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Full text of "History of Kansas newspapers : a history of the newspapers and magazines published in Kansas from the organization of Kansas Territory, 1854, to Jan. 1, 1916 : together with brief statistical information of the countries, cities and towns of the state"

ARTHUR CAPPER, 
Governor of Kansas. 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
AND DEPARTMENT OF ARCHIVES 



HISTORY 



OF 



KANSAS NEWSPAPERS 



A HISTORY OF THE NEWSPAPERS AND MAGAZINES PUBLISHED 

IN KANSAS FROM THE ORGANIZATION OF KANSAS 

TERRITORY, 1854, TO JANUARY 1, 1916 



TOGETHER WITH 

BRIEF STATISTICAL INFORMATION OF THE COUNTIES, 
CITIES AND TOWNS OF THE STATE 



WILLIAM E. CONNELLEY, Secretary 



KANSAS STATE PRINTING PLANT. 

W. R. SMITH, Sfate Printer. 

TOPEKA. 1916. 

6-3318 



z. 




PREFACE. 

IT IS believed that this is the first effort to record the com- 
plete history of every newspaper and periodical published 
in a state. Kansas is the only state of which such a work 
could be written. From the first Kansas regarded the press as 
her supreme asset. In no other state was the press, as a whole, 
ever equal to that of Kansas in either ability or enterprise. 
This high standard was set up in the stirring territorial period 
when Kansas was battling for freedom for herself and liberty 
for America. The fierce conflict which raged here attracted 
the brilliant minds of the times, and it can be truthfully said 
that it was the pen as much as the sword that made Kansas 
free. Here are some of the names of the newspaper men of 
those heroic days: D. W. Wilder, author of the "Annals of 
Kansas"; Josiah Miller and R. G. Elliott, founders of the 
Kansas Free-State; William A. Phillips, author of "The Con- 
quest of Kansas"; Richard J. Hinton, correspondent for a 
number of eastern papers, and later a soldier and author; 
Richard Realf, the free-state poet, and soldier under John 
Brown ; John J. Ingalls, later United States senator, and author 
of "Opportunity," "Blue Grass," and other immortal produc- 
tions; Preston B. Plumb, later United States senator, first to 
promulgate the idea of the conservation of natural resources 
in America, and one of the great business men of his time; 
John Speer, founder of the Kansas Tribune, and author of 
the "Life of General James H. Lane" ; James Redpath, corre- 
spondent and author; George W. Martin, pioneer newspaper 
man, and long secretary of the State Historical Society; Ed- 
mund G. Ross, later United States senator, whose vote saved 
President Johnson ; Martin F. Conway, later member of Con- 
gress ; D. R. Anthony, colonel of the Fifteenth Kansas, and a 
man willing to fight to get peace; John M. Walden, later 

(5) 



6 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church; John A. Martin, 
colonel of the Eighth Kansas, and later governor of Kansas; 
and M. M. Murdock, founder of the Wichita Eagle. 

The roll might be extended indefinitely, and for talent, tact 
and achievement it stands alone. These splendid young Kan- 
sans were ably seconded by such men as Horace Greeley, editor 
of the New York Tribune; Albert D. Richardson, author of 
"Beyond the Mississippi"; Edward Everett Hale, Thomas H. 
Gladstone, John H. Kagi, Joseph Medill, Charles A. Dana, 
Henry Ward Beecher, William Cullen Bryant, Ralph Waldo 
Emerson, F. B. Sanborn, and many others of national and 
international fame. No wonder Kansas got on .the newspaper 
map, forever to remain there. 

The editors of that time were succeeded by the men of the 
second era, reaching down to our generation Prentis, Ware, 
Rice, Baker, King, Hudson, and a host of others. And many 
of the pioneer editors continued work into that period, just as 
scores of the second generation are now still in the harness as 
editors of Kansas newspapers. There is a perfect succession 
by which the methods and ideals of the pioneer editors have 
been perpetuated to this day. From that fountain flows the 
eminence and efficiency of the present Kansas press. Methods 
may be modified by time and changing conditions, but the 
ideals of the founders of the Kansas territorial press can never 
change. They are the principles underlying correct and suc- 
cessful journalism, and are immutable. 

Kansas is the spot-light of America. Conditions made her 
so; she must ever remain so. Her pioneer editors kindled a 
beacon which flames across the sky to this hour. The present 
and future Kansas press will see that its splendor is not 
diminished. However they may differ on other questions, 
Kansas editors are one in their agreement with Ingalls, that 
"Other states could be spared without irreparable bereave- 
ment, but Kansas is indispensable to the joy, the inspiration 
and the improvement of the world." 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



It is a great privilege to be a citizen of Kansas, and it is a 
great responsibility to be charged with the oversight and per- 
petuity of the ideals of the state. But the Kansas newspaper 
man is equal to the task. His first concern is that everything 
vital to Kansas shall be given early and constant attention. 
The job of the Kansas newspaper man is a big one, and if by 
chance one fails to measure up to the Kansas ideals he usually 
seeks fields less strenuous. 

One of the great things done by the Kansas newspaper 
men was the founding of the Kansas State Historical Society. 
And the Society has always recognized its obligations to the 
Kansas press. The closest relations between these two great 
Kansas institutions have always existed. Secretaries Adams 
and Martin were pioneer newspaper men in Kansas. They 
knew the news and how to write it. They knew Kansas 
knew her ideals and traditions and how to serve them and pre- 
serve them. Newspaper men and women have been on the 
board of directors of the Society, and always dominant in its 
councils and management. That is why it is the largest state 
historical society in America, with but one exception, and the 
most efficient of all. In one feature of the Society's activities 
this superiority is specially manifest; that is the newspaper 
collection. A copy of every issue of every paper published in 
Kansas is furnished the Historical Society for its files. These 
files are carefully preserved and bound. This collection 
reaches back to the founding of the Society, 1875. It is now 
believed to be the largest newspaper collection in the world, 
comprising more than fifty thousand bound volumes, including 
some foreign papers that is, papers published in the leading 
cities of the country, which the Society subscribes for to add 
to its collection. Kansas is the pioneer in this idea of pre- 
serving the state's newspapers. 

The Kansas newspaper collection has a value which can not 
be computed in money. To properly care for it and keep it 
accessible to the public is a tremendous task ; but the Society is 



8 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

doing it, although with insufficient facilities. The weeklies are 
all on shelves and properly classified. But the dailies are 
stacked on benches. It is difficult to consult some of them. 
There is ample room in the book-stacking of the Society's 
quarters, but steel shelving has not been supplied. It is hoped 
that the legislature at its coming session will remedy this 
condition by an appropriation to complete the shelving. 



'TVHAT this work shall be found entirely free from errors is 
-* too much to expect. It covers a period of almost eighty 
years, and proposes to give a complete history of practically 
every paper published in Kansas during that time. It is hoped 
that few errors will be found. 

The presentation of the portraits of the Kansas newspaper 
men and women was one of the difficulties of this volume. It 
was impossible to include all. A list was selected as represen- 
tative of the interest and location of the Kansas press. Those 
shown are not put in because of superior talent. Those not 
appearing here are equal in all respects. The list shown is 
intended to be representative only. 

The secretary takes this occasion to express grateful ac- 
knowledgment to the Kansas press for help in putting up this 
work. He never made an appeal in vain. And he wishes his 
acknowledgment to go farther. He has had at all times the 
most cordial support of the Kansas newspapers in conducting 
the affairs of the Kansas State Historical Society. He believes 
that the best he can do in every instance is due the newspapers 
of Kansas. The preparation and publication of this work is, 
he hopes, some effort in the direction of discharging a small 
portion of his obligations to the Kansas press. 



The Story of Kansas and Kansas Newspapers.* 

BY CAPTAIN HENRY KING. 

THE first Kansas banner was a newspaper. It made its advent under 
an elm tree on the town site of Leavenworth, September 15, 1854. 
There was not yet a house to be seen, nor any other definite sign of 
civilization. The situation presented only the aspect of primeval and 
uninterrupted nature. Never before had such a thing come to pass in 
such circumstances. It boldly challenged precedent and announced a new 
departure. For the first time the press manifested the pioneering instinct 
and proposed to lead and not to follow the course of progress to become 
itself a part of the history of settlement and development. Perhaps it 
was an accident; possibly it was an inspiration; certainly it was infused 
with the denoting significance of those choice and potent events which 
constitute the basis and the philosophy of history. 

There was room for the criticism that the scheme of starting a news- 
paper before there was any news to print was illogical, fantastic, pre- 
posterous. But it was not then, and has never since been, so regarded in 
Kansas. The novelty of it was infectious. A second paper was soon 
established at Kickapoo. Early in 1855 two more appeared here in 
Lawrence. Others followed as new towns were founded. The printing 
press preceded all the usual agencies of society. It did not wait for the 
rudimentary clutter of things to be composed and organized. The spirit 
of adventure thrust it forward ahead of the calaboose, the post office, the 
school, the church, and made it a symbol of conquest. Thus the theory 
of publicity was emphasized as a factor in the westward march of the 
American people and their institutions; and thus Kansas was signalized 
by a revelation that materially enlarged the scope and meaning of modern 
journalism. 

It is to be remembered that the Kansas of those prelusive days was an 
unknown quantity. The early explorers had stigmatized it as a desert 
which could only serve the purpose of restricting our population and 
thereby insuring a continuance of the Union. This view had been ac- 
cepted by the geographers, and was not positively contradicted until the 
newspapers crossed the Missouri river and began to put the prolonged 
myth, the monstrous falsehood, in the way of gradual extinction. What 
the newspapers failed to tell, the town builders proclaimed in the form 
of gaudy and alluring pictures, which sometimes represented things that 
had not yet gone through the formality of taking place. It was one of 
these "chromatic triumphs of lithographed mendacity," as he called it, 
which brought a young lawyer named Ingalls from Massachusetts to 
Kansas. His first sight of the town of his imagination was a rude and 
mortifying disappointment. He wrote vividly of the squalid reality as 
contrasted with the beautiful fiction. But, like the rest, he had come to 

Commencement-day address delivered at the Kansas State University, June 6, 1906, 
by Captain Henry Kin?, editor of the St. Louis (Mo.) Globe Democrat. 

(9) 



10 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



stay, to make a home, to find a career. "It remains to be proved," he 
said, "whether there is any heroic stuff in my mold, and whether or not, 
in my hunger after the western horizon, I have eaten my own happiness." 

We may easily believe that this expressed a common feeling among the 
new settlers. Most of them were having their first experience of frontier 
life, and all of them were comparatively poor. The task that confronted 
them involved all kinds of toil, privation, peril and sacrifice; but if they 
could have foreseen the whole story they would not have turned back. 
As they became acquainted with Kansas they developed a faith in her and 
a devotion to her which made them equal to every trial and superior to all 
vicissitudes. The typical habitation was a primitive log cabin, but it was 
invested with the splendor of a castle by their fidelity to all that it 
represented. They drew a profit from the discipline of industry and 
frugality; and they went hungry, if necessary, to keep the newspaper 
coming to the home. 

The newspapers did not have to wait long for news. It soon began to 
reach them in abundance and diversity. There was something doing 
every day. Kansas suddenly became a history maker in the full sense of 
the term. The homeseekers were diverted from their simple and ordinary 
affairs to meet a problem that trivialized all other considerations. An 
irrepressible conflict that had exhausted the ingenuity of statesmen in 
schemes of compromise and postponement was focused here for practical 
adjustment. It was a question of choosing between free and servile 
labor, not on moral grounds alone, but also with reference to social and 
economic interests. A contagion of politics overspread the territory. 
There was a copious flow of speeches, resolutions, manifestoes and proc- 
lamations. Convention succeeded convention almost as often as changes 
of the moon. Twelve general elections were held in less than three years. 
Popular government was exemplified as a continuous assertion of the 
rights and functions of citizenship, including the privilege of shooting 
and being shot at for opinion's sake. 

It was a period of intense feeling and desperate determination. The 
lines were drawn with unmistakable precision, leaving no middle refuge 
for the shirk or the sluggard. As a man voted, so he was expected to 
fight. The conditions were hair-triggered the word and the blow were 
simultaneous. Excesses attended the proceedings on both sides, but we 
can well afford to forget them in view of the rich profusion of heroism 
and glory with which they were associated. It was a busy time for 
newspapers. They had opportunities that combined practice with theory 
and provided ample facilities for all kinds of services. Their post of duty 
was on the firing line, and they helped to bring about the news they pub- 
lished. In several instances their offices were sacked and demolished, but 
somehow they got more type and more presses and resumed their work 
with additional zeal and an invigorated vocabulary. Their number 
steadily increased, until in 1858 there were twenty-two of them. They 
pushed their way, with further accessions, through multiplied difficulties, 
to the day of rejoicing which marked the admission of Kansas to the 
Union, January 29, 1861. And on the 22d of February following, the 
flag of the United States bearing the new star was raised for the first 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 11 

time, over Independence Hall, by that most lovable of our national heroes, 
Abraham Lincoln. 

This should have brought tranquillity and happiness to Kansas. But 
the logic of destiny that was interthreaded with its life and its relations 
had other demands upon its courage and endurance. It was an hour of 
triumph, but the ominous reverberations of the recent conflict would not 
be silenced. It had lit the torch for a great national catastrophe. The 
War of the Rebellion ensued, and it was required to put itself to still 
harder tests than those through which it had just passed. Poor as it was 
in worldly goods, it yet possessed a wealth of manhood and patriotism. 
Its newspapers sounded the trumpet call of duty. At the very outset of 
the war it began offering its sons and soldiers to defend the Union it had 
just entered. It furnished more of them than it had voters, and the ratio 
of mortality among them exceeded that of any other state. It was in- 
vaded and scourged and plundered. Its towns were attacked and un- 
armed citizens massacred in the streets. But it fought on; it kept the 
faith ; it persevered to the end. 

When peace came Kansas was prostrate and desolate. The prolonged 
reign of turmoil and havoc paralyzed its industries and frustrated its 
chances of development. It was set back to a new beginning. The most 
valuable of its few remaining assets was represented in its newspapers. 
How many had contrived to survive they did not explain. There were 
thirty-seven of them precisely the same number, by a singular coinci- 
dence, that existed in the whole country when the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence was proclaimed. They stimulated hope and confidence; they 
invited immigration, and promoted every form of enterprise. The growth 
that followed was unprecedented. It involved all the elements of state 
making, from the bottom weeds to the top of the structure. The spirit of 
the people was adventurous, self -centered, impatient of slow progress, and 
indifferent to the danger of trying experiments. They did not care so 
much how other states had been constructed if to do so they must re- 
linquish the right to fashion Kansas according to their own views and 
purposes. It was their ambition to be sufficient unto themselves, and right 
well was their assurance justified by its general results. 

Those were unique and spacious days in Kansas, never to be repeated in 
any country. It is one of the choicest memories of my life that I was 
permitted to see and feel the wonder and thrill of it all. To look back 
upon it in the light of present conditions is to realize, as was not then 
possible, the full measure of its importance. We were mostly young men 
who had been in the war and were glad to be back, and who had come here 
to find out what fortune could be coaxed or constrained to do for us. In 
many respects it was like drifting in on another planet. The newness 
and strangeness, the vastness, the emptiness, appealed to the imagination, 
and to the judgment as well. Certainly there was no lack of room, or 
liberty, or opportunity; and as for the rest, that was simply a question 
of learning how to grow up with the country. 

There was a serious side to the undertaking, of course, but we did not 
allow that to dismay or depress us. Our habitual mood was one of 
cheerfulness. We lived in the sunshine and wore our hearts on our 



12 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

sleeves, defying the daws to peck at them. The course of thought and 
speech was free from restraining precedents and intrusive superstitions. 
Our mental operations were apt to be venturesome in all directions. We 
did a good deal of trespassing on the grass. Frankness and independence 
were encouraged, and there was indulgence for shortcomings where in- 
tentions were apparent. We did not shoot the violinist when he was doing 
the best he could. Every man had a fair chance and equality prevailed, 
because, like honesty, it was the best policy. No citizen of the state had 
money enough to excite envy. The normal condition of the pecuniary 
appendix was vexed and feverish, and if an octopus had appeared he 
would have been welcomed as something that we needed in our business. 
Instead of antagonizing the railroads, we besought them with gifts of 
bonds galore to come and raise the value of our lands for us and help us 
to build more schoolhouses and to get higher prices for our products. 

The population of the state increased from 140,179 in 1865 to 362,307 
in 1870, and the number of newspapers increased in the same time from 
37 to 80. These papers were all better than their patronage warranted. 
That is to say, they were characteristic of Kansas and in harmony with 
the spirit of the people. They discounted the future and trusted in the 
law of possibilities. And so when it was suggested that we ought to have 
a publication of still more excellence the editors indorsed the idea, and in 
January, 1872, the first number of the Kansas Magazine appeared. It was 
an audacious project, a rushing in where angels might have feared to 
tread. In other words, it was an amplification of the Kansas theory of 
"publishing nonpareil papers in long primer towns." The story of it has 
been appreciatively told by your Professor Carruth. It was not born 
with a silver spoon in its mouth, and it never propitiated fate with the 
earning of a dividend. But it was a good investment, nevertheless. As an 
advertisement for Kansas it was worth many times more than the $10,000 
that it cost its uncomplaining stockholders. It did not pay, strictly 
speaking, but it was a distinctive literary triumph; it added a precious 
chapter to history, and, in Professor Carruth's phrase, "the light of it 
still lingers on the western sky." 

There are things in the bound volumes of that lamented publication 
which belong with the classics of American literature. It has preserved 
for later generations the atmosphere of a remarkable epoch. The ele- 
mental mystery and fascination of the plains, the intermingled comedy 
and tragedy of frontier life, are vividly mirrored in its pages. It re- 
flected from first to last the buoyancy and progressiveness of the young 
state; it was a pronounced assertion of the consciousness of Kansas. 
Ingalls and Steele were the stars of first magnitude in its constellation of 
contributors, but there were others, mostly newspaper men, who did 
striking and unforgettable work, often behind the mask of anonymity. 
The enthusiasm of its founders included some dream stuff, no doubt, but 
at the same time it represented certain vital and practical facts. It was 
not a necessity, and therefore it did not attain permanence; but it sur- 
vived long enough to prove that Kansas was capable of producing a first- 
class magazine, if it was not yet able to support and perpetuate it. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 13 



The failure of the magazine was deeply regretted, but we reconciled 
ourselves to the loss, and went on with our schemes for making Kansas 
grow toward both the horizon and the zenith. We were not in the busi- 
ness of looking backward. When the day was done we left it to itself and 
took up a new one. There was no past tense in the grammar of our 
calculations and our enterprises. It was to-morrow and not yesterday 
that filled our dreams and absorbed our energies. Ill luck came often, 
but it did not tarry, because we snapped our fingers at it and laughed it 
away. Property was always going to be higher in the spring. We cir- 
cumvented the ironies of the financial system by indorsing one another's 
promissory notes. The peculiar metaphysics of the situation hyphenated 
us in a kind of general sympathy and comradery. We had our rivalries 
and our antipathies, but for the most part they were transient and sub- 
ordinate, and did not cause any serious disturbance of the fundamental 
concord. 

It was in our politics, perhaps, that we were most apt to disregard 
the impulses of brotherly kindness and patience. The Kansas newspapers 
had early manifested a partiality for aggressive and vociferous cam- 
paigns. They were very fond of putting candidates under the harrow, 
as they called it a process which they have not yet entirely abandoned, 
I am told. All the leading public men of the state had been subjected to 
such treatment from time to time; and even a toughened veteran like 
Gen. Jim Lane had been lacerated to the point of calling for mercy from 
the Atchison Champion when Ingalls was editing it. "About the mildest 
term it ever applies to me," he said, "is miscreant." The contest of 1872 
was stuffed with this explosive material. A new legislature was to be 
chosen, and it was to elect a United States senator, and a brilliant young 
editor now a scandal of world-wide notoriety Pomeroy, had the prize 
snatched from him, at the very moment of grasping it, by a dramatic 
exposure that was without a parallel. The speech which precipitated this 
squalid and incongruous calamity was not reported, and its excited author 
could not coherently recall what he had said. Well, we could not afford 
to go to press without it, and a brilliant young editor now a prominent 
lawyer Col. W. H. Rossington, went to his desk and wrote such a speech 
as in his opinion ought to have been delivered, and that was the speech 
which was printed everywhere, and praised by the London Times. 

The next day John J. Ingalls was elected senator and started upon the 
road to highest distinction in oratory and statesmanship. For eighteen 
years he served in that exalted station with conspicuous and picturesque 
success, and his statue stands in the national capitol to specify and 
commemorate his recognized greatness. By common consent his name 
leads all the rest in the gallery of eminent Kansas citizens. No adequate 
biography of him has yet been written; no satisfactory analysis of his 
character and achievements has ever been made. The best of all attempts 
in that respect, I think, is to be credited to an honored graduate and 
regent of this university, Mr. Charles S. Gleed. It is comparatively easy 
to measure and define conventional qualities of greatness, but Ingalls 
was phenomenal and paradoxical. The people of Kansas admired and 
applauded him, but they never wholly understood him. He did not invite 



14 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

the familiarity that flatters the vanity and allures the goodfellowship of 
the multitude. His intellect was not persuasive, but intimidating and 
compulsory. He always held a brief for the prosecution. His natural 
attitude was self -poised and imperturbable, as if to say, "I am the master 
of my fate, the captain of my soul." That distinguished Kansas exile, 
George R. Peck, tells of once coming upon him in the midst of a terrible 
political struggle, of which he was the central figure, and finding him 
complacently reading Charles Lamb's Essays. 

There was no affectation, no demagogy in this inflexible imperturba- 
bility. It was a congenital part of the man. "They call me haughty," 
he said, "which means that I scorn stupidity and hate shams and hy- 
pocrisies." His style as a writer and a speaker was inimitably elegant 
and melodious. He was an expert in the chemistry of words and the 
architecture of literary edifices. The rapier and not the machete was 
symbolized in his extraordinary power of invective. He was a poet and a 
lover of nature, and he had a keen sense of humor that was at once both a 
spur and a shield to him. What a delight it was to sit in his library and 
listen to his incomparable talk. I cherish in particular the recollection of 
one such occasion. It was a stormy summer night, with the wind sweep- 
ing through the trees and the rain spattering against the windows. His 
boy Sheffield was playing with toys on the hearth; an enormous cat was 
furtively watching the door. The senator was in his happiest mood. We 
discussed history, science, poetry, sociology almost everything under the 
sun but politics and even politics did not finally escape, for he had to tell 
me of a letter just received from Uncle Chet Thomas, who was holding a 
federal appointment and had been notified that he would have to give it 
up. The letter said, "I wish you would fix it so I can hold on until fall 
and make it as late in the fall as possible." Gradually the conversation 
got around to certain criticisms which had been made on his use of the 
expression "the splendid invention of immortality." Then he delivered 
one of the most eloquent lectures I have ever heard. All the doubts and 
difficulties of the searchers after truth about the future world were pre- 
sented in a most glittering and incisive way; and when he had finished 
we sat silent. The storm had abated, and there were stars to be seen. 
The cat was purring softly in a corner ; the boy lay asleep at his father's 
feet, like Brutus' little lute player. Suddenly the senator turned to me 
and said with thrilling earnestness in his voice, "I would give everything 
I have for my wife's implicit faith in Christianity." 

When the time came for his retirement from the station which he had 
so long adorned, he accepted the inevitable with his usual composure. 
I saw him soon after he left the senate. His talk was still as charming 
as ever, and he spoke freely of the change in his fortunes ; but I could not 
fail to detect in his manner a sense of melancholy. There was no repining 
and no bitterness, but there was the fatigue and debilitation of a chastened 
spirit, the pathetic lassitude of a broken heart. Incidentally he gave me 
to understand that he had ceased to entertain any political plans or 
expectations. He felicitated me upon the fact that I was chief editor of a 
great newspaper, and declared if his life were to be lived over, that would 
be his ambition. I never saw him again. The next I heard from him he 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 15 

was seeking health in the arid solitudes of the Southwest. It was a vain 
and sorrowful quest. "I am desperately tired and discouraged and home- 
sick," he wrote. But he was not to reach home and die there, as he 
wished. His returning journey was cut short, and under an alien sky, 
with his wife at his side and the Lord's prayer on his lips, he fell into the 
ultimate sleep, in the shadow of everlasting wings. 

The editorial fraternity of Kansas has a right to claim Ingalls as one 
of its celebrities. He belonged primarily to the guild of writers, the 
promoters of publicity. It was repeatedly demonstrated that he possessed 
all the instincts and tendencies of a journalist; and his first election to the 
senate, he always insisted, was due to the Kansas Magazine more than 
to any one influence. He never lost his interest in newspapers and their 
relation to the welfare and progress of the state. It was his pleasure to 
see them grow during his presence in the senate at a rate unequaled 
elsewhere. At the time of his death they numbered over 500. They were 
all governed by the same general principle of devotion to Kansas and 
paramount attention to its affairs. It has always been true of the Kansas 
press that it has kept in close touch with its patrons and given preference 
to the local drift of things. This is probably the main secret of its 
strength and its utility, and there is to be derived from it an important 
lesson to journalism. The tendency of too many newspapers is toward 
the remote and universal instead of that which directly concerns the 
average reader. It is all very well to tell what is going on in different 
parts of the world, and to prate profoundly about events and issues that 
have the enchantment of distance, but it is better to make a faithful 
report of proximate occurrences and to editorialize on themes that have to 
do with the practical life of a given community. The paper that devotes 
most of its space to its own town and state has the true idea of its mission 
and its limitations. 

From the first the Kansas newspapers have been guided by this 
salutary theory. They have never attempted to cover the whole earth 
with their searching gaze and their ambitious wisdom, but have been con- 
tent to make the dimensions of the state their principal field of opera- 
tions. This has signified concentration of effort and purpose, and con- 
centration means power and brings results. They have persistently sub- 
ordinated everything else to home news and for Kansas, exploiting its 
advantages and celebrating its virtues, standing by it in adversity and 
rejoicing with it in prosperity. Now and then they have had follies and 
absurdities to confess in its name, and they have not evaded the duty 
which has sometimes required them to poke fun at themselves. They have 
thus caused Kansas to live an open life, with all the world looking on and 
never turning away for lack of entertainment. 

It will not do to deny that there have been times when Kansas had 
the appearance of a lost cause, a collapsed experiment. More than once 
an exceptional malignity of misfortune has strained the confidence of its 
people almost to the point of surrender. When the drouth and the grass- 
hoppers came, for example, and devastated the state to an extent which 
suggested a vindication of the old myth of the desert there was seemingly 
but little justification for hope of success. Those who passed through that 



16 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

distressing and humiliating period can never forget it. But for the news- 
papers, the state might have been depopulated. They labored as assidu- 
ously to cheer the popular heart, to alleviate the want and suffering, to 
save Kansas from threatened dissolution. An appeal was made for out- 
side help, and there went with it a brave proclamation of abiding faith 
in the state. The response was liberal and sufficient. All sections of the 
country contributed, and it is worth remembering that the largest sum 
received from any point was sent by the lately stricken city of San 
Francisco. 

The baleful reputation of this calamity hung over Kansas for several 
years, but the newspapers continued to boast of the state and its re- 
sources, and a succession of good crops helped to verify their estimates. 
History will never tell how diligently the editors sought for facts to in- 
fluence home seekers, and how enthusiastically close they often came to 
bearing false witness, not against their neighbors, but in behalf of them. 
I can personally testify to their good intentions, as well as to their per- 
plexities over the conflict between the demands of veracity and the im- 
pulses of loyalty. We knew that when they feared they might be pre- 
varicating they were at most only anticipating. The eggs were in the 
basket all right, and it was only a matter of waiting for them to be 
hatched. It was permissible to mix visions and prophecies with current 
and negotiable realities when it was all certain to come true. Those of us 
upon whose souls such burdens rested have been greatly relieved and com- 
forted, you may be sure, to see how grandly Kansas has surpassed our 
uttermost speculation. Indeed, we must own to a touch of professional 
chagrin that we stated the case so moderately. 

You hardly need to be reminded that the Kasas papers have alway 
been essentially optimistic, and here again we have a valuable lesson in 
journalism. It is the proper business and obligation of the press to keep 
the bright side of life constantly in view. This does not imply that all 
disagreeable facts should be suppressed or their importance minimized; 
but it does imply that there is no valid reason for a policy which is cal- 
culated only to make people morbid and unhappy. We must not put out of 
sight the truths that we need to consider; but neither should we parade 
and embellish things that can only serve a troublesome purpose. The 
best form of dominion over the public mind is that which excites buoyancy 
and encourages hope and pluck. All praise and honor, therefore, to the 
Kansas newspapers for their steady preaching of the gospel of good 
cheer. It has been a hard task at times to persist in a sanguine view 
while the clouds were rolling by and subscriptions were dwindling and 
creditors were importunate; but they have invariably gone on breathing 
and diffusing ozone, and, like Ulysses, taking the buffets of fortune "with 
a frolic welcome." 

This immensely profitable service was not rendered in any flippant or 
slipshod manner. The Kansas press has ever been noted for its high 
standard of excellence. You will search its files in vain for vibrations 
of unintelligence, for specimens of puerile or slovenly workmanship. 
There can be no "aspersion on its part of speech"; there are no orphaned 
verbs and widowed nouns ludicrously splotching its record. Many of its 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 17 



editors have been finished scholars, and all of them have known how to 
utter their messages in clear, precise and vigorous terms. And Kansas 
has not been ungrateful to these industrious and effective men behind the 
pen. It has rewarded them with official places of profit and distinction. 
They have been summoned from their ordinary labors to perform legis- 
lative and executive duties, to act as consuls and ministers abroad, to be 
governors and United States senators; and in no instance have they 
failed to measure up to the requirements. 

It would be impossible for me to call the complete roll of the Kansas 
editors with whom it was my pleasure and advantage to be associated, 
and I am reluctant to name one without all of them. But I must speak of 
the one always foremost in our esteem and affection dear old Web 
Wilder; all of those acknowledged leaders, Dwight Thacher, Father 
Baker, Noble Prentis, Sol Miller, Ed Howe, the Anthonys, the Martins, 
the Burkes, the Murdocks, Eugene Ware, Ward Burlingame, the Rices, 
Milt Reynolds, Joe Hudson, Jake Stotler, Prouty, Speer, Peters, Hoch, 
Learnard, Hanna, Roberts how readily the list increases! And yet I 
could not forgive myself if I omitted Henry Inman, Alex. Butts, Wirt 
Walton, Johnny Gilmore, Jack Downing, West Wilkinson, Clay Park, 
Buckingham, Meredith, Taylor, Lane, Griffin, Folks, Peffer, Millington, 
Riddle, Capper, MacLennan, Sheridan, Walker, Admire, McElroy, Em- 
mert, Rizer, McNeal, Chalfant, Sampson, and Wilson. These and others 
are all names to be cherished in the great, generous heart of the state. 
Some, alas! have been chiseled on tombstones, others still remain at the 
mastheads of Kansas newspapers, and others have slipped out by well- 
earned right of retirement, which always in the case of the editor carries 
with it an unstifleable longing to be in the harness again. 

I am not seeking to immortalize my former comrades and friends as 
individuals; I am only trying to show what they signify as a fraternity, 
and to indicate how notable and beneficent their efforts have been in the 
shaping of the life of this illustrious commonwealth. Take that most 
exact and valuable of Kansas books, Wilder's "Annals," and you will see 
how the influence of the press runs all through the history of the state like 
an electric current. The book itself is only a compilation of clippings 
from the newspapers, and it provides all the information that is necessary 
to a comprehensive and circumstantial understanding of how the state 
has been made, and why it is what it is instead of something else. Such 
a book could not be written about any other state, because in no other 
state has the press been so intimately and impressively related to the 
general course of events. The force that was crudely set in motion under 
that elm tree on the river bank at Leavenworth has proved to be an 
instrument of destiny, and the lessons it teaches are too plain and too 
important to be misunderstood or disregarded. 

Thus Kansas has been made a training school for journalists, and the 
whole country has derived advantage from its instruction. It has 
equipped men who have reflected credit upon the profession from the 
Atlantic to the Pacific. They are to be found everywhere. There is no 
better recommendation in the newspaper offices of other states than 
"formerly of Kansas." This means much at the present time when 

2 



18 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

journalism is becoming, if it has not already become, the greatest power 
in the system of modern civilization. Kansas now has newspapers in 395 
of its towns, being surpassed in that respect by only seven of the other 
states. They aggregate over 700, and may safely challenge comparison 
of merits with those of any other state. It is to be hoped, or rather it is 
not to be doubted, that they will continue to grow both in number and in 
excellence. That has been their habit in the past, and they can not do 
otherwise in the future without ceasing to be Kansas newspapers. 

It remains to be said, on this noble eminence of Mount Oread, the 
state's intellectual center of gravity, that the dominant note of Kansas 
history and Kansas newspapers is exultant and reassuring. We happen 
to be living just now in an era of accusation and exposure. The air is 
crammed with the yellow particulars of commercial and social iniquity. 
We can not turn in any direction without encountering a prophet of 
disaster. The pessimists are striving with all their benumbing power to 
make us despair of the republic, to persuade us that the canker of vice is 
at the heart of everything, and that nothing can save us but a great 
national regeneration. It is a good time to read the story of Kansas and 
get its healthy inspiration. Let us not be in a hurry to believe that our 
civilization is a failure, and that our patriotism has forfeited its vitality. 
Evils we have continually with us, we know; but have we not also much 
that is good and strong and splendid? This magnificent university is 
itself a standing protest against the skepticism of the carpers and alarm- 
ists. There is yet room for optimism. Wherever reforms are really 
needed they will undoubtedly be made; the intrinsic and puissant virtues 
of organized society will survive and prevail; and it will still remain 
true, as it has ever been, that 

"God 's in his heaven, 
All 's right with the world/' 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



19 



EVERY man thinks his lot the hardest. When he leaves 
college to begin his education the country editor is filled 
with ideas for man's betterment, charged with reforming 
zeal and overflowing with enthusiasm for the purification of 
politics. He calls attention to neighborhood conditions, suggests 
improvement and is shunned by nice people. He pounces upon 
the first wrong that shows its ugly head and subscriptions stop. 
He tries to sweeten the fetor of politics and loses all chance at 
the county printing. 

He soon learns that men do not trouble to change conditions. 
Conditions change the man. The head is squeezed to fit the hat, 
and he acquires the charming art of touching up truth. Youth 
accepts positions instead of getting jobs; ancient maidens enter- 
tain and "a delightful time was had," while a henhouse fire is a 
holocaust. 

But he does his work in the world and we give a meed of 
praise to the busy, brainy, bustling body whose only hope of 
reward is in getting the post office. 




[Drawing by Albert T. Reid.] 

Sharing all our Joys and Sorrows, Boosting our Business, and 
Working with Tireless Energy for Others, the Country Edi- 
tor is the Most Important Factor in his Community. 



20 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




DANIEL W. WILDER. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 21 



DANIEL W. WILDER. 

DANIEL WEBSTER WILDER was born at Blackstone, Mass., July 
15, 1832. He died at his home in Hiawatha, Kan., July 15, 1911. 
He was the seventh son of Dr. Abel Wilder. He spent four years at the 
Boston Latin School, was an attentive and studious boy, received prizes 
every year, graduated second in his class, and received a Franklin medal. 
At Harvard he was an officer in the Hasty Pudding Club, the Alpha 
Delta Phi, and three other college societies. He graduated in 1856, and 
was awarded the first prize, a gold medal, for elocution in competition 
with all the classes. Charles F. Browne, better known as "Artemus 
Ward," was his roommate, and the friendships formed there with such 
men as F. B. Sanborn continue to this day. 

After his graduation Mr. Wilder studied law, and he was admitted to 
the Boston bar in 1857. In June of that year he visited Kansas. In 
1858 he settled at Elwood, in Doniphan county, and became the editor of 
the Elwood Free Press. In August, 1860, he went to St. Joseph, com- 
mercially a Kansas town on Missouri soil, where he was editor of the 
Free Democrat, a Republican paper. For the advocacy of freedom for 
the slaves he was indicted, and compelled to return to Kansas, losing his 
investment in Missouri. He became editor of the Leavenworth Daily 
Conservative in January, 1861. . He was one of the founders of the paper, 
and when Col. D. R. Anthony went into the army he purchased the 
Anthony interest and became the sole proprietor. He married, March 3, 
1864, Miss Mary E, Irvin, of Atchison county. In 1865 he went to 
Rochester, N. Y., where he was the editor of the Evening Express; but 
he found it impossible to remain away from Kansas, and returned again 
in 1868 to edit the Leavenworth Conservative. He became the editor of 
the Fort Scott Monitor in 1871. In 1872 he was elected auditor of state, 
and his first official report created a sensation. Dishonest and corrupt 
practices had long been in existence in the office of the state treasurer. 
Mr. Wilder laid bare the foul ulcer with keen sentences and facts sharper 
than the surgeon's scalpel. He turned a blaze of light into the caves of 
official corruption, and the plunderers fled in consternation. They did not 
return, and from that day Kansas has met her obligations faithfully. 
His reforms extended even to the administrative affairs of counties, and 
they have been of immeasurable value to the people of Kansas. 

In October, 1876, Mr. Wilder resigned -his office to become editor of the 
St. Joseph Herald; but this was only for another attempt at the im- 
possible, and he returned again to Kansas and settled in Hiawatha, 
where he was editor and proprietor of the World. This he disposed of to 
accept the office of state commissioner of insurance. In this capacity his 
fidelity to his trust and his methods of insurance in Kansas have resulted 
in great benefit to the people of that state. 

A word about the "Annals of Kansas." This is one of the greatest of 
American books the greatest Kansas book. Before it we had much 
writing and some bookmaking, but we had no order, no arrangement. We 



22 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




EUGENE F. WARE. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 23 

needed some one to blaze a pathway through our wilderness of material 
and give a proper proportion to the perspective. Only a man of creative 
power could do that. We had accumulated, like David of old, a great store 
of precious stuff, but we had built no temples. Wilder became our 
architect ; he pointed out the proper place for each stone and timber. We 
shall always build along his plans. Utility is the great object of all labor, 
of all effort; what is of no utility fails and is cast aside. In this principle 
lies the imperishable fame of Wilder. In writing this great work perhaps 
he did not realize the value of the services he was rendering his country. 
But it was put into his mind to do it, and he could not but comply; he 
could no more escape it than could the prophet in his mission to Nineveh. 
It is certain that he did not write in any effort to seek fame. It is most 
likely that it was suggested in his editorial labor, and that his paramount 
purpose was to supply the "boys," his contemporary journalists, a terse 
guide to what had been done here. 



EUGENE F. WARE. 

EUGENE FITCH WARE was born at Hartford, Conn., May 29, 1841 ; 
died at Cascade, Colo., July 1, 1911. His parents moved to Burling- 
ton, Iowa, when he was a child. Iowa was at that time a territory, and he 
grew to man's estate on the frontier of our rapidly expanding republic. 
Before he was twenty (in April, 1861) he enlisted in the First Iowa 
volunteer infantry. This regiment was called for a three months' service 
a term supposed by many to be sufficient to put down the rebellion. At 
the expiration of his first period he reenlisted, first in the Fourth Iowa 
cavalry, and then in the Seventh, with which regiment he was mustered 
out in June, 1866. He went into the army a private soldier. In the 
capacity of lieutenant and captain he was aide-de-camp successively for 
Generals Robert B. Mitchell, C. J. Stolbrand, Washington R. Elliott, and 
Granville M. Dodge. General Dodge was one of General Sherman's corps 
commanders. Ware's conception of his duty at the beginning of the war 
he recorded for us at a later date in his exquisite poem, "Neutralia." 

Mr. Ware's newspaper work began in 1866-*67, when he returned to 
Burlington, Iowa, his home, from the army. Of this period of his life he 
has said: 

"I used to be a newspaper man. I was on the Burlington Hawkeye 
away back in '66-'67. That was my first job after leaving the army. I en- 
listed the day we got news of Fort Sumter, in the First Iowa regiment. 
I was just nineteen then. I belonged to a zouave drill company that was 
famous throughout the West for fancy drilling all boys. Minute war 
broke out, nothing would do us but we must go. And such pulling and 
using of influence ! Every one was afraid he 'd be left out on that first 
roll, and that the war 'd be over in sixty days and he would n't get to go. 
I was delighted when I was taken. Well, I served out that stretch, and 
then I did three years in the Fourth Iowa cavalry. And still the war 
was n't over. I went out again as a volunteer cavalry officer, and after 
peace was declared with the South we were sent North to fight Sioux 
Indians. Then we were mustered out, and I went back to Burlington 
twenty-four years old and looking for a job. 



24 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




NOBLE L. PRENTIS. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 26 



"I contributed an editorial or so to the Hawkeye, which was then edited 
by a Mr. Beardsley. After him came Frank Hatton, and then Bob Bur- 
dette, you know. But they were after my time. Mr. Beardsley liked my 
stuff and offered me $75 a month to go on the paper regularly, and after 
consideration I took him up. I liked the work, too. Pretty soon I evolved 
an idea. Mr. Beardsley liked to make running comments on the tele- 
grams we got; for instance, "How does this strike you?" New York, such 
a date, and then the story. I was given charge of the telegraphic news 
and wrote my other stuff beside. . . ." 

In Kansas Mr. Ware wrote much for the newspapers. In the Greeley 
campaign, in 1872, he edited the Fort Scott Monitor in Greeley's interest. 
That fine old paper never had a more interesting year than that when its 
editorials were written by Ware. 

It is hardly necessary to call attention of the people of Kansas to the 
literary labors of E. F. Ware. His "Rhymes of Ironquill" passed through 
many editions and has been read with delight all over the world. Mr. 
Ware was a fine lawyer, and he was commissioner of pensions under 
President Roosevelt. 



NOBLE L. PRENTIS. 

NOBLE LOVELY PRENTIS was born April 8, 1839, in a log cabin 
three miles from Mount Sterling, Brown county, Illinois. He died 
July 6, 1900, at the home of his daughter, at La Harpe, in the same state, 
within a few miles of the place of his birth. His parents were from 
Vermont, and were descended from English settlers who came to America 
in 1630 and 1641, respectively. His grandfather Prentis served in the 
Revolutionary army, and two of his uncles gave their lives one at Bunker 
Hill and one at Saratoga. Several of his mother's family were enrolled in 
that war from the state of Connecticut. His father and mother died at 
Warsaw, 111., of the cholera, in the epidemic of 1849, leaving him an 
orphan at the age of ten. He went to live with an uncle in Vermont. At 
the age of eighteen he went to Connecticut, and was apprenticed to the 
printer's trade. He came West and worked for awhile in a newspaper 
office at Carthage, 111. At the beginning of the Civil War he enlisted as 
a private in the Sixteenth Illinois, serving until the close of the war. He 
was mustered out after putting in four years. He published a newspaper 
at Alexandria, Mo. May 13, 1866, he was married to Miss Maria C. 
Strong, by whom he had two daughters. She died in Atchison in 1880. 
He edited a paper in Carthage, 111. Capt. Henry King induced him to 
come to Topeka in 1869 and assist him on the Record. He next worked 
on the Commonwealth, and next on the Lawrence Journal. From 1873 to 
1875 he edited the Junction City Union; then he returned to the Topeka 
Commonwealth, and about 1877 he began work on the Atchison Champion. 
He remained with the Champion through Colonel Martin's term as gover- 
nor, and in 1888 took charge of the Newton Republican. In 1890 he ac- 
cepted a position on the editorial staff of the Kansas City Star, which he 
held until his death. In 1877 he visited Europe, and his observations he 
published in book form, entitled "A Kansan Abroad," which went through 
two editions. Other books published by him were "Southern Letters," 



26 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




JOSIAH MILLER. 



-<*> 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 27 

"Southwestern Letters," and "Kansas Miscellanies." In the last year of 
his life he wrote a "History of Kansas" for use in the public schools, 
which is to-day a textbook. In 1883 he married Mrs. Carrie E. Anderson, 
of Topeka, who survives him. She was a delightful companion and help- 
mate, and their home life was most charming. A settler in Kansas of an 
early day, and a woman of strong mind and cultivated literary tastes, she 
sympathized with him in all his ambitions and labors, adding strength to 
his life. 

We will add to the above what one of his friends said in loving remem- 
brance of him,: 

"Now this man was without a college or even a high-school education, 
and never saw the inside of a "temple of learning" as a pupil except for 
a few winter terms when he attended a district school in an old unpainted 
building in the muddy lane of an Illinois prairie before the Civil War. 
There he mastered the "three R's" far enough to become a good reader, a 
manipulator of the hieroglyphics which in those days passed for writing, 
and over to fractions in 'rithmetic. Then he served from beginning to 
end of the Civil War, and held his rank that of a private soldier- 
throughout. And here occurs an occasion to refer to another trait of his 
character. Prentis was offered a commission and was urged by his 
company and the colonel of his regiment to accept, but refused on the 
ground that he was "unworthy of the honor." He did compromise on 
"company reader" an office unknown in any other part of the army, I 
believe, but which he filled with great acceptability, as I have been assured 
by several members of his company. Is it any wonder that a man so em- 
barrassed by modesty could not be elected to an office in Kansas, where 
every man and woman is a politician? After the war he came to Kansas 
and became a newspaper writer, and his career had begun. It was a 
rocky road and not always plain. Thousands of the brainiest young men 
of the country were seeking homes in the New West, and competition for 
place and power was sharp in Kansas. It was a case of the survival of 
the fittest. Out of the noble school of intellectual stalwarts thus added to 
the roll of honor of Kansas I select Noble L. Prentis as the greatest 
among them. Why? Because of what he did with what he had. Poor, 
almost penniless, friendless and alone, he came among strangers in a 
strange country, and, with no resources except the rich endowment of 
his brain and heart, made his way to the front in every requirement of 
good citizenship and every attainment of literary and scholastic honors, 
and maintained this standing to the end of his life. This is not my 
estimate alone, but will be concurred in by every one who knew him well." 



JOSIAH MILLER. 

JOSIAH MILLER was born in Chester district, South Carolina, No r 
vember 12, 1828. He was the son of Robert H. Miller and Susannah 
Allilley. The family were Scotch Presbyterians and pronounced op- 
ponents of slavery. They were badly mistreated. Josiah Miller was edu- 
cated at the University of Indiana, graduating in the class of 1851, and 
later from the law school at Poughkeepsie, N. Y. January 3, 1854, he 
was married to Agnes B. Carlisle, of Bloomington, Ind. In August, 1854, 
he came to Kansas and arranged to establish the Kansas Free State 
newspaper at Lawrence, and January 5, 1855, started the paper, the firm 
being Miller & Elliott. May 21, 1856, the paper was destroyed at the 
sacking of Lawrence. He was captured by proslavery forces, held as a 



28 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




CAPTAIN HENRY KING. 



- 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 29 

prisoner of war, and tried for treason against South Carolina. On his 
release he canvassed several of the northern states for Fremont. In 
1857 he was elected probate judge of Douglas county, and in 1859 to the 
first state senate. He was postmaster at Lawrence in 1863, and resigned 
to become paymaster in the army. He served again in the legislature of 
1867. It is claimed for him that he was the author of the motto upon the 
state seal, "Ad astro, per aspera." He was a wide-awake business man 
and accomplished much. He died at Lawrence, July 7, 1870, after having 
a leg amputated on account of some disease of the member. 

The Kansas Free State was the most conservative and most influential 
of the first territorial papers. It was also the most scholarly of those 
early publications. Its counsels were not always heeded, but it opened 
the way to freedom for Kansas. 



HENRY KING. 

IT IS NOT the rule for men to follow the trade or profession to which 
they are best adapted and to achieve the dominant ambition of their 
lives. This inclination and result can in absolute truth be said of Capt. 
Henry King. He learned the printer's trade because the attraction was 
irresistible, and advanced from the composing room and hand press to 
the editorial desk because he must have foreseen the work he was best 
fitted to do. His taste and capacity were for writing, a natural force im- 
pelling him to reduce the- workings of his mind to written form and it 
was real writing, for he never used a stenographer or typewriter, and 
his "copy" was the perfection of chirography. 

As a young man he published and edited a weekly newspaper at his 
home town, La Harpe, 111. This work was interrupted by a four years' 
service in the army in 1861-'65. Returning from the army, he engaged 
in a profitless mercantile business, and studied law, but all the time there 
was a ceaseless call to write, and he was soon working on the Daily Whig, 
at Quincy, 111., of which he became editor. Later, in 1869, he removed to 
Topeka, where in turn he edited the State Record, the Commonwealth and 
the Capital. From the latter post he went to the St. Louis Globe-Demo- 
crat, in 1883, first as contributing editor, and for the last eighteen years 
of his life as managing editor. 

Conducting a metropolitan newspaper gave him the broad field for 
which he had prepared himself, and in which he gained a reputation that 
was conspicuous and a fame that was dear to him. He had made his 
influence felt in Illinois; his career in Kansas was a distinguished one; 
his success in Missouri was so notable that he was elected to be the life 
president of the Missouri State Editorial Association; and, crowning 
these achievements, he was chosen to be the president of the World's Press 
Parliament at the time of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. He was 
also the first editor of the Kansas Magazine, now a bright literary 
memory in Kansas. 



30 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




JOHN S. GILMORE. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 31 



When asked to prepare a biographical sketch recounting his labors and 
experiences, Captain King modestly replied : "Life generally uneventful ; 
simply a story of trying to do my best wherever placed." 

Henry King was born at Salem, Ohio, May 11, 1841, and died at St. 
Louis, March 15, 1915. From 1869 to 1883 he was prominent in Kansas 
affairs. His interest in and love for the state continued up to the date of 
his death, and during the period of his activity he undoubtedly con- 
tributed as much to the history of Kansas and the West as any of his 
contemporaries. 



JOHN S. GILMORE. 

JOHN S. GILMORE was born in Rochester, N. Y., December 6, 1848. 
I His parents were Robert G. and Helen Storrier Gilmore, and in 1857 
he accompanied them and his brothers to Kansas territory. October 
31 of that year the family landed at Wyandotte from a Missouri river 
steamboat (the William Campbell) and set out on their journey of 110 
miles in an ox wagon to the claim which the father had taken in March 
of the same year. Their cabin on the frontier was in the Neosho river 
woods, two miles northeast of the new town of Emporia, and our subject 
lived in the county till the summer of 1865, when, on the 20th of July, he 
entered the office of Jacob Stotler's Emporia News as a printer's appren- 
tice. He afterward worked on the Burlington Patriot (S. S. Prouty), 
the Oswego Register, the Leavenworth Daily Commercial, the Osage 
Chronicle (M. M. Murdock), and the Emporia Tribune. 

Having, before his twenty-first birthday, through work as a typesetter 
and the investment of his wages in cattle, saved up over six hundred 
dollars, he felt an ambition to start a paper. Riding from Emporia to 
Wilson county, on a Kaw Indian pony, in December, 1869, he completed 
negotiations for such an undertaking. He located at Guilford, where a 
few months later the press and other paraphernalia of the office which 
he had selected with his own hands were shipped the last week in March. 
The press was a Washington hand press on which he had "rolled" as an 
apprentice in the office of the Emporia News, and was taken to that town 
by P. B. Plumb in 1857, when he started the News. The first number of 
the Citizen was issued at Guilford, April 21, 1870, with John S. Gilmore 
as editor and proprietor. The young editor in the salutatory announced, 
expressive of his political convictions, that the Citizen was a Republican 
paper. After publishing it for six months and becoming convinced that 
Guilford had but slight prospects as a town, the paper was moved to 
Neodesha and publication resumed as the Neodesha Citizen, the first num- 
ber being issued November 18, 1870. Two years later the paper was sus- 
pended, and in May, 1873, Mr. Gilmore, wishing to locate at the county 
seat, purchased of Wm. A. Peffer the Fredonia Journal printing outfit, 
stopped the Journal, and revived his former paper as the Wilson County 
Citizen, the initial issue appearing on June 6. From the beginning the 
Citizen has never changed hands nor politics; the present proprietor has 
been its sole owner, and has absolutely controlled and directed its course 



32 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




JOHN A. MARTIN. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 33 

from the first. Through all political storms and mutations the policy of 
the paper has been uniform, definite and consistent, nor has its editor 
purposely or unwittingly temporized in any degree at any time or period 
with any of the numerous new parties and movements which have formed 
and flitted since he began. 

While a resident of Neodesha, and when the town was incorporated as 
a city of the third class, in March, 1871, Mr. Gilmore was elected a mem- 
ber of the first council. At the November election of the same year, and 
when lacking a month of being twenty-three years of age, he was elected 
register of deeds of Wilson county as the nominee of the Republican 
party, which office he held two years, retiring without seeking a reelection. 
In 1876 and in 1878 he was elected representative to the state legislature 
from the fifty-fourth district as a Republican, having been unanimously 
renominated both times. January 26, 1880, he was appointed postmaster 
at Fredonia, holding the office until December 20, 1884. In February, 
1891, Gov. L. U. Humphrey, at his own instance, appointed Mr. Gilmore 
a member of the board of directors of the Kansas State Penitentiary to 
fill a two years' vacancy, and in February, 1899, Gov. W. E. Stanley 
appointed him to a vacancy of like duration on the same board, of which 
board he was chosen president. He was elected a member of the Republi- 
can state central committee in 1876, in 1888 and in 1898 from the seventh 
judicial district; has served as chairman of the Wilson county Republi- 
can central committee several times, has been a delegate to almost every 
Republican state convention since 1870, and his active identification with 
the Republican party since he became a voter has never abated. 

May 31, 1882, Mr. Gilmore was united in marriage at Lancaster, Ohio, 
with Miss Viola Butin, of Fredonia, who was born in Wapello county, 
Iowa, October 13, 1860. She died nine days after the marriage, in Wash- 
ington, D. C. February 27, 1890, Mr. Gilmore and Miss Florence Barton 
were married in Newark township, Wilson county. Mrs. Gilmore is a 
daughter of Capt. Wm. H. and Mary J. Barton, and was born in Ironton, 
Ohio, May 14, 1862. Two children have resulted from this union, namely, 
John, born April 26, 1891, and Mary, born July 1, 1894. 



JOHN A. MARTIN. 

JOHN A. MARTIN was born March 10, 1839, at Brownsville, Pa. He 
received a common-school and printing-office education. In October, 
1857, he came to Kansas, locating at Atchison. In February, 1858, he 
purchased the Squatter Sovereign, and changed its name to Freedom's 
Champion. In 1858 he was nominated for the territorial legislature, but 
declined because he was not of legal age. He was a delegate to the 
Osawatomie convention in 1859, which organized the Republican party in 
Kansas. July 5, 1859, he was elected secretary of the Wyandotte con- 
stitutional convention ; he was secretary of the railroad convention which 
met at Topeka in October, 1860; and was elected to the state senate of 
1861. October, 1861, he was mustered in as lieutenant colonel of the 
Eighth Kansas regiment, and a year later was promoted colonel, and 
3 



34 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 






JOHN H. RICE. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 35 

was mustered out November, 1864, with the brevet of brigadier general. 
He was provost marshal of Leavenworth in March, 1862, and of Nash- 
ville, Tenn., from December, 1862, to June, 1863; colonel Third brigade, 
First division, Twentieth army corps, September and October, 1863; 
colonel First brigade, Third division, Fourth corps, September-November, 
1864. He was one of the incorporators of the State Historical Society, 
and its president in 1878. June 1, 1871, he married Miss Ida Challis. 
Colonel Martin served as mayor of Atchison in 1865, and from 1878 to 
1880 was a member of the board of managers of the National Soldiers' 
Home. In 1884 and again in 1886 he was elected governor of Kansas. He 
died October 2, 1889. 



JOHN H. RICE. 

JOHN HOLT RICE, tetter known to the people of his day in Kansas 
I as General Rice, was born in 1825, in Bedford county, Virginia. He 
came of an ancestry that had long been prominent in the civic and 
religious affairs of that historic commonwealth. 

He grew to manhood at Greenville, in East Tennessee, and was edu- 
cated at Tusculum College at that place. He emigrated to Cassville, Ga., 
and was admitted to the practice of law in 1845. At the same time he be- 
came interested in newspaper enterprises, and from that time to his 
death he was continuously connected with the printing and newspaper 
business either as editor or contributor. 

The beginning of the Civil War found him at the head of the Franklin 
Printing Company, of Atlanta, Ga., the largest printing house in the 
South. A physical breakdown and the depression incident to the war 
ruined his business, and at the close of the war, having a large family of 
boys and girls, he came west, believing that it afforded a better oppor- 
tunity for rearing his family. 

He settled on a farm in Miami county, Kansas, but soon drifted back 
into the newspaper business as editor and proprietor of the Paola Re- 
publican. 

From this time on he was one of the factors in the growth of Kansas. 
Still suffering from the physical infirmity acquired by his breakdown of 
years before, he walked with a crutch, but with even that handicap he 
worked with wonderful energy and accomplished much in the promotion 
of the things in which he was interested. 

In 1879 he disposed of the Paola Republican and bought the Fort Scott 
Daily and Weekly Monitor. Taking this paper at a time when its for- 
tunes were at a very low ebb, he soon made it the strongest and most 
influential paper in southeastern Kansas and with a high rank among the 
representative papers of the state. He was a contemporary of F. P. 
Baker, D. R. Anthony, J. K. Hudson, Sol Miller, George W. Martin, 
Marsh Murdock and others of that time who formed a galaxy of really 
brilliant and able newspaper men. 

General Rice continued as the editor of the Monitor until about 1892. 
He spent a short time in promoting a railroad in Louisiana and Arkansas, 



36 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




M. M. MURDOCH. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 37 

and again returned to the newspaper field as editor of the La Porte 
Chronicle, at La Porte, Tex. 

The atmosphere of Texas was too languid and sleepy for General Rice, 
and a few years later found him as the editor of the Sedalia Capital, of 
Sedalia, Mo. 

In 1898, having spent an even fifty years of almost uninterrupted work 
in the newspaper field, he resigned his control of this paper and announced 
his retirement from further active work. He returned to Fort Scott and 
did not again engage in active business. 

The Kansas City Journal on the occasion of his retirement from news- 
paper work feelingly referred to him as follows : 

"General John H. Rice announces his permanent retirement from 
journalism. Just forty years to a day after he began work he laid down 
his pen and left the field to younger men. His has been an active, inter- 
esting and useful professional life. He was one of the most vigorous and 
aggressive writers Kansas has known since the slavery days, and his 
body and brain were never idle ; even when suffering from severe physical 
ailments he continued to work unceasingly, giving to the younger gen- 
eration and to the world a most excellent example of patience, endurance 
and indomitable will power. His was a strict code of ethics in politics, 
morals and journalism. He lived up to the letter and spirit of that code 
and demanded that all others do the same. He was a gentleman of the 
old southern school; kindly, affectionate in his family, and admired even 
by his enemies for his uprightness and his fairness, even in the heat of 
contests. The Journal wishes him many years of quiet, happy life. He 
has earned them by his long and excellent work, and he can afford to rest 
upon honors worthily won." 

General Rice continued to reside in Fort Scott, contributing occasional 
articles to the newspapers, and following, with the same interest he had 
ever shown, the trend of public affairs. General Rice was united in 
marriage to Nancy Russell at Cassville, Ga., in 1847, and this union, 
blessed by ten children, continued a happy one until 1904, a period of 
fifty-seven years, when it was severed by the death of General Rice, 
Mrs. Rice surviving him a few years. 



M. M. MURDOCK. 

MARSHALL M. MURDOCK, founder of the Wichita Eagle, and for 
nearly forty years intimately identified with the history and 
progress of Sedgwick county, was a native of the Old Dominion, having 
been born in the Pierpont settlement in Virginia (now West Virginia) in 
1837, the year Victoria ascended the throne of England. His earlier 
ancestors were Scotch, but his more immediate ancestors lived in the 
north of Ireland, where his grandfather engaged in rebellion against the 
British government about the time of the Revolutionary War in America, 
and was compelled to flee to this country to save his life. He was a 
metal worker, and after settling in Virginia engaged in the iron-molding 
business. His son Thomas, a man of quick conscience, grew up in a 
settlement of slaveholders and developed a strong abhorrence for the 
institution of slavery. He married Catherine Pierpont, a relative of 
Governor Pierpont, and the subject of this sketch was their firstborn. 



38 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Soon after his marriage Thomas Murdock removed with his family to 
Ohio, and for a time was engaged in business at Ironton. While living 
there Marshall Murdock attended the public schools and began his 
apprenticeship at the printer's trade. 

About this time the fight for a "free Kansas" was on, and the entire 
nation was interested in the outcome of the struggle. Thomas Murdock's 
business venture in Ironton had not been a successful one, and with his 
intense dislike for slavery, he determined to join the free-state forces in 
Kansas. Putting his worldly goods and his family in two covered 
wagons, he started for Kansas. He drove one of the teams, and Marshall, 
or "Marsh" as he was generally called, drove the other. After an over- 
land journey of several weeks they reached Topeka, near which town 
Thomas Murdock "took up" a farm. Over that farm John Brown often 
passed with slaves taken from their masters in Missouri and other 
southern states. 

When gold was discovered in the Pike's Peak region Marshall Mur- 
dock caught the "fever" and set out for "hills of golden promise." There 
is little doubt that he was the first to discover silver where the city of 
Leadville now stands, but in those days gold was the attraction, and his 
discovery was not turned to account until some years later. While he 
was in the gold fields the Civil War broke out, his father and two of his 
brothers enlisted, and Marshall returned to Kansas to take care of his 
mother and the younger members of the family. He found employment 
in a printing office at Lawrence, and was thus engaged when Quantrill 
made his raid on that city in August, 1863. Young Murdock saved his 
life by concealing himself in a well while the guerrillas were plundering 
the town. A few bullets were fired into the well, but he escaped unhurt. 
When the confederate General Price threatened to invade Kansas, in 
1864, Marshall Murdock entered the service as lieutenant colonel of the 
Osage and Lyon county militia, which aided in repelling the invaders. 

In 1863 Colonel Murdock married Victoria Mayberry, of Douglas 
county, and soon after his marriage located at Burlingame, where he 
established the Chronicle. He served as state senator for Osage and 
Lyon counties. In 1872, when it became evident that the Santa Fe rail- 
road was to be extended through Wichita, Colonel Murdock removed his 
printing office to that city and founded the Eagle. Soon after locating 
there he was elected state senator for all that part of the state lying 
between Butler county and the Colorado line, defeating David L. Payne, 
who subsequently started the agitation that resulted in the opening of 
Oklahoma to settlement. Colonel Murdock served as postmaster of 
Wichita for a number of years prior to the inauguration of President 
Cleveland, in 1885. He was again appointed postmaster by President 
McKinley and held the office until the time of his death. 

Colonel Murdock died on January 2, 1908, and is buried on the hill 
overlooking the city which he helped to build, and which stands as a 
monument to his patriotism as a citizen, his courage and optimism as a 
journalist, and to his great influence in the public life of his day. One 
son, Victor, represented the Eighth Kansas district in the lower house of 
Congress from 1903 to 1915, and another son, Marcellus, is now con- 
ducting the Eagle along the lines established by his illustrious father. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



39 




VINCENT J. LANE. 



40 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



VINCENT J. LANE. 

VINCENT J. LANE was born at West Middletown, Pa., January 27, 
1828. He died at Kansas City, Kan., August 11, 1914. He was 
educated in the schools of his native town and taught school in Virginia. 
In 1852 he settled in Indiana, where he remained until 1857. In that 
year he came to Kansas and settled at Quindaro, in Wyandotte county. 
He was a Democrat of the old school, and as the county was Democratic 
in the early days, he was frequently elected to office. He was register of 
deeds of Wyandotte county and a member of the legislature. He was 
also postmaster of Kansas City, Kan., under the Cleveland administra- 
tion. Mr. Lane was a good newspaper man. In 1869 he started the 
Wyandotte Herald. It was the leading Democratic paper of Wyandotte 
county during its entire existence. Mr. Lane discontinued it December 
30, 1910, because of his advanced age. 

Mr. Lane was married at Paris, Ind., in 1855, to Miss Sarah Jane 
Robinson. Three children were born of this union: Bush R., Mrs. Jessie 
R. Hall, and Mrs. Mina Fanin. Mr. Lane was a good citizen. He was 
interested in the construction of the Union Pacific railroad and other 
interests for the development of Kansas. 



PRESTON B. PLUMB. 

PRESTON B. PLUMB was born at Berkshire, Delaware county, Ohio, 
October 12, 1837. He died at Washington city, December 20, 1891. 
Plumb's parents were poor, and he was compelled to depend upon his own 
resources at an early age. When he was twelve years old he went to 
Kenyon College, at Gambier, Ohio, through which institution he worked 
his way, acquiring at the same time high efficiency as a printer. At the 
age of fifteen he bought the plant of an abandoned newspaper in Marys- 
ville, Ohio, with the money which his parents secured by mortgaging their 
home. He took his plant to Xenia, Ohio, where he founded the Xenia 
News, a newspaper which exists to this day. 

Plumb was much interested in the Kansas conflict, and early in 1856 
Marcus J. Parrott visited Xenia and delivered an address on the condi- 
tions existing in Kansas. Plumb heard this address and determined to go 
at once to Kansas to do what he found possible on the free-state side. 
He arrived at Leavenworth on the Fourth of July, 1856. He made a tour 
of the settled portions of the territory and returned to Ohio to bring out 
men and munitions to aid the free-state people. On his trip back he passed 
through Iowa City and came into Kansas over the old Lane trail, which 
was the "underground railroad" through Kansas. He arrived at Topeka 
on the 6th of September, 1856, bringing 250 Sharp's rifles, 250 Colt's re- 
volvers, 250 bowie knives, 20,000 rounds of ammunition for the rifles and 
revolvers, and one brass twelve-pounder cannon. These arms were de- 
livered to the free-state authorities. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 41 




PRESTON B. PLTJMB. 



42 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Plumb became foreman in the Herald of Freedom office late in 1856. 
The proprietor of the paper, together with a number of Lawrence people, 
laid out the town of Emporia early in 1857. Plumb was a member of this 
town company and entered into a contract to establish a newspaper at 
Emporia. The first issue of this paper, the Kanzas News, is dated 
the 6th of June, 1857. It was a six-column folio, modeled after the 
Xenia News, from which it got its name. Emporia was at that time an 
outpost on the Great Plains. The News was one of the ablest newspapers 
in Kansas. Plumb became the real founder of the town of Emporia. 
When the success of the town was assured he sold the paper and entered 
the practice of law, which he continued until the beginning of the Civil 
War. In 1862 he helped organize the Eleventh Kansas, and was made 
major. He served till the close of the war and was mustered out as a 
colonel of the regiment, when he returned to Emporia to live. 

In taking up life anew, Plumb resumed the practice of law, and 
engaged in various kinds of business the purchase and sale of cattle, 
building of railroads, dealing in land and in all of which he was very 
successful. He was always prominent in politics in Kansas, serving in 
the legislature two terms. On the 31st of January, 1877, he was elected 
United States senator from Kansas. In that office he distinguished him- 
self and became one of the foremost statesmen of his time. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



43 




GEORGE W. MARTIN, 

One of the pioneer newspaper men of Kansas; founder of the Junction City Union; 

secretary of the Kansas State Historical Society from 1899 to 1914. 
See vol. XIII, "Kansas Historical Collections," for extended biography. 



44 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



ARTHUR CAPPER. 

ARTHUR CAPPER,* the owner of the Capper building and the Cap- 
per publications, was born in Garnett, Kan., July 14, 1865. He 
learned the practical side of the printing business during his school days. 
He came to Topeka in 1884 and secured work as a typesetter on the Daily 
Capital, of which he is now owner and publisher. Later he became a 
reporter on this paper and then city editor. He spent some time in New 
York in work on the New York Tribune, and in Washington as the Daily 
Capital's Washington correspondent. 

Mr. Capper was married in 1892 to Florence Crawford, daughter of 
Samuel J. Crawford, third governor of Kansas. 

In 1893 Mr. Capper started in business for himself by buying the 
North Topeka Mail. Later he purchased and combined with the Mail a 
paper known as the Kansas Breeze, now known as the Farmers Mail and 
Breeze. The other Capper publications Missouri Valley Farmer, Cap- 
per's Weekly, Nebraska Farm Journal, Missouri Ruralist, Oklahoma 
Farmer and the Household were added from time to time. 

Mr. Capper has been president of the Kansas State Editorial Associa- 
tion, president of the Kansas State Good Roads Association, a member of 
the executive committee of the state and local Y. M. C. A., president of the 
board of regents of the Kansas State Agricultural College from 1909 to 
1913, and a director for several years past of the Topeka Provident Asso- 
ciation for the relief of the poor. He is vice president for Kansas of the 
National Welfare League. The Goodfellows' Club of Topeka was or- 
ganized by Mr. Capper and has given timely assistance to hundreds of 
needy persons. One of its functions has been the operation of a free 
employment bureau for those in need of employment a labor exchange 
between the employers and the workers, without cost to either. 

Mr. Capper is president of the International Peace and Equity League, 
a member of the League to Enforce Peace, and the World's Court League, 
and an honorary member of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance 
Union. He is a member of the following secret organizations: Masons, 
Odd Fellows, A. 0. U. W., National Americans, Modern Woodmen, 
Knights of Pythias, Fraternal Aid Association, Knights and Ladies of 
Security, United Commercial Travelers, Loyal Order of Moose, as well as 
member of the board of governors of Mooseheart, the home and school 
conducted at Mooseheart, 111., by the Moose lodge. 

In November, 1914, Mr. Capper was chosen governor of Kansas, being 
the first native-born Kansan to attain that office. 

* See frontispiece for portrait. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 45 



ROBERT G. ELLIOTT. 

ROBERT GASTON ELLIOTT was born in Union county, Indiana, 
July 23, 1828, of South Carolina parentage, who left the South be- 
cause of religious antipathy to slavery. He was educated in the common 
schools of Indiana and at the Miami University of that state, graduating 
in 1850. It was at this institution that he met Josiah Miller, a native of 
South Carolina. These two young men formed a partnership to publish a 
paper in Kansas in the interest of freedom. They moved to Lawrence, 
Kan., and established the Kansas Free State, which was one of the first 
papers, if not the very first, established by the antislavery people in 
Kansas. It was perhaps the ablest paper published in Kansas territorial 
times. It was conservative but uncompromising. It was destroyed by 
the border ruffians when Lawrence was sacked, May 21, 1856. The paper 
was not revived. The files of the Kansas Free State in the Kansas State 
Historical Society are consulted more frequently than any other early 
publication of the state. It was edited with great ability and had a 
broader influence than any other of the early publications. 

Mr. Elliott is still living at Lawrence, Kan., honored by all who know 
him. He has lived to see Kansas grow into a great and influential state, 
and has the satisfaction of knowing that he contributed largely to its 
history, its growth and prosperity. 



WILLIAM R. SMITH. 

WILLIAM R. SMITH, state printer, has been actively identified with 
Kansas newspaperdom for the past quarter of a century. He is a 
native Kansan, having been born at Lecompton, the old territorial capital, 
March 21, 1872. There he grew to manhood, and at the age of eighteen 
made his first newspaper venture by starting the Lecompton Sun. Evi- 
dently the Sun "filled a long-felt want," as it is still illuminating readers 
in its orbit on matters of news interest. Mr. Smith's first act of public 
importance on attaining his majority was to qualify as postmaster of 
Lecompton, his appointment to that position having been confirmed a 
few days before he was of age. At the city election a few weeks later he 
was elected mayor of the town, in which capacity he served two terms. 
On completing his term as postmaster Mr. Smith went to Topeka to take 
the foremanship of the Mail and Breeze office, which position he held for 
two years, when he purchased the Manhattan Republic. He published 
this paper for more than two years, later selling it and going to Lawrence, 
where he published the Fraternal Aid for a year. At the close of the 
year he effected a consolidation of the Plaindealer and the Eagle at Gar- 
nett, and for five years he edited the consolidated paper. During his 
residence in Garnett Mr. Smith served two years as county printer, an 
elective office in Anderson county. From Garnett he went to Ottawa, 
where he was associated with H. J. Allen and A. L. Miller on the Evening 



46 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




WILLIAM E. SMITH, 

State Printer, Topeka, Kansas. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 47 



Herald for a year. His next field was at Fort Scott, where he published 
the Daily Republican for five years. In 1910 he was appointed census 
supervisor of the second congressional district. Early in 1911 he sold the 
Republican and bought the Columbus Daily and Weekly Advocate, which 
he published until the fall of 1915, when the duties of the office of state 
printer, to which he had been elected by a handsome majority in 1914, 
made it advisable for him to sell the property. As state printer Mr. 
Smith is giving the state the benefit of his twenty-five years' experience 
as printer and publisher, and is doing much to demonstrate the wisdom 
of the state operating its own print shop. During his term state publi- 
cation of school books, inaugurated shortly before he assumed the duties 
of the office, is being carried on in a manner that is removing much of the 
criticism of the plan. 



CHARLES F. SCOTT. 

/CHARLES FREDERICK SCOTT was born on a farm in Allen 
^/ county, September 7, 1860. His father was Dr. John W. Scott, who 
came to Kansas in 1857 and was a conspicuous figure in the free-state 
ranks, being speaker pro tern, of the first state legislature, and a member, 
either in the house or senate, of several subsequent legislatures. He 
served through the war as surgeon of the Tenth Kansas, was president 
of the company that laid out the town of lola, was a director in the 
L. L. & G. Railroad (now the Southern Kansas branch of the Santa Fe) , 
was a regent of the State University, and for many years active and in- 
fluential in the business and political affairs of the state. 

Charles F. Scott was educated at the State University, graduating in 
1881, later receiving from that institution the degree of M. S., and from 
the State Agricultural College the degree of LL. D. He was regent of the 
State University for ten years, and was chairman of the first board of 
alumni visitors. 

In 1892 he was one of fifteen Republicans elected to the state senate. 
In 1900 he was elected congressman-at-large, and twice reflected to that 
position. Upon the redistricting of the state he became a representative 
in Congress from the second district, and was reflected, serving in all ten 
years in the national house of representatives, during the last four years 
of which time he was chairman of the committee on agriculture. During 
his service in Congress he was a member of congressional parties that at 
different times visited the Philippines, Hawaii, Porto Rico and Panama, 
and in 1911, after the conclusion of his service in Congress, he was sent 
as one of the five delegates from the United States to the International 
Institute of Agriculture which met at Rome. In 1915, upon the request 
of the committee in charge of the donations, he went to Belgium to over- 
see the distribution of the cargo of food and clothing that had been con- 
tributed by the people of Kansas for the relief of the Belgians, spending 
some time in the war zone. In 1913 Mr. Scott engaged in joint debate 
with Mr. Henry J. Allen, of the Wichita Beacon, under the direction of 
the Redpath-Horner Chautauqua Bureau, dates being filled in six differ- 



48 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




CHARLES F. SCOTT, 

Tola, Kansas. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 49 



ent states. In 1915 he spent some weeks on the lecture platform in 
Pennsylvania and West Virginia, under direction of the Redpath- 
Brockway Chautauqua Bureau, and he is filling a similar engagement 
this summer with the Redpath-Vawter Chautauqua in Missouri, Iowa 
and Minnesota. Besides these "continuous performances," Mr. Scott 
has made occasional speeches on many topics in many states, and 
for twenty years has participated in political campaigns in this and 
other states. During the campaign of 1912 he was in charge of the 
publicity bureau at Republican national headquarters in Chicago, and he 
was one of the delegates-at-large to the late Republican national conven- 
tion, being chosen to that office by the largest vote cast for any of the 
candidates before the state convention. At different times Mr. Scott has 
been president of the Kansas State Editorial Association, of the Kansas 
Day Club, and of various other organizations, and is at present president 
of the Kansas State Historical Society. He is a member of the board of 
trustees of Emporia College, a member of the state Y. M. C. A. board, 
president of the Y. M. C. A. at Tola, an elder in the Presbyterian church, 
and chairman of the board of trustees of Neosho presbytery. 

Mr. Scott has been owner and editor of the lola Register since October, 
1882. His family consists of his wife and four children. 



F. L. VANDEGRIFT. 

T^REDERICK L. VANDEGRIFT began his newspaper career in 
Atchison, where for short periods he worked on the several local 
dailies. While John A. Martin, the owner of the Champion, was governor 
of Kansas, Mr. Vandegrift, although a Democrat, and the paper Re- 
publican, was its city editor. Noble L. Prentis was editor, Governor Mar- 
tin contributing occasionally, and by the combined efforts of the three 
the paper was of greater popular interest than ever before or since. It 
was quoted widespread in the state, and especially was of great influence 
north of the Kaw and Smoky Hill rivers. Afterward Mr. Vandegrift 
and Mr. Prentis were associated in newspaper work again; this time on 
the Kansas City Star, beginning in the autumn of 1891. In 1900 Mr. 
Prentis died, and Mr. Vandegrift was selected to deliver an address in 
eulogy of his friend before the Knife and Fork Club, of which he (Mr. 
Prentis) had been one of the founders. 

In the winter of 1893-'94 Mr. Vandegrift became Kansas correspondent 
of the Star, continuing in that capacity until the spring of 1905. During 
this period he did his best newspaper work, achieving distinction by his 
reports of legislatures and state conventions and his weekly Sunday re- 
views of political events. He particularly had the instinct for political 
news. His acquaintance in the state was so widespread, and his knowl- 
edge of men and motives so keen, that instinctively he knew the logic of 
the news, and his estimates and conclusions rarely if ever missed the 
truth. Added to this, a careful education in his youth had prepared him 

4 



50 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




F. L. VANDEGRIFT, 

Kansas. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 51 



for the work, and, possessing imagination and wit, he was able to turn 
out reports and letters which never lacked interest. He never betrayed a 
confidence, and so was admitted freely to the secrets of all political 
parties. He never lied, never evaded, and thereby his written word was 
worth full weight. For some years he wrote the "Kansas Notes" of the 
Star, succeeding the late Alexander Butts, who initiated that department 
in the paper. Mr. Vandegrift made these paragraphs especially interest- 
ing, because he did not join a mutual admiration society. In the course 
of his newspaper work Mr. Vandegrift has recorded much of the history 
and legend of Kansas. One of his contributions of this character is a 
compendium filling a page of the Star on the occasion of the state's 
fiftieth anniversary. 

Mr. Vandegrift's early education was received from a famous Latin 
school for boys at Keokuk, Iowa. He afterward graduated from Cin- 
cinnati College, whose seat is in the county of which he is a native. At 
present Mr. Vandegrift is the editor of a colonization magazine pub- 
lished by the Santa Fe Railway, but he lives in the hope of returning to 
the more strenuous duties of a daily newspaper, for which he peculiarly 
is fitted. His home is in Kansas City, Mo., but his heart is in Kansas. 
Mr. Vandegrift for some years has been a director of the Kansas State 
Historical Society. 



W. Y. MORGAN. 

WILLIAM Y. MORGAN, editor of the Hutchinson News, director of 
the State Exchange Bank, and one of the leading newspaper men 
of Kansas, was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, April 6, 1866, a son of William 
A. and Minnie (Yoast) Morgan. He received his early education in the 
public schools of Cotton wood Falls, as he was a small child when his 
parents located in their western home. He entered the State University 
at Lawrence, where he took special courses that would prepare him for 
journalism, the profession he had chosen for his life work. While still a 
boy he had learned to set type in his father's office, and the practical 
knowledge thus gained gave him a better idea of the instruction he desired 
at college. He graduated with the class of 1885, and immediately began to 
do local work on a paper in Lawrence; then purchased a newspaper 
which he edited and published at Strong City for four years, but sold it 
to purchase the Emporia Daily Gazette. He built up this paper, made it 
a first-class publication, and continued as its editor until 1895, when he 
sold out to William Allen White and removed to Hutchinson. There he 
organized the News company, of which he is president and the principal 
stockholder, and bought the News, which now has the largest circulation 
of any paper in central Kansas. Mr. Morgan is a great worker and a 
capable manager. Few cities the size of Hutchinson can boast of a paper 
containing as much general news as the one of which he has charge. He 
has always been a stanch supporter of the Republican party, and was 
only twenty when made secretary of the Douglas county convention, and 
in whatever community he has lived he has been honored with the 



52 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




W. Y. MORGAN, 

Hutchinson, Kansas. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 53 



position of secretary or chairman of the Republican central committee. 
In 1899 he was elected state printer by the legislature, and served in that 
capacity until 1903, when he was elected to represent Reno county in the 
lower house of the legislature, serving until 1910, and during two terms 
was chairman of the committee on railroads. He is a member of the Phi 
Gamma Delta college fraternity, and has served as one of the board of 
regents of the State University. He is an active member of the Sons of 
Veterans, and served as state commander in 1894. Fraternally he is 
associated with the Masons, the Knights of Pythias, the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen, Modern Woodmen of America, and the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. 

On November 20, 1891, Mr. Morgan married Colie, a daughter of Wit 
Adair, of Strong City. Mr. Morgan is well known in political, legisla- 
tive and business circles of the state, and has gained a place in the front 
rank of the newspaper fraternity, where his ability as a writer is fully 
recognized by the profession. While abroad some time ago Mr. Morgan 
wrote for the News a series of letters, which have since been published in 
book form under the name of "A Journal of a Jayhawker" and "A Jay- 
hawker in Europe." A born leader, it is but natural that Mr. Morgan 
has taken the lead in movements for good in his city, county and state, 
and he stands among the representative men of central Kansas. 



CHARLES S. GLEED. 

CHARLES SUMNER GLEED was born in Vermont in 1856, and 
^/ came to Lawrence in 1866 with his mother, Mrs. Thomas Gleed, and 
his brother, James Willis Gleed. His first definite employment was in 
connection with newspapers. The possession of a boy's printing plant 
gave him his first knowledge of the rudiments of the typographical art. 
In the ten years prior to 1878, for the purpose of earning a living and an 
education (in high school and the University of Kansas), he did many 
kinds of newspaper work for the Lawrence Republican and its successor, 
the Lawrence Journal; the Lawrence Tribune, the Kansas Spirit, the 
Kansas Collegiate, the Kansas City Journal, the Chicago Tribune and the 
New York Herald. For the Lawrence Journal he was carrier, mailing 
clerk, shipping clerk, cashier, reporter, legislative correspondent, city 
editor, managing editor and editorial writer. For the Tribune he was 
compositor, mailing clerk and countingroom assistant. For the Kansas 
Spirit he was compositor and writer. For the Kansas City Journal he 
was news correspondent, subscription and advertising agent and editorial 
writer. For the Chicago Tribune he was news correspondent and editorial 
writer on western subjects. For the New York Herald he reported many 
important events of national interest. His work in Lawrence brought 
him in close personal relations with T. Dwight Thacher, Noble L. Prentis 
and Frederick J. V. Skiff, of the Journal; the Rev. I. S. Kalloch, of the 
Spirit; John Speer, of the Tribune; and ex-Senator Edmund G. Ross and 
Henry C. Burnett, of the Standard. He also formed the acquaintance of 



54 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




CHARLES S. GLEED, 
Topeka, Kansas. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 55 



practically all the best-known editors of Kansas. In 1878 Mr. Gleed was 
employed to look after the newspaper relations of the Kansas Pacific Rail- 
way, with headquarters in Kansas City. After the purchase of the Kan- 
sas Pacific by the Union Pacific he did the same work in Omaha. In 1880 
he took charge of the publicity work of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe 
in Topeka. For this company he established and edited the Santa Fe 
Trail, a monthly paper devoted to advertising the commercial and in- 
dustrial possibilities and the tourist attractions of the states tributary to 
the Santa Fe lines. In this work he gained an almost intimate acquaint- 
ance with a very large proportion of the newspapers and the newspaper 
men in the southwest quarter of the United States. In 1882, having 
carried his law studies (begun in Lawrence in the first class of the Uni- 
versity law school) to the necessary point, he was admitted to the bar, 
and entered the law department of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe 
company as chief clerk to General Solicitor George R. Peck. In 1884 he 
resigned from the railway service to become editor of the Denver Daily 
Tribune as successor to Eugene Field. He had brought about the sale of 
the paper to Mr. T. C. Henry, who in turn induced him to become editor 
of the paper. In about six months the Tribune and the Republican were 
consolidated under the control of Senator Hill, and Mr. Gleed and his 
brother (who had just completed his law studies in the law school of 
Columbia University, New York) opened their law office in Topeka, 
where they have continued in business ever since. Naturally, Mr. Gleed 
had many clients among newspaper men. One of these was Major J. K. 
Hudson, of the Topeka Capital, and another was Frank P. MacLennan, 
of the Topeka Journal, to whom Mr. Gleed and his brother rendered 
varied services, legal and financial. Mr. Gleed was counsel for Mr. 
MacLennan in his purchase of the State Journal, and for a considerable 
time carried the property in his own name. In 1896 Mr. Gleed, having 
been the attorney in many matters for the Kansas City Journal, had an 
opportunity to purchase the same from its founder, the late Colonel 
Robert T. Van Horn, and his then associate, Mr. William A. Bunker. 
For the twenty years between June, 1896, and June, 1916, Mr. Gleed, 
president, and Mr. Hal Gaylord, secretary and manager, owned and 
operated the Kansas City Journal company and its several publications. 
This paper was founded by Colonel Van Horn in 1854, and is accord- 
ingly the oldest paper in Kansas City and the foremost Republican paper 
in western Missouri. While throughout his control of the Kansas City 
Journal Mr. Gleed was an intensely busy lawyer in connection with numer- 
ous railroad, telephone, banking and manufacturing corporations, he 
never failed to closely direct the editorial policy of the Journal, and did 
for it a great amount of actual writing. Probably no twenty years in 
the life of any paper in the United States will show a better grade of 
editorial opinion than can be found in the pages of the Journal in the 
twenty years referred to. 



56 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




T. A. McNEAL, 
Topeka, Kansas. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 57 



T. A. McNEAL. 

TA. McNEAL responded as follows when requested to furnish a 
9 biographical sketch for this history of Kansas newspapers : "Born 
on a farm in Marion county, Ohio, of reasonably but not excessively poor 
and very honest parents. Worked on farm until I was a young man, 
not because I enjoyed it, but because there was n't any good way, so far 
as I could see, to get out of it. Got some education at Ohio Central 
College, now deceased; also Oberlin, and at Hillsdale, Mich. Came to 
Kansas in 1879. Went into the newspaper business as part owner of the 
Medicine Lodge Cresset. Lived in Medicine Lodge fifteen years. Might 
have stayed longer if I had not been practically busted. Got out first num- 
ber of Kansas Breeze on Friday, April 13, 1894, which shows that I am 
not superstitious. The paper soon achieved rather a wide circulation for 
an infant. It seemed to be going almost everywhere except to hell, and 
I had hard work to keep it from going there. Sold paper to Arthur 
Capper in fall of 1895, after having run it one and a half years, part of 
the time associated with the late Frank Montgomery. Mr. Capper com- 
bined Breeze with North Topeka Mail. I have been editor of combined 
publication ever since. 

"My official career has been made up of four years member of the 
legislature, six years state printer, and one year mayor of Medicine 
Lodge." 



MRS. CORA G. LEWIS. 

CORA GILBERT LEWIS was born in Cameron, Mo., June 29, 1866; 
daughter of Horace W. and Trescinda (Wren) Gilbert.' Educated 
in public schools of Missouri. Married April 26, 1888, to James Millon 
Lewis. Children: Loraine, Gilbert, MacArthur, Kelton E. With hus- 
band in newspaper work, as associate editor of Kinsley Graphic. Mem- 
ber and for two years president Kansas Woman's Press Association; 
president Women's Kansas Day Club ; president seventh district of Feder- 
ated Clubs; member visiting board for state charitable institutions (under 
Governor Hoch). Clubs: State Historical Society; life member Kansas 
Federation Women's Clubs (was president two years). Episcepalian. 
Favors woman suffrage; helped in campaign as a speaker in September 
and October, 1912. 



58 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




MRS. CORA G. LEWIS, 

Kinsley, Kansas. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 59 



ALBERT T. REID. 

ALBERT T. REID, artist-publisher, was born in Concordia, Kan., 
August 12, 1873. His father helped to lay out the town of Con- 
cordia, and was the first county clerk of Cloud county. He was a lawyer, 
a banker, and at one time owned the Republican-Expositor; so, in a way, 
his son inherited the "spell" of printer's ink. Albert T. Reid got his 
early newspaper training on the Kansas City Star. He was with the 
Chicago Record for a few months, and went from there to New York, 
with the Herald. He was on the art staff of Judge, and at the same time 
was drawing for other leading magazines. 

Mr. Reid was married in Topeka, October 19, 1902, to Miss Vera Low, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Low. 

In 1905 Mr. Reid started the Leavenworth Daily Post, which he still 
controls. In March, 1908, the company of which he is president pur- 
chased the Farmers Advocate, Topeka, and in December of that year this 
company purchased the Kansas Farmer and combined the two papers, 
retaining the name of Kansas Farmer. 

Mr. Reid has always taken great interest in the agricultural interests 
of Kansas. He inaugurated and organized the plan which stopped the 
tremendous shipments of live stock from the Kansas farms to market, 
following the loss of corn crops and the dry season two years ago. He 
inaugurated and organized the Kansas Farmer Seed Wheat Club, which 
raised money to buy seed wheat for the farmers of eight western counties 
which had suffered a series of bad seasons. This movement, according 
to State Bank Commissioner Benson, produced over $1,250,000 worth of 
wheat for the markets of 1914. He planned and is carrying out the 
Kansas Farmer Dairy Club a movement in which the banks of Kansas 
are cooperating in starting boys and girls into the profitable business of 
dairy farming. This plan has been most highly indorsed by the state 
bank commissioner, the State Banking Association, the people at the 
Agricultural College, Secretary J. C. Mohler, and officials from the Agri- 
cultural Department of Washington. He is president of the Standard 
Farm-paper Association ; member of the board of trustees for the Topeka 
public library; president of the Kansas Commission to the Panama- 
Pacific International Exposition. 



60 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




ALBERT T. REID, 

Topeka, Kansas. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 61 



CHARLES H. SESSIONS. 

/CHARLES H. SESSIONS was born at Woodstock, Champaign county, 
^/ Ohio, in 1868. His early life was spent on a farm, and for three 
years he worked in a country store. He secured a good common and high- 
school education. He has been a student, and in recognition of his attain- 
ments, Baker University conferred upon him the degree of master of arts. 
Mr. Sessions came to Kansas City, Kan., at the age of twenty, and ob- 
tained employment with the Kansas City Times the very first day he was 
there. After five years with the Times he went to the Kansas City 
Journal, and had charge of the Kansas City (Kan.) bureau of the paper 
for three years only, when he was promoted to the most important out- 
side staff position, coming to Topeka as general state correspondent at 
the capital in 1896. From that time until his election as secretary of 
state, in 1910, he held that position with the Journal, except two years 
when he was staff correspondent at Washington during the great news 
era of the Roosevelt administration. He was appointed private secre- 
tary to Governor Hoch, which position he resigned to go to Washington. 
He was not satisfied with his position at Washington, and returned to 
Kansas. He was assigned his old position at Topeka, where he now 
resides with his Kansas-born wife and Kansas-born son. At the end of 
his second term as secretary of state he was appointed private secretary 
to Governor Capper, which position he still holds. 

Mr. Sessions is recognized as one of the best newspaper men in Kansas, 
and is still the correspondent of the Kansas City Journal. As secretary 
of state Mr. Sessions made a fine record. He kept the bills for legislative 
supplies lower than they had been for a generation. He published the 
Session Laws earlier than they had ever been published; he organized 
the charter department of the state, and compelled many big corpora- 
tions, operating in the state without authority, to take out state licenses 
and come under the state law. He helped to invest $2,000,000 in first- 
class bonds for the state school fund. Mr. Sessions is still a young man 
and has a bright future in Kansas. 



62 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




CHARLES H. SESSIONS, 
Topeka, Kansas. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



63 




CHARLES S. FINCH, 
Lawrence, Kansas. 



64 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



CHARLES S. FINCH. 

CHARLES S. FINCH was born at Girard, 111. Brought with family 
to Kansas in 1869. Lived on a farm and attended school until 
grown. Pupil of State Normal at Leavenworth; at Kansas State Uni- 
versity. Graduated in law department of Michigan University. Prac- 
ticed law eight years. . Edited Lawrence Tribune from January 1, 1889, 
until its consolidation with the Lawrence Journal. Editorial writer for 
the Journal until 1903, then purchased Lawrence Gazette. Family: wife 
and three children. 



ANNA MALLOWS. 

ANNA MALLOWS was born on a farm near White Cloud, Kan.; 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Mallows. Started to school at age 
of four; stayed in the country school (Arnold school) until ready for 
high school; graduated from White Cloud high school on May 10, 1891. 
Began to teach in country schools, spending each summer for a number 
of years in either a teachers' county normal or other school. Completed 
first bookkeeping at Campbell University (Holton) ; took business course 
at Card's School, St. Joseph. Teaching career extended over a period of 
nineteen years, without a year's rest. During the latter years' teaching 
experience the summers were spent in travel. One summer was spent in 
and around Chicago; one summer in and around Nashville, Tenn., during 
which visit most of the southern states were visited, including a trip to 
Mammoth cave. During the summer of 1899 the time was spent in and 
around Detroit, Mich., during which visit the northern states were visited, 
including a visit to Canada and Niagara Falls. Much time was spent on 
the Great Lakes. The first visit to the Rocky Mountains was in 1901, and 
after that several summers were spent in the Rockies, with headquarters 
at Denver, Colo. 

Bought the White Cloud Globe on August 18, 1910, and stayed very 
close to home since, until last summer, when time was taken to visit 
California and the Pacific coast, stopping first at Los Angeles, thence 
Long Beach, San Diego, San Francisco, Pasadena, and on to Portland 
and Seattle, then home by way of Pocatello, Salt Lake City, Denver and 
other midway points, making short stops at each. 

Not only attends to newspaper duties, but took charge of the North- 
east Kansas Telephone Exchange at the same time that the newspaper 
was purchased, acting as local manager and bookkeeper. 

Quit teaching school with $1700 in bank. Newspaper career has been 
a success financially. Own home, plant and fixtures, and some other town 
property, and have a nice little sum in banks for future emergencies. 
Nearly everything earned by hard work, yet life has been one round of 
pleasure. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



65 




MISS ANNA MALLOWS, 
White Cloud, Kansas. 



66 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE. 

WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE was born at Emporia, Kan., February 
10, 1868. He was reared in Butler county, where his father 
moved at an early day. He was educated in the El Dorado schools and at 
the Kansas University. He learned the printer's trade in the office of 
T. P. Fulton, of the El Dorado Republican. In 1891 he went to Kansas 
City, Mo. He did editorial work on the Kansas City Journal. For a time 
he was employed on the Kansas City Star. In 1895 he bought the Em- 
poria Gazette, which paper he has owned, edited and managed to the 
present time: The article which brought him his first wide notice was an 
editorial, "What's the Matter with Kansas?" written in 1896. It was 
quoted all over the United States. When questioned on this subject once 
he made the following explanation: "I accidentally became notorious 
through writing a fool editorial which I left on the hook as 'time copy' 
to keep the printers going while I went on a short visit to my sick wife, 
who was in Colorado." 

The truth of the matter is that the editorial was of high order, and 
brought him deserved prominence. It was the beginning of a literary 
career any author should be proud of, and Mr. White is better known 
away from home as an author than as a newspaper man. Some of his 
books are: "The Court of Boyville," published in 1899; "Stratagems and 
Spoils," 1901; "In Our Town," 1906; "A Certain Rich Man," 1909; "The 
Old Order Changeth," 1910. Mr. White is a contributor to the best maga- 
zines and papers. 



JOHN MAC DONALD. 

JOHN MAC DONALD was born at Linshader, on the western coast of 
Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland, on February 6, 1843. When he 
was a child his parents moved to Gairloch, in the west of Ross-shire, 
situated on an inlet of the Atlantic. It was in this picturesque country 
that MacDonald received his elementary and high-school education, for in 
those days, as in these days, instruction in the higher studies was given 
in the parish schools. 

In 1862 young MacDonald went to London to seek his fortune, and not 
finding it, crossed the Atlantic in 1866 to New York. Two years later 
"he went westward, "not knowing whither he went," but bound to find 
:some haven. He found it in 1870, in Shawnee county, on or near the 
Wakarusa. 

Shortly afterward he began to teach, and he has been connected with 
the public schools in some way until now. He served as superintendent of 
the Shawnee county schools from 1877 to 1881 and from 1883 to 1889. 
In December, 1889, he bought the Western School Journal, and he is still 
its owner and editor. Mr. MacDonald was a member of the Kansas State 
Board of Education from April, 1909, to April, 1915. He was president of 
the Kansas State Teachers' Association in 1898. He is now, and has been 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



67 




WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE, 
Emporia, Kansas. 



O 



68 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

a number of years, president of the Educational Press Association of 
America, and he was many years a member of the board of directors of 
the National Education Association. He has been a member of the Kan- 
sas State Teachers' Association since the early seventies, and of the 
National Association has been a life member since 1886. There are two 
national meetings the National Educational Association in July, and the 
Department of Superintendence in February or March. Mr. MacDonald 
seldom misses a meeting. The following shows his record of attendance 
since 1886: 1886, Topeka; 1887, Chicago; 1890, St. Paul; 1891, Toronto, 
Canada; 1892, Saratoga Springs, N. Y.; 1894, Asbury Park, N. J.; 1895, 
Denver; 1896, Buffalo, N. Y.; 1897, Milwaukee; 1898, Washington, D. C.; 
1899, Los Angeles; 1900, Charleston, S. C.; 1901, Detroit, Mich.; 1902, 
Minneapolis, Minn.; 1903, Boston; 1904, St. Louis; 1905, Asbury Park 
and Ocean Grove, N. J.; 1907, Los Angeles; 1908, Cleveland, Ohio; 1909, 
Denver; 1910, Boston; 1911, San Francisco; 1912, Chicago; 1913, Salt 
Lake City; 1914, St. Paul, Minn.; total, twenty-five meetings. 

Of meetings of the Department of Superintendence, always held in 
February or March, the editor of the Journal attended at Chicago in 1887 ; 
New York, 1890; Philadelphia, 1891; Brooklyn, N. Y., 1892; Boston, 
1893; Cleveland, 1895; Jacksonville, Fla., 1896; Indianapolis, 1897; Chat- 
tanooga, Tenn., 1898; Columbus, Ohio, 1899; Chicago, 1900; Chicago, 
1901; Chicago, 1902; Cincinnati, 1903; Atlanta, Ga., 1904; Milwaukee, 
Wis., 1905; Louisville, Ky., 1906; Chicago, 1907; Washington, D. C., 1908; 
Chicago, 1909; Indianapolis, 1910; Mobile, Ala., 1911; St. Louis, 1912; 
Philadelphia, 1913; Cincinnati, 1915; total, twenty-four. 

Mr. MacDonald is not a graduate of any college, but he has the 
equivalent of a college education, acquired at institutes which were open 
in the evenings for the benefit of persons who had to earn their living 
during the day. The teachers and instruction were of the best. For 
instance, in London, English was taught to MacDonald by Dr. F. J. 
Furnivall, one of the greatest Shakesperian scholars of his time or of any 
period, and he too had the rare privilege of hearing lectures by John 
Ruskin and other eminent men in letters and art. 



WILLIAM D. GREASON. 

WILLIAM DICKSON GREASON, editor, publisher and proprietor 
of the Miami Republican, Paola, Kan., was born in Plainfield, 
Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, August 20, 1859, the son of Thomas 
and Mary J. Greason. He came of Scotch-Irish stock on the paternal 
side, and of Pennsylvania Dutch on the maternal side. His father was a 
pronounced abolitionist and was active in the operation of what was 
known as the "Underground Railroad," the business of which was to 
assist escaping slaves from the South to reach Canada. The father was 
too old for service during the War of the Rebellion, but his two eldest 
sons, John H. and James D., served in Pennsylvania regiments, and the 
Cumberland valley of Pennsylvania, where the Greasons lived, was the 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 69 




JOHN MAC DONALD, 
Topeka, Kansas. 



70 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



center of many rebel raids. In April, 1870, Thomas Greason and family 
came to Kansas, locating in Paola, where he died in the fall of 1872, 
leaving a large family and the heritage of a good name and the golden 
opportunities which residence in Kansas has always presented, whether 
in her pioneer days or in the opulence of her mature years. William D. 
acquired what little schooling he had in the Paola schools, and in June, 
1875, became an apprentice in the Miami Republican office, then owned by 
two of his brothers, Owen H. and Thomas O. Greason, and General John 
H. Rice. Four of his brothers were printers, James D., late of the Atwood 
Citizen, and Charles T. being the other two, besides those above mentioned. 
In 1878 William D. bought a one-third interest in the Western Spirit 
office in Paola, which he sold in 1881, and in 1882 bought a half interest in 
the Miami Republican, the other half then being owned by Leslie J. 
Perry, one of the most widely known and capable newspaper men of the 
Kansas of that period, and one of the most forceful and original writers 
the state has ever had. August 14, 1885, Mr. Perry sold his interest to 
Mr. Greason, who has since been the sole owner, editor and publisher. 
Mr. Greason served two terms as postmaster of Paola, from November, 
1889, to April, 1894, and from July, 1898, to April, 1903. His newspaper 
is one of the oldest in Kansas, having been founded in 1866. 



EDEARDO CAFFARO. 

EDEARDO CAFFARO, proprietor and editor of 11 Lavoratore Itali- 
ano, an Italian weekly newspaper published in Pittsburg, Kan., was 
born in Trausella, Italy, the 17th of June, 1878. Trausella is a small town 
in northern Italy, close to the France and Switzerland boundary. He re- 
ceived his elementary education at Trausella, graduated from the high 
school at Ivrea, and took the degree of the technical institute in Turin in 
1898. In the same year he entered the University of Turin, where he 
studied engineering and mathematics until 1901. He landed in the United 
States (New York) in 1904, and made his home in Colorado until 1905, 
when he came to Pittsburg, Kan., where he has been ever since. 

Just previous to his coming to Pittsburg he was instrumental in the 
transfer of 11 Lavoratore Italiano from Trinidad, Colo., to Pittsburg, Kan. 
Under his management II Lavoratore Italiano has made great progress, 
and it is to-day one of the largest publications of any weekly Italian 
newspaper in the United States, which gives itself entirely to the better- 
ment of the laboring class. 

II Lavoratore Italiano belongs to no political class, and never from its 
beginning took part either for or against any one of the political parties ; 
always ready in a fearless and conscientious way to stand for that which 
is just, and for the advancement and welfare of what its name implies 
the Italian laborer in this great land of America. By Dr. U. A. D. 
Collelmo. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 71 




W. D. GREASON, 

Paola, Kansas. 



72 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




EDEAEDO CAFFARO, 

Pittsburg, Kansas. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



73 




HENRY J. CALNAN, 
Troy, Kansas. 



74 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



HENRY J. CALNAN. 

E Weekly Kansas Chief, published at Troy, is owned and edited by 
. H. J. Calnan. Mr. Calnan was born at Stoneham, Mass., in 1857, 
the same year the Chief was born in Kansas. Mr. Calnan moved with 
his parents to Moulton, Iowa, when a boy, and served four years as an 
apprentice in the office of the Moulton Independent. After becoming a 
printer he worked in different offices. He engaged in railroading, serving 
as a fireman on the Burlington route, was promoted to the position of 
locomotive engineer, and in this capacity worked for several of the rail- 
road systems in the West. His last railroading was in Mexico, where 
he ran an engine on the Mexican National out of San Luis Potosi. Upon 
his return to this country he took up the printing business again, and 
owned and edited several newspapers. He bought the Chief from Mrs. 
Miller, widow of the famous pioneer editor, Sol Miller, twelve years ago. 
The politics of the Chief have always been straight Republican. It is the 
oldest paper in the state. Other papers were started before it was 
founded, but they were later merged with other papers or discontinued. 
Doniphan county, in the early days, was a veritable newspaper grave- 
yard. Many papers were started during the territorial days. Every 
boom town had a boom newspaper. Many of the towns were later aban- 
doned, and all the newspapers expired with the exception of the Chief. 
Mr. Miller found it hard at times to keep his paper going, but he was a 
game old warrior and stayed on in spite of hard times and opposition, 
and lived to see his newspaper enjoying permanent prosperity and a wide 
reputation. 

Mr. Calnan's family consists of his wife and one son, Charles. Charles 
is now attending high school, and when he graduates from that institu- 
tion will attend the Kansas University at Lawrence. His father hopes 
that his son will succeed to the management of the Chief, and is edu- 
cating him in a manner to fit him for the position. 



GEORGE W. MARBLE. 

EORGE WATSON MARBLE was born in Scott township, Bourbon 
county, a mile south of Fort Scott, in 1870; went to work on the 
Fort Scott Tribune on September 1, 1885, and learned the trade on that 
paper under J. B. Chapman, the publisher. In May, 1891, he took a posi- 
tion as reporter on the Tribune, and a year later became associated with 
George W. Martin, formerly of the firm of Martin & Chapman, publishers 
of the paper, as one of the proprietors, continuing, however, his work as 
reporter until 1902, when he bought Mr. Martin's interest and became 
manager, with R. B. Barr as a partner in the business. In 1904 the 
Tribune took over the old Fort Scott Monitor, and the legal designation of 
the paper became The Fort Scott Tribune and the Fort Scott Monitor, 
and it has since been published under that heading. The paper was 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 75 




GEORGE W. MARBLE, 

Fort Scott, Kansas. 



76 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



originally Democratic in politics, it having been originally organized and 
published as a party organ. Upon assuming control of the paper, in 1902, 
Mr. Marble made it independent in politics, with Democratic leanings, and 
it subsequently merged into a distinctly nonpartisan newspaper, support- 
ing Republicans or Democrats according as their individual qualifications 
appealed to the editor. The paper represents the consolidation of the old 
Fort Scott Monitor, established in 1862, the Fort Scott Banner and the 
Fort Scott News. 



J. F. JARRELL. 

JF. JARRELL is a native Kansan; his birthplace, a farm near 
Lancaster, Atchison county, where his parents settled in 1855. He 
was born September 19, 1866. His father was Sanford Jarrell, a 
school teacher, farmer and plainsman before the Civil War; a veteran of 
that conflict, serving in company E, Second Kansas cavalry; later a 
farmer and stockman. His mother was Annie Fletcher, who, as a pioneer 
girl, organized the first Sunday school in her neighborhood, holding the 
sessions under a tree. His schooling consisted of a few terms in rural 
districts, and at the age of sixteen he left the farm with the intention of 
becoming a locomotive engineer. He got a job firing a threshing-machine 
engine, which blew up, scaring him out of his ambition in that direction. 
For two years he experimented with various "walks of life" herded 
cattle, sold books, sold pianos and organs, trucked freight, taught singing- 
school, managed a theatrical company, kicked a job press, and set type. 
On January 1, 1884, he was given his first assignment as a newspaper re- 
porter, on the Atchison Patriot. From then on for twenty-six years he 
was actively engaged in reportorial and editorial work on the Atchison 
Patriot, Atchison Champion, Atchison Globe, Kansas City Times, Topeka 
Capital and Holton Signal, in the order named. He owned the Holton 
Signal for five years, and for a short time in 1903 was a third owner of 
the Atchison Globe, his partners being J. E. Rank and Ralph Tennal. 
That was when E. W. Howe went to Kansas City to run the Daily Mail. 
Mr. Howe did not like the Kansas City venture, so he returned to Atchison 
and bought the Globe back. Mr. JarrelPs work on the Topeka and Kansas 
City papers mainly was as a staff correspondent, handling political and 
legislative news and matters having to do with the settlement and develop- 
ment of western Kansas and of Oklahoma. In 1910 he was appointed 
publicity agent of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company, 
with headquarters in Topeka, which position he holds to date. In 1895 
Mr. Jarrell married Myra Williams, of Topeka, daughter of the late A. L. 
Williams, a former attorney-general of Kansas. Mrs. Jarrell is also a 
writer. She contributes to newspapers and magazines, and has three 
books, a play and an opera to her credit. There are four children in the 
family two already in the writing game, the others training for it. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



77 




J. F. JARRELL, 

Topeka, Kansas. 



78 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 








D. R. ANTHONY, Jr., 
Leavenworth, Kansas, 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 79 



D. R. ANTHONY, Jr. 

DANIEL READ ANTHONY, JR., lawyer, journalist, and member of 
Congress from the first district of Kansas, was born at Leaven- 
worth, August 22, 1870, a son of Col. Daniel R. and Annie (Osborn) 
Anthony. Mr. Anthony has inherited many of the strong characteristics 
of his father, and is recognized as a journalist of marked ability. He was 
educated in the public schools of his native city, and the Michigan Military 
Academy, Orchard Lake, Mich., and then entered the law department of 
the University of Michigan, where he graduated with the degree of LL. B. 
in 1891, and was admitted to the bar. On his return to Leavenworth he 
became connected with the Leavenworth Times, and soon assumed the 
management of the paper. When Colonel Anthony died, in November, 
1904, Mr. Anthony assumed entire control of the Times. On March 29, 
1907, he was unanimously nominated for Congress by the Republicans of 
the first district, and was elected to the Sixtieth Congress to fill a vacancy 
caused by the election of Charles Curtis to be United States senator, and 
was reflected to the Sixty-first Congress, receiving 27,796 votes to 19,842 
for F. M. Pearl, the Democratic candidate, and 650 for J. F. Willetts, who 
rah on the Socialist ticket. In 1910 he again became a candidate for the 
nomination, making his campaign as a "regular" Republican against T. A. 
McNeal, the "Progressive" candidate. In the primary election he was 
successful by a substantial majority, and later at the November election 
he defeated J. W. Chapman, the "Independent Democratic" candidate, by 
an overwhelming majority, being thus again returned to Congress with the 
unqualified indorsement of his constituents. His career as a representa- 
tive in Congress has been consistent, his political methods clean, and his 
endeavor always has been to procure the best legislative results for the 
district he represents. He is one of the leading newspaper men of Kansas 
and of the day, and his paper advocates every policy for the moral and 
material uplift of the people of Kansas and the nation. In June, 1897, Mr. 
Anthony married Bessie Havens, the daughter of Paul Havens, of Leaven- 
worth. They have two children, Eleanor and Daniel. 



80 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



O. W. LITTLE. 

OLCOTT W. LITTLE, one of the able representatives of the Kansas 
press, is a native Kansan, born in Wabaunsee county, January 31, 
1867, and is descended from Scotch-Irish ancestry, being the son of 
William E. and Harriett Z. (Adams) Little. The Little family came to 
America from Scotland at a very early day and located in New England, 
and a number of this branch of the Little family served in the Revolution- 
ary army that was recruited in Vermont. 

Olcott W. Little was reared on the homestead where he first saw the 
light of day. He led the normal life of a country boy, grew up strong and 

self-reliant, and his early educa- 
tion was acquired in the district 
school. His parents wished him 
to have every advantage in an 
educational way, and sent him to 
Ottawa University. After leav- 
ing college he remained at home 
until 1888, when he went to Alma 
to reside, as he was holding the 
office of deputy county clerk. 
Upon completing his term in 
office he entered the employ of 
the Atchison, Topeka & Santa 
Fe Railway Company for a year ; 
but he had grown fond of jour- 
nalism, and while in Alma had 
decided in time to own a paper 
of his own. With this end in 
view he returned to Alma, and 
in 1891 bought a half interest in 
the Enterprise, an influential Re- 
publican journal that has a wide 
circulation. He has taken a 
leading part in politics in Wa- 
baunsee county for years, and 
in 1892 was a delegate to the 
Republican national convention. 
Mr. Little is a Mason, having 
taken all the degrees from the 

Chapter to the Mystic Shrine, and is a member of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. 

In 1905 he married Mrs. Theresa Home, nee Schutter. He owns and 
edits his own paper, and plays no small part in molding the opinions and 
ideas of the Wabaunsee population. The press of Kansas is known for 
its fearlessness in handling public questions, and Mr. Little was one of 
the first to bring before the people of his county those things upon which 
all should be informed. He is the secretary of the Wabaunsee County 
Historical Society. 




0. W. LITTLE, 

Alma, Kansas. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



81 




WILLIAM C. MARKHAM, 
Baldwin City, Kansas. 



O- 



82 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



WILLIAM C. MARKHAM. 

WILLIAM COLFAX MARKHAM is a native of Ohio and the son of 
a Methodist minister. He attended the public schools in four 
different towns, and while living at Lorain had his first newspaper ex- 
perience in reporting daily to the Cleveland papers the dock news from 
that port. 

After spending three years at Baldwin University he came west with 
his parents, and graduated from Baker University in 1891. In 1892-'93 
he took special work in history and politics in Johns Hopkins University, 
where he was a pupil of President Wilson. In August, 1893, he purchased 
the Baldwin Ledger, and is still its proprietor. He was postmaster of 
Baldwin City for thirteen years, and during nine years of that time was 
secretary of the Kansas Postmasters' Association. He organized the 
Southwest Postal Association, covering six states, and until his retire- 
ment from the postal service edited the Southwest Postal News. At each 
convention he published a daily paper. During the last year of his postal 
service he was secretary of the National Association of Postmasters, and 
at St. Paul ran a daily paper during the week of the convention. 

He is the author of several plays covering events of Kansas territorial 
history, besides numerous short poems. In May, 1916, he was elected 
president of the Kansas State Editorial Association. 



HERBERT CAVANESS. 

HERBERT CAVANESS was born at Chetopa, Kan., but refuses to 
reveal the date of that event. He has had rather a peculiar career 
in Kansas, saying that he was handicapped in life by being a preacher's 
son. The older members of his father's congregation yet tell how he 
used to run horse races with the old sorrel mare which his father used to 
ride on the circuit. His father went into the newspaper business, and 
Herbert was put to work learning the printer's trade. He says his early 
ambition was to be a bus driver, but he was forced into the newspaper 
business against his will, and made to wrap papers, set type and take 
proof, when he would much rather have been down at the old swimming 
hole. 

Mr. Cavaness is president of the Tribune Publishing Company, which 
publishes the Chanute Daily Tribune. The Tribune was established in 
1892, and was consolidated July 1, 1909, with the Chanute Sun. The 
Tribune is one of the influential papers of the state. 

Mr. Cavaness was postmaster of Chanute eight years. He says his 
most noteworthy achievement has been that he graduated from Baker 
University without getting married or becoming a preacher. When asked 
what other callings had appealed to him, he made the following reply : 

"I have had a narrow escape from two other callings educational and 
the chautauqua platform. Two members of a country school board 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



83 




HERBERT CAVANESS, 

Chanute, Kansas. 



84 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



promised to vote for me one time, but another fellow was elected by a 
unanimous vote, thus preventing me from becoming an educator. When 
in college I entered an oratorical contest in which there were eleven con- 
testants. It ended my proposed chautauqua career, as the judges unani- 
mously awarded me eleventh place." 

It is not, however, as bad as Mr. Cavaness makes it. He is an inter- 
esting speaker and one of the brightest newspaper men of Kansas. 



H. C. STICKER. 

HC. STICKER was born October 6, 1876, at Neosho Falls, Kan. 
. At the age of eleven he moved with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. 
Sticher, to Yates Center, Kan., where the father was to serve as county 
attorney of Woodson county, and afterward to be honored by an election 
as state representative. 

H. C. Sticher received his education in the schools of Yates Center and 
at the State Agricultural College at Manhattan. He entered the printing 
office of the Yates Center News when he was seventeen years of age, as 
devil, and remained with the firm of Trueblood & Stephenson for six 
years, becoming one of the partners in the last year. Mr. Sticher has 
successfully edited and owned the Neosho Falls Post, the Alma Signal, 
and owned a half interest in the Belleville Telescope with A. Q. Miller. 
He was private secretary to Congressman R. R. Rees, of the fifth district, 
two sessions of Congress, and then resigned to purchase the Osage City 
Public Opinion of Maurice Crowther; later also purchasing the Osa*ge 
City Free Press of Chas. Barnes, both of which papers he now owns and 
is the active editor. 

Mr. Sticher is secretary of the Osage City Commercial Club, also 
secretary of the Trades' Extension Committee. He has been active in 
newspaper work and in politics for the past twenty years. In 1907-'08 he 
was treasurer, in 1909-'10 vice president, and in 1911 president of the 
Kansas State Editorial Association. 



JOSEPH W. HOWE. 

JOSEPH W. HOWE, of Abilene, is a part of the famous "newspaper 

I administration" of Kansas. He is editor of the Dickinson County 

News. He was born on a farm in Saline county. He was graduated 

from Salina Normal University with a bachelor of arts degree. Later he 

taught school. In 1903 he went to Abilene and purchased the Dickinson 

County News. 

J. W. Howe is a Democrat, and for many years has been writing 
politics for his own and many other papers over the state. His reputation 
grew along this line until 1912, when he was elected to the state senate 
from Dickinson and Clay counties. He was the only newspaper man in 
the senate, and his political stories during the 1913 and 1915 sessions of 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



85 




H. C. STICHEK, 

Osage City, Kansas. 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




JOSEPH W. HOWE, 

Abilene, Kansas. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 87 

the upper house of the legislature attracted considerable attention. He 
also wrote feature articles for many of the larger dailies of the East, and 
after his appointment by Governor Hodges as secretary of the State 
Board of Control he gained no little reputation as an authority on mat- 
ters pertaining to the management and conditions of the state's charitable 
and benevolent institutions. 

For eight years he served as secretary of the Democratic State Edi- 
torial Association, and for six years was a member of the Abilene school 
board. 



RALPH A. HARRIS. 

RALPH A. HARRIS, editor and owner of the Ottawa Herald, was 
born in Ottawa, Kan., March 12, 1871, and has made his home there 
up to the present time with the exception of three years spent on a farm 
in Franklin county, Kansas, during his early childhood. He received his 
education in the Ottawa public schools, Ottawa University, and North- 
western University, Evanston, 111. On leaving school he engaged in the 
banking business at Ottawa. In 1907 he purchased the Ottawa Herald 
from Henry J. Allen, and has conducted it since that time. 



MINNIE A. LAWLESS. 

MINNIE A. LAWLESS, editor and manager of the Herald Publish- 
ing Company, of St. Francis, Kan., gained her admittance into the 
newspaper world by her marriage to George Lawless, in 1898, and at once 
became associate editor of the Kansas Eagle at St. Francis. Together 
they struggled along, against all odds, doing most of their own work, 
printing the paper on an old Army press, until 1905, when a change came. 
The two papers of the town were consolidated, Mr. Lawless becoming 
owner. Business had outgrown the back room and hand press, so he 
erected the first brick business house in the city, the present convenient 
home of the paper. The company was then formed, composed of six 
leading business men of the county, and a splendid new and complete 
equipment installed. Mr. Lawless, being elected editor and business 
manager, everything started over again, the enterprise proving pleasant 
and profitable for all concerned. Mrs. Lawless was given the honor of 
naming the new publication, which she christened the Herald. 

In 1912, after a lingering illness, Editor Lawless died, and since that 
time Mrs. Lawless has taken his place as editor and manager, and the 
business has never been more flourishing than it is under her super- 
vision. The circulation has grown to almost 1200. She is a very busy 
woman, devoting her entire time to the details of the office, gathering 
news, and can and often does make a hand at the cases. Having lived in 
Cheyenne county since 1886, teaching school for a number of years, her 
wide acquaintance with people and conditions is a valuable asset in her 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



- 




K. A. HARRIS. 

Ottawa, Kansas. 



-O 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



89 




MRS. MINNIE A. LAWLESS, 
St. Francis, Kansas. 



90 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



work, in which she has had more than ordinary success. Mrs. Lawless 
is fully qualified to write in the essay contest, "If I had it to do over 
again, would I marry a Kansas editor?" as she has served her time in 
every part of the business, from inking the forms to writing copy. 

This woman editor was born in 1868. Her maiden name was Taylor, 
and her early life was spent in Illinois. She is the mother of one child, a 
daughter, Ruth, now eleven years old. 

Mrs. Lawless is devoted to her work, and her constant aim is to help 
her people and her county to improve, and her success is measured by the 
loyal support the Herald receives. 



HENRY J. ALLEN. 

HENRY JUSTIN ALLEN, editor and publisher of the Wichita 
Beacon, a leading member of the newspaper fraternity of Kansas, 
is a native of the Keystone state, born at Corry, Pa., in September, 1869. 
The Allen family was founded in America by John Allen, the grandfather 
of Henry J., who came to the United States from the north of Scotland 
and settled near Corry, Pa., in 1820. He was one of the pioneer farmers 
of that region. His son, John, jr., married Rebecca E. Goodwin, and four 
children were born to them Elizabeth, the wife of G. W. Andrews, of 
Thomas, Okla. ; Henry J., the subject of this sketch ; Cora, wife of Edward 
F. Sheldon, of Ottawa, Kan. ; and La Verne, a farmer at McAlester, 
Okla. At the outbreak of the Civil War John Allen, jr., enlisted in 
company I, Ninth New York cavalry, and served until mustered out of 
the service at the grand review held in Washington after peace had been 
declared. After leaving the army Mr. Allen came to Kansas in the fall of 
1865, settling on land at Riverdale, Clay county, where he lived until he 
retired and removed to Clifton, Kan., where he now resides with his wife. 
Henry J. Allen was reared on his father's farm. He attended the 
public schools of Clay and Osage counties, but was ambitious, and learned 
the barber's trade, which he followed, thus earning enough money to 
attend Baker University. He belonged to the class of 1890, but did not 
graduate. However, in 1893 the university conferred upon him the degree 
of master of arts. While in college he became interested in newspaper 
work and was a member of the editorial staff of the college paper. In 
1891 Mr. Allen was given the management of the Salina Republican, 
owned by Hon. J. L. Bristow. Three years later this property was sold, 
and Mr. Allen bought the Manhattan Nationalist, which he edited and 
published a year before disposing of it. Soon after this he and Mr. 
Bristow bought the Ottawa Herald and the Salina Republican, changing 
the name of the latter to the Salina Journal. Mr. Allen was editor and 
manager of both publications until 1907, when the partnership was dis- 
solved, Mr. Bristow taking the Salina Journal and Mr. Allen the Ottawa 
Herald. The following year he disposed of the Herald and purchased 
the Wichita Beacon, of which he has since been the editor and manager. 
In all his business ventures Mr. Allen has been remarkably successful. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 91 




HENRY J ALLEN, 
Wichita, Kansas. 



92 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



In 1910 he promoted the building of the first Kansas skyscraper, "the 
Beacon Building," which cost $435,000, and is the largest office building 
in the state. In politics Mr. Allen is a stanch Republican, having served 
as private secretary to Governor Stanley, who appointed him president of 
the Board of Charities during his second term in office. Under Governor 
Bailey Mr. Allen served in a like capacity. He has twice been a candi- 
date for Congress in the second Kansas district, but was defeated, once 
by Mr. Bower sock and later by Charles F. Scott. 

While in college Mr. Allen was a member of the Delta Tau Delta fra- 
ternity. He is a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason, a Knight 
Templar, and a member of Midian Temple, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, 
Wichita, a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Modern Woodmen of America, 
the Wichita Commercial Club, the Chamber of Commerce, the Country 
and Riverside clubs, the American Newspaper Association, and an hon- 
orary member of the National Press Club. October 19, 1891, Mr. Allen 
married Elsie J., daughter of Frederick Nuzman, a retired lumber and 
hardware merchant of Circleville, Kan. Mrs. Allen is a graduate of 
Baker University in the class of 1890. 



RALPH H. FAXON. 

RALPH H. FAXON was born near Topeka, Kan., May 9, 1875. His 
parents were early settlers of Shawnee county, living near the 
village and old-time territorial capital of Tecumseh. His father, a 
veteran of the War of the Rebellion, came to Kansas shortly after the 
close of the war, and for nearly fifty years has lived on the same quarter- 
section. 

R. H. Faxon was educated in the public schools of Shawnee county, in 
the academy of Washburn College, Topeka, and in business college at 
Topeka. He became a newspaper reporter on the old Topeka Press while 
still in his teens, and at different times worked on the Topeka State 
Journal, the Kansas City World and the Kansas City Star. He was con- 
nected with the Topeka bureaus of the two last-named papers. This was 
from 1895 to 1897. In the latter year he went to Newton to take news 
charge of the old Newton Republican, of which Noble Prentis was once 
editor, and remained there one year. 

In 1898 Mr. Faxon became secretary to Chester I. Long, then making 
his third campaign for representative from the seventh Kansas district. 
He remained with Mr. Long, who was elected United States senator from 
Kansas in 1903, until the latter's retirement from Congress, March 4, 
1909, or eleven years in all. During his career as secretary to Mr. Long, 
Mr. Faxon became as familiar with Kansas, with its history, its affairs, 
its men and its geography as perhaps any young man of the state. In 
his Washington life he also represented various Kansas newspapers, in- 
cluding the Topeka State Journal, the Topeka Capital, and the Wichita 
Beacon and Eagle. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



93 




RALPH H. FAXON, 

Garden City, Kansas. 



94 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



In April, 1908, Mr. Faxon bought the Garden City Telegram from 
Henry J. Allen, and personally conducted it for four years. As a daily 
paper in a small town it ranked very high and achieved considerable 
reputation. 

During his residence at Garden City Mr. Faxon and C. H. Scott of the 
Hutchinson News organized the New Santa Fe Trail, the first interstate 
good-roads movement in the West. Mr. Faxon also was active in the 
National Irrigation Congress, the Transmississippi Commercial Congress, 
and the International Farm Congress. He organized the Kansas Devel- 
opment Association, merger of state commercial bodies; the Kansas State 
Conservation Commission, and the Arkansas Valley . Commercial Asso- 
ciation. Mr. Faxon was also a director of the Kansas State Historical 
Society for three years, and is a member of the National Historical Asso- 
ciation, the National Geographic Society, the American Humane Associa- 
tion and other organizations. 

In 1912 Mr. Faxon went to Wichita to become industrial and publicity 
commissioner for the Wichita Business Association, and in 1914 became 
secretary of the International Farm Congress. In January, 1916, he went 
to Des Moines, Iowa, to become general secretary of the Chamber of 
Commerce. 



WILLIAM C. AUSTIN. 

WILLIAM CLARK AUSTIN was born at Cottonwood Falls, Kan., 
in 1872. He is still a resident of his native city. His parents 
were from Vermont. Mr. Austin was educated in the public schools of 
Chase county and at the University of Kansas. He was instructor in 
the Cottonwood Falls schools for several years, and for three years en- 
gaged in the grocery business at Strong City. In 1903 he bought the 
Chase County Leader, a Republican weekly, and in 1909 bought the Strong 
City News and the Courant of Cottonwood Falls, consolidating them as 
the Strong City News-Courant, which he still owns. In 1904 he was 
elected as the Republican candidate for register of deeds of Chase county, 
and served two years, and in 1910 was elected state printer. Mr. Austin 
was the author of the uniform blank-book law passed by the legislature of 
1911, which was the first law for uniform county records passed by any 
of the United States. He was reflected state printer in 1912, and at the 
expiration of his term returned to Cottonwood Falls to manage his news- 
papers. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



95 




WILLIAM C. AUSTIN, 

Cottonwood Falls, Kansas. 



96 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



A. Q. MILLER. 

AQ. MILLER is a native Kansan, having been born in Washington 
county, February 7, 1874. After completing his schooling at 
Clifton, Kan., he took a business course in the Alamo City Business Col- 
lege, of San Antonio, Tex. He was married in 1896 to Martha L. Patter- 
son, at Clifton, Kan., and to this union were born five children. 

After several years' apprenticeship in the Clifton News office, under 
various managements, he bought the newspaper, when twenty years of 
age, successfully conducting it for two years. Selling the Clifton News to 
advantage, he bought and conducted the Riley Regent for three years, 
when he sold out to go to Victor, Colo., to become business manager of 
the Victor Daily Record, for a stock company of which he became a stock- 
holder. During the three years he was connected in a business capacity 
with this stock company it purchased and consolidated three newspapers 
in the Cripple Creek district, hitting the high-water mark in circulation 
and business for this gold-mining camp. In 1904 he purchased the 
Belleville Telescope, later consolidating with it the Belleville Freeman and 
Munden Progress. He recently purchased and is publishing from the 
Telescope office the Agenda Times. 

Mr. Miller has adways taken an active interest in public affairs and 
politics, putting his newspaper behind many community enterprises. He 
was secretary of the Belleville Commercial Club five years, which he 
helped to organize, and was secretary of the Republican county committee 
five years. He was sergeant-at-arms in the last Republican national con- 
vention at Chicago, and was one of the ten presidential electors of Kansas 
in 1912. In 1916 he was one of the speakers at the Kansas Day Club 
banquet at Topeka, his subject being "Preparedness and the Republican 
Party." Always active in the fraternity side of newspaper life, he has 
been recording secretary of the Kansas Editorial Association and first 
president of the Fifth District Editorial Association. 

When the Meridian Road was organized at Salina, Kan., Mr. Miller 
was one of the organizers and first treasurer. Likewise when the Rock 
Island Highway Association came into existence the meeting was held at 
Belleville at the invitation of Mr. Miller. He presided at the meeting and 
was elected secretary-treasurer, later organizing the first trip over the 
road from St. Joseph to Denver. When the Rock Island Highway was 
merged, as the Kansas link, into the national highway known as the 
Pike's Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway, at St. Joseph, Mr. Miller presided 
at the meeting, appointed the various committees, and was elected first 
vice president of the national organization. He is at present first vice 
president of the Pike's Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway, treasurer of the 
Kansas Division Meridian Road, secretary-treasurer of the Rock Island 
Highway, executive committeeman Kansas Good Roads Association, coun- 
cilor Kansas Division National Highways Association. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



97 




A. Q. MILLER, 
Belleville, Kansas. 



7 



98 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



CLYDE H. KNOX. 

H. KNOX, of Independence, Kan., a young man of fine ability 
and character, has taken up journalism as his life work and has 
already demonstrated that he has more than ordinary talents in that 
direction. With a keen sense of the power of the press to educate and 
direct public opinion, he has adopted that attitude toward his profession 
which made the Sedan Times-Star a potent influence for good in his com- 
munity. His progressive spirit has brought him into prominence among 
the men of his profession in Kansas, his standing in the newspaper fra- 
ternity being indicated by his election in 1911 as vice president of the 
Kansas State Editorial Association, and as a former president of the 
Republican Editorial Association of the third district. Mr. Knox, further- 
more, is a native Kansan and a representative of that energetic younger 
generation of the state which is ably replacing those men who were the 
helmsmen of affairs during the first half century of Kansas statehood. 

Mr. Knox was born at Baldwin, Douglas county, Kansas, April 19, 
1878, son of Hiram W. and Amelia M. (Knox) Knox. Both parents were 
natives of New York state and came to Kansas in an early period, locat- 
ing at Baldwin in 1876. There the father died in 1878, the year of his 
son's birth. Clyde H. Knox was an infant at the time of his father's 
death, and early had to commence the struggle for life for himself. 
Born and reared in Baldwin, the seat of Baker University, by persistent 
effort he managed to complete three years' work of the university course, 
but the necessity of assuming life's responsibilities at that time precluded 
his further study in the University. He learned the printer's trade in the 
Baldwin Ledger office, under William C. Markham, of Baldwin, and 
worked several hours each day in that office for three years while attend- 
ing college. He was business manager of the Baker Orange, the college 
paper, for a year. From there he went to Kansas City, Kan., where he 
was employed on the Kansas City Tribune. In January, 1898, he accepted 
employment as editor of the Coffeyville Journal, at Coffeyville, Kan., and 
remained there until August 1, 1902, when he bought the Times-Star z\ 
Sedan, Kan. He conducted that paper until September 1, 1906, when he 
sold the plant and returned to Coffeyville, where he bought an interest in 
the Journal. He disposed of his stock in that paper December 1, 1908, 
and on March 1, 1909, bought the Sedan Lance, which he consolidated 
^vith the Times-Star on October 18 following. He later sold the Times- 
Star and bought the Independence Daily Reporter, which he still owns. 

Mr. Knox has prospered in his business ventures, and besides his 
newspaper plant has acquired some good property. In Masonry he has 
attained the Consistory degrees, and in 1910 was secretary of the Blue 
Lodge at Sedan. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



99 




CLYDE H. KNOX, 

Independence, Kansas. 



100 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



W. E. WARD. 

WE. WARD, editor of the Western Times, published at Sharon 
9 Springs, is a native Kansan, with Bourbon county as his birth- 
place. He is forty-three years old, and has lived in Sharon Springs 

A A and been the publisher of the 

Western Times for twenty-five 
years. 

Mr. Ward is also an attorney, 
and is now serving as county at- 
torney of Wallace county, and 
enjoys a large law practice. He 
was register of the United States 
land office at Colby under both 
McKinley and Roosevelt, and 
was twice a member of the legis- 
lature from Wallace county. 
Four years ago he was the Re- 
publican nominee for state sena- 
tor in the thirteen counties com- 
prising the thirty-ninth sena- 
torial district, but was defeated 
in the Democratic landslide. 

The Western Times was es- 
tablished by Kate B. Russell in 
1885. Mrs. Russell was a well- 
known newspaper woman in the 
early days of western Kansas. 
She now lives in Chicago. 




W. E. WARD, 
Sharon Springs, Kansas. 



B. P. WALKER. 

IN OCTOBER, 1897, a young printer walked into the office of the Os- 
tiorne County Farmer, at Osborne, and went to work for seven dollars 
a week. The young printer was B. P. Walker, the present publisher of 
the Farmer. He walked into the office again in August, 1904, as sole 
owner. When he became boss of the Farmer his entire capital was the 
confidence of the man who owned the paper, and his own industry. In 
the following years the Farmer prospered wonderfully, and became one 
of the most valuable weekly newspaper plants in the state. Walker paid 
off every cent of indebtedness with the profits from the office. To-day 
the plant is one of the best in the country. The Farmer is building a fine 
new fireproof modern printing office. The paper is forty-two years old, 
and when it is moved into its new quarters it will be the first time it has 
ever lived in its own home. Walker has been dubbed the laziest editor in 
Kansas, but the Atchison Globe says there ought to be more lazy ones 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



101 




B. P. WALKER, 
Osborne, Kansas. 



102 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

like him. Walker was born in Wisconsin forty years ago, and then some 
three years. His father was a newspaper man before him, and the son 
came honestly by his talents. The Farmer is quoted all over the country 
from its department, "The Musings of the Village Deacon," the creation 
of Walker. The latter came to Kansas in 1877 and has lived here most 
of the time since. He is a practical printer and has worked in every 
branch of the business from daily papers to country shops. He is mar- 
ried and has a wife and baby daughter. In politics he is a Republican, 
and has been termed by William Allen White a diamond-backed stand- 
patter. 



MILTON F. AMRINE. 

MILTON F. AMRINE was born May 6, 1872, at Nokomis, 111. He 
came to Kansas with his parents in March, 1884, and was reared 
on a farm near Wilsey. When sixteen years old he began teaching 
school. He taught eight terms, meanwhile attending the State Normal 
at Emporia, and Baker University at Baldwin, Kan. 

Mr. Amrine was principal of the Council Grove high school for two 
years. He went into the newspaper business as editor and manager of 
the Weekly Guard at Council Grove in the spring of 1898. He was a 
member of the Kansas legislature, house of representatives, in 1909, and 
later became pardon clerk in the office of ex-Governor W. R. Stubbs. 
He was superintendent of the State Reformatory at Hutchinson from 
August, 1910, to August, 1913. Returning to Council Grove, he resumed 
his newspaper work. The paper became a daily in November, 1915, and 
now Mr. Amrine publishes both a weekly and daily edition. In addition 
he owns the Lost Springs News, Herington Sun, and Dunlap Rustler, and 
publishes the Latimer Leader. 

Mr. Amrine married Mabel Francis Chilcott in August, 1905. She 
was the editor of the Louisville Lyre. They are the parents of two girls, 
Dorothy and Mary. Mr. Amrine's parents are living. His father, Fred 
Amrine, born in 1836, was" the son of an Illinois pioneer, and is a Union 
army veteran. His mother is a New Yorker, and daughter of a circuit- 
riding Methodist preacher. 



ANNA CARLSON. 

ANNA CARLSON was reared in Lindsborg, Kan. At the early age 
of fourteen she was initiated into the mysteries of the print shop, 
and since that time, with the exception of one year spent in Alaska, she 
has been identified with the Kansas press. For more than twelve years 
she was editor of the Lindsborg News. Last year she had charge of the 
editorial page of the Wichita Daily Eagle during the absence of Hon. 
Victor Murdock. Miss Carlson is well known throughout the state as an 
editorial writer and paragrapher, and her feature column of the News, 
"The Vitascope," has been widely quoted even beyond the bounds of the 
state. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



103 




M. F. AMRINE, 

Council Grove, Kansas. 



104 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 





JP 



MISS ANNA CARLSON, 
Lindsborg, Kansas. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



105 




GOMER T. DAVIES, 

Conoordia, Kansas. 



106 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SCCIETY. 



GOMER T. DA VIES. 

TALIESIN DAVIES, editor and proprietor of the Concordia 
Daily Kansan, has for nearly thirty years been at the head of a 
western newspaper. The Kansan stands first in Cloud county, and enjoys 
the liberal patronage and unqualified confidence of the people. Mr. Davies 
was born at Pont-y-Pridd, Glamorganshire, South Wales, January 25, 
1855. In 1863 he crossed the Atlantic to seek a home in the United 
States. After landing in America he located in Pennsylvania for a few 
years, then removed to Livingston county, Missouri, and from there to 
Iowa, in 1869. In 1882 he came to Kansas, and a year later purchased 
the Republic County News, which was his first newspaper venture. 
While living in Republic county he was twice elected to the legislature, 
serving in the sessions of 1887-1889. In November, 1896, Mr. Davies 
bought the Kansan and moved to Concordia, where he has since continued 
to reside. 

In 1879 he married, at Cleveland, Lucas county, Iowa, Miss Catherine 
A. Powell, and they have seven children Dr. John D. Davies, Mrs. H. 
Lague, jr., Miss Morfydd 0. Davies, Harry L., Ralph B., Gladys, and 
Ruth. Mr. Davies is a sincere and competent business man. He never 
deviates from what he believes to be right to all who are concerned, 
whether it be in business, political or private life, and is intensely inter- 
ested in all affairs that pertain to the upbuilding and prosperity of the 
community. 

There are few homes the Kansan does not reach, and in each Mr. 
Davies' influence is felt. He is fearless, and in his whole career has 
been characterized by his keen sense of discrimination between right and 
wrong. He is prominent in social orders, having passed through all the 
chairs of the Odd Fellows Lodge, being grand master in 1903-'04, grand 
representative in 1906 and 1907; is a member of the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen, of the Knights of Pythias, Woodmen of America, and 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Mr. Davies is also an active 
member of the Concordia Commercial Club, and one of the directors of 
the Kansas Historical Society; has served as vice president of the Na- 
tional Editors' Association, as president of the Kansas North Central 
Editors' Association in 1896, and as president of the State Editors' Asso- 
ciation in 1901. His printing establishment is one of the finest in the 
eastern part of the state, in keeping with the editor and owner. Mr. 
Davies is a progressive citizen, who would be a worthy acquisition to any 
community. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



107 




D. A. VALENTINE, 
Clay Center, Kansas. 



108 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



D. A. VALENTINE. 

DA. VALENTINE has owned, edited and managed the Clay Center 
9 Times continuously since January 1, 1884 thirty-two years. In 
January, 1881, he became half owner of the Clay Center Dispatch; three 
years later traded his interest in the Dispatch, and other things, for the 
Times. The Times is Valentine; Valentine is the Times. 

He was born in Iowa ; came to Kansas without protest, as a baby, with 
his parents. His father was D. M. Valentine, long associate justice of the 
supreme court. After loafing around a print shop as a small boy, D. A. 
Valentine naturally graduated into a correspondent, a reporter, and then 
into the field which he has held nearly a third of a century against all 
comers. 

For the past thirteen years L. F. Valentine, a brother, has been 
largely responsible for the successful conduct of the paper. For nearly 
three years, in the boom days, the Times was run as a small-town daily, 
and it ranked at that time as one of the very best small-town affairs in 
the state ; but it was too good to live, and too proud to pay. To be sure 
there had been accompanying political honors all these years, but the 
pride and the glory and the satisfaction and the mainstay has been the 
Times. It has always been a model typographically, and always will be 
so long as the Valentines preside over its make-up. 

It has the largest authenticated circulation, field considered, of any 
weekly in the state; has the finest line of country correspondents; no 
editorial page to speak of, except during election campaigns, and from 
a business viewpoint is as steady as an eight-day clock. In fact, it is 
the only country weekly in the whole United States holding active mem- 
bership in the Audit Bureau of Circulations its circulation guaranteed 
by successive outside audits. 



F. D. COBURN. 

FD. COBURN was born in Cold Spring township, Jefferson county, 
. Wisconsin, May 7, 1846. His father was Ephriam W. Coburn, and 
his mother Mary Jane Mulks. At eighteen he was corporal in company 
F, one hundred and thirty-fifth regiment, Illinois volunteer infantry, and 
promoted from private to sergeant-major of the sixty-second regiment, 
Illinois volunteer infantry, veterans. 

Arriving in Franklin county, Kansas, February, 1867, he was a farm 
laborer and farmer there until July, 1880, when invited to a position in 
the office of the State Board of Agriculture under Secretary J. K. Hud- 
son. In 1869 he was married to Lou Jenkins. 

Mr. Coburn was unanimously elected secretary of the Kansas State 
Board of Agriculture, vice J. K. Hudson, resigned, serving until January 
11, 1882, when he was displaced, on a legal technicality, for William 
Sims. He was president of the Indicator Publishing Company, of Kansas 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



109 




F. D. COBTJRN, 
Topeka, Kansas. 



110 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



City, Mo., and editor-in-chief of the Live-stock Indicator for five and a 
half years, 1882 to 1887, and later was editorial writer on the Kansas 
City Gazette with George W. Martin. He has prepared and published, 
as secretary, some thirty-odd volumes of reports of the Kansas State 
Board of Agriculture, and has contributed much to various periodicals 
upon agricultural and kindred topics, and is one of the editors of 
Country Life in America. 

Twice appointed by Governor Glick as regent of the State Agricultural 
College, and twice unanimously elected president of the Board of Regents. 

Sole judge of swine at the Cotton States Universal Exposition at New 
Orleans, 1884. Sole judge of three breeds of swine, and member of the 
committee of three judging all other swine, at the Columbian Exposition, 
Chicago, 1893. 

