several parcels of land, which passed into the possession of his chil- 




S'cr-a^Ji ^lAfi^/<ru- 




HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1167 

dren. He married Sarah, wliose family name is not on record. Chil- 
dren : William. John, James, Andrew, Armstron<,^ Robert, Henry and 
Sarah. 

(II) .Armstrong, son of William and Sarah Willoughby, was born 
in 1805, and died August 4, 1865. He was educated in the common 
schools of his time, and established himself in the mercantile line of 
business in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, in which he met with 
excellent success. He purchased extensive tracts of land, and was 
connected with many important enterprises. He supported the princi- 
ples promulgated by the Whig party, and when the Republican party 
was organized, he transferred his political allegiance to it. He served 
as mayor of the town in i860. He and his wife were members of the 
Presbyterian church. He married Catherine, born 1813, died 1900, a 
daughter of Thomas and Martha King, the former a tailor by trade, 
who had other children: William H., a court crier; Anna; Margaret; 
Sarah, married John Shaffer, who was at one time sheriff of the 
county; Elizabeth; Mary; Mariah. Mr. and Mrs. Willoughby had chil- 
dren: Henry Clay, a tailor by occupation, served in the civil war; John. 
also a soldier in the civil war; Samuel B., a clerk, a soldier in the civil 
war: George, deceased; Frank, see forward; Charles, resides in Bed- 
ford: Margaret, married Alfred Tyhurst, editor of the Huntingdon 
Globe, who was postmaster at the time of his death, his wife finishing 
the unexpired term and being reappointed for a term of four years 
by President Arthur, and they were parents of several children, one 
living, Mary L. 

(Ill) Frank, son of Armstrong and Catherine (King) Willoughby, 
was born in Huntingdon, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, June 27, 
i8s3. H^ ^^'''^ *^^ "^ naturally liright and studious disposition, and his 
record at the public schools which he attended was an excellent and 
satisfactory one. January i, 1871, he entered upon his apprenticeship 
as a printer, and concluded this in March, 1875. For a period of seven 
years he was associated with Hugh Lindsay, in the pulilication of the 
Scvii-JJ'ccklv .\'c-u's. and later entered the employ of the J. C. Blair 
Company, at Huntingdon, with which he is still associated, this making 
a period of more than thirty years. He is now one of the stockholders 
of this companv, and for many years his position has been a most re- 
SDonsible one. He is also a stockholder in the Crand Theater, at Hunt- 



ii68 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

ingdon. His political affiliations are with the Washington party, in 
whose interests he has been active, and he has served as a member of the 
town council. Mr. Willoughby and his wife are members of the Pres- 
byterian church. 

He married, in 1S72, Sarah, daughter of Richard and Elizabeth 
Morrison, and they have had children : Edgar, who is in the employ 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company as a molder, at Altoona, Penn- 
sylvania; Katherine T., married Dr. Alvin Waite ; Frank, died at the 
age of six years; Claude D., also in the employ of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road Company; Elizabeth, married W. S. Tyson, manager of the H. K. 
Mulford Company, wholesale drug establishment in Kansas City, Mis- 
souri; Martha, married J. C. Corbin, manager sales department H. W. 
Gerlock Foundry & Machine Works, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania; Jack, 
in the employ of an insurance company in Huntingdon; Watson, is in 
the employ of the Bell Telephone Company in Kansas City, Missouri; 
Clair, in the emplo}' of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company; Margaret, 
at home. Mr. \^'illoughby has always been enterprising and progressive 
in his business management, and his engaging manner and social dispo- 
sition have won for him many friends in the community. He is a mem- 
ber of the Patriotic Order of Sons of America, Washington Camp, No. 
321, of Huntingdon. Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Willoughby's maternal great-grandfather King served in the 
revolutionary war, and also in the war of 1S12. 



The familv of Heffner is of German descent, and for 
HEFFNER generations they have been farmers, and progressive 

ones, in Pennsylvania. Ellsworth Heffner, a miller and 
farmer of McConnellstown, Pennsvlvania, is an honored member of 
this family. 

(I) John Heffner was born April 7, 1797, died September 16, 1881. 
He lived in Walker township for many years, and was there engaged 
in farming. By occupation he was a farmer. He married and had 
children: i. Benjamin F., born December 6, 1820, died February 2, 
1894; he married (first) January 10, 1843, Eliza Lichenthaler, born 
May 25, 1821, died December 26, 1865; he married (second) August 
14, 1866, Eliza (States) Simpson, born May 28, 1832, died February 
12, 1896, widow of John Simpson. 2. Nancy, born September 10, 




(^Evco^tn^/i^^. 





<U^ 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1169 

1822. 3. Adam, born August 26, 1824. 4. Elizal)clli, born July 10, 
1826. 5. Rebecca, born March 21, 1828. 6. Andrew, born Octoljer 
II, 1829, died August 26, 1872; he was a miller and farmer, and mar- 
ried, September 23, 1852, Jane Yocum; children; Mary Jane, born 
August 4, 1853, died January 21, 1888, married, March 22, 1882, J. 
Stewart Africa; Rachel, bom November z-j, 1855, married, November 

29, 1900, William D. Lincoln; John, born November 17, 1857, died 
April 21, 1907, was a miller; Jane, born October 27, i860, married, 
February 13, 1881, William Miller, who lived most of his life in Illinois 
and South Dakota; Rebecca, born August 26, 1864; Thomas, born May 
3, 1867, married, September 10, 1891, Margaret Lang. 7. John, see 
forward. 8. Peter, born September 23, 1833; married, October 30, 
1856, Inez Stover, born September 14, 1837. 9. Catherine, twin of 
Peter, died September 29, 1881 ; she married September 2}^, 1852, John 
De Arnient, bom October 12, 1830, died September 3, 1864. 10. Rachel, 
born September 22, 1836, married Abraham Baker. 11. Mary Ann, 
born July 29, 1838. 12. Margaret, born October 28, 1840. 13. Wil- 
liam, born January 7, 1843, t'i^tl '" infancy. 14. Orlady, born March 

30, 1844, was a soldier during the civil war. 

(II) John, son of John and Eliza (Lichenthaler) Heffner, was 
born July 21. 1831, and died May 11, 1895. He obtained the water 
rights a little to the south of McConnellstown, Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania, and there erected a grist mill in 1865, which he operated 
until his death in 1895. He also owned and cultivated a farm of one 
hundred and twenty acres at the same place, and was a dealer in finely 
bred horses. He was drafted at the time of the civil war, but when 
he arrived at Hollidaysburg and found that the company had left, he 
hired a substitute. A very short time prior to his death he purchased 
a herd of Durham cattle in Somerset county, and brought it home. 
He was a member of the Reformed church. He married Sarah Wicks, 
born February 9, 183 1, died June 24, 1897. Of their five children, three 
lived to maturity: i. Ora A., married (first) H. C. Poschman, and 
(second) C. N. Miller; both she and her husband were undertakers: 
she died in May, 1906, in East Liverpool, Ohio. 2. Ellsworth E., of 
whom further. 3. Elizabeth W^, married Harry Watson; children: 
Fred, Pearl, Martha, Eleanor, and Catherine, deceased. 

(III) Ellsworth E., son of John and Sarah (Wricks) HefFner, was 



II70 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

born in McConnellstown, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, September 
26, 1861. He attended the public schools to good advantage until he 
had attained the age of sixteen years, then learned the milling trade 
under the supervision of his father, and has been identified with milling 
and farming interests since that time, with the exception of two years, 
when he rented the mill to others. He is engaged in general and dairy 
farming, and also purchases large quantities of grain. He has ground 
as much as two thousand bushels of custom work per month, besides 
his merchant milling. He is a Republican in his political views, but 
has never desired public office. His religious affiliations are with the 
Reformed church, and fraternally he is connected with the Patriotic 
Sons of America. He married in Cromwell township, November 8, 
1888, Ida E. Myers, born March 21, 1867. (See Myers forward). 
Children: i. Alma Maude, born November 29, 1891 ; married, June 
25, 1910, W. Ralph Ward; one child, Margaretta. 2. Woodburn Wayne, 
born May 9, 1897. 3. Vida Alleta, born November 11, 1898, died June 
9, 1899. 

(The Myers Line). 

(I) Nicholas Myers, who was an early settler in Lebanon county, 
Pennsylvania, was a farmer by occupation, and removed to Juniata 
county, Pennsylvania, where he died, near Mifflin. He was a Mennonite 
in religious faith, and married Eckelbarger. 

(II) Samuel, son of Nicholas and (Eckelbarger) Myers, 

was born in Lebanon county, and removed to Juniata county with his 
father. He settled at Lost Creek Valley, where he engaged in farming 
and owned large parcels of land. He was a member of the Dunkard 

church. He married Rush, and they had children: i. John 

R., a farmer, who died in Wooster, Wayne county, Ohio. 2. Samuel, 
lived and died near McVeytown, where he was a farmer. 3. David, 
also a farmer, died in Juniata county. 4. Michael, see forward. 5. 
Susan, married Jacob Eby, and died in Tuscarora Valley, Juniata county, 
Pennsylvania. 6. Hannah, married (first) Mr. Busbey, (second) Wil- 
liam Pannebaker, and died at Honey Grove, Pennsylvania. 7.- Cath- 
erine, married John G. Gluck, and died near Shirleyburg, Pennsylvania. 
8. Sarah, married Samuel Lutz, and died in German Valley, Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1171 

(III) Michael, son of Samuel and (Rush) Myers, was 

born January 8, 1803. He was a farmer, and in 1842 removed to Hill 
valley, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, where he purchased a farm 
on which he resided until his death, January 20, 1886, and which is still 
in the family. He had enjoyed but few educational advantages, but na- 
tive refinement of taste and wholesome ambition led him to make up for 
that deficiency I)y his own exertions, and he became well grounded in 
dififerent branches of study, especially in mathematics and in the Scrip- 
tures. Early in life he became a 15ible student, and all through life the 
Bible was his dearest book. When still a young man he felt that he 
should look to God for guidance; in response to this feeling he united with 
the Brethren church, and was ever afterward a follower of the Lord and 
Master. He was laid to rest by the side of his wife in the cemetery in 
German valley. A remarkable fact in the history of this patriarch is the 
number of his descendants, there being thirteen children, eighty-one 
grandchildren, and thirty-five great-grandchildren. 

He married, 1826, Catherine Holzapple, born in 1802. She was the 
daughter of Adam and Catherine (Mertz) Holzapple, Mennonites, the 
former born in Lebanon county, and engaged in trade at McAlisterville, 
Juniata county ; and they had children : Abraham ; Samuel ; Henry ; 
Leonard ; Frederick ; Elizabeth, who married David Myers ; Catherine, 
mentioned above ; Sarah, married John Book ; Susan, married George 
Strayer. Michael and Catherine (Holzapple) Myers had children: i. 
Mary, married Benjamin Rhodes, and died near McVeytown. Pennsyl- 
vania. 2. Enoch X., see forward. 3. Ephraim, died in Shirleysburg, 
Pennsylvania. 4. Reuben, was a farmer and wagon builder and also 
died in Shirleysburg. 5. Sarah, married Joseph Allen and resides in 
Iowa. 6. Jeremiah, died in Kansas at about the age of thirty-five years. 
7. David, deceased, was a member of the police force in the Pennsyl- 
vania depot in Harrisburg. 8. Rudolph, see forward. 9. Seth, a minis- 
ter in the Dunkard church, who lives in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 10. 
Catherine, widow of William Lukens, lives in Altoona. 11. John G. Z., 
a physician who lives at Osceola Mills, Pennsylvania. 12. Michael, lives 
on a farm near Brumbaugh Station. 13. Clara Belle, married Ephraim 
Wright, and died at Broad Top. 

(IV) Dr. Rudolph Myers, son of Michael and Catherine (Holzap- 



1 172 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

pie) Myers, was born near Lewistown, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, 
August 2, 1840. He was but two years old when his family removed 
to Huntingdon county. His boyhood days were spent upon the farm, 
and he attended the public schools of Cromwell township. Later he 
studied at Shirleysburg Academy, under the tuition of Professor J. B. 
Kidder. His academic course ended, he began to read medicine with 
Robert Baird, M.D., of Shirleysburg, matriculated at Jefferson Medical 
College, Philadelphia, in i860, and at the Bellevue Medical College, 
New York, in 1862. He was graduated from the latter institution in 

1863. In the following month Dr. Myers began the practice of medi- 
cine at Three Springs, Huntingdon county; he removed in December, 

1864, to Burlington, Indiana; in 1868 to Keedysville, Maryland; in 
1872 to Grafton, Huntingdon county ; continued to practice during his 
residence at each of these places. For thirty-three years since 1879 he 
has been continuously in practice in Huntingdon. He is a member of 
the Huntingdon County Medical Association, and was its president at 
one time; a member of the state and American medical societies; and 
he has served one term as a school director. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Baptist church, in which he is a deacon. In his political 
opinions Dr. Myers is an Independent Republican. Dr. Myers mar- 
ried, in Shirleysburg, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, September 22, 
1864, Mary A., born April 19, 1843, daughter of Anion and Wealthy 
Lovell, of Trough Creek Valley. Children: i. Ethelda Alley ne, born 
July 5, 1865, died September 12, 1865. 2. Ida May, born September 20, 
1866, died in infancy. 3. Alice Gertrude, born January 20, 1869; mar- 
ried E. P. Jones, and now lives in Milton, Indiana; children: Mary L., 
deceased; Ernest, John Posey. 4. Lena Lovell, born May 14, 1872; is 
a graduate nurse of Jefferson College Hospital. 5. Ernest Roland, born 
September i, 1875; graduated from Bucknell University, and from the 
Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia; now practices medicine in 
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan province, Canada ; married Lillian Dowler. 

(IV) Enoch X., son of Michael and Catherine (Holzapple) Myers, 
was born August 22, 1830. He married (first) August 26, 1852, Nancy 
Garver, born July 29, 1835, died January 21, 1877. He married (sec- 
ond) January 10, 1878, Harriet Garver, a sister of his first wife. 

(V) Ida E., daughter of Enoch X. and Nancy (Garver) Myers, 
married Ellsworth E. Heffner (see Heffner III). 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1173 

An enterprising and progressive agriculturist in Cromwell 
HEGIE township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, is Jacob R. 

Hegie, who is the owner of one hundred acres of farm 
land and three hundred acres of mountain land in the \icinity of Orhi- 
sonia. He was born in Tell township, Huntingdon county, this state, 
the date of his nativity being March 12, 1845. He is a son of Jacob 
and Susan (Wiser) Hegie, both of whom are now deceased. The 
father was born in Shade Valley, Huntingdon county, and the mother 
in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania. The founder of this family in 
America was John Hegie, a native of Switzerland, whence he immi- 
grated to this country in the early colonial epoch of our national his- 
tory. He registered under the king of England at Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, and went thence to Lancaster county, where he purchased a 
large tract of land from William Penn's heirs, the same having been 
located near Manheim. 

Jacob Hegie Jr. was a son of Jacob Hegie Sr. and Margaret (Mi- 
chael) Hegie, both natives of Pennsylvania, the former having been 
born in Lancaster county. Jacob Hegie Sr. was a mere youth at the 
time of the war for independence, but nevertheless he served as a revo- 
lutionary soldier and was present at the surrender of Cornwallis at 
Yorktown, at which time he was eighteen years of age. He enlisted 
with a troop of cavalry in Philadelphia. After the close of the war he 
went to Adams county, this state, and located just above Huntingdon, 
where his brother Adam had previously settled. His original intent in 
going to that section was to hunt, but he was caught in a storm at Tus- 
carora and found refuge from it at the home of Andrew Michael. Be- 
coming agreeably impressed with that locality, he remained there all 
winter, following the trade of cooper and eventually marrying Mar- 
garet Michael, daughter of the above Andrew. Subsequently he pur- 
chased land in Shade Valley, in Huntingdon county, and there followed 
farming until his demise, at which time his property was divided among 
his sons, namely : Abram, Jacob, Andrew, John and Joseph ; there was 
also a son David, who was dead at the time the property was divided. 
Following are the names of his daughters : Katherine, Hannah, Mary, 
Susan, Elizabeth, Margaret and Julia. Mr. Hegie was an Andrew Jack- 
son man, and he was one of the political leaders of his community. He 
was well known as a patriotic citizen, and was ever ready to lend a 



1 174 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

helping hand to the poor. In addition to his other talents he was a 
good builder, and helped erect many of the early schoolhouses. 

Jacob Hegie Jr. was born in the year 1798, and he received a fair 
education in the pioneer schools. He was a farmer by occupation and 
lived and died on an estate given him by his father. He passed to eter- 
nal rest at the patriarchal age of ninety-one years, his demise having 
occurred in 1889. He was recognized as an active and progressive citi- 
zen in his home township of Tell, and was a devout communicant of the 
Catholic church, in which faith he reared his children. He married 
Susan Wiser, a daughter of John and Barbara Wiser, early settlers near 
Shade Gap, where Mr. Wiser worked at his trade, that of carpenter. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hegie had seven children: Jacob R., Abram, Andrew 
(deceased), Mary, Elizabeth, Catherine and Hannah. 

To the public schools of Tell township, Huntingdon county, Jacob 
R. Hegie, the immediate subject of this review, is indebted for his pre- 
liminary educational training. His boyhood and youth were spent on 
his father's farm, in the work and management of which he was an 
important factor. In young manhood he turned his attention to lum- 
bering, and in 1893 he opened a general merchandise store at Johns- 
town. Subsequently he returned to farming, and he now resides in 
Cromwell township, Huntingdon county, where he has one hundred 
acres of fine land under cultivation and likewise owns a tract of three 
hundred acres of mountain land. He is a Democrat in his political affili- 
ations, and for the past six years has been the efficient encumbent of 
the office of road commissioner. December 24, 1864, when but nine- 
teen years of age, Mr. Hegie enlisted for service in Company C, 67th 
Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, entering the Union army 
at Hollidaysburg. He saw considerable hard service during the last 
stages of the war and participated in battles at Hatcher's Run and on 
the South Side railroad. He was struck at one time with a shell, but 
the same did not penetrate his knapsack and he was uninjured. He 
was honorably discharged from service July 10, 1865. 

June 7, 1868, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Hegie to Miss 
Mary Krugh, a daughter of Michael Krugh, of Dublin township, Hunt- 
ingdon county. This union has been prolific of the following children : 
Martin (deceased), Bruce, George, Jeanette (deceased), Otmer and 
Arthur (both foundrymen), Martha, Anna, Rose and Clara. The 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA \ ALLEY 1175 

Hegie family are devout Catholies in their religious faith and they have 
contributed much to the good works of that church. The old farm is 
noted for its good cheer and genial hospitality and the individual mem- 
bers of the family are popular in the social life of the community. 



John Wesley McAlevy, of Barree township, Hunting- 
McALEVY don county, Pennsylvania, descends in a straight line 

from colonial and revolut iona ry ancestry. The immi- q 

grant progenitor was John McAlevy, of Scotai-Irish extraction, who 
came to America about 1650. He settled intlie wilds of the colony of 
Pennsylvania, took up land, cleared and improved it, erected a log 
house and outbuildings, and there lived and died. He defended himself 
and family from the raids of his red neighbors, who were particularly 
rapacious and predatory at that time. He had a large famil)-, among 
them being many stalwart sons whose descendants are widely scattered 
over Pennsylvania. General William McAlevy was one of his descen- 
dants, and one of the most famous ones. He built McAlevy's Fort, and 
in it made a stand against the enemy. Among the immediate posterity 
of General McAlevy was his grandson Samuel, of whom further. 

(Ill) Samuel McAlevy was bom, lived and died in Huntingdon 
count\-, Pennsylvania. Little is known of his life except that he was 
a farmer on a large scale, a man of importance in his community and 
a good citizen. He and his family w-ere members of the Presbyterian 
church. He married Susan Hamlin, of English extraction, whose fam- 
ily was among the first to be established in Pennsylvania. Children: i. 
John, a soldier in the civil war, enlisted in 22d Regiment Pennsylvania 
Cavalrv. 2. Miles, an iron worker. 3. William, of whom further. 
There were others, but their names are unknown. 

(I\^) William McAlevy, son of Samuel and Susan (Hamlin) Mc- 
Alevv, was born August 29, 1840, in Barree township. Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, on the McAlevy homestead, and died in the 
county of his nativity, August 15, 1904. After receiving his education 
in the common schools of the township near his home, he followed the 
family occupation of farming. He purchased four hundred acres of 
land in Huntingdon county, cleared it, erected houses on it and im- 
proved it, making it within a few years one of the show places of the 
county. He took great pride in his stock and always hatl the liest. Be- 



1 176 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

sides his farm he owned coal land on Stone mountain, near Greenwood 
Furnace. Mr. McAlevy was a valiant soldier in the civil war. At the 
call to arms he enlisted, August 20, 1861, in Company B, 49th Regi- 
ment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served out his enlistment. 
He and his family were members of the Presbyterian church, and gen- 
erous in their support of it. He married, September 16, 1868, Eliza- 
beth Duff, born September 14, 1847, 'ii Huntingdon county, daughter 
of James and Margaret Duff, both of whom were of Scotch-Irish 
extraction. Mr. Duff was a stone mason, and followed it until his 
death. They were both members of the Presbyterian church, inheriting 
their love for the kirk from their forbears. Children of William and 
Elizabeth (Duff') McAlevy: i. Harriet C, at home, a trained nurse. 
2. Mary, married Henry Lightner. 3. Bessie, resides in Clinton, Iowa. 
4. John Wesley, of whom further. 5. Nora B., married Dr. Charles 
Bigelow, of Clinton, Iowa. 6. Stella, married B. P. McMahan, .a mer- 
chant of Huntingdon county. 7. Rosella, married LeRoy Porter Pain- 
ter, of State College, Pennsylvania. 8. Augusta, stenographer ; after 
graduating from school taught for several terms. 

(V) John Wesley McAlevy, son of William and Elizabeth (Duff) 
McAlevy, was born November 26, 1874, in Barree township, Hunting- 
don county, Pennsylvania. He attended the common schools of the 
township near his home, and on leaving them he engaged in farming, 
finally settling on a place that included eighty acres that was bequeathed 
him by his father in Barree township. He has improved it and brought 
it up to a high state of productiveness by careful management. The 
place is well stocked and in conjunction with agriculture he has a small, 
up-to-date, modern dairy, and disposes of his product in State College, 
Huntingdon county. He and his wife are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. He gives his franchise to the Republican party, and 
under it has held local offices. Mr. McAlevy upholds the family tradi- 
tion for honor, honesty and fair dealing. He ranks among the best 
citizens of the county. 

On February 17, 1904, he married Minnie F. Singleton, daughter 
of George and Lillian Singleton. Children: i. William, born Feb- 
ruary 14, 1905; at school. 2. Charles Richard, born June 2, 191 1. 3. 
Margaret Lillian, born July 6, 1912. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1177 

Pierce Young, of Water Street, Pennsylvania, has behind 
YOUNG Iiim an ancient and honorable (iernian lineage. The fam- 
ily has li\ed for generations in and near Wiirtemberg, 
Germany, where llic members of it ha\'e contributed to the wealth of 
the kingdom by their lai)or. Many of the family followed the occupa- 
tion of farming, while others were shoemakers, weavers, while still 
others held minor go\-ernment official positions. 

(I) Peter Young was born in Wiirtemberg, Germany, and there 
lived and died. He was a prosperous farmer and also held the im- 
portant government position of road supervisor. i\mong his children 
was Balthazar, of whom further. 

(II) Balthazar Young, son of Peter Young, was born in Wiirtem- 
berg, there grew up, received his education and married. He adopted 
weaving as his trade and followed it until his death, of typhoid fever, 
in 1854, in the town of Rexingen. He and his wife were inembers 
of the Roman Catholic church. He married Anna Wentz, of Wiirtem- 
berg, who died in 1854, within two weeks of her husband, also of ty- 
phoid fever. Children: i. Melchoir, was born in 1838, and was six- 
teen years old at the time of the untimely death of his parents. In the 
fall of 1857 he, with his two younger brothers, emigrated to the United 
States. He located at Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania, where he lived un- 
til his death, which occurred in 1862, while he was employed in a tan- 
nery. 2. Peter, was born in 1839; he emigrated to the United States 
in 1857. He resumed his apprenticeship at cabinet-making, which he 
began in Germany. Pie enlisted for the three months' service in the 
civil war and at the expiration of that time he returned to Pennsyl- 
vania : made his home in Altoona, where he again did cabinet-making. 
For a number of years he was employed in the car-building department 
of the Pennsylvania railroad, and from which occupation he has since 
retired. He married in Pennsylvania, and is the parent of five chil- 
dren, all of whom are married. 3. Pierce, of whom further. 4. Ingle- 
Ijert was born in 1849, and was a boy of five when his parents died. He 
was virtually adopted by an uncle, who treated him with such kindness 
and consideration that he never desired to leave him, and never followed 
his three elder brothers to America. He finally took orders in the 
Roman Catholic church, and is today a priest in Germany. 

(Ill) Pierce ^'oung, son of Balthazar and .\nna (Wentz) Young, 



1 178 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

was born in Wiirtemberg, Germany, January 17, 1842. He attended 
the schools of his native city, and received an excellent education. After 
the death of his parents in 1854 he was under the care of relatives, and 
was apprenticed to a shoemaker for the purpose of learning the trade. 
In the fall of 1857, when he was but fifteen, he sailed with his two 
brothers for the United States. He located with them at HoUidays- 
burg, Pennsylvania, and soon thereafter he again took up shoemaking. 
In 1859 he moved to Water Street, Pennsylvania, and was employed 
by John Allbright for two years. On May 10, 1861, at the age of nine- 
teen, he established his own shop, and by close attention to business and 
an earnest desire to please, soon built up a thriving patronage, which 
increased as the years went by until he is now the largest shoe manufac- 
turer in the county. He has been constantly employed in shoemaking 
for fifty-two consecutive years, and in former years supplied many of 
the surrounding country towns with shoes. He purchased an old 
house, remodelled it, and there lived modestly with his family. He is 
a Democrat by conviction and votes with that party, and has served as 
supervisor and school director. Like his wife, he is a member of the 
Lutheran church and has been janitor for fifteen years. He is one of 
the most highly respected men in his section, and is one of the leading 
representatives of its industrial and commercial interests. His success 
is the more creditable as it has come to him as the result of foresight, 
executive ability and discrimination, coupled with honesty and courtesy. 
He married (first) in 1863, Wilhelmina Garner, born in Blair 
county, Pennsylvania, who died December 16, 1879, aged thirty-four 
years. He married (second) in 1881, Mary Eva Buckley. Children by 
first marriage: i. Gilbert Lloyd, died aged eleven months two days. 
2. Harry, died aged four years eleven months. 3. John, died aged 
one year four months. 4. Jennie, married M. B. Shade : died July 10, 
1889, aged twenty-one years five months. 5. Adam G., lives in Evans- 
l)urg, Pennsylvania, where he is employed lay a local telephone com- 
pany ; married Lucy Davis ; children : Verda, George, Walter, Martha, 
and one two years old. name not known. 6. Charles, employee of tele- 
phone company in Joliet, Illinois; married May Richardson; child, 
Joyce Pierce. 7. Sallie M., married M. B. Shade after death of her 
sister Jennie, his first wife; died January 9, 1901, leaving three chil- 
dren : Wilmina, Mabel and Erma. Children bv second marriage : 8. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1179 

Henrietta, married Thomas Galley; child, Thomas Jr. 9. Gertrude, 
married Isaac Black; child, Helen. 10. Anna, unmarried. 11. Jessie, 
married Chester Doyle; child, Hazel. 12. Mary. 13. William, died 
in infancy. 14. Carl. 15. Inglebert. 16. Alvin. 



For man)' years Frank and Scott Wible have been con- 
WIBLE nected with the upbuilding' of Three Springs, Huntingdon 

county, and they have just reason to be proud of the fact 
that to their efforts can be traced many a substantial enterprise or ad- 
vancement contributing greatly to the growth and prosperity of this 
section of the state. In every sense of the word they are representa- 
tive citizens and business men of marked capacity. It is to the inherent 
force of character, commendable ambition and unremitting diligence 
of the Wible brothers themselves that they have steadily advanced in 
the business world until they now occupy a leading place among the 
active and representative men of Juniata Valley. 

Scott Wible, the younger of the brothers, was born in Springfield 
township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, February 4, 1876, a son 
of John G. and Evaline (Madden) Wible, both of whom were likewise 
born and reared in Huntingdon county. The paternal grandparents of 
the Wible brothers were John G. and Susan (Giant) Wible, natives of 
Juniata Valley. The senior Wible was a farmer by occupation and he 
passed his entire life in Huntingdon county, where death called him in 
1908. In the maternal line the W'ible brothers are grandsons of Richard 
and Elizabeth (Locke) Madden, the former of whom was a decidedly 
progressive farmer in Huntingdon county. John G. Wible Jr. early 
availed himself of the advantages afforded in the public schools of his 
home locality and he received his preliminary discipline as an agricul- 
turist on his father's farm. After reaching years of maturity he pur- 
chased a farm in Springfield township and at the time of his demise, 
in December, 1908, he was the owner of a finely improved estate of 
one hundred and five acres. In politics he was aligned as a stalwart 
in the ranks of the Republican party and for three terms he served with 
distinction as road supervisor, great improvement in the puljlic thor- 
oughfares having been accomplished during his regime. He was like- 
wise a member of the local school board for several terms. He mar- 
ried Evaline Madden and to them were born nine children, whose names 



ii8o HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

are here entered in respective order of their birth : AlHson, Edward, 
Ellen (deceased), John W. (deceased), Frank, Scott, Charles, Lily F. 
and Jesse. 

To the public schools of Springfield township, Scott Wible is in- 
debted for his primary education, which was later supplemented with a 
course of study in the State Normal School at Orbisonia. For seven 
terms thereafter he was engaged in teaching school, and in 1900 he 
turned his attention to the sawmill and lumber business, following that 
line of enterprise for the ensuing ten years. In 1905 he began farming 
as a side issue, and with his brother Frank purchased a tract of three 
hundred and twenty acres a half mile distant from Three Springs. 
During the intervening years to the present time he has greatly im- 
proved this estate and on the same is most successfully engaged in di- 
versified agriculture. He was one of the organizers of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Three Springs, and is now a stockholder and director 
in the same. Politically, he is a member of the Progressive party, and 
he has been the able incumbent of the office of auditor of Springfield 
and Clay townships. He is now (1913) a member of the election board 
and of the town council in Three Springs, where he is known as a thor- 
oughly alive citizen and strictly reliable business man. He is unmarried. 

Frank Wible, elder brother of Scott, was born in Springfield town- 
ship, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, April 16, 1872. After com- 
pleting the prescribed course of study in the district schools of his na- 
tive place, Mr. Wible was matriculated as a student in the State Normal 
School, at Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, in which excellent institution 
he was graduated in 1900. Prior to graduation he taught school for 
several terms and he likewise taught afterward — in all some fifteen 
terms. In 1905 he and his brother Scott purchased a farm of three 
hundred and twenty acres, near Three Springs, which they have since 
been conducting on a profitable basis. Mr. Wible helped organize the 
First National Bank of Three Springs, in 1912, and he is now vice- 
president and a member of the board of directors of that substantial 
financial institution. He is likewise interested in the lumbering busi- 
ness, under the name of Scott Wible & Brothers, and has money in- 
vested in other local enterprises. He is a Progressive in his political 
faith, and in a fraternal way is affiliated with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. In 1908 Mr. Wible was united in marriage to Miss 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1181 

Luetta Kirkpatrick, a daughter of Mary Kirkpatrick, and a native of 
Franklin county, Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Wiblc have two chil- 
dren, Grace and Kerniit. 

Active and enterprising, it is to be hoped that the Wible brothers 
will long continue to move in the sphere of usefulness in which they 
have won marked success. Socially, they are genial and courteous, and 
well liked among their fellow-citizens. Thorough business men, loyal 
friends and in every sense gentlemen, their careers in life are well 
begun. 



The original home in America ol the Enyeart family, 
ENYEART now of Pennsylvania, was Virginia, where the 
immigrant ancestor settled and founded the branch 
bearing the name in Huntingdon county. The iirst of the line of whom 
we find authentic record is William, soldier of the revolutionary war, 
who was a large land owner and farmer at Raystown Branch, culti- 
vating land, part of which he had purchased from the government, the 
remainder being granted him for service in defense of the colonial 
cause. His life was typical of the period, conflicts with the hostile 
Indians in the semi-wilderness being no uncommon occurrence. He 
was a famous hunter, a dead shot, and in those days, when the home 
larder was largely supplied by the musket of the man of the house, his 
family was never without bear or deer meat, while such luxuries as 
wild turkevs or rabbits were plentiful. In the formation of the political 
system of Huntingdon county he played a prominent role, his opinions 
and suggestions frequently carrying a point or offering a means of set- 
tlement. In the more complicated political maneuvers of to-day he 
would probably be known as the "boss"' of his district and yet the au- 
thority he wielded was only a result of the dependence placed in him 
by his less gifted colleagues. He held the office of auditor in a large 
district, his influence reaching throughout that portion of the state, 
always striving for an efficient and representative form of government 
in the commonwealth, then in its infancy. He was a devout member 
and regular attendant of the Protestant Episcopal church. He died, 
September 2. 1828, having been twice married, his first wife bearing 
him five children, his second sixteen. 

(II) David, fifth child of William Enyeart, was born at Rays- 



ii82 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

town Branch, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, August 9, 1787, died 
January 10, 1857. He obtained his education in the public schools 
of the days, which although thorough, were rather elementary in their 
course of study, inclining rather to the imparting of fundamental knowl- 
edge than to the pursuit of higher education. He followed the farmer's 
occupation throughout his entire life, owning and cultivating land in 
Hart's Log Valley. He fought in the American army in the war of 
1812-14. He was prominent politically in the county, although never 
attaining the eminence in that line gained by his honored father, and 
was a member of the Reformed church. He married, September 12, 
1812, at McConnellstown, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, Margaret 
Householder, and had eight children. 

(III) Isaac v., son of David and Margaret (Householder) Enyeart, 
was born in Raystown Branch, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
July 26, 1824, died July 26, 1886. He obtained a public school edu- 
cation in the place of his birth, and later engaged in general farming 
in Hart's Log. On March 28, 185 1, he moved to Cromwell township, 
Huntingdon county, there purchasing two hundred acres of land, which 
is still held in the family. His father passed the latter years of his life 
here, his declining days brightened and cheered by the loving and de- 
voted care of his son and daughter-in-law. On this farm Isaac Enyeart 
raised a great deal of fine stock, dealing heavily, and breeding some of 
the best blooded stock in the state. He married, April 13, 1847, Mar- 
garet Isenburg, born November 10, 1826, died April 2, 1903; children: 
I. Calvin, born January 17, 1848. 2. Prudence, born May 29, 1849, 
died October 30, 1850. 3. David Rittenhouse Porter, of whom further. 
4. Elizabeth, born February 26, 1852, died June 3, 1852. 5. Mary, 
bom October 12, 1853. 6. Lydia Anna, born May 20, 1857. 7. Wil- 
liam Reed, born February 12, 1859. 8. Howard Lewis, born Septem- 
ber 27, i860. 9. George B. McClellan, born May 23, 1862, died March 
15, 1905. ID. Lydia Grove, born October 17, 1864. 11. John, born 
July 21, 1855, died August 14, 1856. 12. Margaret, born October 3, 
1867. 

(IV) David Rittenhouse Porter, third child and second son of Isaac 
V. and Margaret (Isenburg) Enyeart, was born in Hart's Log Valley, 
Huntingdon county, December 6, 1850. He obtained his education in 
the common schools of his native township, and until he was fifteen years 



HISTORY OF THE Jl'NIATA VALLEY 1183 

of age assisted his father 011 the home farm, accepting at that time a 
position in the general store of Orbison & Miller at Orbisonia, remaining 
in the employ of this firm for abont four years. He then was engaged 
by IVL Starr & Company of the same town, and continued with them for 
about five years, leaving to enter the employ of P. P. Deweese & Com- 
pany, general merchants at Rockhill. After two years with this concern 
he obtained an appointment as assistant freight agent of the East Broad 
Top Railway Company at Orbisonia, and held this position for two 
years. At the end of this time he concluded that the opjxirtunitics for 
advancement and recognition were greater on the road than in the com- 
pany's offices, and accordingly made application for a position as fire- 
man, which, because of his previous service with the company and his 
creditable record, was readily granted. After three years of this life 
he left railroad employ, never to return, and entered his former field of 
activity, the mercantile business, forming a partnership in Orbisonia 
with Jacob Brodbeck, which, however, was discontinued after six months. 
In 1882 Mr. Enyeart opened a general store in a building erected for the 
purpose, later opening a hardware store, which is now conducted by 
his son, William Rutter Enyeart. On February 17, 1913, Mr. Enyeart 
sold his mercantile interests and retired from active business. During 
his residence in Orbisonia he had acijuired one hundred and sixty acres 
of land in the surrounding country, which he has since sold. His career 
after his decision as to what should be his life work, has been full of 
creditable success, and the experience he gained in his earlier unsettled 
occupations has been invaluable in his business life. He has retired at 
an age when many men are still hard at work in the harness and has the 
pleasure and satisfaction of seeing a business of his founding, surviving 
and flourishing in other hands. He is a member of the ^Masonic order, 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Patriotic Order Sons 
of America, and a Democrat in politics, having been councilman, mem- 
ber of the school board, county auditor, and having held numerous other 
local offices. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church. 

He married, January 31, 1871, Jane E. Rutter, born September 10, 
1848; children: i. William Rutter: married, at Huntingdon, May 14, 
1895, Rene B. Rutter, born December 18, 1877; children: Frederick 
Frank, born June i, i8g6, died August 7, 1897, and Ned Porter, born 
September 28, 1897: William Rutter Enyeart is at present manager of 



ii84 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

the hardware business founded by his father. 2. FrankHn, born May 
10, 1873, died August 20, 1873. 



Juniata Valley, Pennsylvania, figures as one of the most 
PARK attractive, progressive and prosperous divisions of the state, 

justly claiming a high order of citizenship, and a spirit of 
enterprise which is certain to conserve consecutive development and 
marked advancement in the material upbuilding of this section. This 
district has been and is signally favored in the class of men who have 
contributed to its development along commercial and agricultural lines 
and in the latter connection Clay Park, the subject of this review, de- 
mands recognition, as he is now actively engaged in farming operations 
in the vicinity of Three Springs, Huntingdon county, where he is the 
owner of a fine tract of five hundred acres of land. He is well known 
as a man whose business methods demonstrate the power of activity and 
honesty in the commercial world. 

Clay Park was born in Clay township, Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania, October 29, 1872. His parents, Jacob and Elizabeth (Madden) 
Park, were both born near Three Springs, Pennsylvania. The Park 
family is one of old English lineage, the founder of this particular 
branch having been an early settler in New Jersey. Later various mem- 
bers of the name drifted west and settled near Hares Valley, Pennsyl- 
vania. James Park, paternal grandfather of Clay Park, was a farmer 
by occupation and followed that calling in Huntingdon county. Jacob 
Park was educated in the public schools of Three Springs, and after 
engaging in diversified agriculture for a number of years he turned his 
attention to the butcher business, in which he was profitably engaged for 
twenty-five years. During the last fifteen years of his life he owned 
and conducted the Park Hotel, an up-to-date hostelry at Three Springs. 
His demise occurred in 1899. He was a member of the Church of God, 
a Republican in politics, and for several years served as school director 
in his home community. He and his wife, whose maiden name was 
Elizabeth Madden, became the parents of the following children: Lu- 
cinda, Harmon, Alexander, Amanda, Clay and Scott. 

To the excellent public schools of Three Springs, Clay Park is in- 
debted for his preliminary educational discipline, which was later sup- 
plemented with effective normal training at Orbisonia and with a course 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1185 

of study in the Valparaiso University, at Valparaiso, Indiana. He taught 
school for eleven winters, six of which were spent at Three Springs. 
In 1898 he engaged in the general mercantile business at Three Springs 
and during the ensuing twelve years built up a splendid business. In 
1910, however, he decided to engage in farming, and in that year pur- 
chased a tract of five hundred acres eligibly located in the borough of 
Three Springs. The same is well improved, and on it a specialty is 
made of raising high-grade cattle and horses. In the same year JVIr. 
Park I)ought a flour and feed mill, which he operates, and he also deals 
extensively in real estate. He was the original promoter of the First 
National Bank of Three Springs, and is now a member of the board of 
directors in that well organized institution. He is well known as a man 
of his word, and all his business dealings have been characterized ijy 
fair and honorable methods. In politics he was formerly a Repuljlican, 
but since the last presidential campaign he has given his allegiance to 
the principles of the Progressive party. He has filled a number of public 
offices in Three Springs, and for three years was auditor of Hunting- 
tl(Mi county. He is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and with the Patriotic Order Sons of America. 

In 1893 Mr. Park was united in marriage to Miss Alice Hudson, of 
Three Springs. The family consists of the following children: Carl, 
Ora, Margaret, Raymond, May, Lillian, Edith, Rex, and Harold. Mr. 
and Mrs. Park are both devout Baptists, and in the faith of that church 
thev are rearing their children. 



John Madden, uncle of Clay Park, a sketch of whose 
MADDEN career precedes this one, has been living retired at Three 

Springs since 1906. He grew up a farmer and followed 
that occupation during the entire period of his active career. He was 
born in Clay township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, February 
5, 1837, and is a son of Richard and Elizabeth (Locke) Madden, both 
natives of Springfield township, Huntingdon county. The paternal 
grandparents of John Madden, were James and Elizabeth (Lane) Mad- 
den, probably natives of McConnells Cove, Fulton county, Pennsylvania. 
The Madden family originated in Ireland, whence the original immi- 
erant came to America and settled in Baltimore, Marvland, later coming 
to Pennsylvania. James Madden was an agriculturist by vocation, and 



ii86 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

for many years he was located in Cromwell township, Huntingdon 
county, moving thence to Springfield township, in which latter section 
he owned a finely improved place of one hundred and fifty acres. He 
died in 1855, aged seventy years. He was twice married, first to Eliza- 
beth Lane, and (second) to Ellen Stains. The first marriage was 
fruitful of ten children, whose names are here entered in respective 
order of birth : Richard, James, John, Hugh, Ruben, Abram, Hannah, 
Charlotte, Eliza and Button. The youngest of the above children lived 
to the patriarchal age of ninety years. By his second wife James Mad- 
den had the following children : Liberty, Oliver, Gildeon, Daniel, Rob- 
ert, Melinda and Rosanna. The father of Elizabeth Lane Madden was 
Richard Lane, an early settler in Huntingdon county. On the maternal 
side John Madden is a grandson of John and Margaret (Ramsey) 
Locke, the former of whom settled in Locke's Valley, in Springfield 
township, Huntingdon county, about the year 1800, and the latter of 
whom lived to be ninety-three years of age. Children of John and Mar- 
garet (Ramsey) Locke: Selea, in whose honor the postoffice of Selea 
was named, he reached the great age of ninety-three years; William; 
Philip, now living at the age of ninety-six years; Simon, Jane, Eliza- 
beth and Eveline. 

Richard Madden, father of John Madden, was a farmer in Spring- 
field township, where he owned between four and five hundred acres of 
land; he died in that section in i860. The names of his children follow: 
Elizabeth Jane, John, Margaret, Charlotte, Eveline, Amon (died in 
civil war of typhoid fever), Amelia, Richard, Enoch and Wealthy. 

John Madden was educated in the public schools of his native place. 
After reaching manhood he engaged in general farming on an estate in 
Fulton county, later removing to Springfield township, in Huntingdon 
county, where he owned a hundred and twenty acres of fine bottom 
land. For ten years he was engaged in the milling business in Fulton 
county. He retired from active business in 1906. and since that time has 
maintained his home at Three Springs, where he enjoys to the full the 
fruits of his former years of earnest endeavor. He was a stalwart in 
the ranks of the Republican party until the formation of the Progressive 
party, since which time he has given his unalloyed support to its prin- 
ciples and policies. He was honored by his fellow citizens with election 
to the office of justice of the peace, but he never took up the commission. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1187 

He served for six years as director of the poor. He and his family are 
memhers of the Baptist churcli, to whose good works they are most 
liberal contributors. 

In August, 1862, John Aladden married May Jane Starr, a woman 
of most gracious and kindly personality. Ten children are the result 
of this union: Samantha, Judson, Arthur Scott, Charles Eugene, Alice 
Gertrude, Ralph Clayton, Luther C, Lloyd, Beatrice and Russell B. 



The W'aite family of Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
WAITE has been so long settled in that state that it is difficult to 
trace it back to the original English ancestor, who probably 
reached the New World in 1650-1660. One branch of it located in 
Berks county, Pennsylvania, moved to Bedford countv, and later mi- 
grated to Blair county. The earliest record is of Joseph and Mary 
W'aite, who were residents of Tyrone township, Blair county, until they 
were advanced in years, when they moved to Franklin township. Hunt- 
ingdon count}-, where they died. He followed the stone mason's trade 
all of his active life, and assisted in the construction of many of the 
public buildings in the counties in which he lived. He and his wife were 
members of the Presbyterian church, an inheritance from their Scotch- 
English ancestry. He was an ardent Whig in his political convictions. 
Children: i. Joseph H., of whom further. 2. John, died in Ohio. 3. 
Benjamin, died in Ohio. 4. Caspar, died in Blair county, Pennsylvania. 
5. Rebecca, only survivor of the family, living in York county, Penn- 
sylvania, over ninety-four years old, widow of James Fisher. 6. Mary, 
died unmarried, aged forty. 7. Abraham, died in Ohio. 8. Catherine, 
married Andrew McKee ; died in Clarion county, Pennsylvania. With 
the exception of Mary, all of them lived to be over eighty-five. 

(II) Joseph H., son of Joseph and Mary Waite, was born in Tyrone 
township, Blair county, Pennsylvania, in 1820; died at Warrior's Mark 
township, Huntingdon county, in January, 1908. He passed his younger 
years in Blair county. In 1869 he moved to Warrior's Mark township 
and bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, where he resided 
until his death. Besides farming he was an auctioneer, and the sale of 
thousands of dollars of property was made by him. He gave his fran- 
chise to the W^iig party until the organization of the Republican party, 
when he gave the latter his allegiance. He was a member of the Pres- 



ii88 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

byterian church; his wife of the Methodist Episcopal church. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Keith, born in Spruce Creek township, in 1821, died at 
Warrior's Mark township in 1893, daughter of Andrew and Mary 
(MacPherson) Keith, of Scotch-Irish descent, and early settlers in Lan- 
caster county, Pennsylvania, and later in Spruce Creek township, Hunt- 
ingdon county, where they both died. They were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and were prominent in every place in which 
they lived. Children: Elizabeth, married Joseph H. Waite; John, 
died in Blair county; Samuel E., died in Iowa; Mary, married Dr. 
Wishart, died in Martinsburg, Blair county, Pennsylvania; Andrew, 
died in Spruce Creek township, a teacher; Adam, died in Huntingdon 
county. Children of Joseph H. and Elizabeth (Keith) Waite: i. Theo- 
dore C, of whom further. 2. Alvin, accidentally killed at age of twelve. 
3. Andrew, a clerk at Warrior's Mark. 4. Mary, married J. H. Mat- 
tern, resides in Warrior's Mark. 5. Hayes H., attorney in Hunting- 
don county. 6. George, an auctioneer in Tyrone, Pennsylvania. 7. 
S. Blair, a farmer in Tyrone township, Pennsylvania. 8. Joseph L., 
superintendent of mines in Georgia. 9. Lilly, married I. S. Buck, of 
Warrior's Mark. 

(Ill) Theodore C, son of Joseph H. and EHzabeth (Keith) 
Waite, was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and died in the 
county of his nativity, August 2^, 1907. He was educated in the public 
schools, and on reaching his majority he settled at Yellow Springs, 
where he engaged in the mercantile business for two years. In the early 
seventies he moved to Water Street, Huntingdon county, and purchased 
the store of the Mytinger estate. He at once improved the building, 
greatly enlarged the stock and built up a large and lucrative business, 
and remained there for thirty-five years. He grew to be one of the 
most prominent and influential citizens in that part of the state. He 
was active in his support of the Republican party, though he never held 
office under it. Both he and his wife were members of the Lutheran 
church, giving it a generous allegiance; and Mr. Waite was deacon for 
years, besides holding other offices. He married Frances Walters, the^ 
descendant of old settlers in Juniata Valley, and who were large land 
holders. Mrs. Waite makes her home with her son, Albert K. Waite. 
Children: i. Walter B., a railway mail clerk, resides at Huntingdon, 
Pennsylvania. 2. Mary, resides at home. 3. Edith, married A. L. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1189 

Hilenian, of Canoe Valley. 4. Winifred, married W. L. Goodman, of 
Altoona, Pennsylvania. 5. Clara, married L. B. Goodman, of Altoona, 
Pennsylvania. 6. Albert K., of whom further. 7. Anna May, died in 
infancy. 8. Bertha, died in infancy. 

(IV) Albert K. Waite, son of Theodore C. and Frances (Walters) 
Waite, was born July 14, 1886, at Water Street, Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania. He received an excellent preparatory education in the 
public schools, afterward finishing at Juniata College. On leaving col- 
lege he entered his father's store as clerk and as the latter advanced in 
years the management of the business devolved upon Albert. After 
the death of his father he purchased the interests of the other heirs in 
the stock of goods, by which he became sole proprietor and manager. 
He runs a general merchandise business, has improved both stock and 
building and continues as successful as his parent before him. He is 
one of the progressive merchants of Water Street, as well as a popular 
citizen. He is an Independent Republican, and has served as township 
auditor. He is a member of the Lutheran church; Mount Moriah 
Lodge, No. 300, Free and Accepted Masons; the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, at Alexandria; the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, at Huntingdon. He is unmarried. 



The Behrer family of Pennsylvania is of comparatively 
BEHRER recent German origin; but by the thrift of the various 
members, as well as their energy and honesty, they have 
won an enviable place in the state as well as their locality. 

(I) George Behrer was born in Germany about 181 8, and while 
yet a youth he emigrated to the United States. He settled in Patton 
township, Center county, Pennsylvania, and there died in 1887, after 
a long and useful life. He selected farming as his occupation, as he 
had followed it in Germany. He purchased a few acres of wild land, 
which he cleared, improved and tilled, erecting thereon comfortable 
buildings of a substantial character. Later he added more acreage, and 
still more until, at the time of his death, he owned a large farm under 
a high state of cultivation. He brought with him from the Fatherland 
progressive ideas of intensive farming and the best methods of securing 
the greatest yield from smallest acreage, which he proceeded to put 
into practice, the results therefrom being wonderful. His methods came 



II90 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

to be widely copied throughout the county. He took an active interest 
in the poHtical questions of his adopted country, and after his naturaU- 
zation he became affiliated with the Democratic party, voting the straight 
ticket and working for its success. He served as school director, and 
proved an able one on account of his superior education. With his wife 
he was a member of the Lutheran church, aiding the same in every man- 
ner possible. He early impressed his children with the idea of the bless- 
ings of political liberty, and preached it to his young friends. He was 
an able, honorable and influential citizen of the county, and his influence 
for good will long be felt. He married Susan Weller, born in Snyder 
county, Pennsylvania, and died July, 1887, about four months before 
him. Children: i. Isaac, a farmer; died in Center county, Pennsyl- 
vania. 2. Elizabeth Ellen, married James Faust ; lives in Tyrone, Penn- 
sylvania. 3. George, a farmer ; resides in Center county. 4. William, 
died, aged twenty-two. 5. Charles Edwin, of whom further. 6. Phillip, 
a farmer; died in Center county. 7. Amelia Rebecca, married John 
Shuey; died October, 1912, in Tyrone, Pennsylvania. 8. Moses Aaron, 
a farmer in Center county. 9. Emma Jane, married William Wyker; 
lives in Ohio. 10. Mary, died in infancy. 11. James, died in infancy. 
(II) Charles Edwin Behrer, son of George and Susan (Weller) 
Behrer, was born September 9, 1862, in Center county, Pennsylvania, 
and died, May 15, 1908, in Franklin township, Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania. He was reared on the farm and received an excellent 
education in the public schools of the township. On reaching man- 
hood he selected farming as his life's vocation, and engaged in that 
occupation with his father. On March 4, 1892, he moved from Center 
county to Huntingdon county to a place that he had purchased the 
previous year, consisting of one hundred and eighty acres. He at once 
engaged in general farming most successfully, and amassed a hand- 
some competence before his death. He was careful in every respect, and 
his buildings were kept in thorough repair, the same rule applying to 
every part of his farm. Than Mr. Behrer there was no more respected 
citizen of Franklin township, and in dying he bequeathed to his children 
an unstained name and clean record. He gave his support to the Demo- 
cratic party; working actively for the same. He served acceptably as 
school director several times. Both he and his wife were members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, supporting it generously. He married, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1191 

January 15, 1889, Lavina Jane I larpster, born November 13, 18O5, in 
Center county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Alexander and Elizabeth 
(Gates) Harpster. Children: i. Reuben Edward, born January 6, 
1890. 2. Elizabeth Laura, born November 28, 1892. 3. Chester War- 
ren, born December 20, 1895. 

(The Harpster Line). 
The Harpster family of Pennsylvania is of English origin. Uavid 
Harpster and his wife Susan were residents of Center county during 
the latter part of the eighteenth century. They were the parents of a 
large family and their descendants are to be found throughout the state. 
Their son Alexander was born in Center county, and there lived and 
died, January 31, 1903. He was one of the prosperous citizens of his 
township, was a prominent man whose influence was felt in his com- 
munity. He was a Republican and a member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. He married Elizabeth Gates, born in Center county, and 
died January 31, 1889, at the homestead in Ferguson township, Center 
county. She was a daughter of Henry and Lavina Gates, early settlers 
and long time residents of the county. He was a carpenter by trade, 
combining it with farming. Children of Alexander and Elizabeth 
(Gates) Harpster: i. Lavina Jane, (see Behrer II). 2. Mary Clara. 
3. Edward S. 4. Anna Belle, dead. 5. Bertha. 6. Laura. 



