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Full text of "A history of Kentucky and Kentuckians; the leaders and representative men in commerce, industry and modern activities"

n 



A HISTORY 



OF 



Kentucky and Kentuckians 



The Leaders and Representative Men in Commerce, 
Industry and Modern Activities 



BY 

E. POLK JOHNSON 



VOLUME III 



ILLUSTRATED 



PUBLISHERS: 

THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COxMPANY 
CHICAGO — NEW YORK 

1912 






32588^ 



^ 



History of 

Kentucky and Kentuckians 



Dunning S. Wilson, M. D., Phar. D., 
whose name introduces this review, has gained 
recognition as an able and successful physician 
in Louisville, and by his labors, his high pro- 
fessional attainments and his sterling char- 
acteristics has justified the respect and con- 
fidence in which he is held by the medical 
fraternity and by the public at large. Dr. Wil- 
son is one of the few Americans, so migratory 
is the race, who make a permanent home in 
their native town. He was born in Louisville 
on November 24, 1876, the son of the late 
Rev. Samuel Ramsey Wilson, who was born 
in Cincinnati. Ohio, in 181 8, and died in Lou- 
isville, May 21, 1886. 

The paternal grandfather was the Rev. 
Joshua Lacy Wilson, a pioneer preacher of 
Cincinnati. Rev. Joshua L. Wilson was a 
Marylander. the son of Dr. Henry Wilson, of 
that state, who removed from Prince Henry 
county, Maryland, to Chesterfield county, Vir- 
ginia, in 1764, where he married Agnes Lacy, 
a daughter of W^illiam and Elizabeth (Rice) 
Lacy, both natives of Hanover county, Vir- 
^ ginia. After marriage he removed to Bedford 
■^ county, \'irginia, and resided near Peaks of 
hotter. He served as a surgeon during the 
Revolutionary^ war. His son. the Rev. Joshua 
Lacy Wilson, became one of the early pastors 
of the First Presbyterian church of Cincin- 
nati, at a time when that was the only Pres- 
byterian church in that city, and the population 
of the citv did not exceed one thousand. Pre- 



vious to this he had served as pastor and 
teacher in Bardstown, Kentucky. He was 
deeply interested in church and school work, 
and at a session of the College or Teachers of 
Cintinnati, keld in 1836, he delivered an ad- 
dress on the proposition that "A Thorough 
System of Universal Instruction is not only 
Necessary but Practicable." The Lancaster 
Seminary, Cincinnati's business college, was 
originated and organized by Rev. Joshua Lacy 
Wilson in 181 5. Rev. Samuel Ramsay Wil- 
son, the father of our subject, was born in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, June 4, 1818. He graduated 
from Hanover College. Indiana, in the class 
of '36 and from Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary. New Jersey, in the clas sof '41, receiving 
the degree of D. D. He was ordained and 
installed a pastor in 1842, for four years was 
a colleague of his father, then succeeded him 
as pastor of the First Presbyterian church, 
Cincinnati and so continued for sixteen years. 
In 1862-3 he had charge of Grand Avenue 
Presbyterian church. New York city, in 
1863-4 was stationed at Mulberry, Kentucky, 
came to Louisville in 1864 and was pastor of 
the First Presbyterian church until 1880. At 
the end of this time Rev. S. R. Wilson went 
to Madison, Indiana, where he stayed two 
years, was then for a while at St. Louis, Mis- 
souri, and Scranton, Pennsylvania, finally re- 
turning to Louisville. He espoused the cause 
of slaver}' from 1843 until the north and 
south divided, and was the author of the 
"Declaration of Testimony" which divided the 



Vol, III— 1 



1147 



1148 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

church in Kentucky in 1867. He turned to tlie Chapter since igoo, and grand secretary and 

church Nortli, and belonged to the Cincinnati treasurer since 1903. This organization has 

Conference at the time of his death. Rev. S. grown to be the hirgest in membership of any 

R. Wilson married Anna Maria, the daughter medical fraternity in the United States. Its 

of Captain Robert Steel, who for many years phenominal growth is due to the activity of 

ran steamboats between Louisville and New Dr. Wilson more than to any other agency. 

Orleans. Captain Steel was born in Pittsburg, He is a member of the Fourth Avenue Presby- 

Pennsylvania, May 9, 1799, and came to Louis- terian church, which his father organized and 

ville in 1S30, dying from cholera in 1850. He which was known years ago as Central church, 

was the son of William Steel, who came from Dr. Wilson was united in marriage to Mar- 

the north of Ireland and settled in Pittsburg, garet, the daughter of Philip Bonn, deceased, 

where he practiced law and served as justice of Louisville, a soldier of the Confederacy. 

of the peace and as county treasurer, and later They have one child, a son aged two years, 

kept an hotel at Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, named Keith Singleton. The Doctor is ac- 

dying in the year 1830, aged tifty-seven years, corded a position of distinction as a member of 

Captain Robert Steel married Margaret Har- the medical fraternity, his talents and strong 

ris McNair, who was born September 4, 1806, mentality making him largely master of the 

and died May 21, 1892, in Louisville, Ken- scientific principles which underlie the work of 

tucky. Their daughter, Anna Maria, the the profession. An energetic nature and stu- 

mother of our subject, was born in Louisville, dious habits have enabled him long since to 

Kentucky, September 21, 1842, and is still attain a high measure of respect as a citizen 

living in the city. and physician. 

Dr. Dunning S. Wilson attended the Louis- H. Gunkel, Jr. — For H. Gunkel, Jr., a 
ville public schools and graduated from the prominent attorney of the city, particular sen- 
Louisville College of Pharmacy in 1894, and timent must attach itself to his home sur- 
where he is now professor of pharmacy, then roundings, for not only was he born in New- 
graduated from the medical department of the port and lived here the most of his life, but 
University of Louisville in 1899, and immedi- his birth occurred in the very house in which 
ately entered into general practice in Louis- he now resides. His parentage is German, 
ville, and has since here continued, having that sound and sterling stock which has proved 
made the medical profession his life work, one of the most valuable elements in the new 
He has succeeded in every way and has also American civilization. The name of his grand- 
served in a number of most honorable posi- father was Henry Christian Gunkel. When 
tions. The Doctor has served as vice-presi- he was a boy Napoleon's army passed through 
dent of the Jefferson County Medical Society, the village where he lived and confiscated all 
and is secretary of the society at the present the property of value. Young Gunkel was 
time. He has served as president of the Lou- forced to accompany the soldiers, and he 
isville Academy of Medicine, is a member of secreted a pair of cuff buttons in his shoe% 
the Louisville Society of Physicians and Sur- which were the only things he saved except 
geons, of the Kentucky State Medical Society the clothes he wore. After the downfall of 
and of the American Medical Association. Napoleon he returned home, and when his 
Dr. Wilson has been a delegate to several son, Mr. Gunkel's father, started for the 
state ■ medical conventions and was the first United States he gave him the cuff buttons, 
physician in Kentucky to join the National which are still in the possession of Mr. Gunkel 
Association for the study and prevention of and which he values very highly, 
tuberculosis. He was also one of the originat- The date of Mr. Gunkel's birth was January 
ors of the Louisville Anti-Tuberculosis Asso- 13, 1871, and he was the son of H. C. and 
ciation and is physician in charge of the Anti- Catherine (Webber) Gunkel. the former of 
Tuberculosis Dispensary. He is a member of whom was born and reared in Germany and 
the Board of United States Pension Examin- the latter in Newport, Kentucky. The father 
ing Surgeons and is first lieutenant, medical was thoroughly educated in Germany and was 
department. First Regiment, Kentucky Na- graduated in medicine and surgery in the Ber- 
tional Guard. Dr. Wilson has served as a lin universities. After coming to America he 
member of the Louisville School Board, as pursued his studies and also received a degree 
delegate to several Republican State Conven- from the Cincinnati Eclectic Medical College, 
tions, is a member of the Commercial and Fil- He located in Newport and there carried on 
son Clubs and the Masonic fraternity, and a his practice for nearly fifty-five years, or until 
member of the Phi Chi medical fraternity, in- his death, in May, 1909, at the age of eighty- 
corporated, which was organized in Louisville four years. He was very successful and was 
in 1894. He has been a member of the Grand well-known in Newport and its vicinity. 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1149 

While in his native country he did military cantile business until his demise, which oc- 

service, having been a surgeon in the army, curred at the age of tifty years. He reared a 

The mother died in her native place in Jan- large family of children, nine of whom lived 

uary, 1893. This estimable couple were the to maturity. 

parents of six children, three being deceased Richard Knott McClure was one of the 

and Mr. Gunkel being the youngest born. younger children and at the time of his fath- 

H. Gunkel, Jr., was reared in Newport and er's death was a lad only about ten years of 
attended the common and high schools, being age. The mother removed with her family to 
graduated from the latter. He afterward took Frankfort and it was in this city that Mr. Mc- 
a course at St. Xavier College at Cincinnati Clure received his public school education, 
and then entered the Cincinnati law school, Very early in life he found it expedient to 
where he finished in 1892, having been admit- enlist himself among the wage earners and he 
ted to the bar a few months previous to that followed in the footsteps of his lamented 
time. He has since carried on a successful father by choosing a mercantile career. He 
practice in Newport and has made an enviable began in the capacity of a clerk and in 1870 
record for himself, being particularly well fit- he and his brother, Albert H. McClure, en- 
ted for the profession of his choice. He is gaged in the boot and shoe business, this asso- 
a member of the Campbell County Bar Asso- ciation lasting about fifteen years. The firm 
ciation, which he assisted in organizing, and was subsequently changed to that of R. K. 
in politics is independent, believing that men McClure & Sons, and in the meantime the line 
and causes outweigh party loyalty. of merchandise had changed and become of a 

A great deal of credit and honor is due to general character. ]\Ir. McClure has en- 
Mr. Gunkel for his organization of the New- countered the most thorough success. The R. 
port Foundry Company, a purely co-operative K. ^McClure establishment is the most popular 
stock company owned entirely by the persons and substantial department store in Frank- 
who are employed in it, with limitation of fort. It occupies quarters in the seven-story 
shares to each individual and no salaried offi- office building known as the ]\lcClure building, 
cers. It has been in successful operation for a handsome edifice completed in 1908, the 
nearly ten years and gives employment to same having been built by Mr. McClure and 
about one hundred and fifty men. It is one his sorn, Albert H., the son being the prime 
of the largest and most successful co-operative mover of the enterprise. Albert H. AlcClure 
companies in this section of the United States has indeed inherited the commercial sagacity 
and is probably the only one of its kind in the of his father and grandfather, and a great 
country. measure of the success and prestige attending 

Richard Knott McClure. — One of the the McClure department store is no doubt due 

most prominent representatives of the mer- to his initiative. 

cantile life of Frankfort is Richard Knott Mc- In 1870, at Frankfort, Mr, McClure was 
Clure, who not only holds a secure position as united in marriage to Miss Sallie Hudson, a 
a business man, but represents one of the lead- native of Franklin county, Kentucky, and to 
ing families of this part of the state. He was them have been born four children, namely: 
born at Owenton, Owen county, Kentucky, on William H., Albert H., Harriet and Rich- 
September 16, 1847, his parents being John D. ard K. 
and Agnes (Todd) McClure. For more than thirty years Mr. McClure has 

He is of Scotch-Irish descent, his father been a ruling elder in the Presbyterian church, 

having been born in the North of Ireland, and he has given cheerful and effective furth- 

The parents of John D. McClure recognized erance to many good causes. Although he 

the opportunities presented by the new world takes an interest in public affairs, particularly 

and crossed the Atlantic to claim their share in those questions effecting the general wel- 

of them when he was but eight years of age. fare, he has never been active in politics. 

They located in Chillicothe, Ohio, and there Dr. John Arvid O. Brennan, one of the 

John D. McClure remained until he was well-known physicians and surgeons of Louis- 

eighteen years of age, when he came to Ken- ville, is a native son of the Blue Grass state, 

tucky and engaged in mercantile pursuits in being born in Louisville on the nth of March, 

Owenton. He married Miss Agnes Todd, of 1880, and is one of the young members of the 

Frankfort, Kentucky, a member of an old and medical profession. He is the son of Thomas 

highly respected family of the Blue Grass and Anna (Bruce) Brennan, the father a 

state. Her father was a Virginian and of native of Ireland, who came to Louisville with 

Scotch lineage and her mother was a Mon- his parents when a child and has been a citizen 

tague. John McClure continued in the mer- ever since, engaged in the manufacturing busi- 



1150 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



ness. The mother was born on the Isle of 
Jersey, the daughter of Dr. Napoleon Bruce. 
She died May 13, 1908. 

Dr. Brennan received his education in the 
public schools of Louisville and in the private 
school of Professor Waddell. lie was gradu- 
ated from' the medical department of the Uni- 
versity of Louisville in 1901 and completed his 
studies in medicine with three years in Vienna, 
Paris and Berlin. Having acquired a thorough 
education in the requirements of his chosen 
profession he returned to Louisville in 1904 
and engaged in the practice of medicine and 
surgery, in which he has since continued, meet- 
ing with the success that his education, dili- 
gence and hard work deserves and which is 
bound to come to those who have labored as 
Dr. Brennan has and does, for he is advancing 
constantly in knowledge and experience. 

Dr. Brennan is a member of the Jefferson 
County Medical Society, the Louisville Society 
of Physicians and Surgeons, the Louisville So- 
ciety of Medicine, is visiting physician to St. 
Mary's and Elizabeth Hospital, and a member 
of the Kentucky State Medical Society and the 
American ^Medical Association. The Doctor is 
a member of the Louisville Lodge of Elks and 
a communicant of St. Paul's Episcopal church. 

John Kruchten. — It would indeed be dif- 
ficult to find among the citizens of the thriving 
town of Dayton one who takes a truer or more 
active interest in its welfare than John Kruch- 
ten, president of the Bank of Dayton, a con- 
servative and substantial banking institution 
which he assisted in organizing in 1906 and 
which in the few years of its career has 
achieved a most gratifying growth. As an ef- 
ficient public servant Air. Kruchten has a rec- 
ord comprising four years in the city council 
and eight years as mayor of the municipality. 
His loyalty to this section of Kentucky is not 
difficult to understand, for he was born on a 
farm in Campbell county, near Dayton, and 
has spent about all his life in this locality. 
The date of the nativity of John Kruchten 
was September 6, i860, and his parents were 
Matt and Alary (Wagner) Kruchten. Both of 
them were natives of the picturesque old city 
of Luxemborg in Germany, where they were 
reared and educated in both the French and 
German languages. They were already ac- 
quainted when they left their native land and 
their marriage was solemnizefl in Dayton, 
Kentucky, whence they came soon after cross- 
ing the Atlantic, the year of their emigration 
and union having been 1857. The father en- 
gaged in agriculture, and was in the prime of 
his life and accomplishment when he was 
killed in 1867 by the kick of a horse. The 
mother survived for many years, thirty-five in 



fact, and died in 1902 in Dayton, where many 
years before she had taken up her residence. 
Alatt Kruchten was a member of the Home 
Guards during the Civil war and participated 
in the Kirby Smith troubles, his sympathies 
being with the Union cause. He and his wife 
were the parents of six children, four of whom 
are still living. 

John Kruchten, who was the second child of 
his parents, was but seven years of age when 
death deprived him of his natural protector. 
The widowed mother brought her young fam- 
ily to Dayton and at an age when most boys 
have little concern in life other than play the 
actual burdens of life had begun to fall upon 
the shoulders of young John. There was little 
time for schooling, and had he been passive 
about it John Kruchten might have' had an 
extremely limited education, for he was taken 
from the public schools to begin the business 
of wage earning not only for his own support 
buT; for contribution to the family exchequer. 
Fortunately he was zealous about learning 
and pieced out his interrupted mental dis- 
cipline most effectively by night attendance at 
the parochial schools. He is one of the bright- 
est examples of the self-educated and self- 
made man, and his career should serve as an 
inspiration to those of the coming generation 
to whom Dame Fortune has been chary in her 
gifts. 

Air. Kruchten set about learning the baker's 
trade and worked at this for about nine years, 
assisting materially in the support of his 
mother and young brothers and sisters. Emi- 
nently thrifty and industrious, he was able in 
1885 to engage in business for himself, choos- 
ing the line of flour and feed, and making a 
thorough success of the enterprise of which 
he is still the manager and proprietor. His 
interests have by no means been of a limited 
character, and among them have been enrolled 
the Citizens' Loan and Savings Association, 
which is one of the largest and most successful 
organizations of its kind in the county. For 
four years he was vice-president of the Citi- 
zens' Loan and Savings Association and for 
the past eight years has held the office of presi- 
dent. In 1906 he assisted in the organization 
of the Bank of Dayton, which opened for 
business on Alarch 6 of that year, with Air. 
Kruchten as president. This bank had a capi- 
tal stock of $25,000 at the time of its organiza- 
tion and has since experienced a substantial 
growth, its deposits now being about $150,000, 
its surplus and profits over $8,000, and its 
loans and discounts $135,000, with semi-an- 
nual dividends of three per cent paid and 
stock quoted at one dollar and thirty-four 
cents. In February, 1910, the bank of which 



>9BtlC iflffiSi 



^79K, L«*«c 



^'Loen 




^^A/A^a^ 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1151 

]\Ir. Kruchten is the head, was housed in W'ilHam Burke Belknap was born in Brim- 
handsome new quarters. This is equipped Held, Hampden county, Massachusetts, on the 
with the most modern appliances m the way ot 17th of May, 181 1, and was a son of Morris 
safe deposit boxes and the like. Burke Belknap and Phoebe Locke (Thomp- 

Mr. Kruchten gives his support to the men son) Belknap, the former of whom died at 

and measures of the Democratic party and Smithland, Livingston county, Kentucky, on 

plays an active role in home afifairs. After the 26th of July, 1837. Tlie latter passed 

serving two four-}ear terms as mayor he re- the evening of her life at DeWitt, Arkansas, 

tired from the duties of this office in January, where her death occurred on the 5th of 

1910. His fraternal relations extend to the h^ebruary, 1873. Morris Burke Belknap was 

Eagles and to the Jackson Club, the latter a born in South Brimfield, Massachusetts, 

Democratic organization. on the 25th of June, 1780, and was a son 

Mr. Kruchten laid the foimdation of a of William Belknap, who was the only son 

happy married life in 1887, on May 4th of of Joseph and Mary (Morris) Belknap, 

which year he was united to i\Iiss Anna B. William Belknap was born at Haverhill, 

Paul, a native of Newport and the daughter ^lassachusetts, about the year 1740, and he 

of Joseph r^aul, a machinist residing in that was twice married, his first union having been 

city. Mr. and Mrs. Kruchten have two daugh- with Elizabeth McNaul, who died soon after 

ters, named Alma Marie and Stella Magdaline. her marriage. He later wedded Anne Burke, 

The family are consistent communicants of and they became the parents of one son and 

the Catholic church of Dayton and assist in the six daughters. Joseph Belknap, father of 

advancement of its good works not only with William, was a son of Samuel Belknap, who 

their means but with their sympathy and per- removed from the vicinity of Lynn, Massa- 

sonal efifort. chusetts, and settled at Brimfield colony, in a 

William B. Belknap.- — Within the pages locality then known as the Holland district, 

of this publication will be found mention of He there secured a large tract of land around 

many of those representative citizens who Holland pond and on the Quinebaug river. 

have been the potent factors in the develop- His wife was an aunt of Robert Morris, 

ment and upbuilding of the city of Louisville, signer o^ the Declaration of Independence, 

and among those meriting a place of special Samuel Belknap was one of the four sons of 

distinction is the late William Burke Belkwap. Abraham Belknap and he settled at Maiden, 

He was one of the most prominent and influ- Massachusetts, whence he finally removed to 

ential business men of the state and a citizen Haverhill, that colony, where he took the oath 

of recognized sterling character. He held com- of fidelity on the 28th of November, 1677. 

manding vantage ground in the confidence and His father was the founder of the family in 

regard of the community in which were cen- America, whither he came from Liverpool, 

tered for so long a period of years his various England, in 1635 o^ "^^37- He first settled at 

and important business interests. He was a Lynn, Massachusetts, from which place he 

man of forceful individuality and played a later removed to the historic old town of 

large part in the business and civic affairs of Salem, where his death occurred in the year 

the Kentucky metropolis, with whose annals 1643. 

the family name has been most conspicuously Alorris Burke Belknap, father of the sub- 
identified, both through his own life and labors ject of this memoir, was the founder of the 
and those of his sons. The career of Mr. western branch of the family. In 1807 he 
Belknap illustrated in a very marked degree left Brimfield, Massachusetts, and made his 
the power of concentrating the resources of way to Ohio. He located in the old town of 
the entire man and lifting them to the plane Marietta, that state, and it may fairly be said 
of high achievement; of supplementing un- that he was one of the pioneers in the develop- 
usual natural endowments by close applica- ment of the iron industry west of the Alle- 
tion and marked tenacity of purpose. Along ghany mountains. From Ohio he removed 
the lines in wdiich he directed his energies to Pennsylvania, and he established his resi- 
and abilities Mr. Belknap made of success dence in Pittsburg in the year 1816. At this 
not an accident but a logical result. There time was virtually initiated his successful 
is no element of subtlety or obscurity, no career in connection with the iron industry, 
manner of indirection in the record of his life, There he applied his theoretical knowledge to 
and so distinctive and beneficent was his in- the practical development of the line of enter- 
fluence in connection with the material and prise mentioned and it was due to his progres- 
social progress of his home city and state sive ideas and well directed efforts that some 
that it is altogether proper that in this work of the first rolling mills were built in Pittsburg. 
be entered a tribute to his memory. In 1827 he made an extended trip through 



1152 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

the ore fields of the Cumberland and Tennes- J. H. Shoenberger, of Pittsburg, manufactur- 
see river district, and on horseback he made ers of nails and boiler plate. In 1847 he be- 
a careful exploration of this region. He ap- came associated with Captain Thomas C. 
preciated the advantages here offered and, Coleman in the purchase of a rolling mill at 
after enlisting requisite capital, he erected the foot of Brook street, and here they be- 
furnaces in Stewart county, Tennessee, and came successful manufacturers of bar iron, 
later at Nashville, that state. He died in building up a large and substantial enterprise, 
Kentucky, as already noted in this context, with which Mr. Belknap continued to be ac- 
and his name merits special prominence on tively identified for many years. This mill 
the roster of those through whose construct- was long in operation and the structure re- 
ive and initiative abilities was compassed the mained on the original site until 1880, when 
development of the great iron industry of the it was razed. 

United States. In the meanwhile Mr. Belknap had estab- 
William Burke Belknap, whose name in- lished an individual enterprise as an extensive 
troduces this review, was reared in the city dealer in iron and heavy hardware, and this 
of Pittsburg, where he was afforded the ad- business he conducted under the title of W. 
vantages of a well conducted private school, B. Belknap & Company. His associate was 
and he early gained experience in connection his brother, the late Morris Locke Belknap, 
with the practical affairs of life. When he William B. Belknap eventually purchased his 
was but sixteen years of age his father in- brother's interest and assumed full control of 
structed him to assume charge of the trans- the business, from which has been developed 
porting of the family's household effects the extensive and important concern known 
from Pittsburg to Tennessee, and also to se- as the Belknap Hardware & Manufacturing 
cure new machinery for the iron furnace Company — probably the largest of its kind in 
which the father had established in Tennes- the entire South. The enterprise has been 
see, where he was located at the time. The wholesale in its functions from the beginning, 
boy selected the equipment required, and in connection with the manufacturing depart- 
loaded the same, together with the household ment, and in the development of the same Mr, 
goods, on a flatboat, on which the family pro- Belknap made a magnificent contribution to 
ceeded down the Ohio river. At Louisville, the prestige and importance of Louisville as 
where no canal had yet been constructed, it an industrial and commercial center. He be- 
became necessary to unload the heavy ma- came one of the most influential factors in 
chinery, which was carted through the city to local business circles and his civic ideals were 
a point below the falls and then reloaded on as high as were his business talents exception- 
the boat at Shippingport. After having been al. He gave his influence and tangible co- 
associated with his father in his iron opera- operation in the fostering and upbuilding of a 
tions for three years Mr. Belknap, who was number of other important industrial and 
then nineteen years of age, decided to under- business enterprises in his home city, and for 
take his independent business career. With the some time he served as president of the 
consent of his father he severed his relations Southern Bank of Louisville, subsequently 
with the latter's affairs and proceeded to the Citizens' Bank, and whose successor is the 
Hickman, Fulton county, Kentucky, a place Citizens' National Bank. 

then known as Mill's Point, on the Missis- Mr. Belknap was a man of broad mental 

sippi river. There he began a trading or gen- ken and impregnable integrity in all the rela- 

eral merchandise business, in which he soon tions of life. He honored Louisville and the 

became associated with two other young men. state of Kentucky through his able and 

They established branches at Moscow and worthy services as a citizen and business man, 

A^icksburg, and soon developed a prosperous and though he never sought publicity and was 

trading business on the river. Serious finan- essentially unostentatious and democratic in 

cial reverses were encountered by the firm, his attitude, he wielded more influence of 

however, in the great panic of 1837, and this beneficent order than have many who have 

resulted in virtual bankruptcy. Air. Belknap come more prominently before the public eye. 

has none of the elements of impassivity or in- He achieved large success and won it by 

action, and his reverses but spurred him to worthy means, and he ever maintained a high 

renewed effort. In 1840, after having visited sense of his stewardship. He was at all 

St. Louis and Cincinnati, as well as Louisville, times ready to co-operate in the promotion of 

he determined to establish his home in the those undertakings that conserved the general 

city last mentioned — a decision which he nev- welfare of the community, and upon the rec- 

er had cause to regret. Here he engaged in ord of his long, active and useful career there 

business as agent for the firm of G. K. and rests no shadow of wrong or injustice. 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY' AND KENTUCKIANS 



1153 



Though never permitting the use of his name 
in connection with candidacy for poHtical of- 
fice, he gave a staunch allegiance to the cause 
of his convictions, and his religious faith 
was that of the Unitarian church, to 
the various departments of whose work he 
was a liberal contributor. His widow, who 
will celebrate her ninetieth birthday anni- 
versary on June ii, 191 1, is a char- 
ter member of the Chestnut Street Pres- 
byterian church, later known as the Warren 
Memorial Presbyterian church, and has been 
a prominent factor in church and benevolent 
activities in the city of her adoption, where 
she is well known and where she is held in 
reverent affection by all who have come wdthin 
the sphere of her gracious influence. Mr. 
Belknap was summoned to the life eternal on 
the 24th day of February, 1889, and, now that 
he rests from his labors, it may well be said 
that "His works do follow him." 

In the year 1843 was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Mr. Belknap to Miss Mary Richard- 
son, who was born in the city of Lexington, 
Kentucky, on the nth of June, 1821, and who 
is a daughter of William Richardson, who be- 
came one of the leading bankers and most in- 
fluential citizens of Louisville, where he held 
for a number of years prior to his demise 
the office of president of tlie Northern Bank 
of Kentucky. 

William R. Belknap. — In the matter of 
definite accomplishment and high personal in- 
tegrity the city of Louisville has every reason 
to be proud of those of her native sons who 
are lending their influence and co-operation in 
forwarding her industrial, commercial and 
civic advancement. As a member of one of 
the old and honored families of the Kentucky 
metropolis, and as one of the essentially rep- 
resentative business men of his native city, 
William Richardson Belknap is eligible for a 
place in this history of Kentucky and Ken- 
tuckians. On preceding pages may be found 
a memoir of his father, the late William 
Burke Belknap, and as adequate data concern- 
ing the family history is incorporated in that 
article it is not necessary to repeat the same 
details. J\Ir. Belknap after serving as presi- 
dent for twenty-eight years, is now chairman 
of the board of directors of the Belknap 
Hardware & Manufacturing Company, of 
which important industrial concern his hon- 
ored father was the founder, and he is other- 
wise closely and prominently identified with 
the business interests of Louisville. 

William Richardson Belknap was born in 
Louisville on the 28th of March, 1849, and is 
a son of ^^'illiam B. and ^lary (Richardson) 
Belknap. To the public and private schools 



of his native city Mr. Belknap is indebted for 
his early educational discipline, which includ- 
ed, besides two years under Rev. Stuart Rob- 
inson, a full course in the Male High School, 
in which he was graduated as a member of 
the class of 1866. A few months afterward 
he was matriculated in Yale University, and 
in this celebrated institution he was graduated 
in 1869, with the degree of Bachelor of Sci- 
ence, bestowed by the Sheffield Scientific 
School. After his graduation he passed an- 
other year in his alma mater, in which he 
completed a well defined post-graduate course 
in natural science, including botany, zoology, 
history and economics. Upon his return to 
Louisville he became an active member of the 
firm of W. B. Belknap & Company, of which 
his father was the founder and executive head. 
This concern was engaged in the wholesale 
iron and hardware trade. Upon the incorpo- 
ration of the business, under the present title, 
the Belknap Hardware & Manufacturing 
Company, in 1880, he became vice-president 
and later president in 1882. He continued as 
such until May, 1910, when he resigned this 
administrative office and assumed that of 
chairman of its board. 

For forty years has Mr. Belknap been ac- 
tively identified with the business interests of 
his native city, and he has in this field as well 
as in the domain of loyal citizenship well up- 
held the prestige of the honored name which 
he bears. He has been a resourceful and po- 
tent factor in giving solidity and progressive 
tendencies to the commercial and industrial 
activities of Louisville, and as a citizen has 
never denied his support to enterprises and 
measures which he thought contributed to the 
welfare of the community. He has taken 
part especially in the upbuilding of the Lou- 
isville Young Men's Christian Association, in 
whose work he still maintains a most lively 
interest. 

He was one of the charter members of the 
Salmagundi Club and for twenty years its 
secretary. He is an independent in politics. 
Both he and his wife hold membership in the 
Presbyterian church, Mr. Belknap as ruling 
elder. 

Among other connections and official posi- 
tions of Mr. Belknap's might be mentioned, 
vice president Associated Charities of Louis- 
ville, vice president Kentucky Humane Soci- 
ety, 1899-1900 president Commercial Club, 
honorary life member Commercial Club, trus- 
tee of Berea College. 

Mr. Belknap has been twice married. In 
December, 1874, he was married to Miss Alice 
Trumbull Silliman, daughter of Professor 
Benjamin Silliman, of New Haven, Connecti- 



1154 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



cut. She was summoned to the Hfe eternal 
in 1890. Concerning the children of this 
union the following hricf record is given : 
Eleanor is the wife of Lewis C. Humi)hrey, 
of Louisville; Alice S. is the wife of Dr. 
Forhes Hawkes, of New York; Mary is the 
wife of George IL Gray, of Louisville, an 
architect by profession; William ?>.. who was 
graduated in Yale University as a member of 
the class of 1908, is now associated with the 
Belknap Hardware and Manufacturing Com- 
pany; and Christine, youngest cjf the children, 
remains at the paternal home. In 1894 Mr. 
Belknap was united in marriage to Miss Juliet 
Rathbone Davison, who was reared in Louis- 
ville, a daughter of Charles G. and the well 
known Mrs. Emily Andrews Davison, noted 
for her musical talents and social qualities. 

Morris B. Belknap. — The life of Colonel 
Belknap was marked by valuable accomplish- 
ment along practical and productive lines, and 
his success as a man of affairs was large ; but 
more to be prized than this were his loyalty 
to principle, a kindly human sympathy, a 
broad intellectual development and a gracious 
personality that characterized the man as he 
was. His career in the business world was 
such as to advance the welfare of others as 
well as his own, and tliough ever free from 
self-seeking and ostentation, his qualifications 
for leadership in thought and action brought 
him into prominence, the while he retained 
an enviable place in the confidence and esteem 
of his fellow men. He was an important fac- 
tor in the business life of his native city, 
where his interests were wide and important 
and where it was given him to add new 
laurels to a name that has been honorably 
linked with the annals of Louisville for more 
than seventy years. Concerning the family 
genealogy and the career of his father, the 
late William Burke Belknap, ample details are 
given in the memoir dedicated to the latter 
on preceding pages, and to that memoir the 
reader is referred for such information. 

Colonel Morris Burke Belknap was born 
in the city of Louisville, Kentucky, on the 7th 
of June, 1856, and at his home 1322 South 
Fourth avenue, this city, his death occurred 
on the afternoon of the 13th of April, 1910. 
Colonel Belknap gained his early education in 
the private school of B. B. Huntoon, there 
continuing his studies until he was seventeen 
years of age, when he found himself well 
prepared for his collegiate course. However, 
he was favored in being able at this time 1873, 
to avail himself of the advantages of foreign 
travel, and in company with his elder brother, 
William R. Belknap, he passed a year in 
Europe. Upon his return he was matriculated 



in the Sheffield Scientific School of Yale Uni- 
versity, where he was in his freshman year a 
classmate of William H. Taft. He was 
graduated in the year 1877 and passed the 
ensuing year in the same institution, ' where 
he took a post-graduate course in chemistry. 
In 1879 Colonel Belknap began his independ- 
ent business career by becoming one of the in- 
terested principals in a company engaged in 
the manufacture of plows and other agricul- 
tural implements in Louisville. He continued 
with this concern for four years, at the expira- 
tion of which, in 1883, he became a member of 
the wholesale hardware firm of W. B. Belknap 
& Company. I lis father, the senior member of 
the firm, died in 1889, and after the incorpora- 
tion of the Belknap Hardware & Manufactur- 
ing Company, which succeeded the business of 
the original firm. Colonel Belknap became 
vice-president of the company, an office 
which he retained throughout his life. An 
appreciative estimate appeared in a Louis- 
ville daily paper at the time of his death, and 
in the reproduction only such minor changes 
are made as to bring the article in keeping 
with the features of this memoir. 

For many years Colonel Belknap had stood 
in the forefront of the South's commercial 
world and had been closely identified with the 
great business interests of Louisville. He 
was recognized everywhere as an important 
factor in promoting the leading commercial 
interests of the city, and for several years he 
was president of the Louisville Board of 
Trade, having had the distinction of being the 
youngest man ever elected to this office. 

Although constantly absorbed in the intrica- 
cies of the large mercantile corporation of 
which he formed so important a part, he 
never lost his fondness for books and always 
found time to devote to literary and scientific 
pursuits. Colonel Belknap kept notably well 
informed along lines of commercial progress. 
Li 1895 he read a carefully prepared paper 
before the National Hardware Association, 
at Pittsburg. The paper dealt with some 
points of the general business interests that 
challenged the attention and invoked the ap- 
proval of a critical and much interested body. 
He was a delegate to the international con- 
gress of Chambers of Commerce at Liege, in 
1905, and in other conventions, at home or 
elsewhere, his voice was always heard with 
respect. 

Colonel Belknap early manifested an inter- 
est in military afifairs, in which connection 
he became prominent and influential in the 
Kentucky National Guard. In 1879 ^''^ ^^~ 
listed as a private in Captain W. O. Harris' 
company of the Louisville Legion, and he 




--^w .^^7^ /i^-^-^'^l— y«l 



ill 



,11 I -rfrunt 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1155 



took great pride in his association with this 
mihtary body. In 1890 he was elected cap- 
tain of Company A, First Regiment of the 
Kentucky National Guard, and three years 
later he was chosen lieutenant colonel of the 
same regiment. Prior to this service, in 1887, 
he was honored by appointment as a member 
of the military staff of Governor Simon B. 
Buckner, with the rank of Colonel. Colonel 
Belknap called the first meeting of officers 
in his home upon receiving news of the 
declaration of war between the United States 
and Spain. He served as lieutenant colonel 
and later as colonel of the First Kentucky 
\'olunteer Infantry in the Spanish-American 
war in 1898, and saw service around Ponce 
and Alayaguez, in Porto Rico. The first Ken- 
tucky Volunteer Infantry was duly mustered 
into the United States service on the 13th of 
May, 1898, and Colonel Belknap was forthwith 
commissioned its lieutenant colonel The regi- 
ment left Louisville on May 13th and after 
spending some weeks at Lexington, Ky., and 
at Chickamauga, arrived at Newport News, 
\^irginia, on the 28th of July. On the ist of 
August orders were received from General 
Frederick D. Grant, who instructed Colonel 
Belknap to take six companies and embark on 
the transport "Hudson" for Porto Rico. The 
command reached Ponce on the nth of Au- 
gust, and upon reporting to General Nelson A. 
Miles was ordered to proceed on the transport 
to Mayaguez, where Colonel Belknap reported 
to General Schwan the 12th of August. This 
officer gave orders for Colonel Belknap to 
disembark his command and, as soon as 
transportation could be secured, to follow the 
Eleventh Infantry to Los Maria. The next 
day, however, was received news of the sign- 
ing of the protocol, a special messenger hav- 
ing been sent by General Miles, and this 
brought an end to hostilities. Colonel Bel- 
knap and his command remained at Maya- 
guez until the 26th of August, when he re- 
ceived orders to proceed to Ponce and join 
General Castleman and the other six com- 
panies of the regiment. This was accom- 
plished on the 29th and 30th of x^ugust. On 
December 12, 1898. the regiment returned to 
Louisville, where General Castleman. Colonel 
Belknap and their comrades received their hon- 
orable discharge. It is not unlikely that the 
death of Colonel Belknap was largely a result 
of his services in Porto Rico, as he never 
entirely regained his former vigor after his 
return. 

Colonel Belknap was a man of firm convic- 
tions and his opinions concerning matters of 
public import were practical and steadfast. 
He was numbered among the leaders in the 



ranks of the Republican party in his native 
state and that he was a prominent factor in 
its councils needs no further voucher than 
that afforded "by the fact that in 1903 he was 
made the Republican candidate for governor 
of Kentucky. He made a spirited and effect- 
ive campaign, which won him over 203,000 
votes. He twice served as chairman of the 
Board of Park Commissioners of Louisville, 
and ever showed a most loyal interest in all 
that touched the welfare of his native city. 

Colonel Belknap was a professed Presby- 
terian, and his religious faith was shown forth 
in all the relations and associations of his life, 
though never with ostentation or intolerance. 
He was a deacon of the Warren }*Iemorial 
church at the time of his death and was one 
of the most liberal supporters of the various 
departments of its work, as was he also of 
philanthropies and benevolences of a general 
order. He was for many years chairman 
of the board of trustees of his church, but 
resigned this office about a year prior to his 
death, as his want of strength made it im- 
possible for him to give to the organization 
the attention which he deemed necessary. He 
assisted most generously in the upbuilding of 
the local Young Men's Christian Association 
and was one of its directors. His genial per- 
sonality made him a favorite in both business 
and social circles, and he was identified with 
various civic organizations of representative 
order. He was a member of the Pendennis 
and the Country Clubs of Louisville, and also 
of the Salmagundi (literary) Club, and for 
some years prior to his demise he was presi- 
dent of the Yale Alumni Association of Ken- 
tucky. Loyal in all the relations of life, 
kindly and tolerant in his judgment of his 
fellow men, a devoted husband and father. 
Colonel Belknap played well his part in life, 
and now that he has passed away his memory 
is held in lasting honor by all who came within 
the sphere of his influence. 

On the 14th of Tune, 1883, were married 
Colonel Belknap and 3>Iiss Lily Buckner, only 
daughter of General Simon B. Buckner, gov- 
ernor of Kentucky and always one of the 
state's most distinguished citizens. Mrs. Bel- 
knap died in the year 1893, survived by four 
children, Gertrude, Walter Kingsbury (who 
was graduated in Yale University, 1908), Lily, 
and Morris B., Jr. To the memory of his wife. 
Colonel Belknap erected a massive and beauti- 
ful stone bridge in Cherokee Park, and this 
is known as the Belknap Bridge. On the i6th 
of July, 1900, was solemnized the marriage 
of Colonel Belknap to Miss Marion S. Du- 
mont, of Plainfield. New Jersey, where she 
was born and reared. She is a daughter of 



1156 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



John B. Dumont, a representative citizen of 
that city. ^Irs. Belknap survives her hon- 
ored hushand and resides with his children 
in the family home. In addition to the Louis- 
ville home the Colonel owned a summer resi- 
dence at "Black Hall," on Long Island Sound, 
in the state of Connecticut. 

John P. Harbick. — Few, if any, residents 
of Covington enjoy a securer hold upon the 
esteem and affection of their fellow townsmen 
than John P. Llarbick, a retired business man 
and one of the most active and prominent 
members of the great ]\Iasonic fraternity to be 
found in the state of Kentucky. He was born 
in Nassau, Germany, April 20, 1834. His 
parents were William H. and Eleonora (Har- 
bick) Harbick. The former was a native of 
Prussia and the latter of France, and although 
they bore the same name they were not related. 
The paternal grandfather, who was of German 
lineage, was extensively engaged in the iron 
furnace business in Lorraine when it was a 
part of France, and afterward pursued similar 
activities in Nassau. Mr. Harbick's father was 
employed by a German nobleman and lived in 
one of the ancient castles about which so much 
of history and romance cling like the ivy upon 
the turrets. It was within such walls that Mr. 
Harbick first saw the light of day. He was the 
second of a family of six children. Besides 
himself two sisters survive at the present time, 
one of them, Kate H. Piepho, residing in Chi- 
cago, and the other, Jeannette H. Temple, upon 
an Indiana farm. Mr. Harbick grew to boy- 
hood upon the estate of his father's patron and 
was to have been afforded a liberal college 
education through the generosity of the noble- 
man, but when he was thirteen years of age 
his father died at the comparatively early age 
of thirty-nine years and many plans were of 
necessity changed. Nevertheless he acquired 
a good common school education in the com- 
mon schools, which are one of Germany's 
points of pride. At the age of fourteen young 
John began to serve an apprenticeship in the 
shoemaking trade and for several years made 
his livelihood in this fashion. 

When John P. Harvick was nineteen years 
of age he departed for the "Land of Promise," 
crossing the Atlantic in company with his 
aunt and sister. Soon after arriving in the 
United States they went to Cincinnati, Ohio, 
this being in the year 1853. John secured em- 
ployment at his trade in Cincinnati and for the 
next four years worked hard, saved every 
penny not actually needed for existence, and 
by such means was able in 1857 to start in 
business for himself in the Queen City. Two 
years later he located in Covington, where he 
had previously married, and bought a lot upon 



which he built his first simple home. He es- 
tablished himself in business here and for 
twenty-eight years operated a store. During 
these early days shoemaking consisted for the 
most part of hand work and in this fashion Mr. 
Harbick made many fine patent leather boots 
for select trade, taking fourteen stitches to the 
inch. By the exercise of good management he 
gained a competence and in 1887, discontinued 
the shoe business to take up the undertaking 
business under the firm name of Harbick & 
Rose. This second commercial undertaking 
was likewise successful, Mr. Harbick possess- 
ing those qualities which bring any enterprise 
to full fruition. In 1904, finding himself the 
master of a fortune sufficient to keep him and 
his wife in comfort for the rest of their days, 
he retired. He has made a number of excel- 
lent investments and may be accounted a man 
of property. 

During the Civil war Mr. Harbick mani- 
fested his loyalty to the Union cause by his 
membership in the Home Guards. He was 
among the first to be enlisted in Company A 
of the Forty-first Kentucky regiment, his rank 
becoming that of corporal. He was present in 
no engagements, the service of the Forty-first 
consisting chiefly of guard duty of bridges and 
supplies. I\Ir. Harbick is a stanch Republi- 
can and in 1881 was elected to the city council, 
in which he served for about six years. In 
1904 he was appointed by Mayor Beach as a 
member of the fire and police board and served 
four years in that capacity. 

Mr. Harbick's career as a Mason began in 
January, 1870, when he was initiated into the 
order which has claimed so much of his time 
and attention and w^iich has rewarded him 
with much of pleasure and distinction. His 
membership has been long, active and useful. 
He has attained to the Thirty-second degree, 
his degrees including the York and the Scottish 
Rite. He has been actively identified with the 
subordinate lodges of Covington for forty 
years and no Mason is better known or more 
worthy in exemplification than he. For years 
his help has been in demand by hundreds 
whom he has graciously instructed in the rites 
of the order. He has doubtless made more 
Masons than any individual living in the state 
today, these including some of the most prom- 
inent not only in the order but in public life. 
Mr. Harbick has occupied chairs in all the 
different branches. In 1877, when he was serv- 
ing his third year as master of his lodge, he 
was also high priest of the chapter, thrice 
illustrious master of the council and eminent 
commander of the Knights Templars. During 
the same year he took the Thirty-second de- 
gree of Scottish Rite. Instantaneously when 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1157 



called upon he can deliver the lecture in any 
of the various branches, for he is the possessor 
of a truly remarkable memory. At various 
times during his years of ^Masonic service he 
has been presented with many tokens of es- 
teem by the lodges with which he has been 
affiliated. Among these was a book containing 
the signatures of three hundred and thirty-five 
brothers, and an emblem bestowed by them 
commemorating the blue lodge, the chapter 
and the commandery, which took the form of 
a gold pendant and bore his name embossed in 
gold letters. Mr. Harbick holds membership 
with the Colonel Clay Lodge, No. 159; Cov- 
ington Lodge, No. 109 ; and Golden Rule 
Lodge, No. 345 ; being an honorary member 
of the two latter. He has also been since 
[865 a member of Naomi Lodge. No. 129, of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

In 1865 Mr. Harbick united with the Union 
Methodist church and for many years served 
upon the official board, being one of the trus- 
tees at the present time. He was a member 
of the choir for many years, serving as chor- 
ister and in fact is still chorister of the Sun- 
day-school. He possesses that true musical 
sense which seems to be innate with so many 
Germans. 

Air. Harbick was married on Christmas day, 
1856, to Elizabeth Keen, a native of Newport 
and a daughter of Joseph A. and Alary 
(Storms) Keen, of New Jersey and Pennsyl- 
vania, respectively. Joseph A. Keen was an 
early settler in Kenton county and made the 
first brick house in Covington in the early 
days. He owned about six acres of land in 
what is now the heart of the city, this being 
bounded by Main, Philadelphia, Pike and 
Ninth streets. It was here that he lived and 
for many years operated a brick yard, the first 
enterprise of its kind within the limits of Cov- 
ington. Joseph A. Keen's grandfather was a 
soldier in the war of the Revolution, belong- 
ing to a regiment known as the "Dirty Blues." 
Mary Storms, Mrs. Harbick's mother, was one 
year old when she was brought from the Key- 
stone state to Hamilton county, Ohio, in 1801. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harbick have no children, but 
have friends in plenty and enjoy the evening 
of life in peace and good fortune, possessing 
the respect of the community and the afifection 
of all of those who know them best. 

Thomas Kelly Van Zandt, A. B., M. D., 
of Louisville, was born in Leavenworth, In- 
diana, on June 24, 1875. He is the son of 
Thomas Kelly Van Zandt, who was a native 
of Indiana. 

The Van Zandts are Holland Dutch, the 

... * 

name origmally having been Van der Zandt. 
The original \ an Zandt in this country was 



John, who had three sons, Abraham, Isaac and 
Jacob. One of the sons went to Tennessee and 
thence into Texas, one went to Minnesota, and 
Isaac, the great-grandfather of our subject, 
came into northern Indiana. The original 
John \'an Zandt came over and fought in the 
Revolutionary war with General Lafayette. 
The grandfather of our subject, Thomas Van 
Zandt, married a daughter of the Hon. Thom- 
as Kelly, who for years was speaker of the 
House of Representatives from New York. 
The father of the Doctor was a journalist and 
visited Leavenworth, Indiana, on newspaper 
business, met his future wife, married her, 
then purchased the Crawford County Demo- 
crat, but died three years after he settled 
there, on May 2, 1875, at the age of twenty- 
six years. The mother of the Doctor was 
Sarah Louise Ouerbacker, who was born in 
Leavenworth, Indiana, in 185 1, the daughter 
of Michael and Sarah (Lowrie) Ouerbacker, 
both natives of Germany, where they were 
sweethearts. She came to Louisville on a 
visit, and he came over on the next ship and 
they were married in Louisville. They then 
went to Leavenworth, where he went into 
business and became quite wealthy. Among the 
children of this old couple were John, Sam- 
uel, Joseph, Peter and George, the Doctor's 
mother and Mary Martha, who married Judge 
N. R. Peckinpaugh, of Leavenworth, now of 
Louisville, who was governor of Alaska for 
four years, appointed under President Harri- 
son. John is deceased, Peter still resides in 
Leavenworth, while Joseph is the president of 
the O. K. Stove and Range Company and vice- 
president of the Commercial Bank and Trust 
Company. Samuel has for years been at the 
head of the Ouerbacker-Gilmore Wholesale 
Grocery Company, a director in the American 
National Bank and an influential business man 
in Louisville. George is vice-president and 
general manager of the Ouerbacker-Gilmore 
Company. Mrs. Van Zandt married for her 
second husband, in 1879, J. T. Crecelius and 
is living in Louisville. 

Dr. Van Zandt was born six weeks after 
the death of his father, and when he was four 
years old his mother brought him to Louisville. 
He attended the public schools and graduated 
from the Male High School, Louisville, in 
1894. He was then in the employ of the Ouer- 
backer-Gilmore Grocery Company for over five 
years and of which he became cashier and head 
bookkeeper. At the end of this time Mr. Van 
Zandt, having decided to make the profession 
of medicine his life business, matriculated in 
the medical department of the Kentucky Uni- 
versity, from which he was graduated in the 
class of 1902, and was honor man of his class. 



1158 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

He was then an interne in the City Hospital Kentucky's eadiest pioneers, who set up his 

for one year, and in 1903 hegan i)ractice. home in h'rankhn on the forks of the Elkhorn 

Dr. \an Zandt has been called upon for Creek. Mr. Marshall's mother was born in 

more than one position of importance. He Morgan county, her fathef being Mason H. 

was associate professor of anatomy until the P. Williams. lun'ther mention of her family 

uniting of the two medical colleges and since is made in the sketch of her brother. Judge 

it has become the University of Louisville, Benjamin G. Williams, contained elsewhere 

and he is now associate professor of obstetrics, in this volume. 

He is on the visiting staff of the Louisville The father of Wiley Cope Marshall for a 

City Hospital, and he has made a'special study number of years followed the trade of a shoe- 

of one of the modern scientific discoveries, one maker in Frankfort and later in life moved to 

that claims the closest attention of the great the country, where he engaged in farming, 

scientific men of the day. the study of anaes- Thus it came about that the early years of 

thetics. Dr. \'an Zandt has probably done Mr. Marshall were spent amid wholesome 

more in that line than any other one physician rural scenes and he was introduced to the 

in Louisville, having administered anaesthetics strenuous occupations which are the share of 

to over two thousand patients without one the farmer's son. He obtained a fairly good 

death. common school education, and at seventeen 

Dr. Van Zandt is a member of the Jefferson left the parental home to begin the battle of 
County Medical Society, the Kentucky State life for himself and finally to enroll himself 
Medical Society, and the Louisville Society of among the ranks of the successful self-made 
Medicine. He is a member of the Masonic men. He was not retarded by false pride and 
Order, belonging to Louisville Lodge, No. 400, at first made his living in various humble 
F. & A. M. The Doctor married Mary Gibson ways. His first position was as a laundry 
Morgan, wdio was born in Nashville, Tennes- agent in Frankfort, and later his uncle. Judge 
see, the daughter of J. B. Morgan. Her moth- Benjamin G. Williams, prominent lawyer of 
er was Jean Gibson, a granddaughter of Gen- Frankfort, took him into his ofiice and home, 
eral Jackson. She is also descended from the and by cleaning the office, acting as office boy 
Polk family, of which President James K. and doing chores about the house young Mar- 
Polk was a member. One son has been born shall was fed, clothed and sheltered. At the 
to the Doctor and wnfe. Thomas Kelly Jr., same time, luider the preceptorship of his un- 
born January 10, 1909. From the above cle, he read law and his study was so effective 
sketch it will be seen that the Doctor is a man that he was admitted to the bar or licensed to 
of intellectuality and advanced ideas, without practice law in 1895. After nearly a year of 
which he could not have attained to the rank practice Mr. Marshall supplemented his pre- 
among the most prominent physicians which vious training by a course in law at the L^ni- 
he now enjoys. He wrote a booklet on "Bible versify of Virginia in 1896. and afterward re- 
Baptism," which received high commendations sumed his active practice at Frankfort, 
from ministers of several denominations, who From early manhood Mr. Marshall has been 
recommended it to their parishioners who had an active worker in the ranks of the Demo- 
doubts on that subject. He also prepared an cratic party. In 1905 he was one of the or- 
analysis of the^ "Twenty-Five Articles of Re- ganizers of the Young Men's Democratic 
ligion" of his church, that by many ministers Club of Frankfort, serving as president of the 
and laymen was pronounced the strongest pre- same for tw^o years. In November of 1909 
sentation of the subject they had ever seen — he was elected county attorney for a term of 
if not absolutely unanswerable. four years, dating from January i, 1910. In 

Wiley Cope ■Marshall. — Prominent this office he has already won popular praise 
among the members of the Franklin county and he is generally recognized to be one of 
bar is Wiley Cope Marshall, county attorney the coimtv's leading young men. 
and a citizen who is a loyal Kentuckian by all The fraternal relations of Mr. Marshall ex- 
the ties of birth and family. He was born tend to the Knights of Pythias, Independent 
in this county August 4, 1872. his parents be- Order of Odd Fellows, and the Benevolent 
ing John Swain and Mary Jane (Williams) and Protective Order of Elks. He is also a 
Marshall. His father, who is now deceased, deacon in the Christian church. 
was a native of Shelby county; the grandfa- In 1898 Mr. Marshall married Miss Maude 
ther, Larkin Samuel Marshall, was born in Gertrude Ponder, daughter of the late T. M. 
Franklin county, near the Forks of Elkhorn Ponder of LaGrange, Oldham county, Ken- 
Creek; and the great-grandfather, William tucky. They have one child, a daughter named 
Marshall, was a Virginian by birth and one of Elizabeth Langsdale Marshall. 



muc'i^^^ 







n^iMX^d^^rr. JrUrT^^^ W^^^^^^JW (7J J. 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1159 



William Tieman Jr. — This long promi- 
nent citizen of Campbell county was born in 
Hanover, Germany, November 9, 1843, ^ son 
of William Tieman Sr., who, as was his wife, 
was a native of Hanover. The elder Tieman 
was a rope maker by trade and a musician by 
profession. In 1844 he brought his wife and 
their infant son to America and the little fam- 
ily settled first at Cincinnati. There they re- 
mained till 1855, when they moved across the 
river to Jamestown, now Dayton, Kentucky, 
where Mr. Tieman embarked in the grocery 
trade and was successful as a merchant for 
several years. A Baptist, he developed into 
a musical evangelist and long labored among 
churches of that denomination as an employe 
of the Baptist Association. So successful was 
he in that capacity and so well known did he 
become in all the region round about that he 
grew to fill a warm place in the hearts of Cris- 
tians not only of the Baptist faith but of other 
creeds as well. He was especially skillful as 
a player of the clarinet and scarcely less so 
as a player of the tuba bass horn, and for 
many years he was a member of some of the 
best orchestras of Cincinnati, a city noted in 
all its history for its musical talent. A great 
lover of children, he was peculiarly happy in 
Sunday-school work, and there and in church- 
es his music was very helpful to him and was 
highly appreciated by all who had opporunity 
to hear it. He died at the home of his daugh- 
ter in Pendleton county, Kentucky, aged sev- 
enty-three years, and he was survived by his 
widow only about two years, when she too 
passed away in Pendleton county. 

Of the eight children of William Tieman 
Sr. one died in Germany, the others were liv- 
ing in 19 10. \Mlliam Tieman Jr. was the 
second in order of birth and was only about 
a year old when his parents brought him 
across the ocean to a home in tlie New W^orld. 
He was reared in Cincinnati and in Dayton 
and educated in common schools and at Nel- 
son's Business College, in the Queen City. As 
a boy he worked in his father's grocery, learn- 
ing the business thoroughly behind the count- 
er, and m the buying of goods and by contact 
with the buying and consuming community as 
well as with the manufacturer and the whole- 
saler, and at twenty engaged in the business 
on his own account, with Henry E. Spilman, 
later pastor of the Baptist church of Dayton, 
as his partner. xA-fter the expiration of a year 
he turned over his interest to his father and 
then gave his attention to real estate and build- 
ing. Several years ago he helped to organize 
the Dayton Lot and Home Company, of which 
he was president during the entire period of 
its existence. The association did much to- 



ward the development of Dayton as a town of 
homes, buying tracts of land, platting it and 
laying out streets and improving and selling 
lots and assisting purchasers to build on them. 

Mr. Tieman, a stanch Democrat of the old 
school, is under the new order of things polit- 
ical as stanch a Republican. While he was as 
yet a young man, in the days before the organ- 
ization of Dayton, he was village clerk of 
Jamestown, which later was consolidated with 
Brooklyn under the present name. Afterward 
he was at different times elected a member of 
the city council of Dayton, in which capacity 
he served faithfully eighteen years in all. 
Governor Harmon of Ohio was one of Mr. 
Tieman's boyhood friends, and the ties that 
bound them so long ago have never been sev- 
ered but have been drawn tighter as years have 
come and gone, and after the former's nom- 
ination to his present great office Air. Tieman 
wrote him, referring to tlie old times and con- 
gratulating him on the probability of his elec- 
tion, adding that though a Republican the 
writer would gladly vote for the friend of his 
youth if the latter were only a candidate for the 
governorship of Kentucky instead of the prob- 
able next chief magistrate of the Buckeye 
State. One of Mr. Tieman's cherished pos- 
sessions is Governor Harmon's reply, acknowl- 
edging the receipt of that letter, referring to 
their former intimacy and thanking him for 
the friendship that had prompted him to send 
his message of good cheer. 

Mr. Tieman married Elizabeth Krantz in 
February, 1864. Her father, Jacob Krantz, 
was a native of Pennsylvania and an early 
settler at Jamestown. His old house, built in 
1830, is now the property of one of his de- 
scendants. By trade he was a ship carpenter. 
Mr. and Mrs. Tieman have children named 
Lillie, Fred and Nelson. Clift'ord, another son, 
is deceased. Adopting the religions ideas of 
his respected father, Mr. Tieman has long 
been a Baptist, and he and his wife are de- 
vout and helpful members of the local organi- 
zation of the denomination. For some years 
he was active in the work of the Ancient Or- 
der of United W^orkmen. He has been prom- 
inent as a Knight of Pythias. In 1886 he was 
made a Mason and he has since attained the 
Thirty-second degree, Scottish Rite. As a 
citizen he has been progressive and public 
spirited, aiding to the extent of his ability ev- 
ery movement which in his judgment had 
promised to advance the best interests of his 
city, county and state, and in national politics 
his outlook is broad and optimistic. 

William Thomas Bruner, M. D. — The 
profession of medicine now numbers in its 
ranks some of the most eminent men of the 



1160 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



country, men of great force of character who 
are devoting their lives to alleviating the suf- 
ferings of mankind. As the standard of the 
profession rises, the class of men attracted to 
it becomes higher. One of the prominent 
physicians and specialists, who has made a 
splendid record as a medical practitioner, is 
the gentleman whose name heads this sketch. 

Dr. Bruner was born in Garnetsville, Meade 
county, Kentucky, on March, i8, 1871, the son 
of the Rev. Isaac Willis Bruner, who was 
born in Grayson county, Kentucky, on March 
31, 1836. The original ancestor was a native 
of Germany who settled in Virginia and reared 
a large family, part of whom went to Texas 
and others to Kentucky. 

Rev. I. W. Bruner is a man of finely edu- 
cated mind, and one of the early teachers of 
Meade county, at one time professor in Salem 
College at Garnetsville, Kentucky. For fifty- 
three years he has been a member of the Bap- 
tist church, and is now district superintendent 
of the Kentucky Children's Home Society, and 
he has been for about ten years traveling over 
the entire state, where he is one of the very 
best known men of Kentucky. He went to 
Hodgenville from Garnetsville, where he lived 
thirteen years, thence to Henry countv, and 
then lived in Bowling Green until 1903, when 
he came to Louisville. He married Maggie 
E. Rogers who was born in Grayson county, 
a daughter of Judge Benjamin L. Rogers, a 
niece of Judge Henry Clay Rogers, of Gray- 
son county, and sister of Henry Clay Rogers, 
a prominent stock buyer of Litchfield, Ken- 
tucky. She is still living, her birth having oc- 
curred in 1848, on February 26. 

Rev. I. W. Bruner and his wife were the 
parents of the following children : Professor 
James D. Bruner, Annie Blanch, Dr. W. T. 
Bruner, Professor General Perry Bruner and 
Tula Lee. Professor James D. Bruner, presi- 
dent of Chowan College, Murfreesboro, 
North Carolina, married Elizabeth H. Coolev, 
of Chicago. He was educated in and gradu- 
ated from Georgetown College, received the 
degree of Ph. D. at Johns Hopkins University, 
then spent two years in special study in Eu- 
rope. He was professor of Romance Lan- 
guages at Chicago University for four years, 
until his health broke down. He was after- 
wards professor of Romance Languages in 
the University at North Carolina, then be- 
came president of Chowan College, 1909, and 
was a professor in the University of Illinois 
at Champaign for a few years before going 
to Chicago University. His wife was a teach- 
er of the German language in Illinois Univer- 
sity. The Professor is an author of note and 
has published several books, all on the line of 



his work. Annie Blanch married Dr. B. L. 
Bruner, at present secretary of state of Ken- 
tucky. Professor General Perry Bruner grad- 
uated from Georgetown College and is a di- 
rector of Music at Wayland College, Plain- 
view, Texas, and is unmarried. Tula Lee 
married F. M. Gerard, and resides in Bowling 
Green. 

Dr. William Thomas Bruner spent his boy- 
hood days in Hodgensville, Kentucky, where 
he attended school. He then attended Frank- 
lin (Indiana) College, and finally graduated 
from Fairmont College, Kentucky, in 1886^ 
with the degree of B. S. He later was gradu- 
ated from the Louisville Hospital College of 
Aledicine in 1896, with the degree of M. D. 
In 1890 the Doctor was graduated from the 
Chicago College of Eye, Ear, Nose and 
Throat. He began general practice in Louis- 
ville in 1896, but for ten years he has made 
a specialty of eye, ear, nose and throat treat- 
ment. The Doctor was a teacher in the med- 
ical department of the University of Ken- 
tucky and one year with the University of 
Louisville. His residence and office are sit- 
uated at 2743 Dumesnil street. 

All his life Dr. Bruner has been interested 
in church and Sunday-school work, and he 
has been a member of the Baptist church for 
twenty-six years, and is president of the Ken- 
tucky Baptist Sunday-school LTnion, president 
of the Louisville Baptist Sunday-school Un- 
ion and president of the Long Run Baptist 
Sunday-school Union. He is also superin- 
tendent of the Sunday-school of Parkland 
Baptist church. Dr. Bruner is a member of 
the Jefi^erson County Medical Society, the 
Kentucky State Medical Society, the American 
JMedical Association and the West End Med- 
ical Society In fraternal relations he is a 
Master Mason. 

Dr. Bruner married Eva Morris, who was 
born in Sulphur, Henry county, Kentucky, the 
daughter of the late W. G. Morris, a tobacco 
broker of Sulphur and Louisville and of the 
firm of W. G. Morris & Company, of Louis- 
ville. They have two children, Nellie Ree, 
born July 14, 1890, graduated from the Girl's 
High School of Louisville, and married to E. 
G. Slaughter of Louisville and William 
Thomas Jr., born May 5, 1902. 

McKenzie Robertson Todd, state inspector 
and examiner, and former private secretary 
to Governor Willson, is one of Kentucky's 
foremost Republicans, having been active in 
politics since 1895 and having been connected 
with the Republican State Central Committee 
for years. Mr. Todd is especially well fitted 
both by excellent principles and native ability 
and talent for positions of public trust and re- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1161 

sponsibility, while his executive and diplomatic his convincing and eloquent oratory. While 

ability and his attainments as a forceful and a student at the University of Michigan he 

able campaign speaker have made him a valu- was chosen, after a heated contest, to repre- 

able adjunct to the party to which he pays al- sent the University at the National College 

legiance. League of Republican Clubs at their annual 

AIcKenzie Robertson Todd is by birth an meeting. He is thus by no means a novice in 
Indianan, having been born in Madison, that the practice of moving the popular mind by 
state, November 30, 1870. His parents are eloquent appeal. As another evidence of the 
William and Jane (Robertson) Todd, both favor in which Mr. Todd is held in high places 
natives of Scotland, the land of the thistle, is the fact that he was appointed by Governor 
When young people they decided to cast their Willson a member of the Perry's Victory Cen- 
fortunes with a land of newer civilization and tennial Commission, under an act of the Ken- 
richer resources. They met and married in tucky legislature authorizing the state's execu- 
the Hoosier state and in 1883 they moved to tive head to appoint five Kentuckians to rep- 
Kentucky, where they first located in Shelby- resent the state in 1913 at the centennial cele- 
ville. In 1884, however, they came to Frank- bration at Put-in-Bay, Ohio, 
fort, where the husband followed his business, John Goodman, M. D. — To feel in the eve- 
which was that of a merchant tailor, and two ning of his long life that he has followed na- 
years later, in 1886, his death occurred. He ture's inward laws, that he has not lived for 
left to mourn his loss a widow, three sons and self alone, that he has helped and uplifted 
one daughter. They were by name John R., many of his fellow men, and that he has won 
Thomas R., AIcKenzie R., and Mary J., de- a high and honored position in society, all 
ceased. Mrs. William Todd still resides in these things and many more are the rewards of 
Frankfort, having made her home in the cap- the splendid career of John Goodman, who 
ital city of the Blue Grass state for some stands in the front ranks of physicians and 
twenty-six years. surgeons in Louisville. No estimate too high 

Mr. Todd is indebted for his public school can be set on the works of such a man, and it 
education both to the schools of Indiana and is hoped that the brief record of the main 
to those of Frankfort. After completing his events, of his career, which is all that can be 
course he entered the University of Michigan, attempted in a work of this kind, will be an 
and in 1894 was graduated from its law de- incentive to those who come after him to high- 
partment. He hung up his professional er and nobler living, for it is in biography 
shingle in the home city and in a gratifyingly alone that the best stimulus is to be found, 
short time was the possessor of an excellent Dr. Goodman was born in Frankfort, Ken- 
practice. About this time, although only about tucky, July 22, 1837, the son of John and Jane 
twenty-five years of age, he became interested (Winter) Goodman. The father was a native 
and then active in politics and in 1896 was of Germany, who came to America in 1798, 
appointed assistant attorney general, in which and settled in Frankfort in 1803. The mother 
capacity he served the state until 1899, a pe- was a native of Maryland, the daughter of 
riod of three years. During the brief time Daniel Winter, a native of Wales. Dr. Good- 
that Governor Taylor was governor of Ken- man received his preliminary education in the 
tucky Mr. Todd served as his private secre- private schools of Frankfort, and in 1855 was 
tary. He was again appointed to the office graduated from Georgetown (Kentucky) 
of assistant attorney general, and served for College. Following his graduation he became 
two years more, after which he was made state a student in the office of Dr. Louis Rogers, in 
statistical agent in the United States depart- Louisville. In 1859 ^^^ was graduated from 
ment of agriculture, which position he re- the medical department of Tulane University, 
signed to become private secretary to Cover- near New Orleans, with high honors. That 
nor Willson when that gentleman assumed the same year he began the practice of medicine 
gubernatorial office. In this important capac- in Louisville and has continued the same up 
ity he served with distinction from December to the present time, and is now in active prac- 
31, 1907, to April 25, 1910, when he resigned tice, with offices in the Weissinger-Gaulbert 
to accept the appointment to the position of building. 

state inspector and examiner, succeeding Mr. Dr. Goodman, in addition to his large prac- 

H. M. Thatcher, who had resigned. tice, has held many important positions. In 

Among Mr. Todd's most valuable services i860 he became demonstrator of anatomy in 

must be noted those as a member of the com- the Kentucky School of Medicine, and when 

mittee of five that successfully conducted the that institution was compelled to suspend its 

Republican campaign of 1907 to a triumphant sessions on account of the war between the 

issue. He is especially sought on account of states, he became an instructor in the Univer- 



1162 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

sity Dispensary School of Medicine and at the the daughter of Professor Henry Aliller, one 
same time was adjunct professor of ohstetrics of Louisville's eminent physicians and med- 
in the medical department of the University ical instructors of his day. She died in 1883, 
of Louisville. In 1868, in conjunction with leaving one son, Dr. Henry M. Goodman. In 
Professor H. AI. Bullitt, Professor Henry 1885 Dr. Goodman was again united in mar- 
Miller (his father-in-law) and others he es- riage, his second wife being Mrs. Resetta S. 
tablished the Louisville Medical College, and Kalfus, who is the daughter of the late R. R. 
became professor of obstetrics in the same, Jones of Louisville. Although past the age 
holding that professorship for eleven years, of threescore and ten, he still attends to his 
Lor three years he also held the chair of ob- large practice. He has had a long career as 
stetrics and diseases of women in the Ken- physician, and has always been ready to go to 
tucky School of Medicine. For ten years Dr. the aid of the suffering, and the gratitude of 
Goodman was physician to the Presbyterian those he has aided has been more precious to 
Orphan Asylum. For twenty-five years he him than all pecuniary rewards. For this, as 
was connected with the House of Refuge and well as his great talents and knowledge he now 
for eight years was one of the physicians of holds the esteem of all and as well for his 
the University Dispensary. In all these char- noble and sincere character, 
ities Dr. Goodman gave his time, skill and Theodore L. Burnett. — Mr. Burnett is 
services, gaining little reward pecuniarily but one of the venerable and distinguished mem- 
receiving the gratitude of many he had assist- bers of the bar of his native state and was a 
ed and the approval of his own conscience. member of the Confederate congress as well 

Dr. Goodman was one of the organizers of as a soldier in the ranks of the Confederacy in 

Louisville's first Board of Health in 1868, and the Civil war, prior to which he had given able 

wrote the health ordinances for the govern- service as a soldier in the Mexican war. He 

ment of the health department of the city, has been engaged in the active practice of his 

many of which are still in force. For three profession for nearly three-quarters of a cen- 

years he w'as a member of the Louisville tury, and since 1866 has followed this voca- 

School Board, and for a similar length of time tion in the city of Louisville, where it was 

was a member of the Board of Commissioners also his to hold the position of corporation 

of Public Charities. The Doctor has been a counsel of the city for eighteen consecutive 

frequent contributor to medical literature, his years. He has ever stood exemplar of the 

papers pertaining to obstetrical subjects and most loyal citizenship and as a lawyer and 

the functions of the female organs having at- man of affairs has ever commanded the uni- 

tracted the attention of the profession, and the form confidence and esteem of his fellow men. 

theories of which he was the originator hav- Theodore L. Burnett was born in Spencer 

ing since received the endorsement of eminent county, Kentucky, on the 14th of November, 

physiologists. 1829, and is the only child of John C. and 

Dr. Goodman has always had a fondness for Marie (McGee) Burnett, both of whom were 

the study of the sciences in general, and has likewise born and reared in Kentucky, where 

given special attention to the science of elec- they continued to reside until their death, both 

tricity, in which field his investigations have having passed away before the subject of this 

been of the practical kind, made with a view review w'as ten years of age. The Burnett 

to inventing useful electrical appliances. In family lineage is traced back to stanch Scotch 

conjunction with his son Henry M. (a leading origin and authentic data are available from 

physician of Louisville) he has been the orig- the year 1322. The progenitor of the family 

inator of numerous electrical inventions, accompanied King Robert Bruce to North- 

among them the needle telephone, in which the eastern Scotland in 1322. The King gave a 

principle of the galvanometer was substituted charter to a large landed estate, and as an evi- 

for that of the magnet and armature generally dence of tenure he gave him a horn. It is 

used. Patents on various modifications of this made of ivory and is to this day preserved in 

instrument were issued early in the history of a glass case in Crathes Castle, which castle was 

the telephone in 1880. The Doctor is a mem- erected on the estate so granted in 1595 and 

ber of the Jefferson County Medical Society has been continuously occupied by the head of 

and of the Kentucky State Medical Society, the family, who at this time is Sir Thomas 

He was a member of the American Gynecolog- Burnett, Baronet. 

ical Society at a time when the membership of In the castle there are portraits of the fam- 

that eminent society was limited to forty, ily and among them the portrait of Bishop 

which honor Dr. Goodman considers the Gilbert r)urnet, who was a cousin of the then 

greatest of the many he has received. head of the family. Bishop Burnet was de- 

In T859 Dr. Goodman married Caroline D., scended from the Crimond branch of the fam- 




J 




mBUC UBEAEI] 

I 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KEXTUCKIANS 



1163 



ilv and accompanied William, Prince of Or- 
ange, to England in the capacity of chaplain 
and was a distinguished character in the Rev- 
olution of 1688 that brought William and 
Mary to the throne of England, and was ap- 
pointed Bishop of Salisbury. 

William Burnet, eldest son of Gilbert Bur- 
net, emigrated to America in 1720 and became 
governor of the colonies of New York and 
New Jersey. Later he was Colonial governor 
of ^Massachusetts and New Hampshire, and 
died in Boston in 1728. Dr. Thomas Burnett, 
the youngest son of the Bishop, and his liter- 
ary executor, spelled the name with two t's, as 
is shown in his manuscript endorsement in 
Vol. I. Burnett's History, printed in 1724 and 
now in possession of the family. George Bur- 
nett, son of Dr. Thomas Burnett, emigrated 
to Mrginia in 1721 and he was the father of 
John Burnett, the latter of whom was the 
grandfather of him whose name introduced 
this article. 

As already stated, the parents of Theodore 
L. Burnett died when he was a boy, but .under 
the careful and solicitous direction of his 
guardians he received excellent educational 
advantages. He completed the academic 
course in Transylvania University at Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky, and in the law department of 
this institution he was graduated as a member 
of the class of 1846. In the same year he was 
licensed to practice by the covirt of appeals, 
but he enlisted as a member of the First Ken- 
tucky Cavalry, which was mustered in the 
United States army for service in the war 
with Mexico. Air. Burnett returned to Ken- 
tucky in 1847 ^"d was soon afterward elected 
county attorney for Spencer county. He be- 
'ame one of the leading lawyers of that section 
of the state and controlled a large practice in 
Spencer and adjoining counties until the time 
of the Civil war. when he enlisted for service 
in the Confederate army as a member of the 
force commanded by General Albert Sidney 
Johnston. He remained in the service until, 
under the authority of the provisional govern- 
ment of Kentucky, he was elected a member of 
the provisional congress of the Confederate 
States. He took his seat as a member of that 
^ody early in the autumn of 1861. and when 
iliis provisional body was succeeded by the 
regular congress of the Confederate States of 
America he was elected a member of the house 
of representatives. At the expiration of his first 
term he was re-elected and he continued a 
member of the southern congress until the 
close of the war. He then resumed the prac- 
tice of his profession in Spencer county, 
where he remained until 1866. when he re- 
moved to tfie city of Louisville, where he has 



since been one of the most honored and best 
known members of the local bar. In 1870 he 
was elected corporation counsel of the city 
and by successive re-elections he continued in- 
cumbent of this position for eighteen consecu- 
tive years, having six times been chosen for 
the ofifice by popular vote, and the high regard 
in which he was held. during this time was 
shown by the fact that at no election was there 
an opposing candidate. Since he retired from 
the ofifice of corporation counsel he has prac- 
ticed in the courts of general jurisdiction, in 
the court of appeals of Kentucky and in the 
supreme court of the United States. Mr. Bur- 
nett is a stanch advocate of the principles 
represented by the Democratic party in its 
original condition, and in 1876 he was chair- 
man of the Democratic state central commit- 
tee of Kentucky. In later years he has not 
appeared as prominently in connection with 
the affairs of the political arena. He has been 
essentially progressive and public-spirited as 
a citizen and no worthv cause to advance the 
general welfare of the community has failed 
to receive his support. He has served for 
many years as a trustee and president of the 
University of Louisville and has otherwise 
shown special interest in educational matters. 
Mr. Burnett, some years ago, received the de- 
gree of LL. D. He was a director of the 
Louisville Water Company for many years. 
Both he and his wife are members of the Prot- 
estant Episcopal church. 