Elected secretary of the Kansas State Board of Agriculture (succeed- 
ing Martin Mohler) January 12, 1894, and reflected by acclamation in 
1896, 1898, 1900, 1902, 1904, 1906, 1908, 1910, 1912 and 1914; resigned, to 
take effect June 30, 1914. Refused, before the State Editorial Associa- 
tion meeting in 1898, at Kansas City, Kan., to be considered as the candi- 
date of the Republican party for governor. Notwithstanding this declina- 
tion, he was given eighty-odd votes for governor at the Republican state 
convention at Hutchinson, later, when W. E. Stanley was nominated. 

Treasurer of the fund raised by Kansas to relieve the famine sufferers 
in India. Unanimously elected president of the first American Corn 
Congress, held in Chicago, February 15 and 16, 1898. Twice appointed by 
Governor Stanley as a regent of the State Agricultural College, and 
unanimously elected vice president of the board of regents, and served 
until he resigned, upon accession of W. J. Bailey as governor. Elected 
but declined to serve as president of the Kansas Semicentennial Exposi- 
tion Association. Chief of the Department of Live Stock of the Louisiana 
Purchase Exposition, 1903-'04. 

Given honorary degree of doctor of laws by Kansas State Agricultural 
College, November 11, 1909. Given honorary degree as master of arts by 
Baker University, June, 1909. 

Director and vice president of the Prudential Trust Company, Topeka. 
Director of the Prudential State Bank, Topeka (was urged at the organi- 
zation to accept its presidency, but declined). Director of the Bank of 
Topeka. Director and vice president of the Capitol Building and Loan 
Association, Topeka. 

Tendered by Governor Hoch appointment as a senator in Congress, 
vice J. R. Burton, re'signed, 1906; declined. Four times unanimously 
elected president of the Kansas State Temperance Union, serving as such 
four full terms; declined a reelection as president, but was made treas- 
urer. Chairman executive committee Kansas State Temperance Union 
ten years. Named by law ex-officio chairman Kansas State Dairy Com- 
mission during its existence, 1907-'08. 

Chairman of the joint Kansas-Oklahoma committee to investigate the 
Kansas State Penitentiary, December, 1908, and January, 1909; ap- 
pointed by Governor E. W. Hoch. Chairman of a like Kansas committee 
for similar duty in 1910; appointed by Governor W. R. Stubbs. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



Ill 




CHARLES MOREATJ HARGER. 

Abilene, Kansas. 



112 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Life member and has been named by law ex-officio chairman Kansas 
State Entomological Commission from its beginning in 1909. Honorary 
life member Kansas State Horticultural Society. Many times unani- 
mously elected a director of the Kansas State Historical Society. Hon- 
orary member Kansas State Editorial Association. 

Author of "Swine Husbandry," 1877; "Alfalfa," 1901; "The Book of 
Alfalfa," 1907; "Swine in America," 1909; also many volumes of reports 
of the Kansas Board of Agriculture on special subjects. 



CHARLES MOREAU HARGER. 

CHARLES MOREAU HARGER was born in Phelps, N. Y., in 1863. 
^/ He was educated in a classical school, and came to Kansas in 1879. 
For several years he was farmer and rancher, and then teacher, being 
principal of the Hope City schools in 1887-'88. He then became a re- 
porter on the Abilene Daily Reflector, and has been its editor for twenty- 
five years. Outside of his newspaper work he has found time to con- 
tribute many articles on western financial and business topics to the 
Century, Harper's, Scribner's, Atlantic, North American Review, Out- 
look, and other magazines, and to eastern newspapers. He has edited 
several books. Honorary literary degrees have been conferred on him by 
Baker University and Bethany College. He was director and lecturer of 
the Department of Journalism, University of Kansas, from 1905 to 1910 ; 
was president of the Citizens' League for Promotion of Sound Banking, 
1912 to 1914 ; is a director of the Abilene National Bank, and member of 
the thrift committee of the American Bankers' Association. He has been 
Republican member of the State Board of Corrections since 1913, and its 
chairman since July, 1915 ; president of the Golden Belt Road Association 
since 1912; one of the organizers of the Kansas Day Club, its secretary 
and president; was assistant secretary of the national Republican con- 
ventions at Chicago, 1908, 1912 and 1916. He is a Mason, Knight 
Templar, and Shriner. He is married and has three daughters. 



FRANK FOCKELE. 

FRANK FOCKELE was born March 9, 1843, in Nieheim, a small 
town in the province of Westphalia, Germany. In addition to his 
training in the common schools he received a collegiate education. In the 
spring of 1864, after listening to the tales of some visiting young Ameri- 
cans, he became restless and decided to find a new home in the land 
beyond the sea. In the city of St. Louis and surrounding settlements he 
found opportunities to make use of his education by giving private lessons 
and teaching school. But the West was calling. In 1871 he answered 
the call, came to Kansas, and settled in Le Roy. The hard times of the 
"seventies" came, but he "pulled through" with the rest of the people. 
In 1880 he entered the newspaper business by forming a partnership 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 113 




FRANK FOCKELE. 
Le Roy, Kansas. 



114 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



with B. Frank Smythe, who had taken over the Le Roy Reporter but could 
not make it go. The paper was a little five-column small-pica affair and 
much of a joke among newspaper men. In the summer of 1881 Mr. 
Fockele bought out his partner and became master of all he surveyed 
which was not much. But he kept on working, adding insurance and real 
estate to his activities, and improving his paper until it became quite a 
respectable sheet. While devoting overtime to his paper and other busi- 
ness, he kept in full touch with the spirit of advancement in his com- 
munity. He served time on the school board and city council, fought 
bravely in the various railroad bond fights, and contributed his share for 
the promotion of the public good. 

In politics Mr. Fockele is a Democrat not of the pernicious-activity 
kind, but so he could always be located. In 1886 the Democrats needed 
a man to run for representative. "Run for" was all it was supposed to 
be. His objections were overruled. To the utter disgust of his Re- 
publican opponent, and his own and everybody else's surprise, Mr. Fockele 
was elected. He served his term, pleased his constituents by the enact- 
ment of needed local legislation, and did not introduce a single freak bill. 

His family life has been quiet and unobtrusive. He lost his life 
companion by death in 1913. Of his four children, Fred F. lives at 
Waverly, Kan., and is a banker; his son Glick and his two daughters, 
Misses Blanch and Kate Fockele, live at Le Roy. 

Eight years ago Mr. Fockele turned the full management of his paper 
and other business over to his son Glick Fockele, and is now taking life 
easy. 



WALT MASON. 

are few people to-day who have not, at some time or other, 
heard of Walt Mason. For the benefit of those few it might be well 
to explain that Walt Mason, familiarly known as "Uncle Walt," is the 
Emporia, Kan., poet, whose inimitable wit has brought him national 
reputation. William Allen White, editor of the Emporia Gazette, some 
years ago called Mr. Mason the "poet laureate of American democracy," 
and admirers of Mr. Mason's work have voiced their approval of the title. 
While Walt Mason has restricted himself almost wholly to the writing of 
prose poems, he has done considerable other newspaper writing. For a 
time he was connected with the Washington (D. C.) News. His book 
called "Uncle Walt's Book" and his "Rhymes of the Range" were pub- 
lished several years ago and are still in great demand. Asked, a short 
time ago, to write a sketch of himself for the Detroit News-Tribune, Mr. 
Mason, though very busy, responded promptly. What he had to say re- 
garding himself follows : 

"I was born at Columbus, Ontario, May 4, 1862. My parents were 
poor. I was the fifth of a series of six sons. My father was a dyer in a 
woolen mill, and was accidentally killed in that establishment when I was 
four years old. He was Welsh and my mother of Scotch descent. My 
mother was fond of books and poetry and old songs, and knew many of 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 115 





WALT MASON, 

Emporia, Kansas. 



116 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



the latter. She died when I was fifteen years old. Meanwhile, during my 
childhood, I had been going to a country school, and working for farmers 
and also in the woolen mill. After my mother's death I went to Port 
Hope, Ontario, and worked in a hardware store for a year and a half, 
drawing the princely salary of two and a half dollars a week and board- 
ing myself. When I was nine or ten years old I was nearly drowned, 
and was hauled out of the water, unconscious, by an older brother. 
I have had defective hearing ever since, and it is probably due to this 
that I never became a merchant prince. Anyhow, I was not a success in 
a hardware store, and when I told my employer I was going to leave he 
said it was the proudest and happiest moment of his life. Having severed 
my diplomatic relations with the hardware man, I crossed Lake Ontario, 
in 1880, going to New York state, where I hoed beans for a summer. It 
was the poorest fun I ever struck. The soil was stony, and the hoe was 
dull, and the sun was as hot as blazes, and there did n't seem to be any 
sense in hoeing beans anyhow. From New York I took my way west- 
ward, arm in arm with the star of empire. I stopped a while in Ohio, 
then in Illinois, and finally reached St. Louis, where I went to work in a 
printing establishment and 'kicked' a job press through the hottest sum- 
mer ever invented. There was a humorous weekly called the Hornet in 
St. Louis, and I sent some stuff to it. The Hornet printed it, and the 
editor wrote to me and asked me to call. He offered me five dollars a 
week to go to work in the office, writing gems of thought, reading proofs, 
sweeping the floors, and otherwise making myself useful. I took the 
job and remained with the Hornet until it went broke. Not being able to 
get another job in St. Louis, I went to Kansas and worked around the 
state for three years as a hired man. Disgusted with that sort of work, 
and being ambitious to get into newspaper business, I managed to get a 
job with the Leavenworth Times. Later I became a reporter on the 
Atchison Globe, and there learned a great deal that was useful to me. 
From that time forward I was chasing myself over the country, and was 
connected with newspapers in a dozen cities, but always had the idea 
that the next town would be a little better, and kept moving around. I 
was mixing up farming with newspaper work in Nebraska for a good 
many years, and making a failure of both. It took me a good while to dis- 
cover that pigs and poetry won't mix. When I did find it out I came to 
Kansas and went to work for William Allen White, writing stuff for the 
-editorial page of the Emporia Gazette. The Gazette always printed on 
its first page an item of local news with a border around it, called a star 
liead. One day the city editor was shy of the necessary item and asked 
me to write something to fill that space. I wrote a little prose poem, 
advising people to go to church next day, which was Sunday. The prose 
rhyme attracted some attention, and on Monday I wrote another one, and 
a third on Tuesday, and so on, and the star-head rhyme became a feature 
of the Gazette. Thus originated the prose poem." 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



117 




HENRY C. MAYSE, 
Ashland, Kansas. 



O- 



118 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



HENRY C. MAYSE. 

HENRY C. MAYSE, editor and owner of the Ashland Clipper, was 
born on a Missouri farm, and his parents being of very limited 
means j Henry was given only a very meager country-school education. 
In 1887, together with his parents and the other members of the family, 
he located at Ashland, Clark county, Kansas, where he entered a bank as 
clerk. The stress of the early nineties closed the bank, and he was given 
the job of deputy in the office of the clerk of the district court. While 
deputy clerk he made use of his time in the study of the law, and in 1892 
was admitted to practice. He was twice elected county attorney of Clark 
county and soon built up a good and lucrative practice. In March, 1895, 
he enlisted the financial assistance of two of his friends and purchased 
the Clark County Clipper, which then had 250 subscribers. He has since 
changed the name to the Ashland Clipper. Having more of a bent for 
newspaper work than for the law, he soon gave up the practice of law 
and has since devoted his time to his newspaper, which he has made one 
of the recognized country weeklies of the state. His originality is prob- 
ably best illustrated in the fact that at the time of his taking charge of the 
Clipper he adopted phonetic spelling and the use of the pronoun "I" in 
his writings, which probably makes him one of the pioneers in the use of 
each. They have both been adopted since by many leading newspapers 
and magazines of the country. He has uniformly advocated progress, 
and since he became owner of the Clipper it has been one of the prime 
movers in every progressive endeavor of the city of Ashland. Several 
years ago he endeavored to have the city put in a light and water system, 
and when the city neglected to do so he attached a generator to his press 
engine, and for more than a year furnished electricity for his office, 
Main street and the opera house, which was one of the very first electric- 
light plants in the southwest part of the state. After the people had 
become accustomed to light, he closed down the plant and asked the mayor 
to call an election, which was immediately done, and the city installed a 
$30,000 light and water system. He has consistently kept his paper 
neutral in politics, locally, which seems to have been very satisfactory to 
the people of the city, as his has, until the past few months, been the 
only paper in that county-seat town. 



M. M. BECK. 

WHEN the Historical Society asked Mr. Beck for a sketch of his life 
he said: "Born on a farm in Wayne county, Indiana, November 22, 
1838. In addition to this encumbrance, and a number of others of a like 
nature, the farm loaded down with a mortgage, it was not only difficult 
but practically impossible, with the financial panic that followed the 
Democratic financial blundering in the late thirties, with pork $1.25 and 
no market to speak of for other farm products, to raise a mortgage and a 
family at the same time. Under these conditions my father lost his farm, 
and I was reared on a rented farm. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



119 




M. M. BECK, 
Holton, Kansas. 



120 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



"Such an education as could be obtained in the common schools of that 
time I received, with a term or two of high school and a course in a 
commercial college. In my eighteenth year I left the farm to clerk in a 
country store, receiving for my first year's services $75, besides board 
and lodging. I remained in this occupation until the Civil War was 
declared, when, on the 18th of April, 1861, I enlisted as a private in com- 
pany K, Sixteenth Indiana infantry, in which regiment I served on the 
Potomac, around Washington city, thirteen months. I then, with others, 
recruited and joined the Eighteenth battery, Indiana artillery, in which 
I served as second lieutenant, first lieutenant and captain, successively, 
until the end of the war. After the war I purchased a general store in a 
country town, which I managed to conduct four years before losing what 
I had previously saved in clerking and from my army pay. 

"In 1869 I came to Jackson county, Kansas, my total assets being a 
wife and baby. That baby is now managing editor of the Chicago 
Tribune. In 1870 I started a drug store in Holton, and three years later 
was appointed postmaster of Holton. In 1875 I was superseded in the 
post office by the editor of the only paper in the county, and this is why 
I concluded to embark in the newspaper business, March 2, 1875. Four 
months later I was reappointed postmaster and held the office until 1886, 
when I was removed by President Cleveland for being an offensive 
partisan. I was again appointed by President McKinley in 1898, and 
held the office four years. In 1881 I purchased my partner's interest in 
the Recorder, and was the sole proprietor until in 1897 my son, Will T. 
Beck, took an interest, and soon thereafter became business manager and 
managing editor, which position he still retains. A year ago I trans- 
ferred my interest in the paper to my son Will and daughter Martha. 
They still retain me as editor. 

"In addition to the post office, I held the office of director of the Peni- 
tentiary two years under Governor MorrilPs administration." 



EDGAR W. HOWE. 

FROM "Who 's Who in America": Edgar Watson Howe; born, Treaty, 
Ind., May 3, 1852; common-school education; been in printing office 
since ten years old; publisher Golden (Colo.) Globe at 19; started Atchi- 
son (Kan.) Globe, 1876; turned business over to sons, 1912; since in 
retirement, and editor E. W. Howe's Monthly. Author : "The Story of a 
Country Town," "The Mystery of the Locks," "The Moonlight Boy," "A 
Man Story," "Daily Notes of a Trip Around the World," "The Trip to 
the West Indies," "Travel Letters from New Zealand, Australia and 
Africa," "Country Town Sayings," "Pagan Psalms," "The Hundred 
Stories of a Country Town." Address : Atchison, Kan. 

William, Allen White: E. W. Howe is the most remarkable man Kansas 
or the Middle West has produced. Moreover, he has written the greatest 
novel ever written in or about Kansas or the Middle West. His "Story 
of a Country Town" is one of the ten best novels written in America. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



121 




EDGAR W. HOWE, 

Atchison, Kansas. 



122 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



American Magazine, August, 1915: E. W. Howe, famous for his 
wisdom and ability to write, is one of America's real possessions. 

Dr. Frank Crane, in New York Globe: E. W. Howe is a national in- 
stitution. On earth, in the heavens above, or in the waters beneath the 
earth, there is nothing like his Monthly; it is a broad stream of horse 
sense; he is giving to the world the most perfect example of self-expres- 
sion with which I am familiar. 

Seattle Post-Intelligencer: There is merit enough in E. W. Howe's 
Monthly to give it a national reading. Labouchere's Truth was never 
better. 

W. D. Howells: E. W. Howe's "Story of a Country Town" is a very 
remarkable piece of realism, and constitutes a part of the only literary 
movement of our time that seems to have vitality in it. 

Edward Bok: E. W. Howe's "Daily Notes of a Trip Around the 
World" is a lesson in travel writing that is worth while. I can not 
imagine a person who should not read this book. 

S. S. McClure: I have read E. W. Howe's travel letters with tre- 
mendous interest. I do not know that I have ever read any book of 
travel equally well done. 

New York Sun: E. W. Howe's travel book has the humor of Mark 
Twain. 



DAVID D. LEAHY. 

DAVID D. LEAHY was born in Ballycomane, County Limerick, Ire- 
land, on October 27, 1858, the same day that Roosevelt was born. 
At the age of twenty he came to Missouri and wrote his first piece for a 
German paper, which caused him trouble. He came to Kansas when he 
was twenty-one, and joined the Payne Oklahoma boomers in 1881, at 
Caldwell, where he edited his first paper. He also had papers at Kiowa 
and Medicine Lodge and worked at Hutchinson and Wellington. He was 
in the first provisional government of Kingfisher after the opening of 
Oklahoma. He began work for the Wichita Beacon in 1889, and went 
to the Wichita Eagle about 1890. He was, at the times mentioned, the 
only reporter on these papers, and became editor of each of them. He 
was Topeka correspondent for the Kansas City Times in 1907-'08. Went 
back to the Wichita Beacon and then to the Wichita Eagle. He went to 
Congress with Victor Murdock, as his secretary, in 1903, and remained 
with him until the death of Colonel Murdock, when he became editor of 
the Eagle. Two years later he went to Topeka to become private secre- 
tary for Governor Stubbs, and served throughout his administration. He 
then went to the Wichita division of the United States marshal's office, 
and made over seventy arrests and took many prisoners to the peni- 
tentiary without ever owning or carrying a weapon of any sort. He 
became editor of the El Dorado Republican in 1914, and served one year 
there, leaving with a view to retiring permanently. Before he got out 
of bed next morning he had a call from H. J. Allen to work on the 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



123 




DAVID D. LEAHY, 

Wichita, Kansas. 



124 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




NORTON A. TURNER, 
Russell, Kansas. 



O- 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 125 



Beacon, and has been with that paper ever since. His peculiar claim is 
that he was never discharged in his life, that he never has asked an in- 
crease in salary, and that he never has had a libel suit or occasion to make 
a retraction of anything written by him, except in the case of something 
he wrote about the senate of Kansas in 1911, when he was arrested, the 
first and only time in his life, for contempt of that body. 



NORTON A. TURNER. 

NORTON A. TURNER, editor and owner of the Russell Record, spent 
practically all his life in western Kansas. He came to Rawlins 
county, Kansas, in the fall of 1885, at the age of nine years, from 
Grundy county, Missouri, with his father (Rev. H. H. Turner, a Baptist 
minister) and his family; lived on a homestead until the fall of 1890; 
moved to Colby, Thomas county, Kansas ; worked in a printing office and 
attended high school. He succeeded P. A. Troutfetter as owner of the 
Colby Tribune in 1896. He was then not yet twenty-one years old, and 
was the youngest proprietor of a printing plant in Kansas. The Tribune 
prospered under Mr. Turner's management, and was recognized as one 
of the leading papers in the sixth district when he disposed of it in the 
spring of 1912. He served as sergeant-at-arms of the house of representa- 
tives during the session of 1911. Mr. Turner purchased the Russell 
Record, the oldest newspaper in Russell county, from L. H. Boyd, Ira S. 
Fleck and J. H. Hill, March 1, 1912. The publication in its more than 
forty years of existence has never been more prosperous or influential 
than now, and is recognized as a power in western Kansas Republican 
politics. The Record's well-known "Loom End" column is widely quoted. 
Lately a new up-to-date intertype was added to the Record's complete 
equipment. 



WILL TOWNSLEY. 

WILL TOWNSLEY was born in Great Bend thirty-four years ago, 
went through the schools there, and served an apprenticeship on 
his father's paper, the Tribune. He acted as collector, while a boy, for 
a small daily, the Evening News, which he published in the nineties. 
After graduation from the local high school he went to Washburn College, 
Topeka. While there he had a paper route on the State Journal, and 
was there for nearly three years, when he returned to Great Bend to take 
charge of the Tribune and get his first real experience. His father's 
health was failing, and some one had to take charge of things. For a 
time his mother had charge of the office. Later he took the manage- 
ment of the paper. He also worked an engraving plant for a couple of 
years, working nights and making cuts for job work and the paper. 

About 1908, while there were two other offices in Great Bend, both of 
them with weekly and daily, he got a chance to buy the other Republican 
weekly and daily, and did so. Then the second daily turned over its 



126 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




WILL TOWNSLEY, 

Great Bend, Kansas. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 127 




SETH G. WELLS, 
Erie, Kansas. 



128 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



business to him. He has been gradually enlarging and improving the 
Tribune until it is one of the best small-town dailies in the West. It 
has been Republican in politics, and thinks more of the short local than 
of the long editorial. 

Mr. Townsley is married and has two children, a daughter four years 
old and a son younger. 



SETH G. WELLS. 

A MAN'S candle power is measured largely by his influence upon his 
own community. In Neosho county, the first step in any public or 
political project is to find out what "Seth" thinks about it. That is to 
say, it is the first step unless "Seth," as in many instances, chances to be 
the originator of the project. "Seth" is Seth G. Wells, editor and owner 
of the Erie Record, and the town's most active, public-spirited and in- 
fluential citizen. 

With the exception of a couple of years spent in California in the late 
eighties, Seth Wells has been connected with his newspaper, the Erie 
Record, since 1879. The greater portion of that time he has been the Erie 
Record, and thus the most consistently influential force in his county for 
a generation. He learned the printer's trade in the Record office, and 
subsequently became its foreman. After a series of adventures in other 
fields of endeavor, he returned to the Record in 1890. He has been the 
owner of the paper for fifteen years, and its guiding hand for twenty-five. 

Mr. Wells was born in Jersey county, Illinois, in 1863, and came to 
Kansas and Neosho county with his parents in the late sixties. His 
father, Judge J. A. Wells, was one of the prominent citizens of the early 
days, and the family has put its impress upon Kansas for nearly fifty 
years. Seth Wells was appointed postmaster at Erie by President Mc- 
Kinley in 1897, and held the office until he was elected state auditor on 
the Republican ticket in the fall of 1902. He was reflected state auditor 
in 1904. 

Those who know Seth Wells best are his closest friends. They say of 
him that he never avoided battle, compromised with wrong, nor forgot a 
friend. 



FRANK P. MAC LENNAN. 

TOPEKA, KAN., July 10, 1916. 
Mr. W. E. Connelley, Secretary State Historical Society, Topeka, Kan.: 

IN REPLY to your request for a brief biography of myself for use 
in the History of Kansas Newspapers I hand you herewith a few 
notes very hurriedly written. 

I was born over fifty years ago in Ohio, and was a Buckeye until the 
age of fifteen, when my parents brought me to Emporia, Kan., where I 
resided until thirty years ago ; then coming to Topeka and buying the 
State Journal at public auction. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



129 




FRANK P. MACLENNAN, 
Topeka, Kansas. 



9 



130 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



When I was a boy, at Springfield, I hung around the printing offices, 
folded papers, and was a newspaper carrier for the old Springfield Ad- 
vertiser. 

When twenty years old I had completed, in three years, the regular 
course at the University of Kansas. About twelve years later, much to 
my surprise, the institution gave me a master's degree. 

At the end of three years at the University my father met with 
financial reverses, and I started to work. Without my knowledge, my 
mother borrowed $300 from a friend and sent me back to finish with my 
class. It took me a number of years to pay off that note, but I was 
grateful to my mother for her action. 

When I left the University I had $13 in money (most of which I de- 
posited in a bank at Lawrence) and the $300 debt. I weighed 123 
pounds; weight now is 200. A school chum and myself walked to Abi- 
lene, where there was a big demand for harvest hands. I learned to 
make a wheat band on the way. That was before the time of the self- 
binder, which was just coming into use. I made from $2 to $2.50 per 
day and board in the harvest field, and gained fourteen pounds. 

The following year I also helped harvest the wheat in Sedgwick county 
and worked on farms along the "Cowskin," southwest of Wichita, and 
also in the neighborhood of Victor Murdock's present suburban three- 
acre home. 

After harvest I joined a railroad surveying party on the plains of 
western Kansas and in Colorado. I spent about two years at this sort of 
work, including a great variety of railroad engineering, and when times 
were hard worked on the section. 

Having gained a sound constitution by much outside work summer and 
winter, I went into newspaper work. For about seven years I worked in 
practically every department on the Emporia News mechanical, re- 
portorial, business, editorial, and as one of the proprietors. I worked on 
the old Taylor drum-cylinder press and in the composing room. I never 
set much type, and have frequently regretted that I never had the oppor- 
tunity to become sufficiently proficient to qualify me for a membership in 
the International Typographical Union, which I consider one of the 
greatest organizations in the United States. The recently retired presi- 
dent of that institution, James M. Lynch, is certainly one of the best and 
fairest men I ever knew. The Typographical Union is a wonderful insti- 
tution for its members, and does them a world of good. Any good printer 
should be proud to belong to it. It not only helps the members to secure 
fair wages and good working conditions to both of which they are 
surely entitled but it helps them when they grow old, and helps them, 
through the Printers Home, when they are sick and incapacitated. If 
all unions were modeled on the plan of the printers' there would be 
fewer labor troubles. 

I did some "make-up" on the old Emporia Weekly News with its ten 
long columns to the page, making long arms necessary and ran the 
Mustang mailer, which included setting the names and addresses of the 
subscribers in type, and keeping the dates of their subscriptions correct 
on the galleys. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 131 



Jacob Stotler, Alexander Butts and I were equal partners on the 
Emporia Daily News for several years. 

When my interest in the News was sold I really wanted to take a six 
months' vacation and spend it in Washington, D. C., as a news corre- 
spondent, and see how the government was conducted and what congress- 
men did to earn their salaries; but the Topeka State Journal was ad- 
vertised to be sold at public auction three weeks after I left the Emporia 
News, so I came up here and bid for it. I got it. 

A year afterward I tried to get rid of it, because I found it was in 
far worse condition than I had imagined any newspaper could be, and I 
had sunk so much money in it the first year all that I had, and all that 
I could possibly borrow, I thought with no prospects but gloom and ex- 
pense in sight. Nobody would buy it, so I tried to make the best of what 
I considered a bad bargain, and about that time the paper began to "play 
even" and pay a little. My credit grew better, and I was able to borrow 
more money. 

Last year I spent almost as much money for new machinery as the 
paper originally cost me, and this year I am spending about as much for 
new equipment, in order to keep up with the procession. Most of my 
earnings go back into the State Journal. 

We had to raise our advertising rates the first of April, and at to-day's 
market price for white paper alone it would cost me $3000 more a 
month for white paper than it did a year ago, and yet one or two ad- 
vertisers think I have no right to advance the rate, even if the circula- 
tion has doubled since they began to pay the former rate. 

I have always liked reporting on a newspaper, and enjoy work in the 
composing room, around the forms and make-up, and about the desk 
where the copy lands, and have an ungratified ambition to learn to 
operate that wonderful machine, the linotype. I own eight of these ma- 
chines, including the very latest model "17," now shipping from the 
factory. 

In the thirty years of the State Journal under my conduct there has 
never been a strike. All differences have been settled by agreement and 
conciliation. 

In addition to being a newspaper man, I am also a farmer that is to 
say, we can raise nearly everything we eat on the 60-acre place I have 
five miles west of Topeka. I have recently gone into the banking busi- 
ness. Six months ago I had no thought of anything of this sort, but all of 
the nine banks in Topeka and two trust companies, I greatly regret to 
say, combined against me and the State Journal to discredit the paper 
and to deprive the city and county of a just rate for their surplus funds. 
I was forced into the banking business to defend the integrity, reputa- 
tion and good faith of my newspaper, and to secure what I considered 
the rights of the city. The new bank, I am sure, will be a benefit to all 
the banks of the city, increase their business, and raise the financial 
standing of the capital city of Kansas. 

I will be merely vice president of the Kansas Reserve State Bank, and 
will try to devote an hour a day to it. Nothing will take my energies and 
time from the daily paper. I have associated with me some of the very 



132 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



best bankers and business men in Topeka and Kansas, and they are all 
enthusiastic and delighted over our great prospects. 

I have a comfortable home for my good family my wife, Anna God- 
dard MacLennan, and daughter Mary; a fireproof modern newspaper 
office; a newspaper which pays its way, gives its owner an adequate live- 
lihood, and earns sufficient money to buy the new machinery and equip- 
ment constantly necessary, and employ labor at fair rates. A great many 
people are employed by the State Journal, and seem to like their work 
and be in comfortable circumstances by reason of it. 

I have never held any public office, elective or appointive, and have no 
ambition in that direction. Without being a candidate, and without my 
knowledge, I was elected vice president of the board of directors of the 
Associated Press, the greatest news-gathering association in the world, 
having a membership of 900 papers and expending $3,000,000 a year in 
its cooperative method of gathering and disseminating news, for it is an 
organization without profit. I was also elected for a second term, which 
was rather unusual. From my own viewpoint, I regard the office of 
director of the Associated Press as preferable to that of the office of 
United States senator. 

I love my work, am out of debt, and consequently content and hopeful, 
constantly striving to make a better newspaper and make Topeka and 
Kansas better places in which to live. 

Very truly yours, FRANK P. MACLENNAN. 



HAROLD T. CHASE. 

HAROLD TAYLOR CHASE has done the editorial writing for the 
Topeka Daily Capital since April, 1889. The Capital carries a 
strong editorial page, and Mr. Chase distinguished himself in his edi- 
torials on sound money in the days when free silver and the gold standard 
were so much discussed and finances were the political issues in the 
country. 

In "Who 9 s Who in America" appears the following sketch of Mr. 
Chase: "Chase, Harold Taylor, newspaper man; born, Wilkes-Barre, 
Pa., April 13, 1864; son of Edward Henry and Elizabeth (Taylor) C.; 
A. B., Harvard, 1886; married Annie Thompson, of Topeka, Kan., Janu- 
ary 15, 1890. Began newspaper work on Wilkes-Barre Record, 1886; 
editor Topeka Daily Capital since 1895. . . ." 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



133 




HAROLD T. CHASE, 
Topeka, Kansas. 



134 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




EDWARD P. HARRIS, 
Topeka, Kansas. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 135 



EDWARD P. HARRIS. 

T?DWARD P. HARRIS was born June 11, 1834, at Hudson, N. H. He 
IT/ learned the printer's trade before he was twenty years old, and has 
been a printer and proofreader from the time he first entered a print 
shop until to-day. 

In 1856 Mr. Harris was at work in Boston, where a party was made up 
to go to Kansas. He joined the party and came to Kansas through Chi- 
cago. He was a member of Lane's Army of the North, and came into 
Kansas over the old Lane trail, crossing the state line from Nebraska, 
August 7, 1856. Two miles over the line sixty men dropped out of the 
company and established the town of Plymouth. Twelve miles further 
down another party, including Mr. Harris, laid out the town of Lexing- 
ton. Still a third party founded the town of Holton. Mr. Harris came 
on to Topeka shortly after the founding of Lexington. Topeka was then 
a little village of three hundred people. It was unsafe to venture far out 
without a revolver, rifle or bowie knife. Mr. Harris said that you never 
knew what tree, bush or clump of grass might hide a border ruffian. 

Mr. Harris has known every governor of Kansas from Andrew H. 
Reeder down to Governor Capper. He is one of the pioneer printers of 
the state. He worked on the Herald of Freedom in 1856. In the fall of 
that year Preston B. Plumb was foreman of the office. Mr. Harris saw 
the free-state legislature dispersed in 1856 at Topeka. He was foreman 
of the state printing office in 1873, which position he held until 1891. He 
was associated with all the old-time newspaper men and printers of Kan- 
sas. In 1891 Mr. Harris became the proofreader for Crane & Company, 
Topeka, where he has remained to this day. 

It is hard to realize that there is yet living, in active service, a man 
who staked out a claim two and a half miles east of Topeka, but such is 
the case. He is still in good health, and has seen the state grow from 
the small fringe of settlements along the eastern border to one of the 
great states of the Union. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 137 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS 

BY COUNTIES. 



THIS HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS does not 
give all changes of editors and publishers. Changes in 
management are noted only when the name of the paper was 
changed or when the paper was .moved from one town to an- 
other. Where possible, the names of the founders of news- 
papers have been given. All newspapers listed are weeklies 
unless otherwise described. 



ALLEN COUNTY. 

Organized, 1855; named for William Allen, United States senator from 
Ohio; county seat, lola; area, 504 square miles, 322,560 acres; population 
(1915), 23,515; assessed valuation (1915), $28,709,782; resources and in- 
dustries agriculture, natural gas, oil, Portland cement, brick and tiling. 

IOLA Population (1915), 7866; elevation, 957 feet; established, 1859; named for Mrs. lola 
Colburn; industries smelters, cement and brick plants; has commission form of govern- 
ment; owns its water and electric light systems; has paved streets, telephones, street railway 
and interurban line to La Harpe; natural gas district; is on the lines of the Santa Fe, the 
Missouri Pacific and M. K. & T. railways. 
ALLEN COUNTY JOURNAL, Democratic; Will H. King, editor and publisher, lola. 

Weekly. Mar. 6, 1913 + 3 vols. 

Established in 1903; early history unknown, Society's file beginning with vol. 9, No. 48. 
CRUSADER, anticlerical; Father Jones, editor, Crusader Publishing Company, publisher, lola. 

Monthly. Mar., 1914 + 2 vols. 

Established in 1914 by the Crusader Publishing Company. 
REGISTER, Republican; Charles F. Scott, editor and publisher, lola. 
Weekly. Jan. 9, 18751906. 34 vols. 
Daily. Oct. 25, 1897 + 65 vols. 

The Register is a continuation of the following papers: The Allen County Courant, lola, 
founded 1867 by W. H. Johnson; name changed in 1868 to Neosho Valley Register, with Talcott 
& Acres, editors and publishers; name again changed in 1870 to Kansas State Register, with M. M. 
Lewis, editor and publisher; the same year Mr. Talcott obtained full control of the paper and 
restored the old name, Neosho Valley Register; in 1875 Messrs. Allison and Perkins took charge, 
changing the name to lola Register. A new Allen County Courant, lola, founded 1883 by H. A. 
Perkins, consolidated in 1886 with the Allen County Democrat, lola, founded in 1886 (presumably 
by J. J. Rambo, since the Society's first issue, vol. 1, No. 37, dated Nov. 27, 1886, shows him as 
editor and publisher), and name changed to Democrat-Courant, with J. C. and J. W. Hamm 
and J. J. Rambo, editors and publishers; in 1888 name changed back to Allen County Courant, 
edited and published by Hamm Bros., and in 1889 the subscription list and good will sold to the 
lola Register. The lola Evening News and lola Weekly News, founded 1896 by E. S. Davis; 
consolidated with the Register in 1897. lola Daily Record, founded 1898 by A. P. Harris, and 
the lola Weekly Record, founded 1899 by Mrs. Jennie Burns; weekly absorbed by the daily and 
discontinued in 1907, and daily consolidated with the Register in 1909. lola Weekly Index, 
founded 1906 by T. F. Zeigler, and the lola Daily Index, founded 1907 by Mr. Zeigler; consoli- 
dated 1909 with the Register. lola Daily Register, founded 1897 by Charles F. Scott; weekly 
edition of the Register discontinued in 1906. 



138 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



ELSMORE Population (1915), 249; elevation, 1055 feet; established, 1888; name formerly 

Elsinore; telephones; is on the M. K. & T. railway. 
LEADER, independent; H. T. Ashford, editor and publisher, Elsmore. 
Weekly. Feb. 6, 1914 + 2 vols. 

Founded 1914 by H. T. Ashford. 

GAS Population (1915), 631; established, 1898; takes its name from the immense gas wells 
opened there; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific and M. K. & T. railway lines, and inter- 
urban lola to La Harpe. 
TRI-CITY HERALD, Republican; A. C. Shaffer, editor and publisher, Gas. 

Semiweekly. Sept. 5, 1902 Nov. 19, 1915. 13 vols. 

Continuation of the following papers: Gas City Herald, founded 1902 by Horace P. and 
L. A. Schell. Gas City Headlight, founded 1901 by Ralph J. Wright; name changed same year 
to Gas City Gaslight; consolidated with Gas City Herald, 1902; name changed 1910 to Tri- 
City Herald, with A. C. Shaffer, editor and publisher. Not received by the Society since Nov. 19, 
1915. 

HUMBOLDT Population (1915), 2131; elevation, 960 feet; established, 1857; named for Baron 
Alexander von Humboldt; industries cement and brick plants, oil refinery, elevators and 
flour mills; owns its waterworks system; has electric lights and telephones; abundant supply 
of natural gas; is on the Santa Fe and M. K. & T. railways. 
UNION, Republican; C. A. Reynolds, editor and publisher, Humboldt. 

Weekly. Oct. 9 and Dec. 11, 1869; June 3, 1876 + 40 vols. 

Founded 1866, with Orlin Thurston, editor, and W. T. McElroy, publisher. By June 1, 1874, 
Mr. McElroy obtained entire control of the paper and published it up to the date of his death. 
The Humboldt Herald was founded in 1887 by S. A. D. Cox. Humboldt Daily News, founded 
1908 by S. A. D. Cox; consolidated 1909 with the Herald, and thereafter known as the Humboldt 
Daily Herald, with A. W. Cunningham, editor and publisher; in 1912 the daily edition was dis- 
continued and the Humboldt Semiweekly Herald took its place, E. A. Berdell, editor.and pub- 
lisher; suspended 1913, when the Humboldt Union purchased its subscription list. 

LA HARPE Population (1915), 1182; elevation," 1045 feet; established, 1881; named for 
La Harpe, 111.; industries smelters; natural gas district; telephones; interurban line to 
lola; on the Missouri Pacific and M. K. & T. railway lines. 

ENTERPRISE, independent; A. R. Johnson, editor and publisher, La Harpe. 

Weekly. Jan. 16, 1913 -f 3 vols. 
Founded 1912 by C. W. Hubbard. 

MORAN Population (1915), 685; elevation, 1098 feet; established, 1881; named for Daniel 
C. Moran and first called Morantown; telephones; natural gas district- on the Missouri 
Pacific and M. K. & T. railways. 

HERALD, Republican; C. C. Thomas, editor and publisher, Moran. 

Weekly. July 2, 1885 -f 30 vols. 
Established in 1883; early history unknown, Society's file beginning with vol. 2, No. 5, 

H. Armstrong, editor and publisher; 

SAVONBURG Population (1915), 221; elevation, 1056 feet; established, 1879; telephones; 

natural gas district; on the M. K. & T. railway. 
RECORD, Republican; P. E. Cooke, editor and publisher, Savonburg. 

Weekly. June 17, 1898 -j- 17 vols. 
Founded 1898 by C. A. Reynolds. 

DISCONTINUED. Vol8t 

lola Allen County Courant and Democrat-Courant. Sept. 27, 18831889. . 5 

Allen County Democrat (1st). Nov. 27, 18861888 1 

Allen County Democrat (2d). Aug. 5, 18981901 3 

Allen County Herald. Dec. 26, 18901893 2 

Allen County Independent. Dec. 17, 1879 1880 1 

Farmers Friend; Friend-Herald; Friend-Democrat. Mar. 29, 18901904 . . 15 

Index. June 15, 19061908 2 

Neosho Valley Register. 

Jan. 5 and Dec. 8, 1869; Sept. 13, 1873 Dec. 12, 1874. . 1 

News. Nov. 20, 18961897 1 

News, Evening (d). Nov. 28, 1896 1897 2 

Record (d). Nov. 4, 1898 July 3, 1909 . . 36 

Record. June 23, 18991906 7 

Southern Kansas Horticulturist (m). July, 18951896 1 

Western Sentinel. Aug. 10, 1894 1898 4 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 139 



DISCONTINUED. Voif 

Elsmore Eagle. Nov. 7, 18901892 

Enterprise (1st). Oct. 25, 1895 1897. . 

Enterprise (2d). Feb. 17, 18991907 

Leader (1st). Feb. 8, 19071912 5 

Gas Headlight; Gaslight. Feb. 22, 19011902 2 

Humboldt Herald (d). May 17, 1909 1912 . 8 

Herald. Aug. 4, 18871913 

Independent Press. Mar. 8, 18821883. . . 

Inter-State. Dec. 6, 18771886 .9 

Kansas Derrick. Jan. 20, 19031905 . . .8 

News (d). Dec. 24, 19081909 1 

Rural Kansan (m). Nov., 18731874 1 

La Harpe Journal; Allen County Journal. Apr. 1, 19041912. . . .9 

Kansas Review. Apr. 12, 19041905 . . 1 

News. Mar. 4, 18981904 7 

Mildred Ledger. July 15, 19101912 3 

Moran High School Mercury. Dec. 9, 18961899 1 

Savonburg Progress. Nov. 13, 1891 1892... 1 

Trio-News. July 6, 18941897 3 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

lola Citizen (d). Jan. 7, 1898. 

Citizen (s-w). Feb. 2, 23 and 26, 1898. 

Co-Operator [scattering]. May 11, 1912 July 26, 1913. 

Courant, Evening (d). Dec. 5-22, 1883. 
Humboldt Herald. Feb. 3, 10, Mar. 24, Apr. 28, May 5, 12, June 2, 23, 30, 1865. 

Leader. Sept. 29, Nov. 3, 1898. 

National Old Age Pensioner. Aug., 1914. 
La Harpe Argus. Sept. 22, 1899 Feb. 2, 1900. 

Kansas Review. Jan. 6 and 13, 1905. 
Moran Allen County Plaindealer. Aug. 28 Nov. 13, 1896. 



ANDERSON COUNTY. 

Organized, 1855; named for Joseph C. Anderson; county seat Garnett; 
area, 576 square miles, 368,640 acres; population (1915), 13,264; assessed val- 
uation (1915), $24,933,666; resources and industries natural gas, agricul- 
ture and stock raising. 

GARNETT Population (1915), 1999; elevation, 1046 feet; established, 1856; industries flour 

mill, elevator; has commission form of government; owns its electric light plant; natural 

gas district; has waterworks, telephones; is on the Santa ]Fe and ..Missouri Pacific railways. 

REVIEW, independent; W. O. Champe, editor, W. O. Champe and C.^T. Richardson, publishers, 

Garnett. 

Weekly. Sept. 16, 1915 -f- 

The Review is the continuation of the following papers: The Garnett Plaindealer, founded 
1865 by I. E. Olney; name changed 1883 to Anderson County Republican, L. H. Gordon and H. M. 
Brooke, editors and publishers; in 1884 consolidated with Garnett Plaindealer (2d), founded 
Jan. 4, 1884, by the Plaindealer Publishing Company; ran as the Republican-Plaindealer, with 
J. W. Richardson, editor and publisher; in 1903 name changed to Garnett Plaindealer and Ander- 
son County Republican, W. R. Smith, editor and publisher; in 1904 consolidated with the Garnett 
Eagle, under title of Eagle-Plaindealer, Will R. Smith, editor and publisher. The Garnett Eagle 
was founded in 1884 as the Westphalia Independent, E. R. Trask, editor and publisher; name 
changed 1885 to Westphalia Democrat, John Gulp, editor and publisher; in 1885 moved to 
Garnett, and name changed to Anderson County Democrat, Jesse Baker, editor, and John Gulp, 
proprietor; name again changed in 1886 to Garnett Eagle, J. W. Richardson, editor and publisher; 
in 1912 the Eagle-Plaindealer was consolidated with the Garnett Journal, and ran as the Garnett 
Journal-Plaindealer, with Levy J. Wright, editor and publisher, until it was absorbed by the 
Evening Review. The Garnett Journal was founded in 1873 by G. W. Cooper; in 1911 it pur- 
chased the subscription list of the Harris Sun, founded 1909 by Fay & Leftwich. The Kansas 
Agitator, Garnett and Greeley, founded 1890 by W. O. Champe, and mailed from Greeley post 
office until Jan. 5, 1891, when it was removed to Garnett and published there; in 1905 name 
changed to the Independent Review, with W. O. and Anna Champe, editors and publishers; dis- 
continued in 1907. The Evening Review, Garnett (daily), founded 1906 by Carleton Champe; 
in 1912 absorbed the Garnett Evening News, founded in 1902 by Horace P. Schell. The Evening 
Review was discontinued in 1915 and continued as the Garnett Review. 



140 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



COLONY Population (1915), 504; elevation, 1122 feet; established, 1870; first known as 
Divide, name changed to Colony in 1872; industries shipping point for stock and hay; 
telephones; is on the Santa Fe and Missouri Pacific railways. 

FREE PRESS, Republican; W. E. Payton, editor and publisher, Colony. 

Weekly. Jan. 26, 1882 + 33 vols. 
Founded 1882 by C. T. Richardson and J. J. Burke. 

GREELEY Population (1915), 527; established, 1854; named for Horace Greeley; natural gas 

district; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 
GRAPHIC, independent; O. L. Cullison, editor and publisher, Greeley. 
Weekly. June 24, 1892 -f- 24 vols. 

Founded 1891 as the Greeley Tribune, by Campbell & Waymire; name changed in 1892 
to the Greeley Graphic, with E. E. Vail, editor and publisher. 

HARRIS Population (1915), 150; established about 1886; named for A. A. Harris; telephones; 

is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

COMMERCIAL, independent; Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Trotwine, editors and publishers, Harris. 
Weekly. Apr. 23, 1914 + 2 vols. 

Founded 1914 by J. R. McNabb. 

K INCAID Population (1915), 402; elevation, 1053 feet; established about 1885; named for Robert 

Kincaid; telephones; is on the M. K. & T. and the Missouri Pacific railways. 
DISPATCH, Republican; J. E. Scruggs, jr., editor and publisher, Kincaid. 

Weekly. Aug. 3, 1888 + 27 vols. 
Founded 1888 by J. E. Scruggs and J. G. Cash. 
TATTLER, edited and published by students of Kincaid high school, Kincaid. 

Semimonthly. Feb., 1915 -f- 1 vol. 
Founded 1914 by the students. 

WESTPHALIA Population (1915), 368; established, 1879; first called Cornell for S. P. Cornell, 
name changed to Westphalia, after Westphalia, Germany, in 1880; telephones; is on the 
Missouri Pacific railway. 
TIMES, Democratic; Ancil F. Hatten, editor and publisher, Westphalia. 

Weekly. Oct. 22, 1885 + 30 vols. 
Founded 1885 by Adele D. Reed. 

DISCONTINUED. V ols. 

Garnett Anderson County Democrat. July 3, 18851886 1 

Anderson County Republican. Apr. 6, 1883 1884 1 

Eagle. July 9, 18861904 17 

Independent-Review. May 26, 19051907 2 

Journal. Jan. 24, 1874; July 10, 1875; Jan. 1 and May 6, 18761912 ... 37 

Kansas Agitator. June 7, 1890 1905 15 

Kansas Korn Knife (m). July, 18951896 1 

News, Evening (d). Feb. 4, 19021912 . . . 21 

Plaindealer (1st). Aug. 26, Sept. 2 and 16, 1870; 

Jan. 16 and July 17, 1874; July 9, 1875; Jan. 7, 18761883 7 

Plaindealer (2d). Jan. 4 May 23, 1884 1 

Republican-Plaindealer. May 30, 18841904 07 

Eagle-Plaindealer. Apr. 1, 19041912 f ' 

Journal-Plaindealer. May 17, 1912 J 

Reporter (d). Feb. 28 May 28, 1898 1 



Review, Evening (d). Jan. 4, 19071915. 



Greeley Light. July 2, 18921898 , 

News. June 9, 18811895. 



Pastor's Visit (m). Apr., 18941896. 



17 

. 5 

14 

2 

Tribune. Apr. 23, 18801881; Mar. 4 June 17, 1892 1 

Harris Sun. May 28, 19091911 * 3 

Kincaid Kronicle. Jan. 30, 1886 Apr., 1888; Sept., 18891892 6 

News (1st). Jan. 11 Aug. 16, 1895 1 

News (2d). June 29, 19001901 1 

Lone Elm Ledger. May 1, 18961898 3 

Selma Telephone. Apr. 5, 18951896. . . . ; 1 

Westphalia . . . . Democrat. Jan. 22 June 25, 1885 . . \ , 

Independent. Aug. 8, 18841885 J 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 141 



SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Garnett Baptist Times (m). Jan.-April, 1892. 

Kansas Sunflower (m). Aug., 1893 Feb., 1894. 
Colon" Gleaner. Mar. 1, 1895. 

Presbyterian Church Bulletin (m). Mar.-July., 1895. 
Harris . . . . Independent. Dec. 30, 1898. 

News. June 29 Dec. 21, 1894. 
Kincaid News. Nov. 29, 1895 Jan. 17, 1896. 



ATCHISON COUNTY. 

Organized, 1855; named for David R. Atchison, United States senator 
from Missouri; county seat, Atchison; area, 423 square miles, 270,720 acres; 
population (1915), 27,227; assessed valuation (1915), $42,068,099; resources 
and industries coal, brick, clay, sandstone, agriculture and stock raising. 

ATCHISON Population (1915), 15,263; elevation, 790 feet; established, 1854; named for 
David R. Atchison; industries foundries, car, wagon and carriage shops, furniture factories, 
cereal plant, brick and tile plant, elevators, mills, etc.; has electric lights, telephones, water- 
works, public library; is on the lines of the Santa Fe, Burlington, Rock Island and Missouri 
Pacific railways. 
ABBEY_STUDENT, edited and published by students of St. Benedict's College, Atchison. 

Monthly. Dec., 1891 + 25 vols. 

Founded 1891 by the students; issued for a short time as a bimonthly. 
CHAMPION, Republican; A. S. Andereck, editor, Champion Publishing Co., publisher, Atchison. 

Daily [evening]. Nov. 6, 13, 16, 1873; Feb. 10, 11, 28, June 17, July 7, Aug. 25, Sept. 13, 
Oct. 17, Dec. 3, 18, 1874; Jan. 1, 12, 31, Feb. 2, July 4, 6, 1875; July 2, 1876 -f 
79 vols. [From Aug., 1901, to May, 1907, the Daily Champion was not pub- 
lished.] 

This paper is the continuation of the Squatter Sovereign, Atchison, which was the first paper 
published in the county. It was subsidized by the Atchison Town Company to the extent of 
$400; founded in 1855 by Robert S. Kelley and Dr. John H. Stringfellow, and was a radical pro- 
slavery paper. In 1857 the paper passed to the control of the free-state party, with Robert Mc- 
Bratney and Frank G. Adams, editors and publishers. In 1858 John A. Martin became editor 
and publisher, changing the name to Freedom's Champion. During the '60s this name was changed 
to the Atchison Champion. In 1865 the Daily Champion was established by John A. Martin; 
in 1868 it was consolidated with the Atchison Daily and Weekly Free Press, founded 1864 by 
Frank G. Adams, the name becoming the Champion and Press, with John A. Martin and Frank 
A. Root, editors and publishers. On May 20, 1869, the office of the Champion and Press was 
destroyed by fire, but within three weeks was again in running order, with John A. Martin as sole 
editor and proprietor. The Kansas Statesman, founded 1901 by G. W. Myers & Sons, was absorbed 
the same year by the Champion. The weekly edition of the Champion was discontinued in 1909. 

CHURCH VISITOR, religious; Paul Tonsing, editor and publisher, Atchison. 

Weekly. Dec. 12, 1908 + 7 vols. 

Early history unknown; Society's file begins with vol. 3, No. 11. 
DISTRICT BULLETIN, organ of the district Epworth League, Atchison. 

Quarterly. Apr., 1916 + 
Founded 1916. 
E. W. HOWE'S MONTHLY, indignation, information; E. W. Howe, editor and publisher, Atchison. 

Monthly. Mar., 1911 + 5 vols. 
Founded 1911 by E. W. Howe. 

GLOBE, independent; Globe Publishing Company, publisher, Atchison. 
Daily [evening]. Mar. 29, 1878 + 93 vols. 
Weekly. July 16, 1908 + 7 vols. 

Established in 1877 as the Little Globe, a free daily, by Howe & Co. The weekly edition 
founded in 1878 by E. W. Howe and Dr. H. B. Horn. 
KANSAS SYNOD LUTHERAN, religious; Rev. M. F. Troxel, editor and publisher, Atchison. 

Monthly. Nov., 1914 + 1 vol. 
Founded 1914 by Rev. Howard C. Garvic. 



142 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



MIDLAND, edited and published by literary societies of Midland College, Atchison. 

Monthly. May, 1891, to Apr., 1904; Jan.-Apr., June, Sept., Nov. and Dec., 1905; 

Jan.-May, Nov., 1906; Jan., 1907; Oct., 1909; Apr., 1915 -f- 12 vols. 
Founded as the Midland College Monthly in 1890 by the literary societies of Midland Col- 
lege: name changed to the Midland in 1892. 

MIDWEST MOOSE REVIEW, fraternal; official organ Loyal Order of Moose; Frank L. Danforth, 
editor, Midwest Moose Review Publishing Company, publisher, Atchison. 

Monthly. Not. received by the Society. 
Established 1912. 
OPTIMIST, edited and published by the students of the Atchison high school, Atchison. 

Monthly. Oct. and Nov., 1915; Feb., 1916 + 
Early history unknown, Society's first issue being vol. 8, No. 2. 

ST. BENEDICT'S CALENDAR, religious; Rev. Gerard Heinz, editor, St. Benedict's College, pub- 
lisher, Atchison. 

Monthly. Jan., 1912 + 4 vols. 

This publication continues the Benedictine Parish Monthly, Atchison, which was founded 
in 1907 by St. Benedict's College. Early history is unknown; the Society's file begins with vol. 11, 
No. 1. 

WESTERN CHIEF, official organ of the I. O. R. M.; Paul Tonsing, editor and publisher, Atchison' 

Monthly. June, 1905 + 11 vols. 

Established in 1901; early history unknown, first number in Society's file being vol. 5, No. 5, 
with G. W. Myers, editor and publisher. 

EFFINGHAM Population (1915), 736; elevation, 1131 feet; established about 1869; named 
for Effingham H. Nickels; has telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

ATCHISON COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL NEWS, edited and published by students of Atchison county 
high school, Effingham. 

Monthly. Mar., 1908 -f 8 vols. 
Founded in 1895 as the High School Quarterly, edited and published by the students; name 

changed in 1899 to the High School Bulletin; name again changed in 1908 to the Atchison County 

High School News. 

NEW LEAF, Republican; C. E. and A. J. Sells, editors and publishers, Effingham. 

Weekly. May 25, 1894 -f- 21 vols. 
A continuation of the following: Effingham Times, founded 1887 by P. N. GSsh; name changed 

1891 to Atchison County Graphic, W. C. Adkins, editor and publisher; name again changed in 

1892 to the Graphic; moved to Atchison 1893, with John T. Seip, editor, and W. C. Adkins, 
manager; sold to the New Leaf, Effingham, 1894. Effingham World, history unknown [no issues 
in Society's collection]; absorbed by the Graphic, 1893. Aug. 17, 1900, the New Leaf purchased 
subscription list of the first Huron Herald, founded Jan. 7, 1892, by Frank I. White. The New 
Leaf was founded 1894 by M. C. and Ina L. Clingman, editors and publishers. 

HURON Population (1915), 216; elevation, 1157 feet; established, 1882; various statements 
are made as to its name, but verification has not been possible; telephones; is on the Missouri 
Pacific railway. 

HERALD, independent; T. A. Kerr, editor and publisher, Huron. 

Weekly. Apr. 12, 1907 -f 9 vols. 
This paper is the second of its name and was founded in 1907 by J. E. Smith; the first Huron 

Herald was absorbed by the Effingham New Leaf, which see. 

MUSCOTAH Population (1915), 465; elevation, 960 feet; established, 1867; an Indian word 
meaning "Beautiful Prairie"; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

RECORD, independent; R. M. Dunlap, editor and publisher, Muscotah. 

Weekly. July 1, 1885 -(- 29 vols. [Aug., 1886, to Jan., 1887, lacking.] 
Founded 1884; early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being vol. 1, No. 39, F. M. 

Bonham, editor and publisher. The paper was not published from June 24 to Aug. 12, 1892. 

POTTER Population (1915, estimated), 175; elevation, 930 feet; was also known as Bennet 

Springs; telephones, elevator; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
KANSAN, independent; John E. Remsburg, editor and publisher. 
Weekly. Dec. 17, 1903 + 12 vols. 

Founded 1900 as the Potter Leaf, by E. L. and Norene Barber; name changed 1903 to Potter, 
Kansan, with Charles B. Remsburg, editor and publisher. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 143 



DISCONTINUED. VoU 

Atchison.. . . Atchisonian. Mar. 24 May 26, 1877. .. 1 

Banner [German]. Mar., 18781879 1 

Baptist (m). Mar., 18901893 3 

Blade. July 23, 18921894 1 

Champion. Sept. 27, 18731909 30 

Champion and Press. Aug. 15, 1868 1873 4 

College Review (m). Atchison and Lawrence. Apr., 1891 1901 8 

Courier [German]. May 5, 18761879 .3 

Free Press (d). May 8, 18651868 7 

Free Press. June 22, 18651868 3 

Freedom's Champion. Feb. 20, 1858 Feb. 3, 1861; Mar. 13, Apr. 6, 

June 29, Aug. 3 and 17, Dec. 28, 1861; Feb. 14, 18621863 4 

Graphic. Sept. 29, 1893 Jan. 10, 1894 1 

[See Graphic, Effingham.] 

Journal. Apr. 19, 18811882 2 

Kansas Agriculturist. July 18, 1898 1899 1 

Kansas Churchman [in Lawrence, Douglas county). 

Kansas Statts Anzeiger [German]. [Published at Wichita 18861894.] 

July 7, 18811913 28 

Kansas Statesman. Feb. 15 Oct. 11, 1901 1 

Kansas Telegraph [German]. Dec. 23, 18801881 1 

Kansas Zeitung [German]. July 22, 18571858 1 

Missouri Valley Farmer. Jan. 4, 18931898 6 

Morning Star and Daily Patriot. Oct. 13, 1895 1896 1 

New Kansas Magazine (m). Feb., 18921893 1 

New West (m). Aug., 1878 1880 2 

Patriot (d). Nov. 17, 1873; Sept. 23, Oct. 19, 1874; Jan. 11 July, 1876; 

July, 18791895 . . 33 

Patriot. Sept. 24, Nov. 12, Dec. 10-17, 1870; Mar. 28, 18741896 22 

Squatter Sovereign. Dec. 25, 1855; Mar. 11 Dec. 9, 1856; 

Jan. 13 Feb. 17, Sept. 5, 12, 26, Oct. 24, 31, Nov. 14, Dec. 5, 1857.. 1 

Sunday Morning Call. Feb. 8, 18801883 4 

Times. Feb. 9, 18871891 3 

Trades-Union. Sept. 12, 18851886 1 

Union [scattering issues]. June 4, 1859 1861 3 

Western Mercury. Dec. 3, 18831886 . 3 

Arrington Times and Atchison County Times. May 28, 18961897 1 

Effingham Atchison County Visitor. Mar. 1, 1905 1907 3 

Enterprise. Apr. 3 Aug. 7, 1886 1 

Graphic. Sept. 26, 18911893 2 

High School Bulletin (m). Feb., 18991908 10 

High School Quarterly. Jan., 18951898 2 

Oracle. Dec., 19011912 1 

Times. Dec. 12, 18871891 4 

Huron.. ...Graphic. Apr. 5, 1890 1891 2 

Herald. Jan. 7, 1892 Aug. 9, 1900 9 

Lancaster Prairie Press. May 12, 18881890 2 

Potter Leaf. Nov. 22, 19001903 3 

Press. Apr. 29, 18981899 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Atchison Advance. Nov. 15, 1884 Jan. 3, 1885. 

Atchison Monthly. Sept., 1881. 

Bee (d). Mar. 25 Apr. 4, 1889. 

Bible Investigator (m). July-Dec., 1881. 

Courier [German]. Atchison and Topeka. May 20, 1879. 

Gardner's Real Estate Bulletin (m). Sept. and Dec., 1873; Mar., 1874. 

Globe (d). Sept. 30, Oct. 12, and Dec. 5, 1873. 

Humorist. Feb. 2, 1884. 

Kansas Illustrated Monthly Souvenir (m). Feb. and June, 1873. 

Messachorean (m). Feb.-June, 1888. 

People's Press. Aug. 5 Sept. 15, 1893. 

Public Ledger. Aug. 19 and Oct. 30, 1880. 

Real Estate Record (m). July, 1869. 

Sentinel of the Northwest (m). Jan., 1883. 

Short Line Advocate. Apr. 21, 1879. 

Sunday Morning Facts. Sept. 2, 1883 Feb. 3, 1884. 

Sunday Morning Sermon. June 1 July 27, 1884. 

Tradesman. Nov. 16, 1891. 

Western Farm and Home (m). Jan.-Apr., and Oct., 1881. 

Effingham Journal. Sept. 3, 1892 Feb. 23, 1893. 

Huron Messenger. July 2, 1884. 

Muscotah News. June 16, 1880. 



144 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Atchison Blade. Nov. 5, 1897 Feb. 19, 1898. 

Bulletin (tri-w). June 20, 1861. 

Bulletin. June 27, July 4, 11, 18, Aug. 2, 8, 15, 1861. 

Journal. Nov. 17 and 24, 1905. 

Morning Star. July 19 Aug. 30, 1905. 

Plain Facts. Oct. 14-28, 1897. 

Sunday Morning Topics. May 31, 1891. 

Tribune. May 21 July 16, 1896. 

Arrington Argus. Aug. 26, Sept. 2, 1904. 

Huron Times. Apr. 4-25, 1891; Feb. 22 June 14, 1901. 

Potter Atchison County Recorder. June 1 Oct. 26, 1900. 



BARBER COUNTY. 

Organized, 1873; named for Thomas W. Barber, free-state martyr; county 
seat, Medicine Lodge; area, 1134 square miles, 725,760 acres; population 
(1915), 9203; assessed valuation (1915), $20,481,090; resources and indus- 
tries red sandstone, brick clay, gypsum, agriculture and stock raising. 

MEDICINE LODGE Population (1915), 1304; elevation, 1470 feet; established, 1873; named 

by the Indians a place of council; industries gypsum cement mill; telephones; public 

library; owns its waterworks system; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
BARBER COUNTY INDEX, Democratic; U. C. Herr, editor, Painter & Herr, publishers, Medicine 

Lodge. 

Weekly. Dec. 16, 1880 + 34 vols. 

Established 1880; early history unknown; first issue in Society's file, vol. 1, No. 28, shows 
M. L. Sherpy, editor and publisher. 

CRESSET, Republican; C. W. McMillan, editor and publisher, Medicine Lodge. 

Weekly. Mar. 20, 1879 + 37 vols. 

Founded 1878 as the Barbour County Mail, by M. C. Cochran; name changed 1879 to the 
Mail, with same editor and publisher; name again changed, same year, to Medicine Lodge Cresset, 
J: W. McNeal and E. W. Iliff, editors and publishers. 

HARDTNER Population (1915), 297; established, 1887; named for Dr. John Hardtner, of 
Springfield, O.; industries elevators, telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

PRESS, independent; George N. Harvey, editor, Roy C. Harvey, publisher, Hardtner. 

Weekly. Oct. 16, 1914 + 1 vol. 
Founded 1911 by George N. Harvey. 

HAZELTON Population (1915), 331; elevation, 1349 feet; established, 1883; named for Rev. 

J. H. Hazelton; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific and Santa Fe railways. 
HERALD, Progressive; C. A. Hyatt, editor and publisher, Hazelton. 
' Weekly. Nov. 24, 1906 + 9 vols. 

Founded 1905; early history unknown; first issue in Society's file, vol. 1, No. 50, shows 
Arthur O. Leamon, editor and publisher. 

KIOW A Population (1915), 954; elevation, 1333 feet; established, 1872; town site moved and 

new town company incorporated 1884; named for Kiowa Indians; has telephones; is on the 

Santa Fe and Missouri Pacific railways. 
JOURNAL, Republican; P. H. Alexander, editor and manager, The Journal Company, publisher, 

Kiowa. 

Weekly. Nov. 4, 1886 + 29 vote. 

Founded 1885; early history not known; first issue in Society's file, vol 2, No. 7, shows W. C. 
Charles and D. A. Ellsworth, editors and publishers. 

NEWS-REVIEW, Republican; Oscar Haberlein, editor and publisher, Kiowa. 

Weekly. Jan. 2, 1903 + 13 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Kiowa Review, founded 1891 as the Alliance 
Review by Hudson & Watrus; name changed 1892 to the Kiowa Review, with C. C. Hudson, 
editor and publisher; consolidated with the News, 1902. The Kiowa News, founded 1899 by Oscar 
Haberlein; name changed, after absorbing the Review in 1902, to the Kiowa News-Review, Oscar 
Haberlein, editor and publisher. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 145 



SHARON Population (1915), 308; elevation, 1456 feet; established, 1883; indastri<-s -flour 
mills and elevators; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

SHARON VALLEY TIMES, independent; P. H. Adair, editor, Todd Tilton, associate editor, Sharon. 

Weekly. Apr. 2, 1914 Dec. 2, 1915. 1 vol. 

Founded 1911; early history not known; first issue in Society's file is vol. 3, No. 4, and shows 
P. H. Adair, editor and publisher. Not received by the Society since Dec. 2, 1915. 

DISCONTINUED. Volg 

Medicine Lodge Barber County Herald. Aug. 23, 18901891 . . 1 

Barbour County Mail. May 21, 18781879 . . 

Chief. July 3, 18861888 . 2 

JEtna. Clarion. Sept. 3, 18851887 2 

Hazelton... ..Express. Jan. 2, 1884 1898.. . 10 
[Suspended Oct. 27, 1893, to Aug. 15, 1896.] 

Isabel Herald. Feb. 10, 19051909 g 

Kiowa.. .. Alliance Review and Kiowa Review. Apr. 1, 1891 1902.. 11 

Herald. July 10, 18841891 . 6 

Kansan. Feb. 15 Sept. 20, 1911 1 

Lake City . . . . Bee. Feb. 24, 18881889 1 

Kansas Prairie Dog. Feb. 19, 18851889 3 

Sharon ... . . Advocate. Apr. 24, 19031904 . . 1 

News. Oct. 22, 18841886 

Shield. Feb. 25 Aug. 12, 1910 1 

Sun City Union. Nov. 21, 18841888 4 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Medicine Lodge Barber County Democrat. Mar. 23 July 6, 1888. 

Independent Star. Feb. 21 Mar. 13, 1888. 
Hazelton . . . .Argosy [scattering]. May 6 July 29, 1898. 

Bee. Mar. 24 Sept. 8, 1894. 

Isabel Star. Oct. 7, 1910. 

Kiowa . . Bugle Blast. Feb. 27 Mar. 20, 1895. 



BARTON COUNTY. 

Organized, 1872; named for Miss Clara Barton, founder of the American 
Red Cross Society; county seat, Great Bend; area, 900 square miles; 576,000 
acres; population (1915), 16,392; assessed valuation (1915), $42,846,807; 
resources and industries rock salt, sandstone, wheat and live stock. 

GREAT BEND Population (1915), 3115; elevation, 1850 feet; established, 1870; named for 
its location on the great bend of the Arkansas river; has electric lights, telephones, water- 
works, public library; is on the Santa Fe and Missouri Pacific railways. 
BARTON COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Democratic; John K. McMullen, editor and publisher, Great Bend. 

Weekly. Nov. 11, 18861915. 28 vols. - 

Daily [evening]. Feb. 15, 1915 + 2 vols. 

Founded in 1885 as a weekly; the first issue in the Society's files, vol. 2, No. 32, gives Dewey 
Langford as editor and publisher; changed to a daily Feb. 15, 1915, J. K. McMullen, editor and 
publisher. 
TRIBUNE, Republican; Will Townsley, editor and publisher, Great Bend. 

Weekly. Aug. 12, 18761915. 39 vols. 

Daily [evening]. Dec. 7, 1908 -f- 14 vols. 

The Tribune is a successor to the following papers: Great Bend Register, founded 1874 by 
the Great Bend Publishing Company, A. J. Hoisington, manager; absorbed by the Tribune 1908. 
Inland Tribune, founded 1876 by C. P. Townsley; name changed 1887 to the Great Bend Trib- 
une, with same editor and publisher; weekly edition discontinued 19 ID Evening News early 
history unknown, first issue in Society's file being dated Dec. 9, 1890, vol. 3, No. 67 [no editors 
given]; later the paper was edited by C. P. Townsley, and suspended Apr. 30 IS97 The Daily 
Item/early history unknown; first issue in Society's file, May 11, 1901, shows F. E. Brown,editor 
and publisher; name changed Dec. 7, 1908, to Great Bend Daily Tribune Will Townsley, Warren 
Baker and Ed. C. Vollmar, editors, tribune PubWrfung Company publishers. Great Bend Daily 
Hustler, founded 1904 by Stoke & Feder; absorbed by the Daily Item 1908. Great Bend Morn- 
ing News, founded 1910 by Gunn & Wattson: absorbed by the Tribune in 1910. 

10 



146 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



TRUTH ABOUT GOD AND LIFE, antireligious; W. H. Kerr, editor, Church of Humanity, publishers, 
Great Bend. 

Monthly. Dec., 1905 + 10 vols. 
Founded 1905 by W. H. Kerr. 

CLAFLIN Population (1915), 610; elevation, 1795 feet; established about 1886; telephones; 

is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

CLARION, independent; W. M. Huff, editor and publisher, Claflin. 
Weekly. Mar. 23, 1899 + 17 vols. 

Founded 1899 by O. E. O'Bleness. Barton Banner, Claflin, founded 1897 by D. B. Downey, 
absorbed by the Clarion in 1899. 

ELLINWOOD Population (1915), 1032; elevation, 1785 feet; established, 1871; named for 

Col. John R. Ellinwood; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
LEADER, independent; J. A. Townsley, editor and publisher, Ellinwood. 
Weekly. Sept. 17, 1896 + 19 vols. 

Founded 1894 by Joseph W. A. Cooke as the Claflin Leader; moved to Ellinwood 1896 and 
name changed to Ellinwood Leader, with same editor and publisher. Ellinwood Advocate, 
founded 1888 by R. M. Watson; consolidated with the Ellinwood Leader 1898. 

HOISINGTON Population (1915), 2189; elevation, 1816 feet; established about 1880; for- 
merly known as Buena Vista, name changed to Hoisington, after A. J. Hoisington, in 1888; 
has electric lights, telephones and public library; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

DISPATCH, independent; Roy Cornelius, editor and publisher, Hoisington. 

Weekly. Mar. 7, 1889 + 27 vols. 
Founded 1889 by Ira H. Clark. 

PAWNEE ROCK Population (1915), 365; established in 1874; named for historic landmark, 

near by; has telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

HERALD, independent; Pete H. McKechnie, editor and publisher, Pawnee Rock. 
Weekly. July 21, 1904 + 11 vols. 

Founded 1904 by Connor & Lippincott. 

DISCONTINUED. Volg 

Great Bend Arkansas Valley Democrat. Aug. 18, 1877 1882 5 

Barton County Beacon. Sept. 4, 1890 1903 14 

Barton County Press [German]. Great Bend and Ellinwood. 

Jan. 18, 19011913 12 

Graphic (d). Mar. 14, 18871888 2 

Item (d). May 11, 19011908 15 

Kansas Volks Freund [German]. Sept. 7, 18781879 1 

Kansas Workman (m). May, 1909 1913. [See Neosho county.] 

News, Evening (d). Dec. 9, 18901897 15 

News, Morning (d). Mar. 12 Sept. 28, 1910 1 

Normal Weekly. June 5, 18911892 1 

Pythian Sisters' News. La Cross, Great Bend and Erie. [See Neosho 
county.] 

Rebekahian; Kansas Rebekah (m). Jan., 18941895 1 

Register. July 3, 18761908 32 

Rustler (d). Mar. 1, 19041908 11 

Claflin . Barton Banner; Claflin Banner. Jan. 14, 18971899 3 

Barton County Banner. Nov. 6, 1890 1894 4 

Gazette. Jan. 26 July 26, 1888 1 

Leader. Mai. 29, 18941896 3 

Ellinwood Advocate. May 18, 1888 1898 10 

Express. Apr. 13, 18781888 10 

Hoisington... ..Blade. Apr. 14, 1892 1893 2 

Echo. July 30, 18871889 1 

Pawnee Rock . . . .Alliance Globe. Sept. 11, 18911892 1 

Leader. Apr. 30, 18861893 8 

Pawnee Chieftain. Oct. 21, 18981899 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Great Bend Barton County Times. July 26 Sept. 27, 1883. 

Evening Star. May 6 June 27, 1893. 

Kansas Educator (m). Sept., 1892 June, 1893. 

New West (m). Sept., 1888. 
Hoisington Mascot. Aug. 17 Sept. 21, 1888. 

Morning Mascot. Oct. 18, 1888. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 147 



Pawnee Rock Crank. Mar. 7-28, 1888. 

Fun. Feb. 2 Mar. 30, 1891. 
Normal Herald (m). Feb.-May, 1892. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Great Bend Christian Educator and God's Defender (m). Dec., 1903 May, 1905. 

Kansas Educator (m). Aug., 1898 Mar., 1900. 
Pawnee Rock Endeavor Banner (s-m). Nov. 1, 15, 1898. 



BOURBON COUNTY. 

Organized, 1855; named for Bourbon county, Kentucky; county seat, 
Fort Scott; area, 637 square miles, 407,680 acres; population (1915), 25,032; 
assessed valuation (1915), $30,807,438; resources and industries agriculture, 
sandstone, brick clay, natural gas. 

FORT SCOTT Population (1915), 11,422; elevation, 800 feet; fort established, 1842; named 
for Gen. Winfield Scott; town organized, 1857; industries coal mines, cement plant, mineral 
paint, tile, brick and pottery works; natural gas district, electric lights, waterworks, street 
railway; has three railway lines, Missouri Pacific, M. K. & T. and Frisco. 
CHURCH ADVOCATE AND HOLINESS BANNER, religious; H. B. Goodrick, editor and business man- 
ager; published by the Board of Publication of the Church of God, Fort Scott. 

Weekly. Feb. 26, 1910 + 6 vols. 

Early history unknown; first issue on Society's file, vol. 22, gives J. G. Elkina, editor. 
REPUBLICAN, Republican; C. B. Griffith, managing editor, Charlie Griffith and Frank Morton, 
publishers, Fort Scott. 

Weekly. Jan. 16, 1902 Aug. 26, 1915. 13 vols. 
Daily. Jan. 19, 1902 + 45 vols. 

The Weekly Republican is the continuation of the following: Bronson Pilot, early history 
unknown, first issue in Society's file being dated Mar. 27, 1884, vol. 2, No. 6, and giving M. H. 
Davis, editor and publisher; name changed 1896 to the Bronson Record, Ritter Bros., editors 
and publishers; moved to Fort Scott 1902, and name changed to Weekly Republican, with F. C. 
Raney, editor and manager; weekly edition discontinued Aug. 26, 1915; daily founded 1902 by 
F. C. Raney and H. W. Shidler. Garland Gazette, founded 1905 with I. S. Boyer, editor; absorbed 
by the Republican 1907. Mapleton Dispatch, founded 1905, L. M. Byington, editor; absorbed 
by the Republican 1907. Uniontown News, founded 1903, Shannon Jones, editor; absorbed by 
the Republican 1907. The Sasnak, founded 1905 by James Burton; consolidated with Town and 
County 1905. Town and County, founded 1905 by Ralph Richards, and the Sasnak, sold to 
the Republican 1907. The Redfield Herald, founded 1905, with J. Frank Pool, editor; absorbed 
by the Republican 1907. 

TRIBUNE AND MONITOR, Democratic; George W. Marble, editor and manager, Robert B. Barr, 
associate editor, Tribune-Monitor Company, publishers, Fort Scott. 
Daily [evening]. Oct. 1, 1884 + 82 vols. 
Weekly and semiweekly. Nov. 6, 1884 -f 31 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Fort Scott Monitor, founded 1862 at Marma- 
ton by D. B. Emmert; moved to Fort Scott 1863, and consolidated with the Bulletin under the 
name of Union Monitor, D. B. Emmert, editor, Charles Hay ward and D. B. Emmert, publishers; 
in a short time the name was changed to Fort Scott Monitor; the Monitor was consolidated with 
the Tribune 1904. Western Volunteer, founded 1862 by E. K. Smith; name changed same year 
to Fort Scott Bulletin; consolidated with the Monitor in 1863. The Daily Monitor was first 
issued 1864; suspended in 1865; in January, 1866, it was revived by W. H. Johnson and D. B. 
Emmert; consolidated with the Tribune 1904. The Lantern, founded 1890 at Mapleton by 
Lockhart & Waterman; moved to Fort Scott 1891 (same editors and publishers); absorbed by 
the Monitor 1901. The Spectator, founded 1889 by Ralph Richards; name changed 1892 to 
Fort Scott Journal (no editors or publishers given); consolidated with the Lantern 1893. Fort 
Scott Industrial Union, founded 1890 by E. Latimer and R. B. Frye; absorbed by the Lantern 
1891. Fort Scott Tribune, founded 1882 as the Banner, by the Banner Publishing Company: 
name changed 1884 to Fort Scott Weekly Tribune (no editors or publishers given). Fort Scott 
Daily Tribune, founded 1884. Fort Scott Daily and Weekly News, founded 1889 by Martin & 
Jenness; absorbed by the Tribune 1890. The Tribune and Monitor were consolidated 1904. 

BRONSON Population (1915), 612; elevation, 1079 feet; established, 1881; named for Ira 

D. Bronson; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 
PILOT, Republican; Lawrence Moore, editor. and publisher, Bronson. 
Weekly. Jan. 15, 1902 + 14 vols. 

Founded 1902 by F. A. Tooney. This is the second paper of this name; the first discontinued 
in 1896. 



148 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



FULTON Population (1915), 440; elevation, 815 feet; established as Osaga, 1869; name changed 
to Fulton in 1878; telephones; is on the St. Louis & San Francisco railway. 

GLOBE, independent; Harry Mills, editor and publisher, Fulton. 

Weekly. Sept. 19, 1912 + 3 vols. 
Founded 1912 by Harry Mills. 

REDFIELD Population (1915), 255; elevation, 863 feet; established, 1866; telephones; is on 

the Missouri Pacific railway. 

LEDGER, independent; M. C. Ellinger, editor, Mrs. M. C. Ellinger, associate editor, Redfield. 
Weekly. May 29, 1913 + 3 vols. 

Founded 1913 by Mr. and Mrs. M. C. Ellinger. 

DISCONTINUED. Volg 



Fort Scott Banner. Oct. 12, 1882 1884 



Camp's Emigrant Guide (m). Feb.-Dec., 1877. . . . 

Citizen (d). Sept. 3 Dec. 4, 1897 

Dispatch. June 9, 18921894 

Fair Play. Apr., 18981899 

Globe, Evening (d). Sept. 11, 18881889 

Herald. May 9, 18781885 

Herald and Record. Sept. 28, 1882 Dec. 4, 1884 . 

Herald, Evening (d). June 5, 18821885 

Industrial Union. Oct. 10, 18901891 

Journal. Sept. 10, 1892 1893. 



2 

1 

1 

3 

2 

Hi! j 

Kansas Staats Zeitung [German]. Jan. 14, 18861887 .' .' '. 2 

Kansas Medical Catalogue (m). Jan., 1890 1893 [scattering] 2 

Lantern. Mapleton and Fort Scott. Sept. 24, 18901901 .11 

Medical Index (m). Jan., 18801884 4 

Monitor (d). Sept. 24, 1871: May 25, 1878; 

Jan. 11, 1880 Dec. 8, 1891; Nov. 1, 18921904 48 

Monitor. June 19, 1867 1870; June, 1876 Nov., 1891; Oct., 1892 1904 30 

New Century. Jan. 3, 18771878 1 

News (d). Nov. 23, 18891890 2 

Normal Journal (s-m and m) [scattering]. Dec. 1, 18831897 4 

Pioneer. Jan. 6, 27, 18761878 2 

Republican Record. Jan. 30, 18791882 4 

Sasnak. Jan. 5 Oct. 7, 1905 1 

Spectator. Jan. 19, 1890 1892 3 

Sunday Call. Jan. 20 June 30, 1889 1 

Town and County. Oct. 20, 1905 1907 2 

Trackman. July 1, 19031909 6 

Union. Oct. 22, 18871888 1 

Unionist. Dec. 11, 19031904 1 

Western Educational Review (m). May, 18801881 1 

Western Medical Journal (m). Jan., 18941903 9 

Bronson. . . . .Pilot (1st). Mar. 27, 18841896 .13 

Record. Dec. 3, 18961902 5 

Fulton. . . . .Independent. Aug. 8, 18841907 . . 23 

Record. Oct. 15, 19091912 2 

Rustler (m). April 5, 18901893 4 

Times. Oct. 8, 18961898 1 

Garland ... ... Gazette. Oct. 20, 19051907 .2 

Gleaner. Apr. 3, 18861887 2 

Hiattville News. Feb. 21, 1908 1910 , 2 

Optic. June 16, 18921893 1 

Mapleton ... . . Dispatch (1st). June 24, 18891895 5 

Dispatch (2d). Oct. 20, 19051907 2 

Lantern. [See Fort Scott.] 

Press. Dec. 20, 19051910 5 

Telephone. Mar. 2, 18871889 . 2 

Redfield Herald. Apr. 8, 19051907 2 

JJniontown Cicerone. Nov. 10, 1911 1912 1 

Herald. July 6 Dec. 14, 1883 1 

News. Apr. 24, 19031907 4 

Sun. Dec. 13, 19001901 ' 1 

Telephone. Oct. 24, 18851887. . . ... 2: 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Fnrt Scott .Broom Corn Reporter. Sept. 15, 1886 Sept. 1, 1887. 

Christian Sower (m). Oct., 1892 Jan., 1893. 
Herold [German]. Apr. 3 May 29, 1890. 
Land Record (m). Sept., Nov., 1870. 
News. Nov. 28, 1889 Mar. 27, 1890. 
Post (d). Oct. 16, Dec. 14, 29, 30, 1869 Jan. 4, 1870. 
Southern Argus. Oct. 15, 1891 Feb. 4, 1892. 
Southern Kansas Immigrant (m). May, Oct. and Dec., 1869. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 149 



SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Fort Scott Bulletin. Sept. 6, Oct. 4, 1862. 

Democrat. Jan. 12, 26, Sept. 21, 1861. 

Farm and News. Jan. 23 Mar. 19, 1896. 

High School Crimson. Dec. 4, 1896. 

Prairieland Magazine (m). Mar., 1902. 

Garland Graphic. Dec. 14, 1905 Mar. 22, 1906. 

Redfield Express. July 12 Nov. 29, 1894. 



BROWN COUNTY. 

Organized, 1855; named for O. H. Browne; county seat, Hiawatha; area, 
576 square miles, 368,640 acres; population (1915), 20,684; assessed valuation 
(1915), $42,586,528; resources and industries agriculture, horticulture, 
live stock. 

HIAWATHA Population (1915), 3627; elevation, 1085 feet; established, 1857; named by Dr. 
E. H. Grant, for the hero of Longfellow's poem; has waterworks, telephones, paved streets, 
public library, and city owns electric light plant; is on the Missouri Pacific and St. Joseph 
& Grand Island railways. 

BROWN COUNTY WORLD, Republican; Ewing Herbert and Drew McLoughlin, editors and pub- 
lishers, Hiawatha. 

Weekly. Mar. 16, 1882 + 34 vols. 
Daily (2d). Oct. 27, 1908 + 17 vols. 

The weekly edition of the World is a continuation of the following newspapers: Union Sen- 
tinel, founded 1864 by H. P. Stebbins; consolidated 1870 with the Dispatch. Hiawatha Dispatch, 
founded 1870 by A. N. Ruley; name changed 1882 to Hiawatha World, D. W. Wilder, editor, 
World Publishing Company, publishers; name again changed in 1884 to Brown County World, 
same editor and publishers. Brown County Advocate, Hiawatha, founded 1874 by Davis & 
Watson; name changed 1875 to the Kansas Herald, S. L. Roberts and D. S. Burger, editors and 
publishers; sold to the World 1883. The daily edition of the World was first issued in 1891 by 
D. W. Wilder and Ewing Herbert, and suspended 1892; revived 1899 by Ewing Herbert, but 
discontinued same year; the present daily was started 1908 by Ewing Herbert. 

KANSAS DEMOCRAT, Democratic; F. M. Pearl, editor and publisher, Hiawatha. 

Weekly. Sept. 5, 1883 + 32 vols. 

Founded 1883 by George T. Williams; consolidated with the Hiawatha News 1909, and called 
the Kansas News-Democrat; in 1913 the old name of Kansas Democrat was restored, F. M. 
Pearl, editor and publisher. The Hiawatha News was founded 1909 by W. F. Hovey. Hiawatha 
Journal, founded 1889 by G. W. Remagen; sold to the Democrat 1895. 

EVEREST Population (1915), 416; elevation, 1146 feet; established about 1882; named for 
Col. A. S. Everest, of Atchison; industries grain elevators; telephones; is on the Missouri 
Pacific railway. 

ENTERPRISE, independent; Mark Falvey, editor and publisher, Everest. 

Weekly. Mar. 9, 1888 + 27 vols. 
Founded 1888 by T. A. H. Lowe, editor and manager. 

FAIR VIEW Population (1915), 413; established, 1872; named by Mrs. O. Fountain for its 

fine outlook; has telephones; is on the Rock Island railway. 
ENTERPRISE, independent; North Worrel, editor and publisher, Fair view. 
Weekly. Mar. 24, 1888 + 28 vols. 

Founded 1888 by S. O. Groesbeck. 

HAMLIN Population (1915), 205; elevation, 980 feet; established, 1870; named for Hannibal 

Hamlin; has telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 
REPORTER, independent; Helen MacDowell, editor and publisher, Hamlin. 
Weekly. July 3, 1913 Dec. 16, 1915. 2 vols. 

Founded in 1912; earliest history unknown; first issue in Society's file, vol. 1, No. 29, shows 
A. G. Huff, editor and publisher. Not received by the Society since Dec. 16, 1915. 

HORTON Population (1915), 3839; elevation, 1050 feet; established, 1887; named for Albert 
H. Horton; has electric lights, waterworks, telephones; is on the Rock Island railway. 



150 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



HEADLIGHT-COMMERCIAL, independent; Charles Herbert Browne, editor and publisher, Horton. 

Weekly. June 8, 1911 -f 5 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Horton Headlight, founded 1886 by Harley W. 
Brundige and Samuel E. Bear; in 1901 consolidated with the Leader, founded 1899 by Johnson 
& Law; name changed to Horton Headlight-Leader, Johnson & Law, editors and publishers; 
after a few issues the name was changed back to Horton Headlight; in 1911 it consolidated with 
the Commercial under name of Headlight-Commercial, with Charles H. Browne, editor and pub- 
lisher. Horton Commercial, founded 1887 by John S. Sherdeman. A daily edition of the Head- 
light was founded 1887 by Brundige & Bear; suspended 1888; revived 1889, but discontinued 
same year. 

MORRILL Population (1915), 533; established, 1877; named for Gov. Edmund N. Morrill; 

has telephones; is on the St. Joseph & Grand Island railway. 
NEWS, independent; D. H. Steele, editor and publisher, Morrill. 
Weekly. Apr. 4, 1890 + 26 vols. 

Founded 1890 by J. P. Grinstead. 

POWHATTAN Population (1915), 294; elevation, 1210 feet; established about 1887; named 
for the Indian chief; has telephones; is on the Rock Island railway. 

BEE, independent; J. E. Smith, editor and publisher, Powhattan. 

Weekly. Feb. 18, 1910 + 6 vols. 
Founded 1901; early history unknown; first issue in Society's file, vol. 9, No. 51, gives Eppie 

L. Barber, editor and publisher. 

ROBINSON Population (1915), 508; established, 1871; named in honor of Gov. Charles Robin- 
son, who owned the original town site; has telephones; is on the St. Joseph & Grand Island 
railway. 

INDEX, Republican; Ralph W. McDonald, editor and publisher, Robinson. 

1 Weekly. July 28, 1893 -f 21 vols. 
Founded 1893 by J. P. Grinstead. 

DISCONTINUED. Vohf 

Hiawatha Brown County Republican. Apr. 4, 1901 1902 . 2 

Brown County World (1st d). Dec. 28, 18911892 1 

Delta of Sigma Nu. [See Douglas county.] 

Dispatch. Apr. 13, 18761882 6 

Free Press. Feb. 17, 18871888 1 

Herald. Feb. 18 Nov. 3, 1904 1 

Herbert's Monthly and Herbert's Weekly. Oct., 19031913 11 

Journal. May 23, 18891895 5 

Kansas Herald. Jan. 8, 18761883 8 

Kansas Newspaperdom ; Newspaper World; Newspaper West (m). 

18941896 5 

Kansas Sun. June 7, 1879 1880 1 

Messenger. Dec. 10, 18811884 2 

News. Mar. 4 July 8, 1909 1 

Our Messenger (m). Nov., 1907 Oct., 1908. [See Sedgwick county.] 

School News (m). Feb., 18961906 10 

Sunflower Magazine (m). May, 18931896 3 

Union Sentinel. Aug. 20, 18641865 1 

Everest Reflector. Sept. 18, 18841886 2 

Fairview Courier. Sept. 29/.1893 1899 6 

Hamlin News Gleaner. July 20, 18891890 1 

Horton Commercial. Nov. 8, 18871911 24 

Gazette. June 25, 18871889 2 

Headlight. Oct. 29, 1886 Oct. 21, 1897; Mar. 10, 18981911 24 

Headlight (d). Oct. 29, 18871889 2 

[Sept., 1888 Oct., 1889, lacking.] 

Leader. Jan. 17, 18991901 3 

News. Sept. 12, 19121914 2 

Railway Register. Apr. 4, 1888 1889 1 

Railway Register (d). Feb. 23 Apr. 30, 1889 1 

Telegram. June 26, 18891890 1 

Morrill Vindicator. Jan. 12, 18951896 1 

Powhattan Post (1st). May 5, 18941895 1 

Post (2d). July 23, 18971901 4 

Reserve Reporter. Dec. 19, 19121913 1 

Robinson Reporter. Aug. 14, 1891 1892 

Willis. ., Journal. July 8, 18971899 1 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 151 



SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Hiawatha North Kansan. Sept. 7 Nov. 30, 1878. 

Horton Brown County Star. Jan. 1 Apr. 23, 1889. 

Morrill ... . . Brown County Herald. July 9 Aug. 20, 1886. 

Journal. July 5 Oct. 18, 1882. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Hiawatha.. .. Academy Review (qr) . Dec., 1892, and March, 1893. 

Bee. Jan. 3 Feb. 21, 1901. 

Brown County Advocate. Oct. 16 and 23, 1874; July 3, 1875. 

Brown County Sentinel. Sept. 9 and Dec. 30, 1869. 

Brown County World (d). Oct. 4-7, 1887. 

North Kansan. Jan. 8, 1879. 

Supporter. Feb. 28 Apr. 4, 1901. 
Horton . . . . . Evangel. Oct. 23 Dec. 24, 1898. 

Headlight (d) [M. E. Conference edition]. March 5-10, 1890. 
Morrill Glad Tidings (m). Aug. 16, 1909 Jan. 1, 1910. 

Interstate Advocate (m). Apr. 1 and June 1, 1886; Apr. 1, 1888. 
Powhattan Parish Monthly (m). Aug., 1897. 



BUTLER COUNTY. 

Organized, 1855; named for A. P. Butler, United States senator from 
South Carolina; county seat, El Dorado; area, 1428 square miles, 913,920 
acres; population (1915), 20,788; assessed valuation (1915), $48,353,266; 
resources and industries natural gas, oil, agriculture and stock raising. 

EL DORADO Population (1915), 2710; elevation, 1290 feet; established, 1868; Spanish words 
signifying "golden land"; industries stone quarries; telephones, municipal waterworks 
system; is on the Missouri Pacific, Santa Fe and Orient railways. 

REPUBLICAN, Republican; Mrs. Marie Antoinette Murdock, editor and publisher, El Dorado. 
Weekly. Nov. 9, 1883 + 32 vols. 

Daily [evening]. May 5, 18851888; Oct. 15, 1896 + 43 vols. 
Founded in 1883 by T. B. Murdock. 
KANSAS WOODMAN, fraternal; George F. Fullinwider, editor and publisher, El Dorado. 

Monthly. June 1911 May, 1912. 1 vol. 

Founded 1911, as the Woodmen of the World, by George F. Fullinwider. Name changed 
1912 to Kansas Woodman. Not received by the Society since May, 1912. 

WALNUT VALLEY TIMES, Republican; C. C. Shelden, editor and publisher, El Dorado. 

Weekly. Apr. 17, 1874 + 42 vols. 

Daily [evening]. Mar. 2, 1887 + 57 vols. 

Founded 1870 by T. B. Murdock; purchased by Alvah Shelden in 1881; daily founded 1887 
by Shelden & McGuin, with Alvah Shelden, editor. 

AUGUSTA Population (1915), 1378; elevation, 1228 feet; established, 1869; named for Mrs. 

Augusta James; telephones; is on the Santa Fe and the Frisco railways. 
BUGLE, independent; H. E. Sehy, editor and publisher, Augusta. 
Weekly. Feb. 11, 1915 + 1 vol. 

A continuation of the following: Augusta News, founded 1889 by Olin W. Meacham and 
J. P. Rice; succeeded 1890 by the Industrial Advocate, W. L. Holcomb, editor, and Olin W. Mea- 
cham, business manager; moved to El Dorado in 1891, J. F. Todd and J. C. Riley, jr., editors and 
proprietors. A daily edition of the Industrial Advocate was started by Messrs. Todd & Riley 
about the first of May, 1892; discontinued June 13 following. Whitewater Tribune, founded 1889 
by Al M. Hendee; moved to El Dorado in 1893, and name changed to Butler County Citizen, 
with E. D. Stratford, editor and publisher; consolidated in 1895 with the Industrial Advocate, 
J. D. Botkin and W. H. Biddle, editors and publishers; name changed 1913 to Butler County 
Democrat, W. T. Cowgill, editor and publisher; moved to Augusta in 1915, and name changed 
to the Augusta Bugle, H. E. Sehy, editor and publisher. 

GAZETTE, independent; Joe M. Satterthwaite, jr., editor and publisher; Augusta. 
Weekly. July 15, 18921908. 18 vols. 
Daily [evening]. Dec. 18, 1903 -f 24 vols. 

The Daily Gazette, founded in 1903 by Timothy Sexton, is a continuation of the weekly 
Gazette, founded 1892 by Mr. Sexton and O. J. Bradfield; the weekly was discontinued in 1908. 



152 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



JOURNAL, Progressive; W. L. Dickey, editor and publisher, Augusta. 

Weekly. Sept. 15, 1887 + 28 vols. 

Founded 1887; first issue in Society's file, vol. 1, No. 27, shows W. M. Rees and W. J. Speer, 
editors and publishers. Southern Kansas Gazette, Augusta, founded 1873 by C. H. and W. J. 
Kurtz; consolidated with the Journal 1887. A daily edition of the Journal was' started in 1907 by 
Will H. Cady; discontinued in 1909. 

BENTON Population (1915), 206; elevation, 1375 feet; established, 1884; telephones; is on 

the Missouri Pacific railway. 

BULLETIN, local; Mr. and Mrs. John W. Millsap, editors and publishers, Benton. 
Weekly. May 22, 1913 + 3 vols. 

Founded 1913 by Mr. and Mrs. Millsap. 

DOUGLASS Population (1915), 633; elevation, 1203 feet; established, 1869; named for Joseph 

Douglass; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

TRIBUNE, Republican; J. M. Satterthwaite, editor and publisher, Douglass. 
Weekly. Jan. 4, 1884 + 32 vols. 

Founded 1884 by J. M. Satterthwaite. 

LATHAM Population (1915), 287; telephones; is on the Frisco railway. 
MIRROR, Republican; T. E. Trigg, editor and publisher, Latham. 

Weekly. Dec. 20, 1901 + 12 -vols. 
Founded 1901 by C. K. Barnes. 

LEON Population (1915), 385; elevation, 1329 feet; established, 1879; first called Noble; name 
changed to Leon in honor of Leon, Iowa; telephones; is on the St. Louis & San Francisco 
railway. 

NEWS, independent; J. S. Martin, editor and publisher, Leon, 

Weekly. Dec. 7, 1911 + 4 vols. 
Founded 1911 by C. V. Cole. 

POTWIN Population (1915), 251; elevation, 1338 feet; established, 1871; formerly known as 
Ayr; name changed to Potwin between 1884 and 1885, probably named for C. W. Potwin, a 
prominent citizen; industries flour mill, alfalfa mill, elevator; telephones; is on the Mis- 
souri Pacific railway. 

LEDGER, local; J. D. Burton, editor and publisher, Potwin. 

Weekly. Jan. 20, 1916 + 
Early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being vol. 1, No. 4. 

TO WAN DA Population (1915), 320; elevation, 1278 feet; established, 1870; telephones; is on 

the Missouri Pacific railway. 

NEWS, independent; George W. Moore, editor and publisher, Towanda. 
Weekly. Jan. 13, 1905 + 11 vols. 

Founded 1905 by Chas. H. Roff. 

WHITEWATER Population (1915), 485; elevation, 1386 feet; established, 1878; name changed 
to Ovo in 1882: changed back to Whitewater in 1888; telephones; has two railways, the 
Rock Island and the Missouri Pacific. 

INDEPENDENT, independent; E. Davis, managing editor, Mrs. Eva F. Davis, city editor, E. 
Davis & Co., publishers, Whitewater. 

Weekly. Oct. 8, 1896 + 19 vols. 
Founded 1896 by E. Davis, jr. 

DISCONTINUED. y j s 

El Dorado Butler County Citizen. May 18, 18931895 1 

Butler County Democrat. March 24. 1881 1891 10 

[From Oct., 1888, to Nov., 1889, called Butler County Jeffersonian.] 

Butler County Democrat (2d). Oct 24, 19131915 2 

Democrat and News. Oct. 9, 1896 1897 1 

Eagle. Feb. 23, 18821883 1 

Educational Advance (m). Jan., 1893 1894 2 

Eli (d). Oct. 20, 18901891 2 

Industrial Advocate. Mar. 19, 18911913 23 

Kansas Templar (m). Jan., 1896 1908 12 

Kansas Workman. Feb. 2, 18891890 2 

[Published at Emporia June 15 to Dec. 7, 1888.] 

Press. Apr.125, 18771883 7 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 153 



DISCONTINUED. Vols 

Augusta... ..Advance. Apr. 25, 1883 1884.. 1 

Electric Light. July 24, 18841886 2 

Industrial Advocate. Aug. 7, 18901891 1 

News. Oct. 25, 18891890 1 

Press. Jan. 4, 18951897 3 

Republican. Sept. 25, 18731875; 18801883 3 

Southern Kansas Gazette. Jan. 1, 22, 1876 1887 11 

Beaumont Business. Sept. 10, 1886 1887 1 

Benton Call. Mar. 3 Sept. 29, 1893 1 

Reporter. Mar. 6, 18841885 1 

Brainerd . . . .Ensign. Oct. 14, 1886 1889. . . 3 

Sun. Oct. 15, 18851886 1 

Douglass Index. June 25, 1880 1883 3 

New Enterprise. Apr. 24, 18791880 2 

Latham Journal. Sept. 4, 18851886 1 

Signal. Sept. 10, 18861890 3 

Times. June, 18901893 3 

Leon Indicator. Jan. 31, 1880 Feb., 1887; Sspt. 1887 May 24, 1894; 

Dec. 27, 18941911 30 

[From Feb. to Sept., 1887, called the Leon Quill, and from May 24 to 
Dec. 27, 1894, the Press.l 

Press. May 24 Dec. 27, 1894 1 

Quill. Aug. 12, 18861887 ' 1 

Potwin Argus. Apr. 26, 19061907 1 

Messenger. Jan. 6, 1888 1889 2 

Towanda Herald. Apr. 9, 1885 May, 1886; Nov., 18861893 8 

Whitewater Herald. June 22, 18931896 . . 3 

Tribune. June 20, 18891893 4 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

El Dorado Democrat (d). Feb. 15-22, 1888. 

Augusta Industrial Advocate (d). May 2 June 13, 1892. 

News. Aug. 7 Nov. 13, 1886. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

El Dorado Advocate (d). Mar. 18 Apr. 13, 1901. 

Church Messenger (m). Jan.-Apr., 1904. 

College Register. Sept., 1894. 

News [scattering]. Apr. 8 Nov. 19, 1897. 

Our Forum (qr). Sept.-Dec., 1896; Mar.-Sept., 1897. 

Visitor (m). June, 1894 Mar., 1895. 
Augusta Butler County Beacon. Mar. 10 June 9, 1894. 

Crescent. Aug. 17, 1870. 

Sunflower (m). Feb.-July, 1894. 

Cassoday Times. Jan. 1 Feb. 19, 1915. 

Douglass Church Record (m). Feb.-March, 1881. 

Elbing Hatchet. July 29, 1893 Jan. 13, 1894. 

Potwin Record. Jan. 1 Feb. 12, 1915. 

Rosalia Enterprise. Nov. 13, 1914 Feb. 5, 1915. 



CHASE COUNTY. 

Organized, 1859; named for Salmon P. Chase, governor of Ohio at the 
time; county seat, Cotton wood Falls; area, 750 square miles, 480,000 acres; 
population (1915), 7154; assessed valuation (1915), $20,140,674; resources 
and industries agriculture, stock raising, limestone quarries. 

COTTONWOOD FALLS Population (1915), 921; elevation, 1191 feet; established, 1859; in- 
dustries stone quarries, mills; telephones, electric lights; is on the Santa Fe railway and 
interurban to Strong City. 

CHASE COUNTY LEADER, Republican; W. C. Austin, editor and publisher, Cottonwood Falls. 

Semiweekly. Feb. 25, 1875 + 41 vols. 
Established 1871 by Wm. A. Morgan. 



154 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



CEDAR POINT Population (1915), 167; established about 1862; telephones; is on the Santa 

Fe railway. 

COTTONWOOD VALLEY NEWS, Democratic; D. F. Drinkwater, editor and publisher, Cedar Point. 
Weekly. Oct. 22, 1914 + 1 vol. 

Founded 1912; first issue in Society's file, vol. 3, No. 12, gives D. F. Drinkwater, editor and 
publisher. 

STRONG CITY Population (1915), 858; elevation, 1181 feet; established, 1872; first called 
Cottonwood; name changed about 1881 to Strong City, in honor of W. B. Strong, president 
of the A. T. & S. F. railway; industries stone quarries; has telephones; is on the Santa Fe 
railway and an interurban line to Cottonwood Falls. 
NEWS-COURANT, independent; William M. Knapp, editor, W. C. Austin, owner, Strong City. 

Weekly. Dec. 30, 1909 + 6 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Chase County Courant, Cottonwood Falls, 
founded 1874 by J. C. Martin and W. E. Timmons. Strong City Independent, founded 1881 by 
R. M. Watson; sold in 1888 to the Chase County Republican, Strong City, founded 1887 by Frank 
D. Weller, continued by W. Y. Morgan; in 1892 name changed to Strong City Derrick, with C. W. 
White, editor and publisher; in 1905 name changed to Strong City Herald, Eugene L. Smith, 
editor and publisher. Elmdale Reporter, founded in 1899 by R. E. Seward; sold to the Strong 
City Herald in 1906. In 1907 the Herald 's subscription list was sold to the Chase County Courant. 
Chase County Reveille, Cottonwood Falls, founded 1890 by E. W. Ellis; consolidated in 1900 with 
the Courant, and called the Courant and Reveille, Philip Goodreau, editor and publisher; in 1907 
the name was changed back to the Courant, with E. F. Halbert, editor and publisher. Strong City 
News, founded 1909 by H. G. Hammond; absorbed in 1909 the Elmdale Gas Jet, founded same 
year by Frank E. Pattie, and during the year 1909 consolidated with the Courant, and continued 
as the News-Courant, J. N. Leonard, editor and publisher. 



DISCONTINUED. 



Vols. 



Cottonwood Falls. . . Central Kansas Index. Apr. 20, 18701871 1 

Chase County Banner. Aug. 3, 18671869 1 

Chase County Courant. Oct. 26, 18741900 26 

Courant. Jan. 24, 19071900 3 

Courant and Reveille. Oct. 18, 19001907 6 

Kansas Press. 1859 1 

[See Council Grove Press.] 

Reveille. Aug. 21, 18901900 10 

School News (m). Nov., 18871888 1 

Cedar Point The Pointer. Mar. 30, 18951896 2 

Elmdale Gas Jet. Mar. 4 Dec. 24, 1909 1 

Reporter. Dec. 15, 18991906 5 

[1899 and 1900 issues scattering.] 

Matfield Green Mirror (1st) . Jan. 27, 18931894 . . 1 

Mirror (2d). Sept. 27, 1907 1908 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Cottonwood Falls. . . Chase County Leader (d). Sept. 29 Oct. 2, 1886. 

Scalping Knife. Sept. 15, 1874. 

True Reformer. Nov. 1, 1876. 

Valley Echo. Oct. 28, 1880 Jan. 27, 1881. 

Matfield Green Independent. Aug. 20, 1904 Jan. 6, 1905. 

Strong City Advance. Sept. 7, 1893 May 10, 1894. 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY. 

Organized, 1875; named for Chautauqua county, New York; county 
seat, Sedan; area, 651 square miles, 416,640 acres; population (1915), 11,236; 
assessed valuation (1915), $14,905,868; resources and industries natural gas, 
oil, agriculture and stock raising. 

SEDAN Population (1915), 1454; elevation, 835 feet; established, 1871; named after Sedan, 
France; industries marble works, oil and gas wells; has telephones, owns its waterworks 
system; is on Missouri Pacific railway. 

TIMES-STAR, Republican; Roy L. Fruit, editor and publisher, Sedan. 

Weekly. Jan. 19, 1894 + 22 vols. 
Continuation of the following: Chautauqua Journal, Sedan, founded 1875 by H. B. Kelley 

and R. S. Turner; consolidated with the Sedan Times 1885. Cedar Vale Times, founded 1878; 

moved to Sedan same year and name changed to Chautauqua County Times, with P. H. Albright, 

editor and publisher; name again changed in 1881 to Sedan Times, A. D. Dunn, publisher; con- 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 155 



solidated 1885 with Chautauqua Journal, under the name of Sedan Times-Journal, R. G. Ward, 
editor and publisher. Cedar Vale Star, founded 1884 by I. D. McKeehen; consolidated with Times- 
Journal at Sedan 1894 and name changed to Weekly Times-Star, Adrian Reynolds and F. G. 
Kenesson, editors and publishers. Freeman's Lance, Peru, founded 1891 by W. A. Tanksley; 
moved to Sedan 1892 and known as Sedan Lance, with A. S. Koonce, editor, and D.E. Shartel, 
publisher; consolidated with the Times-Star 1909. Sedan Republican, founded 1890 by T. B. 
Ferguson, sold to the Lance 1892. Chautauqua County Democrat, and Chautauqua County 
Journal; early history unknown; Society has no copies of either one on file. 

CEDAR VALE Population (1915), 978; elevation, 915 feet; established, 1870; named from 
the location; industries roller mill; has electric lights, telephones; owns its waterworks 
system; is in the gas and oil district; is on the Santa Fe and Missouri Pacific railways. 

COUNTY LINER AND CBDAR VALE COMMERCIAL, independent; W. Cecil Jones, editor and pub- 
lisher, Cedar Vale. 

Weekly. Feb. 27, 1914 + 2 vols. 
Cedar Vale Commercial, founded 1889 by W. M. Jones and J. W. Milnes; consolidated with 

the County Liner 1914. The County Liner, Cedar Vale, founded 1914 by W. Cecil Jones. 

ELGIN Population (1915, estimated), 500; elevation, 781 feet; established, 1869; has tele. 

phones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
DERRICK, independent; H. C. Chacey, editor and publisher, Elgin. 

Weekly. Aug. 14, 1915 + 

Early history unknown; first issue in Society's file is vol. 14, No. 6. 
JOURNAL, local; T. E. Trigg, editor and publisher, Elgin. 

Weekly. Apr. 13, 1916 + 
Founded 1916 by T. E. Trigg. 

?ERU Population (1915), 541; elevation, 805 feet; established, 1870; formerly known aa 
Belleville; industries brick plant, gas Dwells; has telephones; is on the^Santa Fe and Missouri 
Pacific railways. 

SUN, independent; J. R. Potter, editor and publisher, Peru. 
Weekly. Not received by the Society. 

DISCONTINUED. y^ 

Sedan Border Slogan. Aug. 10, 18831884 1 

Chautauqua County Democrat. Feb. 28 July 10, 1884 1 

Chautauqua County Times; Sedan Times. Jan. 3, 1879 1884 6 

Chautauqua Journal. Apr. 21, 18761884 . 9 

Graphic. Dec. 24, 18841890 6 

Lance. Aug. 24, 18921909 .17 

Republican. Sept. 10, 18901892 . 2 

Times-Journal. Jan. 2, 1885 1894 9 

Cedar Vale Commercial. July 20, 18891914 . . .25 

Star. May 9, 18841894 10 

Chautauqua Spgs.. .Express. May 11, 1888 1889. . 1 

Globe. July 7, 19051909 .4 

Mail. Mar. 4 Oct. 28, 1887 1 

Pilot; Oil Leader. May 5 Oct. 6, 1904. 

[See, also, Labette county]. 

Spy. May 19, 18821883 1 

Elgin Clipper. Mar. 7 Nov. 14, 1891 1 

Hewins Sayings. Aug. 1, 19071909 2 

Niotaze Chanticleer (m). Feb.-Oct., 1895 1 

Horoscope. Aug. 4, 1893 1894 1 

Peru Call. Feb. 10, 18881889 2 

Chautauqua County Democrat. Cedar Vale and Peru. 

July 4, 19001902 2 

Chautauqua News. June 3, 1876 1880 3 

[Not published Nov., 1879, to Oct., 1880.] 

Citizen. June 4, 19091911 2 

Derrick. Feb. 7, 19021913 12 

Eagle. Feb. 7, 18901891 1 

Freeman's Lance. Feb. 20, 18911892 2 

Oil Gazette. Apr. 27, 19041906 

Times. July 1, \886- 1887 1 



156 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Sedan Chautauqua County Times. Dec. 13, 1878. 

Home Enterprise (m). Feb.- June, 1880. 

Our Paper (m). Oct., 1885. 

Pro et Con (m). May-July, 1900. 

Republican (d). Oct. 31, 1891. 

School Casket. May 5, 1882. 

Wide Awake. July 10, 1875. 
Cedar Vale Baptist Messenger (m). Mar.-Aug., 1899. 

Blade. Aug. 24 Dec. 21, 1877. 

Times. May 24 Dec. 6, 1878. 



CHEROKEE COUNTY. 

Organized, 1866; named for Cherokee tribe of Indians; originally called 
McGee county in honor of Mabillon W. McGee, proslavery leader; county 
seat, Columbus; area, 589 square miles, 376,960 acres; population (1915), 
36,370; assessed valuation (1915), $27,711,031; resources and industries 
coa 1 , zinc, lead, agriculture. 

COLUMBUS Population (1915), 3500; elevation, 895 feet; established, 1868; first called 
Center, then Centralia, and later named for Columbus, Ohio; industries coal mining, flour 
and feed mills, carriage and wagon factory, canning factory, brick and tile plant, machine 
shop, marble works, powder mill; has commission form of government; owns its waterworks 
system; has electric lights, telephones, public library; is in the gas and oil district; is on the 
Frisco and M. K. & T. railways. 

ADVOCATE, Republican; N. H. Huston, editor and publisher, Columbus. 
Weekly. May 5, 1882 + 35 vols. 

Daily [evening]. June 8, 18861887; 1895 Feb. 27, 1904; Jan. 3, 1910 + 31 vols. 
Founded 1882 as Lea's Columbus Advocate, by A. T. Lea and E. A. Crewson; name changed 
in 1885 to Columbus Advocate, A. T. Lea, editor and publisher. A daily edition was founded in 
1885 by A. T. Lea & Son, which was discontinued in 1887; in 1895 it was reestablished with 
J. M. McNay and Asa Lea, editors and publishers. Baxter Springs Republican, founded 1872 
by A. T. Lea; moved to Columbus in 1876, and name changed to Cherokee County Republican, 
A. J. R. Smith, editor and proprietor; consolidated in 1877 with the Columbus Courier, under 
the name of Republican Courier, S. O. McDowell and A. T. Lea, editors and publishers. The 
Columbus Courier was founded 1874 by J. F. McDowell. In 1878 the name again became the 
Columbus Courier, S. O. McDowell and M. H. Gardner, editors and proprietors; consolidated 
in 1886 with the Border Star (2d), Columbus, under the name of Star and Courier, James Wilson, 
editor and publisher. Border Star (2d), reestablished in 1881, with R. T. Ballard, editor and 
publisher. The Star and Courier and the Star Courier continued until 1896, when it again be- 
came the Columbus Courier, with S. O. McDowell, editor, and Courier Printing Company, pub- 
lisher. Columbus Republican (early history unknown, first issue in Society's file June 15, 1894, 
vol. 3, No. 30, J. M. McNay, editor), absorbed by the Columbus Advocate in 1894. The Colum- 
bus Courier consolidated in 1902 with the Columbus Advocate, and continued with W. A. Mitchell, 
editor and publisher. 

MODERN LIGHT, Democratic; C. W. Grant, editor and publisher, Columbus. 

Weekly. Mar. 19, 1891 + 25 vols. 
Founded 1891 by J. H. Clawson. 
QUESTION MARK, edited and published by students of the high school, Columbus. 

Monthly. Oct., 1912 May, 1913. 1 vol. 
Founded 1912 by the students. Not received by the Society since May, 1913. 

BAXTER SPRINGS Population (1915), 1343; elevation, 833 feet; established, 1866; named 
for A. Baxter and the mineral springs found on the town site; industries mining, planing 
mill; has electric lights, waterworks, telephones, and mineral springs of medicinal value; 
is on the Frisco and the Missouri, Oklahoma & Gulf railways. 
NEWS, independent; Charles L. Smith, editor and publisher, Baxter Springs. 

Weekly. Feb. 23, 1882 + 34 vols. 
Founded 1882 by J. B. Rowley. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 157 



GALENA Population (1915), 5926; elevation, 870 feet; established, 1871; first called Short 
Creek; name changed to Galena, for Galena, 111., about 1877; industries mining, foundry, 
machine shops, stamping and smelting works, flour mill; has commission form of govern- 
ment; electric lights, waterworks, telephone, street railway; is on the interurban line to 
Joplin, Webb City and Carthage, and has two railways, the M. K. & T. and the Frisco. 

ECHO, independent; edited and published by the Echo Publishing Co., Galena. 

Weekly. Aug. 7, 1913 -f- 2 vols. 
Founded in 1912; early history unknown; first issue in Society's file is vol. 1, No. 37, and gives 

Sara C. Scovell as editor and publisher. 

REPUBLICAN, Republican; A. S. McNay, editor and publisher, Galena. 

Weekly. Jan. 19, 1883 + 33 vols. 

Founded 1880; early history not known, first issue in Society's file being vol. 2, No. 6, L. C . 
Weldy, editor and publisher. Name changed in 1893 to Galena Republican, same editor and 
publisher. A daily edition was established in 1897 by Mr. Weldy; suspended in 1900. 

TIMES, Democratic; H. C. McNay, editor and publisher, Galena. 

Daily (evening). Sept. 17, 1896 + 38 vols. 
The Galena Times (weekly), founded 1890, D. R. Neville, editor, and C. T. Dana, business 

manager; suspended 1899. Galena Daily Times, founded 1896 by Cooke and W. L. 

Burke. 

MINERAL and WEST MINERAL Population (1915), 1462; elevation 893 feet; established, 
1882; first known as Cherry; name changed to Mineral in 1895 for mines found there; in- 
dustries coal mining; telephones; is on interurban line to Columbus and Pittsburg and 
on the M. K. & T. railway. 

MINERAL CITIES TIMES, independent; Charles W. Grant, editor and publisher, West Mineral. 
Weekly. Not received by the Historical Society. 

SCAMMON Population (1915), 2364; established, 1884; named for four brothers who operated 
first coal mine there; formerly called Scammonville; industries coal mining; has tele- 
phones, city owns water system; is on the Frisco railway. 

MINER, Democratic; A. McKinnon, editor and publisher, Scammon. 

Weekly. Jan. 29 June 25, 1892 [bound in Cherokee County Short-lived, vol. 2J; 

July 20, 1894 + 21 vols. 
Founded in 1890; early history not known, first issue in Society's file being vol. 1, No. 42. 

The Scammon Globe, founded 1892 by Phil L. Keener; consolidated same year with the Miner, 

under the name of the Globe-Miner, Phil L. Keener, editor and publisher; in 1894 name changed 

to the Scammon Miner, Mr. Keener in charge. 

WEIR Population (1915), 2159; elevation, 919 feet; established, 1872; named for T. M. Weir; 
industries coal mining, feed mill; has electric lights, water system, public library; is on the 
St. Louis & San Francisco railway. 

JOUNRAL, Republican; J. D. L. Waddle, editor, L. H. Waddle, manager, Waddle & Son, pro- 
prietors. 

Weekly. May 31, 18891895; Feb. 25, 1898 + 23 vols. 
Founded 1887 by William Whitworth and George W. Woods; narm changed 1889 to the 

Weir Journal, S. D. Chamberlin, editor and manager. A daily edition was started in 1895 by 

Mrs. M. C. Rudisill, and discontinued same year. 

DISCONTINUED. Volg 

Columbus. . . .Border Star (1st). May 3, 18781880. . 2 

Border Star (2d). June 9, 18821886 5 

Courier; Republican Courier; Star and Courier. 

July 8, 1875; Jan. 13, 18761902 28 

Democrat. Apr. 14 Oct. 27, 1876 1 

Enterprise (w and m). Dec. 15, 1905 1908 2 

Expository (m). 1884. [See Crawford County Short-lived, vol. 3.1 

Good News (m). Mar., 19011904 3 

Journal Kansas Medical Society (m). May, 19071908 1 

[See, also, Douglas county.] 

Kansas Bee Keeper (m). Feb., 18811885 5 

Kansas Prohibitionist. Jan. 1 Jan. 23, 1884: Apr. 8 Dec. 30 1886 1 

News (d and w). Oct. 24, 18821883 

Sprig of Myrtle (m). 18831885 . 2 

[See, also, Ottawa county.] 

Times. Jan. 6, 18811886 . 5 

Vidette. Sept. 28, 18771878 1 



158 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DISCONTINUED. 



Vols. 



Baxter Springs Cherokee County Republican. Dec. 16, 18931914 21 

Delta. Mar. 31 Dec. 22, 1887 1 

Enterprise (d). Jan. 26 Apr. 30, 1909 1 

Ekselsior (m). 1879. [See Jewell county.] 

Republican. June 2, 18761877 1 

Times. Oct. 17, 18781880 2 

Empire City Journal. July 23, 18961903 7 

Mining Echo; Echo. June 2, 1877 1879 3 

Galena Lever (d). Apr. 15 June 30, 1900 1 

Messenger. Jan. 18 Oct. 23, 1879 1 

Miner (1st). May 26, 1877 1881 5 

Miner (2d). June 14, 18881889 1 

News (d). Feb. 14 June 2, 1901 1 

Post. May 16, 1895 1896 1 

Post (d). Mar. 29 May 28, 1898 1 

Republican (d) 1st. Sept. 29, 18971900 6 

Short Creek Banner. Oct. 12 Dec. 27, 1878 1 

Times. Dec. 12, 18901902 11 

Mineral Magnet. May 7 Nov. 26, 1897 

Quakervale Western Friend (m). Quakervale and Varck. 1880 1890 10 

Scammon Globe-Miner. July 1, 1892 1894 2 

Journal [scattering]. Aug. 8, 19031908 5 

Weir . . ... Citizen. Sept. 19, 18931894 1 

Coal World (m). Sept., 18961897 1 

Eagle (1st). Nov. 17, 18871890 2 

Labor Tribune; Weir City Tribune. Aug. 14, 18841901 20 

Sun (d and w). Feb. 18, 18951898 2 

Telegram. Dec. 28, 1905 1907 1 

Tribune (d). Oct. 1, 18971898 2 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Columbus Avalanche. Oct. 28, 1875. 

Baptist Banner. Apr. 8 May 30, 1887. 

Courier (d). Nov. 28 Dec. 6, 1882. 

Gospel Mirror. Sept. 18, 1880 May 24, 1881. 

Journal. Mar. 5, 1874 Mar. 17, 1875. 

Our School Journal (m). Dec., 1877 Mar., 1878. 

Rural Educationist (m). Mar., 1877. 

Western Luminary (m). Jan. and Feb., 1877. 

Workingman's Journal. Columbus and Girard. Jan. 7, 1870. 
Baxter Springs Cherokee Sentinel. Sept. 1, 1871 June 22, 1872. 

Examiner. Sept. 14 Oct. 26, 1871. 

News (d). Oct. 7-11, 1884. 

Reunion Daily News. Aug. 25-30, 1891; Aug. 30 Sept. 4, 1892. 

Sunflower State. Mar. 25; Oct. 14 Dec. 9, 1893. 
Galena. . . . .Banner; Short Creek Banner. Oct. 12 Dec. 27, 1878. 

Cherokee County Teacher. Nov. 16, 1891 July 15, 1892. 

Christian Polemic (m). Feb.-Apr., 1879. 

Our School Journal (2d). 1881. 
Quaker Valley Ionian Casket (m). Dec., 1878 June, 1879. 

Ionian Casket, Jr (m). Oct., 1879. 
Scammonville Radical Democrat. Oct. 31 Nov. 28, 1885. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Baxter Springs Southern Argus. June 18 Oct. 8, 1891. 

Galena Real Estate Guide. June 1, 1891. 

Scammon Miner. Jan. 29 June 25, 1892. 

Register. Apr. 10 Nov. 20, 1891. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 3. 

Columbus . . ... Cherokee County Democrat. Apr. 2 Aug. 6, 1908. 

Patriot. Feb., 1895. 

Republican. June 15 Sept. 27, 1894. 

Taxpayers' Appeal (m). May, June, 1895. 
Baxter Springs Herald. Feb. 8, 22 and 29, 1868. 

Reunion Daily News, Camp Logan. Aug. 30 Sept. 4, 1897. 

Hallowell Enterprise. Nov. 1, 1895 Feb. 21, 1896. 

Scammon Labor Journal. Scammonville and Rosedale. Apr. 25 June, 1885. 

Miners' Journal. Scammonville and Rosedale. Mar. 21 Apr. 18, 1885. 
Weir Journal (d). Mar. 23 May 5, 1895. 

Republican. Oct.. 11 Nov. 8, 1895. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 159 



CHEYENNE COUNTY. 

Organized, 1886; named for the Cheyenne tribe of Indians; county seat, 
St. Francis; area, 1020 square miles, 652,800 acres; population (1915), 4114; 
assessed valuation (1915), $6,881,301; resources and industries agriculture 
and stock raising. 

ST. FRANCIS Population (1915), 492; elevation, 3288 feet; established, 1887; industries- 
flour and feed mill, elevators; has telephones, waterworks system, and owns its electric light 
plant; is on the C. B. & Q. railway. 

HERALD, independent; Minnie A. Lawless, editor and manager, the Herald Publishing Company, 
incorporated, publisher, St. Francis. 

Weekly. July 14, 1904 + 12 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Bird City News; early history unknown, first 
issue in Society's file being vol. 2, No. 21, Oct. 21, 1886, George W. Murray, editor and publisher; 
in 1895 moved to St. Francis, and name changed to the Kansas Eagle, George Lawless, editor 
and publisher. Cheyenne County Rustler, Wano, founded 1886 by H. G. Thurman & Co.; moved 
to St. Francis in 1887, C. E. Dennison, editor and publisher; in 1891 consolidated with the Weekly 
Review, St. Francis, founded 1889 by Jaqua Bros., and continued under the name of the Cheyenne 
County Rustler-Review, C. E. Dennison and R. M. Jaqua, editors and publishers; in 1891 the 
name changed back to Cheyenne County Rustler, C. E. Dennison, editor and publisher; consol- 
idated in 1904 with the Kansas Eagle, St. Francis, continuing as the Kansas Eagle-Rustler, 
George and Minnie A. Lawless, editors and publishers; name again changed same year to St. 
Francis Hearld, with same management. 

DISCONTINUED. Vols 

St. Francis Cheyenne County Citizen. Feb. 14, 19091910 2 

Cheyenne County Herald. St. Francis and Bird City. Dec. 7, 1889 1890, 1 

Kansas Eagle. Apr. 4, 18951904 10 

People's Defender. Apr. 7, 18921894 3 

Review. Dec. 19, 18891890 1 

Bird City Cheyenne County Democrat. Nov. 13, 1886 1889 3 

Frontiersman: Herald of Independence. Oct. 13, 1886 1887 1 

News. Oct. 21, 18861895 , 8 

Jaqua Cynosure; The Gleaner. Guy and Jaqua. Apr. 1, 1887 1888 1 

Wano Cheyenne County Rustler. Wano and St. Francis. July 10, 18851904, 19 

[Called Rustler-Review, Jan. 8 to Nov. 12, 1891.] 

Plaindealer. Wano and St. Francis. Apr. 7, 18871889 2 



CLARK COUNTY. 

Organized, 1855; named for Capt. Charles F. Clark of the Sixth Kansas 
cavalry; county seat, Ashland; area, 975 square miles, 624,000 acres; popu- 
lation (1915), 4290; assessed valuation (1915), $12,439,094; resources and 
industries wheat. 

ASHLAND Population (1915), 904; elevation, 1951 feet; established, 1884; named for Ash- 
land, Ky.; industries cement works, flour mill; has electric lights, telephones; is on the 
Santa Fe railway. 
CLIPPER, independent; H. C. Mayse, editor and publisher, Ashland. 

Weekly. Sept. 25, 1884 -j- 31 vols. 

Clark County Clipper, Ashland, founded 1884 by R. C. Marquis and J. E. Church. Ashland 
Journal, founded 1886, W. L. Cowden, editor, and F. H. Morgan, manager; sold to Clark County 
Clipper in 1897. Clark County Republican, Ashland, founded 1909 by J. B. Burk; subscription 
list sold to Clark County Clipper in 1910; name of Clark County Clipper changed to Ashland 
Clipper 1911, H. C. Mayse, editor and publisher. 

MINNEOLA Population (1915), 448; established, 1887; composite name in honor of Mrs. 
Minnie Davis and Mrs. Ola Watson; industries mills, elevators; has telephones; is on 
the Rock Island railway. 



160 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



RECORD, independent; Claude A. Hays, editor and publisher, Minneola. 

Weekly. Aug. 4, 19081912. 4 vols. 

Founded 1908, J. E. Dancy, editor and publisher. This paper has not been received by the 
Society since Nov. 1, 1912. 

DISCONTINUED. Volgm 

Ashland Clark County Citizen. Nov. 29, 1889 1890 1 

Clark County Republican (1st). Ashland and Minneola. 

May 10, 18881889 1 

Clark County Republican (2d). Sept. 16, 19091910 1 

Journal. Oct. 8, 18861897 10 

Leader. Aug. 23, 19071908 1 

Republican Herald; Ashland Herald. Nov. 7, 18851888 

Appleton Era. Jan. 7, 18861887 2 

Cash City Cashier. Oct. 29, 18861888 1 

Englewood Chief. Apr. 4, 18881892 2 

[Suspended from June, 1889, to Aug., 1891.] 

Clark County Chief. Apr. 24, 18851887 2 

Enterprise. Dec. 16, 18871889 1 

Home Builder. May 31, 19061907 2 

Lexington Leader. Oct. 22, 18861888 2 

Minneola Era. July 28, 18871888 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Ashland Leader. Feb. 15 Apr. 5, 1889. 

Englewood Chief (2d). May 10 June 7, 1907. 

Lexington County Beacon. June 4 to July 16, 1886. 



CLAY COUNTY. 

Organized, 1866; named for Henry Clay; county seat, Clay Center; area, 
660 square miles, 422,400 acres; population (1915), 14,902; assessed valuation 
(1915), $30,938,352; resources and industries agriculture and stock raising. 

CLAY CENTER Population (1915), 3742; elevation, 1200 feet; named for its location, the 
center of Clay county; industries flour mills, elevators, foundries, machine shops, carriage 
and water-tank factories; has electric lights, waterworks, paved streets, telephones; is on 
the Union Pacific, the Rock Island and the Leavenworth, Kansas & Western railways. 

DISPATCH, Democratic; F. W. Parrott, editor, Clay Center Publishing Company, publisher 
Clay Center. 

Weekly. Apr. 13, 1876 + 40 vols. 
Founded 1871 as the Clay County Independent, Clay Center, by E. P. Huston and David 

Downer; purchased in 1873 by J. W. Miller, who changed the name to Clay County Dispatch; 

in 1881 the name changed to the Dispatch, Wirt W. Walton & Co., editors and publishers; in 

1891 the name became Clay Center Dispatch, Bion S. Hutchins, editor and publisher. The Weekly 

Sun, Clay Center, founded in 1890 by A. J. Kellogg & Son; absorbed in 1892 by the Dispatch, 

then controlled by W. D. Vincent, editor, and John B. Park, publisher. 

DISPATCH-REPUBLICAN, Republican; F. W. Parrott, editor, J. M. Best, business manager, Clay 

Center Publishing Co., publisher, Clay Center. 
Daily [evening]. June 6, 1914 + 3 vols. 

The Daily Dispatch, founded in 1903 by C. A. Southwick; consolidated in 1914 with the 
Daily Republican, founded in 1906 by F. W. Parrott; continued as the Dispatch-Republican, 
by F. W. Parrott. 
DISTRICT NEWS, religious; published by the Clay Center District Conference of the Methodist 

Episcopal Church, Clay Center. 

Quarterly. Sept., 19031913. 10 vols. 

Early history unknown; first issue in Society's file is vol. 2, No. 1. Not received since Dec., 
1913. 

ECONOMIST, Democratic; B. F. Hemphill, editor and publisher, Clay Center. 
Weekly. Aug. 17, 1915 + 

Founded 1914; continuation of the Household Economist; history unknown, but one issue 
having been received by this Society. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 161 



TIMES, Republican. Delbert A. Valentine, editor and publisher, L. F. Valentine, manager, Clay 

Center. 

Weekly. Jan. 5, 1882 + 34 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the Clifton Localist, founded 1878 by R. Cunningham & Co.; 
moved to Clay Center in 1879, as the Localist, with Cunningham & Co., editors and publishers; 
name changed in 1881 to Clay County Times, F. Cunningham, proprietor; name changed same 
year to the Times, with J. W. Miller, W. S. Linsley & Co., editors and publishers. A daily edition 
of the Times was founded in 1886 by D. A. Valentine; discontinued in 1888. 

LONGFORD Population (1915), 159; established, 1870; formerly known as Chapman; in- 
dustries cement plaster factory; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

LEADER, local; R. H. Camber, editor and publisher, Longford. 

Weekly. Feb. 25, 1915 + 1 vol. 
Longford Leader (1st), founded 1910 by Frank E. Pattee; discontinued 1914; revived in 

1915, with new volume and number, by R. H. Gamber. 

MORGANVILLE Population (1915), 252; established, 1870; named for Ebenezer Morgan 
its founder; industries flour mill, cement block factory; telephones; is on the Union Pacific 
and Rock Island railways. 

TRIP.UNE, Republican; L. D. Huff, editor and publisher, M organ ville. 

Weekly. May 19, 1904 + 12 vols. 
Founded 1904 by L. D. Huff. 

OAKHILL Population (1915, estimated), 150; established, 1872; telephones; is on the Santa 

Fe railway. 

GAZETTE, independent; H. E. Lyne, editor and publisher, Oakhill. 
Weekly. July 6, 1911 + 5 vols. 

Founded 1911 by W. S. Price. 

WAKEF1 ELD Population (1915), 520; elevation, 1150 feet; established, 1869; named for 
Rev. Richard Wake, one of its original proprietors; telephones; is on the Pacific railway. 

NEWS, independent; Dave B. Pyle, editor and publisher, Wakefield. 

Weekly. July 2, 1914 + 2 vols. 
Founded 1904 by W. F. Rice; consolidated in 1909 with the Wakefield Pointer, early history 

of which is unknown, no issues being on file in Society's collection. Revived as the Wakefield 

News (2d) by Dave B. Pyle, first issue in Society's file being vol. 5, No. 11. 

DISCONTINUED. Volg 

Clay Center . . . . .Argus. Aug. 27, 18851886. . 

Cresset. Oct. 7, 18821883 

Critic. Sept. 5, 18901891 

Democrat. Jan. 2, 18791880 . 

Democrat. July 8, 18861890 , mt \ 5 

[Called Republican Valley Democrat from July, 1888, to July, 1889 1 

Dispatch (d). Mar. 16, 1903 June 6, 1914. . 23 

Eagle. Feb. 5, 18851886 . 

Fire Brand. Dec. 20. 18831-884 

High School Life (m). Jan.-Dec., 1912 '.'.".' 

Holiness War News (m). [See Marshall County Short-lived, vol. 1.1 

Kansas Baptist (m). Oct., 18811884. . 

Little Hatchet (2d). June 3 Dec. 27, 1886. . 

Localist. Clifton and Clay Center. Mar. 16, 1878 1881 4 

Monitor. Dec. 8, 1883 1884 1 

Our Messenger (m). Nov., 1906 Oct., 1907. [See Brown county.] 

Pentecost Trumpet. Sept. 3, 1891 1892 1 

Republican (d). Dec. 10, 1906 1914 .. ' 15 

Sun. Nov. 27, 1890 1892 1 

Times (d). Aug., 1886 1888 

Triple Tie Advocate (m). Apr. 21, 19001913 ! 14 

[First called Triple Tie Benefit Association.] 

Western Breeders' Journal (m). May 1898 1908 10 

Western Record. Sept. 10, 18921893 1 

Clifton Baptist Visitor. [See Republic eounty.] 

Times. [See Washington county.] 
Green Banner. Mar. 5, 1908 1909 

Clay County Star. Green and Morganville. Mar. 29, 18941895. . . 

Herald. Feb. 9, 19051906 

News. Mar. 10, 19101913 3 

Idana Journal. Dec. 3, 1886 1887 1 

Industry Herald. Dec. 30, 18861887 1 

Longford Leader (1st). Oct. 14, 19101914 5 

11 



162 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DISCONTINUED. Yols 

Morganville Advance. Mar. 25 Dec. 26, 1891 1 

Argus. Sept. 27, 19011902 1 

Clay County Sentinel. Apr. 20, 1887 1891 4 

Enterprise [scattering]. Mar. 16 Dec. 14, 1894 ... 1 

News. May 20 Dec. 19, 1885 1 

Sunflower. Jan. 14, 1886 1887 1 

Uncle Sam's Live Stock Journal (m). Oct., 1891 1897 5 

Oakhill Echo. Apr. 12 Oct. 25, 1889. . . 1 

Herald. Sept. 13, 18881889 1 

Wakefield.. ..Advertiser. Mar. 29, 1886 1899 .. . 12 

News (1st). June 23, 1904 1909 6 

Searchlight. Aug. 28, 18991901 2 

Wideawake. Mar. 12 Sept. 11, 1902 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Clay Center Believers' Ensign (m). Jan.-July, 1896. 

Clay County Democrat. Sept. 6 Nov. 15, 1902. 

Clay County Independent. Oct. 12, 1871. 

Dispatch (d). Sept. 16, 17 and 18, 1885. 

Little Hatchet (occasionally). Sept. 28, Oct. 5, Nov. 5, 1878; June 28, 

July 24, 1879; Jan. 1, 31, Mar. 1, 8, 15, May 21, Sept. 20, Oct 21, 1880; 

Feb. 19, 1881; Apr. 2, May 14, 30, June 30, 1883. 
Observer (m). July-Sept., 1887. 
Outlook (m). Nov., 1886 Aug., 1887. 

Republican Valley Banner (m). May-Sept., 1880; Feb. and May, 1881. 
Resolution. Nov. 1, 9, 16, 30, Dec. 14, 1895; Jan. 18, 1896. 



CLOUD COUNTY. 

Organized, 1866; named for Col. William F. Cloud, Second Kansas regi- 
ment; county seat, Concordia; area, 720 square miles, 460,800 acres; popula- 
tion (1915), 19,316; assessed valuation (1915), $36,018,144; resources and 
industries agriculture, stock rais'ng, coal, salt springs, and building stone. 

CONCORDIA Population (1915), 5229; elevation, 1400 feet; established, 1869; name meaning 
"harmony" chosen; industries flour mill, alfalfa mill, broom factory, brick plant; tele- 
phones, electric lights, waterworks system, public library; has four lines of railway; the 
Union Pacific, Santa Fe, Missouri Pacific and Burlington. 

BLADE, Republican; Ray Green, editor and publisher, Concordia. 

Daily [evening] (2d). July 12, 1902 + 27 vols. 
Daily edition founded 1884 by J. M. and J. E. Hagaman; suspended in 1885; revived in 

1887 by the Blade Publishing Company; publication again suspended in 1888. The present 

daily was established in 1902 by George Burroughs and George A. Clark. 

EMPIRE, Republican; Ray Green, editor and publisher, Concordia. 

Weekly. May 1, 1870 Nov. 23, 1872; July 17, 1874; Jan. 7, 1876 + 43 vols. 
This paper is a continuation of the Republican Valley Empire, Clyde, founded in 1870 by 
H. Buckingham; moved to Concordia same year, with H. and A. L. Buckingham, editors and 
publishers. Jan. 7, 1876, the name was changed to the Concordia Empire, H. E. Smith, editor 
and publisher; consolidated 1883 with the Concordia Republican. The Republican is a con- 
tinuation of the Watchman, founded at Clyde in 1871 by Mark J. Kelley, who published it for 
a short time; it was revived by J. S. Paradis & Bro., and later removed to Concordia by J. S. 
Paradis, when the name was changed to Concordia Expositor; name again changed in 1882 to 
<Concordia Republican, W. E. Reid, editor and publisher; consolidated in 1883 with the Empire 
-under the name of Republican-Empire, Charles J. English, editor and publisher. In 1887 the 
=name again became Concordia Empire, with T. A. Sawhill, editor and publisher. The Concordia 
"Times, founded 1884, Charles J. English, editor, and Emory B. Shafer, publisher; a daily edition 
of the Times was started in Dec., 1884, by Mr. English, but was discontinued in Jan., 1885; in 
1891 the Times suspended publication and the plant was afterward absorbed by the Empire. 
The Concordia Democrat, founded about 1885; early history unknown, Society's first issue being 
May 6, 1886, vol. 1, No. 34, W. N. Dunning & Co., editors and publishers; named changed same 
year to Concordia Daylight, with same management; consolidated in 1900 with the Empire, 
and continued as the Empire-Daylight, with T. A. Sawhill and J. A. Marshall, editors and pub- 
Hishers. In 1901 name again became the Concordia Empire, T. A. Sawhill and A. B. Kimball, 
(editors and publishers; 1902 consolidated with the Weekly Concordia Blade, founded 1879 as 
'the Blade, by J. E. Hagaman. Name changed same year to the Cloud County Blade, with J. M. 
:and J. E. Hagaman (Hagaman & Son), editors and publishers; name again changed in 1882 to 
the Kansas Blade, with same management in charge. Name again changed in 1889 to the Con- 
cordia Blade, by the Blade Publishing Company; consolidated in 1902 with the Empire under 
the name of the Blade and Empire, with George Burroughs and George A. Clark, editors and 
publishers. In 1904 the name again became Concordia Empire, George Burroughs and Seward 
A. Jones., editors and proprietors. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 163 



KANSAN, Progressive, Corner T. Davies, editor and publisher, Concordia. 
Weekly. Apr. 18, 1895 + 21 vols. 
Daily [evening]. Mar. 17, 1905 + 22 vols. 

This r paper is a continuation of the following: Cloud County Kansan, Jamestown, founded 
in 1881 by F. P. Kellogg; name changed 1890 to the New Era, John W. McCoy, editor and pub- 
lisher. The Quill, Jamestown, founded 1888, with Mark G. Woodruff, associate editor, and W. W. 
Pinkerton, proprietor; consolidated in 1890 with the Kansan, under name of New Era; name 
changed in 1893 to the Kansan, M. D. Sutheriin, editor and publisher; moved to Concordia in 
1895, consolidated same year with the Alliant, still retaining name the Kansan, Frank Honey- 
well, editor and proprietor. The Alliant was founded in 1890 by Ferd Prince; suspended publi- 
cation in 1894, and again resumed in 1895, Frank R. Forrest and Frank Honeywell, editors and 
publishers. 

PRESS, Democratic; W. H. Dannenbarger, editor and publisher, Coneordia. 

Semhreekly. June 22, 1901 + 15 vols. 

Founded 1892 as the Miltonvale Press, by H. C. Stewart and Jacob Miller; moved to Con- 
cordia in 1901, and name changed to the Press, with J. A. Marshall and L. W. Glidden, editors 
and publishers. 

CLYDE Population (1915), 1211; elevation, 1300 feet; established, 1866; named for Clyde, 
Scotland; industries coal mines; has telephones, electric lights and waterworks; is on the 
Rock Island and the M. K. & T. railways. 

FARMERS' VOICE, Democratic; Mabel Best Morley and G. Vernon Morley, editors and pub- 
lishers, Clyde. 

Weekly. Jan. 22, 1891 + 25 vols. 
Founded 1891 by I. C. W. Hoyt. 
REPUBLICAN, Republican; P. M. Harmon, editor and publisher, Clyde. 

Weekly. Feb. 21, 1901 + 15 vols. 

