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HISTORY 



OF 



Kane County, 111. 



By R. WAITE JOSLYN, L. L. M., 
and FRANK W. JOSLYN, 

Ex-State's Attorney of Kane County. 



VOLUME I 



ILLUSTRATED WITH PORTRAITS AND VIEWS 



CHICAGO 
THE PIONEER PUBLISHING CO. 

190S 



9 7 7. ^X3 




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HISTORICAL 



CHAPTER I. 



INTRODUCTORY. 



History is composite biography. There has been no great event but 
what has affected us all. The spirit awakened by the struggle in 1776 lives 
by heredit}' in all American hearts and l)y arloption and education in the hearts 
of those who were foreigners but are now citizens. Any people become what 
they are by the combined experiences, failures, and successes of their chain of 
ancestry. Too little thought is given, too little credit attached to this fact. 
We cannot change what is back of us. if we would, and what is there deter- 
mines our ecjuipment. So history — the history of a State, Nation, City or 
County, is but a composite biography of those who there worked, and by 
their efforts left to us who here follow them a hundred forces and tendencies 
that aid i>r retard our advancement. They left public opinions, social notions, 
business methods, forms of government, standards of morality, etc.. etc., by 
which we are now controlled ; and which are changed with difficulty. So it is 
with all communities ; their standards are largely set by those who first estab- 
lished themselves in control. To them came others of like standards and 
methods and cemented the recognized ways of doing and thinking. History 
is the composite picture of the past ; setting forth the common outline. 

The subject of this historical sketch is a piece of land thirty miles long 
and eighteen miles wide, within whose borders dwells a population of nearly 
100,000 people of many dift'erent nationalities ; a people whose products are 
distributed to the four ends of the civilized world. Less than seventy-five 
years ago it was a wilderness peopled by native Redmen, whose ancestry had 
dwelt here many centuries, living liy the chase and the hook. Today it is the 
home and workshop of a prosperous poinilation. It is the story of the evolu- 
tion of this territory that we shall here present, seeking to make intelligible 
its varied activities, their origin and progress, and the men and women who 
directed them. 

The word "County" is doubtless a thousand years old. for it originated 
in the Feudal System of about 800 A. D. Charlemagne, after conquering an 
unwilling territory, sent out officials to sfovern it. Some of these were named 



6 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Counts, and in time the district tiiey controlled came to be known as a County. 
When William the Conqueror readjusted English land tenure the County or 
Shire became a political division over -which one of the new nobility was set as 
owner, judge and law maker, subject to the King and owing allegiance to the 
throne. The word "Shire" is an English name and was used as a synonymous 
term, and is yet common in England and New England. 

Under the Feudal System, the Count or Earl was the chief person of 
the County or Shire. He was "lord of the manor.'" The people had little 
power or privilege, their value being as contributors to those in power and 
place, whose occupations ran much to wars and political strife. We here 
today can but vaguely picture the subjection of the general people of those 
ancient Counties. The Count held court, collected taxes and spent them as he 
willed. No workman could leave his County without consent of the overlord. 
Freedom of act was unknown. The common idea was that the lesser man 
was created to give support to the powerful and privileged. 

But times have changed. Some battling has been done; many lives 
sacriticed. Today the Count and Earl and his followers have disappeared, 
and we here control the government and conduct of County affairs. \\'e with 
difficulty realize that this territorial and political division was ever other than 
it is. Therein is the value of history — of such local history as is here pre- 
sented. To those who read it. it gives a larger and more intelligent view of 
the conditions now realized. Today is ever the child of yesterday. 

Another old word grown new is "Sheriff." which in its origin was 
"Shire-reeve," which became, by spelling it as it sounds, spoken quickly, 
S h e r - i f f. It anciently denoted the bailiff' of the Court of the County, then 
termed the "Shire-gemote," or meeting of the general people to do justice. 

Modern counties comprise farm lands and cities, living peacefully 
together, ruled by like laws and customs, each buying and selling their 
products, the one to the other. No such fact existed in the early history of 
Counties and Shires. Each City was an independent commonwealth about 
whose limits ran a protecting wall sharply distinguishing it from the general 
territory about it. Each City was a fortress. The existence and peace of the 
City, which was continuously harassed by the nobility and highwaymen, and 
its merchants plundered as they conveyed their produce to inarket, necessitated 
armed protection. Each City kept its own army, and some built navies. 
Each elected its own officers, built its own churches, and within the safety of 
its protecting walls conducted its affairs much as a modern City does without 
such walls or protection. 

In the Middle Ages walled Cities were built all over Europe, and the 
Lord of the County built his fortified castle upon the highest hill lest his 
neighbor lords come in and wrest from him his place and property. There 
was no cooperation — no agreement between City and Country. 

In ancient Greece and Rome each City was a political and religious unit. 
which could combine or cooperate with another in no manner except by 
conquest. Each City recognized its gods as superior to all other gods, and all 
who were not citizens or slaves, or clients of citizens, were barbarians unde- 
serving charity or mercy. Each City fought its own battles, save where the 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 7 

necessity of existence compelled union of forces against a common enemy. 
There was no method by which a citizen of one City could become a citizen 
of another City. To be ostracized from the City of your birth meant to wander 
over the earth dependent upon }-our own powers alone for life and living. 
Greece and Rome knew no political unit but the City. To some City or some 
citizen all property belonged. 

The Greeks and the Romans invented and developed the City ; the Teutons 
of the [Middle Ages, the County and Township. The Germans were organized 
by villages and tribes. Each was a democratic form of government controlled 
by what in later years became the town-meeting, where gathered all the people 
of the town, decided upon their customs and laws, and did justice between men. 
The Shire-gemote is the original from which our modern County Court was 
derived. 

Under stress of the chaos of the jMiddle Ages, when no central govern- 
ment existed strong enough to hold the plundering hand of marauders and 
highwaymen, the ancient German Villages walled in the lands, usually held in 
common ownership, and prepared to, and through centuries did, defend them- 
selves and perpetuate the liberties and privileges which they had secured by 
continued strife; and did as much, if not more, than any other agency to keep 
alive within the hearts of the many those standards of liberty and freedom, the 
full fruits of which we here enjoy. 

While we speak of our progress and present advanced conditions, it should 
not be forgotten that we arose not by magic in a day, nor were our institu- 
tions conceived anew, but are a development and evolution from that older 
time where struggled our ancestors. W'e here now enjoying some indi- 
viduality, are product of that time. Our Counties, our Cities, our institutions 
and laws are lineal descendants of that ancient day. 

Before the coming of the pioneers some seventy-five years ago, the terri- 
tory now known as "Kane County" was an untilled but beautiful wilderness; 
unknown to white men, but well peopled by savage tribes of Indians. 

About the year 1671 the Frenchmen, LaSalle and Hennepin, started 
westward from the region of the St. Lawrence river and following the shores 
of the Great Lakes came to what is now northern Illinois. They passed down 
the Mississippi valley, and by virtue of their exploration of this region the 
French governnient claimed all land touched by the Great Lakes or drained 
by the ^Mississippi river and its tributary streams, among which was necessarily 
included our Fox river and the land of northern Illinois. The English did 
not concede this claim, but asserted that the New England states extended (by 
virtue of the grants on which they were based) from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific ocean. 

It being impossible to adjust contentions so obviously conflicting, the 
French and Indian war resulted during the years 1754 to 1763. The French 
were for several years successful in repelling attempts of the English to drive 
them from the line of forts they had established through the Ohio valley from 
Louisiana to Quebec. In 1757 \Mlliam Pitt became prime minister of Eng- 
land and inaugurated a campaign that proved uniformly successful against the 
French, until in February. 1763, France signed the Treaty of Paris, In' which 



8 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

England became possessed of the Oliio and Mississippi valleys, of whicli Kane 
county is part. This district then passed from French to English hands and 
its subsequent history changed, to what extent, who shall tell ? 

For citizens of German birth or descent there is this thought — that the 
destinv of the Northwest Territory determined by the French and Indian war 
was settled favorably to England by tlie assistance of Frederick the Great of 
Prussia, with whom England was then in alliance, and who, by warring upon 
the French in Europe, relieved the English there and weakened France. By 
the alliance of England and Prussia in Europe the success of England in 
America was in no small degree made possible. So those of German origin 
coming to the States in the latter days may yet feel that their ancestry, strug- 
gling in Europe, were assisting in the making of a W'esern Empire, where 
today millions of their descendants enjoy the blessing of civilization and 
prosperity — not without justice for service in that day of beginnings. 

Many French settlers had taken land in southern and central Illinois 
before this war. They determined the English should not settle in Illinois 
and, assisted by the Indians, who had been their allies in the French and 
Indian war, entered into a conspiracy with Pontiac. an Ottawa chief, who 
stirred up the Indians to attack the English. This was in May. 1763. Four- 
teen forts were captured, hundreds of families killed, and the existence of the 
settlements of the West threatened. The war continued until 1765. when 
Pontiac made a treaty with the English. Pontiac was killed a few years later 
at Caliokia, Illinois, and was buried on the present site of the city of St. Louis. 

Following the overthrow of Pontiac the Western territory rapidly filled 
with settlers — the Ohio valley first attracting pioneers ; and peace reigned, save 
for the infrequent depredations and frontier attacks by small bands of Indians. 

When the struggle of the Revolution had severed the relations of the 
Colonies with England, the new nation, the United States of America, was 
by treaty acknowledged owner of all the land between the Atlantic ocean and 
the Mississippi river. A new complication, however, at once arose. The 
New England states had claimed, and still claimed, all the land immediately 
west of them to the Mississippi. This claim placed what is now northern 
Illinois partly in Massachusetts and partly in Connecticut, the line running 
east and west through the northern part of what is now Kane county. 

All the territory gained by the French and Indian war had been claimed 
by the states lying directly east. When the Articles of Confederation were 
submitted to the states for adoption in 1777. all ratified them except Maryland, 
which refused ratification until all the states claiming land in the west should 
cede them to the new nation. Maryland held no western land, while other 
states claimed lands that would many times double their area and power. 
New York ceded her land in 1780. The others followed. Massachusetts 
transferring her title in 1784; Connecticut in 178(1. The territory now 
included in Kane county then first became general public domain. 

In 1787, Congress, realizing the need of general laws to govern the 
settlement of this vast territorj^ and to set up a local government over it, passed 
the famous "Ordinance of 1787," which was largely based on an instrument 
of government drawn up by Thomas Jefl'erson, then a member of Congress 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 9 

from A'irginia. He proposed dividing the territory into ten states bearing the 
names : Sylvania, JNIichigania, Chersonesiis, Assenisipa, IMetropotamia, IHi- 
noia, Saratoga, Washingtonia, Polypotamia and Pelesipia. The Congress 
adopted many of Jefferson's suggestions, but abandoned the names he had 
proposed. H for no other reason, we who dwell within this territory shall 
thank Congress for that. 

This Ordinance of 1787 Daniel Webster pronounced one of the most 
notable pieces of legislation in ancient or modern times. It provided that not 
more than five states should be formed from the territory, which number have 
been formed : Illinois, Ohio, Indiana, Michigan and Wisconsin. A general 
territorial government was provided for, controlled by the laws of the nation. 
Slavery was forever barred, which fact had large bearing on the future, not 
only of this western land, but upon the destiny of the nation which seventy 
years later was in mortal civil combat over the question of involuntary 
servitude. 

General Arthur St. Clair, a Revolutionary hero, was at once appointed 
the first governor. The land was surveyed and offered for sale, and despite 
the presence of hostile Indians through most of the district, settlers came in 
rapidly. In fifteen years Ohio was admitted as a state. The first white 
settlement west of the Alleghanies had been made at Marietta, Ohio. In 
1818 Illinois had acquired the 60.000 inhabitants necessary to statehood 
(mostly in the southern and central parts) and was admitted to the Union. 

But as yet no white man had set foot within view of the splendid Fox 
River valley, where only the tepee of the Indian betokened the presence of 
humankind, and the fertile earth lay rich for the hand of husbandry. If, in 
those days, when the nation was being tried and seasoned for its destined 
work, any white man trod the soil of Kane county, no record of his wandering 
has been preserved. The Sac. the Fox. the Illinoi and the Pottawottamie 
hunted and warred where now a contented people pursue the occupations of 
peace and progress. Until about the year 183a the presence of numerous 
bands of hostile Indians in the Fox River valley discouraged the coming of 
settlers, although the land now within the states of Michigan and Ohio was 
filling rapidly. 

In 1832 an Indian chief named Black Hawk, famed for his enmity to the 
white man, formed a conspiracy of the tribes then in the vicinity and attacked 
the settlements. The national government at once sent troops to the seat of 
trouble along the Mississippi and Rock rivers. 

The exact route taken by these troops in crossing the territory, now 
Kane county, is not known with certainty, but tradition says the Fox river 
was crossed at the big bend at Five Islands, and two mounds, claimed to be 
the graves of soldiers who died and were there buried, may still be seen upon 
the hillside south of where the Traction bridge now crosses the river. This 
route has in general been accepted, but in the Aurora Daily News for September 
II, 1908, the following appeared : 
"To the Aurora Historical Society : 

"Colonel John S. Wilcox, if he was correctly reported, in addressing the 
Old Settlers' meeting, about the 30th of June, 1907, at Riverview park, gave 



10 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

some account of the passage of General Scott's army in the march from Chi- 
cago, or Fort Payne, to Rock Island, about the month of August, 1832. 
substantially as the same is given on page 632 of the recent 'History of Kane 
County," published in connection \vith the 'Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois,' 
in these words: 'From this camp (Fort Payne) General Scott moved nearly 
due west, and struck the trail probably a little northerly from Warrenville. 
following that trail he entered Kane county near the dividing line of sections 
12 and 13 in St. Charles township. It passed through the southwest corner of 
Elgin the whole diagonal breadth of Plato township, across the northeast of 
Hampshire, and left the county over the old Hagebone farm, on section 30.' 

"This route is not borne out by the facts in the case. Now what are the 
facts ? Let us see. The Kane County Historian depends on the testimony of 
the old settlers. It has ever been said that testimony transmitted by the 
memory of persons of a reminiscent character should be taken with great care, 
at a time, too, in which there was not a white resident or inhabitant north and 
west of the Fox river until Dixon's Ferr)' on Rock river was reached, making 
it certain there was not a white resident in what is now Kane county at the 
time of the passage of General Scott's army. 

"In his 'History of the Black Hawk A\'ar,' Frank Stevens, on page 247, 
writes: "Then on July 29 he (Scott), finding the spread of contagion once 
more checked, set out with three stafif officers for Prairie du Chien, follow- 
ing the route adopted in 1834 for the mail route from Galena to Chicago, via 
Fort Payne (Xaperville) and x\urora, along through what subsequently became 
DeKalb county, across Lee county, up to Dixon's Ferry, arriving there August 
2 with his stafif officers. On his leaving Chicago, General Scott left orders 
for Lieutenant Colonel Abraham Eustis to follow his (General Scott's) route 
to Fort Crawford with the well known troops, which had or might arrive 
before the 3d of August, which Colonel Eustis did. but upon arriving at 
Dixon's Ferry an express from General Scott informed Colonel Eustis that the 
war was over and ordered him to follow down the left bank of Rock river and 
to establish his camp at Rock Island. By this march Colonel Eustis reached 
Dixon's Ferry August 17, 1832, resting there until August 22. Then he 
resumed his march, reaching the mouth of Rock river in good time. 

"It must not be forgotten that the county of Kane had no corporate 
existence until 1836, and until the organization of Kendall county, in 1841, 
the three northerly townships of that county were a part of the county of 
Kane, hence at this point of our investigation it becomes necessary to introduce 
a part of the historj- of Kentory of Kendall county. In Hicks' history of Ken- 
dall county, published in 1877, at page 96 we read as follows : 'The war being 
closed, Scott's troops were not needed, and about August i*the remnant of the 
little army, with baggage, wagons and a drove of cattle for supplies, marched 
through the northern part of what is now Kendall county on their way to Rock 
Island. Fresh deaths occurred every day and nearly even.- camp was marked 
by graves. The second night out they encamped near Little Rock, and three 
soldiers' graves left behind were seen for years by the early settlers.' 

"On page 113 of Dr. Hicks' History of Kendall County we find this 
reference in regard to the family of David Evans : 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY ]3 

" 'David Evans, from western North Carolina, was the first settler in 
Little Rock, He had a friend and neighbor in General Scott's army in the 
Black Hawk war, who with conu'ades under that general marched throvigh 
northern Kendall ; he liked the appearance of the country. He found his way 
back to his North Carolina home the latter part of the year 1832 and told 
Mr. Evans where to find the best land in the Fox River valley, Mr. Evans 
followed his directions in the spring of 1833. Reaching the Illinois river at 
Ottawa, he crossed the river and went up Fox river to the mouth of the Rock 
creeks, then up the Big Rock nearly four miles he made his claim, between 
Big and Little Rock creeks, which to this day is owned and occupied by a 
member of Mr. Evans' family.' 

"The route of General Scott and his three staft' officers, and a few days 
thereafter by Colonel Eustis and his army, was substantially as follows : From 
Fort Payne, or Naperville, to Aurora, thence to Gray's Ford ( as it was later 
called) at Montgomery Crossing, thence in a westerly direction through what 
is now Riverview park, to a point afterwards on the west line of Oswego and 
east line at Bristol — for it must be borne in mind that the countrv was not 
surveyed for some six or seven years from the time we are considering. This 
point is some thirty-five rods from the north line of Kendall county, thence 
diagonally across what is now section i, Bristol, in a southerlv direction to a 
point near Blackberry creek on section 11, thence down said creek to a crossing 
of the same on what became in the United States survey sections 5, 6, 9 and 
10, passing near the late residences of C. H, Raymond and C. H. Renton, 
thence still in a northwesterly direction across the lands of the estates of Lewis 
Steward and Tom Lye to the east line of section 3 of Little Rock township, 
thence north to the county line along the so-called base-line road ( erroneously 
so called ; the line is actually a correction line, not a base-line ) , thence westerly 
to Little Rock village and still westerly to DeKalb county line. It niav not be 
the actual route on which Scott's army passed, as this road as traveled in after 
years may have been modified by the authorities in locating the road legally, 
and the government surveys may have modified it somewhat. It is, however, 
in a general direction of that route. 

"Wdiatever the facts may be, this route was the first stage and mail route 
into and out of what is now the city of Aurora on the route from Galena to 
Chicago, and from Dixon's Ferry to Naperville it is almost an air line. In 
1834 the streams were made passable, and the road work by such labor as the 
INIcCarthys and their neighbors could give was a mail and stage route well 
into the '50s. It was by this route that Edward Bonney conveyed the mur- 
derers of Colonel George Davenport to Rock Island via Dixon's Ferry in 
September, 1845. See Bonney's book, 'Banditti of the Prairies,' page 190. 

"Not the least important to the student of history is the mention of the 
old charters to the early adventurers or proprietors. More particularly tiie 
charters covering what is now Kane and adjoining counties. All that part of 
Kane county lying between the north line of DuPage and the south line of 
Kankakee county lies within the Connecticut grant; that lying north of the 
north line of DuPage county lies within the Massachusetts Bav grant. 



14 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

to wit: the six townships of llampshire, Kutlami, Dundee, Elgin, Plato and 
Burlington. 

"The claim that Virginia took anything by the George Rogers Clark 
expedition was resisted by the northern states and finally relinquished by the 
claimant, who relinquished the claim by reserving to her officers and soldiers 
of the Revolution certain lands in the 'MiHtary Tract,' which was confirmed 
by Congress in 1812. In 1780 New York authorized her delegates to 
Congress to limit her boundaries in such a manner as they might think expe- 
dient and to cede to the general go\ernment its claim to western lands. New 
York filed her cession to western lands in October, 1782. Virginia followed 
one year later and Massachusetts and Connecticut in 1785 and 1786. The 
only claims aft'ecting Illinois already mentioned are those of Virginia south 
of the fortieth parallel and those of Connecticut and jNIassachusetts to the north 
of that line. 

"In conclusion, just a suggestion in regard to the alleged route mentioned 
by Colonel Wilcox in his address mentioned above. Why should Colonel 
Eustis select that route some twenty-five or thirty miles out of a direct line 
when his general had already selected and majiped the route upon which to 
proceed with his command ? 

"Section i of Article 2 of the Constitution of the Aurora Historical 
Society provides that among the objects of the society shall be: 'To search 
out, procure and preserve in permanent form facts and data in the history of 
the city of Aurora, Kane county, Illinois, and the region in its immediate 
neighborhood as relates to persons, places and all objects of interest therein." 

"Hence this communication is addressed to the Aurora Historical Society, 
with the hope that it may be sufficiently interested in the matters of which it 
treats to cause the historian of the society to formulate a suitable record of 
such matters to be entered in the proceedings of the same for the information 
of all, as the society has well said among other things : 'These materials exist 
now in rich variety, and unless steps are taken to collect them and place them 
in the keeping of some authoritative body, they will in the course of time be 
scattered and finally will he lost." Should the society take this view of the 
matter the writer will feel amply repaid for the time spent in the preparation 
of this article. G. M. Hollenb.\ck. 

"Aurora, Illinois, September 3, 1908." 

Black Hawk was captured and the uprising suppressed. 

This was the last attempt of the redmen to prevent the settlement of 
northern Illinois. The Indians remaining were friendly and all were shortly 
after removed to lands provided for them west of the Mississippi, the United 
States having purchased their lands. But few remained when the first jiioneers 
■came to Fox river. These fast disappeared westward, the last departing in 
1836. 

Not many marks of the presence of these sons of the forest now remain. 
An arrow bead or stone war club, or the vestiges of ancient graveyards now 
and then found in opening gravel pits being the only reminders of the savages 
who once here hunted and fished and warred, as their ancestors had done for 
ten thousand vears before them. 



KAXE COUXTY HISTORY 15 

The chief seats of the Indians appear to have been at Alill Creek, just 
south of Batavia; in the hills east of the river just south of what is now the 
village of Dundee; and on what is now the site of the city of Aurora and 
northeast through the Big Woods on the east side. Well worn Indian trails 
led from one to the other. Others ran west to Indian settlements on Rock 
river; others east. An Indian village also existed where Dundee now stands. 

Where Calvary cemetery, Aurora, is now located, was in early days an 
Indian graveyard, and on the hill just north of where D. C. Cook's publishing 
house stands at Elgin, an old burial ground was disclosed in excavating for a 
gravel pit. This was seen by one of the authors about two years ago and 
indicated a collection of perhaps a dozen graves on a hill overlooking the 
river. Mounds have also been opened at St. Charles and Batavia and on 
\\^ing farm, a mile west of Elgin on Tyler creek, the inviting valleys of which 
tradition says were once the home of the Indian. 

The colonization and settlement of new lands is an old story begun so 
long ago that no history or tradition tells of its first movements. Of the 
Egyptian, the Babylonian, the Chinese, and general settlement of Asia, httle 
is known. But of the great movement of which the settlement of America 
and of Illinois and of this beautiful Fox River valley, where now dwell in 
peace the descendants of nearly every race that has peopled the world, much 
is known. 

We here, battling with our problems day by day, and in our time passing 
as pass all, forget that we are but a link in a chain, but a branch in a tree vast 
and widespreading; but a tributary brook of a broad moving stream covering 
the western world from Russia and India to San Francisco, and now threat- 
ening to invade the Orient ; the Aryan race — the Indu-European group of 
mankind. 

The settlement of Kane county \\-as no spasmodic incident, but was part 
of the onward movement of humankind that began beyond the Caspian sea 
when Europe was a wilderness and America an undreamed of continent. 
There is interest in that fact, rightly seen ; that we here are not disconnected 
but are a related part of world history ; that our ancestry dwelt there on the 
Caspian mountain hills and tended their sheep and cattle and raised their 
crops, ten, perhaps fifty thousand years ago. Yet there are few men now 
dwelling in Kane county but who, could they trace their lineage, would have 
fijund kin among the Aryans of the Himalaya mountains north of India, in 
that remote past. Frenchman, Italian, Spaniard, Irish, German, Hindoo, 
Russian, Englishman, American — all were there, speaking then one language 
from which has come all the languages these peoples now speak. 

For thousands of years they had dwelt in those mountains and filled the 
valle}-s, until their communities grew too large for the earth to support, though 
none more willing than she. 

The western movement began with the Greeks, who left the home of 
the Aryan race, possibly 3000 or 4000 B. C, and in going north around the 
head of the Caspian sea, spread into the Danube valleys and finally through 
the mountain passes into what is now Greece, to the sea. They went not as 
individuals, but as tribes, carrying their wnmen. children and possessions 



10 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

with tlK'iii, \\ hercxcr tliey settled the oreneral go\-ernnient and trilje remained 
tlie same. Tliev came to Greece, fought the people found there, enslaved them, 
and possessed the land. They developed in time the most splendid civilization 
the world has ever seen, and in many regards never since equaled. A second 
emigration followed, and became the Romans of later days. They moved 
farther west to Italy and repeated the experience of the first emigration. 

Still the Arvan ])opulation increased and a third movement began, which 
continued until times when history was written. Its later story is well known. 
This was the invasion of what is now Europe. Forced out of the old home, 
they were unable to go south, for their cousins, the Greeks and Romans, had 
for a thousand years held the land. They turned north, passing through the 
Alps into what is Germany, Austria. Sweden, England. Ireland and Spain. 
The first to come in were the Irish, old Welsh and Britons. They found a 
small, dark race, known as Basques; a remnant of which still dwells in the 
mountain fastnesses of the Pyrenees. They drove them to the 
mountains and poorer lands. Following this first movement to Europe, came 
wave after wave of new and younger blood, the Gauls. Goths, Visigoths. 
Vandals, Huns, Slavonians, and numerous Russian tribes. Each pushing on 
from the Caspian sea forced the tribes next west further west : these in turn 
pressed on those in Europe proper. 

Added to this, the Romans came into Europe by way of France and held 
all Europe west of the Rhine. The story of the conflict of these barbarian 
tribes with Rome in the first centuries A. D. is well known history ; as is also 
the result, and the final formation of France, Germany, England, and all 
European states, from the peoples who had contested so hotly for the advantage. 
The}' were of one race — of the race that is now American — but knew it not; 
and would doubtless have fought as well had they known it. Kinship of 
blood has dulled few swords. So by tribes and moving villages of men was 
Europe settled. 

When America had been well discovered and land claims between nations 
adjusted, its invasion began in a manner not unlike that early invasion and 
settlement of Greece. Rome and Europe. The nations were dealt with peace- 
fully, if possible. Init in any event, were dealt with, disposed of, and the land 
occupied. These invaders came not as barbarian tribes in paint of war, but 
none the less they came as communities, not as individuals. The force of 
united numbers was necessary to make a permanent stand against the native 
Indian. And here was repeated the storv of everv settlement in everv country 
since the world began. Those in possession have never willingly shared with 
new comers. It is ever a question of power, and the \-ictory to the strong. In 
no place has th.e native maintained his ]ilace against the better equipped invader. 
It is the survi\-al of the fittest. 

But. as above suggested, when the American nation had become a 
nation, and the government established — when the movement of settlement 
begun in the Caspian hills those thousands of years ago, had come over the 
Alleghanies to the western prairies, it assumed a different aspect. The eastern 
colonies had all been settletl by groups of men; by communities armed and 
equipped for a contest, they knew they must and did meet. This li-cstcrn 







::'*w'.- 



A J 



■■^■^' 







'fe?5^ 
















p?^v 





KANE COUNTY HISTORY 19 

country zvas settled by individuals. This was a new fact, a new experience 
in the history of the world, — that an individual might go into a new country 
alone or with his family, there build his home and dwell in comparative peace, 
contesting less with fellowmen than with nature; bringing with them no tribal 
gods or set standards save those dictated by the well-being and happiness of 
free men. That this western country has so rapidly advanced in the arts and 
standards of civilized conditions is accounted for doubtless by the fact that 
they met few hostile fellowmen, but only a fertile soil and kindly climate, 
where the toil of men gave back full profit. To defend against the savage 
or wild beast required little attention in the middle west. To the land and its 
development went the energies of the pioneers. It was a new fact — a new 
condition. No walled city was required, and after 1832, no fortress and no 
soldiery. The pioneers came in, built their cabin homes, touched the waiting 
hills and they blossomed into fields of grain. There were none to dispute 
them ; none to question their possession or the fruits of their industry. 



CHAPTER II. 



THE ANCESTORS OF THE PIONEERS. 



]Much has been written, much is known of the personnel of the pioneers 
who in the '30s settled Kane county, building their log cabins of rough hewn 
oak, from Dundee to Aurora, but not so much has been recorded of the ancestry 
of these men, and the nest where they were reared. There is a tradition, much 
repeated, that they were largely of that ancient and honored people, the 
Puritans of the New England colonies. Many were so derived, but not all, nor 
perhaps most of them. 

The type from which these early pioneers came was not the type of Salem, 
but rather a type formed by an admixture of many races during two centuries 
from 1620 to 1830; a peculiarly American type that had been made from the 
struggles of the New England colonies before, during and after the Revo- 
lution, with forest and savage and Englishman and Frenchman. They were 
as unlike the original Puritans as they were unlike the English, the Scot, the 
Irish or the Dutch, from which they were derived. They were the new Amer- 
ican race of men, — sturdy, bold, brave farmer warriors, who cleared the forest 
and planted their crops within the hostile view of barbarian redmen ; their 
guns always within reach; their homes fortresses made ready for momentary 
attack. 

The land along the Atlantic seaboard was settled and permanently occupied 
by different races; the English in the north, the Dutch in New York and 
Pennsylvania, where also were English settlements under Penn ; in Virginia 
and the South many English of a different class and time than the Puritans 
of the North. The Cavalier of the Carolinas was as different from the Puritans 
as either were from the Dutch. A sprinkling of French Huguenots might be 
added. 



20 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

As originally settled, these colonies maintained themselves and realized 
each an independent existence, with little intermarriage and much contest, 
particularly upon religious and jmlitical matters. 

But in the i8th century, when the land near the sea had long been the 
seat of a contented people little disturbed by the presence of savages and pur- 
suing the works of peace, just west of them upon the new frontier line 
pushed west to the Alleghany mountain valley, a new battle was being fought 
for land and place b}^ a new and mixed people made up from the adventurous 
or persecuted who left the older settled colonies and pttshing to the frontier 
forest, there joining the newer immigration of many nations pressing west- 
ward for free land; as years ago the Swedes came and settled in the frontier 
land of the Dakotas and Minnesota. The tide of incoming immigration has 
not stopped among the settled Eastern districts, but has flowed past them 
into the West. So in the last century, a hundred years after the first seaboard 
settlements, this new immigration was coming in and passing to the foothills 
and valleys of the mountains, and beyond into the forests of New York, 
Vermont. Pennsylvania and Virginia. All which country was being rapidly 
filled by this mixed people. By the time of the French and Indian war (1763) 
it had been estimated there was a population of man}" thousands, who realized 
a bulwark of protection between the more settled seaboard colonies and the 
western wilderness, where bands of hostile savage tribes dwelt at perpetual 
warfare with these newer pioneers — the entering- wedge to the western prairie 
lands. The growing eastern populations and the constant stream of immigra- 
tion necessitated this acquisition of new lands ; and coming not as communities, 
but as individual families, pride of race and nationality lost much of its force. 
All mingled here in one common democracy united by the need for common 
defense against an alert foe habituated to forest conflict. Here grew up the 
first American people unprejudiced by the traditions of any particular state. 
All were on a common footing; each equal to any; all imbued by that spirit, 
of independence and courage ever developed by contact with the freedom and 
wildness of nature; where none may dictate and the individual alone is valued. 

They were a rough, sturdy race of men and women, endowed with the 
qualifications of the pioneer in a degree never surpassed in the history of the 
world. They came of the Scotch. Irish-English stock, with a strain of Penn- 
sylvania Dutch ; a sprinkling of French Huguenots. Xo stronger foundation 
was ever built for conquering a wilderness and making a nation. They were 
. the "backwoodsmen" of the latter part of the first century of American 
settlements; a class by themselves — unique in America and in the world — the 
first Americans. 

They dwelt along the border land of the older colonies in the Alleghanies, 
spreading westward into New York and Pennsylvania, hundreds of miles 
from the eastern settlements. They had here, during several generations 
of conflict and conquest, acquired a strong likeness in thought and ways of 
living. The dominant blood was the Scotch-Irish-English Protestant, who 
came to this new land that they might enjoy freedom in act and thought ; 
free from the oppression of the state or church. They were of the old 
Covenanters; followers of Knox and Calvin: hard headed, strong hearted 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 21 

men and women. Men who would rather face the forest and the savage 
than endure the conditions then prevaihng in Europe and England. 

That the early settlers of Kane county were of this new American type 
is evidenced, not only by the communities they built up, but also by the territory 
they came from into the West. Christopher Payne, the first arrival, was from 
New York state. Joseph and Samuel McCarty, the founders of Aurora, were 
of Scotch-English descent, and from New York, though natives of New 
Jersey. Hezekiah and James T. Gifford, founders of Elgin, were from the 
same state and of the same descent. Judge Isaac Wilson, an early pioneer 
of Batavia. was from New York state; as were Joseph Lyon (1835), A. M. 
Moore (1838), William Van Nortwick (1835). 

In Big Rock, L. J. Lamson came from New York in 1837, as did j\Iatthew 
and William Perry, 1835. James W. Swan (1836). Joseph Summers (1836), 
Robert Nash I 1836). Robert Norton and Silas Long were from Ohio. 
Jesse Brady ( 1837) was from New York: as were Isaac Hatch ( 1837), 
Shepherd Johnson (1839). Paul Colburn (1836). 

In Blackberry, William Lance, the first pioneer, came from New Jersey 
in 1S34; David Beeler was a Scotchman; as were David \\". Annis, from Ver- 
mont (1835), R. Acers, of New A'ork; Loren D. Kendall (1834), C. H. 
Spaulding, of New York ; E. G. Moore, of the same state, and others. 

In Burlington the first to come was Stephen Win \'elzer, from New- 
York; also Allison Baker, Solomon Wright and Asa W. Lawrence; John 
Halden was from Pennsylvania, Stephen Godfrey from \'ermont. Nearly 
all were men of the Scotch-Irish-Englisb. type. 

In Campton township, John Beatty, from Pennsylvania ; Harvey Warne 
(1837), was a New Yorker; John Whitney ( 1837), from Ohio; Harry and 
Spaulding Eddy were from New York; Luke Pike, from Ohio; James 
Ward came from New York ( 1836) ; as did Franklin Walkins (1837). 

In Dundee township the first settlers were Jesse H. Newman and Joseph 
Russell, of Scotch-English descent, and originally Virginians and Kentuck- 
ians. Jesse Oatman, A. R. Dempster (1835); Thomas Deweese, T. H. 
Thompson, I. C. Bosworth, ^^'illiam Hale and George McClure, all were of 
Scotch-Irish-English descent. 

In Elgin township, Isaac Stone (1835), E. K. Mann (1S35), Joseph 
Tefft (1835), Nathan Collins (1835). William G. Kimball, S. J. T-Cimball 
were New Yorkers; as were Ira :\Iinard, J. D. Owen, N. G. Phillips, Calvin 
Pratt and Washington Wing; James Hanks, the first settler near Elgin, was 
from New York; General Elijah Wilcox, L. S. Eaton (1838), A. B. Fish 
(1845), George Renwick (1838), Levi S. Stowe (1843), M. C. Town 
(1846L were from the same state. 

In Aurora township, Joseph McCarty was from Elmira, N. Y. (1834). 
During the same year came W. T. Elliott, Elijah Pierce, Seth Reed, Zaphira 
Lake and Hiram. In 1835, Daniel Eastman, Lindolph Huntoon, Winslow 
Higgins, George Gorton, Theodore Lake, E. D. Terry, B. F. Fridley, John 
Barker, M. D. Cone. Charles Bates, L. Muzzy, R. Matthews, D. Gorton, 
B. F. Phillips. Elgin squires; all clearly nf Scotch-Irish-English descent, 



22 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

and of that new American race that developed in the valleys and forests of 
the Alleghanies. 

In Rutland township the tirst settler was E. R. Starks, from Vermont; 
Nathaniel Crampton (1836), Noble King (1836), Elijah Rich (1835), 
Andrew McCornack, were Scotchmen; William Moore (1838), William 
Lynch (1838), and John Hunter (1838), were Irish. 

This typical American people, most of whom had back of them three 
generations among the hills and frontiers of the eastern states, had been 
molded by the experiences and hardships of a century. They were, as 
suggested, a mixed people, but in standards, mostly Scotch Presbyterians ; 
descended largely from Scotch ancestors. They were strict Protestants of 
the older type, when each sect w-as content to believe the members of other 
beliefs w-ould go into outer darkness and they into everlasting joy. They had no 
liking for the Catholics nor the Episcopalians. A headstrong, rough and 
ready people; self-dependent and asking favors of none; instinctive antago- 
nists ; descendants of the followers of Cromwell ; fighters by heredity. 

The Scotch and Irish Presbyterians came to the new world in large 
numbers about 1700, and settled as before outlined, on new lands beyond 
the colonial habitations. They pushed into the wilderness, leading the move- 
ment westward, where they joined the New Englanders in the same terri- 
tory. They were among the first to force themselves into the Indian's 
country. With the Bible in one hand and a flintlock musket in the other, 
they penetrated the wilderness, made a clearing, built their log cabins, tilled 
a few acres of land, hunted in the unbroken forests, fished and trapped and 
made a meager living; meantime, pushing forward and opening prairie and 
forest for those who crowded in behind with industry and progress; and a 
civilization, such as has been the wonder of the world. 

The original seat of this type which settled the entire ]\Iiddle West before 
the modern immigration of German, Scandinavian, Italian, Pole and Russian 
had begun, was in New York, Pennsylvania, and in the Alleghany valleys of 
Virginia. Where their lands were near the more settled eastern populations, 
they built up small towns and villages, where might have been seen a store, 
blacksmith shop and possibly a tavern where the traveler might find rough 
rest for the night : in addition usually a log schoolhouse and church. The 
latter were the first necessities of this devout people. The minister, commonly 
termed the elder, dwelt in no parsonage, but usually was a missionary or 
itinerant preacher who boarded among the cabins and preached zealous. 
earnest, Calvinistic sermons to hearers who came not to criticise but to learn. 
But as a class, these frontiersmen did not build towns, but cultivated their 
farm lands. They settled near together for protection against the Indians, 
who were in the adjoining forest ready at any time to attack, bum and 
destroy 

The forest and hill was everywhere. Nowhere prairie lands ready for 
the plow. Every acre had to be cleared and made ready for cultivation, 
while watchful savages were on every side. The gun and the ax were 
the necessary weapons of these pioneers of the Alleghanies, of whom man}- 
who first came to Kane countv were erandchildren. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 23 

A number of the families settling in the wilderness made a clearing 
and built within it a stockade of logs, set upright, with loopholes all around, 
and a row of log cabins on one side, with a heavy wooden gate that might 
be quickly barred in case of assault. Sometimes a central loghouse was 
built in the middle of the stockade. These forest fortresses were used only 
for storing provisions and in case of threatened Indian attacks; the pioneers 
at ordinary times remaining at their cabins outside the stockade. 

Corn was the grain mostly cultivated in the clearings and was relied 
on for food. But potatoes, melons and fruits were raised and orchards 
planted. Horses and cows, hogs and sheep were kept when practical, which 
was not always, owing to the depredations of wolves and bears. 

The cabin was most frequently of unfinished logs with clay forced in 
between them, and of one room, in one end of which was built a huge fire- 
place of stone, clay, and sticks. This served for heating and cooking pur- 
poses. The floor was made up of logs, one side of which were hewn as even 
as possible and the uneven places filled with clay. This was the puncheon 
floor. The roof was of boards roughly cut out of logs. Pegs of wood dri\en 
into the logs served for hanging garments, or to hold the rifles ; although fre- 
quently the antlers of a deer served that purpose. For a table, a large, rough 
cut board was placed on four wooden legs. Chairs were three-legged hand- 
made stools, save where a prosperous family might enjoy the luxury of a 
rocking chair. The couch or bed of rough boards was covered with blankets 
of deer hides and bearskin; sometimes a buffalo robe. Few pictures adorned 
the walls. Curtains were unheard of luxuries. The customary dress was a 
fur cap, trousers and shirt of buckskin or homespun cloth, and shoes or moc- 
casins of the same skin ; the shirt or outer coat hanging loose nearly to the 
knees, and held at the waist by a belt, in which the hunting knife was carried. 
A long, smooth-bore flintlock rifle completed the pioneer backwoodsman's 
equipment as hunter and farmer. It was usually fired from a rest, being 
heavy. 

Social life among this people, scattered in the wilderness, was necessarily 
very simple, and consisted largely in those pursuits that gave support to the 
family. The husband and father was the provider; the wife and mother, 
housekeeper. To feed and clothe the family from such materials as were 
provided was the mother's work ; no small task in view of the fact that large 
families was the rule. The rule of cooperative help was universal. Log 
rollings, house building, corn shucking, quilting, and the providing of many 
of the needs of life were done by the united effort of neighbors, who gathered 
together, first at one cabin, then another, to do the work. Such meetings were 
made the occasion of such gaiety as was possible among such a people. 
Dancing was usual for the young folks. Intoxicants were plentiful. The 
hostess did her best to provide a table for the party, containing every luxury 
obtainable. Athletic games and contests among the young men were a usual 
feature of the occasion: racing, jumping, wrestling and lifting, husking 
corn, etc. Brawls and fighting were not infrequent. 

A wedding was always the occasion of much festivity. The bride rode 
to church usually on a horse, behind her father, co.ming back on her future 



24 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

husband's horse. If no cliurch was near, the marriage was at the cabin 
of the bride's parents : a dinner was had. and after that dancing all day and 
night, the music being furnished by a lone fiddler; the ballroom, the rough 
puncheon floor. After the wedding the neighbors got together and cut 
the logs and built a new house for the young people, and at the house- 
warming that followed its completion, general feasting and dancing was 
indulged in. 

Education was meager in the wilderness. Few went bevond readinsr, 
writing and simple arithmetic. The teacher boarded with the families as 
part payment for his services. About three and one-half dollars was a year's 
tuition. 

E\"ery family in that day conducted a farm and factory. The women 
wove into homespun cloth the flax grown on the farm or the wool cut from 
the sheep's back. The men tanned and cured the skins they had secured in 
the forest. The kitchen utensils were mostly of wood, hand shaped into 
bowls, plates, spoons, etc. Plows were secured in the East, but harrows 
and other farming tools were hand-made of wood. The corn was usually 
ground on a hand mill consisting of a block of wood with a hole in the 
center, in which the corn was placed. It was then pounded and crushed with 
a stone or wooden pestle worked by hand. In the fall farmers would make 
up a horse pack of hides and skins which were sent to some near town and 
exchanged for necessary articles, such as salt, iron implements, etc., which 
they could not make themselves. 

Theodore Roosevelt, in his "Winning of the West." says of this people: 

"Thus the backwoodsmen lived on the clearings they had hewn out of 
the everlasting forest; a grim stern people, strong and simple, powerful for 
good and evil, swayed by gusts of strong passion, the love of freedom rooted 
in their very heart's core. Their lives were harsh and narrow; they gained 
their bread by their blood and sweat, in the unending struggle with the wild 
ruggedness of nature. They suffered terrible injuries at the hands of the 
redmen. and on their foes they waged a terrible warfare in return. They 
were relentless, revengeful, suspicious, knowing neither ruth nor pity; they 
were also upright, resolute and fearless, loyal to their friends, and devoted 
to their country. In spite of many failings, they were of all men the best 
fitted to conquer the wilderness and hold it against all comers." 

But while many, perhaps most of the early settlers of Kane county, were 
of this Scotch-Irish-English stock, molded and made new in the struggle 
of the wilderness, a considerable element of the older so-called Puritan stock, 
descendants of the original New England people, came here in an early 
day. They were of that class who followed the backwoodsmen as they opened 
the forest and prairie. And that they came into Kane county with the 
descendants of the Scotch Presbyterians, most of whom, like themselves, had 
doubtless never seen an Indian or lived on the frontier battle line, was because 
the land of northern Illinois was cleared of Indians by the soldiers of the 
United States government, and by the purchase of their lands. It is well 
known history that during the time England owned and controlled the col- 
onies, her policy was to discourage settlements in the \\''est, as she enjoyed 




REMAINS OF A LOG CABIN STILL STANDING WEST 
OF ST. CHARLES. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 27 

and desired to continue the profitable trade her merchants there enjoyed among 
the French and Indians. And when independence had been secured, the new 
nation was too busy getting her feet well planted and her name respected 
among the nations of the world, to give much attention to the opening of the 
wilderness. Hence the contest in the early days was carried on by the 
frontier people with little aid from the soldiery, who were more often 
defeated by the Indians than successful, knowing little of the methods of 
frontier warfare. 

But early in the seventeenth century the general government adopted a 
policy of buying the Indian lands and transferring the redmen to the West. 
This was done as regards the lands of the Sacs, Fox and Pottawattomies in 
the Fox river and Rock river valleys. There was some dissatisfaction on 
the part of the Indians with the terms of purchase. This fact is given as the 
exciting cause of the Black Hawk war, which was c^uickly put down by 
government troops. In 1790, in Washington's administration, the Indians 
had attacked settlements in Ohio, and it required several years" fighting to 
suppress the redmen. They made a treaty ceding northern Ohio to the 
United States. 

In 181 1 the Indians again conspired together under a chief named 
Tecumseh and attacked the settlements in the Northwest. William Henry 
Harrison, afterward president, then governor of Indiana territory, met and 
defeated them at Tippecanoe, in western Indiana. The Indians later joined 
with England in the war of 1812. The Fort Dearborn massacre, commemo- 
rated by a bronze statue at the foot of Eighteenth street, Chicago, occurred 
at this time. The punishment given the redmen in these wars increased their 
fear, if not respect, and they not unwillingly, if sometimes reluctantly, sold 
their lands to the general government and accepted lands west of the 
Mississippi. 

This combination of facts made it possible to settle northern Illinois with- 
out massacre or bloodshed. When the pioneers came they found the Indians 
friendly, or at least pacified. They soon disappeared entirely, leaving the 
newcomers in undisturbed possession, contesting only among themselves, and 
with nature. 

As above suggested, this peaceful entry of a new land by individuals was 
a new fact in the world. — a fact since repeated many times in the settlement 
of the far West. 

NATIONAL CONDITIONS IN 1835. 

The coming of the pioneers, who swept like a wave over the middle 
western states after the French and Indian war, reached northern Illinois 
about 1830, during the first administration of Andrew Jackson as president. 
The general population of the United States then numbered about thirteen 
millions, having more than doubled since the War of Independence; mostly 
by natural growth, the later foreign immigration not having yet begun. The 
center of population was near the west line of Maryland. It is now near 
Indianapolis, Indiana. Less than ten per cent of the people lived in cities 
of over 8,000. Now over forty-five per cent are in such cities. New York 
city then comprised 200,000 inhabitants; Philadelphia, 167,000; Baltimore, 



28 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

80,000; Boston, ()0.ooo: Cincinnati, tlie largest western settlement, was a 
small town. Chicago was a distant settlement known as Fort Dearborn, and 
contianed 400 or 300 people. There were but three millionaires in the entire 
country. The naticm was yet largely composed of agriculturists and back- 
woodsmen hunters. 

Great industrial in\entions were, however, fast coming into use. Steam- 
boats were a new fact, and ran on the great lakes from Buffalo to Chicago, 
and on the western rivers. The Erie canal was a much used waterway from 
Xew York to Buffalo and the great lakes, and much facilitated the transporta- 
tion of settlers to Illinois. i\Iany came by lake to Chic^ago, and then west 
by ox-team. The application of steam to railroading began in 1828, but 
railroads were not built in Illinois until after settlement had well advanced. 

President Jackson was at this time seeking to have the charter of the 
United States Bank refused on application for renewal. This he accomplished ; 
which fact, with the general conditions of trade, led to a panic and general 
depression, which, doubtless, had no small part in urging pioneers to under- 
take the settlement of free lands in the wilderness of the West. 

Although it is now but seventy-five years (two generations) since the 
first white men looked upon the beautiful Fox river valley and found it 
good, it is uncertain wlio first trod its soil and who first made permanent 
settlement within its boundaries. 2^Iany came about the same time. 

Among the first to cross the Fox river within the limits of the present 
county were soldiers sent here to put down the uprising of the Indians during 
the Black Hawk war, in 1832. The tradition, which apparently states the 
fact, has for years held place that a troop of horsemen and soldiers from old 
Fort Dearborn, or from the eastern states, made their way northwest along 
what is the old Chicago road, through what is now Bloomingdale, DuPage 
county, and crossed Fox river near what is now known as Five islands, just 
north of St. Charles. The exact point of crossing is not clearly known. They 
passed on further northwest. Two graves of soldiers of that company were 
long visible on the bank of the river. The path they then took was long 
used as the state road from Chicago to the northwest, and is still the "main 
highway as far as Bloomingdale, with branches to the various towns along 
the river. 

None of the first pioneers in the Fox river valley are now living, although 
a mmiber who came as early as 1838 are still residents of the county, and 
though well advanced in years, are able to clearly picture those earlier days. 
\Miere now there are busy factories and places of trade on every hand, and all 
the luxuries, as well as vices of civilization, are realized, then the virgin 
forest and stream filled the landscape with beauty and promise. Of those 
who came from 1840 to 1850 many live to give information of conditions and 
progress then had, and of the arrivals after 1850 a large number still reside in 
the county, where for sixty years, they have been conteiil to dwell with their 
chiklren and grandchildren. 

Such information as we have gathered together in this book we have 
obtained from books which have been written by personal interviews with the 
older settlers yet living, and from the newspapers and records of the county. 



ka>;e cou.xty hl'^toky 29 

THE TRUE CAUSE OF SETTLEMENT. 

It is generally stated in the public histories of Wisconsin and Illinois 
that the defeat of Black Hawk opened to settlement northern Illinois and the 
southern portion of what is now \\"isconsin. Unqualified, this statement 
is misleading; indirectly, it is true tliat the war proved a powerful agent 
in the development of this region. The Indians in themselves were no obstacle 
to legitimate settlement, the frontiers of which were far removd from Black 
Hawk's village, and neetl not have crowded it for several years to come. 
Of course, it was necessary in time to clear the path for civilization. What 
this war accomplished in the way of territorial development was to call 
national attention in a marked manner to the attractions and resources of 
this part of the great Northwest. The troops acted as explorers of this tract, 
concerning which nothing has been known definitely among the white men. 
It is also stated that the Sauk Indians had not inhabited the part of Illinois 
north of the mouth of the Kishwaukee, and when the war was fought and 
they were followed into Wisconsin, it is also stated that they were unfamiliar 
with that country and employed Winnebago guides. Immediately after the 
war the newspapers of the eastern and older settled middle states were filled 
with descriptions more or less full of the scenes and possibilities and prospective 
industries in the Rock river valley, of the groves and prairies on every hand 
and of the dense forests of Wisconsin. From the press were issued books 
and pamphlets and accounts of the newly discovered paradise. For the 
most part crude publications, abounding in error, and today unknown, save 
to the historian, but it is true that they did advertise the country and set 
flowing thither the tide of emigration. There necessarily followed in due 
time the opening to sale of the public lands hitherto reserved and the prop- 
erties of what territory remained among the Indian tribes of the district. 
The Winnebagoes, hitherto unfriendly, were humbled and the spirit of mis- 
chief making ceased. This, it will be noticed, was the last Indian tiprising 
in the northern states, east of the Mississippi river. This incidental subduing 
of the ^^'innebagoes and the broad, liberal advertisement given to the theater 
of disturbance» were, therefore, the two practical and immediate results of 
the Black Hawk war, the consecjuences of which were at once to give 
enormous impetus to the development of the state of Illinois and the territory 
of W'isconsin. 



CHAPTER III. 

HOW THE PIONEERS CAME. 



We liere of today can form no just conception, no right idea of the 
conditions met by the hardy men who came to the, then, far W'est, in the '30s. 
We may enter a plush-seated car at Chicago, run over a track of steel for 
twenty-four hours, and leave the same car at New York, scarcely fatigued by 
the journey. We may start at Chicago at 10 p. m., and be in Buffalo, New 



30 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

York, the following day for lunch. By road travel in a lumber wagon, we 
would have little difficulty in getting to New York in ten days or two weeks. 
But seventy years ago conditions were so different that we, with great 
difficulty, realize them. There was no regularly traveled road west of Detroit 
or Cincinnati. From those points west the country was unbroken and unknown, 
inhabited only by Indians and a few scattered settlements. The only avenues 
of travel were Indian trails and buffalo runs. Traveling meant going through 
an open wood and prairie, over hills antl through \alleys with no guide, save 
the stars and the sun. Where a buffalo run could be followed it materially 
aided progress. Of these buffalo trails a former writer, whose name is not 
given, but who appears to speak with authority, ajitly says : 

"The roads of the country were originally buff'alo trails, as they once 
would go in great herds in their regular migrations o\-er the country. The 
habits and instincts of these animals were \-ery interesting. They seemed to 
have certain routes, running from the northwest toward the eastern and 
southern Atlantic sea shores, and over these they would pass at regular 
intervals. These travels came in time to be interfered with bv the Indians, 
who hunted them for game, and from them got their food and richest raiment. 
They were truly royal game. There were several well noted routes of those 
animals that could be traced, at one time, from the Rocky mountains to the 
Carolinas. On these great buffalo highways were found the Indian villages 
and wigwams of some of the most powerful tribes. The immense herds of 
buffalo in their travels would come to a large stream, and here they would 
regularly go into camp, to use an expression applied only to human action. 
They would stop, and for days tramp and eat down all \-egetation for a 
wide space, dig out mud holes and wallow in the thick mud, and each would be 
dreading to cross, yet all seemed to understand well enough that they would 
cross, and not turn back on their trip. They had no leader bold enough to 
make the plunge. If they had had one of that kind they would no more than 
have paused when they came to the stream. All seemed to equally dread to 
lead the way across, and all were eager to follow any one that would lead. 
When there was nothing more to eat on their grounds they would commence 
to circle, and every time those on the inner side would push those next the 
water a little and little closer to the water's edge. After a time, as they 
would again come around, they would push the outside ones into the deep 
water, when they would boldly turn their heads for the opposite shore and all 
would follow. A singular fact is, that where the buff'alo would have longest 
bivouacked, there, in time, would be found the largest Indian village, and these, 
in turn, are the places where we have built our great cities. In other words, 
the buffalo, and then the Indians, were the natural engineers to point out to 
civilization the natural sites for their great cities. This is true of every city 
in America at least. And it is, in nearly every instance, true that the early 
roads of the country are now the great trunk lines of the railroads, and 
these were but following the buffalo and Indian trails. The first pioneers 
were generally following the Indian trails. By doing this they reached the 
natural fording places of the streams, as well as the easiest passes in the 
mountains. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 31 

"A noted route passed from east to west tlirough Geneva townsliip, which 
crossed the Fox river at Geneva. This afterward became the great highway 
between Chicago and Galena, and finaUy the railroad route. This no doubt 
was a buffalo and Indian highway before America was discovered, or even 
the adventurous Norseman was born. The pioneers simply followed this old 
trail. It became a white man's great traveled route as soon as there were white 
men here to travel on it." 

There appears to have been three means of reaching the West in the 
early days : by wagon, on horseback, on foot ; or by way of the lakes from 
Buffalo to Chicago. From Chicago to the Fox river the travel was by team or 
on foot. Joseph McCarty appears to have come from Elmira, New York, 
alone, and on foot, as did Christopher Payne, the first settler at Batavia. 
William Lance and his son, John Lance, came from Pennsylvania with a 
wagon drawn by eight yoke of oxen, in which rode a daughter, Mary Lance, 
who married John Lowders, and a younger son, who drove the team. The 
two walked all the way, their rifles on their shoulders. Provisions stored 
in the wagon, supplemented by such game as the rifles brought down, made up 
the meager meals enjoyed by the caravan as they camped by their lone fire in 
the wilderness of wood or prairie. Twenty miles a day was good traveling, 
and they came many hundreds of miles. 

The same writer quoted above, wrote years ago as follows, his impres- 
sion, no doubt, having been received from personal experience or first-hand 
statements of the pioneers : 

"In 1834 the stream of immigrants began its mighty course toward this 
upper Mississippi valley, and the story of their coming, the rapidity of the 
growth of population and improvement, the wealth and splendors of civiliza- 
tion that have marked the half century from then till now, is much like a tale 
of enchantment. It is a wonderful picture to the mind. First the lone hunter 
and trapper, bearing about him but little more of civilization, except his gun, 
than were to be seen among the half-naked savages; then came the lone 
pioneer, on foot or on horseback, ready to get far into the hunting grounds, 
and far away from his own people, and content to live and be more of an Indian 
than a white man; then the other class of first-comers, bringing in an ox wagon 
their wives and children, seeking free homes and rich lands, with no other 
end in view than tilling the soil and accumulating land, and raising enough 
to eat and wear. In the splendors of the present the trials and hardships of 
the pioneer fathers are apt to be covered up and forgotten. That they first met 
obstacles that would have appalled any but the most resolute and daring, goes 
without the saying. That they met and conquered many of these obstructions 
our tender children even somewhat understand. Yet the innumerable evils 
and afBictions that lay in their paths — evils that lay in ambush, and that 
came upon them like the unseen waves of an epidemic — cannot now all be told, 
because these were silent heroes, strong and fearless men, who took their 
position in the front of their dependent ones, wearing their lives upon the 
sleeves of their buckskin wa'niuses, they faced, without a tremor, death in 
anv and everv form." 



32 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

It would be of interest to modern residents of Kane county to have at 
first hand the detailed story of such a trip by ox-team or afoot through wood 
and prairie, where for many a hundred miles no human habitation would 
greet the eye; a settler's cabin at long intervals; an Indian camp here and 
there, more feared than the wilderness. Everywhere the tangled wood and 
tall tough prairie grass impeding progress. They who could afford to send 
their goods by steamboat were indeed fortunate. They who came by ox- 
team their tortuous way, deserved all that awaited them of enjoyment or 
property. 

An incident of the difficulties of travel by wagon is given of Dr. L. S. 
Tyler and Mark Ranstead, who, in 1836, settled in Elgin township. Being 
out of tlour, wheat and corn, in December, they went with a team of horses 
to a neighboring cabin. Going, they crossed what is now Tyler creek, over 
the ice. On their return the ice had fallen in, leaving it slanting on both 
sides, the water running above in the middle. They had a load of twenty 
bushels of corn, and fearing to cross, unharnessed the horses, and in attempt- 
ing to get them over the creek one fell on the ice. The horse would have 
drowned had not one of the men stood in the water hip-deep and held his 
head above the surface, while the other went about a mile to the cabin to 
get a team of oxen and a chain to pull the horse out. 

Another incident of apparent fact is tliat of Samuel C. Rowell, founder 
of the Rowell family at Hampshire. \\'hen but eighteen years of age he 
started west alone on horseback from Vermont, and stopped in Kentucky three 
years. He then came northwest by the same means, crossing Indiana and 
entering Illinois near the middle of its eastern line. In crossing the prairies 
further south he found the houses often forty miles apart. Following old 
trails and new wagon tracks, pushing through prairie grass up to his horse's 
neck, swimming swollen rivers, and undisturbed save by a startled herd of 
deer or the yelp of a prowling wolf, he progressed from cabin to cabin. After 
his residence in Kentucky he had acquired the dress there common, long hair 
and whiskers, and suit of buckskin. He was one evening turned from a 
settler's cabin because of his resemblance to a gang of horse thieves who had 
shortly before visited the vicinity. 

The coming of Amos Miner and Levi Leach to Kaneville was by lake and 
wagon route. With wife and child he jnurneyed from ^Vayne county. New 
York, to Detroit by boat, through the Erie canal and the lakes. The balance 
of the way was by wagon. Frequently the wagon would be swamped in the 
wet earth and sand. For miles they would find no dry land. At times the 
team would have to be hitched to the rear of the wagon and hauled out of 
a rut to solid ground. They had often to camp in swamps and sloughs swarm- 
ing with mosquitoes. Upon reaching LaPorte, Indiana, the women of the 
party were taken sick, and a long encampment necessitated. 

Cyrus B. Ingham, who early came to Kane county from Jefferson county. 
New York, wrote in 1869 as follows: "At Detroit we hired a wagon to 
Chicago, and were ten days making the trip. The route between Michigan 
City and Chicago we were forced to travel on the lake shore, with one wheel 
in the water and the other in the dry sand, w ith the wagon tipped sidewise 




KANE COUNTY'S FTEST COURTHOUSE. 




KANE COUNTY'S SECOND COURTHOUSE. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 35 

at about a quarter pitch. All who could, were obliged to walk. We reached 
Chicago May i8, 1835. The next day we crossed the flats at Barrays Point, 
nine miles out (west). At that time almost the entire distance was under 
water often over our boot tops. We crossed Fox river at the old Indian 
village about a mile above where Aurora now stands. There was no wagon 
road then in that direction and we followed the Indian trail. Old Wau- 
bonsie, the Pottawattomie chief, was then still there, ruling his tribe in all 
his Indian glory." 

A vivid picture of the arrival of a caravan from the east was written 
by Mr. Jesse C. Kellogg, of Sycamore, in the Sycamore Sentinel in 1855. 
He wrote : "Soon after the Indians had done their sugar-making, when the 
groves began to grow leafy and the prairies grassy, as the sun sank low in 
the west, and the prairie wolves began to howl, and the sandhill crane to 
scream and poke along the ponds and 'sloughs' for their evening meal of 
crawfish, a close observer might have espied, afar off on an Indian trail, 
suspicious looking canvas, supposed to be the sail of a 'settler's' wagon, evi- 
dently Hearing some grove, and in a strait to get 'somewhar' before night- 
fall. Presently, emerging from the dusky prairie, the settler's wagon, pro- 
pelled by some four or five yoke of oxen, canopied with sundry bolts of sheet- 
ing; within containing the family bedding, clothing and provisions; without, 
implements of cooking and husbandry, chickens in coop and pigs in pen, 
backed by a drove of cows, calves, colts and other young stock on 
foot, would loom up plainly to view, 'fetching in' near some point, bay or 
plum thicket, where in after days 'Bonny chiels and clever hizzies' were to lift 
the latch and force the way to a happy cabin home. It was no uncommon 
thing in those days for the mistress of the wagon to 'pail the keows' in the 
morning and place the milk where, by the incessant motion of the wagon 
during the day, it would churn itself. In this way the family were provided 
with a constant supply of good, fresh butter ; and old chanticleer and his dames 
in the coop behind, never caught napping when hens should be awake, would 
keep up the laying process, so that with other supplies from the wagon a 
settler's wife could usually 'scare up' a pretty good meal on short notice. 
In this hitherto neglected spot, where 'full many a flower" was 'born to blush 
unseen and waste its sweetness on the desert air,' the weary, yet blithe and 
happy groups might have been seen to alight, strike a fire, prepare, and after 
craving God's blessing, eat their frugal meal ; when, guarded by a watchful dog 
and a still more watchful Providence, they would retire for needed repose 
into the inmost recesses of the wagon home. And at an early peep of dawn 
one might have seen the anxious settler reconnoitering, with hurried steps, 
grove and prairie, when after being 'detached here' — 'countermanded there' — 
bothered almost to death for fear that among so many good chances he should 
fail to secure the best, at least he would bring himself to the 'sticking point,' 
seize the ax and 'blaze' the line in the 'timber' and anon, hitch the team to 
the prairie plough and 'mark out the furrow on the prairie.' " 

A history of Elgin, published in 1875 by G. P. Lord and a Mr. Bradford, 
then real-estate dealers here, contains an account of the coming of Hezekiah 
Gifford and his brother, James T. Gifford. The account was published in the 



36 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

lifetime of Hezekiah Gift'ord. and was apparently dictated by him, and may 
be taken as an authentic narrative : 

"The journey, it may easily be imagined, was not a pleasant one. For a 
road the travelers had but the army trail left by Scott's troops during the 
Black Hawk war, some time before. Part of the way the gentlemen rode 
and part of it they walked, but at length they reached the banks of 
the Fox, where St. Charles now stands, forded it near the present 
bridge in that town, and in a very short time afterward were hospitably 
received in Mr. Ferson's log cabin. A very few moments after their reception 
they were kneeling on the floor of the aforesaid cabin, eating off a trunk, in 
lieu of a table, some excellent venison steaks, and drinking coffee with a 
relish that invested the Rio with qualities unknown to the connoisseurs who 
delicately discussed the excellencies of a better kind. 

"After a needed repose. Messrs. Gifford and Dur3-ea took their journey 
down the river, and soon arrived at the present site of Geneva. This short 
journey absolutely entranced them with the beauty of the country through 
which they passed. Still following the river and an Indian trail, they walked 
to the spot where Aurora now stands, and here they found a man digging 
bowlders in the midst of a solitude that would have charmed a hermit. In 
reply to a question, the delver said he was digging stones for a prospective 
dam. The news was quite welcome to the travelers, as foreshadowing civil- 
ization, and with the feeling that they were not altogether in a desert, they 
pursued their journey to where Yorkville now stands. From this place they 
proceeded to Indian creek, Somonauk and Blackberry, and at last rested at 
the cabin of a man named Hollenbeck. Mr. Duryea had now become tired of 
the \\'est, but seeing the patriarchal comforts by which Hollenbeck was sur- 
rounded; seeing him as a Pasha of many corn fields, surrounded by game of 
every kind, and living ostensibly in the happy condition that is exemplified by 

the expression, ,<„,•, i 

My right there is none to dispute, 

he concluded to 'make a claim,' and did so. ^Ir. Gift'ord did the same, and 
the twain returned homeward, parting at Buft'alo. 

"From Buffalo Mr. Gift'ord at once proceeded to the home of his brother, 
Mr. James T. Gifford, in Yates county, where he was received with extreme 
gratification, as during his sojourn in the West his father and other members 
of his family were unaware of his whereabouts. ^Ir. James T. Gifford at 
once commenced asking him about the \\'est. and soon the conversation led 
to a description of the Fox river country. Maps were produced, and a full 
account of its beauties was poured forth by Hezekiah. It was agreed that the 
latter should visit his father's family in Oneida county, and some acquaintances 
in Chenango county, among them a young lady who might possibly be going 
to Illinois before long; that James T. would endeavor to sell his property as 
soon as possible ; and arrangements were made that the brothers should emi- 
grate to the West, and share in the toils and benefits incident to its settlement. 

"A short interval passed. Hezekiah was married ; James T. sold out. and 
was ready for the start ; a lumber wagon was provided and filled with tools ; 
a double team was procured, and the advance made. The young men drove 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 37 

all the way to Chicago, at every step leaving civilization further and further 
behind until, on the 24th of March, 1835, they reached the wished-for hamlet 
by the lake. Here, learning that the place then called Milwaukee Bay was 
a magnificent site for a settlement, they left their wagon at Chicago and rode 
to that point, in company with a man named Goodwin. On the way they did 
not meet a living soul, and being scantily provided with edibles, were necessi- 
tated to divide even their few biscuits with their horses. At length, arriving 
at Milwaukee, they procured food and corn, but soon discovered that people 
from Chicago had claimed all the land in the vicinity, and then came back the 
old thought, 'let us go to the Fox river.' 

"Accordingly they took up the line of march, sending their horses back 
to Chicago by Mr. Goodwin, he being desirous of returning thither without 
delay. An abortive attempt to cross the country from Milwaukee was now 
succeeded by partly retracing their steps to the neighborhood of the present 
city of Racine, where they met a half-breed trader, named Jock Jumbeau, 
who invited them to rest a few days. Jock, who had been a trapper, told the 
Gififords that he knew the country well, and that by taking the trail from his 
cabin they could reach the waters of the Fox river in half a day. He also 
said they would very possibly find settlers on its banks. This was agreeable 
information; and a negro boy, who acted as cook, page, etc., etc., to Jock, 
having prepared the brothers some cakes, they struck into the woods and were 
soon on their way. 

"Reaching the river they walked down stream for miles, but encountered 
no signs of human life. Anxious to explore the west bank, they were pre- 
vented by the depth of the stream, until when quite fatigued, they met a lone 
Pottawattomie in a canoe, who ferried them across, but could give them no 
information of settlers or settlement. Now the explorers found themselves 
with a broad and deep river between them, and, as they feared, all white men, 
but still they walked on. Night overtook them, and they camped without 
supper. Next morning they were up betimes and, still marching southward, 
but no settlers were yet to be seen, and being without a compass, they dared 
not leave the bank of the river for fear of getting lost. Creeks were waded 
through that chilled them to the very bone, but yet, hungry, wet and tired, 
they kept on. At length, when they had been forty-eight hours without food, 
they thought they descried something that seemed like a 'claim mark,' 
and stopped to examine it. The examination did not prove satisfactory, and 
again they pushed southward. After journeying for some hours, Mr. Hezekiah 
Gifford saw through the trees a little edifice called a 'punshon,' or hut, then 
much in use among Indians and settlers. He approached it, calling to his 
brother to follow. On reaching it thej' hallooed, but no response came, and 
then, raising one of the planks, looked in, hoping to find some human being in 
the habitation. But, instead of white settlers, or even Indians, the famishing 
men only saw squatted in all the majesty of repose, decked with his blankets 
and innumerable little evidences of high rank, a dead Pottawattomie chief, 
taking the sleep that knows no waking. The body was in a sitting posture, 
and but little decomposed, and was a terrible evidence to the travelers that 
they were further than ever from civilization and succor. And now, dis- 



38 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

couraged and weakened by privation, the journey was resumed : night came on, 
and the wayfarers having lighted a fire, lay down to sleep. Rain fell during 
the night, and getting up to replenish the fire, wild animals became frightened 
and went crashing and howling through the woods. In the morning they 
started once more, and after a long time, the stream now called the Xippersink, 
in McHenry county, was reached. Here they had to wade up to their waists 
and hold their clothes over their heads to keep them dry. The mud, too, at 
the bottom of the creek almost engulfed them, and. long after that day, the 
Messrs. Gififord laughingly remarked that the creek alluded to might be called 
the Nip-or-sink with increased propriety. But now. at length, they were, 
although unconscious of the fact, drawing near relief. They had walked at 
this time to the bend in the river above the present village of Algonquin, and 
stopping to survey the situation, they descried afar ofi a figure moving. Their 
pace was quickened, and they soon came to a white man, who was splitting 
rails. On being questioned, this man said that he worked for Samuel Gillan, 
who owned a cabin near by. Mr. James T. Gififord. absolutely overburdened 
with joy, cried out, 'Oh! now we'll have a good meal!' Mr. Gillan and his 
wife kindly received the travelers, heard their story of suffering and travel, 
and soon placed before them a meal of corn dodgers and coffee. A good 
night's rest was afterward taken, a hearty breakfast eaten ; a few miles further 
passed, and the ground on which Elgin now stands was reached." 



CHAPTER IV. 



WH.\T THE PIONEERS FOUND. 



\\ hen the first settlers upon the lands of Kane county came here, they 
found a territory very much different from w^hat now presents itself. To the 
east, Fox river ran in a winding path from Dundee to Aurora, its waters 
uninterrupted by any bridge or dam, and everywhere wider than at present. 
The encroachments of the cities on its banks have at some points filled half the 
channel. Along its shores were abundant groves of oak and other trees yet 
common, but at most points now much thinned out. From Aurora northeast- 
ward, on the east side of the river, a veritable forest of thick wood extended 
to where Batavia now stands and two or three miles back from the river, 
known as the "Big woods." On the west side of the river from Batavia 
north of South Elgin another smaller wood existed, known as the "Little 
woods." North of this, the banks of the Fox were thick with trees, but the 
growth did not reach far from the river. In the back districts, wood and 
prairie, hill and valley alternated throughout the territory now covered by 
the county boundaries. About one-fourth was wood land. From the higher 
ridge of land extending from Hampshire to Burlington, creeks and streams 
ran east to the Fox river and west to the Rock river. The land was, and is, 
largely black soil with some clav. and sand and gravel. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 39 

The peculiarity of the district as distinguished from the eastern land, 
to which the newcomers had been accustomed, was the large extent of prairie 
land. The eastern country is a land of hills and forest. There the farmer 
cut the trees, and plowing in between the unremoved stumps, raised his crops. 
But the open prairie, necessitating no clearing, was a new fact wliich it 
required many years for pioneers to understand and cultivate. The prairie 
land was everywhere covered with a tall, rank, tough, native grass, often 
growing ten or fifteen feet high over miles of prairie land. For centuries it 
had grown and accumulated and thickened until it was with difficulty that a 
horse could make its way througli some parts of it. This the pioneers found 
and for years left undisturbed, thinking it unfit for cultivation. 

Great prairie fires would at times sweep over this grass, leaving a desolate, 
blackened waste behind. The general soil at the roots of the prairie grasses 
was wet and swampy, which fact discouraged the farmer. It was with great 
difficulty a plow was run through the tangled tough roots, it requiring several 
yoke of oxen to turn the sod. The cultivation of years, and the constant 
cropping of the grass by cattle, has entirely changed the nature of the plant 
life of the soil and rendered its cultivation easy. 

Nuts of many kinds were found here native : walnuts, butternuts and 
hickory nuts being abundant ; and hazelnut bushes everywhere among the trees. 
Maple trees furnished syrup and sugar. Wild raspberries, gooseberries, straw- 
berries and blackberries were common ; and in the swamps and low places 
mushrooms were plentiful. The writer has personally gathered all these 
varieties in the woods of the county within twenty-five years, but most of the 
trees have been cut down or have died out. Little wild product now grows. 

Game of many varieties, most of which have now disappeared, were found 
throughout the country and adjacent territory and was hunted by the pioneers 
for food and sport. Deer herded in the wood in large numbers. Old settlers 
yet living tell of seeing fifty to a hundred in a herd in Plato and Burlington 
townships. It was a matter of small effort to go out on any morning in the 
'50s and return with venison for breakfast. The increasing population, how- 
ever, soon destroyed or drove them away, and by i860 it was a rare event to 
hunt deer with success. Wild cats were numerous in the wood and preyed on 
the settlers' chickens. The last were killed within twenty-five years. The 
lynx was also found in the woodlands until after the war. Wild pigeons 
came in flocks so numerous as to obscure the sunlight as they flew southward 
to their feeding grounds. Many a pigeon dinner was enjoyed by the early 
residents. It is told that in those days a hunter could sit beneath a dead tree 
and shoot scores of pigeons as they alighted on the bare limbs to rest. The 
sandhill crane, a bird not seen in this locality by many of this generation, was 
numerous in the early days. They built huge conical nests of grass and weeds 
in inaccessible swamps. They stood over four feet high when mature, and 
their flesh is said to have been of excellent flavor. They were much hunted 
but difficult to bag. They would alight generally on a high knoll where the 
surrounding country would be visible. Wild duck and geese in large variety 
and in very great numbers compared to present meager flights were to be seen 
every fall and spring. Without decoy or other device for attracting them a 



40 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

hunter sitting in a hidden spot could in an afternoon bring down more birds 
than he could carry home. Quail by the thousand were found in the brush 
and field everywhere, but were largely destroyed by the trap and gim years 
ago. The fear of their extinction necessitated laws for their protection and 
they are again becoming more numerous and so tame, because not hunted, as 
to feed in the open field or barnyard. The crow was also present when the 
pioneers came and is still very numerous, doing now the same depredations 
he did then, and as wary of hunters and as destructive. Hunters from the 
settlements would camp out and destroy quail by the thousand. Robins and 
the smaller birds yet numerous were here when the first settler appeared. 
Wolves were also plentiful and a continued burden to the white man, who was 
under the need of at all times protecting his stock and chicken yard against 
them. It was no unusual thing in the '40s for the men of the county to meet 
for a wolf hunt. A large number would form a circle many miles in circum- 
ference, some with horns and tin pans to raise the wolves and other animals 
by the noise. In the circle were men on horseback and afoot. All gradually 
narrowed in on the circle, shooting what came in sight and driving them toward 
the center. Many wolves were killed, but more of other kinds of game. 
Trapping and poison were also resorted to to rid the country of wolves, but 
they were so cunning that until a late day they continued to harass the farmer, 
and even now an occasional wolf is seen in an outlying district. 

Many interesting stories are also told of the deer hunts of those days. 
During the winter of 1842 the snow was unusually deep and travel was made 
more difficult by a hard crust that formed on the surface of the snow after a 
thaw. The deer's sharp hoofs would cut through the crust, rendering their 
progress slow and making them easy prey for the dogs and the hunters. 
Many came to the farm yards for food and were shot down by the farmers. 

Fish, too, were found in an abundance now undreamed of. Through the 
years the seine, hook and spear of an ever increasing population of Waltonians 
have depleted the fish supply until a few carp, perch, bullheads, with now and 
then a bass or pickerel of moderate proportions are the onl}' reward of a day's 
fishing. Then, according to the stories of old residents (before the modern 
"fish story was needed to give length and number to a catch") the river 
teemed with fish of many choice varieties, such as bass, pickerel and pike, to 
secure which required none of the modern fly hooks and casting lines. 

For building purposes and fuel the thick wood of high oaks furnished 
ample supply and were drawn upon as though inexhaustible. Now the original 
growth has disappeared and throughout the county only second growth timber 
is to be had. Limestone quarries were found along the Fox river from Aurora 
to Elgin and much used for buildings. 

But aside from these bounties from nature, free for the taking to supply 
the immediate wants of the settlers while the seed they had sown on their 
rough plowed land was growing, neighbors w^ere found in the Indians who 
were encamped along the rivers and creeks. If not the best company, they 
were at least welcome associates. Of these natives Samuel McCarty, who 
came to Aurora in 1834, is reported as having written as follows. "It was 
not a wild, desolate, unpopulated region, for we had plenty of neighbors in 




NORTH END OF STOLPS ISLAND AND WEST AURORA IN 1852. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 43 

the redmen, who had occupied and enjoyed these beautiful prairies and rivers 
for many and many a year before this, and the viHage of the head war chief 
of the Pottawattomie nation was but Httle over a mile north of us. On the 
west side of the river, on the bluff opposite Mr. Tanner's stone farm house 
and a little north, was the Indian burying ground, a part of which is now 
occupied by the Catholics for the same purpose. The village and vicinity 
contained from three hundred to five hundred Indians and we had many visits 
from them. Quite a commercial trade sprang up between us, especially 
swapping bread and tobacco for fish, of which we soon found that they had 
much the largest supply, although we could give but one slke for a large fish 
weighing from three to five pounds, and then at times they would have several 
in their canoes to take back. The treaty with our government for the purchase 
of their reservation had been ratified, I think, about one year previous, and 
consequently they were peaceable and friendly. 

"The old chief, Waubonsie, was a large and powerful man, six feet four 
inches, w-eighing about two hundred pounds and as straight as — an Indian. 
The most of their village was composed of movable or temporary wigwams, as 
the tribe was a wandering and unsettled people. They spent their summers 
here on Fox river but would emigrate to the south to spend the winter on the 
Illinois and Kankakee, returning in the spring. The old chief's wigwam, 
being the capitol of the tribe, was built very substantially, apparently to stand 
for centuries, the posts and frames being of red cedar. The 'palace' was built 
with a good deal of mechanical skill, although the mortises through the posts 
for the girders were chopped with their tomahawks, but in much better style 
than we would think possible with such a tool. The building, I think, was 
about twenty feet wide by thirty feet long. It was built by setting the posts 
firmly in the ground, forming four bents, with girders overhead and ridge 
pole. The principal rafter and cross-bearers were very ingeniously put together 
to gain strength to withstand the heavy gales of the prairie. There was a 
hall about eight or ten feet wide running through the building with a door at 
each end. Each side there were girders about one and one-half feet from the 
ground and on these were small poles. On them was placed wide bark taken 
from the basswood tree, which formed their mattresses or spring beds. These 
were covered with skins of the animals they had slain, such as wolves, lynx, 
wildcats and deer. Thus were formed their beds, with government blankets 
or buffalo skins for covering. They built their fire in the center of the hall 
and would gather in a circle around it to hold their war councils. The outside 
of this capitol was covered with the bark of the linn or basswood tree, taken 
from the standing trees, fitted to the sides and roof of the building very nice 
and tight. It was fastened by cutting three-cornered holes through the bark 
and tying to the cross rafters with the inside bark of young basswood trees. 
The rafters and all of the cross rafters were small straight poles, with the bark 
all peeled off, which made them appear neat and comely. 

"The ladies of honor were quite fond of ornaments and jewelry, generally 
consisting of nicely worked and ornamented moccasins. The ornaments con- 
sisted of the dew-claw or small hoof of the deer, which was a beautiful shining 
black. These were strung so that they had the appearance of small bells. 



44 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

They admired leather fringe and tassels. The principal garment was a skirt, 
formed of a piece of blue broadcloth, just as it was cut from the piece, about 
two yards long. They ran a small cord in the fold (being of double width), 
wrapped it around their waist and fastened with the cord. This made a very 
nice rig, nearly the same size at the top and bottom, but not quite as much 
pull-back as the present style (1875). The upper garment, or waist, was 
made of dark blue calico, fashioned very much like a man's plain shirt, without 
a collar, and reached a little below the waist. The upper classes ornamented 
this garment considerably, generally with silver brooches. I have seen two 
rows of these set so closely that they would nearly touch each other; one row 
around the neck, the other near the shoulder, coming together at the front. 
The brooches were of solid silver, the smaller about the size of a silver half- 
dollar, the others a little larger than the old-fashioned silver dollar. They 
were a little convex, with an engraved border on the outer edge and pins to 
fasten them. I think I have seen from forty to fifty on one person ; also as 
many as ten to twelve brass wristlets on one arm, covering the wrist for about 
two inches. The bonnet, when any was worn, consisted of a man's old- 
fashioned fur hat, with a silver band from one to two inches wide around the 
hat. and a few hawk or eagle feathers tucked under the band. The hair, 
braided, hung down the back, with a large bunch of feathers at the end. Over 
their shoulders, and sometimes over the head, they wore a large Mackinaw 
blanket. This comprised a first-class style of costume. 

"The government had ratified the treaty with the Indians and bought 
out their reservation, which included part of Aurora, the whole of the Big 
Woods, and some prairie lying west of the river. They agreed to go west of 
the 'Great Father of Waters,' and in the spring or fall ( I do not recollect 
which) of 1836 the government moved them beyond Council Bluffs, west of 
the Missouri river, to a large reservation, where they remained until a few 
years past. About two years after they had been moved west, the old chief came 
back to view his familiar hunting grounds. He called on me and took a dish of 
succotash and after he had eaten a tremendous meal, across the table patted 
me on the shoulder and exclaimed, pointing to the table, 'Good ! good !' Also, 
to myself, saying, 'Good shemokeman !' That was the last I ever saw of 
Waubonsie, the war chief of the Pottawattomie nation." 

Another Indian village had long existed on the site of what is now 
Dundee. They were a remnant of the Pottawattomies under Chief Nickoway 
and were related to those north of Aurora. They occupied about five acres 
of land on the east side of the river and engaged in a crude cultivation of the 
soil. Their village was on land now in the village of Dundee. They are 
described as a lazy lot by the first settlers, with whom they bartered vegetables 
and trinkets for tobacco, salt, etc., and begged or helped themselves to what 
they could not get by exchange. They also brought fish, game and honey to 
the settlers. Rum and tobacco were their chief desires. Jesse Oatman, who 
arrived at Dundee about 1835, is reported to have described this village as 
being about eighty rods below the brickyard and comprised six huts or wig- 
wams containing about twenty-five Indians. He visited the chief in his tepee 
and was royally received. The squaw wife was at the time preparing a sand- 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 45 

hill crane for a meal. She picked out a few of the larger feathers and then 
placed the bird, after due dressing, it is presumed, into an earthen kettle filled 
with beans and water, to boil over a fire of coals. 

The Indians who li\'ed along the Fox River valley and in DeKalb county 
along the Kishwaukee river were mostly of the Pottawattomie tribe, which 
was a branch of the Algonquins. They were associated with the Sacs and 
Fox members of the same general confederation. These tribes occupied hunt- 
ing grounds in Michigan and northern Illinois, from which they had in the 
centuries before driven other tribes, their villages being chiefly along Lake 
Michigan and the Illinois and Fox rivers. They ceded their lands to the 
United States September 27, 1833, but were not removed west until 1836. 
The early settlers who traded with them reported them to have been quiet 
and inoffensive and not so bad as the white men, who sold them whisky and 
imposed upon them in trade. An interesting story is told of such a transac- 
tion happening in what is now DeKalb county, then a part of Kane county, 
which doubtless was duplicated many times along the Fox. "A half Yankee- 
fied Frenchman, who will be called Peter, had made a claim on the east side 
of the Kishwaukee, near where Dr. Harrington now resides, and had engaged 
a half-civilized Indian boy called Shaw-ne-neese, who had lived some three or 
four years with the late Hon. James Walker, of Walker's Grove, now Plain- 
field, in Will county, to drive his breaking team. Now, as ill luck would have 
it, or 'somehownother,' it came into their heads that for just about one barrel 
of 'good-ne-tosh' each on their return to Walker's Grove might astonish the 
settlers with a nice Indian pony. The temptation to play on the 'Anglo- 
Saxon' was too strong. Shaw-na-neese, who had a mother, sisters, etc., living 
in the Big Woods, near where Aurora now stands, was supposed to be well 
acquainted with the Indians and could talk either English or Indian. So off 
goes Peter for the whisky, never once 'tinking" of the foolish settler, who for 
fun set a fire on the prairie that burnt up his own stacks. In due time the 
barrel of good-ne-tosh was regularly set up in the cabin of the settler, and 
'where the carcass is there will the eagles be gathered together.' Shaw-na- 
neese talks, Indian talk — ponies plenty — good-ne-tosh plenty — so much pony 
so much good-ne-tosh. Yes. Humph ! The doping begins ; the che- 
mo-ko-man adding 'Kishwaukee' at the bung by night to supply the deficit 
made by the faucet by day until there was a normal certainty of perfecting the 
contract as to measurement. After the barrel was pretty much delivered of 
its contents and the sharpshooters began to hint that it was time for them 'to 
walk up,' that is, if they could, to the captain's office and settle, the Indians 
being really drunk or appearing to be, began to grumble about Peter cheating 
them, selling no good good-ne-tosh, etc. Explanation was attempted, but the 
thing could not be explained, expostulation was used, but in vain. 'You cheat 
poor Indian,' and they grew madder and madder. Peter and his comrades 
began to have fear for their personal safety. There were no white men near, 
and if there had been they could not have expected that they would be sustained 
in such an enterprise, when all of a sudden the terrific warwhoop burst from 
the whole group, and drawing their long knives they rushed upon the liquor 
dealers like so many fiends from the pit. Just at this moment an old Indian 



46 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

snatched Sha\v-na-neese onto a pony behind him and galloped off at the top 
of his speed for what has since been called Charter's Grove. But alas ! and a 
well a-day for unfortunate Peter, when he cried there was 'none to deliver.' 
He had a good pair of legs and it came into his heart that 'jess now,' if ever, 
was the time to use them, and bounding somewhar' about a rod at a jump he 
'cut for the bush' and the Indians after him pell mell. As good luck would 
have it, however, he managed to conceal himself in the thick brush and elude 
their grasp, until at last, giving up further chase, they returned to Peter's 
shanty. Here they soon made a finish of the remainder for their 'own special 
use and benefits'. Peter's bag of flour, fry pan and new blue broadcloth coat 
they vamoosed, cutting up those dreadful antics which savages, thirsting for 
blood, alone know how to perform. Peter's predicament was by no means 
enviable. He knew that he was in the wrong, for 'a guilty conscience needs 
no accuser.' He had time to think and he did 'tink.' He had time for thought 
and he 'taught' 'if he ever lived to get out of this scrape he sure to quit tarn 
liquor business anyhow.' Afar off from the bosom of the thicket he had 
beheld the plunder of his shanty and the subsequent withdrawal of his enemies. 
He had no doubt but that they had gone for reinforcements and would soon 
return and murder him. Perhaps they were still lying in ambush to 'let the 
life out of him.' Still "tinking' discretion to be the better part of valor, he kept 
still until it began to grow dark, when what should he hear but the friendly 
voice of his old comrade 'Shaw-na-neese' cautiously calling to him from the 
plundered shanty and saying to him that he had 'jest' got away from the 
Indians, who were intending to come and kill him as soon as it was dark and 
he was advised further by the redskin not to make his whereabouts very public 
— was assured that he would get up the oxen, gather up the fragments that 
remained, hitch on to the 'truckle truckles' and ioin him with all possible 
dispatch in the grove. Peter and his comrade were at last under cover of 
night, plodding their way over old logs, sloughs and brush to the west side 
of the grove, from whence in a cold rain storm, and Peter in his shirt sleeves, 
they made their retreat toward W^alker's Grove, which they had the good for- 
tune to reach the next day, drenched with mud and water, and where Peter, 
starved, cold and hungry, was prepared to do up any quantity of muttering 
and swearing about the 'tam Injuns.' " 

The chiefs of the tribes that lived in Kane and DeKalb counties were 
Waubonsie (mentioned by Samuel McCarty in quotation above) and Shab- 
bona or Shau-ba-nee. Shabbona's settlement was in DeKalb county, in the 
township now known as "Shabbona," although he often set his wigwam in the 
beautiful grove on the banks of Mill creek, just south of Batavia, now known 
as "Pottawattomie Park" and much used for summer picnics. Waubonsie had 
his headquarters in the Big Woods, south of Batavia and east of the Fox river. 
They were at these points when the first pioneers arrived, numbering in all 
possibly o\'er a thousand warriors, squaws and pappooses. 

They have been described as having been powerful men physically, above 
the average American in size, muscular, courageous and intelligent above the 
average Indian. They had emigrated from Canada at an early day and were 
allied with the French against the English, and later with the English against 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 47 

the Colonies in the Revohitionary war. Shabbona is said to have been born 
in Canada in 1775. He died in 1859. The government at Washington set 
aside land near what is now Shabbona Grove, DeKalb county, and permitted 
him to remain, when the tribe was removed westward in 1836, because of his 
services in the Black Hawk war. 

Shabbona and Waubonsie both sided with the Americans in the Black 
Hawk war of 1832 and refused to take any part against the settlers. In a 
great council of Pottawattomies held on the Des Plaines river, west of Chi- 
cago, they both spoke against Black Hawk and after the council volunteered a 
company of one hundred braves under Shabbona to cooperate with the United 
States troops in protecting the settlers of northern Illinois. Shabbona is said 
to have visited Black Hawk at his camp in Iowa and sought to persuade him 
against a war upon the whites. But Black Hawk believed himself robbed of 
his lands and power by the government and would not stay his hand. Shab- 
bona at once returned to Illinois and set about warning all the settlers of Black 
Hawk's plans, himself going from cabin to cabin and sending his sons and 
members of his tribe as far south as Ottawa. 

The government not only rewarded Shabbona with land at Shabbona 
Grove, but settled upon him a pension of $200 per year. He removed to the 
Kansas reservation given to his tribe in 1836, but returned to DeKalb county 
in 1840 with his family, numbering about thirty persons, and lived at Shabbona 
Grove some time. But at frequent intervals he would go west to visit his 
friends and about 1847 remained so long that the government believed the 
statements of persons who desired to secure the land and in 1849 sold 
Shabbona's property at public sale, the grant to Shabbona being so worded 
as to give him the use of the land so long as he desired to occupy it but without 
power to sell it. Shabbona returned that same year. It is said he came in 
the night with part of his people, possibly twenty-five in all. They camped 
at their old camping place for the last time, for in the morning the settler who 
had purchased the land ordered them ofif with curses and threats. It is said 
that for days this faithful redman, who in so many ways disproved the 
ancient maxim that the only good Indian is a dead one, wandered about in 
the woods. He painted his face black and fell prone upon the graves of his 
children. For a time he would not sleep or eat, but constantly beat his breast 
and fasted until he grew weak and weary. His mind wavered and he wan- 
dered about aimlessly, to be found lying upon the ground on Rich creek in 
Kendall county, distracted and starving. He never returned to Shabbona 
Grove, of which he had been deprived by the white man's cupidity, but it is 
said that the Indian women would at intervals return to the graves of their 
dead and mourn for them, departing as silently as they came. For many 
years Shabbona, then seventy-five years of age, spent his time between his 
friends in central Illinois and his kinsmen in the west. He was a familiar figure 
upon the pony he always rode, taking usually the old Indian trails through 
the woods rather than the roads of the settlers. Sometimes he traveled alone; 
at other times with a company of his tribe, and was always welcomed by the 
settlers, all of whom knew him and of his services to the pioneers. On public 
occasions he was a center of attraction and made much of as a public character. 



48 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

He delighted to attend country fairs with his family, where he was ever the 
observed of all observers. At Ottawa on July 4, 1857. he and his children 
and grandchildren led the procession and in the evening attended a grand ball, 
where he was made judge of which lady excelled in beauty and grace. He 
examined all critically and when called upon for his decision is said to have 
turned to his squaw. Coconako, who weighed near 400 pounds, and touching 
her shoulder with much pride, said, "Much heap, big prettiest squaw. 
During the campaign of 1858 he occupied the platform from which Lincoln 
and Douglas delivered their famous debate at Ottawa. He was then eighty- 
three years of age. In 1857 a sum of money was raised by his white friends 
sufficient to purchase him twenty acres in Norman township. Grundy county, 
Illinois, and build him a house. He lived there until his death, July 27, 1859. 
He was buried at the cemetery in Morris, Illinois, on a lot donated by the 
cemetery. Here his wife, upon her death in 1864, was also interred. On 
October 23, 1903, a monument consisting of a huge boulder bearing the 
inscription, "Shabbona, 1775-1859," was placed at his grave in honor of his 
memory. 

SOME THINGS I REMEMBER OF CHIEF SHABBON.\. 

Written by Laura .\llen Bowers, of Sycamore. 

The first thing I knew about Shabbona mj" father went to his wigwam to 
buy enough trees of him to build a log house. He told him who he was. Then 
Shabbona introduced himself and family thus : 

■'This me Shabbona" (laying his front finger on his breast). 

"This rrte Pokenoquay" (meaning his squaw), and then he pointed to 
Siboquay as his pappoose and pointing to her three children, "These are my 
pappoose's pappooses.' The introduction over, ni}' father made known his busi- 
ness, but the old chief thought it beneath his dignity to sell trees to a Shemoka- 
man and would not let him have a single tree. Consequently he bought the 
trees of Peter Aliller, and we had a shanty to cover our heads made from them, 
in which we lived five years. 

Shabbona was generous with the white people and he would bring a 
quarter of a venison to his neighbors frequently, and once in a great while a 
wild goose and a duck. Often he would go from house to house and eat with 
anyone that would ask him. One Saturday he came to our house and father 
asked him to sit up to the table and have some breakfast. He looked around 
the table and made the remark, "Me no see um, me no eat um." We had eaten 
every bit of bread that there was in the house for our breakfast and were 
going to bake that morning, but that did not help us out for the meal. He 
had asked Shabbona to eat, so I frowningly said in a whisper, "We have not a 
particle of bread in the house." The keen-eyed old fellow saw the maneuver- 
ing and said, "Lazy squaw." He thought I did not want the trouble of get- 
ting his breakfast, but father said, "Bake him some pancakes." So I did and 
it proved to be the very thing he liked best, and I retained my good name in 
his opinion, which I have highly valued, being only about sixteen years old. 




*%*:--• 






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y 



KANE COUNTY'S THIRD COURTHOUSE. 




KANE COUNTY'S FOURTH COURTHOUSE. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 51 

The Indians in those days would not work. They would hunt and the 
squaws did all of the drudgery, such as cutting the wood and hauling it by 
hand, and they had to keep the fires in the wigwam, and they cooked the succo- 
tash to eat, and the corn and beans were some of their own planting and 
harvesting the summer before. The Indians furnished the meat for them. 

They generally had a tame skunk running around for a pet and they 
would play with them as we play with kittens. The government gave each of 
Shabbona's children a pony and they never went on foot anywhere. They 
never provided anything for the ponies to eat during the winter, so the ponies 
had to steal what they ate. As none of us had barns we had to stack the hay 
outdoors. The ponies used to eat nights. The boys of the neighborhood 
would catch them and ride them down as far as Somonauk creek, ten miles 
away. They would drive all they did not ride and leave them in the woods 
and would keep about three ponies and then get on their backs and come home. 
In about three days Shabbona would come along and ask, "You no see um 
ponies?" Then we would innocently ask, "How long have they been gone, 
Shabbona?" and he would say, "Maybe snee days; Ite know know." But they 
always managed to find their way back in a few days and then there would be 
more fun for the boys. 

Shabbona understood the geography of the United States and Canada 
to perfection. Just give him a piece of chalk and start him on some stream or 
lake, say Lake Superior, and he would mark every bit of water and tell you 
what it was named and what the Indians called it. In fact, he would mark 
over a whole floor and tell us just where the different bodies of water were 
located. One time he told us he was Tecumseh's aid and saw Johnson kill 
him with a little gun that went "Ping !" My brother. Harvey Allen, was there 
when he was telling it and he said, "Why didn't you rush in between them and 
kill Johnson?" "Oh," said Shabbona, "two big men. let um fight." Then he 
shook his sides with silent laughter, as though he always liked the white man 
best. He had the faculty of going through gestures in all his talk, which made 
it doubly interesting to his hearers. 

For a few years the white men came from the east, so many in number, 
and all wanted a few acres of timber to fence their farms and get wood for 
their fires that Mr. W^arham Gates, of Paw Paw, bought the grove of Shab- 
bona and he persuaded Uncle Sam to sell it at one dollar and a quarter an 
acre. Then poor old Shabbona felt as though this grove was no longer his. 
He never would live in the log house that Mr. Gates had built for him. He 
wanted to go away (his old place is now owned by William Rusk) and my 
brother took them to Chicago in a double wagon and when half-way there 
they stopped and camped out all night. They had brought a hog with them 
and proceeded to kill and dress it Indian fashion. They built a big fire made 
from rails which they took from the farmers' fences and killed the hog, and 
four of the Indians tied it by the legs and tossed it through and through the 
blaze until every bristle was singed off. They then took out the intestines and 
old Pokenoquay took them and run them between her thumb and front finger 
and they were ready to cook without a particle of water having been on them 
until thev were in the kettle over the fire, and that was all thev had for their 



UNIVERSITY OF 



52 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

supper. They offered my brother some of the stew, but he dechned it. for he 
had brought his own lunch with him. Then they told him to get some of the 
meat from the hog, which he did, and after taking off the skin and broiling it 
on the end of a sharpened stick he took some of the butter off his biscuits and 
spread it on the meat. He called it delicious. You know the Indians never 
eat salt on any occasion. When Shabbona and his family came back to their 
place my father had passed away. I had married and I had never seen any 
of the Indians since their return. I met the old chief just turning in at our 
back gate. He was on his pony and sat there like a statue. I hurried up to 
him and held out my hand and said, "How do you do, Shabbona?" and he 
said, "Show-in" (which meant No), "me no Shabbona." "Yes, you are 
Shabbona," I said. "I know you." He still kept his face straight and kept 
saying "Show-in" for five minutes and then he gave in and said I was right. 
I asked him to come into the house, where my mother was. He shook hands 
with her and said, "Me no see um big Injun." We told him he was dead, but 
he would not believe it and wanted to go upstairs to see if we were fooling 
him, so we gratified him and at last convinced him of the truth. He seemed 
to feel bad and kept saying, "Dead, dead." We had a good visit with him, but 
he wanted to see my Indian and I told him he had gone east. Then he laughed 
and said, "Ite know know maybe, Ite know, me no see um." 

You all know Shabbona was gone from here a few years and then came 
back, thinking it would be home again, but he didn't like it, for it was so 
changed. He felt as though the white man didn't want him any more and he 
went to Morris, Grundy county, and died. I do not know any of the dates of 
his going away or the death of him or his squaw, Pokenoquay. 

The following is from the Aurora Beacon for September 12, 1908: 

"Sitting upright, with bony hands folded in contentment, as they had died 
more than one hundred years ago, Pottawattomie Indians were found recently 
in what apears to have been an Indian burying ground on the C. M. Van 
Der\-olgan farm, two miles east of St. Charles and about thirty feet south of 
Person creek on a bluff above the water's edge. 

"The discovery was made by Charles Van Dervolgan, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank M. \'an Dervolgan, of West Second street, St. Charles, and a 
grandson of the owner of the farm. 

BOXES ARE WELL PRESERVED. 

"While digging in the sand on the bank of the creek the boy unearthed 
a well preserved human skull with the lower jaw bone attached and the most 
perfect set of teeth ever discovered in a skull in this part of the state. Almost 
perfect human bones were also discovered beneath the skull, showing that the 
body, of medium height, had been buried sitting in an upright position. 

"Beyond were found traces of four other skeletons, none, however, being 
in as good condition as the first, which seemed to have been in a dryer portion 
of the gravel pit where the graves so far opened were discovered. 

"Quantities of Indian arrow heads and portions of other Indian relics 
were found in the vicinity, as is customary in most Indian graves. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 53 

"Dr. W. E. Constant, of St. Charles, who examhied tlie skull in the 
possession of young \'an Dervolgan, has given his opinion that it is that of a 
man ahout sixty-five years of age at the time of death. 

"The teeth are the most remarkable feature of the skull, being nearly as 
perfect as at the time of death and unusually sound for a man past middle life. 
Efforts will be made to make further excavations on the \'an Dervolgan 
farm." 



CHAPTER V. 

WH.\T THE PIONEERS BROUGHT WITH THEM. 

The largest asset brought to the country of the then Far West by the early 
settlers was obviously sterling character and courage that might meet all 
obstacles and overcome them. But further than a stout heart, willing hands 
and abundant faith and hope in the destiny of the land they came to possess, 
they brought with them little more than such rough tools and implements as 
might be carried overland in a "prairie schooner" drawn by oxen. 

A paper of which the following is a copy was found among the effects 
cf Thomas H. Thompson, an early settler of Dundee and a justice of the peace 
there. The paper, a notice of a sale of property on execution, gives evidence 
of the equipment of a pioneer cabin home, for at the time, 1836, it is evident 
that no exemption law protected the debtor. He was sold out of everything 
he possessed : 

"Notice. — Taken on execution, and will be sold at public auction, the 
following propert}-, belonging to Jacon Iconberry, at the house of Thomas H. 
Thompson, in Kane County, to-wit : one clock, one table, four chairs, one 
bedstead, one bureau, one cradle, one iron pot, one dish kettle, one bake kettle, 
one spider, shovel and tongs, one fiatiron, one hand saw, one spade, two axes, 
one iron wage (wedge), one scythe sued (snath), one shave, two augurs, 
one keg, one hoe, twenty-five ps. earthenware, two tumblers, one teapot, three 
ps. tinware, two bottles, one jug, six forks, one knife, one set scales and 
weights, one trumpet, two spoons, one tin pail, one puter platter, two pair 
shears, one candlestick, one gimblet, one bread tray, one sive, three old barrels, 
one looking glass, one earth churn, one feather bed, two straw ticks, three B 
quilts, two spreads, two blankets, one tub and soap, one pail & tallow, one 
hammer, one old basket. The above articles will be sold, P. M., on Saturday, 
the 17th of the present month, at one o'clock. S. J. Kimb.\ll, 

"September 5, 1S36. Auctioneer." 

Add to such a household equipment a plow or two, an ax, saw and 
kindred tools, a yoke or two of oxen, now and then a team of horses, a variety 
of seed for planting the new land, a supply of provisions to last until the 
harvest, a few pictures, books and keepsakes from the far away home, and an 
old-style flintlock gun or two, and a small sum of money, and the material 
evidences of civilization and progress brought by pioneers are named. With 



54 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

the assistance of these they settled upon a virgin soil to wrest from nature the 
wealth she held ready for the laborer. With this primitive aid they were to 
build from the forest and hillside and develop from the willing earth a 
civilization unsurpassed by any. 

And last, but not least, they brought with them high ideals of manhood 
and womanhood, based on generations of right living. Religion and morality 
were to the pioneers of Kane county of first importance and its standards to 
them, actual breathing standards upon which the acti\"ities of life were based 
in manner unintelligible to the modern, whose church is more a meeting place 
than a sanctuary; a lecture platform than the voice of the living God. The 
pioneers were religious with sincerity, placing confidence in that Providence 
that attends to the fall of sparrows as with the lives of men. 

That they were so equipped and impressed upon the community in the 
early days the high standards of life held by them and brought with them to 
the West, has had much to do with the maintenance of a society distinguished 
for good citizenship and well ordered government and activities. Though 
their material possessions were small, their spiritual wealth was surpassed by 
few first settlements. 



CHAPTER VL 

WHAT THE PIONEERS DID AND HOW THEY LIVED. 

Were we to mount a canvass-topped lumber wagon, ride to the plains of 
the Dakotas, camping here and there by stream or hill, and one spring day 
pull up beneath a grove of trees upon some hill overlooking a valley of green 
and a river glistening a welcome from the surface of silver, we might renew 
the experience of those who in the '30s came from the East into the valley 
of the Fox — then a Far West country. Could we mount their slow, lumber- 
ing conveyance and rounding the lower end of Lake ^lichigan pull a winding, 
laborious route through hill and vale, along old buffalo paths and Indian trails, 
forty miles west to the Fox river, we should realize the coming of the pioneer. 

When he had arrived at his destination no friendly voice welcomed him. 
but only nature, indifferent to friend or foe. On some liillside under the trees 
overlooking the river running below the caravan would stop; sometimes three 
or four wagons ; more often but a single one. Preparations for camping would 
at once be started, and for some time following the white man and his family 
would live the way of the Indian — his "prairie schooner" his castle, and the 
wild wilderness of wood and prairie his domain. At once the newcomer would 
mark off the land he claimed by cutting the trees and driving pegs all around 
the piece ; or by running a plow around it, turning the sod as clear evidence of 
possession. Then would begin the building of a log cabin and the cultivation 
of a few acres of corn for corn bread, the staple food article of those days, and 
needed vegetables. Selecting the straightest timber at hand the ax soon 
brought enough logs to earth. These were notched at each end so as to fit 
together at the corners of the cabin, and the log given somewhat of a square 



KAISTE COUNTY HISTORY 55 

shape by rough hewing on four sides. These logs, laid one above another, 
crossing and dovetailing at the four corners, comprised the body and frame- 
work of the new home, which was usually built eight or ten feet high. A 
more fastidious settler would shape his logs nearly square, that they might set 
more closely together. Across the top of this frame logs were laid enclosing 
the living space of the house, one room, which would generally measure 
about sixteen by twenty feet. The upper layer of logs made the floor for the 
second or gable story of the building. To make the roof rough hewn boards 
were set at an ordinary roof angle, one over the other, as shingles are laid. 
Beneath these board shingles (usually three or four feet long and two to three 
feet wide) to support them logs were run across from the rear wall to the front 
wall, the end logs at the gables being cut to form a triangle and set one on the 
other, fastened together with wooden pegs. Betw-een the logs on all sides 
clav was forced, filling the spaces between as tightly as possible, to hold the 
elements at bay — a matter more often ardently attempted than successfully 
accomplished — for water will penetrate through the hardest clay on continued 
application. For a floor logs, one side of which had been hewn even by the 
broadaxe, were laid close together over the entire space and clay forced in 
between, making a fairly smooth surface, commonly termed the "puncheon" 
floor, serviceable for wear but not as well conditioned for dancing, for which 
purpose it many a time must serve. 

To the modern housekeeper accustomed to a gas range and modern con- 
veniences for conducting the home, the interior of that early sixteen by twenty 
residence, combining in one kitchen, parlor and bedroom, would present a 
puzzle she would be willing to undertake only on a summer outing. But to 
our esteemed ancestors it was a haven of toil and of rest, where existed all 
that was best of earth; w-here were enjoyed the highest gratifications of living; 
where w-ere born and bred some of the noblest women, the greatest of men. 

To enter this palace of the frontier you w^ould approach a wooden door 
hung on wooden hinges. Noting a string hanging about where the knob of a 
modern door would be, you would pull the string (the latch string) and raise 
the bar that ran across the door inside and locked it. The string ran down 
inside and was attached to the bar, which extended beyond the edge of the 
door into a socket of wood at the side. For extra security at night a large bar 
of oak was placed in position across the door and into sockets at either side. 
The ordinary bar hung on a wooden peg at one end, as on a hinge. The door 
was usually of oak boards, rough hewn, and held together by oak cross-pieces, 
in many cases nailed to the boards with wooden pegs, a hole being first bored 
with an auger and the peg forced into the hole. At other times nails were 
used, but with saving, as iron was scarce and high-priced. The door was no 
more than a hole sawed in the logs, the sawing having been done, however, 
before the logs were set. Pushing the door open and entering an interesting 
view would disclose itself. At the far end of the room an immense fireplace, 
eight or ten feet across (sometimes covering the entire end of the cabin), 
four or five feet high and four or five feet in depth, would be seen. The size 
of the fireplace would depend on the fancy and needs of the owner, there being 
no uniform size. Above the fireplace, which was in fact but the large lower 



56 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

end of the chimney, the chimney proper ran up abo\'e the roof, gradually 
growing smaller to assist the draft. This fireplace and chimney was com- 
monly built of twigs and sticks and clay ; the clay hardened, forming the chim- 
ney, the sticks holding it well together. On one side of the room would have 
been seen a low couch or bed built of logs and with a top of boards upon 
which lay quilts of different colors made by hand, and skins of deer, wolves 
and bears, and here and there a buffalo skin. The bed was usually hidden by 
a blanket or skins suspended to do service as a partition. 

The bed had neither head nor foot, but in many cases comprised merely a 
flat wooden frame on four rough cut wooden legs, the whole held together by 
wooden pegs driven into prepared holes. Sometimes rope was strung across 
in lieu of springs. 

Not far from the bed a table would be noted ; an oblong wooden frame, 
or probably a rough hewn board about two feet wide and six or eight feet 
long, set on posts. Near this the chairs or stools would stand, crudely built of 
a piece of board and three legs forced into holes bored in the seat. In a few- 
cabins a rocking chair brought from the East would be seen. Rugs of skin 
and home-made carpets were in some cabins spread upon the floor. 

A hole in one corner of the ceiling afforded entrance to the gable room 
above, used for sleeping and store room purposes. To mount to this upper 
floor required the agility of a squirrel, for, in many cases the only means of 
getting aloft was a series of pegs about two inches in diameter driven into 
holes bored in the logs. The pegs were usually two or three feet long and 
extended out from the wall, forming a ladder. More prosperous families 
would build a crude flight of steps at an angle of about sixty degrees, but 
economy of space did not usually warrant that luxury. All about die walls 
would also be seen pegs projecting out from six inches to a foot. Upon these 
garments, utensils, implements and weapons were hung in profusion, while the 
ceiling was well provided with the same supports, from which hung corn and 
seed of every description, as well as apples and fruits hung up to dry. An old 
settler remarks that he has seen ceilings so thickly hung with different things 
as to quite hide the logs. A window, a foot or two square, one on each side 
and sometimes one in front, built five or six feet from the ground, let in such 
light as the pioneer enjoyed. Glass was unseen, its place being taken by trans- 
parent skins stretched across a wooden frame hung on wooden hinges in the 
opening. A small window in the gable sometimes dimly lighted the upper 
room. If the pioneer gained time and prosperity enough to build a log cabin 
of two rooms his home was the envy of all his neighbors, for two rooms was a 
convenience seldom enjoyed in the early days, when the time was required for 
toil — toil in attending to growing crops, hunting, and going fifty miles to mill 
and to market. 

At the rear of the room about the fireplace and on the mantel that was 
usually built above it (a board six to eight feet long and a foot or two wide) 
were the implements of cooking suspended on pegs in the logs, or on a work 
table set against the wall. About the center of the roof of the fireplace would 
be seen an iron hook. Upon this were su.spended the kettles for the cooking of 
food ; a kettle hung on this hook coming well over the fire beneath, which was 




Group of Elgin Pioneers, 1806. 



■ KANE COUNTY HISTORY 59 

made up of green logs cut in the woods near by. In many instances logs of 
large size would last for hours once well ignited. A support for the logs was 
usually set in the middle of the fireplace, upon which one end of the log was 
set to allow the air to circulate under and between the timbers. By the side of 
this open grate the family gathered after the work of the winter's day, its 
virtue as a heat dispenser being much impaired, however, by the fact that it 
warmed but one side of the body at a time. 

Of pictures, books and the evidences of culture, taste and refinement 
common to the modern home the settlers possessed little or nothing. A copy 
of the Bible, a singing book and an occasional literary work of a religious trend 
comprised the average library. To cultivate the soil, look after the stock, 
provide shelter and fuel, maintain a clear conscience by the performance of 
religious service, and on occasion attend a wedding, dance or spelling school at 
the log schoolhouse or church, made up the pioneer's life. 

Having erected his log home, and often before, he would construct a rude 
shack for horses and cattle. Poles were driven into the ground with logs laid 
across the top and covered with grass and branches of trees, the sides made up 
of brush, trees and grass packed together for walls. In this shed cattle were 
kept with fair comfort. Near by an improvised chicken coop and pig pen 
would soon be seen. 

Much of the spare time of the earlier settlers was employed in "splitting 
rails" for use in making fences. Many cut rails and sold them to others. 
Mile upon mile of these fences may still be seen in northern Indiana and Illi- 
nois, but have largely disappeared in Kane county, giving place to the more 
modern wire fences. 

There existed no roads in the modern sense. Paths ran through the 
woods, circling around hills, through valleys and over the forks of rivers. 
There were few fences to interfere. The soil was soft and the heavy wagons 
would sink into the soft earth, making a trip of ten miles a day's work. 

Prairie fires wen expected every fall as the tall prairie grass dried. At 
places the grass remained uncut for many years and became thick and high. 
Once well started in a good wind, a prairie fire would travel as fast as horses 
could run and would destroy everything in its path. Many devices were 
employed by the settlers to protect their lives and property from these dreaded 
visitors, which in the fall of the year could be seen like a fiery snake creeping 
across the prairie three or four miles away. It was customary for all the 
farmers to plow the earth all around their buildings and land to be protected. 
Usually a space fifteen to twenty feet wide would be turned as a bunker for the 
oncoming flames. But often in a high wind the flames would jump the plowed 
space and ignite material on the other side. The more effective method of 
combating the prairie tire was what was known as "back-firing." This was 
done by burning the grass away ahead of the apprc>aching fire. Often the 
entire population of the neighborhood would "back-fire" and by leaving a large 
burned space in advance of the flames check their progress. Nothing was more 
feared by the pioneer than these fires that came like a thief in the night and 
left behind destruction and ruin. With the cultivation of the prairies and the 
replacing of the tall prairie grass by cultivated products these fires disappeared. 



60 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

The food staples of the pioneer were rye bread and corn bread. The 
tiour was made in the earlier days by grinding the grain upon a hollowed out 
stone with a stone pestle, much after the primitive style of the Indian. Meat 
such as was obtainable was raised or hunted. Fish, with which the rivers fur- 
nished abundant supply, were caught with hook and seine and salted in large 
quantities by the individual families. Fishing "bees" were customary. The 
owner of a seine would loan it to a number of men, the price being three or 
four dollars for a day's rental. They would seine in company and divide the 
"catch." Beef, pork and mutton were common meats. Apple, cherry, pie 
plant, custard, pumpkin, egg and mince pie were among the delicacies. Mince 
pies were made and allowed to freeze. They were then warmed up by steaming 
in a "colander" over the kettle in which potatoes were boiling. There were 
no stoves in that day of beginnings, and for a time everything was cooked in 
the open fireplace. Later the old brick oven was invented by some pioneer 
and for years served the purpose of the modern range. This brick oven was 
built outside the house or near it. Rough stones and earth were so piled up as 
to leave a space about five feet long and four feet wide. This space was lined 
with brick and an arch was made of mortar, the top being covered with earth. 
A hole was left at the far end for draft and smoke. A crude door was built 
in front. The method of using this brick oven was to fill the space full of 
wood, which was ignited and allowed to burn until the bricks were red hot. 
The wood and burned material was then pulled out. Meats, pies, etc., were 
then jnit into the heated interior and the door closed. Pioneers claim that no 
motlern stove cooks as did this brick oven. No such rich pies, no such juicy 
meats are to be had by modern methods as came from this early device, now 
forgotten. 

The clothing of the settlers was likewise largely home-made of what was 
known as "homespun" material, it being rare that a pioneer possessed store- 
made clothes. Wool from the sheep, or flax, were the materials used. The 
sheep's fleece was washed by the women, who were the makers of clothes in 
that day, to remove the grease. It was then "carded," i. e.. made up into 
long rough rolls about two feet long and an inch across. This roll was then 
placed in the old-fashioned spinning wheel and spun into a yarn, which was 
wound upon rough spindles. This yarn was then worked up into cloth upon 
the home-made loom, with which most log houses were provided, and which the 
hou.sewife worked by hand and foot. A housewife C(juld average a yard or 
two each day and do her housework. 