In the year 1852 was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Mr. Burnett to Miss Elizabeth S. Gil- 
bert (deceased January 7, 1907), who was 
born in Lincoln county. Kentucky, and reared 
in Spencer county, this state, and of the five 
children of this union only two are now living 
— lohn C. who is a representative member of 
the Louisville bar and who is associated with 
his venerable father in practice; and Mary, 
who is the wife of Dr. W. Edward Grant, a 
successful physician and surgeon of Louisville. 
Concerning Mr. Burnett the following appre- 
ciative estimate has been given by one famil- 
iar with his career : 

"Mr. Burnett has a high appreciation of the 
dignity of the legal profession, and by his per- 
sonal bearing has added luster to the legal 
records of the state. In discharge of his du- 
ties as representative of the city he was courte- 
ous, kind and attentive, with a masterful 
command of the resources of the well equipped 
lawyer and advocate, wise in counsel and vig- 
orous in the active conduct of his cases."' 

Frederick W. Hardwick. — One of the im- 
portant factors of Louisville is the W. T. Pyne 
Mill &: Supply Company, an extensive enter- 
prise that has brought success not alone to the 



Vol. in— 2 



1164 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



stockholders, but has also added to the gen- 
eral prosperity by furnishing employment to 
many workmen and thus promoting commer- 
cial activity. 

Frederick W. Hardwick is well known in 
business circles in Louisville and, in fact, 
throughout a large portion of the state. He 
is now the president of the W. T. Pyne Mill 
& Supply Company, a* mercantile enterprise 
of importance. His success in all his imder- 
takings has been so marked that his methods 
are of interest to the commercial world. He 
has based his business principles and actions 
upon strict adherence to the rules which gov- 
ern industry, economy and strict, unswerving 
integrity. His enterprise and progressive 
spirit have made him a first class business 
man in every sense of the word, and he well 
deserves mention in this volume. 

Mr. Hardwick is a native of England, his 
birthplace having been at Wakefield, on May 
17, 1864, the son of Henry and Emma (Brit- 
tlebank) Hardwick, both natives of England. 
The Hardwick family came to the United 
States in April, 1870, locating first at Clarkes- 
ville, Tennessee, from which they later re- 
moved to Bowling Green, Kentucky, where 
the parents now reside. 

The public schools and Ogden College. Bowl- 
ing Green, furnished Frederick W. Hardwick 
his education, but while at school and much 
against the wishes of his parents, who wanted 
him to remain in school another year and grad- 
uate, he, in 1878, took a position in a dry 
goods store in Bowling Green, in which he 
continued to work until 1885, in which year he 
came to Louisville and took a position as as- 
sistant bookkeeper for the old New York Store. 
He remained in this position for four years 
and next took a position as bill clerk in the 
Ninth Street Tobacco Warehouse, where a 
year later he was made cashier and which po- 
sition he held for six years. Mr. Hardwick's 
next position was with the Farmers' Tobacco 
Warehouse, as cashier, where he was at the 
beginning of the Spanish-American war. He 
assisted in raising Company H, First Kentucky 
Volunteer Infantry, and was mustered into 
the service as second lieutenant of the com- 
pany. After being mustered out of the service 
Mr. Hardwick returned to Louisville and 
again went with the Farmers Tobacco Ware- 
house for a short time. In 1900 he became 
secretary of the W. T. Pyne Mill & Supply 
Company and in 1907 became president of that 
company. 

Mr. Hardwick is a thirty-third degree Ma- 
son. He is a member of Louisville Lodge, No. 
400, F. & A. M., King Solomon Chapter, R. 
A. M., and is past commander of De Molay 



Commandery, Knights Templars, an officer in 
the Grand Commandery of Kentucky, a mem- 
ber of Kosair Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, and of the Grand 
Consistory of Kentucky, Ancient and Accepted 
Scottish Rite, of which he has been grand 
registrar for ten years. He is also a member 
of Cherokee Golf Club, the Audubon Club and 
Post D.. T. P. A. 

What Mr. Hardwick is to-day he has made 
himself, and by constant exertion, associated 
with good judgment, he has raised himself to 
the prominent position which he now holds, 
having the friendship of many who know him 
and the respect of all. His life has been a 
series of advances, in which he has always 
forged ahead and never retrograded, and in 
every position which in his life he has been 
called upon to fill he has been highly successful, 
and few men have more devoted friends, while 
none excel him in unselfish devotion to the 
worthy recipients of his confidence and friend- 
ship. 

Henry Smith Ramey. — There are com- 
paratively few men who figure prominently 
in political, military or public life, and it is 
the men who daily concentrate their energies 
upon business interests that are the real force 
of a nation. They uphold the political and 
legal status and labor for the welfare and up- 
building of the community in which their in- 
terests are centered. The growth and de- 
velopment of every city depends upon its in- 
dustrial and commercial interests and the men 
who are its real promoters are they who stand 
at the head of its business interests, advanc- 
ing general prosperity through well directed 
labor and at the same time winning individual 
success. To this class belongs Henry Smith 
Ramey, president of the Lampton, Crane & 
Ramey Company, manufacturers of paints 
and jobbers of glassware, at 809 W. Main 
street, Louisville. 

Mr. Ramey was born in Evansville, Indi- 
ana, on October 3, 1862, the son of Henry 
Ramey, an inventor and manufacturer of agri- 
cultural implements, who was a native of 
Carroll county, Kentucky, and for over forty 
years was engaged in business in Louisville. 
The grandfather was Henry Ramey of Car- 
roll county, Kentucky, then Gallatin county, 
a farmer all his life and a descendent of the 
old Ramey (Remy) family of Virginia. Sev- 
eral of his brothers were Baptist ministers. 
The mother was Mary Waller Bowles, a na- 
tive of Henrico county, Virginia, who was 
related to the Waller family of Baptist minis- 
ters, of which John L. Waller, the noted 
Kentucky Baptist minister, was a member. 
She was also related to the Bacon family, of 



I 



i 









HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1165 



which Nathaniel Bacon the noted Rebel, was 
a member. The grandfather was Lyddall 
Bowles, of Henrico county, Virginia, and his 
grandmother was Sallie Price of Kentucky. 
The early life of our subject's father was 
spent in Carroll county, Kentucky. He and 
his wife both died in Louisville. 

Henry Smith Ramey, was reared in Louis- 
ville from the time he was six months of age. 
He was educated in the Louisville public 
schools. He started in his business life by 
first accepting a position as bookkeeper with 
John H. Brand & Company, coffee and spice 
dealers, later he was cashier for several 
houses, and in 1893 became secretary, treas- 
urer and general manager for the Lampton, 
Crane & Ramey Company, of which he was 
one of the organizers, and on the withdrawal 
of Mr. Lampton from active connection with 
the company in 1899, Mr. Ramey succeeded 
to the presidency. 

The city has benefited by interests which 
have been promoted by him aside from those 
of a strictly personal business character. Mr. 
Ramey was one of the founders of the Ster- 
ling Paint & Color Company of Louisvilk, 
organized in 1897, of which he is vice-presi- 
dent. He was one of the organizers of, and 
is vice-president of the Allen Motor Car Com- 
pany of Fort Worth, Texas. He is also inter- 
ested in and a director of other corporations. 
He is a member of the Board of Trade and 
Commercial Clubs, as well as the Tavern 
Club and the Louisville Country Club. His 
religious tendencies are with the Baptist faith. 

In citizenship Mr. Ramey stands for all 
that is progressive and beneficial, and in busi- 
ness life for all that is honorable. He has 
been to a great extent the architect of his 
own fortune and has builded wisely and well. 
A man of sound judgment, he never has ar- 
rived quickly at conclusions, but when once 
his mind is made up as to what is the right 
course nothing can deter him from pursuing 
it. He possesses excellent executive and 
business ability, combined with a resistless 
energy and resolute purpose, and while he has 
gained a handsome competence he has never 
selfishly used this for his own interests only, 
but has done what he could to promote the 
welfare of the city and to ameliorate hard 
conditions of life for the unfortunate. He 
recognizes fully man's obligation to his fel- 
low men and throughout his life has been 
actuated by high and honorable principles. 

Walter Fisk Boggess, M. D. — The subject 
of this review in one of Louisville's leading 
physicians, who has become established here 
as one of its ablest representatives. Walter 
Fisk Boggess is a native son, born on the farm 



in Jeft'erson county January 19, 1863. He is 
the son of the Rev. Charles Young Boggess, 
who was a native of Muhlenberg county, Ken- 
tucky, born in 1827, the son of Robert Boggess, 
a native of North Carolina, who came to Ken- 
tucky in 1801, located in Muhlenberg county. 
The mother of Dr. Boggess was Rose M. 
Moorman, the daughter of Alanson Moorman, 
who was a native of Lynchburg, Virginia, and 
came to Meade county, Kentucky, early in life, 
settling in Jefferson county in 1858, where he 
died in 1895, at the age of eighty-eight years. 
His daughter. Rose M., was born in 1837, and 
died in 1905. Rev. Charles Young Boggess 
joined the Louisville Southern Methodist Epis- 
copal Conference in 1854 and became an ear- 
nest worker in the active ministry until within 
the last few years. He now resides in Jeffer- 
son county, Kentucky, and is in his eighty- 
fourth year. 

For a number of years Dr. Walter Fisk 
Boggess accompanied his father, who held pas- 
torates in different towns, and was in conse- 
quence reared in various places and attended 
various public schools, afterward becoming. a 
student at Forrest Academy. He was gradu- 
ated from Vanderbilt University in 1882, with 
the degree of B. A. For two years he held the 
position of assistant instructor of the Greek 
language at that same institution. 

Having decided upon the study of medicine 
as his future life work, he studied in Louisville 
and New York cities and received his M. D. 
degree in 1886. Dr. Boggess has met with 
unqualified success and has occupied a number 
of important positions in connection with his 
profession. He was assistant physician at 
Lakeland Asylum, the State Institution for the 
Insane near Louisville, for two years, and in 
1890, began the regular work of a general prac- 
titioner in Louisville. He was professor of 
practice at the Louisville Medical College and 
is consulting physician at the Louisville City 
Hospital and also at the Deaconess Hospital. 
He is a member of the Jefferson County Medi- 
cal Society, of the Kentucky State Medical 
Society and of the American M'edical Associa- 
tion. 

Dr. Boggess married Lida Jones, the daugh- 
ter of Colonel Stephen Jones of Abbington, 
Virginia. From this union there are two chil- 
dren : Elizabeth and Katherine. 

Dr. Boggess has demonstrated that he has 
thoroughly improved the advantages which 
have been afforded him, and that he was par- 
ticularly well equipped for the active work of 
his profession while still a very young man, 
being but twenty-three years of age when he 
received his. M. D. degree, and his judgment 
and wisdom have been singularly matured by 



1166 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



the discipline which has been his and by his 
devotion to study. Mis hfe has Ijeen one of 
signal usefulness and honor, and it is a pleasure 
to offer even this brief resume and tribute. 

Hox. W'lLLi.wi H. Dyer. — In political as in 
business circles, the busy and useful citizen of 
Newport whose name heads this sketch has 
been of service to the people of this city, county 
and state. Mr. Dyer was born in Newport, 
April 19, 1868, a son of William H. and \'ir- 
ginia (Prentice) Hawthorn Dyer. His father 
was of English birth. His grandfather, Wil- 
liam Dyer of Edinburgh was, with his brother, 
owner of several sea-going vessels, some of 
which he commanded from time to time on 
voyages of greater or lesser extent, and not 
the least interesting chapter in the family his- 
tory is that detailing the particulars of his 
death at sea b}- storm and wreck. The senior 
William H. Dyer came as a boy to- the United 
States with his mother, locating in Cincinnati, 
where early in his manhood he embarked in 
the manufacture of blank books, an enterprise 
in which he was quite successful. After his 
marriage to Virginia Prentice Hawthorn he 
took up his residence in Newport, where he 
died in 1870, at the early age of twenty-seven 
years, and where his widow survived until in 
1876. The latter was a granddaughter of Rich- 
ard Southgate, a prominent Kentucky pioneer 
who is represented by a biographical sketch 
on another page of this work. Her maiden 
name was Hawthorn, her father having been 
Jacob Hawthorn, her mother, Richard South- 
gate's daughter. 

The immediate subject of this sketch was 
reared to manhood in Newport, receiving his 
education from public schools and from a col- 
legiate institution in Cincinnati where he fin- 
ished the prescribed course of study. When he 
was about nineteen years old he went to Paris, 
Texas, and there began the real battle of life. 
After a time he transferred his business head- 
quarters to W^aco, in that state, where he pros- 
pered through operations in real estate. Re- 
turning to Newport, he was again amid the 
scenes of his -childhood and youth, where he 
has been doubly orphaned and w^here he had 
been carefully brought up by his grandfather 
and grandmother Hawthorn, from whose home 
he had gone forth a few years before to seek 
fortune in the far South. It was to take charge 
of his grandmother's estate that he came back. 
That he settled in due time, meanwhile giving 
attention to some other business. For some 
years he has been successful as a broker and 
real estate dealer. He was for several terms 
president of the Covington and Newport Real 
Estate Exchange and for more than ten years 
has been a director of the Newport National 



Bank. His social relations have been various, 
and he was long a member of the Supreme 
Council of the Ancient Arabic Order. He is 
a Mason and a Knight of Pythias. 

In his politics Mr. Dyer is a Republican, 
and he has for some years been active in the 
work of his party. In 1895 he was elected to 
represent his assembly district m the Kentucky 
legislature, and in 1900 to represent his sena- 
torial district in the state senate. From the 
beginning of his political career he has been 
active and influential in the promotion of good 
government. He was a leader in the fight 
against gambling and pool rooms, which was 
inaugurated in Campbell county about 1905 
and which after an aggressive campaign ex- 
tending through three years swept all gambling 
from that division of the state. He was during 
the entire period chairman of the Law and 
Order League and of the Citizens' Committee. 
A memorable part of his good work in the 
senate was his authorship of the Ouadriennial 
Assessment Bill, which became a law and is in 
beneficent operations in cities of the second 
class throughout the state. In all important 
deliberations of the senate during his member- 
ship of it he took an active part, and his prom- 
inence is attested by his having been, with 
Governor Cox, a member of the steering com- 
mittee for the Republican party. In all his 
public work he has had in view the greatest 
good to the greatest number of his fellow citi- 
zens. It has not always been pleasant work, 
but history shows that it has been successful. 
It has been successful too in the face of bitter 
opposition that has stopped at nothing that 
promised to advance its interests. His compen- 
sation is mostly in his consciousness of having 
fought good fights for the right and in the 
recognition by the best element of the citizen- 
ship of Campbell county and the great state 
of Kentucky of the fact that he has always 
done so consistently and persistently and with 
utter disregard of his own personal interests. 

Edward Carl Hoagland, Jr. — In financial 
circles of Prospect, Kentucky, Edward Carl 
Hoagland is well known, for he is now accept- 
ably filling the position of cashier in the Bank 
of Prospect, which bank he organized after 
having learned the banking business thoroughly 
with others. Mr. Hoagland was born in Sul- 
phur, Henry county, Kentucky, September 20, 
1880, the son of Edward C. and Cora O. 
(Morris) Hoagland. 

The Hoaglands of Kentucky are of Scotch 
stock, and this branch of the family was 
founded in Kentucky by Isaac Hoagland, who 
with two of his brothers came from Scotland, 
Isaac settling in Woodford county, Kentucky, 
the other brothers settling respectively in In- 



i-^^ Si iff rosiL 
[C LIBRAll 




t. d ¥~M^^ 




^■<^. 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1167 



diana and Illinois. Isaac removed from Wood- 
ford county to Trimble county, where he died. 
Edward C. Hoagland, Sr., removed from 
Trimble county to Oldham county and for 
several years operated a woolen factory, then 
returned to the farm, where he now resides. 
He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, South, and of the Masonic fraternity. 
Mr. Hoagland married Cora V. Morris, who 
was born in Henry county Kentucky, the 
daughter of Squire John Morris, who was a 
Kentuckian by birth and lived all his life in 
Henry county. The children of Edward C. 
Hoagland, Sr., and wife are as follows: Ethel 
P., who married F. D. Hancock, of Sulphur, 
Kentucky; Edward C, Jr., subject; Arthur W., 
deceased ; Frank M., assistant cashier of the 
Bank of Prospect, Kentucky ; Martha L., and 
William G. 

Edward C. Hoagland, Jr., was reared in 
Henry county and was educated at Fairmont 
College, Sulphur, Kentucky, and in the Na- 
tional Normal University at Lebanon, Ohio. 
In 1901 he entered the Deposit Bank in Sul- 
phur, Kentucky, to learn the banking busi- 
ness and in February, 1903, he organized 
the Bank of Prospect, which opened for busi- 
ness February 15, 1903, with a paid up 
capital of fifteen thousand dollars and with 
William Johnston as president and Mr. 
Hoagland as cashier, which order has since 
been continued. In 1906 Mr. Hoagland 
organized the Bank of St. Matthews at St. 
Matthews. Kentucky, but after a few years 
sold his interests in that bank. Throughout 
all his business career he has been closely asso- 
ciated with monied interests, and his name in 
hanking circles is one which carries with it 
weight and confidence, for he has always dis- 
played thorough understanding of banking 
methods and the progressive spirit which en- 
ables one to advance beyond existing conditions 
into fields giving a broader outlook and wider 
scope. 

Mr;. Hoagland is a member of the Masonic 
fraternity, a Master and Royal Arch Mason, 
and also an Odd F'ellow. On April 29, 1899, he 
married Ola Mary, the daughter of William J. 
Johnston, president of the Bank of Prospect, 
To them has been born one daughter, Catherine 
Clay. 

William J. Johnston, president of the 
Bank of Prospect and one of the leading men of 
Oldham county, Kentucky, was born near 
Crestwood, Oldham county, Kentucky, July 
10, 1852, the son of James and Julia (Speer) 
Johnston, natives of ^"irginia. Mr. Johnston 
was reared on the farm and secured a common 
school education. He has followed agricul- 
tural pursuits all his life, meeting with de- 



served success and now owns and occupies a 
fine farm in Oldham county, a minor part of 
the land lying in Jefferson county. Through 
practical, profitable and scientific farming he 
has become well equipped for the duties which 
devolve upon him in his official capacity. For 
a number of years he was a member of the 
Board of Directors of the Crestwood State 
Bank, at Crestwood, Kentucky, and was one 
of the organizers and incorporators and the 
first president of the Bank of Prospect. He 
is also president of the Orchard Grass-Seed 
Commission Company, which is an organiza- 
tion of agriculturists. 

Mr. Johnston married Alberta Smith, who 
was born in Oldham county, Kentucky, the 
daughter of Isaac Clay Smith, a native of Vir- 
ginia, but whose parents were pioneers of 
Kentucky. To Air. and Mrs. Johnston children 
were born as follows : Clay Smith, a farmer on 
the home place in Oldham county, and Ola 
Mary,, wife of Mr. E. C. Hoagland, Jr., cash- 
ier of the Bank of Prospect. 

Ezra Offutt Witherspoon, M. D. — Dr. 
Witherspoon is a young and successful phy- 
sician of Louivsille, a man who has made 
his mark among older professional men, who 
has demonstrated that though his years are 
few his acquirements have preceded them to 
the extent that the future holds remarkable 
promise. His ancestry is one to be proud of, 
for he is the son of a line of professional 
men of intellect, education and success. Dr. 
Witherspoon was born in Lawreiiceburg, 
Kentucky, on October 3, 1878, the son of 
Oran H' and Mary Edmonia (Ofifutt) W^ith- 
erspoon, the father born in Lawrenceburg, 
Kentucky, on June 14, 1842, and died Janu- 
ary 5. 1901, and the mother, born in Scott 
county, Kentucky, on February 4, 1845, is 
still living and now residing in Louisville. 
The grandfather was Dr. John W^itherspoon, 
who was a pioneer physician of Lawrence- 
burg, Kentucky, where he practiced for many 
years and later established the J. & J. A. 
\\'itherspoon Bank, which afterwards became 
the Anderson County Deposit Bank and is 
now the Anderson National Bank. He was 
also associated with Mr. Safifel in operating a 
transportation business, carrying freight and 
passengers from Louisville to Danville via 
Frankfort. Dr. Oran H. Witherspoon, the 
father of our subject, was educated first in 
the common schools of the neighborhood and 
then entered the Kentucky Military Institute, 
finally being graduated from the Jefiferson 
Medical College, Philadelphia, and Bellevue 
Medical College. New York City, graduating 
from both in 1865. He then engaged in prac- 
tice in Lawrenceburg with his father, sue- 



1168 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

ceeded his father and continued there all his the medical department of the University of 

life. He was president of the Anderson Louisville in 1887, and began the practice of 

County Medical Society and was health officer medicine in association with his brother, W. J., 

for Anderson county and also the city of in Sulphur, Kentucky, and in 1891 he located 

Lawrenceburg. in Louisville. He has been on the staff of St. 

Dr. E. O. Witherspoon, the subject of our Anthony's Hospital since the founding of that 
sketch, was reared in Lawrenceburg and at- institution in 1904. He is a member of the 
tended the public schools and later on the Jeft'erson County Medical Society, the Ken- 
Georgetown (Kentucky) College. He was tucky State Medical Society, the Louisville 
graduated from the Hospital Medical College, Clinical Society, the Louisville Society of Med- 
Louisville, in 1901 and for several years took icine, the Mississippi Valley Medical Society, 
post-graduate courses at New York, Phila- the American Medical Association and the 
delphia and Baltimore. He was interne at National Anti-Tuberculosis Congress, 
the Gray Street Infirmary for one year, then The Doctor is a deacon of Frankfort Avenue 
engaged in general practice in 1902. The Baptist church. He was married in June, 1891, 
Doctor was appointed assistant health officer to Fronia L. Shouse, who was born in Henry 
of the city of Louisville in November, 1909. county, Kentucky, the daughter of Dudley L. 
He is ex-president of his Alumni Associa- Shouse. To this union three daughters have 
tion of the Hospital Medical College. He been born : Fannie Newton, aged sixteen years ; 
taught in the college seven years, beginning Helen, aged eight years; and Edith Mason, 
as assistant in chemistry and attaining a aged four years. As a physician Dr. Morris 
professorship in that department. He re- ranks among the most skilled in this part of 
signed to take a position as assistant in the state, and is constantly broadening his 
surgery in the same college, and attained knowledge and promoting his efficiency as a 
a professorship in that branch. Dr. Wither- practitioner by reading, investigation and ex- 
spoon is associated with the staff of periment. By his skill he has attained high 
the City Hospital and the Home for the In- standing and is meeting with excellent financial 
curables. He is a member of the Society of success as w^ell. 

Physicians and Surgeons, the Louisville Acad- Thomas Lewis Edelen. — It cannot be denied 

emy of Medicine, the Jefferson County Med- that the Kentucky bar is one which has more 

ical Society, the Kentucky State Medical So- than its quota of sound and brilliant reasoners 

ciety and the American Medical Association, and forensic lights, whose reputation extends 

He is also a member of the Commercial Club, far beyond the limits of the state. Naturally 

and state head physician for the Modern the greatest number of these are to be found in 

Woodmen of America. the capital city and among the most able repre- 

Dr. Witherspoon married Nell E. Newman, sentatives of the profession in Frankfort is 

who was born in Bardstown, and is the daugh- Thomas Lewis Edelen. He is a native of Ken- 

ter of W. H. Newman, of Louisville. tucky and like all true Kentuckians, very loyal 

loHN Mason Morris, M. D., is a native son to the state which gave him birth. The scenes 
of the EUue Grass state, born in Henry county, upon which he first opened his eyes were in 
Kentucky, on the 25th day of April, 1861. He Harrodsburg, Mercer county, and the date of 
is a prominent member of the medical profes- his nativity was December 28, 1857. The par- 
sion of Louisville and his marked ability and ents of Mr. Edelen were James H. and Alary 
careful preparation have gained him distinction (Lewis) Edelen, the former a native of Leb- 
in the line of his chosen work. He is the son of anon and the latter of Harrodsburg, and 
David Morris, who was a native of Woodford through their union the Scotch, English and 
county, Kentucky. The great-grandfather Mor- Welsh elements are mingled in the veins of 
ris and his brother came over from Ireland in their son. The paternal grandfather, Leonard 
Colonial days, one settling in the North and one Edelen. was a native Kentuckian, and his wife 
in Virginia. The mother of the Doctor was bore the maiden name of Bruce. Her family 
Amanda Watkins. the daughter of John Wat- was of Scotch origin, as is very evident by the 
kins, a Kentuckian. The father of our subject name, and they had crossed the Atlantic at 
died in 1896, at the age of seventy-six years, an early day, settling first in Virginia and sub- 
and the mother died in May, 1910, aged eighty- sequently coming over to Kentucky. The great- 
three years. grandfather Edelen was a native of Maryland 

Dr. Morris was reared on the farm. He and the tracing of the lineage discovers his 

graduated from Fairmount College, Henry forbears living in England. The Welsh ele- 

county, in 1886, and then taught in that insti- ment enters through the mother of Mr. Edelen, 

tution for two years. He was graduated from the Lewis family in Kentucky being an old and 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1169 



numerous one, coming originally from Virginia. 
James H. Edelen, the father of Thomas Lewis 
Edelen, was a drug merchant, and in 1858, the 
year following the birth of the subject, he 
moved from Harrodsburg to Lebanon, and it 
was in the latter city that both he and his wife 
died. They were the parents of two children, 
Mr. Edelen's sister having become the wife of 
Mr. L R. Gilkeson of Lebanon. Mr. Edelen 
passed his boyhood and youth in Lebanon and 
in private schools was prepared for college. In 
September, 1873, he entered what was then 
Centre College, at Danville, Kentucky, and in 
1877 he was graduated from that institution 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. His un- 
usual ability was evident even in his student 
days, and he received the honors of his class. 
He had already come to a conclusion as to his 
life work and immediately took up the study 
of law at Lebanon under William B. Harri- 
son, and in January, 1879, was licensed to 
practice law. He hung out his shingle at Le- 
banon and practiced there until 1891, going 
through the usual experiences of the young 
lawyer, winning encouragement even from de- 
feat, possiblv staring at a blank wall for a time 
in the fashion of the Hon. Peter Sterling, but 
eventually finding himself and winning the 
double benefitiof prestige and practice. In 1891 
he located in F"rankfort and his subsequent 
career has been most gratifying. He was in 
partnership with former Governor Knott until 
that gentleman became dean of the law depart- 
ment of Central University, and for the first 
three years of his residence in the capital city 
he was state reporter of the Kentucky court 
of appeals and issued meanwhile volumes 104, 
105, 106 and 107 of the Kentucky Reports. He 
eventually formed a partnership with the late 
United- States senator. William Lindsay, with 
whom he was associated from 1908 until the 
death of Senator Lindsay in October. 1909. At 
present he is associated \vith Mr. W. O. Davis 
in the practice of the law and their partnership 
is one of recognized strength and reliability. 

Mr. Edelen is one of Kentucky's prominent 
Republicans and is very active in the further- 
ance of the policies of the party. His lodge re- 
lations are confined to membership in the Bene- 
volent and Protective Order of Elks and he is 
Presbyterian in religious faith. 

On November 19, 1884, Mr. Edelen forsook 
the ranks of the bachelors, taking as the lady to 
preside over his household Miss Eliza Bull, of 
St. Louis, Missouri. She is a native of St. 
Louis and a daughter of John C. Bull. They 
have three children: Lida P., J. Leonard and 
Mary Lewis Edelen. Another daughter. Ruth 
by name, died at the age of four years. 

Mr. Edelen's activities are not confined to the 



legal profession and among his other interests 
is the Capital Trust Company of Frankfort, 
of which he is president. 

Roy Lewis Carter, M. D., a well-known 
physician of Louisville, Kentucky, was born on 
a farm in Oldham county, Kentucky, Septem- 
ber 14, 1873. He is the son of Joseph Wilson 
and Fanny (Ingram) Carter, both natives of 
Oldham county, Kentucky. The paternal 
gi'and father was Stephen O. Carter, a native of 
Virginia, and his wife, also a Virginian, was 
Susan Maddex. The maternal grandfather 
was Colonel William Ingram, a native of Ken- 
tucky, who was a large farmer and slave owner. 
He married Rebecca Hitt. who was born in 
Oldham county, the daughter of Joseph Hitt. 
She is still living in Oldham county, in her 
eighty-sixth year. The parents of the Doctor 
were married on the old Ingram homestead 
in Oldham county, and they became the par- 
ents of the following children: James Scott, 
on the old home place in Oldham county, Ken- 
tucky; Dr. Carter, subject; Susan :\Iay, and 
Ingram. The mother was born July 31, 185 1, 
and died October 24, 1903. The father of the 
Doctor was born July 21, 1846, and has fol- 
lowed farming all his life in Oldham county. 
The Carters have always been Baptists in their 
religious faith, while the Ingrains have been 
allied with the Christian church. 

Dr. Roy Lewis Carter secured his early edu- 
cation in the Oldham county schools. He came 
to Louisville in 1890 and worked as a clerk 
for the Louisville & Nashville Railroad Com- 
pany from 1890 to 1895. Having made up 
his mind to make the medical profession his 
life study he, in 1895. entered the Hospital 
College of Louisville, Kentucky, from where 
he was graduated in June, 1898. He entered 
into the practice of medicine in Louisville and 
found his ambitions were justified with the 
success of his endeavors, and if a successful 
and growing practice is an earnest of the fu- 
ture he has every reason to be satisfied with 
his outlook towards his future business life. 

Dr. Carter is a member of the Jefiferson 
County ^Medical Society, the Kentucky State 
Medical Society, the Masonic Order and the 
Junior Order of American Mechanics. He is 
a member of the Board of Trustees of the 
Baptist Orphan's Home, and a member of the 
Long Run Baptist Mission Board. In March, 
1891, the Doctor joined the East Baptist church 
and was elected and ordained deacon of the 
church in 1898, also serving as church clerk 
from 1908 until he left that church on January 
I, 1910. At the present time he is a member 
and Deacon of Highland Baptist church. 

Dr. Carter married Miss Addie Matilda 
Plaster, who was born in Owen county, Ken- 



1170 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



tucky, the daughter of WilHam M. and Sarah 
E. Plaster, the marriage taking place on Octo- 
ber 4, 1892, in Louisville. They have two 
children, Weible Stewart Carter, born Octo- 
ber 18, 1893, graduated from the Louisville 
Male High School on June 16. 1910, receiving 
a gold medal in chemistry ; William Taylor 
Carter, was born July 14, 1899. 

William Joseph Baker, of the firm of 
W. J. Baker & Company, manufacturers of 
fly screens and sheet metal and wire special- 
ties, Newport, Kentucky, was born on a farm 
in Campbell county May 25, 1866, a son of 
William and Lucinda (Nicholson) Baker, 
the father a native of Campbell county, the 
mother a native of Bracken county, Ken- 
tucky. Matthew Baker, grandfather of the 
immediate subject of this notice, was born in 
Pennsylvania and came while yet a young 
man to Kentucky, locating in pioneer times 
in what is now Campbell county. It is re- 
called as an interesting incident in the family 
history that he made his way down the Ohio 
liver by means of a log raft, on which were 
packed such few things as he was enabled 
thus to bring to the new country. He located 
on a farm, became successful and prominent 
as a farmer and died at eighty-six, after a 
life of great activity and usefulness. His 
wife was Betsy Dye, a member of another 
pioneer family of Campbell county. She is 
well remembered by old residents in the vi- 
cinity of the old Baker homestead, where she 
died, deeply regretted by all who knew of her 
sterling character. William Baker, son of 
Matthew and Betsy (Dye) Baker, was reared 
and educated so far as was possible that he be- 
came a good and prosperous farmer, and the 
annals of his neighborhood show that he well 
met the expectations of his parents in that re- 
spect. He died on his homestead in 1904, aged 
eighty-four years. His widow is living at 
Clifton, a suburb of Newport. Of the four 
children of this worthy couple three are liv- 
ing. 

William J. Baker, second in order of birth 
of the children of William and Lucinda 
(Nicholson) Baker, was educated in common 
schools near his boyhood home and brought 
up as a farmer's boy of all work. At nine- 
teen he entered the employ of the Standard 
Carriage Goods Company, of Cincinnati, 
which later became the Higgins Manufactur- 
ing Company of Newport. For this concern, 
under different organizations, he worked 
faithfully and intelligently for seventeen 
years, constantly gaining in usefulness and 
in earning capacity. On August 15, 190 1, he 
engaged in business for himself in Cincinnati. 
The smallness of his beginning may be in- 



ferred from the fact that his entire business 
in its first month amounted to only forty-two 
dollars. Its noteworthy growth is attested by 
the further fact that now its average monthly 
aggregate is eight thousand dollars, with a 
prospect of soon advancing to the ten thou- 
sand dollar mark. On August 15, 1904, he 
moved his enterprise to Newport, where he 
employs about sixty men the year round. 
The growth of this fine manufacturing busi- 
ness under his management speaks well for 
his ability as an organizer and promoter. He 
has taken his place among the leading manu- 
facturers in the Cincinnati district, the prod- 
ucts of his factory are sold throughout a wide 
territory and in some respects his enterprise 
has already attained to national reputation. 

In other directions Mr. Baker finds time 
and inclination to be active and useful. He 
has long been interested in building associa- 
tions and is a director of two. He was one of 
the organizers of the Daylight Building and 
Loan Association and of the Clifton Building 
and Loan Association, and was a leading spir- 
it in the organization of the Citizens' Com- 
mercial and Savings Bank of Newport, of the 
board of directors of which he is a member. 
Of the town of Southgate, where he lives, he 
is one of the trustees. In his political affilia- 
tion he is a Democrat and it may be added 
that he is not without a recognized influence 
in important public movements of interest to 
his fellow citizens of Campbell county. It is 
of record that he was one of the promoters 
and organizers of the Newport Driving and 
Fair Association, of which he has been presi- 
dent during all its history, dating from 1909. 
To this now popular institution he gave five 
years of preliminary work, meeting objec- 
tions, overcoming obstacles, smoothing the 
way and pushing it gradually and with great 
efifort to certain success. He is a Knight of 
Pythias, identified with Eureka Lodge, No. 7, 
and as such is widely known in that order. 

In 1897 he married Miss Elizabeth Burke, 
born in Newport, a daughter of Gerhart 
Burke, a basket maker well known in busi- 
ness circles until his death, which occurred in 
Newport when he had attained to his fifty- 
second year. 

John Means. — "A truly great life," says 
Webster, "when Heaven vouchsafes so rare 
a gift, is not a temporary flame, burning bright 
for a while and then expiring, giving place to 
returning darkness. It is rather a spark of 
ferA'ent heat as well as radiant light, with 
power to enkindle the common mass of hu- 
man mind ; so that when it glimmers in its own 
decay, and finally goes out in death, no light 
follows, but it leaves the world all light, all 



1 



■ .■iwr/iwii 



T/:irfci VVi'.T^r -s-j-*; 



131 






HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1171 



on fire, from the potent contact of its own 
spirit." This quotation appeared in the me- 
morial tribute preached by Rev. Wilham D. 
Ryan, pastor of the Christian church, at the 
time of Mr. Means' death, February 14, 1910, 
and it is particularly apropos of his life. Fol- 
lowing will be given a brief resume of Air. 
Means' career with further extracts form the 
article referred to above. 

John Means was one of the founders of 
Ashland, Kentucky, and was one of the most 
active factors in its subsequent upbuilding 
and development, besides which he was an es- 
sentially progressive business man, carrying 
successfully forward large industrial and fi- 
nancial interests. His ancestry was of Scotch 
origin, the name at one time having been pre- 
ceded by the syllable Mac. In America Alayne 
and Maynes are traceable to the same origin 
and the Irish are disposed to spell the name 
Main or Mains. In Glasgow the name John 
Main appears in the record of 1666 among 
the "Martyrs of Covenant." Mr. Means' an- 
cestors settled in North Ireland about the time 
of the reign of William III and have always 
been Presbyterians in their religious faith. 
In America they appear in two or three 
branches, one of which originally settled in 
New England, another in Pennsylvania, mem- 
bers of which subsequently removed to South 
Carolina, and others having come to Carolina 
direct from Ireland. William Means settled 
on the Juanita river, in Juanita county, Penn- 
sylvania, in a early day, removing thence to 
South Carolina, where he became an earnest 
partisan of the colonies in their early troubles 
with Great Britain. Several of his sons par- 
ticipated in the Revolutionary war, the young- 
est of whom was Colonel John Aleans, grand- 
father of the subject of this review. Colonel 
Means was a native of Union district. South 
Carolina, where his birth occurred on the 14th 
of March, 1770. He was an extensive planter, 
an officer of the state militia and a member 
of the South Carolina state legislature during 
the session of 1815-16. He was strongly op- 
posed to slavery in principle and in 1819 he 
removed to Ohio, taking with him his twenty- 
four slaves, to whom he gave their freedom. 
He settled in Adams county, Ohio, and be- 
came a farmer and iron manufacturer, being 
one of the pioneers in the iron industry and 
being largely interested in the building and 
operating of the first iron furnace in the Buck- 
'"ye state. He was a member of the Ohio 
legislature 1821^-27 and was an eminently in- 
fluential man in business and public affairs. 
He married Ann Williamson, who was a na- 
tive of South Carolina and whose maternal 
ancestry was traced back to Sir Isaac Newton. 



Colonel Means died near Manchester, Ohio, 
on the 15th of March, 1837, his wife passing 
away on the 17th of August, 1840. Of their 
six children, Thomas Williamson Means, fa- 
ther of John Means, of this review, was born 
on the 23d of November, 1803, at Spartan- 
burg, South Carolina. He spent six years in 
a select school estabHshed by his father, 
chiefly for the education of his own children, 
and he secured not only a good English train- 
ing but also gained a respectable knowledge 
of the classics. After the family's removal to 
Ohio he spent some time on his father's farm 
and he also clerked in a store at West Union, 
in which his father had an interest. In 1826 
he took a flat boat loaded with produce to 
New Orleans and after his return to Ohio he 
became storekeeper at Union Furnace, which 
his father and others were then building, 
some four miles distant from Hanging Rock, 
this being the first blast furnace to be built in 
Ohio in the Hanging Rock iron region ; he 
had the pleasure of first firing this furnace. 
In 1837 he in company with David Sinton be- 
came the owner of the Union Furnace, which 
was rebuilt in 1844. In the following year 
was constructed the Ohio Furnace. In 1847 
Thomas W. Means became interested in and 
helped to build the Buena Vista Furnace, in 
what is now Boyd county, Kentucky, and in 
1852 he purchased the Bellefonte Furnace, in 
Kentucky. In 1854 he helped build the 
Vinton, Ohio, Furnace and in 1863, 
with others, bought the Pine Grove Fur- 
nace and Hanging Rock Coal Works; in 
the following year he became one of the own- 
ers of the Amanda Furnace, in Kentucky. 
In 1845 he and David Sinton built a tram road 
to the Ohio Furnace, this being one of the first 
roads of its kind in the country. In connec- 
tion with the Culbertsons he built the Prin- 
cess, a stone coal furnace, ten miles from Ash- 
land. Under the supervision of him and Da- 
vid Sinton the experiments for introducing 
the hot blast were first made and at their 
Union Furnace they put up the second hot 
blast in the United States, only a few years 
after its introduction in England, in 1828. 
He was longer engaged and doubtless more 
extensively and directly concerned in the 
growth and prosperity of the iron business 
than any other man in the Ohio valley. Be- 
sides his extensive furnace interests he had 
considerable real estate holdings, owning as 
much as eighteen thousand acres of ore, coal 
and farm lands in Ohio and nearly thirty 
thousand acres in Kentucky. He was the or- 
iginator of the Cincinnati & Big Sandy Packet 
Company and was a principal stockholder and 
one of tlie incorporators of the Norton Iron 



1172 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



Works, at Ashland. lie helped lay out and 
develop Ashland ; was a large stockholder in 
the Ironton Iron Railway; was one of the 
founders of the Second National Bank of 
Ironton, Ohio, being president of the latter in- 
stitution for a number of years after its or- 
ganization, in 1864; and was a director of the 
Ashland National Bank. In his political con- 
victions he was originally a Whig, having 
cast his first vote for John Quincy Adams for 
president. At the time of the founding of the 
Republican party, in 1858, he became a stanch 
supporter of its principles and policies and 
during the Civil war he was an ardent Union 
man. He passed the latter years of his life 
at his home in Ashland, in which place he 
took up his residence on the 6th of April, 
1882, and his death occurred June 8, 1890. 
He was married on the 4th of December, 
1828, to Sarah Ellison, a native of Buckeye 
Station, Adams county, Ohio, and a daughter 
of John Ellison, an early settler in that coun- 
ty. She passed to her reward at Hanging Rock, 
in 1 87 1, at the age of sixty-one years. They 
became the parents of nine children, eight of 
whom grew to maturity, of which John Aleans 
was the first in order of birth. 

John Means, the immediate subject of this 
review, was born at West Union, Adams 
county, Ohio, on the 21st of September, 1829. 
He was afl'orded excellent educational advan- 
tages in his youth but on account of ill health 
left Marietta College, without graduating, in 
1848. In the following year he pursued a spe- 
cial business course and began life as store- 
keeper at the Ohio Furnace, then owned by 
his father and David Sinton. of Cincinnati. 
Later he became bookkeeper at the furnace 
and in 185 1 went to Buena Vista Furnace, in 
Boyd county, Kentucky, where he soon as- 
sumed the position of manager, retaining this 
position until 1855, in which year he located at 
Catlettsburg, where he became financial agent 
and supply agent for the furnace, acting in 
that capacity until the inception of the Civil 
war, which caused the fires to be extinguished 
in these great furnaces. In 1857 he estab- 
lished his home at Ashland, where he contin- 
ued to reside during the balance of his life. 
He was one of the originators, in 1856, of the 
Cincinnati & Big Sandy Packet Company, a 
business comprised chiefly of large freighters 
in the iron region. This concern was incor- 
porated in 1866, after which time Air. Means 
was a director and a large stockholder in the 
sam.e for a number of years. In 1856 he be- 
came a director in the Kentucky Iron, Coal 
and Manufacturing Company, organized for 
the iMir])ose of founding and building the city 
of Ashland and for the establishment of fac- 



tories and railways. In 1865 he was elected 
president of that company and served in that 
capacity for many years. He was one of the 
organizers of the Lexington & Big Sandy 
Railway Company, Eastern division, in which 
he was a large stockholder, served as director 
and vice-president and was elected president in 
1870, this being one of the largest and most 
successful corporations in this section of Ken- 
tucky. To this concern belongs the Ashland 
h\irnace, which was originated and planned 
by him, the entire plant having been built un- 
der his supervision : his twin daughters had 
the honor of first "firing" this great furnace, 
the date being August 30, 1869. Mr. Means 
was one of the organizers of the Ashland Coal 
Company ; the Hanging Rock Iron & Coal 
Company ; and later he was one of the princi- 
pal owners of the Pine Grove, the Union and 
Ohio Furnaces, and the coal-mining interests 
of Hanging Rock, Ohio. He was one of the 
directors of the Norton Iron Works and was 
treasurer of that company while it was in 
progress of construction, in 1872. In the fol- 
lowing year he was one of the organizers of 
the Low Moor Iron Company, of \'irginia, 
becoming president of the same at the time of 
organization. He had a large interest in the 
fifty thousand acres of mineral and other 
lands of the above companies and he was gen- 
erally concerned in the extensive enterprises 
of his father, who in turn had interests in the 
son's affairs. In 1856 he helped organize the 
Bank of Ashland, in which he was incumbent 
of the position of cashier from January, 1866, 
to July, 1869, and after resigning which posi- 
tion 'he continued as a director in the bank 
until its liquidation, in 1872, and the organiza- 
tion of its successor, the Ashland National 
Bank, of which he became vice-president. In 
1870 he was interested in laying out the town 
of Russell, Kentucky, opposite Ironton, Ohio, 
and in the same year he bought land and laid 
out the Ashland cemetery, being trustee in 
management of the latter for a number of 
years. He was among the first to uncover the 
mineral wealth of Eastern Kentucky and was 
largely instrumental in bringing capital and 
skill to this section for its proper development. 
In politics Mr. Means was ever aligned as 
a stalwart supporter of the cause of the Re- 
publican party and during the war of the Re- 
bellion he was a strong Union man. In i860 
Mr. Means was elected trustee of the town of 
Ashland and served continuously in that ca- 
pacity and as a member of the city council ' 
for many years, some thirty in all. He was 
actively connected with every movement in 
upbuilding the community since the establish- 
ment of Ashland. During the Civil war he 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1173 



was commissioned by the military board of the 
state to forward and pass over pubUc ways 
all soldiers, recruits and war equipage in this 
part of Kentucky and in 1872 he was ap- 
pointed, by Governor Leslie, as one of five 
commissioners from Kentucky to confer with 
five commissioners from each of seven othei 
states to present a memorial to congress for 
the purpose of improving the Ohio river. He 
owned the Ashland Academy property and 
was a most liberal patron ot education and 
an earnest supporter of the common-school 
system. In 1874 he was Republican candi- 
date to represent his district in congress and 
while he received a heavy majority of the 
votes cast in his home county, the opposition 
majority precluded the possibility of his elec- 
tion. He was a man of the most extraordi- 
nary ability and capacity and never undertook 
any cause or work, which he did not succeed 
in bringing to a favorable issue. His religious 
faith coincided with the teachings of the Pres- 
byterian church and he was a loyal and gen- 
erous contributor to all matters concerning the 
church of this denomination in Ashland. 

On the 25th of October, 1854, was solem- 
nized the marriage of Mr. Means to Mrs. Har- 
riet E. Perkins, the youngest daughter of Dr. 
Samuel Prescott Hildreth, of Marietta, Ohio. 
Dr. Hildreth was a member of the Ohio leg- 
islature, was assistant state geologist and was 
one of the most learned and most prominent 
men in that state. Mr. and Mrs. Means be- 
came the parents of the following children — 
Thomas Hildreth is residing in the old home- 
stead at Ashland; Eliza Isabella is the wife 
of William B. Seaton, of Ashland, concern- 
ing whom a sketch appears elsewhere in this 
work ; Lillian and Rosalie, twins, the former 
of wdiom is the wife of William E. Maynard, 
of Brooklyn, New York, and the latter is the 
wife of Dr. Ernst Luther Bullard, of Rock- 
ville, Maryland; Harold maintains his home 
at Ashland and Ellison Cooke resides at Low 
Moor, Virginia. Mrs. Means was summoned 
to eternal rest on the 13th of March, 1895, 
and on the 3d of June, 1896, in New York 
City, Mr. Means wedded Miss Mary Peck 
Seaton, a native of Greenup county, Ken- 
tucky, and a daughter of the later Samuel 
Seaton, a pioneer and well known citizen of 
Eastern Kentucky. John Means died at his 
home, in Ashland, February 14, 1910, and no 
greater tribute can be paid to his memory than 
that expressed in the article written by Rev. 
William D. Ryan at the time of his demise, a 
portion of the same being here incorporated. 

"In this day. when disinterested citizenship 
is all too rare a jewel, it is helpful to reflect 
upon a course of high-minded patriotism such 



as that of Mr. Means. For thirty years he sat 
in the city council. As chairman of the com- 
mittee on finance he gave to the affairs of 
the city the same careful, efficient attention 
that his own business received. He was never 
so absorbed in his own aft'airs that he refused 
to serve his city. He sought no political pre- 
ferment. In 1874 the nomination to represent 
his district in congress was, without his so- 
licitation, tendered him. He accepted it and 
issued a declaration of his principles that was 
notable for its dignity, its clearness and its 
manliness. In the election of his opponent he 
lost nothing in prestige. Perhaps there is no 
need more urgent to-day than for this high- 
minded type of citizenship who recognize the 
obligations of patriotism in times of peace. 
Everything that had to do with human better- 
ment concerned him. Throughout his ca- 
reer he has shown in a most practical way his 
interest in education. In the early days he 
promoted and sustained the Beech Grove 
Academy. Since the coming of the public 
schools he has given them his hearty and sub- 
stantial support. The site for the building 
where all the colored children of our city are 
educated was his free gift, and one of our 
most beautiful school buildings was named 
in his honor. 

"There was a modesty and lack of all osten- 
tation in Mr. Mean's work as a benefactor. 
It is known that his ear was open to the cry 
of the poor. There is perhaps not a religious 
or philanthropic organization in the city that 
has not been aided by his liberality. In his 
giving, as in all affairs of his life, he had firm 
convictions of his own and acted in accord 
with them. It was his special delight to help 
the needy to help themselves. Without break- 
ing the seal of silence that was usually about 
his benefactions, it may be said of him, as 
has been said of another, 'He added to the 
sum of human joy and were everyone to 
whom he did some loving service to bring a 
blossom to his grave, he would sleep to-night 
beneath a wilderness of flowers.' 

"With mind as alert and enthusiasm as 
wholesome as that of a youth of twenty, this 
man of four score years would sit in his wheel- 
chair and talk on any subject that might most 
interest his caller. His range of interests was 
remarkable in all its scope. In all lines of 
business he could, of course, talk as an ex- 
pert ; likewise in civil engineering, in metal- 
lurgy and in mining. But he could speak, too, 
with ripeness and wisdom in almost any realm 
of thought. To discuss with him history, or 
literature, or science, or questions of the day 
was to be delightfully entertained and in- 
structed. He knew and loved the best in lit- 



1174 



I STORY OF KENTUCKY AND KEXTUCKIANS 



eratiire, and he had the best on his book- 
shelves. He had his heroes in American his- 
tory, among them Lincohi, Grant and John 
Quincy Adams. An intensely active business 
career had not crowded out taste and time 
for the finer things of life, and in his declin- 
ing years of dignified ease how great was his 
heritage of joy in these wider interests ! His 
home was a radiating center of happiness, 
around him wife and other loved ones, whose 
highest joy was found in his comfort — a mu- 
tual devotion here that makes us whisper 
'heaven' when we think of his home. May the 
Christ of Gethsemane comfort these aching 
hearts in this time of separation." 

James E. McCracken was bom July i, 
1845, i" Cincinnati, Ohio, and received a com- 
mon school education. In his early life he 
was compelled to seek employment, owing to 
family financial afifairs, and before the break- 
ing out of the rebellion in i860 he was in the 
state of ^lississippi. there employed as mail 
boy carrying United States mail from Cofifee- 
ville to Panola by horse back. At the break- 
ing out of the rebellion he returned to Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. 

A short while after his return from Missis- 
sippi he enlisted in the Eighteenth Regulars 
as a drummer boy, but did not go to the front, 
and through influence was released. Soon af- 
terward, however, he enlisted and served six 
months as a United States teamster, doing 
some hard service. After his term of team- 
stership expired he remained with the Second 
Kentucky Cavalry and did duty at the battles 
of Shiloh, luka, Decatur and others. He then 
returned to Cincinnati, taking up the profes- 
sion of river pilot, and secured a license as a 
U. S. Steersman, under the order of General 
Grant, doing duty on government transporta- 
tion on White River, Arkansas, and lower 
Mississippi, and also on the Tennessee and 
Cumberland, and after the close of the Rebel- 
lion he still retained employment in that ca- 
pacity, also holding other prominent positions 
on the river. He was then employed by the 
old Cincinnati and Nashville Packet Com- 
pany, where he remained until 1875, when he 
retired from the river and embarked in the 
building material business, locating at the cor- 
ner of Front & Ludlow streets, Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and is still in that business, his being 
one of the oldest established business houses 
in Cincinnati and is doing a large and heavy 
business, the firm being well known. 

In 1865 he took up his residence in the 
city of Newport, Kentucky, and immediately 
became identified with the interests of that 
city, serving three terms in the city council 
from the First ward and four terms on the 



Hoard of Education from the First ward, over 
which he was presiding officer for two years, 
when he retired with the greatest honors that 
were ever bestowed on a retiring president. 
He organized and founded the Campbell 
County Protestant Children's Home, and was 
its president for ten years, when he retired. 

He was one of the most prominent and ar- 
dent workers for the Democratic party, and 
was the treasurer of its County Executive 
Committee for several years, and also held the 
position of chairman of the City Executive 
Committee for several years. In 1886 he de- 
clined to become a candidate for state repre- 
sentative, but on October 2d of the same year 
was nominated for mayor on the Democratic 
ticket, but was defeated by a small majority. 
He was then appointed, by Judge McKibben, 
a member of the Police and Fire Commission- 
ers' Board, and was elected chairman of the 
said board. He was identified with the old 
First National Bank of Newport, being one 
of its directors and stock-holders, and was 
one of the founders and organizers of the 
Newport Safe Deposit Company, being elected 
president, and has ever since been its presid- 
ing officer. 

He assisted to organize and found the 
Newport Builders' Exchange, and was its 
first president, and w'as also one of the char- 
ter members of the Cincinnati Builders' Ex- 
change, and in 1891 was elected president of 
the said exchange, being identified with the 
same for a great many years. He was at one 
time largely interested in the Clifton Suburb- 
an Home and Building Company, and also in 
the Ft. Thomas Land Company, over which he 
was the presiding officer. He has been iden- 
tified with the Newport Alutual Fire Insur- 
ance Company for over twenty-five years, and 
in 1902 was elected its president. 

In 1884 he became identified with the Or- 
der of Knights of Pythias, and soon thereaf- 
ter joined the military branch. In 1890 he 
was appointed and served four years as quar- 
termaster of the Kentucky Brigade. He 
served two years as chief of staff and two 
years as adjutant, when he was elected col- 
onel, commanding the Fourth Regiment, un- 
der which capacity he served for four years. 
He was a member of General Carnahan's 
staff for two terms, and in 1905 was elected 
brigade commander of the Kentucky Brigade, 
and has since that time held that position, tak- 
ing a very active part in the interests of the 
Order of Knights of Pythias, with the rank 
of brigadier general, and has commanded a 
great many large military parades. 

The subject of this sketch was the youngest 
of five children of William and Lucv (Win- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KEXTUCKIAXS 



1175 



ters) McCracken. William AlcCracken in his 
youth represented the Fifth ward of Cincin- 
nati, and was a prominent member of the 
Democratic party. He was in the Mexican 
war, with General Robert Lytle, and after he 
returned from the war he became associated 
with the old Cincinnati Commercial paper, be- 
ing also owner and editor of the Columbus 
Delta. Lucy (Winters) McCracken was the 
daughter of Captain John Winter, a steam- 
boat capitalist. William McCracken's par- 
ents. Dr. Nathaniel McCracken and Bridget 
Collins McCracken were born near the city of 
Dublin, Ireland, and were the descendants of 
Colonel Joseph iMcCracken of the British 
Army, and Bridget Collins McCracken was 
the descendant of Bishop Banks of Ireland, 
and they emigrated to this country and settled 
in Cincinnati when the village consisted of 
thirty houses. They located on the outskirts 
of the village, what is now called Fourth 
street, between Walnut and Main, on the east 
side, known then as the old Presbyterian 
burying ground. 

James E. McCracken married Adeline Mad- 
dox, the daughter of Charles Maddox, of 
Owen county, Kentucky, and they now re- 
side at their country home, Bonnie Leslie, 
adjacent to the city of Newport. 

General McCracken is considered a self- 
made man. 

Mason Brown Lucas. — Few people are 
better known in the locality than Mason 
Brown Lucas, county jailer of Franklin coun- 
ty, a descendant of pioneer Kentuckians. and 
the possessor of an extremely interesting Civil 
war record. Mr. Lucas is a native of the 
state, having been born in Stamping Ground, 
Scott county, ^lay i6, 1843. His parents 
were LeGrand and Luticia (Jones) Lucas, 
the father a native of the county which also 
^ave his son birth and the mother, of Frank- 
lin county. LeGrand Lucas was for many 
years a hotel keeper at Stamping Ground and 
as a natural outcome both of his vocation and 
his genial personality was known for miles 
about. The grandfather, Stephen Lucas, was 
a native of the Blue Grass state, who shared 
its romantic history in the early days, and the 
great-grandfather, Thomas Lucas, was a na- 
tive of England, who crossed the Atlantic and 
became one of the state's pioneers. The 
mother's family has likewise been identified 
with Kentucky for a number of generations. 
The father was Feeland Jones and the mother 
bore the maiden name of Betsy Green wald, 
and was a member of a prominent family. 

Mason Brown Lucas was reared in his na- 
tive place and attended its public schools. At 
the age of seventeen he left the parental home 



and came to Franklin county, which was to 
prove the scene of his subsequent career. 
Shortly afterward, although so young, he en- 
listed in the service of the Confederate army 
in the secret service corps under a Mr. Will- 
iams, from whom he became separated and of 
whom he quite lost track. In 1 861 he joined 
the forces of General John Morgan, being a 
member of the Third Kentucky Cavalry, 
whose colonel was Richard M. Ginnolt, and 
served until the end of the war. He was 
captured at Buffington's Island in the Ohio 
River at the time of General Morgan's raid 
into Indiana and Ohio and was taken to Camp 
Morton, Indianapolis. Four months later he 
was transferred to Camp Douglas at Chicago, 
where he languished for fifteen months. Being 
subsequently exchanged he went to Chesa- 
peake Bay and near Richmond re-entered the 
service, in which he continued until Lee's sur- 
render. He served in the body guards of 
General John C. Breckinridge and President 
Jefferson Davis, and went with Davis 
to Washington, Georgia, where his forces 
were disbanded. At the latter place he was 
paid oft' with thirty-two ^Mexican dollars, this 
princely sum representing his compensation 
for four years' service to the Confederacy. 

Mr. Lucas returned home and went to work 
on the farm, receiving for his labors one dol- 
lar a day, which compared favorably indeed 
with his previous compensation. A year later 
he began farming on his own account in 
Franklin county, and he has since then en- 
gaged successfully in the cultivation of the 
soil and particularly has dealt in tobacco. 
Mr. Lucas gives allegiance to the Democratic 
party and for four years was in the revenue 
service under President Cleveland. In 1909 
he was elected county jailer by a majority of 
seven hundred and twenty. 

Mr. Lucas laid the foundation of a home 
on October 22, 1867, when he was united in 
marriage to Miss Julia Polk Head, a native of 
Franklin county and the daughter of Thomas 
Jefferson Head. To this union were born six 
children (two of whom are deceased), as fol- 
lows : Zeb Stewart ; John Mason ; Thomas 
Jefferson, who was killed ; Luticia ; Sally, de- 
ceased ; and Mattie. The death of the wife 
and mother occurred in 1902. Mr. Lucas is 
a member of the Baptist church. 

Clement Benedict Spalding, M. D. — 
Among the names of the younger physicians 
and surgeons of Louisville who have attained 
a satisfying degree of success is the gentle- 
man whose name heads this sketch and whose 
name is descended from a line of ancestry that 
is a heritage of worth. He is the descendant 
of two old Kentucky families, the Spaldings 



1176 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



and the Hills. The paternal grandfather was 
Dr. Benedict Spalding, a native of Marion 
county, where for years he was a leading 
physician, practicing in Lebanon. He was a 
prominent man. a true Southerner in every- 
thing hut one princi])le. he was an Abolition- 
ist. Jle died soon after the w^ar between the 
states. The father of our subject is Benedict 
Spalding, who was born in Lebanon, Ken- 
tucky, in 1 85 1, was educated in the private 
school of Professor Failes, who is now the 
dean of Centre College, Kentucky, and was 
graduated from the Harvard Law School, 
Harvard University, since which time he has 
been in active successful practice in Lebanon, 
Kentucky. The maternal grandfather of our 
subject was Colonel Thomas P. Hill, one of 
Kentucky's prominent lawyers, who was a 
native of Lincoln county, Kentucky, where he 
practiced his profession for years successfully. 
He died in Stanford. Kentucky in December, 
1908. at the age of eighty-three years. Mary, 
the mother of our subject, was born in Stan- 
ford, Lincoln county. Kentucky. 

Clement Benedict Spalding is one of the 
younger practitioners in the medical and sur- 
gical art in Louisville, where he is practicing 
his profession in connection with Dr. L-vin 
Abel. He was born in Lebanon, Marion coun- 
ty, Kentucky, on April 4, 1880, the son of 
Benedict Spalding, attorney of that place. 
Dr. Spalding graduated from Centre College, 
Kentucky, with the degree of A. B. in 1901, 
and from the Louisville, Kentucky, ^ledical 
College in 1904. He was for one year interne 
at St. Joseph's Hospital, Lexington, Ken- 
tucky, then, in April 1905, came to Louisville 
and engaged in general practice, but at pres- 
ent limits his practice in a great extent to 
surgery. He is a member of the Physicians 
and Surgeons Society of Louisville, of the 
Jefferson County Medical Society, of the 
Kentucky State Medical Society, and of the 
Louisville Society of Medicine. He taught 
anatomy and surgery at the old Louisville 
Medical College, and also taught those same 
branches in the Louisville Hospital College, 
and is now demonstrator of operative surgery 
in the medical department of the University 
of Louisville and visiting surgeon to the Lou- 
isville City Hospital. 

George H. Ahlering. — For a period of 
more than thirty years Mr. George H. Ahler- 
ing has been engaged in the practice of law in 
his native town of Newport, where he was 
born August i, 1845. His parents, Henry and 
Mary (Abring) Ahlering, were both natives 
of Hanover, Germany, whence they came to 
the United States when young, the former 
having made the long and weary trip alone. 



at the age of fifteen years, and the latter in 
the com])any of her parents, at which time she 
was a chilcl of seven years. Both located at 
Newport, Campbell county, Kentucky, where 
they were reared, eventually met and wdiere 
their marriage was solemnized in the year 
1844. Mr. Ahlering became a contractor of 
prominence in his adopted home and laid 
many of the early streets of Newport, besides 
which he constructed various wharves on the 
Ohio river. On the inception of the Civil war 
he served for a short time in a Kentucky regi- 
ment, mostly on guard duty. He was sum- 
moned to eternal rest in 1904, at which time 
he had attained the venerable age of eighty- 
two years, and he was deeply mourned by rel- 
atives and a wide circle of loyal friends. He 
survived his cherished and devoted wife by 
two years, her death having occurred in her 
seventy-ninth year. Mr. and Mrs. Ahlering 
became the parents of nine children, five of 
whom are now living, the subject of this re- 
view being the first born. 

George H. Ahlering received his prelimi- 
nary education in the public schools at New- 
port, and he later supplemented this training 
by a course in the Commercial Business Col- 
lege, at Cincinnati. When twenty-one years 
of age he engaged in the grocery business at 
Newport, but disposed of this business at the 
end of one year, at which time he removed to 
Cold Springs, this county, where he followed 
the same business for several years and while 
a resident of this place he served most effi- 
ciently in the capacity of postmaster. He also 
served here as magistrate. In 1878 he began 
reading law in the offices of Judge McKibben, 
of Newport, and so rapid was, his progress 
in the absorption and assimilation of the sci- 
ence of jurisprudence that he was admitted 
to the Kentucky bar in the spring of 1879. He 
immediately began the practice of his profes- 
sion at Newport, where he controls a large 
and representative clientage and where his 
success has been on a parity with his well di- 
rected efforts. For several years he main- 
tained an office in the cities of Newport, Ken- 
tucky, and Cincinnati, Ohio, in partnership 
with C. L. Raison, under the firm name of 
Raison and Ahlering. In politics Mr. Ahler- 
ing gives an uncompromising support to the 
principles and policies of the Republican 
party, on whose ticket, in 1891, he was elected 
mayor of Newport. He served in this capac- 
ity for one year, when the change was made 
from the old to the new constitution. During 
his regime as head executive of the city the 
first brick-paved streets and the main sewers 
of Newport were constructed. During Gov- 
ernor Bradley's administration he served on 



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HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1177 



his staff as aide-de-camp for a period of four 
years, with the rank of colonel, and he was 
also incumhent of this position during the 
short administration of Governor Taylor. 

During the Civil war Mr. Ahlering per- 
formed guard duty as a member of the Ken- 
tucky state troops. He participated in the en- 
gagement at Cynthiana against General Mor- 
gan. Here he was captured and later paroled, 
in June, 1862. In 1863 he became connected 
with the commissary department of the Mis- 
sissippi fleet, and after serving nine months he 
was discharged on account of disability. In 
September, 1864, he enlisted in Company F, 
Fifty-third Kentucky Mounted \'olunteer In- 
fantry, and served as orderly sergeant about 
six months. Later he served in the same ca- 
pacity under Colonel True, until his honorable 
discharge, in September, 1865. He saw much 
active service during the memorable Saltville 
raid. Mr. Ahlering has ever retained a deep 
interest in his old comrades in arms and the 
same is shown by his membership in William 
Nelson Post of the Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with 
Eureka Lodge, Knights of Pythias. 

Mr. Ahlering has been thrice married. He 
first wedded Miss Nannie Niles, in 1868, who 
was born and reared in Campbell county and 
who bore him two children — Walter H. and 
Daisy G., the latter of whom is the wife of 
Thomas Waters, of Kansas City. ^Ir. Waters 
is a traveling freight solicitor for the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Company. The second mar- 
riage of Mr. Ahlering was solemnized in the 
year 1883, at which time he was united to 
Miss Mary Moore, a native of Lexington, this 
state. She is survived by three daughters, 
namely — Nettie E., who remains at the pater- 
nal home ; Lucy E., who is the wife of Harry 
O. Power and who resides in Zanesville, 
Ohio ; and Viola, who is attending school at 
Fort Wayne, Indiana. His present wife, to 
whom he was married in 1895, was the widow 
of Fred Nash at the time of her marriage to 
Mr. Ahlering. Her maiden name was Minnie 
Perry and she is a native of Newport. Her 
mother was a direct descendant of William 
Washington, brother of General George Wash- 
fngton. No children have been born to the 
last marriage, but Mrs. Ahlering was the 
mother of two children by her first marriage, 
one of whom is living — Bettie Nash, who re- 
sides with her mother. Colonel Ahlering is 
a member of the Lutheran church, while his 
wife holds membership in the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. The only son of Mr. Ahlering 
enlisted in the Second Kentucky Infantry dur- 
ing the Spanish-American war and served 



during the entire campaign in Porto Rico. He 
is now engaged in farming at Dupont, Indi- 
ana. 

Thomas Rodman Cartmell. — Among the 
able practitioners at the Louisville bar is 
numbered Thomas Rodman Cartmell, who 
was born on the old Rodman homestead, the 
home of his maternal grandfather, on May 
10, 1869, ^t a time when his parents were 
residents of Union county, Kentucky. The 
father of our subject was the late John Van 
Cartmell. who was born in Bullitt county, 
Kentucky, in 1830, the son of Henry Christ 
Cartmell, a native of Bullitt county, living 
about twenty miles from Shepherdsville, 
Kentucky, where he was a justice of the 
peace and a leading man, but he died early in 
life. His father was Nathaniel Cartmell, a 
native of Winchester, in the Shenandoah 
Valley of Virginia. Henry Christ Cartmell 
married Mary Aud, a Kentuckian by birth, 
whose people came to Kentucky from Mary- 
land. 

The mother of our subject was Annah 
Rodman, who was born in Oldham county, 
Kentucky, in 1838, the daughter of the late 
Judge Thomas A. Rodman, who for thirty 
years served as county judge of Oldham 
county. Judge Rodman was a native of Old- 
ham county, Kentucky, and was descended 
from the old Quaker family of Rodmans, who 
settled originally in Pennsylvania. In 1849 
John A'an Cartmell, then a young man under 
"twenty, came to. Louisville, but subsequently 
removed to Caseyville, Kentucky, wliere he 
resided for a period of ten years, removing 
thence into Union county, Kentucky, where 
for many years he was a prominent man. 
serving two terms as deputy sheriff and one 
full term as sheriff of that county. He be- 
came a capitalist,- and returning to Louisville 
in the spring of 1883, engaged in the whole- 
sale tobacco business and so continued for a 
number of years, but retired from active 
business before his death, which occurred in 
Louisville July 31, 1889, his widow surviving 
him until June 11, 1899. 

Thomas Rodman Cartmell was reared in 
Union county, Kentucky, and attended the 
public schools in L^nion county. Upon com- 
ing to Louisville with his parents in 1885, he 
attended the Cincinnati schools for three 
years, following this with a course at Rugby 
school in Louisville, then the Louisville Law 
School, where he received his degree of B. L. 
and finally supplemented this with a course 
in the law department of the LTniversity of 
Virginia. Mr. Cartmell, having thus 
equipped himself with a thorough grounding 



1178 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

in the requirements of his professional echi- years. In Marcli. 1867, he came to the capital 

cation, began the practice of hiw in Louisville, city, Frankfort, and began keeping hotel, a 

in March, 1896, and so continued until 1906, new vocation, which he pursued for a good 

when he became connected with the legal many years. He was elected sheriff in 1876 

de|)artment of the Kentucky Title Company and again in 1878, serving until 1880. He 

of Louisville. was subsequently appointed jailor to till an 

Mr. Cartmell's social tendencies find alle- unexpired term. He died in October, 1908, 

giance with the Masonic fraternity, in which at the age of eighty-eight years, his birth hav- 

he is a past master of Daylight Lodge, No. ing occurred November 15, 1819. His wife 

760, F. & A. M. He married Mrs. Nellie E. preceded him to the Great Beyond by a num- 

Melton, daughter of John Wagner, of Harr-i- ber of years, her death having occurred in 

son county, Indiana. October, 1896, at the age of seventy-six years. 

Benjamin Gardner Williams. — A strong The family consisted of the following eight 

and able lawyer and a leader among the rep- children: Dial S., Sarah Margaret, Mary J., 

resentatives of the legal profession of the cap- Wiley C, Mason H. P. Jr., Rebecca, John B. 

ital city of Kentucky is Benjamin Gardner and Ben G. In the matter of religious faith 

A\'illiams. The possessor of unusual attain- Mason Williams and his wife belonged to the 

ments and capable of inspiring the confidence Christian church, as indeed did his entire fam- 

of all with whom he comes in contact, Mr. ily. 

Williams has upon more than one occasion Benjamin Gardner Williams was about 
been recognized by the people as the "Man of eight years of age when his father moved to 
the Hour" and has fulfilled numerous impor- Frankfort, and within the pleasant limits of 
tant duties with which he has been intrusted the capital city he has ever since resided. He 
with signal success. He is an unwavering sup- attended the public schools and later the Ken- 
porter of the principles of Democracy and has tucky Eclectic Institute, conducted by Mr. J. 
held several public offices of importance, serv- W. Dodd. Being drawn by natural inclination 
ing as county attorney from 1886 to 1890, and to the legal profession he began to read law 
as county judge for the terms including the and pursued a one year's course in law at the 
years between 1890 and 1898. In 1900, when University of Virginia, being licensed to prac- 
the state of Kentucky became clothed with tice in 1884. He entered upon his active ca- 
the dark habiliments of tragedy and mourn- reer almost immediately, and in evidence of 
ing, Mr. Williams was chosen by the Goebel the speedy recognition he won in professional 
family to assist in the prosecution of the as- circles in Frankfort is the fact that two years 
sassins of Governor Goebel. . later, in 1886, he was elected county attorney, 

Benjamin Gardner Williams was born in in which capacity he served until 1890. In 
Morgan county, Kentucky, August 7, 1859, his the latter year he was elected county judge 
eyes first opening to the light of day upon his and was re-elected in 1894, his second term 
father's farm. His parents were Mason Hoi- expiring in January, 1898. He then retired 
ly Prather and Priscilla (Patrick) Williams, from pubHc life to devote his entire attention 
both of them of North Carolina nativity and to his practice, which has assumed large pro- 
stock. The paternal grandfather. Mason portions, and is of an important character. 
Williams, was a Baptist preacher and farmer. In 1892 Mr. Williams was united in mar- 
who lived and labored to bring to healthy frui- riage to Miss Rose Whitworth, of Louisville, 
tion both Kentucky's fertile acres and the daughter of John and Elizabeth (Howard) 
souls of men, in what is now Magoffin county. Whitworth. Within the walls of their home 
He came from North Carolina at a very early are growing to manhood and womanhood the 
day. He became well known in that section following eight children, by name Priscilla, 
of the new state, and at different times was Virginia, Rose, Ben G. Jr., Jane, John, Ann 
sheriff of Morgan county and representative Howard and Ruth. Mr. Williams belongs to 
of the county in the state legislature. He was the Christian church and is affiliated with the 
of Scotch-Irish descent and possessed in high Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
degree the sturdy characteristics of that stock. William Christian Hiles, retired mer- 

Mr. Williams' father and his brother Dial chant and tobacco broker, is a descendant of 

S. Williams, enlisted in the Confederate army an old Virginia family, his great-grandfather, 

at the time of the Civil war, serving in the William Gates, having emigrated to Kentucky, 

Fifth Kentucky Infantry. The latter was where he became a pioneer settler in Mason 

killed in June, 1864. At the close of the con- county prior to 1800. Mr. Hiles was born on 

flict the father returned to Morgan county and the old homestead farm in Mason county, 

in 1865 sold his farm and moved to Mason Kentucky, on the 7th of December, 1846, and 

county, where he remained for about two is a son of Randolph and Elizabeth (Gates) 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1179 



Hiles, both of whom were likewise natives of 
Mason county. Christian Hiles, paternal 
grandfather of the subject of this review, was 
born in Pennsylvania and moved to Kentucky 
early in the nineteenth century. He estab- 
lished his home in Mason county, near Dover, 
where he reclaimed a farm from the virgin 
wilderness. Both grandfathers served with 
distinction in the war of 1812 and were pres- 
ent at the time the great Indian chief, Tecum- 
seh, was killed in the battle of Thames. In 
1833 William Gates removed to Bracken 
county, this state, where he spent the residue 
of his life, his death having there occurred at 
the venerable age of seventy-eight years. 
Christian Hiles was a staunch Union man dur- 
ing the Civil war and served with efficiency in 
the recruiting department for the United 
States government. His son, Randolph Hiles, 
father of him whose name initiates this review, 
was a farmer and tobacco buyer in Bracken 
county, where he died, in 184^, at the early 
age of twenty-nine years. His wife, Elizabeth 
(Gates) Hiles, survived him by more than 
half a century and subsequently married 
James Stairs, by whom she became the mother 
of four children. She was summoned to the 
life eternal in Bracken county, in 1905, at the 
age of eighty-four years, deeply mourned by 
all who had come within the sphere of her 
gracious influence. Her grandfather, William 
Gates, was numbered among the sterling pio- 
neers who came from Virginia to Kentucky 
in the latter part of the eighteenth century. 
He settled in Mason county, where he pur- 
chased one thousand acres of government land, 
at one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre, 
and he became an extensive planter and slave 
holder. He also erected a distillery, in which 
connection he carried on a successful business. 
He shipped produce by flat boat to New Or- 
leans and frequently made the return trip on 
foot. He gained wide notoriety in his tobacco 
dealings. His regulation price for this article 
was six cents a pound, which was considered 
high m those days. Whenever asked in regard 
to the price received he always replied "six" 
and eventually became known by the sobriquet 
"Old Billy Six," which appellation was handed 
down through the succeeding generations, the 
subject of this review being commonly known 
as "Six Hiles" in connection with his tobacco 
operations. William Gates Jr., grandfather of 
William C. Hiles, of this sketch, was born in 
1794, in Virginia, and at an early age accom- 
panied his parents to the Blue Grass state. He 
followed in the footsteps of his father and he 
served in the battle of Thames in the war of 
1812. He likewise saw Tecumseh killed and 
alwavs maintained that a man by the name of 



White killed the chief and not General John- 
ston. William Gates Jr, died on his plantation 
in Bracken county in 1878. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Theodosia Collins, was a 
cousin of Simon Kenton, the well known Ken- 
tucky pioneer. 