Founded 1900 by W. A. Huff; consolidated 1906 with the Clyde Herald, founded 1878 by 
Beatty & Bachelder. The office of the Herald was destroyed by fire Jan. 31, 1881, and the fol- 
lowing July the paper resumed publication. The issue for Jan. 5, 1882, shows W. F. Beatty as 
proprietor. Consolidated 1906 with the Clyde Republican. A daily edition was established in 
1906 by W. A. Huff, but discontinued in 1907. 

GLASCO Population (1915), 860; elevation, 1318 feet; established, 1870; formerly called 
Dell Ray; named for Glasgow, Scotland, but spelling changed to Glasco; has telephones; 
is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

SUN, independent; Wooster & Townsend, editors and publishers, Glasco. 

Weekly. Jan. 20, 1883 + 33 vols. 
Founded 1883 by J. H. Bond and Frank L. Fisher. 

JAMESTOWN -Population (1915), 912; elevation, 1420 feet; established about 1878; named 
in honor of James P. Pomeroy; has telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

KANSAS OPTIMIST, independent; Fred M. Cook, editor and manager, Optimist Publishing Com- 
pany, publisher, Jamestown. 

Weekly. May 4, 1895 + 21 vols. 
The Optimist was established by Mary L. Burton, May 4, 1895, taking up the old volume 

and number of the Kansan, vol. 13, No. 23, for the first issue. 

MILTONVALE Population (1915), 912; established about 1878; first called Zahnsville; name 
changed in 1883-'84 to Miltonvale in honor of Milton Tootle; has telephones; is on the Santa 
Fe and the Union Pacific railways. 

RECORD, Progressive; M. B. Matson, editor, Z. Matson & Son, owners, Miltonvale. 

Weekly. Feb. 1, 1901 -f- 15 vols. 
Founded 1901 by Will De Vinny. 

DISCONTINUED. Volf( 

Conrordia . ..Alliant. July 5, 1890 1895 . 4 

Blade (d, 1st). 18841888 4 

Cloud County Blade; Kansas Blade; Concordia Blade. 

Apr. 23/18791902 24 

Cloud County Critic. Sept. 20, 1882 1888 . 6 

[Called Kansas Critic, 1888.] 

Daylight. Nov. 30, 18861900 13 

Democrat. May 6 Nov. 23, 1886 1 

Expositor. Jan. 18, 18771881 5 

Republican. Jan. 5, 1882 1883 2 

Times. Mar. 28, 1884 1891... . 8 



164 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DISCONTINUED. Volg 

Ames Advance. June 15, 1885 1886. . . 1 

Bureau. Feb. 18 Oct. 1, 1887 1 

Come and See (m); Kansas Conference Reporter. June 15, 1895 1899. . 3 

Aurora District School (m); Aurora and Concordia. Dec. 1893 1895. ... .2 

News. Nov. 23, 18921893 1 

Clyde Argus. Jan. 5, 1888 1896. .. 8 

Democrat. July 24, 18801882 2 

Herald. June 6, 1878 Feb., 1881; Dec., 18811906 27 

Kansas Sunflower. July 4, 1894 1895 1 

Mail. Nov. 6, 18841887 3 

Press. Feb. 14 Oct. 30, 1884 1 

Glasco Tribune. Aug. 18, 18811882 1 

Jamestown Cloud County Kansan. Oct. 15, 1881 1890. . 



[Called New Era, 1890-1893.] 



11 



Kansan. Nov. 3, 18931895. 

New Era. Dec. 6, 18901893 a 

Quill. Dec. 1, 18881890 2 

Miltonvale Chieftain. July 21, 18871888 1 

Farmers Tribune; Miltonvale Tribune. Feb. 16 Sept. 6, 1894. . . 1 

News. Aug. 25, 18821891 9 

Press (1st). Sept. 16, 1892 1893 1 

Press (2d). Oct. 23, 18961901 4 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Concordia Reformer. Sept. 15 Nov. 2, 1886. 

Ames Courier. Mar. 23 June 29, 1888. 

Glasco Banner. Feb. 25 July 10, 1880. 

Miltonvale Advance. Jan. 13 Apr. 6, 1892. 

Echo. July 26, 1892 Jan. 6, 1893. 

Reporter. Feb. 25 Mar. 17, 1892. 

Review. July 25 Nov. 14, 1889. 

Star. Apr. 14 Aug. 26, 1886. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Concordia Reporter (d). Aug. 8 Sept. 3, 1887. 

Settlers Adviser (m). Feb., 1872. 
Clyde Cyclone (m). July 30, 1881 Feb. 18, 1882. 

Star (s-m). Mar. 14 Apr. 25, 1884. 

Western Rustler (m). Jan., Feb., and May, 1889. 

Zephyr (m). Oct. and Nov., 1905. 

Glasco Cash Merchant (s-m). May-Oct. 15, 1897. 

Miltonvale Leader. Aug. 31, 1893 Jan. 4, 1894. 



COFFEY COUNTY. 

Organized, 1859; named for A. M. Coffey, member of the first Kansas 
territorial legislature; county seat, Burlington; area, 648 square miles, 414,- 
720 acres; population (1915), 14,986; assessed valuation (1915), $24,124,552; 
resources and industries natural gas, agriculture, and stock raising. 

BURLINGTON Population (1915), 2251; elevation, 1030 feet; established, 1857; named for 
Burlington, Vt.; industries water power and mills, tile factory; has electric lights, tele- 
phones, public library and municipal waterworks; is in the natural gas district; is on the 
Santa Fe and the M. K. & T. railways. 

REPUBLICAN, Republican; John Redmond, editor and proprietor, Burlington. 
Weekly. Jan. 25, 1882 Oct. 12, 1915. 34 vols. 
Daily [evening] (2d). Apr. 2, 1906 + 15 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: The Kansas Patriot, Burlington, founded 1864 
by S. S. Prouty; name changed 1870 to Burlington Patriot, A. D. Brown, editor and publisher; 
consolidated in 1886 with the Burlington Republican, founded in 1882 by W. S. Hebron and 
George Sweesey; continued as the Burlington Republican-Patriot, W. S. Hebron and C. O. 
Smith, editors and publishers; name changed in 1888 to the Burlington Republican, C. O. Smith 
editor and publisher; a daily edition of the Republican was started in 1887 by Mr. Smith, but 
discontinued the same year. The Burlington Independent, founded 1875 by A. H. Smith; name 
changed 1907 to Burlington Democrat, with Flory & Son, editors and publishers; in 1910 name 
again became the Independent, A. R. English, editor and publisher; consolidated in 1914 with the 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 165 



Burlington Republican. The Wayerly Sun was founded in 1892 [no issues on file in the Society's 
collection], moved to Burlington in 1895, and continued as the Jeffersonian, the first issue being 
vol. 3, No. 21, Feb. 9, 1895, Dan K. Swearingen, editor and publisher. A daily edition of the 
Jeffersonian was started by Mr. Swearingen in 1895, which in 1898 absorbed the Daily News, 
founded in 1896, John Redmond editor and manager. In 1906 the Jeffersonian, daily and weekly, 
was consolidated with the Burlington Republican, John Redmond, editor and publisher. The 
Republican also claims to be the successor of the following: Burlington Nonpareil, founded 1886 
by E. L. Brown; discontinued in 1893, at which time A. D. Brown was editor and publisher. 
A daily edition of the Nonpareil was started in Apr., 1887, and discontinued after a few weeks. 
The Farm Record, an outgrowth of the Western Real Estate Journal, founded at Topeka by I. W. 
Pack in 1884; name changed same year to City and Farm Record and Western Real Estate 
Journal; moved to Burlington in 1890, and published as the Farm Record, by I. W. Pack; sold to 
Messrs. M. M. Bowman and G. W. Neisherger in 1891 and name changed to the Courier, using 
the old volume and number the first few issues. The office of the Courier was destroyed by fire 
Oct. 23, 1901, after which the paper was discontinued. The Herald and the Times; concerning 
these nothing is known, since no issues are on file in the Historical Society's collection. The weekly 
edition of the Republican was discontinued Oct.. 1915. 

GRIDLEY Population (1915), 283; elevation, 1031 feet; established about 1886; has tele- 
phones; is on the Santa Fe and the Missouri Pacific railways. 

LIGHT, independent; Tom W. Flory, editor and publisher, Gridley. 

Weekly. Dec. 20, 1907 + 8 vols. 
Founded 1907 by S. R. Osborn. 

LEBO Population (1915), 535; elevation, 1155 feet; established, 1883; named for Lebo creek, 
which bears the name of an early settler of the county; has telephones; is on the Santa Fe 
railway. 
ENTERPRISE, Republican; Mrs. Mary E. Evans, editor and publisher, Lebo. 

Weekly. May 28, 18911905. 15 vols. 

Founded 1891 by W. P. Evans. Not received by the Historical Society since Sept. 21, 1905. 
STAR, independent; Austin A. Torrance, editor and publisher, Lebo. 

Weekly. - 1, 1908 + 8 vols. 
Founded 1908 by Austin A. Torrance. 

LE ROY Population (1915), 733; elevation, 990 feet; established, 1855; named for Le Roy, 
111.; industries vitrified brick plant, mills, wagon factory; natural gas district; telephones; 
is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 
REPORTER, Democratic; Click Fockele, editor and manager, Le Roy. 

Weekly. Dec. 26, 1879 -j- 36 vols. 

Founded 1879 by S. H. Dodge. The Busy Bee, Le Roy, founded 1900 by J. S. and Harry 
Covert; name changed in 1903 to the Comment, with same management; absorbed by the Re- 
porter in 1910. Neosho Valley Blade, Le Roy, founded 1901 by Ovid J. Goodwin; merged with 
the Reporter in 1903, with Frank Fockele, editor and publisher. 



WAVERLY Population (1915), 689; elevation, 1127 feet; established 1878; named for Waverly, 
Ind.; hs electric lights, waterworks, telephones and public library; is on the Missouri Pacific 
and Santa Fe railways. 

GAZETTE, Republican; O. J. Rose, editor and publisher, Waverly. 

Weekly. Jan. 26, 1889 + 27 vols. 
This paper is the continuation of the Gridley Gazette, founded 1887 by Dan Swearingen; 

moved to Burlington in 1888 and continued as the Gazette, with Mr. Swearingen still in charge; 

again moved by him in 1889 to Waverly, where it was issued as the Waverly Gazette, with new 

volume and number. From May 28 to Dec. 31, 1897, it was called Post-Gazette. 

DISCONTINUED. y oZs 

Burlington Courier. June 5, 18911901 . . .10 

Democrat. Feb. 6, 1907 June 16, 1910 4 

Farm Record. Dec. 19, 1890 1892 1 

Independent. May 27, 1876 June 30, 1907; June 23, 19101914 34 

[From 1907 to 1910 called the Democrat.] 

Jeffersonian. Feb. 9, 1895 1906 12 

Jeffersonian (d). May 15, 18971906 18 

Kansas Patriot: Burlington Patriot. Sept. 3, 1864 1868; Oct. 15, 

1869 Dec. 9, 1875 [scattering issues]; Jan. 1, 18761886 16 

Neosho Valley Register. Oct. 4, 18591860 1 

News (d). Jan. 13, 18971898 4 

Nonpareil. Sept. 3, 1886 1893 7 

Gridley . . . . Gazette. Mar. 19, 18871888 . . .2 

Herald. Mar. 6, 18941900 * 7 

Standard. July 26, 18891890 1 

Star. June 11, 19021907 ... 5 



166 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DISCONTINUED. 



Lebo Courier. Jan. 11, 18891891 

Light. Mar. 25, 18841889 



True Sabbath (occas.) Sept., 1897 Mar., 1899. [See Franklin county ] 



VoU. 
2 

5 



Le Roy Busy Bee (s-m). Apr. 16, 1900 1903 



Comment (s-m and w). Feb. 16, 1903 1910. . 
Eagle. Nov. 11, 1887 1888. 



2 

8 
1 
Kansas Suffrage Reveille (m). Eureka and Le Roy. Mar. 18961900. . 5 

Neosho Valley Blade. Sept. 20, 19011903 2 

Waverly . . . .News. Mar. 29, 1883 Mar., 1884; Mar., 18851889 6 

Post. Apr. 3, 18961897 1 

Record. Oct. 1, 18981899 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Burlington Little Cassino. Feb. 15 May 15, 1877. 

Nonpareil (d). Apr. 4 May 7, 1887. 

Star. Jan. 13 Feb. 3, 1878. 
Gridley Register. Sept. 23 Oct. 23, 1886. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Burlington. . . .Free West (bi-m). Aug., 1869; June and Nov., 1870. 

Herald. Jan. 10 Feb. 20, 1902. 

Times. Aug. 28 Nov. 13, 1902. 

Vanguard (m). Jan., 1885. 

Voice of the People. Sept. 9 Nov. 18, 1874. 
Waverly Coffey County Populist. June 19 Dec. 25, 1900. 

Republican. Feb. 1 Mar. 22, 1895. 

Sun. Aug. 2-30, 1894; Jan. 11, 1895. 



COMANCHE COUNTY. 

Organized, 1885; named for the Comanche tribe of Indians; county seat, 
Coldwater; area, 795 square miles, 508,800 acres; population (1915), 4688; 
assessed valuation (1915), $10,940,974; resources and industries sandstone, 
mineral paint, gypsum, wheat, and stock raising. 

COLDWATER Population (1915), 1088; elevation, 2085 feet; established, 1884; first called 

Smallwood; later name changed in honor of Coldwater, Mich.; has telephones; is on the Santa 

Fe railway. 

TALISMAN, local; Mclntyre & Stanley, editors and publishers, Coldwater. 
Weekly. Feb. 3, 1905 + 11 vols. 

Founded 1905 by Mclntyre & Stanley. 
WESTERN STAR, independent; H. V. Butcher, editor and publisher. 

Weekly. Sept. 20, 1884 Feb., 1885; July, 1885 -f 31 vols. 

Founded 1884 by J. G. and W. M. Cash; consolidated 1892 with the Protection Echo, founded 
1885 by E. G. Phelps; moved to Coldwater in 1886, E. G. Phelps, editor and publisher, and H. E. 
Ross, associate editor; consolidated 1891 with the People's Advocate, Coldwater, founded 1890, 
N. S. Mounts, editor and publisher; continued as the Echo-Advocate, by E. G. Phelps; consoli- 
dated in 1892 with the Western Star, W. M. Cash, editor and publisher. Coldwater Review, 
founded 1884, with S. W. Vandivert, managing editor, and Joe H. Carter, publisher; suspended in 
1891 and subscription list sold to the Western Star. Nescutunga Enterprise, founded 1886, N. S. 
Mounts, editor, and N. S. Mounts, P. O. Davis and T. E. Beck, proprietors; moved to Coldwater 
in 1888 and name changed to the Coldwater Enterprise, N. S. Mounts, editor, and Geo. W. New- 
man, publisher; sold to the Western Star in 1895, W. M. Cash, editor and publisher. Stock Jour- 
nal, Coldwater, founded 1900, Geo. W. Kelley, editor, Parker Wright, manager, published by the 
Journal Publishing Company; sold to the Western Star in 1904, H. V. Butcher, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

PROTECTION Population (1915), 721; elevation, 1846 feet; established, 1884; has telephones; 

is on the Santa Fe railway. 

POST, local; W. A. Blackburn, editor, W. Clyde Pyle and W. A. Blackburn, publishers, Protection. 
Weekly. Jan. 14, 1909 + 7 vols. 

Founded 1907; early history unknown, Society's first issue being vol/3, No. 2, showing W. 
Clyde Pyle, editor and publisher. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 167 



WILMORE Population (1915), 212; elevation, 2019 feet; established about 1887; named for 
Thomas Wilmore, its first merchant; industries volcanic ash mine; has telephones; is on 
the Santa Fe railway. 

NEWS, independent; Walter C. Ray, editor and publisher, Wilmore. 

Weekly. Aug. 23, 1912 Mar. 28, 1913; Oct. 31, 1913 + 3 vols. 
Founded 1912 by F. C. Trillingham. 

DISCONTINUED. y oi/J 

Coldwater. . . . .Enterprise. July 21, 1888 1895. . . 7 

Journal. Aug. 23, 19001904 3 

People's Advocate. Oct. 18, 18901891 1 

Republican. July 2, 1885 1886 1 

Review. Nov. 29, 18841891 6 

Avilla Comanche County Citizen. Jan. 16, 1885 1887 2: 

Democrat. Oct. 1, 18861887 1 

Comanche City .... News. Dec. 23, 18861888 2: 

Evansville Herald. Oct. 1, 18851887 1 

Nescutunga Enterprise. Mar. 20, 1886 1888 ... .2: 

Western Kansan. Jan. 16, 18851886 1 

Protection Echo. [Coldwater Echo and Echo-Advocate.] Apr. 23, 1885 1892. ... 8- 

Kansas Weekly Ledger. Apr. 1, 18871888 1. 

Leader. Apr. 6, 18881889 ... 1 

Press. Aug. 27, 18861887 1 

Western Kansan. Nov. 11, 18861887 I 

Reeder Comanche Chief. Jan. 23 July 10, 1886 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Coldwater Comanche County Sun (s-m). Sept. 10, 29, 1888. 

Free Knight (m). May, June, 1904. 

Real Estate Journal (m). June, July, 1887. 

Republican. Jan. 6-27, 1887. 

Voice. Jan. 3 Feb. 7, 1891. 

Nescutunga Comanche Chieftain. Oct. 17, 1884 Jan. 9, 1885. 

Protection Press (2d). July 26 Oct. 22, 1891. 

Western Advocate. May 8 July 26, 1886. 



COWLEY COUNTY. 

Organized, 1870; named for Lieut. Matthew Cowley, Ninth Kansas 
cavalry; county seat, Winfield; area, 1112 square miles, 711,680 acres; popu- 
lation (1915), 29,979; assessed valuation (1915), $51,649,561; resources and 
industries natural gas, agriculture, and stock raising. 

WINFIELD Population (1915), 6138; elevation, 1124 feet; established, 1869; named in honor 

of Rev. Winfield Scott, of Leavenworth; industries flour mills, foundry and machine shop,. 

wagon factory, stone quarries; has electric lights, water system, paved streets, telephones; 

interurban connects with Arkansas City; is on the Santa Fe, the Frisco and the Missouri 

Pacific railways. 

COURIER, Republican; E. P. Greer, editor and publisher, Winfield. 
Weekly. Feb. 1, 1873 -f 42 vols. 
Daily [evening]. Apr. 7, 1885 + 91 vols. 

Founded 1871 by R. S. Waddell & Co., R. S. Waddell, editor, and J. C. Lillie, local editor. 
The Daily Courier was founded in 1884, D. A. Millington and Edwin P. Greer, editors and pub- 
lishers. 

FREE PRESS, independent; W. G. Anderson, editor and publisher, Winfield. 

Daily [evening]. Sept. 7, 1902 + 52 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Winfield Tribune, founded 1884 by Ben T. 
Davis; name changed in 1886 to Saturday Evening Tribune, with Cad Allard, editor, and Cowley 
County News Co., publisher; in 1889 the name changed back to Winfield Tribune, E. E. Buck, 
editor and publisher. The Winfield Visitor, daily and weekly, founded 1886 by William M. Allison; 
consolidated in 1889 with the Winfield Tribune, the daily being called the Daily Tribune- Visitor, 
and the weekly the Saturday Evening Tribune, E. E. Buck, editor and publisher. The name of 
the daily was again changed in 1889 to the Daily Tribune, and discontinued in 1891. In 1907 the 
weekly was discontinued and the daily revived, being issued by the Winfield Tribune Printing 
Company. In 1909 the Daily Tribune was consolidated with the Evening Press. The Free Press 



168 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



was founded in 1888 as the Dexter Free Press, by P. W. Craig; moved to Winfield in 1890, the 
name changed to the Industrial Educator, and one issue only was gotten out, when the name was 
changed to the Industrial Free Press, P. W. Craig, editor and publisher; last issue of the In- 
dustrial Free Press in Society's file is vol. 17, No. 15, Nov. 8, 1906. The Winfield Daily Free 
Press was established in 1902; first issue in Society's file is vol. 1, No. 114, William Stryker and 
J. C. Bradshaw, editors and publishers. 

KANSAS KINDERFREUND [German], benevolent; edited and published in the interest of the Evan- 
gelical Luthern Children's Friend Society of Kansas, Winfield. 

BimontMy. Nov.-Dec., 1908 -f- 7 vols. 
Published at Winfield since 1907. 

ARKANSAS CITY Population (1915), 7775; elevation, 1070 feet; established, 1870; first called 
Adelphia, then Walnut City, 'and later Cresswell; industries mills, packing houses, cement 
plant, paint mill, overall and windmill factories, stone quarries; has telephones, electric light, 
waterworks, street railway, and public library; interurban line to Winfield, and is on the 
Frisco, the Santa Fe and the Missouri Pacific railways. 

NEWS, independent; Charles Spencer, managing editor, Charles Alderson, associate editor, News 
Publishing Company, incorporated, publisher, Arkansas City. 

Daily [evening]. Apr. 12, 1911 + 18 vols. 
This paper is the second of its name in Arkansas City, and was founded in 1911 by the News 

Publishing Company, incorporated. 

TRAVELER; Richard C. Howard, editor and publisher, Arkansas City. 

Daily [evening]. Apr. 11, 1887 -f 105 vols. 

Founded 1870 by M. G. Mains. Arkansas City Republican, founded 1884 by C. W. Coombs, 
J. J. Clark and C. T. Atkinson. A daily edition of the Republican was founded in 1886 by G. W. 
Wagner and R. C. Howard; consolidated in 1887 with the Traveler, the weekly being called Re- 
publican-Traveler, and the daily Arkansas City Daily Traveler, J. O. Campbell, editor and pub- 
lisher. The weekly edition was discontinued in 1908. 

ATLANTA Population (1915), 319; established, 1885; has telephones; is on the St. Louis & 

San Francisco railway. 

JOURNAL, local; W. L. Reagan, editor, Byron Darlington, manager, Atlanta. 
Weekly. Oct. 21, 19091914. 5 vols. 

Early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being vol. 3, No. 2, Charles Moody, editor 
and publisher. Not received by the Society since Apr. 2, 1914. 

BURDEN Population (1915), 410; elevation, 1375 feet; established, 1879; named for Robert F. 

Burden; has telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
TIMES, independent; R. W. Niehaus, editor and publisher, Burden. 
Weekly. Apr. 11, 1907 -f 9 vols. 

Founded 1907 by W. H. Hutton. 

DEXTER Population (1915), 468; elevation, 910 feet; established, 1870; named for a famous 
trotting horse owned by Robert Bonner, of New York; has telephones; is on the Missouri 
Pacific railway. 
OBSERVER, independent; J. L. Alexander, editor and publisher, Dexter. 

Weekly. June 3, 1915 -f- 1 vol. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Dexter Dispatch, founded 1905 by W. L. Bald- 
ridge; consolidated 1915 with Dexter News, under the name of the Dexter Dispatch-News, J. L. 
Alexander, editor and publisher; name changed after the second issue to the Dexter Observer. 
Early history of the Dexter News unknown; first issue in Society's file vol. 2, No. 53, Apr. 3, 1914,- 
W. R. Maurer, editor and publisher. 

UDALL Population (1915), 323; elevation, 1281 feet; established, 1882; named in honor of 

Cornelius Udall; has telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
HERALD, independent; Dwight L. Miller, editor and publisher, Udall. 
Weekly. Aug. 14, 19141915. 1 vol. 

Founded 1914 by R. H. Hickey. Not received by the Historical Society since Mar. 19, 1915. 

DISCONTINUED. Vo k. 

Winfield ... . . Albright 's Farm and Ranch. Oct. 7, 19021907 4 

American Nonconformist. Oct. 7, 18861891 5 

[Moved to Indianapolis after 1891.] 

Christian Herald (m). Apr., 18941898 4 

Christna (s-m). Tabor, Iowa, and Winfield. 18891891 2 

Courant (d). Nov. 2, 18811882 1 

Cowley County Courant. Nov. 17, 18811882 1 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 169 



DISCONTINUED. Vo ^ 

Winfield. . . ... Cowley County Monitor. Feb. 7, 18801881 . . 1 

Cowley County Telegram; Winfield Telegram. 

Apr. 21, 1876 Jan. 1882; July, 18821891 15 

Expository (m). 1884. [See Crawford County Short-lived, vol. 3.1 

Farmers' Advocate. Nov. 26, 18921894 2 

Industrial Free Press. May 9, 18901906 17 

Kansas Agriculturist. Nov. 26, 18921894 3 

Messenger [scattering]. Mar. 15 Oct. 18, 1872 1 

Monitor (m). May-Oct., 1895 1 

Monthly Herald. June 1, 18901892 2 

Newspaper Union. Aug. 16, 1890 1894 4 

Plow and Anvil ; Cowley County Democrat. 

Nov. 19, 1874; Jan. 27 Aug. 17, 1876 1 

Primitive Christian. Panama, Neb., and Winfield. Jan. 7, 1902 1904. 

[See Sedgwick county.] 

Public Platform (m). Nov. 1, 18921895 3 

Semi-Weekly. Feb. 1, 18791880 1 

Sentinel. Jan. 11, 18951896 2 

Southwestern Advocate. Aug. 5, 1898 1902 4 

Southwestern Collegian (m). Oct., 1894 Mar., 1897; Nov., 18971899, 5 

Telegram (d). Jan. 1, 1879 Nov., 1881; Mar., 18871888 9 

Tribune. Nov. 26, 1884 Oct. 28, 1892; June 25, 18971907 18 

[Called Saturday Evening Tribune, 1886 to 1889.] 
Tribune (d). July 27, 1889 Mar., 1890; Oct.-Dec. 31, 1890; 

Sept. 6, 19071909 6 

Tribune-Visitor (d). Apr. 23 July 26, 1889 1 

Visitor (d). Jan. 22, 18861889 6 

Visitor. Oct. 14, 18871889 1 

. Western Reville (m). Oct. 1, 18901894 3 

Arkansas City Arkansas Valley Democrat. Aug. 1, 18791909 30 

Border Bulletin (d). July 27 Oct. 29, 1892 1 

Canal City Dispatch. Jan. 6, 18871898 11 

Canal City Dispatch (d); Evening Dispatch (d). 

May 13, 18871894 13 

Enquirer. Apr. 6, 19001905 5 

Fair Play. June 14, 18881892 4 

Gate City Journal. Jan. 20, 18941908 13 

Oklahoma War Chief. 1884. [See Sumner county.] 

Reporter (d). June 30 Dec. 31, 1895 1 

Republican. Feb. 16, 18841887 3 

Republican (d). Aug. 14, Nov. 22, 18861887 2 

Searchlight. Mar. 2, 19061907 1 

Star. Jan. 10 June 12, 1896 1 

Traders Exchange. July 15, 18981900 2 

Traveler; Republican Traveler. Jan. 26, 18761908 32 

X-Rays. Aug. 26, 18991912 13 

X-Rays (d). June 2, 19031911 . 31 

Atlanta News and Record. Feb. 18 Aug. 5, 1904 1 

Burden .Eagle (1st). Jan. 24, 18851889 . . 5 

Eagle (2d). Sept. 3, 18921908 15 

New Enterprise; Siftings; Enterprise. Apr. 29, 18801891 11 

[See, also, Butler county.] 

Spirit of the West. Aug. 7, 18911893 2 

[Called Saturday Journal, Dec. 9 to 30, 1893.] 

Cambridge Commercial. Feb. 19 Nov. 19, 1881 1 

News. Oct. 14, 1882 Mar., 1886; Mar., 18881890 5 

Dexter Advocate. Sept. 2, 18981907 '. . . . 9 

Dispatch. Apr. 6, 19051915 10 

Eye. Mar. 21, 1884 Nov. 28, 1885; Sept. 10, 18871888 3 

[Called Post, June and July, 1888.] 

Free Press. Sept. 14, 18881890 i 

News. Apr. 3, 19141915 1 

Rock Reporter. Aug. 15, 1912 Oct. 17, 1913 1 

Udall News. Dec. 15, 19001910 9 

Record. Mar. 12, 1886 Mar., 1888; Dec., 18881893 6 

[Not published from Jan. 10 to June 19, 1891.] 

Reporter. Dec. 13, 18941895 1 

Sentinel. June 12, 18851886 1 

Times. Apr. 8, 19101913 4 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Winfield News (d). Feb. 19 May 4, 1885. 

Arkansas City Bugle Call. Arkansas City and Harvard. July 25 Sept. 22, 1888. 

Fair Play. Mar. 30 Apr. 7, 1891. 

People's Leader. May 30 Oct. 31, 1891. 
Atlanta Advertiser. Sept. 25 Dec. 4, 1885. 

Cricket. Oct. 4, 1888 June 31, 1889. 

Herald. Mar. 28 May 30, 1890. 



170 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Winfield Cowley County Teacher. Oct. 8, 1879 May, 1880. 

Educational Index (m). Jan.-July, 1893. 

Southwestern Kansas Conference <d). Mar. 10-15, 1887. 
Arkansas City Cherokee Strip Guide. May 20 Sept. 1, 1893. 

Morning Star. May 2, 1893. 

News (d). Feb. 1 Mar. 5, 1894. 

Spy Glass (m). Oct., 1891. 

Sunday Evening Times. Feb. 26 Mar. 19, 1893. 

Burden Poultry Voice (m). Nov., 1893 July, 1894. 

Dexter Delta. Nov. 10, 1892 Sept. 7, 1893. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 3. 

Winfield Assembly Herald (m). Feb. and Mar., 1895. 

Christian Worker (m). May, 1908. 

Cowley County Prohibitionist (s-m). July 25 Dec. 17, 1894. 

Kansas Fancier (m). Dec., 1894 June, 1895. 

Spoon Hook (m). May and June, 1906. 

Vox Studentium (m). Aug. and Sept., 1894. 
Arkansas City Christian Speculator. Dec. 15, 1894. 

Evangel of Reform (m). Jan.-Dec., 1894. 

Life Line (m) [scattering]. Oct., 1894 Feb. 1, 1896. 

Silverdale Record. Aug. 18, 1895. 

Udall Herald [scattering]. Aug. 14, 1914 Mar. 19, 1915. 



CRAWFORD COUNTY. 

Organized, 1867; named for Gov. Samuel J. Crawford; county seat, 
Girard; area, 592 square miles, 378,880 acres; population (1915), 60,289; 
assessed valuation (1915), $44,452,209; resources and industries coal, build- 
ing stone, and agriculture. 

GIRARD Population (1915), 2917; elevation, 990 feet; established, 1868; named for Girard, 
Pa.; industries coal mines, smelter, canning factory, stove foundry; has telephones, electric 
lights and waterworks; is on the Santa Fe and the St. L. & S. F. railways. 

APPEAL TO REASON, Socialist; Louis Kopelin, editor, and W. H. Wayland, publisher, Girard 

Weekly. Feb. 6, 1897 + 19 vols. 

Founded 1895 at Kansas City, Mo., by J. A. Wayland; moved to Kansas City, Kan., 1896, 
and to Girard in 1897, with J. A. Wayland, editor and publisher. 

CRAWFORD COUNTY ENTERPRISE, Republican; Thomas Evans and Harry W. Bouck, editors 
and publishers, Girard. 

Weekly. Jan. 1, 1915 + 1 vol. 

Early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being vol. 11, No. 6, Thomas Evans, editor 
and publisher. 

PRESS, Republican; E. A. and A. B. Wasser, editors and publishers, Girard. 

Weekly. Jan. 6, May 19, 1870; July 3, 15, Aug. 10, 1871; May 28, 1874 + 42 vols. 
This paper is a continuation of the Fort Scott Press, a Democratic paper published in the 
late '60s in Fort Scott. In 1869 Dr. W. H. Warner and E. A. Wasser, then sole owners of the 
Fort Scott Press, moved it to Girard, changing the name to Girard Press and establishing it as 
an independent paper politically. In the summer of 1871 during the Cherokee Neutral Land 
troubles the office was burned by a mob; this suspended the publication of the paper for some 
three weeks. A daily edition was started in 1894 by E. A. Wasser and D. C. Flint, but was dis- 
continued in 1897. 

ARCADIA Population (1915), 746; established, 1862; known as Findlay City, in honor of 
George W. Findlay, for a short time, when old name of Arcadia was again adopted; industries 
brick and tile plant, planing and grist mills; has telephones; is on the St. Louis & San 
Francisco railway. 

JOURNAL, local; G. W. Corporon and W. J. Williams, editors and publishers, Arcadia. 

Weekly. Oct. 15, 1909 + 6 vols. 
Continuation of Arcadia Sunlight, founded 1909 by Dr. L. A. Runnion and H. W. Tucker; 

name changed to Arcadia Journal Dec. 3, 1915, G. W. Corporon and W. J. Williams^ editors and 

publishers. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 171 



ARMA Population (1915), 1742; established, 1894; has telephones; is on the Pittsburg-Joplir, 

electric line and the Missouri Pacific railway. 
RECORD, local; G. W. Taylor, editor and publisher, Arma. 
Weekly. June 24, 1915 + 1 vol. 

Founded 1915 by G. W. Taylor. 

CHEROKEE Population (1915), 1149; elevation, 931 feet; established, 1870; named for 
Cherokee county, within the boundaries of which it was thought to be situated; industries 
coal mining; is on the St. Louis & San Francisco and the Missouri Pacific railways. 

SENTINEL, Republican; H. B. Price, editor and lessee, J. F. Price, owner, Cherokee. 

Weekly. Mar. 28, 1879 + 36 vols. 
Founded 1879 as the Sentinel on the Border, by Charles M. Lucas; name changed 1882 to 

the Cherokee Sentinel, same publisher. 

HEPLER Population (1915), 259; elevation, 998 feet; established, 1871; has telephones; is on 

the M. K. & T. railway. 

ENTERPRISE, local; Ollie L. Mason, editor, Thomas Evans, publisher, Hepler. 
Weekly. Sept. 18, 1914 + 1 vol. 

Founded 1914 by Ollie L. Mason. 

McCUNE Population (1915), 662; elevation, 822 feet; established, 1879; named for Isaac 
McCune, founder of the town; has telephones; is on the St. Louis & San Francisco railway. 

HERALD, Republican; G. H. Dyer, editor and publisher, McCune. 

Weekly. Apr. 21, 1904 + 12 vols. 
A continuation of the following papers: Crawford County Damaerat, McCune, foun ded 

1889 by J. M. Mahr and W. D. Bevans; name changed 1903 to the Times-Democrat, Tom Darli ng- 

tbn, editor and publisher; name again changed 1904 to McCune Herald, W. C. Wiley, edit or, 

F. S. Wiley, publisher. 

MULBERRY Population (1915), 1682; established about 1875; formerly called Mulberry 
Grove; industries coal mining; has telephones; is on the Joplin & Pittsburg electric 
line, and on the St. Louis & San Francisco and Kansas City Southern railways. 

NEWS, Democratic; M. F. Sears, editor and publisher, Mulberry. 

Weekly. Nov. 27, 1903 + 12 vols. 
Founded 1903 by the News Publishing Company. 

PITTSBURG Population (1915), 17,685; elevation, 934 feet; established 1876; named for 
Pittsburg, Pa.; industries coal mining, smelters, brick and sewer tile works, foundries; 
electric lights, paved streets, telephones, street railway, municipal water system, public 
library; is on the Santa Fe, the Kansas City Southern and Missouri Pacific railways. 
HEADLIGHT, Republican; Moore Brothers, editors and publishers, Pittsburg. 
Weekly. Apr. 17, 1886 + 30 vols. 
Daily. July, 18871888. 2 vols. 

Founded 1885; first issue in Society's file is vol. 1, No. 26, Millard F. Sears, editor, and Sears 
& Keyes, publishers. In 1886 the Headlight absorbed the Pittsburg Democrat, which at the 
time was edited by Thomas P. Monfort. The early history of the Democrat is unknown, no 
issues being on file in the Historical Society's collection. A daily edition of the Headlight was 
founded in 1887 by M. F. Sears and C. W. Moore. The Historical Society has not received the 
daily since 1888, except scattering issues, May 3, July 24 and Aug. 8, 1912. 

KANSAN, Democratic; Dr. J. F. Callen and Elizabeth F. Callen, editors and publishers, Pitts- 
burg. 

Weekly. July 3, 1889 + 26 vols. 
Founded 1889 by J. C. Buchanan. 
LAVORATORE ITALIANO [Italian], labor; Edeardo Caffaro, editor and publisher, Pittsburg. 

Weekly. Jan. 5, 1912 + 4 vols. 

Founded 1907; early history unknown; first issue in Society's file is vol. 11, No. 1, Edeardo 
Caffaro, editor and publisher. 

MANUALITE, edited and published by the students of the Normal Manual Training School, Pitts- 
burg. 

Monthly. Oct., 1912 May, 1914, scattering. 2 vols. 
Founded 1912 by the students of the State Manual Training School. 



172 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



WORKER'S CHRONICLE, labor; George D. Brewer, editor, George D. Brewer and A. S. Green, 

publishers, Pittsburg. 

Weekly. Feb. 6, 1914 + 2 vols. 

Founded 1911 as the Labor Herald, by W. F. Sears and Lee A. Leftwich; name changed in 
1913 to the Worker's Chronicle. The first issue of the Chronicle received by the Historical Society 
is vol. 4, No. 10, date as above, George D. Brewer, editor and publisher. 

WALNUT Population (1915), 620; elevation, 940 feet; established, 1871; first called Glen- 
wood, name changed in 1874 to Walnut; named for Little Walnut creek, on which it is located; 
industries flour mills, elevators; has telephones; is on the Santa Fe and the M. K. & T. 
railways. 

ADVANCE, Democratic; Harry W. Tucker, editor and publisher, Walnut. 

Weekly. July 12, 18951912. 16 vols. 
Founded 1895 by W. C. and J. R. Simons; not received by this Society since Jan. 5, 1912. 

EAGLE, Republican; J. A. Martin, editor and publisher, Walnut. 

Weekly. June 9, 1894 + 20 vols. 
Founded 1894 by Lewis Martin; discontinued Oct. 5, 1895, to Mar. 14, 1896; on Dec. 12, 

1914, Mr. Martin died and the paper was discontinued with the next issue, Dec. 15; on Nov. 26, 

1915, the Eagle was revived by J. A. Martin, editor and publisher. 

DISCONTINUED. Vote- 

Girard Christian Helper (m). Dec., 1900; Jan., 1901. 

[See Harper County Short-lived, vol. 2.] 

Coming Nation. Jan. 7, 19111913 2 

Crawford County News. Apr. 20, 18761880 4 

Herald. Feb. 12, 1880 July, 1882; Mar., 18831896 16 

[Called Western Herald, 18901894.] 

Independent News. May 18, 18961909 13 

Kansas Workman (m). Jan., 1882 July, 1885. [See Neosho county.] 

Press (d). Sept. 17, 18941897 4 

Progressive Woman (m). Sept., 19091911 2 

Times. Sept. 16, 19091913 4 

Verdict. Dec. 1, 1899 Aug. 10, 1900 1 

Wayland's Monthly. May, 19001908 ,. . 8 

World. Jan. 4, 18941899 6 

[Called Western World, 18981889.] 

World (d). July 1, 1894 1895 ,, 4 

Arcadia . .Arcadian. July 14 Dec. 27, 1888 1 

Christian Worker. Feb. 7 Sept. 6, 1888 1 

Crawford County Times (2d) ; Arcadia Times. Sept. 10, 18961909 13 

Democrat. Sept. 6, 18881890 2 

News. Aug. 14, 18901898 8 

[Called Crawford County Times from Mar. 11, 1897, to Jan. 6, 1898.] 

Record. May 22, 19031904 1 

Reporter. Sept. 21, 18821888 6 

Cherokee. . . . .Banner. Oct. 6, 18771878 . . 1 

Cyclone. Oct. 4, 18841888 4 

Enterprise. Nov. 10, 1899 Aug. 31, 1900 1 

Index. May 26, 18761877 2 

Temperance Rural. Cherokee and Baxter Springs. July 4, 1878 1879 . . 

Times-Miner. Jan. 13 May 26, 1893 

Young Cherokee. June 10, 18761877 

Farlington Plaindealer. Oct. 11, 18851886 

Western Gem. Sept. 2, 18861887 

Hepler . . .Banner. Feb. 3, 18871889 3 

Enterprise (1st). Jan. 13, 19051906 1 

Leader. Jan. 18 Dec. 20, 1883; Jan. 10 Aug. 6, 1890 

McCune Brick. McCune and Pittsburg. Apr. 10, 1886 1887 1 

Crawford County Democrat. July 27, 1889 1903 14 

Leader. May 18 Sept. 7, 1893 1 

Standard. Mar. 12, 18811882 1 

Times. Sept. 9, 18821891 9 

Times-Democrat. July 9, 19031904 1 

Transcript. Nov. 26, 18971901 3 

Pittsburg Cyclone (qr). Jan., 1898 July, 1912 15 

Democrat (1st). May 21 Sept. 2, 1887 \ -, 

Democrat (2d). July 6, 18881889 J 

Democrat (3d). May 29 Nov. 13, 1913 1 

Herold [German]. June 5, 18901891 1 

Labor Herald. Mar. 3, 19111913 2 

Manual Normal Light (m). June, 1910 May, 1911 1 

Messenger. Mar. 3, 18931895 2 

Miners' Echo (w, d, and tri-w). Sept. 23, 18921893 1 

Penny Post (d). Oct. 26 Nov. 27, 1892 1 

People's Exponent and Smelter. Dec. 31, 1880 1891 11 

t'laindealer. Aug. 5, 18991900 : 1 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 173 



DISCONTINUED. 

Pittsburg Purple and White (m). Sept., 1900 May, 1901 . . 1 

Smelter (2d). July 5, 18951896 

Star (d). June, 18911892 

Sunday Morning Mail. Feb. 7 June 19, 1892 . . 

Tribune. Mar. 21, 18961897 

Tribune (d). Aug. 13, 1896 May 24, 1897; May 7, 18981899 

Volksfreund [German]. Jan. 17, 19011912 ... 11 

World. Aug. 21, 18901893 

World (d). Feb. 1, 1891 Mar., 1892; Aug., 18921894 5 

[Called Pittsburg Star from June, 1891, to Mar., 1892.] 
Walnut Comet. Jan. 8 Aug. 15, 1892 1 

Journal (1st). Jan. 7, 18821894 . H 

[Jan.-Oct., 1892, not published.] 

Journal (2d). Feb. 16, 18941895 2 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Girard Outlook (m). Aug., 1886. 

Arcadia Arcadian (d). Nov. 7, 8, 9, 1888. 

Real Estate Record (m). June, 1888. 

Cherokee Disciples at Work. July 11, 1887. 

Mulberry Gazette. June 19 and Nov. 27, 1886. 

Pittsburg Smelter (d). June 28 Aug. 3, 1890. 

Star. Nov. 21, 1891 Mar. 12, 1892. 

Times (d). Aug. 15 Sept. 5, 1891. 
Walnut Herald. Sept. 2 Dec. 23, 1882. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Girard Conference Daily Press, South Kansas. Mar. 10-14,"1891. 

Normal Record. July 8 Aug. 4, 1881. 

People's Vindicator. Aug. 18, 1870. 
Pittsburg Advance. Nov. 18, 1892 Jan. 20, 1893. 

Volks-Zeitung [German], Nov. 11, 1892 Jan. 6, 1893. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 3. 

Girard Argus (m). Jan.-Mar., 1896. 

Democrat. Mar. 7 Apr. 4, 1896. 

Expository (m). Girard, Columbus, Winfield andjNewton. Nov.. 1883 1884 

National Socialist (m). Apr.-Sept., 1914. 

Our Sunflower (m). Girard, Cherokee and Le Loup. June, 1897 Aug., 1898. 

Cherokee. . Kansas Homestead. Dec. 23, 1899 Jan. 6, 1900. 

Frontenac Journal. Apr. 18 July 4, 1896. 

Vindicator. Feb. 8 and 15, 1902. 
McCune Labor Review. Jan. 24 Mar. 28, 1895. 

Republican. Nov. 9, 1894 Jan. 25, 1895. 

Mulberry. Sun. June 17 Oct. 22, 1898. 

Pktsburg Afro-American. Salina and Pittsburg. Feb-.'.May and June, 1915. 

Gunn Powder. Nov. 20, 1913 Jan. 8, 1914. 

Journal (d). Apr. 2 May 3, 1902. 

Uplift. Dec. 5-19, 1914. 



DAVIS COUNTY. 

Name changed February 28, 1889, to Geary county which see. 

DISCONTINUED. 

Junction City Davis County Republican. 1882 1889. 

Tribune. 18731889. 

Union. 1865 May, 1879; Dec., 18791889. 

Union (d). 1887. 
Fort Riley Soldier's Letter. 18641865. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Junction City Conference Daily Tribune. Mar. 17-22, 1887. 

Democrat. Oct. 28 Dec. 31, 1887. 

Insurance Messenger (m). June, 1888 June, 1889. 

Junction Sentinel. May 14, 1859. 

Methodist (m). June, 1886 June, 1887. 

Parish Iris. Dec., 1884 June, 1885. 

Real Estate Register. Sept. 1, Dec., 1870; Mar.. 1871. 

Tribune (d). Sept. 21-26, 1886. 

Youth's Casket (m). Jan.-Dec., 1878. 



174 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DECATUR COUNTY. 

Organized, December 11, 1880; named for Commodore Stephen Decatur; 
county seat, Ober'.in; area, 900 square miles, 576,000 acres; population (1915), 
7502; assessed valuation (1915), $11,334,641; resources and industries- 
agriculture, and stock raising. 

QBE RLIN Population (1915), 1019; elevation, 2528 feet; established, 1878; named for Oberlin, 

Ohio; has electric lights, waterworks, telephones and public library; is on the C. B. & Q. 

railway. 
HERALD, Democratic; E. M. Coldren, editor, E. W. Coldren, associate editor, Coldren & Son, 

publishers, Oberlin. 

Weekly. June 12, 1879 -f 36 vols. 

Founded 1879 by Humphrey & Counter. 

TIMES, Republican; Lester M. Parker, editor and publisher, J. C. Parker, associate editor, Oberlin. 
Weekly. Jan. 2, 1891 -f 25 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the Allison Breeze, founded 1887 by W. E. Smith; name 
changed in 1888 to the Allison Times; moved to Jennings in 1889, and name changed to the Alliance 
Times, John Shields, editor; moved to Oberlin in 1890; name changed in 1893 to the Oberlin 
Times. 

CEDAR BLUFFS Population (1915), 74; established about 1882; has telephones; is on the 

C. B. & Q. railway. 
BEAVER VALLEY BOOSTER, Republican; H. S. and Lucy J. Kennedy, publishers, H. S. Kennedy, 

editor, Cedar Bluffs. 

Weekly. Aug. 17, 1910 + 5 vols. 

Founded 1910 by Harry S. Kennedy. 

JENNINGS Population (1915), 227; elevation, 2488 feet; established, 1881; was first called 
Slab City; name changed to Jennings in honor of Warren Jennings; is on the Rock Island 
railway. 

GAZETTE, Republican; Forrest Glass, editor and publisher, Jennings. 

Weekly. Nov. 4, 1915 -f- 
Founded 1888 as the Jennings Echo, by George W. Shook and Day; name changed 1915 

to Jennings Gazette, Forrest Glass, editor and publisher. 

NORCATUR Population (1915), 398; elevation, 2628 feet; established, August, 1885; name 
compounded from Norton and Decatur because of its location near the line of both counties; 
industries elevator, flour mill; has telephones; is on the C. B. & Q. railway. 
DISPATCH, independent; J. W. Deeter, editor and publisher, Norcatur. 

Weekly. Aug. 18, 1910 -f 5 vols. 
Founded 1909 by J. W. Deeter. 

DISCONTINUED. ro/s 

Oberlin .. Decatur County News. Dec. 29, 1910-1912 2 

Eye. Sept. 6, 18831910 27 

Keystone (m). Dec., 19061907 1 

Opinion. Dec. 18, 1886-1896 10 

Rathbone Family Historian (m). Jan., 18921894 3 

World and Democrat. Dec. 10, 1885 1886 1 

\llison . . Breeze. Sept. 2, 1887 Jan. 6, 1888 i 

Times. Jan. 13 Nov. 16, 1888 

Dresden Star. Mar. 29, 18901893 3 

Sunflower. July 9, 19081914 6 

Jennings Echo. July 26, 18881915 27 

Reporter. Feb. 22, 19121913 1 

Times; Alliance Times. Nov. 23, 18881890 

Norcatur ..Norton District Methodist (m). 1904 1905. 

[See Smith County Short-lived, vol. 1.] 

Register. Apr. 30, 1886-1910 25 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Oberlin - Decatur County Socialist. Oct. 19, 26, 1906. 

Eye (d). Oct. 12, 1886. 
Farmer (m). Mar., 1888 Aug., 1889. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 175 



DICKINSON COUNTY. 

Organized, 1859; named for Daniel S. Dickinson, United States senator 
from New York; county seat, Abilene; area, 851 square miles 544,640 acres; 
population (1915), 25,339; assessed valuation (1915), $46,182,593; resources 
and industries agriculture, stock raising brick and pottery clay, and min- 
eral springs. 

ABILENE Population (1915), 4267; elevation, 1148 feet; named for the ancient tetrarchy of 
Abilene mentioned in Luke 3:1; industries wagon factory, flour and planing mills, foundries, 
organ factory, medicinal mineral springs and bottiing works; has electric lights, telephones, 
municipal water system, public library; is on the Santa Fe the Rock Island and the Union 
Pacific railways. 
CHRONICLE, independent; P. W. Heath, editor and publisher, Abilene. 

Weekly. Mar. 3, Apr. 21, May 12 and 19, Sept. 1 and 15, 1870; July 16, 1875 + 

40 vols. 

Daily. Sept. 2, 1897 -f- 37 vols. 

The weekly Chronicle was founded in 1870 by V. P. Wilson; consolidated in 1873 with the 
Journal, founded same year by W. H. Johnson, under name Chronicle-Journal; name later changed 
to Dickinson County Chronicle, and still later to Abilene Chronicle. Chapman Star, founded in 
1884 by M. H. Curts; moved to Abilene 1886, and name changed to Abilene Republican; 
consolidated Dec., 1886, with the Chronicle, and name changed to Abilene Journal, J. H. 
Lucas and M. H. Curts, editors and publishers. The Journal began its career with a new volume 
nnd number, but in Feb., 1887, the publication took the old name Chronicle, using its num- 
bering. The daily edition of the Chronicle was founded in 1896 by George Burroughs. 

DICKINSON COUNTY NEWS, Democratic; J. W. Howe, editor, E. L. Van Trees, secretary and 

manager, News Publishing Company, publisher, Abilene. 
Weekly. Nov. 22, 1888 + 27 vols. 

Founded 1888 by Strother Brothers; consolidated 1913 with the Abilene Democrat; early 
history unknown, first issue in Society's file being Dec. 30, 1898. 

IMPLEMENT HARDWARE BULLETIN, trade; H. J. Hodge, editor and publisher; official organ of 
the Western Retail Implement, Vehicle and Hardware Association, and National Federation 
of Implement and Vehicle Dealers' Association, Abilene. 

Monthly. Jan., 1899 + 17 vols. 
Founded 1895 as the Implement Dealers' Bulletin; name changed 1915 to the Implement 

Hardware Bulletin; same management. 

KANSAS STATE SUNDAY SCHOOL JOURNAL, religious; J. H. Engle, editor and publisher, Abilene. 

Monthly. July, 1892 + 24 vols. 

Founded at Hutchinson as a quarterly, in July, 1892, by J. F. Drake; moved to Topeka with 
the Oct., 1892, issue; moved to Abilene Oct., 1896, with J. H. Engle as editor; returned to Topeka 
June, 1898; moved back to Abilene June, 1901, where it has since been published. 

REFLECTOR, Republican; Charles M. Harger, editor, Reflector Publishing Company, publisher, 
Abilene. 

Weekly. Sept. 6, 1883 -f- 32 vols. 

Daily. May 9, 1887 -f- 56 vols. 
Weekly founded 1883 by B. L. and S. K. Strother; daily founded 1887 by L. H. Litts & Co. 

CHAPMAN Population (1915), 746; elevation, 1113 feet; industries flour mill, machine shop; 

has telephones; is on the Union Pacific railway. 

ADVERTISER, independent; Mrs. T. H. Sheeran, editor and owner. Chapman. 
Weekly. Feb. 29, 1901 + 15 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Chapman Courier, founded 1887 by H. C. 
Boles; name changed in 1891 to Chapman Howitzer, with M. H. Curts, editor and publisher: 
in 1892 name again changed to Chapman Standard, J. E. Martin and Fred A. Freeland, editors 
and publishers; in 1901 name changed to Chapman Advertiser; Chapman News, founded 1899 
by J. P. McMillan: consolidated 1901 with Standard. Chapman Lookout, founded 1903 by 
McMillan & Gillis; absorbed in 1907 by the Advertiser. 

ENTERPRISE- Population (1915), 778; elevation, 1144 feet; established, 1872: industries 
flour mills, foundries, machine shops; has telephones, waterworks; is on the Santa Fe. the 
Union Pacific and the Rock Island railways. 



176 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



PUSH AND JOURNAL, independent; Roy A. Hoisington, editor and publisher, Enterprise. 

Weekly. Dec. 14, 1905 + 10 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the Enterprise Push, founded 1905 by I. K. Fretz. Enter- 
prise-Independent, founded 1888 by McK. DeMotte; succeeded in 1890 by the Enterprise-Journal 
with J. C. Gault as editor; consolidated 1905 with Push. 

HERINGTON Population (1915), 4255; elevation, 1333 feet; established, 1884; named for 
its founder, M. D. Herington; has electric lights, waterworks, telephones; is on the Rock 
Island and Missouri Pacific railways. 
SUN, Republican; Ralph R. Lee and William J. Scott, editors and publishers, Herington. 

Weekly. June 1, 1903 + 13 vols. 
Founded 1903 by C. M. Rose. 
TIMES, Republican; H. L. Harris and Perl R. Barton, editors and publishers, Herington. 

Weekly. July 25, 1889 + 26 vols. 
Founded 1889 by A. M. Craig. 

HOPE Population (1915), 570; elevation, 1377 feet; established, 1871; industries roller mills, 
gypsum and plaster works; has electric lights, telephones; is on the Santa Fe and the Missouri 
Pacific railways. 

DISPATCH, Republican; M. C. Hemenway, editor and publisher, Hope. 

Weekly. Jan. 2, 1896 + 20 vols. 
Founded 1886 by A. M. Crary; consolidated Jan. 21, 1892, with the Hope Herald, which 

was founded in 1884 by Wray & Clark; called Hope Dispatch-Herald until Mar. 10 following, 

when name was changed to Hope Dispatch. Western News, founded 1895 by Burton & Ross; 

consolidated with the Dispatch in 1896. 

MANCHESTER Population (1915), 288; established, 1887; formerly called Keystone; name 
changed to Manchester between 1888 and 1890; has telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

MOTOR, independent; W. C. Roughton, editor and publisher, Mable E. Roughton, local editor. 

Weekly. Mar. 31, 1910 + 6 vols. 
Founded 1910 by Frank E. Pattee. 

SOLOMON Population (1915), 1110; elevation, 1171 feet; established in 1866; named for the 
Solomon river, on which it is situated; industries salt and plaster works, flour and feed 
mills, elevators; has telephones; is on the Santa Fe, the Rock Island and the Union Pacific 
railways. 

TRIBUNE, Republican; C. W. Hamilton, editor and publisher, Solomon. 

Weekly. Dec. 4, 1896 + 19 vols. 
Founded 1896 by Dan Campbell, jr.; consolidated 1899 with the Solomon Sentinel, founded 

1879 by J. C. Hill. 

WOODBINE Population (1915), 302; established about 1882; has telephones; is on the Rock 

Island railway. 

JOURNAL, independent; McAfee Sons, editors and publishers, Woodbine. 
Weekly. Mar. 12. 1914 + 2 vols. 

Founded 1914 by J. S. Blagrave and J. S. Hall. 

DISCONTINUED. Volg 

Abilene . . .Alliance Monitor; Monitor; Monitor Herald. July 31, 1890 1898. . . 8 

Democrat (1st). Jan. 1, 18801882 2 

Democrat (2d). Dec. 30, 18981913 .14 

Dispatch. Dec. 14, 18931895 1 

Evangelical Visitor (s-m). Jan. 1, 18931902 10 

Gazette. Abilene and Enterprise. May 3, 1878 1894 11 

[Apr., 1889, to June, 1894, not published.] 

Gazette (d). May 6, 18851888 8 

Gospel Message (m). Aug. 15, 1894 1895. . . 1 

Herald. Dec. 16, 18921893 2 

Home Rule. May 16, 19071908 2 

Kansas Gazette. Enterprise and Abilene. Apr. 27, 18761878 2 

School and Home (m). Nov., 1893 1898 4 

Banner City Register. Apr. 1, 1887 1888 2 

Carlton . . . . Advocate. June 17, 18861888 . 2 

Tribune. Sept. 11, 19071914 7 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 177 



DISCONTINUED. VoU 

Chapman Courier. Jan. 6, 18871891 .4 

Gazette. Jan. 3, 19101912 

Golden Belt Star; Star. June 19, 18841886. . 

Howitzer. Apr. 10, 18911892 

Lookout. Sept. 3, 19031907 . 3 

News. Apr. 6, 18991900 

Standard. Dec. 30, 18921901 9 

Dillon Republican. Jan. 10, 18951898 3 

Enterprise Anti-Monopolist. Dec. 8, 1883 1888 .4 

Eagle. Sept. 6 Dec. 20, 1900 1 

Herald. July 25, 19031905 3 

Independent. Jan. 21, 1888 1890 3 

Integral Cooperator. Sept. 17, 18911894 3 

Journal. Aug. 21, 18901906 16 

Kansas Miller and Manufacturer (m). Jan., 1888 1893 5 

Northwest Expositor and Central Expositor (m). Downs, Cawker City, 

Smith Center and Enterprise. Feb., 1890 1895 . 5 

Register. Dec. 1, 18831884 1 

Star. Sept. 5, 19011903 2 

Herington . . . . Headlight. Mar. 1, 18881889 1 

Journal (m). 18921894 2 

[First number called the Kansas Exchange Journal.) 

Signal (1st). July 9, 1891 1892 2 

Signal (2d). Dec. 28, 18931896 5 

Tribune (1st). Dec. 18, 18841890 6 

Tribune (2d). Apr. 30 Oct. 30, 1896 1 

Vindicator. Feb. 5 July 9, 1890 1 

Hope . ... Crescent. June 22, 1893 1896 .3 

Dispatch (1st). Mar. 5, 18861893 8 

Herald. Feb. 7, 18851892 . 7 

Western News. Apr. 18, 18951896 1 

Manchester News. Nov. 26, 18961906 10 

Sun. Dec. 8, 18871893 6 

Solomon Sentinel. July 30, 18791899 20 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Abilene Little Sand-Pounder. Aug. 14 Oct. 30, 1886. 

Republican. Nov. 12 Dec. 17, 1886. 

Union Labor Banner. Oct. 5 Dec. 14, 1888. 

Herington Herald. Nov., 1886. 

Hope Star. Aug. 18, 1892 Jan. 13, 1893. 

Woodbine Tidings. May 25 Aug. 3, 1889. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Chapman . . ... Christian Endeavorer. Jan. 1, 1894. 

Journal. Oct. 27 Dec. 8, 1892. 
Detroit Free Press. Apr. 7 Aug. 11, 1898. 

Western News. Feb. 11 and July 5, 1870. 
Enterprise '. .Journal (d). June 7 June 10, 1892. 

Kansas Dairy Farmer (m). Oct., 1899 Feb., 1900. 

Pointers. Dec., 1899. 

Herington Herald. June 6 July 25, 1901. 

Hope Herald (d). Oct. 8, 1886. 

Navarre. . . . .Leader. Navarre and Woodbine. Aug. 13, Sept. 17, Oct. 15 Nov. 12, 1914. 



DONIPHAN COUNTY. 

Organized, 1855; named for Alexander W. Doniphan; county seat, Troy; 
area, 379 square miles, 242,560 acres; population (1915), 14,544; assessed 
valuation (1915), $25,876,883; resources and industries agriculture and 
horticulture. 

TROY Population (1915), 1109; elevation, 1093 feet; established, 1855; named for ancient 
Troy; has telephones; is on the Rock Island and St. Joseph & Grand Island railways. 

12 



178 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



KANSAS CHIEF, Republican; H. J. Calnan, editor and proprietor, Troy. 

Weekly. June 4, 1857 + 58 vols. 

Founded at White Cloud in 1857 by Sol Miller, and called the White Cloud Chief; moved tc 
Troy, July 4, 1872; absorbed the Doniphan County Republican, founded 1868 by C. G. Bridges 

HIGHLAND Population (1915), 736; elevation, 887 feet; established, 1857; electric lights, 
telephones; is on the St. Joseph & Grand Island railway. 

VIDKTTE, Republican; Tobias Larson and Warren Kitzmiller, editors and publishers, Highland. 

Weekly. Feb. 18, 1892 + 24 vols. 
Founded 1892 by H. S. and Irvin Hogue. 

SEVERANCE Population (1915), 334; elevation, 899 feet; established, 1869; named for John 
Severance, one of its founders; industries flour mills, elevators; telephones, public library; 
is on the St. Joseph & Grand Island railway. 

NEWS, independent; Rev. A. J. Pirtle, editor and lessee, Severance. 

Weekly. May 11, 1889 -j- 27 vols. 
Founded 1889 by W. T. Randolph. 

WAT HENA Population (1915), 709; elevation, 819 feet; established, 1856; named for a Kick- 
apoo Indian chief; telephones, paved streets, public library; is on the Rock Island and St. 
Joseph & Grand Island railways. 

REPUBLICAN, Republican; W. T. Stewart, editor, W. T. Stewart and Charles A. Fetter, pub- 
lishers, Wathena. 

Weekly. Mar. 30, 1900 + 16 vols. 
Founded 1900 by Pool Grinstead. 

TIMES, independent; C. W. Ryan, editor and publisher, Wathena. 

Weekly. Nov. 22, 1901 + 14 vols. 
Founded 1886 at Troy by A. W. Beale; moved to Wathena 1901, and name changed to 

Wathena Times, with Pool Grinstead as editor and publisher; Troy Republican, founded 1910 

by W. Charles Hopper; consolidated with Times in 1911. 

WHITE CLOUD Population (1915), 563; elevation, 852 feet; established, 1856; named for 
Ma-hush-kah, White Cloud, Iowa Indian chief; industries flour mills'and elevators; tele- 
phones, public library; is on the C. B. & Q. railway. 

GLOBE, Republican; Anna Mallows, editor and publisher, White Cloud. 

Weekly. Sept. 2, 1892 -f- 24 vols. 
Founded 1892 by John J. Faulkner. 

DISCONTINUED. Vofa 

Troy Bulletin. May 5, 18771879 

Doniphan County Republican. 

Jan. 28, 1871 Aug., 1872; Sept., 18731875 3 

Reporter. Apr. 26, 1866 1867 . i 

Republican. Oct. 6, 19101911 1 

Times. Sept. 3, 18861901 15 

Denton... ...Journal. Mar. 25, 1897 1898 1 

Wheel. Mar. 28, 18951896 '.'.'.' i 

Elwood . ... .Advertiser. June 25, 1857 1858 1 

Free Press. June 25, 18591861 .....- 

Kansas Weekly Press. June 5, 18581859 ,',.', i 

Highland . . ... Central State. Nov. 4, 1880 1882 . . 2 

University Nuncio (bi-w). Nov. 23, 18901897 6 

Sentinel. Feb. 13, 18781879 " 1 

Leona Doniphan County Hustler (1st). Feb. 5, 1897 1898 1 

Doniphan County Hustler (2d). Mar. 20, 1903 1908 5 

Sun. Jan. 18, 18951896. ...'.'.'.':.'.'.'.'. 1 

Severance Enterprise. 1883. [See Centralia, Nemaha county.] 

Wathena Advance and Mirror. Mar. 1 Sept. 5, 1878 1 

Gazette. July 4, 18891890 1 

Reporter. Apr. 18, 1867 Apr., 1868; Sept., 1873 1877 5 

Star. May 14, 1896-1900 4 

White Cloud Review (1st). Oct. 30, 1 880-1887 

Review (2d). Oct. 12, 1888 1889., ... i 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 179 



SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Troy , Doniphan County Patriot. Apr. 11, 1863. 

Doniphan County Republican. Oct. 23 and Nov. 6, 1869; Jan. ), 1870; 
Aug. 16, 1873. 

Bendena Echo. July 13 Aug. 24, 1889. 

Brenner Western Emigrant. June 8, 1878. 

Doniphan Bible Investigator (m). Jan.-Sept., 1882. 

Weekly News. Mar. 17 Aug. 25, 1882. 

Kansas Constitutionalist. Jan. 1, 1857. 

Kansas Crusader of Freedom. Jan. 30 Mar. 6, 1858. 

Geary City Era. Aug. 1-15, 1857. 

Highland Alumni Annual, Highland University. 1883, 1884. 

Weekly Highlander. Jan. 1, 1859. 

Palermo Leader. Nov. 19, 1859. 

Severance Advertiser. Aug. 3, 1883 May 2, 1884. 

Times. Aug. 30 Sept. 20, 1883. 
White Cloud News. June 15, 1891 Mar. 15, 1892. 

Triple States. Mar. 26, Apr. 2, 1915. 



DOUGLAS COUNTY. 

Organized, 1855; named for Stephen A. Douglas, United States senator 
from Illinois; county seat, Lawrence; area, 469 square miles, 300,160 acres; 
population (1915), 25,130; assessed valuation (1915), $36,752,518; resources 
and industries agriculture, horticulture, building stone, and coal. 

LAWRENCE Population (1915), 12,884; elevation, 829 feet; established, 1854; named for Amos 
Lawrence, of Boston, Mass.; industries flour, feed and plaster mills, foundries, brick and tile 
plants, canning factory, nurseries, paper mill, carriage and wagon factory, tannery, planing 
mill, broom, barrel, egg case and mattress factories; telephones, electric lights, paved streets, 
street railway, municipal waterworks system, water power; is on interurban line to Kansas 
City, and the Santa Fe and Union Pacific railways. State University and Haskell Institute 
located at Lawrence. 

ADVERTISER, Democratic; Charles C. Seewir, editor and publisher, Lawrence. 

Weekly. Dec. 25, 1913 + 2 vols. 
Founded 1913 by Charles C. Seewir. 

DEMOCRAT, Democratic; Henry Albach, editor and publisher, Lawrence. 

Weekly. Oct. 13, 1910 + . 5 vols. 
Founded 1910 by Henry Albach. 

FRATERNAL AID UNION, fraternal; V. A. Young and B. F. Williams, editors; published in interest 
of the Fraternal Aid Union, Lawrence. 

Monthly. June, 1891 + 26 vols. 
A continuation of the Fraternal Aid, first published in Holton, Armer P. Shaw and Chas. V. 

Hamm, editors; moved to Lawrence July, 1897, C. V. Hamm, editor, and H. W. Grant, associate 

editor; named changed Jan., 1916, to Fraternal Aid Union. 

GAZETTE (2d), Republican; C. S. Finch, editor, C. S. Finch, W. J. Flintom and Clarence S. Hall, 
publishers, Lawrence. 

Daily. Feb. 9, 1903 -f 26 vols. 
Founded 1903 by C. S. Finch and Ed Martindale. 
GERMANIA [German], independent; Henry Albach, editor and proprietor. 

Weekly. Sept. 8, 1877; Jan. 8, 1880 June, 1881; Feb., 1883 + 33 vols. 
Founded 1877 by Gottleib Oehrle. 

GRADUATE MAGAZINE OF UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS; published by Alumni Association of the Schools 
of Arts and Engineering, Lawrence. 

Monthly. Oct., 1902 + 13 vols. 

Founded 1902 by the Alumni Association of the Schools of Arts and Engineering. 
HIGH SCHOOL BUDGET; edited and published by students of Lawrence high school, Lawrence. 

Monthly. Nov., 1898 + 17 vols. 
A continuation of the Windmill; Society's file not complete. 



180 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



INDIAN LEADER; J. R. Wise, editor, Haskell Institute, publisher, Lawrence. 
Weekly. Mar. 6, 1897 + 21 vols. 

Founded 1897 by faculty and students of Haskell Institute. 
JEFFERSONIAN GAZETTE, Republican; C. S. Finch, editor, C. S. Finch, W. J. Flintom and Clarence 

S. Hall, publishers, Lawrence. 

Weekly. April 6, 1899 + 17 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: The Kansas Gazette, founded 1882, by Osbun 
Shannon; absorbed 1899 the Jeffersonian, founded in 1883 as the Enterprise [Dickinson county] 
Register; in 1883 name changed to the Anti-Monopolist, W. H. T. Wakefield, editor, C. B. Hoff- 
man and W. H. T. Wakefield, publishers; moved to Topeka, and in 1884 moved back to Enterprise; 
moved to Council Grove in 1888, W. H. T. Wakefield, publisher; returned to Topeka in 1889 and 
name changed to the Jeffersonian, same editor and publisher; in 1890 Mr. Wakefield moved the paper 
to Lawrence, and published it until 1894, when Ed Martindale became the publisher; in 1899 con- 
solidated with the Gazette, under the name of Jeffersonian Gazette, E. Martindale, manager. 

JOURNAL-WORLD, Republican; W. C. Simons, president and editor, The World Company, pub- 
lisher, Lawrence. 

Daily. Feb. 20, 1911 + 19 vols. 

A continuation of so many newspapers that accuracy is almost impossible. 
Herald of Freedom, founded 1854 by Dr. Geo. W. Brown; the first issue was printed in Penn- 
sylvania, and dated Wakarusa, Kansas Territory, Oct. 22, 1854; the second issue was published 
at Lawrence, and dated Jan. 6, 1855; on May 21, 1856, the office was destroyed by border 
ruffians and publication was suspended until the following November, by which time a new outfit 
was procured; in 1859 the Herald ceased publication. The Kansas State Journal, founded 1861 
by Josiah C. Trask and Hovey E. Lowman, was the successor of the Herald of Freedom; in 1869 
it was consolidated with the Lawrence Republican and the Ottawa Home Journal, and was edited 
and published by Rev. Isaac S. Kalloch, T. D. Thacher and Milton W. Reynolds; the daily edition 
of the State Journal was founded in 1865 by James Christian and Milton W. Reynolds. Lawrence 
Republican, founded 1857 by Norman Allen; T. D. Thacher, editor; published as a daily during 
the legislature of 1861; destroyed in the Quantrill raid Aug. 21, 1863; reestablished 1868 by T. D. 
Thacher, and consolidated in 1869 with the Kansas State Journal and the Ottawa Home Journal, 
the name of the daily edition becoming Republican Daily Journal, and of the weekly edition 
Western Home Journal. The Kansas Weekly Tribune (2d) was founded in 1863 by John Speer; 
destroyed the same year by Quantrill 's ; raiders; reestablished by Mr. Speer in Nov., 1863, 
as a daily and weekly; consolidated 1874 with the Republican Daily Journal, as the Republican 
Daily Journal and the Daily Kansas Tribune, T. D. Thacher and F. E. Stimpson, editors and 
publishers. In 1875 the Kansas Weekly Tribune was again revived by John Speer, J. E. Covel 
and George M. Richards, with John Speer as editor; consolidated 1884 with the Kansas Herald, 
and called the Herald-Tribune until 1885. The North Lawrence Courier, founded 1866 by J. S. 
Boughton; name changed same year to the Kansas Valley Courier; in 1867 name again changed 
to the Clarion, and sold to the Tribune. The Kansas Herald, daily and weekly, founded 1883 by 
C. C. Thacher; consolidated 1884 with the Kansas Tribune, under name Herald-Tribune, W. F. 
Chalfant & Co., editors and publishers; ran until 1885, when the name was changed back to the 
Tribune; consolidated 1890 with the Journal, as the Journal-Tribune. Evening Telegram, founded 
1888, and consolidated same year with the Evening Tribune. Lawrence Weekly Journal was dis- 
continued 1909; daily edition of the Journal was burned out Feb., 1911, and consolidated at 
that time with the World. Lawrence Daily Gazette (1st), founded 1884 by Osbun Shannon; ab- 
sorbed in 1893 the Daily Record, founded 1889, H. M. Greene, editor. The Daily Gazette was 
absorbed in 1895 by the Daily World. Lawrence World, daily and weekly, founded 1892 by J. L. 
Brady, editor and publisher; weekly edition discontinued 1909; daily consolidated with Journal 
1911, under the name of Lawrence Daily Journal- World. 

KANSAS EDITOR; Prof. Merle Thorpe, editor and manager; published by the Kansas University 
Department of Journalism, Lawrence. 

Monthly. Feb., 1914 + 2 vols. 
Founded 1914 by Kansas University. 

KANSAS MUNICIPALITIES, municipal; official organ of the League of Kansas Municipalities, C. H. 
Talbot, editor, Lawrence. 

Monthly. Jan., 1915 + 1 vol. 
Founded 1914 by League of Kansas Municipalities. 

MONTHLY WEATHER REPORT of the Department of Meteorology of the University of Kansas, 
meteorological; published by the University of Kansas, Lawrence. 

Monthly. Aug., 1903 + 13 vols. 

UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN, college; edited and published during the school year by the Kansas 
University Publishing Association, Lawrence. 

Daily. Jan. 16, 1912 -f- 8 vols. 

Founded 1895 as the Kansas University Weekly, Wilbur Gardiner, editor; name changed to 
1904 to the Kansan; in 1910 published triweekly; in 1912 changed to a daily and called University 
Daily Kansan. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 181 



UNIVERSITY SCIENCE BULLETIN, scientific; W. J. Bumgartner, managing editor; published by 

Kansas University, Lawrence. 

Occasional. Oct., 1892 + 20 vote. 

Founded Feb., 1892, as the Kansas University Quarterly; name changed 1902 to the Science 
Bulletin. 

BALDWIN Population (1915), 1231; elevation, 1057 feet; established, 1858; named for John 

Baldwin, of Berea, Ohio; telephones, electric lights, municipal water system; is on the Santa 

Fe railway. Baker University located at Baldwin. 
BAKER ORANGE, college; Frederick Vandegrift, editor; published by Baker Orange Company 

Baldwin. 

Weekly. Jan. 8, 1896 -f 20 vols. 

Founded 1895; C. E. Dalton, editor. 

LEDGER, Republican; W. C. Markham, editor and publisher, Baldwin. 
Weekly. May 1, 1885 4- 31 vbls. 

Founded 1883 as the Criterion, L. A. Sheward, editor and publisher; name changed 1885 to 
Baldwin Ledger, J. L. Bristow, editor and publisher. 

EUDORA Population (1915), 624; established, 1857; named for Eudora Fish, daughter of 
Paschal Fish, Shawnee Indian; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

NEWS, Republican; Will Stadler, editor and publisher, Eudora. 

Weekly. Sept. 8, 1887 + 28 vols. 
Founded 1886 by M. R. Cain. 

LECOMPTON Population (1915), 414; elevation, 846 feet; established, 1854; named for Judge 

, Samuel D. Lecompte; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
SUN, independent; George W. Connell, editor and publisher, Lecompton. 

Weekly. Apr. 23, 1891 + 25 vols. 
Founded 1891 by W. R. Smith. 

DISCONTINUED. Vols 

Lawrence Agora (m). Nov., 1895 1896 1 

[See, also, Saline and Shawnee counties.] 

College Review (m). Lawrence and Atchison. Dec., 1885 1893 5 

Colored Radical. [See Leavenworth County Short-lived, vol. 1.] 
Congregational Record (m). Lawrence and Topeka. Jan., 1859 1867. . 8 

Democrat (1st) (d). July 16 Nov. 10, 1888 1 

Democrat (2d) (d). Oct. 25, 19081910 4 

Gazette. Sept. 7, 18821899 16 

[First called Kansas Weekly Gazette.] 

Gazette (1st) (d). 18841885 1 

Gazette (2d) (d). July 2, 18931895 4 

Head Center; Daily Morning Sun. Jan. 14 June 9, 1883 1 

Herald of Freedom. Oct. 21, 18541859 4 

Jefferies Home Monthly. Aug., 1884 July, 1885 1 

Jeffersonian. Oct. 9, 18901899 9 

Jeffersonian Gazette (d). Oct. 8 Nov. 10, 1900 1 

Journal. July 15, 1886-1909 22 

[Called Journal-Tribune during 1890.] 

Kansan. Oct. 29, 1904 1911 7 

Kansas Churchman. [See Shawnee county.] 

Kansas Collegiate. Oct. 26, 18751879 .5 

Kansas Daily Herald. 18831884 2 

Kansas Daily Tribune. June 14, 1855; Nov. 29, 18631890 45 

[July, 1872; 1875; Oct. 1, 1878 May 16, 1879; Oct. 19, 1879 Dec., 
1879, lacking. From Nov., 1883, to July, 1884, paper was called 
Evening News, Morning News, Morning News-Tribune, and 
Morning Tribune; from July, 1884, to May, 1886, called Herald- 
Tribune.] 

Kansas Free State. Jan. 3, 1855 1856 1 

Kansas Liberal (m). July-Sept., 1882. [See Valley Falls, Jefferson county.] 

Kansas Monthly. July, 18781881 4 

Kansas Progress. June 15, 18821883 1 

Kansas Review (m). Nov., 18791884 5 

Kansas State Journal. Feb. 21, 18611868 4 

[18641867 scattering.] 

Kansas Temperance Palladium. 1879 1880 

Kansas University Lawyer (m) [broken file]. Mar. 21, 18951911 15 

Kansas University Weekly. June. 3, 18951903 8 

Kansas Weekly Tribune. Jan. 1, 18631888 22 

[July 31 Sept., 1873; 1875; Jan.-Apr., 1877; 1880, lacking.] 

Kansas Zephyr (m). July, 1884 1887 ' 

North Lawrence Leader. * Aug. 21, 18841885 

Once a Week. Jan. 6, 18831884 2 

Oread (m). Mar., Apr., May and Dec., 1900; Feb., 1901 1 



182 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Lawrence . . 



Baldwin 

Lecompton . 

Prairie City. 
Lawrence . . . 



Baldwin. 



Lawrence . 



DISCONTINUED. Volg 

Jan. 16 July 3, 1891.. 1 

Progressive Herald. Oct. 17, 19131915 .2 

Record (d). Sept. 12, 1889 1893. . . . 8 

Record (w). Nov. 14, 18891893 4 

Reporter (d). Feb. 22 Oct. 13, 1879 1 

Republican. May 28, 1857 1862 6 

Republican Daily Journal. July 1 Dec. 31, 1868; Dec. 5, 1869; Jan. 1 
June 30, Sept. 17 and 18, Nov. 13, 1870; Jan. 5 Dec. 30, 1871; July 
25, 1874; Apr. 21, Aug. 17, 18, 20, 21, 26, Sept. 15, 1875; Mar. 29, 

July 12 and 14, 1876; July 1, 6, 18771911 69 

Select Friend (m). Oct., 1890 1901 10 

Seminary Notes (m). May, 18911893 . . .3 

Shield of Phi Kappa Psi (m). May, 18851887. . . 2 

Sigma Nu Delta (bi-m). Sept., 1886 1895. . '. . 6 

Smith's Small Fruit Farmer (q). Apr., 18911893 . . 3 

Spirit of Kansas. Feb. 3, 18721884 9 

[Broken files, 1874, 1875, 1883 and 1884.] 

Standard. Apr. 7, 18771880 4 

Students' Journal. Oct. 7, 1892 1895 3 

Telegram, Evening. May 25 July 20, 1888 1 

Tribune (s-w); Herald Tribune (w). Jan. 4, 1884 1885 2 

University Courier (m). Oct. 10, 18781879 1 

University Courier (s-m and w). Sept. 6, 18821895 12 

[Called Courier-Review Oct.-Dec., 1894.] 

University Kansan (1st). Sept. 13, 18891890 1 

University Review. June, 1884 1896 11 

University Times. Oct. 5, 18881889 1 

Western Home Journal. Mar. 11, 1869 1885 15 

Western Record. Mar. 17, 18831884 ... 1 

Windmill (s-m). Oct. 9, 1905 1906. . 1 

World (d). Mar. 4, 18921911 '. ... 35 

World. Mar. 11, 18921909 17 

.Baker Beacon. Sept. 18, 1889 1895. . 5 
[Called Beacon-Index, Dec., 1895.] 

Bee. Aug. 13, 18961898 2 

Criterion. Nov. 29, 1883 1885 1 

Index (m) [broken file]. 18811895 15 

Republican. Apr. 5, 1901 1911... . 10 

Visitor. July 11, 18841885 1 

Young America. 1864 1865 1 

. College Echoes (m). Aug., 1888 1891 .. . 2 

College Oracle (q). June, 18921901 9 

Kansas National Democrat, [broken file]. July 30, 18571861 

Kansas New Era. Lecompton and Medina. Aug. 28, 1866 1867.. 

Ledger. Dec. 13, 18891890 

Monitor. June 4, 1885 1886 

Union [broken file]. Aug. 30, 18561857 

.Freeman's Champion. June 25, 1857 1858 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

. Gazette (d). Sept. 2 Oct. 30, 1885. 

Hand Bill (d). Apr. 23, 1883. 

Historic Times. July 11 Nov. 14, 1891. 

Kansas Mirror. Oct. 20, 1881 Jan. 19, 1882. 

Kansas Pacific Homestead. 1876; Feb., 1877; Apr., 1878. 

Kansas Witness. Apr., 1882. 

Mirror (d). Sept. 13-16, 1881. 

Southern Kansan. Sept., 1883; Feb., 1884; Jan. 15, 1886. 

True Citizen. Aug. 13, 1886 Feb. 19, 1887. 
.Advance (m). Jan.-May, 1887. 

University Breeze. Apr. 24 May 29, 1888. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

.Bismark Fair Daily. Sept. 20, 1882. 
College Life (m). Mar.-May, 1890. 
Commercial Educator (m). July, 1885. 

Democratic Standard. Sept. 29, Nov. 17, Dec. 8 and 15, 1870. 
Kansas Benevolent Society Record (q). ' Jan., Apr. and July, 1880. 
Kansas Monthly. Dec., 1878. 
Kansas Pacific Homestead. 1875. 
Kansas State Journal. May 29, 1862. 
Kansas State Journal (2d). Oct. 8 Nov. 12, 1863. 
Kansas Underwriter and Real Estate Journal (m). June, Aug. and Oct., 1! 

June, 1870. 

Observer of Nature. Dec. 13, 1875. 
Our Schools (m). Jan., Feb. and May, 1879. 
Reunion Banner. Sept. 21, 1882. 
Standard of Reform. July 8 and Aug. 26, 187E 
State Sentinel. Sept. 16, Oct. 7, Nov. 18, 1875. 
Tribune, Evening. Mar. 6-13, 1889. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 183 



Baldwin. .Kansas Messenger. Jan. 1, 1859. 

School Times. Feb. 12, 1892 Apr. 5, 189:5. 
Lecompton.. .Union. Nov. 20, 1856; Feb. 21, 1857. 

Union (s-w). Feb. 7, 1857. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 3. 

Lawrence Bismark Messenger. Sept. 3, 1880. 

Business College Journal. July, 1882. 

Commercial Educator (m). July, 1885. 

Evening Standard. Sept. 16, 1879. 

Latin Notes. Feb. 12, 1897. 

Our Schools (m). Jan., Feb. and May, 1879. 

Pet Stock Record (m). Aug., 1899 Jan., 1900. 

Progressive Educator (m). May 1 Dec. 2, 1889. 

Republican (d). Feb. 21, 1868. 

Shorthand and Telegraph Advocate (m). Aug., 1885. 

Suffrage Advocate. July 5 Nov. 1, 1894. 

Vox Populi. Apr. 18, 1873. 

Western Economist (m). Jan. 1 Aug. 1, 1895. 



EDWARDS COUNTY. 

Organized, 1874; named for W. C. Edwards, an early settler; county seat, 
Kinsley; area, 612 square miles, 391,680 acres; popu ation (1915), 6734; 
assessed valuation (1915), $16,262,835; resources and industries agriculture 
and stock raising. 

KINSLEY Population (1915), 1794; elevation, 2171 feet; established, 1873; originally called 

Petersburg, then Peter's City, and later name changed to Kinsley in honor of E. W. Kinsley; 

industries flour mills, elevators, cement and brick plant; has electric lights, telephones, 

municipal water system; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
GRAPHIC, Democratic; J. M. Lewis, editor and publisher, Mrs. Cora G. Lewis, associate editor, 

Kinsley. 

Weekly. May 4, 1878 + 38 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: The Valley Republican, Kinsley, founded 1877 
by C. L. Hubbs; name changed in 1878 to the Kinsley Graphic, with M. M. Lewis, editor, and 
W. R. Davis, proprietor. The Kinsley Republican, founded 1878 by C. L. Hubbs; consolidated 
1882 with the Graphic, under the name of Republican-Graphic. Edwards County Banner, Kinsley, 
founded 1887 by E. F. Koontz and Joe T. Lawless. The Wendell Champion, founded 1885 by 
Joseph T. Lawless; consolidated 1887 with the Banner. The Banner was sold to the Graphic in 
1887 and the name changed to Banner-Graphic, Lon Beard, editor and publisher. Belpn Beacon, 
founded 1888 by E. F. Koontz; consolidated same year with the Banner-Graphic. Banner- 
Graphic changed name to Kinsley Graphic in 1890. 

MERCURY, Republican; C. E. Ho well, editor and publisher, Kinsley. 

Weekly. Aug. 18, 1883 Jan., 1891; July 30, 1896 + 27 vols. 

Founded 1883 by George M. Flick. Daily Mercury founded July 1, 1887, by W. S. Hebron; 
discontinued 1888. 

BELPRE Population (1915), 411; elevation, 2090 feet; established, 1879; telephones; is on the 

Santa Fe railway. 
ARGOSY, local; W. L. Colyer, editor and publisher, Bclpre. 

Weekly. Feb. 22, 1912 + 5 vols. 
Founded 1911 by W. L. Colyer. 
BULLETIN, Republican; Cora M. Busenbark, editor and publisher, Belpre. 

Weekly. Mar. 1, 1906 + 10 vols 
Founded 1905 by Allen Finlayson. 

LEWIS Population (1915), 412; elevation, 2149 feet; established about 1885; industries- 
cement plant, flour mill, elevators, soda pop factory; telephones: is on the Santa Fe railway. 

PRESS, Republican; Earl Fickertt, editor and publisher, Lewis. 

Weekly. Aug. 6, 1914 + 1 vol. 
Founded 1904 by Gallemore & Edmonds. 



184 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



OFFERLE Population (1912), 175; elevation, 2270 feet; established, 1876; named for Lawrence 
Offerle, one of the founders of the settlement; industries mill, elevator; has telephones; 
is on the Santa Fe railway. 
NEWS, Republican; Jay L. Thompson, editor and publisher. 

Weekly. Feb. 10, 1916 + 
Founded 1916. 

DISCONTINUED. Vols ^ 

Kinsley Edwards County Banner. Jan. 21 Sept. 28, 1887 1 

Edwards County Leader [broken file]. Mar. 29, 18771880 3 

Kansas Staats-Zeitung [German]. July 13, 18781879 ... 1 

Mercury (d). 18871888 2 

Reporter. Sept. 21 Dec. 21, 1876. 

[Bound with Edwards County Leader.] 

Republican. June 1, 18781881 4 

Valley Republican. Nov. 3, 18771878 1 

[Bound with Kinsley Graphic, 1878.] 

Lewis Press (1st). Aug. 26, 19041905 1 

Wellsford Register; Democrat; Watchman. [See Kiowa county.] 

Wendell Champion. Oct. 9, 1885 1886 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Kinsley B-B-Blizzard. Jan. 23, 1886. 

Chronicle (m). Apr .-Nov., 1890. 

Country School (m). Dec., 1897 June, 1898. 

Belpre Beacon. June 15 Sept. 28, 1888. 

Offerle Promoter. Oct. 7 Nov. 18, 1910. 



ELK COUNTY. 

Organized, 1870; named for the Elk river, its principal stream; county 
seat, Howard; area, 651 square miles, 416,640 acres; population (1915), 
10,035; assessed valuation (1915), $14,779,251; resources and industries- 
natural gas, oil, agriculture, and building stone. 

HOWARD Population (1915), 1080; elevation, 1112 feet; established, 1870; named for Gen. 

O. O. Howard; is in the natural gas district; has telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
COURANT, Republican; Thomas E. Thompson, editor and publisher, Howard. 
Weekly. Mar. 17, 1875 + 41 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: The Howard County Ledger, founded 1870 at 
Longton, by Adrian Reynolds; moved 1874 to Elk Falls; again moved 1876 to Howard; con- 
solidated 1877 with the Courant under name of Courant-Ledger, Abe Steinberger, editor and 
publisher. Elk City Courant, founded 1874 by Abe Steinberger, at Elk City, Montgomery county; 
moved same year to Longton, Elk county, where it was published for about a year; removed to 
Howard, and consolidated with the Ledger. The Elk County Herald, Howard, founded 1881 by 
Asa, Thomas E. and John A. Thompson; consolidated same year with the Courant. 

ELK COUNTY CITIZEN, Democratic; F. C. Flory, editor and publisher, Howard. 

Weekly. Aug. 5, 1891 + 24 vols. 

A continuation of the following: Grip, Howard, founded 1883 by Abe Steinberger; name 
changed 1884 to Howard Democrat, James Robert Hall, editor and publisher; name again changed 
1891 to the Elk County Citizen. 

ELK FALLS Population (1915), 332; elevation, 930 feet; established, 1870; named for falls 
at this point in the Elk river; in the natural gas district; has telephones; is on the Santa Fe 
railway. 

REFLECTOR, independent; Mrs. Leah Rubottom, editor and publisher, Elk Falls. 

Weekly. May 12, 1911 + 5 vols. 
Founded 1911 by Frank E. Smith. 

GRENOLA Population (1915), 585; elevation, 1116 feet; established, 1879; a composite name 
formed from Greenfield and Canola, two towns consolidated to form Grenola; industries 
coal, building stone, in the gas district, elevator and mill; telephones; is on the Santa Fe 
railway. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 185 



LEADER, independent; Dick Alexander, editor and publisher, (Irenola. 

Weekly. June 11, 1908 + 8 vols. 
Founded 1908 by J. L. Alexander. 

LONGTON Population (1915), 590; elevation, 916 feet; established, 1870; named for Longton, 

England; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
GLEANER, Republican; Lauren Hale, editor and publisher, Longton. 
Weekly. July 29, 1892 + 23 vols. 

This paper is the continuation of the Longton Times, founded 1881 by Flpry Brothers; name 
changed in 1892 to Longton Gleaner, with Ed. T. Chapman, editor and publisher. 

NEWS, Republican; R. B. McCutchan and J. Christiansen, editors and publishers. 

Weekly. Sept. 28, 1898 + 19 vols. 
Founded 1898 by R. B. McCutchan. 

MOLINE Population (1915), 910; established, 1879; named for Moline, 111.; industries lime 
kilns, cement and brick plants, carriage works, feed mill, natural gas and oil district; tele- 
phones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
ADVANCE, independent; U. G. Sutton, editor and publisher, Moline. 

Weekly. Nov. 14, 1912 + 3 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Moline Mercury, founded 1882 by George E. 
Martin and Jasper Carter. Moline Free Press, founded 1883 by W. C. Goodwin; consolidated 
1885 with the Mercury; name changed in 1889 to the Moline Republican, with George C. Arm- 
strong, editor and publisher; name again changed 1899 to Moline Review, with Jinks Smethers, 
editor and publisher; in 1912 consolidated with the Moline Gazette, founded 1910 by Frank S. 
Evans, and name changed to Moline Advance, Sutton & Sherwin, editors and publishers. 

DISCONTINUED. y ote . 

Howard Broad Axe. Mar. 29 Nov. 15, 1888 1 

Bugle Call [See Cowley county.] 

Democrat. Sept. 3, 18841891 6 

Elk County Ledger. Jan. 20, 1876 1877 2 

[Published at Elk Falls, Jan. 20 to Oct. 28, 1876.] 

Grip. Aug. 15, 18831884 1 

Industrial Journal; Howard Journal. July 4, July 24, 18781883 5 

Kansas Rural (2d). Jan. 5 June 15, 1881 1 

Kansas Traveler. Nov. 20, 18861887 1 

Our Church Mirror (m). Howard, Halstead, Madison, Wichita and Olpe 

[broken file]. Nov., 1890 1897 5 

Traveler (d). Mar. 10 June 1, 1887 

Elk Falls Journal. July 23, 19031909 6 

Signal. Mar. 26, 18801882 

Grenola . . . . Argus. July 17, 18801882 ... 2 

Cana Valley Herald. Mar. 24, 18821883 1 

Chief. July 6, 1883 Feb. 14, 1889; July 13, 18891902 18 

[Called Crisis, Oct. 11, 1890, to June 5, 1891.] 

Greeting. Mar. 9, 19001907 8 

Hornet. Grenola and Howard. Nov. 17, 18841885 1 

Longton Leader. Feb. 10 Nov. 3, 1887 1 

Pioneer. Mar. 24, 18801881 

Signal. Feb. 28, 18901892 2 

Times. May 20, 18811892 11 

Moline. . . . . Free Press. Sept. 7, Oct. 19, 18831885 . . 2 

Gazette. July 28, 19101912 ' 

Mercury. Apr. 29 Sept. 29, 1882; Mar. 27, 18851889 5 

News. Apr. 28 Oct. 20, 1880 1 

Republican. Nov. 8, 18891899 10 

[1889 bound with Mercury.] 
Review. July 7, 18991912 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Howard.. . .Annuity (m). Sept., 1896 May, 1897. 

Clipper. Aug. 20 Nov. 26, 1880. 

Searchlight; Kansas Searchlight (occas). Howard, Winfield and Wichita. 
Sept., 1900 June, 1903. 

Grenola Ostrakon (s-m). June 12 Sept. 25, 1900. 

Moline. . . . .Kansas Live Stock Breeder (m). Moline and Grenola. Apr.-Dec., 1896. 



186 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



ELLIS COUNTY. 

Organized, 1867; named for George Ellis, first lieutenant company I, 
Twelfth Kansas infantry; county seat, Hays; area, 900 square miles, 576,000 
acres; population (1915), 13,197; assessed valuation (1915), $19,975,746; re- 
sources and industries buiMing stone, gypsum, salt marshes, wheat, and 
stock raising. 

HAYS Population (1915), 2339; elevation, 1999 feet; established, 1867; named for Fort Hays, 
which was named in honor of Gen. Alexander Hays; industries flour mill, elevators, planing 
mill, machine shops, stone quarries; has electric lights, telephones, waterworks, public library; 
is on the Union Pacific railway. 

ELLIS COUNTY NEWS, Democratic; B. M. Dreiling, editor, News Publishing Company, publisher, 
Hays City. 

Weekly. Nov. 11, 1899 + 18 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Ellis Independent, founded 1897 by Charles 
Morse; name changed to Ellis County News 1899, Miles H. Mulroy, editor and publisher; con- 
solidated 1912 with the Republican, Hays City, founded 1888 by George P. Griffith, and called 
the Ellis County News-Republican; since 1915 called the Ellis County News. 

FREE PRESS, independent; A. L. Clark & Son, editors and publishers, Hays City. 

Weekly. May 22, 1886 -f 30 vols. 

This paper is probably a continuation of the German-American Advocate, of Hays City, 
founded 1882 by Charles Miller; sometime in 1883 or 1884 Harry Freese became editor and pub- 
lisher; in May, 1886, the name of the German-American Advocate was changed to Hays City 
Times. In 1883-'84 another paper called the Advocate, and probably issued from the office of 
the German-American Advocate, was published by Harry Freese; in 1884 it was called the Advo- 
cate and Ellis County Democrat; in 1885 called Ellis County Democrat and Advocate; from 
Jan. to May, 1886, called Ellis County Democrat; from May, 1886, to 1888, called Ellis County 
Free Press and Democrat; since 1888 called the Hays City Free Press. 

NORMAL LEADER, school; Walter Scott, editor in chief, Normal Publishing Association, publisher, 
Hays City. 

Semimonthly. Mar. 18, 1908 + 8 vols. 
Founded 1908, with Ida Solomon, editor in chief. 

ELLIS Population (1915), 1457; elevation, 2119 feet; established, 1873; named for Lt. George 
Ellis, Twelfth Kansas infantry; industries elevators, stone quarries; telephones; is on 
the Union Pacific railway. 

REVIEW-HEADLIGHT, Republican; W. H. Snyder, editor and publisher, Ellis. 

Weekly. Dec. 5, 1890 + 25 vols. 
This is a continuation of the Headlight, founded in 1880 by Charles E. Griffith; sold to the 

Review in 1890. The Review was founded in 1886 by Frank J. Brettle; consolidated with the 

Headlight in 1890 under the name of Review-Headlight, Frank J. Brettle, editor and publisher, 



DISCONTINUED. 



Vols. 



Hays Democratic Times. Jan. 25, 1888 1891 3 

Ellis County Star. Apr. 6, 1876 June, 1877; Apr., 18791882 4 

German-American Advocate. Oct. 4, 1882 Nov., 1884; June, 1885-1886 . 1 

Advocate. Nov. 22, 29, 1884 

Advocate and Ellis County Democrat. Dec 
Ellis County Democrat and Advocate. Jan 
Ellis County Democrat. Jan.-May, 1886 . . 

Republican. Feb. 25, 1888 1912 

Times. May 15, 18861887 



6-27, 1884 

-Dec., 1885 



25 

Sentinel. Jan. 26, 1876 May, 1884; 

May, 1885 May, 1886; May, 18871895 17 

[Called Star and Sentinel, May, 1882, to May, 1887.] 

Ellis Headlight. Mar. 13, 18801890 .11 

Independent. Jan. 9, 18971899 3 

Review. July 30, 18861890 4 

Walker Journal. Oct. 1; 18871888 . , .1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Hays Alliance Pilot. Sept. 18 Nov. 6, 1890. 

Clark's Occasional. Oct.-Dec., 1913. 

Hornet. Nov. 30, 1892 Feb. 8, 1893. 

Railway Advance. June 23, 1868. 

Union. Jan. 25 Feb. 22, 1887. 
Ellis Standard. Sept. 22, Oct. 27, 1877. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 187 



ELLSWORTH COUNTY. 

Organized, 1867; named for Allen Ellsworth, second lieutenant company 
H, Seventh Iowa cavalry; county seat, Ellsworth; area, 720 square miles, 460,- 
800 acres; population (1915), 10,481; assessed valuation (1915), $27,289,386; 
resources and industries agriculture, stock raising, building stone, gypsum, 
salt mines, potter's clay, mineral paint, and natural gas. 

ELLSWORTH Population (1915), 1982; elevation, 1537 feet; established, 1867; named for 

Lt. Allen Ellsworth; industries stone quarries, salt plant, soda pop factory, flour mill; 

has natural gas; municipal electric light and waterworks systems, telephones; is on the 

Missouri Pacific and Union Pacific railways. 

MESSENGER, Democratic; Frank S. Foster, editor and publisher, Ellsworth. 
Weekly. July 9, 1891 + 24 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the Rural West, founded at Little River, Rice county, 1881, 
by Fosnot Brothers; moved to Ellsworth 1882; name changed to Cyclone 1883, and but one 
issue gotten out, when name was changed to Ellsworth News, with Z. Jackson, editor and pro- 
prietor; in 1885 name changed to Ellsworth Democrat, G. A. Collett and F. S. Foster, editors 
and publishers; daily edition founded 1887, issued a few weeks; in 1891 name chsnged to the 
Ellsworth Messenger, with same editors and publishers. 

REPORTER, Republican; George Huycke Publishing Company, editors and publishers, Ellsworth. 

Weekly. Mar. 19, 26, 1874; Feb. 11, 1875 -f- 41 vols. 

Founded in Dec., 1871, by M. C. Davis, of Moulton, Iowa; sold in 1872 to George A. Atwood, 
who later associated with himself John Montgomery; Mr. Atwood sold his interest in the Reporter 
to Col. Inman in 1874, and in 1875 Inman & Montgomery sold the paper to Mr. Kellogg: in 
1880 Kellogg sold to Gebhardt & Huycke, and in 1888 Mr. Huycke assumed full proprietorship, 
which he continued until his death, May 21, 1914; since then the Reporter has been published by 
his sons under the firm name of the George Huycke Publishing Company. 

HOLYROOD Population (1915), 438; elevation, 1804 feet; established, 1887; industries- 
mill, elevators, cigar manufactory; telephones, municipal waterworks and electric light 
systems; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

BANNER, independent; Herman Reents, editor, E. J. Reents & Son, publishers, Holyrood. 

Weekly. Nov. 1, 1900 + 17 vols. 
Founded 1900 by M. G. Woodmansee. 

KANOPOLIS Population (1915), 658; elevation, 1579 feet; established by the railroad as 
Fort Harker station, about 1867-' 68; name changed to Kanopolis 1885; industries cement 
block works, salt mines, mill, elevators; is in the natural gas district; telephones; is en the 
Union Pacific and Missouri Pacific railways. 

JOURNAL, independent; F. C. Griffith, editor and publisher, Kanopolis. 

Weekly. Apr. 4, 1907 + 9 vols. 
Founded in 1907 by K. L. Griffith. 

WILSON Population (1915), 1026; elevation, 1687 feet; established, 1871; formerly called 
Bosland; name changed to Wilson in 1878, in honor of Hiero T. Wilson; industries coal 
mines, stone quarries, mills, elevators; telephones, municipal electric light and waterworks 
systems; is on the Union Pacific railway. 

KANSASKY POKROK [Bohemian], independent; Joe H. Cerny, editor, Wilson; published by Pokrok 
Publishing Company, Omaha, Neb. 

Weekly. May 22, 1912 + 4 vols. 
Early history unknown; first issue in Society's file is vol. 7, No. 43. 

WORLD, Republican; Warren Baker, editor and publisher, Wilson. 

Weekly. Mar. 6, 1913 -f 3 vols. 
This paper is the continuation of the Wilson Index, founded in 1878 by W. M. Risley; name 

changed 1880 to the Wilson Echo, S. A. Coover, editor and publisher; in 1913 the name was again 

changed to Wilson World, W. S. Baxter, editor and publisher. 



188 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Ellsworth . 

Cain 

Holyrood . 

Kanopolis . 
Wilson 

Ellsworth. 
Kanopolis . 



DISCONTINUED. 

. Democrat . Oct. 8, 18851891 . . . 

Herald. Dec. 29, 18881890 

News. Mar. 14, 18831885 

Populist. Aug. 17, 18951899 

Republican (1st). Apr. 30 Sept. 3, 1880. . . 

Republican (2d). May 3, 18901891 

.News (1st). Jan. 12, 1882 1883 .. 

News (2d). Aug. 7, 18841886 

. Enterprise. Mar. 31, 18871890 . . 

Sentinel. Oct. 8, 18911892 

Sun. Aug. 3, 18941895 

.Everyday Religion (m). May, 19001904 

Journal (1st). June 17, 18861890 

Kansan. Feb. 13, 18901893 

. Eagle. June 2, 18881889 . . 

Echo. May 20, 18801913 

Hawkeye. Oct. 5, 18871888 

Index. Oct. 10, 18781879 

Kansaske Rozhledy [Bohemian]. June 13, 19061914 . 

Wonder. Apr. 22, 18861887 



SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

.Evening Democrat (d). Mar. 23 Apr. 23, 1887. 

Land Journal (m). July, 1878. 

Rural West. Nov. 16, 1882 Feb. 28, 1883. 

Times. May 3, 1879 Apr. 22, 1880. 
.American Industrial Review (m). Nov., 1884. 

Weekly Review. Dec. 6-27, 1884. 



Vols. 

. . 7 

. . 1 

. . 2 

. . 4 

. . 1 

.. 1 

. . 1 

. . 2 

. . 3 

. . 1 

. . 1 
5 



FINNEY COUNTY. 

[See, also, Garfield, Gray, Haskell, Kearny, Sequoyah and Scott counties.] 

Organized, 1884; named for Lieutenant Governor David W. Finney; 
county seat, Garden City; area, 1296 square miles, 829,440 acres; population 
(1915), 6019; assessed valuation (1915), $12,898,236; resources and industries 
building stone, gypsum, potter's clay, agriculture, and grazing. 

GARDEN CITY Population (1915), 3016; elevation, 2836 feet; established, 1879; industries- 
beet sugar factory, flour and feed mills, elevators, flouring mill, machine shops, bottling 
works, broom factory, extensive irrigating works; telephones, electric lights, waterworks 
system, public library; is on the Santa Fe and the Garden City, Gulf & Northern railways. 

HERALD, Progressive; S. G. and Hamer Norris, editors and publishers, Garden City. 

Weekly. Mar. 17, 18831884; 1887 + 27 vols. 
Early history unknown. A daily was founded 1886, J. S. Painter, editor; suspended 1888; 

revived in 1889 and suspended again in 1890. 

TELEGRAM, Republican; E. N. Keep, editor and publisher, Garden City. 

Weekly. Feb. 6, 1912 + 4 vols. 

A continuation of the Garden City Imprint, founded 1889 by D. A. Mims and E. N. Keep; 
in 1912 name changed to Garden City Telegram, founded as a daily in 1906, with Paul S. Rankin, 
editor; daily edition discontinued 1912. 



DISCONTINUED. 

Garden City Arkansas Valley Journal. Aug. 23, 19121914 

Cultivator and Herdsman ; Kansas Cultivator (m and w) . 

May-Sept., 1884; May, 18861887 

Finney County Democrat. Feb. 5, 1887 1891 

Garden City Paper. Apr. 3 Oct. 30, 1879 

Herald (d). Apr. 23, 18861890 

[Nov., 1888, to Apr., 1889, not published.] 

Imprint. Apr. 20, 18891912 

Irrigator. June 29, 18821887 

Lookout. Aug. 1, 18911892 

Prolocutor. Jan. 13, 19101911 .... 

[Published at Syracuse, May 21, 1909.J 
Reflector. July 13, 19051907 

[See, also, Conway Springs, Sumner county.] 



Vols. 
.. 3 

.. 1 

. . 4 

1 

. 7 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 189 



DISCONTINUED. v<rfg 

Garden City Reflector (d). Sept. 26, 1906-1907. . . 

Sentinel. July 30, 18841900 .17 

[Called Sentinel and Cultivator, July, 1887, to Aug., 1888.1 

Sentinel (d). Jan. 5, 18861888 . 6 

Telegram, Evening. Dec. 10, 1906 1912. . . 10 

Tribune. Nov. 10, 18921894 3 

Western Times. Jan. 30 Dec. 2, 1885 1 

[Published at Scott City, May 27 to Dec. 2.] 

Eminence Garfield County Call. July 1, 18871893 6 

Essex Sunbeam. June 10 Nov. 25, 1887 1 

Hatfield News. Aug. 18, 18871889 1 

Ingalls Echo. 1886 1887. [See Gray county.] 

Ivanhoe Times. 1886 1887. [See Haskell county.] 

Kalvesta Hodgeman County Herald ; Kal vesta Herald. Hodgeman Center and 

Kalvesta. May 14, 18861888 3 

Lakin Herald. 18831884. [See Kearny county.] 

Pioneer Democrat. 1886 1887. [See Kearny county.] 

Loyal Garfield County Journal. July 1, 18871889 2 

Montezuma Chief. 1886 1887. [See Gray county.] 

Pierceville Courier. May 14, 18861887 1 

Ravanna Chieftain. Apr. 22, 18861894 10 

Enquirer. Dec. 9, 1887 1888 1 

Kansas Sod House; Ravanna Leader. May 6, 1886 1887 1 

Record. July 15, 18871889 2 

Santa Fe Trail. 18861887. [See Haskell county.] 

Terry Enterprise. July 9, 1886 1887 1 

Eye. Feb. 17, 18871889 3 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Garden City Bundle of Sticks (m). Feb. 15 Sept. 15, 1885. 

Irrigation Champion (m). Sept. 1, 1894 Feb. 15, 1895. 

Optic. Nov. 13, 1880. 

Taxpayer. Mar. 7 Apr. 25, 1891. 
Loco Motive. Dec. 16, 1886 Mar. 17, 1887. 



FOOTE COUNTY. 

Absorbed, March 2, 1881, by Gray county which see. 

Cimarron. . . . .New West; Optic. 1879 1881. 

Signet. 18801881. 



FORD COUNTY. 

Organized, 1873; named in honor of Col. James H Ford, Second Colorado 
cavalry; county seat, Dodge City; area, 1080 square miles, 691,200 acres; 
population (1915), 13,152; assessed valuation (1915), $23,707,729; resources 
and industries gypsum, building stone, agriculture, and stock raising. 

DODGE CITY Population (1915), 4101; elevation, 2504 feet; established, 1872; takes its 
name from Fort Dodge, which was named in honor of Col. Henry Dodge; industries flour 
mills, elevators, alfalfa mill; has electric lights, telephones, public library, municipal water- 
works; is on the Santa Fe and Rock Island railways. 

GLOBE, Republican; W. E. Davis, president, J. C. Denious, editor and manager, Dodge City. 
Weekly. Jan. 1, 1878 + 37 vols. 
Daily. Mar. 7, 1912 + 8 vols. 

Founded 1878 as the Ford County Globe, by D. M. Frost and W. N. Murphy; in 1884 name 
changed to the Globe Live Stock Journal, D. M. Frost, editor and publisher; in 1889 consolidated 
with the Ford County Republican, founded 1886 by Rush E. Deardorff and M. W. Sutton; name 
changed to Globe-Republican in 1889; name again changed in 1910 to the Globe. Daily edition 
founded 1911 by W. E. Davis and J. C. Denious. 



190 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



JOURNAL, Democratic; C. T. Warren, editor and publisher, Dodge City. 

Weekly. Jan. 1, 1909 + 7 vols. 

Founded 1884, with W. F. Petillon, manager; in 1905 name changed to Journal-Democrat, 
R. E. Woods, editor; in 1909 name again changed to Dodge City Kansas Journal. 

BLOOM Population (1915), 25; elevation, 2590 feet; established, 1887; telephones; is on 

Rock Island railway. 

BOOSTER, local; Glen C. Cramer, editor and publisher, Bloom. 
Weekly. Mar. 15, 1916 + 

Founded in 1916; first issue in Society's file is vol. 1, No. 5. 

BUCKLIN Population (1915), 778; elevation, 2418 feet; established about 1885; first known 
as Corbitt; name changed to Bucklin in 1887; named for the township in which it is located; 
industries flour mill, elevators; electric lights, telephones; is on the Rock Island railway. 

BANNER, independent; J. B. Miller, editor and publisher, Bucklin. 

Weekly. May 31, 1901 + 15 vols. 
Early history unknown; first issue in Society's file is vol. 7, No. 31, and shows J. B. Milford, 

editor and proprietor. 

FORD Population (1915), 270; elevation, 2413 feet; established about 1885; named for Ford 
county; industries flour mills, elevators; telephones; is on the Rock Island railway. 

PROMOTER, independent; Ray B. Price, editor and publisher, Ford. 

Weekly. Mar. 24, 1910 + 6 vols. 
Founded 1909 by Ray B. Price. 

KINGSDOWN Population (1915, estimated), 100; elevation, 2518 feet; telephones: is on the 

Rock Island railway. 

CLARION, independent; Velma S. Haley, editor and publisher, Kingsdown. 
Weekly. Jan. 16, 1913 + 2 vols. 

Founded 1912 by Ruth Francis Matthews. 

SPEARVILLE Population (1915), 719; elevation, 2478 feet; established, 1878; named for 
Alden Speare, of Boston; industries flour mills, elevators; electric lights, telephones; is on 
the Santa Fe railway. 

NHWS, Republican; R. E. Wood, editor and publisher, Spearville. 

Weekly. Apr. 7, 1899 + 17 vols. 
Founded 1899 by George M. Kerr. 

DISCONTINUED. Voh 

Dodge City Advance. May 24, 19001901 1 

Democrat; Journal-Democrat. Dec. 29, 1883 May, 1889; 

Dec., 18891908 5 

Ford County Leader. Aug. 17, 1894 1899 5 

Ford County Republican. Jan. 19, 18871889 3 

Kansas Cowboy. June 28, 1884 1885 1 

Reporter. Apr. 7, 18991901 2 

Sun. Apr. 22, 18861887 1 

Times. Oct. 14, 1876 Dec. 25, 1891; Sept. 16, 18921893 16 

Times-Ensign, Dodge City and Bellefont. Jan. 15, 1892 1893 1 

Western Kansas Live Stock Journal; Live Stock Farmer (m). 

Dec. 15, 18991904 3 

World Brotherhood. Dodge City and Bellefont. Dec. 20, 1907 1911.. . 4 

Bellefont Western Kansas Ensign. Feb. 22, 18891891 3 

Bloom Telegram. Apr. 5, 18881889 2 

Bucklin Herald. Nov. 4, 18871888 1 

Journal. Dec. 15, 18881890 2 

Standard. Newkirk, Colcord and Bucklin. Mar. 31, 1887 1888 1 

Times-Ensign. Sept. 15, 18921893 1 

Cimarron... .. Herald ; Kansas Sod House. 18851886. [See Gray county.] 

New West. 18851887. [See Gray county.] 

Ford Gazette. June 4, 18861890 '. 

Ryansville Boomer. Dec. 18, 1885 1888. 2 

Spearville . . . . Blade. Jan. 31, 18851892 

[Aug., 1890 Feb., 1892, lacking.] 

Enterprise News (1st). May 18, 1878 1880 

Ford County Democrat. Spearville and Fonda. Apr. 8, 1886 1888. . . . 

Wilburn ... . . Argun. Apr. 16, 18861887 ; 2 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 191 



SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Dodge City Ford County Democrat. July 17 Aug. 28, 1888. 

Our Methodst. May, 1888 May, 1889. 

Bucklin Bulletin. July 7 Sept. 8, 1892. 

Fonda Herald. Aug. 25, 1886. 

Spearville Echo. Mar. 24 Apr. 28, 1881. 

Ford County Record. Sept. 29, 1885 Feb. 16, 1886. 

Prairie Home. May 15 June 14, 1879. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Dodge City College Advance (m). Nov., 1894 Aug., 1897. 

College Advocate (m). June 20, 1889 Mar., 1890. 

Champion. July 1 Sept. 30, 1887. 

Clarion (d). Apr. 26 June 14, 1909. 

Echo. Jan. 19 Apr. 29, 1893. 

Messenger. Feb. 26 and June 25, 1874. 
Bucklin New Era. Apr. 2 July 2, 1903. 



FRANKLIN COUNTY. 

Organized, 1857; named for Benjamin Franklin; county seat, Ottawa; 
area, 576 square miles, 368,640 acres; population (1915), 22,103; assessed 
valuation (1915), $35,044,711; resources and industries agriculture, stock 
raising, building stone, coal, oil, and gas. 

OTTAWA Population (1915), 9127; elevation, 975 feet; established, 1864; named for Ottawa 
Indian tribe; industries flour mills, planing mill, brick and tile works, condensed milk fac- 
tory, broom factory, nursery, machine shops; telephones, electric lights, waterworks, paved 
streets, public library; is in the natural gas and oil district; is on the Santa Fe and the Mis- 
souri Pacific railways. 
CAMPUS, college; editied and published by the students of Ottawa University, Ottawa. 

Monthly. Dec. 22, 1884 + 31 vols. 
Founded 1884, T. Frank Hamblin, editor in chief. 
CHAUTAUQUA ASSEMBLY HERALD. 

Monthly and Quarterly. Sept., 1891 June, 1912. 
Broken file, issues reaching this Society very irregularly. 
GUARDIAN, independent; Vincent C. Robb, editor and publisher, Ottawa. 

Weekly. Feb. 23, 1901 -f 15 vols. 
Founded 1901 by Vincent C. Robb. 
HERALD, Republican; R. A. Harris, editor and publisher, Ottawa. 

Daily [evening]. Dec. 22, 1896 + 65 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: The Ottawa Herald (1st), founed 1869 by 
Anderson & Tone, of Xenia, Ohio; in 1872 name changed to the Kansas Liberal, edited by 
John Y. Hewitt. Democratic Leader, founded 1871 by John Bain; consolidated 1872 with the 
Kansas Liberal; the Liberal purchased in 1873 by A. T. Sharpe and name changed to Ottawa 
Republican; the subscription list of the Ottawa Week'ly Times (1st), founded in 1874 by Solon 
and Wilbur Paul, was absorbed by the Republican in 1875. Lane Leader, founded 1890 by Dur- 
sley Sargent; moved to Ottawa 1893; consolidated same year with the Ottawa Times (2d), founded 
1893 by L. L. Porter, under name of Times Leader; Times Leader discontinued 1895; resumed 
publication in 1896 as the Ottawa Triweekly Times and Bulletin, George D. and L. E. Rathbun. 
editors and publishers; in 1898 consolidated with the Ottawa Republican; early history of the 
Bulletin not known, issues on file in this Society being for year 1894 only. Ottawa Daily Repub- 
lican was founded about 1879; name changed in 1901 to the Republic. The Ottawa Herald (2d) 
was started in 1882 as the Queen City Herald; in 1883 Messrs. Kessler & McAllister were pub- 
lishers, and in 1886 Kessler & Sumner; in 1889 name changed to Ottawa Herald, with J. B. Krss- 
ler, editor and publisher. The Daily Herald was founded in 1896 by Joseph L. Bristow, editor 
and publisher; consolidated 1915 with the Republic. 

LANE Population (1915), 323; established, 1855; first known as Shermanville; in 1863 the 
name was changed to Lane in honor of Gen. James H. Lane; telephones; Is on the Missouri 
Pacific railway. 

JOURNAL, independent; W. H. McCurdy, editor and publisher, Lane. 

Weekly. Nov. 7, 1913 + 2 vols. 
Founded 1913 by W. H. McCurdy. 



192 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



POMONA Population (1915), 467; elevation, 923 feet; established about 1869; named for 
Pomona, the goddess of fruit trees; industries flour and feed mills, extract factory; has 
telephones; is on the Santa Fe and Missouri Pacific railways. 

REPUBLICAN, Republican; G. R. O'Brien, editor and publisher, Pomona. 

Weekly. Dec. 23, 1897 + 18 vols. 
A continuation of Pomona Republican (1st), founded 1889 by H. B. Hoyt; discontinued 1890; 

Pomona Republican (2d), founded 1897 by A. S. Benton. 

RICHMOND Population (1915), 350; elevation, 1019 feet; established, 1870; industries- 
broom factory; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

ENTERPRISE, Republican; J. R. McNabb, editor and publisher, Richmond. 

Weekly. June 25, 1914 + 2 vols. 
Founded 1913 by J. R. McNabb. 

WELLSVILLE Population (1915), 735; elevation, 1043 feet; established, 1870; named for D. L. 

Wells; in natural gas and oil district; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
GLOBE, independent; Asa F. Converse, editor and publisher, Wells ville. 
Weekly. Sept. 11, 1890 + 25 vols. 

Founded 1890 by F. S. and E. L. Rice. This plant was formerly the Melvern Record. 

WILLIAMSBURG Population (1915), 390; elevation, 1144 feet; established in June, 1868; 
industries coal mines, fire and potter's clay, building stone, cement culvert pipe mold works; 
telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
STAR, Democratic; R. K. Trivett, editor and publisher, Wilhamsburg. 

Weekly. Apr. 14, 1894 + 22 vols. 
Founded 1893 by Ada Cowan. 

DISCONTINUED. Fo j s 

Ottawa . .Baptist (m). Jan., 18911893 .2 

Bee (d and w). Nov. 7, 18871888 1 

Bulletin; Triweekly Times. Feb. 21 Nov. 7, 1895 1 

Fireside, Factory and Farm. May 1, 1886 1888 

Free Thought Ideal (m). Feb. 15, 1898 1900 3 

Gazette. July 12 Dec. 20, 1879 1 

Herald. Mar. 7, 18891915 26 



High School Opinion (m). Feb., 18951898 

Irrigation Farmer (m). Oct., 1895 1896 

Jefferies' Western Monthly. 18841885 

Journal, Evening. Oct. 28, 1915 Apr. 3, 1916 

Kansas Home News. Nov. 21, 18791880 

Kansas Lever. Apr. 2, 18871895. 



4 
1 
1 

1 
1 

Leader. May 13, 1880 1883 

[Feb., 1881, to Aug., 1882, not published.] 

Local News. Apr. 9, 12, 18861888 . .' , 5 

Queen City Herald. Aug. 19, 18861889 2 

Railroad Employees' Companion. Ottawa, Topeka, Chanute and Well- 
ington. Dec. 24, 18881890 2 

Republican; Republican and Weekly Times; Weekly Republic. 

Oct. 15, 1873; Jan. 15, 1874; 18751906 32 

Republican; Republic (d). Sept. 29, 18791914 93 

Select Knight (m). Jan., 19011902 2 

Times. Jan. 11, 18961898 3 

Tribune. Aug. 30, 18891893 3 

Tribune (d) [broken file]. July 13, 18891892 10 

Triumph. Dec. 17, 18751877 2 

True Sabbath and Toilers Friend. Lebo and Ottawa. Sept., 1897 1900 . . 1 
Western Home Journal; Ottawa Journal; Journal and Triumph; Ottawa 
Journal; Independent-Journal. Dec. 7, 1865 Dec, 31, 1868; Dec. 

30, 1869 Oct., 1871; Oct., 1872 Mar., 1873; Sept., 18731906. . . 36 
[July, 1897, to Mar., 1898, not published.] 

Lane . .Advance. July 1, 18811882 1 

Commercial Bulletin. Feb. 3, 18861888 3 

Graphic. Jan. 18, 1895 Dec. 7, 1900 6 

Leader. July 3, 1890-1893 3 

New Leaf. May 2, 19021903 1 

Star. Mar. 15, 18891890 1 

Le Loup ... Our Sunflower. 1898. [See Crawford county.] 

Our Messenger (m). Oct., 1899 1903 4 

[See, also, Osborne and Reno counties.] 

Minneola Journal. Mar. 19 Sept. 3, 1864 1 

Pomona. . , . .Enterprise. June 5, 18841902 , 17 

[Apr., 1886, to Sept., 1887, not published.] 

" ican (1st). Oct. 31, 18891890 1 



Republics 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 193 



DISCONTINUED. 

Princeton Progress. May 15, 18851888 3 

Rantoul Citizen. Nov. 21, 18961898 2 

Richmond Recorder. May 15, 18851888 . . . 

Star. Feb. 2, 19011902 1 

Wellsville ... . Exchange. Apr. 28, 18871889 

Headlight (m). Sept., 18951896. [See Johnson county.] 

News. Apr. 20, 1882 1886 . 3 

[Called Transcript Oct., 1882, to Mar., 1884.J 

Transcript. Oct. 26, 18821884 1 

WilliamshurK Eagle. Feb. 27, 18851889 .4 

Enterprise. June 22, 18891893 4 

Gazette. Apr. 23, 18801883 

Republican. Nov. 19, 18981901 3 

Review. June 7 Oct. 2, 1879 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Ottawa. . . . .Free Leader (m). Sept., 1883 Oct., 1884. 

Mission Banner. May 29, 1891. 

State Press. Oct. 26, 1878 Mar. 15, 1879. 

Sunday Bee. Jan. 8 Feb. 5, 1888. 

Agricola American. Dec. 24, 1885 Jan. 1, 1886. 

Homewood Herald. Dec. 18, 1885 Jan. 1, 1886. 

Lane Leader (1st). Sept. 26, 1885 Jan. 9, 1886. 

Ransomville Register. Dec. 24, 1885. 

Wellsville Shield of Reciprocity (m). Mar.-June, 1891. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Ottawa . . .Broad Axe (s-w). Feb. 3 Mar. 23, 1898. 

Bulletin. Aug., 1869 Aug., 1870. 
Commercial Bulletin. Feb. 3, 1894. 
Costigan's Weekly. Aug. 31 Nov. 2, 1898. 
Dart (m). Sept.-Dec., 1896. 
Eagle (d). Oct. 5 Nov. b, 1896. 
Educational Aid (m). Oct.-Nov., 1892; Jan., 1893. 
Franklin County Press. Mar. 5-26, 1903. 
Franklin County Record. Aug. 11-25, 1899. 
Free Thought Vindicator. Aug., 1895. 
Kansas Baptist Union (m). Jan.- June, 1896. 
Kansas Common School Record. Nov., 1890. 
Kansas Record (m). Jan. -May, 1900. 

Mustard Seed. Springfield, Mo., and Ottawa. May, 1888 May, 1889. 
Republican (d), Conference edition. Mar. 8-14, 1892. 
Times. Aug. 25 Oct. 13, 1893. 
Times-Leader. Oct. 20 Nov. 3, 1893. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 3. 

Lane. . . . .Landmark. Aug. 25 Sept. 22, 1904. 

Light. Aug. 31 Nov. 30, 1894. 

Searchlight. Mar. 1 May 24, 1901. 

Richmond Reporter. July 6 Sept. 28, 1893. 

Williamsburg Franklin County Star. Dec. 1, 1893 Mar. 29, 1894. 

Sunflower. Oct. and Nov., 1894. 



GARFIELD COUNTY. 

This county was created in 1887 out of six townships from the northeast 
corner of Finney county and six from the northwest corner of Hodgeman. 
The county was organized the same year, and in 1892 the state instituted 
quo warranto proceedings against it to test the validity of its organization. 
The supreme court decided that it was illegally organized, having less than 
432 square miles of territory; therefore, it was annexed to Finney county 
by the legislature of 1893. 

Eminence Garfield County Call. 1887 1893. [See Finney county.] 

Essex Sunbeam. 1887. [See Finney county.] 

Kalvesta Herald. 1887 1888. [See Hodgeman county.] 

Loyal Garfield County Journal. 18871889. [See Finney county.] 

13 



194 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Ravanna Chieftain. 1887 1893. [See Hodgeman county.] 

Enquirer. 1887 1888. [See Finney county.] 

Kansas Sod House. 18861887. [See 1 inney county.] 

Record. 1887 1889. [See Finney county.] 



GEARY COUNTY. 

Organized, 1855, as Davis county; named for Jefferson Davis; name 
changed February 28, 1889, to Geary county, in honor of John White Geary, 
thir.d territorial governor of Kansas; county seat, Junction City; area, 407 
square miles, 260,480 acres; population (1915), 10,063; assessed valuation 
(1915), $17,354,535; resources and industries building stone, agriculture, 
stock raising, fire clay, and cement rock. 

JUNCTION CITY Population (1915), 5798; elevation, 1079 feet; established, 1858; named on 
account of its location at the junction of the Smoky Hill and Republican rivers; industries 
foundries, machine shops, flour mills, elevators, cement works, sheet metal works; electric 
lights, telephones, paved streets, municipal waterworks, public library; electric street railway 
to Fort Riley, largest military post in the United States; is on the M. K. & T. and Union 
Pacific railways. 

REPUBLIC, Republican; Charles H. Manley, editor and publisher, Junction City. 

Weekly. Jan. 24, 1902 + 14 vols. 
A continuation of the Junction City Tribune, founded 1873 by Henry Farey and Theodore 

Alvord ; name changed 1902 to the Republic. 

SENTINEL, Democratic; Fred R. Hemenway, editor and publisher, Junction City. 

Weekly. Mar. 16, 1889 + 27 vols. 

Founded 1889 by R. J. Coffey ; in 1890 name changed to Democratic Sentinel by A. W. Chabin ; 
in 1892 name changed to Sentinel-Critic; same year name changed back to Sentinel. Daily Sentinel 
(1st), founded 1894 by A. W. Chabin; discontinued in 1895. Daily Sentinel (2d), founded 1907 by 
A. D. Colby and H. M. Bunce; discontinued in 1909. 

UNION, Republican; H. E. Montgomery, editor, John Montgomery & Son, publishers, Junction 
City. 

Weekly. Sept. 12, 1861 + 45 vols. 

[Nov., 1864, to Apr., 1865, not published. May, 1868, to May, 1869, and Apr., 1879, 

to Apr., 1880, lacking.] 
Daily. Sept. 4, 1897 -j- 42 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the Smoky Hill and Republican Union, founded 1861 by Ges. 
W. Kingsbury; Geo. W. Martin entered the employ of Mr. Kingsbury in 1861 and continued 
with the paper until he became its owner; in 1864 the name was changed to the Courier, with Dun- 
lap & Russell, editors and proprietors, who issued but two numbers; in 1865 it was revived by 
Geo. W. Martin under the name of Junction City Union. The Daily Union (1st) was founded in 
1866; discontinued in 1867. Daily Union (2d), founded 1887; discontinued same year. Daily Union 
(3d), founded 1896 by Montgomery, Gilbert & Moore. 

DISCONTINUED. Vols 

Junction City. Blue and White (m). Nov., 1910 1912 1 

Davis County Republican; Junction City Republican. 

Sept. 22, 18821901 18 

Guidon. Fort Riley. Feb. 25, 1900 1912 13 

Kansas Wheelman's Library (m). Jan., 1891 1892 2 

Methodist (m). June, 1906 May, 1907 1 

Mid-Continental Review (m). Jan., 1890 1891 3 

Sentinel (1st). Dec. 3, 18941895 

Sentinel (2d). Oct. 28, 19071909 5 

Soldier's Letter. Fort Riley. 18641865 1 

Tribune. Aug. 14, 18731902 28 

Union (d), (2d). Mar. 22 Oct. 10, 1887 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Junction City Daisy (d). Mar. 25 Apr. 1, 1901. 

Kansas Frontier. May 25, June 15, 1861. 

Kansas Statesman. June 30, 1860. 

Milford Times. Nov. 3-25, 1892. 

Play Goer (occasional). Oct. 8, 1901 Jan. 25, 1902. 

Statesman. Oct. 13, 1860. 

Youth's Casket (m). Oct., 1878. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 195 



GOVE COUNTY. 

Organized, September 2, 1886; named for Capt. Grenville L. Gove, com- 
pany G, Eleventh Kansas cavalry; county seat, Gove City; area, 1080 
square miles, 691,200 acres; population (1915), 4010; assessed valuation 
(1915), $8,622,862; resources and ndustries gypsum, building stone, min- 
eral paint, agriculture, and stock raising. 

(JOVE CITY Population (1915), 134; established, 1885; named for Capt. Grenville L. Gove; 

industries stone quarries: telephones; the nearest railroad station is Grainfield, eleven miles 

north. 
GOVE COUNTY REPUBLICAN-GAZETTE, Republican: A. K. Trimmer, editor and publisher, Gove 

City. 

Weekly. June 11, 1896 -f 19 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: The Gazette, Gove City, founded 1886 by 
Ralph L. Criswell. The Gove County Graphic, Gove City, founded 1887 by Ralph L. Crisw-li. 
editor and publisher; name changed 1888 to Gove County Republican, J. E. Hart and W. J. 
Lloyd, editors and publishers; sold 1890 to the Gove County Gazette, and continued under the 
name of Gove County Gazette and Republican, E. J. Killean and D. V. Smith, editors and pub- 
lishers: in 1890 purchased by Jones Bros. (O. B. and J. F.), who in 1892 changed the name back 
to the Gove County Gazette. Gove County Echo, founded 1891 by J. L. Cook: consolidated 
1894 with the Gove County Gazette, as the Gove County Gazette-Echo. Quinter Republican, 
founded 1889 by A. K. Trimmer and G. A. Spaulding; moved to Gove City in April, 1896, and 
continued as the Quinter Republican until June 11, 1896, when the name was changed to Gove 
County Republican; consolidated with Gove County Gazette with the issue of Oct. 22, 1896, and 
name changed to the Gove County Republican-Gazette and Quinter Republican: the name of 
Quinter Republican was dropped later. 

GRAINFIELD Population (1915), 193; elevation, 2813 feet; established, 1879; telephones; 

is on the Union Pacific railway. 

CAP SHEAF, independent; C. T. Coggins, editor and publisher, J. R. Young, proprietor, Grainfield. 
Weekly. Oct. 14, 1910 + 5 vols. 

The Cap Sheaf is the second paper of its name at Grainfield, and was founded 1910 by George 
K. Troutwine. Cap Sheaf (1st) was founded in 1885 by E. P. Worcester. 

QUINTER Population (1915), 450; elevation, 2664 feet; established, 1885; formerly called 
Familton; industries -broom factory, cement block factory; telephones; is on the Union 
Pacific railway. 
GOVE COUNTY ADVOCATE, independent; Lisle McElhinney, editor and publisher, Quinter. 

Weekly. June 25, 1904 -f 11 vols. 

Founded 1894 as the Short Grass Advocate, at Gove City, by W. H. Tuttle; moved to Grain- 
Held in 1905, then called the Grainfield Advocate; name again changed in 1908 to Gove County 
Advocate; moved to Quinter in 1908. 

DISCONTINUED. Vols 

<; ve Advocate. Dec. 31, 1897 1901 4 

Gazette; Gove County Gazette and Echo. Apr. 9, 1886 1896 11 

Gove County Echo. Mar. 20, 1891 1894 4 

Gove County Graphic. July 22, 1887 1888 1 

Gove County Leader. Nov. 23, 18941901 6 

Gove County Republican. Nov. 30, 1888 1890. . . 

Buffalo Park Express. June 3, 18801881 1 

Pioneer. Apr. 16, 18851887 

Grainfield Cap Sheaf. July 17, 1885 1894 9 

Golden Belt Advance. June 21 Sept. 10, 1881 1 

Republican. Jan. 28 July 30, 1880 

<irinnell . ... Golden Belt. July 18, 1885 Apr., 1888; Mar., 18891890 4 

Gove County Record. Apr. 20, 1906 Sept. 8, 1913 

Jerome Smoky Globe. Apr. 16, 18871888 1 

Quinter.. ..Republican. Apr. 11, 1889 1896 8 

Settlers' Guide. July 15, 18861889 



196 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



GRAHAM COUNTY. 

Organized, 1880; named for Capt. John L. Graham, company D, Eighth 
Kansas infantry; county seat, Hill City; area, 900 square miles, 576,000 acres; 
population (1915), 7466; assessed valuation (1915), $11,638,752; resources 
and industries building stone, gypsum, agriculture, and stock raising. 

HILL CITY Population (1915), 647; elevation, 2134 feet; established, 1876; named for W. R. 

Hill, its founder; industries cement block factory, foundry, mill, elevators; telephones; is 

on the Union Pacific railway. 

REPUBLICAN, Republican; W. H. Hill and C. H. Emmons, editors and publishers, Hill City. 
Weekly. July 9, 1890 + 25 vols. 

Founded 1890; W. H. Hill, editor, and W. R. Hill, publisher. 
THE REVEILLE-NEW ERA, local; A. C. and C. A. G. Inlow, editors and publishers, C. A. G. Inlow 

business manager, Hill City. 

Weekly. Mar. 16, 1911 + 5 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of. the following: Hill City Reveille, founded 1884 by W. R. 
Hill. Hill City Democrat, founded 1887 by J. F. Stewart; consolidated 1890 with the Reveille, 
Freemont Press, founded 1888 by Bright & Stout; absorbed 1889 by the Reveille. Hill City Sun, 
founded 1887 by T. H. McGill; absorbed 1889 by the Reveille. People's Advocate, founded 1890 
by L. C. Chase; suspended publication from Mar. to Oct., 1891, when it again resumed in 1894, 
published by Inlow & Emmons; consolidated with Hill City Reveille 1895, and called the People's 
Reveille. Hill City News, founded 1894 by R. V. and W. W. Wilcox; absorbed by the Reveille, 
in 1895. Graham County Recorder, founded 1901; absorbed by Reveille in 1905. The New 
Era, founded 1906 by H. D. Clayton: consolidated 1911 with the Reveille, under the name Reveille- 
New Era. 

DISCONTINUED. Fofs 

Hill City . . . . Democrat (1st). July 21, 18871890 .3 

Democrat (2d). Oct. 19, 18941895 . 1 

Graham County Recorder. Apr. 12, 1901 1905 4 

Graham County Times. Apr. 25, 1889 1891 

[See, also, Millbrook Times.] 

Graham Gem. Aug. 6-27, 1897; Dec. 24, 18971901 3 

Lively Times. June 16 July 28, 1881 

Graham Republican. Millbrook. Aug. 6, 1881 Jan. 7, 1882. . . 

New Era. Mar. 1, 19061911 5 

Peoples' Advocate. Aug. 14, 1890 Mar., 1891; Oct., 18911895. . . 3 

Reveille; Peoples' Reveille. Aug. 8, 18841911 24 

Star. Aug. 2, 18881889 1 

Sun. Sept. 20, 18881889 1 

Bogue Signal. Nov. 29, 18881890 2 

Fremont . . Eagle. May 29, 1889 1890 1 

Press. Mar. 6, 18881889 1 

Star. June 7, 18861888 , . 2 

Gettysburg Graham County Lever. Aug. 2, 1879 1880 1 

Times. Gettysburg and Penokee. May 23, 1889 1890 1 

Millbrook . . Graham County Democrat. Oct. 22, 1885 1888 . . .3 

Herald (1st). May 19, 18821883 1 

Herald (2d). Sept. 2, 18851888 3 

Times. July 11, 18791889 10 

Morland ... . Advance. Jan. 28, 19041907 3 

Progress. Sept. 26, 19071908 1 

Standard. Jan. 21 Mar. 18, 1910 1 

Nicodemus Western Cyclone. May 13, 18861888 2 

Roscoe Tribune. June 23, 18801881 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Hill City News. Oct. 2, 1894 Jan. 10, 1895. 

Western Star. Dec. 25, 1879 June 10, 1880. 

Millbrook American Desert (m). Apr. -June, 1887. 

Morland Independent [scattering issues]. Mar. 21, 1901 Feb. 6, 1902. 

Nicodemus Enterprise. Aug. 17 Dec. 23, 1887. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 197 



GRANT COUNTY. 

Organized, 1888; named for President Ulysses S. Grant; county seat, 
New Ulysses; area, 576 square miles, 368,640 acres; population (1915), 900; 
assessed valuation (1915), $2,193,999; resources and industries agriculture 
and stock raising. 

NEW ULYSSES Population (1915), 116; elevation, 2960 feet; established about 1885; formerly 
Ulysses; named in honor of U.;S. Grant; town moved to present location in 1909; railway 
station is situated on the Santa Fe railway. 
GRANT COUNTY REPUBLICAN, Republican; S. A. Davis, editor and publisher. New Ulysses. 

Weekly. Apr. 30, 1892 + 24 vols. 
Founded 1892 by A. T. Evans. 

DISCONTINUED. Vo ^ 

Ulysses Grant County Register. July 21, 1S85 1890 5 

Tribune; Tribune-Commercial; Grant County Register. 

Mar. 19, 18871892 

Cincinnati Commercial. Cincinnati and Appomattox. Apr. 7, 1887 1888 1 

[See, also, Ulyssos Tribune.] 

Standard. Cincinnati and Appomattox. Dec. 21, 1887 1888 1 

Golden Gazette. Feb. 16, 18871889 3 

Shockeyville Eagle. Mar. 16, 18861887 2 

Plainsman. Shockeyville and Ulysses. Jan. 4, 1889 1890 2 

Surprise Post. June 3, 18861887 1 

Zkmville Sentinel. June 30, 18871888 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Ulysses Register (d). Aug. 1-15, 1888. 

Conductor Punch. Nov. 25, 1887 Feb. 3, 1888. 

Lawson Leader. Oct. 28, 1887 Jan. 20, 1888. 

Shockeyvilie Independent. Dec. 7, 1887 Jan. 18, 1888. 



GRAY COUNTY. 

Organized July 20, 1887; named for Alfred Gray, secretary of the Kansas 
State Board of Agriculture; county seat, Cimarron; area, 864 square miles, 
552,960 acres; population (1915), 3674; assessed valuation (1915), $9,187,799; 
resources and industries agriculture and stock raising. 

CIMARRON Population (1915), 559; elevation, 2625 feet; established, Apr., 1878; waterworks 

system, telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

JACKSONIAN, Progressive; Elmer T. Peterson, editor and publisher, Cimarron. 
Weekly. Apr. 2, 1886 + 30 vols. 

A continuation of the following: Cimarron Herald, founded July 16, 1885, by John R. Curry: 
Oct. 29, same year, name changed to Kansas Sod House, James T. Ferris, editor and publisher; 
Feb. 25, 1886, A. F. Enos became a partner of Mr. Ferris in the publication of the Sod House, 
and on Apr. 2, following, they sold their interest, good will and subscription list to Messrs. J. B. 
Fugate and M. Schiffgen, of Newton, and removed their office to Ravanna, Garfield county, con- 
tinuing there the publication of the Sod House until 1887. Messrs. Fugate and Schiffgen began 
the publication of the Jacksonian at Cimarron, dating their first issue vol. 2, No. 1, Apr. 2, 1886, 
M. Schiffgen, editor and manager. Gray County Sentinel, Cimarron, founded by E. S. Garten; 
early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being vol. 16, No. 24, Jan. 5, 1901; sold to the 
Jacksonian Jan. 30, 1902. 

ENSIGN Population (1915, estimated;, 50; elevation, 2720 feet; established about 1886; first 
called Lone Lake; name changed to Ensign in 1888, in honor of G. L. Ensign; telephones; is 
on the Santa Fe railway. 



198 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



GRAY COUNTY RECORD, local; Edward Chalk, editor and business manager, Glenn C. Cramer. 
* publisher, Ensign. 

Weekly. Feb. 3, 1916 + 
Early history unknown; first issue in Society's file bears vol. 2, No. 8. 

MONTEZUMA Population (1915, estimated), 200; new town established in May, 1912; named 
for the ruler of the ancient Aztec empire; the old town established about 1879, a mile and 
a half from the present town site; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railroad. 

PRESS, independent; Earl Fickertt, editor and publisher, Montezuma. 

Weekly. Oct. 7, 1915 + 
The Chief, founded 1914 by R. E. Campbell; name changed 1915 to Montezuma Press. 