When the good ship "Mary Ann" sailed from Lon- 
PETERSON don in 1689 for Massachusetts Bay in America, 
among her passengers was one Angus Paterson, a 
hardy Scotchman who bad tried his fortunes in England and had failed 
to accumulate much of this world's goods. He had heard marvelous 
accounts of the wealth and opportunities of the New World, as well 
as of its hardships and dangers. He decided to put his fortunes to the 
test by emigrating to America. With him came several boon com- 
panions, like himself of Scotch descent ; and they landed near Boston, 
Massachusetts. Paterson looked over the field in that colony and did 
not find it an inviting one, as at that time Puritanism was rampant; 
and though of the kirk he did not fancy the methods employed for 
making proselytes to the religion so vigorously espoused by the Puri- 
tans. He accordingly moved to Vermont, where, if the people were 



1 192 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

not so religiously enthusiastic were much easier to live among, as they 
in a measure pursued their religion in their own way and permitted 
others to do the same. He was encouraged by the pioneers to take up 
wild land, which he did, and succeeded in time in making it a self-sus- 
taining farm. He was a brave man, and it is recorded in the early annals 
of Vermont that he fought the Indians and wild beasts single handed 
on many occasions. On one occasion he rescued a party of three women 
and two children from a band of roving savages who had raided an 
outlying settlement and had taken them captive after massacreing and 
scalping the men and boys. Among his children was Angus, Jr., of 
whom further. 

(I) Angus Paterson, son of Angus Paterson, the Scotch immigrant, 
was born in Vermont in his father's log cabin. His mother was also 
of Scotch origin, and his parents bequeathed to him the indomitable en- 
ergy and fearlessness of the Scotch, the two chief characteristics of 
that people. He, like his father, became a farmer; combining with it 
the trade of trapping in the winter months and hunting in the summer; 
and when occasion demanded it, he was an Indian scout and fighter. 
His farm yielded him but a meager living and his wily red foes were 
ever on the alert to harrass him and endanger the lives of the mem- 
bers of his young famil}^ so he moved /rom Vermont to Delaware, and 

there died at an advanced age. He married Mary , and among 

his children was Theodore, of whom further. 

(II) Theodore Peterson, as the name had come to be called, son 
of Angus and Mary Paterson, was born in Vermont, and moved, while 
yet a lad, to Delaware with his parents. Here he grew to man's estate, 
receiving a meager education at the subscription school, which was 
held during the three winter months of each year. He took up wild 
land, cleared and fenced, and later, after his marriage, erected on it 
a comfortable and secure house of hewn logs, which protected his famih^ 
from Indian incursions. He became famous in his community as a 
progressive farmer. At the breaking out of hostilities between the Col- 
onies and England he enlisted in the Continental army from Delaware, 
and was with Mad Anthony Wayne in several of his daring skirmishes 
with the British. He married Emily Haws, daughter of a neighboring 
farmer. Among their children was James, of whom further. 

(III) James Peterson, son of Theodore and Emily (Haws) Peter- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1193 

son, was born in Delaware, and there married. He was a farmer by 
occupation. Prior to 1794 he moved from Delaware to Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, where he bought land and continued the tilling 
of the soil. Among his children was Robert, of whom further. 

(IV) Robert Peterson, .son of James Peterson, was born in 1794, 
in Dublin township, Iluntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and there died, 
in 1S78. He was reared on his father's farm, educated in the district 
schools, and on reaching his majority he became an expert woodsman 
and a successful farmer. He took up wild land, which he cleared and 
transformed into a valuable farm. Later he took up more wild land, 
which he also converted into a productive place. He was gifted with 
mechanical skill and put it to an advantage on his farms. He was a 
pioneer physician, but had no professional training, his excellent judg- 
ment standing him in good stead and in the place of medical works. On 
this account he was much in demand in his community and section, an<l 
had a large acquaintance throughout the county- He became one of 
the most prominent men in the township and accumulated a handsome 
property of three or four hundred acres of fertile land; and the build- 
ings on his various properties were spoken of as the most convenient 
and commodious in that part of the county. He was a Whig during the 
existence of that party and after its dissolution became an ardent Re- 
publican, voting with and working for the party. Both he and his wife 
were mem1)ers of the Presbyterian church, which they supported gen- 
erously. He married Elizabeth Hollingsworth, born in 1796, in Frank- 
lin county, Pennsylvania, and died in 1849, in Dublin township, 
Huntingdon county. He married (second) Susanna Morrow. Children 
by first marriage: i. James, of whom further. 2. Robert. 3. Ellen, 
married Mr. Cree. 4. Susanna, married Mr. JetTries. 3. Malinda, 
married Mr. Devor. 6. Belle, married Mr. Jacobs. 7. John. 8. Da- 
vid S. 9. Jesse H. 10. Johnson. 11. Bathsheba, married Air. Mat- 
thews. 12. Son, died in infancy. Child by second marriage: 13. 
Daughter, died in infancy. Mrs. Matthews is the only child now living, 
and resides in Mountaindale, Cambria county, Pennsylvania. 

(V) James Peterson, son of Robert and Elizabeth (Hollingsworth) 
Peterson, was born October 16, 1820, in Huntingdon county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and was reared on the home farm and educated in the district 
school. After marriage he purchased a part of the homestead on which 



1 194 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

were buildings. These he renovated and greatly improved, making a 
model farm. Later he bought other land and erected other buildings, 
and there lived until 1896, when he gave up farming and lived with his 
children; dying in 1899 at the home of his son, Alfred S. Peterson, in 
Spruce Creek Valley, and is buried at Pine Grove church. He was a 
member of the Presbyterian church since his boyhood, and was an elder 
in it for forty-five years. He supported the Republican party with his 
franchise, and held many local offices. He was one of the most highly 
esteemed citizens in his township, and was known far and wide for 
the liberality of his opinions, his generosity and fairmindedness. He 
married Marj^ Thompson Devor, born January 21, 1818, in Franklin 
county, Pennsylvania, and died in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
in 1879. She was a daughter of John R. and Mary (Thompson) Devor, 
of Franklin county. Children of James and JMaiy Thompson (Devor) 
Peterson: i. Almira Jane, married J. A. McClain; died at Sharon, 
Pennsylvania. 2. Annie Elizabeth, married William Appleby; died at 
Shade Gap, Pennsylvania. 3. Mary Agnes, married Robert Harper; 
died at Shade Gap, Pennsylvania. 4. Theodore Calvin, of whom 
further. 5. Alfred S., of whom further. 6. Amanda Belle, married 
Walter Clark ; lives in Shirleysburg, Pennsylvania. 

(VI) Theodore Calvin Peterson, M.D., of Shade Gap, Penn.syl- 
vania, son of James and Mary Thompson (Devor) Peterson, was born 
in Dublin township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, November 8, 
185 1. He received his education at Milnwood Academy at Shade Gap, 
and at the Shippensburg Normal, from which he graduated in 1875. 
He taught school before and after graduation and in the meantime read 
medicine. He entered the medical department of the University of 
Michigan and graduated therefrom, with distinction, in 1880. He 
entered upon the practice of his profession at Dublin Mills, remaining 
there for three and one-half years, during which time he established 
a reputation as a careful practitioner. He moved to Warrior's Mark, 
Huntingdon county, and remained in active practice for twelve years. 
His next move was to Wilmerding, remaining for five j^ears. In 1900 
he moved to Spruce Creek, Pennsylvania, staying two years. He prac- 
ticed in Sharon, Pennsylvania, seven and a half years. In 1900 he 
returned to Spruce Creek, again established himself, and has remained 
there until the present time (1913), and has succeeded in building up a 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1195 

larj^t and hicratixc business, lie is tlii' physician to the outdoor poor, 
and his etforts in that (hrection are highly ap[)reciated Ijy his chcnts. 
Both as a citizen and a physician he ranks high in his section, and is 
regarded as one of its most substantial and progressive men. He is a 
Republican in politics, and a consistent member of the Presljyterian 
church, as is his wife. He married, in 18S1, .\nnie E. Davis, of Frank- 
linville, Pennsylvania, daughter of Thomas Davis. One son, Calvin, 
Jr., deceased. 

(VI) Alfred S. Peterson, of b'ranklinville, Pennsylvania, son of 
James and Mary Thompson (Devor) Peterson, was born in Dublin 
township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, September 27, 1853. He 
was educated in the public schools of the township and towns in the 
vicinit}- of his home. He remained on the homestead with his father, 
and managed the place for him for eleven years with exceptional success. 
In i8()6 he moved to Franklin townshiji, Huntingdon county, and bought 
one hundred and forty acres, and has remained on it to the present 
time (1913). He improved his land, bringing it up to a high .state of 
productiveness, doing general farming on it. He combines with farm- 
ing the breeding of fine hogs and registered Hereford cattle, for which 
his place has become famous. He uses the most approved and latest 
methods on his farm, and has one of the model ones in the township. 
He is progressive, thorough and up-to-date, and is known for his up- 
rightness, honesty and generosity. In 191 1 he erected a handsoine brick 
residence, which is both commodious and comfortable. Besides the 
dwelling house, which attracts imiversal attention, he has well planned 
out-buildings, especially for the housing of his stock. He votes the Re- 
publican ticket, and has served as school director. Both he and his wife 
are prominent members of the Presbyterian church, which they support 
generously; and Mr. Peterson has been an elder of the church since 1897. 
He married, in 1879, Emma Swan, born in Huntingdon county, a daugh- 
ter of John J. Swan. Children: i. Denton S., a farmer in Center 
county, Pennsylvania. 2. Mary E., at home. 3. Harry, a steel tester 
at Duquesne, Pennsylvania. 4. Mabel, at home. 5. Owen V. 6. 
Roy E. 

(The Devor Line). 
When Louis XIV. of France persecuted his Protestant subjects with 
such relentless vigor, a great number of them sought refuge in foreign 



1 196 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Protestant countries. One of the families who suffered greatly, through 
loss of life and property, was that of de Vaux, since corrupted into 
Devor. Jean (John) de Vaux fled with his family to the Palatinate, 
and later sailed for America. He reached Manhattan Island about 1688- 
1690, and remained in New York for several years. Later he joined the 
Rochellese colony in Westchester county, at the new village of Rochelle, 
or as it has come to be known, New Rochelle. With him were five sons, 
all of whom married, reared families, and from them descend the vari- 
ous Devor families in the United States. Jacques (James) Devor 
moved to the colony of Pennsylvania, and there settled, and is doubtless 
the progenitor of the Devor families of that state. 

(I) James Devor, a descendant of Jean de Vaux, the Huguenot 
refugee from France, was born in Pennsylvania, whither his grand- 
father went from New York state. He was a farmer and was hunting 
fertile land. He settled in Franklin county, there farmed, reared his 
family, became a prominent and influential citizen and there died. 
Among his children was John R., of whom further. 

(II) John R. Devor, son of James Devor, was born in Franklin 
county, Pennsylvania. He moved to Cumberland county, where he 
farmed until his removal to Ohio, where he lived in Ashland county until 
he was a very old man, then he returned to Pennsylvania and died in 
the home of his daughter, Mary Thompson (Devor) Peterson. He 
was a member of the Presbyterian church, and firm in his belief of the 
Protestant religion. He married Mary Thompson, a native of Cum- 
berland county, Pennsylvania, who died in Ashland county, Ohio. Chil- 
dren: I. Mary Thompson, married James Peterson (see Peterson 
V). 2. Porter, died in Ashland county, Ohio. 3. David, a civil war 
veteran; died in Illinois. 4. Agnes, died in girlhood. 5. Thompson, 
enlisted in the civil war, and was killed in the battle of Missionary Ridge. 
6. Elizabeth (Rose), who was living in Wisconsin when last heard from- 



William Banks, of Mifflintown, Juniata county, Pennsyl- 
BANKS vania, is a member of a family which has achieved prom- 
inence in many and varied directions. The name is en- 
graved on the pages of history in connection with legal and political 
affairs, and the efforts of the various members have been most effective 
in advancing and developing the communities in which they have resided. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1197 

Andrew Banks, grandfather of the WilHani Banks of this sketch, 
was horn in York county, Pennsylvania. He married EHzaheth Lint- 
ner, and had four sons: James; John, an attorney who practiced liis 
profession in Indiana, Pennsylvania; William, and David. All of these 
attained prominence. 

David, son of Andrew and Elizabeth (Lintner) Banks, was born in 
Fermanagh township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, May 23, 1798, and 
died at an advanced age. He followed farming as an occupation, and 
served as associate judge of the courts of Juniata county, Pennsylvania. 
He married, April 10, 1827, Jane Thompson, born in Fayette township, 
Juniata county, Pennsylvania, in 1803, and died at the age of seventy- 
six years, a daughter of Judge William McAlister. They had children : 
James A., who went to California during the gold excitement of 1849, 
was a member of the legislature four years, a member of the senate two 
years, removed to Nevada, was a member of the legislature of that state, 
was murdered by the Indians at the age of thirty-seven years, and was 
a member of the Presbyterian church; William, the subject of this 
sketch; David Stewart, the third son. was a minister of the Presbyterian 
church, and died in California; the fourth son died in infancy; the fifth 
son, Robert E., died of typhoid fever while a student at Jefferson Col- 
lege; the sixth son, John M., is successfully engaged in the practice of 
the law in Indiana, Pennsylvania ; the seventh son. Dr. Lucian, is a well 
known physician in Mifflintown. Pennsylvania. 

William, son of David and Jane Thompson (McAlister) Banks, 
was born on the homestead farm in Fermanagh township, Juniata 
county, Pennsylvania, March 12, 1830. The common schools of the 
district furnished his early education and this was supplemented by at- 
tendance at Tuscarora Academy. In 1886 he undertook the responsi- 
bility of cultivating the farm, which consists of two hundred and forty 
acres, and has been remarkably successful in all his efforts. He has 
planted many acres in fruit trees, and is now considered to have one of 
the most productive farms in the county. He is too ambitious a man. 
however, to be content with one enterprise. He is one of the organizers 
and original stockholders of the Juniata Valley Bank, 1864. this being 
now known as the Second National Bank. In 1862 he volunteered for 
military service, was mustered in, and sent to Harrisburg, his regiment 
being known as the Third Pennsylvania. From there they were sent to 



1 198 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

take part in the battle of Antietam, but reached the battlefield too late 
to be of actual assistance, much to their regret. He joined the Presby- 
terian church in his early youth, and ser\ed it as an elder for many 
years. He was also connected with the Sunday school for more than 
half a century. His six children and twelve grandchildren are likewise 
members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Banks married, near Milfiin- 
town, October i, 1861, Jane E., born in Mifflintown, October 25, 1837, 
a daughter of Dr. Philo and Elizabeth (North) Hamlin, the former one 
of the leading physicians of his time. They have had children: i. 
William H., a well known physician and financier of Juniata county, 
was born November 16, 1862. He was graduated from the University 
of Pennsylvania, and has practiced in Mifilintown since that time. Under 
the second administration of President Cleveland he filled the office of 
examining surgeon for United States pensions. He was one of the or- 
ganizers and is a director of the Miffiintown and Patterson Electric 
Light Company, is a director in the Fermanagh Building and Loan 
Association, and a stockholder in the Mifflintown and Patterson Water 
Company. He married Bess Jacobs Parker, and has five children : 
2. James A., born in October, 1864; was educated in the public schools 
and Mifflintown Academy. For a time he was in the drug store of 
Dr. W. H. Banks, then went to Mifflintown in 1889, and was with his 
uncle. Dr. Lucian Banks, until his death in 1907. Since 1907 he has 
conducted the store at No. 109 Main street. He was one of the or- 
ganizers of the Juniata Farmers' Telephone and Telegraph Company, 
and is treasurer of the corporation at the present time, and a director 
in the Lost Creek Valley Telephone Compan}'. He is a supporter of 
Democratic principles in political matters, and a member of the Presby- 
terian church. He is unmarried, and resides with his father. 3. An- 
drew, was born March 14, 1866. He was graduated from Princeton 
College in 1889, ^^^'^ ^^^^ with Patterson & Neely, and was admitted to 
practice at the bar in 1891. He commenced his legal practice in Mif- 
flintown, removed to Greensburg, Pennsylvania. At the outbreak of 
the Spanish-American war he enlisted in Company I, Tenth Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteers, and was in the Philippines about one and a half 
years. Returning to Mifflintown, he again engaged in the practice of 
law, and has served as district attorney two terms. He is a member 
of the Presbyterian church, and he has served as chairman of the Demo- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1199 

cratic county committee. He is a director of the Juniata Yalley Na- 
tional Bank, is unmarried, and resides with his father. 4. Ella K., 
married J. Howartl Neely, of Milillintown. 5. Philo Hamlin, was edu- 
cated in the Aliriliiitown Academy and the Jefferson Medical College, 
from which he was graduated in June, 1901. He passed successfully 
the examination of the slate board of examiners, and was a surgeon 
in South Africa, wiih the rank of captain, during the Boer war. L'pon 
the return trip to this country he died at New Orleans, November 2^, 
1901. 0. Rel)ccca Jane, married Ezra D. Parker, of Milford township, 
and has two children: Southard E. and Helen W. 7. Anna May, 
died in infancy. 

Mr. Banks has always taken a deep interest in whatever concerned 
the welfare of the community in which he lived, and has filled at various 
times all the public ot^ces within the gift of the township. He has 
served as a school director for several years, and is held in the highest 
esteem by all who know him. His counsel is often in demand by those 
who have the best means of judging correctly of his shrewd and far- 
seeing mind. 



The Thompsons of this sketch descend from John 
THOMPSON Thompson, who with his brother James came from 

the North of Ireland, 1 730-1735, and located first 
in 1735 at New London Cross Roads, Chester county, Pennsylvania. 
Later they moved to Hanover township, Lancaster county, where John 
Thompson married his second wife. From Hanover he moved to the 
Juniata valle\-, settling at a point three miles distant from the present 
borough of Thompsontown. James, his brother, settled in the Cum- 
berland valley. 

(I) John Thompson came up the Juniata with his family in 1768 
or 1769 and purchased a tract of two hundred acres (previously war- 
ranted) near Thompsontown. He is not mentioned on the tax lists of 
Fermanagh township until 1768, when he is assessed on two hundred 
acres, and Robert, his oldest son, on two hundred acres adjoining and 
below at Lockport. John Thompson died about 1779, as his name then 
disappears from the tax rolls. He is buried in the old Thompson grave- 
yard, where a simple stone with the letters "J. T.," without date, marks 
his resting place. He married (first) a Miss Greenlee, daughter of 



I200 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

James Greenlee, of Hanover township. He married (second) a Miss 
Slocum; (third) Sarah, daughter of James Patterson. Children by first 
wife: I. Margaret, married a Greenleaf. 2. Sarah, married John 
McAllister. 3. Elizabeth, married Robert McAllister. 4. William, 
born 1754, died January 3, 1813, married Jane Mitchell. 5. Robert, 
married Sarah Mitchell. 6. Susan, married Captain David Boal, and 
lived in Perry county. 7. Jane, married Robert Wiley, of Washington, 
Pennsylvania. 8. Isaac, died 1823, married, and had a son James. 
Children of second wife : 9. John, who moved from the Juniata Valley 
to Butler county, Pennsylvania. Children by third wife: 10. Andrew, 
married Jane Stewart, and about 1816 moved to near Chillicothe, Ohio. 
II. Peter, of whom further. 12. Thomas, lived with his brother, died 
a bachelor, and the old farm, which then contained four hundred and 
thirty-three acres, passed to his brother, Peter. 

(II) Peter, son of John Thompson and his third wife, Sarah Pat- 
terson, inherited with his brother Thomas the homestead of their father, 
and February 28, 1807, purchased eighty-four acres additional. Peter 
and Thomas worked the farm together, prospered, and enlarged its 
borders, and when Thomas died without heirs, Peter inherited his in- 
terest. Peter Thompson married Mary Patterson, and had issue : John, 
Samuel, Silas, Thomas, John, Patterson, Mary, Margaret, Susanna and 
Ellen. (jVlb 

(III) Samuel, son of Peter and Mary (Patterson) Thompson, was 
born on the old homestead farm on which his grandfather settled, and 
later lived in Center county and in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. He 
was a merchant tailor, and had a place of business in Petersburg, Hunt- 
ingdon county. He served in the war of 1812, was a Whig in politics 
and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. His second wife 
was Mary Griffins; children: Peter, John, Henry, Samuel S., and 
William. 

(IV) Samuel Simpson, son of Samuel and Mary (Griffins) Thomp- 
son, was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, May 24, 18 19, died 
in Logan township, Huntingdon county, October 7, 1889. He learned 
the tailor's trade with his father, established later in business for him- 
self in Petersburg, continuing until about i860, when he sold out and 
purchased a farm of one hundred and twenty-live acres in Oneida town- 
ship, which he cultivated for a few years only. He then returned to 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1201 

Petersburg ami again l)Cgan tailoring, hut later purchased a farm 
on which he livctl until his death. He was a justice of the peace for 
many years; a Republican in politics, and both he and his wife were 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. He held many local of- 
fices and was a man held in high esteem. He married Margaret Nelson, 
who died June 10, 1890, daughter of John and Margaret (Steele) Nel- 
son — he born in Huntingdon county, she in Ireland. John and Mar- 
garet Nelson owned a small farm in Logan township; both were mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church; he was a Democrat and local office- 
holder; children: Margaret, married Samuel Simpson Thompson, of 
previous mention; Ellen, married John Nelson, and died in Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania; John, yet a resident of Petersburg. Children of 
Samuel S. Thompson: i. William, a farmer of Logan township. 2. 
Andrew Gibson, now residing near Denver, Colorado, a painter. 3. 
Mary, married James Gahagan, and lives at Blackstone, Virginia. 
4. John Nelson, of whom further. 5. Nannie, married George Beeler. 
and lives in Indianapolis, Indiana. 6. Martha \Vashington, married 
Daniel M. Wagner, and lives at Colonial Beach, Virginia. 7. Alonzo, 
resides at Mount Union, Pennsylvania. 8. Jennie, married George Ar- 
mitage, and resides in Oakland, California. 

(V) John Nelson, son of Samuel Simpson and Margaret (Nelson) 
Thompson, was born at Petersburg, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
August 27, 1838. He was educated in the township schools, and spent 
his boyhood on the farm. He then entered mercantile life, and April 
I, 1882, engaged with the Petersburg Cooperative Store as a clerk. 
He remained there seventeen years until October i, 1899, when in part- 
nership with John H. Hoffman, purchased the business. They trade 
under the firm name of Hoffman & Thompson, and are well established, 
prosperous and well known merchants. In 1902 Mr. Thompson assisted 
in organizing the Shaver's Creek Bank, and a year later was elected 
vice-president, a position he now holds, the bank now being known as 
the First National Bank. He is a Republican in politics, a member of 
the town council, and president of the board of health. He is a mem- 
ber of Mount Moriah Lodge No. 300, Free and Accepted Masons, of 
Huntingdon, and of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; both he 
and his wife are luemliers of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

He married, ]\Iarch 1=;, 1882, Marv C, daughter of Clark and 



I202 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Susan Walker of Petersburg; children: i. Martha, born May 24, 1883; 
married Dr. J. M. Kerchline, a practicing physician of Petersburg; 
children : Sarah Margaret ; Mary Louise ; Samuel Edward. 2. Samuel, 
born January 8, 1886; now a bookkeeper in Philadelphia; married Mary 
Magraw. 



The Fouse family, which is of German descent, have been 
FOUSE residents in the state of Pennsylvania for a number of 
generations, greatly to the benefit of the sections in which 
the various members of the family have resided. 

(I) Nicholas Fouse was the first of the family to come to America 
and resided at Morrisons Cove, Pennsylvania. He had a family of 
thirteen children, among them being Theobald, of whom further. 

(II) Rev. Theobald Fouse, son of Nicholas Fouse, was born in Mor- 
risons Cove, Pennsylvania. He was a minister of the Reformed church, 
and among the pastorates he held were the following: Marklesburg, 
Beavertown. Hickory Bottom, Millerstown Grove, Sharpsburg and Rus- 
sellville. He married Nancy Shontz, and had children: Adam, of whom 
further; Christian, who was a soldier in the civil war, serving at Nash- 
ville; John, who holds the same record as his brother; Elizabeth, de- 
ceased, married Anthony Shultz ; Catherine, married Samuel Grove ; 
Mary, deceased, married Benjamin Hoover; Benjamin, a soldier in 
the civil war; Rev. Dewalt, a minister of the Reformed church, now 
deceased ; Reuben, was a soldier in the civil war, fought at the battle 
of Fair Oaks, and died from the effects of that conflict; Frederick, 
same record as Reuben; Samuel, fought at Nashville, and is still living; 
and several children who died in infancy. Six brothers devoting their 
lives to the cause of patriotism is a record of which one may well feel 
proud. 

(III) Adam, son of Rev. Theobald and Nancy (Shontz) Fouse, 
was born in Blairs Cove, near Beavertown, Blair county, Pennsylvania, 
died in September, 1884, aged sixty years. He was apprenticed to learn 
the carpenter's trade, at which he worked in his native county. Re- 
moving to Huntingdon county, he purchased a tannery in Lincoln town- 
ship which he operated successfully for many years. Subsequently he 
purchased a farm of one hundred and sixty-five acres in the same town- 
ship, cultivated and improved this in every possible manner, and also 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1203 

raised fine breeds of cattle until a few years prior to his death. Active 
in the interests of the community as he was in his private affairs, Mr. 
Fouse exerted considerable influence in the local councils of the Repub- 
lican i^arty, and was elected county coinniissioner for Huntingdon county. 
He was a lifelong member of the Reformed church, in which he was 
an elder, and an ardent worker in the Sunday school as a teacher and 
superintendent. He was always a total abstainer from tobacco and 
liquor in any form. 

Mr. Fouse married, in Lincoln township, Margaret Jane, 
daughter of Jefferson Simonton, a farmer and tanner of that section. 
She was born June 6, 1832, and had brothers and sisters as follows: 
Mary Ann, married Joseph Hathaway ; Rebecca, married David Hatha- 
way; Martha, married Jacob Hoover; Catherine, married Isaac Latchall : 
Rachel, married John McGlochlan ; George Taylor, a promoter of gold 
mines in California: Jackson, draftsman in Altoona ; and five who died 
in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Fouse had children: Mary Anne, born May 
6, 1849, now deceased: Benjamin S., of whom further: William S., born 
June 6, 1853, married Martha J. Shell, and now lives in Entriken. 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania; Nancy, born July 7, 1855, married 
John Greaser, a farmer of Iowa, and has four daughters: Naomi, re- 
sides with her mother. 

(IV) Benjamin S., son of Adam and Margaret Jane (Simonton) 
Fouse, was born in Marklesburg, Pennsylvania, October 10, 185 1. He 
received his education in the public schools of Marklesburg, and upon 
its completion he was engaged in farming operations at Huntingdon, 
and on his own homestead until 1900. In 1902 he opened a meat market 
in partnership with \Valter Decker, and this has been increased in extent 
from time to time until at the present time (1913) the annual amount 
of business transacted is approximately twenty-five thousand dollars. 
Only the choicest wares of all kinds are handled, and their patronage 
extends over a large area. Mr. Fouse is an ardent Progressive Re- 
publican and has filled a number of local offices. His religious affilia- 
tions are with the Reformed church. 

Mr. Fouse married, October 24, 1876. Mary, daughter of Joseph and 
Martha (Grovel Knode. Having no children of their own, they de- 
voted their time and attention to the rearing and educating of two chil- 
dren, whom they took into their home, but did not adopt, namely : Ross 



I204 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Wicks, who after graduating from Juniata College studied for the min- 
istry of the Reformed church at Dayton, Ohio, and Norwalk, Connecti- 
cut, and is now preaching in the Congregational church, he married 
Florence Williamson and has one daughter, Catherine; Susan Starr, 
who graduated from the high school at the age of sixteen years. 



Angus Campbell, a member of the powerful Clan 
CAMPBELL Campbell, in the Highlands of Scotland, despairing 

of the cessation of the clan feuds so prevalent in 
Scotland among the diiTerent clans, left his native heath about 1640, by 
way of London, for the New World of America. He most probably 
landed in Virginia, as an Angus Campbell was among the emigrants who 
came to that colony in that year. Later, he, his son or grandson, as 
some authorities say that Angus Campbell lived and died in Virginia, 
moved to Pennsylvania. The Campbells were a brave, energetic, fiery 
and chivalrous race. In war they neither asked for nor gave quarter ; 
but a fallen or helpless foe was immune from their wrath or vengeance. 
They were loyal, patriotic, just and generous. Their name was synony- 
mous with honor. From such ancestry descends the Campbell family 
of Pennsylvania. 

(I) John Campbell was born in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, but 
early in life came to Center county as one of its first settlers. He 
descended from Angus Campbell, whose posterity came from Virginia 
to Philadelphia and there located. John Campbell had all of the reso- 
lute traits of his family. He took up wild land, cleared it of its enor- 
mous forest growth, which he burned, to secure enough land on which 
to sow grain. He succeeded in his venture and died a wealthy and 
influential man. Among his children was James Watson, of whom 
further. 

(II) James Watson Campbell, son of John Campbell, the pio- 
neer of Center county, was born in Center county, and there grew to 
manhood. When a young man he learned surveying and did all of the 
surveying for the farmers in that part of the state for years. He finally 
located on a farm, where he prospered. At the time of his death he 
was the owner of three large tracts of land, all of them under cultiva- 
tion. With the rest of his generation he was a member of the Presby- 
terian church, an inheritance from their Scotch ancestry. He married 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1205 

Mary Pennington, descended from English forbears, born in Center 
county, at Potter's Mill. Children: 1. Henry Clay, of whom further. 
2. John, a soldier in the civil war, enlisted from Pennsylvania; killed in 
the battle of the Wilderness. 3. Isaac, deceased ; an attorney of Wichita, 
Kansas. 4. Robert, deceased, a Methodist Episcopal minister. 5. 
Washington, a farmer in Harper county, Kansas. 6. Margaret, mar- 
ried J. B. Williams, of Tyrone, Pennsylvania. 7. Mary, married H. 
J. Proffit, resides in Tyrone, Pennsylvania. 8. Eliza, deceased. 

(Ill) Henry Clay Campbell, son of James Watson and Mary (Pen- 
nington) Campbell, was born in Center county, Pennsylvania, June 21, 
1842, and died in 1904. He arrived at man's estate in the county of his 
nativity. He was reared on the farm and educated in the public schools. 
He early entered into the business of tilling the soil, and through energy 
and acute judgment was immediately successful. After a busy life de- 
voted to his farms he retired in his later years from active participation 
in the afYairs of life and moved to State College, Pennsylvania. He 
was a Republican and served as county commissioner. He was a director 
in the Center Hall Fire Insurance Company and took an active part 
in its management. He enlisted in Company C, 4Sth Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry, and served three years during the civil war. He 
was wounded twice, at the battles of Spottsylvania and Chancellors- 
ville. At the latter place he was shot in the small of the back, and the 
wound gave him trouble the rest of his life. He was an exceedingly 
stout man for his height, which was medium, but was persistently in- 
dustrious despite this handicap. He was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, giving it his support, financially and morally- He 
was a patriotic and loyal citizen, a fine example to the youth of his 
countv, and a good neighbor. He married Jane Anne Bailey, born in 
1842, in Center county, died in 1907, daughter of John and Nancy (Go- 
heen) Bailey, he of English-Scotch extraction, and a well-to-do farmer 
in Center county. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Bailey: Armstrong and 
Joseph, who both served in the 45th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry in 
civil war: John: William: Scott; Samuel: Warren; Washington; Jane 
Anne, married Henry Clay Campbell ; Esther, married Ross Gregory, a 
wealthy farmer of West township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania : 
Mary, now Mrs. Huitt, of Kansas City, Kansas. Children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Campbell: i. John Bailey, of whom further. 2. Milo, resides 



i2o6 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

on old homestead in Center county. 3. Nannie, married H. D. Meek, of 
State College, Pennsylvania. 4. Mary, married J. H. Musser, of State 
College, Pennsylvania. 5. Henry C, a physician in Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. 6. Robert, owner of Penn's Cave in Center county. 7. 
Esther, married Don Devor, of Lansing, Michigan. 8. Margaret, mar- 
ried Harry Koch, an undertaker in State College, Pennsylvania. 

(IV) John Bailey Campbell, son of Henry Clay and Jane Anne 
(Bailey) Campbell, was born November 25, 1868, in Ferguson township. 
Center county, Pennsylvania. He grew up on the farm, attended the 
common schools, and then took an agricultural course at State College. 
Leaving school he taught for two years, after which he entered the 
Eastman Business College at Poughkeepsie, New York, and took a 
business course. For a couple of years thereafter he was bookkeeper 
for A. G. Morse at Tyrone, Pennsylvania, after which time he was 
bookkeeper for four or five years in Pittsburgh. In 1904 he purchased 
three hundred acres in Warriors Mark township, Huntingdon county, 
one mile from the city of Tyrone, and since that time has successfully 
devoted himself to farming and dairying. He has a handsome, com- 
modious and comfortable home in Tyrone, where he dwells in the 
winter in order to afford his children the best educational advantages 
possible. He has built for himself a picturesque bungalow on the apex 
of a hill overlooking his estate, known as "Highland Farm," and here 
resides in the summer, where his children may have pure air to breathe 
and lead a free and untrammelled life in the open. His is one of the 
model farms in the county, and in it he takes the greatest interest and 
pride, managing it to the best advantage. He conducts the best equipped 
dairy that daily supplies Tyrone with the greater part of its milk. To 
furnish the milk a large herd of cows, of a superior stock, is kept, as 
well as other cattle and farm animals. He and his wife are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church of Tyrone. In politics he is a 
Progressive Republican, works for and uses his influence for the party, 
and has been on the board of health of Tyrone. He is a man of superior 
intelligence, with a liberal education, is broadminded and generous. He 
leads a strenuous life, partly because of his live-wire energy, and partlv 
because his large interests demand it. He is a devoted and judicious 
father, a true friend and an untiring worker for the principles he deems 
right. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1207 

He married, October 25, 1899, l^rucie W'aile, born in Huntingdon 
county, a member of an old family in Pennsylvania, and a sister of 
Mrs. Frank Leon Peck, mentioned elsewhere. Children: Richard, 
born November 19, 1900; Fred, December 27, 1905; Margaret, Decem- 
ber 26, 1908. 



This branch of the Smith family is of German ancestry and 
SMITH early settled in Huntingdon county. The first record is of 

Levi Smith. He married Mary Pheasant, daughter of 
Samuel I'heasant, of German descent, who came from Maryland, set- 
tling on a farm of sixty acres in Trough Creek Valley, Cass township, 
Fluntingdon county, and he married (first) Annie Saylor, and their first 
child, ]\Iary, became the wife of Levi Smith. They settled in Union 
township, Huntingdon county, where he became a prosperous farmer 
and prominent in township public life, holding several public offices, 
including that of school director. He was a Whig in politics, later a Re- 
publican. He was a faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
was a class leader and superintendent of the Sunday-school, and a man 
of most excellent standing in the community. He died in L^nion town- 
ship in 1873. the result of an accident. Mary (Pheasant) Smith, his 
wife, survived him for several years. Children: Samuel P., of further 
mention; George; Annie; Rosa E. ; John P.; Mary; Isaac; James; Eliza- 
beth; Abraham, a soldier in the Union army, killed at the battle of the 
Wilderness; David, Miles and Leonard. 

(II) Samuel P., eldest son of Levi and Mary (Pheasant) Smith, 
was Iwrn in Union township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, Sep- 
tember 3, 1832. He was educated in the public schools and at Cassville 
Seminary, and for several years taught in the public schools. He fol- 
lowed the occupation of his father and became a successful farmer, 
owning one hundred and twenty acres of highly improved land, located 
in Union township, on which he resided until 1892. He then sold his 
property and moved to Brady township, there purchasing a farm of 
three hundred and twenty acres which he improved with good build- 
ings. He continued in the active management of his estate until aliout 
1908, although not by any means incapable of attending to his affairs. 
He held the full confidence of his community and was elevated to many 
positions of trust by the votes of his fellow men. He served in all 



i2o8 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

township offices; was justice of the peace for Union township; was 
elected to the same position in Brady township; and in 1881 was elected 
commissioner of Huntingdon county. He was scrupulously upright in 
his management of public affairs, making an honorable official record 
in keeping with his private character. He is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, having been active in all its affairs during his younger 
years. In political faith he is a Republican. He married, in Union 
township, Catherine, daughter of David and Isabella (Wright) Swope, 
of German descent. David Swope was a well-known farmer of Union 
township, a large land owner, and member of the Baptist church. Chil- 
dren of Samuel and Catherine Smith : Ralph P., born September 7, 
1854, married Amanda Fisher; Isabella, married Madison Swope; Jen- 
nie, married James Kidder; Josephine, married Milton Myerly; Har- 
rison, sheriff of Huntingdon county, married May Snowden; Clara, 
married Howard Laird; Samuel, a farmer of Union township; Julia, 
married Charles Straitiff; and Edgar Monroe. 

(Ill) Edgar Monroe, youngest child of Samuel P. and Catherine 
(Swope) Smith, was born in L'nion township, Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania, February 6, 1875. He grew to manhood on the home 
farm, was educated in the public schools, and has always devoted him- 
self to agricultural pursuits. He farmed the homestead acres, lived 
for a time in the Big Valley, Mifflin county, then returned to Hunting- 
don county, purchasing one hundred and thirty acres near Alexandria 
on which he now resides. His farm is a well improved, fertile tract, 
and shows the result of skillful management. Mr. Smith is an inde- 
pendent Republican. He married in 1895, Rebecca, daughter of James 
Huey. Children: Mary A.; Cora M. ; Nora, deceased; Edna J., and 
Samuel H. 



Oliver Scott Rumberger, of Huntingdon county, 
RUMBERGER Pennsylvania, descends from German stock that 
w'as transplanted to American soil immediately be- 
fore the revolutionary war. The immigrant forbear settled in Penn- 
sylvania, and there finished his life. His descendants are widely scat- 
tered over the state. One or more of them were soldiers in the war of 
1812, while the family was largely represented in the civil war. 

(I) George Rumberger moved from the southeastern part of Penn- 




(y ^d f'fu^^^J-e7^(e^ 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1209 

sylvania to Huntingdon county in the early part of 1808, and settled in 
what is now Warrior's Mark township. He worked as a farm laborer 
for Mr. Nearhoof, and as the latter was unable to pay him cash for 
his services he made a deed to him of wild land north of the village of 
Warrior's Mark. This he cleared, put u[> h>y^ buildings, dwelling house 
and barns, lived for many years on it and finally died an old man in 
1845. He and his family were members of the Lutheran church, and 
lived (|uiet, miostentatious lives. 1 le married Catherine Rider, daugh- 
ter of a neighboring farmer. Children: 1. John, lived and died on the 
original homestead. 2. Elizabeth, married John Krider of Lebanon, 
lived and died in Center county, Pennsylvania. 3. George, of whom 
further. 4. Nancy, married Henry Bratton, lived and died in Warrior's 
Mark township. 5. Mary, died, unmarried, in 1898. 

(II) George Rumberger, son of George and Catherine (Rider) 
Rumberger, was born in Warrior's Mark township in 1812. He re- 
ceived his education in the common schools, and lived on the home- 
stead, and there died. He and his wife were standing under a large 
willow tree in the yard, in 1850. when a bolt of lightning struck the tree 
and killed them both. He was an ardent W'hig, and he and his wife 
were members of the Lutheran church. He married Margaret Leathers, 
born in 1820, in Center county, Pennsylvania. Children: i. Oliver 
Scott, of whom further. 2. George, lives in Putnam county, Indiana: 
was a soldier in the civil war, a member of the Fifth Pennsylvania Re- 
serves. 3. John H., died in 1866 from efTects of imprisonment in 
Andersonville: member of 148th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regi- 
ment. 4. Samuel, member of Company H, iioth Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteer Infantry Regiment: died three months after enlistment. 5. Cath- 
erine, unmarried, lives in Mifllin county, Pennsylvania. 

(III) Oliver Scott Rumberger, son of George and Margaret 
(Leathers) Rumberger, was born February j8, 1840. near the village of 
Warrior's Mark, Warrior's Mark township, Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania. He received only a meagre education in the common schools 
of the township, and at the age of ten years, after both parents were 
killed at once and the same time ])y a bolt of lightning, he was placed 
among strangers. In 1857 he liegan to learn the carpenter's trade with 
Jacob Rider, and worked for him until 1861, when, at the call for vol- 
unteers from Pennsvlvania. he enlisted, .August, 1861, in Company D, 



I2IO HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

49th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment, and served in this 
company until March, 1864. He was transferred at that time to Com- 
pany H, of the same regiment, having been promoted to the captaincy 
by slow steps, beginning in March, 1863. He was mustered out in 
June, 1865, as captain of his company. He was wounded May 10, 
1864, at Spottsylvania Court House, in the breast. Some of the bat- 
tles in which he participated were Yorktown, Williamsburg, Malvern 
Hill, Antietam, Fredericksburg, first and second battles; Gettysburg, 
Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Weldon Railroad, Petersburg, 
twice; Winchester; during them all he conducted himself with valor 
and exceeding daring. He returned after the war to Huntingdon county 
and for years conducted a carpenter's shop. He purchased iifty-three 
acres of land in the meantime, where he farmed in a small way but with 
profit. In 1897 he was appointed postmaster at Warrior's Mark and 
continued in that position until 1913, a period of sixteen years, during 
which time he saw his office grow from fourth to third class. He ran 
two rural routes successfully, establishing same on a business basis. 
He is a staunch Republican, and has held many offices of public trust, 
among them being that of township auditor, school director and tax 
assessor for six years. Than Mr. Rumberger no one stands higher 
in the regard of the township. He commands the esteem and respect of 
his fellow citizens, irrespective of political affiliations. He, with his 
wife, is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He belongs to 
the Union Veteran Legion. 

During the civil war, on one of his infrequent furloughs home, he 
married, January 21, 1864, Nancy Elvira Rider, born July 31, 1842, in 
Warrior's Mark, a daughter of Jacob and Maria (Hyskell) Rider. 
Jacob Rider was born in Lebanon county, Pennsylvania, and died in 
Huntingdon county, February, 1887. He was brought by his father, 
John Rider, to Huntingdon county, when quite young. After his mar- 
riage to Maria Hyskell, born in Warrior's Mark township, and died 
there December 25, 1887, he settled in Warrior's Mark, in a home that 
he had already erected. He was a carpenter and builder, and left as 
his monuments many of the handsomest and most substantial public 
and private buildings in Huntingdon county. Both he and his wife 
were members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and were active in 
their work for it. Children of Oliver Scott and Nancy Elvira (Rider) 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 121 1 

Kumberger: 1. Zula, born October 13, 1865; married Frank Lehman, 
a farmer in Warrior's Mark township; children: Frances, Pauline. 
2. George Edwin, born April i, 1870; a farmer living on home place; 
married Luella Wilson; children: Ethel, Lee, Alnieda, Verna. 3. Ada 
Virginia, born July 8, 1872; married Hays Wills, of Warrior's Mark 
township; children: Helen Dorothy, Mildred, Lorena, George Oliver. 
4. Margaret, born November 27, 1880; married Nevin M. Miller, a 
coal and fuel dealer of Tyrone, Pennsylvania; one son, Kenneth. 



This branch of the Johnston family descends from a 
JOHNSTON Scotch ancestor who came to America at an early day, 

settling in Shavers Creek Valley, Huntingdon county. 
He there became owner of considerable land and reared a large family, 
two of his sons succeeding to the ownership of the home farm. His 
son, William Johnston, was born in Shavers Creek Valley, but moved 
to Hart's Log Valley when a young man and lived there the remainder 
of his life. He married Elizabeth Caldwell, and of his large family 
only one survives, James Wilson Johnston, a physician living in north- 
ern Missouri. Elizabeth Caldwell, called Betsey in the family Bible, 
was born on her father's farm, in what is now Porter township, Hunt- 
ingdon county, May 4, 1796, and was married to William Johnston, 
March 3, 1814. Children: i. William Bruce, of whom further. 2. 
David, moved to Benton, Marion county, Missouri. 3. James Wilson, 
a physician, previously referred to. 4. Thomas, settled in Kingston, 
Caldwell county, Missouri. 5. Samuel, settled near his brother Thomas. 
6. John D., died in Shavers Creek Valley, in 1881. 7. Elizabeth, mar- 
ried, July 4, 1849, George Borst, of Shavers Creek Valley, who died 
in 1858; she died July 12, 1880, leaving two children — Mollie E., and 
George C. 8. Sarah, never married. 9. Mary Ann, married Joseph 
Robinson, of Blair county; she died in November, 1881, leaving chil- 
dren: James, Charlotte and Estelle. 10. Rebecca, married Robert 
Caldwell, of Beaver county; children: Harriet, Elizabeth, Sarah. 
Minerva, Samuel. William, James, Calvin and Robert. 

Elizabeth (Caldwell) Johnston was a daughter of Major David Cald- 
vuell, and a granddaughter of Robert Caldwell, born in county Derry, 
Ireland, of Scotch parents. He came to America with his brother 
Charles in early manhood, settling first near Greencastle, Pennsylvania. 



I2I2 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

In 1/54 they explored the tq^per Juniata Valley, selecting homes for 
themselves in what is now Porter township, Huntingdon county. In 
1755 they brought their families and made settlement in what is now 
Hart's Log Valley, where they remained unmolested until 1778, when 
Indian troubles began. Robert settled on the Little Juniata, near where 
the Barre Iron Works were afterwards built. He was on friendly 
terms with the Indians, who always gave him warning of approaching 
danger, allowing him time to prepare therefor or to flee to the nearest 
fort. He died in the fall of 1799, and is buried in the Hart's Log grave- 
yard, near Alexandria. He left three sons — David, William and Sam- 
uel; also five daughters. David Caldwell, known as Major David, was 
born May 8, 1762, died April 28, 1813. He married Rebecca, daughter 
of Matthew Dean, of Canoe Valley, January 13, 1789. She was one of 
the four children of Matthew Dean who were with him in the cornfield 
at the time when his wife and the rest of the family were killed by the 
Indians in 1780, at the home farm. David was a major of militia, and 
elder of Hart's Log Presbyterian church. He had twelve children, 
of whom Betsey (Elizabeth) was the eldest daughter and fifth child. 
She married, as previously stated, William Johnston. 

(Ill) WiUiam Bruce, son of William and Elizabeth (Caldwell) 
Johnston, was born in Huntingdon county, in 1816, died in 1886. He 
became a farmer, and soon after his marriage settled on the farm in 
Franklin township, on which his son, William Hunter Johnston, re- 
sides, and there lived until his death. In 1851 he built the present dwell- 
ing of his son, and there lived in comfort and prosperity for twenty- 
eight years. He was a Republican in politics, and both he and his wife 
were members of the Presbyterian church, which he served for many 
years as elder. Mr. Johnston was noted in his neighborhood for his 
devotion to his religious duties, his honest truthfulness, and sturdy 
uprightness of character. He married Sarah Ann Montgomery, born 
in Chester county, Pennsylvania, in 1814, coming to Chester county 
with her parents when a child. She was a great-granddaughter of Wil- 
liam Montgomery, born in Ireland, who settled in Maryland, coming to 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, about 1792, spending his latter days 
there with his son Charles. Charles Montgomery was born in Mary- 
land, where he grew to manhood, coming to Pennsylvania with the 
Matterns and other early settlers of the county of Huntingdon. He 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1213 

took up land, built a log cabin, and there lived for some time, but later 
moved to Chester county, pioneer life bccominji^ too strenuous. He 
afterward returned to Huntingdon county, where he died. He is buried 
in the Presbyterian cemetery at Graysville, beside his father, William 
Montgomery. Thomas, son of Charles Montgomery, was born in Mary- 
land, in 1780, and was twelve years of age when brought to Huntingdon 
county by his parents, where he died in 1847. He was a surveyor and 
a farmer, prominent in the county, holding the rank of majur in the 
militia. He, too, is buried in the Graysville cemetery. He married a Miss 
Hunter, who bore him three children: Sarah Ann. married William 
Bruce Johnston, of previous mention; Jane IL, married Joseph Long, 
and died in Chester, Pennsylvania ; Elizabeth, died aged about twenty 
years. Children of William Bruce and Sarah Ann Johnston: i. Thom- 
as, a veteran of the civil war; lived in Kansas, died at tlie Home in 1884; 
he married Jennie Eurguson. and had four sons, Harr)-, John. Howard 
and Bruce. 2. Caroline, twin of Thomas; now resides in the Ozark 
mountain region of Missouri; unmarried. 3. William Plunter, of wh(jm 
further. 4. Elizabeth, residing with her sister Caroline, in ^Missouri. 

(IV) William Hunter, son of William Bruce and Sarah Ann 
(Montgomery) Johnston, was born in Franklin township, Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, February 23, 1848. He was educated in the 
public schools, finishing his studies at Airy View Academy. He re- 
mained on the home farm imtil he was si.xteen years of age, then be- 
coming a teamster, driving a six-horse team, hauling logs and lumber. 
Until he was twenty years of age he continued teaming, but during 
that period attended the acadeni}'. In 1870 he settled on a farm owned 
by his father in \'irginia, where he married and remained for six 
years. In the spring of 1877 he returned home and for three years 
cultivated rented farms in the township. In 1884 he became manager 
of the home farm, and on his father's death bnught out the other 
heirs and became sole owner of the homestead, now a farm of two 
hundred and fifty-six acres, one hundred and twenty-five of which is 
under cultivation. He has prospered in his undertakings and is one 
of the substantial farmers of his township. He has held several local 
ofifices, and from 1898 to 1901 was a commissioner of Huntingdon 
county, elected as a Republican. Both he and his wife are members 
of the Presbvterian church. 



I2I4 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

He married, in 1872, Susan Foster, born in Charlotte county, Vir- 
ginia, daughter of Wilham Gideon Foster. Children: i. Charles 
Bruce, his father's assistant on the farm. 2. Kate Stuart, married 
Louis D. Gensimore, and resides near Birmingham, Huntingdon county. 
3. Mary Wright, married William K. Prestle, and resides in Pitcairn, 
Pennsylvania. 4. Edwin M., a farmer near Bellwood, Pennsylvania; 
married Martha Everhart. 5. Sarah, residing at home. 6. Fanny Fos- 
ter, died aged eight years. 7. Jennie Jackson, formerly a teacher ; mar- 
ried George G. Shultz, July 30, 191 3. 8. Margaret. 9. Susan Foster, a 
teacher. 10. Anna Moore, a teacher. 11. William Vaughan. 



J. Price Wertz, a prominent business man of Lewistown, 
WERTZ Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, is descended from a family 

which came to this country from Germany, in the early 
part of the eighteenth century, the members of which have borne their 
share bravely and nobly in working for the welfare of the country of 
their adoption. 

(I) Daniel Wertz, a native of Germany, who had resided in Eng- 
land for a time, emigrated to America and settled near Landisburg, 
Perry county, Pennsylvania. He was a farmer by occupation, and 
became a man of influence in the community in which he resided. 

(II) James, son of Daniel Wertz, settled with his parents at Landis- 
burg. He was a carpenter by trade, and died at the age of eighty-six 
years ; his wife died a few years later. 

(III) Peter, son of James Wertz, was born in Adams county, Penn- 
sylvania. He settled in Spring township, where he had purchased a 
farm which he cultivated until his death. He also followed the occupa- 
tions of a carpenter and a butcher. He married Mary Foose and had 
children: Peter, Margaret, Elizabeth, Catherine, Pollie, David, Henry, 
Mollie ; John, see forward ; Daniel, Sarah, Annie, Abraham and Isabel. 
He and his wife were members of the Lutheran church. 

(IV) John, son of Peter and Mary (Mollie) (Foose) Wertz, was 
born at Newport, Perry county, Pennsylvania, April 24, 1819. His 
opportunities for securing a good education were limited. When he was 
twenty years of age he attended a subscription school at Little Germany, 
paying for this tuition himself. He was but a very young lad when 
he drove a cart in the ore banks of his father, and at the age of sixteen 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 12 15 

years he was apprenticed to learn the trade of shoemaking. This class 
of work was never to his liking, and at the age of nineteen years he ran 
away from home, his entire capital consisting of nineteen cents. Going 
to Mount Arabella Furnace, he found employment there, being engaged 
in chopping wood for a period of six months. One season was spent as 
the driver of a team on the canal, after which he went to Newport and 
made an arrangement with a Mr. Foster to learn carpentry, his wages to 
be six dollars per month. His next engagement was with a Mr. Beatty, 
from whom he received thirteen dollars per month, working as a car- 
penter on the canal, and in 1838, having heard that John Musser, of 
Lewistown, was in need of carpenters, he engaged to work one week 
on trial for that gentleman. So satisfactory was his work that he was 
at once engaged at a salary of twenty dollars per month, and remained 
with him for nine months. For some years he was then employed in 
the boat yard at Lewistown for various people, and, in 1850, he assisted 
in constructing the bridge across the Juniata river. In the same year he 
went to Illinois, and for almost half a year was at work on the Burling- 
ton & Peoria railroad. He then returned to Newport, where he worked 
at house carpentry during the summer and on the canal in the winter. 
Farming then engaged his attention for a time, and he became the owner 
of a farm which he subsequently sold. He built the home, which he 
later occupied with his family, in 1884, and in 1885 opened the store 
which he con<lucted for a number of years. He was a strong supporter 
of the Democratic party, and an advocate of free silver. He was a mem- 
ber of the Lutheran church, of which he was a regular attendant. 

Mr. Wertz married (first) December 22, 1842, Mary, born in Perry 
countv, Pennsvlvania, 1824, died in 1886, daughter of Abraham Frye, 
of Tyrone, Blair county, Pennsylvania. He married (second) Mrs. 
Catherine Zimmerman, a widow. Children, all by the first marriage: 
I. William, see forward. 2. Mary Jane, born March 31, 1845; married 
Perry Rider, and resides in Newport, Pennsylvania. 3. Catherine, born 
December 11, 1846; married John Barrick, of Newport, Pennsylvania. 
4. Mary Ellen, born September 29, 1847, died young. 5. Emma Re- 
becca, born September 9, 1849; married Joseph Murphy, of Miller town- 
•ship. Perry county, Pennsylvania. 6. Martha Eve, born June 15, 1853, 
died at the age of twenty years. 7. John, bom June 17, 1856, resides in 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 8. Margaret, twin of John : married John 



12 16 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Haines, of Altoona, Pennsylvania. 9. Peter, born November 13, 1858, 
resides at Newport, Pennsylvania. 10. Charles, born June 4, i860, is a 
farmer in Iowa. 11. James, born December 26, 1863, is a farmer in 
Dakota. 