Elizabeth (Gates) Hiles had four children 
by her first marriage, and of this number Will- 
iam C. was the third in order of birth and he 
is the elder of the two now living. He was 
reared to the sturdy discipline of the home 
farm and attended the district schools of Ma- 
son and Bracken counties during the winter 
terms, assisting in the work of the farm dur- 
ing the summer seasons. When eighteen years 
of age he showed his intrinsic loyalty to the 
cause of the Union in the war between the 
states by enlisting as a private in Company C, 
Eighty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He 
was mustered out at Cincinnati and served 
with valor during the remaining six months of 
the war. When twenty-one years of age he 
initiated his independent career as a merchant 
at Berlin, Kentucky. One year later he dis- 
posed of his store in Berlin and removed to 
Covington, Kenton county, where he engaged 
in the tobacco business. He carried on this 
line of enterprise for many years and achieved 
eminent success in the same as broker in the 
Cincinnati market and from 1899 to 1904 he 
was inspector for that market. In the latter 
year he retired from active business life and 
is now living in the enjoyment of former years 
of earnest toil and endeavor. 

In politics Mr. Hiles is a stalwart supporter 
of the principles and policies of the Democrat- 
ic party, and he served for five years as a 
member of the city council and four years as 
alderman in Covington. In the Masonic fra- 
ternity he is affiliated with the Blue Lodge, 
No. 156, Free & Accepted Masons. 

In 1 87 1 Mr. Hiles was united in marriage 
to Miss Mary Sommer, who was born and 
reared in the city of Covington and who is a 
daughter of John Sommer, who owned and 
operated the old Central Hotel at the corner 
of Pike and Washington streets in Covington 
for many years. Mr. and Mrs. Hiles became 
the parents of twelve children, of which num- 
ber the following named are now living: 
Mary is the widow of Albert Sloscher; Ger- 
trude is the wife of George Maloney and they 
reside in Bracken county, this state ; Virginia 
is the wife of Adolph Hager, of Kenton coun- 
ty ; Pettus is the wife of Ferdinand J. Ruh, of 
Covington, to whom a sketch is dedicated on 
other pages of this work ; and Edwin remains 
at the parental home. The children who are 
deceased are Abigail, William C.,_Jr., John 
R., Leona, Anna and two who died in infancy. 



Vol. ni— 3 



1180 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



Mrs. Hiles and the children are all communi- 
cants of the Catholic church, in which they 
hold membership in the parish of St. Patrick's 
church in Covington. 

Edwin Timpson Bruce, M. D., is among 
the successful physicians of the younger class. 
He was born in New York city on March 22, 
1880, and is the son of W. M. and Emily C. 
(Westerberg) Bruce, both natives of New 
York city, the father a descendant of Scotch 
ancestry and the mother of English parentage. 
W. M. Bruce is a graduate of Columbia Col- 
lege, and was a successful practitioner in the 
profession of law on Wall street for thirty 
years, being now retired. 

Dr. Bruce acquired his early education in 
the New York city schools, took a further 
course at Temple College, Philadelphia, from 
which he received the degree of B. S. in 1897. 
He then entered the Jefferson Medical College 
at Philadelphia, in which he spent three "years 
and finally won his graduation degree of Doc- 
tor of Medicine from the medical department 
of Centre University. Kentucky, in 1905. 
While he was at the Jefferson Medical College 
and at Centre College he spent eighteen months 
at the Germantown Hospital, Philadelphia. 

Having acquired a thorough knowledge of 
the duties of his profession the Doctor began 
active practice in Louisville in 1905, as a gen- 
eral practitioner, also making a specialty of 
X-ray diagnoses, the only physician in Lou- 
isville engaged in that special line. In connec- 
tion with this work he is Radiographer to the 
University of Louisville and the Louisville 
City Hospital, and is on the staff of the Home 
of the Incurables. 

Dr. Bruce is a member of the Jefferson 
County Medical Society, the Mississippi Val- 
ley Medical Society, the Society of Physicians 
and Surgeons of Louisville, the Louisville 
Academy of Medicine, the Louisville Clinical, 
the Kentucky State Medical Society and the 
American Medical Association, and is also a 
member of the Phi Chi, Greek letter frater- 
nity. 

Dr. Bruce married Isa Robertson, of Phil- 
adelphia, the daughter of James Robertson, a 
Scotchman who graduated as a physician from 
Edinburgh L^niversity and is now in mercantile 
business in Philadelphia. To the Doctor and 
wife has been born one son. Alfred Eli. The 
promise of the future for Dr. Bruce, judging 
from the record of the past, contains a vista 
that is most encouraging and promises a cer- 
tain fulfillment. 

Elliott B. Beard. — With many of the lead- 
ing measures resulting in the permanent devel- 
opment of the city of Shelbyville. Elliott B. 
Beard has been identified, and his efforts have 



been such that they have not only won him a 
place among the prominent people of the city, 
but have also contributed in a large measure 
to the general imjirovement and development 
of the city along lines of substantial advance- 
ment. At the bar and in the handling of busi- 
ness interests, Mr. Beard has become a factor 
in the life of Shelbyville, which is his native 
town and has been his continued place of 
residence, and of business. 

Elliott B. Beard is a native of Shelby coun- 
ty, Kentucky, born January 15. 1868, the son 
of Dr. William F. and Matilda (Roberts) 
Beard. The father was born near Lexington, 
Kentucky, in 1835, the son of Joseph M. 
Beard, who was born in Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1803, the son of Henry Beard, who 
was a native of Ireland, and settled first at 
Philadelphia, and then in Fayette county, Ken- 
tucky, in 1805. Joseph M. Beard, grandfather 
of Mr. Beard, removed from Fayette county 
to Oldham county, Kentucky, from where Dr. 
Beard, our subject's father, removed to Chris- 
tiansburg, Shelby county, where he practiced 
medicine until 1890, when he removed to 
Shelbyville, where he has since practiced and 
is now the leading physician of Shelby county. 
Dr. Beard was graduated from the Medical 
Department of the University of Louisville in 
the class of 1859. His wife, Matilda Roberts 
Beard, was born in Shelby county, and was 
the daughter of William Roberts, also a native 
of Shelby county. 

Their son Elliott B. attended the public 
schools and was graduated from Georgetown 
(Ky.) College in 1890 with the degree of A. 
M. He taught for one year, then read law in 
the office of Pryor J. Foree, Shelbyville, and 
was admitted to the bar in 1893. Practical 
industry, wisely and vigorously applied, never 
fails in securing a due measure of success, and 
the well known and able business man of 
whom this sketch is written has given in his 
career an exemplification of the truth of the 
statement. Soon after entering the practice 
of law, Mr. Beard formed a partnership with 
Judge Charles C. Marshall, which partnership 
was terminated in 1907 when Judge ^Marshall 
went on the Circuit bench. 

Mr. Beard has served with credit in several 
positions and has in every instance received 
the commendation of his supporters and fel- 
low-citizens. He served as judge of the city 
police court from 1896 to 1900, as city attorney 
from 1900 to 1902 and as master commissioner 
of Shelby county courts from 1903 to 1906 and 
as a member of the Kentucky Legislature in 
the session of 1908. He is an interested mem- 
ber of the Masonic Order, and has advanced to 
a high position in its lodges, being a member 






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HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1181 

of Solomon Lodge No. 5, F. & A. M., Shelby- pointment to the office of United States dis- 
ville Chapter No. 2, R. A. M. and Shelby Com- trict attorney for the same district. The in- 
mandery No. 32. He was one of a committee cumbency he retained for a period of four 
selected to prepare a book on Masonic laws years, and his retirement therefrom was the 
of Kentucky. Air. Beard married Aliss "Willie result of a change in the administration of 
J\lay Rives, the daughter of H. P. Rives, of national affairs, as the Rupublican party then 
Christian county, Kentucky. came into power. So excellent had been his 
William Mayfield Smith deserves con- record as district attorney that he was made 
sideration in this publication by reason of his special district attorney for a period of eight- 
standing as one of the representative mem- een months, at the expiration of which he 
bers of the bar of the city of Louisville, as retired. He has since given his attention to 
well as from the fact that he is a native son his private practice, in which he retains a large 
of the fine old Blue Grass state. He was born and representative clientage, and he is known 
in Christian county, Kentucky, on the 3d of as a skilled and versatile lawyer and well for- 
January, 1S53, and is a son of Samuel R. and tified counselor. In politics, as has already 
Mary J. (Pattilloj Smith, both of whom were been intimated, he is a stanch supporter of 
born in the state of North Carolina, where the cause of the Democratic party. Mr. 
they were reared and educated and where Smith is identified with the Alasonic order, 
their marriage was solemnized, after which in which he has attained the chivalric degrees, 
they came to Kentucky, first settling in Chris- besides which he is affiliated with the Inde- 
tian county, whence they later removed to pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights 
Graves county, when their son William M. of Pythias. 

was seven years of age. Samuel R. Smith Mr. Smith has twice been married. In 
became a successful farmer of this state and 1874 he was united in marriage to ]\Iiss Au- 
both he and his wife continued to reside in gusta Anderson, daughter of Lucien Ander- 
Graves county until their death. Samuel R. son, of ^^layfield, Kentucky. She was sum- 
Smith, Sr., grandfather of him whose name moned to the life eternal in 1879 and is sur- 
initiates this article, was of stanch English vived by three sons : — Harry A., Terry P. and 
ancestry, and the family was founded in Lucien R. Harry A. and Lucien R. are en- 
America in the Colonial epoch of our national gaged in the practice of law at Louisville and 
history. He served as a soldier in the Conti- ^layfield, Kentucky, respectively, and the sec- 
nental army in the Revolutionary war. In ond son, Terry P., is engaged in the banking 
the maternal line William Alayfield Smith business in Mayfield. In 1887 Mr. Smith was 
traces his ancestry back to French-Huguenot united in marriage to Miss Dillah Sherrill, 
stock, and the Pattillo family likewise was daughter of Colonel Lee Sherrill, of Ballard 
early founded in North Carolina. county, Kentucky. The children of the sec- 
William Mayfield Smith is indebted to the ond marriage are : — Linda Lee, Ralph W., 
public schools of Mayfield, Kentucky, for his William Mayfield Jr. and Ludie Sherrill. \lrs. 
preliminary educational discipline, and in Smith and the children are members of the 
1871-2 he was a student in the Louisville Law Cumberland Presbyterian church, and Mr. 
School, in which he was graduated in the lat- Smith is a member of the Christian church, 
ter year, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. Alhert L. Boehmer. — One of the progres- 
He had previously given careful attention to sive business men who has contributed mate- 
preliminary reading of the law and thus came rially to the industrial and commercial prestige 
to his profession admirably fortified for its of the city of Covington is Albert Louis Boeh- 
work. He initiated practice in Mayfield, Ken- mer, who is here engaged in the manufacturing 
tucky, immediately after his graduation, and of paints and who has through his well di- 
he soon gained distinctive precedence as one rected endeavors built up a large and prosper- 
of the successful members of the bar of ous enterprise, which is both wholesale and re- 
Graves county. He served four years as pros- tail in its functions. Mr. Boehmer was born 
ecuting attorney of that county, and also rep- in the city of Cincinnati, Ohio, on the 19th of 
resented the same in the lower house of the August, 1868, and is a son of Bernard and 
state legislature. In 1892 Mr. Smith estab- Mary (Meyer) Boehmer, the former of whom 
lished his home in the city of Louisville, and was born in Bissendorf, Germany, and the 
from September of that year until the fol- latter of whom was born in Minster, Auglaize 
lowing February he was assistant United county, Ohio. Bernard Boehmer was reared 
States district attorney for the Kentucky dis- and educated in his native land and as a young 
trict. In February, 1893, in recognition of man he severed the ties which bound him to 
his eligibility and fine legal powers, Presi- home and fatherland and set forth to seek his 
dent Cleveland conferred upon him the ap- fortune in America. He located in the city of 



1182 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

Cincinnati, where he followed the painter's life work, has spent the most of his life here, 
trade, but he soon moved across the river to and he is a native son, born in Louisville on 
Covington, Kentucky, where he engaged in April 8, 1873, the son of Edward and Caroline 
business on his own responsibility and where (Wilson) Fulton. The father was born in 
he continued as a successful contracting paint- Zanesville, Ohio, the son of Robert Fulton, 
er for a number of years. He died in Cov- who was born in Pennsylvania and was one 
ington in 1887, at the age of fifty-four years, of the first men to cross the mountains into 
and his widow, who survived him about seven Ohio in his own conveyance, bringing with 
years, was fifty years of age at the time of her him his family. He was a pioneer of Zanes- 
demise. Of the five children the subject of ville, the old Fulton homestead there still stand- 
this review is the eldest and of the number only ing and being occupied. The great grand- 
two are now living. father was John Fulton, who came from Scot- 
Albert Louis Boehmer was reared to ma- land with his widowed mother when a child 
turity in Covington and his early educational and settled in what was then Robbstown, Penn- 
advantages were those afforded in the paro- sylvania. Edward Fulton, the father of our 
chial schools. At the age of fourteen years subject, came to Louisville as a vouth of 
he entered upon an apprenticeship to the eighteen or nineteen years of age, and became 
painter's trade under the able direction of his one of the Spring Hill distillers of Louisville, 
father, with whom he continued to be asso- He died on January 7, 1893, at the age of 
ciated until the death of the latter. Thereafter fifty-two years, and during his life was a quiet, 
he continued business as a contracting painter home-loving man, and very fond of his large, 
for about six years. In 1893 he established a well-selected library. The mother of our sub- 
small manufactory of paints and from this ject was born in Louisville, the daughter of 
modest nucleus he has built up a very success- Dr. Thomas Wilson and grand-daughter of 
ful busness. He has a well equipped retail Dr. Daniel Wilson, who founded what is now 
paint store and practically all of the stock util- the Peter-Neat wholesale drug concern. Dr. 
ized in the same is manufactured by him. The Thomas Wilson was born in Louisville and 
trade of the concern is confined principally to graduated from the JefTerson Medical College, 
Kenton and neighboring counties and is con- Philadelphia, but never practiced, as he took 
stantly increasing in scope and importance, up the drug business upon the death of his 
Mr. Boehmer has shown a most progressive father. Daniel Wilson, the pioneer, was a 
attitude and has interested himself in other native of Georgia, of Virginia parentage. The 
local lines of business enterprise, including the mother died in 1882, at the age of forty-two 
development of real estate. He is president years. 

of the Beachwood Realty Company, which has Dr. Fulton was reared in Louisville and re- 
efifected the development and upbuilding of the ceived his education in that city, first attending 
attractive suburb of Beachwood. He is also the public and high schools. After grounding 
secretary and treasurer of the Suburban Home himself thoroughly in these preparatory courses 
& Land Company, and both of these corpora- he entered the University of Louisville in 1890, 
tions are now actively concerned in the devel- and was one of the two first four-year students 
oping of the fine suburban district known as to enter that institution. He was graduated 
Fort Mitchell. Though never a seeker of pub- there in 1894, with the degree of M. D., and 
lie office, Mr. Boehmer gives his allegiance to was assistant to the professor of chemistry for 
the Democratic party in so far as national and one year in the Louisville University, then ad- 
state issues are involved, but in local affairs junct professor of diseases of children in the 
he maintains a position independent of strict Kentucky Medical College for two years. At 
partisan lines. He is affiliated with the the end of that time he engaged in country 
Knights of Columbus and the Catholic Knights practice in Oldham county, Kentucky, where 
of America, and both he and his wife are com- he went on account of his health, but in 1903 
municants in St. Benedictus Catholic church. he returned to Louisville and for the next 
On the loth of May, 1910, was solemnized three years was adjunct professor of physiol- 
the marriage of Mr. Boehmer to Miss Caroline ogy in the old Hospital College of Medicine. 
E. Schmidt, who was bom and reared in Cov- He is now (1910) adjunct professor in the 
ington and who is a daughter of Henry diseases of children. Dr. Fulton is engaged in 
Schmidt, of whom individual mention is made the general practice of medicine, at the same 
on other pages of this work. time making a specialty of children's diseases 
Gavin Fulton, M. D., a prominent member and obstetrics. He is a member of the staff of 
of the medical profession of Louisville, whose the Deaconess Hospital and chairman of the 
marked ability and careful preparation have medical committee of the Baby's Free Milk 
gained him distinction in the line of his chosen Fund. He is a member of the Jefferson County 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1183 

Medical Society, the Kentucky State Medical lower Alississippi and Ohio rivers. At the 

Society and the American Medical Associa- beginning of the Civil war Captain Link en- 

tion. listed in Company B of the Twenty-Third 

The Doctor married Mary Henry Peter, Kentucky Volunteer Infantry and served from 
who was born in Louisville, daughter of M. C. 1861 until September 12, 1865, when he re- 
Peter, the well-known citizen and wholesale ceived his discharge. He veteranized and re- 
druggist of Louisville, of whom a sketch is enlisted in the same company and regiment at 
published elsewhere in this work. From this Blaine's Cross Roads in East Tennessee in 
union there are two children : Nellie Crutcher 1864. Under an order of the war department 
and Rhoda Peter. As a physician and surgeon issued in 1864 all the river men were trans- 
Dr. Fulton is constantly broadening his knowl- ferred from the army to the navy and Captain 
edge and promoting his efihciency as a prac- Link was transferred to the United States 
titioner by reading and study. Vindicator, upon which he remained until his 

Captain John Link, now retired, is one of discharge. Previous to his transferral to the 
Newport's interesting characters. He has a navy Captain Link participated in a number of 
thrilling Civil war record, which includes some engagements, among which were Round 
of the most important encounters in that strug- Mountain, Perrysville, Stone River, Talla- 
gle, and also can review twenty-five years' homa. Locust Grove, Battle Creek, Laverne, 
service in Newport's fire department, both in Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Sweet Water 
a minor capacity and as chief, he having been and Blaine's Cross Roads. He was three times 
one of the city's original fire fighters. Captain wounded but not seriously, and at none of 
Link was born in Wheeling, West Virginia, these times was incapacitated. 
February 28, 1836. and is the son of Jacob and After the conclusion of the war Captain 
Jane (Hays) Link, the former a native of Link returned to Newport and set bravely 
Bavaria, Germany, born in the year 1800, and about to take up again the broken threads of 
the latter born in the same year in Philadel- life. He resumed his position in the Globe 
phia. The father cast his fortunes with the Rolling Alills and when in June, 1868, the New- 
new world at a very early age and came across port fire department was organized he was ap- 
with little stock in trade with the exception pointed stoker. In 1872 he became chief en- 
of his knowledge of the butcher trade, which gineer of the department and the following 
he had learned in Germany. In Philadelphia, year was appointed its captain under a new 
where he first located, he met his future wife law passed by the legislature abolishing the 
and married, and shortly afterward located in office of chief engineer. When in course of 
Wheeling, West Virginia, where Captain Link time the abolished office was re-created Cap- 
was born. The family made several changes tain Link assumed its duties again in 1874 
of residence, living for different periods of and remained in this capacity until 1889, when 
time at Alarietta, Ohio, Maysville, Kentucky, he retired. In a few years he returned to 
and finally located permanently in Newport in active life and from 1896 until igoi served as 
1849. The father subsequently retired and chief of the fire department of Newport. In 
died in 1857. The demise of his wife occurred his service of over a quarter of a century he 
in Newport some two years previously. They has inaugurated manv improvements and much 
were the parents of five children, namely, of the efficiency of the organization is directly 
Elizabeth, Mary, Philip, Captain Link and due to his enlightened and zealous manage- 
Charles. All of these are deceased with the ment of its aft'airs. His connection with the 
exception of the subject of the biography.' department beginning as it did at its inception, 
Charles, who died in Newport in 1876, served he has had a virgin field upon which to work, 
in the Civil war for a short time prior to its and the past record of the fire fighters is in- 
close, as a member of the Fifty-Third Ken- deed a credit to its guiding spirit, 
tucky Infantry. In the matter of politics Captain Link is an 

Captain Link was an infant when his fam- enthusiastic supporter of the policies and prin- 

ily left Wheeling, West Virginia, and was only ciples of Republicanism. He is a lodge man, 

thirteen years of age when the home was es- belonging to the Masonic order, including the 

tablished in Newport. In the several places Knights Templar division, and for many years 

at which he resided during his early years he he held membership in the Independent Order 

attended the public schools and obtained a com- of Odd Fellows, although recently he has not 

mon school education. When he became fif- affiliated. 

teen years of age he became apprenticed to an In 1865 Captain Link was united in mar- 
engineer on a steamboat plying on the Ohio riage to Anna Cronin, a native of Cincinnati 
river, and for several years thereafter the and daughter of Morris and Anna Cronin, 
scenes of his activity were the upper and both of whom emigrated to the United States 



1184 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

from Ireland and located in the Queen City, among them those of physiology, pathology, 

Morris Cronin was a cabinet maker by trade, bacteriology and clinical medicine, and was the 

Seven children were born to this marriage, as first instructor to give a systematic course in 

follows: Charles, who died in 1894; Cora, who histology and bacteriology in Louisville. Since 

died in 1906; William, John, Jennie, Mollie and the merger of the medical colleges. Dr. Weid- 

Lizzie (the two latter deceased). The mother ner has occupied the chair of Hygiene ana Pre- 

of these children died in 1883 and Captain ventive Medicine. He has also been for many 

Link married again, this time to Sophia Risch, years connected with the different Louisville 

a native of Campbell county and the daughter hospitals, and has taken great interest in those 

of an emigrated German, named George Risch. lines of professional work. 

Three sons were born to this union : George, Dr. Weidner is a member of the Jefferson 

Harry and Walter. The second Mrs. Link County Medical Society, the Kentucky State 

died in 1894. Medical Society and the American Medical 

Carl Weidner, M. D. — Nowhere are men Association. He is a valued member of the 
so thoroughly grounded in the principles of Masonic order, belonging to Aurora Lodge, 
education and in science generally as in the No. 633, F. & A. M. The Doctor has been 
great German empire ; and the educated Ger- married twice. By his first marriage there are 
man is the synonym of the well-rounded, broad four children : Carl Jacob, M. D., graduated 
cultured man, who may be depended upon to from the medical department of the Univer- 
execute affairs of great importance requiring sity of Louisville, served as house' surgeon of 
powers of mind and persistence. Dr. Weidner St. Anthony's Hospital and is now in practice 
in large measure meets all of these require- with his father. The second child is Teresa, 
ments, and is regarded by many as an ideal the third, Walter and the fourth is Elise. The 
physician. Certainly if patronage is any cri- Doctor's second marriage was to Mamie, the 
terion of ability, he ranks high among the daughter of William Lehr, a well-known paint- 
leading physicians in Louisville, where he is ing" contractor of Louisville, and to them two 
now enjoying a large and lucrative practice. children have been born: Margaret and Gar- 

Dr. Carl Weidner is a native of Germany, land. Dr. Weidner undoubtedly deserves his 

born on the 12th day of September. 1857, at success, for while the physician occupies a 

Hofgeismar. Hess-Nassau. He is the son of foremost place among the learned professions, 

Jacob Weidner. who was a native of the above and the rewards for a successful career in this 

place, and where for many years he was en- line are sufficient to attract an ever increasing 

gaged in cabinet and organ making, in which number of the ambitious young men of the 

line he not only was a finished mechanic but country, still the thorns are numerous among 

an artist. The Doctor was reared in his native the roses and the succe'ssful practitioner has 

town, where he attended the gymnasium or none of the ease which accompanies many of 

high school. After leaving that school he took the professions, and no rewards are too great 

up the study of pharmacy, as a preparation for the years of preparatory study, the per- 

for the medical profession. He came to the severence required to get one into a good prac- 

United States in 1874, coming directly to Lou- tice and the actual hardships which are en- • 

isville, Kentucky, where he had friends from dured in journeying in cold and rain to the 

the old country. In that city he engaged in patients far and near. Dr. Weidner has - 

the drug business until 1879, when he com- worked his way upward until he has found his 

menced the study of medicine and in that year level at the top. 

entered the Kentucky School of Medicine at ■ James L. Dodge. — On the old homestead 

Louisville, where he was graduated in 1881 ' estate which was the place of his nativity and 

with the degree of M. D. The Doctor next which is eligibly located about three miles 

went to' Europe and spent a year and a half in east of Paris, Bourbon county, Mr. Dodge is 

post graduate medical study at the University found as one of the representative agricultur- , • 

of Strassburg. Having thus splendidly equipped ists and stock-growers of his native county, 

himself for his future life work, he re- where, both as a loyal and progressive citizen 

turned to Louisville and immediately entered and as a reliable and substantial business 

into the practice of medicine, in which he has man, he is well upholding the prestige of a 

been engaged ever since. He is well grounded name that has been identified with the annals 

in his profession, and is endowed by nature of Kentucky history for four generations. -v, 

with those characteristics that particularly fit On his present fine homestead James L; 

him for the work of this profession, which is Dodge was ushered into the world on the 17th 

the noblest of all. For years he was connected of May, 1869, and he is a son of David M. 

with the corps of instructors of the Kentucky and Rebecca J. (Kenney) Dodge, both of 

School of Medicine, filling different chairs, whom were likewise natives of this county^ 





(X^- 0^ AW^2^;€ 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1185 

where the former was born on the ist of 22d of May, 1861, David M. Dodge con- 
August, 1832, and the latter on the 24th of contracted a second marriage, having then 
August, 1835. David M. Dodge was a son of been united in the bonds of wedlock to Miss 
Edwin M. and Elizabeth (Seamands) Dodge, Rebecca J. Kenney, daughter of Victor M. 
natives respectively of Clark and Bourbon and Catherine A. (Rogers) Kenney, both of 
counties, this state. Edwin M. Dodge was a whom were born and reared in Bourbon 
son of David and Dorcas (Mills) Dodge, the county. Victor M. Kenney was a son of 
former of whom was the founder of the James Kenney, who was born in Virginia, 
family in Kentucky, whence he came from where he was reared to adult age and whence 
Pennsylvania in the pioneer days and estab- he came when a young man to Kentucky, 
lished his home in Clark county, where he numbering himself among Uie pioneers of 
continued to be engaged in agricultural pur- Bourbon county. His first wife, the mother 
suits until his death. The ancestors of David of Victor M., bore the maiden name of Mar- 
Dodge are as follows : His father was Isaac, garet Johnson, and after her death he con- 
son of Eli, son of Josiah, son of Josiah, son tracted a second marriage. Mrs. Catherine 
of John, son of Richard, who was the founder A. (Rogers) Kenney was a daughter of 
of the Dodge family in America. He ap- Thomas and Rebecca (Spahr) Rogers, who 
peared in Salem, Massachusetts in 1638. — were numbered among the early and honored 
See Genealogy of the Dodge Family. David pioneers of Bourbon county. 
Dodge reared a large family of children and In 1856 David M. Dodge established his 
many of his descendants are now to be found home on the farm now owned by his son 
in various parts of the old Blue Grass com- James L., of this sketch, and as before stated, 
monwealth, as well as in other sections of the the place is located about three miles east of 
Union. Mrs. Elizabeth (Seamands) Dodge, the thriving little city of Paris, on the Paris 
paternal grandmother of James L. Dodge of and North Middletown turnpike. He here 
this review, was a daughter of Manson Sea- gave the best of 'his splendid energies to the 
mands, who served as major of a Kentucky development and improvement of his property, 
regiment in the war of 1812 and who died in and the tangil)le results of his efforts remain 
1856; the maiden name of his wife was patent to all. He was a man of impregnable 
Newton. integrity in all the relations of life, was en- 
Edwin M. Dodge was born in Clark county, dowed with strong mentality and good judg- 
Kentucky, about the year 181 1 and was there ment, and he was numbered among the best 
reared to maturity under the conditions and known and most highly esteemed citizens of 
influences of the pioneer epoch. As a young his native county, where his death occurred, 
man he removed to Bourbon county and lo- on his old homestead, on the loth of April, 
cated in North Middletown precinct, where 1903. He was a stanch Democrat in his po- 
was solemnized his marriage to Miss Eliza- litical proclivities and his religious faith was 
beth Seamands. There he continued his identi- that of the Presbyterian church. He did not 
fication with farming and stock-growing until hedge himself in with mere personal aggran- 
his death, which occurred about the year 1836. dizement but was liberal and progressive in 
and his widow subsequently became the wife his civic attitude. His second wife, Mrs. Re- 
ef Kinzea Stone. They continued to reside becca J. (Kenney) Dodge, who survives him 
in Bourbon county until their death. and remains on the old homestead, bore him 
David M. Dodge remained with his mother four children, concerning whom the follow- 
and stepfather until he had attained to the ing brief record is entered ; Martha V. is the 
age of twenty years, and in the meanwhile he wife of Charles G. Blakely, of Topeka. Kan- 
duly availed himself of the advantages of the sas ; David M. died when about 34 years of 
common schools of the locality and period, age; James L. is the immediate subject of 
the while he contributed his quota to the work this review ; and Victor K. is an interested 
and management of the home farm. In Feb- principal of the Phoenix Motor Car Com- 
ruary, 1852, was solemnized his marriage to pany, of Lexington, this state, where he 
Miss Adeline Fretwell, daughter of Pascal maintains his residence. 

and ^laria (Hildreth) Fretwell, both of James L. Dodge was reared to maturity on 
whom were representatives of old Virginia the old homestead which is his present place 
families. Mrs. Adeline Dodge died in i860, of abode and which was likewise that of his 
and of her four children Bettie is now the nativity, and after availing himself of the ad- 
only one living; she is the widow of Williarn vantages of the district school he continued 
Wood and resides in the city of Indianapolis, his higher academic studies in the Garth In- 
Indiana. The three deceased children were stitute, at Paris, this county. He has never 
Mary D.. Edwin M. and William P. On the severed his allegiance to the great productive 



1186 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

industry under whose influences he was the voyage covering a period of ten weeks 
reared and he is now the owner of the old and three days. The "Austria Nome"' landed 
homestead, to which he has added until his at Baltimore, Maryland, when the family pro- 
landed estate comprises 803 acres. The spa- ceeded to Covington, Kenton county, Ken- 
cious residence and other buildings on the tucky, where Airs. Klaene joined her son 
place are of the best type and this is recog- Henry and her brother, John Boske, who had 
nized as one of the many fine farms that have come to America in 1864. The mother passed 
given Bourbon county such distinctive pres- the residue of her life in this city and was 
tige. As a young man Mr. Dodge began to summoned to the life eternal at the venerable 
devote special attention to the breeding and age of eighty-six years. She was the mother 
training of fine trotting and pacing horses, in of five sons, four of whom accompanied her 
which connection he gained precedence as one to the United States, and of the number three 
of the leading horsemen in the section which are now living, the subject of this review be- 
has ever represented his home. He still con- ing the youngest of the family, 
tinues to own and handle a few high-grade George H. Klaene was a lad of but nine 
horses and has never abated his love for the years at the time of the family immigration to 
horse, but since the death of his father he America and he was afforded the advantages 
has confined his energies more especially to of St. Joseph's parochial schools in Covington, 
diversified agriculture and to the raising of When seventeen years of age he learned the 
high-grade live stock, besides which he deals moulder's trade in the city of Cincinnati, Ohio, 
somewhat extensively in the same, making and he followed the same with marked success 
large shipments each year. He is one of the for a number of years in Cincinnati and Cov- 
progressive and wideawake citizens of Bour- ington. In 1890 he became one of the organiz- 
bon county, ever ready to give his influence ers of the Star Foundry Company, which was 
and aid in support of measures and enter- incorporated, on the 17th of April of that year, 
prises advanced for the general good of the with a capital stock of ten thousand dollars, 
community, and while he has had naught of four thousand of which was paid in. The offi- 
aspiration for public office he is found aligned cial corps of this company consisted of the fol- 
as a stanch supporter of the cause of the lowing: George H. Klaene, president; George 
Democratic party, in whose faith he was Ling, vice-president ; Gerhard Haar, treasurer, 
reared. He is a member of the Presbyterian Anton Graving and Joseph Klaene, together 
church. with the above officers, constituted the original 

On the loth of December, 1890, was solem- board of directors. On the 19th of April, 
nized the marriage of Mr. Dodge to Miss 1906, the company was reorganized and rein- 
Lucy H. Williams, who was born in Harrison corporated under the laws of the state, with a 
county, Kentucky, on the 20th of September, capital stock of twenty thousand dollars. The 
1869, and who was a daughter of John I. and present officers are: George H. Klaene, presi- 
Elizabeth (Stone) Williams. Of this union dent ; A. B. Graving, vice-president ; and Aug- 
were born two children, one of whom died in ust Odberding, treasurer. They also consti- 
infancy ; the surviving child, Edgar W., was tute the present board of directors. The busi- 
born on the 25th of November, 1893. Mrs. ness was begun on a small scale as a jobbing 
Dodge was summoned to the life eternal on foundry and later the manufacturing of stoves 
the 17th of July, 1905, secure in the affection- and ranges was introduced. The scope of the 
ate regard of all who had come within the business has been gradually increased and the 
sphere of her gracious influence. concern is now one of the most successful of 

George H. Klaene, president of the Star its kind in the state. It employs a force of forty 

Foundry Company, of Covington, is an able men and the trade covers the states of In- 

and representative business man in the city diana, Ohio and Kentucky. The Star Foundry 

which has represented his home since he was Company is widely known for its fair and hon- 

a lad of about nine years of age. Mr. Klaene orable business methods, and one of the best 

was born in Lutten, duchy of Oldenberg, assets of the company is the eminently reliable 

Germany, on the 17th of October, 1857, and he character of its executive officers, 

is a son of Harmon Henry and Catherine In politics George H. Klaene is a staunch 

(Boske) Klaene, both of whom were likewise advocate of the cause of the Democratic party, 

natives of the German Empire, where the for- and he has contributed in generous measure 

mer was engaged in gardening and where his to the conservation of the civic and material 

death occurred about the year 1859. The welfare of the city which has so long repre- 

widowed mother and surviving children emi- sented his home. Both he and his wife are 

grated to the United States in 1866. The long communicants of the Catholic church, being 

and weary trip was made in a sailing vessel, members of the parish of St. Joseph's church. 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1187 

Mr. Klaene is affiliated with the Catholic Be- tucky Educational Improvement Association, 

nevolent Society and is now serving his second which drafted the bill known as the County 

term as treasurer in the same. School District bill, which passed into a law 

In 1884 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. in 1908 by the action of the general assembly. 
Klaene to Miss Margaret Welling, who was The law gives Kentucky an educational sys- 
born in Newport, Campbell county, Kentucky, tern that ranks favorably with any of her sister 
and who is a daughter of Henry Welling, a states. Mr. Jones gives support, loyal and 
representative citizen and business man of that staunch, to the politics and principles of the 
place. I\Ir. and Mrs. Klaene became the par- Democratic party, and takes a sincere interest 
ents of eight children, seven of whom are now in all those matters which pertain to the gen- 
living. Kathleen is deceased, and Mary, Clara, eral welfare. He is a member of the Baptist 
Frank, Anna, Gertrude, Margaret and Agnes church and is moderator of the Franklin Bap- 
all remain at the parental home. tist Association. His pleasant fraternal asso- 

Ernest Richard Jones. — A man well- ciations extend to the Independent Order of 

known and esteemed in this part of the state Odd Fellows and to the Knights of Pythias, 

is Ernest Richard Jones, county superintend- Mr. Jones was married, February 8, 1881," 

ent of schools for Franklin county, an office to Miss Mattie Swifzer, of Franklin county, 

to whose duties he has for the five years past They are the parents of the following five 

brought a great deal of efficiency and discrim- children : W^illiam B., Fannie, Grover and 

ination. Mr. Jones shares the fortune of so Thomas and Betty, twins, 

much of America's representative citizenship John Walter Jeffers. — Although of the 

of having been born on the farm, his birth younger generation of Frankfort, John Walter 

having occurred in Fayette county. May 30, JefFers is a man who has already made his 

1861, and his parents being John Hawkin and mark and has been honored with several high 

Agnes Elizabeth (Mitchell) Jones, both of offices, both in a civic and fraternal relation, 

them likewise Fayette county natives. The and to enumerate he is master commissioner, 

father answered to the dual calling of a car- former chief deputy sheriff and past chancellor 

penter and farmer, and was skilled in the trade commander of the Knights of Pythias, an or- 

which took him over a good part of that sec- ganization in which he is widely known. The 

tion of the country. The paternal grand- ancestry of Mr. Jeffers is in many ways of 

father was a native of the neighboring state of peculiar interest and well reoays a passing 

Virginia. survey. His grandfather, Elias Jeffers, was 

Ernest Richard Jones was reared upon the born in Scott county, Kentucky, February 11, 
farm, moved to Franklin county in 1875, and 1820, and died in Frankfort, January 31, 1870. 
received his education in the public schools. The parents of the foregoing were John and 
this being effectively supplemented by a nor- Polly (Tapp) Jeffers, both of them native 
mal course which prepared him for those \ irginians. the father having been born in 
pedagogic duties for which he was naturally in- Culpeper county, that state. John Jeffers 
clined. For a while, however, he engaged in early identified himself with the Blue grass 
farming, and met with a good deal of success state and settled near Lexington, afterward 
in this line, but at the age of twenty-eight he removing to that city with his family and 
took his place at a teacher in the public schools making his residence there for many years, 
of Franklin county. His career as a teacher Both the Jeffers and the Tapp family are of 
and instructor of the young was of eighteen English descent. Elias Jeffers married Ma- 
years duration, and fifteen years were spent in tilda Stubbs in 1841. The wife was a daughter 
Switzer, Kentucky. In 1905 he was elected of William and Betsy (Conway) Stubbs, 
county superintendent of schools, and in 1909 Marylanders, who came to Kentucky by wagon 
was re-elected, now serving upon his second in the year 181 7, when Matilda was a babe 
term of four years. He has also given excellent eleven months old. her birth having occurred 
service as treasurer of the Educational Im- September 27, 1816. Her death occurred in 
provement Commission of Kentucky,which was Frankfort. March 5. 1895. To the grand- 
organized in 1906 and has done its share toward parents of John Walter Jeffers were born four 
the elevation of general educational standards, daughters and six sons, three of whom died in 
He is connected in a prominent capacity with childhood. The others w^ere James Wesley, 
the Kentucky Educational Association, being (deceased), Benoni B.. Mary Ellis (known as 
its present vice-president, and since its organi- Alice), California. Albert Guino, Bettie Al- 
zation he has been one of the directors. Spe- line and Cordelia (or Cordeallah). Six chil- 
cial distinction must attach to him as one of dren are thus living at the present day. Elias 
the prime movers of the cause, and as chair- Jeffers and his wife were God-fearing people, 
man of the legislative committee of the Ken- the father being a member of the Christian 



1188 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

and the mother of the Baptist church. Ehas evidence of the confidence he inspires in his 

Jeft'ers made the liveHhood for himself and his fellow citizens. 

family as a trader and farmer, and for the John Rinehart Wright, M. D. — Each call- 
last six years of his life was assistant keeper ing or business has its place in the scheme of 
of the Kentucky state penitentiary at Frank- human existence, constituting a part of the 
fort. He was a man who weighed over three plan wKereby life's methods are pursued and 
hundred pounds and on account of his genial man reaches his ultimate destiny. There is no 
and generous personality was very popular in class to whom greater gratitude is due than to 
the community. His political convictions were those noble minded men whose life work has 
Democratic. been the alleviation of the burden of suffering 
Albert Guino Jeffers, father of the subject that rests upon the world, thus lengthening the 
of the sketch, was born in Woodford county, span of human existence. 

Kentucky, at \'ersailles, on December 30, 1853. John Rinehart Wright, physician of Louis- 
He passed his childhood in his native place ville. has gained distinctive precedence in the 
and then moved to Anderson county. After treatment of the eye, ear, nose and throat, 
leaving school he moved to Franklin county, and is recognized as an authority on the dis- 
became assistant keeper at the state peniten- eases of those organs. Dr. Wright is a native 
tiary under his father, and subsequently took of Illinois, born in Effingham, November 18, 
up the vocation of farming and stock raising, 1869. He is a son of the late William C. 

in which he has proved very successful, having and (Rinehart) Wright, the father a 

kept in touch with the latest scientific develop- native of Maryland and the mother, born in 
ments. It was in 1902 that he entered upon Pennsylvania, both being early settlers of Illi- 
his duties as sheriff of Franklin county, having nois. The father was on his way with his 
been elected upon the Democratic ticket, and father to the California gold fields in '49, and 
he served for a term of four years. He was they went on their way as far as across the 
in office during the prosecution of James How- Rockies when they changed their plans and 
ard. one of the alleged assassins of Governor returned to Illinois and located there, where 
Goebel. the father engaged in merchandising at Effing- 
His service in this capacity had been pre- ham. He died in 1891 and the mother in 187 1. 
ceded by eight years as deputy sherifif. Dr. Wright was reared in Effingham and 
Albert Guino Jeffers was married in 1878 to secured his preliminary education at the public 
Miss Olive Ann Cain, born in Meade county, schools, graduating from the High School, 
Kentucky, a daughter of John and Elizabeth following this with a course of study at Austen 
(Coleman) Cain, who were likewise natives of College at Effingham. Having decided upon 
IMeade county. John Cain was a miller, and medicine as his choice of a profession for his 
during the war he was in business at Grahamp- life work, he then attended the University of 
ton. To this union was born two sons, John the South at Sewanee. Tennessee, in 1891. 
Walter and Howard Benoni. In order to further perfect himself in his pro- 
John Walter Jeffers, whose name heads this fessional education, he took post graduate 
account, was born in Frankfort, Kentucky, work in Chicago, and commenced his career 
August 2, 1880. He attended the Frankfort as a practitioner in Colorado. In 1904 he lo- 
schools and was graduated from their higher cated in Louisville, since which time he has 
department. Subsequent to this he studied been in continuous practice, making a specialty 
stenography, bookkeeping and commercial law of the treatment of diseases of the eye, ear, 
in a private school at Frankfort. When his nose and throat. Throughout the intervening 
father was elected sheriff in 1902 he became years he has been a close and discriminating 
chief deputy, and he afterward successfully student of his profession, keeping in constant 
engaged in farming. In 1907 he was appointed touch with the advanced ideas and methods of 
master commissioner, which office he still practice as set forth and followed by the lead- 
holds. Like his forbears he is a stalwart sup- ing members of the profession of the w^orld. 
porter of the policies and principles of the He has served in a variety of positions in 
Democratic party, and he is taking an influen- addition to the calls of his regular practice, 
tial position in its ranks. He is an enthusi- He is on the medical staff of the ]\Iasonic 
astic Knight of Pythias and is past chancellor Home for the Widows and Orphans, and on 
commander of the order. He was appointed the staff of St. Mary & Elizabeth Hospital, 
to the receivership for the General Supply & For a time he was associate professor of the 
Construction Company, which failed after se- eye, ear, nose and throat at the Louisville 
curing the contract for the new state capitol ^Medical College and also at the Universitv of 
building. These facts can not but be taken in Louisville. He is a member of the Jefferson 



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HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1189 

County Medical Society, the Kentucky State graded schools at Aloodus, Connecticut, as 
JMedical Society, the American Medical Asso- principal. Finding the schoolroom too con- 
ciation and also of the West End Medical So- hning and that the work of teaching was over- 
ciety of Louisville and the Commercial Club, taxing his strength, Air. Gates went to sea as 
Dr. Wright married Miss Emma Poplin, a a hand before the mast for one season. Re- 
native of Missouri, born in Poplar Bluff, which turning home he was for one year more en- 
town was named for her grandfather, Green L. gaged in the outdoor work of a farmer. 
Poplin, a noted physician of Kentucky who His first venture in the commercial world 
moved into Missouri. Her father was John and the one which decided his career was 
Poplin, deceased. Dr. Wright is recognized made in 1877, when he entered the service of 
as a man of broad mind and scholarly attain- the Turner, Day & Woolworth Handle Com- 
ments, who has carried his investigations far pany, Incorporated, of Louisville, Kentucky, 
and wide into the realms of knowledge, while as yardmaster. He was then twenty-one 
his ready adaptability enables him to apply years of age and he has continued in the ser- 
with accuracy his knowledge to the needs of vice of this company ever since, and in the 
those who come under his professional care, more than thirty-three years that have elapsed 
Charles D. Gates. — To say of him whose he has filled the positions of shipping clerk, 
name heads this sketch that he has risen un- foreman, superintendent, secretary, general 
aided from comparative obscurity to rank manager and president, which latter office he 
among the foremost manufacturers of the now holds. 

state is a statement that seems trite to those The Turner, Day & Woolworth Handle 
familiar with his life, yet it is but just to say Company, Incorporated, is not only one of 
in a history that will descend to future genera- the greatest industries of Louisville, but also 
tions that his business record has been one one of the largest of its kind in the United 
that any man might be proud to possess. Be- States. The head office is located in Louis- 
ginning at the bottom round of the ladder he ville and several other branches are main- 
has advanced steadily step by step until he is tained at other places, including both New 
now occupying a position of prominence York city and San Francisco. It maintains 
reached by few. Through his entire business in all thirty-two branch factories, the most 
career he has been looked upon as a model of important of which are located in Nashville, 
integrity and honor, never making an engage- Tennessee; Huntington, West \'irginia ; 
ment that he has not fulfilled, and standing to- r\Iemphis, Tennessee ; Paragould, Arkansas ; 
day an example of what determination and Cairo, Illinois ; Bowling Green, Kentucky, and 
force, combined with the highest degree of Decatur. Alabama. From well selected hick- 
business probity, can accomplish for a man ory timber are manufactured handles used by 
of natural ability and strength of character. woodmen, farmers, mechanics, miners, rail- 
Charles D. Gates was born in Hadlyme, road contractors and the army and navy. The 
Connecticut, August 21, 1855. His father, company, in addition to supplying a large do- 
Francis E. Gates, now (1910) eighty-four mestic trade, does an enormous export busi- 
years of age, is a direct descendant of the ness, supplying probably three-fourths of all 
famous Gates family of Revolutionary times, the handles that are shipped to England, Ger- 
His mother, who bore the maiden name of many, Australia and other foreign markets. 
Sarah Maria Day, and is now deceased, was To the large interest of this company Mr. 
a member of the illustrious Hugerford fam- Gates has given close and constant attention 
ily whose genealogy is recorded in the Knights for years, becoming familiar with every detail 
of England. Thus coming of New England of the business and to his efforts have been 
stock, "Sir. Gates is from an ancestral line of due, in the main, the gratifying success in bus- 
which any one might justly be proud. His iness with which the Turner, Day & Wool- 
father, grandfather and great-grandfather worth Handle Company has met, and to-day 
were all prosperous farmers -residing in the it is the largest concern of its kind in the 
Connecticut valley. world. Like all forceful men Mr. Gates has 
In his boyhood days Charles D. Gates at- been in demand from other or outside enter- 
tended the district schools, and at the age of prises and corporations, but he has never con- 
fifteen years he w^as sent to the Hartford sented to hold any salaried office. _He has 
graded schools, which he attended for a while served as vice-president of the Louisville Park 
and from which he went to a preparatorv- Commission : and as director of the Lincoln 
school at East Hampton. Massachusetts, and Savings Bank and of the Louisville Board of 
later attended the Williston Seminary at East Trade. He is a member of the Louisville 
Hampton, Massachusetts. He then became Commercial Club, of the Filson Club and of 
a "yankee schooLteacher," in charge of the the Louisville Country Club. Mr. Gates has 



1190 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

taken a lively interest in philanthropic and wealth : The Strothers, the Owsleys, the Mad- 
church work and affairs. He has served as doxes and the Duncans. The Strother family 
president of the Presbyterian Alliance of is an ancient one and is supposed to have been 
Louisville, as an elder in the Presbyterian of Scandinavian origin, and the name now ex- 
church and as chairman of the State Execu- ists in Sweden and Denmark. It is supposed 
tive Committee of the Young Men's Christian to have crossed over into Northumberland, 
Association and as president of the Presby- England, in the tenth century and has been 
terian Orphan's Home. Mr. Gates is a thor- conspicuous in the latter county for centuries, 
ough believer in association work, having been many members of different generations having 
an active member of the Handle Manufactur- held high official positions and belonged to the 
ers' Association of America, and having nobility. The original Strother settler in Ken- 
served as president of the Hickory Handle tucky was the Rev. George Strother, grand- 
Manufacturers' Association for a number of father of our subject, who was born in Cul- 
years. peper county, Virginia, on February 14, 1776, 

In commercial affairs he is possessed of and there in 1796 married Mary Duncan. Im- 

keen penetration, the power of making a quick mediately following their marriage they came 

decision and firmness in maintaining his posi- to Kentucky. He was the son of John F. 

tion once it is taken- — ^essential attributes in Strother and his wife Ann Strother (cousins), 

a man who would dictate the policy of a great John F. was the son of Jeremiah, who married 

corporation. He maintains an attitude of Catherine Kennerly, of Culpeper county, Vir- 

open fearlessness and absolute frankness in ginia, and removed thence to South Carolina 

business relations, so much that he cannot about the time of the Revolutionary war. 

forgive or condone the lack of these traits in Jeremiah was the son of James, who married 

a competitor. Perhaps the recent words of Margaret French, of Culpeper county, Vir- 

an intimate associate of Charles D. Gates ginia, and he was the son of Jeremiah, who 

best sum up his dominant characteristics : was a freeholder of Westmoreland county, 

"When he goes after anything he usually gets Virginia, as early as 1703. He (Jeremiah) 

it, and when he gets anything good he is al- was the son of William, who was born in Vir- 

ways willing to share it." ginia in about 1665,' was a planter, and lived in 

In politics Mr. Gates is a stanch Repub- the original country seat of his father William, 

lican. but he has never sought political honors, who was the original emigrant from Northum- 

In 1884 Mr. Gates was united in marriage berland, England, and settled in King George 

with Miss Lallie S. Davison, daughter of Ed- county, Virginia. His name first appeared in 

mond L. Davison. Mrs. Gates comes of an the records of Virginia on July 12, 1673, when 

old, prominent and well connected Kentucky he came into Rappahanock Court House and 

family. They have a delightful home, pleas- designated the mark of his cattle, 

ant and congenial, where their friends meet Rev. George Strother was a pioneer Meth- 

with the most generous hospitality. odist minister in Bourbon county, Kentucky, 

John C. Strother. — There is no part of a where he first settled. In 1801 he removed to 

biographical history of more general interest Gallatin county, now Trimble county, where 

than the record of the bar. It is well known he and his wife lived the remainder of their 

that the peace, prosperity and well being of lives. The father of our subject was the Rev. 

every community depend upon the wise in- French Strother, son of Rev. George, and was 

terpretation of the laws, as well as upon their born in Trimble county, Kentucky, in April, 

judicious framing, and the records of those 181 1, and died there in October. 1870. He 

who are connected with this administration are married Lucinda Owsley Maddox, who was 

of importance to present the future genera- born in Trimble county, Kentucky, in April, 

tions, John C. Strother is one who has been 1823, and died in that county in ]\Iarch. 1883. 

honored and is an honor to the legal fraternity John C. Strother was born in Trimble 

of Kentucky. He stands to-day prominent county, Kentucky, on February 25, 1846. He 

among the leading members of the bar of the attended the common schools and read law 

state, a position to which he has attained under the preceptorship of the late Hon. W. S. 

through marked ability. Pryor, chief justice of Kentucky, and the late 

Mr. J. C. Strother is a native son of Ken- Joseph Barbour, of the Kentucky superior 

tucky, born in Trimble county on February court, was graduated from the law department 

25, 1846. His genealogy is so well defined of the University of Louisville with the class 

in direct descent of his ancestry of such un- of 1869, and that same year began the practice 

assailable quality that it is only due to give a at Owenton, Kentucky. During his first year 

short sketch of it. Mr. Strother is descended at Owenton he was elected school commis- 

from four pioneer families of the common- sioner of Owen county, a position he held for 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1191 



seven years. In 1873 he was one of five candi- 
dates for the nomination of commonwealth at- 
torney of the Owenton district, and after a 
heated contest was second in the convention 
and but for a dispute which arose over the 
nomination of judge would have been first, as 
he went into the convention with votes enough 
pledged to give him success. He took high 
rank at the bar of Owen and adjoining coun- 
ties and maintained it as long as he practiced 
there. In 1885 he removed to Louisville to 
become chief deputy under the late Attila Cox, 
collector of internal revenue. In July, 1889, 
Mr. Strother returned to the practice of law, 
this time in Louisville, and in 1890 formed a 
partnership with Thomas R. Gordon under the 
firm name of Strother & Gordon, which con- 
tinued for over ten years. In 1901 Mr. 
Strother and his son Shelby French Strother 
formed the firm of Strother & Strother, of 
which later on Rowan Hardin became a mem- 
ber under the firm name of Strother, Hardin 
& Strother. In 1903 Shelby Strother with- 
drew from the firm and entered Harvard Uni- 
versity, and the firm continued as Strother & 
Hardin until November, 1904, when it was 
dissolved, since which time our subject has 
practiced alone. 

Mr. Strother was for a number of years 
chief attorney for the Louisville Title Com- 
pany. He was one of the organizers of and 
attorney for the Louisville Savings, Loan & 
Building Association, which loaned several 
million dollars and was very successful. The 
firm of Strother & Gordon was attorneys for 
the Mutual Life Insurance Company of Ken- 
tucky. Mr. Strother has been prominent and 
successful at the Louisville bar and has ap- 
peared in many celebrated cases. He was at- 
torney for J. G. Mattingly & Company, against 
J. G. Mattingly, which suit involved valuable 
trade marks ; the case was carried to the Ken- 
tucky court of appeals, which enjoined Mr. 
Mattingly from the use of his own name, one 
of two instances of the kind ever occurring in 
the United States. Another celebrated case 
was that of John Loree against William Abner 
and others, which suit was brought to recover 
patent for over thirty thousand acres of Ken- 
tucky land, and in which noted case Mr. 
Strother was council for the defendants. The 
case was tried before Judge W. H. Taft, now 
president of the United States, was won by 
Mr. Strother, then carried to the United States 
circuit court of appeals, where the lower court 
was reversed and the case sent back for re- 
trial. The story of this case reads like a ro- 
mance and is very interesting. In the second 
trial before Judge Taft Mr. Strother won a de- 



cided victory and the suit ended. Mr. Strother 
also defended John Etly, indicted for the mur- 
der of his wife, which was one of the most 
celebrated criminal cases ever tried in Ken- 
tucky. Mr. Strother has always taken an act- 
ive interest in politics, but has never sought nor 
held office since coming to Louisville except 
that of member of the Board of Education of 
the city under the new school law, to which 
he was elected in 1910 without solicitation. 

Mr. Strother is a member of the Jefferson 
County and Kentucky State Bar Associations 
and is a Mason and Odd Fellow, a member of 
the Filson Club, Sons of the American Revo- 
lution and of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
South. He married Mary Frances Greenwood, 
who was born in Bedford, Trimble county, 
Kentucky, the daughter of Isaac S. and Cath- 
erine Morton (Young) Greenwood, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Strothers are the parents of the fol- 
lowing children : Catherine Pryor, Shelby 
French, Eugene Thomas (died in December, 
1903) and Ralph Greenwood. 

Hugh Crockett McKee, present superin- 
tendent of the Frankfort City Schools, has 
given distinguished service since his election to 
that important office in July, 1904, having be- 
come a potent factor in all movements which 
tend toward the elevation of educational stand- 
ards in that city. By ancestral record and 
present loyalty Professor McKee is a repre- 
sentative Kentuckian. His forefathers and 
their achievements will merit a passing glance. 

His parents were Robert B. and Serena D. 
McKee, the former born in the old McKee 
homestead which was patented under the Vir- 
ginia government by John McKee, the sub- 
ject's grandfather. John McKee was born in 
Virginia and was of Scotch-Irish lineage, and 
his wife was a daughter of Colonel Anthony 
Crockett of Revolutionary fame. Professor 
Hugh Crockett McKee is thus a great-grand- 
son of that celebrated American. John McKee 
was a farmer by vocation and was the first 
magistrate of his district after Kentucky be- 
came a state. He lived to be eighty-four 
years of age and was a widely-known and 
much respected man. 

Robert B. McKee, father of the subject, pre- 
vious to the Civil war was employed for four 
years in the Western River and Harbor Im- 
provements service. He was warden of the 
Missouri penitentiary at Jefferson City for six 
years before the war and devoted the last 
twenty-five years of his life to teaching in the 
public schools. He was state examiner under 
Hon. Deshay Pickett, superintendent of public 
instruction. At the time of his demise he was 
seventy-six years of age. His wife was a na- 



1192 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

tive of Ohio county, Kentucky, of Scotch- business in Newport, being the pioneer in that 

Irish descent. She bore her husband four line in northern Kentucky, importing cement 

chiklren, of whom Professor Mclvee was the in those days from Germany. He built up an 

third. extensive business, in which he continued un- 

Hugh Crockett McKee was born on the old til his death, which occurred in 1904, on the 
McKee homestead in Franklin county, June 10, Oth of July, at the age of sixty years. The 
1 87 1. Upon this fair domain he was reared business was carried on by Peter Ader & Son 
and came to young manhood. He received his after 1900, Frank G., our subject, becoming a 
early education in the public schools and his member at that date. Mr. Peter Ader was 
A. JJ. degree in the Kentucky Military Insti- always very active in all that pertained to the 
tute. As seen from the foregoing Professor best interests of the city, serving on the fire 
McKee may claim his pedagogical inclinations and police boards and holding several minor 
by right of heritage. Soon after his graduation ofiices. In politics he was a lifelong Demo- 
he taught school for two years at Shelbyville. crat, and during the time of the war between 
He afterwards opened a private school at the states he was a member of the Home 
Frankfort, which he conducted for a good Guards at Newport. He was married twice, 
many years or until his election to the superin- first to a Miss Krontz, who was the mother 
tendency of the Frankfort city schools in July, of two sons, and after her death he married 
1904. • ]\Iary Collutt. 

He has since attained recognition as one of Mary Collutt, the mother of our subject, 

the state's leading educators, having been presi- was born in Pennsylvania, her parents both 

dent of the Kentucky Educational Association being foreign born, her father a native of 

in 1909, which year the organization registered Alsace Lorraine and her mother, from 

a very large membership and a successful cam- Prussia. Germany, of French descent. They 

paign for better educational conditions was came to the United States and settled in 

conducted throughout the state. Pennsylvania, and later became pioneers of 

Professor McKee finds pleasure in his lodge Cincinnati. The mother had three sons by 
relations. He is a member of the Independent Peter Ader, of whom our subject is the eld- 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent and est. and she died in Newport in 1906. at the 
Protective Order of Elks. As to his church as- age of sixty-three years. She had been pre- 
sociations, he is junior warden of the Ascen- viously married to Charles Wuest, by whom 
sion Episcopal church, having been one of its she had been the mother of two sons, 
vestrymen since 1902. Frank G. Ader was reared in Newport and 

In 1897 Professor McKee was married to educated in the public schools, acquiring the 

Miss Stella Jones, of Frankfort, daughter of branches usually taught in those departments. 

Marcus A. and Sarah M. Jones. They have When fifteen years old he began mechanical 

two daughters, Virginia and Sarah Mason. engineering, and. learning the same, worked 

Frank G. Ader is an extensive contractor, in Cincinnati for a time, but he was young 
and the breadth and importance of his business and restless and wanted to see more of the 
have made him a leading representative of world than he had hitherto had an opportun- 
trade interests and one of the substantial pro- ity of doing. For two years he stayed in 
moters of the material development and gen- Arizona and southern California, being em- 
eral prosperity of the country. Mr. Ader is ployed as an engineer in those countries. Re- 
in the concrete construction business at New- turning to Newport in 1900, he entered into 
port, Kentucky, in which city he was born business with his father in the concrete con- 
October 18. 1874, the son of Peter and Mary struction work, and after his father's death 
(CoUett) Ader. The father, a native of bought out the interests of the heirs and since 
Bavaria. Germany, when about two years old 1904 has carried on the same under the firm 
came to the United States with his parents in name of the Frank G. Ader Construction 
1844, being the youngest of fourteen children. Company, which has developed into one of 
The family settled on a farm on Owl Creek, the largest in this line in Kentucky, giving 
about seven miles from Newport, in Campbell employment to many men and handling many 
county, Kentucky, where the parents of Peter large contracts. 

lived the remainder of their lives. The farm In addition to Mr. Ader's regular business 

is still owned by the heirs. Peter xA.der was he is interested in various other affairs. He 

reared on the farm and when a young man is a director in the Daylight Building Assocja- 

went to Cincinnati and worked in a furniture tion of Newport and also director of the Cin- 

factory for thirty years, maintaining his resi- cinnati Builders' Supply Company. In poli- 

dence at Newport. In 1893, when the cement tics Mr. Ader has always been a stanch 

industry was in its infancy, he engaged in that Democrat but has never taken an active part 



^'^^ 




HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1193 



in political affairs, as his business life made 
all the demands upon his time that he could 
manage. 

On November 7, 1906, Mr. Ader was mar- 
ried to Elizabeth Huber, a native of Newport, 
Kentucky, and daughter of the late Phillip 
Huber, who for many years was a wholesale 
confectioner in Cincinnati. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ader have one child, named Mary Julia. 

John Y. Conn. — -Standing at the helm of 
two of Newport's most useful and thriving 
industries, the Newport Coal Company and 
the Newport Ice Company, is John Y. Conn, 
who serves in the capacity of president of 
both of those institutions. These two con- 
cerns give employment to nearly fifty men and 
thus contribute in good measure to the mate- 
rial prosperity of the city, and Mr. Conn thus 
plays the beneficent role of the citizen who 
furnishes honorable support for many of the 
more dependent members of society. 

Mr. Conn is a native Kentuckian and was 
born in Jefferson county on September 4, 
1859. ^^^ parents were Allen J. and Eliza- 
beth (Tyler) Conn, the former a native of 
Indiana and the latter of Jefferson county, 
Kentucky. The father was a farmer and was 
very successful in his chosen vocation, own- 
ing and operating a fertile tract of land situ- 
ated about sixteen miles east of Louisville. 
Here he lived the greater part of his life and 
from here was called to his reward at the age 
of seventy years. The mother is the repre- 
sentative of an old Kentucky family and may 
be numbered among the pioneers of the Blue 
Grass state, or if not strictly speaking among 
the pioneers, Kentucky being one of the states 
earliest settled, she is, nevertheless, one of 
those who well remembers the charming life 
of Kentucky in ante-bellum days. Now at the 
age of seventy-six years she resides upon the 
old homestead. She is the mother of five chil- 
dren, three boys and two girls, two of whom 
are living at the present day, Mr. Conn and a 
younger sister. INIary Aliller. 

John Y. Conn passed his boyhood days 
upon the farm and enjoyed the manifold ex- 
periences of the lad who has an opportunity 
to live near to the heart of nature. He re- 
ceived a common school education and had 
some thought of following in the paternal 
footsteps in the choice of life work. In 
fact he adhered to this resolution imtil after 
his thirtieth birthday, pursuing his agricultural 
ventures independently in both his native 
county and in Shelby county. Somewhere 
near the year 1890 Mr. Conn located in New- 
port and organized the Frigid Ice Company, 
and he has ever since been closely and promi- 
nently identified with its fortunes, and for the 



past ten years has served in the capacity of 
president, bringing to the solution of its prob- 
lems judgment of a distinguished character. 
The plant is equipped with the most modern 
machinery, having indeed from the first em- 
ployed the latest and best methods known in 
the business. It has been enlarged from time 
to time until it has a present capacity of sev- 
enty-five tons daily and supplying trade in 
both Newport and Cincinnati. This industry 
gives employment to about thirty people and 
is counted as one of the very substantial con- 
cerns of Newport. 

Mr. Conn's executive gifts are by no means 
of small calibre and it is not strange that he 
has not been content to limit himself to the 
management of one concern, even though it 
be of an important character. On July 6, 
1906, the Newport Coal Company began busi- 
ness, Mr. Conn having organized it and from 
the first served in the capacity of president. 
It has a capital stock of ten thousand dollars, , 
and both a wholesale and retail business is 
done. This furnishes employment to between 
fifteen and twenty men and in the four years 
of its existence has experienced a steady 
growth, and should its future progress prove 
proportionate to its past it will eventually en- 
roll itself among the large businesses of this 
part of the Blue Grass state. 

On the 25th of September. 1870, Mr. Conn 
laid the foundation of a happy household by 
his marriage to R. Belle Frederick, a native of 
Jefferson county and the daughter of Blueford 
Frederick, a Jefferson county agriculturist and 
the member of an old Kentucky family which 
originally came from the "Old Dominion." 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Conn are members of the 
First Baptist church of Newport, the former 
having for many years been active in further- 
ing the good and just measures promulgated 
by the church and having served as trustee for 
a period of fifteen years. Although not par- 
tisan in local matters Mr. Conn casts his vote 
with what its adherents are pleased to call the 
"Grand Old Party." 

James F. Jett. — One of the prominent and 
influential representatives of the great dis- 
tilling industry in Kentucky is this well known 
and highly esteemed citizen of Carrollton, 
where his capitalistic interests are of broad 
scope and importance. He has achieved large 
and definite success through his own efforts 
and "by very intelligible merits," as Emerson 
wrote concerning the great Napoleon. De- 
pendent entirely upon his own resources from 
his youth, Mr. Jett has had the power _ to 
marshal the forces at his command in an im- 
pregnable phalanx and has made of success 
not an accident but a logical result, the while 



1194 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

his course has been guided by those principles secured employment in the old Darlington dis- 

of integrity and honor that ever beget ob- tillery, near CarroUton, and with the same he 

jective confidence and esteem. As one of the continued to be identified for a period of 

representative "captains of industry" in his three years, during which he applied himself 

native county and state Mr. Jett is well en- zealously and gained an excellent knowledge 

tilled to recognition in this history of Ken- of the various details of the business. After 

tucky and Kentuckians. leaving this distillery he passed several years 

James F. Jett was born at CarroUton, Car- in the city of Lexington and he was employed 
roll county, this state, on the 20th of June, in various positions at other points in the 
1847, ^J^d is a son of Richard V. and Eliza- state. He was energetic and enterprising, 
beth (Bradley) Jett, the former of whom was carefully conserved his resources and eventu- 
born in Virginia and the latter in Maryland, ally formulated definite plans for independent 
The lineage of the Jett family is traced back business operations. In 1881 he formed a 
to staunch French origin, and the name be- partnership with his brothers, Joseph S., 
came identified with the annals of American George W. and Albert N., and they estab- 
history prior to the war of the Revolution, lished a small distillery in CarroUton. From 
The original representatives of the name in this modest nucleus has been evolved the 
the new world established their home in Vir- large and modern institution with which Mr. 
ginia, and in that historic old commonwealth Jett continues to be actively identified, and 
Richard V. Jett was reared to maturity under the distillery is recognized as one of the most 
the sturdy discipline of the farm. As a young important in the state. In 1889 the business 
man he came to Kentucky and settled on a was incorporated under the title of the Jett 
tract of land near CarroUton, where he en- Brothers Distilling Company, and its opera- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits, in connection tions are based on a capital stock of seventy- 
with which he also found definite requisition five thousand dollars. The stock in the cor- 
for his services at the work of his trade, poration is now held almost entirely by Joseph 
that of shoemaker. He was here employed S. and James F. Jett and they are numbered 
at his trade for a number of years, in the among the most progressive and substantial 
itinerant way common to the early days, business men of their native county. James 
He went about to the homes of the settlers F. Jett has been the general manager of the 
and manufactured shoes from leather that business from the time of its foundation and 
had been tanned by them. Finally he re- has been president of the company from the 
moved from his farm to CarroUton, which time of its incorporation. The distillery is 
was then a small village, and here he con- essentially modern in equipment and facilities, 
tinued to reside until his death, at the has a capacity for the utilization of five hun- 
age of sixty-five years. His wife, who was dred bushels of grain daily, and its trade, 
born in the year 1810, survived him by a based upon the high standard of products, ex- 
score of years and attained to the venerable tends throughout the most diverse sections of 
age of eighty-four years. She was a child the Union. The "Richland" brand of whis- 
at the time of the family removal from Mary- key is a product of this distillery and has 
land to Carroll county, and her parents estab- long enjoyed marked popularity throughout 
lished their home at Ghent, where they became the country. In connection with the distillery 
pioneer settlers. Richard V. and Elizabeth the by-products are eflFectively utilized in the 
(Bradley) Jett became the parents of ten feeding of cattle, and the large barns of the 
children, of whom the subject of this review company have a capacity for the accommoda- 
was the ninth in order of birth, and of the tion of five hundred head of cattle, 
number six are now living. James F. Jett has been a hard worker dur- 

James F. Jett was afforded but limited edu- ing his entire career, and his capacity seems 
cational advantages in his boyhood and youth, to have no bounds. He has not been self- 
as he was enabled to attend the common centered or looked merely to individual ag- 
schools in only an irregular and desultory way, grandizement, but as a citizen has manifested 
and he early initiated his career as one of the the utmost loyalty and public spirit. He has 
world's workers. His mind was receptive, given his aid and influence in the promotion 
however, and his ambition led him to read of innumerable measures and enterprises that 
and study in an efifective way, and this af- have conserved the advancement and welfare 
forded him a firm foundation for the broad of his home city and county, and it is worthy 
fund of information which he has since of special note that he was one of the fore- 
gained in connection with the practical associ- most in promoting and carrying to successful 
ations of a significantly earnest and successful completion the building of the fine bridge 
career. At the age of twenty years Mr. Jett across the Kentucky river between CarroUton 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1195 

and Prestonville, — a work that required ei^ht they have contributed most generously to the 
years to compass. This enterprise met with education of a number of children, while they 
much opposition but the great value of the are ever ready to give their aid in support of 
bridge is now uniformly recognized, as it has worthy charities and benevolences, 
afforded facilities of inestimable benefit to the Jethra Hancock, M. D.— Among the na- 
city of Carrollton and to the inhabitants on the tive sons who have been the architects of their 
west side of the river. The undertaking was own fortunes and have won both fame and 
carried through by a private company, organ- fortune may be mentioned Dr. Jethra Han- 
ized and incorporated for the purpose, and cock, physician of Louisville. Dr. Hancock 
the city and its citizens also contributed to the was born in Birchville, Kentucky, on the 7th 
funds required for the completion of the of July, 1875, the son of the Rev. Thomas 
bridge. Mr. Jett became treasurer of the Howell Hancock. The family traces its gen- 
company at the time of its organization and ealog}' back to the Hancocks of \'irginia. 
still continues incumbent of this office. In Rev. Thomas H. Hancock was born in W'ar- 
1909 he effected the organization of the Car- ren county, Kentucky, in 1834, the son of 
rollton Leaf Tobacco Warehouse Company, Isaac Hancock, a native of Warren county, 
which was incorporated with a capital stock Kentucky, and for fifty years was an evangel- 
of forty thousand dollars and of which he has ist of the Methodist Episcopal church, in east- 
been president from the start. The warehouse ern Kentucky. xA.t the present time he is con- 
of this company is a substantial structure of ducting a training school in Wayne county, 
brick, steel and concrete construction, and Kentucky, which he founded and which is in 
covers an entire acre of ground, as it is two line with his evangelistic work, in which he is 
hundred and four feet square in general lat- still active. He is a pioneer in evangelical 
eral dimensions. It is one of the most modern work in Kentucky, is a very devout Christian 
buildings of its kind, as well as one of the and has devoted his life to the church. He 
largest, in the entire state, and affords facili- married Lucy Alargaret Nichols, who was 
ties that are of great value in connection with born in Elbo (also known as Nichols) Springs, 
the tobacco industry in this section of the twelve miles from Glasgow, in Barren county, 
state, yir. Jett's public spirit has been fur- the daughter of Thomas Nichols, who was a 
ther evidenced by his erection of the Carroll- native of Kentucky, of \"irginia parentage, 
ton opera house block, one of the best build- To Rev. Thomas H. Hancock and wife sev- 
ings in the city and one that affords the best en children were born, as follows : Cora, who 
of facilities for the better class of dramatic married R. C. Lorimore and resides in Hart 
and musical entertainments which it is now county. Kentucky ; Ula married L. C. Thomas 
possible to secure to the city. The fine audito- and resides in Hart county, Kentucky ; \'on- 
rium has a seating capacity for the accommo- tress married Bettie Means, who is now de- 
dation of six hundred persons, and is a credit ceased, and he lives in Texas, engaged in the 
and a source of pride to the city. business of farming; Edgar married Nannie 

Though never imbued with any desire for Lorimore and resides in Hart county. Ken- 
public office, Mr. Jett accords a staunch al- tucky ; Jethra is our subject; Uel is engaged 
legiance to the Democratic party and he has in newspaper work in New York city ; and 
contributed his quota to the success of its Ada is unmarried, a teacher in the Louisville 
cause through his activity in its local contin- public schools. 

gent. He is affiliated with the Carrollton Dr. Hancock was reared on the farm and 

lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Pel- secured his education under Professor C. W. 

lows, in which he has passed the various offi- Matthews at Munfordsville and Greensburg, 

cial chairs, and this organization has but one Kentucky. Professor ]\Iatthews is now living 

member that has been longer identified there- in retirement in Louisville. He is one of the 

with than he. Mr. Jett has also the distinc- best known educators in Kentucky, and many 

tion of being at the present time the oldest of the leading and most successful men of 

native-born citizen residing in Carrollton, Louisville in all lines of business and the pro- 

where his circle of friends are coincident with fessions of to-day were his pupils. At the 

that of his acquaintances. age of sixteen years Dr. Hancock went to 

In 1879 ^Ir. Jett was united in marriage to work on the farm, working during the sum- 
Miss Albertine Anders, who was born in the mers and attending school in winter time, ana 
state of Arkansas, though a representative of later teaching. By the time he was twenty 
an old Kentucky family. Though they have years old he owned a good farm, which he had 
no children of their own Mr. and Mrs. Jett purchased with his earnings and which he still 
have shown a deep interest in aiding the chil- owns, and this is a record that very few young 
dren of others less fortunately placed, and men can claim. He was graduated from the 



Vol. ni— 4 



1196 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



Louisville Hospital Medical College in 1905, 
with the degree of M. D., and that same year 
entered the practice in Louisville in which he 
has been engaged ever since, meeting with the 
success that has attended all his endeavors and 
which he richly deserves for his industry, per- 
sistence and persevering application. 

Dr. Hancock is a member of the Masonic 
order, belonging to Greensburg Lodge. No. 54, 
F. & A. M. He is also a member of the Jef- 
ferson County Medical Society, the Kentucky 
State Medical Society and the American Med- 
ical Association. In 1900 Dr. Hancock mar- 
ried Lora Heizer, of Greensburg, Kentucky, 
who died in December, 1901, her child dying 
at the same time. 

Merrel Clubb Rankin, commissioner of 
agriculture, labor and statistics for the state 
of Kentucky, is one of the progressive and 
public-spirited citizens of Frankfort, and in 
his capacity as a public servant has given the 
most efficient and discriminating service, 
which has served to corroborate in fullest 
measure the wisdom of the choice of his con- 
stituents. His offi.ce is an appropriate one, 
for his birth and early years are calculated to 
put him into sympathetic touch with the 
cause of the farmer, since he was born on a 
farm in Henry county, Kentucky, September 
9, 1849, and there' spent his boyhood and 
youth. His parents are Paschal Hickman 
and Rebecca (Clubb) Rankin, the father be- 
ing a native of Henry county, Kentucky, and 
the mother, of Maclison county, this state. 
His forbears were Southerners and patriots, 
his paternal grandfather, David Rankin, hav- 
ing been born in Harrison county, Kentucky, 
and his father, Mr. Rankin's great-grand- 
father, being a native of \"irginia, who re- 
moved to the Blue Grass state and became 
one of its doughty pioneer settlers. He was 
of Scotch-Irish descent. On the maternal 
side the family is English in descent, and the 
grandfather, Elijah Clubb. was a A'irginian. 

Mr. Rankin's father. Paschal Hickman 
Rankin, engaged in the cultivation of the soil 
and spent his entire life in Henry county, and 
there was gathered to his fathers. He fol- 
lowed the approved pioneer custom and was 
the head of a large household. Of his five 
sons, four are now living, and of the six 
daughters, five are deceased. 