DISCONTINUED. Vol ^ 

Cimarron Gray County Echo. Apr. 21, 1887 1888 1 

Gray County Republican (1st). Jan. 28, 1897 1899 2 

Gray County Times. Jan. 8, 19031904 2 

Herald; Kansas Sod House. July 16, 18851886. . 1 

New West (1st). Mar. 22, 18791882 \ 

Optic. July 11 Sept. 26, 1879 

New West (2d). Jan. 6, 18871895 8 

[Called New West-Echo, May, 1888, to Feb., 1891.1 

Signet. Apr. 24, 18801881 1 

Ensign Razzoop. Nov. 16, 18871888 1 

Ingalls Echo. Oct. 7, 18861887 1 

Gray County Republican. Jan. 12 Oct. 4, 1888 1 

Messenger. July 17, 18891890 1 

Union. Oct. 8, 18871897 9 

Montezuma Chief (1st). Sept. 3, 18861889 

Gray County Republican. Mar. 7 July 25, 1889 / ' 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Cimarron Gray County Republican. Mar. 6 July 24, 1902. 

Appomattox Advocate, Aug. 23, 1888. 

Montezuma News. June 26 Oct. 16, 1912. 



GREELEY COUNTY. 

Organized July 9, 1888; named in honor o c Horace Greeley; county seat, 
Tribune; area, 780 square miles, 499,200 acres; population (1915), 913; 
assessed valuation (1915), $3,764,081; resources and industries agriculture 
and stock raising. 

TRIBUNE Population (1915), 159; elevation, 3612 feet; established, 1886; named in honor of 
the New York Tribune, Horace Greeley's paper; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 
GREELEY COUNTY REPUBLICAN, independent; J. L. Pyles, editor and publisher, Tribune. 

Weekly. Jan. 5, 1888 + 27 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Greeley County Tribune, Horace, founded 1886, 
Carter Hutchinson, editor; moved to Reid, Nov., 1887, and name changed to Greeley County 
Republican, J. M. Hawkins, editor; moved back to Tribune in 1888; in 1889 took over the Greeley 
County Enterprise, founded in 1887 as the Tribune-Enterprise, by A. S. Carnell. . 

DISCONTINUED. VolSf 

Tribune Greeley County Enterprise. July 8, 18871889 2 

Greeley County Journal. Tribune and Horace. Mar. 27, 1890 1892. . . 2 

Greeley County Tribune. Tribune and Reid. Apr. 24, 1886 1887 1 

Leader. Oct. 25, 18941897 2 

[Called Greeley County Democrat, Oct. 25, 1894, to Jan. 17, 1895.] 

Western Homestead (m). Tribune and Hutchinson. A Jan. 1, 18921899, 7 

Colokan Graphic. Nov. 10, 18871888. 1 

Greeley Center Greeley County Gazette. Greeley Center and Horace. 

Apr. 5, 18861888 2 

Greeley County News. Greeley Center and Horace. 

Nov. 4, 18861888 1 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 199 



Horace Champion. June 29, 18881889 1 

Headlight. May 12, 18921893 

Messenger. Feb. 2, 1888 1889 1 

Reid Greeley County Republican. Nov. 17, 1887 1888 1 

[Bound with Greeley County Tribune.] 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Hector Echo. Apr. 1 July 29, 1886. 

Horace Greeley County New Era. Oct. 11 Nov. 22, 1889. 



GREENWOOD COUNTY. 

Organized, 1862; named or Alfred B. Greenwood; county seat, Eureka; 
area, 1155 square miles, 739,200 acres; population (1915), 14,500; assessed 
valuation (1915), $33,521,788; resources and industries building stone, 
natural gas, potter's clay, mineral paint, cement, silica, agriculture, and 
stock raising. 

EUREKA Population (1915), 2261; elevation, 1093 feet; established, 1857; industries flour 
mills, elevators; natural gas district; telephones, electric lights, waterworks system; is on the 
Santa Fe and Missouri Pacific railways. 

DEMOCRATIC MESSENGER, Democratic; Robert Focht, editor and publisher, Eureka. 

Weekly. May 2, 1884 + 32 vols. 
This paper is a continuation of the Severy Enterprise, founded Jan., 1884, by R. H. Smith. 

After a few weeks' existence the Enterprise was discontinued and the plant moved to Eureka, 

where the publication of the Democratic Messenger was begun, the first issue being vol. 1, No. 45. 

HERALD AND GREENWOOD COUNTY REPUBLICAN, Republican; George E. Wood, editor and pub- 
lisher, Eureka. 

Weekly. Oct. 30, 1868; Oct. 15, Dec. 24, 1869; Jan. 27, 1876 -f 40 vols. 
Founded 1868 by S. G. Mead; consolidated 1892 with the Greenwood County Republican, 

which was founded 1879 as the Eureka Sun, by W. E. Doud, and the name changed in 1880 to the 

Greenwood County Republican, S. A. Martin, editor. 

HIGH SCHOOL BANNER, school; edited and published by students of the Eureka high school. 

Eureka. 

Monthly. Dec., 19101911. 2 vols. 

Founded about 1906, the first issue received by the Society being for Dec., 1910, vol. 5. No 
issues received since May, 1911. 

HAMILTON Population (1915), 335; established about 1879; industries cement block ma- 
chinery factory; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

GRIT, independent; Albert W. Bentley, editor and publisher, Hamilton. 

Weekly. Sept. 2, 1909 + 6 vols. 
Founded 1901 as the Hamilton Eagle by Marion E. Doud; name changed 1903 to Hamilton 

Times, E. F. Hudson, editor and publisher: name again changed 1909 to Hamilton Grit, T. S. 

Howell, editor and publisher. 

LAMONT Population (1915, estimated), 50; established about 1889; Madison is its nearest 

banking town; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 
LEADER, local; Lawrence M. Shearer, editor and publisher, Lamont. 
Weekly. Aug. 14, 1912 + 4 vols. 

Founded 1912 by Lawrence M. Shearer. 

MADISON Population (1915), 629; established, 1879; named for the township in which it is 
located and which was formerly part of Madison county; industries coal and oil district, 
mill, light and ice manufacturing plant; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

MIRROR, local; Lawrence M. Shearer, editor and publisher, Madison. 

Weekly. Oct. 21, 1914 -f 1 vol. 
Founded 1914 by Lawrence M. Shearer. 



200 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



NEWS, local; Eugene Kelley, editor and publisher, Madison. 

Weekly. Mar. 18, 1915 + 1 vol. 

The News is a continuation of the Live Stock Belt, early history unknown, no copy being in 
the Society's collection. The first issue of the Madison News (2d) on file is vol. 5, No. 20. 

PIEDMONT Population (1915, estimated), 300; elevation, 1196 feet; established about 1880: 

telephones; is on the St. Louis & San Francisco railway. 
NEWS, local; J. S. Martin, editor and publisher, Piedmont. 
Weekly. Feb. 10, 1916 + 

Founded 1916 by J. S. Martin. 

SEVERY Population (1915), 635; elevation, 1104 feet; established, 1879; formerly known as 
Gould, but name changed to Severy, in honor of L. Severy, of Emporia, on advent of the 
Santa Fe; industries mill, elevator; telephones, electric lights; is on the Santa Fe and Frisco 
railways. 

SEVERYITE, Republican; C. G. Pierce, editor and publisher, Severy. 

Weekly. Feb. 8, 1889 + 27 vols. 
Founded 1887 as the Kansas Clipper, by J. H. Morse and B. F. Blankenship; in 1889 name 

changed to the Severyite, C. G. Pierce, editor and publisher. 

DISCONTINUED. Vols 

Eureka Academy Student [broken file]. Nov. 8, 1889 1913 .18 

Censorial. Apr. 12, 18761879 . 3 

Graphic. Feb. 12, 18791882 3 

Graphic (d). Oct. 24, 19031904 1 

Greenwood County Democrat. Apr. 13 Dec. 28, 1882 1 

Greenwood County Republican. Nov. 12, 18801892 12 

Kansas Alliance Union. Apr. 11, 1890 1893 4 

Kansas Suffrage Reveille (m). 18961897. [See Coffey county.] 

Lutheran (m). Jan., 18981901 . 3 

Republican. Dec. 8, 18991900 1 

Sun. May 30, 18791880 1 

Sunflower (m) [broken file]. Apr., 1905 Apr., 1906 2 

Times. Dec. 29, 18931895 . .' 2 

Union. Jan. 3, 18961899 4 

Fall River Courant. July 16, 18861888 . . .3 

Echo. Apr. 6, 18831886 

Kansas Advocate. Nov. 10, 18921896 

News. Nov. 11, 18981909 

Saturday Morning Sun. Dec. 8, 18881889 1 

Times (1st). Sept. 8, 18811891 .10 

Times (2d). Feb. 3, 19101913 4 

Gould Pioneer. Gould and Severy. Jan. 27, 18811883 ". ; 2 

Hamilton Broad Axe. Nov. 8, 18891890 - 1 

Eagle. Feb. 14, 19011902 2 

Enterprise. July 2, 1897 1898 1 

Post. July 1, 18981899 1 

Times. July 17, 19031907 4 

Madison Index. Nov. 30, 18941901 7 

Madisonian. Sept. 20, 19011908 '. 7 

News (1st). May 9, 18791892 2 

News (2d); Star. July 6, 19001901 

Our Church Mirror (m). [See Elk county.] 

Spirit [scattering]. Dec. 5, 1907; May 20, 19091913 5 

Star. Sept. 16, 18921900 8 

Times (1st). Oct. 6, 18771878 1 

Times (3d). May 27, 18871888 1 

Zenith; Times (2d). Apr. 2 Dec. 10, 1886 1 

Piedmont . . ... Journal. Piedmont and Severy. May 19, 1910 1911 2 

News. Jan. 11 Dec. 27, 1907 1 

Reece Sunflower. May 23, 1885 1886 1 

Severy. . . . Kansas Clipper. Dec. 31, 18871889 . . 1 

Liberal. Dec. 11, 18841886 2 

Record. Feb. 4, 18871891 5 

Southern Kansas Journal. Dec. 29, 18831887 3 

Telegram. Feb. 20, 18911892 2 

Virgil . . . . .Greenwood Review. July 15, 18871892 4 

Leader. Oct. 19, 18941907 13 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1; 

Eureka Kansas Dairyman (m). Feb.-Aug., 1898. 

News, Evening. Jan. 10 Feb. 9, 1898. 
Real Estate Register (m). Aug., 1883. 
Republican (d). Aug. 10, 1888. 
Republican Club. Aug. 18 Oct. 20, 1891. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 201 



Fall River Chief. June 6 Nov. 14, 1M*1. 

Citizen. Nov. 12 Dec. 31, 1897. 
Gould. . . . Homeseeker's Guide (m). May, 1*>7. 

News. Apr. 9 May 14, 1880. 

Madison . . . . .Church and Library (m;. Madison, Wichita and Olpe. 

July, 1896~-Oct., 1897. 

Piedmont World. Nov. 7, 1902 Feb. 20, 1903. 

Quincy Enterprise. Aug. 25, 1905. 

Gazette. Feb. 12 June 3, 1904. 
Severy Enterprise. Jan. 18 Feb. 15, 1884. 

Leader. Severy and Gould City. Feb. 27 Apr. 2, 1880. 
.Virgil Rural Age. Mar. 1, 1896. 

Rural Home (s-m). Jan. 15 May 1, 1898. 



HAMILTON COUNTY. 

Organized January 29, 1886; named for Alexander Hamilton; county seat, 
Syracuse; area, 972 square miles, 622,080 acres; population (1915), 2253; 
assessed valuation (1915), $5,164,263; resources and industries building 
stone, gypsum, stock raising, aFalfa, and grazing 

SYRACUSE Population (1915), 900; elevation, 3227 feet; established, 1873; name formerly 

Holidaysburg; name changed to Syracuse prior to 1878; industries flour mills, machine 

shops, elevators; municipal electric light plant and water system; is on the Santa Fe railway 

HAMILTON COUNTY REPUBLICAN-NEWS, Republican; Earl C. Ross, editor and publisher, Syracuse' 

Weekly. Mar. 16, 1906 + 10 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Syracuse News, founded 1898 by H. A. Lan- 
man & Son; consolidated 1903 with the Syracuse Republican (2d), founded 1902 by Earl C. Ross, 
and continued as the Syracuse News until 1907, when it was consolidated with the Hamilton 
County Republican, founded 1906 by Charles E. Baxter, under the name Hamilton County Re- 
publican and Syracuse News, G. R. Hickok, editor, and F. B. Williams, business manager; name 
changed 1915 to Hamilton County Republican-News, E. C. Ross, editor and publisher. 

JOURNAL, Democratic; Henry Block, editor and publisher, Syracuse. 

Weekly. July 17, 1885 + 30 vols. 
Founded 1885; Lester & Armour, editors and publishers. 

DISCONTINUED. Vote. 

Syracuse Arkansas Valley Sentinel; Syracuse Sentinel. Apr. 20, 1900 1901 1 

Democrat. Jan. 15 Aug. 26, 1887 1 

Democratic Principle. Oct. 12, 18871894 7 

News. Mar. 25, 18981907 10 

Republican (1st). Sept. 29, 18931900 6 

Republican (2d). July 31, 19021903 1 

Sentinel. Dec. 24, 18861889 

Coolidge . . . . Border Ruffian. Jan. 2, 18861887 1 

Citizen. Sept. 17, 18861890 4 

Enterprise and Unmuzzled Truth. June 1, 1894 1899 i 

Hamilton County Bulletin. Coolidge and Syracuse. Sept. 12, 1890 1893, 3 

Interstate. Jan. 20 Oct. 27, 1893 : 

Leader. Jan. 16, 19081910 

Times. Nov. 3, 18871890 , 

Enfield Tribune. Enfield and Ulysses. 1887. [See Grant county.] 

Hartland Herald. 18861887. [See Kearny county.] 

Times. 1886-1887. [See Kearny county.] 

Johnson City World. 1886 1887. [See Stanton county.] 

Kendall Boomer. Mar. 17, 18861887 4 

Free Press. Dec. 7, 18891890 

Gazette. Mar. 30 Aug. 18, 1887 

Ken; Signal. Feb. 12, 18861887 

Shockeyville Eagle. 18861887. [See Grant county.] 

Surprise Post. 1886. [See Grant county.] 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Syracuse Standard. Sept. 2 Nov. 12, 1897. 

West Kansas News. Mar. 23 June 29, 1887. 

Coolidge Citizen (d). Oct. 25 Nov. 24, 1888. 

Kendall Hamilton County Republican. May 6 Sept. 9, 1886. 



202 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



HARPER COUNTY. 

Organized, 1873; named for Marion Harper, first sergeant, company E, 
Second Kansas cavalry; county seat, Anthony; area, 810 square miles, 518,- 
406 acres; population (1915), 13,316; assessed valuation (1915), $30,387,382; 
resources and industries building stone, mineral paint, volcanic ash, salt, 
agriculture, and stock raising. 

ANTHONY Population (1915), 2435; elevation, 1337 feet; named for Gov. George T. Anthony; 
industries bottling works, planing mill, flour mill, salt plant, elevators, glove factory; mu- 
nicipal electric light plant and water system, public library, telephones; is on the Santa Fe, 
Rock Island, Orient and Missouri Pacific railways. 

ADVOCATE, Democratic; J. R. Hoffman, editor and publisher, Harper. 

Weekly. Oct. 30, 1891 + 24 vols. 
This paper was founded in 1885 as the Attica Advocate, by L. A. Hoffman; daily edition 

was published in 1887; in 1891 the paper was moved to Harpar and continued as tho Harper 

Advocate, with L. A. Hoffman & Son, editors and publishers. 

BULLETIN, independent; R. P. McColloch, editor and publisher, Anthony. 
Veckly. Oct. 9, 1891 + 24 vols. 

Mar., 1899, to Feb., 1900.. not published. 

A continuation of the following: Harper County Enterprise, Anthonv, founded 1884 by 
Alexander & Wikoff; consolidated 1891 with the Alliance Bulletin, of Harper, founded 1890 by 
William Whitworth; the consolidated papers continued under the name of Weekly Bulletin, 
R. L. Kinsley, editor; a daily edition was started in 1904 by Armstrong & Son and ran from Mar. 
to Oct. 

REPUBLICAN, Republican; Lester Combs, editor and publisher, Anthony. 

Weekly. Oct. 9, 1879 + 36.vols. 

Founded 1879 by George W. Maffet and Charles Metcalf, editors and publishers; a daily 
edition was started in 1886 and discontinued in 1889. 

SENTINEL, Republican; Harry T. Leonard, editor and publisher, Harper. 

Weekly. Aug. 17, 1882 -f 33 vols. 

Founded 1882 by W. A. Richards; daily edition founded 1885 by Joseph C. McKee, and 
discontinued 1888; in 1892 absorbed the Harper Graphic, founded 1883 by Charles S. Finch; 
the Graphic issued a daily edition in 1886. 

ATTICA Population (1915), 639; elevation, 1453 feet; established, 1882; named for a province 

of ancient Greece; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
INDEPENDENT, independent; L. D. Harding, editor and publisher, Attica. 
Weekly. Aug. 23, 1895 + 20 vols. 

Founded 1895 by L. B. Wilson. 

BLUFF CITY Population (1915), 258; elevation, 1197 feet; established about 1879; first called 
Bluff Creek, from its location; telephones; is on the Kansas & Southern railway. 

NEWS, independent; J. E. Grove, editor and publisher, Bluff City. 

Weekly. Dec. 24, 1897 -f 18 vols. 
Founded 1897 by W. T. Cowgill. 

FREEPORT Population (1915), 108; elevation, 1338 feet; established about 1885; telephones; 

is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

NEWS, local; B. W. Barnes, editor and publisher, Freeport. 
Weekly. July 9, 1915 + [Broken file.] 

Founded 1914. 

WALDRON Population (1915), 217; elevation, 1269 feet; established about 1900; telephones; 

is on the Rock Island and K. C. M. & O. railways. 

STATE LINE DEMOCRAT, Democratic; George A. White, editor and proprietor, Waldron. 
Weekly. Dec. 25, 1912 + 3 vols. 

Early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being vol. 2, No. 9, D. Paul Zeigler & Son, 
editors and publishers. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



203 



DISCONTINUED. r ,, /x 

Anthory . Bulletin (d). Mar. 7 Oct. 24, 1904 

Chronicle (m). 19071909. [See Reno county.] 

Free Press (d). Apr. 25, 18871888 .2 

Free Press (w). Apr. 28, 18871888 1 

Gospel Press. 18991901. [See Sumner county.] 

Harper County Democrat. Mar. 27, 18861887 1 

Harper County Enterprise. 1885 1891 7 

Journal (1st). Aug. 22, 18781884 5 

Journal (2d). Apr. 27, 18881896 .6 

Journal (d). Apr. 16 Sept. 6, 1888 ... 1 

Republican (d). May 26, 18861889 ... 6 

Westland Home. Nov. 8, 19041905 1 

Attica. . . Advocate. Feb. 12, 18851891 . . 7 

Advocate (d). Mar. 14 June 13, 1887. . 1 

Bulletin. Sept. 4, 18861888 . 2 

Tribune. Dec. 3, 18911895 . 3 

Bluff City . . . Herald. June 2, 18881890 . . .2 

Independent. Nov. 20, 18911895 3 

Tribune. Jan. 13, 18861888 

Crisfield Courier. Oct. 30, 18851890 4 

Danville Argus and Courant. NTov. 24, 1882; Mar., 18831884 1 

Express. June 6, 1885 1886 1 

News. Feb. 11, 18991901 

Freeport . . . Leader. Aug. 13, 18851891 5 

Tribune. Mar. 11 Sept. 30, 1886 1 

[Bound with Midlothian Sun.] 

Harper Alliance Bulletin. Sept. 19, 18901891 1 

College Journal (m) [broken file]. 1888 1898 2 

Graphic. Aug. 14, 18831892 7 

[Aug., 1888, to Sept., 1890, not published.) 

Graphic (d). Feb. 17 Aug. 31, 1886 1 

Harper County Times. Oct. 24, 18781885 7 

News. Nov. 23, 19001901 1 

Prophet. July 21 Nov. 30, 1888 1 

Sentinel (d). Oct. 2, 1885 Feb. 10, 1887; May 21, 18871888 5 

Midlothian Sun. Aug. 20, 18851886 . 1 

Waldron . Argus. Nov. 15, 19061913 . 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Anthony . Herald. Jan. 14 May 8, 1886. 

Attica Record. Mar. 24 Apr. 29, 1886. 

Harper . .News, Morning (d). Oct. 22 Nov. 3, 1886. 

News. Oct. 29, 1886. 

Republican (d). Jan. 3 Feb. 26, 1889. 

Young Men's Voice (m). July, 1892 July, 1893. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Attica Kelley's Illustrated Magazine (m). Feb., 1895. 

Corwin Dispatch. Apr. 23 May 21, Aug. 28 Sept. 18, 1897. 

Harper. . . . . .Christian Helper (m). Harper and Girard. Aug., 1900 Jan., 1901. 

College Outlook (m). Nov., 1899 May, 1900. 



HARVEY COUNTY. 

Organized, 1872; named for Gov. James M. Harvey; county seat, Newton; 
area, 540 square miles, 345,600 acres; population (1915), 18,663; assessed 
valuation (1915), $36,950,836; resources and industries building stone, brick 
day, gypsum, natural gas, and agriculture. 

NEWTON Population (1915), 7620; elevation, 1456 feet; established, May, 1871; named for 
Newton, Mass.; industries flour and alfalfa mills, elevators, carriage and wagon works, 
nursery, poultry packing plants, threshing machine, separator and broom factories; public 
library, electric lights, telephones, municipal water system; in the natural gas district: is on 
the Santa Fe and Missouri Pacific railways. 



204 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



BETHEL COLLEGE MONTHLY, college; E. R. Risen, editor; published by the faculty of Bethel Col- 
lege, Newton. 

Monthly. Jan., 1903 + 13 vols. 
A continuation of the School and College Journal, founded 1891 by the Catholic Educational 

Society; name changed 1903 to Bethel College Monthly. 

HEROLD [German], independent; C. E. Krehbiel, editor, H. P. Krehbiel, manager, Herold Pub- 
lishing Company, publishers, Newton. 

Weekly. Jan. 4, 1910 + 6 vols. 

A continuation of the following: Marion County Anzeiger, Marion, founded 1887 by J. F. 
Harms; consolidated with Das Kansas Volksblatt, Newton, founded 1897 by Volksblatt Publish- 
ing Company; in 1899 purchased by the Kansan, but issued regularly, Wm. J. Krehbiel, editor: 
consolidated 1902 with the Hillsboro Post, founded 1898 by H. H. Fast; 1902 name changed to 
Post und Volksblatt; name changed again 1910 to Der Herold. 

JOURNAL, Democratic; R. E. and Esther Nye, editors and publishers, Newton. 

Weekly. Dec. 21, 1888 + 27 vols. 

A continuation of the following: Newton Democrat, founded 1883 by J. B. Fugate; absorbed 
during the latter 80 's by the Newton Weekly Journal. The Kansas Chronicle, Newton, founded 
1888 by Dewey Langford; name changed same year to Newton Weekly Journal, John A. Reynolds, 
editor; on Feb. 9, 1894, consolidated with the Newton Kansan; ran as the Journal and Kansan 
until July, 1894, when both appeared as separate papers. Harvey County Banner, founded 1896 
by L. M. Harter; consolidated 1898 with the Journal. A daily edition of the Journal was issued 
from Jan., 1902, to Mar., 1903. 

KANSAN-REPUBLICAN, Republican; J. L. Napier, editor, the Kansan Printing Company, pub- 
lisher, Newton. 

Weekly. Jan. 6, 1876 -f 40 vols. 

[Not published Feb. 8, to June 28, 1894.] 
Daily. Sept. 15, Oct. 31, 1887 + 68 vols. 

[Not published Sept., 1888, to Nov., 1891; Jan. 12, 1894, to Mar. 11, 1897.J 
A continuation of the following: The Newton Kansan, founded 1872 by H. C. Ashbaugh. 
Newton Daily Kansan, founded about 1887; suspended from Sept., 1888, to Nov., 1891, when 
it again resumed, and later suspended from Jan. 12, 1894, till Mar. 11, 1897. Feb., 1894, 
the weekly Kansan consolidated with the Newton Journal, and until July following was* 
published as the Journal and Kansan, after which date both papers were issued separately. Newton 
Daily Herald, founded 1895 by A. G. Stacy; absorbed same year by the Kansan. Harvey County 
News (1st), founded 1875 by A. W. Moore, J. E. Duncan, editor; in 1879 the name was changed 
to Newton Republican, C. G. Coutant and A. R. Wickersham, editors and publishers; a daily 
edition of the Republican was started about 1884, and consolidated in 1899 with the Kansan; both 
daily and weekly issued under the name of the Newton Kansan-Republican. The Kansas Volks- 
blatt was purchased by the Kansan in 1899, but has been published separately since. 

MONATSBLATTER AUS BETHEL COLLEGE [German], college; E. R. Risen, editor; published by the 
faculty of Bethel College. 

Monthly (ex. July and Aug.). Feb.,'1903 + 13 vols. 
Founded about 1896 by Bethel College. 

BURRTON Population (1915), 655; elevation, 1457 feet; established, Sept. 6, 1873; named for 
Burrton township, in which it is situated, which was named for I. T. Burr, a vice president of 
the Santa Fe railroad; industries elevators, flour mills; in natural gas district: telephones: 
is on the Santa Fe railway. 
GRAPHIC, independent; Thomas & Williams, editors and publishers, Burrton. 

Weekly. Nov. 28, 1886 + 29 vols. 

A continuation of the Burrton Monitor, founded May 20, 1881, George A. Vandeveer, editor, 
and published by the Burrton Publishing Co.; succeeded by the Burrton Graphic, M. L. Sherpy, 
editor. Kansas Grit Weekly, founded 1904 by George W. Kelley ; name changed in 1906 to the Burrton 
Grit; name changed 1910 to Burrton Free Lance (2d), Ben W. Harlow, editor; consolidated 1912 
with the Graphic. Burrton Tribune, founded 1913 by T. C. Bales; consolidated 1914 with the 
Graphic. 

HALSTEAD Population (1915), 1040; elevation, 1388 feet; established, 1873; named in honor 
of Murat Halstead; industries elevators, flour mills, broom factory; telephones, public 
library; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

INDEPENDENT, Republican; E. J. Bookwalter, editor and publisher. 

Weekly. Apr. 29, 1881 + 35 vols. 
A continuation of the following: Halstead Independent, founded 1881 by Joe F. White. 

Halstead Tribune, founded 1890 by J. C. Gaiser; Aug. 5, 1892, consolidated with the Halstead 

Independent, published as the Independent-Tribune until Oct., same year, when the name was 

changed back to the Independent. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



205 



SEDGWICK Population (1915), 673; elevation, 1377 feet; established, June, 1870; named in 
honor of Gen. John Sedgwick; industries nursery; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
PANTAGRAPH, independent; Ollie W. Weaver, editor and publisher, Sedgwick. 

Weekly. Mar. 7, 1884 -f 32 vols. 

Founded 1883 as the Sedgwick Jayhawker, by Mark F. Hobson; name changed in 1883 to 
the Sedgwick Palladium; name again changed in 1884 to Sedgwick Pantagraph, Cash M. Taylor, 
editor and publisher. 

DISCONTINUED. , . 



Newton 



Burrton 



Halstead 



Walton . 



Newton . . 



Burrton 
Halstead 



Newton 



Anzeiger [German]. June 10, 18871892 4 

Church Messenger. 1905. [See Reno county.] 

Congregational Kansas (m). 1909 1911. [See Shawnee county.] 

Democrat. July 6, 1883 1887 4 

Expository (m). 1884. [See Crawford county.] 

Golden Gate. Aug. 13, 18791882 3 

Harvey County Banner. Aug. 7, 1896 1898 

Harvey County News (1st). Mar. 15, 18761879 4 

Harvey County News (2d). June 23, 1893 1895 2 

Herald (d). Jan. 9 Feb. 28, 1896 1 

Journal (d). Feb. 10, 19021903 2 

Kansas Chronicle. Feb. 10 Dec. 14, 1888 1 

Kansas Commoner. Sept. 2, 1887 1890 3 

Kansas Endeavorer (m). Nov., 18971900 3 

Kansas Volksblatt [German]. Nov. 26, 18971899 2 

Neue Vaterland [German]. Jan. 11 Aug. 16, 1879 1 

Post and Volksblatt [German]. Jan. 30, 19021909 9 

Republican. Aug. 7, 18791899 .19 

Republican (d). Feb. 25, 18861899 27 

School and College Journal (m). Dec., 1898 1902. 4 

School Journal (m). Oct., 18911893 2 

Breeze. Oct. 18, 19011902 1 

Chronicle (m). 18971899. [See Reno county.] 

Free Lance (1st). Feb. 22, 18901893 3 

Free Lance (2d). Mar. 10, 19101912 . 2 

Kansas Grit. July 16, 19041910 6 

Monitor. May 20, 18811886 .6 

Telephone. Nov. 2, 18781881 2 

Tribune. Mar. 4 Nov. 18, 1914 . . 1 

...Clipper. Jan. 12, 1884 1886 2 

Herald. Jan. 13, 18871888 2 

Nachrichten aus der Heidenwalt [German] (m). Jan., 1877 1881 '. . 5 

Our Church Mirror (m). 1892. [See Elk county.] 

Tribune. Mar. 28, 18901892 2 

Zur Heimath [German] (s-m). Halstead, Summerfield, 111., and St. Louis, 

Mo. Feb., 18751881 7 

. . Independent. Apr. 2, 18861888 . . . 

Reporter (1st). May 23, 18901893 . 2 

Reporter (2d). July 3, 19131916. . . ; 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

. . Arkansas Valley Democrat. Mar. 30 June 29, 1883. 

Bee. June 7 Aug. 2, 1879. 

Church Herald (m). June, 1892 Mar., 1894. 

Hausfreund (m) [German]. Dec., 1889; Jan. and Mar., 1890; Oct., 1892. 

Harvey County Voice. Oct. 15, 1892 Jan. 7, 1893. 

Ladies' Magazine (m). Aug., 1891 June, 1892. 

Perfect Peace (m). Jan., 1894. 
Anzeiger [German]. Oct. 31, 1892. 

Real Estate Guide. Apr., 1885. 
. . . .Herald (d). Mar. 15 Apr. 14, 1887. 

Record. Mar. 9, 1877. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

. . Democrat. Apr. 17 June 5, 1914. 
High School Clarion (m). Oct., 1893 May, 1894. 
Transcript. Oct. 25 Dec. 13, 1899. 



206 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



HASKELL COUNTY. 

Organized, July 1, 1887; named for Dudley C. Haskell; county seat, 
Santa Fe; area, 576 square miles, 368,640 acres; population (1915), 995; 
assessed valuation (1915), $3,734,088; resources and industries dairying, 
wheat, and stock raising. 

SANTA FE Population (1915), 125; elevation, 2950 feet; established, 1886; named for the 
Santa Fe Trail, for Santa Fe, N. M., and for the Santa Fe railroad; telephones: nearest railroad 
station is Sublette, ten miles southwest, on the Santa Fe railway. 

MONITOR, Republican; John J. Miller, editor and publisher, Santa Fe. 

Weekly. June 15, 1888 + 27 vols. 

Founded 1888 as the Haskell County Republican, G. M. Keller, editor and publisher; name 
changed same year to Santa Fe Monitor, J. W. Richardson, editor and publisher. Ivanhoe Times, 
founded 1886 by C. T. Hickman; name changed in 1892 to the Santa Fe Times, and absorbed samp 
year by the Santa Fe Monitor. 

SUBLETTE Population (1915, estimated), 150; established, 1912; named for William Sublette, 
an early Santa Fe trader; industries grain elevator; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
HASKELL COUNTY CLIPPER, Republican; J. F. Pearce, editor and publisher, Sublette. 

Weekly. Apr. 18, 1913 + 3 vols. 

Founded 1899 as the Haskell County Republican, Santa Fe, by J. F. Pearce; moved to Sub- 
lette 1913, and name changed to Haskell County Clipper, S. D. Snavely, editor and publisher. 

DISCONTINUED. 

Santa Fe Champion. May 27, 18871888 

Haskell County Republican (1st). Feb. 8 May 30, 1888 1 

Haskell County Republican (2d). Jan. 27, 18991913 14 

Haskell County Review. July 2, 18871888 1 

Leader. Apr. 26 Dec. 27, 1888 1 

Trail (1st). June 11, 18861887 1 

Trail (2d). June 6, 18951898 2 

Ivanhoe. . . ... Times. Dec. 12, 18851892 6 



HODGEMAN COUNTY. 

Organized, 1879; named for Amos Hodgeman, captain company H, 
Seventh Kansas cavalry; county seat, Jetmore; area, 864 square miles, 
552,960 acres; population (1915), 3165; assessed valuation (1915), $7,996,776; 
resources and industries building stone, gypsum, agriculture, and stock 
raising. 

JETMORE Population (1915), 391; elevation, 2268 feet; established, 1879; originally called 
Buckner; name changed to Jetmore in 1880, in honor of Col. Aaron B. Jetmore, of Topeka: 
telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

REPUBLICAN, Republican; E. W. Harlan, editor and publisher, Jetmore. 

Weekly. Jan. 30, 1895 + 21 vols. 
A continuation of the following: Jetmore Siftings, founded 1886 by Imes Bros., W. H. Imes, 

editor; name changed in 1895 to Jetmore Republican (2d), C. E. Roughton, editor and publisher. 

Jetmore Sunflower, founded 1889 by O. E. Hardy; absorbed in 1895 by the Jetmore Republican 

The Reveille, Jetmore, founded 1882 by T. S. Haun; name changed 1892 to Western Herald. 

with P. H. Hand, editor and publisher; consolidated 1911 with the Jetmore Republican. 

DISCONTINUED. Volgm 

Jetmore Buckner Independent. Nov. 7, 18791881 1 

Hodgeman County Scimitar. Feb. 13, 18861889 4 

Journal. Dec. 11, 18871889 1 

Reveille. Jan. 6, 18821892 10 

Siftings. Nov. 11, 1886 Oct. 27, 1887; Aug. 9, 1888 1895 8 

Sunflower. Dec. 18, 18891895 6 

Western Herald. Feb. 18, 18921911 19 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 207 



DISCONTINUED. Voltl 

Cowland Chieftain. Apr. 30 Oct. 30, 1885 . 1 

Fordham Republican. Apr. 9 Oct. 15, 1879 1 

Hodgeman Center . Agitator. Mar. 1, 18791880 1 

Hodgeman County Herald. Hodgeman Center and Kalvesta. 
May 14, 1886 June 24, 1887. [See Finney county.] 

Orwell Times. Jan. 14 Dec. 23, 1886 I 

Ravanna Chieftain. 18861893. [See Finney county.] 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Jetmore Republican (1st). Oct. 16-30, 1889. 

Henston Gazette. July 22 Oct. 21, 1887. 

Pawnee Valley Democrat. Dec. 31, 1886 Mar. 5, 1887. 



JACKSON COUNTY. 

Organized, 1857 orig'nally called Calhoun county, in honor of John C. 
Calhoun; name changed to Jackson, February 11, 1859, in honor of President 
Andrew Jackson; county seat, Holton; area, 658 square miles, 421,120 acres; 
population (1915), 15,668; assessed valuation (1915), $30,055,020; resources 
and industries building stone, coal, gypsum, agriculture, and stock raising. 

HOLTON Population (1915), 2666; elevation, 1043 feet; established, 1856; named for Edward 
D. Holton, of Milwaukee, Wis.; industries elevators, feed and planing mill, bottling works, 
cement works; waterworks, municipal electric light plant, telephones; is on the Rock Island, 
the Union Pacific and the Missouri Pacific railways. 

RECORDER, independent; M. M. Beck & Son, editors and publishers, Holton. 

Weekly. Mar. 30, 1875 + 41 vols. 
This paper is a continuation of the following: Jackson County News, Holton, founded 1867 

by Alonzo W. Moore; name changed in 1872 to Holton News, A. W. Moore and George S. Irwin, 

editors and publishers; in 1875 the News was sold to the Express, and published as the Express 

and News, Frank A. Root, editor and publisher. Holton Express, founded 1872 by Frank A. Root; 

consolidated with the Recorder 1875. Holton Recorder, fuonded 1875 by Shiner & Laithe; 

name changed the same year to Recorder and Express; in 1877 the word Express was dropped. 

Soldier City Tribune, founded by Armer P. Shaw; moved to Holton 1890, and name changed to 

Independent-Tribune; consolidated with the Recorder in 1905. 

SIGNAL, Democratic; S. T. Osterhold, editor and publisher, Holton. 

Weekly. Jan. 9, 1878 + 38 vols. 
Founded in 1878 by T. A. Fairchild and W. W. Sargent. 

DELIA Population (1915, estimated), 250; elevation, 973 feet; established, 1905; named for 
Mrs. Delia Cunningham; telephones; is on the Union Pacific railway. 

NEWS, local; Charles L. Faulkner, editor and publisher, Delia. 

Weekly. Mar. 24, 1916 -f 
Founded 1916; vol. 1, No. 12, gives W. J. Granger, publisher. 

HOYT Population (1915), 293; elevation, 1166 feet; established, 1883; telephones; is on the 

Rock Island railway. 

BOOSTER, local; W. J. Granger, editor and publisher. 
Weekly. July 23, 1915 + 1 vol. 

Founded 1915 by W. J. Granger; absorbed Feb. 4, 1916, the Netawaka Talk, founded in 
1907 at Netawaka by W. J. Granger. 

MAYETTA Population (1915), 279; elevation, 1187 feet; established, Dec. 1, 1886; composite 
name given in memory of Mary Henrietta Lunger, deceased daughter of Mrs. E. E. Lunger, 
founder of the town; telephones; is on the Rock Island railway. 

HERALD, independent; J. W. Watkins, editor and publisher, Mayetta. 

Weekly. Feb. 17, 1910 + 6 vols. f 

Founded 1910 by W. H. Holmes. 



208 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



NETAWAKA Population (1915), 327; elevation, 1149 feet; established, 1866; an Indian word 
meaning "fine view"; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

CHIEF, independent; W. F. Turrentine, editor and publisher, Netawaka. 

Weekly. May 4, 1916 + 
Founded 1916 by W. F. Turrentine. 

SOLDIER Population (1915), 327; elevation, 1885 feet; established, Sept., 1878; named for the 
township in which it is situated; telephones; is on the Union Pacific railway. 

CLIPPER, Republican; Ben. L. Mickel, editor and publisher, Soldier. 

Weekly. Jan. 15, 1891 + 25 vols. 
Founded 1891 by Ben L. and Minnie M. Mickel. 

WHITING Population (1915), 390; elevation, 1104 feet; established, 1866; named in honor of 
Mrs. Martha S. Whiting, of Boston, who became the second wife of Senator S. C. Pomeroy; 
telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific and Rock Island railways. 

JOURNAL, independent; Butters & Butters, editors and publishers, Whiting. 

Weekly. Feb. 18, 1898 -f- 18 vols. 
Founded 1897 by W. E. Johnson. 



Holton . 



Circleville 



Delia .-;'. 
Denison . 



Hoyt 

Mayetta 
Netawaka 



Soldier . 
Whiting. 

Holton . 

Denison . 

Hoyt 

Netawaka 
Soldier . 
Whiting. 

Denisofi 
Hoyt 



DISCONTINUED. Vols 

Argus. Apr. 20 Oct. 24, 1897 1 

Campbell Caravan (m). Jan.-May, 1915 1 

Campbell College Charta (m). Sept., 19031912 9 

Express. Apr. 12, 1872 1875 . 3 

Fraternal Aid (m). May 15, 18911897 6 

[See, also, Douglass county.] 

Independent Tribune; Holton Tribune. June 28, 1890 1905 15 

Jackson County Federal. Sept. 1, 18861887 1 

Jackson County News; Holton News. Apr. 11, 1872 1873 2 

Kansas Sunflower; Sunbeam. Dec. 19, 18951904 8 

Normal Advocate [broken file]. May 15, 18821899 11 

University Informer. June 23, 1892 1898 7 

Jackson County World. Jan. 18, 1901 1909 9 

[July 31, 1908, to Apr. 23, 1909, not published.] 

Kansas Bazaar. June 25, 1891 1893 1 

Kicker; News. Nov. 22, 18941900 6 

Rural Advocate. July 4 Oct. 24, 1890 1 

. Paper. Apr. 4, 19071908 2 

.Journal. Nov. 14, 18951896 1 

Leader. Oct. 3, 19001901 1 

News. Oct. 7, 19091910 1 

Star. Dec. 20, 18891890 1 

.Sentinel. Apr. 19, 19021914 .13 

Times. June 9 Nov. 10, 1887 1 

.News. July 20, 19041905 1 

.Bee (d and w). Netawaka and Holton. Apr. 18, 18791880. . 1 

Chief (1st). June 4, 18721874 2 

Herald. July 31, 18961899 3 

Review. June 15 Sept. 1, 1888 1 

Star. Apr. 7, 18931894 . 2 

Talk [broken file]. Nov. 1, 1907 Jan. 28, 1916 1 

Times. Oct. 15, 19031904 1 

Wasp. Jan. 11 Oct. 4, 1895 1 

. Tribune. Jan. 26, 18881890 2 

.News. Mar. 16, 1883 Jan., 1891; June, 18911892 10 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

. Express. Sept. 30 Oct. 1, 1873. 
Recorder. Mar. 19-23, 1886. 
.News. June 8-29, 1888. 
.Messenger. Apr., 1887. 
.Reporter. Sept. 1 Oct. 27, 1888. 
. Home Doings. Sept. 11, 18, 1890. 
. Telephone. May 24 July 5, 1878. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 

. Hammer (m). Jan.-Mar., 1899. 
Herald. Oct. 2, 1902 Jan. 29, 1903. 
.Journal. July 30 Dec. 31, 1896. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 209 



JEFFERSON COUNTY. 

Organized, 1855; named for Thomas Jefferson; county seat, Oskaloosa; 
area, 568 square miles, 363,520 acres; population (1915), 15,769; assessed 
valuation (1915), $31,737.415; resources and industries building stone agri- 
culture, and stock raising. 

OSKALOOSA Population (1915), 808; elevation, 991 feet; established, 1856; named for Oska- 
loosa, Iowa; industries saw and grist mills, cannery, bridle-bit factory; telephones, electric 
lights; is on the Santa Fe and Missouri Pacific railways. 

INDEPENDENT, Republican; F. H. Roberts, editor and publisher, Oskaloosa. 

Weekly. Jan. 1, 1870 Jan., 1876; Sept., 1876 + 45 vols. 
Founded 1860 by J. W. Roberts. 

JEFFERSON COUNTY TRIBUNE, Democratic; Clayton Wyatt, editor, Harmon Publishing Com- 
pany, publisher, Oskaloosa. 

Weekly. Apr. 21, 1899 + 17 vols. 
Founded 1899 by Coif ax B. Harmon. 

TIMES, Democratic; Clayton Wyatt, editor, Harmon Publishing Company, publisher, Oskaloosa. 

Weekly. Jan. 10, 1891 + 25 vols. 
Founded 1891 by A. G. Patrick; absorbed in 1897 the McLouth Champion, published by 

H. F. Thompson, early history unknown, first issue in Society's collection being dated Mav 8 

1896, and numbered vol. 2, No. 24. 

McLOUTH Population (1915), 580; elevation, 1159 feet; established, 1887; named for Amos 
McLouth, original owner of the town site; industries flour mills, elevators, creameries; tele- 
phones; is on the Missouri Pacific and the Leavenworth & Topeka railways. 

TIMES, Republican; W. W. Randel, editor and publisher, McLouth. 

Weekly. May 5, 1887 -f 28 vols. 
Founded 1887 by A. B. Mills. 

MERI DEN Population (1915), 471; established, 1872; named for Meriden, N. H.; creameries; 

telephones; is on the Santa Fe and Leavenworth & Topeka railways. 
LEDGER, independent; Lizzie Shafer, editor and publisher, Meriden. 
Weekly. Mar. 30, 1894 + 22 vols. 

Founded 1894 by Charles E. Prather. 

NORTONVILLE Population (1915), 661; elevation, 1160 feet; established, 1873; named for 
L. Norton, jr., an early roadmaster of the Santa Fe railroad; electric lights, telephones; is 
on the Santa Fe railway. 

NEWS, Republican; D. E. Hill, editor and publisher, A. P. Burdick, owner, Norton ville. 

Weekly. May 8, 1885 + 29 vols. 
Founded 1885 by R. E. Van Meter; in 1898 absorbedjthe Norto:wiile]Herald, founded in 1896 

by Alonzo W. Robinson; called the News-Herald from Sept. 30, 1893, tojMar. 17, 1899, when the 

old name was again taken. 

PERRY Population (1915J, 464; elevation, 849 feet; established, 1865; first called Perryville 
and named for John D. Perry, president of the Union Pacific railway, E. D.; elevators; tele- 
phones; is on the Union Pacific railway. 

MIRROR, Republican; R. B. Griffith, editor and publisher, Perry. 

Weekly. June 2, 1898 -+- 18 vols. 
Founded 1898 by C. M. Dunn. 

VALLEY FALLS Population (1915), 1244; elevation, 913 feet; established, 1854; first called 
Grasshopper Falls, from falls in the Grasshopper, now Deleware, river; name changed to 
Sautrelle Falls, and in 1875 to Valley Falls; industries elevators, mills, creamery; water- 
works, electric lights, water power; is on the Santa Fe, the Missouri Pa?iftc and the Union 
Pacific railways. 
14 



210 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



FARMER'S VINDICATOR, Democratic; George Harmon, editor, Harmon Publishing Company, pub- 
lisher, Valley Falls. 

Weekly. Sept. 13, 1890 + 25 vols. 
Founded 1890 by N. H. Harmon. 

KANSAS FRATERNAL CITIZEN, fraternal; George Harmon, editor, Kansas Fraternal Citizen Com- 
pany, publisher, Valley Falls. 

Monthly. Feb., 1914 + 2 vols. 
Founded 1912 at Hutchinson, by the Society of the Kansas Fraternal Citizen, Rodolph Hat- 

rield, state president; moved to Topeka 1913, with George Harmon, editor; the following year 

moved to Valley Falls. 

NEW ERA, Republican, George Harmon, editor and publisher, Valley Falls. 

Weekly. Sept. 25, 1873 -f 42 vols. 

Founded 1865 as the Kansas New Era, at Lecompton, by S. Weaver; in 1867 moved to 
Medina, Jefferson county, and in 1871 to Grasshopper Falls (now Valley Falls). 

REPORTER, Republican; G. C. Hall, editor and publisher, Valley Falls. 

Daily. July 21, 1915 + 1 vol. 
Founded 1915 by G. C. Hall. 

WINCHESTER Population (1915), 457; elevation, 1160 feet; established, 1857; named for 

Winchester, Va.; telephones; is on the Union Pacific railway. 
STAR, Republican; Mrs. O. C. Kirkpatrick, editor and publisher, Winchester. 

Weekly. Feb. 3, 1893 + 23 vols. 

Founded 1888 as the Winchester Herald, by S. T. Marshall; name changed 1893 to 
Star, W. C. Starr, editor. 

DISCONTINUED. 



Winchester 

Vols. 



Oskaloosa . . 

McLouth . . . 

eriden 

Nortonville. 

Osawkie 
Perry 

Valley Falls. 



Williamstown 
Winchester. . 



Oakaloosa . . 
Grantville . 
Osawkie . . . 

Perry 



..Kansas Churchman (m). 1900. [See Shawnee county.] 

Sickle and Sheaf; Weekly Sickle. Oct. 9, 18731886 

. . . Champion. May 8, 18961897 

Tribune. Mar. 29 Aug. 30, 1895 

Advocate. Aug. 10, 1889 1890. [See Shawnee county.] 

Report. June 27, 18851889 

Tribune. June 5, 18901897 . . . 

. . Herald. Feb. 7, 18961898 

Royal Neighbor (m). Jan., 1894 1895 

Sentinel. Feb. 6, 19031904 

. . . Chief. Dec. 21, 19011902 

Times. Dec. 4, 18851886 

.Jefferson County Journal. Sept. 24, 18971898. . . 

Kaw Valley Chief (1st). Oct. 10, 18791882 

Monitor; Kaw Valley Chief (2d). May 25, 18831884 

News. Mar. 21, 18911892 

World. Aug. 1, 18951897 

. .Eastern Kansan. Aug. 24, 19111914 

Fair Play. May 19, 18881890 

Kansas Educational Journal (m). [See Leavenworth county.] 

Kansas New Era. May 29 Sept. 4, 1867 

[See, also, Lecompton, Douglas county.] 
Liberal; Kansas Liberal (m and w). Vallev Falls and Lawrence. 

Aug. 9, 18801883 .'. 

Lucifer, the Light Bearer. Aug. 24, 18831890 

[See, also, Topeka, Shawnee county.] 

Register. Feb. 11, 18811891 

Republican. Sept. 7, 18891890 

. . .Mail. Oct. 17, 19011902 

. .Argus. Aug. 23, 18771888 

Herald. Feb. 23, 18881892 



Valley Falls. 



SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 
.Kansas Statesman. Dec. 17, 31, 1869. 
.News. Nov. 21, 1901 Mar. 22, 1902. 
.Journal. Oct. 25 Dec. 27, 1902. 
.Champion Liar. July 1, 1897. 

Kansas Journal. Dec. 3, 1898. 

Sun. Oct. 18 Nov. 22, 1893. 
.Baptist (m). Feb.-June, 1884. 

Kansas Jeffersonian. Nov. 3, 1866. 

Patrick's Advertiser. Nov. 13, 1886. 

Patrick's Independent. Nov. 3, 1887. 

Patrick's Paralyzer. Oct. 31 and Nov. 2, 1885. 

Register (d). Sept. 1, 1885. 

Social Reformer (m). Aug., 1884 Jan., 1885. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 211 



JEWELL COUNTY. 

Organized, 1870; named for Lewis R. Jewell, lieutenant colonel, Sixth 
Kansas cavalry; county seat, Mankato; area, 900 square miles, 576,000 
acres; population (1915), 17,165; assessed valuation (1915), $39,637,290; 
resources and industries build ng stone, gypsum, coal, cement rock, salt 
springs, agriculture, horticulture, and stock raising. 

MANKATO Population (1915), 1054; elevation, 1752 feet; established, 1872; originally called 
Jewell Center; name changed to Mankato in 1880; named for Mankato, Minn.; telephones, 
municipal water system, city library; is on the Rock Island and Missouri Pacific railways. 
HIGH SCHOOL RECORD, school; edited and published by the students of the high school, Mankato. 

Monthly. Oct. 15, 1904 + 11 vols. 
Founded 1904 by the high-school students. 
JEWELL COUNTY MONITOR, Republican; Emmet D. George, editor and publisher, Mankato. 

Weekly. June 5, 1874; June 30, 1876 + 40 vols. 

A continuation of the following: Jewell City Clarion, founded 1872 by W. P. Day and W. D. 
Jenkins; name changed 1873 to Jewell County Diamond, M. Winsor, editor and publisher; con- 
solidated in 1878 with the Jewell County Monitor, founded 1874 at Jewell Center, by Frank Kirk; 
ran as the Jewell County Monitor and Diamond at Jewell Center; name changed back to Jewell 
County Monitor in 1880; in 1904 the name was changed to Jewell County Advertiser, Coleman 
& Dillman, editors and publishers; in 1907 the paper again took its old name, Jewell County Moni- 
tor, with E. D. George, editor and publisher. 

WESTERN ADVOCATE, Democratic; Henry R. Honey, editor and publisher, Mankato. 

Weekly. Aug. 7, 1890 + 25 vols. 

Founded 1890 at Burr Oak, by William E. Bush and Mattie E. Convis; moved to Mankato 
in 1892. 

BURR OAK Population (1915), 723; elevation, 1662 feet; established, 1870; named for the 
stream on which it is situated; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

HERALD, Republican; Harry E. Ross, editor and manager, Burr Oak. 

Weekly. Jan. 25, 1883 -f 33 vols. 
This paper is a continuation of the following: The Central Reflex, founded 1880 at Burr 

Oak, by H. E. Taylor; name changed same year to Burr Oak Reveille; consolidated in 1884 with 

Burr Oak Herald, founded in 1882; publication continued under name Burr Oak Herald, with Orm 

C. Emery, editor, and J. E. Faidley, proprietor. 

ESBON Population (1915), 337; established, 1873; telephones; is on the Rock Island railway. 
TIMES, Democratic; Earl Vaughn, editor and publisher, Esbon. 

Weekly. Feb. 3, 1899 + 17 vols. 
Founded 1899 by H. S. Simpson and A. C. Cutler. 

FORMOSO Population (1915), 412; established about 1889; telephones; sanitarium; is on Rock 

Island railway. 

NEW ERA, independent; J. F. Hale, editor and publisher, Formoso. 
Weekly. Dec. 21, 1900 -j- 15 vols. 

Founded 1900 by A. E. Coleman and Bert Laughlin. 

JEWELL Population (1915), 775; elevation, 1564 feet; established about 1870; named for Lieut. 

Col. Lewis R. Jewell; industries flour mills, elevators; electric lights, telephones; is on the 

Missouri Pacific railway. 
JEWELL COUNTY REPUBLICAN, independent Republican; W. C. Palmer, editor and publisher, 

Jewell City. 

Weekly. Dec. 19, 1879 + 36 vols. 

Founded 1879 by H. C. and W. W. Brown. 

LOVEWELL Population (1915, estimated), 110; established about 1890; telephones; is on the 
Santa Fe railway. 



212 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



INDEX, independent; Chester Simmons, editor and publisher, Lovewell. 

Weekly. Jan. 30, 1913 + 3 vols. 

Founded 1913 by R. M. Moser and Rev. R. L. Turk; absorbed in 1914 the Formoso Spirit 
founded 1912 by T. J. Wilson. 

RANDALL Population (1915), 338; elevation, 1448 feet; established, 1870; originally called, 
Vicksburg; name changed to Randall in 1882; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 
NEWS, Republican; J. O. Rodgers, editor and publisher, Randall. 

Weekly. Dec. 6, 1901 -(- 14 vols. 
Founded 1901 by W. A. Smith. 

DISCONTINUED. Vols 

Mankato Ekselsior. Baxter Springs, North Branch and Mankato. 

[Jewell Center.] July, 1879, Sept., 1880 May, 1881 1 

God's Missionary Messenger (qr). 1906 1907. [See Republic county.] 

Jacksonian. Feb. 2, 1888 1890 3 

Jewell County Review. July 18, 1879 1885 15 

[Called Mankato Review, Mar., 1883, to Dec., 1885.] 

Kansas Jewellite. Aug. 16, 18821884 1 

Labor Clarion. July 12, 18881889 1 

[Bound with Salem Argus.] 

Review (d). Aug. 2 Sept. 30, 1887 1 

Burr Oak. . . . . .Independent; Jewell County Independent; Burr Oak Republican. 

Dec. 17, 18861887 1 

Reveille. Jan. 6, 18801884 4 

[First issue called Central Reflex.] 

Rustler. June 3 Oct. 28, 1886 1 

Thinker. [See McPherson County Short-lived, vol. 2.] 

Esbon. . . . . .Leader. June 30, 18921893 1 

Sentinel; Jewell County Search Light. Feb. 1 Nov. 9, 1894 1 

Formoso ... . . Enterprise. Jan. 3 Aug. 28, 1896 1 

Spirit. Nov. 6, 19121914 2 

Jewell Jewell County Democrat. Dec. 11, 1885 1887 2 

Jewell County Diamond. June 4, 1874; Jan. 20, 1876 1877 2 

Jewell County News. Oct. 9, 18911895 3 

Omio . . . . Democratic Mail. May 17 Sept. 27, 1884 1 

Jewell County Journal. May 29, 18791880 1 

Western Advocate. Feb. 14 Sept. 7, 1882 1 

Randall . . . .Beacon. Sept. 27, 18891890 1 

Exponent. Jan. 2, 18911892 2 

Register. Apr. 25, 18851888 3 

Tribune. Oct. 8 Dec. 31, 1887 1 

Salem Argus. Mar. 1, 18831890 6 

[Not published Jan. to June, 1889; called Kansas Labor Clarion July 
12, 1888, to Jan. 17, 1889.J 

Jewell County Chronicle. Apr. 13, 1882 Jan. 18, 1883 1 

People's Friend. May 20, 18851887 2 

White Rock Independent. June 20 Dec. 19, 1879. . ...... 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Dentonia Institutionist (m). Apr .-June, 1890. 

Esbon Light of Liberty. Nov. 30, 1894 Jan. 11, 1895. 

Formoso Times. Oct. 4 Nov. 8, 1889. 

Jewell Clarion. Aug. 30, 1872. 

Jewell County Record. Apr. 9 Aug. 20, 1897. 

Jewell County Republican (Daily Conference edition). Mar. 27 Apr. 1, 1889. 

Rubens Anti-Monopolist. Feb. 9, 1882. 

Webber Herald. May 18 June 1, 1894. 

Times. Mar. 30 May 11, 1894. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 213 



JOHNSON COUNTY. 

Organized, 1855; named for Rev. Thomas Johnson, missionary to the 
Shawnee Indians; county seat, Olathe; area, 480 square miles, 307,200 acres; 
population (1915), 18,507; assessed valuation (1915), $40,424,435; resources 
and industries building stone, gray marble, coal, natural gas, agriculture, 
horticulture, and stock raising. 

OLATHE Population (1915), 3335; elevation, 1032 feet; established, 1857; name a Shawnee 
Indian word meaning beautiful; industries flour mill; in natural gas belt; municipal elec- 
tric light plant, waterworks, paved streets, public library; is on the Missouri & Kansas 
Interurban, the Frisco, the Santa Fe, and the Kansas City, Clinton & Springfield railways. 

INDEPENDENT, independent; Morris Patton, editor, C. W. Gorsuch, associate editor, Olathe. 

Weekly. Feb. 7, 1912 + 4 vols. 
This paper is a continuation of the Lenexa News, founded about Nov., 1905, first issue 

in Society's file being vol. 1, No. 52, Nov. 23, 1906, E. A. Legler, editor and publisher; moved to 

Olathe 1912, and name changed to Olathe Independent, Will H. Peter, editor and manager. 

KANSAS STAR, educational; edited and published by the Kansas School for the Deaf, Olathe. 
Semimonthly. May, 1876 + 40 vols. 

Founded 1872 by Kansas School for the Deaf. 

MIRROR, Republican; John W. Breyfogle, editor, Mirror Publishing Company, publisher, Olathe. 
Weekly. Mar. 15, 1866 Jan. 23, 1868; Jan. 6, 1876 + 42 vols. 

Scattering issues, Oct. 25, 1862; Oct. 29, 1864; Sept. 3, 1868; Oct. 24, 1869; Oct. 23 and Nov. 
27, 1873; Jan. 22 and July 2, 1874; Sept. 30, Oct. 28 and Dee. 23, 1875. 

The Olathe Mirror was founded May 9, 1861, by John Francis; on Sept. 6, 1862, the 
office was wrecked by Quantrill, and the publication was discontinued until 1862, when it was 
revived by Mr. Francis. The Mirror is also a continuation of the following: Spring Hill Enter- 
prise, founded 1870 by Buel & Sprague; name changed 1872 to Western Progress, W. H. McGown, 
editor and publisher; in 1873 moved to Olathe, and in 1880 sold to John Hindman, of the Gazette. 
Olathe News Letter, founded 1870 by J. A. and H. F. Cannutt; consolidated with the Mirror and 
published under the name of Mirror and News Letter until 1882. Olathe Gazette, founded 1880 by 
John Hindman; consolidated 1883 with the Mirror and published until 1886 as the Mirror-Gazette, 
when the name again became the Mirror. Olathe Re view, founded about 1881; absorbed by the 
Mirror. Olathe Republican, founded 1884 by H. F. Cannutt; sold to Mirror-Gazette in 1885. 
Olathe Weekly Herald, early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being dated September 8, 
1893, and numbered vol. 2, No. 49, John F. Herman, editor and publisher. Olathe News, founded 
by C. M. Norris (no issues in the Society's collection); consolidated 1898 with the Herald, and 
called News-Herald; consolidated 1902 with the Mirror. Lenexa Leader, founded 1908 by Mrs. 
M. S. Capps; consolidated with the Mirror in 1909. 

REGISTER, Democratic; R. A. Clymer, editor, Register Publishing Company, publisher, Olathe. 

Weekly. Nov. 11, 1898 Jan. 27, 1910; May 11, 1911 -j- 17 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Alliance Echo, Olathe, early history unknown, 
first issue in Society's file being vol. 3, No. 1, dated July 21, 1893, E. W. Justus, editor and pub- 
lisher; name changed in 1894 to Olathe Tribune, and published by the People's Party Publishing 
Company; name again changed in 1905 to the Republican Tribune, John W. Richardson, editor 
and publisher; sold in 1907 to the Olathe Register, founded 1898 by Samuel T. Seaton. 

DE SOTO Population (1915), 343; elevation, 729 feat; established, 1857; named for Hernando 
De Soto, the Spanish explorer; telephon?3; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

EAGLE EYE, independent; Wiard & Wiard, editors and publishers, De Soto. 

Weekly. Nov. 4, 1898 + 17 vols. 
Founded 1898; name changed 1910 to De Soto Herald, George E. Glenn, publisher; name 

again changed to Eagle Eye in 1912, with Wiard & Wiard, publishers. 

EDGERTON Population (1915), 286; elevation, 9S8 feat; established July, 1870; named for a 
Mr. Edgerton, of the engineering department of the A. T. & S. F. railroad; telephones; is on 
the Santa Fe railway. 

JOURNAL, Republican; Charles W. Mays, editor and publisher, Edgerton. 

Weekly. Dec. 28, 1906 + 9 vols. 
Founded 1906 by Charles W. Mays. 



214 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



GARDNER Population (1915), 536; elevation, 1065 feet; established, 1857; authorities differ as 
to the naming of the town; by one it is claimed to have been named in honor of Henry J . 
Gardner, governor of Massachusetts in 1855; by another for O. B. Gardner, an early resident 
of Johnson county and a member of the Gardner Town-site Company; telephones; is on the 
Santa Fe railway. 

GAZETTE, independent; Ed. L. Eaton, editor and publisher. Gardner. 

Weekly. Sept. 28, 1899 -f- 16 vols. 
Founded 1899 by R. B. Huffman. 

SPRING HILL Population (1915), 540; elevation. 1030 feet; established, 1857; named for 

Spring Hill, Ala.; telephones; is on the St. Louis & San Francisco railway. 
NEW ERA, Republican; Will F. Wilkerson, editor and publisher, Spring Hill. 

Weekly. Nov. 15, 1883 Jan., 1885; Aug., 1888 -f 28 vols. 
Founded 1883 by J. W. Sowers. 

DISCONTINUED. V(>li . 

Olathe Alliance Echo; Olathe Tribune; Republican Tribune. 

July 21, 18931907 14 

Gazette. July 24, 18791883 3 

Herald; News-Herald. Sept. 8, 18931902 9 

Johnson County Democrat. May 18, 18821891 10 

Kansas Baptist Review (m). Aug., 1897 Apr., 1898 1 

Kansas Patron. May 10, 18811903 23 

[Called Patron and Farmer, Mar. 10 to Aug. 18, 1881.] 

Leader (1st). Jan. 9, 18791881 2 

Leader (2d). Aug. 27, 18911893 3 

Our Little Friend. Oct. 14, 18931896 3 

Progressive Thought (qr. , m and bi-m). Sept., 1893 1903 9 

Republican. May 8, 18841885 2 

Western Progress. Jan. 28, Feb. 11, Apr. 1, Nov. 4, 1875; 

Jan. 6, 18761880 4 

De Soto Pioneer. Oct. 29, 18971898 1 

Edgerton Enterprise. Edgerton and Olathe. Nov. 27, 1903 1904 1 

Gazette. May 10, 18951896 1 

Globe. Mar. 3, 18991901 3 

News. May 22, 19021903 2 

Gardner Graphic. Apr. 24, 18911893 3 

Kansas True Flag; Gardner Flag; Weekly Message. 

Sept. 22, 18941896 1 

Young Kansan; Kansan. May 31, 1889 1891 2 

Lenexa ... . . Leader. Oct. 14, 19081909 ... 1 

News. Nov. 23, 19061912 5 

Spring Hill Headlight (m). Spring Hill and Wellsville. July, 18941896 2 

Kansas Register. Apr. 13 Oct. 26, 1878 1 

Review. Sept. 30, 18811882 . . . 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Olathe Baptist Builder (m). May-Sept., 1887. 

Educational Advocate (m). Mar., 1880 Feb., 1881. 

Kansas Central. Mar. 11, Apr. 15, 22, 29, May 6, June 17, 1868. 

Kansas Plaindealer. Jan. 4 May 3, 1887. 

Meteor, Evening. Apr. 1-26, 1879. 

News Letter. Oct. 30, Nov. 13, 1873; Jan. 15, July 2, Oct. 1, 1874. 

Antioch Local (m). Oct., 1895 Mar., 1896. 

De Soto Signal. Jan., 1887. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Lenexa World. Mar. 14 Apr. 25, r _1913. 

Merriam Herald-Chieftain. Mar. 21 Apr. 25, 1913. 

Overland Park News. Mar. 28 Apr. 25, 1913. 

Stanley Review. Mar. 14 Apr. 25, 1913. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 215 



KEARNY COUNTY. 

Organized March 27, 1888; named for Gen. Phillip Kearny; county seat, 
Lakin; area, 864 square miles, 552,960 acres; population (1915;, 2316; as- 
sessed valuation (1915), $5,672,404; resources and industriesbuilding stone, 
gypsum, irrigation projects, agriculture, and stock ra'sing. 

LAKIN Population (1915), 480; elevation, 2998 feet; established, 1874; nam^l for David L. 

Lakin, of Topeka; telephones, electric light; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
KHARNY COUNTY ADVOCATE, Republican; W. E. Slavens, editor and publisher, Lakin. 
Weekly. May 23, 1885 + 30 vols. 

Founded 1885 by F. R. French and C. 6. Chapman; consolidated 1895 with the Lakin Union, 
founded 1895 by H. S. Gregory, and which issued but two numbers; consolidated 1911 with the 
Lakin Investigator, founded 1911 by F. R. French. 

DISCONTINUED. Volt 

Lakin Herald. May 13 Dec. 30, 1882 . . . 

Index. May 3, 18901898 ... 8 

Investigator. Apr. 13, 18981911 13 

Pioneer Democrat. Jan. 12, 18861890 5 

Deerfield Farmer. Dec. 22, 19041905 . . 1 

News. Apr. 22 Oct. 14, 1909 1 

Hartland Herald. Feb. 27, 18861891 5 

Kearny County Coyote. Chantilly, Omaha and Hartland. 

Jan. 1, 18871890 3 

Times. Apr. 2, 18861887 2 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Lakin. . . . .Eagle. May 20 Oct. 10, 1879. 

Union. Mar. 28, 1895. 
Hartland Standard. Dec. 24, 1888 Mar. 2, 1889. 



KINGMAN COUNTY. 

Organized, 1873; named for Samuel A. Kingman, chief justice of the 
supreme court; county seat, Kingman; area, 864 square miles, 502,960 acres; 
population (1915), 12,612; assessed valuation (1915), $31,255,185; resources 
and industries building stone, gypsum, mineral paint, agriculture, and stock 
raising. 

KINGMAN Population (1915), 2255; elevation, 1504 feet; established, 1874; named for Judge 
Samuel A. Kingman; industries elevators, flour mills, planing mill, salt mine, creamery; 
telephones, electric lights, waterworks; is on the Santa Fe and the Missouri Pacific railways. 

JOURNAL, Democratic; R. S. Whitelaw, editor and proprietor, Kingman. 

Weekly. Jan. 3, 1890 -f- 26 vols. 
Founded 1888 as the Voice of the People, by S. H. Snider and O. P. Fuller; name changed 1889 

to Kingman Weekly Journal, J. A. Maxey, editor and publisher. 

LEADER-COURIER, Republican; Ed A. Palmer and John McKenna, editors and publishers, King- 

man. 

Weekly. Dec. J6, 1884 + 31 vols. 

This paper is a continuation* of the following: Kingman Courier, founded 1884 by John C. 
Foley. Kingman Daily Courier, founded 1887 by John C. Foley; discontinued in 1889. * Kingman 
Leader, founded 1884 by Bion S. Hutchins and W. L. Chellis: consolidated 1889 with the Courier 
and continued as the Leader-Courier, with Morton Albaugh, editor and publisher. 

THE ORACLE, school; edited and published by students of the Kingman county high school, 
Kingman. 

Seiimothly. Nov., 1910 -f- 5 vols. 
Founded 1906 by the students of the county high school. 



216 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



CUNNINGHAM Population, (1915, estimated), 500; established, 1886; originally known as 

Ninnescah; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

CLIPPER, independent; J. Milton Banie, editor and publisher, Cunning" am. 
Weekly. Oct. 17, 1902 + 13 vols. 

Founded 1902 by C. C. Hixon. 

NASHVILLE Population (1915, estimated), 200; elevation, 1750 feet; established about 1888; 

industries mill, elevators; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
JOURNAL, independent; Clyde Walter, editor and publisher, Nashville. 
Weekly. Sept. 26, 1912 -f- 3 vols. 

Founded 1912 by Clyde, Walter. 

NORWICH Population (1915), 432; elevation, 1496 feet; established about 1885; named for 
Norwich, Conn.; industries elevators, flour mill; telephones; is on the Santa Fe and Missouri 
Pacific railways. 

HERALD, local; W. R. Harman, editor and publisher, Norwich. 

Weekly. Jan. 20, 1899 + 17 vols. 
Founded 1899 by J. A. Maxey. 

PENALOSA Population (1915, estimated), 250; elevation, 1730 feet; established about 1885; 

first known as Lotta; name changed to Penalosa, in honor of the Spanish explorer, in 1887; 

telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 
TIMES, local; W. Ward, editor and owner, Penalosa. 
Weekly. Aug. 12, 1915 -f 

Founded 1915 by E. W. Park. 

ZEN DA Population (1915, estimated), 300; established later than 1900; telephones; is on the 

Santa Fe railway. 

CITIZEN, independent; E. J. Garner, editor and publisher, Zenda. 
Weekly. Aug. 20, 1909 -f 6 vols. 

Founded 1909 by Elwood G. Slemmer. 

DISCONTINUED. Vols _ 

Kingman Courier. Apr. 18, 1884 1889 6 

Courier (d). May 2, 18871889 .4 

Home Life (m). Apr., 18991901 1 

Kingman County Citizen. Sept. 13, 18791884 4 

Kingman County Republican. Mar. 1, 1882 1884 3 

[Called Citizen Republican, 1884.] 

Kingman County Telegraph [German]. Sept. 6, 1906 1912 6 

Mercury (1st) ; Kingman Blade. June 14, 1878 1880 . 2 

News. Dec. 16, 18861888 1 

News (d). Dec. 16, 18861888 2 

[Nov., 1887, to Feb., 1888, lacking.] 
Southern Kansas Democrat; Kingman County Democrat. 

Oct. 13, 18831895 .11 

Voice of the People. Mar. 8, 18881889 2 

Cleveland Star. July 20, 18811882 1 

Cunningham Chronicle. Jan. 5, 18931894 1 

[NinnescahJ Herald. Aug. 12, 18861892 6 

[Jan.-May, 1891, not published.] 

New Murdock Herald. Apr. 8 Dec. 22, 1887 -. 1 

Norwich News. Jan. 2, 18861892 . . . 7 

Saturday Morning Bee; Norwich Courant. Sept. 22, 18941898 4 

Penalosa News (1st). Aug. 12, 18871888 1 

News (2d). Feb. 25, 19101914 5 

Spivey Dispatch. Feb. 24, 18871888 2 

Index. June 5, 18891891 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Kingman Mercury (2d). May^S June 13, 1890. 

Nashville News. Apr. 12 July 12, 1888. 

Norwich Star. June 4, 1903. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 217 



KIOWA COUNTY. 

Organized, March 25, 1886; named for the Kiowa tribe of Indians; county 
seat, Greensburg; area, 720 square miles, 460,800 acres; population (1915), 
6464; assessed valuation (1915), $16,214,039; resources and industries- 
building stone, agriculture, and stock raising. 

GREENSBURG Population (1915), 1298; elevation, 2235 feet; established, 1885; named for 
Col. D. R. Green; industries elevators, mills; telephones; is on the Rock Island railway. 
KIOWA COUNTY SIGNAL, independent; Poore & Holmes, editors and publishers, Greensburg. 

Weekly. Mar. 5, 1886 + 30 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Kiowa County Signal, founded 1886 by Will E. 
Bolton and a Mr. Lee. Greensburg Rustler, founded 1886 by S. B. Sproule; absorbed in 1888 
by the Kiowa County Times, founded 1888 by H. B. Graves; consolidated 1895 with the Kiowa 
County Signal. Greensburg Republican, founded 1902 by William Waddell; consolidated 1911 
with the Signal. 

PROGRESSIVE, Progressive; A. W. Gibson, editor and publisher, Greensburg. 

Wa-kly. Jan. 2, 1913 + 3 vols. 
Founded 1912 by A. W. Gibson. 

HAVILAND Population (1915), 565; elevation, 2162 feet; established, 1887; telephones; is on 

the Santa Fe railway. 

ONLOOKER, independent; J. A. Renicker, editor and publisher, Haviland. 
Weekly. May 6, 1903 + 13 vols. [Broken file.]. 

Founded 1903 by Frank Fesler. 

MULLINVILLE Population (1915), 441; elevation, 2318 feet; established about 1886; in- 
dustries mill, elevators; telephones; is on the Rock Island railway. 
NEWS, independent; Theo. C. Perry, editor and manager, Perry Bros., publishers, Mullinville. 

Weekly. Mar. 13, 1913 + 3 vols. 

Founded as the Mullinville Tribune 1905 by J. G. Connor; name changed 1913 to Mullin- 
ville News, with Perry Brothers, editors and publishers. 

DISCONTINUED. Volgf 

Greensburg Kiowa County Opinion. July 30, 18971898 1 

Kiowa County Times. Aug. 17, 1888 1895 7 

Republican (1st). Mar. 22, 18871888 1 

Republican (2d). Aug. 8, 18901891 1 

Republican (3d). Aug. 7, 19021911 9 

Republican Banner. Apr. 18, 18911895 4 

Rustler. Apr. 22, 18861888 

Dowell Democrat and Watchman. Dowell and Wellsford. Nov. 28, 18851886.. 1 

Haviland . . . . Kiowa County Independent. Haviland and Greensburg. 

June 6, 18991900 1 

Tribune. Nov. 17, 18871889 

Mullinville . Mallet. Sept. 30, 18861888 . . ... 2 

Telegram. Sept. 30, 18861887 

Tribune. July 27, 19051913 

Wellsford ... . . Kiowa County Democrat. Jan. 13, 18871888 . . .2 

Record. Jan. 8 June 11, 1914 

Register (1st). June 13 Nov. 21, 1885 1 

Register (2d). Jan. 2 Oct. 25, 1890 1 

Republican. Aug. 20, 18861887 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Greensburg Irrigation World (m). Dec., 1894 Jan., 1895. 

Wellsford Reformer. Dec. 29, 1888 Aug. 9, 1889. 



218 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



LABETTE COUNTY. 

Organized, 1867; name is from the French words la Mte the beast; 
county seat, Oswego; area, 649 square miles, 415,360 acres; population (1915), 
31,014; assessed valuation (1915), $37,073,251; resources and industries- 
building stone, brick clay, coal, oil, gas, agriculture, and stock raising. 

OSWEGO Population (1915), 2258; elevation, 899 feet; established. 1867; named for Oswego, 
N. Y.; industries flour mills, creamery; coal, gas, and oil district; telephones, electric lights, 
municipal water system; is on the M. K. & T. and the S. L. & S. F. railways. 
DEMOCRAT, Democratic; Alf. D. Carpenter, editor and publisher, Oswego. 

Weekly. Oct. 21, 1899 + 16 vols. 

Founded Oct. 21, 1899, by Alf D. Carpenter; Feb., 1909, purchased subscription list of the 
Oswego Blade, founded Jan. 27, 1894, as the Union Blade, Capt. G. A. Nicholette, editor and 
publisher. Union Blade, consolidated with the Oswego News ( history unknown ; no copies on file in 
Historical Society), and appeared as the Oswego News-Blade, first issue in Society's file being 
Sept. 29, 1894, vol. 1, No. 36, S. C. Steinberger, publisher; name changed Feb. 17, 1897, to Oswego 
Weekly Blade, William Cook, editor and publisher; Jan. 11, 1900, the Labette County Times- 
Statesman was sold to the Blade. The Times-Statesman is a continuation of the Chetopa States- 
man, founded Aug. 6, 1885, by Nelson and Mrs. R. M. Abbott; removed to Oswego Aug., 1889; 
purchased Jan. 14, 1892, the subscription list of the Labette County Times, Oswego, and became 
the Labette County Times-Statesman, R. B. Claiborn, editor and publisher; history of Labette 
County Times unknown, first issue in Society's file bearing date and number, June 18, 1892, vol. 2, 
No. 2, S. C. Steinberger, editor and publisher. 

DIAL, college; edited and published by the students of Oswego College, Oswego. 

Bimonthly. Apr., 1912 + 4 vols. 
Founded 1912 by students of Oswego College. 
INDEPENDENT, Republican; W. A. Blair, editor and publisher, Oswego. 

Weekly. Jan. 22, 1876 + 40 vols. 
Founded 1872; first issue in Society's file gives F. B. McGill, editor and publisher. 

ALTAMONT Population (1915), 691; elevation, 904 feet; established, 1870; originally called 
Elston; name changed about 1879; telephones; is on the St. Louis & San Francisco railway. 

JOURNAL, Republican; Frank E. George, editor and publisher, Altamont. 

Weekly. Feb. 16, 1905 -j- 11 vols. 
Founded in 1903; early history unknown. 

BARTLETT Population (1915), 269; elevation, 888 feet; established about 1887; named for 
Robert A. Bartlett, chief promoter of the town; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

NEWS, independent; Thomas A. Reed, editor and publisher, Bartlett. 

Weekly. Aug. 26, 1915 + 1 vol. 
Founded 1915 by Thomas A. Reed. 

CHETOPA Population (1915), 1899; elevation, 825 feet; established, 1868; name formed from 
two Osage Indian words, che and topa, meaning four houses; industries flour mills, creamery, 
brick plant; telephones, natural gas district, municipal electric light and waterworks systems: 
is on the M. K. & T. and the Missouri Pacific railways. 

ADVANCE, Republican; H. R. Huston, editor and publisher, Chetopa. 
Weekly. July 8, 1875; July 6, 1876 + 38 vols. 

Founded 1868 by John W. Homer and A. S. Corey; in 1874 the name was changed to Southern 
Kansas Advance, with J. M. Cavaness, editor and publisher; in 1878 name again changed to 
Chetopa Advance. 

CLIPPER, independent; M. A. Chesley, editor and publisher, Chetopa. 

Weekly. Jan. 2, 1903 + 13 vols. 

Founded in 1888 by J. J. Rambo, as Chetopa Democrat; name changed 1903 to Chetopa 
Clipper, M. A. Chesley, editor and publisher. 

EDNA Population (1915), 467; elevation, 978 feet; established, 1876; named for little Misa 
Edna Gragery; industries elevators, flour mill; in the gas district; telephones; is on the 
Missouri Pacific railway. 

SUN, independent; W. E. Staige, editor and publisher, Edna. 

Weekly. 
History unknown; no copies on file in the Historical Society. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 219 



MOI NI> VALLKY Population l!lf, NKK; elevation, K24 feet; established, 1869; named from 
a mound-like- range of hills in its vicinity; industries brick plants, glas* works, flour mill, 
elevator, coal mines, stone quarries; in gas and oil region: telephone; ison the St. Louis& San 
Francisco railway. 

.loi UN AI., Republican; D. H. Wallingford and R. J. Conderman, editors and publishers. Mound 
Valley. 

Weekly. Sept. 28, 1906 -f 9 vols. 
A continuation of the Mound Valley Herald, founded 1882 by C. Len Albin; consolidated 

19i:$ with the Mound Valley Journal, founded 1906 by D. H. Wallingford and R. J. Conderman. 

PARSONS Population (1915), 12,118; elevation, 898 feet; established, 1870; named in honor 
of Judge Levi Parsons, one of the builders of the M. K. & T. railway; industries flour and 
feed mills, ice and cold storage plants, corset factory, stone quarries, car and bridge building 
shops, machine shops; is in the gas and oil belt, coal mines; telephones, electric lights, paved 
streets, waterworks; is on the M. K. & T. and the St. Louis & San Francisco railway*-. 

ECLIPSE, Democratic; Celsus A. Lamb, editor and publisher, Parsons. 
Weekly. Jan. 13, 1876 -f- 40 vols. 
Daily. Jan. 3, 1881 + 88 vols. 
Weekly Eclipse was founded in 1874 by J. B. Lamb. The Daily Eclipse. was founded in 

1881 by J. B. Lamb & Son. 

KANSAS BAPTIST, religious; J. T. Crawford, editor and publisher, Parsons. 

Monthly. Feb. 1907 + 8 vols. 

Early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being numbered vol. 4, No. 2. 
SUN, Republican; Frank Motz, editor and manager, Sun Publishing Company, publisher, Parsons. 

Daily. Feb. 19, 1884 + 82 vols. 

The Parsons Sun (weekly) was founded in 1871 by Milton W. Reynolds and Leslie J. Perry; 
about 1878 or 1879 H. H. Lusk became the publisher and ran the Sun for many years; the weekly 
edition was discontinued with the issue for Dec. 25. 1908. The Daily Sun was founded about 1880 
or 1881, the first issue in Society's file being July 1, 1884, vol. .', No. 100, H. H. Lusk, editor and 
publisher. 

DISCONTINUED. Vote . 

Oswego.. ..Bee. Jan. 1, 1887 1889. .. . 2 

Bee (d). Mar. 7, 18871888 

Courant. Mar. 25, 18891890 2 

Golden Rod (bi-m). Aug., 18911907 16 

Journal, Evening (d). Mar. 10 May 9, 1903 1 

Labette County Democrat. Apr. 23, 1880 1896 16 

Labette County Statesman; Times-Statesman. Aug. 8, 1889 1900 10 

[1889 bound with Chetopa Statesman.] 

Oswego College Student (m). Aug., 1896 1897 

Pilot. Oswego and Altamont. Feb. 5, 19031904 1 

Republican. Aug. 12, 18811886 . . 

Republican (d). Aug. 9, 18811883 

Union Blade; News Blade. Jan. 27, 18941909 

Altamont Gazette. Jan. 25 Oct. 25, 1895 1 

Mill's Weekly World (Cherry vale, Altamont and Farsonsj, and Western 

World (Parsons). Aug. 8, 18881893 6 

Saturday Item. Aug. 29, 18961897 1 

Sentinel. Apr. 28, 18861890 

Bartlett Breeze. Sept. 15, 19101911 1 

Chetopa Democrat. Mar. 16, 18881902 . . ... 15 

Herald. Apr. 8, 18761878 1 

Kansas Messenger (m). 1904. (See Shawnee county.] 
Statesman. Aug. 6, 1885 1889 

Dennis Leader. Feb. 9, 18991900 2 

Edna Enterprise. Apr. 15 Sept. 2, 1887 . . 1 

Enterprise (2d). Sept. 23, 18991905 6 

Independent. Aug. 23, 18901893 

News. Oct. 28, 18931894 1 

Star. Oct. 28, 18871888 . . 

Sun. Nov. 24, 18941903 

Labette City Record. Oct. 21, 1899 1901. . - 

Star. Labette City and Parsons. Feb. 4 Dec. 30, 1898 . . 

Mound Valley Herald. July 16, 18851913 . . . 

News. Apr. 29, 18861887. . 1 



220 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DISCONTINUED. Vole 

Parsons . . Blade. Sept. 4, 18921901 . . .9 

Clarion. July 5, 18881891 ... .2 

Eli (d). Feb. 5 Dec. 3, 1891 2 

Evening Star (d). Apr. 6 Oct. 19, 1881 1 

Globe, Evening (d). May 23, 18981899 3 

Globe. Oct. 27, 18991900 ': 1 

Herald, Evening (d). Feb. 11, 19021904 8 

High School Sentiment. Dec., 1900 1908 8 

Independent. Mar. 10, 1894 1908. . . 15 

Infant Wonder (d). Dec. 26, 18781880 3 

Journal (d). Nov. 6, 18891890 1 

Kansas Workman; State Alliance. Jan. 16 Dec. 17, 1891 1 

News (d). Apr. 25, 19001901 3 

Our Home Visitor (m). May, 18911892 2 

Outlook (d). 18771878 1 

Palladium. Feb. 24, 18831912 30 

Republican (d). May 10, 18801881 2 

Searchlight of the W. R. C. (m). Apr. 15, 18981900 ... 3 

Sun. Mar. 4 Nov., 1876; May, 18771908 32 

Wilsonton Journal (m). May, 18881908 20 

White Banner. Wilsonton and Altamont. July, 18941902 8 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Oswego American Crank. Nov. 19, 1892 Mar. 11, 1893. 

Independent (d). Dec. 15, 1882 Jan. 6, 1883. 

Kansas Christian Advocate. Dec. 14, 1881 May 19, 1882. 

Labette County Times. June 18 July 9, 1892. 

Register. July 30, 1869; Dec. 6 and 12, 1873; July 10, 1874. 
Chetopa Settlers' Guide (m). Apr.-Oct., 1877. 

Times. Aug. 2, 1884. 
Mound Valley Times. Dec. 16, 1881 Apr. 28, 1882. 

United Labor. Aug. 6, 1887. 
Parsons Arbitrator. Sept. 10 Oct. 29, 1886. 

Broadaxe. Dec. 28, 1877; Jan. 11, 1878. 

Coffin's Business Directory. Feb., 1878. 

Eye Opener. July 9-23 and Dec. 26, 1892. 

Railway Employe. May 1, 1893. 

Surprise. June 13, 1874 Jan. 20, 1875. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Oswego Kansas Farm and Home (m). Feb.-Aug., 1899. 

Pilot (d). Feb. 4-19, 1903. 

Chetopa. Advance (reunion daily). Oct. 3-6, 1894; Sept. 4-7, 1895; Sept. 22-26, 1896. 

Dennis Hustler. Oct. 1 Dec. 31, 1898. 

Parsons Business College Journal (m). Jan., 1896. 

Free Parliament. Dec. 20, 1904; Jan. 17, Feb. 2 and 16, Mar. 16, 1905. 



LANE COUNTY. 

Organized, June 3, 1886; named for James Henry Lane, United States 
senator from Kansas 1861-1866; county seat, Dighton; area, 720 square 
miles, 460,800 acres; population (1915), 2120; assessed valuation (1915), 
$6,627,856; resources and industries building stone, gypsum, wheat, grazing, 
and stock raising. 

DIGHTON Population (1915), 272; elevation, 2761 feet; established about 1879; named for 
Dick Dighton, a surveyor; industries elevator, flour mill; telephones; is on the Santa Fe 
railway. 

JOURNAL-HERALD, independent ;~J. E. Lucas, editor "and publisher, Dighton. 

Weekly. May 1, 1885 + 31 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the Lane County Herald, founded 1885 by W. D. Pratt; name 
changed in 1892 to the Dighton Herald, F. H. Lobdell, editor and publisher; consolidated 1911 
with the Lane County Journal, founded 1897 by J. B. Milford; continued since as the Journal- 
Herald, with J. E. Lucas, editor and publisher. 

NEWS, Republican; Roy A. and Idabel C. Giles, editors and publishers, Dighton. 

Weekly. May 1, 1913 -+ 3 vols. 
Founded May 1, 1913, by Roy A. Giles. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 221 



DISCONTINUED. Vo/g 

Diirhton ... . . Idea. Mar. 25 June 7, 1896. . . 1 
Journal. Feb. 18, Mar. 4, 1886 1892. .. ... 6 

Lane County Farmer. Dec. 5, 1890 1892 .2 

Lane County Journal. Feb. 11, 18971911 . 15 

Progress (Digh ton Junction); Western Progress. Feb. 4 Aug. :*, I**". 1 

Republican. June 29, 18871889 

California Lane County Gazette. Jan. 29, 18801882 . 2 

Healy Banner. Dec. 2, 19031904 . 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 
Dighton Advance (m). Mar. June, 1890. 



LEAVENWORTH COUNTY. 

Organized, 1855; named for Gen. Henry Leavenworth, United States 
army; county seat, Leavenworth; area, 455 square miles, 291,200 acres; 
population (1915), 40,625; assessed valuation (1915), $42,357,238; resources 
and industries building stone, coal, red and yellow ochre, cement, potter's 
clay, agriculture, horticulture, and stock raising. 

LEAVENWORTH Population (1915), 22,090; elevation, 791 feet; established, 1854; named for 
Fort Leavenworth, oldest post in Kansas; industries a manufacturing center; factories in- 
clude stoves, mill and mining machinery, steam engines, wagons, carriages, furniture, shoes, 
pumps, soap, bridges, boilers, mechanical musical instruments, and many minor manufacturing 
plants; coal; electric light, waterworks, paved streets, telephones; is on the Santa Fe. Missouri 
Pacific and Union Pacific railways. 

HOME RECORD, charity; Mrs. Harriet E. Shelley, editor, Home for the Friendless, publisher, 
Leavenworth. 

Monthly. Nov. and Dec., 1873; Jan. and Apr., 1874, Jan., 1876 -f- 39 vols. 

[Not published Dec., 1912, to July, 1914.] 
Founded 1872, with Mrs. C. H. Gushing as editor. 

JOURNAL OP THE U. S. CAVALRY ASSOCIATION; Col. E. B. Fuller, editor, U. S. Cavalry Associa- 
tion, publisher, Leavenworth. 

Quarterly. Mar., 1888 + 28 vols. 
Founded 1888 by the U. S. Cavalry Association. 
LABOR CHRONICLE, labor; James F. O'Connor, editor and publisher, Leavenworth. 

Weekly. Feb. 12, 1909 + 7 vols. 

Founded 1909 as the Leavenworth Chronicle; name changed 1911 to the Labor Chronicle 
and Resubmissionist; name Resubmissionist dropped 1915. 

NEW ERA, prison reform; edited by the prisoners of the United States penitentiary, Leavenworth . 

Weekly. Feb. 27, 1914 + 2 vols. 
Founded 1912. 

OLD LADIES' JOURNAL, charity; Mrs. M. G. McNaughton, editor, board of managers of Wm. Small 
Memorial Home for Aged Women, publishers, Leavenworth. 

Monthly. Jan., 1898 + 18 vols. 
Founded 1893 by the board of managers. 

POST, independent; Albert T. Reid, president, Wallace F. Hovey, secretary and treasurer, Fred 
W. Jameson, editor and manager, Post Publishing Company, publisher, Leavenworth. 

Daily. Aug. 19, 1905 + 41 vols. 

Founded 1905 by the Post Publishing Company. The third newspaper of its name in Leaven- 
worth. 

TIMES, Republican; Daniel R. Anthony, jr., editor and publisher, Leavenworth. 

Weekly. Mar. 14, 1857; May 28, 1859; Oct. 24, 1863; Jan. 20, 18761887: 1896 + 

24 vols. 

[See, also, Short-lived, vol. 4.] 
Daily. Jan., 1870 July, 1878; Oct., 1878 + 126 vols. 

[See, also, Short-lived, vol. 4.J 



222 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



This paper is a continuation of the following: The Leavenworth Journal, founded 1856 by 
Col. S. S. Goode, who was succeeded by "Jack" Henderson. John A. Halderman later took the 
plant in satisfaction of an indebtedness and in the spring of 1858 leased it to Hutchinson Campbell. 
A daily edition was issued for about a year, when the building in which the Journal office was lo- 
cated collapsed, "pieing" the type and destroying most of the other materials. A few numbers of 
the Journal were subsequently issued from the Times office, when the Journal finally suspended. 
Shortly afterwards Geo. F. Prescott, C. A. Prescott and William White started the Daily Dispatch, 
using the press recovered from the ruins of the Journal office; this paper was issued for some ten 
or eleven months, when it suspended and the material was purchased by D. R. Anthony in 1861, 
when he started the Conservative. The Leavenworth Times was founded in 1857 by a stock com- 
pany; Robert Crozier was editor. It later passed into the hands of Col. John C.Vaughn and son, 
Champion Vaughn, and a daily edition was started by them in 1858. The Leavenworth Conserva- 
tive, daily, triweekly and weekly, was founded 1861. D. R. Anthony, D. W. Wilder, Mathew 
Weightman, Geo. F. Prescott, George C. Hume and Henry Buckingham formed the stock company, 
and D. W. Wilder was editor. After many changes in ownership, in Aug., 1868, the Times and 
Conservative were consolidated under the name of Times and Conservative; eventually the name 
was changed back to Leavenworth Times. In Apr., 1871, the Times and Bulletin were consoli- 
dated; W. S. Burke, editor, J. C. Ketcheson, business manager, and S. R. Marshall, treasurer. 
This arrangement only continued to May, 187l, when the Bulletin seceded from the combination 
and was purchased by D. R. Anthony. The Bulletin, daily, triweekly and weekly, was founded 
1862 by the Bulletin Printing Company, consisting of Henry Buckingham, A. N. Hamilton and 
Geo. F. Prescott; Nov. 21, 1862, a morning edition was started and published for a short time. 
In Sept., 1864, the establishment was purchased by D. R. Anthony, who continued it until 
Aug. 2, 1865, when he sold it to C. D. Roys & Co. The paper passed through several hands, when in 
May, 1871, it again came into the control of Mr. Anthony, who in November of that year purchased 
the Times and merged it with the Bulletin. The Leavenworth Commercial was founded in 1866 
by George F. Prescott, George C. Hume and A. F. Callahan. This paper passed through many 
sucessive ownerships until finally purchased by D. R. Anthony, who ran an evening edition for a 
few months and then merged it with the Times. The Lawrence Standard, early history unknown, 
moved to Leavenworth in 1880; published by E. G. Ross & Sons, under name of Democratic Stand- 
ard; daily edition was founded in 1881, called Leavenworth Evening Standard. The Labor 
Chronicle (1st), early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being vol. 3, No. 3, Jan. 12, 1895; 
published by the Leavenworth Trades and Labor Council, William A. Doidge, George W. Leek 
and Charles Sproul, committee on publication; name changed in 1901 to Leavenworth Chronicle, 
R. E. Davis, editor and publisher. Leavenworth Post [German], daily, founded about 1887 by 
Max Gronefeld; name changed in 1897 to Leavenworth Tribune, Louis Latte, editor; consolidated 
May, 1901, with Leavenworth Chronicle, and continued as Chronicle-Tribune, daily (weekly 
edition of the Leavenworth Tribune is still issued separately) ; in 1902 the daily Chronicle-Tribune 
was merged into the Evening Standard, and in 1903 the Evening Standard was consolidated with 
the Leavenworth Times. 

TRIBUNE [German], independent; S. Kuraner, editor and publisher, Leavenworth. 

Weekly. May 10, 1901 + 15 vols. 

Founded in 1887; early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being vol. 14, No. 49:5, 
May 10, 1901, S. Kuraner, editor. 

EASTON Population (1915), 292; elevation, 905 feet; established, 1854; named for Gen. Lucien 
J. Eastin, editor of the Kansas Herald; change in spelling brought about by Gov. Reeder, 
whose home was Easton, Pa.; telephones; is on the Union Pacific railway. 

TRANSCRIPT, independent; E. S. Hays, editor and publisher, Easton. 

Weekly. Society has but one issue, Oct. 29, 1908. 
Founded 1908 by J. O. Potter and R. W. Stafford. 

LANSING Population (1915), 824; elevation, 814 feet; established, 1864; telephones; is on the 

Santa Fe, the Union Pacific and the Missouri Pacific railways. 
NEWS, Republican; C. A. Henrie, editor and publisher, Lansing. 
Weekly. Nov. 15, 1895 + 20 vols. 

[Not published, June 15, 1906, to Nov. 1907.] 
Founded 1895 by John Higgins. 
SQUARE DEAL, prison reform; "Tex," editor; J. K. Codding, warden, Lansing. 

Weekly. Oct. 22, 1915 -f- 
Founded 1912 as the Penitentiary Bulletin; name changed 1915 to the Square Deal. 

TONGANOXIE Population (1915), 954; elevation, 829 feet; established, 1866; named for Ton- 
ganoxie, a Delaware Indian, who in territorial days kept a sort of tavern near the present 
town site; telephones; is on the Union Pacific and the Missouri Pacific railways. 

MIRROR, Republican; William Heynen, editor and publisher, Tonganoxie. 

Weekly. May 4, 1882 + 33 vols. 
Founded 1882 by Rev. Henry Osborn. The Weekly Sentinel, founded at Leavenworth in 

1889 by Geo. D. Purdy & Co., moved to Tonganoxie the same year; May 10, 1902, the name was 

changed to the Tonganoxie Republican, with Geo. B. Hellenbeck as editor and publisher; sold 

to the Mirror 1903. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



223 



DISCONTINUED. Vole 

L.-iiv.-nworth . ..Advertiser; Western Life. May 5, 1899 190* . 9 

Advocate. Aug. 18, 1888 1891. .. . 3 

Appeal. Dec. 29, 18771879 

Appeal (d). Jan. 11, 18761878 . 3 

Appeal and Tribune. Oct. 15, 1877; Aug. 23, 1878; Oct. 14, 18791880 . . 1 

Art League Chronicle (m). Jan., 18911898 . 8 

Chronicle. Nov. 3, 18831884 1 

Commercial (d). Mar. 3, Sept. 20, Oct. 11, 1868; July 18, and Dec. 7, 

1869; Oct. 18, 1871; Apr. 18, 1872; 1873 1876" 4 

Conservative (d). Jan. 28, 1861 Jan., 1867; June, 18671868 14 

Democratic Standard. Oct. 20, 18801883; 18971903 8 

Hatchet (m). Feb., 18961897 1 

Herald. Feb. 17, 1894 July 4, 1896; Dec. 5, 18961898 .3 

Journal of Commerce (s-m). Sept. 15, 18921894 2 

Kansas Churchman (m). 1902. [See Shawnee county.] 

Kansas Commoner. Sept. 20, 18841885 1 

Kansas Educational Journal (m). Jan., 1864 Aug., 1865; Grasshopper 

Falls, Sept., 1865 Jan., 1866; Topeka, June, 1866 Aug., 1867; Em- 

poria, Sept., 1867 Apr., 1871; Emporia and Topeka, May, 1871 

Apr., 1873; Leavenworth, May, 1873 Mar., 1874 10 

Kansas Farmer (m). 18671873. [See Shawnee county.) 

Kansas Freie Presse [German]. June 2 and Dec. 31, 1869; Nov. 16, 1870; 

Jan. 5, 18761886 11 

Kansas Freie Presse [German] (d). 

Jan. 12 Apr., 1876; Dec., 1879 May, 1881; June, 1881 1886. . . 14 

Kansas Prohibitionist. Mar. 21, 18831884 1 

Kansas Territorial Register. July 7 Dec. 22, 1855 . 1 

Kansas Weekly Herald. Sept. 15, 18541859 5 

Labor News. May 21, 18921895 3 

Labor Review [broken file]. May 14, 19041910 2 

Medical Herald (m). Aug., 18671875 7 

Orphans' Friend (m). Nov. 15, 18781897 19 

Post [German] (d) ; Post and Tribune. Dec. 2, 1887 1901 26 

Post [English ed.] (d). Oct. 7, 18951896 1 

Post. July 10, 18961897 1 

Problem (qr). Jan., 19001903 3 

Public Press. June 21, 1877 1883 . 6 

Public Press (d). Apr. 2, 18771882 12 

Sonntags-gast [German]. Oct. 23, 18981901 3 

Standard, Evening (d). July 24, 18811903 44 

Sun (d). Oct. 4, 18871890 6 

Sunday Herald. Nov. 2 Dec. 4, 1879 : . . 1 

Taps (m). Oct. 15, 18891891 2 

Times and Conservative (d). Sept. 17, 1868 1870 4 

Union. Jan. 25, 19021904 ' 3 

Visitor ; Catholic Visitor ; Kansas Catholic. Olathe and Leavenworth. 

May, 18821890 7 

[See, also, Wyandotte county.] 

Western Homestead (m). May, 1878 1882 4 

Workingman's Friend. Nov. 30, Dec. 7, 14, 21, 1878; Feb. 8, Mar. 15. 

1879; May 7, 18811882 2 

Reveille. National Military Home. Feb. 1, 18931895 

Fort Leavenworth. .News. July 23, 1904 Nov. 1, 1905; June 20, 19081914 8 

Sentinel. [See Saline county.] 

Easton Light and Herald. July 26, 18951905 10 

Lansing Penitentiary Bulletin. Feb. 9, 19121915 4 

Prison Trusty. May 26, 18921894 

Linwood Leader. Dec. 27, 1883 1884. . . 1 

Leaf. Aug. 1, 19011902 ... 1 

Ledger. Apr. 22, 1898 1899 1 

Times. Sept. 29, 19091910 1 

Tonganoxie News. Mar. 4, 1885 1887. .. 2 

Republican. May 17, 19021903 1 

Sentinel. Feb. 23, 18891902 11 

[Not published Nov., 1893 June, 1894.] 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Leavenworth Argus. Nov. 3, 1873. 

Bulletin, Evening. Oct. 3, 5, 20, 21, 28, 30, Nov. 13, 1868. 

Call, Evening. Jan. 25, Apr. 8, Aug. 26, 1872; Feb. 10, Mar. 6, Dec. 15, 1873; 

Mar. 17, 1874. 

Journal, Evening. Jan. 26, 1858. 
Ledger. May 18, 1858. 



224 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Leavenworth Bulletin. Feb. 18, 1899. 

Commercial. July 25, 1867, 

Conservative. June 19, Aug. 7, 14, 1862; Jan. 8, 22. Mar. 26, 1863. 

Herald. Mar. 10, 1860. 

Independent. Feb. 11 May 19, 1894. 

State Sentinel. Apr. 1, 1875. 

Weekly Bulletin. Aug. 19, 1868. 
Linwood Monitor. Sept. 10 Oct. 8, 1897. 

News. Dec. 30, 1905; Jan. 20, 27, 1906. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 3. 

Leavenworth Bulletin, Evening [extra]. Oct., 1864. 

Conservative. May 24, June 29, July 2, 1861. 

Conservative (d). Feb. 28, Mar. 27, Apr. 13, June 17, Julv 16, 20> Aug. 6, 19 

29, 1862; July 3, 1863; July 3, 1864. 
Inquirer. May 29, 1862. 
Inquirer (d). Oct. 24, 29, 1862. 
Kansas Daily Ledger. Apr. 13, 1859. 
Ledger. Sept. 12, 1858. 

Times. Jan. 9, May 22, July 10, Aug. 7, Sept. 18, Oct. 9, 1858. 
Times (d). Jan. 25, 1859; Apr. 5, June 12, Aug. 27, 28, Sept. 2, 30, Nov. 6. 

1862; Feb. 14, 17, Mar. 14, Oct. 25, Dec. 1, 1863; Mar. 1, 1864. 



LINCOLN COUNTY. 

Organized, 1870; named in honor of Abraham Lincoln; county seat, 
Lincoln; area, 720 square miles, 460,800 acres; population (1915), 10,433; 
assessed valuation (1915), $23,261,080; resources and industries building 
stone, mineral paint, potter's clay, cement rock, salt marshes and springs, 
coal, agriculture, and stock raising. 

LINCOLN Population (1915), 1142; elevation, 1374 feet; established, 1871; named for President 
Lincoln; originally called Lincoln Center; industries flour mills, cement plant, stone quar- 
ries, coal mines; municipal water and electric light systems, public library, telephones; is on 
the Union Pacific railway. 
REPUBLICAN, Republican; Lee Meadows, editor and publisher, Lincoln. 

Weekly. Jan. 7, 1886 + 30 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the Western Democrat, founded at Lincoln in 1874 by F. M. 
Beatty; suspended in 1875 and equipment sold to G. W. Wellman, who associated with him W. C. 
Buzick, and commenced the publication of the Saline Valley Register, vol. 1, No. 1, of which ap- 
peared June 30, 1875. In 1879 the name was changed to the Lincoln Register, George W. Ander- 
son, editor and proprietor; in 1880 Mr. Anderson changed the name of the paper to Lincoln County 
Register, and in 1881 the old name, Saline Valley Register, was again adopted, Messrs. A. C. 
Springer, G. F. Kline and M. J. Watson being the editors and publishers. In 1884 the name was 
once more changed, the paper appearing as the Lincoln Banner, A. G. Hobbs & Sons, editors and 
publishers. In 1886 Messrs. Daughters and Smith became editors and publishers, when the name 
was again changed, this time to the Lincoln Republican. 

SENTINEL, Democratic; Wenslow Cipra, editor and publisher, Lincoln. 

Weekly. June 1, 1894 + 22 vols. 

Established 1887 as the Sylvan Grove Sentinel, W. H. Pilcher, editor and publisher; moved 
to Lincoln 1894, name changed to Lincoln Sentinel; in 1901 absorbed the Lincoln Beacon, which 
was founded in 1879 as the Lincoln County Beacon, by W. S. and Anna C. Wait. 

BARNARD Population (1915), 408; elevation, 1322 feet; established, 1888; telephones; is on the 

Santa Fe railway. 

BEE, independent; Will De Vinney, editor and publisher, Barnard. 
Weekly. Mar. 8, 1902 -j- 14 vols. 

Founded 1902 by Will De Vinney. 

BEVERLY Population (1915), 334; elevation, 1326 feet; established, 1886; telephones; is on 

the Union Pacific railway. 

TRIBUNE, independent; Carl Judge, editor and publisher, Beverly. 
Weekly. July 28, 1910 -j- 5 vols. 

Founded 1910 by C. L. McAfee. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 225 



SYLVAN GROVE Population (1915), 555; elevation, 1466 feet; established, 1877; named for 
i hi- twin groves near which the town is situated; industries mill, elevators, creamery; tele- 
phones; is on the Union Pacific railway. 

NEWS, Republican; James A. Schilling, editor and publisher, Sylvan Grove. 

Weekly. May 4, 1900 + 16 vols. 
Founded as the Sylvan Alert about 1893, first issue in Society's file being vol. 2, No. 42, April 

25, 1895, Jeffers & Smith, editors and publishers; name changed 1900 to Sylvan Grove News 

St. Tlair & Hoffer, editors and publishers. 

DISCONTINUED. y^ 

Lincoln Banner. Feb. 28, 1884 1886 . 

Lincoln County Beacon; Lincoln Beacon, Mar. 25, 18801901 

Lincoln County Democrat. May 6, 1886 1890 . 

Lincoln County Farmer. Dec. 5, 1890 1892 

Lincoln County News. 1873 

Saline Valley Register. Apr. 19, 1876 1884 

[Called Lincoln County Register, Sept., 1879, to Nov., 1881.] 

Barnard Times. Aug. 9, 18881892 3 

Beverly Journal. June 1, 1905 1906 1 



Star. June 29, 18931895 

Sylvan Grove Sentinel. July 28, 18871893 . . . 

[Not published Oct., 1890, to Mar 



Sylvan Alert. Apr. 25, 18951900. . 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Lincoln Lincoln County Patriot. July 15, 1875. 

Sylvan Grove Saline Valley Sunflower. Feb. 9, 1900. 



, 1892.J 



LINN COUNTY. 

Organized, 1855; named for Lewis F. Linn, United States senator from 
Missouri; county seat, Mound City; area, 637 square miles, 407,680 acres; 
population (1915), 15,013; assessed valuation (1915), $20,534,691; resources 
and industries building stone, cement rock, coal, oil, gas, agriculture, and 
stock raising. 

MOUND CITY Population (1915), 718; established, 1855; named for its proximity to Sugar 
Mound; industries glass factory, coal, stone quarries, oil and gas; telephones; is on the 
Missouri Pacific railway. 

BORDER SENTINEL (2d), Democratic; C. E. and Helen C. Dallas, editors and publishers. 

Weekly. Jan. 14, 1916 + 
Founded 1886 as the Torch of Liberty, a monthly, by S. M. Brice; in 1889 changed to a weekly; 

in 1909 name changed to Linn County Democrat and Torch of Liberty, E. C. Lowe and J. A. 

Mantey, editors and publishers; name shortened same year to Linn County Democrat, of which 

C. E. Dallas eventually became editor and publisher; name changed to Border Sentinel Jan. 14, 

1916, C. E. and Helen Dallas, editors and publishers. 

LINN COUNTY REPUBLIC, Republican; John C. Madden, editor and publisher, Mound City. 

Weekly. Jan. 11, 1895 + 21 vols. 

Founded 1884 as the Mound City Progress, by J. C. Cash; name changed 1895 to Linn County 
Republic and Mound City Progress, Nev. Campbell, editor and publisher; name shortened in 
1896 to Linn County Republic. 

BLUE MOUND Population (1915), 636; established, 1860; named for Blue Mound, a near-by 
eminence; telephones, electric lights; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

SUN, Republican- Lowe & Lowe, editors and publishers, Blue Mound. 

Weekly. May 31, 1883 + 31 vols. 
Founded 1883 by W. E. Barnes. 

LA CYGNE Population (1915), 997; elevation, 827 feet; established, 1869; French words mean- 
ing "the swan"; industries coal mines; telephones; is on the St. Louis & San Francisco railway. 
JOURNAL-RECORD, Republican; U. G. Stewart, editor and pfcblisher, La Cygne. 
Weekly. Jan. 1, 1876 + 40 vols. 

15 



226 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



This paper is a continuation of the following: The La Cygne Weekly Journal, founded 1870 
by Gary and J. P. Kenea; in 1893 consolidated with the Linn County Clarion, of Mound City, 
and ran until Jan., 1914, as the Journal-Clarion. The Linn County Clarion was founded in 1876 
by J. C. Cannon and T. B. Van Buskirk, and was printed on the press of the Linn County Enter- 
prise, of Mound City, which was founded in 1875 by J. J. McCallum; consolidated 1915 with the 
La Cygne Weekly Record, founded 1907 by C. J. Moore; continued as the La Cygne Journal- 
Record, U. G. Stewart, editor and publisher. 

PARKER Population (1915), 394; elevation, 1009 feet; established about 1889; named for 
J. W. Parker, of Atchison, who owned the town site; telephones; is on the M. K. & T. railway. 

MESSAGE, Republican; Benjamin F. Winchel, editor and publisher, Parker. 

Weekly. Mar. 6, 1896 -J- 20 vols. 
Founded 1896 by B. E. Newbold. 

PLEASANTON Population (1915), 1516; elevation, 862 feet; named for Gen. Alfred Pleasan- 
ton; industries coal mines, stone quarries, flour mills, hay press factory, oil and gas; tele- 
phones, electric lights, waterworks, public library; is on the Missouri Pacific and the St. 
Louis & San Francisco railways. 

HERALD, Republican; J. E. Latimer, editor and publisher, Pleasanton. 

Weekly. Jan. 27, 1882 + 34 vols. 

Founded 1881 with J. M. Voss, editor, and T. B. Harper, local editor. 

OBSERVER-ENTERPRISE, Republican; C. E. Craig, editor, The Linn County Publishing Company, 
publisher, Pleasanton. 

Weekly. Feb. 14, 1874; Feb. 12, 1876 -f 39 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Pleasanton Observer, founded 1871 by Leander 
K. Zook. Prescott Sunflower, founded 1893 by L. R. Sellers; consolidated 1893 with the Observer. 
Parker Pointer, founded 1896 by Ernest McClure; moved to Mound City in 1897 and name 
changed to Kansas Standard, with Ernest McClure and C. E. Dallas, editors and publishers; 
consolidated 1901 with the Pleasanton Enterprise, founded 1899 by J. R. Holmes and C. E. Craig; 
consolidated 1911 with the Pleasanton Observer, under the name of Observer-Enterprise, Craig 
& Kennedy, editors and publishers. 

DISCONTINUED. 

Mound City.. . .Border Sentinel (1st). Apr. 6, 1866 1874. . 

Kansas Standard. Feb. 12, 18971901 

Linn County Clarion. Oct. 12, 1876 1893 

Linn County Democrat. Jan. 28, 1909 1916 

Progress. Apr. 18, 1884 Jan., 1886; June, 18861894 

Torch of Liberty. Sept. 1, 1886--1909 

Blue Mound . . . Farm Record. Jan. 3 June 13, 1890 

Searchlight. Nov. 1, 18951900 

Centerville Courier. Feb. 2 Nov. 16, 1905 

Echo. Mar. 29, 19061907 , 

Goodrich Graphic. Dec. 13, 1889 1891 

La Cygne . Kansas Standard. Jan. 23, 1903 1906 . . . 

Record. Oct. 3, 19071915 

Parker . . Pilot; Pilot and Graphic. Apr. 12, 18891894 

Pleasanton . Border Sentinel. June 27 Oct. 25, 1902 

Enterprise. May 25, 18991911 

Item; The Advertiser. July 26, 18951897 

Prescott Eagle. Apr. 28, 1883 1888 

Enterprise. Feb. 9 Oct. 26, 1889 

Register. Apr. 22, 18981899 

Republican. Aug. 4, 18881889 

Sentinel. Dec. 7, 19001902 

Sunflower. Mar. 4 Oct. 28, 1893 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Blue Mound Independent. Feb. 9, Mar. 2 and 9, 1883. 

Goodrich Sentinel. Sept. 19 Nov. 14, 1889. 

La Cvene Leader. Jan. 13, 1887 Nov. 8, 1888. 

Visitor (m). Sept., 1890 Aug., 1891. 
Pleasanton ..Advertiser. Feb. 11 Mar. 19, 1897. 

Free Press. Oct., 1869. 

Linn County Weekly Press. Nov. 13, 1869 Jan. 8, 1870. 

Real Estate Banner. Jan. 1, 1870. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Mound City . .. Linn County Enterprise. July 15, 1875. 

Linn County School Journal (m). Jan.-June, 1900. 
Report. Nov. 16, 1860. 



Vols. 
.. 8 
. . 5 
. . 17 
. . 7 
. . 10 
22 

. . 1 

. . 5 

1 

.. 2 
2 

. 4 

8 

. . 6 

1 

. . 12 
. . 2 
. . 5 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 227 



La Cygne Western Fire Journal (m). Mar., 1900. 

Parker Pointer. Oct. 29, 1896 Feb. 5, 1897. 

Pleasanton Linn County Weekly Press. Feb. 5, 1870 Feb. 10, 1871. 



LOGAN COUNTY. 

Created, 1881, as St. John county; named for Gov. John P. St. John; 
name changed to Logan county by legislative enactment February 24, 1887. 
Organized, September 17, 1887; named in honor of John A. Logan; county 
seat, Russell Springs; area, 1080 square miles, 691,200 acres; population 
(1915), 3013; assessed valuation (1915), $7,953,409; resources and industries- 
building stone, wheat, alfalfa, live stock, and grazing. 

RUSSELL SPRINGS Population (1915), 115; established, Dec., 1886; named for Avra P. 

Russell, captain of company K, Second Kansas cavalry; telephones; is on the Scott City & 

Northern railway. 

LEADER, Republican; A. L. Stonaker, editor and publisher, Russell Springs. 
Weekly. Dec. 29, 1905 + 9 vols. 

Founded 1905 by W. A. Keithly. 

OAKLEY Population (1915), 542; elevation, 3049 feet; established, 1886; named for Mrs. Eliza 

Oakley Gardner; industries flour mill, creamery, cold storage and ice plant; municipal 

electric lights, telephones; is on the Union Pacific railway. 

COURIER, school; edited and published by students of Oakley high school, Oakley. 
Monthly. Nov., 1915 + 

Founded 1915 by the students. 

GRAPHIC, Republican; J. R. Young, editor and publisher, Oakley. 
Weekly. Nov. 8, 1889 + 26 vols. 

Founded 1888 as the Weekly Press, by J. P. Israel; name changed same year to the News 
Letter, with John A. Goodier, editor and publisher; succeeded in 1889 by the Oakley Graphic, 
C. V. Kinney, editor and publisher. 

WINONA Population (1915), estimated, 200; elevation, 3322 feet; established, 1884; originally 
called Gopher; changed to Winona about 1887; telephones; is on the Union Pacific railway. 

LOGAN COUNTY NEWS, Republican; F. B. Joslyn, editor and publisher, Winona. 

Weekly. Dec. 16, 1904 + 11 vols. 
Founded 1904 by D. H. Runneals. 

DISCONTINUED. Vote . 

Russell Springs Logan County Banner. Oct. 18, 1894 1895 1 

Logan County Clipper. Mar. 19, 18961900 5 

Logan County Leader. Oct. 6, 18871889 . 2 

Logan County Republican. Mar. 1, 1888 1894... . 7" 

Record. Mar. 3 Sept. 23, 1887 1 

Augustine Herald. Aug. 31, 1887 1891 3 

Ennis City Courier. Ennis City and Monument. June 10, 1886 1887 1 

McAllister Record. June 11, 18871888 1 

Monument Courier. Sept. 18, 1887 1888 1 

[Bound with Ennis City Courier.] 

Obelisk. July 5, 18881889 1 

Observer. July 3 Nov. 27, 1890 1 

Oakley Logan County Times. Oakley and Logan Springs. Dec. 23, 1886 1888, 1 

News Letter. Nov. 24, 18881889 1 

Opinion. Oct. 12, 18851889 .4 

Republican. Dec. 8, 18871888 1 

Saturday Press. Mar. 24 Nov. 17, 1888 1 

Page City Messenger. May 4, 18891890 1 

Winona Clipper. Dec. 1, 18871896 .8 

Messenger. Dec. 10, 18861889 2 



228 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



SHORT-LIVED -VOL. 1. 

Russell Springs Leader (d). Dec. 12-14, 1887. 

Ennis City Western Kansas Advocate (m). July 1, 1886 Jan. 1, 1887. 

Logansport Light. July 27 Sept. 23, 1887. 

Winona Clipper (d). Dec. 23, 1887. 



LYON COUNTY. 

Created as Breckinridge county, 1855; named for John C. Breckinridge, 
and organized in 1858; name changed by legislative enactment February 5, 
1862, to Lyon county, in honor of Gen. Nathaniel Lyon; county seat, Em- 
poria; area, 858 square miles, 549,120 acres; population (1915), 26,468; as- 
sessed valuation (1915), $42, 234, 526; resources and industries building stone, 
potter 's clay, agriculture, and stock raising. 

EMPORIA Population (1915), 10,664; elevation, 1138 feet; established, 1857; named from the 
Latin word emporium a place of trade, a market town; industries marble and iron works, 
flour and woolen mills, brick and tile plant, creamery; electric lights, water system, telephones, 
paved streets, public library; is on the M. K. & T. and the Santa Fe railways. 
COLLEGE LIFE, college; edited and published by students of the College of Emporia, Emporia. 

Weekly. Oct. 11, 18901911; 1913 + 22 vols. 

Founded about 1889; edited and published by the student body of the College of ^Emporia. 
GAZETTE, Republican; William Allen White, editor and publisher, Emporia. 
Weekly. Apr. 23, 1890 + 25 vols. 
Daily. Apr. 18, 1890 + 76 vols. 

Founded 1890 by J. R. Graham & Co., as Emporia Standard; name changed in 1892 to Em- 
poria Gazette; the Daily Gazette founded 1890 by J. R. Graham & Co. 

HIGH SCHOOL ECHO, school; edited and published by students of Emporia high school, Emporia. 

Monthly. Oct. 7, 19101912; 1913 + 4 vols. 
Founded about 1908 or 1909. 

SPOILED CHILD, college; edited and published by the class of journalism of the State Normal 
School, Emporia. 

Weekly. Not received by the Historical Society. 
Founded 1913, as The Birch Rod, with Harry E. Van Campen, editor. 

STATE NORMAL BULLETIN, college; edited and published by students of Kansas State Normal 
School, Emporia. 

Weekly. Sept. 10, 1901 + 15 vols. 

[Publications received irregularly, therefore a much broken file.] 

Founded 1901 as The All School Bulletin, with J. H. Green, editor, and C. M. Ware, associate 
editor; name changed same year to the State Normal Bulletin. 

TEACHING, college; edited by the faculty and published by the Kansas State Normal School, 

Emporia. 

Semimonthly. Nov. 1, 1914 -f- 2 vols. 

Founded 1910 as the State Normal Record, and succeeded by Teaching, founded 1914. 
TIMES, Democratic; Harrison Parkman, editor and publisher, Emporia. 
Weekly. Feb. 8, 1895 + 21 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the Allen Tidings, founded 1887 by Major A. Paul; moved to 
Emporia in 1892; name changed in 1894 to Emporia Times, with P. F. Yearout and M. Q. Starr, 
editors and publishers; a daily edition of the Emporia Tidings (the first few issues being called the 
Daily Populist) was founded in 1894, and discontinued the same year. The Lyon County Demo- 
crat, Emporia, founded in 1892 by D. S. Gilmore; sold to the Times in 1895. 

ADMIRE Population (1915, estimated), 210; elevation, 1230 feet; established, 1886; telephones; 

is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

NORTHERN STAR, local; Robert L. Henderson, editor and publisher, Admire. 
Weekly. Dec. 12, 1912 + 3 vols. 

Founded 1909; early history unknown; first issue in Society's file is vol. 4, No; 4. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 229 



ALLEN Population (1915), 311; elevation, 1314 feet; established, 1854; telephones; is on the 

Missouri Pacific railway. 

NORTHERN LYON COUNTY JOURNAL (2d), independent; D. S. Gilmore, editor and publisher, Allen. 
Weekly. Feb. 20, 1914 + 2 vols. 

Founded 1890 as the Admire News, by W. H. Hottle; moved to Allen in 1909, and name 
changed to Allen Enterprise; in 1914 name again changed to Allen Journal, with M. F. Armine, 
editor and publisher; in 1915 name changed to Northern Lyon County Journal (2d), D. S. Gil- 
more, editor and publisher. 

AMERICUS Population (1915), 462; elevation, 1154 feet; established, 1857; named in honor of 
the explorer, Americus Vespucius; industries stone quarries; telephones; is on the M. K. & T. 
railway. 

GREETING, independent; D. C. Grinell, editor and publisher, Americus. 
Weekly. Sept. 12, 1890 + 24 vols. 

[Not published April, 1892, to July, 1893.] 

Founded 1890 by C. V. and Eva Aldrich; moved to Dunlap, Morris county, in 1892; published 
there a few months, when publication was suspended; moved back to Americus and resumed pub- 
lication July, 1893. 

HARTFORD Population (1915), 678; elevation, 1083 feet; established, 1857; named for Hart- 
ford, Conn.; industries feed mill, elevators, coal mines; telephones; is on the M. K. & T. 
railway. 
NEOSHO VALLEY TIMES, Republican; A. S. Bernheisel, editor and publisher, Hartford. 

Weekly. Dec. 20, 1895 + 20 vols. 

This paper is the continuation of the Neosho Rapids Times, founded 1895; moved to Hart- 
ford the same year and name changed to Neosho Valley Times, with A. S. Bernheisel, editor and 
publisher; in 1898 absorbed the Hartford News, founded in 1890 by C. C. Rogan. 

OLPE Population (1915), 245; elevation, 1200 feet; established about 1882; originally called 
Bitlertown; name changed to Olpe about 1887; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

OPTIMIST, Democratic; Lawrence M. Shearer, editor and publisher, Olpe. 

Weekly. Nov. 22, 1906 + 8 vols. 
Founded 1906 by H. B. Albertson. 

READING Population (1915), 350; elevation, 1079 feet; established about 1870; named for 

Reading, Pa.; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
HERALD, Republican; Leslie Fitts, editor and publisher, Reading. 

Weekly. June 22, 1908; Mar. 31, 1913; Sept., 1913 + 3 vols. 

Founded 1908 by Eaton & Halstrom. 

DISCONTINUED. Fofe 

Emporia Baptist (m). Nov., 1895 1900 5 

Baptist Visitor (m). Dec., 18901894 4 

Bulletin (d). May 16 July 16, 1881 1 

Columbia [Bohemian]. Dec., 1890 1891 .... 1 

Convincer. Feb. 3 Nov. 2, 1912 1 

Democrat. 1882 1889 8 

Democrat (2d). June 24, 18981899 

Democrat (d). Apr. 12, 18991900 1 

Democratic Record. Feb. 2, 1899 1900 2 



Educationalist (m). Jan., 18791880. 

Fanatic. Nov. 5, 18871888 

Farmers' Journal (m). Mar., 1898 1901 
Globe. Nov. 18, 18861887 . 



Globe (d). Aug. 8, 18861887; 1889. . 



2 
1 
3 
1 
3 

[Called Democrat, July-Sept., 1889]. 

Hatchet (m). Dec. 18771878 1 

High School News (m). Sept., 1899 1900 1 

Independent League (m). Sept., 18941895. . . 1 

Journal (1st). Jan. 24, 18801881 ... 1 

Journal (2d). May 22, 19081910 3 

Journal (d). Feb. 8, 19101911 2 

Kansas Educational Journal (m). 1867 1871. 

[See Leaven worth county.] 

Kansas Greenbacker. Sept. 7, 18781879 1 

Kansas Prohibitionist. Topeka and Emporia. Aug., 19021905 3 

Kansas School Magazine (m). Jan., 19121914 3 

Kansas Sentinel. Mar. 3, 18801882 2 

Kansas Teacher (m). May, 1914. [See Shawnee county.] 

Kansas Workman. 18881889. [See Butler county.] 

Ledger. July 8, 1875: 18761882 . . 6 



230 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DISCONTINUED. 



Tofe. 



Emporia Lyon County Democrat. Mar. 3, 1893 1895 2 

Lyon County Farmer. Oct. 26, 19111912 1 

Miniature (s-w). Mar. 15 June, 1887. 

[Bound with College Life, Emporia, 1890.] 

National Era. May 16 Dec. 26, 1879 1 

News. Aug. 1, Nov. 21, 1857; Sept. 29, 1860; Dec. 30, 1865 Jan., 1873; 

Oct., 18731889 24 

News (d). Nov. 1, 18781889 21 

News- Democrat. Dec. 26, 18891890 1 

News-Democrat (d). Dec. 24, 18891890 1 

Normal Alumnus (m). Oct., 19051908 3 

Normal Quarterly. Apr., 18891894 . 6 

Oven (m). May 20, 18981901 4 

Primitive Friend (m). Apr., 1883 1885 2 

Quid Nunc (m). Mar., 19081909 2 

Remember (m). Sept., 19081909 1 

Republican (d). Jan. 21, 18821905 . . 46 

Republican. Dec. 9, 18861905 19 

State Normal Monthly. Oct., 18941901 7 

State Normal Record. Nov. 15, 19101914 . . .4 

Students' Salute. Mar. 12, 18951897 2 

Sun. Apr. 10, 18781879 1 

Tidings. June 4, 18921895 2 

Tidings (d). Mar. 20 Nov. 7, 1894 2 

[First called Daily Pop.] 

Zeitung [German] (m). May, 18881892 4 

[Called Western Anzeiger, May, 1888.] 

Admire Free Press. Jan. 7, 1887 1888 1 

Independent. Dec. 11, 18911893 1 

.... Journal. Nov. 1, 1895 1897 2 

News. Sept. 14, 19001909 8 

Allen. . Enterprise. Feb. 4, 19001914 14 

Herald. Nov. 16, 18941897 3 

Northern Lyon County Journal (1st). Aug. 6, 1897 1908 10 

Tidings. May 5, 18871892 5 

Americus. . . . . Herald. Dec. 7, 18801882 1 

Ledger. Mar. 14, 18851889 ... 4 

Sentinel. May 25, 19001901 1 

Hartford Call. Oct. 17, 18791891 .11 

Enterprise. Jan. 10, 18791880 1 

News. May 8, 18901898 : ......,,. 8 

Neosho Rapids. . . . .Leader. 1888 1889. [See Shawnee county.] 

Neosho Valley Press. Sept. 16, 18861887 1 

Neosho Vivifier. Oct. 7, 18851886 , 1 

Pilot. Feb. 6, 18891891 ! 2 

Times. Feb. 21 Nov. 28, 1895 1 

Olpe .Our Church Mirror. [See 'Elk county.] 

Reading. . . . .Advance. May 27, 18931895. . . 2 

Record. Feb. 25 Dec. 30, 1898 1 

Recorder. Jan. 13, 19001908 8 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Emporia Christian Visitant (m). Oct.-Dec., 1886. 

H. E. Norton & Co.'s Real Estate Bulletin (m). Oct., 1869. 

Herald. Jan. 16 Apr. 10, 1890. 

Industrial Review. Oct. 2 Nov. 27, 1886. 

Kansas State Sunday Sunday School Journal (q). Topeka and Emporia. 
Jan. 1, 1883 Oct., 1885. 

Land Buyer. Apr., July, 1878. 

Real Estate News (m). Feb.-Mar., 1894. 

Real Estate Register (m). Mar., 1869 Dec., 1877. 

Tribune. Dec. 29, 1869 Nov. 30, 1870. 

Union Spy and Fair Bulletin (d). Sept. 7, 1880. 
Admire Advance. Apr. 8-29, 1893. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Emporia College Coyote (s-m). Nov. 26, 1897 Apr. 29, 1898. 

Columbian Magazine. Nov. 1, 1895. 

Lantern. Aug. 28, 1897 Jan. 8, 1898. 

Oven (s-m). May 20, 1898. 

Primary School (m). July-Sept., 1895. 

Umbrella. Aug. 9 Oct. 11, 1895. 

Western Building, Loan & Investment Journal (m). Oct., 1895 Mar., 1896. 

Western World (m). Dec., 1895 Jan., 1896. 
Reading Ledger. Mar. 21 Oct. 3, 1896. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 231 



SHORT-LIVED VOL. 3. 

Emporia Harry Norton's Bulletin. Vol. 9, No. 39 [1883]. 

News (d). Sept. 22, 1870. 

Real Estate Register. Aug., 1869; Aug.. 1875. 

Times (d). June 5 July 13, 1905. 



McPHERSON COUNTY. 

Organized, 1870; named for Gen. James B. McPherson; county seat, 
McPherson; area, 900 square miles, 576,000 acres; population (1915), 21,233; 
assessed valuation (1915), $46,893,346; resources and industries building 
stone, gypsum, and agriculture. 

McPHERSON Population (1915), 4057; elevation, 1498 feet; established July 4, 1872; named 
for Gen. James B. McPherson; industries broom factory, flour mills, elevators, sorghum 
mills, carriage factory and machine shops; telephones; municipal electric light and water sup- 
ply systems; is on the Union Pacific, the Rock Island, the Santa Fe and the St. Louis & San 
Francisco railways. 
DEMOCRAT-OPINION, Democratic; Warren Knaus, editor and publisher, McPherson. 

Weekly. Oct. 1, 1886 + 29 vols. 

This is a continuation of the Democrat, McPherson, founded 1886, Warren Knaus, editor, and 
Davis & Knaus, publishers; consolidated in 1912 with the McPherson Opinion, founded by the 
Opinion Printing Company in 1889 at Wichita, as the Wichita Opinion; moved to McPherson in 
1893, and consolidated with the McPherson Times, which was founded in 1893 by O'Connor & 
James; after the consolidation the paper continued as the McPherson Opinion, with J. W. Ozias, 
editor and publisher, and C. E. Foote, associate editor, the first issue being numbered vol. 5, No. 1, 
July 14, 1893. 

FREEMAN, Republican; J. A. Almgren, editor and publisher, McPherson. 
Weekly. Aug. 16, 1878 + 35 vols. 
Daily. Not received by the Society. 

Founded 1878 by A. L. Clark and D. O. McCray. Daily edition founded 1887 by H. B. Kel- 
ley, and suspended in 1888. Kansas Vim, McPherson, founded 1888 by G. P. Hall; consolidated 
in 1891 with the McPherson Freeman, and continued as the Freeman- Vim; name shortened in 
1895 to McPherson Freeman. 

REPUBLICAN, Republican; Wm. J. Krehbiel, editor and publisher, McPherson. 

Weekly. Dec. 11, 1879 + 36 vols. 

Daily. Feb. 5, 1887 -f 58 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the McPherson Messenger, founded in 1872 by Yale Bros.; 
in 1874 purchased by George W. McClintick, and name changed to McPherson Independent; in 
1879 name changed to McPherson Republican, with F. S. Presbrey, editor, and S. G. Mead and 
F. S. Presbrey, publishers. The McPherson Independent (2d), founded 1882 by George W. Mc- 
Clintick; name changed in 1884 to McPherson Press, and published by the Weekly Press Company; 
consolidated 1885 with the Republican, and the weekly edition carried under the name of Mc- 
Pherson Republican and Weekly Press; name shortened to McPherson Republican in 1894. Mc- 
Pherson Daily Republican, founded 1887 by S. G. Mead. The Galva Clarion, founded 1899 by 
L. G. and G. W. Folsom; sold in 1900 to the McPherson Republican. 

CANTON Population (1915), 659; elevation, 1592 feet; established, 1879; industries flour mill, 
elevators, creamery; telephones; is on the Santa Fe and Rock Island railways. 

PILOT, independent; I. K. Fretz, editor and publisher, Canton. 

Weekly. Mar. 2, 1899 + 17 vols. 
This paper is a continuation of the Canton Argus, first issue of which appeared Dec. 1, 1898, 

F. T. Sheppard, editor, and L. H. Merrill, publisher; sold in 1899 to Ledbetter & Webster, who 

changed the name of the paper and took a new volume and number, their second issue being called 

the Canton Pilot, vol. 1, No. 1, Mar. 2, 1899. 

IN MAN Population (1915), 478; elevation, 1486 feet; established about 1885; named in honor 
of Maj. Henry Inman; industries flour mill, elevator; is on the Rock Island railway. 

REVIEW, independent; Aron Dick, jr., editor and publisher, Inman. 

Weekly. Feb. 4, 1892 + 24 vols. 
Founded 1912 by L. C. Heim. 



232 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



LINDSBORG Population (1915), 1953; elevation, 1333 feet; established, 1868; composite word 
formed from " Lind, " the first syllable of the surnames of five members of the first company 
settling there, and the Swedish word borg, meaning castle; industries elevators, flour mills, 
broom factory, brick plant; telephones, municipal waterworks and electric light plants; is on 
the Union Pacific and the Missouri Pacific railways. 

BETHANY MESSENGER, college; edited and published by the students of Bethany College, Linds- 
borg. 

Weekly. Oct. 15, 1907 + 8 vols. 

Founded 1892 by students of Bethany College; suspended for a time after 1897 and publica- 
tion resumed later. 

NEWS AND RECORD, independent; J. O. Stromquist, manager, Bethany Publishing Company, pub- 
lisher, Lindsborg. 

Weekly. Sept. 21, 1881 -f- 34 vols. 

Founded 1881 as the Smoky Valley News, by August Ringwald; name changed in 1887 to the 
Lindsborg News, with J. A. Udden, editor, Bethany Publishing Company, publisher; consoli- 
dated 1912 with the Lindsborg Record, founded 1896 by A. Ringwald, and continued as the Linds- 
borg News and Record. 

POSTEN [Swedish], Republican; Daniel Nystrom, editor, Bethany Printing Company, publisher, 
Lindsborg. 

Weekly. Feb. 8, 1898 + 18 vols. 
Founded 1897, and edited by faculty of Bethany College. 

MARQUETTE Population (1915), 751; elevation, 1384 feet; established, 1874; named for Mar- 

quette, Mich.; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 
TRIBUNE, independent; H. E. Bruce, editor and publisher, Marquette. 
Weekly. Apr. 5, 1889 + 27 vols. 

A continuation of the Marquette Monitor, founded 1887 by J. W. Richardson; suspended in 
1889, and succeeded by the Marquette Tribune, with James A. Harris, editor. 

MOUNDRIDGE Population (1915), 694; elevation, 1486 feet; established, 1876; first called 
Christian; name changed in 1887 to Moundridge on account of the elevation of the town site; 
industries elevators, flour mills; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

JOURNAL, independent; John H. Simonson, editor and publisher, Moundridge. 

Weekly. June 30, 1894 + 21 vols. 
Founded 1887 as the Moundridge Leader, with James M. Cputts, editor, and E. A. Hubbert, 

publisher; name changed in 1894 to the Moundridge Journal, Orin Bartlett, editor and publisher; 

suspended publication Sept. 27, 1895, to Jan. 23, 1896. 

DISCONTINUED. Vol8f 

McPherson.... Alliance Index, Jan.-Apr., 1891; Peoples' Advocate, May-Nov., 1891; 

Peoples' Party Advocate, Nov., 1891 Feb. 26, 1892; McPherson 
County Advocate, Galva and Canton, Mar .-July, 1892; Peoples' Ad- 
vocate, Galva, Apr.-Aug., 1893; Jan. 9, 18911893 . 2 

Anzeiger [German]. Apr. 15, 18871890 



Comet. Aug. 3, 1881 1882. 

Deutsche Westen [German]. Apr. 11, 19071910. 

Farmers' Advocate. July 9 Sept. 11, 1874 

Freeman (d). Sept. 13, 18871888 

Game and Shooting (m). Mar., 18951898 

Independent (1st). Oct. 28, 1874; Apr. 5 Sept., 1876; Mar., 18771879 

Independent (2d). Aug. 30, 18821884 

Industrial Liberator. Feb. 9 Aug. 26, 1882 

Industrial Union. June 26, 1890 1891 

Kansas American. July 9, 19031906 

Kansas State Register. Jan. 27 Nov. 3, 1887 

Kansas Vim. Feb. 2, 18891891 

McPherson County Champion. May 21, 1885 1887 . 

McPherson County Times. Feb. 3 July 7, 1893 

Messenger. Dec. 19, 18721873 



Opinion. July 21, 18931912 

Our Opinion. Sept. 6, 18881890 

Press. Aug. 6, 18841885 

Rays of Light (m) [broken file]. Dec., 18991912 . 

School, Fireside and Farm ; The Educator and Companion (m and w) 

Jan., 18881896 

Sonntagsschul-Bote [German] (m). McPherson and Durham. 

Feb., 19001902 2 

Teacher and Student (m). July 15, 18961899 4 

Zion's Bote [German]. 1907 1913. [See Marion county.] 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 233 



DISCONTINUED. . Fote 

Canton . ....Carrier. June 4, 1885 1888 3 

Champion. Sept. 20, 18951898 3 

Monitor. Mar. 4, 18801881 1 

News. Jan. 29, 18911892 1 

Republican (1st). Jan. 11, 18891890 2 

Republican (2d). Aug. 5, 18921895 3 

Galva Clarion. July 21, 18991900 1 

Times. July 21, 18881892 3 

Inman Independent. July 11, 18911892 1 

Lindsborg. . . .Bethany Messenger (1st) (m). Dec., 18921897 4 

Framat [Swedish]. 18871889 2 

Kansas Missions Tidning [Swedish] (m). July, 19041912 8 

Kansas Posten [Swedish]. Oct. 4, 18821883 1 

Kansas Young Lutheran; The Christian Messenger Cm). 

Jan. 10. 19081914 7 

Localist. May 3, 18791883 4 

Record. Dec. 25, 18961912 15 

Marquette Monitor. Mar. 25, 18871889 . 2 

Moundridge Leader. Mar. 3, 18871894 ; 7 

Windom Chronicle (occasional). June, 1911 Feb., 1912. [See Reno county.] 

Enterprise (1st). May 28, 18861888 2 

Enterprise (2d). May 5, 18921894 2 

Press. Apr. 20, 19061907 1 

Record. Aug. 16, 18841886 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

McPherson Dispatch. May 26 June 9, 1883. 

Indicator. Aug., 1885. 

Israel at Work (m). July and Aug., 1889. 

Kansas Courier. Oct. 13 Nov. 10, 1893. 

Leader. Mar. 24 July 14, 1881. 

McPherson County School Journal (m) . July-Dec., 1880. 

Canton Mirror. Feb. 12 Mar. 26, 1881. 

Galva Enterprise. Feb. 5-26, 1892. 

Lindsborg Kansas Staats Tidning [Swedish]. Dec. 24, 1879 Feb. 18, 1880. 

News (d). May 31 June 2, 1887. 

Pedagogen (m). Feb., 1885 Apr., 1886. 

Praktiken. Jan. 15, 1886. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

McPherson Thinker. McPherson and Burr Oak. June 30, 1883 Mar. 4, 1884. 

Times. Dec. 15, 1893 Feb. 22, 1894. 
Canton Leader. Dec. 2, 1898 Feb. 17, 1899. 



MARION COUNTY. 

Organized, 1865; named for Gen. Francis Marion; county seat, Marion; 
area, 954 square miles, 610,560 acres; population (1915), 21,577; assessed 
valuation (1915), $41,639,062; resources and industries building stone, gyp- 
sum, and agriculture. 

MARION Population (1915), 1951; elevation, 1310 feet; established, 1860; formerly called 
Marion Centre; named for Gen. Francis Marion; industries elevators, artificial stone manu- 
factory, creamery; waterworks, telephones, paved streets, municipal electric light plant; is on 
the Santa Fe and Rock Island railways. 
RECORD, Republican; Homer Hoch, editor and manager, Marion. 

Weekly. July 23, 1875 + 40 vols. 

This is a continuation of the following: The Western News, Marion Centre, founded Sept., 
1869, by A. W. Robinson; sold in 1871 to John E. Murphy, who changed the name to Western 
Giant, and published it until Sept., 1871, when it was sold to C. S. Triplett, who changed 
the name to Marion County Record. In 1874 the paper was purchased by E. W. Hoch. Marion 
Times, founded 1890 by C. E. Foote and Henry Kuhn; name changed in 1899 to the Marion Head- 
light, with H. J. Buschlen, editor and publisher; sold to the Record in 1909. 

REVIEW, Democratic; T. B. Matlock, editor, Mrs. T. B. Matlock, associate editor, Marion. 

Weekly. Jan. 2, 1908 + 8 vols. 

Founded 1907 as the Lincolnville Lance by D. O. Bell; name changed to Marion County Lance 
same year; moved to Marion, Jan., 1908, and name again changed, appearing as the Marion 
Review, with C. C. Jones as editor and publisher. 



234 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



BURNS Population (1915), 417; elevation, 1497 feet; established about 1881; industries ele- 
vator, carriage factory, squab plant; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

CITIZEN, Progressive; R. E. Eakin, editor and publisker, Burns. 

Weekly. July 13, 1893 + 22 vols. 
Founded 1893 by H. Bruce. 