(V) William, son of John and Mary (Frye) Wertz, was born at 
Lewistown, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, October 31, 1843. When he 
was four years of age his parents removed to Ickesburg, Pennsylvania, 
and he has a faint recollection of the flood of 1847; later the family 
moved to Newport. The common schools of Newport furnished his 
education until the age of nine years, when he commenced the serious 
business of life as a driver of mules on the tow path. So small was he 
at this time that he was obliged to take the mules to a fence in order to 
mount them. He was thus employed until he was old enough to take 
charge of a boat. He enlisted for a period of nine months, at Newport, 
Pennsylvania, August 9, 1862, becoming a private in Company I, 133d 
Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was sent to the front with his 
regiment and participated in the battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellors- 
ville and Antietam. He was honorably discharged at the expiration of 
his term of service, May 28, 1863, and returned to his home. In Septem- 
ber, 1863, he purchased an interest in the boat "Abraham Collins," of 
which, with its team of five mules, he had sole charge, day and night, 
until early in 1865. In the summer of 1864 he also had charge of an- 
other boat, the "Lizzie Dugan," for A. Collins, of Falmouth. He 
became the sole proprietor and manager, in 1865, of the boat "Parish 
No. 35." He added to his fleet of boats by purchase, from time to time, 
until it numbered nine. They plied between Nanticoke, Baltimore. New 
York and Philadelphia. Two trips were made to Lake Champlain and 
Fort Henry, which consumed one month and five days, and netted the 
(at that time) large sum of three hundred dollars. Mr. Wertz was 
actively engaged in the boating business until 1892, when his other busi- 
ness interests consuming the greater part of his time, he sold all his 
boats with the exception of five. He became a stockholder in the People's 
Bank of Newport, upon the organization of that institution, and filled 
the office of director for a period of seventeen years. When the bank 
was reorganized, becoming the National Bank, he was also a stockholder 
and director, an office he is still holding. He resided in Oliver township 
until his removal, in 1884, to Newport, where he had purchased a resi- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1217 

dence which he lias occupied since tliat time. lie has filled several town- 
ship offices as a representative of the Democratic party, and was a sup- 
porter of the free silver movement. He served several terms as a dea- 
con of the Zion Lutheran Church, and has been a member of its Sab- 
hath school throughout his life. He is a member and past commander 
of Lieutenant Arnold Lobaugh Post, No. 297, Grand Army of the Re- 
public. 

Mr. Wertz married, August 12, 1863, Catherine, daughter of the 
Rev. Samuel Glaze, who was killed on the railroad crossing at Newport, 
Pennsylvania. Children: i. Margaret W., married Silas J. Clark, of 
Newport, Pennsylvania. 2. William Henry, a coal operator at Houtz- 
dale, Pennsylvania; married Cora Noll, of Newport, Pennsylvania. 3. 
Carrie Letitia, married Harry B. Miller, and removed to Pendleton, Ore- 
gon, in 1895. 4. Laura Myrtle, married Herman E. Snyder, of Harris- 
burg, Pennsylvania. 5. An infant, deceased. 6. J. Price, see forward. 
7. Victor Haldeman. 8. Fannie Eleanor. 

(VI) J. Price, son of \\^illiam and Catherine (Glaze) Wertz, was 
born in Perry county, Pennsylvania, November 2, 1875. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools of his district, where he proved himself an 
apt and studious pupil. At a suitable age he engaged in business, and 
after a variety of experiences established himself in the laundry business 
in 1902, on South Main street, where the old brewery was formerly 
located. In 1906 he removed to No. 127 South Main street, where his 
business is conducted at the present time ; he has since bought the entire 
property. In 1909 he commenced the manufacture of shirts, in which 
line of industry he has achieved an undeniable success. He has seventy- 
five people in his employ, and everything is done which can tend toward 
the comfort of his employees or facilitate the work. Like his ancestors 
in this country, Mr. Wertz is a staunch supporter of Democratic prin- 
ciples, and he is a member of the following organizations, all of Lewis- 
town : Independent Order of Odd Fellows; Patriotic Order Sons of 
America, and Knights of Pythias. 

Mr. Wertz married, at Donnally Mills, in 1893, Ada, daughter of 
Isaac Barratt, a farmer of Donnally Mills, Pennsylvania. They have 
had children: An infant, deceased; Esther Hazel, William Barratt, 
Amanda Ethel. John Paul, Robert Barnett, Jacob Edward. 



I2i8 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

The Ingrams of this record came to Huntingdon county 
INGRAM from Washington county, Maryland, where John Ingram, 
a farmer, Hved and died, leaving issue. 

(II) William, son of John Ingram, was born in Washington county, 
Maryland, there grew to manhood and married. Later he settled in 
Huntingdon county on a tract of land in Franklin township, yet known 
as the Ingram homestead. The original tract contained between six 
hundred and seven hundred acres which, ere he died, William Ingram 
largely cleared and improved. He married Mary Johnson, born in Han- 
cock county, Maryland, a distant relative of President Andrew Johnson. 

(III) John, son of William and Mary (Johnson) Ingram, was born 
in Franklin township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, in 1805, died 
at the Ingram homestead in 1874. He inherited the homestead and on it 
built houses and barns, still standing and in use. He was a Democrat 
in politics and both he and his wife were members of the Presbyterian 
church. He married Mary Ann McCartney, born in Franklin township, 
1813, died in 1884, daughter of Robert and Nancy (Orr) McCartney. 
Nancy Orr's grandparents were early settlers and were captured by In- 
dians on one of their raids. Robert McCartney was born in Scotland, 
coming when young to the United States, settling in Franklin township, 
Huntingdon county, where he owned and cultivated a farm of three hun- 
dred acres. He was drowned in the Juniata river in 1813, his widow 
never remarrying. He left two children, Elizabeth, who died unmar- 
ried, and Mary Ann, wife of John Ingram, mentioned above. Children 
of John Ingram: i. Elizabeth, married Robert B. Brown and died in 
Clarion county, Pennsylvania. 2. Amelia, married J. C. Bailey and died 
in Kansas. 3. Robert, died in Huntingdon county, aged thirty-four 
years. 4. Lavina, died unmarried, aged forty-eight years. 5. Denton, 
died in Huntingdon county, a farmer. 6. Nannie Orr, now residing 
with her brother, J. A\'arren Ingram. 7. Ella, died aged nineteen years. 
8. J. Warren, of whom further. 

(IV) J. Warren, youngest child of John and Mary Ann (McCart- 
ney) Ingram, was born in Spruce Creek valley, Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania, June 13, 1854. He was educated in the public schools 
and Pittsbursfh Business College, graduating from the latter in 1870. 



'& 



He remained on the home farm as his father's managing assistant until 
the death of the latter, then bought out the interest of the other heirs 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1219 

in one lunulrcd and eiglity acres, wliicli he eullivated until i^ii. spe- 
cializing in the breeding of Hereford cattle, lierkshire hogs and Shrop- 
shire sheep. He was a successful stock breeder and fanner, but in 191 1 
retired from the farm, moving to Spruce Creek, where he now resides. 
He was one of the organizers of the Grange Trust Company, of Hunt- 
ingdon, which he has served as director from its beginning. He is a 
Democrat in politics, but he never sought or accepted public office. Both 
he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Ingram married, in December, 1894, Elizabeth, daughter of 
Albert Wilson, of Blair county, Pennsylvania. They have no issue. 



The founder of this branch of the Hazlett family in 

HAZLETT Pennsylvania was Joseph Hazlett, who was born in 

Ireland. \M:en a young man he came to the United 

States with his two brothers, settling in Pennsylvania. He married and 

left issue. 

(II) William, son of Joseph Hazlett, the emigrant, was born in 
Pennsylvania in 1782, died March 14, 1843. He was one of the early 
settlers in the Kishaco(]uillas valley, Mifliin county, where he was a 
large landowner and prosperous farmer. Both he and his wife were 
members of the Presbyterian church and active workers. He married 
Ann Wilson. Children: i. Margaret, born 1808, died 1859: married 
James R. McDowell. 2. Sarah, born 18 10, married John McDowell. 
3. Joseph, bom June 10, 1812. died August 23, 1820. 4. Rev. John, 
born 1815: was a minister of the Presbyterian church and principal of 
a seminary near Pittsburgh ; married Margaret McCurdy. 5. William 
Wilson, of whom further. 6. Anna, born in 1820, married John Huey. 
7. Maria, twin of Anna, married a Mr. Fleming. 8. Ephraim, born 
April 15, 1822, died 1889; married Louisa Metz. 9. Rev. Silas, born 
1824, the only survivor; is now living at Lake City, Minnesota, a re- 
tired minister of the Presbyterian church; married Eliza Jane Patton. 
10. Jane, born February 14, 1829, died in October, 1845. 11. Emme- 
line, born 183 1, married Henry Steeley and died in the west. 

(III) William Wilson, son of William and Ann (Wilson) Hazlett, 
was born in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, August i, 1817, died Novem- 
ber 25, 1856. at his farm in Allensville. He was a farmer all his life, 
first at the home farm and after marriage, at Allensville, where he 



I220 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

owned a large and fertile farm. He was a Democrat in politics, and a 
member of the Presbyterian church; his wife of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. He married, February 22, 1853, Margaretta Garver, born 
at Manor Hill, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, November 28, 1832, 
died January 28, 1864, daughter of John R. and Elizabeth Garver, old 
residents of Manor Hill, but both born in Mifflin county. He was a 
blacksmith by trade and father of a large family. Mrs. Hazlett sur- 
vived her husband and married (second) Nicholas C. Decker. Children 
of William Wilson Hazlett: William Wilson (2), of whom further; 
John Charles, of whom further. 

(IV) William Wilson (2), eldest son of William Wilson (i) and 
Margaretta (Garver) Hazlett, was born at Allensville, Mifflin county, 
Pennsylvania, April 6, 1854. He was educated in the public schools and 
Kishacoquillas Seminary. He grew to manhood at the home farm and 
in 1880 formed a partnership with his brother, opening a clothing store 
on Penn street, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, trading as Hazlett Brothers. 
The firm continued in successful business until 1898, when they dis- 
solved, John C. Hazlett retiring, William W. continuing the clothing 
and gentlemen's furnishing business at the old stand. The business has 
always been a prosperous one and is firmly established in public favor. 
Mr. Hazlett is a Republican in politics and a member of the Presby- 
terian church. He is prominent in the Masonic order, belonging to 
Mount Moriah Lodge, No. 300, Free and Accepted Masons ; Standing 
Stone Chapter, No. 201, Royal Arch Masons; Huntingdon Comman- 
dery. No. 65, Knights Templar, and Harrisburg Consistory, Ancient 
Accepted Scottish Rite, thirty-second degree. He also belongs to Jaffa 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, at Altoona, 
Pennsylvania. 

(IV) John Charles, youngest son of William Wilson (i) and Mar- 
garetta (Garver) Hazlett, was born in Allensville, Mifflin county, Penn- 
sylvania, November 20, 1855. He was educated in the public school, 
Kishacoquillas Seminary and a private school at Manor Hill. He grew 
up on the home farm, but in 1880 engaged in the clothing business in 
Huntingdon with his brother, their store being located on Penn street, 
where for eighteen years they conducted a successful business as Hazlett 
Brothers. In 1898 they dissolved, John C. retiring and establishing an 
exclusive shoe store at No. 402 Penn street, where he conducts a pros- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1221 

perous business. He was one of the organizers of the Union National 
Bank of Huntingdon; has been a director since its organization, and 
since about 1908 its honored president. He is a Republican in politics, 
but has never accepted public office. In religious faith he and his wife 
are members of the Baptist church. He is prominent in the Masonic 
order, belonging to Mount Moriah Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; 
Standing Stone Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Huntingdon Comman- 
dery, Knights Templar, and Harrisburg Consistory, Ancient Accepted 
Scottish Rite, thirty-second degree. He also belongs to Jafifa Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, at Altoona. 

Mr. Hazlett married, January 20, 1885, Mabel E. Howe, born in 
Allegany county. New York. Children: i. Cloyd A., born August 7, 
1896; now associated in business with his father; married Glennie Au- 
gusta French, of Warsaw, New York, and has a son, William Whitney 
Hazlett. 2. Jay William, born August 10, 1891 ; now in the clothing 
business in Huntingdon ; married Margaretta Bayer. 3. Sylvia Jane, 
born November 15, 1892; a student at Washington College, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 



The ancestors of the Schweyer family of Juniata 
SCHWEYER county, Pennsylvania, were residents in Pomerania, 

Europe, as early as the twelfth century. Two 
brothers, Felix and Conrad Schweyer, joined the army of the Swedish 
king, Gustave Adolphus, when he landed at Stettin in 1630, on his 
march into central Europe, in order to take sides against Catholicism 
in the thirty years' war waged by the Protestants. Felix Schweyer 
was killed during an assault on the city of Frankfort, on the river 
Oder. Conrad Schweyer remained with the army until peace was de- 
clared in 1648 when, instead of returning to his native land, Pomerania, 
he settled in Biberic, Germany, broken in fortune. His death occurred 
there in 1672. 

(II) Augustus, son of Conrad Schweyer, had three sons, who all 
married and had families. Their names were: Christopher, Francis 
(see forward) and Leopold. 

(III) Francis, son of Augustus Schweyer, married, and among his 
children was a son, Nicholas. 

(IV) Nicholas, son of Francis Schweyer, sailed for America on 



1222 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

the ship "Neptune," which left Rotterdam, July 25, 1752, and landed at 
Philadelphia, October 4, 1752, having consumed more than two months 
in crossing the Atlantic ocean. He settled at Kutztown, Berks county, 
Pennsylvania, where he became the owner of a large amount of real 
estate, was a man of influence in the community, and died in 1801. He 
was buried on his farm, which adjoined Kutztown. Six sons and two 
daughters survived him. 

(V) George, son of Nicholas Schweyer, died and was buried at St. 
John's Church, Hamburg, Berks county, Pennsylvania. He married 
Barbara Rishel, and became the father of five sons. 

(VI) George, son of George and Barbara (Rishel) Schweyer, is 
buried in an unmarked soldier's grave along the Canadian line, in which 
section of the country he was an active participant in the war of 1812. 
He married Elizabeth Gearhard, who died in 1810. They had children: 
George, John, see forward ; Susannah, Sophia. 

(VII) John, son of George and Elizabeth (Gearhard) Schweyer, 
was born in Kutztown, Berks county, Pennsylvania; died, January 15, 
1876; was buried in Union cemetery, near Mifflintown, Juniata county, 
Pennsylvania. He settled in Mifflintown in 1832, purchased consider- 
able real estate the following year, and from that time was one of the 
large property holders of that section of the country. He was also ex- 
tensively engaged in the manufacture of furniture, and every summer 
shipped numerous boatloads of furniture down the Juniata canal and 
up and down the Susquehanna, to all the towns along the line, including 
Harrisburg, Williamsport and Wilkes-Barre. He married, 1832, Eliza- 
beth Van Gundy, born in Buffalo Valley, Union county, Pennsylvania, 
a great-granddaughter of Christian Van Gundy, who was engaged in 
a seven years' lawsuit with Ludwig Derr for the land on which Lewis- 
burg, Pennsylvania, now stands. They had three children, of whom 
two died in infancy. 

(VIII) Benjamin Franklin, the only child to reach maturity of 
John and Elizabeth (Van Gundy) Schweyer, was born in Mifflintown, 
Juniata county, Pennsylvania, July 2, 1838. His education was ac- 
quired in the public and private schools of Mifflintown, and at an early 
age he commenced his career as a contributor to the pages of the 
county papers. In 1870 he became the editor and proprietor of the 
Juniata Sentinel, a Whig paper, established December 9, 1846, which 




^'^.X^2A^t^>^^<^- 



• HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1223 

was originally a Whig sheet, but was at the time of Mr. Schweyer's 
purchase a Republican paper, and he very naturally took up the cause 
of the Republican party upon becoming the owner. He Ijecame the 
owner in 1873 of the Juniata Republican, a stock paper that was de- 
fected by President Andrew Johnson's movement. Mr. Schweycr con- 
solidated the two papers under the name of the Juniata Sentinel and 
Republican, and continued as owner up to the time of his death, 
April 7, 1913. It has always been the main Republican paper of Juni- 
ata county, and has never wavered in its allegiance to the Republican 
party. While his influence was an important factor to be reckoned with, 
Mr. Schweyer never desired nor accepted puljlic office. He was a mem- 
ber of the Pennsylvania Reserves during the civil war, and was present 
at the battle of Antietam. His religious affiliations were with the Pres- 
byterian church. Mr. Schweyer married, in Fayette township, Juniata 
county, Pennsylvania, January 8, 1863, Evaline Robison, born in Fer- 
managh township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, April 18, 1842, died 
in 1904. She was the daughter of John and Margaret (Davidson) 
Robison; granddaughter of Captain David Davidson, a soldier during 
the American revolution: and a great-granddaughter of Alexander 
Robison, of Scotch-Irish descent, who was born in the Cumberland 
valley, Pennsylvania, in 1732, and located as a land owner in what is 
n(iw Juniata county, in 1767. He was a soldier under Braddock in 
the expedition against the French and Indians at Fort Pitt, and a soldier 
under Colonel Bouquet in the expedition against the Pontiac Indian 
conspiracy in 1764. Mr. and Mrs. Schweyer had children: John 
Franklin: Will^erforce, see forward: .\nnie E., died February 9, 1903: 
Elizabeth, deceased: ]\Iary Evaline, married Andrew C. Ellison, of Mif- 
fiintown: Isabella, married Albert M. Robinson, of Philadelphia. 

(IX) Wilberforce, son of Benjamin Franklin and Evaline (Robi- 
son) Schwever, was born in Mifflintown, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, 
April 21, 1865. For a time he went to the public schools of his native 
township, then became a student at Airy View Academ}-, Port Ro}-al, 
Pennsylvania. He next went to the Northwestern University, Chicago, 
Illinois, from the law department of which he was graduated in the 
class of 1889. He was admitted to the bar in the same year, and 
shortly afterward received an appointment from the Census Bureau, 
Washington, District of Columbia. He established himself in the prac- 



1224 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

tice of his profession in Mififlintown, interrupting this in May, 1891, 
when he went to Winchester, Virginia, and practiced there for about 
one year. Returning to Mifflintown, his legal work has been connected 
with that section since that time. For a time he was associated with 
his father in the editing and proprietorship of the Juniata Sentinel and 
Republican, and, upon the death of the senior Schweyer, he became the 
owner and so continues. Mr. Schweyer has filled a number of public 
offices: he was elected district attorney, 1894-95-96, again in 1909-10- 
11; county solicitor, 1903-04-05; and borough solicitor, 1905-06-07. 

Mr. Schweyer married, at Lewistown, Pennsylvania, May 28, 1895, 
Mary Juniata Patton, born in Lewistown, April 9, 1869, daughter of 
Robert William and Elizabeth Moore (Milliken) Patton, whose other 
children were : Maria Granville ; Joseph Milliken, deceased ; and Rob- 
ert William. Robert William Patton, the elder, was a jeweler by occu- 
pation. He was treasurer of Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, for a time, 
and served as postmaster at Lewistown, Pennsylvania, for a period of 
twelve years. He was first sergeant of the Logan Guards of Lewis- 
town, Pennsylvania, one of the first companies to respond to the call of 
President Lincoln for troops, arriving in Washington, District of Co- 
lumbia, April 18, 1 86 1, and was also major of the 131st Regiment Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers. Mr. and Mrs. Schweyer have had children : Eliza- 
beth Milliken, born March 24, 1896; Benjamin Franklin, June 18, 
1897; Evelyn Robison, November 12, 1898; Robert Patton, November 
5, 1900. Elizabeth Milliken Schweyer is now attending school in Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia, while the others attend the public schools 
at Mifflintown. Mr. Schweyer and his family are members of the Pres- 
byterian church. 



William James McNabb, of Belleville, Mifflin county, 
McNABB Pennsylvania, is of the fourth generation of his family 
in this country, and has displayed the excellent business 
qualities which made his ancestors successful. 

(I) William McNabb, his great-grandfather, came to America from 
Ireland in the latter part of the eighteenth century, and settled in the 
eastern part of Pennsylvania, after a voyage of three months' duration. 
He died in Derry township, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, at the age 
of about seventy years. He married Margaret Mitchell, who had come 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1225 

to America on the same vessel. They had children: Rohert ; John; 
William, see forward; James. 

(II) William (2), son of William (i) and Margaret (Mitchell) 
McNabb, was born in Mifflin county. Owing to the early death of his 
mother, his limited education was acquired in the public schools of that 
section, which at that time was not settled as it is at present. He was 
apprenticed to learn the trade of blacksmithing with John Rouls, of 
Belleville, and when he had completed his apprenticeship, established 
himself in business, opening his shop on the present site of the Belleville 
hotel, and continued there very successfully until he abandoned it be- 
cause of the pressure of other business. His death occurred at the age 
of seventy years. Mr. McNabb married Nancy Moran, and they had 
children: Mary Ann, who married Joseph Hoar and has three children; 
Henry S., married Margaret Wilson, has three children and resides in 
Lancaster, Pennsylvania ; John, see forward ; William Wallace, married 
(first) Elizabeth, daughter of Davis Gibboney, of Blair county, Penn- 
sylvania, married (second) Nancy, daughter of Frank and Barbara 
(Steele) Morgan; Arie, married Washington Nelson, of Belleville, had 
one child which died; Theodore, died at the age of fifteen years; David 
Ashton, married Eliza Gilmore. 

(III) John, son of William (2) and Nancy (Moran) McNabb, was 
born in Belleville, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, in 1822. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools, and upon the completion of his education, 
entered upon his business career by filling positions of various kinds con- 
nected with the mercantile line. In 1873 he decided that he had gained 
a sufficient amount of experience to establish in business independently, 
which he accordingly proceeded to do. Results have proved the wisdom 
of this decision. In 1882 he associated himself in a business partnership 
with F. H. Gulp, and bought out the business of A. F. Gibboney, at Belle- 
ville; and, in 1885, Mr. Gulp sold his interest, and the firm became 
McNabb & Son, continuing under this style until the death of Mr. 
McNabb, March 2, 1894. The name of the firm was then changed to 
read McNabb & Fleming, as it has been known up to the present time. 
This firm carries on a general mercantile business ; in fact, it is a country 
department store. Mr. McNabb married Elizabeth, a daughter of James 
Longwell, who was born in Armagh township, Mifflin county, Pennsyl- 
vania, of which his father had been one of the early settlers. They had 



1226 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

children : Nannie Moran, who married James R. Fleming, and has one 
child, Nellie McNabb; Ellen Grace, deceased; William James, see for- 
ward. 

(IV) William James, son of John and Elizabeth (Longwell) Mc- 
Nabb, was born in Belleville, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, September 28, 
1858. He was educated in the public schools of Belleville, and at a suit- 
able age engaged in business pursuits. He worked under the supervision 
of his father until 1885, and his connection with the business is given in 
detail in the preceding lines. In political matters he is a strong Republi- 
can, has served as a county committeeman, and is now registrar of the 
township. He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. He 
married, Alarch 26, 1891, Bettie Laurene, born in Belleville, on the farm 
of her father, April 8, 1868, a daughter of John W. Wilson. They have 
had children: i. James Ta3dor, born May 5, 1892, died May 31, 1892. 
2. John Wilson, born August 13, 1895; was graduated from Belleville 
high school in the class of 1912, and is now a student in the Pennsyl- 
vania State College in the class of 19 16. He is making a special study of 
chemistry. 3. Elizabeth Garver, born August 3, 1898, died August i, 
1899. 4. William Henry, born June 28, 1900, died March 11, 1906. 5. 
Joseph Sylvester, born July 18, 1902. 6. James Randolph, born August 
7> 1905- 



There are turning points in every man's life called oppor- 
EWING tunity. Taken advantage of they mean ultimate success. 

The career of J. B. Ewing is a striking illustration of the 
latter statement. Diligent and ever alert for his chance of advancement, 
he has progressed steadily until he is recognized today as one of the fore- 
most business men of the Juniata Valley. Here he is held in high esteem 
by his fellow-citizens, who honor him for his native ability and for his 
fair and straightforward career. He is the owner of a large milling 
business in this section of the country and also has farming interests here. 
A son of John and Mary J. (Bowers) Ewing, John B. Ewing was 
born in Juniata county, Pennsylvania. July 23, 1874. His paternal grand- 
parents were Anthony B. and Mary Ann (Johnston) Ewing, both of 
whom were born and reared in Perry county, Pennsylvania. Anthony 
B. Ewing was a miller in Perry and Juniata counties, and his demise oc- 
curred at Mount L^nion, Pennsylvania. He and his wife were the parents 



HISTORY Ol" THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1227 

of eight cliildren, whose names are here entered in respective order of 
birth: David, James, John, Rachel, Hannah, Mary, Ehzabeth and An- 
thony. All of the above are deceased except James, Mary and Elizabeth. 
Mrs. Ewing is likewise deceased. She and her husband were staunch 
Methodists in their religious faith, and he was a Democrat in politics. 

John Ewing, third son of .\nthony B. and Mary Ann (Johnston) 
Ewing, was born in Perry county, Pennsylvania, in the year 1846. He 
was educated in the public schools of Juniata and Mifflin counties, and as 
a youth learned the trade of miller under the able tutelage of his father. 
As a voung man he owned a mill at Shirleysburg, in Huntingdon county, 
and in 188 1 he located in Juniata county. He owned and operated mills 
at Mount Union and Orbisonia at the time when he was summoned to 
eternal rest, January 11, 1900. In 1868 was celebrated his marriage to 
Mary J. Bowers, who was bom in May. 185 1, and who is a daughter of 
John B. and Susan (Sherlock) Bowers, both of Juniata county. John B. 
Bowers was for many years a prominent farmer in Juniata county, where 
his death occurred. He was a son of Samuel and Susan (Snyder) Bow- 
ers, farmers in Perry county. His brothers and sisters were George. 
Samuel, Solomon, Mary and Lydia. When old age overtook them Mr. 
and Mrs. Samuel Bowers became meml)ers of the household of their 
son Samuel, in Juniata count)', where they both died. Susan ( Sherlock ) 
Ewing was a daughter of William and .Mary ( Wallsmith ) Sherlock, the 
former of Scotch-Irish descent, and the latter a native of Juniata county. 
They both passed to eternal rest at Academia, Pennsylvania. There 
were three children born to John and Mary J. (Bowers) Ewing, as fol- 
lows: James Elmer, of Mount I'nion ; Laura B., the wife of W. J. 
W'elch, of Mount L'nion ; and John B., the immediate subject of this 
review. The mother of these children survives her honored husband and 
now maintains her home at Mount Union. 

John B. Ewing received a fair public school education in IMilllin and 
Huntingdon counties. Like his father he grew up in the milling busi- 
ness, and he has always been identified with that line of enterprise. He 
and his father erected the Orbisonia Roller Mills in 1900 and he is now 
sole owner of this extensive business. In recent years he acquired a fine 
farm of one hundred and fifty acres and on the same he is engaged in 
diversified agriculture and in the breeding of good draught horses. He 
was one of the organizers of the First National Bank of Orbisonia and is 



1228 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

a director in the same. While not actively interested in politics, he is a 
stalwart supporter of Democratic principles. He fraternizes with Crom- 
well Lodge, No. 572, Free and Accepted Masons, and in religious mat- 
ters he and his wife are fervent Baptists. 

May 5, 1898, he married Margaret E. Carver, a member of an old 
pioneer Pennsylvania family, and a daughter of John E. and Anna (Bow- 
man) Carver. They have had the following children : John Boyd, Anna 
Carver and George Ellis. The attractive family home is the scene of 
many interesting social gatherings and it is noted for its genial hospi- 
tality. 



The Brewster family of Pennsylvania descends from 
BREWSTER Scotch-Irish ancestry. The founder of the American 

branch of the family came to the New World about 
1670, settled first in Connecticut and later went to Delaware. His de- 
scendants are numerous, some of whom located in Pennsylvania. 

(I) Henry Brewster, the first of this branch of the family of whom 
there is definite knowledge, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania. 
He was a wealthy merchant in Concord, and in 1839 moved to Indiana. 
After a year's stay in the west he returned to Pennsylvania, and estab- 
lished himself in Shirleysburg, and re-entered the mercantile business. 
He was a popular man, and in 1846 was nominated for the state legisla- 
ture on the Whig ticket, being elected over his opponent by a large ma- 
jority. He was an uncommonly good surveyor, and surveyed much land 
in Franklin county. He was also a justice of peace for many years, and 
was not only a pioneer of Shirleysburg, but was a highly educated and 
able man. He was one of the founders of the Presbyterian church in 
Shirleysburg. He married Nancy Campbell, born in Perry county, Penn- 
sylvania, the daughter of A. Campbell, who descended from the Clan 
Campbell, of Scotland. Children: i. William H., of whom further. 
2. James C, was a soldier in the civil war. 3. John, resides in Hunting- 
don county, Pennsylvania ; a civil war veteran. 4. Alexander, resides in 
Chicago; a civil war veteran. 5. Martha, now Mrs. Douglas, of Harris- 
burg, Pennsylvania. 

(II) William H., son of Henry and Nancy (Campbell) Brewster, 
was born in Concord, Franklin county, Pennsylvania. He was educated 
at the Milnwood Academy, at Shade Gap, Pennsylvania, under Pro- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1229 

fessor James Y. McGinness, the founder of the school. Leaving school 
he entered the mercantile business at Shirleysl)urg as a general merchant, 
and continued in that line of endeavor until his death, which occurred in 
1905. Like his father he was also a surveyor, and was a farmer in a 
small way. He was an ardent Republican, voting with and working for 
the party. He and his family were members of the Presbyterian church, 
and he was once a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
He married Mary Stewart, born in I'almyra, Missouri. She was the 
daughter of Robert Stewart, born in 1832, in Alexandria, Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, and his wife, Lucy (Leonard) Stewart, born in 
Palmyra, Missouri. Robert Stewart was descended from the ancient 
Stewart family, of Scotland, which settled in New York, and was con- 
nected with many of the most aristocratic and oldest families in that 
city. The Stewarts are, and have long been, among the prominent fami- 
lies of the metropolis. Rev. James Anderson, on the maternal side, was 
the pastor of one of the first Presbyterian churches in that city, and was 
a pioneer pastor of the Lancaster, Pennsylvania, church. Children of 
Robert and Lucy (Leonard) Stewart: Thomas; Sarah; Mary, married 
William H. Brewster; William Brown; Lucy. Children of William H. 
and Mary (Stewart) Brewster: i. Robert Henry. 2. Frank S., of 
whom further. 3. Charles C, district attorney. 4. William, died in in- 
fancy. 5. Laura, died in infancy. 6. John, died in infancy. 

(Ill) Frank S., son of William H. and Mary (Stewart) Brewster, 
was born November i, 1862, at Shirleysburg, in Pennsylvania. He re- 
ceived his education first in the public school, and then for two years 
attended the high school at Beaver, Pennsylvania. He next was under 
the tutelage of Professor J. B. Kidder, at Shirleysburg, Pennsylvania, 
who came from New York City, where he had taught for many years, 
and took the building in which Frank S. Brewster now lives. He was 
accompanied by twenty-five young ladies of New York, and he estab- 
lished and conducted a female seminary. At the same time, in Shirleys- 
burg, Hugh McGinness was principal of a boys' school. Professor Kid- 
der remained at the head of his seminary for many years, and later had 
a select school. Among his pupils were boys and girls who later be- 
came prominent men and women ; among them was, notably, William 
Sims, now of the United States navy. Professor Kidder died in 
Huntingdon, at the age of ninety, retaining the love and respect of his 



I230 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

former pupils until his death. Frank S. Brewster made an effort to 
re-establish the seminary of Professor Kidder, and graduated one class. 
He then entered the inercantile world with his father, remaining with 
the latter until his death. He is a public surveyor by vocation, and 
follows it. He is a member of the Presbyterian church and holds the 
dignified position of elder in that church. 



Among the old English families of Pennsylvania must 
WESTON be ranked the Westons. The immigrant progenitor 

landed in New York in 1680, having sailed six weeks 
previous from London in the "Hope," Jonathan Smith, master. He 
remained in New York for several years, and then went with a party 
of friends into Delaware, where they suffered untold hardships, and 
were taken and held captive by the Indians for months. They were 
finally rescued by a hunting party and taken to Concord. Here John 
Weston located, married and died. Later his descendants scattered to 
the four corners of the colonies, and there is not today a state in the 
Union which has not within its borders one or more of that name. 
They have filled every walk of life, and alw^ays with dignity, doing 
whatsoever their hands found to do, and doing it cheerfully and con- 
scientiously. Many of them were soldiers in the revolution, the war 
of 1812, the civil war and the Spanish war. John and Simon Weston, 
brothers, and cousins of Arthur C. Weston, of whom further, were 
members of one of the volunteer companies from Pennsylvania during 
the civil war; and John was wounded and died at Richmond, Virginia. 
Arthur C. Weston was born in 1850, in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, 
and died January 13, 1913, at Orbisonia, Pennsylvania. He received 
his education in the common schools of Cassville. At an earlv age he 
left school and began to learn the blacksmith's trade from his step- 
father, John Moyer. He pursued his vocation at Cassville, and in 1897 
moved to Orbisonia, where he was employed for four years in the car 
shops, in the blacksmiths' department. Later he moved to Huntingdon 
and engaged in blacksmithing for the Blain Brothers. Then he de- 
cided that he would try a more southern climate, and he departed for 
Florida for the same firm, and remained in that state eleven months, 
at the end of which time he was compelled to return to Pennsylvania, 
as the climate of Florida did not agree with him. Returning to Orbi- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 123 1 

sonia he was again employed as blacksmith at the East Broad Top rail- 
way car shops until his death. Mr. Weston was an honest and up- 
right man, highly esteemed for his probity by those who knew iiim. 
He was of an old Presbyterian family and lived and died in that faith. 
He was also a member of the Red Men, standing high in the order. 

Mr. Weston married, November 16. 1876, Maggie Benney, of 
McVeytown, Pennsylvania, daughter of William Benney, a carpenter, 
who lived and died in McVeytown, and who came to the United States 
from England when a youth of nineteen. Children of Arthur C. and 
Maggie (Benney) Weston: i. Esco, married Bessie Pierce; children: 
Wilma, Mary and Roliert. 2. Mary, married L. P. Carver; no issue. 
3. Walter, a blacksmith in Orbisonia ; married Minnie Cree ; one child, 
Cree. 4. Louise, married J. C. Barree; twt> children, Margaret and 
Greta. 5. Creta, at home. 6. John Moyer. 7. Arthur Paul. 



The Brewsters herein recorded are of famous Pil- 
BREWSTER grim ancestry, tracing their descent from "Elder" 
William Brewster, who came in the "Mayflower," 
landing at PlyuKJUth Rock. December 16, 1620. He there bore an im- 
portant part in establishing the Pilgrim republic; was one of the sign- 
ers of the "Compact," and is believed to have been its author. He was 
the moral, religious and spiritual head of the colony during its first 
years; its chief civil adviser and trusted guide until his death. 

^^'illiam Brewster, of Scrooby, Nottinghamshire. England, father 
of Elder William Brewster, was assessed in that town in 1570 on 
goods valued at three pounds. In 1575 he was appointed by Arch- 
bishop Sandys, receiver of Scrooby and bailiff of the Manor house, 
having life tenure of both offices. Some time in the year 1588 or pos- 
sibly before he was appointed to the additional office of postmaster 
under the crown. He was known as the "Post" of Scrooby, and was 
master of the court mails, which were accessible only to those con- 
nected with the court. 

"Elder" William, son of William and Prudence Brewster, was born 
during the last half of the year 1566, the date being fixed by an affi- 
davit made by him at Leyden, Holland, June 25, 1609, when he de- 
clared his age to be forty-two years, but no date of his birth or mar- 
riage has yet been discovered, Scrooby parish records not beginning 



1232 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

until 1695. He entered the University of Cambridge (Peterhouse Col- 
lege), but does not appear to have taken his degree. He is next found 
as a "discrete and faithful" assistant of William Davidson, secretary 
of state to Queen Elizabeth, accompanied that gentleman on his em- 
bassy to the Netherlands in 1585, and served him at court after his 
return until his downfall in 1587. He then returned to Scrooby, where 
he was held in high esteem and was useful in "promoting and further- 
ing religion." In 1590 he was appointed administrator of the estate 
of his father, who died in the summer of that year, and succeeded him 
as postmaster, holding that position until September 30, 1607. While 
in Scrooby he lived in the old Manor house, where the members of the 
Pilgrim church were accustomed to meet on Sunday. When the Pil- 
grims attempted to move to Holland, William Brewster was among 
those detained and imprisoned, also suffering great loss of property. 
After finally reaching Holland he endured many hardships, not being 
as well fitted for hard labor as the other Pilgrims who succeeded in 
reaching that land of refuge. He spent twelve years in Leyden, in- 
creasing his earnings during the latter years by teaching and by the 
profits of a printing press he set up there. When it was decided that 
the church at Leyden should emigrate to Virginia, William Brewster, 
who had already been chosen elder, was desired to go with the first 
company, which he did, and with his wife Mary and two young sons 
sailed in the "Mayflower." But Virginia was never reached, Plymouth 
Rock being the historic spot where the first landing was made, Decem- 
ber 16, 1620. His useful life ended there April 10, 1644, in peace and 
honor. His wife died April 17, 1627. At the time of his death but 
two of his children were living, Jonathan and Love, both being men 
of prominence in church and state. For several generations the Brew- 
sters remained in New England, then found their way to other states, 
where they also have attained prominence. In the sixth American 
generation the name appears in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, where 
the grandfather of John Brewster, of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, was 
an early resident. 

(VI) William Brewster was among the early settlers of Fannetts- 
burg, Franklin count}'', Pennsylvania, where he was proprietor of a 
general store. Both he and his wife were members of the Presby- 
terian church. He married Margaret Robinson, of Scotch ancestry, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1233 

and had issue: John, a soldier of tlie war of 1812. engaged at the 
battle of Chippewa, proprietor of a large tannery in Hill Valley, died 
at Shirleysburg, Pennsylvania ; Mary, married Nathaniel Kelley ; Mar- 
garet, married S. O. Brown; Henry, of whom further; Maria, married 
John Skinner; Dr. William, for several years editor of the TTuntingdoii 
Journal, died at Newville, Pennsylvania; Alexander, died in early man- 
hood; James R., a merchant tailor and real estate agent, died at New- 
ville, Pennsylvania. 

(VII) Henry, son of William and Margaret (Robinson) Brewster, 
was born at Fannettsburg, b>anklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1798. He 
was educated in the public suliscription schools, and while yet a boy was 
attacked by rheumatism which lamed him for life. He began business in 
his father's store, succeeded him in lousiness, and continued in Fannetts- 
burg, until about 1826, when he opened a general store in Concord, 
Pennsylvania, and there married. Pie continued in business there until 
1838, then with his family moved to the state of Indiana, settling on 
the banks of the Wabash river. Here he opened a store, but they all 
suffered from fever and ague to such an extent that after one year he 
returned to Pennsylvania, and in 1839 established a general store at 
Shirleysburg, continuing in successful business until 1853, when he re- 
tired, but continued his residence there until his death in 1880. In 1840 
his store was destroyed Iiy fire, his son Henry Robert and his mother-in- 
law both losing their lives in the fire. He was an old-time WHiig; took 
an active part in politics, and in 1845 represented his district in the 
Pennsylvania legislature. In religious faith he was a Presbyterian. 
He married (first) Nancy Campbell, born in Fannettsburg, her parents 
both born in Ireland. Alartha. her mother, was burned to death in 
1840. when the store of her son-in-law was destroyed. She died in 
1855, the mother of all his children. He married (second) a widow, 
Mrs. Withington, who did not long survive her marriage. He married 
(third) Miss Eliza N. Elliott, who survived him a few years. Chil- 
dren: I. William, deceased, a merchant of Shirleysburg. 2, James 
Campbell, born September 24, 1834; a veteran of the civil war, in Com- 
pany G, 5th Regiment Pennsylvania Reserves, wounded at the battle of 
Mechanicsburg. held a prisoner in Libby three weeks, fought at Fred- 
ericksburg and Gettysburg, and was honorably discharged June 13. 
1864; was a merchant and postmaster at Meadow Gap, Huntingdon 



1234 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

county, many years, and is now living there retired; married, in 1869, 
Elizabeth Weaver. 3. Henry Robert, lost his life in his father's burn- 
ing store building in Shirleysburg in 1840. 4. John, of whom further. 
5. Margaret, died in Indiana. 6. Alexander McGinley, moved to the 
state of Illinois; was a successful farmer, now living in Chicago, re- 
tired. 7. Martha, married David R. Douglass, whom she yet survives, 
a resident of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 

(VIII) John, son of Henry Brewster and his first wife, Nancy 
Campbell, was born in Concord, Franklin county, Pennsylvania, Au- 
gust 4, 1838. He was educated in the public schools and at Juniata 
Academy, and in his youth gained a good knowledge of merchandising 
in his father's store. He began business life for himself in 1859, he 
and his brother James C. forming a partnership and opened a general 
store at Saltillo, Pennsylvania, their combined capital being $1,500. 
Two years later James C. sold his interest in the business to his 
brother and enlisted. John Brewster continued at Saltillo until 1862, 
then sold out, and in 1863 located in McConnellstown, where he re- 
mained until 1864. He then assisted in the raising of Company K, 
78th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, went to the front, 
serving in Tennessee until the close of the war. On his return to Penn- 
sylvania he located in Huntingdon, where he served six years as clerk 
of court. At the expiration of that term of years he organized, with 
others, the Standing Stone National Bank of Huntingdon, and was 
chosen its first president. This position he has honorably and capably 
filled until the present time (1913). The institution he organized and 
has guided all these years is one of the solid banking houses of Juniata 
Valley, and its president is held in honor and esteem as a wise, cau- 
tious financier. He holds the respect of his associates and of the com- 
munity in which the greater part of his business life has been spent. 
He is a Republican in politics; has served on the school board, and 
always has been a friend of progress in all lines. He is a member of 
the Reformed church, the Grand Army of the Republic and of the Im- 
proved Order of Heptasophs. 

Mr. Brewster married Phoebe Hudson, born in Saltillo, Pennsyl- 
vania, March 26, 1838, daughter of George and Rebecca (Hubbell) 
Hudson, granddaughter of John and Eleanor (Moreland) Hudson, 
and great-granddaughter of George Hudson, one of the pioneers of 




-^^^^^Alyn^ /k^\s^^^i.^cy-V'^^t^^^^.4L^ 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1235 

Huntingdon county, Pennsylv.inia. George Hudson (i), a soldier of 
the revolution, was a farmer of Shade Gap, coming there from Cum- 
berland county. His second wife was Isabella Buchanan. John, sec- 
ond son of George (i) Hudson, was born September 13, 1768, died 
October 29, 1814. After his marriage to Eleanor Moreland, he settled 
on a farm in Clay township. George (2), eldest son of John Hudson, 
was born January 16, 1796, died in 1855. He was a farmer, a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church, a ^Vhig in politics, and in 1835 repre- 
sented his district in the Pennsylvania legislature. He married, in 
1824, Rebecca liubbell, born June 8. 1799, died September 13, 1880. 
Their seventh child, Phoebe, born March 26. 1838, married John Brew- 
ster, of Huntingdon. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Brewster: Nancy, died 
in girlhood; Grace, a graduate of Millersville Normal School, now a 
teacher; Anna Rebecca, a graduate nurse, died April 19, 1913; Mary, 
married Charles C. Brewster, district attorney of Huntingdon county; 
Maude, married Parker Heikes, and resides near Great Falls, Montana ; 
a son, died in infancy. 



William H. Banks, M. D.. of Mifflintown, Juniata county, 
BANKS Pennsylvania, was born in Fermanagh township, Juniata 

county. Pennsylvania, November 16, 1862, a son of Wil- 
liam and Jane ( Hamlin ) Banks. Dr. Banks was educated at Airy View 
Academy and at the Lewistown Academy, and with Dr. Lucian Banks 
as his preceptor, he began the study of medicine, and in 1889 received 
his diploma from the University of Pennsylvania. He has since en- 
gaged in the practice of his profession in Mifflintown, Pennsylvania. 
Under Mr. Cleveland's second administration he held the office of 
examining surgeon for United States pensions. Dr. Banks is a mem- 
ber of the Juniata County Medical Society. He is also a member of 
Union Lodge, No. 324, Free and Accepted Masons. He is a director 
in the Mifflintown and Patterson Electric Light Company, of which he 
was one of the organizers, also a director in the Fermanagh Building 
and Loan Association, of Mifflintown, Pennsylvania, and a stockholder 
in the MifHintown and Patterson Water Company. 

In October, 1892, Dr. Banks was married to Bess Jacobs Parker, 
daughter of Robert Parker, of Mifflintown, Pennsylvania. Their chil- 
dren are: Robert Parker, Jane Hamlin, William Hamlin Jr., Kathryn 



1236 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Jacobs, and Hugh McAlister. The family are members of the Pres- 
byterian church. 



John Wigton left England for America, in 1725, aboard 
WIGTON the sailing vessel "The Cow," Davy Smith, master. 

After a tempestuous voyage the ship reached Philadel- 
phia, October 31, 1725. Here John Wigton located, married and re- 
mained six years. At the expiration of that time he moved into the 
interior, and taking up wild land, cleared it and became a farmer. Af- 
ter the death of his wife he married a second time, and among the 
younger children of the last marriage was Christopher, of whom 
further. 

(II) Christopher, son of John Wigton, was born about 1772, in 
Chester county, Pennsylvania, where he received his education in the 
township schools. On reaching his majority he moved to Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, where he purchased land and became a farmer 
on an extensive scale ; later he entered into the iron business, becom- 
ing one of the largest iron masters of that section and a prominent citi- 
zen. He was exceedingly patriotic. At the outbreak of hostilities be- 
tween the United States and Great Britain in 1812, he was among the 
first to enlist, was elected an officer of his company and served two 
years. He returned to Pennsylvania at the close of the war and again 
resumed business. Before his death he amassed a fortune, and was 
a large land owner. He was a Whig in politics, and was always active 
in support of the principles of the party. In religion both he and his 
wife were members of the Presbysterian church, in which he was an 
elder, and took a great and practical interest. Finally he settled in 
Franklinville, where he died. He married Margaret Hines, the daugh- 
ter of a neighbor. Children: i. Mary, married Joseph Dysart; died 
in Altoona, Pennsylvania. 2. Ellen, married William T. Wallace ; died 
in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 3. Richard Benson, a coal dealer in 
Philadelphia, where he died. 4. Andrew Jackson, died in Franklin- 
ville. 5. Samuel, of whom further. 

(III) Samuel, son of Christopher and Margaret (Hines) Wigton, 
was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, and died in 1888, in Al- 
toona, Pennsylvania. He received his education in the common schools 
of the township, and there grew up. He moved with his father to 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1237 

lluiUingdoil county, aiul entered with him and his brother, Richard 
Benson, in the iron business at Erankhnville, and later at Rock Hill. 
He accumulated a large property, most of which consisted of three 
farms containing about five hundred rich acres. His next removal was 
to Altoona, Pennsylvania, where he passed the two last years of his 
life. He was a director in the Altcxma bank; a member of the Presby- 
terian church and served as an elder for many years, supporting the 
church generously in every way. In politics he gave his franchise to 
the Republican jjarty, and served once as county commissioner; and he 
also assisted in surveying and laying out the b'ranklin township turn- 
pike. He was one of the influential men in any place in which he lived, 
and was esteemed and respected by his fellow-citizens. Mr. Wigton 
married Eliza D. Ingram, born in Huntingdon county, where she died 
in 1883, a daughter of William Ingram by a second wife, his other 
child being William, who died without issue. Like her husband, Mrs. 
Wigton was an active member of the Presbyterian church, and was 
known far and wide for her unostentatious charities. Children: i. 
Theodore, a retired business man of Philadelphia. 2. Wade H.. an 
employee of the Pennsylvania railroad at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 
3. John M., of whom further. 4. Annie, unmarried. 5. Christopher 
H., died in Philadelphia. 6. W^illiam, twin of Christopher H., died in 
Denver, Colorado. 

(IV) John M., son of Samuel and Eliza D. (Ingram) Wigton, was 
born February 18, 1851, in Spruce Creek Valley, Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania. He early entered the public school of the township, and 
his education was finished at Academia, Pennsylvania. Immediatelv 
thereafter he became manager of his father's farms, continuing farm- 
ing until this day. .\fter the death of his father he purchased three 
hundred acres in Franklin township, which he has converted into models 
of agricultural success. He erected new barns and remodelled the 
dwelling, making it more modern and commodious. Mr. Wigton votes 
the Republican ticket, and has done so since attaining his majoritv. 
He has served only in the township offices, as he finds his time and 
energies amply engrossed by his business interests. However, he is 
always active in his support of his friends seeking political ofifice. In 
religion, with his wife, he is a meinber of the Presbyterian church, of 
which he has been an elder for the past twenty-five years. Mr. Wigton 



1238 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

ranks with the substantial men of his township and is greatly esteemed 
and respected by those who know him. 

Mr. Wigton married, in 1879, Jennie Jackson, born in Huntingdon 
county, a daughter of Dr. Robert J. Jackson, who at the time of his 
death was medical director of Eastern Tennessee. Children: i. Mary 
Eliza, married Alexander Newland, and lives in Kewanee, Illinois. 2. 
Lois Russel, married John Everhart; lives in Bellwood, Pennsylvania. 
3. Anna Wade, married Dr. Henry Wilson, lives in Warriors Mark, 
Pennsylvania. 4. Robert J., a farmer, who purchased the home place 
in 1913. 5. Elizabeth, married John Keller, of Canoe Valley, Novem- 
ber 2, 1913. 



The earliest available record of this family begins 
BRODBECK with Michael Brodbeck, born in York county and 
settled near Three Springs, Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania. He obtained a public school education, and all his life 
was a farmer. He enlisted in the Union army at the outbreak of the 
civil war and served through the entire conflict. Both he and his wife 
were members of the Reformed churcli. He inarried Sarah Amig, and 
had issue as follows: Jacob, of whom further; Alexander, Lucy, Wil- 
liam, John, Alice, Frank, Sarah, Wesley and Van. 

(II) Jacob, son of Michael and Sarah (Amig) Brodbeck, was born 
in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, July 24, 1848, died in 1901. He 
obtained an education in the public schools of Huntingdon county, and 
later engaged in farming on his father's farm during the time his father 
was in the army. He likewise conducted a mercantile business in Orbi- 
sonia until his death. Both he and his wife were members of the Re- 
formed church; she still attends. He is survived by a widow and five 
children. His death was deeply regretted by Orbisonia's fraternity of 
business men, who lost one of their most enterprising and energetic 
members, while his loss was sincerely mourned by a large circle of 
friends, who had been bound to him by the charms of his good-fellow- 
ship and the love of his sterling qualities. He married Marion Salome, 
daughter of John and Susan (Isenburg) Hicks. Children: i. Allie, 
bom 1872, married Samuel Carothers, a carpenter; they have one child, 
John. 2. Jessie, born 1875, married Augustus Wingert, of Philadel- 
phia; children: Paul and Clarence. 3. Edward Clarence, born 1879, a 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1239 

carpenter of Philadelphia; married Estella Brown; children: Robert, 
Kenneth, Edward and Raymond. 4. Maud, born 1880, married Nor- 
man Karper, a coal dealer of Philadelphia. 5. Myrtle, born 1886, mar- 
ried Roy Voshal, an electrician, living in North Carolina; children: Le- 
roy and Donald. 



Henry Nearhoof, the German immigrant ancestor 
NEARHOOF of the Nearhoof family, of Huntingdon county, 

Pennsylvania, probably landed in America in 1765. 
He was a soldier in the war of the revolution, as his name occurs fre- 
quently on the roster of several companies sent by the colony of Penn- 
sylvania to aid her sister colonies in their struggle for independence. 
He settled at Warriors Mark immediately after, if he was not there 
before, the revolutionary war. H^e took up a large body of wild land, 
part of which he cleared, erected comfortable houses of hewn logs, and 
remained on it until the time of his death. Mr. Nearhoof lived a quiet 
life, liked by his neighbors, and commanded their respect by his energy 
and integrity. He had only one child, Henry, of whom further. 

(II) Henrv, son of Henry Nearhoof, was born on his father's ex- 
tensive farm in Warriors Mark township, Huntingdon county, Pennsyl- 
vania. He was his father's only heir, and after the latter's death he 
began farming. In 1810 he erected a brick house which is still stand- 
ing in good condition on the farm. He grew to be one of the wealthiest 
men of his section and one of the most prominent, and was known far 
and wide for his acts of charity. He was a member of the Lutheran 
church, inheriting his faith from his forbears. He died in the home- 
stead and is buried at the Cross Roads. Children: i. George, a farmer 
in Warriors Mark township, where he died. 2. John, died in Illinois. 
3. Andrew, died in Bald Eagle Valley, Blair county. 4. Jacob, of whom 
further. 5. Margaret, married Alexander Bratton; died in Warriors 
Mark. 6. Mary, married George Crane; died in Juniata Valley. 7. 
Henry, lived and died in Warriors Mark township. 