Shoes were supplied the family by a traveling shoemaker. This itinerant 
cobbler would put up at a settler's house for a week or longer and make up 
shoes, usually of heavy calf leather, for the entire family. The leather was 
either furnished by the farmer or bought at the tannery by the cobbler, who 
was repaid for the raw material l)ut charged only for his labor as reward to 
himself. These boots and shoes would ordinarily last a year. 

Hats were usually made by the women of the family by weaving them 
from rice and wheat straw. For winter wear they were made of skins, 
coonskins being mostly used. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 61 

Linen was little used about the household, although a tablecloth of linen 
was usually kept in exclusion for use in case "company" came. 

For lighting purposes, to supplement the fireplace, home-made candles 
were universally employed. Kerosene lamps, which were considered as great 
an invention at that time as Edison's electric light is now, came into use in the 
'50s. Before that time and long after the women "dipped" their own candles. 
Cotton strings were hung on a stick, the threads being tied on the stick at 
intervals of two or three inches and six or a dozen on the stick. The threads 
as they hung down loose being about a foot long, were dipped together into a 
deep receptacle filled with melted tallow. A small portion of the tallow would 
adhere to the suspended string. The stick was then lifted out and hung up 
until the tallow hardened. It was then dipped again and again, each time 
accumulating an additional amount of tallow. When the tallow was about an 
inch in diameter the candle was complete for use. For use the string was 
ignited and by absorbing the melting tallow oil maintained a light that would 
last several hours. 

A device more crude than this was made by placing a string in a saucer- 
shaped vessel and filling the vessel with tallow or other oil. By igniting the 
string a crude candle was realized. Gas was not used until after the Ci\i\ war, 
and electric light was unknown in 1880. 

SOCIAL LIFE. 

Social events among those who first came to the West was like the coming 
of a circus for a small boy, rare but welcome facts. With a wilderness to 
conquer and a home to build without other assistance than the primitive imple- 
ments, men and women had no more time for social affairs than has the modern 
workman who, when the day's toil is ended, is well pleased to rest and recuper- 
ate. But among the younger people the neighborhood gatherings were not 
infrequent. Spelling schools and exhibitions, quilting bees, husking bees, etc.. 
furnished many opportunities for the settlers to gather together for mutual help 
and amusement. Spelling schools were popular, sometimes three or four occur- 
ring the same week at different schools, the entertainment moving from school 
to school. Often the contestants and visitors would come ten or fifteen miles 
to attend. 

The news of such an event was communicated from house to house by 
those passing — whoe\-er knew of the event being supposed to acquaint any he 
might see with the coming exhibition. Ordinarily a competition would be 
arranged between different schools or localities. The country teacher was 
usually in charge of the affair. All who were to spell stood up in two rows, 
one on each side of the room, the spectators occupying the seats between. The 
teachers (mostly men) would sometimes assist their sides. A word would 
be given the first one in the line. If he or she missed she sat down. Then the 
word if missed was given to the first of the other side. Whoever missed sat 
down. The side first all down were defeated. Sometimes in place of a com- 
petition sides would be chosen and a "general" spell indulged in. After the 
"spell down" a visiting interval was had, then speaking, and the evening closed 
with a second "spell down." 



62 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Not the least enjoyable part of these events was the coming and going. 
Being usually during the winter season, a sleigh was provided in which a 
dozen or fifteen couple would be stowed away and a merry time had. 

Dancing parties occurred about every two weeks, being held, in the early 
days, in the settlers' houses. The Virginia reel, "duck dive" and round dance 
were usual. The waltz and two-step now customary would have been an 
undreamed of pleasure on the rough board floor of the log cabin. The charge 
per couple was usually one dollar. A fiddler sat at the end of the room on a 
box or table; sometimes two fiddlers. Often the dance was given in the barn, 
which was larger than the house. The dance would begin at nine or ten and 
end at daylight. The "boys" would drive up to the cabin of the young lady 
he desired as "company" at the dance, and although she had no prior notice 
she was usually ready in ten or fifteen minutes. 

The various "bees" that were held from time to time afforded the early 
settlers amusement and at the same time accomplished useful work. Here the 
entire neighborhood would gather at one house and all make quilts, or pare, 
cut and string apples, or husk corn, as the occasion required. And there were 
house-raising bees, in which a new settler having cut his logs would be assisted 
by all in the erection of his home. Prizes were usually presented to winners 
at husking, paring, etc. 

In addition to these e\"ents Christmas, Thanksgiving and the Fourth of 
July were always occasions for special doings. The enthusiasm and patriotism 
of the pioneers on the Fourth of July can scarcely be concei\-ed by the modern 
citizen who thinks of it mostly as a day for a picnic or for the production of as 
much noise as possible. 

Then, too, there were church events, which, among a people so many of 
whom were devout religionists, were of large importance. Everyone attended 
church. Meetings were held in the schoolhouses before churches were built, 
and in the cabins before there were schools ; prayer meetings weekly. Nearly 
all the modern denominations were represented. Presbyterians of Scotch descent 
and Methodists being most numerous. There being no regular preachers, the 
pulpits were filled by the old-time circuit preachers, who came with fiery and 
earnest messages, and moved on to the next place. His compensation 
seems to have been such material comfort as the settlers provided and the 
consciousness of serving his God. 

Of the other side of pioneer life — the criminal and vicious — there is also 
evidence. Horse stealing was always to be guarded against and was usually 
punished with the severity usual where horses are rare possessions. Over- 
indulgence in intoxicants was not infrequent, particularly at public events, 
and owing to the absence of well established government often resulted in a 
general town fight between elements from different parts. In Kane county all 
large affairs usually occurred at St. Charles, where many such melees are said 
to have occurred. Claim jumping was a universal evil, so extensive in fact 
that committees were appointed to judge such cases. !\Iany stories are told of 
such contests from Dundee to Aurora. The decision of such a decision is still 
in existence, the following cut being photographic copy. In this case, as 
appears from reading the letter of James C. Hanks, Hanks, to whom the land 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 



63 



was finally given, got into a controversy with a Thos. Deweese, and to end 
the affair Deweese knocked Hanks down with a stone. 







"^J ^7" 



^-A-J^ 



JUDGMENT OF A "CLAIM JUMPERS COMMITTEE." 



In Dundee township this same Deweese had trouble over land he claimed 
there. Jesse C. Kellogg wrote in 1885 of the measures taken by the settlers 
to protect their lands, as follows : 

" 'In those days, there being no king in Israel, every man did that which 
seemed right in his own eyes." The size of claims, therefore, varied from two 
eighties of prairie and one of timber to a half section of timber and a tract of 
prairie two miles square. Some assumed the right to make and hold claims 
by proxy, being thereunto duly authorized by some brother, sister, uncle, cousin, 
aunt or friend. Meanwhile new settlers poured in apace, astonished to find the 
choice timber and prairie 'blazed' and 'furrowed' into claims, whose ample 
acres the claimant with all his children, uncles, aunts and cousins to the 'third 
and fourth generation' would never be able to till or occupy. The new settler, 
perplexed, baffled and becoming more and more desperate on finding 'God's 
green earth' thus monopolized, would approach his more fortunate neighbor 
with the spirit of Abraham to Lot: 'Now, I have come a great way to get 
some of this timber and prairie and one thing is certain, I am going to have 
some. There is enough for vou and me and our bovs. Now don't let us 



64 KANE COUNTY HT^TORY 

quarrel. You turn to the right and I will turn to the left, or vice versa." 
Sometimes this good Scripture and consecjuently good common sense logic 
would win. but in other cases the grasping spirit of the borderer would stave 
ofif all kind of division or compromise, and laying his hand upon his rifle he 
would bluster and threaten in "great swelling words' and drive away the 
stranger from his right. Hereupon arose innumerable disputes and wrangles 
concerning the size, tenure and boundaries of claims. The more reflecting 
among the settlers saw a dark cloud, big with the elements of strife and 
social disorder, gathering in the not very distant horizon, whose tornado 
blasts threatened soon to lay waste all that was of value in the rising com- 
munity. There was no municipal law reaching these cases and if there had 
been the settlers probably would have been none the better for it. for it is 
believed that at this period there was neither a justice nor a statute book 
north of the Illinois river and w-est of Fort Dearborn, unless we except 
Ottawa and Chicago. A\'rongs and outrages for which there was no known 
legal redress were being multiplied. Blackened eyes, blood}' noses and chewed 
ears were living realities, while the dirk, pistol, rifle, with something like 
'cold lead.' were significantly talked of as likely to bring about some 'realities' 
which might not be "living." What could be done to insure domestic tran- 
quillity, promote the general welfare and secure to each settler his right? 
Evidently but one thing. Happily some had seen something in the New 
Testament about those who are without law unto themselves, and settlers 
found themselves in this fix exactly. It was. therefore, apparent both from 
Scripture and reason that the settlers must become "a law unto themselves' 
and 'where there was a will there was a way." 'A settlers" meeting" at a given 
time and place therefore came to be the \\ atchword from shanty to wagon 
until all were alarmed. Pursuant to this proclamation a heap of law and 
order loving American citizens convened on September 5. 1835, at the shanty 
of Harmon Miller, standing on the east bank of the Kishwaukee, nearly oppo- 
site the present residence of \Villiam A. Miller in the town of Kingston. 
Happily the best possible spirit prevailed. The Hoosier from the Wabash, 
the Buckeve from Ohio, the hunter from Kentucky, the calculating Yankee, 
brother Jonathan's 'first born' and the "beginning of his strength.' impelled 
by a sense of mutual danger, hereby sat down in grave council to dictate 
laws to Kishwaukee 'and the region lying around about through all the coasts 
thereof.' Hon. Levi Lee, now chairman of a committee to report on petitions 
for the ']Maine law" in the legislature of Wisconsin, was chosen to preside 
over this august assemblage, where the three great departments of free 
governments, the executive, the legislative and the judicial, were most happily 
united, and Captain Eli Barnes was appointed secretary. Gently glided the 
sometimes turbid waters of the 'ancient river.' the sonorous Kishwaukee, as 
speech after speech setting forth the woes and wants of the settlers, the kind 
of legislation demanded by the crisis, went the rounds. Even those who were 
not 'used to talkin" much afore folks' evinced their cordial approbation and 
readiness to cooperate by doing up an amount of encoring which, no doubt, 
really did 'astonish the natives.' At last, ripe for immediate action, a com- 
mittee was selected to draft and present to the meeting a constitution and 




OLD FORDIXG PLACE USED BEFORE BRIDGE WAS 
BUILT, ELGIN. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 67 

by-laws by wbich the 'settlers upon the public lands' should be governed. 
After some little deliberation back of the shanty, around the stump of a big 
white oak, which served as a writing desk, said committee reported a pre- 
amble, constitution and by-laws, which for simplicity and brevity and adapta- 
tion to necessity it would be hard for any modern legislation to beat. The 
self-evident truths proclaimed by Jefferson in the immortal declaration, it is 
believed, were the first time reiterated on the banks of the Kishwaukee, and 
had there been a little more time for reflection and preparation the top of 
some settlers" wagons would have been converted into the 'Star Spangled 
Banner' and thrown to the breezes of heaven from the tallest tree top in the 
grove. The common sense, law and logic, as well as patriotism, contained in 
this constitution and by-laws were instantaneously recognized to be the very 
things demanded by the crisis and were adopted with unparalleled enthusiasm, 
each subscribing his name thereto with his own hand, thereby pledging his 
'life,' 'fortune' and 'sacred honor' to carry out the provisions of the code. 
It is not known that a copy of this singularly unique document is now extant. 
As nearly as can be recollected its provisions were somewhat as follows : A 
prudential committee were to be t'hen and there chosen, whose duty it should 
be 'to examine into, hear and finally determine all disputes and differences 
then existing or which thereafter might arise between settlers in relation to 
their claims,' and whose decisions with certain salutary checks were to be 
binding upon all parties and to be carried out at all hazards by the three 
departments of government consolidated in aid of the executive, in what 
jurists sometimes dominate the 'posse comitatus.' Each settler was 
solemnly pledged to protect every other settler in the association in the peace- 
able enjoyment of 'his or her claim as aforesaid,' and further, whoever 
throughout all Kishwaukee or the suburbs or coasts thereof should refuse to 
recognize the authority of the aforesaid association and render due obedience 
to the laws enacted by the same from time to time 'to promote the general 
welfare" should be deemed a heathen, a publican and an outlaw, with whom 
they were pledged to have no communication or fellowship. Thus was a wall 
affcjrding protection to honest settlers built in troublous times. The thing 
worked like a charm and the value of these associations in northern Illinois 
to the infant settlements has never been overestimated. Similar associations 
were form.ed and maintained in Somonauk and other portions of the county, 
until the lands came into market. This event took place in Chicago in 1843, 
when the land was sold to the highest bidder ; that is. so far as 'terra firma" is 
concerned. The moral as well as the physical power of 'settlers' associations' 
was so great that if a speculator presumed to bid on a settler's claim he was 
certain to find himself 'knocked down and dragged out,' and had the land 
officer shown the least sympathy or favor to the 'rascal' there can be no 
doubt but what an indignant and outraged yeomanry would have literally 
torn the land office to fragments 'in no time.' " 

Such was the life of the pioneer, rough and free; filled with toil from 
day to day, for men, women and children, with an hour of pleasure and 
pastime between. An unending contest with nature. That results have 
justified those who came here and laid the foundations of a civilization that is 



68 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

unsurpassed in attainments, material, spiritual and moral, none will deny; 
and that what has resulted has come from the wisdom of those hardy men 
who here first turned the soil who will gainsay ? 

From a wilderness of wood and prairie communities second to none have 
been built. In 1834, those who came found no inhabitants but the primitive 
Indian. At once they set about establishing the civilization and standards of 
white men. Roads were laid out and opened, bridges built, mills erected from 
Dundee to Aurora. Tilled fields everywhere gave their products. Saw mills 
followed. Manufacturing plants were not long in coming. The first rail- 
road was laid and opened for trafiic in . Progress, material and social, 

advanced until today Kane stands third in population and wealth in the state; 
its cities send goods to the far ends of the world, and their names are known 
and respected in every place. 

MARRIAGE .SCENES IN PIONEER DAYS. 

Excerpts from Judge Caton's reminiscences. 

I stood up before them and asked them in English if they wished to 
enter into the contract of marriage. When Kinzie, acting as interpreter, 
asked them if they wanted to get married they both answered "We! We!" 
with an inclination of the head and an emphasis which showed that they 
were in earnest. I then told them to join their right hands, which, when it 
was interpreted, they obeyed. I then went through with a rather short cere- 
mony, making them promise enough, if they kept all. to secure a life of happi- 
ness, which Kinzie interpreted sentence by sentence, and then I pronounced 
them man and wife in as solemn a voice as I could assume, and told the groom 
to kiss his bride, which, when he understood the command, he did with anima- 
tion, while the bride seemed becomingly embarrassed. It was evident that 
she would have preferred to have had that part of the ceremony a little more 
private. 

After this all were seated on benches, boxes and stools, except the bride 
and groom and myself, who occupied the only three chairs in the house, 
which had probably been borrowed for the occasion. Some refreshments 
were then served, including a sort of whisky punch ; after this I left them to 
have a good, jolly time among themsehes. As I left, Kinzie slipped into 
my hand the silver dollar allowed by law. 

Not many days after the matrimonial event last described, a couple of 
rather ragged, barefooted boys called at my office and told me that I was wanted 
at their house to marry their sister. Careful inquiry informed me that they 
lived in a log house in the woods about two miles north of town, that their 
name was Cleveland, and that the party was already waiting for the squire. 
I recognized the house by their description as one which I had seen when 
out hunting in that direction, and as soon as I could prepare myself properly, 
I procured a horse and rode out to the rural abode of Mr. Cleveland. On ar- 
riving. I hitched my horse to a sapling near by and went in. I was greeted 
by the matron of the house, who was a fat, robust looking woman, while Mr. 
Cleveland was a tall, spare man with a very fair complexion; I may say he 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 69 

was a pronounced blonde. There was but one room in the house, though 
that was of good size. It served as kitchen, drawing room, reception room, 
parlor and dressing room, and, no doubt, as sleeping room for the whole 
family, though no sign of a bed appeared. 

The old lady bustled about till she found the washboard, which she deftly 
clapped onto the frame of a chair from which the splint bottom had long since 
disappeared, and invited me to be seated, and I was seated, and wiped from 
my forehead the fast flowing perspiration provoked by a very warm July day. 
A survey of the reception room disclosed no furniture except a deal table, the 
seat which I occupied and several benches of dififerent lengths, not to mention 
some pots and kettles in the corner of the great fireplace, and some shelves 
in one corner on which were some tin plates and cups and other table furni- 
ture, by no means extravagant. Near this sat the master of the mansion, 
who might have been fifty-five years old, and opposite to him sat, on another 
stool, a soldier from the garrison, as I judged from the clothes he wore. I 
soon observed that one corner of the room was cut off by old quilts and other 
articles of bedding, and by the agitation and whispering, this was evidently 
occupied. As it proved this was the dressing room in which the bride was 
being adorned. 

After a while the curtain was raised, and the bridal party came forth from 
the secluded corner and burst upon us like — like — I am at a loss to find a fair 
comparison. First came the two younger sisters. They were of medium 
height for their ages, and slightly built, and really handsome, one perhaps 
fifteen and the other eighteen, decently and plainly dressed, but neatly. One 
of these, the eldest, I recognized as having seen at Ingersol's hotel at Wolf 
Point, waiting on the table. They were followed by the bride, gayly decked 
out in furbelows. 

Two boys walked into the house covered with perspiration and dust, 
each one having a gallon jug strapped to his back. Our hostess soon undid 
the straps and placed the jugs on the table, scolding the boys roundly for 
their tardiness, while they protested they had fairly run their legs off, in order 
to get back in time to see the fun. Madame soon found a milk pan, into which 
she put a cup of molasses from one jug, and then a cup of whisky from the 
other, and then a cup of cold water from a pail standing under a table; after 
she had thus measured out about six quarts, she went at it with a large 
wooden spoon and stirred it up lively. When sufificiently mixed, the good 
and hospitable lady took a tin cup and dipped it partly full and presented it 
to me, saying, "Squire, are you fond of blackstrap? I always had a knack 
for making blackstrap, and you shall try it first, though you ain't the oldest, 
I guess." 

I protested that blackstrap was my delight and the only drink I ever 
indulged in, and after putting it to my lips pretended to drink heartily. I 
was so busy praising the beverage that I doubt if she observed whether I 
drank or not. I then pased the cup to mine host, who smacked his lips after 
a few swallows as if he were well used to the exercise. He refilled the cup and 
passed it to the son of Mars, who did ample justice to the skill of his future 
mother-in-law and then passed it to the bride, and thence it proceeded to the 



70 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

other members of the family. This refreshing scene occurred before the mar- 
riage ceremony, an innovation no doubt born of the behef that it was the 
most important. 

One Saturday in March, 1835, I was called upon at my office by a stout, 
vigorous young farmer named Powell, and requested to go the next day about 
sixteen miles up the north branch, and unite him in marriage to a young lady 
living in a log house at Dutchman's Point. 

The low, flat prairie was covered with water for the first eight or nine 
miles which splashed up at every step, and frequently the horse would step 
close beside a crawfish hole, with which the prairie was honeycombed, when the 
water would shoot up like a geyser to the height of several feet, often giving 
me a good sprinkling of the muddy water and more than once striking me 
fairly in the face. I had taken the precaution to tie a wrap around my neck 
so as to protect my shirt collar and bosom, .long leggins protected my lower 
garments, and the overcoat received most of the showers of mud which 
came above my knees. But the boots! Nothing could be done for them, 
and they were soon so soiled that their color was indistinguishable. But that 
was no matter. Everybody was prepared to make allowances for that condi- 
tion of things, so I gave myself no trouble about it. 

At length, after I had covered eight or nine miles of this low, wet prairie. 
I struck higher ground and it was possible to increase my speed, which I 
did, for I saw I was likely to be late to the wedding. I, however, arrived 
at the designated place in good time. The house was a large, commodious 
log structure with several rooms on the ground floor. What was most 
cheering to me was a great wood fire in an old-fashioned fireplace at one 
end of the house, which would admit great logs four or five feet in length, 
and seemed big enough to roast an ox. The fire was occupied by the culinary 
operations, which were going on. A fine turkey and a plump pig, which were 
suspended before it and were constantly being basted by a ten-year-old boy, 
whose face was as red as a beet, diffused through the room an appetizing fra- 
grance which made me rejoice that dinner time was rapidly approaching, 
and my mouth fairly watered at the thought. A nice party of well dressed 
country people occupied the room, who were as chatty and as jolly as the 
occasion required. Powell met me at the door and without giving me time 
to take off my muddy wraps led me direct to the bride, to whom he intro- 
duced me with a flourish, which showed that the situation produced in him no 
more embarrassment than as if he had been married once a week for the last 
five years. Not so, however, with the girl ; she seemed considerably embar- 
rassed as all eyes were turned upon her. She was taller than the average 
of women, and fairly stout in proportion. Indeed, she was a large, well 
formed woman of fair complexion. She was decidedly awkward in her 
actions, evidently having seen but little of even country society. This might 
have been expected when neighbors were miles away, and she probably had 
not a single acquaintance in town, and had never been there more than to 
pass through it on her way west. In fine, she was troubled to know where to 
put her hands and feet. 



ta- * 



.l,UNK[«,u 




LOOKING UP NORTH BROADWAY, AURORA, ABOUT 1855. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 73 

Well, I married them good and strong, but at the conclusion I thought 
I would not gratify the groom's love of display and increase the bride's em- 
barrassment by directing him to salute his bride, yet he did it all the same, 
and she submitted meekly, as if it were inevitable, as he had no doubt in- 
formed her that it was indispensable to a good marriage. 

It was dark when we arrived at the log cabin of the settler, who was 
among the first to locate in the O'Plane timber. It was a good sized, com- 
modious house for a frontier settler, and all about bespoke neatness and 
respectability. Several of the neighbors were assembled to witness the cere- 
mony. Angeline introduced me to them all. for she had made the acquaint- 
ance of nearly all of the settlers for miles around. She had giv-en me no 
description of the bride or groom, only that they knew nothing of what is 
called society, but had only associated with frontier life, and that the bride's 
family belonged to the Society of Friends, and so I must expect to see every- 
thing plain — very plain. As my family belonged to that society and I had 
been brought up under its teachings, I was glad to learn that I should meet 
some of that faith which my mother so much loved, out on this remote 
frontier. 

Angeline had already told them of my antecedents in this regard, and 
doubtless this had its influence in the selection which was made of the offici- 
ating officer, for the Friends will- tolerate a marriage ceremony performed 
by a civil magistrate, while they cannot, with a clear conscience, be present 
at one celebrated by a preacher of another denomination. 

The bride was young, and the groom was not many years her senior. 
She was quite plain looking, but he was one of the handsomest young men 
I ever saw. His was not an efifeminate, delicate beauty, but a manly, sturdy 
beauty, if that term be proper when speaking of one of medium size, yet 
of a powerful build, uniform features, a frank, open and winning counte- 
nance, toward whom one felt oneself drawn as if by a cord of friendship, 
not to say admiration, at first sight. He was a decided brunette, but this 
rather added to his manly beauty. I soon learned that he was as unacquainted 
with the ways of the world as one who had spent his life on a farm well 
could be, and had never been in any town more than to pass through it, and 
had only associated with those in similar conditions. He was of good natural 
parts and a clear intellect. 

He soon intimated to me that he would like to see me alone, so we 
took a walk out of doors, when he told me that he had never seen a wedding, 
and would like to be instructed as to the mode of proceeding and what he 
was expected to do. I then rehearsed to him the order of the ceremony to 
its conclusion, that he would have nothing to do but to assent to the ques- 
tions which I should ask him, and to join right hands with the lady. That 
at the conclusion of the ceremony I should direct him to salute his bride, 
which he must do as an evidence that he recognized her as his lawful wife; 
this meant that he should kiss her then and there. 

In the meantime Angeline had been getting the bride ready for the 
dread event. She, too, had never witnessed a wedding and knew nothing of 
its proceedings, but had some idea of its consequences. 



74 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

The bridesmaid gave her minute instructions as to how she should 
act her part, but carefully abstained from any intimations to the concluding 
performance, about which I was so particular to instruct the groom. 

When we returned to the house the party seemed to be in waiting for 
us. The bride and bridesmaid were seated by themselves at one end of the 
room, while the company were seated as far away as they could get. As 
I saw everything was ready, I told the groom to take his place at the right 
hand of the bride, who, with the bridesmaid, rose to her feet in good order. 
She was dressed in white muslin, as was befitting, but the pattern of the 
\vedding garment was very domestic and unique. In short, it was precisely 
that of a lady's nightgown with a yoke at the top and a most elaborate skirt 
and large sleeves. This Angeline had gathered around the waist with a 
broad, red ribbon, which I think she had brought along for the purpose, as a 
sort of wedding present, for I afterward learned that she had planned that 
wedding costume to suit her own fancy, or, I may say, freak. It was in the 
main well adapted to the plain and simple taste of the Friends, though the 
red belt and big bow in front were a reluctant concession to the vanities 
of the world. The hair of each of the ladies was disposed of in the plainest 
possible way and without the least ornament, and I, who had in early life 
been taught to admire plainness in everything, thought they really looked 
beautiful. 

I placed myself in the space in front of the bridal party and then asked 
the company to arise. I proceeded to deliver a lecture upon the solemnity of 
the occasion and the great responsibilities which these parties were about to 
assume, and how they should bear themselves toward each other in order to 
insure the greatest amount of domestic happiness, and all of that. During 
this delivery I tried to imagine myself a person of fifty, who knew well what 
he was talking about, instead of a young squire of twenty-three. 

I knew Miss Talcott was all the while trjang to catch my eye so that 
by some ludicrous or grotesque look or expression of countenance she could 
make me break down or make me laugh, but I refused to gratify that desire, 
and kept my eyes steadily fixed upon the two interested parties, who were a 
real study at that time. 

At the close of my lecture I proceeded with the ceremony proper, w^hich 
I soon concluded and pronounced them man and wife, when I directed the 
groom to salute his bride. As this was the part he had no doubt most held 
in expectation, he made a fierce grab at his new-made wife and attempted 
to execute the order. This was entirely unexpected by her, and as she 
probably had no idea of the meaning of the direction which I had given, she, 
no doubt, thought the young man had lost his mental balance as she had 
nearly done herself; she rushed away from the supposed madman in real 
terror and actually fought back in a cat-like manner. But he was equal to 
the occasion, and followed her up with such manly vigor, quite to the corner 
of the room, to which she retreated, that by his superior strength he accom- 
plished his purpose with such a smack that it could have been heard out of 
doors. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 75 

When she was released from the embrace of her stalwart husband, she 
had nearly fainted, but Angeline came to her support and assured her that 
it was all right and a necessary part of the ceremony which she had unfor- 
tunately neglected to explain to her. It took some time, however, to recon- 
cile her to having been kissed by a man in so public a way, and Angeline 
said she much doubted whether he had ever kissed her before in his life. 

This rumpus was enjoyed by the mischievous bridesmaid beyond meas- 
ure, and she could hardly refrain from laughing outright and boisterously at 
the ludicrous figure which the scene presented. Her plans had worked to a 
charm and just as the ingenious girl had hoped. Most of the company stared 
upon the scene as if a cataclysm was actually taking place, though a few 
plainly understood and enjoyed it. 

After this funny episode had terminated and Angeline had got the parties 
back to their places, though it was difficult to make the timid bride under- 
stand that all was not yet over, I stepped up to the married couple and 
shook their hands and warmly congratulated them on the happy change which 
had now taken place in their life history, though I doubt if the abashed girl 
understood a word I said ; but the groom e\idently enjoyed the situation in 
a calm and confident manner. I was stubbornly blind and deaf to all the winks 
and nods of the roguish bridesmaid to go further and kiss the bride myself. 
I felt it would have been a cruelty to have further embarrassed the timid 
creature, especially as I felt sure that Angeline would have assured all the 
rest that it was the proper thing for each one to do the same thing. 

When I turned away, leaving half of the program unexecuted, the brides- 
maid hastened up to the father and mother of the bride and by mere force 
rushed them up to the wedded pair to kiss and congratulate their daughter, 
and assured the good lady that it would be a clear slight if she should omit 
that mark of respect for her son-in-law. Her confident impetuosity carried 
her point, and the young man took the salute of his new mamma, if not with 
a hearty relish, at least with a benign resignation. The father kissed his 
daughter with an affectionate tenderness which plainly bespoke the depth of 
the love he felt for her, and she received it as if it was a daily occurrence 
and carried a blessing with it. All efforts to get the rest of the company 
to follow up the assault proved abortive, and soon the order of the gathering 
was broken up. Then we did our best to inspire a lively mood and not en- 
tirely without success. I talked with all of the oldest people in the room on 
such subjects as I thought would most interest them, and it was not difficult 
to get on free and easy terms with them all. 



CHAPTER VII. 



LETTERS OF JAMES C. HANKS. 



The following are authenticated letters of James C. Hanks, the first 
white man who settled in the northern part of Kane County and who is 
credited with having written letters (possibly the same here presented) 



76 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

that induced tlie Giffords and other pioneers to come west. The series cover 
the period from 1834 to 1838. during which year Mr. Hanks died. His 
grave is still to be seen in the old cemetery at Elgin in Channing street, 
where the remains of his father, B. Hanks, are also interred. The originals, 
of which the following are true copies, are now owned by Mr. Arthur B. 
Hinsdell, by whose kindness they are here presented. The series show, 
as does no presentation of facts, the struggles of the pioneers, the conditions 
they met and the character of men they were. 

Far West, Galena Lead ]\Iines, October 17, 1834. 
Beloved and kind parents : 

After a stroll of three miles out of town to see the waters of the 
Mississippi. I find time to ease your anxiety for the present concerning your 
far distant son. 

You, I suppose, have heard by John's leter that I started afoot and alone 
for the far West. From Chicago about fifteen miles west the land is poor 
and level; after this there is but very little level land to the Mississippi. For 
the first hundred miles in my travel I saw none but what was tillable and the 
greater part of it as fine a soil as I ever saw, the land just rolling enough for 
convenience and beauty. Since that not one-fourth of the country is tillable. 
It outdoes the turnpike for steepness and continuation of hills though not 
so high. I found the boys Tuesday noon within six miles of the highest 
settlers on Fox river. This handsome river is about fifty rods wide, a siiallow 
stream with gravel bottom. We spent two and a half days up the river looking 
for locations and in justice to the country I must say that in goodness it sur- 
passes anything that I have yet seen ; so much so that I am perfectly satisfied 
with the choice I there made. 

My claim and Elisha's are joining, six miles above any settlers and about 
three miles from the river on the east side on a stream of water about the size 
of Spaldings spring run with a grave! bottom, three feet bank, and dry. The 
land begins to rise from the banks. For beauty, convenience and goodness 
take the three together, and I think my choice surpasses any lands I ever 
saw. The soil when plowed up and wet is so black that it would be difficult 
to distinguish l)y the color between a pile of charcoal and of earth the 
distance of thirty rods. The prairie is on the creek, and timber back, which is an 
uncommon thing in this country. The prairie land rises from the creek about 
three feet in a hundred, the timljer more; for further particulars look at my 
map. John's claim is about ten miles from mine on the other side of the river 
in tlie settlement. His is a good claim; creek on one side. There is a chance for 
a number of good farms joining mine not yet taken. They are now running 
a straight road from Chicago to Galena, which will go somewhere between 
John's and my claim; then I shall not be more than thirty miles from Chicago. 
But from these pleasing news to my sad tale. The boys started for Chicago. 
I started for Galena alone; down the river for fifteen miles, the most of 
the way my road notliing but an Indian trail. I got witliin two miles of the 
Galena road and a man told me that if I would strike across the prairie 
I would gain two miles and would reach a house where tliey keep travelers. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 77 

About 4 o'clock, I had three crackers in my pocket, so I thought I would do 
without my dinner for the sake of gaining two miles. I soon reached the 
Galena road, the best one for walking I ever saw ; I pushed cheerfully along, 
not knowing any more about the road than you do, except that the houses 
were scattering and that it was necessary for a fellow to have his pockets 
full of provision, which I had intended doing when necessary. I kept the 
main road though there were paths ; put off until 5 o'clock looking for a house 
and I saw none. I began to mistrust that I might have come past it, but 
could not fully believe it until 7 or 8 o'clock, then I gave it up that I had 
passed it. 

The prairies were afire all around me; I had to pass through one chain. 
A prairie fire is about as large and handsome as that hill fire which came from 
Mr. Farnum's two years ago. At 8 o'clock I came to a creek on the edge of 
the prairie, and as the prairies were from three to ten miles across, and 
finding some straw which assured me no house was near, I gathered the straw 
in one arm and found a bush in which I fastened my umbrella to break off 
the wind from me, I committed myself to the care of my Maker and laid 
down. Here you may think not to sleep, but I can assure you that I was 
not afraid and I slept half of the night. The fires that were burning on 
all sides of me at night had disappeared in the morning. In the morning I 
was faint from fasting, but moderately traveled on, expecting that I would 
soon find a house. My first prairie was about ten miles across, and half the 
way I could not see a tree in any direction. The smoke prevented my seeing 
more than three miles, when I espied a woods ahead. Hope revived and I 
pushed on in hopes of finding a house, but alas, I soon found to all appearance 
an unbounded prairie before me again. I gathered some acorns and passed 
on to a brook ; there sat down to breakfast on cold water and bitternuts. I 
traveled on till noon and then met a boy on horseback and from him I begged 
two small biscuits and found that I had but ten miles further to travel before 
I would find a house. Thus ended my troubles, except that my boots blistered 
my feet some. I reached the house between 3 and 4. 

The land in Illinois is clay, while Michigan is sand. 

I am at Rock river, within 100 miles of Chicago. 

J. C. H. Oct. 21. 

Chicago Jany ist 1835 
Dear parents 

I again find time to answer your request to write often. Through the 
continued goodness of my maker and preserver I yet enjoy good health My 
privileges for attending meetings, &c have been pleasant I have not missed 
an evening for more than a week. Last evening I attended a prayer meeting 
then went to the Methodist watch meeting till past midnight this morning at 
daylight I again attend prayer meeting. Professors here are getting awake 
to their duty and I am in hopes the churches will be faithful that the Lord 
may come in pov^er 

Last evening at the Methodist meeting 7 or 8 went to the anxious seat 
The presbyterians think of holding meetings a part of next week 



78 KANE COUNTY HI8T0RY 

I can say of a truth the Lord has been kind unto me even since I left 
home, though an unreflecting glance at my history Looks hard, I have had 
strength of Body to surmount every hardship. Every undertaking I have laid 
before the Lord for him to direct me and the still small voice has told me I 
was doing my duty. Never before have I lived so long without a remorse 
for doing what I ought not to have done or leaving undone things I ought 
to do 

I have made several attempts for an easier way of living than out doors 
work but in each have failed but was not disappointed for I knew that him 
who I chose for to decide the case would decide for the best 

The weather still continues tine sun shines now and it looks more like 
Oct than Jany 

There was a ball in town last evening but not much extra doings today 

You will see where I spent monday and tues on my map above Chicago 
in making a claim for speculation in S. F. Spaldings name I have chopped, 
fenced, sowed and dragged a piece of ground, cut some house logs and begun 
a house so that if the preemption law is extended we shall gain a preemption 
and get our two lots of poor land at lo - the acre William you wished me 
to rectify my mistake about the Springs. Tell Elisha that there is a spring 
nearly as large as Uncle Zz within six rods of where we stuck the stake for his 
ploughing. There is dry land for building 6 rods below it where it might be 
carried in to the Lower windows 

It will be 3 weeks tomorrow since I came from my farm and began work. 
I have earned $23.50 in the time but my Board makes a hole in it. C. Metcalf 
and myself will start in a day or two out on the Oplain (Desplaines) river to 
split Rails at 50 cents a hundred and be found. 

The most I ask of you is to write 1/2 as often and half as much as I do. 
I can think of no more for the present only that you must be making prepara- 
tions for the West and urging all honest friends with all the confidence you 
can put in me to come to the far west. 

With the Lord I leave you praying that you may put all confidence in 
him and it shall be well with vou. 

Your distant unworthy son T C H 

To B. & E. Hanks : 

Our lattitude is but little south of you. I will give you my own opinion 
why we can raise larger corn here than with you. I think it is because of the 
black soil. You know that anything black will retain more of the sun's 
rays and become hotter than light colored. The ground becomes hotter and 
brings forward vegetation faster. If this looks reasonable to you you may 
believe. If not it is only an opinion of my own. 

Oplain River Jany i8th 1835 
Happy Home 

Tis true I love thee all thy scenes I love them well I have not much 
news so I will give you some of my views concerning these prairies you know 
my belief is that we live in an age of Improvement and that we ought not to 
take everything that everybody says for granted without looking at the reason 




FRONT AND BACK OF A LETTER WRITTEN IN lS?-.5 BY J. C. 

HANKS FROM ELGIN. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 81 

of the case and searching to know whether or no people are not imbibing 
mistaken notions 

My opinion concerning tlie origin of these prairies is different from any 
person I have ever yet talked with on the subject It is the minds of all 
that they are formed by fire killing the timber but I believe that this opinion 
is without proof or foundation I believe that looo years ago there was 
not 34 as much timber here as there is now 

We read in the bible that in old times they would drive their flocks to 
different parts of the country for pasture no person can doubt but what 
that country was blest with prairies I believe that from the hands of the 
Creator a large portion of the world was left without timber but no part 
of the Eastern country that I have seen has a rich soil enough to produce 
a growth of grass that by burning would kill the young trees and keep them 
from getting the start but here the fires on the rich soil kill the young trees. 
All the timber in this country is on the poorest land or swampy where fires 
cannot run as a general thing the further from the timber the better the 
prairie Where there is timber here there is not half as much dead timber 
as there is in Steuben further reasons I will bring with me Jany 26. Since 
my last with pleasure I acknowledge receipt of your, Sarahs, Jasons and Wm 
but have no news on hand to answer them I cannot say that I was pleased to 
hear of Jason's appointment for I think he could have done better to come 
here I am pleased with Wm singing and believe if he comes here in the 
Spring he will gain his health if he does not before Everybody here back 
in the country is hearty there is no cesation for cold weather by the new 
comers and claimers of lands Wm if you do not come in the Spring early 
I cannot answer for you a farm have one of uncle Elijahs Boys come if you can 
the claim I am trying to hold for Jason I shall try to hold still for some friend 
mention all the names who are coming in the Spring Wm Rumsey is boarding 
here with me he came here the other day took him a claim and is now to work 
on it 28 miles north west of Chicago he has a good claim but I do not like 
the river I have a week yet to stay here then I think some of going to mine 
we have not had more than two days yet but what it has thawed some for 
the last 2 weeks we have had rain and wet snow 3 or 4 days sleighing on 
about 3 inches of snow but is now all gone This letter is a hard case for 
all the time I have been writing there has been half a dozen or not much less 
talking and you know of old that I never could write where others were 
talking As ever J C Hanks 

Chicago Febr 20th 1835 
Kind Father 

My absence from here longer than I had expected has prevented my 
writing as often as I should like. But as we cannot always do as we would 
I shall try to be contented with doing as I can I have been absent from here 
about 7 weeks and my situation has not been as pleasant as at your own com- 
fortable tire side we had no hard winter weather until the first of Febr the 
first week in Febr was the coldest take the week through I ever knew though 
I quit work Init one day for the cold. Since the first week It has been come- 



82 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

fortable winter weather W'lien there was moveable snow with wind it was 
nothing uncommon to have the walls and floor white with snow the day that 
I lay by for the cold our fire did not thaw the snow and ice off from the 

floor four feet back from the fore . W'm R boarding 

with me our living was poor I am safe in saying that the poorest days board 
that I ever had in Steuben was better than the best I have had on the — plain 
river Why I staid was that I might learn the value of a comefortable living 
I could still have made good wages but could bare no longer to see others 
getting their farms fenced and mine untouched I expect that I shall have 
rather a lonely time for a few days or weeks I shall go and build a house 
and live bachellor hermitage The hardships of the past and the prospects a 
head has never yet drew from me one faint wish to be back or that I never had 
come but with as good health as I have had I am determined to fence and 
plough sow and plant 20 acres this Spring if \\"m can come in the Spring 
I shall make calculations on fencing 40 acres by the first of June My purse 
is light to form so strong a resolution on though my wages have been very good 
and I have not spent only where necessity called I cannot begin house keeping 
without running in debt you need not put yourself out to send me any money 
soon. If I have my health I will work it through. My clothes, seed, fall 
ploughing axe S:c has taken my money as fast as I could earn it your last 
which told of \\m. buying J's Lumber unhinged my calculations and ex- 
pectations for a short time It causes me rather unpleasant feelings to give 
up the idea of your holding the claim joining mine but my hope of holding 
it for you until you return from down the river is very faint for new land 
claimers are beginning to come in droves W'm if you are very anxious to 
come and live in this country if it is as good as I have recommended I think 
you must come early in the Spring or you cannot suit yourself with a con- 
venient farm do not think me homesick by urging you to come early in 
the Spring. I tell you as I have formerly that nothing but the love I have for 
the happiness and comefort of my nearest and dearest kindred would ever 
call me back again the thought some times comes into my mind that perhaps 
I am wrong in urging you to come so far when you are so comefortably sit- 
uated there. It also looks as though I was trying to draw the property out of 
your hands and get it into my own the country suits me and I cannot content 
myself to come back and settle for life in Steuben what I have formerly said 
of the country I still think to be true It is not on my account that I could 
urge you to come but have looked at your comefort in old age I want you 
should act upon your own feelings. If it should be your choice to stay 
there and William will consent to stay with you I want you to do so but if you 
had rather come here it would suit me better Brother Wm If you think it best 
to stay there with your health again regained and continued you can have a 
comefortable living I want you to do as you think will best suit my dear 
parents you know their mind better than I do If you have heard Father 
say he had rather not leave Kennedyville you cannot suit me better than 
to lay out your money for the \\'heeler farm and make your selves contented 
or you cannot be happy. Nothing would give me more pain than to know 
you gave your selves uneasiness on mv account If you think best to stay 



KAXE COL^'TY PIISTORY 83 

there I have no claim but cm one dollar of \'onr property and could not 
recei^•e more without repaying with interest give your selves no uneasiness 
about me for the Lord is my helper your son 

J C Hanks 
2 1 St In 2 or 3 years it will be much the cheapest building of brick in this 
State The people here are of the cipinion that the preemption law will be 
extended in that case I shall be sure of mine at lo -per acre If I had not 
made my claim last fall and should go on now and make it I would not give 
2/-per acre extra to have it warranted to me at congress price. 

I have frosted my feet and obliged me to get a pair of shoes to-day 
I shall get 150 lbs pork to day 
23 on the 23 I shall start for my farm 

The nearest meeting house to Chicago is about 60 miles south was dedicated 
last Sabbath about 200 present and not one had lived in the place more 
than 20 months this speaks well of the rapid settlement of this country 

Kennedyville 15th ;\Iay 1836 
Dear Son 

\\'e Received your Letter sent from Warren was glad to hear 3'ou was 
well. I have Received a Letter from Genl. McClure and put my mind to Rest 
Respecting your holding the two claims all will be safe when you get there 
I also Received a Letter from Fanny Cline which gave me great satisfaction 
Also one from S. F. Spalding in answer to the one you began before you left 

We are now all in Tolerable health Locky has had a of the Billions 

fever and fever Ague which kept her Down about five or six weeks she is 
now smart again my health continues about the same as when you Left. I 
think the pain in my side Rather increases. I can do but verry Little Labour 
I have had one of Mrs. Hannas Boys with me about 3 weeks. I have 
finished my sowing and plainting and shall not hire any more until Having 
if my health continues as well as it is now. Eleanor is in the school again 
this Summer at $2 per week begun i May. Asahel & Eliza was out hear 2 
weks ago all well. Jason started for the west 8 days ago in Company with 
Joseph Burnham He said he should come and see you before he come back. 
Expects to be gone until fall. I borrowed the $45 for him from Ostrander 
a few Days. I went Last Thursday to S. Mills and J. Smith and made out to 
get the amount. \ ha\e wrote to St. Louis and Chicago before. I expect to 
get a Letter from you in the morning from Pittsburgh or Cincinnatti. Times 
are very Dull here uow all are waiting for the Rail Road to be Located 
as you can hold both of your claims according to Genl. McClures statement 
I think you had best hold on upon these for we all have the Illinois fever 
and want to come there as soon as we can Dispose of what we have here, 
you must give my Respect to all inquiring friends. Mother and the Children 
join me in sending their Love may the Lord protect you and preserve your 
health and pore upon you the best of Heavenly blessings 

B Hanks 



84 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Dear Brother 

I feel as if I must write a few lines to you this evening seeing that I 

cannot ha\-e the pleasure of talking with you. We are very lonesome without 

you and feel as though we could not be separated from you when we 

could be with you. The Illinois Fever has raged still harder with us since 

we read Aunt Fanny's letter stating that her health had not been so good 

in three years and that she was well pleased with the country. She said 

that you must come and see her as soon as you got to Fox River. Ward 

Sherman. James Hogland, & two or three others started last week for Illinois. 

Asahel sends word that you must write to him. Locky says I must tell you 

she had the Billions Fever and that run into the Fever and Ague and from 

that into the Illinois Fever. My health is quite good but yet I am not willing 

to stay here. Please write to me on the receipt of this. Ma sends her love 

and says you must write to her. „ 

■^ -^ rrom your 

Sister Sarah 
James C Hanks 

TA r> .1 August •?! 1836 

Dear Brother & o o 

I this evening sit down to write a few lines to my dear and only brother 
to let you know how much I miss you in our little circle especially when we 
sit down to sing We are very sorry to hear that you have been sick We are 
all better than we have been We received your letter Monday morning 
Pa & Ma & Sarah & I went to Branchport last week We received a letter 
from Asahel they are all well Sophia walks and talks some Eleanor is a 
keeping school yet I have not been more than two weeks this summer on 
account of sickness Jason has moved into Widow Chapins house they are all 
well We expect a new Minister here he is a comeing next Sunda\' Vincent 
McClure is a going to St. Louis in two or three weeks with his Uncle 
Wisner he thinks he shall come and see you Old i\Ir. Hastings died a few 
weeks ago and Mrs. Chapins babe it was about ten months old Diantha 
Smith is married to i\Ir. Fuller Minerva Howell is married to Mr. Underbill 
We are a going to clean the meeting house tomorrow Hiro Kennedy is 
not any better he has got the Consumption he is confined to the house most 
of the time you must write a great long letter to me It 'S so late that I 
cannot finish my letter to night 

Thursday it rains some this morning I suppose that you want to know 
something about the fruit \\'e have not got any plums but we have got 
plenty of apples I should like to come out to Fox River and see the bound- 
less prairies INIa says it is the lonesomest summer she has ever experienced 
for there has one of us been sick all the time with the Fever We have 
cleaned the meeting house today I want to see you very much Martha 
and Caroline is here tonight they all send their love to you and we all do to 
I must now to a close for I expect the Mail every minute so good 

bye dear Brother 
From your sister Locky (J C Hanks) 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 85 

(you must not mind Lockys mistake in subscribing your name in the place 
of hers, we had some frost here night before last the fog prevented it 
from doing much injury) 

Kennedyville Sept ist 1836 

Far distant Son 

Your letter of the 8th august was received on Monday last we were 
glad to hear that you were getting better of your sickness I hope you will 
be prudent and not work beyond your strength We have been severely 
afflicted with sickness this summer I have been unable to do any work 
for five weeks yesterday I about 2 acres of my got tired 

and quit at 4 oclock and Today am hardly able to sit up I have had the 
bilious fever and it hangs about me yet Togeather with a severe D 
I feel sometimes almost discouraged and ready to give up but when I Reflect 
that God is able to keep and support all that will put their Trust in him I 
try to be reconciled to my lot I have got through my harvesting had I think 
about 50 or 60 bushels of wheat and about a hundred bushels of oats my corn 
and potatoes 3 acres on the ground we t of will be as good as I 

could expect if the frost keeps off until the middle of Sept shall have a good 
crop of buckwheat it is very hard' hiring any one to work cannot get work 
done without paying the money our orchard back of the B is full this 

year and some consid in the other the grafts are full I want you should write 
to me the particulars of your bargain with Jason he says he let you have 
$53. and is to have one of your claims I think you have mised it if you 
have sold him one of your claims for that price when he says you could 
sell your claim for $1000. I think you had better sold to some person that 
would have given you the worth of the claim Jason says he shall not go 
to that country but will pay for the lot when it comes in market so you see 
That it is a mere p of speculation with him if you had sold one of 

your claims say for five Hundred Dollars it would have helped you to 
made improvement and paid for the other The Rail Road is not located yet 
they are surveying the Different Routs it will be located this fall we have 
now but faint hope of its coming this way I am obliged to sell the Wheeler 
lot for what I can get for it D says he must have the interest 

immediately Jason talks some of buying it I offered it for Ten Dollars 
an acre and that will leave me but about $80. If the Rail Road is located up 
the Canistro this wall be a hard place to dispose of property, but if it comes 
up this valley I shall be able to sell to good advantage Mother is gaining 
her health sloly Sarahetts health is verry poor this summer the Doctor 
has given her some stuff that she thinks helps her I paid of Dr. Case by paying 
fifty-one Dollars he thrown of Ten Dollars by my paying him $40. in money 
I thought best to do it although I had to borrow some I think I shall get 
along with it I think if my health gets better I shall sell the first opportunity 
write often Locky will tell you the Rest 

B Hanks 



86 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Chicago Sept 6, 1836 
Dear Afflicted Home 

You are not forgotten by me though you may think neglected I left 
town near four weeks ago and went into the country 25 miles South west 
to help the man I Board with here in town to do his haying and harvest. I ex- 
pected to be gone but 2 weeks this has caused my neglect. I worked 26 days at 
haying and harvest and in the time I had but Yz days rest for wet weather price 
10/- I have been very hearty since I wrote my last. All Steuben folks are well. 
I saw J. G. Higgins at church yesterday all well at his house. Truely your 
afflictions are great but precious promise that God does not afflict willingly 
but for our good. Be ye reconciled and faithful and God will be our friend 
I cannot say much in favor of onward progress of Christianity but I hope 
there is enough praying souls to save the country from a judgment. I am 
glad to hear that you expect a minister I have not lately heard from my 
claim but spring crops are coming in well. I am not much disappointed in 
Jasons account I thank him for the credit he gives the Fox River Country 
but I do not his asserting absolut no such things. 

\\'inter wheat never until last winter failed in this country and the oldest 
settlers say that it would have stood then had it been sowed the last of 
August there is much wheat already sowed Spring wheat has always 
done well here average crops from 15 to 20. Just tell J that in this cold 
climate York State corn that was planted early was out of the way of frost 
in August ^Melons and punkins were also ripe in Augst now judge honestly 
whether it is a cold climate tell Jason probably he can get a farm up by the side 
of Elishas where the cold winds for many a year will not find his little 
opening. The money I had of Jason was not for a part of my claim nor 
did I give it to him only on conditions that he would move on early next 
Spring. I shall sell it 
I shall go out and sow some wheat in about a week. T r H 

Chicago Sept i6th 1836 
Sweet Sweet Home 

I this rainy after noon have quit work and believe you will not think 

me idling away an hour by bringing into sweet remembrance my dearest 

Friends. 

This nnist be a barren little epistle for I am destitute of interesting matter 

I have stayed longer from m>- farm than I expected to when I left it the 

man I left it in charge of was in town last week, he said my held had not 

been disturbed. The 4 acres that was to have been ploughed by my house he 

said could not be ploughed till the grass was burnt this fall. 

I am looking for him in town again and shall move out my trunk and some 

provision for keeping house, he said there had been no sickness nor hardly 

a case of the ague in that section of the country this season all acquaintances 

are well except S F Spal he has been down at the heel but is getting better. 

The oldest settlers complain nf its being a very cold season I think it has 

been as cold a season with the exception of frost as you often have in 

Steuben 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 89 

There was little frost here in August Ijut it done no injury I ha\e under- 
stood that it whitened the cornfields in some parts of Michigan. 
Sept 19 Dear Sister Locky Your Lengthy and welcome letter has just 
come to hand and I feel that I should not be worthy of being called 
your Dear and only brother should I delay answering it I must say Sis 
(not wishing to flatter you) that your letter is more to the point and better 
than both that I received from E & S, I have not news enough on hand to 
pay for yours, these verses for your Album (please write them in tu}' 
scrap book) are the most I can at present do. Sister I think that we shall 
not always be separated but shall have our little family singing circls and shall 
enjoy and prize them more than ever a pleasant family sing last evening 
made me think of my sweet sweet Home there is peaches and apples brought 
in here but they sell them high 

I do believe if Sarah was out here lix'ing in a little log house (jn punken 
pye and Indian she would get well I am looking for E. S. J\I. out here to live 

Sister) i Though boundless space, doth part our clay, 
I see you often, at your play; 
Your tuning harp, I almost hear 
When eastern gales pass by mine ear. 

2 I see you oft in youthful glee, 

In search of fruit, from tree to tree. 
With club, or pole, that at your ease 
Your taste or fancv vou mav please. 

3 Your thoughts may wander after me. 
You can not tell just where I be, 

No settled home, nor feeling 1111 

To check my passage through this life. 

To Sister Locky Your Brother James 

Kind Father I am glad to see that you put your faith trust and hope on 
God in your afflictions both of body and of mind. I know by sweet experi- 
ence that if we in faith do ask that lie will lend a helping hand in temporal 
as well as spiritual concerns Be thou not faithless but believing and you 
shall find help. I enjoy myself of late much better than I did when I first 
came here this spring though the cause of religion at large is very low. 
When I first came the Devil told me there was nothing in the wav I might 
soon get rich in time I found out that he wanted to involve me in business 
cares and anxieties that I might neglect my God I've told him I cannot 
buy his gold so dear nor part with heaven for him Of late my mind 
has been a perpetual calm I know of a truth that the Lord rules and reigns 
in my heart Nothing troubles me for the Lord will provide Father you 
know that it is customary with all Christians for to say that they just want 



90 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

enough of this world for a coinefortalile li\-ing and then they are going 
to do much more for the cause of rehgion O how man}' wih in this way 
have to answer for the sin that it is better not to than to and 

not perform I have made a covenant with my God that a certain sum 
is all that I ask and should I ever obtain to that sum all my increase shall 
then be given to the Lord and I hope that I may ever give when an oppor- 
tunity olYers should I never attain the sum I do not know how nor where 
I shall spend the winter yet this gives me not a moments uneasiness for 1 
know that the Lord will provide. 

Your son James 

I believe I mentioned in my last your present request respecting my agree- 
ment with L H. S. it was understood that if he did not come on I would 
pay him the money and interest $50. the $3. note I will pay if I can collect 
it If it suits him I shall let Harris Butler have what Jason was a going 
to have at $1. an acre except the timber 

I start in the morning for Fox River they tell me my corn is fit to cut up 
tell Jason to plant some of the large kind of corn that has the ears as high 
as a mans shoulders the ist of June in the warm climate of Steuben and 
see if it will be fit for harvesting the middle of Sept. 



Hermitage Oct loth 1836 



Dear Friends 



I am now spencHng my time xery pleasantly by my own fire side you 
may think it to be a lonely and very unpleasant life but I can say not so 
My God mv bible and my singing book are the best companions I ever 
enjoyed Were I to be separated from these or the society of man for this 
life alone I would say deprive me of the latter you probably think that my 
evening hours must be lonesome but could you unobserved see me spend my 
evenines I fear vou might envv mv lonelv retreat I have no more fears 
(or what we call being afraid) than though I were sitting by your own fire 
side I work till dark but not very hard then cook my supper when cleared up 
My Bible My God and Singing book are the best of all company I have kept 
house for two weeks and not one lonesome hour have I experienced 
Last Sabbath went to the river to meeting about 3>4 miles south west (the 
settlement at Elgin?) there is a very interesting bible class which they intend 
to keep up through the winter there is a dozen men of your own age 
engaged in it and I think you would enjoy the meetings then a sermon read 
I think there will be Methodist preaching in this neighborhood once a fort- 
night after conference I can not well get around flatly contradicting Jasons 
account of this so much admired country My potatoe tops were as green as 
in July until the 29th of Sept. My corn was not as ripe as I could have 
wished it was too large a kind for so late planting I cut it up before the 
frost and what there was of York State corn was dry and hard I do not 
believe there has ever been such a growth of corn raised in Steuben with 
as little labor T will let you know how much there is of it after I husk it 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 91 

Oct TQth I have left off finishing this letter until now liecause Philo was 
a going home and you by him would hear from me I am well and very 
hearty my clothes are all getting too small for I think I am ten or 15 
pounds heavier than I ever was in Steuben I know this to be a healthy 
country and nine tenths of the Eastern people that come here have better 
health than they ever before enjoyed I sincerely and honestly believe that 
it would be for your and the families health to come there has not been any 
agi-ie nor other sickness to speak of for miles around Marcus came here 
this morning and will be the bearer of this to Chicago he is hearty, and 
well pleased with the country he says it is very uncertain whether he ever 
comes back to Steuben to live. The fall has been very cold it is now snowing 
the ground is whitened 

No more J C Hanks 

I have not received any letters from home since I came out to the river. 

Fox River, Oct. i6th, 1836. 
Dear Sister Eleanor ' 

You still have a brother who loves you and is as willing to do your 
comfort and happiness as he ever has been Sister we should never know how 
much we loved were we always to remain with each other. I think of you 
oftener and of your need of a brothers care and advice than when I was 
first here. 

I often think that were you all here I should be the happyest person 
in the world. 

I have got completely above cares and troubles for the things of earth 
I am no more my own master I am an hired servant to my Heavenly Father. 
I go to Him for advice in every thing of any importance spiritual or temporal 
and he is ever ready to give instructions and pay me for my labors And 
never when I have went to him for advice have I had to regret at doing amiss. 
Eleanor I have a great anxiety for your happiness and can not be reconciled 
to your spending your days in that hard hard country. In my travels and 
new acquaintances generally the first topic is to know what place one or both 
parties are from. My subject will be so new to you that it will be difficult 
for you to get my meaning. You recollect that about 10 years ago Howard 
& canistee were talked of only as miserable places with hardby civilized 
inhabitants. It was as much as we w-anted to know : he or they are how- 
ardites. I am not going to give the inhabitants of Steuben as hard a name 
as had the howardites but I will tell you it makes a difference in a mans 
being respected in travelling and forming new acquaintances wdiere he is 
from. 

A most every person who has only a verbal Historical account of Steuben 
think it worse than it really is. To tell a person that I am from Steuben 
County the next question two out of three times is. that is a hard frosty 
mountainous country is it not? the people live mostly by lumbering and 
hunting dont they? But observe a traveller from the Genessee country 
and how altered the conversation he is at once considered as a man of natioml 
and agricultural intelligence and his companv is sought by the wise and 



92 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

the learned; and I think ere long this place will be as noted for enterprise 
and intelligence as any in the united states. 

Nov. 2 1 St Sister I have got the start of you a little I had this letter 
begun before I received your jealous request. I expect now to touch your 
pride a little and I hope you will not hesitate to show this to friends because 
of what I am now about to write for I mean what I say. Father in his last 
complained of hard times and that it was almost impossible for him to raise 
money, to pay his debts, you may think me hard hearted but it was good 
news to me I shall soon be looking for an answer to my letter titled my last 
request for your removal and it would be happyer news to me to hear that 
your property was to be sold at Sheriff sale than to hear you had made up 
your mind not to come here I firmly believe that it would be for all of your 
healths to come here 

Sister tell my dear parents that I shall almost consider thim them mur- 
derers of our beloved sister Sarah should her health continue to decline 
and they neglect to bring her here where I firmly believe they might in a 
few short months behold her blooming rosy cheeks I often think that this 
sorrowing world is not good enough for so pure a heart as Sarah yet we 
can not oh! no! we can not spare her 

We have had a pleasant fall for doing fall work not more than lyz inches 
of snow at a time. I am scoring timber at $i. per day I have engaged to 
keep school in my own district this winter at $i8. a mo. all acquaintances 
except Sarah McClure were well when last heard from She is at Chicago 
her life is not expected 

urge all friend to come to this country and try not to let the unwelcome news 
come that you have made up your minds to stay 
To "^'our 

my Distant 

sister Eleanor Brother James 

Kennedy ville Novm 20th 1836. 
Dear Son 

We received your letter of the 19th Oct with heartfelt gratitude that 
you were contented and happy in your lonely retreat we are all enjoying a 
good degree of health at present except Sarahett she is about as usual I 
was glad to hear that your Corn Crop was good. I have got along with my 
fall work as well as could be expected I made 9 barrels of cyder sold all but 
2 for 14 & 16, - per Barrel Wheat is 14/- per bushel here Corn 8/- I have 
sold my Wheeler lot to Jason. Deavenport would wait no longer unless he 
could have the back interest paid and I could not pay it and thought best to 
sell it Jason gives me the Debt he had against you of fifty Dollars I have the 
writing you gave him with his Receipt on the back. Jason says he will build 
on it but I doubt whether he will. I wanted to pay the bank debt and have 
him pay that on Gansvort the $50.00 — but be would not take the lot on no 
other condition than turning the $50.00 to you which leaves me in the same 
imbarrisment as to my debts as before the bank will not renew the Note 
again I shall lia\e to pay it the 13th of Jany. and I owe Gansvort $80. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 93 

which he is threatening to sue f(.)r he has quit (writing worn off) 
I have paid (paper torn) Debt and am trying to make up the money for the 
bank which I must do as tlie bank does not discount a Dollar now. I have 
put up one barrel of Pork which I think will fetch me $20.00 and shall have 
about $20.00 worth of wheat to spare and how I am agoing to make out the 
money for Gansvort I know not but I must Trust to providence, if you sell 
a part of your claim or can work it any way to deposit $50. in the Bank at 
Chicago and send a check on (illegible) Bank it would relieve me frc^n my 
present imbarrisment Times are very Dull her now the Rail Road is not 
located here yet and we dont expect it now until Spring I am still of the 
opinion that I shall sell here the first opportunity and come to Illinois Eleanor 
and Sarahett are agoing to Pratsburgh to school this winter Caroline & 
Martha McClure are agoing with them they have hired a room of the Widdow 
Ellas for 50 cts. per week They board themselves we shall send them pro- 
visions by the mail man they calculate to stay about 4 months we shall be 
very lonesome without them this winter but we think it the best for them to 
go. our new Minister has moved on with his family he will be located some 
where in this Neighborhood, he is a very fine man and a good Preacher 
you must write the particulars as to your Crop of Corn and what you are 
doing there I think it not best for you to lay out too much Expense on your 
lot untill you are sure of the tit# we know not what may happen respecting 
the sale. Hinsdell and family are well they \^re out here about 3 weeks 
ago Philo S. says he likes your location well and says he thinks he will come 
to Illinois in the spring with his family If you cannot make it convenient to 
send the check you will write me respecting the s?.me. Do not sacrifice any- 
thing or spoil your calculations to send it as I think there will be some way to 
pay it if we will put our Trust in him who is able to deliver us out of all our 
troubles. Sarah thinks her health better than it has been she thinks she shall 
be able to attend school this winter Your Mother and the girls send their 
love to you and say you must write often our friends and Neighbors are all 
well. John H says he shall certainly go to Illinois in the spring. 

Write often 
B Hanks. 

• Elgin March 7th 1837 

Dearest Girls 

E. C. M. & S. your welcome letter reached me after a two months passage, 
And with great satisfaction I have many times perused it. I was much 
pleased to learn that you were spending the winter so agreeably and profitable. 
The Lord^e praised foj^he health you enjoy especially for the improvement 
of Sarah. My health is and has been through the winter as good as it ever 
was. All friends here as far as I know are well. I still believe this to be as 
healthy a country as any part of the United States. 1 closed my school Feb 
24th The weather and sleighing was good which it was necessary I should 
improve in getting out my rail timber, which is my present business. I have 
a heavy spring's work before me but I shall try to take it by the foretop. I 
intend to put in to spring crops 22 acres a part of which it to fence. You 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

may think me out of place here telHng my business to young Ladies, But we 
are all Farmers. 

My greatest earthly wish is that Dea. McClure. S. Campbell and B. 

Hanks were settled here on adjoining farms. The claim north of mine is now 
offered for sale it will probably be sold before my eastern friend will get here. 
This in a few years will be the most noted part of the United States, and soon 
it will be a most recommend to a Traveller to say his residence is in North 
Illinois. 

A letter which I wrote last fall headed my last request could not have been 
received or the question with you would lie settled whether you ever come 
to this country or not I expected an iminediate answer to that which if it 
had been in the negative I should have stired myself to hunt up a pot Wrestler 
by this time. But no certain answer respecting your coming, must in a few- 
days oblige me to retire a lone to Rosendale Shanty. 

I have become acquainted with as fine a lot of Miss's as Kennedyville can 
produce. Pride Flattery or something else tells me that my standing is as 
fair as it used to be with the Belles of Both I often fancy I get a look, which 
says; a call would be acceptable. But I have yet the first girl in Illinois to 
ask for her Company. There is a better Society of young men than Kenne- 
dyville ever could lioast of. There is to be 2 weddings this week. I received 
and answered a letter from A'incent which was 3 months coming. He wrote 
he should call on me in the Spring 

as ever Jas C Hanks 

Eleanor Carolina Martha & Sarah 
Eleanor 

You may think as an objection to your coming here that it will take a 

length of time before you will pass at with the first Dear Sister your 

Brother has already done this work, he will warrant you an immediate recep- 
tion with the first I have left no stone unturned in paving Virtues path for 
myself and you, and the standing I now possess among the intelligent is my 
reward I have many friends and no enemies but the \'Tilgar and Intemperate. 
Four fifths of the young men who remain the neighborhood where they are 
raised remain Boys until they are 40 years old, while if at 20, they would 
leave home in 2 years they miglit be men 

James 
Caroline 

Be assured your scroll was welcome to your old Friend who for a long 
time previous had thought himself forgotten and forsaken by his dearest 
friends at the Fast. I wish I dared to indulge a hope that your Kind parents 
might find a home in this Fairy Land. I will be hard for Vincent to come 
back and stay contented in .Steu]:)en County If he sliould settle in this country 
and request it I think vou had lietter come 

J. C. H. 
Sister Sarah 

I have been trying to think of some news that would please you and 
compensate your letter but T cannot T now am sitting in my old school room 




LOCATION OF JA:\1ES 



T. GIFFORD'S LOG CABIN, THE SECOND 
BUILT IN ELGIN. 




VILLA STREET, ELGIN. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 97 

with )-2 dozen around me talking. It is wet over head and under foot the 
Snow is melting verjr Fast We have had lo weeks good sleighing Sarah I 
wish you would persuade pa to come I shall forfeit my word if I ever again 
ask him if he received the letter I wrote last Oct 

JCH 
Martha 

The Old Bachelor is glad to be remembered and consoled by old Friends 

in his solitary life. Maids • in Steuben must get as fashionable as 

bachelors are here. I wish the of the beau for the west might 

be brought up by a dozen of the Belle's of Steuben. (If my credit is good) 
please give half a dozen of the best old maids a smack for me and tell them 
we have 2 weddings a week here. 

March 8th) I have just returned from a splendid wedding there 

was 120 guests The house small for so large a company, the fashions are 
different from ours I have attended 2 and in neither did the groom speak to 
the bride on the day of the wedding till after the ceremony. He arrived with 
an excort at the hour appointed and the not is immediately tied. One thing 
I did not like, the groom was a magistrate and He suffered 2 of the escort 
in front to carry flags and he followed them in train riding round the house 
We had a good supper but their fashion is to set a table, which was a lengthy 
business for it was 8 times filled before all had feasted. Many little oddities 
were amusing and would draw from me a smile in my sleeve and I think it 
would you were you to pass a plate of ice cake to a row of ladies and have each 
so polite as to take a piece with her fork. 

No more room Jas C Hanks 

March 14, 1837 
Dear Son 

We received your two letters yesterday morning with pleasure we had 
almost despaired of ever hearing from you again you must not let it be so 
long again it is a great privilege we have now in sending letters free we do 
not half take the advantage of it as we might I have sent you a nomber of 
Newspapers some directed to you and F Spalding there is two letters yet 
unanswered, we are all in tolerable health at this time we have been attend- 
ing meeting at held by the P and the 

Methodist in union mother and myself hav been evry day for 9 days & 
Locky with us most of the time there has been and is yet a Glorious time 
of the outporing of the holy spirit a Nomber of conversions already among 
the No Esq R & Charles L a nomber of women and 30 or 40 

we shall go after the Girls at Prattsburgh day after to-morrow the 
tomorrow they have had a very agreeable winter they will write to 
you as soon as they get home Eliza Heath is not very good this winter 
she has had 4 or 5 of this winter. The and are 

generally well uncle Z and myself will come and see you in May or before if Z 
sells his farm we shall come early of not we shall start as soon as he 

has a chance to sell Now for his price 14 Dollars per acre Sally is 

afraid to have him sell until he s-nes and sees the crauitrv mother will not 



98 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

aeree to have me sell until I come out and see the country &c. I do not know 
but I shall yet this Spring if I have a good chance I intend to write evry 
week to you and you may write to us e\Ty Day if you are a mind jwhat 
know of being so in writing we want to hear what you are about. 

The Preemption Law has passed the Senate you will hear from us again 
soon B Hanks 

Write how far you are from Elgin P Office &C write how much money 
you think it will take for me to come once and back and whether I had best 
come with horse & wagon and whether If I do not sell and dont have money 
to get back you can help me and all about it &c what the name of the man 
you live with &c 

Kennedy ville 6th April 1837 
Dear Son 

I have this day sold my farm to Russell Kellogg and Received S2000 in 
money for it and Now by the assistanc of Divine Providence we shall get 
Ready for a start to Illinois as soon as Possible which I think will be by the 
15th Alay Uncle and family are coming with us we think of selling 

our teams here and come by water from Buffalo to Chicago I do not think 
mother could stand the journey by Land through Michigan there will be such 
a rush to the west this Spring there will be no accommodations on the Road 
Aunt Sally is very feeble and would hardly stand the journey I want you to 
write immediately upon the Receipt of this which I have requested S Spalding 
to forward to you immediately Start one back immediately on the Receipt 
of this Let us know about Provisions there and whether j-ou will have a 
place to shelter us a few Days until we can assist you in building a shelter 
you had best buy a good cow if you can and whether we had best bring a 
wagon and Harness bv water with us or can we buv them there write what 
pork is and other Provisions put in as much spring wheat and other spring 
crops as you possibly can if you have to go upon tic some for plowing etc 
we shall have some money when we get there if we have Stock 

and grain is very high here I am offered 40 Dollars for the old cow I 
shall write several times before we start and at Buffalo 

B Hanks 

We are all well and in good spirits yet and we intend to think it is all for the 
best that we should come we have earnestly laid the case before the Lord, 
and there seems to be a door open for our Departure from this place and 
with the Blessing of God upon us we hope to see you at your place A letter 
from Hinsdell this evening told they were well but Eliza was very sorry we 
were going west, our friends all well it is over three weeks since we received 
a letter from you I expected one before this time the last was 15th 

July you will try the experiinent you will find in the Evening Post I seni 
you of Raising apples by sticking the sions into a potatoe and bury it all 
except 2 or 3 inches in the ground write whether we had best bring a barrel 
of Flour at $10 or can we get it there better 

B Hanks 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 99 

April loth 1S37 
Dear Sir 

I iiave liad tiie pleasure of receiving two letters from you within a week 
Dated Feb 15 and March 14th and agreeable to promise and now cominence 
mv weekly epistles, our mail route has been let but a post master has not 
been appointed on account of the burning of the General post office. Your 
letter directed to Elgin has come the quickest of any for the past 6 months 
My health continues good and all other acquaintances as far as known are 
well. 

It is hard for me to say whether I was pleased with your and uncle Z's reso- 
lution of coming this spring to see the country. Your coming to see the 
country before you move will release me from the obligation I am under that 
nothing within my power should be left un done that should be done to make 
you all contented and happy, according to your state ment Mother and Aunt 
are not willing to take my word for the good qualities of this country when 
I think that Aunt is unwilling to exchange that hill for these beautiful prairies 
it draws tears from my eyes O Aunt believe my report. I believe it will be 
for your health and happiness 

uncle Z for 10 years you have not known or heard of my telling a lie — could 
I have a deed of the best thousand acres of land on your hill providing I 
would come and live on it it would be no more temptation for me to go than 
the same number of acres would be .on the rocky mountains 
Uncle Z I know that you and myself are too near alike for you not to be 
pleased with this country I must say do sell come and be happy 
Everybody here women as well as men believe they are in the best part of 
the United States this makes contentment and a contented mind is happy 
Mother I am sorry that you have to put my kind Father to the trouble of coming 
so far to look out the road before you will venture to come Mother should 
you ever be fortunate enough to get here I fear that you will regret that you 
cannot have it to say that you enterprize and perseverence brought you here. 
I drew up a paper last fall and got some men to sign it binding themselves 
to assist in protecting that claim for you until the 4th of July next 
The Illinois State legislature has passed an act allowing a man to hold 320 
acres of land and to trespass on that the law is the same as though he had a 
deed 

My business is making rails I have got the timber cut for 3.000 i.ooo made. 
I have concluded to hire my board what time I work on my claim 8 acres 
of my ground I have let to be sown to Spring wheat on shares, I get 1/3 in 

the for the use of the ground. Spring wheat in this country has 

always averaged 20 bu to the acre the winter wheat looks well. I shall try 
to have me a good garden, plant 5 acres to corn and potatoes sow 6 to oats 
and 2 to buck wheat. I shall work out some through the summer perhaps 
with the Boys again at Chicago. Flour is worth $12 corn $1 oats .75 pota- 
toes 31. Horses such as yours $80. each oxen average price 80. cows 

-5 H^"gs on foot 7 cts pork per bbl $26 Labor I think that good hands may 
calculate through the season at 1.25 per day 



100 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

The hurt that I got lias pained you more than me I had called the committee 
to get a decision on a disputed piece of timber the 4th time and my opponent 
would never be ready I told him that I should not consent to another adjourn- 
ment and that he acted no part of a gentleman in objecting as he did on 
unreasonable grounds to General McClures setting at the last meeting at 
this alone he got angry and said if you insinuate on my feelings I will knock 
you down he stooped to pick up a stone I then turned to leave him he 
threw the stone which I did not expect nor see the motion the stone would 
weigh 4 lbs I was senseless a few minutes headed 2 or 3 hours, this 

was done Saturday evening I kep school monday I have commenced a suit 
against him my trial come on in June court 

I am living at Elbert Howard ,- t ^- tj 1 

^ lours J C Hanks 

I have never received a newspaper from you I hope you will now send them 
often to Elgin and I shall get them Our spring has been favorable for work 
but it is backward 

Kennedyville May 24th 1837 
Dear Son 

I now resume my pen for the last time while I stay in this country and 
the last letter I shall frank for I shall deliver up the Post Office tomorrow 
We received your letter dated loth April and have wrot you since directed 
to Elgin P. O. we are expecting a letter from you buy mail I received a 
letter from S F Spalding Dated 22nd April I wrote him the same time I 
did you after I sold he stated he would send your letter to you the first oppor- 
tunity I can tell you Dear Son it is a hard thing to pull up and move so far 
as we are going but through the blessing of our Heavenly Father we hope to 
go through with it the times are extremely hard here now. I cannot sell the 
things I have for 1,4 the value of them and shall have to team some things to 
be sold when they can be to some better advantage than now we were at 
Hinsdells and spent the last Sabbath called at Wm Lomises and left Eleanor 
while we were at B she is a going to move her things tomorrow and 

go herself next Day it is hard parting, but we hope all for the best we shall 
start on Thursday next 30th May for Buffalo with 5 teams T 2 ^I 3 we 
have got a good wagon and harness to fetch with us I have got 500 Dollars 
in specie and the remainder I shall have to fetch in bills as the banks in this 
State have stopt specie Payments all business is at a stand here now. 

I expect we shall have a hard time of it in getting to Buffalo and getting 
shipt on board of a vessel as the roads are extremely bad it has rained about 
every day here for 2 weeks back a very cold wet backward spring. 3^ the 
people have not planted their corn yet the last arivals from Buffalo was last 
Friday 19 May the ice was not out of the Lake yet so they could 
with boats from there 1 fear we shall have a slim chance to engage a passage 
as there is such a rush to the west this spring, teams have been constantly 
passing here from Buffalo for 2 weeks past, we need your earnest Prayer 
for our well fare we cannot tell anything near what time we shall arrive 
at Chicago but shall as soon as providence permits if you could be there on 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 101 

our arrival it would be a satisfaction, you must consult all our interests as to 
that, we shall want to buy a span of good horses immediately on our arrival 
it would be well to be looking out for them before we arrive Give our 
Respects To the Boys and Mary. 

B Hanks 

Independant Grove Sept 22nd 1837 
Dear Children 

We this evening received your letter of the 20th ult. which gave us much 
satisfaction we had been long waiting for a letter we are much pleased to 
hear that Eliza was getting better and also that Eliason health was better we 
received a letter from Theron & Eleanor and answered the same we are all 
in good health and spirits we like the country better the more we become 
acquainted with it in General. I believe it to be a healthy country as any in 
the United States and equal to any in the richness of the soil we have had a 
verry warm and wet summer the Crops both winter and spring has come in 
good Corn is a fine crop and Completely out of the way of the frost we 
are shelling some of the of Ohio Corn this evening for to grind 

for mush have had ^ bushell of York Corn ground before the first frost 

1 have seen in Illinois was on the morning of the 20th Sept it has 

the leaves on the vines but has not touched the Corn leaves we have sowed 4 
bushels of wheat and shall sow two more Next week on part of our Corn 
ground, our house is verry comfortable for a Log house we are about 
building a and buttery and petitioning our hous so as to make two 

Rooms 12 feet by 16. the Land is surveyed North of us within about i^ 
miles of us we expect it will be surveyed here Next Season we are expecting 
that Congress will do something this Session Respecting Publick Land we 
cannot now tell when it will come into market the Settlers that are on the 
land here feel confident that they shall get their land at Congress price Claims 
are selling very high here Claims have been sold here since I came from 
$500 to $1500. Some hold their claims ar $3000 we have 2 grist mills and 
our saw mill in operation within 4 miles of us one of them a flouring mill with 

2 of stones I think this to be a good place for farming purposes and 
also good for mercantile business the merchant at Elgin 3 miles from us 
has sold $8000 worth of goods within the last year, and he has but a small 
assortment, which he fills up monthly from Chicago. I think this will be a 
good place for you if you follow merchandizing or farming James has raised 
this year 100 bushels oats 100 bushels corn will have as much as 100 of Pota- 
toes and turnips to any amount to 200 bushels we have had a better garden 
than ever we had at Kennedyville all kinds of sauce plenty and mellons as 
many we wanted we have upwards of 40 acres of prairie broke forty five 
fenced shall fence this winter 150 acres, we have raised buckwheat enough 
for our use pumpkins as many as we want for us and cows we have 2 good 
cows make butter to be verry comfortable No trouble about Pasture the 
prairie affords first rate pasture our Neighbor has milked 20 cows this summer 
sold her butter at 2/- per lb. it is all fudge what you heard at Kennedyville 
about our being so homesick it is true we were a little homesick for a few 



102 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

days after our arival but soon got over it and Now we would not care for ever 
seeing Kennedyville again if our children & friends were here we shall expect 
you out here to see the country soon if Nothing more. 

Give our love to Theron & Eleanor we shall write to them soon Sarah 
will write you a letter soon & Mother says she will write too 

B Hanks 

G C Nixon was here staid over night with us he likes the Country has 
gone in company with two men in Chicago and has gone up the Mississippi 
4CX) miles above Galena building saw mills his partners find money and Nixon 
goes on with 25 men 

Dear Brother & Sister 

I have had the poorest health since our folks came I have ever had in 
this Country I have not been able to work more than half the time since they 
came I over done myself about that time I have not been confined to my 
bed. At present my health is good I must urge you to leave that place I 
think you can make money here as fast as there and have your health which 
is of more value to you than the United States treasury would be to you 
My opinion is the same respecting the value of the country that it always has 
been Wheat is $ Horses & Oxen from $50 to 80 Cows $20 to 30 
Hogs $6. on foot Uncle Z has taken a part of my Claim at $275. he is 
building an addition to my shanty lie lives about 40 rods from us we have 
got a supply of fodder for our horses & Cows our stable and sheds are yet 
to build I must leave room for the rest 

Yours as ever James C Hanks 

Dear Sister & 

We received a letter from Brother Asahel and your self last evening and 
was much pleased to have you write some in it Sister I was very sorry to 
hear that you have been sick so long we all think that if you was here you 
would get your health Aunts health is better and also the babes how does 
little Sophia come you must give her a kiss from all of us our folks is a 
standing here now and saying hurry Lock for they are ready to go to the 
office and so I must wind up 

Eliza and Sophia do write 

Sister Locky 

Elgin Oct 13th 1837 
Distant Brother & Sister 

As an excuse for my neglect of writing is the following. It has never 
been my intention to overstep the truth in my letters to Steuben and my con- 
science still is clear that the country will bear me out in my representations. 
I thought Father & Mother on their arrival too homesick dissatisfied & dis- 
contented to represent the country unprejudiced and I knew their words 
would and ought to be taken in preference to mine and I expected that my 
Dear Dear Sisters who never befure had known a false report to drop from 
my lips or ]>en might think that I had by misrepresenting deceived my kind 




BRIDGE ACROSS FOX Rn'ER. THAT WAS FLOATED DOWN 
STREAM IX FLOOD OF 1S57. 




DOWNER'S PLACE TX AX EARLY DAY. AURORA. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 105 

and respected parents; but their representations since reconciled, agree so well 
with mine that I think my epistles may be welcomed without distrust 

My health is poor. I have not been able to labor more than 3/2 of the 
summer. My poor health I attribute to over doing about the time father 
came. I have had a cough by turns since. I am better some than other 
times my ups and downs are once in 3 or 4 weeks but of the two I think the 
downs are on the gain. My cough reminds me of my Dear Departed Brother ; 
Sister you know that ever since mv conversion my Motto has been 

Thy servant waiteth, Lord thy bidding. 

Watching, steering on his bark; 

Longing for his Saviours coming 

For to sink the pilgrims Ark. 
Then ; Oh then, my spirit rising 
Angels meeting, Saviour saying, Child come home. 

i8th Yesterday I rode 8 miles down the river to consult a skillful physician, 
he gives me great encouragement and I am now so heavy laden with medi- 
cines & Blisters that it is hard to finish my page 

Your Brother Jas C Hanks 

„ „ „. , Independant Grove Oct 18th 18^7 

Lver Dear Sisters 

It is with pleasure I tlevote a few moments of time to hold converse with 
you by letter Your to long unanswered letters were heartily welcomed by 
us. I was pleased to hear that your healths were some better especially Sister 
Elizas. Dear Sister I fear your health will never be much better while j^ou 
remain at B. Port. This country agrees with me so well I cannot but think it 
would with you. If you could but once see me you would hardly think me to 
be that pale sister of yours. Brother's health is quite poor but I think it is 
owing to his overdoing and not to the country. The remainder of the family 
are well. Uncle's family are well ; the babe is getting fleshy. Dear Sisters 
hoiv I do want to see yoit. I cannot have it that I shall always lie separated 
so far from you. Since the arrival of Brother Theron's letter I have cher- 
ished the hope that I shall enjoy the pleasure of having both of my Dear 
Sisters in this country. I am very much pleased with our society as far as 
I have become acquainted with it. I have had an introduction to a dozen 
or more Eastern young ladies and so far as I am capable of judging all of 
them well educated and refined. There is a half a dozen more within the 
bounds of our society which I have not as yet had an introduction to, who in 
respectability stand on an equal footing. Dear Sister do not think that we 
are in a heathen land or in an uncultivated society. As a whole it is as refined 
a society as I ever was acquainted with. We have become very attached to 
Gen McClures family they almost fill the place of Dea McClures family. 
The most we regret is that we were not situated nearer them than 3^ miles. 
We are looking for Julia and Mary down to make us a visit this week. Mary 
is expected to be married to a Captain Jemmerson of the garrison of Chicago 
soon. Sarah appears to be gaining slowly but not able to sit up yet Lock 
and May are great cronies. We have not been to Aunt C but hope to 



106 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

go this fall. From accounts we think ourselves well rid of Kennedyville, 
although we shall ever respect many of its inhabitants 

I am very sorry to hear that my dear little Sophia is so unwell Give her a 
sweet kiss for me and do not let her forget me. I often fondly embrace her 
in my arm when dreaming; O that I could in reality. Frank is very happy 
and talks a great deal about his little cousin Sophia and Aunts. We all send 
out love to Brothers and yourselves. You must all write to us. I will lea\e 
this page for ma to finish. 

Your Absent Sister Sarah 

Eliza and Eleanor. 

Pa's hurry to Elgin flustrates Ma so that she gets me to copy it for her. 

Sarah 
Dear Children 

Through the mercy and goodness of God I am in the land of the living. 
My health is very good. James has given you a description of our feelings ; 
he was much troubled on account of our lonesomeness I must ask you my 
Dear Children how could we help being lonesome the great 

distance that separated us. I could hardly be reconciled. If you was here 
I should be contented. A. B. H. you must not sell and locate yourself until 
you come and see us. I think you would be much pleased with this country. 
I think it will be fine for ^Merchants as well as Farmers. Perhaps it would 
agree better with your health to go to farming; if you think so come to this 
country Eleanor you want to know whether the Prairies are as handsome 
as I expected. I think they are. I could not be contented to go back to 
Kennedyville and live. You must not give yourselves any uneasiness on our 
account. I think it is all for the best that we came here. Sarah has got her 
health. I fear we shall have to pass through another dark cloud of afflic- 
tion ; but you know a Mother's fears and anxieties are great for her children. 
James has written you respecting his health but we have the promise that 
there shall not be more laid on us than we are able to bear, my love to all 
my Dear Children, this is from your ever affectionate mother 

Elizabeth Hanks 
give my love to )0ur father and mother and Hannah 

Elgin March ist 1838 

Dear Absent Children We received your letter of the "th Feby yesterday 
and to-day undertake to answer it although with a heavy heart, we can 
truly say that our afflictions are great but our God in whom we trust is able 
to carry us through them all we are all in Tolerable health except James 
he has been confined to his bed since the 30 January he has not bore his 
weight on his feet in 3 weeks his physician has given it as his opinion that 
his lungs are and has about given him up we are now giving 

him some syrrups and other simple medicines but have but little expectation 
that he will remain with us but a short time we still entertain hopes that the 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY ]07 

Lord will Restore him to health again, he is in his hands and is perfectly 
reconciled to his will we try to be reconciled to our situation but I assure 
you we cannot Describe our feelings on this subject, we were very sorry to 
hear that Eliza was so sick but we hope she will be restored to health again 
before this letter reaches you we were pleased to hear that you had a fine 
son hope it will live and be a blessing to his parents and friends my health 
is as good as usual I have it pretty hard now taking care of James and do 
the work necessary to be done we had a very mild winter untill the first of 
February since that time it has been verry cold but pleasant this is the 
first stormy day we have had in a month the snow has been about 4 or 5 
inches deep for 4 weeks and excellent sleighing. Uncle Campbells family are 
all well except Aunt she has been to him about two months 

they think she is now. I shall expect you out here in the Spring 

write on the Receipt of this 

Yours with Respect 

B Hanks 

Thursday Evening March i 1838 
Absent Brother & Sisters 

Your long expected letter has at length arrived which give us both pleas- 
ure and pain. I was much delighted to hear that you had so fine a son and 
hope I shall have the pleasure of seeing him at some future day. Kiss the 
little darling for me I am very sorry to hear that sister has the fever I 
hope she has recovered ere this. O that I could run in and see you every 
day but this cannot be at present. Father has written respecting Brothers 
health, he is very low and we fear will not recover. He appears quite com- 
fortable at present. We have a very large singing school at Elgin, there 
is about 50 that attend the school and as fine looking Ladies and Gentlemen 
as you have in any of your Eastern schools. I can assure you Dear Sisters 
that I have become much attached to the Society here but should enjoy myself 
far better if my dear Brother was only well. Uncle and Aunt Eline have 
been out to see us. their health and spirits never were better. P C Rue and 
his wife have also been out they have a sweet little boy. John intends to go 
after his mother in the Spring. They were well excepting the babe which 
was quite unwell with a cold while here. I expect Sophia feels quite proud 
of her little Brother, do not let her forget me. Frank talks a great deal 
about cousin Sophia. My love to all. 

Yours truly 

S E Hanks 
To All. 

Thursday 12 o'clock at Night 
My dear Children 

Through the blessing of God I am permitted to sit by the bedside of 
your dear and only brother to watch and keep him from sleeping too long on 
account of his night sweats. He will not want a mother's care much longer. 



SOI KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

No my dear Children he will go to that Saviour in whom he trusts. O that 
we could be as resigned to the will of God as he is. He has no doubt of his 
salvation ; no doubts no fears cross that peaceful breast I have heard him 
sing a few words with the girls they are sitting in the room with him. I 
must leave my troubles at home and look away to our native land and see 
mv dear afflicted daughter. The hand of affliction has been laid on you 
several times my dear child. O may it lead you to the Saviour Am I 
addressing my Child or has that spirit been summoned away to the eternal 
world. I should like to see your dear little Son and daughter. You must 
tell our little Granddaughter she must not forget her Grand parents in the 
far West Perhaps we may be permitted to meet you all again. 

Give mv love to Theron and Eleanor and tell them they must remember 
us at the throne of Grace for truly our afflictions are great "but the Lord is 
able to deliver us out of all of them.'" My respects to all. 

From your ^lother 

E Hanks 

A B and E Hinsdell. 

W'heat is selling here at from lo to 12 shillings Corn one dollar Oats 
50 cents Flour at Chicago from 8 to 9 dollars We have about 3000 rails 
split by the job at one dollar per Hundred and Board themselves I have 
hauled 1400 out to our lot where we have as 

before stated. 

B. H. 

.p. ru-i^ Pleasant Grove 23rd April 1838 

I again take my pen to give you some information relative to your 
moving to this country further than I did in my letter of the i6th int. James 
continues v.'ith us yet and I think probably will until the weather gets warmer' 
we can see no alteration in him for the better but he keeps waisting away 
the rest of us are as well as could be expected considering our fatigue in 
taking care of James, we think it will be best for you to move rite on as 
soon as you can get your business closed, the earlier you can get here in the 
season the better the Lakes are now clean of ice which is six weeks sooner 
than they were last season the Steam Boat James Maddison is a good boat 
and runs regular trips from Buffalo to Chicago if you happen to be at 
Buffalo when she is in you will do well to get aboard of her we think you 
had best Ixix up and fetch all your furniture and what goods you can Goods 
will be very scarce here this year I am informed that there will not be one 
half the goods brought to Chicago this season these was lost mennv of the 
merchants have not gone after goods and some of them that have gone get no 
goods. You can have boxes made of good seasoned pine boards and plowed 
and grooved together to keep out the wet they need not be plained at all 
you can box up your chairs and fill in with anything that you can get in that 
you wish to fetch you can bring your crockery safe by packing them well 
Crockery is very dear here All your necessary kitchen furniture will be 
wanted when you get here tubs, Churn, Pails & Pans &c you can pack them 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 109 

all full in your boxes bring plenty of dried fruit bring if you can blue 
Broad Cloth suitable for me a coat and pantaloons, ydu had Ijest bring nails 
for building a barn etc. Andrew Jarvin and William Rumsey called on us 
today on their way to Rock River Jarvin lives in Michigan now thinks he 
shall move to Rock River he likes this country well John Rue is going after 
his mother this spring if you could come in company with them it would be 
well he will come out and see if he comes to Kennedyville. 

I expect to receive a letter from you soon on your receipt of my first 
letter Not answered and perhaps I may think of something more that shall 
wish to inform you, then you will see what I have wrote in these two last 
letters and answer them as soon as you can we all feel anxious to see you 
all, write to us often until you start let us know the time If you can get a 
good hand to work that wants to come to this country encourage him to 
come we shall want a good hand my man that I hired for $12 per month 
has left me after working a month got homesick. I have hired another for 
a month but he is good for nothing and a wages is high here. 

After all our advice and wants you must use your own judgment about the 
whole matter as we know that your judgment is good we are perhaps two 
much interested to give such advice as we should, think the journey will 
be a benefit to your and Elizas health. I hope the Lord will give your health 
and strength sufficient for whats before you. 

Yours with respect 

B. Hanks. 

Sister I would like to have you get me Black silk enough for a cape as 
near like my dress as you can. Ma wishes you to bring 10 yds of blue calico 
for aprons. Sister you cannot tell with what joy we received the news of 
your coming to this country. How does Sister Eleanor feel about it dear 
girl I know it will be hard for her to part with yuu but we will hope that they 
will soon follow. Give an aliundance of love to her for me. Ma wants you 
to bring 3 or 4 pounds of stocking yarn for us. 

Aly love to all and kiss little Sophia and Jerome for me How I do want 
to see the dear little fellow. 

Yours truly 

Sar. 

Ma is very anxious to hear how Elinn your health is. Aunt is gaining 
slow. 

Brother please bring me a parasol if you can collect any of Pa's money. 

Sarah. 

Dear Children 

T & E Loomis. 
You must not think hard that we have not answered your letter before 
we hardly have time to write to anybody but we feel verry much interested 
in Asahel and Eliza coming to this country and have wrote to 
you have or will see all the letters and know how it is with us we are passing 
through trials and afflictions which we cannot describe to you The Lord has 



llu KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

supported us thus far and given us health and strength to take care of your 
poor but rich Brother he now is not able to help himself at all he is we 
think weaker than William was a week before he died we try to be recon- 
ciled and know it is our duty to be but when the time of his Exit comes it 
will be a trying time we need your prayers that we may have 
sufficient to bear us up under this great affliction we see that God has been 
good to us in many ways. I left twenty dollars with for you 

and he will if he has not pay you Twenty Dollars more in good and take his 
pay out of Notes I left with him. We have had cold wet weather here for 
about 2 weeks back. I have sowed 8 acres of spring wheat and 5 of oats, 
and have 6 more to sow. The girls send their love to you and will write 
soon Mother is almost worn out taking care of James joines me in love to 
you and to your Father, mother and sister write upon receipt of 

this with Respect your Father 

B Hanks 

Elgin, June 14th, 1838. 
Dear Children 

Your letter dated 30th May was received the 12th int. we are much 
pleased to hear that Eliza was on the gain and yourself and babes well we are 
all enjoying good health although we feel verry lonesome at times on account 
of being deprived of the company and advice of our Dear James, but we try 
to be reconciled and I think we are as much as could be expected I was in 
hopes you would have been ready to start sometime in June as it is so much 
pleasanter and safer coming early in the season I presume you will come as 
soon as your business and Elizas health will permit we have had very dry 
weather hear for 2 or 3 weeks until 4 days ago I do not know as it has 
injured the crops much some pieces of corn planted on dry ground did not 
come up well my spring crops are doing well now. I was out to Chicago 
Twice the week before last with a wagon the roads were excellent started 
from home at 8 o'clock A. M. arrived at Chicago at 4 P. M. I bought a 
barrel of good Pork for S22. good dried apples at 14s per bushel Peaches 
at $3.50 Good sugar at is Coffee 6 lbs for a Dollar business 

is quite lively in Chicago this Spring more steamboats than usual have 
arrived there this spring. Geo. C. Nixon and wife caled on us last Sabbath and 
staid untill Alonday 10 Oclock we all went with them to Genrul McClures 
and took dinner and then he started on for Galena he leaves Mrs. Nixon 
there and he goes about 200 miles beyond to a place caled the pinary where 
he is building mills with a Company they gave us the news of Kennedvville 
from their Description it must be a God forsaken place Scarcely one Righteous 
person left to save the place I think we are well away from it Nixon told 
us that Jason had made up his mind to come with you himself see Frank 
and take another Tour in the west we shall be verry happy to see him here 
but little Frank he cannot have 

I will now mention what artickles we should be glad to have you bring 
us you need pay no attention to what we have wrote before as it will be 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY HI 

later in the season than we antisipated wlien we wrote before you will get 
the $ioo Note from Farnums if possilile the Taylors Note trad for a w-agon 
if you can if not leave it for collection as soon as due my fanning mill I 
want taken to pieces boxed up and brought on if it could be sent to Buffalo to 
the Care of Thomas Dudley I could get it from them to Chicago at most any 
time I have wrote to Uncle Elisha respecting it. Sell the lumber at Taylor 
Mill or leave it in the care of J or some other person to sell the other 

note if you cannot trade them off leave this also for collection mother wants 
you to fetch her a set of Curtain Calico she thinks you had best fetch a set 
too for yourselves, mother and Sarah have got them Dark Dresses you 
may bring one for Locky Sarah w-ants silk enough for a cape to her black 
silk dress bring common merino enough for mothers and Sarah Dresses 
a parasol for Sarah Broad Cloth for me a coat, we can get the other 
artickles we wrote for before as cheap in Chicago as in your place taking 
out transportation. 

I am now alone and shall not hire any until haying and Harvesting comes 
on and then I shall want one or two hands for a month or two I think I can 
get what help I shall want here as there is a number of young men come into 
the place this spring your goods if you cannot dispose of them there without 
a sacrifice fetch them along with you you can sell them here I shall send you 
another Chicago paper you will see some of the prices in that, as this will 
probably be the last letter you will receive from us before you start I will 
give you some directions about getting to us from Chicago you will call on 
J Rue & H Butler in Chicago they will give you some directions if you come 
from there in the stage you will have to stop about a mile from us at Mrs. 
Howard you can get the stage driver to take the county road my team can 
bring your goods from Chicago if the road should be good if not there is 
teams always enough in Chicago that can be hired to bring 
them out. if you could take a boy from 12 to 18 years old and bring with 
you I think it would be a good plan Such a boy can do most any kind of 
farming here Mother and the girls join me in love to you all hoping by the 
goodness and blessing of God we shall soon see each other again. 

Yours with Respect 

B Hanks 

Aunt Sally Campbell is better she has rode over and made a visit. 

Marcus Stearns was here last week and staid two nights he is doing 
very well in this country. 

you must write immediately on the Receipt of this, bring a rocking 
chair 

Kennedyville. 4 Nov AD 1838 
Dear Brother 

After a short delay on the reception of your letter I take this opportunity 
of answering it. our familv is all well that is at home you are aware that 



112 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

John, Elisha and George have gone to the west, they are in the Wisconsin 
Territory on the Chippeway river tliey wer well the last we heard from them 
they will probably call on you when they return and that will be I think next 
May or June, this season was verry wet the fore part and the latter verry dry 
Crops came in very light buckwheat was hardly worth harvesting come 
was but little raised on account of its not being planted what was planted 
done well we planted two acres and had abought Seventy bushels and two 
hundred and thirty of wheat three hundred of oats thirty six of peas twenty 
five of Buckwheat One hundred and fifty of potatoes two hundred of Appels 
and twenty five ton of hay we have one span of horses five cows four year- 
lings six calves and a coalt seventy five sheep fifteen hogs, we have built 
one horse barn thirty by twenty six I have got all my land paid for an a 
deed for the whole of it two hundred and thirty acres in number and have 
got all my debts paid and two hundred dollars on hand besides two hundred 
and forty on interest. You wanted me to give you the prices of the different 
articles wheat is twelve shillings per bushel corn is one dollar per bushel 
Oats are three shillings Buckwheat is six shillings potatoes fifty cents peas 
one dollar. 

there is a fair prospect for the York and Erie Railroad agoing on Edward 
Farnum has got in head engineer of this County there is four Companies 
now exploaring the rout up the Cohocton and Canesteo Brigham is with the 
company on this ri\er he went to the post four weeks ago they hav got as 
far as both an Calculate to run as far as they can until coald weath will oblige 
them to quit it will be ascertained this winter whether it will go up the 
canisteo or the Cohocton. their has ben svral changes taken place this fall in 
out neighborhood Franklin Glass died in September last of the Consumption 
Casandra Smith died three weeks ago of the asthma and the consumption 
Electa Smith died a week ago yesterday of the consumption it has been a 
hard shock to Mrs. Smith but she is a recovering slowly the rest of our 
neighborhood enjoys good health my health in particular has ben verry good 
and all of us have enjoyed good health Elishas family are all well and Jasons 
Old Mr. Neally was taken last Wednesday evening with a fit of Numbpalsy 
and is speechless yet we do not expect that he will survive long Your letter 
informed us of the loss you had received in the death of James it was a 
heavy blow sent by the great giver of all good for some good purpose we 
know not. I am rejoicet to hear that you hav bourne your self up in your 
troubles and are now in good circumstances. Give our respects to Tephaniahs 
family and yours in particular tell Xiah that he has forgotten his promise 
like all other emegrants and we began to think that you had but the long 
looked for letter arrived at last do not let as long a time slip againe for it is 
pleasant to converse with freinds especially Brothers if they are at a distance 
If you see Daniel or Cornelius family tell them that we send our respects to 
them. I ad no more 

This from your afifectionate Brother 

Elijah Hanks 

Brigham Hanks) 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 



113 



CHAPTER VHI. 



LIST OF EARLY FAMILIES. 



Family Name. Place of Settlement. 

Adams Aurora 

Allen Aurora 

Anderson .... Campton ...... 

Annis Blackberry . . . 

Arvedson .... Carpentersville 

Averill Batavia 

Backus Hampshire . . . 

Baker Virgil 

Balduc Aurora 

Ball Aurora 

Barber Campton 

Barrett Aurora 

Bartlett Campton 

Baumann .... Dundee 

Beaupre 

Bergland 

Beverly Maple Park . . . 

Bishop Aurora 

Bosworth .... Dundee 



Bowdish 

Bowne St. Charles 

Bowron Aurora 

Boyce Big Rock 

Boyce Big Rock 

Bradley Geneva 

Bradley Aurora 

Brady Big Rock and 

Aurora 

Britton Plato 

Brown St. Charles .... 

Brown .\urora 

Brown Batavia 

Brown Elgin 

Brown Aurora 

Brownell St. Charles 

Burnham Batavia . . 

Burnidge .... Plato 

Burr Batavia 

Burton Plato 

Burton Aurora 

Burton Aurora 

Butler Aurora 



Time. 
1862 

1854 

1852 

1855 
1840 
1882 
185I 
1867 

1843 
1864 

1843 

1859 
1883 
1865 
1844 

1854 
1838 



1840 

1857 

1854 

1855 
1846 

1855 

1836 

187- 

1838 

1845 

185- 

1872 

1875 
1857 



1857 
1863 

187I 
1873 



Where from. 

Chemung Co., N. Y. 
Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Shien, Norway. 



Rensselaer Co., N. Y. 

Windham Co., Conn. 

England. 

Quebec, Canada, French. 

Madison Co., N. Y. 

St. Lawrence Co., N. Y. 

Detroit. Alich. English. 

Grafton Co., N. H. Mass. 



English. 



Canada. 

Sweden direct. 

Oneida Co., N. Y. Wheelwright. 

Leicester, Mass. England. 

Elgin, 1867, N. Y. Saratoga Co., 

England. 
Otsego Co., N. Y. 
Tompkins Co.. N. Y. 
Clinton Co., N. Y. 
\'ermont. 
Springfield, N. H. 
Lee, Mass. 
Massachusetts. 

Westchester Co., N. Y. 
Cheshire Co.. N. H. 
Warren, Mass. 

Jefferson Co., N. Y. (Scot-Eng.). 
New York. 
Concord, N. H. 

Rockingham Co., N. Y. English. 
New York. Wisconsin, 1839. 
Vermont. English. 
Market Harbor, England. English. 
Wyoming Co., N. Y. 

Norwich, Vt. 
Anderson, Lid. 
Jefferson Co.. N. Y. 



114 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 



Family Name. 



Place of Settlement. 



Calkins Sugar Grove. . . 

Calkins Sugar Grove . . . 

Card Aurora 

Carlson St. Charles 

Carpenter .... Dundee 

Cary Kaneville 

Chaffee Campton 

Chase Aurora 

Chipp Virgil 

Clayton Aurora 

Rev. Clifford 

Coffin Batavia 

Colton St. Charles . . . . 

Cranston St. Charles . . . . 

Crawford ... .St. Charles . . . . 

Crego Blackberry . . . . 

Dale Big Rock 

Dauberman . . . Kaneville 

Davidson .... Elgin 

Davis Big Rock 

Day Aurora 

Day Aurora 

De'Wolf St. Charles . . . . 

Doherty St. Charles .... 

Downing Virgil 

Downing 

Dunton Aurora 

Durant St. Charles .... 

Durant St. Charles . . . . 

Dwyer Rutland 

Dwyer Rutland 

Eakin Rutland 

Eastman Plato 

Eaton Elgin 

Edwards Dundee 

Eitelgoerge . . . Aurora 

Evans Aurora 

Evans Sugar Grove . . . 

Everts Geneva 

Fasmer 

Fassett Hampshire .... 

Fedou Elgin 

Ferson St. Charles . . May, 

Fikes Sugar Grove . . . 

Fink Kaneville 

Fisher Campton 



Hillsboro Co., N. Y. English. 
Wales and Ohio. 1844. 



Time. Where from. 

Washington Co., N. Y. 
846 Steuben Co., N. Y. 
842 Wyoming Co., N. Y. 
873 Langelanda, Sweden. Scandinavian. 
837. Uxbridge. Mass. 
860 Orleans Co., N. Y. 
841 Windham Co.. Vt. 
868 Geauga Co., Ohio. Wis. 
878 England. 
867 New York City. 

Erie Co., N. Y. 
852 Lincoln Co., Me. 
863 Rutland Co.. Vt. 
863 Delaware Co., N. Y. 
848 Belfast. Scotch-Irish. 

(St. Charles Valley Chronicle). 

851 Chenango Co., N. Y. 

852 England direct. 
862 

854 
847 

859 

841 

85-' 
868 
868 
846 

845 
854 
841 
844 
847 
840 
838 
839 
854 
841 
861 

851 
863 
865 
886 

834 
842 

851 
869 



Otsego Co., 
Connecticut. 
New York. 
Queens Co., 
Queens Co., 
New York. 
Springfield, 



N. Y. 

Ohio. 
Ireland. 
N. Y. 

N. Y. 

Vt. 



French. 
1820. 



County Londonderry, Ireland. 

Orange Co., Vt. 

Otsego Co.. N. Y. 

Chautauqua Co.. N. Y. Welsh. 

Germany. 

Welsh ( Pennsylvania-Canada). 

Wales direct. Welsh. 

Berkshire Co., Mass. 

Prussia. 

Otsego Co., N. Y. 



Sullivan Co., N. H. 
Montgomery Co., N. Y. 
Onondaga Co.. N. Y. 
Hesse-Cassel, Germany. 



German. 





KANE COUNTY HISTORY IV, 


Family Name. 


Place of Settlement. 


Time. 


Where from. 


Fitchie 


. . Plato 


[885 


Perthshire, Scotland. 


Foley 


. . St. Charles .... 


[864 


Irish. 


Fox 


. . Aurora 


[857 


Chenango Co.. N. Y. 


Frace 


. . Kaneville 


[852 


Morris Co., N. Y. German. 


Frazier . . . . 


. . Batavia and 








Aurora 


866 


Onondaga Co., N. Y. 


Frederick . . 


. . Kaneville 


[846 


Fulton Co., N. Y. German. 


Freiler . . . . 


. . Elgin 


[883 


Hartford, Conn. 


Frisbee . . . . 


. . Aurora 


[874 


Cortland Co., N. Y. 


Gage 


. . Rutland 


[872 


Plato 


Gale 


. . Aurora 


86 s 


Onondaga Co., N. Y. 


Gannon . . . . 


. . Kaneville 


[847 


Ireland direct. 


Garfield . . . . 


. . Campton 


[841 


Rutland Co., Vt. 


German . . . . 


. . Geneva 


836 


Montgomery Co., N. Y. Scot-Eng 


Gilbert . . . . 


. . Aurora 


86q 


Massachusetts. 


Gleason . ... . 


. . Burlington .... 


840 


Genesee Co.. N. Y. 


Godfrey . . . 


. . Batavia 


839 


Orange Co., Vt. 


Goding . . . . 


. . Aurora 


864 


England. 


Griffith 


. . Batavia 


846 


England. 


Guild 


. . Aurora 


860 


Wayne, 111. 


Hagelow . . . 


. . Elgin 


[864 


Wurtemberg, Germany. 


Hall 


. . Big Rock 




(N. Y. City), 6 Vt. Orphan. 


Hall 


. . St. Charles .... 


844 


Herkimer Co., N. Y. 


Halloway . . 


. . St. Charles .... ] 


8,S.^ 


Dutchess Co.. N. Y. Scotch-English 


Hanson . . . . 


. . Sugar Grove . . . 


87.S 


Kendall Co., 111. 


Hardy 


. . Aurora 


860 


Oneida Co.. N. Y. English. 


Hardv 




871 


Grafton Co., N. H. English. 


Harris 


. . Aurora 


862 


Sussex Co., N. J. 


Harris 


. . Big Rock ] 


874 


Welsh-English. 


Harter . . . . 


. . Kaneville 




Centre Co.. Pa. Ger-.Penn. Dutch. 


Hatch 


. . Elgin ] 


8.U 


New York. 


Hawley . . . . 


. . Dundee ] 


850 




Heath 


. . Elsfin ] 


871 
858 


West Hartford, Conn. 


Hemmens . . 


. . Elgin 




Hinds 


. .Aurora ] 


842 


Westernville, N. Y. Eng.-Sc. -Irish 


Hines 


. .Virgil 


84.S 


Erie Co., N. Y. 


Hinman . . , 


. . Dundee 


883 


Oneida Co., N. Y. 


Hirsch 


. . Aurora 


861 


French. 


Hitchcock . . 


. . Aurora ] 


8,=;,s 


West Springfield, Mass. 


Hodder . . . . 


. . Aurora i 


854 


Dorsetshire. England. 


Holden .... 


. . Aurora 


8,S7 


Sullivan Co., N. H. 


Holmes . . . . 


. . Aurora ] 


863 


Fairfax, Vt. Scotch-Irish. 


Hooker . . . . 


. . St. Charles .... j 


8,W 


Canada. English-Scotch. 


Hopkins . . . 


. . Aurora i 


870 


Native. 


Howard . . . 


. . St. Charles .... i 


8.^7 


Cliautauqua Co.. N. Y. Eng.-Irish. 


Hoyt 


. .Aurora i 


840 


Maine. Danburv. Mass. Ohio. 


Hoyt 


. . Kaneville i 


884 


New Hampshire. English. 



116 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 



Family Name. 


Place of Settlement. 


Time. 


Where from. 


Hubbard 


. Aurora i 


«S.5 


Oneida Co., N. Y. 


Hubbard .... 


. Aurora i 


86.5 


Madison Co.. N. Y. 


Hughes 


. Big Rock 1 


84.S 


Pennsylvania. Welsh. 


Huls 


. St. Charles .... i 


8.S.S 


Seneca Co., N. Y. Dutch-Welsh. 


Hunt 


. Dundee ] 


S42 


New York. 


Hunt 


. Kaneville , 




Chenango Co., N. Y. 


Hvde 


.Batavia i 


845 




Ingham 


. Sugar Grove ... J 


839 




Irwin 


. St. Charles .... i 


884 


Lewis Co.. N. Y. 


Isbell 


. Aurora 






Isbell 


. Aurora ] 


8,S.S 


Lenox, Mass. 


Jones 


. St. Charles ] 


838 


Washington Co., Vt. 


Jones 


. Big Rock ] 


868 


Wales direct. 


Joslyn 

Keefe 


. Elgin 1 


8;n 


Nunda. 1837. Geneseo Co., N. Y. 
New Brunswick. Irish. 


.\'irgil 


s^.s 


Kellev 


. Elgin ] 


860 


Schenectady, X. Y. 


Kibling 


. Blackberry .... ] 


855 


\'ermont. 


Kilbourne . . . 


. Elgin ] 


871 


Orange Co., Vt. 


Kimball 


.Elgin 


8.U 


Grafton Co.. N. H. 


Kimball 


. Elgin ] 


[836 




Kimball 


. Elgin 


[838 




Knickerbocker 


. Aurora 


[837 


Dutchess Co., N. Y. 


Lakin 


■ Virgil 


[861 


Essex Co., X. Y. 


Lamson 


. Big Rock 


[836 


X'ew York Citv. Mass. America 


Lamson 


. Aurora 


[867 


Windsor, \'t. 


Langworthy . 


.Aurora 


'873 


Marengo. 


Lee 


. Plato 


183.^ 


\\'estchester Co., N. Y. 


Lee 


. Kaneville 


[844 


Middletown Countv. 


Lemon 


. Campton 


[842 


^Massachusetts. 


Leydon, Rev. 


. Aurora 


885 


Catholic priest. 


Lockwood . . 


. Bata\ia 


1853 


Westchester, X. Y. 


Long 






Franklin Co., Mass. 


Long 


. Big Rock 


[840 


Greenfield. Mass. 


Long 


. Big Rock 


840 


Shelburne, Mass. 


Lord 


1 


865 


Genesee Co.. X. Y. English. 


Loser 


. Aurora ] 


852 


Luxemburg, Germany. 


Lowrie 


. Elgin 


[882 


Berwickshire, Scotland. 


Mallory 


. Batavia 


.852 


Milo, Yates Co.. X. Y. Scotch. 


Mann 


. Elein 


i8:;o 
1867 
[866 


Countv Westmeath, Ireland. 


Mann 


. Elarin 


Sweden. 


Marme 


. Aurora 


X'euwied, Prussia. 


Marx 


. Aurora 


'8,v 




Mason 


. Aurora 


1849 


Canada. 


Mathews 


. Aurora 


[868 


Kendall Co., 111. English-Irish. 


Maurer 


. Xaperville 


1853 


France direct. 


McCarty . . . . 


. Aurora 


'834 


Morris Co., X. J. Scotch-English. 


McClellan . . . 


. Batavia 


[86q 






CHICAGO STREET ABOUT 1866, LOOKING WEST FROM FOUN- 
TAIN SQUARE. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 



119 



Faraih' Name. Place of Settlement. 

McClure Elgin 

McDoIe Sugar Grove . 

McDole Sugar Grove . 

McDole Sugar Grove . 

Meredith Big Rock . . . . 

Meredith .... .Aurora 

Meredith Aurora 

Merrill Kaneville . . . 

Meyer Aurora 

Mighell Sugar Grove . 

Miller, C. A 

Miller Aurora 



Miller Elgin 

Miller Dundee .... 

Miner Kaneville . . 

Minium Kaneville . . 

Montony Aurora .... 

Moody Cainpton . . . 

Morris Blackberry . 

Moulding .... Campton . . . 

Munger Dundee .... 

Newman Elgin 

Newton Batavia .... 

Newton Batavia .... 

Nimmo Elgin 

Norris Blackberry . 

Norris Aurora .... 

Norton Dundee .... 

Oppenheimer . • Elgin 

Osborn Kaneville . . 

Outhouse .... Elgin 

Owens Kaneville . . 

PaDelford . . . Elgin 

Parker Dundee .... 

Paull Sugar Grove 

Paull Aurora .... 

Pease Plato 

Peck Plato 

Perry Big Rock . . . 

Phillips Aurora .... 

Pingree Rutland .... 

Pond Aurora .... 

Powell Aurora .... 

Pratt Aurora .... 

Prentiss, Rev . . East Aurora 

Prindle Aurora .... 

Probert Elgin 



Tune. 

846 

835 
839 
852 

843 
867 

870 

853 
871 

837 
842 

842 

854 
871 
842 

844 
846 
865 
865 

853 

873 
863 

854 
854 

854 

844 

853 
861 

876 

883 

857 
842 
858 
841 
881 
860 
883 
845 
849 
811 
872 
864 

853 
884 
876 

843 



Where from. 

Steuben Co., N. Y. Scotch-Irish. 
Chemung Co., N. Y. Scotch-Eng. 

Chemung Co., N. Y. 
Welsh, direct from Wales. 
Welsh, native of Wales. 
Montgomeryshire, Wales. 
New Hampshire. English. 
Saxony. 
Rutland, Vt. 
Scotland direct. 
Tompkins Co., N. Y. 
Hesse-Cassel, Germany. 
Wurtemberg, Germany. 

Crawford Co., Pa. 

Elmira Co., N. Y. German-Irish. 

New Brunswick. Scotch. 

Monmouth Co., N. J. 

Lancashire, England. 

Addison Co., Vt. 

Hertfordshire, England. 

Wyoming Co., N. Y. 

Scotland. 

New York. 

Chemung Co., N. Y. 

Herkimer Co., N. Y. Eng.-German. 

Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Auburn, N. Y. England, 1823. 

Campton Township. 

New York. English. 

Buffalo, N. Y. 

Massachusetts. 

Medina Co., Ohio. 

Medina Co., Ohio. 

Tolland Co., Conn. English. 

Ontario Co., N. Y. 

New York. 

Litchfield Co., Conn. 

Plymouth Co., Mass. 

Addison Co., Vt. Scotch-English. 

Delaware Co., N. Y. 

Cortland Co., N. Y. 