DURHAM Population (1915), 283; elevation, 1378 feet; originally Moore's Ranch; established, 
1859 by A. A. Moore, and a noted trading post and tavern on the Santa Fe Trail; later on the 
land came into the possession of Albert Crane, of Chicago, who in the later 70 'a called it Dur- 
ham Park Ranch; eventually a settlement grew around the post office, becoming known as 
Durham about 1887; telephones; is on the Rock Island railway. 

TRIBUNE, independent; The Tribune Publishing Company, editors and publishers. 

Weekly. Sept. 2, 1915 + 
Founded 1915 by The Tribune Publishing Company. 

FLORENCE Population (1915), 1258; elevation, 1269 feet; established, 1870; named for Mrs. 
Florence Crawford Capper, daughter of Gov. S. J. Crawford; industries stone quarries and 
crushers, elevators, flour mills; telephones, waterworks; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

BULLETIN, Republican; Raymond Gear, editor and publisher, Florence. 

Weekly. Feb. 17, 1887 + 29 vols. 
Founded 1887 by J. B. Crouch. 

HILLSBORO Population (1915), 1223; elevation, 1433 feet; established, 1879; named for John 

G. Hill; industries elevators, flour mills; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
TABOR COLLEGE HEROLD [German], college; D. E. Harder, editor and publisher, Hillsboro. 

Monthly. Jan., 1912 + 4 vols. 
Founded 1912. 
VOR WARTS [German], Progressive; A. L. Schellemberg, editor and publisher, Hillsboro. 

Weekly. Jan. 5, 1908 + 8 vols. 

A continuation of the Hillsboro Journal, founded 1903; name changed to Vorwarts in 1910. 
ZION'S BOTE [German], official organ of the Mennonite Brethren of North America; A. L. Schel- 
lemberg, editor and publisher. 

Weekly. Jan. 2, 1895 + 20 vols. 

Founded in 1884; first issue in Society's file is vol. 11, No. 2; moved to Medford, Okla., in 1899; 
moved to McPherson in 1907, and thence to Hillsboro in 1913. 

LOST SPRINGS Population (1915), 261; elevation, 1476 feet,' established, 1870; named for the 
Lost Springs on the Santa Fe Trail; industries elevators, flour mills; telephones; is on the 
Santa Fe and Rock Island railways. 

NEWS, independent; L. N. Woodside, editor and publisher, Lost Springs. 

Weekly. Aug. 12, 1915 + 
Founded 1915 by L. N. Woodside. 

PEABODY Population (1915), 1401; elevation, 1358 feet; established, 1871; named for F. H. 
Peabody, of Boston, one-time president of the A. T. & S. F. railway; industries stone quar- 
ries, creamery; electric lights, water system, public library, telephones; is on the Santa Fe 
arid Rock Island railways. 
GAZETTE-HERALD, Republican; Oscar S. Stauffer, editor and publisher, Peabody. 

Weekly. Jan. 21, 1876 + 40 vols. 

Founded 1873 by J. P. Church; daily edition founded 1887 by W. H. Morgan; discontinued 
same year. Peabody Herald, founded 1911 by C. T. Weaver; consolidated 1915 with the Ga- 
zette. 

DISCONTINUED. y ote> 

Marion. . . . .Banner. Mar. 11, 1880 1882. . . . 2 

Central Advocate. Feb. 13 Nov. 27, 1891 1 

Central Kansas Telegraph. Apr. 24 Nov. 6, 1880 1 

Cottonwood Valley Times; Marion Times. Apr. 21, 1887 1901 12 

[Not published Sept., 1889, to Nov., 1890.] 

Graphic. Dec. 22, 18821884 1 

Globe. July 23, 1890 1891 1 

Headlight. May 4, 18991909 11 

Marion County Anzeiger [German]. July 15, 1887 1888 1 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 235 



DISCONTINUED. Vo ls. 

Marion ... Marion County Democrat; Independent. Mar. 15, 18831884 1 

Register. Jan. 14, 18861888 2 

Rural Kansan (m). Feb., 18891890 2 

School Gleaner (m). Sept., 18891890 1 

Scimitar. Jan. 9 Oct. 2, 1890 1 

Times (d). Feb. 6 Oct. 1, 1888 2 

Tribune. July 10, 18861887 1 

Burns Monitor. Nov. 1, 18891890 1 

Canada Arcade. Jan. 4 Nov. 1, 1887 1 

Durham Journal. Oct. 4, 19061907 1 

Florence. . . . . Herald. Oct. 13, 18761891 14 

[June, 1885 Feb., 1887, lacking]. 

News. July 10, 18861887 1 

Tribune. July 12, 18841886 2 

Hillsboro Anzeiger [German]. Sept. 14, 18881897 9 

[Formerly Marion County Anzeiger]. 

Freie Presse [German]. Feb. 21 Aug. 29, 1890 1 

Freundschafts-Kreis [German] (m). Apr., 1885 1886 2 

Herald. Sept. 30, 18861889 3 

Intelligencer. Sept. 8, 18811882 2 

Journal. June 5, 19081910 2 

Kansas Courier. Sept. 25, 18911893 2 

Phonograph. Jan. 7 June 3, 1881 1 

Post [German]. Mar. 25, 18981902 .4 

Lincolnville Lance; Marion County Lance. June 28 Dec. 27, 1907 1 

Lost Springs Courier. July 12, 1888 1889. . 1 

Trail. Nov. 5, 19081910 

Peabody Church of the New Jerusalem (m). Feb., 1910 Aug., 1915. 5 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Marion Advance. Oct. 1-8, 1892. 

Enquirer. Mar. 15, 1890. 

Lower Light (m). Nov., 1887 Oct., 1889. 

Marion County Democrat. Apr. 7 May 26, 1892. 

Register (d). Sept. 6, 1886. 

School Galaxy. Sept. 6, 1877 Jan. 3, 1878. 

Burns Mirror. Sept. 5, 1890 Jan. 16, 1891. 

Hillsboro Farmers' Anzeiger [German], Nos. 1 and 2, 1883. 

Lincolnville. ....... Star. July 16 Nov. 19, 1887. 

Lost Springs Journal. Sept. 17 Nov. 26, 1887. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Marion Baptist (m). Jan.-June, 1895. 

Journal (m). July and Aug., 1895. 

Hillsboro Christliches Kinderblatt [German]. Nov. 2-30, 1902. 

Peabody Graphic. May 20 June 19, 1891. 

Tampa Star. Apr. 25 Aug. 15, 1912. 



MARSHALL COUNTY. 

Organized, 1855; named for Frances J. Marshall, member of the first 
territorial legislature from that district; county seat, Marysville; area, 900 
square miles, 576,000 acres; population (1915), 21,757; assessed valuation 
(1915), $48,235,473; resources and industries building stone, brick and 
potter's clay, gypsum, coal, agriculture, and stock raising. 

MARYSVILLE Population (1915), 2166; elevation, 1153 feet; established, 1855; named for 
Mrs. Mary Marshall, wife of F. J. Marshall; industries elevator, flour and alfalfa mill, 
broom factory, cigar factories, foundry, planing mill, silo factory; paved streets, electric 
lights, waterworks, telephones; is on the Union Pacific and St. Joseph & Grand Island rail- 
ways. 

ADVOCATE-DEMOCRAT, Democratic; H. M. and L. R. Broderick, editors and publishers, Marys- 
ville. 

Weekly. Dec. 29, 1882 + 33 vols. 



236 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



This paper is a continuation of the following: Marshall County Democrat, founded 1880 by 
John I. Reece; consolidated 1899 with the People's Advocate under name of Advocate-Democrat, 
with Reude & Broderick, editors and publishers. Daily Free Press, Marysville, founded 1899; 
name changed in 1890 to Evening Democrat, with William Becker, editor and publisher; dis- 
continued 1892. The Bugle Call, founded 1885 by P. D. Hartman; name changed 1886 to the 
True Republican, Marysville; name changed in 1890 to the People's Advocate, with Clark & 
Runneals, editors and publishers; consolidated 1899 with the Marshall County Democrat. 

MARSHALL COUNTY NEWS, Republican; George T. Smith, editor and publisher, Marysville. 

Weekly. Oct. 5, 1872 + 43 vols. 

Founded 1869 as the Locomotive by P. H. Peters; sold in 1870 to Thomas Hughes, and name 
changed to Marshall County News. 

THE MARSHALL COUNTY SCHOOL JOURNAL, educational; W. H. Seaman, editor and publisher, 
Marysville. 

Monthly. Apr., 1908 + 7 vols. [Broken file.] 

Early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being numbered vol. 6, No. 8. 
MARSHALL'S MANHOOD, religious; Harvey F. Smith, editor, published by the County Committee, 
Marshall County Young Men's Christian Association, Marysville. 

Quarterly. June, 1912 + 3 vols. 
Founded 1912. 

AXTELL Population (1915), 710; elevation, 1360 feet; established, 1872; named for Dr. Jesse 
Axtell, an officer of the St. Joseph & Grand Island railway; industries two creameries; tele- 
phones; is on the St. Joseph & Grand Island railway. 

STANDARD, independent; Frank A. Werner, editor and publisher, Axtell. 

Weekly. Nov. 11, 1898 + 17 vols. 
Founded 1898 by H. C. Pershing; consolidated 1908 with the Axtell Anchor, founded 1883 by 

Milt. L. Singrey. 

BEATTIE Population (1915), 478; elevation, 1291 feet; established, 1870; named in honor of 
A. Beattie, mayor of St. Joseph, Mo., in 1870; industries stone quarries; telephones; is on 
the St. Joseph & Grand Island railway. 
EAGLE, Republican; Fred W. Reed, editor and publisher, Beattie. 

Weekly. Oct. 2, 1891 + 24 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the North Star, Beattie, founded 1884 by A. J. Tucker; name 
changed in 1885 to the Star, with W. W. Brooks, editor; in 1891 name again changed to William- 
son's Beattie Eagle; name shortened in 1894 to the Beattie Eagle; in 1902 absorbed the Beattie 
Palladium, founded 1898 by J. M. Kendall. 

BLUE RAPIDS Population (1915), 1326; elevation, 1175 feet; established, 1870; named on 
account of its location on the Blue river; industries water power, flour mill, gypsum mill, 
stone quarries, glove and mitten factory, electric plaster mills; waterworks, telephones; is 
on the Union Pacific and Missouri Pacific railways. 
TIMES, Republican; Livy B. Tibbits, editor, Charles C. Tibbits, publisher, Blue Rapids. 

Weekly. Jan. 13, 1872; Jan. 29, 1874; Jan. 27, 1876 -f- 40 vols. 

Founded in 1871 by W. P. Campbell and C. E. Tibbits, the paper being printed from material 
purchased from the office of the Netawaka Herald, which was founded in 1871; in 1901 absorbed 
the Blue Rapids Motor, founded in 1890 by R. A. and H. A. Russell. Blue Rapids Journal, founded 
1908 by Graham Brothers; consolidated with the Times in 1912. The Evening Journal, Blue 
Rapids, founded 1911 by George C. Hall; consolidated with the Times in 1912. 

FRANKFORT Population (1915), 1256; elevation, 1146 feet; established, 1867; named for 
Frank Schmidt, a member of the town company; industries elevators, stone quarries; electric 
light, telephones; is on the Union Pacific and Missouri Pacific railways. 

INDEX, independent; F. M. Hartman, editor and publisher, Frankfort. 

Daily. Apr. 27, 1906 + 19 vols. 
Founded 1905 by Warren & Hartman. 

HOME CITY Population (1915, estimated), 225; established during the latter '70's; first known 
as White's Quarry, name changed to Home City about 1878; telephones; is on the St. Joseph 
& Grand Island railway. 

TRIBUNE, independent; Harley R. Row, editor and publisher. Home City. 

Weekly. Nov. 20, 1908 + 7 vols. 
Founded 1908 by L. E. Busenbark. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 237 



IRVING Population (1915), 388; elevation, 1092 feet; established, 1860; named for Washington 
Irving; telephones; is on the Union Pacific and Missouri Pacific railways. 

LEADER, independent; Bert W. Forbes, editor and publisher, Irving. 

Weekly. May 20, 1886 + 29 vols. 
Founded 1886 by J. R. Leonard. 

OKETO Population (1915), 228; elevation, 1164 feet; in the early 60's was a stopping point on 
the overland stage line, named in honor of Ar-Ka-Ke-tah, head chief of the Otoe Indians , 
abbreviated to Oketo; industries flour mill, elevator, stone quarries; telephones; is on the 
Union Pacific railway. 

EAGLE, independent; Charles R. Sheddon, editor and publisher, Oketo. 

Weekly. Jan. 2, 1908 + 3 vols. [Mar. 24, 1910, to Sept. 10, 1914, lacking.] 
Founded 1908 by J. A. Church. 

SUMMERFIELD Population (1915), 293; elevation, 1526 feet; established, 1882; originally 
called Manley; name changed to Murray, and in 1889 changed to Summerfield, in honor of 
E. Summerfield of Lawrence; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

SUN, independent; Charles E. Jones, editor and publisher, Summerfield. 

Weekly. Feb. 14, 1889 + 27 vols. 
Founded 1889 by Fabrick & Felt. 

VERMILLION Population (1915), 295; elevation, 1184 feet; established, 1869; named for the 
stream on which it stands; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

TIMES, Republican; F. W. Arnold, editor and publisher, Vermillion. 

Weekly. Dec. 8, 1904 -f- 11 vols. 
Founded 1904 as the Vermillion Times (2d) by H. L. Huff. 

WATERVILLE Population (1915), 638; elevation, 1171 feet; established, 1868; named for 

Waterville, N. Y.; telephones; public library; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 
TELEGRAPH, Republican; Henry C. Wilson, editor and publisher, Waterville. 

Weekly. Jan. 1, 1870 -f- 43 vols. [June, 1873, to Jan., 1876, lacking.] 
Founded 1870 by Frank A. Root; name changed 1877 to Blue Valley Telegraph, with J. E. 
Reece & Co., publishers; in 1880 name again became Waterville Telegraph, with C. F. Stanley, 
editor and publisher. ^c,^^^^ 

Vols. 



DISCONTINUED. 



Marysville Bugle Call. Dec. 10, 18851886 1 

Democrat, Evening (d). Dec. 22, 18901892 

Enterprise. July 14, 18661868 \\ 2 

3 

.2 



Free Press (d). July 31, Aug. 5, 18891890 

Kansas Staats-Zeitung [German]. Apr. 12, 1879 1881. . 



Local Lantern. Jan. 21, 18991901 

Marshall County Courier [German]. Sept. 7, 1906 1912 . 

People's Advocate. Aug. 27, 1890 1898 

Post [German]. July 30, 18811902 

Republican. Oct. 5, 19001902 1 

Signal. Sept. 1, 18811883 3 

True Republican. Aug. 12, 1886 1890 4 

Axtell . . Anchor. Oct. 18, 18831908 . . 25 

Visitor. Aug. 9, 1883 1884. . 1 

Beattie . . Boomerang and Boomer. Sept. 22, 1883 1884 ... 1 

North Star; The Star. Sept. 5, 18841891 7 

Palladium. Nov. 11, 18981901 3 

Bigelow . . Gazette. Oct. 20, 19111912 1 

Blue Rapids Journal. Nov. 5, 19081912 . 4 

Journal, Evening. Feb. 2 Apr. 10, 1912 1 

Lantern. Blue Rapids and Marysville. Apr. 22 Dec. 15, 1876 1 

Leader. Oct. 2, 19081909 1 

Lyre. Dec. 18, 18861887 1 

Motor. July 25, 18901901 10 

Frankfort . . . . Bee. Nov. 18, 1881 1898 .17 

Greenback Headlight; National Headlight. Oct. 24, 1879 1881. . . 2 

Marshall County Index. Nov. 17, 19051906 1 

Record. Aug. 1, 18761879 . 3 

Review. July 21, 18931910 .14 

[Not published Nov. 12, 1909, to June 16, 1910.] 

Retiew (d). June 12, 19091910 1 

Sentinel. May 21, 18861892 6 

Irving . . .Blue Valley Gazette. Apr. 8, 1876 1878. . . .3 

Citizen. Feb. 13 July 2, 1880 1 



238 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DISCONTINUED. VoU 

Oketo Sun and Herald. Nov. 30, 18891904 14 

Vermilion Little Presbyterian (m). Aug., 19031904 ... 1 

Monitor. Nov. 20, 18961899 .3 

Record. May 28, 18911896 . . 4 

Times (1st). Apr. 13, 19001902 2 

Vliets Echo. May 26, 18991904 6 

Waterville Blue Valley Clipper. Oct. 24, 19011902 1 

Parish Pages (m). Aug., 19031912 9 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Marysville Bugle Call. Dec. 10, 1885 Aug. 5, 1886. 

Institute (d). July 7-31, 1884. 

Marshall County Democrat. Oct. 21 Nov. 3, 1880. 

Marshall County News (d). Oct. 2, 3, 1879; Sept. 21-24, 1880. 

Marshall County Record. Oct. 8 Dec. 17, 1880. 

Pickings (m). Jan. and Feb., 1883. 

Beattie Western Breeder (m). Sept., 1887 May, 1891. 

Blue Rapids Kansas Pilot (m). Jan. and Mar., 1879. 

Frankfort Our New Home. Dec. 2, 1869. 

Irving Recorder. Dec. 10-31, 1869. 

Vermillion Kind Words (m). July-Sept., 1881. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Marysville Marshall County Schools (m). Apr., 1899. 

Normal Herald (m). Dec., 1894 June, 1895. 

Frankfort Epworth Advocate (s-m). July 13, 1895 Mar. 7, 1896. 

Irving Holiness War News (m). Irving and Clay Center. Nov., 1890 Oct. 1 ,1891. 

Vermillion Owl. May 1 Sept. 18. 1896. 



MEADE COUNTY. 

Organized November 4, 1885; named for Gen. George Gordon Meade; 
county seat, Meade; area, 975 square miles, 624,000 acres; population (1915), 
5276; assessed valuation (1915), $10,380,276; resources and industries 
artesian wells, wheat, alfalfa, and grazing. 

MEADE Population (1915), 764; elevation, 2502 feet; established May 5, 1885; name formerly 

Skidmore, then Meade Center, later Meade; electric lights, telephones; waterworks; is on 

the Rock Island railway. 

MEADE COUNTY NEWS, Democratic; Agnes Wehrle, editor and publisher, Meade. 
Weekly. Jan. 11, 1900 + 16 vols. 

Founded 1900 by John D. Wehrle. 

GLOBE, Republican; William S. Martin, editor and publisher, Meade. 
Weekly. July 16, 1885 + 30 vols. 

This paper is the continuation of the following: Meade County Globe, founded 1885 by the 
Globe Publishing Company; in November, same year, sold to Messrs. J. E. Johnston, L. S. Sears 
and W. S. Kinnear. Meade County Republican, founded 1887 by T. J. Palmer; consolidated with 
Globe in 1892. Meade Center Press, founded 1885 by Canon Brothers, with D. A. Canon, editor; 
name changed in 1886 to Meade County Press-Democrat, W. H. Sprigg, editor, and Mechler Bros., 
publishers; name shortened in 1890 to Meade County Democrat, James Smith, editor; consolidated 
1893 with the Globe. 

TATTLER; edited and published by students of the high school, Meade. 

Semimonthly. Mar. 11, 1913 + 5 vols. 
Founded 1913 by the students. 

FOWLER Population (1915), 469; elevation, 2485 feet; name formerly Gilbert; changed to 
Fowler in 1885, probably in honor of George Fowler, an early resident; industries alfalfa mills, 
elevators; is on the Rock Island railway. 

NEWS, independent; Perry Bros. (T. C. and C. C.), editors and publishers. 

Weekly. Apr. 2, 1914 -f 2 vols. 
Founded 1906 as the Fowler Hustler, Robert Wood, editor and publisher; name changed in 

1907 to the Fowler Gazette, and again in 1914 to the Fowler News, with T. C. and C. C. Perry, 

editors and publishers. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 239 



PLAINS Population (1915), 323; elevation, 2766 feet; name formerly West Plains (1885); in- 
dustries flour mill and elevator; telephones; is on the Rock Island railway. 

JOURNAL, independent; Fred W. Calvert, editor and publisher, Plains. 

Weekly. Dec. 21, 1907 + 8 vols. 
Founded 1906 by Maurice MacDonald. 

DISCONTINUED. Vol8f 

Meade Meade County Nationalist. Feb. 6, 18911892 2 

Press; Meade County Press-Democrat; Meade County Democrat. 

Sept. 24, 18851891 5 

Republican. Mar. 9, 18871893 6 

Telegram. Mar. 15 Sept. 9, 1886 1 

Fowler Gazette. May 23, 19071914 7 

Graphic. July 2, 18851890 . 5 

Hustler. Sept. 19, 19061907 1 

Mertilla Meade County Times. Apr. 3, 18861888 3 

Pearlette Call. Apr. 15, 18791880 1 

Spring Lake Hornet. Spring Lake and Artesian City. June 2, 1885 1889 3 

West Plains Guardian. Feb. 25, 18861887 . . 1 

Mascott. Oct. 4, 18881889 1 

News; Democrat. May 26, 18871888 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 
Fowler Advocate. Apr. 30 July 9, 1886. 



MIAMI COUNTY. 

Organized as Lykins county in 1855; named for David Lykins, mission- 
ary to the Miami Indians and member of the territorial council, 1855; name 
changed to Miami in 1861; county seat, Paola; area, 588 square miles, 
376,320 acres; population (1915), 18,676; assessed valuation (1915), $31,- 
356,687; resources and industries agriculture, coal, marble, oil, and natural 



PAOLA Population (1915), 3392; elevation, 860 feet; established, 1855; named Peoria Village in 
honor of Baptiste Peoria, one of the incorporators; changed to Paola in 1856; industries 
brick plant, radiator factory and creamery; electric lights, waterworks, telephones; in the ga^ 
and oil district; has three railroads, the Missouri Pacific, the M. K. & T. and the St. Louis & 
San Francisco. 
MIAMI REPUBLICAN, Republican; W. D. Greason, editor and publisher, Paola. 

Weekly. Feb. 2, 1867; Apr. 18, 1868; Dec. 11, 1869; broken file 1871 to 1876; Aug. 19, 

1871 + 42 vols. 

Founded 1866 by John McReynolds and Basil M. Simpson; consolidated 1880 with the Re- 
publican-Citizen, founded 1878 by A. R. Wickersham and J. D. Greason. 

WESTERN SPIRIT, Democratic; John W. Sheridan, editor, Western Spirit Publishing Company, 

publisher, Paola. 

Weekly. Dec. 26, 1873; Aug. 28, 1874 + 42 vols. 

Founded 1871 as the Kansas Spirit, by Perry & Bright; Mr. Bright retired same year, and Mr. 
Perry changed name to the Western Spirit. Miami Talisman, founded 1881 by C. L. Rood; sus- 
pended in 1882, and was succeeded by the Paola Times, W. E. Brayman, editor and publisher, who 
started with a new volume and number; consolidated 1903 with the Western Spirit. 

LOUISBURG Population (1915), 621; elevation, feet; established, 1867; named first New 

St. Louis, and changed to Louisburg in 1870; industries extensive nurseries; in the gas dis - 
trict; has one railroad, the M. K. & T. 

HERALD, independent; Miss Adrian B. White, editor and publisher, Louisburg 

Weekly. Aug. 30, 1877; Sept. 9, 1887 + 28 vols. 
Founded 1876 by Emmanuel F. Heisler. 



240 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



OSAWATOMIE Population (1915), 2870; elevation, 853 feet; established, 1855; name a com- 
posite word formed from Osage and Pottawatomie; has commission form of government and 
owns its electric light plant; has waterworks system, telephones, ice plant; is in the gas and 
oil district; is on the Missouri Pacific railway, and repair shops are maintained there. 
GRAPHIC, independent; Keith Clevenger, editor and publisher, Osawatomie. 

Weekly. Mar. 23, 1888 + 28 vols. 

Founded 1887 as the Osawatomie Gaslight, by C. S. Bixby; suspended in 1888 and succeeded 
by the Osawatomie Graphic, Frank Pyle, editor and publisher; consolidated 1912 with the Osawat- 
omie Globe, founded 1891 by Kelly Mount. 

DISCONTINUED. Vo i 8 . 

Paola . - Call, Evening (d). Aug. 1 Sept., 1896 1 

Miami School Journal (m). June 1889 1891 2 

Miami Talisman. Sept. 15, 18811882 1 

Record. Apr. 21, 19041905 1 

Republican Citizen. Aug. 2, 18781880 2 

Times; Miami Farmer. Mar. 23, 18821903 21 

[Called Times-Signal, July 9, 1891, to Jan. 21, 1892.] 

Fontana . . Bulletin. Oct. 2, 18961897 1 

News (1st). June 4, 18851890 5 

News (2d). Feb. 2, 19071909 2 

Louisburg Border Chief; Border Watchman. Nov. 6, 18791881 ... 2 

Osawatomie Advertiser. Nov. 3, 18881890 1 

Farmers' Signal. May 8, 18901891 1 

Gaslight. Mar. 25, 18871888 1 

Globe. Sept. 5, 18911912 16 

[Lack Nov. 22, 1900, to Aug. 24, 1905.] 

Journal. May 15, 18961898 2 

Progress. Oct. 2, 19021903 1 

Sentinel. May 23 Nov. 21, 1885 1 

Times. July 22, 18801881 1 

Traders' Exchange; Commercial Club. 1900. [See Shawnee county.] 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Paola. . .Border Tier Real Estate Bulletin (m). Apr.-May, 1869. 

Democrat. Sept. 28, 1871. 
Eastern Kansan. June, 1902. 
Journal of Didactics (m). Jan.- June, 1880. 
Southern Kansas Herald. Apr. 7, 1865. 

Osawatomie News. Aug. 2 Sept. 17, 1915. 

Sentinel. May 8 June 26, 1886. 



MITCHELL COUNTY. 

Organized, 1870; named for William D. Mitchell, Second Kansas regi- 
ment; county seat, Beloit; area, 720 square miles, 460,000 acres; population 
(1915), 13,731; assessed valuation (1915), $29,907,777; resources and in- 
dustries agriculture and stock raising. 

BELOIT Population (1915), 3240; elevation, 1380 feet; established, 1870; first known as Willow 
Springs; name changed to Beloit, after Beloit, Wis.; industries mills and elevators; has 
commission form of government and owns its electric light plant; waterworks, telephones; 
is on the lines of the Union Pacific and Missouri Pacific railways. 

CALL, independent; A. B. Adamson and H. K. Houghton, editors and publishers, Beloit. 

Daily. Oct. 1, 1901 + 29 vols. 
Founded 1901 by Seward A. Jones and P. G. Chubbic. 

GAZETTE, Republican; J. R. Harrison, editor and proprietor, Beloit. 

Weekly. Apr. 11, 1872 Apr., 1873; June, 1876 + 40 vols. 
Founded 1872 by A. B. Chaffee and J. J. Johnson; in 1894 absorbed the subscription list of 

the Cawker City Times, founded 1888 by J. W. McBride. Daily Gazette, founded 1907 as the 

Beloit Daily Times, with W. A. Huff, editor; consolidated in 1909 with the Gazette, E. W. Swan, 

editor and publisher; ran as the Gazette and Times until 1910, when the name was changed to 

the Daily Gazette, which discontinued in 1911. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 241 



CAWKER CITY Population (1915), 840; elevation, 1473 feet; established, 1870; named in 
honor of E. H. Cawker; industries creamery, flour mill and elevators; owns its electric light 
plant; has waterworks and telephones; is on the line of the Missouri Pacific railway. 

LEDGER, independent Democratic; Robert Good, editor and publisher, Cawker City. 

Weekly. Jan. 6, 1899 + 17 vols. 
Founded 1899 by G. L. Hudkins. 

PUBLIC RECORD, Republican; Levi L. Alrich, editor and publisher, Cawker City. 

Weekly. Apr. 19, 1883 + 33 vols. 
A continuation of the Echo, Cawker City, founded 1875 by Austin L. Topliff and Stephen 

De Young; suspended 1878 and succeeded by the Free Press, founded the same year by Stephen 

De Young. This paper ran until 1883, when it was succeeded by the Public Record, L. L. Alrich, 

editor and publisher. 

G-LEN ELDER Population (1915), 506; elevation, 1425 feet; established, 1871; first known as 
West Hampton; industries flour mill and elevators; has electric light plant and telephones; 
is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

SENTINEL, Progressive; O. A. Brice, editor and publisher, Glen Elder. 

Weekly. Jan. 1, 1891 -+- 25 vols. 
Founded 1891 as the People's Sentinel, by Clark E. and Mabel B. Harvey; name changed 

1913 to Glen Elder Sentinel. 

SCOTTSVILLE Population (1915), 236; elevation, 1521 feet; established, 1878; has telephones; 

is on the line of the Missouri Pacific railway. 

ADVANCE, independent; C. O. McCall, editor and publisher, Scottsville. 
Weekly. June 30, 1904 + 11 vols. 

Founded 1904 by Ed Hill. 

SIMPSON Population (1915), 290; elevation, 1333 feet; established, 1879; first named Britts- 
ville by J. J. Britt; name changed to Simpson, for Alfred Simpson, in 1882; owns its water- 
works system; has electric lights and telephones; is on the Union Pacific railway. 

NEWS, independent; F. S. Rupe, editor and publisher, Simpson. 

Weekly. Mar. 28, 1912 + 4 vols. . 
Founded 1912 by Knowles C. Weiss. 

TIPTON Population (1915, estimated), 210; established, 1872; first known as Pittsburg; name 

changed to Tipton in 1882; telephones; no railroad. 
TIMES, independent; C. W. Wells, editor and publisher, Tipton. 

Weekly. Apr. 29, 1915 + 1 vol. 
Founded 1915 by C. W. Wells. 

DISCONTINUED. y ote 

Beloit Courier. Feb. 27, 18791895 16 

Dairy Age (m). Apr., 19001902 2 

Democrat; Western Democrat. Sept. 27, 1878 1890 12 

[Called Western Nationalist 18821883.] 
District of Salina Watchman (m). 19061907. [See Saline county.! 

Gazette-Times; Gazette (d). Aug. 2, 1909 1911 5 

Good Tidings (bi-w). Apr., 18911895 1 

[Not published Sept., 1891, to May, 1894.J 
Kansas Woodman; Western Woodman; Royal Neighbor (m). 

Mar., 18931899 7 

New Man (m). Oct., 18951898 3 

Now and Here (m). Dec., 19081909 1 

Record. Feb. 20, 18771879 2 

Royal Neighbor (m). Jan., 1900 1901 . 2 

Times. Aug. 22, 18951909 14 

Times (d). Dec. 27, 19071909 4 

Today (m). Aug., 19081909 1 

Western Call. Nov. 21, 18901910 19 

Cawker City Echo. May 18, 1876 1878 2 

Expositor. [See Dickinson county.] 

Free Press. Nov. 30, 18781883 5 

Journal. May 12, 18801890 10 

Times. June 8, 18881894 7 

Tribune. 18731874 1 

Glen Elder Herald; Kansas Herald. Mar. 5 May, 1885; June, 18861890 4 

Independent. Jan. 21, 18991904 6 

Key. Apr. 15, 18801881 1 

Republican. Oct. 13, 18931894 1 

16 



242 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DISCONTINUED. Vols 

:Scottsville Independent. Feb. 13, 1886 1889. .. . 3 

Register. Mar. 9 Nov. 9, 1899 1 

Tri-County News. Mar. 15, 1889 1898 9 

Simpson. . . . .Record. Aug. 4 Dec. 22, 1905. . 1 

Sittings. Oct. 11, 18841886 2 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Beloit Dental Herald (m). Jan., 1888 Jan., 1889. 

Harmonic (m). Sept., 1892 June, 1893. 

Mitchell County Farmer (m). July, 1884. 

Mitchell County Mirror. May 17 June 28, 1871. 

Trade Journal. May 8 Aug. 7, 1890. 
Cawker City Campfire (m). Aug., 1882 Sept., 1883. 

Sentinel. Apr. 3, 1874. 

Tribune. Dec. 2 and 9, 1873. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Beloit Kansas Evangelist (m). Dec., 1898 July, 1899. 

Cawker City G. L. Hudkins' Real Estate Salesman. Oct. 27, 1899. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 

Organized, 1869; named for Gen. Richard Montgomery; county seat, 
Independence; area, 648 square miles, 414,720 acres; population (1915), 
49,824; assessed valuation (1915), $56,221,200; resources and industries 
-coal, oil, gas, building stone, brick, tile and potter's clay, agriculture, and 
stock raising. 

INDEPENDENCE Population (1915), 12,144; elevation, 816 feet; established, 1869; industries- 
Portland cement plants, brick, tile and pottery works, asphalt and rubber factory, oil re- 
fineries, window glass factory, flour and planing mills, foundries, machine shops; electric 
light plant, street railway, paved streets, waterworks, telephones, natural gas; is on the 
Santa Fe and Missouri Pacific railways, and interurban line to Coffeyville. 

REPORTER, Republican; Clyde H. Knox, editor and publisher, Independence. 

Daily. 1882 + 83 vols. 
Founded 1881; first issue in Society's file shows R. C. Harper, editor and publisher; the paper 

has been called the Evening Reporter, Morning Reporter and Independence Daily Reporter. 

SOUTH KANSAS TRIBUNE, Republican; W. T. and C. A. Yoe and C. A. Connelley, editors and 
publishers, Independence. 

Weekly. Feb. 9, 1876 + 42 vols. 
Founded 1871 by Lyman U. Humphrey and W. T. Yoe. 
STAR, independent; A. T. Cox, editor and publisher, Independence. 
Daily [evening]. Broken file. Mar. 4, 1901 + 50 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Southern Kansan, Independence, founded 1873 
'by W. H. Watkins; name changed to Independence Kansan, with Will H. Warner, editor and 
publisher; a daily edition of the Kansan was founded by Mr. Warner about 1877 or 1878, but 
discontinued. Independence Courier, founded 1875 by J. J. Chatham; name changed in 1876 
to Weekly Courier; in 1877 name again changed, becoming the Workingman's Courier, Frank C. 
'.Scott, editor and publisher; in 1879 consolidated with the Kansan. Independence Kansan, sold 
.in 1884 to H. W. Young and consolidated with the Star. Coffeyville Star, founded 1881 by Henry 
W. Young; moved to Independence same year and name changed to the Star, H. W. Young, 
editor and publisher. The Living Age, Independence, founded 1881 by P. B. Castle and F. G. 
Beattie; consolidated same year with the Star. In 1884 the Star absorbed the Independence Kansan 
and continued under the name of the Star and Kansan until 1905, when it was discontinued. 
Evening Star, successor of the Star and Kansan, was founded in 1901 by A. T. Cox. 

CANEY Population (1915), 3104; elevation, 738 feet; established, 1869; named for Caney 

creek; industries glass factories, brick and tile plant, zinc smelter, oil refinery, gas and oil 
wells; telephones, public library; is on the M. K. & T. and the Missouri Pacific railways. 

CHRONICLE, Progressive; J. R. Brady, editor and publisher, Caney. 

Weekly. July 24, 1885 + 30 vols. 
Founded 1885 by Retta Reynolds. Daily edition of the Chronicle founded 1911 by J. R. 

Brady. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 243 



NEWS, Republican; Harry E. Floyd, editor and publisher, Caney. 

Weekly. Dec. 1, 1905 -j- 10 vols. 
Founded 1904 by Fred C. Trillingham. 

CHERRYVALE Population (1915), 4235; elevation, 837 feet; established, 1871; named from 
its situation in the valley of Cherry creek; industries brick and tile plants, iron works, oil 
refinery, implement factory, zinc smelter, flour mills, elevators, oil and gas wells; waterworks, 
electric light plant, telephones; is on the Santa Fe and the St. Louis & San Francisco rail- 
ways. 

REPUBLICAN, Republican; Will R. Burge, editor and publisher, Cherry vale. 
Weekly. June 18, 1886 + 29 vols. 
Daily (2d). Nov. 7, 1903 + 25 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Cherryvale Globe, founded 1878 by C. P. 
Buffington and Guy H. Piatt; consolidated 1882 with the Cherryvale News, founded in 1881 by 
S. P. and C. E. Moore, and called the Cherryvale Globe-News, S. P., C. E. and F. G. Moore, 
editors and publishers. Cherry Valley Torch, Cherryvale, founded 1882 by C. P. Buffington and 
Tom C. Copeland; consolidated in 1885 with the Globe-News, and continued as the Cherryvale 
Globe and Torch, with C. P. Buffington and E. S. Williams, editors and publishers. Messrs. 
Buffington and Williams in 1885 founded the Daily Globe and Torch, which suspended in 1888, 
when it was absorbed by the Cherryvale Republican. The Daily Globe and Torch was revived 
in Dec., 1888, and ran until Jan. 12, 1889, when it again suspended. The Cherryvale Republican 
was founded 1886 by L. A. Sheward and S. L. Smith. People's Party Plaindealer, Cherryvale, 
founded 1892 by M. C. Handley; consolidated in 1893 with the Republican, and continued as the 
Republican- Plaindealer, D. R. Neville, editor and publisher; name shortened to the Republican 
in 1893. A daily edition was founded in 1894 by E. L. Eaton and ran for several weeks; one week 
it was called the Daily Clarion, but the name of the Republican was again taken and one issue 
gotten out; it suspended Aug. 8, 1894. Southern Kansas Farmer, Cherryvale, founded 1890 by 

the Farmer Publishing Company, with Richardson, editor; name changed in 1891 to 

the Kansas Commonwealth, and published by the Commonwealth Publishing Company; con- 
solidated same year with the Cherryvale Republican. Cherryvale Evening Clarion (2d) , founded 
1898 by Robert Aikin. Cherryvale Weekly Clarion (2d), founded 1901 with L. I. Purcell, editor. 
Morehead Searchlight, founded 1898 by W. C. McConnell; sold to Cherryvale Clarion Apr., 1900. 
In Nov., 1903, Mr. Purcell purchased the Republican, and immediately began the publication 
of the daily and weekly Republican, discontinuing the daily edition of the Clarion, and leasing the 
weekly tolCarl F. White and Fred C. Eskridge. The name of the Weekly Clarion was changed 
in 1904 to.the Cherryvale Weekly Journal, with Robert J. Milligan, publisher; suspended Oct., 1908 

COFFEYVILLE Population (1915), 15,228; elevation, 744 feet; established, 1869; moved to* 
present location, one mile distant, 1871; named for Hon. A. M. Coffey; industries glass 
factories, oil refinery, foundries, brick, tile and pottery works, zinc smelters, excelsior factory, 
carriage and wagon factories, box factories, plaster factory, flour mills, oil and gas wells; 
municipal electric light and waterworks systems, telephones, paving, public library; is on the 
Santa Fe, the Missouri Pacific, the St. L. & S. F. and the M. K. & T. railways. 
CHRISTIAN, religious; Arthur Long, editor and publisher, Coffeyville. 

Weekly. 

History unknown; no issues on file in Society's collection. 
INDEPENDENT, Republican; C. W. Kent, editor and publisher, Coffeyville. 

Weekly. Mar. 8, 1895 Jan., 1897; Feb., 1901 + 17 vols. 

Founded 1893; first issue in Society's file shows C. W. Kent, editor and publisher. The Cherry- 
vale New Era, founded 1899 by C. W. Kent; moved to Coffeyville in 1900 and consolidated with 
the Independent; continued as a semiweekly under the name of Independent-New Era. In 1902 
the paper returned to its old name of Independent, published semiweekly; in 1908 it became 
the Weekly Independent, and in 1909 absorbed the Liberty Sentinel, founded 1905 by F. L. Tom- 
linson. 

JOURNAL, Republican; U. J. Powell, editor and publisher, Coffeyville. 

Weekly. Oct. 30, 1875 + 40 vols. 

Daily. July 31, 1894 + 69 vols. 

Founded 1875 by William A. Peffer. The Sun, Coffeyville, founded 1886 by W. A. Peffer, jr., 
and John Truby; consolidated 1889 with the Journal under name of the Journal and Sun, D. 
Stewart Elliott and W. A. Peffer, editors and publishers; in 1891 name changed back to the Journal, 
with D. S. Elliott, editor and publisher; in 1893 Mr. Stewart founded the Daily Journal. 

SUN, independent; Stanley Platz, editor, Maddox & Platz, publishers, Coffeyville. 

Daily. Mar. 28, 1913 + 6 vols. 

Founded 1911; early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being vol. 2, No. 175, Paul 
Jones, editor and publisher. 

ELK CITY Population (1915), 653; elevation, 836 feet; established, 1869; industries brick and 
tile works, flour mill; natural gas district, telephones; is on the Santa Fe and Missouri Pacific 
railways. 



244 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



GOD'S MESSENGER, religious; Francis A. Stinson, editor and publisher, Elk City. 

Monthly. Sept. 17, 1914 + 1 vol. 

Early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being vol. 7, No. 12. 
MID-WEEK REPORTER, local; F. A. Stinson, editor and publisher, Elk City. 

Weekly. Dec. 8, 1915 + 
Founded 1915 by F. A. Stinson. 
SUN, Republican; L. W. Davis, editor and publisher, Elk City. 

Weekly. Oct. 2, 1903 + 12 vols. 
Founded 1903 by Maurice McDonald. 

DISCONTINUED. 



Vols. 



Tndeoendence .Call, Evening (d). Mar. 2 June 30, 1896 1 

Free Press; Times (d). Feb. 28 June 3, 1913 1 

Kansan. Jan. 28, 18761884 9 

Kansas Good Roads Advocate (m). Mar., 19121913 1 

Kansas Populist. Independence and Cherryvale. June 23, 1893 1904. . 12 

Living Age. Feb. 3 Sept. 29, 1881 1 

Montgomery Argus. July 30, 1886 1887 1 

News (d and w). Mar. 23 July 18, 1886 1 

Outlook; Religious Outlook. Feb. 14 July 19, 1900 1 

Republican. July 5 Dec. 1, 1900 1 

Star. Apr. 14, 18811884 4 

[Coffeyville Star, Apr.-Oct., 1881.] 

Star and Kansan. Jan. 2, 18851905 21 

Times; Kansas Populist. Apr. 1, 19041913 10 

United Labor. May 5, 18921894 3 

Tanev Advance; News Advance. Sept. 5, 19061907 1 

Chronicle (d). [Broken file.] May 28, 19111913 2 

Herald. June 10 Dec. 30, 1904 1 

Patriot. Apr. 21, 18991900 1 

Times and Phoenix. May 17, 18891898 10 

Cherrvvale . .Bulletin. Apr. 12, 18841888 5 

Champion. June 4, 18871895 8 

Cherry Valley Torch. Mar. 1, 18821885 3 

Clarion, Evening (d). Aug. 25, 18981903 11 

Clarion; Journal (w and s-w). Apr. 20 July, 1900; July, 1901 1908; 

May 9 Dec. 17, 1914 9 

Globe. July 26, 18791882 2 

Globe and Torch. May 1, 18851888 3 

Globe and Torch (d). May 16, 18851889 5 

[Not published June, 1887, to Dec. 9, 1888.] 

Globe-News. 18821885 3 

Journal (d). Nov. 22, 19061914 7 

Kansas Commonwealth. Apr. 2 Aug. 27, 1891 1 

Kansas Populist; Morning News; Daily News (d). Mar. 28, 1894 1907, 26 

Leader. July 9 Dec. 14, 1877 1 

Mills' Weekly World. 1888. [See Labette county.] 

New Era. Mar. 23, 18991901 2 

News (1st). Apr. 28, 18811882 1 

News (2d). June 3, 18981907 9 

Republic. Jan. 13 July 14, 1893 1 

Republican (1st). June 5 Aug. 8, 1894 1 

Southern Kansas Farmer. Sept. 11, 1890 1891 1 

Telegram (d). Jan. 30 May 8, 1892 1 

Coffevville. . .Afro-American Advocate. Sept. 2, 18911893 2 

American. Apr. 23, 18981899 1 

Bee (d). Mar. 1 Sept. 18, 1909 2 

Chronicle (d). Jan. 13 Feb. 27, 1909 1 

Courier; Workingman's Courier; Coffeyville and Independence; 

Aug. 28, 1874 Dec., 1876; Apr., 18771879 4 

Eagle. Oct. 27, 18881890 1 

Earth (d). June 23, 19091915 14 

Gaslight. Nov., 18981903 5 

Gate City Enterprise. Oct. 17, 18841885 1 

Gate City Gazette. Aug. 20, 1886 1887 1 

Herald (d). July 21, 19101911 1 

High School News (m). Oct., 19031904 1 

[First called World.] 

Independent (d). Dec. 8, 18961899 6 

Kansas Blackman. Aug. 17 Dec. 28, 1894 1 

Montgomery County Democrat; Coffeyville Democrat. 

May 14, 18961902 6 

News; News-Broad Axe. Feb. 2, 1890 1893 2 

Public School Review (m). Oct., 19021903 1 

Record (d). May 11, 19021908 , 12 

Record. June 6, 1902 1908 6 

Sun. Nov. 26, 18861889 3 

Telegram (d). Jan. 30 May 30, 1893 1 

Vindicator. Dec. 17, 19041907 3 

War Day Memories (m). Aug., 1911 1912 1 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 245 



DISCONTINUED. Volg 

Peering. . . . . News. Nov. 1, 19071908 . . 1 

Times. Aug. 18, 19101912 2 

Elk City . . . . Democrat. Sept. 5, 18851886 . . 1 

Eagle. Sept. 17, 18861890 .4 

Enterprise. Aug. 31, 1889 1905. . . 16 

Globe. Aug. 9, 18821887 5 

Star. June 6, 18841885 1 

Times. 1880 1 

Havana Harp. Oct. 6, 19051907 2 

Herald. July 7, 18871889 2 

Press; Torch. June 12, 18911893 .... .2 

Recorder. Mar. 18 Dec. 6, 1889 1 

Vidette. Dec. 4, 18851887 1 

Liberty . . . . Express. Apr. 28, 19041905 2 

Light. Mar. 5 July 30, 1886 1 

Review. Jan. 14, 18871892 . . .6 
Sentinel. Nov. 23, 19051909 4 

Tyro Herald [broken file]. Jan. 25, 19071909 .2 

Life. July 13, 19051906 1 

Life (d). Aug. 20 Dec. 18, 1905 1 

Telegram. Sept. 16, 19091911 1 

SHORT-LIVED Vol. 1. 

Independence Buyer's Guide. Apr. 3 May 15, 1886. 

Itemizer. July 19 Aug. 5, 1879. 

Montgomery Monitor. Dec. 26, 1885 Jan. 30, 1886. 

News. May 14 July 23, 1886. 

Parish Churchman (m). Nov., 1880. 

Pioneer. Nov. 13, 1869 Jan. 1, 1870. 

Southern Kansas Journal; Land Buyers' Guide (m). Mar., 1887. 

Stewart's Southern Kansas Guide (m). Apr.-Oct., 1884; Mar., 1885; Jan., 1886. 
Caney Caney Valley Home (m). May, 1884. 

Sunbeam. Sept. 30 Nov. 11, 1887. 

Cherryvale .Advocate (qr). July and Oct., 1883; Apr. and Aug., 1884; 

Apr. and June, 1885; Mar., 1886. 

Clarion. Oct. 1 Dec. 31, 1885. 

Home. Nos. 1, 2 and 3, 1883. 
Coffeyville Oklahoma Boomer. Jan. 21 Apr. 1, 1885. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Cherryvale Cent (d). Nov. 22 Dec. 15, 1888. 

People's Party Plaindealer. Sept. 14, 1892 Jan. 13, 1893. 
Coffeyville Broad-Axe. Dec. 31, 1891 Apr. 29, 1892. 

Gate City Independent. Aug. 18, 25, 1893. 

Index. Oct. 1, 1889 July, 1891. 

Ranch and Range. Jan. 5 Apr. 14, 1893. 
Havana Globe. Nov. 7, 1890 Jan. 2, 1891. 

News. Apr. 12 Aug. 2, 1890. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 3. 

Independence Call. Mar. 12-26 and June 4, 1896. 

Call, Evening (d). July 1-8, 1896. 

Courier. Mar. 7-19 and Nov. 17, 1879. 

Caney Vox Populi. Sept. 10, 1896. 

Cherryvale Baptist Banner (m). Jan.-Mar., 1899. 

Bugle Call (d). Aug. 20-24, 1901. 

Kansas Agriculturist (occas). Nov. 1, 1901; Feb., 1902; Feb., 1903; 
July and Oct., 1904; Jan. and Aug., 1905. 

Silver Advocate. July 23 Oct. 30, 1896. 
Coffeyville Democrat (d). Apr. 25 May 18, 1901. 

Gas (m). Nov., 1899; Jan., 1900; June, 1901. 

Gas and Oil Developer. Apr., 1904. 

Herald. Mar. 21 June 13, 1908. 

People (d). Mar. 8-30, 1911. 

Real Estate News. Nov. 23, 1907. 
Deering Sentinel. Aug. 13 Dec. 24, 1909. 



246 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



MORRIS COUNTY. 

Organized, 1858; named for Thomas Morris, United States senator from 
Ohio, 1833-1839; county seat, Council Grove; area, 700 square miles, 448,000 
acres; population (1915), 11,810; assessed valuation (1915), $23,243,719; 
resources and industries building stone, brown ochre, gypsum, agriculture, 
and stock raising. 

COUNCIL GROVE Population (1915), 2405; elevation, 1234 feet; established, 1847, as a trad- 
ing post on the Santa Fe Trail; 1850 the Kansas Indian mission was established at this point, 
and in 1858 the town of Council Grove was incorporated, situated in the grove where the 
council between the United States commissioners and the Osage Indians was held, Aug. 10^ 
1825, for the conclusion of a peace treaty for the right of way of the Santa Fe Trail through 
the Indian lands; industries elevators, marble and granite works; telephones, municipal 
electric light and water systems, public library; is on the Missouri Pacific and the M. K. & T. 
railways. 

GUARD, Republican; M. F. Amrine, editor and publisher, Council Grove. 
Weekly. Aug. 9, 1884 -+- 31 vols. 
Daily [evening]. Nov. 1, 1915 + 1 vol. 
Founded 1884 by I. and E. Sharp, and John Maloy. Alliance Herald, Council Grove, founded 

1891 by L. McKenzie and C. W. White, with L. McKenzie, editor; consolidated 1891 with the 

Guard; name changed to Alliance Herald-Guard, L. McKenzie, editor; in 1892 name changed back 

to Council Grove Guard. Daily edition founded 1915 by M. F. Amrine. 

REPUBLICAN, Republican; C. L. Daughters, editor and publisher, Council Grove. 

Weekly. Jan. 18, 1879 + 37 vols. 

Founded 1872 as the Morris County Republican, Council Grove, by J. T. Bradley. Council 
Grove Democrat, founded 1870 by S. M. Hays; consolidated 1877 with the Republican, under 
name of Republican and Democrat, Moriarty & Dunn, editors and publishers. Morris County 
Times, Council Grove, founded 1879 by Edward J. Dill (?); name changed to Kansas Cosmos 1881, 
Edward and Charles W. White, editors and publishers; sold to the Republican in 1886 with F. E. 
and O. S. Munsell, editors and publishers. 

DUNLAP Population (1915), 320; elevation, 1182 feet; established, 1875; named for Joseph 
Dunlap, Indian trader and founder of the town; telephones; is on the K. M. & T. railway. 

RUSTLER, independent; Carl C. Lamb, editor and publisher, Dunlap. 

Weekly. Apr. 18, 1914 -f- 2 vols. 
Founded 1914 by Carl C. Lamb. 

DWIGHT Population (1915), 268; elevation, 1496 feet; established, 1887; named for Dwight 
Rathbone, who owned part of the land included in the town site; telephones; is on the Rock 
Island railway. 

SIGNAL, independent; M. B. and C. H. Johnson, editors and publishers, Dwight. 

Weekly. June 13, 1912 + 4 vols. 
Founded 1912 by N. M. and J. S. Davis. 

LATIMER Population (1915, estimated), 120; elevation, 1411 feet; established about 1883; 
originally called Far West; name changed in 1888 to Latimer; telephones; is on the Rock 
Island railway. 

LEADER, local; Kenneth C. Doddridge, editor and publisher, Latimer. 

Weekly. July 15, 1915 + 1 vol. 
Founded 1915 by Kenneth C. Doddridge. 

WHITE CITY Population (1915), 608; elevation, 1469 feet; established, 1871; named for F. C. 
White, superintendent Union Pacific, southern branch; telephones; is on the M. K. & T. and 
the Rock Island railways. 

REGISTER, Republican; C. C. Miller, editor, Miller & Holmes, publishers, White City. 

Weekly. June 7, 1889 -f 26 vols. 

This paper is a .continuation of the White City Whig, founded 1885 by R. B. Brown; sold to 
G. W. Simpson and' name changed in 1886 to the Morris County News; name again changed, 
same year, to White City News; name changed in 1889 to White City Register, with W. G. Means 
& Co., publishers. The Dunlap Reflector, founded 1896 by S. M. Padgett & Sons- consolidated in 
1898 with the Register, S. M. Padgett & Sons, editors and publishers. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 247 



WILSEY Population (1915), 291; elevation, 1500 feet; established about 1885; telephones; is on 

the Missouri Pacific railway. 

WARBLER, independent; A. R. Pirtle, editor, Warbler Publishing Company, publisher, Wilsey. 
Weekly. May 4, 1905 + 11 vols. 

Founded 1905 by W. Charles Hopper. 

DISCONTINUED. V9U ^ 

Council Grove. . ..Anti-Monopolist. Jan. 10, 1888 1889 ... 1 

Appeal. Oct. 27, 19041907 3 

Appeal (d). Sept. 20, 19061907 . 2 

Bugle. Feb. 7 Oct. 2, 1896 1 

Courier. Dec. 18, 18911897 6- 

Democrat (1st). Jan. 26 Dec. 1, 1866 1 

Democrat (2d). Oct. 26, 18711877 7 

Kansas Cosmos. Jan. 7, 1881 Jan., 1885; July, 18851886 5- 

Kansas Press. Cottonwood Falls and Council Grove. [Broken file.] 

May 30, 18591865 3- 

Morris County Advance. Aug. 26, 19081910 2 

Morris County Republican; Republican and Democrat. 

June 6, July 25, 1874; Jan. 8, 18761879 4 

Morris County Times. Apr. 30, 18801881 2 

Neosho Valley Times. Sept. 14, 18991900 1 

Dunlap. Courier. Nov. 23, 18891891 2 

Leader. Dec. 25, 19031907. ... 4 

News. Apr. 14 Aug. 31, 1894 1 

Reflector. Jan. 7, 18961898 * 

Dwight. . . . . .Spirit. Nov. 3, 19051910. . . ... & 

Sun. Aug. 29, 18961898 2 

Tribune. Oct. 21, 19101911 1 

Wasp. Apr. 16, 18871891 

Parkerville Morris County Enterprise. Jan. 3, 18781884 7 

Morris County News. Feb. 11, 18981900 3 

Times. Oct. 8, 18871888 1 

Tribune. Jan. 16, 18961898 2 

White City Whig; Morris County News; White City News. Sept. 19, 18851889 ... 4 

Wilsey Bulletin. June 6, 18891891 2 

Morris County Republican; Morris County Independent; Wilsey Inde- 
pendent. Oct. 6, 1892 May, 1893; Mar., 18941895 1 

[See, also, Short-lived, vol. 1.] 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Council Grove Advertiser. Dec. 25, 1869 Aug. 30, 1870. 

News, Morning (d). Sept. 15-18, 1891; Sept. 27-30, 1892. 

Republican (d). Apr. 17-19, 1884. 

Temperance Banner. Aug. 19 Nov. 4, 1882. 

Vidette. May 19, 1883. 
Dunlap Chief. Mar. 3 June 2, 1882. 

Greeting. May 6 June 17, 1892. 

Reporter [broken file]. July 20, 1883; Mar. 21, 1884 May 10, 1888. 

Sweet Chariot. Sept. 1 Dec. 31, 1887. 
Dwight Field and Range (m). Kansas City, Mo., and Dwight. July-Oct., 1887. 

Independent. Oct. 23 Dec. 11, 1891. 
Wilsey Morris County Republican. Oct. 6 Dec. 22, 1892. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Council Grove. . . .Herald. Dec. 16, 1898. 

News, Evening (d). Dec. 13-29, 1915. 

Burdick Bulletin (m). Dec. 15, 1909 Dec. 15, 1910. 

Dwight Advocate (m). July, 1899 May, 1900. 

White City Messenger (m). Oct.-Dec., 1906; Jan., Feb. and Apr., 1907. 



248 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



MORTON COUNTY. 

Organized, 1886; named for Oliver P. Morton, United States senator 
from Indiana, 1867-1877; county seat, Richfield; area, 729 square miles, 
466,560 acres; population (1915), 1729; assessed valuation (1915), $3,437,195; 
resources and industries building stone, gypsum, artesian wells, agriculture, 
grazing, and live stock. 

ELKHART Population (1915, estimated), 500; elevation, 3600 feet; established, 1913; indus- 
tries cement block works; telephones, municipal waterworks; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
TRI-STATE NEWS, independent; Eugene L. Smith and J. E. Burks, editors and publishers, Elk- 
hart. 

Weekly. Apr. 29, 1915 + 1 vol. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Richfield Republican, founded 1886 by War- 
drip & Baker, editors and publishers; consolidated 1890 with the Morton County Monitor, of Mor- 
ton, founded 1888 by Van Gundy Bros., Glen S. Van Gundy, editor, and ran as the Monitor- 
Republican; name changed in 1895 to Monitor-Republic, Ernest C. Wilson, editor and publisher; 
name later shortened to the Monitor. Taloga Star, founded 1887 by H. M. Gilbert; moved to 
Richfield in 1890 and name changed to Morton County Star, with H. M. Worthington, editor and 
publisher; purchased by the Monitor-Republican in Oct., 1893; The Monitormoved to the new town 
of Elkhart in 1915, and changed its name to the Elkhart News; consolidated same year with the 
Elkhart Enterprise, early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being vol. 7, No. 4, Apr. 23, 
1914, with J. E. Burks, editor and publisher; continued after consolidation as the Elkhart Tri- 
State News, Eugene L. Smith and J. E. Burks, editors and publishers. 

ROLLA Population (1915, estimated), 180; established, 1913; telephones; is on the Santa Fe 

railway. 
MORTON COUNTY PIONEER, independent; F. B. Van Gundy & Son, editors and publishers, Rolla. 

Weekly. Sept. 6, 1912 + 3 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the Pioneer, of Sid, early history unknown, no issues being 
in Society's collection; moved to Richfield in 1912, with F. B. Van Gundy & Son, editors and pub- 
lishers; in 1914 moved to Rolla. 

DISCONTINUED. 

Richfield.. . . .Great Southwest; Southwest Leader; Leader-Democrat. Vols. 

Oct. 7, 18861889 2 

Leader. Jan. 9, 18861887 1 

Monitor-Republican; Richfield Monitor. Apr. 6, 1890 May, 1900; 

Nov., 1906 Dec., 1909; Feb., 19101915 18 

Morton County Star. Jan. 23, 18911893 3 

News. Aug. 10, 18891890 1 

Republican. May 4, 18871889 

Cundiff Journal. Mar. 25, 18881889 1 

Elkhart Enterprise. Apr. 23, 19141915 2 

Frisco . . Morton County Democrat. Dec. 25, 1886 1888 1 

Pioneer. Jan. 6, 18861887 1 

Morton Morton County Monitor. Morton and Richfield. Sept. 22, 1888 1890. . 2 

Taloga Star. Oct. 7, 18871890 3 

Westola Wave. May 25, 18881889 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Morton Herald. Jan. 10-24, 1889. 

Westola. . , , .Sunbeam. Sept. 22 Dec. 1, 1887. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 249 



NEMAHA COUNTY. 

Organized, 1855; Ne-ma-ha, an Indian word signifying " muddy water," 
given to the Nemaha river and later to the county; county seat, Seneca; 
area, 720 square miles, 460,800 acres; population (1915), 18,309; assessed 
valuation (1915), $41,647,729; resources and industries building stone, coal, 
potter 's clay, agriculture, horticulture, and stock raising. 

SENECA Population (1915), 1916; elevation, 1151 feet; established, 1857; originally called 
Rock Castle; name soon changed to Seneca, after Seneca county, Ohio; industries brick and 
tile plant; municipal electric light and waterworks system, telephones; is on the St. Joseph 
& Grand Island and Missouri Pacific railways. 

COURIER-DEMOCRAT, Democratic; Adriance & Adriance, editors and publishers, Seneca. 

Weekly. Nov. 28, 1884 + 31 vols. 
This paper is a continuation of the Nemaha Courier, Seneca, founded 1863 by John P. Cone; 

name changed in 1871 to the Seneca Weekly Courier, Frank A. Root and West E. Wilkinson, 

editors and publishers; name again changed in 1884 to the Courier-Democrat, Thompson & 

Perry, editors and publishers. 

TRIBUNE, Republican; W. H. Jordan, editor and publisher, Seneca. 

Weekly. May 28, 1879 + 36 vols. 
Founded 1879 by Wern & Clawson. 

BERN Population (1915), 256; elevation, 1285 feet; established, 1888; supposed to have been 
named by Swiss settlers, for Bern, Switzerland; electric light, telephones; is on the Rock Island 
railway. 

GAZETTE, Republican; Driggs & Driggs, editors and publishers, Bern. 

Weekly. May 6, 1898 + 18 vols. 
Founded 1898 by M. E. Ford. 

CENTRALIA Population (1915), 596; elevation, 1256 feet; established, 1859; moved one mile 

south to present site in 1867; named on account of its central location in Home township; 

industries creameries, elevator, mill; municipal electric light plant, telephones, public library; 

is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

JOURNAL, Progressive; H. L. Wait, editor and publisher, Centralia. 
Weekly. Dec. 26, 1884 + 31 vols. 

This is a continuation of the Centralia Enterprise, founded 1883 by H. H. Brooks; name 
changed in 1884 to Centralia Journal, and published by the Journal Publishing Company, G. W. 
Pampel, president. Centralia Times, founded 1893 by the Times Publishing Company; sold 
to the Journal in 1900. 

CORNING Population (1915), 419; elevation, 1357 feet; established, 1867; moved to new town 
site, a mile and a half distant, in 1870; named for Erastus Corning, of New York; industries 
elevators, creamery; electric light, telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

GAZETTE, Progressive; L. S. Slocum, editor and publisher, Corning. 

Weekly. Jan. 3, 1895 + 21 vols. 
Founded 1895 by Fred Haughawout. 

GOFF Population (1915), 343; elevation, 1229 feet; established, 1880; named in honor of Edward 
H. Goff, a Union Pacific railway official; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

ADVANCE, independent Democratic; Ray T. Ingalls, editor and publisher, Goff. 

Weekly. Mar. 31, 1892 + 24 vols. 
Founded 1892 as the Goffs Advance, by Fred Haughawout. In 1907 the spelling of the 

town changed to Goff. 

SABETHA Population (1915), 1856; elevation, 1305 feet; established, 1857; name said to be a 
corruption of the word Sabbath; a temporary fort was established on Sunday and the town 
named for the fort; industries iron foundry, planing mill, cement block works, creamery, 
mill, elevators; municipal electric light and water systems, telephones; is on the Rock Island 
and the St. Joseph & Grand Island railways. 



250 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



HERALD, independent; Ralph Tennal, editor and publisher, Sabetha. 

Weekly. Jan. 3, 1884 -f- 32 vols. 

Founded 1884 by T. L. Brundage; consolidated 1893 with the Nemaha County Republican, 
Sabetha, founded 1876 by J. F. Clough, and continued as the Republican-Herald, J. A. Constant, 
editor and publisher; name shortened to Sabetha Herald in 1895. 

SALVATION MESSENGER, religious; Le Roy M. Kopp, editor, Sabetha. 

Semimonthly. Jan. 15, 1916 + 

Early history unknown; first issue in Society's file is numbered vol. 2, No. 1. 
STAR, independent Republican; C. J. Durst, editor andjjublisher, Sabetha. 

Weekly. Jan. 3, 1896 + 20 vols. 
Founded 1896 by C. J. Durst. 

WETMORE Population (1915), 544; elevation, 1089 feet; established, 1866; named for W. T. 

Wetmore; industries elevators, creamery; electric lights, telephones; is on the Missouri 

Pacific railway. 

SPECTATOR, Republican; W. F. Turrentine, editor and publisher, Wetmore. 
Weekly. Jan. 4, 1907 + 8 vols. 

Founded 1882 by J. F. Clough and T. J. Wolfley; name changed in 1887 to Nemaha County 
Spectator, T. J. Wolfley and J. M. Cober, editors and publishers; in 1904 consolidated with the 
Wetmore Enterprise, and name became Wetmore Enterprise and Nemaha County Spectator, J. W. 
Coleman, editor and publisher; name again changed in 1906 to Wetmore Spectator, W. F. Turren- 
tine, editor and publisher. 

DISCONTINUED. 

Seneca.. ...Courier. Oct. 21, 1869; May 16, Oct. 10, 1873; Vols - 

Mar. 13, May 29, June 5, 12, 1874; July 9, Dec. 3, 18751884 9 

Nemaha County Republican. Seneca and Oneida. Apr. 13, 19001904 . 4 

News. Aug. 7, 18901899 9 

[1890 bound with Goff News.] 

Our Mission (m). Jan., 18841886 2 

Rural Kansan; Nemaha Kansan. June 7, 1900 1904 4 

Bancroft World. June 21, 19011902 1 

Bern Press. May 3, 18891898 9 

Centralia. . . . . Enterprise. July 20, 18831884 ... 2 

Times. Feb. 24, 18931899 7 

Corning Clipper. July, 18931894 1 

Goff News. June 16, 18871890 3 

Kelly Booster. July 23, 19141915 1 

Independent. July 18 Dec. 29, 1899 1 

Reporter. Apr. 3, 19021905 

Oneida. . . ... Chieftain; Democrat; Dispatch. Mar. 31, 18831884 2 

Journal. Oct. 4, 18791882 2 

Monitor. Apr. 17, 18851886 1 

News. Feb. 24 July 28, 1895 1 

World. Mar. 25 Dec. 24, 1892 1 

Sabetha Advance. Jan. 20, 18761877 2 

[See, also, Short-lived, vol. 1.] 

Commercial. Nov. 30, 18991900 1 

Nemaha County Republican. Oct. 5, 18761893 17 

Wetmore Enterprise. Apr. 8, 19041906 3 

Nemaha County Spectator. Dec. 2, 1882 Aug., 1884; 

Aug. 29 Sept. 26, 1885; Sept., 18861904 20 

Rural Enterprise. May 1, 18991900 2 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Seneca... .... Independent Press. June 11, 1870. 

Nemaha Valley Homeseeker. Feb. 1, 1889. 
Corning Chief. Apr. 12 July 12, 1884. 

Independent. Apr. 18 July 19, 1890. 

Goff Reporter. Jan. 15-29, 1891. 

Neuchatel L'Etoile du Kansas [French] (m). Jan., 1873. 

Oneida. . . . . .Owl. Aug. 21, 28, 1886. 

Record. Feb. 7 Apr. 4, 1901. 

Sabetha Advance. May 28 July 30, Aug. 27, 1874; Apr. 22, 1875. 

Wetmor Register. July 31 Aug. 28, 1886. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 251 



NEOSHO COUNTY. 

Organized, 1864; originally part of Dorn county until 1861 when name 
was changed to Neosho; county seat, Erie; area, 576 square miles, 368,640 
acres; population (1915), 23,050; assessed valuation (1915), $30,476,568; 
resources and industries gas, oil, building stone, and agriculture. 

ERIE Population (1915), 1202; elevation, 900 feet; established, 1866; named for a small lake 
in the vicinity; industries oil refinery, stone quarries, flour and saw mills, elevators; munic- 
ipal waterworks and electric light systems; telephones; has two railroads, the Santa Fe and 
the M. K. & T. 

KANSAS WORKMAN, fraternal; published under the direction of Grand Master Workman of the 
A. O. U. W.; Cooper Jackson, Newton, Kan., associate editor; published at Erie. 

Monthly. May, 1913 + 3 vols. 
Founded 1882 at Girard by A. P. Riddle; moved by him to Minneapolis, in 1885; in 1909 

moved to Great Bend, with William P. Feder, editor and publisher; in 1913 moved to Erie, with 

T. A. Cordry, editor. 

RECORD, Republican; Seth G. and Don E. Wells, editors and publishers, Erie. 

Weekly. May 5, 1876 June, 1884; Apr., 1885 + 38 vols. 

This is a continuation of the Neosho County Record, Erie, founded 1876 by George W. Mc- 
Millen. The Neosho Valley Enterprise, Osage Mission, founded 1880 by F. W. Ward; moved to 
Erie in 1882 and continued as the Neosho County Republican (with new volume and number), 
T. F. Ross, editor, and D. C. Ambrose and T. F. Ross, publishers; in 1886 consolidated with the 
Record and continued as the Republican-Record, Benj. J. Smith and D. C. Ambrose, editors and 
publishers; name shortened in Dec., 1904, to the Erie Record, Seth G. Wells, editor and publisher. 

SENTINEL, Democratic; Alf. Q. and Lester A. Wooster, editors and publishers, Erie. 

Daily. July 1, 1909 + 13 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the Neosho County Democrat, Osage Mission, founded 1883, 
E. J. Kenney, editor, and A. Conn, publisher; moved to Erie and continued as the People's Vindi- 
cator, by the Vindicator Publishing Company, W. E. Hardy, president and editor; in 1890 name 
changed to Erie Sentinel, with C. R. Watt and Clay D. Herod, editors and publishers. Chanute 
Blade, founded 1883, by Blade Publishing Company; consolidated 1906 with the Sentinel. The 
Erie Daily Sentinel was founded 1909 by Alf. Q. Wooster & Son, and succeeds the weekly edition 
of the Sentinel which was suspended in Dec., 1912. 

CHANUTE Population (1915), 9033; elevation, 940 feet; established, 1870; consolidation of 
New Chicago, Tioga, Chicago Junction and Alliance; named for Octave Chanute; industries 
brick, cement, lime and tile plants, oil refineries, factories; commission form of government, 
owns its electric light plant, waterworks and gas wells; telephones; has two railroads, Santa 
Fe and M. K. & T. 

TRIBUNE, Republican; Herbert Cavaness, editor, Tribune Publishing Company, publishers, 
Chanute. 

Daily. July 1, 1892 + 74 vols. 
Weekly. Feb. 12, 1904 -f 12 vols. 

A continuation of the following: Chanute Times, founded 1872 by A. L. Rivers. Chanute 
Daily Times, founded 1890 by Times Publishing Company; suspended same year. Chanute 

Vidette, founded 1887 by Jones and G. M. Dewey; in 1891 consolidated with the Times, 

under name of Chanute Vidette-Times, G. M. Dewey and J. H. Hale, editors and publishers; in 
1897 name shortened to Chanute Times, with A. H. Turner, editor and publisher; in 1913 the 
weekly Times was discontinued with issue of May 30, and the daily edition began on June 3, fol- 
lowing; this was sold to the Tribune July 19, 1913. The Chanute Daily Tribune was founded in 
1892, H. P. Hutton, editor and G. M. Dewey, publisher. Oil and Gas Review, founded 1903 by 
Edward D. Kelley; purchased by the Tribune in 1904. The Morning Sun, Chanute, founded 
1896 by Frederick P. Cone; consolidated 1909 with the Tribune. The Chanute Weekly Sun, founded 
1909 by F. P. Cone, absorbed by the Tribune. The Chanute Weekly Tribune, founded 1904 by 
Cavaness Bros, and Helmick. 

ST. PAUL Population (1915), 906; elevation, 986 feet; established, 1847; post office, 1851; first 

known as Osage Mission, name changed to St. Paul, 1895; gas and oil district; telephones; 

is on the M. K. & T. railway. 
A. H. T. A. WEEKLY NEWS, official paper of the Anti-Horse Thief Association; W. W. Graves, 

editor and publisher, St. Paul. 

Weekly. Feb. 27, 1902 + 14 vols. 

Founded 1902 by W. W. Graves. 



252 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



JOURNAL, Democratic; W. W. Graves, editor and publisher, St. Paul. 

Weekly. July 7, 1875; Jan. 5, 1876 + 40 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the Neosho Valley Eagle, founded in 1868 at Jacksonville by 
B. K. Lamb; purchased in 1869 by Kimball & Barton, who in 1871 sold it to the Erie Publishing 
Association, with J. A. Wells, as editor; the establishment was moved to Erie and the name changed 
to Erie Ishmaelite. In June of that year the paper was again sold, to Scott & Perry, who moved 
it to Osage Mission, and continued the publication under the name of Osage Mission Journal. 
In 1895 the name of the town of Osage Mission was changed to St. Paul, and the name of the 
paper was changed to Neosho County Journal, with E. B. Park, editor and publisher; in 1901 name 
again changed to St. Paul Journal, W. W. Graves, editor and publisher. 

KANSAS DEGREE OF HONOR MESSENGER, fraternal; official organ of the Kansas Degree of Honor; 
Gertrude Thielen, editor, St. Paul. 

Monthly. Aug., 1915 + 
Early history unknown; first issue in Society's file being vol. 2, No. 10. 

THAYER Population (1915), 512; elevation, 1045 feet; established, 1870; named for Nathaniel 
Thayer, of Boston; in the gas and oil district; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

NEWS, independent; A. L. Palmer, editor and publisher, Thayer. 

Weekly. Dec. 18, 1891 + 24 vols. 
Founded 1891 as the Thayer Independent News by Palmer & Mitchell; name shortened in 

1905 to the Thayer News, with A. L. Palmer, editor and publisher. 

DISCONTINUED. Vo j 8 . 

Erie Neosho County Republican. Oct. 26, 1882 1886 4 

People's Vindicator. Mar. 20. 18881889 2 

Pythian Sisters' News (m). 18921893 1 

[See also Barton county.] 

Sentinel. May 16, 18891912 23 

Chanute. . . .Blade. Aug. 16, 18831906 23 

Blade (d). May 11, 19031905 9 

Chronicle. May 4, 18821883 2 

Democrat. Feb. 27, 18791882 3 

Morning Sun. Nov. 21, 18961909 37 

Neosho County Chronicle. June 22 Oct. 5, 1894 1 

Oil and Gas Review. Oct. 24, 19031904 1 

Railroad Employes' Companion. [See Franklin county.] 

Times. Jan. 6, 18761891 15 

Times (d). June 3 July 19, 1913 1 

Vidette; Vidette-Times; Chanute Times. Dec. 21, 1887 1913 26 

Galesburg Enterprise. Jan. 15, 18971907 11 

Morehead Searchlight. Oct. 27, 18981900 2 

New Chicago Transcript. Sept. 23, 18701872 2 

Osage Mission Neosho County Democrat. Jan. 19, 1883 1887 5 

Neosho Valley Enterprise. Oct. 7, 18801882 2 

Temperance Banner (m & s-m). Oct., 18781880 

Stark Enterprise. Dec. 6, 18981899 1 

Freeman. June 5, 18901891 1 

News. Sept. 28, 19011909 9 

Plaindealer. Mar. 20 Aug. 14, 1896 1 

Thayer Graphic. Sept. 14, 18941895 1 

Headlight. July 26, 18711892 22 

Herald. Aug. 1, 18851886 1 

Tioga Herald. May 13, 18711872 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Chanute. . . .Recorder (m). Oct., 1882 Mar., 1883. 

Times (d). June 14 Sept. 13, 1890. 

Galesburg Journal. Apr. 22 July 15, 1885. 

Stark Herald. June 14, 1888. 

Thayer Hornet. Sept. 23 Nov. 4, 1892. 

Urbana Star of Hope (m). Jan.-Apr., 1878. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Chanute Law and Order. Nov. 15, 1894. 

Sun. Mar. 18 Apr. 15, 1909. 

World. Feb. 28 Mar. 18, 1896. 
Osage Mission .... .Transcript. Oct. 17, Nov. 7, 1873; Jan. 9, Feb. 27, Mar. 20, 1874. 

Stark Herald. Apr. 30 July 9, 1908. 

Thayer Criterion. Mar. 6, Apr. 7 May 12,' 1871. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 253 



NESS COUNTY. 

Organized, 1880; named for Corp. Noah V. Ness, Seventh Kansas Regi- 
ment; county seat, Ness City; area, 1080 square miles, 691,000 acres; popu- 
lation (1915), 5547; assessed valuation (1915), $11,258,375; resources and 
industries wheat, stock, and grazing. 

NESS CITY Population (1915), 675; elevation, 2260 feet; established, 1878; industries ele- 
vators, flour mills, stone quarries; municipal electric light plant; telephones; is on the Santa 
Fe railway. 
NESS COUNTY NEWS, Republican; J. K. Barnd, editor and publisher, Ness City. 

Weekly. Nov. 22, 1884 + 31 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the Ness City Times, founded 1879 by J. F. Wood; consoli- 
dated with the Ness County News 1891. Ness County News founded 1884 by J. K. Barnd and 
R. J. McFarland. 

UTICA Population (1915), 243; elevation, 2614 feet; established, 1880; probably named for 

Utica, Ohio; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 
ENTERPRISE, independent; B. M. Bovard, editor and publisher, Utica. 
Weekly. June 10, 18991915. 16 vols. 

Founded 1899 by Paul Klein. According to Ayer's Newspaper Directory this paper is still 
published; it has not been received by the Historical Society, however, since March 12, 1915. 

DISCONTINUED. Vols 

Ness ... ... Graphic. May 1 Oct. 30, 1886 ... 1 

Ness County Echo. Mar. 18, 18931915 22 

Ness County Republican. Mar. 9, 18941896 3 

Sixteenth Amendment. Apr. 11 Nov. 17, 1885 1 

Times. June 24, 18801891 11 

Truth. Apr. 21, 18831884 1 

Walnut Valley Sentinel; Ness City Sentinel. July 31, 18861893 7 

Bazine . . . .Leader. Feb. 5 Aug. 16, 1889 ... 1 

Register. Feb. 17, 18871888 1 

Brownell. Courier. Dec. 11, 19081912 4 

Clarinda Pioneer. Clarinda and Sidney. May 10, 18791880 3 

Harold. . . . .Boomer. Apr. 14 Sept. 15, 1887. . . 1 

Record. Sept. 22, 18871889 2 

Nonchalanta Herald. May 20, 18871889 '. 1 

Ransom Every Day Religion (m). 18991900. [See Ellsworth county.] 

Journal. Mar. 20, 19031904 2 

Schoharie Globe. July 7, 18831884 1 

Sidney Advance. Feb. 9, 18821883 1 

Western Central Kansas Cowboy. Sept. 1, 1883 1884 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Ness Lance. Oct. 19 Dec. 21, 1892. 

Bazine Banner. June 29 Aug. 10, 1888. 



NORTON COUNTY. 

Organized, 1872; named in honor of Orloff Norton, captain of company 
L, Fifteenth Kansas cavalry; county seat, Norton; area, 900 square miles, 
576,000 acres; population (1915), 10,393; assessed valuation (1915), $17,- 
040,006; resources and industries building stone, potter's clay, agriculture, 
and stock raising 

NORTON Population (1915), 1513; elevation, 2284 feet; established, 1872; named for Capt. 
Orloff Norton; industries elevators, flour mills, brick and tile works, carriage and plow 
works; waterworks, municipal electric light plant, telephones, State Sanitarium for Tuber- 
culosis; is on the C. B. & Q. and the Rock Island railways. 



254 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



CHAMPION, Republican; J. W. Conway, editor and publisher, Norton. 

Weekly. Feb. 28, 1884 + 32 vols. 
Founded 1884 by J. W. Conway and P. H. Loomis. 
COURIER, Republican; F. M. Duvall, editor and publisher, Norton. 

Weekly. Feb. 8, 1883 + 33 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the Norton County People, Norton, founded 1880 by H. T. 
Carlisle; name changed 1883 to Norton Courier, with J. H. Littell and J. A. Littell, editors and 
publishers. 

NORTON COUNTY NEWS, Republican; Perry Coler, editor and publisher, Norton. 

Weekly. May 11, 1905 + 11 vols. 

Founded 1893 as the Liberator, Norton, by D. W. Hull; name changed in 1905 to Norton 
County News, with W. E. Garland, editor and publisher. 

TELEGRAM, independent; D. G. Hamilton, editor and publisher, Norton. 
Weekly. Apr. 18, 1906 + 10 vols. 

Daily. Apr. 5, 1907 Apr. 12, 1908; May 23, 1911 -f 12 vols. 
Founded 1906 by W. E. Garland. 

LENORA Population (1915), 447; elevation, 2260 feet; established, 1873; named for Mrs. 

Lenora Hauser; industries elevators, flour and alfalfa mills; telephones; is on the Missouri 

Pacific railway. 

NEWS, independent; E. E. Jeter, editor and publisher, Lenora. 
Weekly. June 27, 1902 + 14 vols. 

Founded 1902 by Mellen & Higginbotham. 

DISCONTINUED. Fo j 8 

Democrat. Apr. 8, 18861888 2 

[Called Reporter Apr.-June, 1886.] 

Farmers' Advance. June 5 Sept. 11, 1890. 

[Bound with the Almena Advance.] 

Liberator. Feb. 10, 18931905 12 

New Era and Weekly Democrat. July 4, 18881891 3 

Norton County Advance. June 6, 1878 1882 4 

Norton County People. July 15, 18801883 2 

Republican. Dec. 16, 18921895 3 

. .Advance. May 3, 18891890 1 

Enterprise. Apr. 5 Nov. 1, 1894 1 

Lantern. Oct. 15, 18961900 4 

Plaindealer. Feb. 2, 18881911. , . . 24 

Star. Dec. 17, 1885 May, 1887; Nov. 18871889 3 

Gazette. May 9, 18891890 1 

. .Norton County Badger; Edmond Times. Feb. 26, 18861890 5 



Norton . . 



Almena . 



Calvert . 
Edmond 
Lenora. . 



Oronoque . 

Norton . . . 

Densmore . 
Lenora. . 

Norton 

Clayton . . . 
Edmond . . 
Lenora 



. Common People (d, w and s-w). Aug. 19, 18861887 1 

Kansas Monitor. Aug. 7, 18851886 1 

Kansas Northwest. Apr. 9, 1884 1885 1 

Lantern. Aug. 29, 18951896 1 

Leader. Mar. 16, 18821888 6 

New Era. Sept. 23, 1898 1899 1 

Norton County High School Quill (m). May, 19071911 4 

Record. Sept. 2, 18871890 3 

Courant. Jan. 3 Aug. 8, 1907 1 

Magic. June 18 Nov. 12, 1886 1 



SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Normal Instituter. Aug. 13, 1888 Aug. 30, 1889. 
Norton County Bee. May 7, 1877. 
Norton District Advocate (s-m). May 21, 1889. 
Dispatch. May 16 July 26, 1889. 
' News. June 21 Sept. 27, 1888. 
Independent. May 28 Sept. 2, 1898. 
Sun. Mar. 6 June 26, 1890. 
Times. Feb. 1 June 3, 1893. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Educational Echo (m). Sept., 1897. 

Norton County Educator (m). Nov. and Dec., 1889; Jan. and Mar., 1890. 
. Success. Apr. 6 and 13, 1906. 
.New Leaf. Feb. 12 Apr. 20, 1911. 
.Independent. May 28 Sept. 3, 1898. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 255 



OSAGE COUNTY. 

Originally created as Weller county in 1855; name changed to Osage 
county February 11, 1859, and organized in March, 1859; named for Osage 
tribe of Indians; county seat, Lyndon; area, 720 square miles, 460,800 acres; 
population (1915), 20,072; assessed valuation (1915), $33,059,641; resources 
and industries coal, building stone, yellow ochre, potter 's clay, salt springs, 
agriculture, and stock raising. 

LYNDON Population (1915), 808; elevation, 1006 feet; established, 1869; named for Lyndon, 
Vt.; industries flour mill, creamery; municipal electric light plant, telephones; is on the 
Santa Fe and Missouri Pacific railways. 
PEOPLE'S HERALD, Republican; Dow Busenbark, editor and publisher, Lyndon. 

Weekly. Aug. 8, 18901915. 25 vols. 

A continuation of the Quenemo Leader, founded 1889 by George Rogers; moved to Lyndon 
in 1890 and name changed to People's Herald with A. C. Easter, editor, and George Rogers, pub- 
lisher. 

[Not received by the Society since Nov. 11, 1915.] 

BURLINGAME Population (1915), 1474; elevation, 1049 feet; established, 1855; originally 
called Council City, name changed Jan. 30, 1858, to Burlingame, in honor of Anson Burlin- 
game; industries coal mines, planing mill; telephones, municipal electric light plant; is on 
the Santa Fe railway. 

ENTERPRISE, independent; C. A. Stodard and Ed Riddle, editors and publishers, Burlingame. 

Weekly. Oct. 17, 1895 + 20 vols. 
Founded 1895 by Stodard & Riddle. 

OSAGE COUNTY CHRONICLE, Republican; George W. Burroughs, editor and publisher, Burlingame. 

Weekly. Oct. 17, 1868 Jan., 1872; Sept., 1873 % 46 vols. 
Founded 1863 as the Osage Burlingame Chronicle, by M. M. Murdoek; name changed in 

1870 to the Weekly Osage Chronicle; in 1873 name became Osage County Chronicle, with W. F. 

Chalfant, editor and publisher. 

CARBONDALE Population (1915), 456; elevation, 1078 feet; established, 1869; named on ac- 
count of its location in a coal mining district; industries coal mining; telephones; is on the 
Santa Fe railway. 

POST, independent; Rev. D. D. McSkimming, editor and publisher, Carbondale. 

Weekly. July 1, 1909 + 7 vols. 
Founded 1909 by Isom J. Shepard. 

MELVERN Population (1915), 415; elevation, 994 feet; established, 1870; named for Malvern 
Hills, Scotland; industries elevator, cheese factory, stone quarries, coal mines; telephones; 
is on the Santa Fe railway. 

REVIEW, Democratic; A. R. Ball, editor and publisher, Melvern. 

Weekly. Jan. 8, 1891 + 25 vols. 
Founded in 1891 with Isaac and J. E. Farley, editors, and A. R. Ball, publisher. 

OSAGE CITY Population (1915), 2823; elevation, 1084 feet; established, 1869, as Onion Creek 
post office; name changed to Osage City in 1870; indus'tries coal mines, stone flagging, ochre, 
machine shops, creamery, canning factory; telephones, municipal electric light plant; is on 
the Santa Fe and Missouri Pacific railways. 
FREE PRESS, Republican; H. C. Sticher, editor and publisher, Osage City. 

Weekly. July 10, 1875; Jan. 8, 1876 + 40 vols. 

Founded 1871 as the Shaft by W. H. Morgan and A. B. Cooper; in 1875 the name was changed 
to Osage City Free Press, with John P. Campbell, editor and publisher; in 1912 consolidated with 
Public Opinion, founded 1892 by Blain& Rochford, and continued as the Free Press-Public Opinion, 
H. C. Sticher, editor and publisher; name shortened in 1913 to Osage City Free Press. In 1915 
Mr. Sticher issued the Osage City Free Press and Public Opinion separately, each paper taking 
its old volume and number. 

OVERBROOK Population (1915), estimated, 400; elevation, 1100 feet; telephones; is on the 
Missouri Pacific railway. 



256 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Lyndon. . 



Burlingame . 



CITIZEN, non-partisian; J. H. Andrews, editor and publisher, Overbrook. 

Weekly. Jan. 21, 1898 + 18 vols. 

Founded 1898 by Don Quillen; consolidated 1901 with the Overbrook Herald, founded 1889 
by S. A. and M. R. Stauffer. Overbrook Reporter, founded 1893 by Tom A. Ellis, absorbed 1894 
by Overbrook Herald. 

QUENEMO Population (1915), 630; elevation, 941 feet; established, 1870; named for a Sauk 
and Fox Indian; industries coal mines, mill, creamery; telephones; is on the Santa Fe and 
Missouri Pacific railways. 

NEWS, Democratic; T. A. Carder, editor, E. A. Thomas, owner, Quenemo. 

Weekly. Dec. 5, 1902 + 13 vols. 
Founded 1902 with Owen A. Coile, editor; in 1906 absorbed the Quenemo Republican, founded 

1892 by Ellis & Ellis, E. L. Truesdail, editor and publisher. Tribune, Quenemo, founded 1900 by 

A. P. Shaw & Co.; absorbed by Republican in 1902. 

SCRANTON Population (1915), 717; elevation, 1105 feet; established, 1871; named for Scranton, 

Pa.; industries coal mining; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
GAZETTE, independent; Clyde Frazee, editor and publisher, Scranton. 
Weekly. May 2, 1890 + 26 vols. 

Founded 1890 by R. M. Parker and O. K. Stakebrake. The Scranton News, founded 1905 
by E. L. Truesdail, consolidated same year with the Gazette. 

DISCONTINUED. y j s 

. Current Remark. Sept. 19, 1895 1902 7 

Journal. Feb. 9, 18821899 17 

Kansas Plebeian. Lyndon and Scranton. July 13 Dec. 28, 1882 . . 1 

Leader. Feb. 2, 18821883 \ 2 

Osage County Democrat. Jan. 6, 1910 1913 4 

Osage County Graphic. Aug. 2, 18881895 6 

Presbyterian Announcement (m). Sept., 1900 1902 

Record. Jan. 1, 19031906 4 

Times; The Kansas Times. Lyndon and Osage City. May 6, 1876 1881, 5 
[Not published Nov., 1879 Mar., 1880.] 

. Debtor and Workingman. Mar. 1, 1895 1896 1 

Democrat. Nov. 2, 18881890 1 

Echo; National Echo; Our Weekly Tribune (m and w). 

May, 18881894 4 

Fulcrum. Mar. 6 Oct. 16, 1896 1 

Herald. Sept. 29, 18811884 2 

Herald and Blade. Sept. 29, 18921893 1 

High School Oracle (m). [Broken file.] Jan., 19001907. . 7 

Independent. May 13, 18861888 2 

Osage County Democrat. Burlingame & Osage City. 

Nov. 2, 18811887 5 

Plebeian and the Chronicle (m). Dec., 1893 1895 2 

. Astonisher and Paralyzer. Jan. 3, 1885 1887 2 

Carbondalian. Apr. 23, 18871909 23 

Independent. Feb. 22, 18821883 2 

Journal. May 29 Dec. 4, 1879 1 

Osage County Courier. Aug. 11, 18931894 1 

Record. Apr. 7 Nov. 30, 1888 1 

.Record. Mar. 12, 18841890 7 

.Wolverine. Jan. 15 Dec. 31, 1914 1 

.Advertiser. Dec. 9, 19101911 1 

. Kansas People. Feb. 2, 18871891 . 4 

Kansas People (d). Sept. 8, 18871890 7 

Knights and Ladies of Security (m). 18971899. 

[See Shawnee county.] 

Republican. June 9, 18821883 1 

.Herald. Apr. 11, 18891901 12 

Reporter. Aug. 18, 18931894 1 

.Leader. May 18, 18891890 1 

Osage County Republican. July 29, 1886 1892 6 

Osage County Sentinel. Mar. 10, 1892 1893 1 

Republican. Apr. 7, 18921906 '. 14 

Saturday Tribune. Sept. 15, 1900 1902 2 

.Kansas Workman. Scranton and Quenemo. Jan. 4, 1883 1888 5 

Osage County Times. Scranton, Burlingame and Osage City. 

Apr. 21, 18881891 4 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

.Beech Brook Breeze (m). Sept., 1888 Mar., 1889. 
News (m). June, 1886 Aug., 1889. 
Osage County Real Estate Journal (m). Sept., 1869. 



Carbondale. 



Melvern 

Michigan Valley. 

Olivet 

Osage City 



Overbrook 

Quenemo 

Scranton 



Burlingame. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 257 



Osage City Shaft. Mar. 23 Apr. 13, 1872; Nov. 1, 1873 Apr. 18/.1874. 

Quenemo Weekly Offering. Jan. 17 Mar. 14, 1893. 

Rosemont Reflector. Oct. 23 Dec. 16, 1887. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Lyndon Endeavor Spirit. Apr. 24 Aug. 14, 1905. 

Carbondale Calendar. Jan. 28 Apr. 1, 1886. 

Independent. Apr. 8-29, 1886. 
Osage City Homes in the West. 1873. 

Osage County Times. Sept. 16, 23, 1904. 
Scranton News. Jan. 26 May 4, 1905. 

SHORT-LIVED, DAILIES VOL. 1. 

Lyndon News. Sept. 21 Oct. 26, 1901. 

Burlingame Daily Normal Migma. May 25 July 6, 1895. 

Live Men of Burlingame. Sept. 1-4, 1896. 



OSBORNE COUNTY. 

Organized, 1871; named for Vincent B. Osborne, company A, Second 
Kansas regiment; county seat, Osborne; area, 900 square miles, 576,000 
acres; population (1915), 12,973; assessed valuation (1915), $26,260,936; 
resources and industries agriculture, wheat, and stock raising. 

OSBORNE Population (1915), 1601; elevation, 1557 feet; established, 1871; industries brick 
plant, flour mills and elevators; telephones; municipal electric light plant; is on the Missouri 
Pacific railway. 
OSBORNE COUNTY FARMER, Republican; Bert P. Walker, editor and publisher, Osborne. 

Weekly. Jan. 14, 1876 + 40 vols. 

This is a continuation of the Osborne Weekly Times, Osborne City, founded 1873 by F. E. 
Jerome & Co., and owned by the Osborne City Town Company. The paper suspended in Nov., 
1874, and the plant was purchased by F. H. Barnhart who in Jan., 1875, began the publication 
of the Osborne County Farmer. Osborne Journal, founded 1886 by Knowlton & Prewitt; name 
changed in 1887 to Osborne County Journal, with F. H. Barnhart, editor and publisher; con- 
solidated 1889 with the Farmer. 

OSBORNE COUNTY NEWS, independent; Ernest B. Smith, editor and publisher, Osborne. 

Weekly. May 18, 1883 + 33 vols. 

Founded 1883 by C. H. Topliff. A daily News was founded June 10, 1881, by George B. 
Ficardt, and ran until Aug. 31, same year, when it was discontinued; a second daily edition, called 
Osborne Evening News, founded Oct. 17, 1888, by W. D. Gerard & Co., ran until Oct. 31, 1888; 
a third daily was founded sometime in 1913, first issue in Society's file being Feb. 25, 1914, vol. 3, 
No. 72, and discontinued in Jan., 1915. 

ALTON Population (1915), 428; elevation, 1651 feet; established, 1870; formerly called Bull 
City after H. C. Bull; name changed to Alton 1885; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific 
railway. 
EMPIRE, Republican; H. L. Clark, editor and publisher, Alton. 

Weekly. Jan. 18, 1883 + 33 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the Glen Elder Key, founded 1880 by George E. Dougherty; 
moved to Bull City [Alton] in 1881, and continued as the Osborne County Key, A. J. Runyon, 
editor and publisher; in 1883 name changed to Western Empire, with F. J. Hulaniski, editor and 
publisher; purchased by F. W. Arnold in 1895 and name changed to Alton Empire. 

DOWNS Population (1915), 1552; elevation, 1485 feet; established, 1879; named for William 
F. Downs; industries mills and elevators; waterworks, electric light; on the Missouri Pacific 
railway. 
NEWS, Republican; William Ransom and C. E. Mann, editors and publishers, Downs. 

Weekly. Mar. 3, 1904 + 12 vols. 

Early history unknown, first issue on file in Society's collection being vol. 2, No. 13, W. B. 
Gaumer, editor and publisher; consolidated with the Downs Times, Jan. 13, 1916. The Times 
was a continuation of the Downs Chief, founded 1885 by A. L. Topliff and W. H. Whitmore; merged 
with the Times in 1891. The Whisperer, Portis, founded 1890 by E. R. Powell; consolidated the 
same year with the Times. 

17 



258 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



OUR 'MESSENGER, temperance; official organ of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance 

Union; Mrs. Alice G. Young, editor, Downs. 
Monthly. Jan., 1886 + 30 vols. 

Founded in 1886 at Topaka, Miss Olive P. Bray, editor; moved to Hutchinson in 1897, with 
Elizabeth P. Hutchinson, editor; moved to Nickerson in 1898; moved to Le Loup, Franklin county, 
1899, with Jennie M. Kemp, editor; moved to Downs, 1903, with Mrs. Alice G. Young, editor; 
moved to Clay Center, 1905; to Hiawatha, 1907; to Wichita, 1908; to Downs, 1909; to Manhattan, 
1913; to Downs again, 1913. 

NATOMA Population (1915), 561; elevation, 1834 feet; established, about 1888; elevators; 

telephones; is on the Union Pacific railway. 

INDEPENDENT, Republican; H. B. Brown, editor and publisher, Natoma. 
Weekly. Feb. 19, 1909 + 7 vols. 

Founded 1909 by R. H. Camber. 

PORTIS Population (1915), 321; elevation, 1541 feat; established, 1871; named in honor of 
T. J. Portis; telephones, elevator; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

INDEPENDENT, Republican; J. E. Kissell, editor and publisher, Portis. 

Weekly. June 18, 1904 + 12 vols. 
Founded 1904 by W. & H. Woolman. 

DISCONTINUED. Fo[s 

Osborne Kansas Prohibitionist. Aug. 23, 1910 1911 1 

News, Evening (d). Feb. 25, 19141915 2 

Osborne County Journal. Nov. 10, 1886 1889 . 3 

Truth Teller. Oct. 10, 18791881 1 

Western Odd Fellow (m). 18861888. 

[See also Saline and Shawnee counties.] 

Bull City Osborne County Key. July 9, 1881 1882 1 

[Alton] Post. Jan. 22 June 24, 1880 1 

Downs . ...Chief. Nov. 20, 1885 1891 .. . 6 

Globe. July 28, 18881890 2 

Northwest and Central Expositor. 1890. [See Dickinson county.] / 

Times. Feb. 19, 18801916 36 

World. Nov. 2, 18931895 1 

Natoma Courier. Nov. 8, 19011903 2 

Portis Patriot. Dec. 8, 18811890. [Called the Whisperer, Apr. to July, 1890.] 9 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Osborne American Schools (m). Atchison and Osborne. Jan.-Mar., 1895. 

Friend (m). May, 1880 Feb., 1881. 

News (d). June 10 Aug. 13, 1881. 

News, Evening (d). Oct. 19-31, 1888. 

Covert Farmers' Aid. May 22 Oct. 2, 1890. 

Downs Headlight. June 30 Aug. 11, 1887. 

Hulaniski's Saturday Evening Lamp. Oct. 20 Nov. 10, 1883. 



OTTAWA COUNTY. 

Organized, 1866; named for the Ottawa tribe of Indians; county seat, 
Minneapolis; area, 720 square miles, 460,800 acres; population (1915), 11,605; 
assessed valuation (1915), $27,914,429; resources and industries wheat 
;and grazing. 

MINNEAPOLIS Population (1915), 1922; elevation, 1255 feet; established, 1866; first known 
as Markley's Mills; name changed to Minneapolis, "City of Waters," about 1871; named 
for Minneapolis, Minn.; industries mills, elevators, foundry; has telephones, electric lights, 
and city owns its waterworks system; is on the Santa Fe and Union Pacific railways. 

BETTER WAY, Democratic; R. Pearl Johnson, local and society editor, A. W. Wright, manager, 
owned by the F. C. Johnson estate. 

Weekly. Aug. 6, 1896 + 19 vols. 
Founded 1896 by D. M. Dunn. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 259 



MESSENGER, Republican; E. C. Woodward, editor and publisher, Minneapolis. 

Weekly. Sept. 27, 1883 + 32 vols. 

This is a continuation of the Sentinel, founded 1875 by D. R. Crosby & Co., with D. R. Crosby, 
editor; name changed in 1883 to Minneapolis Messenger, D. M. and C. M. Dunn, editors and 
publishers. Daily Messenger founded 1887 by A. P. Riddle and C. M. Dunn; discontinued same 

Sear. Minneapolis Commercial, founded 1886 as the Ottawa County Commercial, with H. R. 
ampbell, managing editor, and published by the Commercial Company; merged with the Mes- 
senger 1892. 

SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF JUSTICE, fraternal; official organ of the Sons and Daughters of Justice, 
W. W. Walker, jr., editor, Minneapolis. 
Monthly. May, 1901 -f- 15 vols. 
Founded 1901 by J. F. Scherer. 

BENNINGTON Population (1915), 402; elevation, 1222 feet; established, 1870; industries- 
mill, elevator; has telephones; is on the Union Pacific railway. 

OTTAWA COUNTY DEMOCRAT, independent; Albert B. Edson, editor and publisher, Bennington. 

Weekly. Aug. 14, 1891 Apr. 14, 1893; Oct. 18, 1895 + 21 vols. 
This is a continuation of the Solomon Valley Democrat, Minneapolis, founded 1884 by L. H. 

and M. J. Keys; moved to Bennington after Apr., 1893. 

CULVER Population (1915), 356; elevation, 1266 feet; established about 1878; probably named 

for George Culver; is on the Union Pacific railway. 

RECORD, local; Mrs. R. F. Montgomery, editor and manager, Carl Judge, publisher, Culver. 
Weekly. Nov. 6, 1913 + 2 vols. 

Founded 1913 with Hattie Lyne, editor, and Rev. R. L. Turk, publisher. 
DELPHOS Population (1915), 879; elevation, 1300 feet; established, 1869-'70; named for the 

famous city of Greece; has telephones, public library; is on the Union Pacific railway. 
REPUBLICAN, nonpartisan; J. D. Smith, editor and publisher, Delphos. 
Weekly. Dec. 3, 1888 + 27 vols. 

Founded 1888 by J. M. Waterman. 

TESCOTT Population (1915), 501; elevation, 1298 feet; established, 1866; formerly called 
Churchill Postoffice; elevator; has telephones; is on the Union Pacific railway. 

PRESS, independent; B. A. Belt, editor and publisher, Tescott. 

Weekly. Apr. 14, 1910 + 6 vols. 
Founded 1910 by B. A. Belt. 

DISCONTINUED. y ote> 

Minneapolis Independent. Jan. 15, 1876 1880 4 

Kansas Union; Ottawa County Index; Minneapolis Journal. 

Oct. 4, 18901903 13 

Kansas Workman (m). Aug. 15, 1885 1909 24 

Messenger (d). Apr. 9 June 11, 1887 1 

Ottawa County Commercial; Minneapolis Commercial. 

Nov. 3, 18861892 6 

Ottawa County Index. Feb. 18, 18801883 4 

Progressive Current. Dec. 7, 1883 1884 1 

Review. Oct. 9, 18911901 10 

Sentinel. Apr. 20, 18761883 7 

Solmon Valley Democrat. July 24, 1884 1891 7 

Solomon Valley Mirror (m). Oct. 1, 1874 1886 . 5 

Sprig of Myrtle (m). July, 18861909 23 

[See also Cherokee county.] 

Ada Recorder. June 3, 19091911 2 

Bennington Herald and Star. Jan. 11, 1889 1891 2 

Journal. Apr. 3 Nov. 20, 1885 1 

Star. July 13, 1883 Feb., 1884; July, 13331889 3 

Delphos. . . . . .Carrier. July 8, 1881 1888. . . . 7 

Herald. Feb. 7, 18791880 2 

Niles Recorder. Apr. 2 Sept. 24, 1914 1 

Tescott Herald. May 27, 18871891 4 



260 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Minneapolis Daily Institute. July 7 Aug. 1, 1885. 

Normal Institute Record. July 15 Aug. 9, 1878. 

Ottawa County Loan and Insurance Record (m). Feb., 1884. 

Republican. Feb. 20 Mar. 6, 1885. 

School Journal (m). Dec., 1885 May, 1886. 

School-room Journal (m). Sept., 1888 May, 1889. 

Souvenir. June 30, 1892 May 31, 1893. 

Ye Pedagogue (m). Dec., 1891 Apr., 1893. 
Bennington Mercury. July 27 Aug. 17, 1888. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Minneapolis Church Gleaner. July 8, 1887. 

Niles News Item. Sept. 1, 1905. 

Tescott Telegram. June 13 Oct. 31, 1902. 



PAWNEE COUNTY. 

Organized, 1872; named for the tribe of Pawnee Indians; county seat, 
Larned; area, 756 square miles, 483,840 acres; population (1915), 8651; 
assessed valuation (1915), $26,494,246; resources and industries building 
stone, potter 's clay and ocher, agriculture, and stock raising. 

LARNED Population (1915), 2900; elevation, 2002 feet; established, 1873; named in honor of 
Gen. B. F. Larned; industries flour and feed mills, elevators, machine shops, foundry, cream- 
ery; telephones, electric lights, waterworks; is on the Santa Fe and the Missouri Pacific rail- 
ways. 

CHRONOSCOPE, Republican; Harry H. Wolcott and Lynn M. Christy, editors and publishers, 
Larned. 

Weekly. Dec. 11, 1878; Jan. 1, 8, 22, 29, Mar. 5, Oct. 2, 1879; Jan. 8, 1880 + 36 vols. 
This paper is a continuation of the following: Larned Press, established 1873 by W. C. Tomp- 

kins. The Republican, Larned, founded 1 876, published about one year. Larned Enterprise, founded 

1878 by Henry Inman; name changed same year to Chronoscope; daily edition of the Chronoscope, 

founded in 1887, suspended in 1888. 

TILLER AND TOILER, Democratic; Harvey Eckert and Leslie Wallace, editors and publishers, 

Larned. 

Weekly. Apr. 30, 1892 + 24 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Pawnee County Herald; name changed 1878 to 
the Optic, H. H. Doyle, editor and publisher. Larned Eagle, founded 1884 by E. W. Freeman; 
consolidated with the Optic 1885 and continued as the Larned Eagle-Optic, T. E. and A. B. Left- 
wich, editors, Optic Printing Company, publishers, until it was merged with the Tiller and Toiler, 
in 1901. The Tiller and Toiler was formerly published at Bluffton, Ind.; first issue in Society's file, 
vol. 2, No. 42, shows W. P. McMahon, editor. 

GARFIELD Population (1915), 320; elevation, 2068 feet; established, 1873; telephones, public 

library; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
BOOSTER, independent; F. L. McDowell, editor and publisher, Garfield. 

Weekly. Apr. 7, 1911 + 5 vols. 

This is a continuation of the Garfield Leader, founded 1909 with Walter T. Graves, editor and 
publisher; name changed 1911 to Garfield Booster, L. K. Monger and Jack Milford, editors and 
publishers. 

DISCONTINUED. Vohf 

Larned ... ... Chronoscope (d). Mar. 9, 18871888 . . . 

Labor News. July 26, 18881889 1 

Optic; Eagle Optic. Nov. 27, 18781901 23 

Pawnee County Herald. Jan. 6, 1877 1878 2 

Pawnee County Republican. Aug. 6, 1886 1887 1 

Press. Oct. 20, 18761878 2 

Burdett Bugle. July 27, 18861888 2 

Garfield Leader. May 13, 1909 1911 

Letter. July 23, 18851886 1 

News. June 17, 18871888 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 261 



SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Larned. . . . . Democrat. Oct. 26, 1888 Jan. 5, 1889. 

Tiller and Toiler (d). Apr. 26 May 19, 1893. 

Press. June 10, 1873. 

Western Kansas Voice (m). Oct., 1894 May, 1895. 



PHILLIPS COUNTY. 

Organized, 1872; named in honor of William Phillips, free-state martyr, 
murdered at Leavenworth September 1, 1856; county seat, Phillipsburg; 
area, 900 square miles, 576,000 acres; population (1915), 13,220; assessed 
valuation (1915), $22,600,392; resources and industries building stone, 
brick, fire and potter's clay, gypsum, agriculture, and grazing. 

PHILLIPSBURG Population (1915), 1237; elevation, 1939 feet; established, 1872; named for 
Col. Wm. A. Phillips; industries elevator, flour mill, creameries; telephones, waterworks, 
electric lights; is on the Rock Island railway. 
NEWS, Republican; Warren White, editor and publisher, Phillipsburg. 

Weekly. Sept. 23, 1886 + 29 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the Phillips County Herald, Phillipsburg, founded 1878 by 
Charles F. Jenkins; name changed in 1882 to Phillispburg Herald, with William Bissel, editor, 
Herald Publishing Association, publishers; merged in 1905 with the Phillipsburg Dispatch, founded 
1886, Ira A. Kelley, editor, and Moss & Kelley, publishers, and continued as the Dispatch. Phil- 
lipsburg News, founded 1889 by Warren White: consolidated 1908 with the Dispatch, and con- 
tinued as the Phillipsburg News-Dispatch, with Warren White, editor and publisher; name changed 
to Phillipsburg News Apr. 20, 1916. 

PHILLIPS COUNTY POST, Democratic; F. W. Boyd, editor and publisher, Phillipsburg. 

Weekly. Dec. 11, 1902 + 13 vols. 
Founded 1902 by W. B. Gaumer. 

AGRA Population (1915), 324; elevation, 1852 feet; established, 1888; telephones; is on the 

Rock Island railway. 

SENTINEL, independent; A. R. Gross, editor and publisher, Agra. 
Weekly. Jan. 21, 1904 -f 12 vols. 

Founded 1903 by Percy F. and E. L. Root. 

KIRWIN Population (1915), 584; elevation, 1695 feet; established, 1869; named for Col. John 
Kirwin, United States army, who was in command of a stockade built at this point; indus- 
tries mills, elevators, creameries, telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

KANSAN, Progressive; F. L. Platt & Co., editors and publishers, Kirwin. 

Weekly. May 15, 1902 + 14 vols. 
This paper is a continuation of the Independent (1st), Kirwin, founded 1880 by Garretson & 

Topliff; destroyed by fire Oct. 28, 1888. The Independent (2d), reestablished in 1889 by W. H. 

Gray, H. W. and S. C. Landes, editors and publishers; name changed in 1902 to the Kansan, by 

F. L. Platt & Co. Kirwin Progress, early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being 

dated May 10, 1906, vol. 2, No. 32, J. R. Green, editor and publisher; merged with the Kansan 

in 1909. 

LOGAN Population (1915), 670; elevation, 1950 feet; established, 1870; named in honor of Gen. 
John A. Logan; industries stone quarries, flour mills, creamery, cement stone factory; tele- 
phones, electric lights, waterworks; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

REPUBLICAN AND THE PRAIRIE VIEW NEWS, Republican; E. M. Shaver, editor and publisher, 
E. M. and M. M. Shaver, proprietors. 

Weekly. June 24, 1886 -+- 29 vols. 
The Logan Republican was founded 1886. The Prairie View News, founded in 1905 by A. F. 

Walker. 

LONG ISLAND Population (1915), 225; elevation, 2071 feet; established, 1873; industries- 
alfalfa mill, elevators, creamery; telephones; is on the C. B. & Q. railway. 

NEW LEAF, independent; Ira C. Young, editor and publisher, Bessie E. Young, associate editor, 
Long Island. 



262 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Weekly. June 1, 1905 + 11 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the Long Island Leader, founded 1885 ; first issue in Society 's 
file, July 29, 1886, vol. 1, No. 36, shows J. N. Curl, editor and publisher; name changed in 1905 to 
the Long Island New Leaf, with J. E. Jones, editor, and Matteson & Jones, publishers. 

DISCONTINUED. y oZg 

Phillipsburg . . ..Democrat. Aug. 11, 1887 1891. .. . 4 

News. May 31, 18991908 10 

Phillips County Herald. Feb. 13, 18781905 26 

Times. July 5, 18841885 1 

Agra Graphic; Kirwin Graphic. Jan. 26 Aug., 1889 1 

High School Purple (m). Oct., 19081909 1 

Kansas Razoo. Dec. 4, 18961898 2 

News. July 22, 18931895 2 

Politician. Jan. 16 June 13, 1890 1 

Glade Echo. Nov. 12, 1915 Jan. 28, 1916 1 

Kirwin... ..Argus. May 10, 1906 1909 .. . 3 

Chief. Jan. 8, 18761891 15 

Globe. Oct. 9, 18911901 * 10 

Independent (1st). Dec. 8, 18801888 8 

Independent (2d). Nov. 6, 18891902 13 

Progress and Democrat. Jan. 11, 18771878 2 

Republican. Aug. 1, 1883 1885 2 

Logan . .Enterprise. Aug. 29, 18791884 4 

Herald. Oct. 15, 19091911 2 

Phillips County Freeman. Jan. 10, 1884 1890 7 

Long Island Argus. Feb. 5 Oct. 29, 1885 1 

Leader. July 29, 18861905 18 

Phillips County Democrat. July 31 Dec. 25, 1886 1 

Phillips County Inter Ocean. Jan. 1, 1887 1891 4 

Marvin Monitor. Sept. 3, 18861888 1 

Prairie View News. Jan. 15, 19031912 10 

Speed. . . ... Clarion. July 2, 19081909 1 

Record. Nov. 12, 1915 1916 1 

Woodruff Budget. Dec. 20, 19061911 5 

Gazette; Republican. Sept. 3, 18861887 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Phillipsburg Alliance Watchman. July 11 Aug. 15, 1890. 

Democrat (d). Sept. 27, 1887. 

Herald (d). Sept. 28, 29, 1882. 

Lively Times. May 9, 16, June 27, July 4, 1874. 

Phillips County School Journal (m). May, 1889 Jan., 1890. 
Kirwin Chief (d). July 17-20, 1883 (M. E. Conference); Mar. 25-30, 1886. 

Iconoclast. Nov. 13 Dec. 4, 1879. 

Kansas Northwest. Aug. 31, Sept. 7, 1883. 

Northwest (d). Aug. 7-14, 1883. 

Rag Baby. Oct. 7 Nov. 6, 1879. 

Solomon Valley Democrat. Aug. 14 Dec. 26, 1878. 

Marvin Democrat. Sept. 29, Oct. 5, 1883. 

Woodruff News. May 9 June 6, 1890. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Phillipsburg Teachers Voice (m). Nov., 1893 Mar., 1894. 

Agra Kansas Breeze. Sept. 22 Dec. 15, 1898. 

Kirwin Argus (d). Sept. 15-17, 1908. 

Logan Breeze. Dec. 4, 16, 1897. 



POTTAWATOMIE COUNTY. 

Organized, 1857; named for the Pottawatomie Indian tribe; county seatt 
Westmoreland; area, 848 square miles, 542,720 acres; population (1915), 
16,105; assessed valuation (1915), $30,809,152; resources and industries 
agriculture and stock raising. 

\\ESTMORELANr-Fopulation (1915), 469; elevation, 1500 feet; established, 1871; named for 
Westmoreland, Pa.; has telephones; is on the Kansas Southern & Gulf railway. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 263 



RECORDER, Republican; W. F. Hill, editor and publisher, Westmoreland. 

Weekly. May 7, 1885 -j- 31 vols. 
Founded 1885 by J. W. Shiner and J. K. Codding. 

SIGNAL, Democratic; W. F. Challis, editor and proprietor, A. M. Gilmore, r publisher and business 
manager, Westmoreland. 

Weekly. Dec. 6, 1895 + 20 vols. 

Founded 1890 as the Alliance News, Westmoreland, by J. C. Stanley; name changed 1895 to 
Westmoreland News, with C. A. and W. D. Wallace, editors, and W. D. Wallace, publisher; name 
again changed, same year, to Westmoreland Signal, with W. S. Anderson, editor and publisher. 

GARRISON Population (1915), 125; elevation, 1060 feet; established, 1879; named for Cornelius 
K. Garrison, president of the Missouri Pacific railway; is on the Union Pacific railway. 

STAR, independent; B. J. Schreck, editor and publisher, Garrison. 

Weekly. July 24, 1914 Aug. 13, 1915. 1 vol. 
Founded 1914 by B. J. Schreck. [Not received by the Society since Aug. 13, 1915.] 

HA VENSVILLE Population (1915), 335; elevation, 1170 feet; established, 1878; named in 
honor of Paul E. Havens; industries elevator, creamery; telephones; is on the Union Pacific 
railway. 

REVIEW, Republican; Mrs. R. C. Coverdale, editor, R. C. Coverdale, publisher, Havensville. 

Weekly. Sept. 3, 1900 + 15 vols. 
This is a continuation of the Havensville Torchlight, founded 1891 by E. D. Anderson; name 

changed 1900 to the Havensville Review, with R. C. Coverdale, editor and publisher. 

OLSBURG Population (1915), 182; elevation, 1429 feet; established in the late 70's; originally 
spelled Olesburgh, and probably named for Ole Thrulson; telephones; is on the Union Pacific 
railway. 

GAZETTE, Republican; Edwin Bronaugh, editor and publisher, Olsburg. 

Weekly. Feb. 24, 1899 + 17 vols. 
Founded 1897 as the Olsburg Optic, by Eldon C. Newby; name changed 1899 to the Olsburg 

Gazette, Alfred Chandet and Fred C. Marble, editors and publishers. 

ONAGA Population (1915), 817; elevation, 1095 feet; established, 1877; name derived from the 
Pottawatomie Indian name Onago; telephones, electric lights; is on the Union Pacific railway. 

HERALD, Republican; Clarence Haughawout, editor and publisher, Onaga. 

Weekly. Apr. 10, 1890 + 25 vols. 
This paper is a continuation of the Onaga Journal, founded 1879 by Stauffer & Carnes; name 

changed in 1885 to the Onaga Democrat, with A. W. Chabin, editor and publisher, Cockrell & 

Corriger, proprietors; name again changed, in 1890, to Onaga Herald, F. H. Haughawout & Son, 

editors and publishers. 

ST. GEORGE Population (1915),"254; elevation, 993 feet; established, 1857; telephones; is on 

the Union Pacific railway. 

NEWS, independent; W. L. Hauldren, editor and publisher, St. George. 
Weekly. Jan. 5, 1912 + 4 vols. 

Founded 1904 as the Louisville Lyre, by the Lyre Publishing Company; moved to St. George 
1912, and name changed to St. George News, with W. L. Hauldren, editor and publisher. 

ST. MARYS Population (1915), 1031; elevation, 957 feet; established, 1855; named for the 
St. Mary's Catholic Mission; industries brick, tile and cement works, mill, elevators; has 
electric light, telephones; city owns its waterworks system; is on the Union Pacific railway. 
THE DIAL, college; edited and published by students of St. Mary's College, St. Marys. 

Monthly. Feb., 1890 + 26 vols. 
Founded 1890 by the students. 
STAR, independent; Willis E. Miller, editor and publisher, St. Marys. 

Weekly. Mar. 13, 1884 + 32 vols. 
Founded 1884 by John O 'Flanagan. 

WAMEGO Population (1915), 1572; elevation, 987 feet; established, 1866; named for a Pottawat- 
omie chief, Wa-me-go; industries flour and alfalfa mills, elevators, cement plant, barrel 
and broom factories; telephones; municipal electric light and waterworks systems; is on the 
Union Pacific railway. 

REPORTER, Republican; K. C. Smick, editor and publisher, Wamego. 
Weekly. Jan. 6, 1910 + 6 vols. 



264 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



This paper is a continuation of the following: Pottawatomie Gazette, Louisville, the first 
paper in the county, founded 1867 by A. Sailers; nama changed in 1870 to the Kansas Reporter, 
with W. H. Powell, editor, published by a stock company; moved to Wamego in 1881, Sylvester 
Fowler, editor and publisher; susp3nded 1887; revived August 10, 1888, by W. P. Campbell, and 
consolidated in 1899 with the Kansas Agriculturist. Kansas Agriculturist, Wamego, founded 1879 
by J. E. Clardy & Co. Daily Wamagan, founded 1887 by E. A. Weller, and Weekly Wamegan, 
founded 1889, both consolidated 1889 with the Agriculturist; name changed in 1910 to the Wamego 

TIMES, independent; J. A. Lister, editor and publisher, Wamego. 

Weekly. Jan. 6, 1893 + 22 vols. 

Founded 1889 at Louisville as the Pottawomte'County Times by Sylvester Fowler; moved to 
Wamego in 1892 and name changed to Wamago Times, R. M. Chilcott, editor and publisher. 
Wamego Daily Times, founded 1892 by R. M. Chilcott, and discontinued same year. 

DISCONTINUED. y oZg 

Westmoreland Alliance News. Nov. 21, 1890 1895. .. 5 

Indicator. Oct. 9, 1889 1891 . 2 

Period. Oct. 2, 18821885 3 

Belvue Dodger. Jan. 1 Aug. 6, 1889 ... 1 

Mirror. Nov. 18, 18971898 1 

Blaine News. Sept. 10, 18971901 4 

Butler City News. May 30, 18891890 1 

Emmett Citizen. May 7, 1907 Feb. 4, 1909; June 24, 19091912 5 

Havensville Independent. Oct. 27, 1880 1881 . . 1 

Register. July 1, 18891890 ... 1 

Torchlight. Nov. 19, 18911900 10 

Louisville Courier; Wheaton Courier. Oct. 14, 1897 1899 . 2 

Indicator. Apr. 28, 18871889 2 

Kansas Reporter. Oct. 6, 1870 1881 11 

Lyre. Aug. 19, 19041912 8 

Pottawatomie County Herald. Jan. 29 July 2, 1879 1 

Pottawatomie County Times, Louisville and Wamego. 

Aug. 16, 18891892 4 

Pottawatomie Gazette. July 17, 18671870 4 

Republican. Apr. 20, 18821886 5 

Olsburg Graphic. Dec. 3, 18961897 ... 1 

News Letter. Feb. 17, 1887 1896 9 

Optic. Nov. 4, 18971898 1 

Onaga Courier. July 7, 18981899 . 2 

Democrat. Oct. 8, 1885 Dec., 1887; Oct., 18881890 4 

Journal. May 16, 18781885 .7 

Register. July 16, 18961897 ... L 

Republican. June 7, 19001910 11 

Western Home Seeker; Homestead (m). July, 1899 1901 1 

St. Marys Democrat. Feb. 1, 1878 1879 1 

Democrat (2d). June 22, 18931895 2 

Eagle. Mar. 14, 18951908 13 

Eagle-Journal. Oct. 1, 1908 1912 3 

Express. May 21, 1880 1888 . 8 

Gazette. Mar. 2, 18881891 3 

Journal. June 7, 1894 1908 .15 

Pottawatomie Chief. Jan. 5, 18781879 2 

Times. Feb. 12, and Apr. 7, 18761878 2 

Wamego Blade. June 25, 1873; Jan. 1, 1876 1877 . 1 

Democrat. Nov. 12, 18851886 1 

Kansas Agriculturist. Feb. 22, 1879 1909 .... ... 31 

Kansas Reporter. Oct. 21, 18811889 .7 

[Not published July, 1887, to Aug., 1888]. 

Kansas Valley. Nov. 25, 18691871 2 

Tribune. Sept. 1, 18771881 .4 

Wamegan (d). Apr. 5, 18871889. 5 

Wamegan. June 28 Nov. 15, 1889 1 

Wheaton Exponent. Oct. 2, 19031905 . . .2 

Tribune. Jan. 25 May 17, 1900 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Westmoreland Inkslinger's Advertiser. Jan. 1 May 11, 1878. 

Signal. Aug. 3 Oct. 12, 1888. 

Garrison Times. July 27 Sept. 7, 1880. 

Olsburg School Mirror (m). Feb.-May, 1890. 

Wamego Agriculturist (d). Sept. 28-30, 1881. ' 

Kansas Reporter (d). Sept. 5-9, 1882. 

Kansas Teacher (m). Oct., 1889 July, 1890. 

Pottawatomie County Democrat. Nov. 13, 20, 1880. 

Times (d). June 7 July 2, 1892. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 265 



SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Havens Morning News. Feb. 18 Sept. 2, 1882. 

St. Marys Kansas Home Seeker (m). June-Sept., 1896. 

Wamego .Presbyterian Herald. Nov. 17, 1894 Apr. 6, 1895. 

Wheaton Advance. Feb. 3 Apr. 28, 1889. 

Mirror. Sept. 8 Nov. 9, 1899. 



PRATT COUNTY. 

Organized, 1879; named in honor of Caleb S. Pratt, second lieutenant 
company D, First Kansas infantry, killed at battle of Wilson's Creek, 
August 10, 1861; county seat, Pratt; area, 720 square miles, 460,800 acres; 
population (1915), 11,642; assessed valuation (1915), $28,422,418; resources 
and industries building stone, gypsum, agriculture, and stock raising. 

PRATT Population, 3797; elevation, 1885 feet; established, 1884; named for Caleb S. Pratt; 

industries elevators, flour mills; municipal electric light plant, paved streets, telephones; 

is on the Santa Fe and Rock Island railways. 

REPUBLICAN, Republican; Clarence W. Miller, editor, A. A. Cochran, publisher, Pratt. 
Weekly. Jan. 5, 1888 + 28 vols. 

This is a continuation of the Pratt County Press, luka, founded 1878 by J. B. King and 
M. C. Davis; consolidated 1887 with the Saratoga Sun, founded 1884 by Capps & Albaugh; ran 
as the Pratt County Republican, Lanstrum & Warren, editors and publishers, until 1905, when 
the name changed to Pratt Republican, with J. K. Cochran, editor and publisher. Pratt County 
Times, founded at luka 1881 by Times Company; moved to Pratt in 1884, with J. D. Quillen, 
editor, J. D. Quillen and J. W. Naron, publishers; consolidated with the Pratt County Republican, 
1894. 

TRIBUNE, independent; Cecil P. Rich, editor and publisher, Pratt. 

Weekly. Aug. 19, 1915 + 1 vol. 
Founded 1914 by Cecil P. Rich. 
UNION, Democratic; S. B. Gebhart, editor and publisher, Pratt. 

Weekly. May 29, 1890 + 26 vols. 

Founded 1890 as the Pratt County Union, by Joel Raace; nama changed 1901 to Pratt Union, 
S. B. Gebhart, editor and publisher; consolidated 1890 with the Pratt County Register, Pratt, 
founded 1886, by Dilday & Van Senden. 

BYERS Population (1915), estimated, 200; established, 1914; named for O. P. Byers, of Hutchin- 

son; telephones; is on the Anthony & Northern railway. 
JOURNAL, independent; J. G. Connor, editor and publisher, Byers. 
Weekly. June 18, 1915 + 1 vol. 

Founded 1915 by J. G. Connor. 

COATS Population (1915), 270; elevation, 1962 feet; established about 1887; industries- 
cement block factory; telephones; is on the Santa .Fe railway. 

COURANT, independent; Manford E. Henderson, editor and publisher, Coats. 

Weekly. Aug. 3, 1905 -f- 10 vols. 
Founded 1904 by H. B. Albertson. 

IUKA Population (1915), 228; elevation, 1925 feet; established, 1877; telephones; is on the 

Anthony & Northern railway. 

TRIBUNE, independent; Sam H. Barnd, editor and publisher, luka. 
Weekly. Dec. 2, 1915 + 

Founded 1915 by S. H. Barnd. 

PRESTON Population (1915), 278; elevation, 1843 feet; established, 1887; industries elevators, 
flour mills; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific and Rock Island railways. 

NEWS, independent; Bruce R. Keller, editor and publisher, Preston. 

Weekly. 
History unknown, paper not received by the Historical Society. 



266 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



SAWYER Population (1915), 250; elevation, 1914 feet; established about 1886; industries- 
brick and stone yards, foundry, well auger factory, machine shop; telephones; is on the Santa 
Fe railway. 

NEWS, independent; Fred C. Trillingham,. editor and publisher, Sawyer. 

Weekly. Nov. 13, 1906 + 9 vols. 
This is a continuation of the Sawyer Sun, founded 1905 by W. H. Holmes & Co.; name changed 

in 1906 to the Sawyer News, with Fred C. Trillingham, editor and publisher. 

DISCONTINUED. Vo i 8f 

Pratt Citizen. Oct. 21, 19021904 2 

Fulcrum (m). June, 19091912 3 

Independent. Dec. 3, 19131914 1 

Pratt County Register. Oct. 2, 1886 1890 4 

Cullison Banner. Apr. 29, 1886 1888 2 

Times. Mar. 14, 19131915 2 

Tomahawk. Sept. 7, 18881890 1 

luka Hustler. Feb. 24, 19101911 1 

Index. Nov. 21, 19131915 2 

Pratt County Press. Aug. 29, 18781887 9 

Pratt County Times. luka and Pratt. Oct. 8, 1881 Jan., 1886; 

Apr., 18861894 13 

Traveler. Oct. 21, 18861888 1 

Preston ... . . Herald. Aug. 11, 18871888 . . 1 

Pilot. Dec. 29, 19051909 3 

Plaindealer. Mar. 9, 18891901 13 

Saratoga Pratt County Democrat. July 9, 18851886 1 

Sun. Mar. 5, 18851887 3 

Sawyer Saw. Oct. 13, 19051906 ' 1 

Sparks. Dec. 27, 19001901 1 

Springvale Advocate. Feb. 23 July 14, 1888 1 

Stafford Citizen. 18771878. [See, also, Stafford county.] 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Pratt Plain Dealer. July 14 Nov. 9, 1888. 

Saratoga Plaindealer. Jan. 25 and Feb. 10, 1888. 



RAWLINS COUNTY. 

Organized, 1881; named in honor of Gen. John A. Rawlins, Secretary of 
War; county seat, Atwood; area, 1080 square miles, 691,200 acres; popula- 
tion (1915), 5702; assessed valuation (1915), $8,519,853; resources and in- 
dustries building stone, coal in limited quantity, stock raising, wheat, and 
alfalfa. 

ATWOOD Population (1915), 502; elevation, 2843 feet; established, 1879; moved to present 
site 1880; absorbed the town of Kelso, formerly called Prag; named for Atwood Matheny, 
son of J. M. Matheny, founder of the town; telephones; is on the C. B. & Q. railway. 
CITIZEN-PATRIOT, Democratic; Will H. Hill, editor and publisher, Atwood. 

Weekly. Sept. 10, 1880 Jan., 1883; Apr.-Dec., 1883; Feb., 1884 + 33 vols. 
This paper is a continuation of the following: The Celia Enterprise, founded 1885 by Fred 
H. Eno; moved to McDonald in 1888 and name changed to the McDonald Times, same editor 
and publisher; moved to Atwood in 1891 and continued as the Times, with J. W. Morphy, editor, 
and John F. Price, publisher; name again changed, in 1894, to the Atwood Patriot, with C. W. 
Coffin, editor and publisher. Blakeman Register, founded 1887 by F. F. Coolidge; consolidated 
1894 with the Atwood Patriot, G. W. Coffin, editor, and Atwood Publishing Company, publishers. 
Rawlins County Democrat, Atwood, founded 1885 by L. A. Hannigan; moved to Blakeman in 
1888; suspended in 1889; reestablished 1890, with new volume and number, at Atwood, E. A. 
Mikesell, editor, Mikesell & Chessmore, publishers; consolidated 1894 with the Patriot. The 
Republican Citizen, founded 1880 by Cy Anderson and J. D. Greason; consolidated 1912 with the 
Patriot and continued as the Citizen-Patriot. 

SQUARE DEAL, Progressive; F. D. Greason, editor and publisher, Atwood. 

Weekly. Dec. 22, 1905 + 10 vols. 
Founded 1905 by J. D. Greason & Son. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 267 



HERNDON Population (1915), 279; elevation, 2660 feet; established, 1878; first called Pesth, 
from Budapest, Hungary; name changed 1879 to Herndon, in honor of William H. Herndon, 
law partner of Abraham Lincoln; industries elevators, flour and alfalfa mills, machine 
shop; telephone, electric light; is on the C. B. & Q. railway. 
NONPAREIL, independent; A. J. Roberts, editor and publisher, Herndon. 

Weekly. Dec. 10, 1908 -f 7 vols. 

Founded 1905; early history unknown; first issue in Society's file is vol. 4, No. 28, A. J. Roberts, 
editor and publisher. 

DISCONTINUED. 



Atwood ........... Journal. Apr. 25, 18881889 ...... .2 

Journal (2d). Jan. 1, 18981899 . . ........ 1 

Patriot. June 15, 18941909 ...................................... 16 

Pioneer. Oct. 23, 18791880 ...................................... 1 

Rawlins County Democrat. Atwood and Blakeman. 

Sept. 30, 18851894 ........................................... 9 

Times. Aug. 20, 18911894 ....................................... 2 

Blakeman ......... Register. Nov. 10, 18871894 ..................................... 6 

Celia ............. Enterprise. Dec. 12, 18851888 ................................... 3 

Herndon .......... Courant. Mar. 16, 18881890 ..................................... 3 

Ludell ............ Gazette. May 14, 18871894 .... .6 

Settler. Oct. 18, 18841887 ....................................... 3 

McDonald ......... News. Oct. 4, 19071911 . . .4 

Times. Sept. 6, 18881891 ........................................ 3 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Atwood ........... Democrat. July 20 Nov. 2, 1894. 

Review. Atwood and Ludell. Mar. 11 May 19, 1891. 
Herndon .......... Reporter. Jan 17 Apr. 12, 1901. 

Ludell ............ Review. June 8 July 6, 1881. 



RENO COUNTY. 

Organized, 1872; named for Gen. Jesse L. Reno; county seat, Hutchinson; 
area, 1260 square miles, 806,400 acres; population (1915), 39,442; assessed 
valuation (1915), $79,757,786; resources and industries salt, building stone, 
mineral paint, agriculture, and stock raising. 

HUTCHINSON Population (1915), 18,194; elevation, 1533 feet; established, 1871; named for 
its founder, C. C. Hutchinson; industries salt works, soda ash plant, flour and alfalfa mills, 
elevators, packing house, foundries, strawboard factory, cannery, paint mill, machine and 
boiler shops, furniture and automobile factories; waterworks, electric lights, telephones, 
paved streets, public library; is on the Santa Fe, the Missouri Pacific and the Rock Island 
railways. 
BLADE [Negro]; Leroy Perkins, editor, M. B. Brooks, business manager, Hutchinson. 

Weekly. Not received by the Historical Society. 
GAZETTE, Democratic; Harvey Leavitt, editor and manager, Hutchinson. 

Daily. June 2, 1908 + 30 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: The Clipper, founded 1889 by W. A. Loe; 
name changed in 1902 to the Independent, with Sheridan Ploughe, editor and publisher. Satur- 
day Bee, Hutchinson, founded 1895 by Harry L. Fontaine, editor and publisher; consolidated 1905 
with the Independent. The Independent consolidated 1908 with the Gazette, Harry A. Lill, 
editor and publisher. Alliance Gazette, Hutchinson, founded 1890 by Warren Foster; name 
changed 1895 to Hutchinson Gazette, with Lee A. Hutton, editor and publisher; name changed 
to the Semi-Weekly Gazette, 1902, E. G. Nettleton & Co., editors and publishers; discontinued 
in 1910. Hutchinson Daily Bee, founded 1902 by the Lawson Printing Company; name changed 
in 1905 to the Daily Independent, Sheridan Ploughe, editor and publisher; name again changed, 
in 1908, to Hutchinson Daily Gazette, with Harry A. Lill, editor and publisher. 

HIGH SCHOOL Buzz, edited and published by the students of Hutchinson high school, Hutchinson. 

Monthly. Dec. 15, 1910 + 5 vols. 
Founded 1910 by the students. 



268 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



NEWS, Republican; W. Y. Morgan, editor and publisher, Hutchinson. 
Weekly. July 15, 1875; Feb. 17, 1876 + 40 vols. 
Daily [evening]. Aug. 17, 1886 -f 93 vols. 

Weekly edition founded 1872 by Perry Bros. & Co.; daily edition founded 1885 by Ralph M. 
Easley. 

OBSERVER; Sheridan Ploughe, editor, the Wholesaler Printing Company, publishers, Hutchinson. 

Monthly. Mar., 1915 + 
Founded 1915 by Sheridan Ploughe. 

REFORMATORY HERALD; L. A. Coffin, editor; published by the Kansas State Industrial Reform- 
atory, Hutchinson. 

Weekly. Jan. 28, 1916 + 

Early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being vol. 6, No. 4, L. A. Coffin, editor. 
WHOLESALER, trade; A. L. Sponsler, president and editor, T. G. Armour, secretary and manager, 
Wholesaler Printing Company, publishers, Hutchinson. 

Weekly. Mar. 20, 1909 + 7 vols. 

Founded 1908; early history unknown; first issue in Society's file numbered vol. 2, No. 1, 
A. L. Sponsler, editor. 

ARLINGTON Population (1915), 465; elevation, 1599 feet; established, 1877; named for the 
famous "Heights of Arlington"; telephones; is on the Rock Island railway. 

ENTERPRISE, Republican; M. L. Barrett, editor and publisher, Arlington. 

Weekly. Apr. 1, 1886 + 30 vols. 
Founded 1885; first issue in Society's file, vol. 1, No. 16, gives J. E. Eaton and H. C. Warner, 

editors and publishers. 

HAVEN Population (1915), 545; elevation, 1470 feet; established, 1878; industries elevators. 

flour mill; electric light plant, telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 
JOURNAL, independent; R. G. Hemenway, editor and publisher, Haven. 

Weekly. Aug. 8, 1896 Nov. 11, 1909; Oct. 24, 1913 + 15 vols. 

Founded 1896 by George W. May. 

LANGDON Population (1915), 216; elevation, 1697 feet; established, 1873; industries fish 
hatchery conducted by private enterprise, elevators; telephones; is on the Rock Island rail- 
way. 

LEADER, independent; B. B. Miller, editor and publisher, Langdon. 

Weekly. Nov. 23, 1911 + 4 vols. 
Founded 1911 by H. B. Albertson. 

NICKERSON Population (1915), 1167; elevation, 1601 feet; established, 1878; named for 
Thomas Nickerson, president of the A. T. & S. F. railroad; industries elevators, mills; 
telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

ARGOSY, Republican; Henry A. Lyon, editor and publisher, Nickerson. 

Weekly. Dec. 7, 1878 + 37 vols. 
Founded 1878 by J. W. Sargent as the Argosy; name changed 1886 to Nickerson Argosy, 

F. R. Dougherty, editor and publisher. Nickerson Register, founded 1884 by C. N. and H. E. 

Whitaker; name changed 1889 to Nickerson Industry, Claypool & Raisner, editors and publishers; 

the same year name again changed to Nickerson Register, with Harry H. Brig-htman, editor and 

publisher; consolidated 1891 with the Argosy, W. F. Hendry and J. E. Humphrey, editors and 

publishers. 

PARTRIDGE Population (1915), 231; elevation, 1612 feet; established, 1874, about three- 
quarters of a mile from present site; formerly called Reno Centre; name changed to Partridge 
in 1886; telephones; is on the Santa Fe and Rock Island railways. 

TAXPAYER, local; F. W. Gillespie, editor and publisher, Partridge. 

Semimonthly. Mar. 9, 1916 + 
Founded 1916 by F. W. Gillespie. Society received but one issue. 

PRETTY PRAIRIE Population (1915), 379; elevation, 1574 feet; established, 1889; named 
from its situation; industries elevators, mills; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

TIMES, independent; C. W. Claybaugh, editor and publisher, Pretty Prairie. 

Weekly. Jan. 26, 1911 + 5 vols. 
Founded 1910 by Percy Torrey. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



269 



SYLVIA Population (1915), 634; elevation, 1735 feet; established, 1874; originally called Zenith, 
name changed to Sylvia 1886; industries elevator, mill; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

SUN, independent; G. H. Yust, editor and publisher, Sylvia. 

Weekly. May 30, 1902 + 14 vols. 
Continuation of the first Sylvia Sun, founded 1900 by C. S. Eckert, discontinued Sept. 13. 

1901; Sylvia Sun (2d), founded about Jan. 1, 1902, with George Walker, editor and publisher; 

first issue in Society's file bears number, vol. 1, No. 22. 

TURON Population (1915), 567; elevation, 1774 feet; established, 1886; industries elevators, 
flour mill, creamery, bottling works, telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific and Rock Island 
railways. 

PRESS, Republican; B. S. Edwards, editor and publisher, Turon. 

Weekly. Apr. 4, 1895 Apr. 1, 1909; 1911 + 19 vols. 
This is a continuation of the Pretty Prairie Press, founded 1894 by T. G. Elbury; moved to 

Turon in 1895, and name changed to the Turon Weekly Press, with the same editor. 

DISCONTINUED. Volg 

Hutchinson Alliance Gazette; Hutchinson Gazette. Sept. 4, 1890 1910. .. .19 

Bee (d). Mar. 19, 19021905 . 7 

Call (d). Apr. 11 June 18, 1888 1 

Clipper. Feb. 11, 18891902 .11 

Democrat (2d). Apr. 6, 18951902 

Examiner. Mar. 22 Nov. 23, 1876. . . 

Headlight. Sept. 29, 18931895 

Herald. Apr. 5, 18771885 

Herald (d). Apr. 12 Dec. 31, 1887 1 

Independent. Jan. 22, 1902 1908 . 6 

Independent (d). July 11, 19051908 .11 

Inter-State Schoolman (m). Mar., 19051913 . 8 

Interior. Jan. 18, 18771885 

Interior-Herald; Weekly Herald. Jan. 10, 18851903 19 

Kansan. Jan. 3, 18961898 3 

Kansas Educator (m). Jan., 1903 1907 4 

Kansas Herold [German]. Apr. 28, 18881890 2 

Kansas State Sunday School Journal (qr). July-Sept., 1892. 
[See Dickinson county.] 

Mail. Sept. 3, 18981901 3 

Our Union; Salt Workers Journal. Nov. 18, 1893 1894 1 

Patriot (d). July 10 Sept. 19, 1893 1 

Republican. Mar. 23, 18891890 2 

Saturday Bee. Dec. 21, 1895 1905 10 

School and Fireside (m). Oct., 18941905 .10 

School Visitor (m). Jan., 18931894 2 

Sunday Democrat; Dollar Democrat; Hutchinson Democrat (1st). 

Jan. 7, 18831890 8 

Times (1st). Dec. 6, 18891895 5 

[Called Times-Republican, July 4, 1890, to Dec. 4, 1891.] 

Times (2d). Nov. 3, 1906 1910 . 3 

Tradesman. Nov. 22, 19021907 . 5 

Western Homestead (m). 18981899. [See, also, Greeley county.] 

Weekly Visitor. Apr. 7 Oct. 27, 1900 1 

South Hutchinson . .Journal. May 18, 1888 1889 1 

Leader. Nov. 30, 18861887 1 

Saturday Review. Sept. 10, 18871890 3 

Abby ville Chronicle. June 4 Oct. 9, 1897 1 

Tribune. Aug. 26, 18861887 1 

Buhler Herald. Oct. 23, 19131914 1 

Haven Dispatch. July 28, 18881889 1 

Independent. June 10, 1886 June, 1888; Jan.-Mar., 1889; 

Dec., 18891893 6 

Item. Mar. 23, 18941895 2 

Lerado Ledger. Nov. 4, 18861888 1 

Nickerson Chronicle (m). Burrton, Sterling, Wichita, Anthony, Mount Hope, 

Plevna, and Windom. Aug., 18941912 17 

Our Messenger (m). 18971898. [See Shawnee county.] 