In his youth Merrel Clubb Rankin lived 
upon his father's farm, coming close to 
Nature's heart, and as soon as he was old 
enough taking his place as an assistant in the 
manifold duties to be there encountered. He 
attended the common schools and had the 
advantage of about ten months' educational 
training in a college at New Castle, Kentucky. 
When he was but seventeen years of age he 



was deprived of his father by death, and as 
he was one of the elder members of the fam- 
ily a large share of the care and support of 
the widowed mother and the younger brothers 
and sisters fell upon his shoulders. He was 
thus brought face to face with the stern re- 
sponsibilities of life before his time, and when 
his youthful associates were enjoying the 
springtide of life. When their fortunes were 
made securer and the others were old enough 
to shift for themselves he was able to carve 
out his own destiny. He has always followed 
the occupation of an agriculturist and his suc- 
cess is doubtless largely due to the progres- 
siveness of his ideas and the fidelity with 
which he keeps in touch with the latest scien- 
tific discoveries in his line. 

Mr. Rankin has always been a Republican 
and has given the most loyal support to the 
party. In 1904 he was one of the prime mov- 
ers in the organization of the American 
Society of Equity and also of the Burley 
Tobacco Society, and he gained prominence 
in the section by his yeoman service in the 
work of organizing the farmers and making 
convincing speeches in behalf of the cause for 
which he felt so keenly. He was made a 
popular and successful candidate for nomina- 
tion by the Republican State Committee at 
Louisville in 1907 for his present office of 
commissioner of agriculture, labor and statis- 
tics for the state of Kentucky and was 
elected to this office in November, 1907, for 
a term of four years, dating from January i, 
1908. He takes pleasure in his fraternal re- 
lations, which extend to the Masons, in which 
he has attained to the Royal Arch degree, and 
to the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. Since the age of sixteen years he has 
been a member of the Christian church and 
for sixteen years he has held the office of 
elder. 

Mr. Rankin was married, January 5, 1871, 
to Miss Isabel Highfield, born in ]\Iadison 
county, Kentucky. She died in 1888 and left 
two children : James William Rankin, now 
clerk in his father's office ; and ^Minnie Ran- 
kin. Mr. Rankin was married a second time, 
in 1892, the lady to become his wife being 
Mrs. Sarah E. Robertson, nee Kephart. 

George Grove Speer, vice president of the 
People's State Bank at Frankfort, is a recog- 
nized authority on banking and finance and is 
the vigorous exponent of sound commercial 
principles. He was one of the organizers of 
the bank which, although it was incorporated 
no earlier than January 28. 1909. and began 
business June 23 of that year, already enjoys 
the reputation of being a substantial and con- 
servative institution and has met with really 
remarkable success. The People's State Bank 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1197 



has a capital of $50,000, engages in general 
banking, and its officers are: O. H. Skiles, 
president; G. G. Speer, vice-president; and 
George Halmhuber, cashier. 

George Grove Speer is a native of the Blue 
Grass state, having been born in Anderson 
county, March 12, 1869. He is the son of Dr. 
James William and Susan Mary (Mountjoy) 
Speer. His father was born in Oldham coun- 
ty, Kentucky, March i, 1836, and is the son 
of James G. Speer, who was born in Virginia 
February 12, 1809, and died in May, 1909, at 
Alton, Anderson county, Kentucky, the home 
of his son, being at the time of his demise over 
a hundred years of age. He was of Scotch- 
Irish parentage and followed the calling of 
a physician. He was the great friend and as- 
sociate of Abraham Lincoln, both of them 
sharing the same tastes and even the same 
birth year. At one time in Springfield Mr. 
Lincoln and James G. Speer shared the same 
office, the lawyer and physician preparing side 
by side for the fray of their respective pro- 
fessions. Dr. Speer prescribed, when the need 
arose, for the members of Mr. Lincoln's fam- 
ily. In course of time he returned from Illi- 
nois to the south and located in Oldham coun- 
ty, where he practiced for many years and be- 
came a prominent figure in the afifairs of that 
section of the state. 

In Oldham county Dr. James William Speer 
was born, reared and educated. In the ques- 
tion of life work he followed in the paternal 
footsteps, preparing in the iMiami Medical 
College in Cincinnati, Ohio, from which he 
received his degree. In the Civil war he 
served in the Army of the Confederacy as a 
member of the famous "Orphan Brigade" 
and was a brave and gallant soldier. Upon 
first engaging in the practice of his profession 
he located in Alton, Anderson county, Ken- 
tuckv, where ever since he has continued to 
reside and to minister to the ills of sufifering 
humanity, meeting with eminent success. He 
is a loyal and unwavering Democrat, but has 
never been lured to office-seeking by the glam- 
our of honor and emolument. His wife is 
a native of Alton and the daughter of George 
W. Mountjoy, and is a member of an old and 
numerous Anderson county family, distin- 
guished by wealth and the possession of great 
tracts of land. This family, the Mountjoys, 
was originally of the "Old Dominion." 

George Grove Speer is the only child of his 
parents. He was principally educated in the 
Kentucky Military Institute, from which he 
was graduated in 1886. He was naturally in- 
clined to the legal profession and began the 
study of law at Lawrenceburg under Major 
L. W. McKee, being ultimately admitted to 



the bar. In 1892 he began his practice at 
Lawrenceburg and continued until 1898, when 
on account of failing health he was forced to 
abandon his profession. He thenceforth de- 
voted his whole time and energy to farming 
and to the breeding of saddle horses. He 
stood high in the confidence and esteem of the 
community and for twelve years held the of- 
fice of master commissioner — from 1892 un- 
til 1904. In the latter year he entered the 
state auditor's office, having charge of the 
claim department, and holding this position 
for four years. The assumption of the above- 
mentioned position necessarily took him to 
the capital city, and he has ever since resided 
within the pleasant limits of Frankfort. Mr. 
Speer has been interested in a number of large 
business concerns of the city, probably the 
most important of these being his share in the 
organization of the thriving People's State 
Bank. He is a stanch adherent of Democratic 
principles and policies and takes a decided in- 
terest in public afifairs generally. He is a 
member of the Christian church. Fraternally 
he is connected with the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. 

Mr. Speer assumed marital relations April 
18, 1894, when he was united in marriage to 
Miss Hallie B. Hanks, daughter of Joseph and 
Harriet H. (Taylor) Hanks, of Lawrence- 
berg, Anderson county. They have one child, 
a son named William Carrol Speer. 

Benjamin Haley Poindexter. — The lin- 
eage of the subject of this review, who is 
secretary of the Southern National Life In- 
surance Company of Louisville, bespeaks long 
and prominent identification with the annals 
of American history, many representatives of 
the name showing that intrinsic loyalty and 
patriotism which led them to take an -active 
part in the great conflict between the states, 
and others figuring conspicuously in the great 
questions of the day as represented in polit- 
ical warfare. Mr. Poindexter has an excep- 
tionally fine ancestry, which is always a good 
beginning for any one, and a slight diversion 
in order to place a short sketch before the 
reader will not prove uninteresting and will 
show the stock from w^hich Mr. Poindexter 
came and demonstrate some of the character- 
istics which often descend from one genera- 
tion to another. 

The Poindexters are of French Huguenot 
stock, who left France upon the revocation 
of the Edict of Nantes, going thence to the 
Isle of Jersey, where some of the family still 
live, thence coming to the new world, settling 
in Louisa county, Virginia. Among the mem- 
bers of the family to become prominent in 
the United States are: United States Senator 



1198 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



Poindexter, from Mississippi, who was born 
in Louisa county, \irginia ; Colonel John A. 
Poindexter (an uncle of Benjamin H.), who 
served as a colonel in the war with Mexico 
vmder his personal friend, General IVice, and 
who went to Missouri upon the breaking out 
of the war between the states to join General 
Price, and fought all through the war in the 
Southern army as a colonel on General Price's 
staff, dying a few years after the war closed. 
He became prominent in Alissouri politics and 
at the time of his death was a prospective 
candidate for the Democratic nomination for 
governor. The Hon. Miles Poindexter, at 
present a member of Congress from the state 
of Washington and an "Insurgent" candidate 
for the United States Senate, is a cousin to 
our subject. All the Poindexters still bear 
the French Huguenot type of features and 
many characteristics, thus shovving the strong 
and persistent personality of the progenitors. 
So far as the record at hand shows the orig- 
inal \^irginia Poindexter settler was John, the 
father of David, and the grandfather of our 
subject, and the original Kentucky settler, 
David Poindexter, was born in Louisa county, 
Virginia, and there married Elizabeth Watts, 
of the old Virginia family of that name. 
Coming to Kentucky, he settled in Stamping 
Ground, where he lived the remainder of his 
days. He was engaged in the tanning busi- 
ness at Stamping Ground for many years, and 
also owned an interest in a Louisville tannery. 
The father of our subject is Richard ]\Ientor 
Johnson Poindexter, who was born on the old 
homestead at Stamping Ground on June 30. 
1833' and is still living. He was engaged in 
merchandising at Stamping Ground for many 
years, but for ten years has been retired from 
active business. He married Martha Jane 
Haley, who was born in Fayette county, Ken- 
tucky, the daughter of Benjamin Haley, a 
native of Kentucky, born of \'irginia parents. 
Her brother, the Rev. T. P. Haley, has for 
many years been a minister of the Christian 
church, was at one time pastor of the Broad- 
way Christian church at Louisville, was pas- 
tor of a St. Louis, Missouri, church and is 
now honorary pastor of Haley's Memorial 
Christian church, named in his honor, at 
Kansas City, Missouri. He married Mary 
McGarvey, sister to the Rev. McGarvey, for 
many years president of the Bible College at 
Lexington. Kentucky. Another brother of 
Mrs. Poindexter's. the Rev. Henry H. Haley, 
deceased, was a leading minister of the Chris- 
tian church. 

Benjamin H. Poindexter was reared on the 
old Poindexter homestead at Stamping 
Ground, Scott county. He received his edu- 
cation at Georgetown (Kentucky) College 



and in 1878 went to Missouri, where for five 
years he w^as engaged in lead mining, and 
where he still holds important mining inter- 
ests. Returning to Kentucky, he settled in 
Hawcsville. where in 1890 he was elected 
county clerk of Hancock county, serving five 
years. During that period he organized the 
Bank of Lewisport, remaining the cashier of 
the same for five years. He then organized 
and was one of the incorporators of the Me- 
chanic's Bank and Trust Company of Owens- 
boro, becoming cashier of the institution and 
so continued until 1908, when he resigned to 
accept the secretaryship of the Southern Na- 
tional Life Insurance Company and removed 
to Louisville. /' 

Mr. Poindexter married Emma Mason 
Barron, who was born in Owensboro, Ken- 
tucky, the daughter of Thomas Mason Bar- 
ron and the great-great-granddaughter of 
George Mason of Gunston Hall, Virginia, the 
adjoining plantation to Mt. Vernon, Wash- 
ington estate, on the Potomac. He w-as the 
author of the Virginia Bill of Rights, and was 
conspicuous in the framing of the American 
Constitution. He received grants from Vir- 
ginia for large tracts of Kentucky lands, and 
a tract of ten thousand acres lying in Daviess 
county was among them. The warrant for 
these lands is still held by the family, and 
while much of the land has passed into other 
hands the Mason claim is still valid and no 
deed has ever been, or can be made, to them 
without the consent of the Mason heirs. Upon 
this tract of Daviess county land, Thomas 
Mason Barron settled at an early date, coming 
from Virginia and bringing his family and 
stores, making the entire trip in carriages. 
Mrs. Poindexter, through her descent from 
George Mason, is a member of the Daughters 
of the Revolution, in w'hich she is active, hav- 
ing been twice a delegate to the national meet- 
ings and served on different committees. 

Mr. Poindexter takes an active interest in 
the Masonic Order and is a member of 
Owensboro Lodge, No. 303, F. & A. M., 
Owensboro Chapter, R. A. M., Owensboro 
Commandery, K. T.. and Kosair Temple. 
Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. In person, in talents and in charac- 
ter Mr. Poindexter is a worthy of his race, 
and he has attained to distinction in various 
lines of life, which is indicative of great men- 
tal breadth and superior business qualifica- 
tions. 

Thomas J. Minary. — If there is any one 
feature that gives emphasis to the enterprising 
character of the city of Louisville in this pro- 
gressive era it is the superiority of the facili- 
ties provided for rapid transit within her bor- 
ders, and. judged by the high standard mair. 





'^^^^ 




/•■ «^9 Wj?W t^t^ 1 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1199 

tained, the Kentucky metropolis holds rank the Central Passenger Railroad Company, op- 

with the leading- cities of the Union. In the erating one of the two pioneer street railways 

providing of such admirable facilities the of Louisville. In 1876 recognition of his fine 

Louisville Railway Company has accomplished executive powers was given, for in that year 

a large and important contribution to the pub- he was chosen general manager of the busi- 

lic utilities of the city, and of this stanch cor- ness of the company. Under his energetic and 

poration Thomas J. Alinary is president. The well directed management large and valuable 

fine modern system of this company is one improvements were made in the properties 

that will compare more than favorably with controlled by the company. More adequate 

those of other cities throughout the Union, service was provided over existing lines and 

and the full appreciation of the efficiency of new lines were extended, besides which im- 

the service can be gained only by those who provements were made in the rolling stock and 

have been able to make a comparison between the various other operative facilities of the 

the same and those employed in other cities system. In 1888 Mr. Minary was elected pres- 

of the same class and of even far greater pop- ident of the company, and of this position he 

ulation. As the head of Louisville Rail- continued incumbent until the following year, 

way Company Mr. Minary has shown an ad- when all of the street railway interests of the 

ministrative and directing power equal to city were consolidated under the title of the 

every emergency and contingency, and his Louisville City Railway Company. Mr. Min- 

generalship and constructive ability have done ary became one of the heavy stockholders of 

much to further the growth and material pros- the company at the time of its incorporation 

perity of Louisville, as well as to offer its cit- and its organization, and the effective amalga- 

izens the present admirable facilities within mation of all street railway interests in the city 

and without the gates of the city. As one of was largely promoted through his earnest ef- 

the essentially representative business men and forts and able presentation of the case to the 

alert and progressive citizens of the state and interested principals. He continued to be an 

its leading city, Mr. Minary is consistently active executive of the new corporation after 

given recognition in this publication. the same was formed, and in 1901 he was 

Thomas J. Minary was born in Versailles, elected president of the same, of which re- 
Woodford county, Kentucky, on the 19th of sponsible and exacting office he has since con- 
August, 1850, and is a son of John S. and tinned the able and valued incumbent. He 
George Ann (Stone) A^Iinary, the father a na- has accomplished a great work in extending 
tive of Pennsylvania, who came to Woodford and perfecting of the complex system con- 
county when a young man and remained there trolled by the company, has been animated by 
the residue of his life, and the latter of whom distinctive public spirit, and has done all in 
was a member of the old and well known his power to conserve the interests of the 
Stone family, whose name has long been prom- stockholders of his company, while advocat- 
inently identified with the history of this com- ing liberality in all extension and equipment 
monwealth. John S. Alinary was one of the work. The citizens of Louisville have a full 
pioneer merchants and influential and hon- appreciation of the facilities afforded, and ad- 
ored citizens of Versailles, and there he contin- verse criticism can come only from those 
ued to reside until his death, which occurred moved by political motives or lack of knowl- 
in 1900. The mother is still living at the ven- edge. 

erable age of eighty-three, and of their chil- Air. Alinary has made noteworthy progress 

dren five sons and one daughter are now liv- during his years of active identification with 

ing. industrial and civic interests, and his career ha; 

Thomas J. Alinary, whose name initiates been marked by insuperable integrity of pur- 
this review, gained his early educational dis- pose as well as by broad and liberal policies, 
cipline in the public schools of his native city His capitalistic interests ramify outside of the 
and at the age of seventeen years he became a corporation just mentioned, and in the field of 
salesman in his father's store, one of the lead- street railway enterprise he has been a promi- 
ing mercantile establishments of Versailles, nent figure in other cities than Louisville. At 
where he continued to be thus engaged until one time he owned a controlling interest in 
1869 when, at the age of nineteen years he and was president of the Southern Street Rail- 
came to Louisville, — a city in which he was wav Company, of St. Louis, Missouri, and 
destined to gain distinctive success and marked later he became largely interested in the street 
prominence in connection • with business and railways of Springfield, that state, where he 
civic affairs of wide scope and importance, was for a time president of the Consolidated 
Here he was engaged in the mercantile busi- Railway Company. He is a member of the 
ness until 1872, when he became secretary of directorate of the German National Bank of 



1200 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



Louisville, is the owner of valuable realty in 
the city and other parts of the state, and has 
other large capitalistic interests of varied and 
important order. 

Mr. Minary is essentially a business man 
and realizes that his maximum powers are best 
exercised along avenues of constructive and 
administrative work. Thus he has never man- 
ifested aught of ambition for political office, 
though he is a staunch advocate of the prin- 
ciples and policies for which his party stands 
sponsor. He is identified with the Louisville 
Commercial Club and also holds membership 
in other civic and fraternal organizations of 
prominence in his home city, where his popu- 
larity in both business and social circles is of 
the most unequivocal type. 

On the I2th of June, 1876, was celebrated 
the marriage of Mr. Minary to Miss Amelia 
Stephens, who was born and reared in Breck- 
inridge county, this state, where her father, 
the late James G. Stephens, was a citizen of 
prominence and influence. Four sons were 
born of this union, of whom three survive, as 
follows: James S., of Louisville, Thomas 
Helm, assistant to his father in the railroad 
business, and A. D., of Louisville, Kentucky. 
John S. died at the age of twenty-two. 

Carroll Chapman English, M. D., is one 
of the younger physicians of Louisville, who 
has met with most gratifying success and se- 
cured a practice of which many an older phy- 
sician might well be proud. A native son, his 
birth occurred in Elizabethtown, Hardin coun- 
ty, Kentucky, on the 4th day of March, 1878, 
the son of Wood English, who was born in 
Hardin county, Kentucky, in 1845, the son of 
John English, a native of Virginia, who was 
the Kentucky pioneer of the English family. 
The mother of the Doctor was Myra Chap- 
man, who was born in Hartford, Hart county, 
Kentucky, the daughter of William Carroll 
Chapman, a native of Kentucky, whose an- 
cestors are of Virginia stock. The grandfa- 
ther English was a planter and slave holder 
and the grandfather Chapman was a mer- 
chant. For many years the father of the Doc- 
tor was engaged extensively in agricultural 
pursuits and live stock dealing, and was one 
of the largest stock dealers in Kentucky, but 
has now retired from active business life. 
Both the English and Chapmans are of the 
Baptist religious faith. 

Dr. English was reared in Hardin county, 
w^here he received his preliminary education in 
attendance at the public schools, and he was 
prepared for college at Hardin Collegiate In- 
stitute, after which he entered Georgetown 
College, where he took a course of study ex- 
tending over a period of two years. Deter- 



mining to prepare himself as completely as 
possible for his profession, he next entered 
the medical department of the University of 
Louisville and was graduated from that insti- 
tution with the degree of AI. D. in April, 1904. 
Thus, having with study, experiment and ob- 
servation acquired all that was possible out- 
side of actual experience to the successful 
practice of his profession, he then went into 
the general practice in Louisville, and has 
demonstrated that his studies were founded 
upon the rock of the tried experience of those 
who have studied to win the best results of 
the day, and that he has been successful has 
been proven by the results. 

In the spring of 1905 he became a teacher 
in the medical department of the University 
of Louisville, in charge of the children's clinic, 
and is still connected with that institution. 
He was house physician of the University of 
Louisville for one year. He is a member of 
the Jefferson Medical Society, the Kentucky 
State Medical Society and the American Med- 
ical Association. He is also a member of the 
Audubon Country Club, the Tavern Club and 
the Phi Chi Medical Fraternity, and his relig- 
ious views connect him with the Baptist 
church. 

Baron H. Woodbury. — The association of 
Baron H. Woodbury with the active life of 
Dayton and this part of the state has been of 
a varied character and he is widely known in 
the community in which he has made his home 
for so many years. He is now living retired 
from active labors and enjoying the compe- 
tence accruing from previous years of indus- 
try and enterprise. He is a native Kentuck- 
ian, having been born at Newport on August 
20, 1848, the son of John B. and Evalina 
(Buchanan) Woodbury, the former a native 
of Massachusetts and the latter of Maryland. 
They were married in the city of Philadelphia 
and shortly after came to Kentucky, locating 
first in Newport and later in Dayton, which 
latter place was in that early day known as 
Jamestown. The father had been extensively 
engaged in manufacturing in Philadelphia 
and after coming to Dayton he embarked in 
the manufacturing business, his particular 
line being matches, which he turned out in 
great quantities, remaining at the head of the 
plant for a number of years. He had the dis- 
tinction to be the first in this line in the west. 
He was a student and investigator, his mind 
having a scientific bent and he was one of the 
originators of the oil refining industry. He 
w^as likewise a pioneer in his realization of the 
practical benefit to be derived from the refin- 
ing of cotton seed oil, and he introduced his 
method in many sections of the south. He 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1201 



died very suddenly of pneumonia while en- 
gaged in that work in New Orleans. His 
demise was in the year 1879, at which time 
his age was sixty-seven years, and he was 
interred in Evergreen Cemetery in Newport. 
During the Civil war he belonged to the Day- 
ton home guards. His widow survived sev- 
eral years and died of apoplexy at the age of 
eighty-two years at the home of Mr. Wood- 
bury, although prior to her death she had 
made her home for several years with a son 
in Arkansas. She and her husband were the 
parents of four children, one of whom died in 
infancy and two of whom survive at the 
present time. 

Baron H. Woodbury was the youngest 
child of his parents and he was only about a 
year old when they located in Dayton. He 
was reared in Dayton and received a common 
school education. During his early years he 
busied himself with varied employments. He 
drove a wagon in the coal trade, and for sev- 
eral years was engaged in steamboating on the 
White river in Arkansas, owning a boat in 
partnership with his brother. In 1883 he re- 
tired from this business and returned to 
Kentucky, settling in Newport and buying a 
mineral water plant, which he operated suc- 
cessfully for nearly a quarter of a century. 
He developed a large business and the prod- 
uct of his factory enjoyed an excellent 
reputation. In 1907 a stock company was or- 
ganized and Mr. Woodbury's son became 
principal owner, Mr. Woodbury having since 
retired. His executive talents have not been 
limited to the management of his factory but 
he was one of the organizers of the Central 
Savings Bank & Trust Company and has been 
a member of the directorate since its incep- 
tion. Politically Mr. Woodbury is inclined 
toward the men and measures of the Repub- 
lican party, although in local matters he is in- 
dependent rather than partisan. He has never 
aspired to share the honors and emoluments 
of office. He is a lodge man, being a member 
of the Masonic fraternity and of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, of which 
latter he is a charter member. 

Mr. Woodbury in 1883 ^^^^ the foundation 
of a home life by his marriage to Bird Ella 
Stamper, a native of Covington and daughter 
of Pleasant Stamper, a carpenter and builder 
who lived in Dayton at one time. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Woodbury was born one son, Charles 
Buchanan, who as previously mentioned is 
now at the head of the Woodbury mineral 
water factory. The mother passed to the 
Great Beyond March 12, 1907. 

Oliver Haydex Skiles, president of the 
People's State Bank of Frankfort, was the 
principal organizer of this substantial and 



prosperous institution, which took its place 
among the city's successful enterprises in June, 
1909. Mr. Skiles is a man of discretion and 
sound judgment and he has proven that he has 
executive gifts of a high order, all of which 
serve to make him an ideal incumbent for an 
office of a nature as important as the one filled 
by him. This is not his initial venture at bank 
organizing, for it is due to him that the state 
bank at Mt. Eden, Shelby county, Kentucky, 
came into existence in 1900. yiv. Skiles' con- 
nection with the Mt. Eden bank was of nine 
years' duration. 

As is the case with so many Americans who 
play the more important roles in the varied 
drama of our national life, Mr. Skiles was 
born upon a farm in Owen county, Kentucky, 
November 20, 1866, and he passed his earlier 
years among its busy, but wholesome scenes. 
His parents were Christopher C. and Margaret 
(Hulette) Skiles, both of whom were born on 
farms in Owen county, the former, March 22, 
1844, and the latter, April 27, 1848. When 
Mr. Skiles was a child about five years of age 
he had the great misfortune to lose his mother 
by death, her demise occurring October 15, 
1 87 1. In due time the father married again, 
the lady to become his wife being Isabel Bab- 
bitt, of Franklin county. By the first mar- 
riage there were three children, namely : 
Oliver H., Alfiora and Margaret S., all of 
whom are living. To the second union ten 
children were born. The father is still living 
in Owen county, where he has followed for so 
long a time the calling of agriculture. Polit- 
ically he gives stanch allegiance to the Demo- 
cratic party and he is a careful student of 
those questions which affect the general wel- 
fare. In church faith he is a Baptist. -\Ir. 
Skiles' grandfather was John Skiles, who was 
born in Virginia of Scotch-Irish parentage. 
He was an early settler of Owen county and 
was the father of five stalwart sons, all of 
whom married and settled in Owen county, to 
whose material prosperity they and their chil- 
dren have greatly contributed. 

Circumstances permitted Oliver Hayden 
Skiles to obtain but a Hmited education in his 
earlier days, his books and desk in the school 
room early having to be abandoned for the 
more serious problems of life. Having a real 
desire for learning he has since effectually 
remedied by his own study and research any 
such defects as might have existed. When 
he was twenty-three years of age he left the 
farm and for the next ten years engaged suc- 
cessfully in a new line of work, the merchan- 
dise business, which he conducted first for 
four years at Moxley. Kentucky, and then for 
six years at New Liberty, this state. _ 

As previously mentioned Mr. Skiles estab- 



1202 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



lished the ^It. Eclen bank in 1900, and for 
nine years acted as its cashier, then selling his 
interests and establishing the I'eople's State 
Bank in January, 1909, the new institution 
opening for business some six months later, 
and in the short time ensuing building u]) a 
splendid business. 

Like many of his brethren in the South Mr. 
Skiles gives whole-souled allegiance to the 
Democratic party, and has never been among 
those to crave the honors and emoluments of 
ofifice. He finds much pleasure in his lodge 
affiliations, which embrace the Knights 
of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He is a member of the Christian 
church, in which he holds the office of deacon. 

In 1888 Mr. Skiles was united in marriage 
to Miss Addie S. Rude, daughter of Captain 
Willis Rude of Covington, Kentucky, in which 
place Mrs. Skiles was born and reared. Their 
union has been blessed by the birth of four 
children : Howard Gayle, Walter Edward, 
Oliver Raymond and Dimple (deceased). 
The eldest son, Howard Gayle Skiles married 
Miss Allie May Fawkes, of Shelbyville. He 
has great native ability and has made rapid 
progress as a banker. When he was nineteen 
years of age he was elected cashier of the Cit- 
izens' Bank at Pekin, Indiana, which position 
he now holds. The two other sons are asso- 
ciated with their father in the Peoples' State 
Bank. 

Oliver Hayden Skiles may be reckoned as a 
representative citizen. His career is an inspir- 
ing one, for he began at the bottom of the lad- 
der and his progress upward has been made 
by his own efiforts, for he has not been depend- 
ent upon helping hands. 

Oscar F. Barrett. — The life history of Os- 
car F. Barrett is that of a successful business 
man who owes his advancement to close ap- 
plication, energy, strong determination and ex- 
ecutive ability. He has never allowed outside 
pursuits to interfere with the performance of 
business duties or the meeting of any business 
obligations, and thus he stands to-day one of 
the prosperous residents of his community, 
with extensive business interests in various 
parts of Kentucky, and strong in his honor and 
good name. 

Oscar F. Barrett was born in Meigs county, 
Ohio, on April 27, i860, the son of John and 
Dorothea (Harpold) Barrett, the former a na- 
tive of Lewis county, Kentucky, and the latter 
of Meigs county, Ohio. The Barretts origi- 
nally came from Virginia, and were among the 
pioneers of Lewis county, Kentucky, in the 
thirties. Davis Kelly Barrett, grandfather of 
our subject, was a native of Virginia and came 
to Kentucky with his family, locating in Lewis 



county. He turned his attention to river in- 
terests in later years on the Ohio and ^Nlissis- 
sippi rivers, conducting an extensive business 
until the war between the states, when he lost 
his packet boats in the South. Later he re- 
turned to \'irginia, where he died. The father 
of our subject was reared in Kentucky, mov- 
ing later to Meigs county, Ohio, where he 
married and then settled in Covington, Ken- 
tucky, and for many years was engaged in the 
wholesale coal business and river transporta- 
tion. He died at his home in Fort Thomas, 
Kentucky, in 1897, at the age of fifty-eight 
years. When a young man and soon after his 
marriage he enlisted in the One Hundred and 
Forty-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry, served a 
short time, and was mustered out as captain 
of his company, receiving his discharge on ac- 
count of disability, although not serious. His 
. widow survives him, residing at Fort Thomas. 
They were the parents of three children, one 
of whom died in infancy and two living at the 
present time, our subject being the eldest of 
the children. 

Oscar F. Barrett was six years old when his 
parents settled in Covington, Kentucky, where 
he was reared, and was educated both in Cov- 
ington and in Dayton, Kentucky, at the pub- 
Ifc and private schools, finishing at Hughes 
High School of Cincinnati. For a number of 
years he was associated in business with his 
father, and after his father's death succeeded 
to and continued the same line, river trans- 
portation and boat building, the ship yards 
being at Levana, Ohio. His business includes 
the Frankfort Elevator Coal Company, of 
which Mr. Barrett is president, and which ex- 
tends over all points on the Ohio, Mississippi 
and Missouri rivers, with five tow-boats in 
commission. Mr. Barrett employs about three 
hundred men and practically is sole owner of 
all the interests involved in the business. He 
was one of the organizers of the Campbell 
County Bank at Bellevue, Kentucky, a pros- 
perous institution of which he is president and 
he is a director of the Louisville and Cincin- 
nati Packet Company, a director of the Con- 
solidated Boat Store Company and a director 
of the Columbia Life Insurance Company of 
Cincinnati. While he was a resident of the 
Highland, Kentucky, district he was chair- 
man of the Board of Trustees. Mr. Barrett 
was never active in politics, his numerous 
business interests occupying all his attention, 
although he belonged to several social socie- 
ties. He is a Mason, having taken the degrees 
as high as the Knight Templar, Scottish Rite 
and Shriner, and is also a member of the 
Knights of Pythias, and Eagles. 

Air. Barrett was married in 1890 to Mary 



fUBUC LIBRA../; 

i 




^c^J^W^^^e^, 9)1^, 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1203 



E. Slack, a native of Mason county, Ken- 
tucky, and a daughter of Jacob A. Slack, a 
farmer and tobacco merchant of that county 
who died in Covington, Kentucky. He be- 
longed to an old Kentucky family. A brother 
who died recently was of the fourth genera- 
tion of Jacob A. Slack who had owned the 
old homestead. Mr. and . Mrs. Barrett have 
two children : Oscar Slack, sixteen years old, 
attending Cincinnati University, and Dorothy 
Marie. Mr. Barrett is a member of the Bap- 
tist church and for a number of years while 
living in Dayton, Kentucky, was a trustee and 
deacon of the church and for ten years was 
superintendent of the Sunday-school. His 
wife and son are members of the Christian 
church. He has conducted all affairs, whether 
of private interests or of public trusts, as to 
merit the esteem of all classes of citizens, and 
no word of reproach is ever uttered against 
him. As a man and citizen he enjoys the 
nrosperity which has deservedly come to him. 

Emmet F. Horine, M. D. — As one of the 
representative physicians and surgeons of the 
younger generation in the city of Louisville, 
Dr. Horine is especially entitled to recogni- 
tion in this publication, while further interest 
attaches to his career from th^ fact that he 
is a native son of Kentucky. 

Dr. Emmet Field Horine was born in 
Brooks, Bullitt county, Kentucky, on the 3rd 
of August, 1885, and is a son of Dr. George 
and Elizabeth B. (Barrall) Horine. Dr. 
George Horine was born in Bullitt county on 
the loth of April, 1857, and was a son of Jacob 
Horine, who was likewise a native of the same 
county, where he was born on the 27th of 
February, 1824, and where his death occurred 
on the loth of December, 1876. Jacob Horine 
married Emily Ann Foster, who was born in 
Bullitt county on the 9th of April, 1835, and 
who died December 7th, 1865. Jacob Horine 
was a son of Captain George Horine, who 
was born in a German settlement in western 
Pennsylvania, on the 25th of April, 1790, and 
whose death occurred January 30, 1877. He 
married Margaret Kennedy and became one 
of the influential and honored citizens of Bul- 
litt county, Kentucky, where he owned a valu- 
able landed estate on Knob Creek. On the 
27th of January, 829. Governor Thomas Met- 
calfe commissioned him a captain in the Thir- 
ty-second Regiment, First Brigade of the Ken- 
tucky Militia, and this commission is treastired 
as a valuable heirloom by Dr. Emmet F. Ho- 
rine, whose name introduces this review. Cap- 
tain Horine was requested to recruit men in 
Bullitt county and with them to assist in the 
defense of General Gaines, who was then op- 
erating on the Sabine river in Louisiana. Cap- 



tain Horine was a son of Jacob Horine, who 
was born m one of the Rhenish provinces of 
Germany, aljout 1750. This worthy ancestor 
emigrated to America about 1770 and located 
in the western part of Pennsylvania. He be- 
came a member of the Pennsylvania militia 
and assisted in subduing the Indians at the 
time of the memorable Wyoming massacre. 
In the war of the Revolution he was found 
enrolled as a valiant soldier in the Continental 
line. He married Barbara Schwartz, in 1780, 
and in 1795 they removed to Mercer county, 
Kentucky, where they remained until 1798, 
when they established their home in Bullitt 
county, about one and a half miles distant 
from the Jefferson county line. There Jacob 
Horine secured several hundred acres of land 
and reclaimed a valuable farm, thus being the 
founder of the family in Kentucky. Jacob 
Horine was a son of Frederick Horine, who 
was born in Germany, in 171 5, and who served 
as a soldier in the- German army, in the reign 
of Frederick the Great. 

Elizabeth B. (Barrall) Horine, mother of 
Dr. Horine, was born in Bullitt county, Ken- 
tucky, and is a daughter of Silas F. Barrall, 
who was likewise a native of that county and 
who died in January, 1910, at the age of 
seventy-six years. The lineage of the Barrall 
family is traced back to staunch French line- 
age, and Christian Barrall, grandfather of 
Mrs. Elizabeth B. Horine, was a native of 
France, whence he came to America as a 
young man, becoming one of the early settlers 
of Louisville, Kentucky. Dr. George Horine 
was graduated in the Kentucky School of 
Medicine, in 1879, and secured first honors 
of his class, being awarded a medal for the 
highest class averages in surgery and materia 
medica. After his graduation he began the 
practice of his profession at Brooks, Bullitt 
county, and eventually he turned his attention 
more particularly to the treatment of the dis- 
eases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, in con- 
nection with which he completed a thorough 
post-graduate course. He continued in prac- 
tice in his native county until 1892, when he 
removed to Americus, Georgia, where he was 
engaged in the work of his profession along 
the special lines noted until his death, which 
occurred on the 8th of December, 1903. He 
was sunnved by his wife, one son and one 
daughter, and after his death they returned to 
Kentucky and established their home in Louis- 
ville. 

Dr. Emmet F. Horine was about seven 
years of age at the time of the family re- 
moval to Americus, Georgia, to whose public 
schools he is indebted for his early educational 
training. Thereafter he entered Emory Col- 



1204 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

lege, at Oxford, Georgia, where he was a stu- Hving, and all of them are residents of this 

dent in 1902-3, but he withdrew from this in- city. 

stitution while an undergraduate by reason of Dr. Kehm was reared and educated in the 

the death of his father. After the removal of "Monument City," and shortly after his grad- 

the family to Louisville, where his mother still uation from the high school of his native place 

maintains her home, he entered the Kentucky he decided upon the vocation for which his 

School of Medicine, in which he was gradu- subsequent career was to prove him eminently 

ated as a member of the class of 1907, and well fitted. He chose the Eclectic Medical 

from which he received his well earned degree College of Cincinnati for his alma mater and 

of Doctor of Medicine. In his junior year was sent forth from her portals in 1896 with 

he received a gold medal for the highest aver- the degree of M. D. His choice of college no 

age in scholarship, and in reward for having doubt had a great deal to do in deciding his 

achieved the highest average in his senior future residence, for after several years he 

year he was appointed to the position of in- came over the river to Newport, of which 

terne in St. Anthony's Hospital, in Louisville, town he had already received a favorable im- 

where he retained this incumbency foi fifteen pression. He is identified in the happiest 

months and where he gained most valuable manner with the life of the town and enjoys 

clinical experience. At the expiration of the a good-sized and remunerative practice. He 

period noted the Doctor engaged in the gen- belongs to several of those societies destined 

eral practice of his profession in Louisville, to bring together the members of the profes- 

and here he is proving very successful in the sion and to assist in the dissemination of all 

vocation that was likewise dignified and hon- such progressive ideas as may be evolved in 

ored by the services of his father. He is a the most enlightened and zealous investiga- 

close and appreciative student, and in the med- tion. His affiliation extends to the American 

ical department of the University of Louis- Medical Association and the state and county 

ville he is assistant to the chairs of surgery, societies. 

abdominal surgery and gynecology. He is a Dr. Kehm is a loyal Republican, and, as 

member of the Jefiferson County Medical So- previously mentioned, has served for a num- 

ciety, the Kentucky State Medical Society ber of years as Newport's health officer, and 

and the American Medical Association and is prior to that time he gave two years of effi- 

a close observer of the ethics of his profession, cient service as district health physician, 

so that he has gained the unqualified confi- Dr. Kehm was married in 1897 to Miss 

dence and esteem of his confreres, both of Cora Wentz. of Findlay, Ohio, a native of the 

his own and the younger generations. Hoosier state, and to their union have been 

Charles J. Kehm, M. D., is not only one born a son and daughter, named Charles and 

of Newport's able and successful practitioners Charlotte, respectively. Both Dr. and Mrs. 

but for the past eight years he has given emi- Kehm are communicants of St. Mark's Lu- 

nent satisfaction in the more public capacity theran church. 

of health officer, displaying commendable zeal Oliver Holt Kelsall, M. D. — Among the 
in his watchfulness over sanitary conditions in brightest and most promising young physi- 
the city and inaugurating several reforms cjans and surgeons of Louisville may be men- 
which have proved of great benefit to the com- tioned that of our subject, Dr. Oliver Holt 
munity. Dr. Kehm was born in Baltimore, Kelsall, a native son of the Blue Glass state, 
Maryland, February 7, 1869, and is the son of having been born in Louisville on February 
Adam and Elizabeth (Glaser) Kehm, both 18. 1878, the son of John and Martha (Crow- 
natives of Germany, who followed the ex- ell) Kelsall. The father was a native of Eng- 
ample set by so many of their friends and as- land, and came to the United States when 
sociates and came to the United States to seek twenty-one years of age, locating in Louisville, 
improved fortunes in a land of newer civiliza- He was with the B. F. Avery Manufacturing 
tion and richer opportunity. They were both Company of Louisville for many years and at 
young people at the time of their emigration the time of his death was assistant general 
and they were reared and educated in Balti- manager of that concern, which is one of the 
more, in which city they met each other and largest manufacturing concerns in the south, 
united their hands and fortunes in matrimony. When he first came to Louisvihe he was a 
In 1890 they removed to Newport, and here machinist without means, and his first work 
the father, who had followed the vocation of was on the building of the Big Four Railroad 
shoe making, died in 1895 at the age of forty- bridge. He then began work in the B. F. 
nine years. His widow still survives and Avery & Company shop, and worked his way 
makes her residence in Newport. Dr. Kehm up to superintendent, then to assistant gen- 
was one of five children, four of whom are eral manager. He was a fine singer and sang 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1025 



tenor in Warren Memorial Presbyterian 
church. He lost his life on March 27, 1890, 
in the cyclone which struck Louisville upon 
that date. He was a member of the Walnut 
Street Presbyterian church and a Mason, be- 
longing to the Blue Lodge, F. & A. M., Royal 
Arch. Knights Templars, and attaining as high 
as the thirty-second degree in the Scottish 
Rite. The mother was born in Louisville, 
Kentucky, the daughter of Stephen Brun 
Crowell, a native of New Jersey, and she died 
in the fall of 1888. They were the parents ot 
the three following children : John Bright, a 
machinist with the Louisville City Railroad 
Company, Oliver Holt and George Avery, who 
is professor of electrical engineering at East 
Lansing, Michigan. 

Dr. Kelsall received his education in the 
public schools in Louisville and was graduated 
from the Louisville Male High School in 
1896. He then entered the medical depart- 
ment of the LTniversity of Louisville and was 
graduated therefrom with first honors in the 
class in 1899, receiving the M. D. degree. In 
order to acquire a practical knowledge of 
medicine and treatment, immediately after 
graduation he went to the City Hospital, 
w^here for one year he was resident physician 
and surgeon, after which he entered the gen- 
eral practice of medicine and surgery in Louis- 
ville, meeting with a deserved success and 
having a large and prominent list of patrons. 
In addition to his practice he finds time to en- 
gage in various other pursuits. He taught 
various branches in the medical department 
of the Kentucky University for several years 
and was appointed to the chair of Genito- 
urinary Diseases and Bacteriology in the 
medical department of the Kentucky Univer- 
sity, and upon the amalgamation of the 
schools he filled the same chair in the Univer- 
sity of Louisville. 

Dr. Kelsall is a member of the Jefiferson 
County Medical Society, the Kentucky State 
Medical Society, the American Medical Asso- 
ciation and the West End Medical Society of 
Louisville. He married Miss Stella C. 
Fischer, who was born in Louisville, the 
daughter of Jacob and Caroline (Decker) 
Fischer, natives of Louisville. The Doctor 
and his wife have four children : Estella, 
Oliver Crowell, Harvey Irwin and Martha 
Ann. Dr. Kelsall and his wife are members 
of Covenant Presbyterian church. 

J. S. Crowell, a large publisher of Spring- 
field, Ohio, who published the "Woman's 
Home Companion" and the "Farm and Fire- 
side" periodicals, which he founded, is an 
uncle to the Doctor. The grandmother on the 
Doctor's mother's side was a Graham and was 



born in the north of Ireland, the daughter of 
Scotch-Irish Presbyterian parents. 

Archibald Waller OvERxoN.-^The stand- 
ing of Archibald Waller Overton, cashier of 
the Farmers' National Bank of Frankfort, 
both as a private citizen and a man of affairs 
is unimpeachable throughout that section of 
the Blue Grass state which was the scene of 
his birth and where for so many years he has 
made his home. Nowhere does true patriot- 
ism and state loyalty bloom more brightly 
than in the breast of the Kentuckian, and Mr. 
Overton may be pardoned for an unusual 
amount of pride in his state and in his family, 
for his paternal grandfather, Waller Overton, 
came to Kentucky from his native Louisa 
county, Virginia, only three years later than 
the celebrated Daniel Boone, who began the 
exploration of her fair acres in 1769. 

Mr. Overton was born November 11, 1846, 
on his father's farm in Fayette county, his 
parents being Dabney Carr and Eliza (Har- 
ris) Overton. This was also his father's 
birthplace, but his mother had come from 
Louisa county, Virginia. The father followed 
the honorable vocation of agriculture and was 
also one of the early magistrates of his county 
at a time when that office was an elevated and 
important one and when its incumbent was 
the recipient of high esteem and many hon- 
ors. He was the father of nine children, only 
three of whom survive at the present day. 

When Mr. Overton was a lad about eleven 
years of age he removed to Virginia with his 
guardian, General D. B. Harris, who lived 
in Louisa county, where he was engaged in 
the manufacturing of tobacco, and in the cul- 
tivation of the soil. General Harris was a son 
of Frederick Harris, of Louisa county, Vir- 
ginia, the first president of the old Virginia 
Central Railroad, now a part of the C. & O. 
Railroad, and it was the first railroad built in 
the South, and one of the first in the United 
States. Frederick Harris was also a captain 
in the war of 1812. There in Virginia Mr. 
Overton grew to manhood, receiving his ru- 
dimentary education in the public schools and 
later entering the A'irginia Military Institute. 
Like most young men of his period he was 
familiar with agriculture in all its depart- 
ments and could no doubt have made of it a 
successful life vocation had he so chosen. At 
the beginning of the Civil war he was a cadet 
in the Virginia Military Institute and like his 
fellow students enlisted in the army of the 
Confederacy. He saw some hard fighting and 
participated' in the battle of New Market, 
when the forces of General John C. Breckin- 
ridge met those of General Sigel of the Union 
army. He subsequently resumed his stud- 



1206 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



ies and was graduated from the Institute in 
1866. From 1866 to 1871 Air. Overton was 
engaged in the manufacture of tobacco in 
Louisa county, N'irginia. He had ever been 
attracted by the idea of his native state, and 
in 1871 he concluded again to cast his for- 
tunes witli it, locating in Frankfort. Si.x 
nicmths later the Farmers" Bank of Kentucky 
engaged his services as bookkeeper in the 
branch bank at Henderson, and this position 
he held for three years. Air. Overton was 
made general bookkeeper in the mother bank 
at Frankfort, to which city he changed his 
residence. In 1888 Mr. Overton was called 
to the position of assistant cashier of the 
Farmers' Bank of Kentucky, and in 1898, 
upon the death of the cashier, he was pro- 
moted to the cashiership of the bank. This 
bank went into liquidation in 1900 and was 
succeeded by the new and present institution, 
known as the Farmers' Bank of Frankfort, 
and Air. Overton has held the office of cashier 
since its organization. 

On March 11, 1877, Air. Overton laid the 
foundations of a happy home by his union 
with Aliss Laura Ellen Harris, a native of 
Louisa county, Virginia. They have but one 
child, a son, named Waller Bullock Overton. 

In the matter of politics Mr. Overton gives 
his allegiance to the Democratic party and 
takes a keen interest in the solution of all 
problems pertaining in any way to the pub- 
lic welfare. He is a Knight Templar Alason 
and a member of the Episcopal church, hav- 
ing been a vestryman of his church for years. 

Edward Daniel Shinnick, proprietor and 
editor of the Shelbyville Record, Shelbyville, 
Kentucky, has gained a reputation, not only 
as an excellent man to conduct a newspaper 
as a disseminator of news, but as an active 
participator in every effort to advance the in- 
terests of the community. A few words con- 
cerning the life and career of the present 
proprietor of the Shelbyville Record, w'ill be 
of interest to the readers of this history. 

Mr. Shinnick was born in Shelbyville, June 
I, 1854, and is the son of William and Alice 
(Casey) Shinnick, the father being a native 
of Troy, New York, and the mother of county 
Cork, Ireland. The grandfather was Edward 
Daniel Shinnick, a native of Ireland, who as 
an emigrant settled at Troy, New York, where 
he lived the balance of his life. His son, Will- 
iam Shinnick, came to Shelbyville in 1849, 
and was a carriage-maker, which business he 
followed until within a few^ years of his death, 
which occurred in May, 1892, his wife's death 
having occurred in February, 1888. 

At Dodd's High School, Shelbyville, Ed- 
ward D. Shinnick of this sketch finished his 



education, and then followed the carriage- 
making business until 1886, when he entered 
the newspaper business as local editor and 
business manager of the Shelbyville Sentinel, 
afterwards purchasing a half interest in that 
papef, his partner being T. F. Pointer until 
Alarch, 1898, when the Sentinel was sold to 
C. M. Lewis. From that time on for two 
years, Mr. Shinnick was bookkeeper for the 
Shelbyville Water and Light Company and 
also as a side business engaged in a farming 
venture. From the fall of 1900, he was a 
commercial traveler from Louisville until 
February, 1902, when he returned to Shelby- 
ville and bought the Shelbyville Record, which 
he has been conducting ever since with signal 
success, having kept abreast of the times and 
adding materially in other interests. For a 
number of years he was secretary of the 
Shelby County Democratic committee. In 
1896 he became a Gold Standard Democrat 
and was relieved from his position as secre- 
tary of the committee. He was president for 
nearly two years of the Eighth District Pub- 
lishers' League and is now chairman of the 
executive committee of the Kentucky State 
Press Association. 

Mr. Shinnick married Miss Alollie Sulli- 
van, of Shelbyville, and they have four sons : 
William C, Frank B., Edward D. Jr., and 
Charles L. Air. Shinnick belongs to the 
Knights of Columbus and in religion is a 
member of the Roman Catholic church. 

AIoRDECAi Williams. — Popular and well 
known in political affairs as well as in the 
business world, Alordecai Williams, who is 
now living in virtual retirement at Normal, 
Kentucky, is a man of unusual vigor and keen 
business acumen. He is widely known and 
respected both on account of his ability and 
genial kindliness of spirit and as a citizen 
his loyalty and public spirit have ever been of 
the most insistent order. 

Alordecai Williams was born in Greenup 
county, now Boyd county, Kentucky, on the 
20th of December, 1835, a son of Alarcus 
Lindsey and Elizabeth (Kring) Williams, 
both of whom were born and reared in the 
state of Pennsylvania. The Williams fam- 
ily is of Scotch-Irish descent and prior to the 
war of the Revolution three brothers of the 
name came to America, locating respectively 
in Pennsylvania, Alaryland and Virginia. He 
whose name introduces this paragraph is a 
representative of the Pennsylvania branch. 
Alarcus Williams, father of Alordecai. was 
born in 1813, in the old Keystone state of the 
Union, whence he accompanied his parents 
as an infant to Lawrence county, Ohio. He 
was a son of Alordecai and Elizabeth (David- 



I 





^O^dc&a^^ 



tUi tt«W TSi^^ 

FUBLIC UB 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1207 



son) Williams, who removed from Ohio to 
Kentucky about the year 1815. Location was 
made on Williams creek, which took their 
name as they were the first settlers in what is 
now Boyd county. The father engaged in 
farming and built the first log cabin in that 
section, his nearest neighbor being at Catletts- 
burg, some fourteen miles distant. He re- 
claimed a fine farm from the wilderness. 
He was summoned to the life eternal in 1833, 
his wife having survived until i860. "Sir. 
and Airs. Mordecai Williams became the par- 
ents of seven children, of whom Alarcus was 
the fourth in order of birth. He was reared 
to the invigorating discipline of the home 
farm, with whose work he continued to be 
identified until the time of his marriage, at 
which time he located near Clinton Furnace, 
where the family home was maintained for 
the ensuing ten years, at the expiration of 
which he purchased six hundred acres of land 
adjoining Catlettsburg. There he passed the 
residue of his life, his death having occurred 
in 1887. He was prominent and influential 
in local afl:'airs and in his political convictions 
he was a staunch adherent of the principles of 
the Democratic party. In the early '50s he 
was honored by his fellow citizens with mem- 
bership in the state legislature. During the 
Civil war he was an ardent sympathizer with 
the cause of Secession and owing to their out- 
spoken manner he and his son. James L., were 
taken to Camp Qiase by the Federal soldiers 
and there held in duress for several months. 

Airs. Alarcus Williams survived her hon- 
ored husband for many years and was sum- 
moned to eternal rest in 1898. She accom- 
panied her parents from Pennsylvania to 
Kentucky when a mere child. The Kring 
family same down the Ohio river from their 
native state by keel boat and stopped at Mays- 
ville, Kentucky. Henry Kring. the father, 
was a practical furnace man and had come to 
Kentucky to take charge of Beaver Furnace, 
in Bath county, one of the earliest furnaces 
in the state. The family continued to reside 
in Bath county for a number of years and sub- 
sequently ATr. Kring had charge of other fur- 
naces in other sections of Kentucky. He died 
in Bath county, his wife having preceded him 
to the life eternal, dying at Oakland furnace. 
Air. and Airs. Williams were devout members 
of the Alethodist Episcopal church and they 
were prominent and well beloved citizens dur- 
mg their lifetime. They became the parents 
of two children — Alordecai and James L., the 
latter of whom died in 1868. 

Alordecai Williams was reared in Boyd 
count}-, Kentucky, to whose public schools he 
is indebted for his early educational training. 



later supplementing this discipline by a course 
of one year in Center College, at Danville, 
Kentucky. He remained under the parental 
roof until he had reached the age of twenty- 
three years, when he engaged in the clay busi- 
ness, shipping his product by river to parties 
in Cincinnati, Ohio. He carried on an exten- 
sive business in this line for several years and 
in 1 861 he turned his attention to the lumber 
industry, shipping logs by river to cities on 
the lower Ohio river. In the latter business 
he was associated with David D. Geiger for a 
period of thirteen years and he also operated 
a saw mill for a few years. He is still inter- 
ested in the lumber industry, owning a log 
boom on the Alud river in West Virginia, 
about seven miles from the Ohio river. In 
all his ventures Air. Williams has met with 
most gratifying success and he is now living 
practically retired at his beautiful home in 
Normal, Kentucky. 

In politics Air Williams endorses the cause 
of the Democratic party and his citizenship 
has ever been characterized by those quahties 
which foster progress and development and 
which tend to promote the general welfare. 
In 1 87 1 he was elected to represent the district 
comprising Boyd, Carter and a portion of El- 
liot counties in the Kentucky state legislature, 
in which he served with efficiency one term 
of three sessions. While in the legislature 
he was a member of several important com- 
mittees connected with the revision of statutes 
and he introduced a number of bills, some of 
which became laws. In 1898 he was a candi- 
date for congress from the Ninth district and 
in the ensuing election, while he received the 
largest number of votes ever awarded a Dem- 
ocrat for that position in Boyd county, he was 
defeated in the district by ten votes. Later 
errors were discovered in connection with the 
count which would have given him his seat by 
a good majority. However, no contest was 
made. 

Air. Williams is one of the most promi- 
nent Alasons in this section of the state, hav- 
ing passed through the circle of York Rite 
Alasonry. He was first affiliated with the or- 
der at Catlettsburg in 1862, and holds mem- 
bership in the lodge, chapter and commandery. 
Air. and Airs. Williams are devout members 
of the Alethodist Episcopal church. South, 
and in the same have won distinction for ex- 
tensive charity and many good works. A 
few years ago Air. Williams had a narrow es- 
cape from losing his life. Two burglars en- 
tered his home at an early hour in the morning 
and their prowlings awakened him. Getting 
out of bed he took his Alasonic sword and in 
the exciting encounter which followed he was 



1208 



HTSTORV OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



shot twice, one of the bullets entering the stom- 
ach and proving quite serious. The burglars 
escaped but later were captured and are now 
serving out terms in the state penitentiary. 

Mr. Williams has been twice married. In 
1859 was celebrated his marriage to Miss 
Nancy J. Cox, a native of Bath county. Ken- 
tucky. She was a daughter of Joshua and 
Rosanna Cox and her death occurred in 1871. 
Of the two children born to this union one 
died in infancy and the other, Anna Dicken- 
son, passed away at the age of thirty years. 
In 1875 Air. Williams was united in marriage 
to Mrs. Neppie (Savage) Roberts, widow of 
Lmnan Roberts, who was a native of Vermont 
and former professor in the Millersburg 
schools. No children have been born to this 
latter marriage but Air. and Airs. Williams 
have reared and are educating one of Mr. 
Williams' granddaughters, Annie Williams 
Haney, who was left an orphan at the age of 
seven years. 

Airs. Williams is a daughter of John P. 
Savage, a son of James Savage, of Revolu- 
tionary fame, he having served throughout 
the entire struggle for independence. After 
the close of the war, in 1791, James Savage 
removed from Virginia to Kentucky, with his 
wife and children. Settlement was made at 
Poplar Flat, Lewis county, Kentucky, some 
fourteen miles above Alaysville. There Air. 
Savage improved a fine farm from the virgin 
wilderness and in those early pioneer days it 
was necessary to barricade the doors against 
the attacks of Indians. The old homestead 
is now owned by the fifth generation of his 
descendants and the old log cabin built by 
him in the early days is still a part of the fam- 
ily residence. A fact worthy of record here 
is that during the many years which have 
elapsed since the time of the immigration of 
James Savage to Kentucky not a single death 
occurred in the house from disease until a few 
years ago. James Savage continued to reside 
on his homestead during the remainder of his 
life, and prior to his death, through thrift and 
industry, he had accumulated a large property, 
owning at one time a great number of slaves 
His wife, whose maiden name was Alary Phil- 
lips, was a native Virginian and was descend- 
ed from King Philip, of England. To Mr. 
and Airs. James Savage were born eight chil- 
dren — six sons and two daughters. 

John P. Savage, father of Airs. Williams., 
passed his life on the old homestead and he 
there reared and educated a family of fifteen 
children. He was one of the leading planters 
in that section and he married Alargaret Friz- 
ell, whose birth occurred in Lewis county. 
Kentucky, she being a direct descendant of 



Lord Baltimore. She was summoned to the 
life eternal in 1891, at the home of her daugh- 
ter, Airs. Williams. Mrs. Williams was 
reared in Lewis county, where she attended 
the country schools in her girlhood. Subse- 
quently she was a student in the seminary at 
Alaysville and also at the National Normal 
School at Lebanon, Ohio, graduating in the 
latter institution in three different courses. 
After leaving school she taught at Alillers- 
burg for several years and later was a teacher 
in mathematics and Latin at the National Nor- 
mal School for five years. In 1867 she es- 
tablished the Eastern Kentucky Normal 
School, at Catlettsburg, this being the first 
school of reputation in the eastern section of 
the state. After conducting the same for 
some six years she left the institution in the 
charge of others to go abroad to study German 
and French. Her stay in Europe, however, 
was suddenly curtailed by the financial trou- 
bles of the day and she returned to Catletts- 
burg in 1874, at which time she closed the 
Normal school and turned her attention to 
pedagogic work again. In 1878 she reorgan- 
ized the Eastern Kentucky Normal School at 
her home at Normal and she continued head 
of the same for the ensuing eleven years. 
Airs. Williams is one of the best known edu- 
cators in eastern Kentucky and is a woman of 
brilliant mind and most gracious personality. 
She is a representative of a fine old military 
family, members' of the same having served in 
the Revolution, the Civil war and the Span- 
ish-American war. Three of her brothers 
were dashing and gallant soldiers in the Con- 
federate army in the sanguinary struggle be- 
tween the states. Air. and Airs. Williams are 
universally esteemed and are deeply beloved 
by all with whom they have come in contact. 
Their contribution to progress and education 
in the Blue Grass state has been of most im- 
portant order and their entire lives have been 
characterized by good deeds and kindly con- 
sideration for others. 

Edward Hermann, M. D. — Although be- 
longing to the younger generation of medical 
practitioners, Edward Hermann, AI. D., has 
already taken an assured position among 
those who so ably represent the profession in 
the city of Newport. He was born here June 
10, 1879, his parents being Joseph and Caro- 
line (Blesch) Hermann. The mother was a 
native of Kentucky, though of German ex- 
traction, but Joseph Hermann was born in the 
Fatherland and came to the United States in 
1858. The story of how he finally came to 
take up his residence in Newport is an inter- 
esting one, although it was by no means an 
agreeable one for the gentleman most con- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KEXTUCKIANS 



1209 



cerned. Upon casting his fortunes with the 
United States Joseph Hermann located in 
New York city, where he secured employ- 
ment. At the beginning of the Civil war he 
enlisted, September 24, 1861, in Company K 
of the New York Volunteer Infantry, and 
after having served two years w^as discharged 
in May, 1863. On August 24 of that same 
year he made his second enlistment, in Com- 
pany L of the Fifteenth Regular New York 
Volunteer Heavy Artillery. He was in a 
great many engagements and saw a great 
amount of hard fighting, his service to his 
adopted country being at the expense of great 
physical well-being, for he was wounded early 
in 1865, lost the sight of one eye while in 
service, and became a sufferer from rheuma- 
tism. He was mustered out August 30, 1865, 
at Dukamp Hospital on Davis Island, where 
he had been sent to recover from his disabili- 
ties. After he had returned to the great me- 
tropolis in which he had begun his American 
career he looked about him for a business 
opening and went into partnership with a 
Hebrew in the manufacture antl sale of leather 
pocketbooks. The business proved exceed- 
ingly prosperous, and for several years Mr. 
Hermann was upon the road as salesman and 
he amassed a property worth several thousand 
dollars. Upon his return from an extended 
trip over the country what was his chagrin to 
find that his partner had converted ever\'thing 
into cash during his absence and had de- 
camped. He immediately started out in pur- 
suit, what clues he had taking him westward, 
and finally he landed in Newport in a state of 
great financial stringency, and although he 
perhaps did not suspect it at the time, the 
town was to prove his future home. He se- 
cured work and after he had got well 
upon his feet again, figuratively speaking, he 
engaged in the hotel business in Newport, 
playing the pleasant role of landlord for a 
number of years and with entire success and 
popularity. He died very suddenly February 
27, 1910, from a stroke of apoplexy suffered 
while at the supper table. He is regretted by 
a wide circle of friends and acquaintances, 
and nowhere more than in William Tell lodge 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of 
which he was treasurer for about twenty 
years. 

]\Irs. Joseph Hermann survives her hus- 
band, being now about sixty years of age. 
Although she was born in Newport, her par- 
ents were natives of Germany, her father, 
Sebastian Blesch, having come to America 
when a young man, and upon settling in New- 
port, married here and here engaged in mer- 
chant tailoring. He carried this on success- 



fully and was known as one of the well-known 
business men in the early days. Joseph Her- 
mann and his wife, Caroline Blesch Hermann, 
were the parents of nine children, of whom 
four sons and three daughters are living at 
the present time, Dr. Hermann, whose name 
initiates this review, being fourth in order of 
birth. 

Dr. Edward Hermann was reared in New- 
port and is indebted to the excellent public 
schools of the city for his early educational 
advantages. Graduated from the high school 
at the age of seventeen, it was not long before 
he came to a decision as to his future career 
and accordingly at the age of twenty began 
the study of medicine. In 1903, when he was 
twenty-four years of age, he received his de- 
gree from Miami Medical College at Cincin- 
nati, and has ever since carried on his practice 
in his native place, where he has received 
gratifying recognition of his talents in minis- 
tering to the ills of suffering humanity. He 
is one of the staff of Speer's Hospital of Day- 
ton. Kentucky, and is a member of the Amer- 
ican Medical Association and the Kentucky 
State and Kenton-Campbell County Medical 
Societies. 

Mr. Hermann is Republican in politics, par- 
ticularly in national and state aft'airs, but in 
those of local import he has independent ten- 
dencies, voting for whom he believes to be the 
best man rather than the party he favors. In 
the year 1905-6 he served as district physician, 
bringing no small amount of ability to the dis- 
charge of the duties of this office. He is a 
member of the great Masonic fraternity and 
also holds membership in the Modern Wood- 
men of America. 

Dr. Hermann laid the foundation of a 
happy home life by his marriage on June 29, 
1906. to Miss Otillia Shaefer. She is a native 
of Portsmouth, Ohio, and a daughter of 
Joseph Shaefer, who died when she was an 
infant. 

Ferdinand George Ott. — One of Dayton's 
substantial citizens and prosperous business 
men is Ferdinand George Ott, who is engaged 
in the drug business. He was born on a farm 
near Lanesville. Indiana. July 12, 1857, but is 
of foreign extraction. His parents were Bern- 
hard and Pauline (Neuman) Ott, the former 
a native of Wurtemberg and the latter of 
Prussia, Germany, who came to the United 
states when young and located in Newport, 
Kentucky. It was in that city that they were 
married, and not long after their union they 
located upon a farm near Lanesville, Indiana, 
and for a number of years engaged in its cul- 
tivation. In 1862 they returned to Newport, 
where they passed the remainder of their lives. 



1210 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



the demise of the father occurring when he 
was seventy-three years of age and tliat of the 
mother when she was sixty-four. This es- 
timable couple were the parents of ten chil- 
dren, live of whom grew to maturity. At the 
time of the Civil war the father was a mem- 
ber of the old home guards. 

Ferdinand Ceorge Ott, who was the eldest 
of his father's lar^^e family, was tive years of 
age when his parents located in Dayton. He 
attended the public schools for a time and ow- 
ing to straitened circumstances very early in 
life founil it necessary to face the problem of 
earning a living. His first position was as a 
bell boy in the old Gibson Hotel in Cincinnati. 
His future work was no doubt determined by 
the fact that when he was fourteen years old 
he found a position of humble character with 
a drug store in Cincinnati and followed this 
with several similar positions. He found the 
work so congenial and proved so apt in pick- 
ing up the details that the question of a voca- 
tion in life was settled without much difficulty. 
He entered the Cincinnati College of Phar- 
macy and was graduated from this institution 
in 1882. He was thrifty and an excellent man- 
ager and after clerking for about one year he 
found himself in a position to go into busi- 
ness for himself, and so bought a drug store 
in Dayton. Three years later he sold out and 
for the thirteen years following worked in 
stores in Covington, Cincinnati and Newport. 
In 1905 he bought his present drug business 
in Dayton and has ever since carried it on 
with the utmost success. 

Mr. Ott is a socialist in politics, has always 
taken an active interest in the cause and be- 
lieves in its triumphant future. He was one 
of the original members in an organization 
known as the Dayton's Men's Club, a civic 
organization which has done a great deal for 
the improvement and advancement of the city 
and which has an active membership of about 
one hundred at the present time. He is an 
enthusiastic Alason, a member of the blue 
lodge and senior deacon of the Henry Barnes 
Lodge, No. 607. 

The marriage of Mr. Ott to Miss Florence 
L. Davidson, a native of Springfield. Ohio, 
w^as celebrated February 10, 1891. She was 
reared and educated in Springfield, where her 
father. Otho Davidson, engaged in the coop- 
er's trade and lived until his demise. Her 
mother, Laura Savilda (Black) Davidson, was 
a lineal descendant of John Ouincy Adams. 
Her death occurred in Cincinnati. Mr. and 
Mrs. Ott have one child, a daughter, named 
Laura Elizabeth, twelve years of age. 

Charles Wheeler Bell. — Most men es- 
teem themselves fortunate to succeed in any 
one line, but to few is it given to become 



prominent in many fields of endeavor. The 
versatility of Charles Wheeler Bell is indeed 
remarkable, for he has won the most flatter- 
ing recognition as a factor in the world of af- 
fairs, and likewise as a lecturer and educator, 
while as insurance commissioner of Kentucky 
he has gained the esteem of all who best 
realize the efficiency he has brought to the dis- 
posal of the duties of his office. 

Charles Wheeler Bell is a native son, hav- 
ing been born at Springfield, Washington 
county, Kentucky, April 23, 1866. He is the 
son of William H. and Ann M. (Scott) Bell. 
The father also had his birthplace in the state, 
his nativity having occurred in Mercer county, 
Kentucky, and his death at Lawrenceburg, the 
date of the latter event being 1892, his age at 
the time being sixty-five years. Mr. Bell's 
grandfather was Burrus Bell, also of Mercer 
county, and the Bells, like so many of the old 
Kentucky families, had been previously 
founded in the Old Dominion. Tracing the 
line to remoter generations it is discovered 
that it is of English origin. The mother of 
Mr. Bell was born in Washington county, 
Kentucky, and her father was William Scott, 
a pioneer of Washington county and a man 
of prominence. 

William H. Bell was a farmer, but his agri- 
cultural operations were interrupted by the 
breaking out of the Civil war. He saw ex- 
tended service in the conflict, for as captain of 
Company H, Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, he 
served from a date very little subsequent to 
the firing of Fort Sumter to the treaty at Ap- 
pomattox. For a number of years after the 
close of the war he was in the government 
service as ganger and store-keeper. In later 
years he followed the vocation of a grocer at 
Lawrenceburg. He was interested in party 
affairs and gave hearty support to the cause of 
Republicanism. 

Charles Wheeler Bell w-as reared in Wash- 
ington and Anderson counties and had the good 
fortune to receive an excellent education. 
After a preliminary introduction to the pri- 
mary branches in the country schools he en- 
tered the Central Kentucky Normal College, 
and afterw^ard matriculated at the Anderson 
Seminary and the Lawrenceburg Normal Col- 
lege, graduating from the latter in the year 
1889. Naturally inclined toward a career as 
an educator, he had already taken up teaching 
in 1884, and while he was perfecting his edu- 
cation he taught and attended school alter- 
nately. His pedagogical career, interrupted 
though it was, included the years between 
1884 and 1908, and in the latter year he was 
appointed insurance commissioner of Ken- 
tucky, of which office he is the present incum- 
bent. From the year 1890 for the ensuing 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1211 



eighteen years Professor Bell was principal of 
the city schools of Harrodsburg, Kentucky. 
He gives his faith and his suffrage to the Re- 
publican party and has no small influence in 
party ranks. In his religious convictions he is 
a member of the Christian church, in which 
he is an elder. 

Professor Bell has been twice married, his 
first wife being Miss Maude Myles, a daughter 
of the Rev. James Myles, and the date of their 
union being in 1892. His second union was 
with Miss Myrtle Britton, and their marriage 
was solemnized in 1904. 

In no field has Professor Bell achieved a 
greater degree of success than as a lecturer. 
His attainments as a speaker are splendid and 
wherever his eloquence is heard he'wins hosts 
of admirers. He has high standing as a 
Chautauqua speaker and his gifted services 
'have been retained by a number of these in- 
stitutions. He is by no means a "prophet 
without honor," for Kentucky takes a proper 
pride in him, and his fame has spread far be- 
yond the borders of the state. He has called 
forth many plaudits and from some of these 
appreciations it is a temptation to quote. The 
celebrated author and lecturer, Elbert Hub- 
bard, of East Aurora, New York, has written 
him the following characteristic letter : 

"Dear Friend : 

"I have read your splendid speech with 
smiles and things. It is extra choice, and I 
congratulate you on it. Any man who can 
write as well as you should keep right at it. 
It is certainly worthy of being reprinted and 
widely distributed. Come and see us when 
you are along this way. With love and bless- 
ings ever, I am 

"Your sincere 

"Elbert Hubbard." 

The famous Louisville Coiiricr-Joiinial had 
said : "Mr. Bell is possessed of a quaint, bu- 
colic humor, as pure and fresh as a fresh 
plowed furrow. He told of the 'Good Old 
Days' in such a manner that he was continu- 
ously interrupted by the heartv laughs of the 
'500.'" 

The comment of the Louisville Post is 
quoted for the reason that it gives a nearer 
glance at the personality of the man : "All 
the speeches were good, but Mr. Bell of 
Frankfort fairly carried away the honors. 
His address upon 'The Good Old Times,' was 
an admirable mixture of pathos and humor 
and his unique delivery added to its effect. 
He won the audience after speaking less than 
three minutes. In appearance Mr. Bell is the 
typical American humorist, and his quaint 
manner of being funny, his satirical way of 
speaking and the purity of his vocabulary re- 



call the traditions of Artemus Ward," In 
short the "good and the great" have com- 
mended him highly and repeatedly. Governor 
Augustus E. Willson has called the celebrated 
"Good Old Days," "Food for hungry hearts, 
rest for weary cares and raiment for pleasant 
thoughts." A prominent clergyman has called 
the same, "The greatest speech of the kind he 
has ever listened to," and a Louisville citizen 
of high standing accuses Mr. Bell of having 
made the best after dinner speech he ever 
heard. 

The career of the subject of this biography 
in the lecture field dates from 1910, and it is 
not hazarding much to predict that even 
greater victories lie before him. 

William Barnett Owen, M. D., is one of 
the younger representatives of the medical 
profession, but his ability does not seem to be 
limited by the years of his connection with 
the profession. He established his home and 
practice in Louisville in 1906, and already has 
secured a good patronage here. He is a na- 
tive of Kentucky, born in Hart county, March 
12, 1880, the son of Jordan and Kate E. 
(Green) Owen. Jordan Owen was born in 
Green county, Kentucky, the son of Jordan 

and (Tinsley) Owen, natives of Bedford 

county, Virginia, and came to Kentucky in the 
early forties, locating in Green county, the 
Owens being of Welsh, Scotch and Irish de- 
scent. The mother was born in Hart county, 
Kentucky, the daughter of William Green, a 
native of Kentucky, of English descent and a 
large slave owner, owning an extensive plan- 
tation in Louisiana. The father of the Doctor 
has been engaged in the tobacco warehouse 
business in Louisville since 1895, owning and 
operating the Main Street Tobacco Ware- 
house under the firm name of the Owen-Dan- 
nenhold Company. 

Dr. Owen was reared in Hart county until 
he reached his thirteenth year, when he came 
to Louisville and passed through the public 
schools and jManual Training School. He at- 
tended the Allman University School, taking 
a course in languages, and finally graduated 
from the medical department of the Kentucky 
University on July 3, 1903. The Doctor then 
held an interneship in St. Joseph's Hospital, 
Lexington, going thence to New York city, 
where he served as interne in Mt. Sinai Hos- 
pital, the Ruptured and Cripple Hospital and 
the New York Post Graduate Hospital. He 
then engaged in the practice at Louisville in 
igo6. in which he is still and with every pros- 
pect of so continuing. He is attending sur- 
geon to the Louisville City Hospital and as- 
sistant to the chair of gynecology in the medi- 
cal department of the University of Louisville, 



Vol. Ill— 5 



1212 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



and a member of the Jefferson County Med- 
ical Society, the Kentucky State Medical So- 
ciety and the American .Medical Association, 
also the Louisville Society of Physicians and 
Surgeons. He is also medical examiner for 
the North Western Mutual Life Insurance 
Company and the Union Central Life Insur- 
ance Company. 

In social and fraternal societies the Doctor 
is a member of the Masonic order, belonging 
to Excelsior Lodge, No. 258, F. & A. J\I., and 
he is also a member of the Tavern Club. The 
Doctor is a member of the Broadway Chris- 
tian church. 

George F. Roth is particularly well 
equipped for his position as manager and pro- 
prietor of the Covington Architectural Iron 
Works by reason of the fact that he has 
practically grown up with that line of indus- 
try. He was born on Pike street, in the city 
of Covington, Kentucky, on the nth of July, 
1870, and is a son of Godfred and Mary 
(Herman) Roth, the former of whom was a 
native of Germany, whence he emigrated to 
America when a lad of seventeen years. He 
was accompanied by his brothers, but becom- 
ing separated from them he located at Cov- 
ington, where he follow^ed his trade of black- 
smith. He was summoned to the life eternal 
in 1882, at which time George F. was but 
twelve years old. Mary (Herman) Roth was 
of French parentage, her parents emigrating 
at an early day to Covington, where they both 
succumbed to the cholera epidemic. ■ Mary 
was then adopted by a family named Her- 
man and she was reared and educated in Cov- 
ington, where she passed away when the sub- 
ject of this review w^as a child of eight years. 

Thus thrown upon his own resources at an 
early age, it is most gratifying to view the 
success which it has been his to achieve. His 
preliminary educational advantages were 
those afforded in the common schools, after 
leaving which he began w^ork in a safe fac- 
tory in his native town to learn the business. 
Later he worked for several years in the 
structural iron plant owned by Fred J. Mey- 
ers, and here familiarized himself with the 
intricacies of the trade, at which he was em- 
ployed in various factories for a number of 
years. In 1898 he became personally inter- 
ested in this line of enterprise, having at that 
time purchased a third interest in the concern 
conducted by John H. Luter & Company. 
The present company, known as the Coving- 
ton Architectural Iron Works, was established 
by Keiser & Lueke in 1890. This firm passed 
through several different ownerships and in 
1899 J^Ir. Roth bought an interest in the same, 
under the firm name of John H. Luter & 



Company. For a number of years the busi- 
ness had been on the decline and in July, 1900, 
the entire business passed into the hands of 
Mr. Roth, who reorganized and rechristened 
the same as the Covington Architectural Iron 
Works. He installed the latest accessories in 
the way of modern machinery and through 
his able management the business has been 
largely increased and put upon a successful 
basis. The plant now employs about twenty 
men and manufactures structural and orna- 
mental iron and steel, besides which it con- 
ducts a general repair business. In addition 
to the factory building is a suite of splendidly 
equipped offices and pattern rooms adjoining 
it. 