Steuben Co., N. Y. 

Litchfield Co., Conn. 

Rochester, N. Y. English. 



120 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 



Family Name. 



Place of Settlement. 



Quackenbush . . Dundee . . . . 

Quereau Aurora . . . . 

Ravlin, Rev. . . Kaneville . . 
Raymond .... Kaneville . . 

Reed Plato 

Reese Aurora .... 

Reese Dundee .... 

Reeves Elgin 

Reid Hampshire . 

Reising Aurora .... 

Reynolds Sugar Grove 

Rice Aurora .... 

Riddle Aurora . . . . 

Riser Aurora .... 

Roberts Aurora .... 

Root Elgin 

Roots Blackberry . 

Rovelstad .... Elgin 

Ryan Elgin 

Safford Aurora .... 

Satterfield .... Aurora .... 



Schairer Burlington . . . 

Schickler Aurora 

Schmahl Aurora 

Schmidt Elgin 

Schoeberlein . . Aurora 

Schultz Elgin 

Scott Campton 

Scott Plato 

Seapy Plato 

Shaw Campton 

Shedden Plato 

Shellhorn .... Kaneville . . . . 

Shepard Blackberry . . . 

Sherman Elgin 

Sholes Hampshire . . . 

Simmons 

Simpson Aurora 

Sisley Hampshire . . . 

Skinner Hampshire . . . 

Skinner Plato 

Smailes Elgin 

Smith Hampshire . . . 

Smith Burlington . . . 

Smith Sugar Grove . . 

Smith Carpentersville 

Snow Batavia 



Time. 
849 

845 
843 

877 
85- 
863 

848 

865 

855 
836 

843 
856 

855 
882 

845 
848 
872 
849 
862 

857 
867 

856 

868 

857 

857 
869 

844 
872 

852 
870 
842 
885 
852 
838 
887 

857 
850 
86— 
846 

853 
852 

837 
841 

844 
878 

856 



W'liere from. 

Otsego Co., N. Y. Holland. 

Cayuga Co., N. Y. 

Essex Co., Vt. Irish-Scotch-Eng. 

Middleboro, Plvmouth Co., Mass. 

DuPage Co., Il'l. 

German. 

Cook Co., 111. German. 

Wayne Co., N. Y. 

Kingston, Upper Canada. Scotch. 

Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany. 

Ulster Co., N. Y. English. 

Merrimack Co., N. H. 

Keene, N. H. 

Hartford, Conn. Swiss-German. 

Kendall Co., 111. Scotch- Welsh-Eng. 

Genesee Co., N. Y. 

Lockport, N. Y. 

Scandinavian. 

Ireland direct. Irish. 

Washington Co., N. Y. Scotch. 

Washington Co., N. Y. 

Prussia. 

(New York, 1853). Bavarian. 

Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany. 

Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany. 

Prussia. 

Madison Co., N. Y. 

California. 

Oneida, Co., N. Y. 

Scotland direct. 

Wurtemburg, Germany. 

New York. Ger. and Hoi. -Dutch. 

Dutchess Co., N. Y. 

Burling Township. 

Pennsylvania. Irish-English. 

Bureau Co., 111. 

Geneva. 

Seneca Co., N. Y. 

Esse.x Co., N. Y. 

England. 

Baden, Germany. 

Caldwell's Manor, Canada. 

Rutland Co., Vt. 

Cabot, Vt. 

Orange, N. J- England, 1851. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 



121 



Family Name. Place of Settlement. 

Snyder ...... Kaneville ... 

Solfisburg .... Aurora 

Southworth . . Aurora 

Spencer Kaneville . . . 

Spooner Batavia 

Squires Aurora 



Sterling Batavia 



Stevens 

Stewart St. Charles 

Stolp Aurora . . , 

Stone . ., Elgin 

Stone Aurora . . 

Stone Elgin 

Struch Burlington 

Sturges Virgil ... 

Sylvester .... Aurora . . 

Tarble Aurora . . , 

Thies Plato .... 

Thompson . . . Sugar Grov 
Treadwell .... Elgin .... 
Trumbull ... .St. Charles 

Tyler Aurora . . 

Van Fleet .... Aurora . . 
Van Liew .... Aurora . . 
Van Nortwick . Batavia . . 
Van Nostrand . Elgin .... 
Van Patten . . . Elgin .... 

Wade Aurora . . 

Wasmer Aurora . . 



W'aite Sugar Grove 



\\'alker Aurora . . . 

Ward Campton . . 

Warford Geneva . . . 

Waterhouse . . Aurora . . . 

Watson 

Watson Elgin 

Watts Aurora . . . 

Weld Elgin 

Wells Geneva . . . 

Wells Kaneville . 

Werthwein . . . Hampshire 
Westgarth . . .Campton . . 

White Elburn . . . 

White 

Whitford Elgin 

Whitford .... Elgin 

Whitney Campton . . 



846 
861 
87 1 
862 
870 

855 
868 
865 

855 
842 

85-' 
868 

877 
871 

854 
874 
846 
874 

845 
851 
840 
862 
846 

835 

843 
878 

857 
871 
868 
868 
835 
844 
862 

853 
874 
871 
841 
846 
866 
881 
852 
875 



1840 
1839 



Where from. 

Lancaster Co., Pa. 
Direct from Sweden. 
LaSalle Co. 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Cortland Co., N. Y. 
Montgomery Co., N. Y. 
Onondaga Co.. N. Y. 

Onondaga Co., N. Y. Germany, 1738. 

Bakersfield, Vt. 

Bradford Co., Pa. Scotch-Irish. 

Belvidere, 111. 

Germany direct. 

England direct. 

Whitehall, N. Y. Canadian. 

Sacketts Harbor, N. Y. 

Germany. 

Windham Co., Vt. 

Windsor Co., Vt. 
St. Charles, 111. 

Holland. 

New Jersey. German. 

Somerset Co., N. J. 

Cortland Co., N. Y. 

Tioga Co., N. Y. English. 

Consdorf, Germany. 

Jefferson Co., N. Y. 

Oswego Co., N. Y. 1854, England. 

Genesee Co., N. Y. 

England. 

Middlesex Co., Conn. English. 

New Jersey. 

DuPage Co., 111. 

Knox Co., Me. Scotch-English. 

North Adams, Mass. 
Massachusetts. 
Newark, N. J. German. 
Geneva. English. 
Geneva. Scotch-German. 
Norfolk Co., Mass. English. 
Medina. Ohio. 
Colchester, Vt. 
Tompkins Co., N. Y. 



122 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Family Name. Place of Settlement. Time. Where from. 

Widmayer . . .Hampshire .... 1870 

Wilcox Elgin 1842 IMontgomery Co., N. Y. English. 

Wilcox St. Charles .... 1883 Broome Co., N. Y. 

Wilder Aurora 1837 New York. 

Willard Aurora 1867 Connecticut. French-Scotch. 

Williams Geneva 1886 Madison Co., N. Y. 

Wilson Elgin 1841 Genesee Co., N. Y. English. 

Wilson Sugar Grove . . . 1856 

Winteringham . St. Charles .... 1864 England. 

Wright St. Charles .... 1859 Madison Co., N. Y. 

Young Blackberry .... 1843 Orange Co., Vt. 

Young Kaneville 1871 Orange Co., Vt. 



CHAPTER IX. 



BEGINNINGS ALONG FOX RIVER. 



The county of Kane, although among those last settled in Illinois, is 
now one of the most populous and wealthy in the State. It derives its name 
from Hon. Elias K. Kane, one of the early and prominent citizens and 
politicians of southern Illinois. Prior to 1836. the territory from the present 
north line of La Salle county to the Wisconsin line, and from what was 
then Cook county, on the east, to what was Jo Daviess county, on the west, 
was a part of La Salle county. In the winter of 1835-36, the legislature 
passed an act by which the present territory of Kane and DeKalb counties, 
and the three north townships of Kendall, were laid ofif into a county and 
denominated Kane. In the winter of 1836-7, the west half of Kane was 
appropriated to an organization denominated DeKalb county, and subse- 
quently the three southern townships were allotted to Kendall countj 
leaving Kane with its present area — eighteen miles wide by thirty long, 
and embracing fifteen townships. It contains 540 square miles or 345,000 
acres. The present population of the county is 78,792. 

The government surveys of Kane county took place in 1839 and '40, 
and the lands came into market in 1842. In the early days of Illinois, the 
local government was mainly by counties, though they were divided into 
election precincts for the convenience of voting, etc. In 1850, this precinct 
arrangement was abandoned in Kane county, and township organization and 
government took their place. 

The first actual settler in Kane county was Christopher Payne, from 
North Carolina, who arrived with his family in October, 1833, and located 
one mile east of Batavia. He made his journey from Carolina wath an 
ox-team; but came originally from New York. Colonel Nathaniel Lyon 
and Captain C. B. Dodson .settled near Batavia in the spring of 1834, there 
being only five other families in the county at that time. During the summer 
and fall, some forty families located along Fox river, among whom were 
Messrs. Haight, Joseph and Samuel McCarthy, Aldrich, Vandeventer, How, 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 123 

McKee, Town, Churchill, Miles, William and John Van Nortwick, Ira 
Minard and James Herrington. At this time the country now embraced by- 
Kane county was in possession of the Pottawattomie Indians — the wigwam 
of Waubonsie, their chief, being a little north of Aurora, but most of them 
were soon after removed beyond the Mississippi. 

The first store and saw-mill in the county were built by C. B. Dodson, 
in the summer of 1834, at Clybourneville, one mile south of Batavia. The 
first flouring-mill was erected in Batavia in 1837 by Mr. M. Boardman, and 
was followed the same year by another at Aurora, built by Messrs. McCarty. 
Up to this time the nearest flouring-mills were at Ottawa. 

The first school in the county was held in a log cabin on Colonel Lyon's 
claim, one mile east of Bata\ia, and was taught by a Mr. Knowles, from 
Vermont, with an average attendance of nine scholars. 

The first post office was establishd at Geneva, or Herrington's Ford. 
in 1835, and called La Fox, James Herrington being postmaster. 

The first celebration of the Fourth of July is said to have taken place 
in Elgin in 1836. The year following, S. S. Jones, Esq., delivered his cele- 
brated oration on the Fourth of July, to eleven hearers. 

The first white child of Kane county was Dodson Vandeventer. born in 
the "Big Woods," October 10, 1834. 

The first church was organized in Batavia in 1835. The first sermon 
preached in the county was by the Rev. N. C. Clark, at the log cabin of 
Christopher Payne, the first settler, as. early as August, 1834. Indeed, Mr. 
Clark might well have been styled the pastor of the entire Kane county 
settlement for several years, and was truly one of the pioneer preachers of 
this region. 

The first newspaper in Kane county was published at St. Charles in the 
fall of 1841. by John Thomas. It was styled the St. Charles Patriot, after- 
wards the Fox River Advocate and Kane County Herald. The paper was 
burned out in 1842, but Ira Minard went to Hennepin, on the Illinois river, 
with two teams and purchased a press and material, so that the paper was 
continued as the Fo.x River Advocate, edited by D. D. Waite. 

The following extract from a letter to the Genesee Evangelist, in 1848, 
will give the impression of a traveler with regard to Kane county si.xty years 
ago, and also the population of some of the villages of the county at that 
time : 

"This county lies north of Kendall and west of DuPage, and if any 
preference can be given among so many counties, all of which are so beautiful 
and so fertile, that preference must be given to Kane. I think, after taking 
all things into consideration, that I may safely pronounce it the best county 
in the State. Although the prairie land predominates, it is interspersed with 
valuable groves, containing timber sufficient for fuel, fencing and building 
for years to come. 

"Most of the county is within a day's drive of the lake, thus enjoying 
a proximity to market not possessed by counties further west. The new 
railroad from Chicago to Galena passes directly through it and afifords a ready 
communication at all times with Chicago. But its magnificent river, which 



124 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

supplies so inucli w ater power and propels so much machinery, adds materially 
to the wealth and business of the county. This is Fox river, which rises in 
Wisconsin, a few miles west of Milwaukee, and empties into the Illinois at 
Ottawa. After running twenty, or thirty miles from its source, and before 
entering the State of Illinois it becomes sluggish, and for most of the way 
has too little fall to propel machinery with much power. By the time, how- 
ever, that it reaches the north part of Kane county, its descent is more rapid 
and it rolls on in a broad channel and nearly a straight course through the 
whole length of the county (about thirty miles), afifording many valuable 
mill sites. On ascending or descending the ri^•er. the traveler passes, once 
in every five miles, on an average, a thriving village, divided by the stream, 
until he reaches the sixth before leaving the county. Each of these villages 
contains one or more flouring mills. A short distance north of the south line 
of the county is Aurora, containing some 1,000 or 1,200 inhabitants. Seven 
miles north of here is Batavia, a place somewhat smaller than Aurora, Like 
its sister village, it is separated by the channel of water which propels its 
machinery. A small island divides the river as it passes through the village. 
Two miles north of Batavia is Geneva, the shire town of Kane county, 
although it is the smallest of its villages. Two miles further on is St, Charles, 
containing some 1,200 or 1,500 inhabitants. A paper mill has been erected 
here and is now in operation, being the only one in northern Illinois, Ten 
miles north of St, Charles is Elgin, the largest and prettiest village in Kane 
county. The state of society here is, good and the country around beautiful 
and fertile, thus making Elgin one of the most delightful places in the world 
for a residence. Proceeding five miles northward we reach Dundee, the last 
of the Kane county villages. The place contains some 600 inhabitants, and 
as its Scotch name would indicate, has several Scotch families in and 
around it." 

The following letter, which appeared in the Kenosha Telegraph, in 183 1, 
will give some further idea of Dundee and Elgin as they appeared at that 
time : and something of the county : 

"Air. Editor: The river which rises a few miles northwest of Mil- 
waukee, and flows so tardily to the state line, and through McHenry county, 
Illinois, begins, as it approaches the line of Kane county, to move more 
rapidly onward. Its haste to reach its destination continues through nearly 
the entire length of the county, affording water power which already propels 
a large amount of machinery, and may be made to propel much more. The 
river passes in nearly a straight course from north to south through the eastern 
part of the county, lined on each side by a narrow strip of woods, beyond 
which the high, rolling prairie, dotted as it is by well cultivated farms and 
comfortable dwellings, presents an appearance which beauty's self tuight 
envy. Six of the numerous mill-seats on the river are the nuclei of as manv 
villages, distant from each other, on an averag-e, less than five miles. With 
such a water power within them, and such a beautiful and fertile country 
around them, it is not strange that Kane county has reason to be proud of 
its villages. All of them are within about thirty-five miles of Chicago. All 
but one are connected with that city by railroad, and thus have daily or 




OLD WOODEN BRIDGE, CHICAGO STREET. ELGIN, 1866. 




OLD BRIDGE ACROSS FOX RIVER. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 127 

semi-daily communication witli it. Four of tliem liave newspapers — a larger 
number, probably, than are issued in any other county in the state, with 
the exception of the one embracing Chicago. 

"The most northern of the Kane county \-illages, on Fox river, is 
Dundee, which, as its name would indicate, has a large sprinkling of Scotch 
inhabitants in and around it. It lacks that appearance of thrift and enterprise 
which mark its sister villages further south — and as the iron horse is not to 
visit it. its future prospects are not the brightest. Its present population is 
about 800, with the usual proportion of churches, schools, etc. 

"Five miles further down is Elgin, containing about 2,000 inhabitants. 
One of the first settlers and principal founders of this place was James T. 
Gifford, whose lamented death occurred last summer. To no man is Elgin 
more indebted, and long will her citizens regret their loss. Mr. Gifford 
lived to see a beautiful village of 2,000 inhabitants on a spot which, when 
first visited by him, some fifteen years since, had just been vacated by the 
wild Indian. He also lived to realize that much depends upon the influence 
exerted on an embryo village, and to have cause for gratulation that the 
influence which he and his co-pioneers brought to bear on Elgin while society 
was in its forming state there, was Christian. Few places can boast of better 
society than this village. The number and strength of its evangelical 
churches ; the number of houses erected for the worship of Jehovah, and 
the interest felt in the subject of education which, whatever may be said to the 
contrary, are the true indices of the state of society, speak an unequivocal 
language in favor of Elgin. The scarcity of grog-shops proclaim as unequivo- 
cally that here King Alcohol is not an absolute monarch. 

"The Congregationalists, Calvanistic Baptists, Free Will Baptists, 
Methodists and Unitarians each have church edifices — all of them respectable 
in appearance, and some of them large and attractive. 

"For several years there was published at this place a religious paper 
called The Western Christian, and designed to be the organ of the anti-slavery 
Baptists. This has recently been removed to Utica, N. Y., where it is now 
published. It is succeeded by The Elgin Gazette, a paper not denominational 
nor exclusively religious, but which, nevertheless, exerts a good moral 
influence. 

"A large two-story brick schoolhouse indicates the interest taken in the 
subject of education here. In addition to this an effort was made some two 
years since, by the Free Will Baptists, to establish a college at this place, and 
some $5,000 was subscribed by the citizens toward the erection of a building. 
A noble structure has been commenced, but the work has been suspended 
in consequence of a lack of funds, and the building seems likely for the 
present to remain in statu quo. 

"The Elgin woolen factory is a large establishment of the kind, which 
adds materially to the business and to the appearance of the place. Near 
this establishment a splendid brick store, 75 by 100 feet long, has been erected 
during the past season, and during the coming season a block containing 
eight or ten others of like dimensions is to be erected in proximity to it. 
Some idea may be formed from these facts of the growth of the place. The 



128 KANE COUXTY HISTORY 

rapidity of its present growth may be attributed in a great measure to the 
passage through it of the Chicago & Galena railroad. 

"Elein. like other Fox river villages in the countv. is divided bv the 
stream, and each of its sections is striving for the ascendant. The railroad 
was at first constructed to east Elgin, with the expectation that if it did not 
cross there it would cross at some point above. The directors have, however, 
since decided to leave the present track some distance east of the village and 
cross two or three miles below. The road will then be constructed to the 
section of the village lying west of the ri\er. where a depot will be erected. 
This will probably cause the road between east Elgin and the Junction to be 
unused, and will transfer much of the business of the place from the east to 
the west side of the stream. A natural consequence of the location of the 
depot is an increase in the value of village lots on the west side." 

Many of the suggestions of the above writer have been realized, but 
trade was not diverted to the west side, that side of the river having increased 
comparatively little since the above was written, while the east side now con- 
tains nearly all the business district. 

A saw-mill was built by Joseph McCarty on the island at Aurora in 
1835, the first timber being sawed on June 8. 1835. An old style, upright 
saw being used. The first saw-mill was built just south of Batavia at the 
mouth of Mill Creek by C. B. Dodson. A mercantile establishment that sold 
everything salable was opened by James L. Adams in 1836. Tax'erns were 
built at Aurora and Elgin that year. A stage route from Chicago to Elgin 
opened in 1837. A library was opened at Aurora in 1837. A postoffice was 
established in 1837. and a bridge built in 1836. 

In 1834 a log schoolhouse was erected by the efforts of Colonel Joseph 
Lyon, about one mile east of what is now Batavia. with nine pupils. A 
bridge was built in 1837. The first Batavia tavern was built in 1837. A church 
was organized in 1835. 

In 1839 a bridge was erected at Dundee; a schoolhouse built in 1837; 
a "hotel" opened on the west side by Hardin Oatman in 1838: a saw-mill 
erected in 1837. 

At Elgin a log schox^'house was built in 1837. near what is now South 
Elgin. Elgin was made a v'ostoffice in 1837: a log tavern appeared in 1836. 
July 4, 1836. the first road vas built east from Elgin to Meacham's Grove 
(now Bloomingdale). A juvice of the peace and constable were elected 
in 1836; a saw-mill was completed in 1837. A grist-mill was built the same 
year on the east side at the head of the old race way. The town plat was 
sur\-eyed in 1836. A wooden bridge was put up at a cost of $400 in 1837. 
The first frame dwelling was built in Elgin by Dr. Joseph Tefift in 1838, on 
the site of the present city hall, then Dr. Tefft's residence; a blacksmith set 
up business in 1838. The first school was opened in 1835. ''"d the first 
religious service was held in the Giflford cabin, September, 1835. A religious 
society was organized in 1836. 

At Geneva a school was opened in 1835 by Mrs. Samuel Sterling, who 
taught in her own cabin. A blacksmith arrived in 1836; a church was 
organized in 1837; the town was platted in 1837. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 129 

At St. Charles the tnwn was platted in 1837, and named Charleston. A 
dam, saw-mill and bridge went up in 1836. 

At Virgil the first framehouse was built in 1839, by Luther Merrill; a 
tavern was opened in 1840; a blacksmith shop in 1845; ^ postoffice in 1849. 

At Sugar Grove the first log cabin was raised in 1836, with nails, sawed 
boards and shingle roof; a tavern was built in 1836; a postoffice established 
in 1840. The first "store" was opened in 1839 by P. Y. Bliss, who built 
a framehouse in 1838. The store was long one of the largest in Kane county 
and drew the trade from many miles distant. 

In Rutland township a postoffice called Deerfield was established in 1838; 
a log house was erected in 1840, and a church organized by the Catholics 
about the same time. 

In Plato township the Griggs ta\'ern did business in 1836 or 1837; a 
church was built in 1852, and a school in 1840 at Plato Corners. 

At Kaneville a postoffice was established in 1845; '^ hotel in 1852. 

At Hampshire the first school was opened about 1840; a church in 1852. 

So the county advanced to settlement, forming the basis for the large 
and splendid development that has since resulted. The first needs, the church, 
the schoolhouse, the saw-mill, the postoffice, the general store and the open 
road everywhere were first attended to; dams, bridges, and grist-mills came 
next. Soon frame dwellings were built by the more well-to-do (if there 
were any such), and progress was then upon its way in the valley of the Fox, 
preparing for those industries that make its cities world famous, and the 
product of its farms a household word. 

Since these early beginnings by sincere men it has advanced continuously. 
May its future progress be no less notable. 



CHAPTER X. 

UNDERGROUND RAILROAD. 

The history of the underground railroad in this county was never written 
and, in fact, it would be difficult to secure a good history of the movement, 
as all of its operations were supposed to be generally conducted in a secret 
manner. Synopsis of the underground railroad : "It was a strange road. 
It had neither locomotive nor cars ; it ran in the darkness and was invisible. 
Its operations were so secret that the people called it the underground rail- 
road. The friends of this mysterious railway declared that its charter came 
from God and that it ran from the northern portion of the southern states 
to Canada. Its officers were largely volunteers and its route was that which 
afiforded to its passengers the greatest safety — salary, time, if not paid in this 
world will surely be in the next ; running expenses donated. It is true that 
the present generation knows but little of the meaning of the term, under- 
ground railway, and we have been surprised to hear people who have attained 
their majority ask if there really was a railroad that ran under ground. It 



130 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

is not such a strange question in view of the fact that we may have so many 
city railways that are now operated under the surface of the earth. The 
work of this road was simply to aid the fugitive slaves of the South to 
Canada, where freedom was assured. A conductor on one of these roads 
not only jeopardized his life but subjected himself to a heavy tine and im- 
prisonment under the fugitive slave law in Illinois, and if one will refer to 
the statute books that were printed after the adoption of the new constitution 
of 1848 they will find heavy fines and long terms of imprisonment for those 
convicted in aiding negroes from slavery to freedom. The only passengers 
using the underground railway were the negro people then in slavery and it 
had been running years before Lincoln's famous proclamation was signed and 
it might be well to state the feeling of Abraham Lincoln when he attached 
his name to that immortal document. After he had drafted it and laid it 
aside for reflection it was brouglit to him to sign. He lifted his hand to the 
place of signature and then it fell by his side. Again he lifted it and again 
it fell. Then, turning to some one near him. he said, T have been shaking 
hands with the people all day and my hand is very w-eak and shaky. If I 
should tremble as I write my name on this paper, which will be handed down 
in history, if any deed of mine is, all the world will say "he hesitated." ' He 
lifted his hand once more to the place of signature and steadily and firmly 
wrote A. Lincoln, with whicii all the world is now familiar. Then leaning 
back satisfied he said, 'That will do." Its principal stations were through 
Illinois, Indiana and Ohio — the route that afforded the passengers the great- 
est safety — and lay through the anti-slavery portions of the three states 
mentioned. The homes of abolitionists whose aim was to carry fugitive 
slaves from one station to another with safety were the stations used. It 
must be remembered that it was not without fear and trembling that many 
escaped sla\'es, who started on their perilous journey, for if they were cap- 
tured the usual penalty was to sell the escaped slave further south. One 
negro told how he rubbed onions on the bottom of his shoes to fool the 
hounds, but this had to be repeated many times in order to break the scent. 
Often they would wade in streams for a mile or more, or, if possible, steal 
a mule and ride for some distance. Many of the negro men and women that 
appeared at the homes of these abolitionists in DeKalb county were covered 
with stripes from head to foot and had sutYeretl untold agonies in slavery. 
After the publishing of Uncle Tom's Cabin, by Harriet Beecher Stowe. anti- 
slavery sentiment grew apace and perhaps more than any other factor this 
book secured the organization of a party that was opposed to the further 
extension of that relic of barbarism — slavery." 

The present generation can have but little conception of the condition 
of affairs pertaining to the underground railroad and perhaps the following 
extracts from Mr. Miller's letter will best illustrate the situation in those pioneer 
days. Mr. Miller says : "The Church was anti-slavery in its views and here was 
the 'Union depot' of the 'Underground Railroad.' There were a great many 
amusing incidents when the trains came in, especially after the Fugitive 
Slave Law was passed, for the slaveholders had got the lines so marked out 
they could follow the fleeing slaves as a hound could a fox. I might mention 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 131 

many facts, I will give only two. A woman came to my house — as white 
as most women — and said she was a slave and with her iuisband was fleeing 
for their freedom and was overtaken by her master and overseer, and they 
both ran for their lives to the woods, got separated from each other, and had 
wandered around until she was nearly starved to death, and had to leave the 
woods; she said she could hear nothing from her husband and feared he was 
taken back, and she wanted to be sent to Canada. About noon I got Brother 
Baker to take my horse and take her to the depot at Downer's Grove. He 
got back about dark. Late in the evening a white man called at my house 
inquiring for such a woman. I took him to be her master, but after keeping 
him in the dark for some time I found he was her husband. He said he must 
see her that night, for she would be gone in the morning and he would lose 
her, and then wept. I could find no one to go, as I learned the master was 
in town the day before. I told him I would go, and about two o'clock in the 
morning we reached the depot. I rapped on the door. A voice said, 'Who 
is there, what is wanted?' I inquired, 'Have you a colored woman here?' 
He said, 'No.' (He thought I was the master.) He did not tell a lie; she 
was not colored." 

The other instance he gives is this : "Soon after there came one woman 
and two men and wanted to rest awhile, as they were acquainted with one 
Larry, who lived here some time and was making money. A message came 
to me from Ottawa saying, 'Four slaveholders are on the track looking for 
forty slaves that had left the same neighborhood and they were going to 
Chicago, two by way of Joliet and two by the way of Aurora. Hide them' 
was the message. We did hide them and watched the movements of the 
slaveholders as they came into town. They tried to get men to watch and 
help them, but I am happy to say, with little success. Then they went to 
Naperville and hired men to watch there. There was a good deal of excite- 
ment and fear lest they should get them. No one dared to keep them or take 
them off, I felt something must be done. Colonel Lyon had a covered family 
carriage that would carry six persons, and said I might have it. I got two 
of the best horses in town, had my wife and the colored woman dress alike, 
sitting on the seat together, and the men lying on the bottom of the wagon 
at the back covered over with blankets. W'e were to start at eleven in the 
evening, and as we were ready a lawyer came in. I did not know his views 
on slavery and trembled a little until he turned to the one living here the 
longest and placed in his hand a bright shining silver dollar saying, 'God 
bless you, Larry.' I had no fear of him after that and always found him 
a fast friend to the slave. \\'hen we reached Naperville we met two men; 
one took the horses by the bits and the other came to the wagon. Seeing the 
two women, my wife moved her veil to one side, he saw that she was white 
and supposing the boys were bags, said to the other, 'All right,' and we 
passed on. On reaching Chicago, near 'Bull's Head,' we met a man and the 
colored woman said, 'That's my master.' The boys peeped out and said, 
'Sure enough,' and began to get their weapons ready, for they were armed 
to the teeth, saying they would never go liack alive. I knew then all the 
'Underground Railroad Hotels" in Chicag<'>. I tocjk them down Washington 



132 KANE COrXTY TTT^^TORY 

street. Deacon Philo Carpenter's back door was on that street, and I opened 
the gate and drove up to his back door and called for 'Sir. Carpenter. The 
woman said he was down in the city. I called for his wife: she came and at 
once understood our business. She said. T do not know what we shall do, 
there is great excitement in the city. The slaveholders are here and our house 
and Dr. Dyers are watched day and night." I saw a scuttle hole overhead 
and asked her what it was for. She said "to go up and fix the stove pipe." 
We sent them up there with orders to let no one up alive. I then found 
Deacon Carpenter. He said. T don't see how we can get them ott and I am 
afraid they will get them, for the boats are watched, also the railroads.' I 
then called on Mr. Isbell, a colored barber under the Sherman House, and a 
Mr. Lucas, a colored merchant tailor, and recjuested them to get the promi- 
nent colored men together. \\"e met in a private house for consultation. 
They told me of a man in the lumber business owning land and mills in 
^Michigan, and also vessels, and said one was loading in Chicago and would 
sail tomorrow for Michigan. 'He is not known as an abolitionist, and yet he 
is a friend to the colored people." I went to see him. He said, T will take 
them.' A\'e took the following plan to get them to his warehouse: Forty 
colored men armed themselves and went in a body to Deacon Carpenter's, 
and the men on the watch, seeing them, supposing they were after them, fled, 
and the boys followed them. A covered wagon drove into the yard, and they 
(the fugitives) all got in and the driver drove from one street to another so 
fast no one could follow and came to the warehouse. A signal was given, 
agreed upon, the door was opened, and all safe inside. The next day at 
noon, when all were at dinner, each took a bag on his shoulder and went on 
board, and a little after we saw them on board just going to their homes in 
Michigan, where they are now well-to-do farmers." 

From this it appears that this fair country of ours was not always "the 
home of the free,'" for the stars and stripes then was the emblem of a gov- 
ernment whose supreme court had decided that slaves were still property, 
although in a free state, and it was the duty of every otlicer and citizen 
to return them to their masters, tlius making slave catchers of every citizen. 
This was one step toward the war. 



CHAPTER XI. 

THE RESURRECTIONISTS. 

Another type of criminality was ram])ant in the early days of our country's 
history, and that was the crime of grave robbing. This had been carried on 
for vears in this section of the country and many were the bodies stolen by 
men who were called resurrectionists. In the early days no arrangements 
were made with hospitals for subjects for dissection in medical institutions 
and thev were compelled to resort to the crime of body snatching. The Medi- 
cal Institution at St. Charles, organized by Dr. George W. Richards, profes- 




VIEW, LOOKING NORTH FROM NEAR FOX STREET, AURORA 

ABOUT 1853. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 135 

sor of theory and practice of medicine, and formerly president of the La 
Porte (Indiana) j\Iedical School, had established a summer school for phy- 
sicians in St. Charles. His home was opposite the present Universalist 
parsonage in that city, and the institution in which the dissection was carried 
on was a stone barn, which has since been torn down. Students in those days 
came to college poor in purse and were anxious to work to pay their way 
through school, and as bodies were constantly needed by the Medical Insti- 
tution they naturally sought remunerative occupation by robbing graves. 
Two or three graves of honored citizens had been examined and discovered to 
be emptied of their precious contents. "Many who had recently lost friends 
commended the painful task of examining their newly made graves, while 
many friends only refrained from it lest they should find their fears realized 
and that the outrage so hopeless of redress had been consummated. The 
irritation and indignation that was caused by this feeling may be readily 
imagined." In the spring of 1849 three men driving a pair of horses attached 
to a spring wagon stopped for supper at the Lovell tavern, four miles east of 
Sycamore, on the St. Charles and Sycamore road. While eating their supper 
the land lord's daughter overheard some conversation which made her sus- 
picious. She reported the conversation to her father, who went out and 
found the implements used by the resurrectionists secreted in the bottom of 
the wagon. Mrs. George M. Kenyon had been but recently buried and they 
surmised that it was the intention of the grave robbers to secure her body 
for the dissecting table, and it was also known that a friendless German had 
been buried in the south burying ground of Sycamore, now the present site 
of the Methodist parsonage, and it was supposed that they were also seeking 
for his body. This news was conveyed to Mr. Harry Joslyn, and he, with 
Mr. Lorenzo Whittemore. Kimball Dow and a few others, armed themselves 
and hid near the burying ground, with the hope that the resurrectionists might 
be caught robbing the grave. Early in the evening, not long after dark, three 
men made their way into the cemetery and immediately began search for the 
grave of the German. As they approached it the men in hiding noticed 
that they were armed. One of their number went to the wagon to secure 
the tools necessary for digging. At this moment one of the party in hiding 
was seized with a fit of coughing, which alarmed the grave robbers, and they 
immediately hurried to the wagon and drove into town. The party in hiding 
followed them into the village and caused the arrest of the resurrectionist 
party. One was found to be the son of Dr. Richards, president of the Medical 
Institution at St. Charles. Another was a man by the name of John Rude, 
and the name of the other was unknown. There not being found sufficient 
evidence of their guilt, they were released. The parties arrested were thor- 
oughly alarmed and their fright was not lessened by Waterman answering 
their question as to what would be done by them by the promise to shoot 
them in the morning. It was supposed after their severe fright that they 
would make a hasty retreat for St. Charles, but they recovered their nerve, 
and although they started directly east for their home, they evidently decided 
they would not return without something to show for their night's work. 
Mrs. George M. Kenyon was buried in what is now known as the Ohio Grove 



13t) KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

cemetery and, dying at the age of but seventeen years, in the bloom of youth, 
a girl well known, great sympathy was felt for the young husband and her 
immediate family. After her burial her grave was watched for two nights 
and it was supposed that all would be well thereafter. The parties watching 
the grave of Airs. Kenyon the third night left shortly after midnight. Two 
of her girl friends were impressed by the story of the grave robbers, which 
had been circulated throughout the country, laid a twine over the grave and 
fastened it at each side, covering it with dirt so that if it were molested it 
could easily be detected. When the relatives arrived at the grave in the 
morning they still found the string in position, but something made them 
uneasy, and after hearing the story of the grave robbers being in Svcamore 
they decided to investigate. Upon digging down their fears were realized 
as the comb of the deceased was found about a foot below the surface. 
Reaching the coffin they found it emptied of its contents and the grave clothes 
alone remained in it. The lid of the casket had been broken in and the body 
taken hastily away. News of this crime spread over the country like wildfire. 
Mr. David Churchill, father of the deceased, was a man well known and 
highly respected, and the circumstances of the young lady's death made the 
crime seem doubly terrible. It was decided before any action was taken in 
the matter to have a party go to Dr. Richards at the Medical Institution and 
demand the return of the body. Upon arriving at St. Charles they procured 
a search warrant and went to the institution and while on their way found 
the horse belonging to a Sycamore physician, who had doubtless gone there 
in great haste to inform Dr. Richards that he had better be on his guard. 
Upon examining the dissecting room they f-^ nnd fragments of human bodies 
and skeletons, but none corresponding- to the description of Mrs. Kenyon. 
As they were about to leave the building Mr. Kenyon discovered upon the 
stone flagging a lock of hair belonging to his wife. It was the precise peculiar 
shade of his lost wife's hair and he knew it in an instant. It was not sufficient 
evidence to convince a jury perhaps, but it satisfied him. He went back and 
begged piteously for the remainder of his wife's remains and it was here that 
Dr. Richards made his great mistake in inflaming the searching party. He 
said to Air. Kenyon in his hour of sorrow: 'T have no subjects now, but if 
you will come again in a few days I will have a lot of them, and from your 
way. too." The party returned to Sycamore, reported to their neighbors what 
had transpired, showed the friends the lock of hair belonging to Mrs. Kenyon, 
told of the insulting remarks made by Dr. Richards to the grieved husband, 
and with one accord the citizens of Sycamore and vicinity volunteered to go 
next day and recover the body or know the reason why. A large part of 
them were young men, impetuous and ready for trouble, but the older men 
counseled conservative action. A committee was selected to again visit Dr. 
Richards and was composed of the following men : Esquire Currier, of St. 
Charles; John C. Waterman, William Fordham, Lorenzo Whittemore and 
Kimball Dow, of Sycamore. They informed Dr. Richards what they were 
there for, told of the party that was ready for action, and that it had only 
been by the intercession of their friends that an assault had not been made at 
once. They still found Dr. Richards defiant and impudent, and he denied 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 137 

any knowledge about tlie body they sought for. and said perhaps the students 
might account for it. They noticed also that Dr. Richards and some of the 
students were fully armed and seemed to be ready for trouble in case of an 
attack. When J\Ir. Kenyon caught sight of Rude, who had been detected at 
Sycamore, he took an instincti\'e aversion to him and could scarcely be 
restrained from shooting him on the spot. Nothing, however, was gained 
by this parley. The crowd had increased on the way. so that now about 
three hundred men stood in front of Dr. Richards' house and had sn arranged 
their party that escape was impossible. Seeing that trouble was in store for 
them, one of the young men of the institution informed them that he had 
seen a corpse answering the description of Mrs. Kenyon. Upon hearing this 
David Churchill, father of the deceased, and Mr. Kenyon, her husliand. rushed 
for the door and forced it partly open, when the muzzle of a gun was thrust 
out and fired. Mr. Churchill pushed the barrel of the gun downward, so that 
no one was injured. This was followed by a shot from Air. Kenyon, who 
was armed with a rifle. He fired blindly through the door and by the irony 
of fate his bullet pierced Rude, the guilty resurrectionist, through the hips 
and he was mortally wounded. An assault followed and all the windows in 
the building were broken and several students wounded and Dr. Richards 
was struck twice. As he appeared at the door and made a sign to surrender 
a stone struck him in the temple and he was carried back senseless. The 
friends of Richards feared that another attack would be made and secured 
the services of an attorney, A. Barry, who promised them that the body would 
be returned, and he instructed Mr. Prescott, a relative of Mrs. Kenyon. to go 
to a spot two miles south of St. Charles on a farm now owned by Mrs. Harvey 
Jones, of Sycamore. And it should be stated in passing that a constable 
appeared on the scene and ordered the mob to cease firing, and at that junc- 
ture Mr. Barry, an attorney, since well known in this county, promised the mob 
that he would return the body the next morning. Mr. Barry and a student 
named Harvey, with Air. Bannister and Prescott, of St. Charles, found the 
remains buried on the banks of the Fox river in a grove, about two feet deep, 
wrapped in a blanket. The body was taken to the river, washed of the earth that 
adhered to it. wrapped in some clothing, placed in a coffin and brought back 
to Sycamore. A second funeral ser\'ice was held at the Alethodist church 
at Sycamore and a large concourse of people met on that Sabbath day to 
consign for the second time to the grave the body that had caused so much 
excitement in all the country around. It has been stated that the bodv was 
taken to the home of Air. Kenyon and there buried under his window, but 
the body was buried in the grave from which it was taken and a tombstone 
pointed out to those interested in the early history of the county, and many 
are the visitors even to this day to the grave which caused so much turmoil 
and loss of life. An impression seems deeply founded that Dr. Richaras 
was on the whole a bad man of the criminal type and thus he has been 
depicted in the histories to the present time. We will say, however, that Dr. 
Richards was a very well educated gentleman and at the time he was shot 
ranked as high as any other physician in Illinois. Alany were the physicians 
of Chicago who sought his counsel. Airs. Harvey A. Jones, who was then a 



138 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

girl of ten or twelve years, and witnessed the shooting and knew Dr. Richards 
intimately, as he had been tlieir family physician for years, says that his home 
was one of refinement, that he had traveled abroad and in many respects was 
regarded as one of the most intellectual men of the community. It is needless 
to sav that this broke up the organized band of resurrectionists, and from 
that dav the visitors, even to this day. to the grave which had been their 
family phvsician for years, say that to this day. with one exception, crime of a 
like nature in this locality has been unknown. Rude died the day following, 
the students recovered, while Dr. Richards finally died from the efifects of his 
wounds inflicted by the Sycamore mob. We will say, howe\-er. that had it 
not been for the impudence of Dr. Richards and his students when parties 
were searching for the body and for the carelessness with which the remains 
of the dissected bodies were handled, this trouble would never have occurred. 
Parties still living remember well how Dr. Richards and his students threw 
the remains of human bodies after dissection into the river, which naturally 
excited a spirit of opposition to their work. The account as we give it is 
from a conversation held with George M. Kenyon about a month previous 
to his death, with ]^Irs. Harvey A. Jones, who witnessed the riot, and from 
members of the mob who participated in that event, and reported by L. AI. 
Gross in his historv of DeKalb countv. 



CHAPTER XII. 

BANDITTI. 



The history of northern Illinois in pioneer days is not unlike that of other 
sections of our country. The lawless element always seeks the frontier, as 
thev are generally freer from detection and are brought to justice with greater 
ditficulty than in older settlements. In this section of the countrv- in the later 
'30s and early '40s, all through this state and eastern Iowa were organized 
bands of thieves. Some of these were desperate men, who were driven from 
their homes in the east because of crimes committed. As there was but little 
property in those early days and horses were extremely valuable as a means 
of travel, and in fact w-ere the only means of communication, the desperadoes' 
work was largely horse stealing. It is due largely to the men of Kane. 
DeKalb, Ogle and Winnebago counties that this rascalit}' was brought to a 
close east of the Alississippi valley. The story has been frequently told and 
it is with considerable care and after personal investigation that we state the 
facts that appear below. Great injustice has been done in the different 
accounts of the stories of the banditti, which has been a severe infliction to 
those who survive and were entirely innocent of the crimes committed. Mob 
law is never justifiable and in many cases had the law taken its course and 
the men been put on trial it is claimed their innocence could have easily been 
established. As it is, even the excitement of that time, when prairie pirates 
were thirsting for blood, no real proof was ever established against the men 




PECK'S STORE OX SITE OF OLD CITY HALL. ELGIN. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 141 

so hastily and cruelly executed at \\'ashington's Grove June 29, 1S41. In 
Brodie's Grove, which is west of the present township of Malta, was a 
rendezvous for the banditti. Air. Benjamin \\'orden. one of the early pioneers 
of DeKalb county, discovered what was known as the "sink hole" while in 
search of some cattle. Into this the horses were taken and secured during 
the day and at night were removed to stations further north, the horse thieves 
finding an excellent market for their stolen property in the lumber districts of 
Wisconsin. The line of tra\el was usually from Brodie"s Grove to Gleason's 
at Genoa. Henpeck, now Old Hampshire, in Kane county, thence north 
through McHenry county into \\'isconsin. It was sometimes very difficult 
to detect the parties who were in sympathy with the banditti. In almost 
every instance when they were brought to trial they had representatives who 
were on the jury and conviction seemed almost impossible. After several 
trials, with the thefts of horses increasing, the citizens who were law-abiding 
organized themselves into what is known as the Regulators or Lvnching 
Clubs. 

yh. Burton C. Cook, state's attorney 1846-52. wrote as follows: 
"During the term of Mr. Fridley as prosecuting attorney, and for a part 
of my term, the northwestern part of the state was infested by a most danger- 
ous and wicked association of outlaws, thieves and counterfeiters, such as are 
often found upon the frontiers of civilization, having grips, signs and pass- 
words whereljy they could identify each other, and bound by oaths to protect 
each other. They were the enemies of society, unscrupulous and brutal. 
The citizens of DeKalb and Ogle counties organized bands of regulators to 
protect themselves and their property. Mr. Campbell, the captain of the 
regulators, was shot at his own house at White Oak Grove, and then the 
citizens followed, capturefl and shot some of the more notorious of the gang 
and it was finally broken up in this section. The able and efficient prosecution 
by my friend. Mr. Fridley. was greatly appreciated by the bar and by the 
citizens generally at the time and was greatly instrumental in freeing the 
country from the presence of the evil-doers. The indignation excited by the 
torturing to death of Colonel Davenport at Rock Island caused such persistent 
and hot pursuit of the rascals, and the execution of so many of them, that 
the gang was wholly suppressed. 

"The main trouble with these desperate outlaws was in the region Iving 
along the Rock river and its tributaries, which was settled by a much less 
desirable class than that which for the most part peopled the Fox River 
valley. But the records show that even in Kane county there was more or 
less difficulty with them. Their principal acts of outlawry consisted of horse 
stealing and they were adepts at the business. At the April ( 1848) term of 
the circuit court two men. Ames and Holmes, were convicted of stealing a 
span of horses from William Lance, of Blackberry, and sentenced to eight 
years" imprisonment in the penitentiary at Alton, whither they were taken by 
Sheriff Spaulding. The county commissioners, in September of the same 
year, passed an order offering a reward, not exceeding $50. for the appre- 
hension and conviction of each person found guilty of stealing a horse, mare 
or mule, within the limits of Kane countv." 



142 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

CHAPTER XHI. 

GEOLOGICAL. 

Kane county occupies a position nearly in the nortlieast corner of the state 
of Illinois, is thirty miles long by eighteen broad, and has an area of 540 square 
miles. It is bounded north by JNIcHenry county, east by Cook and DuPage, 
south by Kendall, and west by DeKalb. Being in such close proximity to 
Chicago, it is traversed by several of the great trunk lines of railway, which 
pass through in seeking an entrance to the metropolis. It consists of fifteen 
congressional and sixteen civil townships, and ranks, in point of wealth, 
population, manufactures, dairy and farm products, and other respects, among 
the first in the state. A large portion of its population has clustered into the 
numerous thrifty cities, towns and villages which lie within its borders. These 
include Carpentersville. Dundee. Elgin. South Elgin, St. Charles, Geneva. 
Bata\-ia, North Aurora, Aurora and Montgomery, all rm Fox river, and 
Sugar Grove. Big Rock. Kaneville, Elburn, !\Iaple Park, Hampshire, Pingree 
Grove, Rutlandville and several lesser settlements in the interior of the county. 

The county is well watered l:)y Fox river and its tributaries, while the 
drainage from the northwestern portion finds its way ultimately to Rock 
river, the immediate outlet being Coon creek, in the townships of Burlington 
and Hampshire. Fox river is, for a prairie region, a remarkably steady 
stream, but this is accounted for in the fact that it drains Lake Geneva, in 
Wisconsin, and Fox and Pistaka lakes, in north.ern Illinois, and numerous 
other smaller bodies of water in the same region, besides being fed by springs 
all along its course. Its principal tributaries in this county are Tyler, Ferson, 
Blackberry, Big Rock and I\IilI creeks, from the west, and Brewster, Norton 
and Indian creeks, from the east, with a number of smaller ones discharging 
a greater or less quantity of water into the parent stream. Fox river fur- 
nishes excellent water power from one end of the county to the other and 
dams have been constructed across it at Carpentersville, Elgin, South Elgin, 
St. Charles, Geneva, Batavia, North Aurora. Aurora and Montgomery, while 
others which existed in an early day were located at other points along the 
stream and were not of extensive proportions. The general course of the 
river is southerly and the scenery along its banks is remarkably fine. Its 
channel is dotted with numerous islands, some of which are very large and 
have become valuable property, as is the case at Batavia and Aurora. 

At the great bend, in St. Charles township, the stream sweeps along the 
north shore of a low wood-crowned limestone bluff, and with its islands and 
the beautiful shores present a most picturesque and inviting scene. 

Fine drives have been constructed along both sides of the river through- 
out the length of the county, and the visitor to the region is greatly impressed 
with the beauties which lie spread before him. 

A branch of the Kishwaukee river rises in Rutland township and flows 
northward, while another branch drains a considerable portion of Virgil. 
Nelson's lake, in Batavia and Blackberry townships, and Lilly lake, in Camp- 
ton, once contained a considerable amount of water, but the system of 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 143 

drainage adopted in late years has robbed them of their dignity as lakes. The 
first settlers found in certain portions of the county quite extensive tracts of 
low, marshy lands, which were called "sloughs," but judicious drainage has 
reclaimed the land covered by them in most instances and heavy crops of 
corn, etc., are raised where once was only a miry bog. 

Stretching away from Fox river, in either direction, lies a broad prairie 
region, exceedingly fertile and dotted with numerous groves of timber. The 
surface of the county is diversified more than is usually the case in a prairie 
country. The bed of Fox river lies from thirty to ninety feet below the sur- 
rounding country and in places its banks are bold and approach the magnitude 
of bluffs. In the central portion of the county, principally in the townships 
of Campton and Blackberry, and again in Dundee, Elgin, St. Charles and 
Plato, hilly ridges exist, from whose summits commanding views are had of a 
broad and fertile region. Johnson's Mound, in the township of Blackberry, 
formerly known as Beeler's Mound, is said to be the highest point of land in 
the county, rising to the height of ninety feet or more from the midst of the 
prairie. 

The surface rock underlying Kane county belongs to the silurian 
formation and mostly to the Niagara group. 

■ In the north part of the township of St. Charles the Cincinnati group 
comes to the surface in a low anticlinal, which bears in a northwesterly direc- 
tion and forms the ridge on sections 3 and 10, around which Fox river sweeps 
in a long curve toward the north and west and suddenly turns to the south, 
flowing along a channel greatly diminished in width from that above. The 
Cincinnati formation outcrops on both sides of the river for a half mile or 
more and abounds in fossils characteristic of the group. With one exception 
all the rock outcroppings are along Fox river. The exception is in the fork 
of Big Rock creek, in the township of Big Rock, and section 26, where the 
Niagara outcrops in several places. 

The strata in the Niagara formation are of varying thicknesses, from an 
inch or less to two feet or more in the Aurora and Batavia quarries. From 
Montgomery to a point above Batavia the exposure is almost continuous. 
Between Geneva and Batavia the rock dips below the surface, but appears 
again at Geneva and is thence nearly continuous to \\'est St. Charles, when it 
again disappears for a distance of nearly three miles. It shows a fine exposure 
in North St. Charles. At South Elgin it appears and is extensively quarried 
for building purposes. 

A verv good quality of lime has been manufactured from the Niagara 
at Aurora, Batavia, St. Charles and South Elgin, and the business is still 
carried on at some of these points. 

The thickness of the Niagara formation varies from eighty to one 
nundred feet. It is sparingly supplied with fossils, the most prominent being 
Pentamerus Oblongus and Orthoceras Undulatum. It is usually of a light 
buff color, though in places it graduates to a bluish tinge, the latter being 
characteristic of the lower and harder layers. In Aurora and Batavia occur 
thick-bedded layers, which are extensively quarried for building purposes. 
Fair examples of buildings constructed from this rock are the old Kane 



U4 KANE COrXTY TITSTOPvY 

county courthouse, the Aurora city hall and the Congregational church, private 
insane hospital and the two public school buildings in Batavia, and the high 
school building in Geneva. It is frequently ferruginous, and this is sometimes 
a very objectionable feature. It does not withstand the action of frost or 
heat well, but is durable and presents a fine appearance when not too much 
exposed. The thinner lavers make, in connection with good mortar, a very 
strong wall and withstand the action of the elements much better than tlie 
thicker-bedded stone. 

The overlying surface formations of Kane county belong chiefly to the 
quaternary age, the deposits being made up of clay, sand, gravel, cobblestone 
and the boulders of the drift period. 

The surface soil is largely composed of vegetable mold, the entire prairie 
portion being a mixture of loam and decomposed vegetation. In the timbered 
districts, which comprise possibly one-fourth of the total area, the soil is of a 
more clayey nature. \'ery few sandy tracts exist, though there are immense 
deposits of coarse and fine sand in the form of glacial moraines and deposits, 
of which Bald ( or Ball) ^lound and Johnson's Mound, in Blackberry, and the 
ridge of hills running through Campton, St. Charles. Plato, Elgin and Dundee 
are good examples. Brick clay abounds in many parts of the county and 
good molding sand is found in the Fox river Ijluffs, near the mouth of X'orton 
creek, in St. Charles and southeast of Elgin. 

Owing to the limestone formations nearly all the springs and streams 
are of hard water. There are a few exceptions in the case of wells sunk 
wholly in gravel and deep mineral bearing springs which come up from sand- 
stone formations, as in the case of artesian wells and the medicinal springs 
on the west side of the river in the city of St. Charles. The deepest wells 
are at the watch factory in Elgin, the grape sugar works and the courthouse 
in Geneva, and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy car shops at Aurora. 
\\'ater flows from them in a strong stream and is very soft and pleasant to 
the taste. 

An extensive peat bed occurs between Dundee and Carpentersville, cover- 
ing probably i6o acres, and there are lesser deposits in other places. One 
of the latest to develop was a short distance southeast of Aurora, which 
became fired accidentally during the drouth of 1887 and burned until heavy 
rains extinguished the fire. 

Most of the timber now existing in Kane county is a second growth, 
the original heavy bodies having been principally cleared away. In many 
places groves of rapidly growing varieties of trees have been set out, thou- 
sands of evergreens have been brought in to beautify both city and farm 
property, and great numbers of orchards exist, mostly consisting of apple 
trees. Upon the soil of Kane county will grow almost every product of the 
temperate zone, but the changeable nature of the climate renders the winters 
too severe for the least hardy trees, plants, etc. For this reason less attention 
is paid to the raising of peaches, pears and other fruits than formerly. 

A mastodon was unearthed in April, 1908. That this mammoth roamed 
the fields and woods of Kane county some one hundred thousand years ago 




OLD WAVERLY HOUSE, ELGIN. 




THE OLD MILL THAT FORMERLY STOOD UN 

THE BORDEN FACTORY. 



THE SITE OF 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 147 

is unquestioned. Such hnds have been made throughout the Mississippi 
valley. 

Workmen on the drainage district ditch this morning on tlie farm of 
Will Campbell, three miles southwest of Oswego, hauled out one of the teeth 
of the prehistoric monster and it was discovered by Commissioner Watts 
Cutter, who was overseeing the work. 

The tooth was a perfectly formed one about fourteen inches long and 
some six inches square at the large end. The discovery of the dental work 
of the prehistoric monster caused a sensation and after it had been examined 
by the party the workmen commenced to dig around in the hope of unearthing 
other parts of the animal's framework. 

Soon their efforts were successful and a portion of the femur was tlug 
up. It was a piece about a foot and a half long and was apparently broken 
oft'. At the large end it was fourteen inches in diameter and tapered rapidly 
down to seven inches at the place where the fracture occurred. Soon another 
dipper ful of the big machine brought up a couple of foot bones and for several 
hours the finds were numerous. Part of the bones were quite badly decayed 
but a number of the specimens were in good shape and intact. 

The finds were cleaned up and taken to the Cutter drug store in Oswego, 
where they attracted much attention among the people of the village. Owing 
to the fact that many of the bones are probably missing, having decayed and 
fallen apart, it is hardly probable that anything like a perfect skeleton can be 
constructed, but there will be enough bones found to give some idea of the 
size of the great animal which rambled over Kendall and Kane counties 
before the arri\al of the trollev car and other twentieth centurv creations. 



CHAPTER XIV, 

INTERNAL IMPROVEMENTS, 

Earl)- roads in use in Kane countv were simply well-worn Indian trails, 
which connected their various important villages. In a short time from the 
first settlement, however, lines of travel were opened leading to the principal 
points in the state, \Mth Chicago as a starting point, highways branched 
off in various directions, and some of them were laid across the county of 
Kane, One of the most prominent objective points was Galena, and as early 
as 1834 a road thence from Chicago was opened for travel, crossing Fox 
river at what is now Montgomer}-, at the southern edge of the county. The 
growth of the McCarty settlement at Aurora, where also a postoffice was 
established in the spring of 1836. caused a change to be made in the route, 
it being altered so as to pass through Aurora. This, known as the "Galena 
road," a name which still clings to it. became one of the most extensively 
traveled thoroughfares in this region. It led westward from Aurora into and 
through the township of Sugar Grove, a corner of Blackberry and across 
Kaneville, and thence in a northwesterly direction to the northwest part of 



148 KAXE COrXTY PIISTORY 

tlie state. Lines of road were also laid crossing Fox ri\er at St. Charles and 
Elgin, both making for the same part of the state as the one which crossed at 
Aurora. When the da}'S of stage lines came into existence these were all 
busy routes of travel. 

The necessity of having roads was early recognized and met by the 
settlers. Generally they were laid on what seemed to be the most convenient 
and eligible routes between the terminal points, without special regard to 
directness. There were sloughs and hills to be avoided and good crossings 
to be selected at streams and other circumstances which naturally made the 
earlier highways rather devious. But with the establishment of the govern- 
ment lines of survey and increase in wealth they were gradually straightened, 
until at present comparatively few of the angular and crooked roads are in 
existence. 

The first work done by the county board of commissioners regarding 
the laying out of roads was July 12, 1836, when they ordered views of roads 
to be made, as follows : 

From Geneva to the west or north line of this county, on the best and 
most direct line toward Rockford; Thomas E. Dodge, David Dunham and 
John Griggs, viewers. 

From Geneva westerly to the house of Eli Barnes, thence westerly to the 
county line, on the best route to Galena ; Henry IMadden, Frederick Love and 
Edwin Keyte, viewers. 

From Gene\-a northerly, along the west side of Fox river, to the north 
line of Sandusky precinct; James T. Wheeler. Seth Stowell and Joel S. 
Young, viewers. 

From Geneva, on the east side of Fox river, northerly by T. Dues" (or 
Dewees') mill to the county line; Sanders M. Howard. Thomas Dewees and 
William Hammond, viewers. 

From the termination of a road through Sandusky precinct, on the west 
side of Fox river, along the west side of said river to the county line; Samuel 
J. Kimball, Francis Perry and Thomas H. Thompson, viewers. 

From Geneva to the Cook county line, at or near the head of the Big 
Woods, to intersect a road leading from said line to Chicago; James Her- 
rington, Wallace Hotchkiss and Alexander Wheeler, x-iewers. 

From Geneva to the west line of Cook county, to intersect a road leading 
from said line to Chicago; viewers same as last above. 

From Geneva southerly by Ball Mound, thence by or through Sugar 
Grove, near the house of Elijah Pierce, to the point where the Ottawa road 
crosses Rock creek; Lyman Isbell, Harry White and James Carman, viewers. 
From Geneva westwardly, near the south end of Charter's Grove, to cross 
the south branch of Kishwaukee, near Wilson's Ford, passing William A. 
Miller's and Levi Lee's, thence to the county line at the termination of 
Haight's road ; Harman Miller. Matthew McCormick and Levi Lee, viewers. 
From Squaw Grove northerly by Frederick Love's, X. C. Moore's, 
Samuel Jenks' and Stephen Morey's claims, thence down the west side of the 
Sycamore river, crossing said stream near Harmon Miller's, thence to Squaw 
Prairie ; Samuel Jenks. Harmon Miller and N. C. Moore, viewers. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 149 

From Paw Paw Grove northerly to Shabbona's Grove, thence along at 
or near Amos McKellen's, thence down the east side of the timber by John B. 
Collins', T. Love's, Eli Barnes' and John Smith's claims, crossing the south 
branch of the Sycamore, terminating at or near ]\IcCollum's ; Amos McKellen, 
John B. Collins and Mark Daniels, viewers. 

From this time onward until the board of county commissioners gave 
place, under the new constitution, to the board of supervisors, the greater pro- 
portion of the business before it was in relation to the roads of the county, 
and the pages of the musty old records are filled with petitions and appoint- 
ments of viewers and road supervisors, the number of road districts in the 
county amounting up to considerably more than one hundred previous to 
1849. The roads were not constructed after what would at this day be con- 
sidered the most approved plan. Each able-bodied man in the county between 
the ages of twenty-one and fifty years was required to work a certain number 
of days upon the public roads, and the road supervisors, as they were called, 
were expected to see that the work in their respective districts was done in 
proper form. The time was "put in," and the dirt was piled up in the style 
common for many years. Poll tax was a later device by which a payment 
was taken in lieu of work. 

Finally some wise head evolved the plan of building plank roads ; a law 
was passed by the legislature authorizing the formation of companies for 
their construction and tlie idea became so popular that little was heard of but 
new companies, who expected to get rich out of the tolls to be realized upon 
the completion of divers and sundry plank roads. The year 1848 witnessed 
probably the greatest excitement over the new idea, not unlike that relating 
to trolley lines the past ten years. Among the companies organized and the 
roads projected were the following: 

In August, 1848, a plank road from Doty's to Chicago was in "traveling 
order," twelve miles being then completed eastward from the first named 
point, which was in Cook county. The toll was twenty-five cents and the 
travel over it was so great that at the date named the daily receipts were 
about fifty dollars. 

About October i, 1848, permission was granted to organize the Aurora 
& Naperville Plank Road Company, w-ith a capital stock of $20,000, in shares 
of $50 each, the estimated cost of the road being $2,200 per mile; distance 
from Aurora to Naperville nine miles. Books were opened for subscriptions 
to the stock October 7 and the company was to be organized as soon as suffi- 
cient stock was taken. The effort did not prove successful, and the Aurora & 
DuPage Plank Road Company was organized, to construct the road from 
the west end of Cook county to Aurora, a distance of twenty-one miles. The 
capital stock was $40,000 and the six miles of road west of Doty's were 
included. This scheme also fell through. February 23, 1850, a company 
was organized, under the general plank road law, to build a plank road from 
Aurora to Little Rock, Kendall county. Shepherd Johnson, Thomas Judd, 
Colonel S. S. Ingham, L. D. Brady and B. F. Hall were appointed commis- 
sioners to open books and solicit stock, but the road was not constructed. 
These were but a few of the roads which existed only in imagination. 



150 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

In February, 1850, the subscription books of the St. Charles & Sycamore 
Plank Road Company were opened and by the close of the month $30,000 
had been subscribed by the citizens of the two places. The work was put 
under contract in April following. By the middle of May nearly four miles 
of the road (then called the Sycamore and Chicago plank road) had been 
graded and plank was then being laid. Three hundred thousand plank had 
at that time been distributed along the road, cut at the St. Charles and Batavia 
saw-mills. These mills were then busy and a large quantity of lumber was 
purchased, beside what was furnished by them, from the yards of Norton & 
Butler, in Chicago. This plank road was in operation a number of years and 
the old toll house in West St. Charles was, after the company ceased to exist 
(about i860), converted into a dwelling. The old planks were brought to 
St. Charles and used for fuel at Butler's west side paper mill and the St. 
Charles Hotel. 

The growth of population and increase of business in the great west at 
length demanded that something should take the place of stage lines, which 
should afiford facilities for more rapid transit and furnish better transporta- 
tion for the products of the soil than ox teams and "prairie schooners" 
afforded. The railroads offered the only solution of the problem and it hap- 
pened that the first line of railway constructed in northern Illinois had a 
portion of its pathway across the county of Kane. This was the Chicago & 
Galena Union Railroad, which was begun in 1848. An article in the Aurora 
Beacon, October 19, 1848, has the following to say of that road at the time: 
"Four miles of this road are already completed and the track is being laid 
at the rate of 1,500 feet per day. A locomotive (the Pioneer) for the road 
has arrived at Chicago and will immediately be put upon the track. The track 
will be laid as far as Brush Hill this fall and to Fox River early in the 
spring." 

There was some delay in building the road, for it was open to Elgin, 
but the first railroad train from Chicago reached that place early in February, 
1850. It was not until two years later that the line was extended beyond 
Elgin. 

An article appearing in Railway and Locomotive Engineer for July, 1908, 
speaks of the old "Pioneer," a photo of which is given below, as follows : 

THE PIOXEER. 

"Through the courtesy of Mr. \\'. B. Kniskern, passenger traffic man- 
ager of the Chicago & North-Western Railway, we have been favored with 
an excellent photograph of an interesting old-time engine called the 'Pioneer.' 
from which our illustration has been made. Speaking of this engine Mr. 
Kniskern says in a letter to us : 

" ' "The Pioneer" was the first locomotive used by any line out of Chi- 
cago. It reached Chicago on a sailing brig in 1848 and was drawn across the 
city by horses and placed upon the tracks of what is now the Galena division 
of the C. & N.-W., then known as the Galena & Chicago Union Railway. It 
made its first trip in November, 1848, with a party of prominent people (to 




THE PIONEER. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 153 

Elgin) and on the return trip a farmer with a wagonload of wheat hailed 
the train, and "The Pioneer" on its return trijj brought to the city this, the 
first rail shipment of grain, to the Chicago market. Similarly, a few days 
later, a drove of hogs was transferred to the railway a few miles outside of 
town, and thus became the forerunner of the livestock shipments for which 
the city is today noted. "The Pioneer" today occupies a place of- honor in 
the Field Columbian Museum in tliis city.' 

"The credit of having saved this historic engine from being scrapped 
must be given to Mr. Marvin Hughitt, president of the Chicago & North- 
Western. By his sensible act in saving 'The Pioneer' Mr. Hughitt introduced 
a new fashion, which is still popular and has saved many interesting articles 
from the melting pot. 

"In describing this engine in his well-known work, 'The Development 
of the Locomotive Engine,' Mr. Angus Sinclair says : 'The first locomotive 
to raise noise echoes in Chicago was "The Pioneer," whose antique appear- 
ance is familiar to people who visit the Field Museum in Chicago. The 
engine is well worthy of careful examination by people who appreciate the 
great benefits conferred upon humanity by the locomotive engine. 

" 'After tedious research I have succeeded in tracing the history of this 
old locomotive, which is an object of keen interest to many people, especially 
those about Chicago. "The Pioneer" was the thirty-seventh locomotive built 
by M. W. Baldwin and was turned out in 1836 for the Utica & Schenectady 
Railroad. After a few years of service in the Mohawk Valley the engine was 
sold to the Michigan Central Railroad, where it was known as "The Alert," 
While in Michigan a few changes were made on the engine. As originally 
built it had a single fixed eccentric for each cylinder with two arms extending 
backward having hooks to engage with a pin on a rocker arm which actuated 
the valve rod. That motion was removed and double eccentrics with V-hook 
put in its place, the motion now found on the engine. 

" 'When the Galena & Chicago Union Railroad Company were ready to 
begin track laying in 1848 they bought "The Alert" from its owners and 
called it "The Pioneer," a proper name for the first locomotive to perform 
service west of the lakes. "The Pioneer" is the same type as Baldwin's 
second engine, "The Miller," long a favorite pattern with Mr. Baldwin, but is 
larger and has two inches longer stroke, but the other details are the same 
except the improved valve motion." 

" 'The Pioneer.' when being repaired in the shop in 1855, was equipped 
with a feed water heater. ]Mr. R. W. Bushnell, who was for many years 
master mechanic of the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern, in a letter 
containing many interesting reminiscences of 'The Pioneer,' writes thus of 
the feed water appliance : "The heater consisted of vertical pipes placed 
around the inner side of the inside pipe of the smokestack and connected at 
top and bottom by return bends, the pump forcing the water through these 
pipes to the boiler. The stack was of ordinary pattern for wood burners in 
those days, but to get ample surface for the water heater the inside pipe was 
made very large to get as many pipes in as possible. To cap this and to retain 
heat in the stack the cnne was made unusually large.' " 



154 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

The Dixon Air Line Road, under the management of the Chicago & 
Galena Union, was completed to Geneva in 1853 and pushed westward until 
finally it became the main line of the Chicago & North- Western Railway, as the 
great system has for many years been called. 

The railway did not at first tap the Fox river country at Elgin, however. 
The peopje of St. Charles seeing the road about to go around them and leave 
them several miles away, bestirred themselves and built what was known as 
the St. Charles Branch Railroad, connecting with the Chicago & Galena 
Union about four miles east of St. Charles. The first train over it reached 
the place December 13, 1849, the cost of the branch having been about 
$23,000. March 11, 1850, the following directors were elected: Ira Minard, 
Darwin Millington, G. C. Stevens, F. H. Bowman, Elisha Freeman. Mr. 
Freeman was chosen president, Mr. Stevens secretary, and Mr. Minard acting 
director and treasurer. An engine arrived for the branch in July, 1850. 
This road, as were all the early ones, was laid with strap rail. 

Early in 1850 the subject was agitated of connecting St. Charles and 
Geneva by rail. Stock was taken and proposals for doing the work were 
invited in March. Matters progressed favorably and finally a branch on the 
east side of the river, one and seven-eights miles in length, was built between 
the two places and cars commenced running over it to Geneva, September 12, 
1850. Both this and the St. Charles branch were abandoned after about ten 
years and the latter place was without railway facilities until January 16, 
1871, when a branch two and seven-tenths miles long was opened between 
the two towns on the west side of the river, which later became the property 
of the Chicago & North-Western Company and is still operated. 

The North-Western continued its line from Geneva to Batavia, on the 
west side of the river, in the summer of 1873, and in 1883 extended it to 
Aurora, opening business over it in the fall of that year. Depot grounds, 
yards and general right of way had some time previously been secured, at 
large cost to the company. 

The Fox River Railroad, northward from Elgin to IMcHenry, was com- 
menced in 1853 and completed in 1855. The south end of the Wisconsin 
Central Road, from Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, south, passed into the hands of 
the Chicago & Galena Union Company in May, 1859. The latter company 
repaired the track and began running regular trains over the whole from 
Elgin to Lake Geneva on May 16, 1859. This line has since remained under 
the same management, now known as the Chicago & North-Western. 

Early in January, 1849, a project was set on foot for building a branch 
railroad from Aurora to connect with the Chicago & Galena Union at or near 
Warrenville, about twelve miles distant, in DuPage county. An enthusiastic 
meeting was held on the 27th of the month, when it was unanimously 
Resolved, "That this meeting use its best exertions for the construction of a 
branch railroad from West Aurora, by the most feasible route, to the main 
line of the Chicago & Galena Union Railroad." A bill to charter the Aurora 
Branch Railroad was passed by the legislature in 1849 (house, February 6. 
and senate, February 9) and a board of directors was elected, consisting of 
Stephen F. Gale, Chicago; Benjamin Hackney, Charles Hoyt and William V. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 155 

Plum, Aurora, and Rodney McDole, Sugar Grove. The books were opened 
February 21, 1849, and in less than twenty-four hours $25,000 in stock was 
taken, or one-fourth the amount required. Mr. Gale was chosen president 
and P. A. Hull, of Aurora, secretary of the board. By the 19th of April 
$40,000 had been subscribed. Two or three routes were surveyed, but the 
one finally adopted, October 22, 1849, started from East Aurora and led by 
way of Batavia to Turner Junction; length, twelve and three-fourths miles. 

November 22, 1849, 5 P^r cent installments on the capital stock were 
called for and proposals were invited for grading the road from the Junction 
to the Batavia depot. Work was begun about the middle of March, 1850, 
ground being first broken at the Junction. It was determined to extend the 
line down the river as soon as practicable. Two fine passenger cars for this 
branch arrived in July, 1850. and until the completion of the branch were 
used on the main line between Chicago and Elgin. Trains began running as 
far as Batavia on Monday, September 2, 1850. A grand celebration was 
held there August 29 in honor of the completion of the road to the place. 
The cars reached Aurora early in October, and trains commenced running 
regularly on the 21st of that month. J. Frink & Co. established a daily line 
of stages from Aurora with the cars. 

The extension south and southwest from Aurora was begun in 1851-52, 
and in 1855 was under control of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Company, 
with trains running through to Burlington, Iowa, without change of cars. 
Some years later a direct line was constructed from Aurora to Chicago and 
the old spur to the Junction became a comparatively little used branch. 

The Ottawa, Oswego & Fox River Valley Railroad was graded in 1870 
from Streator to Geneva, the towns along the route having issued bonds to 
aid in its construction. The unfinished line was turned over to the Chicago, 
Burlington & Quincy in October, 1870, and the latter company finished it 
and has since operated it. 

The Chicago & Iowa Railroad, extending westward from Aurora, and 
for a time known as the "Hinckley Road," was also mainly built in 1870. 
The track between Aurora and Rochelle was completed at 10 o'clock on the 
night of December 31, 1870, and there was great rejoicing along the line. 
This road is practically at present a part of the great Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy system, although operated under its original name. The trains of the 
Chicago, Burlington & Northern, a new line opened in 1886, pass over its 
tracks. The Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Road, like the Chicago & North- 
Western, has grown from a very small beginning to be one of the great railways 
of the country, including in its various lines several thousand miles of track. 

The Chicago & Pacific Railroad, leading from Chicago through Elgin 
and the northern portion of Kane county, was built in 1873-75. Track laying 
west of Elgin was commenced on Thanksgiving Day, 1874, and the road was 
finished as far as Genoa, DeKalb county, January 9, 1875. This road finally 
passed, a few years later, into the hands of the Chicago, ]\Iilwaukee & St. 
Paul Company, since when it has become one of the leading lines of the county. 

The Chicago, St. Charles & Mississippi Air Line Railway was graded 
from Chicago to St. Charles in 1852-53, piers and abutments built for a 



156 KAXE COUNTY HISTORY 

bridge across Fox river, and a small amount of work done west of that 
stream. But the investment in this road proved a disastrous one for the 
people of St. Charles and it was never completed, although about eight miles 
of track were laid at the east end. The right of way reverted to the original 
owners and the heavy stone piers stood in the river, lone monuments for years 
of the efforts of former times. But they were destined to become useful, for 
a new company, called the Minnesota & Northwestern, desiring an entrance 
to Chicago and recognizing the advantages offered by the direct and already 
graded "Air Line." purchased the right of way. built a splendid line of road, 
and commenced running regular trains over it in the midsummer of 1887. 
This road extends westward and northwestward to St. Paul and ;Minneapnlis 
and was known as the Chicago, St. Paul & Kansas City Railroad. Later it 
became the Chicago & Great Western, by which name it is now known. 

Mr. Lewis ^I. Gross in his history of DeKalb County gives the following 
account of the aft'air : 

"Although people generally took their produce to St. Charles they found 
even that distance difficult to travel in years like 185 1 and it became evident 
that something must be done to secure better means of communication with 
the outside world and transportation of the products of the country to market. 
Heretofore all the goods sold in stores were hauled from Chicago or from 
St. Charles, causing great inconvenience and a large expenditure of money 
for the merchants. The Chicago. Burlington & Ouincy was now in process 
of construction and promised relief to the southern portions of the county. 
The Galena division of the North-Western road was also being built, a branch 
of which was extended to St. Charles, which was then a very flourishing little 
city and the principal market for all the northern part of the county. When 
the matter came before our people to have the road extended through Kane 
and DeKalb counties the people were too poor to aid in the project. A plank 
road was established from Sycamore to St. Charles, these roads at this time 
being very popular throughout the eastern states and covered most of the 
distance between cities, but in a year or two the plank warped and the road 
became almost impassable and the planks were finally confiscated by the people 
living along the road and the project was given up. This was to be a toll 
road and people generally supposed it would be a source of great profit. 

'Tn 1849 a road was commenced between Chicago and St. Charles, and 
on the 1 2th of December of that year the first train entered that city and the 
screams of the locomotive was heard for the first time in the Fox river valley. 
In August the Chicago & Galena division of the North-\\'estern had completed 
their track to Elgin and had changed their route from St. Charles to that 
place. The citizens of that city, seeing that the salvation of their town 
depended upon the thoroughfare which had been opened, took the matter in 
their own hands and ran two trains daily from Elgin to the junction. Ira 
Minard, of St. Charles, controlled the line until October, 1856. when it 
passed into other hands. The depot stood on the east side of the city of St. 
Charles on land now occupied by the Free Methodist church. In 1853 Minard. 
with others, obtained a charter for the St. Charles & Galena Air Line road, 
into w'hich the charter previously granted for the branch track was merged. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 157 

Winard became president of the company and a large amount of stock was 
taken by settlers along the line. The Chicago & Galena road commenced 
with the ostensible purpose of extending to Galena never approached nearer 
that town than Freeport, but from there depended upon the Illinois Central 
track. In an evil hour one E. C. Litchfield, from Cazenovia, New York, 
appeared in St. Charles, representing that he and his friends possessed suffi- 
cient means to build a railroad through, if he was allowed to hold a controlling 
interest in the stock. He was permitted to subscribe for it, the thorough- 
fare was commended and graded from Chicago to St. Charles, the culverts 
were built, also the piers and abutments for the bridge across Fox river (now 
used by the Great Western ) and the track was laid for nine miles from Chi- 
cago. Minard had staked his whole fortune of eighty thousand dollars upon 
the enterprise, while hundreds of poor men had taken stock for all they could 
afford. It must be understood that Litchfield promised that the road would 
be finished and that it should not previously pass out of his hands into the 
Galena or any other competing line. Never was a villainous scheme more 
successfully executed. When the controller of the stock had crippled the only 
man who had any power to oppose him and was assured that any opposition 
to his own designs would result in that man's ruin, he coolly informed iilinard 
he had concluded to sell his stock in the Chicago & St. Charless Air Line to 
the Chicago & Galena Company, and promised to make reparation for any 
personal inconvenience which such a course might occasion him if he would 
raise no objectic)n. Minard was then permitted to take his choice, and there 
was no choice to take. The refusal and loss of his property could not help 
his friends, who were already ruined nor save his town, which was then 
doomed, and he accordingly took the course which any other sane man would 
have taken. The road ended at the Des Plaines river, and the grading upon 
the west bank of the Fox river, since it was not necessary for the interest of 
the Chicago & North-Western Company to continue it. Seven hundred thou- 
sand dollars paid by hard working farmers and industrious mechanics across 
the country was lost, and many farmers were reduced from wealth to poverty, 
and the useless piers stood along the banks of the Fox river as a monument 
to the perfidy of Litchfield until they were in later years occupied by the 
Chicago & Great W'estern. The real estate of the St. Charles & Chicago Air 
Line had acquired a large amount of value, especially that part of the property 
which was to be used for depot and grounds in Chicago and, therefore, the 
railroad property of this proposed line had appreciated enormouslv in value. 
There was more than enough to pay for all the work that had been done 
upon the road. It has been reported that Litchfield and Minard, by thus 
selling out their friends, made a profit of over four hundred thousand dollars. 
It must be said, in passing, that the friends of Minard think he has been 
unjustly blamed for his course in the disaster, but it is sufficiently apparait 
that he was far beneath the mark of innocence. The loss of this railroad 
to those who had invested was the severest blow that had ever visited St. 
Charles and almost annihilated the village. Had that line been built through 
to what is now Sycamore and Dixon to the river it is possible that the towns 
of DeKalb, Cortland and Malta would never have been built, and St. Charles 



158 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

and Sycamore might have become two of the largest cities of northern 
Ilhnois." 

The Ilhnois Central, also desiring an outlet northwestwardly from Chi- 
cago, has purchased the right of way, and in 1887 engaged in the heaviest 
job of railroad construction which has ever been undertaken in Kane county, 
and one of the heaviest in northern Illinois. This road crosses the Fox river 
in the northern portion of St. Charles township, at Coleman, just above the 
great bend, and passes out of the county from the township of Burlington. 
The new line is known as the Chicago, Madison & Northern. 

The Joliet, Aurora & Northern Railroad was opened in 1886 between 
Aurora and Joliet. In 1887 the management was shifted, the name was 
changed to Elgin, Joliet & Eastern, and an extension was made in 1888 from 
a point a few miles southeast of Aurora, which taps the Chicago & North- 
western at Turner Junction, and reaches to Elgin. This serves as a belt 
line for the transfer of freight from the different roads leading to Chicago 
from the west, without the necessity of passing through that city. 

The Illinois & Fox River Railroad Company was incorporated by act 
of the legislature, approved February 16, 1865, the incorporators being A. J. 
Joslyn, P. J. Burchell, A. ;M. Herrington, J. \V. Eddy, William Cofifin, Daniel 
Volintine and William B. Allen, all of Kane county, and others in the 
counties of Kendall and Grundy. Capital stock to be $1,000,000, limited 
to $2,000,000. The company was empowered to construct a railroad from 
Elgin through St. Charles, Geneva, Batavia, Aurora, Oswego, Bristol and 
Yorkville, to Morris, Grundy county, with the privilege of extending it 
south through the coal fields to connect at some point in said county with the 
Chicago, Alton & St. Louis Railroad. At a meeting of the incorporators, held 
April 20, 1865, Daniel Volintine was elected chairman, and P. A. Armstrong, 
secretaiy. The road has never been built. 

TELEGRAPHS AND TELEPHONES. 

W^hen the railroad fever made itself manifest in Kane county, it was quite 
natural that the people should desire telegraph lines as an accompaniment, and 
numerous schemes were sprung upon the people to supply the need ; but, as in 
the case of plank roads, most of them went no farther than talk. In June, 
1848, it was proposed to construct a telegraph line from Janesville. Wisconsin, 
to Joliet or Ottawa, Illinois, via Beloit, Rockford, Belvidere, Elgin, St. Charles, 
Geneva, Batavia, Aurora and Oswego, connecting with other through lines 
at the terminal points. The sum of $9,000 was asked to build the branch route, 
and an office was promised to each place subscribing $2,000. The stock was 
to be in shares of $50 each, and the profit was promised to amount to 15 to 
25 per cent. The plan failed of consummation. 

Another line, from Elgin to Aurora, and thence to Naperville, was talked 
of in May, 1849. Offices were promised at Elgin, St. Charles, Geneva, 
Batavia and Aurora, provided each place subscribed not less than $500, and 
also provided $4,600 should be subscribed along Fox river. That this propo- 
sition must at length have been looked upon with favor is evident, from the 




FLOOD OF 1857, AURORA, SHOWING SOUTH END OF STOLPS 

ISLAND. 



KAXE COUNTY HISTORY 161 

fact that a line was put up in Kane county in the -winter of 1850-51, reaching 
from Elgin to Aurora, and thence extending to Naperville. All local lines 
of telegraph tinally ga\-e way to the great systems which followed up the 
railroads, and have since grown to mammouth proportions, and become num- 
bered among the giant monopolies of the land. 

The telephone systems, of which there are two doing business in Kane 
county, the Chicago Telephone Company and the Interstate Telephone Com- 
pany, are of practically late origin, but have become an indispensable part 
of the life of business and social activities. In 1885 the telephone was prac- 
ticallv unknown, so much so as to pass entirely unmentioned by a historian 
of that period. Toda\- a resident of Kane county may talk with anyone 
within 500 miles n\er the wire at comparatively small cost. To converse with 
a person 50 miles distant is a daily occurrence. The Chicago Telephone Com- 
pany is a branch of the corporation of the same name doing business in 
Chicago. It is the unl}- "phone service from Kane county to Chicago; the 
other company being unalile to secure a franchise in Chicago. This company 
offers communication with the country, and towns and cities outside Chicago. 
Its promoters hope to ultimately secure a grant in Chicago and be able to 
compete with the Chicago people for the Chicago ser\-ice. 

The past twentv vears has seen the rise and rapid development of the 
electric railwav and the automobile. The electric tnilley cars now connect 
everv city along the ri\'er from Aurora to Carpentersville. A complete system 
of lines centering at Elgin and Aurora traverse the county and extend into 
nearbv counties. A new line is now building from Woodstock to Sycamore, 
crossing the west end of the county. This will greatly aid travel in that 
section. The A. E. & C. Railway Company have absorbed most of the traffic, 
and now own the Aurora-Elgin line, the Belvidere line and the Aurora, Elgin 
& Chicago third rail line, which runs cars to Chicago every hour — time one 
hour and twenty-five minutes. The corporation is controlled by stockholders 
at Cleveland, Ohio. The traffic is large. A new line will be laid this year 
from Elgin to Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, and the summer resorts. 

Drainage ditches have been an improvement much enjoyed the past 
twenty years for the purpose of reclaiming swamp lands. Hundreds of acres 
have been, by this means, made productive. An extensive drain was put in 
Rutland township in 1886, and this year one is being dug through Plato and 
other townships. The southern end of the county is also putting in ditches. 



CHAPTER XV. 

AGRICULTURAL AND DAIRYING INTERESTS, STOCK, ETC. 

The early settlers of Kane county, though accustomed to wooded country, 
soon discovered that in the soil of the beautiful prairie, which made up the 
most of its area, there lay unbounded resources for the benefit of the agri- 
culturist, and it did not require long for them to learn to take advantage 



162 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

of these. All the small grains were successfully grown, and corn came in 
time to be the staple crop. Fruits of various sorts were raised in greater oi; 
less abundance. In time the profits in attempting to raise wheat became so 
small that attention was turned to other branches of agriculture. About 1864 
or 1865, a few experiments were tried in the dairying line, and proved so 
successful that the business soon became general throughout Kane and other 
counties in the northern part of the state, and has grown to mammoth pro- 
portions. Among the pioneer dairymen in this county were D. E. ^^'ood. of 
Elgin; ]\Iartin Switzer and L. C. Ward, of St. Charles; Rodney McDole and 
Joseph Ingham and J. B. Paull of Sugar Grove, and H, L. Ford, of Batavia, 
These were all in the business as early as 1865-66. Mr. ^IcDole managing 
a private dairy, and others erecting factories for the manufacture of cheese. 
Others in Dundee, Elgin, Plato, Campton, Blackberry, Geneva. Burlington, 
\'irgil. etc., fell into the new line, and the result was manifest in discharged 
farm debts and fine improvements in nearly all sections of the county. 
Experienced cheese makers came on from the East — Herkimer and Oneida 
counties. New York, and elsewhere — to superintend the factories. At length 
the manufacture of butter was also commenced, and has practically super- 
seded cheese making, which is less profitable. The products of the Kane 
county creameries command the highest prices in the markets. East, West ■ 
and South. 

In march, 1872. a board of trade was organized at Elgin for the benefit 
of dairymen, and up to August, 1877, it had transacted business amounting 
to S22. 180.204. 49J 2, being a monthly average of 8120,544.59. The quotations 
upon the Elgin market control the prices of butter and cheese throughout the 
United States, and aftect many foreign markets as well. 

Aside from the vast amount of milk manufactured in Kane county, 
many thousand cans are shipped each year to dealers in Chicago, direct from 
the various railway stations on several lines of the road. Dundee and Car- 
pentersville furnish the greatest amount, with Elgin, St. Charles. Geneva, 
Elburn and other points closely following. 

With the introduction of the dairy business into this region naturally 
came the desire to weed out inferior grades of cattle, and replace them by 
those of greatest profit. As a consequence the fields and pastures of Kane 
county nurture as fine stock at the present day as can be found in the United 
States. The premium herds of the old countries have been drawn upon in 
order that the very best might be secured ; the principal breeds finding favor in 
the eyes of dair^-men being the Holstein-Friesian. the Shorthorns, the Jerseys, 
the Herefords. and the Polled-Angus : some being preferred for their milk 
yield alone, and others for both milk and beef. Among the noted stock 
breeders and dealers of the county were Dr. W. A. Pratt and the Manns, 
of Elgin; M. W. Dunham and N. S. Carlisle, of St. Charles (the latter's 
farms lying in Hampshire); Frank H. Hall, of Sugar Grove: George E. 
Brown & Co.. George Leigh & Co., Blair Bros. & Curry, and Hiram Norris, 
of Aurora; and Hon. John Stewart, of Campton. besides numerous others 
engaged in stock raising to a considerable extent in various parts of the county. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 163 

Some of these became so extensively interested also in the importation 
and raising of fine horses that their names are known throughout the civilized 
world. Particularly was this the case with Mark W. Dunham of St. Charles, 
and George E. Brown & Co.. of Aurora, from whose stock farms have come 
many of the finest animals in the world. The specialty of the Dunham farm 
was the magnificent Percheron horse, and in handling these 'Sir. Dunliam 
acquired, during the years he followed the business, a splendid fortune. His 
annual importations from France amounted to hundreds of the very finest 
horses which money can purchase, and he was the heaviest dealer in this 
class of horses in America. George E. Brown & Co., owners of two large 
stock farms, one in Aurora and the other in Batavia, acquired a national 
reputation as dealers in the fine English draft horses, Cleveland Bays and 
Exmoor ponies, and their annual importations are scarcely behind those of 
Mr. Dunham. Their Batavia farm, known as "Brookside," was formerly 
the property of Col. B. H. Campbell, also a noted stock dealer. \\'. S. Frazier, 
of Aurora, was for a number of years engaged in the culture of fine horses, 
and some of the most noted racers of the country were housed in his stables. 

The settlers of this portion of the state early turned their attention toward 
exhibiting the products of the soil and of making displays of their best stock. 
On October 2, 1842, a state fair, so-called, was held at Aurora, and is said 
to have been the first in the state, although an unsuccessful attempt had been 
made in the year previous to hold one at Naperville. The stock exhibited 
comprised half a dozen cattle and a few hogs, and Charles Hoyt purchased 
nearly all of them after the "fair" was over. Five or six hundred people 
attended. Aurora had agreed to furnish a free dinner for the occasion, but, 
owing to a misunderstanding between the managers and the citizens, it was 
not done, and the inhabitants of Sugar Grove provided roast pigs, coffee, 
bread, etc.. the pigs being artistically carved with a hatchet. Dinner was 
eaten on an open spot of ground west of Ri\-er street, in the rear of the present 
business district. On the same day the first stone was turned in the old Black 
Hawk mill. 

The Kane County Agricultural Society was organized ^lay 18, 1857, 
although exhibitions had taken place annually since 1853. The first officers 
of the socity were: President, William P. West; secretary, S. W. Curtis; 
treasurer, George W. Waite. Its fairs were for years almost the princioal 
annual events in the county, and were very largely attended. As the population 
became more dense, interest commenced to lag, and now the old fair grounds 
are deserted, and the ancient race tracks are overgrown or cut up into building 
lots. Several attempts to revive the interest proved failures, and finally the 
idea of holding fairs in other portions of the county were broached. The 
Aurora Agricultural and Horticultural Society was incorporated in 1869, 
with a capital stock limited to $10,000. Fifty-five acres of land, lying east of 
the city, were purchased for a fair ground, costing about $7,000, and the total 
expenditures were carried up to over $20,000. The first fair Was held Sep- 
tember 21 to 25, 1869, and several others followed in succeeding years. In 
the spring of 1874 the society found itself badly in debt, and the grounds 
were sold in June of that year to a newly organized association, called the 



164 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Northern Illinois Agricultural Society, having a capital stock of $15,000. 
The experience of this association was, in the end, no more encouraging than 
that of its predecessor, and no fairs have been held for several years. The 
Elgin Agricultural Society was organized in 1870, and expended $10,000 in 
grounds and buildings; but after a few attempts at holding fairs the scheme 
was abandoned as unprofitable. 

The only exhibitions of this character that are held in this vicinity are 
the county fair at Woodstock, McHenry county, and the so-called horse 
shows. The chief farm products now raised are corn, wheat, oats ; and within 
the past few years considerable land has been planted to the sugar beet, a 
large crop being raised this year. Foreign laborers are brought in to work 
the crops, as the local farmer is as yet unfamiliar with its culture. No fac- 
tories have been built in this county to date, the crop being contracted for 
by factories in Wisconsin and shipped there. The belief is that more land 
will be given to this product. The days when farming was chiefly done by the 
labor of the individual have gone. Machinery has everywhere come into 
use until nearly every farm process is now done with a machine. Plowing 
alone seems to hold its own and require the hand to guide the blade in the 
furrow. The reaper is an old story, but the corn cutter, upon which one man 
sits, and driving his horses through the corn field, cuts it down, row by row, 
is a modern invention that saves much labor. To buy the mechanisms now 
considered necessary to farming alone requires an expenditure of several 
thousand dollars. And lands that, in the '40s, could be bought for from 25 
cents to $1.25 an acre now sell for from $90 to $125 an acre. 

Another fact conspicuous in farming is the change of nationalities in the 
owners. Fifty years ago farms were owned and worked largely by the 
Yankees, who entered them in the first place. Later these original settlers 
sold out or leased to Germans, and within the past fifteen years the Ger- 
mans are being displaced in large numbers by the Scandinavians, who buy 
them out. The rural free delivery list of the Elgin postofiice shows the 
present predominance of the Germans and natives of Sweden and Norway. 
While many Germans are found among the very earliest settlers, the wave of 
immigration from Germany did not begin until after the Civil war, and the 
coming of the Scandinavians may be noted in the early '70s by the appearance 
of their names in the directories. Both these classes make good farmers, 
and accumulate property by frugality and toil where the native Yankee would 
not make ends meet, owing to his more expensive ways of living. 

REPORT OF SALES OF SCHOOL LAXD IX KAXE COL"XTY. 



lownship 
range 


and 


Date 
1845 


Purchaser 


Number of 
acres 


Price per acre 


42, R. 


7 


Dec. 16 


Stewart Christy 


40 


$ .25 No. I 


42. R. 


7 


Dec. 16 


Robert Eakin 


40 


■37^ 9 


41. R. 


6 


Oct. 31 


Joel Root 


40 


1-25 15 


41. R. 


r, 


Oct. 31 


Th. Robinson 


40 


1.25 16 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 165 



Township and 
ranfje 


Date 


Purchaser 


Number of 
acres 


Price I 


3er acre 




41, R. 6 


Oct. 31 


Jno. 0. Kane 


40 


1.25 


2 




41, R. 6 


Oct. 31 
1845 


Jos. Robinson 


40 


1.25 


3 




39, R- 6 


Oct. 13 


Israel Seaton 


20 


1.25 


23 




39, R. 6 


Oct 13 


Israel Seaton 


20 


■50 


25 




39. R- 6 


Oct. 31 


Jno. Bunker 


20 


1.25 


31 




39, R- 6 


Oct. 31 


Jno. Bunker 


20 


1.62^ 


32 




39, R- 6 


Nov. 8 


Aaron Phelps 


20 




16 




39, R- 6 


Nov. 8 


Aaron Phelps 


20 


(33) 


$65 


.00 


39, R- 6 


Jan. 3 
1846 


Patk. Markey 


60 


(26-27-28) 


55 


.00 


39, R- 6 


Jan. 3 


Jas. Donough 


60 


( 5- 6- 7) 


85 


.00 


39. R- 6 


Jan. 3 


Jas. Donough 


80 


( 8-11-12-1 


2) 67, 


50 


38. R. 6 


Feb. 2 


Jas. Dundas 


39-60/ IOC 


• 1.25 


9 




■38, R. 6 


Feb. 2 


Justus E. Ament 


40 


■50 


7 




39, R- 6 


Oct. 13 


Israel Seaton 


20 


■50 


24 




The 


above shows 


the prices paid for 


land sixty 


years ago. 


Today 


the 



same farming lands sell for $100 to $125 per acre. 



CHAPTER XVI. 

RELIGIOUS .\ND EDUCATIONAL. 

One of the early settlers of St. Charles, Joseph T. Sibley, states that 
probably the first minister of the gospel wdio visited the Fox river valley 
was Rev. John Clark, a Methodist Episcopal clergyman, with whom Mr. 
Sibley had become acquainted at Middlebury, Vermont. He became a resident 
of Kane county about 1837, in which year Mr. Sibley helped to build a log 
house for him on the east side of the river, between Geneva and Batavia, on 
the corner opposite the old Todd place. It is stated he came here from Chi- 
cago. Mr. Clark was born in Washington county, New York, July 30. 1797, 
converted in 181 7, and in 1820 entered the New York conference at the 
Methodist Episcopal church as an itinerant. In 1832 he was appointed super- 
intendent of all the Indian missions in the Northwest, and arrived at Green 
Bay, Wisconsin, July 21, of that year, being the first Protestant minister to 
administer the sacrament in the state. In 1836 he was transferred to the 
Illinois conference, and it is likely that he first visited this region some time 
previous to that date — perhaps about 1833-34. He was transferred to Texas 
in 1841, to the Troy conference in 1844, and to the Rock River conference 
in 1852, when he was stationed in Chicago. As presiding elder, Mr. Clark's 
labors led him over a large district lying west of Lake Michigan. Clark (now 
Jennings) Seminary, at Aurora, was named in his honor, the idea of such 
a school having first been advanced by him. He died of cholera in Chicago, 
July 1 1, 1833, and was mourned both East and West as a good man gone. 



166 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

It has also been stated that probably the first sermon in Kane county- 
was preached in August, 1834, at the log house of Christopher Payne, in 
Batavia township, by Rev. N. C. Clark, a minister of the Congregational 
church, whose labors among the pioneers of the valley began at that time. 
"Father Clark," as he was called, has been described as "one of God's noble- 
men, of a kindly, affectionate nature, truthful and sincere, and one who drew 
men to better things, by his own gentle and consistent ways, quite as much 
as by his persuasive exhortations. No breath of suspicion ever followed him 
from his first entrance into the county until loving hands bore him tenderly 
to the beautiful city of the dead that overlooks his old homestead in Elgin." 
Mr. Clark assisted in the organization of several Congregational churches in 
Kane county, and his home was for a time in St. Charles, where he was 
residing in 1837. 

Contemporary laborers with "Father Clark" were Elder J. E. Ambrose, 
of the Baptist denomination, and Rev. William Kimball, a Methodist. A 
former historian has said of these three : "These men traveled on foot or on 
horseback among the early settlers around Chicago, stopping where night 
overtook them, and receiving the hospitalities of the cabin; without money and 
without price. Reverently asking the blessing of God upon all that they did, 
their lives were simple and unostentatious, their wants few and easily satis- 
field; their teaching plain and unvarnished, touched with no eloquence, save 
that of their daily living, which was seen and known of all men. Though of 
different religious sects — one being a Congregationalist, one a Baptist, and 
the other a Methodist — yet no discord was ever manifested between them, 
but a united effort was made by them to show men the way to better things 
by better living. They were not only physicians for the soul's care, but they 
sometimes ministered to the body's ailments. They married the living and 
buried the dead; christened the babe, admonished the young and warned the 
old; cheered the despondent, rebuked the wilful, and hurled the vengeance of 
eternal burnings at the desperately wicked. A\'hen other orators were scarce, 
they sometimes mounted the rostrum on the Fourth of July, and stirred the 
people to patriotic thoughts. Wherever they came they were welcome, and 
notice was soon sent around to the neighbors, and a meeting held. For years 
they could say literally, as did the Master before them, 'The foxes have holes, 
and the birds of the air have nests, but (we) the sons of men have not where 
to lay our heads." 

The first actual church organization in the county was effected by the 
Congregationalists, at Batavia, in August, 1835. The Baptists and Metho- 
dists formed nearly contemporary organizations, the years 1836 and 1837 
witnessing the formation of several church societies in the county. The 
Episcopalians were also early in the field, and the Universalists built, in 1842. 
at St. Charles, the first house of worship erected by that denomination in Illi- 
nois. The material used in its construction was brick. Rev. William Rounse- 
ville, who assisted in the work of building it, also formed a Universalist society 
at Aurora in the same year. Rev. Andrew Pingree. of Rutland, was also an 
early Universalist minister. 




PEESBYTERIAN CHURCH, ELGIN. 




ELGIN SEMINARY. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 169 

Following in rapid succession after the organizations mentioned came 
others by various denominations in different parts of the county, until now 
many hundred thousand dollars are invested in church property, while scores 
of beautiful and substantial edifices point their stately spire upward, and testify 
that the religious welfare of the inhabitants is not lost sight of. 

The first Sunday school in the county was organized at Batavia in 1835, 
and from that beginning similar organizations have spread throughout the 
length and breadth of the county, until scarcely a hamlet is without their 
influence. The Kane Count}- Sunda}- School Union, with representatives from 
every portion of the county, has been in existence since 1866. and in its animal 
con\-entions seeks to discover the best methods of operating and governing 
the Sunday schools. 

That there were many laughable incidents in the history of the early 
churches, and in the experience of the teachers of the gospel, is a well authenti- 
cated fact. The shepherds looking for the lost sheep of Israel were neither 
more nor less than human beings, and that they enjoyed the ludicrous episodes 
in their experience can hardly be doubted. In 1883, when there were but 
few Episcopalians living in St. Charles, Bishop Chase, a tall, fine-looking, 
white-haired old man, held service under the ritual of that church in that 
place. J. W. Churchill, the Batavia lawyer, who was a "bluff, nervous fellow, 
and much attached to the forms of his church," asked his daughter, on their 
way to cliurch, if she had her prayerbook. "No, father," she replied, "I forgot 
it." "Forget your prayerbook!" was the excited rejoinder; "Go and get it! 
You might as well be in hell as in an Episcopalian church without a prayer- 
book." The chronicler does not state whetlier the young lady returned for 
the book or not. 

The Free Methodists, a strong body, whose first churches were organized 
in Kane county about 1859-60, under the ministry of Re\-. Dr. Redfield, have 
for many years held their camp meeting in the beautiful "round grove," three 
miles northeast of St. Charles, and the attendance is generally very large. A 
tract of ground has been set off especially for their use, and churches are 
usually represented from nearly all parts of northern Illinois. The tent life of 
these people lasts one week in each year. 

Other ministers of the gospel who visited the Fox river settlements very 
early were Rev. Perry, who preached in the house of William T. Wheeler, 
at St. Charles, in the spring of 1835; Rev. Jesse W'alker, a missionary to the 
Indians, and Rev. Mr. Hubbard, a Baptist. The latter men first made their 
appearance about 1834-35. A Bible class had also been organized at the 
house of John Kittridge, in St. Charles, probably in the fall of 1834. 

CATHOLIC CHURCHES, SCHOOLS AND H0SPIT.\LS IN K.\NE COUNTY. 

Aurora — St. Mary's church, Rev. D. O'Brien, pastor; Timothy D. Burke, 
assistant. St. Mary's school; 12 teachers of Providence; pupils, 400. St. 
Nicholas' church, Rev. C. Schnueckel, pastor; L, M. Linden, assistant; St. 
Nicholas' school; 12 Sisters of St. Francis; pupils, 600. St. Charles' hospital, 
under the direction of 22 Sisters of St. Francis. Sacred Heart church. Rev. 
J. C. Simond Scliool, 5 Sisters: pupils. 50. Annunciation B. Y. M. church. 



170 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Rev. H. Bangen. School, 3 Sisters of St. Francis; pupils. 80. Holy Angels' 
church, Rev. F. L. Reynolds, pastor. St. Joseph's church, Rev. J. F. Schmitt, 
pastor; Rev. Charles Nix, assistant. School, 7 schools Sisters of St. Francis; 
300 pupils. 

Batavia, Kane County — Church of the Holy Cross, Rev. L. Erhardt, 
pastor. 

Elburn, Kane County — Church of St. Gall, Rev. L. Erhardt, pastor. 

St. Charles, Kane County — St. Patrick's church. Rev. T. Ryan, pastor. 
St. Charles school, 7 Dominican Sisters. 

Elgin, Kane County — St. ]\Iary's school, 11 Sisters of Charity; pupils, 
238. St. Mary's church, Rev. J. McCann, pastor; F. B. Swanson, assistant. 
St. Joseph's church. Rev. Joseph Rohde, pastor. St. Joseph's school, 4 teachers 
of St. Francis; 100 pupils. St. Joseph's hospital in charge of 13 Sisters of St. 
Francis. Chaplain, Rev. James Friderich. 

Hampshire, Kane County — Church of St. Charles, Rev. C. J. Huth, 
pastor. 

Gilberts — St. Mary's church, attended from Huntley. ]\IcHenry County. 

Maple Park — St. Mary's church. Rev. F. J. Hartman. 

Virgil, Kane County — St. Peter's church. Rev. F. G. Hartmann. School, 
I lay teacher; pupils, 50. 

KANE COUNTY BIBLE SOCIETY. 

In 1833, while Kane county was yet a part of LaSalle county, a Bible 
society was formed at Bailey's Grove, lying south of the Vermillion river, 
near Tonica. Tw^o directors were afterward chosen to represent the Big 
Woods district, viz. : E. S. Town, of Batavia, and a Mr. Strong, late of 
Aurora. Calvin Ward, of St. Charles, was chosen for the Little Woods 
district, and J. H. Mason, of Big Grove. Kendall county, for that district. 
The earlier records of the Kane County Bible Society have been lost, but the 
first officers were Solomon Hamilton, Esq., of Elgin, president; E. Bucking- 
ham, a young lawyer, of Geneva, secretary; E. S. Town, of Batavia, treasurer. 
The secretary died about 1841. The county society accomplished but little 
during the first year of its existence, as the several local societies had not 
become auxiliary to it. These latter were located at Aurora, Sandusky Precinct 
(embracing Batavia and Geneva), St. Charles, Elgin, and Dundee, and each 
did some work. In 1847, Rev. Amasa Lord was put in charge of the work in 
northern Illinois. An agent was employed the same year to canvass the 
county, and auxiliary societies were organized in each precinct. In February, 
1848, the collection of $654.38 in cash was reported, of which about half had 
been expended in the work. In the succeeding years this society did a great 
amount of work. 

EDUC.VTIONAL. 

Schools were opened in a somewhat primitive fashion in Kane county 
as early, perhaps, as 1834; it is thought a school was taught in that year in 
a little log cabin at Batavia, although 1835 may be the correct date. 

In 1835 the first school in St. Charles was taught, and we hear of them 
soon after in Aurora, Geneva. Elgin, Dundee and elsewhere. There was 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 171 

little system in the manner of maintaining these early schools, there being 
then no effective laws in the state to govern them. They were usually of a 
rather select nature, although occasionally they might also be termed free 
schools ; but in the latter case the expenses were necessarily borne by a very few 
individuals. At one time the pioneer inhabitants of Aurora elected three school 
trustees, not, however, in pursuance of an)- statute, who were to superintend 
the interests of education. Their honors were duly bought, it seems, for Burr 
Winton, who was one of the first board, once stated that he had to pay the 
bill for one quarter, amounting to nearly $30, out of his own pocket, and he 
never collected $5 in return. 

Edward \V. Brewster, a native of Orange county. New York, came west 
in 1839 and settled upon a large tract of land in the northeastern portion of 
St. Charles township. He built a schoolhouse in the Little Woods and gave 
instruction gratis, this being the first absolutely free school in the state of 
Illinois. "Father Brewster," as be was called, was an enthusiast in the cause 
of education, and under the new constitution was elected superintendent of 
schools for Kane county in 1850. He inaugurated the plan of holding 
teachers' institutes, and continued the friend of free schools until his death, 
which occurred in May, 1886, when the venerable man had nearly reached 
the age of ninety years. 

Both male and female teachers found employment in the schools of pioneer 
days, the former usually holding forth in the winter and the latter in summer. 
The school-teacher's position, while full of honor, was not one of great 
emoluments, and there is no instance of any of the early wielders of the rule 
becoming wealthy off his or her salary. The quarters in which the young idea 
was taught the rudiments of an education were generally in some small log 
structure; but this did not interfere with their opportunities for acquiring 
such knowledge as could be imparted to them. And be it understood that 
among the schoolmasters and schoolma'ams of the '30s and '40s there were 
many wise heads, whose stores of educational fruit had been carefully laid up 
in eastern institutions, and furnished a seemingly exhaustless fountain of 
information from which to draw for the benefit of their western pupils. 
Such opportunities to learn as were presented were quickly taken advantage 
of, and the classes that issued forth from the log buildings of old were anything 
but numbskulls. 

The first free school district in Illinois was organized on the east side 
of the river at Aurora, in 1851, under a special act of the legislature, the 
general free school law not being passed until two years later. The progress 
of the schools of the county since then has been wonderfully rapid, and no 
better schools can be found today in the Union than Kane county possesses. 

Alfred Churchill, school commissioner of Kane county in 1846, wrote 
as follows to the Prairie Messenger, published at St. Charles : "Generally, 
I would say that the schools are in a bad state, with some few exceptions, 
at the head of which is placed Sugar Grove precinct; one school in Pigeon 
Woods; one or two in the northeast corner of section 32, range 7. These 
exceptions I do not make on account of the high character of the schools, 
but on account of the determination of the inhabitants to do the best they can. 



172 KAXE COUNTY HISTORY 



In tlie villages on Fox river I have found that common schools were in a worse 
state than in the country townships. This fact I attribute to two main causes — 
lirst, an aristocratic feeling, which is manifested by the number of select 
schools, which are partially sustained (I say partially, for there are so many 
that none could be well sustained) ; and secondly, a miserable sectarian spirit, 
which destroys all union of effort. 

"Dundee has a very comfortable schoolhouse, and, I think, from the 
energetic character of the directors, they will have a good common school 
this winter. They expressed a determination to make their common school 
superior to the select schools. 

"At Elgin, I found three or four elegant houses for as many different 
sects to worship (I hope not their creeds, but their creator) in, and not one 
public schoolhouse; but I have hopes of that place, as they have a few indi- 
viduals there, redeeming spirits, at work for the benefit of all. 

"St. Charles has undoubtedly paid too much attention to erecting the 
walls of intended places of worship and select schools to show well at the 
common schools; though I saw a lot of boys throwing stones through the 
windows of a tolerable building, and concluded from the circumstances that 
it was the common schoolhouse, as the boys were well dressed and apparently 
just out of the high school — young aristocracy thus venting its spleen against 
plebeianism. 

"Geneva commenced late in the season a house for common schools, 
and was progressing rapidly when the extreme cold weather set in, which 
has temporarily suspended operations. 

"Batavia has two houses for worship, which are generally occupied by a 
few scholars in each — the people there not being sufficiently agreed about the 
road to heaven to let their children associate in one school on earth, under 
one good and efficient teacher. 

"Aurora has two public schools in houses belonging to the town, which, 
from appearances, were built before their meeting houses, which argues well 
for their good sense, showing that they were more desirous of buildings for 
utility than show; and, from the literary societies, libraries, and desire for 
reading and literary conversation manifest in one class (in Aurora I could 
distinguish but one class, and that included the whole population of the 
place), I am satisfied that Aurora is destined to take a high stand among 
the inland towns of the West." 

Mr. Churchill believed the select school directly opposed to the common 
school interests, and urged the people to establish common schools, and live 
up to the school law then in force in the state. He was hostile, not to the 
teachers of the select schools, but to the schools themselves, as dangerous to 
society, and for other well-grounded reasons. He urged directors to use 
every effort to make the common schools superior to all others in their districts. 
His hopes and desires for the common schools were realized in a few years, 
and although select schools still continue to solicit patronage, the prestige 
which the new free school law gave to the common schools placed the latter 
in the position they should long before have occupied. With the ascendency 
of the district schools, those of a select nature began to wane, and they 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 173 

were soon lost sight of, with the exception of such institutions as Jennings 
(Clark) Seminary and the Elgin Academy, and the many business colleges 
since arisen, which were and still are valuable preparatory schools, and do 
not interfere with the public places of learning. 

In 1848 there existed what was known as the Kane County Educational 
Association, which held its meetings at various places in the county. Prominent 
individuals delivered addresses before it, and the people generally were invited 
to attend its meetings. Andrew Pingree was secretary, and S. S. Jones was 
elected president at a meeting held at St. Charles, October 4, 1848. The 
following vice-presidents were elected at the same time: Dr. Hale, Dundee; 
J. Scott, Franklin; Andrew Akin, Hampshire; Dr. Sanford, Elgin; Stewart 
Christie, Jackson-; N. E. Daggett, Washington; J. W. Hapgood. Burlington; 
Spalding Eddy, Fairfield; Rev. G. S. F. Savage, St. Charles; A. W. Glass, 
Geneva; J. C. Waldron, Batavia ; W. R. Parker, Fox River; Mr. Hall, Big 
gnd Little Rock; Thomas Judd, Sugar Grove; David Wheeler, Blackberry. 
The association then voted to petition the legislature for free schools. 

Some of the early pedagogues were characters in their way, and James 
Bancroft, who held forth in St. Charles, was a notable example. F. G. Garfield, 
of Campton, in calling up memories of the olden days, wrote as follows con- 
cerning Mr. Bancroft, in the spring of 1885 : 

"Asa Haseltine, Fanny Bancroft and Horace Bancroft were born in 
the same neighborhood and were schoolmates of my father; and ivhen, on 
May 23. 1841. a boy, I had arrived in St. Charles and put up with \Mieelock 
about noon. I was considerablv astonished two hours afterwards bv having; 
all of those old schoolmates of mv father, whom, of course. I knew nothing 
about, getting around me, making inquiries of my father, and when he would 
arrive, etc. But I was more than astonished when James Bancroft, the father 
of Horace and Fanny, introduced himself by telling me he had taught my 
father his letters, and was a school-teacher then, which was the fact. He 
was a natural born school-teacher — good for that and little else. For years 
he occupied the upper story of his son Horace's stone building, on the corner 
west of the old hotel, and ran a school upon the pay-by-the-scholar principle. 
From the parents of some he would collect tuition, and from some he would 
not : but it was all the same to him if he was only imparting knowledge to 
the young. He got money enough from his patrons to pay for his clothes, 
his whiskey and provisions, all of which, at that time, were cheap. Bark 
from the saw logs in the mill yard furnished him fuel, and he would always 
have from one to three cords of it packed up in a large room which was alike 
his kitchen, parlor, bedroom and schoolroom ; and there, amidst piles of bark, 
accumulation of old clothes, dishes, dirt and fleas, he taught the male children 
of St. Charles the first rudiments of an education. He used to surrender his 
schoolroom to Judges Moody and Howard when they desired to hold court, 
and Sam Flint used to tell a story, how once when his room was crowded, 
with Moody upon the bench and Fridley and Farnsworth as opposing counsel, 
the large audience, crowding back against one of his piles of bark, tipped it 
over, whereupon the fleas rushed out in such force as to tip the benches 
over, loaded with the crowd, and break up the court. But James Bancroft 



174 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

performed well the part for which it seemed that Providence designed him. 
Commencing school teaching at the age of sixteen, he taught for over a half 
century, and probably no man in St. Charles ever taught a greater number 
of scholars in the aggregate; and no man upon this continent ever exceeded 
him in the pleasing art of imparting knowledge to the young." 

The first of the fine public school buildings in the county were erected in 
St. Charles, that on the west side, in 1854, and that on the east side, in 1856, 
costing, respectively, $6,000 and $15,000. These were considered in their 
day remarkably fine buildings, but, while still in use, they have been over- 
shadowed by the splendid buildings erected at Dundee, Elgin, Geneva, Batavia 
and Aurora, the latter city especially being supplied with the very best of 
structures. The rural districts have mostly frame buildings of a simple style 
architecture, though in places brick has been the material used. 

In March, i860, according to the report of Rev. David Higgins, county 
superintendent of schools, there were in Kane county 186 schools, with a 
total attendance of 9.074 (males 4,827 and females 4,247). In 1887 the state- 
ment of the county superintendent, Marvin Quackenbush, whose death in 
1904 was lamented by all. showed the following facts : 

Ungraded schools 120 

Graded schools 30 

Male teachers 51 

Female teachers 287 

Pupils attending 10,421 

Males 5,370 

Females 5,151 

Schoolhouses 150 

VALUE OF PROPERTY. 

Aurora $200,665 

Batavia and Geneva 77,350 

St. Charles 33,825 

Elgin 132,850 

Dundee 27,000 

Sugar Grove 7-750 

Campton 5'700 

Blackberry 7,30o 

Plato 7,000 

Rutland 5,300 

Kaneville 3,000 

Virgil 8,400 

Burlington 7,560 

Hampshire 9,800 

Big Rock 7.100 

Pupils between ages of 6 and 21 years: 

Males ' 8. 1 1 7 

Females 8,241 

Total 16,358 





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OLD BAPTIST SCHOOLHOUSE. 




'OLD BRICK SCHOOL," DEDICATED JANUARY, 1848. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 177 

The report of Prof. H. A. Dean, present county superintendent, shows 
the following condition in 1907: 

Interesting data regarding the condition of the public schools of Kane 
county is given in the annual report of County Superintendent of Schools Dean. 
The report includes the entire work of the school system from June 30, 1906, 
to July I, 1907. 

NOW 32.941 CHILDREN IN KANE. 

It is estimated in the report that there are 32,941 children in the county 
under 21 years of age. Of this number 23.345 are between the ages of 6 and 
21 years. There are 51 graded schools and 107 ungraded schools throughout 
the county. The total enrollment for the year was 12,259, in the graded 
schools and 2,332 in the ungraded districts. 

Four hundred and fifty-six teachers are employed in the county and the 
average pay is $120 for men and $52 for women, monthly. The total value 
of Kane county school property is placed at the high figure of $1,336,245. 
School apparatus is valued at $21,664 and the libraries at $19,169.50. The 
total amount of district tax levy for schools was $391,776. The total expendi- 
tures fcr the year were $520,507.17. 

INTERESTING' COMPARISONS. 

Comparisons in the report show that approximately the same number of 
boys and girls attended the graded schools. In the ungraded districts the 
boys outnumbered the girls by about 200. In the high schools, however, thei-e 
were approximately 400 more girls than boys. There were 247 graduates 
from high schools during the year. Of this number 151 were girls and 96 
boys. 

The year appears to have been a poor one in the line of school improve- 
ments. The report shows that but three school buildings were erected during 
the season. Two of these were to replace burned buildings, the G.. P. Lord, 
of this city, and the Oak street school, at Aurora. 

That the educational standard of the county as a whole is fast becoming 
better is shown by the statistics that there are throughout the county only 
three persons between the ages of 12 and 21 years who are unable to read 
and write. 

The total amount of bonded school debt of the county is $262,100. 

SOME SCHOOL STATISTICS. 

Other interesting figures are : 

Number of boys under 21 years of age, 16,427; number of girls under 21 
years of age, 16,514: number of boys between the ages of 6 and 21. 11,544; 
number of girls between the ages of 6 and 21,1 1,801. 