Record. Mar. 6, 18951896 1 

Register; Nickerson Industry. Sept. 6, 18841891 .6 

Register (d). 1887 1 

Olcott Press. Jan. 11 Nov. 1, 1889 1 

Partridge Cricket; Press. Nov. 4, 18861887. . . 1 

Republican. Mar. 6, 18961897 1 

Plevna Torchlight. June 14, 18881889 1 

Pretty Prairie Press. Feb. 7, 18941895 . . 1 

Record. Feb. 23, 19061907 1 



270 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DISCONTINUED. Vola 

Sylvia Banner. Dec. 6, 18891895 .5 

Chronicle. July 10 Dec. 4, 1896 1 

Herald. Apr. 4 Aug. 29, 1889 1 

Reno County Globe. June 30 Dec. 15, 1899. . 1 

Sun (1st). Aug. 10, 19001901 1 

Telephone. May 25, 18861889 3 

Turon. . . . .Headlight. May 2, 1889 1893. . . . 4 

Rustler. Oct. 14, 18861889 2 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Hutchinson Kansas Veteran. Nov. 4, 1885 Feb. 17, 1886. 

Law and Gospel (m). Oct., Nov., 1886. 

New Rural. July 1 Oct. 1, 1885. 

New Times (South Hutchinson), Feb. 10 Apr. 28, 1887. 

Real Estate Reporter (m). June, 1891. 

Reno Independent. Feb. 23, 1876. 

World. Dec. 19, 1889 Mar. 20, 1890. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Hutchinson Christian Bugle (m). May, 1909 Feb., 1910. 

Normal Class (m). Dec., 1894; Jan. and Apr., 1895. 

Reno County Republican. June 29 Aug. 10, 1894. 

World (d). Oct. 6-13, 1894. 

Haven Record. Jan. 3 Apr. 17, 1896. 

Partridge Reno County Journal. Nov. 30, Dec. 7, 1894. 

Sylvia Independent. Dec. 4, 1897 May 7, 1898. 



REPUBLIC COUNTY. 

Organized, 1868; named for the Republican river; county seat, Belleville; 
area, 720 square miles, 460,800 acres; population (1915), 16,915; assessed 
valuation (1915), $40,494,127; resources and industries building stone, pot- 
ter's clay, coal, salt marshes, agriculture, and stock raising. 

BELLEVILLE Population (1915), 2216; elevation, 1512 feet; established, 1869; named for Mrs. 
Arabelle Tutton, whose husband, A. B. Tutton, was a member of the town company; in- 
dustries flour and alfalfa mills, elevators, marble works, creameries; telephones, municipal 
water and electric light systems; is on the Union Pacific and the Rock Island railways. 

REPUBLIC COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Democratic; S. H. Rogers, editor and publisher, Belleville. 

Weekly, Sept. 26, 1906; Jan. 10, 1907 + 9 vols. 
Founded (1st) in 1906 by H. N. Boyd; suspended same year; revived in January, 1907, by 

Mr. Boyd, with new volume and number. 

SWATTER, independent; H. N. Boyd, editor and publisher, Belleville. 

Monthly. Jan.-May, 1915; Nov., 1915 + 1 vol. 
Founded 1915 by H. N. Boyd. Society has scattering issues only. 
TELESCOPE AND FREEMAN, Republican; A. Q. Miller, editor and publisher, Belleville. 
Weekly. Oct. 14, 1870; Nov. 10, 17, 24, Dec. 8, 29, 1871; Jan. 19, 1872; 

Apr. 6 to July, 1876; Apr., 1877 -f- 39 vols. 
Founded 1870 by J. C. Humphrey. Logan Enterprise, founded 1879 by Finke & Swartout; 

name changed 1884 to Phillips County Freeman, with H. N. Boyd and Lightfoot, editors and 

publishers; moved to Belleville, 1890, and published as the Republic County Freeman, under a 
new volume and number, H. N. Boyd, editor and publisher; name changed 1899 to Belleville Free- 
man, Orm C. Emery, editor and publisher; consolidated with the Telescope in 1909. A daily edi- 
tion of the Freeman was founded in 1905 by Tom Charles, and discontinued same year. Munden 
Progress, early history unknown, no copy in Society's file, consolidated with the Telescope. 

COURTLAND Population (1915), 441; elevation, 1496 feet; established, 1885; telephones; is 

on the Rock Island and the Santa Fe railways. 

JOURNAL, independent; Bruce and Frances E. Borin, editors and publishers, Courtland. 
Weekly. Apr. 16, 1915 + 1 vol. 

Founded 1903 as the Comet, by Hoyt & Tibbetts; name changed in 1915 to the Courtland 
Journal, with Bruce and Frances E. Borin, editors and publishers. 

REGISTER, Republican; R. Cameron, editor and publisher, Courtland. 

Weekly. Feb. 2, 1889 + 27 vols. 
Founded 1889 by Frank M. Coffey. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 271 



CUBA Population (1915), 475; elevation, 1593 feet; established, 1873; present town three miles 
from the old town site; was established in May, 1884; telephones; is on the C. B. & Q. and th e 
Rock Island railways. 

DAYLIGHT, Republican; W. L. Shannon, editor and publisher, Cuba. 

Weekly. Oct. 19, 1888 -f- 26 vols. 
This paper is a continuation of the following: Republic County Pilot, Cuba, founded 1885* 

W. S. Elliott, editor and publisher; name changed 1887 to the Cuba Pilot, with J. D. Bennett, 

editor and publisher; suspended 1888, succeeded by the Cuba Daylight, with J. G. Clark & Co., 

editors and publishers; suspended Mar. 1, 1889. The Cuba Union, founded 1888, by T. A. Cordry; 

succeeded Mar. 8, 1889, by the Union Pilot, J. J. Shimek and S. J. Cordry, editors and publishers; 

in May, 1890, name changed to the Cuba Daylight, with S. J. Cordry, editor and publisher. 

MUNDEN Population (1915), 244; elevation, 1626 feet; established, 1887; named for John 
Munden, owner of the town site; telephones; is on the Rock Island railway. 

PRESS, independent; W. E. Muth, editor and publisher, Ollie L. Muth, associate editor, Munden. 

Weekly. Oct. 6, 1910 -f 5 vols. 
Founded 1910 by W. E. Muth. 

NARKA Population (1915), 278; elevation, 1583 feet; established, 1887; telephones; is on the 

Rock Island railway. 

NEWS, Republican; W. E. Muth, editor and publisher, Ollie L. Muth, associate editor, Narka. 
Weekly. Sept. 2, 1893 + 22 vols. 

Founded 1893 by James A. Harris. 

REPUBLIC Population (1915), 427; elevation, 1495 feet; established, 1871; named for the county ; 

telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

NEWS, Republican; Grafton Nutter, editor and publisher, Republic City. 
Weekly. Dec. 21, 1883 + 32 vols. 

Early history unknown; first copy in the Society's file, vol. 1, No. 40, shows Gomer T. Davies, 
editor and publisher. 

SCANDIA Population (1915), 621; elevation, 1429 feet; established, 1868; called Scandia by 
the Scandinavian Agricultural Society, which colonized it; industries cement block works, 
elevators, creamery; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific and the Rock Island railways. 
JOURNAL, Republican; William H. Hill, editor and publisher, Scandia. 

Weekly. Jan. 9, 1878 + 38 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Belleville Republic, founded Feb. 7, 1872, sold 
in 1874 and removed to Jewell Center; reestablished at Belleville as Belleville Republic, Aug. 15, 
1875; moved to Scandia, Aug. 16, 1876, and name changed to the Scandia Republic, with A. B. 
Wilder, editor and publisher; name changed in 1877 to the Republic County Journal, Scandia, 
L. H. Tibbetts, editor and publisher, who started with a new volume and number; name again 
changed, in 1882, to Scandia Journal, Chas. F. Woodward, editor and publisher. 

DISCONTINUED. Vols 

Belleville Baptist Visitor (m). Jan.-Nov., 1896 1 

Democrat. June 18, 1886 Dec. 12, 1890; Oct. 2, 18911895 8 

[Called Democrat-Press, Nov. 7 to Dec. 5, 1890.] 

Freeman (d). Feb. 25 Dec. 30, 1905 2 

God's Missionary Messenger (m). Republic, Mankato and Belleville. 

Dec., 19031910 . 7 

Record. Oct. 5, 18831885 2 

Republic. Feb. 7, 28, July 10, 1872; 

Feb. 26, Apr. 16, June 4, Dec. 10, 1873; Jan. 28, 1874; 

Apr. 19 Aug. 9, 1876 1 

[Bound with Scandia Republic.] 

Republic County Freeman. Oct. 9, 1890 1909 10 

Republic County Press. Aug. 22, 1889 1890 1 

Courtland Comet. Feb. 27, 19031915 13 

Cuba Advocate. Oct. 22, 18971901 4 

Alliance Sun. May 14 Oct. 29, 1891 1 

Cesky Lev [Bohemian]. May 4, 18911892 1 

Conservative Cuban. Aug. 22, 1884 1886 1 

Republic County Pilot. Mar. 26, 18851888 4 

Union; Union-Pilot. Aug. 30, 18881890 2 

Kackley Evangelistic War Cry. 18931894. 

[See, also, Saline County Short-lived, vol. 2.] 

Leader. Apr. 13, 18931894 1 

Western Record. Apr. 1 Sept. 19, 1893 1 



272 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DISCONTINUED. Vols 

Munden People's Advocate. May 4, 19121913 . . 1 

Times. Oct. 28, 18981899 1 

Republic Republic County Teacher (m). Sept., 18941896 1 

Scandia Independent. Dec. 17, 18861889 8 

Republic. Aug. 16, 18761877 1 

Republic County Chief. May 22, 18851886 1 

Warwick Leader; Advanced Leader. June 17, 18861887 1 

Wayne Journal. Dec. 17, 19091910 1 

Register. June 6, 18851887 2 

White Rock Independent. 1879 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Belleville Calcium Light. Dec. 20, 1890 Mar. 12, 1891. 

Kansas Enterprise. Oct. 20, 1882. 

Kansaske Noviny [Bohemian]. Feb. 1 May 17, 1892. 

Cuba Farmers' Alliance. Aug. 7 Oct. 3, 1890. 

Narka Bazoo. Apr. 5 June 15, 1888. 

Scandia Republic County Independent. Sept. 13 Dec. 13, 1883. 

Wayne Register. Jan. 6 June 23, 1887. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Clifton Baptist Visitor (m). Mar., 1895 Nov., 1896. 

Courtland Press. Nov. 16 Dec. 28, 1894. 

Cuba Record. Oct. 12 Dec. 14, 1900. 

Kackley Herald of Pentecost (m). Aug., Sept., 1894. 



RICE COUNTY. 

Organized, 1871; named for Gen. Samuel A. Rice; county seat, Lyons; 
area, 720 square miles, 460,800 acres; population (1915), 14,437; assessed 
valuation (1915), $36,850,596; resources and industries salt, agriculture, and 
stock raising. 

LYONS Population (1915), 2130; elevation, 1696 feet; established, 1870, as Atlanta; the post 
office was originally called Brookdale; in 1876 the new town of Lyons, named for Freeman 
J. Lyons, was started, absorbing Atlanta; industries salt works, mills, elevators, cement 
works, machine shop, wagon and carriage shop, gasoline engine works; telephones, electric 
lights, municipal water plant; is on the Santa Fe, the Missouri Pacific and the St. Louis & 
San Francisco railways. 

NEWS, Democratic; Martin L. Laude, editor and manager, Lyons Publishing Company, pub- 
lishers, Lyons. 

Daily. Jan. 19, 1909 + 14 vols. 
Early history unknown; first issue in Society's file shows E. H. Young, editor and publisher. 

REPUBLICAN, Republican; Clark Conkling, editor and publisher, Lyons. 

Semiweekly. Sept. 11, 1879 + 36 vols. 
Founded 1879 by Clark Conkling. Lyons Daily Republican, founded 1887 by Clark Conkling, 

suspended 1888. Soldiers' Tribune, Lyons, founded 1887, with A. J. Garrison, editor-in-chief; 

in 1888 name changed to Lyons Tribune, Elbert W. Hoyt, editor and manager, and A. W. Hoyt, 

publisher; consolidated in 1893 with the Republican. 

RICE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Democratic; M. R. Laude, editor and manager, Lyons Publishing 

Company, publishers, Lyons. 

Weekly. May 8, 1879 May 21, 1881; Feb. 21, 1884 + 32 vols. 

Founded 1878 by E. W. Wood and William J. Fuller; suspended from Nov., 1887, to Mar., 
1890, when it resumed with Fred N. and Minnie Wo9d Cooper, editors and publishers; name 
changed 1906 to the Central Kansas News-Democrat, with Ernst H. Young, editor and publisher; 
in 1915 name shortened to Central Kansas Democrat, and same year again changed to the Rice 
County Democrat, with Martin C. Laude, editor and publisher. A daily Central Kansas Democrat 
was founded 1887 by F. N. Cooper & Co., and was suspended same year. 

ALDEN Population (1915), 255; elevation, 1684 feet; established, 1882; telephones; is on the 
San ta Fe railway. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 273 



JOURNAL, independent; J. H. Myers, editor and publisher, Alden. 

Weekly. July 25, 1905 Sept. 17, 1908; Oct. 1, 1914 + 5 vols. 

Founded 1905; first issue in Society's file, vol. 1, No. 8, gives name as Alden Star-Journal, 
Melville C. Stevens, editor and publisher. 

BUSHTON Population (1915), 288; elevation, 1760 feet; established in the early 80's as Sorghum; 

name changed to Bushton in Jan., 1887; industries flour mills, elevators; telephones; is on 

the Missouri Pacific railway. 

NEWS, independent; Tom D. Hickman, editor and publisher, Bushton. 
Weekly. Nov. 17, 1899 + 16 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the Chase News, founded 1896 by L. D. Harding; moved to 
Bushton in 1899 and name changed to Bushton News, L. D. Harding, editor and publisher. 

CHASE Population (1915), 252; elevation, 1717 feet; established, 1880; post office originally 

called Wildwood; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
REGISTER, independent; John W. Mahuran, editor and publisher, Chase. 
Weekly. May 28, 1903 + 13 vols. 

Founded 1902 as the Chase Breeze, by C. R. Cal dwell; name changed in 1903 to the Chase 
Register, with Charles B. Garten, editor and publisher. 

GENESEO Population (1915), 543; elevation, 1727 feet; established, 1886; named for Geneseo, 
111.; industries elevator, creamery; telephones; is on the Santa Fe and the Missouri Pacific 
railways. 

JOURNAL, independent; Jack Gage, editor, and Jack Gage and J. C. Ellis, publishers, Geneseo. 

Weekly. Mar. 10, 1904 Apr. 19, 1906; May 27, 1909 -f- 8 vols. 
Founded 1904 by Arthur Conard. 

LITTLE RIVER Population (1915), 625; elevation, 1581 feet; established, 1880; name derived 
from its situation on the Little Arkansas river; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

MONITOR, independent; W. G. Greenbank, editor and publisher, Little River. 

Weekly. July 1, 1886 + 29 vols. 
Founded 1886 by T. G. Robison. The Comet, Little River, founded 1891 by J. F. Wilcox, 

merged with the Monitor. 

STERLING Population (1915), 2214; elevation, 1644 feet; established, 1872; first known as 
Peace; name changed in 1876 to Sterling in honor of Sterling Rosan; industries salt works, 
mills, elevators, machine shops, washing machine, seed cleaning and broom factories; tele- 
phones, electric lights, municipal waterworks; is on the Santa Fe and Missouri Pacific railways 
COOPER COURIER, college; edited and published by students of Cooper College, Sterling. 

Semimonthly. Mar. 12, 1892 + 26 vols. 

Founded 1892 by the Chrestomatheoh Literary Society of Cooper College. 
BULLETIN, Republican; S. R. and Ruth Lyons, editors and publishers, Sterling. 

Weekly. May 24, 1877 + 37 vols. 

Founded in 1877 at Lyons as the Weekly Bulletin by Charles D. Ulmer; moved to Sterling 
same year; name changed in 1882 to the Sterling Bulletin, with same editor and publisher; in 1890 
name again changed to the Bulletin, with J. E. Junkin, editor, and Junkin & Steele, publishers. 
Rice County Gazette, Peace, founded 1876 by E. Branson Cowgill; moved to Sterling, Apr. 20, 
1876; name changed in 1880 to Sterling Gazette, same editor and publisher; consolidated 1891 
with the Bulletin, and name became the Bulletin and Gazette, J. E. Junkin, editor, and Junkin & 
Steele, publishers; in 1899 name changed to Sterling Kansas Bulletin, same editor and publishers. 



DISCONTINUED. 



Vols. 



Lyons Central Kansas Democrat (d). Mar. 4 Nov. 23, 1887 1 

Democrat. Sept. 6, 18891890 1 

Prohibitionist. July 2, 18851890 . 5 

Republican [1st] (d). Jan. 10 Aug. 5, 1882 .... 1 

Republican [2d] (d). Feb. 18, 18871888 3 

Rice County Breeze. Sept. 24, 18971898 1 

Rice County Eagle. Mar. 6, 18901908 18 

Soldiers' Tribune; Lyons Tribune. Dec. 1, 1887 1893 6 

Weaver's Herald (m). Dec., 1898. [See, also, Labette county.] 

Bushton Star. Aug. 17, 18941895 1 

Cain City Razzooper. Aug. 18, 1887 1888 1 

Chase ... . . Breeze. June 12, 19021903 ... 1 

Dispatch. June 14, 18841885 1 

News. Apr. 3, 18961899 3 

Record. May 6, 18861895 6 

18 



274 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DISCONTINUED. y olg 

Frederick Independent. Jan. 1, 18881889 1 

News. Sept. 4, 19081910 2 

Republican. Aug. 24, 18921893 1 

Rice County News. Aug. 28, 18901895 5 

Herald. Feb. 10, 18871899 13 

Post. Aug. 6, 19081909 1 

Little River Comet. May 13 Dec. 23, 1891. . 1 

Rural West. May 5, 18811882 2 

Raymond Independent. May 6, 1887 1888 1 

Sterling. . . .Arkansas Valley Times. Jan. 5 Oct. 10, 1888. . 1 

Bulletin (d). May 10, 18871888 2 

Champion. July 28, 18881894 6 

Chronicle (m). 18991903. [See Reno county.] 

Coopers' Quarterly. Dec., 19001906 6 

Journal; Farm Journal. Apr. 27, 1901 1912 11 

News. Oct. 26, 19101913 3 

Republican; Saturday Republican. Aug. 7, 1886 1888 2 

Republican (d). Mar. 7 Aug. 25, 1887 1 

Rice County Gazette; Sterling Gazette. Jan. 20, 18761891 16 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Alden Herald. May 19 Sept. 29, 1888. 

Cain City News. Aug. 1 Dec. 6, 1889. 

Little River . .News. Nov. 3, 1880 Jan. 26, 1881. 

Raymond Advance. Nov. 20, 1885 Apr. 29, 1886. 

Sterling New Home (m;. Dec., 1880 Sept. 13, 1882. 

News. Feb. 23 June 29, 1889. 

Recorder (m). Mar., 1881 Feb., 1882. 

Valley Echo. Nov. 1, 1884. 

World. July 21 Sept. 8, 1892. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

rSterling Chautauqua Bulletin (bi-m). Apr. and Aug., 1912. 

Chase. . . . . .Church Worker (m). Aug., 1893 Mar., 1894. 

Endeavor Banner (s-m). Aug. 15 Oct. 1, 1898. 
Frederick. . . . .Bulletin. Sept. 28, 1893 Feb. 3, 1894. 

Flame. Oct. 14 Dec. 30, 1897. 
Saxman. . . .Bulletin. Jan. 16, 19111912. 



RILEY COUNTY. 

Organized, 1855; named for Maj. Gen. Bennett Riley, United States 
army; county seat, Manhattan; area, 617 square miles, 394,880 acres; popu- 
lation (1915), 16,518; assessed valuation (1915), $30,013,842; resources and 
industries building stone, cement rock, potter's clay, agriculture, and 
stock raising. 

MANHATTAN Population (1915), 6816; elevation, 1012 feet; established, 1855; a consolida- 
tion of the towns of Poleska, Canton and Boston; industries flour mills, elevators, foundry; 
waterworks, electric lights, telephones, paved streets, street railway, public library; is on 
the Union Pacific and Rock Island railways. 

INDUSTRIALIST, college; edited and published by the faculty of the Kansas State Agricultural 
College, Manhattan. 

Weekly. Apr. 24, 1875 July, 1886; Dec., 1886 Jan., 1888; Dec., 1888 + 40 vols. 
Founded 1875, with John A. Anderson, managing editor, and J. H. Folks, business manager. 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, college; Tom Blackburn, editor, Dorian P. Ricord, business manager, 
published by the students of the K. S. A. C., Manhattan. 

Semiweekly. Mar. 18, 1896 + 20 vols. 
Founded 1895 as the Students' Herald, with J. W. Holland, editor; name changed 1913 to 

Kansas Aggie; name again changed, in 1914, to Kansas State Collegian. 

MANHATTAN MERCURY, Republican; Fay N. Seaton, editor and publisher, Manhattan. 

Daily. Feb. 8, 1909 + 22 vols. 
Founded 1909 by Charles M. Vernon. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 275 



NATIONALIST, Republican; Deputy & Shellenbaum, editors and publishers, Manhattan. 

Weekly. Dec. 23, 1870 + 45 vols. 

Daily. Feb. 1, 1909 + 22 vols. 

A continuation of the following: The Western Kansas Express, the first paper published in 
Riley county, initial number appearing May 4, 1859, C. F. Deyivaldi, editor and proprietor. 
The press and material for the paper were taken up the Kansas river on a steamboat. In 1860 
the name was changed to the Manhattan Express. Mr. DeVivaldi was appointed consul to Santos, 
Brazil, in 1861, and James Humphrey edited the paper until 1863, when J. H. Pillsbury purchased 
it and changed the name to the Independent. The Kansas Radical was established in July. 1866, 
by E. C. Manning; in July, 1868, L. R. Elliott purchased the Independent of J. H. Pillsbury, 
and on Sept. 13, following, having purchased the Radical of E. C. Manning, he consolidated the 
two papers, and Sept. 19 issued the first number of the Manhattan Standard. In Dec., 1870, 
Albert Griffin purchased the Standard and changed the name to the Nationalist. In Oct., 1893, 
the Tri-Weekly Nationalist was started, with E. C. Parker as editor, suspending in Nov. following. 
The Daily Nationalist was founded 1909 by S. W. McGarrah. 
REPUBLIC, Republican; Fay N. Seaton, editor and publisher, Manhattan. 

Weekly. June 23, 1882 + 33 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Manhattan Enterprise, founded 1876 by C. M. 
Patee and A. L. Runyon; name changed 1882 to Manhattan Republic, with G. A. Atwood editor 
and publisher. The Daily Republic, founded 1887 by G. A. Atwood; suspended 1891. The Satur- 
day Signal, founded 1888 by McDonald Bros.; name changed 1890 to the Signal, with James W. 
McDonald and Dudley Atkins, editors and publishers; sold to the Republic in 1891. The Evening 
Republic, founded 1904 by M. S. and W. M. Amos; suspended in 1905. The Mercury, Man- 
hattan, founded 1884 by J. J. Davis and Clair M. Patee; consolidated Dec. 30, 1909, with the 
Republic. 
RILEY COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Democratic; F. B. Lamb, editor and publisher, Manhattan. 

Weekly. Feb. 3, 1911 + 5 vols. 
Founded 1910 by A. H. Hammond. 
TRIBUNE, Republican; C. A. Kimball, editor and publisher, Manhattan. 

Weekly. Sept. 23, 1915 + 

A continuation of the Free Lance; no copies on file in the Historical Society. The Tribune, 
founded 1914, early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being vol. 2, No. 25. 

CLEBURNE Population (1915), estimated, 200; elevation, 1068 feet; established, 1859; first 
known as Big Timber; name changed to Cleburne about 1887; telephones; is on the Union 
Pacific railway. 

NEWS, independent; George C. Hall, editor and publisher, Cleburne. 

Weekly. Feb. 6, 1913 + 3 vols. 
Founded 1913 by George C. Hall. 

LEONARDVILLE Population (1915), 376; elevation, 1377 feet; established, 1881; first called 
Leonard, then Leonardville; named in honor of Leonard T. Smith, of Leavenworth; tele- 
phones; is on the v Union Pacific railway. 

MONITOR, independent, John L. Simpson, editor and publisher, Leonardville. 

Weekly. Apr. 3, 1884 + 32 vols. 
Founded 1883 at Clay Center by P. S. Loofbourrow; in 1884 moved to L3onardville, and 

name changed to the Leonardville Monitor, with same editor and publisher; in 1913 consolidated 

with the Leonardville Echo, founded 1912 by Guy E. Harmon, ran as the Echo-Monitor, John L. 

Simpson and Guy E. Harmon, editors and publishers. In 1914 nama ajain b33ama Leonardville 

Monitor, with J. L. Simpson, editor and publisher. 

OGDEN Population (1915), 275; elevation, 1050 feet; established, 1857; named for Maj. E. A. 

Ogden; telephones; is on the Union Pacific railway. 
COURIER, local; R. K. Evans, editor and publisher, Ogden. 
Weekly. May 14, 19151916. 1 vol. 

Founded 1915 by R. K. Evans. Not received by the Society since May 5, 1916. 

RANDOLPH Population (1915), 363; elevation, 1052 feet; established, 1856; originally called 
Waterville; name changed to Randolph in 1876 in honor of Gardner Randolph; telephones; 
is on the Union Pacific railway. 
ENTERPRISE, nonpartisian; Eldon C. Newby, editor and publisher. 

Weekly. June 20, 1888 + 27 vols. 

This is a continuation of the Randolph Echo, founded 1882 by P. B. Lewis; moved to Leonard- 
ville and continued as the Leonardville Echo, with same editor and publisher; again moved to 
Randolph in 1886 by Mr. Lewis, and in 1888 sold to T. B. and Chas. S. Lewis, who changed the 
name to the Randolph Enterprise. Randolph Leader, founded 1889 by Atkins and Hudson; con- 
solidated with the Enterprise in 1890. The Spirit of the Valley, Randolph, founded 1898 by 
Albert Havermale; consolidated same year with the Enterprise, Isaac Moon, editor and publisher 



276 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



RILEY Population (1915), 326; elevation, 1279 feet; established, 1871; first known as Union; 

name changed to Riley Center in the late '70's; telephones; is on the Rock Island railway. 
REGENT, independent; Bert Dunlap, editor and publisher, Riley. 
Weekly. July 5, 1889 -f 25 vols. 

Founded 1889 by Charles A. Southwick. 



DISCONTINUED. 



Vols. 



Manhattan . . . .Alumnus (m). Sept., 1907 1910 3 

Beacon. Mar. 21, 18721875 3 

College Hill Hustler. Nov. 7, 19031905 1 

Enterprise (1st). May 24, 18761882 6 

Enterprise (2d). May 2 Dec. 24, 1907 1 

Express. Aug. 20, 18591862 3 

Homestead (occas). Mar., 18691902 8 

Independent. Aug. 10, 1863 Feb., 1865; Sept., 18661868 3 

Jayhawker (s-qr). Aug. 1, 19021907 5 

Journal of Mycology (m). Jan., 18851888 4 

Kansas Agricultural Review (m). Nov., 19061907 1 

Kansas Radical. July 14, 18661868 2 

Kansas Telephone (m). June, 18801894 4 

Literary Review (m). Jan.-Dec., 1872 1 

Manhattan District Methodist (m). Jan.-Dec., 1890 1 

Mercury. May 9, 18841909 25 

Our Messenger (m). 19131914. [See Shawnee county.] 

Our Reminder (m). June-Nov., 1898 1 

Poultry Culture (m). 1907. [See Shawnee county.] 

Republic (d). July 8, 18871891 8 

Republic, Evening (d). Jan. 4, 19041905 4 

Riley County Educator (m). Feb., 18931901 8 

Saturday Signal. Dec. 22, 18881891 3 

Standard. Sept. 19, 18681870 2 

Bala City Advance. May 24, 18901891 1 

Leonardville Echo (1st). Apr. 17 Dec. 25, 1885 1 

Echo (2d). Dec. 26, 19121913 1 

Randolph Echo. Nov. 22, 18801883 4 

[See, also, Leonardville.] 

Spirit of the Valley. Mar. 26 Aug. 13, 1896 1 

Riley Independent. Sept. 11, 18791883 4 

Times. Nov. 11, 18871889 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Manhattan.. . .Argus (m). Oct., 1887 1888. 
Courier. Vol. 3, No. 3. 
Enterprise [broken file]. May 24, 1876 Mar., 1880. 



Golden Cresset (m). Feb., 1882 Apr., 1885. 
Hygiene Miscellany and Medical News 



News (m). June, 1877 Jan., 1878. 

Independent. Apr. 6, 13, 1882. 

Kansas Presbyter (m). Sept., 1889 Sept., 1890. 

Land Register. Jan., 1870. 

Manhattan District News (m). Aug.-Oct., 1889. 

Methodist (m). Oct.-Dec., 1886. 

Midget. June 28 Oct. 4, 1890. 

National News. Feb. 16 July 30, 1881. 

Nationalist (d). Sept. 29, 1880. 

Nationalist (tri-w). Nov. 2-7, 1893. 

News. Jan. 15 May 1, 1876. 

Signal (m). Apr., 1886. 

Mayday News Gleaner. Dec., 1879 Nov. 26, 1880. 

Randolph Leader. Oct. 10, 1889 Jan. 2, 1890. 

Riley Kansas Real Estate Journal. Jan. 15, 1892. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Manhattan Golden Cresset (m). Mar., 1884, and Mar., 1885. 

High School Monitor (m). Nov., 1873 Mar., 1874. 

Kansas Land Register (m). June, 1870; Apr. July, Sept., 1874. 

Mercury (d). Mar. 2-8, 1897. 

Prohibition Lance. Aug. 3, Nov. 30, 1894. 

Riley County Democrat. Aug. 26, 1909. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 277 



ROOKS COUNTY. 

Organized, 1872; named for John C. Rooks, member of company I, 
Eleventh Kansas cavalry; county seat, Stockton; area, 900 square miles, 
576,000 acres; population (1915), 10,596; assessed valuation (1915), $20,163,- 
239; resources and industries building stone, gypsum, potter's clay, agri- 
culture, and stock raising. 

STOCKTON Population (1915), 1291; elevation, 1775 feet; established, 1872; originally called 
Stocktown by first settlers, who were cattle dealers; later the name was shortened to Stockton; 
industries elevators, flour mill, marble works, machine shops; telephones, waterworks, public 
library, municipal electric light plant; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

REVIEW, Republican; N. F. Hill, editor and publisher, Stockton. 

Weekly. Mar. 4, 1909 -f 7 vols. 
This is a continuation of the Weekly Echo, Woodston, founded 1903, J. W. Shorthill, editor 

and publisher; in 1907 name changed to You All's Doin's, Merton L. Smith, editor and publisher; 

in 1909 moved to Stockton, and name changed to Stockton Review, with W. R. Baker, editor and 

publisher. 

ROOKS COUNTY RECORD, Republican; W. L. Chambers, editor and publisher, Stockton. 

Weekly. Dec. 6, 1879 + 36 vols. 

Founded 1879 as the Stockton Record, by W. L. Chambers and T. C. McBreen; name changed 
in 1880 to Rooks County Record, same editors and publishers. 

THE ROOKS COUNTY SCHOOL MONTHLY, educational; J. W. Smith, editor and publisher, Stockton. 

Monthly. Oct., 1908 + 7 vols. 
Founded 1908 by C. E. Rarick. 

PALCO Population (1915), 268; elevation, 2282 feet; established, 1 887; originally called Cresson; 

name changed to Palco about 1888; industries elevators, flour mill, machine shop, cement 

plant; telephones; is on the Union Pacific railway. 
NEWS, independent; Lulu B. Ross, editor and publisher, Palco. 
Weekly. Mar. 11, 1915 + 1 vol. 

Founded 1905 as the Palco Enterprise, by E. G. and C. A. G. Inlow; name changed in 1915 to 
the Palco News, with Lulu B. Ross, editor and publisher. 

PLAINVILLE Population (1915), 1008; elevation, 2156 feet; established, 1877; named on ac- 
count of its location; industries elevators, mill; municipal water system, public library, tele- 
phones, electric lights; is on the Union Pacific railway. 

TIMES, independent; Will A. Hill, editor and publisher, Plain ville. 
Weekly. Jan. 19, 1905 + 11 vols. 

Founded 1904 by Fisk & Merrill. Plainville Gazette, founded 1898 by W. A. Hill, consoli- 
dated with the Times in 1913. 

WOODSTON Population (1915), 367; elevation, 1711 feet; established Oct. 21, 1885; industries- 
elevator, mill, machine shop; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

ARGUS, independent; Fred M. Learned, editor and publisher, Woodston. 

Weekly. Apr. 22, 1909 + 7 vols. 
Founded 1909, with Fred M. Learned, editor, and Green & Learned, publishers. 

DISCONTINUED. Vol8 

Stockton Academician (q and m). May, 18881896 . . 

Alliance Signal. Jan. 1, 18911899 8 

Democrat. Oct. 23, 1885 1886 1 

News; Western News. Apr. 20, 1876 1909. . . 32 
[Published at Plainville, May, 1881, to Apr., 1882.1 

Post. Mar. 23 Oct. 26, 1905 1 

Rooks County Democrat [broken file]. Sept. 30, 1886 1889 3 

Palco Enterprise. Mar. 16, 19051915 10 

Plainville Echo. Apr. 4, 18841886 . . 

Gazette. July 1, 18981913 .15 

Press. Feb. 28 Dec. 23, 1885 1 

Rooks County Journal. Plainville and Stockton. Feb. 14, 18951902 ... 8 

Times (1st). Feb. 4, 18861894 .9 



278 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DISCONTINUED. y ole 

Webster Eagle; Stockton Eagle. Sept. 4, 18851888 3 

Enterprise. Mar. 8 Nov. 15, 1888 1 

Merchant's Journal. Nov. 21, 1894 1895 1 

Woodston Echo; You All's Doin's. May 28, 19031909 6 

Saw; Register. Nov. 5, 18861889 3 

Star. Oct. 20, 19011903 2 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Stockton Christian Call. May 1 -Dec., 1892. 

Clipper. Aug. 20 Dec. 17, 1890. 

Observer. Sept. 2 Nov. 4, 1890. 

Rooks County Teacher (m). Oct. 15, 1892 June, 1893. 
Cresson Dispatch. Dec. 8, 1887. 



RUSH COUNTY. 

Organized, 1874; named for Capt. Alexander Rush, company H, Second 
Kansas, colored; county seat, La Crosse; area, 720 square miles, 460,800 
acres; population (1915), 8065; assessed valuation (1915), $17,539,421; re- 
sources and industries wheat, grazing, and stock raising. 

LA CROSSE Population (1915), 767; elevation, 2061 feet; established, 1876; industries flour 

mill, elevators, foundry, machine shops; telephones, electric lights; is on the Missouri Pacific 

railway. 
CHIEFTAIN, Democratic; Willis W. Wade, editor and manager, Rodney Torrey, publisher, La 

Crosse. 

Weekly. Jan. 18 Mar. 22, 1881; Sept. 26, 1882 Jan., 1891; July, 1892 + 32 vols. 

Founded 1881; early history unknown. 

REPUBLICAN, Republican; A. W. and L. L. Robinson, editors and publishers, La Crosse. 
Weekly. Feb. 5, 1897 + 19 vols. 

Founded 1897 by A. C. Whiteman. 

BISON Population (1915), 285; elevation, 2012 feet; established about 1888; industries ele- 
vator, mill, cement works; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

BEE, independent; I. R. Timken, editor and publisher, Bison. 

Weekly. Aug. 22, 1902 + 13 vols. 
Founded 1902, with Ed. Stullken, editor and publisher. 

McCRACKEN Population (1915), 371; elevation, 2139 feet; established, 1886; named for J. K. 

McCracken; industries elevators, mills, creameries; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific 

railway. 

ENIEEPEISE, Republican; Clarence P. Dutton, editor and publisher, McCracken. 
Weekly. Aug. 7, 1896 + 19 vols. 

This is a continuation of the McCracken Enterprise (1st), founded 1887 by the Enterprise 
Publishing Company; suspended 1894, at which time F. R. Newton was editor and publisher. 
The McCracken Enterprise (2d), founded in 1896 by D. M. Snodgrass; in 1902 absorbed by the 
McCracken Republican, founded 1900 by Clarence P. Dutton; continued as the Republican- 
Enterprise, with Clarence P. Dutton, editor and publisher; in 1904 Mr. Dutton again changed 
the name to the McCracken Enterprise. 

OTIS Population (1915), 328; elevation, 2037 feet; established about 1886 ^telephones; is on the 

Missouri Pacific railway. 
REPORTER, independent; J. J. Rothe, editor and publisher, Otis. 

Weekly. May 31, 1912 + 4 vols. 
Founded 1912 by C. W. Chaddock. 

RUSH CENTER Population (1915), 178; elevation, 2004 feet; established, 1874; formerly called 
Walnut City; industries mill, elevators; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
E, Republican; E. A. Kirch, editor and publisher, Rush Center. 

Weekly. May 23, 1902 + 13 vols. 
Founded 1902 by Fred C 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 279 



DISCONTINUED. 

La Crosse . . . Clarion. July 19, 18891897 . . ,9 

Democrat. Jan. 6, 18871891 2 

Kansas Rundschau [German]. Sept. 17, 1897 1898 1 

Pythian Sisters' News. 18921893. [See Barton county.] 

Western Economist. Jan. 29, 18911894 4 

McCracken Enterprise (1st). Mar. 18, 18871894. . . 8 

Republican. Oct. 19, 19001902 2 

Rush County Leader. May 18 Nov. 4, 1895 1 

Rush Center Rush County News. May 17, 1888 1891 .3 

Walnut Valley Standard. Dec. 13, 1876; Jan. 13, 18931901 9 

Walnut City Blade. July 19, 18781880 2 

Democrat. Aug. 20, 1886 1888 2 

[First called Rush County Democrat.] 

Gazette. Feb. 10, 18861887 2 

Herald. May 18, 18831886 . . .3 
News (d). June 20, 18871888 2 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

La Crosse. . . .Eagle. May 13 Dec. 26, 1878. 

Progress. Nov. 9, 1877 Mar. 25, 1878. 
Ruch Center Rush County Progress. Rush Center and La Crosse. June 22 Nov. 2, 1877. 

Walnut Valley Standard (1st). Dec. 24, 1874. 



RUSSELL COUNTY. 

, Organized, 1872; named for Avra P. Russell, Captain company K, 
Second Kansas cavalry; county seat, Russell; area, 900 square miles, 576,000 
acres; population (1915), 11,047; assessed valuation (1915), $26,377,444; 
resources and industries building stone, coal, potter's clay, salt springs, 
agriculture, and stock raising. 

RUSSELL Population (1915), 1601; elevation, 1828 feet; established, 1871; first called Fossil 
Station; name changed to Russell for Capt. A. P. Russell; industries elevators, flour mill, 
stone quarries, creamery; municipal electric light and water systems, telephones; public library; 
is on the Union Pacific railway. 
RECORD, Republican; Norton A. Turner, editor and publisher, Russell. 

Weekly. July 8, 1875; July 13, 1876 + 39 vols. 

The Record was founded with material from the office of the New Republic, which was es- 
tablished at Bunker Hill in 1872 by John R. Rankin, and which suspended publication in 1874, 
when the material passed into the hands of Dollison Bros, who moved it to Russell and on Nov. 19, 
began the publication of the Russell County Record. After nearly a year's existence it was sus- 
pended for a short time, resuming publication in November, 1875. Russell Independent, founded 
in 1879 by W. P. Tomlinson and H. C. Brown; absorbed in 1881 by the Record. Western Live 
Stock Journal, Russell, founded 1884 by C. W. Stowe and E. L. S. Bouton; name changed in 1887 
to the Russell Journal, E. L. S. Bouton, editor and publisher. Russell Review, founded 1886 by 
J. H. and H. Franklin; consolidated 1887 with the Rush County Democrat, Walnut City, founded 
in 1886, with E. F. Mullay, editor; continued as the Russell Democratic-Review, H. Franklin, 
manager, and Smith & Banks, publishers; consolidated in 1888 with the Russell Journal; sold to 
Russell Record in 1898. 

REFORMER, Democratic; Arch L. Taylor, editor and publisher, Russell. 

Weekly. Jan. 8, 1897 + 19 vols. 
Founded 1897 by F. J. Smith. 

BUNKER HILL Population (1915), 235; elevation, 1861 feet; established, 1871; industries- 
elevator, mill, machine shop; telephones, municipal water system; is on the Union Pacific 
railway. 

ADVERTISER, independent; Homer U. Brookhart, editor and publisher, Bunker Hill. 

Weekly. Apr. 25, 1912 + 4 vols. 
Founded 1912 by H. U. Brookhart. 

DORRANCE Population (1915), 238; elevation, 1729 feet; established about 1876; industries 
mills, elevators; electric lights, telephones; is on the Union Pacific railway. 

STAR, independent; W. H. Holmes, editor and publisher, Dorrance. 

Weekly. Oct. 9, 1913 + 2 vols. 
Founded 1913 by B. J. Barrett. 



280 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



LUCAS Population (1915), 658; elevation, 1493 feet; established, 1877; originally called Blue 
Stem; name changed to Lucas in 1887; named for Lucas Place, St. Louis, Mo.; industries 
elevators, mills; municipal electric light and water systems, telephones; is on the Union Pacific 
railway. 

INDEPENDENT, independent; O. L. Walmer, editor and publisher, Lucas. 

Weekly. Nov. 12, 1908 + 7 vols. 
Founded 1908 by Barr & Deeble. 

LURAY Population (1915), 469; elevation, 1576 feet; established in the 70's; first called Lura; 

name changed to Luray in 1887; industries elevators, mill; telephones; is on the Union Pacific 

railway. 

HERALD, Republican; S. Belveal, editor and publisher, Luray. 
Weekly. Feb. 27, 1902 + 14 vols. 

Founded 1902 by Burlin & Foltz. 

WALDO Population (1915), 260; elevation, 1720 feet; established, 1888; telephones; is on the 

Union Pacific railway. 

ADVOCATE, independent; H. P. Tripp, editor, H. B. Brown, publisher, Waldo. 
Weekly. Dec. 22, 1910 + 5 vols. 

Founded 1910 by L. E. Blagrave. 

DISCONTINUED. y^ 

Russell Advance. Mar. 8 Oct. 5, 1878 1 

Bugle (m). Oct., 19071912 5 

Hawkeye. Mar. 23, 18821883 1 

Independent. Feb. 8, 18791881 3 

Live Stock Journal; Russell Journal. Dec. 10, 18841898 13 

Recorder [German]. Sept. 1, 19051908 3 

Review; Democratic Review. Aug. 14, 1886 1888 2 

Russell County School Signal (m). Jan., 18891892 3 

West Kansas Bote [German]. July 21, 18981899 1 

Bunker Hill Advertiser (1st). Apr. 16, 18801881 ... 2 

Banner (1st). Jan. 6 Dec. 29, 1882 ' 1 

Banner (2d). May 29, 18841885 1 

Banner (3d). Mar. 30, 19111912 1 

Gazette. Mar. 15, 1888 1889 1 

News. Nov. 26, 18861888 1 

Dorrance. . . . . News. Aug. 3, 19111913 ... 2 

Nugget. Oct. 28, 18861889 2 

Lucas Advance. June 29, 18881897 9 

Journal. Aug. 24, 19061907 1 

Sentinel. Apr. 5, 19011909 8 

Luray Headlight. Aug. 25, 18871890 3 

Star. Jan. 19 June 8, 1893 , . , 1 

Waldo Enterprise. July 21, 18881890 '. 1 

[Not published July, 1889 Apr., 1890.] 

Shadows; New Era. May 19, 1905 1909 4 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Russell Gazette. Mar. 14 June 13, 1889. 

Kansas Plainsman. July 8, 1876. 



ST. JOHN COUNTY. 

(See Logan county.) 

Ennis Courier. 18861887. 

Western Kansas Advocate (m). [See Logan County Short-lived, vol. 1.] 

Gopher The Scout. Gopher and Winona. 1886 1889. 

Oakley Opinion. 18851887. 

St. John County Times. 18861888. [See Logan County Times.] 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 281 



SALINE COUNTY. 

Organized, 1859; named for the Saline river; county seat, Salina; area, 720 
square miles, 460,800 acres; population (1915), 20,665; assessed valuation 
(1915), $45,867,688; resources and industries building stone, gypsum, fire 
and potter's clay, salt springs, agriculture, and stock raising. 

SALINA Population (1915), 10,488; elevation, 1223 feet; established, 1859; named for the Saline 
river; industries elevators, flour and alfalfa mills, carriage and wagon factory, brick plant, 
glove factory, oil refinery, creamery, foundries, machine shops, implement works, broom and 
mattress factories; telephones, electric lights, waterworks, street railway, public library; is 
on the Santa Fe, the Rock Island, the Missouri Pacific and the Union Pacific railways. 

DISTRICT OF SAUNA WATCHMAN, religious; official paper of the Bishop of Salina; the Ven. Thomas 
A. Sparks, editor, Right Rev. S. M. Griswold, publisher, Salina. 

Monthly. Nov., 1907J+ 8 vols. 
Early history unknown; first issue in Society's file is vol. 4, No. 8, Rev. Wm. N. Colton, editor . 

FARMERS' UNION, official organ of the Farmers' Educational and Cooperative Union of Kansas; 
M. McAuliffe, editor andjpublisher, Salina. 

Weekly. Apr. 3, 1908 + 7 vols. 
Founded in 1908, M. McAuliffe, editor and publisher. 

HABIT, school; edited and published by students of Salina high school, Salina. 

Monthly. Oct., 1914 + 2 vols. 
Early history unknown; first copy in Society's file is vol. 5, No. 1, George Bailey, editor in 

JOURNAL, Republican; J. L. Bristow, editor and publisher, Salina. 

Semiweekly. Apr. 6, 1876 -f 29 vols. 

Daily [evening]. Mar. 1, 1887 + 38 vols. [Not published 1888 to 1903.] 
This is a continuation of the following: Saline County Journal, Salina, founded 1871 by W. 
H. Johnson. Salina Daily Journal, founded 1887 by M. D. Sampson, suspended in 1888. Salina 
Independent, founded 1882 by W. H. Johnson; name changed in 1885 to the Salina Republican, 
with W. H. Johnson and H. D. Baker, editors and publishers. Salina Daily Republican, founded 
1888 by J. Leeford Brady. In 1893 the Republican purchased the Saline County Journal, and con- 
tinued as the Salina Republican-Journal, daily and weekly; in 1902 the weekly became the Salina 
Semi-weekly Journal, and the daily the Salina Evening Journal, with B. W. Hanna, editor and 
publisher. 

SUN, Republican; W. H. Johnson, editor and publisher, Salina. 

Weekly. Oct. 14, 1885 + 30 vols. 

Founded 1885 as the Rising Sun, by the Salina Prohibition Club; sold in 1889 to W. H. John- 
son, and name changed to the Salina Sun. 

UNION, Democratic; W. C. Lansdon, editor and manager, J. R. Burton, president, Central Kansas 
Publishing Company, publishers, Salina. 

Weekly. Sept. 26, 1890 + 25 vols. 

Daily (evening). June 13, 1898 + 50 vols. 

Founded 1890 as a weekly by A. C. Pattee and Frank Honeywell; daily founded 1898 by 
H. N. Gaines. 

WESLEYAN ADVANCE, edited and published by the students of. Kansas Wesleyan University, Dean 
Swift, managing editor, Salina. 

Monthly. Feb., 1892 + 21 vols. 
Early history unknown; first issue in Society's file being vol. 3, No. 3, O. E. Collins, editor. 

BROOKVTLLE Population (1915), 261; elevation, 1358 feet; established. 1870; telephones; is 

on the Union Pacific railway. 

HEADLIGHT, local; Henry C. Paulsen, editor and publisher, Brookville. 
Weekly. Sept. 26, 1902 -f- 13 vol* 

Founded 1901; early history unknown, first issue in Society's file is vol. 2, No. 7, J. W. Titus, 
editor and publisher. 

GYPSUM Population (1915), 638; elevation, 1225 feet; established in the late 70 's; named for 
Gypsum creek, on which the town is situated; industries creamery, flour mill; telephones; 
is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 



282 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



ADVOCATE, independent; J. S. Goodwin, editor and publisher, Gypsum. 

Weekly. July 16, 1886 + 29 vols. 

This is a continuation of the Gypsum Valley Echo, Gypsum City, founded 1886 by J. Wayne 
Amos, editor, and J. S. Hall & Co., publishers; succeeded 1890 by the Gypsum Advocate, with 
J. Wayne Amos, editor and publisher. 

DISCONTINUED. 

Salina Agora (q). July, 1891 1892. [See Shawnee county.] Vols - 

Democrat. Oct. 31, 18781879 1 

Farmers' Advocate. Mar. 24, 18761879 4 

[Called Salina News, Dec. 19, 26, 1879.] 

Forward (m). June, 18941895 1 

Gazette (d). Jan. 9 June 23, 1889 1 

Herald. Dec. 18, 1869; Jan. 1, 1870; Feb. 5, 1876 1909. . . 34 

Herald (d). Mar. 7, 18871888 3 

Independent. Oct. 21, 18821885 3 

Irrigation Farmer (m). Feb., 18941895 1 

News, Evening (d). Aug. 19, 18891891 5 

News. May 1 Dec. 25, 1891 1 

Normal Educator (m). Mar., 18991904 5 

Normal Register (q and m). June, 18841893 3 

Occidental Home Monthly [broken file]. May, 18971909 7 

Open Church (m). Nov., 18931896 2 

Record, Evening (d). June 24 Nov. 13, 1897 1 

Register and Calendar (q) [broken file]. 19041911 6 

Republican; Republican-Journal. Nov. 28, 18851903 17 

Republican; Republican-Journal (d). Dec., 18 1888 1903 28 

Sentinel and Kansas Churchman (m). [See Shawnee county.] 

Svenska Herolden [Swedish]. Dec. 13, 18781881 3 

Tidings. Jan. 5, 18901893 4 

Vade Mecum (m). Sept., 18871891 4 

Wesleyan Advocate; Kansas Wesleyan Lance (m). May, 1888 1889... 3 
Western Odd Fellow (m). 1888 1891. [See Shawnee county.] 

Woman's Mission Star. Nov. 15, 1889 1890 1 

Assaria Argus. Feb. 4, 18871890 3 

Brookville Earth. Dec. 26, 18901898 7 

Independent. Mar. 31 Nov. 18, 1880 1 

Times. Mar. 26, 18871888 .- 1 

Transcript. Nov. 25, 18801890 

Chico Advertiser. Apr. 17, 18861887 1 

Gypsum Banner. May 7, 18861887 1 

Chronicle (amateur sheet, hand printed). Aug. 23, 1900 1902 3 

News. Aug. 27, 18961898 1 

New Cambria Times. Feb. 12 Sept. 24, 1914 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Salina. . . . .Baptist Times. July 26, 1892 Mar. 24, 1893. 

Journal (d). Sept. 13-18, 1892. 
Kansas Central Advocate. Dec., 1873, Feb., 1874. 
Kansas Land Journal. Apr., 1874; Mar., Aug., 1877; Feb., 1878. 
M. E. Conference Daily. Mar. 12-18, 1878. 
News. Dec. 19, 1879 Oct. 2, 1880. 
News, Morning (d). July 4-31, 1878. 
Record. Aug. 11-25, 1880. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Salina Enterprise. Nov. 14, 1908 Feb. 4, 1909. 

Evangelistic War Cry. Kackley and Salina. Oct. 3; Nov. 30, 1893 
May 3, 1894. 

Kansas Central Land Journal (m). July, 1875; Jan., 1876. 

New Idea. April, 1902. 

Rustler. Aug. 29, 1891; Feb. 16, Apr. 13, 1895. 

Western Reformer (m). Mar., July, 1880. 
Assaria Enterprise. Mar. 15-28, 1906. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 283 



SCOTT COUNTY. 

Organized, 1886; named in honor of Gen. Winfield Scott; county seat, 
Scott City; area, 720 square miles, 460,800 acres; population (1915), 2288; 
assessed valuation (1915), $5,582,231; resources and industries building 
stone, gypsum, cement rock, wheat, and grazing. 

SCOTT CITY Population (1915), 772; elevation, 2958 feet; established, 1885; named for Gen. 

Winfield Scott; industries elevators, flour mills; telephones; is on the Santa Fe, the Missouri 

Pacific and the Colorado, Kansas & Oklahoma railways. 

NEWS-CHRONICLE, Democratic; E. H. Epperson & Son, editors and publishers, Scott City. 
Weekly. Mar. 31, 1886 -f 30 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: Scott County Herald, moved to Scott City in 
1886 (?); early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being dated April 22, 1886, vol. 8, 
No. 25, F. A. Capps, editor, Mrs. S. W. Case, corresponding editor, and S. W. Case, publisher; 
consolidated 1888 with the Scott Sentinel, Scott City, founded 1886, M. J. Keyes, editor and 
publisher; continued as the Sentinel-Herald, with D. F. Hall, editor, and J. M. Beadles, managing 
editor; in 1891 name changed to Scott County Lever, J. C. Starr, editor and publisher; consoli- 
dated in 1892 with Scott County News, Scott City, founded 1886, J. C. Starr, editor, and F. L. 
Crampton, manager; continued as the Scott County News-Lever, with J. C. Starr, editor and 
publisher; name shortened in 1903 to Scott County News, Mr. Starr, editor and publisher; con- 
solidated in 1909 with Scott County Chronicle, founded 1900 at Grigsby, as the Chronicle, with 
W. E. Baxter, editor and publisher; moved to Scott City in 1902 and name changed to the Scott 
County Chronicle, Elmer H. Epperson, editor and publisher. 

REPUBLICAN, Republican; Miss Ella J. Starr, editor and publisher, Scott City. 

Weekly. Feb. 16, 1911 + 5 vols. 

Founded 1909; first issue in Society's file is vol. 2, No. 52, Morris & Van Kirk, editors and 
publishers. 

DISCONTINUED. V ols. 

Scott City Common School (m). Dec., 18971898 . . 1 

Coyote (m). Oct., 19101911 1 

Republican. Dec. 22, 18931896 3 

Scott County Herald. Apr. 22, 18861888 3 

Scott County Lever. Feb. 19, 1891 1892 2 

Sentinel. Sept. 1, 18861888 2 

Sentinel-Herald. Jan. 3, 18891891 2 

Western Times. 1886. [See Wallace county.] 

Grigsby Chronicle. Apr. 20, 19001902 2 

Scorcher. Nov. 26, 18861887 1 

Pence Phonograph. Oct. 15, 18871889 2 



SEDGWICK COUNTY. 

Organized, 1870; named for Maj. Gen. John Sedgwick; county seat, 
Wichita; area, 1008 square miles, 645,120 acres; population (1915), 73,294; 
assessed valuation (1915), $117,724,736; resources and industries agricul- 
ture, stock raising, building stone, brick, and potter's clay. 

WICHITA Population (1915), 53,582; elevation, 1358 feet; established, 1868; named for the 
Wichita Indians; industries elevators, flour and alfalfa mills, brick plants, bridge shops* 
foundries, planing mills, cement and potters works, packing houses and numerous factories; 
electric lights, waterworks, telephones, natural gas, street railway; is on the Santa Fe, the; 
Rock Island, the Frisco, the Orient, the Missouri Pacific, and the Midland Valley railways. 
An interurban line, the Arkansas Valley, connects it with neighboring towns. 
BEACON, Progressive; Henry J. Allen, editor and publisher, Wichita. 

Daily. Sept. 1, 1884 -f- 96 vols. 

A continuation of the following: the Weekly Beacon, founded 1872; early history not known, 
first issue in Society's file gives Fred A. Sowers, editor and publisher. The Democrat, Wichita 
founded 1890 by F. B. Smith, consolidated same year with the Beacon; the weekly edition of the 
Beacon was discontinued Sept. 27, 1907. The Wichita Daily Beacon, founded 1884 by W. S. White 
and F. B. Smith; consolidated 1888 with the Evening News, and name changed to the Evening 
News-Beacon, with John S. Richardson, editor, and Frederick N. Peck, publisher; in 1890 the 

name was again changed to the Wichita Daily Beacon, Smith and John S. Richardson, editors 

and publishers. Wichita Evening News, founded in 1885, absorbed by the Beacon within a year 
or two. The Evening Journal, Wichita, founded 1890 by S. A. Harburg, merged with the Beacon 
same year. 



284 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



BROAD Ax [Negro]; W. G. Curtis, editor and publisher, Wichita. 

Weekly. [Not received by the Society.] 

BROOM CORN REVIEW, devoted to interests of the broom corn and broom manufacturing indus- 
tries; J. D. Bertolette, editor and publisher, Wichita. 

Weekly. Jan. 5, 1912 + 4 vols. 
Founded 1912 by the present publisher. 

CATHOLIC ADVANCE, religious; Rev. John W. Maher, D. D., editor, Advance Publishing Company, 
publisher, Wichita. 

Weekly. Mar. 20, 1902 + 14 vols. 

Founded in 1901; early history unknown; first issue in Society's file, vol. 2, No. 2, shows T 
Spencer Sprague, editor, Sprague & Foppe, publishers. 

CHRISTIAN WORKER, religious; D. F. Broadus, editor, Christian Worker Publishing Company, 
publisher, Wichita. 

Monthly. Feb. 11, 1915 + 1 vol. 
Founded 1915 by present publishers. 

DEMOCRAT, Democratic; Park S. Warren, editor, Democrat Publishing Company, publisher, 
Wichita. 

Weekly. Jan. 7, 1899 + 17 vols. 

This is a continuation of the Mirror, Wichita, founded 1888 by R. E. Ryan and E. L. Mac- 
Kenzie; name changed 1898 to the Blaze, and published by the Blaze Publishing Co.; name changed 
Jan. 7, 1899, to the Democrat, with John H. Shields, editor, and published by the Democrat Pub- 
lishing Co. West Wichita News, founded 1909 by E. V. Welch; consolidated 1913 with the Demo- 
crat. 

THE WICHITA EAGLE, Progressive; Victor Murdock, editor, Marcellus M. Murdock, publisher. 
Wichita. 

Weekly. Apr. 12, 1872, to Apr., 1873; Dec., 1873 + 43 vols. 
Daily. July 15, 1884 + 97 vols. 

Founded 1872 as the Wichita City Eagle, by Marshall M. Murdock. The Daily Eagle was 
founded in 1884 by M. M. and R. P. Murdock. 

HEROLD [German], independent; John Hoenscheidt, editor and publisher, Wichita. 

Weekly. May 7, 1885, to July 4, 1913; Sept. 11, 1914 + 30 vols. 

Founded 1885 by John Hoenscheidt; on Sept. 23, 1886, the paper took the volume and num- 
ber of the Kansas Staats Anzeiger, vol. 8, No. 6. 

THE HIGH SCHOOL MESSENGER, school; edited and published by students of Wichita high school, 
Wichita. 

Weekly. Sept. 29, 1911 + 4 vols. 

Early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being vol. 19, No. 1. 

MISSIONARY MESSENGER, religious; edited and published by The Missionary Press Company. 
Wichita. 

Monthly. Feb., 1910 + 6 vols. 

Early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being vol. 15, No. 4, Charles E. Bradt, 
editor. 

PRICE CURRENT, trade; W. H. Purdy, editor, Clarence I. Reed, publisher, Wichita. 
Weekly. Aug. 10, 1889, to Dec. 18, 1897; June 11, 1898 + 24 vols. 
Founded 1889 as the Wichita Price Current by Percy Longsland and E. H. Brown; suspended 
in January, 1890; resumed in June, 1891, with Percy Longsland, editor and publisher. 

REPUBLICAN, Republican; W. H. Webb, editor, Republican Publishing "Company, publishers. 
Wichita. 

Semi-weekly. Feb. 12, 1916 + 

Founded 1916. Not received by the Society since Feb. 23, 1916. 
SOUTHWEST FARMER, agricultural; edited and published by the Farmer Publishing Co., Wichita. 

Weekly. July 20, 1906 + 10 vols. 

Founded 1906 as the Agricultural Southwest, by the C. I. Reed Publishing Company; name 
changed 1912 to the Southwest Farmer, with same editor and publisher. 

STOCKMAN, official organ Wichita Live Stock Exchange; Edward S. Kennedy, editor, W. H. 

Purdy, owner. 

Daily.Wt July 11, 1910 + 11 vols. 

Founded 1907 as the Wichita Daily Live Stock Journal; early history unknown, first issue in 
Society's file being vol. 7, No. 19, published by the Journal Publishing Co. Name changed 
Oct. 1, 1914, to Wichita Daily Stockman. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 285 



SUNFLOWER, college; Lyle Day, editor, published by the students of Fair-mount College, Wichita. 

Monthly and Weekly. Jan., 1896 -f- 19 vols. 
Founded 1896, with W. H. Isley, editor. 

UNIVERSITY LIFE, college; Noble W. Cain, editor in chief, published by the students of Friends 
University, Wichita. 

Monthly and Weekly. Apr., 1899 + 17 vols. 
Founded 1899 by the students. 

ANDALE Population (1915), 296; elevation, 1440 feet; established in the early 80 's; named for 
Anderson and Dale, two early settlers; telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

GLOBE, local; Percy Torrey, editor and publisher, Andale. 

Weekly. Nov. 15, 1911 + 4 vols. 
Founded 1911 by Percy Torrey. 

CHENEY Population (1915), 662; elevation, 1388 feet; established, 1883; named for Benj. P. 

Cheney, of Boston; industries elevators, mills; telephones, electric lights; is on the Santa Fe 

railway. 

SENTINEL, Republican; Keith E. Cox, editor and publisher, Cheney. 
Weekly. Mar. 1, 1894 + 22 vols. 

Founded 1894 by J. A. Maxey. 

CLEARWATER Population (1915), 547; elevation, 1271 feet; established, 1872; named on ac- 
count' of the clearness of the stream on which it is situated; industries elevators, mills; nat- 
ural gas, electric lights, telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific and Santa Fe railways. 
COURANT, independent; Earl Leedy, editor and publisher, Clearwater. 

Weekly. July 2, 1908 -j- 7 vols. 

Founded 1902 as the Clearwater Echo, by U. S. Weaver; name changed 1908 to the Clear- 
water Courant, with O. A. Miles, editor and publisher. 

GARDEN PLAIN Population (1915), 288; elevation, 1448 feet; established, 1875; originally 
called Southwick Glen, name changed to Garden Plain in 1883; telephones; is on the Santa Fe 
railway. 

NEWS, local; Robert Wiske, editor and publisher, Garden Plain. 

Weekly. May 23, 1913 + 3 vols. 
Founded 1910 as the Goddard Gazette, by W. R. Shellenberger; moved to Garden Plain 

in 1913 and name changed to Garden Plain News, M. R. Anderson, editor and publisher. 

MAIZE Population (1915), 200; elevation, 1350 feet; established about 1886; telephones; is on 

the Missouri Pacific railway. 

REVIEW, local; C. S. Day, editor and. publisher, Maize. 
Weekly. Sept. 17, 1915 + 

Founded 1915 by present publisher. 

MOUNT HOPE Population (1915), 516; elevation, 1420 feet; established, 1874; telephones; 

is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

CLARION, independent; Ben O. Woolman, editor and publisher, Mount Hope. 
Semiweekly. Nov. 13, 1903 + 12 vols. 

Founded 1885; early history unknown; first issue in Society's file, vol. 1, No. 25, gives Hull & 
Anderson, editors and publishers; suspended July 22, 1892, and resumed publication Dec. 9, 1892, 
with Lester L. Brown, editor, Brown & Son, publishers; name changed in 1903 to the Mount Hope 
Weekly Clarion, with S. C. Timmons, editor, and Fred F. Williams, business manager. 

VALLEY CENTER Population (1915), 356; elevation, 1348 feet; established, 1871; industries- 
feed and alfalfa mill, elevator; telephones; is on the Frisco railway and the Arkansas Valley 
Interurban. 

INDEX, independent; W. H. Woodhouse, editor and publisher, Valley Center. 

Weekly. Jan. 15, 1897, to Sept. 23, 1910; Oct. 20, 1911 + 18 vols. 
Founded 1896 by H. C. Houston. 



286 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DISCONTINUED. Vo j 8> 

Wichita . . . .American. Dec. 27, 19121913 1 

American Horticulturist (m). July, 1895 1896 1 

Arkansas Valley Farmer. Jan. 9 Dec. 23, 1910 1 

Arrow. July 4, 18851893 8 

Beacon. Feb. 11, July 29, 18741907 33 

Boys' World. Jan. 1 May 28, 1898 . 1 

Call (d). Feb. 12 Sept. 2, 1887 1 

Central Friend (m). Oct., 19111913 1 

Christian Companion. Jan. 6, 1910 Jan. 7, 1915 6 

Chronicle, Wichita and Mount Hope. 19031907; 19091910. 

[See Reno county.] 
Church and Library (occasional). 18951896. 

[See Greenwood county.] 
Citizen; Labor Union; Union Labor Press; Independent. 

June 24, 18861888 2 

Colored Citizen. Feb. 21, 19031904 1 

Commercial. Dec. 24, 18871889 1 

Democrat (1st). Jan. 23 Sept. 18, 1890 1 

Globe (d). 1887 1 

Globe. Feb. 17 Oct. 29, 1887 1 

Herald. Dec. 22, 18771879 2 

Independent. Nov. 17, 18881889 1 

Jerry Simpson's Bayonet. May 8, 18991900 2 

Jibber Jab (m). Mar.-Dec., 1894 1 

Journal (d). Feb. 16, 18871890 8 

Journal. May 23, 18881890 3 

Kansas Commoner. Jan. 1, 18911913 22 

Kansas Freemason (m). St. John and Wichita. June, 1894 1899 5 

Kansas Globe. Nov. 21, 18871888 1 

Kansas Grit. Aug. 24, 18951896 1 

Kansas Magazine (m). Jan., 1909 1912 6 

Kansas Presbyterian (m). Jan., 19001901 1 

Kansas Staats-Anzeiger [German], Jan. 7, 1886 1895 9 

Kansas Star; Kansas Farmers Star. Nov. 23, 18901909 19 

Kansas Union Journal. Nov. 2, 1907 1909 , 1 

Kellogg 's Wichita Record. Jan. 7, 18931904 11 

Labor Gazette. June 6, 19131914 1 

Leader (d). Sept. 29, 18811882 1 

Leader. Feb. 16, 18821883 1 

Leader [prohibition paper]. 1888. [See Shawnee county]. 

Leader (m). Sept., 18901896 6 

Live Stock Inspector; Farmers Star and Live Stock Inspector; 

Interstate Farmer. Sept. 3, 19091912 3 

Mirror; The Blaze. Sept. 2, 18881899 10 

Nation. Sept. 3, 18861887 1 

National Baptist World. Aug. 31 Nov. 23, 1894 1 

National Leader. Jan. 31 Aug. 2, 1902 1 

National Monitor. May 3, 18791880 1 

National Reflector (1st). Dec. 21, 18951898 2 

National Reflector (2d). July 13, 19121913 1 

New Republic. Feb. 24, 18831892 8 

Newspaper Union and Record. Aug. 9, 18901892 2 

Observer. Dec. 13, 19021903 1 

Oklahoma War Chief. 1883. [See Sumner county.] 

Opinion. June 23, 1889 Sept., 1890; Dec., 18911893 3 

Our Church Mirror (m). 1894. [See Elk county.] 

Our Messenger (m). 19081909. [See Osborne county.] 

People's Friend. May 24 Sept. 28, 1894 1 

Picket (s-m). Feb., 18961898 2 

Poultry World (m). Mar.-Dec., 1903 1 

Primitive Christian; Primitive Christianity. July 19, 19041909 6 

Printer (m). Nov., 18991902 1 

Railroad Bulletin. Mar. 22, 19051906 2 

Register. May 15, 18971906 10 

Republican (d). Mar. 18, 18801881 2 

Republican. Mar. 20, 18801881 1 

Resident, Evening (d). Apr. 12 Dec. 27, 1886 1 

Searchlight. June 2, 19001912 12 

Social Ethics. Jan. 6, 19041905 1 

Southwestern Farmer; American Horticulturist (m). 

Sept. 11, 18961900 5 

Southwestern Grain and Flour Journal (m). Aug., 1905 1915 10 

Star (d). June 16, 18971898 2 

Stern des Westens [German]. Feb. 21 Aug. 15, 1879 1 

Sunday Growler. Dec. 5, 18861888 2 

Sunflower Poultry Journal (m). May, 19001901 1 

Times (d). June 27, 18811884 6 

Times. May 19, 18831884 1 

Times; Live Stock Journal. Apr. 14, 18941901 8 

Tontie (m). Oct., 1898 1902 . 4 

Tribune. Mar. 15 Nov. 16, 1871 1 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 287 



DISCONTINUED. 

Wichita. . . . . .Tribune. July 23, 18981899 

Union Advocate. Mar. 9 June 1, 1895 

Vidette. Aug. 25, 18701871 

Welch's Weekly. Feb. 10 Sept. 8, 1911 

Western Evangelist and Church Builder. May 5, 18871889 . . . 

Western Methodist. Nov. 1, 18891898 9 

Western Newspaper Union. Jan. 5, 1895 1910 15 

West Wichita News. Apr. 24, 19091913 ...-. 5 

Bentley News. May 25, 19001910 10 

Cheney Blade. Jan. 20, 1888 1890 '..... 3 

Herald. Cheney and Wichita. Aug. 6, 18911894 

Journal. Mar. 1, 18841886 3 

Clearwater Echo (1st). June 17, 18921893 . . 

Echo (2d). May 15, 1902 1908.... ' 6 

Leader. Apr. 30, 18861887 1 

Sun. June 30, 18881890 2 

Colwich Courier. June 16, 18871892 6 

Sedgwick County Reporter. Jan. 13 June 23, 1893 1 

Derby Dispatch. Oct. 26, 18891890 1 

Garden Plain . . . . Herald. Dec. 29, 18871888 

News. Sept. 30, 19051906 \\\\ \ 

Goddard . . ... Gazette. July 14, 19101913 . . . 

Paper. Dec. 7, 19051906 

Reporter. Aug. 1, 1889 1890 1 

Maize Critic. Sept. 8, 18941896 2 

Mount Hope Mentor. Sept. 11, 1885 1903 16 

[Not published July-Dec., 1892.] 

Valley Center News. Aug. 15, 18851890 5 

Viola News. Apr. 2 Dec. 10, 1904 ! 

SHORT-LIVED, DAILIES VOL. 1. 

Wichita Commoner. July 23-30, 1892. 

Democrat. Sept. 21 Oct. 3, 1887. 

News, Evening. Nov. 26, 1885 Feb. 24, 1886. 

Noon Tribune. May 4, 1881. 

SHORT-LIVED, DAILIES VOL. 2. 

Wichita Drovers News. Sept. 9-30, 1894. 

SHORT-LIVED, WEEKLIES AND MONTHLIES VOL. 1. 

Wichita. . . .Arkansas Valley Sunshine. Sept. 17 Nov. 5, 1881. 

Breeze. Nov. 5, 1887 Jan. 21, 1888. 

Diocesan News. Jan. 20 Nov., 1888. 

District Advocate (m). July, 1886 June, 1887. 

Express. Oct. 13^Dec. 8, 1888. 

Globe. Apr. 8, 1887. 

Saturday Evening Call. Dec. 19, 1885 Apr. 24, 1886. 

Saturday Morning Enquirer. Jan. 4 Mar. 15, 1885. 

Tribune. Apr. 22 July 15, 1881. 

University Review (m). Mar., 1887 Mar., 1888. 

Y. M. C. A. Echoes (m). July 15, 1886 Feb. 15, 1887. 
Colwich Rambler. Feb. 10 Mar. 10, 1887. 

SHORT-LIVED, WEEKLIES AND MONTHLIES VOL. 2. 

Wichita. . . .Business Informer. Nov. 1, 1889. 

Christian Helper. Aug. 1, 1892 July 1, 1893. 

Commercial Bulletin. Sept. 29, 1888 Mar. 2, 1889. 

Grand Army Forum. Oct. 1, 1891 Feb. 25, 1892. 

Kansas Cultivator and Stockman. Dec. 10-24, 1890. 

Kansas Sunflower. Sept. 26 Nov. 7, 1890. 

Key (m). Apr., 1892. 

National Detective Review (m). Apr.-Oct., 1889. 

Poultry Home (m). Nov., 1890 May 15, 1891. 

Price Current. Aug. 10, 1889 Jan. 11, 1890. 

Southwestern Business Journal (m). Mar.-Aug., 1889. 

Southwestern Specimen. Feb. 8 Apr. 19, 1890. 

Telegrapher (m). May-Sept., 1892. 

World. Feb. 16 Mar. 30, 1889. 

North Wichita Burton Baptist (m). May, 1889 Jan., 1890. 

Clearwater Independent. Oct. 1 Dec. 31, 1887. 

Times. Nov. 26, 1886 Jan. 21, 1887. 

Derby Mimeogram. Oct. 1, 1891 May 5, 1892. 

Valley Center Journal. Feb. 26 May 27, 1892. 



288 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



SHORT-LIVED, WEEKLIES AND MONTHLIES VOL. 3. 

Wichita American Times. Mar. 7-27, 1908. 

Commercial Journal. July, 1896; Aug., 1897; July, 1898. 

Factarian. Feb. 26 Mar. 12, Apr. 2, 1914. 

Home Journal. Sept. 6 Oct. 10, 1902. 

Journal of Commerce. Apr. 22 May 6, 1899. 

Kansas Craftsman. May, 1900. 

Kansas Headlight. Aug. 24 Sept. 14, 1894. 

Silver Cause. Sept. 12 Oct. 31, 1896. 

Sunday School Journal (m). Nov., 1899 May, 1900. 

Workers ' Call. Apr. 13 and 20, 1912. 
Clearwater Gazette. June 16 July 21, 1899. 

Kansas Jayhawker [broken file]. Oct. 6, 1899 Apr. 13, 1900. 
Viola Sun. May 9 June 23, 1905. 



SEQUOYAH COUNTY. 

(See Finney county.) 



Garden City Irrigator. 1882. 



Nov. 13, 1880. [See Finney county. Short-lived vol. 1.1 
Paper. 1879. 



SEWARD COUNTY. 

Organized, 1886; named for Senator William H. Se ward; county seat, 
Liberal; area, 648 square miles, 414,720 acres; population (1915), 4498; as- 
sessed valuation (1915), $7,279,086; resources and industries grazing, stock 
raising, wheat, and broom corn. 

LIBERAL Population (1915), 2314; elevation, 2843 feet; established, 1888; telephones; is on 

the Rock Island railway. 

DEMOCRAT, Democratic; Abe L. Hiebert, editor and publisher, Liberal. 
Weekly. Feb. 12, 1909 + 7 vols. 

This is a continuation of the Liberal Independent; early history unknown, first issue in Society's 
file being vol. 2, No. 41, Abe K. Stouffer, editor and publisher; name changed 1911 to the Liberal 
Democrat, with Carl G. Eddy, editor and publisher. 

LIBERAL NEWS, Republican; Ray Millman, editor and publisher, Liberal. 

Tmce-a-week. Dec. 22, 1892 + 23 vols. 

Founded in 1886 as the Fargo Springs News by A. K. Stouffer, who moved it to Arkalon in 
1888 and published it as the Arkalon News; moved it to Liberal in 1892 and continued it as the 
Liberal News. In 1893 purchased the Liberal Lyre, founded 1890 by H. V. Nichols, consolidat- 
ing it with the News. 

DISCONTINUED. y^ 

Liberal Leader. Apr. 26, 18881890 

Liberalist. Jan. 13, 19111912 

Lyre. Nov. 21, 18901893 3 

Southwest Chronicle. Aug. 2, 18881890 2 

Arkalon News. Apr. 26, 18881892 5 

Fargo Springs News. Apr. 22, 18861888 

Prairie Owl. Oct. 8, 18851888 

Seward County Democrat. Apr. 30, 1886 1888 3 

Springfield Republican. Jan. 26, 1889 1893 5 

Seward County Courant. May 20, 18871888 1 

Soap-Box. May 5, 18871888 1 

Transcript. Sept. 9, 18861889 3 

Western Vidette. June 14 Oct. 15, 1890 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Liberal Chronicle, Jr. Christmas, 1888. 

Springfield Seward County Populist. Aug. 31 Oct. 26, 1894. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 289 



SHAWNEE COUNTY. 

Organized, 1855; named for the Shawnee tribe of Indians; county seat, 
Topeka; area, 558 square miles, 357,120 acres; population (1915), 64,661; 
assessed valuation (1915), $88,763,326; resources and industries building 
stone, coal, brick clay, agriculture, and stock raising. 

TOPEKA Capital of Kansas. Population (1915), 46,747; elevation, 934 feet; established, Dec. 
5, 1854; name is a Kaw Indian word meaning a place where Indian potatoes grew abundantly; 
industries machine shops, foundries, railroad shops, packing house, brick plant, creameries, 
bridge shops, mills, elevators, mattress factory, broom factory, steam boilerworks, cigar and 
numerous other factories; telephones, electric lights, street railway, municipal waterworks; is 
on the Santa Fe, the Union Pacific, the Missouri Pacific and the Rock Island railways. 
BOYS' CHRONICLE, published in the interest of the Boys' Industrial School, M. A. Coffin, manag- 
ing editor, Topeka. 

Monthly. July, 1905 + 10 vols. 
Founded 1905 by the Boys' Industrial School. 
BULLETIN OF THE KANSAS STATE BOARD OF HEALTH; edited by S. J. Crumbine, secretary, Topeka. 

Monthly. July, 1905 + 11 vols. 
Founded 1905 by the State Board of Health. 
CAPITAL, Republican; Arthur Capper, editor and publisher, Topeka. 

Daily. Apr. 21, 1879 + 107 vols. 

This is a continuation of the following: Kansas State Record, founded 1859 by E. G. and 
W. W. Ross. Daily Record (1st), founded 1861 and published during the session of the first state 
legislature, discontinuing in June; again published Jan. 11 to Mar. 11, 1862, during the session 
of the legislature; published regularly as a daily June 3, 1868, to Apr. 3, 1869, when the office and 
contents were totally destroyed by fire. During the month following a half sheet was issued, until 
a new office could be procured, when the paper resumed its original size. On Dec. 7, 1871, the Daily 
Record was consolidated with the Commonwealth, the weekly edition being continued by G. D. 
Baker for a short time, when he and S. D. MacDonald purchased the material of the old Record 
from the Commonwealth Printing Company, and continued the publication of the Record until 
May 25, 1875, when it was again absorbed by the Commonwealth. The Topeka Leader founded 
Dec. 9, 1865, by J. F. Cummings and Ward Burlingame; Mar. 4, 1869, absorbed by the Common- 
wealth. The Leader revived in Sept., 1876, and ran a few months, when it was once more bought 
by the Commonwealth. The Commonwealth, daily and weekly, founded May 1, 1869, by Salmon S. 
Prouty and J. B. Davis, Ward Burlingame being its chief editor. Oct. 20, 1873, the whole office 
was destroyed by fire, and for the next few weeks the paper was issued from the Blade office, until 
a new plant could be secured; Nov. 1, 1888, consolidated with the Topeka Daily Capital, which 
was founded Apr. 21, 1879, by Joseph K. Hudson and E. E. Ewing. The weekly edition of the 
Capital was changed in 1913 to Capper's Weekly. 

CAPPER BULLETIN, devoted to the interests of the Capper publications; Arthur Capper, publisher, 
Topeka. 

Occasional. Aug., 1907 + 4 vols - 

Founded 1907 by the employees of the Capper publications. 
CAPPER'S WEEKLY, Republican; Arthur Capper, editor and publisher, Topeka. 

Weekly. Sept. 14, 1882; Jan. 4, 1883 + 32 vols. 

Founded 1879 by J. K. Hudson and E. E. Ewing, as the Weekly Capital; ran as a semiweekly 
from 1894 to 1907; name changed in 1913 to Capper's Weekly. 

COLORED WOMAN'S MAGAZINE; Mrs. M. A.Johnson, editor, Mrs. M. L. Thomas, publisher, Topeka. 

Monthly. Apr. 15, 1915 + 

Early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being vol. 6, No. 4. 
COMMERCIAL CLUB BULLETIN; official organ of the Topeka Commercial Club, Topeka. 

Monthly. (Scattering numbers only.) May, 1911 + 
Founded by the Topeka Commercial Club, 1911. 
CONGREGATIONAL KANSAS, religious; J. S. Guild, editor and publisher, Topeka. 

Monthly. Jan., 1901 + 15 vols. 

Founded 1901 by the Executive Committee of the Kansas Congregational Home Missionary 
Society. 

CONSTRUCTION NEWS; Fred B. Cooper, editor and publisher, Topeka. 

Weekly. Apr. 4, 1913 + 3 vols. 
Early history unknown; first copy in Society's file is vol. 1, No. 8. 

19 



290 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



CORN AND WHEAT REGION BULLETIN; issued by the Kansas section of the U. S. Weather Bureau, 

Topeka. 

Daily. Aug. 2, 1902 + 13 vols. 

Early history unknown. 
FARMERS' MAIL AND BREEZE, Republican; T. A. McNeal, editor, and Arthur Capper, publisher, 

Topeka. 

Weekly. Oct. 30, 1882 + 44 vols. 

This paper is a continuation of the following: North Topeka Mail, founded 1882; C. G. 
Coutant and F. H. Collier, editors, F. H. Collier and W. E. Coutant, publishers ; consolidated in 
1885 with the North Topeka Times, founded 1871 by Charles Maynard; during 1872 and 1873 
the paper changed hands several times and the name was changed to Topeka Weekly Times, with 
Jacob V. Admire, editor and publisher; in 1874 V. P. Wilson & Son became the publishers, moving 
the paper to the south side, where in 1875 they were associated with W. H. Johnson in the pub- 
lication of the Daily Evening News, which paper was later sold to N. R. Baker in 1876 and sus- 
pended the same year. In 1875 Frank A. Root purchased the plant of the Kansas Magazine, 
published in 1872 and 1873, and in May, 1876, established the Daily Topeka Argus, which was 
discontinued after a few issues and the office moved to North Topeka, where the same year Mr. 
Root resurrected the North Topeka Times, continuing the old volume and number; a daily was 
issued for a few weeks in 1878 by Frank A. Root and George S. Irwin; in 1881 a second daily was 
published for a few months by George S. Irwin, when it was discontinued. The Kaw Valley Chief, 
founded 1879 at Perry by L. E. and A. H. Merritt, was merged with the Times in 1882; the 
Times consolidated with the Mail in 1885. Richland Argosy, founded 1893 by C. W. Searing; 
absorbed by the Mail in 1894. Saturday Evening Lance, founded 1883 by Harry W. and M. 
O. Frost; consolidated 1896 with the Mail. The Kansas Breeze, Topeka, founded 1894 by T. A. 
McNeal; consolidated 1895 with the Mail and continued as the Mail and Breeze, with T. A. McNeal, 
editor, and Arthur Capper, publisher; name changed in 1906 to the Farmers' Mail and Breeze. 
Richland Observer, founded 1903, sold to the Mail and Breeze 1904. 

HOUSEHOLD; a magazine for the rural home; Alice Elizabeth Wells, editor, Arthur Capper, pub- 
lisher, Topeka. 

Monthly. Oct., 1904 + 10 vols. 
This is a cotinuation of Push, founded 1902 by T. A. McNeal and A. T. Reid. Name 

changed in 1903 or 1904, to Household, first issue in Society's file being vol. 4, No. 5. 

JOURNAL OF THE KANSAS MEDICAL SOCIETY, medical; W. E. McVey, editor, Kansas Medical 

Society, publisher, Topeka. 

Monthly. , June, 1901 + 15 vols. 

Founded at Topeka, 1901, with W. E. McVey, editor; moved to Lawrence with Sept., 1904, 
issue, Dr. G. H. Hoxie, editor; moved to Columbus, with May, 1907, issue, Dr. Charles S. Huff- 
man editor; moved to Kansas City, with May, 1908, issue, with James W. May, editor; moved 
back to Topeka, May, 1914, with W. E. McVey, editor. In Jan., 1904, the Wichita Medical 
Journal (early history unknown, no issues being in Society's collection), owned by Drs. W. H. 
Graves and G. K. Purves, was merged with the Journal of the Medical Society, as was also the 
Western Medical Journal of Fort Scott; this latter publication was started in 1890, as the Kansas 
Medical Catalogue, by the Fort Scott Medical Publishing Company, C. B. Keith, president, 
and J. B. Carver, corresponding secretary; name changed Jan., 1894, to the Western Medical 
Journal; at the time of its consolidation with the Journal of the Kansas Medical Society it was 
owned by Dr. A. J. Roberts. 
KANSAS BANKER, financial; W. W. Bowman, editor, Kansas Bankers' Association, publishers, 

Topeka. 

Monthly. Feb., 1911 + 5 vols. 

Founded 1911 by the Kansas Bankers' Association. 
KANSAS CHILDREN'S HOME FINDER; official organ of the Kansas Children's Home Finding Society; 

D. F. Shirk, editor and manager, Topeka. 
Monthly. Feb., 1898 + 18 vols. 

Founded 1898 by Rev. O. S. Morrow. 
XANSAS CHURCHMAN; official organ of the Protestant Episcopal Church in Kansas; Right Rev. 

Frank R. Millspaugh, editor in chief, the Rev. W. R. B. Turrell, Arkansas City, editor, Topeka. 
Monthly. Sept., 1876 + 23 vols. 

This paper was founded at Topeka about 1876 by Rev. H. H. Loring; in June, 1883, it was 
published at Lawrence, with Rev. A. Beatty, editor; it continued at Lawrence until Mar., 1885, 
when it was discontinued; in Nov., 1885, the paper was again issued at Topeka with Bishop Thomas 
H. Vail, editor; since that time it has been published at many different towns through the diocese; 
in 1908 the place of publication was again Topeka, where it continued some years, and where it is 
at present published. 
JCANSAS FARMER, agricultural; T. A. Borman, editor in chief, Kansas Farmer Co., publishers, 

Albert T. Reid, president, S. H. Pitcher, secretary, Topeka. 
Weekly. May 1, 1863 + 51 vols. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 291 



Founded 1863 at Topeka, the organ of the State Agricultural Society, by F. G. Adams, secre- 
tary, who was its first editor; transferred to J. S. Brown, Jan. 1, 1865, who removed it to Lawrence, 
and continued it till Aug., 1867, when it was purchased by George T. Anthony, who removed it 
to Leavenworth; it was first published as a monthly, but in 1872 wa< issued as a semimonthly; 
in Nov., 1873, purchased by J. K. Hudson, and in Jan., 1874, removed to Topeka and issued as a 
weekly; consolidated in 1908 with the Advocate, founded in 1889 at Meriden, S. McLallin, editor, 
and S. McLallin, J. P. Limeburner and F. N. Newhouse, publishers. The Alliance Tribune, 
Topeka, founded 1889 by J. K. Estes; name changed in 1892 to Topeka Tribune, and published 
by the Topeka Tribune Publishing Co.; consolidated same year with the Advocate. The Kansas 
News, Topeka, founded in 1897 by George B. Harrison & Co.; consolidated same year with the 
Advocate, and ran as the Advocate and News, with George B. Harrison & Co., editors and pub- 
lishers; in 1899 name again changed to the Farmers' Advocate, with same editors and publishers. 

KANSAS ISSUE, temperance; edited and published by the Kansas State Temperance Union, Topeka. 

Monthly. Aug., 1898 + 17 vols. 
Founded 1898 by the Kansas State Temperance Union. 

KANSAS TEACHER; D. A. Ellsworth, editor, Kansas State Teachers' Association, publishers, 
Topeka. 

Monthly. May, 1914 + 2 vols. 
Founded at Emporia, May, 1914; moved to Topeka, July, 1915. 

KANSAS TRADES UNIONIST, labor; Frank B. Brown, publisher, Mrs. F. B. Brown, business manager, 

Topeka. 

Weekly. Oct. 29, 1915 + 

Founded 1904 as the Oakland Blade, by W. S. Anderson; moved to Topeka in 1915 and 
name changed to the Kansas Trades Unionist, with Frank B. Brown, publisher. 

KANSAS WEATHER SERVICE BULLETIN; issued by the Kansas section of the U. S. Weather Bureau, 
Topeka. 

Monthly. Aug., 1886 + 25 vols. 
Early history unknown; broken file. 

KNIGHTS AND LADIES OP SECURITY; official organ of the Knights and Ladies of Security; George 
M. Crawford, editor, Topeka. 

Monthly. Apr., 1895 + 19 vols. 

Founded 1895 by E. G. Moore; moved to Osage City in 1897, with A. P. Shaw, editor and 
publisher; in 1899 moved to Topeka. 

LEGAL NEWS, devoted to court news; Nanon L. Herren, editor and publisher, Topeka. 

Daily. Nov. 10, 1897 + 30 vols. 

Founded 1897, Arthur Callaham, editor, and E. L. Smith, publisher. 

MERCHANTS' JOURNAL, trade; Paul A. Lovewell, vice president and editor, Charles P. Adams, 
president and manager; Guy D. Adams, secretary and treasurer, Merchants' Journal Com- 
pany, publishers, Topeka. 

Weekly. Mar. 28, 1891 -f 25 vols. 

Founded 1891 as the Merchants' Weekly Journal, by the Kansas Credit and Collecting Com- 
pany; name changed same year to the Merchants' Journal, no editor or publisher named. 

MISSOURI VALLEY FARMER, agricultural; Charles Dillon, editor, Arthur Capper, publisher, Topeka. 

Monthly. Dec., 1900 + 5 vols. 

Founded 1893 at Atchison, by the Champion Publishing Company; moved to Kansas City, 
Mo., by Chas. M. Sheldon, and later moved to Topeka. 

NEBRASKA FARM JOURNAL, agricultural; Harley C. Hatch, editor, J. Y. Dunlap, manager, Arthur 

Capper, publisher, Topeka. 

Semimonthly. Jan., 1909 + 7 vols. 

Early history unknown; first issue in Society's file is vol. 14, No. 1; Capper Publishing Com- 
pany, publishers. 

PAUL JONES MONTHLY MAGAZINE [Negro], literary; Paul Jones, editor and publisher, Topeka. 

Monthly. (Broken file.) Oct., 1907 + 1 vol. 
Founded by Paul Jones in 1907. 
THE PINK RAG, independent; Charles H. Trapp, editor and publisher, Topeka. 

Weekly. June 20, 1907 + 7 vols. 

Founded 1907 by Charles H. Trapp as a free daily; discontinued Sept. 23, 1908; resumed as 
a weekly May 8, 1912, with same editor and publisher. 

PLAINDEALER [Afro-American], Republican; Nick Chiles, editor and publisher, Topeka. 

Weekly. June 6, 1899 + 17 vols. 
Founded 1899; J. H. Childers, editor, and Nick Chiles, business manager. 



292 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



SHAWNEE CHIEF, independent; W. E. Cain, editor and publisher, Topeka. 
Weekly. Apr. 25, 1913 + 3 vols. 

Founded 1913 as the North Shawnee Chief by Ernest Tucker; name changed same year to 
Shawnee Chief, with same editor and publisher. 

STATE JOURNAL, independent; Frank P. MacLennan, editor and publisher, Topeka. 

Daily. [Evening.] Jan. 16, 1879 + 106 vols. 

This is a continuation of the Topeka Blade (daily and weekly), founded Aug. 1, 1873, by J. 
Clarke Swayze; discontinued Jan. 31, 1874; resumed Jan. 7, 1875; purchased by George W. Reed 
in 1879 and name changed to Kansas State Journal; in 1881 Samuel N. Wood became managing 
editor, and the State Journal Company, composed of P. B. Maxson, president, E. L. Patee, secre- 
tary, George W. Reed, treasurer, were the publishers. In Nov., 1882, Reed, Allen & Co. became 
the publishers, and in Jan., 1883, Reed & Allen were owners; in Apr., 1883, Samuel N. Wood 
succeeded Walter N. Allen as one of the publishers, and in June following George W. Reed again 
became the publisher; in Jan., 1884, the paper was taken over by the State Journal Company, 
with Allen Sells, president, W. N. Allen, vice president, George W. Reed, treasurer, O. N. Mc- 
Clintock, secretary, H. W. Young, business manager, LeGrand Byington, editor in chief; name 
changed in 1884 to the Topeka Daily Journal; in 1885 W. P. Tomlinson, became editor; in April, 
same year, the paper went into the hands of a receiver; in June following, it again passed into 
the possession of the State Journal Company, being acquired the same month by Walter N. Allen, 
who was publisher and managing editor; in Oct., 1885, the paper was purchased by Frank P. Mac- 
Lennan, the present owner. A weekly edition was published from the time the Journal came 
into existence until Oct. 5, 1905, when it was discontinued. 

TELEPHONE NEWS, official publication of the Kansas Independent Telephone Association; Fred 
Coulson, secretary and treasurer, Topeka. 

Monthly. Apr., 1915 + 1 vol. 
Founded 1915 by the Association. 

WASHBURN REVIEW, college; Edwin A. Menninger, editor in chief, published by students of Wash- 
burn College, Topeka. 

Weekly. Sept. 21, 1893 + 22 vols. 

This is a continuation of the following: Washburn Argo, founded 1885, by students of Wash- 
burn College, with Ellsworth Ingalls, editor in chief; consolidated in 1891 with the Washburn 
Reporter, founded 1887, with E. D. McKeever, editor in chief, and ran as the Argo-Reporter, 
with Frank S. Ditto, editor in chief, Argo-Reporter Company, publishers; in 1893 name changed 
to the Washburn Mid-Continent, C. W. Boughton, editor in chief. The Washburn Reporter (2d), 
founded 1895,, with J. W. Beede, editor in chief; merged with the Mid-Continent in 1897, and 
name changed to Washburn Weekly Review, with W. G. Magaw, editor in chief. 

THE WESTERN INDEX [Afro-American], religious; official organ of the A. M. E. church; Rev. 
J. A. Hamlett, editor and publisher, Topeka. 

Monthly. [Broken file.] Sept. 16, 1910 + 5 vols. 
Early history unkown, first issue in Society's file being vol. 3, No. 21. 

WESTERN ODD FELLOW; official organ of the I. O. O. F. in Kansas; H. C. Stevens, editor, F. S . 
Stevens, publisher, Topeka. 

Monthly and semimonthly. Apr., 1886 -}- 29 vols. 

Founded 1886 at Osborne, by Topliff & Richey; moved to Salina in 1888, with D. J. Richey, 
editor and publisher; moved to Topeka in 1891, with A. L. Voorhis, editor and publisher. 

WESTERN SCHOOL JOURNAL, educational; John MacDonald, editor and publisher, Topeka. 

Monthly. Feb., 1885 + 31 vols. 

This is a successor of the following: Kansas Educational Journal, founded at Topaka in 1864, 
Rev. Peter McVicar, editor; discontinued from 1874 to 1877, when it was resumed at Emporia, 
as the Hatchet, with Wharton & Davis, editors and publishers; name changed in 1879 to the 
Educationalist, with O. B. Wharton, A. W. Stubbs and B. T. Davis, editors and publishers; name 
again changed in 1880 to the Educationist, George W. Hoss, editor and publisher; in 1885 name 
again changed, becoming the Western School Journal, H. C. Spser, editor, and the Educational 
Publishing Company, publishers; in 1888 John MacDonald became the owner, and has been in 
charge since. 

X-RAYS DEMOCRAT, Democratic; A. P. Tone Wilson, jr., editor and publisher, Topeka. 

Weekly. Apr. 5, 1912 + 4 vols. 

The Weekly X-Bays was founded in 1899 at Arkansas City by Henry B. Funk; a daily edi- 
tion was founded in 1903 by Funk Bros., and discontinued Apr., 1911; moved to Topeka in 1912, 
and name changed to the Weekly X-Rays Democrat, with A. P. Tone \Vilson, jr., editor and 
publisher. 

YELLOW DOG, local; C. B. Arthur, publisher, Topeka. 

Weekly. May 15, 1915 + 1 vol. 
Founded 1915 by C. B. Arthur. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 293 



ROSSVILLE Population (1915), 647; elevation, 928 feet; established, 1871; industries mill, 

elevators, nursery; telephones; is on the Union Pacific railway. 
REPORTER, independent; Peter Navarre, editor and publisher, Rossville. 
Weekly. June 2, 1905 + . 11 vols. 

This is a continuation of the following: Perry ville Times, founded Dec. 12, 1870, by H. G. 
Evans; in Nov., 1874, moved to St. Marys; name changed 1878 to St. Marys Democrat, W. H. 
Tipton, editor and publisher; moved to Rossville in 1879 and name changed to the Kansas Valley 
Times, with O. LeRoy Sedgwick, editor and publisher. The Rossville Times (2d), founded Sept. 7, 
1888 (vol. 1, No. 1), by G. A. Weller; sold Nov., 1899. Rossville News, founded Dec. 1, 1899 
(vol. 1, No. 1), by H. J. Richmond, editor and publisher; name changed 1901 to the Shawnee 
County News, Rossville, H. J. Richmond and U. G. Stewart, editors and publishers; name again 
changed 1905 to Rossville Reporter, U. G. Stewart, editor and publisher. 

SILVER LAKE Population (1915), 202; elevation, 913 feet; established, 1868;"named for the 
lake on which it was situated; telephones; is on the Union Pacific railway. 

MIRROR, independent; Peter Navarre, editor and publisher, Silver Lake. 

Weekly. Mar. 16, 1911 + 5 vols. 
Founded 1911 by Anderson Bros. 

DISCONTINUED. 



Topeka Advocate; Advocate and News; Farmers Advocate. Meriden and Topeka. 

Aug. 10, 18891908 ........................................... 19 

Agora (q). Salina and Topeka. July, 1891 1895 .................... 5 

[See, also, Douglas county.] 

Alliance Tribune. Dec. 10, 18891892 .............................. 3 

American Bimetallist; Topeka American. Oct. 10, 1896 1898 ......... 2 

American Citizen. Feb. 23 Dec. 28, 1888 ................. 1 



American Young Folks (m). Sept., 18751882 

Ancient Order of the Pyramids (m). May, 1896 1899. . . . 
Anti-Monoplist. 18831884. [See Dickinson county.] 

Apostolic Faith. Mar. 22, 18991900 

Argo-Reporter. Jan. 11, 18921898 

Ark Light (m). Nov., 19041910 



7 



1 

2 
5 

Association Reflector (m). Dec., 1888 1890 2 

Baptist Visitor (m). Jan., 18911901 10 

Barks and Cackles (m). Apr., 18971898 1 

Blade (d). Aug. 9, 18731879 10 

[Not published during 1874.] 

Blade. Apr. 6, 18761879 4 

Budget; Budget and News [broken file]. Nov. 15, 1890 1894 3 

Bulletin Washburn Laboratory of Natural History (occasional). 

Sept., 18841890 2 

Call [Negro] [broken file]. June 28, 18911898 5 

Central Baptist. St. Louis and Topeka. Oct. 7, 1909 1912 3 

Christian Citizen; Midland Christian Advocate. 

Sept. 14, 18881890 1 

Christian Courier (m). Nov., 18991902 2 

Church Index (m). Jan. 31, 19001901 1 

Citizen (d). Apr. 11, 18851886 1 

Club Member; Current Topics (m and w). Apr., 19051911 9 

Colored Citizen (1st). Apr. 19, 18781880 2 

Colored Citizen (2d) [broken file]. June 17, 18971900 2 

Commercial Advertiser. Mar. 25 Aug. 5, 1877 1 

Commercial and Hotel Register (m). June, 18991901 3 

Commonwealth (d). May 1, 1869 Jan. 1, 1870; Feb. 13, 1871 1888. . . 37 

Commonwealth. July 2, 18741888 15 

[Also scattering issues 1869, 1870 and 1872]. 

Compatriot News (q). Jan., 19021903 '. 1 

Congregational Record (m). 1866 1867. [See Douglas county.] 

Congregationalist; Pilgrim (m). Nov., 18921895 2 

Cooperator; Cooperator and Press (d). Sept. 2, 1895 1896 3 

Cooperator and Press (w). Jan. 24 Oct. 16, 1896 1 

Courier [German]. 1879 1880. [See Atchison county.] 

Critic (d). Mar. 5 June 23, 1884 1 

Crop Bulletin of Kansas Weather Service. Apr., 18921911 20 

Current Comment. Sept. 15, 1899 1901 ' 

Democrat; State Press (d). Oct. 10, 18811882 1 

Democrat (d) [published irregularly]. Feb. 20, 18931901 9 

Educational Calendar (m). Nov., 18771878 : 

Educationist (m). July, 18801884 ' 

Epworthian and Kansas Christian Advocate. Apr. 23, 18921896 I 

Equity. Apr. 15, 18991901 ' 

Ezel (m). Jan.-Aug., 1888 

F. A. and I. U. and Helping Hand (m). Nov., 18911901 10 

Fair Record (d). Sept. 11-15, 1871 1 

Faithful Witness (m). Jan. 1, 1882 Dec., 1885; July, 18861887 * 

Farmers' Family Journal (m). Aug., 19041905 1 



294 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DISCONTINUED. y olg 

Topeka Farmers' Wife (m). July, 18911894 3 

Farmers' Union. 1908 1909. [See Saline county.] 

First Friend (q). First quarter, 1906 1908 3 

Flambeau Bulletin (s-m). Feb. 4, 18991900 1 

Foundation Principles (s-m). Dec., 1893 1894 1 

Fulcrum. Oct. 23, 1896 1903 8 

Glada Budskapet [Swedish] (m). July, 19001903.. . . 3 

Gleanings (q). Mar., 18951899 4 

Good Citizen (m). Feb. 15, 18991901 2 

Good Tidings. Dec. 2, 18801886 4 

Grand Army Journal. Mar. 29, 18901892 2 

Helpful Hen (m). June, 19061907 1 

Herald (d). July 1, 19001907 . . 28 

High School World. Oct. 2, 18961913 27 

Independent. May 6 Nov., 1897 1 

Insurance Solicitor (m). Oct. 6, 1893 1896 3 

Investors' Guide (m). Nov. 9, 1896 1907 10 

Jeffersonian. Mar. 28, 1889 1890 .2 

Kansas Architect (m). Oct., 19041906 2 

Kansas Baptist Review. Apr. 21, 18981899 2 

Kansas Bee Journal; Rural Kansan (m). Jan., 18951896 1 

Kansas Breeze. Apr. 13, 18941895 1 

Kansas Commercial News (m). June, 1901 1902 1 

Kansas Cooperator (m). Mar. 15, 1900 1902 2 

Kansas Cycler (s-m). May 20, 18951897 2 

Kansas Democrat. Jan. 1, 1874 1882 8 

Kansas Democrat (2d) (d). Apr. 8, 18861893 18 

Kansas Democrat (w). Sept. 22, 1892 1893 1 

Kansas Educational Journal (m). [See Leavenworth county.] 

Kansas Endeavorer (m). Jan., 1894 1901 8 

Kansas Financier (m). Aug. 2, 18881891 > 4 

Kansas Freeman (d). Oct. 24 Nov. 7, 1855 1 

Kansas Knight and Soldier (s-m). July, 1884 1889 4 

Kansas Knocker (q). Apr., 19001901 . . . ; 1 

Kansas Law Journal (m). Feb. 7, 1885 1887 4 

Kansas Magazine (m). Jan., 18721873 4 

Kansas Medical Journal (m and w). May, 18891898 : 10 

Kansas Methodist; Kansas Methodist Chautauqua (m and w). 

Jan., 18791888 10 

Kansas Methodist Times; Kansas Methodist (bi-w). Topeka and Man- 
hattan. Jan. 5, 18911892 2 

Kansas Newspaper Union. Aug. 11, 1883 1895 11 

Kansas Prohibitionist (m). Aug. 1, 19021903 1 

[See, also, Lyon county.] 

Kansas Staats Anzeiger [German]. Aug. 28, 1879 1881 2 

Kansas State Journal. Jan. 1, 1880 Oct., 1885; Nov., 18911905 20 

Kansas State Ledger [Negro] (occas). July 22, 1892 1906 11 

Kansas State Notes (m). June 10, 18961901 6 

Kansas State Record. Oct. 15, 1859 1875 9 

[1863 to 1867, scattering issues only.] 

Kansas State Record (1st and 2d) (d). Mar. 26, 18611862 2 

Kansas State Record (3d), (d) Dec. 20, 18681871 7 

Kansas State Register. Aug. 15 Nov. 1, 1900 1 

Kansas State Sunday School Journal (q and m). Hutchinson, Topeka, 

and Abilene. [See Dickinson county.] 

Kansas Telegraph [German], Jan. 4, 18811904 24 

Kansas Temperance Monitor (m). Sept. 15, 1895 1898 3 

Kansas Trade Journal (m and bi-m). Aug., 18891892 2 

Kansas Tribune, Lawrence and Topeka; and the Topeka Tribune [broken 

file]. Sept. 15, 1855 June, 1861; July, 18661867 6 

Kansas Watchman. May 25 Nov. 15, 1905 1 

Kansas Worker (m). July 5, 18931911 20 

Kimball Family News (m). Jan., 18981903 5 

Labor Champion; Kansas Champion. Mar. 28, 1902 1907 5 

Labor Chieftain. Dec. 17, 18861887 1 

Lantern. Jan. 15 Dec. 31, 1887 .' 1 

Leader. Dec. 7, 18651876 4 

[Not published Apr., 1869, to Sept., 1876.] 

Leader. Wichita, Topeka and Neosho Rapids. Sept., 1890 1892 5 

Light (m). Aug., 18841889 5 

Lucifer, the Light Bearer. Oct. 10, 18901896 5 

[See, also, Jefferson county.] 

Market Review (d). Oct. 2, 18991900 2 

Medical Monograph (m). Jan.-Dec., 1899 1 

Memorial Chimes (m). Apr., 19011907 6 

Mills and Smiths' Real Estate Advertiser (m). Oct., 18671871 4 

Missouri Valley Veterinary Bulletin (m). Apr., 19091910 1 

Modern Mercury (m). Oct., 19011903 2 

Modern Mexico. Sept., 18951897 , 2 

National Amateur (bi-m). Sept., 19081909 2 

National Workman. May 25 Dec. 21, 1882 1 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



295 



DISCONTINUED. 

Topeka Nequa (m). Apr.-July, 1896 1 

Neue Pfade im Fernen Westen [German]. Aug.-Oct., 1885 1 

New Model Searchlight (m). Jan. 1, 18961897. . . 1 

New Woman. July 3, 18971898 1 

News (d). Jan. 4 Dec. 21, 1888 1 

Norden [Swedish] (s-m). Apr. 18 Dec. 19, 1913 1 

Ottawa Journal [Topeka edition). Mar. 1, 1894 1896 2 

Our Messenger (m). 1886 1897. [See Osborne county.) 

People; The New Era. Mar. 25, 18931895. ... .2 

Populist. May 7, 18921893 2 

Post (d). July 22 Sept. 21, 1880 1 

Post. Jan. 6 Aug. 31, 1888 1 

Poultry Culture (m). Manhattan and Topeka. Jan , 19071916 9 

Poultry West (m). Feb., 18981905 7 

Press (d). Feb. 15, 18931896 10 

Printer Girl (m). Sept., 18881889 1 

Progressive Autoist (m). May, 1911 1913 2 

Psychic Century. Jan. 10 May 30, 1901 1 

Push (m). Sept., 19021903 1 

Railroad Employes' Companion. [See Franklin county.) 

Railroad Register. Mar. 17, 18931895 2 

Republican (d and w). Dec. 29, 18891894 5 

Santa Fe (m). Apr., 18981903 6 

Santa Fe Trail (occasional). 18801883; 1892 2 

Saturday Evening Lance. June 9, 1883 1896 12 

Sentinel (d). July 11, 18921893 1 

Shawnee County Socialist. Aug. 9, 19131914 1 

Shawnee Independent. Oct. 6, 1894 1896 1 

Shorthand for Everybody (occasional). Sept. 7, 1895 1901 5 

Smashers Mail (w and m). Mar 7 Dec., 1901 1 

Smith 's Fruit Farmer and American Horticulturist (m). Feb., 1894 1895, 1 

Spirit of Kansas [broken file]. Sept. 27, 18841892 6 

State Press. Mar. 23, 18931896 3 

State Record (occasional). July 20, 1899 1909 1 

Sunday Ledger [broken file]. May 27, 18881895 6 

Tempelklockan [Swedish] (m). Jan., 18921896 ... 5 

Times-Observer [Negro]. Sept. 4, 18911892 . . 1 

Topics (d). Oct. 5, 18911892 2 

Traders Exchange and Commercial Club News; Kansas Road Maker, 

Osawatomie and Topeka. July, 1900 1901 1 

Tribune (d). Jan. 12 Mar. 1, 1864 1 

Tribune [Negro]. June 24, 18801881 1 

Tribune; Western Recorder; Tribune-Recorder. June 7, 1883 1885 .... 2 

United Presbyterian (m). Mar., 18881891 3 

Villa Range; Ladies' Home Journal (m). Nov., 18891890 1 

Volks Freund [German] (d). Oct. 14, 18851886 1 

Volksblatt [German]. July 26, 18981899 1 

Waif; Western Youth (m). Jan., 18921893 2 

Washburn Argo (m). Dec., 18851891 6 

Washburn Reporter (1st). Apr. 29, 18871892 5 

Washburn Reporter (2d). Aug. 20, 1895 1897 1 

Weather Maps (d). Kansas Weather Bureau. Jan. 29, 1895 1900 15 

Welcome; Music and Home Journal (m). Jan., 1885 1889 4 

Western Baptist. Sept. 5, 18841890 5 

[Not published July, 1889 to Jan., 1890.) 

Western Barber (m). Sept. 15, 18981901 3 

Western Index. Sept. 16, 19101914 4 

Western Jewell; Home Journal (m). Nov. 4, 1893 1895 2 

Western Patriot (m). Sept., 18961897 1 

Western Pigeon Review; Belgian Hare Journal, (m). Dec. 1896 1901. . 4 

Western Poultry Breeder (m). May, 18891903 14 

Western Real Estate Journal; City and Farm Record broken file]]. 

Feb., 18841891 6 

Western Veteran (w and m). Topeka, Kansas City and Wichita. 

May 1, 18891904 14 

Westminster Visitor. Mar. 28, 1907 1908 1 

Whim-Wham. Oct. 9, 18801881 1 

Woodcraft in Kansas (m). June, 19091911 2 

North Topeka .. . .Argus; Times (d). Sept. 1, 1880 1881 ... . 3 

News. Oct. 24, 1885; Mar. 17, 18881892 3 

News, Evening (d). Jan. 1 Dec. 21, 1888 1 

News Letter (d). Mar. 17 June 23, 1899 1 

Times. Mar. 17, 1871 Mar., 1873; Feb., 1874 1876 4 

Times. June 8, 18761885 9 

Dover Herald. Aug. 14, 19111913 2 

Oakland Blade. Dec. 9, 1904 1915... 10 

News. Oct. 31, 18901892 2 

Richland Argosy. May 11, 18931895 *. . 8 

Future (m). Sept., 18851887 1 

Observer. July 30, 19031904 1 



296 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DISCONTINUED. Vola 

Rossville.. ...Carpenters' Kansas Lyre. Oct. 10, 1884 1888. .. . 3 

Critic. July 22, 18921893 1 

Kansas Valley Times. Feb. 7, 18791882 .4 

News. July 14, 18831884 1 

News; Shawnee County News. Dec. 1, 1899 1905. 6 

Times. Sept. 7, 18881898 10 

Silver Lake News; Topeka Sentinel. Apr. 13 Sept. 15, 1882 1 

SHORT-LIVED, DAILIES VOL. 1. 

Topeka... . . Epworthian. June 21-30, 1892. 

Globe. July 15 Aug. 2, 1889. 

Leader. Oct. 6 Nov. 3, 1888. 

Pantagraph. Jan. 5-21, 1881. 

Tattler. Feb. 13-22, 1879. 

Times. Oct. 28 Nov. 6, 1878. 

Truth. Oct. 28 Nov. 7, 1892. 
North Topeka Courier. July 1 Oct. 17, 1888. 

Mail. Mar. 1 and 2, 1888. 

Sunflower. Oct. 19 Nov. 5, 1888. 

SHORT-LIVED, DAILIES VOL. 2. 

Topeka. . . .Argus. May 8-10, 1876. 

Bulletin. Feb. 2-7, 1874. 
Call, Evening. May 17 July 8, 1893. 
Conference Daily (M. E. Church). Mar. 14-21, 1888. 
Kansas State Fair Advance. Sept., 1873. 
Kansas Tribune. Mar. 7, 8, 11 and 15, 1856. 
Ledger. June 13-20, 1893. 
Populist. Jan. 10-31, 1893. 

Shawnee County Fair, Daily Programme. Sept. 28, 29, 1876. 
Times. May 4, 1875 Jan. 27, 1876 [scattering]. 
Whim- Wham. Sept. 17 Oct. 27, 1881. 

SHORT-LIVED, DAILIES VOL. 3. 

Topeka Fair Record, Sept. 11-15, 1871. 

Fair Program. Sept. 15, 1892. 

Herald, Evening. July 10 Dec. 5, 1882. 

Kansan. Dec. 21, 1894. 
North Topeka Courier. Dec. 16, 1887 Apr. 18, 1888 [scattering]. 

Republic, Evening. Aug. 7, Sept. 20, 1882. 

SHORT-LIVED, DAILIES VOL. 4. 

Topeka. . . .Booster. Feb. 10 Mar. 29, 1913. 

Capital (jr. edition). Dec. 30, 1909. 

Herald. Apr. 26 June 23, 1913. 

Plaindealer. Aug. 12-16, 1907. 
North Topeka Gospel Call. Feb. 25, 1897. 

News Letter. Mar. 17, 1899. 

SHORT-LIVED, WEEKLIES AND MONTHLIES VOL. 1. 

Topeka. . . .Argus (w and m). May 18, 1888; May and June, 1889. 

Bazaar News (m). Apr., 1877. 

Bee (m). Aug., 1887 Apr., 1888. 

Boycotter. Dec. 25, 1885 Feb. 19, 1886. 

Budget. Nov. 15, 1884 Jan. 5, 1888. 

Business College Journal (bi-m). Sept., 1885 Nov. 15, 1889. 

Chips. Apr. 28, 1883. 

Church & Co. 's Monthly. Apr.-May, 1884. 

Free Discussion (m). Topeka and Eskridge. Aug. 20, 1878; Sept., 1879; 
Jan., 1880 Aug., 1881; Jan., 1886 Feb., 1887. 

H. M. Washburn's Christmas Courier. 1888. 

Kansas Advertiser; Agriculturist (m). May, June, 1876. 

Kansas Democrat. Feb. 4-13, 1886. 

Kansas Home (m). Feb. 15, 1886 Dec. 13, 1890. 

Liberal Advocate. Oct. 14-28, 1879. 

Little Messenger. Nov. 2, 1886. 

Living Age. Oct. 8 Nov. 5, 1880. 

Mayflower. Mar. 16, 1883. 

Railway Telegraph College. Oct. 15, 1882. 

Religious Evolutionist (m). Mar., 1881. 

Saturday Night. Nov. 11 Dec. 2, 1882. 

Season Signal (m). Dec. 20, 1886; Apr. 15, 1887; Sept., 1888; Sept., 1889. 

Trade Gazette (m). Aug., Sept., 1886. 

Kansas Journal of Commerce (m). Oct., 1887 Nov., 1892. . 

Watchword (m). July, 1885. 

Western Reform Advocate. Aug. 28, 1882. 
North Topeka. . . .Bulletin. Nov. 29 Dec. 27, 1883. 

Fire and Hammer (m). Nov., 1883 Aug., 1885. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



297 



SHORT-LIVED, WEEKLIES AND MONTHLIES VOL. 2. 

Topeka American Buyer and Seller (m). Nov., Dec., 1891. 

Bee. Mar. 30 Aug. 31, 1890. 

Boanerges Reporter. Mar. 21 May 2, 1891. 

Commercial Bulletin (m). May, 1889. 

Detective World (m). Aug., 1890 June, 1891. 

Ham and Eggs, or the Hog and Hen (m). July, 1890 Feb., 1891. 

Illustrated Companion. Aug. 21, 1890. 

Independent. Feb. 27 Mar. 13, 1891. 

Kansas Church Tidings (m). Feb. 21, 1890 July 18, 1891. 

Kansas Siftings (m). June, 1889 Apr. 22, 1890. 

Monday Morning Herald. Oct. 28 Dec. 23, 1889. 

Monthly Messenger. Dec., 1889. 

New Age (1st). Feb. 13, 1892. 

New Age (2d). Feb. 27, 1892. 

Oratorius (occas). Jan.-Sept., 1891. 

Our State. Oct. 12, 1889 Feb. 15, 1890. 

Potwin Tribune [Potwin Place]. Sept. 28, 1889 Sept. 26, 1890. 

Signal (m). Sept., Nov. and Dec., 1889. 

Sumner Times (bi-m). Nov. 24 Dec. 22, 1891. 

Oakland Item. Dec. 21, 1889 Mar. 29, 1880. 

Silver Lake Echo. Jan. 26, and Feb. 9, 1889. 

SHORT-LIVED, WEEKLIES AND MONTHLIES VOL. 3. 

Topeka American Journal of Education (m). May-Oct., 1876. 

Bazaar News (m). May, 1876. 

Busy Bee Magazine (m). Feb.-Apr., 1893. 

Christian Church Helper (m). Apr.-June, 1893. 

Commercial. Mar. 5, 1879. 

Commercial Bulletin (m). May, 1889. 

Health Messenger. 1888. 

High School Budget (m). Oct. 27, 1893 Mar., 1894. 

Holiday Visitor. Dec. 25, 1876. 

Kansas Agriculturist (m). July, Aug., 1876. 

Kansas Arts and Industries (m). Oct., 1891 Mar., 1892. 

Kansas Capital. Dec. 24, 31, 1876. 

Kansas Chautauqua Assembly. July 19, 1887. 

Kansas Evangel (m). Oct. and Dec., 1873; Feb. and Mar., 1874. 

Kansas Freeman. Nov. 14, 1855, Jan. 9, 1856. 

Kansas Monthly Souvenir. Sept. and Nov., 1872. 

Kansas News (m). Sept. 15, Oct. 25, 1888. 

Kansas Quarterly Review of Real Estate. Jan., 1873. 

Kansas School Journal. Aug. 15, and Sept. 15, 1874. 

Kansas State Grange Bulletin (q). May 10, 1875. 

Kansas Temperance Palladium. Jan. 22, 1880. 

Monthly Balance. Aug.-Oct., 1891. 

New Era. 1876 (?). 

Purchasers' Guide. Nov. 14, 1885. 

Real Estate Bulletin. Feb. 15, 1866; Mar. 1, 1867. 

Real Estate News. .Sept. 18, 1882. 

Reunion Banner. Oct. 30, 1881; Sept. 16, 1882. 

Santa Fe Reporter. Sept. 24, 1892 Feb. 25, 1893. 

San Juan Guide. 1877. 

Sensation. 1893. 

Signal (m). June, Sept., 1893. 

Star of Empire. Oct., 1868; Jan., 1869 Dec., 1870. 

Sun. Mar. 3, 1879. 

Sunday Morning Salute. July 28, 1878. 

Town and Country. 1879. 

Trade Gazette. July, 1887. 

Tramp. July 28, 1878. 

Tribune (tri-w). Oct. 26, 1878. 

Truth Teller. Feb. 17 Mar. 4, 1862. 

Wasp. June, 1889. 

Western Cumberland Presbyterian (m). June-Sept., 1892. 

Western Reform Advocate. Aug. 28, 1882. 

SHORT-LIVED, WEEKLIES AND MONTHLIES VOL. 4. 

Topeka American Citizen. Jan. 11 July 11, 1889. 

Baptist Headlight (s-m). Sept. 15, 1893 Aug. 8, 1894. 

Colored Patriot [Negro]. Apr. 20 June 22, 1882. 

First Methodist (m). Sept.-Nov., 1893. 

Herald of Kansas. Feb. 13 June 11, 1880. 

Hurry Kain. Dec. 23, 1893 Mar. 10, 1894. 

Kansas Blackman [Negro]. Apr. 20 June 29, 1894. 

Kansas Herald. Jan. 30 Feb. 6, 1880. 

Liberal Advocate. Nov. 4, 1879 Jan. 20, 1880. 

Shawnee County District School (m). Sept., 1893 Apr., 189 J. 

Signal (m). Mar., 1894. 

Tanner and Cobbler. Aug. 13 Nov. 2, 1872. 
North Topeka Benevolent Banner. May 21 Oct. 22, 1887. 



298 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Topeka. . 



Topeka 



Richland 

Topeka 



North Topeka, 
Richland . . 



Topeka .... 



North Topeka. 
Tecumseh. . 



Topeka . 



SHORT-LIVED, WEEKLIES AND MONTHLIES VOL. 5. 

. Banner. 1895. 
Cash Trade Journal. 1895. 
Centennial Tea Chest. Jan. 25, 1876. 
Columbia Herald (m). Nov., 1894 Mar., 1895. 
District Visitor (m). June 11 Nov. 7, 1894. 
Druggist. Feb., 1895. 
Kansas Financier. July 21, 1890. 

Kansas Home Missionary. Oct. 1, 1895 Feb. 1, 1896. 
Laboring Man. Aug. 18, 25, 1894. 
Massachusetts Quarterly. Mar.-Nov., 1895. 
National Passenger (m). Aug., 1888 Mar., 1889. 
National Referendum. Feb. 21 June 29, 1895. 
News. Nov. 18 Dec. 2, 1894. 
Real Estate Reporter. Aug., 1895. 
Shawnee Drum-Beat. Feb. 2 June 18, 1895. 
That Tired Feeling. 1895. 
Truth. Jan. 25 Feb. 1, 1896. 

SHORT-LIVED, WEEKLIES AND MONTHLIES VOL. 6. 

. Free Lance. July 10, 1897. 

Harbinger (m). Feb.- July, 1897. 

Herald. July 21 Aug. 4, 1898. 

Illustrated Weekly. June 1, 15, 1895; July 4, 11, Aug. 1, 1896. 

Inland Wheelman. Apr. 10 Aug. 14, 1896. 

Kansas News. Aug. 25 Nov. 17, 1897. 

Newspaper Union. Oct. 23, Nov. 18, 25, 1897. 

People's Friend. Dec. 11, 1896. 

Rights of Man. Jan. 29, Feb. 13, 1897. 

Silver Republican. July 3 Sept. 25, 1896. 

Standard Shorthand School Journal. 1896. 

Student's Guide (m). Jan., 1885. 

Sun Flower. Sept. 27 Dec. 12, 1896. 
.Times. Nov. 12, 1897; Feb. 26, 1898. 

SHORT-LIVED, WEEKLIES AND MONTHLIES VOL. 7. 

.Christian Blade (m). Jan., 1898 Jan , 1899. 

Kansas News; People's Advocate; North Topeka News. 
July 9 Sept. 8, 1898. 

Kansas Register. Sept. 30 Dec. 9, 1899. 

Knocker. Nos. 1 and 2, 1899. 

Macedonian Call (m). Jan., 1900. 

National Passenger (m). Aug. and Nov., 1888. 

Protector (m). Aug., 1896 Jan., 1897. 

True Democrat; Farmers' Tribune. Sept. 8, 1898 Jan. 14, 1899. 

Western Cumberland Presbyterian (m). Apr., 1900. 

Western Poultry Journal (m). Jan.-Sept., 1899. 
.News-Letter. Dec. 3, 1898 Mar. 4, 1899. 
.Reporter. Aug. 11, 25, and Sept. 1, 1899. 

SHORT-LIVED, WEEKLIES AND MONTHLIES VOL. 8. 

. Baptist News (m). Oct., 1900i 

Bulletin (m). July 20, 1899 Feb. 17, 1900. 

Christian Citizen. Jan. 9, 1899. 

Christian News (m). Oct.. 1900. 

Church News (m). Oct., 1900. 

Comet. Sept. 14 Oct. 18, 1900. [Scattering.l 

Congregational News (m). Oct., 1900. 

Good Tidings. Dec. 9, 1880. 

Holiday Visitor. Dec. 25, 1875. 

Methodist News (m). Oct., 1900. 

New Republic Magazine (m). June, 1900. 

Presbyterian News (m). Oct., 1900. 

Saturday News. Mar. 29, Apr. 12, 1890. 

Visitor (m). Oct., 1900. 

Western Socialist News (m). Apr.-Sept., 1900. 
. .New Republic. Aug. 4 Dec. 20, 1900. 
. .Kansas Settler. Feb. 3, 17, 24; Mar. 10, 17, 31; Apr. 7, 1858. 

Note Book. Aug. 13-27; Sept. 10 and 17; Oct. 2, 1857. 

SHORT-LIVED, WEEKLIES AND MONTHLIES VOL. 9. 

. . Democrat. June 22 Aug. 3, 1905. 
Endeavor Spirit. Nov. 13 Dec. 18, 1905. 
Ham Cry (m). May, 1901. 

Harbinger (m). Nov., 1902; Mar. and Apr., 1903. 
Home Rule Movement. 1901. 
Inland Investor (m). Jan.-Mar., 1905. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 299 



Topeka Kansas Democrat. Dec. 22, 1904. 

Kansas State Capital (m). Mar., 1901. 

New Abolition (m). June 2, 1900 June, 1901. 

Observer. Aug. 29 Nov. 7, 1902. 

Real Estate Investor (m). Apr.-Nov., 1901. 

Southwestern Grain Journal. Jan. 15 Feb. 1, 1903. 

Western Correlator (m). June, 1901. 

SHORT-LIVED, WEEKLIES AND MONTHLIES VOL. 10. 

Topeka Billard Independent. Oct. 1, 1914. 

Building and Loan News [occas]. Jan., Apr., 1906. 

City Progress (m). Aug., 1914. 

Golf Bug. July, 1915. 

Grand Army Reveille (m). Feb. 15, July 15, Aug. 30, 1906; Apr., 1907: 
May and June, 1909. 

Industrial Council Bulletin (m). Nov., 1911 Apr., 1912. 

Kansas Baptist Herald [scattering]. Oct. 3, 1911 Aug. 16, 1913. 

Kansas Democratic News. Feb. 22, Mar. 4, 1916. 

Kansas Herald. June 28, 1913. 

Labor. Nov. 4-18, 1911. 

National Watchman. May 9, 1914. 

Santa Fe Red Ball (occas.) Jan. 31, 1911 Jan. 17, 1913. 

Saturday Night Wheeze. May 22, 1915. 

Schriver's Weekly. Nov. 6 Dec. 4, 1914. 

Stevic's Horn (m). Mar., 1908. 

Topeka Magazine (m). Nos. 1, 2 and 3, 1914. 
North Topeka Christian Messenger. Jan. 13, 1909. 

Ginger Snap (m). May, 1908. 

Pointer. Oct. 21, Nov. 4, 1910. 



SHERIDAN COUNTY. 

Organized, 1880; named in honor of Gen. Philip H, Sheridan; county seat, 
Hoxie; area, 900 square miles, 576,000 acres; population (1915), 4873; as- 
sessed valuation (1915), $9,053,940; resources and industries building stone, 
agriculture, and stock raising. 

HOXIE Population (1915), 484; elevation, 2654 feet; established about 1878; named for H. M. 

Hoxie; telephones; is on the Union Pacific railway. 
SENTINEL, Republican; Fred E. Bear, editor and publisher, Hoxie. 
Weekly. July 17, 1884 + 31 vols. 

Founded 1884 as the Weekly Sentinel, at Kenneth, with W. L. Humes, editor, and W. D. 
Street, publisher; name changed in 1885 to the Kenneth Sentinel, W. D. Street, editor and pub- 
lisher; moved to Hoxie in 1886 and name changed to Hoxie Sentinel, W. H. Ward, editor and 
publisher. 

SELDEN Population (1915), 308; elevation, 2834 feet; established, 1888; telephones; is on 

the Rock Island railway. 

OBSERVER, independent; Fred E. Bear, editor and publisher, Selden. 
Weekly. Apr. 24, 1913 + 3 vols. 

Founded 1913 by William E. Landau. 

DISCONTINUED. VolSf 

Hoxie... ..Democrat; Kenneth and Hoxie. Dec. 18, 1885 1891. . 6 

Palladium. Aug. 21, 18911906 14 , 

Sheridan County Democrat. Apr. 30, 18921896 4 

[First called Hoxie Times.] 

Kenneth Sheridan County Tribune. July 14, 18811882 1 

Selden Independent. Nov. 1, 19011912 11 

Times; Sheridan Times. May 5, 18871888 1 

Sheridan Times. [See Selden Times.] 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Hoxie Times. June 22, 1892. 

Kenneth Sheridan County Times. June 25 July 2, 1885. 

Selden Courant. Mar. 11, 18, May 13, and June 10, 1893. 

Sheridan Times. May 12 June 23, 1887. 



300 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



SHERMAN COUNTY. 

Organized, 1886; named in honor of Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman; 
county seat, Goodland; area, 1080 square miles, 691,200 acres; population 
(1915), 4043; assessed valuation (1915), $8,982,234; resources and industries- 
agriculture, and stock raising. 

GOODLAND Population (1915), 1742; elevation, 3667 feet; established, 1887; named for Good- 
land, Ind.; industries elevators, creamery, railroad machine shops; telephones, electric 
lights, municipal water system, public library. 
REPUBLIC AND NEWS, Democratic; J. H. Stewart, editor and publisher, Goodland. 

Weekly. Aug. 27, 1886 + 29 vols. 

This is a continuation of the Sherman County Republican, founded at Itasca, in 1886, with 
Bayard Taylor, editor, and Hedrick & Co., publishers; moved to Sherman Center with issue of 
Oct. 15, 1886, and mailed from the Gandy (Sherman county) post office, same editor and pub- 
lishers; moved to Goodland, Oct., 1887, with same management; name changed 1889 to Good- 
land Republican, J. H. Stewart, editor and publisher; in Oct., 1891, name again changed to Good- 
land Republic, J. H. Stewart, editor and publisher. State Line Register, founded at Kanorado, 
in 1888, with Charles A. Fitch, editor, J. Frank Longanecker, publisher; in Feb., 1889, moved 
to Lamborn, with same management; in 1891 moved to Goodland, and name changed to the 
Sherman County Farmer, with Charles A. Fitch, editor and proprietor; sold to the Republic after 
the issue of Apr. 28, 1892, and ran as the Goodland Republic and Sherman County Farmer the 
balance of the year, J. H. Stewart being editor and publisher. The Goodland Banner, founded 
1898 by Krow & Denison; sold to E. F. Tennant, May 20, 1899, and name changed to the Good- 
land News; consolidated 1907 with the Republic. 

SHERMAN COUNTY RECORD, independent; R. G. Wolfe, editor and publisher, Goodland. 

Weekly. Aug. 9, 1906 + 10 vols. 

Founded 1906 as the Goodland Record by Boyd Publishing Co.; name changed 1907 to the 
Sherman County Record, W. R. Boyd, editor and publisher. 

DISCONTINUED. V ols 

Goodland... . .News (1st). Oct. 20, 1887 1896 .. 9 

News (2d). Apr. 22, 18981907 10 

[First called Goodland Banner.] 

Sherman County Dark Horse. Eustis and Goodland. June 10, 1886 1894, 8 

Sherman County Democrat. Eustis and Goodland. Apr. 7, 1887 1889. . 3 

Sherman County Farmer. Jan. 29, 1891 1892 1 

Gandy New Tecumseh. Gandy, Leonard and Itasca. Nov. 9, 1885 1887 ...... 1 

Kanorado State Line Register. Kanorado and Lamborn. Oct. 11, 1888 1891 2 

Sherman Center News. July 22, 18861887 1 

Voltaire Adviser. 18851886 1 

Sherman County News. Oct. 1, 18861888 2 



SMITH COUNTY. 

Organized, 1872; named for Maj. J. Nelson Smith, Second Colorado 
cavalry, killed October 23, 1864; county seat, Smith Center; area, 900 square 
miles, 576,000 acres; population (1915), 15,308; assessed valuation (1915), 
$29,910,838; resources and industries building stone, gypsum, agriculture, 
and stock raising. 

SMITH CENTER Population (1915), 1405; elevation, 1800 feet; established, 1871; industries- 
elevators, mills, cement works; electric lights, telephones, municipal water plant; is on the 
Rock Island railway. 

SMITH COUNTY JOURNAL, Democratic; Ben T. Baker, editor and publisher, Smith Center. 

Weekly. Aug. 16, 1890 + 25 vols. 
Founded 1890 by M. L. Lockwood and J. A. Wright. The Bazoo, Smith Center, founded 

1884 by J. W. Stewart; name changed in 1889 to Stewart's Bazoo, same editor and publisher. 

in 1899 name again changed to the Bazoo, with Thomas T. Long, editor and publisher; sold to 

Smith County Journal in 1900. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 301 



SMITH COUNTY PIONEER, Republican; V. Hutchings and A. L. Headley, editors and publishers, 

Smith Center. 

Weekly. Jan. 7, 1876 -\- 40 vols. [Early issues scattering.] 

Founded in Nov., 1872, at Cedarville, by Dr. W. D. Jenkins, and sold to the Cedarville Town 
Company in 1873, edited successively by Dr. W. D. Jenkins, Lew Plummer and Mark J. Kelley; 
in the fall of 1873 the office was sold to Levi Morrill, who removed it to Smith Center; in Oct., 
1874, it was sold to Will D. Jenkins, jr., who in 1878 changed the name to the Smith County Kansas 
Pioneer; in 1886 the name was shortened to Kansas Pioneer, with W. H. Nelson and J. N. Beacom, 
editors and publishers; in 1889 the name was again changed, becoming the Kansas Weekly Pioneer 
J. N. Beacom, editor and publisher. The Daily Pioneer, founded 1887 by W. H. Nelson; dis- 
continued in 1888. Smith County Record, Smith Center, founded 1881 by E. M. Burr; sold to 
John Q. Royce in 1884, who changed the name to the Smith County Bulletin; consolidated in 
1890 with the Pioneer and continued under the name of Pioneer-Bulletin, J. N. Beacom and W. H. 
Nelson, editors and publishers; in 1893 name again changed to Smith County Pioneer, W. H. 
Nelson, editor and publisher. The Gaylord Herald, founded 1879 by J. W. McBride; sold in 
1901 to the Pioneer. The Bellaire News, founded 1900 by Till Vinsonhaler; sold to Pioneer in 
1901. 

ATHOL Population (1915), 305; elevation, 1786 feet; established, 1888; telephones; is on th 

Rock Island railway. 

RECORD, Democratic; Ed Bronaugh, editor and publisher, Athol. 
Weekly. Nov. 12, 1908 + 7 vols. 

Founded 1908 by W. A. Williamson. 

GAYLORD Population (1915), 368; elevation, 1594 feet; established, 1870; named for C. E. 

Gaylord, one of its founders; industries elevator, flour mill, creamery; telephones, electric 

lights; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

SENTINEL, Republican; George P. Leary, editor and publisher, Gaylord. 
Weekly. July 24, 1902 + 14 vols. 

Founded 1902 by Bert Headley. 

KENSINGTON Population (1915), 608; elevation, 1769 feet; established, 1887; industries- 
elevators, mill; telephones; is on the Rock Island railway. 

MIRROR, Democratic; Walter Boyd, editor and publisher, Kensington. 

Weekly. May 10, 1888 + 28 vols. 
Founded 1888 by W. H. Nelson and J. N. Beacom. 

LEBANON Population (1915), 695; elevation, 1812 feet; established, 1887; the old town of 
Lebanon was about 4 miles southwest of the present site, and was established in 1876; all 
buildings were moved to the new site between Sept., 1887, and Feb., 1888; named for Lebanon, 
Ky.; industries elevator, mill, cement works; telephones, electric lights, waterworks; is on 
the Rock Island railway. 

LOCKWOOD'S HERALD, independent; M. L. Lockwood, editor and publisher, Lebanon. 

Monthly. June 28, 1912 -j- 3 vols. 
Founded 1912 by M. L. Lockwood. 

TIMES, independent; H. L. Wright, editor and publisher, Lebanon. 

Semiweekly. May 7, 1903 + 13 vols. 
Continuation of the following: The Lebanon Critsrion/foundei 1887 by Byron J. Thompson; 

consolidated with the Lebanon Journal, 1903, and name changed to Lebanon Times, George w! 

Tew, editor, and L. M. Linton, publisher. Lebanon Journal, founded 1889 by J. A. Wright; 

consolidated 1903 with the Criterion and ran as the Lsbanon Times. The Lebanon Argus' 

founded 1898 by G. C. McNeice; merged with the Times 1909. 

DISCONTINUED. Volg 

Smith Cent3r Bazoo; Stewart's Bazoo. Feb. 5, 1885 1899 13 

Church Calendar (m). 1895 1896. [See Wyandotte county.] 

Democratic Messenger; Smith County Messenger. Sept. 6, 1900 1910. 10 

Independent. Smith Center and Harland. Dec. 22, 1879 1880. 1 

Kansas Free Press. Oct. 3, 18791881 ' ' 2 

Light of Liberty (m. and w). Smith Center and Lebanon. 

Sept., 18911895 3 

Northwest Expositor (m). 18911892. [See Eickinson county.] 

Pioneer (d). Nov. 1, 18871888 2 

Smith County Bulletin. Mar. 7, 1884 1890 6 

Smith County Record. Feb. 3, 1882 1884 3 

Athol News (1st). Nov. 24, 18881889 . . 1 

News (2d). Nov. 30, 19051906 



302 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DISCONTINUED. y olg 

Bellaire News. Jan. 12, 19001901 I 

Cedarville Cedar Enterprise. Apr. 13, 1911 1912 2 

Globe. July 11, 18861890 .4 

Review. Jan. 81, 1884 1885. . 1 

Telephone. May 17 Dec. 27, 1883 1 

Cora Union. Feb. 11, 18861887 1 

Gaylord Herald. Sept. 4, 18791901 22 

Harlan. . . .Advocate. June 25, 1885 1887. . 

Chief. Nov. 29, 18831885 2 

Enterprise. Nov. 24, 18871888 1 

Kensington Union Labor Trumpet. Aug. 3, 1888 1890 2 

Lebanon Argus. May 13, 18981909 .11 

Criterion. June 24, 18871903 .16 

Journal. Dec. 21, 18891903 14 

Reamsville. . . .Dispatch. Feb. 14, 1884 1885.. . 1 

People's Friend. Reamsville and Athol. Oct. 20, 18871888 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Smith Center Norton District Methodist (m). Norcatur and Smith Center. 

July, 1904 Apr., 1906. 

Smith County Bulletin (d). Sept. 13-18, 1887. 

Toiler. Oct. 11 Nov. 7, 1879. 

True Voter. Oct. 6-27, 1880. 
Lebanon Gospel Herald (m). Jan.-Sept., 1909. 



STAFFORD COUNTY. 

Organized, 1879; named for Lewis Stafford, captain of company E, 
First Kansas infantry; county seat, St. John; area, 729 square miles, 506,880 
acres; population (1915), 11,383; assessed valuation (1915), $27,527,455; 
resources and industries wheat, and stock raising. 

ST. JOHN Population (1915), 1637; elevation, 1915 feet; established, 1875; originally called 
Zion Valley by the Mormon colony settling there; name changed to St. John, July 1, 1880, in 
honor of Gov. J. P. St. John; industries elevators, roller mill; electric lights, water system, 
telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

COUNTY CAPITAL, Democratic; John W. Lill, editor and publisher, St. John. 

Weekly. Jan. 21, 1887 + 29 vols. 
Founded 1887 by I. S. Lewis and Rader. 

NEWS, Republican; Herbert J. Cornwell, editor and publisher, St. John. 

Weekly. July 26, 1888 June, 1894; Nov., 1894 -|- 27 vols. 
This is a continuation of the following: St. John Advance, founded 1880 by Ralph M. Easley ; 

consolidated 1888 with The Sun, St. John, which was founded 1885 by C. B. Weeks, and name 

changed to the St. John Weekly News, W. K. P. Dow, editor and publisher. 

HUDSON Population (1915), 251; elevation, 1867 feet; established in the early 80 's; formerly 
called Rattlesnake; name changed to Hudson about 1887; industries flour mill, elevators; 
telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

HERALD, independent; H. J. Wilcox, editor and publisher, Hudson. 

Weekly. Jan. 27, 1915 + 1 vol. 
Founded 1914 by Sam H. Barnd. 

MACKSVILLE Population (1915), 753; elevation ,2032 feet; established about 1885; named for 

George Mack, first postmaster of Stafford county; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
MACKSVILLE ENTERPRISE, independent; A. L. McMillan, editor and publisher, Macksville. 

Weekly. June 2, 1905 + 10 vols. 

This is a continuation of the Macksville Argus, founded in 1900; first issue in Society's file, vol. 1, 
No. 31, gives Miss M. L. Doran as editor and publisher; suspended July 8, 1904, and succeeded 
the latter part of that month by the Macksville Enterprise, with new volume and number. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 303 



STAFFORD Population (1915), 1728; elevation, 1865 feet; established, 1878; industries mill, 
elevator, creamery, planing mill; telephones, municipal electric light and water plants, library; 
is on the Santa Fe and Missouri Pacific railways. 
COURIER, Democratic; Nate E. Reece, editor and publisher, Stafford. 

Weekly. Dec. 18, 1902 + 13 vols. 
Founded 1902 by Nate E. Reece & Company. 
STAFFORD COUNTY REPUBLICAN, Republican; E. A. Briles, editor and publisher, Stafford. 

Weekly. Apr. 24, 1886 + 30 vols. 