(III) Jacob, son of Henry Nearhoof, was born on the Nearhoof 
homestead, in 1803 ; died in the place of his nativity in 1876. After his 
father's death he purchased a portion of the homestead, erected new and 
commodious buildings on it, which have since been destroyed. He lived 
and died here, although owning other property in Blair county. He was 



I240 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

a Democrat, always voting with that party. Both he and his wife were 
members of the Brethren church. He married Catherine Grazier, born 
in 1806 and died in 1899, daughter of Michael and Mary (Beck) Gra- 
zier. Michael was the son of Yost Kressner, anglicized into Joseph 
Grazier. Michael was born in Huntingdon county, there married and 
died. He was a farmer in Warriors Mark township, Huntingdon 
county. Children: Daniel; Samuel; Jeremiah; Joseph; Christiana; 
Nancy; Susan; Catherine, married Jacob Nearhoof; all are now dead. 
Children of Jacob and Catherine (Grazier) Nearhoof: i. David, a 
farmer, died in Blair county. 2. Mary, died in Blair county. 3. Abed- 
nego, a farmer, died in Huntingdon county. 4. Jeremiah, died in Hunt- 
ingdon county. 5. Michael, died in Blair county. 6. Joseph, died 
young. 7. Martha, died in infancy. 8. Lavina, twin of Martha, died 
in infancy. 9. Nancy Jane, died young. 10. Wesley, died young. 11. 
James Bell, lives in Warriors Mark. 12. Levi, of whom further. 13. 
Ellen Salina, lives at Warriors Mark. 14. Miles, lives in Blair county. 
(IV) Levi, son of Jacob and Catherine (Grazier) Nearhoof, was 
born March 7, 1845, o" his father's homestead in Warriors Mark town- 
ship, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. He was reared on the farm 
and educated in the public schools of the township. He inherited a 
portion of the homestead and later purchased the interest of his youngest 
brother, Miles, and has lived and farmed on the land since. He was 
a Republican for years, but now gives his franchise to the Prohibition 
party. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and of the 
Grange, and has been school director. He married, December 28, 1876, 
Emma Elizabeth Ganoe, born July 8, 1852, in AVarriors Mark township, 
a daughter of Thomas and Nancy (Campbell) Ganoe. Children: i. 
Ira Lester, bom October 24, 1877, clerk in Tyrone; married Mary De- 
lozicr; children: Margaret and John. 2. Ida Catherine, born October 
7, 1879; married Lawrence Whippo, of Warriors Mark township: one 
child, Emma. 3. Margaret Electa, born October 11, 1881 ; educated in 
Shippensburg Normal School and Juniata College; has taught for nine 
years. 4. James Ernest, born September 22, 1883, married Alma Buck; 
assists father on farm ; has two children : Scott and George. 5. Laura 
Emma, born February 19, 1886, died aged five months. 6. Levi Earl, 
born August 5, 1887; educated at Millersville Normal School and Juni- 
ata College, taught four years. 7. Victor Thomas, born January 11, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1241 

1890, student at Dickenson Seminary. 8. Ella Lucinda, born March 19, 
1892, educated at tlie Dickenson Seminary. 

(The Ganoe Line). 

The Ganoe family of Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, is of Hu- 
guenot descent. The name was formerly spelled Gano. Like all other 
co-religionists Jacob Ganoe, the French progenitor of the family, left 
his uniiappy country to escape religious persecution. He went to Eng- 
land immediately after the revocation of the edict of Nantes, and there 
remained for some time. With his wife and children he joined other 
Huguenots who sought refuge in America in order that they might en- 
joy the Protestant religion without being put to death or their substance 
confiscated by the state. Jacob Ganoe came with the Thebidaux, du Bois, 
Blanchard and other families. He remained for some time in New 
York City, then went to Westchester county, New York, after which he 
settled in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. His remains were interred 
in the Methodist Episcopal cemetery, near Warriors Mark, showing that 
he was a very old man at the time of his death, as that faith was not in 
existence until John Wesley visited the colony of Georgia in the early 
part of the year 1700. He married Elizabeth Armitage. Among his 
children was James, of whom further. 

[11) James, son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Armitage) Ganoe, was 
born, lived and died in America. He lived on his own farm, but did not 
operate the same, as he was a prospector, performing a vast amount of 
that kind of work for business companies having mining interests. He 
was highly educated, speaking fluently both English and French. He 
married Barbara Snyder, doubtless a daughter of one of the Palatines. 
Children: i. Alfred, married Nancy Douglass; children: Benjamin, 
Joseph, Isabel, Martin, Martha, William. 2. Martha, married Rev. 
Elisha Butler; children: Emma, Elisha, Electa, Emma, Edwin, Eman- 
uel, Elmira, Eber, Ellsworth; she died in 1912, aged ninety-four years. 
3. Nancy, married Martin Myers ; children : Louisa, Martha, Marv, 
George, Porter. 4. Jacob, married Rebecca Bathurst ; children : David. 
Marjor}', Jeremiah. Nora, Apalona. 5. Sarah. 6. Catherine, married 
David Smith; children: Abednego, Percilla, Emma. 7. An infant. 8. 
Thomas, of whom further. 9. Mary, married William Decker ; chil- 
dren: Blair, Juniata, Mary. 



1242 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(III) Thomas, son of James and Barbara (Snyder) Ganoe, was 
born July 5, 1822, in Warriors Mark township. He received his educa- 
tion in the common and private schools, and also under his father's ex- 
cellent tuition. He farmed on the Ganoe homestead, which he inherited, 
and there died, and with his wife is buried in the Warriors Mark ceme- 
tery. He was at one time a member of the state militia and was acci- 
dentally shot in the knee, this making him a cripple for life. He led a 
consistent Christian life, and was a devout member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. He married Nancy Campbell, born in Franklin 
county, Pennsylvania, March 7, 1827. Children: i. Emma Elizabeth, 
wife of Levi Nearhoof (see Nearhofif IV). 2. James, died aged nine- 
teen. 3. Margaret, died aged twenty-six. 



The Thompsons of this record, represented in the 
THOMPSON present day by William Thompson, of Alexandria, 

Pennsylvania, descend from a Scotch-Irish ancestor, 
James Thompson, who came from Scotland in 1730, settling in Lan- 
caster county. He had all of a Scotchman's love of adventure, and 
when the colonies were struggling against French and Indian foes he 
gladly and bravely bore his part. He served under the command of 
the youthful Washington and went down in defeat with the English 
army at Braddock's Field. His son William, then a lad of fourteen 
years, was also with the army, serving as teamster, and was one of the 
drivers who after the burial of General Braddock drove their horses 
and wagons over the grave made in the road, that all traces of freshly 
turned earth might be obliterated and the brave general's body escape 
mutilation by the savages. This same James Thompson (known as 
Uncle Jimmie), who thus early received his "baptism of fire," was the 
hero of another perilous adventure. He was captured by Indians raiding 
along the Susquehanna river, and carried away to Canada, along with 
a Miss Young. They were held prisoners for a long time. Miss Young 
being obliged to work in a cornfield. Taking advantage of the entire 
village being on a hunting trip they made an attempt to escape. They 
had been left in the care of two guards, one of whom the young man 
killed, and the other he disarmed and bound. Miss Young was recap- 
tured, while Thompson kept in hiding for several days and finally made 
his dangerous journey southward. After narrowly escaping capture on 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1243 

several occasions, and after almost incredible suffering, living for days 
on roots and berries, he reached the west bank of the Susquehanna. 
Luckily he there found several Indian canoes, which he cut loose, taking 
one for his own escape, and soon reached Fort Dorris, near Lewisburg, 
where he resided several years but later migrated west, and many of his 
descendants live in Franklin and vicinity. His escape from the Indians 
had a romantic ending. After reaching friends, he raised a company 
and went back to the Indian camp, defeating the red men, and recaptur- 
ing Miss Young. 

In the provincial and revolutionary periods several families by name 
Thomson and Thompson became conspicuous in the military and civil 
service of Lancaster and Cumberland counties and in the Juniata Valley. 
Lancaster county furnished three colonels of the name in the revolu- 
tionary war — Colonel James, Colonel Robert and Colonel Andrew 
Thompson. Colonel James commanded a York county battalion and 
was also councillor for that county. Colonel Robert and Colonel James 
married daughters of Robert Bailey. 

The ancestor of this branch. James Thompson, came to America in 
1730-35, from the North of Ireland, with his brother John, first locating 
at New London Crossroads, Chester county, Pennsylvania, thence mov- 
ing to Hanover township, Lancaster county, but now in Dauphin county. 
John later moved to the Juniata Valley, settling near the present town 
of Thompsonville. James settled in the Cumberland Valley, near Cham- 
bersburg. 

Rev. James Thompson, grandson of James Thompson, the emigrant, 
was born in Buffalo Valley, Pennsylvania, died in Alexandria, Hunting- 
don county, October 8, 1830, at the early age of thirty-nine years. He 
was educated under the tuition of Rev. Dr. Hood, he and his classmate, 
Judge Greer, receiving their diplomas from Dr. Hood at the same 
time, one entering the ministry, the other the law. After being or- 
dained a minister of the Presbyterian church. Rev. Thompson first ac- 
cepted a call to a church in Union county, Pennsylvania, which he served 
until 18 19. In that year the churches at Shavers Run and Alexandria 
united and called him as their pastor. He accepted, and on April 19, 
18 19, was ordained and installed. The congregation then had no place 
of worship of their own, but occupied a stone shop belonging to George 
Wilson, as their place of meeting. Soon after the coming of Rev. 



1244 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Thompson a lot for church and cemetery purposes was secured, a frame 
building erected thereon, which, from the color it was painted, became 
known as the "White Meeting House." Here the congregation wor- 
shipped for many years, when a more modern building was erected. 
The fruits of his eleven years as pastor were abundant. The first Pres- 
byterian minister of the town, he gave Alexandria its first church build- 
ing, and laid there a broad and enduring foundation on which the re- 
ligious life of the community has been built. His was the first inspiring 
effort that blazed the way for greater achievements. He married Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Zachariah and Elizabeth Gemmill. Her father was 
owner of the land on which Alexandria stands, having purchased it 
from the owner, by whom it was patented in 1775. After the death of 
Zachariah GemmJll, his widow, Elizabeth, laid out Alexandria, in Au- 
gust, 1793. The original plan consisted of one hundred lots so arranged 
that each lot was two hundred feet in length and sixty feet in front, 
excepting those on the river and four around the public square, which 
were shorter. These lots were subject to a ground rent beginning Sep- 
tember I, 1793. The rental on the Front street lots was $1 annually; 
on Second street, two-thirds of a dollar ; and on Third street, one-half 
of a dollar. A century later many of these lots were still subject to 
this ground rent and still are. Elizabeth Gemmill gave her daughter, 
Elizabeth Thompson, quite a generous portion of the home farm, and 
on the part nearest the village Rev. James built his house when first 
coming there in 1819. This building, with but comparatively few 
changes, is now the residence of his son William, who was born within 
its walls. Mrs. Thompson died in 1877, having been a widow for forty- 
seven years. Children: Anna, deceased; William (of whom further); 
Elizabeth, died in infancy; Jane, died unmarried in 1880. 

William, only son of Rev. James and Elizabeth (Gemmill) Thomp- 
son, was born in his present home, November 14, 1823. He was a lad 
of seven years when his father died, and when fifteen years of age he 
left school and went to Pittsburgh to learn the printer's trade. He 
did not fancy the trade, and after eighteen months' service gave it up 
and began clerking in a dr3'goods store, but only for a short time. He 
then spent a few years in the iron mills of Pittsburgh, but the love of 
adventure that brought his sire to the wilds of western Pennsylvania in 





cfo^T^-J^Z— 



teeIewyokk 

PU3LIC LIBRARY 

ASTOR, LEMOX AND 
L_ "-"'^^ FOUNDATIONS. I 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1245 

the days of old, gained llie upper hand, and about 1855 he went to Kan- 
sas, there undergoing the frightful experiences of border warfare. 
Here he fell into the hands of a gang of ruffians, who placed him on a 
boat bound down the ri\er. lie soon made his escape, and in i860 
made his way back to quieter and less dangerous scenes. He again set- 
tled in Pittsburgh, and soon after joined in with the pioneers in the oil 
fields of Pennsylvania, there finding his life work. He has been promi- 
nently identified with oil production until the present time. He has 
operated alone, in partnership, and has connection with the operations 
of many companies. He was successful in all his undertakings and has 
gradually narrowed his field of operations until his only interests are 
as a stockholder in various successful and established companies. Be- 
sides his oil operations he has had other important business interests. 
He was one of the organizers of the Oil City Savings Bank, for many 
years its president, and was for a long time identified with the Centen- 
nial Bank of Philadelphia, which he yet serves as director. 

Though for many years Mr. Thompson's business interests have 
taken him far and often from the scenes of his childhood, he has ever 
cherished an especial fondness for the home of his birth, and in every 
possible way has advanced the interests of his native village and lifetime 
home. In association with Mr. Wolverton they erected a beautiful 
library building in Alexandria, and, in memory of their mothers, both 
daughters of Elizabeth Gemmill, they named it the Memorial Public 
Library. The shelves are well filled and the library would be a credit 
to even a much larger town than Alexandria. The Presbyterian church, 
founded by his father, has also been an object of Mr. Thompson's gen- 
erous regard. When the recent alterations and repairs were completed 
it was his pleasant duty and privilege to furnish the funds and thereby 
continue in a material sense the work begun spiritually by his honored 
father. Iia political faith Mr. Thompson has been a lifelong Republican. 
He is a member of the Union League, and numbered among his warm 
personal friends the late president of that institution, Mr. James Ho^ie. 
Another close friend of Mr. Thompson for many years was Charles 
Pugh, vice-president of the Pennsylvania railroad, now deceased. Mr. 
Thompson is a member of the Fairbrook Club, of Pennsylvania Furnace, 
and the Rod and Gun Club, of Spruce Creek, Pennsylvania. 



1246 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

The Green family, represented in the present generation 
GREEN by Elisha J. Green, of Alexandria, is of Enghsh descent, 

and has long been resident in Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania, where they have for the most part been successfully identified 
with agricultural pursuits. 

(I) George Green, the pioneer ancestor of the branch of the family 
herein described, came to this country from England (traditionally 
from Chester) some time prior to 1740, and settled in Baltimore county, 
Maryland. He died some time after the year 1763 in Maryland. The 
name of his wife is not known, but he was the father of a numerous 
family, among whom were Thomas, Isaac, Charles, George; Elisha, of 
whom further; Clements, Millie. 

(II) Elisha, son of George Green, settled near Donation, Hunting- 
don county, Pennsylvania, where his death occurred April 17, 1844, at 
an advanced age. He married (first) Priscilla , who died Au- 
gust 18, 1828. Their children were: Charles, born July 21, 1781; 
Ruth, April 20, 1786, married James Stewart: Susannah, February 3, 
1788; George, September 13, 1791 ; Rebecca, October 26, 1793; Pleas- 
ant, June 7, 1795; Elijah, of whom further; Sarah, March 16, 1800; 
Elizabeth, December 11, 1802. He married (second) Margaret (Mil- 
ler) Stewart, widow of Robert Stewart, of Manor Hill. She died Oc- 
tober 3, 1865. 

(III) Elijah, son of Elisha and Priscilla Green, was born in Hunt- 
ingdon county, Pennsylvania, September 28, 1797. He resided on part 
of the old homestead, now the Oswald farm, where he died. He and 
his wife were active members of the Presbyterian church. He married 
Jane, daughter of John Stewart, of Corn Hill, and sister of James 
Stewart. Their children were: Robert Stewart, born December 5, 
1821, died December, 1884; Elisha, January 15, 1824, died June 25, 
1898; Sarah Anne, May 2, 1826, married Samuel Kurtz; John Alexan- 
der, January 10, 1829, died June 7, 1903; James, of whom further. 

(IV) James, son of Elijah and Jane (Stewart) Green, was born in 
Standing Stone Creek Valley, Pennsylvania, May 3, 1831, died Decem- 
ber 8, 1900. He was engaged in farming throughout his life. Repub- 
lican in his political affiliations, he was honored by election to a number 
of local public offices, the duties of which he performed in a very effi- 
cient manner. His religious connection was with the Baptist church, of 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1247 

which he was a inenihcr. He married Charlotte, daughter of Samuel 
Miller, who was a miller and farmer of Huntingdon county. Children: 
Anderson, superintendent of the Reform School of Geneva, Illinois; 
Elisha James, of whom further; Jennie; Annie, died in early childhood; 
Martha; George, in the employ of the Pennsylvania Steel Works, at 
Steelton, Pennsylvania; Carrie M. ; Lena. 

(V) Elisha James, son of James and Charlotte (Miller) Green, was 
born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, February 17, 1864. He was 
educated in the common schools of his native township, acquiring the 
usual education of a farmer's son, and this he has supplemented in 
later years by close observation and study along the line of agriculture. 
For some years he assisted his father in the cultivation of the homestead 
farm, and in 1902 purchased a farm of one hundred and four acres, 
which he manages independently and successfully. It is well stocked in 
all essential points, and a part of it is planted in fruit trees, which are 
now in tine bearing condition. Mr. Green has made a scientific study 
as to the needs of the different seasons, and markets his products in a 
very satisfactory manner. He has also devoted considerable time to 
lumber interests, and has shown himself a practical, keen-witted man 
of business in whatever enterprise he has undertaken. He has taken 
an active part in the interests of the Republican party, in the political 
matters of the section, and has filled very acceptably a number of public 
offices. He has served as auditor of the township for a long period, and 
has been a member of the school board for seven years. 

Mr. Green married, January 23, 1896, Alfaretta, daughter of James 
and Alice (Randolph) Gallagher, and granddaughter of Washington 
Randolph, who was a soldier in the regular army during the civil war. 
The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Children: 
Charlotte, died in early childhood; Carl Miller, James, Josephine, all 
of whom attend the public schools. 



Among the Dutch immigrants who arrived in .Amer- 
CROTSLEY ica in the year 1750 was Jacob Crotsley, a farmer in 

Holland, who came to the New World to better his 
fortunes. He most probably landed in New York, to which port there 
plied a line of sailing vessels from Holland. He remained on Manhat- 
tan Island for some time, and from there drifted to Flunterdon county, 



1248 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

New Jersey. He farmed in New Jersey until his death. Children: 
Mathias, a soldier in the war of the revolution, and was killed in battle 
between the Continentals and the British troops; Andrew, of whom 
further. There were five other sons and daughters. One branch of the 
family lives in New York, another in Ohio. 

(H) Andrew, son of Jacob Crotsley, the Dutch emigrant and foun- 
der of the American branch of the family, was born in New Jersey, 
and was a man of importance and an extensive farmer. He married 
Jennie Parkes. All of his children were born in New Jersey. Among 
his children was Jacob, of whom further. 

(III) Jacob (2), son of Andrew and Jennie (Parkes) Crotsley, was 
born in New Jersey. In 1833 he moved to Cass township, Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, where he bought four hundred acres of wild land, 
part of which he cleared, improved, erected buildings thereon, and here 
passed the remainder of his life. He is buried in the family graveyard 
on the place. He married twice, the names of his wives unknown. Chil- 
dren: Andrew, William, John; Ralph, of whom further; Rachel, Her- 
man, Wesley. The two last were by a second marriage. 

(IV) Ralph, son of Jacob (2) Crotsley, was born August 26, 1823, 
in New Jersey, and came with his father to Cass township, Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1833. He received his education in the com- 
mon schools of the township and was reared on the farm. Reaching 
maturity he engaged in farming on the homestead, where W. A. Crots- 
ley now lives, in Union township, and died there, July 6, 1908. He 
was a general farmer, and was known for his progressiveness. He 
erected the brick residence on the property which is still standing. He 
was active in local politics; was school director and auditor of the 
township, besides holding other official positions. He assisted in or- 
ganizing the Home Guards during the civil war, and became major 
of it. He married Isabel Pheasant, born October 10, 1833, in Union 
township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, daughter of William and 
Sarah (Hazzard) Pheasant. Mr. Pheasant was the son of William 
Pheasant, whose father, Samuel, emigrated from England and settled 
in Frederick county, Maryland, and moved to Huntingdon county, 1810. 
Among the children of Ralph and Isabel (Pheasant) Crotsley was W. 
A., of whom further. 

(V) W. A., son of Ralph and Isabel (Pheasant) Crotsley, was born 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1249 

March 15, i860, in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. He was edu- 
cated in the pubHc schools, and since he was ten years of age has lived 
on his present farm. He is the owner of the old homestead of about 
five hundred acres. He is a successful general farmer and a breeder of 
pedigreed Guernsey cattle and Chester White hogs. He ranks as one of 
the progressive farmers and business men of his county. He was one of 
the organizers of the Huntingdon County Grange Mutual Fire Insur- 
ance Company, of which he is the president. He is also interested in 
the Saltillo Telephone Company. He is a Republican; has been super- 
visor and auditor of the township; member of the Patriotic Order Sons 
of America; Heptasophs; Grange, and he and family are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. He married, in 1884, Olive Theo- 
docia, daughter of Richard Chilcott, an early settler in Huntingdon 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Crotsley have one child, Grace Louisa, married 
Oren G. Swope, and they have one child, Albert O. Swope. 



There is little that is definite that is known of the 
WHITTAKER Whittaker family of Pennsylvania. It is probably 

an ofifshoot of the Whittaker family of Vermont, 
of which the immigrant ancestor came to America in 1650, from Dor- 
setshire, England. Like so many of the old colonial families, the Whit- 
takers have failed to preserve their records, or they have passed into 
other hands. 

(I) Thomas Whittaker was born May 19, 1798. He is thought to 
have come to Pennsylvania, with his brother John, who was born about 
1796, and who served in the war of 1812, to Huntingdon, and there 
located. For some time he was a teamster between Philadelphia and 
Pittsburgh, running his own teams. Later he built a mill one mile from 
Huntingdon, which he r*i successfully. In June of 1845 he purchased 
three hundred acres in Porter township, in Huntingdon county. He 
erected suitable houses on the upper portion, the lower having been 
well supplied by the former owner. Here he did general farming until 
the time of his death, August 30, 1864. He was a Whig in politics, af- 
terward becoming a Republican. He married (first) Margaret Alex- 
ander, born January 14, 1803, died January 23, 1845; married (second) 
Catherine Alexander, a sister of his first wife, born September 22, 
1809. Children by first marriage: i. John A., born April 12, 1824. 



I250 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

2. William A., born July 12, 1826. 3. Caroline, born October 18, 1828. 

4. Thomas S., of whom further. 5. Eliza C, born August 19, 1832. 
6. James, born November 13, 1835. 7. JMartha G., born February 13, 
1840. 8. Margaret, born January 23, 1845. Child by second marriage: 
9. Mary Frances, born October 4, 1849. 

(II) Thomas S. Whittaker, son of Thomas and Margaret (Alex- 
ander) Whittaker, was born August 8, 1830, in what is now Smithfield 
township, Huntingdon county, at Whittaker Mills; and died May 6, 
1909, in the county of his birth. He received his education at the 
Huntingdon Academy, and was reared on the farm. As a young man 
he was boss of a construction gang on the Broad Top railroad, and 
built a record track on the main line of the Pennsylvania railroad. 
When hostilities began between the North and South in 1861 he ofifered 
his services to his country. He enlisted in 1862 for nine months in 
Company C, 125th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers. At the end of 
that time he was honorably discharged, and immediately re-enlisted, in 
1863, in Company M, 20th Pennsylvania Cavalry. He was promoted 
to the first lieutenancy and served six months, and served another short 
enlistment. In 1866 he began farming where Alton Shaffer now (1913) 
resides, on one hundred and six acres. Here he continued to live until 
1908, when he retired from active farming and moved to Smithfield, 
and there lived until his death the following year. He married Lydia 
Steele, born November 10, 1838, the daughter of George and Mary 
(Stoler) Steele. After his marriage in 1866, Mr. Whittaker built the 
house in which he died. George Steele was a farmer and cooper, and 
owned a large tract of land near Saxton, Bedford county, Pennsylvania. 
He was a member of the Reformed church, while the rest of the family 
were Dunkards. Children of George and Mary (Stoler) Steele: Eliza- 
beth ; Ann ; David ; Thomas ; Frederick ; Susan ; Rachel ; Matilda ; Lou- 
isa; Sarah. Children of Thomas S. and Lydia (Steele) W'hittaker: 
I. John C, born April 28, 1867. 2. Edgar B., born September 11, 1870. 

3. Clarence H., born June 20, 1872. 4. Mary G., born April 8, 1874. 

5. Charles S., of whom further. 

(III) Charles Steele Whittaker, son of Thomas S. and Lydia 
(Steele) Whittaker, was born April 28, 1876, in Porter township, Hunt- 
ingdon county, Pennsylvania. He received his preparatory education 
in the public schools in his native township and finished in an academy 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1251 

in Ohio. Leaving school he taught in West Virginia and Pennsylvania 
for nine terms. He then opened a carpenter's shop in West Virginia, 
and later in Pennsylvania, in hoth of which states he did well. Next he 
engaged in farming, purchasing one hundred and twenty-eight acres, 
on which he does general farming and dairying. He is a member of 
the Presbyterian church and of the Grange; and is independent in poli- 
tics. He has been township auditor and has held other offices. He 
married, October 13, 1898, Mary L. Lincoln, daughter of Robert G. 
Lincoln, of Walker township, an old and important family. Children: 
1. William, born April 5, 1900, died within a few days of his birth. 2. 
Thomas C., born September 23, 1901, died March 8, 1912. 3. Alice 
Margaret, born November 19, 1906. 4. Walter Howard, born July 26, 
1910. 



For many generations the Henry family has been estab- 
HENRY lished in Pennsylvania. The state records show that sev- 
eral of the name were enlisted men in the war of the 
revolution, and there are many named on the rosters of the various 
companies sent from Pennsylvania during the civil war. The original 
immigrant ancestor probably came from England about 1670, as one 
Thomas Henry, able seaman, made the voyage at that time on the 
"Spotted Cow," out from London, James Brown, master. Thomas 
Henry quit his ship on reaching New York, and later became one of 
the prominent men in an English colony in Ulster county. Later his 
descendants, as was the invariable custom of the times, drifted into 
Pennsylvania, established themselves as farmers, and there some of 
their posterity remains to-day. 

(I) Jonathan Henry was born in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania; re- 
ceived his education in the common schools and grew to manhood on 
his father's farm. On reaching his majority he engaged in the cooper- 
age business, near Siglerville, Pennsylvania, where he established his 
home and shop, and where he eventually died, after a long and quietly 
useful life. Owing to his business he was one of the best known men 
in that section of the state, and he held the respect of his fellow citizens. 
He married a Miss Hassinger. Children, all of whom are living except 
Richard M. : Samuel; Wilson; Thomas; Richard M., of whom further; 
Julia Ann; Rebecca; Florence; Sarah. 



1252 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(II) Richard M., son of Jonathan Henry, was born near Siglerville, 
Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, in the Henry homestead. He was reared, 
educated and settled in his native county, near the home of his father, 
where he purchased the property that had once belonged to his great- 
grandfather, George Hassinger, who had come from Germany years 
before the revolutionary war, and who had fought valiantly for the 
cause of his adopted country against English aggression. Richard M. 
Henry was one of the prosperous farmers of his section and succeeding 
in accumulating a large estate before his death in 1908, which occurred 
in his home. He was a staunch Republican, voting with that party since 
its organization. At the last call of the United States government for 
troops he enlisted in a Pennsylvania regiment, and served until the end 
of the civil war. He, with his wife, was a member of the Lutheran 
church, of which he was a deacon for many years. He was a man of 
unbounded influence among his neighbors on account of their confidence 
in him as a man and fellow citizen who had their best interests at heart. 
They sought his advice and generally followed it, and in his death he 
was universally mourned. He married (first) Susanna Brown, born in 
Mifflin county, and died in 1890, the daughter of Christopher and Mar- 
garet Brown, who were descended from families which had long been 
established in Pennsylvania. Mr. Brown was an extensive land owner, 
and a wealthy man. He retired late in life from active participation 
in affairs and moved to Siglerville, where they both died. Their chil- 
dren were : Alexander, deceased ; Samuel ; James ; John, deceased ; Su- 
sanna, deceased; Agnes; Ellen; Jane, deceased. Children of Richard 
M. and Susanna (Brown) Henry: i. Wilson N., of whom further. 

2. Margaret, married E. O. Heorsh, lived and died in Mifflin county. 

3. Sally, married S. R. Palmer, of Altoona, Pennsylvania. 4. Robert, an 
employee of the Pennsylvania railroad at Altoona. 5. Sidney, an em- 
ployee of the Pennsylvania railroad at Altoona, Pennsylvania. 6. 
Emma, married Bruce Reager, of Mifflin county. 7. Brown, lives in 
Mifflin county. 8. Carrie, married Samuel Harshbarger, of Burnham, 
Pennsylvania. 9. Lizzie, married and lives in Chicago. 10. Susanna, 
married Mr. McElhoe. 11. George, died aged nineteen years. 12. Wil- 
lis, laborer in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. Mr. Henry married 
(second), Mrs. Lucas, and had five children: Delia, Frank, James, 
Bessie and Theresa. 



HISTORY OF 'JHK Jl'NIATA VALLEY 1253 

(111) Wilson N., son of Richard M. and Susanna (Brown) Henry, 
was born May 31, 1861, in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania. He was reared 
on his father's farm, educated in the common schools of the township 
and after marriage became an agriculturist. In 1891 he moved to 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and purchased the old Crane place 
in Spruce Creek Valley, Franklin township, and has since made his 
home there. After the deeds were made to him he began improvements 
on the place, erected new and modern buildings, increased the fertility 
of the land by judicious scientific methods, and does a highly successful 
general farming. He is one of the prominent men of the township and 
has held nearly every township office, under the Republican party, of 
which he is a strong supporter, except that of tax collector. He has 
served as state road foreman, giving entire satisfaction in that capacity. 
Like his wife he is a member of the Presbyterian church, has been one 
of its trustees for years, and also superintendent of the Sunday school. 
During the time that he served he succeeded in imbuing the young people 
of the township with a deep interest in the school, thereby increasing 
materially the attendance. He married Annie Crain, born in Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, but a resident of Blair county at the time of her marriage, 
a daughter of Aram and Mary (Crain) Crain, and a descendant of a 
family long established in Pennsylvania. Children : Mary ; Clara, mar- 
ried L. F. Frank ; Gertrude, Lincoln, Harry, Roy, Kelley, Paul, Helen, 
Winifred, Frances, Wilson ]t. 



Harry Brown Stewart, who is successfully engaged as 
STEWART a dairy farmer at Alexandria, Huntingdon county, 

Pennsylvania, has built up an extensive and profitable 
business, and has achieved the reputation which comes to a man when he 
has demonstrated his ability to overcome obstacles, and with resolute 
and honorable purpose pushes forward to the goal. 

(I) John Stewart, the emigrant ancestor of the family of which 
Harry Brown Stewart is n representative, was born in county Derry, 
Ireland, 1756, and came to America in 1793. He was a weaver by trade. 
and settled at first in Perry county, removing to Huntingdon county in 
1800. He located one mile north of Center Union, on "Corn Hill." 
where his death occurred, August 12, 1848. He married Sarah Mc- 
Kean, a native of county Antrim, Ireland, who died April 15, 1849, '^t 



1254 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

the age of ninety-three years. Children : James ; Alexander ; Mary, 
died at sea in infancy; Jennie; Robert; John P., see forward; Elizabeth. 

(II) John P., son of John and Sarah (McKean) Stewart, was born 
at Manor Hill, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, October 23, 1800, 
died April 6, 1877, on his farm at Standing Stone Creek, adjoining 
"Corn Hill." He married (first) Matilda Green, by whom he had chil- 
dren: Vienna, Mary, Anderson P., Marietta, Palmer L., see forward; 
Alvernon, Evaline R., Asbury J. He married ('second) Lucy Ann, 
born March i, 1820, died July 10, 1876, daughter of William Foster, 
who migrated from county Fermanagh, Ireland. One of her grand- 
fathers was William McCracken, a revolutionary soldier of Tuscarora 
Valley. Children by this marriage: Anna M., married William H. 
Linton; OHver L. ; John F. ; William B. ; Thompson C. ; Delilah M., 
married J. C. Longenecker; Adaline; Walter S. ; Harry W. ; David M. 

(III) Palmer L., son of John P. and Matilda (Green) Stewart, was 
born December 24, 1832, died April 23, 1912. He was born in Standing 
Stone Valley, Warm Springs, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and 
was educated in the district schools of that section. He was a farmer 
by occupation and the owner of sixty-six acres of land in Juniata town- 
ship, which he kept in a fine state of cultivation until he retired in 1902. 
At the time of the civil war he enlisted in Company C, First Pennsyl- 
vania Cavalry, Thirty-second Regiment, and served a three-year terra. 
He was a Republican in political matters, and filled a number of local 
offices. He and his wife were members of the Baptist church. He 
married, 1869, Sarah Silknitter, born July 21, 1842. Her father, John 
Silknitter, was of German descent, and came from Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, to Himtingdon county; he was a member of the Baptist 
church; married Sarah, daughter of Moses Dickey, who was a soldier 
in the revolutionary war and served in Big Valley in 1777; they had 
eight children. Mr. and Mrs. Stewart had children as follows: Harry 
Brown, see forward; J. Guy, born January 20, 1872, is in the employ 
of the Raystown Water Power Company; Mertie, born April 4, 1874, 
married Clement Gill, a tablet cutter; Charles, born March 19, 1876, 
deceased; Emma, born May 12, 1878, married George Megahan, pro- 
prietor of a grocery store; B. Franklin, born July 19, 1880, is an elec- 
trician in the employ of the Westinghouse Company at Pittsburgh; 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1255 

Mary M., l)orn Feliruary 11, 1883, is luiniarricd, and is a clerk in a 
store. 

(IV) Harry Brown, son of I 'aimer L. and Sarah (Silknitter) Stew- 
art, was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, April 4, 1870. He 
received a sound, practical education in the public schools of his section 
of the country, and being of an observant nature has added to this con- 
siderably as the years have gone by. All the working years of his life 
have been spent on a farm, and he is thoroughly familiar with all the 
details of the work connected with it. In 1904 he purchased a farm in 
Porter township, this consisting of one hundred and two acres, well im- 
proved. He had this properly fenced for a dairy farm, and now has a 
herd of fourteen cows, Holstein cattle, Chester White hogs and Per- 
cheron horses. In every detail this farm is a model of its kind. The 
most scrupulous attention is paid to cleanliness and the care of the ani- 
mals, and the quality of the milk from this farm is said to be the finest 
in the county. In politics Mr. Stewart is a Republican, has filled a 
number of local ofiices, and is now serving as school director, in which 
position he is doing excellent work. Mr. Stewart married, 1896, Lula, 
daughter of Jeremiah Brennanan, a farmer. Three children have been 
born to them: One, who died in infancy; Warren, born February ly, 
1901, attends school; Lester, born May 24, 1908. Mr. and Mrs. Stew- 
art are members of the Baptist church. 



In length of residence in this country and prominence in its 
PECK public afl:'airs the Peck family ranks with the oldest and 
highest. The immigrant progenitor, John Peck, came from 
Devonshire, England, about 1626, and landed in Virginia, at Jamestown. 
He later found his way to New Amsterdam, and settled on Manhattan 
Island, about a mile from what is now known as Battery Park. He 
and his Dutch neighbors were friendly and the relations between them 
were cordial until the day of his death. Being an Englishman, he took 
no part in the deliberations of the village, but pursued the even tenor of 
his wa}- unmolested. He died on Manhattan Island. It is thought that 
he married and brought his wife with him from England, for neither 
the Virginia nor the Dutch Colonial records make any notice of his 
marriage. He had a large family, and the descendants of his sons and 
daughters are widely scattered over the United States. They have occu- 



1256 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

pied every walk of life, many have been state and national representa- 
tives ; others writers ; others yet ministers of the gospel ; still others have 
been teachers, farmers and journalists. In whatever position they have 
served they have done so with dignity and distinction. Among the sons 
of John Peck was John, of whom further. 

(II) John (2), son of John (i) Peck, the immigrant, was born most 
probably on Manhattan Island. He was a farmer and a fisherman; at 
times a trapper and hunter, and also was an Indian fighter. He lived 
and died on Manhattan Island. Among his children was Abner, of 
whom further. 

(III) Abner John, son of John (2) Peck, was born on Manhattan 
Island, and like his father combined the occupations of farming, fishing, 
hunting, trapping and fighting Indians. Among his children was Albert 
or Alfred, of whom further. 

(IV) Albert (or Alfred), son of Abner John Peck, was born in New 
York, probably about 1730. There is little known of him except that 
he married Katrin Schuyler, the daughter of a Dutch immigrant. 
Among his children was John, of whom further. 

(V) John (3), son of Albert and Katrin (Schuyler) Peck, was born 
in New York in 1755. He grew to manhood in the place of his nativity. 
He was a soldier in the war of the revolution, enlisting in the Continen- 
tal army from New York. He was with General Anthony Wayne, and 
was in the battle of Stony Point. He was wounded, and remained at 
home for over a year. Recovering he again entered the army and re- 
mained until articles of peace were signed between the Colonies of 
America and the English government. He grew to prominence after 
the war as a man of business, and at his death was considered a rich 
citizen. His estate was in litigation for some years because he disin- 
herited a daughter who had married a man of whom he disapproved, 
probably the son of a Tory. Among his children was Liflett, of whom 
further. 

fVI) Liflett Peck, son of John Peck, the revolutionary soldier, was 
born in Jefferson county, New York, where his father moved prior to 
his birth. He lived and died at Stone Mills, on his farm of two or three 
hundred acres. He and his wife were active members of the Baptist 
church, and were generous in their support of it. He married Lois 
Webb, born in Jefferson county, near Stone Mills. She was. a member 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1257 

of the prominent Webb family of that section of the state, descendants 
of General William Brewster, who came over in the "Mayflower." She 
had five brothers, all of whom were highly educated men and all were 
noted divines of the Baptist church. Mr. James B. Webb, a member of 
the family and a prominent attorney of Lombard, Illinois, has written 
a complete history of the Webb family, which is considered one of the 
most valuable contributions to the pioneer, colonial, revolutionary and 
Baptist histories of this country. One of the ancestors of the Webb 
family accompanied King Richard Cour-de-Lion into Palestine in the 
third crusade, or holy war. Children of Liflett and Lois (Webb) Peck : 
I. William, died a young man. 2. Walter Webb, of whom further. 3. 
Frank, died in Salina, Kansas, in 1913. 4. Elliott, died in Salina, Kan- 
sas, in 1913. 5. Abner W., lived many years on the homestead; once 
sherifif for two terms and assemblyman of Jefferson county. New York ; 
a soldier, captain during the civil war ; died in Watertown, New York. 
6. A daughter, died a young woman. 

(VII) Walter Webb, son of Liflett and Lois (Webb) Peck, w^as 
born January 17, 181S, in Jefferson county. New York, died November 
4, 1890, in Salina, Kansas. He received his preparatory education 
under private tutors, afterward attending the public school. About 
1842 he went south, to Jefferson county, Mississippi, to teach, and con- 
tinued at that occupation for several terms. He then turned his atten- 
tion to planting, purchased a plantation of seven hundred acres of ex- 
ceedingly fertile bottom land in Jefferson county. He remained south 
until 1871, continuing the planting of cotton, when he disposed of his 
plantation and moved with his family to Salina, Salina county, Kansas. 
He purchased four hundred and sixty acres of land, the oldest farm, it 
is said, in Salina county, there established himself until his death. He 
raised stock and farmed, and had one of the model farms of that sec- 
tion. He was a strong Democrat, working for the party at all times. 
He and his wife were consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He married Kate May Osteen, born in Jefferson county, Mis- 
sissippi, May 31, 1840, a former pupil. She was the daughter of 
Thomas Sheriff and Elizabeth Osteen, of Jefferson county, Mississippi. 
They were natives of South Carolina, descending from good old Salz- 
burger families, whose forbears came from the Salza Valley, Switzer- 
land, at the time that General Oglethorpe induced emigrants to join the 



1258 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

English in the new colony of Georgia. The Salzburgers, as they are 
locally known in South Carolina and Georgia, were persecuted with 
fiendish cruelty by Grand Duke Leopold because of their adherence to 
the Protestant faith, and to escape the inquisition they emigrated in 
great numbers to the New World. It is to the credit of the Salzburgers 
that they insisted that a clause be inserted in the constitution of the col- 
ony of Georgia forbidding slavery, black and white, and among those 
who approved the clause most vigorously was David Osteen, whose de- 
scendants afterward moved across the Savannah river into South Caro- 
lina. Slavery was finally introduced into Georgia through the efforts 
of four or five families from Dorchester, Massachusetts, who moved 
south and carried with them their slaves, intending to enter Georgia. 
The Salzburgers met them at the river and forbade them to cross. 
Later, after spending five years on the South Carolina side of the river, 
and sending messengers to King George and General Oglethorpe, over 
the earnest protest of David Osteen and other Salzburgers, they were 
given permission to bring in their slaves, and the constitution was 
changed to meet the demand of the people from Massachusetts. Mr. 
Osteen was a cotton and rice planter in South Carolina, and moved to 
Mississippi prior to the civil war. He was, also, a large slave owner, 
and was known for his kindness to the latter. He and his wife were 
active members of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which faith their 
immigrant ancestors were among the first members after it was organ- 
ized by John and Charles Wesley on their visit to the colony of Georgia, 
and John Osteen was among the first teachers of the first Sunday school 
ever held in the world. The Osteens were also prominent in the or- 
ganization of the first orphan asylum in the colony of Georgia, and 
later organized one in South Carolina. Thomas Sheriff and Elizabeth 
Osteen assisted in organizing the Cane Ridge Methodist Episcopal 
church, in Mississippi, which is still in existence and is regarded as a 
monument to them. They were prominent socially, commercially and 
in religious matters in whatever part of the country they lived. 
Children: Mary, widow of Rev. Calvin Critchfield Watkins, a Metho- 
dist Episcopal minister of Mississippi ; Kate May, married Walter Webb 
Peck ; Jennie, married Dr. Addison J. Mattox, a wealthy and prominent 
physician and planter of Mississippi and Louisiana. Children of Walter 
Webb and Kate May (Osteen) Peck : i. Frank Leon, of whom further. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1259 

2. Albert, died in infancy. 3. Raphael Douglas, resides in Lancaster, 
California, a farmer. 4. Ernest Lee, died in 1892, in Salina, Kansas. 
5. George Clinton, a fruit grower in Los Angeles, California. 6. Walter 
Killingsworth, a newspaper man in Los Angeles, California. 7. Lily, 
died unmarried in 1896. 

(VIII) Frank Leon, son of Walter Webb and Kate May (Osteen) 
Peck, was born August i, 1857, on his father's cotton plantation in Jef- 
ferson county, Mississippi. He received his preparatory education in 
Mississippi, finishing at the high school in Salina, Kansas. Leaving 
school he taught two terms, and then engaged with his father in stock 
raising and farming in Salina county. In the fall of 188 1 he moved to 
Pennsylvania and located near Tyrone, and with the exception of three 
years he has since lived in this vicinity, where he does general farming 
and stock raising. He is a Progressive Republican; a member of the 
Grange, and he and his entire family are consistent members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Peck commands the respect and es- 
teem of his fellow citizens by his integrity, honor, right living and right 
thinking. He married, December 29. i88r, Anna Mary Waite, born 
September 21, 1855, in Eden Valley, Pennsylvania, near Spruce Creek, 
daughter of John G. and Isabella (Henderson) Waite. Her forbears 
were: Caspar and Eva (Pool) Waite, who were among the early set- 
tlers in the Juniata Valley, he being direct from Germany; was a farmer 
and large land owner ; children : Eliza, Eva, Margaret. Joseph, Jacob, 
Caspar, Daniel, John, Molly. John Waite, son of Caspar and Eva 
(Pool) Waite, was born February 3, 1787, in Sinking Valley, Hunting- 
don county, Pennsylvania; married Esther Wagner, born December 18, 
1793; children: Daniel, born January 18, 1818; Mary, born December 
13, 1820, married Jacob Stover, died February 12, 1891, near Tyrone; 
Abram, born November 12, 1822, died unmarried; John G. ; Eve, born 
January 3, 1826, died August 29, 1898, married George Walter; Henry, 
born January 3, 1828, died May 25, 1872, in Center county, Pennsyl- 
vania ; Esther, born 1830, married Augustus Weekland. 

John G. Waite, son of John and Esther (Wagner) Waite, was born 
June 20, 1824, near Union Furnace, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. 
His father having died when he was six years of age, his mother pur- 
chased a farm one mile from Spruce Creek, where he lived until he 
attained his majority. He then worked by the month for his brother- 



i26o HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

in-law, Jacob Stover, for two years at ten dollars a month, on a farm 
near Spruce Creek, owned by the Huntingdon Furnace Company. He 
and his brother Henry then leased the same farm and farmed together 
for several years. In March, 1850, he married Isabella Henderson, 
daughter of David and Margaret (Conrad) Henderson, who was born 
April 2, 1826. After his marriage he bought out his brother's interests 
in the personal property, where he continued to farm for nine years, 
during which time he and his wife both worked very hard, accomplish- 
ing the building of the large barn which still stands on the farm, now 
owned by John Stover. He cleared about sixty acres of land, from 
which he received two crops for his labor. His extensive farming often 
made it necessary to have as many as twenty-five and thirty men at 
work at one time. In 1859 he purchased the John Henderson estate, 
three hundred and thirty-five acres of land, in Warriors Mark township, 
the place now owned and farmed by Frank Leon Peck, known as the 
Waite homestead, where he engaged in farming and stock raising. 
This he continued until 1865, when he retired from active farming and 
gave his attention to real estate. In 1882 he moved to Tyrone, where 
he died November 2, 1891. He was a Republican; he and his family 
were active members of the Methodist Episcopal church, he being a 
prominent financial supporter and serving a number of years as trus- 
tee. His affliction with rheumatism confined him to his bed and chair 
for a number of years. During these years he was a living example of 
Christian fortitude and patience, being ably ministered to by his loving 
wife, and his support was his faith in God. At the time of his death he 
was identified as a prominent real estate owner of Tyrone. Mr. and 
Mrs. Waite's social and charitable qualities made them friends wherever 
they went, and their home was noted for miles around for its hospitality. 
Isabella (Henderson) Waite died August 31, 1900, at her home in Ty- 
rone. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Waite were: i. Robert H., born 
December 14, 1851, died January 2, 1864. 2. Anna Mary, born Sep- 
tember 21, 1855; married Frank L. Peck. 3. Margaret E., born July 
31, 1866; married, June 12, 1895, H. E. Gardner, who is mentioned 
further below. 4. Drucilla B., born September 5, 1871, wife of John B. 
Campbell. 

Harry E. Gardner was raised on his father's farm at Rock Springs, 
Center county, Pennsylvania, and received his education in the common 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1261 

schools. He began his business Hfe by clerking in a country store at 
Spruce Creek, and then in a general store at Tyrone, after which he 
moved to Pittsburgh, where he received a thorough initiation into busi- 
ness management. The appreciation of his business ability demanded 
his services in New York City, where he is now a director, secretary, 
and treasurer of the Clinton Point Stone Company. Through his affa- 
ble disposition, the cheery nature of his wife, and the hospitality of 
their home, they enjoy a wide circle of friends in both cities, x^s men- 
tioned above, he married Margaret E. Waite ; they reside in East 
Orange, New Jersey, and have two children : Wilson E. and John W. 
Children of Frank Leon and Anna Mary (Waite) Peck: i. Grace 
Isabel, educated in Tyrone high school, now at home. 2. John Walter, 
attended Tyrone high school ; graduated from agricultural department 
of State College ; sujierintends a large poultry and stock farm. 3. Rob- 
ert Lee, educated at Juniata College, died in 1909. 4. Florence Kate, 
educated in Tyrone high school, now at home. 5. Ralph Emerson, 
graduated from Snyder township high school and Juniata College, now 
at home. 6. Margaret Mildred, educated in Tyrone high school. 7. 
Anna Mary, died in infancy. 



At this juncture in a volume devoted to the careers of 
DUNAHAY representative citizeas of Juniata Valley, Pennsyl- 
vania, it is a pleasure to insert a brief history of 
Thomas Dunahay, who has ever been on the alert to forward all meas- 
ures projected for the good of the general welfare and who has served 
his community in various official capacities of trust and responsibility. 
For four years he was constable of Bedford county, and he is now de- 
voting the major portion of his time and attention to diversified agri- 
culture and stock-raising, his finely improved estate of one hundred 
and eighty-one acres being eligibly located in West township, Hunting- 
don county, three miles distant from Petersburg. 

Thomas Dunahay was born in Claysburg, Blair county, Pennsyl- 
vania, March i, 1859. He is a son of David and Eliza A. (Dodson) 
Dunahay, the former of whom was born at Cherry Tree, Pennsylvania, 
September 4, 1830, and the latter of whom was born at East Freedom, 
Blair county, this state, September 29, 1827. The father died Septem- 
ber 12, 1892, aged sixty-two years, and the mother died October 24, 



1262 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

191 1, aged eight3'-four years. David Dunahay was a son of John and 
Mary (Davis) Dunahay, the former a native of county Tipperary, Ire- 
land, and the latter of Wales. John Dunahay came to America as a 
small boy and he grew up near Cherry Tree, at the corner of Blair 
and Cambria counties, Pennsylvania. He early entered upon an ap- 
prenticeship to learn the trade of shoemaker and was identified with 
that line of work during the entire period of his active business career. 
He was a very energetic old man and a very brave-spirited one. He 
was seventy-one years of age at the time of the inception of the civil 
war. All four of his sons enlisted for service in the Union army and 
so high was his personal feeling in connection with the preservation of 
the Union that in spite of his age he too enlisted. He was living in 
Cambria county, Pennsylvania, at the time, with his daughter Elizabeth 
and her husband. One morning he expressed his determination to go 
to war and gathered his things together much to the consternation of his 
daughter, who asked him; "Are you going crazy, father?" "No," he 
said, "I'm going to join the army. All my sons are serving for the 
cause and they are no better men than I am to-day, so I can fight for 
my country, too." He joined and saw considerable service, but while in 
camp in Kentucky he was murdered by a camp follower to get five 
hundred dollars which he had in his wallet. Thus was brutally quenched 
the spirit of one of the noblest men who served in the cause of freedom 
and justice. John and Mary (Davis) Dunahay became the parents of 
eight children, concerning whom the following facts are here incor- 
porated : I. David, of whom further. 2. Catherine, twin of David, 
married Alex Brown and they removed west to the state of Indiana in 
1861. 3. John, removed to North Dakota, where he gained prestige as 
a prominent and prosperous farmer and where his demise occurred in 
1910. 4. James, was a coal miner and was killed in a mine in Clay 
county, Indiana. 5. George W., was a farmer in the state of Washing- 
ton at the time of his death. 6. Sarah, married Anthony Wire, of 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania; now deceased. 7. Elizabeth, married Daniel 
DeArmy and they removed west to North Dakota. 8. Maria, married 
William McCuUough and lived at Brazil, Indiana, for many years. All 
four of the above sons saw hard service in the civil war and although 
wounded all survived that sanguinary struggle. The maternal grand- 
parents of the above children were Thomas and Barbara (Lingenfelter) 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1263 

Dodson. the former of whom was born April 25, 1796, died November 
II, 1878, and the latter of whom was born in September, 1798, died 
September 17. 1892. The birthplace of jjoth was in the vicinity of 
East Freedom, Blair county, this state. The Dodsons were of Irish 
and the Lingenfelters of German descent, both families having been 
among the early settlers in Blair county. Thomas Dodson was a school 
teacher in winter and a farmer in summer. He was born, lived and 
died on a farm of one hundred and sixty-six acres, known as the Dod- 
son homestead. He and his wife were lifelong Methodists and for 
many years he was a deacon and trustee in the church. Their mar- 
riage was solemnized April 24, 1823, the ceremony having been per- 
formed by Richard Silver, Esq. He was a staunch Republican and was 
incumbent of numerous local offices, all of which he filled with credit. 
Following are the children of Thomas and Barbara Dodson: i. Mary 
Ann, born March 6, 1824, died October 9, 1908; married Jacob Zeth 
and they lived at Claysburg, Pennsylvania. 2. Margaret, bom May 8, 
1825 ; is single and living at East Freedom, Pennsylvania. 3. Delilah, 
born June 19, 1826; wife of Jacob Myers, of Woodbury, Pennsylvania. 
4. Eliza A., wife of David Dunahay. 5. Rachel, born January 11, 1831 ; 
widow of James Pressel and resides near Claysburg. 6. Thomas, born 
March 4, 1832, lives at Ohiopyle, Pennsylvania. 7. Elizabeth, born 
January 31, 1834; wife of J. E. Nofsker, of East Freedom. 8. Cather- 
ine, born April i, 1836; wife of Martin Nofsker, of Claysburg. 9. 
Jacob L., born August 4, 1839, deceased. 10. James, born August 20, 
1841 ; lives at Duncansville, Pennsylvania. 

David Dunahay passed his boyhood and youth in Indiana county, 
Pennsylvania, where he attended the public schools. After reaching 
his legal majority he settled in Blair county, where he farmed on rented 
property for several years, eventually removing to Somerset county, 
where he purchased a finely improved estate. His death occurred in 
Blair county. He served in Company H. Twelfth Pennsylvania Cavalry, 
during most of the war, although he was previously enlisted for ninety 
days in the Pennsylvania infantry. He was a Republican in his political 
allegiance, and in middle life became a devout member of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church. He married Eliza A. Dodson and their union 
was blessed with four children: i. Margaret, born March 25, 1855, 
died December 12, 1870. 2. John, born January 14, 1857; married 



1264 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Emma Myers and they now live on a farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres near New Leipsic, North Dakota. 3. Thomas, of whom further. 
4. Jacob, born June 8, 1863, died May 22, 1864. 

To the pubHc schools of Blair county, Pennsylvania, Thomas Duna- 
hay is indebted for his preliminary educational training which has since 
been effectively supplemented with extensive reading. He remained at 
home with his father until his marriage, when he removed to Somerset 
county, where he farmed for the ensuing eleven years, when he removed 
to Bedford county, remaining in that section for six years. In 1887 he 
engaged in the lumber business at McKee, Blair county, in partnership 
with his brother John, under the name of Dunahay Brothers. In 1894 
he withdrew from the lumber concern and began farming near Sinking 
Valley. In 1905 he purchased one hundred and eighty-one acres of land, 
known as the James A. Davis farm, and since April, 1908, he has been 
living on that estate, which is located in West township, Huntingdon 
county, near Petersburg. In addition to general farming he keeps Ches- 
ter White hogs and breeds Bench Beagle hounds. Formerly he was a 
Republican in his political views and for four years he was constable 
of Bedford county. He is now a supporter of the principles and poli- 
cies for which the Progressive party stands sponsor. He is one of the 
genial, well liked citizens of West township, being held in high esteem 
by all with whom he has come in contact. 

Mr. Dunahay married, November 6, 1881, Jeanetta Schaff, born in 
Milford township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, April 30, 1861, died 
July 8, 1910. She was a daughter of David and Louisa Schaff, of Con- 
fluence, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Dunahay was a woman of most gracious 
personality and was beloved by all who came within the sphere of her 
gentle influence. Eight children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Dunahay : 
I. Elizabeth, born January 4, 1883; wife of Ross Smith, of Derry, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. 2. David Sherman, born July 15, 
1885, died September 12, 1886. 3. Harry M., born August 20, 1887; a 
farmer in Winnebago county, Illinois. 4. Herbert R., born December 
7, 1889; lives with his brother, Harry M., in Illinois. 5. Thomas Blair, 
born April 8, 1892; resides at home. 6. Raymond Edgar, born March 
24, 1894; resides at home. 7. Mary Louise, born January 27, 1897; 
resides at home. 8. Calvin S., born July 5, 1899, died September 14, 
1900. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1265 

Cromwell township, lluntiiigdon county, Pennsyl- 
CROMWELL vania, is so named in memory of Colonel Thomas 

Cromwell, who was an early settler, a "distinguished 
and hospitable citizen," from whom descended a later day Thomas 
Cromwell, grandfather of John C. Cromwell, of Maddensville. He was 
a farmer all his life, following part of the time the mason's trade. His 
home was in Springfield township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. 
He married Matilda Everheart and had is.sue: George, John C, Henry 
Irvin, Thomas, Hannah, Juniata, Maggie, Elizabeth, Ida, Sylvester, men- 
tioned below. 