Number of graded schools, 51 ; number of ungraded schools, 107; number 
of public high schools, 13; number of boys enrolled in graded schools. 6,128; 



178 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

number of girls enrolled in graded schools, 6.131 ; number of boys enrolled in 
ungraded schools, 1,256: number of girls enrolled in ungraded schools, 1,076. 

Number of men teachers in graded schools, 32 ; number of women teachers 
in graded schools, 319; number of men teachers in ungraded schools, 4; num- 
ber of women teachers in ungraded schools, loi. 

Highest monthly wages paid any man, S280; highest monthly wages paid 
any woman, $120; lowest monthly wages paid any man for full time, $35; 
lowest monthly wages paid any woman for full time, $25 ; average monthly 
wages for men, $120.96; average monthly wages for women, $52.81. 

Number of boys enrolled in high schools, 784 ; number of girls enrolled in 
high schools, i .006 ; number of boys graduated from high schools, 96 ; num- 
ber of girls graduated from high schools, 151. 

Number of beginners employed as teachers, 37 ; number of men examined 
for teachers" certificates. 16; number of women examined for teachers' cer- 
tificates, 183; number of men rejected, 2; number of women rejected, 19. 

The above facts and figures indicate that the schools of the county have 
grown in many ways over 100 per cent in the past twenty years. The value 
of the school property has increased nearly threefold. 



CHAPTER XVH. 

REVOLUTIONARY WAR. 

Kane county has the honor of being the resting place of at least one 
Revolutionary soldier who died and is buried at Canada Corners near Lily 
Lake, in 1852. In 1901 a committee was appointed to consider the erection 
of a monument to his memory. The committee comprised John Stewart, J. J. 
Read, L. M. Gross, John Winterhaller and the superintendent of DeKalb 
county schools. Kane county supervisors appropriated $200, the Daughters of 
the Revolution contributed $25, and $475 additional was raised. On July 4, 
1902, the monument was dedicated in the presence of a large assembly of 
people. ]\Ir. Frank W. Joslyn made a talk, following whom Mr. Miller, 
president of the Hamilton Club, of Chicago, gave the address of the occasion. 
The monument contains the following inscription : 

ABNER POWERS— 1 760- 1 852 

BENNINGTON-SARATOGA-VALLEY FORGE- 
YORKTOWN 

The veteran of the Revolution was the father of Manly Powers, of Virgil, 
Kane county. 

MEXICAN WAR. 

The first real service in the field which men from this county experi- 
enced, was during the Mexican war, 1846-48. A few scattering individuals 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 179 

enlisted in the regular army, and only a portion of them returned to the 
county ; the others died or became residents of the West. 

Early in the spring of 1847, Governor French, of Illinois, issued a call 
for volunteers to go to Mexico, and under this call Edward E. Hai-vey, of 
Elein, and William G. Conklin and Lewis A. Norton, of St. Charles, raised a 
company of infantry, reporting to the governor for duty about the 15th of 
June. The company was promptly accepted, and about the 5th of July received 
marching orders, and proceeded to Alton, Illinois, where it was mustered into 
service on the 20th of the same month. The company was assigned to the 
Sixth Regiment Illinois Infantry, commanded by Colonel Collins, of Jo 
Daviess county. Lieutenant Colonel Hicks and Major Livingston were both 
from Jefferson county. The regiment mustered 1,139 '""S"' ^"^ consisted 
of twelve companies, of which one (Company I) was from Kane county, the 
others being one each from Jefferson, Fayette, Greene, Boone, Monroe, Wash- 
ington. Franklin. \\'arren, Madison, and two from Jo Daviess. 

From Alton the command proceeded on board a Mississippi transport to 
New Orleans, thence on the steamship "Ohio" to Vera Cruz. Mexico. At 
that point the regiment was divided; the first battalion, consisting of Com- 
panies A. D. E. F, and H, under Colonel Collins, was for a time stationed at 
the San Juan bridge, on the national ruad, where there was some skirmishing, 
in which one man was killed and two were wounded. The second battalion, 
consisting of Companies B, C, G, I, and K, uncter Lieutenant Colonel Hicks, 
was sent to Tampico, where it did garrison duty until relieved by a Louisiana 
regiment, when it proceeded to Vera Cruz and marched inland toward the City 
of Mexico, Company I lost, from sickness, thirty-four men, including Captain 
Harvey. Lieutenant Norton was on detached service during most of his term, 
acting as quartermaster and commissary. The regiment remained until the 
close of the war. when it returned to Alton, and was there mustered out of 
service. Lieutenant William G. Conklin afterward, during the war of the 
Rebellion, served as battalion major in the Eighth Illinois Cavalry. 

The recruiting headquarters of the above company, which saw hard serv- 
ice during its period of enlistment in Mexico, were at St. Charles. Its roster 
was as follows : E. E. Harvey, captain ; Lewis A. Norton, Hugh Fullerton, 
and William G. Conklin, lieutenants; Nelson Warner, first sergeant; Benja- 
min F. Garfield, second sergeant; Smith M. Berry, third sergeant; S. D. 
Padelford, first corporal; Jonathan Ellis, second corporal; Andrew J. Hill, 
fourth corporal ; James Welch, first musician ; Charles E. Merrifield, second 
musician. Privates — Warren Bulson. George Boss, Jacob Brewer, Thomas 
Bennett, David Brow. Eleazer Button. A. Gorman, William Courtner, Free- 
dom Chase, John Crap, William H. S. Carlisle, Thomas Christie, Frederick 
Dorchester, Perry Dunfield, Philip Effner, Henry Foote, Georg^e Fribert, 
Asa M. Friend, Jacob Fonts. William Freeman, Stephen Finch, Stephen 
Ferguson, James Gange, George Hicks, Benjamin B. Thatcher, Paul Hoff- 
man, Edward Herrick, Harry Henries, Edward H. Johnson, Charles J. Gush, 
George Kleeburgh. Charles Kleeburgh, Silas Klesalar, Lesser Lebenstein, 
William H. Lawson, Isaac Lewis, Spaulding Lewis, John Siliger, Samuel 



180 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

McDonald, Matthew Moran. David Mooney, Alexander Mc^Millen, Peter 
Matthews. Robert D. Massey, Nicholas IMore. HeiirA^ Marshall. John Mead, 
Malcolm AlcCallum. John S. Norris, David Xewton, Michael Phelps. James 
Price, Orange H. Phelps, Stephen B. Portwood, Jacob Pauley, Thomas Pride- 
more, John Phelps. Jedediah Phillips. George D. Roberts. Alfred Romain, 
George W. Rintew, Timothy Ryan. Philip H. Sargent. Thomas Sirben. Henry 
Stickler, William Sioss, John Spencer, Sewell W. Smith, Henry \\'. Smith. 
George A. Thompson, James Thompson. David Tubbs, John M. Walker, 
Fred Wilger, John D. Scomaker, Haney Wakeman. Charles P. Brown, John 
Norton. 

During its term of service the regiment lost three hundred and thirty- 
two men, who died of disease, four killed in battle, one hundred and thirty- 
five discharged by surgeon, thirteen transferred or resigned, eighteen by de- 
sertion, and received seventy-two recruits. At the final muster-out at Alton, 
in the latter part of July, 1848. there remained but three hundred and sixty- 
seven of the one thousand, one hundred and thirty-nine who had gone bravely 
out but a year before, and this handful of survivors returned in such a state 
of physical prostration and general ill health that a number died after reach- 
ing Alton. Lieutenant Conklin. the only one of the commissioned officers of 
Company I living in 1888, removed some years before that from St. Charles 
to De Soto. Wisconsin. 

THE WAR OF THE REBELLION. 

The alacrity with which the President's call for seventy-tive thousand 
volunteers in April. 1861, immediately after the firing upon Fort Sumter, 
was responded to was an evidence of the deep feeling among the Northern 
people. In Kane county there was almost no need for the call, for men came 
flocking from all directions and from all pursuits to the recruiting headquar- 
ters, ready to take their places in the rapidly filling ranks. During the week 
or ten days immediately succeeding the call the bustle and activity were won- 
derful. Men volunteered as fast as their names could be received, and 
thousands of dollars were raised by private subscription for the support of 
the families of the volunteers. In Aurora alone, during that time, nearly 
six thousand dollars were thus raised, and four military companies were 
wholly or partially filled in the same period. The same spirit was observed 
throughout the county. For one volunteer company sixty names were obtained 
on the roll in three hours. Captain Nicholas Greusel, who commanded a 
company from ^lichigan in the Mexican war. raised a company at Aurora, 
and Captain Edward S. Joslyn another at Elgin. These were the first bodies 
of Kane county troops to depart for the field. Captain Greusel's men were 
mostly enlisted on the i8th and Captain Joslyn's on the 22d of April. The 
company from the south end of the county left Aurora on Sunday, the 21st 
day of April, 1861, and was accompanied to the train by six thousand people. 
All the physicians left in the city volunteered their services during- the war free 
to the families of the men who had enlisted. Moving to Springfield, this 
company was assigned to the Seventh Regiment of Illinois Volunteer Infantry 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 181 

for a three months' term of service, and proceeded thence to Alton. Captain 
Greusel was promoted to major of the regiment. The command served its 
time and was mustered out July 25, 1861, but immediately reenlisted for 
three years. Major Greusel being promoted to colonel of the Thirty-sixth Illi- 
nois infantry and E. S. Joslyn. lieutenant colonel. 

By this time the great war was fully inaugurated, and people began to 
realize that the movement on the part of the southern men was not to be 
crushed in an easy manner; it had been thoroughly organized and only the 
most strenuous effort could hope tp put down the rebellion, which now ap- 
peared in all its magnitude. But the work went bravely on; men and means 
continued to come to the aid of the government, and the volume of war swelled 
to an enormous extent. The adjutant-general of Illinois, in his report upon 
the filling of the quota of the state under a call for three hundred thousand 
men, in August, 1862, thus wrote, after explaining that the full quota of the 
state was to be raised and no credit was to be allowed for the excess of men 
already in the field : 

"To raise either 52,296 or 35.320 volunteers (with perhaps the exception 
of one thousand, who had enlisted between July 7 and August 5) but thirteen 
days were allowed. The floating population of the state who would enlist 
had already done so. These new volunteers must come, if come at all, from 
the farmers and mechanics of the state. Farmers were in the midst of their 
han-ests, and it is no exaggeration to say that, inspired by a holy zeal, ani- 
mated by a common purpose, and firmly resolved on rescuing this government 
from the very brink of ruin, and restoring it to the condition our fathers left 
it, over fifty thousand of them left their harvests ungathered, their tools on 
their benches, the plows in the furrows, and turned their backs upon home 
and loved ones, and before eleven days expired the demands of the country 
were met and both quotas were filled. Proud, indeed, was the day to all Illi- 
noisans when this extraordinary announcement was made- — that the enlistment 
rolls were full. 

"And when the historian shall write the record of these eventful days of 
Aug^ist, 1862, no prouder record can be erected to the honor and memory of a 
free people than a plain, full narrative of actual realities." 

Pursuant to the call for three hundred thousand troops in the summer of 
1862, the board of supervisors of Kane county held a special meeting and 
took action upon the following resolutions, presented by a committee appointed 
by a mass meeting of Kane county citizens held at the courthouse : 

"Resolved, That we recommend that the board of supervisors of Kane 
county appropriate and pay to each recruit in Kane county the sum of one 
hundred dollars until our full quota is made up under the call of the Presi- 
dent for three hundred thousand volunteers. 

"Resolved, That we pledge ourselves to stand by and support the board 
of supervisors in making such appropriation, and we believe that the interests 



182 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

of the country imperatively demand that such action should be immediately 
taken. 

"Resolved, That this war must be vigorously prosecuted and this Union 
must be preserved." 

A committee of the board was appointed to draft resolutions expressive 
of the sense of the board in the matter, and they reported their belief that the 
board should "appropriate sixty dollars, either in cash or in county orders, 
bearing interest at seven per cent, to each private and non-commissioned 
officer, not exceeding five hundred men, who shall enlist before the first day of 
September next, in the present war, under the President's last call for three 
hundred thousand men, said sixty dollars to be paid by a committee of the 
board, who shall hereafter be appointed, on the presentation of proper vouch- 
ers that such recruits have been organized into a company and mustered into 
the United States service." The report was adopted, as was also a resolu- 
tion providing for the payment of the first fifteen thousand dollars of the 
moneys so appropriated. In addition to the bounty offered by the county, 
there were township and city bounties amounting to twenty or twenty-five 
dollars for each recruit. 

The report of J. H. Mayborne, of Geneva, enrolling officer for Kane 
county, dated October 8, 1862, shows that about one-third of the whole able- 
bodied male population of the county, between the ages of eighteen and forty- 
five years, was then in actual service. The following table shows the total 
number enrolled and the number in service from each township at the date of 
the report : 

Total number 
Townships. enrolled. In service. 

Aurora i ,845 626 

Sugar Grove 225 66 

Big Rock 201 40 

Kaneville 283 78 

Blackberry 236 64 

Batavia 418 1 10 

Geneva 271 loi 

St. Charles 352 131, 

Campton 186 42 

Virgil 244 103 

Burlington 167 57 

Plato 204 89 

Elgin 696 353 

Dundee 356 90 

Rutland 172 45 

Hampshire 230 92 

• Total 6,086 2,087 




WEST BANK OF FOX RIVER CAMPING SCENE, NORTH 

OF ELGIN. 




FOX RIVER NEAR TROUT PARK, NORTH OF ELGIN. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 185 

The 2,087 ^^'-^ "Of include men wiio died or were killed in the service, 
or those who had been discharged. Had they been included the number at 
that time, instead of 2.087, would have been at least 2,500. The casualties 
among Kane county troops had been \ery great, showing that they had borne 
the brunt of the battle. A single instance will serve to show how much they 
had been exposed to the fire of the enemy. The Fifty-second Illinois, at the 
Battle of Shiloh. April 6-7, 1862, lost 28 men killed and 135 wounded, and of 
these Kane county was represented by 13 killed and 51 wounded. Besides 
these a considerable number of Kane county boys were reported missing after 
the battle. 

At the time of the last draft in 1864 Kane county was out of its reach, 
having already furnished, under previous enlistments, 347 men more than her 
quota. The quota of each township and the number credited to it at that time 
were as follows : 

Number 
Townships. <I)uota. credited. 

Big Rock 105 100 

Kaneville 115 126 

^'irgil ri8 124 

Burlington 80 y2 

Hampshire 97 130 

Rutland '. 76 74 

Plato 94 109 

Campton 94 94 

Blackberry 144 195 

Sugar Grove 106 106 

Aurora ( outside city) 192 204 

Aurora (city) — 

First ward 199 206 

Second ward 334 345 

Third ward 210 261 

Fourth ward 157 194 

Batavia 237 262 

Geneva 131 154 

St. Charles 222 273 

Elgin (outside city) no 128 

Elgin (city) — 

First ward 63 69 

Second w-ard 39 41 

Third ward 56 61 

Fourth ward 57 63 

Dundee • 178 200 



Total 3.214 3.561 

When a new call for recruits was made, in February, 1865, the quota to 
be raised in Kane county, aside from all credits, was as follows : 



186 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Townships. Ouota. 

Aurora, city and township 124 

Big Rock 14 

Kaneville i 

Virgil 12 

Burlington 12 

Rutland 8 

Plato 2 

Campton 18 

Blackberry 9 

Sugar Grove 19 

Batavia 24 

Geneva 7 

Elgin, city and township 24 

Dundee 10 

Total 284 

Hampshire had an excess of nineteen and St. Charles of live; therefore 
they had no men to raise under this call. The heavy call on Kane county was 
owing to the fact that the enrollment lists in the provost marshal's otiice had 
not been corrected. 

The total enrollment for the county was based upon the population of 
i860, and, as shown, was 6,086 men. Of these 4,103 were liable to military 
service, and the total quota of men required to be furnished by the county 
amounted to 3.872. It has been figured that the grand total of men furnished 
by the county was 3,990, or an excess of 118 over the quotas. These were 
apportioned in the various armies of the service as follows : Infantry, 157 com- 
missioned officers and 2,989 enlisted men; cavalry, 40 commissioned officers 
and 600 enlisted men; artillery, 10 commissioned officers and 194 enlisted men. 
Of the whole 885 men were in the service 100 days and the remainder for 
longer terms. The report of the adjutant-general of the state varies slightly 
irom the foregoing in its figures, as the following from said report shows: 
Population in i860, 30,024; first and second-class enrollment in 1863, 4,530; 
ditto in 1864, 4,962; revised enrollment, January, 1865, 5,002. Quotas prior 
to December 31, 1864: 1861, 842; 1862, 576; call 700,000 February i and 
March 14, 1864, 1,020; call 500,000 July 18, 1864, 774; total quotas, 3,212; 
total credits, 3.588; excess, 376. Quotas to December 31, 1865: Assigned 
quota, 284: net quota, 660; total quota, 3.872; credit. 285; total credit. 3,873; 
excess, i. Aside from any of these credits must be taken into account the 
men from this county who served during the war in the navy, and probably 
many others who enlisted in organizations raised in other states, and were 
possibly never credited on the Illinois report. The entire number who enlisted 
from Kane county in defense of the flag, in all capacities, could not have fallen 
short of 4,000, or over 13 per cent of the whole population of the county. The 
record shines in undimmed luster twenty-two years after the close of the strife, 
and it is known that Kane county was represented on 107 of the battlefields 
of the Rebellion. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 187 

By the returns made in August, 1865, by A. B. Coon, captain and provost 
marshal of the Second IlHnois congressional district, which then included Kane 

county, it is seen that the county paid sums as follows for bounties to volunteers 
during the war : 

Bounty Number of 

Date ot call. paid. bounties. Average. 

July 9 and August 5, 1862 $ 60 768 $ 46,080 

February i and March 14, 1864... 100 742 74,200 

July 18, 1864 600 8 4,800 

December 19, 1864 600 270 162,000 

Total 1,788 $287,080 $160.56 

lOO-day men $ 50 489 24,450 



2,277 $311030 $136.86! 
The total amounts paid by other counties in the district were : 

Bounties. 

Winnebago 1,946 $540,600 

Boone 861 295,388 

McHenry 1,704 419,660 

Lake 1,317 347,410 

DeKalb ; . . . 1,454 357,48o 

Kane county paid the least average bounty, but divided the sum total 
among the greatest number of men. The subjoined notes upon the history 
of the regiments in which Kane county men principally served are from the 
reports made by the adjutant-general of the state, as republished in 1886, and 
are in some instances furnished by members of the regiments themselves : 

STORIES OF THE BOYS IN BLUE BY A VETERAN OF THE SIXTIES. 

(In Aurora Daily News, March 11, 1908.) 



Aurora Daily News : ^^^^^^' ^"•""^'' February 29, 1908. 

I know my friends in Kendall county are always interested in anything 
pertaining to the doings of Company C, Fourth Illinois Cavalry, and if my 
little stories are not fully up to the mark will overlook it. 

The old soldiers of the Civil war have always kept a loving remembrance 
of their comrades who stood shoulder to shoulder with them in putting down 
the rebellion. Many of those comrades have passed out of our lives. Some of 
them have been so scattered over this great countiy that we have lost all trace 
of them. Others, and the great majority, are peacefully sleeping beneath the 
sod in our many beautiful cemeteries, where friends have placed white stones 
to mark their last resting places, and it is gratifying to know that the people , 
of this busy world of ours have the time to pay a loving tribute to their soldier 
dead. All surviving comrades of that great struggle know that year by year 
they are growing older and older and before many years they also will have 
to answer the last roll call. 



188 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

It is very true since the close of the Civil war that the old soldiers have 
formed many new and valuable friendships which they prize highly. But 
never in these later years can they make such friendships as they had with the 
comrades of the long ago. 

Those times, the sweet memories the old soldiers kept ever green, and 
in writing little campfire stories about the happenings of the Civil war I know 
that there are those who for various reasons were not permitted to show their 
love and patriotism by fighting for the preservation of the Union and the dear 
old flag we love so much, are with the old soldiers in thought and sympathy, 
and know that death only can dissolve the bond of comradeship formed during 
the '60s. 

ACCOUNT OF COMPAXY C. 

In this little article I will give you a little account of the doings of old 
Company C in the early part of the war. While at Cairo in the winter of 
1861-62 both the Mississippi and Ohio rivers got on a rampage, overflowing 
their banks and inundating that city so that the streets became vast sheets of 
water which reached up to the second stories of many of the buildings. The 
people were obliged to flee from their homes. Rowboats and hastily con- 
structed rafts were put in requisition to save the women and children from 
being drowned. At this time, it will be remembered, that Cairo and the 
greater part of southern Illinois was a hotbed of secession, the people as a 
general thing being in full sympathy with what afterwards became the lost 
cause. But our Union soldier boys did not give this matter a thought. They 
went to the rescue of the unfortunates and did ever3'thing they could to help 
and relieve the suffering caused by that awful flood, and through their efforts 
much property as well as human lives were saved, and there is no doubt that 
this was instrumental in changing views of many of the people who had been 
made to believe that the Yankee soldiers were all hoof and horns, and I wish 
to say that there is no doubt that the state of Illinois was later indebted to the 
efforts of General John A. Logan, or the "Black Eagle," as we liked to call 
him, for changing the views of many of the people of southern Illinois, so that 
they became Unionists instead of Confederates. 

PROTECTED BY BRIDGE. 

Shortly after this great flood Company C was detached from the regiment 
and ordered to a point near Anna. Illinois, for the purpose of protecting the 
place. As was well known at that time, the Illinois Central was the chief 
Illinois Central Railroad bridge that spanned the Big JMuddy river at that 
means of transportation the government had of sending supplies to the army 
at Cairo, where General U. S. Grant was gathering his army to invade the 
southern Confederacy. If this bridge could be destroyed the Confederates 
knew that untold damage would result to the Union forces : therefore rebel 
soldiers were sent over from time to time across the Ohio river from Kentucky 
with orders to destroy and put this bridge out of commission. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 189 

But old Company C was "Johnnie on the Spot," and soon convinced those 
raiders that the job could not be done. After numerous attempts, the rebels 
abandoned the project, but not without several engagements in which they were 
defeated and a number of them killed. After all danger from those raids was 
over Company C remained on duty at this point until General Grant was ready 
to make his forward movement, when it was recalled to join the regiment at 
Cairo. 

I must not forget to acknowledge that while at Cairo we received from 
the good ladies at Oswego a box containing all kinds of good things to eat, 
pies, cakes, roast chicken, etc.. and if those kind ladies could have seen us dis- 
pose of their contribution from the dear old home it would have done their 
hearts good and more than paid them for sacrificing time and labor. God 
bless those good women who gave so much to lighten the burdens of the Union 
soldiers. 

On January 31. 1862. the captains of the different companies in the regi- 
ment had a chance to do a little weeding out in their commands. At this time 
there was a fleet of gunboats just completed and at anchor in the Mississippi 
ri\er, and men were wanted to man them. The government not wanting to 
wait to enlist them, called for volunteers. The captains of the Fourth Illinois 
Cavalry took it upon themselves to send such men as they would rather spare. 
They told these men they had to go, and they went. These soldiers were nearly 
all Norwegians and Germans, who could hardly speak the English language. 
Some few companies, among which was Company C, did not have any unde- 
sirable soldiers; therefore did not furnish any recruits for the United States 
navy. Charles \\'elsh, a private of Company I (Earlville company), who was 
under arrest for drunkenness and attempting to kill Lieutenant Hapman. of 
his company, was given the alternative of taking service in one of the gunboats 
or standing courtmartial. He chose the former, and the Fourth Illinois Cav- 
alry was not of the imdesirable soldiers. At Pilos Knot, on the opposite side 
of the Mississippi river, from Cairo, were many swamps in which grew great 
groves of pecan trees. The nuts from these trees in great abundance simply 
went to waste, and the hogs, which, owing to their size and shape, were called 
"Missouri Razor Backs," were turned loose in these groves to fatten. I have 
mentioned this last to show what great change has taken place in that time. 
Pecan nuts are now a luxury, and instead of feeding them to the hogs all the 
Americans take pleasure in eating them. 

At last the Fourth Illinois Ca^•alry was ordered aboard the transports and 
were soon steaming up the Ohio river. We were compelled to drop anchor at 
Mound City, Illinois, for the purpose of coaling up. At Mound City, in the 
national cemetery, are buried three of our comrades of Company C — Julius 
Brown, Jonathan P. Warner and John S. Burnes. 

HISTORY OF SEVENTH REGIMENT. 

Illinois having sent six regiments to the Mexican war, by courtesy the 
numbering of the regiments which took part in the war for the Union began 
with number seven. A number of regiments which responded to the first call 



190 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

of the President for troops claimed to be the first regiment in the field, but the 
honor of being the first was finally accorded to Colonel John Cook, and hence 
his regiment was numbered seven. The Seventh Regiment was recruited as 
follows: Company A from Elgin and vicinity; Company B, Mattoon and 
vicinity; Company C, Aurora and vicinity; Company D. Litchfield and 
vicinity; Company E, Atlanta and vicinity; Company F. Bunker Hill 
and vicinity; Company G. Springfield and vicinity; Company H. Lincoln and 
vicinity; Company L. Springfield and vicinity; Company K. Carlinville and 
vicinity. 

The regiment was mustered into the United States service at Camp Yates, 
April 25, 1861, by Captain John Pope, U. S. A. Was forwarded to Alton, St. 
Louis. Cairo and ]\Iound City, where it remained during the three months' 
service. 

Was reorganized and mustered for three years' service July 25. 1861, by 
Captain T. G. Pitcher. U. S. A. Proceeded to fronton, ^Missouri, and joined 
the command of Brigadier General B. ^L Prentiss. August 23. 1861, marched 
to Cape Girardeau, Missouri, where it remained some time. Colonel Cook 
commanding post. The regiment went into winter quarters at Fort Holt, 
Kentucky, Colonel Cook commanding post. The garrison consisted of a 
brigade — Seventh and Twenty-eighth Illinois and :McAllister's Battery. 
General Grant commanded the district of Cairo. 

Was with the reconnoitering expedition, under General Grant, in the rear 
of Columbus, Kentucky. During the battle of Belmont was sent to Elliot's 
Mills, just above Columbus. On February 3, 1862, embarked for Fort Henry, 
and on the 12th for Fort Donelson, taking part in the investment and siege 
of that place, February 13. 14 and 15, and was engaged in the last charge on 
the left of the enemy's works. At Donelson the regiment was commanded by 
Lieutenant Colonel Babcock, Colonel Cook commanding Third Brigade, Sec-- 
ond Division. Alajor General C. F. Smith commanding. Loss, three killed, 
including the gallant Captain ilendell, of Company I. and nineteen wounded. 
February 21, 1862, left Fort Donelson for Clarksville, Tennessee. Major 
Rowett commanding, Lieutenant Colonel Babcock absent, sick, and Colonel 
Cook commanding brigade. Ordered to Nashville, and afterwards to Pitts- 
burgh Landing, where it arrived 'Slarch 22. 1862. Was engaged continually. 
April 6 and 7. at the battle of Shiloh, under command of Lieutenant Colonel 
Rowett, Colonel Babcock being absent, sick, and Colonel Cook ha\-ing been 
promoted to brigadier general on the 2d of INIarch; was a part of Colonel 
Sweeny's brigade of General W. H. L. Wallace's division; went into action 
between 9 and 10 o'clock April 6th. and first took possession at Duncan's 
Field and drove the enemy in its front across the field, but was in turn driven 
back; and when the division commander. General \\'. H. L. Wallace, was 
killed and the brigade commander. Colonel T. W. Sweeny, was wounded and 
taken off the field. Lieutenant Colonel Rowett obtained permission from Gen- 
eral McClernand to form on his left and become a part of his line, where his 
horse was killed in a charge on the enemy. The Seventh was in the line that 
repulsed the last charge of the enemy on the night of the 6th, when it was 
advanced to a picket line and remained there until relieved by General Buell's 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 391 

command near daylight next morning. It went into action before noon on the 
7th, and was hotly engaged when the enemy retreated at 3 o'clock p. m. In 
this battle the regiment lost, in killed, two commissioned oiScers and fifteen 
men; wounded, seventy-nine. Lieutenant Colonel Rowett was among the 
latter. 

Was engaged up to JMay 30 with Third Brigade, Second Division, and 
in center of right wing, moving upon Corinth — meanwhile having several 
skirmishes with the enemy. On evacuation of Corinth, May 30, by the enemy 
the regiment marched to Farmington and Booneville, Mississippi, repairing 
roads and bridges, and returned to Corinth. June 11, 1862. At the battle 
of Corinth, October 3 and 4, 1862, the regiment was engaged both days, entire, 
on right of Third Brigade, and still in Second Division. Colonel Babcock 
was in command. On the 5th of October marched in pursuit of enemy as far 
as Ruckerville, and returned on the loth. Loss at Corinth — two commissioned 
officers and six men killed and forty-six wounded. Also twenty-one prisoners, 
who ha\e since been exchanged and returned to duty. December 8, marched 
to Lexington, Missouri, in pursuit of guerrillas. 

Februarv 28. 1863. Colonel Andrew J. Babcock resigned and retired from 
the service, when Lieutenant Colonel Richard Rowett was promoted colonel, 
to rank from that date. 

April 15, 1863, marched with General Dodge's command through luka, 
Glendale and Burnsville to Bear Creek, on the Alabama line. On the 17th 
deployed as skirmishers, drove the enemy from the creek, and, as soon as the 
cavalry had crossed. Companies C and K pushed forward at a double quick in 
support of a battery. The remainder of the brigade then crossed, and, mov- 
ing forward to Cherokee, engaged the rebels. The Seventh, on the right, 
killed twelve of the enemy and captured two prisoners. At dark retired, and 
next morning moved back to Bear Creek. 

April 25, again moved forward to Tuscumbia, and the same evening to 
South Florence, joining the Ninth Illinois (mounted) Infantry. The next day 
moved with main column to Town Creek. April 28, crossed Town Creek and 
drove the enemy three miles, and remained on the ground during the night 
with the Second Iowa Infantry. On the 29th, recrossed and returned to 
Corinth with the command, arriving May 2. Loss, during this expedition, 
one man killed — accidentally shot. 

]\Iay 12 to June 8. 1863, guarded railroad from Bethel to Jackson, Tennes- 
see. June 18, mounted, by order of ^lajor General Dodge, and theranainder 
of the month was scouting through west Tennessee. July 7 to 9, on scout. 
July 26 to August 5, on expedition under command of Colonel Rowett, of the 
Seventh, capturing forty-two prisoners, including one colonel and two cap- 
tains, and many horses and mules. Lost one man. accidentally killed. Again 
went out, together with one hundred men of the Tenth Missouri Cavalry, 
Had several skirmishes and captured twenty prisoners. September 26, com- 
menced a four days' expedition with the Seventh Kansas Cavalry, Colonel 
Rowett in command. Had some very brisk skirmishes, and captured thirty 
prisoners and several horses and mules. October 4, relieved Eighteenth 
Missouri, at Chewalla, and was again relieved on the 28th. 



192 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

October 26, proceeded to luka. Here guarded approaclies until the 6th of 
November, when marched to Eastport. and, crossing tlie Tennessee river, 
moved on flanks of Dodge's command, capturing horses, etc., and figtiting 
guerrillas until Xoxemlier 12. when camped at Pulaski. November 17 to 
19. scouted to and beyontl Lawrenceburg. capturing thirty prisoners. Novem- 
ber 21, ordered to Corinth, and returned to Pulaski, capturing twentv-fi\e 
prisoners. December 10, ordered on scout to\\ard Shreve Creek and Florence, 
Alabama. 

The Seventh Infantry reenlisted as veterans at Pulaski. Tennessee. De- 
cember 22, 1863, and was mustered in January 6, 1864, and left immediately 
for Illinois, to receive thirty days' furlough. Arrived at Springfield, January 
18, 1864. Received an enthusiastic reception from the citizens. Quartered 
in Representatives' hall until next day, when furloughed. Reassembled Feb- 
ruary 18. 1864, reinforced by two hundred recruits. Left Camp Butler for 
Pulaski on the 23d, under command of Major Estabrook — Colonel Rowett 
teing in command of Camp Butler. Arrived at Pulaski, February 27, 1864, 
where the regiment was mounted, and left for Florence, Alabama, ninety miles 
distant, to patrol the Tennessee river and watch Forrest's command, which 
were just leaving Tuscaloosa, Alabama, on the memorable raid on Paducah 
and Fort Pillow. The regiment was divided into three detachments — four 
companies at Florence, two companies at Sweetwater and four at Centre Star. 

April 8. Colonel Rowett returned to the regiment, whose headquarters 
were at Florence. Alabama, and again assumed command, having been relieved 
from the command at Camp Butler at his own request. 

On the morning of the 7th of May, General Roddy's reljel brigade crossed 
the Tennessee, between Sweetwater and Centre Star, and attacked the com- 
panies at Florence antl Sweetwater. After six hours' sex'cre fighting against 
ten times their number, the companies were obliged to retire with a loss of 
three officers and thirty-two men wounded and captured. On the 13th of May. 
the Seventh returned with the Ninth Ohio Cavalry, under command of Colonel 
Rowett, and drove the rebels across the Tennessee, capturing a number of pris- 
oners. Was engaged in patrolling the river until June 14. when the regiment 
was dismounted and ordered to report to the brigade commander at Rome. 
Georgia. Arrived at Chattanooga, Tennessee, on the 17th of June, and was 
ordered to Tilton, Georgia, to patrol the railroad from Dalton to Resaca. 
which was then threatened by rebel cavalry. On July 7 was reliexed bv 
the Eighteenth Wisconsin Infantry, and proceeded to Rome, Georgia, and 
went into camp on the south side of the Etowa river. On the 29th of July the 
non-veteran officers and men were mustered out by reason of expiration of 
term of service. Captain Hector Perrin was mustered as lieutenant eolonel. 
and Captain Edward S. Johnson as major. On the 3d of October. 1864, the 
Fourth Division, Fifteenth Army Corps (to which the Seventh was attached), 
commanded by General John M. Corse, was ordered to Allatoona Pass to 
assist in the defense of that important station, then threatened by Hood's 
army. The Third Brigade, consisting of the Seventh, Fiftieth and Fiftv- 
seventh Illinois and the Thirty-ninth Iowa, commanded by Colonel Rowett, 
reached the Pass on the morning of October 4. The railroad being destroyed 




ST. JOSEPH'S CHURCH, ELGIN. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 195 

after the passage of this brigade, the rest of the division failed to reach its 
destination. On the morning of the 5th the Pass was attacked by General 
French's rebel division, numbering six thousand men. The Seventh, armed 
with the Henry rifle (or sixteen-shooter j, did gallant and fearful work — suc- 
cessfully repelling four separate charges made by the desperate and hungry 
enemy on the line occupied by them — its torn and bleeding ranks told at what 
a fearful cost. Its colors, under which fell many a gallant bearer that day, 
were never lowered. 

"Let its stained and tattered mass, 
Tell the story of the terror and the glory 
Of the battle of the Allatoona Pass." 

The brave Captain Jack Sullivan and Adjutant Robinson fell mortally 
wounded. Colonel Rowett was severely wounded in the head. Thirty-eight 
men were killed and sixty-seven wounded. The enemy lost two thousand, 
two hundred killed and wounded, and, not able to stand against this gallant 
little band of defenders in the Pass, they fled, leaving this number on the 
field. The Seventh, together with all those who assisted in that gallant de- 
fense and glorious victory, won never fading laurels, and was highly compli- 
mented by the division commander and General Sherman, who said: "For 
the numbers engaged they stood upon the bloodiest battlefield ever known 
upon the American continent." After the battle the regiment returned to 
Rome, and on the 12th of November, with their corps, under command of 
General Osterhaus, joined the Grand Army of Sherman at Kingston, Georgia, 
where preparations were being made for the "March to the Sea." 

On the 2 1st of November the regiment was remounted and detailed as the 
advance of the Fifteenth Army Corps. On December 22, under command of 
Lieutenant Colonel Perrin. it entered Savannah with Sherman's victorious 
columns. Then, turning northward with the army, entered into the campaign 
of the Carolinas; participated in the battles of Salkahatchie Swamp, Bentonville 
and Columbia. 

While on the march to the sea the regiment was surprised by the appear- 
ance of Captain E. R. Roberts, who was captured, with most of his company. 
May 7, 1864, at Florence, Alabama. He had efifected his escape from the 
prison pen at Columbia, South Carolina, and by night had traveled one hundred 
and eighty miles to join his regiment. 

April 20, Colonel Rowett returned from his enforced absence, caused by 
wounds received at the battle of Allatoona, and again took command of the 
Third Brigade. 

After the surrender of General Johnson, April 26, the regiment took up 
its line of march for home by way of Petersburg, Richmond and Alexandria 
May 17. 1865, and took part in the grand review at Washington, when it was 
ordered to Louisville, Kentucky, where, on the 9th of July, it was mustered 
out of service. The regiment arrived at Springfield July 1 1 , when it was paid 
ofif and discharged. 

As a little retrospect it will not be improper to say that the Seventh In- 
fantry takes great pride in the fact that it was the first organized regiment 
from this state mustered into the L'^nited States service in the war that was 



196 KA.NE LUl -XTV IIISTOKY 

waged to save the Union, and the first to return to the capital of the state and 
reenlist as veterans, as well as being the only regiment in the whole army that 
purchased its own gnns — the Henr\" rifles, sixteen-shooters — paying fifty dol- 
lars each for them out of their meager pay of thirteen dollars per month, 
thereb}- increasing their effective force fi^•e-fold. Colonel Rowett, who com- 
manded the Seventh the last four hours of the battle of AUatoona, where 
Sherman had stored millions of rations, while according to all the highest 
meed of praise for gallant conduct and stubborn courage, insists that without 
the aid of the sixteen-shooters French's six thousand rebels would have over- 
whelmed the gallant fifteen hundred of "The Pass." Colonel Rowett was 
promoted to brevet brigadier general on recommendation of General Sherman 
for gallant conduct in this battle. 

General Sherman, speaking of this battle in his ofticial report, says : 

"I esteemed this defense of AUatoona so handsome and important that I 
made it the subject of a general order, viz. : No. 86 of October 7. 1864: 

"The general commanding avails himself of the opportunity in the hand- 
some defense of AUatoona to illustrate the most important principle of war, 
that fortified posts should be defended to the last, regardless of the relative 
numbers of the part}' attacking or attacked. The thanks of this army are 
due and are hereby accorded to General Corse. Colonel Tourtellotte, Colonel 
Rowett. officers and men. for their determined and gallant defense of AUa- 
toona, and it is made an example to illustrate the importance of preparing in 
time and meeting the danger when presented, boldly, manfully and well. 

"Commanders and garrisons of the posts along our railroads are hereby 
instructed that they must hold their posts to the last minute, sure that the time 
gained is valuable and necessary to their comrades at the front. 

"By order of Major General W. T. Sherman. 

"(Signed) L. 'SI. Davtox. Aid-de-camp." 

SEVENTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 

(Three ^lonths' Ser\-ice.) 

Major. 
Nicholas Greusel. Aurora; mustered out Jul}- 2^. 1861. 

Sergeant Major. 
Samuel G. Ward. Aurora; mustered out July 25. 1861. 

COMPAXY A. 

Captain. 
Edward S. Joslyn. Elgin; mustered out July 25. 1861. 

First Sergeant. 
S. G. Ward, Aurora; promoted sergeant major. 

Sergeants. 
Jonathan Kimball. Elgin; mustered out July 25. 1861. as first sergeant. 
F. A. Raymond. Elgin; mustered out July 25. 1861. 
George F. Wheeler. Elgin; mustered out July 2^. 1861. 
Walter H. Kimball. Elgin; mustered out July 25. 1861. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 197 

Corporals. 
E. Buck, Elgin ; discharged ; disability. 
G. W. Padelford. Elgin; mustered out July 25. 1861. 
J. R. Kinney. Elgin: mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Holland Handburg. Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
William S. Smith. Elgin: mustered out July 25, 1861. 

Musicians. 
Gust. C. Kothe, Elgin: mustered out July 25. 1861. 
John Goodwin. Elgin; mustered out July 25. 1861. 

Privates. 
J. W. Aldrich, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
David Allen. Elgin; discharged July 8. 1861 ; disability. 
Cullen Allen. Elg-in ; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
John J. Adams, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Charles R. Brown. Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Henry P. Baldwin. Elgin; mustered out July 25. 1861. 
David Bradley, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
A. A. C. Bacon. Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Alden Bates. Elgin: mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Robert S. Brown, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Charles M. Boutwell, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Sidney Bradford. Elgin: mustered out July 25. 1861. 
Benjamin S. Cool! Elgin; mustered out July 25. 1861. 
C. H. Chapman, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Charles H. Campbell, Elgin; discharged July 8, 1861 ; disability. 
John Coon, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Thomas Crayon, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
H. S. Doty, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
C. F. Dike. Elgin; mustered out July 25. 1861. 
E. H. Densmore, Elgin; died June 2, 1861, at Elton, 
C. L. Dixon, Elgin: mustered out July 25, 1861. 
M. L. Dixon, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
John Detman, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

G. W. Forsyth. Elgin; transferred to Barker's Dragoons July 13. 1861. 
M. H. French, Elgin; discharged July i. 1861 ; disability. 
C. W. Guptail, Elgin; niustered out July 25, 1861. 
S. M. Harney, Elgin; mustered out July 25. 1861. 
S. F. Hammond, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
C. M. Harvey, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
John Hart, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
R. Humphrey. Elgin: mustered out July 25, 1861. 
J. L. Haines, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861, 
A. A. Keyes, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Nathaniel B. Lewis, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
\y. H. Mitchell, Elgin: mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Albert Messenger, Elgin: mustered out July 25, 1861. 
A. Martens, Elgin: mustered out July 25, 1861. 



198 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

John Murphy, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

Joseph Over, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

James O'Donnell, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

G. H. Peeler, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

H. S. Padleford, Elgin; mustered out July 25. 1861. 

Hiram Peterson, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

John Ryan, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

William Renwick, Elgin: mustered out July 25, 1861. 

J. R. Rickey, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

Henry Rice, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

Alexander Robinson, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

M. Harney Searghfield, Elgin; died May 19, 1861, at Alton. 

J. S. Soper, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

M. J. Southworth, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

Charles H. Slawson, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

A. R. Smith, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

B. Sweeney, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

C. W. Smith, Elgin; mustered out July_25, 1861. 
Jacob C. Schneider, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
T. J. Thompason, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

J. M. Vining. Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
O. R. Wilson, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
N. D. Wollaver, Elgin; mustered out July 25. 1861. 
J. H. Ward, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
William Wollaver, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
A. R. Walker, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
W. H. Wheeler, Elgin; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

COMPANY C. 

Captains. 
Nicholas Greusel, Aurora; promoted. 
Samuel E. Lawyer, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

First Lieutenants. 
Samuel E. Lawyer, Aurora; promoted. 
Silas Miller, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

Second Lieutenants. 
Silas Miller, Aurora; promoted. 
Rufus P. Pattison, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

First Sergeant. 
George W. White, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

Sergeant. 
Benj. F. Campbell, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
George P. Douglas, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
John J. Aiken, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

Corporals. 
Henry A. Tittsworth, Aurora; mustered out as sergeant July 25. 1861. 
Charles R. White. Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 199 

George Prindle, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Fred H. Ollemacher. Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

Musicians. 
Henry A. Snell, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Joseph P. Wightman, Aurora ; promoted principal musician. 

Priz'atcs. 
Wm. H. Anderson, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Wm. H. Billings, Aurora; discharged June 3, 1861 ; disability. 
Albert N. Brown, Aurora; mustered out as corporal, July 25, 1861. 
Wm. Brown, Jr., Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Melville Bowers, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Albert Billings, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Jos. H. Bishop, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
C. A. Bamber, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
John F. Churchill. Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Henry Gushing, Aurora; discharged June 3, 1861. 
George Garman. Aurora; discharged June 3, 1861. 
John R. Dolan, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Robert Drain, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Samuel Ebbersall, Aurora: mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Charles Eppner, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Michael Flinn, Aurora, mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Thomas Flinn, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Patrick M. Fitzgerald, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Marcus D. Flowers, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Abner Fields. Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
John Fox. Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Jacj Gallagher, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Oscar Getman, Aurora ; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Andrew Golden, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
F. A. Gates, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
John A. Gronberg. Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Edwin Goodwin, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Frederick Hoff, Aurora; died at Atound City, June 23, 1861. 
F. N. Holden, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Jacob Hopper, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
John H. Hubbard, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Wm. Delos Hawkins. Aurora: mustered out July 25, 1861. 
James W. Harris. Aurora: mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Samuel Hitchcock, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. ■ 
John W. Kendall, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Frederick Knight. Aurora; mustered out July 25. 1861. 
Orvis C. Lathrop, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Joseph Loomis, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
George Meigs, Aurora; mustered out July 25. 1861. 
John N. Murray, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Robert Miller, Aurora: mustered out July 25. 1861. 



200 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Caleb Mayhew, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Ellihu Mayhew, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Rees L. Merriam, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Frank Morlett, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
George W. Moore, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
N. M. Moore, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
George W. Morton, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Thomas McConley, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Fred'k Nichols, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Oscar Pease, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Wm. H. Puffer, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Wm. W. Roberts, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Lewis Ruse, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
John M. Steele. Aurora; mustered out July 25. 1861. 
James A. Swain, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Fletcher J. Snow, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
William F. Schaffer, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
William Shies, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Harvey S. Seymour, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
George W. Vail, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
M. J. Walker, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Henry C. Williamson, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
LeRoy Waller, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Wm. A. Warner, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 186 1. 
F. W. Wells, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

Recruits. 
James Courtney, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Freman H. Goodwin, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
Emery D. Hazelton, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 
George W. Kiger, Aurora; mustered out July 25, 1861. 

SEVENTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 

(Three Years' Service.) 

Lieutenant Colonel. 
Nicholas Greusel, Aurora ; promoted colonel, Thirty-sixth Infantry. 

Major. 
Nicholas Greusel, Aurora ; promoted. 

Quarteriiiasfcr. 
William Brown, Jr., Aurora; died October 9, 1862; wounds. 

Regimental Band. 
First Class. 
Joseph M. Barden, St. Charles; mustered out August 27, 1862. 
John S. Cummings, St. Charles; mustered out August 27, 1862. 

Second Class. 
Samuel Clark, St. Charles; mustered out August 27, 1862. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 201 

Third Class. 
Phinias A. Walker, St. Charles: mustered out August 27, 1862. 
Moses G. Hascall. St. Charles; mustered out August 27, 1862. 
Thomas L. Johnson, St. Charles; mustered out August 27, 1862. 
Labra C. Spoore, St. Charles; mustered out August 27, 1862. 
Wm. H. McCracken, St. Charles; mustered out August 27, 1862. 
George Garren, St. Charles; mustered out August ij, 1862. 

COMPANY A. 

Captains. 
Samuel G. Ward, Elgin; killed at Shiloh, April 6, 1862. 
George F. Wheeler, Elgin; resigned December 31, 1862. 
Thomas McGuire, St. Charles; discharged March 12, 1865. 

First Lieutenants. 
Jonathan Kimball, Elgin; resigned February 5, 1862. 
Mason M. Marsh, Elgin; resigned November 22, 1861. 
Thomas McGuire, St. Charles; promoted. 

Second Lieutenants. 
Thomas McGuire, St. Charles; promoted. 
Charles T. Elliot, St. Charles; mustered out July 29, 1864. 

Sergeants. 
James R. Kinney, Elgin ; reported dead ; cause not given. 
George W. Wheeler, Elgin ; promoted captain. 
Thomas McGuire, St. Charles ; promoted second lieutenant. 
Charles T. Elliot, St. Charles; promoted second lieutenant. 

Corporals. 
Jacob C. Schneider, Dundee ; reenlisted as veteran. 
Charles Eppner, Aurora; discharged December 12, 1861 ; disability. 
Arthur N. Stone, Elgin ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Musician. 
Henry Snell, Aurora; transferred to Thirty-sixth Infantry. 

Privates. 
Oscar N. Adams, Elgin; discharged July 29, 1864. 
John Bradford, Elgin; died at home March 31, 1862. 
Eugene Bradford, Elgin. 

Robert Carmon, Elgin; mustered out June 8, 1865, as sergeant. 
Henry Carmichael. St. Charles; reenlisted as veteran. 
William H. Coleman, Elgin; discharged January 5, 1863; disability. 
William L. Gage, Elgin. 

George Gilbert, Elgin; died, Cairo; no date given. 
Henry C. Hassen, Elgin; reenlisted as veteran. 

Morris W. Hickey, St. Charles; mustered out July 29, 1861, as sergeant. 
John W. House, Geneva ; discharged July 29, 1864. 
John Hart, Hampshire; died at Fort Holt. November 7, 1861. 
Francis M. Hickox, Elgin. 

Walter J. Mallett, Elgin; mustered out June 8, 1865. 
Edward Orton, Elgin; discharged July 29, 1864. 
Michael O'Brien, Elgin; discharged July 29, 1864. 



202 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

George E. Silver, Elgin; mustered out July 29, 1864. as corporal. 

William Schaffer, Aurora; reeulisted as veteran. 

Charles Stone, Elgin. 

Johnson Thompson, Dundee. 

Lawrence J. Wheeler, Elgin; transferred to Eighth Illinois Cavalry. 

William Wheeler, Elgin; died at Elgin, August 2, 1861. 

Recruits. 
John Fitzgerald, Aurora; discharged October i, 1864. 
Richard M. Johnson, Elgin; discharged October i, 1864. 
George N. Sill, St. Charles. 

J^cterans. 
Henry Carmichael, Elgin; mustered out July 9, 1865. 
John R. Hundley, Elgin; mustered out July 9. 1865. 
Andrew Hughes, Elgin; absent; sick at muster out. 
William E. Lawless, Elgin; mustered out July 9, 1865. 
Francis D. Orcutt, Elgin; mustered out July 9, 1865. 
William C. Schaffer, Aurora; mustered out July 9, 1865. 
Arthur N. Stone, Elgin; discharged April 9, 1865. 
Jacob C. Schneider, Dundee; mustered out July 9, 1865. 

COMPANY B. 

Recruits. 
Edwin H. Hill, Elgin; mustered out July 9, 1865. 
John W. House, Geneva; discharged July 29. 1864. 
Walter J. Mallett, Elgin; mustered out June 8, 1865. 
Hiram Peterson, Elgin ; reenlisted ; promoted sergeant. 

COMPANY c. 

Captain. 
Samuel E. Sawyer, Aurora; discharged July 24, 1864. 

First Lieutenant. 
John H. Hubbard, Aurora; mustered out July 9, 1865. 

Second Lieutenant. 
John H. Hubbard, Aurora ; promoted. 

Sergeants. 
Judson Parks, Aurora. 
John H. Hubbard, Aurora ; promoted second lieutenant. 

Corporal. 
William H. Voorhees, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

JJ'agoner. 
Henry H. Showers, Aurora; died. Fort Holt, Kentucky, January 16, 
1862. 

Privates. 
Clark B. Alford, Aurora; killed at Corinth, October 3, 1862. 
Charles Blackman, Batavia; reenlisted as veteran. 
Frederick C. Bryant, Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 
Edgar Campbell, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 
Levi Casselman, Aurora. 
Alonzo Ecker, Aurora; died Fort Holt. Kentucky. January 27. 1862. 




BUSINESS DISTRICT. WEST ELGIN. 1866. 




VIEW OF ELGIN BUSINESS DISTRICT IN 1866. 



KANE OOUNTY HISTORY 205 

Joseph Kopf, Aurora. 

John Lemuel, Aurora; died, Camp Girardeau, September 14, 1861. 

Paul J. B. Marion, Sugar Grove. 

Eli McDaniels, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

Edward McNolty, Aurora; discharged July 24. 1864. 

Henry Nichboy, Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Oliver Rose, Aurora; discharged December 2-], 1861. 

Veterans. 
Thos. W. Billington, Virgil; killed at Rome, August 19, 1864. 
Charles Blackman, Batavia ; mustered out July 9, 1865. 
Edgar Baker, Aurora; mustered out July 8, 1865. 
Frederick C. Bryant, Aurora; mustered out July 9, 1865. 
Thomas J. Carpenter. Aurora; mustered out July 9, 1865, as corporal. 
John Fouke, Aurora; mustered out July 9, 1865. 
Jesse Hamilton, Aurora; mustered out July 9. 1865. 
Eli McDaniels, Aurora; mustered out July 9, 1865. 
Henry G. Nichboy, Aurora: mustered out Julv 9, 1865. 
Marcellus K. Snell, Aurora: mustered out Julv 9, 1865. 
James A. Tebay, Batavia; mustered out July 9, 1865. 

Recruits. 
Thomas Bentley, Aurora; mustered out May 19, 1865. 
H. Hammerschmidt, Aurora; mustered out July 9, 1865. 
Andrew Hellgoth, Aurora; killed. Allatoona, October 5, 1864. 
John Schmidt, Aurora; mustered out July 9, 1865. 
John Simon, Aurora; mustered out July 9, 1865. 
Charles Stealboldt, Aurora; mustered out July 9, 1865. 
Abraham Staley, Aurora; mustered out July 9, 1865. 
William Turner, Aurora; mustered out July 9, 1865. 
Charles Yews, Aurora; died, Rome, Ga., November i, 1864. 

Unassigned Recruits. 
Henry C. Bell, Aurora; died. Camp Butler, Illinois, April 11, 1864. 

EIGHTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY G. 

Drafted and Substitute Recruits. 
John Joyce, Aurora; mustered out October 20, 1865. 

HISTORY OF THIRTEENTH INFANTRY. 

The Thirteenth Regiment Illinois Infantry was one of the reo-iments 
organized under the act known as the Ten Regiment Bill. 

It was composed of companies as follows : "I" from Cook county, "H" 
from Kane county, "K" from DuPage county, "E" and "F" from DeKalb 
county, "A" and "C" from Lee county, "B" and "G" from Whiteside county, 
and "D" from Rock Island county. 

John B. Wyman, of Amboy, was elected colonel ; B. F. Parks, of Aurora, 
lieutenant colonel; and A. B. Georges, of Dixon, major. 



206 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

The regiment was mustered into the state service on the 21st day of 
April and into the United States service on the 24th day of Alay, 1861, for 
three years or during the war, by Captain John Pope, of the regular army, 
at Camp Dement, Dixon, Illinois. 

The Thirteenth was the first regiment organized from the then Second 
Congressional District of the state, and was composed of as good citizens as 
northern Illinois contained, many that enlisted as privates rising to field ofificers 
in later regiments. 

Its colonel, John B. Wayman, organized and commanded the "Chicago 
Light Guards," the first Crack Corps the Garden City ever had, and he soon 
brought the Thirteenth to a degree of proficiency in drill and soldierly deport- 
ment that was never excelled by any regiment with which it was afterwards 
associated. 

On the l6th of June it was ordered to Caseyville, Illinois, ten miles 
east of St. Louis, and on the 5th day of July it passed through St. Louis to 
Rolla, Missouri, where it remained until the spring of 1862. 

While stationed at Rolla it was engaged in guarding supply trains to and 
from General Lyon's army, in suppressing guerrilla bands in that part of the 
state, and was a part of General Fremont's force that went to Springfield. 
Missouri, in the fall of 1861, after General Price, when the regiment was well 
and favorably known as ''Fremont's Grey Hounds," a name given to them 
by General Fremont himself, on the evening the regiment joined his army at 
Bolivar, in splendid shape, after a day's march of forty-two miles. 

In 1862 it joined General Curtis' army at Pea Ridge, two hundred and 
fifty miles southwest of Rolla, and was with General Curtis in his memorable 
march from Pea Ridge to Helena, Arkansas, on the Mississippi river. 

It was a part of General Sherman's army in his attack upon Chickasaw 
Bayou, and from that time on became a part of the noted Fifteenth Army 
Corps, commanded so long by General Sherman in person. In the first day's 
assault at Chickasaw Bayou, Colonel W'yman was killed. The day following, 
it was a part of General F. P. Blair's brigade that distinguished itself by 
approaching nearer to the rebel works than any other command in that part 
of the field. The losses to the regiment on that day were 183 killed and 
wounded. It was present at the capture of Arkansas Post, after which it 
returned to Young's Point, opposite ^^icksburg. \\niile there General Steele's 
division, of which the Thirteenth was a part, made a very successful raid to 
Greenville, Mississippi, and up Deer creek, driving the rebels out of that 
region and destroying an immense quantit}' of corn intended for the rebel 
garrison at Vicksburo-. 



s> 



THIRTEENTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY B. 

Musician. 
George A. Hall. Batavia; transferred to invalid corps and mustered out 
June 18, 1864. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 207 

Privates. 
Edward E. Dunham, Geneva; mustered out June i8, 1864. 
Moses D. M. Hubbard, Sugar Grove; discharged February 6, 1862; 
disability. 

COMPANY E. 

Privates. 
John Trowbridge, Aurora; mustered out June t8, 1864. 

COMPANY F. 

Recruits. 
Abbott Merrill, Kaneville; mustered out June 18, 1864. 

COMPANY G. 

Recruits. 
Fred Babcock, St. Charles; mustered out June 18, 1864. 
John E. Clark, St. Charles; deserted March 9, 1862. 
Hiram C. Frisbie, St. Charles; died September 25, 1863. 
John O'Brien, St. Charles; mustered out June 8, 1865. 
Patrick Ponsonby, St. Charles; mustered out June 2, 1865. 
Samuel Pike, St. Charles; discharged October 31, 1862. 
George Rogers, St. Charles; mustered out June 18, 1864. 
Almon A. Stevens, St. Charles. 
Isaac Shipman, St. Charles; died October 13, 1863. 

COMPANY H. 

Captains. 
George H. Gardner, Aurora; dismissed, no pay, September 3, 1862; 
reinstated; died January 5, 1863. 

Edwin Went, Aurora; mustered out June 18, 1864. 

First Lieutenants. 
Edwin Went, Aurora; promoted. 
Ethan A. Pritchard, Aurora; mustered out June 18, 1864. 

Second Lieutenants. 
Ethan A. Pritchard, Aurora; promoted. 
Jesse D. Pierce, Aurora; mustered out June 18, 1864. 

First Sergeant. 
Jesse D. Pierce, Aurora ; promoted second lieutenant. 

Sergeants. 
William Larabe, Aurora; mustered out June 18, 1864. 
George E. Putnam, Aurora; mustered out June 18. 1864 as first sergeant. 
John Woodard, Aurora; discharged October 9, 1861. 

Corporals. 
Eley H. Holley. Aurora; mustered out June 18. 1864, as sergeant. 
George W. Meirs, Aurora; discharged March 25, 1864; disability. 
Malcomb G. Clark. Big Rock; mustered out June 18, 1864. 
Rodnev F. |av. Sugar Grove ; prisoner of war ; mustered out Tune 7, 
1865. 



208 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Henry K. Allison. Aurora: transferred to Illinois cavalry January 15, 

1864. 

Frank W. Whipple, St. Charles; mustered out June 18. 1864. as private. 

Musicians. 
Edwin \\'. Loomis. St. Charles: discharged January 10. 1863. 
Frank Brown. Aurora: deserted July 30. 1862. 

Privates. 
Lendrum Armstrong. Aurora; deserted May 4. 1863. 
Orrin \". Anderson, Aurora; mustered out June 18, 1864. 
Benjamin F. Brisben, Aurora; transferred to Illinois cavalry September 
I, 1863. 

Albert E. Beardsley, Aurora; mustered out June 18. 1864. 
Thomas L. Burt. Aurora; mustered out June 18. 1864. 
Eugene A. Brownell. St. Charles: mustered out June 18. 1864. 
Edwin H. Babcock. Aurora; died June 6, 1863. 
George Bankson. Aurora; discharged April 30. 1863. 
Thomas Bexton. Aurora; mustered out June 18. 1864. 
Alfred Barnes, Sugar Grove: prisoner of war; mustered out June 7, 
1865. 

George E. Conklin. St. Charles; prisoner of war; mustered out June 2, 
1865. 

Guy C. Clark. Big Rock; mustered out June 18. 1864. as corporal. 
\\'alter B. Corthell. Big Rock; mustered out June 18. 1864. 
Philander C. Costar. Aurora; mustered out June 18. 1864. 
William Cheetham. Aurora: mustered out June 18. 1864. 
Frank W. Gushing. Aurora; mustered out June 18, 1864. 
Edward L. Currier. St. Charles: prisoner of war; mustered out Tune 8, 
1865. 

Noah Sharp Cramer, Aurora; discharged October 21, 1862 ; Sen. G. C. M. 
Bartley Dein. Aurora; mustered out June 18, 1864. 
Peter Dougdale. Aurora: mustered out April 22, 1863: disability. 
Waterman DaLee. Aurora; mustered out June 18, 1864. 
John Eddy, St. Charles; mustered out June 18, 1864. 
Edwin M. Emerson. Aurora : transferred to second lieutenant to Tenth 
Missouri Cavalry. 

John E. Foster. Big Rock: discharged April 25. 1862; disability. 
John Fisher. Big Rock; deserted January 20. 1863. 
Barney Hines. Aurora; discharged August 12. 1863; disability. 
Henry M. Harmes. Sugar Grove: deserted January 20. 1863. 
James H. Huntoon. Aurora; deserted January 20. 1863. 
John Hall, Aurora: discharged January 11. 1863: disability. 
John 'M. Jolley. Aurora; transferred to Illinois Cavalry. March 15. 1864 
Henry H. Johnson, Big Rock: transferred to Illinois Cavalry. Januan 
15, 1864. 

Robert S. Johnson, Aurora; mustered out June 18. 1864. as corporal 
Eldorado Knight. St. Charles; mustered out June 18. 1864. 
Randolph Morton. Aurora; mustered out July 18. 1865. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 209 

James McGuire, Aurora; discharged August 19, 1861. 
Charles Pelan, Aurora; mustered out June 18, 1864, as sergeant. 
Josepli C. PauHn, Aurora; died December 8, 1861. 
Lemuel Purdy, Aurora; mustered out June 18, 1864. 
George B. Robinson, Aurora; transferred as hospital steward to non- 
commissioned staff, October 8, 1863. 

Frederick Rink, x-\urora; mustered out June 18, 1864, as corporal. 
Marcus E. Sherman, Aurora; died December 30, 1862. 
Mathias Siegfried. Aurora; mustered out June 18, 1864. 
George W. Smith, Aurora; discharged March 5, 1862. 
John A. Sohnley. Aurora; died January 21, 1863; wounds. 
Edwin Sheehey, Aurora; mustered out June 18, 1864. 
Christopher C. Scraft'ord, Aurora; discharged September 8, 1863. 
Steward B. Strong. Aurora; discharged July 29, 1862. 
Christopher Schafer. Aurora; mustered out June 18. 1864. 
Emil Sier, Aurora; died February 5, 1862. 
Nelson Terrill. Aurora; died October 28, 1861. 
Peter Thompson, Aurora; discharged September 12, 1862. 
Arthur B. \\'est. Sugar Grove; mustered out June 18, 1864. 
Dexter L. Watson, Aurora; died January 11, 1863; wounds. 
George W. Young, St. Charles; mustered out June 18, 1864. 

Recruits. 

Henry Bonon, Aurora; died April 29, 1864. 

Joseph Everard, Aurora; mustered out June 18, 1864. 

Emil Kotha, Aurora; died June 12, 1863; wounds. 

Orville B. Merrill, Aurora; transferred as lieutenant to Thirty-sixth 
Illinois Infantry, September 17, 1861. 

John H. Steel, Aurora; wounded December 29. 1862; in hospital. 

Abram \'an Riper, Aurora. 

Smith S. \\'ard, Kaneville; promoted captain Fifty-second Illinois, August 
2, 1861. 

Wharton L. White, Blackberry; died September 20, 1861. 

Newton Wells, .Aurora; mustered out June 18. 1864. 

COMP.\NY I. 

Prkvtc. 
Phillip H. Carr, Dundee; discharged September 19, 1861 ; blind. 

Recruits. 
Cyrus Golden, Aurora; discharged September 26, 1862; disability. 
Jacob H. Quant, Aurora; mustered out June 7, 1865. 
George C. Wood, Aurora; discharged August 23, 1862; disability. 

COMPANY K. 

Privates. 
James P. Gillespie, Aurora; mustered out June 18. 1864. as corporal. 
Hiram Slate, Aurora; transferred to Tenth Missouri Cavalry. October i, 
1861. 



210 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

FOURTEENTH (REORGANIZED) INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY I. 

Privates. 
Ovid B. Smith, Rutland; mustered out June 19, 1865. 
Cornelius B. Vaugh, Rutland; mustered out September 16, 1865, as 
corporal. 

George W. Wright, Rutland; sick at muster-out. 

FIFTEENTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

Drum Major. 
Nicholas Wolaver, Dundee. 

COMPANY D. 

Privates. 
Marshall Stephens, Hampshire; discharged October 16, 1862; disability 
Henry E. Stephens, Hampshire; mustered out May 24, 1864. 
Robert Williams, Hampshire; mustered out May 24, 1864. 

COMPANY F. 

Corporal. 
John W. Davenport, Dundee; died November 24, 1863. 

Privates. 
George Lock. Dundee; mustered out May 24, 1864. 
James AVollaver. Dundee; discharged August 13, 1861. 
Nicholas Wollaver. Dundee; transferred to N. C. S. ; drum major. 

Unassigned Recruit. 
William H. Rowe, St. Charles. 

FIFTEENTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY D. 

Private. 
Henry Gates, Elgin; died at Bacon Creek, Kentucky, January 23, 1862. 

COMPANY E. 

Recruits. 
Peter F. Guthrie, St. Charles; mustered out July 9, 1864, as sergeant. 
Henry C. Matteson. St. Charles : promoted hospital steward. 
Henry C. Young. St. Charles; discharged October 27, 1863; disability. 
TWENTIETH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY G. 

Drafted and Substitute Recruits. 
John Hanson, Campton; substitute; never reported to company; drafted. 



KAXE COUNTY TTTsTORY 211 

COMPANY K. 

Recruits. 
Nathaniel P. Barnard. Aurora: mustered out July i6, 1865. 
Luman C. Preston. Aurora; mustered out July 16, 1865. 
Fayette Schofield. Aurora; mustered out July 16, 1865. 

Unassigiicd Recruits. 
Nathaniel Barnnino, Aurora. 

TWENTY-THIRD INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY c. 

Recruits. 
John Durand, St. Charles: discharged March 19, 1S63. 
George Durand, St. Charles : reenlisted as veteran. 
Charles Lake, St. Charles; discharged; minor. 
John Vermor. Geneva; died October 22, 1862. 

COMPANY H. 

First Lieutenant. 
Anthony ^IcBriarty. Elgin; mustered out September 14, 1864. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Anthony McBriarty. Elgin ; promoted. 

TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY c. 
Corporal. 
Julius Beinsdorf, Aurora; mustered out August 6, 1864. 

Privates. 
Jno. G. Battenshlag, Aurora: deserted December 20. 1861. 
Jacob Echenberger, Aurora; mustered out August 6, 1864. 

TWENTY-SINTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 

( Three Years' Service. ) 

COMPANY' E. 

Private. 
David Cothrin. Rutland; deserted August 18. 1862. 

COMPANY' H. 

Musician. 
John H. Dodge. Aurora; deserted February i, 1863. 

THIRTY-FIRST INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY I. 

Recruits. 

Andrew ^liller, Aurora: mustered out July 19. 1865. 



212 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

THIRTY-SECOND INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY K. 

Veteran. 
George W. C'pton, Dundee: mustered out September i6. 1865. 

THIRTY'-THIRD INFANTRY REGi:\IENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMP.\XV A. 

Prizrate. 

Charles A. Barrows. Elgin: transferred to Invalid Corps. Januarv 14. 
1864. 

COMPANY B. 

Sergeant. 
Alfred C. Cambridge. Elgin: deserted March 17, 1863. 

Recruits. 
Henry Ankel. Sugar Gro\e; mustered out October i. 1865. 
Joseph Albee, Sugar Grove: mustered out October i. 1865. 

COMPANY D. 

Recruits. 
James D. Brower. Sugar Grove: mustered out Octolier i. 1865. 
John ]\Ioore, Sugar Grove; mustered out October 4. 1865. 

COMPANY F. 

Recruits Transferred from One Hundred and Tieenty-fourth Illinois Infantry. 
Edwin M. Benedict. Batavia: mustered out November 24. 1865. 
John H. Cleveland, Batavia; mustered out Xovember 24. 1865. 
Josiah L. Coolidge. Batavia; mustered out Xovember 24. 1865. 
David Dean, Batavia; mustered out Xovember 24, 1865. 
Michael Davis. Batavia; mustered out Xovember 24, 1865. 
Edward F. Fish. Batavia; mustered out X'ovember 24. 1865. 
Francis F. Joy. Virgil; mustered out X'ovember 24, 1865. 
Russell L. Massee. Batavia; mustered out X'ovember 24, 1865. 
\'alentine McDonald. Batavia; mustered out X'ovember 24. 1865 
\\illiam H. Price. Batavia; mustered out Xovember 24, 1865. 
Cyrus R. Roff. Batavia; mustered out Xoveml^er 24. 1865. 
Clark Wood. Batavia; mustered out X'ovember 24. 1865. 

Unassigned Recruits. 
Lewis Baker, Rutland. 
Royal Robinson. Rutland. 

THIRTY-FOURTH IXFAXTRY REGIMEXT. 
(Three Y'ears' Service.) 

COMPANY c. 

Recruits Transferred fro)n One Hundred and Fourth Illinois Infantry. 
Walter Ketchum. Rutland ; never reported to company. 
George Roller. Rutland; mustered out July 12. 1865. 
George ^'ermett. Rutland: mustered out July 12. 1865. 




THE ISLAND IN AX EARLY DAY— AURORA. 
Now Occ-upied by the Postoffice. City Hall, G. A. R. Hall and Other 

Prominent Buildins:?. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 215 

THIRTY-FIFTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 

(Three Years' Service.) 

Surgeon. 

Sidney B. Hawley. St. Charles; mustered out September 27, 1864. 

HISTORY OF THIRTY-SINTH INFANTRY. 

The Thirty-sixth Infantry, IlHnois Volunteers, was organized at Camp 
Hammond, near Aurora, Illinois, by Colonel N. Greusel, and was mustered 
into the service by Colonel Brackett, United States mustering officer, Sep- 
tember 21,. i8(5i, for a term of three years, or during the war. The regiment 
numbered nine hundred and sixty-five officers and enlisted men, and had two 
companies of cavalry ("A" and "B"j, one hundred and eighty-six officers 
and men. On September 24, moved via Quincy, Illinois, to St. Louis, Mis- 
souri, where the companies of infantry were armed. Companies "A" and "B" 
receiving Minie and Enfield rifles, the other companies remodeled Spring- 
field muskets, caliber 69. On September 28 left St. Louis by rail for RoUa, 
Missouri, leaving the cavalry at Benton barracks. Went into camp at Rolla 
September 29, remaining there until January 14, 1862, the time being taken 
up with severe drill, camp and postguard duty, and an occasional scout. 
Left Rolla January 14, 1862, for Springfield, Missouri, the Thirty-fifth, Forty- 
fourth and Thirty-sixth Illinois Infantry, and Twenty-fifth Missouri Infantry 
composing the brigade commanded by Colonel Osterhaus. Passed through 
Springfield on the 14th of February, halted on the 22d and remained for a 
few days near Bentonville, Arkansas. Companies "B" and "K" participated 
in the fight at that place March 6; was engaged in the battles at Leetown 
March 7 and Pea Ridge March 8; went into camp at Keitsville, Missouri, 
after the fight. Broke camp April 5 and started for Batesville, Arkansas, 
reaching that point May 3. Here the regiment was transferred to the com- 
mand of General Asboth, who started with his command from Batesville for 
Cape Girardeau. Missouri, May 11. arriving on the 22d. On the 23d 
embarked on a boat for Hamburg Landing, Tennessee, marching out to 
Corinth. Mississippi, on the 29th. On evacuation of Corinth marched to 
Booneville and from there to Rienzi. remaining there until September 6; 
then ordered to Cincinnati ; went into camp in Covington, Kentucky. From 
there ordered to Louisville, arriving September 19; was assigned to General 
Sheridan's division. Started October i on the Kentucky campaign, marching 
via Bardstown and Springfield to Perryville, at which place it was engaged 
October 8. Mo\-ed thence in pursuit of Bragg via Danville and Lancaster to 
Crab Orchard, returning via Lancaster, Danville, Lebanon, Newmarket, Cave 
City and Bowling Green to Nasln-ille. near which place it encamped November 
8. Remaining in camp at this place, "Seven Mile Creek" and "Mill Creek" 
until December 26, the regiment broke camp and started on the Murfreesboro 
campaign. On December 31 took part in the battle of Stone River. After 
the battle and evacuation of ^lurfreesboro went into camp on the bank of 
Stone river, on the Shell)y\-ille pike, where it remained until June 24, 1862. 
The regiment then took part in the Tullahoma campaign, participating in the 
skirmishes incident to the dri\'ing of Bragg's armv nut of middle Tennessee. 



21() KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Reached Cuwan July 3. where it went into camp ami remained until July 30. 
when it hrdke camp and marched to Bridgeport, Alabama. Went into camp 
and assisted in bridging the Tennessee ri\'er, preparatory to crossing and 
entering upon the Chattanooga campaign. Crossed the river September 2. 
anil being in McCook's corps, marched to Broomtown valley, crossing LcK)k- 
ont mountain through ^^"inston"s Gap. Here iMcCook was ordered to join 
Thomas, which he did by a forced march of forty-si.x miles. The regiment 
took part in the battle of Chickamauga September 20 and retired via Ross- 
ville with the .'irmy into Chattanooga, sharing with the rest of the army in its 
privations during the siege. The regiment took an active part in the battle 
of Missionary Ridge Novemlier 25. 1863. its colors being among the first 
planted on the Ridge. On the 28th started under Sheridan for Knoxville, 
Tennessee, to relieve Burnside. Reached that point December 6. Moving 
out on the 12th, marched to tlifferent points east of Kno-x\ille until it 
bivouacked in midwinter at Blain"s Cross Roads on the 17th. Reenlisting 
at this place January i, 1864, the regiments started January 6 for Chatta- 
nooga to arrange details of muster for new term of service, preparatory to 
veteran furlough. Returning, left Naslnille. Tennessee, March 26, for Chat- 
tanooga, marching nearly the entire route. May 3 started on the Atlanta 
campaign ; was under fire almost daily, with quite severe fighting at Rocky 
Face Ridge, Resaca, Adairsville, New Hope Church, Kenesaw Mountain, 
Peach Tree Creek and Jonesboro, marching into Atlanta September 8. On 
September 2'^ was ordered back to Chattanooga, leaving that place on the 2d 
of October in pursuit of Hood ; marched to Ringgold, Shell ]\Iijund, White- 
side, Gordon Mills, Summerville, Alpine, Huntsville. Decatur, Athens, Pulaski, 
Columbia, Spring Hill and Franklin, being rear guard and under fire ahiKist 
continuously from Spring Hill to Franklin. It was there engaged in the 
hottest of that memorable battle. General Thomas personally thanking the' 
regiment for its bravery and gallantry in that fight. The First Brigade, to 
which it belonged. Colonel Opdyke commanding, charged the rebel lines, and 
at different periods in the action captured thirty-three { 33 ) stands of colors, 
and on the night of November 30 was the last to cross the bridge over the 
Harpeth ri\-er on retiring from the field for Nash\'ille, which place it reached 
on the afternoon of December i. The regiment was placed in position on 
the Hillsboro and Granny M'hite Pikes. Was engaged in the battle of Nash- 
ville December 15 and 16, and captured a battery and over one hundred 
prisoners on the 15th. On the retreat of Bragg the regiment joined in pur- 
suit December 17, passing through Brentwood to Franklin, thence to Columbia 
and Pulaski, reaching Lexington on December 28. Leaving there on the 
31st, passed through Athens on the 5th of January, 1865. reaching Hunts^•ille 
on the 6th, where the regiment built barracks and went into winter quarters 
Leaving Huntsville March 28, proceeded by rail to Chattanooga, from thence 
through east Tennessee. Marching from Bull's Gap. went into camp at Blue 
Springs April 4. AMiile in camp at this place the regiment received, on the 
night of April 10. the news of Lee's surrender, and, in the same camp, April 
15, news of the assassination of President Lincoln. Orders were then received 
to return to Nashville, the regiment marching from Blue Springs to Bull's 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 217 

Gap, where it boarded a train and returned to Xaslnille \-ia Kno.wille and 
Chattanooga. Remained there until June 15. wlien it proceeded by rail to 
[olinsonville, on the Tennessee river, where it was placed on transports, 
under orders for New Orleans, Louisiana, reaching that point June 23. At 
the special request of General Sheridan, the Thirty-sixth was detailed for 
headquarters and other special duty, thereby receiving from other troops the 
sobriquet, "Sheridan's pet." The regiment did special duty quelling dis- 
turbances, guarding paymasters and conveying rebel archives captured in the 
West, to Washington, D. C., until October 8. on which date it was mustered 
out of service and jiroceeded to Springfield, Illinois, received pay, and disbanded 
October 27, 1865. 

In general engagements alone the Thirty-sixth ( Infantry ) Regiment 
lost in killed and wounded over seven hundred men. It was reinforced by 
two liundred and twenty-one recruits and drafted men. It marched and was 
transported by rail and boat over ten thousand miles during its term of 
service. Changed commanding officers ten times, yet it maintained through- 
out its term of service the esprit de corps of its original organization. 

The regimental cnmmanders ha\e been Colonel Nicholas Greusel, Lieu- 
tenant Colonel Ed. Joslyn, Colonel Silas ]\liller, Lieutenant Colonel Albert 
Jenks, Lieutenant Colonel Porter C, Olson, Captain J. B. McNeil, Captain 
Wm, Mitchell, Company "A" ; Major L. P. Holden, of the Eighty-eighth 
Illinois Infantry, assigned by Colonel .Opdyke, brigade commander. Major 
Holden was relieved by Captain Geo. \\'. Mossman, Compau)' F, on his pro- 
motion to major, who was hiniself relie\ed by Lieutenant Colc^mel B. E. 
Campbell, assuming command and retaining the same until the regiment was 
mustered out of the service. 

The brigade commanders have been Colonels Osterhaus, Hausendifel. 
Knoblesdorf and Greusel, General Sill, Colonel E. T. Sherman, General 
W. H. Lytle, General Nathan Kimball and Colonel Opdyke. 

Division commanders. Generals Sigel, Asboth. JefT. C. Da\is, G(jrdon 
Granger, Sheridan, Newton, Wagner and Elliott. 

Corps commanders. Generals Curtis, Pope, Gilbert, McCook, Granger, 
Howard, Stanley, Thos. J. Wood, 

Department commanders. Generals Eremont, Hunter, Halleck, Wright, 
Nelson, Buell, Rosecrans, Thomas and Sheridan. 

Companies "A" and "B" Cavalry. After receiving arms at Benton bar- 
racks they joined the regiment at Rolla, Missouri ; made occasional scouts 
until late in December, when they started upon an expedition under General 
Carr in the direction of Springfield, Missouri. Early in February joined the 
army of General Curtis, made several expeditions with General Asboth ; 
moved to Osage Springs, thence into the Indian Territory with General 
Sigel. Returning was with him in fight at Bentonville, March 6, Leetown, 
March 7, and Pea Ridge, March 8. Thence moved to Batesville, and about 
May I started with General Jeff C. Davis to Cape Girardeau, Missouri, 
Thence by boat moved to Hamburg Landing, Tennessee ; thence to Corinth, 
Mississippi, Company A being assigned to General Schuyler Hamilton and 
Company B to General Gordon Granger as escorts ; subsequently Company B 



218 KAXK rorXTY HISTORY 

to General Rosecrans and then to General Mitchell, moving into Alabama. 
The companies never again serving in the same departments, they will be 
given separate reports. 

Company A was soon transferred to General Rosecrans' headquarters 
and remained with him through the battles of luka and Corinth, then to 
General C. S. Hamilton and with him to ilemphis; thence as escort to General 
Lauman to \"icksburg. May 17. The company was in action near Greenville, 
and was on expedition to Haines' Bluff. Joined Grant's army on Big Black 
river, thence moved with Sherman's army to Jackson. July 25 embarked for 
New Orleans; was in action at Morganzia Bend in General Heron's division. 
Went to the Techs country; was in action with General Dick Taylor and 
General Kirby Smith. On General Banks' expedition to Red river with 
General Lee; returned to Xew Orleans and was consolidated as Company I, 
Fifteenth Illinois Cavalry. Sent to regiment at Helena, Arkansas, January- 
25, 1865. Gloved to Brownsville. Again consolidated as Company "M. 
Tenth Illinois Cavalry, and returned to Xew Orleans. In June embarked 
for Shreveport. July, started on march to San Antonio. Texas. Remained 
until November 22 and moved via Galveston. Xew Orleans and Cairo to 
.Springfield. Illinois, and received final muster out and discharge January 6. 
1866. Company commanders have been Captain Albert Jenks. Lieutenant 
Samuel B. Sherer. Lieutenant Azariah C. Ferre. Captain George A. Willis 
and Captain Daniel Dynan. 

Company B Cavalry, upon joining General Buell's army was transferred 
from General ]SIitchell to General Carlin and marched through Alabama. 
Georgia, Tennessee and Kentucky to Louisville, returning through Kentucky 
W'ith General Carlin. \\"as in battle of Perryville (first to enter the town) 
and in action at Lancaster and near Crab Orchard. Countermarched to Cave 
City, thence to Bowling Green, thence to Edgefield via Tyree Springs, where 
had an engagement with General John ^lorgan, and also the. following day 
at Shackle Island. \\'as in a cavalry action at Hepworth Shoals (special 
mentioned by General Rosecrans). Then assigned as escort to General Jeff 
C. Davis. Camped near X'ashville December 26, led the advance of McCook's 
corps to Xolensville (complimented by McCook and Davis personally, and 
official reports). Crossed Overall's Creek and was in cavalry fight with 
Colonel Stokes. Was in battle of Stone River; with Davis" e.xpedition to 
Eaglesville. \'ersai]les and Franklin. Had cavalry action at \'ersailles. Rover, 
Franklin and A\'alnut Church. In June. 1863. transferred as escort to Gen- 
eral T. L. Crittenden and marched with him to Stevenson. Alabama, then to 
Chattanooga. Tennessee, and on to Ringgold. Georgia, back to Crawfish 
Springs. Had cavalry engagement at Rossville and Ringgold. Was in the 
battle of Chickamauga. then marched back to Chattanooga. Generals ]\IcCook 
and Crittenden subsequently being relieved, the company escorted them to 
Stevenson. Returned to Chattanooga, assigned to General Thomas' head- 
quarters. Took seven hundred starving horses and mules to Stevenson, 
returned to Chattanooga. Assigned to General Hooker as escort, marched to 
Stevenson, thence via Whiteside to ^^'auhtehie and camped in Lookout vallev. 
By order war dejiartment transferred as Company K. Fifteenth Ilhnois 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 219 

Cavalry. In battles of Lookuut [Mountain. ^Missionary Ridge and Ringgold; 
returning to Lookout \'alley, camped until the spring of 1864. Was escort 
to General Hooker in Atlanta campaig'n; charged across and saved a burning- 
bridge over Pumpkinvine creek (special mention). General Hooker being 
relieved by General Howard, the company went through with him to the sea 
as escort and scouts. Was in action at Rome, Adairsville, Resaca, Snake 
Creek Gap, Taylor's Ridge, Lafayette, Greysville, Lynch's Creek, Mt. Elon 
and Fayetteville. Captain \Vm. Duncan was twice taken prisoner, but escaped. 
With five men he received the surrender of Milledgeville with General Howard 
thirty miles away. With two men he floated down the Ogeechee river in a 
dugout past Ft. McAllister out into the bay and thus opened communication 
between Sherman and Dahlgren. ^^lustered out September 23, 1865. Com- 
pany commanders have been : Captain Henry A. Smith, Lieutenant Francis 

E. Reynolds, Captain Samuel B. Sherer, Lieutenant John A. McQueen and 
Captain William Duncan. 

REUNION OF 1908. 

Veterans of the Civil war — members of the Thirty-sixth Regiment, Illi- 
nois Volunteers — celebrated the forty-sixth aimiversary of the battle of 
Chickamauga Creek and held their annual reunion in Elgin today. Men from 
ever}- part of the country, some of them coming nearly a thousand n-iiles, 
attended the session, which was one of the most interesting ever held. 

The following officers elected at the annual meeting : 

President — Fred Sly, Sandwich. 

Vice President — John C. Taylor. 

Secretary and Treasurer — William F. Sylla, Elgin. 

Following met-nbers of the regiment registered at City Clerk Sylla's 
office prior to the meeting in the city hall council chamber : 

Company A — Major George D. Sherman, Milton S. Townsend, \\'illiam 

F. Sylla, John Hewitt, F. B. Perkins, Charles B. Stiles, all of Elgin, and 
Albert C. Wagher, Linton, S. D. ; C. C. Truax, Crystal Lake; Homer Wilcox, 
Marengo: J. C. Denison, Chicago; John F. Scott, Pittsfield. Ill; Brayman 
Loveless, \Mieaton, and John Carl, Aurora ; Alexander Manahan, Elgin ; John 
Cooper, Yorkville; E. H. Young, Fulton; J. C. Hall and Ed Harpending. 

Coi-npany A (Cavalry) — A. R. Gillette, Chicago; W. D. Hawkins, Chi- 
cago, aiid Nicholas Hettinger, Aurora ; Thomas Robinson, Aurora ; J. T. 
McCroskey, Joliet; Eugene Mann. Batavia ; J. S. Barber, Sandwich. 

Company B (Cavalry) — James Shedden. Dundee; W. F. Wattenpugh, 
Sumner, Iowa; Lloyd Lathrop, Elgin; \\ O. Wilcox, Elgin; A. A. Lee, 
Elgin; John McQueen. Elgin; Frank U. Brown, Chicago; James S. Hutch. 
Piano; E. E. Balch, Elgin; Willis Richardson, LaFox; Willet Richardson, 
Kaneville ; John P. Fyfe, Ravenswood Park. 

Company B — W. F. Donavan, Yorkville; J. E. Way, Aurora. 

Company C — Joseph A. Young, New Galilee, Pennsylvania ; Abraham 
Stewart and ^^'. H. Rogers, Monmouth, Illinois; Major John M. Turnliull, 
Monmouth. 



220 KANE COUNTY HISTOEY 

Company D — Olie H. Johnson. Newark; John Larkin, Joliet; J. C. 
Taylor. Sandwich : W. W. Gifford, Johet ; John Heier, Morris ; Frank T. 
Hennig. Cliicago. 

Company E — J. F. Harrah Aurora; W'ilHam Wollenwel^er, Yorkville; 
Henrv Hennis, Sandwich ; Charles Foster, Piano, and Joel \\'agner, Big Rock. 

Company F — T. L. Munn, Parker, Kansas; G. A. Cummings, Edina, 
Missouri; C. 'SI. Rolph, Seneca. Illinois; G. Gunnerson, Herscher, Illinois; 
Terrence Johnson, Newark; Bergo Thompson, Sheridan; Fred L. Sly, Sand- 
ivich; Martin Wilson, Aurora; F. A. Whitney, Sandwich; Charles F. Sweet- 
land, Sandwich; E. H. Strait, Ottawa; William Browning. Sandwich. 

Company G — Wallace Ellis, Seneca; W. W. Kerns, Morris; Joseph 
Scofield, Morris ; Charles Pratt, Rochelle. 

Company H — Henry B. Ford, Elgin; C. H. Benson, Maywood; S. 
Carver, Omro, Wisconsin ; B. E. Allen. Laurens, Iowa ; Charles Dygert, 
Algonquin; C. H. Thomas, Chicago. 

Company I — Joseph M. Comp. \\'interset, luwa; Hohart Doctor, St. 
Johns, Indiana. 

Company K — Harrison Blank, \Vinthrop. Iowa ; C. H. Tucker. Belyi- 
dere; Hiram Watkins, St. Charles; John F. Elliott. St. Charles. 

MEMBERS IN MANY ENG.AGEMENTS. 

Northern Illinois' Thirty-sixth Infantry is named by authorities as one 
of the eighty regiments participating in the greatest number of engagements 
and losing the most men in battle in the Civil war. The regiment was com- 
posed of ten infantry companies and two troops of cavalry, all told twelve 
hundred men. The regiment returned from the struggle with less than half 
their number. The others died on the battlefields of Pea Ridge. Perryville,. 
Stone River. Chickamauga Creek. Mission Ridge, Kenesaw Mountain. Frank- 
lin, Nashville, Vicksburg and Atlanta, the principal contests in which the 
regiment participated. 

Regrets were received from the following comrades : 

John B. Burr, Company .A, Davenport, Iowa. 

Wm. Varnes. Company I. Oswego. Illinois. 

W. A. Mitchell, captain Company A. \\'ilmington. Illinois. 

G. ^^^ Mossman. Company F, Las Cinces, New ]\Iexico. 

John Bush. Company E. Table Rock. Nebraska. 

John Pfanstiel, captain Company E, East Oakland, California. 

James Warrensford, Company A, Dahinda, Illinois. 

\\'illiam W. Trimble, Company H. Glencoe. Oklahoma. 

William Smailes. Company A. South Haven, ^Michigan. 

Henrv Russell. Company A, Avoca, Iowa. 

Robert H. Gilmore. Company D, Hastings. Nebraska. 

Robert Jordan, Company G. Elk City, Oklahoma. 

Henry C. Scott, Company B. Folsom, California. 

George F. Roots, Company F. ]Manhattan. Kansas. 

C. H. Bissell. Company D. Mena, Arkansas. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 221 

Albert H. W'ulff, Company F, Fredericksburg. Missouri. 

Duportal G. Sampson. Company A, Asbland, Wisconsin. 

Alfred J. West, Company B, Port Huron. Michigan. 

William C. Hall. Company K. Madeira, California. 

G. S. Hollenbeck. Company F, Chebanse, Illinois. 

C. F. Dike, Company H, Nunda, Illinois. 

W. E. Partridge, Company F, Alta, Iowa. 

N. H. Clark, Company I, Knoxville, Illinois. 

J. C. Wright, Company C, Aledo, Illinois. 

M. G. Yarnell, Company G, Minneapolis. 

Irwin Benton, A Cavalry, Redding, Iowa. 

J. Henry Hogue. Company K, Monmouth. Illinois. 

Alex M. Friland. Company F, Fedora, South Dakota. 

John D. Pingel. Company B, Sedgwick, Kansas. 

A. G. Switzer. A Cavalry, Wales, Massachusetts. 

E. B. Baldwin, captain Compan}' C. Edna. Kansas. 

Eben Gates, Company D, Brook, Indiana. 

John W^. Evarts, A Cavalry, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

E. Nute, Company A, Alta, Iowa. 

E. H. Stinson, Company C, Hampton, Iowa. 
J. H. Moore, Company A, Chicago. 

H. E. Dewey, Company E, Lead; South Dakota. 

W. H. Mossman. Comj^any F. Ellensburg, Washington. 

John P. Lloyd, Necedah, Wisconsin. 

N. G. Curly, Company G, Osage City, Kansas. 

Hamlet Levens, Company E, Hancock, Minnesota. 

Thos. C. Penningtcm. Company B, cavalry, Chicago. 

F. N. Brown, Company B, cavalry, Chicago. 
Geo. W. Hulse. Company G, Gladbrook, Iowa. 
Edward Leahy. Company B, Ashland, Illinois. 
Schuyler Rue, Company B. cavalry, Oregon City. Oregon. 
Daniel C. Clark. Company H. Magnolia. Iowa. 

Christ Wentz, Company I, Belle Plaine, Iowa. 

Wm. Freese, Company I, Bailey's Harbor, W'isconsin. 

John Larking. Company D. Joliet, Illinois. 

E. H. Strait, Ottawa. Illinois. 

Chas. Pratt, Rochelle, Illinois. 

J. F. McCroskey, Joliet, Illinois. 

Joel Wagner, Big Rock. Illinois. , 

Gustavus Dorsterwitz, Coloma, Michigan. 

C. A. Tucker, Belvidere, Illinois. 

J. F. Young. New Galilee. Pennsylvania. 

Emery Pratt, Waukon, Iowa. 

From early morning until noon the white-haired veterans came to the 
city. Many who joined the Thirty-sixth in Kane county when the call to 
arms was sounded now live many miles away. Among the visitors from great 
distance were A. C. Wagher. of Linton, North Dakota ; J. F. Young, of New 



222 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Galilee, Pennsyhania, and T. L. Aluiin, of Parker, Kansas. Mr. Young was 
a drummer boy in Company C and shook hands with his old comrades today 
for the first time since the regiment was mustered out of the service. 

DRUMMER STILES BE.\TS .'\SSEMBLV. 

Charles B. Stile*, of this city, the drummer of Company A, composed 
chiefly of Elgin men, played his drum at an upper window in the city hall and 
at II o'clock the veterans assembled for their meeting. Major George D. 
Sherman, of Elgin, president of the society, called the meeting to order and 
for several minutes letters of regret from conn-ades living at too great a 
distance to attend were read. 

The thanks of the Thirty-sixth was voted Captain L. M. Kelley, chief 
deputy in the department of pensions, for his assistance in collecting the names 
of the living members. There are now but a few hundred left of more than 
a thousand who enlisted from this vicinity. 

THIRTY-SIXTH INF.VNTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 
Colonels. 
Nicholas Greusel, Aurora; resigned February 7. 1863. ' 
Silas Miller. Aurora: died at Nashville, July 27, 1864. 
Benjamin F. Cam])])ell, Aurora: nnistered out October 8, 1865, as lieu- 
tenant colonel. 

Licutciiaut Colonels. 
Edward S, Joslyn, Elgin: resigned .\ugust 20, 1862. 
Albert Jenks, Aurora; resigned February 24, 1S63. 
Benjamin F. Campbell, Aurora; promoted. 

Majors. 
Alonzo H. Berry, St. Charles; discharged September 7, 1862. 
Silas Miller, Aurora ; promoted colonel. 
George D. Sherman, Elgin; mustered out December 12. 1864. 

Adjiitants. 
George A. Willis, Aurora ; promoted captain Company A, Fifteenth 

Cavalrv. „ , , 

(Jiiartcnnastcrs. 

Isaac K. Buck, Elgin: resigned March 3, 1862. 

Surgeons. 

Delos W. Young. Aurora: resigned Feliruary jt,. 1863. 

Jethro A. Hatch, .Aurora; mustered out October 8, 1865. 

First Assistant Surgeons. 

Sidney B. Hawley, Aurora; resigned September 3, 1862. 

Jethro A. Hatch. Aurora ; promoted surgeon. 

Second Assistant Surgeons. 

Jethro A. Hatch, Aurora ; promoted. 

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

Sergeant Majors. 
Fred A. Raymond, Elgin ; reduced and returned to Company A. 
Leslie P. Ticknor, Elgin; mustered out September 22, 1864. 




BRIDGE AT CHICAGO STREET, ELGIN. 




PARK, ELGIN, ABOUT 1860. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 225 

Oiiarf^'niiiistcr Sergeants. 
Addison A. Keyes, Elgin ; reduced and returned to Company A. 
Charles W. Rhodes. Aurora; mustered out September 22, 1864. 

Hospital StezK'ards. 
John H. Karl, Aurora; discharged July 22. 1862; disability. 

Principal Musicians. 
Thomas P. Matteson, Aurora; mustered out March 3, 1863. 

COMPANY A. 

Captains. 
Melvin B. Baldwin, Elgin; resigned June 8, 1862. 
George D. Sherman. Elgin ; promoted major. 
Leveritt ]\I. Kelly, Udina : mustered out October 8, 1865. 

first Lieutenants. 
Edward S. Chapell. Elgin; died Octuher 14, 1861. 
George D. Sherman, Elgin ; promoted. 
Leroy Salisbury, Elgin: mustered out January 18, 1865. 
Leveritt yi. Kelly. Udina; prcimoted. 

.Second Ltenteiiauts. 
Isaac X. Buck. Elgin ; promoted quartermaster. 
William S. Smith, Elgin; resigned August 31, 1862. 
Leroy Salisliurv, Elgin ; promoted. 

First Sergeant. 
(ieorge D. Sherman. Elgin; promoted first lieutenant. 

Sergeants. 
Alexander C. Lynd, Elgin; discharged June 12. 1863; disability. 
Alexander Robinson, Elgin; discharged April 25. 1863; disability. 

Corporals. 
Walter J. Ordway. Elgin; reenlisted as veteran. 
Leslie P. Ticknor. Elgin; promoted sergeant major. 
John W. Aldrich. Dundee; reenlisted as veteran. 

Bent D. C. Roland, Elgin; sergeant; discharged June 17, 1864, for pro- 
motion to second lieutenant Sixteenth United States Cavalry. 
Leroy Salisbury. Elgin ; promoted second lieutenant. 
John S. Long. Elgin; discharged September 22. 1864. 
Frank B. Perkins. Elgin; transferred to Eifty-second Illinois June 9. 1862. 

iMusicians. 
Charles B. Stiles, Elgin; discharged September 22, 1864. 
Brayman Loveless, Elgin ; discharged September 22. 1864. 

Privates. 
Albert Andrews, Elgin; died October 10, 1862; wounds. 
Bernan N. Adams. Elgin; discharged February 3, 1862; disability. 
Daniel W. Brown. Elgin; transferred to ^'. R. C. 
Patrick Brannan. Dundee; discharged January i, 1863; wounds. 
Christopher P. Baker. Elgin; discharged Xrivember 8, 1864. 
John Bluckman. Dundee; reenlisted as veteran. 

Cyrus F. Dean, Elgin; died at Nashville January 14. 1863; wounds. 
William Dade, Elgin; deserted October 10, 1861. 



226 KANE COUXTY IllsTdUY 

Patrick Gibbons, Dundee: killed at Perryville October 8. 1862. 
Alonzo S. Harpending, Elgin; discharged September 22, 1864. 
Jeremiah C. Hall, Udina; corporal; discharged September 22, 1864. 
Daniel B. Hoxie, Dundee; mustered out September 8. 1864. 
Alexander F. Henderson, Udina; died January 16, 1863; wounds. 
John A. Hewitt, Dundee; discharged November 18, 1864, as corporal. 
Leveritt AI. Kelly. Udina; reenlisted as veteran. 

Frederick Hrahan, Dundee; died while prisoner of war, December i, 1863. 
George H. Knowles, Dundee; discharged September 22, 1864. 
Addison A. Keyes, Elgin; discharged August i, 1862. for promotion in 
One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Illinois Infantry. 

Peter Little, Elgin; discharged September 22. 1864. 

Alexander Manahan, Elgin; discharged June 10. 1863; disability. 

Tobias Miller, Udina ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Lewis F. ]\Iiller, Dundee; discharged September 22. 1864. 

Leonard \\'. Alann, Elgin; discharged November 8, 1864, as sergeant. 

Dorus Murus, Dundee; died at Annapolis ^larch 4. 1863; wounds. 

Fenelcn J. Nicholas, Dundee; reenlisted as veteran. 

Charles Olzewski, Elgin; reenlisted as veteran. 

Augustus Ritze, Dundee; reenlisted as veteran. 

Frank W. Raymond, Elgin; discharged September 22, 1864. 

Fred A. Raymond, Elgin; promoted sergeant major. 

^^'illiam F. Sylla, Elgin; discharged December 2},. 1861 ; disability. 

^Michael Seisloff, Elgin ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Tolmus Stanton, Dundee; killed at Stone River December 31, 1862. 

Adelbert Shaw, Elgin; discharged September 22, 1864, 

James AI. \'ining, Dundee; discharged September 22, 1864. 

Ebson J. Wickwire, Elgin; discharged May 29, 1862; disability. 

Homer H. Wilco.x, Elgin ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Joseph N. Yerkes, Aurora; died at Nashville March 21. 1864. 

Veterans. 
John W'. Aldrich, Dundee; sergeant; killed at Adairsville j\Iay 19, 1864. 
Leman Bartholomew, Dundee: mustered out October 8. 1865, as first 
eant. 

Jeptha C. Deitison, Elgin ; promoted hospital steward, 
Leveritt j\I. Kelly, Rutland; promoted first lieutenant. 
Fenelon J. Nicholas. Dundee: deserted June 5. 1865. 
Walter J. Ordway, Dundee; first sergeant; died June 12, 1864: wounds. 
Augustus Ritze. Dundee; transferred to \'. R. C. June 10, 1865. 
Alichael Seislofif, Elgin; mustered out October 8, 1865, as sergeant. 
Arzotus White, Dundee: mustered out October 19, 1865, as corporal. 

Recruits. 
Henry E. Deill. Rutland; mustered out October 8. 1865. 
Albert Deill, Rutland; discharged June 5, 1865; disability. 
George '\\. Salisbury. Elgin: discharged August 8. 1863. 
Francis M. Shaw. Rutland: mustered out October 8. 1865. 
John F. Scott. Elgin: discharged .\ugust 8. 1863. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 227 

Henry Samis, Rutland; died at Nashville July 24, 1864. 

Ottis D. Shaw, Rutland; corporal; missing November 30, 1864; sup- 
posed dead. 

George M. Salisbury, Elgin; veteran recruit; mustered out October 8, 
1865, as corporal. 

Richard Cool, Hampshire; discharged June 12, 1865; disability. 

COMPANY B. 

Captains. 
Silas Miller. Aurora; promoted major. 

Benjamin F. Campbell, Aurora; promoted lieutenant colonel. 
William H. Dugan, Big Rock; mustered out October 8. 1865. 

First Lieutenants. 
Joseph M. Walker, Aurora; dismissed April 30, 1863. 
George P. Douglass, Aurora ; commission cancelled. 
William H. Dugan, Big Rock; promoted. 
Owen Hughes, Aurora; mustered out October 8. 1865. 

Second Lieutenants. 
Benjamin F. Campbell, Aurora ; promoted captain. 
George P. Douglass, Aurora: mustered out November 15, 1864. 
Samuel Hitchcock, Aurora ; declined ; commission cancelled. 

First Sergeant. 
George P. Douglass, Aurora ; promoted second lieutenant. 

Sergeants. 
Samuel Hitchcock, Aurora; discharged September 22, 1864, as sergeant. 
Abner Field, Aurora; discharged September 22, 1864. 
Charles W. Rhodes. Aurora ; promoted quartermaster sergeant. 

Corporals. 
William Wanner, Aurora; discharged February 7, 1862. 
Ezra W. Parker, Aurora; killed at Chattanooga September 20, 1863. 
Owen Hughes. Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

William F. Blakeslee. Aurora; died at Cincinnati March 8, 1863; wounds. 
John H. Gronberg, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 
Emery D. Hoselton. Aurora; discharged September 22, 1864. 
William H. Dugan. Big Rock; reenlisted as veteran. 
Thomas Flynn. Aurora; discharged September 22, 1864. 

Musicians. 
George Brewer, Aurora; discharged August 18, 1862, to accept promotion. 
Willard Pettingell. St. Charles; discharged May i. 1863; disability. 

]Vagoner. 
John F. Lilly, Aurora; discharged September 22, 1864. 

Privates. 
Henry Alcott, Aurora; died at Nashville June 10, 1864; wounds. 
Ernest Ansorge, Aurora; killed at Perryville, Kentucky, October 8, 1862. 
Charles G. Avers, Aurora; discharged September 22, 1864, as corporal. 
William H. Brandon, Aurora; left sick at Lebanon, Missouri, October 7, 
1861. 



228 KANE COUXTY HISTORY 

Rudolph Brager, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 
Christ Brunnemeyer, xVurora; discharged June 2t,, 1864; disabihty. 
George H. Bruns, Aurora; discharged Xo\ember 3, 1864. 
Arba Camp, Aurora ; reenhsted as veteran. 
Daniel Davis, Big Rock; reenlisted as \eteran. 
Robert Drane, Aurora; discharged November 8, 1864. 
Frank Dugan, Aurora; died at Chattantiuga October 3, 1863; wounds. 
Carl Eckhart, Aurora; deserted Deceiriber 31, 1862. 
John W. Edwards, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 
James Eddy, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 
John Eddy, Big Rock; discharged September 22. 1864. 
Frederick Eniede, x-\urora; reenlisted as veteran. 
John VV. Evans, Big Rock; discharged January 22, 1864. 
John Fife, Aurora; discharged June 8, 1865; wounds. 
William H. Hartless, x\urora; discharged August 20, 1864. 
Charles M. Harvey, Elgin; transferred to Company K, Fifteenth Illinois 
Cavalry. 

Frederick Heine. Aurora ; died at Columbus. Ohio, February 19, 1864. 

Charles G. Heinze, Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Dow Hodges, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

Thomas E. Hornby, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

William E. Jackson, Aurora; discharged September 22. 1864. 

John H. Karl, Aurora ; promoted hospital steward. 

Sidney E. Kendall, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

Henry B. Latham, Big Rock ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Franklin Leet, Aurora; supposed discharged October — , 1863. 

Henry Levoy, Aurora; mustered out June 15. 1865 ; was prisoner. 

Robert Logan, Big Rock; reenlisted as veteran. 

Brarton Loyd, Aurora; died at Louisville January 6, 1864. 

Elihu Mahew. Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

Joseph McGee, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

George W. Miller, Aurora; discharged September 22, 1864. 

Nathaniel M. Moore, Aurora; discharged December 9. 1861 ; disability. 

William Ott, Aurora; discharged September 22, 1864. 

John Ott, Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Peter Pelican, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran, 

Edward Pierce, Big Rock ; reenlisted as veteran. 

VanWyck Race, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

Jefferson Reed, Aurora; discharged September 22, 1S64. 

Henry Reitz. Aurora : killed at Perryville, Kentucky, October 8, 1862. 

Adam Reitz. Aurora; discharged May i, 1863: disability. 

George Reitz. Aurora; discharged September 22, 1864. 

Henry L. Ribby, Aurora; killed at Kenesaw Mountain, June 19, 1864. 

Daniel B. Roberts, Big Rock; transferred to V. R. C. May I, 1864, 

Charles W. Sears. Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 

William Scheffer, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

Thomas W. Sedg^vick, Aurora: discharged September 22. 1864. * 

Fritz Stevens. Aurora: missing in action October i, 1862. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 229 

Charles E. Strong. Aurora; discharged August i6, 1862; disabiHty. 

William A. Tobey, Aurora; discharged August 16, 1862; disability. 

Daniel Terry, Aurora; mustered out October 8, 1865. 

Frank Thomson, Aurora; killed at Stone River December 31, 1862. 

Robert N. Thompson, Aurora ; discharged for promotion as second 
lieutenant. 

Charles W. Travis, Big Rock; reenlisted as veteran. 

William VanOhlin, Aurora; discharged May 13, 1863; disability. 

William S. Waterman, Big Rock ; discharged August 20, 1862 ; disability. 

Alfred J. West, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1864. 

Joel J. Wilder. Aurora; discharged August 11. 1863; disability. 

Jacob Winn. Aurora; died at Andersonville September 26, 1864; grave 
nine thousand seven hundred and eighty-five. 

Elnathan S. Weeden. Aurora; transferred to \'. R. C. August 31, 1863. 

James H. Woodard, Aurora; died at Louisville ^lay 8. 1863. 

Fritz Wokersein, Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Christian Zimmer. Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Veterans. 

George Berger. Aurora; mustered out October 8. 1865, as first sergeant. 

Rudolph Brager, Aurora; mustered out October 8. 1865, as sergeant. 

Arda Camp, Aurora; mustered out October 8. 1865. 

Thomas Clark, Aurora; mustered' out October 8. 1865, as corporal. 

William H. Dugan, Big Rock ; promoted first lieutenant. 

Daniel Davis, Aurora; mustered out October 8, 1865, as corporal. 

John W. Edwards, Aurora; mustered out October 8, 1865. as corporal. 

Frederick Emde. Aurora ; detached at muster out of regiment. 

John H. Gronberg, Aurora; mustered out October 8, 1865, as corporal. 

Dow Hodges, Aurora; mustered out June 19. 1865. 

Thomas E. Hornby, Aurora; mustered out October 8. 1865. 

Charles Heinze, Aurora; killed at Atlanta July 23, 1864. 

Owen Hughes, Aurora ; promoted first lieutenant. 

Sidney E. Kendall. Aurora; mustered out October 8. 1865, as corporal. 

Henry B. Latham. Big Rock; first sergeant; died December 18, 1864, 
while a prisoner; wounds. 

Robert Logan, Aurora; wounded; transferred to V. R. C. May i, 1865. 

Elihu Mayhew, Aurora; mustered out October 8, 1865. 

John Ott, Aurora; mustered out October 8, 1865, as corporal. 

Edward Pierce, Aurora; mustered out October 8, 1865, as sergeant. 

Peter Pelican, Aurora; deserted June 10, 1865. 

VanWyck Race, Aurora; mustered out October 8, 1865. 

Charles W. Sears, Aurora; discharged to date June 17, 1865. 

William Schefter, Aurora ; transferred to first United States Engineer 
August 14, 1864. 

Charles W. Travis. Aurora; mustered out October 8, 1865. as corporal. 

Fritz Wokersein, Aurora; mustered out October 8, 1865, as sergeant. 

Christian Zimmer. Aurora ; mustered out October 8. 1865. as sergeant. 



230 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Recruits. 
John N. Tones. Big Rock; mustered out October 8. 1865. 
Henry A. Snell. Aurora; mustered out June 5. 1865, as corporal. 
Daniel Terry, Aurora; veteran recruit; mustered out October 8, 1865. 
John P. Fyfe. Aurora ; veteran recruit ; discharged June 8, 1865 ; disability. 
Joseph E. Way, Big Rock; mustered out October 4. 1865. 

COMPANY C. 

Privates. 
Ethan Keck, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 
Ralph Miller, Aurora; died October 16, 1862; wounds. 
Walter V. Reeder. Aurora; died December 13, 1863; wounds. 
Carvasso Reeder. Aurora; discharged September 23, 1864. 

Veteran. 
Ethan Keck, Aurora; mustered out October 8, 1865, as sergeant. 

Recruit. 
Harlan E. King, Aurora: mustered out June 22. 1863; disability. 

COMPANY D. 

Privates. 
Miles Murray, Sugar Grove ; mustered out May 26, 1865 ; prisoner of war. 
Phillip Stage, Sugar Grove; reenlisted as veteran. 

Veteran. 
Philip Stage, Kaneville; mustered out October 8, 1865. 

COMPANY E. 
Privates. 
Mat Blu. Aurora; discharged September 22. 1864. 

Henry Coleman, Aurora; died at Perryville. Kentucky, October 9, 1862; 
wounds. 

Edgar S. Case, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

Peter Johnston, Aurora; discharged August 20, 1863; disability. 

Stephen Winans, Aurora; discharged November 6, 1864. 

Veteran. 
James S. Hatch, Aurora; mustered out June 19. 1865, as sergeant. 

Recruits. 
James Allison, Big Rock; mustered out August 29, 1865. 
James Hening, Aurora; discharged September 22, 1864. 
Joseph Jenkinson, Aurora; mustered out September 30, 1865. 

COMPANY F. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Lewis E. Belden, Aurora; mustered out October 8, 1865, as sergeant. 

Privates. 
Lewis E, Belden, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 
George W. Dessalet. Aurora; discharged September 22, 1864. 
John Green. Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 
William G. Huggett. Aurora; died January 10, 1863; wounds. 
James H. Hall. Aurora; corporal; killed in battle of Chickamauga. 
Alfred Johnson. Aurora; discharged September 22. 1864. 
William E. Jackson, Aurora; killed at Perryville October 8, 1862. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 231 

John Lamb, Aurora; discharged January i, 1863. 

WiUiam McClary, Aurora; reenhsted as veteran. 

Nels L. Nelson, Aurora; corporal; killed at Perryville, October 8, 1862. 

James W. Olson, Aurora; discharged September 22, 1864; first sergeant. 

Thomas Orstad, Aurora; discharged June 7, 1862; disability. 

Severt A. Peterson, Aurora; discharged March 23, 1863; disability. 

Peter Phillips, Aurora; died at Murfreesboro December i, 1863. 

Walter E. Partridge, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

Alfred Riggs, Aurora ; corporal ; killed at Stone River. 

Frederick W. Sly, Aurora; discharged November 7, 1863; disability. 

Charles F. Sweetland, Aurora; mustered out May 30, 1865; was prisoner. 

James Sifleet, Aurora; died at Nashville January 8, 1863. 

William Thompson, Aurora; killed in battle before Dallas, Georgia. 

Augustus Vanorder, Aurora; killed in battle at Stone River. 

COMPANY H. 

Mtisician. 
Elmore Day, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

Private. 
Julius H. Wilbur, Elgin; discharged July 12. 1862; disability. 

COMPANY I. 

Recruits. 
John Roush, Aurora; mustered out October 8, 1865, as corporal. 
John Shields, Aurora; mustered out October 8, 1865. 
Isaac P. Smith, Aurora; mustered out August 2, 1865. 

COMPANY K. 

Captain. 
Aaron C. Holden, Aurora; died December i, 1862. 

First Lieutenant. 
Aaron C. Holden, Aurora; promoted. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Aaron C. Holden, Aurora ; promoted. 

Corporal. 
Edward Reeder, Aurora; mustered out December 15, 1864, as private. 

Privates. 
Allen Burroughs, Aurora ; killed in battle of Chickamauga. 
Peter Burnett. Aurora ; transferred to V. R. C. as corporal. 
John Clark, Aurora; discharged April 6, 1863; disability. 
James Downey, Aurora ; mustered out June 26, 1864. 
Thomas Glove. Aurora; discharged December 10, 1862; disability. 
George S. Hall, Aurora; killed in battle of Stone River. 
Joseph Levican, Aurora: mustered out September 22, 1864. 
George G. Lyon, Aurora; appointed chaplain August 20, 1861. 
George B. Lenhart, Aurora ; killed in battle of Stone River. 
John P. Lenhart, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 
Charles Mongerson, Aurora ; mustered out. 

Thomas Moffett, Aurora; killed in battle of Perryville, October 8, 1862. 
Edward H. Mayberry. Aurora; missing at battle of Chickamauga. 



232 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Charles J. Alinor, Aurora; discharged April 9, 1863; wounds. 

Edward J. Millay, Aurora; died at Springfield. Missouri, May 5, 1862. 

Simeon Parsons. St. Charles; reenlisted as veteran. 

George W. Vail, Aurora; mustered out September 22, 1864. 

Veterans. 

John P. Lenhart, St. Charles; mustered out October 8, 1865, as sergeant. 

John C. Minkler. St. Charles; transferred to First United States Veteran 
Volunteer Engineers. 

Simeon Parson, St. Charles; discharged June 19, 1864; wounds. 

Recruits. 

Hiram Bogardus, St. Charles; mustered out July 15, 1865; was prisoner. 

James Guss, St. Charles; transferred to \'. R. C. ; mustered out Novem- 
ber 16. 1865. 

John McFarland, Aurora; deserted March 19, 1864. 

Patrick O'Connor. St. Charles; discharged May 3, 1865; disabled. 

Peter Paquette, St. Charles; mustered out July 15. 1865; was prisoner. 

Harlow Slate. Aurora; missing in action at Chickamauga. 

Hiram F. Watkins, St. Charles; mustered out October 8, 1865. 

William Crocker, Sugar Grove; substitute; mustered out October 8, 1865. 

Unassigned Recruits. 

Henry Forbes, Aurora. 

Lewis Kelsey, Aurora. 

James B. Lowry, Aurora; mustered out May 11, 1865. 

George Lown,% Aurora; mustered out May 11, 1865. 

John Powell, St. Charles. 

Elijah R. Winn, Aurora; died at Camp Yates. Illinois, April 16, 1864. 
Unassigned, Drafted and Substitute Recruits. 

John Welch, Aurora : substitute. 

THIRTY-SEVENTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY K. 

Private. 
John W. Fallen, Rutland: mustered out October 4, 1864, as sergeant. 

THIRTY-NINTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY D. 

Veteran. 
Samuel Gregory, Aurora; mustered out December 6, 1865, as sergeant. 

COMPANY F. 

Private. 

Martin V. B. Peters, Elgin ; reenlisted as veteran. 

HISTORY OF FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 
The Forty-second Infantry, Illinois Volunteers, was organized at Chi- 
cago, Illinois. July 22, 1861, by Colonel William A. Webb. 




ST. MARY'S ACADEMY, ELGIN. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 235 

Moved to St. Louis, September 21, 1861. Joined Major General Hunter 
at Tipton, Missouri, October 18, 1861, and was assigned to Colonel Palmer's 
Brigade. Arrived at \\'arsa\v October 25. Moved November i. at 10 o'clock 
p. m., and reached Springfield, Missouri, a distance of 97 miles, at 4 o'clock 
p. m., on the 4th. Moved from Springfield, 9th, and went into winter quarters 
at Smithton, Missouri, December 13. 