Founded 1886 by R. M. Blair and Henry Inman, editors, W. H. Webb, publisher. The Al- 
liance Herald, founded 1890, with Anna Lindsley, editor, May Garvin, publisher; sold to the Re- 
publican in 1892. 

DISCONTINUED. Volg 

St. John. . . . .Advance. Apr. 10, 1880 Aug., 1884; Apr., 18851893. . . .12 

High School Echo (s-m). Jan. 10, 19111913 

Kansas Free Mason. 18941898. [See Sedgwick county.] 

Stafford County Rustler. Feb. 14, 18891890 1 

Sun. Jan. 20, 1885 1888 3 

Truth's Reflex (m). Jan., 18991901 2 

Cassoday Mirage. July 1, 18871889 1 

Stafford County Herald. Aug. 27, 18861887 1 

Hudson Patriot; Journal. Nov. 10, 1909 1913 4 

Macksville Argus. Oct. 5, 19001904 4 

Independent. Apr. 23, 18911892 1 

Index. July 18, 19011904 4 

Sun. Jan. 21 Nov. 3, 1893 

Telephone. May 17, 18881890 

Times. May 6, 18861888 3 

Milwaukee Bee; Stafford County Bee. June 15, 18821883 1 

Seward Independent. Oct. 17, 18871890 2 

Stafford . . .Alliance Herald. May 29, 1890 1892. . . 

Citizen. Nov. 30, 1877 1878 1 

People's Paper. June 16, 1892 1897 . 6 

Plain Truth. Apr. 10 Sept. 25, 1889 1 

Stafford County Democrat. Nov. 5, 1885 1888 3 

Stafford County Herald (1st). June 14, 18791885 6 

Stafford County Herald (2d). Jan. 2, 18891890 1 

Stafford County Leader. Feb. 24, 1899 1900 

Telegram. May 5, 18871888 2 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

St. John. . . . .Musical Mishap (m). Apr., 1892. 

School News (m). Sept. 1897 June, 1898. 

Bedford Pilot. Oct. 20 Nov. 3, 1881. 

Stafford Bob Shaw's Stafford County Review. Dec. 15, 1897. 

Epworth Reporter (m). June and July, 1894. 

School Journal (m). Dec. 24, 1888 Mar. 9, 1889. 



STANTON COUNTY. 

[See, also, Hamilton county.] 

Organized, 1887; named in honor of Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War; 
county seat, Johnson; area, 672 square miles, 430,080 acres; population (1915), 
824; assessed valuation (1915), $1,667,197; resources and industries agri- 
culture, and stock raising. 

JOHNSON Population (1915), estimated, 75; elevation, 3329 feet; established, 1885; originally 

called Veteran, because it was founded by veterans of the Civil War; name changed to Johnson 

City in 1886, in honor of Col. A. S. Johnson; no railway. 
PIONEER and JOURNAL-NEWS, independent; Charles Steinhoff, editor, Mrs. H. E. Jones, owner 

and publisher, Johnson. 

Weekly. June 11, 1914 + 2 vols. 

Founded 1914; early history unknown; first issue in Society's file gives Mrs. H. E. Jones as 
editor and publisher; consolidated Mar. 3, 1916, with the Stanton County Journal and Progressive- 
News. Stanton County Journal, founded 1899 by C. E. and L. E. Van Meter; in 1913 consoli- 
dated with the Progressive-News, early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being vol. 1. 
No. 27. P. H. Loomis, editor and publisher. 



304 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DISCONTINUED. Vols 

Johnson Journal. Apr. 6, 1888 1898 10 

Progressive-News. Mar. 22 Oct. 4, 1913 1 

Stanton County Eclipse. May 27, 1887 1888 1 

Stanton County Journal. June 22, 1899 1916 17 

Stanton County Republican. Nov. 23, 18891891 1 

Stanton County Sun. Dec. 11, 18911894 2 

Stanton Telegram. Cognac and Johnson City. July 6, 1888 1889 . . 2 

World. Oct. 7, 18861888 2 

Borders Border Rover. Aug. 12, 1887 1889 1 

Mitchell Courier. June 8, 18871888. . 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Eli Gazette. Aug. 18 Oct. 7, 1887. 

West Haven Stanton County Herald. May 13 June 3, 1887. 



STEVENS COUNTY. 

Organized, 1886; named for Thaddeus Stevens; county seat, Hugoton; 
area, 729 square miles, 466,560 acres; population (1915), 2370; assessed valu- 
ation (1915), $4,055,105; resources and industries agriculture, and stock 
raising. 

HUGOTON Population (1915), 308; elevation, 3200 feet; established about 1887; named in 
honor of Victor Hugo, the final syllable having been added to differentiate it from Hugo, 
Colorado; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 

HERMES, independent; E. B. McConnell, editor and publisher, Hugoton. 
Weekly. Aug. 4, 1887 + 24 vols. 

[Not published Feb. 21, 1890, to Dec. 22, 1893.] 
Founded 1887 by Chas. M. Davis. 

DISCONTINUED. Volg ^ 

Hugoton Hugo Herald. Feb. 13, 1886 1889 4 

Southwest Kansan. Jan. 11, 1896 1897 1 

Dermot Enterprise. June 2, 1887 1888 1 

Moscow Review. Apr. 7 Dec. 15, 1888 1 

Woodsdale Democrat. Mar. 11, 18871889 

Sentinel. Mar. 8, 18891892 . 3 

Stevens County Sentinel. Jan. 28, 1893 1894 1 

Stevens County Tribune. Jan. 9, 18901892 2 

Tribune Sentinel. July 8, 1892 1893 1 

Voorhees Vindicator. Oct. 4, 18871890 3 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Woodsdale Stevens County Eagle. Mar. 28 May 2, 1889. 

Times. Oct. 15 Nov. 27, 1886. 



SUMNER COUNTY. 

Organized, 1871; named in honor of Charles Sumner, of Massachusetts; 
county seat, Wellington; area, 1188 square miles, 760,320 acres; population 
(1915), 28,027; assessed valuation (1915), $56,179,977; resources and indus- 
tries building stone, marble, rock salt, mineral springs, agriculture, and 
live stock. 

WELLINGTON Population (1915), 5642; elevation, 1189 feet; established, 1871; named for 
the Duke of Wellington; industries elevators, flour and feed mills, machine shops, plow 
factory, marble and granite works; natural gas, electric lights, waterworks, paving, telephones; 
is on the Santa Fe and Rock Island railways. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 305 



JOURNAL, Republican; Chester Leasure and Burns Hegler, editors and publishers, Wellington. 

Daily (evening). Dec. 14, 1896 + 38 vols. 

Founded 1896 as the Evening Journal by W. M. Taylor; name changed in 1900 to the Wel- 
lington Journal, same editor and publisher. The Daily Mail, founded 1889, W. E. S. Traughber, 
editor, and Fred Bohanna, business manager; merged with the Journal in 1909. 

MONITOR-PRESS, Republican; J. G. Campbell, editor and publisher, Wellington. 

Weekly. Sept. 18, 1873 + 42 vols. 

This is a continuation of the following: the Oxford Times, the first paper in the county, 
founded June, 1871, by Mugford & Hughes; in 1871 it was purchased by E. R. Trask; sold in 1872 
to John H. Foulks, who changed the name to the Oxford Press; in May, 1873, he removed to 
Wellington and again changed the name, this time to the Sumner County Press. In 1886 the Wel- 
lington Daily Press was founded, with A. L. Runyon, editor, and published by the Press Printing 
Co.; suspended in 1887; the Wellington Monitor, founded 1886 by J. G. Campbell and Charles 
Hood; consolidated in 1892 with the Sumner County Press, and continued as the Wellington Moni- 
tor and Sumner County Press, Campbell & Hood, editors and publishers; name shortened same 
year to Monitor-Press. Sumner County Star, Wellington, early history unknown, first issue in 
Society's file being Mar. 14, 1895, vol. 3, No. 36, A. A. Richards, editor and publisher; consolidated 
in 1909 with the Monitor-Press. 

NEWS, Progressive; H. L. Woods, editor and publisher, Wellington. 

Daily. Sept. 2, 1901 Nov. 22, 1902. 3 vols. 

Founded 1901 by H. L. Woods and W. R. Stotler. No copy received by the Society since 
Nov. 22, 1902. 

PEOPLE'S VOICE, Democratic; Charles R. Havens, editor and publisher, Wellington. 

Weekly. Sept. 12, 1890 + 25 vols. 

Founded 1890 by Lyman Naugle. From 1893 to 1895 the following papers were issued from 
the Voice office at Wellington, all being identical except for the heading and the names of local 
editors: Mulvane Voice, Charles S. Sherman, editor; Corbin Voice, Henry Howe, editor; South 
Haven Voice, R. L. Wright, editor; Argonia Voice, E. L. Wilson, editor; Mayfield Voice, George 
R. Steele, editor; Belle Plaine Voice, Charles Hatfield, editor; Hunnewell Voice, Lyman Naugle, 
editor. Wellington Daily Voice, founded Sept., 1896, by Lyman Naugle; ran for a short time. 

SUMNER COUNTY REPUBLICAN, Progressive; H. L. Woods, editor and publisher, Wellington. 

Weekly. 
Not received by the Historical Society. 

ARGONIA Population (1915), 450; elevation, 1253 feet; established, 1881; named for the Greek 
ship Argo in which Jason sailed to Colchis in quest of the "Golden Fleece"; industries flour 
and feed mills, elevators; telephones; is on the Santa Fe and Missouri Pacific railways. 

ARGOSY, independent; G. C. Colin, editor and publisher, Argonia. 

Weekly. Oct. 23, 1913 + 2 vols. 
Founded 1913 by G. C. Colin. 

BELLE PLAINE Population (1915), 817; elevation, 1205 feet; established, 1871; name French 
words meaning "beautiful plain"; industries mill, elevators, planing mill; telephones; is on 
the Santa Fe, the Missouri Pacific and the Midland Valley railways. 

NEWS, independent; J. Byron Cain, editor and publisher, Belle Plaine. 

Weekly. Dec. 6, 1879 + 36 vols. 
Founded 1879 as the Belle Plaine Home News, by J. J. Burnes; name changed in 1880 to Belle 

Plaine News, same editor and publisher. The Defender, Belle Plaine, founded 1895 by Will W. 

Welter, sold to the News in 1904. 

CALDWELL Population (1915), 2215; elevation, 1111 feet; established, 1871; named in honor 3 { 
Alexander Caldwell, U. S. Senator from Kansas 18711873; industries mills, elevators, 
marble works; electric lights, waterworks, telephones; is on the Santa Fe, the Rock Island 
and the Kansas Southwestern railways. 
ADVANCE, independent; Clarice O. Mclntire, editor and publisher, Caldwell. 

- Weekly. Mar. 1, 1894 + 22 vols. 

This is a continuation of the following: Caldwell Post, founded 1879 by J. D. Kelly, jr.; in 
1883 consolidated with the Caldwell Commercial, founded 1880, W. B. Hutchison, editor, Hutchison 
& Spaun, publishers; continued as the Caldwell Journal, with W. B. Hutchison, editor; name 
changed 1894 to the Caldwell Weekly .Advance, John E. Wells, editor and publisher; Caldwell 
Daily Journal, founded 1887 by W. E. Powers and R. B. Swartout, discontinued same year. 

NEWS, Republican; C. B. MacDonald, editor and publisher, Caldwell. 

Weekly. Mar. 23, 1887 + 29 vols. 

Founded 1887 by Robert T. Simons. The Daily News, founded 1887 by Mr. Simons; dis- 
continued same year. 

20 



306 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



CONWAY SPRINGS Population (1915), 941; elevation, 1358 feet; established, 1884; named 
for Conway township and for mineral springs on the town site; industries mills; telephones; 
is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

STAR, independent; E. L. Cline, editor and publisher, Conway Springs. 

Weekly. June 12, 1885 + 30 vols. 
Founded 1885; early history unknown, Society's first issue being vol. 1, No. 35, Wolfe & 

Anderson, publishers, Magill & Wolfe, proprietors; Aug. 7, 1885, A. M. Anderson became the editor 

and proprietor. 

HUNNE WELL Population (1915), 187; elevation, 1104 feet; established, 1880; named for H. H. 

Hunnewell; industries mills, elevators; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
HERALD, local; C. V. Cole, editor and publisher. Hunnewell. 
Weekly. Dec. 2, 1915 + 

Founded 1914; early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being vol. 2, No. 42. 

MILAN Population (1915), 253; elevation, 1221 feet; established, 1878; industries elevator, 

mill; telephones; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
NEWS, independent; Fred Scott, editor and publisher, Milan. 
Weekly. Jan. 19,. 1911 + 5 vols. 

Founded 1910 by C. E. DeVore. 

MULVANE Population (1915), 1024; elevation, 1230 feet; established, 1879; named for John R. 
Mulvane; industries mills, elevator; natural gas, electric lights, telephones; is on the Santa 
Fe railway. 
NEWS, independent; J. L. Papes, editor and publisher, Mulvane. 

Weekly. July 30, 1903 + 13 vols. 

Founded 1903 by C. E. and W. A. Farney. Mulvane Record; early history unknown; first 
issue in Society's file, vol. 3, No. 9, gives G. L. Reed, editor and publisher; merged with the News 
in 1906. 

OXFORD Population (1915), 641; elevation, 1163 feet; established January, 1871; originally 
called Nep-tah-wal-lah for an Osage chief; town site purchased by the Oxford Town and Im- 
migration Company in the early summer of 1871 and name changed to Oxford; industries 
mill, elevator; telephones; is on the Santa Fe, the Missouri Pacific and the Midland Valley 
railways. 

REGISTER, independent; Harry Hoffman, editor and publisher, Oxford. 

Weekly. Feb. 15, 1884 19JLO. 21 vols. 
Founded 1884, with W. A. Martin and J. S. Converse, editors and publishers; in Nov., 1887 

name changed to the Oxford Weekly Register, J. S. Converse, editor and publisher; 1888, sold to 

A. A. Richards, who changed the name to the Mocking Bird, taking a new volume and number. 

Sold in 1893 to C. B. MacDonald who changed the name back to the Oxford Register. Late history 

not known; not received by the Society since 1910. 

SOUTH HAVEN Population (1915), 433; elevation, 1123 feet; established, 1878; named for 
South Haven, Michigan; telephones; is on the Santa Fe and the Kansas Southwestern railways. 

1NEW ERA, local; A. V. Wilkinson, editor and publisher, South Haven. 

Weekly. Feb. 20, 1886 + 30 vols. 
Founded 1886 by W. S. Chenoweth. 

DISCONTINUED. VoZs 

Wellington Christian Reminder (m). Feb. 15, 18331891 . . 3 

Gazette (d). Sept. 7, 18891890 

Journal. Aug. 5, 18921893 1 

Kansas Weather Observer (m). Jan., 1885 1886 1 

Mail (d). Nov. 2, 18891909 '. 40 

Methodist News (m). May, 18901892 1 

Monitor. Jan. 15, 18861892 6 

Postal Card (1st) (d). Apr. 11, 1885 1837 

Postal Card (2d) (d). Jan. 1 Juna 17, 1393. . . 1 

Press (d). Feb. 20, 18861887 '. 3 

Primitive Christian. Jan. 19, 1893 1894 1 

Quid Nunc (d). Jan. 14, 1887 1888 3 

Quid Nunc. Feb. 11, 18871888 2 

Railroad Employee's Companion. 1888 -1890. [See Franklin county.] 

Republican. Mar. 27 Aug. 28, 1886 1 

School Times (s-m). Nov. 15, 18941895 . . 1 

Standard (d). June 7, 18871889 4 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



307 



DISCONTINUED. Volg 

Sumner County Democrat. Apr. 25, 1877 1881 4 

Sumner County Standard. Sept. 27, 1884 1896 11 

Sumner County Star. Mar. 14, 18951909 .15 

Vidette (s-w). May 9 Dec. 4, 1879 1 

Voice (d). Sept. 14 Nov. 7, 1896 1 

Wellingtonian. Mar. 3, 1881 1885 . 5 

Wellingtonian (d). May 2 Oct. 6, 1885 1 

Argonia Clipper. Mar. 8, 18841915 31 

People's Press, Argonia and Milan. Jan. 22, 1891 1892 1 

People's Voice. 18901892 2 

Voice. Mar. 16, 18941895 1 

Belle Plaine Defender. Nov. 7, 18951904 . 9 

Kansas Odd Fellow. May 1, 18821883 1 

Resident. Apr. 9, 1885 1886. .. 

Voice. Mar. 16, 18941895 1 

Caldwell . . ... Commercial. May 6, 18801883 . 3 

Epworth Lever (m). South Haven and Caldwell. Oct., 1894 1898. .. . 4 
[Called Methodist Lever and the Good Samaritan, 18941896.] 

Free Press. Sept. 19, 18851886 1 

Industrial Age. Caldwell and Wellington. July 29, 18871889 . . 1 

Journal. May 17, 1883 Sept., 1891; May, 1892 1894. . . 11 

Journal (d). Oct. 7 Nov. 29, 1887 1 

News (d). Oct. 7 Nov. 29, 1887 1 

Oklahoma War Chief. Jan. 12, 18831886 4 

[Published at Wichita, Jan. 12 Mar. 9, 1883; Geuda Springs, Mar. 23 
July 19, 1883, and Aug. 30, 1884; Oklahoma Ty., Apr. 26 May 3, 
1884; Arkansas City, May 10, 1884, and Feb. 3 June 11, 1885; South 
Haven, Oct. 23 Dec. 4, 1884; Caldwell, June 18, 1885 Aug. 12,1886.] 

Post. Jan. 2, 18791883 .4 

Standard. Feb. 7 Sept. 11, 1884 1 

Times. June 5, 18861887 1 

Conway Springs. . . .Reflector (2d). Feb. 20, 19021905 4 

[See, also, Finney county.] 

Truth. Mar. 17, 18981899 2 

Corbin Voice. Mar. 16, 18941895 1 

Geuda Springs. . . .Geuda News. Sept. 16, 1898 1899 1 

Geuda News. June 21, 19121914 2 

Herald (1st). Aug. 22, 18821895 13 

Herald (2d). June 21, 19011906 . 5 

News. July 3, 1884 1885 1 

Hunnewell Reporter. Sept. 3, 18971898 1 

Rustler. Hunnewell and South Haven. Dec. 14, 18891890 1 

Star. Jan. 14 Nov. 25, 1905 1 

Voice. Mar. 23, 18941895 1 

Mayfield Voice. Mar. 16, 18941895 1 

Milan Press. Jan. 28, 18921899 7 

Mulvane. . . . .Gospel Press (m). Attica and Mulvane. July, 18971903 .6 

Graphic. June 18, 18911893 .2 

Herald. Mar. 26, 18801882 2 

Record. Mar. 21, 18851906 . . 22 

Voice. Mar. 16, 1894 1895 1 

Oxford . ..Bee. Jan. 8, 1899 1900. .. 2 

Independent. May 27, 18761878 2 

Mocking Bird. Apr. 14, 18881893 6 

Reflex. Apr. 1 Aug. 26, 1880 1 

South Haven . . . .News. June 22, 18851886 1 

Patrick Henry. Jan. 9, 18901891 1 

Voice. Mar. 16, 18941895 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Wellington. Bandman (m). Feb.-July, 1893. 

Gazette. Jan. 3-31, 1890. 

Juvenile. Aug. 5, 1892 Mar. 25, 1893. 

Public School Journal (m). Oct. 25, 1890 Apr., 1892. 

Rambler. Apr. and May, 1886. 

Stars and Stripes. May, 1888 July, 1890. 

Caldwell Standard (d). June 20 July 2, 1884. 

Geuda Springs Crank. Sept. 4 Nov., 1886. 

South Haven Rustler. Sept. 24 Dec. 31, 1892. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Wellington Bee (tri-w) . May 27, 1895. 

Leader. May 17 June 21, 1907. 

Sumner County News. Nov. 26, 1902 Jan. 21, 1903. 

Sumner County Real Estate Exchange, Spring and Summer, 1892. 



308 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Belle Plaine Gazette. Sept. 26, and Oct. 3, 1907. 

Conway Springs. . . .Reflector (m). Aug., 1898 Aug., 1899. 

Hunnewell Times. May 12, and June 23, 1900. 

Milan Herald (m). Sept., 1899 June, 1900. 

Oxford Weekly. Dec. 16, 1880 Mar. 11, 1881. 

South Haven Star. Feb. 28 May 9, 1902. 

Sumner City Gazette. Sept. 16, 30, Oct. 28, and Nov. 19, 1871. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 3. 

Wellington . .Leader. Apr. 18 June 5, 1907. 

Standard (d). Mar. 27 Apr. 13, 1895. 



THOMAS COUNTY. 

Organized, October 8, 1885; named for Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas; 
county seat, Colby; area, 1080 square miles, 691,200 acres; population (1915), 
3996; assessed valuation (1915), $11,428,206; resources and industries 
wheat, barley, and stock raising. 

COLBY Population (1915), 767; elevation, 3138 feet; established, 1881; named for J. R. Colby; 

industries flour and feed mill, elevators, creamery, bottling works; electric lights, water 

system, telephones; is on the Union Pacific and the Rock Island railways. 
FREE PRESS, Democratic; E. F. Foor, editor and publisher, Colby. 
Weekly. Aug. 29, 1889 + 26 vols. 

Founded 1889 by Borden & Edmunds. 

TRIBUNE, Republican; Oren M. Beauchamp, editor and publisher, Colby. 
Weekly. May 17, 1888 + 28 vols. 

Founded 1888 by I. A. Kelley. The Thomas County Cat, Colby, founded 1885 by D. M. Dunn 
and E. P. Worcester. The Hastings Gazette, founded 1888 by G.F.Roberts; moved to Brewster 
same year and name changed to Brewster Gazette, same management; Nov., 1890, merged with 
the Thomas County Cat, Colby, G. F. Roberts, editor and publisher; February, 1891, merged with 
the Tribune, P. A. Troutfetter, editor and publisher. 

REXFORD Population (1915), estimated, 75; elevation, 2955 feet; established about 1887; 

supposed to have been named for a member of the Rexford family, either A. F. or J. W.; 

telephones; is on the Rock Island railway. 

NEWS, Republican; A. A. Gillispie, editor and publisher, Rexford. 
Weekly. Apr. 24, 1903 + 13 vols. 

The second paper of the same name; was founded in 1903 by W. H. Miller. 

DISCONTINUED. y 0/8 

Colby... ..Democrat. Aug. 12, 1886 1889 ... 3 

News. May 25,f 1892 1893 1 

Thomas County Cat. Mar. 12, 18851891 6 

Brewster Gazette. Aug. 25, 1888 1890 . 2 

Hustler. Jan. 15 July 30, 1909 1 

Record. June 28, 19071908 1 

Gem .Leader. Aug. 18, 19091911 2 

Hastings Gazette. Feb. 10 Aug. 18, 1888 1 

Menlo Enterprise. Aug. 27, 19091912 . . .3 

Record. June 17, 19071912 5 

Quickville Courier. Jan. 6 Feb. 24, 1888 1 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 309 



TREGO COUNTY. 

Organized, June 21, 1879; named for Edgar P. Trego, captain of company 
H, Eighth Kansas infantry; county seat, Wa Keeney; area, 900 square miles, 
576,000 acres; population (1915), 4623; assessed valuation (1915), $9,792,918; 
resources and industries chalk beds, agriculture, and live stock. 

WA KEENEY Population (1915), 702; elevation, 2456 feet; established, 1878; name a composite 
word from the names of the founders, Albert E. Warren and James F. Keeney; municipal 
electric light and water plants, telephones; is on the Union Pacific railway. 

TREGO COUNTY REPORTER, Democratic; J. W. Bingham, editor, H. F. Kline, publisher, Wa Keeney. 

Weekly. Sept. 9, 1909 + 6 vols. 
Founded 1895 as the Independent, W. C. Olson & Son, editors and publishers; name changed 

1909 to Trego County Reporter, with Sam M. Wassam, editor and publisher. 

TREGO COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL JOURNAL, school; edited and published by the faculty of Trego 
County High School, Wa Keeney. 

Monthly. 

Not received by the Society. 
WESTERN KANSAS WORLD, Republican; H. S. Givler, editor and publisher, Wa Keeney. 

Weekly. Mar. 15, 1879 + 37 vols. 

Founded 1879 as the Wa Keeney Weekly World, by W. S. Tilton; name changed in 1885 to 
the Western Kansas World, same editor and publisher. Trego County Republican, Wa Keeney, 
founded 1887 by Shepard & Logan; merged with the World in 1887. 

DISCONTINUED. 



Wa Keeney Independent. Dec. 21, 18951909 . 



Kansas Leader. Aug. 6, 18791881 

News (d). May 11, 1912 1913 . ... 

Omnicrat. Feb. 9, 18931895 

Trego County Republican. May 12, 1887 1889 

Trego County Tribune. Dec. 10, 18851890 



14 
2 
1 
2 
2 
4 
Cyrus Globe. May 20, 18821883 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Wa Keeney Examiner. Dec. 4, 1902. 

Short Grass News. Apr. 6, 13, 1912. 

Sun. Nov. 4, 1892 Feb. 2, 1893. 

Ogallah News. May 21, 1887. 

Tregola Index. Aug. 7 Oct. 23, 1886. 



WABAUNSEE COUNTY. 

Organized, 1859; created in 1855 as Richardson county, and named for 
Wm. P. Richardson, a pro-slavery member of the Kansas territorial council, 
1855 and 1857; name changed February 11, 1859, to Wabaunsee, in honor of a 
Pottawatomie chief; county seat, Alma; area, 804 square miles, 514,560 
acres; population (1915), 11,904; assessed valuation (1915), $24,696,772; 
resources and industries building stone, agriculture, and stock raising. 

ALMA Population (1915), 794; elevation, 1060 feet; established, 1857; named for a city in Ger- 
many and in memory of the battle of Alma, Crimean war; industries flour mill, bottling 
works, stone quarries; telephones, electric lights; is on the Santa Fe and Rock Island rail- 
ways. 

ENTERPRISE, Republican; Frank I. Sage and O. W. Little, editors and publishers, Alma. 

Weekly. Oct. 11, 1884 + 31 vols. 
Founded 1884 by V. C. Welch and Frank I. Sage. 
SIGNAL, independent; R. E. Lewis, editor and publisher, Alma. 

Weekly. Sept. 7, 1889 + 26 vols. 

Founded 1890 by Matt Thomson. 



310 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



ALTA VISTA Population (1915), 467; elevation, 1432 feet; established, 1884; formerly called 
Pike, later Cable City; name changed to Alta Vista, "high view," in March, 1887; industries- 
elevator, feed mill; telephones, electric lights; is on the Rock Island railway. 

JOURNAL, independent; W. C. Coates, editor and publisher, Alta Vista. 

Weekly. June 9, 1899 + 17 vols. 
Founded in 1899 by Fred D. James. 

ESKRIDGE Population (1915), 808; elevation, 1412 feet; established, 1868; named for C. V. 

Eskridge, who bought the first town lots; industries creamery; telephones, electric lights; 

is on the Santa Fe railway. 

TRIBUNE-STAR, Republican; H. E. Rickle and W. H. Melrose, editors and publishers, Eskridge. 
Weekly. Oct. 19, 1883 + 32 vols. 

Continuation of the Eskridge Star, founded 1883 by J. J. Mitchell; consolidated in 1909 with 
the Wabaunsee County Tribune. The Eskridge Tribune, founded 1900 by F. M. and A. B. Hart- 
man; name changed in 1901 to Wabaunsee County Tribune, with F..M. Hartman and F. A. Seaman , 
editors, A. B. Hartman, publisher; consolidated 1909 with the Star and name changed to Eskridge 
Tribune-Star, Ned Dill, editor, W. H. Melrose, manager, Tribune Publishing Company publishers. 

HARVEYVILLE Population (1915), 282; elevation, 1113 feet; established, 1880; Harveyvflle 
post office established in 1869 one mile north of present site of Harvey ville; named for Henry 
Harvey, missionary to the Shawnee Indians and an early settler; town moved to new site 
on advent of the railroad; telephones, electric lights; is on the Santa Fe railway. 
MONITOR, independent; R. R. Rea, editor and publisher, Harveyvflle. 

Weekly. Feb. 19, 1904 + 12 vols. 
Founded 1903 by E. J. Dill. 

DISCONTINUED. Volss , 

Alma.. ..Blade. Mar. 14, 1877 1878. . 1 

C. M. A. Emblem (m). May, 1908 1910 2 

Union. Jan. 17 May 8, 1872 1 

Wabaunsee County Herald; Alma Weekly Union. Apr. 1, 1869 1872 ... 3 

Wabaunsee County Herald (2d). Dec. 25, 18791881 2 

Wabaunsee County News. Jan. 1, 1873 1894 21 

Wabaunsee County Truth (m). Dec., 18981899 1 

Alta Vista Bugle. June 7, 18891890 1 

Record. Apr. 17, 18901895 6 

Register. June 16, 18871889 2 

Eskridge Bible School Advocate (m). Jan. 1, 19031904 2 

Free Discussion. 1886 1887. [See Shawnee county.] 

Home Weekly. Sept. 6, 18811888 7 

Land Mark. Oct. 17, 18731883 2 

[Not published Dec., 1874, to June, 1883.] 

Tribune. Aug. 18, 19001909 8 

Wabaunsee County Democrat. June 11 Nov. 26, 1886 1 

Harveyville Herald. June 11 Aug. 13, 1886. 

[Bound with Wabaunsee County Democrat, Eskridge.] 

Maple Hill News. Dec. 30, 19101911; 1 

Paxico Courier. Aug. 30, 18881889 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Alma Teacher, Patron and Pupil (m). Oct. 1, 1897 Dec. 1, 1899. 

Eskridge Wabaunsee County Sun. Oct. 11 Nov. 29, 1888. 

Wabaunsee Patriot. Sept. 7 Oct. 19, 1861. 



WALLACE COUNTY. 

Organized, 1868; organization declared void by supreme court and legis- 
lative enactment; reorganized, 1889; named for Gen. Wm. H. L. Wallace; 
county seat, Sharon Springs; area, 900 square miles, 576,000 acres; popula- 
tion (1915), 2090; assessed valuation (1915), $5,176,793; resources and in- 
dustries agriculture, and stock raising. 

SHARON SPRINGS Population (1915), 645; elevation, 3440 feet; established, 1868, as Eagle 
Tail Station; name changed to Sharon Springs in 1886, for Sharon Springs, N. Y.; telephones ; 
is on the Union Pacific railway. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 311 



WESTERN TIMES, Republican; W. E. Ward, editor and publisher, Sharon Springs. 

Weekly. Oct. 16, 1886 + 30 vols. 

This is a continuation of a paper published in Chicago, 111., for twelve years by Mrs. M. E- 
DeGeer; moved to Garden City, Kan., in 1885, and started publication as the Western Times, 
M. E. DeGeer and S. W. Case, editors and publishers; in 1886 moved to Scott, Scott county, with 
Kate B. Russell, editor and publisher, and M. E. DeGeer, corresponding editor, the first issue 
being vol. 12, No. 19, dated May 13; moved to Sharon Springs same year [1886], first issue being 
dated Oct. 16, vol. 13, No. 1, with same management; second issue numbered vol. 2, No. 2. Sharon 
Springs Leader, founded 1887 by Joe F. White; absorbed by the Western Times, in 1891. The 
Weskansan, Weskan, founded in 1888 by the Weskan Publishing Company. The Alliance Echo, 
Sharon Springs, founded 1890 by J. K. Laycock and O. J. Benjamin; consolidated with the Wes- 
kansan, September, 1891; Weskansan consolidated with the Western Times in 1899. The Com- 
monwealth, Sharon Springs, founded 1910 by F. C. Griffith; consolidated 1913 with the Western 
Times. 

DISCONTINUED. 



Sharon Springs ..... Alliance Echo. July 18, 18901891 ................................. 1 

Commonwealth. July 15, 19101913 ............................... 4 

Leader. Jan. 1, 18871891 ........................................ 5 

People's Voice. Mar. 13, 18921897 ................................ 5 

Wallace ........... Herald. Mar. 10, 18881889 ...................................... 1 

Wallace County Gazette. June 4, 18901891 ........................ 1 

Wallace County News. June 12, 18861887 ......................... 1 

Wallace County Register. Jan. 2, 18861890 ........................ 4 

Weskan ........... Weskansan. Dec. 6, 18881899 .................................... 11 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 
Sharon Springs ..... Rose of Sharon. Apr. 28 Sept. 9, 1886. 

Wallace ........... Wallace County Index. Mar. 9 Aug. 3, 1906. 

Western Kansas Rustler. Aug. 17 Sept. 30, 1886. 



WASHINGTON COUNTY. 

Organized, 1860; named in honor of George Washington; county seat, 
Washington; area, 900 square miles, 576,000 acres; population (1915), 19,001; 
assessed valuation (1915), $41,059,664; resources and industries agricul- 
ture, and stock raising. 

WASHINGTON Population (1915), 1405; elevation, 1322 feet; established, 1859; first called 
Washington Center; industries flour mill, carriage and wagon shops; electric lights, tele- 
phones, municipal waterworks; is on the C. B. & Q. and the Missouri Pacific railways. 
HIGH SCHOOL NEWS, school; published by the students of Washington High School. 

Weekly. Mar. 6, 1916 + 
Founded 1916 by the students. 
PALLADIUM, Democratic; Samuel Clarke, editor and publisher, Washington. 

Weekly. Jan. 13 Sept. 15, 1893; Nov. 27, 1897 + 18 vols. 
Founded 1893 by Samuel Clarke. 
REPUBLICAN-REGISTER, Republican; J. H. Barley, editor and publisher, Washington. 

Weekly. Jan. 7, 1876 + 40 vols. 

This is a continuation of the following: Western Observer, Washington, founded Mar. 25, 
1869, by Mark J. Kelley; in May, 1870, the paper was sold to George W. Shriner and James F. 
Tallman, and its name changed to the Magnet; on Aug. 18, 1870, Messrs. Mark J. Kelley and 
J. O. Young founded the Washington Kansas Republican, and a daily edition was issued during 
the political campaign from Oct. 19 to Nov. 8, 1870, being the first daily ever issued in the county; 
in Jan., 1871, J. O. Young purchased the Magnet from Mr. Shriner, and Mr. Kelley's interest in 
the Republican, consolidating the two papers under the name Republican and Magnet; after a 
few months the paper appeared as the Republican; in 1894 name changed to the Washington 
Republic, with L. J. Sprengle, editor and publisher; name again changed to Washington Republican 
in 1896, L. A. Palmer, editor and publisher; in 1905 consolidated with the Register, and continued 
as the Republican-Register, C. E. Ingalls, editor and publisher. Washington County Register, 
Washington, founded 1880, by Williamson & Clarke [the Society's file lacks all of vol. 11. The 
Daily Register, founded 1882 by Clarke & Clarke; discontinued same year. Washington Post, 
founded in 1883 by Charles F. Barrett. Washington Daily Post (1st), founded 1886 by Charles 
F. Barrett; issued during the county fair. Washington Daily Post (2d), founded 1887 by Mr. 
Barrett; discontinued same year; the Post consolidated with the Register in 1895 and ran as the 
Post-Register, with J. T. Hole and James Pontius, editors and publishers. The Watchman, Wash- 
ington, founded 1896 by the Watchman Publishing Company, consolidated in 1898 with the 
Post-Register; in 1902 the name of the Post-Register changed to the Washington Register, J. A. 
Totten, editor and publisher, and ran under that name until its consolidation with the Republican. 



312 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



1BARNES Population (1915), 417; elevation, 1328 feet; established, 1870; originally called 
Elm Grove; name changed to Barnes in 1876, in honor of A. S. Barnes; telephones; is on the 
Missouri Pacific railway. 

CHIEF, Republican; Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Shannon, editors and publishers, Barnes. 

Weekly. Mar. 22, 1894 + 22 vols. 
Founded in 1894 by L. C. Solt. 

CLIFTON Population (1915), 342; elevation, 1261 feet; present town established 1870; named 
for the surveyor who platted the original town in 1859; industries stone quarries, mill, 
elevators; telephones; is on the Rock Island, the Missouri Pacific and the Union Pacific rail- 
ways. 

NEWS, independent; J. M. Foster, editor and publisher, Clifton. 

Weekly. Dec. 18, 1885 + 30 vols. 
Founded in 1885 as the Local News by J. M. and J. C. Padgett (Padgett Bros.); in 1891 name 

changed to Clifton News, L. A. Palmer, editor and publisher. 

GREENLEAF Population (1915), 797; elevation, 1412 feet; established, 1876; named for A. W- 
Greenleaf, of Boston, Mass.; telephones, municipal waterworks; is on the Missouri Pacific 
railway. 

SENTINEL, Republican; Hoy Smith, editor and publisher, Greenleaf. 

Weekly. Aug. 10, 1894 + 21 vols. 
Founded 1894 by James C. Freeley. 

HADDAM Population (1915), 412; elevation, 1387 feet; established, 1869; named for Haddam, 

Conn.; telephones; is on the C. B. & Q. railway. 

CUPPER-LEADER, independent; S. H. and J. S. Graves, editors and publishers, Haddam. 
Weekly. 1883 + 32 vols. 

Clipper, founded 1883 by J. B. Campbell. Haddam Leader (2d), founded 1910 by the Leader 
Publishing Company, J. C. Jenkins, business manager; consolidated 1912 with the Clipper and 
issued as the Haddam Clipper-Leader, H. M. Woolman, editor and publisher. 

HANOVER Population (1915), 1000; elevation, 1225 feet; established, 1869; named;for Hanover, 
Germany; industries mill, canning factory, nursery; telephones, electric lights, municipal 
water plant; is on the C. B. & Q. and the St. Joseph & Grand Island railways. 
DEMOCRAT AND ENTERPRISE, independent; Frank E. La Shelle, editor and publisher, Hanover. 

Weekly. Oct. 25, 1877 + 38 vols. 

This is a continuation of the Washington County Sun, Hanover, founded 1877 by IE. N. 
Emmons; name changed in 1878 to the Hanover Democrat, with J. M. Hood, editor and pub- 
lisher. Hanover Enterprise, founded 1896 by Robert Baldwin; consolidated in 1899 with the 
Democrat, and continued as the Hanover Democrat-Enterprise, James Pontius, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

HERALD, Democratic; D. O. Munger, editor and publisher, Hanover. 

Weekly. July 6, 1900 + 16 vols. 
Founded 1900 by D. O. Munger. 

LINN Population (1915), 277; elevation, 1463 feet; established, 1877; originally called Summit; 

telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 
DIGEST, Republican; W. T. Logan, editor and publisher, Linn. 
Weekly. Oct. 8, 1897 + 18 vols. 

Founded 1897 by L. H. and Ruth Coff. 

MAHASKA Population (1915), 201; elevation, 1603 feet; established, 1888; probably named, 
indirectly, for Mah-hos-kah, White Cloud, Chief of the Kiowa Indians; telephones; is on the 
Rock Island railway. 

LEADER, independent; W. E. Muth, editor and publisher, Ollie L. Muth, associate editor, Mahaska. 

Weekly. Sept. 22, 1905 + 10 vols. 
Founded 1905 by W. E. Muth. 

PALMER Population (1915), 209; elevation, 1325 feet; established, 1878; named for J. Palmer; 

telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

INDEX, Republican; George W. Sangster, editor and publisher; Mrs. G. W. Sangster, associate 
editor, Palmer. 

Weekly. Dec. 18, 1903 + 12 vols. 
Founded 1903 by C. A. Welshre 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 313 



DISCONTINUED. y olg 

Washington Kansas Magnet; Republican; Republican Valley Watchman. 1870 1871, 1 

Kansas Republican (d). Oct. 19 Nov. 7, 1870 1 

Little Blue. Jenkins Mills, Neb. Aug. 21, 1869 Mar. 16, 1870 f 1 

Observer. Mar. 25, 1869 June 23, 1870 

Post. May 4 Dec. 14, 1883; Nov. 6, 18851895. . . .9 

Post (d). Apr. 19 Aug. 2, 1887 1 

Register (d). Sept. 5-20, 1882. 

[Bound with Washington County Register. 1881 1882.] 

Times (d). May 13, 18871888 1 

Watchman. Jan. 3, 18961898 3 

Washington County Register; Post Register. Aug. 20, 1881 1905 24 

Washington County Register (d). Aug. 3, 18841885 2 

Barnes Enterprise. Aug. 6, 1885 1895 10 

Clifton Baptist Visitor. [See Republic county.] 

Localist. Mar. 16 Dec. 14, 1878 1 

Review. Feb. 27, 18791892 . . 13 

Times. May 6, 18921893 2 

Greenleaf Enterprise. Mar. 20 Oct. 9, 1896 1 

Herald. Sept. 14, 18831889 6 

Independent. Sept. 15, 1882 1883 1 

Journal; Independent Journal. Jan. 15, 1881 1895 15 

Parish Pages (m). Nov., 19011903 2 

Haddam. ... . .Investigator. May 10, 18881889 ... 1 

Leader (1st). Oct. 22, 19091910 1 

Leader (2d). Apr. 15, 19101912 2 

New Era. Aug. 26, 18861887 . . 1 

Politician. Feb. 15 Sept. 5, 1889 1 

Hanover Enterprise. Nov. 20, 18961899 3 

Grit. Aug. 8, 18841885 1 

Western Independent. May 18, 18761877 . . 1 

Hollenberg Record. Jan. 19 Oct. 19, 1889 1 

Linn Gazette. Nov. 1, 18891890 1 

Local Record. Aug. 8, 18901891 1 

Palmer Index (1st). Jan. 6 July 28, 1894 1 

Pioneer (1st). Jan. 7, 18881890 3 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Washington Morning and Day of Reform (m). July, Aug., 1884. 

Post (d). Sept. 21-25, 1886. 

Washington County Answer. Feb. 1, 1882. 

Greenleaf Safeguard. Sept. 22, 1887 Jan. 20, 1888. 

Haddam Times. Mar. 1-15, 1890. 

Hollenberg Argus. May 15, 1885. 

Palmer Globe. Feb. 23 Aug. 23, 1884. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Washington Free Thought Ideal. Mar. 1, 1898. 

Independent. Aug. 12, 1899. 

Register (M. E. Conference daily). Mar. 4-7, 1891. 

Washington County Independent. Jan. 5, 12, 1900. 

Clifton Journal. May 18 June 22, 1878. 

Haddam Gazette. Nov. 22, 1879. 

Hanover Enterprise (1st). May 24, 1873. 

Palmer Pioneer (2d). Feb. 13 Mar. 6, 1891. 



WICHITA COUNTY. 

Organized, 1886; named for the Wichita Indians; county seat, Leoti; area, 
720 square miles, 460,800 acres; population (1915), 1519; assessed valuation 
(1915), $3,447,596; resources and industries agriculture, and stock raising. 

LEOTI Population (1915), 273; elevation, 3300 feet; established, 1885; called Bonasa from 
Jan. 6, 1886, to Jan. 18, 1887, when name Leoti was restored; industries flour mill, elevator; 
telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 



314 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



STANDARD, Republican; Clyde K. Gerard, editor and publisher. Leoti. 

Weekly. Nov. 19, 1885 Oct. 14, 1909; Sept. 9, 1915 Mar. 16, 1916. 24 vols. 
Founded 1885 as the Wichita Standard, Leoti, by C. S. Triplett; name changed in 1889 to 
the Leoti Standard, same editor and publisher. (Not received by the Society since Mar. 16,1916. 

DISCONTINUED. VoZs> 

Leoti . . . . Lance. Apr. 29, 18861887 . . 1 

Transcript. May 5, 18871890 3 

Western Farmer. Farmer City and Leoti. Apr. 5, 1889 1890 2 

Western Kansan. Jan. 2, 1891 1897 7 

Wichita County Democrat. Aug. 19, 18861887 1 

Coronado Star. Aug. 12, 18861887 1 

Wichita County Herald. July 15, 18861887 1 

Selkirk Graphic. Sept. 26, 18891891 1 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Coronado Chronicle. Jan. 12 Mar. 15, 1888. 

Wichita County Farmer. Feb. 9 Mar. 1, 1888. 



WILSON COUNTY. 

Organized, 1867; named for Col. Hiero T. Wilson, of Fort Scott; county 
seat, Fredonia; area, 576 square miles, 368,640 acres; population (1915), 
19,797; assessed valuation (1915), $30,966,642; resources and industries 
natural gas, oil, brick clay, cement rock, agriculture, and stock raising. 

FREDONIA Population (1915), 3472; elevation, 864 feet; established, 1868; named for Fre- 
donia, N. Y.; industries flour and feed mills, foundry, machine shop, iron works, window 
glass factory, cement and brick plants, linseed oil mill; electric lights, telephones, municipal 
water system; is on the Santa Fe, the Missouri Pacific and the St. Louis & San Francisco 
railways. 

HERALD, Democratic; E. F. and Ben S. Hudson, editors and publishers, Fredonia. 
Weekly. Mar. 20, 1891 + 25 vols. 
Daily [evening]. Apr. 29, 1904 + 24 vols. 
Founded 1891 by Jesse Williams as the Alliance Herald; name changed 1901 to the Fredonia 

Herald, J. M. Kennedy, editor and publisher. Fredonia Daily Herald; founded 1904 by Max J. 

Kennedy. 

WILSON COUNTY CITIZEN, Republican; John S. Gilmore, editor and publisher, Fredonia. 

Weekly. June 6, 1873 + 43 vols. 

This paper was first issed Apr. 21, 1870, at Guilford as the Guilford Citizen by John S. Gil- 
more. The type was new, but the press was one that had been used in the printing of the Emporia 
News for thirteen years. On Oct. 22, 1870, the Citizen contained its own obituary, and the office 
was then moved to Neodesha, where on Nov. 18, the same year, Mr. Gilmore issued the first 
number of the Wilson County Citizen, which continued to appear regularly until Nov. 29, 1872, 
when it was discontinued. In May, 1873, Mr. Gilmore purchased the office of the Fredonia Journal, 
discontinuing the Journal and resurrecting the Wilson County Citizen, which appeared June 6, 
1873 (vol. 3, No. 27). The Fredonia Journal was founded Jan. 13, 1871, by Messrs. W. A. Peffer 
and George M. Wellman, who had purchased the office of the Wilson County Courier. The Courier 
was first established at Le Roy as the Le Roy Courier in Oct., 1866, by William J. Kent and William 
Higgins, and suspended in 1868. On Oct. 30, 1869, the Le Roy Courier (2d) was established by John 
R. Jennings, who used the old stereotyped heading of the first Courier, which he found in the 
town and appropriated to his use for economy's sake. This paper was continued until Jan., 1870, 
when it was discontinued and the office moved to Fredonia, where it passed into the hands of 
Messrs. Peffer and Wellman. 

ALTOONA Population (1915), 1009; elevation, 875 feet; established, 1869; originally called 

Geddesburg; name changed to Altoona, for Altoona, Pa., in 1870; industries zinc smelter; 

cement plant, flour mill, elevator, brick plant, natural gas; telephones, waterworks, electric 

lights; is on the Missouri Pacific railway. 

TRIBUNE, independent; Austin V. Butcher, editor and publisher, Altoona. 
Weekly. Jan. 19, 1905 + 11 vols. 

Founded 1903; early history unknown. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 315 



BUFFALO Population (1915), 736; elevation, 975 feet; established, 1867; named for the Ameri- 
can buffalo; industries brick plant, mill, natural gas; electric lights, telephones; is on the 
Missouri Pacific railway. 

ADVOCATE, independent; N. B. Anthony, editor and publisher, Buffalo. 

Weekly. Apr. 3, 1889 + 27 vols. 
This is a continuation of the Buffalo Express, founded 1888 by W. H. Jones; sold in 1889 and 

name changed to Buffalo Advocate, with Nannie Libbey, editor and publisher. 

NEODESHA Population (1915), 3011; elevation, 796 feet; established, 1869; name is of Osage 
origin, meaning "meeting of the waters"; industries flour mills, brick and tile plant, bottle 
glass factory, oil wells and refinery, cement plant, zinc smelter, broom factory, railroad shops ; 
electric lights, waterworks, telephones; is on the Missouri Pacific and St. Louis & San Francisco 
railways. 
REGISTER, Republican; Paul Wiley, editor and publisher, Neodesha. 

Weekly. Nov. 30, 1883 Mar., 1893; Mar., 1894 + 31 vols. 

Founded 1883 by John S. Gilmore; name changed 1893 to the Railroad Register, with J. 
Kansas Morgan, editor and publisher; moved to Topeka 1893, with Morgan & Dunn, editors and 
publishers; moved back to Neodesha, 1894, taking old name of Neodesha Register, J. B. Morgan, 
J. Kansas Morgan and Robert Akin, editors and publishers. Neodesha Daily Register, founded 
1902 by Badger & Adams, discontinued same year. 

SUN, Progressive; C. E. Cowdery, editor and publisher, Neodesha. 

Daily. Nov. 3, 1902 + 26 vols. 

Continuation of the following: Neodesha Daily Derrick, founded 1896 by Robert Akin; 
name changed 1898 to Neodesha Daily Sun, C. E. and P. B. Cowdery, editors and publishers; 
discontinued the same year. Neodesha Daily Sun (2d), founded May, 1900, by C. E. and P. B. 
Cowdery. Wilson County Sun (weekly), founded 1891 as Neodesha Sun by Grant Shaw and 
Martin Phillippe; name changed same year to Wilson County Sun, with the same editors and 
publishers: The Altoona Journal, founded 1887 by M. A. Rhea and R. G. Kinyon; subscription 
list combined with the Wilson County Sun, 1903. The weekly edition was discontinued in 1905. 

NEW ALBANY Population (1915), 238; elevation, 892 feat; established, 1866; named for New 
Albany, Ind.; industries mill, brick plant, stone quarries, telephones; is on the St. Louis 
& San Francisco railway. 

KANSAS X-RAY, local; H. H. Peyton, editor and publisher, New Albany. 

Weekly. Dec. 31, 1897 + 18 vols. 
Founded 1887 by Cowdery Bros. 

DISCONTINUED. Vol8 ^ 

Fredonia.. ...Chronicle. Sept. 16, 1885 1888 ... . 3 

Democrat. May 25, 18821890 9 

Times. July 3, 18831885 1 

Tribune. Jan. 31, 18781879 1 

Altoona.. ..Advocate. Aug. 27, 1886 1887.. 1 

Journal. Dec. 23, 18871903 16 

Mirror. July 27, 19051908 3 

Benedict . . ... Courier. Mar. 10, 1899 1902 .4 

Echo. Nov. 11, 18861890 3 

Buffalo Clipper. July 1 Dec. 2, 1887 1 

Express. Mar. 2 Nov. 16, 1888 1 

Coyville Star. May 21, 18971898 : 1 

Guilford Citizen. Apr. 21 Oct. 6, 1870 1 

Lafontaine Banner. June 7, 19071913 6 

Neodesha Citizen. Nov. 18, 18701872 : 2 

Derrick; Sun (d). May 27, 1896 1898 . 3 

Free Press. Mar. 8, 18761883 .< 7 

Gazette. Aug. 28, 18811882 1 

Independent. Nov. 18, 18871889 2 

Register, Evening (d). Jan. 1 Oct. 31, 1898 2 

Register (d). Nov. 21, 19021905 6 

Student (m). Oct. 9, 18941898 4 

Wilson County Sun. Mar. 12, 18911905 15 

New Albany Maple Grove Visitor; County School Champion (m). 

Sept., 18971913 15 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Fredonia Amicus Life-Line (m). Oct., 1891 July, 1892. 

Wilson County Teacher (m). Dec., 1885 July, 1886. 
Coyville Press. Oct. 7, 1887 Jan. 6, 1888. 



316 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Lafontaine Spy. Feb. 10 May 26, 1887. 

Neodesha South Kansas Prohibitionist. July 22 Oct. 5, 1882. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 
Benedict Star. May 20 June 3, 1898. 



WOODSON COUNTY. 

Organized, 1855; named in honor of Daniel Woodson, Secretary Kansas 
territory; county seat, Yates Center; area, 504 square miles, 322,560 acres; 
population (1915), 9331; assessed valuation (1915), $14,957,286; resources 
and industries sandstone, agriculture, and stock raising. 

YATES CENTER Population (1915), 2199; elevation, 1112 feet; established, 1875; originally 

called Butler; name changed to Yates Center in honor of Abner Yates, owner of the town site; 

industries stone quarries, furniture factory, bottling works, mill, elevator, natural gas; 

electric light, waterworks, telephones; is on the Santa Fe and the Missouri Pacific railways. 
NEWS, Republican; R. H. Trueblood, editor, W. H. Trueblood and F. L. Stephenson, publishers. 
Weekly. June 8, 1877 + 37 vols. 

Founded 1877 as the Weekly News, by Steinberger and E. W. Baker; in 1878 sold to 

W. H. Jones and name changed to Yates Center News, with W. H. Jones and G. W. Fry, editors 
and publishers; in 1884 name changed to the News, with George E. Faler, editor, Faler & Co., 
publishers; in February, 1890, consolidated with the Tribune, founded in 1889 by W. H. Jones, 
ran as the News-Tribune for several issues when the name was changed back to the News; later in 
the same year [1890] it was once more changed to the Yates Center News, C. C. Clevenger, editor, 
and Trueblood, Stephenson & Hale, publishers; however, before the year was out it was again 
called the News, and in 1895 the name once more became Yates Center News, with R. H. True- 
blood and F. L. Stephenson, editors and publishers. 

WOODSON COUNTY ADVOCATE, Democratic; F. M. Patterson, editor and proprietor, Yates Center. 

Weekly. Feb. 6, 1891 + 25 vols. 

Founded 1890 as the Farmers Advocate by A. E. and N. S. Macoubrie (?) (Society's file is 
incomplete, lacking the first 36 numbers) ; name changed in 1899 to the Woodson County Advocate, 
with Hudson & Kinyon, editors and publishers. 

WOODSON COUNTY JOURNAL, Progressive; C. Borin, editor and publisher, Yates Center. 

Weekly. Oct. 3, 1912 -f- 3 vols. 
Founded by C. Borin in 1912. 

NEOSHO FALLS Population (1915), 536; elevation, 973 feet; established, 1857; named for the 
Neosho river, on which it is situated; industries elevator, mills, oil wells; telephones; is on 
the Santa Fe and the M. K. & T. railways. 

POST, Republican; J. W. Dickson, editor and publisher, Neosho Falls. 

Weekly. Sept. 24, 1873 + 42 vols. 
This is a continuation of the Frontier Democrat, founded at Neosho Falls in October, 1869 > 

by I. B. Boyle; name changed about January, 1870, to Neosho Falls Advertiser; in December, 1872. 

the material was purchased by W. W. Sain and Dow, who on Jan. 1, 1873, issued the first 

number of the Woodson County Post; in 1883 the name was changed to Neosho Falls Post, W. L. 

Challis, editor and publisher; in 1887 changed to the Post, J. N. Stout, editor and publisher, and 

again changed by Mr. Stout in 1891 to Neosho Falls Post. 

TORONTO Population (1915), 694; elevation, 931 feet; established, 1869; named for Toronto, 
Canada; telephones; is on the Santa Fe and Missouri Pacific railways. 

REPUBLICAN, Republican; E. E. Kelley, editor, The Kelley Family, publishers, Toronto. 

Weekly. Aug. 3, 1888 + 27 vols. 
Founded 1883 as the Toronto Topic by W. H. Jones; name changed in 1888 to the Toronto 

Republican, with N. B. and C. A. Buck, editors and publishers. The Altoona Mirror, founded 

1905 by George Scarbrough; moved to Toronto and name changed to the Toronto Record, Will M. 

Davis, editor and publisher; consolidated with the Republican with the June 10, 1909, issue, J. P. 

Lawton, editor and publisher; ran as the Republican- Record until Nov. 18, same year, when the 

old name, Toronto Republican, was again adopted, E. E. Kelley, editor and publisher. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 317 



DISCONTINUED. Vol8 , 

Yates Center .. ..Argus. Mar. 18, 1882 1884 .. . 3 

Center (m). Nov., 19031907 4 

Saturday Tribune. Feb. 15 Nov. 8, 1902 1 

Sun; Independent-Sun. Aug. 30, 18861888 2 

Sunflower Sentinel (m). Sept., 1896 1901 4 

Tribune. Jan. 19, 18891890 1 

Woodson Democrat. July 11, 18841894 10 

Woodson Gazette. Sept. 14, 1894 1896 2 

Neosho Falls Woodson County Republican; Independent. Sept. 8, 1886 1887 1 

Piqua Herald. Feb. 6 May 29, 1903 1 

Toronto ... . . Record. Dec. 17, 19081909 1 

Register. Sept. 3, 18861887 1 

Select Knight (m). Jan., 19081911 4 

[See, also, Franklin county.] 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Yates Center Land Mark (m). Apr., 1883. 

Woman's Friend (m). Apr.-Sept., 1894. 

Woodson Republican. Nov. 15, 1894 Jan. 10, 1895. 
Neosho Falls District Fair Daily News. Sept. 23, 1880. 

Neosho Valley Reformer. Feb. 18 May 6, 1898. 

Our School Review (m). May, 1878. 

People's Herald. Aug. 14 Oct. 23, 1878. 

Record. Aug. 12, 19, Sept. 9, 1879. 

Young Jay hawker (m). Apr., May and July 30, 1877. 



WYANDOTTE COUNTY. 

Organized, 1859; named for the Wyandot Indians; county seat, Kansas 
City; area, 153 square miles, 97,920 acres; population (1915), 110,549; as- 
sessed valuation (1915), $116,839,016; resources and industries building 
stone, fire clay, cement rock, natural gas, agriculture, and stock raising. 

KANSAS CITY Population (1915), 91,659; elevation, 763 feet; established, 1886, when by 
proclamation of Gov. John A. Martin the cities of Kansas, Wyandotte and Armourdale were 
consolidated under the name of Kansas City; in 1910 Argentine and Quindaro were absorbed, 
and to-day Kansas City is the largest city in the state; industries stock yards, meat-packing 
plants, flour mills, cotton mills, brick plants, boiler works, foundries, railroad shops, and many 
large factories; telephones, municipal electric light and water systems, street railway; is on 
the Missouri Pacific, Union Pacific, Rock Island, Santa Fe, Chicago & Great Western, Frisco, 
Kansas City Southern, and Kansas City Northwestern railways. 

ADVOCATE [Negro], independent; Thomas Kennedy, editor and publisher, Kansas City. 

Weekly. Mar. 26, 1915 + 1 vol. 
Founded 1914 as the Kansas City Independent by Thos. Kennedy; name changed to Kansas 

City Advocate Jan. 14, 1916. 

COOPERS' INDUSTRIAL JOURNAL, labor; official organ of Coopers' International Union of North 
America; W. R. Deal, editor and publisher, Kansas City. 

Monthly. Dec., 1897 + 18 vols. 

Early history unknown, first issue in Society 's file being vol. 9, No. 2. 
FEEDING AND MARKETING, live stock; E. Martindale, editor and publisher, Kansas City. 

Weekly. Feb. 6, 1913 + 3 vols. 

Founded as the Stock Yards Nugget; early history unknown, first issue in Society's file 
being vol. 2, No. 42, E. Martindale, editor and publisher; name changed to Feeding and Marketing 
Apr. 26, 1916, same editor and publisher. 

GAZETTE-GLOBE, Democratic; Gazette Publishing and Printing Company, publishers, Kansas 
City. 

Weekly. June 4, Aug. 20, 29, Oct. 1, 1859; Apr. 1, 1865; Feb. 17, Apr. 21, June 30, 
Oct. 13, 1866 Oct., 1872; Oct. 10, 1873 Oct. 31, 1903; Apr.-Oct., 1909; Dec., 
1913 + 38 vols. 
Daily. Mar. 15, 1887 + 29 vols. 



318 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



This paper is a continuation of the following: Wyandotte City Register, founded in May, 
1857, by Judge M. W. Delahay, the first number being issued in a tent on the corner of Nebraska 
avenue and Third street. The paper was sold to Eddy & Patton, and finally passed into the hands 
of Mr. Ephriam Abbott, who changed its name to the Citizen, and published it a few months. 
It was succeeded by the Western Argus, with J. E. Bennett, editor, and P. Sidney Post, commer- 
cial editor. The first issue was dated May 25, 1858, and it was continued until 1861, when the plant 
was sold to R. B. Taylor, of the Gazette. The Wyandotte Gazette was established August 7, 1858, 
by S. D. Macdonald; in 1860 it was suspended for a few months, when it resumed publication with 
S. D. Macdonald and R. B. Taylor, publishers, Mr. Macdonald retiring after a few weeks. In 
January, 1861, the office was destroyed by fire, when Mr. Taylor purchased the office of the Western 
Argus and continued the publication of the Gazette. In 1887 the name of the paper was changed 
to the Weekly Gazette by R. B. Armstrong, and the same year a daily edition was founded; 
in 1888 George W. Martin became associated with Mr. Armstrong in the publication of the Ga- 
zette, and changed the name of the paper to the Kansas City Gazette. Kansas Tribune, Kansas 
City, founded 1894 by R. B. Armstrong, consolidated in 1898 with the Gazette. Kansas City 
Globe, daily, founded 1905 by J. J. Maxwell, consolidated in April, 1909, with the Gazette, and 
has since been continued as the Gazette-Globe. 

INTERSTATE NEWS, independent; Grace A. Wallace, editor and publisher (Rosedale Station), 
Kansas City. 

Weekly. 

History of this paper unknown, no issue ever having been received by the Society. 
INVESTOR'S GUIDE, insurance; E. W. Poindexter, editor and publisher, Kansas City. 

Monthly. Sept. 17, 1907 + 8 vols. 

Early history unknown, first number in Society's file being called the Insurance Solicitor, 
dated Topeka, Oct. 6, 1893, vol. 6, No. 1, E. W. Poindexter, publisher; name changed 1896 to the 
Investors' Guide; moved to Kansas City in 1907. 

JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF BOILER-MAKERS, IRON SHIP BUILDERS AND HELP- 
ERS OF AMERICA, labor; James B. Casey, editor, Punton-Clarke Publishing Company, Kansas 
City. 

Monthly. Jan., 1897 + 19 vols. 

Early history unknown; Society's file begins with vol. 9, No. 1. 

KANSAN, Republican; Kansas City Publishing Company, editor and publisher, Kansas City. 
Weekly. Feb. 12, 1914 + 2 vols. 
Daily. Apr. 3, 1916 + 

Founded as the Wyandotte News; early history unknown, first issue in Society's file being 
vol. 2, No. 31, C. G. Wickwire, editor and publisher; name changed to Kansas City Kansan, Jan. 6, 
1916, and published by Kansas City Publishing Co.; Daily founded Apr. 3, 1916. 

KANSAS ELEVATOR [Negro], Democratic; A. D. Griffin, editor and publisher, Kansas City. 

Weekly. Feb. 12, 1916 + 
Founded 1916 by A. D. Griffin. 

NEUE KANSAS STAATS-ZEITUNG [German], Republican; Carl Gleeser, editor and publisher, Kansas 
City. 

Weekly. Apr. 18, 1895 + 21 vols. 
Founded 1894 by F. Gehring, as the Kansas Staats Zeitung. 
PRESS, Republican; J. B. Hippie, editor and publisher, Kansas City. 
Weekly. Aug. 17, 1889 + 25 vols. 
[Early issues scattering.] 
Founded in 1889 by J. B. Hippie. 
REPUBLIC, independent, Grant S. Landrey, editor and publisher, Kansas City. 

Weekly. Dec. 8, 1887 + 28 vols. 

Founded 1887 as the Argentine Republic by Joseph T. Landrey; name changed 1912 to the 
Republic, with Grant S. Landrey, editor and publisher. 

SUN, independent; E. F. Heisler, editor and publisher, Kansas City. 

Weekly. Jan. 1, 1891 -f- 25 vols. 

Founded 1889; first issue in Society's file is vol. 2, No. 47, E. F. Heisler, editor and publisher. 
THE UNIVERSITY LOG-BOOK, college; edited by students of Kansas City University, and published 
by the Log-Book Stock Co. of Kansas City University, Kansas City. 

Monthly. Feb., 1899 + 4 vols. 
Early history unknown; Society has only a broken file. 

UNIVERSITY PEN POINT [Negro], school; edited and published by students of Western University 
(Quindaro), Kansas City. 

Monthly. Jan., 1915 + 1 vol. 
Founded 1915 by the students of Western University. 



HISTORY OF KANSAS NEWSPAPERS. 



319 



WEINHOLDS' COMMERCIAL BULLETIN, for gratuitous distribution; edited by T. V. Weinhold in 
the interest of the Weinhold Brothers Hardware Company, Kansas City. 

Monthly. Jan., 1915 + 1 vol. 
Founded 1914 by Weinhold Brothers. 

HERALD, Republican; S. F. Davidson and A. W. Dornon, editors and publishers, Kansas City. 

Weekly. June 21, 1916 + 
Early history unknown, the first issue in the Society's collection being vol. 4, No. 6. 

BONNER SPRINGS Population (1915), 1541; elevation, 793 feet; established, 1870; originally 
Tiblow, and named for Henry Tiblow, Delaware Indian; name changed to Bonner Springs 
in 1888 in honor of Robert Bonner of the New York Ledger; industries cement plant, flour 

mill, brick plant, nurseries; natural gas, waterworks, electric lights, telephones; is on the 
Union Pacific and Santa Fe railways. 

CHIEFTAIN, independent republican; Imri Zumwalt, editor and publisher, Bonner Springs. 

Weekly. Apr. 30, 1896 + 20 vols. 

Founded 1896 as the Wyandotte Chieftain by Ed. L. Matthews; name changed in 1900 to 

the Bonner Chieftain, with same editor and publisher. 

DISCONTINUED. Volg 

Kansas City Advocate, Argentine. Feb. 14 Nov. 24, 1888 . . > 1 

[Wyandotte, Agassiz and Literary Companion (m). Nov., 1886 1888 3 

Argentine, Age. Aug. 19, 18921893 1 

Quindaro, American Citizen [Negro]. July 26, 1889 June 6, 1890; 

Feb. 13, 18911904; 19051907 16 

Armourdale.] American Citizen [Negro] (d). [Broken file.] Dec. 15, 18981900 1 

American Eagle. July 22, 1893 1896 4 

Appeal to Reason. 1896. [See Crawford county.] 

Bethany Visitor (m). Apr., 18931902 7 

Chester Swine Journal. June 5, 1914 1915. . . 1 

Chief. Wyandotte. Sept. 12, 18831885 ' 2 

Chindowan. Quindaro. May 13, 18571858. . . 

Chronicle. Feb. 20, 18901892 '3 

Church Calendar (m). Feb., 18961899 3 

Cromwell's Kansas Mirror. Armourdale. Dec. 22, 1887 1897. 9 

Democrat. Wyandotte. May 21, 1867 1868 2 

Eagle. Argentine. Apr. 8, 18921894 3 

Equitable Aid Union Advocate (m and s-m). Wyandotte. 

Jan. 15, 18811884 8 

Farmer and Breeder. May 20 Dec. 16, 1915. . 1 

Globe (d). June 19, 19051909 ' 11 

Herald. Wyandotte. Jan. 4, 18721910 .39 

High School Record (m). Dec., 18981900 2 

International Brotherhood of Stationary Fireman's Journal (m). 

Aug., 19001911 10 

Jay Hawker (m). [Broken file.] Oct., 1907 1912. .. 2 

Jones & Go's. Cyclone (m). Mar., 18951899 4 

Kansas Catholic. Apr. 17, 18901895 5 

[See Leavenworth county.] 

Kansas Cyclone. Jan. 15, 18871888 1 

Kansas Globe. Kansas City Sun and Globe. May 10, 1884 1886 3 

Kansas Herold [German]. Mar. 2, 1890 1891 1 

Kansas Pilot. Mar. 1, 18791881 2 

Kansas Pioneer [German]. Wyandotte. Sept. 29, 1883 1889.. 6 

Kansas Pioneer [English ed]. Wyandotte. June 30, 1887 1888 1 

Kansas Progressive. Oct. 20, 1911 1912 1 

Kansas Prohibitionist. Dec. 12, 1905 1910 5 

Kansas Tribune. June 28, 1894 1898 . 4 

Kawsmouth Pilot; The Kawsmouth. Wyandotte. Mar. 5 Sept. 3, 1881, 1 

Kawsmouth Pilot (d). Wyandotte, 1881 1 

Labor Record. July 20, 18941911 17 

[Called Kansas Citizen and Labor Record, Apr.-July, 1895.] 

Labor Review. Argentine. June 20, 18911892 1 

Light. Aug. 9, 18841887 3 

Modern Knight (m). May, 1896 1898 2 

National Progressive. Mar. 6, 1913 1914 1 

National Review. Apr. 26 Oct. 25, 1913 1 

News. Nov. 2, 1900 June, 1902; Dec. 1, 1905 1907. . 4 

News, Magazine. Dec. 6, 19121913 1 

Pioneer. May 9, 18781880 . 2 

Presbyterian Magazine (m). Nov. 2, 18951897 1 

[Called First Presbyterian Church News. Nov., 1895 Mar., 1896.] 

Republican. Sept. 10, 1881 1882 1 

Republican (d). Sept. 13, 18811882 1 

Search Light (m). Apr., 18951897 2 

Spy, Evening. Dec. 25, 1880 1882 1 



320 KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

DISCONTINUED. Vols 

Stock Farm and Home Weekly. Feb. 21 Sept. 11, 1880 1 

Topics; Kansas Topics. May 16 Dec. 7, 1895 1 

Tribune (d). Aug. 12, 18961897 2 

Van Peyma's Paper. Sept. 3 Nov. 19, 1903 1 

Waechter [German]. Apr. 21, 18921894 3 

Western Argus; Wyandotte. [Broken file]. May 20, 1858 1861 2 

Western Christian Recorder (m). Feb. 26, 18981899 1 

Woman's Missionary Record (m). July, 1895 1897 .' 2 

Wyandotte Chief. June 20, 19121913 . 2 

Wyandotte Cricket (d). July 10, 19121914 5 

Edwardsville Visitor. Oct. 18, 19121913 1 

Rosedale Commercial. [First called Town Topics.] Aug. 10, 1895 Mar., 1897; 

May, 18981902 7 

Record and Era. Apr. 14, 18881890 2 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 1. 

Kansas City Delphian (m). Jan.-Mar., 1892. 

Glad Tidings (m). May- July, 1891. 

Ledger. June 6-27, 1885. 

Methodist (m). July, 1887 Mar., 1888. 

Owl. July 12 Sept. 18, 1890. 
Argentine Argus. Aug. 25 Dec. 1, 1887. 

Sif tings. Jan. 9 May 29, 1886. 
Armourdale Advocate. Dec. 15-29, 1888. 

Advocate (d). Jan. 5 Mar. 4, 1889. 

News. May 1 Oct. 2, 1885. 

Riverview Age. July 12 Sept. 13, 1890. 

Rosedale Bee. [Scattering issues.] Dec. 5, 1889 Sept. 18, 1890. 

Enquirer. Jan. 25 June 14, 1890. 

Iron City Press. Jan. 25 Feb. 8, 1883. 

Wasp. Sept. 15, 1883 Nov. 7, 1885. [Scattering issues.] 
Bonner Springs Citizen. Apr. 18 July 11, 1890. 

Kaw Valley News. Feb. 28 Apr. 4, 1890. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 2. 

Kansas City Champion. Aug. 28, Dec. 25, 1897; Jan. 6 Apr. 14, 1898. 

Republican. Mar. 15 Apr. 26, 1894. 

Stockman and Farmer. Oct. 2 Nov. 27, 1880. 

Sun (d). May 23, 1892. 

Western School News (s-m). Nov. 19, 1896 Mar., 1898. 

Wyandotte Chief. Dec. 29, 1894. 

Quindaro Kansas Tribune. Sept. 20, 1860. 

Wyandotte Kansas Real Estate Herald (m). May, 1869. 

Register. July 25, 1857. 

SHORT-LIVED VOL. 3. 

Kansas City Church Life. Feb. 6 July 3, 1901. 

Gunn Powder. Mar. 13, 1914. 

Hawthorne Herald (m). Nov., 1900 Nov., 1901. 

Home Protector (m). Aug., 1900. 

Kansas Citian (m). June, 1914. 

Line-Up. Nov. 15, 1904 Aug. 5, 1905. 

News (d). June 21, 1901. 

Occasional. Feb., Apr., May, Nov., 1889, and May, 1901. 

Temple Builder (m). July-Sept., 1908. 

Union Leader. Apr. 25 Aug. 2, 1901. 
Argentine Baptist Banner. Sept. 7-28, 1892. 

Kansas Citizen. Dec. 30, 1894 Mar. 30, 1895. 

Armourdale Monthly Clipper. Sept., 1886. 

Rosedale. . . .Inter-State News. Aug 23, Oct. 18, Nov. 8, 1905; 

Oct. 27 and Nov. 3, 1911; Mar. 1, 1912. 



ERRATA. 



PAGE 195. Quinter Gove County Advocate, founded 1894; read "1904." 
PAGE 227. Discontinued list Oakley Logan County Times, Oakley 
and Logan Springs; read "Russell Springs." 

PAGE 279. Discontinued list Ruch Center; read "Rush Center." 

(321) 



21 



GENERAL INDEX. 



A. 

Abbey Student, Atchison 141 

Abbott, Ephraim, editor and publisher. . 318 
Abbott, Nelson, editor and publisher... 218 
Abbott, Mrs. R. M., editor and publisher, 218 
Abilene, history of current newspapers 

published in 175 

named for 175 

newspapers published at.... 175, 177 

Statistics of 175 

Academy Review, Hiawatha 151 

Academy Student, Eureka 200 

Acres. Talcott &, publishers 137 

Ada Recorder 259 

Adair, Colie (Mrs. W. Y. Morgan) . . 53 

Adair, Wit 53 

Adair, P. H., editor and publisher 144 

Adams, Badger &, editors and publishers, 315 

Adams, Charles P. . 291 

Adams, Franklin G., founds Atchison 

Free Press 141 

secretary and editor 291 

secretary Kansas State Historical 

Society 7 

and Robert McBratney, editors and 
publishers of the Squatter Sover- 
eign, Atchison 141 

Adams, Guy D. 291 

Adams, Harriett Z. (Mrs. Wm. E. Little), 80 
Adamson, A. B., editor and publisher. . 240 
Adelphia, name changed to Walnut City, 168 
Adkins, W. C., editor and publisher. . . . 142 

Admire, Jacob C 17 

editor and publisher 290 

Admire, newspapers published at. . 228, 230 

statistics of 228 

Adriance & Adriance, editors and pub- 
lishers 249 

Advance Publishing Company, Wichita, 

publishers 284 

Advanced Leader, Warwick 272 

Advertiser, Pleasanton 226 

Advocate, Anthony 202 

Advocate, Cuba 271 

Advocate, Meriden 291 

Advocate, Topeka 293 

Advocate and News, Topeka 291, 293 

Advocate-Democrat, Marysville . . . 235, 236 

Aetna Clarion 145 

Afro-American, Pittsburg 173 

Afro-American Advocate, Coffeyville. . . . 244 
Agassi? and Literary Companion, Wy- 

andotte .*. 319 

Agenda Times 96 

Agora 181, 282, 293 

Agra, newspapers published at ... 261, 262 

statistics of 261 

Agricola American 193 

Agricultural Southwest, Wichita 284 

Agriculturist, Topeka 296 

Agriculturist, Wamego 264 

Akin, Robert, editor and publisher .... 315 
Albach, Henry, editor and publisher. . . 179 
Albaugh, Capps &, editors and publish- 
ers 265 

Albaugh, Morton, editor and publisher. . 215 
Albertson, H. B., editor and publisher, 229 

265, 268 
Albin, C. Len, editor and publisher. . . . 219 



Ail-right, P. H., editor and publish,-,- 
A Ijright's Farm and Ranch, Winfield" 
Alden, newspapers of 

statistics of 

Aider-son, Charles, associate editor ! ' 
\\'"'! ch ' C. V., editor and publisher. . 
A drich, Eva, editor and publisher 
Alexander & Wikoff, editors and pub- 
lishers 

Alexander, Dick, editor ami publish,,- 
Alexander, J. L., editor and publisher 

Alexander, P'. H!,' editor 'and publisher 68 .' 
All School Bulletin, Emporia 

A Hard, Cad, editor 

Allen & Co., Reed, publishers ". 

*u! en ' S,- ra , (J P S - Edwai 'd F- Sheldon')', 

Allen, Elizabeth 

Allen Henry J 45( ' 47 ' 37 ' 94' 

biographical sketch 

editor and publisher . . . 

portrait of 

Alien, John 

Allen, John, jr '..'.'.'. 

Allen, La Verne 

Allen, Norman, editor and publisher' ! ! '. 

Allen, Walter N., publisher 

T,', ien> William > U. S. Senator from Ohio, 
Allen, newspapers published at... 229 

statistics of 

Allen county, named for ....I'....... 

newspapers of '.'.'.'.'.'. .137- 

statistics of 

Alliance, now Chanute 

Alliance Bulletin, Harper . . .... 202 

Alliance Echo, Olathe .' 

Alliance Echo, Sharon Springs .'.'.'. 
Alliance Gazette, Hutchinson .... 267 

Alliance Globe, Pawnee Rock 

Alliance Herald, Fredonia . . . 

Stafford 

Alliance Herald-Guard, Council Grove . '. 

Alliance Index, McPherson . 

Alliance Monitor, Abilene 

Alliance News, Westmoreland .... 263 

Alliance Pilot, Hays 

Alliance Review, Kiowa 

Alliance Signal, Stockton 

Alliance Sun, Cuba . . . ! 

Alliance Times, Jennings ..'. 

Alliance Tribune, Topeka 291, 

Alliance Watchman, Phillipsburg 
Allilley, Susannah (Mrs. Josiah Miller), 

Allison & Perkins, publishers 

Allison, William M., editor and publisher, 

Allison, newspapers of 

Alma, named for 

newspapers of 309, 

statistics of 

Almena, newspapers of 

Almgren, J. A., editor and publisher . . . 
Alta Vista, newspapers of 

statistics of 

Altamont, newspapers of 218 

originally called Elston 

statistics of 

Alton, formerly called Bull City 

newspapers of 257, 

statistics of . 



154 

168 
274 
272 

it;- 
229 
229 

202 
185 

185 
144 

228 
167 
292 
90 
90 
122 
90 
283 
91 
90 
90 
90 
180 
292 
137 
230 
229 
137 
-139 
137 
251 
203 
214 
311 
269 
146 
314 
303 
246 
232 
176 
264 
186 
144 
277 
271 
174 
293 
262 
27 
137 
167 
174 
309 
310 
309 
254 
231 
310 
310 
220 
218 
218 
257 
258 
257 



(323) 



324 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Altoona, originally called Geddesburg. . 314 

named for 314 

newspapers of ai4. 315 

statistics of 314 

Alumnus, Manhattan ' ' 276 

Alvord, Theodore, editor and publisher. . 194 

Ambrose, D. C., publisher 251 

American, Wichita 286 

American Bimetallist, Topeka ........ 293 

American Buyer and Seller, Topeka . . 297 

American Citizen, Topeka 293, 297 

American Citizen, Kansas City .' 319 

American Corn Congress, F. D. Coburn 

first president of 110 

American Crank, Oswego 220 

American Desert, Millbrook . . . 196 

American Eagle, Kansas City 319 

American Horticulturist, Topeka 295 

American Horticulturist, Wichita 286 

American Journal of Education, Topeka, 297 

American Nonconformist, Winfield .... 168 

American Schools, Atchison and Osborne, 258 

American Times, Wichita 288 

American Young Folks, Topeka 293 

Americus, named for 229 

newspapers of 229, 230 

statistics of 229 

Ames, newspapers of 164 

Amicus Life-Line, Fredonia 315 

Amos, J. Wayne, editor and publisher . '. 289 

Amos, M. S., editor and publisher 275 

Amos, W. M., editor and publisher .... 275 

Amrine, Fred 102 

Amrine, Milton F., biographical sketch, 102 

editor and publisher 229, 246 

portrait of .' 103 

Ancient Order of the Pyramids, Topeka, 293 

Andale, named for 285 

statistics of 285 

Andale Globe 285 

Andereck, A. D., editor 141 

Anderson & Dale, Andale named for . . 285 

Anderson & Tone, Xenia, Ohio 191 

Anderson, Hull &, editors and publishers, 285 

Anderson, Wolfe &, publishers 306 

Anderson Bros., editors and publishers, 293 

Anderson, A. M., editor and publisher, 306 
Anderson, Mrs. Carrie A. (Mrs. Noble 

L. Prentis) : 27 

Anderson, Cy, editor and publisher .... 266 

Anderson, E. D., editor and publisher. . 263 

Anderson, Geo. W., editor and publisher, 224 

Anderson, John A., managing editor . . 274 

Anderson, Joseph C 139 

Anderson, M. R., editor and publisher. . 285 

Anderson, W. G., editor and publisher. . 167 
Anderson, W. S., editor and publisher 

263, 291 

Aiiderson county, named for 139 

newspapers of 139-141 

statistics of 139 

Andrews, G. W 90 

Andrews, J. H., editor and publisher . . 256 

Annuity, Howard 185 

Anthony, Daniel 79 

Anthony, Daniel Read.. 5, 17. 21, 35, 79 

editor and publisher 222 

Anthony, Daniel Read, jr., biographical 

sketch 79 

editor and publisher 221 

portrait of 78 

Anthony, Mrs. Daniel Read 79 

Anthony, Mrs. Daniel Read, jr 79 

Anthony, Eleanor 79 

Anthony, George T 17, 202 

editor and publisher 291 

Anthony, N. B., editor and publisher. . 315 

Anthony, named for 202 

history of current newspapers pub- 
lished in 202 



Anthony, newspapers of 202 

statistics of . 

A - H. T. A. Weekly News,' St.' Pa ul '. '. 
Anti-Monopolist. Enterprise, Council 
Grove and Topeka 

180,' ''JIT. 
Rubens 

Autioch, The Local ........ 

Apostolic Faith, Topeka ......... 

Appeal to Reason, Kansas City 'and Gi- 
rard i 70 

Appleton Era '.'.'. '. 

Appomattox, newspapers of '.' 197' 

Arbiter, Parsons '.'. 

Arcadia, formerly called Fin'dlay ' City 

newspapers of 170 172 

statistics of '. 

Argentine, newspapers of ....... BiS- 

Argo-Reporter, Topeka 292 

Argonia, named for 

newspapers of .".".' 305' 

statistics of 

Aigosy. Nickerson 

Argus, Hollenberg .'.'.'!'. 

Argus, Manhattan ...'.'. 

Argus, Daily, Topeka 

Ark-Light, Topeka '. ' .' 

Arkalon News '.'.'.'.'. 

Aikansas City, former names of'..' ! . . '. '. 
history of current newspapers of. . 
newspapers published at .... 168- 
statistics of 

Arkansas Valley Commercial Association, 

Aikansas Valley Democrat, Arkansas 

City 

Great Bend . ' ' 

Newton 

Arkansas Valley Farmer, Wichita .... 

Arkansas Valley Journal, Garden City. . 

Aikansas Valley Sunshine, Wichita.'... 

Arkansas Valley Times, Sterling 

Arlington, named for 

statistics of 

Arlington Enterprise, history of 

Avma, statistics of 

Avma Record 

Armour, Lester &, editors and publish- 
ers 

Armour, T. G .....;. 

Avmourdale, newspapers of 319, 

Armstrong & Son, editors and publish- 
ers 

Armstrong, George C., editor and pub- 
lisher 

Armstrong, H., editor and publisher. . . . 

Arnold, F. W., editor and publisher, 

Airington, newspapers of 143, 

Arrow, Wichita 

Art League Chronicle, Leavenworth. . . . 

Aitesian City, Hornet 

Arthur, C. B., publisher 

Ashbaugh, H. C., editor and publisher. . 

Ashford, H. T., editor and publisher. . . 

Ashland, named for 

newspapers of 159, 

statistics of 

Assaria, newspapers of 

Assembly Herald, Winfield 

Association Reflector, Topeka 

Astonisher and Paralyzer, Carbondale.. 

Atchison. David R., U. S. Senator from 
Missouri 

Atchison, John A. Martin, mayor of. ... 
history of current newspapers pub- 
lished at 141, 

named for 

newspapers of 141- 

statistics of 

Atchison county, named for 



203 
202 
251 

177 
293 
212 
214 
293 

319 
160 
198 
220 
170 
173 
170 

-320 
293 
305 
:i()7 
305 
268 
313 
276 
290 
293 
288 
168 
168 

-170 

168 

94 

169 
146 

205 
286 
188 
287 
274 
268 
268 
268 
171 
171 

201 
268 
320 

202 

185 
138 
237 
257 
144 
:^86 
233 
239 
:>9.'i 
204 
138 
159 
160 
159 
282 
170 
293 
256 

1 11 
35 

142 
141 
14 I 
141 
141 



GENERAL INDEX. 



325 






Atchison county, newspapers of. ... 141-144 
statistics of 14i 

Athol, newspapers of :;ni. 

statistics of 

Atkins & Hudson, editors and publishers. 

Atkins, Dudley, editor and publisher . . 

Atkinson. C. T., editor and publisher . . 

Atlanta, name changed to Lyons 

Atlanta. Cow ley county, newspapers of, 

statistics of 

Attica, named for 

newspapers of 202, 

statistics of 

At wood, George A., editor and publisher. 



Atwood, named for ................. 

newspapers of ......... 70, 266, 

statistics of ................... 

Augusta, history of current newspapers 

published, at .............. 151, 

jTamed for .................... 

newspapers of ............. 151 

statistics of ................... 

Augustine Herald .................. 

Aurora, newspapers of ............. 

Austin, William C., biographical sketch, 

editor, publisher and owner. . 153, 

portrait of .................... 

AviHa, newspapers of ............... 

Axtell, named for ................. 

newspapers of ............ 236, 

statistics of ................... 



302 
301 
275 

_'7.-. 
168 
L'T 1 -' 
168 
169 
168 
202 
203 
202 
187 
275 
266 
267 
266 

152 
151 
-153 
151 
227 
164 

94 
154 

95 
167 
236 
237 
236 



B. 

Bachelder, Beatty &, editors and pub- 
lishers 163 

Badger & Adams, editors and publishers, 315 

Bailey, George, editor in chief 281 

Bailey, Gov. Willis J 92, 110 

Bain, John, editor and publisher 191 

Baker, Wardrip &, editors and publish- 
ers 

Baker, Ben T., editor and publisher . . . 

Baker, E. W., editor and publisher .... 

Baker, Floyd P., editor and publisher . . 

17, 

Baker, G. D., editor and publisher . . 

Baker, H. D., editor and publisher . . . 

Baker, Jesse, editor 

Baker, N. R., editor and publisher .... 

Baker, W. R., editor and publisher .... 

Baker. Warren, editor and publisher. . 



Baker Beacon-Index, Baldwin ........ 

Baker Orange, Baldwin .......... 98, 

Baker University, Baldwin 61, 82, 90, 

98, 102, 110, 

Bala City Advance ................ 

Baldridsre. \V. I,., editor and publisher. . 
Baldwin, John, Berea, Ohio ......... 

Baldwin, Robert ................... 

Baldwin, named for 

newspapers of .......... 82, 

statistics of 



248 
300 
316 
6 

35 
289 
281 
139 
290 
277 
145 
187 
182 
181 
92 
112 
276 
168 
181 

. . . 312 
. . . 181 
181-183 
. 181 



Ball, A. R., editor and publisher 255 

Ballard, R. T., editor and publisher . . 156 

Bancroft World 250 

Banie, J. Milton, editor and publisher . . 216 

Banks, Smith &, publishers 279 

Banner City Register 176 

Banner-Graphic, Kinsley 183 

Baptist, Valley Falls 210 

Baptist Banner, Columbus, Argentine 

and Cherry vale 158, 245, 320 

Baptist Builder,' Olathe 214 

Baptist Headlight, Topeka 297 

Baptist Messenger, Cedar Vale 156 

Baptist Times, Garnett and Salina, 141, 282 



Baptist Visitor, Bell.-villr -j71 

Clifton 272, 313 

Kmporia and Topeka 229, 293 

Barber, Eppie L., editor and pub- 
lisher 142, 150 

Barber. Xorene. editor and publisher.. 142 
Barber, Thomas W., free state martyr 

of Kansas '. . in 

Barber county, named for Ill 

newspapers of 14 1. 1 !."> 

statistics of 1 1 I 

Burbour County Mail, Medicine Lodge, 144 

145 

Barks and Cackles. Topeka 293 

Bi.rley, J. H., editor and publisher. . . . 311 

Barnard, statistics of 224 

newspapers of 224, 225 

Burnd, J. K., editor and publisher .... 253 
B;;rnd, Sam H., editor and publisher, 265 

302 

Barnes, A. S 312 

B;;rnes, B. W., editor and publisher. . . 202 
Barnes, C. K., editor and publisher. . . . 152 

Barnes, Charles W 84 

Barnes, W. E., editor and publisher. . . 225 

Barnes, newspapers of 312, 313 

statistics of 312 

Barnhart, F. H., editor and publisher. . 257 
Barr & Deeble. editors and publishers. . 280 
Br.rr, Robert B., associate editor. . . 74, 147 
Barrett, B. J., editor and publisher... 279 
Barrett, Charles F., editor and publisher, 311 
Barrett, M. L. editor and publisher. . . 2 
Bartlett, Orin, editor and publisher. . . . 232 

Barlett, Robert A., town promoter 2 

Bartlett, named for 218 

newspapers of 218. 2 

statistics of 218 

Barton, Kimball &, editors and publish- 
ers 252 

Barton, Florence (Mrs. John S. Gilmore), 

Barton, Mrs. Mary J 

Barton, Perl R., editor and publisher. . 176 

Barton, Capt. William H 

Barton Banner and Claflin Banner. . . . 146 

Barton county, named for . 14o 

newspapers of 145-14 / 

statistics of 1 

Baxter, A 156 

Baxter', Charles E., editor and publisher, 201 
Baxter, W. E., editor and publisher. . . . 2 
Baxter, W. S., editor and publisher. . . . 187 

Baxter Springs, named for 156 

newspapers of 156, lo 

statistics of 156 

Bazaar News, Topeka 29? 

Bazine, newspapers of ^ 

Bazoo, Smith Center 300, 301 

B B-Blizzard, Kinsley 1 

Beacom, J. N.. editor and publisher. ... 3 

Beadles, J. M., publisher 283 

Beale, A. W., editor and publisher. . . . 178 
Bear Brundige &. editors and publishers, 150 
Bear, Fred E., editor and publisher. . . . 2 
Bear, Samuel E., editor and publisher, 1 
Beard, Lon, editor and publisher 1 



Beardsley, Mr. 

ton (Iowa) Hawkeye . . . 



editor of Burling- 



25 
236 



Beattie, A., mayor of St. Joseph, Mo.. . 
Bcittie, F. G., editor and publisher. . . . 24.! 

Beattie, named for 236 

newspapers ot * QR 

statistics . -''' 

Beatty & Bachelder, editors and pub- 
lishers loo 

Beatty, Rev. A., editor 290 

B, atty, F. M., editor and publisher 2 

Beatty, W. F., editor and publisher. ... 1 
Beauchamp, Oren M., editor and pub- 
lisher 308 



326 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Beaumont Business 153 

Beaver Valley Booster, Cedar Bluffs... 174 

Beck, M. M., biographical sketch 118 

portrait of 119 

& Son, editors and publishers 207 

Beck, Martha 120 

Beck, T. E., publisher 166 

Beck, Will T 120 

Becker, William, editor and publisher. . 236 

Bedford Pilot 303 

Bee, Ottawa 192 

Beech Brook Breeze, Burlingame 256 

Beecher, Henry Ward 6 

Beede, J. W., editor-in-chief 292 

Belgian Hare Journal, Topeka 295 

Bell, D. O., editor and publisher 233 

Bellaire News 301, 302 

Bellefont, newspapers of 190 

Belle Plaine, named for 305 

newspapers of 305, 307, 308 

statistics of 305 

Belleville, Chautauqua county, now Peru, 155 

Belleville, Republic county, named for. . 270 

history of current newspapers of . . 270 

newspapers of 270-272 

statistics of 270 

Beloit, first known as Willow Springs. . 240 
history of current newspapers pub- 
lished in 240 

named for 240 

newspapers of 240, 242, 243 

statistics of 240 

Belpre, newspapers of 183, 184 

statistics of 183 

Belt, B. A., editor and publisher 259 

Belveal, S., editor and publisher 280 

Belvue, newspapers of 264 

Bendena Echo 179 

Benedict, newspapers of 315, 316 

Benedictine Parish Monthly, Atchison.. 142 

Benevolent Banner, North Topeka 297 

Benjamin, O. J., editor and publisher. . 311 
Bennet Springs, now known as Potter. . 142 
Bennett, J. D., editor and publisher. . . . 271 

Bennett, J. E., editor 318 

Bennington, newspapers of 259. 260 

statistics of 259 

Benson, W. F 59 

Bentley, Albert W., editor and publisher, 199 

Bentley News 287 

Benton, A. S., editor and publisher. . . . 192 

Benton, newspapers of 152, 153 

statistics of 153 

Berdell, E. A., publisher 138 

Bern, named for 249 

newspapers of 249, 250 

statistics of 249 

Bernheisel, A. S., editor and publisher, 229 
Bertolette, J. D., editor and publisher . . 284 

Best, J. M 160 

Bethany Messenger, Lindsborg . . . 232, 233 

Bethany Visitor, Kansas City 319 

Bethel College Monthly, Newton 204 

Bevans, W. D., editor and publisher . . 171 

Beverlv, newspapers of 224, 225 

statistics of 224 

Bible Investigator, Atchison and Doni- 

phan 143, 179 

Bible School Advocate, Eskridge 310 

Biddle, William H., editor and publisher, 151 
Big Timber, name changed to Cleburne, 275 

Bigelow Gazette 237 

Billard Independent, Topeka 299 

Bingham, J. W., editor 309 

Birch Rod, Emporia 228 

Bird Citv, newspapers of 159 

Bismarck Daily Fair, Lawrence 182 

Bismarck Messenger, Lawrence 183 

Bison, statistics of 278 

Bison Bee 278 



Bissel, William, editor . . 

Bitlertown, name changed to Olpe .... 

Bixby, C. S., editor and publisher 

Blackburn, Tom, editor 

Blackburn, W. A., editor and publisher, 
Blade, Alma 

Concordia 

Walnut City 

Blagrave, L. E., editor and publisher . . 
Blagrave, J. S., editor and publisher . . 
Blain & Rochford, editors and publishers, 

Blaine News 

Blair, R. M., editor 

Blair, W. A., editor and publisher 

Blakernan, newspapers of 266, 

Blankenship, B. F., editor and publisher, 

Blaze, Wichita 284, 

Block, Henry, editor and publisher .... 
Bloom, newspapers of 

statistics of 

Blue and White, Junction City 

Blue Mound, named for 

newspapers of 225, 

statistics of 

Blue Rapids, named for 

newspapers of 236- 

statistics of 

Blue Stem, name changed to Lucas .... 

Blue Valley Clipper, Waterville 

Blue Valley Gazette, Irving 

Blue Valley Telegraph, Waterville 

Bluff City, first called Bluff Creek . . . 

newspapers of 202, 

statistics of 

Bluff Creek, name changed to Bluff City, 

Boanerges Reporter, Topeka 

Bob Shaw's Stafford County Review, 

Stafford 

Bogue Signal 

Bohanna, Fred, business manager .... 

Bok, Edward 

Boles, H. C., editor and publisher .... 
Bolton, Will E., editor and publisher . . 

Bonasa, now Leoti 

Bond, J. B., editor and publisher 

Bonham, F. M., editor and publisher . . 
Bonner, Robert, New York Ledger, 168. 
Bonner Springs, formerly called Tiblow, 

named for 

newspapers of 319. 

statistics of 

Bookwalter, E. J., editor and publisher, 
Borden & Edmunds, editors and pub- 
lishers 

Border Bulletin, Arkansas City 

Border Chief, Louisburg 

Border Rover, Borders 

Border Ruffian, Coolidge 

Border Sentinel, Mound City, history of, 

Border Slogan, Sedan 

Border Star, Columbus la". 

Border Tier Real Estate Bulletin, Paola, 

Border Watchman, Louisburg 

Borders, Border Rover . . . ... . 

Borin, Bruce, editor and publisher 

Borin, C., editor and publisher . ... . . 

Borin, Frances E., editor and publisher. 

Borman, T. A., editor-in-chief 

Bosland, name changed to Wilson 

Boston, now Manhattan 

Botkin, Jeremiah D., editor and publisher, 

Bouck, Harry W., editor and publisher, 

Boughton, C. W 

Boughton, J. S., editor and publisher . . . 

Bourbon County, named for 

newspapers of 147 

statistics of 

Bouton, E. L. S., editor and publisher . . 



261 
229 
240 
274 
166 
310 
162 
279 
280 
176 
255 
264 
303 
218 
267 
200 
286 
201 
190 
190 
194 
225 
226 
225 
236 
-238 
236 
280 
238 
237 
237 
202 
203 
202 
202 
297 

303 
196 
305 
122 
175 
217 
313 
163 
142 
319 
319 
319 
320 
319 
204 

308 
169 
240 
304 
201 
225 
226 
155 
157 
240 
240 
304 
270 
316 
270 
290 
187 
274 
151 
170 
292 
180 
147 
-149 
147 
279 



GENERAL INDEX. 



327 



Bovard, B. M., editor and publisher . . . 
Bowersock, Justin D ................ 

Bowman, M. M., editor and publisher . . 
Bowman, W. W., editor ............ 

Boyd, L. H ........................ 

Boyd, F. W., editor and publisher ..... 

Boyd, H. N., editor and publisher ..... 

Boyd, W. R., editor and publisher ..... 

Boyd, Walter, editor and publisher .... 

Boyd Publishing Company, publishers . . 
Boyer, I. S., editor and publisher .... 

Boyle, I. B., editor and publisher .... 

Boys' Chronicle, Topeka ............ 

Boys' World, Wichita ........... .... 

Bradfield, O. J., editor and publisher.. 
Badley, J. T., editor and publisher ____ 

Bradshaw, J. C., editor and publisher. . 
Bradt, Charles E., editor ............ 

Brady, J. Leeford, editor and publisher, 

Brady, J. R., editor and publisher ..... 

Brainard, newspapers of ............ 

Bray, Olive P., editor ............... 

Brayman, W. E., editor and publisher. . 
Breckenridge, John C ............... 

Brenckenridge county, name changed to 

Lyon ........................ 

Breeze, Lyon ...................... 

Brenner, Western Emigrant .......... 

Brettle, Frank J., editor and publisher, 
Brewer, George D., editor and publisher, 
Brewster, newspapers of ............ 

Breyfogle, John W., editor ........... 

Brice. O. A., editor and publisher ..... 

Brice, S. M., editor and publisher ..... 

Bridges, C. G., editor and publisher. . . . 

Bright & Stout, editors and publishers, 
Bright, Perry , editors and publishers, 
Brightman, Harry H., editor and pub- 

lisher ........................ 

Briles, E. A., editor and publisher.... 

Bristow, Joseph L., editor and pub- 

lisher ............ 90, 181, 191, 

Britt, J. J ........................ 

Brittsville, name changed to Simpson. . 
Broadaxe. Howard ................. 

Broaderick, Reude &, editors and pub- 

lishers ....................... 

Broaderick, H. M., editor and publisher, 
Broaderick, L. R., editor and publisher, 
Broadus, D. F., editor .............. 

Bronaugh, Edwin, editor and publisher, 

Bronson, Ira D .................... 

Bronson, named for ................ 

newspapers of ............ 147, 

statistics of ................... 

Brookdale, now Lyons .............. 

Brooke, H. M., editor and publisher. . . 
Brookheart, Homer U., editor and pub- 

lisher ........................ 

Brooks, H. H., editor and publisher. . . . 

Brooks, M. B., biisiness manager ...... 

Brooks, W. W., editor and publisher. . . 
Brookville, newspapers of ....... 281, 

statistics of ................... 

Broom Corn Reporter, Fort Scott ...... 

Broom Corn Review, Wichita ......... 

Brown & Son, publishers ........... 

Brown, A. D., editor and publisher. . . . 

Brown, E. H., editor and publisher. . . . 

Brown, E. L., editor and publisher. . . . 

Brown, F. E., editor and publisher. . . . 

Brown, Frank B., editor and publisher. 
Brown, Mrs. Frank B .............. . 

Brown, Dr. George W., editor and pub- 
lisher .............. . 



253 
92 
165 
290 
125 
261 
270 
300 
301 
300 
147 
31fi 
289 
286 
151 
246 
168 
284 
180 
281 
242 
153 
258 
239 
228 

228 
262 
179 
186 
172 
308 
213 
241 
225 
178 
196 
239 

268 
303 

281 
241 
241 
185 

236 
235 
235 
284 
263 
301 
147 
147 
148 
147 
272 
139 

279 
249 
267 
236 
282 
281 
148 
284 
285 
164 
165 
284 
165 
145 
291 
291 

180 



Brown, H. B., editor and publisher 258 

280 

Brown, H. C., editor and publisher. ... 211 

279 

Brown, J. S., editor 291 

Brown, John 5, 38 

Brown, Lester L., editor 285 

Brown, R. B., editor and publisher. . . . 246 
Brown, W. W., editor and publisher. . . . 211 

Brown county, named for 149 

newspapers of 149-151 

statistics of 149 

Browne, Charles F., "Artemus Ward," 21 
Browne, Charles Herbert, editor and 

publisher 150- 

Browne. O. H 149 

Brownell Courier 253 

Bruce, H., editor and publisher 234 

Bruce, H. E., editor and publisher 232 

Brundage, T. L., editor and publisher. . 250- 
Brundige & Bear, editors and publishers, 150 
Brundige, Harley W., editor and pub- 
lisher 150- 

Bryant, William Cullen 6 

Buchanan, J. C., editor and publisher. . 171 

Buck, C. A., editor and publisher 316 

Buck, E. E., editor and publisher 167 

Buck, N. B., editor and publisher 316 

Buckingham, A. L., editor and pub- 
lisher 162 

Buckingham, Henry, editor and pub- 
lisher 17, 162, 2*22 

Bucklin, first called Corbitt 190- 

named for 190" 

newspapers of 190, 191 

statistics of 191 

Buckner Independent, Jetmore 206" 

Buel & Sprague, editors and publishers, 213" 
Buena Vista, name changed to Hoising- 

ton 146 

Buffalo, named for 315- 

newspapers of 315- 

statistics of 315 

Buffalo Park, newspapers of 195- 

Buffington, C. P., editor and publisher. . 243 
Bugle Call, Arkansas City and Howard, 169* 

185 

Cherryvale 245- 

Marysville 236, 237, 238 

Building and Loan News, Topeka .... 299 
Bulin & Foltz, editors and publishers . . 280- 

Bull, H. C 257 

Bull City, named for 257 

name changed to Alton 257 

newspapers of 257, 258" 

Bulletin, Anthony, history of 202 

Lyons ' 273" 

Bulletin and Gazette, Sterling 273 

Bulletin, Kansas State Board of Health, 

Topeka 289- 

Bulletin, Washburn Laboratory of Natural 

History, Topeka 295- 

Bumgartner, W. J., managing editor . . 181 
Bunce, H. M., editor and publisher . . . 194 

Bundle of Sticks, Garden City 189- 

Bunker, Wm. A 55- 

Bunker Hill, newspapers of 279. 28a 

statistics of 279 

Burden, Robert F 16& 

Burden, named for 168" 

newspapers of 168 170 

statistics of 168 

Burdett Bugle 260- 

Burdette, Robert J., editor Burlington 

(Iowa) Hawkeye 25 

Burdick, A. P 209- 

Burdick Bulletin 247 

Burge, Will R., editor and publisher . . 243- 



328 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Burger, D. S., editor and publisher . . 149 

Burk, J. B., editor and publisher 159 

Burke, J. J. and C. T. Hutchinson. edi- 
tors and publishers 140 

Burke, W. L., editor and publisher . . 157 

Burke, W. S., editor and publisher, 17, 222 

Burks, J. E., editor and publisher .... 248 

Burlingame, Anson 255 

Burlingame, Ward, editor and publisher, 17 

289 

Burlingame, first called Council City . . 255 
history current newspapers pub- 
lished in 25*5 

newspapers of 255257 

statistics of 255 

Burlington, named for 164 

newspapers of 164-166 

statistics of 164 

Burlington Republican, history of .... 164 

Burnes, J. J., editor and publisher . . . 305 

Burnett, Henry C 53 

Burns, Mrs. Jenny, editor and publisher, 137 

Burns, newspapers of 234, 235 

statistics of 234 

Burr, E. M., editor and publisher 301 

Burr, I. T 204 

Biirr Oak, named for 211 

newspapers of 211, 212 

statistics of 211 

Burroughs, George W., editor and pub- 
lisher 162, 175, 255 

Burrton, named for 204 

newspapers of 204, 205 



statistics of 



204 



Burrton Graphic, history of 204 

Burton, J. D., editor and publisher .... 152 

Burton, J. R., president 281 

Burton, James, editor and publisher . . 147 
Burton, Mary L., editor and publisher . . 163 

Burton Baptist, North Wichita 287 

Buschlen, H. J., editor and publisher . . 233 
Busenbark, Cora M., editor and publisher, 183 
Busenbark, Dow, editor and publisher. . 255 
Busenbark, L. E., editor and publisher, 236 
Bush, William E., editor and publisher, 211 
Bushton, formerly called Sorghum .... 273 

newspapers of 273 

statistics of 273 

Business College Journal, Lawrence . . 183 

Business Informer, Wichita 287 

Busy Bee, Le Roy 165 

Busy Bee Magazine, Topeka 297 

Butcher, Austin V., editor and publisher, 314 
Butcher, R. V., editor and publisher . . 166 
Butin, Viola (Mrs. John S. Gilmore) . . 33 

Butler, A. P 151 

Butler City News 264 

Butler county, named for 151 

newspapers of 151153 

statistics of 151 

Butters & Butters, editors and publishers, 208 

Butts, Alexander 17, 51, 131 

Buyer's Guide, Independence 245 

Buziok, W. C., editor and publisher .... 224 

Byers, O. P 265 

Byers, named for 265 

statistics of 265 

Byers Journal 265 

Byington, Le Grand, editor in chief . . . 292 
Byington, M. L., editor and publisher . . 147 



C. M. A. Emblem, Alma 310 

Coble City, now Alta Vista 310 

Cady, Will H., editor and publisher. . . . 152 

Caffaro, Edeardo, biographical sketch ... 70 

3ditor and publisher 171 

-portrait of 72 

Cain. J. Byron, editor and publisher. . . 305 



Cain. M. R., editor and publisher 181 

Cain, Noble W., editor 285 

Cain, W. E., editor and publisher 292 

Cain City, newspapers of 273, 274 

Cain News 188 

Calcium Light, Belleville 272 

Caldwell, Alexander 305 

Caldwell, C. R., editor and publisher. . 
Caldwell, history of current newspapers 

published at 305 

named for 305 

newspapers of 305, 307 

statistics of 305 

Calhoun county, named for John C. Cal- 

houn 207 

Call, Hutchinson 269 

Call, Evening, Independence 244 

Callaham, Arthur, editor 291 

Callahan, A. F., editor and publisher. . . 222 
Callen, Elizabeth F., editor and pub- 
lisher 171 

Callen, Dr. J. F., editor and publisher. . 17] 

Calnan, Charles . . 74 

Calnan, Henry J., biographical sketch. . 74 

editor and publisher 178 

portrait of 73 

Calvert, Fred W., editor and publisher, 239 

Calvert Gazette 254 

Cambridge, newspapers of 169 

Cameron, R., editor and publisher 270 

Campbell & Waymire, editors and pub- 
lishers 140 

Campbell, Dan, jr., editor and publisher, 176 

Campbell, J. G., editor and publisher.. 305 

Campbell, H. R., managing editor 259 

Campbell, Hutchinson, editor and pub- 
lisher 222 

Campbell, J. B., editor and publisher. . . 312 

Campbell, J. O., editor and publisher. . . 168 

Campbell, John P., editor and publisher, 255 

Campbell, Nev., editor and publisher. .. 225 

Campbell, R. E., editor and publisher. . 198 

Campbell, W. P., editor and publisher, 236 

264 

Campbell Caravan, Holton 208 

Campbell College Charta, Holton 209 

Camp's Emigrant Guide, Fort Scott .... 148 

Cana Valley Herald, Grenola 185 

Canada Arcade 235 

Canal ^City Dispatch, Arkansas City. ... 169 

Caney, named for 242 

newspapers of 242-245 

statistics of 242 

Cannon, J. C., editor and publisher. . . . 226 

Cannutt, H. F., editor and publisher. . . 213 

Canon Bros., editors and publishers. . . . 238 

Canon, D. A., editor 238 

Canton, newspapers of 231, 233 

statistics of 231 

Canton, now Manhattan 274 

Capital, Topeka 289 

Capper, Arthur, biographical sketch. ... 43 

editor and publisher.. 17, 57, 61, 135 

289, 290, 291 
portrait of, frontispiece. 

Capper, Mrs. Florence Crawford 234 

Capper Bulletin, Topeka 289 

Capper's Weekly, Topeka 44, 289 

Capps & Albaugh, editors and publishers, 265 

Capps, F. A., editor 283 

Capps, Mrs. M. S., editor and publisher, 213 

Carbondale, named for 255 

newspapers of 255-257 

statistics of 255 

Carder, T. A., editor and publisher. . . . 256 

Carlisle, Agnes B. (Mrs. Josiah Miller), 27 

Carlisle, H. T., editor and publisher... 254 

Carlson, Anna, biographical sketch .... 102 

portrait of 104 

Carlton, newspapers of 176 



GENERAL INDEX. 



329 



Carnell, A. S., editor and publisher. . . . 198 
Carnes, Stauffer &, editors and publish- 
ers 263 

Carpenter, Alf. D., editor and publisher. 218 

Carpenters' Kansas Lyre, Rossville. . . . 296 

Carruth, William H 12 

Carter, Jasper, editor and publisher. ... 185 

Carter, Joe H., publisher 166 

Carver, J. B., corresponding secretary. . 290 

Case, S. W.,. editor and publisher. . 283, 311 

Case, Mrs. S. W., corresponding editor, 283 

Casey, J. B., editor 318 

Cash, J. C., editor and publisher 225 

Cash, J. G., editor and publisher. . 140, 166 

Cash, W. M., editor and publisher 166 

Cash City Cashier 160 

Cash Trade Journal, Topeka 298 

Cassoday, newspapers of 153, 303 

Castle, P. B., editor and publisher 242 

Cavaness Bros. & Helmick, editors and 

publishers 251 

Cavaness, Herbert, biographical sketch. . 82 

editor and publisher 251 

portrait of 83 

Cavaness, J. M., editor and publisher . . 218 

Catholic Advance, Wichita 284 

Catholic Educational Society, publisher, 204 

Cawker, E. H 241 

Cawker City, named for 241 

newspapers of 240-242 

statistics of 241 

Cedar Bluffs, statistics of 174 

Cedar Enterprise, Cedarville 302 

Cedar Point, newspapers of 154 

statistics of ..... 154 

Cedar Vale, named for 155 

newspapers of 155, 156 

statistics of 155 

Cedarville, newspapers of 301, 302 

Cedarville Town Company, publisher. . . 301 

Celia Enterprise 266, 267 

Centennial Tea Chest, Topeka 298 

Center, Yates Center 317 

Centerville, newspapers of 226 

Central Advocate, Marion 234 

Central Baptist, Topeka 293 

Central Friend, Wichita 286 

Central Kansas Democrat, Lyons, 272, 273 

Central Kansas Index, Cottonwood Falls, 154 

Central Kansas News-Democrat, Lyons, 272 
Central Kansas Publishing Company, Sa- 

lina 281 

Central Kansas Telegraph, Marion .... 234 

Central Reflex, Burr Oak 211, 212 

Central State, Highland 178 

Centralia, named for 249 

newspapers of 249, 250 

statistics of 249 

Cerny, Joe H., editor 187 

Cesky Lev [Bohemian], Cuba 271 

Chab'in, A. W., editor and publisher, 194, 263 

Chacey, H. C., editor and publisher .... 155 

('haddock, C. W., editor and publisher . . 278 

Chaffee, A. B., editor and publisher . . . 240 

Chalfant, W. F., editor and publisher, 17, 255 

& Co., editors and publishers 180 

Chalk, Edward, editor and business man- 
ager 198 

Challis, W. F., editor and proprietor . . . 263 

hallis, W. L., editor and publisher .... 316 

Chamberlin, S. D., editor and publisher, 157 

Chambers, W. L., editor and publisher, 277 

Champe, Anna, publisher 139 

Champe, Carleton, editor and publisher, 139 

Champe, W. O., editor and publisher . . 139 

Champion and Press, Atchison 141 

Champion Liar, Perry 210 

Chanticleer, Niotaze ". 155 

Chantilly, Kearny County Coyote .... 215 



Chainlet, Alfred, editor and publisher .. 263 

Chanute. named for Octave Chanute . . 251 

newspapers of 251, 252 

statistics of -jr, 1 

Chanute Tribune, history of . , 251 

Chapman, C. O., editor and publisher . . '_' 1 .". 

Chapman, Ed. T., editor and publisher, 1*:> 

Chapman, .1 . I'. 71 

Chapman, J. W ; 79 

Chapman, Clay county, now Longford . . 161 
Chapman, Dickinson county, newspapers 

of IT:.. 177 

statistics of 17.' 

Chapman Advertiser, history of 175 

Charles, Tom, editor and publisher .... -J7t 

Charles, W. C., editor and publisher . . 144 

Chase, Edward Henry 132 

Chase, Harold Taylor, biographical sketch 132 

portrait of 133 

Chase, L. C., editor and publisher .... 196 

Chase, Salmon P., governor of Ohio . . 153 

Chase, newspapers of 273, 274 

originally Wildwood post office .... 273 

statistics of 27.". 

Chase county, named for 153 

newspapers of 153, 154 

statistics of 153 

Chatham, J. J., editor and publisher . . 242 

Chautauqua Assembly Herald. Ottawa.. 191' 

Chautauqua Bulletin, Sterling 274 

Chautauqua county, named for 154 

newspapers of 154-156 

statistics of 1' 

Chautauqua Journal, Sedan 154, 155 

Chautauqua Springs, newspapers of ... 1 .">.-> 

Chellis, W. L., editor and publisher .... 215 

Cheney, Benj. P., Boston 285 

Cheney, newspapers of 285, 287 

statistics of 285 

Chenoweth, W. S., editor and publisher, 3 

Cherokee, named for 171 

newspapers of 171173 

statistics of 171 

Cherokee county, named for 156 

newspapers of . . 156158 

originally called McGee county .... 156 

statistics of 156 

Cherokee Neutral Land Troubles 170 

Cherokee Sentinel, Baxter Springs .... 15* 

Cherokee Strip Guide, Arkansas City . . 170 
Cherry, Cherokee co., name changed to 

Mineral 157 

Cherry vale, named for -4'.> 

newspapers of 243-245 

statistics of 243 

Cherryvale Republican, history of .... 243 

Cherry Valley Torch, Cherryvale . . 24:;. -j l 1 

Chesley, M. A., editor and publisher . . 218 

Chessmore, Mikesell &, publishers .... 266 

Chester Swine Journal, Kansas City . . 3 

Chetopa, derivation of name 

newspapers of 218220 

statistics of 21* 

Chetopa Advance, history of 2 

Cheyenne county, named for 159 

newspapers of 159 

statistics of 159 

Chicago Junction, now Chanute -">! 

Chico Advertiser 282 

Chilcott, Mabel Frances (Mrs. M. F. Am- 

rine), editor 102 

Chilcott, R. M., editor and publisher. . . 264 

Childers. J. H., editor 291 

Chiles, Nick, editor and publisher 2 

Chindowan, Quindaro 319 

Chips, Topeka 296 

Chrestoinatheon Literary Society, founder. 273 

Christian, James, editor and publisher. . 180 

Christian, now Moundridge '-3'J 



330 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Christian, Coffeyville 243 

Christian Blade, Topeka 298 

Christian Bugle, Hutchinson 270 

Christian Call, Stockton 278 

Christian Church Helper, Topeka 297 

Christian Citizen, Topeka 293, 298 

Christian Companion, Wichita 286 

Christian Courier, Topeka 293 

Christian Educator and God's Defender, 

Great Bend 147 

Christian Endeavorer, Chapman 177 

Christian Helper, Girard and Harper. . 172 

203 

Wichita 287 

Christian Herald, Winfield 168 

Christian Messenger, Lindsborg 233 

North Topeka 299 

Christian News, Topeka 298 

Christian Polemic, Galena 158 

Christian Reminder, Wellington 306 

Christian Sower, Fort Scott 148 

Christian Speculator, Arkansas City... 170 

Christian Visitant, Emporia 230 

Christian Worker, Arcadia 172 

Wichita 284 

Winfield 170 

Christiansen, J., editor and publisher. . 185 

Christliches Kinderblatt, Hillsboro 235 

Christna, Winfield 168 

Christy, Lyne M., editor and publisher. . 260 

Chronicle, Anthony, 203, 205, 233, 269, 286 

Chronicle, Jr., Liberal 288 

Chronicle-Journal, Abilene 175 

Chronicle-Tribune, Leavenworth 222 

Chubbic, P. G., editor and publisher. .. 240 

Church & Co.'s Monthly, Topeka 296 

Church, J. A., editor and publisher 237 

Church, J. E., editor and publisher. ... 159 

Church, J. P., editor and publisher 234 

Church Advocate and Holiness Banner 

Fort Scott 147 

Church and Library, Madison, Wichita 

and Olpe 201, 286 

Church Calendar, Kansas City and Smith 

Center 301, 319 

Church Gleaner, Minneapolis 260 

Church Herald, Newton 205 

Church Index, Topeka 293 

Church Life, Kansas City 320 

Church Messenger, El Dorado 153 

Newton 205 

Church News, Topeka 298 

Church of the New Jerusalem, Peabody, 235 

Church Record, Douglass 153 

Church Visitor, Atchison 141 

Church Worker, Chase 274 

Churchill, now Tescott 259 

Cicerone, Uniontown 148 

Cimarron, newspapers of, 189, 190, 197, 198 

statistics of 197 

Cimarron Jacksonian, history of 197 

Cincinnati, Grant co., newspapers of ... 197 

Cipra, Wenslow, editor and publisher. . 224 

Circleville, newspapers of 208 

Citizen, Wyandotte 318 

Citizen-Patriot, Atwood, history of 266 

Citizen-Republican, Kingman 216 

City Progress, Topeka 299 

Claflin, newspapers of 346 

statistics of 146 

Claiborn, R. B., editor and publisher . . 218 
Clardy, J. E. & Co., editors and pub- 
lishers 264 

Clarinda Pioneer 253 

Clark, Wray &, editors and publishers, 176 

Clark & Runneals, editors and publishers, 236 

Clark, A. L., editor and publisher 231 

& Son, editors and publishers .... 186 
Clark, Capt. Charles F., Sixth Kansas 

Cavalry 159 



Clark, George A., editor and publisher. . 162 

Clark, George W., editor and publisher, 162 

Clark, H. L., editor and publisher .... 257 

Clark, Ira H., editor and publisher . . . 146 

Clark, J. G. & Co., editors and publishers, 271 

Clark, J. J., editor and publisher .... 168 

Clark County, named for 159 

newspapers of 118, 159, 160 

statistics of 159 

Clarke & Clarke, editors and publishers, 311 
Clarke, Punton-, Publishing Company, 

publishers 3 IS 

Clarke, Samuel, editor and publisher . . 311 

Clark's Occasional, Hays 186 

Clawson, Wern &, editors and publishers, 249 

Clawson, J. H., editor and publisher . . 156 

Clay, Henry 160 

Clay Center, history of current news- 
papers published in 160, 1.61 

named for 160- 

newspapers of 160162 

statistics of 160 

Clay County, named for 160- 

newspapers of 160162 

statistics of 160 

Claybaugh, C. W., editor and publisher, 26& 
Claypool & Raisner, editors and pub- 
lishers 268 

Clayton, H. D., editor and publisher . . 196 

Clayton Success 254 

Clearwater, named for 285 

(newspapers of 285, 287, 288: 

statistics of 285 

Clearwater Courant, history of 285 

Cleburne, formerly Big Timber 275 

statistics of 275- 

Cleburne News 275 

Cleveland, President Grover 38, 120- 

Cleveland Star 216 

Cleven ger, C. C., editor 316. 

Clevenger, Keith, editor and publisher, 240- 

Clifton, named for 312 

newspapers of 161, 312, 313 

statistics of 312 

Cline, E. L., editor and publisher 306 

Clingman, Ina L., publisher 142 

Clingman, M. C., editor and publisher, 142 

Clipper, Hutchinson 267, 269 

Cloud, William F., colonel Second Kan- 
sas Regiment 162 

Cloud county, named for 162 

newspapers of 162164 

statistics of 162 

Clough, J. F., editor and publisher .... 250- 

Club Member, Topeka 293 

Clyde, named for 163 

newspapers of 162164 

statistics of 163 

Clymer, R. A., editor 213 

Coal World, Weir 158" 

Coates, W. C., editor and publisher .... 310 

Coats, statistics of 265 

Coats Courant 265 

Cober, J. N., editor and publisher .... 250- 

Coburn, Ephraim W 108 

Coburn, Foster D., biographical sketch 108 

portrait of 109 

Cochran, A. A., publisher 265 

Cochran, J. K., editor and publisher . 265 

Cochran, M. C., editor and publisher . 144 

Cockrell & Corriger, proprietors 263 

Codding, J. K., editor and publisher . 263 

warden and publisher 222 

Coff, L. H., editor and publisher 312 

Coff, Ruth, editor and publisher 312 

Coffey, A. M 243 

member first territorial legislature 164 

Coffey, Frank M., editor and publisher 270- 

Coffey, R. J., editor and publisher ... - 194 



GENERAL INDEX. 



331 



266 
268 
289 
220 



county, named for ifi' 

newspapers of n>4 

statistics of 164 

CoftVyville, named for 243 

newspapers of 243-245 

statistics of 243 

Coffin, C. W., editor and publisher 266 

Coffin, G. W., editor 

Coffin, L. A., editor 

Coffin, M. A., managing editor 

Coffin's Business Directory, Parsons 

Coggins, C. T., editor and publisher .... 195 

Coile, Owen A., editor 256 

Colborn, Mrs. lola 137 

Colby, A. D., editor and publisher 194 

Colby, named for J. R. Colby 308 

newspapers of 125, 308 

statistics of 308 

Colby Tribune, history of 308 

Coldren, E. M., editor and publisher . . 174 

Coldren, E. W., associate editor 174 

Coldwater, named for 166 

newspapers of 166,167 

statistics of 166 

Cole, C. V., editor and publisher, 152, 306 

Coleman & Dillon, editors and publishers, 211 

Coleman, A. E., editor and publisher ... 211 

Coleman, J. W., editor and publisher . . . 250 

Coler, Perry, editor and publisher 254 

Colin, G. C., editor 305 

College Advance, Dodge City 191 

College Advocate, Dodge City 191 

College Coyote, Emporia 230 

College Echoes, Lecompton 182 

College Hill Hustler, Manhattan 276 

College Journal, Harper 203 

College Life, Emporia 228, 230 

College Life, Lawrence 182 

College Oracle, Lecompton 182 

College Outlook, Harper 203 

College Register, El Dorado 153 

College Review, Atchison 143 

College Review, Lawrence 181 

Collelmo, Dr. U. A. D 70 

Collett, G. A., editor and publisher . . .187 

Collier, F. H., editor and publisher. . . 290 

Collins, O. E., editor 281 

Colokan Graphic 198 

Colony, formerly Divide 140 

newspapers of 140, 141 

statistics of 140 

Colored Citizen, Topeka 293 

Colored Patriot, Topeka 297 

Colored Radical, Lawrence 181 

Colored Woman's Magazine, Topeka. . . 289 

Colton, Rev. Wm. N., editor 281 

Columbia. Emporia ... 229 

Columbia Herald, Topeka 298 

Columbia University, New York 55 

Columbian Exposition, Chicago 110 

Columbian Magazine, Emporia 2 

Columbus, named for 156 

newspapers of 156-158 

statistics of 156 

Columbus Advocate, history of 156 

Colwich Courier 287 

Colyer, W. L., editor and publisher. ... 183 

Comanche Chief, Reeder 167 

Comanche Chieftain, Nescutunga 167 

Comanche City News 167 

Ccmanche county, named for 166 

newspapers of 166, 167 

statistics of 166 

Combs, Lester, editor and publisher. ... 2 

Comet, Courtland 171 

Comet, Little River 273, 274 

Comet, McPherson 232 

Comet, Topeka, 298 

Coming Nation. Girard ' . . 172 

Commercial Advertiser, Topeka 293 



Cimmirrcial and Hotel Advertiser, To- 
peka 

Commercial Bulletin, Lane 

Topeka 

Wichita 

Commercial Club, Osawatomie 

Commercial Club Bulletin, Topeka .... 

Commercial Club News, Osawatomie . . . 

Commercial Educator. Lawrence. . 182, 

Commercial Journal, Wichita 

Comment, Le Roy 

Common People, Lenora 

< '(minion School, Scott City 

Commoner, Daily, Wichita 

r.mnnonwealth, Sharon Springs 

Compatriot News, Topeka 

Conard, Arthur 

Concordia, history of current newspapers 

published at 

meaning of name 

newspapers of 162- 

statistics of 

Concordia Commercial Club 

Conderman, R. J., editor and publisher, 

Conductor Punch 

Cone, Frederick P., editor and publisher, 

Cone, John P., editor and publisher. . . . 

Conference Daily, Topeka 

Conference Daily Press. Girard . . .... 

Congregational Kansas 205, 

Congregational News, Topeka 

Congregational Record, Lawrence and 
Topeka 181 > 

Congregationalist, Topeka .... ... 

Conkling, Clark, editor and publisher . . 

Conn, A., publisher 

Connell, George W., editor and pub- 
lisher 

Connelley, C. A., editor and publisher.. 

Connelley, William E 

Connor & Lippincott, editors and pub- 
lishers ; 

Connor, J. G., editor and publisher. - . . 

Conservative Cuban, Cuba . . . . 

Constant, J. A., editor and publisher. . 
Construction News, Topeka . . ... 
Converse, Asa F., editor and publisher 
Converse, J. S., editor and publisher. 

Convincer, Emporia .-.v 

Convis, Mattie E., editor and pubhshei. 

ConwaV J W., editor and publisher 

Conway, Martin F., member of congress 

from Kansas 

Conway Springs, named for . 

newspapers of 

statistics of : 

Conway Springs Star, history of ..... 

Cook, Fred M., editor and manager 

Cook, J. L., editor and P$fjL; 



Cooke^Tseph' W.' 'i-V editor' and P uV 
Coolidge^F/F.V editor and publisher. . 



Cooper Fred N.', editor and publisher. . 

rpr G W publisher 

Cooper, Minnie Wood, editor and pub- 
lisher 

Cooper College, Sterling 

Cooper Courier, Sterling 

Coopers' Industrial Journal, Kansas City, 

Cooper's Quarterly, Sterling 

Coover, S. A., editor and publisher 

Copeland, Tom C., editor and publisher, 



293 
192 
297 

287 

288 
295 
L83 
288 

165 
254 
283 
287 
311 
293 
273 

162 
162 
-164 
162 
106 
219 
197 
251 
249 
296 
173 
289 
298 

293 
293 
272 
251 

181 
24'- 
128 

146 

217 

271 

250 

192 
306 
229 
211 

254 

5 

306 
308 
306 
306 
163 

218 
157 

14t> 
266 
201 
168 
255 
289 
272 
139 

272 
273 
273 
317 
274 
187 
243 



332 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Cora Union 302 

Corbin Voice 305, 307 

Corbitt, now Bucklin 190 

Cordry, S. J., editor and publisher 271 

Cordry, T. A., editor and publisher, 251, 271 

Corey, A. S., editor and publisher 218 

Corn and Wheat Region Bulletin, Topeka, 290 

Cornelius, Roy, editor and publisher... 146 

Cornell, S. P\ 140 

Cornell, Anderson county, name changed 

to Westphalia 140 

Corning, named for 249 

newspapers of 249, 250 

statistics of 249 

Cornwell, Herbert J.. editor and pub- 
lisher 302 

Corporan, G. W., editor and publisher. . 170 

Coronado, newspapers of 314 

Corriger, Cockrell &, proprietors 263 

Corwin Dispatch 203 

Costigan's Weekly, Ottawa 193 

Cottonwood Falls, newspapers of.. 153, 154 

statistics of 153 

Cottonwood Valley News, Cedar Point. . 154 

Cottonwood Valley Times, Marion 234 

Country editor, sketch of 19 

Coulson, Fred 292 

Council City, now Burlingame 255 

Council Grove, history of cui'rent news- 
papers published in 246 

named for 246 

statistics of 246 

Council Grove high school 102 

Counter, Humphrey &, editors and pub- 
lishers * 174 

Country School, Kinsley 184 

County Beacon, Lexington 160 

County Capital, St. John 302 

County Liner and Cedar Vale Commer- 
cial 155 

County School Champion, New Albany. . 315 

Courant, Cottonwood Falls 154 

Courant and Reveille, Cottonwood Falls, 154 

Courant-Ledger, Howard 184 

Courier, Independence 242 

Oakley 227 

Courtland, newspapers of 270, 272 

statistics of 270 

Coutant, C. G., editor and publisher, 290, 204 

Coutant, W. E., publisher 290 

Coutts, James M., editor 232 

Covel, J. E., publisher 180 

Coverdale, R. C., editor and publisher. . 263 

Coverdale, Mrs. R. C., editor 263 

Covert, Harry, editor and publisher. . . . 165 

Covert, J. S., editor and publisher 165 

Covert, Farmers Aid 258 

Cowan, Ada, editor and publisher 192 

Cowden, W. L., editor 159 

Cowdery, C. E., editor and publisher. . . 315 

Cowdery, P. B., editor and publisher. . . 315 
Cowgill, E. Branson, editor and publisher, 273 
Cowgill, W. T., editor and publisher, 151, 202 

Cowland Chieftain 207 

Cowley county, named for 167 

newspapers of 167170 

statistics of 167 

Cox, A. T., editor and publisher 242 

Cox, Keith E., editor and publisher. . . . 285 

Cox, S. A. D., editor and publisher. . . . 138 

Coyville, newspapers of 315 

Coyote, Scott City 283 

Craig & Kennedy, editors and publishers, 226 

Craig, A. M., editor and publisher 176 

Craig, C. E., editor and publisher 226 

Craig, P. W., editor and publisher 168 

Cramer, Glenn C., publisher 190, 198 

Crampton, F. L., manager 283 

Crane & Co., Topeka 135 



Crane, Albert, proprietor Durham Park 

Ivaiich 234 

Crane. Dr. Frank 122 

Crary, A. M., editor and publisher 176 

Crawford, Florence (Mrs. Arthur Cap- 
per) 44 

Crawford, George M., editor 291 

Crawford, J. T., editor and publisher. . . 219 

Crawford, Gov. S. J 44, 170, 234 

Crawford county, named for 170 

newspapers of 170-172 

statistics of 170 

Cresson, now Palco 277 

Cresson Dispatch 278 

Cresswell, now Arkansas City 168 

Crewson, E. A., editor and publisher. . . 156 

Crisfield Courier , 203 

Criswell, Ralph L., editor and publisher, 195 

Cromwell's Kansas Mirror, Armourdale, 319 
Crop Bulletin, Kansas Weather Service, 

Topeka 293 

Crosby, D. R. & Co., editor and pub- 
lishers 259 

Crouch, J. B., editor and publisher. . . . 234 

Crowther, Maurice 84 

Crozier, Robert, editor 222 

Crumbine, S. J., editor 289 

Crusader, lola 137 

Cuba, newspapers of 271, 272 

statistics of 271 

Cullison, O. L., editor and publisher. . . . 140 

Cullison, newspapers of 266 

Gulp, John, editor and publisher 139 

Cultivator and Herdsman, Garden City. . 188 

Culver, George 259 

Culver, probably named for 259 

statistics of 259 

Culver Record 259 

Cummings, J. F., editor and publisher, 289 

Cundiff Journal 248 

Cunningham, A. W ' . . . . 138 

Cunningham, Mrs. Delia 207 

Cunningham, F 161 

Cunningham, R. & Co., editors and pub- 
lishers 161 

Cunningham, formerly Ninnescah 216 

newspapers of 216 

statistics of 216 

Current Comment, Topeka 293 

Current Remark, Lyndon 256 

Current Topics, Topeka 293 

Curry, John R., editor and publisher. . . 197 

Curtis, Charles 79 

Curtis, W. G., editor and publisher. . . . 284 

Curts, M. H., editor and publisher 175 

Cushing, Mrs. C. H., editor 221 

Cutler, A. C., editor and publisher 211 

Cyclone, Ellsworth . . 187 

Cyclone, Pittsburg 172 

Cynosure, and Gleaner, Guy and Jaqua, 159 

D. 

Dale and Anderson, Andale named for, 285 

Dallas, C. E., editor and publisher, 225, 226 

Dallas, Helen C., editor and publisher. . 225 

Dalton, C. E., editor 181 

Dana, C. T., business manager 157 

Dana, Charles A., 6 

Dancy, J. E., editor and publisher 160 

Danforth, Frank L., editor 142 

Dannenbarger, W. H., editor and pub- 
lisher 163 

Danville, newspapers published at 2 

Darlington, Byron, manager 168 

Darlington, Tom, editor and publisher. . 171 

Dart, Ottawa 193 

Daughters & Smith, editors and publish- 

ers 224 

Davidson, S. F., editor and pxiblisher. . . 319 



GENERAL INDEX. 



333 



Davies. Gladys 

Davies, Gomer Taliesii 

sketch of 

editor and publisher 
portrait of 

Davies, Harry L 

Davies, Dr. John D. 



106 

biographical 

106 

163, 271 

105 

106 

. 106 



Davies, Morfydd 106 

Davies, Ralph B 106 

Davies, Ruth 106 

Davis & Knaus, editors and publishers, 231 
Davis & Watson, editors and publishers, 149 
Davis & Wharton, editors and publish- 
ers 

Davis, Ben T., editor and publisher. . . . 



292 
167 
292 
304 
152 



Davis, Charles M., editor and publisher 

Davis, E., managing editor 

I 'avis, E., jr., editor and publisher.... 152 

Davis, E. S 137 

Davis, Mrs. Eva F 152 

Davis, J. B., publisher 289 

Davis, J. J., editor and publisher 275 

Diivis, J. S., editor and publisher 246 

Davis, Jefferson 194 

Davis, L. W., editor and publisher. ... -II 

Davis. M. C 187 

editor and publisher 265 

Davis, M. H., editor and publisher 147 

Davis, Mrs. Minnie 159 

Davis, N. M., editor and publisher 246 

Davis, P. O., publisher 166 

Davis, R. E., editor and publisher. ... 2 
Davis, S. A., editor and publisher . . . 197 
Davis, W. E., editor and publisher... 189 

Davis, W. R., proprietor 183 

Davis, Will M., editor and publisher . . 316 
Davis, county, name changed to Geary. . 173 

newspapers of 173 

Davis County Republican, Junction City, 1 

Day, , editor and publisher 174 

Day, C. S., editor and publisher 285 

Day, Lvle, editor 285 

Day, W. P., and Jenkins, W. D., editors 

and publishers 211 

Deal, W. R., editor and publisher .... 317 
Deardoff, Rush E., editor and publisher, 189 
Debter and Workingman, Burlingame. . 256 

Decatur, Commodore Stephen 174 

Decatur county, named for 174 

newspapers of 174 

statistics of 174 

Deeble & Barr, editors and publishers . . 280 

Deerfield, newspapers published at 215 

Deering, newspapers published at 245 

Deeter, J. W., editor and publisher .... 174 

Defender, Belle Plaine 305 

DeGeer, Mrs. M. E., editor and publisher, 311 
Delahay, Judge M. W., editor and pub- 
lisher 318 

Delia, named for 207 

newspapers published at .... 207, 208 

statistics of 207 

Dell Ray, name changed to Glasco .... 163 

Delphian, Kansas City 3 

Delphos, named for 259 

newspapers of 259 

statistics of 259 

Delta of Sigma Nu, Hiawatha 150 

Democrat, Marysville 236, 237 

Norton 254 

Walnut City 279 

Wichita 283 

Democrat and News, El Dorado 152 

Democrat and Watchman, Dowell and 

Wellsford 217 

Democrat-Courant, Tola, J. C. & J. W. 

Hamm and J. J. Rambo, publishers, 137 
Democrat-Opinion, McPherson, history 

of . '-231 



Democrat-Press, Belleville 271 

Democratic Leader, Ottawa 191 

Democratic Mail, Omio 212 

Democratic Messenger, Eureka 199 

Smith Center 301 

Democratic Principle, Syracuse 201 

Democratic Record, Emporia 229 

Democratic Sentinel, Junction City .... 194 
Democratic Standard, Lawrence ... 53, 182 

Leavenworth 222, 223 

Democratic Times, Hays 186 

DeMotte, McK., editor and publisher . . 176 
Denison & Krow, editors and publishers, 30a 
Denison, newspapers published at .... 208 
Denious, J. C., editor and manager .... 189 
Dennis, newspapers published at . . 219, 220 
Dennison, C. E., editor and publisher . . 159 
Densmore, newspapers published at .... 254 

Dental Herald. Beloit 242 

Denton, newspapers published at 178 

Dentonia Institutionist 212 

Derby, newspapers published at 287 

Derniott Enterprise 304 

Derrick, Elgin 155 

Deputy & Shellenbaum, editors and pub- 
lishers 275 

De Soto, named for 213 

newspapers published at 213, 214 

statistics of 213 

Detective World, Topeka i'!7 

Detroit, newspapers published 177 

Deutsche Westen, McPherson 23'2 

De Vinnev, Will, editor and publisher. . 163 

224 
DeVivaldi, C. F., consul to Santos, Brazil, 275 

editor and proprietor 275 

DeVore, C. E., editor and publisher . . . 306 
Dewey, G. M., editor and publisher ... 251 

Dexter, named for 168 

newspapers published at 168170 

statistics of 168 

Dexter Observer, history of . 168 

DeYoung, Stephen, editor and publisher, 241 

Dial, Oswego 218 

Dial, St. Marys 263 

Dick, Aron, jr., editor and publisher. . . 231 
Dickey, W. L., editor and publisher. . . . 152 

Dickinson, Daniel S 175 

Dickinson county, named for ^ . 175 

newspapers of 84, 175-177 

statistics of 175 

Dickson, J. W., editor and publisher. . . 316 

Dighton, named for 220 

newspapers of 220, 221 

statistics of 220 

Dilday & Van Senden, editors and pub- 
lishers 265 

Dill, E. J., editor and publisher. . . 246, 310 

Dill, Ned, editor and publisher 310 

Dillon & Coleman, editors and publishers, 211 

Dillon, Charles, editor 291 

Dillon Republican 177 

Disciples at Work, Cherokee 173 

Dispatch, Daily, Clay Center 160 

Leavenworth 222 

Dispatch Republican, Clay Center 160 

District Bulletin, Atchison 141 

District Fair Daily News, Neosho Falls, 317 

District News, Clay Center 160 

District of Salina Watchman 241, 281 

District Visitor, Topeka 298 

Ditto, Frank S., editor 292 

Divide, now Colony 140 

Doddridge, Kenneth C., editor and pub- 
lisher 246 

Dodge, Gen. Grenville M 23 

Dodge. Col. Henry 189 

Dodge, S. H., editor and publisher.... 165 

Dodge City, named for 18 J 

newspapers published at, 189, 190, 191 



334 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Dodge City, statistics of 189 

Dodge City Globe, history of 189 

Doidge, William A., publisher 222 

Dollison Bros., editors and publishers. . 279 

Doniphan, Alexander W 177 

Doniphan, newspapers published at. ... 179 

Doniphan county, named for/ 177 

newspapers of 178, 179 

statistics of 177 

Doran, Miss M. L., editor and publisher, 302 
Dorn county, name changed to Neosho 

county 251 

Dornon, A. W., editor and publisher. . . 319 

Dorrance, newspapers of 279, 280 

statistics of 279 

Doud, Marion E.. editor and publisher. . 199 

Doud, W. E., editor and publisher 199 

Dougherty, F. R.. editor and publisher. . 268 
Dougherty, Geo. E., editor and publisher, 257 
Douglas county, named for Stephen A. 

Douglas 179 

newspapers of 179-183, 210 

statistics of 179 

Douglass, named for Joseph Douglass. . 152 

newspapers published at 152, 153 

statistics of 152 

Dover Herald 295 

Dow, , editor and publisher 316 

Dow, W. K. P., editor and publisher. . . 302 

Dowell, Democrat and Watchman 217 

Downer, David, editor and publisher. . . 160 
Downey, D. B., editor and publisher. . . 146 

Downing, Jack 17 

Downs, named for Wm. F. Downs 257 

newspapers published at 257, 258 

statistics of 257 

Doyle, H. H., editor and publisher 260 

Drake, J. F., editor and publisher 175 

Dreiling, B. M., editor and publisher. . . 186 

Dresden, newspapers published at 174 

Driggs & Driggs, editors and publishers, 249 
Drinkwater, D. F., editor and publisher, 154 

Drovers' News, Daily, Wichita 287 

Duncan, J. E., editor 204 

Dunlap, Bert, editor and publisher.... 276 

Dunlap, J. Y., manager 291 

Dunlap, Joseph . . . -. 246 

Dunlap, R. M., editor and publisher. . . 142 

Dunlap, named far 246 

newspapers published at 102, 229 

246, 247 

statistics of 246 

Dunn & Morgan, editors and publishers, 315 
Dunn & Moriarty, editors and publishers, 246 

Dunn, A. D., editor and publisher 154 

Dunn, C. M., editor and publisher, 209, 259 
Dunn, D. M., editor and publisher, 258, 259 

308 

Dunning. W. N. & Co., editors and pub- 
lishers 162 

Durham, formerly Moore's Ranch 234 

Durham, newspapers published at, 234, 235 
Durham Park Ranch, now Durham. . . . 234 

Durst, C. J., editor and publisher 250 

Dutton, Clarence P., editor and publisher, 278 
Duvall, F. M., editor and publisher. . . . 254 

Dwight, named for 246 

newspapers published at 246, 247 

statistics of 246 

Dyer, G. H., editor and publisher 171 

E. 