(II) Sylvester, son of Thomas and Matilda (Everheart) Cromwell, 
was born in Springfield township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, in 
1842, died in 191 1. He obtained a public school education and after a 
little further instruction accepted a position as school teacher, abandon- 
ing this profession to engage in farming; later doing contract work in 
the coal mines of Bedford county. He then returned to his earlier occu- 
pation, cultivating a farm of one hundred and fifty acres in Springfield 
township, also, in partnership with his son, John C, doing a large lum- 
ber contracting business. He was a Democrat in politics and held manj' 
local offices. He was a member of the Church of God. 

He married Diana, daughter of Jacob Booth, a farmer of Springfield 
township, formerly of York county, of German descent. Children: r. 
John C, of whom further. 2. William, a farmer; married Jennie Mad- 
den; three children. 3. Ettie, married Grant Lane, a farmer, teacher 
and justice of the peace ; four children. 4. Annie, married Walter Lytle ; 
four children. 

(III) John C, eldest child of Sylvester and Diana (Booth) Crom- 
well, was born in Springfield township, Huntingdon county, Pennsyl- 
vania, February 17, 1870. He obtained his education in the public 
schools and for sixteen years followed the profession of a teacher in the 
vicinitv of Maddensville, also farming and dealing in lumber, as well as 
working in the mines for a short time. In 1907 he purchased the IMad- 
densville Flour Mill, and three hundred acres of land with a dwelling 
thereon. The mill is forty by forty feet, four stories high and is sup- 
plied with power by an overshot water wheel. He is a Democrat in 
politics and has held numerous local offices. He is a member of the 
Patrons of Husbandry, belonging to Grange No. 329, and is a member 



1266 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

of the Church of God. In poHtical belief he is a Repubhcan. He mar- 
ried, December 25, 1896, EHzabeth May Ashton, a daughter of David 
and EHza (Madden) Ashton, and a granddaughter of Robert Madden, 
one of the early settlers of Springfield township. He was one of the 
noted bridge builders of Huntingdon county and built the bridge that 
crosses the Juniata river at Huntingdon (standing at this time, 1913). 
Children of Mr. and Mrs. Cromwell : Frederick, born September 5, 
1899; Helen, born February 20, 1905; Carl, died in infancy, and 
Horace W. 



Dr. James T. Mahon, whose death was deeply and sin- 
MAHON cerely deplored by his associates in the medical profession 

as well as by a large circle of friends and patients, had 
attained a high rank in his profession many years prior to his death. He 
had been a resident of Lewistown, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, for 
many years. His father. Dr. David D. Mahon, was born August 28, 
181 5, and was also a successful physician. He had located at Newton 
Hamilton, Mifilin county, Pennsylvania, and was engaged in the active 
practice of his profession a long time. He married Martha S. Cochran, 
and they both died in Newton Hamilton. 

Dr. James T. Mahon was born in Shippensburg, Cumberland county, 
Pennsylvania, December 8, 1841, and removed with his parents to Mif- 
flin county. His preparatory education was acquired in the public schools 
of his native town, and he was later graduated with honor from the 
Baltimore Medical College (University of Maryland), in 1864. Imme- 
diately after his graduation he established himself in practice at Newton 
Hamilton, and had already achieved a very reasonable amount of suc- 
cess when he succeeded to the practice of his father in 1865 at Newton 
Hamilton. Twenty years later, 1885, he removed to Lewistown, Mif- 
flin county, where his reputation as a physician had preceded him, and 
where he had a large and lucrative practice until the time of his death, 
February i, 1895. He held a number of public and semi-public offices. 
He served as assistant surgeon of the One Hundred and Eighty-seventh 
Pennsylvania Volunteers during the civil war, and was the surgeon for 
Colonel Huling Post, of Lewistown, for several years. For the period 
of twenty-seven years he was the physician for the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road Company, and he was a member of the United States pension board 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1267 

of examining surgeons in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania. His fraternal 
affiliations were with Lewistown Lodge, No. 203, Free and Accepted 
Masons, of which he was past master; and he was a member of Chapter 
No. 186, Royal Arch Masons. 

Dr. Mahon married, March 6, 1873, Eliza Ellen Thompson, born 
in Mexico, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, November 7, 1843, ''nd her 
line of descent will be found below. 

(The Thompson Line). 

(I) John Thompson Sr. was born in Scotland from whence he mi- 
grated to Ireland, county Antrim, about 1735. Subsequently he emi- 
grated to America, came up the Susquehanna and Juniata rivers, and 
landed at the mouth of the run three miles east of Thompsontown. He 
married (first) a Miss Greenleaf, (second) a Miss Slocum, (third) a 
Miss Patterson. 

(II) William, son of John Thompson and his first wife, was born 
in 1754. He was an active participant in the battles of Brandywine and 
Germantown. He married Jane [Mitchell, of Chestnut Level, Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania, who died January 3, 1813, at the age of fifty- 
nine years. Of this marriage there were nine children, James being the 
next in line of descent. 

(III) James, son of William and Jane (Mitchell) Thompson, was 
born February 2, 1782, died December 14. 1847. His entire life was 
spent in Juniata county, Pennsylvania. He married, April 2, 1810, 
Martha Porter Allen, born September 19, 1788, died at ]\Iexico, Juniata 
county, November 22, 1855. She was a daughter of David Allen, and 
a lineal descendant of Admiral Nelson. They became the parents of 
six children. 

(IV) Charles Allen, eldest child of James and Martha Porter (Al- 
len) Thompson, was born in Mexico, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, 
January 11, 181 1, died October 19, 1854. He was a man of many- 
sided ability; he was a merchant, had milling and grain interests, and 
also largely interested in the coal industry. His political affiliations 
were with the Republican party, and he was a member of the United 
Presbyterian church. He married Mary Ann Cochran, born in Millers- 
town, Perry county, Pennsylvania, June 14. 18 15, died in Mexico, Juni- 
ata county, June 14, 1887. They had children: Martha Jane; James 



1268 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Horace; William Porter; Emma Sophia; Eliza Ellen, who married Dr. 
Mahon; Ada Marion; Anna Mary; Charles Alien. 

In 191 1 the first Thompson reunion was held at Thompsontown, 
Juniata county, Pennsylvania, and a monument was erected at Thomp- 
son's Lock, one and one-half miles east of Thompsontown, to the mem- 
ory of John Thompson, the emigrant ancestor, the following inscription 
being placed upon it : "John Thompson, Pioneer and Patriot, Founder 
of the Thompson Family in Juniata County, Died 1769. Advocate of 
the Open Bible, Civil and Religious Liberty. Erected by a Grateful 
Posterity. 191 1." 



Harry E. Knepp, of Lewistown, Mifflin county, Pennsyl- 
KNEPP vania, is one of the most enterprising and successful busi- 
ness men and farmers in that section of the country. His 
methods are progressive to the utmost limit and every new idea is 
adopted as soon as it has been proved that it has a practical value. 

(I) John Knepp, the first of the line herein followed, was of German 
descent, as is indicated by the name, and was one of the early settlers 
in the Juniata Valley. 

(II) Henry David, son of John Knepp, was born in West Beaver 
township, Snyder county, Pennsylvania, January 20, 1849. He was 
educated in the public schools, and devoted his time and attention to 
agriculture, in which he was eminently successful. He came to Mifflin 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1875, and resided in Decatur township for a 
period of seven years. He returned to Snyder county, lived there nine 
years, and removed to Derry township in 1891, and resided there 
up to 1903, when he removed to Lewistown, and there built a fine brick 
residence in which he now lives. He is a Republican in politics, and a 
member of the Reformed church. Mr. Knepp married Margaret Ellen 
Peter, born in Snyder county, Pennsylvania, May 15, 1852, daughter 
of John H. and Leah (Dean) Peter, the former born in Snyder county, 
September 22, 1818, the latter born in the same county, September 22, 
1 82 1. Mrs. Knepp was the granddaughter of Anthony and Catherine 
(Houser) Peter, and the great-granddaughter of Lemuel Peter, who 
died in Pennsylvania. She was also the granddaughter of Valentine 
and Sophia Dean, the former one of the early settlers of Mifflin county. 
Grandfather Anthony Peter had by his first wife the following children: 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1269 

Isaac, Henry, Jolin H., Rebecca, Susannah, and Elizabeth; he married 
(second) Catherine Stulb, and had children: Jonathan, David, Annie, 
Leah, Sophia, Rachel, Mary, Sarah and Amanda. John H. and Leah 
(Dean) Peter had children: Henry Jackson, Margaret Ellen and John 
William. Mr. and Mrs. Knepp had children: i. y\lice May, born April 
20, 1871; married William Ruble, of Pottstown, Pennsylvania, and has 
had children: Myrtle Viola, born January 25, 1895; Esther May, De- 
cember 28, 1896; Charles Henry, March i, 1899; Anna Grace, March 
25, 1901 ; George, April 4, 1904; Margaret Caroline, January 25, 1908; 
David Franklin, July 19, 191 1. 2. Anna Jane, born August 30, 1872; 
married Albert Montgomery, of Lev^fistown, and has one child: Walter 
Henry, born in 1893. 3. Carrie Minerva, born April 6, 1873, died in 
infancy. 4. Harry E., see forward. 5. Clarence Andrew, born April 3, 
1880; married Florence Kreps, of Decatur township, and has children: 
Margaret Elizabeth, born September 20, 1904; Albert Henry. June 29, 
1906; Stella Catherine, October 24, 1907; Ethel Marie, September 24, 
1912. 

(Ill) Harry E., son of Henry David and Margaret Ellen (Peter) 
Knepp, was born in Decatur township, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania. De- 
cember 15, 1877. His youth was spent on a farm and he attended the 
public schools until he had attained the age of fourteen years, at first 
those of Snyder county, then those of Lewistown, Mifflin county, known 
as the tollgate schools. He is one of the foremost farmers and dairy- 
men of the district and operates two farms at the present time, 
and is the owner of a farm of two hundred and fifty acres. This is 
known as the Charley Sayler farm, and the farm of one hundred and 
fifty acres near Burnham is known as the R. N. Jacobs farm. He is 
also largely interested in the lumber business, attending to this industry 
in association with John H. Mels, the firm being Mels & Knepp, and they 
own and operate two saw mills. For a period of four years Mr. Knepp, 
in addition to his farming and other interests, was engaged in general 
contract work for the Logan Iron Company, the Standard Steel Works. 
and other concerns. He has lived on the R. N. Jacobs farm for almost 
twenty years, and before that his father had lived upon it for eight 
years. The dair\' farming of Mr. Knepp is carried on on an extensive 
scale, and he is largely engaged in stock raising, having some very fine 
breeds of cattle. His political affiliations are with the Republican party 



1270 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

and he is a member of the Lutheran church. He is also a member of 
the Patriotic Order Sons of America. 

Mr. Knepp married, February 5, 1902, Carrie, born in Snyder 
county, August 29, 1877, daughter of Levi Kline, an early settler of 
Snyder county, now deceased. They have had children: Anna Mar- 
garet; Sarah Elizabeth, born July 29, 1909. 



An able and representative agriculturist, who has done 
APPLEBY much to advance progress and conserve prosperity in 

Dublin township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
where he has served as township supervisor and school director, is 
Thomas Bruce Appleby, who owns and operates a fine farm of one 
hundred and twenty-seven acres, eligibly located near the village of De- 
corum. Mr. Appleby is a native of Dublin township, born March 7, 
1870, son of John Scott and Ann Catherine (Fleming) Appleby, both 
of whom were likewise born and reared in Dublin township, Hunting- 
don county, Pennsylvania. In the paternal line Mr. Appleby traces his 
ancestry to John Appleby, who married Percilla Mantage and who was 
an early settler in this section of the old Keystone commonwealth. 

After completing the prescribed course of the public schools of 
Dublin township John Scott Appleby was matriculated as a student in 
Milnwood Academy, which he attended for a number of years. On 
reaching his majority he turned his attention to farming operations and 
continued to be identified with that line of enterprise until 1897. I" 
that year he was elected steward of the Huntingdon County Home, and 
he served in that capacity with the utmost efficiency for thirteen suc- 
cessive years. In 1910 he retired from active business life and spent his 
closing years at Shirleysburg, where his death occurred in January, 
1912. He was active in local politics, being affiliated with the Repub- 
lican party, and he and his family were devout members of the Presby- 
terian church. Two of Mr. Appleby's brothers were soldiers in the civil 
war and both managed to survive that sanguinary conflict. Mr. Appleby 
married Ann Catherine, daughter of James and Elizabeth (Wilson) 
Fleming, of Dublin township. Mr. Fleming was a pioneer settler in 
this section and helped to clear the country of heavy timber. He was 
a farmer by occupation and owned two hundred and fifty acres of valu- 
able property. In recent years eight thousand dollars' worth of timber 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1271 

was sold off his land. Mr. and Mrs. Appleby became the parents of 
the following children: Rellie, deceased; Thomas Bruce, of this sketch; 
Matilda, deceased; Percilla; James; Jane; John O. ; Harry C. ; Warren, 
deceased ; Emelia E. ; Rola. 

Thomas Bruce Appleby was educated in the public schools of his 
home locality and he early began to assist his father in the work and 
management of the home farm. In April, 1900, he purchased the old 
Cree farm, in Dublin township, the same comprising one hundred and 
twenty-seven acres of most arable land. In 1907 he erected a spacious, 
modern barn, and it may be said that the fine buildings on his place, 
situated in the midst of well cultivated fields, are the best indications of 
his innate ability as an able and progressive farmer. He is engaged in 
diversified agriculture and the raising of high-grade stock and in both 
lines of enterprise has won marked success. He is an old-line Republi- 
can and is now serving in a most capable manner as supervisor of Dub- 
lin township, where he is likewise a member of the school board. He 
is deeply and sincerely interested in all that affects the good of the 
general welfare and in every sense of the word is a representative citi- 
zen. His religious faith coincides with the teachings of the Presbyter- 
ian church, in which he is an elder. 

In 1907 Mr. Appleby married Margaret, daughter of David Peter- 
son, and a descendant of an old pioneer family in Huntingdon county. 
Mrs. Appleby is a woman of charming personality, and she and her 
husband are well liked by all with whom they have come in contact. 
Mr. and Mrs. Appleby have two children : Fred and Loraine. 



t> 



Many of the ablest men in America are ardent de- 
GILLILAND votees of the great basic industry of agriculture, and 

it is well that this is so, because the various learned 
professions are rapidly becoming so crowded with inefficient practition- 
ers that in a few years it will be practically impossible for any but the 
exceptionally talented men to make good, or even to gain a competent 
living therein. The independent farmer who in addition to tilling the 
soil cultivates his mind and retains his health, is a man much to be en- 
vied in these days of strenuous bustle and nervous energy. He lives 
his life as he chooses and is always safe from financial ravages and 
other troubles of the so-called "cliff dweller." An able and representa- 



12/2 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

tive agriculturist, who has done much to advance progress and conserve 
prosperity in Juniata Valley, is Samuel E. Gilliland, who owns and op- 
erates a splendidly improved farm of one hundred and ninety acres in 
Dublin township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. 

A native of Huntinedon countv, Pennsvlvania, Samuel E. Gilliland 
was born on the farm he now owns in Dublin township, the date of his 
birth being November 8, 1865. He is a son of John and Sarah J. (Pe- 
belt) GiUiland. In the agnatic line Mr. Gilliland is descended from 
German ancestry. His great-grandfather, accompanied by several 
brothers, came to America in an early day from German}^ Andrew 
Gilliland, his grandfather, was born and reared in America, and for 
many years he followed his trade of blacksmith in Black Log valley, 
where he likewise owned and conducted two farms. He became the 
father of eight children, whose names follow : Andrew, Samuel, Mat- 
thew, John, Hannah, Peggie, Liza and Mary. John Gilliland, father of 
Samuel E. Gilliland, was given but meager educational advantages in 
his youth, having been obliged to go to work at an early age in order 
to help support the family. After reaching adult age he and another 
man bought a farm which they ran in partnership for several years. 
After his marriage Mr. Gilliland rented a farm for some time and 
eventually purchased an estate of one hundred and fifteen acres in Dub- 
lin township. This place continued to represent his home until his death. 
He married Sarah J. Pebelt, whose grandparents caine to America from 
Ireland in 1750. James Pebelt, an uncle of Mrs. Gilliland, was ship- 
wrecked at sea while journeying to America. He saved his life by 
swimming ashore. Mr. and Mrs. Gilliland became the parents of the 
following children: Andrew W., lived in Philadelphia; William Pe- 
belt (Andrew W. and William P. married sisters, Emma and Anna 
Cree) ; John Harvey, deceased, was a resident of Pittsburgh ; Myra E. ; 
George Doris, of Philadelphia ; Samuel E. ; Myra H. ; Ira, died aged 
fourteen years. At one time in the early pioneer days, when JMrs. Gilli- 
land was at home alone with her children, a band of Indians came 
through the country and knocked at her door. She offered them milk 
from the spring house and being impressed with her hospitality they 
left her undisturbed. 

Samuel E. Gilliland was educated in Cree school in Dublin township. 
As a youth he assisted his father in the work and management of the 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1273 

old homestead farm, and is now the sole owner of this well ke])t estate. 
He is engaged in general farming and in breeding high-grade stock, in 
both lines of which he has met with unqualilied success. His farm 
covers one hundred and ninety acres and is eligibly located near liurnt 
Cabins. He has been county assessor for six years and has served at 
different times as a member of the school board. He is a devout Pres- 
byterian in his religious faith, and a Democrat in politics. Mr. Gilli- 
land is always courteous, kindly and affable, and those who know him 
personally accord him the highest esteem. His life has been exemplary 
in all respects and he has ever supported those interests which are cal- 
culated to uplift and benelit humanity, while his own high moral worth is 
deserving of the highest commendation. 



The McClenahen family is one which has been 
McCLENAHEK well known in America since the middle of the 

eighteenth century, and they have ever been in 
the front rank when the call to arms came for the defense of the 
country of their adoption. 

(I) William McClenahen, who was of Scotch descent, married Eliza- 
beth Wingate, of Irish extraction. She was the daughter of Jes.se Win- 
gate, who marrietl I':iizabeth Kennedy. Mrs. McClenahen was the grand- 
daughter of Samuel Wingate, born in Maryland, married Jane B. 
Breckenridge, born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, daughter of 

Breckenridge, who was captured by the Indians in Chester 

countv. Samuel Wingate was a shoemaker throughout the active years 
of his life, and the greater part of his life was spent near Belleville, to 
which section he had come about iSoo. Samuel and Jane B. (Brecken- 
ridge) Wingate had children: John, married Catherine Lindsey; David, 
born in Crawford county, died young; Hannah, married Robert Neiley 
in Mifflin county; Rachel, died young; Jesse, mentioned above; Jane, 
born in Lewistown, married .\ndrew Cross; Agnes, married James Mc- 
Clenahen ; Mary, married George McClenahen ; Margaret, married Jesse 
Crawford; Samuel, married Mary Moore, in Center county. William 
and Elizabeth (Wingate) McClenahen had a number of sons and 
daughters. 

(II) George B., son of William and Elizabeth (Wingate) McClena- 
hen, was born in 1803, and after his marriage settled in Milroy, Mif- 



1274 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

flin county, Pennsylvania, where he resided until his death, which oc- 
curred February 2, 1884. For fifty years he was the "village black- 
smith" at Milroy, having learned his trade early in life and followed it 
conscientiously. He was esteemed by all as a worthy citizen, and re- 
spected for his intelligence and his justice to all. He was one of the 
charter members of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and he and 
his wife were members of the Presbyterian church. He married, 1831, 
Mary Wingate, died May 27, 1898. They had children: i. Rachel, 
born November 16, 1832, died May 5, 1862; she married, June 5, 1855, 
Edmund Faulkner, and the two of their children now living are: Laura; 
George, married, at Seattle, Washington, October 27, 1889, Lena Park- 
hurst. 2. Elizabeth, born November 8, 1834, died in infancy. 3. 
Charles, born September 6, 1836, died November 26, 1894; he married 
(first) December 23, 1865, Martha Anner, (second) December 11, 1879, 
Catherine Coldren; children of first marriage: Irene, married Ralph 
Faulkner ; Herbert, married Bessie Snook ; Keturah ; Mary. 4. Fran- 
cis B., see forward. 5. Jane, born in 1843, "Ji^d in infancy. 6. Sarah, 
born March 14, 1846. 7. William, born June 8, 1849, died in infancy. 
(Ill) Captain Francis B. McClenahen, son of George B. and 
Mary (Wingate) McClenahen, was born at Milroy, Mifflin county, 
Pennsylvania, September 29, 1840, died June 9, 191 1. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools of his native tovv'nship, and at a suitable 
age became the assistant of his father, and continued this work until 
August, 1864, when he enlisted. He was commissioned as a lieutenant 
recruiting officer, organized a company of soldiers at Milroy, and with 
the rank of captain was assigned to Company K, Two Hundred and 
Fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers. His service continued until the close 
of the war. At Petersburg, Virginia, 1865, he was brevetted major for 
gallant service. June 2, 1865, he was honorably discharged, returned 
to his home and there resumed his former work, with which he was 
occupied until almost the close of the year 1868. In 1876 he re- 
moved to a farm he purchased in Armagh township, near Milroy, and 
there the remainder of his life was spent, and his intelligent cultivation 
produced very fruitful results. He was active in the political affairs 
of the community, always giving his earnest support to the Democratic 
party, and was appointed postmaster at Milroy, February, 1894, assum- 
ing the duties the following month. He was an honored member of 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1275 

Colonel Hilling Post, No. 176, Grand Army of the Republic, at Lewis- 
town. 

Captain McClenahen married, November 19, 1868, Sarah Agnes, 
daughter of William A. and Margaret (Brown) McManigal. They 
have had children: William K., see forward; Edith, married Charles 
Henry; George B. ; Walter B., see forward; Frank W., see forward; 
Margaret ; May Thompson ; Rachel ; Harry ; James McManigal. 

(IV) William K., son of Captain Francis B. and Sarah Agnes 
(McManigal) McClenahen, was born in Milroy, Mifflin county, Penn- 
sylvania, January 25, 1870. He received his education in the public 
schools and was graduated from the high school at Milroy. Until he 
had attained his majority he was engaged in farming, under the super- 
vision of his father, then learned the carpenter's trade, with which he 
was occupied for a period of nine years. During this time he had also 
given his attention to a variety of other subjects, and in 1904 the firm of 
McClenahen Brothers was organized, and they undertook contracts for 
all kinds of plumbing, heating and electrical work. In February, 1909, 
the Belleville Electric Company was incorporated at Belleville, Pennsyl- 
vania. The general offices are at Reedsville, Pennsylvania, while the 
power house is at Belleville. The officers of the corporation are as 
follows: W. K. McClenahen, president; Thomas E. Zook, vice-presi- 
dent; W. B. McClenahen, secretary; I. Z. Hertzler, treasurer; F. W. 
McClenahen, superintendent. Mr. McClenahen came to Belleville, in 
May, 191 1, as general manager of the company. He is a staunch sup- 
porter of the Democratic party, but has no desire to hold public office, 
feeling that he is best serving the country by attending to his business 
concerns and thus increasing its prosperity indirectly. His wife is a 
member of the Lutheran church. 

Mr. McClenahen married, June 4, 1896, Fanny Foltz, born in Al- 
lenville, January 15, 1874. She is a daughter of David and Catherine 
Christina (Lyghtle) Foltz. Children: Catherine Gertrude, born Feb- 
ruar}' 3, 1899: Mary Frances, May 7, 1901 ; Robert Lee, June 4, 1903; 
Paul David, December i, 1905; Sarah Agnes, June 2, 1908. 

(IV) Walter B., son of Captain Francis B. and Sarah Agnes (Mc- 
Manigal) McClenahen, was born in Milroy, Mifflin county, Pennsyl- 
vania, September 9, 1874. He also was educated in the public schools 
and was graduated from the Milroy Academy. Having accepted a 



1276 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

position as clerk in the store of Mr. Thompson, of Milroy, he re- 
mained in it for a period of nine years. He then went to Braddock, 
Pennsylvania, where he was the manager of Walters' grocery store, 
and held this position two years. He enlisted in the United States 
army. Artillery Corps, January 25, 1898, and spent six years with the 
regular army. He served throughout the Spanish- American war; was 
a private, corporal, sergeant, first sergeant, sergeant major of Artillery 
Corps and appointed electrician sergeant, June, 1899; appointed to 
United States Artillery School, Fortress Monroe, Virginia, May, 1901, 
and was graduated from this institution in June, 1902; in January, 
1 904, he was discharged at Fort Terry, New York ; became a member 
of the Belleville Electric Company, of which he is the secretary. He 
was formerly an adherent of the Democratic party, but is now a Pro- 
gressive. 

Mr. McClenahen married, in April, 1901, Jose A., daughter of 
Jacob Blymyer, who was formerly the proprietor of the Logan Mills. 
They have had four children: Jose, born March 19, 1902; Margaret, 
December 4, 1904; Miriam, February 25, 1907; Agnes, May 26, 1909. 

(IV) Frank W. McClenahen, son of Captain Francis B. and Sarah 
Agnes (McManigal) McClenahen, was born in Milroy, Pennsylvania, 
November 11, 1876. He received his education in the common schools, 
and assisted with the work of the farm, upon which he resided until 
he attained the age of twenty-five, when he became a stationary engi- 
neer at Clearfield, Pennsylvania. In 1904 he became a member of the 
firm of McClenahen Brothers, remaining to the present time (1913). 
He is a Democrat in politics, and a Congregationalist in religion, his 
wife being a member of the Lutheran church. He married, September 
22, 1904, Letitia Gertrude, daughter of David and Catherine Christina 
(Lyghtle) Foltz. Children: John Frederick, born December 4, 1905; 
Christina Agnes, born June 20. 1912. 



Henry Guyer, of Pennsylvania, is descended from straight 
GUYER German ancestry, his forbears having lived in that coun- 
try for many generations. In the Fatherland the Guyer 
family are farmers, and rank among the best and most loyal subjects 
of the Kaiser. 

(I) Henry Guyer, the founder of the American branch, was born 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1277 

in Prussia, Germany, in 1824, died in Huntingdon county, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1908. He was educated in the schools of his native place, and 
entered farming while yet a young man. Besides himself there was 
only one other son in his immediate family, Andrew, who li\ed and 
died in Germany. John Bonsla, a neighbor of Henry Guyer in Ger- 
many, emigrated to the United States. After he had resided in Penn- 
sylvania a year or so, his sister, Anna Bonsla, joined him, and some- 
what later Henry Guyer emigrated and made his home for some time 
with John Bonsla. After arriving in Pennsylvania, owing to his inabil- 
ity to speak English, he was forced to accept a position in which Eng- 
lish was not necessarily spoken, and he became a laborer. Later he 
rented land in Huntingdon county, in which venture he was eminently 
successful. He finally retired from the farm and moved to McConnells- 
town, Pennsylvania, where he died. Soon after his arrival in Pennsyl- 
vania he married Anna Bonsla, whom he had known in Germany. She 
died in 1895, after spending her life assisting her husliand in every 
wa}' that a thrifty, careful wife could. Children: i. John, killed on 
Pennsylvania railroad near Huntingdon : married Anna Cuznes. 2. 
Conrad, killed on Pennsylvania railroad, unmarried. 3. Henry, of 
whom further. 4. Anna, deceased ; married William Hicks. 5. Mag- 
gie, married \\'ilson Heffner. 6. Andrew, a carpenter in Altoona, Penn- 
sylvania ; married Rosa Myers. 

(II) Henry (2). son of Henry ( i) and Anna (Bonsla) Guyer, was 
born August 6, 1862, in Porter township, Huntingdon county, Pennsyl- 
vania. He attended school at Water Street, after which he remained 
at home with his father assisting him on the farm until his marriage, 
when he rented a place in Walker township, tluntingdon county. Next 
he took a farm in West township, and for eight years he so managed it 
that it paid him handsomely. His next venture was the purchasing of 
one thousand acres of land, eight hundred of which was timber and 
mountain land, situated in Barree and Jackson townships, Huntingdon 
county, known as the Crownover place. This purchase was made in 
191 1, since which time Mr. Guyer and family have made their home 
on this valuable tract. He does a successful general farming, and has 
brought the land under cultivation to a high state of productiveness. 
In fact, there is not a farmer in Pennsyhania who receives a greater 



1278 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

profit from tilling the soil than Mr. Guyer. By his enterprise and 
executive ability he has achieved merited success, and is ranked among 
the substantial citizens of Huntingdon county. He supports the Demo- 
cratic party with his franchise, but has never held office, as he finds his 
time and energies amply engrossed by his business interests. He and 
his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Manor Hill, 
giving it moral as well as financial assistance. 

He married Ida May Gilbaugh, born October 23, 1869, near Mar- 
kl'esburg, Pennsylvania, daughter of Valentine and Sarah (Moyer) 
Gilbaugh, who were prominent people in the farming community. Mrs. 
Gilbaugh died when her daughter was eighteen months old, and Mr. 
Gilbaugh still lives on the homestead. Children: Samuel, born Octo- 
ber 10, 1892; Philip, March 22, 1894, died October 23, 1912; Cyrus, 
August 22, 1895; Ruth, April 19, 1897; John Wesley, July 30, 1898; 
Arthur, February 17, 1900; Thomas, December 20, 1901 ; Martha, No- 
vember 29, 1903; Ada Theresa, March 7, 1906; William Foster, De- 
cember 30, 1907; Anna, June 3, 191 1. 



Coming originally from Sweden to Holland, the Yocum 
YOCUM family of Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, was planted 
therein by John Yocum, one of two brothers who came 
to America in the latter part of the eighteenth century. The other 
brother settled in Chester county, but John, more favorably impressed 
by the country to the west, purchased land in the Ridges, Huntingdon 
county. He married and had issue. 

(II) Jesse, son of John Yocum, was born in Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania, March 22, 1793, died at Mill Creek, same county, April 
23, 1875. He followed the occupation of a farmer all his life, owning 
as well as cultivating the land. Politically he was a Democrat, and 
held the office of justice of the peace for thirty years. Both he and his 
wife were lifelong members of the Baptist church, in the work of 
which organization they were very active. He married Elizabeth 
Kelly, born April 6, 1800, died February 17, 1875. Children: i. Mary 
Jane, born January i, 1823; married Matthew Postlethwaite, a farmer 
and stock-dealer of Illinois. 2. Marshall, of whom further. 3. Amy, 
born December 29, 1829; married James Van Zandt, a carpenter of 
Mill Creek, Pennsylvania. 4. Lewis, born November 20, 1825; a la- 




ji <^^^^/^/o 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1279 

borer; married Sophia Nunier. 5. Eleanor, born November 9, 1833; 
married John McDonald, a distiller. 

(Ill) Marshall, son of Jesse and Elizabeth (Kelly) Yocum, was 
born in Brady township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, March 20, 
1824, died at Mapleton, same county, June 5, 1909. He obtained a 
public school education and until 1853 was a boatman on the state canal. 
It was at this time that the construction of the Pennsylvania railroad 
westward through the state revolutionized the mode of travel, the slow- 
moving canalers giving way to the swift, steam-driven trains. In the 
passing of the canal boat, many of the men formerly employed thereon 
entered the service of the railroad. Among these was Mr. Yocum. who 
continued in that line until 1871, when he retired, spending his later 
years peacefully and cjuietly at his home in Mapleton, where he died. 
He was a Democrat in political belief, although his interest in affairs of 
town or county never led him to accept public office. He married, at 
Huntingdon, P'ebruary 27, 1853, Sarah Jane Campbell, born June 30, 
1830, died April 19, 1893, daughter of Matthew F. Campbell, born in 
Shirley township, Huntingdon county, June 19, 1801. Matthew F. 
Campbell was of Scotch-Irish descent, son of John Campbell, who came 
to America prior to the revolution, settling in Huntingdon county. He 
married Jane Cluggage, sister of Major Cluggage, of revolutionary 
fame. John Campbell died when Matthew F. was but a boy, and the 
latter, to eke out the family's slender resources, was bound out to a 
tailor, a trade he learned thoroughly, following it until 1837, when he 
opened a general store at one of the locks along the canal. In partner- 
ship with Asa Corbin, he purchased a large tract of land on which he 
realized a great profit by the sale of the timber and by disposing of 
the land itself as a site for the town of Mapleton. In 1847 ''•^ '^"i^t a 
house across Hares Creek, from Mapleton, and there resided until a 
few years previous to his death. In religious belief he supported the 
doctrines of the Presbyterian church, and was largely instrumental in 
the erection of a house of worship for the members of that faith in 
Mapleton, which was the first church built in the town. Politically he 
was a Whig, and held the office of county commissioner. He married, 
July 19, 1829, Jane Dean, born March 13, 1809, died December 27, 
1864. Children of John and Jane (Cluggage) Campbell: Robert, lived 
in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Sarah, married John Rush, and li\ed in 



i28o HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Allegheny City, Pennsylvania; Matthew F., of previous mention, mar- 
ried Jane Dean. Children of Matthew F. and Jane (Dean) Campbell: 
Sarah Jane, of previous mention, married Marshall Yocum; Matilda, 
died in infancy. Children of Marshall and Sarah Jane (Campbell) 
Yocum: i. Ellen, died aged five years. 2. Robert Campbell, of whom 
further. 3. Bruce, superintendent of Pittsburgh Sand Works, married 
Mattie Stever. 4. Charles, died in infancy. 

(IV) Robert Campbell, second child and first son of Marshall and 
Sarah Jane (Campbell) Yocum, was born in Mapleton, June 27, 1856. 
He obtained his education in the public schools of Mapleton and in the 
Iron City Commercial College at Pittsburgh, whence he was graduated 
in 1872. After graduation he spent two years in Iowa and Illinois, re- 
turning east in 1874 and engaging in the grocery business at Lewistown. 
He again went west, but in 1880 came to Philadelphia and entered the 
emplo}' of commission houses, and in 1881 entered the employ of the 
Pennsylvania railroad, moving to Harrisburg in 1897, where he con- 
tracted for twelve years. In 1900 he moved to Mount Union, Pennsyl- 
vania, remaining there until 1910, when he moved to Mapleton. He 
is a Democrat in politics, although only active as a private citizen. Mr. 
Yocum has had uniform success in the varied undertakings and pursuits 
in which he has engaged and at the present day is one of Mapleton's 
well-liked and respected citizens. In company with his brother, Bruce 
Yocum, they own a part of the original Campbell estate, upon which is 
located valuable glass sand, which is under lease of the Pennsylvania 
Glass Sand Co., Philadelphia. 

He married, in August, 1880, Annie Mary, born April 7, 1862, 
daughter of Lorenzo D. and Catherine (Hughes) Civils. Children of 
Robert Campbell and Annie M. Yocum: i. Fairman Bruce, of whom 
further. 2. Wilbur M., born October 21, 1883; he is employed as ste- 
nographer in the office of the general superintendent of motive power 
for the Pennsylvania railroad at Altoona ; married Veda Fleck ; has one 
child. Marshall Emory. 3. Hattie E., born August 22, 1885; married 
Alexander Sheaffer; two children: Ruth A. and Juniata. 4. Amelia, 
born February i, 1887, died in December, 1887. 5. James R., born 
June 9. 1888, died November 3, 1888. 6. Walter Roy, born July 16, 
1889, died May 3, 1892. 7. Jennie E., born November 4, 1890; attends 
Juniata College. 8. Warren R., born June 29, 1892 ; an employee of the 




/p W •^''^'^^-'^^-^-^^ 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1281 

Pennsylvania railroad at Altoona. 9. Annie M., born December 13, 
1893; attends school at Mount Union. 10. Bertha Ellen, born July 23, 
1896; attends Mount Union high school. 1 1. Robert Campbell Jr., born 
March 29, 1899. 12. Verna Kathleen, born September 18, 1901. 13. 
Alfred Lewis, born July 3, 1903, died June 16, 1910. 

(V) Fairman Bruce, eldest child of Robert Campbell and Annie 
Mary (Civils) Yocum, was born at Mapleton, Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania, April 15, 1882. He obtained an education in the public 
schools of Mapleton, Harrisburg and Mount Union, o1)taining, soon 
after leaving school, a position in the freight office of the Pennsylvania 
railroad at East Liberty, Pennsylvania, where he remained for five 
years, later becoming a passenger brakeman on the Pittsburgh division 
of the same road. In 19 12 he abandoned railroading and purchased 
the general store of I. W. Fleck, a business he now successfully con- 
ducts. His political belief is Democratic and his only fraternal connec- 
tion is with the Masonic order, at Johnstown, in which he is a Master 
Mason. He married, June 25, 1908, Emma Duella, daughter of Timo- 
thy E., a foreman in the mills of the Cambria Steel Company of Johns- 
town, and Phoebe (Riblett) Hunt. Child of Fairman Bruce and Emma 
Duella Yocum: Mary Frances, born September 17, 191 1. 



More than a generation ago the German language 
ISENBERG gave place to the English among the Isenbergs of 
Pennsylvania, yet there is scarcely one who does not 
know that the family is of German extraction. Isenberg means moun- 
tain (berg) of iron (isen). As is the case with all names of German 
origin, it was given to or assumed by the family at or near the division 
of Germany at the time of the great migrations, A. D. 500. The name 
referred either to their character or to their place of abode. The family 
either dwelt in the vicinity of a "mountain of iron" or were in character 
like a "mountain of iron." 

There are two forms of the name — Isenberg and Eisenberg. The 
former is the old High German, the latter the modern German. "Isen," 
iron, is now spelled "eisen," hence both forms are correct. The branch 
of the family with which we are here concerned spells the name accord- 
ing to the old German, Isenberg. 

In tlie Rhine vallev, east of Coblentz, and north of Frankfort-on- 



1282 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

the-Main, the name of Isenberg first appears in history. In 1006-08 
Gerlach von Isenberg was one of the counts of the "Holy Roman Em- 
pire of the German Nation,"' mider Otto I., II., III. and Henry '11. An- 
other one of this family after returning from the fifth crusade, 1228-29, 
led by Frederick 11. of Germany, founded the beautiful cathedral of 
Limburg-on-the-Lahn. In the fourteenth century Arnold von Isenberg 
became a cardinal and archbishop of Treves, where the fictitious "holy 
coat of Christ" is kept. This family, which is a royal one, continues 
to hold its place in the German empire, for Prince Karl Isenberg is to- 
day a member of the Prussian House of Lords. His wife is the sister 
of the Emperor Francis Joseph of Austria. 

Early in the Reformation this family became Protestant. They 
became Lutherans of the mild Melancthonian type, but the adoption of 
the Formula of Concord, May 28, 1577, drove them to accept the Re- 
formed faith. Seven years later saw this accomplished when Re- 
formed ministers from Heborn University took the place of the High 
Lutheran ministers, and during the subsequent controversies the Isen- 
bergs were staunch defenders of the Reformed faith. In 1690 there 
began a reign of terror along the Rhine. The electors or rulers became 
Catholics, and for more than a century the people were subjected to un- 
told persecutions, principally ecclesiastical, and it was doubtless during 
one of these persecutions that some of the Isenbergs immigrated to 
America. 

Just when the first Isenbergs came to America cannot be established 
with any degree of certainty, but the record of the birth of Enoch Isen- 
berg, which occurred in 1761, proves they were here prior to that date, as 
he is not the eldest of the children born here. Tradition says that the 
Isenbergs came to Maryland by way of New York. Thej^ settled in 
what was Frederick county, Maryland, near Double Pipe Creek, which 
now divides Frederick and Carroll counties, so that it is uncertain in 
which of these two they settled. Two of these brothers were John 
Henry and Peter. When the revolutionary war broke out, Peter being 
unmarried, joined the Continental arm3^ John Henry remaining at 
home to take care of his wife and children. Peter Isenberg enlisted as 
a private, rose to the position of hospital attendant, and finall}^ became 
chaplain. There was a Peter Isenberg, a Refomied minister, who died 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1283 

in Ohiu in 1804, and this may have been the Peter here referred to. 
As far as known he left no descendants. 

(I) John Henry Isenberg, the immigrant, Hved in Maryland, we 
know for a certainty, but when he died and where he is buried is not 
on record. Certain it is that his sons — Gabriel, Enoch, Nicholas and 
Henry — removed to Pennsylvania. They came to Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania, in 180J, accompanied by a brother-in-law, Mr. Schively, 
to arrange for the purchase of land. Mr. Schively went to Rock Hill, 
now Orbisonia, to work at the furnace, this being the first place where 
iron was manufactured west of the Susquehanna river. The Isenberg 
brothers went to the vicinity of Alexandria. They returned to Mary- 
land, but the failure of some financial enterprises delayed the bringing 
of their families until 1804. They came by way of Chambersburg and 
the Black Log mountains. The difficulties of travel in those days were 
enormous. There was scarcely a decent wagon road, and the only 
means of travel was on foot or by heavy road wagons resembling the 
prairie schooner of the west. The purchase of the land was completed 
when they reached their destination, and that they were people of means 
is proved by the fact that the payments were made in cash. They were 
prominent in the religious life of the community, took part in the erec- 
tion of the union church at Shafersville, the erection of Keller's and the 
Alexandria Reformed church. John Henry Isenberg married, but the 
name of his wife is not on record. His children were: i^Gabriel, who 
had children : i. Eve. who married Samuel Long, of Huntingdon, and 
had : Christian ; Margaret, married Simon Coulter ; Catharine, married 
James Mehaffy, of Pittsburgh ; David, married ; a son. ii. Salome, mar- 
ried jNIichael Young and had : Susan, who married Henry Walker, iii. 
Catharine, died unmarried at the age of *■ eighty-nine years, iv. John, 
died in 1847, married (first) Susan Gustier, (second) Barbara Grove, 
sister of Samuel Grove, who married Catharine, a daughter of Enoch 
Isenberg; he had children: Samuel, married (first) Susanna Thomp- 
son, (second) Elizabeth Schlonaker; John, married Catharine Shade; 
David, married Mary Ann Bonnell; Rebecca, married Joshua Hicks; 
Jacob, married Black; Ephraim, married; Joel, married; Susan- 
nah, married John Hicks; Catharine, married Hutchinson; Mar- 
garet, married Isaac Enveart; Nannie, married Frederick Weaver; Sa- 
lome, married George Stoufifer; Mary A., married (first) Sylvester 



1284 HISTORY OF THE JUNL\TA VALLEY 

Myers, (second) Benjamin Kyler; Joshua, married Maria J. Mealey; 
Lydia E., married G. L. S. Baker, v. David, born in 1796, married 
Margaret Steele, and had : Lydia A., married VViUiam Baird ; EHza- 
beth, married Robert McCaig; Catharine, married James McClintic; 
Margaret, married Dr. Joseph Henderson, vi. Mary, married (first) 
Jesse Lucas, (second) Daniel Stirk, and had: Gabriel, Thomas, Mar- 
garet, Susan and Catherine, vii. Susan, married George Strong and 
had: Catharine, married Lewis Cameron, viii. Martha. 2. Enoch, 
married Dorothy Smouse, and had : i. George, married Nancy Wise, 
and had : John Enoch, Daniel, Henry, Michael W. and Mary Ann. 
ii. Henry, married Elizabeth Caracker, and had : Samuel, George. Eve, 

Henry, Daniel, Joseph and Dorothy, iii. Daniel, married Lef- 

fard, and had : Anna, Margaret, William L., Enoch, Ansavilla, Cath- 
arine, Emily, John C, Daniel, Isabelle. iv. Catharine, married Samuel 
Grove, and had : Joseph, Dorothy. John, Susannah, Solomon, David, 
Samuel, Kate, Abram. v. Susannah, married Philip Piper, and had: 
John, Joseph, Enoch, Philip, Abraham, William, Lydia, Polly, Maggie, 
vi. Joseph, married Elizabeth Piper, and had : Dorothy, John, Enoch, 
George, Catharine, Margaret, Clara, vii. Abram, married Nancy 
Grove, and had : Susannah, Thomas, Catharine, Dorothy, Jacob Miller, 
Solomon H., Joseph Grove, John Harnish, Samuel B., B. Frank, viii. 
Samuel, unmarried, ix. Anna, married Cross, and had : Benja- 
min, Mary. x. Anna Mary, married Jacob Hoffman, and had : Cath- 
arine, William, Anna Rebecca, Mary, Susan, Peter, Henry A., Jacob A., 

^ViIhelmina, two died in infancy, xi. Enoch, married Lefford, 

and had: Ann Catharine, Anna Mary, Jacob, Susan, William H., 
Annsavilla, Samuel V., B. R. 3. Nicholas, married Mary Smouse, and 
had : i. John, married Mary Piper, and had : Samuel, Ephraim, John, 
Susannah, Julia Ann, Anna Mary, and another, ii. Enoch, married 
Sarah Caldwell, iii. Joel, married Margery Canan, and had : Elizabeth, 
John, Anna Mary, James C, Henry C. iv. Benjamin, married Mary 
Caracker, and had : Nicholas, William, Daniel, Eve, Mary. v. William, 
married Elizabeth Roseborough, and had : Benjamin, Rebecca, Rosan- 
nah, Maria, John, William, Sarah, Kieffer, Miles Peter, Susan, Louisa, 
Marshall, vi. Eve, married Andrew Mattern, and had : Catharine, 
John, Mary, Nicholas, George, Elizabeth, Joel, William Abram. vii. 
Ann Margaret, married John Piper and had : Anna Mary, John H., 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1285 

Julia Ann, Peter, William T., Nicholas, viii. Mary Salome, married 
Samuel Stewart, and had: David, James, William, Benjamin, Eliza- 
beth, Ann. 4. Henry, see forward. 5. Peter, married Margaret 
Smouse, and had : i. Jonathan, married Elizabeth Gahagan, and had : 
John Perry, Annalisa, Marg-aret Jane, James G., Mary Ann, Pleasant 
Elizabeth, ii. Philip, married Sarah L. Burkholder, and had: Jacob 
D., Elizabeth, Catharine, George, Margaret, Leroy, Lorain, iii. Mor- 
decai, married Elizabeth Keckendorn, and had : Mary Ann, Sallie Ann, 
David Allen, Mamie Allen, Hannah, Margaret E., Nicholas Smouse, 
Peter Sprankle. iv. David, married Agnes Mooney, and had : Mar- 
garet, Elizabeth, Philip, Charlotte, Mordecai, Salome, Joel, Amos, Hos- 
sannah, Hannah, William, Jonathan, v. Hannah. 6. Mrs. Shively, 
who had: Daniel, Henry, James, Mrs. Wolheater, Mrs. Forest. 7. 
Mrs. Truby. 8. Mrs. Hartline. 9. Mrs. Hostler. 

(II) Henry, son of John Henry Isenberg, lived near Alexandria 
in 1804, and came to Huntingdon about 1820. He was a blacksmith 
about twelve years. He married Catherine Methord, and had chil- 
dren: I. Gabriel, a well digger, died unmarried at the age of seventy- 
five. 2. Margaret, married Gasaway Maccabee, and had : i. Will- 
iam, who married Ruth Jenkins, ii. Catharine, married John Mel- 
lott. iii. Gasaway Jr., married Rachel Jenkins, iv. Susan, married 

■ Dunlap. V. Maria M. 3. Susan, married (first) John Mellott, 

(second) John Caraher, and had: John and Hiram. 4. Kate, married 
John Gentry, and had: Henry. 5. Henry, married Mary Richardson, 
and had: Henry. 6. John, married Kate Africa, and had: Kate and 
Elwood. 7. Maria, married John Holmes, and had : Sarah, married 
George W. Walker. 8. Elizabeth, married Daniel Piper, and had : i. 

William, ii. Catharine, iii. Elizabeth, married Herncane. iv. 

Clara, married Moore, v. Martin, veteran, died in the Soldiers' 

Home, Dayton, Ohio. 9. Samuel, see forward. 10. Ephiah, born 18 12, 
married Adam Norris, and had: Robert, Anna, Maria, William, 
Charles. Mary Jane. 

(III) Samuel, son of Henry and Catherine (Methord) Isenberg, 
born in Huntingdon county. Pennsylvania. 18 10, died in 1890, was 
educated in public schools, and learned the trade of carpentering and 
cabinet making, which he followed until 1858. Then he purchased a 
farm in Shirley township, which he cultivated during his active years. 



1286 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Up to the time of the civil war he was a Democrat, wlien he became a 
Repubhcan and was elected supervisor and school director. He mar- 
ried (first) in 1834, Jane Hildebrand, who died in 1840; married (sec- 
ond) in 1842, Elizabeth Stonerode. Children b}^ first wife: i. Ann 
Eliza, married Joseph Work, of Alexandria, and had : Howard, Jen- 
nie, George, Joseph, died in 1893. 2. Susan, married, in 1864, Sellers 
Raugh, and had : William, Hannah, Elizabeth, Charles, David, Edgar, 
Grace. 3. George W., married (first) in 1867, Mary Kriedler, and had: 
Burton, Gemmil, Ralph, Ella, Carl, Mary, Hope; married (second) in 
1895, Hattie Abigail, and had : Maud, Donald, Franklin, and an infant. 
Children by second wife: 4. Louisa, married Reuben Myers, and had: 
Bruce, Orville, Ralph, Roy, Letitia, Clarence, Ella. 5. Milton W., see 
forward. 6. Marion, married, in 1872, B. Carl Wharton, and had: 
Burton, Hayes, Grace, Huldah. 7. Naomi, married Jackson L. Grove, 
and had : Ruth, Howard, Florence, Mahlon, Elizabeth, Alma, Lawrence, 
Emma. 8. Jerome, married, in 1882, Elizabeth Spanogle, and had: 
Ethel, Catharine, John, Mary, 9. Eleanor. 10. Howard. 11. Dor- 
othy, married Cloyd Postlewait, and had : Preston, Russell, Ernest, 
Dorothy, Marv. 12. Alfred, married, in 1892, Annie G. Shope, and 
had : Cloyd, Marie, Ralph, Jannett, Alfred. 

(IV) Milton W., son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Stonerode) Isen- 
berg, was born in Alexandria, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, Au- 
gust 21, 1848. Educated in the public schools of Shirleyburg, he later 
attended the Shirleyburg Academy and the Petersburg Normal School. 
He taught school about six years in the winter, doing farm work in the 
summer. In 1872 he engaged in the grocery business in Altoona, and 
at the end of six years bought a farm in Shirley township. He was 
elected to the offices of registrar and recorder, and clerk of the orphans' 
court, and held them until 1897, when he with some others organized 
the Keystone Sand Company, at Mapleton, Pennsylvania, and he was a 
large shareholder and one of the directors until he disposed of his in- 
terests. For several years he has been secretary of the wholesale gro- 
cery business of the Bayer-Beaver Company, and he is a director in the 
First National Bank of Mount Union. Formerly a Republican, he is 
now a Progressive, and has been secretary of the school board of Shir- 
ley township. He is a member of the Standing Stone Conclave, Im- 
proved Order of Heptasophs, and he and his wife are members of the 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1287 

Reformed church. He married, February 26, 1874, Emma, daughter 
of Lawrence P. and Dehlah Work. Children : Samuel Lawrence, died 
at two years of age; Grace, died in infancy; Mabel, married Elmer New- 
ton Rupert, of Huntingdon, and has Allen and (ienevieve; Edith, mar- 
ried Irvin Wallace Fleck, of Huntingdon, and has Natalie, Elizabeth 
and Charlotte; Frederick Milton, a florist of Huntingdon, who married, 
September 10, 19 13, Dorris Anna Ward. 



The Linn family, of Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, has 
LINN been identified with the agricultural interests of the state 

for a number of generations. The earliest member of the 
family of whom we have definite information is John Linn, of Irish de- 
scent. He was owner of a large farm in Huntingdon county, which he 
cultivated in a practical and profitable manner. He was a member of the 
Church of the Brethren. He married and had children : George, Wil- 
liam, Samuel, David, Belle, Rachel, deceased; John R., McKendree. 

(II) John R., son of John Linn, was born in Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania, P'ebruary 3, 1847, and his entire life was spent in that 
county. He farmed on an extensive scale in Springfield township, 
where his farm was one of the best kept in every respect in the section. 
In his political affiliations he was a Democrat, and was elected to serve 
in a number of local offices. He and his wife were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Linn married Mary, daughter of 
James Love, who also farmed on a large scale. Children : John Cal- 
vin, a farmer, married Mary Fraker and has one son, William L. ; 
James Wilbur, of whom further; two children, died in infancy. 

(III) James Wilbur, son of John R. and Mary (Love) Linn, was 
born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, July 15, 1872. The public 
schools of his township furnished him with a sound and practical edu- 
cation, and he then turned his attention to the occupation which had 
been so successfully followed by his father and grandfather. He pur- 
chased a farm of one hundred and thirty-seven acres in 1904, and this 
is now one of the model farms of his district. It is well fenced and a 
goodly part of it is planted in fruit trees, which are now in fine bearing 
condition. The farm is well stocked, and Mr. Linn deals in grain and 
also handles farm machinery to a certain extent. He has an accurate 
and ready knowledge of the best methods of carrying on the farm in- 



1288 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

dustry, and his products are always of such excellence as to command a 
ready sale in the market and bring him good financial returns. Indus- 
try is probably the most marked characteristic of Mr. Linn, and his 
continued and well-directed efforts have brought him prosperity. In 
politics he is a Democrat. 

Mr. Linn married, August 22, 1894, Mertie, daughter of William 
and Caroline Frehn, the former a miller and a member of the Church 
of God. Children: Lewis Melvin, born January 22, 1897, was edu- 
cated in the public schools, and now assists his father in the cultivation 
of the homestead farm; William Robison, born February 6, 1902; 
Freda May, born February 12, 1910. 