Marched from Smithton, February 3, 1862, to St. Charles, Missouri. 
Arri\ed at Fort Holt, Kentucky, February 20. Occupied Columbus, March 4, 
1862. Moved to Island Xo. 10, March 15, and was engaged until its sur- 
render, on the nth April. Colonel Roberts, with fifty men of Company A, 
spiked six guns of the enemy on the night of April i. 

On the night of April 4, 1862, Captain John A. Hottenstein, with 20 men 
of Company H, ran the blockade at Island Xo. 10, on the gunboat "Caron- 
delet," commanded by Captain Walke. 

Joined General Pope's Army, nth. Moved to Fort Pillow, 14th. Moved 
to Hamburg, Tennessee, arriving April 22. Was engaged in the siege of 
Corinth. Engaged in the battle of Farmington, May 9, 1862, losing two 
killed, twelve wounded, and three missing. Led the advance in pursuit of 
Beauregard's Army to Baldwin, Mississippi. 

The Forty-second occupied Cortland, Alabama, from July 25, until Sep- 
tember 3, 1862, when it left for Nashville, Tennessee, via Decatur, Alabama. 
Had a battle at Columbia, Tennessee, September 9, 1862, and lost one man 
killed. Enemy reported eighteen killed and forty-five wounded. Arrived 
at Nashville, September 13. 

Remained in XTashville during the siege. December 10. marched out 
six miles on the Nolensville pike. December 26, engaged in the Murfreesboro 
campaign. Skirmished with the enemy December 30, and was engaged in 
the battle of Stone River. December 31, with a loss of twenty-two killed, 
one hundred and sixteen wounded, and eighty-five prisoners. 

March 5, 1863, engaged in the pursuit of Van Dorn to Columbia, return- 
ing to camp at Murfreesboro, 14th. June 24, entered upon the Tullahoma 
campaign. July 31, camped at Bridgeport, Alabama. September 2, engaged 
in the Chattanooga campaign. Marched to Alpine, Georgia, thence to Tren- 
ton, and crossed Lookout mountain. Engaged September 19 and 20, in the 
battle of Chickamauga, Georgia, losing twenty-eight killed, one hundred and 
twenty-eight wounded, and twenty-eight prisoners, and retreated to 
Chattanooga. 

November 28, engaged in the battle of j\Iission Ridge, losing five killed 
and forty wounded, the Forty-second being on the skirmish line during the 
whole engagement. Pursued the enemy to Chickamauga Creek, and returned. 
November 28, entered east Tennessee campaign. December 27, camped at 
Stone's Mill. 

January i. 1864, regiment reenlisted as a veteran volunteer organization. 
January 15, moved to Danbridge. 21st, started for Chattanooga, arriving 
February 2. 21st, moved, by rail for Chicago. March 2. the men were fur- 
loughed. Returned April 2. Arrived at Chattanooga April 27. 



236 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Entered Atlanta campaign May 3. Was engaged at Rocky Face Ridge, 
Resaca. Adairsville, New Hope Church, Pine Mountain, Kenesaw Mountain, 
Peacli Tree Creek, Atlanta, Jonesboro. and Lovejoy Station, encamping at 
Atlanta. September 8. Total loss on the campaign, twenty killed, eighty-nine 
wounded, and seven prisoners. September 25 moved to Bridgeport, Alabama, 
by rail; October 19, by rail to Chattanooga, and thence marched to Alpine, 
Georgia. Returned October 30. Moved, by rail, to Athens, Alabama, and 
marched to Pulaski, Tennessee, arriving November 5. November 22 com- 
menced retreat for Nashville, engaging with the enemy at Spring Hill and 
Franklin, and losing twenty-four killed, ninety-five wounded, and thirty 
prisoners. Arrived at Nashville December i. 

December 15 and 16. 1864, engaged in the battle of Nashville, losing two 
killed and eleven wounded. Pursued the enemy eighty-two miles, camping at 
Lexington, Alabama, December 31. January i, 1865, marched, via Hunts- 
ville, to Decatur, Alabama, arriving January 6. April i left Decatur, and 
proceeded, by rail, to Bull's Gap, Tennessee, and thence marched to Blue 
Springs, arriving April 6. Returned to Bull's Gap April 19, and proceeded, 
by rail, to Nashville. 

June 15, moved, by rail, to Johnsonville, Tennessee, and thence, by water, 
to New Orleans, and camped at Chalmette June 23. July 18 proceeded to 
Port Lavaca, Texas ; disembarked July 23, and proceeded to Camp Irwin. 
August 17 returned to Lavaca, and went on post duty. 

December 16, 1865, mustered out and left Indianola, 20th. Left New 
Orleans 24th, and arrived at Camp Butler January 3. 1866. 

January 12. 1866, received final payment and discharge. 

FORTY-SECOND INFANTRY REGIMENT.' 
(Three Years' Service.) 

Colonel. 
Edgar D. Swain, Batavia; mustered out December 16, 1865, as lieutenant 
colonel. 

Licntcmvit Colonel. 
Edgar D. Swain, Batavia; promoted. 

Major. 
Henry K. W'alcott, Batavia; mustered out December 16, 1865. 

Quarteniiaster Sergeant. 
Joseph Vollor, Batavia ; promoted regimental quartermaster, but not 
mustered: mustered out December 16, 1865, 

Commissary Sergeant. 
Albert C. Cleveland. Batavia ; promoted first lieutenant and adjutant. 

COMPANY B. 

Privates. 
Marvin Dennis, Elgin; died at Smithton, Missouri, December 31, 1861. 
Peter B. Lee, Elgin; mustered out September 16, 1864, as corporal. 
Nicholas Matuse. Elgin; died at Smithton, Missouri. January 12. 1862. 
William Schwader, Elgin; reenlisted as veteran. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 237 

COMPANY E. 

Private. 
Patrick Hasson, Elgin; died at Paducah May 6, 1862. 

COMPANY G. 

Corporal. 
Daniel L. Edmund, Elgin; discharged May 17, 1862, as private; disability. 

Recruit. 
George Robbins, Elgin ; transferred to Eleventh Illinois Cavalry Sep- 
tember 19, 1 86 1. 

COMPANY H. 

Captain. 
Wesley P. Andrews, Batavia; discharged May 11, 1864. 

COMPANY I. 

Captains. 
Edgar D. Swain, Batavia; promoted lieutenant colonel. 
Ogden Lovell, Kaneville; resigned September 28, 1864. 
Henry K. Wolcott, Batavia; promoted major. 
John S. Hedges, Batavia; mustered out December 16, 1865. , 

First Lieutenants. 
Wesley P. Andrews, Batavia; promoted to Company H. 
Ogden Lovell, Kaneville; promoteid. 
Henry K. Wolcott, Batavia; promoted. 
John S. Hedges, Batavia; promoted. 
Charles E. Smiley, Kaneville; mustered out December 16, 1865. 

Second Lieutenants. 
Ogden Lovell, Kaneville; promoted. 
Henry K. Wolcott, Batavia; promoted. 
Charles A. Linstrom. St. Charles; mustered out December 16, 1865, as 

sergeant. „ • 

ptrst Sergeant. 

Henry K. Wolcott, Batavia; promoted second lieutenant. 

Sergeants. 

James S. Wilson, Batavia; mustered out September 19, 1864, as first 
sergeant. 

Samuel E. Andrews, Batavia: deserted April 20, 1862. 

William W. Brown, Batavia; discharged August 8, 1862, and mustered 
in Company K, One Hundred and Twenty-third New York. 

Simeon A. Hitchcock. Batavia; transferred to Invalid Corps February 

Corporals. 
Edwin D. Campbell, Kaneville; died at Chattanooga, November i, 1863. 
John S. Hedges, Batavia; reenlisted as veteran. 
Charles E. Smiley, Batavia; reenlisted as veteran. 
Joseph Vollor, Batavia; reenlisted as veteran. 
James S. VanAllen, Batavia; deserted June 18, 1862. 
George S. Blakely. Batavia; died at Tipton, Missouri, December 22, 1861. 



238 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Musicians. 

Chauncey H. Stackey, Batavia; mustered out September i6, 1864. 

Edward N. Blakeslee, Aurora; mustered out September 16, 1864. 

Privates. 

Abner D. Brooks, Batavia; discharged July 9, 1862; disabled. 

Charles A. Burnell, Batavia ; corporal ; killed at Chickamauga, September 
20, 1863. 

Sidney Barlacorn, Batavia; corporal; died November 22, 1863. 

John Brislen, Kaneville; killed at Chickamauga September 20, 1863. 

Albert C. Cleveland, Batavia ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Elin J. Canfield, Batavia ; transferred to Fifty-fifth Illinois September 
20, 1861. 

Stephen Drezzy, Aurora; deserted June 18, 1862. 

Edmond Farren, Batavia; reenlisted as veteran. 

Silas Gray, Aurora; mustered out December 14, 1864. 

Charles A. Linstrom, St. Charles; reenlisted as veteran. 

Patrick Larrissey, St. Charles ; missing after battle of Chickamauga. 

Peter LaPlant, Batavia; mustered out September 12, 1864. 

Wallace W. Meade, Batavia; reenlisted as veteran. 

Samuel March, Batavia ; reenlisted as veteran. 

George Odell, Batavia; discharged November 25, 1862, to enlist in Fourth 
United States Cavalry. 

Harrison V. Osborn, Batavia; mustered out September 30, 1864. 

Edgar Stephens, Batavia; mustered out September 16, 1864. 

Aaron C. Smith, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

William Smith, Aurora; transferred to Invalid Corps August 18, 1863. 

Charles Taylor, Batavia; died at Tipton, Missouri, December 6, 1861. 
'Martin Wilbur, Batavia; corporal; deserted April 20, 1862. 

Mark J. Whitney, St. Charles; discharged November 25, 1862, to enlist 
in Fourth United States Cavalry. 

Veterans. 

Albert C. Cleveland, Batavia; reappointed commissary sergeant. 

Edmund Farran, Batavia; mustered out December 16, 1865; wounded. 

John S. Hedges, Batavia ; promoted sergeant, first sergeant, first 
lieutenant. 

Charles A. Linstrom, St. Charles; mustered out December 16, 1865, first 
sergeant ; wounded, 

Charles E. Smiley, Kaneville ; promoted sergeant, first sergeant, first 
lieutenant. 

Aaron C. Smith, Aurora; discharged December 16, 1865. 

Joseph Valler. Batavia; reappointed quartermaster sergeant. 

Recruits. 

George D. Kenyon, Batavia; mustered out December 16, 1865. 

Beall M. Kenyon, Batavia; mustered out December 16, 1865. 

COMPANY K. 

First Lieutenant. 
Joseph Hudson, Dundee; promoted. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 239 

Second Lieutenant. 
Joseph Hudson, Dundee; promoted. 

Priz'ates. 
Edwin D. Clisbee, Big Rock; deserted August 22, 1861. 
Stephen Dokey, Elgin; discharged November 25, 1862, to enlist in 
Fourth United States Cavalr}'. 

Joseph Hudson, Dundee; promoted corporal, sergeant and second 
lieutenant. 

FORTY-THIRD INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY H. 

Privates. 

Charles M. Bowman, St. Charles; reenlisted as veteran. 

John Peter Johnson, St. Charles; discharged; disability; August 15, 
1862" 

Andrew Liens, Geneva; died or discharged for wounds. October 17, 1862. 

Patrick McLane, St. Charles ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Henry William Peterson, Geneva; discharged November 7, 1861; 
disability. 

FORTY-FOURTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 
Surgeon. 
Emery A. Merrifield. Elgin; mustered out September 25, 1865. 

FORTY-FIFTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY K. 

Vete7-an. 
Harrison Hines, Aurora; mustered out July 12, 1865, as sergeant. 

Drafted and Substitute Recruits. 
William H. Walters, Geneva; substitute; mustered out June 3, 1865. 

FORTY-SIXTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY H. 

Prii'ate. 
Charles H. Stone, Batavia; discharged July 20, 1862. 

Recruit. 
Patrick Nugent, Geneva: transferred to V. R. C. November 11, 1863. 

COMPANY I. 

Second Lieutenant 
William H. Howell. Geneva; killed in battle of Shiloh. 

Sergeant. 
John St. John, Aurora: discharged October 19, 1862: disability. 



240 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Priz'ates. 
John R. Hight. Geneva; discharged November 25, 1862. 
Patrick Nugent. Geneva; transferred to Company H. 

FORTY-S£:VENTH (CONSOLIDATED) INFANTRY. 
(Three Years" Service.) 

COMPANY A. 

Recruit transferred from A'iuciity-/iftlt Illinois Infantry. 
Emory J. Ladd, Aurora; mustered out January 21, 1866. 

HISTORY OF FIFTY-SECOND INFANTRY. 

The Fifty-second Infantry lUinois \'olunteers was organized at Geneva, 
Kane county. Illinois, in November. 1861. by Colonel J. G. Wilson, and 
mustered into United States service No\ember 19 by Lieutenant J. 
Christopher. 

November 28, moved with nine hundred and fortj'-tive men to St. Louis, 
Missouri, and went into quarters at Benton Barracks. Here Colonel Wilson 
resigned. 

December 8 the regiment. Lieutenant Colonel J. S. \\'ilcox commanding, 
moved to St. Joseph, Missouri. January 16, 1862, moved to Cairo via Pal- 
myra, Quincy and Mississippi river. January 24 moved to Smithland. 
February 7 T. W. Sweeny was commissioned colonel of the Fiftj^-second. 

February 10. 1862. embarked for Fort Donelson and arrived 17th. i8th 
was sent with prisoners to Chicago. March 7 arrived at St. Louis. March 
13, left for Army of the Tennessee, and 20th, disembarked at Pittsburg 
Landing, and was assigned to Third Brigade, Second Division, Colonel 
Sweeney commanding brigade and General Smith the division. 

The regiment took a prominent part in the battle of Shiloh April 6 and 
7, losing one hundred and seventy killed, wounded and missing — Major 
Stark commanding first day and Captain Bowen on the second. The regi- 
ment was engaged in the siege of Corinth ]\Iay. 1862. Pursued the retreating 
enemy to Booneville, Mississippi, and returned to Corinth where the regi- 
ment remained until the battle of Corinth, October 3 and 4. Was heavily 
engaged in this action. Colonel Sweeney commanding the regiment — the loss 
being seventy killed and wounded. Pursued the retreating enemy as far as 
Ruckerville. and returned 12th. 

October 3 moved to Hatchie river and returned. 

December 9. 1862. moved with an expedition to Alabama. ]\Iet the 
enemy near Little Bear Creek, drove him fifteen miles and returned to Corinth, 
arriving 14th. December 19, under command of Lieutenant Colonel Wilcox, 
left Corinth with the expedition of General G. M. Dodge to intercept Forrest. 
Marched one hundred miles in four and one-half days, and returned weary 
and foot-sore. 

January 2, 1863. moved to Tennessee river to intercept Forrest, as he 
had already crossed at Crump's Landing. Expedition returned. 

January 26 moved to Hamburg. Tennessee: embarked on a little steamer, 
and on the next day disembarked and returned to Corinth. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 241 

February 25, 1863, moved, Major Erown commanding regiment, Colonel 
Sweeney commanding expedition, to Jacinto, Mississippi. Arrived 2yth. 
Remained until March 4, when it returned to Corinth. 

On the 15th of April, Lieutenant Colonel Wilcox commanding regi- 
ment, moved with an expedition of four brigades of infantry, one of cavalry, 
and fourteen pieces of artillery, Brigadier General G. M. Dodge commanding, 
to northern Alabama. Marched to Burnsville on the iSth; through luka on 
the iC)th; crossed Bear creek on the 17th — Colonel Cornyn's cavalry skirmish- 
ing with the enemy. 

April 20 Colonel Sweeney was promoted to brigadier general. 23d the 
whole force advanced, driving the enemy. That night lay in line of battle. 
24th mo\-ed forward and entered Tuscumbia, Alabama. 

April 27 moved toward Courtland. Met the enemy at Town creek and 
skirmished till night. 28th gained possession of the railroad bridge, elYected 
a crossing and dro\-e the enemy three miles. 29th returned, arriving in 
Corinth May 2. 1863. 

-Vugust 18 moved to Germantown. and regiment assigned to guarding 
railroad. 

October 29 moved to luka. 31st bivouacked three and a half miles 
east of luka. November 6 the whole left wing of the Sixteenth Corps moved 
eastward. Arrived at Eastport and crossed the Tennessee. No\ember 1 1 
arrived at Pulaski, Tennessee. Remained, doing provost duty. 

Jaiuiary 9, three-fourths of the ' regiment having reenlisted, it was 
mustered as a veteran organization. Started for Illinois, and arrived at Chi- 
cago January 17. Proceeded to Geneva. Kane county, and was furloughed 
20th. 

February 24 moved for Pulaski. Tennessee, under command of Lieu- 
tenant Colonel- E. A. Brown, Colonel Wilcox having resigned. Arri\-ed at 
Pulaski 29th. April 29, in Colonel E. W. Rice's Brigade (First Brigade), 
General Sweeny's Division (Second), Left Wing, Major General G. M. 
Dodge, Sixteenth Army Corps, moved southward, arri\-ing at Chattanooga 
May 2. 

May 3, 1864, commenced the Atlanta campaign. The regiment par- 
ticipated in the battle of Snake Creek Gap. Resaca. Lay's Ferry, Rome Cross 
Roads, Dallas, Kenesaw Mountain, Nickajack Creek, Decatur, July 22 and 28, 
before Atlanta and Jonesboro, and went into camp at East Point. 

September 26, 1864, the Second Division, I.eft Wing, Sixteenth Army 
Corps, was transferred to Fourth Division, Fifteenth Army Corps, moved to 
Rome, and by rail to Cartersville, and from thence marched to Allatoona. 
Arriving there too late for battle, it returned to Rome. 

October 11, Lieutenant Colonel Bowen being mustered out. Major Boyd 
took command. 

The regiment marched with the division. Brevet Major General J. M. 
Corse commanding, to Savannali, Georgia. 

December 18 the non-veteran officers were mustered out, and J. D. Davis, 
having received a commission as lieutenant colonel, took command of the 
regiment. 



colonel. 



242 KANE COUNTY HLSTORY 

December 21, marched into Savannah. 

January 29, 1865, started on the Carolinas campaign. Was present at 
the battle of Bentonville and arriv'^d at Goldsboro ^larch 24. 

April 10, marched to Raleigh. Lay at Morrisville during Johnson's 
surrender. 

Marched via Richmond and Alexandria and was in the grand review at 
Washington May 24, 1865. June 2, moved to Louisville, Kentucky. 

July 5, mustered out of United States service. Gloved to Camp Douglas, 
Chicago, Illinois, and received final payment and discharge July 12, 1865. 

FIFTY-SECOXD INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 
Colonels. 
John S. Wilcox. Elgin; resigned February 20, 1864. 
Jerome D. Davis, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865, as lieutenant 

Lieutenant Colonels. 
John S. Wilcox, Elgin ; promoted. 
Jerome D. Davis, Dundee; promoted. 

Adjutants. 
Ethan J. Allen, Hampshire; resigned September 12. 1862. 
Edward S. Wilcox, Elgin; resigned June 29, 1864. 

Quartermasters. 
Charles B. \\'elis, Geneva; discharged November 30, 1862; captain and 
commissary of subsistence. United States volunteers. 

Fulton Gififord, Elgin; mustered out November 20, 1864. 

Surgeons. 
Leland H. Angel, Aurora; resigned March 7. 1862. 
Edgar Winchester, Elgin; resigned April 23. 1864. 

Chaplain. 
Benjamin Thomas, Elgin; promoted to Ninth Louisiana Volunteer A. 
D., November 6, 1863. 

XOX-COM MISSIONED ST.\FF. 

Sergeant Major. 
Charles C. Brown, Dundee. 

Quartermaster Sergeants. 
Fulton Gififord, Elgin; promoted quartermaster. 
James M. Thurston, Elgin; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Commissary Sergeants. 
Charles C. Stevens, Geneva. 
George M. Peck, Dundee; mustered out October 24, 1864. 

Principal Musicians. 
William H. Young, Elgin. 
Charles Tones, Elgin. 

•' ^ VETERANS. 

Contm issary Sergeant. 
Charles H. Hill, Udina; promoted adjutant. 




VIEAA^ OF EL(;iX. EAST SIDE, 1866. 



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VIEW OF ELGIN, EAST SIDE, 1866. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 245 

Principal Musician. 
William C. Wells. Udina ; died at Nashville May 14, 1864. 

COMPANY A. 

Captains. 
Smith G. Ward, Kaneville; discharged October 7, 1862; disability. 
George E. Young. Kaneville: mustered out October 14. 1864. 
Charles Barnett, Kane county; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

First Lieutenants. 
George E. Young, Kaneville; promoted. 
Charles R. White. Aurora; resigned December 26, 1863. 
Thomas W. Mack, Kaneville; mustered out November i. 1864. 
George L. Kinnear, Virgil; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Second Lieutenants. 
Charles R. White, Aurora ; promoted. 
Thomas W. Mack, Kaneville; promoted. 
Harvey O. Perry, Kaneville; mustered out July 6, 1865, as sergeant. 

First Sergeant. 
James P. Snell. Aurora: mustered out October 24. 1864. 

Sergeants. 
James Crandall, Kaneville; reenlisted as veteran. 
Clinton P. Taft, Kaneville: mustered out December 3, 1864. 
Walter H. Fifield. Kaneville. 
Joseph Payro, Kaneville: mustered out October 26, 1864. 

Corporals. 
Jacob Snell, Kaneville. 

Henry Ellithorpe. Blackberry; died October 30, 1861. 
Harvey Perry. Kaneville ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Henry Richardson. \'irgil; dropped from rolls September i, 1862. 
John F. Strohecker, Kaneville; reenlisted as veteran. 
George Haven, Kaneville; mustered out June 7, 1865; was prisoner. 

JVagoner. 
Benjamin Snow, St. Charles. 

Privates. 
Samuel Avard, Virgil. 

Charles Barnett, Kane county; reenlisted as veteran. 
Charles W. Barker. Blackberry ; reenlisted as veteran. 
James Beechem. Virgil; reenlisted as veteran. 
Peter Bushman, Kaneville; reenlisted as veteran. 
George B. Barker, Blackberry; mustered out October 24, 1864. 
David Blackman, ^'irgil ; transferred to Invalid Corps : transferred back 
February 6, 1864. 

Ezakiel Clark, Geneva. 

Abram T. Cary. Kaneville: reenlisted as veteran. 

Charles G. Chapel. \'irgil ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Bradish Cadwell, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

Seymour A. Crance, Big Rock ; reenlisted as veteran. 

John Davis. Kaneville; discharged April 4, 1862; disability. 



246 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Timothy Dooley, Kane county; reenlisted as veteran. 

Charles Doty, Kaneville; deserted October 26. 1861. 

James Dooley, Sugar Grove; deserted October 26, 1861. 

Lyman B. French, Kane county. 

James D. Graves, Big Rock. 

Henry Hamilton, Kaneville; reenlisted as veteran. 

Henry Harman. Kaneville ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Andrews Hayden, Big Rock. 

Charles H. Hoisted, Kaneville; reenlisted as veteran. 

John Jones, Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 

David Jones, Sugar Grove. 

Walter Jones, Big Rock. 

Hiram Jewett. Kaneville; reenlisted as veteran. 

Charles Kelly, \'irgil; mustered out October 24. 1864. 

John Kiernan, Kaneville. 

Jesse Keene, Virgil. 

Gustavus-King, Blackberry; mustered out October 24, 1864. 

George L. Kinnear, Virgil ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Daniel Koskle, Kaneville. 

William W. Lindsay, Kaneville. 

Charles Laartz, Kaneville; reenlisted as veteran. 

Charles Layman, Kaneville. 

Wallace Miner, Kaneville. 

Thomas Mack, Kaneville; promoted sergeant, then second lieutenant. 

^^'alter Ottaway, Blackberry. 

John Owen. Kaneville. 

Andrew Pooler. Kaneville ; reenlisted as veteran. 

David Pingrel. Blackberry ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Emerson D. Piney. Aurora. 

Edwin Rood. Blackberr}\ 

William Rice, Kane county: mustered out October 24, 1864. 

Henry Swartz. Kane\ille; reenlisted as veteran. 

Daniel Snell. Kaneville : reenlisted as veteran. 

Eber Sheldron, Kaneville ; reenlisted as veteran. 

David Smith. Blackberry; reenlisted as veteran. 

Richard J. Smith, Aurora. 

Augustus Schutt, Elgin; reenlisted as veteran. 

John Scott. Elgin; deserted October 2f>. t86i. 

Webster Smith. Virgil. 

Levi Shambow, Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 

David Thompson. Kaneville. 

Sherman Towle. Aurora. 

Harvey Z. Tydeman. Blackberry. 

Charles Wagner. Kane county. 

Elias S. Ward, Kane county: mustered out October 24. 1864. 

Julian L. Ward. Kane county. 

John H. Whitnev. Kaneville. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 247 

Oscar Whitcomb, Kaneville; mustered out October 24. 1864. 
George Woodard, Virgil. 
George A. W'allin. Kane county. 

Veterans. 
Alanson Baker. Kaneville; mustered out July 6, 1865. as corporal. 
George H. Bellinger. Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
James Beechem. Virgil; mustered out July 6, 1865, as corporal. 
Peter Bushman. Kaneville; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
James F. Crandall, Kaneville ; promoted second lieutenant Eighth United 
States Colored Heavy Artillery September 15, 1864. 

Abram T. Gary, Kaneville; mustered out July 6, 1865, as sergeant. 

Charles G. Chapel, Kaneville; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Bradish Cadwell. Airgil ; mustered out July 6. 1865. 

George Coats, Kaneville; mustered out July 6. 1865, as sergeant. 

Seymour A. Crance, Aurora; killed in railroad accident June 13, 1864. 

Timothy Dooley, Kaneville; mustered out July 6, 1865, as wagoner. 

Alonzo J. Denny, Sugar Grove; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Henry Hamilton, Kaneville; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Henry Harmon. Kaneville; discharged May 26, 1865. 

Charles H. Hoisted, Big Rock; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

John Jones, Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Hiram Jewett. Kaneville; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Chas. Knickerbocker. Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Charles Laartz, Kaneville; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Harvey O. Perry. Kaneville; mustered out July 6. 1865, as first sergeant. 

Andrew Pooler, Kaneville; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

John F. Strohecker. Kaneville ; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Daniel Snell. Kaneville; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Augustus Schutt, Kaneville; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Eber Sheldon, Kaneville; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

David Smith. Blackberry; mustered out July 6, 1865, as corporal. 

Levi Shambow, Aurora; mustered out July 6. 1865. 

Freeman Woodman. \'irgil; mustered out July 6, 1865, as sergeant. 

Recruits. 
Daniel C. Ames, Kaneville; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Daniel Abbott. Geneva; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
William Coats. Big Rock; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
George Colling. \'irgil ; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
WilHam Colling. \'irgil ; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
George Coats, Big Rock; reenlisted as veteran. 
Alonzo J. Denney. Kaneville ; reenlisted as veteran. 
John H. Dodds. Big Rock; mustered out October 24, 1864. 
Elder Dacons, Kaneville; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Silas Empey, Big Rock. 

Henry Elkins, Sugar Grove; mustered out October 24, 1864. 
James Flynn, Blackberry ; mustered out October 24. 1 864. 
Charles A. Gee. Kane county; discharged July 21, 1862; disability. 



248 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

George Gooro, Gene\a ; deserted March i, 1865. 
Joseph D. Hayes, Blackberry; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
George E. Hoyt, Kaneville; died at Chattanooga October 8, 1864. 
Zoring Harding, Aurora. 

John Lebkisher, Big Rock; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Eugene LeBaron, Geneva; died June 25, 1865. 
Malcomb A. Miner, Kaneville; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Henry Hunger, Blackberry; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
John Moore, Virgil; mustered out January 5, 1865. 
Franklin Perry, Geneva; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Peter Quinn, Blackberry; died at Andersonville Prison October 8, 1864; 
grave No. 10,531. 

Samuel Reeves, Blackberry; mustered out July 6. 1865. 
Albert W. Swan, Big Rock; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Oscar Seeley, Blackberry. 

Harvey Tydeman, Blackberry; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
William Tydeman, Blackberry; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
John Woodman, Virgil ; discharged May 26, 1865. 

COMPANY c. 

Private. 
Chester E. Williams, Dundee. 

Recruits. 
William Dorman, Plato; mustered out July 6, 1865; wounds. 
Edmund J. Graves, Geneva; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

COMPANY D. 

Captairvs. 
Jacob Grimes, Batavia; resigned December 14, 1861. 
D. Carlos Newton, Batavia; mustered out December 18, 1864. 

First Lieutenants. 
D. Carlos Newton, Batavia; promoted. 

Lewis H. Everts, Geneva ; promoted assistant adjutant-general. 
Joseph J. Kelser, Batavia; mustered out December 18, 1864. 
Lawrence W. Wolcott, Batavia; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Second Lieutenants. 
Lewis H. Everts, Geneva ; promoted. 
Joseph J. Kelser, Batavia ; promoted. 

First Sergeant. 
Joseph J. Kelser, Batavia ; promoted second lieutenant. 

Sergeants. 
George Spalding, Geneva. 
James P. Prindle, Batavia. 

Adolphus Datham, Batavia; reenlisted as veteran. 
Thomas W. Poor, Geneva. 

Corporals. 
James Kelly, Batavia. 
Edmund R. Blanchard, Batavia; reenlisted as veteran. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 249 

Musicians. 
Chauncy Burr, Batavia. 
Henry W. Strong, Geneva. 

Privates. 
Thomas Andrews, Batavia. 
Alfred K. Benedict, Batavia. 
Benigh P. Barlow, Blackberry. 
James L. Gary, Geneva. 

James H. Gary, Geneva ; reenlisted as veteran. 
Samuel W. Canfield, Batavia; died at Ghicago October 15, 1863. 
Sevellon A. Gorwin, Batavia ; reenlisted as veteran. 
Joseph H. Garver, Blackberry. 
John Garl, Batavia ; reenlisted as veteran. 
Albert E. Gurtis, Geneva ; reenlisted as veteran. 
Joseph S. Dickerson, Batavia. 
Edmund Derrick, Gampton. 
David Davis, Big Rock; reenlisted as veteran. 
John Fletcher, Geneva. 

John Hodkinson, Batavia; mustered out November 19, 1864. 
Eli Hight, Geneva; reenlisted as veteran. 
John Leeding, Geneva ; reenlisted as veteran. 
William H. Lamb, Geneva; reenlisted as veteran. 
Elijah Lyman, Geneva. 
Edward G. Milgate, Aurora. 
John Nailor, Batavia; reenlisted as veteran. 
Henry Osgood. Batavia; mustered out November 18, 1864. 
Frederick Ott, Geneva ; reenlisted as veteran. 
Jason R. Prindle, Batavia; reenlisted as veteran. 
Abijah L. Prindle, Batavia. 
Lagore Prindle, Batavia. 

Nels E. Peterson, Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 
John Palmer, Batavia. 
Richard Roberts, Big Rock. 
Stephen J. Roots, Blackberry. 
Charles Shields, Geneva. 
Ward M. Scott, Geneva; reenlisted as veteran. 
Ansell A. Smith, Batavia ; reenlisted as veteran. 
Richard Smith, Geneva. 
Joel G. Sheperdson, Blackberry. 
Alfred Short, Batavia ; reenlisted as veteran. 
Hosea Smith, Geneva. 
Joseph Trumley, Blackberry. 
Urial Titus, Geneva ; reenlisted as veteran. 
Alexander Trumley, Batavia; reenlisted as veteran. 
Arthur Vandever. Batavia. 
William H. Watson, Geneva. 
Gustavus A. Wallin, Geneva: reenlisted as veteran. 



250 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Frederick Wilson, Geneva. 

Henry M. Willard, Aurora. 

George L. Williams. Big Rock; reenlisted as veteran. 

Lawrence W. W'olcott. Batavia; reenlisted as veteran. 

J'cteraiis. 
E. R. Blanchard, Batavia; mustered out July 6, 1865, as sergeant. 
John Carl, Batavia; mustered out July 6. 1865. 
James H. Gary, Geneva; mustered out July 6. 1865. as corporal. 
Elbert E. Curtis, Geneva; mustered out July 6. 1865, as corporal. 
Robert T. Curtis. Blackberry; mustered out July 6, 1865. as corporal. 
Sevellon A. Corwin, Batavia; discharged June 24, 1865. 
David Davis. Big Rock; mustered out July 6. 1865. 
Safford E. Harlow, Elgin; mustered out July 6. 1865. as corporal. 
Eli Hight, Geneva, mustered out July 6. 1865. 
John Leeding. Geneva ; confined at Dry Tortugas. 
Adolphus Latham. Batavia; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Samuel M. Laughlin, Batavia; deserted August 19. 1864. 
John Nailor. Batavia ; transferred to \'. R. C. 
Frederick Ott. Geneva; mustered out July 6. 1865, as corporal. 
Nels E. Peterson. Geneva; mustered out July 6. 1865. 
Jason R. Prindle, Batavia; mustered out July 6. 1865. as sergeant. 
Ward M. Scott, Geneva; mustered out July 6. 1865. 
Lewis Stanfer, Geneva; mustered out July 6. 1865. 
Ansell A. Smith, Batavia; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Alfred Short, Batavia; mustered out July 6, 1865, as wagoner. 
Urial Titus, Geneva; mustered out July 6. 1865. 
Alexander Trumley, Batavia; mustered out July 6. 1865. 
Gustavus A. Wallin, Geneva; mustered out July 6. 1865. as corporal. 
George L. Williams, Big Rock; mustered out July 6, 1865, as sergeant. 
Lawrence W. Wolcott, Batavia ; promoted sergeant, then first lieutenant. 
Alexander M. Watson, Batavia; promoted sergeant, then captain. 

Recruits. 
Webster Burr, Batavia. 
Stephen Blain, Geneva. 

Henry Carl, Batavia; mustered out July 6. 1865. 
James H. Carman. Geneva; mustered out May 23. 1865. 
Robert T. Curtis. Geneva ; reenlisted as veteran. 
William Gilbert. Batavia; mustered out July 6. 1865. 
William W. Griffin. Virgil; discharged June 8. 1863; disability. 
William F. Hall, Batavia; mustered out July 6. 1865. 
Stephen Morey, Batavia; mustered out July 6. 1865. 
John O'Brien, Batavia; mustered out July 6. 1865. 
Thomas W. Poor. Geneva ; mustered out May 29. 1865. 
Frank Shoemake, Batavia; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
George W. Thatcher, Batavia ; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Charles E. Van Vlack, Geneva; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
John Zimmerman, Batavia; mustered out July 6. 1865. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 251 

COMPANY E. 

Privates. 
Otto Gronberg, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

Thomas Ponsoby, Kane county : transferred from Company A, Cavalry. 
Erastus Roberts, Kane count}-. 
Charles VVoodworth, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

Veterans. 
John Fletcher, Geneva; mustered out July 7, 1865, as musician. 
Otto H. Gronberg, Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865, as sergeant. 
Charles Woodworth. Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865, as corporal. 

Recruit. 
William Free, Batavia ; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

COMPANY F. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Arthur P. Yaughan, Aurora; mustered out December 18, 1864. 

Sergeant. 
Arthur P. Vaughan. Aurora ; promoted second lieutenant. 

Corporal. 
John M. Ferris, Geneva. 

Privates. 
Jeremiah Dodd, Batavia. 

Robert Megison. Elgin; discharged December 12. 1862; disability. 
Reuben \^n:eeler, Geneva. 

Veterans. 
Frederick Carter, Geneva; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Frederick Hartwick, Geneva; mustered out July 6, 1865, as corporal. 
Elijah Limond, Geneva; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
George Reed, Geneva; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Reuben Wheeler, Geneva; mustered out May 31, 1865. 

Recniits. 
Francis H. Brown, Geneva; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
George Reed, Geneva; reenlisted as veteran. 

COMPANY G. 

Captains. 
Francis H. Bowman, St. Charles; resigned April 19, 1862. 
William H. Wilcox. Elgin; mustered out December 18, 1864. 

First Lieutenants. 
William H. Wilcox, Elgin ; promoted. 
James Davidson, Elgin; mustered out December 18, 1864. 

Second Lieutenant. 
William Shattuck, Campton; mustered out July 6, 1865, as sergeant. 

Sergeant. 
Oscar F. Lawrence, Elgin. 

Corporals. 
Jeremiah H. Burley, St. Charles. 
Frank S. Rockwell. St. Charles. 
John H. Andrus, St. Charles. 



252 KA^'E COLWTY HISTORY 

Prifates. 
Mortimer Able, Elgin; reenlisted as veteran. 
Isaac Atkinson, Elgin. 

Horace C. Brintnall, Elgin ; reenlisted as veteran. 
William E. Bird, Campton; reenlisted as veteran. 
William H. Brown, Campton; discharged May 21, 1864; disability. 
Noble Cole, Campton ; reenlisted as veteran. 
Henry H. Downey, Campton; reenlisted as veteran. 
William Diamond, Geneva. 

James Davidson, Elgin ; promoted sergeant and second lieutenant. 
Edwin F. Furnald, St. Charles; mustered out November 18, 1864. 
Moses H. Huntley, Batavia; reenlisted as veteran. 
Daniel L. Holgate. Elgin. 

Charles H. Hall, Campton; mustered out June i, 1865. 
Oliver Kingsbury, St. Charles; mustered out November 25, 1864. 
N. Bishop Lewis, Elgin; mustered out November 18, 1864. 
George Mock, Geneva. 
\Mlliam Mock. Elgin. 
W'alter Phelps, Campton. 
Stephen S. Pierce. St. Charles. 

Seth Phillips, Geneva; discharged September 28, 1862; disability. 
William H. Riggs, St. Charles; reenlisted as veteran. 
John Sperry, St. Charles. 

William Shattuck. Campton; reenlisted as veteran. 
James Sullivan. St. Charles; reenlisted as veteran. 
Hiram N. Wheeler, St. Charles; mustered out November 18, 1864. 
F. W. H. H. ^^'atkins, Campton; reenlisted as veteran. 
Eugene Walker, Campton. 
Eugene Whitesell. St. Charles. 

J 'ctcraiis. 
Mortimer Able, Kane county; mustered out July 6. 1865, as sergeant. 
Horace C. Brintnail. Kane county; mustered out July 6. 1865. 
William E. Bird, Kane county; mustered out July 6, 1865, as corporal. 
Noble Cole, Kane county; mustered out July 6, 1865, as sergeant. 
Henry H. Downey, Kane county; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Alcony P. Green, Kane count}'; promoted sergeant, then first lieutenant. 
Moses H. Huntley, Kane county; mustered out July 6, 1865, 
Peter Hawkins, Kane county; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
James Justice, Kane county; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Austin Mudge, Elgin; mustered out July 6, 1865, as corporal. 
William H. Riggs. Kane county; mustered out July 6, 1865, as corporal. 
William Shattuck, Kane county; mustered out July 6, 1865, as first ser- 
geant. 

James Sullivan, Kane county; mustered out July 6, 1865, as sergeant. 
Tames M. Thurston. Elgin ; promoted to quartermaster sergeant. 
F. W. H. H. W^atkins, Kane county; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Walter Able, Elgin ; died at Rome, Ga. 




FOUNTAIN SQUARE. ELGIN, IN 1870. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 255 

George H. Bishop, Geneva; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Thomas Hawkis, Elgin; discharged May 29, 1865. 

Porter Johnson, Blackberry; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Patrick McMahon, Geneva; mustered out November 28, 1864. 

Benjamin F. McMasters, St. Charles. 

Jacob A. Sabins, St. Charles; mustered out July 6, 1865, as corporal. 

David Seeley, Blackberry; deserted April 29, 1864. 

Charles M. Smith, Geneva: transferred to V. R. C, June, 1865. 

Adolph Thiese, Elgin; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Frank Whitney, Hampshire; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

COMPANY H. 

Captains. 
Alvah P. Moffatt, Aurora; resigned April 8, 1862. 
Luther C. Lee, Aurora; resigned November 7, 1862. 
Maurice J. McGrath, Aurora; mustered out January 23, 1865. 
Henry C. Williamson. Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

First Lieutenants. 
Luther C. Lee, Aurora; promoted. 
Maurice J. McGrath, Aurora ; promoted. 
Cornelius Snyder, Aurora; mustered out December 18, 1864. 

Second Lieutenants. 
Maurice J. McGrath, Aurora ; promoted. 
Cornelius Snyder, Aurora; promoted. 
Alfred Billing, Aurora; mustered out December 18, 1864. 
Elijah Perrigo, Aurora; mustered out Jul}- 6. 1865, as sergeant. 

First Sergeant. 
Cornelius Snyder. Aurora ; promoted second lieutenant. 

Sergeants. 
Alfred Billing. Aurora ; promoted second lieutenant. 
William Pruitt, Aurora; discharged April 22, 1862. 
George Rogers, Aurora; discharged June 6, 1862. 
James H. Snell. Aurora: reenlisted as veteran. 

Corporals. 
Trumans S. Chapel, Aurora: mustered out November 18, 1864. 
Noyes B. Wood, Aurora; discharged July 8, 1863. 
Washington J. Terry, Aurora: discharged April 22. 1862. 
Elijah Perrigo, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 
Henry E. Perrin, Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 
Clark Smith, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 
Ripha Warden, Aurora; mustered out December 31. 1864. 
Charles T. Douglas, Aurora: discharged Julv 19, 1863. 

Mitsician. 
James P. Wightman. Aurora: died January 30, 1863. 

Privates. 
Samuel Armstrong. Aurora: discharged May 16. 1862. 
George H. Bills, Aurora: reenlisted as veteran. 



256 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

William H. Billing, Aurora; died Rome. Ga.. August 29. 1864. 

James Bowers. Aurora; died Aurora. III. October i. 1863. 

James C. Brooks. Aurora: mustered out June 6, 1865; was prisoner. 

David Bronson. Aurora; discharged November 11. 1862. 

Richard S. Breese. Aurora; discharged January 16. 1862. 

Jacob Beecher. Batavia ; reenlisted as veteran. 

George J. Cassalman, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

George Cassalman. Aurora; discharged Februarj^ 27, 1862. 

Thomas Cuthburt. Aurora; discharged May 10. 1862. 

Jesse Dawson. Batavia; killed in action October 3. 1862. 

Adam Deal. Aurora; discharged May 22, 1862. 

Lewis A. Duncan, Aurora; discharged April 19, 1862. 

John Divine. Aurora; mustered out November 18. 1864. 

Alanson A. Edwards, Aurora; mustered out November 18, 1864. 

Thomas Fitzgerald. Aurora; discharged July — , 1863. 

Horace J. Gusline. Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

William Gibbons. Batavia; discharged September 19. 1862. 

Frederick Gerber. Aurora; discharged June 9. 1862. 

Patrick Kerns. Aurora; transferred to \'. R. C. April 10. 1864. 

Thomas Kilborn. Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

Lawrence Lewis, Batavia; discharged January 16, 1862. 

Alvin S. Martin. Batavia; mustered out November 18. 1864. 

Amos Martin. Batavia ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Nelson jNIiller. Batavia. 

Richard D. Marlett. Aurora : transferred to Company A. Cavalry. 

Alexander McLellen, Aurora; discharged November 8. 1862. 

Hiram Miller. Aurora : reenlisted as veteran. 

Amos Miller. Aurora; discharged September — . 1862. 

Jacob Meisner. Batavia; discharged September — , 1862. 

Dennis O'Hern. Aurora; discharged May — . 1862. 

Thomas Pruett. Aurora: discharged May 2. 1862; disability. 

Ransom Putnam. St. Charles; discharged July 25, 1863. 

Jacob Price. Batavia. 

James Raw. Batavia: died December 20. 1861. 

David \\'. Ray, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

William Ray, Aurora; discharged September 10. 1862. 

Flavius J. Randall. Batavia; transferred to Invalid Corps May r, 1864. 

Alexander Raymo. Aurora; discharged May 25. 1S62. 

Hiram Smith. Batavia; deserted November 16, 1861. 

Nelson M. Satterfield. Aurora; discharged April 24. 1862; disability. 

William Steinhauser, Aurora; died ]^Iay 27. 1862. 

Nelson Stickles. Aurora; died ]\Iay i. 1862. 

William Stevens. Aurora; discharged August 20, 1862. 

Washington Stickler. Batavia; died ^larch i, 1862. 

Justin Terry, Aurora; discharged July 3. 1862. 

Amos Terry. Aurora; discharged May 27. 1862. 

James Thompson. Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 257 

Peter Van Raalt, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 
Henry P. Williamson, Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 
Thomas P. Young. St. Charles; discharged June 6, 1862. 

P'cteraiis. 
George H. Bills, Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
George P. Brown, Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Jacob Beecher, Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

George J. Cassalman. Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865, as musician. 
Eugene B. Eastman, Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Horace J. Gusline, Aurora ; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Jacob Hoag, Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Fred A. Hanover. Aurora: mustered out July 6, 1865, as musician. 
Thomas Kilborn. Aurora; mustered out July 6. 1865, as sergeant. 
Amos Alartin, Aurora: mustered out July 6, 1865. as sergeant. 
Hiram ^liller, Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865, as wagoner. 
Charles P. Orr, Aurora ; promoted first lieutenant from sergeant. 
Elijah Perrigo. Aurora; mustered out July 6. 1865. as first sergeant. 
Henry E. Perrin. Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Clark Smith. Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
James H. Snell. Aurora: mustered out July 6, 1863, as sergeant. 
David \\\ Ray, Aurora: mustered out July 6, 1865. 
James Thompson, Aurora; died July 21, 1864. 
Peter Van Raalt, Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865, as corporal. 
Henry C. Williamson, Aurora; promoted sergeant, then captain. 
Henry Williams, Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Lud Wildrick, Aurora: mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Recruits. 
Marion Curry, Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Loren Davis, Batavia; died May 10, 1864. 
William Erkenbrack, Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Eugene Eastman, Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 
Francis Hecker, Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Hiram Kannady, Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
William D. Newell, Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
John H. Orr, Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Francis Orbin, Batavia; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
William Rose, Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Horatio Superman, Batavia; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Christopher Steabold, Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Alexander Sanders, Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Jonathan Stickler. Batavia; discharged April 2, 1862. 
Roswell Williams, Batavia; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Henry \\' ilHams. Batavia ; reenlisted as veteran. 

COMPANY I. 

Capfains. 
Joseph T. Brown. Dundee; discharged February 3, 1864. 



258 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Thomas H. Thompson, Dundee; mustered out October 24. 1864. 
Amos W. Welbern. Dundee; mustered out July 6. 1865. 

First Lieutenants. 
Charles B. Wells, Geneva ; promoted quartermaster. 
Thomas H. Thompson. Dundee : promoted. 
Jerome D. Davis. Dundee; promoted lieutenant colonel. 
John \\'. Acker, Dundee; mustered out July 6. 1865. 

Second Lieutenants. 
Thomas H. Thompson, Dundee; promoted. 
Jerome D. Davis, Dundee ; promoted. 
Amos W. \A'elbern, Dundee; promoted. 
Leroy Powers, Dundee; mustered out July 6. 1865, as sergeant. 

First Sergeant. 
Samuel Anderson, Elgin. 

Sergeants. 
Thomas H. Thompson. Dundee; promoted second lieutenant. 
Cyrus P. Bailey, Dundee. 

Amos Welbern, Dundee ; reenlisted as veteran. 
John W. Sharp. Dundee. 

Corfjorals. 
Jerome D. Davis, Dundee; promoted sergeant, then lieutenant. 
William G. Stanford. Dundee. 
Adelbert E. Rose, Dundee. 
William J. Demster, Dundee. 

James A. Rose. Dundee; mustered out October 24, 1864. 
G. Rockwell V"n Dries'n. Drmdee. 

Privates. 
John W. Acker. Dundee: reenlisted as veteran. 
Frank Abbott, Elgin : reenlisted as veteran. 
Henry Batterman. Elgin. 

John Binner, Dundee; mustered out October 24, 1864. 
Edgar Bowen, Dundee; reenlisted as veteran. 
John Bryan, Dundee; reenlisted as veteran. 
W'illiam A. Carnaby, Dundee; reenlisted as veteran. 
Charles Campbell. Dundee; mustered out March 27, 1S63; disability. 
John C. Cockerton, Dundee. 

Andrew J. Davis. Dundee; mustered out October 24, 1864. 
Humphrey \\'. Davenport, Dundee; reenlisted as veteran. 
John Dempster. Dundee; reenlisted as veteran. 
Hugh Durham. Dundee; reenlisted as veteran. 
Henry C. Edwards. Dundee. 

Elisha Egleston. Dundee; mustered out October 24. 1864. 
Erasmus Fitts, Dundee. 

David Gorom. Dundee; discharged June 20. 1S64; disabilit}'. 
William H. Harlow. Dundee; reenlisted as veteran. 
Edward J. Hawley. Dundee. 
Newton Heath. Dundee; reenlisted as veteran. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 259 

Joel N. Haven, Dundee. 

Frederick Hilgenfield, Dundee; transferred to Invalid Corps April i8, 
1864. 

Henry S. Holden, Dundee; mustered out October 24, 1864. 

William S. Huntley, Dundee. 

Frank J. Huntoon. Dundee. 

James Jones, Dundee ; mustered out March 26, 1863 ; disability. 

George S. Kendall. Dundee; mustered out October 24, 1864. 

Holmes \\'. Kendall. Dundee; mustered out October 24, 1864. 

Anson Lowe. Dundee ; reenlisted as veteran. 

John Lake. Dundee; mustered out November 2, 1864. 

James Miller. Dundee. 

Imogene Moore, Dundee ; reenlisted as veteran. 

George W". More. Dundee. 

Daniel Manning, Dundee ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Joseph Mitchell, Dundee; discharged December 2, 1863; disability. 

Robert Oates, Dundee: mustered out October 24. 1864. 

J. Parker Perry, Dundee; reenlisted as veteran. 

Chauncey H. Parmely. Dundee; reenlisted as veteran. 

Leroy Powers. Dundee; reenlisted as veteran. 

George Pounder, Dundee. 

Jefferson Robinson, Dundee; reenlisted as veteran. 

Hiram P. Rose, Dundee; mustered out October 24, 1864. 

Frederick Scholts, Dundee; reenlisted as veteran. 

Peter Scholts. Dundee; mustered out October 24, 1864. 

Milo L. Sherman, Dundee; reenlisted as veteran. 

John E. Shaw, Dundee; mustered out October 24, 1864. 

Michael Shovelancl, Dundee. 

Jcseph H. Simpsim. Dundee; mustered out November 2, 1864, as ser- 
geant. 

Caleb M. Smith, Dundee. 

Solomon Spicer, Dundee. 

Calvin W. Sprague. Dundee. 

Henry W. Transue, Dundee. 

Sidney L. W'anzer, Dundee; discharged October 20, 1863; disability. 

Waldo Ward, Dundee. 

Joseph Watts, Dundee; reenlisted as veteran. 

Henry F. Western, Dundee. 

William E. Wisner, Dundee ; reenlisted as veteran, 

James Wolaver, Dundee. 

Clark Wolaver, Dundee ; reenlisted as veteran. 

William Wolaver. Dundee; reenlisted as veteran. 

Jacob Wolaver, Dundee. 

Veterans. 

Frank Abbott, Elgin : mustered out July 6, 1865, as musician. 

Edgar Bowen, Dundee; mustered out July 6. 1865, 

John Bryan, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865. 



260 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

William A. Carnaby, Dundee; discharged March 13, 1865, as sergeant; 
disability. 

H. W. Davenport, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

John Dempster, Dundee ; promoted hospital steward. 

William H. Harlow, Dundee; discharged July 6, 1865, as corporal. 

Newton Heath, Dundee; nuistered out July 6, 1865. 

William R. Hemenway, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Imogene Moore, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865, as sergeant. 

J. Parker Perry, Dundee: mustered out July 6, 1865, as sergeant. 

Milo L. Sherman, Duntlee; discharged May 23. 1865; disability, 

Joseph Watts, Elgin; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Amos W. Welbern, Dundee; promoted sergeant, then second lieutenant. 

William Wola\-er, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865, as corporal. 

Recruits. 
Ezra Aldrich, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Alanson M. Barnard, Dundee; absent without leave since June 20, 1865. 
George W. Barter, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Aaron J. Buck, Dundee; mustered out May 28. 1865. 
George W. Conrad, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Robert Duff, Rutland; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Charles Ehom, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Philemon Gaut, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865, 
Lev.'is C. Guptill, Elgin; nuistered out July 6, 1865. 
Nelson Hiltz, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Edgar E. Hoxie, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Frank C. Kendall, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
David Maear, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
^^'illiam ]\Iaear, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
J. Willard Merrill, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
John S. Moore, Dunilee ; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Charles Ott, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Henry Perry, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Sanford J. Peck, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
John Ouinlam, Elgin; mustered out May 28, 1865. 
Z. Taylor Russell, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Joseph Shuckneck, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Charles Scott, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Henry Sprague, Elgin; killed Atlanta August 13, 1864. 
Frederick Wall, Dundee; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Hubbard Wells, Elgin; mustered out July 6, 1863. 
William Webb, Elgin; mustered out May 28, 1865. 

COMP.\NY K. 

Captains. 
John S. Wilcox. Elgin ; promoted lieutenant colonel. 
Alphonso Barto, Plato; mustered t)ut October 24, 1864, 
Henry M. Patchin, Hampshire; mustered out July 6, 1865. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 261 

First Lieutenants. 
Ethan J. Allen, Hampshire; promoted adjutant. 
Edward S. Wilcox, Elgin; promoted adjutant. 
Henry S. Doty, Hampshire; mustered out October 24, 1864. 
John M. Vote, Hampshire; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Second Lieutenants. 
Alphonso Barto, Plato ; promoted. 
Edward S. Wilcox, Elgin ; promoted. 
Henry S. Doty, Hampshire ; promoted. 
Charles Isbell, Hampshire; mustered out July 6, 1865, as sergeant. 

First Sergeant. 
Henry S. Doty, Hampshire ; promoted second lieutenant. 

Sergeants. 
Thomas Clark, Elgin. 
Jedediah S. Dormand, Plato. 
Van Rensselear J. Lowe, Elgin. 
David Curtis, Dundee; discharged April 6, 1863. 

Corporals. 
Henry N. Patchin, Hampshire; reenlisted as veteran. 
George Ostrander, Elgin; mustererl nut October 24, 1864. 
Robert C. Burns. Hampshire. 
David Corsair, Plato ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Rodney W. Stone, Elgin. ; 

Tinidthy Silver, Elgin; mustered out October 24, 1864. 

Musicians. 
Thomas E. Lawrence, Geneva. 
William Wells, Aurora. 

Prii'ates. 
William Allen, St. Charles; never joined company after muster. 
David Allen, Hampshire. 

Charles Baldwin, Hampshire; reenlisted as veteran. 
Charles Bennett, Plato. 

William Barrett, Elgin ; reenlisted as veteran. 
Larier Bennett, Plato, reenlisted as veteran. 
Calvin AL Coon, Hampshire. 

Dean Cutting, Elgin; discharged in 1862; disability. 
Thomas Clute, Plato. 
Gary M. Campbell, Plato. 
John A. DeWolf, Hampshire. 
Edward Doty, Hampshire; reenlisted as veteran. 
James S. Ellis, Elgin. 
David Edwards, Elgin. 

Charles Gustafson, Elgin: discharged July 5, 1862. 
Frank Garner, Hampshire; reenlisted as veteran. 
John Haines, Hampshire. 
Peter Hanover, Elgin ; reenlisted as veteran. 
James B. Hoagland, Elgin. 



262 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Charles Isbel, Hampshire ; reenhsted as veteran. 

George Johnson, Plato ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Jeremiah Jones, Elgin; reenlisted as veteran. 

William W. Kenned}-, Elgin. 

Michael Ketsell, Elgin. 

John Lightfoot, Elgin. 

Joseph B. Lightfoot, Elgin ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Leroy Morgan, Hampshire. 

Samuel Morris, Elgin ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Patrick Murry. Elgin; discharged August 21. 1862; disability. 

John Murry, Elgin. 

Lawrence McGowan. Plato; reenlisted as veteran. 

Andrew J. Pitcher. Burlington. 

James Pierce, Elgin. 

George M. Peck, Dundee ; promoted commissary sergeant. 

Edward Patchin, Hampshire; reenlisted as veteran. 

Edward F. Parker. Hampshire; discharged October — , 1861 ; writ of 
habeas corpus. 

George H. Peck, Elgin. 

Franklin B. Reams, Hampshire: reenlisted as veteran. 

Charles C. Robinson. Plato. 

William P. Roberts. Plato; reenlisted as veteran. 

Samuel A. Reams, Plato; reenlisted as veteran. 

Anson Reberger, Elgin. 

John Swadling, Elgin ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Thomas Siddons, Elgin. 

Edwin C. Sackett, Plato. 

Merritt L. Sherman. Burlington; mustered out October 24. 1864. 

Hugh Shannon, Elgin; mustered out October 24, 1864. 

WilHam Tuck, Plato. 

Samuel P. Tyler. Hampshire. 

Orin W. Tyler, Hampshire; reenlisted as veteran. 

Benjamin Thomas, Elgin; promoted chaplain. 

Cummings Tyler, Hampshire. 

George Underbill, Elgin; discharged December 22, 1862. 

George W. Vale. Hampshire; discharged January 2, 1864. to enlist in 
Company H. First Missouri Light Artillery. 

John M. Vote, Hampshire ; reenlisted as veteran. 

William Walters, Elgin. 

Cuthbert Walters, Elgin; mustered out October 24, 1864. 

George Whitcomb, Jr., Hampshire. 

William A. Whitmire, Hampshire; mustered out October 24. 1864. 

Thomas Williams, Plato. 

David L. Young. Plato. 

Veterans. 

Charles Baldwin, Hampshire; mustered out July 6, 1865, as corporal 

Larier Bennett. Plato; mustered out July 6. 1865. as sergeant. 



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BELOW THE DAM, CARPENTERSVILLE, ABOUT 1875. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 265 

William Barrett. Elgin; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
David Corsair, Plato: mustered out July 6, 1865, as sergeant. 
Edward Doty, Hampshire; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Henry W. Eastman. Elgin: promoted sergeant major from sergeant. 
Francis Garner, Hampshire: mustered out July 6, 1865. 
C. M. Getzelman, Hampshire; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Peter Hanover, Elgin; mustered out July 6, 1865, as corporal. 
Charles Isbell, Hampshire; mustered out July 6, 1865, as first sergeant. 
George H. Johnson. Plato; mustered out July 6. 1865, as corporal. 
Jeremiah Jones. Elgin; mustered out July 6, 1865, as corporal. 
Joseph B. Lightfoot, Elgin; mustered out July 6, 1865, as sergeant. 
Samuel Morris. Elgin: mustered out July 6. 1865. 

Lawrence McGowan, St. Charles; mustered out July 6, 1865, as corporal. 
Henrv N. Patchin. Hampshire; promoted captain from first sergeant. 
Edward O. Patchin, Hampshire; mustered out July 6, 1865, as sergeant. 
Samuel A. Ream. Hampshire; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Franklin B. Ream, Hampshire: mustered out July 6, 1865, as corporal. 
William B. Roberts, Plato; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Owen W. Tyler, Hampshire; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
John M. Vote, Hampshire: promoted corporal, sergeant and first 
lieutenant. 

Recndts. 
Abraham Aurand, Elgin; discharged. 
Henry Batterman, Elgin; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Ambrose Brayman, Elgin; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Madison B. Cole. Elgin; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
John Eaton, Burlington; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Josiah N. French, Elgin; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Malachi Getzelman. Hampshire : reenlisted as veteran. 
Jonathan Klick, Hampshire: mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Daniel Kohler, Hampshire; died at Dallas, Georgia, June 4, 1864. 
William H. Litner, Hampshire; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
John Larkins, Elgin: mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Michael McCarthy. Elgin; mustered out July 6. 1865. 
Samuel McGahey, Elgin; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Phillip Munch, Hampshire. 
Antoine Mooth, Hampshire. 

Sebastian Pfister, Elgin; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
John Reinhart. Elgin; mustered out June 3, 1865. 
Otis B. Skinner, Elgin; discharged. 
Levi Ream. Hampshire; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Charles Schueese. Elgin: mustered out July 6, 1865. 
Peter Tyson. Hampshire. 
Harlow H. Tyler. Elgin; discharged. 
Frederick W. Tyler, Elgin ; discharged. 
Alphonso Vanocker, Plato; mustered out July 6, 1865. 
William Vote, Hampshire; died at Marietta, Georgia, August 12, 1864. 



266 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

John Van Meet, Elgin : discharged. 

William Whitcomb, Hampshire. 

Ernest Whitmire, Hampshire; mustered (Uit July 6, 1865. 

UitassigiieJ Recruits. 
Thomas J. Clark, Geneva. 
Chauncey E. Doty, Elgin. 

Delazon Ellithorp, Elgin; discharged January 28, 1863: wounds. 
Robert Long, Geneva. 
Sylvester Yeldham, Aurora; deserted. 

HISTORY OF FIFTY-FIFTH INFANTRY. 

The Fifty-fifth Illinois Infantry \'ulunteers was organized at Camp 
Douglas, Chicago, and mustered into service October 31, 1861. 

It was one of the two regiments raised by David Stuart, its subsequent 
colonel, under act of Congress, and called the "Douglas Brigade." The other 
regiment was the one afterwards known as the famous "Forty-second Illi- 
nois." The two regiments never served together. The Fifty-fifth Illinois was 
principally made up from bodies of recruits raised in Fulton. jMcDonough. 
La Salle, Grundy, DeKalb, Kane and Winnebago counties, and its members 
were largely young men raised upon farms. 

Left Camp Douglas November 9, 1861, over the Chicago & Alton Rail- 
road for Alton, Illinois, thence by steamboat for St. Louis, and arrived at 
Benton Barracks November 11. Remained at Benton Barracks under the 
immediate command of General W. T. Sherman until January 12, 1862. wiien 
it departed for Paducah, Kentucky, by steamer, which place was reached on 
January 22. The voyage was a tedious and painful one owing to steamer 
being frozen into ice and aground for many days. 

The regiment participated in the expedition sent to Columbus. Kentucky. - 
to test the question of its evacuation immediately after the capture of Fort 
Donelson. 

The contest at the latter place was avoided by the regiment in conse- 
quence of the utter worthlessness of its arms before that time issued to it. 

On March 8, 1862, the Fifty-fifth embarked on steamer to participate in 
the movement up the Tennessee river, which resulted in the battle of Shiloh, 
movement on Corinth, etc. On March. 15, it landed with other troops at a 
point several miles above Pittsburg Laniling and attempted to cut the railroad 
in the interior, but this object was defeated by high water. 

From that point the expedition dropped down to Pittsburg Landing and 
went into camp on the front line. It was here brigaded with the Fifty-fourth 
and Seventy-first Ohio, and Colonel D. Stuart, of the Fifty-fifth, placed in 
command of the brigade then known as the Second Brigade. Fifth ( Sherman's) 
Division. Although belonging to Sherman's division, it was located about 
two miles east of the other three brigades of its division, being in point of fact 
the extreme left of the army, which met the rebel attack so soon to go into 
historv as the battle of Shiloh. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 267 

Prentiss' division was next to its right and front, though about one mile 
away. The Fifty-fifth with its companion regiments was encamped upon the 
road leading from Pittsburg Landing to Hamburgh Landing, and near a small 
branch of Lick Creek. 

On tlie morning of the battle of Shiloh, like all other troops upon the 
field, it had no premonitions of the fearful cundict t(5 follow, until the report 
of firearms further to the right gave evidence of that fact. The regiment, 
under the immediate command of Lieutenant Colonel O. Alalmborg, formed 
the center of the brigade, the Seventy-first Ohio being on its right, and the 
Fiftv- fourth Ohio (Zouaves) upon its left. After forming line in several 
localities contiguous to its camp, during which time it was not engaged except 
in skirmishing, though under the fire of Gage's rebel battery, position was 
taken to the left of its camp and about sixty rods in its rear along the south 
edge of a preci])itous ravine. Inuring the evolutions resulting in this forma- 
tion the Se\enty-first Ohio ( excepting eighteen men and its adjutant) 
retreated. 

The position of the regiment at this time was with its right resting at a 
point precisely five hundred yards east of Colonel Stuart's headquarters, with 
the Fifty- fourth Ohio upon its left. A full half mile of space unoccupied by 
troops existed to its right. This dangerous interval had been in part caused 
by the retreat of the Seventy-first Ohio. No artillery was upon this portion 
of the field to assist the federal troops. The Fifty-fifth Illinois had exactly 
five hundred and twelve men in line, and the Fifty-fourth Ohio from three 
hundred and fifty to four hundred. 

The first date given in the following is the one of rank or enlistment and 
the last the date of muster : 

George Johnson, Chicago; January 12, 1864; January 31, 1864. 

John D. Johnson, Chicago; January 22, 1864; January 31, 1864. 

John L. Lidburg, Chicago; January 25, 1864; January 31, 1864. 

Patt Lynch, Chicago; February 5, 1864; February 29, 1864. 

Walter Murry, Chicago; February 9, 1864; February 29, 1864. 

Robert Parny. Chicago; February 29, 1864: February 29, 1864. 

\\'illiam Potter, Chicago: February 9, 1864; February 29, 1864. 

^\'illiam L. Quick. Harlem; Fel^ruary 12, 1864; February 29, 1864. 

Michael Stanton, Groveland ; October 12, 1864; October 12, 1864. 

Thomas Wilson, Chicago; January 12, 1864; January 31, 1864. 

John Wells, Chicago: February 9, 1864; December 29, 1864. 

RECRUITS TRANSFERRED FROM COMP.-kNY G, I27TH ILLINOIS INFANTRY. 

First Sergeant. 
Charles R. Danisson; August i8, 1862; October 22, 1862. 

Sergeants. 
Dow Shebley: August 18, 1862; October 22. 1862. 
Matthew Kuns; August 18, 1862; October 22, 1862. 
Daniel Newcomb; August 18, 1862; October 22, 1862. 
Albert ]\I. Clark; August 18, 1862; October 22, 1862. 

Corporal. 
John Rapp; August 18, 1862; October 22, 1862. 



268 KANE COrXlY HISTORY 

Privates. 
Jacob Baker; August i8. 1862; October 22, 1862. 
John Elliott; August 18, 1862; October 22, 1862. 
John Fitzgerald; August 18, 1862; October 22. 1862. 
James Fitch; August 18. 1862: October 22. 1862. 
Hugh Fagan; August 18, 1862; October 22, 1862. 
Edward Grinimeson ; August 18. 1862: October 22. 1862. 
Joseph Kearney; August 18. 1862; October 22. 1862. 
James Harris; August 18. 1862; October 22, 1862. 
Thomas R. Powers. Nf>\ember 8, 1863; January 20. 1864. 
William Toorner; August 18. 1862; October 22. 1862. 
Robert S. Wood; August 18. 1862: October 22. 1862. 

In this position it was finally attacked by Chalmers and Jackson's 
Brigades of Bragg's Corps, who had been placed in positimi at this point 
under the personal supervision of General Albert Sidne\ Johnston, the rebel 
commander-in-chief. 

The main attack commenced here about noon, and this position was held 
until between two and three o'clock p. m. b}' the two isolated regiments above 
named, and was of incalculable value to the ultimate success of the Union 
Army, inasmuch as it defended the extreme left during a vital period from a 
flank movement contemplated by the rebel order of battle and vigorously 
attempted at the period spoken of. 

After being nearly surrounded and suiTering terribly the regiment re- 
treated from point to point and took its position with its organization still 
complete in the last line formed in the evening near the Landing. It partici- 
pated in the battle of Monday, acting on the right, and suffered some loss. 
During this terrific conflict, the first in its history, the Fifty-fifth lost the 
heaviest of any Federal regiment in that engagement except the Ninth Illi- 
nois. The loss of the Fiftj'-fifth was one officer and fiftj'-one enlisted men 
killed and nine officers and one hundred and ninety men wounded, being a 
total of two hundred and fifty men. Twenty-six men were captured. 

The regiment was engaged in the advance on Corinth and lost one killed 
and eight wounded on May 17. 

Entered Corinth May 30, and mo\ed thence westward with General 
Sherman, stopping for a greater or less period at Chewalla. LaGrange. Lafay- 
ette. ]\I(iscow and Hollv Springs. On Julv 21. 1862. the regiment reached 
^Memphis with General Sherman's division and remained until November 26, 
doing camp and picket duty, participating in several expeditions into the in- 
terior, having one man wounded. Took part in what was known as the "Talla- 
hatchie" campaign, leaving ]\Iemphis November 26. 1862. Returned to Mem- 
phis and descended the Mississippi river to take part in the battle of Chickasaw 
Bayou, where it lost two killed and four woimded. 

Was at battle of Arkansas Post January to and 11. Rising three men 
wounded. 

Its first colonel, David Stuart, who had previously been appointed briga- 
dier general bv the President, failed of confirmation and thereupon quit the 



KANE COUNTY HLSTORY 209 

service in the spring of 1863. Colonel O. Malmborg commanded the regi- 
ment during the balance of its three years' term. 

April 30, 1863. was with expedition making feint on Maine's Blufif. 
Thence it proceeded after tlie army, then making the movement in rear of 
\'icksburg, overtaking the same in time to be under fire at Champion's Hill, 
sufYering no loss. Crossed the Big Black May 17 at Bridgeport and arrived 
in front of the works at Vicksburg May 18. Participated in the assaults of 
May 19 and 22. and bore its full share during the siege, losing fourteen killed 
and thirty-two wounded. 

It lost one man killed while scouting near the Big Black. After being 
present at the surrender of Vicksburg July 4, the regiment proceeded with 
Sherman's expedition to Jackson, wherein it lost one killed and two wounded. 

Encamped in tiie vicinity of the Big Black until September zj. 1863, 
when it embarked at \'ick,sburg for Memphis and moved thence through 
Corinth to luka. Moved finally across the Tennessee and upon the laborious 
march to Chattanooga, arriving at that point November 21, 1863. During 
night of November 23. with rest of brigade, manned fleet of pontoon boats 
in North Chickamauga creek and during intense darkness descended and 
crossed the Tennessee and captured the enemy's pickets — one of the most 
daring operations of the war. At the battle of Mission Ridge, which followed, 
the regiment lost three wounded. 

Marched with Sherman the round trip to the relief of Kncxville. En- 
camped after retmn successively at Bridgeport, Bellefonte and Larkinsville 
during the winter. While at the latter place, after exacting the right to elect 
otificers, the regiment veteranized, at which time the existing field officers 
all failed of election, and at the end of their term qviit the service. The vet- 
erans were granted thirty days' furlough from this point. At the opening of 
the Atlanta campaign the regiment took its place as usual in the Second Di- 
vision of the Fifteenth Corps and shared in the manifold labors and dangers 
of that famous campaign, including the movement on and battle of Jones- 
boro, losing thirty-six killed and eighty-six wounded, being a total of one 
hundred and twenty-two, or about one-half of its number engaged. 

The heaviest loss was at the assault upon Kenesaw Mountain on June 
27, 1864, viz. : Fourteen killed, including its gallant commander. Captain 
Augustine, and thirty-three wounded. 

Joined in the pursuit of Hood through northern Alabama and returned 
to Atlanta, Georgia, where one hundred and sixty-two non-veterans were 
discharged. 

Marched the entire distance on the picnic excursion termed the "March 
to the Sea." Thence north, and lost near Bentonville, N(.)rth Carolina, one 
man killed, one wounded and six taken prisoners. 

After surrender of Johnston, regiment marched to Washington via 
Richmond and took part in the grand review. 

The regiment was then ordered to Louisville, Kentucky, where it 
remained in camp a few weeks. Thence moved by steamer to Little Rock, 
Arkansas, where it was mustered out August 14, 1865. Arrived at Chicago 
August 22, where it receixed final payment and discharge. 



5i70 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

During the entire periotl of its service it received less than fifty recruits, 
hence all its casualties were from its original members. 

This regiment was engaged in thirty-one battles and was one hundred 
and twenty-eight days under fire. It marched three thousand two hundred 
and forty miles, traveled by railroad two thousand eight hundred and seventy- 
five miles and by water a further distance of five thousand eight hundred 
and fifty miles, total eleven thousand nine hundred and si.xty-five miles. 

It lost actually killed in battle one hundred and eight men, and its total 
wounded were three hundred and thirty-nine, making an aggregate of four 
hundred and seventeen struck with the missies of war. There are no data 
to state the exact number of mortally wounded, though it is known that 
thirty-five died from such cause within one year after "Shiloh." Of the 
men who actually took the field in battle array more than two out of every 
three were hit by bullets. About one-third of such men lost their lives from 
the casualties of battle or disease. During the war this regiment had only 
forty-nine men captured, which speaks volumes for its disciplne and cohesion. 

It was extremely fortunate in its medical department, Dr. E. O. F. 
Roler, of Chicago, being its surgeon in chief. 

Its chaplain, the Rev. M. L. Haney, was all that could be desired, noted 
as well for his great personal bravery as for his zealous performance of 
professional duties. 

It is not probable that any other regiment so closely followed the destiny 
of General W. T. Sherman. It was first in his brigade at Benton barracks, 
in December, 1861, and thereafter became a member of the Fifth Division, 
commanded by that general. Subsequently it was always a member of the 
Second Division of the Fifteenth Army Corps, and following all the footsteps 
of that general except the Meridian raid. In its various marches it traversed 
every southern state except Delaware, Te.xas and Florida. 

Owing to its extraordinary losses at Shiloh and receiving no recruits it 
was small in numbers at all subsequent periods and noted for its proficiency 
in drill. 

After reorganization at the end of its three years' term, it was com- 
manded until nearly the close of its career by its senior captain, when Captain 
C. A. Andress became lieutenant colonel. Its dead now lie buried in nine 
different states. 

FIFTY-THIRD INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY B. 

Vctera}!s. 
Hugh Kennedy, Aurora; promoted sergeant, then second lieutenant. 

COMPANY c. 

Recruits. 
James Timons, Rutland; mustered out July 22, 1865. 

Unassigiicd Recruits. 
Thomas O. Long, Rutland. 
Peter J. Peterson, Rutland. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 271 

FIFTY-FIFTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY D. 

Recruits Transferred from One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Illinois 

Infantry. 
Henry Haeger, Elgin; mustered out August 14, 1865. 

COMPANY E. 

Captain. 

Charles Tazewell, Elgin; resigned August 31, 1862. 

Second Lieutenant. 

William R. Halligan, Elgin; resigned March 5, 1862. 

Corporals. 

Joseph Lightfoot, Elgin; died at Young's Point, Louisiana, March 6, 
1863. 

William Short, Elgin; reported deserter, February, 1864. 

Joseph Carley, Elgin; reenlisted as veteran. 

Jacob Flatro, Elgin. 

Prii'ates. 

John F. Bauman, Elgin; mustered out April 21, 1865. 

George W. Bangs, Elgin; mustered out October 31, 1864. 

Charles Cleaves. Elgin; deserted May 25, 1862. 

Elan T. Canfield, Batavia. 

William Downes, Elgin; discharged December 23, 1863; disability. 

Timothy Donovan, Elgin. 

Robert K. Florence, Elgin. 

Michael Guilfoil. Elgin; promoted principal musician. 

James D. Gubbins, Elgin; mustered out October 31, 1864. 

John Guilfoil, Elgin; mustered out October 31, 1864. 

John Hunter, Gilbert ; reported discharged ; died since. 

Thomas Mann, Elgin; transferred to V. R. C. April 28, 1864; mustered 
out October 31. 1864. 

Horatio Nelson, Elgin; mustered out October 31, 1864. 

Nelson W. Pecar, Gilbert; reenlisted as veteran. 

James Robinson, Elgin. 

John Smith, Elgin; died at Walnut Hills, Missouri, June 22, 1863; 
wounds. 

Charles Sylva. Kane county. 

William Thdmpson. Dundee; discharged January 28. 1863; wounds. 

Veterans. 

Joseph Corbey. Elgin; discharged June 25, 1864; disability. 

Nelson W. Pecar, Dundee; mustered out .August 14, 1865, as corporal. 

COMPANY F. 

Private. 
David Kreider, Virgil. 

Veterati. 
Edmund T. Tottman, \'irgil; discharged .April 28, 1865; disability. 



272 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

COMPANY H. 

Recruit. 
Charles Ingraliam, Batavia ; transferred to V. R. C. May i. 1864. 

COMPANY K. 

Private. 
L. B. Mohler, Virgil ; reenlisted as veteran. 

J'^eteraii. 
L. B. Mohler, Virgil: mustered out August 14, 1865; prisoner of war. 

FIFTY-SEVENTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years" Service.) 

COMPANY G. 

Captain. 
David Arnold, Elgin; mustered out July 7, 1865. 

First Lieutenant. 
David Arnold, Elgin ; promoted. 

Sergeant. 
George W. White. Elgin; deserted February 8. 1862, Chicago, Illinois. 

Corporal. 
David Arni)ld, Elgin; reenlisted as veteran. 

COMPANY G. 

Veteran. 
David Arnold, Elgin; promoted sergeant, then first lieutenant. 

HISTORY OF THE FIFTY-EIGHTH INFANTRY. 

The Fifty-eighth Illinois Infantry Volunteers was recruited at Camp 
Douglas, Chicago. Illinois, on the iith of February, 1862. The regiment left 
Camp Douglas, eight hundred and eighty-seven strong, via the Illinois Central 
Railroad for Cairo, Illinois, and reported to Brigadier General E. A. Paine on 
the 1 2th. Was immediately furnished with arms and started from Cairo 
about midnight, with orders to proceed up the Ohio to Smithland, Kentucky, 
thence up the Cumberland to the vicinity of Fort Donelson, and report to the 
officer in charge of United States forces. Arrived near Fort Donelson on 
the night of the 13th and disembarked at daybreak, the 14th, having been 
assigned to the Third Brigade. Third Division, Colonel J. M. Thayer, First 
Nebraska, commanding. 

Was temporarily assigned tu the Second Division, General C. F. Smith 
commanding. On reporting to General Smith was assigned to the brigade of 
Colonel Lauman, of the Seventh Iowa, and about 11 A. M. 14th was in 
position, subject to considerable annoyance from the enemy's shell from the 
fort. In the afternoon two cumpanies were deployed forward and were 
briskly engaged for a short time. The men suffered exceedingly from the 
intense cold, no fires being allowed. The men were poorly prepared for the 
severe task imposed upon them — very few having seen service. The arms 
furnished them had been condemned and thrown aside b\- other regiments 
and there was. in short, no confidence in them whatever. .\ few casualties 




FIRST IRON BRIDGE, ELGIN. 



•iMdJL. 




WEST EI.GIX FKO.M CHICAGO STKKK'I' I'.IIIDGE, ABOUT 1870. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 275 

occurred during the evening and night. On the morning of the I5tli was 
reassigned to the Third Brigade, Third Division. \\'as under fire a short 
time in the morning and in the evening. While attempting to secure an 
atlvanced and desirable position was considerably cut up and thrown into con- 
fusion by a masked battery, upon which it approached to within two hundred 
and fifty yards. For a few moments the ranks were considerably broken, the 
fire being entirely une.x]5ected. By moving to the right, howexer, a short 
distance, it was protected from the sweeping fire of grape and canister and 
reformed, though then exposed to a murderous fire from the enemy's sharp- 
shooters ( who swarmed every tree) and skirmishers. Threw out skirmishers 
and drove back the enemv, and held the same. Xight now closed around. 
When leaving the boats the commissary was directed to bring to the regiment 
rations for three days, they being unprovided with ha\-ersacks. In the many 
changes made the commissary sergeant was unable to find the regiment and 
the men got no rations from Friday morning till Sunday morning, when they 
were procured from the division commissary at daybreak. On the morning 
of the 1 6th. Sunday, a white flag was seen waving over the fort, denoting its 
surrender. 

The conduct of the men on this occasion was remarkable; raw men, with- 
out rations, and armed with the most worthless guns, they behaved as well as 
veterans of a hundred battles. Remained at Fort Donelson till the afternoon 
of Tuesday, the i8th, when it moved on about four miles en route for Fort 
Henry. Camped for the night and at 7 A. M. the next day resumed the 
march and arrived at Fort Henry about noon. The roads were almost 
impassable and consequently the march was a most difficult one. Remaining 
at Fort Henry till it embarked on the transport "Boston" and went up the 
Tennessee with the troops commanded by Major General Smith. Arrived 
at Crump's Landing, about four miles above Savannah, and disembarked. 
Were at once moved out about eleven miles into the neighborhood of Purdy. 
During the march it rained incessantly. Remained all night, returning to 
transports about 9 P. M. Men very much exhausted. Made a capture of a 
few rebel pickets. Remained on transport till morning, then disembarked and 
went into camp about one-half mile from the landing. Remained in camp 
for several days, drilling and completing organization df the regiment. 

On the 2gth of March embarked on steamer and went up to Pittsburg 
Landing. Having been reassigned to the division of General C. F. Smith, 
was directed to report to Colonel Sweeney, of the Fifty-second Illinois, and 
was assigned to his brigade. Went into camp (juite near the river, not over 
one-third of a mile distant. Proceeded to change arms, secured transporta- 
tion, and in every way completed the organization. On the morning of 
Sunday, the 6th of April, was awakened by heavy firing from the front; 
received orders to fall in and await further orders. About 8 :30 A. M. was 
moved out one mile and a half, when orders were received from General 
Grant, in person, to take position across a road and hold that position. Imme- 
diately changed front and took the position as directed. With some slight 
changes in position, mainly to the front and perpendicular to the front, it 
occupied tlie same ground all day. From the time of going into the fight, 



276 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

about 9 A. M.. it was almost continually under fire. About 4 P. ]\I. the right 
and left were giving way, but orders were imperative to hold the position. 
At length it became evident that unless some change was made the regiment 
would be taken jirisoners. The regiment stood alone. Charge after charge 
was made by the stubborn and determined foe. To prevent being flanked, the 
order was given to fall back to the brow of a hill in the rear. Arrived thf^re, 
found the enemy on our rear (now front) on all sides, and the regiment 
exposed to a continuous fire. Disorganized portions of regiments were then 
in the utmost confusion. Orders were gi\en to forward and cut its way out, 
which could have been done with less loss than was suffered afterward in 
Soutiiern prisons. About two thousand three hundred ofticers and men were 
captured in this fight by the enemy. The surrender did not all take place the 
same time. The surrender of the Fifty-eighth was made a few minutes 
before 6. The loss in this engagement was frightful — amounting in killed, 
wounded and prisoners to upwards of four hundred and fifty. More than 
three-fourths of those taken prisoners were wounded, and only two hundred 
and eighteen were taken prisoners. The fact of the regiment being taken 
was undoubtedly in a great measure the salvation of the army. The right 
and left were entirely turned, and the enemy, on one wing only, needed to 
know of the success of the other to press on ; but \\hile the center held out 
they could not know their success. And when at last this small band was 
forced to succumb, night closed her mantle over the scene and the hauehtv 
victors could pursue their advantage no further. Suffering all the privations 
and hardships which the rebels knew so well how to inflict on their helpless 
victims, for about seven months, the prisoners, or what was left of them, about 
one hundred and thirty men. were paroled and allowed to go north. The few 
men left in camp were strengthened by men returned from hospital and sent 
from the state as recruits, and participated, with credit, in all the skirmishes 
and 1 attles consequent on the siege of Corintli. Was engaged at the battle, 
near luka and lost twenty-three out of thirty-one in killed, wounded and 
prisoners. 

In December. 1862, different detachments of the regiment were concen- 
trated at Camp Butler, near Springfield, Illinois. Remained at Camp Butler, 
recruiting and guarding rebel prisoners, until June, 1863, when the regiment 
was sent to Cairo to garrison that post. Remained at that place till January i, 
1864 — in the meantime garrisoning Mound City, Illinois, and Paducah. Ken- 
tucky, for the greater part of the time. Some of the companies had a skirnush 
near Obion River. Kentucky, in October. Companies A and B garrisoned 
Mayfield, Kentucky, and had several slight encounters with rebels at that 
place. 

On the 2ist of Jaimary embarked on transjiort and went to \'icksburg, 
Mississippi. Was assigned to the First Brigade, Third Division, Sixteenth 
Army Corps, and on the 3d of February left Vicksburg, Mississippi, for Meri- 
dian, Mississip])i. Was the first regiment to cross the Big- Black, the first to 
engage the enemy at Oueen's Hill, and the first infantry regiment to enter 
Meridian, Mississippi. During this expedition the men were seventy hours 
with but one day's rations, with which they marched forty-seven miles and 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 277 

destroyed seven miles of railroad. Returned to \'icksburg and was sent with 
the troops of General A. J. Smith to participate in the Red River campaign. 
Arrived at Simmsport on the evening of tlie 12th of March. Disembarked 
to cook, etc. 

On the morning of the 13th moved out from Simmsport about five miles 
and took possession of two field works, which the rebels evacuated on the 
approach of the regiment. Returned to the boats in the evening and at 8 
o'clock the same night started for Fort De Russey. Arrived at the fort, which 
it invested, about 4 P. M. on the 14th. A sanguinary struggle ensued, but 
after a stubborn resistance the enemy surrendered. The colors of the Fifty- 
eighth were the first planted on the works. The boats having come up, the 
troops were embarked and proceeded to Alexandria. After great and unnec- 
essary delay at Alexandria, moved up the river (by land about twenty miles, 
the remainder by water) to Grand Ecore; there disembarked and remained 
until the 7th of April, when the army of General Smith moved out on the 
Shreveport road, preceded two days by the Army of the Gulf. During the 
afternoon of the 8th heavy firing was heard in the advance and on arrival at 
Pleasant Hill learned that a severe engagement had taken place, in which the 
troops of General Banks had been signally defeated and were then falling 
back. A council of war having been held, it was decided to give the enemy 
battle and early on the following day the lines were formed. About 4 P. M. 
the rebels, fluslied with the victory of the previous day and heavily reinforced 
by fresh troops from Texas, threw themselves upon the line. A brigade of 
Maine troops on the right was speedily driven from the ground. The Fifty- 
eighth occupied the extreme left of the line, and as the brigade of eastern troops 
gave way charged on the enemy and poured upon them an enfilading and near 
fire, which at once turned their flank. Following up this advantage the regi- 
ment captured over five hundred prisoners and recaptured from the enemy a 
battery belonging to the First United States Artillery, which had been taken 
from General Banks' troops. In this engagement the loss was very heavy. 
The utmost gallantry was shown, both by officers and men, and to the Fifty- 
eighth is due the credit of having given the first check to the foe and of taking 
five-sixths of the prisoners captured during the engagement. Many of the 
prisoners here taken were the same the regiment guarded in Camp Butler. 
Though the enemy was most signally defeated, the command was ordered to 
retreat, and at 3 o'clock A. M. on the loth the army fell back, leaving the dead 
and wounded on the field, to be cared for by an enemy who was then some 
sixteen miles distant, retreating as rapidly as possible. Reached Grand Ecore 
on the 1 2th and went into camp. 

Mustered out at Montgomery. Alabama, April i, 1866, and ordered to 
Springfield, Illinois, for final payment and discharge. 

FIFTY-EIGHTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 

(Three Years' Service.) 

Colonel. 
William F. Lynch. Elgin; mustered nut Feliruary 7. 1865. 



'^78 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Major. 
Thomas Newlaii, Aurora; resigned August 20, 1864. 

Qiiartcrinaster. 
Nicliolas T. Roche. St. Cliarles ; commission cancelled. 

Surgeon. 
Henry M. Crawford, St. Charles; mustered out February 7, 1865. 

First Assistant Surgeon. 
Emery A. Merrifield, Elgin; prumoteil sergeant Forty-fourth Regiment. 

COMPANY .\. 

Captain. 
jLihn Muri)hy. Elgin; transferred as consolidated. 

First l.icutciiants. 
Eugene Lynch. Elgin; resigned October 2, 1862. 
John Murphy, Elgin; promoted. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Jojm ]\rur])hy, Elgin; promoted. 

First Sergeant. 
John Murphy, Elgin; promoted second lieutenant. 

Privates. 
Daniel Di.xon. Elgin; killed at Fort Donelson, February 15, 1862. 
Edward Fitzgibbons, Geneva; deserted April, 1862. 
Patrick Hough. Elgin ; reenlisted as veteran. 
Alpheus Hannigan, Elgin; discharged June 16, 1862; disability. 
Peter Hinds, Elgin; discharged July 18, 1862; disability. 
John C. B. Hilbert, Elgin: killed at Fort Donelson, February 15. 1862. 
Bartholomew Kelly, Elgin; killed at Fort Donelson, February 15, 1862. 
Joseph Leonard, Aurora ; transferred to Company A as consolidated. 
Daniel Murphy, Elgin ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Charles A. Mallory, Aurora; promoted quartermaster sergeant October. 
20, 1862. 

Dennis Murran, Elgin; deserted February 18, 1862. 

Francis Overton, Aurora; mustered out February 7, 1863. 

John O'Brien, Elgin; reenlisted as veteran. 

John O'Mara, Elgin; deserted February 11, 1862. 

James O'Brien, Elgin: deserted February 11, 1862. 

Frederick Rumble. Aurora; mustered out February 7. 1865. 

Henry J. Rumble, Aurora; discharged August, 1862; disability. 

Daniel M. Smith. Elgin; deserted February 11, 1862. 

Richard Wright. Elgin; deserted February n. 1862. at Camp Douglas. 

William \\'alsh. Elgin; deserted February 11. 1862. at Camp Douglas. 

I'eteran. 

« 

Daniel Murphy. Elgin; transferred to Company .\ as consolidated. 

Reeruils. 
Barnev Carty, Aurora: transferred to Company -\ as consolidated. 
William L. Gage, Elgin; transferred to Company A as consolidated. 
Thomas Jones, Elgin: discharged June 16, 1862; disability. 
James Kinnev. .Xurora; transferred to Companv .\ as consolidated. 



KANE COUNTY IITSTORY 279 

Benj. F. IMontgomery. Geneva; transferred to Company A as consoli- 
tlated. 

John Sayers, Aurora ; transferred to Company A as consolidated. 
John B. Smith, Elgin ; promoted wagon master. 

COMPANY B. 

Captain. 

David J. Lynch, Elgin; resigned November 3, 1864. 

Recruits. 

Michael Armon. Elgin; deserted March 15. 1863. at Camp Butler, 
Illinois. 

Lyman Burr, Aurora; transferred to Company B as consolidated. 

Adam Deal (or Dale) , Aurora ; transferred to Company B as consolidated. 

John Edwards, Elgin; deserted January 22, 1863, at Camp Butler, Illinois. 

Tobias Hudson, Aurora; deserted March 29, 1863, at Camp Butler, 
Illinois. 

William Hamilton, Elgin ; transferred to Company B as consolidated. 

John Price, Aurora; transferred to Company B as consolidated. 

John Sheady, Elgin; died, Memphis. I\Iav 25, 1864. 

James Sweet, Aurora; died at Memphis, May 24, 1864; wounds. 

Robert Sommers, Elgin ; transferred to Company B as consolidated, 

John Scanlan, Elgin ; transferred to Company A as consolidated, 

John Terry, Aurora; discharged October i, 1863; disability. 

Martin Tiernan, Aurora; deserted November 22, 1863, at Paducah, 
Kentucky. 

Thomas Taylor, Aurora ; transferred to Company B as consolidated. 

COMPANY C. 

Privates. 

Nathaniel S. Abbott, Elgin; discharged December 31, 1861. 

Merritt Fenton, Aurora; discharged March 20, 1862; disability. 

Frederick Goble, Elgin; discharged for wounds received April 6, 1862, 

Daniel Harris, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

Edson R. Hitchcock, Aurora; transferred to V. R. C. November 15, 
1864. 

George Reed, Aurora; deserted June 15, 1862, at Cairo, Illinois. 

J'ctcrait. 

Daniel Harris, Aurora ; transferred to Company C as consolidated. 

Rccinits. 

Comfort H. Chapmaji, Dundee; deserted January 25, 1863, at Camp 
Butler, Illinois. 

James M. McNall, Plato; died June 3, 1862, 

Joseph Plant, Aurora: accidentally killed May i, 1863. 

Elisha Tarble, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

Abijah Tarbell, Aurora; mustered out January 14, 1865. 

COMP.\NY D. 

Captain. 
Gustar C. Kothe, Elgin; mustered out Felaruary 7, 1865; expired term. 



280 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

First Lieutenant. 
Gnstar C. Kothe, Elgin ; promoted. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Gustar C. Kothe. Elgin; iJi'omcjted. 

Sergeant. 
Frederick Schuiz, Elgin; killed at Shiloh April 6, 1862. 

Recruits. 
John Benchler, Aurora; transferred to Company D as consolidated. 
John Elchroth. Aurora; killed at Old Town, Mississippi, July 14. 1864. 

COMPANY E. 

Veteran. 
John P. Ott, Geneva; deserted August i, 1864, while on furlough. 

Recruits. 
John P. Ott, Geneva; reenlisted as veteran. 
Richard V. Smith, Aurora; deserted April 8, 1864. 
Jesse Schafer, Elgin ; transferred to Company D as consolidated. 

COMPANY F. 

Recruit. 
William Bronson, Sugar Grove; transferred to Company C as (.onsoli- 

" COMPANY G. 

First Lieutenant. 
Robert H. Winslow, Sugar Grove; resigned January 26, 1863. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Robert H. W'inslow. Sugar Grove ; promoted. 

Prii'ates. 
Samuel B. Cole, Elgin; transferred to Com]:iany I January 5. 1862. 
Cyrus Cole, Elgin; transferred to Company I January 5, 1862. 
Edward Champlain, Elgin; transferred to Company I January 5, i862_. 
Thomas Connery, Elgin; transferred to Company I January 5, 1862. 
Richard Collins, Plato; transferred to Company I January 5, 1862. 
Solona Ellis, Elgin; transferred to Company I January 5, 1862. 
Asa Fairbanks, Aurora; died at Hermann, Missouri, November q. 1864. 
William Freeborn, Elgin; transferred to Company I January 5. 1862. 
David Gifford, St. Charles; discharged May 12, 1862; disability. 
James Golden, Elgin; transferred to Company I January 5. 1862. 
Charles Gibbs, Dundee; transferred to Company I January 5, 1862. 
Thomas James, Plato; transferred to Company I January 5, 1862. 
John Oness, Big Rock; transferred to Company I March 2, 1862. 
William Oness, Big Rock; transferred to Company I March 2, 1S62. 
Edward Parker, Elgin; transferred to Company I January 5, 1862. 
\\'illiam Painter, Plato: transferred to Cnmi^any I January 5. 1862. 
Joe Rose, Elgin; transferred to Company I January 5, 1862. 
Alonzo B. Russell, Sug'ar Grove; reenlisted as veteran. 
Duane Smith. Aurora; deserted February 8, 1862, at Camp Douglas, 
Illinois. 

William Sowles. Plato; transferred to Company T January 5. 1862. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 281 

George Tompkins, Plato; transferred to Company I January 5, 1862. 

Liul W'ildrick, Aurora; deserted February 8, 1862, at Camp Douglas, 
Illinois. 

Seldon S. \\'alkley, Plato; transferred to Company I January 5, 1862. 

John Wilson. Elgin; transferred to Company I January 5, 1862. 

/ 'etci aiis. 

Dennis Hamblin, St. Charles; promoted sergeant, then second lieutenant. 

Alonzo B. Russell, Sugar Grove; transferred to Company B as consoli- 
dated, n 

Kccrtiits. 

William Clegg, Aurora; transferred to Company B as consolidated. 

William Dunn, Aurora. 

George Hodgden, Big Rock; deserted February 2, 1862, at Camp Douglas, 
Illinois; transferred from Company I. 

Sylvester M. Johnson, Sugar Grove; transferred to Company B as 
consolidated. 

Andonison J. Nichols, St. Charles; discharged June 22, 1862; disability; 
transferred from Company I. 

Henry Rodgers, Aurora; deserted August 24, 1863, at Cairo, Illinois. 
Under Cook of A. D. 

Bill Johnson, St. Charles; transferred to Company B as consolidated. 

COMP'ANY H. 

Privates. 
Herman Burr, Elgin; discharged; served with Company I. 
A. B. Foster, Elgin; died, Memphis, February 28, 1863. 
George Shever, Aurora; discharged April 25, 1862; disability. 

RecrJiits. 
Hiermann Burr, Elgin; deserted. 
Thomas Ryan, Elgin; discharged July 3, 1862. 

COMPANY I. 

Fii'st Lieutenant. 
David J. Lynch, Elgin ; promoted to Company B. 

Privates. 
David Bradley, Elgin; accidentally killed December 29, 1865. 
James Burns, Elgin; died at Macon, Georgia; prisoner of war 
Thomas Betts, Aurora; discharged March 24, 1863; wounds 
James Costello, Elgin; mustered out February 7, 1865. 
Patrick Coleman, Elgin ; discharged for disability. 
Joseph Copias, Elgin; discharged February 2, 1862; disability. 
William Dunn, Aurora; transferred to Company G February 25, 1862. 
Edward Galligher, Elgin; discharged August 28, 1862; disability. 
Michael Gartland, Elgin; drowned at Fort Henry March — , 1862. 
William Given, Elgin; died at Camp Douglas. Illinois, February 12, 1862. 
James Heffernan, Elgin; First sergeant; killed at Shiloh April 6, 1862. 
Dennis Hamblin, St. Charles; transferred to Company G January 5, 1862. 
Gregory Larkin, Rutland; deserted February — , 1863. 
Anthony McBriarty, Elgin; transferred to Company G January 5, 1862. 



282 KANE COINTY HISTORY 

Thomas McKenna, Aurora; mustered out February 7. 1865. 

J. Mahoney (or Moloney), Rutland: killed at Shiloh April 6, 1862. 

Jesse Maybee, Elgin: discharged May 26. 1862: disability. 

Jason H. Morris, Rutland: absent: sick at muster out of regiment. 

Patrick McEvoy, Elgin ; deserted March — . 1 863. 

Adonison J. Nichols, St. Charles ; transferred to Company G January 5, 
1862. 

George P. Nelson, Elgin; discharged by order of Colonel Lynch. 

Albert Phillips. Aurora; deserted February — . 1863. 

Jerome Phillips, Aurora; deserted February — , 1863. 

John Ryan No. i, Rutland; deserted February — , 1863. 

John Ryan No. 2, Rutland; discharged for disability. 

Edward Scott, St. Charles; transferred to hospital April 6, 1862. 

James Scanlon, Elgin ; transferred to V. R. C. 

James Syron, Rutland: killed at Yellow Bayou, Louisiana, ]\Iay 18, 1864. 

Joseph Tyrrell, Rutland; mustered out February 7, 1865, as sergeant. 

William R. Willie, St. Charles. 

Recruits. 

Cyrus Coles, Elgin ; discharged for disability. 

Alexander Cannon, Elgin; deserted February — , 1863. 

Aaron Cribbs, Elgin; deserted May 11, 1862. 

Edward Champlain, Elgin; discharged. 

Thomas Connery, Elgin. 

Patrick Downey, Aurora; transferred to Company D as consolidated. 

Charles Dickenson, Plato; deserted January 20, 1862. 

Egbert O. Dickinson, Elgin. 

Solono Ellis, Elgin; deserted February i, 1862. 

W'illiam Freeborn, Elgin: discharged May 27, 1862: disability. 

Charles Gibbs, Dundee; discharged May 22. 1862; disability. 

Patrick Graham, Aurora; deserted November — , 1864. 

John Jones, Elgin; died December 4, 1862. 

Thomas James, Kane county. 

Edward Keating, Elgin; deserted May — , 1864. 

Patrick Kinney, Dundee: transferred to Company D as consolidated. 

Alfred Nicholson, Elgin; deserted February, 1863. 

John O'Ness, Big Rock; discharged October 20, 1862; disaljility. 

William O'Ness, Big Rock, reenlisted as veteran. 

John Powell, Plato: discharged May 26. 1862: disability. 

Warren Painter. Plato; deserted March — . 1862. 

Edward Parker, Elgin; deserted February 26. 1862. 

William Painter, Kane county; deserted February 26, 1862. 

Joseph Rose, Elgin: deserted February — , 1863. 

A\'illiam Sowles, Kane cour.ty; discharged October 20. 1862; disability. 

John Wilson, Elgin. 

Seldon S. Walkley, Kane county ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Heiman Burr. Elgin; mustered out February 7, 1862, as a member of 
Company H. 



KANE COUNTY IILSTORY 283 

FIFTY-EIGHTH (CONSOLIDATED) INFANTRY' REGIMENT. 

(Three Years' Service.) 
Colonel. 
William F. Lynch, Elgin; muster in revoked May 27, 1865. 

First Licittcnaut. 
John Murphy, Elgin; cashiered (as major) October 8, 1865; disability; 
removed February 2, 1866. 

Major. 
John Murphy, Elgin; promoted. 

COMPANY A. 

Captain. 
John Murphy, Elgui; promoted major. 

Privates. 
Barney Carty, Aurora; died at Greenville. Louisiana, September 17, 1865. 
William L. Gage, Elgin; mustered out May 20, 1865. 
Patrick Haugh, Elgin; mustered out April i. 1866, as first sergeant. 
James Kinney, Aurora; discharged April 9, 1865, day he left service. 
Joseph Leonard, Aurora; absent without leave since March 11, 1865. 
Benj. F. Montgomery, Aurora; mustered out April i, 1866. 
Daniel Murphy, Elgin; mustered out April i, 1866, as corporal. 
John O'Brian, Elgin; mustered out April i, 1866. 
John Savers, Aurora; mustered out May 24, 1865. 
John Scanlnn. Dundee; mustered out April i, 1866. 

COMPANY B. 

First Sergeant. 
Alonzo B. Russell. Sugar Grove; promoted second lieutenant. 

Corporals. 
John Price. Aurora; mustered out March 19. 1866. 
William R. \\')lie, St. Charles; absent; sick at muster out of regiment. 

Privates. 
William Clegg, Aurora ; deserted. 

Adam Deal, Aurora; discharged July 18, 1865; disability. 
William Hamilton, Elgin; died at Montgomery, Alabama, July 21, 1865. 
Sylvester M. Johnson, Sugar Grove; mustered out June 6, 1865. 
Robert Love, Aurora; mustered out April i, 1866, as corporal. 
Robert Sommers, Elgin; mustered out February 11, 1866. 
Thomas Taylor, Aurora; mustered out April i, 1866. 

COMPANY c. 

Privates. 
Daniel Harris, Aurora; died at Montgomery, Alabama, July 8, 1865. 
Elisha Tarble, Aurora; mustered out April i, 1866. 

COMPANY 1). 

Privates. 
John Benchler, Aurora; discharged September 13, 1865; disability. 
Jesse Schafer, Elgin; mustered out April i, i8(S6. 

John Thompson, Elgin ; killed at Nashville, Tennessee, December 30, 
1864. 



284 KAXK CorX'I'Y TTTSTORY 

COMPANY E. 

Prizxitcs. 
Thomas Burke. Rutland; deserted April 6. 1865. 
John Scott. Rutland; deserted April 6. 1865. 

[ 'iiassigiu'd Recruits. 
Laben Blair. Aurora. 
John Williams. Elgin. 

FIFTY-XIXTH IXFAXTRY REGHIEXT. 
(Three Years" Service.) 

COilTAXY B. 

J'etera)i. 
John E. Brown. Elgin : nuistered out December 8, 1865. as corporal. 

Rccntits. 
Thomas Hagan, Aurora ; absent ; sick at muster out of regiment. 
Marcellus C. Hibbard. Aurora: mustered out December 8. 1865. 
Hugh Patterson. Aurora: deserted June 18. 1865. 

COMP.\NV D. 

Recruit. 
.\braham Zimmerle. Rutland: mustered rut December 8. 1865. 

COMP.ANY F. 

Recruit. 
John L. Slawson. Aurora: missing after battle of Pickett's Mill. May 

^7 1864. COMPANY G. 

Recruits Transferred from Eiglity'Ui]ith Illinois Infantry. 
Forgust Anderson. A.urora: mustered out December 8. 1865. 
.Andrew Ducat. Aurora: discharged June 19. 1865. 
William H. Xisley, .Aurora: mustered out December 8. 1865. 

COMPANY H. 

Recruits Transferred from Eighty-ninth Illinois Infantry. 
Alexander Burns, Aurora; mustered out December 8, 1865. 
Frank ^I. Barry. Aurora; discharged August 11. 1865. 
Lewis .A. Duncan. Kane county: mustered out September 5. 1865. 
Andrew J. Hasley. Aurora : charge of desertion removed. 
John S. \'. Jarstad. Aurora; absent; sick at muster out June 22, 1865. 
George AI. Jenks. Aurora: mustered out December 8. 1865. 
William Russ. Kane county: mustered out December 8. 1865. 
Henrv C. Scott. Aurora: mustered out December 8. 1865. 
\\'illiam Williams. Aurora: mustered out December 8. 1865. 

COMP.\XV I. 

Recruits Transferred from Eighty-uiutli Illinois Infantry. 
John AI. Alurray. Aurora: deserted June 19. 1865. 
Palmer Presher. Aurora; mustered out December 8. 1865. 
George Strewer. Elgin: deserted June 19. 1865. 




INTERIOR OF OLD DU BOIS OPERA HOUSE BURNED IN 1886. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 287 

COMPANY K. 

Recruits Transferred from Eighty-ninth Illinois Infantry. 
Patrick Hickey, Aurora; mustered out December 8, 1865. 

Unassigncd Recruits. 
Charles Griffin, Rutland. 
Henry Harvey, Rutland. 

STXTY-FOURTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY c. 

Corporal. 

Daniel Murphy, Elgin. 

Prii'otes. 

Bartholomew Kelly, Elgin; discharged July 2, 1862; disability. 

Davis M. Smith, Elgin ; transferred Sixteenth Missouri Infantry July 
19. 1862. 

Martin Tansev, Elgin; transferred Sixteenth Missouri Infantrv July 19, 
1862. 

\\'illiam Welch, Elgin; transferred Sixteenth Missouri Infantry July 19, 
1862. 

COMPANY E. 

Corporal. 
John C. Hibbert, Elgin; transferred Sixteenth Missouri Infantry July 
19, 1862. 

SIXTY-FIFTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years" Service.) 

COMPANY D. 

Recruit. 
Martin Herser, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

COMPANY E. 

Veteran. 
William Rose, Blackberry; transferred to Company K as consolidated. 

COMPANY H. 

Veterans. 
John Gibbons, Aurora ; transferred to Company H as consolidated. 
Kelvin Nichols, Aurora; transferred to Company H as consolidated. 

COMPANY I. 

Private. 
Josiah \\*ilkinson. Blackberry; mustered out ^lay 15, 1865. 

SIXTY-FIFTH (CONSOLIDATED) INFANTRY REGIMENT. 

(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY G. 

Private. 
Abram Lansing, Aurora; absent; sick at muster out of regiment. 



288 KANE COINTY HISTORY 

SIXTY-SEVEXTH IXFAXTRY REGLMEXT. 
(Three Months' Service.) 
Quartermaster. 
Isaac X. Buck, Aurora; mustered out September. 1862. 

- COMP.\N'Y A. 

Sergeants. 
S. Byron Winfield, Geneva ; promoted commissary sergeant. 
Alex. N. Davis, Geneva; mustered out October 6, 1862. 

Prh'atcs. 
Frank Bunker, Geneva; mustered out October 6, 1862. 
Wilber F. Higgins, Geneva; deserted June 15, 1862. 
Sheldon E. Whipple, Geneva; mustered out October 6, 1862. 

COMPANY I. 

Privates. 
John Freeman. St. Charles; mustered out September 2"/, 1862. 

SIXTY-EIGHTH INFANTRY REGIMEXT. 

(Three ^lonths' Service.) 

COMPAXY K. 

Privates. 
W'illard Algire. Sugar Grove: mustered out September 26. 1862. 
James D. Hughes. Sugar Grove; mustered out September 26, 1862. 
Thomas Hamilton, Sugar Grove; mustered out September 26. 1862. 
Francis M. Meadows, Sugar Grove; mustered out September 26, 1862. 
James Stewart, Sugar Grove; mustered out September 26, 1862. 

HISTORY" OF SIXTY-XIXTH IXFAXTRY. 

The Sixty-ninth Regiment was organized at Camp Douglas, Chicago, 

and was mustered into service June 14. 1862. It remained on duty at Camp' 
Douglas, guarding the camp and rebel prisoners. 

SIXTY-NINTH IXFAXTRY REGIMEXT. 
(Three Months' Service.) 

COMPANY B. 

Captain. 
Jonathan Kimball, Elgin; mustered out September 2y, 1862. 

First Lieutenant. 
Samuel H. Himter, Elgin; mustered out September 27, 1862. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Thomas W. Tefft. Elgin; mustered out September 2~. 1862. 

First Sergeant. 
John Short, Elgin; mustered out September 2j, 1862. 

Sergeants. 
Michael J. Dunne. Dundee: mustered out September 2/. 1862. 
John Cockerton, Elgin: mustered out September 2/. 1862. 
John Megginson, Elgin; mustered out September 2~. 1862. 
Calvin Loomis, Elgin; mustered out September 2-. 1862. 



KANE COUNTY TTISTORY 289 

Corpornls. 
Henry T. Adams, Elgin; mustered out Septemljer 2/, 1862. 
John C. Russell, Elgin; mustered out September 2j. 1S62. 
Sibeus Sweet, Elgin; mustered out September 27, 1862. 
Henry W'ells, Elgin; mustered out Septcmljer 27. 1862. 
Albert Kinney, Elgin; mustered out September 2/. 1862. 
Edgar Hoxie, Dundee; mustered out September 2/, 1862. 

Pri-iVfcs. 
S. Nathaniel Abbott, Elgin; mustered out September 2/. 1862. 
George Abbott, Elgin; mustered out September 2/. 1862. 
George Adams, Elgin; mustered out September 2/, 1862. 
Robert Adams, Elgin; mustered out September 27, 1862. 
John Augustine, Elgin; mustered out September 27, 1862. 
Alexander Cannon, Elgin; mustered out September 2/, 1862. 
Thomas Cannon, Elgin; mustered out September 27, 1862. 
Charles Crane. Dundee; mustered out September 2/, 1862. 
John Cambell, Dundee; mustered out September 27, 1862. 
George W. Clark, Elgin; mustered out September 2y. 1862. 
D. B. Caffee, Campton; mustered out Septemljer 27, 1862. 
George Dunlap, Elgin; mustered out September 27, 1862. 
Milton Earring, Elgin; mustered out September 27. 1862. 
Robert K. Florence, Elgin; musteretl out September 2j. 1862. 
Daniel Flynn, Elgin; mustered out September 2j, 1862. 
Thomas Frazier, Plato; mustered out September 2y, 1862. 
Joseph Flannery. St. Charles; mustered out 'September 27. 1862. 
David Gifford, St. Charles; mustered out September 27, 1862. 
Philander Gates, Campton; mustered out September 27, 1862. 
Danford M. Jones, Elgin: mustered out September 27, 1862. 
Aaron Kribbs, Elgin; mustered out September 2j, 1862. 
Chester Kinney, Elgin; mustered out September 27, 1862. 
Richard Keough, Elgin; mustered out September 27. 1862. 
John McConnell, Aurora; mustered out September 2j, 1862. 
Peter Pocket, St. Charles: mustered out September 27. 1862. 
Henry Plaunty, Hampshire; mustered out September 27, 1862. 
Christopher Rose, Elgin; mustered out September 27, 1862. 
William H. Rowe, Plato; mustered out Septemljer 2j, 1862. 
James Sheedy. Elgin: mustered out September 2y, 1862. 
William F. Todd, Elgin; mustered out September 27. 1862. 
George A. ^Vebster, Elgin: mustered out September 2/, 1862. 
Benjamin Webster, Elgin: mustered out September 2y. 1862. 
Albert Ward, Elgin; mustered out September 2j, 1862. 
Peter Wolover, Dundee; mustered out September 27, 1862. 

Recruits. 
Phillip Brinnan. Dundee: deserted June 24, 1862. 
James K. Elliott, St. Charles : discharged by the surgeon. 
Stephen A. Houghton, Dundee: transferred to Miller's Battery. 



2y0 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Heiinezaii Leverett, Elgin; transferred to Company E, Sixty-ninth 
Regiment. 

Patrick Alurreen. St. Cliarles ; discharged by the surgeon. 

COMPANY c. 

Prkvfcs. 
Wilber F. Higgins, Geneva: mustered out September 2j, 1862. 
William LeBarren, Geneva; mustered out September 27. 1862. 
James C. Long. Geneva; mustered out September 27, 1862. 
George Steurtr, St. Cliarles; mvstered out September 2~, 1862. 

COMPANY D. 

Sergeant. 
Theodore F. Barnes, Aurora; mustered out October 6, 1862. 

COMPANY E. 

Musician: 
Hannigan Loverett, Elgin; mustered out September 27, 1862. 

COMP.\NY F. 

Prizxites. 
James E. Hollenback, Aurora; mustered out October 6, 1862. 
Hiram Kenneday, Aurora; mustered out October 6, 1862. 
Alexander Saunders, Aurora; mustered out October 6, 1862. 
Peter Stuckey, Aurora; mustered out October 6. 1862. 

SEVENTY-FIRST INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Months' Service.) 

COMPANY F. 

Privates. 
Samuel Baxter, Aurora; died. Mound City. October 19, 1862. 
Amasa Trask. Aurora; mustered out October 29. 1862. 

HISTORY OF THE SEVENTY-SECOND INFANTRY. 

The Seventy-second Regiment Illinois Volunteers was organized at 
Chicago as the First Regiment of the Chicago Board of Trade. Its first bills 
were put out for one company, calling itself the "Hancock Guards." on July 
23, 1862, and exactly one month afterwards (August 23, 1862) the entire 
regiment was complete and mustered into the service of the United States 
for three years, or during the war. The very day of their muster they were 
started ofif for Cairo, where they arrived on the 24th. Their strength at that 
time was thirty-seven (37) officers and nine hundred and thirty men. 

On the 6th day of September they were ordered out to Paducah, Ken- 
tucky, wliere they went on post duty until the 17th, when they were sent down 
to Columbus, Kentucky, at which point they did guard and picket duty mainly, 
until November 21. They were nut. however, idle in this time, but in addition 
to the thorough and constant drilling, which has since made them one of the 
finest organizations in th.e army, found time for two expeditions, one to 
Clarkson, Missouri, on October 6. when they dispersed a rebel camp and cap- 
tured a lumiber of prisoners, horses, etc.. and the other, on October 21. to 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 291 

New Madrid, which was not so eventful. On November 21 they were ordered 
to join General Ouimby's command, Seventh Division, Seventeentli Army 
Corps, at Moscow, Tennessee, and with that command they arrived on 
December i, 1862, at Lumpkin's Mills, Mississippi, whence they accompanied 
(jrant's army as far as the Yaconapatafa river. Owing to the supplies being 
rut off at Holly Springs, the army was forced to return, after penetrating 
as far as the point mentioned, and the Seventy-second was sent as guard to 
the wagon train to Memphis, Tennessee. There, at a distance of about eight 
miles from the city, on the line of the Memphis & Charleston Railroad, they 
went into camp and remained until January 19, 1863, when they were sent 
into the city and quartered at the navy yard to do provost guard duty. While 
making Memphis their headquarters the regiment went out on an expedition 
to Horn Lake Creek, where they dispersed a gang of Blythe's rebel guerrillas, 
capturing quite a number of them. 

On March i the division, of which the Seventy-second formed a part, 
started down the Yazoo Pass, but finding Fort Pemberton in their way and 
not being able to take it just then, went back. April 23 they landed at 
Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, and from there marched up with Grant's army 
to Yicksburg. On May 16 they arrived at Champion Hill, just in time to 
turn the enemy's left, and by that movement decided the fate of the day. 
That was their first battle and, fortunately for them, their share in it, although 
a most important one, was not very severe. On May 17 they found themselves 
at Big Black, in the rear of Vicksburg, and on the igth this regiment was the 
first to open the attack on the rebel stronghold. In the desperate charge of 
the 22d they participated with the highest honor to themselves, losing some 
one hundred and thirty of their number killed, wounded and missing, but 
fighting a.'; bravely as men could fight until the last. From that time until 
July 4, when the rebels capitulated, the Seventy-second did its duty among 
the foremost in the siege, and on the capitulation were among the first to 
enter the city. 

On July 12 the Seventy-second embarked for Natchez, Mississippi, where ' 
they landed the succeeding day, taking possession of the town, capturing a 
large number of prisoners, pieces of artillery, confederate government stores, 
and five thousand head of Texas cattle. Here they remained until October 
17, doing provost duty, with the exception of a couple of skirmishes at St. 
Catherine's Creek, Mississippi, September i, and at Cross Bayou, Louisiana, 
on September 23. 

October 18, 1863, they went on provost guard duty at Vicksburg, Missis- 
sippi, where they remained until October 30, 1864. During this year of com- 
parative inaction they only went on two expeditions. The first of these was to 
Benton, Mississippi, on May 7, 1864, where they had a short but pretty severe 
fight with a bodv of rebels ; and the second was to Grand Gulf, Mississippi, on 
July 18. 