In politics Mr. Roth accords a staunch alle- 
giance to the Republican party and he has 
served most efficiently on the school board of 
Covington for three years, first by appoint- 
ment and later by election. In the year, 1909, 
he served as president of the same. His Ma- 
sonic affiliations are as follows : Blue Lodge, 
Covington, No. 109, Free & Accepted Ma- 
sons; Covington Chapter, No. 35, Royal 
Arch Masons; Kenton Council, No. 13; and 
Covington Commandery, No. 7, Knights 
Templars. He has been an active member of 
the Turner Society for nearly twenty-five 
years and is identified with the Ancient Or- 
der of United Workmen and various local 
clubs of a representative order. Both he and 
his wife hold membership in St. Paul's Lu- 
theran church. 

On the 17th of August, 1892, was solem- 
nized the marriage of Mr. Roth to Miss Ma- 
tilda Tierke, who was born and reared in 
Covington. Mr. and Mrs. Roth are the par- 
ents of four children, whose names are here 
entered in* order of birth — Leslie, Edna, El- 
vira and George Jr., all of whom remain at 
the parental home. 

W. Prince Wells. — The present is emi- 
nently a practical age. We live in a busy 
work-a-day world and the masses of the peo- 
ple are chiefly concerned in the affairs of ev- 
ery-day life. Great intellects bind themselves 
to consideration of industrial matters rather 
than to questions of state-craft. We are in- 
terested to a greater extent in inventions than 
in art, and the sciences which can be utilized 
in the creation of w^ealth and the building up 
of industries receive the greater share of our 
attention. The factories and workshops, the 
multiplied and equipped lines of transporta- 
tion, the great warehouses, stores and public 
buildings are the evidences of physical prog- 
ress and prosperity, and the man who stands 
at the head and as the representative of a great 
concern is the man who is a leader in the 



t fHBRKWTOlK J 
PUBLIC UBRARtj 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1213 

events and great interests of the day. Such who died in 1910; W. Prince Wells; and 

a man is the subject of our sketch. Samuel L., who resides in Denver, Colorado, 

W. Prince Wells, the state representative of with his mother. 
Kentucky for the Rambler automobiles and W. Prince Wells, the immediate subject of 
bicycles, with headquarters at 718-724 Fourth our sketch, spent his boyhood days in Louis- 
avenue, Louisville, was born in Bloomfield, ville, and went to work when he was about 
Spencer county, Kentucky, on January 18, fourteen years old. The first five years were 
1866. He is the son of Jesse Stone Wells, spent between the New York and White's dry 
who was born in Spencer county, Kentucky, goods stores in this city. He then found it 
in 1837, and was the son of William Wells, expedient to direct his energies along another 
who with his brother Samuel were pioneers channel of enterprise, so went on the road ex- 
of Fort Wayne, Allan county, Indiana, they hibiting and selling bicycles, and is a pioneer 
having settled there during the days when the in that line. When he began his work in the 
early comers were in constant danger from the bicycle line the old high-wheel machine was 
savage Indians, when incessant vigilance was in vogue, but he soon saw the impracticability 
the watchword, and the depredations of this of the old style and advocated the building of 
stealthy foe more to be dreaded than any other a wheel more practicable and safe. Just as 
form of danger, but despite their care Samuel, soon as the manufacture of the "safety" wheel 
the brother of William, was captured by the was begun, Mr. Wells returned to Louisville 
Indians and put to death by having his heart and established himself in the bicycle busi- 
cut out. William, the grandfather of W. ness. That was in 1890, so for a period of 
Prince, came into Kentucky about the year twenty years he has been in the bicycle busi- 
181 5. William Wells' mother was a Scotch ness and is now the pioneer in that line, 
woman of the Prince family. William settled When the automobile business was in its in- 
in Spencer county, Kentucky, and there spent fancy Mr. Wells had the distinction of being 
the remainder of his life. He married a 5liss the first representative identified with that im- 
Alexander, who was a native of Kentucky, portant line of enterprise in this state, and in 
and to them were born three daughters and 1901 he became the Kentucky representative 
one son, as follows: Elizabeth married Dr. of the Rambler Corporation. For twenty- 
George W. Foreman, of near Bardstown, eight years he has been connected with the 
Kentucky. She died in her seventeenth year. Rambler Company in handling bicycles and 
Rebecca Prince married Dr. Bemis Wooden, automobiles. 

of Fairfield, Spencer county, and died in July, In 1900 Air. W^ells erected a store for the 

1909, aged eighty-two years. Sallie married handling of bicycles at 538 Fourth street, and 

Pitts Stallard, Spencer county, Kentucky, and in 1905 he built his garage at 718-720 Fourth 

is seventy years of age. street, which is a three and two story brick, 

Jesse Stone W^ells was a merchant at Bloom- 50 x 200 feet, with a floor space of about 26,- 

field previous to the war between the states. 000 feet, which is the largest garage in the 

In early days he was in the steamboat trade state of Kentucky. 

between Louisville and New Orleans. He Air. Wells is prominent in business clubs, 
was a strong sympathizer with the Southern being a member of the Louisville Automobile 
cause during the Civil w^ar. and gave freely of Club, is president of the Autcmiobile Dealers 
his means to the support of the Confederacy. Association, and a member of the Commercial 
After the war he engaged in merchandising Club. He married Rosina L. Heuse, who was 
at Eminence. Kentucky, where he continued born in Louisville, Kentucky, the daughter of 
until 1879. when he came to Louisville and Samuel Heuse, retired, of Louisville. To Mr. 
died in 1880, at 538 South Fourth street, and Mrs. Wells one daughter has been born, 
which old residence now is owned by his son Princess Ethel Wells, who graduated from 
Prince. He married Mary Casey, who w-as Semple College in the class of 1910. Mrs. 
born in Nelson county, Kentucky, and be- Wells is a member of the Lutheran church, 
longed to the Casey family of that county, but the Wells family are all Baptists. 
Her parents died soon after coming into Ken- Just as the value of a farm is estimated by 
tucky and she is now residing in Denver, Col- its products, or a system by its results, so is 
orado, being in her sixty-eighth year, and en- a man fairly measured by his achievements 
joying good health. The children of Jesse and Mr. Wells has every reason to be satis- 
Stone Wells and Mary Casey, his wife, were : fied with his own. 

Katie, who married Dr. H. C. Stinson, of Ar- Charles Harwood Morris, attorney-at- 
kansas. now superintendent of the Arkansas law, is the gifted son of a gifted father, both 
State Asylum for the Insane ; Ida Stone, who of them holding high place among the mem- 
married A. P. Niles. of Denver, Colorado, and bers of Kentucky's legal profession. Al- 



1214 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



though it is probable that Mr. Morris' career 
has not vet reached its summit, he has aheady 
had the incumbency of several important of- 
fices, and his efficiency has disphiyed itself as 
being of a distinctively high order. lie be- 
longs to the South by tics of birth and senti- 
ment his ancestors for a number of genera- 
tions having lived in Kentucky and \irginia, 
his mother's family, in fact, having been 
founded in the "Old Dominion" as early as 
1690. 

Charles Harwood Morris was born in Shel- 
byville. Shelbv county, Kentucky, March 20, 
1 87 1. He is the son of James S. and L. Mag- 
gie (Scearce) Morris, the former born in 
Mercer county, Kentucky, August 10. 1844, 
and the son of Joseph Morris, a \'irginian. 
The mother is also of Shelby county, where 
her birth occurred September 4, 1845, her 
parents being Shelby R. and Martha (New- 
ton) Scearce. the former dying in the home 
countv in 1891. Her mother, Mr. Morris' 
grandmother, was Martha Newton, a Ken- 
tuckian and a daughter of Samuel Newton of 
Buckingham county. Virginia, a lineal de- 
scendant of Matthew Agee, a French Protest- 
ant driven from his native country in 1690 by 
religious persecution and finding a haven in 
\'irginia. 

Mr. ]Morris' father, James S. Morris, now a 
resident of LaGrange. is a lawyer by profes- 
sion and for seventeen years was common- 
wealth's attorney for the old seventeenth judi- 
cial district, his incumbency including the 
years between 1876 and 1893. During that 
time he resided in Shelbyville, but in the year 
following removed to Oldham county and lo- 
cated at LaGrange, where he has even since 
resided and engaged in the practice of the 
law. He gave splendid service by his repre- 
sentation of the district composed of Oldham 
and Trimble counties in the legislature of 
1906, and he has served as special judge in a 
number of counties in Eastern Kentucky. His 
is the enviable distinction of having been paid 
a personal compliment for his services as 
commonwealth's attorney in the Constitutional 
Convention of 1891. His loyalty to the Demo- 
cratic party is well known and it takes the 
form of activity in its behalf. He was one 
of the presidential electors in 1904 for the 
Seventh district. 

Charles H. Morris spent his early years at 
Shelbyville and there received his common 
school education. When he was twelve years 
old he entered the Scearce Select Academy for 
Boys with the view of preparing for a collegi- 
ate course, but after four years of study within 
its portals he drifted into the mercantile 
business and was engaged in this field from 



his si.xteenth to his twenty-fourth year. He 
then reverted to his first idea of taking up a 
profession, and began to study law in his fa- 
ther's office. He was subsequently admitted 
to the bar and practiced at LaGrange for four 
years, when his health failed and not until 
1904 was he able to resume his active prac- 
tice. Upon January i, 1905, Mr. Adorris was 
appointed to the position of law clerk with 
General N. B. Hays, attorney general, with 
whom he served for four years and was then 
retained by General James Breathitt in the 
same office, a compliment of unusual force 
since Mr. Morris was opposite in politics to 
General Breathitt. 

By all the arguments of heritage and per- 
sonal conviction Mr. Morris is a Democrat, 
and for twelve years was a member of the 
Oldham County Democratic Committee and 
ten years chairman of the same. He is an 
enthusiastic lodge man, finding great pleasure 
in his fraternal relations. He is high priest 
of the Frankfort Royal Arch Chapter of Ma- 
sons and present exalted ruler of the Frank- 
fort Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 
Mr. Morris was married. May 10, 1910, to 
Miss Agnes White Crutcher, daughter of R. 
L. and Emma Crutcher, of Frankfort. 

John Greife. — Standing at the head of that 
substantial and prosperous concern, the John 
Greife Coal Company of Newport, is one of 
the city's sound and public-spirited citizens, 
the gentleman whose name appears in this 
title. He is a native son of the city which is 
the present scene of his activities, his birth 
having occurred on April 12, 1858. His par- 
ents were natives of that country which has 
given to America one of her most superior 
sources of immigration, they, — Frederick W. 
and Clara (Pieper) Greife, — having been 
born in Germany, in which land they were 
reared and married, coming soon after the 
latter event, in 1845, to America. They sailed 
via New Orleans and landed at Cincinnati, 
after having been nearly three months on the 
way. They did not remain in the Queen City, 
but crossed the Ohio to Newport, Kentucky, 
and they continued to live here for the re- 
mainder of their lives. They were intelligent 
and excellent citizens and naturally soon be- 
came favorably known in the commtmity. 
The father helped to organize and was a char- 
ter member of the First German Baptist 
church of Newport, the edifice in which the 
congregation worshipped being a small and 
humble one erected on the southeast corner of 
Sixth and Columbia streets. He likewise 
helped to organize the German Baptist church 
of Cincinnati, the fiftieth anniversary of 
which was celebrated in 1908. He was the 






^L:!^S*^ u 






',*•/, 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1215 



first pastor of the Newport congregation and 
was active in cliurch work for many years, 
his infiuence as a man of strict integrity and 
lofty principle being wide and beneficent. He 
and his wife were the parents of seven chil- 
dren, six of whom are living and he whose 
name initiates this sketch being the sixth in 
order of birth. 

John Greife was reared in Newport and re- 
ceived his education in the excellent public 
schools of the city. After his graduation 
from the high school he took a commercial 
course in the old Queen City Commercial Col- 
lege, situated on P^ifth and Walnut streets, 
Cincinnati, his natural tastes and inclinations 
fitting him for a career in business. After 
finishing at this institution he filled several 
clerical positions in Cincinnati, bringing an 
imusual amount of faithfulness and efficiency 
to all of them. In 1881 he entered the field in 
which his greatest success has lain, forming 
a partnershij) with George E. Crowhurst in 
the coal business in Newport, the firm being 
known under the name of John Greife and 
Company. This satisfactory arrangement 
continued for a number of years and with the 
greatest success and was only terminated by 
the retirement of Mr. Crowhurst. In 1905 
the John Greife Coal Company was incorpo- 
rated, with a capital stock of $10,000, and has 
ever since continued in this manner. Mr. 
Greife has since the beginning held the office 
of president and has been very active in its 
management, being a man of splendid execu- 
tive ability and initiative. In politics he casts 
his support with the Republican party and he 
and his family are members of the First Bap- 
tist church of Dayton, to whose support they 
contril)ute not only in a material manner but 
with the sympathy they bestow upon all the 
good measures promulgated by it. 

Mr. Greife was married in 1882. the lady 
to become his wife being Mary Elizabeth Wil- 
son, a daughter of John Wilson, who was 
engaged with the firm of P. Smith & Com- 
pany, dealers in photographic supplies in 
Cincinnati for many years. Mrs. Greife, 
however, was reared in Dayton. To this 
union have been born two children. Harry W. 
and John Raymond. The residence of the 
subject of the biography in Dayton dates 
from the year 1877. 

Lanham Robertson. — The interesting sci- 
ence of architecture finds one of its most 
talented representatives in the person of 
Lanham Robertson, a member of the eminent 
firm of Fahnestock, Ferber & Robertson of 
Cincinnati. Mr. Robertson comes of a family 
of scholars, his grandfather, Joseph Robert- 
son, LL. D., having been a man of much abil- 



ity and prominence in his native Scotland. 
He was curator of the historical department 
of the Register House at Edinburgh, and the 
greatest record scholar in the country. He 
died while engaged upon some of his best and 
most important work. 

Lanham Robertson is a native of Kentucky, 
his birth having occurred in Louisville, July 
19, 1880, his father's name being C. J. Stuart- 
Robertson, and his mother's, ])revious to her 
marriage, Lizzie Tompkins, the former a 
native of historic old Edinburgh and the lat- 
ter the daughter of a well known Louisville 
family. The father came to the United States 
when a young man, found his way to Louis- 
ville, engaged in business and married there, 
but was cut short in his career by death some 
four years after the latter event. The mother 
still resides in Covington, Kentucky. 

The late C. J. Stuart-Robertson and his wife 
were the parents of three children, he whose 
name initiates this biography being the eldest 
born and the only one surviving. He passed 
his boyhood in Louisville, attended the public 
schools and was graduated from the high 
school at the age of nineteen. His first expe- 
rience in the business world was gained as an 
employe of the Louisville & Nashville Rail- 
way and Standard Oil Company in an engineer- 
ing and architectural capacity. He had early 
evinced a remarkable ability and originality 
in his chosen profession and in 1908 he en- 
gaged in architecture, in Covington, whence 
he had moved, upon his own account. This 
venture proved successful and in 1910 a part- 
nership was formed under the firm name of 
Fahnestock, Ferber & Robertson, with offices 
in Cincinnati. This constitutes a strong com- 
bination and the firm has filled a number of 
important contracts, although such a short 
time in the field. One of Mr. Robertson's 
chef d'oeuvres was his much admired design 
for the home of the widows of the Knights of 
Pythias situated near Lexington. 

In the matter of politics Mr. Robertson 
gives his allegiance to "the Grand Old Party," 
as its supporters are pleased to call it, and his 
fraternal relations consist of membership in 
the Knights of Pythias and the Red Men. He 
is a communicant of the Episcopal church. 

Presley Meguiar. — That honored citizen, 
the late Presley Meguiar. was for many years 
identified in no uncertain manner with a num- 
ber of the most important concerns of this 
part of Kentucky. A financier of talent, he was 
at the same time one of the largest tobacco 
dealers in the state. He was a veteran of the 
Civil war and during his long life he stood 
close to many of the most important events in 
the historv of the county. Mr. ^^leguiar v.as 



1216 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



born in Robinson county, Tennessee, April 
25, 1S25, and died in Louisville, Kentucky, 
January 29, 1904. He was reared upon a 
farm and owing to adverse circumstances re- 
ceived but a limited education. His first 
adventure in the world of affairs was as the 
proprietor of a book store in Franklin, Ken- 
tucky, whence he removed early in life. After 
carryings this on for a short time he removed 
to l;')Owling Green, Kentucky, and became a 
partner in a drug store. During the last three 
years of the Civil war he was a soldier in the 
Confederate service, being assigned to duties 
in the commissary department. After the ces- 
sation of hostilities between the north and the 
south he removed to Louisville and it was 
while in that city that he became interested in 
the tobacco business. He proved to be one of 
the most astute and brilliant of business men 
and his scope of affairs grew with the years, 
until at the time of his death he was one of the 
largest dealers in the entire south. His activi- 
ties were by no means limited to the tobacco 
trade, even though engaged in it in such an 
extensive manner, and it was his distinction 
to be one of those w^ho assisted in the organi- 
zation of that sound corporation, the Fidelity 
Trust Company of Louisville, in which he 
continued to be a director until his summons 
to Ihc life eternal. He was also a director of 
the Louisville Heating Company from the 
time of its organization and of several other 
companies. 

]\Ir. Meguiar was first married to a Miss 
Curd, the marriage being solemnized at Bowl- 
ing Green, Kentucky. The maiden name of 
the second Mrs. Meguiar, who now survives 
her honored husband, was Mary E. Ray, and 
she was born in Montgomery county, Ken- 
tucky, October 27, 1831. She is the daughter 
of John Ray. an Indianan, who on December 
13, 1829, took as his wife Emily Keas, who 
was born in Montgomery county, Kentucky, 
January 21, 181 1. Neither she nor her hus- 
band were long-lived, the father dying in 1834 
and the mother on April 25, 1835. Of their 
three children Mrs. Meguiar is the only one 
living at the present day. She was reared by 
an aunt. Her grandfather, John Ray, was a 
Methodist minister of the old circuit rider 
school who traveled over the states of Indiana 
and Kentucky preaching salvation to the souls 
of men. On February 11, 1857, she married 
John W. White, who was born in Virginia 
October 24, 1824, and died in Mt. Sterling, 
Kentucky, October 7, 1869. John W. White 
came from the Old Dominion to Montgomery 
county when a boy to visit his grandfather and 
the older man persuaded him to make the visit 
a_ permanent one. He reared and educated 
him and his grandfather's farm was the scene 



of his youthful years. He adopted agriculture 
as a life work and for a number of years was 
connected with the banking interests of Mt. 
Sterling, the once well-known firm of White, 
Hoffman and Barnes now being designated as 
the Exchange Bank. The children born to Mr. 
and Mrs. White were three in number. Eu- 
gene died at age of four years and eleven 
months. Isa B. became the wife of Robert 
M. Trimble and she and her family now live 
with Mrs. Meguiar, her three Trimble grand- 
children being J. W. White Trimble, Robert 
M. Jr., and Mary Ray. John W. resides in 
Mt. Sterling. 

The second marriage of Mr. Presley Me- 
guiar was solemnized in February, 1876. Mrs. 
Aleguiar has always resided in Mt. Sterling, 
w^here she has a beautiful home, while Mr. 
Meguiar spent part of each week at his busi- 
ness in Louisville, and Kentucky's largest 
city was the scene of his demise. The suc- 
cess he achieved was entirely due to his own 
efforts, his indomitable courage, perseverance 
and unfailing good judgment having stood him 
in better stead than more tangible capital. He 
was a force in the business world and both 
from this aspect and as a good citizen he will 
long be remembered. Politically he was a 
loyal Democrat and though not in public life, 
he was interested in all the important ques- 
tions of the day. He was for years a member 
of the_ Chester Street Methodist church of 
Louisville and he was extremely liberal jn his 
benefactions to the church. He was president 
of the "Church Extension Board" of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. South, from the 
tune of its organization until his death. Mrs. 
Meguiar has been a life-long member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. South. 

Charles H. Whitlatch/M. D. — The med- 
ical profession in the city of Louisville has as 
one of its able and representative younger 
members, Dr. Charles Henry Whitlatch, who 
has here been engaged in practice since 1906 
and he has built up a successful business, 
which is constantly increasing in scope and im- 
portance. 

Dr. Whitlatch was born in Charlestown, 
Clark county, Indiana, on the 23d of Novem- 
ber, 1880, and is a son of Isaac and Sarah J. 
(Toombs) Whitlatch. His father was born in 
Scott county, Indiana, about 1850, a son of 
Isaac Whitlatch, who was also a native of 
Indiana, in which state the family was founded 
in the early pioneer days, original representa- 
tives having moved there from Philadelphia. 
The lineage of the family is traced back to 
staunch Scotch-Irish stock. The mother of 
pr. Whitlatch was born at Milton, Kentucky, 
in 1852. and her death occurred in 1897. She 
was a daughter of John Toombs, who was 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1217 

born in Kentucky, in 1806, and who died in which appropriately received his cognomen. 

1898, at the age of ninety-two years. He had The carpenter family was originally one one 

witnessed and contributed to the development of the Colonial families of Virginia and a few 

of the state and in his venerable age he often citizens of the "Old Dominion" were better 

recalled that he remembered Louisville when known or more beloved than Mr. Carpenter's 

it was a mere village. great-grandfather, the Rev. William Carpen- 

Dr. Charles H. Whitlatch is indebted to the ter, a German Lutheran minister who for 
public schools of his native town for his early many years labored for the welfare of human- 
educational discipline, which included a course ity "without money and without price." 
in the high school, in which he was graduated The above-mentioned William Carpenter 
in the class of 1900. Thereafter he completed was born in ]\Lidison county, Virginia, ]\lay 
a course and was graduated in the Bryant & 20, 1762, but he later cast his fortune with 
Stratton Business College, in the city of Louis- Kentucky, founding the Carpenter family 
ville, after which he entered the old Louisville there and being one of the Boone county 
Hospital College of Medicine, in 1901. In this pioneers. In 1778, when only sixteen years 
well ordered institution he completed the pre- of age, he entered the Colonial army and 
scribed course and was graduated as a mem- served until the close of the Revolution. He 
ber of the class of 1905. He received his de- seems to have studied theology under the Rev. 
gree of Doctor of Medicine and also had the G. Henkel and as he was a member of the 
distinction of securing third honors in the Pennsylvania Ministerium it is likely that he 
class of one hundred students. This gained was ordained by that body. His ordination 
to him an appointment as interne for one year must have been satisfactory for he was called 
at the Infirmary on Gray street, where he se- upon to minister in Episcopal pulpits without 
cured clinical experience of much value. He question. He was. however, Lutheran in 
has been engaged in the general practice of his faith and ministered in that church for many 
profession in Louisville since 1906, and for years, being the father of that church organi- 
two years he was assistant professor of ob- zation in Boone county. His identification 
stetrics in the Louisville Hospital Medical Col- with clerical afifairs began with his twenty- 
lege. He is now assistant to the chair of sur- fifth year and his early career was passed in 
gery in the medical department of the Louis- his native county in Virginia. In 1813 he 
ville University, besides which he has the dis- came over to Kentucky, located near Florence, 
tinction of being city physician, to which posi- in Boone county, and there entered upon many 
tion he was appointed in 1909, for a term of years of great usefulness, his entire service 
four years. Dr. Whitlatch is actively identi- as an exponent of the Scriptures being of 
fied with the Jefiferson County Medical So- forty-five years duration. Twenty-six years 
ciety, the Kentuckv State Medical Society and of this time he served as pastor of the Heb- 
the American Medical Association, taking an ron church in his native county in Virginia, 
active interest in the work of each and also and he followed a colony composed of mem- 
having recourse to the best standard and peri- bers of his church to Boone county where he 
odical literature of his profession. In a fra- was pastor for nearly twenty years prior to his 
ternal way Dr. Whitlatch is identified with the death, on February 18, 1833. He, with others 
Modern Woodmen of America, and both he who contemplated removing to Kentucky's fer- 
and his w^ife hold membership in the Broad- tile acres, made a trip of inspection to Boone 
way Christian church. county in 1804, but it was fully nine years 

In 1907 was solemnized the marriage of Dr. later when he settled there permanently. By 

Whitlatch to Miss Mary B. Chambers, who heritage and his ow^n activities he was a man 

was born at Henderson, Kentucky, and who is of means and he secured a large farm in the 

a daughter of Byrd L. Chambers, a represen- new home, upon which he lived with his fam-' 

tative citizen of that place. Dr. and Mrs. ily and slaves during the remainder of his hfe- 

Whitlatch have one daughter. Dorothy, who time. As he asked and received no salary for 

was born on the loth of March, 1909. his ministerial labors a farm was a practical 

Ow^EX J. Carpenter, a wholesale liquor necessity. This tract was located near the 

dealer and one of Covington's leading real present town of Florence and was an at- 

estate developers, is a native Kentuckian and tractive and valuable property and his farn- 

his ancestry numbers among its members some ily of boys and his slaves cleared and tilled it. 

of the mo'st valuable and interesting of the It has been said of him that he never lacked 

Blue Grass state pioneers. He was born in the comforts and never craved the luxuries. 

Boone county, February 7, 1854.. and is the He was a typical pioneer of the better class 

son of Caleb and Zeuri'lda (Utz) Carpenter, and presented a distinguished appearance in 

both of whom were likewise natives of the his Colonial costume, with his knee breeches, 

county which was once the scene of the ac- which he wore up to the time of his death, 

tivitie's of the celebrated Daniel Boone and Of William Carpenter, pioneer preacher and 



1218 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



philanthropist, it may truly be said that he de- 
voted his entire life to the uplift of humanity, 
and the memory and influence of the good he 
did assuredly was not "interred with his 
bones." 

Caleb Carpenter, the father of Owen J. 
Cari^enter, was reared and educated in Boone 
county and for several years followed the oc- 
cupation of a farmer and stock trader. He 
located in Covington. Kentucky in 187 1, and 
at one time during his residence in this city 
engaged in the wholesale liquor business. He 
was cut otif in the prime of life, his death oc- 
curring in 1878. at the age of forty-nine years. 
His widow survived him for three decades, 
dying at Delhi, Ohio, in 1908, at the age of 
seventy-hve years. She was a daughter of 
David Utz, a native of Culpeper county, \'ir- 
ginia. and of German descent. Like the for- 
bears on the paternal side of the family he 
came to Kentucky at an early day. The name 
of his father was Absalom Utz. Mr. Car- 
penter was the third in order of birth of the 
eight children of his parents, five of these 
surviving at the present day. 

The pleasant, if strenuous, experience of the 
farmer's son were the lot of Owen J. Car- 
penter in his early years. He received a com- 
mon school education and was about eighteen 
years of age when he removed with his par- 
ents to Covington in the fall of 187 1. The 
following year he became associated with his 
father in the wholesale liquor business, and in 
1879. shortly after his father's demise, he be- 
came established in this business on his own 
account in partnership with his brother 
David L. In 1886 he succeeded to the entire 
management of the concern and has ever since 
operated it with financial success. 

The talents of \lv. Carpenter, fortunately, 
have not been confined to his one line of en- 
deavor, but he has from time to time been 
interested in various business enterprises and 
corporations of Covington and vicinity. Much 
of his time has been expended upon real estate 
development, and his services in this line to 
the city of his residence are indeed com- 
mendable. He is known as the "father of Ft. 
Mitchell," a suburb, and it was through his 
well-directed effort that electric roads were 
built thereto. He bought the land now occu- 
pied by the town of Ft. Alitchell, platted the 
same and sold it. having secured means of con- 
veyance and transportation to the larger town. 
Subsequently several additions to the same 
were platted and Ft. Mitchell, now a corpo- 
ration of the sixth class, can boast of some of 
the finest residences in this section of the 
country. 

As one of the organizers of the Kenton Wa- 
ter Company Mr. Carpenter is likewise en- 



titled to credit, he having served for many 
years as president of the foregoing. This com- 
pany was largely instrumental in building up 
the suburb of Latonia. In the face of this 
distinguished achievement it is not strange 
that Mr. Carpenter is accounted one of the 
leaders in upbuilding this section. 

Mr. Carpenter forsook the ranks of the 
bachelors and laid the foundation of a con- 
genial home life by his marriage on the i8th 
day of October. 1883, the lady to become his 
wife being Mattie J. Adams, a native of Mis- 
souri, who was brought by her parents to 
Versailles, Kentucky, at the time of the Civil 
war, she being then an infant. Her father 
was William W. Adams, for many years a 
prominent stock man of Lexington, Kentucky. 
Two sons have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Carpenter, William A. and Owen Coleman, 
the latter of whom died at the age of seven 
years. 

Mr. Carpenter was for many years a Demo- 
crat, but since 1896 he has cast his vote with 
the Republican party. 

Woodford W. Longmoor. — It was within 
the province of the late Woodford Woodnut 
Longmoor to have wielded a large and benef- 
icent influence in the business, social and pub- 
lic afi^airs of his native state, which he also 
represented as a gallant soldier of the Con- 
federacy in the Civil war, and he was that ex- 
ponent of that high type of manhood which 
ever stands indicatory of usefulness and sub- 
jective integrity and honor. He was incum- 
bent of the office of clerk of the Kentucky 
court of appeals at the time of his death, 
which occurred in Frankfort, the capital city, 
on the 20th of March, 1891. 

Mr. Longmoor was a scion of families 
whose names have been identified with the his- 
tory of Kentucky since the pioneer epoch. 
He himself was born in Kenton county, on the 
21 St of June, 1840, and he was a son of George 
and Amanda (Hammett) Longmoor, the for- 
mer of whom was born in Bourbon county, 
this state, and the latter of whom was born in 
Kenton county, where her father Samuel 
Hammett, was a pioneer farmer. George 
Longmoor became one of the prosperous agri- 
culturists of Kenton county, where he con- 
tinued to reside until his death, which occurred 
in 1847, ^lis wife surviving .him by a number 
of years. 

As a lad of fourteen years Woodford W. 
Longmoor was sent to the neighboring city of 
Cincinnati, Ohio, to attend school, where he 
continued his studies for a period of five 
years, the last two of which he passed in 
Farmers' College, an excellent institution of 
that period. He also completed a commercial 
course in the same city, and there he assumed 



HISTORY OF KEXTUCKV AND KENTUCKIANS 



1219 



a clerical position in a foundry after he left 
school. When the Civil war was precipitated 
upon a divided nation he forthwith manifested 
his intrinsic loyalty to the cause of the Con- 
federacy hy enlisting as a private in Company 
H, Second Kentucky Infantry, with which he 
served three months, at the expiration of 
which he was compelled to return to his home 
that he might recuperate from injuries re- 
ceived in a severe fall. After his recovery he 
assisted in the organization of two companies, 
under the command of Ca])tain Corbin, of 
Boone county, and he accompanied the com- 
mand as far as Mount Sterling, Montgomery 
county, where the troops were routed by Un- 
ion soldiers, who had concealed themselves in 
the court house and in private dwellings. In 
this encounter a number of the Confederate 
soldiers were killed. In attempting to efifect 
his escape Mr. Longmoor was captured by the 
Winchester Home Guards, who incarcerated 
him in the Clark county jail. The next day he 
was sent to Lexington, and later he was taken 
to Covington and Cincinnati, from which latter 
city he was removed to Camp Chase, at Colum- 
bus, Ohio, and finally he was sent to the Fed- 
eral prison on Johnson's island, in Lake Kv\e. 
After several months of imprisonment he was 
exchanged, in the autumn of 1862. He made 
his way to Murfreesboro, Tennessee, where he 
found Colonel Hanson of the old Second In- 
fantry, and by this commander Mr. Long- 
moor became a member of Company B of the 
Second Kentucky Cavalry, with which he re- 
mained until after the battle of Cynthiana, 
Kentucky, on the 17th of June, 1864. He par- 
ticipated in the various raids and engagements 
in which his command was involved, and in 
the memorable raid of General Morgan he 
\vas again captured. He was held at Camp 
Douglas, Chicago, for four months and then 
made his escape. After a perilous trip through 
Ohio and Kentucky he finally succeeded in 
rejoining his regiment at Wytheville, Mr- 
ginia. At Cynthiana, on the nth of the same 
month, he had received a severe wound in the 
thigh, and this injury finally necessitated the 
amputation of his right leg. 

For nearly two years after the amputation 
of his leg Mr. Longmoor was unable to move 
about, but in 1866 he engaged in the dry-goods 
business at Burlington, Boone county. Eight 
months later he removed to Cynthiana. Har- 
rison county, where he was engaged in the 
hardware business, in which he continued until 
1868, when he changed to the furniture busi- 
ness, in which he there continued until 1874. 
In that year he was elected clerk of the circuit 
and criminal courts of Harrison county, of 
which ofifice he continued incumbent for six- 



teen years. In 1890 there came further recog- 
nition of his ability and efifective services, in 
that he was elected clerk of the Kentucky 
court of appeals, the highest tribunal of the 
state. lie took the oath of office in Septem- 
ber of that year and moved to Frankfort, 
where he continued in tenure of the office 
until his death, which occurred on the 20th of 
the following March, after an illness of brief 
duration. Mr. Longmoor was a man of strong 
intellectual powers and mature judgment, and 
his life was guided and governed according to 
the highest principles of integrity and honor, 
so that he held inviolable place in the confi- 
dence and respect of his fellow men. He was 
an uncompromising advocate of the cause of 
the Democratic party, and was for many years 
active in its work. He was affiliated with the 
United Confederate Veterans' Association 
and other civic organizations. 

In the year 1867 was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Mr. Longmoor to Miss Louisa Bell 
Addams, of Cynthiana, Kentucky, and she now 
maintains her home in Frankfort. She is a 
daughter of the late Abram Addams, who was 
a scion of an old and distinguished Virginia 
family, a number of whose members were 
found enrolled as jiatriotic soldiers in the war 
of the Revolution. Woodford W. Longmoor, 
Jr., the only child of Mr. and Mrs. Longmoor, 
is given a brief sketch in following paragraphs. 

Woodford W. Longmoor bears the fully 
patronymic of his honored father, to whom 
brief memorial tribute has been paid in the 
preceding paragraphs, and it may be said that 
he is w'ell upholding the presige of the family 
name. Mr. Longmoor is now incumbent of 
the office of city clerk of Frankfort, is a mem- 
ber of the bar of his native state and has been 
successful in connection with the promotion 
of important enterprises so that he stands as 
a representative business man of the capital 
city, where he has maintained his home since 
his father here assumed the office of clerk of 
the court of appeals. 

Woodford Woodnut Longmoor, Jr.. was 
born in Cynthiana, Kentucky, on the 21st 
of January, 1872, and there he was reared 
to years of maturity, duly availing him- 
self of the advantages of the public schools 
and having been graduated in the high 
school as a member of the class of 1890. 
He then began reading law under the 
efifective preceptorship of John B. Minor in 
the University of Virginia, at Charlottesville, 
and later he continued his studies in the Louis- 
ville Law School, but the sudden death of his 
father in March, 1891. caused him to abandon 
his work in this institution. He returned to 
Frankfort, w-here he was appointed deputy 



1220 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KEXTUCKIANS 



clerk of the court of appeals, of which his 
father had been clerk at the time of his death 
and in which office the latter was succeeded 
by his wife's brother, Abram Addams. The 
subject of this sketch held the office of deputy 
clerk for seven years, and in the meanwhile, 
in 1892, he had been licensed to practice law. 
After leaving the office of the clerk of the 
court of appeals he was for a time in the law 
office of lion. Proctor Knott, former governor 
of the state, and later was identified with pro- 
fessional work in the office of Thomas H. 
Hines, another representative member of the 
bar of the capital city. 

Mr. Longmoor was the organizer of the 
Frankfort Telephone Company, and for more 
than five years he was actively identified with 
the telephone business, in connection with 
which he showed marked initiative and admin- 
istrative ability, as did he later in the pro- 
motion of the electric interurban line between 
Frankfort and Versailles, — this being the first 
interurban road to be granted a franchise in 
Kentucky. Mr. Longworth was elected city 
clerk of Frankfort in November, 1909, and the 
duties of this office now engross a goodly por- 
tion of his time and attention. He has ever 
manifested a lively interest in the history of 
his native state and is at the present time vice- 
president and curator of the Kentucky State 
Historical Society. He is also one of the vice- 
presidents of the Ohio Valley Historical So- 
ciety, and he is an enthusiastic worker in both 
of these sterling organizations. In the Ala- 
sonic fraternity he has attained the chivalric 
orders, being therein identified with the 
Frankfort commandery of Knights Templars, 
and he is also a member of the Ancient Arabic 
Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 
He is one of the valued members of Frankfort 
Lodge. Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, of which he is past exalted ruler. His 
political faith is that in which he was reared, 
and he is thus a stalwart in the camp of the 
Democratic party. 

On October 15, 1901, Mr. Longmoor was 
united in marriage to A'liss Ruth Gordon Ely, 
daughter of Dr. James R. Ely, one of the 
leading physicians and representative citizens 
of Frankfort. 

J. Lyman Bryax, county' clerk of Newport, 
is not only entitled to consideration on his 
own account and for his own high qualifica- 
tions, but is interesting as the scion of a dis- 
tinguished Kentucky family and the direct de- 
scendant of the noted American pioneer and 
explorer of the Blue Grass state, Daniel 
Boone. Mr. Bryan was born in New Liberty, 
Owen county, Kentucky, December 6, 1869, 
his parents being John Gano and Eunice Isa- 



bella (Fish) Bryan. Both of them were na- 
tive Kentuckians, the former's birthplace be- 
ing Fayette county, and the latter's Boone 
county. They were married in Owen county, 
and located soon after in Fayette county, 
where the father pursued the calling of a 
farmer. He died in 1880, at the early age of 
thirty-six years. 

John Gano Bryan was descended from one 
of the oldest Kentucky families. His great- 
great-grandfather, William Bryan, born 
March 7, 1833, married Mary Boone, a sister 
of Daniel Boone, Kentucky's first white settler. 
Daniel Boone married Rebecca Bryan, a sis- 
ter of William Bryan, thus connecting the two 
pioneer families in a very intimate way. Will- 
iam Boone was the first settler at Bryan Sta- 
tion, and that he came there many years prior 
to the date given in history is evident from 
records at Salisbury, North Carolina, which 
show that he disposed of his lands there prior 
to such date. It was in 1779 that he v/ith his 
family and three brothers, Joseph, James and 
Morgan, arrived at the fort. William Bryan 
headed a hunting expedition in company with 
eleven others and in a skirmish with the In- 
dians was wounded, and died in the station a 
few days later, this being in 1780. The re- 
moval to Kentucky was due to political perse- 
cution and illegal taxation, and the Boones 
and the Bryans being united by intermarriage 
became possessed by the desire to live in the 
country, untrammeled by unjust laws. They 
were attracted to Kentucky by the fertile 
fields, beautiful rivers and forests and came 
here after a tedious journey, becoming dis- 
tinguished citizens. 

The widow of John Gano Bryan survives 
and resides at Newport. Her father, Ezra K. 
Fish, came to Kentucky when a young man 
and located in Boone county, where he married 
and engaged in merchandising. He later be- 
came a merchant in Kenton county and was a 
member of the state legislature from there 
several times. He was also sheriff of Kenton 
county at one time and was a director in the 
old Northern Bank at Covington. In 1861 he 
removed to New Liberty and remained there 
until his death, which occurred Februar}^ 12, 
1 87 1, his age being seventy-five years. He 
was a cousin of Hamilton Fish. Two sons, 
John and Albert Fish, served in the Confed- 
erate army during the Civil war. Another 
son, Oliver, was a graduate of West Point 
and held the office of first lieutenant in the 
United States army. When the Civil war 
broke out he resigned as his sympathies were 
with the South. He tried to join the Con- 
federate army, but was arrested and required 
to take the oath of allegiance at Alexandria, 









Ttt»t^ 



H [STORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1221 



Kentucky. The father accunuilated consider- 
ahle land and owned many slaves prior to the 
Avar. He was the father of fourteen children. 

John G. Bryan and his wife were the par- 
ents of six children, of whom four are living. 
J. Lyman Bryan, the suhject of this biogra- 
phy, being the eldest in the family. When 
eleven years of age he came to Campbell 
county with his mother, the father being dead, 
attended the public school, and being the 
eldest, soon went to work to assist the family. 
He began as cash boy in a store ; later drove 
a dry goods wagon ; became clerk in a dry 
goods store ; and when about twenty years 
old entered the city treasurer's office as clerk 
for his uncle, James H. Smith, and for four 
years was practically in charge. When Jo- 
seph AI. Betz was elected county clerk he was 
made chief deputy, in January, 1898, and for 
two years served in this capacity. He be- 
came the candidate for city treasurer and was 
elected on the Democratic ticket, serving out 
a four years' term. He became assistant 
cashier and teller of the Newport National 
Bank, which position he held for eight years, 
having taken the same two years before leav- 
ing the treasurer's ofifice. In the fall of 1909 
Mr. Bryan became a candidate for the county 
clerkship and was elected by a majority of 
two hundred and seventy. This was remark- 
able, owing to the fact that only two Demo- 
crats were placed in office that election, the 
Republican majority being six or seven hun- 
dred. ^Ir. Bryan succeeded Mr. Betz, whose 
deputy he had been. 

In October, 1894, Mr. Bryan was united 
in marriage to Miss Nellie May Randall, a 
native of St. Louis, ^Missouri. To this union 
was born one child, Gertrude Lyman, who is 
now about twelve years old. The mother 
died June 7, 1902. Mr. Bryan has numerous 
fraternal affiliations, including the Masons, 
the Elks and the Knights of Pythias. He be- 
longs to the Christian church. 

An appropriate honor was conferred upon 
the family in the person of Mr. Br}'an's sis- 
ter, Fannie Belle Bryan, when she was se- 
lected to unveil the reconstructed monument 
of Daniel Boone at Frankfort, Kentucky, on 
May 26, 1 910. The ceremonies were under 
the auspices of the Rebecca Bryan Boone 
Chapter of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution of Newport. Miss Bryan is a 
member of that chapter and her appointment 
to the honor was due to the fact that she is 
the most direct living female descendant of 
Daniel Boone, holding membership in that 
chapter. Several years ago the legislature 
appropriated funds to restore the monument, 
which had been defaced by vandals, and as- 



sisted by the Rebecca Bryan Boone Chapter 
of the Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion, the historic monimient now stands re- 
stored to its former beauty. 

William A. Rabe. — Among those citizens 
who contribute in very decisive fashion to the 
strength of Covington and to her civic, so- 
cial and industrial life, none of them play a 
more praiseworthy role than William A. Rabe. 
Mr. Rabe's most important connection is as 
secretary-treasurer of the Kenton Supply 
Company, a thriving concern dealing on an 
extensive scale in builders' supplies and coal, 
and although this office is one requiring no 
small amount of energy and thought, he yet 
finds time and occasion for numerous other 
interests. Among these may be mentioned his 
identification as director with the Covington 
First National Bank and as director and ap- 
praiser of the Citizens' Perpetual Building and 
Loan Association. 

William A. Rabe was born in Covington, in 
December, 1874, and belongs to that strong, 
fine stock, the Teutonic, which has played such 
a splendid part in the history of the world. 
His parents, Frank and Bernadine (Von 
Wahlde) Rabe, were both natives of Germany, 
and both of them came when young to the 
United States. They and their friends located 
in Covington, and it was here that they met 
and married. The father was for many years 
a leading contractor and builder in Covington 
and was a man of influence in the communitv. 
He was very active in his day and generation 
and many churches, building blocks and resi- 
dences stand to-day as a monument to his 
memory. He died October 19, 1892, at the age 
of fifty-one years, but his widow survives and 
makes her home in Covington. They were the 
parents of ten children, eight of whom are liv- 
ing, and he whose name initiates this sketch, is 
the fourth in order of birth. 

Mr. Rabe received the greater part of his 
education in the parochial schools of Coving- 
ton, supplementing this with a two years' 
course of study at St. Mary's Institute in Day- 
ton, Ohio. Later, not being particularly drawn 
towards the professions, he took a commercial 
course, becoming well versed in shorthand and 
typewriting, and subsequently devoting his at- 
tention to the study of architectural work. To 
the latter subject he gave practical application 
for several years in the employ of Daniel Se- 
ger of Covington, and he was also engaged for 
a time as estimator in stone and marble work 
for Charles McDonald. 

In 1898 Mr. Rabe became a more indepen- 
dent factor in the business world and formed 
the partnership of Schofield & Rabe, archi- 
tects, a business which continued for some six 



1222 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

years After the dissolution of the foregoing Harkv Adolph Davidson, B. S., M. D.— 
partnership Mr. Rabe assisted in organizing During the years which have marked the pe- 
the concern now known as the Kenton Supply riod of the professional career of Dr. David- 
Company, which has proved an unqualified sue- son he has met with gratifying success, and he 
cess and which will be described in greater de- has won the patronage of many of the leading 
tail in coining paragraphs. His connection with citizens and families of Louisville. A close 
the First National Bank and the Citizens' Per- and discriminating student, he endeavors to 
petual P.uilding & Loan Association (with keep abreast with the times m everything re- 
which lallcr he has been associated for some lating to discoveries in the medical science and 
half dozen vears), has been previously noted, treatment thereof. • -n t « 
and for several years past he has given valu- Dr. Davidson was born in Louisville, Jefifer- 
able service as treasurer of that splendid elee- son county, Kentucky, on December 23, 1875, 
mosynary institution. St. Inlin's Orphan Asy- the son of the late Joseph Thormeyer Dayid- 
lum' Vithough predisiwsed in favor of those son, who was born in Fort Hamilton, New 
principles promulgated bv the Democratic York, the son of Captain Joseph Davidson, of 
party, he is not partisan in local affairs. In the United States army. He came to Louis- 
1910 he was appointed a member of that im- ville in 1846, when a boy of only twelve years, 
portant body, the board of health, and although and for many years was engaged in business 
so short a time has elapsed, his counsel has in that city. He served as a member of Louis- 
already proved itself well worth taking. He ville's old volunteer fire department. He was 
belongs to several organizations, of which the well-known in Masonic circles as one of the 
greater part are outgrowths of the Catholic distinguished Masons of Kentucky. Joseph T. 
church, of which he and his family are faithful Davidson was made a Mason by Clark Lodge, 
communicants, the church in which they hold No. 51. in 1864, but became a member of 
membership being St. Aloysius. Among these Abraham Lodge, No. 8, when Lodges 8, 51, 
organizations are the Knights of Columbus, 106 and 113 were consolidated. He became a 
the Catholic Knights of America and St. Aloy- member of Louisville Chapter, Royal Arch 
sius Benevolent Society. Masons, in 1880, and was number 52 on the 
On September 14. 1898, Miss Theresa M. register of DeMolay Commandery, Knights 
Ruh. a native of Covington and a daughter of Templars, and was also a Scottish Rite Mason, 
a well-known citizen, Anton Ruh, became the having taken the thirty-second degree. He 
bride of Mr. Rabe. Their union was blessed served as grand tyler of the Grand Lodge of 
by the birth of two sons, Alvin F. and William Kentucky for over thirty years, having been 
]'., the latter of whom was accidentally elected in 1876, was grand sentinel of the 
drowned at Norwood, a suburb of Cincinnati, Grand Chapter of Kentucky from 1876 to 1905 
while visiting relatives there on August 9, 1910. and of the Grand Council in 1882-83-84. He 
The Kenton Supply Company with which was for many years superintendent of the old 
Mr. Rabe is connected, is an outgrowth of the Masonic Temple at Fourth and Jeft'erson 
partnership formed May 18, 1904. by Joseph streets. He w^as imbued with that fraternal 
and John Carl, George Lubrecht and William spirit which constitutes the basic element of 
A. Rabe. dealers in builders' supplies and coal, the craft and which has been a most potent 
The concern soon became more extensive than force in the civilization of the world through 
anticipated, and the following January was in- inculcating principles of mutual helpfulness, 
corporated with a capital stock of twenty-five- brotherly kindness and forbearance. He 
thousand dollars, the first official board se- brought to his duties keen perception, a me- 
lected being the same in personnel as that thodical and systematic spirit and unwavering 
which at the present day has its destinies in devotion, and his Masonic service therefore 
charge. Anton Ruh was president, Joseph received the endorsement of all the representa- 
Carl, vice-president, and William A. Rabe. sec- tives of the order. He died June 21. 1906. a 
retary and treasurer. The new corporation member of Broadway Christian church. His 
began business February i, 1905, and has since wife. Mary A. Davis, was born in Grant 
experienced a sure and steady growth, becom- county, Kentucky, the daughter of John W. 
ing largely extended. Besides the coal and Davis, a native of Kentucky, whose parents 
sand yards on Robbins Street, near Licking were natives of Virginia. She died in 1894. 
river, a branch has been established at La- at the age of forty-eight years, 
tonia, and the business is one of the most ex- Dr. Davidson was a member of the first 
tensive not only in Covington but in this part graduating class of the Manual Training 
of the country. The coal and sand in which School of Louisville, being first honor man of 
the company deals is delivered to them by both the class of '94. He was graduated from the 
rail and barges. Kentucky State University, Lexington, class 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1223 

of '96, receiving the degree of B. C. E., and ward was for a time Greek and Latin profes- 
then graduated from the Louisville Hospital sor at Augusta College. He then came to 
College of Medicine, class of '99, with the de- Newport and began the study of law with 
gree of M. D. He supplemented this with a Richard Southgate, a prominent lawyer and 
post-graduate course in the schools and hospi- pioneer. After being admitted to the bar he 
tals of New York city in 1902 and 1907. The practiced law with F. M. Webster for many 
Doctor was a professor in the old Hospital years under the firm name of Root & Webster, 
Medical College and is now adjunct professor this being the leading firm in those days, and 
of pediatrics of the medical department of the in which he continued until liis death in New- 
University of Louisville. Before entering the port on the 12th of February, 1868. In his 
practice, he was for eight years a teacher of early days he was a staunch Democrat, very 
physiology and mathematics at the manual active in politics and held a number of posi- 
training high school, Louisville. tions of public trust, but the contest between 

Dr. Davidson is on the staff of the Kentucky the states changed his views and, believing in 

Children's Home, and a director of the Y. M. abolition, he became an ardent Union man 

C. A. He is a member of Phi Chi (medical during the war and upon the organization of 

Greek Letter Society) and of Phi Kappa tlie Republican party from that time forth 

Alpha (literary Greek Letter Society), and pinned his faith to that party, 

belongs to the Jefferson County Medical So- Mr. Root was distinguished as a lawyer and 

ciety, Kentucky State Medical Society, the orator. He had a clear conception of the force 

American Medical Association and the Louis- and import of language and discerned all the 

ville Academy of Medicine. He is a deacon fine shades of meaning. He was exact in 

of Broadway Christian church. statement and construction, apt in the citation 

The Doctor married Virginia Good Gaggs, of authorities supporting his theory of a case, 
a daughter of William Carter Gaggs, who with Possessing the qualities desired in a public 
his wife are natives of Yorkshire, England, official, he was not permitted to pursue his 
Mrs. Davidson was born in Louisville, Ken- public life without interruption. He was a 
tucky, and to this union have been born one number of times elected to the state legislature 
child, a son named Harry Carter, aged five and as a member distinguished himself in lay- 
years. Dr. Davidson has been prompted by ing the foundation for the state public school 
laudable ambition in his profession", and to system. Mr. Root took a great interest in 
his earnest purpose and unflagging energy may education and in every way used his influence 
be attributed the success which he has won in to promote every measure that would further 
his chosen calling, for although a young man educate the masses and bring all educational 
he has won a position and success as a member advantages within the reach of all classes. He 
of the medical profession that many an older was president of the school board of Newport 
physician might well envy. for many years and was at the head of every- 

Ira Root. — For many vears Ira Root was thing educational. He was a member of the 
one of the prominent citizens of Newport, Constitutional convention in 1849. His re- 
Kentucky, where he held some of the most ligious training was with the Methodist Epis- 
important elective offices, and in his death copal church, and he was one of the organizers 
the city lost one who had devoted his best ef- of Grace Methodist Episcopal church in New- 
forts to the upbuilding of public interests and port and was a prominent and devoted worker 
had achieved an enviable distinction in the and member until death, participating in the 
different departments of life. He became en- activities of the church and in the organized 
twined with many ties of warm aft'ection and charities of the city. He made a point of the 
an abundant progeny of generous and kindly amenities of life and never forgot the little 
deeds dispersed among his fellow-men and proprieties that indicate the well-bred gentle- 
growing to a fruitful maturity, a lasting honor man. His manner was often forcible but al- 
to their author and a grateful boon to hu- ways courteous. He lived in the community 
manity. long enough to become identified with its wel- 

Ira Root was born in Piermont, New fare and prove the value of his citizenship by 

Hampshire, May 4, 1806, the son of Ephriam advocating and supporting every measure for 

and Vashti (Birge) Root, the former a native the improvement of conditions and the good 

of Piermont, New Hampshire, and the latter of society. 

from Hebron, Connecticut. When he was Mr. Root was married on December 25, 

eighteen years of age he went to Cincinnati, 1834, to Sarah Ann Perry, a native of New- 

where his uncle, the Rev. David Root, a prom- port, where she passed her entire life, dying at 

inent Presbyterian clergyman, lived, completed the age of ninety years and six months, with 

his education at Miami University, and after- all her faculties intact to the last. Her father. 



1224 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

Colonel David Perry, was a native of Mrginia ployed for several months. At the age of nine- 
and when a young man came to Kentucky, teen years he went to Colorado in the capacity 
locating at Newport among the pioneers, and of secretary to a railroad promoter, and he 
he died in Newport a few years later, aged remained in the west for a period of eighteen 
thirty-eight years. Mr. and Mrs. Root were months. Upon his return to Covington he be- 
the parents of four children : Oliver W., Albert came interested in the organization of the Ken- 
T., James C. and Susan R., the latter the ton Supply Company, of which he was one of 
widow of Frank S. Barker. Of the above the incorporators and with which he was act- 
children all are deceased except the latter, ively identified for three years, at the expira- 
Mrs. Barker. The sons were all lawyers of tion of which he disposed of his interests 
promise and ability, particularly the eldest one, therein and engaged in the cement business. 
Oliver W., who was one of the most con- In March, 1910, he incorporated the business 
vincing pleaders in the west. He was born in as the F. J. Ruh Company, with a capital stock 
Newport on October 3, 1835, graduated from of ten thousand dollars, and he has since been 
Miami University in 1858 and taught elocu- president of the company, which shows a large 
tion and languages in that institution for two and prosperous business in the contracting 
years, being considered one of the finest elo- line. He is also treasurer of the company and 
cutionists and orators in the west. He was John Exterkamp is secretary. The company 
twice a candidate for congress on the Republi- does contracting and all kinds of cement work. 
can ticket and delegate to five national Repub- In 1900 Mr. Ruh also formed a partnership 
lican conventions. J\Ir. Oliver W. Root sec- with William C. Kircher, a well-known car- 
onded the nomination of General Grant in penter and builder, and they have since con- 
1868. After the death of his father he con- ducted a prosperous business in the erection 
tinued the latter's business, associated with his of houses, which they have placed upon the 
brother, Albert T. Root, which continued sue- market. In politics Mr. Ruh is a staunch ad- 
cessfully for eighteen years. Few of his com- herent of the Democratic party, and he and his 
petitors at the bar possessed the same degree wife are communicants of the Catholic church, 
of mental strength and culture and few were holding membership in the parish of St. Pat- 
so indefatigable in their work. He was a rick's church. 

leader in thought as well as in action. His On the 12th of September, 1906, was sol- 

carefully matured opinions were expressed in emnized the marriage of Mr. Ruh to Miss 

language clear and concise, his argument en- Pettus L. Hiles, who was born and reared in 

forced with all the power of a skilled logician, Covington and who is a daughter of William 

and his diction pure, beautiful and elegant. C. and Mary (Sommers) Hiles, the former of 

He served also as county attorney several whom was born in Bracken county, this state, 

times. Mr. Oliver W. Root never married, and the latter in Covington, both being repre- 

and he died on the 3rd day of August, 1904. sentatives of honored pioneer families of this 

He accumulated a large fortune and in his will state. The parents of Mrs. Ruh now reside 

left many bequests to charitable institutions, in Covington, and on the other pages of this 

churches and needy people. work appears a sketch of the career of Mr. 

Ferdinand J. Ruh.— Mr. Ruh is one of the Hiles. Mr. and Mrs. Ruh became the parents 

successful contractors and representative of three children : Ferdinand J., Jr., who died 

young business men of his native city of Gov- at the age of thirteen months, and Mrginia 

ington, Kenton county, where he was born on and Willis. 

the 14th of November, 1883, and he is a son Edward L. Williams. — The field of in- 
of Anton and Monica Ruh, of whom more surance is constantly attracting men of enter- 
detailed mention is made in a sketch dedicated prise, energ}' and laudable ambition, w^ho find 
to the father on other pages of this work. in this scope for their dominant qualities, rec- 

Ferdinand J. Ruh gained his early educa- ognizing- that the business ofifers excellent 

tional training in the parochial schools of Gov- opportunities for advancement. There has 

ington and later \yas a student in St. Joseph's been no greater development m any line of 

College, in the city of Cincinnati, Ohio, for business than in insurance during the last quar- 

three years. _ After leaving school he secured ter of a century, and at the head of some of 

employment in the tile manufactory in Coving- the strongest companies of this character stand 

ton, but he was thus engaged only a short time, men of pronounced business abilitv. with 

He Jhen began the study of law, but he soon marked capacity to plan and to perform, 

realized that he had more definite predilection Among this number is included Edward L. 

for busmess pursuits than for the legal profes- Williams, president of the Southern National 

sion, and he thus secured a position in the Life Insurance Company of Louisville. 

Citizens' National Bank, in which he was em- Edward L. Williams was born in Glasgow. 






'C^<),0'J^£& 



4:^Cl^^^f>t^ 



tm Ms"^ To««. « 






HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1225 



Barren county, Kentucky, on May lO, 1866. 
He is the son of Dr. W. A. Williams and Mary 
Jane (Graves) Williams, both natives^ of 
Kentucky. The Williams family came to Ken- 
tucky from Virginia, the Kentucky settler 
having been Captain Williams, a Revolution- 
ary soldier, who was great-grandfather of our 
subject. The maternal grandfather was Bart- 
lett Graves, a prominent man of Barren and 
Hart counties, Kentucky, who surveyed all the 
land in those counties and took up large tracts 
of land and was at one time the wealthiest 
man in that section of Kentucky. Dr. Will- 
iam A. Williams was a graduate of the Louis- 
ville Medical College and practiced all his life 
in Glasgow. 

Edward L. Williams attended the public 
schools at Glasgow and the Southern Normal 
School founded by his brother, J. Thomas 
^Williams, at Bowling Green, Kentucky. At 
the beginning of his business life, before he 
knew just the particular groove into which he 
was destined to fit, he commenced with tak- 
ing an engagement with the Adams Express 
Company at Glasgow, and later on was en- 
gaged with a planing mill and in contracting at 
the same city. In 1895 he entered into the life 
insurance business as a solicitor. From that 
time on each step in his career was one of ad- 
vance, bringing him a broader outlook and 
greater opportunities. He did not learn the 
lessons of business life from experiment, 
which always involves expensive blunders, but 
has ever made a close study of conditions and 
problems before embarking upon any enter- 
prise and has therefore brought to the solu- 
tion of every question sound opinions and 
thorough understanding. 

Soon after he started in as a solicitor he 
was made district manager and then superin- 
tendent of agents for Kentucky for the Aetna 
Life Insurance Company. The next step in 
his progress was as agency instructor for the 
New York Life Insurance Company working 
out of Louisville. Finally, in November, 
igo8, he organized the Southern. National Life 
Insurance Company, of which he was elected 
president at its organization. Thirteen years' 
connection wath life insurance has rnade him 
thoroughly acquainted with the business, its 
methods of conduct, its management, its ne- 
cessities and its possibilities and in the impor- 
tant position which he now occupies he has 
instituted plans and methods, the value of 
which are being demonstrated in the success 
attending them. 

Mr. Williams is married to Mary E., the 
daughter of J. P. Snellings, of Alexandria, 
Louisiana, and they are the parents of two 
children : Mary S., and Edward L. Jr. 



]\Ir. Williams has always been a student and 
hard worker and has worked his way up to 
prominence, manifesting a fidelity of purpose, 
an indefatigable enterprise and a fertility of 
resource that has enabled him to carve his 
name deeply on the records of insurance in 
the state of Kentucky. 

Lawrence J. Droege. — One of the leading 
fire insurance agencies of the city of Coving- 
ton is that conducted by Mr. Droege, and he is 
recognized as one of the representative busi- 
ness men of the younger generation in his na- 
tive state. He was born in Covington, on the 
19th day of October, 1871, and is a son of 
Lorenz J. and Mary (Moeller) Droege, both 
of w'hom were born in Westphalia, Germany, 
where they were reared and where their mar- 
riage was solemnized. Immediately after 
their marriage they emigrated to the United 
States, and they established their home in Cov- 
ington about 1854. The father was a wagon 
maker by trade and to this business he devoted 
his attention during the greater portion of his 
active career. He died in Covington in 1891, 
at the age of sixty-six years. During the Civil 
war he was located at Atlanta, Georgia, where 
he was employed by the United States govern- 
ment in the manufacturing of wagons for the 
military service. He was a communicant of 
the Catholic church, as is also his widow, who 
still resides in Covington. Of their seven 
children six are living and of the number the 
subject of this review is the youngest. 

Lawrence J. Droege gained his early educa- 
tional discipline in the parochial schools • of 
Covington, and later continued his studies in 
turn in St. Francis Xavier College, in the city 
of Cincinnati, and St. Vincent's College, in 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. At the 
age of seventeen years he w^as appointed dep- 
uty city clerk of Covington and after serving 
in' this capacity for three years he engaged in 
the insurance business, in which he has been 
most successful. On the ist of March, 1910, 
he purchased the insurance agency of John 
Whitney, the same being one of the oldest in 
Covington, and he is now the representative of 
a number of the leading fire insurance com- 
panies that operate in Kentucky. In politics 
Mr. Droege is a staunch Democrat and he is 
affiliated with the Knights of Columbus, the 
Catholic Mutual Benefit Association and the 
National Union. Both he and his wife are 
communicants of the Catholic church and hold 
membership in St. Joseph's parish. 

On the 30th of October, 1901, was solem- 
nized the marriage of Mr. Droege to Miss Anna 
M. Pieper, who was born and reared in Cov- 
ington and who is a daughter of the late Fred- 
erick Pieper, who was for many years engaged 



1226 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



in ihc jewelry business in this city and who 
was an honored and influential citizen. Mr. 
and Mrs. Droege have three chiUlren,— Marga- 
ret Mary, Virginia Mary and Lawrence F. 

Charles Hubert Vreeland. — A native son 
of Kentucky, Mr. Vreeland has honored the 
state through his services in public offices of 
distinctive trust, including that of state coni- 
missioner of agriculture, as well as through his 
productive energies along normal lines of busi- 
ness enterprise. He is now president and gen- 
eral manager of the Frankfort Printing Com- 
panv. which publishes the Frankfort Daily 
News, in the capital city of his native state, 
and is one of the well known citizens of Ken- 
tuckv. where he is held in unqualified confi- 
dence and esteem and where he has been ac- 
corded special tributes of commendation for 
the excellent work which he did in connection 
with the development and improvement of the 
agricultural resources of the state during his 
incumbency of the official position previously 
mentioned.' Charles Hubert A^reeland was 
born in \\\ishington county, Kentucky, on the 
4th of September, 1873, and is a son of 
Charles Elmer and Ida Belle (Quint) Vree- 
land. both of whom were likewise born and 
reared in Kentucky. When he was a child 
Mr.V^reeland's parents moved from Kentucky 
to Dallas, Texas, but eight years later they re- 
turned to Kentucky and located in Glasgow\ 
Barren county, where they remained two years 
at the expiration of which time they estab- 
lished their home in Louisville. There the 
father was engaged in the real estate business 
for a number of years. He was a valiant 
soldier of the Confederacy in the war between 
the states, in which he served under the com- 
mand of General John Morgan. He passed 
the closing years of his life in Louisville and 
his wife is now living at Frankfort. 

To the public schools of Texas and Ken- 
tucky Charles Hubert Vreeland is indebted for 
his early educational discipline, the greater 
portion of which was received in the city of 
Louisville. As a youth he identified himself 
with the newspaper business, in connection 
with which he familiarized himself wath the 
intricacies of the "art preservative of all arts" 
and finally he became editor of the Russellville 
Ledger, at Russellville. Logan county. A 
short time afterward, however, he assumed a 
position on the reportorial staff of the cele- 
brated Louisville Courier Journal, with which 
well know^n paper he continued to be thus iden- 
tified for a period of four years. He was then 
appointed to the position of assistant commis- 
sioner of agriculture of the state, under Ion 
B. Nail, and during the four years of his 



incumbency of this positoin he was also secre- 
tary of the State Board of Election Commis- 
sioners. In 1903 he was elected state com- 
missioner of agriculture and he retained the 
office for one term of four years, having 
assumed his executive duties in January, 1904. 
He made a most admirable record in his ad- 
ministration of this important office as he 
effected splendid improvements in his depart- 
ment. He organized county farmers' insti- 
tutes and also organized the State Farmers' 
Institute, wdiich was afterwards made an ad- 
junct to the department by legislative enact- 
ment. He did much other work that tended 
greatly to forward agricultural interests in 
the state. As an appreciation of his effective 
services in this office the Kentucky State Farm- 
ers' Institute presented him, in 1907, with a 
fine gold watch. Through his influence while 
commissioner of agriculture many important 
changes were made in the management of the 
state fair, bringing its annual exhibitions up to 
a high standard and thus insuring their cumu- 
lative popularity. Mr. Vreeland served as 
president of the State Fair Association dur- 
ing the time he was commissioner of agricul- 
ture. Upon his retirement from this office in 
1907, there came distinctive marks of popular 
appreciation and confidence in that he was 
made, without opposition, the Democratic 
nominee for the office of secretary of state, but 
owing to normal political exigencies, which 
compassed the defeat of the party ticket in the 
state that year, he was not elected. In Janu- 
ary, 1908, Mr. Vreeland purchased the busi- 
ness and plant of the George A. Lewis Pub- 
lishing Company, of Frankfort, and reorgan- 
ized the business under the title of the Frank- 
fort Printing Company, which is duly incor- 
porated under the laws of the state and of 
which he is president and manager. The com- 
pany does a general printing and publishing 
business, being one of the state printers. The 
company also publishes the Frankfort Daily 
N'euv, which is an afternoon issue and which 
is one of the leading exponents of the Demo- 
cratic party in the state, as well as a valiant 
promoter of local interests. Mr. Vreeland has 
ever given an unqualified alliegance to the 
Democratic party and he is identified with 
various social and fraternal organizations of a 
representative character. He was a member 
of the Kentucky Committee at the Jamestown 
Exposition. 

In the year 1900 was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Mr. A^reeland to Miss Hallie Elise 
Rodman, of Frankfort, and they have four 
children, namely : Charles Elmer, Elizabeth 
Hunt. A'irginia Russell and Russell Rodman 
Vreeland. 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1227 



Henry S. \'anzant. — A scion of one of the 
old and honored families of Metcalfe county, 
Kentucky, where his paternal grandfather 
and great-grandfather established their home 
in the pioneer days, Mr. Vanzant has well up- 
held the high prestige of the honored name 
which he bears and is at the present time chief 
clerk in the department of insurance of the 
state of Kentucky, thus maintaining his resi- 
dence in Frankfort, the capital city. Mr. Van- 
zant was born on the homestead farm in Met- 
calfe county, Kentucky, on the 13th of Decem- 
ber. 1870, and is a son of Milton S. and Ellen 
Elizabeth (Holland) Vanzant, both of whom 
were likewise born and reared in Metcalfe 
county. Milton S. Vanzant, a son of Hugh R. 
Vanzant. was born, reared and died in the 
same residence in Metcalfe county, where his 
entire active career was one of close identifica- 
tion with agricultural pursuits. His widow 
still resides on the old homestead, and of the 
nine children four are now living. 

Henry S. \^anzant reverts in memory to the 
associations of the home farm in connection 
with his early discipline, and his preliminary 
educational training was that of the common 
schools, after leaving which he continued his 
studies in Edmonton Academy. He continued 
to be associated in the work and management 
of the home farm until he had attained to the 
age of twenty years, when he assumed the po- 
sition of clerk in the dry goods store of his 
elder brother at Edmonton, Metcalfe county. 
In 1894 he was the Republican candidate for 
county clerk, and that he made an admirable 
campaign and secured the support of a large 
number of citizens of the county needs no fur- 
ther voucher than that he was defeated by only 
one vote, thus overcoming a long fixed and 
large Democratic majority. He afterward be- 
gan the study of law under the preceptorship 
of John W. Compton. a well known attorney 
of Edmonton, and in 1898 he was admitted to 
the bar. He began the practice of his profes- 
sion in Edmonton and gained unqualified suc- 
cess in his chosen field, proving himself a ver- 
satile trial lawyer and showing himself well 
fortified in the minutia of the law. He. con- 
tinued to be engaged in active practice until 
1902. when he was appointed to the position 
of United States ganger, in which capacity he 
served five years, with official headquarters at 
Owensboro, this state. On the 6th of Janu- 
ary, 1908, there came further mark of distinc- 
tion and of his eligibility in that he was ap- 
pointed to his present position, that of chief 
clerk in the insurance department of the state 
government. Mr. Vanzant has always been 
aligned as an uncompromising advocate of the 
principles and ])olicies of the Republican partv 



and has given effective service in behalf of its 
cause. He is a Master Mason and is also affil- 
iated with the Knights of Pythias. 

On the 5th of December, 1892, was solem- 
nized the marriage of Mr. Vanzant to Miss 
Pearl McKey, of Randolph, Metcalfe county, 
where she was born and reared. They have 
one child, Henry Russell Vanzant. 

Edward E. Walker. — Realty is the basis of 
all security and the foundation of security in 
real estate transfers is found in the probity, 
knowledge and liberality of those by whom 
they are conducted. Holding, by reason of 
prudence, integrity and significant ability, as 
well as through the wide scope and importance 
of operations, a position of much prominence 
among the real estate dealers of the city of 
Covington, Mr. Walker has been enabled to 
exert an emphatic and noteworthy influence in 
connection with the upbuilding of "Greater 
Covington," where his operations have been 
widely diversified and wholly beneficial in the 
promotion of the material and civic advance- 
ment of the city. In the fire insurance branch 
he has represented some of the largest corpor- 
ations in this and foreign countries. Most of 
these large fire corporations have been continu- 
ously represented by Mr. Walker since 1893. 

Edward Everett Walker is a native of Cov- 
ington, where he was born on the 17th of July, 
1861, and he is a son of Eliphalet and Frances 
(Townsend) Walker, the former of whom 
was born near the city of Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, and the latter in Campbell county, Ken- 
tucky. Eliphalet Walker was a son of Nathan 
Walker, who was likewise born in the old Key- 
stone state, and who was of staunch German 
lineage. In 1851 Nathan Walker established 
his residence in Covington, Kentucky, where 
he was the first in this section of the west to 
engage in the manufacture of high beaver 
hats. He had learned his trade in the city of 
Pittsburg, and in connection with his opera- 
tions after locating in Covington, he purchased 
beaver skins from trappers and utilized the 
same in the manufacture of his hats for which 
there was a read}' demand. In 1855, ^" com- 
pany with a large colony, he made the trip 
across the plains to California, and he later es- 
tablished his home in Portland, Oregon, where 
he continued to reside until his death, which 
occurred when he had attained to the patri- 
archial age of ninety-nine years and three 
months. The hat manufactory which he had 
established in Covington was continued by his 
son Eliphalet and his step-son Joseph Havlin, 
and the latter's son John likewise became iden- 
tified with the enterprise. It may be noted that 
John Havlin is now a representative business 
man of Cincinnati, Ohio, where he owns and 



Vol. Ill— 6 



1228 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



conducts the Havlin Hotel and he is also a 
principal stockholder in the circuit of theatres 
bearing his name throughout the various sec- 
tions of the Union. Mrs. Keziah Walker, wife 
of Nathan Walker, was likewise a native of 
Pennsylvania, and she died in Covington, Ken- 
tucky, at the age of eighty-seven years. 

Eliphalet Walker was reared to adult age 
in his native state, where his educational ad- 
vantages were those of the common schools 
and he was about nineteen years of age at the 
time of the family removal to Covington. He 
continued to be associated with his step- 
brother in the hat business for several years 
and thereafter he built up a successful busi- 
ness in the line of his trade as a pattern and 
model maker, with headquarters in the city of 
Cincinnati, Ohio. For a number of years past 
he has lived virtually retired from active busi- 
ness and he has maintained his home consecu- 
tively in Covington since his youth. At the 
time of the Civil war he was a staunch sup- 
porter of the cause of the Union, and he 
served as a member of the home guards. His 
wife, who was a representative of an old and 
honored Kentucky family, died in Covington 
in 1 8/ 1, at the age of twenty-nine years. They 
became the parents of four sons and two 
daughters, and all are living with the excep- 
tion of two sons. 

Edward E. Walker, the eldest of the four 
living children, is indebted to the public 
schools of Covington for his early educational 
discipline, and at the age of sixteen years he 
entered upon an apprenticeship at the pattern- 
maker's trade, under the direction of his 
father. He became a skilled workman and he 
continued to be engaged in the work of his 
trade in Cincinnati until 1891, when he was ap- 
pointed cashier for the Sixth Kentucky inter- 
nal-revenue district, under the late David N. 
Comingore, the collector for this district. Mr. 
Walker held this position for two years, at the 
expiration of which, in 1893, he resigned the 
same and established himself in the real estate 
and insurance business, with which he has 
since been successfully identified. He has 
handled many large and valuable properties 
and upon his books are represented at all 
times most attractive investments, as well as 
properties for exchange. He is known as a 
progressive and enterprising business man, and 
his course has been such as to retain to him 
the unqualified confidence and esteem of all 
with whom he has had dealings. He is one of 
the popular citizens of his native city and takes 
a deep interest in all that tends to advance its 
material and civic prosperity. 

In politics Mr. Walker has ever accorded an 
uncompromising allegiance to the Republican 



party and he has given efficient service in be- 
half of its cause. In 1897 he was appointed 
assistant postmaster at Covington, and he held 
this position for four years under the adminis- 
tration of Orin A. Reynolds. He served one 
term as a member of the board of education 
of Covington and one term as a member of 
the city board of aldermen. He served Kenton 
county in the 1908 session of the Kentucky 
legislature as state senator, overcoming a nor- 
mal Democratic majority of two thousand. 
He is a director of the local organization of the 
Young Men's Christian Association, has been 
an incumbent of this position for a number of 
years, and is also a member of the board of 
trustees of the Protestant Children's Home. 
Both he and his wife hold membership in the 
Shinkle Methodist Episcopal church and he is 
a valued member of its board of trustes. 

In the year 1891 was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Mr. Walker to Miss Amy Lotz, who 
was born and reared in Covington and who is 
a daughter of the late George Lotz, who was 
for many years one of the representative mer- 
chants of Covington, where he was engaged in 
the shoe business. Mr. and Mrs. Walker have 
five children, — Merl , Pearlie, Mae, Kenneth 
and Hazel. Pearlie is now the wife of Charles 
Mann, of Covington. 

Peter N. Bardo is a retired manufacturer, 
but is joint owner with Thomas Ford in the 
Bourbon Copper & Brass Works, whose cap- 
ital stock is $50,000 and also has numerous 
other interests, among them a high official 
capacity in the Citizens' Commercial & Sav- 
ings Bank of Newport. He is one of the city's 
substantial citizens, and has from time to time 
played a prominent and valuable part in the 
management of its afifairs. He was born in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, April 4, 1847, and is the son 
of Nicholas and Elizabeth (Greenwall) 
Bardo, the former a native of Italy and the 
latter of Pennsylvania. The senior Bardo 
came to the United States when young and 
located in Cincinnati, where he married and 
engaged in the confectionary trade for a num- 
ber of years, meeting with much success in 
this vocation. He resided in Newport for a 
good many years prior to his death, which 
occurred in 1865, at the age of fifty-four years. 
His wife preceded him to the beyond, her de- 
mise being when she was but thirty-five years 
of age. They were the parents of seven chil- 
dren, all of whom are deceased with the ex- 
ception of Mr. Bardo and a sister Elizabeth, 
who became the wife of James Pratt of Cin- 
cinnati. 