Elias Fraker, father of Samuel O. Fraker, of Orbisonia, 
FRAKER Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, died in 1894. He 

obtained a public school education in the place of his 
birth, and when a young man began farming in Huntingdon county. 
He made his home in this county and in Fulton county until his death, 
cultivating his acres with great success. He was a member of the Pres- 
byterian church, and a Democrat in politics, holding several township 
offices. He married Mary Brown, born at Burnt Cabins, Fulton county, 
Pennsylvania, October 18, 1822, died 1886. Children: i. Amanda, 
born August 6, 1846, died August 9, 1846. 2. Elizabeth, born October 
24, 1847, died October 25, 1867. 3. Daniel Chance, born May 13, 1850, 
died October 31, 1867. 4. William Henry, born October 15, 1852, died 
July 25, 1868. 5. Martha Bell, born October 24, 1857, died September 
26, 1867. 6. Samuel Ora, of further mention. 7. Walker Brown, born 
February 29, 1864, died October 4, 1867. 

(II) Samuel Ora, sixth child and third son of Elias and Mary 
(Brown) Fraker, was born at Burnt Cabins, Fulton county, Pennsyl- 
vania, September 23, i860. He obtained an education in the public 
schools of the place of his birth, and when a young man engaged in 
the farmer's occupation, leaving this to enter the hotel business in 1886 
at Burnt Cabins, where for three years he conducted a hotel. He then 
came to Huntingdon county, holding the proprietorship of a hotel at 
Orbisonia for six years, at the end of that time engaging in the raising 
of stock and farming. He has a farm of three hundred and fifty acres 
upon which he has bred many fine cattle, horses and sheep. Besides this 






I ^^1 



^/^mu? 



/^, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1289 

property he is tlie owner of two hundred acres of valuable coal anil 
timber land. He was one of the organizers of the First National Bank 
of Orbisonia, incorporated January icS, 1908, and for the past four 
years has been president of that organization. Another business propo- 
sition of which he was the promulgator was the water plant installed in 
1908, of which he and Dr. Bush are the sole owners. He holds a posi- 
tion high in the estimation of his fellowmen and is one of the most 
progressive citizens of the community, always striving in a public spir- 
ited, unselfish manner for the advancement of the best interests of Or- 
bisonia. He is a Democrat in politics, but has never aspired to enter 
the arena of county politics, confining his political activities to the filling 
of the various township offices in which he has been placed by his host 
of friends. He is a member of Cromwell Lodge, No. 572, Free and 
Accepted Masons, and Huntingdon Lodge, No. 976, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. 

He married, in 1886, Adaline McGowgan, of Fulton county. Chil- 
dren : I. Hattie Eugene, born January 26, 1893, *J'ed February 2-], 
1895. 2. Helen Magdalene, born May 31, 1895. 3. Julius Orville, born 
January 14, 1899. 



William Burket, of Warriors Mark, Pennsylvania, is 
BURKET now living virtually retired from active participation in 

business affairs. He is the owner of two fine farms in 
Warriors Mark township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and for 
over fifty years he was engaged in the work of his trade, that of car- 
penter. His citizenship has been characterized by loyalty and an ardent 
support of all measures and enterprises projected for the good of prog- 
ress and improvement, and his exemplary life and straightforward 
career have won him the unqualified confidence and esteem of all with 
whom he has come in contact. 

A native of the old Keystone commonwealth, William Burket was 
born in Blair county, Pennsylvania, August 20, 1836, son of Peter H. 
and Nancy (Homer) Burket, both of whom are now deceased, the for- 
mer having died in 1893 and the latter in 1894. Peter H. Burket was 
born in Sinking Valley, Pennsylvania, in the year 1809, son of Jacob 
Burket. who for many years was a tavern keeper at Brookville and later 
at Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, in which latter place he died. Jacob 



I290 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Burket was twice married, Peter H. having been a son of the first union. 
Peter H. Burket was a tanner by trade, and in 1840 he estabHshed the 
family home at Warriors Mark, where he purchased a tannery and 
where he continued to reside until his death. In addition to the tan- 
ning business he also conducted a small farm. He was a fervent mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he was an officer and 
class leader for many years. He was a stalwart Republican, and he 
was a member of the school board at Warriors Mark. He married 
Nancy, daughter of Peter Homer, who was of German descent and who 
came to Warriors Mark township from Lancaster county, Pennsyl- 
vania. Mr. and Mrs. Burket had eight children, as follows : William, 
of whom further; James, killed at the battle of Chaplain Farm, near 
Richmond, during the civil war; David, married Harriet , en- 
gaged in the general merchandise business at Altoona, Pennsylvania; 
John, married Ellen McFarland, lives in Warriors Mark, a carpenter 
by trade, but now retired; Adaline, wife of Jerry Ike, who is engaged 
in the real estate business ; Eliza, wife of H. H. Waite, an attorney at 
Huntingdcn, Pennsylvania; Howard, a farmer in the vicinity of Sink- 
ing Valley, this state, married Sarah Livingston; Melvin, died in the 
army during the civil war. 

William Burket came to Warriors Mark with his parents when but 
four years of age and here he was educated in the public schools. As 
a youth he helped his father in the tannery, and when in his twentieth 
year began to learn the trade of carpenter under the tutelage of David 
Filer. In 1863 he manifested his intrinsic loyalty to the cause of the 
Union by enlisting for service as a member of Company B, Ninety-first 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving until the close of the war. 
He was the only one of his three brothers who served in the war to sur- 
vive. For fully half a century he worked diligently at his trade of car- 
penter and he has erected at least fifty barns in this part of the country, 
all of which are noted for their splendid construction. He owns the 
old Burket homestead in Warriors Mark township, the same compris- 
ing sixty-five acres, and he has another farm of one hundred and sixteen 
acres in the same locality. Since 1909 he has lived in retirement at 
Warriors Mark. He is a Republican in politics, and for twelve years 
served as school director, most of that time as secretary of the board. 
In religious matters he is a devout member of the Methodist Episcopal 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1291 

church, in whose failh lie has reared his children. He is a broad- 
minded man and a warm-hearted friend, helping all who are in need 
of his assistance. 

Mr. Burket married (first) in iJ^S'), .Miriam W'eslcjn, who died Oc- 
tober 9, 1870; (second) Ellen Salina Nearhoff. Children of Mr. l!ur- 
ket : Clayton, a carpenter in Warriors Mark, married Mary Kinch ; 

Grace, who is the widow of Kibbel, is now a resident of Florida; 

Nannie, wife of William Kinch at the time of her demise in the spring 
of 1913; Essa, married, and lives at Jnniata, PennsyKania. 



The Nearhoof family of Huntingdon county, Penn- 
NEARHOOF sylvania, had for its progenitor Henry Nearhoof, 

who emigrated from Germany before the revolu- 
tionary war. It is possible that he took an active part in the struggle 
of the colonies for their independence, as the name of Henry Nearhoof 
appears several times in the Continental Records of Pennsylvania. He 
settled at Warriors Mark township, Huntingdon county, where he 
farmed until his death. He cleared and improved the land of which a 
part is still owned by Levi Nearhoof, and at the time of his demise 
owned five or si.x hundred acres. He lived a quiet life, but was known 
throughout the township for his generosity and integrity. He had one 
son, Henry, of whom further. 

(II) Henry (2), son of Henry (i) Nearhoof, the German immi- 
grant, was born on his father's farm in Warriors Mark township, Hunt- 
ingdon county, Pennsylvania. After his father's death he, being the 
only heir, inherited the extensive estate, and he at once began to farm 
it. He erected the brick house, in 18 10, still standing in good condition. 
He was one of the successful and wealthy men of his day, and a mem- 
ber of the Lutheran church. He died on the homestead and is buried 
at Cross Roads. He married, but the maiden name of his wife is 
unknown. Children: i. George, lived and died in Warriors Mark 
township, a farmer. 2. John, went west and died in Illinois. 3. An- 
drew, died in Bald Eagle Valley, Blair county. 4. Jacob, of whom fur- 
ther. 5. Margaret, married Alexander Bratton ; died in Warriors Mark 
township. 6. Mary, married George Crane : died in Juniata Valley. 
7. Henry, a farmer, lived and died in Warriors Mark township. 

(III) Jacob, son of Henry (2) Nearhoof, was born on the Nearhoof 



1292 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

homestead, in 1803, died in the place of his nativity in 1876. He 
bought a portion of his father's homestead, and erected new buildings, 
since destroyed. He spent his entire life here, devoting it to his family 
and his farming interests. He had other landed property in Blair county, 
Pennsylvania, and was one of the prosperous men of his locality. He 
was a progressive farmer and introduced many improved methods of 
farming. He was a loyal Democrat, voting with and working with 
the party at all times. Both he and his wife were members of the 
Church of the Brethren. He married Catharine Grazier, born in 1806, 
died in 1899, when past ninety-three. She was the daughter of Michael 
and Mary (Beck) Grazier. Michael Grazier was one of the numerous 
sons of Yost Kressner, anglicized into Joseph Grazier, who came from 
Germany prior to 1800. Michael Grazier was born in Huntingdon 
county, there married and died. He was a farmer near Tyrone, but in 
Huntingdon county. He was one of the best and most thorough farm- 
ers in the township, and grew rich tilling the soil. He was a lifelong 
Democrat, working actively for the party. Children of Michael and 
Mary (Beck) Grazier: Daniel, a farmer, died in Warriors Mark town- 
ship ; Samuel, a farmer, died in same township ; Jeremiah, a farmer, 
died in same township; Joseph, a farmer, died in same township; Chris- 
tina, married Henry Krider, died in same township ; Nancy, married 
James Bell, died in Tyrone ; Susan, married Caleb Guyer, died in Ty- 
rone; Catharine, married Jacob Nearhoof. Children of Jacob and Cath- 
arine (Grazier) Nearhoof: i. David, a farmer; died in Blair county. 
2. Mary, married Ross Williams, died in Blair county. 3. Abednego, a 
farmer, died in Huntingdon county. 4. Jeremiah, a farmer, died in 
Huntingdon county. 5. Michael, a farmer, died in Blair county. 6. 
Joseph, died while yet a young man. 7. Martha, died in infancy. 8. 
Lavina, twin of Martha, died in infancy. 9. Nancy Jane, died un- 
married while yet a young woman. 10. Wesley, died while yet a young 
man. 11. James Bell, of whom further. 12. Levi, a farmer, lives on 
homestead. 13. Ellen Salina, married William Burket, lives at War- 
riors Mark township. 14. Miles, lives in Blair county. 

(IV) James Bell, son of Jacob and Catharine (Grazier) Nearhoof, 
was born May 15, 1843, ^^ Warriors Mark township, on the Nearhoof 
homestead. He received his education in the common schools of the 
day, and was reared on the homestead in a deeply religious atmosphere. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA V ALLEY 1293 

He early learned the eari)enter's trade, and folbiwed it for fourteen 
years, during whicli time he assisted, or managed, in the erection of 
many of the handsomest liouses and I)uildings in that section of Penn- 
sylvania. After fourteen years' experience with the scjuare, hammer 
and saw lie tlecided to engage in the family occupation of farming. 
He purchased eighty acres, which was wild land, cleared and improved, 
erected thereon sulistantial huiklings which are still in use, and re- 
mained there for thirty-tive years. The property grew in value, as it 
was on the main pike to Tyrone, and in 1906 Mr. Nearhoof was in- 
duced to sell it for a handsome sum. He retired from farming, built 
a handsome modern home in the village of Warriors Mark, and has 
since lived in the village. He enlisted in 1863 in Company E, Forty- 
sixth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served for three months 
in the civil war. He is a Republican, works for the party, and has been 
school director and road supervisor. Both he and his wife are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is a trustee. Mr. Near- 
hoof commands the respect of those who know him for his honesty and 
uprightness. 

He married (first) in 1865, Mary C, daughter of Martin Weston. 
She died in 1895. He married (second) in 1900, Juniata Miller, born 
in Warriors Mark township, daughter of Vincent Miller. Children by 
first marriage: i. Wilber, an employee of the Pennsylvania railroad at 
Altoona, Pennsylvania ; married Rosa Ale ; three children : Harvey, 
Owen and Viola. 2. Burton, rural free delivery carrier in Warriors 
Mark township. 3. Elmer, a farmer of Warriors Mark township; mar- 
ried May Goodman ; three children : Catherine, Clarence and Helen. 
4. Oscar, an employee of the Pennsylvania railroad at Altoona, Penn- 
sylvania ; married Lorena Wise ; two children : Frances W. and Es- 
ther B. 



The Parker family of Juniata Valley, Pennsylvania, is 
PARKER of English descent. The immigrant ancestor, David 

Parker, came from t)evonshire, England, to America, 
in the sailing vessel, "The Good Fortune," Captain Green, in 1692, and 
landed in Massachusetts. Later he drifted into Delaware, and thence 
to New Jersey. Some of his descendants moved to the colony of Penn- 
sylvania soon after the death of William Penn. 



1294 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Ezra D. Parker, son of E. Southard and Isabella (Wilson) Parker, 
was born August 15, 1872, in Mifflintown, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, 
where the family was among the first and most influential in that sec- 
tion. He was educated in the fine public schools in Mifflin and Wash- 
ington, D. C, and finished at the Mt. Herman school. At the age of 
nineteen, being ambitious to enter the business world for himself, he 
accepted the position of bookkeeper in the Columbian National Bank of 
Washington. He remained here for some time, making an enviable 
record for himself as an accurate and painstaking worker. His next 
position was in the National Metropolitan Bank, which he held until 
1909, at the same time he was manager of the Clearing House. He 
returned to Juniata county in 1909, settled on a fine farm of three hun- 
dred and fifty acres, known as Wilson Heights. Here he does general 
farming and stock raising, and in the few years that he has owned it 
he has converted it into one of the show places in that section of the 
covmtry. He is one of the leading men of the township, progressive, 
democratic, simple in manner and cordial toward all. He is a member 
of the Masonic order, at Washington, D. C, Lafayette Lodge, No. 19. 
Both he and wife are members of the Presbyterian church, and he is a 
Democrat in politics, but has never asked for office. He married, June 
30, 1897, Jennie, daughter of William Banks. Children: Southard, 
born May 30, 1898, attending Lewistown Academy; Helen, born Au- 
gust 26, 1900, attending school at Mifflintown. 



Elmer Addison Smith, of Huntingdon county, Pennsyl- 
SMITH vania, is one of the solid citizens of that section of the 

state. On the paternal side he is of English extraction, 
while on the distaff he descends from a German Palatine emigrant. 

(I) Samuel P. Smith was born and reared in Union township, 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. He remained in that locality nearly 
all of his life, and was a farmer by occupation, owning a large amount 
of land. In his day he was a prominent man, and for thirty years held 
the office of justice of the peace. He and his wife were members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. In his later years he voted the Re- 
publican ticket, or as soon as that party was organized. He married 
Catherine Swoope, also born and reared in Union township. Among 
his nine children, all of whom are living, was Ralph, of whom further. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1295 

(II) Ralph, son of Samuel 1'. and Catherine (Swoope) Smith, was 
born in Union township, Lluntingclon county, Pennsylvania. He is a 
general farmer on a large scale, owns four hundred acres of land, much 
of it under cultivation, and raises grain, stock and quantities of fruit. 
He is a Republican. He has served as school director and has held 
other local ofiices; is clerk of the county home, and a stockholder and 
director of the National Bank of Three Springs, Pennsylvania. With 
his family he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and is 
well and favorably known in his community. In 1871 he married 

Amanda, daughter of Jacob and (Shock) Fisher, both of whom 

are of Cermau descent, and moved from Lebanon to Union township, 
where he purchased one hundred and eighty acres of land and there 
farmed for years. He and his family were members of the Lutheran 
church. Children of Ralph and Amanda (Fisher) Smith: Albert, 
died in infancy; Elmer Addison, of whom further; Lottie E., married 
Dr. Lane, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, one child, Harrison ; Byron, 
married Clement, and is a farmer in Barree township, Hunting- 
don county; Denver C, a farmer in Cass township, Huntingdon county; 
Beulah May, married Ebert Evans, a farmer in Crow Creek Valley; 
Carrie A., married William Morris, an electrician in East Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. 

(III) Elmer Addison, son of Ralph and Amanda (Fisher) Smith, 
was born August 10, 1874, in Cass township, Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania. He received his education in the public schools of the town- 
ship, and at an early age engaged in farming. He purchased ninety- 
eight acres of land in Cass township and brought it to a high state of 
fertility. In 1910 he sold this farm and bought two hundred acres, of 
which one hundred and sixty-eight are tillable. He has the place well 
stocked, and takes great pride in his animals. He does successful 
general farming, and has one of the show places in Huntingdon 
county. He is a public-spirited and able man, and commands the re- 
spect of his neighbors. He also combines dairying with his farming, 
although not on an extensive scale. He and his wife are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and he of the Patrons of Husbandry, 
Lodge No. 935. He supports the Republican ticket with his vote. He 
married, October 12, 1893, Ella M. Wright, born October 23. 1873, 
daughter of J. Frank and LA'dia (Apgar) Wright, a farmer by occupa- 



1296 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

tion. Mr. Wright is a veteran of the civil war, having enlisted in 1861 
in Company F, Second Pennsylvania Regiment. He was one of five 
brothers who served the Union cause, the others being Henry, Levi, 
Abraham and Caleb. Children of Elmer Addison and Ella M. (Wright) 
Smith: Edna M., born in March, 1895; Lillian A., January 2, 1897; 
Chester C, November 3, 1899; Freeman, January 2, 1902, deceased; 
Robert L., November 21, 1906; Ebert M., September 27, 1909. 



Albert Thompson Kelly, while a native born son of Hunt- 
KELLY ingdon county, descended from Ohio parentage, the 
earlier family, however, having been Pennsylvanians of 
Irish descent. His grandfather married Margaret McKee, born in Ohio. 
After his marriage he lived at ^tna Furnace, Pennsylvania, Kankakee, 
Illinois, Smith's Ferry, Pennsylvania, finally settling in East Liverpool, 
Ohio, where he engaged in the oil bvisiness until his death. Children : 
Joseph McKee, of whom further; Celeste, married and moved to Cali- 
fornia and there died; Josephine, married Rev. George Cable, and died 
in Minnesota; Jay, died in youthful manhood. 

(II) Joseph McKee Kelly was born in the state of Ohio, and there 
grew to manhood and received his education. He followed the for- 
tunes of his father, engaging with him in the oil business in Pennsyl- 
vania, Illinois, and Ohio, finally settling with him in East Liverpool, 
where he became a leading man of affairs. Besides his oil interests he 
was president of the Union Building and Loan Association, vice-presi- 
dent of the First National Bank, secretary and treasurer of the East 
Liverpool Cemetery Association. He was ambitious not for wealth, 
but to be of service to his fellowman. Public-spirited, generous and 
very charitable, he lived a life of usefulness and gained an enviable repu- 
tation for uprightness and true manliness. He was a Republican in 
politics, but never sought or accepted public office. He was for several 
years a trustee of the First Presbyterian Church of East Liverpool, and 
was especially helpful in the erection of the new church built by that 
congregation. He died January 26, 19 10. He married, in Lisbon, 
Ohio, Sarah Elizabeth Thompson, born in Milroy, Mifflin county, Penn- 
sylvania, died in June, 1892, daughter of Samuel and Nancy (Cooper) 
Thompson. Samuel Thompson was a tanner by trade, and a well-to- 
do farmer of Eden Hill, Huntingdon county. He had children : Lydia, 




ffu/itfif f7/w/N/i4on. .yf/l. S). 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1297 

the only living memljer of her family, never married; Sarah Elizabeth, 
married Joseph MeKee Kelly; Mary, married Harry Nivling, and died 
at Sioux City, Iowa; Alfred, a soldier of the civil war, dying soon after 
the close of the war from disease contracted in the army; Carolitie, 
second wife of Joseph M. Kelly, died in East Liverpool, Ohio; Emma, 
married John Sample, and died near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania ; John, 
died in Belhvood, Pennsylvania. Children of Joseph McKee and Sarah 
Elizabeth Kelly : Alleen, died aged thirty-seven years, unmarried ; Al- 
fred T., of whom further; John Charles, of East Liverpool; Dorothy, 
married W. H. Vodrey, and resides in East Liverpool ; George Har- 
rington, of Cleveland, Ohio. 

(Ill) Alfred Thompson, son of Joseph McKee and Sarah E. 
(Thompson) Kelly, was born at Eden Hill, Spruce Creek township, 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, April 16, 1866. He was educated 
in the public schools, Oberlin College and Princeton L'niversity, being 
graduated from the latter institution with the degree of B. A., class of 
1890. After leaving the university he entered the service of the First 
National Bank of East Liverpool, continuing until 1908, when ill health 
caused his retirement. He came to Huntingdon county, purchasing a 
farm in Spruce Creek township, but only lived four months to enjoy 
his country estate, dying July 16, 1909. He possessed talents of a high 
order, was a business man of ability and a citizen whose life was beyond 
reproach. He was interested in the development of a literary spirit in' 
East Liverpool, and was especially active in the Cosmopolitan Club, of 
which he was president. In religious faith he was a Presbyterian. 

Mr. Kelly married, November 7, 1900, Sarah Culbertson Thomp- 
son, born in Spruce Creek township. Huntingdon county, daughter of 
Dr. Sidney and Lusetta (Isett) Thompson and granddaughter of Robert 
and Sarah (McManigal) Thompson, early settlers of Mifflin county, of 
Scotch-Irish parentage. Dr. Sidney Thompson was born in Milroy, 
Pennsylvania, and obtained a university education, graduating from 
Princeton, class of 1854. He then entered the medical department of 
the University of Pennsylvania, whence he was graduated M.D., class 
of 1856. He located in Spruce Creek township, Huntingdon county, 
where he practiced until his death in 1888. He was a skillful, beloved 
physician, accomplishing great good in his community. His practice 
was very large, his death resulting froin overwork. His wife, Lusetta 



1298 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Isett, born in Spruce Creek township, survives him, never having remar- 
ried. Both were communicants of the Presbyterian church; children: 
Bertha, married Perry R. Moore, of Toledo, Iowa; Sidney Carlton, of 
Toledo, Iowa; Sarah Culbertson, widow of Alfred Thompson Kelly, 
now residing at Spruce Creek, Pennsylvania; Mary Belle, married R. 
W. Bailey and resides in Brooklyn, New York; Virginia W., resides in 
Altoona, Pennsylvania. Children of Alfred Thompson and Sarah C. 
(Thompson) Kelly: Sidney Thompson, born May 21, 1903; Robert 
Allen, born March 26, 1905, died aged eighteen months; Edward Isett, 
born January 14, 1907. 



The Zooks of Mifflin county, Pennsylvania (and in 1880 
ZOOK there were thirty-eight families of the name in that county), 

descend from Moritz Zook (or Zug), a grandson of Hans 
Zook (Zug), born in Switzerland, a Mennonite minister exiled to 
Germany. Moritz Zook came to America from Pfaltz, Germany, in 
1742, settling in Lancaster county, nov^^ Center township, Berks county. 
He later moved to Whiteland, Chester county, where he died. He left 
five sons — John, Christian, Henry, Abraham, Jacob; and a daughter 
Fanny. 

(II) John, son of Moritz Zook came to Mifflin county in 1793, with 
his brother Christian, and both lived their lives there. John had sons : 
John, Abraham, Christian, Joseph, Jacob, David and Shem : also five 
daughters. The sons all married and left issue, except Jacob. 

(III) David, son of John Zook, came to Kishacoquillas valley with 
his parents, and there married Elizabeth King. Children : Levi, lived 
in Lancaster county, married a Stillfoss; Joel, married Catherine Ke- 
heagy; Enoch, of whom further; Simeon and Simon, twins, the first 
married Rebecca Hertzler, the second married Rebecca King. Two 
daughters of David Zook married and settled nearby; the other two 
married and moved to Lancaster county. David Zook reared his family 
on a farm of over five hundred acres, which he cleared with the aid of 
his sons, and there both he and his wife died. 

(IV) Enoch, son of David and Elizabeth (King) Zook, was born 
in Kishacoquillas valley, in 1818, died January 16, 1888. He was edu- 
cated in the primitive schools of that day, but acquired a good education. 
He was a farmer, and never left the old homestead, of which he inher- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1299 

ited a part. At the age of thirty years he was cliosen minister of the 
Aniish Mennonite Church of Union townsliip, and for forty years, until 
his death, held that relation to the congregation. He married Mary, 
daughter of Yost and Elizabeth (Beiler) Hertzler. Children: i. 
David Hertzler, of whom further. 2. Enoch A., resides in Union town- 
ship, one mile north of Belleville, a farmer; married (first) Rachel 
Hooley, (second) Lydia Blank. 3. Yost, died aged twenty-one years. 
4. Abner Y., a farmer of the Kishacoquillas valley, and a landowner 
in California and North Dakota; unmarried. 5. Israel T., married and 
lived on the homestead until twenty-five years old, and then joined an 
Amish Mennonite colony and moved to North Dakota, where he now 
resides. 6. Salome, married Christian Detweiler, and died fifteen years 
later in Knoxville, Tennessee. 7. Nancy, lived her life of sixty years 
in the valley, unmarried. 8. Sarah, lived at the homestead until her 
father's death, then married J. H. Peachy, an agriculturist and an edu- 
cator, now a member of the Pennsylvania legislature. 

(V) David Hertzler, son of Enoch and Mary (Hertzler) Zook, 
was born at the homestead in Union township, Mifflin county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and died there. He attended the public school, later finishing his 
education at Kishacoquillas Seminary. At the age of eighteen years he 
began teaching and for the succeeding ten years taught during the win- 
ter terms. He served for twenty-five years as school director, and al- 
though devoted to his Mennonite religion and a progressive and trusted 
leader of his people, he was also deeply interested in the cause of edu- 
cation and in political affairs, filling many town offices. He was mar- 
ried at the old Hooley homestead to Elizabeth, daughter of John C. 
and Elizabeth (Hertzler) Hooley, and settled on a portion of the Zook 
homestead, which Mr. Zook later purchased and there resided until 
death. His widow survives him, still residing at the homestead. Her 
father, John C. Hooley, was born, lived and died on the "Pike"' between 
Reedsville and Belleville, a farmer and large landowner. His father, 
John Hooley, was an early settler, and died on the same farm as his 
son John C. Both were members of the Amish Mennonite church, and 
John C. a progressive and helpful citizen in the establishment of schools 
and in public afifairs. Children of John C. Hoolev: i. David, lives in 
La Grange county, Indiana, a farmer. 2. Levi, a farmer of Michigan. 
3. Stephen, the owner of the original Hooley homestead and now living 



I300 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

near there retired. 4. Joseph, now Hving at West Liberty, Ohio, a 

farmer. 5. Leah, married (first) — ■ Kaufman, (second) Jonathan 

Zook, and died in Missouri. 6. Kate, married Peter Y. King, a farmer 
of Mifflin county. 7. Mary, deceased, married Jacob Zook. 8. EHza- 
beth, of previous mention, married David H. Zook. 9. Rachel, de- 
ceased, married Enoch A. Zook. 10. Sarah, unmarried and residing 
with her brother Stephen. 11. Fannie, resides with her brother Ste- 
phen and sister Sarah. Children of David H. and Elizabeth Zook : 
I. Thomas Edwin, of whom further. 2. Reuben, married Sarah King, 
and lives on the homestead. 3. Mary, married Levi D. Kaufman, a 
farmer of the Kishacoquillas valley. 4. Stephen, a farmer of Logan 
county, Ohio. 5. Nellie, resides with her widowed mother on the home- 
stead. 6. Fannie, died in infancy. 

(VI) Thomas Edwin, eldest son of David Hertzler and Elizabeth 
(Hooley) Zook, was born at the homestead in Union township, Mifflin 
county, Pennsylvania, April 9, 1868. He was educated in the public 
schools, and through boyhood and youthful manhood worked at farm- 
ing in the Kishacoquillas valley. At the age of twenty-five years he 
entered the employ of the Kishacoquillas Valley railroad, then in course 
of construction, continuing four years, working part of this period as 
fireman. In 1899 he formed a partnership with Israel Z. Hertzler and 
started at Belleville a small machine and buggy repair shop in a build- 
ing thirty by forty feet, the two partners constituting the entire working 
force for the first two years. The business had then grown to a re- 
spectable size and was rapidly extending to other towns when their little 
shop burned to the ground. They at once rebuilt on a much larger 
scale, adding a foundry in the place of the buggy repair department. 
The new building was seventy by forty feet, and equipped with one mo- 
tor. The product of the plant was principally farm tools and imple- 
ments for the local trade and a general line of farm repair work. The 
reputation of the firm extended, however, be)'ond local limits, and re- 
quiring much more than the partners could raise they incorporated, 
Februarv 11, 1909, with fifteen thousand dollars capital, the Hertzler 
& Zook Company, with Thomas E. Zook, president; R. K. Yoder, vice- 
president; Israel Zook Hertzler, secretary and treasurer. This proving 
insufficient to meet the demands of a largely increased business, on 
August 6, 1912, the capital stock was increased to fifty thousand dol- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1301 

lars. More ground was purchased and new Ijuildings have been erected 
until now the plant consists of a machine sJiop two-story sixty by forty 
feet, foundry seventy by forty feet, painting and erecting building two- 
story forty by sixty feet, shipping and store room thirty-five by sixty feet 
pattern building one-story, thirty by forty feet, an office building, and 
several smaller buildings required for storage of material. The plant 
keeps constantly employed about fifty men and the output is shipped to 
every state in the Lhiion, to South America and Hawaii. The special- 
ties manufactured are: Grain drills, wood-sawing machinery of many 
kinds, feed mills, stoves and numerous farm tools and implements. The 
success attending the operation of this plant is based upon the excel- 
lence of their articles of manufacture and the wise executive manage- 
ment of Messrs. Zook and Hertzler, who from a little two-man repair 
shop have developed a large and prosperous business, extending over 
half the world. This is a wonderful result to accomplish in less than 
twenty- five years and speaks in loudest praise of the founders and prin- 
cipal members of the present company. Mr. Zook is a Republican in 
politics, but has never accepted public office, devoting himself entirely 
to his private business concerns. He is a member of the Amish Men- 
nonite church, the faith of many generations of his family, and his wife 
was also a member. He married, March 29, 1907, Sarah M. Yoder, born 
in Juniata county, daughter of Moses P. and Sarah Yoder, who came to 
Mifflin county when Sarah M. was an infant. She died without issue, 
May 3, 1912. 



The well-known and prosperous manufacturing firm, 
HERTZLER Hertzler & Zook Company, of Belleville, Pennsyl- 
vania, of which Israel Zook Hertzler is secretary and 
treasurer, is fully described in the preceding sketch, devoted to its presi- 
dent. Thomas E. Zook. The Hertzler genealogy begins with Jacob 
Hertzler (Swiss, Hurshler), born of Swiss parents in Switzerland in 
1703. He grew to manhood in his mountain home, became a farmer, 
and a minister of the A.mish Mennonite church. He married, but his 
wife died early, leaving him a son John, of further mention. He mar- 
ried (second) Catherine , and moved to the German Palatinate, 

now Bavaria, part of the German Empire. He resided there several 
years, but finally was driven by religious persecution to seek a home in 



I302 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

America. He sailed on the ship "St. Andrew" from Rotterdam, touch- 
ing at Plymouth, England, and arriving at Philadelphia, September 9, 
1749. He settled on a farm in Berne township, Lancaster (now Upper 
Berne) township, Berks county, two miles west of Hamburg. This he 
purchased from the proprietaries, Richard and Thomas Penn, warrant 
dated January 9, 1750, price stated $1.25 per acre; the name of the tract, 
"Contentment," its area, 182 acres and 30 perches. In 1752 he pur- 
chased no acres; in 1765, 36 acres; in 1766, 44 acres; and in 1773, 30 
acres, with odd perches in each tract, the whole totaling 404 acres, 4 
perches, all of which he improved. On August 30, 1773, he divided his 
lands among his children, John, Jacob, Christian, and Fanny, the latter 
wife of John Kauffman. Catherine, his second wife, died between Au- 
gust 30, 1773 (when she is known to have been alive) and March 4, 
1774 (when it is known she was dead). Jacob, the Swiss emigrant, 
died in 1786, later than March 20. Both are buried in the Amish Men- 
nonite burial ground, two miles west of Hamburg, Pennsylvania, their 
graves unmarked, as was the custom of that faith. The sons of Jacob, 
having taken the oath of allegiance to the King of England, consequently 
took no active part in the revolution, refusing, as did all the Amish 
Mennonites, to break their oath. 

(II) John, only son of Jacob Hertzler and his first wife, was born 
in Switzerland ; was with his father in Germany, and came to Phila- 
delphia with him on the ship "St. Andrew," arriving September 9, 1749. 
He became a farmer, and lived on land inherited from his father, near 
Moortown, Center township, Berks county, where he died in April, 
1801, and is buried in the Adam Kurtz graveyard, near Womelsdorf, 
Pennsylvania. He married Veronica Reichenbach, of Swiss birth, 
daughter of John and Veronica Reichenbach, born in Switzerland. She 
died in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, in 1806, and is buried in Amish 
burial ground near Belleville. Children : John ; Barbara ; Catherine ; 
Jacob; EHzabeth; David, of whom further; Veronica and Christian. 

(III) David, son of John and Veronica (Reichenbach) Hertzler, 
was born in Berks county, Pennsylvania, January 26, 1768, died in 
Menno township, Mifflin county, October 21, 1855. He was a land- 
owning farmer, and adhered to the religious faith of his fathers. He 
married Mary Yoder, born September 16, 1771, died June 25, 1856. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1303 

Children: John, Fanny, Sarah, Mary, Shem, Abraham, Joseph, Leah, 
EHzabeth and David. 

(IV) Shem, son of David and Mary (Yoder) Hertzler, was born 
in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, October 3, 1805, died in Juniata county, 
January 19, 1849. He was a farmer all his life, but after his marriage 
moved to near Academia, Juniata county, which was ever afterward 
his home. He was a member of the Amish Mennonite church, and 
lived in strict accordance with the regulations of that faith. He mar- 
ried, March 22, 1827, Lydia Yoder, born in Juniata county, July 16, 
1805, and in 1836 they moved to Juniata county. Children: Julianna, 
Sarah, Benjamin, Mary, Tobias, Jacob, of whom further, David, Bar- 
bara and Lydia. 

(V) Jacob, son of Shem and Lydia (Yoder) Hertzler, was born in 
Juniata county, Pennsylvania, November 29, 1839, and now at the age 
of seventy-four years is living retired in Belleville, Pennsylvania, hon- 
ored and respected. He was educated in the public schools, and all his 
active vears was engaged in farming. He is a minister of the Amish 
Mennonite church, having held that sacred office for forty years. He 
married (first) Sarah Renno, born in Fermanagh township, Juniata 
county, died about 1882, aged about thirty-three years, daughter 
of David and Rachel (Yoder) Renno — he a land-owning farmer 
near Mifflin, and both members of the Amish Mennonite church. 
Children : John, David, Stephen, Jonas, Christian, Sarah, of pre- 
vious mention, and Barbara. Children of Jacob and Sarah Hertz- 
ler: David, born June 24, 1870; Israel Zook, of whom further. Jacob 
Hertzler married (second) Katherine Y. Byler, born in Mifflin county, 
daughter of J. L. and Sarah Byler; no issue. 

(VI) Israel Zook, second son of Jacob and Sarah (Renno) Hertz- 
ler, was born at Walnut (postoffice), Juniata county, Pennsylvania, 
April 21, 1875. He was educated in the public schools near Nook, at 
Mechanicsburg and Ore Bank. Being ambitious to accomplish a course 
in engineering, he entered as a student in the mechanical engineering 
course of the International Correspondence School of Scranton, being 
the first student enrolled from Belleville. He faithfully pursued the 
studies of this course and obtained a good theoretical knowledge, at the 
same time working out and proving the theories while working in the 
engine room of Wilson & Maclay, where he was in charge of the en- 



1304 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

gine and its maintenance for four years. He became thoroughly in- 
formed in engine and machine construction, and also a good machinist, 
with such confidence in his ability that in 1899 he formed a partnership 
with Thomas E. Zook, and started a small machine and buggy repair 
shop. This business grew and expanded into the present large and 
profitable business of Hertzler & Zook Company, of Belleville, capital 
$50,000, with an extensive plant and a product known over the entire 
American continent. Of this company Mr. Hertzler is secretary and 
treasurer. Besides his mechanical ability, which has always been a 
strong asset of the firm, he is a well-balanced man of business, with a 
keen judgment and fine executive ability. He is a Progressive in poli- 
tics, and thoroughly independent in his political action. Both he and 
his wife are members of the Amish Mennonite church, he being a trus- 
tee and chairman of the young people's meeting. 

He married, January 25, 1898, Mary E. Yoder, born in the Kisha- 
coquillas Valley, daughter of Levi Z. and Fanny Yoder, of an old Val- 
ley family. Children: Arie Lenore, born November 17, 1902; Mary 
Elizabeth, July 19, 1907; Elsie Ruth, March 23, 191 1. The family 
home is at Belleville, Pennsylvania. 



The Goodhart family, of which James McEwen 
GOODHART Goodhart, of Lewistown, Pennsylvania, is a mem- 
ber, has been connected with the history of the 
country since a considerable length of time prior to the revolution. 

(I) Frederick Goodhart emigrated from Germany to America. 

(II) John Goodhart was of Trumbull county, Ohio. 

(III) John, son of John Goodhart, was born in Perry county, Penn- 
sylvania, March 22, 1809, and died at Spring Mills, Center county, 
Pennsylvania, July 7, 1888. During his earlier years he was engaged 
in the manufacture of the once celebrated Conestoga wagons, for which 
the state of Pennsylvania was noted before the advent of railroad 
travel. His later years were spent on his farm near Spring Mills, 
Pennsylvania. Mr. Goodhart married, March 13, 1834, Martha Gregg, 
daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Gregg) McEwen, and granddaugh- 
ter of William and Sarah (Holmes) McEwen. The last two mentioned 
came to this country from Gileorbet, Ireland, about 1734-35, and were 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1305 

of Scotch-Irish descent. EHzabeth (Gregg) McEwen was a daughter 
of James Gregg, and a niece of Andrew Gregg (ist). 

Henry McEwen enHsted in a company of Pennsylvania riflemen 
under the command of Captain Hendricks, at Cadisle, Pennsylvania. 
They were at once ordered to Boston, and his company with several 
others was chosen by General Schuyler, with Arnold in command, to 
make the memorable march from Fort Western, now Augusta, through 
the wilderness to join General Montgomer)- and assist in the attack on 
the fortress at Quebec. In this hand-to-hand tight ]\IcEwen was 
wounded and taken prisoner, his captain and steadfast friend, Hen- 
dricks, mortally wounded. Henry McEwen had the distinction of not 
only serving his countr_\' during the revolution, but gave one of his sons 
in the war of 1812, one in the war with Mexico, another, his namesake, 
Henry McEwen Jr., when he was quite an old man, to the war of the 
rebellion. 

(IV) James McEwen, son of John and Martha Gregg (McEwen) 
Goodhart, was born at Potters Mills, Center county, Pennsylvania, Sep- 
tember 28, 1842. He was educated at the Aaronsburg Academy, and 
at the Plainfield Institute, now Northwestern College. Napierville, Illi- 
nois. After leaving school he came to Lewistown and entered into the 
employ of George Blymyer & Sons, and several years later associated 
himself in a partnership with J. Ritz Burns and J. S. Houtz, in the dry 
goods business, the tinn name being Burns, Goodhart & Houtz. Twen- 
ty-one years were spent in this business, and then Mr. Goodhart with- 
drew and purchased the Lewistown Foundry & Machine Company, of 
which he was president for a period of fifteen years. During this time, 
in connection with several others, he purchased a farm east of the town 
and organized the iNIount Rock Land & Improvement Company and 
the Mount Rock Cemetery Company, of both of which companies Mr. 
Goodhart is president. Some years ago he was also one of the organ- 
izers of the Lewistown Trust Company, in which he is serving as vice- 
president and as one of the directors. He served as postmaster of 
Lewistown during the second administration of President Cleveland ; 
was a school director for twelve years, during this time acting as secre- 
tary of the board ; and has been active in any project for the public 
welfare. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and has taken the 
Knight Templar degree. His association with the Presbyterian church 



i3o6 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

is active ; he is at present a ruling elder, and he has frequently served in 
its higher courts. 

Mr. Goodhart married (first) Sarah Beatty, daughter of Samuel 
Kyle, of Reedsville, Pennsylvania, and granddaughter of Judge Joseph 
Kyle, of Kishacoquillas valley. They had no children. He married 
(second) June 7, 1882, Rosanna Catharine, daughter of the late Hugh 
Hamilton, of Fermanagh, Juniata county, Pennsylvania. Her great- 
grandfather was Captain John Hamilton, of revolutionary fame, who 
gave his services as well as his means to the cause of his country. Her 
mother was Sarah Kloss, of Juniata county. Of this marriage two 
children were born: i. Martha Gregg Goodhart is wife of Charles M. 
Thompson, of Elkhurst, West Virginia, and has one child, James Good- 
hart Thompson. Mrs. Thompson was a graduate of Elmira College, 
Elmira, New York. Mr. Thompson is a son of John I. Thompson Jr., 
and a grandson of the late Moses Thompson, of Lemont, Center county, 
Pennsylvania. 2. Hugh Hamilton Goodhart, a graduate of the Penn- 
sylvania State College, Pennsylvania; is a mechanical engineer, resid- 
ing in Bufifalo, New York. Through her Hamilton ancestry Mrs. Ro- 
sanna Catharine Goodhart is a member of the Bellefont (Pennsylvania) 
Chapter, D. A. R. 

References as to family history: "The Goodhart Family," by Rich- 
ard Goodhart; "History of Loudoun Virginia Rangers," by Briscoe 
Goodhart; "The History of Clan McEwen," by R. S. T. MacEwen, 
Esq., of Glasgow, Scotland; "The Hamilton Family History," by A. 
Boyd Hamilton, Esq., of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; as to McEwen, in 
the revolution, Lossing's "Our Country," volume 2, chapter 17; "The 
History of Center and Clinton Counties," by John B. Linn, Esq. ; and 
Pennsylvania Archives. 



Thomas Spangler Johnson, a prominent business man, 
JOHNSON of Lewistown, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, has been 

identified with much that has made for the prosperity 
and welfare of the town in which he resides. His family has been 
resident in this country for some generations, having come here from 
Ireland. 

(I) Thomas Johnson, a native of Ireland, married Jane Boyd. 

(II) Thomas, son of Thomas and Jane (Boyd) Johnson, was also 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1307 

born in Ireland. He married Nancy Hazlett and had children : Mary, 
died unmarried, at an advanced age ; Jane, married James McGonigal, 
had a number of children, all deceased ; Nancy, married William Mc- 
Gonigal, and had one son who assumed his mother's maiden name, be- 
ing known as John Johnson, and is a resident of Bethlehem, Pennsyl- 
vania; Margaret, married John Clark, and had a number of chil- 
dren; Matilda, married Henry Stewart, of county Derry, Ireland, and 
has had four children ; William, see forward. 

(HI) William, son of Thomas and Nancy (Hazlett) Johnson, was 
born in county Derry, Ireland, March 28, 1819, and died in Lewistown, 
Pennsylvania, February 8, 1898. He was educated in the common 
schools of his native country, in which he remained until he had at- 
tained his majority, being employed meanwhile in farming operations. 
He emigrated to the United States in May, 1840, and after a voyage 
of fifty-six days arrived at Philadelphia and after a short stay there 
went on to Lewistown, in which he lived until his death. For a period 
of five years he filled various positions in the general store of Lewis G. 
Watson, at which time he was promoted to a clerkship in the business, 
and at the expiration of seven years Mr. Johnson established himself in 
the shoemaking business, commencing his operations on the same prem- 
ises on which he resided for so many years. This residence, however, 
was not a continuous one. He sold the business to Joseph Wills in 
1855, then removed to Lewisburg, Union county, Pennsylvania, where 
he was in the boot and shoe trade for one year. Returning to Lewis- 
town, he purchased the place in which he previously conducted his busi- 
ness in rented cpiarters, and again opened a boot and shoe store there. 
His previous reputation had not been forgotten, and his place of busi- 
ness was at once well patronized, and was an immediate success. He 
gave it his personal supervision until 1893, at which time he turned it 
over to his son, Thomas Spangler Johnson, and his son-in-law, John C. 
Axe. In politics he was a Republican. Mr. Johnson married, January 
17, 1856, Julia Ann. a daughter of John and Catherine (Bingman) 
Riegel, and a granddaughter of Captain Frederick Bingman, who en- 
tered the Continental army as a drummer boy, served throughout the 
revolutionary war, rose to the rank of captain, and participated in the 
battle of Brandywine and many other important engagements. He was 
ninety-one years of age at the time of his death and had become a 



i3o8 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

wealthy ironmaster. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson had children: William 
Hazlett, died January 8, 1868; Maggie Bingman, married John C. Axe, 
of Lewistown, Pennsylvania; Mary Hazlett; Thomas Spangler, see for- 
ward. 

(IV) Thomas Spangler, son of William and Julia A. (Riegel) John- 
son, was born in Lewistown, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, March 24, 
1872. He was educated in the public schools of his native town and 
at the Lewistown Academy. At a suitable age he entered the business 
of his father, which was turned over to him and his brother-in-law, John 
C. Axe, and they were successfully associated until the latter part of 
November, 1907, since Avhich time Mr. Johnson has managed its affairs 
alone. He has proved that the business ability which characterized his 
father has descended to him in fvill measure, and has the esteem of all 
who know him. His methods are enterprising and progressive and 
as a member of the Republican party, he has been elected to the position 
of treasurer of the Republican county committee of Mifflin county. 
He is a member of Lewistown Lodge, No. 97, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and of the Patriotic Order of Sons of America. 



About 1642, William Stewart, of Edinburgh, Scotland, 
STEWART sailed from London, England, for America. He was 

a member of a famous family, and at that time the 
name was spelled Stuart. He landed in New York and there remained 
for many years. His descendants are now scattered throughout the 
United States, many of whom are in both New York and Pennsyl- 
vania. They intermarried with the Thompsons, the Pierponts, the 
Gemmills, and many other families of more or less note, and thus are 
connected with hundreds of families. 

(I) John Gemmill Stewart was born November 25, 1801, at the old 
Lockhouse, in Alexandria, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. His 
mother was the daughter of Zachariah and Elizabeth Gemmill. Zacha- 
riah Gemmill was the owner of the land which is to-day the site of 
Alexandria, having purchased it from the former owner by whom it was 
patented in 1775. After the death of Zachariah Gemmill his widow, 
Elizabeth, with far-seeing business acumen, laid out the town of Alex- 
andria, August, 1793. There were one hundred lots, each two hundred 
feet long, with sixty feet frontage. These lots were subject to a 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1309 

qround rent, l)eginning September i, 1793, and rnnning until the present 
day. The rental of the front street lots, on the river, was one dollar 
annually; on Second Street, two-thirds of a dollar, etc. A century 
later these lots were still subject to ground rent. John (Jemniill Stewart 
was a prominent and inlluenlial man in his couununity, standing for all 
that is highest and noblest in manhood. Pie died, in 1882, mourned by 
his neighbors and the county at large. He married Elizabeth Steinman, 
born at Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, in 1829, and died in 1892. She 
was descended from a Palatine family long settled in Pennsylvania. 
Children: i. T. Calvin, deceased, a Presbyterian minister of note; had 
churches in Niles, Ohio, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 2. John Gem- 
mill, retired ; makes home in Alexandria, but spends summers in New 
York City. 3. Satira, deceased ; married Evander P. Walker. 4. Jacob 
Steinman, an attorney in Phillipsburg, New Jersey. 5. Robert A., a 
physician in Phillipsburg, New Jersey. 6. Sarah P., unmarried, lives in 
Alexandria. 7. William T., of whom further. 8. George Lowrie, died 
in 1892; a salesman for Wanamaker, of Philadelphia. 9. Joseph, died 
in infancy. 10. Jacob Steinman, died in infancy. The two latter are 
not in order of birth. 

(II) William T. Stewart, son of John Gemmill and Elizabeth 
(Steinman) Stewart, was born May 14, 1855, in Alexandria, Hunting- 
don county, Pennsylvania. He early entered the public schools, and 
made a record as a student. At the age of eighteen he decided to enter 
commercial life, and went to Easton, Pennsylvania, where he was em- 
ployed in a drug store for three years. His larger opportunity came 
during the year of the Centennial in Philadelphia, and he was quick to 
embrace it in the form of the responsible position of assistant paying 
teller in the Centennial National Bank of Philadelphia. He remained 
there until 1881, when he entered a partnership with A. D. Cooke to 
manufacture chamber furniture. In his new venture he did exceedingly 
well, not only supplied the market but created new markets in other 
localities. For two years this business was continued with success, but 
he was desirous of a larger field, and in 1883 formed the W. T. Stewart 
Company, with Dr. Peetrie as the company, and for twelve consecutive 
years he was engaged in the manufacture of a fine line of household 
furniture. Looking over the field he saw the need of furniture for 
school buildings, and began the manufacture of modern school furni- 



I3IO HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

ture, at Dayton, Ohio, under the name of the Philadelphia School 
Furniture, with the main office in Philadelphia. The business grew 
by leaps and bounds, and was a pronounced success from the be- 
g-inning. In 191 1 he formed a connection with the American School 
Furniture, and changed the name to the American Seating Com- 
pany, with Mr. Stewart as manager of the Philadelphia house. He 
may be said to be the pioneer in the modern furniture world. He is 
quick to seize an innovation, adapt it to the use of the public and its 
comfort, and is always on the alert for new ideas in every department 
of furniture building. He is progressive, up-to-date and original 
in his ideas and methods. His furniture factories are, and always have 
been, equipped with the latest machinery, and the materials used are the 
most approved and substantial. He lives at 1233 South 58th street, 
Philadelphia, but has a handsome country home in Alexandria, Penn- 
sylvania, where he and his family spend a portion of each summer. 
He is a member of the Masonic order, in high standing; and he and 
his wife are Presbyterians. 

He married, in 1881, Margaret Tate Davis, born in Philadelphia, 
daughter of Captain Wilton S. and Elizabeth Davis. Captain Davis 
commanded a company in the civil war, and was killed in the battle of 
Mine River. Children of William T. and Margaret Tate (Davis) 
Stewart: Edith, at home; William T. Jr., in insurance business in 
Philadelphia. 



The Harpers of this record descend from WiUiam 

HARPER H. Harper, a farmer of Huntingdon county. He 

was a member of the Presbyterian church, married, and 

had issue. 

(II) Archibald, son of William H. Harper, died in August, 191 1. 
He obtained his education in the public schools, and throughout his 
life followed farming, owning one hundred and seventy-five acres of 
land, improved with excellent buildings. He fought in the Union army 
during the civil war, and on some occasions would entertain a gathering 
of friends with thrilling tales of the hard-fought battles and gallant 
deeds he witnessed and took part in during the war between the states. 
He was a Republican in politics, and very active in local affairs. He 
was a member of the Presbyterian church. He married, in Dublin 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 131 1 

township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, Margaret Appleby, who 
died May 2^, 1899, aged about sixty years. Children: i. Anna, mar- 
ried Daniel B. Kline, an employee of the Pennsylvania railroad. 2. 
William, a lumberman, of Virginia. 3. Alvira, married Charles Cor- 
nelius, a farmer. 4. John Walker, of whom further. 5. James M., 
employed by State Highway Department. 6. Lizzie, died in early 
childhood. 7. Bessie, deceased. 8. Margaret, single. 

(Ill) John Walker, fourth child and second son of Archibald and 
Margaret (Appleby) Harper, was born December 26, 1871. He ob- 
tained a public school education, and when a young man engaged in 
farming, first renting land, then purchasing one hundred and sixty- 
three acres of fertile and well improved land in Huntingdon county, 
on which he conducts fruit raising and dairy operations, besides raising 
some stock of excellent blood. He is a Republican in politics, but does 
not take an active part in political affairs. 

He married, November 16, 1897, Emma Laird, born July 4, 1859, 
daughter of Robert A. and Elizabeth (Martin) Laird, the former a 
farmer, and associate judge of Huntingdon county. Two children 
blessed this union, Mabel M., and Mary Elizabeth, who died aged 
three months. The family are memliers of the Presbyterian church of 
Alexandria, Pennsylvania. He is a member of Hartslog Grange, 
Patrons of Husbandry. 



The ancestral seat of the ancient Scottish family of Elder 

ELDER was Elderslie, six miles west of Glasgow, on the south 

bank of the Clyde, near Paisley, in the county of Renfrew, 

Scotland. The family originated in the counties of Perth and Fife, on 

the east coast of Scotland, along the Tay, at Perth, Dundee, Kinross 

and Forfar, in and below the Sidlaw Hills, many of them settling in 

the cities of Glasgow and Edinburgh, where their descendants still live. 

The first of the name to come to America was Robert Elder, born 

about 1679, in Eilinburgh, Scotland, moving first into the neighborhood 

of Lough Neagh, county Antrim, Ireland, from whence he emigrated 

to Pennsylvania in 1730, locating in Paxtang township, then Lancaster, 

now Dauphin county, three miles east of Harrisburg. 

Robert Elder, of Path Valley, Franklin county, Pennsylvania, pro- 
genitor of the Elder family of Lewistown, was born near Perth, on the 



13 12 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Tay, Scotland, migrating about 1737 to the vicinity of Lough Inch or 
Lough Swilly, county Donegal, Ireland, from that point emigrating to 
the county of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, with his brother David, about 
1745 to 1754, and finally settled in the Path Valley of Franklin county, 
Pennsylvania, about 1750, where a great many of their descendants 
now live. 

Both these Elder families were of the same stock and were closely 
related in blood to the brothers Robert and Samuel Elder, who came 
from Scotland in 1729 and 1730 to the state of Maine, and who were 
the first ancestors of the large family of Elders in the New England 
states. 

(I) Robert Elder, great-grandfather of George Wilson Elder, came 
to Path Valley, Cumberland county (now Franklin county), 1750 to 
1754; was a farmer, and took up extensive tracts of land; some of that 
land is still owned by his descendants. He married and lived to a great 
age. To Robert and Mary Elder, his wife, were born a large family 
of sons — David, Abraham, John, Robert, Mathew, Joseph and Sam- 
uel. He died upon the old home place in 1807, which in his will he 
called a plantation. That in his sixty years residence in Pennsylvania 
he never forgot his Scottish birth, is proved by describing himself as 
"yeoman" in his will. He is buried at Dry Run, Franklin county, Penn- 
sylvania. 