October 30, 1864, they were ordered to report to Major General Howard, 
commanding Army and Department of the Tennessee, then with Sherman's 
army, and in pursuance of this order arrived at Nashville, Tennessee, on 
November 13. They there found themselves too late to join Sherman in his 



292 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

great "march to the sea," and were ordered to Cohuiibia, Tennessee, to join 
Major General Schofield's command, which they did on November 21, when 
Hood crossed the Tennessee river and seemed coming down "Hke a wolf on 
the fold." Schofield's army found it convenient to retire towards Nashville. 
On November 29 they evacuated Columbia, and the Seventy-second was in a 
severe skirmish with the enemy at Spring Hill, on the road between Columbia 
and Franklin. On the succeeding day they arrived at Franklin and hastily 
threw up some light earth works. About 4 o'clock that afternoon Hood 
attacked them and the battle raged from that hour until midnight with terrific 
fury. In that fight the Seventy-second lost nine officers out of sixteen engaged 
and one hundred and fifty-two men, who were either killed or severely 
wounded. That night they left their works and retreated towards Nashville, 
which they reached on December i, and here the Seventy-second was thrown 
on the extreme right of the Federal lines inclosing- Nashville, under command 
of General A. J. Smith. On December 1 5 the whole Union army was moved 
outside its works to give battle to Hood, and on that and the succeeding day 
the great battle of Nashville took place, resulting in the complete whipping of 
the "Rebs." From that time until January 3, 1865, they were engaged in the 
pursuit of Hood's army, following it up closely as far as Clifton, but Hood 
managed to escape across the Tennessee river. From Clifton the regiment 
went by boat up the Tennessee river to Eastport, Mississippi, arriving there 
January 13, 1865, and there remaining in quarters until February 9, making 
in that time but one expedition, and that a fruitless one, to luka and Corinth. 
Mississippi. 

February 9 they started for New Orleans, where they arrived February 
21. Until Alarch 21 they remained in camp eight miles below the city and 
then they were embarked and taken across the gulf to Dauphin Island, 
Alabama, where they arrived on March 17. The ne.xt day the brigade, which 
included the Seventv-second, crossed over to the main land on the western 
shore of Mobile bay. Here they remained a few days, skirmishing with the 
enemy, when, having accomplished the object of the e.xpedition, which was 
merely a feint on Mobile from that direction, they rejoined the army at Fish 
river, near Smith's Mills, Alabama. 

On March 26 the corps to which they were attached moved, and on the 
morning of the 27th appeared in front of Spanish Fort. From that time until 
the night of April 8 the regiment was actively engaged in the siege. At 5 
o'clock on the evening of the 8th the Union troops were ordered up into the 
first line of their works. The attack began and at near midnight the First 
Brigade (including the Seventy-second) and the Third Brigade, Sixteenth 
.\rmy Corps, charged on the enemy's works and carried them, capturing the 
fort. The next morning they moved out on the road to Blakely, when their 
division was held in support of the other divisions charging the enemy's works 
at that place. The place having been taken, the command went into camp 
here until the 14th, on which date they moved forward on the road to Mont- 
gomery, Alabama, marching over the two hundred miles tn that place in 
exactly eleven days. At Montgomery they remained in camp until May 2^. 
when they were ordered to Union Springs, Alaliama, forty-five miles from 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 293 

Montgomery. There tliey remained, doing post duty, until July 19, when 
they started on their homeward journey. 

On August 6 they were mustered out of the service at Vicksburg and 
thence marched directly home to Chicago. 

During their term of service they received some four hundred and fifty 
recruits, and when ordered home they transferred two hundred and seventy of 
these to the Thirty-third Regiment Illinois Veteran Volunteers at Meridian, 
Mississippi. They brought home twenty-two officers and three hundred and 
ten men. 

In an attack upon some of the regiment by a gang of drunken rebels at 
Yerger's Landing, on their way home, private Levi Derby, of Company E, 
was killed, and Sergeant Major Blake was so seriously injured by a pistol 
shot that his life was endangered. 

The following little table of statistics is furnished by the adjutant of the 
regiment and gives some idea of what their service has been : 

Number of officers belonging to regiment at date of muster in 37 

Number of enlisted men belonging to regiment at date of muster in ... . 930 

Total 967 

Number of officers returning with regiment 22 

Number of enlisted men returning with regiment 310 

Total 332 

Number of officers killed in service 7 

Number of men killed in service 78 

Number of officers died of disease 3 

Number of men died of disease 130 

Number of officers wounded 10 

Number of men wounded 120 

Number of officers taken prisoners 3 

Number of men taken prisoners y6 

Total 427 

Number of battles fought 7 

Number of skirmishes II 

Total 18 

Number of miles traveled since entering service 9,280 

Number of days under the enemy's fire 145 

SEVENTY-SECOND INFANTRY REGIMENT. 

(Three Years' Service.) 

First Assistant Surgeon. 
Charles A. Bucher, Batavia ; mustered out August 7, 1865. 



294 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

COMPANY A. 

Prizvtcs. 
Oscar S. Ingersoll. St. Charles; discharged January 20, 1863: disability. 
Davi^ Lorrioux. Rutland; discharged December 3, 1864. 

COMPANY B. 

Private. 
Isaac B. Dorr, Geneva; mustered out August 7, 1865. as corporal. 

Recruits. 
Paul E. Gros, Rutland ; transferred to Thirty-third Illinriis Infantry. 
David Larreaux. Rutland ; transferred to Thirty-third Illinois Infantry. 

COMPANY E. 

Privates. 
Lewis O. Lyon, Geneva; mustered out August 7, 1865, as corporal. 
Thomas S. Seacord. Geneva; died. ]\Iemphis. January 28. 1863. 

COMPANY F. 

Privates. 
Alexander Archibald. Dundee; mustered out August 7. 1865. 
Alfred Booth. Dundee; mustered out August 7, 1865. 
Edward Oertell. Dundee; promoted first lieutenant from first sergeant. 

COMPANY G. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Benjamin F. Leonartl. Aurora ; commission cancelled. 

First Sergeant. 
Benjamin F. Leonard, Aurora; severly wounded; discharged July 30, 
1863; disability. 

Privates. 
Ebenezer Denny. Aurora; discharged August 30, 1863. for promotion 
in Fiftieth U. S. C. I. 

James; T. Fox, Aurora; discharged for promotion February 16, 1863. 
Barnett Payne. Aurora; mustered out August 7, 1863, as corporal. 
David Peabody, Aurora; mustered out August 7, 1863. as corporal. 
Jacob H. Staley, Aurora; killed at Franklin, Tennessee. November 30, 
1864. 

James VanSickles. Sugar Grove; mustered out August 7, 1865. 

COMPANY' H. 

Private. 
Charles Deiter, Aurora; died, Memphis. June 10, 1863. 

COMPANY' K. 

Corporal. 
Edward G. Stevens. Aurora; mustered out August 7. 1865. as private. 

Recruit. 
John ]\Iurray. Aurora; deserted September 2/. . 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 295 

SEVENTY-SIXTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMP.'\NY B. 

Privates. 
Joseph B. Crawford, Sugar Grove; mustered out July 22, 1865. 
John A. Crawford, Sugar Grove; discharged October 25, 1864; disabiUty. 
Stephen Gibson, Sugar Grove; mustered out July 22, 1865, as corporal. 
William I. Hayes, Sugar Grove; died, Memphis, July 6, 1863. 

Unassigned Recruit. 
George Nelson, Aurora; discharged July 2, 1864. 

SEVENTY-SEVENTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY D. 

Corporal. 
James Scuun, Rutland; mustered out June 17, 1865. 

Priz'ate. 
John Scoon, Rutland; mustered out July 10, 1865. 

EIGHTY-SECOND INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY H. 

Sergeant. 
Peter Steven, Aurora; mustered out June 9, 1865, as private. 

Corporal. 
Carl Schulze, Aurora; mustered out June 9. 1865, as sergeant. 

Musician. 
Joseph Diller, Aurora; mustered out June 9, 1865. 

Privates. 
Johann Beetenschlag, Aurora; died July 26, 1864; wounds. 
Christian Holz, Aurora; died at Aurora, Illinois, March i, 1864, as 
corporal. 

Peter Schmidt. Aurora; mustered out June 9, 1865. 

COMPANY I. 

Priz'atc. 
Bent Stevenson, Blackberry; mustered out June 9, 1865. 

EIGHTY-SIXTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY A. 

Private. 
James A. Allison, Montgomerv; transferred to V. R. C. September i, 
T863. 

HISTORY OF EIGHTY-EIGHTH INFANTRY. 

The Eighty-eighth Infantry Illinois \'(ilunteers was organized in Chicago, 
Illinois, in September, 1862, by Colonel Francis T. Sherman, and was known 



296 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

as the "Second Board of Trade Regiment." It was mustered in September 4, 
1862. 

Ordered to Louisville. Kentucky. September 4. and went into camp below 
Jeffersonville. Received arms on the nth. Moved to Covington, Kentucky. 
I2th. On the 15th was brigadeil with Twenty-fourth Wisconsin and Secona 
and Fifteenth Missouri, Colonel Greasel's (First) Brigade, Granger's Division. 
Army of the Ohio. On the 21st moved to Louisville and was brigaded with 
Twenty-first ^Michigan. Twenty-fourth Wisconsin and Thirty-sixth Illinois, 
Colonel Grease! commanding. Thirty-seventh Brigade, Eleventh Division, 
Brigadier General P. H. Sheridan commanding. 

October i. 1862, marched in pursuit of Bragg. Engaged in the battle of 
Perryville, October 8, losing four killed, five mortally wounded, and thirty-six 
wounded. Marched to Crab Orchard and thence to Lebanon and Bowling 
Green, Kentucky, arri\ing October 30. 1862. Moved toward Xashville, 
arriving at Edgefield Xo\ember 7. Moved November 17 six miles south of 
Nashville, on Nolensville pike. 

November 20, 1862, brigaded in First Brigade. Second Division, under 
Major General P. H. Sheridan, of the right wing. Army of the Cumberland. 
December 26, 1862. marched in the advance upon Murfreesboro. 
December 31. 1862, to January 3, 1863, engaged in the battle of Stone 
Iviver. 

January, 1863, to June, 1863, encamped at Murfreesboro. with the excep- 
tion of a scout to Columbia, Tennessee, in pursuit of \'an Horn. 

June, 1863. to July. 1863 brigaded in First Brigade, Second Division, 
Twentieth Army Corps. Engaged in the advance in movement against and 
pursuit of Bragg from middle Tennessee. 

August, 1863, encamped at Bridgeport, Alabama. 

September, 1863. joined in the Chickamauga campaign and advanced to 
Alpine, Georgia. 

September 19 and 20. 1863. engaged in the battle of Chickamauga. 
October. 1863, encamped at Chattanooga. Brigaded in First Brigade. 
Second Division, Fourth Arm}- Corps. 

November 23 to 25, 1863, engaged in the battle of Mission Ridge. 

Formed part of the assaulting column upon the left center of the enemy's 

position, and was among the first to place its colors upon the enemy's works. 

December, 1863, to February, 1864, engaged in scouting through east 

Tennessee, when it encamped at Loudon, where it remained until April. 1864. 

April, 1864, moved to Cleveland, Tennessee. 

May, 1864, joined in the advance upon the Atlanta campaign. It con- 
tinued with the advance as part of the Fourth Corps, commanded by Major 
General Howard, throughout the w-hole of that campaign, up to and including 
the capture of Atlanta, participating in the following principal battles and 
skirmishes : Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca. Adairsville. New Hope Church. 
Pine Mountain. Mud Creek, Kenesaw Mountain, Smyrna Camp Ground. 
Atlanta, Jonesboro and Lovejoy Station. Its services in the advance 
movements were continuous and constant from May to September, 1864. 




FIRST M. E. CHURCH, ELGIN. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 299 

September, 1864, was ordered to Chattanooga and was engaged during 
the niontli in duty at that place and Whiteside and Bridgeport. 

October, 1864, moved to Gaylesville, Alabama, and returned to 
Ciiattanooga. 

November, 1864, uKJved to Pulaski, Tennessee, and thence, upon the 
advance of Hood, to Cokuubia, Franklin and Nashville. It was engaged in 
skirmishes at Columbia and Spring Hill, and in tiie battle of Franklin, upon the 
right center, the main point of attack of the enemy. 

December 15 and 16, 1864, engaged in the battle of Nashville. 

December 16, 1864, to January, 1865, joined in the pursuit of Hood from 
Tennessee. 

January, 1865, to March, 1865, encamped at Huntsville, Alabama. 

March, 1865, moved to Bull's Gap, east Tennessee. May, 1865, moved 
to Nashville, where it remained until its muster out. 

During the period of its service the regiment was always in the front. It 
was never upon garrison duty. Its losses in the engagements in which it 
participated aggregate two-thirds of its number; and its conduct in every 
battle w^as such as to merit and receive the commendation of its brigade, 
division and corps commanders. For its conduct at Stone River, Mission 
Ridge and Franklin it was made the subject of special mention. 

The regiment was mustered out June 9, 1865, at Nashville, Tennessee, 
and arrived at Chicago June 13, 1865, where it received final pay and discharge 
June 22, 1865. 

EIGHTY-EIGHTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY A. 

Prk'ates. 
William Dade, Kane county; deserted October 29, 1862. 
William J. Russell, Geneva; mustered out June 9, 1865, as sergeant. 
Otis B. Skinner, Elgin; deserted September 9, 1864. 

COMPANY B. ' 

Private. 
Frederick A. Shull, Rutland; mustered out June 9, 1865. 

COMPANY c. 

Privates. 
William Buzzell, Hampshire; discharged May 13, 1865. 
Israel Brooks, St. Charles; deserted Septemer 19, 1862. 
Oscar Humphrey, Hampshire; corporal: dietl December 2, 1864; wounds. 

COMPANY H. 

Private. 
Benjamin S. Cool, Elgin; killed at Perryville. Kentucky, October 8, 1863. 

COMPANY I. 

Private. 
John Liddel, Aurora; deserted November 29, 1862. 



300 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

COMPANY K. 

Prk'atcs. 

Leonard D. Brisbane. Virgil ; captured at Franklin, Tennessee. November 
30, 1864. 

Phillip Flood, Virgil ; mustered out June 9, 1865, as corporal. 

Michael Grady. Virgil,; transferred to V. R. C. September 30, 1864. 
John Stockwell, Virgil; discharged December 18, 1862; disability. 

John Wilcox, Virgil ; first sergeant ; killed at Chickamauga. Tennessee, 

September 20, 1863. 

HISTORY OF EIGHTY-NINTH INFANTRY. 

The "Rail Road Regiment" was organized by the railroad companies 
of Illinois, at Chicago, in August, 1862. Captain John Christopher. Sixteenth 
United States Infantry, was appointed colonel, and Charles T. Hotchkiss. 
lieutenant colonel. It was mustered into the United States service August 2y. 

Ordered to Louisville, Kentucky. Septeml:)er 4. and was assigned, by 
Major General Wright, commanding Department of Ohio, to Third Brigade, 
Colonel Woodruff; Second Division, General Cruft; Army of Kentucky, 
General Nelson. Assigned October i to Sixth Brigade, General Willich; 
Second Division, General Sill ; McCook"s Corps of Buell's Army. 

The regiment, on leaving Loitisville, started in pursuit of the rebel forces 
itnder General Bragg, and, after a fruitless and wearisome march of a month, 
reached Bowling Green, Kentucky. At this point the tenth company, F. 
joined the regiment. When in the service but about four months, it took an 
active part in the memorable battle of Stone River, where, by its gallant con- 
duct, the men soon became classified among the old, tried soldiers. It did 
well, and among the heroes who that day died in liberty's cause was Captain 
Henry S. Willett, of Company H. 

On the -th of Januarv, 1863, Colonel Christopher, who had never joined 
the regiment, resigned. The line of promotion then ensuing made Captain 
William D. Williams, of Company F, major. 

At Liberty Gap another loss was sustained : Captain Herbert M. Blake, 
Company K, a truly brave and efticient otTicer, fell mortally wounded. Chicka- 
mauga seemed to affix the seal of its devotion. There fell Lieutenant Colonel 
Duncan J. Hall, Captains Rice, Spink and Whiting, and Lieutenant Ellis, 
besides the scores of brave men who fought with noble heroism, and who 
dared to "do and die" in defense of the "old flag." 

LTpon the reorganization of the Army of the Cumberland the regiment 
was transferred, with Willicb's command, to its new position in the First 
Brigade, Third Division. Fourth Army Corps. At Missionary Ridge it again 
encountered the foe. scaling the enemy's entrenchments and driving him from 
them. In this charge fell those gallant officers, Lieutenant E. O. Young. Com- 
pany A. and Captain Henry L. Rowell, Company C. 

It then marched to the relief of Burnside. liesieged at Knoxville. This 
accomplished, it moved on with the brigade, in the marches and counter 
marches through East Tennessee. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 301 

Early in April, 1864, it marclied with tiie command to southern Ten- 
nessee, preparatory to General Sherman's glorious campaign through northern 
Georgia, for the occupation of Atlanta. 

With the brigade, it participated in the splendid victories of Rocky Face. 
Resaca, Pickett's Mills. Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, and the flank 
movement of Atlanta, and pursued the routed enemy in his retreat to Jones- 
boro and Lovejoy's Station. 

On this campaign Lieutenant Nathaniel Street, of Companv D, and 
Captain William Harkness. Company A, ofl^ered up their lives a sacrifice to 
their country. 

After the unsuccessful attempt of the rebel forces to destroy the railroad 
communications of the army between Atlanta and Chattanooga, the regiment 
rendered very important service, while on detached duty, in repairing the 
damages on tlie railroad inflicted by the enemy. 

On the 30th of October. 1864. the regiment was ordered to rejoin the 
command at Pulaski. Tennessee. It participated in the brilliant achievements 
of Spring Hill, Columbia. Franklin and Nashville, in the latter of which fell 
Lieutenant P. G. Taite, of Company G. pierced by a cannon ball. Subse- 
quently it pursued Hood's shattered forces in their flving retreat across 
Tennessee. 

It passed winter quarters at Huntsvillc, Alabama, in January, 1865. and 
on the 1st of February traveled by railroad for Na.shville. and after Iving 
there fi\-e days, returned to Camp Green. About the middle of March, the 
coiumand embarked on the cars for East Tennessee, to reestablish communi- 
cations through to Virginia, and prepare to repel rebel invasion. 

On the surrender of Lee's army, further movements in that section were 
abandoned, and the Fourth Corps returned by cars to Nashville, to muster 
out of service its non-x-eterans. 

On the loth of June, 1865. the regiment was mustered out of the LTnited 
States service, in the field, near Nashville. Tennessee. Left there June 10, by 
the Louisville, New Albany & Chicago Railroad, and arrived in Chicago on 
the night of June 12, 1865, and was discharged at Camp Douglas, on the 24th 
of Juiie, 1865, making its term of service two years, nine months and twenty- 
seven days. 

CHRONOLOGICAL RECORD OF ENGAGEMENTS. 

October 7, 1862, battle of Lawrenceburg. 

October 8, 1862, battle of Perryville. 

December 31, 1862. to January 4, 1863, battle of Stone River. 

January 24 and 25, 1863, battle of Liberty Gap. 

September 19 and 20, 1863, battle of Chickamauga. 

November 23. 1863. occupied Orchard Knob. 

November 24, 1863. battle of Lookout Mountain. 

November 25, 1863, battle of Missionary Ridge. 

Night of January 27, 1864, regiment retreated from Dandridge. 

May 9 to 12, 1864, battle of Rocky Face. 

Night of May 12. 1864. enemy evacuated Buzzard's Roost. 

Mav 14 and 15. battle of Resaca. 



302 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Night of Alay 15, enemy evacuated Resaca. 

May 27, 1864, battle of Pickett's Mill. 

Night of June 4th, enemy evacuated Dallas. 

June nth to July 2, 1864, investment of Kenesaw Mountain. 

Night of July 2. 1864, enemy evacuated Kenesaw Mountain and Marietta. 

Night of July 20. 1864, enemy evacuated Peach Tree Creek. 

July 22d to August 26. 1864, investment of Atlanta. 

September i, 1864, battle of Jonesboro. Enemy evacuated at night. 

September 3 and 4. 1864. action before Lovejoy's Station. 

September 8, 1864, entered Atlanta. 

November 24 and 2^. 1864, skirmish of Spring Hill. 

November 30, 1864. battle of Franklin. 

December 15 and 16, 1864, battle of Nashville. 

CASUALTIES. 

In 1864, four hundred and forty recruits were added to the regiment, 
making a total borne on the rolls of one thousand four hundred and three. 
The regiment left in the field two hundred and two recruits (transferred to 
the Fifty-ninth Illinois \'eterari \'olunteers), and mustered out on its rolls 
three hundred and eighty-one men, of the rank and file, leaving eight hundred 
and twenty killed in action, died from wounds, or discharged on account of 
disability contracted in the service. The principal losses were at the battles of 

Stone River, killed, wounded and prisoners 142 

Liberty Gap, killed, wounded and prisoners 13 

Chickamauga, killed, wounded and prisoners 109 

Missionary Ridge, killed, wounded and prisoners 35 

Atlanta, killed, wounded and prisoners 211 

Nashville, killetl. wounded and prisoners 39 

EIGHTY-NINTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

Major. 
Bruce H. Kidder, Aurora; discharged ^larch 14. 1865. 

Surgeon. 
Samuel F. Hance, Aurora; resigned ]\Iarch 26, 1863. 

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

Sergeant Major. 
Jerry M. Grosh, Geneva; promoted adjutant. 

COMPANY A. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Jacob N. Hopper, Aurora; resigned January 26, 1863. 

Sergeant. 
Jacob N. Hopper, Aurora; promoted second lieutenant. 

Corporals. 
George W. Videtto, Aurora; discharged February 13, 1863; disability. 
Moses Plummer, Aurora; discharged December 26, 1862; disability. 
J. K. Lowry, Aurora; mustered out June 10. 1865; prisoner of war. 
Levi C. Way, Aurora; transferred to ^". R C. September 20, 1863. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 303 

Priz-atcs. 

William H. Chattle. Aurora; transferred to Engineer Corps July 
30, —. 

Richard Xorthan, Aurora; discharged October 31, 1862; disability. 

Recruits. 

George Bardes, x\urora; died, Andersonville prison, August 26, 1864; 
grave five thousand four hundred and fifty-seven. 

Charles Darans, Aurora; died July 4, 1864; wounds. 

Lyman Farrar, Aurora; deserted May 14, 1864. 

Marcellus C. Hibbard, Aurora ; transferred to Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry. 

Ruell Ncwter, Aurora; discharged April 3, 1865; disability. 

John Powers, Aurora; deserted October — , 1863. 

John L. Slawson, Aurora; was prisoner; transferred to Fifty-ninth Illi- 
nois Infantry; mustered out July 19, 1865. 

Arthur O. Valentine, Aurora; died May 27. 1864; wounds. 

COMPANY B. 

Recruits. 
Thomas Hagan, Aurora; transferred to Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry. 
John Johnson, Aurora; deserted about February i, 1864. 
Hugh Patterson, Aurora; transferred to Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry. 
William M. Sullivan, Aurora; deserted, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

COMPAN-i- c. 

Recruits. 
Robert M. Black. Aurora; killed at Kenesaw ^Mountain June 24. 1864. 
John Burlingham, Aurora; deserted September 31, 1863. 
William Gadbury, Aurora; mustered out June 10, 1865. 
William H. Pearce, Aurora; deserted October i, 1862. 
Peter B. Wade, Aurora; died at Chattanooga, June 30, 1864. 
Richard Welch, Aurora ; corporal ; deserted October 2, 1862. 

COMPANY D. 

Recruits. 
Mathew Hellixon, Aurora; died at Nashville January 31, 1864. 
Henry Hottendorf, Aurora; transferred to Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry. 
James Lyons, Aurora; deserted December 6, 1864. 

COMPANY E. 

Captains. 
Bruce H. Kidder, Aurora; promoted major. 
John W. Warren, Aurora; mustered out June 10, 1865. 

First Lieutenants. 
John B. Watking. Aurora; resigned January 2S. 1863. 
John W. Warren, Aurora; promoted. 
Ribert Miller, Aurora; mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Second Lieutenants. 
GeoKge W. White, Aurora; cashiered June 18, 1863. 



304 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Robert Miller, Aurora; promoted. 

Oscar C. Pease, Aurora; mustered out June lo. 1865. 

First Scrgea)it. 
Robert Miller, Aurora; promoted second lieutenant. 

Sergeants. 
y. W. Warren, Aurora; promoted first lieutenant, then captain. 
Samuel Ebersol, Aurora; died at Chickamauga September 21, 1864; 
wounds. 

C. R. Taylor, Aurora; discharged December 28, 1862; disability. 
O. C. Pease, Aurora ; promoted second lieutenant. 

Corporals. 
George Shears, Aurora; mustered out June 10, 1865, as private. 
Frank Mariett, Aurora; mustered out June 10, 1865, as sergeant. 
Andrew Golden, Aurora; mustered out June 10, 1865. 
Albert Marney, Aurora; discharged April 27, 1863, as private. 

Privates. 
Robert M. Black, Aurora; transferred to Company C. 
William Blackie, Aurora; deserted December 16, 1862. 
C. B. Brooks, Aurora; mustered out June 10, 1865. 
C. M. Bryant, Aurora; discharged April 10, 1863. 
J. C. Coggswell, Aurora; died at Nashville January i, 1863. 
Thomas W. Clark, Aurora; mustered out June 10, 1865. 
William Cousins, Aurora; mustered out June 10, 1865, as corporal. 
George Carman, Aurora; corporal; died at Ackworth, Georgia, June 8, 
1864; wounds. 

H. L. Evens, Aurora; mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Seth G. Eggleston, Aurora; mustered out June 10, 1865; wounds. 

C. G. Evens, Aurora; mustered out June 10, 1865. 
William Gadberry, Aurora; transferred to Company C. 
O. B. Gates, Aurora; mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Edwin Goodwin, .\urora; mustered out June 10, 1865, as sergeant. 
Winfield Green, Aurora; transferred to V. R. C. October 22, 1861. 
J. T. Huff. Aurora : transferred to Mississippi Marine Brigade December 
15, 1862. 

Stephen Hiller, Aurora; mustered out June 10, 1865, as bugler. 

D. M. Lacey. Aurora; discharged March 16, 1863; disability. 

J. M. LaCoste, Aurora; died at Andersonville September 5, 1864; grave 
seven thousand nine hundred and twenty-seven. 

Peter Love, Aurora; mustered out June 10, 1865, 

F. A. Lund, Aurora; mustered out June 10. 1865, as sergeant. 

Thomas Mahoney. Aurora; mustered out June 10, 1865. 

John McKinley, Aurora; discharged December 28, 1862. 

Alexander McKenzie. Aurora; sergeant; died September 3, 1864; 
wounds. 

S. K. McCullough. Aurora: corporal; transferred to Engineer Corps 
July 27, 1864. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 305 

Frank Myers, Aurora; died at Chattanooga January 24, 1863; wounds. 
Isaiah Michard, Aurora; died at Nashville December 12, 1864. 
P. McGrath, Aurora; discharged JNIarch 25, 1863; wounds. 
A. Paradise, Aurora; transferred to V. R. C. May 31, 1864. 
William Pearce, Aurora ; transferred to Company C. 
John Pinegar. Aurora: deserted June i, 1863. 

George L. Richards, Aurora; discharged May 19. 1862, as corporal; 
disability. 

P. James Reedy, Aurora; corporal; died July 2, 1864; wounds. 

F. Shugar, Aurora; discharged May 9, 1865; wounds. 
A. E. Saterfield, Aurora; mustered out June 10, 1865. 

__,^^Septa Slosson, Aurora; mustered out June 10, 1865. 

J. P. Smith, Aurora; discharged April 7, 1863; disability. 

Jubal Shaw, Aurora: died at Andersonville June 21. 1864; grave two 
thousand si.x hundred and forty-seven. 

L. W. Stop, Aurora; died at Andersonville August 4, 1864; grave four 
thousand seven hundred and twenty-four. 

Samuel Simms, .Aurora; transferred to Engineer Corps July 27. 1864. 

Henry H. Willis, Aurora; discharged June i. 1863, to accept lieutenancy, 
Fortieth New \'ork. 

G. A. Wilder, Aurora; mustered out June 10, 1865. 
Durkee Whipple, Batavia; mustered out June 10, 1865. 
James Wildrick, Aurora: mu.stered 'out June 10, 1865. 

J. P. VVentworth, Aurora: discharged May 20, 1863: disability. 

Richard Welch, Aurora : transferred to Company C. 

Charles S. Welch, Aurora; discharged April 4. 1863; disability. 

James Wade, Aurora; mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Peter B. Wade, Aurora ; transferred to Company C. 

Recruits. 

George B. Bagg, Aurora; transferred to V. R. C. November i, 1864. 

.\lexander Burns, Aurora ; transferred to Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry. 

Frank M. Barry, Aurora ; transferred to Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry. 

Daniel Conant, Aurora; discharged April 19, 1865; wounds. 

Lewis &. Duncan, Kane county; transferred to Fifty-ninth Illinois 
Infantry. 

Charles H. Gibbeons, Aurora; transferred to Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry. 

Andrew J. Hosley, Aurora; transferred to Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry. 

Henry Howard, Aurora; captured December 2, 1863; supposed killed. 

Henry S. Hunter. Aurora : deserted. 

James Hughes, Aurora; deserted September 30, 1864. 

John S. Jorstad, Aurora: transferred to Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry. 

George M. Jenks, Aurora: transferred to Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry.' 

William Russ, Kane county: transferred to Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry. 

Henry C. Scott, Aurora: transferred to Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry. 

William C. Sweet, Aurora; died at .-\ndersonville prison April 12. 1864; 
grave five hundred and five. 



306 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

William Williams. Aurora: transferred to Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry. 

COM PAX Y F. 

Recruit. 
Anthony Ilandley. Kane county: transferred to Fifty-ninth Illinois 
Infantry. 

COMPANY II. 

Recruits. 
Forgust Anderson, .\urora : Yeteran volunteer: mustered out lune lo, 
1865. 

Andrew Ducat. Aurora: mustered out June 10. 1865. 
W'illiam H. Xislev, Aurora: mustered out June 10. 1865. 

COMP.\NY I. 

Recruit. 
George Staurer. Elgin : transferred to Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry. 

COMPANY K. 

Corporal. 
Lennis Stewart. Geneva: discharged October 22. 1862; disabiHty. 

Privates. 
William Aikens. Blackberry: killed at Chickamauga, September 19, 1863. 
Clement G. Bradley. Batavia: killed at Chickamauga. September 19, 1863. 
James Dahy, Elgin: deserted May 15, 1865. 
Milo Eastman. Elgin; discharged January 11, 1863; disability. 
Jerry 'M. Grash. Geneva ; promoted sergeant major. 
Andrew Hutchinson. Blackberry: discharged March 2j. 1863: disabiHty. 
John J. Matherson. Blackberry: mustered out June 10. 1865. as sergeant. 
William H. Reed. Geneva; mustered out June 10, 1865. 
Thomas Rogers, Blackberry; died in rebel hospital at Atlanta, Georgia, 
October 25, 1863; wounds. 

Joseph \V. Reason, Aurora; mustered out June 10, 1865. 

William Stewat. Geneva; transferred to Engineer Corps July 2y. 1864. 

Holis A. Scott. Geneva; mustered out May 15. 1865. 

Levi Sharp. Blackberry : transferred to Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry. 

John K. Wilder, Geneva: deserted December 12. 1862. 

Recruits. 
Xoah H. Howard. Aurora; died at Springfield, Illinois, March 11. 1864. 
Ge<irge W. Hagedon. Big Rock: died at Loudon. Tennessee, March 12, 
1864. 

Patrick Hickey. Aurora: transferred to Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry. 
John M. Murry, Aurora: transferred to Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry. 
Palmer Fresher. Aurora : transferred to Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry. 
Thomas W. Snell. Aurora: deserted September 20, 1864. 

L'liassigncd Recruits. 
Andrew W. Baker. Aurora: discharged July 25, 1864. 
Thomas H. Hughan. Aurora: discharged July 25. 1864. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 3CT 

NINETIETH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 
COMP.ANV c. 
Recruits. 
James Bell, Rutland ; transferred to Forty-eighth Ilhnois Infantry. 
David Demuse, Rutland: transferred to Forty-eighth Ilhnois Infantry. 

COMP.\NY H. 

Privates. 
George Currie, Elgin; deserted August 15, 1862. 

Patrick Hopkins, Virgil; mustered out June 15, 1865, as corporal; 
wounded. 

James Maguire, \'irgil; deserted June 26, 1863. 

NINETY-SECOND INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

Unassigiied Recruit. 
Timothy P. Pierson, Aurora ; deserted. 

NINETY-FIFTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY A. 

Recruits. 
William Campbell, Aurora; deserted March i, 1864. 

Emer_\- J. Ladd, Aurora ; transferred to Company A, Forty-seventh 
Illinois Infantry. 

Samuel Snyder, Aurora; killed at Fort DeRussey, March 16, 1864. 

COMPANY E. 

First Sergeant. 
Thomas Gilkerson, Hampshire : promoted second lieutenant, then first 
lieutenant. 

Priz'ates. 
Dexter S. Cowles, Hampshire; mustered out August 17, 1865. 
Wesley J. Colgrove, Hampshire; died at ^Memphis January 24, 1863. 
Andrew Farrell, Hampshire; mustered out August 17, 1865. 
Woodburn Hardy, Hampshire; mustered out August 17, 1865. 

COMPANY G. 

Recruit. 
Andrew DeWolf, Hampshire; died at St. Louis December 22, 1863. 

COMPANY I. 

Private. 
Elijah B. Way, Dundee; died at Memphis, July 10, 1863. 

ONE HUNDRED AND FOURTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 

(Tliree Years' Service.) 

COMPANY A. 

Privates. 
Peirce Kinnelly, Rutland; deserted March 20, 1863. 
David ^'arner. Rutland; discharged February 23, 1865; wounds. 



308 KAXE COrXTY HISTORY 

Recruit. 
Amos T. Ferguson, Rutland; mustered out June 6, 1865. 

COMPANY D. 

Private. 
Ora D. Wallbridge. Rutland; discharged May 5. 1864; wounds. 

HISTORY OF OXE HUNDRED AND FIFTH INFANTRY. 

The One Hundred and Fifth Regiment Illinois Infantry Volunteers was 
mustered into the service of the United States September 2. 1862. 

On the 8th moved to Camp Douglas. On the 30th left Camp Douglas 
for Louisville, Kentucky, arriving on the 2d of October, and, reporting to 
General Dumont, was attached to his division. Brigadier General W. T. Ward's 
brigade. On the 3d moved in the direction of Frankfort; arrived on the 9th, 
after a severe march. Were engaged in guard and picket duty, with 
occasional slight skirmishing with the enemy. \\'hile at Frankfort, made a 
raid to Lawrenceburg and returned. On the 26th moved, en route to Bowling 
Green, arriving on the 4th of November, and remaining one week, was ordered 
to Scottsville. November 25, moved to Gallatin, Tennessee; December 11 
moved to South Tunnel; February i. 1863. returned to Gallatin, remaining 
till the 1st day of June, 1863, when it moved to Lavergne. From thence to 
Murfreesboro, Tennessee, returning to Lavergne the last of July. Moved to 
Nashville August 19. Was quartered in Fort Negley, doing guard duty in 
it and the city of Nashville. Exchanged the Austrian musket, with which the 
regiment had been armed, for the Spring rifle musket. Meanwhile it was 
attached to the Eleventh Army Corps, ^ilajor General O. O. Howard 
commanding. 

On the 24th day of February, 1864, it took the line of march in the 
direction of Chattanooga, Tennessee. On the — day of March it arrived at 
Wauhatchie. at which place it remained until the 2d day of May, being, 
brigaded with the One Hundred and Second and One Hundred and Twenty- 
ninth Illin.ois, Seventieth Indiana and Seventy-ninth Ohio, with which it 
remained during the war. In the meantime the Eleventh and Twelfth Army 
Corps were consolidated under the name of the Twentieth Army Corps, Major 
General Joseph Hooker commanding. 

May 2 moved to Gordon's j\Iills. !May 6 marched to Leet's farm; 
thence to Taylor's Ridge on the 7th. May 10 moved to Snake Creek Gap. 
May 12 to Sugar Valley. May 13 moved in the direction of Resaca, Georgia, 
skirmishing that evening and the next day. The morning of the 15th moved 
with the corps to the extreme left of the lines, immediately upon its arrival 
taking part in a charge upon the enemy's works, which were carried, losing 
several men in the engagement. On the i6th pursued the retreating enemy, 
arriving at Calhoun on the 17th. On the i8th moved to near Cassville. On 
the 19th the One Hundred and Fifth being in advance, skirmished with the 
rear guard of the enemy, driving them at every point. Remained near Kings- 
ton until the 23d, when ordered forward, crossing the Etowah river. 24th 
moved to Burnt Hickory. On the 25th, continuing its march towards Dallas, 




VIEW OF EAST ELGIX STIOWING ACADEMY, 1866. 




VIEW FROM BRIDGE NORTH— ELGIN— 1866. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 311 

Georgia, encountering" the enemy, ha\'ing- a ijrisk engagement till dark, the 
casualties nnmbering fifteen, including two commissioned officers. 

From this time until the first of June the regiment was engaged in 
advancing the line, building and strengthening the works and skirmishing, 
losing sixteen men. 

On the first of June moved to the extreme left with the Twentieth Corps. 
On the 2d the One Hundred and Fifth w'as ordered out as flankers, in which 
position it lost a most excellent officer, Surgeon Horace S. Potter, being 
killed by a shell. On the 3d moved around and beyond the enemy's right, 
encamping near Ackworth, Georgia. Here it remained until the 6th, when 
it moved forward and took position near Golgotha Church, in line of battle, 
throwing up entrenchments and remaining until the 15th, when it again 
moved forward, encountering the enemy behind breastworks. A steady fire 
W'as kept up until dark. That night and the next da}' (the i6th) was occu- 
pied in strengthening the position, by erecting breastworks, being exposed to 
the fire of the enemy. Lost nineteen men during the two days. The night 
of the 1 6th the enemy retreated. On the 17th, i8th, 19th, and 20th, fol- 
lowed the retreating enemy, with slight skirmishing, at intervals. 21st, 
severe skirmish firing; 22d moved forward about a mile, in close proximity 
to the enemy's works, exposed to their fire — losing eleven men. The enemy 
evacuated his position during the night of July 2. On the 3d moved in the 
direction of Marietta, Georgia. The brigade to which the One Hundred and 
Fifth was attached being the advance, skirmished with the enemy — losing 
one man killed and two wounded. Camped about four miles from Marietta, 
Georgia, in plain view of a portion of the rebel army. On the evening of the 
4th, continued the march in the direction of the Chattahoochee river, camp- 
ing within two miles of that stream, on the north side, the night of the 6th. 
Remained there until the 17th, when it crossed the river and encamped until 
the afternoon of the i8th. Moved forward about five miles and rested till 
the morning of the 20th. Crossed Peach Tree Creek and came upon the 
enemy. A line of battle was formed — a charge of the enemy was repulsed 
in the afternoon, and several prisoners captured; also, the colors of the 
Twelfth Louisiana. 21st was occupied in hurrying the dead of both sides, 
and collecting and turning over ordnance and other property. On the 22d 
moved forward about three miles, where the enemy was again encountered, 
posted behind the defenses of Atlanta. Litrenchments were immediately 
thrown up. Remained in this position until the 26th, when relieved and placed 
on reserve. 29th moved six miles to the right of the lines. Making the 
position secure by throwing up works, remained until the 2d day of August. 
Returned to the left and took position, which was fortified and strengthened. 
Constant skirmishing and artillery firing was kept up until the night of the 
25th of August, when ordered to fall back to the Chattahoochee river. Here 
it remained until the 27th, when it took position on the north side of that 
stream, doing picket and guard duty. 

The 2d day of September the city of Atlanta surrendered. The regi- 
ment remained in the vicinity of Atlanta until the 15th of November, when 
the "grand march to the sea" was begun. The One Hundred and Fifth 



312 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

accompanying the expedition, bore its fnll share of the trials and hardships 
incident thereto. Passing en the route Decatur, Sithonia. Social Circle. Rut- 
ledge and Madison, at which last named place it arri\ed on the 19th of 
November. From thence, marching southward to the city of ^lilledgeville. 
the capital of Georgia, arriving en the 22d, and remaining until the 24th. 
Thence to the north of the Mississippi and Georgia Central Railroad. Passing 
through Sandersville. Davisboro. and Louisville (the One Hundred and 
Fifth and part of the One Hundred and Second routing a body of rebel 
cavalry between the last two named places), reaching ^lilan on December 3. 
Continuing the march towards Savannah, passing through Springfield on the 
7th, having a slight skirmish with guerrillas, arriving in the vicinity of 
Savannah on the loth. The One Hundred and Fifth, being the advance that 
day, had a brisk skirmish with the enemy's pickets, driving them within the 
defense of the city. Participated in the siege of Savannah. That city was 
evacuated on the night of the 20th of December. On the 31st of December, 
1864, and January i, 1865, was occupied in crossing the Savannah river — 
losing one man by a musket shot from the enemy — mo\-ed five miles and 
encamped until the 4th of January. Marched north to Hardee's farm, and 
again encamped, remaining until the 17th with slight skirmishing at intervals. 
Moved to Hardeeville, remaining there until the 29th. when it started on the 
campaign of the Carolinas. 

Moving northward, nothing of interest occurred until the 2d day of 
February, when the One Hundred and Fifth, being in advance, encountered 
the enemy near Lawtonville strongly posted behind barricades. It immediately 
charged the enemy, driving them from their po.^ition. through the town — 
losing eight men in the engagement. 

Continued the march on the 3d, 4th. 5th. Ctli and 7th. when tlie One 
Hundred and Fifth again had the advance; had some slight skirmishing with 
\\'ade Hampton's cavalry: 8th, gth and loth was engaged in tearing up rail- 
road between Graham Station and Williston. From thence, crossed the South 
and North Edisto rivers, on the road to Columbia, arriving opposite that city 
on the 1 6th, after a very disagreeable march through swamps and marshes. 
Not being able to cross the Congaree at that point, moved up the river, and 
crossed the Broad and Saluda rivers, which unite and form the Congaree. 
Marching northward, arrived at \\'innsboro on the 21st. On the 22d, the 
regiment, again in the ad\ance. had some skirmishing with Butler's rebel 
cavalr}-, and crossed the W'ateree river. Reached Hanging Rock on the 27th. 
rested one day; 29th. moved northward, arriving at Chesterfield iMarch 3; 
at Cheraw' March 6. Crossed Great Pedee and Lumber rivers, and arrived at 
Fayetteville, North Carolina, on the iith. Resting three days. 15th. moved 
in the direction of Raleigh, North Carolina, some ten miles, where it encoun- 
tered the enemy, heavily entrenched, near Averysboro. Then, on the i6th, 
followed the battle of Averysboro — the enemy being driven from their posi- 
tion. The One Hundred and Fifth lost six killed and sixteen wounded. 

On the 19th. 20th and 21st, took part in the engagement near Bentonville. 
The enemy evacuated that place on the night of the 21st. Arrived at Golds- 
boro on the 24th. Thus ended the campaign of the Carolinas. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 313 

Remained at Goldsboro until April lo, 1865. Continued the marcli 
toward Raleigh, arriving at Smithfield on the nth, and at Raleigh on the 
13th, encountering but little opposition from the enemy. Resting until the 
25th, moved out some fourteen miles on the Holly Springs road, in the direc- 
tion of General Johnston's army. Encamped during the 26th and 27th. In 
the meantime, General Johnston surrendered. On the 28th, returned to 
Raleigh and immediately began making preparations for the homeward march. 

On the 30th left Raleigh en route to Washington City via Richmond, 
passing through the latter city on the nth of May. Arrived in the vicinity of 
Alexandria, Virginia, on the igth. Took part in the grand review at Wash- 
ington, on the 24th, where the regiment received a compliment for their 
mo\-ements in the manual of arms, and their military appearance. 

Remained in the vicinity of Washington until the 7th of June, when 
the regiment was mustered out of the service, and started, by rail, for Chicago, 
Illinois, where it arrived on the loth. 

Remained at Camp Fry, until the 17th. when paid ofT and disbanded. 

Recruits. 

George Roller, Rutland: transferred to Thirty-fourth Illinois Infantry. 

George E. Vermette, Rutland, transferred to Thirty-fourth Illinois 
Infantry. 

COMPANY E. 

JVagoiicr. 
John Parrott, Rutland; mustered out June 6, 1865. 

Private. 
George Hemenover, Rutland ; died at Hartville, Tennessee December 7, 
1862: v-ounds. 

COMPANY K. 

Recruit. 
Alfred G. Parker, Rutland; transferred to Thirty-fourth Illinois Infantry. 

ONE HUNDRED AND EIFTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY A. 

Priz'atcs. 
Benjamin Allen, Geneva; discharged July lO, 1863; disability. 
Hiram W. Bowers, Batavia ; mustered out June 7, 1865, as corporal. 
William Kane, Geneva; discharged January 19, 1863; disability. 
John Kesler, Geneva; discharged December 7, 1862; disability. 
Thomas Spanton, Plato; mustered out June 7, 1865. 
Sylvanus Waffles, Geneva; died at Chattanooga August 9, 1864. 
Elias C. West, Geneva; mustered out June 7, 1865. 

COMPANY c. 

Privates. 
Lemuel Jordan, Burlington; discharged January 16. 1863; disability. 
William Jordan, Burlington; transferred to Company E, One Hundred 
and Fifth Illinois Infantry. 

Henry B. Thompson, Burlington; discharged January 11, 1863; disability. 



314 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Hiram Wriglit, Burlington; died December 21, 1863. 
John Wright, Burlington; mustered out June 7, 1865. 

COMPANY D. 

Sergeant. 
Henry V. Martin, Geneva; reduced to ranks at his own request; dis- 
charged May 15, 1863. 

COMPANY G. 

Captain. 

John M. Smith, Burlington; discharged December 24. 1864. 

First Lieutenant. 

John M. Smith, Burlington; promoted. 

Sccoiui Lieutenants. 

John M. Smith, Burlington ; promoted. 

James S. Hasburgh, Burlington; mustered out June 7, 1865, as sergeant. 

Corporal. 

James Hasburg, Burlington ; commissioned second lieutenant ; not 
mustered; mustered out June 7, 1865, as sergeant. 

Musician. 

Samuel C. Perrv, Burlington; died at Cincinnati, Ohio, December 28, 
1862. 

Privates. 

Anson B. Barker, Burlington ; died at Bowling Green, Kentucky, Decem- 
ber 4, 1862. 

Nathan E. Bradburn, Burlington; transferred to Engineer Corps July 
25, 1864. 

William Bock, Burlington; died at Gallatin. Tennessee. March 27, 1S63. 

John Barnard, Hampshire; mustered out June 7. 1865. 

Allin S. Calkins, Burlington; mustered out June 7, 1865. 

George W. Collins, Plato; mustered out June 7, 1865. as corporal. 

Hiram Carlisle. Burlington; died at Bowling Green. Kentucky. December 
6, 1862. 

Charles W. Chapman. Burlington; discharged January 12. 1863; 
disability. 

William A. Congle, A^irgil; mustered out June 7, 1865. 

Egbert V. Davis. Burlington; mustered out June 7, 1865. 

Linneaus Ellis, \'irgil; mustered out June 7, 1865; wounded. 

William H. L. Eddy, Burlington; mustered out June 7, 1865, as corporal. 

Daniel W. Fish. Burlington; discharged December 14, 1862; disability. 

Daniel Holdridge, Burlington; mustered out June 7, 1865. as corporal. 

William X. Ingalls, Burlington ; died at Gallatin, Tennessee, December 
13, 1862. 

Hervey M. Morgan. Burlington; mustered out June 7, 1865. as corporal. 

W'illiam P. McLelland, Burlington; discharged March 11, 1863, to 
enlist in Mississippi jNIarine Brigade. 

George W. McLelland. Burlington; mustered out June 7, 1865. 

Charles A. Maltby, Burlington ; transferred to Invalid Corps October 20, 
1864; wounded. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 315 

Julius Planty, Hampshire; transferred to Engineer Corps July 25, 1864. 

Myron C. Perry, Burlington; mustered out June 7, 1865. 

Elijah Samis, Burlington; died at Gallatin, Tennessee, December 6, 1862. 

William M. Smith, Burlington; discharged July 9, 1864, to accept pro- 
motion as second lieutenant. One Hundred and Fourteenth United States 
C. T. 

Martin Young, Burlington; died at South Tunnel, Tennessee, July 11, 
1863. 

ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTEENTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 

(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY E. 

Captain. 
John G. Day, Elgin; mustered out June 20, 1865. 

First Liciitcjiaiit. 
John G. Day, Elgin; promoted. 

First Sergeant. 
John G. Day, Elgin; promoted first lieutenant. 

Recruit. 
Jerome Otis, Aurora; mustered out May 30, 1865. 

COMPANY G. 

Privates. 
Perry C. Hough, Geneva; mustered out June 20, 1865, as corporal. 
Josiah Jackson, Blackberry; discharged April 25, 1863; disability. 
Jacob C. Miller, Geneva; mustered out June 20. 1865, as sergeant. 
Harris B. Osborn, Geneva; discharged October i, 1863, for promotion 
to assistant surgeon, Second Mississippi Colored Infantry. 

James B. Post, Blackberry; died at Corinth August 15. 1863. 

ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTEENTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 

(Three Years' Service.) 
Unassigncd Recruit. 
Noah Murphy, Montgomery; mustered out i\Iay 2^, 1865. 

ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTEENTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 

(Three Years' Service.) 

Second Assistant Surgeon. 
Elmer Nicholas. Aurora; dismissed July 14, 1864. 

COMPANY c. 

Recruit. 
Jefferson D. Ellis, Batavia ; mustered out October i, 1865. 

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTIETH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 

(Three Years' Service.) 

Surgeon. 
Phineas K. Guild, .\urora; resigned June 12. 1S63. 



31(5 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

HISTORY OF ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH 

INFANTRY. 

The One Hundred and T\vent}-fuurth Illinois Infantr)- was a repre- 
sentative, self-raised regiment, recruited from Henry, Kane, McDonough. 
Sangamon, Jersey, Adams, Wayne, Cook, Putnam, Pike, Mercer and Chris- 
tian counties. August 27, 1862, the first company went into camp at Camp 
Butler, near Springfield. Six days later all were in camp, and the field 
officers chosen. September 10 it was mustered into the United States service 
for three years by Lieutenant F. E. DeCourcey. 

October 6, left for the front, which was found at Jackson, Tennessee, at 
3 a. m. the gth. Was assigned to the First Brigade, Third Division, Seven- 
teenth Army Corps, consisting of the Twentieth, Thirty-first, Forty-fifth and 
One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Illinois and the Twenty-third Indiana, 
cohimanded by Colonel C. C. Marsh, of the Twentieth Illinois, General John 
A. Logan commanding the di\'ision. and General J. B. McPherson the corps. 
With this organization the regiment remained till April 5, 1864. In the crisp 
autumn air and lovely camp at Jackson the discipline and efficiency of the 
regiment were rapidly developed and the foundations largely laid for all the 
distinction it afterwards achieved. 

Left Jackson November 2, to participate in the movement under General 
Grant, via Bolivar and Lagrange, Tennessee, and Holly Springs, Abbeville 
and Oxford, Mississippi, to the rear of \'icksburg. Returned from the Yacoma 
upon the burning of the depot of supplies at Holly Springs, and after some 
time spent in guarding the Memphis & Charleston Railroad, reached Memphis 
January 21, 1863. 

A month later was a part of the command w hich moved down the Mis- 
sissippi to Lake Providence, Louisiana, General I. N. Haynie being then in 
command of the Brigade. After two months of inactivity was a part of a 
force moving from Milliken's Bend. .April 25, upon what proved to be the 
final Vicksburg campaign, General Julin E. Smith having succeeded General 
Haynie, who had gone home sick. April 30, crossed the Alississippi from 
DeSchroon's plantation in Louisiana, to Bruinsburg in Mississippi, on the 
gunboat Mound City. 

May I, after a rapid and hot march of about twelve miles, the regi- 
ment received its first baptism of fire in bearing a jiart of the battle of Thomp- 
son's Hills, or Port Gibson. May 12 it bore an important part in the battle 
of Raymond, May 14 it was at the capture of Jackson and May 16 it did noble 
service at the battle of Champion Hills, capturing more men from the Forty- 
third Georgia, after killing its colonel and major, than its own ranks num- 
bered. It also killed most of the men and horses of a battery, really capturing 
the guns. The loss of the regiment in this action was sixty-three killed and 
wounded. 

The morning of May 19 crossed the Big Black and moved on Vicksburg. 
Was in the fearful charge of May 22, and occupied the extreme advance 
position gained that day, during the whole of the siege. It was just to the 
right of the Jackson road, upon which and the covered way subsequently dug,. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 817 

the left of tlie regiment rested, and is said to have been the nearest camp to 
the enemy's works. It was immediately in front of the fort, which was 
mined — in large part by men of the One Hundred and Twenty-fourth — and 
blown up June 25 antl July i. At the first explosion the regiment lost forty- 
nine men in killed and wounded in what was called the "Slaughter Pen," 
being ordered into the crater formed by the explosion, two companies at a 
time for half an hour, all day of the 26th. 

General Smith having been assigned to the command of a division. 
General J\I. D. Leggett, formerly colonel of the Seventy-eighth Ohio, assumed 
command of the First Brigade, June 2. 

On the 4th of July the regiment shared with the First Brigade in the 
iKjuor of first entering the captured city and helping to swell the slmut that 
arose as the Forty-fifth Illinois ran out its colors from the cupola of the 
court house. 

From August 21 to September 2 was absent on an expediti(jn t(_) Munroe. 
Liniisiana. under General J. D. Stevenson, General Logan being in comiuand 
oi the post of Vicksburg. 

From October 14 to 20 was absent on an expedition in force against 
Loring, Wirt Adams and others to Brownsville and the Bogue Chittn creek. 
Skirmished considerable, but the enemy retreated. 

November 7 the brigade broke camp in Vicksburg, where its camp had 
been since the siu-render, and removed to Big Black, 14 miles east. The 13th. 
General Logan took his farewell of his old fighting Third Division, to the 
regret of all, and was subsequently succeeded by General Leggett, the First 
Brigade being commanded by General M. F. Force. In December, Colonel 
Sloan was dismissed the service, and Lieutenant Colonel J. H. Howe subse- 
(|uentlv commanded the regiment. 

januarv. 1S64, was renc'ered memorable in the history of the regiment 
by its winning an "Excels.'or " piize banner, which General Leggett signalized 
his assuming command by tendering to the best drilled and finest regiment 
in the division. The three brigades drilled separately, on the 20th of January 
the First Brigade, the One Hundred and Twenty- fourth winning; on the 21st 
the Second Brigade, the Seventy-eighth Ohio winning; on the 22d the Third 
Brigade, the Seventeenth Illinois winning. On the 23d the three victorious 
regiments drilled, and the One Hundred and Twentj'-fourth won handsomely, 
the awartl being unanimous by the committee. General McPherson presented 
the banner. The regiment bore the banner in triumph till the 5th of April 
following, including the famous Meridian raid under General Sherman from 
February 3 to March 4, or upwards of three hundred miles marching in the 
face of the enemy, and much of the time under fire, pro\'ing bv its g"ood be- 
ha\-ior and bravery in the field, as well as liy its bearing upon drill and parade, 
its right to the proud distinction of being the "Excelsior" regiment of the noble 
Third Di\-ision. April 5, through a reorganization effected in veteranizing, the 
regiment found itself outside of tlie third division, to which the banner was 
to belong, according to the terms understood in drilling for it, and so sur- 
rendered the proud trophy to Colonel Scott, temporarily commanding the 
di\-isinn. But the banner was never afterwards liorne bv anv command. The 



318 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Illinois was the only "Excelsior" regiment 
of that famous old division. 

The 5th of April. 1864, the regiment moved to Mcksburg again, where 
its camp remained till February 25, 1865. Much of that time was passed 
on provost duty, from which a little relief was found in an expedition of 
eighteen days in ;May. under General McArthur. to Benton and Yazo<j) City, 
and one of nine days in July, under General Slocum. to Jackson, in both of 
which some considerable service was seen and loss sustained. 

October 13 it went up the river, ultimately as far as Memphis. But 
nothine noteworthv occurred, and the 26th found it back in camp and on 
provost duty again. 

Februar}' 25, 1865, after a stay in \'icksburg and vicinity of nearly two 
3-ears, found the regiment on the steamer "Grey Eagle," bound for New 
Orleans with orders to report to General Canby. This was done the 27th, 
and followed by other orders to report to General A. J. Smith, below the 
city, for duty in the field. 

March 11 embarked on the steamship "Guiding Star," and 'Sla.rch 16 
debarked at Fort Gaines, on Dauphine Island, Alabama. 

Were assigned with the Eighty-first and One Hundred and Eighth Illi- 
nois and the Eighth Iowa, to the Third Brigade, Colonel J. L. Geddes, of the 
Eighth low-a, commanding, of the Third Division, commanded by General 
E. A. Carr, of the Sixteenth Army Corps, under General A. J. Smith ; moving 
with the Thirteenth Army Corps, commanded by General Gordon Granger 
and a force under General F. Steele, against the defenses of Mobile, all under 
command of General E. R. S. Canby. 

]\Iarch 21 crossed the bay, and on the 22d debarked on Fish river and 
moved on Spanish Fort. Shared actively in the investment on the 27th and 
the siege which followed, the Third Brigade constituting the extreme right 
of the investing line, and being exposed not only to the direct fire from the 
enemy's works in front, but to an enfilading fire from batteries Huger and 
Tracy, and gimboats in the river above. Bore a conspicuous part in the 
brilliant attack on the enemy's extreme left on the night of April 8. which 
terminated the siege, was among the first to enter the works, captured several 
guns and many prisoners, swept up the Old Fort in the darkness, reaching 
it before midnight, and was shelled by the Union fleet before the change of 
occupation was known. 

Started for Montgomery, Alabama. April 13. reaching it on the 25th, 
and going immediately upon provost duty. Colonel Geddes commanding post, 
and Colonel Howe the brigade. 

The 1 6th of July left for home via the Alabama river and railroad to 
Vicksburg. passing through IMeridian, Jackson, the battle ground of Cham- 
pion Hills, and the old camps on the Big Black. On the 28th of July left 
Mcksburg on the good steamer "Ida Handy" and on the 3d of August 
reached Chicago in company with the Seventy-sixth Illinois, Colonel Busey 
commanding. On the i6th of August, eleven days less than three years since" 
the first company went into camp at Springfield, the regiment was mustered 
out at Camp Douglas. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 319 

Colonel Howe's history of the battle flag of the regiment, stated that it 
had been borne four thousand one hundred miles, in fourteen skirmishes, ten 
battles and two sieges of forty-seven days and nights, and thirteen days and 
nights respectively, and so had been under fire eighty-two days and sixty 
nights; the distance not including that from Montgomery to Chicago. 

The regiment was one of the most fortunate in the service. It always 
obeyed orders, taking and holding every position to which it was assigned 
unflinchingly. Regiments by its side sustained fearful losses in officers and 
men while its numbers were comparatively intact. One officer alone was killed 
in the service, and he was sitting in his tent, off duty, when struck, at the siege 
of X'icksburg. Two others resigned from wounds, and two died. Twenty 
men were killed in action, twenty-nine died from wounds, five were captured 
when detailed on a scout, four of whom did not live to return, and one hun- 
dred and thirty-seven men died of disease. Very many others, ofticers and 
men, were wounded and some seriously, but they were not lost to the regi- 
ment. The regiment never was repulsed, never retreated a step in the face 
of a foe and never lost a prisoner in action. 

The following from the pen of General M. D. Leggett. was written in 
January, 1886, and is thought worthy of a place in closing this history: 

"As to the Excelsior Banner, it is due to the members of the old Third 
division that I should tell them all I know about it. When we went into the 
Atlanta campaign we sent all our surplus and unnecessary baggage back to 
Nashville for storage, in order to lighten our transportation. With such 
baggage the Excelsior Banner went. At the time of the siege of Nashville, 
in December, 1864, this baggage had its location changed and was lost, but 
was not captured by the enemy. I caused an exhaustive search to be made 
for it in the spring of 1865, but without success. If I could have found this 
Excelsior Banner, I should have sent it to Colonel John H. Howe, of the One 
Hundred and Twenty-fourth Illinois. This was a splendid regiment and 
splendidly officered, and deservedly earned the banner after a severe struggle. 
To be the best drilled and best disciplined regiment in the old Third Division 
of the Seventeenth Corps, was honor enough. This was Logan's division and 
McFherson's corps up to the fall of Vicksburg, and no troops did more hard 
marching and hard fighting. It may be truthfully said of them, they were 
never driven from a position, and never attempted to take a position and 
failed. 

(Signed.) M. D. Leggett. 

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY 

REGIMENT. 

(Three Years' Service.) 

Lieutenant Colonel. 
Adin Mann, Batavia ; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Majors. 
Rufus P. Pattison, Aurora: discharged July 9, 1863. 
Adin Mann, Batavia : promoted. 



320 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Surgeon. 
Leland H. Angell, Aurora; discharged June i, 1864. 

Second Assistant Surgeon. 
John Jassoj'. Aurora; dismissed November 17, 1864. 

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

Hospital Stczvard. 
Charles B. Allaire, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Principal Musician. 
Joseph E. !\Ierrill, Aurora; Mustered out August 15. 1865. 

COMPANY B. 

Captains. 
Adin Mann, Batavia; promoted major. 
Edwin E. Stafford, Bata\ia; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

First Lieutenant. 
Edwin E. Stafford, Batavia ; promoted. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Christopher H. Keller, Blackberry; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

First Sergeant. 
H. Emory Abbott, Geneva; discharged March 2, 1863. 

Sergeants. 
Christopher H. Keller, Blackberry; promoted to second lieutenant. 
Fred V. D. Vanliew, Batavia; discharged June 19. 1863; disability. 
Julius G. Brown, Batavia; discharged May 24, 1865, as private. 
James Bradley. Batavia; discharged May 24, 1865, as private. 

Corporals. 
Thomas W. AIcAuley, Batavia; mustered out August 15, 1865, as private. 
Henry A. Lewis, Kaneville; private; discharged July 10, 1863. 
Edward L. Hunt, Geneva; mustered out August 15, 1865, as private. 
Salem B. Town, Batavia; discharged February 28, 1863; disability. 

Musician. 
John Bullard. Batavia; discharged February 22, 1863; disability. 

Privates. 
Cleavland Acox. Kaneville: died at Clinton, Mississippi, ;\Iarch 7, 1864; 
wounds. 

James D. Austin, Batavia; mustered out August 15, 1865. 
William A. Bingham, Batavia: discharged February 3, 1864, for pro- 
motion in colored regiment. 

Samuel Ball, Batavia; died at home February 22, 1863. 
Theodore T. Ball, Batavia; mustered out August 15, 1865. 
John S. Ball, Batavia; discharged December 16, 1862; disability. 
Charles E. Bassett, Batavia: mustered out August 15, 1865, as corporal. 
Franklin Boyd, Batavia; died at Memphis June 23, 1863. 
Ebenezer Bradley. Batavia; discharged August 20, 1864. 
Joseph Barrett, Batavia; died on hospital boat, August 29, 1863. 
Beverly \'irgil; died at Memphis, July 13, 1863. 




LOOKING UP EIVER FEO.M ,ST0LP8 

ABOUT 1860. 



ISLAND, AURORA, 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 323 

Charles A. Buecher, Batavia; discharged February 22, 1863; disabihty. 

Charles W. Cook, Geneva; mustered out August 15. 1865. 

Ransom Conley, Batavia ; reported transferred to \'. R. C. ; no ofificial 
notice received. 

Oscar F. Cooley. Batavia; killed before Vicksburg June 8, 1863. 

Oliver B. Douglas, Batavia; discharged February 22, 1865; disability. 

Louis A. Derosier, Batavia; discharged May 24, 1865. 

Rasalva Fisk, Batavia; corporal; died at New Orleans April 21, 1865; 
wounds. 

Hicks Frydendall, Batavia; mustered out August 15, 1865, as corporal. 

Charles B. Grover, Batavia; discharged August 12, 1864; disability. 

George W. Gregg, Batavia: mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Harlow Helmer, Batavia; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Isaac S. Hedges, Batavia; corporal; died at home August 15, 1863. 

William J. Hollister, Batavia; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Jackson Hovey, Kaneville; mustered out August 15, 1865, as corporal. 

Albert Johnston, Blackberry: discharged June 14, 1865. 

Hiram Jenkins, Batavia; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Martin C. Jones, Batavia; died at St. Louis, August 3, 1863. 

John \\'. Lumm, Batavia; discharged June 3, 1865. 

Francis W. Mann, Batavia; discharged May 24, 1865. 

Frederick Miller, Batavia; discharged October 10, 1863; wounds. 

Frederick \'. L. Morris, Batavia; mustered out August 15, 1865, as 
corporal. 

Noah Monroe, Batavia; discharged May 24, 1865. 

John H. Mole, Batavia; mustered out June 15, 1865, as corporal. 

Walter M. McAuley. Batavia ; detached at muster out of regiment. 

James Martin, Batavia; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Isaiah Noakes, Batavia; died at home October 4, 1862. 

William Noakes. Batavia : absent, sick, at muster out of regiment. 

Thomas O'Connor, Geneva; discharged May 24, 1865. 

W'illiam Reed, Virgil; discharged February 28, 1863; disability. 

Elisha P. Stone, Batavia; discharged April 25, 1863; disability. 

James K. Stephenson, Batavia; discharged September 11, 1863; disability. 

]\Ienard L. Stone, Batavia; died at Memphis April 21, 1863. 

Emanuel Sturgis, Batavia; discharged February 22, 1863; disability. 

William Tulloch, Batavia; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Samuel M. Updyke, Geneva; died on hospital boat May 15, 1863. 

George Voorhees, Batavia; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Kirby Waite, Batavia; died at St. Louis, March 2, 1863. 

Orson Weaver, Batavia: mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Theodore Wood, Batavia; discharged July 20, 1864, for promotion in 
colored regiment. 

Daniel Whipple, Batavia: discharged January 20, 1863; disability. 
Patrick Welsh. Virgil: mustered nut August 15, 1865, as corporal. 
William Walrod, Virgil; mustered out August 15, 1865. 
Gilbert W. Young, Batavia; mustered out August 15, 1865, as sergeant. 



324 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Recruits. 

Andrew Anderson, Batavia; transferred to Thirty-third llHnois Infantry. 

Henry P. Brown, Batavia; mustered out August 15, 1865, as first 
sergeant. 

Edwin M. Benedict. Batavia; transferred to Thirty-third lUinois Infantry. 

Josiah S. Coolidge. Batavia; transferred to Thirty-third Ilhnois Infantry. 

John H. Cleveland. Batavia; transferred to Thirty-third IlHnois Infantry. 

David E. Dean, Batavia; transferred to Thirty-third IlHnois Infantry. 

Michael Davis, Batavia ; transferred to Thirty-third Illinois Infantry. 

Edwin F. Fish, Batavia ; transferred to Thirty-third Illinois Infantry. 

Francis F. Joy, Virgil; transferred to Thirty-third Illinois Infantry. 

Charles Lappin, Batavia; transferred to Thirty-third Illinois Infantry. 

Russell Massee, Batavia ; transferred to Thirty-third Illinois Infantry. 

Frederick L. ^Manning, Batavia : transferred to Thirty-third Illinois 
Infantry. 

Charles H. flails, Batavia; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

James T. McMasters, Batavia; mustered out August 15. 1865, as corporal. 

Valentine McDonald. Batavia; transferred to Thirty-third Illinois 
Infantry. 

William H. Price. Batavia; transferred to Thirty-third Illinois Infantry. 

Nathaniel Radcliff. Batavia; mustered out August 15. 1865. 

Cyrus R. Rofif, Batavia ; transferred to Thirty-third Illinois Infantry. 

William J. Reynolds, Batavia; transferred to Thirty-third Illinois 
Infantry. 

Ferd. G. Stephenson, Batavia; mustered out August 15. 1865. 

Peter Mctor, Batavia; Captured and murdered bv enemv. October 16, 
1863. 

Edwin A. Williams. Batavia; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Clark \\'ood, Batavia; transferred to Thirty-third Illinois Infantry. 

COMPANY D. 

. ' First Lieutenant. 
Henry J. Brockway. Dundee; mustered out August 15. 1865. 

Sergeant. 
Henry J. Brockway. Dundee; promoted first lieutenant. 

Corporals. 
Frank B. Reeves. Dundee; discharged September 18, 1863; wounds. 
\\'illiam E. Tollhurst, Dundee; died at home October 21, 1862. 

Privates. 
Daniel Brown, Dundee; discharged September 18. 1863; disability. 
Alliert M. Dunton. Dundee; discharged October 27, 1864; wounds. 
Josiah \\'. Goodwin. Dundee ; died of wounds received at Champion Hills, 
Mississippi. May 16, 1863. 

Albert Gibbs, Dundee; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Milford G. Harris. Dundee; mustered out August 15. 1865. 

Stephen A. Houghton. Dundee; discharged October 12, 1863; disability. 

Lorenzo C. Kelly, Geneva; discharged July 7. 1865. 

Joseph L. Satterlee, Aurora; discharged June 3, 1865. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 325 

Rccniit. 
James D. Brower. Sugar Grove; transferred to Tliirty-third Illinois 
Infantry. 

^ COMPANY E. 

Captains. 
William B. Sigley. Aurora: resigned June 27, 1864. 
Reese L. Merriman. Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

First Lieutenants. 
James H. Blackmore, Aurora: resigned July 24. 1863. 
Reese L. Merriman. Aurora; promoted. 
William H. Anderson, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Osborn Willson, Aurora; resigned July 13. 1863. 

First Sergeant. 
Hiram J. Howland, Aurora; died May 3, 1863; wounds. 

Sergeants. 
William H. Anderson, Aurora ; promoted first lieutenant. 
Reese L. Alerriman. Aurora; promoted first lieutenant. 

Corporals. 
Homer J. Elliott. Aurora; sergeant: discharged October 9, 1863, for 
promotion in United States Colored Infantry. 

Horace J. Hall, Aurora; sergeant; discharged January 5, 1864, for pro- 
motion in United States Colored Infantry. 

Robert B. Stephens, Aurora; died at Lagrange, Tennessee, December 5, 
1862. 

John Fairweather, Aurora; discharged August 14, 1863. for promotion 
in First United States C. H. A. 

Jonathan Crosby, Aurora; mustered out May 29, 1865, as private. 

Musician. 
Frank Pinney, Aurora; discharged July 26, 1864, for promotion as hos- 
pital steward Third United States Colored Cavalry. 

Wagoner. 
Fowler Irwin, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Privates. 
Nelson P. Atwood, Aurora; discharged October 21, 1862; disability. 
Charles L. Cheeney. Aurora ; died at Jackson. Tennessee, October 24, 
1862. 

Thomas D. Cuthbert, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 
Henry Dickson, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865, as corporal. 
Silas W. Dunning, Aurora; mustered out June 14, 1865; was prisoner. 
Justus Dodge, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 
Marshall Dow. Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 
Sylvester D. Elderkin. Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 
Sebra Emerson, Aurora; deserted October 6, 1862. 
Patrick M. Fitzgerald. Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865, as ser- 
geant. 

John H. French, Aurora; died \'icksburg November 14, 1864. 



326 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Arthur M. Gurnsey. Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

William M. Hale, Aurora; mustered out August 15. 1865. 

Lanson Hinman, Aurora; discharged March 5, 1863: disability. 

Charles Hartman, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Daniel Jenkins, Aurora; died \"icksburg January 11, 1864. 

John Karney, Aurora: mustered out August 15, 1865. 

James W. Lusk, Aurora: mustered out June i. 1865, as corporal. 

Jacob L. Lantz. Aurora ; transferred to \'eteran Reserve Corps October 
26, 1863. 

Herbert Lane, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865, as corporal. 

John Martin, Aurora; killed at Raymond, ]\Iississippi, May 12, 1863. 

Edward McGlvnn, Aurora: died at Camp Douglas. Illinois. August 15, 
1865. 

Michael Maloney, Aurora; mustered out Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 

David S. Miller, Aurora: mustered out August 15. 1865. 

Neil McGlaughlin, Aurora: mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Amos B. Morey, Aurora: mustered out August 15, 1865. 

William Mears, Aurora: discharged September 17, 1864; disability. 

Horace McKay, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Joseph R. Miller. Aurora; died Mcksburg July 28. 1863. 

Horace Miner, Aurora; transferred to \'eteran Reserve Corps June 30, 
1864; mustered out July 5. 1865, as first sergeant. 

Joseph D. Newman, Aurora; mustered out July 6, 1865. 

Charles M. Plummer. Aurora; transferred to \'eteran Reserve Corps 
April 2, 1864. 

Harvey B. Powers. Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865, as first 
sergeant, commissioned second lieutenant : not mustered. 

Peter Rackmeyer, Aunira; died IMemphis June 10, 1863. 

Ezra D. Race. Aurora: corporal; transferred to \'eteran Reserve Corps 
October 26, 1863. 

Maurice C. Ryan, .\urora ; discharged December 30. 1863. for promo- 
tion in Sixty-third L'nited States Colored Infantry. 

John E. Roach, Aurora; discharged April 15, 1863; disability. 

Adam N. Roach, Aurora: died at Lake Providence. Louisiana, April 22. 
1863. 

William Smith. Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865, as corporal. 

David D. Speer, Aurora; discharged September 17, 1864; disability. 

Martin L. Stage, Aurora; discharged October 29, 1864; disability. 

Napoleon J. Smith. Aurora; discharged August i. 1863. for promotion 
in First Louisiana Colored Infantrv. 

John St. Martin. Aurora; absent; wounded at \'icksburg"; unofficially 
reported transferred to \'eteran Reserve Corps. 

Joseph Thompson, Aurora: mustered out .\ugust 15, 1865. 

Richard S. Thom])si)n, Aurora; mustered out August 15. 1865. as ser- 
geant. 

William Vinter, Aurora; discharged December 18, 1862: disability. 

Daniel \'iiison, Aurora; mustered nut August 15. 1865. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 327 

Henry Weber, Aurora; deserted October 6, 1862. 

John H. Ward, Aurora ; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps October 
26, 1863; mustered out June 25, 1865. 

John Wilyne, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

David Weigler, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Job H. Yaggy, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865, as corporal. 

Recruits. 

Nelson W. Hinkston, Aurora; musician; discharged April 15, 1863; 
disability. 

Alonzo V. Howard, Sugar Grove; transferred to Thirty-third Illinois 
Infantry. 

COMPANY F. 

Recruits. 
Henry Ankel. Sugar Grove; transferred to Thirty-third Illinois Infantry. 
Joseph Allbee. Sugar Grove; transferred to Thirty-third Illinois Infantry. 
Adolph Nebring, Sugar Grove; transferred to Thirty-third Illinois In- 
fantry. 

COMP.ANY H. 

Captain. 
John W\ Kendall. Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

First Licutowiits. 
Justus D. Andrews, Aurora; resigned January 28, 1863. 
Theodore Potter, Aurora; resigned January 26, 1864. 
Greenville A. Spear, Aurora: died November 8. 1864. 
Freeman L. Campbell, Aurora: mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Second Lieutenants. 
Theodore Potter, Aurora; promoted. 
Joy Jay Tarble, Aurora ; declined commission. 
Greenville A. Spear, Aurora; promoted. 
George M. Cn^nk, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865, as sergeant. 

First Sergeant. 
George S. Prindle, Aurora; private; discharged May 12, 1863, for pro- 
motion as hospital steward United States Army. 

Sergeants. 
Greenville A. Spear, Aurora ; promoted second lieutenant. 
Joy Jay Tarble, Aurora; promoted second lieutenant; declined; mustered 
out May 28, 1865. as private. 

Melvin Tarble, Aurora; private: discharged August 31, 1863, for promo- 
tion as hospital steward United States Army. 

Freeman L. Campbell, Aurora: promoted first lieutenant. 

Corporals. 
George M. Cronk, Aurora; mu.stered out August 15, 1865, as first ser- 
geant ; commissioned second lieutenant ; not mustered. 

Levi Morgan. Aurora; discharged July 6, 1865, as sergeant. 
Oliver D. Bonney, Aurora; sergeant: discharged January 13. 1864, for 
promotion second lieutenant Sixty-sixth United States Colored Infantry. 
Charles E. Otis, Aurora; mustered out June 2, 1865, as private. 



32S KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Alvin A. Page, Aurora : died at Lagrange. Tennessee, November 23, 
1862. 

George R. Robinson. Aurora ; private : transferred to \'eteran Reserve 
Corps January 15. 1864. 

Russell Richardson, Aurora; mustered out May 28, 1865, as pri\ate. 

Samuel Miner. Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865, as sergeant. 

Musicians. 

Joseph E. IMerrill, Aurora ; promoted principal musician. 

Xenophon Beher, Aurora; discharged January 19, 1864. for promotion 
chief bugler Third United States Colored Cavalry. 

JVago)tcr. 

Albert B. Albee. Aurora: mustered out August 15. 1865. 

Frifafcs. 

Orrin C. Allison, Aurora: died Mcksburg August 16. 1863. 

Merritt Allen. Aurora: mustered out August 15. 1865. 

Charles B. Allaire. Aurora : promoted sergeant major. 

Gustavus Alcott, Aurora: muste-ed out May 28. 1865. 

Robert T. Anderson. Aurora; discharged November 21. 1863: disability. 

Theodore Bammer. Aurora: mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Wallace W. Baker, Aurora: mustered out May 31, 1865, as sergeant. 

George H. Baker. Aurora; discharged March 29. 1863; disability. 

Frank Bailey. Aurora; mustered out August 15. 1865, as corporal. 

Samuel A. Campbell. Aurora; discharged January 4, 1864, for promotion 
as first sergeant Third United States Colored Cavalry. 

John D. Church, Aurora; mustered out August 15. 1865. 

William Cassalee, Aurora; mustered out August 15. 1865. 

\\'illiam Carpenter. Aurora; mustered out August 15. 1865. 

William H. Crosby. Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Florence M. Crosbh. Aurora; discharged January 10, 1864, for promotion 
as first sergeant Third United States Colored Cavalry. 

James R. Chidester, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Henry E. Daniels, Aurora; discharged December 11, 1863, to enlist as 
hospital steward United States Army. 

Horace I\I. Drake. Aurora; mustered out ]May 3. 1865. 

Solomon S. Dennison, Aurora; discharged December 13, 1863, for pro- 
motion as quartermaster sergeant Third United States Colored Cavalry. 

Warren H. Ensign. Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

James A. Egleston, Aurora; discharged August 26, 1863; disability. 

Charles Edson, Aurora; discharged May 7, 1863; disability. 

Henry H. Evans, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Henry Fransham, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865, as sergeant. 

William Ferrin, Aurora ; detached at muster out of regiment. 

Jacob F. Fisher, Aurora; mustered out August 15. 1865. 

Theophilus Gaines, Aurora; transferred to \'eteran Reserve Corps April 
2. 1864. 

Theodore Golden. Aurora; mustered out August 15. 1865. 

Martin J. Gould. Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 329 

James R. Gillett, Aurora; discharged January 3. 1863; disability. 

\\'illis A. Gardner, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Jason Gregory. Aurora; mustered out August 15. 1865, as corporal. 

William Hurlbut, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Austin P. Hatch, Aurora; discharged August 7, 1863; disability. 

James A. Hurd, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865, as corporal. 

Daniel Harris, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Ashael Judd, Aurora; discharged January 2, 1864, for promotion quarter- 
master sergeant Fifth United States H. A. C. 

Herman Kennedy, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Martin Lenox, Aurora; killed at Champion Hills, Mississippi, May 16, 
1863. 

William T. Murra}-. Aurora; mustered out June 17, 1865. 

Henry J. Morton, Aurora; mustered out Augvist 15, 1865. 

John Miles, Aurora; died Chicago April 14, 1865. 

John A. Miller, Aurora; transferred to \'eteran Reserve Corps October 
28, 1863. 

Orlando J. McCollum, Aurora ; transferred to \'eteran Reserve Corps 
January 15, 1865. 

George Ormes, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Emerson Pinney, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865, as corporal. 

David H. Parsons, Aurora; corporal; died at home July 23, 1864. 

John J. Potter, Aurora; died St. Louis August 12, 1863. 

George ^\^ Rake, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865, as corporal. 

Alphonzo Rice, Aurora; killed at Champion Hills, Mississippi, May 16, 
1863. 

George \\'. Slate, Aurora; discharged October 8, 1864; disability. 

Albert Stickles. Aurora; mustered out August 15. 1865. 

George A. Snow. Aurora; killed at Champion Hills, Mississippi, May 16, 
1863. 

Charles H. Sneidecker, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865, as ser- 
geant. 

Byron Snow, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865, as sergeant. 

Han-ey S. Seymore, Aurora; discharged April 2, 1864, for promotion 
quartermaster sergeant Fifth United States H. A. C. 

Wilford A. Seymore, Aurora; mustered out June 7, 1865, as corporal on 
detached service. 

Peter F. Shvler. Aurora; killed at Champion Hills, Mississippi, May 16. 
1863. 

Leroy J. Smith, Aurora; drowned September 29, 1863. while trying to 
escape from burning steamer Campbell. 

David Smith, Aurora; discharged April 25, 1864; wounds. 

Joseph Sedgwick, Aurora; corporal; discharged December 15, 1863; 
promoted first sergeant in Third United States Colored Cavalry. 

Martin J. Tarble, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Charles Tittsworth. Aurora; died at Memphis June 23, 1863; wounds. 

W^illiam Van Sickle, Aurora; discharged October 20, 1862; disability. 



330 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

George A. \\'hite, Aurora; mustered out May 23, 1865. 

John Waldvogel, Aurora; discharged November 18, 1862; disabihty. 

Wilham A\'right, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Wallace Wilder, Aurora; died at Annapolis, Maryland, March 16, 1865. 

John Woodward, Aurora; discharged August 26, 1863; disability. 

Charles Woodward, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Evans 'M. Waterman, Aurora; discharged March 6, 1863; disability. 

Albert A. Westever, Aurora; mustered out August 15, 1865. 

Har\-ey Woodcock, Aurora; mustered out August 15. 1865. 

Henry Young, Aurora; discharged December 3. 1863; disability. 

Recruit. 
Henry Loomis, Aurora; discharged February 26, 1863; disability. 

HISTORY OF ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SE\ENTH 

INFANTRY. 

The One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Infantry was raised under the 
call of President Lincoln for five hundred thousand volunteers in the summer 
of 1862. Company A was recruited in Kendall county; Company B, in and 
around Chicago; Company C, at Elgin; Company D, in Grundy county; Com- 
pany E, at St. Charles; Company F, at Piano; Company G. in Chicago; Com- 
pany H, about Lyons ; Company I, at Elgin, and Company K, at Aurora and 
Big Rock. The regiment was mustered in this service at Camp Douglas 
September 6, 1862. 

The regiment performed a considerable amount of guard duty in Camp 
Douglas, where the Harper's Ferry prisoners were sent in the fall of 1862. 

The command drew a full complement of English Enfield rifles in the 
beginning of November, 1862, and on the 9th of that month departed over the 
Illinois Central railway for Cairo, where it went on board the steamer Emer- 
ald, and landed at Memphis, Tennessee, on the 13th. Went into camp near the 
city and was assigned to the First Brigade, Second Division, Fifteenth Army 
Corps, then a part of the right wing of the Army of the Tennessee. 

On the 26th of Novemljer departed on the expedition under General W. 
T. Sherman in pursuit of Generals Price and Van Dorn. Marched to the 
neighborhood of Oxford, iMississippi, where the command was reviewed by 
General Grant, and returned without encountering the enemy, to Memphis, 
on the 13th of December. 

On the 20th of that month embarked on the Mississippi river as a part 
of the expedition under General Sherman, destined to operate against \'icks- 
burg. Reached the Yazoo December 25 and was engaged in the operations on 
the Chickasaw Bayou from December 26 to January i. during which its losses 
were one man killed (William Elmy, of Company H) and seven wounded. 
A number of men soon after died of malignant measles. 

The regiment was with the expedition under General ]\IcClernand, which 
captured Arkansas Post. January 11, 1863, and was one of the first to plant 
its colors on the enemy's works. Its losses in the assault were two killed, 
twenty wounded and nine missing. 

Following this expedition the army encamped at Young's Point, and on 
the peninsula opposite Vicksburg, where the One Hundred and Twenty- 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 331 

seventli performed picket and fatigaie duty, working on the famous "canal" 
begun by General Butler, and during the next three months having a great 
amount of sickness in its ranks, and losing a large number of men by disease. 
At times the regiment could report scarcely a hundred men for duty. 

The One Hundred and Twenty-seventh took part in the expeditiini to 
Steele's and Black Bayous in March, liut. though suffering great hardships, 
returned without loss. 

It was engaged in the movements to Grand Gulf, and in the rear of 
Vicksburg in May, and, when General Grant's army closed upon the doomed 
city on the i8th of the month it formed a part of tlie line of battle of the 
Fifteenth Corps, on the right of the army. 

It was in the bloody assaults upon the Vicksburg lines, May 19 and 22, 
on the first day planting its colors on the glacis of the rebel works, and main- 
taining its position until nightfall, when the troops were withdrawn. The 
losses of the regiment in the two engagements were about fifteen killed and 
sixty wounded. 

During the siege of Vicksburg the regiment was on detached duty at 
the Chickasaw Bayou until within a few days of the surrender, when it re- 
turned to the trenches, and was present at the surrender of the rebel stronghold 
July 4, 1863. 

On the night following the surrender all the men fit for duty, less than 
fifty in number, under Major Curtiss, marched with General Sherman's com- 
mand, which drove General Joe Johnston from Jackson a few days later. Dur- 
ing these operations the remnant of the regiment was under the immediate 
command of Lieutenant Richmond, of Company E. 

Following the defeat of Johnston, the Fifteenth Corps went into camp 
near Black river, about fifteen miles east of Vicksburg, where it remained 
rmtil ordered, in September, to Chattanooga. 

After the return of the Fifteenth Corps from Jackson, the One Hundred 
and Twenty-seventh was granted about twenty-five furloughs and leaves of 
absence. When the regiment went into camp at Black river it had less than 
one hundred men fit for duty, about four hundred lieing in the hospital on 
W'alnut Hills, in the rear of Vicksiourg. 

On the 22(1 of September the Fifteenth Army Corps, under orders from 
General Grant, broke camp on Black river, and, marching to Vicksburg, took 
steamers for Memphis, from which point the troops marched overland, three 
hundred miles, to Chattanooga, Tennessee, where they began to arrive about 
the 15th of November. There was considerable fighting at Collierville, on the 
line of the Memphis and Charleston Railway, and in the neighborhood of 
Tuscumbia, Alaliama, but, in spite of all opposition, the corps arrived in splen- 
did fighting trim in front of General Bragg's army at Chattanooga, and took 
part in the battles of Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge, November 22 
to 25, which ended in the total discomfiture of the rebel forces with heavy loss. 
During the march through the mountains between Bridgeport and Chatta- 
nooga the One Hundred and Twenty-seventh was on detached service guarding 
trains. Following the defeat of Bragg it formed a part of General Sherman's 
expedition for the relief of General Burnside, besieged in Knoxville. Tennes- 



332 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

see, by the rebel General Longstreet. marcbing to witbin a few miles of tbat 
place and returning to Bridgeport about tbe i8tb of December. 

In Januar}-. 1864. tbe Fifteenth Corps was cantoned along the Memphis 
and Charleston Railway, tbe divisions occupying Huntsville. W'oodville. 
Larkinsville and Scottstero, in northern Alabama, tbe Second Division, to 
which tbe One Hundred and Twenty-seventh belonged, being stationed at 
Larkinsville. 

During tbe latter part of January and tbe beginning of February, the 
regiment took part in the forward moxement of the corps, which crossed the 
Tennessee river near its soutliern bend, and made a demonstration in favor 
of General W. T. Sherman, then engaged in bis famous raid from \'icksburg 
toward Meridian. Mississippi, at the head of the Seventeenth Army Corps. 

During tbe encampment at Larkinsville a number of the officers of the 
One Hundred and Twenty-seventh sent for their wives, who visited them in 
cam]) and remained several weeks. 

A sad occurrence, and one which cast a gloom over the regiment greater 
than tlie loss of twenty men in battle, was the murder of Joseph E. Corby, of 
Company I, who was found dead in front of our camp on the morning of 
January 24, 1864. 

The regiment broke camp at Larkins\ille on the ist day of May, 1864. 
and m(jved with its division toward Chattanooga, which place was reached 
on the 5tb. and on tbe evening of the same day encamped on the Chickamauga 
l)attlefield with tbe Armv of the Tennessee, then imder command of General 
J. B. McPherson. 

The One Hundred and Twenty-se\-enth took part in tbe series of battles 
around Resaca, notably tbe one on the evening of May 14, when the brigade 
to which it was attached carried the fortified line along the slope of Conasine 
creek by a desperate assault with tbe bayonet, in which the regiment bore a 
conspicuous part and captured a number of prisoners. Immediately following 
this successful charge came the return assault of General Cleburne's rebel 
division, which made three furious charges upon our lines only to be bloodily 
repulsed. In the operations in front of Resaca the One Hundred and Twenty- 
seventh lost one man killed and three wounded. 

In tbe sharp fighting among tbe Dallas Hills from tbe 26tb of iNIay to 
June I tbe One Hundred and Twenty-seventh was almost constantly under 
fire, showing conspicuous gallantry in tbe actions of the 27tb and 2gtb. Daniel 
T. Lane, of Company E, was seriously wounded on tbe 27th. 

On tbe 4th of June the enemj- al)andoned his strong works at Dallas and 
fell back behind the still stronger position on and around Kenesaw Mountain 
and Pine Hill, where he maintained himself for nearly a month, during which 
period it rained almost incessantly, making active operations nearlv impossible. 

On tbe 27th of June occurretl tbe desperate assault of the Fifteenth Corps 
upon Kenesaw Mountain, which frowned a thousand feet above tbe beads of 
our men. ccnered with rifle pits, strong parapets, and death-dealing batteries. 
In this marvelous affair tbe One Hundred and Twenty-seventh stood up 
srrandlv under tbe most terrible fire it had ever encountered. 




FOUNTAIN SQITARE— LOOKING NOrvTII— LSGO. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 335 

On the 2d uf Jul)- the enemy aljandoned the defenses of Kenesaw and 
fell hack to the Chattahoochee river. On the 6th our advance was in sight of 
Atlanta, and on the 12th and i3tli the Army of the Tennessee was transferred 
by a rapid movement from the extreme right to the extreme left, and, follow- 
ing Garrard's cavalry column across the Chattahoochee near Rosswell, en- 
trenched itself and compelled the rebel commander to retreat across the river 
into his Atlanta lines. The One Hundred and Twenty-seventh took part in 
all these movements. 

The whole army now crossed the Chattahoochee, and the battle of Peach 
Tree Creek followed on the 20th of July. General John B. Hood had been 
placed in command of the rebel army on the 19th in place of General Joseph 
E. Johnston, relieved by Jefiferson Davis, and fighting became desperate. 

In the bloody engagement of the 22d of July, east of Atlanta, in which 
the lamented McPherson fell, the One Hundred and Twenty-seventh was in 
the thickest of the fray, the brigade to which it belonged being led into the 
fight jjy General Logan in person. 

A few days later the Fifteenth Corps was transferred to the extreme 
right of the army, where, on the 28th of July, it was furiously assailed by a 
corps of Hood's army, which was repulsed with terrible loss, leaving no less 
than eight hundred and twenty-eight dead in front of our lines. The weight 
of the attack fell upon the Second Division of our corps. The One Hundred 
and Twenty-sexenth, forming the extreme right of the army, and, being 
mostly on the skirmish line, came very near being captured. The timely arrival 
of a brigade of the Fourteenth Corps, piloted upon the field by Robert Murphy, 
a drummer bov of the One ?Iundred and Twenty-seventh, saved the day. The 
losses (if the regiment on this day were Corporal John T. Bennett and William 
Peterson, of Comiiany D, and Alfred X. Murdnck and William Pooley, of 
Ciimpanv A. killed, and seventeen wounded and missing. 

Aliout this date Comi)an)^ G, Captain Sewell, was detailed at corps head- 
(|uarters as provost guard, a jiosition which it held for several months. On 
the 31st of July the morning report of the One Flundred and Twenty-seventh 
showed only ninety-two men fit for duty carrying guns. 

On the 3d of August the regiment took part in an attack on the rebel 
skirnnsh line to the west of Atlanta, in which it displayed its usual gallantry 
and lost a number of men, among whom were Sergeant Ira B. Whitney, of 
Company B, killed, and five men, including Captain A. C. Little, wounded. 
Elias Smithers, of Company E, died a few days later of wounds received. 

The regiment participated in the subsequent operations around Atlanta, 
including the great flanking movement of August 27, by which General Sher- 
man placed the hulk of his army in the rear of General Hood and compelled 
him to evacuate Atlanta on the 2d of September. During the withdrawal of 
the army from the lines on the night of August 26 Sergeant Major William 
\\'. Lawton, of the One Hundred and Twenty-seventh, was mortally wounded 
and died the same night in the ambulance. This was the only casualty in the 
Army of the Tennessee during the movement. 

The One Hundred and Twenty-seventh was hotly engaged in the battle 
of joneslxiro. below .Atlanta, fought by Logan's corps on the 1st of September, 



336 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

its officers and men displaying the greatest gallantry and inflicting some loss 
upon the enemy. In this battle the killed were Sergeant J. R. Grassmire, of 
Company I ; James Griffin, of Company H : Levi Mead, of Company F, and 
Francis H. Chappell, of Company D, and a number wounded. 

On the 9th of September the army encamped around the captured city, 
the Second Division of the Fifteenth Corps occupying East Point, about six 
miles southwest of Atlanta. About this date Captain Gillette received his 
commission as major and Lieutenant Richmond was promoted captain of 
Company E. 

The army remained in its cantonments until the beginning of October, 
during which period General Sherman exchanged two thousand prisoners with 
General Hood at Rough-and-Ready Station, below Atlanta. Among those 
exchanged were the boys of the One Hundred and Twenty-seventh captured 
on the 22d of July. 

General Hood began his famous raid upon the communications of Sher- 
man's anny about the ist of October, and on the 3d of the month Sherman's 
army was in rapid pursuit of the rebel army, which consisted of twenty-five 
thousand infantry and ten thousand cavalry. During the pursuit of Hood and 
the subsequent march through Georgia and South Carolina, the One Hundred 
and Twenty-seventh was commanded by Captain Charles Schryver, of Com- 
pany F, the senior officer then with the regiment. From August 14, 1864, 
to April I, 1865, Colonel Curtiss was absent from the regiment. A portion 
of this time he was in command of a provisional division under General Scho- 
field, in North Carolina. Captain Little was also absent on furlough during 
the same period and was in command of four hundred men under General 
Schofield in North Carolina during a part of the time. 

The One Hundred and Twenty-seventh accompanied Sherman's army 
on its grand march through Georgia and the Carolinas. From Atlanta to 
Columbia, South Carolina, it was on detached service, during which time it 
reported directly to the headquarters of the Army of the Tennessee. At Co- 
lumbia it returned to the division, and took part in the operations, thence on 
to Goldsboro, North Carolina. During the month of January, 1865, it was 
encamped on the great rice plantations southwest of Savannah, Georgia. It 
was present at the capture of Columbia, South Carolina, and in the advance 
upon Fayetteville, North Carolina. A number of its men were engaged in a 
severe skirmish, in which Francis B. Imhoff, of Company B, was killed, and 
R. R. Parkin, of Company I, wounded. At the severe battle of Bentonville, 
March 19 and 20, it was for twenty-four hours on the skirmish line, but es- 
caped without loss. At Goldsboro, North Carolina, the army encamped for 
about fifteen days, during which time it was furnished with a complete outfit 
of new clothing. At Goldsboro, Colonel Curtiss, Captain Little and forty or 
fifty furloughed men rejoined the regiment. Here also Sergeant James G. 
Naid was mustered in as adjutant, assuming his duties on the ist of April, at 
which time Colonel Curtiss assumed command of the regiment. Captain 
Little was soon after detailed on detached duty. 

The army left Goldsboro in pursuit of General Johnston on the loth 
of April, and reached Raleigh, the capital of North Carolina, on the 14th, 




RESIDENCE OF JOHN W. MARSHALL. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 339 

where it went into camp in and around the city. The Fifteenth Corps was 
encamped during most of the time until the last of the month about one mile 
north of the city. 

General Joseph E. Johnston surrendered the remaining armies of the 
Confederacy on the 26th of April, and on the 29th the One Hundred and 
Twenty-seventh, in company with the Fifteenth Corps, commenced the march 
from Raleigh to Petersburg, Virginia, one hundred and sixty-eight miles dis- 
tant, which point was made in just six days, ecjual to twenty-eight miles a 
day. On the 13th of May the army passed through Richmond, and on the 
2 1 St reached the vicinity of Washington, District of Columbia, and went into 
temporary camp on the hills west of Alexandria. The march through Virginia 
took the command through Petersburg, Richmond, Hanover Court House, 
Fredericksburg, Stafford, Dumfries and Occoquan. A portion of the One 
Hundred and Twenty-seventh visited Fort Darling, below Richmond, and 
made a flying visit to Mount Vernon, the home of Washington. 

The One Hundred and Twenty-seventh took part in the grand review at 
headquarters and was specially complimented for its fine discipline and mili- 
tary bearing. During the next fourteen days the command was encamped 
near Fort Slocum, north of the city, where it was mustered for discharge on 
June 4 by Captain Potter, of the Seventieth Ohio Volunteers. 

On the 7th of June the regiment left Washington for Chicago. It was 
finally mustered out on the 17th of June, 1865, after an arduous service of 
almost three years. The actual number of men finally discharged was about 
two hundred and forty, all that remained of the nine hundred with which the 
regiment left Camp Douglas in November, 1862. 

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVENTH INFANTRY 

REGIMENT. 

(Three Years' Service.) 

Major. 
Frank C. Gillette, St. Charles; mustered nut July 11, 1865. 

Adjutant. 
Addison A. Keys, Elgin ; promoted captain Company H. 

Quartcnuastcr. 
Samuel W. Durant, St. Charles; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

First Assistant Surgeon: 
Anson L. Clark, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

Quartermaster Sergeants. 
Samuel W, Durant, St. Charles ; promoted regimental quartermaster. 
Ozias J. Lent, St. Charles ; absent ; sick at muster out of regiment. 

Commissary Sergeant. 
Ozias J. Lent. St. Charles ; promoted quartermaster sergeant. 

Hospital Sfe7i'ards. 
Charles Hill Duck, Elgin; discharged November i, 1863. 
Salem E. Weld, Elgin; mustered nut June 5, 1865. 



340 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Principal Mitsicians. 

Henry C. Elliott, St. Charles; mustered out June 5. 1865. 

Joseph Smith, Aurora; died at Oswego. Illinois, June 16, 1863. 

COMPAXY c. 
Captains. 

John S. Riddle, Elgin; died July 22. 1863. 

William ^^'arner. Hampshire; mustered out to date June 5, 1865. 

First Liciitoiants. 

Thomas Clarck, Elgin; resigned March 2. 1863. 

William Warner, Hampshire ; promoted. 

Lucius B. Patchin. Hampshire; resigned June 8. 1865. 

Scconit Licufrnants. 

William \\"arner. Hampshire: promoted. 

Lucius B. Patchin, Hampshire : promoted. 

First Sergeant. 

Lucius B. Patchin. Hampshire : promoted second lieutenant, then first 
lieutenant. 

Sergeants. 

Edwin Wheedon, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

Amos S. Patton. Hampshire; transferred to Invalid Corps December 2, 
1863. 

Charles \\'. Guptill, Elgin; mustered out to date June 5, 1865. 

Theophilus Renwick, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

Corporals. 

Cullen Allen. Hampshire; mustered out June 8, 1865, as first sergeant. 

James L. Sheehan, Elgin; wounded; mustered out to date June 5, 1865. 

Clark Bradon, Elgin; discharged December — , iS6j. 

Romulus F. Boreman. Elgin; private; mustered out to date June 5, 1865. 

Benjamin Hewitt, Elgin; discharged August 29. 1863. 

Lorenzo Patchin, Hampshire ; private ; wounded ; mustered out to date 
June 5, 1865. 

David \\'. Chapman, Elgin; discharged February 14, 1863. 

Henry Hadlock. Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

Privates. 

Thomas Bennett, Hampshire; discharged December 29, 1863. 

James H. Bartlett, Elgin ; died at Walnut Hill, Mississippi, lulv 2j. 
1863. 

John Battinger. Hampshire; mustered out June 5, 1865; wounded. 

Emmer Bowen, Hampshire; transferred to Invalid Corps [anuarv 10, 
1865, 

Friend F. Church, Hampshire; died at Milliken's Bend June 11. 1863. 

James W, Cox, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

Patrick H. Dooley, Plato ; deserted ; furnished a substitute in George H. 
Burnside. who refused to act but mustered in on own hook. 

William D. Daggett, Jr., Elgin ; died at A\'alnut Hill, Mississippi, June 
29, 1863. 

Edmund Dogherty. Hampshire; mustered out June 5, 1865. as corporal. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 341 

Alexander Dennis, Elgin; color sergeant; wounded; died July 28, 1864. 
Henry Darville, Hampshire; mustered out to date June 5, 1865. 
Philander S. Earl, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865. 
Byron G. Eaton, Hampshire; deserted; furnished substitute until July, 
1863; substitute deserted. 

William Fogg. Elgin; discharged February 14, 1863. 

Cyruel Gage. Hampshire; deserted; date unknown. 

Charles Gustason, Elgin; mustered out to date June 5, 1865. 

John Gable. Elgin; transferred to Invalid Corps September 18, 1863. 

Joseph Gould. Elgin; mustered out to date June 5. 1865. 

Jonathan L. Haines, Hampshire ; sergeant ; mustered out to date June 

5, 1865. 

Malachi Hanslin. Hampshire; mustered out June 9. 1865. 

Michael Hemrick. Hampshire; mustered out June 5. 1865. 

Edwin Hammond. Elgin; died at Milliken's Bend June 13. 1863. 

George H. Himes, Elgin; deserted; furnished substitute; deserted soon 
as paid. 

Theodore Hougland, Elgin; died at Keokuk June 21. 1863. 

Albert Inglesby, Elgin; died at Marietta, Georgia, September 15, 1864. 

Alfred Johnson, Elgin; died at Milliken's Bend April 8, 1863. 

John Keller. Hampshire; mustered out to date June 5, 1865. 

George Kirkpatrick, Elgin; wounded; transferred to Invalid Corps De- 
cember I, 1863. 

George H. Knott, Elgin; mustered out June 19, 1865. 

Lewis F. Kurtz. Hampshire; mustered out June 5, 1865, as corporal. 

Lew'is Little, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

Jesse Mabee, Elgin ; mustered out June 5, 1865, as corporal. 

John Maher, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865, as corporal. 

Nicholas j\Iiller, Hampshire; died January 16, 1863; wounds. 

James Murray, Elgin; discharged January 9, 1863. 

Michael Murray, Plato; mustered out to date June 5, 1865. 

John ^McCartney, Elgin; mustered out to date June 5, 1865. 

William Nicholson. Elgin; died at Camp Sherman, Mississippi, Septem- 
ber 22, 1863." 

Patrick O'Flaherty, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865, as corporal. 

Thomas Parkin, Elgin; died at Elgin August 30. 1863. 

Hercules P. Rice. Elgin; died at Young's Point February 22. 1863. 

John Saunders, Elgin ; died at Camp Sherman, ^lississippi. September 
I, 1863. 

John Smithing, Hampshire; discharged June 15, 1863. 

John Senift, Hampshire; died at Vicksburg May 19, 1863; wounds. 

Joseph Smithing, Hampshire; died St. Louis February 8, 1863. 

John R. Sutter, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

James Schoonhoven, Elgin; discharged No\'ember 21, 1863. 

John Taylor, Elgin; mustered out June 5. 1865. 

Oscar T. Thompson. Hampshire; corporal; died at Walnut Hill, Missis- 
sippi, July 2, 1863. 



342 KAXE COUNTY HISTORY 

Joliii Taylor ( j), Elgin; died Wvatt. Mississippi. December 4, 1862. 

Monroe Underhill, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865, as corporal. 

Luman H. Westover, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

Ruel R. Welch. Elgin; discharged June 20, 1863; wounds. 

Henry Whelpley, Hampshire; mustered out June 5. 1865. 

Patrick Wallace, Hampshire; mustered out June 5. 1865, as sergeant. 

John \\"allace. Hampshire; died July 29, 1864; wounds. 

Recruit. 
Edmund C. Ball. Hampshire; mustered out June 21, 1865; wounds. 

COMPANY E. 

Captains. 

Frank C. Gillette. St. Charles; promoted major. 

James F. Richmond, St. Charles; mustered out June 5. 1865. 

First Lieutenants. 

James F. Richmond. St. Charles; promoted. 

Frederick Knight, St. Charles; resigned September 20. 1864; second 
lieutenant. 

Ira F. Hall. St. Charles; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

Second Lieutenant. 

Frederick Knight. St. Charles; promoted. 

First Sergeant. 

James G. Nind. St. Charles; promoted adjutant. 

Sergeants. 

Samuel \\". Durant. St. Charles; private; promoted quartermaster ser- 
geant. 

Jesse Curren, St. Charles; killed A'icksburg May 19. 1863. 

Henry M. Sill, St. Charles; mustered out January 13. 1863, as private. 

John M. Metcalf. St. Charles; transferred to A'eteran Resen-e Corps 
Alarch 15. 1865. 

Corporals. 

Ozias J. Lent, St. Charles; private; promoted commissary sergeant. 

Henry J. Parker, St. Charles; mustered out May 31. 1865, as private. 

Henry Person. St. Charles; discharged February 10, 1863, as private. 

Ira F. Hall, St. Charles; promoted sergeant, then first lieutenant. 

Wallace M. Peirce, St. Charles; deserted January 18. 1863. 

George A. Dunham. St. Charles; mustered out June 5, 1S65, as private. 

Eugene A. McWayne, St. Charles; mustered out June 5, 1865. as 
sergeant. 

Privates. 

George H. Aldrich. St. Charles; died Memphis January 12, 1863. 

Frank Avert. St. Charles; mustered out June 29. 1865. 

Charles H. Beach, St. Charles; mustered out June 5, 1865, as sergeant 

John Z. Belyea, St. Charles; corporal; died at home November 23, 1863. 

Michael Bolf, St. Charles; mustered out to date June 5, 1865. 

Charles Bowman. St. Charles; discharged February 5, 1863. 

Jeremiah Becker, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865; wounded. 

Philip Brisbin, St. Charles; mustered out June 3, 1865. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 343 

Edgar U. Benedict, St. Charles; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

James Blomly, St. Charles; mustered out June 5, 1865, as corporal. 

Joseph Clark, St. Charles; discharged July 2"]. 1863: disability. 

John S. De\\'olf, St. Charles; discharged for promotion May 2-j, 1864. 

William Dickenson, St. Charles; mustered out June 5. 1865. 

James Doyle, St. Charles; mustered out June 5, 1865, as corporal. 

Dennis Doyle, St. Charles; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

James Earnshaw, St. Charles; transferred to Invalid Corps December i, 
1863. 

Thomas Evison, St. Charles; discharged February 7, 1865. 

George C. Elliott, St. Charles; mustered out June 5, 1865, as first 
eant. 

Henry C. Elliott, St. Charles ; promoted principal musician. 

Charles Ferson, St. Charles; mustered out to date June 5, 1865. 

Eugene Fowler, St. Charles; discharged April 18, 1864; wounds. 

Andrew Goldsbury, St. Charles; mustered out June 5, 1865, as corporal. 

\"alentine O. Gilbert, St. Charles ; transferred to Invalid Corps November 
7. 1863; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Julius A. Green. St. Charles; mustered out to date June 5, 1865. 

lohn M. Green, St. Charles; died at Young's Point, Louisiana, March 7, 
1863: 

Hav Guthrie, St. Charles; died at ^lilliken's Bend, Louisiana, April 15, 
1863. _' , 

Alfred T. Hart, Geneva: discharged February 17. 1864; disability. 

John Hight, Geneva; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

Nathaniel A. Haile, St. Charles; mustered out June 5. 1865, as corporal. 

W'ashington Hammon, St. Charles; discharged March 11, 1863. 

John J. Hand, St. Charles: mustered out June 5, 1865, as corporal. 

Charles J. Kolson, Geneva; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

]\Iichael Kelly, St. Charles; discharged March 4, 1863. 

Francis Kirk, St. Charles; mustered out to date June 5, 1865. 

Daniel T. Lane, St. Charles: mustered out June 5, 1865, as corporal. 

Michael Lincoln, St. Charles; died at Arkansas Post January 11, 1863. 

Frank W. Lynde, St. Charles; mustered out ^lay 12. 1865. 

Michael Murphy, St. Charles; mustered out May 22, 1865. 

Isaac P. IMichael, St. Charles; discharged April g, 1863. 

Charles M. Alichael, St. Charles; discharged February 22, 1863. 

Robert ^larsden. St. Charles; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

Felix McFarlane, St. Charles: mustered out June 5, 1865. 

Franklin Newman, St. Charles; mustered out June 5, 1865, as sergeant. 

Ozro B. Pratt, St. Charles ; corporal ; killed at Atlanta, Georgia, Julv 22, 
1864. 

Michael Ronon. St. Charles; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

Thomas Ryan. St. Charles: died at Rome. Georgia. August 5. 1864: 
wounds. 

Luther B. Swarthout, St. Charles; corporal; died at home December 21, 
1863. 



344 KAXE COl'XTY HISTORY. 

Isaac Swarthout, St. Charles; mustered out June 5, 1865, as musician. 

Elias Smithers. St. Charles; died at Marietta, Georgia. August 18, 1864; 
wounds. 

William Switzer, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865, as corporal. 

James Stricklin, Elgin; discharged February 3. 1864, as corporal; 
disability. 

John Smith (i). Geneva; discharged April 14, 1863: disability. 

Charles Switzers, Elgin ; deserted. 

John Smith (2), Geneva; mustered out June 5. 1865, as corporal. 

George Tyler, St. Charles; died at \'icksburg July 9. 1863; wounds. 

John P. Trumbull. St. Charles; discharged August 29. 1863. as corporal. 

Charles Trumbull, St. Charles; transferred to Invalid Corps December i, 
1863. 

Charles O. Thompson, St. Charles: mustered out June 5, 1865. 

Judson Thompson, Kane county; died at ]\Iilliken"s Bend. Louisiana. 
April 16. 1863. 

Deid'rich H. Tangem'n. St. Charles: sergeant: transferred to Invalid 
Corps February 15. 1864. 

Brainerd T. \Mieeler, St. Charles; mustered out June 5. 1865. as sergeant. 

August Winder, Elgin; deserted November 5, 1862. 

Recruit. 

Harley Beach, Virgil; mustered out to date June 5. 1865. 

COMPANY F. 

Captain. 
Charles Schryver. Aurora: mustered out June 5. 1865. 

Corporal. 
Daviil D. Schryver. Big Rock: mustered out June 5. 1865, as sergeant. 

Musician. 
Joseph E. Smith. Aurora: died at Oswego. Illinois. June 16. 1863. 

Priz'atcs. 
William D. Coulson. Big Rock; mustered out June 5. 1865; wounded. 
Warren Dick, Big Rock: mustered out June 5, 1865. as corporal. 
Harrison Horton, Big Rock: died at Camp Sherman. Mississippi, Sep- 
tember 10, 1863. 

Henry Houghtaylen. Big Rock: died ^Memphis September 4. 1863. 
David \'aughn. Big Rock; mustered out ]^Iay 25. 1865. 
Alonzo \'oris. Big Rock; died at Young's Point, Louisiana. January 
31, 1863. 

COMP.\NY H. 

Prii-atcs. 
Harley Beach. St. Charles; transferred to Company E. 
William Bushey. St. Charles; transferred to Company E. 
Adam Widner, Rutland: transferred to Companj" C. 

COMPANY I. 

Captains. 
Frederick A. Raymond, Elgin; dishonorably discharged July 6. 1864. 
Nelson H. Merrill, Elgin; mustered out June 5. 1865. 



KANE COrXTY HISTORY 345 

first Liciitciianfs. 

Horace Perry, St. Charles; resigned July 5, 1863. 

Nelson H. Merrill, Elgin: promoted. 

Benjamin C. W'ilkins, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

Second Liciitciiaiits. 

Addison A. Keys, Elgin; promoted adjutant. 

James S. Loper, Elgin; discharged March 31, 1864. 

First Sergeant. 

Marcellus B. Joslyn. Elgin; discharged February 4, 1863. 

Sergeants. 

James S. Loper, Elgin ; promoted tirst sergeant, then second lieutenant. 

Benjamin C. Wilkins, Elgin; promoted first lieutenant. 

George Preston. Elgin; discharged July 11, 1863, as private. 

William V. Adams, Elgin; died in Andersonville Prison September 11, 
1865 ; grave No. 8,402. 

Corporals. 

William H. Holden. Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865, as first sergeant. 

Nicholas Hareth, Elgin; mustered out June 19, 1865, as private. 

Ora B. Douglass, Elgin; first sergeant; died at St. Louis July 28, 1863; 
wounds. 

Calvin Shurtlifi^, \'irgil ; discharged April 10, 1863. 

Robert Scott, Virgil; discharged July i, 1863. 

Charles E. Hunter, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865, as private. 

Julius C. Pratt, Elgin; sergeant; died at Memphis July 19, 1863. 

Mnsieians. 

Ralph S. Hunn. Elgin; transferred to Invalid Corps May 15, 1864. 

Joseph B. Corbey, Elgin; died at Larkinsville, Alabama, June 25, 1864. 

Prizvtes. 

Charles Malls, Batavia ; transferred to Company B. 

James T. I\Ic]\Iasters, Batavia ; transferred to Company B. 

Nathaniel Ratcliff. Batavia ; transferred to Company B. 

Edwin A. Williams, Batavia ; transferred to Company B. 

Beman W. Adams. Plato; deserted January 29, 1863. 

James Bowman, Elgin; discharged; date unknown. 

Peter Bartleine, Elgin; died St. Louis October 16, 1863. 

William F. Becker, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865, as corporal; was 
prisoner. 

Lafayette Boutwell, \'irgil ; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

Norman Billington, Plato; discharged February 5. 1863. 

Thomas Caton, Plato; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

John W. Carr, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865, as corporal. 

John Collins, Plato; mustered out June 5. 1865, as sergeant. 

John S. Cox. Elgin; mustered out May 15, 1865; wounded. 

Edward A. Cummings. Elgin; mustered out June 20, 1865. 

George Colie, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

Moses Cherry, Kane county; deserted September 10, 1862. 



346 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

George A. Culbertson. Elgin ; died at Bridgejiort. Alabama, November 
19, 1863. 

Charles H. Duck, Elgin; promoted hospital steward. 

John J. Dougherty, Plato; mustered out June 5, 1865. as corporal. 

George R. Eastman, Plato; mustered out June 5, 1865, as sergeant; was 
prisoner. 

James Ellis. Plato; reported deserter August 23, 1864. 

John H. Eraser, Plato; mustered out June 5. 1865. 

Alexander Eraser, Plato; discharged July 29. 1863. 

William H. Eraser, Rutland; corporal; died at Elgin. Illinois. December 
12, 1863. 

Henry Eolnier, Elgin; mustered out June 5. 1865, as corporal. 

Erederick S. Grav. Elgin ; died at Young's Point. Louisiana. Tune 23, 
1863. 

Horatio Gray, Elgin; deserted January 29, 1863. 

Joseph R. Grassmire. Elgin; sergeant; died at East Point. Georgia, 
September 4, 1864; wounds. 

Franklin Howard. Virgil : mustered out June 5. 1865. 

Peter Hines. Elgin; mustered out June 5. 1865. 

Edward \'. Jackson, Burlington; mustered out June 5. 1865. 

John P. Konaka, Elgin; transferred to Invalid Corps June 13, 1864. 

Mark P. Ladd, Plato; died St. Louis January 5, 1863. 

George W. Loudon, Plato; deserted September 10, 1862. 

John J. McClear, Elgin; discharged February — , 1863. 

Albert Messenger, Elgin; mustered out June 5. 1865. 

Nelson C. ]\Iorey, Plato; killed Vicksburg ]\Iay 19. 1863. 

Ezra W. Morehouse. Plato; died at Napoleon, Arkansas. Tanuarv 18, 
1863. 

William AIcNicle, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865, as sergeant. 

Andrew McCornack. Rutland; mustered out June 5, 1865. as sergeant. 