Peter N. Bardo, who was the third child 
in order of birth, was about eight years of age 
when his parents moved to Newport. Here 




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^T9n, LtNOK 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1229 



he was reared and here received his education 
in the pubhc schools. 

When he was a very young man he entered 
a brass foundry in Cincinnati and during his 
employment because master of all the details 
of the trade. He served in various capacities 
in the business for about eighteen years and 
in the early seventies, in partnership with 
Thomas Ford, John G. Hatch and John Elli- 
horst, bought the Robinson Brass Foundry, 
the establishment in which he had worked for 
so long a time. It was then known as the Bour- 
bon Copper & Brass Works and was one of 
the oldest businesses of its kind in Cincinnati. 
It has since been carried on under the same 
name and at present and for several years past 
the plant has been owned jointly by ]\Ir. Bardo 
and Thomas Ford, who in 1903 incorporated 
the same under the laws of Ohio with a capital 
stock of $50,000. It is most successful and 
gf extensive operation, having in years past 
built the majority of the distilleries in Ken- 
tucky. 

Mr. Bardo was one of the organizers of the 
Citizens' Commercial and Savings Bank of 
Newport and is a member of the board of 
directors. He is likewise a member of the 
water works commission and served for two 
years on the board of aldermen. In politics 
he is an uncompromising Democrat and fra- 
ternally he is associated with the Newport 
Elks, of which he is one of the oldest mem- 
bers, his membership number being 47. He 
and his family are communicants of the Cath- 
olic church. 

yiv. Bardo was married in 1872 to Miss 
Mary Ford, a native of the state of Maryland 
and daughter of Owen Ford, who was born 
in Ireland and upon emigrating to America, 
lived first in Maryland and then in Newport. 
Mr. Ford was the father of four children only 
one of whom is living, a son named Thomas. 
Those deceased are Patrick. James and John, 
all of whom grew to maturity. The union of 
]\Ir. and Mrs. Bardo was blessed by the birth 
of ten children, of whom the following are 
living: Peter Jr., Alice, Stella, Catherine, 
John. William. Thomas, and Gertrude. A 
daughter Mary is deceased. ]\Irs. Bardo died 
in August 1907, and her mortal remains were 
interred in St. Stephens cemeter^^ During 
the Civil war Mr. Bardo served as a member 
of the Home Guards. 

Harry M. Healy, Jr. — The financial his- 
tory of Kentucky would be very incomplete 
and unsatisfactory without personal and some- 
what extended mention of those whose lives 
are interwoven so closely with the industrial, 
commercial, financial and political develop- 
ment of the country. The subject of this re- 



view, while professionally an attorney, has 
been identified with so many other enterprises 
that a resume of the business enterprises of 
both himself and his father will be of interest 
to our readers. 

Harry M. Healy, Jr., of Newport, Kentucky, 
was born in Newport on the 26th of April, 
1873, the son of Henry M. and Ellen (McEn- 
tee) Healy. The father was a native of Ire- 
land, and came to the United States with his 
parents when only three weeks old, was reared 
in New York and spent his early life there. 
The mother was born in Albany, New York, 
reared and educated in that city, and finally 
married there. In 1859, when the father was 
about twenty years old, he came west, having 
learned the binder's trade, all the branches of 
the printing business, especially binding and 
ruling, and upon arriving at Cincinnati he be- 
came the head of one of the largest printing 
and binding establishments in that city. It 
was not long before he bought the establish- 
ment and from that time on operated the same 
for a number of years with great success, un- 
til his death, which occurred in 1899. Soon 
after his marriage he located in Newport as a 
resident and completely identified himself with 
that place, taking an active part in all affairs 
that would be of benefit to that city. He 
helped to organize the first electric light plant 
in Newport and Covington and was for years 
secretary and treasurer of the same. He was 
also one of the organizers of the street railway 
company in those cities connecting with Cin- 
cinnati. Mr. Healy was also interested in 
many real estate and development propositions 
in Newport, Bellevue and Dayton, and at the 
head of many important interests in building 
up those places. He was cashier of the New- 
port National Bank for two years during the 
panic of 1890 and carried the business through 
successfully. A staunch Democrat, he was act- 
ive in politics and was chairman of the execu- 
tive committee for twenty-five years. He 
never sought or held office but was a very in- 
fluential man and did much for his party and 
friends. His widow survives, living in New- 
port, the mother of eight children, six of 
whom are living. 

Harry M. Healy, Jr.. is the fifth child in or- 
der of birth and was reared in Newport and 
received a liberal education. His father gave 
all his children a first-class education, every 
one of whom attended the public schools, the 
high school and college. Our subject gradu- 
ated from the Jesuit College at St. Mary's, 
Kansas. In 1897 he entered the Cincinnati 
Law School, from which he was graduated in 
1900. His father dying in 1899 placed the 
charge of the extensive printing and binding 



1230 



HISTORY OF KEXTUCKV AXD KENTUCKIANS 



plant in Cincinnati in our subject's hands, and 
he sold the same in a few years. In i(p3 he 
engaged in the active practice of the law in 
Newport and has continued the same to the 
present time. Mr. Heal}- is a Democrat al- 
thougii not taking an active part, and is a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Columl)US. He has 
many business interests, operates a moving 
picture show, organized the Commonwealth 
Coal Company and is a director of the same. 
He married, in 1906, Marguerite H. Edgar, a 
native of Newport, where she was reared and 
c<lucated. Mr. Healy is a Catholic and his 
wife a Methodist. One of the prominent char- 
acteristics of Mr. Healy 's successful business 
career is that his vision has never been 
bounded by the exigencies of the moment, but 
has covered as well the possibilities and oppor- 
tunities of the future. This has led him into 
extensive undertakings, bringing him into 
marked prominence as a financier. He has 
figured for many years most orominentlv and 
honorably in financial interests and has been 
one of the real upbuilders and promoters of 
the city of his birth. 

Orie S. Ware. — One of the representative 
members of the bar of Kenton county is Orie 
Solomon Ware, who is engaged in the success- 
ful practice of his profession in the city of 
Covington and who is a scion of one of the 
honored pioneer families of Kentucky. 

Mr. Ware was born at Peach Grove, Pen- 
dleton county, Kentucky, on the nth of May, 
1882, and is a son of Solomon G. and Ida F. 
(Petty) Ware, the former of whom was born 
in Campbell county, this state, and the latter 
in Kenton county. Daniel W., great-grand- 
father of him whose name initiates this review, 
was a native of Virginia and came to Ken- 
tucky in the latter part of the eighteenth cen- 
tury in company with two or more of his 
brothers. They established their home in 
Campbell county, where one of the brothers, 
Israel, had a patent for one thousand acres of 
land, being one of the first to secure such pat- 
ent in the state. William Ware, father of Sol- 
omon G. Ware, was born in Campbell county 
and became one of the prosperous agricultur- 
ists and influential citizens of that section of 
the state. Solomon G. Ware w^as likewise 
identified with agricultural pursuits during the 
earlier part of his active career and in 1889 
he established his home in Covington, wdiere 
he has since been engaged in active business, 
as had he previously in Pendleton county for 
a period of five vears. He is a staunch Demo- 
crat in his political proclivities, is known as 
one of the sterling and representative business 
men of Covington and both he and his wife 
hold membership in the Baptist church. Sol- 



omon G. and Ida F. (Petty) Ware became the 
parents of six sons and one daughter, all of 
whom are living, and of the number the sub- 
ject of this review was the second in order 
of birth. 

Orie S. Ware was about seven years of age 
at the time of the family removal from Pen- 
dleton county to Covington, in which city he 
was reared to maturity. Here he duly availed 
himself of the advantages of the excellent 
public schools, after which he attended an ex- 
cellent private academy conducted by Profes- 
sor George W. Dunlap, at Independence, Ken- 
tucky, in which institution he was graduated 
as a member of the class of 1898. About one 
year later he became a student in the law office 
of Judge W. McD. Shaw, of Covington, where 
he gained his initial discipline in connection 
with the preparation for the work of his 
chosen profession. Finally he was matricu- 
lated in the Cincinnati Law School, in the city 
of Cincinnati, Ohio, in which he was grad- 
uated as a member of the class of 1903, and 
from which he received his degree of Bachelor 
of Laws. He immediately opened an office in 
Covington, where he conducted an individual 
practice until the ist of January, 1910, when 
he became a partner of his former preceptor, 
Judge Shaw, who had just retired from the 
bench of the Kenton circuit court. Since that 
time he has proved an able and valued coad- 
jutor of Judge Shaw and their professional 
business is conducted under the firm name of 
Shaw & Ware. Mr. Ware has proved himself 
well qualified for the work of both branches 
of his profession and has been distinctively 
successful therein. In politics he is a staunch 
advocate of the cause of the Democratic party 
and he has been an active worker in its ranks. 
He is a most appreciative member of the 
Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained 
to the Thirty-second degree of the Ancient and 
Accepted Scottish Rite and in which he also 
holds membership in the Ancient Arabic Order 
of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He has 
held various offices in both the York and 
vScottish Rite bodies and is past master of 
Covington Lodge, No. 109, Free and Accepted 
Masons. In 1910 he was elected grand junior 
warden of the Grand Lodge of Kentucky. He 
is a member of the Baptist church and his wife 
holds membership in the Presbyterian church. 

On the 19th of September, 1906, Mr. Ware 
was united in marriage to Miss Louise Cul- 
bertson, who was born and reared in Coving- 
ton and who is a daughter of the late Louis 
Culbertson, a well-known and honored citizen 
of Covington for many years prior to his 
death. Mr. and Mrs. Ware have one son, \\'ill- 
iam. 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIAXS 



1231 



Francis Marion Dailev^ the present city 
attorney of Kentucky's capital city, has gained 
a position of distinctive priority as one of the 
representative memhers of the bar of the state, 
and he served four years as prosecuting at- 
torney for Frankhn comity, retiring fom this 
office in 1910, at the time of his election to his 
present office. Fie has gained success and pres- 
tige througli liis own endeavors and thus the 
more honor is due him for his earnest labors 
in his exacting profession and for the prec- 
edence he has gained in his chosen vocation. 

Francis M. Dailey was born in Chariton 
county, Missouri, on the 25th of January, 1874, 
and is a son of John William and Will h^Ua 
(Patton) Dailey, the former of whom was 
born in Franklin county, Kentucky, and the 
latter of whom was born in Randolph county, 
Missouri. The father died in his native county 
in 1898, at the age of fifty years, and his 
widow now resides in the city of Frankfort. 
John W. Dailey was a son of John P. Dailey, 
who likewise was born and reared in Franklin 
comity, Kentucky, and whose father, so far as 
family tradition determines, was a native of 
Ireland, having estaljlished his home in Ken- 
tucky in the pioneer days. John P. Dailey 
became one of the pro.sperous farmers of 
Franklin county, where he continued to reside 
until his death, his old homestead having been 
near Peak's Mill. John W. Dailey was reared 
to the discipline of the farm, but as a youth he 
learned the trade of blacksmith in his native 
county. When a young man he went to Mis- 
souri, where his marriage was solemnized and 
where he remained until his son, hVancis M., 
was about three years of age. when he returned 
to his native county and located in the city of 
Frankfort, where he passed the residue of his 
life. Besides following the work of his trade 
he was also engaged in the buying and selling 
of horses and at one time he owned a stable 
of thorough-bred horses, many of whom won 
distinctive victories on the turf. The subject 
of this review is the only child. 

Francis M. Dailey was reared to adult age 
in Frankfort, to whose public schools he is in- 
debted for his early educational discipline, 
which was supplemented by a course in the 
Frankfort Male Academy, in which he was 
graduated. This institution is not at the pres- 
ent time in existence. Finallv he entered Pur- 
due University, at Lafayette. Indiana, but he 
was compelled to return home on account of 
the impaired health of his father. Under 
these conditions he assumed charge of the 
business afifairs of his father and he had the 
latter's running horses on the turf for two 
seasoAs. He then began the study of law and 
under the preceptorship of Patrick U. Major, 



of Frankfort, later continuing his technical 
reading under the direction of \V. J. Hendrick, 
another able member of the bar of the capital 
city. He made excellent progress in his ab- 
sorption and assimilation of the science of 
jurisprudence and was admitted to the bar 
when twenty-four years of age. Since that 
time he has been actively engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession in Frankfort and his 
ability and devotion to the work of his chosen 
calling have given him a secure standing as 
one of the leading members of the bar of 
Franklin county. When twenty-seven years of 
age he was elected prosecuting attorney of the 
l-'rankfort city courts and this incumbency he 
retained four years, at the expiration of which 
he was elected county attorney, in which posi- 
tion he made an admirable record during his 
term of four years, which expired on January 
I, 1910. He has since been city attorney and 
in this office he is well tipholding his reputa- 
tion as a skilled trial lawyer and able official. 
He has ever given a staunch allegiance to the 
Democratic party and is affiliated with the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He 
is one of the popular young men of Frank- 
fort, being held in high esteem in professional 
business and social circles. Mr. Dailey is a 
bachelor. 

William H. Neweli,, a member of that im- 
])ortant concern, the Ohio Custom Garment 
Conii)any, of Cincinnati, is a Democrat who 
was elected in 1909 a representative to the 
Kentucky legislature from a Republican dis- 
trict (the eighty-fourth). He was a member 
of many committees of importance and the 
author of the bill classifying cities and towns 
which became a law. He is one of the most 
prominent Elks in the state, is a man of versa- 
tility and one who has had an interesting and 
varied career. Mr. Xewell was born in New- 
port December 19, 1871, and is of foreign ex- 
traction, his parents, Matthew and Rosa 
(Cochran) Newell, having been born, the for- 
mer near Manchester, England, and the latter 
in Ireland. They were married in England 
and came to the United States in the later '50s, 
locating first in Cincinnati and later in New- 
port. Kentucky, where they still reside. Young 
Newell spent his boyhood and youth in his 
native place, attending the parochial schools 
and later the public schools and supplementing 
this with a business course in the Commercial 
College in Cincinnati. He early manifested 
talent as an artist and for a number of years 
traveled over the country giving exhibitions of 
rapid work in crayon and oil. having devoted 
considerable attention to the cultivation of the 
latter branch. For sixteen vears he was en- 



1232 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



gaged in newspaper and editorial work in Cin- 
cinnati upon various of the Queen City jour- 
nals, and gained that broad experience with 
human nature and all sorts and conditions of 
men which can nowhere be acquired with such 
facility as in the capacity of a servant of the 
Fourth Estate. 

Mr. Newell's career as a public man began 
in 1902 when he was elected by the Newport 
water works commission as .its secretary and 
superintendent and has served for the ensuing 
eight years, up to the present time, in that re- 
sponsible office. He resigned to accept his 
present position with the Ohio Custom Gar- 
ment Company of Cincinnati, which he had as- 
sisted in organizing in July, 1909, he being one 
of the partners in the concern. They manu- 
facture clothing for merchant tailors, their 
trade taking in a majority of the states. The 
plant is one of some magnitude, about one 
hundred persons being employed during the 
busy season. 

Mr. Newell has been active in Democratic 
politics for a number of years and for four 
years served as secretary of the city and 
county Democratic committee. In the fall of 
1909 he was elected on the ticket of his party 
as representative to the state legislature from 
the Eighty-fourth district of Kentucky. He 
proved an able legislator and w^as a member 
of various committees, among them those on 
commerce and manufacturing, county and city 
courts, municipalities, geological survey, and 
others. His efforts to secure beneficial legis- 
lation for his section were able and fruitful, 
and the bill fathered by him to secure classi- 
fication of cities and towns became a law. 

As previously stated, Mr. Newell is one of 
Newport's prominent Elks. He is a member 
of New^port Lodge No. 273, and holds life 
membership in the same having served as its 
secretary for ten years. He assisted in the or- 
ganization of the state association of Elks at 
Georgetown, Kentucky, and was elected first 
vice-president. He is also an Eagle and has 
the distinction of being the first Eagle in the 
Blue Grass state, his number being i. In this 
lodge likewise he has long held the office of 
secretary. 

The marriage of Mr. Newell to Miss Mary 
E. McCarthy, took place in November, 1902. 
Mrs. Newell is a daughter of John McCarthy, 
a well-know^n resident of Newport. Two 
daughters have been born to this union, by 
name Laura Marie and Mary Elizabeth. Both 
Mr. Newell and his wife are members of the 
Catholic church. 

J. Hunter Peak, M. D. — The city of Lou- 
isville, with its flourishing industrial activi- 
ties and rapid development, has attracted with- 



in its confines men of ability and high char- 
acter in the various professional lines and in 
this way progress has been conserved and so- 
cial stability fostered. He whose name intro- 
duces this review has gained recognition as a 
scientist and as one of the able and successful 
surgeons of the province, and by his labors, 
his high professional attainments and his ster- 
ling characteristics has justified the respect 
and confidence in which he is held by the 
medical fraternity and by the public at large. 

J. Hunter Peak was born near Bardstown, 
Kentucky, June 14, 1865, the son of John and 
Sarah (Coy) Peak, both native born Ken- 
tuckians. John, the father, was born near 
Lebanon, Marion county, Kentucky, in 1843, 
and died in 1878. The mother of this sub- 
ject was born near New Haven, Kentucky, in 
1844, and died in 1870. She was the daughter 
of John and Dolly Coy. In 1872 the elder 
Peak moved the family to Texas, where he 
died, and it was in that state that Dr. Peak 
was reared to manhood. He received his lit- 
erary education at Garden Valley Institute, 
Texas, where he was graduated in 1887, and 
which prepared him to take up the practical 
and responsible duties of life. He began 
teaching in Ellis county and taught there four 
years and then taught two years in Young 
county. His choice of a life work fell upon 
the medical profession, and while teaching 
school he read medicine and in 1891 he matric- 
ulated in Louisville, Kentucky, Medical Col- 
lege, where he was graduated in 1894. He 
then took a post graduate course at the Ken- 
tucky School of Medicine. He then located 
in Louisville and engaged in the practice of 
his profession, where an energetic nature and 
strong mentality has enabled him long since 
to pass from the ranks of the many and stand 
among the successful and prominent few. 

In 1895 Dr. Peak was elected a member of 
the Louisville General Council from the Third 
w^ard, and after serving almost two years in 
that body resigned to accept a position as Unit- 
ed States pension surgeon, which position he 
held for four years. In 1899 he was appointed 
special United States pension surgeon, which 
position he resigned in 1903 to look after his 
private practice, as he preferred to concentrate 
his energies upon his professional work. Af- 
ter Dr. Peak resigned from office he turned 
his entire professional attention to surgery, 
and has made it an exclusive specialty ever 
since. In the fall of 1909 he was elected to 
represent the F'ourth and Fifth wards of the 
city as a member of the Loui.sville School 
Board, which position he now^ holds and will 
be a member of the last board under the pres- 
ent law. 





(fi 



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ffiA JHW I -Ms, 



MT9'A, LEN^K 
TILD2M FOWNOATtcvil 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1233 



Dr. Peak is a member of the Jefferson 
County Aledical Society, the Kentucky State 
Medical Society and the American Aledical 
Association. He is a member of the Masonic 
order, belonging to Preston Lodge, No. 281, 
F. & A. M., Louisville, Kentucky, and to Scot- 
tish Rite Consistory, Southern Jurisdiction. 

The Doctor's religious convictions are evi- 
denced by his connection with the Methodist 
Episcopal church, being a member of the same, 
chairman of its Board of Trustees, chairman 
of the Sunday-school Board and past superin- 
tendent of the Sunday-school. In politics he 
is a Republican but is non-partisan in local 
affairs. 

Dr. Peak married Estella Thurman of Lou- 
isville, Kentucky, the daughter of Sanford H. 
Thur.man, of the old Kentucky family of that 
name, who married Mary Jane Irvin, of the 
old Kentucky Irvin family. To the Doctor 
and wife two children have been born, as fol- 
lows : Maricita, aged eighteen years, and Ca- 
lena, aged fourteen years. 

The record of Dr. Peak's life is an upright 
and straightforward one, his success has been 
achieved along the lines of legitimate activity 
and imfaltering energy and he has well earned 
the uniform regard that is extended to him by 
the professional as well as business men of the 
state. 

George W. Walters, M. D.— Dr. Walters 
has been engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession in Covington for nearly forty years 
and thus is one of the oldest practitioners, in 
point of consecutive service, to be found in 
Kenton county at the present time, the while 
his high professional ability and marked suc- 
cess have long given him precedence as one of 
the representative physicians and surgeons of 
this section of the state, where he is known as 
a loval, liberal and public-spirited citizen of 
sterling character. Dr. Walters was born in 
the city of Cincinnati. Ohio, on the 24th of 
September, 1849, ^^'^^ is a son of Ferdinand 
and ?vlary (Dowling) Walters, the former of 
whom was born in Maryland and the latter in 
England. The mother came to the United 
States when twenty years of age. and her mar- 
riage to Ferdinand Walters was solemnized in 
the city of Philadelphia. The father of the 
Doctor was a millwright and built up a large 
and important business as a contractor in this 
line. He erected many distilleries in Kentucky 
and numerous flour mills in this state and 
other sections of the Union. He took up his 
residence in Cincinnati in 1833 and he moved 
thence to Covington about 1850, when the sub- 
ject of this review was an infant. Here he 
passed the residue of his life and here his 



death occurred in the year 1876. In politics 
he was a Democrat of the old school but at the 
time of the Civil war he transferred his al- 
legiance to the Republican party. His widow 
was summoned to the life eternal in 1881, and 
of their seven children four are living. Dr. 
George W. being the youngest of the number. 
Charles F., one of the older sons, was a valiant 
soldier of the Union in the Civil war, in which 
he served four years as a member of the Sev- 
enth Kentucky Volunteer Cavalry. He held 
the office of ordnance sergeant and he was 
breveted lieutenant at the time of receiving 
his honorable discharge. He was captured, to- 
gether with about three hundred other Federal 
soldiers, by General Morgan in the early pe- 
riod of his service, but after a short time his 
exchange was effected at Camp Chase, Ohio. 
In after years he often met with Morgan's 
men in annual reunion and found much pleas- 
ure in recalling the more gracious associations 
of the great conflict, whose animosities had 
been softened by time. 

Dr. George W. Walters was reared to ma- 
turity in Covington, to whose public schools he 
is indebted for his early educational discipline, 
which included a course in the high school. 
As a youth he served an apprenticeship at the 
trade of pattern making and for a time he was 
associated with his father's business. In 1868 
he began the study of medicine, under the pre- 
ceptorship of Dr. Cooke, of Cincinnati, and in 
the autumn of that year he was matriculated 
in the Physio-Medical Institute, in Cincinnati, 
in which he was graduated as a member of the 
class of 1870, and from which he received the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine. In 1881, after 
an intervening period of successful practice, 
he completed an effective post-graduate course 
in the Medical College of Ohio, in the same 
city. In 1870 Dr. Walters initiated the prac- 
tice of his profession at Mason, Warren 
county, Ohio, where he remained two years. 
He then returned to Covington, where he has 
been actively and successfully devoting his at- 
tention to general practice as a physician and 
surgeon during the long intervening years, 
which have given him a secure place in popu- 
lar confidence and esteem both as a physician 
and as a citizen. The Doctor is a valued 
member of the Kenton-Campbell County Med- 
ical Society, of which he served as president 
in 1896. He is also actively identified with the 
Kentucky State Medical Society and the 
American Medical Association. Though loyal 
to the civic duties and manifesting at all times 
a deep interest in all that touches the welfare 
of his home city Dr. Walters has never had 
aught of ambition for public office. He gives 



1234 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AXD KENTUCKIANS 



his allegiance to the Republican party and his 
wife holds membership in tlie Christian church, 
wiiich he himself attentls and supports. 

In the year 1881 was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Dr. Walters to ]\Iiss Emma Oder, 
who was born at Williamstown, Grant county, 
Kentucky, and who is a daughter of Reuben 
antl Margaret (Masterson) Oder, both of 
whom were likewise born in Kentuck}-. where 
the respective families were founded many 
years ago. Reuben Oder, a carpenter jjy trade 
and vocation, served in the Union army dur- 
ing the Civil war as a member of a regiment of 
Kentucky cavalry. Dr. and Mrs Walters have 
one child, Edith, who remains at the parental 
home. 

William B. Woodfokd.- — It is a notable 
fact that Kentucky's sons always have a deep 
attachment for their native state, and indeed 
Kentucky's history has been a wonderful one 
in many respects. Her sons have become 
prominent in every walk of life, and her 
statesmen have been the pride of the nation. 
One man alone, or even a few men do not 
constitute the strength of the commonwealth. 
It is the aggregate endeavor of loyal citizen- 
ship of the vast majority, and in this respect 
Kentucky has been fortunate, for her repre- 
sentatives have been enterprising, resolute 
men. who have striven with natural conditions 
until they have made the country bloom and 
blossom as the rose, and have steadily carried 
forward the work of progress and improve- 
ment. William B. Woodford of this review, 
is to be numbered among the wide-awake men 
of Bourbon county and is today successfully 
carrying on operations as an agriculturist. 

Mr. Woodford was born in l^aris, Bourbon 
county. August 17, 1848. His parents. Will- 
iam T. and Mary (Hallack) Woodford, were 
among the representative people of Kentucky. 
1 he former was a native of the Old Dominion, 
where he was born, February 14. 181 7, his 
father, William Woodford, emigrating thence 
with his family when he was a small boy, and 
settling in Montgomery county, where he con- 
tinued to make his home until his death. He 
was the father of eight children, as follows : 
Mary, Samuel A., John T., William T., Lucy, 
Thomas, Sally and James Madison. Lucy died 
December 7, 1910. having attained her nine- 
tieth year. 

William T. Woodford, father of William 
B.. was reared a farmer, even when a lad be- 
ing familiar with the pleasant secrets of har- 
vest and seed-time. He was educated in the 
common schools and when a young man, after 
his father's death, he came to Bourbon county 
and for some years was engaged in merchan- 
dising in North Middletown. Later he re- 



moved to Paris, where he continued in the 
same line, and met with no small amount of 
success. He secured a congenial life compan- 
ion and a household of his own, when in 1847, 
in Paris, he was united in wedlock to Miss 
^lary Hallack, who was 'norn in Fayette coun- 
ty, Kentucky, on August 31, 1827. In 1849 
Mr. Woodford abandoned town life and re- 
moved to the country, where the balance of 
his life was devoted to farming. He became 
well-to-do and enjoyed consideration as one of 
the influential and highly respected men of 
his day. His death occurred in August, 1888, 
but his widow survives and makes her home 
with one of her sons in Paris. They were the 
parents of seven children : William B., the 
subject and the eldest in order of birth; Lu- 
cinda H. ; Anna M.; J. Hal; Mary M.; 
Clara (deceased) ; and Llva. 

Mr. Woodford, the immediate subject of 
the review, was reared upon the farm, early 
chose it as a life work, and has always fol- 
lowed it, never regretting his decision. He 
received his education in the schools of his 
native county. He was married in Bourbon 
county, Kentucky, November 4, 1872, to Miss 
Bettie Bedford, daughter of George M. Bed- 
ford, a prominent farmer and breeder of short 
horn cattle of Bourbon county. The first 
Mrs. Woodford was summoned to the Great 
Beyond in 1877, leaving no issue, and in 1896, 
Mr. Woodford married Miss Carrie Larue, 
daughter of Clifton and Eliza (Perrine) La- 
rue, and a native daughter of the Blue Grass 
state, her birth having occurred in Mason 
county, November 22, 1858. No children have 
been born to the union. Mrs. Woodford is 
a member of the Christian church. 

Mr. Woodford is esteemed as one of the 
enterprising and public spirited men of the 
county — owns 1,050 acres all in a body, being 
quite a large cattle feeder. "Woodland, ' 
which is the name of the place, is five miles 
south on the Winchester Pike. 

Dr. Frank Fithian, for over a decade and 
a half a representative physician and surgeon 
of Paris, Bourbon county, Kentucky, is a na- 
tive son of the fine old Blue Grass state. He 
was born in Clark county, Kentucky, on the 
2d of November, 1859, and is a son of Dr. 
Joseph and Emily (Owen) Fithian, the for- 
mer of whom was born in Philadephia, Penn- 
sylvania, and the latter in Kentucky. Dr. Jo- 
seph Fithian was a son of Joel and Sarah 
(Sinnickson) Fithian, natives of New Jersey 
who moved to Oxford, Ohio, when their son 
was a small child. On the mother's side the 
family dates back to the early settlements in 
New York and the emigrant ancestor of the 
Fithian familv was William, who came from 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1235 



England about 1630. Joel I'lthian served in 
the war of 1812. Dr. Joseph Fithian was ed- 
ucated at Miami University and took his med- 
ical course at Jefferson Medical College, Phil- 
adelphia, from which he was graduated in 
1853. He then came to North Middleton, 
Bourbon county, Kentucky, with his brother 
Dr. Washington, and practiced here until 1870 
when he removed to Paris, Kentucky. Here 
he practiced until his death. July 12, 1898. 
He was a popular and successful physician 
and was surgeon in the U. S. army, Eighteenth 
Kentucky Infantry. He was an active mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church and fraternally 
was afifiliated with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. His wife was a native of Bour- 
bon county, Kentucky, where she was reared 
and educated. She died December 19, 1897, 
leaving three children, Dr. Frank, Miss Nellie, 
and Mrs. C. D. Webb, of Paris, Kentucky. 

Dr. Frank Fithian was reared to maturity 
in his native county and there received his 
early educational training, which was later 
supplemented by a course in Centre College, 
at Danville, in which excellent institution he 
was graduated as a member of the class of 
1880, and from which he received the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts. Immediately after his 
graduation he was matriculated in the medical 
department of the University of Pennsylvania, 
at Philadelphia, in which he was graduated in 
1884, with the well earned degree of Doctor 
of Medicine. He initiated the practice of his 
profession at North Middletown, this count\-. 
and there controlled a successful and lucrative 
clientage for a period of ten years. In 1894 
he removed to Paris and here his success has 
been on a parity with his well directed efforts. 
His broad human sympathy and spirit of help- 
fulness as combined with his acknowledged 
skill in the work of his profession tend to make 
him a most popular doctor. 

He has ever given a most loyal and public- 
spirited support to all measures and enter- 
prises tending to conserve the general welfare 
of the community. He is an appreciative 
member of the Masonic fraternity, in which he 
is affiliated with Coeur de Lion Commandery, 
No. 26, Knights Templars, of which he is past 
commander. He also holds membershio in 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks 
and in connection with his profession he is a 
member of the Bourbon County Medical So- 
ciety, the Kentucky State Medical Society, the 
/■merican Medical Association and the Ken- 
tucky State Medical Association of Railroad 
Surgeons. Both he and his wife are devout 
members of the Presbyterian church. 

In 1896 was solemnized the marriage of Dr. 
Fithian to Miss Mason White, who was born 



in Paris, Kentucky, and who is a daughter of 
George G. White. Dr. and Mrs. Fithian are 
the parents of three children — George White, 
Josephine, and Emily Owen, all of whom re- 
main at the parental home. 

William S. Jones.-;— Bourbon county has 
been the home of William S. Jones from the 
time of his nativity and he is a scion of the 
third generation to be actively identified with 
agricultural pursuits within the borders of this 
favored section of the Blue Grass common- 
wealth. He has wrought out a very intelligent 
success through the persistent application of 
his energies and abilities in connection with 
the great basic art of agriculture and is recog- 
nized as one of the representative farmers and 
stock-growers of his native county, where he 
is well upholding the prestige of the honored 
name which he bears. 

William S.- Jones was born in Bourbon 
county, Kentucky, on the 7th of July, 1845. 
and is a son of John W. and Amanda ( Tal- 
botl ) Jones, both of whom were likewise na- 
tives of Bourbon county, where the former 
was born on the 15th of June, 1820, and the 
latter on the 2d of October, 1823; their mar- 
riage was solemnized in this county on the 
2Cth of October, 1840. John W. Jones was a 
son of William S. and Nancy (Ashurst) Jones, 
who established their home in North Middle- 
town precinct, Bourbon county, in the pioneer 
days and who here continued to reside until 
their death. William S. Jones, the founder of 
the family in I'ourbon county, became a suc- 
cessful farmer and was the founder of a large 
and well improved landed estate at the time 
of his death, lie was a man of sterling char- 
acter, did well his j)art in connection with the 
industrial and social development of the coun- 
ty and here commanded the uniform esteem 
of all who knew him. William S. and Nancy 
• (Ashurst) Jones became the parents of five 
children — John W., Benjamin F., Josiah A., 
Rebecca and William S. The last mentioned 
died in infancy and the other four children at- 
tained to maturity and reared families. 

John W. Jones, father of him whose name 
initiates this review, was reared and educated 
in Bourbon county and soon after his mar- 
riage, in the year 1840, he settled on a farm 
about two miles north of North Middletown, 
on the North ^Middletown and Cane Bridge 
turnpike. There he developed a valuable 
property, made excellent improvements on 
his farm and on this homestead he continued 
to reside until his death. His first w'ife was 
summoned to the life eternal on the lOth of 
May, 1850, and on the 14th of May, 1851, was 
solemnized his marriage to Miss Sarah Red- 
mon, who was born in Bourbon county, on the 



1236 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

30th of January, 1823, and who was a daugh- the North Middletown and Cane Ridge turn- 

ter of Ceorge L. Redmon, a representative pike, one mile north of Middletown, where he 

pioneer of the county. Of the first union were owns 575 acres of well improved and highly 

born five children, concerning whom the fol- cultivated land. In addition to raising the 

lowing brief record is entered — Susan A. was various crops best suited to the soil and cli- 

born on the 8th of Octpber, 1841, and died on mate he is also a successful grower of live 

the 17th of January, 1908; Mary C, who was stock of excellent grades and his work as a 

born on the 9th of August, 1843, <Jied on the farmer has been characterized by indefatig- 

loth of October, 1851 ; William S., the sub- able energy and progressive methods, through 

ject of this sketch, was the next in order of which he has gained precedence as one of the 

birth; Daniel R., who was born on the nth essentially representative agriculturists of his 

of July, 1847, <Jied on the 12th of October, native county. He is liberal and loyal as a 

1851; and John W., who was born May 12, citizen and gives his support to all public en- 

1849. died on the 22d of the following Octo- terprises that make for the well being of the 

ber. The children of the second marriage were community. He and his family are zealous 

two in number — Sallie B., who was born on members of the Christian church-, in whose 

the 2 1 St of September, 1856, died on the 4th faith he was reared and in the same he has 

of February, 1906; and the other child, a served as an elder for the past fifteen years, 

daughter, died in infancy, unnamed. John W. On the loth of October, 1883, was solem- 

Jones died on the 4th of March, 1889, and nized the marriage of Mr. Jones to Miss Em- 

his second wife passed to the life eternal on ma Collins, who was born in Bourbon county, 

the 15th of January, 1897. on the i6th of October, i860, and who is a 

John W. Jones was a man of prominence daughter of William and Sallie (Trimble) 

and influence in his county, was progressive Collins. (See her brother John T. Collins' 

in his ideas and methods and was loyal and sketch on other pages for her family history.) 

liberal in his civic attitude. He won success Concerning the children of this felicitous un- 

by very appreciable merits, was kindly and tol- ion the following brief data are given — John 

erant in his judgment of others and was ever W., who was born November 24, 1884, is now 

ready to aid those "in any way afflicted or dis- incumbent of the office of cashier of the North 

tressed in mind, body, or estate." He accumu- Middletown Deposit Bank, in which his fa- 

lated a large tract of land and in the work and ther is a stockholder ; Sarah A., who was born 

management of the same brought to bear such on the 29th of October, 1889, is the wife of 

progressive ideas that his success was of very Walter S. Meng, who is engaged in farming 

distinct and definite order. He was a stanch in this county; and Robert G., who was born 

Democrat in his political proclivities and while on the i8th of June, 1894, remains at the par- 

never ambitious for public office his aid and ental home and assists his father in the work 

influence were ever given in support of all and management of the farm. The attractive 

measures and enterprises tending to conserve home is a recognized center of gracious hos- 

the best intersts of the community. He was pitality and the family is one that enjoys un- 

a sincere and devoted member of the Chris- qualified popularity in connection with the 

tian church, as were also his first and second best social activities of the community, 

wives, and he served as an elder in the same- Mitchell W. Thomas. — Since 1891 

for many years. He commanded a secure Mitchell W. Thomas has maintained his home 

place in the confidence and esteem of all who at Ashland, Kentucky, where he has extensive 

knew him and his life course was ordered lumber and property interests and where he 

upon the highest plane of integrity and honor, has won wide repute as a man of enormous 

William S. Jones, whose name introduces energy and unusual business acumen. In 

this article, was reared to maturity on the 1908 he retired from active participation in 

home farm and he has never found it expedi- the lumber industry and is now devoting his 

efit to withdraw his allegiance from the great entire time and attention to his various finan- 

basic industry under whose influences he was cial interests, which are of good proportions, 

reared. He was afforded the advantages of Mr. Thomas was born in Smith county. Vir- 

Clay Seminary, at North Middletown, an in- ginia, on the 5th of January, 1850, and is a 

stitution that is now known as the Kentucky son of Abijah and P'riscilla'Cavinett (Scott) 

Classical & Business College. He was mar- Thomas, both of whom were likewise born 

ried in the year 1883 and then established his and reared in Smith county, Virginia. The 

home on a farm one mile south of North Mid- father was of Welsh descent and the mother 

dletown, on the Thatcher's ^lills turnpike, but of Scotch-Irish ancestry. Abijah was identi- 

three years later he removed to his present fled with agricultural pursuits during the early 

finely improved homestead which is located on part of his business career and later he was 



ni ^Ew TQu i 

^r9n, LIH9K I 

TUftEM FOWNOATigiet I 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1287 



a manufacturer. He built the first wooleti 
mill in southwestern Virginia, the same being 
located six miles distant from Marion, the 
county seat of Smith county. It was con- 
structed in the days prior to the Civil war and 
was successfully operated before the incep- 
tion of the war and a part of the time during 
that confiict. Mr. Thomas also owned a large 
iron furnace, which was destroyed during the 
raid of General Stoneman, in December, 1864. 
He was active in developing the natural re- 
sources of the country in which he lived and 
during the war operated both his mill and his 
furnace, disposing of his entire output to the 
Confederate government. He was summoned 
to eternal rest in Smith county in 1876, at the 
age of sixty-three years. His wife, who sur- 
vived him for nine years, died on the same 
day of the month as her husband — December, 
9. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Thomas became the parents 
of twelve children, eight of whom are living 
in 191 1, Mitchell W., of this review, being the 
seventh in order of birth. 

Alitchell W. Thomas was reared to adult 
age in his native place. His educational train- 
ing was of meager order, the war and its rav- 
ages militating against any consistent system 
of schooling. He worked on the home farm 
during his boyhood days, having charge of 
the same while his father and brothers were 
employed at the factories. When twenty- 
three years of age he engaged in the lumber 
business, establishing a factory, together with 
a retail and wholesale trade, near Glade 
Spring, Washington county, Virginia. He 
had a large portable mill and moved the same 
later to adjoining counties, continuing to be 
identified with the lumber industry for a num- 
ber of years, during which time he organized 
the M. W. and A. P. Thomas Lumber Com- 
pany, his partners being two of his brothers. 
In 1889 Mr. Thomas of this review sold his 
interest in the above lurnber company and 
came to Kentucky, where he was identified 
with the Thomas Lumber Company at Cat- 
lettsburg for about two years, at the expira- 
tion of which he removed to Ashland, where 
he purchased a small saw mill, which he sub- 
sequently . enlarged and which he operated 
with increasing success for several years. The 
latter concern eventually grew into the Ash- 
land Lumber Company, which was organized 
in 1898 and which is still doing a thriving 
business. For a number of years after its or- 
ganization Mr. Thomas was president and 
active head of the company. Operations 
were begun at Ashland with fourteen rafts of 
logs purchased on the Ohio river, this being 
the beginning of successful lumber operations 
at Ashland, as prior to that time none of the 



mills had been able to carry on a successful 
and lucrative business. After thus building 
up several large enterprises in the lumber in- 
dustry Mr. Thomas retired from active par- 
ticipation therein in 1908, since which year his 
whole time has been devoted to his extensive 
property interests in Ashland. With that keen 
foresight which is a natural instinct with the 
big business man and capitalist ]\Ir. Thomas 
has invested in local real estate and improved 
the property. 

In 1906 was begun the construction of one 
of the finest modern business and office build- 
ings in the city, the same being known as the 
Thomas Block. It was completed in January, 
1907, and is fifty by one hundred feet in lat- 
eral dimensions and three stories in height. 
The material used for construction was fire- 
burned brick with the outside walls of con- 
crete, and the top floor of the buidling is de- 
voted to the exclusive use of the Park City 
Club. Mr. Thomas was one of the organizers 
of the Citizens' Bank & Trust Company, in 
which he is a director and stockholder. In 
politics he accords a staunch allegiance to the 
cause of the Democratic party in all matters 
of national import while in local affairs he is 
non-partisan, giving his support to men and 
measures meeting with the approval of hi.« 
judgment. In religious matters he and his 
wife are devout members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, South, to whose charities 
and benevolences they are most liberal con- 
tributors. Fraternally Mr. Thomas is affil- 
iated with various local organizations of rep- 
resentative character and as a citizen his in- 
trinsic loyalty has been a potent influence in 
the general progress and development. 

In the year 1873 was celebrated the mar- 
riage of Mr. Thomas to Miss Margaret C. 
Smith, a native of Washington county, Vir- 
ginia, and a daughter of Pleasant Smith, who 
was an extensive land owner in southwestern 
Virginia, where he passed the latter years of 
his life. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas became the 
parents of one daughter, Mary Cavinett, who 
was summoned to eternal rest at Catletts- 
burg in 1890, at the age of fourteen years. 

John W. Jones. — One of the steadfast and 
popular financial institutions of Bourbon 
county is the North Middletown Deposit Bank, 
and the same is favored in having as one of 
its executives John W. Jones, who is the effi- 
cient incumbent of the office of cashier and 
who is numbered among the essentially repre- 
sentative citizens and business men of the 
younger generation in his native county. 

Mr. Jones was born on the family home- 
stead, in North Middletown precinct, Bourbon 
county, on the 24th of November. 1884, and 
is a son of William S. and Emma (Collins) 



1238 



SrokV ()!• KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



Jones, concerning whom specific mention is 
"made on other pages of this work, so that a 
repetition of the data concerning the family 
genealogy and the noteworthy career of the 
honored father is not demanded in the pres- 
ent article. John W. Jones was reared to the 
invigorating 'discipline of the farm, and after 
completing the curriculum of the puhlic 
schools he entered the Kentucky Classical _& 
I'.usiness College, at North Middletown, in 
which well ordered institution he was gradu- 
ated as a memher of the class of 1903. Soon 
afterward he assumed the position of hook- 
keeper in the North ^liddletown Deposit Bank, 
and after retaining this incumhency for sev- 
eral months he returned to the home farm, 
with whose management he continued to be 
actively associated until xNovember, 1907, 
when he resumed the position of bookkeeper 
in the bank. Definite recognition of his abil- 
ity and eilective services was that accorded in 
January, 1909, when he was advanced to the 
office of assistant cashier. In this position he 
manifested marked facility in the directing and 
handling of the executive details of the busi- 
ness, and the official estimate of the same was 
significantly shown in April, 1910, when he 
was chosen cashier of the institution, an office 
in which he has amply justified the confidence 
thus reposed in him and in which he did much 
to facilitate and expand the business of the 
bank. He is a young man of progressive ideas 
and sterling character and he has won to him- 
self the high regard of those with whom he 
has come in contact in business and social cir- 
cles. 

Though never an aspirant for public office, 
Mr. Jones is loyal to all civic duties and re- 
sponsibilities and his political allegiance is 
given to the Democratic party. Both he and 
his wife are active and valued members of the 
Christian church in North Middletown and 
they are prominent in connection with the best 
social at^airs of the community. 

On the 23d of February, 19 10, was solem- 
nized the marriage of Mr. Jones to Miss Beu- 
lah E. Bridges, who was born in Franklin 
county, this state, on the 27th of November, 
1884, and who is a daughter of Benjamin F. 
and Sarah R. (Moreland) Bridges, now resi- 
dents of Georgetown, Scott county. 

Judge Henry Clay Smith. — One of the 
foremost of American poets and authors, 
Oliver Wendell Holmes, many years ago 
penned the lines, 

"There was a young fellow of excellent pith, 

Fate tried to obscure him by naming him 

Smith." 

And in the case of Judge Henry Clay Smith, 

as in that of the subject of the ode, Fate has 



been worsted in her nefarious designs. In 
every walk of life, in law and in agricultural 
operations of the most enlightened character, 
as a worthy and representative citizen of 
Bourbon county, he is well-known and hon- 
ored. 

Judge Henry Clay Smith was born in North 
Middletown Precinct, Bourbon county, June 
16, 1848. His parents, Algernon S. and 
Amanda F. (Thomas) Smith, were both of 
them not only natives of the Blue Grass state, 
but the father was also a native of Bourbon 
county where his eyes first opened to the light 
of day. May 16, 1809, the year which gave to 
America a bevy of her greatest men. The 
birth of the mother occurred in Montgomery 
county, December 27, 1828. Her grandfather, 
William Thomas, came from Culpeper county, 
Virginia, and a more extended account of the 
family is given in the sketch of Hon. Claude 
M. Thomas on other pages of this work. Al- 
gernon S. Smith was a son of Weathers Smith, 
who was a native of Fairfax county, Vir- 
ginia, and when a yoimg man (in 1785), he 
immigrated to Bourbon county where he made 
his home until his demise. He married a 
young woman of the same name. Miss Lydia 
Smith, a daughter of Withers Smith, who was 
an early settler of Bourbon county. To 
Weathers Smith and Lydia Smith one child 
was born, namely Algernon S., who was the 
father of Judge Smith, the subject of this re- 



view. 



Algernon S. Smith and Amanda F. Thomas 
were married in Montgomery county, Ken- 
tucky, October i, 1846, after which they set- 
tled on Strodes Creek, about three miles west 
of North Middletown, and there made their 
home until their death, both dying with Asiatic 
cholera, he on September 28, 1852, and his 
wife October 2 of the same year. They were 
the parents of two children. — Henry Clay, the 
eldest ; and Algernon S., who was born March 
20, 1850, and died September 10, 1872. 

Judge Henry Clay Smith received his liter- 
ary education at the Stony Point Academy 
under Professor John W. Fox and later ma- 
triculated in the Kentucky University at Lex- 
ington, now known as Transylvania Univer- 
sity. After finishing his education he returned 
to farming and has ever since continued in that 
vocation. He was married in Clark county, 
Kentucky. October 21. 1869, to Miss Nannie C. 
Rice, who was born in Bourbon county, March 
24, 1850, the daughter of Harvey W. and 
Lodusca (Wright) Rice, early settlers and 
among the prominent people of their county. 
To the union of Judge Smith and his wife 
were born two children, AUie Dee, born Jan- 
uary 26, 1873, widow of R. H. Dickson, makes 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KEXTUCKIANS 



1239 



her home with her father. She has one child, 
Stanley Smith Dickson, born July 30, 1897. 
Judge Smith's son, Henry S., born September 
14, 1878, died February 23, 1895. 

In August 1882, Judge Smith was elected 
justice of the peace of North Middletown 
{^recinct and served until he was elected county 
judge in Ala}-, 1899, to fill the unexpired term 
of judge William Purnell and in the regular 
election in November, 1901, he was elected to 
the same ofifice and served until January i, 
1906. During the time he was in office the 
new court house was built at a cost of $165,- 
000. Since his retirement he has devoted his 
time and capabilities to farming and stock- 
raising. He owns a fine farm of six hundred 
acres with a beautiful modern home, located 
on the North Middletown and Thatcher's Mills 
turnpike, and about two and one-half miles 
south of North Mirldletown. His homestead 
is known as "Oakland" and is considered the 
I)est farm in the precinct and one of the best 
in the county. In connection with general 
farming and tlie feeding of export cattle, 
Judge Smith breeds to some extent thorough- 
bred saddle horses. 

Judge Smith and his wife are members of 
the Christian church and he is a member of 
the Masonic fraternity. Washington Lodge, 
No. 79, of North Middletown and of North 
]\ii(ldletown Chapter, No. 26, while he like- 
wise holds membership in the Coeur de Lion 
Commandery, No. 26, of I'aris, Kentucky. He 
is affiliated also with the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, Paris Lodge, No. T^y},. 

Judge Smith and his household are to be 
lumibered among the best and most highly re- 
spected citizens of the county. They are pub- 
lic spirited and altruistic, ever ready to give 
their support to any measure likely to result 
in the greatest good to the greatest number. 

William V. Huffman, M. D. — Many of 
the native sons of Kentucky have here attained 
to distinctive success in the various professions, 
and among the number is Dr. Hufifman. who 
has gained precedence as one of the repre- 
sentative physicians and surgeons of Bourbon 
county and who is established in the general 
practice of his profession in the thriving little 
city of Millersburg. His precedence in his ex- 
acting vocation is based alike upon his fine 
technical ability and his sterling character, and 
he holds unassailable position in the confidence 
and esteem of the community in which he has 
elected to establish his home and to render self- 
abnegating service in behalf of suffering hu- 
manity. He has shown a high appreciation of 
the dignity and responsibility of his profession, 
and has kept in close touch with the advances 
made in both medicine and surgery, so that he 



finds himself amply fortified as a diagnostician 
and in the employment of the most efficacious 
remedial agents. 

Dr. Hufi'man was born in Harrison county, 
Kentucky, on the 3rd of July, 1858, and is a 
son of George W. and Lucinda (Jones) Huff- 
man, the former of whom was born in Har- 
rison county, this state, on the 20th of Febru- 
ary, 1826, and the latter in Bourbon county, 
on the 15th of September, 1829. These dates 
indicate that the respective families were 
founded in Kentucky in the pioneer days, and 
the names of both have been worthily asso- 
ciated with the material and social develop- 
ment of the fine old Blue Grass commonwealth. 
George W^ Hufifman became one of the repre- 
sentative agriculturists and inlluential citizens 
of Harrison county, where he continued to re- 
side, honored by all who knew him, until his 
death which, occurred in August, 1904. His 
cherished and devoted wife, a woman of most 
gracious personality, was summoned to the life 
eternal in October, 1909, and of their six chil- 
dren four are living, — Dr. Lucius D, who is a 
leading physician and surgeon of the city of 
Covington, this state; Dr. William V., whose 
name initiates this sketch ; W^arder W., who is 
a representative farmer of Harrison county; 
and Mary, who is the wife of Benjamin Harp, 
a prosperous agriculturist of the same county. 

Dr. W^illiam V. Huffman was reared to the 
sturdy and invigorating discipline of the farm, 
and under its beneficent influences was quick- 
ened his ambition for a wider sphere of en- 
deavor. He was afforded the advantages of 
the public schools of his native county, as well 
as those of a well conducted private school, 
and in 1883 he began the work of preparing 
himself for his chosen profession. He took up 
the study of medicine under the efifective pre- 
ceptorship of Dr. J. T. Stuart and of his 
brother. Dr. Lucius D. Hufifman, both of whom 
were at that time successful practitioners in 
Harrison county, and in 1885 he was matricu- 
lated in the celebrated Jefiferson Medical Col- 
lege, in the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
in which he completed the prescribed course 
and in which he was graduated as a member 
of the class of 1887, receiving from this fine 
old institution the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine. Dr. Hufifman served his professional 
novitiate by engaging in practice in Corinth, 
Grant county, Kentucky, where he remained 
for a short time, and in March, 1889, he es- 
tablished his residence in Millersburg, where 
he has since continued in the active work of 
his profession, in which his success has been 
on a parity with his recognized ability and un- 
equivocal devotion. He is one of the leading 
representatives of his profession in this section 



1240 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

of the state' and as a citizen he is tlistinctively the eleven children, was reared on the home- 
loyal and public-spirited, taking lively inter- stead farm in Harrison county and received 
est in all that tends to conserve the social and his preliminary education in the common 
material welfare of the community and com- schools. At the age of eighteen years he be- 
manding as his own the uniform confidence gan to learn the art of telegraphy and was sub- 
and regard of its people. He and his wife are sequently employed by the Louisville & Nash- 
prominent in connection with the best social ville Railroad Company as telegrapher and 
activities of their home city and at their at- agent in various places. In the fall of 1886 he 
tractive residence is dispensed a gracious hos- went to Fort Worth, Texas, where he took up 
pitality. Subordinating all else to the demands stenography and typewriting in the Commer- 
of his profession. Dr. Huffman has had naught cial Business College. There he became the 
of desire for political office, though he accords private secretary to the general manager and 
staunch support to the cause of the Democratic receiver of the International & Great North- 
party. Both he and his wife hold membership ern Railway Company. Two years later he 
in the Christian church and are active in its resigned this position and came to Cincinnati 
work. where he assumed the position of private see- 
On the 2ist of September. 1886, was sol- retary to the joint agent of the Chesapeake & 
emnized the marriage of Dr. Iluft'man to JMiss Ohio and the Louisville and Nashville Rail- 
Mary L. .JMcKenney, who was born in Harri- roads. In this office he was promoted to the 
son county, this state, on the 22nd of July, position of cashier and in 1896 he became 
1868, and who is a daughter of Richard and joint freight agent of these railroads which in- 
Amanda (Stewart) McKenney, both of whom cumbency he still retains. For many years 
are now deceased. Dr. and Mrs. Huffman be- he has been a resident of Covington, having 
-came the parents of two children,^ — -George established his home in Latonia when that 
Richard, who was born March 24, 1896, and place was a hamlet of but one hundred and 
Anna Frances, who was born January 5, 1899, fifty people. In this suburb he has erected 
her death occurring on the 24th of September, seventy-seven houses and he has been most 
1904. influential in connection with its local affairs. 
James T. Earle. — One who owes his pres- Before Latonia was annexed to Covington 
tige as a successful business man and in- Mr. Earle served as post-master, president 
fluential citizen to his own well directed ef- of its school board, as a member of its council 
forts is James Thomas Earle, who was born and he served for four years as its mayor, 
in Harrison county, Kentucky, on the 27th of having been the last incumbent of that office. 
August, 1866, and who is a son of Jonathan He took an active part in its consolidation 
R. and Aramenta (King) Earle, both of whom with Covington and while mayor he assisted in 
were likewise born in Harrison county. Mr. the organization of the State Law & Order 
Earle is a scion of one of the fine old families League at Louisville, Kentucky, being elected 
of the Blue Grass state, where various repre- as the first president of the same. He was 
sentatives of the name followed with consider- also one of the organizers of the First Na- 
able success the great basic industry of agri- tional Bank of Latonia, in 1902, and he has 
culture. Jonathan R. Earle became the owner since served as president of this bank. In 
of a fine landed estate in Harrison county and politics he is an uncompromising advocate of 
he raised the same to a high state of cultiva- the cause of the Republican party and was the 
tion. He is now living virtually retired with first Republican appointed by the State Elec- 
his children in the city of Covington. During tibn Commission as election commissioner in 
the Civil war he served as a valiant soldier in Kenton county after the repeal of the Goebel 
the home guards, an organization to prevent election law, which almost caused a civil war 
homes, railroads and public property from be- in Kentucky. He is a member of the state 
jng destroyed. Kentucky furnished soldiers to board of equalization, being appointed to this 
both armies and as many sympathizers of both office by Governor Willson in 1910 for a term 
sides were left at home an organization of this of four years. Fraternally Mr. Earle is af- 
kind was highly essential. In politics he ac- filiated with the Masonic Order and with the 
cords and unswerving allegiance to the princi- Knights of Pythias. He is a member of the 
pies and policies of the Republican party. Chamber of Commerce in Cincinnati and has 
Aramenta (King) Earle was summoned to the served as a member of its board of directors 
life eternal in 1908, secure in the high regard and as secretary of the same. Both he and his 
of all with whom she came in contact. Mr. family are members of the Baptist church, 
and Mrs. Earle became the parents of eleven In 1889 was solemnized the marriage of 
children, six of whom are now living. Mr. Earle to Miss Katherine B. Good, who 
James T. Earle, sixth in order of birth of was born and reared in Harrison countv. an 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1241 

old schoolmate of Mr. Earle's, and who is a lature, Charles Stuart Parnell, the great Irish 
daughter of Joshua J. Good, for many years leader in the English Parliament, who later, 
a prominent husiness man of Cynthiana, Ken- publicly and by letter, expressed his hearty 
tucky. Her maternal grandfather was Colonel appreciation of this speech in the most flatter- 
Renaker, a representative of one of the old- ing terms of admiration. In 1888 Mr. Mc- 
est families of the state. He was a distin- Dermott served as United States Chief Super- 
guished Democratic campaign speaker and was visor of Elections for Kentucky ; in 1890 he 
at one time a member of the state legislature, was a member of the state constitutional con- 
Mr. and Mrs. Earle became the parents of vention; in 1892 he was chairman of the com- 
live children, whose names are here entered mittee of three that prepared the charter for 
in order of birth, — Marietta, Lucile, Katherine, the city of Louisville which is still in force; 
James and Elizabeth, four of whom remain at and in 1894, in a primary where almost 20,000 
the parental home, Katherine having died votes were cast, he was selected by a big 
a few months after her birth. Mrs. Earle is a majority over two strong competitors as the 
prominent factor in connection with the social candidate of the Democratic party for the 
activities of Covington and her home is a rec- office of representative in Congress. Before 
ognized center of gracious hospitality, the election, the late Richard Watson Gilder, 
Edward J. McDermott, — Numbered the poet. and the great editor of the Century 
among those who have attained precedence magazine, wrote: *T hope to Heaven Mc- 
and success as members of the bar of Ken- Dermott will win for Congress. He is a man 
tucky is Edward J. McDermott, who is en- of the Wilson sort (referring to the Hon. 
gaged in the practice of his profession in his W. L. Wilson of West Virginia and the Demo- 
native city of Louisville, where he was born cratic leader of the House) and would be for 
on the 29th of October, 1852. He is a son of good government all along the line." In De- 
William and Catherine McDermott. In June, cember, 1894, the Century said, in one of its 
^^33, William McDermott sailed from Bel- editorials, that the nomination of Mr. McDer- 
fast, Ireland, when he was a boy, and settled mott was a significant and hopeful sign for 
in Louisville, which then had about 5,000 peo- good government; but by reason of the panic 
pie. There he married Catherine, who was of 1893 and a secret anti-Catholic agitation 
born in Kentucky. Her grandfather was a going on over the country at the time, he 
soldier of the Revolution. At the first public was defeated with the remainder of the ticket 
school in Louisville at the Southwest corner in the Republican land-slide of 1894. 
of Fifth and Walnut Street she was given a Air. McDermott is known as a speaker of 
silver medal, which Mr. McDermott has and especially fine ability ; and, by special invita- 
on which was engraved the words : "City lion has appeared as a guest of and speaker 
School July 29th, 183 1. From Louisville City before the foremost commercial bodies in Bos- 
to Catherine L. Byrne for scholarship." Will- ton, New York, Chicago and other cities, 
iam McDermott died here November 9, 1854. and also before many important national or- 
Catherine McDermott died here March 30, ganizations, such as the National Municipal 
1890. In 1871 Mr. McDermott was gradu- League, the American Political Science Asso- 
ated in and given a medal by the Male High ciation, etc. He has delivered lectures at 
School of Louisville, after which he was a several universities of the North and South 
student in the Queen's College, Belfast, Ire- and before big audiences in our large cities, 
land, for one year, and for one year in the His lecture on "Leo XIII and the Papacy" 
University of Gottingen, in the kingdom of was delivered to large audiences in Louisville, 
Hanover, Germany, and he still speaks and Cincinnati, St. Louis and Atlantic City. Of 
writes German. After his return to America Mr. McDermott's speech in Louisville on 
he entered the law school of historic old Har- "The North" before the Wholesale Druggists' 
vard University, in which he was graduated Association of America in 1891, Mr. George 
as a Bachelor of Laws in 1876. In the same William Curtis, while editor of Harper's 
year he began the active practice of his pro- Weekly, wrote : 

fession in the city of Louisville, where his "I am conscious of my own proud fond- 
abilities and his devotion to his chosen voca- ness for New England but the New England 
tion have gained for him pronounced success feeling of my day was never that of the Es- 
and prestige. In 1880 he was elected to the sex Junta. It was always blended with the 
low-er house of the state legislature and in pride of nationality. That is the only state 
the same year was presidential elector for his pride in this country and it is that which your 
state on the ticket of his party. While in speech fosters and makes it a public service." 
the legislature he was selected to deliver the Of Mr. McDermott's speech on "Commer- 
welcoming speech to the guest of the legis- cial and Political Problems from a Southern 



124: 



HISTORY UF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



Standpoint," at the great annual dinner of the 
New York Board of Trade h'ebruary 24th, 
1892, Mr. Curtis wrote: 

"The warmth of its reception was a proof 
of its eloquent statement of the common feel- 
ing. It is a chapter in the gospel of public 
morality which will he like seed upon good 
ground." 

At that dinner the speakers were ex-Min- 
ister J. W. Foster, Col. W. C. P. Breckin- 
ridge, Member of Congress from Kentucky, 
Mr. St. Clair McKelway (lulitor of the 
Brooklyn Eagle), Mr. Frederick Taylor and 
Mr. McDermott. His speech was a plea for 
clean politics, a clear platform, courageous 
leaders and sound money. The A''^7C' York 
Ei'ening Post on February 25, 1892, published 
only Mr. ]\lcDermott's speech and said: 

"The chief honors of the evening, however, 
were won by Mr. McDermott, whose refer- 
ences both directly and indirectly to Mr. 
Cleveland brought out great applause. At 
the close of his speech Mr. McDermott re- 
ceived quite an ovation. The guests arose, 
waved their napkins and cheered him again 
and again." 

This speech so pleased ex-President Cleve- 
land that he had Mr. McDermott invited to 
the preliminary private caucus of his leaders 
at Chicago before the meeting of the Demo- 
cratic Convention that nominated him again 
for the Presidency in 1892. 

At the meeting of the American Political 
Science Association held at St. Louis in the 
latter part of December, 1910, Mr. McDer- 
mott read a paper entitled "The Delays and 
Reversals on Technical Grounds in Civil and 
Criminal Trials." This paper is to be printed 
in the proceedings of the Association and also 
simultaneously in the Journal of Criminal Law 
and Criminology of Chicago, and in the 
American Law Review of St. Louis. An 
editorial in the St. Louis Times entitled "Help- 
ful Criticism" referring to this paper says in 
part : 

"There is hope of improvement in the work 
of the courts when members of the legal pro- 
fession make an earnest search for defects, 
and offer remedies for ills which the public 
is made to feel in countless ways * * * ^ 
plea for simplicity in the drawing up of in- 
dictments touches one of the defects in the 
law which have come down from generations 
far removed. All the matters dealt with by 
Mr. McDermott are familiar, and it is not 
to be supposed that they can be remedied 
readily, or without vigorous effort." 

At the annual banquet of the Engineers and 
Architects Club of Louisville, of which Mr. 



McDermott was recently elected an honorary 
member, the predominating subject was "In- 
telligent City Building." The principal speaker 
of the evening was Mr. McDermott, his sub- 
ject being "Planning for the Future." Mr. 
McDermott kej)t right to his subject all the 
way through his speech from which the fol- 
lowing is a very short extract : 

"In the government of cities Europe has 
far surpassed us. There political questions 
are not for a moment considered in municipal 
government, and the ablest and most unselfish 
men have managed the European cities with 
economy, ability and success. We must change 
our whole conception of the government of 
the city and the rights of the public as against 
individuals. We must give a new and more 
vigorous application to the legal principle: 
'Sic utere tuo ut alienum non laedas.' 

"The first consideration for every city is 
to preserve the health of its citizens by good 
sanitation, by providing first, a ptire and 
abundant water supply and second, good drain- 
^gQ * * * q-j-ig ^yjgg ^j^j fortunate plan- 
ning of Washington one hundred years ago 
by a man of genius has been one of the chief 
causes that have .made our capital the most 
beautiful city in America. Similar work sev- 
eral thousand years ago made Athens the most 
beautiful and the most distinguished city in the 
world. Public opinion must be turned to this 
subject — must be turned in the right direction. 
If a city is to thrive and be comfortable and 
beautiful, it must be planned in advance as 
carefully as a house is planned before it is 
built." 

Besides being a brilliant orator Mr. Mc- 
Dermott is a very forceful writer. The lead- 
ing article in the Journal of Criminal Law and 
Criminology for January, 191 1, is by him and 
this article has also appeared in the Kentucky 
State Medical Journal and in many of the 
Medical Journals in the country and has been 
approved by many editorials in the leading 
newspapers of the country. His editorial "Our 
Shame" in the Louisville Courier-Journal, has 
attracted much attention. In this article he 
scores those who make it easy for criminals 
to escape altogether or with a light sentence 
and those who pardon, wholesale, life con- 
victs, especially murderers. In the Colunibiad 
of February i, 191 1, the monthly journal of 
the Knights of Columbus is printed a sketch 
of Chief Justice Edward Douglas White writ- 
ten by Mr. McDermott by special request. 
The chief justice sent a letter to Mr. McDer- 
mott thanking him for the sketch which he 
said gave him pleasure because it was "more 
candid, more sensible and less extremely ful- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1243 

some" than many which had appeared in the Rogers and daughter of Susan Preston Rogers 

newspapers and magazines since his appoint- Barr and the late Hon. John W. Barr, who 

ment. was one of the prominent lawyers and jurists 

Mr. McDermott • was twice elected (in of Kentucky and who presided for twenty 
1901 and 1907) vice president of the Ken- years on the bench of the United States Dis- 
tucky State Bar Association and was elected trict Court of Kentucky. Mr. and Mrs. Ma- 
in 190S-6 president of the Louisville Bar Dermott have three children, namely: Susan 
Association and as local secretary of the Barr, Edward J., Jr., and Catherine Watson 
Harvard Law School Association. He was Barr. 

twice offered an appointment to a Circuit AL\jor John Miller. — The names and 
judgeship by the Governor of the State; deeds of those who have wrought nobly in 
but he declined the appointment. He was the past should not be allowed to perish and 
selected to speak for Louisville at the dedi- it is in the. making of perpetual record con- 
cation of her building at the Tennessee cerning such persons that a publication of this 
Centennial Exposition at Nashville in 1897 order exercises its supreme function. The 
and to speak for Kentucky at the St. Louis name of the Miller family is one which is 
World's Fair in 1904 and at the unveiling inefifaceably traced on the history of Bour- 
of Lincoln's splendid monument in Hodgen- bon county, Kentucky, and which has been 
ville in 1909. He conducted and won the suit identified with the annals of American history 
in Hodgenville that brought about the sale since the early colonial epoch. Strong men 
of Lincoln's home, which was later l>ought and true, and gentle and gracious women have 
by Mr. Collier of New York and presented represented the name as one generation has 
to the Lincoln ^lemorial Association as a followed another upon the stage of life, and 
national i)ark. In 1907 lie was president of loyalty and patriotism have been in distinc- 
the Kentucky State Develoj^ment Association tive evidence, the while the family escutcheon 
and presided' at the convention in Xoveiuber. has ever been a symbol of integrity, honor 
Mr. McDermott enjoys distinctive popularity and usefulness. In Kentucky, where the fam- 
in his native city and is here identified with ily was founded more than a century and a 
such representative organizations at the Pen- halt ago. there have been many worthy 
dennis and Commercial Clubs. In 1892 he citizens to upbear the prestige of the name 
was elected as the Commercial Club's annual and thus there is peculiar consistency in offer- 
honorary member of that year, one being se- ing in this publication a review of the family 
lected each year for meritorious public serv- history. 

ices. That club had then 1,000 mem])ers and Major John Miller, the founder of Millers- 

now has over 3,000. Mr. McDermott is a burg, Bourbon county, Kentucky, and one of 

man of broad culture and tine literary ability the earliest settlers of this section of the 

and he has made contributions to many maga- state, was born in Sherman's Valley, near 

zines and other periodicals, literary, legal and Carlisle, Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, on 

scientific. the 21st of September, 1752, and he is the 

He is a member of the Catholic church progenitor of many descendants resident of 

and in 1910 was Grand Knight of the 700 Bourbon and Nicholas counties at the present 

Knights of Columbus of this city. Mr. Ale- time. Major John Miller, in company with 

Dermott was the only speaker at the public his brother, Robert, and several others, emi- 

celebration of the Silver Jubilee of Bishop grated from Pennsylvania to Kentucky in 1775,- 

William G. McCloskey May 23, 1893. ^"<^1 ^t having been induced to take this action by 

the installation of his successor. r>ishop Denis the Governor of Mrginia, who gave to each 

O'Donaghue, at the Cathedral of Louisville of them a pre-emption grant of four hundred 

March 30, 1910. He was also selected to acres of land in that section of Kentucky, 

speak at the Silver Jubilee Banquet of the which was then a part of Fincastle county, 

late distinguished Bishop Thomas V. Dudley Virginia. The long and hazardous journey 

of the Episcopal church in January, 1900. and through the wilderness was made on foot and 

at large public banquets to Dr. William H. the sturdy pioneers arrived at their destina- 

Whitsitt, president of the Baptist Theological tion without serious difficulty en route. Major 

Seminary in 1899. and to the Rev. Carter John Miller and his brother, together with 

Helm Jones, of the Baptist church, in October, William McClelland and William Steele, had 

1907, and to the Rev. E. L. Powell, of the the prescience to discern the special advan- 

Christian church, in May, 1905. tages and attractions of what is now Millerf- 

On October 15, 1895, was solemnized the burg precinct, Bourbon county, and here they 

marriage of Mr. McDermott to Miss Susan secured their respective allotments of land. 

Rogers Barr, granddaughter of Col. Jason In addition to his grant of four hundred 

Vol. m— 7 



1244 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AXD KENTUCKIANS 



acres, ^lajor Miller entered an additional 
tract of one thousand acres, which he secured 
at the nominal expenditure of twenty shillings 
per hundred acres. While they were sur- 
veying their lands they were continually 
menaced by the Indians and on one occasion 
William Steele was wounded by one of the 
savages. Concerning the conditions and in- 
cidents touching the lives of these sterling 
pioneers the following j)crlinent record has 
been written, being from the pen of George 
W. Bryan, who was one of the representa- 
tive citizens of Millersburg. But slight change 
is made in the phraseolog}- in the reproduc- 
tion of the article. 

"To protect their families froiu attack and 
siege of the Indians, each of the Millers built 
ujion his lands a log block house or fort, 
Major Miller's being built near the present 
boundary line of Bourbon and Nicholas coun- 
ties, on the land now owned by his great- 
grandson. William M. Layson. Robert Miller's 
was near the big spring on Isaac Chanslor's 
farm. These block hotises were loop-holed 
and sufficiently large to accommodate the fami- 
ilies of the neighboring settlers, who often 
fled to them for refuge. After planting a few 
acres in corn by simply tickling the rich soil 
with the hoe, the pioneers returned in the 
latter part of the year to Pennsylvania for 
their families. In the following spring they 
began their return journey, traveling by land 
to Pittsburg and thence down the Ohio in 
flat boats, intending to land at Limestone, 
Maysville, and then to proceed to their settle- 
ment, forty miles distant, over the 'Old BufTalo 
Trace,' wdiich is now the Maysville and Lex- 
ington turnpike road. The danger in making 
the voyage down the river came not, how- 
ever, from the water, but from the shore. 
From tree and bush, from rock and ravine 
the deadly bullet and the flint-head arrow, 
dipped in poison, singly and by volleys, kept 
constantly on the alert the harassed voyageurs, 
compelling them to keep their boats in the 
•middle of the river, to be out of range. But 
with all their precautions, Robert Miller fell 
a victim to their attacks and his body fell 
into the river and into the hands of the In- 
dians. Owing to this hostility, the travelers 
did not land at Maysville as they had intended, 
but continued their river journey to Bear- 
grass, Louisville, where there was a settlement 
and fort, and it was not thought safe to settle 
upon their lands until about 1785-6. But 
even then, as everyone conversant with the 
early history of the 'dark and bloody ground' 
knows, they were often subject to sudden at- 
tacks by wandering bands of Inrlians from 



beyond the Ohio, who resented the occupa- 
tion of their himting grounds by the whites. 
"The settlement grew in population and 
im])ortance, as it was on the highway of im- 
migration into Kentucky from the east. So 
that in 1798 Major John Miller had surveyed 
one hundred acres, which was laid ofi in 
town lots and incorporated as the town of 
Millersburg. As the facilities of transporta- 
tion were meagre and the eastern markets 
distant, a great many trades and factories 
were established to supply the necessities of 
the community. More, in fact, a great many 
more, before the incorporation than there is 
now, — a century later. 

"The flouring mill was built by the Millers 
on each bank of the Hinkston. Flour, to- 
gether with jeans, linsey-wool and flax cloths, 
spinning wheels, furniture, etc., as well as 
the products of the farm, were hauled in 
road wagons to Maysville, and shipped by 
flat-boats down the Ohio and ^^lississippi 
rivers to New Orleans. The money received 
was mostly silver, and, as it was before the 
advent of steam, getting back was another 
matter. But many a return trip was made 
on horse-back, with saddle-bags containing 
the silver, not only to Millersburg. but on 
to Philadelphia, where merchandise was pur- 
chased, hauled by land to Pittsburg, and then 
by flat-boat to Maysville, where the road 
wagons received it for final delivery to 
purchasers." 

Soon after coming to Kentucky Major John 
Miller returned to Cumberland county. Penn- 
sylvania, where was solemnized his marriage 
to Ann ]\IcClintock, who accompanied him 
on his return to Kentucky. As noted in a 
preceding paragraph, some time had elapsed 
before he made final settlement on his land 
in Bourbon county, where he continued to 
reside until his death, which occurred on the 
5th of September, 181 5. His wife was bom 
in Pennsylvania, on the 9th of July, I7S5, 
and died at the old homestead in Bourbon 
county, Kentucky, on the 19th of December, 
1825. Major Aliller served with distinction 
in the war of the Revolution and was known 
as an able commander having been major of 
his regiment. As has already been stated. 
Major ^liller eventually surveyed one hun- 
dred acres of his land and platted the same 
into town lots, thus becoming the founder of 
Millersburg, which was named in his honor. 
He was a man of fine intellectual and physical 
powers and wielded large and beneficent in- 
fluence in connection with the material and 
social development of Bourbon county, where 
he ever held a secitre place in popular con- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1245 



lidence and esteem. He became the father 
of four sons and two daughters and at the 
present time tliere are to be found in Bour- 
bon and Nicholas counties many of his de- 
scendants, who have hkewise played well 
their part in connection with the work of 
progress and development, as have also the 
intermediate generations. Within the pages 
of this publication will be found special men- 
tion of many representatives of this sterling 
family and the article here entered is given 
as a supplement to such individual sketches. 

William McClure Miller, A1. D. — On 
other pages of this work is entered detailed 
record concernmg the Miller family, which 
was founded in IJourbon county, Kentucky, 
prior to the war of the Revolution, by Major 
John Miller, in whose honor the thriving lit- 
tle city of Millersburg received its name. Of 
this honored family whose name has been in- 
dissolubly and prominently identified with the 
development and up-building of this favored 
section of the IMuegrass state. Dr. Miller is a 
worthy scion, and as one of the representa- 
tive physicians and surgeons of his native 
county, as well as by reason of his high status 
as a business man and influential citizen, it is 
imperative as a matter of consistency that in 
this volume be incorporated a brief review of 
his career. For adequate data concerning the 
family history ready reference may be made 
to the article previously mentioned, the same 
aijpcaring under the indexed title of the 
"Miller Family." 