(II) Abraham Elder, second son of Robert Elder, was born on 
the Franklin county homestead in Path Valley, then Cumberland 
county, Pennsylvania, July 27, 1754; was a soldier of the revolution, in 
Captain Noah Abraham's company. Colonel AVilliam Chambers' regi- 
ment of the Cumberland county militia; married Susannah Ardery, 
daughter of James Arderv, one of the first settlers of Cumberland 
county, after the revolution in 1784, migrated to Center county, Penn- 
sylvania, as one of the first settlers of the Half Moon Valley. The 
first summer he came alone, occupying the abandoned cabin of some 
former hunter, making a small clearing and planting crops for the fam- 
ily to subsist on when he should bring them later. He returned to Path 
Valley in the fall, and in the spring of 1785 he came again to Half 
Moon, bringing his family, including Robert, a three-weeks'-old baby; 
the trip was made upon horseback through an unbroken wil- 
derness, by rough Indian trails ; with him also came his older 



HISTORY OF THF. JUNIATA VALLEY 13 13 

I)rollicr, David Elder, and family, who, however, did iiol re- 
main. Abraham found his wheat crop planted the previous 
year very promising, and housing his family in the old cabin 
he proceeded to make them comfortable. He took up a large tract 
of land adjoining the later village of Stormstown, becoming one of the 
largest land owners in Center county. He was a man of active, ener- 
getic temperament, of liberal enterprise and great sagacity. He erected a 
sawmill, and carried on a distillery upon the stream running through his 
lands; built roads over the mountain into the Bald Eagle Valley at Port 
Matilda, constructing and operating a grist mill and sawmill. Upon 
the site of the rude cabin he built a substantial log house; it was in this 
building that the first religious meetings of the Presbyterians of the 
Half Moon Valley were held. In 1808 he erected a commodious stone 
mansion, regarded in that day as very imposing. He hauled his flour 
to Baltimore and Philadelphia, bringing back goods in exchange. When 
the road to Pittsburgh was opened he established a tavern-stand and a 
general store for the accommodation of his neighbors and the traveling 
public. This hotel was known far and near as "Elders," and was much 
patronized by western voyagers, freighters and teamsters, it being on 
the direct route from Bellefonte to Pittsburgh. It was a favorite place 
for public meetings, general trainings and similar gatherings, and rarely 
lacked for some enlivening incident. He maintained this place of enter- 
tainment for twenty-five years. He became a large owner of land not 
only of that upon which he had settled, but purchased many tracts along 
Buffalo Run, and in other parts of Center county. As a soldier of the 
revolution, he supported the policies of \Vashington, Hamilton and 
Adams as a leading Federalist in his county. Mr. Elder filled consider- 
able space in the local history of Half Moon Valley, and commanded 
high esteem as a man of more than ordinary ability and prominence. 
He died in the old stone mansion in July, 1827, at the age of seventy- 
three years. His wife, Susannah Ardery, was born in Path Valley, 
April ri, 1758, and died in Half Moon, May 7, 1831. According to a 
wish expressed before his death, his remains were disinterred when she 
died, and both were buried in the Presbyterian churchyard at Spruce 
Creek. His sons were: James, who died on the homestead in 1854, 
without issue; and Robert Elder, the younger son; his only daughter, 
Elizabeth, married Michael Brown, the ancestor of the Brown family 



1314 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

in the valley; their bodies lie in the Brown burial ground on the Brown 
homestead, in Worth township, Center county, Pennsylvania. 

(III) Robert Elder, second son of Abraham Elder, was born May 
9, 1785, in Path Valley, Franklin county, at the home of his grand- 
father, Robert Elder; was three weeks old when in 1785 he came to 
Half Moon Valley, Center county, in his mother's arms, upon the back 
of a packhorse. The cradle in which he was rocked, hollowed from a 
gum log, furnished with crude rockers, is still (1913) treasured in 
the family. Robert Elder inherited the homestead of his father, and 
became a farmer and active business man, building in 1832 a large stone 
addition to the old stone mansion, and as thus completed the house still 
stands. He was conspicuously distinguished as a man of generous im- 
pulses and kindly disposition, and grew to be one of the best known 
and most popular citizens of Center county, as well as of the entire 
Juniata Valley. He was of a very charitable disposition, and to the 
needy and such as deserved assistance he proved a strong friend. His 
generosity to his less fortunate neighbors did not interfere with his con- 
tinued and life-long prosperity; aside from his large ownership of land 
he became interested in many profitable enterprises in various parts of 
Pennsylvania. November 9, 1809, Robert Elder married Esther Wil- 
son, born in Chester county, November 24, 1786, oldest daughter of 
George Wilson, a distinguished and recognized leader of the Society of 
Friends of Half Moon Valley, a man much in favor with all classes. 

Robert Elder's children were : Susan A. Elder, Rebecca B. Elder, 
Jane W. Elder, Abraham M. Elder, George W. Elder and Elizabeth B. 
Elder. Mrs. Esther Wilson Elder died February 24, 1861 ; Robert El- 
der died July 28, 187 1, at the ripe age of eighty-six, upon the ^pot that 
had for that number of years been his home. He was a generous and 
indulgent parent, and while he instilled into his children maxims of in- 
dustry, thrift and frugality, he was a firm believer in the enormous value 
of a liberal education; to that end he gave his sons the best opportunities 
for such advancement at Allegheny College, Washington and Jefferson, 
and Harvard Universities. 

(IV) George Wilson Elder, an able lawyer and man of great influ- 
ence and wealth in the Juniata Valley, was the youngest son of Robert 
and Esther Wilson Elder, and was born at the Elder homestead, in Half 
Moon township, Center county, Pennsylvania, July 28, 1821. He was 




Ku).^V ^dJUK. 



Zr^-.t AAA,/:ir.M/j^^. Ca. 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX AMD 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 131 5 

educated at the public schools near his birthplace, and at Allegheny Col- 
lege, Meadville ; graduated from Washington and Jefferson College, 
Cannonsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1846. Among his college mates were 
Justice James P. Sterrett, of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania; Hon. 
William H. West, the blind lawyer and orator, of Ohio; Hon. James 
G. Blaine; Justice Cyrus L. Pershing, of the Supreme Court of Pennsyl- 
vania ; Rev. Robert F. Wilson, a Presbyterian minister, of Lewistown. 
Pennsylvania ; Rev. Joseph R. Wilson, a Presbyterian divine, father of 
Woodrow Wilson, President of the L'nited States; and Plon. Mathew 
S. Quay, United States senator from Pennsylvania. On graduation he 
immediately registered as a law student in the office of General Hugh N. 
McAllister, a distinguished lawyer at Bellefonte. Later, in 1849, he 
graduated from the law department of Harvard University ; among his 
classmates were Anson Burlingame, minister to China ; Judge Horace 
Gray, of the Supreme Court of the United States; and George F. Hoar, 
United States senator from Massachusetts. During his student days he 
applied himself with extraordinary diligence to take the most advan- 
tage of his excellent opportunities. He became a skilled debater and 
orator, taking a leading and successful part in the debating societies at 
both universities and holding an advanced standing in his classes. 
While at Cambridge he enjoyed the unusual privilege of hearing Rufus 
Choate and Daniel Webster trying cases of large moment in the Boston 
courts. 

During the same year (1849) he took up his residence at Lewis- 
town, Pennsylvania, becoming at once resident counsel of the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad and canal for that district. He engaged in the successful 
and extensive practice of the law. He early attained a position of promi- 
nence and trust in his chosen profession, which he retained to the day of 
his death, being as a man and patriotic citizen held in universal esteem. 
He was a lawyer of splendid abilities and transacted a large volume of 
business in the county, state and federal courts. His eloquence and 
oratory at the bar and upon the platform was of the first order; he was 
witty, much beyond the average, and his sallies and humor were en- 
joyed even by those who were sometimes his victims. 

In 185 1 he enjoyed a long trip to Europe and the British Isles, going 
as a commissioner for the state of Pennsylvania to the World's Fair in 
London. On May 24, 1853, he was married to Margaretta Scott Shaw. 



1316 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

of Lewistown, a woman of marked literary talent, depth of mind, wide 
culture and force of character. She was a member of the Scott and 
Shaw families, one of the oldest and most respected families of the 
Susquehanna and Juniata Valleys. She was the daughter of John and 
Margaret Scott Shaw, born at Hope Furnace, Mifflin county, Pennsyl- 
vania, November 25, 1830. Her father was county surveyor of Mifflin 
county for many years, one of the first superintendents of the Freedom 
Furnace and the Hope Furnace in that county. She came of that 
Scotch-Irish stock to whose hardy natures the middle and southern 
states are largely indebted for the pure and resolute virtues of their 
people. Her ancestors upon both sides were among the survivors of 
the terrible siege of Londonderry, that last stronghold of Protestantism, 
"where, at length on the verge of the ocean, hmited to the last asylum, 
baited into a mood in which men may be destroyed, but will not easily 
be subjugated, the imperial race turned desperately at bay." They came 
to Pennsylvania in the latter part of the seventeenth century and the 
early j-ears of the eighteenth century, settling near the old Donegal 
Church, in Lancaster county. 

Her paternal grandfather was Judge William Shaw, member of the 
committee of safety for Northumberland county during the revolution. 
He was captain of a Northumberland company; was an intimate friend 
of Benjamin Franklin, and an active patriot in the revolution. Her 
great-grandfather on her mother's side, John Little, was captain of a 
company of foot in the French and Indian war; she cherished with 
particular pride all her life long, the commission of Captain Little, 
signed b_v John Penn, as a memento of the loj^alty and patriotism of 
her ancestor. Her grandfather, James Scott, was an officer in the revo- 
lution, in Colonel x^lexander Lowry's regiment of Lancaster county, 
recruited at Donegal. 

She received her education at the public schools at Lewistown and 
at the Lewistown Academy and Tuscarora Seminary. All her life long 
she was an active and influential advocate and worker in all lines of 
public welfare, educational, social and moral reform. During the 
civil war she was treasurer of the Soldiers' Aid Society, and during its 
whole period she was most active in sending aid to the patriotic soldiers 
in the northern armies at the front, opening her handsome home for 
the meetings of the ladies of the society in their hospital aid work. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1317 

She was president of the Mifllin county Woman's Christian 'J'eniperance 
Union for nearly twenty years; was superintendent of Scientific Tem- 
perance Instruction in the pubhc schools of Lewistown for many years; 
was president of the Art Club, the Outlook Club, an active organizer 
and officer of the Villati^e Improvement Society; she was an inspiring 
leader and inlluential adviser in the temperance organizations of the 
state and county, and in Lewistown. Her life was especially rich in the 
religious realm — as a teacher in the Presbyterian Sabbath school, and 
as a member and officer of the Foreign and Home Missionary Societies 
of the Presbyterian Church. \\ ithin the home circle her influence was 
most striking, in the education and moulding of the characters and 
minds of her large family of children in the highest and truest elements 
of home life, as well as the broader jjlane of social and business life. 
She died September 3, 1900, and is buried in the family hit in St. 
Mark's cemetery, beside her husband. 

George W. Elder was one of the founders and leaders of the Re- 
publican party in Penns}l\ania, entering with all the force of his trained 
intellect in the maintenance of the Union and the cause of freedom for 
the slave, casting his first Republican vote in 1856 for John C. Fremont, 
and his last in 1900 for William McKinley. He was foremost during 
the war of the rebellion in the organization and equipment of troops for 
the national government, and in aid to the soldiers at the front and in 
care for the families of the nation's dead, lending his assistance in every 
way by his voice and his means to the cause of the Union. He was a 
member of one of Pennsylvania's emergency regiments during the Get- 
tysburg campaign, served as a draft commissioner for the state of Penn- 
sylvania, a difficult and onerous position ; was presidential elector in 
Pennsylvania in 1868 for U. S. Grant. He held a high place m his 
profession, and was successful in his business enterprises, having large 
lumber, coal, iron and land interests ; was a large stockholder in the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company and other corporations ; was a large 
stockholder of the Mifflin County National Bank, and a director for 
thirty years in that strong and prosperous bank. He owned large prop- 
erty interests in Wisconsin, Kansas and Colorado, and was largely in- 
terested with his son, George Robert Elder, a successful lawyer and 
mining operator, at Leadville, Colorado, in gold, silver and lead mines; 



I3i8 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

was a founder of the Lewistown public librar}-, and for thirty years 
its president. 

His ancestry embraced three of the four racial strains which have 
marked the upbuilding of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania in its 
marvelous governmental and industrial prosperity — the Scotch, Quaker, 
English and Scotch-Irish. In the Scotch line George W. Elder was of 
the sixth generation in lineal descent from the first Robert Elder, who 
came from Edinburgh, Scotland, to Pennsylvania, shortly after 1700, 
becoming a large land owner in the southern counties of Pennsylvania. 
The descendants from Robert Elder in the collateral lines include the 
old family names of Rutherford, Espy, Robinson, Wallace, Forster, 
Sherer, Campbell, EUmaker, Doll, Alricks, Bailey, Sumner, Snowden, 
Wilson, Simpson, Barnett and Stewart. 

On his departure from Edinburgh Robert Elder parted with a 
brother, James Elder, a professor of Edinburgh University, and from 
him were descended the famous nautical engineers and steam ship- 
builders, David, James and John Elder, whose mammoth works at Go- 
wan on the Clyde, a few miles below Glasgow, are the largest in the 
world, building the formidable dreadnoughts of the British navy, and 
such famous transatlantic steamers as the "Lucania" and "Campania," 
of the Cunard line. To John Elder of this family belongs the wonder- 
ful distinction of the invention of the triplex expansion engine for the 
propulsion of ocean-going steamers; this gigantic stride in the develop- 
ment of steam has been deemed in the world of invention as equal in 
importance to the great services of Watt, Stephenson and Fulton, in 
marshaling the forces of steam to the hand of man. 

In the Quaker English line, on his mother's side, he was of the 
seventh generation in lineal descent from Valentine HoUingsworth, an 
Englishman of noble descent, whose ancestral seat was at HoUings- 
worth, in the parish of Mottsam, county of Chester, eleven miles from 
the city of Manchester. This estate has wholly belonged to the family 
of HoUingsworth from a period prior to the Conquest, one manor still 
belonging to Captain Robert de HoUingsworth, an officer of the English 

army. 

Valentine HoUingsworth accompanied his friend William Penn to 
Pennsylvania in the ship "Welcome" in 1682, and purchased a large 
tract of land which now lies in the states of Maryland and Delaware, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1319 

at the town of Newark, lie was a niau of distinction and inllnence in 
the colony, and was charged with important responsibilities. He was 
present at the original reading of the charter of William Penn before 
the Provincial Council and Assembly of the Province of Pennsylvania, 
the second day of the second month, 1683, being a member of the assem- 
bly. His first wife, Caroline Cornish, was the daughter of Henry Cor- 
nish, an opulent merchant of London, owner of the manor of Cawood, 
county of York, an alderman of the city of London, and high sheriff 
of London and Middlesex county in 1680; it was during his term of 
office the Popish Plot was discovered, and, when Lord Howard was 
found guilty of treason by the House of Lords, it became his duty to 
carry out the sentence, as sherifif. He was defendant as alderman, in 
the celebrated quo warranto proceedings against the city of London in 
1680. 

Henry Cornish was elected Lord Mayor of London in October, 
1682, and so declared by the recorder of I^ondon. The vote was stricken 
in the interest of the king, and Cornish was deprived of the position; 
on a second election, Cornish was defeated by a small majority of forty- 
five votes, Pritchard the king's candidate, receiving 2,138 votes, and 
Cornish 2,093. O" May 8, 1683, Cornish was tried for riot and fined 
£4,100, which he was forced to pay. Cornish was tried for treason, 
October 19, 1685, for complicity with Lord Russell, and upon false 
and perjured testimony was convicted of treason by a pliant jury and 
the cruel judges of the Bloody Assizes. He was pursued by the ma- 
lignant crueltv of James II., King of England, and his bloody Chancellor 
Jefl'reys. He was executed October 23, 1685, under circumstances of 
great degradation, upon a gibbet erected where King street meets Cheap- 
side, in sight of Cornish's own house. His head was placed over the 
Guildhall, and his body drawn and quartered. The description of his 
trial and execution, as given by Lord Macaulay's "History of England," 
volume I, pp. 394-596, is one of the most brutal recitals of the tyranny 
of an English king in the history of the nation. The brutal Jeffreys, 
Lord Chancellor of England, when approached by Dr. Calamy, pastor 
of the Church of St. Lawrence, of whose vestry Cornish was a mem- 
ber, for a mitigation of the sentence, is said to have replied to the good 
doctor, that: "A mine of gold as deep as the monument is high and a 
bunch of pearls as big as the flames at the top of it, would not save 



I320 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Cornish." The frightful death of Justice Jeffreys, in the tower of 
London, and the life imprisonment of the perjured witnesses in the 
tower, was small atonement for this judicial murder. The attainder of 
Cornish's estates was reversed by act of Parliament, January 30, 1688, 
I. William and Mary. 

The descendants of Valentine Hollingsworth and Caroline Cornish 
consists of the influential families of Hollingsworth, Cooks, Dixons, 
Piersons, Wilsons, Wests, Woodwards, Harlans, Greggs, Stephens, 
Norris, Packers, Browns, Hunters, Downings, Leonards and Grays, in 
the states of Pennsylvania, Delaware, Virginia and New Jersey. 

George W. Elder was emphatically the lawyer, and allowed nothing 
to distract his full energy from the protection of his clients' interests; 
he was deeply interested in public affairs, but never accepted or sought 
public office. He believed to a wonderful degree in the power of thor- 
ough and extensive education to develop the best character in man and 
woman. His most valuable gifts to his children were their educational 
opportunities at Princeton, Wells, Wellesley, and the Boston Polytechnic 
School. He was a man of the strictest integrity, deep knowledge and 
keen foresight, and his counsels were sought in every movement for 
the public good. He was a man of robust health and commanding 
figure, and was able to transact business and affairs almost to the day of 
his death. He died in his eighty-first year, November 10, 1901, and was 
buried in the family lot in St. Mark's Cemetery. He left five children 
surviving him: Rufus Choate Elder, of Lewistown; George Robert 
Elder, of Leadville, Colorado, both lawyers; Herman Scott Elder, of 
Lewistown, senior partner of the firm of Elder & Eckbert, proprietors 
of the Logan Mills; Esther Elder Mann, wife of Frank E. Mann, of 
Lewistown, manager of the James H. Mann Axe Manufactory at 
Manns, Pennsylvania; and Mary Elder Brinton, wife of William G. 
Brinton, of The Oxford Press, Oxford, Chester county, Pennsylvania. 
(V) Colonel Rufus Choate Elder, the eldest son of George Wilson 
Elder and A/Iargaretta Shaw, was born March 29, 1854, at Lewistown, 
Pennsylvania. He is an eminent lawyer of commanding influence and 
sterling character in the Juniata Valley, still residing in his birthplace. 
His father was for more than half a century one of the most promi- 
nent, scholarly and successful advocates and lawyers of the central part 
of Pennsylvania. His great-grandfather, Abraham Elder, was a soldier 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1321 

in ;i Cuiiil)crlaii(l county company tluring the revolution. On his ma- 
ternal side Colonel Elder is a lineal descendant of Captain John Little, 
an officer in the l<>ench and Indian war. His great-grandfather, Judge 
William Shaw, was an officer in the revolution, being captain of a 
Northumberland county company, and was a member of the committee 
of safety of Northumberland county, and a lifelong friend of Benjamin 
Franklin. His great-grandfather, James Scott, was a lieutenant in a 
Lancaster county company in the revolution, recruited at Donegal, of 
Colonel Alexander Lowry's regiment. He was educated in the public 
schools and academy at Lewistown, being a particularly bright and 
ready scholar, showing a decided bent toward mathematics; was pre- 
pared for college at Tuscarora Academy, Juniata county, Pennsylvania; 
matriculated in the fall of 1871 in the sophomore class at Princeton 
college, and graduated in the class of 1874. His attainments were par- 
ticularly noticeable in mathematics, geometry and calculus, standing 
near the head of his class in those studies. Immediately upon his gradu- 
ation from Princeton he registered as a student of law in the office of 
his father at Lewistown, under whose able and wise preceptorship he 
spent three years gaining a wide knowledge of the law. April 10, 1877, 
upon the motion of his father, he was admitted to the liar of the courts 
of Mifflin county. He was elected district attorney of Mifflin county in 
November, 1877, and served until January i, 1881, in that office. He 
was most fortunate in opening his career as a lawyer in the office of his 
father, who held high rank as a lawyer in Lewistown and possessed an 
extensive and lucrative corporation practice in the court of common 
pleas, and a large probate and orphans' court clientage. Under these 
advantageous conditions he rapidly ac(|uircd an accurate knowledge of 
practice and pleading in the criminal and civil branches. 

In July, 1877, in the midst of the great railroad strikes in Pennsyl- 
vania, he became connected with the National Guard of Pennsylvania, 
enlisting as a private in Company G, Fifth Regiment National Guard 
of Pennsylvania, this company being known as the Logan Guards, a 
name made famous by the old Logan Guards Company of Lewistown, 
which was one of the first five volunteer companies to enter Washing- 
ton from Pennsvlvania in 186 1, and now known as the First Defenders. 
This enlistment marked Colonel Elder's commencement of thirty years' 
continuous service as a soldier in the National Guard of Pennsylvania. 



1322 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

He served as first lieutenant of this company from November 9, 1878, 
until May 7, 1883, and from the latter date served as captain of the 
company until April 15, 1892, when he became major of the Fifth Regi- 
ment. On July 20, 1894, he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the 
same regiment, and served in that capacity until 1898, when the Spanish 
war commenced. Upon the declaration of war by the United States 
against Spain he volunteered at once with his regiment for that service, 
and was commissioned, on May 5, 1898, lieutenant-colonel of the Fifth 
Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, United States Army, and served 
with his regiment in the First Brigade, Third Division, First Army 
Corps, until mustered out, November 7, 1898. The regiment was dur- 
ing this period in camp at Chickamauga and Lexington, and a part of 
this time Colonel Elder served as president of a court martial, composed 
of nine members. His impartiality, knowledge of civil and military 
law and his dispatch of business in this position, contributed in no small 
degree to his enviable reputation as an officer and disciplinarian. After 
the reorganization of the Fifth Regiment, National Guard of Pennsyl- 
vania, he served as lieutenant-colonel until February 17, 1902, when he 
was commissioned colonel, and commanded the regiment until 1906, 
when he resigned. 

He served as a private in the railroad riots of 1877; as major com- 
manded a battalion and acted as provost marshal during the riots at 
Homestead in 1892; commanded a battalion during the riots at Punxsu- 
tawney in June, 1894; he was in command of his regiment as colonel 
at Ashland in October, 1902, during the anthracite riots. 

As a soldier and of^cer Colonel Elder early acquired a high and 
well-deserved reputation as an efficient disciplinarian, and a trained and 
reliable commander; his personal and incessant care for his men under 
the rigid demands of the march, the camp and the endless drill, earned 
for him great and lasting popularity with his men. This high character 
for efficiency, discipline, courtesy, vigilance and impartiality as an officer 
remained with Colonel Elder all the years of his service and was never 
lost. 

He has been a staunch Republican all his life, casting his first presi- 
dential ballot for Rutherford B. Hayes, and his latest in 1912 for Wil- 
liam H. Taft. He has been a delegate to Republican national conven- 
tions at Chicago. He declined at one time the nomination for presi- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1323 

dent judge of the Twentieth Judicial District, and though deeply inter- 
ested in the welfare of the Republican party has never at any time 
wished to be known or classed as a politician. 

He has been actively engaged in the practice of law for over thirty- 
six years, being associated in partnership with his father for over twenty 
years; has practiced continuously in the lower and appellate courts of 
the state and the United States courts, except during those periods 
when called away from home into the military service of the United 
States and the state of Pennsylvania, f lifted w'ith a ready and quick 
perception of the legal principles controlling a law case, possessed of a 
tenacious memory, a clear voice, rapid in enunciation and expressed 
without hesitation ; his rare common sense gave him a signal vantage 
ground in the trial of his intricate cases over his rivals at the bar; his in- 
cisive address, simple and forcible diction and sound arguments were 
always sure of carrying the court and jury with him. As a lawyer it has 
always been his highest ambition to serve his clients with faithful and 
untiring devotion, and, when satisfied of the justice of a cause, he 
brought all the forces of his trained, logical, legal mind to the case in 
hand, and was ever cool, calm and amiable, never disconcerted or di- 
verted by any turn a case might take, and was most happy when deeply 
occupied in solving some abstruse law technicalities, or mastering and 
marshalling the field for the trial of some important case. As a coun- 
sellor he w-as always discreet, careful and safe ; and brought to his 
clients' service a keen business judgment and a broad professional 
knowledge. He has always upheld the dignity and honor of the legal 
profession; and his high standard of integrity and uprightness has 
earned for him an enviable reputation at the bar and the highest esteem 
of the courts, the people and his associates at the bar. His industry in 
the preparation of his cases is indefatigable, and he has well learned 
that old maxim of the skilled lawyer — "Nihil sine laborc." 

He is the resident counsel of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, 
the Standard Steel Company, Penn Central Light & Power Company, 
the Mifflin County National Bank, the Pennsylvania Glass Sand Com- 
pany, the James H. Mann Axe Company, the Thompson Woolen Fac- 
tories, the Susquehanna Silk Mills, and other corporations. He does a 
large probate and orphans' court business. He is vice-president and 
director of the Mifflin County National P>ank, one oi the strongest finan- 



1324 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

cial institutions in the state; vice-president of the Lewistown Library 
Association; was a prime mover in the erection and equipment of the 
splendid Lewistown Hospital, and is one of its trustees; is a member of 
the First Presbyterian Church of Lewistown, and is one of the most 
active and efficient trustees ; and is an active and influential member of 
the Lewistown Board of Trade. 

On June 15, 1881, Colonel Elder was married to Miss Loa Belle 
McFarland, at Marshalltown, Iowa, a member of one of the oldest fam- 
ilies of New York and Pennsylvania. Mrs. Elder was the youngest 
daughter of Lewis and Jane McFarland, and was born at Union 
Springs, New York. She was a woman of wide culture and refinement; 
was a public spirited woman, interested in everything that made for the 
uplift of the community, and was an earnest worker in all branches of 
church activity and in the home circles. She presided over the home of 
her husband with fidelity, dignity and grace, and contributed largely 
by the force of her character to the splendid education of her children 
and the advancement of the interests of her husband. She was a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church, and for many years a teacher in its 
Sabbath school. She was a charter member of the Outlook Club, and 
head of the executive committee of the Lewistown Library Association; 
she was for a long period president of the Woman's Home and Foreign 
Missionary Society of the Huntingdon Presbytery. Few women pos- 
sessed a wider knowledge of missionary work in the foreign and home 
fields, or showed more interest in missions. She was an active worker 
in the ranks of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, and served 
as an officer of the local organization. Her practical ideas and active 
effort in all these lines of work, and her intelligent grasp of educational 
theories, made her a very useful member of society. Mrs. Elder died 
November 22, 191 1, after a lingering and exhausting illness; her won- 
derful Christian fortitude under the constant suffering when confined 
to her home proved her unfaltering trust in her religious faith. She 
was laid to rest in the family lot in St. Mark's Cemetery. 

Colonel and Mrs. Elder had three children : Margaretta Elder, edu- 
cated at Blair Hall and the noted Chicago Kindergarten School; for 
some years she was a successful teacher in the kindergarten department 
of the public schools of the city of Brooklyn, New York, only resigning 
her position when called at the death of her mother to preside over her 




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HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1325 

father's home. Jane Belle Elder, their second daughter, is a graduate 
of Blair Hall and Mt. Holyoke College. She is a fine German scholar, 
having taken a course in the University of Berlin, Germany. She is a 
teacher of German in the high schools of Paterson, New Jersey. George 
Wilson Elder, the youngest child of Colonel Elder, was educated at 
Blair Hall and at Pennsylvania State College. He is thoroughly versed 
in all branches of stock breeding and stock raising, and is now in the 
service of one of the largest and best ecjuipped stock farms in the world, 
near Youngstown, Ohio. He is a young man of great charm of man- 
ner, and his devotion to his mother in her last illness proved the rare 
fiber of his lovable character. He is over six feet in height, and carries 
himself with ease and lightness, notwithstanding his weight exceeds two 
hundred pounds. He is a careful and accurate business man, with every 
promise of a successful career. 

(V) George Robert Elder, second son of George Wilson Elder and 
Margaretta Shaw Elder, now a successful lawyer and extensive gold 
and silver mine owner of the city of Leadville, state of Colorado, was 
born at Lewistown, Pennsylvania, January 9, 1856. He was educated 
in the public schools and the Lewistown and Tuscarora academies ; en- 
tered Princeton University in 1871, when fifteen years old, and gradu- 
ated with his class in 1875, at the age of nineteen. He was an indus- 
trious and diligent student, and kept a high standard of scholarship dur- 
ing his college course. At Princeton he was an enthusiastic devotee of 
gymnastic and athletic sports ; played for three years as a member of 
Princeton's champion football team; in that whole period the Princeton 
Tigers never suffered a defeat, Yale, Columbia, Lafayette and Rutgers 
scoring but one goal in all that series of games. To young Elder be- 
longed the unique honor of kicking the first goal from the field in the 
first footliall championship game played between those strenuous rivals, 
Yale and Princeton, at Hamilton Park, New Haven, Connecticut, No- 
vember 15, 1873. He was a skilful baseball player and active oarsman, 
being one of the founders of the Independent Baseball Club, long the 
champions of the Juniata Valley, and an organizer of the Juniata Boat 
Club. 

He prepared for the profession of the law by three years of hard 
study in the office of and under the strict and able direction of his 
father, and was admitted to the bar of Pennsylvania at the August term. 



1326 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

1878, of the Court of Common Pleas. He settled in Colorado in Sep- 
tember, 1878, being admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court of Colo- 
rado, December 7, 1878; established himself as a lawyer in the city of 
Leadville just at the commencement of that city's wonderful ore dis- 
coveries. His close industry, high moral character, profound legal 
knowledge and rare talents as an advocate and counselor, rapidly won 
for him an extensive and lucrative practice in the mining litigation aris- 
ing from the enormous silver and lead developments in the Leadville 
district. He was counsel in the Waterloo, Morning Star, Half Way 
House suits, the Little Ella, Little Lulu, Virginius, Curran Grand Prize 
and Emma mine cases ; and in the criminal branch in the Dixon and 
Goodwin murder cases ; as special prosecuting attorney in the Goodwin- 
Sullens case he secured one of the few convictions of murder in the first 
degree, obtained in the annals of the Fifth Judicial District of Colorado. 
The fact that the jury found the defendant guilty after the short delib- 
eration of five minutes was a splendid testimonial to the unrivaled mar- 
shalling of the evidence and the convincing eloquence of Mr. Elder and 
his associate counsel, Judge Allen T. Gunnell. The conviction of the 
principals in the famous ore stealing cases from the Aspen and Emma 
mines did much to drive from the district this pernicious form of theft. 
This period of the settlement of the land titles of rich gold and silver 
mines, and coal and iron entries, brought him a large land office practice 
before the land officers of the districts, the Commissioner of the 
General Land Office, and the Department of the Interior at Washing- 
ton. His civil business in the lower courts and the United States dis- 
trict and circuit courts entailed upon him a large appellate practice in 
the Colorado Supreme Court, the United States Supreme Court and the 
United States Circuit Court of Appeals; in this field his talents as an 
accurate and concise brief maker and his vigorous and eloquent advo- 
cacy brought him well-merited success. 

During this period Mr. Elder acquired large and valuable mining 
properties and became an owner in the stock of some of the bonanza 
mining corporations, out of which he reaped substantial dividend re- 
turns. For many years he was a large stockholder and managing direc- 
tor of the Dunkin mipe, one of the Fryer Hill bonanzas. He also held 
large stock interests in the Adams Mining Company, one of the greatest 
producers of silver, lead and zinc of the Carbonate Hill section; this 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1327 

mine is still produciiij^ over a half million dollars per annum of ores 
after twenty-live years' operation. Notwithstanding the discouragement 
of the final demonetization of silver, Mr. Inkier has continued to invest 
heavily in precious metal mining in Colorado, with the firm and unwav- 
ering helief that the state of Colorado contains ine.xhaustible mineral 
treasures, and that some day the world will have to restore silver to a 
world-wide use as coined money. 

In October, 1886, he was married to Miss Ida Dull, only daughter 
of Daniel Matieu Dull and Nannie J. Bratton Dull, of Lewistown, Penn- 
sylvania, a young lady of great personal beauty, handsome presence 
and of wide popularity. She was a graduate of Ogontz College, at 
Philadelphia, receiving all the advantages of that excellent institution. 
She is closely related to many of the prominent and distinguished fami- 
lies of the Keystone State: the Dulls, Brattons, Hollidays, Lowrys, Mc- 
Cormicks, Bells, Ross. Hamiltons, Criswells, Gross, Boyds, Stewarts, 
McCoys, etc. 

Her father, Daniel M. Dull, a veteran of the Mexican war, accom- 
panied General Scott's ann_\- in its victorious entry of the City of Mex- 
ico, and was honorably mentioned for bravery and courage at the battle 
of Chapultepec in the official return of General John W. Geary. He 
was a large landowner, proprietor of the Dull Sand mines near McVey- 
town, Pennsylvania, producing the highest grade of silica sand in the 
world : was an able and successful contractor, having extensive con- 
tracts on the Pennsylvania railroad and canal, the Gallitzin tunnel in the 
Alleghanies, the Hoosac tunnel in Massachusetts, the bridges at Pitts- 
burgh over the Ohio and Allegheny rivers, and the immense steamboat 
locks and dams upon the Monongahela r'wer in W'est Virginia, con- 
structed by the L'nited States. 

Mrs. Elder is a woman of splendid literary, artistic and musical 
talents, her papers read before the Woman's Club of Denver having 
been classed as wonderful products of a woman's pen; her addresses 
upon art, music and travel before the Woman's Club of Leadville were 
always enthusiastically appreciated. She is a woman of a charming per- 
sonality and a splendid conversationalist ; she has been a diligent French 
scholar and student, speaking the French language with fluent and un- 
usual command of the difficult idioms of Paris and the provinces. This 
talent has been the result of studious work, and was greatlv aided and 



1328 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

promoted by her numerous trips to Europe and long sojourns in the 
cities of the continent. Mrs. Elder is passionately fond of music; for 
many years she was leading soprano in the Presbyterian Church at 
Levvistown, her voice being favorably compared in its thorough train- 
ing and its compass and beauty of tone to that of some of the best 
modern singers. She sang at some of the noted concerts of the Apollo 
Club of Leadville, a famous musical organization of that city, her per- 
formances being received with great favor. She is a skilled organist and 
pianist, and finds time in the midst of the exacting calls of her fine 
home and its social activities to keep fully abreast in her practice with 
the best modern piano musical scores. 

She is a woman of wide and discriminating scholarship ; has main- 
tained a broad and catholic taste in her choice of books ; is a thorough stu- 
dent in ancient and modern history, and vies with her student husband in 
his close study of the developments of modern constitutional and govern- 
mental law. She has studied with thorough discrimination the works 
of the great masters of the arts of painting, sculpture and architecture 
at first hand in the magnificent galleries of Rome, Florence, Milan, Dres- 
den, Munich, Brussels, Vienna, Amsterdam, Antwerp, Paris, London, 
and other centers of art; the cathedrals, palaces, churches, abbeys, cas- 
tles, and the remains of ancient architecture in Europe have always 
had a great fascination and charm for her, and her mind has widened 
and improved in such interesting studies. In her home she has many 
well-selected copies of some of the great paintings of the older schools 
of modern art, such as Guido Reni and Del Sarto and other noted 
artists. The happiness and comfort of a well-ordered home is the high- 
est ambition of Mrs. Elder's life, and she cheerfully denies herself many 
of the wider social activities to compass this ambition. 

Her ancestry embraces all five of the virile Anglo-Saxon lines which 
have combined to render the people of the United States the most cos- 
mopolitan the world has yet seen — the English, German, Huguenot 
French, Scotch and Scotch-Irish ; and all of her ancestors were active 
patriots in the revolution. At its original organization Mrs. Elder 
joined the Daughters of the American Revolution; her certificate. No. 
622, was signed by Mrs. Benjamin Harrison, president general. She 
preserves with great pride the commission of her great-grandfather, 
Captain William Bratton, signed by John Hancock. Captain Bratton 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1329 

was one of the few sur\ivor.s of the PaoU Massacre, most of his regi- 
ment, the Seventh of tlie Pennsylvania Line, heing murdered in that 
night attack. He was wounded at the battle of Germantown, and was 
present at the battles of Trenton and Princeton. His wife, Hester 
Hamilton, of Newton Hamilton, i'ennsylvania, was a survivor of one 
of the dreadful Indian massacres of the jjorder, having a miraculous 
escape from captivity in the .Mlegheny mountains while being taken to 
Canada by the Indians. 

Her great-great-grandfather, Cas])er Dull, was captain of the Phila- 
delphia Light Dragons in the revolution, a famous cavalry organization 
of that period, which still (1913) continues its existence as the noted 
City Troop of the National Guard. Captain Casper Dull was the son 
of Casper Dull, a native of the city of Mainz on the Rhine, in the 
Grand Duchy of Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, who, with his brothers. 
Christian and Sebastian Dull, sailed from Rotterdam, August 27, 1839, 
in the ship "Samuel," Hugh Percy, captain, and landed at Philadelphia. 
Captain Casper Dull married Hannah Matieu, a lady of French Hugue- 
not descent, born in Philadelphia; they are buried in the old Presbyter- 
ian cemetery at McVeytown, Pennsylvania. 

Mrs. Elder is a lineal descendant in the fourth generation of Adam 
Holliday and Sarah Campbell Holliday. Adam Holliday was born in 
Scotland, and after a short emigration to the north of Ireland he came 
to Pennsylvania in 1750, settling first in the neighborhood of ]\Ianor, 
Lancaster county. Adam Holliday was a noted frontiersman, was the 
founder of the city of Hollidaysburg, Blair county, Pennsylvania. Be- 
ing a man of considerable means, he purchased large tracts of land, his 
first purchase being one thousand acres, comprising all the lands upon 
which Hollidaysburg now stands. Adam Holliday was a man of great 
activity and courage; during the Indian wars and the war of the revolu- 
tion out of his own means he built forts and e(iuipped troops with arms 
and ammunition for the defense of the frontier. He became a man of 
large wealth and prominence. Adam Holliday lived to a good old age, 
and died at Hollidaysburg in 1801. He was ancestor of the large family 
of Hollidavs throughout the United States. Mrs. Sarah Campbell Hol- 
liday, born in Scotland, was a full cousin of the Duke of Argyle, who 
visited the Holliday family at Hollidaysburg, and afterward sent her 



I330 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

from Scotland a gold snuff box, inscribed, "To my American cousin, 
Sarah Campbell," decorated with the Argyle and Clan Campbell arms. 

Mr. Elder's great-grandfather. Judge William Shaw, was a member 
of the committee of safety of Northumberland county in the revolu- 
tion, and an officer in a Northumberland county company. His great- 
great-grandfather, Captain John Little, was captain of a company of 
foot in the French and Indian war; his parchment commission, signed 
by John Penn, governor of the province of Pennsylvania, is in Mr. 
Elder's possession. Another great-grandfather. Lieutenant James Scott, 
was an officer in one of the Donegal companies of Colonel Alexander 
Lowry's regiment of Lancaster county troops. 

In the Elder line every ancestor was in the ranks as a patriot in the 
revolution. In the muster roll of the Third company of the First Bat- 
talion of Cumberland county, July 31, 1777, the name of Abraham 
Elder, his great-grandfather, appears as a private, as well as the names 
of David Elder and Samuel Elder, his brothers. Colonel Robert Elder's 
regiment of Lancaster county contained the names of eight Elders. All 
of the sons of John Elder, the fighting parson of the revolution, served 
in Lancaster county regiments. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elder have one son, Robert Dull Elder, born June 25, 
1889; educated in the high school at Leadville; Lawrenceville School, 
New Jersey, 1907; Princeton, A. B. 1911; Columbia M. A., 1913; Co- 
lumbia Law Department, LL.B., 19 14. Robert maintained a high type 
of scholarship at Princeton and Columbia, especially in English litera- 
ture and ancient and modern languages. He recently published a fasci- 
nating and entertaining novel of American life, called "The Sojourner," 
Harper & Brothers, April, 1913. This novel has been denominated by 
competent critics as one of the best American novels of the year 1913. 

His son has inherited much of his father's enthusiasm in athletics; 
he was a prize winner in many wrestling matches at Princeton and at 
Columbia. For several years he has won the first prizes at the Cale- 
donian games at Leadville in throwing the sixteen and twelve-pound 
hammers. At the completion of his law course at Columbia University 
he intends to join his father in the practice of the law. The success 
of his novel, "The Sojourner," will doubtless encourage him to further 
efforts in the literary line. 

For many years George R. Elder was counsel of Lake county in its 




OXe^^^^mc^eju^ 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1331 

large and extensive bond litigation, and his industry, ability and thor- 
ough knowledge of the constitutional and legislative limitaticjns gov- 
erning bond issues and the court decisions made upon them, was fully 
rewarded by a long series of judgments in favor of Lake county in 
the lower and higher courts. In company with Governor Charles S. 
Thomas, now United States senator from Colorado, in December, 1898, 
he argued the case of Henry H. Dudley vs. Lake county, in the Su- 
preme Court of the United States, involving $150,000 of bonds and 
coupons directly, and indirectly over $1,250,000 bonds, coupons and in- 
terest of a second issue. The unanimous decision of that court by 
Justice Harlan, delivered in February, 1899, sustained all of the con- 
tentions of Air. Elder and his associate counsel. 

In politics he has always been an optimist, believing that the won- 
derful educational advantages of the American electorate would safely 
protect and secure the inestimable privileges gained from the lessons of 
European history and the .\merican revolution. This optimism is based 
on the staunch belief that the blending and welding into a cosmopolitan 
nationality in the United States of all these Anglo-Saxon and Latin 
races — the most moral races of men the world has yet seen; blest with 
the most equitable laws ; the fairest domestic and civil virtues ; and the 
least violenf passions — cannot and will not impair with inexorable fa- 
tality the life of this magnificent nation. 

For fully fifteen years he voted for and labored to support and 
maintain the high protective war tariffs, and the stationary currency 
system, based upon the bonds of the United States, inaugurated and per- 
petuated by the Republican party. When this plutocratic system created 
within the great prosperous American nation and its popular govern- 
ment an intrenched fortress of special privilege, monopolies and trusts, 
with its subsidized array of purchasable officials, judges, congressmen 
and senators, he left the Republican party and advocated the doctrines 
of the People's party, the first party to declare against these cancers in 
the body politic. He gave his best effort in Colorado to ballot reform, 
writing the first demand for the Australian Ballot Act as chairman of 
the platform committee of the first party asking such reform in Colo- 
rado. He was an insistent advocate of the first Corrupt Practice Act, 
and the bill as passed in 1891 is substantially as first prepared by him. 
He strenuously supported Woman Suffrage, and the success of its adop- 



1332 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

tion in the state of Colorado in 1893 was in no small degree due to his 
incessant activity and advocacy. He has been a firm advocate of the 
income tax, postal savings banks, public ownership of public utilities, 
such as water, light, telegraph and telephone, where the nature of the 
utility is necessarily a monopoly. He believes profoundly in the rigid su- 
pervision of railroad corporations with monopoly privileges, under wise, 
comprehensive national control, and in case of failure of such laws, to 
gradually replace existing railroads by government ownership, provided 
this end is attained without the taking o^'er of the great issues of watered 
bonds and stock created recklessly b}- the private railroad corporations. 
He has advocated for many years the Panama Canal as the first step to 
destroy the tyranny of the transcontinental railroads, and to bring back 
American commerce on the sea to American owned ships. To these 
ends it is his firm belief that the American Congress should grant liberal 
subsidies to American ships, so long as the British Empire continues its 
enormous subsidies to English ships. It is his belief that the expendi- 
ture of a small percentage of the gigantic and staggering $400,000,000 
annually expended by the United States government and the state gov- 
ernments on the military and naval establishments of the nation in sub- 
sidies to American owned ships, would place such a final embargo upon 
international wars as to require no peace congresses or great standing 
armies. He firmly believes that the national circulating medium for 
this wonderful, progressive nation should never be circumscribed by 
and based upon its existing bonded debt and the limited annual produc- 
tion of the precious metals. The National Banking System, once a 
powerful factor in American finance for good, no longer meets the in- 
sistent demands of commerce and trade for a stable, elastic and abun- 
dant circulating medium. From these propositions it was inevitable 
that he should become a supporter of the Democratic party as soon as 
repeated defeats brought it to an unqualified support of these funda- 
mental demands. He gave his support in the campaign of 19 12 to the 
nomination and election of Woodrow ^^^ilson. 

Mr. Elder was a lieutenant in the Colorado militia during the 
strikes of 1880 at Leadville. and was appointed colonel upon the staff of 
Governor Davis H. Waite, the reform governor of Colorado in 1893. 

The holding of public office has never appealed to him, and his chief 
regret has been that the engrossing environment of active and profes- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1333 

sional life has r(il>l>(.'(l liim of the more lasting" and constant pleasure of 
the scholar and student. 

Mr. Elder has visited, in his several trips to Europe with his family, 
most of the great capitals of the world and the great art centers, with 
their wealth of art, science, architecture and learning, and their great 
stores of historical and governmental progress: he has always believed in 
the wonderful advantage to be derived from intelligent foreign travel. 

Mr. Elder has been a liberal Presbyterian all his life long in his 
church alliances, although this has a dash of hesitancy, presumably an 
outgrowth of the mingling of a long line of (Juaker ancestry with his 
pronounced Scotch antecedents of birth and training. 

Mr. Elder is a thoroughly western man; has been a lifelong resident 
of Colorado, his adopted state, and few of its citizens are more familiar 
with the growth of the state of Colorado and its imperial resources; he 
is now a large owner of gold, silver, lead and zinc mining interests, ranch 
land and city property: and, though loyal to Colorado, he still has large 
property interests in the commonwealth of Pennsylvania. He is a man 
of most temperate habits, of a robust and active figure, is essentially 
a man of aiTairs, and enjoys the conduct of business. In his family 
and home he has been most fortunate ; he has shown a great sagacity 
and foresight in the business of mining, and his own and his wife's 
property interests require constant attention and make his life a very 
busy and active one. 

(VI) Robert Dull Elder, only son of George Robert Elder and Ida 
Dull Elder, was born June 25, 1889, in the city of Leadville, county of 
Lake, state of Colorado. His birthplace is one of the greatest centers 
of silver, gold, leail and zinc mining in the world. Its elevation of 
10,225 feet above sea level makes it one of the highest cities in altitude 
in the world. It is surrounded by some of the most sublime and won- 
derful mountain scenery on the Western continent. The house in which 
he was born lies fairly in the shadow of that monarch of the Rocky 
Mountains — Mt. Massive, 14.434 feet high, the loftiest mountain peak 
of all the main range of the Rocky Mountains. 

His childhood was passed in the cities of Leadville. Denver and 
Washington, D. C, and in Lewistown, Pennsylvania. He was sent 
early to kindergarten .schools, and under the careful teaching of his 
father and mother he was able to read at the early age of four and one- 



1334 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

half years. He became an omnivorous reader of juvenile tales of voy- 
ages, travel and adventure, such as Mayne Reid, Defoe, Oliver Optic, 
Abbott, Alcott, Henty and Alger, and the long list of ancient voyages, 
like Drake, etc., long before his age permitted him to enter the public 
schools; to this early extravagance in reading is doubtless due his ex- 
traordinary and fertile imagination. Portions of his childhood days 
were spent at the home of his grandparents in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, 
in the heart of the romantic and beavitiful scenery of the famous moun- 
tains of the Juniata Valley and river of the same name. In the heat 
of the summers he would accompany some of the family to Atlantic 
City or some other point on the Jersey coast. 

He entered the public schools at Leadville at six years of age, and 
passed with rapidity through all of the minor grades ; his naturally 
quick and retentive mind enabling him to surpass in rank most of the 
children of his own age. With a decided talent for music he early be- 
came a skilled mandolin player, and was a member of a juvenile man- 
dolin club of note in Leadville, whose performances excited much favor- 
able comment. Upon entering the high school at Leadville, he easily 
took a high position in all of his classes, being accounted by all his in- 
structors a bright, studious and obedient scholar. 

In the winter of 1904 he was taken upon a long trip to Europe with 
his parents, leaving Boston by the White Star Line for Naples, in the 
Mediterranean, by the Azores, Gibraltar, Marseilles and Genoa. Upon 
this trip he visited all the wonderful galleries of painting and sculpture 
of Naples, Rome, Florence, Milan, Venice, Paris and London, with their 
great public buildings, the cathedrals, churches, palaces, castles, St. 
Peter's, the Vatican, the Pantheon, Coliseum, the Louvre, museums, 
theaters, opera houses, towers, catacombs, parks, gardens, cemeteries, 
etc., and with his receptive mind carrying away comprehensive memor- 
ies of all these grand productions of ancient and modern art, science 
and architecture. He developed upon this trip his striking powers of 
observation, which were rapid, accurate and acute to a wonderful de- 
gree. An instance in point, which would seldom have occurred to a 
grown person, was his remark to his mother while looking at the body 
of the dog in the museum of Pompeian relics : "That dog must have 
been tied up, because there is the crease of the chain on his neck." The 
all-absorbing and changing colors of the ocean waves, the sky upon the 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1335 

lakes, bays and rivers, the forests and the mountains, and the diverse 
shades of tlie old houses and fortresses and buildings were the constant 
subject of his observation and remark, and his diligent notation in his 
voluminous notebooks. 

As a boy he was very fond of the active sports — football, baseball, 
tennis, skating, riding and swimming. He spent most of his hours out 
of school and in vacations riding horseback. He became an accom- 
plished and daring horeback rider; he was so fond of his ponies, "Mid- 
get" and "Daisy," that he would let no one care for them but himself, 
and their attention became of superior moment in his thoughts to his 
own meals and sleeping hours, and it is still his greatest pleasure to 
ride in the open air all day long upon a fine horse. 

In the fall of 1904 he entered the third grade of Lawrenceville 
School, New Jersey, rooming in the Dickinson House in the Circle. His 
course was a great success at this excellent school; in his first year he 
took first testimonials, and made excellent progress in the classics and 
English literature. In the second year, an illness in the fall lessened 
his standing somewhat, but he won through abreast of his class. During 
his last year of 1907, at Lawrenceville, he distinguished himself by 
taking the first English prize essay in his class. His attainments this 
year were particularly flattering in English literature. During his stay 
at Lawrenceville he was for a time editor of The Lawrenceville Liter- 
ary Magazine, his principal personal contributions being serial stories 
of western adventure and stirring life in the Rocky Mountains, which 
gave him quite a school reputation as an author and writer. 

He graduated in June with his class of 1907 at Lawrenceville, and 
passed his entrance examinations for the freshman class of 191 1 at 
Princeton University. During the summer of 1907 he made another 
trip to Europe with his parents, this time going from New York to 
London, rambling among the great cotnmercial and manufacturing 
cities of England, the English university towns, the cathedral cities, the 
dukeries, etc., to the city of Newcastle-on-Tyne ; from this point a 
North Sea yachting steamer was taken for Bergen, Norway, and a 
long coasting trip among and through the fiords and mountains of 
Western Norway followed, terminating at Trondhjem. The wild 
grandeur and diversified scenery of the Hardanger, Sogne, Nord, Ster 
and Ramsdal fiords, with their magnificent mountains, so like in mag- 



1336 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

nitude and color to his lovely Colorado mountains, rising vertically 
thousands of feet in the air from the verge of these inland arms of the 
sea; the glaciers, especially the Jostedalsbrae, the tumbling cascades 
with their veils of mist, and the immense rushing waterfalls, falling 
down from the gigantic dizzy rocks, and the masses of unseen icefields 
and virgin snow ; these features, with all the old Norse legends of myth- 
ology, the habits, manners and customs of these honest, stolid, fair- 
haired people, were a source of endless wonder and education to him, 
particularly appealing to his vivid and plastic imagination. Later his 
trip took him by rail to Christiania, with its great harbor and shipping ; 
thence by the cataracts and falls of Trollhatten and the wonderful Gota 
canal through the Lakes Venern, Vettern and Malaren to Stockholm — - 
the Venice of the north — with its picturesque islands and nearby lakes 
and arms of the Baltic; so like in environment to the "Queen of the 
Adriatic," and yet so unlike its dark memories of the Doges Palace, the 
Bocca Di Leone, the Bridge of Sighs, and the time-washed piles of its 
cathedrals and palaces ; indeed, Stockholm forms a striking picture to 
the traveler of a city in all the freshness and glory of youthful beauty. 
Among the wonders of Sweden it was impossible for this seventeen- 
year-old student to choose the greatest — the Tumuli, at Upsala — the 
mounds of Odin, Thor and Prey; the tombs of the great hero Gustavus 
Adolphus and of the famous warrior-lion Charles XII., in Riddar- 
holm Church ; the old age-worn sea vessels of the Vikings at Chris- 
tiania; the blood-stained shirt worn at Lutzen by Gustavus Adolphus, 
and the hat with its fatal bullet-hole worn by Charles XII. at Fredriks- 
hald, shown in the royal palace of the Swedish kings in Stockholm. 
And then journeying southward by Malo to Copenhagen, with its fine 
museums and art galleries, the home of Thorwaldsen — with the won- 
derful Twelve Apostles and the Kneeling Angel in the Fruekirke, 
bringing back to this youth memories of the Lion of Lucerne by the 
same hand, chiseled out of the native lime of Switzerland, the Grypo- 
theks, Rosenborg Castle, the Marble Church and the great Museum 
of Northern Antiquities, with its endless treasures of Scandinavian 
history. Across the arms of the sea to Berlin, with its imperial gal- 
leries, crowded with the most extensive and valuable collections of 
modern and ancient art, the Brandenburg Gate; the magnificent Col- 
umn of Victory; the Thiergarten, with its wonderful ancestral tribute 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1337 

to the Hohenzollern princes, tlie Sieges-iMlee, tlie statue of Oueeii 
Luise, the Royal Palace ot Charlottenburg, with the impressive mauso- 
leum, Potsdam and its military memories of Frederick; the Palace and 
Park of San Souci, the New Palace, the Town Palace and the Garrison 
Cluirch where the great I'rederick lies, with the Chateau of Babelsberg, 
and its beautiful park. Then to the luxurious capital of Saxony, Dres- 
den, and its picture gallery, containing the masterpiece of the world's 
greatest painter, the Sistine Madonna of Raphael ; journeying up the 
Elbe river and over the mnuntains to Vienna, with its rich Imperial 
Gallery of Art, with e\'ery school of art in the world represented: the 
Schonborn Gallery, the Imperial Library; the immense Hnfburg Pal- 
ace — in its treasury, among its countless treasures are the crown and 
swords of Charlemagne; the gigantic Rathaus, with its lavish ornamen- 
tation and stately architecture of the modern school; the old Capuchin 
Church, with the melancholy sarcophagi of the dead Hapsburgs; the 
Prater Park along the Danulje and the lieautiful Schonlirunn Chateau 
and Palace with its exquisite gardens and parks, Roman ruins, obelisks 
and fountains. Returning westward along the Danube to IMunich on 
the Isar, with its irregular streets in the old city, and the new city with 
its grand boulevards, line public buildings, well-kept parks and monu- 
ments; and in its collections of art ranking among the richest cities of 
the world. Nuremburg, the old mediaeval cit}', with its hoary castle and 
old world history; its instruments of torture for the exaltation of jus- 
tice and the promotion of religion — The Holy Virgin (Iron Maiden) 
and Cradle of Justice ; Heidelberg, with its impregnable fortress and 
castle — the most magnificent ruin in all Europe; by the street of the 
mountains — the rich grape country, to Mainz on the Rhine, and thence 
down that beautiful river with its developed inland navigation; by 
Bingen, Coblentz, Bonn, to Coin, with its immense cathedral ; Holland, 
with its dikes and ditches; Amsterdam, and its opulent commerce: The 
Hague, .\ntwerp, the second commercial city of the world, and Brus- 
sels, with galleries and museums crowded with the golden treasures of 
all the arts ; notably in architecture the Hotel de Ville, in Brussels — 
one of the finest structures in Europe ; the massive Gothic Cathedral at 
Antwerp and its unrivaled quays along the Scheldt. Then to Paris, 
where all wise travelers from the L^nited States make their adieux to 
the glories of Europe. Here his last month was all too short to properly 



1338 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

appreciate the wonders of Paris, the Louvre, Luxembourg Gallery, 
Jardin des Plantes, ficole des Beaux Arts, Notre Dame, Versailles, 
Fontainebleau, St. Denis, Chantilly, Madeleine, Etienne du Mont, the 
Bois du Boulogne, Napoleon's Tomb, and its endless boulevards, thea- 
ters, opera houses and museums of history and science. There was 
great need of the long rest on the Oceanic, White Star Line — Cher- 
bourg to New York. This trip to Europe, at his impressionable age, 
exerted the most powerful and lasting influence in his education. 