Andrew W. McCornack, Rutland; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

William F. McCornack, Rutland; mustered out June 5. 1865; was 
prisoner. 

Nelson H. ^lerrill, Elgin; promoted first sergeant, first lieutenant and 
captain. 

Hiram O. Perry, Elgin; discharged February 6, 1863; disability. 

Erederick G. Peasley, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

Richard Parkins. Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865, as corporal. 

John Plant. Elgin; mustered out June 5. 1S65. as corporal; was prisoner. 

Joseph Priller. Elgin; mustered out June 5. 1865. 

Frank Plantey. Hampshire; died jMemphis August 22, 1863. 

John Peters, Elgin; mustered out June 5. 1865. 

Isaiah Ross, Elgin; discharged February 5. 1863. 

Alfred F. Roberts. Elgin; corporal; died at ^lemphis June 7. 1863; 
wounds. 

Charles Schroeder. Elgin; corporal; died at ^lemphis Septemlier 25. 
1.863 ; wounds. 




FIRST IRON BRIDGE, ELGIN, BUILT IX 18(36. 




VIEW SHOWING FIRST BUILDING OF ELGIN WATCH WORKS 

TAKEN IN 1866. 



KANE (X)rNTY HISTORY 349 

Theodore Schroeder. Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

Charles Seidle. Elgin ; died Elgin ; date unknown. 

Fred Sother, Elgin; died at Young's Point February 22, 1863. 

William G. Scott, Elgin; died at Walnut Hills, Mississippi, July 28, 
1863. 

Joseph A. Spaulding, Elgm; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

George W. Schoonhoven, Elgin; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

Roswell W. Turner, Elgin; discharged March — , 1863. 

Alex. Thompson. Elgin; deserted September 10, 1862. 

Salem E. W'eld, Elgin ; promoted hospital steward. 

George Wilcox, Plato; mustered out June 5, 1865, as corporal. 

Recruits. 

Henry Hager, Elgin; transferred to Company D, Fifty-iifth Illinois 
Infantry. 

Robert L. Todd, Elgin: died at Allatoona, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

I'liassigncd Rcxniits. 

William Hosier, Batavia ; discharged May 14, 1864. 

John Moore, Sugar Grove. 

Charles ^I. Tompkins, Batavia. 

William Tompkins, Batavia; died Camp Butler April 9, 1864. 

Frederick Terwilliger, Aurora. 

COMPANY K. 

Captain. 
Alexander C. Little, Big Rock; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

First Sergeant. 
Alexander C. Little. Big Rock; wounded August 3. 1864; promoted 

captain. 

Corp(n-al. 
George S. Foster, Big Rock; discharged April 19, 1863; disability. 

Priz'ates. 
George S. Armstrong. Big Rock; mustered out to date June 5, 1865. 
Edward S. Bateman, Big Rock; mustered out June 5, 1865, as corporal. 
Samuel G. Bateman, Big Rock; discharged June 19. 1863; disability. 
Edwin A. Fountain, Big Rock ; corporal ; died at Walnut Hill, Mississippi, 
June 17, 1863; wounds. 

George Hoagland, Big Rock ; mustered out June 5, 1865. as corporal. 
John Leader. Big Rock; transferred to Invalid Corps December 15, 1863. 

Unassigncd Recruit. 
Joseph Crosson. Kane county. 

ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTIETH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 

(Three Years' Service.) 

COMP..\NY G. 

Prifatr. 
Jacob D. Wigton. Geneva. 



350 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

HISTORY OF ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SECOND 

INFANTRY. 

The One Hundred and Thirty-second Infantry Illinois Volunteers was 
organized at Camp Fry, Chicago, Illinois, by Colonel Thomas J. Pickett, and 
was mustered in for one hundred days from June i, 1864. 

Moved, June 6, for Columbus, Kentucky, and arrived on the 8th, report- 
ing to Brigadier General Henry Prince. On the 15th of June moved to 
Paducah, Kentucky, and reported to Colonel S. G. Hicks. 

The regiment remained on duty at Paducah until expiration of service, 
when it moved to Chicago, and was mustered out October 17, 1864. 

ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SECOND INFANTRY 

REGIMENT. 
(One Hundred Days' Service.) 

COMPANY C. 

Cap fain. 
Charles Barker, Aurora; mustered nut October 17, 1864. 

Second Licittcnant. 
H. A. Hinckley, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 

First Sergeant. 
R. B. Campbell, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 

Sergeants. 
L. B. Persons, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 
John Bevier, Aurora; mustered out October 17. 1864. 

Corporals. 
George Hackney, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 
Sylvester H. Schuyler, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 
Walter W. Bostwick, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 
J. H. Damon, Blackberry Station; mustered out October 17, 1864. 

Wagoner. 
John Saltsgiver, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 

Privates. 
John Bailey. Aurora; mustered out Oct(iber 17, 1864. 
George C. Baird, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 
Frank Breese, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 
George Betts, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 
Green Bennett, Sugar Grove; mustered out October 17, 1864. 
Charles Clute. Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 
Rollin Connell, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 
James Cavenaugh, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 
D. S. Darling, Aurora; absent; not mustered in. 
Levi Dunbar, Aurora; mustered out October 17. 1864. 
Robert C. Fetch, Aiu'ora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 
J. R. Flanders, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 
F. B. Foster, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 
Fred Groch, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 
George Hollenb,eck. .\urora ; absent ; not mustered in. 



KANE COIXTY HISTORY 351 

George Hopler, Aurora ; absent ; not mustered in. 

Charles F. Harrall, Aurora ; absent ; not mustered in. 

James Judson, Aurora ; absent ; not mustered in. 

Mark W. Kendall, Blackberry Station; mustered out October 17, 1864. 

George Latham, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 

William Martin, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 

J. J. Miller, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 

Reuben E. Perkins, Sugar Grove; mustered out October 17, 1864. 

William Robinson, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 

Charles W. Scarlett, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 

William F. Spaulding, Aurora ; mustered out October 17, 1864. 

Joseph Sinister, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 

Henry P. Starr, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 

Edward P. Wells, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 

Wm. H. Woodward, Aurora; mustered out October 17. 1864. 

William Wade, Aurora; mustered out October 17, 1864. 

COMPANY I. 

Private. 
James Scupham, Blackberry; mustered out October 17, 1864. 

HISTORY OF ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-FOURTH 

INFANTRY. 

The One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Infantry Illinois Volunteers was 
organized at Camp Fry, Chicago. Illinois, by Colonel Waters W. McChesney, 
and was mustered in May 31, 1864. for one hundred days. 

Left camp June 3 for Columbus, Kentucky, where it was assigned to 
garrison duty. 

Mustered out of service October 25, 1864, at Chicago, Illinois, by 
Lieutenant Joseph Horr, Thirteenth United States Infantry. 

ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-FOURTH INFANTRY 

REGIMENT. 

(One Hundred Days' Service.) 

COMPANY c. 

Priz'atc. 
William M. Gregory, Elgin; mustered out October 25, 1864. 

COMPANY E. 

Private. 
Stephen Keck, Elgin; mustered out October 25, 1864. 

COMPANY F. 

Private. 
John G. Hitchcock, Elgin; mustered out October 25, 1864. 

ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SEVENTH INFANTRY 

REGIMENT. 

(One Hundred Days' Service.) 



352 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

COMPANY E. 

Private. 
Jeremiah Sands, Montgomery: mustered out September 24, 1864. 

ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-EIGHTH INFANTRY 

REGIAIENT. 

( One Hundred Days' Service. ) 

COMPANY I. 

Corporal. 
Clarke Howe, Rutland: mustered out October 14. 1864. as private. 

Private. 
William Carson, Rutland: mustered out October 14. 1864. 

ONE HUNDRED AND FORTIETH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(One Hundred Days' Service.) 

COMPANY A. 

Private. 
William H. Harrison, Sugar Grove: mustered out October 29. 1864. 

HISTORY OF ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-FIRST INFANTRY. 
The One Hundred and Forty-first Infantry was mustered into the 
United States service at Elgin, June 16. 1864. Strength, eight hundred and 
forty-two. Departed for the field June 2j. 1864. Was mustered out at 
Chicago, October 10. 1864. 

ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-FIRST INFANTRY REGIMENT. 
(One Hundred Days' Service.) 

Lieutenant Colonel. 
Thomas Clark, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Adjutant. 
Edward C. Lovell, Elgin: mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Qnarterniaster. 
Alonzo H. Barry, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

First Assista)it Snrgeon. 
Francis C. Hagemann, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Cliahlain. 
Samuel S. Kimball, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Sergeant Major. 

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

Pearl De Hoyt. Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Quartermaster Sergeant. 
Nehemiah J. Wheeler, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Principal Musicians. 
Leveritt Hannegan, Elgin: mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Russell Dickerson, Elgin ; mustered out October 10, 1864. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 353 

COMPANY A. 

Captai)i. 
Phillip H. Carr, Dundee; mustered out October lo, 1864. 

First Lieutenant. 
Thomas W. Teft, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Edward W. King. Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

First Sergeant. 
Charles W. Bennett, Plato; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Sergeants. 
Frank Reeves, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. ■ 
James Benthuysen, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Corporals. 
Daniel Metcalf, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Thomas Clute, Plato; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
George W. Salisbury, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Abner Wight, Dundee; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
George Smith, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Tames Mellon, Dundee; mustered out October 10. 1S64. 
Henry Gillett, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Henry Nicholson, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Musicians. 
William S. Moffatt, Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Horace Smith, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Wagoner. 
Charles Fowler, Hampshire; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Privates. 
John A. Andrews, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Charles F. Benthuysen. Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Howard Bartlett, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Alfred Baker. Eigin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
\Mlliam H. Bigelow, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Edward Burnidge, Plato; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Curtis A. Codv, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Charles Clearman, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John Christoph, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John Coheld, Dundee: mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Nelson Cart, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John F. Critchton, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Edwin Campbell, Plato; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Charles W. Cole. Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Joseph Daak, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Robert Duff, Dundee: mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Alexander Duft. Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
George A. Doolittle, Plato; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Dennis Dickson. Hampshire ; transferred to Company H before muster in. 
Frank E. Eaton, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 



354 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

John Evans, Elgin; mnstered out October lo. 1864. 

William C. Fox, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

John C. Griffith. Dundee; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

John Gierheim, Dundee; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Joachim Gaistor, Dundee; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Charles Gustason. Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

John Henning, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Oliver A. Hinsdell, Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

William H. Hintze. Elgin: mustered out October 10, 1864. 

John Heed. Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

George T. King, Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

George S. Kelly, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Wicliffe S. Long. Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

William B. Long, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Charles R. McClure, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Amos Perry, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Henry Pruss, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

George Plumleigh. Dundee; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Austin Roberts, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864, 

William Rankin, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Alanson Reser, Plato; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

George \Y. Rineheinier, Plato; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Henry Rose, Elgin; died at Columbus. Kentucky, September 25, 1864. 

Rollin Renwick, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

George Smith (2), Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

William E. Smith. Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Joseph Smith, Plato; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Charles Shuckney. Dundee; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Henry W. Salisbury, Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Henry Shannon. Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Francis Van Aken. Plato: mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Lawrence Welch. Dundee; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

John Woller. Dundee; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Charles Woller, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Moses W. Wilson, Dundee; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Wellington W'ilcox, Plato; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Milton Young. Dundee; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

John Zimmerman. Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

COMPANY B. 

Captain. 
Alexander Grimes, Batavia ; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

First Lieutenant. 
Charles D. F. Smith, Geneva; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Charles S. Gregg. Batavia; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

First Sergeant. 
David W. Starkey, Batavia; mustered out October 10. 1864. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 355 

Sergeants. 
David A. Martin, Batavia; mustered out October lo, 1864. 
William A. Moore, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Edgar H. Killmore, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Robert M. Town, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Corporals. 
Charles C. Auble, Geneva; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Myron D. Palmer, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
George Burton, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Loomis H. Grimes, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Winfield S. White, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Arthur D. Wilson, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Thomas Dow, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Priz'ates. 
Romulus Andrews, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Montgomery Auble, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Ira M. Bly, Virgil; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Amos Burton, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Joseph Burton, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Henry J. Callaghan, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Charles Chambers, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Thomas M. Clapp, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Lucius L. Clark. Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
James A. Clure. Batavia: mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Garrett Cotters, Blackberry; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Alverado Dickerson. Batavia; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Adolphus Eyando, Batavia; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
William W. Fowler, Elgin; drowned in Mississippi river at Columbus, 
Kentucky. September 3. 1864. 

Eben Fuller, Burlington; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

William P. Genge, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

William W. Golden, Burlington; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Isaac F. Grimes, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Darwin C. Grow, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

John A. Hadank, Batavia; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

David N. Hall, Virgil; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Martin H. Hampton. Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Charles Hedland, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Philip Helmer, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Wilbur F. Higgins, Geneva : mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Jasper Hilbert, Elgin; died at Columbus, Kentucky, September 10, 1864. 

Oscar D. Hill, Burlington; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Charles Janes, Batavia; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Samuel S. Kimball. Geneva: promoted chaplain. 

Mark F. Kernan, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Chauncey L. King. Virgil: mustered out October 10, 1864. 

John F. Lakins. Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 



356 KA^E COUNTY HISTORY 

George W. ^lann, Batavia; mustered out October lo, 1864. 
Sedate P. Martin, Bataxia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Jason McCann. Blackberr}- ; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Benj. F. McLellan, Burlington; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
X'^alentine McXitt, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Adolphus Mead, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Joseph Monk, Batavia; mustered cut October 10, 1864. 
Philip Murtaugh. Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Lewis Noahr. Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Cornelius O'Laughlin, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Jerome Otis, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Alonzo Putnam, St. Charles; deserted June 17, 1864. 
Albert W. Pease, Burlington; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Henry Pettenger, Burlington: mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Charles A. Price. Batavia: mustered out October 10, 1864. 
James H. Payne, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Ira E. Robertson, \'irgil; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Edward L. Rockwell, Batavia: mustered out October 10, 1864. 
James Row, Batavia: mustered out October 10. 1864. 
George W. Russell, Virgil; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Joseph W. Smith, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
William Steer. Batavia; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Charles Stephens. Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Parley R. Sweet, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Clark W. Sweet. Batavia: mustered out October 10, 1864. 
David H. Sawyer, Burlington: mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Charles G. Thomas, Elgin: mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Thomas S. Tapley, Plato; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
David Twigg. Batavia: mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Levi L. \\'atrons, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Henry Whitle, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
George C. ^^'illiams, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Walter S. \\'ilson. Batavia: mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Fred A. Wood, Batavia; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Wallace W. Woodruff. Batavia; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Seymour A. Wolcott, Batavia: mustered out October 10, 1864. 

COMPANY c. 

Capfain. 
Samuel H. Hunter. Elgin: mustered out October 10. 1864. 

First Lieutenant. 
Michael J. Dunne. Elgin: mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Second Lieutenant. 
James B. Robinson. Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

First Sergeant. 
Henry Phillips. Elgin: mustered out October 10. 1864. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 357 

Sergeants. 
William F. Todd, Elgin; mustered out October lo, 1864. 
James W. Cook, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Clark Stewart, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Danford M. Jones, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Corporals. 
Christopher Batterman, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864 
Jerome G. Blackman, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Charles F. Gifford, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John Tibbots, Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1S64. 
George Standage, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Christopher Ross, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Edwin S. Burdick, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Edwin Gifford, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Privates. 
George W. Adams, Hampshire; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Charles Able, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Oscar Babcock, Dundee; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
John Batterman, Elgin: died at Columbus, Kentucky, September 18, 1864. 
James Barker, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Charles D. Baker, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Frederick W. Barrick, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Ziba S. Beardsley, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Charles Brown, Virgil; died at Columbus, Kentucky, September 4, 1864. 
William Christoph, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
James W. Cooke, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
William W. Dike, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Gustavus Davis, Hampshire; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Albert W. Eaton, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Edmond Feehan, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Robert B. Gardner, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Amos Gilman, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John Groff, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Thomas Goodman, Rutland; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Patrick Goodman, Rutland; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John A. Gale, Elgin ; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John Harper, Hampshire; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Eli Henderson, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Leveret Hennegan. Hampshire; promoted principal musician. 
Ralph Hubble, Elgin; died at Columbus, Kentucky, August 30, 1864. 
William Knox, Rutland; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Joseph L. Lakins, Virgil; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Edwin Lester, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John A. Mallory, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Charles D. Matthews, Burlington; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John McMahon, Rutland; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
William McDonald, Elgin; mustered nut October 10. 1864. 



358 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Henry McLean. Burlington; mustered out October lo, 1864. 

Christian Meierhoff, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Earnest ]Meierhoff, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Charles Neale, Campton; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Daniel Paddock, Hampshire; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Nathan B. Peterson, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

George Perry, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Thomas Powers, Rutland; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Charles Pettit, Dimdee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

William Ryan. Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Lucius B. Rice. Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

James K. Rice, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Willard Stoddard. Elgin; died at Columbus. Kentucky. August 18, 1864. 

Thomas Smith, Plato; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Arthur Spaulding. Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

John Fred Smith, Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Peter Smith. Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

William Salisbury, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

George W. Short. Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

William T. Strain, Hampshire; maistered out October 10, 1864. 

Albert Tuffelmire. Hampshire; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Leman S. Tanner. Dundee; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

George P. Terril. Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

DeWitt Torrence, Dundee; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Jacob \'ogle, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Carl \"oss. Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

William Waite, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Mathias Webber, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

William S. Weeks, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Benjamin Webster. Elgin; died at Columbus. Kentucky, July 20, 1864. 

Frederick Westfahl. Dundee; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Jay Wilbur, Dundee; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

William H. Wilson, Elgin ; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

John Walters, Hampshire; deserted June 29, 1864. 

Orestas W. Young, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

COMPANY D. 

Captain. 
Bryant D. Beach, St. Charles; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

First Lieutenant. 
Hiram Sargent. St. Charles; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Henry A. Person, St. Charles; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

First Sergeant. 
Charles A. Miller, St. Charles; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Sergeants. 
John Johnston. St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Orrin Lane. St. Charles; mustered out October 10. 1864. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 359 

Richard A. Sargent, St. Charles; mustered out October lo. 1864. 
WilHam Pahner, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Corporals. 
Charles Hyde, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Peter M. Kilron, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Charles H. Wallace, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Terrence Ryan, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Allen D. Matteson, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Joseph W. Whipple, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Allen Freeman, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Waldo Beach, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Musicians. 
Rhoderick- Parker, St. Charles; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
George Barnum, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Privates. 
Eugene Barnett. Blackberry; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Charles Bowman, St. Charles; died at Columbus, Kentucky, July 2, 1864. 
Horatio Blanchard, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Thomas Boyle, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Hiram Brown ; St. Charles ; deserted. 

Benjamin Burchell, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John Conley, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Adelbert Conlon, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Charles Cook, Elgin ; died near Marion, Kentucky, of accidental wounds, 
August 21, 1864. 

John Cronon, St. Charles ; deserted. 

Edward Delaney, St. Charles ; deserted. 

Michael Donon, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Anthony Duffy, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Homer Eddy, St. Charles; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

James Elliott, St. Charles ; deserted. 

James Ellis, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Frank Fowler, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Michael Gebel, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Toney Gebel, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

John Golley, St. Charles ; deserted. 

Ezra Graham, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Charles A. Graves, Burlington; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

George Goodier, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

George H. Hall, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Herbert Hammond, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Washington Hammond, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Charles Haveland, St. Charles ; deserted. 

Jeffrey Huggins, St. Charles; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

William Hines, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Malcomb Howe, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Thomas Hudley, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 



360 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Alvin Hyde, St. Charles; mustered out October lo, 1864. 
Willie O. Hyde, St. Charles; died at Columbus, Kentucky, September 15, 
1864. 

James Jarvis, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Charles Juckett, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Michael Kaysier, St. Charles ; deserted. 
Jeremiah Lane, St. Charles ; deserted. 

William B. Lloyd, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Patrick O'Malley, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Hosmer Mark, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
James ^larshall, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John Marshall, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Almon Miller. St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Charles Miller, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Arthur Millington, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Thomas Murray, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Peter Oleson, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Thomas Pender, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
James F. Partlow, Burlington; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Charles Sargent, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Lyman Sawyer, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Horace E. Smith, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Albert Stevens, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John E. Swarthout, St. Charles; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Harvey Tefft, Campton; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
George Thompson, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Henry Tomlinson, St. Charles; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Adam F. VanVorst, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Washburn W. Vinton, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Francis \\". Watson, Elgin : promoted assistant surgeon. 
Lee Weed, St. Charles: mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Franklin Wilson, St. Charles : deserted. 

William B. Wilson, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Clarence Wodell,- St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Franklin Young. Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
William J. Young, Burlington; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

COMPANY E. 

first Sergeant. 
Ambrose Stearns, Elgin; mustered out to date October 10, 1864. 

Sergeants. 
Marshall S. Pritcbard, Elgin: mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Oscar J. Twogood, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Robert C. Rowland, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Charles B. Detrick, Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Corpo7-aIs. 
Solomon Stevens, Elgin: mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Patrick Ford. Elgin: mustered out October 10. 1864. 




SNOW BANKS ON DOI'GLAS A\ENrE IN THE '80S. 













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DOUGLAS A\-ENUE, ELGIN. L\ THE '90S. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 363 

Amos Cook, Elgin; mustered out October lo, 1864. 
John M. Mowatt, Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
West C. W. Post, Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
John Dillon, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
William H. Upston, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Henry W. Lyon, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

COMPANY G. 

Captain. 
Charles Herrington, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Chester Stuart, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

First Sergeant. 
William S. Watrous, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

.Sergeants. 
William Outhouse, Geneva; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Richard Southgate, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Rial Botsford. Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Felix Mayer, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Corporals. 
George P. Cook. Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
George German, Geneva; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Charles Heal, Geneva; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Fidel Rudizer, Geneva; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Newton J. Kendall, Gene\a ; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
William McFadden, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Peter G. Miller, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Emery A. Matthevvson, Elgin; absent; sick at muster out of regiment. 

Privates. 
John Ahles, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Emel Blackmere, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
George Boynreif, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Thomas Brennen, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Mark Brown, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
William Bacon, Elgin; deserted June 17. 1864. 
Eugene B. Brown, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Eugene J. Casey, Elgin; deserted June 18, 1864. 
Eli E. Curtis, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Henry Cottrell. Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Jasper Cook, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Thomas Carter, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John Carroll, Elgin ; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Lawrence Condon, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John Cfindon, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Samuel Chenney, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Winfield S. DeWolf, Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Samuel Donelson, Geneva; mustered out October to, 1864. 
Thomas Donor, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 



364 KiVNE COUNTY HISTORY 

Daniel Ellis, Elgin; mustered out October lo, 1864. 

Martin Fink, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Albert Gilford. Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Charles Hendrickson. Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Timothy Hay, Elgin; drowned in Mississippi river June 30, 1864. 

Wilson Kelly. Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Samuel Kelly, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Charles Kimball, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Walter B. Kendall, Blackberry; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Albert Kendall, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Henry Loveland, Geneva; mustered out November 14 to date October 10, 
1864. 

Frederick Mayar, Geneva, mustered out November 14 to date October 
10, 1864. 

Edward McMellon, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Charles McBrairty, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Patrick Murphy; deserted June 25, 1864. 

John Nelson, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Levi W. Olmstead. Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

George H. Oakley, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Wesley J. Powers, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Charles Pride, Geneva: mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Ezekiel Pratt, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Roseel Peck, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Robert F. Pouley, Blackberry; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

George C. Pulver. Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

George W. Rowell, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

\Mlliam Renwick. Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

David Reed, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Marcus Reed. Geneva; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

John Rogers, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Judson Stewart, Elgin; deserted June 20, 1864. 

Freeman Stinchfield, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

David Silver. Blackberry; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Jackson Switzer, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Albert Seaton, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Ira D. Seaton. Geneva: mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Frank Seely, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Thomas Smith, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Albert Town, Winfield; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Sanford H. Townsend, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

John Wilkerson, Blackberry; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Jacob Wilder, Geneva; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Frank Wilcox, Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Frank Webb, Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Samuel Wise, Elgin; deserted June 17, 1864. 

George Wallize, Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 



KANE COUNTY HISTOEY 365 

Peter Wise, Elgin; mustered out October lo, 1864. 
James Wilson, Geneva; deserted June 26, 1864. 
James Young, Elgin; deserted June 17, 1864. 

COMPANY H. 

Privates. 
August J. Burback, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
George Doherty, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Dennis Dickson, Hampshire; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
George W. Eldridge, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
William H. Grant, Batavia; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
William Ginter, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John J. Gibbons, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John Peters, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
William J. Robinson. Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Benjamin F. Warnock, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Peter Welsh, Elgin; deserted June 22, 1864. 

COMPANY I. 

Captaiti. 
Robert H. Winslow, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

First Liciitcimiit. 
Daniel W. Coan, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Scamd Lieutenant. 
Henry C. Dodge, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

First Sergeant. 
John W. Blake, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Sergeants. 
Robert B. Edwards, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John M. Hughes, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1S64. 
William Jewell, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Fayette S. Hatch, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1S64. 

Corporals. 
Charles H. Rice, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John M. Hamilton, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Joseph M. Denning, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
James C. Law, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Joseph La wry, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Horace Hinkley, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Marian G. Traugh, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Edwin W. L. Rice, .Aurora ; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Privates. 
Nathaniel C. Austin. Sugar Grove; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
George H. Austin. Sugar Grove; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Henry Bruce, Aurora; deserted June 24, 1864. 
George Betts. Aurora; deserted June 24. 1864. 
Eugene E. Beaver, Aurora; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Henry Bews. Sugar Grove; mustered out October 20, 1864. 
John H. Bathrick, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 



366 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Carlotto Colson, Aurora ; mustered out October lo, 1864. 

John D. Clarke, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Hiram Clarke, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

James Cossalman, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

William Colburn, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864, 

Duane Darling. Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Elijah Dunne, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

John \V. Edwards, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

William Perkins, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Thomas Fyfe. Aurora; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

James X. Gillett, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Jacob Goodrow, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Charles Guy, Aurora; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Andrew J. Gilbert, Aurora; died at Columbus, Kentucky, July 28, 1864. 

Herbert W. Gilbert, Aurora; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Frank Hamilton, Aurora; deserted June 20, 1864. 

W. Philip Hilpish, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

William Hoat, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Lathrop P. Hubble, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Rufus P. Johnson, Sugar Grove; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

John W. Johnson, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Delos Kearns, Big Rock; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Samuel W. Laury, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

George Lappen, Kaneville; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Theron B. Lucky, Aurora: mustered out October 10, 1864. 

James E. Lomax, Aurora; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Parsons Mix, Aurora; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Prank ^lyer. Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

William McMullen, Aurora; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Joseph IMar, Aurora; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

John jMunroe, Aurora; deserted June 24, 1864. 

Maiden C. Newman, Sugar Grove; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

John Oats, Aurora; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Walter Reed, Aurora; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

William Roberts, Aurora; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

William Ray, Aurora; mustered out October 10. 1S64. 

James Rumble, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

William K. Sullivan, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Napoleon Sloan. Sugar Grove; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Horace Satterlee. Sugar Grove; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Nelson M. Satterfield. Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

William Stewart. Aurora; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

George Severance. Aurora: mustered out October 10, 1864. 

John Stanard, Aurora: deserted June 24. 1864. 

Thomas B. Smith, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Justus Terry, Aurora: nuistered out October 10. 1864. 

Orren Thatcher. Aurora; mustered nut October 10. 1864. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 367 

Washington J. Terry, Aurora; mustered out October lo, 1864. 
Louis Thon. Aurora; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
John M. A'an Nortrick. Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Charles Van Devier, Aurora; deserted June 24, 1864. 
WilHam I\I. \\'illiams, Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
William Winters. Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Quinc}' Wimple. Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John M. Weese, Aurora; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
William H. ^^'ells. Aurora; nuistered out October 10. 1864. 
Sylvester W'ildrick. Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Gerard E. Wagner, Sugar Grove; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Nicholas \\'alker, Aurora; mustered out October iQ, 1864. 
George Yeldam. Aurora; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

COMPANY K. 

Captain. 
John Gilman. St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Charles Person. St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

First Sergeant. 
Frank Gilman, Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Sergeants. 
James Fennerty, St. Charles; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Charles Conklin. St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Charles Belyea. St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Charles H. Merchant. Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Corporals. 
John Ferson, St. Charles; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Jesse Blank, St. Charles; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
William K. Reed, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Nathan Conner, St. Charles; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Edward R. Hazleton. St. Charles; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Evelyn E. Rich, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Zack Burchell, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Kirk Ferson. Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Musicians. 
Horace Brigham. Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Charles Fay, Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 

Wagoner. 
Hamilton Lillas, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Privates. 
Simson C. Aldrich. St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John August, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Anson Adams, St. Charles; died at Columbus, Kentucky, July 26, 1864. 
William Ballow. St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Robert Beckington. Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 



368 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Lewis Babbitt, Elgin; mustered out October lo. 1864. 
Mark Burton, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Thomas Cooley, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Ichabod Casey, Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
Lyman Conner. St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Henry Clark, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Andrew J. Dunham, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Joseph Flannery, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Abraham Freeland, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
William Goakey, St. Charles: mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Frank B. Hassans, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Albert Haskins, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John Inman, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Robert Lovedale, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Charles Lake, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
William H. Lake, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Patrick Merreen, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John Mostow, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John McCoy. Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Thomas Mitchell, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
George Menard, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Alfred Peterson, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Ransom Putnam, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
William L. Pease, Elgin; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
James Powell, Elgin; deserted June 20, 1864. 
Lewis C. Ray. Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John Ray, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
William Russell, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
John Sullivan, Elgin; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Joseph P. Smith, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Thomas Standidge, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Albert E. Smith, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
James Teft, St. Charles; mustered out October 10. 1864. 
William Whitney, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
David Welch, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Wentworth Wheeler, St. Charles; mustered out October 10, 1864. 
Morgan Wilcott. St. Charles; discharged June 16, 1864. 

ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SLXTH INFANTRY REGIMENT. 

(One Year's Service.) 
COMPANY c. 

Privates. 
Amos Cook, Aurora; mustered out July 8, 1865. 
Henry Ebert, Aurora; mustered out July 8, 1865. 
Walter James, Aurora; mustered out July 8, 1865. 
Edward C. Millgate. Aurora: mustered out July 8. 1865, as corporal. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 369 

ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SEVENTH INFANTRY 

REGIMENT. 
(One Year's Service.) 

COMPANY E. 

Private. 
Solomon Lohr, Dundee; mustered out January 20, 1866. 

COMPANY F. 

Second Lieutenant. 

George Gilman, Blackberry; mustered out January 20, 1866. 

Sergeant. 

Simon E. Chaffee, St. Charles; mustered out January 20, 1866. 

Corporals. 

Wesley J. Powers, Blackberry; mustered out January 20, 1866, as 
musician. 

Alexander A. McEwen, Blackberry; died at Albany, Georgia, September 
24, 1865. 

Albert Kinnear, Blackberry; mustered out January 20, 1866. 

Privates. 

Robert C. Berry, Virgil; mustered out January 20, 1866, as corporal. 

Therone A. Chaffe, St. Charles; mustered out January 20, 1866. 

Edwin Eddy, St. Charles; mustered out January 20. 1866. 

William Gaunt, Virgil; mustered out January 20, 1866. 

George E. Gilman. Blackberry ;• promoted second lieutenant. 

Paseal Hitchcock, Virgil; mustered out January 20, 1866. 

Joseph E. Kendall, Virgil; mustered out January 20, 1866. 

William H. McNair, Blackberry; mustered out January 20, 1866. 

Thaddeus A. Watson, Blackberry; mustered out January 20. 1866. 

ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-SECOND INFANTRY REGIMENT, 

(One Years' Service.) 

COMPANY A. 

Corporal. 
William Wood, Montgomery; mustered out September 11, 1865. 

HISTORY OF ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-THIRD INFANTRY. 

The One Hundred and Fifty-third Infantry Illinois Volunteers was 
organized at Camp Fry, Illinois, by Colonel Stephen Bronson, and was mus- 
tered in February 27, 1865, for one year. On March 4 moved by rail, via 
Louisville and Nashville, to Tullahoma, reporting to Major General Millroy. 
The regiment was assigned to the Second Brigade, Defenses of Nashville & 
Chattanooga Railroad, Brevet Brigadier General Dudley commanding brigade. 
In the latter part of March Major Wilson, with three companies, went on a 
campaign into Alabama and returned. On July i moved, via Nashville and 
Louisville, to Memphis, Tennessee, and was assigned to the command of 
Brevet Major General A. L. Chetlain. Was mustered out September 15, 
1865, and moved to Springfield, Illinois, and September 24 received final pay 
and discharge. 



370 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

ONE HUNDRED AXD FIFTY-THIRD INFANTRY REGIMENT. 

(One Year's Service.) 
Adjutant. 
John Gilman. St. Charles; mustered out September 21, 1865. 

Quartermaster. 
N. J. Wheeler. St. Charles; mustered out September 21, 1865. 

COMPANY c. 

Captain. 
Edward C. Lovell, Elgin; mustered out September 21, 1865. 

First Sergeant. 
Henry Phillips, Elgin; mustered out September 21, 1865. 

Sergeants. 
Henry C. Padelford, Elgin; mustered out September 21, 1865. 
William F. Todd. Elgin; mustered out September 21, 1865. 
Dunford M. Jones. Elgin; mustered out September 21, 1865. 

Corporals. 
Julius H. Wilbur, Elgin; mustered out September 21, 1865. 
Henry Squire. Elgin ; private ; absent ; sick at muster out of regiment. 
Jerome Wiltsie. Dundee; mustered out September 21, 1865. 

Musician. 
Thomas Dougherty, Elgin; mustered out September 21, 1865. 

Privates. 
F. B. Bardett. Elgin; mustered out September 21, 1865. 
Nelson Cart, Elgin; mustered out September 21, 1865. 
Henry Derks. Dundee; absent; sick; unofficially reported dead. 
John Dougherty. Elgin; mustered out September 21. 1865. 
John Flynn. Elgin; mustered out September 21, 1865. 
S. Judson Gifford. Elgin; mustered out September 21. 1865. 
John Griffith, Dundee; mustered out September 21, 1865. 
Sylvester Holbrook. Elgin; mustered out May 25. 1865. 
John Hesse, Elgin; mustered out September 21. 1865. 
William Holden. Elgin; deserted March i, 1865. 
Richard A. Horton. Dundee; mustered out September 21. 1865. 
Jeremiah Jeffries. Elgin; mustered out September 21, 1865. 
John A. Johnson. Dundee; mustered out September 21. 1865. 
Ludwig Leutz. Elgin; mustered out September 21. 1865. 
Albert Mallery, Elgin; mustered out September 21, 1865. 
James Mitchell, Dundee; mustered out September 21. 1865. 
Henry Michel, Elgin; mustered out September 21. 1865. 
Augustus C. Perry, Dundee; died, Memphis, September i. 1865. 
Elliott D. Perry. Dundee; mustered out September 21, 1865. 
Henry Pittenger, Burlington; mustered out September 21. 1865. 
Joseph Smith. Elgin; mustered out September 21. 1865. 
Alfred O. Van Akin. Elgin; mustered out September 21, 1865. 
Eben K. W^ard, Burlington; mustered out September 21. 1865. 
George J. Walsh, Dundee; mustered out September 21, 1865. 
Lawrence Walch. Dundee; mustered out September 21, 1865. 



KANE COUXTY HISTORY 371 

John Weiting, Rutland: mustered out September 21, 1865. 
Frank Young. Elgin; mustered out September 21, 1865. 

COMPANY E. 

Privates. 
George Hoffman, \'irgil ; deserted February 14, 1865. 
Patrick Smith, \'irgil ; mustered out Septemlier 21, 1865. 

ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-SIXTH INFANTRA^ REGIMENT. 

( One Year's Service.) 

COMPANY A. 

Corporal. 
David W. Carson, Stigar Grove; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

COMPANY B. 

Captains. 
Thomas L. Johnson, Aurora; resigned June 13, 1865. 
Washington I. Terry, Aurora; mustered out September 20. 1865. 

First Lieutenants. 
Washington I. Terry, Aurora ; promoted. 
John W. Blake, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

Second Lieutenants. 
John W. Blake, Aurora ; promoted. 
Richard F. McCabe, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

First Sergeant. 
Joel J. Wilder. Aurora; died. Nashville, April 12. 1865. 

Sergeants. 
Stephen R. Wilcox, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865, as private. 
Andrew Lamb. Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Michael Flinn, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. as private. 
Arthur Briggs, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865, as first 
sergeant. 

Corporals. 
Frederick H. Hotz, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865, as 
sergeant. 

Michael Hass. Aurora; musteretl nut September 20. 1865. 
Richard F. McCabe. Aurora ; promoted first sergeant, then second 
lieutenant. 

Peter S. Lossing, Aurora; mustered out August 5, 1865. 

Joseph Shuster, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865, as sergeant. 

Lewis Wilder, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

Charles E. Moulton, Aurora ; absent ; sick at muster out of regiment. 

Duane S. Darling, Aurora; mustered out September 5, 1865. 

Musicians. 
Elijah Dunn, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865, 
George L. Ross. Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

JVagoncr. 
Alexander W. Bowman, Aurora; absent; sick at muster out of regiment. 



372 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Privates. 
George C. Allen, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Llewellyn Baker, Aurora; absent; sick at muster out of regiment. 
John Burns, Aurora; deserted March 10, 1S65. 
Hiram G. Barlow, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Mathias Beltgen, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Zacheus Disotele, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Thom.as Cole, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Felix Caffery, Aurora; mustered out May 17, 1865. 
Peter Coldwater, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
William W. Coleman, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Rolin T. Cornell, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865, as corporal. 
Frank Dana, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Jacob S. Drake, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Zacheus Disotele, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
John G. Ferris, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Charles Flint, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
James Fitzgerald, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865, as corporal. 
William H. Fikes, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Albert G. Felton, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865, as corporal. 
Abner Fields, Avirora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Stephen Goodrich, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Herbert W. Gilbert, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
John Greely, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Abraham Gauslain, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Bruce R. Gates, Aurora ; absent ; sick at muster out of regiment. 
Philip Hilpish, Aurora; mustered out September 20. 1865. 
Frederick Haschel, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Christopher Hetz, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
John Hatch, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Charles L. Johnson, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Charles Knapp, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Michael Kelly, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Delos Kearns, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Peter Karp, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Peter W. Kieron, Aurora; deserted June 29, 1865. 
Patrick Lowry, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
John Lane, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Dennis Murray, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
John Murray, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Gierhardt Mercus, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Mathias Millen, Aurora; mustered out August 25. 1865. 
Melvin McClure, Aurora; mustered out June 8, 1865. 
James Manahan (i) . Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
James Alanahan (2), Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
John McPherson, Aurora; deserted March 10. 1865. 
Adam Mills, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 373 

Hiram Miller, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Philip Midland, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
George Nichols, Aurora; mustered out August 22, 1865. 
Elmer Nichols, Aurora; mustered out August 24, 1865. 
Malchom J. Palmer, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Miles Powers, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Freeman Pierson, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Mathias Poule, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
James G. Pierce, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Robert Peoples, Aurora; discharged June 7, 1865. 

William H. Pierce, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865, as 
corporal. 

Joseph Pondsom, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

Frank Rausch, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

Alanson Race, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

Walter Reed, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

John Rost, Aurora ; absent ; sick at muster out of regiment. 

Robert Smith, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

George Smith, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

Hoel Smith, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

Charles Simpson, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

John H. Smith, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

Frank Tuber, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

John M. Van Nortwick, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

Edward R. Verning, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865, as 



sergeant. 



Charles W. Vanvelsor, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

William C. Van Osdel, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

William Woods, Aurora; deserted March 10, 1865. 

John Woodard, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

Thomas Whaley, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

Joseph Wenkler, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

John H. Wrigley, Aurora; mustered out Seotember 20, 1865. 

Frederick Westover, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

Alfred Williams, Aurora; died at Chattanooga, Tennessee, May 5, 1865. 

Paulus Zipprich, Aurora; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

COMPANY c. 
Privates. 
John S. Giley, Rutland; deserted March 12, 1865. 
John Kelly, Aurora; deserted March 14, 1865. 
John Worth, Rutland; deserted March 14. 1865. 

COMPANY F. 

Sergeants. 
John Dailey, Batavia; mustered out May 15, 1865. 
Robert C. Lindsay, Batavia; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Louis Noahs, Batavia; mustered out September 20, 1865, as private. 



374 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Corporals. 
Charles Janes. Batavia ; absent ; sick at muster out of regiment. 
Edwin Platts, Batavia; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Robert R. Hunt, Batavia; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
William J- Knox, Batavia; mustered out September 20, 1865, as sergeant. 
John P. ]\Iabon, Batavia; mustered out September 20, 1865. 

Privates. 
George D. Chapel, Batavia; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
James Clure, Batavia; mustered out September 20. 1865. 
Charles E. Cooley. Batavia: mustered out July 19. 1865. 
John Donoven, Batavia; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Homer Dailey, Batavia; mustered out ]\Iay 15, 1865. 
John Hoban. Batavia; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Frederick Johnson, Batavia; mustered out September 20. 1865. 
Huntoon Johnson, Batavia ; rejected and discharged. 
George H. Kessler, Burlington; mustered out September 22. 1865. 
Horace C. Kessler, Burlington; discharged to date August 18. 1865. 
Edgar H. Mix, Batavia; mustered out May 15. 1865. 
Wesley E. Platts. Batavia; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
Dodson \^andevener. Batavia ; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
John Young, Batavia; mustered out September 20. 1865. 

COMPANY G. 

Privates. 
John Baley. Aurora: deserted March 12, 1865. 
Jacob Holmes. Aurora ; mustered out September 20, 1865. 
John McWilliams. Aurora; deserted March 12. 1865. 

COMPANY K. 

Private. 
Charles L. McKinzie. Aurora: mustered out September 20, 1865. 

SECOND CAVALRY REGIMENT. 
f Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY C. 

Recruit. 
William H. Hill. Sugar Grove: veteran: transferred to Company B as 
consolidated. 

COMPANY I. 

Recruit. 
Henry S. Hicks. Sugar Grove: transferred to Company A. 

THIRD CAVALRY REGIMENT. 

(Three Years" Service.) 

Unassigned Recruit. 
Alonzo Turner. Aurora. 




EPISCOPAL CHURCH. ELGIX. 




ST. MARY'S CHURCH. ELCilX. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 377 

HISTORY OF EIGHTH CAVALRY. 

The Eighth Cavah-y Regiment was organized at St. Charles, Illinois, 
in September, 1861, by Colonel J. F. Farnsworth, and was mustered in Sep- 
tember 18, 1 86 1. 

On October 13, the regiment moved to Washington City, and camped 
at Meridian Hill on the 17th. On December 17 moved to camp near Alex- 
andria. Virginia. March 10. 1862. the regiment joined the general advance 
on ]\Ianassas, in General Sumner's division. The Eighth Cavalry remained at 
Warrenton until April u — at four different times driving the enemv across 
the Rappahannock. Embarked at Alexandria on April 23, and landed at 
Shipping Point, May i. May 4 moved to Williamsburg, and was assigned 
to the Light Brigade, General Stoneman commanding. The regiment was 
engaged during the advance of the army up the Peninsula. 

On June 26th six companies of the regiment met the advance of the 
enemy, under Jackson, at Mechanicsville, and held it in check until three 
o'clock in the afternoon, when their line was driven back to the infantrv lines. 

The regiment did important duty, in the charge of base which followed 
this action, at Gains' Hill, Dispatch Station and Malvern Hill, and, covering 
the extreme rear of the army, continually skirmished with the enemy's cav- 
alry. Remained on picket, on the James river, while the army lay at Harri- 
son's Landing. Led the advance to the second occupation of Malvern Hills, 
and, with Benson's Battery ( LTnited States Artillery), bore the brunt of the 
fight — Lieutenant Colonel Gamble being severely wounded. Brought up the 
rear of our retreating army to Barrett's Ford, on the Chickahominy. 

On August 30, 1862, embarked at Yorktown, and landed at Alexandria 
on September i, and moved immediately to the front. On the 4th, crossed 
into Maryland, and was engaged at Poolsville. Captured the colors of the 
Twelfth Virginia (rebel) Cavalry at Monocacy Church. Captured twenty 
prisoners at Barnesville. Engaged at Sugar Loaf Mountain, Middletown and 
South Mountain, and, at Boonesboro, captured two guns, killed and wounded 
sixty-seven, and taking two hundred prisoners. 

The Eighth Cavalry was engaged at the battle of Antietam. 

On October i had a severe fight with the enemy, during a reconnoissance 
to Martinsburg. 

Moved in ad\'ance of the Army of the Potomac, and was engaged with 
the enemy's cavalry at Philemonte, Uniontown, Upperville, Barbee's Cross 
Roads, Little Washington and Amesville, arriving at Falmouth, November 
23, 1862. During the battle of Fredericksburg. December 13, two squadrons 
were in the city till its evacuation. The Eighth was on picket until February 
17, 1863, on the left flank of the army, across the Peninsula and up the Rappa- 
hannock, to Port Conway, when it was moved to the right flank, near Dum- 
phries. Loss, up to this time, twenty-se\-en killed, seventy-one wounded and 
twenty missing. 

During the campaign of 1863. the regiment was engaged in the following 
actions: Sulphur Springs. April 14: near Warrenton, April 17; Rapidan Sta- 
tion, May I : Northern Neck, May 14: Borstly Ford, June 9; Upjierville. 21 ; 



378 ~ KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Fairville, Pennsylvania. June 30 ; Gettysburg-. July 8 ; Williamsburg. Mary- 
land, July 6; Boonsboro. July 8; Funktown, July 10; Falling Water, July 14; 
Chester Gap, July 21; Sandy Hook, July 22; near Culpepper, August i; 
Brandy Station, August 4; Raid from Dumphries to Falmouth, August 30; 
Culpepper and Pony Mountain, September 13; Raccoon Ford, September 
13; Liberty Mills, September 21; Raccoon Ford to Brandy Station, October 
11; Manassas, October 15; Warrenton Junction. October 30; Rexleysville, 
November 8; iMitchell's Station, November 12; Elv's Ford, November 30, 
1863. 

Loss, during the campaign, twenty-three killed, one hundred and sixteen 
wounded, and thirty-seven missing. 

The regiment was mustered out of 5er\ice at Benton Barrack's. ^Missouri, 
July 17, 1865, and ordered to Chicago. Illinois, where it received final pay- 
ment and discharge. 

EIGHT CAVALRY REGIMENT. 

(Three Years' Service.) 

Colonel. 
John F. Farnsworth. St. Charles; promoted brigadier general December 
5, 1862. 

Major. 
William G. Conklin, St. Charles: resigned January 8, 1862. 

Battalion A J jit fonts. 
Edmund Gifford, Elgin: resigned August i. 1862. 
John Fifield, Blackberry: resigned January i, 1862. 

Qiuirferinastcrs. 
George G. Stevens, St. Charles; resigned January 25, 1862. 
James F. Berry, St. Charles: resigned June 17, 1864. 

Surgeon. 
Abner Hard, Aurora; mustered out July 17. 1865. 

First Assistant Surgeon. 
Samuel K. Crawford, St. Charles; resigned June 6, 1863. 

Second Assistant Surgeon. 
Eugene Nelson, St. Charles; mustered out July 17. 1865. 

Coinniissary. 
Bradley L. Chamberlain. St. Charles; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Battalion Oiiartertnasters. 
James S. ^'anPatten, St. Charles: ]M"omoted regimental quartermaster. 
Elon J . Farnsworth, St. Charles : transferred to Company K, as captain, 
December 24. 1861. 

Bradley L. Chamberlain, St. Charles : promoted regimental commissary. 
Henry V. T. Huls. St. Charles: mustered out July 31. 1862. 
Mark H. Bisby, St. Charles: mustered cut July 8, 1862. 

NON-COMMISSIOXEn ST.\FF. 

Qnarfennaster Sergeants. 
Mark H. Bisby, St. Charles ; promoted battalion quartermaster. 
Richard VanVlack, St. Ciiarles : promoted second lieutenant Company A. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 379 

Henry V. T. Huls. St. Charles ; promoted battalion quartermaster. 

CoDiiiiissary Sergeants. 
Joseph B. Hull, St. Charles; discharged September lo, 1862. 
George J. Johnson, Blackberry; discharged July i, 1862; disability. 

Hospital Stcivards. 
George A. Nichols, St. Charles; discharged March 9, 1862; disability. 
Robert Sill, St. Charles; promoted adjutant. 
Andrew J. Willing, St. Charles; mustered out September 28, 1864. 

Veterinary Surgeons. 
Lucius S. Kemp, St. Charles; discharged October 14, 1862. 
George Corwin, St. Charles; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Color Sergeant. 
John Ryan, St. Charles; transferred to Company A, as sergeant. 

COMPANY A. 

Captains. 
William C. Conklin, St. Charles; promoted major. 
Patrick G. Jennings, St. Charles; resigned January 10, 1862. 

first Lieutenants. 
Bryant Beach, St. Charles; resigned June 8, 1863. 
Leonard Y. Smith, Kane county; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Second Lieutenants. 
Nelson L. Blanchard, St. Charles; resigned January 2y, 1862. 
Leonard Y. Smith, Kane county ; promoted. 
Benton Van Dyke, St. Charles; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

First Sergeant. 
Charles Hoag, St. Charles; mustered out September 28, 1864, as private. 

Quartermaster Sergeant. 
Frank D. Beach, St. Charles; discharged August 16, 1862. 

Sergeant. 
Homer P. Haskins, St. Charles; died at New York May 16, 1862. 

Corporals. 
Henry ^IcKindly, St. Charles; deserted September 4, 1862. 
Frank Woodruff, St. Charles ; died at ^Vashington, District of Columbia, 
January 13. 1863. 

Bugler. 
Woodb'ry Underwood, St. Charles; discharged December 6, 1862; 
disability. 

Farrier. 
John S. Johnson, Aurora; discharged November 13, 1862; disability. 

Blacksmith. 
John Lewis, St. Charles; mustered out September 28, 1864. 

Wagoner. 
Andrew Brown, St. Charles; mustered out September 28, 1864. 

Privates. 
Nelson P. Atwood, Kane county; discharged November 8. i8fii ; 
disability. 



380 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Mark H. Bisby, St. Charles; promoted battalion quartermaster sergeant. 

Marble H. Baird, St. Charles; discharged March 6, 1862; disability. 

Lorenzo Burges, St. Charles; discharged April 29, 1863; disability. 

Joseph Boonville, St. Charles; Died at Alexandria, Virginia. February 
22, 1862. 

Thomas J. Brown, St. Charles; mustered out September 28. 1864, as 
sergeant. 

Albert Crandle, St. Charles; deserted July 16, 1863; second desertion. 

John Carlin, St. Charles; discharged September 23, 1862. 

Sylvester Cavanaugh, Virgil; mustered out September 28, 1864. 

Michael Conley, St. Charles; died at Alexandria. \^irginia, February 6, 
1862. 

John Durant, St. Charles; discharged September 17. 1862; disability. 

George Downey, Hampshire; discharged January 18, 1862. 

Stephen Evens. St. Charles ; died at Washington, District of Columbia, 
January i, 1863. 

Peter Forrest, St. Charles; deserted June ■ — , 1862. 

David H. Fillmore, Virgil; mustered out September 17, 1864. 

Webster Fuller, St. Charles; discharged December 28, 1862. 

Robert M. Gardner, Kane county; discharged March — , 1864. 

H. V. T. Huls, St. Charles ; promoted battalion quartermaster sergeant. 

Alonzo Hall. Batavia; reenlisted as veteran. 

Alichael Hopkins, St. Charles; discharged December — . 1862; disability. 

John Hathaway, Dundee; discharged April — , 1863; disability. 

Edward Hilly, Hampshire; reenlisted as veteran. 

Henry Hauxladen, St. Charles; reenlisted as veteran. 

William R. Monroe, St. Charles; mustered out June 16. 1865. 

Owen Monroe. St. Charles: discharged November 10, 1863. 

Samuel McGonnel, St. Charles; killed at Upperville, Virginia; November 
5, 1862. 

Thomas O. !McCracken, St. Charles: discharged December 31, 1862; 
disability. 

Peter G. Miller, St. Charles: discharged August 15, 1862; disability. 

Bernard Martin. St. Charles; mustered out September 28, 1864, as 
corporal. 

Charles H. Parks. St. Charles; reenlisted as veteran. 

Charles Plopper, Virgil; killed at Middletown, !Marvland. September 13, 
1862. 

Thomas Pindar, St. Charles; discharged March 3. 1863; disability. 

Samuel Peterson. St. Charles : reenlisted as veteran. 

Thomas Paine. St. Charles; discharged November 10, 1862; disability, 

John Ryan, St. Charles; discharged in 1863. as sergeant; disabilitv. 

William Riley. St. Charles; reenlisted as veteran. 

William W. Roberts, Aurora; discharged April 27, 1864; wounds. 

Robert W. Sill, St. Charles ; promoted hospital steward. 

James Shields, Hampshire; discharged June 23, 1863; disability. 

David G. Smith, Virgil; mustered out September 28. 1864. as corporal. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 381 

Peter C. Simmons, St. Charles; discharged Februar}- 5, 1863. 

Frank P. Smith. \''irgil; discharged August 15. 1862. 

Hanson M. Town, St. Charles : killed at Upperville, \^irginia, January 
21, 1863.' 

Charles W'anzer. Dundee ; died at Washington, District of Columbia, 
January 10. 1863. 

Arnold B. Wallace, A'irgil ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Zirma Willard. St. Charles: discharged August 15, 1862; disability. 

Vetera)is. 

Peter Casper. St. Charles; mustered out July i/. 1865, as sergeant. 

Nicholas Cossman. St. Charles; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

John Durant, St. Charles; mustered out July 17, 1865, as sergeant. 

Alonzo Hall, Batavia ; commissioned commissary sergeant; absent; sick 
at muster out of regiment. 

Edward Hilly, St. Charles; mustered out July 17, 1865, as corporal. 

Henry Hauxladen. St. Charles; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Samuel Peterson, St. Charles; mustered out July 17, 1865, as corporal. 

Charles H. Parks. St. Charles; mustered out June 2, 1805. 

William Riley, St. Charles; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Joseph R. Shields, St. Charles; mustered out July 17. 1865, as sergeant. 

Recruits. 

John Carlin, St. Charles; veteran; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

John Durand, Jr., St. Charles; reenlisted as veteran. 

Andrew J. Ta3-lor. Dundee; mustered out July 17. 1865. 

Henry C. Young. St. Charles: mustered out July 17. 1865. as corporal. 

COMPANY B. 

First Lieutenant. 
H. Spencer Carr. Geneva; dismissed October 5. 1864. 

Second Lieutenants. 
S. Spencer Carr. Geneva ; promoted. 
John Weed, Burlington: mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Sergeant. 
J. William Moody. Burlington; discharged January 16. 1862: disability. 

Blacksmith. 
George INIcGregor. Dundee ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Wagoner. 
O. D. Patten. St. Charles: discharged October 10. 1862. 

Privates. 
Ebenezer Bassett. Hampshire: mustered out September 28. 1864. 
George H. Bell. Hampshire: reenlisted as veteran. 
Benjamin F. Cutshaw. Burlington : reenlisted as veteran. 
O. Chris Crawford. Dundee; discharged January 18, 1862; disability. 
Hiram S. Dewitt. Hampshire: reenlisted as veteran. 
C. A. Fassett. Hampshire : reenlisted as veteran. 

Charles Ingols. Burlington ; died on the road to New York. ^lay 10. 1862. 
James M. Maynanl. Hampshire; reenlisted as veteran. 
James F. Partlow. Burlington: discharged April 17. 1862: disability. 



382 - KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

George \V. Perry, Burlington; mustered out September 28, 1864. 

John Pouge, Plato; mustered out September 28, 1864. 

Reuben S. Pittenger, Burlington; discharged May 2, 1862; disability. 

Alfred C. Patterson, Dundee; deserted August 20, 1862. 

Robert L. Reeves, Burlington; mustered out September 28, 1864. 

Dennis H. Remington, Hampshire ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Veterans. 

George P. Banner, Burlington; mustered out July 17, 1865, as corporal. 

John Weed, Burlington; mustered out July 17, 1865. as first sergeant. 

Recruits. 

Frank B. Brown, Hampshire; transferred to \'. R. C. September i, 1863. 

James C. Brown, Hampshire, mustered out September 28, 1864. 

Cyrus H. Cronk, Hampshire; reenlisted as veteran. 

John Congle, Hampshire; discharged April 17, 1862; disability. 

Edward A. Douglas, Geneva; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Reed Davis, Burlington; mustered out June 22, 1865. 

Aranthus Everetts, Burlington; mustered out July 17. 1865. 

Martin A. Graves, Hampshire ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Simeon P. Hatch, Burlington; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

John McGregor, Dundee; reenlisted as veteran. 

Calvin M. Partlow, Burlington; mustered out July 17. 1865. 

Andrew H. Reynolds, Hampshire; reenlisted as veteran. • 

John W. Reeves, Burlington; mustered out July 17. 1865. 

Joseph J. Reed, Burlington ; died at Washington, District of Columbia, 
May 5, 1864. 

Frederick Sheldon, St. Charles; deserted October 14. 1861. 

John J. Weed, Burlington; reenlisted as veteran. 

\Mlliam Weed. Burlington; luustered out September 28, 1864, as 
corporal. 

John D. Williams, St. Charles; nuistered out July 17, 1865. 

COMPANY D. 

Corporal. 
George Voges, Geneva; discharged August 15, 1862; wounds. 

Privates. 
John George Dusold. Geneva; died January 10, 1863, of wounds received 
at Funkstown, Maryland. 

Conrad Gilg, Geneva; died at Alexandria. Mrginia, February — , 1862. 
John Paul, St. Charles; transferred to Company M. 
Antoine Plank. St. Charles ; reenlisted as veteran. 
John Smidt, Batavia; deserted from hospital. 
Jacob Wagner, Batavia ; deserted from hospital . 

Recruit. 
William Meyer, Elgin; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

COMPANY E. 

Privates. 
Thomas Bently. Virgil ; discharged. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 383 

John L. Brown, Batavia ; killed at Barber's Cross Roads. \'irginia, 
November 5, 1862. 

Frank Gooder, \'irgil ; mustered out September 28, 1864. 

James H. McConnell, St. Charles; discharged December 22, 1862; 
disability. 

William F. Yeoman, \^irgil; mustered out September 28, 1864. 

Recruits. 

James Kellum, Geneva; mustered (mt July 17, 1865. 

Georgre A. \Miitaker, Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 

COMPANY G. 

Private. 
B. L. Chamberlain, St. Charles; promoted battalion quartermaster. 

COMPANY H. 

Captains. 
Rufus M. Hooker, St. Charles; died August i, 1862. 
John M. Southworth, St. Charles: resigned August 18, 1862. 

First Lieutenant. 
Charles Harrison, St. Charles; resigned May 22, 1862. 

Second Lieutenant. 
John M. Southworth. St. Charles ; promoted. 

Recruits. 
Justus M. Neal, Geneva; mustered out July 17, 1865. 
Walter L. Sprague. Geneva ; died at Andersonville prison August 2, 1864 ; 
^ave four thousand five hundred arid ninety-eight. 

COMPANY I. 

Captains. 
Hiram L. Rapelge. Kaneville; resigned August 29, 1862. 
A. Levi Wells. Kaneville: mustered out September 18, 1864. 
Francis M. Gregory, Kaneville; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

first Lieutenants. 
A. Levi Wells, Kaneville: promoted. 
Azer W. Howard, Kaneville: resigned April 11, 1864. 
Francis M. Gregory. Kaneville, promoted. 
Aaron W. Chase. Blackberry: mustered out July 17. 1865. 

Second Lieutenants. 
John Cool, Hampshire; resigned September i, 1862. 
Francis M. Gregory. Kaneville, promoted. 
Aaron W. Chase. Blackberry, promoted. 

First Sergeant. 
John C. Fifield. Blackberry: promoted adjutant Third Battalion. 

Sergeants. 
Noble D. Frary, Blackberry; private; discharged for disability April 17, 
1862. 

Azer W. Howard, Kaneville: promoted first lieutenant. 
George Cook, Campton ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Lawrence J. Wheeler, Elgin; mustered out September 28, 1864, as 
private. 



384 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Corporals. 

John W. Swain, Blackberry; discharged August i6, 1862; disability. 

A. L. Wells, Kaneville ; promoted first sergeant, then first lieutenant. 

Hiram D. Rudd, Kaneville: discharged October 27, 1862; disability. 

Earlon G. Edgar, Batavia: discharged April 2t,. 1862: disability. 

Thomas H. Tracy, Blackberry: discharged August 12, 1862; disability. 

Zaccheus Hays. Blackberry: mustered out September 28, 1864, as first 
sergeant. 

William G. Miner. Kaneville; discharged February 28. 1863. as sergeant; 
disability. 

Privates. 

Andrew Anderson, Blackberry: discharged January 2, 1864; disability. 

Zopher H. Adams, Elgin; discharged August 12. 1862; disability. 

John R. Akers, Blackberry; discharged November 13. 1862; disability. 

John Akin, Blackberry; reenlisted as veteran. 

Oscar Bowdish, Blackberry: mustered out September 28, 1864, as 
corporal. 

Charles Brash, Blackberry; reenlisted as veteran. 

Philander W. Bemis, Blackberry: promoted sergeant major. 

Porter S. Bowdish, Blackberry; discharged March 7, 1863; disability 

James A. Bell, Kaneville ; sergeant ; died at Washington, District of 
Columbia, October 6, 1862. 

William Boots, Hampshire; reenlisted as veteran. 

Sydney Bradford, Elgin ; reenlisted as \eteran. 

Aaron W. Chase, Blackberry; reenlisted as veteran. 

Lemuel M. Chase, Blackberry: reenlisted as veteran. 

James Cossleman, Aurora; discharged April 17, 1862, as bugler; 
disability. 

Albert Cool, Hampshire; mustered out September 28, 1864. 

Dwight E. Cornwall, Kaneville; reenlisted as veteran. 

Doren Carver, Burlington; reenlisted as veteran. 

Alexander Frazer, Burlington; transferred to Company B. 

Reuben Fellows, Blackberry: mustered out September 28, 1864, as 
sergeant. 

Appollos S. Fuller, Blackberry: mustered out September 28, 1864, as 
corporal. 

■ Martin A. Graves, Burlington ; transferred to Company B. 

Oscar L. Gardner, Blackberry; mustered out September 28, 1864. 

Francis M. Gregory, Kaneville; reenlisted as veteran. 

John J. Gosper, Kaneville; reenlisted as veteran. 

Davis Gillott. Batavia; discharged April 17, 1862; disability. 

Jacob Hepyle, Blackberry; reenlisted as veteran. 

Roswell Humphrey, Hampshire: reenlisted as veteran. 

Alfred Johnson, Blackberry; discharged March 9, 1862; disability. 

Augustus Johnson, Blackberry: reenlisted as veteran. 

John W, Johnson, Blackberry; died at Alexandria. \'irginia, February 
23, 1862. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 385 

George J. Johnson, Blackberry ; promoted regimental commissary sergeant. 

Charles H. Kidder, Batavia ; reenlisted as veteran. 

George Kimball, Hampsliire; discharged April 5, 1863; disability. 

Charles B. Kendall, Blackberry ; promoted hospital steward. 

John G. Kribbs. Elgin; discharged November 18, 1803. for promotion in 
colored regiment. 

Morris Law, Blackberry; discharged January 14, 1863; disability. 

David McGuire, Batavia; mustered out September 28, 1864. 

William McNair, Blackberry; reenlisted as veteran. 

Alexander JNIcMillan, Campton; discharged February 18, 1863; disability. 

George C. Mathuzen, Blackberry; reenlisted as veteran. 

William ]\Iarshall, Hampshire; mustered out September 28, 1864. 

William ^Moulding, Blackberry; transferred to Company K. 

Joseph Pifer, Blackberry; reenlisted as veteran. 

George W. Page, Blackberry; discharged for disability. 

Charles E. Ross, Kaneville ; reenlisted as veteran. 

David M. Rogers, Blackberry; died at Harrison's Landing, Virginia, 
August 4, 1862. 

Thomas S. Rich, Hampshire ; transferred to invalid corps. 

Melvin E. Robinson, Blackberry; reenlisted as veteran. 

James Sherburn, Rutland; discharged March 8, 1862; disability. 

Francis R. Stanton, Dundee; mustered out July 21, 1865; prisoner of 
war. 

James A. Soule, Kaneville ; reenlisted as veteran. 

N. F. Tinkham, Kaneville; discharged May 25, 1862; disability. 

John AL Williams, Blackberry; mustered out September 28, 1864, as 
sergeant. 

Harvey S. White, Blackberry; reenlisted as veteran. 

Henry H. Walker, Kaneville; reenlisted as veteran. 

Hiram M. Woodard, Kaneville; discharged August 12, 1862; disability. 

Isaac Witherick. Blackberry; discharged October 13, 1863; disability. 

Veterans. 

John Akin, Blackberry; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Charles Brash, Blackberry; mustered out July 17, 1865, as corporal. 

Sidney Bradford, Elgin; mustered out July 17, 1865, as corporal. 

William Boots, Hampshire; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

George Cook, Campton; mustered out February 9, 1866, to date August 
3, 1864, for promotion in colored regiment. 

Loren Carver, Burlington; mustered out July 17, 1865, as tirst sergeant. 

Aaron Chase, Blackberry; promoted sergeant, then second lieutenant. 

Lemuel Chase, Blackberry; mustered out July 17, 1865, as sergeant. 

Dwight E. Cornwell, Kaneville; mustered out July 17, 1865, as sergeant. 

Norris A. Fink, Kaneville; mustered out July 17, 1865, as sergeant. 

Francis M. Gregory, Kaneville ; promoted sergeant then second lieutenant. 

John J. Gosper. Kaneville ; discharged for promotion in colored regiment. 

Roswell Humphrey, Hampshire; mustered out July 17, 1865, as sergeant. 

Jacob Helpyle, Blackberry; mustered out July 17, 1865. 



386 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Augustus Jol:ns(jn. Blackberry; mustered out July 17, 18(15. 
Charles H. Kidder. Batavia; mustered out July 17, 1865. 
George C. Mathewson, Blackberry; mustered out July 17, 1865. as 
sergeant. 

Arterus AlcCollum, St. Charles; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

William McXair, Blackberry; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Joseph Pifer. Blackberry; mustered out July 17. 1865. 

Melvin E. Robinson, Blackberry; mustered out July 17, 1865, as corporal. 

Charles E. Ross, Kaneville; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

James Soule, Kaneville'; promoted regimental commissary sergeant. 

Harvey S. White, Blackberry; discharged Alay 27, 1865, as first sergeant. 

Henry H. \\'alker, Kaneville; mustered out July 17. 1865. as sergeant. 

Recruits. 
George Corwin, Batavia : promoted regimental commissary sergeant. 
William Duff, Rutland; mustered out July 17, 1865. 
Robert Duff, Rutland; discharged August 8, 1864: disability. 
Xorris A. Fink, Kaneville ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Benjamin Garfield, Blackberry; mustered out July 17, 1865, as corporal. 
Thomas Lovell, Kaneville; mustered out July 17, 1865. 
Frank E. Ross. Kaneville; discharged July 29, 1862. 
James Sherburne, St. Charles; veteran; mustered out July 17, 1865. 
Hiram M. Woodward, Kaneville; mustered out July 17, 1865. as corporal. 
Lowell ^I. W'oodard, Kaneville: mustered out July 17, 1865, as bugler. 

COMPANY K. 

Capfaifi. 
Eben J. Farnsworth, St. Charles ; promoted brigadier general June 28, 
1863; killed July 3, 1863. 

Privates. 
Andrew Ducat. Aurora; discharged March 8. 1862; disability. 
William R. Moulding. Blackberry; discharged March 9. 1862; disability. 

Recruit. 
Frank Mighell. Sugar Grove; reenlisted as veteran. 

COMPANY L. 

First Lieutenant. 
Judson A. Stevens, Geneva; mustered out September 18. 1864. as second 
lieutenant. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Judson A. Stevens, Geneva ; promoted. 

Veterans. 
William Xourse, St. Charles; mustered out July 17, 1865. 
Henry Sheldon. St. Charles; mustered out July 17. 1865. 

Recruit. 
Edward Murphy. St. Charles; reenlisted as veteran. 

COMPANY M. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Ralph B. Swarthout, St. Charles: mustered out July 17. 1865. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 387 

Private. 
Ralph B. Swarthout, St. Charles; reenlisted as veteran. 

Recruits. 
John Paul, St. Charles; discharged November 24, 1862; disability. 
Danfred D. Searls, St. Charles; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Uiiassigiicd Recruits. 
John B. Duff, Rutland. 
Boyd A. Wadhams, St. Charles. 

NINTH CAVALRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

NON-COM MISSIONED STAFF. 

Commissary Sergeant. 
William E. Walker, Dundee; reenlisted as veteran, and mustered out 
October 31, 1865. 

COMPANY G. 

Recruits. 
William H. H. Russell, Sugar Grove; mustered out October 31, 1865. 
John R. Renwick, Elgin: mustered out August 28, 1865. 

COMPANY H. 

Recruits. 
Herman Casteal, Aurora; deserted Julv 24, 1865. 
Alfred R. Stolp, Aurora; discharged February i, 1862; disability. 

COMPANY I. 

Recruit. 
William Chrystal, Virgil; mustered out October 31, 1865. 

COMPANY L. 

Recruits. 
Edw^ard Brown, Virgil; mustered out October 31, 1865. 
Henry Hoyt, Virgil; mustered out October 31, 1865. 

TENTH CAVALRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY D. 

Corporal. 
Charles L. King, St. Charles ; reenlisted as veteran. 

TENTH ( REORGANIZED) CAVALRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

Major. 
George A. Willis, Aurora; mustered out November 22, 1865. 

COMPANY K. 

Captain. 
William Duncan. Plato; mustered out July 15, 1865. 

First Lieutenants. 
Charles M. Harvey, Elgin; mustered out December 16, 1864. 
John A. McQueen, Plato: resigned June 20, 1865: second lieutenant. 



388 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Second Lieutenant. 
John A. McQueen, Plato; promoted major. ^ 

COMPANY L. 

Captain. 
Albert Collins, Aurora; resigned June 28, 1865. 

COMPANY M. 

Captain. 
Daniel Dynan, Aurora; mustered out November 22, 1865. 

First Lieutenant. 
Jerome B. Marlett, Aurora; mustered out November 22, 1865. 

Second Lieutetiant. 
George Gunter, Sugar Grove; mustered out November 22, 1865. 

ELEVENTH CAVALRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY K. 

Corporal. 
Ebenezer F. Weeman, Burlington ; reenlisted as veteran. 

TWELFTH CAVALRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY E. 

Recruit. 
Melbourn Kipp, Clintonville. ^^ 

^^ COMPANY H^. 

Captain. 
Franklin T. Gilbert, Clintonville; transferred to Fifteenth Illinois Cavalry. 

First Licuteimnt. 
Charles O. Connell, Clintonville; transferred to Fifteenth Illinois Cavalry. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Theodore G. Knox, Elgin; transferred to Fifteenth Illinois Cavalry. 

Unassigncd Recruits. 
John Banks, Blackberry. 

Timothy Donovan, Elgin; transferred to Seventeenth Illinois Cavalry. 
Jacob Miller, Rutland. 
Marshall B. Shenvin, Batavia ; transferred to Seventeenth Illinois Cavalry. 

THIRTEENTH CAVALRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY H. 

Captain. 
Robert H. Fleming. Aurora; resigned January 10, 1863. 



•This company was originally attached to the Fifty-second Illinois Infantry. Assig:ned to Company H, Twelfth 
Illiaols Cavalry, and subsequently assigned to Company G, Fifteenth Illinois Cavalry. 




WEST ELGIN ABOUT 1860, LOOKING NORTHWARD FRO:\I THE 

BRIDGE. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 391 

Sergeant. 
Irving B. Fleming, Aurora; died, Aurora, Illinois, January 7, 1862. 

Corporals. 
Thomas B. Whitford, Aurora; discharged. 
Calvin Hubbard, Aurora. 
Timothy Maloney, Aurora; deserted June 20, 1862. 

Privates. 
John R. Adair, Aurora; discharged June 22, 1862; disability. 
James Brennan, Aurora ; discharged. 

William Bird, Aurora ; appears on original roll of Company G. 
John Burns, Aurora; died at Reeves Station, Missouri, April 24, 1862. 
James Conway, Aurora; transferred to Twenty-third Illinois Infantry. 
John Coats, Aurora ; discharged for disability. 

George Kennedy, Aurora ; transferred to Company A, as consolidated. 
James Caliill, Aurora; transferred to Company A, as consolidated. 
Alexander Kinkade, Aurora. 

Martin Myers, Aurora ; transferred to Company A, as consolidated. 
William B. Mattock, Aurora. 

Orrin Mimner, Aurora; discharged March 9, 1862; disability. 
Adam Putnam, Aurora. 
Charles Phillips, Aurora. 

Thomas H. Ruby, Aurora; discharged March 9, 1862; disability. 
Peter Shields, Aurora; deserted September — , 1862. 

Recrttits. 
Charles Bailey, Aurora. 
William Coan, Aurora. 
William Eddlegeorge, Aurora; discharged in 1862; disability. 

FOURTEENTH CAVALRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY B. 

Recruits. 
Joseph Kemp, Aurora; mustered out July 31, 1865. 
Henry Luck, Aurora; mustered out July 31, 1865. 
Michael Peters, Aurora; mustered out July 31, 1865. 

COMPANY D. 

Privates. 
Charles Austin, Elgin ; reclaimed by Ninth Vermont Infantry. 
Charles B. George, Elgin ; reclaimed by Ninth Vermont Infantry. 
Thomas E. Steady, Elgin ; reclaimed by Ninth Vermont Infantry. 

COMPANY I. 

Private. 
-Alexander Carmichael. Elgin; mustered out May 20, 1865. 

HISTORY OF FIFTEENTH CAVALRY. 

The companies that composed the Fifteenth Cavalry Regiment were 
independent companies attached to infantry regiments, and acted as such. 



392 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Aloved with the army from Cairo in the spring of 1S62, up the Tennessee 
river to Fort Henry. Disembarked and was moving to the rear, when the 
Fort was evacuated by the rebels; took possession, but remained there a few 
days only. 

Moved, under command of General Grant, to Fort Donelson. Fort 
surrendered after a siege of three days. Moved with the fleet up Tennessee 
river to Pittsburg Landing. Participated in the Shiloh battle, April 6 and 7, 
1862. 

Moved with the army in the siege of Corinth. Fort evacuated about 
May I, 1862. Ordered from there to Jackson, Tennessee. There and then 
oreanized into Stewart's Battalion, commanded bv Colonel Conrine. 

Moved in the month of November to Corinth, Miss. 

In the spring of 1863, organized the Fifteenth Regiment. George A. 
Bacon was appointed colonel. F. T. Gilbert, lieutenant colonel. We were 
under command of General G. 'M. Dodge. Scouted through the states of 
Mississippi. Alabama, Kentucky and Tennessee, till October, 1863; moved 
by way of Memphis. Remained three weeks under command of General Hurl- 
but, thence to Helena, Arkansas, arriving about the month of November, 1863. 

Then, under command of General Buford of Illinois, did post duty and 
long service scouting through Arkansas and Mississippi. 

August 10, 1864, ordered to Springfield, Illinois, to be discharged. By 
expiration of term of service, mustered out August 25, 1864. 

The reciTjits who were enlisted in 1862, were consolidated with the 
Tenth Illinois Cavalry. Gloved to San Antonio, Texas, and mustered out of 
service. 

HISTORY OF COMPANY I, FIFTEENTH CAVALRY. 

This company was organized at Aurora, Kane county, Illinois, Aug^ist 2. 
1861, by Captain Albert Jenks, and was mustered in September 23 as cavalry, 
attached to Thirty-sixth Illinois Volunteers. 

On September 24 moved from camp, and reported to the regiment at 
Rolla, ^Missouri. On December 31 reported to Colonel Carr. commanding 
Third Illinois Cavalry, and moved to Bennett's Mills. On February 10, 1862, 
moved to Osage Springs, Missouri, arriving there on the 20th. March 2 
moved, with Sigel's division, to near Bentonville, losing four men. taken 
prisoners. A\^as engaged March 7 and 8 at Pea Ridge. 

Moved, with the army to Salem. May i ordered to White river. 
Returned to Batesville on the 9th. A\'as engaged in the movements of 
Asboth's division, and arrived at Cape Girardeau, Missouri, ilay 24. Moved 
to Hamburg Landing, Tennessee, ^^'as escort for General Rosecrans at battle 
of Corinth, October 3 and 4. 

December 25, 1862, was assigned to the Fifteenth Illinois Cavalry. On 
June 9. 1863, moved to ^Memphis, May 20 landed at Chickasaw Bayou, and 
was engaged in the operations against ^'icksburg, with the regiment. August 
17 moved to Carrollton, Louisiana. September 3 moved with Fourth 
Division. Thirteenth Army Corps, to ^lorganzia, Louisiana, and was engaged 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 393 

in the campaign, General Herron commanding. October lo returned to Car- 
rollton. 15th moved to Brasher, Louisiana, and on the 17th to Xew Iberia, 
Louisiana. Was engaged in scouting, and various expeditions, reporting to 
Brigadier General A. L. Lee, as escort, January 5, 1864. 

On February 11 the company moved for IlHnois, for veteran furlough, 
and on the 26th, the men were furloughed at Chicago, Illinois. 

COMPANY K. 

First Lieutenant. 
Llewellyn B. Brown, Elgin; resigned March 7, 1865. 

Farrier. 
Alonzo H. Sanborn, St. Charles; promoted veterinary surgeon. 

COMPANY L. 

Privates. 
James Bancroft. St. Charles; discharged June 7, 1865, as sergeant; 
disability. 

Sidney R. Powers, Elgin; deserted January 12, 1863. 
James H. Sterling, St. Charles; mustered out July 31, 1865. 

FIFTEENTH CA\ALRY REGIMENT. 

(Three Years" Service.) 

Majcr. 
Samuel B. Sherer, Aurora; mustered uut August 25, 1864. 

COMPANY E. 

Private. 
Walter R. Carr, Elgin. 

COMPANY F. 

Captain. 

Albert Collins, Aurora; see regiment, as consolidated. 

Privates. 

Charles Beck. Aurora; transferred to Company L, Tenth Illinois Cavalry, 
as consolidated. 

John W. Byers; died at Helena, Arkansas, October 3, 1864. 

William Johnson, Aurora; transferred to Company L, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Charles A. Moffit. Aurora; transferred to Company L, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

William J. Prentice, Aurora; discharged, October 28, 1864; disability. 

COMPANY G.* 

Captains. 
Franklin T. Gilbert, Clintonville; promoted major. 
Charles O. Connell, Clintonville; mustered out October 31, 1864. 

First Lieutenants. 
Charles O. Connell, Clintonville; promoted. 
Theodore G. Knox, Elgin; mustered out October 31, 1864. 

T u'.u Q'''>^'"=>"y attached to Fifty-second Resiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry. Assigned as Comoany H 
T^yelftll Cavalry, and subsequently assigned as Company G. Fifteenth Cavalry. December 25. 1862 



394 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Second Licitfciuiiits. 
V Theodore G. Knox, Elgin; promoted. 

Nelson Dedrick, Clintonville; mustered out October 31, 1864. 

Sergeants. 

Nelson Dedrick, Clintonville; promoted first sergeant, then second 
lieutenant. 

Morris J. Corron, Clintonville; discharged March 4. 1862, as private. 

Corporals. 

John Murdock, Clintonville; mustered out October 31, 1864, as sergeant. 

Charles R. Brown, Elgin; mustered out October 31, 1864. 

Jasper Baker, Clintonville; discharged June 7, 1862. 

Elias C. Howard, St. Charles; discharged June 27, 1862. 

Priz'afcs. 

William B. Buck, Clintonville; discharged June 23, 1862. 

Abram Barden, Elgin; mustered out October 31, 1864, as blacksmith. 

Benjamin F. Brown, Clintonville; discharged April 9, 1862. 

Llewellyn D. Brown, Clintonville ; captured and paroled ; promoted first 
lieutenant, Company K, Fourteenth Illinois Cavalry. 

Sereno Bridge, Elgin; mustered out October 31, 1864. 

John B. Conklin, Hampshire; died at St. Louis February 18, 1862. 

Darwin Davis, Clintonville; discharged ^lay 3, 1862. 

James Dewell, Clintonville; discharged June 23, 1862. 

William Dewell, Clintonville; discharged June 7, 1862. 

Freeman Elliott, Campton ; mustered out October 31, 1864, as sergeant. 

Clement Gearhart, Clintonville; mustered out October 31, 1864. 

Francis Glenn. Diuidee; died at Helena, Arkansas, October 24, 1863. 

Ole Hanson, Batavia ; mustered out October 31, 1864, as corporal. 

William E. Hill, Elgin; mustered out October 31, 1864, as corporal. 

Orson Hotchkiss, Aurora; discharged October 14, 1862, as corporal. 

Elijah B. Ketchum, Aurora; discharged June 7, 1862, as corporal. 

Noah Kipp, Chntonville; mustered out October 31, 1864. 

John E. Lowe, Clintonville; discharged May 3, 1862. 

Richard H. Lampson. Campton; discharged June 23, 1864, as corporal. 

John Morley, Elgin; wounded July 7, 1863; left in hospital at Corinth, 
Mississippi, July 8, 1863. 

Norman D. Perry, Clinton\-ille; discharged June 23, 1862. 

Charles B. Prindle. Clintonville ; corpora! ; died at Helena. Arkansas, 
December 3, 1863. 

Hiram Peterson, Clintonville; discharged March 4, 1862. 

Kitridge Putnam, Clintonville; mustered out October 31, 1864. 

Grove Rose, Clintonville; mustered out October 31, 1864. 

Alonzo H. Sanborn, St. Charles; discharged May 3, 1862, as farrier. 

Frederick Sheldon. St. Charles ; bugler ; discharged. 

Daniel Townsend, Elgin; saddler; transferred to Company L 

William TuUock, Geneva; discharged April 8, 1862. 

Oren C. Webster, St. Charles; deserted November 10, 1861. 

Wallace W. Young. Elgin ; discharged December 10. 1862. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 395 

Recruits. 

Richard D. Alarlett, Aurora ; transferred from Company H, Fifty-second 
Illinois Infantry; discharged June lo, 1864. 

Thomas Ponsley, St. Charles; transferred to Company G, Fifty-second 
Illinois Infantry. 

COMPANY H*. 

Captains. 
Christian B. Dodson, Geneva; resigned, August 10, 1862. 
William C. Wilder, Geneva; resigned February 13, 1863. 
Thomas J. Beebe, Geneva; mustered out August 13, 1864. 

First Lieutenants. 
William C. Wilder, Geneva; promoted. 
Thomas J. Beebe, Geneva ; promoted. 
Ebenezer C. Litherland, Burlington ; mustered out at consolidation. 

Second Lieutenants. 
John C. Bundy, St. Charles; promoted lieutenant colonel in Arkansas 
regiment. 

Ebenezer C. Litherland. Burlington; promoted. 

First Sergeant. 
Horatio G. Lumbard. St. Charles; discharged February 17, 1862, for 
promotion as adjutant in Eighth Illinois Cavalry. 

Quartermaster Sergeant. 
Charles Herrington, Geneva; deserted October 5, 1862. 

Sergeants. 
Thomas Beebe, Geneva ; promoted first lieutenant. 
William Burman. Geneva; discharged January 10, 1862; disability. 
Thomas C. Brown, Burlington ; promoted first sergeant. 

Corporals. 
Charles M. Green, Gene\'a; discharged No\-ember 26, 1863, for promotion 
to first lieutenant. Thirteenth Arkansas Cavalry. 

Henry B. Hazlehurst, St. Charles; mustered out August 31, 1864. 
John Fisher, Campton; mustered out August 31, 1864. 
John Fox. Blackberry; mustered out August 31, 1864. 

Privates. 
John Akin, Blackberry; deserted August 10, 1861. 
John Beebe, Geneva; mustered out August 31, 1864. 
Ephraim Blockman, St. Charles; mustered out August 31, 1864. 
Charles H. Bunker, Geneva; mustered out August 31, 1864. 
Rudolph C. Bowers, St. Charles; discharged April 13. 1862. 
Abial S. Brown, Batavia; discharged August 30, 1861 ; disability. 
James Beebe. Geneva; discharged Feliruary 19, 1863; disability. 
F. B. Beach. St. Charles; discharged August 24, 1861 ; wounds. 
Thomas Calleghan, Blackberry; discharged May 18, 1863; disability. 
Frank A. Clark, Geneva; discharged September 4, 1863, for promotion 
to Lieutenant First Mississippi Colored Infantry. 



* This Company was formerly known as Kniie County Cavalry Subsequently assigned as Company H 
Fifteenth Cayalry \'oliinteers. 



396 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Marshall Clark, Geneva; discharged January lo, 1862; old age. 

Hollis Clark. Geneva; mustered out August 31, 1864. 

Robert G. Curtis, Geneva; discharged May 4, 1864, for promotion as 
lieutenant. First Mississippi Colored Infantry. 

David Caruthers, Kane county; mustered out August 31, 1864. 

William B. Gary, Blackberry; mustered out August 31, 1864. 

Edward Durant, St. Charles; mustered out August 31, 1864. 

John W. Edwards, Blackberry; mustered out August 31, 1864. 

Barney F. Freeman, Blackberry; corporal; died at Benton Barracks, 
October 18, 1861. 

Richard Flower, Geneva; mustered out August 31, 1864. 

George E. Gilman, Campton; discharged February 23, 1864; disability. 

Chester German, Geneva; mustered out August 31, 1864. 

Augustus Gustoson, Geneva; mustered out August 31, 1864, as corporal. 

Alfred Herrington, Geneva; mustered out August 31, 1864. 

Thaddeus Herrington, Geneva; mustered out August 31, 1864. 

John B. Herndon, A'irgil; mustered out August 31, 1864. 

Wallace Hickox, Virgil; discharged April 10, 1864, for promotion as 
second lieutenant, Fourth Arkansas Cavalry. 

Frank H. Harris, Virgil; discharged November 16, 1861 ; disability. 

George H. Hall, Blackberry; mustered out August 31, 1864. 

J. M. Haskins, Blackberry; discharged February 13, 1863; disability. 

William Hinch, St. Charles; mustered out August 31, 1864. 

Allen Hickerson, Burlington; reenlisted as veteran. 

James O. Haile, St. Charles; corporal; died at Young's Point, Louisiana, 
March 24, 1863. 

William K. Kennear, Campton ; died at Benton Barracks December 4. 
1861. 

Dennis Lucy, Geneva; discharged May 18, 1863; disability. 

F. J. Minneum. St. Charles; discharged August 19, 1861 ; disability. 

John Noble. St. Charles; mustered out August 31, 1864, as sergeant. 

Charles R. Palmer, Burlington; mustered out August 31, 1864. 

Andrew J. Pease, Burlington ; drowned at Batesville, Arkansas, May 29, 
1862. 

Thomas B. Reeves, Burlington; discharged July 3, 1862. 

Jamed Rodley, Blackberry: discharged October 7, 1861 ; disability. 

Charles Stewart, Geneva; mustered out August 31, 1864. 

William F. Stewart, Batavia; discharged January 14, 1863. 

W'illiam Story. Geneva; mustered out August 31, 1864. 

Fayette Smith, Burlington; mustered out August 31, 1864. 

Albert B. Town, Blackberr\-; discharged October 12, 1861 ; disability. 

James E. Tracy. Blackberry; discharged November 17, 1861 ; disability. 

William H. H. Thompson, St. Charles; deserted at St. Louis, Missouri, 
March 15, 1862. 

Fayette Thompson. St. Charles. 

William H. Tilton. Geneva; mustered out August 31. 1861. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 397 

Jerome Wilson, Geneva; deserted October i6, 1862. 

Thomas G. Wills, Virgil; discharged November 11, 1862; disability. 

Thomas W. West, Geneva; mustered out August 29, 1864. 

E. F. Wicks, St. Charles; mustered out August 31, 1864. 

Andrew Wallan, Blackberry; reenlisted as veteran. 

Orlando W'ood, Blackberry; discharged November 11, 1862; disability. 

Benjamin Wells, St. Charles; mustered out August 31, 1864. 

Thomas P. Young, St. Charles; discharged November 8, 1861. 

Veterans. 

Allen B. . Hickerson, Geneva ; transferred to Company L, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Charles C. Rinehart, Geneva; transferred to Company L, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Andrew Wallen, Geneva ; corporal ; transferred to Company L, Tenth 
Illinois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Recruits. 

Willard B. Allen, Hampshire; transferred to Company L, Tenth Illi- 
nois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Henry J. Allen, Hampshire; transferred to Company L, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Frank Broadbent, Geneva ; transferred to Company L, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

James E. Beebe, Geneva ; transferred to Company L, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

William S. Coon, Hampshire; transferred to Company L, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

John Haynes, Hampshire ; \-eteran recruit ; transferred to Company L, 
Tenth Illinois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

John R. Hight, Hampshire; veteran recruit; transferred to Company L, 
Tenth Illinois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

John H. Haley, Hampshire ; veteran recruit ; transferred to Company L, 
Tenth Illinois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Joseph R. Jarvis, Hampshire ; transferred to Company L, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

William Mackey, Hampshire ; transferred to Company L, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Charles W. Maude, Hampshire ; corporal ; veteran recruit ; transferred 
to Company L, Tenth Illinois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Julius H. Norton, Elgin : transferred to Company L, Tenth Illinois Cav- 
alry, as consolidated. 

George A. Thompson, Geneva ; transferred to Company L, Tenth Illi- 
nois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Abraham Updike. Geneva ; transferred to Company L, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Albert Wattenpaugh. Plato; transferred to Company L, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalrv, as consolidated. 



398 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

COMPANY I.* 

Captaiu^-. 
Albert Jenks, Aurora; promoted lieutenant colonel. Thirty-sixth Illinois 
ment. 
George A. Wills, Aurora; see regiment, as consolidated. 

First Lieutenants. 
Samuel B. Sherer, Aurora; promoted to Company K. 
George A. Willis, Aurora ; promoted. 
Azariah C. Ferrie, Aurora; resigned October ii, 1864. 
Daniel Dynan, Aurora; see regiment, as consolidated. 

Second Lieutenants. 
Azariah C. Ferrie, Aurora; promoted. 
George A. Willis, Aurora; promoted. 
Albert Collins, Aurora; promoted captain. Company F. 
Daniel Dynan, Aurora; promoted. 
Jerome B. Marlett, Aurora; see regiment, as consolidated. 

Company Quartcrnwster Sergeant. 
Francis E. Reynolds, Aurora; promoted first lieutenant. Company K. 

Sergeants. 
Fletcher J. Snow, Aurora ; detached at muster out of regiment. 
James J. Johnson, Aurora; promoted major. First Arkansas Cavalry. 
Fred Otis W'hite, Sugar Grove; discharged November 4, 1863. 

Corporals. 
George Stewart, Aurora; mustered out August 24, 1864, as private. 
Jerome B. Marlett, Aurora; paroled prisoner; reenlisted as veteran. 
Henra B. Douglas, Aurora ; captured at Holly Springs ; paroled. 
David Hill, Jr., Aurora: died March 19, 1864. while prisoner of war. 
Isaac Rice, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

Farrier. 
George A. Carson, Aurora; deserted April 10. 1863. 

Saddler. 
James J. Hume, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

Privates. 
James Allen, Aurora; mustered out August 24, 1864. 
Charles Angell, Aurora; sent to hospital October 26, 1862; supposed 
discharged; reported deserter. 

Smith D. Avery, Aurora; died at Rolla, Missouri, January i, 1862. 

Henry Beebe, Aurora; mustered out August 24, 1864. 

John Beebe, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

Irwin M. Benton, Aurora ; reenlisted as \eteran. 

Joseph Burley, Aurora; mustered out August 24, 1864; was prisoner. 

Hope S. Chapin, Aurora; discharged December 10, 1861 ; disability. 

Joseph Carle. Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 



* This Company was formerlj' attached to the Thirty-sixth KeBinient, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and 
known as Company ".A" Drasroans. subsequentlv a^isiirned as Conipanv '"I," Fifteenth Regiment, Illinois Volun- 
teer Cavalry. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 399 

Samuel W. Clark, Aurora; discharged February 7, 1862; disability. 
Charles O. Dorr, Sugar Grove ; reenlisted as veteran. 
Edward F. Dorr, Sugar Grove ; died at Sugar Grove, Illinois, September 
29, 1861. 

George L. Dorr, Sugar Grove ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Henry C. Davis, Aurora; died. 

John W. Everts, Aurora. 

George Gunter, Sugar Grove ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Martin Glen, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran, 

Robert Haschel, Aurora; died at New Orleans November 13, 1863. 

Gilbert Heath, Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Chancey Hollenback, Aurora; mustered out August 24, 1864, as corporal. 

Jesse Hollenback, Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Nicholas Hittinger, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran; paroled prisoner. 

Joseph Ingham, Ain"ora ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Ira Jacobs, Sugar Grove ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Oliver H. Judd, Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 

James j\I. Kennedy, Aurora; mustered out August 24, 1864. 

Richard Larkin, Elgin ; reenlisted as veteran ; paroled prisoner. 

Truman Lillie, Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Christian Logan, Aurora; died at Rolla, Missouri, October 7, 1861. 

Joseph R. Loomis, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

George H. McCabe. Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Joseph F. McCrosky, Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 

James McMulIen, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

George W. Moon, Aurora; discharged December 10, 1861 ; disability, 

Andrew Nortrip, Aurora; discharged January 26, 1863. 

Elias Nortrip, Aurora; discharged January 21, 1862. 

Eugene Newell, Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Charles H. Oderkirke, Aurora; discharged November 28, 1862; disability. 

John A. Radley, Aurora; discharged August 14, 1862. 

Caleb B. Bears, Montgomery; deserted May 19, 1863. 

Thomas B. Robinson, Montgomery ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Orrin Squires, Montgomery; discharged April 9, 1863; wounds. 

Thomas J. Slosson, Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Cassius P. Snook, Batavia; discharged July 24, 1862; disability. 

Abijah Tarble, Aurora; discharged December 10, 1861 ; disability. 

Eleazer Todd, Sugar Grove ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Charles Weaver, Aurora ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Orrin Z. Whitford, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

Darius D. Williams, Sugar Grove; reenlisted as veteran. 

VETER.^NS. 

Quartermaster Sergeant. 
Joseph Ingham. Aurora; discharged October 15, 1864. 

Sergeant. 
Jerome B. Marlett, Aurora ; promoted second lieutenant. 



400 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Corporals. 

Isaac Rice, Aurora; first sergeant; transferred to Company M, Tenth 
Illinois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

George Gunter, Sugar Grove; quartermaster sergeant; transferred to 
Company M, Tenth Illinois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Charles O. Dorr, Sugar Grove ; commissary sergeant ; transferred to 
Company M, Tenth Illinois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Privates. 

Erwin H. Benton, Aurora ; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

John Beebe, Aurora ; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois Cavalry, 
as consolidated. 

John Carl, Aurora; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois Cavalry, 
as consolidated. 

Joseph Carl, Aurora ; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois Cavalry, 
as consolidated. 

George L. Dorr, Sugar Grove ; corporal ; transferred to Company M, 
Tenth Illinois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Martin Glen, Aurora; corporal; transferred to Company M, Tenth 
Illinois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Gilbert Heath, Aurora : transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois Cavalry, 
as consolidated. 

Nicholas Hettenger, Aurora; transferred to Company ^I, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Jesse Hollenbrock, Aurora; corporal; transferred to Company M, Tenth 
Illinois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Ira Jacobs, Sugar Grove; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Oliver H. Judd. Aurora ; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Truman Lillie, Aurora; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois Cav- 
alry, as consolidated. 

Joseph R, Loomis, Aurora. 

Richard Larkin, Elgin; corporal; transferred to Company M, Tenth 
Illinois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

James McMullen, Aurora ; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

George H. McCabe, Aurora; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalr}-, as consolidated. 

Joseph F. McCrosky, Aurora; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Eugene Newell, Aurora; sergeant; transferred to Company M, Tenth 
Illinois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Thomas B. Robinson. Montgomery; transferred to Company M. Tenth 
Illinois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Thomas J. Slossen, Aurora : transferred to Company M. Tenth Illinois 
Cavalrv, as consolidated. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 401 

Eleazer Todd, Sugar Grove; sergeant; transferred to Company M, Tenth 
Illinois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Charles Weaver, Sugar Grove ; transferred to Company AI, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Orrin Z. Whitford, Sugar Grove; transferred to Company M, Tenth 
Illinois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Darius D. Williams, Sugar Grove; transferred to Company M, Tenth 
Illinois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Recruits. 

John Carl, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

John Cooper, Aurora; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois Cavalry, 
as consolidated. 

O. Burdette Dewey, Aurora ; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Stephen V. or C. Estee, Aurora; corporal; transferred to Company M, 
Tenth Illinois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

William Ellis, Aurora ; deserted. 

Mark D. Flowers, Aurora; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Charles T. Finley, Aurora; transferred to Company M. Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Frankley Fox, Aurora; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois Cav- 
alry, as consolidated. 

Frank H. Goodwin, Aurora; died Memphis March 14, 1863. 

John C. Goodwin, Aurora; paroled prisoner; died at New Orleans April 
23, 1864; wounds. 

James R. Gillette. Aurora; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

William D. Kawkins, Aurora; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

William M. Howell, Aurora; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Horace A. Miller, Aurora; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Richard M. Northam, Aurora; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Isaac S. Oliver. Aurora; never joined; died at Camp Butler April i, 1864. 

Benjamin F. Persons, Aurora ; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Thomas Robinson, Aurora ; transferred to Company IM. Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

John Schoolcraft, Aurora ; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Edwin Scrafford, Aurora ; transferred to Company M. Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Lucien F. Town, Aurora; transferred to Company M, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalrv, as consolidated. 



402 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Thomas F. W'liite. Aurora; transferred to Company M, Tenth Ilhnois 
Cavalry, as consoHdated. 

James S. \\'ood, Aurora; transferred to Company M. Tentli Ilhnois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Andrew Yeldham, Aurora; died at Memphis September 25, 1864. 

COMPANY K.* 

Captains. 
Henry A. Smith. Burlington : cashiered. 
Samuel B. Sherer, Aurora ; promoted major. 
Francis E. Reynolds, Aurora; resigned February 28. 1864. 
William Duncan, Plato; see regiment as consolidated. 

First Lieutenants. 
Samuel Chapman, Plato; resigned April i, 1862. 
Francis E. Reynolds, Aurora; promoted. 
Charles '\l. Har\-ey, Elgin; see regiment as consolidated. 

Second Lieutenants. 
John S. Durand, Plato; resigned March 28, 1862. 
Henry C. Padelford, Elgin; resigned July 14, 1862. 
Edward M. Barnard, Elgin; resigned January 23, 1863. 
Charles M. Harvey, Elgin; promoted. 
John A. McQueen, Plato; see regiment as consolidated. 

First Sergeant. 
Edward M. Barnard. Elgin ; promoted second lieutenant. 

Sergeants. 
Henry C. Padelford, Elgin ; promoted second lieutenant. 
Vernon O. Wilcox, Plato : transferred to A'eteran Reserve Corps April 
— 1863. 

George W. Archer, Plato; discharged September 23. 1864. 
John W. Davis, Burlington; discharged April ig, 1863; wounds. 

Corporals. 
John McQueen. Plato: reenlisted as veteran. 

Henry \\'eightman. Burlington; discharged July — , 1862; disability. 
Henry C. Scott. Plato; discharged September 23, 1864. 
William Duncan, Plato ; reenlisted as veteran. 
Eugene M. Griggs, Plato ; reenlisted as veteran. 
John Baker, Plato; killed near Atlanta, Georgia. July 24. 1864. 
Rue Schuyler. Jr.. Plato; sergeant: discharged September 23. 1864. 

Bugler. 
Wallace S. Clark. St. Charles : reenlisted as veteran. 

Farrier. 
John M. Padelford, Elgin; discharged February 6, 1862; disability. 

Blacksmith. 
William Donovan, Elgin ; detailed by Pay Department by order of General 
Grant. 



• This company was formerly attached to the Thirty-sixth Beglment Illinois Volunteer Infan- 
try, and known as "Company "B" Dragoons, subsequently assigned as Company "K," Fifteenth 
Illinois Cavalry Volunteers. 




HOLY TRINITY E\'AXGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH. ELGIN. 




GERMAN EVANGELICAL CHURCH, ELGIN. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 405 

Saddler. 

Russell C. Fowler, Elgin; discharged January 17, 1862; disability. 

IVagoner. 

Julius C. Pratt, Elgin; discharged December 18, 1861 ; disability. 

Privates. 

John Archer, Plato; discharged September 23, 1864. 

Henry Ball, Plato ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Nathaniel Brown, Plato ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Mortimer C. Briggs, St. Charles; discharged September 23, 1864, as 
corporal. 

Ephraim M. Gardner, Plato; discharged September 23, 1864. 

Robert Collins, Plato ; reenlisted as veteran. 

William J. Christy, Plato; reenlisted as veteran. 

George Cox, Plato; discharged September 23, 1864. 

Robert N. Chrysler, Plato; reenlisted as veteran. 

Isaiah B. Curtis, Plato; discharged July 18, 1862; disability. 

Charles Collins. Plato; discharged September 23, 1864. 

George W. Campbell, Plato; reenlisted as veteran. 

Charles Cooley, Plato; reenlisted as veteran. 

Harrison Eaton, Plato; discharged September 23, 1864. 

Edwin F. Everts. Aurora; discharged June — , 1862; disability. 

John Eraser, Plato; discharged September 23, 1864. 

William H. Fletcher, Rutland ; discharged September 23, 1864. 

Patrick Glennon, Plato; in hospital at Jacinto, Mississippi, August 14, 
t862. 

Robert Gallagher, Plato ; reenlisted as veteran. 

John Gilbert, Plato ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Norton N. Harger, Plato ; discharged September 23, 1864. 

Oliver Hanagan, Plato; deserted September 25, 1862. 

Jerry Hickey, Plato ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Charles F. Holmes, Plato; discharged September 20, 1862; disability. 

Charles P. Kennedy, Plato; discharged September 23, 1864. 

John M. Kingsley, Plato; discharged September 23, 1864. 

James Knox, Plato; discharged April 19, 1863; wounds. 

Christopher Kingsley, Plato; discharged September 23, 1864. 

Abijah A. Lee, Plato; reenlisted as veteran. 

Eben Lowder, Plato; died at St. Louis November 2, 1861. 

Lloyd T. Lathrop, Plato; discharged September 23. 1864. as corporal. 

William M. Love, Plato; discharged September 23, 1864. 

William Mehan, Plato; reenlisted as veteran. 

John Muldoon, Plato; discharged September 23. 1864. 

Eugene Mann, Batavia; discharged September 23, 1864. 

Henry Nelson, Plato ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Thomas C. Pennington, Plato ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Peter D. Porchet, Plato; reenlisted as veteran. 

Marquis L. Perry, Plato; discharged September 23. 1864, as sergeant. 

David Peterson. Plato; discharged July 18, 1862; disability. 



406 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Isaac Peterson, Plato; discharged September 23, 1864. 

William H. Pease, Plato; reenlisted as veteran. 

Abner A. Pease, Plato ; reenlisted as veteran. 

George Perkins, Plato ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Jeremiah Phelan, Plato; reenlisted as veteran. 

John D. Pringle, Plato; discharged September 23, 1864. 

George Pettingill, Plato; reenlisted as veteran. 

Daniel Rettis, Plato; discharged September 23, 1864, as sergeant. 

Daniel Reynolds, Plato; reenlisted as veteran. 

Earl Robinson, Plato; reenlisted as veteran. 

Abraham Rumsey, Plato ; wounded ; transferred to Veteran Reserve 
Corps January — , 1864. 

Henry J. Rogers, Plato; deserted October 17, 1861. 

William E. Satterfield, Plato; mustered out October 10, 1864. 

Justice J. Stringer, Plato; discharged July 18, 1862; disability. 

Amos D. Scott, Plato; discharged September 23, 1864. 

Abijah L. Strang, Plato; discharged September 23, 1864. 

Charles L. Seward, Plato; discharged April — , 1862; disability. 

Henry M. Sawyer, Plato; discharged January — , 1862; disability. 

James Sheddon, Plato; discharged September 23, 1864. 

Clark Tucker, Plato; discharged September 23, 1864. 

John B. Thompson, Plato; discharged September 23, 1864. 

George M. Winchester, Plato; discharged September 23, 1864. 

Wallace W. W^attenpaugh, Plato; discharged April — , 1863; disability. 

Martin F. Wattenpaugh, Plato; discharged September 23, 1864. 

Noah Wallice, Plato; discharged June 26, 1862; disability. 

John Wagoner, Plato ; reenlisted as veteran. 

Benjamin Weaver, Aurora; discharged September 23, 1864. 

Veterans. 

Myron J. Amich, Plato; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois Cav- 
alry, as consolidated. 

Edwin E. Balch, Plato ; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois Cav- 
alry, as consolidated. 

Nathaniel Brown, Plato; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Henry Ball, Elgin; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois Cavalry, 
as consolidated. 

George W. Campbell, Udina ; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Charles Cooley, Plato Center; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Robert Collins, Plato ; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois Cavalrj', 
as consolidated. 

Robert N. Crysler, Plato; deserted January 27, 1864. 

William Duncan, Plato; promoted captain. 

Eugene H. Griggs, Plato; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY _407 

John Gilbert, Plato ; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois Cavalry, 
as consolidated. 

Robert Gallagher, Elgin ; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Jerry Hickey, Plato; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois Cavalry, 
as consolidated. 

Nathan H. Larkin, Plato; mustered out July 24, 1865; was prisoner. 

Abijah A. Lee, Elgin ; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois Cavalry, 
as consolidated. 

John A. McQueen, Elgin ; promoted second lieutenant. 

William Meehan, Plato ; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois Cav- 
alry, as consolidated. 

Henry Nelson, Elgin ; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois Cavalry, 
as consolidated. 

George J. or D. Pettingill, St. Charles; transferred to Company K, Tenth 
Illinois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Jeremiah Phelan, Plato Center; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

William H. Pease, Plato Center; transferred to Company K, Tenth 
Illinois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

George Perkins, Plato; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois Cav- 
alry, as consolidated. 

Peter D. Porchet, Plato; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Abner A. Pease, Plato ; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois Cavalry, 
as consolidated. 

Daniel Reynolds, Plato; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois Cav- 
alry, as consolidated. 

Earl Robinson, Plato; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois Cavalry, 
as consolidated. 

John Wagner, Plato; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois Cavalry, 
as consolidated. 

Recruits. 

Rob. J. Eakin, or Aiken, Aurora ; transferred to Company K, Tenth 
Illinois Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Henry L. Forbes, Aurora; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Charley M. Harvey, Elgin ; transferred from Company B, Thirty-sixth 
Infantry, December i, 1861 ; promoted second lieutenant. 

Henry Irish, Aurora ; transferred to Company K. Tenth Illinois Cavalry, 
as consolidated. 

James Moore, Aurora ; transferred to Company K. Tenth Illinois Cavalry, 
as consolidated. 

Willett Richardson, Campton ; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 

Willis Richardon, Campton ; transferred to Company K, Tenth Illinois 
Cavalry, as consolidated. 



408 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 



COMPANY L. 



Corporal. 
Phiranda A. Butterfield, Rutland; discharged June 27, 1862; disability. 

COMPANY M. 

Unassigncd Recruits. 
James Snowball, Aurora; rejected April 26. 1864. 
George \\". Hurlbut. Plato; never naustered. 
William Seymour. Hampshire; mustered out ^lay 21, 1865. 
Orlando \anekin, Plato; rejected. 

HISTORY OF SIXTEENTH CA\-ALRY. 

The Sixteenth Cavalry was composed principally of Chicago men. Thiele- 
man's and Schambeck's cavalry companies, raised at the outset of the war. 
formed the nucleus of the regiment. The former company served as General 
Sherman's body guard for some time. Captain Thieleman was made a major 
and authorized to raise a battalion. Thieleman and Schambeck's companies 
were thenceforth known as Thieleman's Battalion. 

In September. 1862. the \\'ar Department authorized the extension of 
the battalion to a regiment, and on the nth of June, 1863, the regimental 
organization was completed. In October. 1863. the Sixteenth Cavalry was 
ordered to Knoxville. Tennessee, and a portion of it participated in the mem- 
orable defense of that place in November and Decem'oer. A detachment 
under Colonel Thieleman constituted the garrison at Cumberland Gap. and 
one battalion, under Major Beers, was sent up Powell's Valley in the direction 
of Jonesville, ^"irginia. On the 3d of January. 1864. this battalion was at- 
tacked by three brigades of Longstreet's command, and after maintaininj; 
its ground for ten hours against five times its own number and losing heavily 
in killed and wounded, its ammunition having become exhausted, it was com- 
pelled to surrender. The loss of the regiment upon this occasion was three 
hundred and fiftj'-six men and fifty-six ofiicers. Long afterward the rebels 
exchanged less than one-third of these prisoners, sent them back in the most 
wretched condition from the horrors of the prison pen at Andersonville. The 
others were victims of the frightful tortures to which they were there subjected 
and now lie buried in the National cemetery at that place. 

After the conclusion of the east Tennessee campaign, the regiment was. 
in February, 1864, ordered to report at Camp Nelson, at Mount Sterling, 
Kentucky, where it was remounted, and in the latter part of April it left that 
place for Georgia. It then constituted a part of the cavalry corps under 
General Stoneman. 

It arrived at Red Clay, Georgia, May 10, and on the 12th was engaged 
in the battle of Vornell Station, where it lost one officer, Lieutenant Kerfurth, 
wounded and captured, and twelve men. It was there on dutj- almost every 
day from that time imtil after the fall of Atlanta — a period of nearly four 
months — during which it participated in the battles of Rocky Face Ridge. 
Buzzard's Roost, Reseca. Kingston, Cassville, Carterville, Allatoona, Kene- 
saw. Lost Mountain, Mine's Ridge, Powder Springs, Chattahoochee and 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 409 

various engagements in front of Atlanta and Jonesboro. Returning to De- 
catur, Georgia, it remained there until September 14, and was then ordered to 
Nicholasville, Kentucky, to again remount. On the 22d of October it left 
that place for Nashville, and was ordered thence to Pulaski, thence to Fayette- 
ville and back, and then, after a few days, to Waynesboro, near the Tennessee 
river. It had been there but three days when Hood crossed the river at 
Florence and below, and the brigade in which the Sixteenth was then serving 
was ordered to fall back. On this retreat it kept up a running fight with the 
enemy for three days and nights, until it reached Columbia. While the main 
army remained here, the Sixteenth was sent up Duck river to defend some 
fords at which it was supposed the enemy would attempt to cross. The expec- 
tation was realized, and in the six hours' engagement which followed the 
regiment held its position triumphantly against a vastly superior force of the 
rebels until dusk, when it learned that a large body of the enemy had crossed 
the Duck river and got completely in its rear. The only support the regiment 
then had was part of a company from the Eighth Michigan, and one company 
from the Eighth Iowa. The enemy had two brigades in line of battle across 
the pike and directly in the rear. 

The night was dark and our boys approached quietly until within one 
hundred yards of the enemy, when the charge was sounded, and the lines of 
the enemy were broken. 

The Sixteenth next participated in the battle of Franklin and in various 
skirmishes between there and Nashville. 

It engaged in the two days' battles at the latter place and in the pursuit 
of the enemy to the Tennessee river. It then returned to Pulaski and there 
went into camp, but most of the regiment was kept on scouting duty from that 
time until March, 1865. It then moved to Springfield, and in May returned 
to Pulaski, whence most of it was sent to Holton, Courtland and Decatur, 
Alabama. 

On the 1 8th of June it returned to Pulaski, and on the 2d of July it was 
ordered to Franklin, where it remained, scouring the country in all directions, 
until ordered to Nashville for muster out. It arrived in Chicago on the 23d 
of August, 1865, for final payment and discharge. 

During its term of service the Sixteenth marched about five thousand 
miles and engaged in thirty-one general battles and numerous skirmishes. 
At its muster out the only members left of the original field and staff officers 
were Colonel Smith, Captain Ford and Lieutenant Finger. The original 
force of the regiment was twelve hundred men. It received one hundred 
recruits, and at its discharge could muster only two hundred and eighty-five 
men, showing a casualty list of nearly one thousand. 

In January, 1865. Captain Hiram S. Hanchett, of this regiment, was 
captured at Mount Pleasant, Tennessee, and taken to the rebel prison at 
Cahaba, Alabama. There he organized the sixty men he found in prison, 
systematized a plan of escape, and this band of braves overpowered the guard, 
broke out and marched for two days, fighting all the while, hoping to reach 
the river and capture a steamboat on which they might escape. After that 
struggle, however, they were overpowered and then taken back. A number 



410 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

of the fugitives were killed; but for Captain Hanchett a worse fate was re- 
served. He was enclosed in a wooden box eight feet square with one aperture, 
through which his food was passed. 

Here he remained until the rebels heard General Wilson was coming 
and deemed it was best to shift their quarters. 

Poor Hanchett was, by over a month of this confinement, reduced to too 
feeble a state to move and they blew out his brains when they left. 

SIXTEENTH CAVALRY REGIMENT. 

(Three Years' Service.) 
Chaplain. 
Cornelius R. Ford, Aurora; mustered out August 19, 1865. 

COMPANY F. 

Sergeant. 
James B. Benedict, Aurora; deserted May 26, 1865. 

Wagoner. 
Thomas McEnta, Aurora; deserted February 23, 1863. 

Privates. 
Walter Bratt, Aurora; captured November 24, 1864. 
Patrick Flemming, Aurora; mustered out August 19, 1865. 
John Hieronymus, Aurora; mustered out August 19, 1865. 
John Hughes, Aurora; mustered out August 19, 1865, as blacksmith. 
Truman U. Phillips, Aurora ; captured and exchanged ; died at St. Louis 
May 28, 1865. 

Charles Strong, Aurora; absent; sick at muster out of regiment. 

Hans Temm, Aurora; deserted July 22, 1863. 

Edward Trumbull, Aurora; mustered out August 19, 1865. 

COMPANY H. 

Captains. 
William P. Gibbs, Aurora; discharged June 8, 1864. 
John Q. Hattery, Aurora; mustered out August 19, 1865. 

First Lieutenant. 
John O. Hattery, Aurora ; promoted. 

Second Lieutenant. 
John Q. Hattery, Aurora; promoted. 

Quarlerniasfcr Sergeant. 
Nicholas G. Shelman. Aurora; deserted I\Iay 9. 1863. 

Commissary Sergeant. 
Thomas G. Calkins, Aurora ; detached at muster out of regiment. 

Sergeant.^. 
Calvin E. Breed, Kane county; mustered out August 19. 1865, as cor- 
poral. 

Byron T. Whitford, Aurora; discharged June 30. 1865, as private; 
disability. 

Eli McDaniel, Aurora; deserted May 25, 1863. 

Corporals. 
William Bronson. Aurora : deserted May 20. 1863. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 411 

Charles E. Pierce, Aurora; died at Andersonville Prison August 6, 1864; 
grave No. 4,887. 

Melancth'n B. Fletcher, Aurora; mustered out August 19, 1865, as 
sergeant. 

Charles R. Vaughan, Aurora; private; sentenced to make good time lost 
by desertion. 

Farrier. 

William B. Maddock, Aurora; discharged February 16, 1864. 

IVagoncr. 
Nelson M. Saterfield, Aurora; deserted April 25, 1863. 

Privates. 

William Bailey, Kane county; deserted May 21, 1863. 

Joseph Chaffin, Kane county; deserted October 22, 1863. 

Charles Clyde, Kane county; discharged June 14, 1865. 

Samuel H. Drew, Kane county; transferred by sentence of courtmartial 
to Company D, Ninety-fifth Infantry, March 11, 1865. 

John Haley, Aurora; deserted April 25, 1863. 

John Hunter, Kane county; prisoner of war; mustered out to date May 
30, 1865. 

Charles A. W. Hayes, Aurora; mustered out August 19, 1865. 

Charles H. Harder, Aurora; mustered out August 19, 1865. 

Samuel O. Hart, Kane county. 

John Krohl, Aurora; died at Andersonville Prison August 4, 1S64; grave 
No. 4,700. 

John Kolly, Aurora; mustered out August 19, 1865. 

William H. Lott, Aurora; paroled prisoner; died at Annapolis, Mary- 
land, November 29, 1864. 

Albert Miller, Kane county; paroled prisoner; mustered out to date May 
30, 1865. 

Charles Ohswald, Kane county, discharged February 2, 1865 ; disability. 

Joseph Rupert, Aurora; mustered out August 19, 1865. 

John Rothenback, Kane county; deserted March i, 1863. 

William H. Sanders, Aurora ; deserted ; arrested and sentenced to forti- 
fications during enlistment. 