Dr. William McClure Miller, who is en 
gaged in the practice of his profession in Mil- 
lersi)urg and who is president of the Fx 
change Bank of this city, was born near Mil 
lersburg. Bourbon county, Kentucky, on the 
r)th of October, 1849, and is a son of James 
M. and Rachel A. J. (Hitt) :\Tiller, whose 
marriage was solemnized in Bourbon county 
in the year 1843. James ]\F ]\Iiller was born 
in this county, on the 14th of January, 1823, 
and his wife was here ushered into the world 
on the 27th of March. 1825. James M. Miller 
was a son of Alexander S. Miller, who was 
lorn in Bourbon county, on the 5th of May, 
1796, and who here continued to reside until 
the close of his long and useful life, which 
came to its end on the 6th of January, 1870. 
Alexander S. Miller married Miss Martha 
Harris, who was born in Bourbon county on 
the 5th of February, 1801, and whose death 
liere occurred on the 8th of July, 1854. Alex- 
ander S. ^liller v;as one of the successful ag- 
riculturists and representative citizens of his 
native county, and was influential in connec- 
tion w'ith public affairs of a local order. He 
was a son of Major John Miller, the founder 



of the family in Kentucky, and concerning the 
latter due mention is made in the previously 
noted record concerning the family. 

Soon after their marriage James M. Miller 
and his wife settled on the old Hitt home- 
stead, three miles south of Millersburg, this 
having been the birthplace of Airs. Miller. 
On this finely improved farm, eligibly sit- 
uated on the Alaysville and Lexington Pike, 
James M. IMiller continued to be actively en-, 
gaged in farming and stock-growing for many 
years, and no citizen holds more secure place 
in popular confidence and esteem. He was a 
man of sterling character and strong intellec- 
tuality and his influence and tangible co-opera- 
tion were given to those measures and enter- 
prises tending to conserve and advance the 
best interests of the community. He was a 
stanch advocate of the principles and policies 
of the Democratic party, and both he and his 
wife were zealous members of the Methodist 
church. He passed to his reward on the 27th 
of August, 1 881, and his cherished and de- 
voted wife survived him by nearly a quarter of 
a century, having been summoned to the life 
eternal on the 19th of September, 1904; her 
memory is revered by all who came within the 
sphere of her gracious and kindlv influence. 
James M. and Rachel A. J. (Hitt) Miller be- 
came the parents of eight s:hildren, concern- 
ing whom the following brief data are given : 
Miss Mary Mac is living in Atlanta, Geor- 
gia ; John A. died when 59 years, while liv- 
ing in Atlanta, Georgia, where his family still 
lives — wife and three daughters and one son ; 
Dr. AX'illiam AlcClure. whose name initiates 
tUis article, was the next in order of birth ; 
Henry Bascom is a resident of Atlanta, Geor- 
gia, where he is engaged in drug business; 
Martha is wife of R. P. Milam, of Atlanta; 
Raymond is a ranchman by vocation and re- 
sides in Colorado, near Pueblo ; and Robert L. 
is living in Dublin, Georgia, in the furniture 
and undertaking business. 

Dr. William McClure Miller, who is of the 
fourth generation in line of direct descent 
from Major John Miller, was reared on the 
home farm and under its sturdy and invigorat- 
ing discipline he waxed strong in mental and 
physical powers. After duly availing him- 
self of the advantages of the common schools 
of the localit}' and period he continued his 
higher studies in the Kentucky Weslyan Col- 
lege in Millersburg. With such excellent ac- 
ademic training as a basis for technical disci- 
pline he finally entered the Philadelphia Col- 
lege of Pharmacy, in the city of Philadel- 
phia, in which institution he completed the 
prescribed course and was graduated as a 
member of the class of 1870. In the follow- 



1246 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



ing year, shortly after attaining his legal ma- 
jority, he engaged in the drug business in 
Alillersburg, where he successfully continued 
operations in this line of enterprise for fully 
a quarter of a century, during which he main- 
tained prestige as one of the representative 
business men of the thriving little city of 
which his honored ancestor was the founder. 
His predilection for the medical profession 
had been fortihed by his former technical 
training and by his long experience in the 
drug business, and finally he determined to 
prepare himself for that profession. He en- 
tered the Ohio Medical College in the city of 
Cincinnati, where he completed the regular 
course of study and in this excellent institu- 
tion he was graduated as the member of the 
class of 1889, duly receiving his well-earned 
degree of Doctor of Medicine. To fortify 
himself still further for the exacting and re- 
sponsible work of his chosen profession, the 
Doctor went to London, England, soon after 
his graduation, and in that great metropolis 
he completed an effective post-graduate course 
in the year 1890. In 1894 he also took a 
course in the New York PosL-Graduate 
School of Medicine, and during the interven- 
ing years, through careful study and investi- 
gation, with resource to the best of standard 
and periodical literature of his profession, he 
has kept in close touch with the advances 
made in both medicine and surgery, the while 
his success in his professional work has been 
on a parity with his recognized ability, 
through which he has built up and maintained 
a large and essentially representative prac- 
tice. He has been continuously engaged in 
the practice of his profession in Millersburg 
since the time of his graduation, and here he 
has ministered with all of devotion and much 
of skill in the alleviation of human suffering, 
the while he is held in affectionate regard by 
the many families he has thus served in his 
humane and noble mission. He is a member 
of the Bourbon County Medical Society, the 
Kentucky State Medical Society and the 
American Medical Association, and for nearly 
forty years he has been affiliated with Amity 
Lodge, No. 40, Free & Accepted Masons, in 
Millersburg, of which body he has thrice 
served as worshipful master. He and his 
wife hold membership in the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, South, and his political allegi- 
ance is given to the Democratic party, in 
whose faith he was reared. Mr. Miller is in- 
trinsically loyal, progressive and public-spir- 
ited in his civic attitude and gives his support 
to all objects and measures that are projected 
for the best interests of his home city and 
county. 



Dr. Miller has been twice married. On the 
25th of April, 1883, was solemnized his union 
to Miss Martha Hulchcraft, who was born 
and reared in Bourbon county and who was 
the daughter of the late James Hutchcraft, a 
well-known citizen of this section of the 
state. Mrs. Miller passed to eternal rest on 
the 27th of March, 1903, having borne no 
children. On the 29th of January, 1906, Dr. 
Miller was united in marriage to Miss Alice 
Hart, who was born in Chicago, Illinois, and 
who is a daughter of Dr. Charles F. and Anna 
(Hutchcraft) Hart, both of whom were born 
in Kentucky and both of whom are now de- 
ceased. Dr. and Mrs. Miller have two sons, 
— -William McClure, Jr., who was born No- 
vember 17, 1906, and Charles Hart, who was 
born on the i6th of May, 1908. Dr. and Mrs. 
Miller are prominent in connection with the 
leading social activities of Millersburg and 
their home is one notable for its gracious hos- 
pitality. 

William M. Jones. — "Sunny Valley," the 
fine homestead farm occupied by William M. 
Jones, is eligibly located about one and a half 
miles south of North Middletown, Bourbon 
county, and is one of the most attractive rural 
demesnes of this favored section of the old 
Blue Grass state. Mr. Jones is known as one 
of the representative agriculturists and stock- 
growers of his native county, where he is well 
entitled to the implicit confidence and esteem 
so uniformly reposed in him. He was born 
in this county on the 25th of November, 1854, 
and is a son of Josiah A. and Leoma (Tal- 
bott) Jones, both of whom were likewise na- 
tives of Bourbon county, where the respective 
families were founded in the pioneer days 
and where the names have been prominently 
and worthily identified with the civic and 
industrial development and progress. Josiah 
A. Jones was a son of William S. and Nancy 
(Ashurst) Jones and his wife was a daughter 
of Mason and Susan (Leach) Talbott. Josiah 
A. and Leoma (Talbott) Jones became the 
parents of four children, concerning whom 
the following brief record is entered, — Susan 
is the widow of A. K. Young and resides in 
the city of Paris, this county; William M., 
of this sketch, was the next in order of birth ; 
Mary L. died when about forty-five years of 
age ; and Allen G. is a prosperous farmer 
of Bourbon county. The parents continued 
to maintain their home in this county until 
their death and the father was a representa- 
tive farmer and influential citizen, ever com- 
manding the esteem of all who knew him. 
He was a Democrat in politics and both he 
and his wnfe held membership in the Christian 
church. 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1247 



William M. Jones gained his early experi- 
ences in connection vvitli the practical atfairs 
of life through his association with the work 
of the home farm, on which he was reared 
io adult age, in the meanwhile having duly 
availed himself of the advantages of the jniblic 
schools of the locality. When about sixteen 
years of age he initiated his independent 
operations as a dealer in live stock and with 
this line of enterprise he has continued to be 
successfully concerned during the intervening 
years, which have also been marked by his 
close and successful association with agricul- 
tural interests. His advancement has been 
made by a very appreciable industry and good 
management and he is today one of the ex- 
tensive farmers and stock-dealers of his na- 
tive state. His beautiful homestead comprises 
eight hundred and fifty acres of valuable land, 
all in one body, and constitutes one of the 
"show places" of P)Ourbon county. In addi- 
tion to diversified agriculture he has made a 
specialty of the breeding of registered saddle 
horses and a number of the finest horses 
raised upon his estate have gained world-wide 
reputation, among the most prominent being 
Sterling Denmark. ^Montgomery Chief. Bour- 
bon King, Marvel King and P^rilliant King. 
In politics Mr. Jones is found arrayed as a 
stalwart and intelligent supporter of the cause 
of the Democratic party and while he is ever 
ready to give his influence and aid in support 
of all enterprises and measures tending to 
advance the general welfare he has been ani- 
mated by naught of ambition for public office. 
His wife holds membership in the Christian 
church and their beautiful home is recognized 
as a center of that gracious hospitality which 
has given Kentucky so wide and enduring 
reputation. 

On the 31st of May, 1882, Mr. Jones was 
united in marriage to Aliss Fannie Evans, 
who was born in Clark county. Kentucky, on 
the 27th of August, 1857, and who is a daugh- 
ter of Thomas J. and Mary J. (Rice) Evans, 
both of whom were likewise natives of Ken- 
tucky, the former having been born in Clark 
county on the 2nd of October. 1832, and the 
latter in Bourbon county, on the 9th of Feb- 
ruary, 1837. Their marriage was solemnized 
in Bourbon county on the 22nd of November. 
1855, and they thereafter maintained their 
home in Clark county until 1873. when they 
removed to Bourbon county and established 
their home on the fine farm now owned by 
William AI. Jones, the subject of this review, 
where they continued to reside until their 
death. Mrs. Evans was strmmoned to the life 
eternal on the i6th of August. 1904. and her 
husband passed away on the 7th of -March, 



1906. They became the parents of six chil- 
dren, namely : Fannie, Charlton T., Pattie D., 
Richard M., Effie S. and Jennie R. After 
his marriage Mr. Jones established his home 
on a farm near his present homestead and 
since 1904, the "Sunny Valley" estate has 
been the place of his abode. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Jones have been born four children, all 
of whom are living, and their names and 
respective dates of birth arc here recorded : 
Luella. June 23, 1883; ^lary Graham, De- 
cember 7, 1884; Thomas J., October 4, 1887; 
and L. Raymer, April 25, 1895. 

Allex G. Jones. — A highly esteemed and 
essentially representative farmer and stock- 
grower of Bourbon county is Allen G. Jones, 
who owns and resides upon the farm, which 
was the place of his nativity and which is 
one of the valuable places of this section of 
the county. Mr. Jones has made a specialty 
of the breeding of fine horses and in this 
connection his farm has gained a wide 
reptitation. 

Allen G. Jones was born on his ])resent 
homestead, on the 21st of April. 1865, and 
is a son of Josiah A. and Leoma (Talbott) 
Jones, both of whom were likewise natives 
of Bourbon county, where the former was 
born on the i6th of March, 1826, and the 
latter on the 7th of August, 1830. In this 
county their marriage was solemnized on the 
15th of April, 1847, ^"<^1 soon afterward they 
located on the present homestead of their 
son Allen G.. two miles northwest of North 
Middletown. on the Paris and North Middle- 
town turnpike. Here Josiah A. Jones con- 
tinued to be actively engaged in agricultural 
pursuits and stock-growing until his death, 
which occurred on the 6th of December. 1889, 
and his widow, now venerable in years, re- 
mains with her son on the old homestead. 
Josiah A. and Leoma (Talbott) Jones be- 
came the parents of four children : Susan A., 
who was born January 27, 1848. is the widow 
of A. K. Young and resides at Paris, Ken- 
tucky ; William M., who was born November 
24. 1854. is individually mentioned elsewhere 
in this volume ; Mary L.. wdio was born Au- 
gust 31. 1850, became the wife of John G. 
Redmon and died on the 15th of April. 1895; 
and Allen G., the subject of this review, is 
the youngest of the children. 

Allen G. Jones was reared to the discipline 
of the home farm and he has never found it 
expedient to direct his energies along other 
lines of enterprise than that to which he thus 
became accustomed when a youth. He was 
afforded the advantages of the Kentucky Clas- 
sical & Business College, at North Middle- 
town, and he has been continuouslv identified 



1248 



HISTORY OF KEXTUCKY AND KENTUCKIAXS 



with the work and management of the farm 
on which he was born. At the present time 
he is the owner of a vahiable landed estate 
of four hundred and sixteen acres and he is 
known as one of the substantial and progres- 
sive men of his native county, where he is 
engaged in diversified agriculture and the 
raising of live stock of excellent grade. He 
is one of the representative breeders of regis- 
tered saddle horses in America and many of 
the horses from his farm have achieved high 
reputation, including Montgomery Chief, 
which he sold for five thousand dollars in 
1902. this constituting a record-breaking price 
for a saddle stallion at that time. He also 
owns Bourbon King, a celebrated stallion, as 
well as Marvel King and Brilliant King. His 
brother. William ]\I., is associated with him 
in the ownership of the three stallions last men- 
tioned and he is considered one of the most 
successful breeders of fine saddle horses in 
the United States. Mr. Jones is liberal and 
loyal in his civic attitude, takes a lively interest 
in all that touches the welfare of the comniun- 
ity and his political allegiance is given to the 
Democratic party, though he has had no de- 
sire for public office. His beautiful home 
is the center of generous hospitality and Mrs. 
Jones is a most gracious chatelaine of the 
same. She holds membership in the Chris- 
tian church. 

On the i8th of November. 1891, 'Sir. Jones 
was united in marriage to Miss Effie S. 
Evans, who was born in Clark county, this 
state, on the 27th of October, 1868, and who 
is a daughter of Thomas J. and Mary J. 
(Rice) Evans. Mr. and ^Irs. Jones have 
three children : Josiah A., born September 28. 
1892; Ina P., born December 14. 1895; and 
Charlton, born November 20, 1896. 

Charles C. Clarke. — On a fine homestead 
of four hundred and forty acres, in Bourbon 
county, resides this well known and highly 
esteemed representative of the agricultural 
industry in this section of the state and he 
is a prominent factor in connection with pub- 
■ lie afifairs in the county, where he is now 
serving as chairman of the Bourbon County 
Democratic Committee. He is signally alert 
and progressive as a citizen and his influence 
and cooperation are given in support of all 
measures and projects tending to enhance the 
general welfare of the community. 

Charles C. Clarke was born in Mason 
county, Kentucky, on the 27th of December, 
1868, and is a son of John and Nannie (Fitz- 
gerald) Clarke, both of whom were likewise 
born in that county and both of whom are 
representatives of sterling pioneer families 
of that section of the state. John Clarke was 



a son (jf Charles Clarke, who likewise was 
born in Mason county and who became one 
of the prominent and influential citizens of 
that section. He served several years as 
county sheriff and was also called to other 
local offices of public trust. He married Miss 
Caroline Hoard and they became the parents 
of four chiklren : John, Charles, Seth and Car- 
oline. John Clarke was born in the year 
1835 and his entire active career was one of 
close and successful identification with agri- 
cultural pursuits. He was one of the repre- 
sentative citizens of Mason county and was a 
particularly successful business man, having 
been known as one of the best financiers of 
Mason county. He was primarily instru- 
mental in the organization of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Maysville, this county, and 
served on its board of directors until his 
death, which occurred in 1833. His wife, 
now venerable in years, resides in the city 
of Maysville. She is a devout member of the 
Christian church, with which her husband 
also was actively identified for many years 
prior to his demise. Of the four children the 
following data are given : Caroline is deceased. 
Anna P. is the wife of Charles C. Hopper, of 
Maysville ; Charles C, of this review, was the 
next in order of birth ; and John remains on 
the old homestead farm in Mason county, 
where he is serving his second term as 
sherift". 

Charles C. Clarke gained his early experi- 
ences in connection with the practical affairs 
of life through his close association with the 
work of the old homestead farm, on which 
he was born. His early educational advan- 
tages were those afforded in the graded 
schools of Mason county and he was but fif- 
teen years of age at the time of his father's 
death. He then assumed the practical charge 
of the home farm, to whose supervision he 
continued to give his attention imtil he had 
attained to his legal majority. In 1890, short- 
ly after his first marriage, Mr. Clarke re- 
moved to Bourbon county and purchased his 
present fine homestead, which is located about 
seven miles east of the city of Paris, on the 
Paris and North Middletown turnpike. 
Everything about the place indicates thrift 
and prosperity and Air. Clarke is recognized 
as one of the most progressive and successful 
farmers of the county, besides which he 
raises high-grade live stock, and he has 
built up a successful enterprise in the buying 
and shipping of cattle. In politics he is rec- 
ognized as one of the leaders of the Demo- 
cratic party in his county and this fact is 
evidenced in his incumbency of the office of 
chairman of the Democratic committee of 




'■^mc 



^fi4«r/ 








Uo 



oT^"©-^^, 



HISTORY OF KEXTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1249 



Bourbon county. He is a member of the 
board of trustees of the Kentucky Ckissical 
& Business College, at North INliddletown, 
and both he and his wife hold membership in 
the Christian church. 

In Mason county, this state, on the 5th of 
Febiuiry. 1890, Mr. Clarke was united in 
marriage to Miss Florence Fox, who was 
born and reared in that county and who was 
a daughter of Andrew and Amanda (Daugh- 
erty) Fox. She was summoned to the life 
eternal in August, 1907, and of the four 
children the following brief data are given, — 
fohn F. is deceased ; Claude remains at the 
parental home; Harry D. is deceased; and 
Charles C. Jr., remains at the homestead. On 
the loth of November, 1909, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Clarke to Miss Sadie H. 
Young, who was born in Bourbon county, on 
the 4th of December, 1881, and who is a 
daughter of James W. Young, a sketch of 
whose career appears elsewhere in this volume, 
so it is not necessary to enter further review 
of the family history in this connection. Mr. 
and Mrs. Clarke have one child, — Sallie 
Young Clarke, who was, born on the 5th of 
October, 1910. 

AvLETTE BucKNER. — Within the pages of 
this work will be found specific mention of a 
number of the representatives of the Buckner 
family, whose name has been long and promi- 
nently identified with the annals of Kentucky 
and which has ever stood exponent of the 
highest type of citizenship. Aylette Buckner 
is numbered among the able and successful 
agriculturists and stock-growers of Bourbon 
county and his well improved farm comprises 
one hundred and seventy-five acres, located 
about seven miles east of the city of Paris, on 
the Paris and Little Rock turnpike. Besides 
this farm he also owns a large tract of land 
in Canada. He is progressive in his farming 
enterprise and is contributing his quota to up- 
holding the high standard of the agricultural 
industry in his native county. Aylette Buck- 
ner was born in Bourbon county on the 15th 
of Tanuary, 1877, and is a son of William S. 
and Rosa' (Lindsay) Buckner, both of whom 
were likewise natives of Bourbon county, 
where the former was born in February, 1851, 
and the latter in April. 1852. William S. 
Buckner died February 9. 1890, and his wife 
is still living in Paris, Kentucky. He whose 
name initiates this sketch has been identified 
with agricultural pursuits throughout his en- 
tire career. He was reared on the old home- 
stead farm and early began to assist in its 
work, the while he was afforded excellent 
educational advantages, having attended a 
private school conducted by William L. Yerkes, 



at Paris, this state, and having later con- 
tinued his studies in the University of Ken- 
tucky, now known as Transylvania University 
at Lexington. Mr. Buckner has resided on 
his present homestead since the time of his 
marriage and upon the same he has made 
improvements of the best type, ever^'thing 
about the place giving unmistakable evidence 
of thrift and prosperity. His political alle- 
giance is given to the Democratic party and 
while he takes a loyal interest in all that 
touches the welfare of the community he has 
had no ambition for public office. He is a 
member of the Christian, or Campbellite, 
church, and his wife holds membership in the 
Methodist Episcopal church. South. 

On the 15th of June, 1904. was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Buckner to Miss Mary 
H. Lockhart, who was born at Paris, Bour- 
bon county, on the 29th of November, 1883, 
and who is a daughter of General C. and 
Florence (Kelly) Lockhart. A review of the 
career of her father appears elsewhere in this 
publication so that further data concerning the 
family history is not demanded in the present 
connection. Mr. and Mrs. Buckner have one 
son, Catlett L., who was born on the 27th of 
December, 1907, at Asheville, North Carolina, 
where his parents were sojourning for the 
winter at the time of his birth. 

William L. Doolax has indicated both in 
his devotion to study of the science of juris- 
prudence and his success in the practical work 
of his profession that he is well deserving of 
tlie unmistakable prestige he has gained as one 
of the well fortified and representative young- 
er members of the bar of his native state, and 
he is established in practice as an attorney and 
counselor at law in the city of Louisville, 
where his careful observance of the unwritten 
code of professional ethics has gained for him 
the high regard of his confreres at the bar. 
Mr. Doolan was born on a farm in Shelby 
county, Kentucky, on the 22d of January, 
1876, and is a son of Professor Thomas J. and 
Rowena E. (Weakley) Doolan. The father 
was born in county Cork, Ireland, on the 15th 
of ^larch, 1841, and he died at his home in 
Shelby county, Kentucky, on the 13th of 
jNIarch, 1899, only two days prior to the time 
when he would have celebrated his fifty-eighth 
birthday. He was a child at the time of the 
family emigration from the Emerald Isle to 
America, and he was reared to maturity in 
Shelby county, Kentucky, where his father 
located soon after coming to the United States. 
He came into the world with the heritage of 
fine physical powers and alert mentality, and 
his ambition was early quickened to action, as 
he easily proved his leadership in his classes 



1250 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



in the schools of Shelbyville, after completing 
the curriculum of which he entered (jeorge- 
town College, in which lie was graduated as 
a member of the class of i860, lie forthwith 
put his scholastic acquirements to practical 
use by turning his attention to the pedagogic 
profession, in which he was destined to attain 
noteworthy success and high reputation. In 
the autumn of i860 he began teaching in the 
Weakley neighborhood, a few miles southeast 
of Shelbyville, and several months later he 
opened a select school at Christianburg, in the 
same county; this he conducted with marked 
success. In 1861 was solemnized his mar- 
riage to Miss Rowena Elizabeth Weakley, the 
only daughter of the late Calvin S. and Mary 
Weakley, honored citizens of Shelby county. 
Mrs. Doolan was w'ell fitted, through culture, 
assidious industry and excellent judgment, to 
be a true helpmeet to her devoted and honored 
husband, and their relations were ever of the 
most idyllic order, characterized by mutual 
love and sympathy as well as by thorough in- 
tellectual companionship untouched by intol- 
erance. She entered the school room with 
him and for many years they were associated 
in the conducting of one of the most thorough 
and profitable schools in Shelby county. 
Early in his pedagogic career Professor 
Doolan was prevailed upon to establish a 
school of high order at Finchville, that coun- 
ty, and tliis institution soon became a source 
of just pride in that section of the state. The 
splendid intellectual and administrative abil- 
ity of Professor Doolan and his gracious wife 
attracted to their school many pupils from dis- 
tant points in the state, and these were accom- 
modated in the home of Professor Doolan and 
those of other families of the community, 
where the influences and surroundings were 
of the most beneficent order. Both the pro- 
fessor and his wife showed remarkable power 
in arousing and maintaining the interest of 
the pupils, with the result that the latter made 
substantial and rapid advancement, according 
to their instructors, the utmost affection and 
esteem. Professor Doolan was a most excel- 
lent teacher, painstaking and loyal in his pro- 
fession, and mention also may be made of the 
fact that he and his devoted coadjutor exer- 
cised in a quiet way a most constant interest 
in the moral and religious training of their 
pupils, whose characters were thus moulded 
and established. Many of the best men and 
women of Kentucky and many men who have 
attained prominence in the various vocations 
of life, received their original inspiration and 
guidance in the Doolan school. In the latter 
years of his life Professor Doolan gave up 
his work as a teacher and devoted his time and 



energies to the management of his well im- 
proved landed estate in Shelby county, where 
he gained precedence and success as a pro- 
gressive agriculturist ami stock-grower. As 
the result of his mature judgment and careful 
administration of his affairs he was duly 
pros])ered, thus being able to leave a goodly 
estate to his family. 

In addition to his professional affairs Pro- 
fessor Doolan was entrusted with much bus- 
iness extraneous thereto and involving public 
trust. For four years he was president of the 
Shelby County Agricultural Society, to whose 
annual fairs he brought a degree of prosper- 
ity theretofore attained. He served many 
years as deputy clerk of Shelby county and 
was called upon to write many deeds, wills 
and other official documents. Often he was 
called upon to examine and give his opinion 
concerning legal matters and measures touch- 
ing the general welfare of the community. 
He was an expert surveyor and in this capac- 
ity his services were much in demand in lo- 
cating disputed lines and corners, in dividing 
landed estates and in general surveying work. 
His counsel was sought in connection with al- 
most every subject in which the farmers of his 
section were interested, and his opinions con- 
cerning the popular topics and the issues of the 
day had great weight with his neighbors. He 
had splendid powers of ratiocination, and 
view^ed all practical matters in their true pro- 
portions, thus reaching conclusions by safe 
methods of reasoning. 

Early in life Professor Doolan united with 
the Shelbyville Baptist church, and none had 
a deeper reverence for the spiritual verities 
than did he. His life was one of definite con- 
secration, and for many years prior to his 
death he had served as deacon and moderator 
of the Buck Creek Baptist church, besides 
which he was for nineteen vears incumbent 
of the office of clerk of the Shelby County 
Baptist Association. He loved the Bible and 
was a deep student of the same, so that he 
was able to expound its teachings with surety 
and reverence. At the time when he was 
summoned to the life eternal one of his in- 
timate friends wrote the following sentiments, 
which are well worthy of perpetuation in this 
sketch : "He was rich in his experience of 
grace, as was readily seen from his public 
prayers — how humbly he confessed human 
unworthiness, and how earnestly he plead for 
mercy through the merits of a crucified Sa- 
viour. It saddens my heart to know that no 
more will we hear his familiar voice in prayer, 
no more will w-e listen to his exposition of 
Scripture in the Sunday-school, no more will 
we receive his counsel in the church meeting, 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1251 



no more will we greet him in the congregation 
of the saints. Farewell, beloved brotlicr, un- 
til we meet in that 'city whose builder and 
maker is God.' " 

The memory of Professor Doolan shall long 
be held in reverence in the community that 
so long represented his home and in which 
his hold upon popular confidence and affec- 
tion was ever inviolable. His widow still re- 
sides on the old homestead, which is endeared 
to her by the gracious memories and associa- 
tions of the past, and in the loss of her loved 
companion she finds much of solace in the 
affectionate regard of her children and of a 
circle of friends that is limited only by that 
of her acquaintances. She also is a devout 
and zealous memljer of the Bajjtist church, 
with which her children likewise are identi- 
fied, thus showing their appreciation of the 
precepts and teachings of their devoted par- 
ents. Professor Doolan is survived by five 
sons and four daughters, whose names are 
here given: Esten, John C, Leonard W., 
William L., Ernest, Elma, Sallie, Lillie and 
Rowena. 

William Lee Doolan, whose name initiates 
this review, was reared to the discipline of the 
home farm and was prepared for college in 
Shelby Academy, the school owned and con- 
ducted by his father. For two years he was 
a student in Hardin Collegiate Institute, at 
Elizabethtown, this state, and he completed 
liis literary education in Washington & Lee 
University, at Lexington, \'irginia. In 1900 
he was graduated from the law department 
of Louisville University, from which he re- 
ceived the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He 
was forthwith admitted to the bar of his na- 
tive state and opened an ofiice in the Kenyon 
building, in Louisville, where he has since 
maintained his headquarters, the while he has 
so demonstrated his powers and his integrity 
of purpose as to gain success of unequivocal 
order in his exacting profession. Though 
never incumbent of political ofifice Mr. Doolan 
is aligned as a staunch supporter of the cause 
of the Democratic party, and both he and his 
wife are active members of the Highland Bap- 
tist church, in their home city. 

On the 1 6th of June, 1898, Mr. Doolan 
was united in marriage to Aliss Nellie 
Brown, daughter of Horace G. Brown, of 
Roanoke, A'irginia, and they have tw'o children 
— William Lee, Jr., born October 27, 1899, 
and Thomas Jeft'erson, born September 

4. 1901- 

John H. Roseberry. — At this point atten- 
tion is directed to the career of one of the 
most progressive and extensive farmers and 
stock dealers in Bourbon county and it may 



be said that Mr. Roseberry is not only one 
of the well known and highly esteemed citi- 
zens of his native county but that he is also a 
citizen whose loyalty and public spirit are of 
the most unequivocal order. He has been in- 
fiuential in the furtherance of the industrial 
and civic advancement of Bourbon county and 
here his circle of friends is coincident with 
that of his acquaintances. 

John FI. Roseberry was born in Bourbon 
county on the 20th of May, 1851, and is a son 
of Hiram M. and Caroline K. (Hildreth) 
Roseberry, both of whom were likewise na- 
tives of Bourbon county, where the respective 
families w-ere founded in the pioneer days. 
Hiram M. Roseberry was born on the 13th of 
November, 1824, and his wife was born De- 
cember 10, 1830; their marriage was here sol- 
emnized on the 30th of November, 1848, and 
of the two children, John H., of this sketch, 
is the younger. Molly F., who was born on 
the 25th of September, 1849, ^"d who died in 
January, 1896, became the wife of Nathaniel 
Rogers on the ist of October, 1867, and they 
became the parents of one son, Hiram R., who 
married Miss Ida Barton ; Mr. Rogers is 
now deceased and his wife and only son. Bar- 
ton, now reside in the city of Cincinnati, 
Ohio. Hiram M. Roseberry was a son of 
Hugh and Mollie (Parker) Roseberry, the 
former of whom was born in Virginia, on the 
28th of June, 1788, and the latter in Mary- 
land, on the 23d of January, 1798. Hugh 
Roseberry came to Kentucky in 1803, at which 
time he was about sixteen years of age, and 
his wife was brought by her parents to this 
state in April, 1798, being about three months 
old at the time. Mr. Roseberry established 
his home in Bourbon county, as did also the 
parents of his wife, and here his marriage to 
Miss Alollie Parker was solemnized on the 
4th of May, 181 7. He died on the 14th of 
November, 1858, and his wife, long surviving 
him, was summoned to the life eternal on the 
23d of May, 1880. They became the parents 
of six children — Caroline, Henrietta, Hiram 
AL, Mary, Rebecca and a daughter who died 
in infancy. The only one of the children now 
living is Rebecca, who is the widow of James 
M. Hughes and resides in Paris, Kentucky. 
Hiram M. Roseberry was reared on the old 
homestead farm and for a number of years 
after attaining to maturitv he continued to be 
identified with agricultural pursuits. In 1875 
he was one of those primarily instrumental 
in the organization of the Agricultural Bank 
at Paris, this county, and he served as presi- 
dent of this institution until his death, which 
occurred on the 3d of November, 1895. A 
number of years prior to his demise he re- 



1252 



HISTORY OI' IvEXTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



moved from his farm to Paris, where he re- 
sided until a year beftn-e his death. His cher- 
ished and devoted wife here died on the ist 
of March, 1891, and in 1894 he became a 
resident in the home of his son, John H,, the 
subject of this review, where he remained un- 
til he was summoned from the scene of life's 
mortal endeavors. He was a man of sterling 
character and of distinctive business ability, 
tie gained a large and worthy success and so 
ordered his course as to retain at all times 
the inviolable confidence and esteem of his 
fellow men. He was a Democrat in his po- 
litical proclivities and both he and his wife 
were zealous members of the Christian church 
of Paris. 

John H. Roseberry passed his boyhood and 
youth on the farm and he has been continu- 
ously identified with the great basic art of 
agriculture to the present time. He was af- 
forded the advantages of the select school 
conducted by Professor Thomas J. Dodd, in 
Paris, and after his school days he continued 
to be associated in the work and management 
of the home farm, of which he eventually be- 
came the owner. He is at the present time 
the owner of valuable land in Bourbon county 
and his beautiful home, known as "Ellerslie," 
is most attractively located at a point five 
miles east of Paris, on the Paris and Cane 
Ridge turnpike. In addition to diversified 
agriculture Mr. Roseberry gives special at- 
tention to the raising and dealing in of high- 
grade live stock and he is known as one of 
the most alert and progressive representa- 
tives of these lines of industry in his native 
county. He is essentially loyal and public- 
spirited as a citizen, always ready to give his 
influence and aid in support of movements 
and enterprises for the advancing of the best 
interests of his home county and state and 
while he has never been an aspirant for public 
office he accords a stalwart allegiance to the 
cause of the Democratic party. He is a con- 
sistent and valued member of the Cane Ridge 
Christian church, as was also his wife. It 
should be noted that the maternal grandpar- 
ents of Mr. Roseberry were likewise num- 
bered among the sterling pioneers of Bourbon 
county. They were John and Marianne (Fin- 
ley) Hildreth, both of whom were natives of 
\^irginia, where the former was born on the 
26th of June, 1790. and the latter on the 3d 
of March, 1800. They came to Bourbon 
county in a very early day and here they 
passed the residue of their lives, honored by 
all who knew them. Mr. Hildreth was sum- 
moned to eternal rest on the 25th of October, 
1872, and his wife passed away on the nth 
of June, 1862. They became the parents of 



eleven children, namely — Sarah M., Minerva 
J., Luvica, Catherine A., William J., Joseph 
A., Mary E., Caroline K., Bradford, Eliza T. 
and John F. All of the number are now de- 
ceased except Joseph A., who resides on Cane 
Ridge and who is one of the prosperous 
farmers and stock-growers of Bourbon 
county. 

On the loth of November, 1891, was sol- 
emnized the marriage of Mr. Roseberry to 
Miss Elizabeth Brent Wilson, who was born 
in Bourbon county in December, 1868, and 
who was a daughter of Henry T. and Anna 
(Young) Wilson. She was a woman of most 
gracious personality and gained the affection- 
ate regard of all who came within the sphere 
of her gentle and kindly influence. She was 
summoned to the life eternal in April, 1901, 
and is survived by two children — Caroline K., 
who was born September 5, 1892, and Hiram 
M., born November 13, 1894. 

William T. Buckner. — The man best fit- 
ted to meet the wonderfully changed life of 
to-day is not a new type of man. He is a man 
resplendent with the same old sterling qual- 
ities, — great in his home life, great in his civic 
and patriotic life and great in his religious 
life. William T. Buckner is a gentleman of 
the old-school regime and he is a descendent 
of an old English family that was early 
founded in Y'irginia, which commonwealth 
cradled so much of our national history. A 
most interesting record of the family history, 
of the Buckners will be found elsewhere in 
this volume, in the biography of Walker 
Buckner, so that but scant details are con- 
sidered necessary in this connection. 

William T. Buckner was born on the fine 
old homestead farm which now represents his 
home and the date of his nativity was March 
20th, 1848. He is a son of William T., and 
Lucy A. (Woodford) Buckner, both of 
whom were born in \"irginia, the former on 
the 9th of February, 1813, and the latter on 
the 30th of March, 1822. When mere chil- 
dren they accompanied their parents to the 
fine old Blue Grass state and they were reared 
and educated in Bourbon county, where their 
marriage was solemnized and where they 
passed their entire lives. William T. Buckner 
became a successful agriculturist in Bourbon 
county and he was summoned to eternal rest 
in 1888. He was a man of prominence and 
influence in his county and his memory is 
revered by all who came in contact with his 
gracious personality. He was a son of William 
T. Buckner, who was a son of Thomas and 
Elizabeth (Haws) Buckner, both of Virginia. 
William T. Buckner, (I), was a native of the 
Old Dominion Commonwealth where he was 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1253 



born in 1786, and he immigrated with his fam- 
ily and lirotliers to Kentucky, settling near 
North .Middletown, this county, where his 
death occurred in 1850, at the age of sixty- 
four years. He was twice married, his first 
union being with his cousin, ^fiss Mary Buck- 
ner, a daughter of William and Elizabeth 
(Monroe) Buckner. They became the parents 
of two children, of whom William T., father 
of him whose name introduces this article, was 
the eldest, b'or his second wife William T. 
Buckner married Sallie Clay, who bore him 
three children. William T. Buckner (II) and 
Lucy A. (Woodford) Buckner had only one 
son. William T. (Ill), whose name initiates 
this review. Mrs. Buckner died December 7. 
1910, at her son's home in her eighty-ninth 
year. 

Mr. William T. Buckner w^as reared 
to the sturdy disci])line of the farm and 
he has never severed his allegiance to the 
great basic industry of agriculture, through 
his association with which he has gained 
definite and worthy success. He was 
afforded excellent educational advantages in 
his youth, including a course of study in the 
select scIkjoI conducted by Professor Thomas 
J. Dodd. at Paris, this state. After his mar- 
riage ]\Ir. Buckner established his home on 
his present finely improved farm, which is the 
old family homestead and which, is located 
seven miles east of Paris. He is one of the 
large landholders of Bourbon county, being 
at the present time the owner of about nine- 
teen hundred acres of most arable land, all 
of which is well improved, and he devotes his 
attention to diversified agriculture and the rais- 
ing of high-grade stock. In ])olitics. while 
never a seeker of public office, ^Ir. Buckner 
is a stanch adherent of the Democratic party 
and his wife holds membership in the Presby- 
terian church. 

In the year 1875 was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Mr. Buckner to Miss Anna Clay 
Wornall. who was born in Clark county and 
who is a daughter of James R. and Anna 
(Moore) Wornall. Mr. and Mrs. Buckner 
became the parents of six children, of whom 
three are living: Thomas M.. who is in- 
dividually mentioned on other pages of this 
work; James M., who still remains at the 
parental home and is associated in the work 
and management of the farm; and Lucy W., 
who is the w-ife of Clarence Kenney. Mr. and 
Mrs. Kenney likewise reside on the old home- 
stead of yir. Buckner and the family is one 
of prominence in connection with the best 
social activities of the community. 



Thomas M. Buckner. — A representative 
of the great basic industry of agriculture in 
Bourbon county, Kentucky, Thomas M. Buck- 
ner is a native son of this county and he is 
a scion of a fine old southern family founded 
in X'irginia in the early colonial days. He 
was born on the 15th of September, 1881, and 
is a son of William T. and Anna C. (Wornall) 
Buckner, the former of whom was likewise 
born in Bourl)on county, and the latter is 
a native of Clark county. Concerning the 
Buckner family further information is given 
in the sketch of William T. Ikickner. father 
of Thomas M. and also in the sketch of 
Walker Buckner. an uncle of the subject of 
this review, wdiich appears on other pages of 
this work. 

After availing himself of the advantages 
afforded in the public schools of his native 
county, Thomas M. Buckner pursued his 
higher academic training in the \V. L. 
^'erkes Academy, at Paris, Kentucky, and 
in the Bingham Military School, at Ashe- 
ville. North Carolina. He was matriculated 
in the historic old University of X'irginia. at 
Charlottesville, in wdiich he was graduated, 
and from which he received his degree. After 
his graduation Mr. Buckner returned to Bour- 
bon county where he initiated his independent 
career as a farmer and stock-grower. Shortly 
after his marriage, in 1904, he established his 
home on a farm about seven miles northeast 
of Paris, on the Ilarrod's Creek pike. He 
has made the finest of improvements on his 
place and has brought the same up to a high 
degree of cultivation. He is a member of the 
Kappa Alpha college fraternity. Both he and 
his wife are prominent and popular figures in 
connection with the best social activities of 
the community. 

On the 28th of April, 1904, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Buckner to Miss Martha 
Davenport Clay, who is likewise a native of 
Bourbon county, where she was born on the 
4th of October, 1881. She is a daughter of 
Christopher F. and Mary (Brooks) Clay, 
representative citizens of this county. Mr. 
and Mrs. Buckner have no children. 

Judge John Q. Ward. — One of the most 
highly honored- representatives of the legal 
fraternity of Bourbon county was the late 
Judge John Q. W^ard, wdio, although more than 
a decade has passed since he was removed by 
the hand of death from a community in which 
he had been one of the best loved and most 
valuable factors in its many-sided life, is still 
keenly remembered and keenly regretted by 
hosts of friends and admirers. 



1254 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



Judge Ward was born in Oxford, Scott 
county, Kentucky, on the 29th of August, 
1838. Of Scotch-Irish ancestr}', the domi- 
nating characteristics of the two nations have 
been agreeably blended and fused in the Ward 
family, the versatility and alertness of the 
latter being combined with the unswerving 
loyalty to duty and unwavering fidelity of the 
former. The year 1750 marked the advent 
of the Ward family in America, \'irginia be- 
ing chosen for ]:)ermanent location. The great- 
grandfather, Joseph Ward, figured promi- 
nently in public alfairs in the Old Dominion 
commonwealth, serving as a member of the 
state legislature and also as judge of the 
courts of quarter sessions for several terms. 
He married Margaret Coalter, a representa- 
tive of an old Virginia family and they re- 
moved from Fauquier county, Virginia, to 
Harrison county, Kentucky about the year 
1785. Their son, Gary Aldry Ward, was- the 
father of John O. Ward, of this sketch, and 
was born in Harrison county, Kentucky. As 
he grew to man's estate he learned the printer's 
trade and at one time edited a paper at Ox- 
ford. Kentucky. After 1832 he clirected his 
energies to farming and merchandising in 
Scott county and he became one of the most 
influential citizens in his section of the state. 
His wife whose maiden name was Elizabeth 
Jane Risk, was a daughter of John and Ann 
(Daugherty) Risk, both of whom were repre- 
sentatives of pioneer families of Woodford 
county, Kentucky. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gary Aldry Ward became the 
parents of three children and of this number 
John O. Ward was the first in order of birth. 
He was born in Scott county, Kentucky, Au- 
gust 29. 1838, and he obtained his education 
in the public schools of Scott county and in 
Georgetown Gollege, in which well-ordered in- 
stitution he was graduated as a member of 
the class of 1858 with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. Immediately after his graduation he 
began the study of law at Georgetown and he 
made such rapid progress under the able pre- 
ceptorship of Marcellus Polk that he was 
admitted to the bar in August, i860. In Sep- 
tember of the same year he initiated the prac- 
tice of his profession as a member of the legal 
fraternity of Gynthiana, Kentucky. Like most 
young lawyers Judge Ward entered into poli- 
tics with great enthusiasm. In 1862 he was 
elected county attorney and he filled this office 
most acceptedly for four years. He was also 
common school commissioner and in 1873 was 
elected to the state legislature. Aside from 
his official duties his time was given to his 
practice, which steadily grew in volume and 
importance, and experience soon tested his 



abilities and proved his merit. The legal busi- 
ness entrusted to his care was of a Jiigh char- 
acter and with consummate skill he handled 
the intricate problems of the law. His suc- 
cess was gratifying and he manifested the 
most painstaking elTort in the trial of cases en- 
trusted to him. As an advocate he was pre- 
eminent and his fame became widespread. His 
superior knowledge of the elemental principles 
of jurisprudence, as well as his accurate com- 
prehension of the finer shades of meaning 
which are often found in the law, made him 
particularly fit for judgeship. In 1884 he 
was elected to the bench of the Superior court 
to fill the unexpired term of Judge Reid. In 
1886 further mark of popular appreciation 
was given him in that he was then re-elected, 
without opposition, for a full term of four 
years, and in 1890 he declined a re-election. 
Oriihis retirement from the bench, Judge Ward 
removed to Paris, Kentucky, where he con- 
tinued in the private practice of his profession 
with unqualified success until his death, June 
26, 1899. 

On November 30, 1865, was solemnized the 
marriage of Judge Ward to Miss Mary Eliza 
Miller, who was born in Harrison county, this 
state, on the 8th of January, 1843. She was a 
(laughter of James and Ann F. (Boyd) Miller, 
I^rominent citizens of Harrison county. Mrs. 
Ward survived her honored husband for a 
number of years and was summoned to the 
life eternal on the 5th of September, 1908. 
They were both earnest members of the Pres- 
byterian church, in which the judge served 
for many years as elder and to the charities 
and benevolences of which he was a most 
liberal contributor. He was elected moderator 
of the synod of Kentucky in 1893, by acclama- 
tion, and was the first layman ever chosen to 
that office in the state. In a fraternal way 
Judge Ward was a valued and appreciative 
member of Blue Lodge, Free & Accepted 
Masons, in whose charitable work he was 
deeply and actively interested. He was also 
a member of the Ancient Order of United 
W'orkmen. He ever manifested a keen insight 
in educational matters and- for a number of 
years served as curator of the Gentral Uni- 
versity at Richmond, Kentucky. He was one 
of the most earnest and active friends of the 
public school system and did much to raise its 
standard in Kentucky. He was a strong 
LInion man during the Givil war, being opposed 
to secession under any and all circumstances. 
He was broadly informed on all matters con- 
cerning the political situation of the country 
and frequently advanced his views from the 
campaign platform, where his eloquence, logic 
and forceful arguments always carried con- 



AiTtR, LCM9M 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1255 



viction. He was foresighted enough to look 
beyond the interests of the moment to the 
splendid possibilities of the future. Upright 
in his dealings with his fellow men and in all 
relations of life, his record will bear the search- 
light of fullest investigation. His mind was 
of giant strength. He was broad-minded and 
liberal in thought and action, was charitable 
towards others' opinions and was ever mind- 
ful of their rights and sensibilities. In public 
life he was fair, honorable and outspoken, — 
in private life he was true, kind and tender 
and at all times, under all circumstances, he 
was just, loyal and markedly courteous. 

Judge and ^Irs. Ward became the parents 
of three children, concerning whom the follow- 
ing brief data are here incorporated : J. Miller 
Ward of whom mention is made on other 
pages of this work; Ann Gary Ward, who 
became the wife of E. F. Clay Jr., was sum- 
moned to eternal rest on the 9th of May, 1900; 
and Jay Q. is engaged in the great basic 
industry of agriculture in Harrison county. 

Rev. Samuel R. Wilson, D. D. — One of the 
ablest divines of the Presbyterian church dur- 
ing the most critical years of its growth in the 
nineteenth century was the Reverend Samuel 
R. Wilson, D. D., of Louisville. For fourteen 
years, from March 12, 1865, to December 9, 
1878, he was pastor of the First Presbyterian 
Church in that city. His high character, un- 
flinching courage, varied learning, masterful in- 
tellect, and extraordinary oratorical and argu- 
mentative powers, as well as his entire devo- 
tion to the exacting duties of his high calling, 
have been universally recognized by all who 
knew him or felt the influence of his com- 
manding personality during his long and useful 
ministry. Richard H. Collins, the Kentucky 
historian, has said of him that he was "one of 
the ablest men in the pulpit and one of the 
greatest in controversy in the State of Ken- 
tucky," and that "he and his co-laborers in the 
same city made the Presbyterian pulpit of 
Louisville for years by far the ablest in any 
city in the United States. New York possibly 
excepted." 

His grandfather. Dr. Henry Wright Wilson. 
was a native of Annapolis, Maryland, born 
about 1720; educated as a physician, and died 
near New London, Bedford County, \^irginia. 
in the winter of 1777-78. His death was occa- 
sioned by typhus, or "camp fever," contracted 
wdiile attending the sick soldiers of the Revo- 
lutionary army. 

If the genealogist traces his lineage back 
three generations farther he meets James Wil- 
son, of Calvert County, Maryland, whose an- 
cestors are supposed to have come from Eng- 



land, or Scotland, about 1660, and first settled 
in Virginia. Major Josiah Wilson, son of 
James, was long a man of public influence. He 
served as high sheriff of Prince George's and 
of Anne Arundel counties, Maryland ; was an 
alderman and incorporator under the first 
charter of Annapolis, granted by Queen Anne 
in 1708; and for several terms, and at the time 
of his death in November, 171 7, was a member 
of the Lower House of the Maryland General 
Assembly. He married Martha Lingan, daugh- 
ter of George and Anne Lingan, and their son, 
Josiah Wilson, Jr., wedded Elizabeth Sprigg, 
daughter of Lieutenant Colonel Thomas 
Sprigg and his wife, Margaret (Mariartee), 
all of Calvert and Prince George's counties, 
Maryland. The son of Josiah Wilson, Jr., be- 
came the Dr. Wilson who lost his life, from 
disease, contracted while in attendance upon 
the soldiers of the Revolution. 

Joshua L. Wilson, son of Dr. Henry Wright 
Wilson was born in Bedford County, Virginia, 
September 22, 1774, and died in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, August 14, 1846. His mother, who was 
born Agnes Lacy, was a native of Hanover 
county, Virginia, a sister of Rev. Drury Lacy 
and first-cousin of "Father" David Rice, both 
Presbyterian clergymen of prominence and the 
latter widely known as the leading pioneer 
apostle of that church in Kentucky. Dr. Jos- 
hua L. Wilson was closely identified with the 
establishment and progress of Presbyterianism 
in Ohio, by virtue of his long connection with 
the First Presbyterian church of Cincinnati, of 
which he was pastor for thirty-eight years 
( 1808-46). Before moving to Ohio, he resided 
in Kentucky for nearly twenty-seven years, 
from October, 1 781, to May, 1808. In 1839 he 
officiated as Moderator of the General Assem- 
bly of the Old School Presbyterian church. 
His maternal uncle, Rev. Drury Lacy, and his 
cousins. Rev. Dr. John Holt Rice, Rev. Dr. 
Benjamin H. Rice, Rev. Dr. Nathan L. Rice, 
and Rev. Dr. Moses D. Hoge, have all filled 
the Moderator's chair. Owing to his unusual 
height and imposing presence, Dr. Wilson was 
commonly known as "the pulpit giant." In his 
book of "Personal Memories," Hon. E. D. 
Mansfield, of Cincinnati, has said of him, — 
"After making due allowance for generals, 
lawyers, and merchants, there was no man in 
the Cincinnati of that day more noted, more 
respected, or more remarkable than Rev. Dr. 
Joshua L. Wilson. His name and acts in soci- 
ety- were known to ever}'body. He was a man 
amiable in character, just in life, of great au- 
thority, and scarcely less pugnacity. With 
strong opinions and strong character, he 
.thought what was worth preaching was worth 



1256 



HIST(3RY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



fighting for. So, though no IshmaeHte, his 
hand was upHfted against the IshmaeHtes when 
they came in his way. He was a beloved pas- 
tor in his own congregation, res])ected by the 
people, and died much lamented." He mar- 
ried Sarah 15. Mackay, a native of Bahimore. 
Maryland, and the only child of George and 
Margaret Mackay. 

His son. Samuel R. Wilson. D. D., the sub- 
ject of this sketch, was born June 4. 1818, in 
Cincinnati, and died at Louisville, Ky., March 
3, 1886. He was named for a favorite family 
physician. Samuel Ramsay, M. D., long an act- 
ive and prominent practitioner of medicine in 
Cincinnati. Through his mother he could 
trace a French and Scotch-Irish descent, his 
maternal grandmother being a Marylander of 
Huguenot origin, and his grandfather, George 
Mackay, being a native of Belfast, Ireland. On 
his father's side, his ancestry was English, 
Norman-French, and Welsh. 

Samuel Ramsay Wilson attended a school at 
Oxford, Ohio, conducted by Rev. Robert H. 
Bishop, D. D.. later entered Hanover College, 
Indiana, as a Junior in the fall of 1834, and 
graduated from that institution, with the A. B. 
degree. September 27, 1836. After a year's in- 
termission, he became a student at the Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary and. after complet- 
ing the full three years' course, graduated in 
1840. The degree of A. M. in course, was con- 
ferred upon him by Hanover College, in 1843, 
and the degree of Doctor of Divinity by Miami 
University, Ohio, in 1856. He was licensed to 
preach by the Presbytery of New Brunswick, 
N. J., August 5, 1840. The same year he be- 
came Assistant Pastor of his father in the 
First Presbyterian Church. Cincinnati. On 
April 26th, 1842, he was ordained by the Pres- 
bytery of Cincinnati, and about the same time 
was made full co-pastor with his father of the 
First church. This relation continued until the 
latter's death in 1846. From 1846 to March 2, 
1 86 1. Dr. Samuel R. W^ilson was sole pastor of 
the same church. Upon resigning this charge, 
he accepted a call from the Grand (now the 
Fourth) Street Presbyterian church, of New 
York City. Impaired health, however, neces- 
sitated his resignation in January. 1863. For 
about fifteen months, while recuperating, he 
occupied the pulpit of the Mulberry Presby- 
terian church in Shelby County. Kentucky. 
This period was probably the happiest of his 
life and to this famous country church and the 
noble people in the neighborhood, of which it 
is the center, he remained always devotedly at- 
tached. 

Coming to the City of Louisville in the 
prime of his manhood and in the full maturitv. 



of his splendid abilities, he found, in the pastor- 
ate of one of its leading churches, a field of ac- 
tivity and usefulness worthy of his great pow- 
ers. It was during his connection with the 
First Presbyterian Church of Louisville that he 
wrote the celebrated "Declaration and Testi- 
mony,' an ecclesiastical document which fig- 
ured so largely in the reconstruction annals of 
the Presbyterian Church in Missouri and Ken- 
tucky. Collins, the Kentucky historian, previ- 
ously quoted, pronounced this remarkable pa- 
per "one of the noblest defenses of true Pres- 
byterianism and of the crown rights of the 
Head of the Church ever penned," and others, 
equally qualified to speak, have concurred in 
this judgment. 

Of his printed sermons, one of the most 
noteworthy was that delivered December 20, 
1868. on the occasion of the funeral of Mr. 
William Garvin, an elder of the First Presby- 
terian Church and one of the leading mer- 
chants and citizens of Louisville, who, on the 
night of December 4. 1868, met a tragic death 
in the burning of ihe Ohio River mail steam- 
boat "United States," on which he was a pas- 
senger. Another notable address was that on 
"The Causes and Remedies of Impending Na- 
tional Calamities," delivered in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, November 18. i860, on the eve of the 
Civil war. A fitting sequel to this sermon was 
his speech on "Loyalty." delivered in Pitts- 
burg. Pennsylvania. ^lay 26, 1865. before the 
Old School General Assembly, in which he de- 
fended the memory of his friend. Dr. James 
Henley Thornwell, of South Carolina. A par- 
allel to this brilliant performance was the 
speech delivered by him in vindication of "The 
Declaration and Testimony" and the Louisville 
Presbytery, made before the Synod of Ken- 
tucky at Louisville, October 16. 1865. All in 
all, this was one of the best efiforts of his life, 
rendered in a contest with adversaries worthy 
of his steel. 

Quite a number of his sermons and ad- 
dresses, besides those above mentioned, found 
their way into print, and at various times he 
was associated in the editorship of certain re- 
ligious periodicals. In 1872 he also edited and 
published a volume of "Hymns of the Church." 
to which is prefixed a most excellent discourse 
on "Music." 

Dr. Wilson was a member of Presbyterian 
General Assemblies a great number of times; 
was Clerk of the Presbytery of Cincinnati, for 
nine or ten years, and presided as Moderator 
of the Synod of Cincinnati repeatedly. His 
unremitting and diversified labors earned for 
him a high place among those whose live? 
have been given to the advancement of liie 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1257 



Presbyterian Church and the promotion of tie 
cause of Christianity and education in rlie 
West and South. He was a delegate to the 
World's Protestant Convention, in London, 
England, in 1846, but. for reasons satisfactory 
to himself and his church, 'did not attend or 
take part in the convention. He traveled in 
Great Britain and on the continent on this trip 
abroad. He made a second trip to Europe in 
1851, and a third in 1873. 

Rev. Dr. Alfred Nevin. editor of the "Pres- 
byterian Encyclopaedia," published in 1884, 
has put upon record this concise and very just 
tribute to his superiority as a pastor and 
jireacher — "Dr. Wilson is a strong and able 
theologian, and an earnest gospel preacher. 
Strongly conservative in his theology, thor- 
oughly Presbyterian in his feelings, and hav- 
ing the courage of his convictions, he has fre- 
quently been engaged in controversy in regard 
lo church polity and doctrine. In his prime he 
was one of the ablest preachers in the Presby- 
terian Church." 

The •'Herald and Presbyter," of March 10, 
1886, appearing just after his death, gave a 
lengthy editorial notice of his career and char- 
acter and, among other things, said — 

"Dr. Wilson was naturally endowed with 
talents of the highest order. He was a natural 
logician, and his acquirements within the 
bounds of his profession were exact and thor- 
ough. As a speaker, he was fluent and free 
from faults in modulation, emphasis and gest- 
ure. In exegesis and doctrinal theology, he 
was acute and profound. As an ecclesiastic, 
whether as a debater or as a moderator, he had 
iew e(|uals. He bore a conspicuous and effi- 
cient jiart in the settlement of most of the 
great questions that came before the Church 
and the world, even from the beginning of his 
ministry." 

Dr. Wilson was thrice married. His first 
wife was Nancy Campbell Johnston, of Cin- 
cinnati, who was survived by a daughter, Rhuy 
H. Wilson. His second wife was ■Mary C. 
Bell, a daughter of James Franklin Bell, of 
Scott County, Kentucky, grandfather of Ma- 
jor-General James Franklin Bell, late Chief of 
Staff of the United States army and himself 
a native of Shelby County, Kentucky. One 
of the sons born of this marriage is Samuel M. 
Wilson, a leading lawyer of the City of Lex- 
ington. Dr. Dunning Steele W'ilson, a son by 
the third marriage, is a prominent physician 
of Louisville. His mother was a daughter of 
the late Captain Robert Steele, of Louisville. 
Samuel M. Wilson. — To have advanced to 
the front rank of Kentucky lawyers and be in 
logical succession to a circuit judgeship before 
reaching the age of forty is what might have 



been expected of a member of the Wilson 
family of Kentucky, the members of which, as 
appears from the foregoing sketch of them, 
have for generations made an enduring im- 
press on the professional life of Virginia, Ken- 
tucky and the West. Samuel Mackay Wilson, 
son of Rev. Dr. Samuel R. Wilson, and t!ie 
subject of this reference, comes of a fine line 
of Maryland and X'irginian forebears, who 
have generally achieved distinction in the pub- 
lic and professional walks of life. 

Mr. Wilson was born in Louisville, October 
15, 1 87 1, and received his early education in 
private schools and under the careful training 
of his father. Entering the preparatory de- 
partment of Centre College, Danville, Ken- 
tucky, October i, 1886, he spent two years 
therein, and in the fall of 1888 became a fresh- 
man in the college proper. He left that insti- 
tution at the end of his junior year, and after 
teaching a year and a half, spent a year at 
Williams College. Massachusetts. Another 
season of teaching, for a year and a half (tnc 
last six months in the preparatory department 
of Centre College), enabled him to enter the 
law department of Centre College. During his 
professional course he had the advantage of 
instruction under such men as ex-Governor J. 
Proctor Knott, Hon. R. P. Jacobs, and Hon. 
John W. Yerkes, and during his college career, 
both in Kentucky and in Massachusetts, he 
won several first prizes in oratory. 

On the 17th of June. 1895. Mr. Wilson be- 
came a student in the law office of the late 
Judge Jere R. Morton, at Lexington, and there 
continued his reading until October 14, 1895, 
when he was admitted to practice as a member 
of the Fayette county bar. That city has 
since been the scene of his efficient activities as 
a lawyer, acting judge and participant in pub- 
lic affairs. For the first seven years of his 
residence in Lexington he practiced alone ; 
then, for a year, was a member of the firm of 
Morton, Darnall and Wilson ; and from April. 
1903, to Judge Morton's death in December, 
1908, was of the firm of Morton, Webb and 
W^ilson. Since January, 1909, he has again 
followed an independent practice. From 1903 
to 1908 Judge Wilson served as deputy com- 
missioner of the Fayette Circuit Court, and on 
a number of occasions in 1908-10 acted as 
special circuit court judge. His high profes- 
sional standing is further evidenced and em- 
phasized by his service, since 1908, as profes- 
sor of Elementary Law. Common Law Plead- 
ing and Real Property, in the law department 
of the Transylvania University, Lexington. He 
is chief counsel and general manager of the 
Lexington and Central Kentucky Title Com- 



1258 



HISTORY OF KEXTUCKY AXD KENTUCKIAXS 



pany, of which he was the principal founder; 
director of the Lexington Law Library Asso- 
ciation and vice president of the Kentucky 
State Bar Association (1910-11). In Xovem- 
ber, 1901, Judge Wilson assisted in the re-or- 
ganization of the State Bar Association, and 
in 1902-04 compiled its Code of Ethics. 

From a literary standpoint he is the author 
of the "Early Bar of Fayette County," 1901 : 
"George Robertson," 1908 (in "Great Ameri- 
can Lawyers"); "The Old Maysville Road." 
1908; and "Year Book of Kentucky Society of 
Sons of the Revolution," 191 1. In 1898-99 he 
was editor and manager of the Kappa Alpha 
Fraternity Journal, published during that per- 
iod at Lexington. The only public offices, out- 
side of his professional held, ever held by 
Judge Wilson have been as a member of the 
Lexington Board of Education, in 1904-05 and 
again in 1910, and as one of the Perry's Vic- 
tory Centennial Commissioners for Kentucky, 
the term of his latter appointment covering 
1910-13. 

Judge Wilson was vice president and direc- 
tor of the Lexington Commercial Club in 1910, 
and holds membership in the following, as well 
as in the other organizations mentioned : Lex- 
ington, Country, and New Ellerslie Fishing 
Clubs, and the Civic League, of Lexington ; 
Tavern and Filson Clubs, Louisville ; Kappa 
Alpha fraternity and Sons of the Revolution 
in Kentucky ; and the Maryland, Ohio A'alley, 
Mississippi A^alley and Kentucky Historical 
Societies. 

When the last word has been said, however, 
Judge Wilson's mind and heart are really 
wrapped up in the engrossing activities of his 
professional work. This, the most earnest and 
striking phase of his broad life, is well de- 
picted by one of the leading publications of his 
state in the following extracts: "Mr. Wilson 
was associate counsel for Caleb Powers in his 
last trial at Georgetown and gained a state- 
wide celebrity by the able manner in which he 
assisted in the defense of that noted state pris- 
oner. His extensive knowledge of the law. his 
clear conception of the fine constitutional 
points involved, his forceful presentation of 
these points from the standpoint of his client, 
and his brilliant final speech in defense of the 
prisoner, are still fresh in the mind of the pub- 
lic and stamp Mr. Wilson as one of the braini- 
est of the galaxy of brilliant attorneys en- 
g^aged in the manv trials of the case. He was 
one of the attorneys for the plaintiff's in the 
recent Water Works litigation, and his able ex- 
position and defense of the people's rights in 
this controversy greatly strengthened him with 
the general public. He is chief counsel and 



general manager of the Lexington and Central 
Kentucky Title Company, and enjoys besides 
an extensive general practice. 

".Although a Democrat, Mr. Wilson stands 
high in the estimation of Governor Willson, 
and in recognition of his legal ability he has 
several times been appointed as special judge 
by the Governor to sit in important cases ; and 
each time that this honor has been conferred 
upon him he has acquitted himself creditably. 

"Mr. Wilson not only takes high rank as a 
lawyer, but is regarded as one of Lexington's 
most brilliant orators, possessing gracefulness 
of delivery, fluency of speech and earnestness 
of manner that renders him a most attractive 
public speaker." 

On October 26, 1899, Mr. Wilson married 
Miss Mary Bullock Shelby, of Lexington, 
Kentucky, youngest daughter of Edmund 
Pendleton and Susan Goodloe (Hart) Shelby, 
of "Grassland," Fayette County, that state. 
Mrs. Wilson is a great-granddaughter of Gen- 
eral Isaac Shelby, hero of King's Mountain 
and the first governor of Kentucky ; is a gradu- 
ate of Sayre Institute (1894) and attended 
Dana Hall and Wellesley College (1894-96), 
and is not only highly educated, but is one of 
the most accomplished and attractive of Lex- 
ington's young matrons. 

Major-Gexeral James Franklin Bell. — 
Of the many notable Kentuckians who have 
been conspicuous in the naval and military 
service of their country, there is none, whether 
voluntee'r or regular, who has achieved higher 
distinction as a soldier than Major-General 
James Franklin Bell, late Chief of Staff of the 
United States army. His rise to eminence wa^ 
not the result of fortuitous circumstances or of 
personal or official favoritism, but was the as- 
sured reward of thorough preparation, hard 
and faithful work, patient waiting, and proved 
capacity. His elevation to the chief command 
of the army of the United States caused no 
envious murmurings and no adverse comment, 
open or suppressed, because of the unanimous 
recognition, throughout all branches of the 
service, of his superior merit and of his abso- 
lute fitness. Moreover, his frank, open nature 
and sunny, warm-hearted, generous disposition 
have won and bound to him a host of friends 
both in the army and out of it. To such 
friends and to his numerous kindred and "cou- 
sins" throughout Kentucky, his official titles 
and trappings are of far less moment than his 
own loyal, lovable, big-hearted manhood, and 
with these, his own home people, he is even to 
this day simply but affectionately plain "Frank 
Bell." 

General Bell comes of a race of warriors. 



Jo 



w^ r ■ I !■ I 



n2Lic lib:; AKi 






HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKLA.NS 



1259 



His great-great-grandfather, Captain David 
Bell, of Augusta County, \'^irginia, served 
both in the French and Indian war and in the 
War of the Revolution. His son, John Bell, 
in all likelihood, also saw service in the Revo- 
. lutionary army of Virginia, and many of their 
kindred in Augusta County and throughout 
the Valley of Virginia went forth to swell the 
patriot forces in the field. 

William Bell, the immigrant ancestor, and 
father of Captain David Bell, mentioned 
above, was a member of the large Scotch- 
Irish colony settled in the North of Ireland. 
Here he was born about the year 1685. With 
many of his name and kindred, he emigrated 
to America about 1735, probably entering the 
Delaware Bay and river and landing first in 
Pennsylvania. He settled in Augusta county, 
Mrginia, about eight miles northeast of the 
site of Staunton, in 1738-40. certainly prior to 
1746. Was a staunch Presbyterian and 
founded the family locally known as "The 
Stone Church Bells." by which name they have 
always been distinguished from other families 
of the same name in Augusta county. The 
Bell family was closely allied. b\- blood and 
marriage, to the Andersons, Aliens. Craigs. 
Trimbles. Hendersons, ]\Iillses and other 
prominent Augusta county families. 

John Bell, son of Captain David Bell by his 
wife, Florence Henderson, and grandson of 
William, the progenitor of the family, was born 
in Augusta county, \'irginia, about 1758; mar- 
ried in Botetourt county, \'irginia, about 
1788, Jane Mills, a daughter of John Mills, Sr., 
and sister of Captain John ]\Iills, of the Rev- 
olutionary army. John Bell removed from 
Mrginia to Fayette county. Kentucky, about 
1790. By the will of his father, Capt. David 
Bell, a military survey of 2,000 acres, for serv- 
ices in the French and Indian war, located on 
Shannon's Run, a branch of Elkhorn Creek, 
in Fayette (originally Fincastle) county, was 
devised to him and his brother, James Bell. 
They secured this land almost in its entirety, 
and James Bell continued to reside on a por- 
tion of it until about the year 1840. John Bell 
farmed on an extensive scale and raised a large 
family of children. He died in March, 1835, 
at "Stoneleigh," his handsome estate near Lex- 
ington, and his widow, Jane (]\Iills) Bell, also 
died there in 1836. 

James Franklin Bell, son of John, was born 
in Fayette county, Kentucky, September 13, 
1803, and died near White Sulphur, in Scott 
county, Kentucky, November 13, 1866. He 
farmed successfully in Fayette, Franklin, 
Scott and Woodford counties, and. like his 
father before him, was long a Ruling Elder in 

Vol. Ill— 8 



the Presbyterian church. His wife. Mary 
Jane Wilson, was a native of Scott county. 
Kentucky, a daughter of Captain John Wilson, 
and granddaughter of Richard Wilson, of 
Pennsylvania, a near kinsman of Hon. James 
Wilson, the "Signer" and Supreme Court Jus- 
tice. 

John W'ilson Bell, the eldest son of James 
Franklin Bell, became the father of General 
James Franklin Bell, the subject of this sketch. 
Born in Franklin county. Kentucky, on May 
8, 1829, he died at Shelby ville, Kentucky, on 
January 3, 1904. He was twice married. His 
first wife. Sarah Margaret Allen, mother of 
General Bell, was a daughter of Dr. Joseph 
Fawcett Allen, by his wife, Sarah Anne \'ena- 
ble, both of Shelby county, Kentucky. Sarah 
(\"enable) Allen was a granddaughter of 
Colonel -John Cowan of Lincoln and Mercer 
counties, Kentucky. Colonel Cowan was of 
Scotch-Irish descent and was a prominent 
leader among Kentucky pioneers. He came 
from Pennsylvania to Kentucky at a very earlv 
day, was a captain of militia in Lincoln county, 
\'irginia, (now Kentucky), during the Revo- 
lution and later held the rank of Colonel in the 
Kentucky militia. John Wilson Bell married, 
secondly, Jane Hardin Logan, a granddaughter 
of Mark Hardin and a great-granddaughter of 
Governor John Adair of Kentucky. Preserv- 
ing the traditions of his family, John Wilson 
Bell, for many years before his death, w^as a 
Ruling Elder of the Presbyterian church at 
Shelby ville. His long and honorable career 
was devoted to the engrossing activities of 
farm and country life. Two of his brothers. 
Captain Joseph Nelson Bell and Captain David 
Brainard Bell, served during the Civil war, in 
the Confederate army, as also did their broth- 
er-in-law, Henry Simpson Halley. All three 
were ideal soldiers. 

James Franklin Bell, the Major-General, 
was born near Shelbyville. in Shelby county, 
Kentucky, on January 9, 1856. Only a meagre 
summary of his arduous and eventful career 
can be given here. He received his prepara- 
tory education in the public schools of Shelby- 
ville. and, in 1874. entered as a cadet the 
United States Military Academy at W^est 
Point, New York. From this historic institu- 
tion he graduated with honor in 1878. \\'as at 
once commissioned Second Lieutenant and, 
later, as First Lieutenant of Cavalry. He 
served on the plains in the Seventh U. S. Cav- 
alry, Custer's old command and a crack regi- 
ment, from 1878 to 1894. Captured a band 
of half-breed Cree Indians, near Fort Buford, 
South Dakota, in 1883. Served in the Sioux 
Campaign, around Pine Ridge, South Dakota, 



1260 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KKNTUCKIAXS 



in 1891. Was Adjutant of regiment and Sec- 
retary of Cavalry and Light Artillery School, 
1891 -1894, and Aide to General J. W. For- 
syth, in California, Arizona, and the state of 
Washington, in 1895-1898. Served with 
marked distinction in the Spanish-American 
Campaign in the Philippine Islands and in the 
rhilii)pine insurrection. Was promoted Cap- 
tain, U. S. A., in March, 1899. On Mtirch 7, 
1899, was wounded in action at San Juan del 
Monte, P. I. On July 5, 1899, was appointed 
Colonel of \'olunteers, and organized the 36th 
Infantry, U. S. Volunteers, in the Philippine 
Islands during the same month. He continued 
in command of this regiment until December. 
1899. In 1899 he was awarded a congres- 
sional medal of honor for gallantry in action, 
near Porac, P. I. December 5, 1899, ^'^^ ^P" 
pointed Brigadier-General of Volunteers. 
Commanded the Fourth Brigade, Second Divi- 
sion. Eighth Army Corps, and 3rd District, 
Department of Northern Luzon, to July, 1900. 
W^as Provost Marshal-General of the City of 
Manila, P. L, to February, 1901. Appointed 
Brigadier-General, U. S. A., in February. 1901. 
Commanded ist District, Department of North- 
ern Luzon, to November, 1901, and the Third 
Brigade, Department of Southern Luzon, to 
December, 1902. Returned to the United States 
in 1903. Was Commandant of the Infantry 
and Cavalry School, Signal School and Staff 
College, to April, 1906. Became Major-Gen- 
eral. U. S. A., on January 3, 1907. Received 
the degree of LL. D. from the State University 
of Kentucky, at Lexington, on June 6, 1907. 
From April, 1906, to April, 1910, was Chief of 
Staff' and. next to the President, the virtual 
head of the United States Army. In the spring 
of 1 9 10, by his own request, he was relieved 
from this responsible and very exacting posi- 
tion by President Taft. and since December, 
191 o, he has been assigned to duty in the 
Philippines, over the military establishment of 
which he has supreme command. 

On January 5. 1881. General Bell was mar- 
ried to Sarah Buford, daughter of Thomas 
Jefferson and Grace (Bowers) Buford, of 
Rock Island, Illinois. Their married life has 
been an ideally beautiful and happy one, and 
Mrs. Bell, who is a woman of exceptional in- 
tellectual and social attractions, has been to 
her husband at all times both an aid and an 
inspiration. Her sister, Anna Buford. is the 
wife of Brigadier-General Ernest A. Garling- 
ton of the regular army. The Bufords. like 
the Bells, are a vigorous and valiant old Ken- 
tucky family of the best Virginia stock. 

Besides the large infusion of Scotch-Irish 



blood which Hll.> his veins. General Bell may 
also claim a sturdy English lineage. This 
comes through the Venables, the Fawcetts, the 
Pollocks (or Polks), the jMortons, and the 
Woodsons. Through the marriage of Abra- 
ham \ 'enable to Martha Davis, a granddaugh- 
ter or great-granddaughter of the Indian 
"Princess," Niketti ("She sweeps the dew 
from the flowers") it is possible for General 
Bell to claim descent from Opechancanough, 
the celebrated Chief of the Powhatans and 
uncle of Pocahontas. The prominent and; 
powerful Virginia families who trace their 
descent in part from Niketti are. most of them, 
as proud of the fact as are the numerous de- 
scendants of Pocahontas of the high-bred In- 
dian strain which they owe to her. To the list 
of Scotch-Irish families found in General 
Bell's pedigree and already mentioned should 
be added the names of the Millers, McClel- 
lands, Hunters, Montgomery s, Gilchrists and 
Wilsons. 

Certainly from the happy commingling of 
such sturdy and heroic ancestral strains, it is 
not strange that so perfect a specimen of phy- 
sical manhood, so fine a soldier, and such a 
whole-hearted, genuine Kentucky gentleman, 
clothed invariably with the modesty, which 
one finds so becoming in an acknowledged 
master of the art of war, should have been 
produced. Kentucky has furnished to the na- 
tion no son of whom she has more reason to 
be justly proud. 

Governor Is.aac Shelby. — This great Ken- 
tuckian. first governor of the state, has. been 
liappily characterized as a "brave and mag- 
nanimous soldier, a sagacious statesman, and 
a patriot who counted no cost in his devoted 
service to the land which gave him birth." 