In September, 1907, he matriculated in the freshman class, 191 1, at 
Princeton University, in the full classical course. His four years at 
Princeton were crowded, industrious, studious years, with special atten- 
tion to English literature, ancient and modern languages. In addition 
to the regular course he planned out and rigidly persevered in a wide 
course of literary, scientific and philosophical reading. At college and 
in his vacations he continued to write and compose other literary pro- 
ductions than the essays, critiques, etc., required in the regular course. 
In the gymnasium and on the athletic field he became an expert wres- 
tler, swimmer and hammer thrower, taking some wrestling prizes. In 
1910, as a Democrat, he worked actively and effectively for the elec- 
tion of his Professor of Political Science at Princeton, Woodrow Wil- 
son, for Governor of New Jersey. In June, 191 1, he received the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts at the graduation of his class, and he cherishes 
with great pride his diploma signed by Woodrow Wilson as president 
of the University of Princeton, the class of 191 1 being the last graduat- 
ing class of Princeton to receive diplomas signed by Woodrow Wilson 
as president of Princeton College. He entered the Law Department 
of Columbia University, New York City, in the fall of 191 1. During 
the years 1912 and 1913 he applied for and won a Master of Arts de- 
gree from Columbia University, conferred upon him at the June Com- 
mencement, 1913, his thesis in course being considered an admirable 
production, with a profound analysis of the modern constitutional limi- 
tations upon the creation of trusts and monopolies and their congres- 
sional control. 

His summers in Colorado have been active ones, riding horseback, 
fishing and hunting — being much in the open air — all the time writing 
and composing in different literary lines. He is of a strong, active 
figure, and believes firmly in the doctrine of mens saiia in sano cor- 
pore. For several years he has won the first prizes for throwing the 



t> 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1339 

sixteen and twelve pound hannners, at the Caledonian games at Lead- 
ville, his brawny competitors far surpassing him in weight and years. 
He is a splendid horseback rider, and loves a blooded horse of life and 
action. 

During the Presidential campaign of 19 12 he worked enthusias- 
tically in New York City as a street campaigner and as a member of an 
uptown district Democratic club, for the election of Woodrow Wilson, 
his old preceptor at Princeton, as President of the United States, and 
it was a source of endless gratification to him that the nation elected 
Woodrow Wilson as Princeton's second gift to the Presidency — James 
Madison, the author and defender of the Constitution, being the first. 

In the fall of 1912 he finished his first literary work, a novel called 
The Sojourner. This he oflfered to the firm of Harper & Brothers, pub- 
lishers, of New York City, who upon examination concluded it was a 
production of sterling merit, justifying its publication by them. It was 
published April 3, 1913, and placed upon the market in the spring of 
that year. It has received most favorable commendation from critics, 
as a vivid, vital and buoyant story of American life — a western tale, 
full of strong passions, tender sympathies, of weakness and strength, 
with its pages crowded with the spirit and poetry of the West — and 
descriptive passages of the great mountains of the West, whose beauty 
and charm could only be caught by an author who was born among 
them. His novel has been termed by competent critics as one of the 
best American novels of recent issue from the press. The success of 
this, his first novel, may encourage him to further adventures in the 
same fascinating field. It is his ambition to join his father in the prac- 
tice of the law and observe the legal traditions of the family. 



Andrew Boelus "' Brumbaugh, M.D., (Jacob,* 
BRUMBAUGH George,^ Jacob,- Johannes Henrich ^ Brumbach)* 

was born August 9, 1836, upon the homestead 
farm in Penn township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. His edu- 
cation was begun in a subscription school prior to the establishment of 
an organized system of public education in Pennsylvania, and continued 
in the public schools, after which he taught nine years. He attended a 

* Extracted from Genealogy of the Brumbach Families ; Gaius Marcus Brumbaugh, 
1913; pp. 521-529. 



I340 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

select school (Academia) near Newport, Perry county, Pennsylvania, 
and Millersville State Normal School. "His early training was aca- 
demic, not collegiate, but by private study and earnest application he 
became a thorough master of the classics and sciences, thus fitting him- 
self for that large sphere in life to which ambition and destiny led him." 

October ii, 1859, he married Maria Baer Frank, born February 10, 
1840, on the Frank farm f in Penn township, Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth Brubaker (Baer) Frank. 
Her parents came from Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, where the Bru- 
bakers, Baers and Franks have a long and interesting Mennonite 
ancestry. 

Andrew'^ decided to make the practice of medicine his life work. 
While earning a living for his small family by working at the carpenter 
trade, with anatomy and other medical books open before him upon 
the work bench, he laid deeply the foundation for his later medical and 
surgical success. He also trained both hands, and became ambidextrous 
for his later surgical and other professional work. He matriculated at 
the Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania, October, 
1863, and graduated (M.D.) in the class of 1866. Prior to graduation 
he had acc^uired a considerable medical practice in Penn township and 
at Marklesburg, as shown by his diaries for '62 and '63. 

October 12, 1864, the family moved from the homestead farm to 
Marklesburg (James Creek P. O.). April, 1866, he located in the office 
of the late Dr. Luden, in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, and continued in 
active practice in this town until his death. Intense concentration and 
keen observation were the keynotes of his life. Much of his recreation 
and happiness throughout life was drawn from the gratification of his 
intense love of nature and for nature study. 

Dr. Brumbaugh was truly a "pioneer educator'' in his church and 
among his own people. He regarded the founding of The Pilgrim at 
Marklesburg, Pennsylvania, in 1870, as a logical step toward the fulfill- 
ment of his cherished dream — his oft-repeated words were, "Paper and 
advanced educational institution together at Huntingdon." "With single- 
ness of purpose and a deep insight as to the future educational and other 

tThis was the site of "Fort Hartsok" (or "Hartslog"), closely adjoining the 
Brumbaugh homestead, and this farm later passed into ownership of the late David 
Boyer' Brumbaugh. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1341 

possibilities lor tlie college and nilier associated clnircii interests to he 
grouped together at llnnlin.t^dim. lie steadily tried to iniUience the opin- 
ions of the church leaders and In lay dee]) the foundations for Juniata 
College," etc. 

Dr. Brunihaugh was baptized hy "S. Lehman of Va., Sept. 7. 1853, 
in Morrison's Cove, Blair Co.. Pa., at the Clover Creek Ch.,"" having 
walked twelve miles across Tussey's mountain from his home to attend 
the then nearest church. He continued actively in the work of the 
Church of the Brethren (G. B. B.) throughout his life. At the time of 
his death he had been the only secretary of "The Brethren ((German 
Baptist) Church of Huntingdon, Pa." . . . "which began its exist- 
ence in 1876 with a membership of eight persons," and was incorporated 
June 16, 1888.* 

Dr. Brumbaugh similarly held the position of secretary of trustees 
of Juniata College, and served, with singleness and steadfastness of pur- 
pose, the Normal Select School and each of its successors in title. See 
also mention of Juniata College in the historical pages of this work. 

For a number of years Dr. Brumbaugh was literary editor of The 
Pilgrim and also of The Huntingdon Journal. He founded the Juniata 
Echo, in connection with the other trustees of Juniata College, and was 
its editor, representing it in membership upon the Pennsylvania State 
Editorial Association. His literary activity also showed itself in various 
papers and addresses before medical, literary and historical bodies. He 
loved books and literary work, seeking therein relaxation from the ex- 
acting duties of his extensive medical and surgical i)ractice. 

"No doctor in this section of the State was a closer student and 
investigator than Dr. Brumbaugh. Though advanced in years, he was 
modern and up-to-date in his work, the natural sequence of his close 
alliance with the medical societies of the state and nation, whose meet- 
ings he regularly attended. He was identified with the Huntingdon 
County Medical Society, which he helped to organize in 1872 [president, 
secretary and treasurer at various times] ; member of the State Medical 
Society ; the American Medical Association ; the National Association of 
Railway Surgeons, and of the American Academy of Railway Surgeons. 
He was a member of the pension examining lioard in Huntingdon for 

* The application for incorporation of the congregation is a beautiful piece of 
penmanship by Dr. Brumbaugh, evidencing intense interest and devotion in the 
work. 



1342 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

nearly thirty years, and at the time of his death was the surgeon of the 
Pennsylvania and Broad Top railroads at this point. He was the county 
inspector of the State Board of Health and a member of the local board 
[as also a member of the National Board of Health during its exist- 
ence]. He was the physician at the Orphans' Home for 27 years, and 
the bigness of his heart is revealed from the fact that he served without 
any compensation whatever." * He also assisted the late David Em- 
mert.t the founder of the said Orphans' Home, and the originator of 
the "Huntingdon idea" in dealing with orphans, in every manner possible 
and served continuously as a trustee — all the Huntingdon Brumbaughs 
have been closely connected with this work. 

"Dr. Brumbaugh is highly esteemed not only for his professional 
ability, but also for his public-spirited generosity and active interest in 
all movements relative to the general improvement of the community in 
whose behalf he has so industriously and effectively labored. 

"Here for forty-two years he has been going in and out of the homes 
of our people, ministering alike to rich and poor, high and low, and win- 
ning fresh laurels year after year, both for his well-rounded ability and 
the persevering industry he displayed in his professional life. He was 
equally successful in the dual relation of physician and surgeon, which 
is uncommon. 

" . . . Our remembrance of him will be of one who in all his 
relations in life, both public and private, was the embodiment of loyalty 
and devotion." i 

January 21, 1908, Dr. and Mrs. Brumbaugh attended the annual 
meeting of the Pennsylvania State Editorial Association at Harrisburg. 
They returned to Huntingdon next day, and the doctor at once started 
in his buggy to see patients. He became sick with intense symptoms 
of appendicitis; went to bed; was taken to Philadelphia for operation, 
and died there January 27, 1908, "to the unfeigned sorrow and regret 
of thousands who had the pleasure of his acquaintance." Thus his oft 
expressed wish that he might "die in the professional harness" was 
actually fulfilled. His body was tenderly laid away in Riverview Ceme- 
tery, overlooking the center of much of his long years of faithful ser- 
vice. Such a life is a continued blessing, and an inspiration. 

At a special meeting of the Huntingdon County Medical Society, 

* Howard E. Butz, Huntingdon Globe, Jan. 30, 1908. 
tDied at Huntingdon, Pa., June 21, 1911. 
t Mr. Butz, Huntingdon Globe, Jan. 30, 1908. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1343 

January 29, 1908, tlie following was ordered U) be placed upcjn the 
minutes : 

"In the death of Dr. Andrew B. Brumbaugh, wlio was one of the 
founders and a member of the society since April 9, 1872, and its secre- 
tary for many years, this society has sustained a great loss. He was 
rarely absent from its meetings and was always willing to use his rich 
fund of experience and ripe judgment in promoting the interests of the 
society and maintaining its dignity and honor. 

"For forty-two years, by day and by night, in sunshine and storm, 
he devoted his talents to the people of this community and ministered 
with great medical and surgical skill to alleviate their sickness and 
sufifering." 

The following editorial appeared in The Juniata Echo, February, 
1908, Carman Cover Johnson, editor-in-chief: 

"The inadequacy of words forces itself upon us as we endeavor to 
speak editorially by way of appreciation of our deceased Dr. A. B. 
Brumbaugh. He was such an ardent spirit in his interest in everything 
that made for the advancement of Juniata in general, and of The Echo 
in particular. The Echo was his own creation; and it seems such a 
strange coincidence that his death should occur while the last Echo, 
containing just a little sketch of him, was being published. The Doctor 
had creative imagination, literary taste and style, insight into human 
nature, sympathy to the extent of self-sacrifice; devotion to home, and 
friends, and profession, and church, and school, away beyond the ordi- 
nary; and a hearty good-cheer that made him always invigorating. He 
leaves a great vacancy in the large community of which he was part : and 
we can only hope that those who take up the various lines of activity in 
which he led shall catch somewhat of inspiration from his resourceful 
personality." 

The following is an extract from minutes of Trustees of Juniata 
College, March 3, 1908, and signed by the committee: David Emmert, 
Joseph E. Saylor, and I. Harvey Brumbaugh: 

"The Trustees of Juniata College in recording the death, January 27, 
1908, of Dr. Andrew Boelus Brumbaugh, Secretary of the Board of 
Trustees, unite in expressing their feeling of loss and sorrow in the re- 

* Editorial in Juniata Echo, Feb., 1908, Vol. XVII, No. 2. 



1344 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

moval from their midst of one who had been a loyal and earnest co- 
worker in the cause of Christian education. 

"Dr. Brumbaugh was active in promoting and establishing the small 
school which was opened April 17, 1876. From that date to the time 
of his death he was Secretary of the governing body, or Trustees of 
the institution, and its inner history is preserved in his handwriting. 
He was most faithful in attendance upon meetings, even when held at 
hours which interferred with his professional practice. His service as a 
Trustee was much more than perfunctory. As a close student of affairs, 
well read in different fields of study and investigation, his views were 
progressive and often ahead of the times. He suggested new activities 
and gave the enthusiasm of his own spirit to aid any movement which 
counted for the development of the College. 

"Dr. Brumbaugh also served as a member of the Faculty, giving his 
time without remuneration, for lectures to the student body on hygiene. 
In this form of instruction he took special delight, and his practical work 
along this line is well remembered by many who were under his tuition. 

"As Editor of the Juniata Echo he performed a distinctive service 
to the college, especially in maintaining an official organ for the institu- 
tion in the days when it was small. His pen was ready and high hopes 
were expressed most confidently for the school to which he gave so much 
of his time and thought. 

"On the personal side Dr. Brumbaugh will be remembered best as 
the college physician, who ministered with skill and devotion to those 
who needed his assistance. To natural acumen, and a thorough under- 
standing of the science of medicine he added those qualities which made 
him cjuick to perceive the source and nature of disease, and ready to 
adapt the remedy to the patient. Joined to this professional skill were 
those personal traits of sympathy and solicitude which made one glad to 
go to him for medical advice. 

"In recalling these services to the college and recording the loss 
which it has suffered the Trustees wish to add their word of sympathy 
for the immediate family, who have no more the companionship with 
one who possessed so many splendid traits of heart and mind. May 
they enjoy the comforts and blessings of Our Heavenly Father, who 
does all things well !" 

Mrs. Brumbaugh desired to live in close association with the projects 
so dear to her late husband, and purchased a lot facing the campus of 
Juniata College and the new stone church erected therein, and in 191 1 
moved into her new residence at 16 18 Moore street, Huntingdon, Penn- 
sylvania. Children: Gains Marcus, M.D., born May 7, 1S62; infant 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 134S 

son, born and died February 19, 1865; Cora Adele (Mrs. Alfred Purvis 
Silverthorn, of Coali)ort, Pennsylvania), born April 21, 1866. 

Gaius Marcus" Brumbaugh, M.S., M.D., (Andrew Boelus,-''' Jacob,* 
George,^ Jacob,- Johannes Henrich^) was born May 7, 1862, in Penn 
township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, on the old homestead farm. 
He was educated in private school, Huntingdon Academy, Brethren's 
Normal School, Juniata College, graduating from latter (B.E., '79); 
also received M.E. and M.S. ('98) from the same institution. He 
taught several years in public schools of Pennsylvania ; attended 
medical lectures at University of Pennsylvania; Medical Department, 
Columbian University (now G. W. U.); Howard University, Medical 
Department, graduated M.D., from same '85 ; Medical Department, 
Georgetown, graduating M.D. from latter, '98. He removed to Wash- 
ington, D. C, in 1882, but has continued his legal residence at Hunting- 
don ; held several positions under the government, the last being assistant 
chief, Bureau of Animal Industry; and since 1899 has been a member 
of Third Board of United States Pension Examining Surgeons, of which 
he was secretary, 1899-1913. He entered upon active medical practice 
(Reg.) in Washington, D. C, October, 1887; member Medical Society 
of the District of Columbia ; American Medical Association ; American 
Association for the Advancement of Science, Pennsylvania German So- 
ciety ; Pennsylvania Historical Society, etc. He is examiner for a num- 
ber of life, accident and health insurance companies; lecturer on materia 
medica and therapeutics. National Training School for Nurses (Sibley 
Hospital) for over fourteen years; author of "Genealogy of 
the Brumbach Families," 1913, 875 pp., etc. He became a mem- 
ber of the German Baptist Church, April 5, 1876, and actively 
participated in the foundation of the Normal Select School, Brethren's 
Normal College and Juniata College, as pupil, later pupil instructor and 
graduate; was elected trustee of Juniata College (1909) as his father's 
successor in membership in that board. He is a Republican. Office and 
residence, 905 Massachusetts Avenue, N. W., Washington, D. C, and 
Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. 

October i, 1889, at Elmira, New York, he married Catherin Elliott 
Brown, born June 15, 1868, in Mansfield, Tioga county, Pennsylvania, 
daughter of Charles W. Brown, M.D., and Mary Eleanor (Elliott) 
Brown. 



1346 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

"Catherin Elliott (Brown) Brumbaugh, a native of Pennsylvania, 
w^as taken, when a young girl, to Elmira, New York, where her father. 
Dr. Charles W. Brown, was a prominent physician. Here she spent her 
girlhood, attended St. Ursula and the Woman's College of that city. 
Here she married Dr. Gains Marcus Brumbaugh, and moved to Wash- 
ington, D. C, where she has been identified with various organizations 
looking to the betterment of the race. Prominent among these is the 
National George Jr. Republic League, of which she is recording sec- 
retary. 

"She began her activities as a Daughter of the American Revolution 
in Constitution Chapter, holding the office of registrar and then record- 
ing secretary, which office she resigned to become corresponding secre- 
tary in the new chapter, Livingston Manor, organized by her mother, 
February, 1909. She was one year state recording secretary, declining 
renomination in order to give more time to the office of secretary to the 
National Magazine Committee,* which office she resigned on her elec- 
tion in 191 1 to the office of registrar-general Daughters of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, for a term of two years [and reelected in 1913]. She 
was elected corresponding secretary-general of Children of the American 
Revolution, October, 1913; is national chaplain of the Children of the 
American Revolution, of which her two interesting boys are enthusiastic 
members. Through her father's line she is a member of the Daughters 
of Founders and Patriots of America. 

Children: Charles Andrew, born May 13, 1897; Marcus Morton, 
born July 28, 1899, died May 15, 1900; Elliott Frank, born January 
24, 1903. 



John Musser Beck, son of Joseph L. and Sarah C. (Mc- 
BECK Elwain) Beck, was born at Warriors Mark, Pennsylvania, 

June 15, 1872. He was educated in his native township, 
and after being graduated from the Lockhaven Normal School was 
engaged in the profession of teaching for a period of seven years. Hav- 
ing prepared himself for the entrance examination, he entered the Med- 
ico-Chirurgical College at Philadelphia, from which he was graduated 
with honor in 1901, the degree of Doctor of Medicine being conferred 
upon him. He at once established himself in the active practice of 
his profession at Alexandria, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and 
has been engaged in it since that time. While comparatively young in 
* Amer. Monthly Mag., March, 1912, p. 105. 



HISTORY 01' THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1347 

the profession he has adopted, Dr. Beck has won the confidence of his 
patients and tlie esteem of his professional hrcthren. He is devoted to 
the profession he has made his hfe work, and enters into every detail 
connected with it with the zeal and energy which are only to be found 
in those who ultimately attain more than an ordinary share of success. 
He is a member of the Huntingdon County Medical Society, and has 
served as secretary of this body for the past three years. He is also a 
member of the State and American medical societies. He fills the posi- 
tion of county physician for the district in whicli he resides, and is con- 
sulting physician at the Blair JMemorial Hospital. His affiliation with 
other organizations is as follows : Mount Moriah Lodge No. 300, Free 
and Accepted Masons; Hartslog Lodge No. 286, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and Modern Workmen. He is a Republican in politics. 
Dr. Beck married, October 30, 1901, Rose, born in Warriors Mark, 
a daughter of Alexander and Catherine (Berkey) Crawford. They 
have no children. 



The name is one of great antiquity in England, where 
HORTON it is found as early as the year 1300. In England, as 

well as in America, they have usually been land owners 
and concerned in the pursuits connected with agriculture. The first of 
the family who emigrated to this country came over from England be- 
tween 1633 and 1638 — Thomas, Jeremiah, and Barnabas were among 
the early emigrants, and tradition sa)'s that they were brothers. Thomas 
came over in the "Mary and John" in 1633 and settled in Springfield, 
Massachusetts. Jeremiah also settled in Massachusetts, while Barnabas 
settled on Long Island and is the ancestor of the family herein recorded. 
(I) Barnabas, son of Joseph Horton, was born in Mousely, Leices- 
tershire, England, July 13, 1600. He emigrated to America in the ship 
"Swallow," Captain Jeremy Horton, master and owner, landing at 
Hampton, Massachusetts, thence to New Haven, Connecticut, 1640, 
settling permanently at the east end of Long Island, now Southold, 
Sufifolk county. New York, in October, 1640. He was accompanied 
by his wife Mary, and children. Joseph and Benjamin, both born in 
England. Children, last eight born in Southold: i. Joseph, born about 
1632, married Jane Budd. 2. Benjamin, married Anna, sister of Jane, 
and both daughters of John (i) Budd. 3. Caleb, of whom further. 



1348 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

4. Joshua, married Mary Tuthill. 5. Jonathan, married Bethia Wells. 
6. Hannah, married Barnabas Terrill. 7. Sarah, married Joseph Conklin. 
8. Mary, married Joseph, son of John (i) Budd. 9. Mercy, married 
Christopher Youngs. 10. Abigail, married Charles Booth. 

(II) Caleb, third son of Barnabas Horton, was born at Southold, 
Long Island, in the autumn of 1640, married there, December 23, 1665, 
Abigail, daughter of Peter Hallock, the emigrant. After marriage they 
settled at Cutchogue, Southold township. He was made a freeman in 
1664, and was a land owning farmer. He died October 3, 1702 ; his wife 
died in 1697. Children: i. Barnabas (2), of whom further. 2. Jona- 
than, born 1668; married. 3. Xathan, 1670; died withovit issue. 4. David, 
born 1672; married Mary, daughter of Jonathan (i) Horton. 5. Mary, 
born 1675 • married Nathaniel Terry. 6. Hannah, married Ensign John 
(2) Booth. 7. Abigail, married David, son of Charles and Abigail 
(Horton) Booth. 8. Esther. 9. Rachel, died unmarried. 10. Ruth. 

(III) Barnabas (2), son of Caleb and Abigail (Hallock) Hor- 
ton, was born at Cutchogue, Long Island, September, 1666, married, 
about 1686, Sarah Hines. Children: Caleb, of whom further; Barna- 
bas (3), married Mary Sweazy, and moved to Goshen, Orange county. 
New York; Penelope; Bethia. 

(IV) Caleb (2), son of Barnabas and Sarah (Hines) Horton, was 
born in Southold, Long Island, December 22, 1687, married, December 
10, 1714, Phebe Terry, daughter of Nathaniel, son of Richard Terry; 
she was born in Southold, in 1698. They moved to Roxbury, now 
Chester, New Jersey, in 1748, where they died. Both were members and 
liberal supporters of the churches at Southold and Chester. On their 
tombstone in Chester is this inscription : "Caleb Horton, of Southold, 
Long Island, died August 6, 1772, having lived about eighty-five years 
with an unblemished character." "Phebe, wife of Caleb Horton, died 
December 24, 1776, having finished a life of seventy-eight years, fifty- 
eight of which she was the wife of Caleb Horton." 

"Martha's care she had at heart 
And also chosen Mary's part." 

Children, all born in Southold: i. Caleb, 171 5; married Sarah 
Benjamin. 2. Hannah, 1717; married Samuel Sweazy. 3. Nathaniel, 
October 13, 1719; married Mehitabel Case. 5. Phebe, married Henry 
Tuthill. 6. Elijah, June 19, 1724; married Lydia Sweazy. 7. Richard, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1349 

of whom further. 8. Sarah, married Stephen Sweazy. 9. Mary, mar- 
ried Richard Terry. lo. Rachel, married. August 23, 1753, Jonathan 
Racket. 11. Rhoda, married Rohert Rohinson, and died in Chester, 
June 30, 1771, aged forty-three years five days. 

(V) Richard, son of Caleh (2) and Phehe (Terry) Horton, was 
born in Southold, Long Island, about 1727, married Elizabeth Harri- 
son, and moved to Chester, New Jersey, about 1750, going thence to 
Radnor, Delaware county, Pennsylvania. He was a member of the 
Society of Friends, and attended the Radnor meeting. Children, all 
born in Radnor: i. Samuel, about 1752; settled in Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania, a blacksmith. 2. Nathan, of whom further. 3. Josiah, 
1756. 4. Jesse. 5. John, married Elizabeth Thomas, and left issue. 
6. Thomas. 7. Septimus, died in Baltimore, about 1850. 

(VI) Nathan, son of Richard and Elizabeth (Harrison) Horton, 
was born in Radnor, Delaware county, Pennsylvania, about 1754. He 
settled in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, where he established a 
blacksmith shop, and became noted for the excellent character of his 
work, and attained high standing as a good citizen. He married Re- 
becca Priest, and lived in \\'est Chester a short time before moving to 
Huntingdon. Children, iirst three born in West Chester: i. William, 
1789. 2. Henry, of whom further. 3. Mary, twin of Henry. 4. Cath- 
erine. 5. Rebecca. 6. Deborah. 7. John. 8. Elizabeth. 9. Nathan Priest. 

(VI) Nathan, son of Richard and Elizabeth (Harrison) Horton, 
born at Broadtop, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, died at Wells 
Valley, Fulton county, Pennsylvania. He was a farmer, owning con- 
siderable land, but was very liberal and died comparatively poor. He 
and his wife were devoted members of the Baptist church, although 
his parents were members of the Society of Friends. He married 
Elizabeth White, and both lived to be about eighty years of age. Chil- 
dren: I. Thomas, died in Fulton county. 2. Nathan, died in Fulton 
county. 3. Alexander, died from injuries received in the civil war. 
4. George, died in Huntingdon county. 5. Jesse W., of whom further. 
6. Mary, married Mr. Allway, whom she survives, a resident of Hunt- 
ingdon county, aged about eighty-two years, and is a second time wid- 
owed. 7. Hannah, married Amos Feigard : both died in Huntingdon 
county. 



I350 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(VIII) Jesse W., son of Henry and Elizabeth (White) Horton, was 
born at Broad Top, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, June 21, 1822, 
died in Belleville, Mifflin county, January 23, 1913. He learned the 
blacksmith's trade in his youth, following the example of many of 
his kindred, and like his grandfather became a very expert worker in 
iron and steel. About 1844 he settled in Belleville, but only remained 
one year, then removed to Whitehall, where he worked for two years 
and in the meantime married. After his marriage he moved to Kings, 
where he worked at his trade for seven years, then in 1854 returned 
to Belleville, where he established a shop in an old tannery building. 
In 1875 he built a new shop and continued in successful business opera- 
tion until his retirement. In 1861 he enlisted in Company C, 45th 
Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving for eleven months 
and receiving an honorable discharge. He was a Democrat in politics, 
and served as school director, but with that exception never accepted 
public office. He married Catherine Whitman, born in Berks county, 
Pennsylvania, August 14, 1818, died December 14, 1893, daughter of 
John and Eva Whitman, of German descent, who moved from Berks 
county about 1838 and settled in the Kishacoquillas valley, where he 
purchased a small tract of land on which he lived until death. His only 
son Isaac died in Mifflin county, and his only daughter Catherine mar- 
ried Jesse W. Horton, both members of the Lutheran church. Chil- 
dren of Jesse W. Horton: i. Eve Elizabeth, born 1845; married Eli- 
phas Biglow, whom she survives, a resident of Burnham. 2. Henry 
John, senior member of the firm of H. J. Horton & Company, of Belle- 
ville; he married Clarissa, daughter of Richard Brindle. 3. Isaac, of 
whom further. 4. Mary Catherine, born 1856; married David Stropp, 
and resides in Belleville. 5. William Thomas, born 1861 ; now regis- 
trar of Susquehanna Collegiate Institute, Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania. 

(IX) Isaac, son of Jesse W. and Catherine (Whitman) Horton, 
was born in Menno township, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, December 
15, 1852. He was educated in the public schools of Belleville, and at 
a youthful age began working with his father and learned the black- 
smith's trade. He continued with his father until about 1874, when 
the latter admitted his two sons, John and Isaac, to a partnership. This 
continued until about 1892, when the father withdrew and the firm con- 
tinued a general blacksmith business as Horton Brothers until 1906. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1351 

111 the latter year the tirni reorganized as II. J. Horton & Company, 
and a new member aihnitted. Jesse Cloyd Horlon, son of Isaac. When 
the Horton P>rotiiers ac(|uired the business it was an ordinary country 
blacksmith shop, well patronized and doing a good business, but in no 
way differing from other shops in the county. The young men, both 
expert smiths, immediately began enlarging their plant and equipping 
it with modern tools and machinery driven by a gasoline engine. They 
also added a wagon and carriage making departinent, erecting a special 
building, 25 by 80, two stories high, and five men being kept constantly 
employed. This is now one of the best equipped and prosperous smith- 
ing concerns in Mifflin county. While the Hortons in each of the nine 
generations have usually been farmers, yet each generation has pro- 
duced an expert blacksmith ; in fact, it may be said to be a family trade. 
The firm of H. J. Horton & Company, founded upon the business 
established by Jesse W. Horton, is composed of Henry John and Isaac, 
sons of the founder, and Jesse Cloyd, a grandson. 

Isaac Horton is a Democrat in politics, and has served three terms 
as school director. He is a member of the Knights of the Golden 
Eagle, and liotli he and his wife belong to the Lutheran church. He 
married, December 2^, 1875, Margaret Yocum, born in Menno town- 
ship, daughter of James and Jane Yocum, of an old Mifflin county 
family. Children: i. Charles Raymond, born June i, 1877; now a 
clerk in collateral department of Fourth Street National Bank, Phila- 
delphia: he married Arie Finkle. 2. Jesse Cloyd, born March 10, 1879; 
learned the blacksmith's trade with his father, and is now junior mem- 
ber of the firm of H. J. Horton & Company. 3. Anna Ethel, born 
March 25. 1881, residing at home. 4. Isaac Merle, born May 29, 1887; 
now a bank clerk in Philadelphia. 5. James Blair, born December 14, 
1896; now a student in Belleville high school. The family residence is 
"on the hill." in Belleville, erected in 1905 by Isaac Horton. 



For generations the Hutchison family has been 
HUTCHISON prominent in the affairs of the state of Pennsyl- 
vania, especially Juniata Valley. William Hutchi- 
son, the immigrant forbear, was born in county Tyrone, Ireland, about' 
1730. He emigrated to the New World before 1798, and settled in 
Tyrone, Pennsylvania. In 1798 he was assessed for three hundred 



1352 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

acres of land in Tyrone. Later he moved to Muskingum county, Ohio, 
and is buried near McConnellsburg, Ohio. When he came to America 
he was accompanied by several brothers and sons, and they, with the 
exception of his son Archibald, went with him to Ohio. He was a 
man of importance from the time of his landing until his death, and 
must have had considerable means, as he was able to purchase land and 
establish himself comfortably within a few months after locating in 
Pennsylvania. Among his children was Archibald, of whom further. 
(II) Archibald, son of William Hutchison, the Irish immigrant, 
was himself an immigrant in that he was born in Ireland and came with 
his father to the United States, possibly just at the close of the revolu- 
tionary war. He was born in county Tyrone, Ireland, about 1758, and 
died in Pennsylvania, in 185 1. When his father moved farther west 
he remained in Pennsylvania. After his marriage he moved to a place 
now known as the John Waite farm, and there his first three children 
were born. From there he moved in 1808 to the Spanogle farm, now 
owned by Scott Buck, and in 1810 he purchased the Hutchison farm' 
now owned by the heirs of A. C. Hutchison. He became the owner 
through purchase of several other farms, property in HoUidaysburg, 
and in Warriors Mark. He was an advanced and exceedingly prosper- 
ous farmer. He ran a line of teams to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, han- 
dling the pig iron output. He and his wife were devout members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and he was a Whig in politics. He 
married Mary Hyskell, born in 1764, in Germany, and died in 1848, 
in Pennsylvania. Her brothers, Frederick and George Hyskell, came 
from Germany to Pennsylvania in 1788 and purchased farms. In 
1792 Benjamin Hyskell, born in Germ_any in 1729, and died in Pennsyl- 
vania in 181 1, and his wife, Margaret Spensard, born in Germany in 
1748 and died in Pennsylvania in 1831, joined their sons in Pennsyl- 
vania. They were accompanied by their other children, and made their 
home in Pennsylvania until the time of their deaths. Children of Ben- 
jamin and Margaret (Spensard) Hyskell: George; Catherine; Polly; 
Frederick ; Jane ; Elizabeth ; Mary, who married Archibald Hutchison. 
Children of Archibald and Mary (H3rskell) Hutchison: i. John, born 
1799, died aged thirteen. 2. Benjamin, born 1803; lived and died on 
homestead, where he was killed by a thresher ; he was a prominent local 
Methodist preacher; married Rebecca Wilson, of Indiana county, Penn- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY I353 

sylvania. 3. \\'illiain, of whom further. 4. Eliza, married Jeremiah 
Cunningham, a prominent man of Blair count)', prothonotary, state 
senator and iron master; lived and died in llollidaysburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. 5. Margaret, married Judge James Gardner, associate judge of 
Blair county; banker and prominent man. 6. Sarah, married John I. 
Patterson, soldier in the civil war and merchant. 7. Mary Ann, mar- 
ried Samuel Lehman, lived and died on the farm bequeathed her by 
her father. 8. John, lived and died on farm bequeathed him Ijy his 
father; married Jemima Weston. All except Margaret were members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and from them descend many of 
the prominent families of Juniata Valley. 

(Ill) ^^'illiam (2), son of Archibald and Mary (Hyskell) Hutchi- 
son, was born in Pennsylvania, in 1805. He was an unusually well 
educated man for the day in which he lived, having attended the best 
private schools in his vicinity. He was a farmer until 1850 on the 
old homestead; at that time he bought the Addleman tract, east of 
Warriors ]\Iark, on which were a log house and barn. He erected a 
handsome brick residence and put up a new barn; the former is still 
standing at the present time (1913). Later he purchased a portion of 
the Johnston farm, and still later a part of the Weston, which gave 
him possession of three large tracts of land. He was one of the influ- 
ential men of his day, and was prominent in the afifairs of the town- 
ship. He invariably stood for the right in all questions, and he, with 
one or two others, were peacemakers in the township. He was the 
friend of the poor and oppressed, and in him they had confidence. He 
was a Whig during the life of that party, and when the Republican 
partv was organized gave it his support and influence. He declined 
all public office, though urged on numerous occasions to accept the 
nominations for the state legislature and associate judge. Pie was 
generous to a fault, though in an unassuming and unostentatious way. 
He was a noble man and a good citizen, and had few if any enemies. 
He was exceedingly prosperous in his undertakings, but was not wealthy 
as the world knows it to-day. He was a devout member of the Metho- 
dist church, and was one of the trustees when the present church edi- 
fice was erected. He was greatly mourned in his section at his death, 
which occurred May 23, 1884. He married (first) Elizabeth Wallace; 
(second) Mary Jane Patterson, born in 1833, at Pennsylvania Fur- 



1354 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

nace, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and now (1913) eighty years 
old, lives on the old homestead east of Warriors Mark. She is the 
daughter of John and Mary (Irvin) Patterson, who were of ancient 
Scotch-Irish descent. He was born in Juniata county. She was his 
second wife. He was the father of sixteen children, three by the first 
marriage and thirteen by the second. Children of William and Mary 
Jane (Patterson) Hutchison: i. George G. Hutchison, of whom fur- 
ther. 2. Elizabeth, married George Curry, of Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania. 3. Annie, died in infancy. 4. William, drowned, aged five. 
5. Louis A., a clerk in the Carnegie Steel Company, Pittsburgh. 6. 
Edwin, traveling salesman, resides in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 

(IV) George G., son of William and Mary Jane (Patterson) 
Hutchison, was born November 19, 1854, in Warriors Mark township, 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. He was educated in the Millers- 
ville Normal School and at the State College, taking an agricultural 
course. After completing his education he engaged in the manage- 
ment of his father's lands for many years. He became a salesman 
for an agricultural implement firm, covering Central Pennsylvania, for 
about eight years. He next devoted his time and attention to mining 
fire clay, in which he was successful. He combined with this the han- 
dling of ore and taking out cross ties and lumber for eight or ten 
years. During this time he purchased the Hyskell farm and ran it, and 
at the present time owns one-third of the Hutchison farm. In 1891- 
1893 he was sergeant-at-arms of the Pennsylvania state senate. From 
1895 to 1903 he was deputy dairy and food commissioner, and assisted 
in the formulating of the pure food law of Pennsylvania. He was on 
the committee that framed the national law ; and has participated in food 
conventions over the United States. Under Governor Pennypacker 
he was appointed general agent of the department of agriculture, and 
has charge of concentrated commercial feeding stock association. 
Finding the law governing it insufficient he used his influence to have 
it repealed and another and more comprehensive one drafted. The 
present law is the result of his effort largely, and is widely recognized 
as being one of the best, as it saves farmers and feeders thousands of 
dollars per annum. In the last legislature he secured the passage of a 
pure seed law, and many others that are of supreme importance and 
benefit to the farmers. He was appointed by Governor Pattison a mem- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1355 

ber of the National l-arniers' Congress and has Ijcen reappointed by 
each governor from lliat time to tlie present. In 1913 he was ap- 
pointed by Governor J. K. Tener a ineml)er of the American Commis- 
sion of Agriculture. He has been a member of the State Board of 
Agriculture for twenty years, and Imlds farmers' institutes in Hunt- 
ingdon county. He is also member of the Dairyman's Union; Live 
Stock Association ; Grange, of which he has been local master, and has 
served on the Grange legislative committee. He has been a member 
of the board of trustees of the State College three terms, and is actively 
interested in the welfare of that institution. Among other excellent 
measures that he has had adopted was a two years' course in agricul- 
ture, not requiring a preparatory education. He takes a vivid and 
working interest in the school of domestic science and home economics, 
feeling that this is important to the young women of the state. He 
ranks as one of the progressive and up-to-date men of his state, who 
has always at heart the good of the commonwealth. He is a staunch 
Republican, and works for the party actively. He and his wife are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and he was a delegate to 
the last general conference, and is a trustee of the local church. He 
is always engaged in the lietterment of the community, taking an in- 
terest in the least detail. He has educated his children in the best of 
educational institutions, holding that an education is the best invest- 
ment that can be made. In 1903 he erected a handsome home on a 
hill overlooking Warriors Mark, and there lives, entertaining many 
prominent people who are numbered among his state-wide acquain- 
tance. 

He married Ada F. Hyskell, daughter of Thomas B. and Mary 
(Weston) Hyskell. Children: i. William Allen, graduate of State 
College: traveling salesman for American Milling Company; was for- 
merly connected with a large dairy of three hundred cows ; was for 
years special agent for Dairy and Food Commission of the State of 
Pennsylvania ; makes home in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania ; married 
Helen Patton: one child, \Vinifred. 2. Thomas Raymond, educated at 
Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania; manager of Armour & Com- 
pany plant at St. Joseph, Missouri; married Edith En3^ert, of Peoria, 
Illinois. 3. Florence, educated at Irving College; at home. 4. Herbert 
Lynn, educated at Juniata College; taught five years; now salesman 



1356 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

for Quaker Oats Manufacturing Company; second lieutenant of Sheri- 
dan Troop, National Guard, Pennsylvania; member of Sons of Ameri- 
can Revolution. 5. Helen, died while in senior class at Dickinson Semi- 
nary. 6. Frederick Hyskell, died aged six years. Two other children 
died in infancy. 



The first member of this branch of the HoUis family to 
HOLLIS settle in Pennsylvania was William Hollis, born in Ire- 
land, December 10, 1828, died in Yeagertown, Pennsyl- 
vania, October 7, 1907. He remained in his native land until eighteen 
years of age, then came to the United States, settling in Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, where he learned the blacksmith's trade. About 1850 he 
came to Yeagertown (Manns Narrows) and for fifty years was con- 
nected with the William Mann Jr. axe works, being a great part of this 
period manager or superintendent of the factory. In 1906 he helped 
to organize the Lewistown Trust Company, of which he was a director 
until his death. He was an expert worker in metals, and a born man- 
ager of men. He was a veteran of the civil war; a Repubhcan in poli- 
tics, and both he and his wife members of the Lutheran church. He 
married, in Yeagertown, Emily Amanda Foster, born in Mifflin county, 
died in May, 1863, Mr. Hollis remaining a Avidower forty-four years. 
Children: Elizabeth, died in infancy; Anna Mary, married Meade 
Logan, both deceased; Nora, married M. L. Yearick, and resides in 
Philadelphia: Joanna, died in infancy: Joseph Henry, twin of Joanna. 
(II) Joseph Henry, son of William and Emily Amanda (Foster) 
Hollis, was born in Yeagertown, Pennsylvania, February 9, 1863. He 
obtained his primary and preparatory education in the public school, 
and later entered Pennsylvania State College, whence he was gradu- 
ated, class of 1883. He entered business life as an employee of the 
William Mann Jr. Axe Company, learning all the details of manufac- 
ture. He was advanced in rank rapidly and continued until the plant 
became a part of the American Axe & Tool Company. He remained 
with the latter company until 1905, succeeding his father as manager, 
and later as superintendent, holding that position until the Yeagertown 
plant was closed and he was transferred to East Douglass. Massachu- 
setts, as superintendent of the company plant there. He remained 
there two years, then until January i, 1908, was superintendent of the 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1357 

Mann Edge Tool Company, at Lewistown, Pennsylvania. In the lat- 
ter year he resigned his position and formed a partnership with John 
Miller, and with him was engaged in the lumber business until the 
death of Mr. Miller in January, 19 12. Mr. Hollis closed up the busi- 
ness of the firm and is now operating alone, having a mill and forty- 
acre tract in Ferguson valley. He is also interested in real estate in 
Other localities. In politics Mr. Hollis is a Republican, and is a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Malta, the Golden Eagle, also of the Improved 
Order of Red Men. He married, in 1892, Jane McDonald, born in 
Mifflin county, daughter of James L. and Sarah McDonald. Children: 
I. William, now a student at Temple College, Philadelphia. 2. Mar- 
garet, twin of William, graduate of Drexel Institute, Philadelphia. 3. 
Gerald, student of Yeagertown high school. 4. Joseph Foster. 5. Jo- 
seph Foster. 6. Arthur. 7. Walter. 8. Richard, died in infancy. 

The family home is at Hollis Station, on the trolley line, on the old 
homestead of Emily Wagner Foster, mother of Emily Amanda (Fos- 
ter) Hollis, and her residence after marriage of William Hollis. 



The Gutshall family of Perry county, Pennsylvania, 
GUTSHALL of which Edward Solomon Gutshall is a representa- 
tive at the present time in Huntingdon, Pennsyl- 
vania, is one which came to this country from Germany in the early 
days of colonial settlement, and transplanted to America the many 
fine traits which are inherent in the natives of that country. Since 
that time the family has scattered, and representatives of it are now 
to be found in many sections of the United States. They took up the 
burdens of their adopted country with the utmost eagerness and bore 
their share bravely during the civil war. 

(I) Solomon, grandfather of Edward Solomon Gutshall, was born 
in Perry county, Pennsylvania, and the greater part of his life was 
spent there, where he followed the occupation of a blacksmith, and also 
cultivated his extensive farm. He was a strong worker for Demo- 
cratic interests, and filled a number of local public offices. His religious 
affiliations were with the Lutheran church. He married Margaret 
Rhinesmith, and had children: Samuel, see forward; Elizabeth and 
Joseph, both deceased. 

(II) Samuel, son of Solomon and Margaret (Rhinesmith) Gut- 



1358 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

shall, was born in Perry county, Pennsylvania, in 1847, ^^d there re- 
ceived the usual education of a farmer's son at that time, in the com- 
mon schools. AA'hen he was old enough, he commenced to assist his 
father in the cultivation of the homestead farm, and practically his 
entire life has been spent in farming operations. He has now retired 
from active life, and lives at Huntingdon. In political matters he affil- 
iates with the Democratic party, and has filled a number of local offices, 
among them being that of assessor, which he held for seventeen years. 
He and his wife are members of the Lutheran church. He married 
Priscilla, born in 1849, daughter of Simon and Mary (Mowel) Kern, 
whose only other child was William, now a resident of Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. Simon Kern was a native of Perry county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he was engaged in farming: and as a representative of the 
Democratic party filled a number of local public offices. L^pon the out- 
break of the civil war he enlisted, and served until the close of that 
struggle, when he was honorably discharged. He and his wife are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Gutshall; Edward Solomon, see forward; Luella, born 1873, 
married William Prostle, principal of Houtzdale schools; Oma, born 
1876, married John McElroy, a brickmaker, of Huntingdon, Pennsyl- 
vania; Wilmer, born 1881, is in the employ of a contractor; Myrtle, 
born 1886, married Harry Hoffman; Mabel, twin of Myrtle, married 
■ McElroy, proprietor of a restaurant at Mount Vernon, Penn- 
sylvania. 

(Ill) Edward Solomon, son of Samuel and Priscilla (Kern) Gut- 
shall, was born in Perry county, Pennsylvania, February 9, 1872. He 
attended the public schools of his township, and being of a naturally 
studious and ambitious nature he acquired a fund of knowledge which 
has served as a very substantial foundation for the superstructure he 
placed upon it. The course was supplemented b}^ one term's attend- 
ance at Juniata College, and he then engaged in teaching, an occupa- 
tion with which he was identified for a period of eight years. He then 
removed to Huntingdon, where he was in the employ of the J. C. Blair 
Company for a considerable length of time, then abandoned this occu- 
pation in favor of farming, with which he has been identified since that 
time. He devotes his time to general farming conducted on scientific 
principles, paying great attention to intensified cultivation, from which 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1359 

he has liad exccllciil results, lie also lias some fhic specimens of Hol- 
stein cattle, and has been very successful in his dairy farming opera- 
tions. A man of many-sided ability, Mr. Gutshall is also engaged as 
an agent of the Prudential Life Insurance Company of Newark, New 
Jersey. He is independent in his pnlilieal (ipinions, and his popularity 
is attested by the fact that he has been elected to hold a number of 
local offices, and has tilled these to the satisfaction of the entire com- 
munity, irrespective of political convictions. 

Mr. Gutshall married, in 1892, Mollie, daughter of David and Sarah 
(Long) Boyd. Children: i. Claire, born 1894; was graduated from 
Huntingdon high school, studied one term at Juniata College, and is 
now engaged in teaching. 2. Marie, born 1896, is a student at Hunt- 
ingdon high school, member of the class of 1914. 3. Ruth, born 1898, 
is a student at high school. 4. Ivatherine, born I905, attends public 
schools. 5. Joseph, born 1909. 6. Edward, born 1912. Mr. and Mrs. 
Gutshall are earnest members of the Lutheran church. His fraternal 
affiliations are with Camp No. 321, Patriotic Order Sons of America; 
and the Royal Arcanum. 



The Hendersons of Pennsylvania, who have played 
HENDERSON a conspicuous part in the development of the natu- 
ral resources of the commonwealth and who have 
ever been [irominent, politically, commercially and socially, are of Cel- 
tic origin, descending from Thomas Henderson, who emigrated from 
Ireland in 1727. He married and had three sons — Archibald, William 
and Thomas. The descent of the family herein recorded is through 
Matthew, son of Thomas, who married and had children : James, 
married Miss Skidmore : Sarah; Thomas; Mary; Archibald: Clemson; 
]\Iatthew; John; David, of whom further; Barton, married Miss Slay- 
maker; and Mary Ann. 

(III) David, son of Matthew Henderson, was born in Lancaster 
countv, I^ennsylvania, where his entire life was spent. He married 
and had issue: David S., of whom further; Benjamin, a contractor of 
Harrisburg; George, a brick manufacturer, died in Maytown, Pennsyl- 
vania; James, a retired business man of Marietta, Pennsylvania; John 
and Jacob, died in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. 

(IV) David S., son of David Henderson, was born in Maytown, 



1360 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, March 25, 1827. He obtained a pub- 
lic school education at the place of his birth, and when twenty-one 
years of age moved to Alexandria, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
where he entered the employ of William Shaw, a shoemaker, who 
taught him that trade. Upon the death of his employer and instruc- 
tor he purchased the shop and fixtures from the estate and continued 
the business, although on a much larger scale than heretofore, employ- 
ing eight operators and shipping to distant parts of the country. Dur- 
ing the civil war he was appointed provost marshal, stationed at the 
state capitol. At the close of the war he again engaged in shoe manu- 
facturing until appointed to a post in the internal revenue service as 
storekeeper and ganger for a central Pennsylvania district, retiring 
during the administration of President Cleveland, after eighteen years 
of continuous, active service in safeguarding and protecting the inter- 
ests of the federal government. As an employer of men he was kind, 
reasonable and tolerant, and as a government employee he was faith- 
ful and indefatigably energetic in the pursuance of his tasks and the 
performance of his duty; and now (1913) at the age of eighty-six 
years he is enjoying a quiet life of ease, the reward of labor and in- 
dustry. He is prominent in Masonic circles, and holds the thirty-second 
degree in the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite. Politically he is a 
Republican, and both he and his wife were members of and deeply in- 
terested in the work of the Presbyterian church. He married Mary 
Elizabeth Walker, who died in 19 10, daughter of William and Nancy 
(Dorris) Walker, both natives of county Donegal, Ireland. William 
Walker emigrated from his native land when a young man and came 
to Pennsylvania, settling in Huntingdon county, where he followed the 
carpenter's trade, later owning a line of boats on the old Pennsylvania 
canal. Here he and his wife spent their lives, both members of the 
Presbyterian church. Children of William and Nancy (Dorris) 
Walker: William, a tinner, died in Alexandria, Pennsylvania; Robert, 
enlisted in a Pennsylvania regiment during the civil war, killed at the 
battle of Antietam, September 17, 1862; Thomas, died at Alexandria, 
Pennsylvania; George, a tinner, died at Alexandria; Mary Elizabeth 
(of previous mention), married David S. Henderson; Annie, died at 
St. Paul, Minnesota, married Robert Dorsey; Margaret, married John 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 1361 

Peightal, and lives in Phillipsburg. Center county, Pennsylvania; 
Emma, married Jolin S. Rung, deceased, and lives in Pennsylvania. 
Children of David S. and Mary Elizabeth (Walker) Henderson: Wil- 
liam Shaw, a salesman, lives at home; Nannie, married William H. 
Huey, and lives in Alexandria: George Elliott, of whom further. 

(V) George Elliott, second son and third child of David S. and 
Mary Elizabeth (Walker) Henderson, was born in Alexandria, Hunt- 
ingdon county, Pennsylvania, September 4, 1861. He obtained a pub- 
lic school education, later acquiring a sound and thorough basic knowl- 
edge of business law and principles in the Crittenden Commercial 
School, Philadelphia. His first business association was with Fox, 
Moore & Compan_\-, for whom he traveled as salesman for five years, 
later entering the employ of the Delta Coal Mining Company, operat- 
ing in the Broad Top and Clearfield districts, as city salesman, con- 
tinuing in this position for four years. At the expiration of this time 
he began independent operations in Cambria county, organizing the 
Woodland Coal & Coke Company. At the present time he holds large 
interests in this company, as well as in the firm of Henderson, Hughes 
& Company, with offices at Nos. 1226- 1230 Real Estate Trust Build- 
ing, Philadelphia, and the Juniata Coal Company, with mines at Ben's 
creek, Cambria county, which he owns in conjunction with John Phil- 
lips. The three companies in which he is directly interested operate 
four mines, with a payroll numbering from four hundred to five hun- 
dred men. Mr. Henderson has seen all the varied phases of mining 
life and has reached his present position through his own efforts and 
recognized ability. The step from salesman