William J. Sanders, Aurora; discharged July 2j, 1865; disability. 

Augustus Stevens, Kane county; mustered out August 19, 1865, as 
sergeant; was prisoner. 

George W. Thayer, Kane county; transferred to Thirty-ninth Illinois 
Infantry. 

Julius Vocker, Kane county; deserted May 20, 1863. 

Walter A. Warren, Kane county; missing in action near Columbia, Ten- 
nessee, since November 25, 1864. 

COMPANY M. 

Private. 
Thomas E. Brown, Aurora: discharged to date May 29, 1865. 



412 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

HISTORY OF SEVENTEENTH CAVALRY. 

The Seventeenth Cavalry Regiment, Uhnois \*ohinteers, was organized 
under special authority from the War Department, issued September 1 1 , 
1863, to Hon. John F. Farnsworth. The rendezvous was established at St. 
Charles, Kane county. Illinois. By the approval of the governor of the state 
the colonelcy of the regiment was offered to John L. Beveridge, then major 
in the Eighth Illinois Cavalry, who assumed the work of recruitment and 
organization and opened the rendezvous November 15, 1863. Eight com- 
panies were mustered in January 22, 1864. Four other companies were 
mustered in and the organization of the regiment completed February 12, 
1864. 

By the close of April next six hundred and fifty horses had been brought 
in by the men, under instruction from the cavalry bureau, and sold to the 
government. 

May 3, 1864. the regiment moved, under orders from the general-in- 
chief, to report to Major General Rosecrans, commanding the Department of 
Missouri at St. Louis. Missouri. 

The regiment was sent to Jefferson Barracks. Missouri, where one thou- 
sand one hundred sets of horse equipments were received. From there it 
moved to Alton, Illinois, and relieved the Thirteenth Illinois Cavalry in guard- 
ing the military prison at that place. For this purpose five hundred muskets 
were drawn from the arsenal. 

Early in June following the First Battalion was ordered to St. Louis, and 
the Second Battalion followed immediately. Both being fully mounted, they 
were ordered at once to the north Missouri district. 

The First Battalion, Lieutenant Colonel Dennis J. Hynes commanding, 
proceeded to St. Joseph, Missouri, where the commanding officer reported 
in person to General Fisk, commanding the District of North ^Missouri. 

The Second Battalion, Major Lucius C. IMatlack commanding, was 
assigned by General C. B. Fisk to the post of Glasgow, Missouri. 

From this period for four months the three battalions were separate and 
remote from each other. Their history will be fitly given in separate narra- 
tives, extending over the time intervening and up to the time of reunion with 
the regimental headquarters. 

OF THE FIRST B.\TTALION. 

Lieutenant Colonel Hynes, being detailed as chief of cavalry, and at- 
tached to General Fisk's staff, the first squadron (Companies A and B), under 
Major H. Hillard, was ordered to Weston, Missouri. The second squadron 
(Companies C and D) was ordered to remain at St. Joseph, Alissouri, 
Captain J. D. Butts in command. 

The duties of the battalions were mainly escort and provost guard duty 
for three months; not ahvays at the same localities, 3'et always within the 
District of North Missouri. 

In September, 1864, the invasion of Missouri by Price's army of rebels 
increased the responsibility of their work by the increased restlessness of the 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 413 

rebel sympathizers around them ; but no actual conflict with the enemy occurred 
in that district. 

Late in September the second squadron (Companies C and D), com- 
manded by Captain Jones, was moved over the country to Jefferson City, 
Missouri, and here, rejoining the regiment, took part in the defense of the 
city, October 6 and 7, 1864. 

The first squadron (Companies A and B) remained in north Missouri 
during the winter and joined the regiment in June, 1865. Lieutenant Colonel 
Hynes and Major Hillard had been ordered to the regiment in February and 
March preceding while the headquarters was at Pilot Knob, Missouri. 

OF THE SECOND BATTALION. 

From July, 1864, for three months Major Matlack, with the battalion 
(Companies E, F, G and H) occupied the post of Glasgow. This was ad- 
jacent to the strongholds of numerous guerrilla bands, whose influence with 
rebel sympathizers and their inroads upon the loyal inhabitants and interrup- 
tions of United States telegraph lines required scouting parties constantly 
on the road for a distance of from thirty to sixty miles. Threatened attacks 
upon the post and actual assaults upon. the outposts kept the entire detachment 
busy day and night. 

Parties were sent out under orders from General Douglas, commanding 
Eighth Sub-District, District of North Missouri, to remote points, and fre- 
quent fights ensued. In every instance but one — when a score of the Seven- 
teenth men fottght five times their number — their success in punishing the 
enemy was decided, yet not without the loss of a few killed and wounded. 
Among these fights may be named one near Allen, on the North Missouri 
Railroad, in July, 1864; one near the Porsche Hills, and a third near Roche- 
port. None of these demand a more extended notice. 

The reported presence of the rebel Colonel Thornton, with one thousand, 
five hundred men, induced an order from General Rosecrans, through General 
Fisk, for a movement from Glasgow, northward and westward, in search of 
Thornton. Pursuant thereto Major Matlack moved with all his mounted 
force and a squadron of the Ninth Cavalry, Missouri State Militia, to Chilli- 
cothe, on the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad. Here, reinforced by five 
hundred militia, the column w-as divided into three detachments and thor- 
oughly scoured the whole country from the railroad southward and westward 
to the river. No enemy was found, but the presence of the troops reassured 
the Union men of that country, and held their enemies in check. The distance 
traveled was three hundred miles. 

In September, 1864, the Second Battalion was ordered to move over the 
country and report to General McNeil, commanding the district of Rolla, at 
Rolla, Missouri. It rejoined the regiment at Jefferson City, with which its 
movements are thenceforward identified. 

OF THE THIRD BATTALION. 

From July, 1864, until late in August of the same year this battalion, 
with regimental headquarters, remained at Alton, Illinois. Being removed 
to Benton Barracks, and fully mounted, it was ordered, early in September, 
to Glasgow. Missouri, but at Jefferson City its destination was changed, and. 



414 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

joined by the Second Battalion, Colonel John L. Beveridge commanding, re- 
ported to General John McNeil at Rolla September 19, 1864, with the two 
battalions. Here commenced an active and vigorous campaign, in which the 
movements of the regiment were a unit. 

When all communications between Rolla and St. Louis were interrupted 
by Price's army, and General Ewing's small force had retired from Pilot 
Knob, after a brave resistance. Colonel Beveridge. with the Seventeenth, by 
order of General McNeil, moved out at noon, September 28, and, driving a 
cavalry force which appeared near Cuba, reached Leesburg the day following 
— thirty-three miles distant — and saved General Ewing, with Colonel Fletcher 
(since governor of Missouri) and their seven hundred men, from imminent 
peril of capture and covered their return to Rolla, ^Missouri. 

Early in October the regiment moved from Rolla — a part of McNeil's 
brigade — towards Jefferson City, reaching there in time to aid in constructing 
defenses and in repelling the attack of Price, October 6 and 7, where Com- 
panies C and D rejoined the regiment. 

The day following General Pleasanton arrived from St. Louis and or- 
ganized the entire force — four thousand — as a cavalry division, under General 
Sanborn. Colonel Beveridge was placed in command of the Second Brigade, 
which included the Seventeenth Illinois Cavalry and the Third, Fifth and 
Ninth Missouri Cavalry. 

]\Iajor Matlack commanded the Seventeenth, which took part in the 
attack made on Price at Boonville, October 11, and which induced an early 
evacuation of that point by the rebels. 

At Independence the Seventeenth dismounted, was deployed on the left, 
and in support of the Thirteenth Alissouri Cavalry, when the rear guard of 
the enemy was attacked and their artillery captured. This was October 22, 
1864. Same day, at midnight, the brigade left Independence in the direction 
of Hickman's Mills, twelve miles distant, where the enemy was intercepted 
the next day about noon. \\'hile the main column of the brigade, under 
General McNeil, who had assumed command, attacked near the head of the 
rebel column, the Seventeenth, Colonel Beveridge commanding, was ordered 
to form a separate column and strike the enemy on the flank, one mile or 
more in the rear. By a rapid movement their flank was reached, but at a 
moment preceding an attack, which must have been a success, peremptory 
orders were received to return and support the battery in front. Two days 
after this the division, now under General Pleasanton's immediate orders, 
captured Major General Marmaduke, Brigadier General Cabel, ten rebel 
cannon and more than a thousand prisoners, with their arms, at Mine Creek, 
Kansas, having moved seventy miles within twenty-four hours. 

The Seventeenth", with McNeil's brigade, was hurried forward in pursuit 
of the retreating foe. Three times the pursuers formed in line of battle, but 
only in the last case did the enemy maintain his ground. Then the rebels had 
chosen their ground on an open prairie, and were quietly waiting the approach 
of the Union forces — a brigade, now thinned down to fifteen hundred men, 
moving up to attack fifteen thousand. Every man of this little band could 
see and w-as seen bv everv man of the rebel armv. The Seventeenth was made 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 415 

the guide for the whole line, of which it was the left. After a short, sharp 
engagement and an attempt by the rebels to overwhelm its right, which was 
prevented by the arrival of two guns, which checked the rebels, an order came 
from General Pleasanton to charge along the whole line. After some delay 
the command "forward" was given, and away went the Seventeenth boys. 
With only three hundred men they pushed up in the face of the enemy, who 
moved ofif at their approach, while the center and right were fully half a mile 
in the rear. This was October 25, 1864, and occurred in the vicinity of Fort 
Scott. The lack of forage and the rapid marching caused the loss of more 
than half their horses, and hundreds of miles were traversed by some of the 
Seventeenth on foot. 

The escape of the rebels over the Arkansas line was followed by the 
march of the brigade to Springfield, Missouri. Here orders from headquar- 
ters directed it to proceed southwest to Cassville, Missouri, thence back to 
Rolla, Missouri, which w^as reached by November 15, 1864. During the 
forty-three days intervening the regiment had marched over one thousand 
miles and suffered the loss of six hundred horses. 

In January, 1865, the Seventeenth was ordered to Pilot Knob, Missouri. 
After being remounted it was ordered to Cape Girardeau, Missouri, in April. 

Colonel Beveridge was now breveted brigadier general, and in command 
of Sub-District No. 2, of St. Louis District, headquarters at Cape Girardeau, 
Missouri. Lieutenant Colonel Hynes commanded the regiment. 

A threatened attack on the Union lines was rumored abroad. An expedi- 
tion was sent out, comprising the Seventeenth and some Missouri artillery, 
commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Hynes, late in April, but no enemy was 
found. 

The week following the Seventeenth accompanied commissioners from 
department headquarters with a flag of truce, who reached General Jeff 
Thompson and arranged terms and places for the capitulation of his forces. 

From Cape Girardeau the regiment was ordered to Kansas, and occupied 
detached posts along the plains ; whence they returned to be mustered out in 
November and December, 1865, at Leavenworth, Kansas. 

Their last important work was that of a detachment, accompanying the 
commissioners, who went to Fort Smith to treat with the Indians at the great 
council held in September, 1865. 

The service of the regiment has been wholly within the Department of 
the Missouri, commanded, respectively, by Generals Rosecrans, Dodge and 
Pope. 

While the regiment was stationed at Pilot Knob Major Matlack was 
ordered to St. Louis and assigned to duty as provost marshal. 

From Cape Girardeau Colonel Beveridge was ordered to Warrensburg, 
thence to Kansas City, and thence to Rolla, Missouri. He closed out all the 
military in Missouri south of the Missouri river outside of St. Louis county, 
mustering out the Missouri troops, supervising the removal of military' stores, 
and subjecting the military to the civil authorities when the regiment was 
mustered out. Colonel Beveridge, by order of the secretary of war, was de- 
tained in the service and presided over a military commission in St. Louis for 



416 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

the trial qf rebel offenders against property and persons of the United States. 
He was finally mustered out of the service February 6, 1866, having served 
over four years. 

The Seventeenth was the last cavalry regiment organized in this state. 
Its services were confined chiefly to the Department of the ^lissouri. 

While the regiment did not experience any severe engagements, it per- 
formed hard and valuable services in frequent skirmishes with the enemy, in 
routing guerrilla parties and in long and weary marches. 

As the youngest of the cavalry regiments it is entitled to the respect of 
the older regiments and the gratitude of the state and nation. 

SEVENTEENTH CA\^\LRY REGIMENT. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

Surgeon. 
Samuel K. Crawford, St. Charles; mustered out December 5, 1865. 

Chaplain. 
Edward O. Brien, St. Charles; mustered out November 28, 1865. 

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

Hospital Stczvard. 
Thomas C. Fuller, Blackberry; mustered out December 5, 1865. 

COMPANY A. 

Sergeant. 

David Peterson, Elgin; private; deserted July 3, 1864. 

Bugler. 

Rudolph C. Bowers, St. Charles; discharged March 14. 1865; disability. 

IVagoner. 

Barton Clark, Elgin; discharged September 15, 1865, as private; dis- 
ability. 

Privates. 

Hiram J. Brown, Elgin; discharged to date December 15, 1865, as cor- 
poral. 

Truman Brown, Campton; discharged January 26, 1866, to date Decem- 
ber 15, 1865. 

Wallace Daily, Batavia; deserted July 14, 1865. 

George M. Hayes, Elgin; discharged September 12, 1865. 

George Panton, Elgin; discharged April 8, 1864; minor. 

Seth Phillips. Elgin; discharged to date December 15, 1865. 

Albert Sharpless, St. Charles; discharged to date December 15, 1865. 

Joseph S. Smith, Elgin; discharged to date December 15, 1865. 

Abram P. Taylor. Elgin; discharged to date December 15, 1865. 

Charles L. Treest, Elgin; discharged to date December 15, 1865. 

William H. Treest, Elgin; deserted July 5, 1864. 

Leonard N. Underbill. Elgin; bugler: discharged to date December 15, 
1865. 

Recruit. 

Alonzo Treest, Elgin; discharged to date December 15, 1865. 




FIRST UNIVERSALLST CHURCH. ELGIN, ERECTED IN 1865. 




WASHINGTON SCHOOL, ELGIN. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 419 

COMPANY B. 

Sergeant. 

Charles E. Yerrington. St. Charles; mustered out December 15, 1865, 
as corporal. 

Corporals. 

L^-man D. Murgau. Hampshire; mustered out December 15, 1865, as 
private. 

John German. Geneva; mustered out December 15. 1865, as sergeant. 

Privates. 

David Beebe. Gene\a ; mustered out December 15, 1865, as sergeant. 

George Baker. Hampshire ; corporal ; absent ; wounded at muster out of 
regiment. 

John Burns. Hampshire; mustered out December 15, 1865. 

James Clark, Geneva; mustered out December 15, 1865, as sergeant. 

Ransom Dewolf, Hampshire; mustered out December 15. 1865. 

James Field, Hampshire; mustered out December 15, 1865. 

Jasper Garner, Hampshire; mustered out December 15, 1865. 

Allen Holmon, Aurora; died at Alton, Illinois, August 2, 1864. 

Sevan Hall. Campton; discharged March 16, 1865. 

Samuel Johnson, St. Charles; deserted September 10, 1865. 

Toseph Keller. Rutland; dishonorablv discharged to date December 15, 
1865: 

George Miller, St. Charles; mustered out December 15. 1865. 

George March, St. Charles; discharged September 10, 1865. 

John Patchin, Hampshire; mustered out December 15, 1865, as corporal. 

Edward Pay, Blackberry; mustered out May 15, 1865. 

Samuel P. Root, Blackberry; mustered out December 15, 1865, as 
corporal. 

Arthur N. Root, Blackberry; mustered out December 15, 1865. 

John H. Ream, Hampshire ; in confinement at Fort Leavenworth, Kan- 
sas, on charge of mutiny. 

Nathaniel Roath, Rutland; mustered out December 15, 1865. 

John Shannon, Geneva; deserted September 14, 1865. 

INIorris Stewart, Geneva; discharged September 22, 1864. 

Jacob G. Yote. Hampshire; mustered out December 15, 1865. 

Recruits. 

William P. Aikens. St. Charles; died at St. Charles, Illinois, March 30, 
1864. 

George Daville, Hampshire; mustered out December 15, 1865. 

George E. Hadsall, Hampshire; mustered out December 15, 1865. 

Charles W. Sisson, St. Charles; mustered out December 15, 1865. 

Franklin Stanton, St. Charles: discharged April 5. 1865. 

Linus Simons, St. Charles; died at Alton, Illinois, July 10, 1864. 

COMPANY c. 

Sergeant. 
Fergus Bentley, Blackberry; private; deserted June 18, 1865. 



420 KANE COUNTY IlL^TORY 

Corpora!. 
Christopher McGough, Blackberry; discharged October 23, 1865. 

Privates. 
Samuel Brisbin, \'irgil : mustered out November 23. 1865. 
Charles B. Burns, Blackberry; mustered out November 23, 1865. 
John W. Bell, Hampshire; mustered out May 24, 1865. 
Abram L. Babcock, Hampshire; mustered out November 23, 1865. 
George H. Fuller, Virgil; mustered out November 23, 1865, as bugler. 
Thomas Fuller, Blackberry; promoted hospital steward. 
Phineas B. Gurnsey, Virgil; mustered out November 23, 1865. 
Charles H. March, Blackberry; mustered out November 23, 1865. 
William M. Miner, Blackberry; mustered out November 23, 1865. 

Recruits. 
George Maynard, St. Charles; mustered out November 22,, 1865. 
Richard A. Roberts, St. Charles ; detached at muster out of regiment. 

COMPAXY D. 

Second Lieutenant. 
James B. Reed, St. Charles; mustered out December 20, 1865. 

First Sergeant. 
James B. Reed, St. Charles : promoted second lieutenant. 

Corporal. 
Invin Beach, Virgil; mustered out December 20. 1865, as private. 

Farrier. 
Norman D. Perry, Clintonville; mustered out December 20, 1865. 

Priz'ates. 
John Duncan, \'irgil ; mustered out December 20. 1865. 
Byron McMasters. St. Charles; mustered out December 20, 1865. 
Charles Scranton. St. Charles; mustered out December 20, 1865, 

Recruits. 
Fayette Robinson, St. Charles; deserted June 27, 1864. 
James Tompkins, St. Charles; died at Chicago !May 15, 1864. 

COMPANY E. 

Privates. 

Frederick F. Farson, St. Charles; mustered out November 23, 1865. 

George W. Warner, Batavia : mustered out ^lay 15. 1865. 

Recruits. 

Nathan B. Brown, St. Charles; mustered out November 23, 1865, as 
corporal. 

Byron Brown, St. Charles; mustered out November 23, 1865. 

William L. Cook, St. Charles; mustered out November 23, 1865. 

Edward Darby. St. Charles; mustered out November 23, 1865. 

Joshua Getz, St. Charles; mustered out November 23, 1865. 

Leo Grollment, St. Charles; mustered out November 23, 1865. 

John N. Hill, St. Charles; mustered out November 23, 1865. 

Natlian Kernell, St. Charles; mustered out November 23, 1865, as ser- 
geant. 

Addison Low. St. Charles: nuistered out November 22,. 1865. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 421 

Thomas Price. St. Charles; deserted September 19, 1865. 
Simeon Shaver, St. Charles; mustered out November 23, 1865. 
John W. Snelling, St. Charles; mustered out November 23, 1865. 
Charles Van Sickle, St. Charles; deserted July 16, 1864. 
Henry Wilson, St. Charles ; dishonorably discharged to date November 
22>, 1865. 

COMPANY F. 

Privates. 
Dewitt C. ]\Iyers, Burlington; mustered out December 18, 1865. 
Horatio N. Peavy, Hampshire; mustered out December 18, 1865. 
Horace F. Kinkaid, Aurora; mustered out December 18, 1865. 
Alexander H. Kinkaid. Aurora; discharged September 24, 1865. 
Ramson McClellan, Burlington; died at Alton, Illinois, June 30, 1864. 

COMPANY G. 

Recruit. 
Marshall B. Sherwin, Batavia : discharged January 26, 1866. 

COMPANY H. 

First Lieutenant. 
Charles D. Larribee, Geneva; resigned June 30, 1865. 

Recruit. 
Timothy Donnova, Elgin; mustered out December 15, 1865. 

COMPANY M. 

Private. 
John Phillips, Blackberry; deserted April 19, 1864. 

Recruits. 
Edmund Phillips, St. Charles; mustered out November 23, 1865. 
Walter M. Parker, St. Charles ; absent ; sick at muster out of regiment. 
William R. White, St. Charles; mustered out November 23, 1865. 
George W^illiamson, St. Charles; mustered out November 23, 1865. 
Andrew J. Webb, St. Charles; mustered out November 23, 1865. 

EIRST REGIMENT LIGHT ARTILLERY. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

COMPANY B. 

Veteran. 
Samuel Hadlock. Elgin ; assigned to new Company A. 

Recruit. 
Samuel Hadlock, Elgin ; reenlisted as veteran. 

COMPANY c. 

Recruits. 
Nicholas Clancy. Rutland; mustered out June 12. 1865. 
Joseph Mattelle, Rutland; mustered out June 12, 1865. 
William H. Warner, Rutland; mustered out June 12, 1865. 

COMPANY D. 

Recruits. 
John Doner, Blackberry; mustered out July 28, 1865. 
James Dooley, Blackberry; mustered nut July 28, 1865. 



422 KANE COUXTY HISTORY 

George L. Seeley. Blackberry; mustered out July 28, 1865. 
Lewis Whitmarsh. Virgil; died at \'icksburg June 4. 1863. 

COMPANY H. 

Recruits. 
Peter Nelson. Geneva; deserted April 6, 1862. 
John Tucker, St. Charles; deserted April 30, 1862. 

COMPANY M. 

Private. 
Frank W. Alead (Elgin). ]\lcHenry; mustered out July 24, 1865. 

SECOND REGIMENT LIGHT ARTILLERY. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

BATTERY G. 

Priz'Qtc. 
Martin O'Connell, Blackberry; reenlisted as veteran. 

BATTERY I. 

Corporal. 
Hiram W. Hill. Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

Private. 
Stilman Stolp, Aurora; reenlisted as veteran. 

Veterans. 
Hiram \V. Hill. Aurora; mustered out June 14, 1865, as sergeant. 
Stillman Stolp, Aurora; mustered out June 14. 1865, as corporal. 

Recruits. 
Gordon J. Beverly, Aurora; mustered out June 14, 1865. 
William Ellis. Aurora; mustered out June 14, 1865. 
William G. Hall, Aurora; mustered out June 14, 1865. 
Oron ^Manchester, Aurora; mustered out June 14. 1865. 
William McAllister, Aurora ; transferred to Invalid Corps. 
Judson Parks, Aurora; mustered out June 14, 1865. 
John H. Phelps, Aurora; mustered out June 14, 1865. 
George A. Stolp, Aurora; mustered out June 14, 1865. 
Thomas Saunders, Aurora; mustered out June 14. 1865. 
Perry G. Tripp, Aurora; mustered out June 14, 1865. 
William G. Tabor. Aurora; mustered out June 14, 1865. 
William Usher, Aurora; mustered out June 14. 1865. 

BATTERY L. 

Jabez H. Moore. Geneva; discharged February 20, 1865. 

BATTERY M. 

Unnssigned Recruit. 
George E. Beuerman. Rutland. 

COGSWELL BATTERY LIGHT ARTILLERY. 
(Three Years" Service.) 
Recruits. 
Henry Babcock. Rutland; died. Nashville, February 19, 1865. 
George R. Cox, Rutland. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 423 

RENWICK'S ELGIN BATTERY, LIGHT ARTILLERY. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

Captains. 

George W. Renwick, Elgin; resigned May 27, 1863. 

Andrew M. Wood, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

First Lieutenants. 

Andrew M. Wood, Elgin; promoted captain. 

Caleb Rich, Elgin; mustered out x\pril 27, 1865. 

John Short, Elgin; discharged March 7, 1864. 

Lorin G. Jeffers, Elgin; resigned March 5, 1864. 

Joel H. Wicker, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

Henry E. Tower, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

Second Lieutenants. 

Lorin G. Jeffers, Elgin; promoted senior first lieutenant. 

Waldo W. Paine, Elgin; mustered out April 23, 1863. 

Henry E. Tower, Elgin ; promoted senior second lieutenant. 

Joel H. Wicker, Elgin ; promoted senior first lieutenant. 

Henry E. Tower, Elgin; promoted junior first lieutenant. 

James N. Boutwell, Elgin; mustered out July iS, 1865. 

William \\'. Clift, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

Sergeant Ahijor. 

John Short, Elgin ; promoted first lieutenant. 

First Lieutenant. 

Thomas H. Elliott, Elgin; mustered out July 18. 1865, as private. 
Quartermaster Sergeant. 

Joel H. Wicker, Elgin ; promoted first sergeant, then second lieutenant. 

Sergeants. 

George Daniels, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

Henry Tower, Elgin ; promoted cjuartermaster sergeant, then second 
lieutenant. 

George F. Renwick, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865, as private. 

Corporals. 

Orange B. Kent, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865, as saddler. 

James N. Boutwell, Elgin ; promoted first sergeant, then second lieutenant. 

Charles Dunlap, Elgin; deserted January 15, 1863. 

John W. Davis, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865, as first sergeant. 

William \\'. Clift, Elgin; promoted quartermaster sergeant, then second 
lieutenant. 

Patrick Roland, Elgin; deserted June 12, 1863. 

Michael J. Linch, Elgin; deserted November ig, 1862. 

John Penman, Sr., Elgin; mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Adney B. Strong, Elgin ; in confinement at muster out of battalion. 

Patrick H. Flynn, Elgin; deserted November 17, 1862. 

Nicholas Evans, Elgin ; sergeant ; died at Knoxville. Tennessee, February 
6, 1864. 

Abraham Kaplin, Elgin; deserted Januari- 9, 1863. 



424 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Privates. 
John Ailanis. Elgin; deserted January lo, 1863. 
Henry Allen, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 
William Anderson, Elgin; deserted January 10, 1863. 
James Allen, Elgin; deserted January 10, 1863. 
Horace Albee, Elgin; deserted Jamiary 10, 1863. 
James \V. Brockway, Elgin; discharged for promotion May 20, 1864. 
James Blowers, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

Elias Bennett, Elgin; died at Knoxville, Tennessee, February 28, 1864. 
Daniel Brooks, Elgin; deserted November 30, 1862. 
Peter Berdean, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 
Henry H. Blair, Elgin; discharged September 12, 1862; disability. 
Alex Bailey. Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 
John Burmaster, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 
Nathan Benham, Elgin; deserted October 15, 1862. 
Eugene Bradford, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 
John D. Burg, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 
Stephen Bell, Elgin; mustered out June 24, 1865, as corporal. 
Charles P. Burns, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 
Charles H. Burns. Elgin; deserted January 4, 1863. 
Augustus W. Bunnell, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 
Charles Bockleman, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865, as sergeant- 
\\'illiam Cumming. Elgin ; transferred to Mississippi ^larine Brigade. 
James Collins, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1863. 
Edward D. Clark, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 
Joseph Crane, Elgin; died at Bowling Green, Kentucky, September 21. 
1863. 

James Creen, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

John C. Crew, Elgin : mustered out July 18, 1865, as corporal. 

Duncan Crawford, Elgin ; died, Knoxville, Tennessee, December 25, 1863. 

Richard F. Crawford, Elgin; discharged for promotion October 31. 1863. 

Julius Clark. Elgin: mustered out July 18. 1865. 

Orson H. Crandall. Elgin: discharged for promotion April 2, 1863. 

Frank B. Chadwick, Elgin: deserted September 20, 1862. 

Matthew Corrigan. Elgin; mustered out July 18. 1865. 

Daniel Cullin. Elgin: deserted January 10, 1863. 

Amos Cribbs. Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865, 

Patrick Corbett. Elgin; deserted January 9, 1863. 

Augustus A. Clark, Elgin. 

Thomas Crapo, Elgin; discharged May 2^. 1865, 

Isaac Campbell, Elgin; deserted August 29, 1864. 

James W. Davis, Elgin; deserted November 20, 1862. 

Richard Dovle, Elgin; deserted October 20, 1862. 

Frederick Dowd. Elgin: deserted January 9, 1863. 

James Deane, Elgin: deserted November 20, 1862. 

John Dailey, Elgin; died at Beaufort, South Carolina, April 25. 1865. 

John Dolan, Elgin: mustered out June 2. 1S65. 



KA^E COUNTY HISTORY 425 

Tarvis Dean, Elgin; mustered uiit July 18, 1865, as corporal. 

Andrew Dignan, Elgin; died at Madison, Indiana. May 24, 1864. 

Bela Darrell, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

John Darrell, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865, as bugler. 

Thomas Dwyer, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

James Dignam, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

James Dunlap, Elgin; deserted November 11, 1862. 

James \V. English, Elgin; deserted January 4, 1863. 

William Elmy, Elgin; deserted August 17, 1862. 

John Foley, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

Wellington M. Friend, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865, as sergeant. 

John Forrest, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

Joseph Frangen. Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

Michael Gooden. Elgin; deserted December 17, 1862. 

James E. Green, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

James Grady, Elgin; died at Hartland, Illinois, November 26, 1862. 

Robert B. Graves, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865, as company quar- 
termaster sergeant. 

Daniel Green, Elgin; deserted December 17, 1862. 

Amos Gillette, Elgin; discharged February 19, 1865; disability. 

Charles Heaton, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

Bartholomew Higgins, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865 

Adelbert L. Hooker, Elgin ; transferred to Volunteer Reserve Corps 
April 1 1, 1864. 

John Hessler, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

George Hawkins, Elgin ; in confinement at muster out of battery. 

George Helt, Elgin; deserted November 20, 1862. 

John Harvey, Elgin; deserted December 17, 1862. 

George A. Hanaford, Elgin; discharged January 7. 1864, for promotion. 

John Hughes, Elgin; deserted January 15, 1863. 

George W. Hyde, Elgin ; transferred to Mississippi Marine Brigade. 

[Merrill C. Johnson, Elgin; dropped from rolls January i, 1863. 

William Jones, Elgin; deserted November 19, 1862. 

Thomas Johnson, Elgin; deserted November 19, 1862. 

Levi B. Knapp, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

Michael Kennedy, Elgin ; transferred to \'olunteer Reserve Corps Jan- 
uary. 1863; mustered out July 8, 1865. 

Lewis A. Linda, Elgin ; transferred to Sixth Illinois Battery. 

William Lee. Elgin ; drowned at Knoxville, Tennessee, September 24, 
1864. 

Jerome B. Lick, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

Edward B. Leona, Elgin; deserted October 20, 1862. 

Henry Lange, Elgin; deserted January 9. 1863. 

James McDonald, Elgin: mustered out July 18, 1865. 

Thomas McGuire. Elgin; dropped from rolls November 20, 1862. 

Henry Myer, Elgin; mustered out July 18. 1865, as corporal. 

Lewis Merritt. Elgin; deserted November iq. 1862. 



42(1 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Henry Miller, Elgin'; deserted November 19, 1862. 
Charles Mitchell, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 
George L. Metzig. Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 
John McNish, Elgin; deserted November 19, 1862. 
Daniel McNichol, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 
John W. Mchoney, Elgin; mustered out July 18. 1865, as bugler. 
Edmund Nugent, Elgin; deserted October 20, 1862. 
Alexander Ney, Elgin; mustered out May 27, 1865. 
James Ness, Elgin; deserted November 19. 1862. 
Joseph O'Conner, Elgin; deserted November 19, 1862. 
John O'Brien, Elgin; mustered out July 18. 1865. as sergeant. 
John Powers, Elgin; deserted November 19, 1862. 
Chas. H. Phetteplace, Elgin; discharged August 2, 1864; disabilitv. 
Robert Penman, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 
William Penman, Elgin; mustered out July 18. 1865. 
Thomas S. Peck, Elgin; deserted January 9, 1863. 
Patrick Ouinn, Elgin; absent; sick at mustei out of battalion. 
Joseph Roab. Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 
Charles Reardon, Elgin; died, Chicago, December 13, 1862. 
Frank Robinson, Elgin ; mustered out July 18. 1865. 
James Roche. Elgin; deserted November 15. 1862. 
James Riley, Elgin; deserted November 15, 1862. "" 

George W. Sherwood, Elgin: deserted September 30. 1862. 
Harvey J. Sherwood, Elgin ; absent ; sick at muster out of battalion. 
Russell M. Skeels. Elgin; discharged April 3, 1863; disability. 
Frederick Stone, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865, as corporal. 
Robert Stafford, Elgin: deserted November 19. 1862. 
Robert N. Stephens. Elgin; deserted December 20, 1862. 
Albert Sherman, Elgin; dropped from rolls January i, 1863. 
Hein-y Smith. Elgin: mustered nut July 18, 1865. 
Samuel Smith. Elgin; deserted November 19, 1862. 
Charles H. Shrader. Elgin; absent; sick at muster out of battalion. 
Erasmus R. Taylor, Elgin: discharged September 25, 1863; disability. 
Robert R. Thompson, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1863. 
Frederick Thompson, Elgin; deserted December 20. 1862. 
lames Thompson, Elgin; transferred to Ninth Illinois Infantry January . 
1863". 

Raymond O. Usher, Elgin; dropped from rolls January 9. 1863. 

Chas. Van Landschoot, Elgin; mustered out July 18. 1865. 

John Walsh, Elgin; mustered out July 18. 1865, as corporal. 

Samuel S. Wytey, Elgin; mustered nut June 21, 1865. 

Albert C. Ward, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865, as corporal. 

George R. Wells, Elgin: mustered out July 18, 1863. 

John Zarr, Elgin; mustered out July 18. 1863. 

Recruits. 
Samuel Armstrong. Elgin; deserted January 12, 1863. 
James Bradley, Elgin: discharged June 18. 1863 : disability. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 427 

Kellogg C. Bartlett, Elgin: mustered out July i8, 1S65. 

George H. Darrow, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865, as sergeant. 

Alanson F. Darrow, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

Joseph L. Dodd, Elgin; mustered out July 20. 1865. 

Samuel Dashway, Elgin; deserted June i, 1863. 

Milton Earing, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865, as corporal. 

E. J. Farnam, Elgin. 

John Graham, Elgin ; died at Loudon Station, Tennessee, September 27, 
1863. 

F. B. Hemmingway, Elgin; deserted November 20, 1862. 
William Hanlon, Elgin; deserted January 9, 1863. 
Patrick Hughes, Elgin; deserted December 17, 1862. 

D. W. Hewitt, Elgin. 

Eugene Kennedy. Elgin ; died at Camp Nelson, Kentucky, February 8, 
1864. 

Henry H. Lewis, Elgin ; mustered out July 18, 1865, as sergeant. 

George A. Lowe, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

Michael McGown. Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

Amos Mead, Elgin. 

Alexander H. Ni.xon, Elgin. 

Joseph C. Otwell, Elgin; transferred to \'olunteer Reserve Corps; mus- 
tered out July 15. 1865. 

Nicholas Oswell. Elgin; deserted January 9, 1863. 

John Peters, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

Charles Reed. 

Loren Ramsdell. 

John Sweeny, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865, as corporal. 

John Turney, Elgin; mustered out July 8, 1865. 

Eldridge H. Thompson, Elgin; absent; sick at muster-out of battalion. 

Nathan Taylor, Elgin; discharged September 25. 1863; disability. 

John Ward, Elgin; mustered out July 18, 1865. 

Asa W'est. Elgin; deserted May 22. 18G3. 

HENSHAWS B.\TTERY. 

( Three Years' Service. ) 

Privates. 

John Christian, Aurora; discharged August 9. 1864. 

Alden R. Seaman, Rutland; died. Ottawa. Illinois. March i. 1863. 

Oscar Savory, Rutland; mustered out July 18. 1865. 

Recruit. 
Ole Mickelson. Rutland; mustered out July 18. 1865. 

TWENTY-NINTH REGIMENT UNITED STATES COLORED 

INFANTRY. 
(Three Years' Service.) 

Unassigned Recruit. 
Jordan Stewart, Batavia. 



428 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

UNITED STATES COLORED RECRUIT. 

FIFTY-NINTH UNITED STATES COLORED INFANTRY. 

Henry ]\Iason, Kane county. 

FIRST ARMY CORPS. 

ENLISTED MEN OF COMPANY NO. 3. 

Assigned to Company H, Second Regiment, United States Veteran Volunteers. 
Joseph Rivers, ^Montgomery ; mustered out February i8, 1866. 
Alexander Thompson, Montgomery; mustered out February 21, 1866. 

ENLISTED MEN OF COMPANY NO. 4. 

Assigned to Company B, Fourth United States Veteran Volunteers. 
Benjamin N. Alartin, Rutland; mustered out March 2, 1866. 

ENLISTED MEN OF COMPANY NO. 7. 

Assigned to Company B, Fiftli Regiment, United States Veteran Volunteers. 
John H. Fleming, Geneva; mustered out March 15, 1866, as sergeant. 

ENLISTED MEN OF COMPANY' NO. 9. 

Assigned to Company D, Sixth Regiment, United States Veteran Volunteers. 
Grove Arnold, Aurora; mustered out April 3, 1866. 
Thomas Bexan. Aurora; mustered out April 3, 1866. 
John Jordan. Aurora; mustered out April 3, 1866. 
Charles Peland, Aurora; mustered out April 3. 1866, as corporal. 

ENLISTED MEN OF COMPANY NO. ID. 

Assigned to Company K. Eighth Regiment. United States Veteran Volunteers. 
William Brown. ^Montgomery; mustered out April 11, 1866. 
Frederick H. Duve, Montgomery; mustered out April 11, 1866. 
Jeremiah Felix, ^lontgomery; mustered out April 18, 1865. 
James M. Gardner, Alontgomery ; mustered out April 12, 1866. 
Lewis N. S. Truck, Montgomery; mustered out April 11, 1866. 
William Tappen. Montgomery: mustered out April 11, 1866. 

RECRUITS FOR THE REGULAR ARMY. 

THIRTEENTH UNITED STATES INFANTRY. 

John Almon, Kane county. 
Walter Aitkins, Kane county. 
Isaac Bogarth, Sugar Grove. 
W'illiam Blubois, Kane county. 
Henry Brown. Kane county. 
Alexander Brown, Kane county. 
Frederick Carlson, Kane county. 
Henry Carr, Kane county. 
Peter Cress. Kane county. 
Asa J. Cook. Kane county. 
George W. Deiler. Kane county. 
Timothy Dwyer, Kane county. 
Donald Fisher. Kane county. 
John E. Gainey, Kane county. 
John Greeley. Kane county. 



KANE COUXTY HISTOEY 429 



Charles Henry, Kane county. 
Jay W. Hyatt, Kane county. 
Asa T. Howland, Kane county. 
William Hughes, Aurora. 
David W. Johnson, Kane county. 
Samuel Johnson, Kane county. 
Charles D. Kelley, Kane county. 
John H. Logan, Kane county. 
Ferdinand Long, Kane county. 
John Laux, Kane county. 
Michael Murphy, Kane county. 
Charles ^Marshall, Kane county. 
John O'Farrell, Kane county. 
William Owler, Kane county. 
Cornelius Olson, Kane county. 
Charles A. Porter, Kane county. 
Owen Poulson. Kane county. 
John Peterson, Kane county. 
James H. Russell, Kane county. 
Albert G. Riley. Sugar Grove. 
John T. Rogers. Kane county. 
Henry J. Rugg, Aurora. 
James Sweeney, Montgomery. 
Oliver F. Shead, Kane county. 
Olof Silverord, Kane county. 
Xavier Schmidt, Sugar Grove. 
John Sanders, Kane county. 
John E. Seeley, Kane county. 
Frank \\'illiamson, Kane county. 
\\'illiam W'alls, Kane county. 
Anders Wetters, Kane county. 
LeRo}' Waller, Kane county. 



Rcgiiiuiit Not Designated. 
Henry Morris Deal, Plato. 

SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR. 

HISTORY OF THE THIRD REGIMENT INFANTRY, ILLINOIS 

VOLUNTEERS. 

Regiment was enrolled April 26, 1898, and mustered into the service for 
two years. May 7, 1898. at Camp Tanner, Springfield, Illinois. Left Camp 
Tanner and arrived at Chickamauga Park May 16, 1898; arrived at Newport 
News July 24, 1898: sailed on St. Louis for Porto Rico July 25, 1898: 
arrived Ponce. P. R.. July 31. 1898; landed at Arroyo August 2, 1898, under 
slight resistance by Spanish. Participated in engagement at Guayama, August 
5, 1898; north of Guayama August 8 and 13, 1898: outpost duty north of 
Guayama till October i, 1898; in camp east of Guayama until November 2, 



430 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

1898; embarked on Roumania for New York November 2, 1898, and sailed 
November 3, 1898, arriving November 9. 1898. Ordered to home stations 
via railroad, arriving November 11. 1898. The regiment was mustered out 
at JoHet, IlUntjis. January J4. 1899. 

THIRD REGIMENT INFANTRY. 
(Two Years' Service.) 
Major. 
Joseph B. Caughey, Elgin; mustered out January 24. 1899. 

Assistant Surgeon. 
Carlton E. Starrett, Elgin; mustered out Januarv 24. 1899. 

Battalion Adjutant. 
George E. Houck, Elgin; mustered out Januarv 24. 1899. 

Band. 
Albert Hagopean, Elgin; transferred from Company E; mustered out 
January 24, 1899. 

Winfield S. Leidig, Elgin ; transferred from Company E ; mustered out 
January 24, 1899. 

Etinne Noiret, Elgin ; transferred from Company E ; mustered out 
January 24, 1899. 

Alfred J. Scarisbrick, Elgin; transferred from Company E; mustered out 
January 24, 1899. 

Leonard Schoeberlein, Aurora ; transferred from Company A ; mustered 
out January 24. 1899. 

COMPANY A. 

Priz-ates. 

Joseph Farrell, Elgin; transferred to Company E May 11, 1898. 

Roy Fisk, Elgin; transferred to Company E May 11. 1898. 

Fred H. Fricke, Aurora ; transferred from Company C ; transferred to 
Reserve Corps Ambulance. 

Joseph Howard, Elgin; transferred to Company E May 11, 1898. 

Thomas F. McCarthy, Elgin; transferred to Company E ]May 11, 1898. 

William H. Snyder. Aurora; transferred to Companv D May 11, 1898. 

Jacob Schrepfer, Elgin; transferred to Company E May 11, 1898. 

Leonard Schoeberlein, Aurora ; transferred from Company F ; transferred 
to Regiment Band May ir. 1898. 

COMPANY c. 

Privates. 
Adolph R. Bergeman, Aurora: transferred to Company I May 11, 1898. 
Robert M. Dyer. Aurora: transferred to Company I May 11, 1898. 
William E. Ferriere, Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11, i8g8. 
Fred H. Fricke, Aurora: transferred to Company A ^lay 13, 1898. 
Charles O. Miller, Aurora; transferred to Company I ^lay 11, 1898. 
Adolph Martin, Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11, 1898. 
John Paulus, Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11, 1898. 
Mont L. Robinson, Aurora: transferred to Company I ^lay 11, 1898. 
Sam F. Stiilson, Aurora: transferred to Company I May 11, 1898. 




FOUXTAIX SQUARE SHOWING FOUXTAIN. 




NOON AT WATCH FACTORY, ELGIN. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 433 

COMPANY D. 

Captai>i. 
John L. Graves, Aurora: mustered out January i8, 1899. 

First Licntenmit. 
Fred L. Thatcher, Aurora ; absent ; sick at muster out of regiment. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Charles F. Spicer, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

First Sergeant. 
John H. Simmons, Aurora ; mustered out January 18, 1899, as sergeant. 

Quartermaster Sergeant. 
WiUiam H. Snyder, Aurora; transferred from Company A; mustered 
out January 18, 1899. 

Sergeants. 
Warren O. Lintner, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
George R. Pulford, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899, as private. 

Corporals. 
Frank Davis, Aurora; promoted sergeant May 7, 1898; mustered out 
January 18, 1899. 

Ellis Ames, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
Walter T. Grant, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899, as private. 
Arthur C. Russell, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
Dale E. Lanigan, Aurora; promoted first sergeant June 17, 1898; mus- 
tered out January 18, 1899. 

John F. Helslag, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
Archie G. Sylvester, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Musician. 
Harry Marvin, Aurora; mustered out January 18. 1899. 

Priz'ates. 
Stephen A. Boone, Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11. 1898. 
W. H. Branson, Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11, 1898. 
John Burkel. Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11, 1898. 
Charles E. Brown, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
Grover W. Breese, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
Thomas Blair. Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
LaFontaine Cooley, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
James M. Cornell, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
Frank L. Drew. Elgin ; transferred from Company I ; promoted corporal 
June 17, 1898; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

James W. Dunlap, Aurora; promoted corporal June 17. 1898; mustered 
out January 18. 1899. 

Fred Dano. Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11. 1898. 
George Dunn, Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11, 1898. 
Jesse C. Eatinger. Geneva: mustered out January 18. 1899. 
George Fanble; Aurora; promoted corporal May 7. 1898; mustered out 
January 18, 1899. 

Ray R. Fisk, Elgin : transferred from Company E ; mustered out January 
18, 1899. 



434 KAXE COUNTY HISTORY 

John A. Farrell. Elgin; transferred to Company E May 12, 1898. 

Joseph Farrell, Elgin; transferred from Company E; mustered out Jan- 
uary 18. 1899. 

John Gabrielson. Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Ralph Gharet. Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11, 1898. 

George Gharet. Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11, 1898. 

Charles O. Hendricker, Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11, 1898. 

Albert \\'. Hendricker. Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11, 1898. 

George Hamell. Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11. 1898. 

Charles J. Johnson, Aurora ; transferred to Company I May 1 1. 1898. 

Peter Johnson. Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11. 1898. 

John Jackson, Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11. 1898. 

Clarence B. Knight, Aurora; mustered out January 18. 1899. 

John N. Kramer, Aurora; mustered out Januan,- 18, 1899. 

Edward G. Karl, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Roy E. Knight, Aurora; transferred to Company I ilay 11. 1898. 

Lawrence Krantz, Aurora; transferred to Company I ^lay 11, 1898. 

Charles F. Kuehn. Aurora; transferred to Company I ilay 11, 1898. 

Anthony J. Love, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Charles Leidberg, Aurora; mustered out January 18. 1899. 

Emil Larson. Batavia; mustered out January 18. 1899. 

George Law, Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11, 1899. 

George H. Lippold, Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11, 1899. 

Claude LaSure, Aurora; mustered out January 18. 1899. 

John Maher, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Alex Menz. Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Edward McGinnis, Aurora; mustered out January 18. 1899. 

Fred Martin, Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11, 1898. 

Fred A. Martin, Aurora; transfered to Company I May 11, 1898. 

Lester K. Oakley. Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11, 1898. 

Robert H. Ostrander. St. Charles; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Charles Pfister, Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11, 1899. 

Edward Pfister, Aurora; transferred to Company I !May 11. 1899. 

Elmer Phillips, Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11. 1899. 

Charles F. Phillips, Aurora; promoted corporal June 17, 1898; mustered 
out January 18, 1899. 

Frank E. Pagel. Aurora; mustered out January 18. 1899. 

Eugene A. Pierce, Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11, 1898. 

James Robinson, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
Frank Resetter, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
Edmund Russ, Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11. 1898. 

James A. Sherwood, Aurora; promoted corporal May 7, 1S98; mustered 
out January 18, 1899. 

William Stratton, Aurora; mustered out January 18. 1899. 
Emil Stegmann. Aurora; promoted artificer May 20, 1898; mustered out 
January 18, 1899. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 435 

Jacob Schrepfer, Elgin; transferred from Company E; mustered out 
January i8, 1899. 

Charles Swahn, Batavia; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Arthur Streed, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Edward G. Schairer, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Louis E. Shoger, Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11, 1898. 

Frank Seigmund, Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11, 1898. 

Ernest J. Thill, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Raymond White, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Clare Weaver, Batavia; transferred to Company I May 11, 1898. 

John C. Weiland, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
Transferred from Company I. 

Joseph Apple, Elgin; transferred to Company E May 12, 1898; mustered 
out January 18, 1899. 

Frank Burns, Batavia; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Martin Bickler, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Claude C. Colie, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Clare E. Coburn, Elgin; transferred to Company E May 12, 1898. 

Harry W. Dean, Elgin; transferred to Company E May 12, 1898. 

Albert H. Drew, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Lewis A. Drake, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Harry F. Dyer, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Henry B. Damon, Elgin; died November 25, 1898, Chicago. 

Harry H. Elmore, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Frank M. Gillis, Elgin; transferred to Company E May 12, 1898. 

Chester S. Goddard, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Claude C. Hayford. Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Rudolph Hansen, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Harry Howard, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Charles Jefferies, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Bert Kiser, Elgin: mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Gustave Krueger, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Emil Mattson, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Otto Messner, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Wm. McCarthy, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Frank McQueeny. Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Richard E. Nass, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

John J. Nepomuck, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Herman C. Niss, Elgin ; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Edward Runge, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Henry C. Rahn, Elgin; deserted July 5, 1898, Chickamauga Park, 
Georgia. 

John Schrepfer, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

John W. S. Soost, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

William A. Thompson, transferred to Company E May 12, 1898. 

Hugh G. Taylor, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Chas. C. Zimmerman, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 



436 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Recruits. 

Lester S. Allen, Elgin; mustered out January i8, 1899. 

Bert C. Drake, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

William C. Flaherty, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

William T. Gleason, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

William A. Haywood, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Dennis Hennessey, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Oscar H. Hamilton, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Gustave Johnson, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Nelson W. Johnson, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Maurice Kundert, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Alfonso Lapoint, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Fred Lackey, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

George P. McKee, Aurora; promoted corporal July 5, 1898; mustered 
out January 18, 1899. 
/ Eugene P. Morean, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

John J. Murphy, Geneva; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

James E. Moore, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Charles H. Pruett, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Fred W. Pruett, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Michael Rausch, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Charles M. Smith. Aurora; promoted musician October i, 1898; mustered 
out January 18, 1899. 

Charles F. Soules, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Adam Thiel, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Otis E. Walbaum, Elgin; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

COMPANY E. 

Captain. 
Benjamin E. Gould. Elgin: mustered out January 13, 1899. 

First Lieutenant. 
Jacob Bodee, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Frederick J. Smailes. Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

First Sergeant. 
James E. King, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Quartermaster Sergeant. 
Burton R. Dodge, Elgin; mustered out January 13. 1899. 

Sergeants. 
Charles F. Krueger, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 
William E. Gieske, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 
Walter Hanchet, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 
Ralph Hawthorne, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Corporals. 
William C. Marvyne, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 
Charles D. Fuller, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1869. 
Edward C. Joslyn. Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 
Roy Slocum, Elgin: mustered out January 13, 1899, as private. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 437 

Jesse L. Prime, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Charles A. Bode, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Guy W. E. Graham, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

John W. Dame, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Frank Zorno, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

James W. Rodgers, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Wagoner. 

Joseph E. Edwards, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Musicians. 

Oscar L. Adams, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Clarence H. Eames, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Privates. 

Arthur E. Arvedson, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Albert W. Anderson, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Henry W. Batterman, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

George W. Brown, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Arthur S. Butler, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Carl C. Bonner, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

George E. Breidster, Elgin; discharged September 29, 1898; O. W. D. 

John D. Bruce, Elgin; transferred to Company A May 11, 1898. 

Justus A. Carpenter, Elgin; died November i, 1898, Elgin, Illinois. 

Ervie W. Colton, Elgin; mustered out January 13. 1899. 

M. W. Cloudman, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Clarence E. Cash, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Ira A. Carswell, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Walter E. Dewis, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Theo. S. Erickson, Elgin; mustered out January 13. 1899. 

William J. Eyre, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Charles Edwards, Elgin; transferred to Company A May 11, 1B98. 

Frank B. Foote, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1898. 

George E. Fleming, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1898. 

Donald Gaylord, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1898. 

Joseph Howard, Elgin; transferred from Company A; mustered out 
January 13, 1898. 

Lester D. Hardiman, Elgin; promoted corporal July 14, 1898; mustered 
out January 13, 1899. 

James S. Hippie, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

William A. Hawley, Dundee; promoted corporal July 14, 1898; mustered 
out January 13, 1899. 

Max Heineman, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Albert Hagopean, Elgin; transferred to Regiment Band May 20, 1898. 

George R. Knott, Elgin; mustered out January 13. 1899. 

August E. Krogsrud, Elgin; mustered out January 13. 1899. 

Winfield S. Leidig, Dundee; transferred to Regiment Band June 7, 1898. 

Charles T. Lincoln, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

John A. Moore, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Clarence T. Manville, Elgin: mustered dut January 13. 1899. 



438 KANE COUNTY HISTOKY 

Arthur C. INlann, Dundee; mustered rjut January 13, 1899. 

Patrick F. Moore, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Edwin M. McDowell, Elgin; promoted corporal July 14, 1898; mustered 
out January 13. 1899. 

Albert C. Marcellus, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Thomas F. McCarthy, Elgin; transferred from Company A; mustered 
out January 13, 1899. 

Nels Nelson, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Ivan A. Olson, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Joseph Patt, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Robert Pumleigh, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Carl E. Peterson, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Benjamin H. Rendell, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Albert A. Sederstram, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Stephen A. Stuart, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

John W. Sponholtz, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Fred Schoeberlein, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

John Scheflow, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Alfred J. Scarisbrick, Elgin; transferred to Regiment Band May 20, 
^898. 

Henry F. Volstorft", Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

William H. Welsby, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

John G. Westveer. Elgin; mustered out January 13. 1899. 

Edward A. York, Elgin; transferred to United States Hospital Corps 
June 4, 1898; S. O. No. 26. 

Transferred from Co)iipany I. 

Alfred S. Bennorth, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Stuart Barlow, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Edward G. Daugherty. Elgin; mustered out January 13. 1899. 

Chas. E. Hunt, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Clair E. Colburn, Elgin; died September 23, 1898, Guayama, P. R. 

Carleton C. Taylor. Elgin; mustered out January 13. 1899. 

Marceus Veure, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1S99. 
Transferred from Company D. 

Joseph Apple, Elgin: mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Harry W. Dean, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

John Farrel, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Frank N. Gilles, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Wm. A. Thompson, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Recruits. 

George O. Apple. Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Fred E. Barnes, Elgin; mustered out January 13. 1899. 

Walter H. Brown, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

Albert H. Chapman, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

August E. Frank. Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

William E. Foster. Elgin; mustered out January 13. 1899. 

James C. Humphrey, Elgin; mustered out January 13. 1899. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 439 

James F. Hennessey, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 
Fred H. Meister, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 
Etienne Noiret, Elgin; transferred to band July 20, 1898. 
Frank D. Newton, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 
Edward Paul, Elgin ; mustered out January 13,1 899. 
Harry A. Quackenbush, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 
Guy D. Reid, Hampshire; mustered out January 13, 1899. 
John D. Smith, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 
Fred E. Seymour, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 
Ray W. Shultz, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 
Frank W. Sawyer, Dundee; mustered out January 13, 1899. 
Adolph C. Stover, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 
Fred S. Smith, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 
Harry Wendell, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 
Ulysses J. Wanemaker, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 
Park J. Whipple, Elgin; mustered out January 13, 1899. 

COMPANY F. 

Private. 
Leonard P. Schoeberlein, Aurora; transferred to Company A May II, 
1898. 

COMPANY G. 

Corporal. 
Laverne I. Dolph, Elgin; mustered out January 14, 1899. 

Privates. 
Edgar D. Beebe, Elgin; died May 16, 1898, at Springfield, Illinois. 
Mark Conley, Elgin ; transferred from Company I ; mustered out January 
14, 1899. 

Carey A. Dolph, Elgin; transferred from Company I; mustered out 
January 14, 1899. 

Lee J. Laurie, Aurora; transferred to Company I May 11, 1898. 

COMPANY I. 

Captain. 
Charles N. Greene, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

First Lieutenant. 
William Kline, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Second Lieutenant. 
Albert Lindsey, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1898. 

Privates. 
Robert L. Angell, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
Joseph F. Apple, Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 
John W. Althen, Elgin; transferred to Company D May li, 1898. 
Louis Andrews, St. Charles; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
James A. Bedford, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
Alfred Bedfard, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
Frank Burns, North Aurora; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 
Alfred S. Bennorth, Elgin; transferred to Company E May 11, 1898. 
Stuart Barlow. Elgin; transferred to Company E May 11, 1898. 



440 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Martin Bickler, Elgin; transferred to Company D May ii, 1898. 

Charles Coon, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

William Calahan, Aurora; promoted corporal July 19, 1898; mustered 
out January 18, 1899. 

Harry Cowan, Aurora; transferred to Company B June 8, 1898. 

Mark Conley, Elgin; transferred to Company G May 11, 1898. 

Clare E. Coburn. Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

Glen F. Collins, St. Charles; discharged May 17, 1898; S. O. No. 115. 

Claud C. Colie, Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

Louis A. Drake. Aurora: transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

Seth Dyer, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Frank Drew, Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

Edward G. Dougherty. Elgin; transferred to Company E July 19, 1898. 

Albert H. Drew, Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

Henry B. Damon. Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

Harry W. Dean. Elgin: transferred to Company D ^lay 11, 1898. 

Harry F. Dyer, Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

Carey Dolph, Elgin: transferred to Company G May 11, 1898. 

Fred Eardley, Aurora; promoted corporal July 19. 1898; mustered out 
January 18, 1899. 

Harry H. Elmore, Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11. 1898. 

Henry Greiner. Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Chester S. Goddard, Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11. 1898. 

Frank M. Gillis. Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

J. L. Gulig, St. Charles; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Henry Hedin, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Cornelius Holdren. Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Albert Hippe. Aurora: discharged August 3, 1898; S. O. No. 181. 

William F. Herlehy, Aurora; transferred to Hospital Corps September i, 
1898. 

Rudolph Hanson, Elgin; transferred to Company D Islay 11, 1898. 

Harry Howard, Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

Oscar Hegland. St. Charles; mustered out January 18. 1899. 

Charles E. Hunt, Elgin; transferred to Company E May 11, 1898. 

Claude A. Hayford. Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

William A. Jerl, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Charles Joslyn, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Joseph Johnson, Aurora; mustered out January 18. 1899. 

Charles Jeffries, Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

John Kolf. Aurora; mustered out January 18. 1899. 

Gus A. Krueger. Elgin: transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

Burt Kaiser. Elgin; transferred to Company D Maj' 11, 1898. 

Charles Kingburg. Batavia; mustered out January 18. 1899. 

Fred E. Landburg. Aurora; mustered out January 18. 1899. 

John Lorang. Aurora; mustered out January 18. 1899. 

Lee J. Loria. Aurora: transferred from Company G; mustered out Jan- 
uary 18. 1899. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY .444 

William C. Alunson, Aurora; mustered out January i8, 1899. 

Charles Monroe, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

John McCarthy, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Waldo Mills, Aurora; transferred to Hospital Corps June 13, 1898. 

Otto Messner, Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

Emil Mattson, Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

William McCarthy. Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

Frank M. McOueeny, Elgin; transferred to Company D May II, 1898. 

Herman C. Niss, Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

Richard Nass, Elgin; transferred to Company D May il, 1898. 

John J. Nepomick, Aurora; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

Fred Parks, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Alexander Plant, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Lee Ryan, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Henry C. Rhan, Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

Edward Runge, Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

Henry Rowcliff, Batavia; mustered out January 18, 1898. 

John W. S. Soost, Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

John Schrepfer, Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

Hugh C, Taylor, Elgin; transferred to Company D May il, 1898. 

William A. Thompson, Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

Carlton C. Taylor, Elgin; transferred to Company E May li, 1898. 

Marcus Veuve, Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 

John Wantz, Aurora ; mustered out January 1 8, 1 899. 

Chas. Zimmerman, Elgin; transferred to Company D May 11, 1898. 
Transferred from Company D. 

Jolm Burkel, Aurora ; promoted corporal, then sergeant, then quarter- 
master sergeant, November 3, 1898; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

William H. Branson, Aurora; promoted sergeant May 11, 1898; mus- 
tered out January 18, 1899. 

Stephen Boone, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

John Custer, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

George Dunn, Aurora; promoted corporal August 16, 1898; mustered 
out January 18, 1899. 

George Gharet, Aurora; promoted corporal July 19, 1898; mustered out 
January 18, 1899. 

Ralph Gharet, Aurora; promoted corporal June 17, 1898; mustered out 
Januan,' 18, 1899. 

George Harnell, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Albert W. Hendricker, Aurora; promoted sergeant, then first sergeant, 
May II, 1898; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Fred Dano, Aurora; promoted corporal May 20, 1898; mustered out 
January 18, 1899. 

Lawrence Krantz, Aurora; promoted corporal August 11, 1898; mustered 
out January 18, 1899. 

George A. Law, Aurora; promoted sergeant May 11, 1898; mustered out 
January 18, 1899. 



442 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Peter Johnston, Batavia; mustered out January i8, 1899. 

Charles Johnston, Batavia; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

John Jackson, Geneva; mustered out January iS, 1899. 

Chas. F. Kuehn, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Roy E. Knight, Aurora; mustered cut January 18, 1899. 

George H. Lippold, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Thomas Manion, Aurora; promoted corporal May 26, 1898; mustered 
out January 18, 1899. 

Fred A. Martin, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Fred Martin, Aui:ora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Lester K. Oakley, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Elmer Phillips, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Charles Pfister, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

A. Eugene Pierce, North Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Edmond Russ, Aurora; promoted corporal July 19, 189S; mustered out 
January 18, 1S99. 

Henry Russ, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Edward Pfister, Aurora; promoted sergeant May 11, 1898; mustered out 
January 18, 1899. 

Clare Weaver, Batavia; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Frank Wellman, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Frank Seigmund, Aurora; discharged September 15, 1898; disability, 
out January 18, 1899. 

Louis E. Shoyer, Aurora; promoted musician May 11, 1898; mustered 
Transferred from Company C 

Adolph R. Bergeman, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Robert M. Dyer, Aurora; died June 8, 1898, at Ch'cakamauga Park, 
Georgia. 

Chas. O. Miller, Aurora; promoted corporal May 11, iSg6; mustered 
out January 18, 1899. 

Adolph Martin, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

John Paulus, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Mont L. Robinson, Aurora; promoted corporal May 26, 1898. 

Sam F. Stilson, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

W. E. Ferriere, Aurora; promoted artificer June 11, 1898; mustered out 
January 18, 1899. 

Recruits. 

John Dehn, Aurora; promoted corporal August 11, 1898; mustered out 
January 18, 1899. 

Alexander Dissell, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

William Edwards, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Arthur H. Fuller, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Chrib Hennes, Aurora; died September 22, 1898, at Guayama, P. R. 

Rufus Lincoln. Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Wm. McNally, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

James McCullom, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 

Frank H. Michaels, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 




HIGHLAND AVENUE BRETHREN CHURCH, ELGIN, 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 445 

John Rousell, Aurora; mustered out January i8, 1899. 
Byron Rogers, Aurora: mustered out January 18, 1899. 
Walter S. Shackley. Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
George Schneider. Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
Frank G. Sperry, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
Mathew Schmit, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
Jacob C. Trumbull, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
Edward Whitmore, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 
Fred Young, Aurora; mustered out January 18, 1899. 



CHAPTER XVHI. 



POLITICAL. 



The political complexion of the county of Kane for many years from the 
date of its organization was democratic. At the first presidential election, in 
1836, the county polled 334 votes, of which the democrats cast 235 and the 
whigs 93. At the general election of August 6, 1838, Thomas Cralin, demo- 
crat, received 511 votes for governor, and Cyrus Edwards, whig, 323. B. F. 
Fridley was elected sheriff on the same ticket by a clear majority of 301 over 
both his whig opponents, Leonard Howard and William L. Church, and two 
out of the three commissioners were also democrats. The tide was turned in 
1840. when the exciting Harrison campaign brought out a vote of 1,584, the 
whigs carrying the county by a majority of 36. The lead was reversed in 
August, 1842, when out of a total vote of 1,240 Thomas Ford, democratic 
candidate for governor, received 750; Joseph Duncan, whig, 457, and Charles 
W. Hunter, the first candidate of the liberty party, 32. Of the liberty votes 
13 were cast in St. Charles and 6 in Elgin. This was the beginning of the 
wonderful action against slavery and its ills, which was brought to full fruition 
by the ever memorable Emancipation Proclamation in 1863. To be an aboli- 
tionist in those days meant far more than a casual glance at the printed word 
today could possibly reveal, an abolitionist then being considered no more 
favorably than is a socialist now. 

In August, 1843, John Wentworth, democrat, beat Giles Spring, whig, 
247 votes for congress in Kane county. In 1844, at the presidential election, 
the fight was hot, and resulted in the democrats polling 1,046 votes, the whigs 
748. and the liberal party 299. In March, 1848, the county cast 1,108 votes 
for the new constitution and 348 against; and upon the question of a two-mills 
tax, for the support of schools, the 221 persons who in their blindness voted 
against it were overwhelmed by the 1,176 who were wiser and voted for it. 
At the general election in August following, B. C. Yates, whig, was elected 
sheriff, but John F. Farnsworth, liberty candidate for state senator, was 
defeated by William B. Plato, democrat. John Wentworth was reelected to 
congress, his competitors being J. Young Scammon, whig, and Owen Lovejov, 
liberty candidate. The latter received 418 votes, which showed that the little 



440 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

seed sown in 1S42 was growing. Aside from the three regular tickets there 
were two others in the I'leld, a "people's" ticket and the "barn-burners" or 
Van Buren nominations. Mr. Yates was elected upon the people's ticket, as 
was also Charles B. Wells, for circuit clerk. Wentworth's majority for con- 
gress in the county was 368, which was only exceeded by Lake, LaSalle and 
DeKalb. The district (fourth) was then composed of the counties of Cook, 
Lake, McHenry, Boone, DuPage, Kane, DeKalb, Kendall, Will, Grundy, 
LaSalle, Bureau, Livingston, Champaign, McLean, Vermilion and Iroquois — 
seventeen in all. Among the candidates for circuit judge were Theophilus L. 
Dickey of Ottawa, and Onslow Peters, of Peoria. The latter withdrew and 
Mr. Dickey was elected. The death of this estimable gentleman and able 
judge occurred July 22, 1885. At the presidential election in 1848 the heaviest 
vote was polled which up to that time the county had given — 2,858. 

In 1849 the democratic ticket was again successful in the county. By 
1850 the whig party had gained such strength that it began to make itself 
heard and felt. At a whig meeting held at Geneva, August 10, 1850, Leonard 
Howard was chairman and T. C. Moore, secretary. Other prominent whigs, 
whose names appear in the record of this meeting, were B. C. Yates, M. V. 
Hall, Ira H. Fitch, Wm. Debit, Charles Clark, Thomas H. Thompson, C. F. 
Buck, A. C. Gibson, Peter Sears, L. A. Norton and Dr. Tyler. Resolutions 
were adopted opposing the extension of slavery in any manner; endorsing 
Daniel Webster's remarks on the subject of slavery; approving Senator 
Seward's course on the slave question; lauding the dead president, Zachary 
Taylor (died July 9, 1850), for his manly and judicious course; and expressing 
confidence in the then president, Millard Fillmore ; also favoring a free bank- 
ing system in Illinois, "in which the interests of the bill holder shall be under 
all circumstances fully and completely secured." 

The people of Kane county condemned in strong language the fugitive 
slave act, passed by congress in 1850. Mass meetings were held and resolu- 
tions adopted opposing the act, and asserting that "the doctrine of property in 
man is directly opposed to the principles of our government, at war with 
Christianity, and repugnant to the common sense of mankind." The previous 
heavy democratic majorities in the county were so reduced in 1850 that the 
greatest was but no, which William B. Plato received for state senator over 
T. C. Moore. A portion of the whig ticket was elected. For the legislature, 
Augustus Adams, whig, and B. F. Hall, democrat, were chosen. B. C. Yates 
had ninety-six votes majority over James Hotchkiss, for sheriff, and J. P. 
Bartlett, for coroner, defeated Seth Marvin by 100. For congressman the Kane 
county vote stood : Richard S. Molony, democrat, 978 ; Churchill Coffing, 
whig, 938; James H. Collins, free soil, 237. The district elected Molony. 

The intense feeling upon the slavery question brought out the warmest 
advocates for either side of the controversy, and on more than one occasion 
serious trouble was threatened. The pro-slavery men were bitter in their 
denunciation of the action of their anti-slavery opponents, but the latter man- 
fully stood their ground through all the stormy years, until the terrible war 
of the Rebellion forever settled the question and saw the star of their hope 
arise and lead all the world to the contemplation of a land whose people were 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY Ul 

free — where the fetters were stricken from four milHon human beings, whose 
days had been previously passed in !)ondagc. At one time a series of aboHtion 
lectures was delivered at the courthouse in Geneva, by Ichabod Codding, and 
the bitter pro-slavery men threatened to mob the speaker. John F. Farns- 
worth, of St. Charles, and Isaac Preston, of Aurora, paroled the ante-room of 
the courthouse with slugshots in their sleeves, made of chunks of lead encased 
in old stockings, ready to give the rioters a warm reception should they 
attempt to carry out their threats and interrupt Mr. Codding's speeches. Such 
episodes as these led to the tremendous revulsion of feeling which finally over- 
threw the old order of things, and established a new one from which the 
county has never since departed. It is true that in certain years, and on purely 
home issues, the question of politics has scarcely entered into the fight, but on 
all matters of national importance the voice of Kane county has been distinctly 
heard upon the platform where it became anchored in the great presidential 
campaign of 1856 — that of the republican party. The men who so zealously 
advocated the abolition of slavery went out in the dark years of 1861-65 and 
fought for the principles in which they believed. The political struggle 
through which the nation passed during the decade preceding the Civil war 
was shared in most earnestly by the people of this county; and none were 
readier than they to advance to the country's aid in time of trouble. 

The assertion has been made by more than one person that the repub- 
lican party was organized in Kane county, but a few dates will dispel that 
illusion : 

On the 22d of February, 1854, a free-soil or free-tlemocratic convention 
was held at Jackson, Michigan, a mass convention at Kalamazoo, on the 21st 
of June following, and a grand mass convention at Jackson on the 6th of July. 
All of these were prior to anything held in Kane county, or, so far as know n, 
in any other part of this or any state. A republican platform was adopted. At 
Madison, Wisconsin, a republican state convention met and adopted a sterling 
platform on the 18th of July, 1854. August 4, of the same year, a call 
was circulated in Kane county for a republican county convention, to be 
held at Geneva, on the 19th of the same month. This call was signed by 
George S. Bangs, William McMicken, William A. Tanner, William McMicken, 
Jr., I. W. Phillips, A. Woodworth, A. Huntington, P. A. Allaire, A. R. Bart- 
lett, F. A. Munson, R. G. Montony, I. A. W. Buck, I. T. Bevier, J. H. 
Thompson, A. D. Warner, Holmes Miller, Ira Fox, A. Hard, C. Osborn, Rev. 
Lewis Benedict. Austin Mann. E. K. Isbell, C. S. Roe, Burr Winton, L. D. 
Brady, S. Hoyles, Z. Church, and many other well-known citizens of the 
county. The convention was temporarily presided over by Hon. A. C. Gibson, 
of Aurora, and Rev. A. J. Joslyn, of Elgin, was secretary. The permanent 
organization had E. W. Brewster, as president; L. A. Winslow, A. H. Baird, 
J. P. Bartlett, and T. H. Thompson, vice presidents; H. T. Kingsbury, of 
Aurora, and E. W. Vining, of Elgin, secretaries. Prominent delegates made 
rousing speeches, and emphatic resolutions were adopted. 

The republican congressional convention was held September 20, 1854, 
in the Congregational church at Aurora. The first republican ticket contained 
the names of the following candidates: For congress, J. H. Woodworth, 



448 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

of Chicago; for senator, Augustus Adams; for members of assembly, Benjamin 
Hackney, of Aurora, and William Patten, of Sandwich; for sheriff, Edward 
Alexander, of Geneva; for coroner, J. P. Bartlett, of Campton. The entire 
ticket was elected with the exception of Alexander, who was beaten for sheriff 
by L. P. Barker, democrat, of Batavia. 

A claim made that the party was organized in LaSalle county must be 
set aside in the light of the foregoing facts, for the first republican county 
convention in that county was held in Ottawa, on the 30th of August, 1854, 
eleven days after the one at Geneva. But it cannot be denied that the great 
movement was stirring the entire region at one and the same time, and the 
stupendous republican party was finally fully organized and united at the 
national convention held at Philadelphia in 1856. 

In 1873 the farmers' movement gained footing in Kane county, and 
numerous local organizations of the Patrons of Husbandry, known as Grang- 
ers, were formed; the first of these was at St. Charles. Mark H. Bisby, of 
the township, was county deputy and organizer, and most of the prominent 
farmers in the county were engaged in the movement. Several candidates 
upon the county ticket were elected by the Grangers in 1873, but as a political 
card the order did not continue long in importance, and the star of the insti- 
tution finally set. 

From the days of the early settlements a strong temperance feeling has 
existed among the people, and we find that, in Aurora at least, a temperance 
organization existed as early as 1837, presided over by Elias D. Terry. Var- 
ious societies have been formed in the different towns and villages, most of 
which are now out of existence. Their places have been largely filled by 
the Woman's Christian Temperance Unions, the Young Woman's Christian 
Temperance Unions, the Young Men's Christian Association and prohibition 
party. The work these bodies are doing is of almost incalculable magnitude, 
and its influence for the good of the race is undisputed. 

In 1884 there were four presidential candidates, viz.: Blaine, republican; 
Cleveland, democratic; St. John, prohibition, and Butler, independent green- 
back. At the election this year( 1908) the candidates of seven different parties 
will have a place on the ticket, which will be nearly three feet wide and two 
feet in length. 

The most important political change in the past fifty years has been the 
passing of the new primary election law. which practically destroys the 
influence of the county convention in the nomination of candidates for office. 
Two primary laws were declared unconstitutional. The present one is yet to 
be tested. Its pnictical effect has been on its first trial, to aft'ord the \oter a 
choice of from three to six candidates for each, where under the old system the 
voters elected the delegates and they chose the candidates. On tlje first trial 
for direct nominations the voters apparently used good judgment, for the list 
of nominees is made up of men apparently capable of filling the positions for 
which they seek election. 

Since the convention of 1854 Kane county has continued republican by 
a large majority, the present plurality being six to one. Democrats have, 
however, been elected to tlie cminty judgeship three times, owing to local con- 



KANE COUNTY HISTOKY 44y 

ditions. The modern tendency is the development of two contending repub- 
Hcan factions. 

Names of county ol^cers, from organization of the county in 1836 to 
7.871 : 

County Clerk— 1836 to 1847, Mark W. Fletcher; 1847 to 1849, J- L. 
Warner; 1849 to 1857, James Harrington; 1857 to 1861, John Green; 1861 
to 1869, H. B. Pierce; 1869 to 1872, Frank P. Crandon. 

Circuit Court Officers: Recorder — 1836 to 1843, David Dunham; 1843 
to 1847, George W. Gorton; 1847 to 1849, E. H. Swarthout. Clerk — 1836 
to 1837, Allen P. Hubbard; 1837 to September, 1848, M. W. Fletcher; Sep- 
tember, 1848 to 1849, Charles B. Wells. Clerk and Recorder — 1849 to 1852, 
Charles B. Wells; 1852 to 1856, Luther Dearborn; 1856 to i860, Paul R. 
Wright; i860 to 1864, Thomas C. Moore; 1864 to 1868, Pindar F. Ward; 
1868 to 1872, J. W. Parrington. 

Treasurer — 1837 to 1840, John Griggs; 1840, H. A. Miller; 1841 to 
1843, B- T. Hunt; 1843, E. R. Allen; 1844, Charles Metcalf; 1845 to 1847, 
James Hotchkiss; 1847 to March, 1850, Thomas A. Scott; from March, 1850, 
to November, 1850, S. K. Whiting; from November, 1850, to November, 
1851, John Clark; from November, 1851 to 1853, A. W. Glass; 1853 to 1855, 
George P. Harvey; 1855 to 1857, George W. Waite; 1857 to 1859, William 
R. West; 185910 1861, Adin Mann; 1 861 to 1865, R. W. Hoyt; 1865 to 1867, 
W. H. Miller; 1867 to 1869, A. Barto; 1869 to 1872, W. P. West. 

Sherifif — 1836 to 1840, B. F. Fridley ; 1840 to 1842, James Risk; 1842 
to 1848, Noah B. Spaulding; 1848 to January, 1851; B. C. Yates; 
January, 1851 to 1852, Luther Dearborn; 1852 to 1854, Noah 

B. Spaulding; 1854 to 1856 L. P. Barker; 1856, to 1858, George E. Corwin; 
1858 to i860, E. J. Allen; i860 to 1862, Demarcus Clark; 1862 to 1864, J. H. 
Whipple; 1864 to 1866, H. L. Perry; 1866 to 1868, D. Smith; 1868 to 1870, 
L. M. Kelly; 1870 to 1872, J. C. Brown. 

County Judge — 1836, Mark Daniels; 1837 to 1839, Isaac Wilson; 1839 
to 1842, H. N. Chapman; 1842, L. Howard; 1843 to 1847, S. S. Jones; 1847 
to 1849, Alexander V. Sill; 1849 to June, 1851, J. G. Wilson; June, 1851, to 
1857, W. D. Barry; 1857 to 1861, Daniel Eastman; 1861 to 1865, R. N. 
Botsford; 1865 to 1867, J. T. Brown; 1867 to 1869, C. D. F. Smith; 1869 
to 1872, W. D. Barry. 

School Commissioner— 1 84 1 to 1843, Ira Minard; 1843 to 1845, Wyatt 
Carr; 1845 to 1847, A. W. Churchill; 1847 to 1849, John W. Hapgood; 
1849, Joseph Kimball; 1850 to 1853, E. W. Brewster; 1853 to 1855, D. D. 
Waite; 1855 to 1857, Mervin Tabor; 1857 to 1861, David Higgins; 1861 
to 1863, N. T. Nichols; 1863 to 1865, Clark Braden; 1865 to 1869, C. E. 
Smith ; 1869 to 1872, George B. Charles. 

County Clerk — 1873, J. C. Sherwin; 1880, Thomas Meredith; 1887, 
A. M. Beaupre; 1894, Charles W. Raymond; 1898, John McKellar; 1892, 
William F. Lynch; 1906, William F. Lynch. 

Clerk of Circuit Court— 1872, H. f. Rockwell : 1876, C. P. Dutton; 1884, 

C. A. Miller; 1888, John Dewey; 1898, T. J. Rushton; 1900, B. E. Gould; 
1904, E. F. Rogers. 



450 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

Recorder — 1892, Joseph Ingham; 1896. Frank E. George; 1900, Frank E. 
George; 1904, Frank E. George. 

Treasurer— 1873, H. C. Paddock; 1876. T. F. Tohnan; 1878, T. B. 
Coulter; 1880, F. L. Young; 1886, C. E. Smiley; 1890, J. ]\I. Innis; 1894, 
Robert J. McCormack; 1898, Henry McGough; 1900, Samuel Shedden; 
1904, George A. James. 

Sheriff — 1872, J. C. Brown; 1874, L. M. Kelley; 1876, C. S. Mixer; 
1880, N. S. Carlisle; "1886, John Kelley; 1890, William H. Reed; 1894, Robert 
E. Burke; 1898, H. S. Demmer; 1900, Robert E. Burke; 1904, B. E. 
Richardson. 

County Judge — 1872, W. D. Barry; 1874, John W. Ranstead; 1882, 
E. C. Lovell; 1892, D. B. Sherwood; 1894, M. O. Southworth; 1904, Frank 
G. Plain. 

Probate Judge — 1902, J. H. \Mlliams; 1906, D. B. Sherwood. 

(This court was established in 1902.) 

Probate Clerk — 1902, Peter Klein; 1906, M. J. Beverly. 

States Attorney — 1836, B. F. Fridley; 1846 to 1852, Burton C. Cook; 
1876, Henry B. Willis; 1880, T. E. Ryan; 1884, John A.' Russell; 1888, F. G. 
Hanchett; 1892, Frank W. Joslyn; 1896. Frank W. Joslyn ; 1900, W. J. 
Tyers; 1904, Frank R. Reid. 



CHAPTER XIX. 



COURTS BENCH AND BAR. 

The county commissioners at their meeting held in September, 1836, 
selected grand and petit jurors for the first term of the Kane county circuit 
court, who were as follows: Grand jurors — Isaac Wilson (made foreman of 
the jury), Sidney Kimball, Allen Ware, James T. Wheeler, William Van 
Nortwick, Samuel jMcCarty, X^icholas Gray, Edwin Knight. James Squares, 
Benjamin F. Phillips. Otho W. Perkins, Ansel Kimball, Walter Hotchkiss, 
John Van Fleet, William T. Elliott, John Ross, Friend Marks, Solomon 
Dunham, Marshall Starks, George Johnson, Lyman Barber. Petit jurors — 
Calvin Ward, Read Ferson, B. H. Smith, E. R. Mann, Solomon H. Hamilton, 
James H. Latham, Carlos Lattin. John V. King, James Ferson, John Douglas, 
Ira ]Merrick and Gideon Young. 

The first term of the circuit court was held at Geneva, in James Herring- 
ton's log house, on June 19, 1837, Judge John Pearson presiding. A. B. 
Hubbard acted as clerk pro tem and B. F. Fridley as sheriff. The first jury 
trial at this court was that of John Wilson et al. vs. Thomas Wilson, for 
trespass. The jury found the defendant guilty and assessed the plaintiff's 
damages at $4,160.66, probably an amount equal to all the money in circula- 
tion in the county at that time. The calendar at that term was large, most 
of the actions being for trespass. The grand jury presented five indictments, 




EARLY KANE COUNTY JUDGES AND LAWYERS. 



E. G. MOXTOXY. 

J. F. FAKXSWORTH. 

E. S. JOSLYN. 

A. H. BARKY. 



P.. N. BOTSFOKD. 
I. G. WILSON. 
A. M. HEERIXGTON. 
F. G. GARFIELD. 



B. F. PARKS. 

B. F. FRIDLEY. 

J. H. MAYBORNE. 

SYLA-AXrS WILCOX. 



KANE COUNTY IIISTOEY 453 

two for riot and three for larceny. The rioters were fined $5 and costs each 
at the following September term. Much of the business of this grand jury 
and of the first term of court w-as with claim jumpers and house burners. 
A couple of these worthies were in examination before the jury and one of 
its members, Mr. Van Nortwick, became so disgusted with the testimony that 
he impatiently blurted out, "Gentlemen, you can think what you please, but 
I believe these fellows swear to a d — d lie, both of them!" It was a favorite 
scheme with some of these claim jumpers to come from somewhere down the 
river, engage to do a job of plowing for a settler, and after having plowed 
two or three acres drive off and sell the claim to another party. These rascally 
proceedings did not always result healthfully for the perpetrators. The fol- 
lowing from the diary of Captain Thomas H. Thompson, of Dundee, is an 
illustration of the above subject, and good evidence of what the settlers were 
forced to go to law about : 

"Fence put up Friday, September 15, 1836; commenced drawing logs 
to build house i6th; i8th, finished drawing logs and put up body of the 
house; the same day Benjamin Bell came on the premises and swore that 
Sutfin should not build, for he (Bell) was going to build and both of them 
could not stay on the claim; at night the logs were taken down, put in a pile 
and set fire to; 20th, more logs drawn, the house raised, the roof boards put 
on; 2ist, 22d, 23d, work putting in gable ends, making door, chinking, hewing 
down the walls and mudding; evening of 23d, roof torn off; 24th, at daylight. 
Benjamin Bell and James Robinson came to the house; 25th, at night, house 
set on fire." 

At this term of court Mark W. Fletcher was appointed clerk in place of 
Hubbard, who resigned after the first day. It is said that not a single lawyer 
was then living within the limits of Kane county. Alonzo Huntington was 
the state's attorney in attendance on the court. Selden M. Church had been 
appointed clerk originally, but removed to Rockford before court was held, 
and ]\Ir. Hubbard received his appointment from Judge Ford September 21. 
1836. This first term of court lasted three days, during which time there 
were five jury trials, four changes of venue granted, fourteen judgments ren- 
dered amounting to $5,400, twenty suits continued and five dismissed. There- 
fore it seems the pioneers dabbled quite extensively in legal proceedings, and 
usually for cause. It is recorded that Jacob B. Mills and H. N. Chapman 
were at this term granted the privilege of practicing as attorneys in the court. 
On the second day John Douglass, by birth a Scotchman, renounced his 
allegiance to the British government and swore fealty to that of the United 
States. 

In September, 1837, the second term of the court was held by Judge 
Thomas. Most of the settlers attended the terms of court, it is said, either 
as jurors, parties to suits or witnesses, or merely as spectators. Beside the 
suits brought on account of conflicting claims to lands there was much trouble 
and litigation over prairie fires carelessly kindled. These were, in the lan- 
guage of an eminent member of the bar and formerly a practitioner of the 
Kane county courts, "an annual terror," and caused great destruction of 
property. When Mark W. Fletcher w'as clerk of the courts he had a Bible 



454 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

upon which to swear witnesses and on one side of it was a cross, while a 
dollar embellished the other side, the witness having his choice of objects to 
swear upon. 

The first judge of the circuit court for the district which included Kane 
county was John Pearson and the second Thomas Ford, who was in 1842 
elected governor of the state. Hon. B. C. Cook has said of him : "He was 
one of the best circuit judges I ever knew." He was succeeded by Judge 
Caton and the latter by Judge T. Lyle Dickey. Previous to 1852 the prose- 
cuting attorneys of the district were Nonnan H. Purple, afterward a judge 
of the supreme court and one of the ablest attorneys in the state; Seth B. 
Farwell, B. F. Fridley and Burton C. Cook, the latter holding from 1846 to 
1852 and attending every term of the court held in the county. He succeeded 
Mr. Fridley, during whose term the courts were called upon to take in hand 
the work of suppressing a class of criminals such as are found at some period 
troubling the settlers in all new countries. 

\'ery comical incidents sometimes occurred in the court, human nature 
then being very much the same as at the present day. During the December 
term, in 1858, a couple of rival horse doctors on the witness stand made 
considerable sport for the spectators. One of them solemnly swore to his 
positive knowledge of a disease among horses called the red belly-ache, while 
the other as solemnly and earnestly swore that there was no such thing, and 
both adhered tenaciously to their belief, defending their positions with much 
loud talk and many emphatic gestures. 

PROBATE COURT. 

The probate court, originally, was simply a probate justice of the peace, 
who was his own clerk, and conducted the business of his office without the 
presence of the sherifif or his bailiff. Archibald Moody, of St. Charles, died 
Jul)' 2^, 1836, and the first recorded act of the probate court was the 
granting of letters of administration to his widow, Lydia C. Moody, by 
Mark Daniels, probate justice, on the 6th of June, 1837. The bonds of the 
administratrix were S2.000. with Gideon Young as surety. The first will 
probated was that of Warren Tyler, also of St. Charles. It was dated 
September 10, 1837. and proved and admitted to record November 6, 1837, 
by Isaac Wilson, who had succeeded Daniels as probate justice. The first 
letters of guardianship were issued to Closes Selby, as guardian of Rebecca 
Gillespie, November 5, 1838. The seal of this probate court is described as a 
"copper block, with a weeping willow and tombstone, emblematic, in those 
days, of grief for the dead." 

In 1849. under the new constitution, the probate justices gave place to 
the county court, of which Isaac G. \\"ilson, afterward circuit judge, was 
elected first judge, with James Herrington as county clerk. They were elected 
in November. 1849, commissioned in December, and held the term of the 
county court in January, 1850. beginning on the loth of the month. Of 
this court, Andrew J, Waldron and Marcus White w^ere associate justices. 
Among other business transacted was the granting of grocers' licenses — 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 455 

i. e. licenses for the sale of liquors — to John D. Wygant, of Batavia, and 
William G. Webster, of Geneva, the charge for the same being $25 each. 

CITY COURT OF AURORA AND ELGIN. 

When the original charter of the city of Aurora was granted by the 
legislature in 1857, it was given an addendum providing for a city court at 
that place, the idea emanating from the brains of B. F. Parks and O. D. 
Day. A. C. Gibson was chosen the first judge. Elgin copied and adopted 
the Aurora charter, and a city court was also created at that place, of which 
C. H. Morgan was the first judge. By the terms of these charters, the 
expenses of the courts were to be met by their respective cities. An act was 
passed in 1859 providing that the same judge should preside over both courts, 
and the two were consolidated under the title of the court of common pleas 
of the cities of Aurora and Elgin. The bulk of business was transacted in 
the Aurora branch. In 1870, when the new constitution was framed and 
adopted, a clause was inserted similar to that in the constitution of 1848, by 
which Kane county is entitled to have a superior court, with terms held at 
Elgin and Aurora. The present judge of this court is Hon. Mangan, of 
Aurora. Prior to tiie term of Judge Mangan, Judge John L. Healy and Judge 
R. P. Goodwin, of Aurora, and Judge A. H. Barry, of Elgin, held the office. 
Several attempts have been made to abolish the court, but the efforts have 
proved unfruitful, owing to lack of interest. This year an attempt to awaken 
interest to abolish the justice court and give the city court their work, so 
far has resulted in nothing practical. 

BENCH AND BAR. 

The judicial district embracing Kane county has been remarkably for- 
tunate in its choice of men to occupy the bench. Judge Ford, in his subsequent 
career as governor of Illinois, won an enviable reputation by his upright 
and straightforward administration of the affairs of the commonwealth. 
Judge John D. Caton was for many years an honored resident of Cook and 
LaSalle counties, and Judge Dickey, who was from the same county, died 
July 22, 1885. His duties as circuit judge were admirably discharged, 
and his marked ability was evident in his career as a judge of the supreme 
court of Illinois. Judge Pearson was judge of the Seventh judicial circuit, 
Kane county being in the Sixth, and held court several times in said county. 
Judge Jesse B. Thomas belonged in what was then the First circuit, and 
Judge Caton was a justice of the supreme court at the same time his services 
were rendered in the Kane circuit. Supreme court then held court in their 
districts as appellate justices now do. His first term here began August 25, 
1842. Hon. Isaac G. Wilson's first term of the Kane county circuit court 
began August 11, 1851, Phineas W. Piatt being, at the time, state's attorney. 
He held the office until 18 — , being succeeded by Judge Henry B. Willis, the 
present judge. 

Judge Wilson was a native of Middlebury (now Wyoming) county, 
New York, and the son of an eminent lawyer and judge. He was graduated 
from Brown university, at Providence, Rhode Island, in 1838, and removed 



456 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

at once to Chicago, whitlier his father had shortly before preceded him. He 
began the study of law under Butterfield & Collins, then prominent Illinois 
practitioner.'^. About a year later he entered the law school at Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, and in 1841 was admitted to the Massachusetts bar, returned 
to Illinois and began practice at Elgin, in August of that year. He was ele- 
vated to the bench in 185 1, holding through subsequent elections for about 
seventeen j-ears. In 1867 he removed to Chicago, remaining until 1871, when 
he lost his valuable law library in the great fire. He finally returned to Kane 
county, locating at Geneva, and w^as elected one of the judges of the Twelfth 

judicial circuit. He held the office continuously from 1879 to . The 

characteristics of Judge Wilson were remarkable industry, strict integrity, 
and opposition to needless litigation and the delays which are so vexatious 
in most courts. He is regarded as one of the ablest lawyers of Illinois, and 
during his years upon the bench was several times chosen to represent his 
district in the appellate court. 

Hon. Silvanus Wilcox, who succeeded Judge Wilson in 1867, is a native 
of Montgomer}- county, Xew York. He was a cadet at West Point for two 
years, beginning in April. 1836, but was obliged to resign on account of 
ill health, standing fifth in general merit, in a class of fifty. He spent five 
months in the \\'est. in 1840, and finally located, in 1844. at Elgin, where 
he was the next year appointed postmaster by President Polk, holding the 
office during the latter's administration. He was admitted to the bar in 1846, 
and in 1867 elected judge of the Twentj^-eighth judicial circuit, comprising 
the counties of Kane. DuPage and Kendall. He was reelected in 1873. but 
resigned in 1874, because of poor health, his resignation being received with 
regret by the judiciar}- of the state. 

Judges Wilson and \\'ilcox and Judge Willis are the only citizens fur- 
nished by Kane county for the circuit bench of the district, but those from 
other counties, who have performed its duties have been men of marked 
ability and high standing in the profession. Judge Hiram H. Cody, of 
DuPage, was no exception to the rule, and Judges Charles Kellum and Clark 
W. Upton, stand also in the front rank. George W. Brown and L. J. Ruth, 
of DuPage, and Charles A. Bishop, of DeKalb county, all three of whom 
have died within three years, were each able lawyers and capable judges, 
whose loss to the district can hardly be estimated. 

Judge Henry B. Willis, present circuit judge, was born May 8, 1849, 
in A^ermont, and came to Illinois with his parents in 1852, they locating at 
Genoa, DeKalb county. In 1870 he graduated from Albany Law School. 
Albany. New Y^'ork, and began practice in Elgin in 1872. He was state's 
attorney. 1876 to 1880. and mayor of Elgin, 1885-7. He was elected cir- 
cuit judge in 1891. succeeding Judge Isaac G. \\'ilson, and has since held that 
office, conducting its business with dignity and ability. In 1906 he was 
appointed one of the justices of the appellate court for the Second district. 

NOT.^BLE CASES. 

Although numerous murders have been committed in Kane county, 
and some of them of the most diabolical character, but two men have been 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 457 

legally executed for this crime within the limits of the county. At the 
February term of the circuit court, in 1855, John Collins was convicted of 
murder for having, while intoxicated, killed his wife. He was sentenced 
to be hanged, and the penalty was inflicted upon him by Sheriff Spaulding, 
April 21, 1855. N. S. Young, Esq., of Batavia, thus describes the incident: 

"The sheriff and prisoner were escorted from the jail, in the old stone 
court house, by an armed military company from Ciiicago, procured for the 
purpose, to a spot southwest from the court house, in a hollow or ravine 
just north of the present Chicago & Northwestern Railroad track, and in 
sight of the present depot grounds. The scaffold was made with a platform 
some three feet from the ground, with two upright posts eight or ten feet 
apart, and a cross-beam on top. The rope hanging down from the center 
of the cross-beam, passed over a pulley and along the beam to the post, over 
another pulley and down to a large, heavy iron weight, to which it was fast- 
ened. The prisoner was dressed in a nankeen suit of clothes : a white cotton 
cap was drawn over his head and face : his arms were tied to his body, the rope 
was placed around his neck, and, standing west, the sheriff, with a hatchet,, 
cut a rope which held the heavy weight. Falling quickly and heavily, it gave 
the culprit a sudden jerk upward about one foot. A slight contraction of 
the legs was all there was to be seen of struggling, and soon they relaxed, and, 
after hanging thirty minutes the doctor pronounced him dead. A large con- 
course of people was present on the rising grounds near, and all through 
the proceedings quiet and order prevailed, with no disturbance." 

In 1897 an Italian named Romano was executed for killing 

a companion. 

There have been several noted murder cases in the county, among them 
the following: April 3, 1868, Mrs. Mary Widner, second wife of Adam 
Widner, was found to have been murdered. The crime was laid to John 
Ferris and wife, who rented part of the Widner house, and with whom there 
had been a dispute and one or two lawsuits. The trial was held at Wood- 
stock, McHenry county, and ended early in April. 1869, with a verdict of 
acquittal for Mrs. Ferris and a sentence of fourteen years in tlie penitentiary 
for the husband, who was proved to be undoubtedly guilty. 

Rev. Isaac B. Smith was tried in the fall of 1869 for the alleged drown- 
ing of his wife in a creek near Elgin and Turner Junction. The trial was 
long, and excited great interest, but a verdict of not guilty was reached in 
November. 

The Kimball case, tried in the circuit court in the fore part of May, 1881, 
was for the fatal wounding of Billings \\^right by William Kimball, in the 
car shops at Aurora, October 22. 1880, while the latter was intoxicated. 
Wright died of his wounds in November following. The jury found Kimball 
not guilty, on the plea of emotional insanity. 

On Sunday, June i, 1884, Otto John Hope, a German farmer, residing 
in Sugar Grove township, was killed, and his hired man, Ed. Steinburn, 
dangerously wounded during a dispute over the feeding of some of Hope's 
cattle on the highway. Ozias W. Fletcher and his son Merritt W.. were the 
guilty parties, the shooting being done with a revolver. The trial, which 



458 KAXE COUNTY HISTORY 

ensued, was intensely bitter, and resulted in sending the senior Fletcher for 
three years to Joliet, and sentencing the young man to death. Steinburn, the 
principal witness, recovered and went to Europe, and, finally, after Merritt 
Fletcher had been confined in jail three years, he succeeded in having his 
sentence commuted to three years in the penitentiary, making an incarceration 
of six years. 

A fiendish murder was committed at Elgin, March 3. 1883, when George 
Panton shot and killed his tenant, William Smith, in consequence of a dispute 
over the occupation of a house belonging to Panton. It was shown that the 
murder was deliberate, cold-blooded and unprovoked. Panton was arrested 
and tried on a change of venue in the Boone circuit court, the jury finding 
him guilty of murder in the first degree, and the judge sentencing him to 
be hanged. He was granted a new trial and a second time sentenced, but 
Governor Oglesby commuted his sentence to imprisonment for life in the 
penitentiary. He was accordingly sent to Joliet. where he eventually became 
violently insane, and in the spring of 1887 he was removed to the asylum 
at Elgin, from which he subsequently escaped and has been unheard of since 
Many other cases have been tried, but no convictions have been secured. 

THE EARLY BENCH AND BAR. 

The following reminiscences are from the book of Judge John Dean 
Caton, who tried the first law suit in Kane county, and for many years was 
a judge of the district: 

It happened also that I tried the case which was submitted to the first 
petit jur}" ever impaneled in Kane county. It was Wilson vs. Wilson. 

One day while at work in my office a man and his wife, way-worn and 
dusty, entered, and sought my professional services for the redress of a 
grievance which they had suffered. Both were rather undersized, under thirty 
years of age, very poorly clad, and were what may be justly termed simple 
people, without force of will or energ)'. Their story was that they had come 
from Buffalo on a schooner, which a week before had been wrecked about 
two miles south of this city; they and the crew had been all landed safely, 
after a hard night's experience on the wreck, but they had lost everything 
except what was on their persons. After a day or two's stay in the town, 
they had started on foot for the country, and when in the prairie about two 
miles beyond Laughton's Crossing, where Riverside now is, they had met a 
drove of horses from Schuyler county, in this state, belonging to one Wilson, 
who was in charge, with several men with him. Wilson pretended to be a 
sheriff, and to have a warrant for their arrest, and did arrest them and detained 
them about half an hour in the prairie, but finally left them, nearly frightened 
to death. 

After they had somewhat recovered from their fright, they turned back, 
and stopped at Laughton's house at the ford, and told their pitiable story. 

Laughton had been a client of mine, and they were strenuously advised 
to come back to Chicago and state their case to me, with the confident assur- 
ance that I would see that justice was done for the outrage. This they did. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 45<J 

and hence their appearance in my office as above stated. I immediately took 
means in a quiet way to obtain the name of the owner of the horses, and leader 
of the gang, who was yet in town, and before night he was under bail to 
appear at the next term of the circuit court to answer to an action of trespass 
and false imprisonment. My clients' names were Wilson, and that was the 
name of the defendant. 

McScammon was retained for the defense. He succeeded in getting 
the case continued for one or two terms, and then took a change of venue to 
Kane county, on an affidavit showing that the people of Cook county were 
prejudiced against his client so that he could not have a fair trial here. 

The records of the court show the following as to this case : 
John Wilson j 

P..RMLICE Wilson ! rj,^,^^^^_ 

vs. I 

Thom.\s Wilson J 

This day came the parties upon a plea of not guilty; it is, thereupon, 
ordered that a jury come, and thereupon came the jurors of a jury of good 
and lawful men, to-wit : 

Calvin Ward. Carlos Lattice. 

Reed Person. John V. King. 

Benjamin H. Smith. John Douglass. 

E. K. Mann. Ira ]\Ierril. 

Solomon H. Hamilton. James Person. 

James Latham. Gideon Young, 

who were severally elected, tried and sworn well and truly to try the issues 
joined between the plaintiffs and the defendant, who upon their oaths do say : 
"We, the jury, find the defendant guilty, and assess the plaintiffs' 
damages at four thousand one hundred and sixty-six dollars and sixty-six 
cents." 

John Pearson had been elected judge of this circuit at the session of 
the legislature (1836-37), and he opened his first court at Geneva, on June 
ig, 1S37, and the first case on the docket was that of Wilson vs. Wilson, 
change of venue from Cook county. I had found a witness, who from a 
distance of half a mile or more had seen the plaintiffs walking on the road in 
the prairie, when they were met by the defendant with a drove of horses; 
that the defendant with several other men stopped and dismounted from 
their horses and seemed to surround the plaintiffs, and that after half an 
hour had elapsed they remounted their horses, gathered up the drove, and 
proceeded with them toward Chicago, and that after the expiration of 
another half hour the plaintiffs had returned along the road to Laughton's 
house, when they appeared to be in a much demoralized and frightened 
condition. At that time the parties to a suit, or those who had even a 
remote interest in the result, could not be allowed, or forced to testify, so 
that what actually took place at the time of the stoppage in the prairie could 
not be explained to the jury, but I had an undoubted right to draw the most 
unfavorable inferences against the defendants, which could be justified from 
the facts proved, and I made the most of this right. 



m) KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

The jury was out but a little while, when they returned with a verdict 
of "guilty," and assessing the plaintiffs' damages at four thousand one hun- 
dred and sixty-six dollars and sixty-six cents, which amount at that time was 
considered simply enormous, at least in this part of the state, for a trespass 
to the person. 

In the olden time in Illinois, say prior to 1850, the circuit system of 
practice was in vogue in legal life, and presented incidents and peculiarities 
which are entirely wanting since the country has become more populous. 
\Mth the growth of the cities and towns, resident lawyers of ability and 
learning are found in every county seat at least, who require no assistance in 
the conduct of the most important cases. It was not so in the early days. 
Then the few local lawyers who had settled in the county towns were gen- 
erally newcomers, without experience and self-confidence, and both they and 
their clients depended largely on the assistance from abroad, especially at 
the trials of causes. This state of things necessitated a class of itinerant 
lawvers whose ability and experience had secured to them reputations coex- 
tensive with their judicial circuits, and. in many cases, throughout the state. 
These were few at first, but with the increase of population and business 
their nuinbers increased, while their theaters of action became more 
circumscribed. 

At first they, with the judge, traveled on horseback in a cavalcade across 
the prairies from one county seat to auother. over stretches from fifty to 
one hundred miles, swimming the streams when necessary. At night they 
would put up at log cabins in the borders of the groves, where they fre- 
quently made a jolly night of it. This was a perfect school for ston.- telling, 
in which Mr. Lincoln became so proficient. It was, indeed, a jolly life on the 
border, the tendency of which was to soften the asperities and to quicken 
the sensibility of human nature. Here was unselfishness cultivated, and 
kindliness promoted, as in no other school of which I have knowledge. 

This circuit practice required a quickness of thought and a rapidity 
of action nowhere else requisite in professional practice. The lawyer would, 
perhaps, scarcely alight from his horse when he would be surrounded by two 
or three clients requiring his services. Each would state his case in turn. 
One would require a bill in chancery to be drawn. Another an 
answer to be prepared. .\ third a string of special pleas, and 
for a fourth a demurrer must be interposed, and so on, and all of this 
must be done before the opening of the court the next morning. Then per- 
haps he would be called on to assist in or to conduct a trial of which he had 
never heard before, just as the jury was about to be called, when he must 
learn his case as the trial progressed. This requires one to think quickly and 
to make no mistakes, and to act promptly to take advantage of the mistakes 
of the adversary, who was probably similary situated. It is surprising how 
rapidly such practice qualifies one to meet such emergencies. 

Those early settlers had not much money to pay lawyer's fees, but they 
would generally pay something and give notes for the balance, or, perhaps, 
turn out a horse or a colt in payment. These would probably ser\'e to pay 
tavern bills, and a horse or two might be led home or sold on the wav. Fee 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 461 

notes formed a sort of currency at a county seat about court time, and could 
frequently be sold to a merchant or the landlord at a moderate discount. 
A town lot or an eighty of land would sometimes be taken for a fee, espe- 
cially when it had been part of the subject-matter of the litigation. 

The southern part of this state was first settled, and so legal tribunals 
were there first established. The first settlers were mostly immigrants from 
Kentucky and Tennessee, with some from Virginia and the Carolinas, 
though many were from the eastern states. The lawyers from tlie southern 
states were in the majority, while the eastern states furnished many able 
lawyers as well. 

All of these men would ha\e ranked high at any bar, and were thor- 
oughly read in the fundamental principles of the law. Later came Lincoln; 
Davis. Treat, Douglas and Trumbull, all able men. It may be remembered 
that all were young men then, and fond of amusements and pastimes and 
practical jokes, and after the pressure of the first few days of the court was 
over, they spent their evenings, and I may say night, in hilarity, which was 
at times, no doubt, boisterous. For instance. Benedict, who had a fog-horn 
of a voice, which he used most recklessly when excited, and who had been 
roaring to a jury at an evening session, was met, when he came to the tavern, 
by the sheriff, with a bench warrant on an indictment "for making loud and 
unusual noises in the night time," and soon a court was organized and he 
was put upon his trial, and before midnight he was convicted and sentenced 
to repeat the offense in arguing a motion for a new trial, or to pay a heavy 
fine, upon the ground that two aiTirmati\-es would make a negati\-e, or that 
the hair of the same dog would cure the bite. It was said that he fairly 
outdid himself in that effort, so that he aroused the whole town from their 
slumbers, and he came near being fined for overdoing it. 

Judge Young was a good performer on the fiddle and thus contributed 
much to the hilarity of circuit life. As the settlements extended into the 
northern part of the state, this circuit system of practice came with them, 
and for a time prevailed in all of its pristine beauty, except in Chicago alone. 
where the visits from foreign lawyers were only made upon special retainers 
and in important cases. I saw I\Ir. Lincoln here several times engaged in 
important cases. 

Under the old circuit system, when the state was divided into fi\-e cir- 
cuits, and a circuit judge was elected for each, John York Sawyer was judge 
of the Vandalia circuit. He was not a tall, nor a very stout man, but carried 
in front about the largest bay-window for his size I ever saw. He presided 
in a very suave way, but with a fixed determination to do ample justice and 
without a very scrupulous regard to forms, especially if those forms did 
not suit him at the time. It was related to me that on one occasion Hubbard, 
who had a considerable practice, argued some question before him at great 
length and with great confidence, and concluded with an air of assurance 
which declared that he knew he could not be beaten this time. The judge 
in his decision praised Hubbard's argument and followed it all the way 
through, especially emphasizing the weakest parts of it, as if he was greatly 
impressed with them, and then decided against him without stating a single 



462 KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

reason for the decision. This enraged Hubbard terribly, and he could hardly 
wait till court adjourned and the judge had retired before he gave vent to his 
indignation to the members of the bar and other by-standers. in terms forcible 
if not elegant, and in conclusion "he said : 'T tell you, gentlemen, what I am 
going to do about it, and so you may prepare yourselves with smelling bottles 
or cover these streets with quick lime; I am going right now to hunt up that 
offensive mass of bloated humanity, and I will relieve his corpus of a peck 
of tadpoles the first slash."' But he did not do it, and I was told that the 
facetious judge, when told of it, laughed heartily at Hubbard's rage, regard- 
ing it as an excellent joke. 

Another circuit scene, in which we may see how Judge Sawyer admin- 
istered the law, may be given as it was told to me by Judge Ford, soon after 
I made his acquaintance, in 1834. 

At the time of which he spoke, horse thieves were punished at the whip- 
ping post, and Ford always insisted that it was the most deterrent punishment 
ever inflicted for the punishment of crime. He said he had often seen 
criminals receive a sentence of ten years or more in the penitentiary with 
apparent indifference, but he had never seen a man sentenced to be whipped 
who did not perceptibly wince, and that the most 'nardened would turn pale 
and shudder. 

A man who had been indicted for horse stealing, had retained General 
Turney to defend him. The general struggled hard for his client, but the 
proof was so clear that the task was hopeless, and the jury, after a short 
absence, returned a verdict of guilty. The general immediately entered a 
motion for a new trial, and was about to proceed to argue it, when the dinner 
bell at the tavern hard by, where they all boarded, was heard loudly calling 
all to dinner. Judge Sawyer, as I have said, was a man with a very pro- 
trudent stomach, and he especially prized his dinner. The judge interrupted 
the counsel, saying: "General Turney, I hear the dinner bell now ring, so 
the court will adjourn till one o'clock, when I shall take pleasure to hear you 
on your motion for a new trial." So the court was adjourned till one o'clock, 
but before the judge left the bench he motioned the sheriff up to him, and 
in a determined whisper, said : 

"While I am gone to dinner take that rascal out behind the court house 
and give him forty lashes, and mind you, lay them on well, and tell him if 
he is ever caught in this count)' again you will give him twice as much." 

After the whipping the culprit was turned loose and was taken charge 
of by some of his friends, who washed him oft' and bathed his lacerated back 
with whiskey, and dressed him, and when he had taken some dinner he 
hobbled down the street, and as he passed the court house he heard the 
general's loud voice and crossed over, and soon discovered he was earnestly 
pleading for a new trial in his case. This horrified him. and he rushed into 
the house and cried out, "For God's sake don't get a new trial. If they try 
me again they will convict me again, and then they will whip me to death." 

The general stood aghast for a moment and said, "What does all this 
mean?" With the utmost composure the judge replied: "Well. General 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 463 

Turney, I thought we would make sure of what we had got, so I ordered 
the sheriff to whip that rascal while we were at dinner, and I trust he has 
done so. But go on, general, with your argument, for I am inclined to be 
with you. I think another whipping would do him good." 

A year later I was retained in the most important case, nominally at 
least, in which I was ever engaged. That was to defend one hundred and 
twelve men charged with the crime of murder. For some years before there 
was a sort of an organized band of criminals, principally engaged in horse 
stealing and counterfeiting, but who on occasions did not hesitate to commit 
murder. They became bold and defiant. They were well known throughout 
the community, and had many sympathizers, who, in order to turn sus- 
picion from themselves, roundly denounced them when in certain circles; 
indeed, they were so well organized and bold, and had so many sympathizers, 
who did not profess to be of them, that it was impossible to punish them, 
even upon the clearest proof of guilt. The jail was broken open and burned 
to liberate some of the gang who were confined in it, and some of their 
sympathizers would always manage to get on the jury, so that a conviction 
became impossible. 

But the evil-doers consisted of but a small percentage of the population 
of the county, a great majority of whom were as excellent men as could 
be found in any other community. They, seeing that the arm of the law was 
too short to afford them protection for either life or property, formed them- 
selves into a sort of association or club, the declared object of which was to 
rid the community of the criminal class; one Campbell was elected captain 
of this club, which also elected several subordinate ofiicers. This was done 
on Saturday, and, as its proceedings were open and public, they were known 
immediately throughout the county. The desperadoes saw at once that they 
must strike such a terror throughout the community as to disintegrate the 
members of this club by the force of fear, or they must go themselves. They 
saw it was an issue of blood, and did not hesitate to accept it at once. By 
arrangement three of the gang were to commence operations by assassinating, 
in the most public manner, Campbell, the leader of the association, and accord- 
ingly, on Sunday, rode up to his cabin in broad daylight, called him to the 
door and riddled him with bullets. 

The news of this terrible tragedy was known throughout the county by 
Monday morning, and without call or notice, the members of the club assem- 
bled at their appointed rendezvous, and details were sent out to arrest and 
bring in the murderers. This was finally accomplished, and they were brought 
before the assembled club in a grove a few miles south of the county seat. 
There a court was organized, consisting of a judge and jury, all of whom 
were sworn by a justice of the peace, to impartially try the case, and a true 
verdict to render. Witnesses were sworn before this tribunal, who saw the 
murder committed, and who positively identified the prisoners as the murder- 
ers. Lawyers had been appointed to prosecute and defend the prisoners, and 
every formality was observed which was characteristic of a regularly consti- 
tuted court of justice established by law. A verdict of giiilty was returned, 
and a sentence passed that all should be shot on the spot. A company was 



4Gi KANE COUNTY HISTORY 

detailed to carry the sentence into execution, wiiicii was done at the word of 
their commanding officer. 

This prompt proceeding struck such a terror into the criminal class, that 
tlie most notorious of them fled at once, without standing on the order of 
their going, and their sympathizers were dumb with terror. 

Accordingly an indictment was presented against one hundred and twelve 
who were present at the trial and execution of the culprits. Of course, my 
consultations had been with only a few of the leaders, but now it was neces- 
sary to have them all together, and accordingly we marched out onto a 
little isolated peak in the prairie, and I had them formed in a circle around 
me, while I called over a list of the defendants, when all answered to their 
names except four, who were unavoidably absent. Even the sherifif, in whose 
nominal custody they were, was conveniently absent, and no one but the 
prisoners and myself were within two hundred yards of us. I was assured 
that no one of them had boasted of the transaction, or in an\- way admitted 
that he was present at the time, and I saw no difficulty in the way, except as 
to the four defendants that were not present, in whose favor a judgment of 
acquittal was as necessary as to the others ; but this was got over by selecting 
four of the party, each of whom was to answer for one of the absentees when 
his name should be called in court to plead to the indictment. When all of the 
many details were arranged for the conduct of the case, we marched back to 
the court house, which was cleared of all others, as supposed, and when my 
numerous clients filed in they filled the little court room quite up to the table 
around which the lawyers sat. While the court was waiting for our appear- 
ance it had been occupied with some unimportant business, so that all was 
ready to proceed with the case when we arrived. The case was at once 
called, and the clerk proceeded to call the prisoners, who promptly answered 
to their names. I confess I felt a little anxious whenever the name of an 
absentee was called, but the proxies all answered promptly and without 
another word, until the last answer was made, when some one near the door 
hallooed out in a rather tremulous voice, "That ain't him." 

This caused a flutter of excitement for a moment, and the judge directed 
that name to be called again, when the proxy, who was standing away back 
in the crowd, again responded for his principal, and no one could tell who 
had interrupted the proceedings in the manner stated. 

I called no witnesses, no argmnent was made to the jury on either side, 
and I asked the court to instruct the jury that mere rumors were not evidence, 
which, of course, he did, and explained the law in his own way as to what 
evidence was necessary to authorize a con\iction. The jury were absent but 
a short time, when they returned with a verdict of acquittal, upon which 
judgment was entered, and thus ended that celebrated case. 

There were great discrepancies in the statements made by the brothers 
and the third witness, and as the science of jurisprudence had not so far 
progressed as to offer a high premium for perjury by allowing tiie prisoner 
to swear in his own exculpation, the evidence closed with two witnesses 
against one. Mr. Dickey, who was defending the prisoner, to overcome 
this advantage, in summing up to the jury pointed out many inconsistencies 




EARLY KANE COUNTY JUDGES AND LAWYERS. 



S. D. LOCK WOOD. 
O. D. DAY. 
JAMES COLEMAN. 



.J. G. BAKE. 

K. M. IRELAND. 

S. S. JONES. 



CHARLES WHEATON. J. W. KANPTEAD. 



A. S. BABCOCK. L. R. WAGNER. 

LUTHER DEARBORN. W. F. LYNCH. 

A. G. m'dOLE. T. E. RYAN. 

E. C. LOVELL. J. S. AVILCOX. 



KANE COUNTY HISTORY 467 

in the statements of the witnesses for the people, and insisted that the story 
told by his witness was the most probable and natural for the occurrences 
of such a fight, and said that if Scott or Bulwer or Cooper, or any other 
great novelist, were going to describe such a fight in a novel they would 
describe it just as his witness had testified to this one, simply because it was 
most probable and natural — most consistent with human action under such 
conditions. 

In reply to this Fridley in his closing speech said that Mr. Dickey had 
told them that if a novelist was going to put in his novel an account of such 
a fight as this was, he would put it down just as his witness had stated it 
here. "Well," said Mr. Fridley, "I agree with Mr. Dickey in this. Now 
what does a novelist do, when he's going to write a novel? He just sits 
down and invents the infernalest lie he can think of. Then he tells the story 
in his book, and that's just the way with Mr. Dickey's witness. He just 
invented this big lie, and then came here and told it to you, but he didn't 
expect you to believe it any more than you would a novel. Mr. Dickey was 
right in what he said and he don't believe it either." 

Benjamin F. Fridley was certainly a man of some remarkable char- 
acteristics. His mind was clear and penetrating, his observations exception- 
ally acute; his study of mankind was much more profound than his study of 
law. He was witty without knowing it, and his sense of the ludicrous was 
really brilliant without his appearing to appreciate it. I scarcely ever knew 
him to laugh, while his quaint suggestions would sometimes provoke laugh- 
ter in others, though generally these were made in so solemn and matter-of- 
fact a way as not to provoke boisterous laughter, but rather a quiet internal 
satisfaction. 

He readily perceived the vital points of a case, though when his interest 
could be subserved thereby he could appear to be as stolid as a block about 
them. His primary education was very limited, and his orthography was 
nearly as remarkable as th