Eagle Tail Station, now Sharon Springs, 310 

Eakin, R. E., editor and publisher .... 234 

Eales, T. C., editor and publisher 204 

Earth, Brookville 282 

Easley, Ralph M., editor and publisher, 268 

302 

Eastern Kansan, Paola 240 

Eastern Kansan, Valley Falls 210 



Ivistin, Gen. Lucien J., editor 

Easton, named for 

newspapers published at 222, 

statistics of 

Eaton Halstrom, editors and pub- 
lishers 

Eaton, E. L., editor and publisher, 214, 

Eaton, J. E., editor and publisher 

Echo, Burlingame 

Cawker City 

Woodston 

Echo-Advocate, Coldwater 

Eckert, C. S., editor and publisher 

Eckert, Harvey, editor and publisher. . . 

Economist, Clay Center 

Eddy & Patton, editors and publishers, 
Eddy, Carl G., editor and publisher. . . . 
Edgerton, named for 

newspapers published at 

statistics of 

Edmond, newspapers published at 

Edmonds & Gallemore, editors and pub- 
lishers 

Edna, named for 

newspapers published at 218. 

statistics of 

Edson, Albert E., editor and publisher. . 

Educational Advance 

Educational Advocate, Olathe 

Educational Aid, Ottawa 

Educational Calendar, Topeka 

Educational Index, Winfield 

Educationalist, Emporia 

Topeka 

Educationist 

Educator and Companion, McPherson . . . 
Edwards, B. S., editor and publisher. . . 

Edwards, W. C 

Edwards county, named for 

newspapers of 183, 

statistics of 

Edwardsville Visitor 

Effiugham, named for 

newspapers published at .... 142, 

statistics of 

Effingham New Leaf, history of 

Ekselsior, Baxter Springs, North Branch 

and Mankato 158, 

Elbing Hatchet 

Elbury, T. G., editor and publisher .... 
El Dorado, meaning of name 

newspapers published at 66, 

lol, 152, 

statistics of 

Elgin, newspapers published at 

statistics of 

Eli Gazette 

Elk City, newspapers published at . . . . 

statistics of 

Elk county, named for 

newspapers of 184, 

statistics of 

Elk Falls, named for 

newspapers published at 184, 

statistics of 

Elkart, newspapers published at 

statistics of 

Elkins, J. G., editor 

Ellinger, M. C., editor and publisher. . . 
Ellinger, Mrs. M. C., associate editor. . . 
Ellinwood, named for 

newspapers published at 

statistics of 

Elliott, D. Stewart, editor and publisher, 
Elliott, L. R., editor and publisher.... 
Elliott, Robert Gaston 5, 

biographical sketch 

Elliott, W. S., editor and publisher. . . . 

Elliott, Gen. Washington R 

Ellis & Ellis, publishers 



222 
222 
223 
222 

229 
243 
268 
256 
241 
277 
166 
26?) 
260 
160 
318 
S88 
213 
254 
213 
254 

183 
218 
219 
218 
259 
152 
214 
193 
293 
170 
229 
292 
292 
232 
269 
133 
183 
184 
183 
320 
142 
143 
142 
142 

212 
153 
260 
151 
122 
153 
151 
155 
155 
304 
184 
245 
243 
184 
185 
184 
184 
185 
184 
248 
247 
147 
148 
148 
146 
146 
146 
243 
275 
27 
45 
271 
25 
25f> 



GENERAL INDEX. 



335 



Ellis, E. W., editor and publisher 

Ellis, George, first lieutenant Company 

I, Twelfth Kansas Infantry 

Ellis, J. C., publisher 

Ellis, Tom A., editor and publisher. . . . 
KM is. named for 

newspapers published at 

statistics of 

Ellis county, named for 

newspapers of 

statistics of 

Kills County News, Hays, history of. ... 
Ellsworth, Allen, second lieutenant Com- 
pany H, Seventh Iowa Cavalry . . 

Ellsworth, D. A., editor 144, 

Ellsworth, named for 

newspapers published at .... 187, 

newspapers published at, history of, 

statistics of 

Ellsworth county, named for 

newspapers of 

statistics of 

Elmdale, newspapers published at 

Elm Grove, now Barnes 

Elsmore, newspapers published at, 138, 

statistics of 

Elston, name changed to Altamont 

Elwood, newspapers published at 

Elwood Free Press, edited by D. W. 

Wilder 

Emerson, Ralph Waldo 

Emery, Orm C., editor and publisher . . 

Eminence, Garfield County Call . . 189, 
Emmert, D. B., editor and publisher, 17, 

Emmett Citizen, 

Emmons, C. H., editor and publisher . . . 
Emmons, E. N., editor and publisher . . . 
Empire City, newspapers published at . . 
Emporia, laid out by Lawrence people. . 

named for 

newspapers published at ..31, 51, 
114, 130, 131, 223, 228- 

statistics of 

Emporia Times, history of 

Endeavor Banner, Chase 

Pawnee Rock 

Endeavor Spirit, Lyndon 

Topeka 

Enfield Tribune 

Engle, J. H., editor and publisher 

Englewood, newspapers published at . . 
English, A. R., editor and publisher . . . 
English, Charles J., editor and publisher, 
Ennis City, newspapers published at. . . 

228, 
Eno, Fred H., editor and publisher .... 

Enos, A. F., editor and publisher 

Ensign, G. L 

Ensign, first called Lone Lake 

named for 

newspapers published at 

statistics of 

Enterprise, newspapers published at, 175 

statistics of 

Enterprise, Arlington 

Columbus 

Enterprise News, Spearville 

Enterprise Publishing Co., McCracken . . 
Epperson, E. H. and Son, editors and 

publishers 

Epworth Advocate, Frankfort 

Epworth Lever, Caldwell 

Epworth Reporter, Stafford 

Epworthian, Topeka 293, 

Equitable Aid Union Advocate, Wyan- 

dotte 

Equity, Topeka 

Erie, history of newspapers published at, 



154 

186 
L-T:; 
256 
186 
186 
186 
18 
186 
186 
186 

187 
291 
187 
188 
187 
187 
187 
187 
187 
154 
312 
139 
138 
218 
178 

21 
6 

211 
270 
193 
147 
264 
196 
312 
158 
12 
228 
66 

-231 
228 
228 
274 
147 
257 
298 
201 
175 
160 
164 
162 
227 
280 
266 
197 
197 
197 
197 
198 
197 

-177 
180 
175 
268 
157 
190 
278 

283 
238 
307 
303 



319 
293 
251 



named for 251 

newspapers published at, 128, 251, 252 

statistics of 251 

Esbon, newspapers published at . . 211, 212 

statistics of 211 

Eskridge, C. V., town of Eskridge named 

for 310 

Eskridge, Fred C., editor and publisher, 243 

newspapers published at 310 

statistics of :; 1 < 

Eskridge Tribune-Star, history of 310 

Kssrx Sunbeam 189. I'.i:; 

Bates, J. K., editor and publisher 291 

Eudora, named for 181 

statistics of Ml 

Eudora News I s 1 

Eureka, newspapers published at. . 199. 'joo 

statistics of 199 

Ki:stis, newspapers .published at :'.<>o 

Evangel, Horton 1 ."> ! 

Evangel of Reform, Arkansas City .... 17'* 
Evangelistic War Cry, Kacklev and Sa- 

lina 271, 282 

Evans, A. T., editor and publisher .... 197 
Evans, Frank S., editor and publisher, 185 
Evans, M. C., editor and publisher .... 293 
Evans, Mrs. Mary E., editor and pub- 
lisher 165 

Evans, R. K., editor and publisher .... I'T" 
Evans, Thomas, editor and publisher. . . 170 

171 
Evans, W. P., editor and publisher .... 165 

Evansville Herald 167 

Evening papers, see names of papers. 
Everest, named for Col. A. S. Everest. . . 149 
newspapers published at .... 149, 150 

statistics of 149 

Every Day Religion, Ransom 253 

Everyday Religion, Kanopolis 188 

Ewing, E. E., editor and publisher .... 289 

Examiner, Hutchinson 269 

Expositor, Cawker City 241 

Expository, Columbus, Girard and Win- 
field 157, 169, 173, 205 

Eye Opener, Parsons 220 

Ezel, Topeka 293 



F. 

F. A. and I. U. and Helping Hand, To- 
peka 293 

Fabrick & Felt, editors and publishers. . 237 

Fairchild, T. A., editor and publisher. . 207 

Fair Play, Fort Scott 148 

Fair Play, Valley Falls 210 

Fail-view, named for 149 

newspapers of 149, 150 

statistics of 149 

Faithful Witness, Topeka 293 

Faler, George E., editor and publisher. . 316 

Fall River, newspapers of 200, 201 

Fall River Citizen 201 

Falvey, Mark, editor and publisher 149 

Fanatic, Emporia 229 

Fanin, Mrs. Mina 40 

Far West, name changed to Latimer. . . 246 

Farey, Henry, editor and publisher 194 

Fargo Springs News 288 

Farley, Isaac, editor -">"> 

Farley, J. E., editor 255 

Farlington, newspapers of 172 

Farm and News, Fort Scott 149 

Farm Record, Blue Mound 226 

Burlington 165 

Farmer and Breeder, Kansas City 319 

Farmers' Advance, Norton 254 

Farmers' Advocate, McPherson 232 

Saliua 282 

Topeka 59, 291, 293 

Tates Center 316 



336 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Farmers' Aid, Covert 258 

Farmers' Alliance, Cuba 272 

Farmers' Anzeiger, Hillsboro 235 

Farmers' Family Journal, Topeka 293 

Farmers' Friend, Friend-Herald and 

Friend- Democrat, lola 138 

Farmers' Journal, Ernporia 229 

Farmers' Mail and Breeze, Topeka, his- 
tory of 290 

Farmers' Signal, Osawatomie 240 

Farmers' Star and Live Stock Inspector, 

Wichita 286 

Farmers' Tribune, Topeka 298 

Farmers' Union, Salina 281 

Topeka 294 

Farmers' Vindicator, Valley Falls .. 209, 210 

Farmers' Wife, Topeka 294 

Farney, C. E., editor and publisher. . . . 306 

Farney, W. A., editor and publisher. . . . 306 

Fast, H. H., editor and publisher 204 

Faulkner, Charles L., editor and publisher, 207 

Faulknei 1 , John J., editor and publisher, 178 

Fay & Leftwich, editors and publishers, 139 

Faxon, Ralph H., biographical sketch. . 92 

portrait of 93 

Feder, William P., editor and publisher, 145 

251 
Feeding and Marketing, Kansas City, 

history of 317 

Felt, Fajbrick &, editors and publishers. . 237 

Ferguson, T. B., editor and publisher. . 155 

Ferris, John T., editor and publisher. . . 197 

Fesler, Frank, editor and publisher 217 

Fetter, Charles A., publisher 178 

Ficardt, George B., editor and publisher, 257 

Fickertt, Earl, editor and publisher. . . . 183 

198 

Field, Eugene 55 

Field and Range, Dwight 247 

Finch, Charles S., biographical sketch of, 64 

editor and publisher. ... 179, 180, 202 

portrait of 63 

Findlay, George W 70 

Findlay City, name changed to Arcadia, 170 

Finke & Swartout, editors and publishers, 270 

Finlayson, Allen, editor and publisher. . 183 

Finney, David W., lieutenant governor. . 188 

Finney county, named for 188 

newspapers of 188-189 

statistics of 188 

Fire and Hammer, North Topeka 296 

Fireside, Factory and Farm, Ottawa. . . . 192 

First Friend, Topeka 294 

First Methodist, Topeka 297 

First Presbyterian Church News, Kansas 

City 319 

Fish, Eudora 181 

Fish, Paschal, Shawnee Indian 181 

Fisher, Frank L., editor and publisher. . 163 

Fisk & Merrill, editors and publishers. . 277 

Fitch, Charles A., editor. . . 300 

Fitts, Leslie, editor and publisher 229 

Flag, tj. S., hoisted over Independence 

Hall by President Lincoln.... 10, 11 

Flambeau Bulletin, Topeka 294 

Fleck, Ira-S 125 

Fletcher, Annie (Mrs. Sanford Jarrell), 76 

Flick, George M., editor and publisher. . 183 

Flint, D. C., editor and publisher 170 

Flintom, W. J., publisher 179, 180 

Florence, named for 234 

newspapers of 234, 235 

statistics of 234 

Flory Brothers, editors and publishers. . 185 

Flory & Son, editors and publishers. . . . 164 

Flory, F. C., editor and publisher 184 

Flory, Tom W., editor and publisher. . . . 165 

Floyd, Harry E., editor and publisher. . 243 

Focht, Robert, editor and publisher.... 199 

Fockele, Blanch 114 



Fockele, Frank, biographical sketch.... 112 

editor and publisher ............. 165 

portrait of .................... 113 

Fockele, Mrs. Frank ................ 114 

Fockele, Fred F ..................... 114 

Fockele, Glick ..................... 114 

editor and manager ............. 165 

Fockele, Kate ...................... 114 

Foley, John C., editor and publisher... 215 

Folks, John H ................... 17, 274 

Folsom, G. W., editor and publisher. . . . 231 

Folsom, L. G., editor and publisher. . . . 231 

Foltz, Burlin &, editors and publishers, 280 

Fonda, newspapers of ........... 190, 191 

Fontaine, Harry L., editor and publisher, 267 

Fontana, newspapers of ............. 240 

Foor, E. F.. editor and publisher ...... 308 

Foote, C. E., editor and publisher, 231, 233 
Foote county, absorbed by Gray county. . 

newspapers of 



189 
189 

284 



Foppe, Sprague &, publishers ......... 

Forbes, Bert W., editor and publisher. . 237 
Ford, Col. James H., Second Colorado 

Cavalry ...................... 189 

Ford, M. E., editor and publisher ..... 249 

Ford, named for ................... 190 

newspapers of ................. 190 

statistics of ................... 190 

Ford county, named for ............. 189 

newspapers of ............. ] 89-191 

statistics of ................... 189 

Fordham Republican ................ 207 

Formoso, newspapers of ........ 211, 212 

statistics of ................... 211 

Forrest, Frank B., editor and publisher, 163 
Fort Harker Station, name changed to 

Kanopolis .................... 187 

Fort Leavenworth, oldest post in Kan- 

sas .......................... 221 

Fort Leavenworth, newspapers of ..... 223 

Fort Riley, Soldier's Letter .......... 173 

Fort Scott, named for .............. 147 

newspapers of ....... 21, 25, 35, 47 

76, 147, 148 
149. 170, 290 

statistics of ............. ...... 147 

Fort Scott Republican, history of ...... 147 

Forward, Salina ................... 282 

Fosnot Brother^, editors and publishers, 187 
Fossil Station, name changed to Russell, 279 
Foster, Frank S., editor and publisher, 187 
Foster, J. M., editor and publisher.... 312 

Foster, Warren, editor and publisher. . . 267 
Foulks, John H., editor and publisher. . 305- 
Foundation Principles, Topeka ....... 294 

Fountain, Mrs. .................. 149 

Fowler, George .................... 238 

Fowler, Sylvester, editor and publisher, 264 
Fcwler, named for ................. 238 

newspapers of ............ 238, 239 

statistics of .................... 238 

Framat, Lindsborg ................. 233 

Francis, John, Olathe, editor and pub- 

lisher ........................ 213 

Frankfort, named for ............... 236 

newspapers of ............. 236-238 

statistics of ................... 236 

Franklin, Benjamin ................ 191 

Franklin, H., editor and publisher.... 279 

Franklin county, named for .......... 191 

newspapers of ............ 191, 193 

statistics of ................... 191 

Franklin Printing Company, Atlanta, 

Ga ............. .............. 

Fraternal Aid, Holton and Lawrence.. 



Fraternal Aid Union, Lawrence 



35 
179 
208 
179 



Frazee, Clyde, editor and publisher 256 

Frederick, newspapers of 274 

Fredonia, newspapers of 31, 314, 315 



GENERAL INDEX. 



337 



Fredonia, statistics of 314 

Fredonia Herald, history of 314 

Fredonia Journal, bought by John S. 

Gilmore 31 

Free Democrat, St. Joseph, Mo., edited 

by D. W. Wilder 21 

Free Discussion, Eskridge 310 

Topeka 296 

Free Knight, Coldwater 167 

Free Lance, Burrton 205 

Manhattan 275 

Free Leader, Ottawa 193 

Free state legislature, 1856, dispersed. . 135 

Free Parliament 220 

Free Press, Hiawatha 150 

Marysville 236, 237 

Free Press-Public Opinion. Osage City, 255 

Free Thought Ideal, Ottawa 192 

Washington 313 

Free Thought Vindicator, Ottawa 193 

Free West, Burlington 166 

Freedom's Champion, Atchison. . . . 141, 142 

Freeland, Fred A., editor and publisher, 175 

Freeley, James C., editor and publisher, 312 

Freeman's Champion, Prairie City 182 

Freeman's Lance, Peru 155 

Freeman-Vim, McPherson 231 

Freeport, newspapers of 202, 203 

statistics of 202 

Freese, Harry, editor and publisher . . . 186 

Freie Presse, Marion 233 

Fremont, newspapers of 196 

French, F. R., editor and publisher .... 215 

Fretz, I. K., editor and publisher, 175, 231 

Freundschafts-Kreis, Hillsboro 235 

Friend, The, Osborne 258 

Frisco, newspapers of 248 

Frontenac, newspapers of 173 

Frontier Democrat, Neosho Falls 316 

Frontiersman and the Herald of Inde- 
pendence, Bird City 159 

Frost, D. M., editor and publisher 189 

Frost, Harry W., editor and publisher . . 290 

Frost, M. O., editor and publisher 290 

Fruit, Roy L., editor and publisher .... 154 

Fry, G. W., editor and publisher 316 

Frye, R. B., publisher 147 

Fugate, J. B., editor and publisher, 197, 204 

Fulcrum, Burlingame 256 

Fulcrum, Topeka 294 

Fuller, Col. E. B., editor 221 

Fuller, O. P., editor and publisher .... 215 
Fuller, William J., editor and publisher, 272 
Fullinwider, George F., editor and pub- 
lisher 151 

Fulton, T. P : 66 

Fulton, first known as Osaga 148 

newspapers of 148 

statistics of 148 

Fun, Pawnee Rock . 147 

Funk Bros., editors and publishers .... 292 

Funk, Henry B., editor and publisher . . 292 

G. 

G. L. Hudkins' Real Estate Salesman, 

Cawker City 242 

Gage, Jack, editor and publisher .... 273 

Gaines, H. N., editor and publisher . . . 281 

Gaiser, J. C., editor and publisher .... 204 

Galena, named for 157 

newspapers of 157, 158 

statistics of 157 

Galena Republican, history of ......... 157 

Galesburg, newspapers of 252 

Gallemore & Edmonds, editors and pub- 
lishers 183 

Galva, newspapers of 231-233 

22 



Gamber, R. H., editor and publisher. . . 161 

258 

Game and Shooting, McPherson 232 

Gandy, New Tecumseh 300 

Garden City, newspapers of, 188, 189, 28* 

statistics of 188- 

Garden Plain, newspapers of 285, 287 

statistics of - 285- 

Gardiner, Wilbur, editor 180- 

Gardner, Mrs. Eliza Oakley 227 

Gardner, Henry J., governor of Massa- 
chusetts 214 1 

Gardner, M. H., editor and publisher. . . 156 
Gardner, named for O. B. Gardner .... 214 

newspapers of . 214 

statistics of -jit 

Gardner's Real Estate Bulletin, Atchi- 
son 143 

Garfield, newspapers of 260 

statistics of 260 

Garfield Booster, history of 260 

Garfield county, annexed to Finney 

county 193 

newspapers of 189, 193, 194 

Garland, W. E., editor and publisher . . 254 

Garland, newspapers of 147149 

Garner, E. J., editor and publisher .... 216 
Garnett, history of current newspapers 

published at . 139 

newspapers of 45, 139-141 

statistics of 139 

Garrison, A. J., editor-in-chief 272 

Garrison, named for Cornelius K. Gar- 
rison 263 

newspapers of 263, 264 

statistics of 263 

Garretson & Topliff, editors and pub- 
lishers 261 

Garten, Charles B., editor and publisher, 273 
Garten, Ellis S., editor and publisher . . 197 

Garvic, Rev. Horace C., publisher 141 

Garvin, May, publisher 303 

Gas, Allen county, newspapers of 138 

statistics of 138 

Gas, Coffeyville 245 

Gas and Oil Developer, Coffevville .... 245 

Gate City Enterprise, Coffeyville 244 

Gate City Independent, Coffeyville, 244, 245 

Gate City Journal, Arkansas City 169. 

Gault, J. C., editor and publisher 176 

Gaumer, W. B., editor and publisher. . . 257 

261 

Gaylord, C. E 301 

Gaylord, Hal 55 

Gaylord, named for 301 

newspapers of 301, 302 

statistics of 301 

Gazette, Gove City 195 

Gebhardt & Huycke, editors and publish- 
ers 18T 

Gebhardt, S. B., editor and publisher. . 265 
Gear, Raymond, editor and publisher. . . 234 
Geary, John White, governor of Kansas, 194 

Geary City Era 179- 

Geary county, named for. 194 

newspapers of 194 

statistics of 194 

Geddesburg, now Altoona 314 

Gehring, F., editor and publisher 318 

Gem Leader 308 

Geneseo, named for 273 

newspapers of 273, 274 

statistics of 273 

George, Emmet D., editor and publisher, 211 
George, Frank E., editor and publisher. . 218 
Gerard, Clyde K., editor and publisher. . 314 
Gerard. G. E. & Co., editors and pub- 
lishers . . 257" 



338 



GENERAL INDEX. 



German- American Advocate, flays City, 186 

Gettysburg, newspapers of 196 

Geuda Springs, newspapers of 307 

Gibson, A. W., editor and publisher. . . . 217 
Gilbert, Moore & Montgomery, publish- 
ers 194 

Gilbert, H. M., editor and publisher 248 

Gilbert. Horace W 57 

Gilbert, Mrs. Trescinda (Wren) 57 

Gilbert, name changed to Fowler 238 

Giles, -Idabel C., editor and publisher. . . 220 

Giles, Roy A., editor and publisher 220 

Gillespie, F. W., editor and publisher. . 268 

Gillis, McMillan &, editors and publishers, 175 

Gillispie, A. A,, editor and publisher. . . 308 
Gilmore, A. M., publisher and business 

manager 263 

Gilmore, D. S., editor and publisher, 228, 229 

Gilmore, John S., biographical sketch. . 31 

editor and publisher, 17, 33, 314, 315 

portrait of 30 

Gilmore, Mrs. John x S., death of 33 

Gilmore, Mary 33 

Gilmore, Robert G 31 

Girard, named for 170 

newspapers of.... 170, 172, 173, 205 

statistics of 170 

Girard Press, history of 170 

Gish, P. N., publisher 142 

Givler, H. S., editor and publisher 309 

Glad Tidings, Morrill 151 

Glada Budskapet, Topeka 294 

Glade Echo 262 

Gladstone, Thomas H 6 

Glasco, formerly called Dell Ray 163 

named for 163 

newspapers of 163, 164 

statistics of ....'.. 163 

Glass, Forrest, editor and publisher. . . . 174 

Gleaner, Colony 141 

Gleanings, Topeka 294 

Gleed, Charles S 13 

biographical sketch . . 53 

portrait of 54 

Gleed, James Willis 53 

Gleed, Mrs. Thomas 53 

Gleeser, Carl, editor and publisher 318 

Glen Elder, first known as West Hampton, 241 

newspapers of 241, 257 

statistics of 241 

Glenn. George E., editor and publisher, 213 

Glick, Gov. Geo. W 110 

Glidden, L. W., editor and publisher. . . 163 

Globe, Cyrus 309 

Globe Live Stock Journal, Dodge City. . 189 

Globe Miner, Scammon ' . . . 157 

Goddar I, newspapers of 285, 287 

God's Messenger, Elk City 244 

God's Missionary Messenger, Republic, 

Mankato and Belleville 271 

Goff, named for Edward H. Goff 249 

newspapers of 249, 250 

statistics of 249 

Gognac, Stanton Telegram 304 

Gold discovered in Western Kansas. ... 38 

Golden Belt, Grinnell 195 

Golden Belt Advance, Grainfield 195 

Golden Belt Road Association 112 

Golden Belt Star, Chapman 177 

Golden Gate, Newton 205 

Golden Gazette 197 

Golden Globe, Golden, Colo 120 

Golden Rod, Oswego 219 

Golf Bug, Topeka ,. 299 

Good, Robert, editor and publisher.... 241 

Good Citizen, Topeka 294 

Good News, Columbus 157 

Good Samaritan, South Haven and Cald- 

well 307 

Good Tidings, Beloit 241 

Topeka 294, 298 



Goode, Col. S. S., editor and publisher. . 222 

Goodfellow's Club, Topeka 44 

Goodier, John A., editor and publisher! ! 227 

Goodland, named for 299 

newspapers of 300 

statistics of 300 

Goodland Republic and News, history of, 300 
Goodreau, Philip, editor and publisher, 154 

Goodrich, newspapers of 226 

Goodrick, H. B., editor and business 

manager 147 

Goodwin, J. S., editor and publisher! ! . 282 
Goodwin, Ovid J., editor and publisher, 165 
Goodwin, Rebecca E. (Mrs. John Allen), 90 
Goodwin, W. C., editor and publisher.. 185 

Gopher, The Scout 280 

Gordon, L. H., editor and publisher .... 139 
Gorsuch, C. W., editor and publisher . . 213 

Gospel Herald, Lebanon 302 

Gospel Message, Abilene 176 

Gospel Mirror, Columbus 158 

Gospel Press. Anthony 203 

Mulvane 307 

Gould, newspapers of 200, 201 

Gove City, named for Capt. Grenville L! 

Gove 195 

newspapers of 195 

^statistics of . . . 195 

Gove county, named for 195 

newspapers of ! 195 

statistics of 195 

Gove County Republican-Gazette, history 

of '. 195 

Graduate Magazine, University of Kan- 
sas, Lawrence 179 

Gragery. Edna, Labette county town 

named for 218 

Graham Bros., editors and publishers . . 236 

Graham, J. R. & Co., editors . 228 

Graham county, named for Capt. John 

L. Graham '. 196 

newspapers of 196 

statistics of 196 

Grainfield, newspapers of . 195 

statistics of 195 

Grand Army Forum, Wichita 287 

Grand Army Reveille, Topeka 299 

Grant, Charles W., editor and publisher, 156 

157 

Grant, Dr. E. H 149 

Grant, H. W.,. associate editor 179 

Grant county, named for Pres. Ulysses 

S. Grant 197 

newspapers of 197 

statistics of 197 

Grantville News 210 

Grasshopper Falls, name changed to 

Valley Falls 209 

named for 209 

'newspapers of 210, 223 

Grasshoppers in Kansas 15 

Graves, H. B., editor and publisher .... 217 
Graves, S. H., editor and publisher .... 312 
Graves, Dr. W. H., editor and publisher, 290 
Graves, W. W., editor and publisher ... 251 

252 

Graves, Walter T., editor and publisher, 260 
Gray, W. H., editor and publisher .... 261 
Gray county, named for Alfred Gray .. 197 

newspapers of 197, 198 

statistics of 197 

Greason, Charles T 70 

Greason, James D., editor and publisher, 68 
70, 239, 266 
Greason, James D. & Son, editors and 

publishers . . . . i 266 

Greason, John H 68 

Greason, Mary J. . 68 

Greason, Owen H 70 

Greason, William D. . 70 



GENERAL INDEX. 



339 



Greason, William D., biographical sketch 

of 

editor and publisher . .- 

portrait of 

Greason, Thomas G8, 

Greason, Thomas O. 

Great Bend, named for 

newspapers of .... 125, 128, 145 

statistics of . . 

Great Southwest, Richfield 

Greeley, Horace 6, 25, 140, 

Creeley, named for 

newspapers of 

statistics of 

Greeley Center, Greeley County Gazette. 

Greeley county, named for 

newspapers of 198, 

statistics of 

Greeley County Republican, history of. . 

Green & Learned, publishers 

Green, A. S., publisher 

Green, Col. D. R., Greensburg named 

for 

Green, J. H., editor 

Green, J. R., editor and publisher. . . . 

Green, Ray, editor and publisher 

Green, newspapers of 

Greenback Headlight, Frankfort 

Greenbank, W. G., editor and publisher. 
Greene, Homer M., editor and publisher. 
Greenleaf, named for A. W. Greenleaf, 

newspapers of 312, 

statistics of 

Greensburg, named for 

newspapers of 

statistics of 

Greenwood county, named for Alfred B. 

Greenwood 

newspapers of 199- 

statistics of 

Greenwood Review, Virgil 

Greer, E. P., editor and publisher 

Greeting, Dunlap 

Gregory, H. S., editor and publisher. .. 

Grenola, derivation of name 

newspapers of . . 

statistics of 

Gridley, newspapers of 165, 

statistics of 

Griffin, A. D., editor and publisher .... 
Griffin, Albert, editor and publisher, 17, 

Griffith, C. B., editor 

Griffith, Charles, publisher 

Griffith, Charles E., editor and pub- 
lisher 

Griffith, F. C., editor and publisher... 

Griffith, George P., editor and publisher, 
Griffith, K. L., editor and publisher. . . . 
Griffith, R. B., editor and publisher... 

Grigsby, newspapers of 

Grinnell, D. C., editor and publisher, 

Grinnell, newspapers of 

Grinstead, J. P., editor and publisher, 
Grinstead, Pool, editor and publisher. . 

Grip, Howard . . 184. 

Griswold, Right Rev. S. M., publisher, 

Grit, Hanover 

Groesbeck, S. O., editor and publisher. . 
Gronefeld, Max, editor and publisher. . . 

Gross, A. R., editor and publisher 

Grove, J. E., editor and publisher 

Guardian, West Plains 

Guidon, Fort Riley 

Guild, J. S., editor and publisher 

Guilford Citizen 31, 314, 

Gunn & Watson, editors and publishers, 

Gunn Powder, Kansas City 

Gunn Powder, Pittsburg . 



239 

71 

70 

70 
I I:, 
1 17 
145 
248 
198 
140 
140 
140 
198 
198 
199 
198 
198 
277 
172 

217 
228 
261 
162 
161 
237 
273 
180 
312 
313 
312 
217 
217 
217 

199 
-201 
199 
200 
167 
229 
215 
184 
185 
184 
166 
165 
318 
275 
147 
147 

186 
187 
311 
186 
187 
209 
283 
229 
195 
150 
178 
185 
281 
313 
149 
222 
261 
202 
239 
194 
289 
315 
145 
320 
173 



Gypsum, named for 

newspapers of 282 

statistics of 282 

Gypsum Valley Echo, Gypsum City ... 



H. E. Norton & Co.'s Real Estate Bulb- 

tin, Emporia .................. 

H. M. Washburn's Christmas Courier. 

Topeka ....................... 

IhibiTlin, Oscar, editor and publisher.. 
Habit, Salina ...................... 

lliKlduin, newspapers of ........ -1-. 

statistics of ................... 

Hagaman, J. E., editor and publisher. . . 
Halbert, E. F., editor and publisher... 
Halderman, John A., editor and pub- 

lisher ...... . ................. 

Hale, Trueblood, Stephenson &, publish- 

ers .......................... 

Hale. Edward Everett .............. 

Hale, J. F., editor and publisher ...... 

Hale, J. H., editor and publisher ...... 

Hale, Lauren, editor and publisher. ... 

Haley, Velma S., editor and publisher. . 
riall, Clarence S., publisher ..... 179, 

Hall, D. F., editor ................. 

Hall, G. C., editor and publisher ..... 

Hall, G. P., editor and publisher, .... 

Hall, George C., editor and publisher, 



Hall, J. S., editor and publisher ....... 

Hall, J. S. & Co., publishers 

Hall James Robert, editor and publisher, 

Hall', Mrs. Jessie R. . ................ 

.Hr.llowell Enterprise ................ 

Halstrom, Eaton &, editors and publish- 
g rs .......................... 

Halstead, named for Murat Halstead. . . 
newspapers of ............. 204, 

statistics of ................... 

Halstead Independent, history of ...... 

Ham and Eggs, or Hog and Hen, lo- 



144 

281 

: - 

:; ' - 
Hi- 
154 

222 

31 

211 
251 
1 
1 
1 

283 
21(1 
231 
236 
275 
176 
2 

184 
40 



229 
204 
205 

204 
204 



Ham Cry, Topeka. ......... ..... 

Hamblin, T. Frank, editor-in-chief ---- 

Hamilton, A. N., publisher ---- . . . ---- 

Hamilton, C. W., editor and publisher. . 
Hamilton, D. G., editor and publisher. . 
Hamilton, newspapers of ........ 199, 

statistics of ................... 

Hamilton county, named for ...... .... 

newspapers of ................. 

statistics of ................... 

Hamlett, Rev. J. A., editor and publisher, 
Hamlin, Hannibal ................. 

Hamlin, named for ............. ..... 

newspapers of ............ 149. 

statistics of ........... ....... 

Hamm Bros. (J. C. and J. W.), pub- 

lishers ........................ 

Hamm, Charles V., editor ............ 

Hammond, A. H., editor and publisher. 
Hammond, H. G., editor and publisher, 
Hand, P. H., editor and publisher ..... 

Hand Bill, Lawrence ................ 

Handley, M. C., editor and publisher . . . 
Banna,' B. J. F. . . . ................. 

Hanna B. W., editor and publisher. .. 
Hannigan, L. A., editor and publisher. . 
Hanover, named for ................. 

newspapers of ............. 312, 

statistics of ................. 

Hanover Democrat and Enterprise, his- 

tory of ....................... 

Harbinger, Topeka ......... ... ..... 

Harding, L. D., editor and publisher . . . 
Harding, L. H., editor and publisher. . . 
Hardner D. E., editor and publisher. . . 
Hardtner, named for Dr. John Hardtner. 



298 

1 

222 

176 

254 

2 

* 

201 

201 

201 

2 

149 

149 

1 

149 

139 

179 

27o 

154 

2 

I 82 

243 

1J 
2 

266 
12 
A 
31L 

J 

2 

202 

273 

234 

144 



340 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Hardtner, statistics of 144 

Hardtner Press 144 

Hardy, O. E., editor and publisher 206 

Hardy, W. E., editor 251 

Harger, Charles Moreau, biographical 

sketch 112 

editor 175 

portrait Ill 

Harlan, E. W., editor and publisher. . . . 206 

Harlan, newspapers of 301, 302 

Harlow, Ben W., editor and publisher. . 204 
Harman, W. I., editor and publisher. . . 216 
Harmon, Colfax B., editor and publisher, 209 

Harmon, George, editor 210 

Harmon, Guy E., editor and publisher. . 275 
Harmon, N. H., editor and publisher. ... 210 
Harmon, P. M., editor and publisher. . . 163 
Harmon Publishing Co., publishers, 209, 210 

Harmonic, Beloit 242 

Harms, J. F., editor and publisher. .. . . 204 

Harold, newspapers of 253 

Harper, Marion, sergeant Company E, 

Second Kansas Cavalry 202 

Harper, R. C., editor and publisher. . . . 242 
Harper, T. B., local editor and publisher, 226 

Harper, newspapers of 202, 203 

Harper county, named for 202 

newspapers of 202 

statistics of 202 

Harris, A. A 140 

Harris, A. P., editor and publisher. . . . 137 
Harris, Edward P., biographical sketch, 135 

portrait of 134 

Harris, H. L., editor and publisher. . . . 176 

Harris, James A 232, 271 

Harris, Ralph A., biographical sketch. . 

editor and publisher. 191 

portrait of . 

Harris, named for. 140 

newspapers of 139-141 

statistics of 140 

Harrison, George B. & Co., editors and 

publishers 291 

Harrison, J. R., editor and publisher. . . 240 

Harry Norton's Bulletin 231 

Hart, J. E., editor and publisher 195 

Harter, L. M., editor and publisher. . . . 204 

Hartford, named for 229 

newspapers of 229, 230 

statistics of ..... 229 

Hartland, newspapers of 201, 215 

Hartman, Warren &, editors and pub- 
lishers 236 

Hartman, A. B., editor and publisher. . 310 
Hartman, F. M., editor and publisher. . 236 

310 

Hartman, P. D., editor and publisher. . 236 
Harvey, Clark E., editor and publisher, 241 
Harvey, George N., editor and publisher, 144 
Harvey, Henry, town of Harveyville 

named for 310 

Harvey, Gov. James M. 203 

Harvey, Mabel B., editor and publisher, 241 
Harvey, Roy C., editor and publisher. . 144 

Harvey county, named for 203 

newspapers of 203-205 

statistics of 203 

Harveyville, named for. 310 

newspapers of 310 

' statistics of . . . : 310 

Haskell, Dudley C. 206 

Haskell county, named for 206 

newspapers of 206 

statistics of '^06 

Hastings Gazette : 308 

Hatch, Harley C., editor 291 

Hatchet, Emporia 229, 292 

Hatfield, Charles, editor 305 

Hatfield, Rodolph 210 

Hatfield News 189 



Hatten, Ancil i3\, editor and publisher. . 140 

Hatton, Frank 25 

Haughawout, Clarence, editor and pub- 
lisher 26S 

Haughawout, F. H. & Son, editors and 

publishers 263 

Haughawout, Fred, editor and publisher, 249 
Hauldren, W. L., editor and publisher. . 26B 

Haun, T. S., editor and publisher 206 

Hauser, Mrs. Lenora 254 

Hausfreund, Newton 205 

Havana, newspapers of 245 

Haven, Reno county, newspapers of, 268, 270 

statistics of 268 

Havens, Bessie (Mrs. D. R. Anthony, 

jr.) '. 79> 

Havens, Charles R., editor and pub- 
lisher 305 

Havens, Paul 7 

Havens, Paul E 263 

Havens [Havensville] Morning News. . 265 
Havensville, newspapers of 263265 

statistics of 263 

Havensville Review, history of 263 

Havermale, Albert, editor and publisher. 275 
Haviland, newspapers of 217 

statistics of 217 

Hawkins, J. M., editor and publisher . . 198- 
Hawthorne Herald, Kansas City ...... 320 

Hays, Gen. Alexander 186 

Hays, Claude A., editor and publisher . . 160- 

Hays, E. S., editor and publisher 222 

Hays, S. M., editor and publisher 246- 

Hays, named for . 186 

newspapers of : 186- 

statistics of 186 

Hays Free Press, history of 186- 

Hayward, Charles, publisher . 147 

Hazleton, named for Rev. J. H. Hazle- 

ton 144 

-newspapers of 144. 145 

statistics of . 144 

Head Center, Lawrence 181 

Headley, A. L., editor and publisher . . . 301 
Headley, Bert, editor and publisher ... 301 
Headlight-Commercial, Horton, history of, ISO- 
Health Messenger, Topeka 297 

Heath, P. W., editor and publisher .... 175 
Hebron, W. S., editor and publisher, 164, 183 

Hector Echo 199- 

Hedrick & Co., publishers 300- 

Hegler, Burns, editor and publisher . . . 305 
Heim, L. C., editor and publisher .... 231 

Heinz, Rev. Gerard, editor 142 

Heisler, Emmanuel F., editor and pub- 
lisher 239, 318" 

Hellenbeck, George B., editor and pub- 
lisher 222- 

Helmick, Cavaness Bros. &, editors and 

publishers 251 

Helpful Hen, Topeka 294 

Hemenway, Fred R., editor and pub- 
lisher . 194 

Hemenway, M. C., editor and publisher, 17ff 
Hemenway, R. G., editor and publisher, 268 
Hemphill/B. F., editor and publisher. . 160' 
Hendee, Al M., editor and publisher ... 151 
Henderson, "Jack," editor and publisher, 222 
Henderson, Manford E., editor and pub- 
lisher 265 

Henderson, Robert L., editor and pub- 
lisher 20/8- 

Hendry, W. F., editor and publisher . . . 
Henrie, C. A., editor and publisher .... 2 

Henry, T. C 55 

Henston Gazette 207 

Hepler, newspapers of 171, 172 

statistics of ,. 171 

Herald, Ellsworth 18* 



GENERAL INDEX. 



341 



Herald, Walnut City ................. 

Herald and Blade, Burlingame ....... 

Herald and Record, Fort Scott ...... 

Herald and Star, Bennington ......... 

Herald of Freedom, Lawrence, 42, 135, 

destroyed by Border Ruffians .... 

Herald of Kansas, Topeka " ........... 

Herald of Pentecost, Kackley ......... 

Herald Publishing Association, Phillips- 

burg ......................... 

Herald-Tribune, Lawrence ........... 

Herbert, Ewing, editor and publisher . . 
Herbert's Monthly and Herbert's Weekly, 

Hiawatha ..................... 

Herington, M. D., founder of town of 

Herington ..................... 

Herington, named for ............... 

newspapers of ........ 102, 176 

statistics of .................. 

Herman, John F., editor and publisher. 
Herndon, William H., partner of Abra 

ham Lincoln 
Herndon, formerly Pesth 

'named for ..................... 

newspapers of ................. 

statistics of ................... 

Herod, Clay D., editor and publisher . . 
Herold, Newton .................... 

Herren, Nanon L., editor and publisher, 
Hewins Sayings ................... 

Hewitt, John Y., editor ............. 

Heyneu, William, editor and publisher. . 
Hiattville, newspapers of . ........... 

Hiawatha, named for ................ 

newspapers of, 21, 149, 150, 151, 

statistics of .................... 

Hiawatha, Brown County World, his- 

tory of .................... ... 

Hickey, R. H., editor and publisher . . 
Hickman, C. T., editor and publisher . . 
Hickman, Tom D., editor and publisher, 
Hickok, G. R., editor ............... 

Hiebert, Abe L., editor and publisher. . 
Higginbotham, Mellen &, editors and 

publishers .................... 

Higgins, John, editor and publisher. . . . 

Higgins, William, editor and publisher, 
High School Banner, Eureka ........ 

High School Budget, Lawrence ...... 

High School Budget, Topeka ........ 

High School Bulletin, Effingham ..... 



279 
256 
148 
259 
181 
180 
297 



High School Buzz, Hutchinson . . 
High School Clarion, Newton . . . , 
High School Crimson, Fort Scott . 

High School Echo, Emporia 

High School Echo, St. John 

High School Messenger, Wichita . 
High School Monitor, Manhattan . 
High School News, Coffeyyille . . . 

High School News, Emporia 

High School News, Washington . . 
High School Opinion, Ottawa 
High School Oracle, Burlingame . 

High School Purple, Agra 

High School Quarterly, Effingham, 



High School Record, Kansas City 

Mankato 

High School Students, Mankato, edi- 
tors and publishers 

High School World, Topeka 

Highland, newspapers of 178 

statistics of , 

Highlander, Highland 

Hill, D. E., editor and publisher 

Hill, Ed., editor and publisher 

Hill, I. C., editor and publisher 

Hill, John H 

Hill. N. F., editor and publisher ....... 



261 
180 
149 

150 

176 
176 
177 
176 
213 

267 
267 
267 
267 
267 
251 
204 
291 
155 
191 
222 
148 
149 
258 
149 

149 
168 
206 
273 
201 
288 

254 
222 
314 
199 
179 
297 
142 
143 
267 
205 
149 
228 
303 
284 
276 
244 
229 
311 
192 
256 
262 
142 
143 
319 
211 

211 
294 
179 
178 
179 
209 
241 
176 
234 
277 



Hill, Nathaniel P 

Hill, W. F., editor and publisher 

Hill, W. H., editor and publisher 

Hill, W. R., editor and publisher 

Hill, Will A., editor and publisher 

Hill. William H., editor and publisher. . 

Hill City, named for 

newspapers of 

statistics of 

Hillsboro, named for 

newspapers of 204, 234, 

statistics of 

Hindman, John, editor and publisher. . 
Hinton, Richard J., correspondent, sol- 
dier and author 

Hippie, J. B., editor and publisher. . . . 

Historic Times, Lawrence 

History of Kansas Newspapers, by coun- 
ties 

Hixon, C. C., editor and publisher.... 
Hobbs, .A. G. & Sons, editors and pub- 
lishers 

Hobson, Mark F., editor and publisher, 

Hoch, E. W., editor and publisher. . 17, 

61, 110, 

Hooh, Homer, editor and publisher. . . . 
Hodge, H. J., editor and publisher. . . . 
Hodgeman, Amos, captain Company H, 

Seventh Kansas Cavalry 

Hodgeman Center, newspapers of 

Hodgeman county, named for 

newspapers of 189, 206, 

statistics of 

Hodges, Gov. George H 

Hoenscheidt, John, editor and publisher, 
Hofer, St. Clair &, editors and publish- 
ers 

Hoffman, C. B., publisher 

Hoffman, Harry, editor and publisher, 
Hoffman, J. R., editor and publisher. . 
Hoffman, L. A., editor and publisher.. 
Hoffman, L. A. & Son, editors and pub- 
lishers 

Hogue, H. S., editor and publisher. . . . 

Hogue, Irvin, editor and publisher 

Hoisington, A. J., manager 

Hoisington, Roy A., editor and pub- 
lisher 

Hoisington, formerly Buena Vista .... 

named for " 

newspapers of 

statistics of 

Holcomb, Walter L., editor 

Hole, J. T., editor and publisher 

Holiday Visitor, Topeka .... 297, 

Holidaysburg, name changed to byra- 

cuse 

Holiness War News, Irving 

Holland, J. W., editor 

Holmes, Miller &, publishers ......... 

Holmes, Poore &, editors and publishers. 
Holmes, J. R., editor and publisher... 
Holmes, W. H., editor and publisher .. 

Holmes, W. H. & Co., editors and pub- 

Holton^named for Edward I) . Holton 
newspapers of .... 76, 120, 207, 
statistics of 

Holton Recorder, history of 

Holyrood, newspapers of 

statistics of 

Home Builder, Englewood 

Home City, formerly White's Quarry . . 
statistics of 

Home City Tribune 

Home Doings, Soldier 

Home Enterprise, Sedan 

Home for the Friendless, publisher .... 



55 

263 
196 
196 
277 
266 
271 
196 
196 
196 
j:; 
235 
234 
213 

5 

318 
182 

137 
216 

224 
205 
57 
233 
233 
175 

206 
207 
206 
207 
206 
87 
284 

225 
180 
306 
202 
202 

202 
178 
178 
146 

176 
146 
146 
146 
146 
151 
311 
298 

201 
238 
274 
246 
217 
226 
207 
279 



207 
208 
207 
207 
187 
187 
160 
236 
236 
236 
208 
156 
2-21 



342 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Home Journal, Wichita 288 

Home Life, .Kingman 216 

Home Protector, Kansas City 320 

Home Record, Leavenworth 221 

Home Rule, Abilene 176 

Home Rule Movement, Topeka 298 

Home Weekly, Eskridge 310 

Homes in the West, Osage City 257 

Homeseeker's Guide, Gould 201 

Homewood Herald ; 193 

Honey, Henry R., editor and publisher, 211 

Honeywell, Frank, editor and publisher, 163 

281 

Hood, Charles, editor and publisher. . . . 305 

Hood, 3. M., editor and publisher 312 

Hope, newspapers of . 176, 177 

statistics of 176 

Hope Dispatch, history of 1'76 

Hopper, W. Charles, editor and publisher, 178 

247 

Horace, newspapers of 198, 199 

Horn, Dr. H. B., editor and publisher'. . 141 
Home, Mrs. Theresa nee Schutter (Mrs. 

O. W. Little) ' 80 

Homer, John W., editor and publisher, 218 

Hornet, Spring Lake and Artesian City, 239 

Hornet^ St. Louis 116 

Horoscope, Niotaze 155 

Horton, Albert H. 149 

Horton, named for 149 

newspapers of 150, 151 

statistics of 149 

Horton Headlight-Commercial, history of, 150 

Hoss, George W., editor and publisher, 292 

Hottle, W. H., editor and publisher . . 292 

Houghton, H. K., editor and publisher, 240 

Household, Topeka 290 

Houston, H. C., editor and publisher . . 285 

Hovey, W. F., editor and publisher, 149, 221 

Howard, Gen. O. 184 

Howard, Richard C., editor and pub- 
lisher 168 

Howard, named for : 184 

newspapers of 184, 185 

statistics of 184 

Howard County Ledger, Longton 184 

Howe, Edgar Watson, biographical 

sketch 120 

editor and publisher 17, 76, 141 

; portrait of 121 

Howe, Henry, editor 305 

Howe, Joseph W., biographical sketch . . 84 

editor '..... 175 

portrait of 86 

Howell, C. E., editor and publisher 183 

Howell, T. S., editor and publisher .... 199 

Howells, William Dean 122 

Howe's (E. W.) Monthly, Atchison 120 

122, 141 

Hoxie, Dr. H. G., editor 290 

Hoxie, named for H. M. Hoxie 299 

newspapers of 299 

statistics of 299 

Hoxie Sentinel, history of 299 - 

Hoyt, & Tibbetts, editors and publishers, 270 

Hoyt, A. W., publisher 272 

Hoyt, Elbert W., editor and manager . . 27^ 

Hoyt, H. B., editor and publisher 192 

Hoyt, I. C. W., editor and publisher . . . 163 

Hoyt, newspapers of 207, 208 

statistics of -. 207 

Hubbard, C. W., editor and publisher. . 138 

Hubbert, E. A., publisher 232 

Hubbs, C. L., editor and publisher. .... 183 
Hudkins, G. L., editor and publisher! . . 241 
Hudson & Kinyon, editors and pub- 
lishers ! . . . . 316 

Hudson & Walrus, editors and publishers, 144 

Hudson, Atki-ns &, editors and publishers, 275 

Hudson, Ben S., editor and publisher . . 314 



Hudson, C. C., editor and publisher . . . 

Hudson, E. F., editor and publisher, 199, 

Hudson, Joseph K., editor and publisher, 

35, 55, 108, 289, 

Hudson, formerly known as "Rattle- 
snake" 

newspapers of 302, 

statistics of 

Huff, A. G., editor and publisher 

Huff. H. L., editor and publisher 

Huff. L. D., editor and publisher 

Huff, W. A., editor and publisher, 163, 

Huff, W. M., editor and publisher 

Huffman, Dr. C. S., editor 

Huffman, R. B., editor and publisher. . 
Hughes, Mugford &, editors and publish- 
ers 

Hughes, Thomas, editor and publisher, 

Hugo, Victor 

Hugo Herald, Hugoton 

Hugoton, named for : 

newspapers of 

statistics of ....:.... 

Hulaniski, F. J., editor and publisher, 
Hulaniski's Saturday Evening Lamp, 

Downs 

Hull & Anderson, editors and publish- 
ers 

Hull, D. W., editor and publisher 

Hume, George C., publisher 

Hume, W. L., editor 

Humboldt, named for Baron Alexander 
Von Humboldt 

newspapers of 138, 

statistics of 

Humboldt Union, history of 

Humphrey & 'Counter, editors and pub- 
lishers ; 

Humphrey, J. C., editor and publisher, 
Humphrey, J. E., editor and publisher, 

Humphrey, James, editor 

Humphrey, Lyman U 

editor and publisher 

Hunnewell, H. H 

Hunnewell, named for 

newspapers of 305 - 

statistics of 

Huston, E. P., editor and publisher. . . . 
Huston, H. R., editor and publisher. . . . 
Huston, N. H., editor and publisher ... 
Huron, newspapers of * 

statistics of 

Hurry Kain, Topeka .. 

Hutchings, V., editor and publisher. . . . 
Hutchins, Bion S., editor and publisher, 

Hutchinson, Carter, editor 

Hutchinson, Elizabeth P editor . . . . . 
Hutchinson, named for C. C. Hutct 



144 

314 

6 

291 

302 
303 
302 
149 
237 
161 
240 
146 
290 
214 

305 
236 
304 
304 
304 
304 
304 
257 

258 

285 
254 
222 
299 

138 
139 
138 
138 

174 
270 
268 
275 
33 
242 
306 
306 

-308 
306 
160 
218 
156 

-144 
142 
297 
301 
160 
215 
198 
258 



267 

210, 258 
267-270 
. . . 267 
. . . 305 
. .. 251 
267 
168 
187 
144 



sou J c i 

Hutchinson, newspapers of... 51, 

Hutchinson Gazette, history of 

Hutchison & Spaun, publishers 

Hutton, H. P ; 

Hutton, -Lee A., editor and publisher . . . 
Hutton, W. H., editor and publisher. . . 
Huycke, George, editor and publisher, 

Hyatt, C. A., editor and publisher 

Hvgiene Miscellany and Medical News, 

Manhattan 276 

I. 

Iconoclast, Kirwin ' 262 

Idana Journal 161 

Idea, Dighton 221 

Iliff, E. W., editor and publisher 144 

II Lavatore Italiano, Pittsburs:, moved 

from Trinidad, Colo 70 

Illustrated Companion, Topeka 297 



GENERAL INDEX. 



343 



Illustrated Weekly, Topeka 

lines, W. H., editor 

Iraes Bros., publishers 

Implement Dealers' Bulletin, Abilene... 

Implement Hardware Bulletin, Abilene, 

Independence, newspapers of. . 98, 242- 
statistics of 

Independence Daily Star, history of... 

Independence Hall, Philadelphia 

Independent, Frederick 

Hutchinson 267, 

Kirwin 261, 

- Manhattan 

. Matfield Green 

Wa Keeney 

Independent League, Einporia 

Independent News, Girard 

Independent Star, Medicine Lodge 

Independent-New Era, CoffeyvUle. 

Independent-Tribune, Holton .... 

Index, Lovewell 

India Famine Sufferers 

Indian Leader, Lawrence 

Indicator Publishing Co., Kansas City, 
Mo 

Industrial Advocate, Augusta 151, 

Industrial Advocate, EJ Dorado... 151, 

Industrial Age, Caldwell and Wellington, 

Industrial Council Bulletin, Topeka .... 

Industrial Free Press, Winfield... 168, 

Industrial Journal, Howard 

Industrial Liberator 

Industrial Review, Emporia 

Industrial Union, McPherson 

Industrialist, K. S. A. C., Manhattan. . 

Industry, Nickersou 268, 

Industry Herald 

Infant Wonder, Parsons 

Ingalls, C. E., editor and publisher. . . . 

Ingalls, Ellsworth, editor-in-chief 

Ingalls, John J ........ 5, 9, 12, 

Ingalls, Ray T., editor and publisher. . . 

Ingalls, Sheffield 

Ingalls, Gray county, newspapers 'of . . . 

Inkslinger's Advertiser, Westmoreland. . 

Inland Investor, Topeka 

Inland Wheelman, Topeka 

Inlow & Emmons, editors and publishers, 

Inlow, A. C., editor and publisher 

Inlow, C. A. G., editor and publisher.. 

Inlow, E. C., editor and publisher 

Inman & Montgomery, editors and pub- 
lishers . . . 

Inman, Maj. Henry 17, 231, 260, 

editor and publisher 

Inman, named for 

newspapers of 231, 

-statistics of 

Institute, Marysville 

Institute, Minneapolis 

Insurance Messenger, Junction City. . . 

Insurance Solicitor, Topeka 294, 

Integral Cob'perator, Enterprise 

Interior, Hutchinson . . . . . 

Interior-Herald, Hutchinson 

International Brotherhood of Stationary 
Firemen's Journal, Kansas City. . . 

International Farm Congress 

International Institute of Agriculture, 
. Rome 

International Peace and Equity League, 

International Typographical Union 

Interstate Advocate, Morrill 

Interstate Farmer, Wichita 

Interstate News, Kansas City 

Inter-State News, Rosedale 

Interstate Schoolman 



297 
206 
206 
175 
175 
-245 
242 
242 
11 
274 
269 
262 
276 
154 
309 
229 
172 
145 
243 
207 
211 
110 
J80 

108 
153 
152 

307 
299 
169 
185 
232 
230 
232 
274 
269 
161 
220 
311 
292 

15 
249 

14 
189 
198 
264 
.298 
298 
196 
196 
196 
277 
277 

187 
303 
187 
231 
233 
231 
238 
260 
173 
318 
177 
269 
269 

319 

94 

47 
44 
130 
151 
286 
318 
320 
269 



Investors' Guide, Topeka - ( .n 

Kansas City, History of 318 

lola, newspapers of 137-139 

statistics of 137 

lola Register, history of 137 

Ionian Casket, Quaker Valley 158 

Ionian Casket, jr., Quaker. Valley 158 

Iron City Press, Rosedale 320 

Irrigation Champion, Garden City 189 

Irrigation Farmer, Ottawa 192 

Salina 282 

Irrigation World, Greensburg -17 

Irrigator, Garden City 288 

Irvin, Miss Mary E. (Mrs. D. W. Wilder) , 21 

Irving, named for Washington Irving. . 237 

newspapers of 237, 238 

statistics of 237 

Irwin, George S., editor and publisher. . 207 

290 

Isabel, newspapers of 145 

Isley, W. H., editor 285 

Israel, J. P., editor and publisher 285 

Israel at Work, McPherson 233 

Itasca, New Tecumseh 300 

Item, Great Bend . 145 

luka, newspapers of 265, 266 

statistics of 265 

Ivanhoe Times 189, 206 

J. 

Jackson, Andrew, President 207 

Jackson, Cooper, associate editor 251 

Jackson, Z., editor and publisher 187 

Jackson county, first called Calhoun 

county '-07 

named for 207 

newspapers of r 207, 208 

statistics of 207 

Jacksonian, Mankato 212 

Jacksonville, Neosho Valley Blade 252 

James, O'Connor &, editors and pub- 
lishers " 231 

James, Mrs. Augusta. 151 

James, Fred D., editor and publisher. . . 310 
Jameson, Fred W., editor and manager, 221 

Jamestown, named for 163 

newspapers of 162164 

statistics of 163 

Jaqua Bros., editors and publishers. . . 159 
Jaqua, R. M., editor and publisher. . .. . 159 

Jaqua, Cynosure and Gleaner 159 

Jarrell, J. F., biographical sketch of . . . 76 

portrait of 77 

Jarrell, Mrs. Myra Williams ' 76 

Jarrell, Sanford 76 

Jarrel, Mrs. Sanford 76 

Jayhawker, Kansas City 319 

Jayhawker, Manhattan : 276 

Jefferies' Home Monthly, Lawrence. . . . 181 
Jefferies' Western Monthly, Ottawa. ... 192 
Jeffers & Smith, editors and publishers. . 225 
Jefferson county, named for Thomas 

Jefferson 209 

newspapers of 209, 210 

statistics of ... . 209 

Jeffersonian, Burlington 165 

Lawrence and Topeka . . 180, 181, 294 
Jeffersonian Gazette, Lawrence, history of, 180 
Jenkins, Charles F., editor and publisher, 261 
Jenkins, J. C., business manager ...... 312 

Jenkins, Lou (Mrs. F. D. Cobufn) .... ?08 

Jenkins, W. D., editor and publisher. . . 211 

Jenkins, Dr. W. D., editor. . 301 

Jenkins, Will D., jr., editor and pub- 
lisher 301 

Jennings., John E., editor and publisher, 314 

Jennings. Warren 174 

Jennings, formerly called Slab City 174 

named for 174 



344 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Jennings, newspapers of 174 

statistics of 174 

Jerome, F. E., & Co., editors and pub- 
lishers 257 

Jerome, Smoky Globe 195 

Jerry Simpson's Bayonet, Wichita 286 

Jeter, E. E., editor and publisher 234 

Jetmore, named for Col. Aaron B. Jet- 
more 206 

newspapers of 206, 207 

statistics of 207 

Jetmore Republican, history of 206 

Jewell, named for Lt. Col. Lewis R. 

Jewell 211 

newspapers of 212 

statistics of 211 

Jewell Center 211 

Jewell county, named for 211 

newspapers of 211, 212 

statistics of 211 

Jewell County Monitor, Mankato, his- 
tory of 211 

Jibber Jab, Wichita 286 

Johnson & Law, editors and publishers, 150 
Johnson, A. R., editor and publisher. ... 138 

Johnson, Col. A. S 303 

Johnson, Andrew, President, saved from 
impeachment by vote of Edmund G-. 

Ross 5 

Johnson, C. H., editor and publisher. ! . 246 

Johnson, F. E., estate of, owner 258 

Johnson, J. J., editor and publisher .... 240 

Johnson, Mrs. M. A., editor 289 

Johnson, M. B., editor and publisher. . . 246 
Johnson, R. Pearl, local and society edi- 
tor 258 

Johnson, Rev. Thomas, missionary to 

Shawnee Indians 213 

Johnson, W. E., editor and publisher. . . 208 
Johnson, W. H. ( editor and publisher, 137 

147, 175 
281, 290 

Johnson, originally called Veteran 303 

named for 303 

newspapers of 201, 303, 304 

statistics of 303 

Johnson, Pioneer and Journal-News, his- 
tory of 303 

Johnson City World, 201, 304 

Johnson county, named for 213 

newspapers of 213, 214 

statistics of 213 

Johnston, J. E., editor and publisher. . . 238 

Jones & Co., Cyclone, Kansas City 319 

Jones & Dewey, editors and publishers, 251 
Jones Bros. (O. B. and J. F.) ( editors 

and publishers 195 

Jones, C. C., editor and publisher 233 

Jones, Charles C., editor and publisher, 237 
Jones, Mrs. H. E., owner and publisher, 303 
Jones, Paul, editor and publisher, 243, 291 
Jones, W. Cecil, editor and publisher. . 155 
Jones, W. H., editor and publisher. . . . 315 

316 

Jones, W. M., editor and publisher. . . . 155 
Jones, Seward A., editor and publisher, 162 

240 

Jones. Shannon, editor 147 

Jordan, W. H., editor and publisher . . 249 
Joslyn, F. B., editor and publisher. . . 227 

Journal and Sun, Coffeyville 243 

Journal Clarion, Mound City 226 

Journal-Democrat, Dodge City 190 

Journal Kansas Medical Society, To- 

peka, history of 290 

Journal of Commerce, Leavenworth . . . . 2?3 

Wichita 288 

Journal of Didactics, Paola 240 

Journal of Mycology, Manhattan 276 



Journal U. S. Cavalry Association, 

Leavenworth 221 

Judge, Carl, editor and publisher 224 

259 

Junction City, named for 194 

newspapers of 25, 43, 173, 194 

statistics of 194 

Junction City Sentinel, history of 194 

Junction City Union, history of 194 

Junkin, J. E., editor 273 

& Steele 273 

Justus, E. W., editor and publisher. ... 213 

Juvenile, Wellington 307 

K. 

Kackley. Evangelical War Cry 282 

Kagi, John H., 6 

Kalloch, Rev. Isaac S., editor and pub- 
lisher 53, 

Kalvesta, newspapers published at. ... 

193, 
Kanopolis, formerly called Fort Harker 

station 

newspapers published at 187, 

statistics of 

Kanorado, State Line Register 

Kansah, Gardner 

Hutchinson . 

Jamestown * 

Lawrence . 

Kansan-Republican, Newton, history of, 
Kansas conditions during the territorial 

days 

establishment of early newspapers 

in 

help asked for citizens of 

Ingalls' remarks concerning 

number of towns having news- 
papers 

pioneer in the preservation of local 

newspapers 

soldiers furnished by, during civil 

war 

spirit of 

views of early explorers concern- 



180 
189 
207 

187 
188 
187 
300 
214 
269 
163 
181 
204 

10 



16 



13 



ing 



Kansas Advertiser, Topeka 

Kansas Advocate, Fall River 

Kansas Aggie, K. S. A. C., Manhattan, 

Kansas Agitator, Garnett and Greeley, 
founded by W. O. Champe. . . 139, 

Kansas Agricultural Review, Manhattan, 

Kansas Agriculturist 143, 169, 

264, 

Kansas Alliance Union, Eureka 

Kansas American, McPherson 

Kansas Architect, Topeka 

Kansas Arts and Industries, Topeka . . . 

Kansas Banker, Topeka 

Kansas Bankers' Association, publishers, 

Kansas Baptist, Parsons 

Kansas Baptist Herald, Topeka 

Kansas Baptist Review, Olathe and lo- 
peka 214 ' 

Kansas Baptist Union, Ottawa 

Kansas Bazaar, Circleville 

Kansas Bee Journal, Topeka 

Kansas Bee Keeper, Columbus 

Kansas Benevolent Society Record, Law- 
rence 

Kansas Blackman ^44, 

Kansas Blade, Concordia 162, 

Kansas Breeze. Topeka 44, 57, 

290, 

Kansas Capital, Topeka 

Kansas Catholic, Leavenworth .... 223, 

Kansas Central, Olathe 

Kansas Central Advocate, Salina 



11 

53 

9 

296 
200 
274 

140 

276 
245 
297 
200 
232 
294 
297 
290 
290 
219 



294 
193 
208 
294 
157 

182 
297 
163 
262 
294 
297 
319 
214 
282 



GENERAL INDEX. 



345 



Kansas Central Land Journal, Salina . , 

Kansas Champion, Topeka 

Kansas Chautauqua Assembly, Topeka . . 

Kansas Chief, Troy 74, 

Kansas Children's Home Finder, Topeka, 

Kansas Christian Advocate 

Kansas Christian Advocate, Topeka .... 

Kansas Chronicle, Newton 204, 

Kansas Church Tidings, Topeka 

Kansas Churchman, Atchison, 143, 181, 
223, 282, 

Kansas Citian, Kansas City 

Kansas Citizen, Argentine 

Kansas Citizen and Labor Record, Kan- 
sas City 

Kansas City, formerly Wyandotte 

newspapers published at 98, 

317- 

statistics of 

Kansas City Globe-Gazette, history of . . 

Kansas City (Mo.) Journal, 37, 53, 61, 

Daily Mail 

Star 25, 49, 51, 59, 66, 

Times 61, 76, 92, 

World 

Kansas Clipper, Severy 

Kansas Collegiate 53, 

Kansas Commercial News, Topeka 

Kansas Commission to the Panama Pa- 
cific International Exposition 

Kansas Common School Record, Ottawa, 

Kansas Commoner 205, 223, 

Kansas Commonwealth, Cherryvale, 243, 

Kansas Congregational Home Missionary 
Society, publisher 

Kansas Constitutionalist, Doniphan . . . 

Kansas Cosmos, Council Grove . . . 246, 

Kansas Courier 233, 

Kansas Cowboy, Dodge City 

Kansas Craftsman, Wichita 

Kansas Credit and Collecting Company, 
publisher 

Kansas Critic, Concordia 

Kansas Crusader of Freedom, Doniphan, 

Kansas Cultivator, Garden City 

Kansas Cultivator and Stockman, Wich- 
ita 

Kansas Cycler, Topeka 

Kansas Cyclone, Kansas City 

Kansas Dairy Farmer, Enterprise .... 

Kansas Dairyman, Eureka 

Kansas Day Club 49, 96, 

Kansas Degree of Honor Messenger, St. 
Paul 

Kansas Democrat, Hiawatha, history of, 
Topeka 294, 296, 

Kansas Democratic News, Topeka . . 

Kansas Derrick, Humboldt 

Kansas Development Association . . . 

Kansas Eagle, St. Francis 87 

Kansas Ea?le-Rustler, St. Francis . 

Kansas Editor, Lawrence 

Kansas Educational Journal 223 

292 

Kansas Educator 146, 147 

Kansas Elevator, Kansas City 

Kansas Endeavorer, Newton and Topeka, 

Kansas Enterprise, Belleville 

Kansas Evangel, Topeka 

Kansas Evangelist, Beloit 

Kansas Exchange Journal, Herington. . 

Kansas Fancier, Winfield 

Kansas Farm and Home, Oswego 

Kansas Farmer, Topeka and Leaven- 
worth 59, 

Topeka, history of 290, 

Kansas Farmer Dairv Club . . 



282 
294 
297 
178 
290 
220 
293 
205 
297 
210 
290 
320 
320 

319 

317 

110 

320 

317 

317 

318 

66 

76 

92 

122 

92 

200 

181 

294 

59 
193 
286 
244 

289 
179 

247 
235 
190 

288 

291 
163 
179 

188 

287 
294 
319 
177 
200 
112 

252 
149 
299 
299 
139 
94 
159 
159 
180 
229 
294 
269 
318 
205 
294 
f'72 
297 
242 
177 
170 
220 

223 

291 
59 



Kansas Farmer Seed Wheat Club 59 

Kansas Farmers' Star, Wichita 286 

Kansas Federation Woman's Clubs.... 57 

Kansas Financier, Topeka 294, 298 

Kansas Fraternal Citizen 210 

Kansas Freeman, Topeka 294, 297 

Kansas Freemason, Wichita and St. 

John 286, 303 

Kansas Free Press, Smith Center :01 

Kansas Free State, Lawrence, 5, 29, 45, 181 

destruction of 27 

Kansas Freie Presse, Leavenworth 2 

Kansas Frontier, Junction City 194 

Kansas Gazette, Abilene 176 

Lawrence 180, 181 

Kansas Globe, Kansas City H19 

Wichita 236 

Kansas Good Roads Advocate, Indepen- 
dence 244 

Kansas Greenbacker, Emporia 229 

Kansas Grit. Newton 204 

Wichita . . : JS6 

Kansas Headlight, Wichita 288 

Kansas Herald 222 

Glen Elder 241 

Hiawatha 149, 150 

Lawrence 180, 181 

Topeka 297, 299 

Kansas Herold [German] 269 

Kansas City 319 

Kansas Home, Topeka 296 

Kansas Home Missionary, Topeka 298 

Kansas Home News, Ottawa 192 

Kansas Home Seeker, St. Marys 265 

Kansas Homestead, Cherokee 173 

Kansas Illustrated Monthly Souvenir, 

Atchison 143 

Kansas Independent Telephone Associa- 
tion, publisher 292 

Kansas Issue, Topeka 291 

Kansas Jayhawker, Clearwater 288 

Kansas Jeffersonian, Valley Falls 210' 

Kansas Jewellite, Mankato 212 

Kansas Journal, Perry 210 

Kansas Journal of Commerce, To'peka . . 296 

Kansas Kinderfreund, Winfield 168 

Kansas Knight and Soldier, Topeka. . . . 294 

Kansas Knocker, Topeka 2U4 

Kansas Korn Knife, Garnett 140 

Kansas Labor Clarion, Salem 212 

Kansas Land Journal, Salina 282 

Kansas Land Register, Manhattan 276 

Kansas Law Journal, Topeka 294 

Kansas Leader, Wa Keeney 309 

Kansas Ledger, Daily, Leavenworth . . . 224 

Kansas Lever, Ottawa 192 

Kansas Liberal, Lawrence 181 

Ottawa 191 

Kansas Live Stock Breeder, Moline. ... 15 

Kansas Magazine, Topeka .... 12, 13, 15 

29, 290, 294 

Wichita 286 

Kansas Magnet -'513 

Kansas Medical Catalogue, Fort Scott . . 148 

290 

Kansas Medical Journal, Topeka . . 157, 294 
Kansas Messenger, Baldwin 183 

Chetopa 219 

Kansas Methodist, Topeka 294 

Kansas Methodist Chautauqua, Topeka, 294 

Kansas Methodist Times 294 

Kansas Miller and Manufacturer, Enter- 
prise 177 

Kansas Mirror, Lawrence 182 

Kansas Missions Tidning, Lindsborg. . . 233 

Kansas Monitor 254 

Kansas Monthly, Lawrence 181, 182 

Kansas Monthly Souvenir, Topeka 297 

Kansas Municipalities 1 

Kansas National Democrat, Lecompton, 182 



346 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Kansas New Era. Lecompton, Medina 

and Valley Falls 182, 210 

Kansas News, Topeka, 291, 297, 298 

Kansas News-Democrat, Hiawatha .... 149 
Kansas Newspaperdom, Newspaper 

World, Newspaper West, Hiawatha, 150 

Kansas Newspaper Union, Topeka 294 

Kansas North Central Editors' Associa- 
tion ^06 

Kansas Northwest, Kirwin ...., 254 "62 

Kansas Odd Fellow, Belle Plaine .' 307 

Kansas Optimist, Jamestown 163 

Kansas Pacific Homestead, Lawrence . 182 

Kansas Pacific Railway -5 

Kansas Patriot, Burlington . . 164' 165 

Kansas Patron, Olathe 214 

Kansas Pilot, Blue Rapids '. 238 

Kansas City 319 

Kansas Pioneer, Smith Center... ' 301 

Wyandptte 319 

Kansas Plain Dealer, Olathe ......... 214 

Kansas Plainsman, Russell 280 

Kansas Plebeian, Lyndon 256 

Kansas Populist, Cherryvale and Inde- 
pendence / 244 

Kansas Posten, Lindsborg .....' . 233 

Kansas Prairie Dog, Lake City ...,];' 145 

Kansas Presbyter, Manhattan 276 

Kansas Presbyterian, Wichita 286 

Kansas Press, acknowledgments to .... 8 

-Cottonwood Falls 154, 247 

Council Grove ' 247 

Weekly, Elwood '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 178 

Kansas Progress, Lawrence 181 

Kansas Progressive, Kansas City 319 

Kansas Prohibitionist, Columbus 157 

Emporia 229 

Kansas City .' 319 

Leavenworth 223 

Osborne ; 258 

Topeka 294 

Kansas Quarterly Review of Real Es- 
tate, Topeka 297 

Kansas Radical, Manhattan 275, 276 

Kansas Razoo, Agra 262 

Kansas Real Estate Herald, Wyandotte, 3-20 

Kansas Record, Ottawa 193 

Kansas regiments, Second Cavalry, Com- 
pany E " . 76 

Sixth cavalry 159 

Eighth infantry 6, 33 

Ninth cavalry 167 

Tenth infantry 47 

Eleventh 42 

Fifteenth . 5 

Kansas Register, Spring Hill . . 214 

Topeka 298 

Kansas Reporter, Louisville 264 

Wamego 264 

Kansas Republican, Daily 313 

Kansas Review, La Harpe 139 

Lawrence 181 

Kansas Road Maker, Topeka . 295 

Kansas Rundschau, La Crosse 279 

Kansas Rural, Howard 185 

Kansas Searchlight, Howard 185 

Kansas School for the Deaf, Olathe, edi- 
tor and publisher 213- 

Kansas School Journal, Topeka 297 

Kansas School Magazine 229 

Kansas Semi-Centennial Exposition, . . . 110 

Kansas Sentinel, Emporia 229 

Kansas Pettier, Tecumseh 298 

Kansas Sittings, Topeka 297 

Kansas Spirit, Lawrence 53 

Paola 239 

Kansas Sod House, Cimarron . . . . 190, 198 
Kansas Sod House, Ravanna .... 189, 194 

197 



Kansas Staats Anzeiger, Atchison, To- 
peka and Wichita '. . . . 143, 284 

286, 294 

Kansas Staats Fidning, Lindsborg 233 

Kansas Staats Zeitung, Fort Scott 148 

Kansas City 318 

Kansas Standard, La Cygne and Mound 

City 226 

Kansas Star, Olathe 213 

Wichita 286 

Kansas State Agricultural College 44 

59, 84, 110 

faculty of, editors and publishers, 274 

students of, editors and publishers, 274 

Kansas State Board of Agriculture. . . 108 

112 
Kansas State Board of Education .... 66 

Kansas State Capital, Topeka 299 

Kansas State Collegian, K. S. A. C., 

Manhattan 274 

Kansas State Dairy Commission 110 

Kansas State Editorial Association. . 44, 49 
82, 84, 96, 98 
106, 110, 112 

Kansas State Fair Advance, Topeka... 296 
Kansas State Good Roads Association, 44 

96 

Kansas State Grange Bulletin, Topeka, 297 
Kansas State Historical Society ... 7, 35 

49, 51, 57 
94, 106 

founded by Kansas newspaper men, 7 
Kansas State Horticultural Society ... 112 
Kansas State Industrial Reformatory, 

Hutchinson 268 

Kansas State Journal, Lawrence 180 

181, 182 

Topeka 292, 294 

Kansas State Ledger, Topeka 294 

Kansas State Notes, Topeka 294 

Kansas State Penitentiary 110 

Kansas State Record, Topeka .... 289, 294 
Kansas State Register, lola, M. M. 

Lewis, editor and publisher 137 

McPherson 232 

Topeka 294 

Kansas Statesman, Atchison, founded by 

G. W.- Myers & Son 141, 143 

Junction City 194 

Oskaloosa . 210 

Kansas Stats Sunday School Journal . . 230 

269, 294 

history of 175 

Kansas State Teachers' Association .... 66 

68, 291 
Kansas State Temperance Union. . 110, 291 

Kansas Suffrage Reveille, Eureka 200 

Kansas Sun, Hiawatha 150 

Kansas Sunflower, Garnett 141 

Holton 208 

Wichita 287 

Kansas Synod Lutheran, Atchison, Rev. 

M. F. Troxel, editor and publisher, 141 
Kansas Teacher, Emporia, Topeka and 

Wamego 229, 291, 264 

Kansas Telegraph, Atchison and Topeka, 143 

294 

Kansas Telephone, Manhattan 276 

Kansas Temperance Monitor, Topeka . . 294 
Kansas Temperance Palladium, Topeka, 181 

297 

Kansas Templar, El Dorado 152 

Kansas Territorial Register, Leaven- 
worth 223 

Kansas Times, Lyndon ........'...... 256 

Kansas Topics, Kansas City 320 

Kansas Trade Journal, Topeka 295 

Kansas Trade Unionist, Topeka 291 

Kansas Traveler, Howard 185 



GENERAL INDEX. 



347 



Kansas Tribune, Kansas City 

Lawrence 180, 

- Quindaro 

Topeka 294, 

Kansas Underwriters and Real Kstatr 
Journal, Lawrence 

Kansas Union, Minneapolis 

Kansas Union Journal, Wichita 

Kansas University, Publisher 

Kansas University Lawyer, Lawrence . . 

Kansas University Quai'terly, Lawrence, 

Kansas University Weekly, Lawrence. . 

Kansas Valley, Wamego 

Kansas Valley Courier, Lawrence 

Kansas Valley Times, Rossville . . 293, 

Kansas Veteran, Hutchinson 

Kansas Vim, McPherson 231, 

Kansas Volksblatt, Newton 204, 

Kansas Volks Freund, Great Bend .... 

Kansas Watchman, Topeka 

Kansas Weather Observer, Wellington. . 

Kansas Weather Service Bulletin. To- 
peka 

Kansas Weekly Herald, Leavenworth . . 

Kansas Weekly Pioneer, Smith Center, 

Kansas Wesleyan Lance, Salina 

Kansas Wesleyan University, Dean Swift, 

managing editor 

students, editors and publishers . . 

Kansas Wheelman's Library, Junction 
City 

Kansas Witness, Lawrence 

Kansas Woman's Christian Temperence 
Union, publisher 44, 

Kansas Woman's Press Association .... 

Kansas Woodman, Beloit and El Dorado, 

Kansas Worker, Topeka 

Kansas Workman 146, 152, 

229, 256, 

Erie, history of 

Kansas X-Ray, New Albany 

Kansas Young Lutheran, Lindsborg . . . 

Kansas Zeitung, Atchison 

Kansas Zephyr, Lawrence 

Kansaske Rozhkedy, Wilson 

Kansasky Pokrok, Wilson 

Kanzas News, Emporia, founded by P. 

B. Plumb 

Kaw Valley Chief, Perry 210, 

Kaw Valley News, Bonner' Springs .... 

Kawsmouth, Wyandotte 

Kawsmo.uth Pilot, Wyandotte 

Kearny county, named for Gen. Phillip 
Kearny 

newspapers published at 

statistics of 

Kearny County Advocate, history of ... 
Keener, Phil L., editor and publisher . . 
Keeney, James F., one of the founders 

of Wa Keeney . . 

Keep, E. N., editor and publisher 

Keith, C. B., president 

Keithly, W. A., editor and publisher . . 

Keller, Bruce R 

Keller, G.. M., editor and publisher .... 
Kelley, E. E., editor and publisher .... 
Kelley, Edward D., editor and pxiblisher, 
Kelley, Eugene, editor and publisher . . 
Kelley, George W., editor and publisher, 

Kelley, H. B., editor and publisher, 154, 
Kelley, Ira A., editor and publisher, 261, 
Kelley, Mark J., editor and publisher . . 

.301, 

Kelley, Robert S., and Dr. John H. 
Stringfellow, founders of the Squat- 
ter Sovereign, Atchison 



181 
320 
296 

182 
259 
286 
180 
181 
181 
180 
181 
264 
180 
296 
270 
232 
205 
146 
294 
306 

291 
223 
301 
282 

281 
281 

194 
182 

258 
57 
151 
241 
294 
220 
259 
251 
315 
233 
143 
181 
188 
187 

42 
290 
320 
319 
319 

215 
215 
215 
215 
157 

309 
188 
290 
227 
265 
206 
316 
251 
200 
166 
204 
231 
308 
162 
311 



141 



Kellogg, Mr. , editor and publisher, 167 

Kellogg, A. J., & S<m. i-rlitoi-> and pub- 
lishers 160 

Kellogg, F. P., editor and publisher "... 163 

Kellogg's Wichita Record 286 

Kelly, J. D., jr., editor and publisher. . . 305 

Kelly, newspapers published at 250 

Kelso, formerly Prag, absorbed I. 

wood 266 

K<-mp. .Jennie M., editor 258 

Kendall, J. M., editor and publisher . . 236 

Kendall, newspapers published at 201 

Kenea, Cary, editor and publisher .... 226- 
Kenea, J. P., editor and publisher .... 226 
Kennedy & Craig, editors and publishers, 226 

Kennedy, Edward S., editor 284 

Kennedy, H. S., editor and publisher . . 174 
Kennedy, J. M., editor and publisher . . 314 

Kennedy, Lucy J., publisher 174 

Kennedy, Thomas, editor and publisher, 317 
Kenneson, F. G., editor and publisher . . 155 

Kenneth, newspapers published at 299 

Kenney, E. J., editor 251 

Kensington, newspapers published at . . 301 

302 

statistics of 301 

Kent, C. W., editor and publisher ...... 243 

Kent, William J., editor and publisher. . 314 

Kenyon College, Gambier, Ohio 40 

Kerr, George M., editor and publisher . . 190- 

Kerr, T. A., editor and publisher 142 

Kerr, W. H., editor and publisher .... 146 
Kessler & McAllister, editors and pub- 
lishers 191 

Kessler, J.B., editor and publisher . . . 191 
Ketcheson, J. C., business manager . . . 222 
Keyes, M. J., editor and publisher . . . 283 
Keys, L. H., editor and publisher . . . . 259 
Keys, M. J., editor and publisher . . . . 259 
Keystone, name changed to Manchester, 176 

Keystone, Oberlin 174 

Killean, E. J., editor and publisher .... 195 
Kimball & Barton, editors and publishers, 252 
Kimball, A. B., editor and publisher . . . 162 
Kimball, C. A., editor and publisher . . . 275 

Kimball Family News, Topeka 294 

Kincaid, named for Robert Kincaid . . 140 
newspapers published at .... 140, 141 

statistics of 140 

Kind Words, Vermilion 238 

King, Capt. Henry 6, 25 

biographical sketch of 29 

portrait of . : 

"The Story of Kansas and Kansas 

Newspapers" by , 9 

King, J. B., editor and publisher. 265 

King, Will H., editor Allen County 

Journal 137 

Kinguian, named for Judge Sam'l A. 

Kingman 215 

newspapers published at .... 215, 216 

statistics of 215 

Kingman Leader-Courier, history of ... 215 

Kingman county, named for 215 

newspapers of 216 

statistics of , 215 

Kingman Count \- High School, students, 

editors and publishers 215- 

Kingsbury, Geo. W., editor and pub- 
lisher 194 

Kingsdown, statistics of 190 

Kingsdown Clarion 190 

Kinnear, W. S., editor and publisher . . 238 
K inner, C. V., editor and publisher .... 'J'-'T 

Kinsley, E. W 183 

Kinsley, R. L., editor and publisher . . 202 
Kinsley, formerly called Petersburg '. . . 183 

named for 183 

newspapers published at, 57, 183, 184 



348 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Kinsley Graphic, history of 183 

Kinyon & Hudson, editors and publishers, 316 
Kinyon, R. G., editor and publisher . . 315 
Kiowa, newspapers published at . . 144, 145 

statistics of 144 

Kiowa county, named for 217 

newspapers of 217 

statistics of 217 

Kiowa County Signal, Greensburg, his- 
tory of 217 

Kirch, E. A., editor and publisher .... 278 
Kirch, Fred C., editor and publisher . .- 278 

Kirk, Frank, editor and publisher 211 

Kirkpatrick, Mrs. O. C., editor and pub- 
lisher 4 210 

Kirwin, named for Col. John Kirwin. . . 261 

newspapers published at 261, 262 

statistics of 261 

Kirwin Kansan, history of 261 

Kissell, J. E., editor and publisher 258 

Kitzmiller, Warren, editor and publisher, 178 

Klein, Paul, editor and publisher 253 

Kline, G. F., editor and publisher 224 

Kline, H. F., publisher 309 

Knapp, William M., editor and publisher, 154 
Knaus & Davis, editors and publishers, 231 
Knaus, Warren, editor and publisher. . . 231 
Knights and Ladies of Security, Topeka, 256 

291 

Knocker, Topeka 298 

Knowlton and Prewett, editors and pub- 
lishers 257 

Knox, Amelia M. (Mrs. Hiram W.) 98 

Knox, Clyde, editor and publisher 242 

biographical sketch 98 

portrait of 98 

Knox, Hiram W., . 98 

Koonce, A. S., editor 155 

Koontz, E. F., editor and publisher. . . . 183 

Kopelin, Louis, editor 170 

Kopp, Le Roy M., editor and publisher, 250 

Krehbiel, C. E., editor 204 

Krehbiel, H. P., manager 204 

Krehbiel, William J., editor and pub- 
lisher 204, 231 

Krow & Denison, editors and publishers, 300 

Kuhn, Henry, editor and publisher 233 

Kuraner, S., editor and publisher 222 

Kurts, Chas. H., editor and publisher. . 152 
Kurtz, W. J., editor and publisher.... 152 

L. 

Labette City, newspapers of 219 

Labette county, name derived from. . . . 218 

newspapers of 218-220 

statistics of 218 

Labor, Topeka 299 

Labor Champion, Topeka 294 

Labor Chieftain, Topeka 294 

Labor Chronicle, Leavenworth . . . . 221, 222 
Labor Chronicle and Resubmissionist, 

Leavenworth 221 

Labor Clai'ion, Mankato 212 

Labor Gazette, Wichita 286 

Labor Herald, Pittsburg 172 

Labor Journal, Scammon 158 

Labor News, Lamed 260 

Labor Record, Kansas City 319 

Labor Review, Argentine 319 

Labor Review, Leavenworth 223 

Labor Review, McCune 173 

Labor Tribune, Weir 158 

L&bor Union, Wichita 286 

Laboring Man, Topeka 298 

Labouchere's Truth 122 

La Crosse, newspapers of 278, 279 

statistics of 278 

La Cygne, named for 225 

newspapers of 225-227 

statistics of . . 225 



La Cygne Journal-Record, history of . . . 225 

226 

Ladies' Home Journal, Topeka 295 

Ladies' Magazine, Newton 205 

Lafontaine, newspapers of 315, 316 

Lague, Mrs. H., jr 106 

La Harpe, named for . 138 

newspapers of 138, 139 

statistics of 138 

Lake City, newspapers of 145 

Lakin, named for David L. Lakin 215 

newspapers of 189, 215 

statistics of 215 

Lamb, B. K., editor and publisher 252 

Lamb, Celsus A., editor and publisher. . 219 

Lamb, Charles 14 

Lamb, F. B., editor and publisher 275- 

Lamb, J. B., editor and publisher 219 

Lamb, J. B. & Son, editors and publish- 
ers 219 

Lamborn, State Line Register 300 

Lamp, Carl C., editor and publisher. . . . 246 

Lamont, statistics of 199 

Lament Leader 199 

Lancaster, Prairie Press 143 

Land Buyer, Emporia 230 

Land Buyers' Guide, Independence.... 245 

Land Mark, Eskridge 310 

Land Mark, Fort Scott 148 

Land Mark, Yates Center 317 

Land Register, Manhattan 276 

Landau, William E., editor and publisher, 299 
Landes, H. W., editor and publisher. . . . 261 
Landes, S. C., editor and publisher. . . . 261 
Landrey, Grant S., editor and publisher, 318 
Landrey, Joseph T., editor and publisher, 318 

Lane, Bush R 40 

Lane, Gen. James H., 5, 13, 135, 191, 220 

Lane, Vincent J 17 

biographical sketch 40 

portrait of 39 

Lane, formerly known as Shermanville, 191 

named for 191 

newspapers of 191-193 

statistics of 191 

Lane county, named for 220 

newspapers of 220, 221 

statistics of 220 

Lane Trail 40, 135 

Langdon, statistics of 268 

Langdon Leader 268 

Langford, Dewey, editor and publisher. . 145 

204 

Lanman, H; A., & Son, editors and pub- 
lishers 201 

Lansdon, W. C., editor and manager. . . 281 

Lansing, newspapers of 222, ^23 

statistics of 222 

Lanstrum & Warren, editors and pub- 
lishers 265 

Lantern, Emporia 230 

Lantern, Fort Scott .148 

Lantern, Mapleton 147, 14r= 

Lantern, Topeka 294 

LaPorte (Texas) Chronicle, John H. 

Rice, editor of 37 

Larned, named for Gen. B. F. Larned. . 260 

newspapers of 260, 26 1 

statistics of 260 

Larned Chronoscope, history of 260 

La Shelle, Frank E., editor and pub- 
lisher 31!2 

Latham, newspapers of 152, 153 

statistics of 152 

Latimer, E., editor and publisher. . 147, 226 
Latimer, J. E., editor and publisher. . . 226 

Latimer, formerly called Far West 246 

newspapers of 102, 246 

statistics of 246 

Latin Notes, Lawrence. . . 183 

Latte, Louis, editor and publisher 2'22 



GENERAL INDEX. 



349 



Laude, Martin L., editor and publisher, 272 
Laughlin, Bert, editor and publisher... 211 

Lavoratore Italiano, Pittsburg 171 

Law, Johnson &, editors and publishers, 150 

Law and Gospel, Hutchinson 270 

Law and Order, Chanute 252 

Lawless, George, death of 87 

editor and publisher 159 

Lawless, Joe T., editor and publisher. . . 18>3 
Lawless, Minnie A., biographical sketch, 87 

editor and manager 159 

portrait of 89 

Lawless, Ruth 90 

Lawrence, named for Amos A. Lawrence, 179 
newspapers of, 25, 53, 64, 179-183, 222 

Quantrill's raid on 38 

statistics of 179 

Lawrence Jeffersonian-Gazette, history of, 181 
Lawrence Journal- World, history of. ... 180 
Lawrence Republican, destroyed by fire, 180 

Lawson Leader 197 

Lawson Printing Company, editors and 

publishers 267 

Lawton, J. P., editor and publisher. . . . 316 
Laycock, J. K., editor and publisher. . . . 311 

Lea, Asa T., editor and publisher 156 

Lea, Asa T. & Son 156 

Leader, Kackley 271 

Leader, Langdon 268 

Leader, Topeka 294 

Leader, Wichita 286 

Leader Publishing Company 312 

Leader-Courier, Kingman 215 

Leader-Democrat, Richfield 248 

League of Kansas Municipalities 180 

League to Enforce Peace 44 

Leahy, David D., biographical sketch. .. 122 

portrait of 123 

Leamon, Arthur O., editor and publisher, 144 

Learnard, Oscar E 17 

Learned, Green &, publishers 277 

Learned, Fred M., editor and publisher, 277 
Leary, George P., editor and publisher. . 301 

Lea's Columbus Advocate 156 

Leasure, Chester, editor and publisher. . 305 
Leavenworth, John A. Martin, provost 

marshal of 35 

elm tree on levee mentioned 17 

named for Gen. Henry Leavenworth, 221 
newspapers of ....... 17, 21, 31, 59 

221, 222, 223, 224 

statistics of 221 

Leavenworth county, named for 221 

newspapers of 17, 21, 31, 59 

116, 221-224 

statistics of . . . . . 221 

Leavenworth Times 21, 31, 79 

116, 221-224 

history of 222 

Leavitt, Harvey, editor and publisher. . 267 

Lebanon, named for 301 

newspapers of 301, 302 

statistics of 301 

Lebanon Times, history of 301 

Lebe, named for 165 

newspapers of 165, 166 

statistics of 165 

Lecompton, named for Samuel D. Le- 

compte 181 

newspapers of, 45, 181, 182, 183, 210 
Ledbetter & Webster, editors and pub- 
lishers 231 

Lee, Mr. , editor and publisher . . 217 
Lee, Rahoh R., editor and publisher ... 176 

Leedy, Earl, editor and publisher. 285 

Leek, George W., publisher 222 

Leftwich, Fay &, editors and publishers, 139 

Leftwich, A. B., editor 260 

Leftwich, Lee A., editor and publisher, 172 
Leftwich, T. E. ( editor 260 



Legler, E. A., editor and publisher ... I'l:: 

Le Loup, newspapers of 19- 

Lenexa, newspapers of 213, _' 1 1 

Lenora, named for - "> 1 

newspapers of ' - "> * 

statistics of 254 

Leon, first called Noble 152 

named for !.">_' 

newspapers of 152, 153 

statistics of 152 

Leona, newspapers of 178 

Leonard, Harry T., editor and publisher, 202 
Leonard, J. N., editor and publisher . . 1 ", i 
Leonard, J. R., editor and publisher . . 237 
Leonard, see Leonardville. 
Leonard, Sherman county, New Te- 

cumseh 300- 

Leonardville, formerly Leonard, named 

for 275 

newspapers of 275, '_'7<i 

statistics of 275 

Leonardville Monitor, history of 275- 

Leoti, newspapers of 314 

statistics of 313 

Leoti Standard, history of 314 

LeRoy, named for 165 

newspapers of 114, 165, 166 

statistics of 165 

Lester & Armour, editors and publishers, 201 

L'Etoile du Kansas, Neuchatel 250 

Lewis, Charles S., editor and publisher, 275 
Lewis, Mrs. Cora G., associate editor . . 183 

biographical sketch of 57 

portrait of 58" 

Lewis, I. S., editor and publisher 302 

Lewis, James Milton, editor and pub- 
lisher 57, 183 

Lewis, Kelton E 57 

Lewis, Loraine 57 

Lewis, M. M., editor . . -. 183 

Lewis, MacArthur 57 

Lewis, P. B., editor and publisher .... 275 
Lewis, R. E., editor and publisher .... 309 

Lewis, newspapers of 183, 184 

statistics of 183 

Lexington, newspapers of 160 

Libbey, Nannie, editor and publisher . . 315 

Liberal, newspapers of 288 

statistics of 288" 

Liberal, Valley Falls 210 

Liberal Advocate, Topeka 296, 297 

Liberal Democrat, history of 288 

Liberalist, Liberal 288" 

Liberator, Norton 254 

Liberty newspapers of 243, 245 

Life Line, Arkansas City 170 

Light. Kansas City 319 

Topeka 294 

Light of Liberty, Smith Center 301 

Lightfoot, , editor and publisher . . 270 

Lill, Harry A., editor and publisher . . . 267 
Lill. John W., editor and publisher ... 302 

Lillie, J. C., local editor 16T 

Limeburner, J. P., publisher 291 

Lincoln, Abraham, President.. 11, 224, 267 

Lincoln, formerly Lincoln Center 224 

historv of current newspapers pub- 
lished at 224 

named for 224 

newspapers of 224, 225 

statistics of 224 

Lincoln county, named for 224 

newspapers of 224, 225 

statistics of 224 

Lincolnville, Marion county, newspapers 

of *....... 233, 235 

Lindsborg, named for 232 

newspapers of 102, 232, 233 

statistics of 2 

Lindsley, Anna, editor 303 



350 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Linn, newspapers of 312. 313 

statistics of 312 

Linn county, named for 225 

newspapers of 225^227 

statistics of 225 

Linsley, W. S. & Co., editors and pub- 
lishers 161 

Linton, L. M., publisher 301 

Lin wood, newspapers of 223, 224 

Lippincott, Connor &, editors and pub- 
lishers . . 146 

Lister, J. A., editor and publishers.... 264 

Literary Review, Manhattan 276 

Littell, J. A., editor and publisher 254 

Littell, J. H., editor and publisher 254 

Little, Harriett Z. Adams (Mrs. Wm. E.), 80 
Little, Olcott W., biographical sketch. . . 80 

editor and publisher 309 

portrait of 80 

Little, William E 80 

Little Blue, Washington 313 

Little Casino, Burlington 166 

Little Messenger, Topeka . . 296 

Little River, name derived from 273 

newspapers of 187, 273, 274 

statistics of 273 

Little Sand Pounder, Abilene 177 

Little Presbyterian, Vermilion 238 

Litts, L. H. & Co., editors and publish- 
ers . 175 

Live Men of Burlingame 257 

Live Stock Belt, Madison 200 

Live Stock Inspector, Wichita 286 

Live Stock Journal, Wichita 286 

Lively Times, Hill City 196 

Phillipsburg 262 

Living Age, Independence 242, 294 

Topeka 296 

Lloyd, W. J., editor- and publisher 195 

Lpbdell, F. H., editor and publisher. . . . 220 

Local, Antioch 214 

Local Lantern, Marysville 237 

Local News, Clifton 312 

Ottawa ; 192 

Lockhart & Waterman, publishers 147 

Lockwood, M. L., editor and publisher, 300 

301 

Lockwood's Herald, Lebanon 301 

Loco Motive 189 

Locomotive, Marysville 236 

Loe, W. A., editor and publisher 267 

Log Book Stock Company, Kansas City 

University, publishers 318 

Logan, Shepard &, editors and publish- 
ers 309 

Logan, Gen. John A 227, 261 

Logan, W. T., editor and publisher. . . . 312 

Logan, named for 261 

newspapers of 261, 262, 270 

statistics of 261 

Logan county, formerly St. John county, 227 

named for 227, 228 

statistics of 227 

Logansport Light 228 

Lone Elm Ledger 140 

Lone Lake, name changed to Ensign. . . 197 

Long, Arthur, editor and publisher 243 

Long, Chester I 92 

Long, Thomas T.. editor and publisher, 300 

Long Island, newspapers of 261, 262 

statistics of 261 

Longanecker, J. -Frank, editor and pub- 
lisher 300 

Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth 149 

Longford, formerly Chapman 161 

statistics of 161 

Longford Leader 161 

Longsland, Percy, editor and publisher, 284 

Longton, named for . 185 

newspapers of 185 

statistics of .185 



Loofbourrow, P. S., editor and pub- 
lisher 275 

Lookout, Garden City 188 

Loomis, P. H., editor and publisher. . . . 254 

303 

Loring, Rev. H. H., editor and pub- 
lisher 290 

Lost Springs, named for 234 

newspapers of 102, 234, 235 

'Statistics of 234 

Lotta, name changed to Penalosa .216 

Louisburg, first called St. Louis 239 

newspapers of 239, 240 

statistics of 239 

Louisville, newspapers of . . . 102, 263, 264 
Lovewell, Paul A., editor' and vice presi- 
dent 291 

Lovewell, statistics of :M 1 

Lovewell, Index 211" 

Low, M. A 59 

Low, Vera (Mrs. Albert T. Reid) .... :>!> 

Lowe, E. C., editor and publisher .... 225 

Lowe, T. A. H., editor and publisher . . 225 

Lower Light, Marion 235 

Lowman, Hovey E., editor and publisher, 180 

Loyal, Garfield count v, newspapers of, 189 

193 

Lucas, Charles M., editor and publisher, 171 

Lucas, J. E., editor and publisher .... 220 

Lucas, J. H., editor and publisher .... 175 

Lucas, -formerly Blue Stem 280 

named for 280 

newspapers of 280 

statistics of 280 

Lucifer, the Light Bearer, Valley FaKs 

and Topeka 210, 294 

Ludell, newspapers of 267 

Lunger, Mrs. E. E. 207 

Lunger, Mary Henrietta 207 

Lura, name changed to Luray 280 

newspapers of 280 

statistics of 280 

Lusk, H. H., editor and publisher .... 219 

Lutheran, Eureka 200 

Lykins, David, missionary to the Miami 

Indians 239 

Lykins county, name changed to Miami 

county 239 

Lynch, James M . 130 

Lyndon, named for 255 

newspapers of 255-257 

statistics of 255 

Lyne, H. E., editor and publisher .... 161 

Lyne, Hattie, editor 259 

Lyon, Henry A., editor and publisher. . 268 
Lyon county, created as Breckenridge 

county 2*28 

named for Gen. Nathaniel Lyon . . 228 

newspapers of 228-231 

statistics of 228 

Lyons, Freeman J 272 

Lyons, Ruth, editor and publisher 273 

Lyons, S. R., editor and publisher .... 273 

Lyons, newspapers of 272, 273 

statistics of 272 

Lyons Republican, history of 272 

M. 

McAfee Sons, editors and publishers . . 176 

McAfee, C. L., editor and publisher .... 224 
McAllister. Kessler &. editors and pub 

lishers 191 

McAllister Record 227 

McAuliffe, M., editor and publisher .... 281 
McBratney. Robert, and Frank G. Adams, 
editors and publishers Squatters 

Sovereign, Atchison 141 

McBreen, T. C., editor and publisher . . 277 

McBride, J. W., editor and publisher . . 240 

301 



GENERAL INDEX. 



351 



McCall, C. O., -editor and publisher ... 241 
McCallum, .F. J., editor and publisher . . 226 
McClintick, George W., editor and pub- 
lisher 231 

McClintock, O. N., secretary 292 

McClure, Ernest, editor and publisher. . 226 

Met 'lure, S. S 1L"J 

McColloch, R. P., editor and publisher, 202 
McConnell, E. B., editor and publisher, 304 
McConnell, W. C., editor and publisher, 243 
McCoy, James W.. editor and publisher, 163 
McCracken, named for J. K. McCracken, 278 

newspapers of 278, 279 

statistics of 278 

McCracken Enterprise, history of 278 

McCray, D. O., editor and publisher... 231 

McCune, named for Isaac McCune 171 

newspapers of 171-173 

--statistics .of 171 

McCurdy, W. H.. editor and publisher. . -191 
McCutchan, R. B., editor and publisher, 185 
McDonald Bros., editors and publishers, 275 
McDonald, C. B., editor and publisher, 305 

306 
McDonald, James W., editor and pub- 

lisher 275 

McDonald, Maurice, editor and publisher, 238 

244 
McDonald, John, biographical sketch... 66 

editor and publisher 292 

portrait of 69 

McDonald, Ralph W., editor and pub- 
lisher 150 

MacDonald, S. D., editor and publisher, 218 

O QQ 

McDonald, newspapers of 266, 267 

McDowell, F. L., editor and publisher. . 260 
McDowell, Helen, editor and publisher, 149 
McDowell, J. F., editor and publisher. . 156 
McDowell, S. O., editor and publisher. . 156 

Macedonian Call, Topeka 298 

McElhinney, Lisle, editor and publisher, 195 
McElroy, W. T., founder Humboldt 

Union 17, 133 

McFarland, R. J., editor and publisher, 253 
McGarrah, M. C., editor and publisher, 275 

McGee, Mabillon W 156 

McGill, F. B., editor and publisher 218 

McGill, T. H., editor and publisher. . . . 196 
McGown, W. H., editor and publisher. . 213 

McGuin, Shelen &, publishers 151 

Mclntire, Clarice O., editor and pub- 
lisher 305 

Mclntyre & Stanley, editors and pub- 
lishers 166 

Mack, George 302 

McKechnie, Pete H., editor and pub- 
lisher 146 

McKee, Joseph C., editor and publisher, 202 
McKeehen, I. D., editor and publisher, 155 
McKeever. Edwin D., editor-in-chief... 292 
McKenna, John, editor and publisher. . . 215 
MacKenzie, E. L., editor and publisher, 284 

McKenzie, L., editor and publisher 246 

McKinley, President William. . 38, 120, 128 
McKinnon, A., editor and publisher. . . . 157 

Macksville, named for 302 

newspapers of 302, 303 

-statistics of 302 

Macksville Enterprise, history of 302 

McLallin, Stephen, editor and publisher, 291 
McLennan, Anna Goddard (Mrs. Frank 

P.) 132 

McLennan. Frank P., 17, 55 

biographical sketch 128 

editor and publisher 292 

portrait of 129 

McLennan, Mary 132 

McLouth, named for Amos McLouth... 209 
newspapers of 209, 210 



McLouth, statistics of 

McNabb, J. R., editor and publish,-!-. . . l i 

1 !)"' 

McNaughton, Mrs. M. G., editor -J.-JA 

McXuy, A. S., editor and publisher.... 157 
McNay, H. C., editor and publish, i -. . . i." 
McNay, J. M., editor and publisher. . . . !.'; 
McNeal, J. W., editor and publisher... 144 

McNeal, T. A 17. 7'.. 

biographical sketch of 7,1 

editor and publisher i_'9o 

portrait of r,r, 

Macoubrie, A. E., editor and publish,-!-. :;H, 
Macoubrie, N. S., editor and publishc: 
McPherson, named for Gen. James B. 

McPherson 231 

newspapers of 23] 

statistics of 231 

McPherson Democrat-Opinion, history of, 231 
McPherson Republican, history of ...... 231 

McPherson county, named for 231 

newspapers of L'3 1233 

statistics of 231 

McReynolds, John, editor and publisher. '2-'.'.< 
McSkimming, Rev. D. D., editor and 

publisher 2 .">."> 

McVey, W. E., editor 290 

Madden, John C., editor and publisher. . _;_:.". 

Maddon & Platz, publishers 243 

Madison, named for . . N 199 

newspapers of 200,- '201 

statistics of 

Maffet, George W., editor and publisher. 202 

Magaw, W. G., editor in chief 292 

Magill & Wolfe, proprietors 306 

Magnet, Washington 311 

Mahaska, statistics of 312 

Mahaska Leader 312 

Maher, Rev. John W., editor 284 

Mah-hos-kah, Kiowa chief, town of Ma- 
haska probably named for 312 

Mahr, J. M., editor and publisher 171 

Mahuran, John W., editor and publisher, 273 
Ma-hush-kah, White Cloud. Iowa Indian 

chief 178 

Mail, Daily, Wellington 305 

Mail and Breeze, Topeka 45, 290 

Mains, M. G., editor and publisher 168 

Maize, newspapers of 285, 287 

statistics of 285 

Mallows, Anna, biographical sketch.... 6.") 

editor and publisher 178 

portrait of 65 

Mallows, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 64 

Maloy, John, editor and publisher 246 

Manchester, formerly called Keystone. . . 176 

newspapers of 176. 177 

statistics of 176 

Manhattan, consolidation of three town- 
sites 274 

newspapers of, 45, 90. 258, 274276 

statistics of _' 7 t 

Manhattan Nationalist, history of 275 

Manhattan Republic, history of 275 

Mankato, named for 211 

newspapers of -11, 212 

originally called Jewell Center 211 

statistics of 211 

Manley, Charles H., editor and publisher, 194 

Manley, name changed to Murray 237 

Mann, C. E., editor and publisher 257 

Manning, E. C., editor and publisher. . . 275 

Mantey, J. A., editor and publisher 225 

Manual Normal Light, Pittsburg 172 

Manuelite, Pittsburg 171 

MapJe Grove Visitor, New Albany ...... 315 

Maple Hill News 310 

Mapleton, newspapers of 147. 148 

Marble, Fred C., editor and publisher. . . 263 
Marble, Gteorge W., biographical sketch. 74 



352 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Marble, George W., editor and manager, 147 

portrait of 75 

Marion, named for Gen. Francis Marion, 233 

newspapers of . 233-235 

statistics of 233 

Marion Centre, name shortened to Ma- 
rion 233 

Marion county, named for. . . 233 

newspapers of 233-235 

statistics of 233 

Marion Record, history of 233 

Market Review, Topeka 294 

Mai-kham, William Coif ax, biographical 

sketch 82 

editor and publisher. . . 98, 181 

portrait of 81 

Markley's Mills, name changed to Min- 
neapolis 258 

Marquette, named for 232 

statistics of 232 

newspapers of 232 

Marquis, R. C., editor and publisher... 159 

Marshall, Francis J 235 

Marshall, J. A., editor and publisher, 162, 163 

Marshall, Mrs. Mary 235 

Marshall, S. R 222 

Marshall, S. T., editor and publisher. . . 210 

Marshall county, named for 235 

newspapers of , . 235-238 

statistics of 235 

Marshall's Manhood, Marysville 236 

Marysville, named for 235 

newspapers of 236-238 

statistics of 235 

Marysville Advocate-Democrat, history of, 235 

Martin & Chapman, publishers 74 

Martin, George E., editor and publisher, 185 
Martin, George W., Fort Scott, editor 

and publisher 74 

Martin, George W., editor and publisher, 
and secretary Kansas State His- 
torical Society 5, 7, 17, 35 

110, 194, 318 

portrait of 43 

Martin, J. A., editor and publisher Wal- 
nut Eagle-Republican 172 

Martin, J. C., editor and publisher 154 

Martin, J. E., editor and publisher 175 

Martin, J. S., editor and publisher, 152, 200 

Martin, John A 6, 17, 25, 49, 141, 317 

biographical sketch 33 

portrait of 32 

Martin, Lewis, editor and publisher. . . . 172 

Martin, S. A., editor and publisher 199 

Martin, W. A., editor and publisher. . . . 306 
Martin, William S., editor and publisher, 238 
Martindale, Ed, editor and publisher. . . 179 

180, 317 

Marvin, newspapers of 262 

Mascot, Morning, Hoisington 146 

Mason, Ollie T., editor 171 

Mason, Walt, biographical sketch 114 

portrait 114 

Massachusetts Quarterly, Topeka 298 

Matfield Green, newspapers published at, 154 
Matheny, Atwood, town of Atwood named 

for 266 

Matheny, J. M 266 

Matlock, T. B., editor 233 

Matson, M. B., editor 163 

Matson, Z., & Son, proprietors 163 

Matthews, Ed. L., editor and publisher, 319 
Matthews, Ruth Francis, editor and pub- 
lisher 190 

Maurer, W. R., editor and publisher. .. 168 
Maxey, J. A., editor and publisher, 215 



Maxson, P. B. 



216 

285 
292 



May, George W., editor and publisher. . 268 
May,. James W., editor and publisher. . . 290 



May berry, Victoria (Mrs. M. M. Mur- 

dock) 38 

Mayday News Gleaner 276- 

Mayetta, named for 207 

newspapers of 207, 208 

statistics of 207 

Mayfield Voice 305, 307 

Mayflower, Topeka 296 

Maynard, Charles, 290 

Mavs, Charles W., editor and publisher, 213 

Mayse, Henry C., biographical sketch, 118 

editor and publisher 159 

portrait of 117 

Meacham, Olin W., editor and publisher, 151 

Mead, S. G., editor and publisher. . 199, 231 

Meade, Gen. George Gordon 238 

Meade, formerly called Skidmore 238 

newspapers of 238, 239 

statistics of 238 

Meade Center Press 238 

Meade county, named for 238 

newspapers of 238, 239 

statistics of 238 

Meade Globe, history of 238 

Meadows, Lee, editor and publisher .... 224 
Means, W. G. & Co., editors and pub- 
lishers 246 

Mechler Bros., publishers 238 

Medical Herald, Leavenworth 223 

Medical Index, Fort Scott 148 

Medical Monograph, Topeka 294 

Medicine Lodge, named for 144 

newspapers of 57, 144, 145 

statistics of 144 

Medill, Joseph 6 

Medina, Kansas New Era 210 

Mellen & Higginbotham, editors and 

publishers 254 

Melrose, W. H., editor and publisher . . 310 

Melvern, named for 255 

-newspapers of 192 

statistics of ~. 255 

Memorial Chimes, Topeka 294 

Menlo, newspapers of 308 

Menninger, Edwin A., editor-in-chief. . . 292 

Merchants' Journal, Topeka 291 

Webster 278 

Mercury, Manhattan 275, 276 

Meriden, named for 209 

newspapers of 209, 210, 291 

statistics of 209 

Meridian road, organized at Salina.... 96 

Meridith, Fletcher 17 

Merriam Herald-Chieftain 214 

Merrill, Fisk &, editors and publishers, 277 

Merrill, L. H., publisher 231 

Merritt, A. H., editor and publisher . . 20 

Merritt, L. E., editor and publisher . . 290 

Mertilla, Meade County Times 239 

Messachorean, Atchison 143 

Messenger, Hiawatha 150 

Metcalf, Charles, editor and publisher. . 202 

Methodist, Junction City -173, 194 

M. E. Conference Daily, Salina 282 

Methodist Lever. South Haven 307 

Methodist News, Topeka 298 

Wellington 306 

Methodist Record, Kansas City ....... 320 

Miami county, newspapers of .... 239, 240 

organized as Lykins county 239 

statistics of . .' 239 

Miami Farmer, Paola 240 

Miami Republican, Paola 68, 70, 239 

Miami School Journal, Paola 240 

Miami Talisman, Paola 239, 240 

Michigan Valley Wolverine 256 

Mickel, Ben L., editor and publisher . . . 208 

Mickel, Minnie M.. editor and publisher, 208 

Mid-Continental Review, Junction City, 194 



GENERAL INDEX. 



353 



Midget, Manhattan 276 

Midland, Atchison 142 

Mi<ll;md Christian Advocate, Topeka . . 293 

Midland College Monthly, Atchison .... 142 

Midlothian Son 203 

Mid-Week Reporter, Elk City 244 

Midwest Moose Review, Atchison .... 142 

Mikescll & Chessmore, publishers 266 

Mikesell, E. A., editor 266 

Milan, newspapers of 306-308 

statistics of 306 

Mildred Ledger 139 

Miles, O. A., editor and publisher 285 

Milford, J. B., editor and publisher, 190, 220 

Milford, Jack, editor and publisher .... 260 

Milford Times 194 

Millbrook, newspapers of 196 

Miller & Holmer, publishers 246 

Miller, A. L. . . 45 

Miller, A. Q., biographical sketch .... 96 

editor and publisher 84, 270 

portrait of 97 

Miller, Mrs. A. Q 96 

Miller, B. B., editor and publisher .... 268 

Miller, C. C., editor and publisher .... 246 

Miller, Charles, editor and publisher. . . 186 

Miller, Clarence W., editor 265 

Miller, Dwight L., editor and publisher, 168 

Miller, J. B., editor and publisher.... 190 

Miller, J. W., editor and publisher.... 160 

161 

Miller, Jacob, editor and publisher. . . . 163 

Miller, John J., editor and publisher. . . 206 

Miller, Josiah, biographical sketch 27 

editor and publisher 5, 27 

portrait of 26 

Miller, Robert H 27 

Miller, Sol, editor and publisher. . 17, 35 

74, 178 

Miller, Mrs. Sol 74 

Miller. W. H., editor and publisher. . . . 308 

Miller, Willis E., editor and publisher, 263 

Milligan, Robert J., editor and publisher, 243 

Millington, D. A., editor and publisher, 17 

167 

Millraan, Ray, editor and publisher. . . . 288 
Mills and Smiths' Real Estate Adver- 
tiser, Topeka 294 

Mills' Weekly World, Altamont and Par- 
sons 219 

Mills' Weekly World, Cherry vale. . 219, 244 

Mills, A. B., editor and publisher 209 

Mills, Harry, editor and publisher 148 

Millsap, John W., editor and publisher, 152 
Millsap, Mrs. John W., editor and pub- 
lisher 152 

Millspaugh, Right Rev. Frank R., editor- 
in-chief 290 

Milnes, J. W., editor and publisher .... 155 

Miltonvale, first called Zahnsville 163 

named for 163 

newspapers of 163, 164 

statistics of 163 

Milwaukee, newspapers of 303 

Minis, D. A., editor and publisher 188 

Mineral, formerly known as Cherry. . . . 157 

and West Mineral, statistics of. ... 157 

newspapers of 157, 158 

Miner's Echo, Pittsburg 172 

Miners' Journal, Scammonville and Rose- 
dale 158 

Miniature, Emporia 230 

Minneapolis, formerly Markley's Mills . .258 

named for 258 

newspapers of 258260 

statistics of 258 

Minneapolis Messenger, history of 259 

Minneola (Clark county), named for. . . 159 

newspapers of 160 

statistics of 159 

23 



Minneola (Franklin county) Journal... 192 

Mirror, Wichita 284, 286 

Mirror and News Letter, Olathe .' 21? 

Mission Banner, Ottawa 193: 

Missionary Messenger, Wichita ....'.'.'. 284 
Missionary Press Co., Wichita, publish- 
ers 

Missouri Ruralist, Topeka " i , 

Missouri State Editorial Association 

Henry King elected president of . . 29 

Missouri Valley Farmer, Atchison 143 

Topeka 44 291 

Missouri Valley Veterinary Bulletin 

Topeka 2 94 

Mitchell, Palmer &, editors and publish- 
ers 252 

Mitchell, J. J., editor and publisher! '. '. '. 310 

Mitchell, Gen. Robert B 23 

Mitchell, W. A., editor and publisher.. 156 

Mitchell (Stanton county) Courier 304 

Mitchell county, named for Wm. D. 

Mitchell I 240 

newspapers of '.',', 240-242 

statistics of 240- 

Mocking Bird, Oxford .' 306 

Modern Knight, Kansas City 319 

Modern Light, Columbus 155 

Modern Mercury, Topeka '.'.'. 294 

Modern Mexico, Topeka 294 

Mohler, Jacob C ! 59 

Moline, named for 135. 

newspapers of 135 

statistics of 135 

Moline Advance, history of 185 

Monatsblatter aus Bethel College, New- 
ton 204 

Monfort, Thomas P., editor and pub- 
lisher 171 

Monger, L. K., editor and publisher. . '. '. 260 

Monitor, Clay Center 275 

Perry 210 

Monitor-Republican, Richfield 248 

Montezuma, named for 198 

newspapers of 189, 198 

statistics of 198 

Montgomery, Gilbert & Moore, publish- 
ers 194 

Montgomery, Frank C., associate editor, 57 

Montgomery, H. E., editor 194 

Montgomery, John, editor and publisher, 187 
Montgomery, John & Son, publishers . . . 194 
Montgomery, Mrs. R. P., editor and 

manager 259- 

Montgomery county, named for Gen. 

Richard Montgomery 242 

newspapers of 242245- 

statistics of 242 

Monthly Balance, Topeka 29T 

Monthly Clipper, Armourdale 320- 

Monthly Messenger, Topeka 297 

Monument, newspapers of 227 

Moody, Charles, editor and publisher . . 168^ 
Moon, Isaac, editor and publisher .... 275- 
Moore, Montgomery, Gilbert &, pub- 
lishers 194 

Moore Bros., editors and publishers . . 171 
Moore, A. A., proprietor Moore's ranch, 

Santa Fe trail 234; 

Moore, A.W., publisher 204 

Moore, Alonzo W., editor and publisher, 20T 
Moore, C. E., editor and publisher .... 243' 

Moore, C. J., editor and publisher 22ft; 

Moore, C. W., editor and publisher .... 171 

Moore, E. G., editor and publisher 291 

Moore, F. G., editor and publisher 243" 

Moore, George W., editor and publisher, 152" 
Moore, Lawrence, editor and publisher. . 147 
Moore, S. P., editor and publisher .... 243 
Moore's Ranch, name changed to Dur- 
ham Park Ranch 234- 



354 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Moran, named for Daniel C. Moran .... 138 

newspapers of 138, 139 

statistics of 138 

Mmvhead Searchlight 243, 252 

Morgan & Dunn, editors and publishers, 315 
Morgan, Ebenezer, founder of Morgan- 

ville 161 

Morgan, F. H., manager 159 

Morgan, J. Kansas, editor and publisher, 315 

Morgan, Mrs. Minnie (Yoast) 51 

JVIorgan, W. H., editor and publisher . . 234 

Morgan, W. H., editor and publisher . . 255 

Morgan, William A 51, 153 

Morgan, William Y., biographical sketch 

of 51 

books published by 53 

editor and publisher 154, 268 

elected state printer 53 

portrait of 52 

Morganville, named for 161 

newspapers of 161, 162 

statistics of 161 

Moriarity & Dunn, editors and pub- 
lishers 246 

Morland, newspapers of 196 

Morley, G. Vernon, editor and publisher, 163 

Morley, Mabel Best, editor and publisher, 163 

Mormon colony, Stafford county 302 

Morning and Day of Reform, Washing- 
ton 3 

Morning News, Havens (Havensville) . . 265 
Morning Star and Daily Patriot, Atchi- 

cnn . 143 



Morphy, J. W., editor 266 

Morrill, Gov. Edmund N 120, 150 

Morrill, Levi, editor and publisher .... 301 

Morrill, named for 150 

newspapers of 150, 151 

statistics of 150 

Morris & Van Kirk, editors and pub- 
lishers 283 

Morris, Thomas, U. S. senator, Ohio. . . 246 

Morris county, named for . . . 246 

246 
290 
186 
200 
147 

248 



246 



newspapers of 
statistics of . 

Morrow, Rev. O. S., editor and publisher 
Morse, Charles, editor and publisher . . 
Morse, J. H., editor and publisher . . . 

Morton, Frank, publisher 

Morton county, named for Levi P. Mor 

ton 

newspapers ot ^* 

statistics of 248 

Moscow Review 304 

Moser, R. M., editor and publisher .... 212 

Moss and Kelle^, publishers 261 

Motz, Frank, editor and manager 219 

Moulton (Iowa) Independent 74 

Mound City, named for 225 

newspapers of 225, 22fi 

statistics of 225 

Mound Valley, named for 219 

newspapers of 219, 220 

statistics of 2 

Moundridge, formerly Christian 232 

named for 232 

newspapers of 232, 233 

statistics of 232 

Mugford & Hughes, editors and pub- 
lishers 303 

Mulberry, formerly Mulberry Grove ... 171 

newspapers of 171173 

statistics of 171 

Mulks, Mary Jane (Mrs. Ephriam W. 

Coburn) 108 

Mullav, E. F., editor and publisher .... 279 

Mullinville, newspapers of 217 

statistics of 217 

Mulroy, Miles H., editor and publisher, 186 



Mulvane, named for John R. Mulvane. . 306 

newspapers of 305, 306, 307 

statistics of 306 

Mulvane News, history of 306 

Munden, named for John Munden 271 

newspapers of 96, 270-272 

statistics of 271 

Hunger, D. O., editor and publisher. . . . 312 
Munsell, F. E., editor and publisher. . . . 246 
Munsell, O. S., editor and publisher. . . . 246 

Murdock, Marcellus M 38 

publisher 284 

Murdock, Mrs. Marie Antoinette, editor 

and publisher 151 

Murdock, Marshall M. . . 6, 17, 31, 35, 122 

biographical sketch 37 

editor and publisher 255, 284 

portrait of 36 

Murdock, Thomas 37, 38 

Murdock, Thomas B 17 

editor and publisher 151 

Murdock, Victor 38, 102, 122, 130 

editor 284 

Murphy, John E., editor and publisher. . 233 
Murphy, W. N.. editor and publisher. .. 189 
Murray, George W., editor and publisher. 159 
Murray, name changed to Sumrnerfield. . 237 

Muscotah, meaning of name 142 

newspapers of 142, 143 

statistics of 142 

Music and Home Journal, Topeka 295 

Musical Mishap, St. John 303 

Mustard Seed, Ottawa 193 

Muth, Ollie L., associate editor. . . . 271, 312 
Muth. W. E., editor and publisher, 271, 312 
Myers, G. W., & Son, editors and pub- 
lishers 141, 142 

Myers, J. H., editor and publisher 273 

N. 

Nachrichten aus der Heidenwelt, Hal- 
stead 205 

Napier, J. L., editor 204 

Narka, newspapers published at. . . 271, 272 

statistics of 271 

Naron. J. W., publisher 265 

Nashville, newspapers published at 216 

statistics of 216 

Nation, Wichita 286 

National Amateur, Topeka 294 

National Association of Postmasters, 

Wm. C. Harkham, secretary of. ... 82 

National Baptist World, Wichita 286 

National Detective Review, Wichita.... 287 

National Echo, Burlingame 256 

National Editors' Association 106 

National Educational Association 68 

National Era, Emporia 230 

National Federation of Implement and 

Vehicle Dealers' Association 175 

National Geographic Society 94 

National Headlight, Frankfort 237 

National Historical Association 94 

National Irrigation Congress 94 

National Leader, Wichita 286 

National Military Home [Leavenworth] 

Reveille 223 

National Monitor, Wichita 286 

National Old Age Pensioner 139 

National Passenger, Topeka 298 

National Press Club 92 

National Progressive, Kansas City 319 

National Referendum, Topeka 298 

National Reflector, Wichita 286 

National Review, Kansas City 319 

National Socialist, Girard. 173 

National Soldiers' Home, John A. Mar- 
tin member board of managers of. . 35 

National Watchman, Topeka 299 

National Welfare League 44 



GENERAL INDEX. 



355 



National Workman, Topeka 

Nationalist, Manhattan 275, 

history of 

Natoma, newspapers published at 

statistics of 

Nau.u'le, Lyman, editor and publisher. . . 

Navarre, Peter, editor and publisher. . . . 

Navarre Leader 

Nebraska Farm Journal, Topeka. .. 44, 

Neisberger, G. W., editor and publisher, 

Nelson, W. H., editor and publisher. . . . 

.Vein aha county, named for 

newspapers of 249, 

statistics of 

Neodesha, incorporated as city of third 

class 

newspapers published at 31, 

newspapers published at, history of, 
statistics of 

Neosho county, named for 

newspapers of 251, 

statistics of 

Nrosho Falls, newspapers published at . . 

316, 
statistics of 

Neosho Falls Post, history of 

Neosho Presbyter 

Neosho Rapids, newspapers published at, 

Neosho Valley Blade, Le Roy 

Neosho Valley Democrat, Osage Mission, 

Neosho Valley Eagle, Jacksonville 

Neosho Valley Enterprise, Osage Mission, 

Neosho Valley Press, Neosho Rapids .... 
Neosho Valley Reformer. Neosho Falls. . 
Neosho Valley Register, lola, 137, 138, 
Neosho Valley Times, Council Grove. . . . 

Hartford 

Neosho Vivifier, Neosho Rapids 

Nep-tah-wal-lah, name changed to Ox- 
ford 

Nequa, Topeka 

Nescutunga, newspapers published at. . 

Ness City, newspapers published at .... 

statistics of 

Ness county, named for Noah V. Ness, 

newspapers of 

statistics of 

Netawaka, named for 

newspapers published at, 207, 208, 

statistics of 

Nettleton, E. G. & Co., editors and pub- 
lishers 

Neuchatel, L'Etoile du Kansas 

Neue Kansas Staats Zeitung, Kansas 

City 

Neue Pfade im Ferneii Westen, Topeka, 

Neue Vaterland, Newton 

Neville, D. R., editor and publisher. . . . 

New Abolition, Topeka 

New Age, Topeka 

New Albany, statistics of 

Newbold, B. E., editor and publisher. . 
Newby, Eldon C., editor and publisher, 

New Cambria Times 

New Century, Fort Scott 

New Chicago, now Chaiiute 

New Chicago Transcript 

New Era, Formosa 

Haddam 

Hill City 

Jamestown 

Norton 

Topeka 

Valley Falls 

Waldo . 



294 
276 
275 
258 
258 
305 
293 
177 
291 
165 
301 
249 
250 
249 

33 
315 
315 
315 
251 
252 
251 

84 
317 
316 
316 

49 
229 
230 
165 
252 
252 
251 
252 
230 
317 
165 
247 
229 
230 

306 
295 
166 
167 
253 
253 
253 
253 
253 
208 
236 
208 

267 
250 

318 
295 
205 
157 
243 
299 
297 
315 
326 
263 
275 
28^ 
148 
251 
252 
211 
313 
196 
163 
254 
295 
210 
280 



\-w Enterprise, Douglass 153 

New Home, Sterling .-7 j 

Newhouse, F. N., publisher 291 

New Idea, Salina 

New Kansas Magazine, Atchison 143 

New Leaf, founded by M. C. and Ina L. 

Clingman i jj 

Lane 192 

Newman, George W., publisher n;t; 

.\r\\- Man, Beloit _ j i 

\c\\- Model Searchlight, Topeka 29.") 

New Murdock, Herald i r, 

New Republic, Bunker Hill .' .' 378 

North Topeka 298 

Wichita 

New Republic Magazine, Topeka 298 

New Rural, Hutchinson 27<> 

News, Caldwell 305 

Doniphan 179 

Hutchinson 268 

Yates Center :; 1 1; 

Evening, Great Bend 145, 146 

Topeka 290 

Morning, Havens [Havensville] . . . 265 

Xews-Beacon, Wichita 283 

Xi>\\ s-Courant, Strong City, history of. 1 ."> 1 

News-Tribune, Yates Center . . . 316 

New Santa Fe Trail, first interstate good- 
roads movement in the west 94 

Newspaper Union and Record, Wichita, 286 
Newspapers, history of, by counties, 137-320 

number in Kansas in 1858 10 

number in Kansas at close of civil 

war 11 

number of towns in Kansas sup- 
porting 18 

New Tecumseh, Gandy Leonard and 

Itasca 300 

New Times. South Hutchinson 270 

Newton, F. R., editor and publisher. . . . 278 

Newton, named for '_'<:: 

newspapers published at 25, 9'! 

204, 205 

statistics of 203 

Newton Kansan-Republican, history of. . 204 

New Ulysses, named for 197 

statistics of 197 

New Ulysses, Grant County Republican, 197 

New West, Atchison 143 

Cimarron 189, 190, 198 

Great Bend 146 

New Woman, Topeka 295 

New York Globe I 1 ! 1 - 1 

New York Herald 53, 59 

New York Ledger 319 

New York Sun 1-- 

New York Tribune 6, 44 

Tribune, Greeley county, named for. 198 
Nicholette, Capt. G. A., editor and pub- 
lisher 218 

Nichols, H. V., editor and publisher. ... 2 

Nickels, Effingham H 14 1 -' 

Nickerson, Thomas, town of Nickerson 

named for 268 

Nickerson, newspapers published at.... 258 

268. 269 

statistics of - tis 

Xickerson Argosy, history of 268 

Nicodemus, newspapers published at... 196 
Niehaus, R. W., editor and publisher. . . 168 
Niles, newspapers published at... 259, 260 
Ninnescah, name changed to Cunning- 
ham - 1 > 

Ninnescah Herald '-' ' ' ; 

Xoble, name changed to Leon !"> - 

Xonchalanta Herald -'>- 

Noon Tribune, Wichita 2 

Norcatur, origin of name 174 

newspapers piiblished at 174, 302 

statistics of 174 



356 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Norden, Topeka 295 

Normal Advocate, Holton 208 

Normal Alumnus, Emporia 230 

Normal Class, Hutchinson 270 

Normal Educator, Salina 282 

Normal Herald, Marysville 238 

Pawnee Rock 147 

Normal Instituter, Norton 254 

Normal Journal, Fort Scott 148 

Normal Migma, Burlingame 257 

Normal Quarterly, Emporia 230 

Normal Record, Normal 173 

Normal Register, Salina 282 

Normal Weekly, Great Bend 146 

Norris, C. M., . editor and publisher ... 213 
Norris, Hamer, editor and publisher . . 188 
Norris, S. G., editor and publisher .... 188 

North Kansan, Hiawatha 151 

North Lawrence Courier 180 

North Lawrence Leader 181 

North Shawnee Chief, Topeka 292 

North Star, Beattie 236 

North Topeka, newspapers published at, 57 
290, 295-299 

Northern Lyon County Journal 230 

Northern Lyon County Journal, Allen, 

history of 229 

Northern Star, Admire 228 

Northwest, Kirwin 262 

Northwest and Central Expositor, Downs, 258 
Northwest Expositor and Central Ex- 
positor, Enterprise 177 

Norton, L. jr., Nortonville named for . . 209 

roadmaster, Santa Fe railroad ... 209 

Norton, named for Capt. Orloff Norton, 253 

newspapers published at 254 

statistics of 253 

Norton county, newspapers of .... 253, 254 

statistics of 253 

Norton District Methodist, Norcatur and 

Smith Center 174, 302 

Nortonville, named for 209 

newspapers published at .... 209, 210 

statistics of 209 

Norwich, named for 216 

newspapers published at 216 

statistics of 216 

Now and Here, Beloit 241 

Nutter, Graf ton, editor and publisher . . 271 
Nuzman, Elsie J. (Mrs. Henry J. Allen), 92 

Nuzman, Frederick 92 

Nye, Esther, editor and publisher 204 

Nye, R. E., editor and publisher 204 

Nystrom, Daniel, editor and publisher . . 232 



Oakhill, newspapers of 161, 162 

statistics of 161 

Oakland, newspapers of .... 291, 295, 297 

Oakley, named for 227 

newspapers published at .... 227, 280 

Oberlin, named for 174 

newspapers published at 174 

statistics of 174 

O'Bleness, O. E., editor and publisher . . 146 
O'Brien, G. R., editor and publisher . . 192 

Observer, Hutchinson 268 

Stockton 278 

Wichita 286 

Observer-Enterprise, Pleasanton, history 

of 226 

Observer of Nature, Lawrence 182 

Occasional, Kansas City 320 

Occidental Home Monthlv, Salina 282 

O'Connor & James, editors and pub- 
lishers 231 

O'Connor, James F., editor and pub- 
lisher 221 

Oehrle, Gottleib, editor and publisher.. 179 



Offering, Quenemo 257 

Offerle, named for Lawrence Offerle . . 184 

newspapers published at 184 

statistics of 184 

O'Flanagan, John, editor and publisher. 263 

Ogallah News 309 

Ogden, named for Maj. E. A. Ogden . . 275 

statistics of i!7."> 

Ogden Courier 275 

Oi! and Gas Review, Chanute .... 251, 252 

Oketo, named for 237 

newspapers published at .... 237, 238- 
Oklahoma, opened as result of agitation 

started by David L. Payne 38 

Oklahoma Boomer, Coffeyville 245 

Oklahoma boomers 122 

Oklahoma Farmer 44 

Oklahoma War Chief 169, 286, 307 

Olathe, named for 2ia 

history of newspapers published at. 213 
newspapers published at, 213, 214, 223 

statistics of 213 

Olcott Press 269- 

Old Ladies' Journal, Leavenworth 221 

Olesburgh, see Olsburg. 

Olivet Advertiser 25& 

Olney, I. E., founder of Garnett Plain- 
dealer 139 

Olpe, formerly called Bitlertown 229 

newspapers published at 229. 230- 

statistics of 229 

Olsburg, newspapers published at. . 263. 264 

statistics of 263 

Olsburg Gazette, history of 263 

Olson, W. C., & Son, editors and pub- 
lishers - 309* 

Omaha, Kearny County Coyote 215 

Omio, newspapers published at 212 

Omnicrat, Wa Keeney 309* 

Onaga, name derived from 263 

newspapers published at .... 263, 264 

statistics of 263 

Onaga Herald, history of 26'3. 

Once a Week, Lawrence 181 

Oneida, newspapers published at 250' 

Onion Creek post office, name changed 

to Osage City 255 

Open Church, Salina 282 

Optic, Garden City 288- 

Optic Printing Co., publishers, Lamed, 260 

Optimist, Atchison 142 

Oracle, Effingham 143 

Orator ius, Topeka 29T 

Oread, Lawrence 181 

Oronoque, newspapers published at .... 254 

Orphans' Friend, Leavenworth 22& 

Orwell Times 207 

Osaga, name changed to Fulton 148- 

Osage City, formerly Onion Creek post 

office 255 

newspapers published at, 84, 255-257 

statistics of 255 

Osage City Commercial Club, H. C. 

Sticher, secretary of 84 

Osage City Free Press, history of .... 255 

Osage county, named for 255 

newspapers of 255257 

originally called Weller 255- 

^statistics of 255 

Osage Mission, name changed to St. Paul, 251 
newspapers published at .... 251, 252 

Osawatomie, named for 240' 

newspapers published at 240 

statistics of 240 

Osawatomie Convention :;:; 

Osawkie, newspapers published at 210 

Osborn, Annie (Mrs. D. R. Anthony. 

sr. ) .' . 79 

Osborn, Rev. Henry, editor and pub? 
lisher . 



GENERAL INDEX. 



357 



Osliorn, S. R., editor and publisher .... 165 

Osborne, newspapers published at, 257, 258 

statistics of 257 

Osborne county, named for Vincent B. 

Osborne 257 

history of newspapers of 257 

newspapers of 100, 257, 258 

statistics of 257 

Oskaloosa, named for 209 

newspapers published at .... 209, 210 

statistics of 209 

Osterhold, S. T., editor and publisher. . 207 

Ostrakon, Grenola 185 

Oswego, named for 218 

newspapers published at. . 31, 218-220 

statistics of 218 

Oswego College, students, editors and 

publishers 218 

Oswego Democrat, history of 218 

Otis, statistics of 278 

Otis Reporter 278 

Ottawa, named for 191 

newspapers published at.. 45, 47, 87 

90, 180, 191-193, 295 

statistics of 191 

Ottawa Herald, history of 191 

Ottawa University, 80, 87 

Ottawa county, named for 258 

newspapers of 257260 

statistics of 258 

Our Church Mirror, Howard, 185, 200, 205 

230, 286 

Our Forum, El Dorado 153 

Our Home Visitor, Parsons 220 

Our Little Friend, Olathe 214 

Our Messenger 150, 192, 269 

286, 295 

history of 258 

Our Methodist, Dodge City 191 

Our Mission, Seneca 250 

Our New Home, Frankfort 238 

Our Opinion, McPherson 232 

Our Paper, Sedan 156 

Our Reminder, Manhattan 276 

Our School Journal, Columbus 158 

Galena 158 

Our School Review, Neosho Falls 317 

Our Schools, Lawrence 182, 183 

Our Sunflower, Girard, Cherokee and 

Le Loup 173, 192 

Outlook, Girard 173 

Independence 244 

Our Union 269 

Our Weekly Tribune 256 

Oven, Emporia 230 

Overbrook, newspapers published at. ... 256 

statistics of 255 

Overbrook Citizen, history of 256 

Overland Park News 314 

Ovo, name changed to White Water .... 152 

Owl, Kansas City 320 

Oxford, newspapers published at. . 305-308 

originally called Nep-tah-wal-lah . . . 306 

statistics of 306 

Oxford Register, history of 306 

Ozias. J. W., editor and publisher 231 

P. 

Pack, I. W., editor and publisher 165 

Padgett, J. C., editor and publisher. . . . 312 
Padgett, J. M., editor and publisher. . . . 312 
Padgett, S. M. & Sons, editors and pub- 
lishers 246 

Page City Messenger 227 

Painter & Herr, publishers 144 

Painter, J. S., editor and publisher. . . . 188 

Palco, formerly Cresson 277 

newspapers of 277 

statistics of . 277 



Palermo Leader 

Palmer & Mitchell, editors and publish- 
ers 

Palmer, Ed. A., editor and publisher. . . 
Palmer, J., town of Palmer numed for, 
Palmer, L. A., editor and publisher. . . . 

Palmer, T. J., editor and publisher. .. . 
Palmer, W. C., editor and publisher. . . . 
Palmer, newspapers of 312, 

statistics of 

Paola, formerly Peoria Village 

newspapers of 35, 239, 

Papes, J. L., editor and publisher 

Paradis, J. S. & Bro., editors and pub- 
lishers 

Parish Churchman, Independence 

Parish Iris, Junction City 

Parish Monthly, Powhattan 

Parish Pages, Waterville 

Park, E. B., editor and publisher 

Park, E. W., editor and publisher 

Park, John B., publisher 

Park, H. Clay 

Parker, E. C., editor 

Parker, J. C., associate editor 

Parker, J. W 

Parker, Lester M., editor and publisher, 
Parker, R. M., editor and publisher. . . . 
Parker, named for 

newspapers of 226, 

statistics of 

Parkerville, newspapers of 

Parkman, Harrison, editor and publisher, 

Parrott, F. W., editor 

Parrott, Marcus J 

Parsons, named for Judge Levi Parsons, 

newspapers of 219, 

statistics of 

Parsons Sun, history of 

Partridge, newspapers of 268, 

statistics of 

Pastor's Visit, Greeley 

Patee, C. M., editor and publisher 

Patee, E. L., secretary 

Patrick, A. G., editor and publisher .... 

Patrick's Advertiser, Valley Falls 

Patrick's Independent, Valley Falls. . . . 

Patrick's Paralyzer, Valley Falls 

Pattee, A. C., editor and publisher 

Pattee, Frank E., editor and publisher. . 

Patterson, F. M., editor and publisher. . 
Patterson, Martha L. (Mrs. A. Q. Miller), 
Pattie, Frank E., editor and publisher. . 

Patron and Farmer, Olathe 

Patton, Eddy &, editors and publishers, 

Patton. Morris, editor 

Paul, Major A., editor and publisher . . . 

Paul, Solon, editor and publisher 

Paul. Wilbur, editor and publisher 

Paul Jones' Monthly Magazine, Topeka. 
Paulsen, Henry C., editor and publisher, 
Pawnee county, named for 

newspapers of 260, 

statistics of 

Pawnee Rock, named for 

newspapers of 146, 

statistics of 

Pawnee Valley Democrat, Hodgeman 

county 

Payne, David L 

Payton, W. E., editor and publisher. 

Paxico Courier 

Peabody, named for F. H. Peabody 

newspapers of 

statistics of 

Peace, name changed to Sterling 

Rice County Gazette 

Pearce, J. F., editor and publisher 



234, 



179 

252 
215 

311 
312 

238 
211 
818 

312 
239 
240 
306 

162 

245 
173 
151 
288 

252 
216 
160 

17 
275 
174 
226 
174 
256 
226 
227 
226 
247 
228 
160 

40 
219 
220 
219 
219 
269 
268 
140 
275 
292 
209 
210 
210 
210 
281 
161 
176 
316 

96 
154 
214 
318 
213 
228 
191 
191 
291 
281 
260 
261 
260 
146 
147 
146 

207 
38 
140 
310 
234 
235 
235 
273 
273 
206 



358 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Pearl, F. M., editor and publisher. . 79, 

Pearlette Call 

Peck, Frederick N., publisher 

Peck, George R 14, 

Pedagogen, Lindsborg 

Peffer, William A., editor and publisher, 
31, 243