Isaac Shelby was born December 11, 1750, 
in Frederick (now Washington) county, 
^Maryland, near the North Mountain and in 
the vicinity of Hagerstown, and was a son of 
Captain Evan Shelby. Until the age of twen- 
ty-one years he was chiefly employed in farm- 
ing and herding cattle for his father, but he 
took the pains to avail himself of the limited 
educational advantages which western Mary- 
land then afforded. Drawing his life-blood 
from the sturdiest of \\'elsh and English an- 
cestors, early disciplined in the woodcraft of 
the frontier, with his mind stored and teem- 
ing from childhood with the thrilling tales of 
border warfare, in which his father had been 
long and arduously engaged, it is not surpris- 
ing that, on reaching man's estate. Isaac 
Shelby should have displayed a natural apti- 
tude for war and an exceptional ca])acity for 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1261 



leadership. Indeed, it has been truly said of 
liini that he was a horn soldier and a soldier 
horn to connnand. 

in 1771 young Isaac removed with the other 
members of the Shelby family to the Holston 
region in southwest Virginia, where he shared 
the customary experiences and adventures of 
a pioneer and frontiersman. Shortly after 
this change, Lord Uunmore's war broke out 
and he received a lieutenant's commission in 
a company of Fincastle troops, of which his 
father was captain. He fought valiantly at 
Point Pleasant on October 10, 1774, in the 
lierce, all-day, hand-to-hand encounter with 
the Indians under Cornstalk. Of this cngage- 
uK-nt, which has often been called the "first 
battle of the American Revolution." Lieuten- 
ant Shelby, in a letter to his uncle, John 
.Shelby, written a few days after the battle, 
has left us the best account. He remained as 
-econd in command of a garrison at the mouth 
of the Great Kanawha until July, 1775, and 
lor nearly a year following he explored, lo- 
cated and surveyed lands in Kentucky. 

In July, 1776, Isaac Shelby, while in Ken- 
tucky, was appointed captain of a minute com- 
j)any by the Committee of Safety of Virginia, 
in 1777 he was api)ointed by Governor Pat- 
rick Henry, of Virginia, a commissary of sup- 
plies, for an extensive body of militia guard- 
ing the frontier posts. In 1778 he was en- 
gaged in the commissary department, provid- 
ing supplies for the Continental Army and for 
an expedition, by way of Pittsburg, against 
the Northwestern Indians. He rendered sim- 
ilar service in 1779. In the spring of that 
year he was elected a member of the X'irginia 
Legislature from Washington county and in 
the fall of the same year was commissioned a 
major, by Governor Thomas JeiTerson, in the 
escort of guards to the commissioners for es- 
tablishing the boundary line between Virginia 
and North Carolina ; and shortly afterwards 
he was appointed by Governor Caswell, of 
North Carolina, a colonel of the new county 
of Sullivan. On the 30th of July, 1780, he 
captured a formidable Tory stronghold on the 
Pacolet River. He was largely responsible 
for the victory in the battle of IMusgrove's 
Mill, August 18, 1780; was one of those in 
chief command in the battle of King's Moun- 
tain, October 7, 1780, and contributed most 
largely to the success there achieved. A few 
months later, in command of a troop, he joined 
General Francis ISIarion and served under him 
until near the end of the war. 

In 1 781 he was elected a member of the 
North Carolina legislature; in 1783 moved to 
Kentucky ; was a member of three of the 
Kentucky conventions, held in 1787, 1788 and 



1789, preparatory to its applying for statehood. 
In January, 1791, he was appointed with Gen- 
eral Charles Scott, Benjamin Logan and two 
others, a member of the local Board of War, 
created by congress for the District of Ken- 
tucky, with full discretionary power to pro- 
vide for the defense of the frontier settle- 
ments and the prosecution of the war with the 
Indians. He was made high sherilT of Lincoln 
county, Kentucky, and continued as such until 
his election as governor in May, 1792. W'as 
a member of the convention which framefl the 
first constitution of Kentucky in April, 1792. 

Governor Shelby was one of the first trus- 
tees of Transylvania Seminary (afterwards 
Transylvania University), having been ap- 
pointed in 1783. He was also a member and 
chairman of the first board of trustees of Cen- 
tre College (now Central University), 
founded in 1819. He took his seat as first gov- 
ernor of the state June 4, 1792, his term con- 
tinuing until 1796. The Constitution making 
him ineligible to succeed himself, he was not 
re-elected. In 1812, however, when war with 
Great Britain was again declared, he was 
promptly summoned by his fellow citizens to 
serve once more as governor of Kentucky. 

In this, our second War of Independence, 
Governor Shelby, now a major general of mi- 
litia and commander-in-chief, under General 
Harrison, of an army of four thousand Ken- 
tucky volunteers, demonstrated the vitality of 
his rugged manhood and the unfailing 
strength of his patriotism by winning, in the 
forefront of battle, at the head of his cour- 
ageous comrades-in-arms, fresh laurels both 
for himself and for his beloved Kentucky in 
the notable battle of the Thames. For his ser- 
vices in this battle, fought on the 5th of Octo- 
ber, 181 3, on Canadian soil, and fast upon the 
heels of Perry's famous naval victory on Lake 
Erie, Governor Shelby, a few years later, re- 
ceived a handsome gold medal and the unani- 
mous thanks of Congress. The grateful com- 
monwealth, whose destinies were entrusted 
to his guidance during this trying period, 
promptly recorded its appreciation and its 
gratitude in resolutions which declared "the 
high estimation in which they held the con- 
duct of their venerable chief magistrate, Isaac 
Shelby, in leading the Kentucky militia into 
Upper Canada to victory and to glory." 

In 181 7 Governor Shelby w^as selected by 
President Monroe as secretar\' of war, but 
declined the office on the score of age. He 
was one of the presidential electors for Ken- 
tucky in 1797, in 1801, and in 1805. In 1818 
he was commissioned with General Andrew 
Jackson to hold a treaty with the Chickasaw 
tribe of Indians for the purchase of lands 



1262 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



west of the Tennesbce river, which .service he 
performed with entire satisfaction to all par- 
ties concerned. The death of this great Amer- 
ican occurred on July 18, 1826, at his historic 
home, "Traveller's Rest," Lincoln county, Ken- 
tucky, where he had first permanently settled 
in 1783. An evidence of his general popu- 
larity as a hero is the fact that counties in 
nine states have been named Shelby in his 
honor. 

Governor Shelby was married at JJoones- 
boro. Kentucky, in 1783, to Susannah Hart, 
daughter of Captain Nathaniel Hart, one of 
the proprietors of tlie Transylvania Company. 
Of this union were born eleven children, 
nearly all of whom grew^ to maturity and have 
themselves married prominently and left num- 
erous descendants. 

When not serving his country as a soldier 
in the tield or as a civil officer in legislative 
lialls or in the executive chair, it was Gov- 
ernor Shelby's delight to occupy himself with 
the quiet pursuits of peace and his chief inter- 
est lay in the simple joys of home and country 
life. His old Kentucky home. Traveller's 
Rest, was. until the end of his long life, an 
unrivaled seat and center of truly genuine 
and dignified hospitality. And the traditions 
of that earlier day, wdien every weary, way- 
worn traveler was welcome, have been handed 
down by successive owners of the estate, mem- 
bers of the Shelby family, even to our own 
time. 

Governor Shelby has received high tribute 
from many distinguished pens. Says Theo- 
dore Roosevelt, in his "Winning of the West." 
referring to the battle of Point Pleasant, Octo- 
ber 10, 1774: 

"One of Christian's captains was a stout 
old Alarylander of \Velsh blood, named Evan 
Shelby; and Shelby's son, Isaac, a stalwart, 
stern-visaged young man, who afterwards 
played a very prominent part on the border, 
'was a subaltern in his company, in which Rob- 
ertson likewise served as a sergeant. Al- 
though without experience of drill, it may be 
doubted if a braver or physically finer set of 
men were ever got together on this continent 
. . All the after-time leaders of the west 
were engaged in some way in Lord Dunmore's 
war. Their fates were various . . 
Shelby won laurels at King's Mountain, be- 
came the first governor of Kentucky, and 
when an old man revived the memories of his 
youth by again leading the western men in 
battle against the British and Indians." 

Bancroft in his "History of the United 
States," says of Shelby, in the battle of 
King's Mountain, October 7, 1780: "The two 
center columns, headed by Campbell and 



Shelby, climbing the mountain, began the at- 
tack. Shelby, a man of the hardiest make, 
stiff as iron, among the dauntless singled out 
for dauntlessness, went right onWard and up- 
ward like a man who had but one thing to do, 
and but one thought to do it." 

Says .Shalcr, in "Kentucky, A Pioneer 
Commonwealth," of the same engagement, 
"Although Shelby was not in name the chief 
in this action, there is no reason to doubt that 
the conception of the campaign and the vigor 
of its execution were his alone. His also was 
the scheme of attack which led to the battle 
of Cowpens." 

General Shelby's service at the battle of the 
I'hames, October 5, 1813, also received enthu- 
siastic praise from his contemporaries. In 
the official report of General Harrison to Gen- 
eral Armstrong, Secretary of War, the former 
.';ays : "In communicating to the President 
through you, sir, my opinion of the conduct 
of the officers who served under my command, 
I am at a loss how to mention that of Gov- 
ernor Shelby, being convinced that no eulog- 
iirm of mine can reach his merit." In his fifth 
annual message. President Madison, always 
a warm admirer of Governor Shelby, refer- 
ring to the war, makes honorable mention of 
"the chief magistrate of Kentucky, whose 
heroism, signalized in the w'ar which estab- 
lished the independence of his country, sought, 
at an advanced age, a share in hardships and 
battles for maintaining its rights and its 
safety." 

It can not be otherwise than appropriate to 
conclude this brief review with an extract 
from the tribute paid Governor Shelby by 
Governor James T. Morehead in his cele- 
brated Address delivered at Boonesboro, Ken- 
tucky, May 25, 1840. 

"The life of Isaac Shelby," said Governor 
Morehead, "is a signal example of unblem- 
ished personal integrity and enlarged public 
usefulness, which may be safely imitated by 
all those who aspire to become benefactors of 
their country. Starting into active life with- 
out the aid of large fortune or a finished edu- 
cation, he pursued the gradations of military 
rank from the lieutenancy of a militia com- 
pany to the command of a regiment ; he rose 
from the inconspicuous but important station 
of a surveyor among the pioneers to the gover- 
norship of a great commonwealth, and was 
distinguished in all the posts to which he was 
called. His mind, like his body, was strong 
and vigorous ; boldness, energ^^ decision were 
its leading characteristics. Capable of think- 
ing for himself, he investigated every impor- 
tant subject that came within the range of his 
private or public duties, with candor and de- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1263 



liberation ; and having formed his opinions, 
he followed them with unshaken firmness. 
He spoke and wrote as he thought, with great 
force and vigor, always expressing his opinions 
with manl}' frankness and a lofty disdain of 
personal consequences. His manners were 
plain and simple, and commanded, without any 
affectation of dignity or superiority, the uni- 
versal deference of his associates. He was 
sincere, but not profuse, in his professions of 
attachment; faithful and steadfast to his 
friends when those attachments were once 
formed. Elevating himself in the discharge 
of his official duties above the inriuence of 
private considerations, he sought and re- 
warded merit for his country's sake. Such 
being his character as a public man, he main- 
tained all the relations of life with equal 
credit and success. His death produced a 
sensation, which told with great emphasis of 
the loss of a public benefactor." 

J. Miller Ward. — An essentially progres- 
sive and public-spirited citizen and one who 
has contributed in no small measure to the 
development and upbuilding of this section 
of the fine old Blue Grass state, J. Miller 
Ward is successfully engaged in agricultural 
pursuits in Bourbon county, Kentucky, and 
he has gained distinctive precedence as a 
raiser of high-grade stock. He is a native 
Kentuckian, born in Harrison county on the 
19th of December, 1866. His parents were 
Judge John O. Ward and Mary Eliza Miller 
Ward, both now deceased, of whom more de- 
tailed information is contained on other 
])ages of this work devoted to the lives and 
achievements of Kentuckians. 

Mr. Ward was reared to adult age on the 
old home farm and after preliminary training 
in the common schools of his native county, 
he was matriculated in Central University, at 
Richmond, Kentucky, in which he was grad- 
uated as a member of the class of 1888, with 
the degrees of Bachelor of Science. Soon 
after completing his education he engaged 
with his grandfather in farming and the 
breeding of thoroughbred trotting horses, on 
Sunny Side farm, two miles west of Paris, 
Kentucky, on the Paris and Cynthiana pike. 
Mr. Ward is now the owner of this fine es- 
tate. Soon after his marriage, in 1893, he 
settled on the Sunland Stock Farm, near 
Paris, and later he removed to the city of 
Paris where he resided for three years, 
though he continued in business as a farmer 
and stock-raiser. In 1909 he inherited his 
present homestead. Sunny Side farm, on 
which he now resides. He has extensive land 
holdings in different sections of the state and 
he and his wife own over two thousand acres 



of fine, arable land. ^Ir. Ward is a stanch 
Democrat in his political proclivities and both 
he and his wife hold membership in the 
Presbyterian church, in whose faith they were 
reared. He is a member of the Sigma Nu 
college fraternity and of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. Both are popular 
and prominent in the best social activities of 
their community and their spacious home is 
widely renowned for its gracious Kentucky 
hospitality. 

On the 15th of November, 1893, ^Ir. Ward 
was united in marriage to Miss Belle Brent 
Clay, who was born in Bourbon county, Ken- 
tucky, on the 30th of August, 1872, a daugh- 
ter of James E. and Elizabeth (Alexander) 
Clay, of whom mention is made on other 
pages of this work. Mr. and Mrs. Ward be- 
came the parents of three children, namely, 
James Clay Ward, who was born on the 30th 
of August, 1894; J. Miller Ward Jr., born 
May 20, 1899; and Sam Clay Ward, born 
February 12, 1900. 

loiix F. McDaniel. — An influential factor 
in connection with financial aft'airs in Bourbon 
county and a scion of one of the sterling pi- 
oneer families of Kentucky is John F. Mc- 
Daniel. who is incumbent of the important 
executive office of cashier of the Exchange 
I')ank of Millersburg. one of the substantial 
and popular monetary institutions of this part 
of the state. Mr. ^^IcDaniel's career has been 
marked by energy, ambition and definite pur- 
pose, and his success and prestige represent 
the direct result of the application of his own 
energies and talents, the while his course has 
been so ordered as to gain and retain to him 
inviolable popular esteem. As one of the 
representative citizens and business men of 
Bourbon county he is well entitled to specific 
recognition in this work, as is he also by 
reason of his being a member of a family 
whose name has been worthily linked with the 
history of Kentucky for many years. 

John F. McDaniel was born on a farm in 
Harrison county, Kentucky, on the 15th of 
April. 1856. and is a son of Elisha and Kiz- 
ziah (Coons ) McDaniel, the former of whom 
was born in Clark county, this state, on the 
28th of ^larch, 1821, and the latter was born 
in Harrison county, on the ist of August, 
1829. Elisha McDaniel was a son of George 
and Susan (McDonald) McDaniel, both of 
whom were likewise natives of Kentucky, 
where the respective families were founded 
prior to the opening of the nineteenth 
century, the lineage of both being traced 
back to staunch Scottish origin. George 
McDaniel established his residence in Har- 
rison county, Kentucky, in 1832, and there 



1264 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

both he and his wife continued to reside thiana, the judicial center of the county. He 
until their death. In that county was then secured the position of individual-de- 
• ciOleninized the marriage of Elisha McDaniel posit bookkeeper in the Farmers' National 
and KrS'zfal'U-CcJOns, in September, 1850. Airs. Bank of Cynthiana, a position which he re- 
McDaniel was a daughter of John and Rachel tained for six years, at the expiration of which 
(Morgan) Coons, both of whom passed their impaired health caused him to resign the same, 
entire lives in Kentucky. After his marriage Thereafter he was identified with various pur- 
Elislia McDaniel settled- on the old Coons suits until 1896, when he engaged in the gen- 
homestead, in Harrison county, and he eventu- eral merchandise business at Cynthiana, and 
ally became the owner of this property. There he continued in this line of enterprise until 
he continued to be actively identified with the 1901, when he disposed of the business and 
agricultural and stock-growing industries until became one of the principals in effecting the 
his death, which occurred on the 3d of No- organization of the Harrison Deposit Bank 
vember, 1893. He was a man of impregnable at Cynthiana, in which institution he had 
integrity, and his career was marked by earn- charge of the individual-deposit books until 
est and worthy toil and endeavor. His de- 1906, when he resigned the position to accept 
voted wife survived him by nearly a decade that of cashier of the Exchange Bank of Mil- 
and was summoned to the life eternal on the lersburg. He has since continued in tenure 
1 2th of January, 1901. They were survived by of this office and through his careful and 
four children : George S., who is a prosperous able administration of the executive affairs 
farmer of Harrison county; John F., whose of the institution he has done much to fur- 
name initiates this sketch ; Lillie M., who is ther its success and popularity. The bank is 
the wife of George R. Burberry, of Center- amply fortified in capitalistic resources and in 
ville, Bourbon county; and Charles M., who the personnel of its principals, and he him- 
is successfully identified with agricultural self is a stockholder and director of the same, 
pursuits in Harrison county. A man of broad mental ken and much in- 
John F. McDaniel gained his early experi- tellectual power, Mr. McDaniel naturally takes 
ences in connection with the work and man- a lively interest in public affairs, and he is 
agement of the home farm, and his prelimi- especially loyal and progressive in his civic at- 
nary education was secured in the common titude. He is ever ready to lend his influence 
schools of his native county. Even as a boy and co-operation in the support of measures 
he manifested definite ambition as a student and enterprises tending to advance the social 
and he made good use of the advantages af- and material well-being of his home city and 
forded him. For the gaining of advanced county, and while he has been in no sense a 
educational discipline he realized that he must seeker of political preferment he accords a 
depend upon his own resources, and his ambi- staunch support to the principles and policies 
tion was one of definite action. When he for which the Democratic party stands sponsor 
was twenty years of age he passed the required in a basic sense. He is affiliated with the 
examination and secured a teacher's certificate. Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order 
and during the winter of 1879 ^^^ taught sue- of Odd Fellows, and both he and his wife hold 
cessfully in one of the district schools of his membership in the Methodist Episcopal church, 
native county. For several years hereafter South. 

he devoted his attention to pedagogic work In Bourbon county, Kentucky, on the 22d 

during the winter term and was employed in of October, 1884. Mr. McDaniel was united 

farm work during the summer seasons. By in marriage to Miss Mary S. Batterton, who 

this means he secured the funds that enabled was born in this county on the 2d of June, 

him to prosecute his higher academic studies 1858, and who is a daughter of Benjamin A. 

in the Kentucky Wesleyan College, at Millers- and Maiy J. (George) Batterton, both of 

burg, and later he attended the New Albany whom were likewise born in Kentucky. Mr.- 

Business College, at New Albany, Indiana. As and Mrs. McDaniel have five children, namely : 

he made his own opportunities in the educa- Mary E., John F., Jr., Richard S., Kizziah 

tional field, he was fully appreciative of the M., and George. 

same and applied himself with all of diligence, Francis AI. Woodward. — A venerable and 

thus admirably fitting himself for the practical highly honored citizen of Campbell county is 

duties and responsibilities of life. Francis Marion Woodward, who has been a 

In 1883 Mr. McDaniel assumed the office resident of the county for nearly two score of 

of deputy county clerk of Harrison county, years and who is now serving in the office 

and he retained this incumbency for four of justice of the peace. He maintains his 

years, during which time he resided in Cyn- home in the attractive little suburban town 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1265 

of Bellevue and his circle of friends in tlie was concerned in the erection of many large 
community is coincident with that of his public and business buildings in Ohio and Ken- 
acquaintances, tucky. On the 6th of May, 1909, while work- 
Francis JNIarion Woodward was born in the ing on a building, he fell a distance of thirty- 
city of Cincinnati, Ohio, on the 2d of Octo- four feet, and after he had struck the ground 
ber, 1832, and is a son of Amos and Cynthia a brick gable fell upon him, inflicting injuries 
(Gay) Woodward, both of whom were born of such serious nature that he has since been 
in the vicinity of the city of Buffalo, New incapacitated for the active work to which he 
York, and both of whom were young at the devoted so many years of his earnest and 
time of the immigration of the respective industrious life. He was nearly seventy-seven 
families to Ohio, in the year 1819. Both years of age at the time of this accident, and 
families settled in Cincinnati and the names only his strong constitution, fortified by right 
became closely identified with its pioneer an- living in past years, enabled him to recuperate 
nals. There was solemnized the marriage of from his injuries. Since that time he has 
Amos Woodward and Cynthia Gay, and they lived virtually retired in Bellevue, where he 
became the parents of four sons and three finds due demand upon his time and atten- 
daughters^ of whom one son and two daugh- tion in administering the affairs of his offfce 
ters died in childhood. Three of the children of justice of the peace, a position of which 
are living at the present time. One son, Har- he has been an incumbent for the past decade 
vey, was a valiant soldier in the Fifth Ohio and in which his services have been marked 
Volunteer Infantry in the Civil war, in which by much discrimination and judicial acumen, 
he served four years, though he was held For thirty-five years he has resided in either 
captive in southern prisons during twenty- Dayton or Bellevue and he is well known in 
two months of this period — principally at Campbell county, where he commands secure 
Salisbury, North Carolina, and in historic old vantage ground in popular confidence and es- 
Libby prison, at Richmond, X'irginia. He now teem. He was a charter member of Brick- 
resides in the state of California. William layers' Union, No. i, in the city of Cincinnati, 
Woodward who now lives at Fort Thomas, and later was made an honorary member of 
Kentucky, was like his brother a loyal soldier Union No. 2, at Newport, Kentucky. Of 
of the Union, having served for one year in the organization first mentioned he is the only 
the Fifty-third Kentucky Mounted Infantry, charter member now living, and further dis- 
When a young man Amos Woodward, tinction is given in this connection by reason 
father of the subject of this sketch, became of the fact that this union was the first of 
a steamboat engineer, and he continued to be kind organized west of the Alleghany moun- 
identified with navigation affairs on the Ohio tains. In politics Mr. Woodward has ever 
and Mississippi rivers during the residue of accorded a staunch support to the cause of 
his life, serving the major portion of the time the Republican party, with which he united at 
on packet boats plying between Cincinnati and the time of its organization, and he cast his 
New Orleans. He died near Dyersburg, Ten- first presidential vote in support of its first 
nessee, in 1878, at the age of seventy-six years, standard-bearer, General John C. Fremont. 
His devoted wife was summoned to eternal Mr. Woodward has been twice married. On 
rest in 1869, at the age of fifty-nine years, the 6th of August, 1856, he wedded Miss 
Francis M. Woodward, the second in order Elodia Cordingly, who was born and reared 
of birth in the family of six children, was in Cincinnati, Ohio, and who was a daughter 
reared to maturity in Cincinnati, where his of John L. Cordingly. a steamboat engineer 
early educational privileges were those af- and machinist who was a well known and 
forded in the common schools of the period, highly esteemed citizen of Cincinnati in the 
His advantages in this respect were some- early days. Mr. and Mrs. Woodward became 
what meager, but he has profited by the les- the parents of four children, one of whom 
sons learned under the guidance of that head- died in infancy ; Charles F., single, is a resi- 
master, experience, and is a man of broad and dent of Dayton, Kentucky ; Carrie L. is un- 
accurate information. He is the eldest of married also resides in Dayton ; and Minnie 
the three brothers now living, and concerning Grace is the wife of Robert E. L. Clary, 
the other two mention has been made in a pre- who is general freight agent for the southern 
ceding paragraph. In his youth Mr. Wood- division of the Louisville & Nashville Rail- 
ward served a thorough apprenticeship at the road, with headquarters in the city of Bir- 
brick-layer's trade, in which he became a skilled mingham, Alabama. Mrs. Woodward passed 
artisan, and he continued to be actively identi- to the eternal life on the 2d of February, 
fied with the work of his trade for the long 1875, at Dayton, Kentucky, and on the 17th 
period of fifty-eight years, within which he of September, 1884, in the city of Cincinnati, 



1266 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Wood- 
ward to Mrs. Elizabeth (Garner) Jasper, who 
was the widow of William Jasper. ^Irs. 
Woodward was born in England and was three 
years of age at the time of her parents' im- 
migration to the United States. The family 
resided for a nmiiber of years at Lexington, 
Kentucky, and there she married William Jas- 
per, who died in 1880. Of this union were 
born four children of whom one is deceased. 
Those living are: Lillie, the wife of William 
McClure, a resident of Bellevue; Bessie Jas- 
per a resident of Bellevue; and George Jasper 
who resides at Springfield, Massachusetts. 

Richard Alexander Robinson. — The late 
Richard Alexander Robinson was one of the 
leading citizens and business men of Louis- 
ville. A sketch of his life finds an appropri- 
ate place in the history of those men of bus- 
iness and enterprise in Kentucky whose force 
of character, whose sterling integrity, whose 
fortitude amid discouragements, whose good 
sense in the management of complicated af- 
fairs and marked success in establishing large 
industries and bringing to completion great 
schemes of trade and profit have contributed 
in an eminent degree to the development of 
the vast resources of the country. 

Mr. Robinson was in the broadest sense a 
self-made man, being both the architect and 
builder of his own fortune, and in large meas- 
ure the promoter of the commercial prosper- 
ity of the community in which he lived, but 
it was not only his success that made him one 
of the most honored and respected residents 
of the city, it was the character of the man, 
his unfaltering honesty, his kindly purposes, 
his recognition of the good in others, his 
broad sympathy and unbounded charity. 
These endeared him to all with whom he came 
in contact until memory now holds his life 
history as a sacred treasure. 

Mr. Robinson was born October 23, 1817, 
on "Spring Hill" farm near Winchester, 
Frederick county, Virginia, the oldest son of 
T yles Robert and Catherine (Worthington 
Goldsborough) Robinson, while his paternal 
grandparents were Alexander and Priscilla 
Robinson of Baltimore, Maryland, where 
Alexander was a prominent merchant. Lyles, 
the father of Richard A., was reared by his 
aunt at Winchester, Virginia, his mother hav- 
ing died in his early infancy. He married 
Catherine Worthington Goldsborough. the 
daughter of Dr. Richard Goldsborough, of 
Cambridge, Alaryland. 

After attending the Winchester Academy 
Richard A. Robinson in 1832 began his busi- 
ness career as a clerk in a general store in 
Shepherdstown, Virginia. His mother died 



in 1828 and his father, in 1834, leaving young 
Richard A., as the eldest child, practically the 
head of the family of orphaned children, and 
it was the object to prepare a home where all 
the children could be together that brought 
Richard A. to Louisville, Kentucky, in 1837. 
Here he liecame a bookkeeper in a wholesale 
grocery house, but a year later he entered the 
employ of Casseday & Ranney, where he was 
bookkeeper until 1841, wfien he engaged in 
business for himself as a member of the firm 
of Robinson, Lee & Company, which firm es- 
tablished a retail dry goods store on Market 
street. In the meantime he had succeeded in 
bringing to Louisville his brothers, two of 
whom, Goldsborough and Archibald M., be- 
came members of the above firm. , Mr. Lee 
dying in 1841, the business was continued un- 
der the firm name of Robinson & Brothers. In 
1842 he married Eliza D., the daughter of 
William F. and Mary S. Pettet, of Louis- 
ville, and soon after that event he transferred 
his interests in the dry goods business to his 
brothers and hnnself engaged in the retail 
drug business on Market street, in company 
with Arthur Peter. In 1846 Mr. Robinson 
established a wholesale drug business on Main 
street, which became the house of R. A. Rob- 
inson & Company in 1855. Subsequently his 
sons, William A. Robinson. Worthington Rob- 
inson and A. Lee Robinson, and Charles W. 
Pettet became associated with him, and the 
business developed later into what is now the 
Robinson-Pettet Company, one of the largest 
concerns in that line in the South. 

To open a new avenue of trade for other 
of his sons, the wholesale hardware house of 
Robinson Brothers & Company, was estab- 
lished in 1878, and later Mr. Robinson formed 
a joint stock company to operate the "Louis- 
ville Woolen Mills," of which he became the 
president. He was also one of the founders 
of the Louisville Cotton Mills, of which 
his son William A. became first president. 

Years before this Mr. Robinson, with other 
prominent business men, established the Un- 
ion Lime & Cement Company, of which he 
became president. For six years he was a di- 
rector of the Louisville & Nashville Rail- 
road, and for five years of the Elizabethtown 
& Paducah Railroad Company. He was also 
a director of the Louisville Bridge Company. 

]\Ir. Robinson's religious faith was an ele- 
ment of his life and prompted him to the most 
honorable relations with his fellowmen, it be- 
ing manifest in every transaction where he 
endeavored to put into practice the golden 
rule. He became a member of St. Paul's 
Episcopal church when it was established in 
1839 and served as Sunday school teacher. 



I^OBuS^^j 



-.»?;•*' ^' 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1267 



vestryman and warden in the church. After 
St. Paul's was removed to its present loca- 
tion Mr. Rohinson became a member of St. 
Andrew's church. In 1882 he was elected the 
first honorary life member of the Louisville 
Board of Trade. 

The public benefactions of Mr. Robinson 
cover a wide territory and a great variety of 
objects. He made large donations to several 
worthy institutions and contributed with large 
liberality to every worthy charity or society 
to assist the poor or the unfortunate. There 
was no educational cause or institution which 
did not find in him its most powerful ally and 
most capable supporter. It was not wonder- 
ful that in the life of this large-souled, un- 
swerving, conscientious man all the generous 
and philanthropical affections should grow 
and flourish. He felt himself enobled by his 
work. Among other benevolent work Mr. 
Robinson endowed a scholarship in the The- 
ological Seminary of Virginia for the educa- 
tion of Episcopal ministers ; and made en- 
dowments of five thousand dollars each to the 
T ouisville Charity Organization Society, the 
Home for Friendless Women. Home of the 
Innocents, the Orphanage of the Good Shep- 
herds and the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation. He also gave liberally to the Prot- 
estant Orphan Asylum, the John N. Norton 
Memorial Infirmary and St. Andrew's church. 
The old Winchester Academy which Mr. Rob- 
inson attended as a boy was succeeded by the 
Shenandoah \'alley Academy, which has 
taken high standing in \'irginia, and in 1894 
Mr. Robinson purchased and presented to the 
Academy, a tract of twenty acres adjoining. 
Winchester, and upon which it has since been 
established in a permanent home. He also 
endowed three scholarships in the Academy. 
His generous nature was also just, as every 
one who knew him intimately well under- 
stood. He was loyal in his friendships and 
generously remembered the friends of his 
youth. The tenor of his life was even and in 
all his relations he was honorable and relia- 
ble. The lesson of such a man's life is worth 
something in a community, the sagacious man 
of business holding in mind the complex de- 
tails of its numerous departments, the quiet 
citizen who discharges with seriousness _ and 
conscientious fidelity the duties of citizen- 
ship, the benevolent and generous Christian 
who recognizes the claims of humanity and 
s'^eks to befriend, improve and uplift those 
who need help — such a man has not lived in 
vain — he has been successful. 

He died peacefully and well prepared on 
December 9. 1897. His religion need not be 
sought with a lantern and doubted when 



found, for the man of iron judgment and un- 
bending will, of powerful perceptions and 
resolute purposes, uncovered his head and 
went obedient to every mandate. He planted 
here and planted there, and rejoiced in the time 
of harvest. He believed in the inscription on 
the high priest's miter, and sought to send the 
light of holiness and peace into all the cor- 
ners of the earth. 

Benjamin A. Crutcher, who in the gen- 
eral practice of law has built up an extensive 
patronage indicative of his comprehensive 
knowledge of the principles of jurisprudence 
and his correct adaptation thereof to the points 
in litigation, has been numbered among the 
members of the bar since 1884. He is at pres- 
ent commonwealth attorney, residing in Win- 
chester, Kentucky. 

Mr. Crutcher was born in Jessamine county, 
Kentucky, June 21, 1856, the son of Thomas 
B. and Sarah (Price) Crutcher. His father 
was born in Jefferson county, Kentucky, Feb- 
ruary 14, 1831, and died in Jessamine county, 
Kentucky, at the age of seventy-two years. 
His mother was born at Bardstown. Nelson 
county. Kentucky. February 21, 1831 and is 
still living at Nicholasville. Kentucky. They 
were the parents of seven children, of whom 
six are living: John A., living in Louisville, 
Kentucky; Benjamin A.; Lizzie, in Nicholas- 
ville ; Sallie, deceased ; Carrie, Thomas B. and 
Fannie, the last three living in Nicholasville. 
Our subject's grandfather, Norvill Crutcher, 
and his wife. Sarah (Pollock) Crutcher, were 
natives of Virginia and of Welsh descent. 
They came to Jessamine county, Kentucky, 
when our subject's father was a boy, having 
previously lived in Jefferson county. Thomas 
B. Crutcher, the father, was given a common- 
school education and for fifty years _ he 
was in the mercantile business in Nicholasville. 
He was police judge and served on the city 
council for a number of years and was an act- 
ive member of the Baptist church. He took 
a great interest in educational work and was 
president of the jessamine Female Institute 
and promoted Bethel Academy and finally 
combined the two schools into one. 

Mr. Benjamin A. Crutcher was reared in 
Nicholasville, Kentucky, where he began his 
education by attending the common and 
graded schools, and continued by his takmg a 
literary course at William Jewell College, at 
Liberty, Ohio, from which he returned home. 
While working in his father's store, he read 
law and was admitted to the bar in 1884. and 
immediately began the practice of his profes- 
sion Mr. Crutcher was elected county attor- 
ney and served one term, then was re-elected 



1268 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



and served until he was elected commonwealth 
attorney in 1892, when he resigned the office 
of county attorney. At his first election he 
had some opposition, but since then he has had 
none, and as he is 'serving his fourth term, 
the completion of the present one will make 
twenty-four years in all. In 1907 Mr. 
Crutcher removed to Clark county and pur- 
chased a farm of one hundred and fifty acres 
on the Paris Pike, where he resided until the 
spring of 19 10, when he removed to Winches- 
ter. Plis district is composed of Clark, Jessa- 
mine, Madison and Powell counties. 

Mr. Crutcher married, in 1879, Cora Og- 
den, a native of Winchester, Kentucky, who 
died in 1889 at the age of thirty years. She 
was a daughter of James and Mary (Baldwin) 
Ogden. Three children were born of this un- 
ion : Mary, at home; James O.. of Winches- 
ter; and Allan, at home. Mr. Crutcher's sec- 
ond marriage occurred on November 24, 1892. 
to Emma Hedges, who was born in Circle- 
ville, Ohio, December 12, 1858, a daughter of 
loshua Hedges, of Pickaway county, Ohio, 
bne child has been born to this union, Will- 
iam, who is at home. Mr. Crutcher is a mem- 
ber of the fraternal orders of ]\Iasons, Odd 
Fellows and the Knights of Pythias, being 
connected with these orders in Nicholasville 
and with the Elks in Winchester. He and 
his family are members of the ]\Iethodist Epis- 
copal church South. I\Ir. Crutcher in poli- 
tics has been a life-long Democrat, and, keep- 
ing well informed on the questions and issues 
of the day, is able to support his position by 
intelligent argument. He takes an active in- 
terest in community affairs and has been in- 
fluential in the ranks of his party, doing all in 
his power to promote its growth and secure its 
success. His is a well rounded character, in 
which the varied interests of citizenship, of 
professional service, home and social life have 
received due attention. He is a well read 
man, has a host of friends, and in all relations 
he has commanded the esteem of those with 
whom he has come in contact, while the com- 
munity interests have benefited by his co-oper- 
ation and practical labors. 

Chatz M. Dean. — In the various counties 
of Kentucky are to be found many of the 
native sons of these respective sections who 
have found within their borders ample scope 
for effective eft'ort along business and pro- 
fessional lines and who have achieved suc- 
cess worthy of the name. Such an one is Air. 
Dean, who is recognized as one of the rep- 
resentative business men of his native county 
and who is successfully identified with the 
tobacco trade at Worthville, one of the thriv- 
ing and attractive towns of Carroll county. 



Chatz Miller Dean was born on the old 
homestead farm near the village in which he 
now^ resides, and the date of his nativity was 
July 10, 1861. He is a son of Chatz T. and 
Permelia (Tucker) Dean, the former of 
whom was born in Harrison county and the lat- 
ter in Bourbon county, this state, and both of 
whom were representatives of old and hon- 
ored families of the Blue Grass common- | 
wealth. William P. Dean, grandfather of 
him whose name initiates this sketch, was a 
native of Pennsylvania, where the family, of 
English origin, was founded in the Colonial 
era. He was reared and educated in his na- 
tive state, whence he emigrated to Kentucky 
in the latter part of the eighteenth or early in 
the nineteenth century. He secured a large 
tract of land in Harrison county, but a few 
years later he removed to Carroll county, 
where he secured land in the vicinity of the 
present tow^n of Worthville. He became one 
of the pioneers of this section of the state and 
contributed his quota to its civic and industrial 
development and upbuilding. The old home- 
stead is still in the possession of his descend- 
ants, and on this place he continued to reside 
until his death, when about seventy years of 
age. His name merits an enduring place on 
the roster of the worthy and honored pioneers 
of Carroll county. He accumulated a large 
landed estate, w^as the owner of many slaves 
and was numbered among the leading planters 
of the northern part of the state. His wife 
survived him by a number of years, and the 
estate was greatly depleted through the rav- 
ages of the Civil war and through the conse- 
quent freeing of the family slaves. Mrs. Dean 
attained to the venerable age of ninety-eight 
years and was summoned to the life eternal 
about the year 1869, her remains being laid to 
rest beside those of her husband on the old 
homestead plantation. She became the mother 
of three sons and four daughters, all of whom 
are now deceased. 

Chatz T. Dean was a boy at the time of the 
family removal to Carroll county, where he 
was reared to maturity on the home farm, in 
the meanwhile duly availing himself of the 
advantages of the common schools of the lo- 
cality and period. When about twenty years 
of age he initiated his independent career, 
without assistance from his father or others, 
and his self-reliance and ambition led him to 
secure a position in the employ of Joseph 
Thompson, who was the owner of several 
thousand acres of land in the valley of the 
Kentucky river and who was a prominent 
breeder of fine horses, in connection with 
which line of enterprise he maintained a pri- 
vate race track. Finally Air. Dean purchased 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1269 

land from Mr. Thompson and began indepen- passed the closing years of their lives. Chatz 

dent operations as an agriculturist and stock- T. and Permelia (Tucker) Dean became the 

grower. He eventually accumulated a valuable parents of six children, all of whom are liv- 

landed estate of about one thousand acres, ing except one daughter. Those surviving are 

the greater portion of this tract having been four sons and one daughter, and of the num- 

formerly a part of the Thompson estate, which her the youngest is he whose name forms the 

was originally granted by Virginia to John caption of this article. 

Williams and which next passed into the hands Chatz M. Dean passed his childhood and 
of Mr. Thompson, from whom Mr. Dean pur- youth in the midst of the gracious environ- 
chased his original homestead, as has just been ments and influences of the old homestead 
noted. The old parchment deed from Vir- on which he was born, and he \vas but twelve 
ginia, of which Kentucky was then an integral years of age at the time of the death of his 
part, is now in the possession of the subject father. He is indebted to the public schools 
of this sketch and is prized as a valuable his- of Carroll county for his early education, and 
torical and family heirloom. Chatz T. Dean he continued to be actively associated with the 
became the owner of a number of slaves, but work and management of the homestead farm 
these were given freedom as the result of the after the death of his father. He eventually 
Civil war. Air. Dean was numbered among came into possession of a portion of this fine 
the representative planters of Carroll county, property, and there he continued to devote 
was a man of strong character and impreg- liis attention to diversified agriculture and 
nable integrity and always held secure place stock-growing until 1908, when he removed 
in the confidence and good will of his fellow to Worthville, where he has erected a fine 
men. He continued to reside on his fine old modern residence, in which he has since main- 
homestead until his death, in 1873, at the age tained his home, though he still retains pos- 
of sixty-five years. He was liberal and loyal session of three w^ell improved farms near 
as a citizen, was a staunch and efifective ad- Worthville, the aggregate area of his landed 
vocate of the cause of the Democratic party estate being about five hundred acres. 
and both he and his wife w^ere most earnest Since establishing his residence in Worth- 
and zealous members of the Methodist Episco- ville Mr. Dean has engaged in the real-estate 
pal church, with whose southern body they and insurance business in which connection 
identified themselves after the Civil war had he is a member of the firm of Nash & Dean, 
brought about the division of the denomina- w'hich has built up a large and prosperous 
tion in the north and south. Mr. Dean de- enterprise in this line. For many years Mr. 
frayed the major part of the expense of the Dean has been one of the leading tobacco 
erection of the Methodist church near his growers of Carroll county, and when the prices 
old homestead, in 1870, and the cost of the on the product were so greatly depressed as 
building was about three thousand dollars, to make the business unprofitable under exist- 
This was called Dean chapel, and when the ing conditions he was actively identified with 
new edifice of the Alethodist Episcopal church, what is known as the Burley-tobacco pool, in 
South, was recently completed in the village 1902. He was one of the principal promoters 
of Worthville it was consistently entitled the of the organization of the tobacco-growers of 
Dean Alemorial church, in honor of this noble Carroll county at this time and it was largely 
and honored citizen, members of the family due to his active and indefatigable efforts 
having contributed most generously to the in this organization that its has been developed 
building of the new church. Mrs. Dean sur- to its present status of prominence and influ- 
vived her husband by a period of fifteen years ence. He was chairman and first secretary 
and continued to reside on the homestead, of the Carroll county society thus formed, and 
endeared to her by the gracious memories and he has expended ample time, labor and money 
associations of the past, until she too was in furthering its interests, 
called to the life eternal, at the age of seventy- In politics Mr. Dean has ever accorded un- 
eight years, her memory being revered by all equivocal allegiance to the cause of the Demo- 
who came w^ithin the compass of her gentle cratic party and his attitude has ever been 
and gracious influence. She was born in Bour- marked by loyal interest in all that tends 
bon county and was a daughter of William to conserve the best interests of the community. 
and Elizabeth (Day) Tucker, who were na- He served as magistrate for eight years, but 
tives of Maryland and who were young at has had no definite predilection or desire for 
the time of the removal of the respective public office. He was one of the organizers 
families to Bourbon county, Kentucky, where of the Worthville Deposit Bank, of whose 
their marriage was solemnized. They eventu- directorate he has been a valued member from 
ally removed to Grant county, where they the time of its incorporation. Mr. Dean is 



1270 HISTORY Ol^" Kl-:xrUCKY AND KKNTUCKIANS 

affiliated witli tlie local lodges of the Masonic school at ?^Iedia, the county seat of Delaware 
fraternitv and the Independent Order of Odd county, he took a course at the University of 
Fellows, and it is worthy of note that in the Tennsylvania. In i88o he went west and 
former he is a charter niember of Worthvillc spent four years in Colorado, but returned 
Lodge, No. 68i, Free & Accepted Masons, at east in the early ])art of 1884 and engaged in 
Worthville, of which he was chosen the first the hardware business in New York city, 
master, an office in which he served for sev- This experience was of sufficient training that 
eral terms, lie and his wife are most zeal- when he came to Louisville in November, 
ous members of the Methodist Fpiscopal 1886, he was offered and accepted the position 
church. South, and he w^as one of the most of buyer for the W. B. Belknap Hardware 
liberal contributors to the erection of the Dean and Manufacturing Company, and since that 
Memorial church, of this denomination, at time has proved himself so invaluable to this 
Worthville. He has served as elder of the firm that his connection has been cemented 
church for several years and is active in the more closely as time has passed. Mr. Hey- 
various departments of its work. burn became in succession treasurer, vice- 
In the year 1889 was solemnized the mar- president and president of the company, tak- 
riage of Mr. Dean to Miss Bessie Gullion, ing the latter position in May, 1910. 
who was born and reared in Carroll county. Lie is oue of the most progressive and pub- 
as was also her father, George P. Gullion, lie-spirited men of the city and state and his 
who is one of the representative agriculturists success cannot but be viewed with pleasure by 
of the county and a member of one of its all who have cognizance of his earnest efforts 
old and honored families. Mr. and Mrs. Dean and worthy career as a capable business man. 
have one child. Donna, who was born on the Mr. Heyburn has taken an active part in busi- 
i8th of November, 1903. The beautiful fam- ness circles since coming to Louisville and is 
ily home is known or its cordial and refined regarded as one of the city's most able and 
hospitality and Mr. and Mrs. Dean find their useful men. He is essentially public-spirited 
circle of friends limited only by that of their and takes an active interest in the building up 
acquaintances. of the city and her institutions and is a most 
WiLLi.AM Heyburn, one of Louisville's worthy member and honored president of the 
prominent citizens and leading business men, Louisville Y. M. C. A. 

and president of the Belknap Hardware and Socially Mr. Heyburn shows his inclina- 
Manufacturing Company, is a striking exam- tions by his membership with the Pendennis 
pie of what may be accomplished when deter- and Country Clubs. He married Julia, the 
mined perseverance is seconded by native daughter of Henry W. Barret, of Louisville, 
ability. His rise to the position which he and they have three sons : Henry Barret, 
now occupies is indicative of his especial fit- John Gilpin and Alexander, 
ness for the w^ork to which he is devoting his Smitfi A. Blackburn, M. D., is numbered 
energies. Under his capable direction the among the representative physicians and sur- 
business of the company has increased to geons of his native county and state and is ac- 
mammoth proportions, so that the enterprise tively engaged in the general practice of his 
is one of the most important contributing to profession in the attractive little city of Ver- 
the commercial activity and consequent pros- sailles, Woodford county. Smith Alford 
perity of the state. Blackburn was born in this county on the 22d 
Mr. Heyburn is a native of Pennsylvania, of August, 1875. and is the only child of 
born near Chadd's Ford in Delaware county, William and Jennie (Alford) Blackburn. 
Pennsylvania, on August 17, 1861, the son of The father was born near Spring Station, 
John Brinton and Sarah (Gilpin) Heyburn. Woodford county, in the year 1846, and is a 
both natives of Delaware county, the father son of William E. Blackburn, an elder broth- 
dying in 1874 and the mother still living. The er of Hon. Joseph S. C. Blackburn, who 
Heybitrn family has been in Delaware county, served in the distinguished office of governor 
Pennsylvania, since the days of William of Kentucky. William E. Blackburn was a 
Penn. Both the Heyburn and Gilpin families son of Major Edward and Prudence (Berry) 
have been English Quakers for many genera- Blackburn and his father w-as a gallant officer 
tions and both came over from England dur- in the Mexican war, soon after the close of 
ing the seventeenth century. wdiich his death occurred. W'illiam E. Black- 
William Heyburn was born on the farm burn married Henrietta Everitt and her deatli 
and reared upon the same, and he was given occurred November 19, 1904, at a venerable 
every opportunity to acquire a lirst class edu- age. The Blackburn family has been most 
cation, which he took advantage of and after prominently identified with' the development 
receiving his preliminary training at the high and upbuilding of the fine old Blue Grass 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1271 



commonwealth and the name has long been 
associated with the annals of Woodford 
county. Here William Blackburn, father of 
him whose name initiates this sketch, was 
reared and educated and here he was long 
identified with agricultural pursuits. He be- 
came one of the prominent and influential 
citizens of the county and at the present time 
he is a resident of the city of Louisville, 
where he is employed in the United States 
internal revenue service. He has been twice 
married. He first wedded Miss Jennie Al- 
ford, of Midway, Woodford county, and she 
died on the 2d of September, 1875, only a few 
weeks after the birth of her only child, Dr. 
Smith A. The father later wedded Miss Ada 
Bibb, of Arkansas, and the union has been 
without issue. 

Dr. Blackburn gained his early educational 
discipline in the public schools of Woodford 
county and this training included a course in 
the high school at Versailles. Later he con- 
tinued his academic studies in Center College, 
at Danville, and in preparation for the work 
of his chosen profession he finally was matric- 
ulated in the medical department of Colum- 
bian University, now known as the George 
Washington University, in the city of Wash- 
ington, D. C. In this celebrated institution 
he was graduated as a member of the class 
of 1899, and he duly received his well earned 
degree of Doctor of Medicine. He shortly 
afterward opened an office in the city of Lou- 
isville, where he built up a successful practice 
and where he continued to maintain his resi- 
dence until 1901. when he returned to his na- 
tive county and established himself in prac- 
tice at Versailles, where he now controls a 
large and representative professional business 
and where he holds prestige as one of the 
leading physicians and surgeons of the coun- 
ty. The Doctor is a member of the Kentucky 
State Medical Society and the American Med- 
ical Association. He is a close and apprecia- 
tive student of both departments of his pro- 
fession and has recourse to the best of its 
standard and periodical literature. He was 
reared in the faith of the Democratic party 
and has never severed his allegiance thereto, 
though he has never had aught of ambition 
for political office, finding that the demands 
of his exacting profession place sufficient re- 
sponsibility upon hrm without digression from 
this course. He is past chancellor command- 
er of Grey Lodge, No. 27, Knights of Pyth- 
ias, in A'ersailles, and holds membership in 
the Christian church. His wife is a member 
of the Methodist church. 

In the year 1906 was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Dr. Blackburn to Miss Laura Brown- 



ing, who was born and reared at Versailles, 
and who is a daughter of Charles W. and 
Laura Browning, both of whom are living in 
\ ersailles. Mr. Browning was for a number 
of years general manager of the Louisville 
& Atlantic Railroad and was an influential 
figure in connection with railroad afi^airs in 
Kentucky. Dr. and Mrs. Blackburn have one 
daughter, Henrietta. 

Arthur C. Hall. — An essentially loyal and 
public-spirited citizen and a representative 
member of the bar of Kentucky, Arthur Cole- 
man Hall is well upholding the prestige of the 
honored name which he bears and has gained 
distinctive precedence as an able and versatile 
trial lawyer, well versed in the science of 
jurisprudence. He was born in Clark county, 
Kentucky, on the 2nd of September, 1873, a 
son of George C. and Mary E. (Hall) Hall. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hall bore the same name but 
were not related. The former is a native of 
Henry county, Kentucky, whither his parents 
came from \'irginia, and the latter is a native 
of Clark county, her ancestors being of North 
Carolina stock. Joshua F. Hall, paternal 
grandfather of Arthur C. Hall, emigrated 
from the Old Dominion commonwealth to 
Kentucky shortly after the organization of 
Kentucky as a state in 1792. He located on a 
farm in Henry county, where his marriage 
was solemnized and where he continued to 
reside during the residue of his life. He was 
a staunch Methodist and spent much time and 
money in furthering the interests of the 
church, holding camp-meetings and doing all 
in his power toward the conversion of his fel- 
low men. George C. Hall, father of him to 
whom this sketch is dedicated, was reared and 
educated in Henry county and has spent prac- 
tically his entire life thus far in his native 
state. He resided in Putnam county, Indiana, 
and he also lived in various counties in Ken- 
tucky. During the major portion of his active 
business career he was engaged in farming 
and he was also largely interested in contract- 
ing and building. He is now living virtually 
retired from active participation in business 
afifairs and maintains his home in the city of 
Newport, having there resided for the past 
twenty years. He has attained to the vener- 
able age of seventy-eight years, and his wife 
is in her seventy-first year. Mrs. Hall is a 
daughter of James Hall, who was born in 
Clark county and whose parents were natives 
of North Carolina and pioneer Kentuckians. 
Representatives of this fine old family served 
in the war of the Revolution, the war of 1812 
and in the Civil war, being members of the 
Confederate army in the latter conflict. 
George C. and Mary E. Hall became the par- 



1272 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

ents of five children, all of whom are living, the interest of that machine. Their local trade 

the subject of this review being the fourth in extends over Kenton, Campbell and Boone 

order of birth. counties, in Kentucky, and a force of from 

Arthur Coleman Hall has passed most of twenty-five to thirty people are constantly em- 
his life thus far in Campbell county and his ployed. The founder of the business, John A. 
preliminary educational advantages were such Fischer, invented and had patented the Family 
as were afforded in the private and public Fire & Burglar Proof Safe, which he manu- 
schools of this county. In 1896 he entered factured and sold extensively during his life- 
the law office of Aubry Barber, at Newport, time, and which is still manufactured and 
and in 1897 he was matriculated in the Cincin- forms no small business of the present com- 
nati Law School, in the city of Cincinnati, in pany. He was a native of Germany, the date 
which excellent institution he studied for two of his birth being 1846. He was but ten years 
years. He was admitted to the bar at New- of age at the time of his emigration to the 
port in 1898, and he immediately thereafter United States. He made the journey alone and 
initiated the practice of his profession in the proceeded directly to Ludlow, Kentucky, where- 
city of Covington, in partnership with R. H. he joined relatives. While crossing the Atlan- 
Gray. In 1890 he established his home in tic he lost his hat and was compelled to finish 
Bellevue, and he has built up a large and the trip bareheaded. He secured employment 
representative clientage in Newport and gained in a dry-goods store at Ludlow and when four- 
recognition as an able and well-fortified coun- teen years of age entered upon an apprentice- 
selor. Mr. Hall is a loyal Democrat in his ship at the locksmith's trade, being identified 
political proclivities and he has always taken with this occupation for a number of years, 
an active interest in the local councils of the In 1872 he entered into a partnership alliance 
party. He has never manifested aught of with William Bogen Schutz, and they began 
desire for the honors or emoluments of public business as locksmiths in the city of Coving- 
office but has devoted himself most assiduous- ton. This enterprise proved disastrous and 
ly to the demands of his profession. As a Mr. Fischer was soon working at his trade 
citizen he is enterprising and progressive and again as a journeyman, and it was during this 
he has contributed in no small measure to the period that he patented his safe. In 1884 he 
civic and material development of his home laid the foiuidation for his future success as 
cottnty. He is a man of large ideas and broad a hardware merchant and through fair and 
information and holds a seciu'e place in pop- honorable methods he built up a fine thriving 
ular confidence and esteem. In a fraternal business, the same being now carried on by his 
way he is affiliated with the Independent heirs. He was summoned to the life eternal 
Order of Odd Fellows. at Covington, in 1892, at the age of forty-six 

John J. Fischer. — Persistency and constan- years. His death was the result of injuries 
cy, when coupled with a determination to received from an accidental fall from a build- 
forge ahead, bid fair for eminent success in ing in. process of construction. He was a 
any line of enterprise, and it is to these quali- large-hearted, broad-minded man, deeply in- 
ties that the Fischer Brothers Company, deal- terested in all matters pertaining to the general 
ers in hardware, farm implements and electri- welfare and he was held in high esteem by his 
cal supplies, owe the prestige and distinctive fellow citizens. He married Julia Monning, 
precedence which it has been theirs to gain in a native of Ironton, Ohio, and they became the 
the industrial world of Kentucky. The com- parents of twelve children, eleven of whom 
pany is the outgrowth of the business estab- are now living, the subject of this review being 
lished, in 1884, by John A. Fischer in Coving- the eldest in order of birth. Mrs. Fischer 
ton and conducted by him until his death, in survives her honored husband and she now 
1892, at which time his sons succeeded to the resides at Covington, much beloved by all who 
business. The Fischer Brothers Company was have come within the sphere of her gracious 
incorporated under the laws of the state in influence. 

1907, with a capital stock of fifty thousand John J. Fischer was born at Covington, 

dollars. Its official corps consists of the fol- Kenton county, Kentucky, on the 19th of 

lowing: J. J. Fischer, president; F. A. December, 1868, and he was reared and edu- 

Fischer, vice-president and treasurer ; and H. cated in his native city. After a good com- 

A. Schroetter, secretary. This substantial mon-school training he pursued a course of 

concern owns and operates three stores at study in the night school of a business college 

Covington, Newport and Latonia, and they at Covington. He became associated with 

do an extensive wholesale and retail business, his father in the work and management of his 

They are agents for the Iowa separator and hardware business at an early age and he has 

a salesman travels throughout Kentucky in been identified with this line of enterprise dur- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



11^73 



ing his entire active business career, being now 
one of the owners of the business estabhshed 
by his father. Through the able management 
of Mr. Fischer and his brothers the trade has 
been graduahy extended to its present large 
proportions. Mr. Fischer is president of the 
concern and he has the general management 
of the three stores. In politics he is aligned 
as a loyal supporter of the cause of the Dem- 
ocratic party and though he has never mani- 
fested aught of ambition for public office he 
has given freely of his aid and influence in 
support of all movements projected for the 
good of the community. He has been a mem- 
ber of the school board in Covington for a 
number of years and both he and his wife 
are devout communicants of the Catholic 
church. Fraternally he is affiliated with the 
Knights of Columbus. 

In 1893 was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Fischer to Miss Bernardina Lage,- who 
was born an reared in the city of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and who is a daughter of Bernard Lage, 
of that city. Mr. and Mrs. Fischer became 
the parents of eight children, three of whom 
are deceased. Those living are Genevieve, 
John, Clarence, Justin and Ouentin. 

Louis Marshall. — The able and popular 
cashier of the Woodford Bank & Trust Com- 
pany of Versailles is a scion of a family 
whose name has been identified with the an- 
nals of American history from the early 
Colonial epoch and one which has given to . 
the nation many of its most distinguished pat- 
riots and statesmen, including Hon. John Mar- 
shall, chief justice of the United States su- 
preme court. The history of Kentucky gives 
ample data concerning the prominent part 
which the Marshall family has here played in 
connection with civic and material develop- 
ment and upbuilding and within the limita- 
tions of the present review it is impossible 
to give more than a brief outline touching 
the genealogy. 

On the beautiful family homestead known 
as Buck Pond, in Woodford county, Kentucky, 
Louis Marshall was ushered into the world 
on the 4th of July. 1856. He is a son of Hon. 
Edward Colston Marshall, who was born on 
the same old homestead in 1821. The latter 
was a son of Dr. Louis Marshall, who was 
born at Oak Hill, Fauquier county, Virginia, 
on the 7th of October, 1773. Dr. Marshall was 
a son of Colonel Thomas Marshall, who was 
born in Washington parish, Westmoreland 
county, \"irginia, on the 2nd of April, 1730, 
and who was a son of Captain John Marshall 
(of the forest), the latter having been born 
in Westmoreland county, Virginia, about 1700. 
Captain John Marshall was a son of Thomas 



Marshall, who was born in eastern X'irginia 
about the year 1675 and who was a son of 
Captain John Marshall, who served as captain 
in a cavalry regiment in England during the 
reign of King Charles I. This distinguished 
ancestor was born and reared in Ireland and 
was a zealous supporter of the crown and of 
the established church of England. He was 
one of the first to ofi^er his services to Charles 
I and after the accession of Cromwell he 
found conditions so obnoxious that he came to 
the colony of Virginia, where he established 
his home about the year 1650. He was an act- 
ive participant in the Indian wars of the col- 
ony and Campbell's history of Virginia gives 
him credit for having been the most potent 
factor in bringing about a termination of hos- 
tilities. Thomas Marshall removed from the 
eastern part of the Old Dominion to Washing- 
ton parish, Westmoreland county, where he 
died in May, 1704. He was a successful 
planter and was a zealous communicant of the 
church of England. Captain John Marshall 
(of the forest) married Elizabeth Markham 
and he became siezed of a large landed estate 
on Appomattox creek, in Washington parish, 
Westmoreland county, X'irginia. He served 
as captain in the militia and was a man of dis- 
tinctive prominence and influence in his com- 
munity. He continued to reside in West- 
moreland county until his death, which 
occurred in 1752. 

Colonel Thomas Marshall, great-grand- 
father of him whose name initiates this sketch, 
was, according to well authenticated family 
tradition, a classmate of General Washington, 
whom he often attended in various surveying 
expeditions. During the French & Indian war 
he served as lieutenant of volunteers and after 
his father's death the family removed to the 
vicinity of Germantown, Fauquier county, Vir- 
ginia, where he accepted the agency for the 
immense landed estate owned by Lord Fair- 
fax. He was an uncompromising patriot and 
when the war of the Revolution was precipi- 
tated he was found duly prepared to do his 
part in furtherance of the cause of indepen- 
dence. After the formal organization of his 
regiment he was made its major and he distin- 
guished himself at the battle of Great Bridge, 
the first Revolutionary engagement on Vir- 
ginia soil. He was with the Continental forces 
at Valley Forge and when General ]\Iercer 
was killed, at Germantown, he succeeded to 
the latter's command. In the battle of Bran- 
dywine his horse was killed under him and 
history gives him definite credit for having 
saved the patriot army from destruction at 
this time. In recognition of his gallant ser- 
vices the A'irginia house of burgesses pre- 



1274 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

sented him with a magiiihcenl swurd. Many and with a nnniber of fellow students he par- 
3ears later this valuable heirloom was pre- ticipated in the attack on the Bastile. He was 
sented by one of his granddaughters to the his- present at the massacre of the Swiss guard, 
torical society of jMaysville, Kentucky. Col- witnessed the murder of the Princess de 
onel iNlarshall w^as frequently called upon to Lanil)alle and at the time of the Reign of 
serve as a member of the \ irginia house of Terror he was arrested and condemned to 
burgesses and was a member of the conven- death. He was confined in prison for a con- 
tion that declared independence for that col- siderable period and was finally liberated 
ony. In 1779 Colonel ^Marshall, in command of through the intercession of his brother, John, 
the Third Virginia regiment, was sent to rein- the distinguished chief justice of the United 
force General Lincoln in South Carolina. He States supreme court. Upon his return to 
arrived in time to be beleaguered with Lin- America Dr. Marshall established his resi- 
coln's forces at Charlestown. that state, and dence upon the old homestead in Woodford 
to share in the surrender of that city to the county, Kentucky, and here he attained pres- 
llritish. He finally was paroled and with tige as the most erudite and successful phy- 
other officers made a trip to Kentucky on sician and surgeon in the state. He was a 
horseback, in 1780. It was on this memorable man of the highest intellectual powers and 
journey through the wilderness that he lo- manifested the inherent family talent and pro- 
cated the fine old ancestral plantation, to which pensity for teaching. His interest in educa- 
he gave the name of Buck Pond and upon tional work was signally shown by his gather- 
which he established his home in the year men- ing at his country home the most promising 
tioned. Shortly afterward he was appointed young men of Kentucky, to whom he gave 
surveyor general of lands in Kentucky. In instruction in his well ordered private school. 
1785 he brought his family to this state, mak- In 1838 he was chosen president of Washing- 
ing the trip down the Ohio river on a flat boat, ton and Lee University, of Virginia, and in 
In 1787 he represented Fayette county, of 1855 he was made president of Transylvania 
which Woodford county was then a part, in University, of Lexington, Kentucky. He at- 
the Virginia legislature and in the following tained to the patriarchal age of ninety-three 
year he was elected a delegate to the conven- years and his name merits an enduring place 
tion which met at Danville, Kentucky, to upon the roll of the distinguished men of the 
formulate and adopt a state constitution. Later fine old commonwealth which represented his 
he served as United States collector of inter- home during the major part of his long and 
nal revenue for this state. In the year 1800 he useful life. Dr. Marshall married Miss 
resigned his beautiful homestead, upon wdiich Agatha Smith, who was born in 1782 and 
he had made the best of improvements, to his whose death occurred in May, 1844. 
youngest son, Louis, and then went to live Hon. Edward Colston Marshall, son of Dr. 
with his son Thomas at Washington, Mason Louis and Agatha (Smith) Marshall, was 
county, Kentucky, where he died on the 2nd reared to maturity on the old homestead of 
of June, 1802. On the 2nd of April, 1730, which so frequent mention has already been 
Colonel Thomas Marshall was united in mar- made, and besides the refining influences of 
riage to Miss Mary Randolph Keith, a daugh- a cultured home he was afforded the best of 
ter of Parson James and Alary Islam (Ran- educational advantages, having attended in 
dolph) Keith. Parson Keith was born in" turn Washington College, in Virginia; Center 
Scotland and came thence to America, about College, at Danville, Kentucky ; and Transyl- 
1720, when he established his home in Vir- vania University, at Lexington, this state, 
ginia. His wife was a daughter of Thomas Through careful study he admirably prepared 
Randolph, of Tuckahoe, who was the second himself for the work of the legal profession 
son of William Randolph, of Turkey Island, and after his admission to the bar he engaged 
and therefore closely related to the historic in the practice of law at Nicholasville, Jessa- 
character, John Randolph, of Roanoke, as mine county, Kentucky. Early in 1847 he en- 
well as to Thomas Jefferson and Richard listed for service in the Mexican war and in 
Henry Lee. this connection he was commissioned first 
Dr. Louis Marshall, youngest son of Col- lieutenant in a regiment of United States In- 
onel Thomas Marshall and grandfather of fantry, later being promoted captain of his 
Louis Marshall, of Versailles, Kentucky, was company. He served until May, 1848, when 
sent to Edinburgh, Scotland, to complete his he received his honorable discharge. In the 
literary and scientific studies and he then w^ent following year he joined the ever memorable 
to the city of Paris for instruction in medicine exodus of gold seekers who were making their 
and surgery. At that climacteric period in way across the plains to the new Eldorado in 
French history he became an ardent republican California, where he became prominent and in- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1275 



fluential in public affairs in the pioneer days 
of that state. In 185 1 he was elected the first 
reoresentative of California in congress and in 
1856 he returned to Kentucky, where he 
showed his affection for and appreciation of 
the gracious associations of the old Buck Pond 
homestead by purchasing the same from his 
father. He became associated with others in 
the founding of the Lexington Daily Press 
and in the same year he was an independent 
candidate for congress, but was defeated. 
\fter the election he returned to California 
and there he was elected attorney general of 
the state. He there passed the residue of his 
life and he died, in the city of San Francisco, 
in the year 1883. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Josephine Chalfont, was born and 
reared in Ohio and was a daughter of Robert 
Chalfont. She likewise passed the closing 
years of her life in California, where she died 
in 1893, and of the children the subject of 
this sketch in the only one now living. The 
parents were communicants of the Protestant 
Episcopal church and the father was a man 
who well maintained the traditions and honors 
of the family name. 

Louis Marshall, the immediate subject of 
this review, gained his early educational dis- 
cipline in the schools of Kentucky and as a 
young man he accompanied his parents on 
their removal to California. In the city of 
San Francisco he became a successful stock- 
broker and there he held membership in the 
Stock Exchange. About 1896 he returned to 
Kentucky and established his home at Ver- 
sailles. He also, with signal consistency and 
appreciation, purchased the ancestral home- 
stead, upon which stands the fine old Colonial 
residence built by Colonel Thomas Marshall 
about the year 1780. This valuable property 
he still retains. Shortly after establishing his 
home in Versailles Mr. Marshall was elected 
cashier of the Woodford County Bank & Trust 
Company, of which position he is still incum- 
bent, and he is recognized as one of the able 
and discriminating financiers of his native 
state. He has never had aught of ambition 
for public office, though he is essentially pro- 
gressive and public-spirited in his attitude, 
and his political allegiance is given to the 
Democratic party. 

At San Francisco, California, in the year 
1883, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Marshall to Miss Susie Thorne, a daughter 
of Isaac and Susan (Bryant) Thorne the for- 
mer of whom was numbered among the ster- 
ling pioneers of California. Mr. and Mrs. 
Marshall have two children, Edith, who re- 
mains at the parental home, and ' Josephine, 
who is the wife of Laurance A. Raley, a 



native of Kentucky, a scion of an old and 
influential family of this state and now a resi- 
dent of Atlanta, Georgia. 

Harry A. Schoberth. — A native son of 
Woodford county, Kentucky, and a scion of a 
fine old German family, his grandfather be- 
ing a relative of the Emperor of Germany, 
Harry A. Schoberth is present city attorney 
for Versailles, is master commissioner of 
Woodford county and represents his district 
in the state legislature. He was born at Ver- 
sailles, Woodford county, Kentucky, on the 
I St of June, 1882, and is a son of Anthony and 
Elizabeth (V^ogler) Schoberth, the former of 
whom is a native of Germany and the latter 
of whom was born in Franklin county, Ken- 
tucky, of German parentage. Anthony Scho- 
berth is a son of George Schoberth, who still 
resides in Germany, at the advanced age of 
ninety-two years. Anthony Schoberth re- 
ceived excellent educational advantages in his 
youth and after completing the curriculum of 
the common schools he was matriculated in 
the Berlin University, at Berlin. While pur- 
suing his studies in this institution he was 
drafted to serve in the German army. In or- 
der to escape this arduous service he emigrat- 
ed to America, arriving at New Orleans, Lou- 
isiana, in 1874. Thence he proceeded to Lou- 
isville, Kentucky, and in 1877 he located at 
Versailles, this county, where he has since 
maintained his home. He has devoted the 
major portion of his active career to the stock 
business, being at the present time buyer and 
shipper for himself and live stock inspector 
for Woodford county, Kentucky, dealing prin- 
cipally in fancy saddle horses. In 1877 was 
solemnized his marriage to Miss Elizabeth 
Vogler, who was born and reared in Franklin 
county, this state. Mr. Vogler claimed the 
Empire of Germany as the place of his nativ- 
ity and Mrs. Vogler was a representative of 
a fine old Virginia family : Both were sum- 
moned to eternal rest when Mrs. Schoberth 
was a small child. Anthony and Elizabeth 
Schoberth became the parents of three chil- 
dren, namely — Harry A., the subject of this 
review ; Raymond, who is in school at Ver- 
sailles, Kentucky ; and Elma, who is the wife 
of John Wilkerson, of Newcastle, Kentucky. 

Harry A. Schoberth, first in order of birth 
of the above children, received his prelimin- 
ary educational discipline in the public 
schools of Versailles and in Rose Hill Acad- 
emy, at Versailles. Later he attended Henry 
Academy and in 1900 he entered Central Uni- 
versity, at Richmond. In 1901 he was matric- 
ulated in the law department of the Univer- 
sity of Louisville and in this celebrated insti- 
tution he was graduated in 1902, with highest 



Vol. ni— 9 



1276 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



honors, being chosen valedictorian of his class. 
Immediately after his graduation he located at 
Versailles, where he has built up a large and 
lucrative clientage, and where his prominence 
in legal and i)olitical circles amply contradicts 
the scriptural aphorism that "A prophet is not 
without honor save in his own country." He 
is recognized as one of the representative 
members of the bar of Woodford county and 
he has gained precedence as an able trial law- 
ver and as a learned and well fortified coun- 
selor. He has been cU)scly identified with 
political aft'airs since early youth and is 
aligned as a staunch supporter of the prin- 
ciples and policies of the Democratic party. 
He was chairman of the county campaign 
committee before he had attained to his legal 
majority and he has frequently served in this 
capacity since that time. In 1907 he was giv- 
en distinctive mark of popular appreciation in 
that he was then elected to represent the Fif- 
ty-third district, comprising Woodford 'coun- 
ty, in the state legislature. In 1909 he was 
re-elected to this office without opposition 
from either party. In the session of 1908 he 
was the youngest member in the assembly and 
during that session he was chosen by the joint 
legislature to introduce William "J. Bryan, 
who was to address the legislature. In 1910 
he was leader for his party on the floor of the 
house, being unanimously chosen for this po- 
sition. He is now (1910) candidate for 
speaker of the house of representatives. In 
1910 he was appointed master commissioner 
of Woodford county by Judge R. L. Stout, of 
the circuit court, and he was recently chosen 
city attorney for Versailles. In all of his 
public offices he has served with utmost effi- 
ciency and satisfaction and he is rapidly gain- 
ing prestige as one of the leading lawyers of 
the younger generation in the entire state. 
He is an eloquent orator and his extensive 
reading and retentive Jiiemory make him a 
ready debater, his logical arguments and earn- 
est utterances never failing to carry convic- 
tion. In a fraternal way Mr. Schoberth is 
affiliated with Gray Lodge, No. 27. Knights of 
Pythias, in which he is past chancellor, and 
he is serving as grand vice-chancellor in the 
Grand Lodge of the state of Kentucky, be- 
ing the youngest grand vice-chancellor of the 
Knights of Pythias in the United States. His 
religious faith is that of the Catholic church. 

Abner C. Hunter. — Prominently identi- 
fied with financial interests in his native coun- 
ty, Mr. Hunter is now incumbent of the re- 
sponsible office of cashier of the bank of J. 
Amsden & Company, at Versailles, this being 
one of the old and substantial monetary insti- 
tutions of Woodford county. 



Abner C. Hunter is a scion of the third 
generation of the family in Kentucky. He 
was born on the old homestead farm in Wood- 
ford county, on the 7th of July, 1868, and is 
a son of lAbner C. and Edith (Sanders) Hunt- 
er. Abner C. Hunter, Sr., was likewise a na- 
tive of Woodford county and he was a son 
of William Stuart Hunter, who was born and 
reared in Virginia, whence he emigrated to 
Kentucky and established his home in Wood- 
ford county in the pioneer days. Here he 
died in the year 1835 and his wife long sur- 
vived him, she having been summoned to 
eternal rest in 1878. Abner C. Hunter, Sr., 
was reared to maturity on the farm which 
was the place if his nativity and his educa- 
tional advantages were those alTorded in the 
common schools of Woodford county. Here 
he continued to be actively identified with 
agricultural pursuits until 1849, when he 
joined the historic hegira of gold-seekers who 
were making their way across the plains of 
California, where he remained for some time 
and where he met with measurable success in 
his quest for gold. He returned to Woodford 
county in 1866 and here purchased the old 
homestead farm from his mother. To the 
management of this well improved homestead 
he continued to devote his attention during 
the remainder of his active career and there 
he continued to reside until his death, which 
occurred in 1883. He took a lively and intel- 
ligent interest in public afifairs and was lib- 
eral and progressive as a citizen. He gave 
his allegiance to the Democratic party and 
he was long numbered among the prominent 
and influential citizens of Woodford county. 
In 1857 was solemnized his marriage to ^liss 
Edith Sanders, who w^as born at Natchez, 
Mississippi, and who is a daughter of the 
late Louis and Margaret (Price) Sanders, 
who were natives of Kentucky but who were 
residents of Natchez, Mississippi, at the time 
of their daughter's marriage. Mrs. Hunter 
survives her honored husband and now re- 
sides at Versailles, Kentucky. 

Abner C. Hunter, Jr., the immediate sub- 
ject of this review, was reared to maturity 
on the old homestead farm, of wdiich men- 
tion has been made, and he was afforded the 
advantages of the excellent schools of Wood- 
ford county. He continued to be identified 
with the work and management of the home 
farm until 1885. when he assumed a clerical 
position in the bank of J. Amsden & Com- 
pany, of Versailles, and he continued to be 
employed in this institution until 1889. when 
he later secured the position of assistant 
cashier of .the First National Bank of ^lerid- 
ian. Mississippi. In 1903 he resigned this po- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1277 

sition to accept that of cashier of the Union vising architect of the miHtary occupation of 

Bank & Trust Company in the same city and Cuba and he remained upon the island for two 

of this responsible executive office he re- years, or until military occupation ceased in 

mained in tenure until 1906 when, after the 1902, in which year he returned to the United 

death of James Amsden, he was appointed States. Being now well grounded and wide- 

to succeed the latter as cashier of the bank of ly experienced in his profession he felt justi- 

J. Amsden & Company, at Versailles, having fied in going farther afield than Covington and 

returned to his native county for the purpose for the ensuing two years was engaged in 

of assuming this position, of which he has architectural work in Omaha, Nebraska. The 

since continued the efficient and popular in- charms of the Blue Grass state, nevertheless, 

cumbent. Mr. Hunter is prominently affil- remained undimmed in his memory and he 

iated with the time-honored Masonic frater- returned to Covington and entered into busi- 

nity and is master of Landmark Lodge, No. ness for himself. He has been eminently suc- 

41, Ancient Free & Accepted Masons, at the cessful, and has made plans for many of the 

time of this writing, in 1910. He also holds principal buildings in Kentucky and Ohio, 

membership in the Chapter and Commandery, Politically Mr. Walker constitutes in himself 

of which latter body he is an officer. He is a member of that large Democratic following 

also identified with Grey Lodge, No. 27, which is sometimes termed the "Solid South." 

Knights of Pythias, of which he is past chan- His fraternal relations extend to the Knights 

cellor. He is a communicant of the Protest- of Pythias at Covington, in which he is active 

ant Episcopal church and Mrs. Hunter, of the and prominent, it having upon occasion been 

Presbyterian church. his distinction to represent the order at the 

In the year 1891 was solemnized the mar- Grand Lodge, 

riage of Mr. Hunter to Miss Blanche Fergu- >^Ir. Walker was married July 14, 1904, to 

son, who was born and reared in Woodford ^iiss Helen Bondesson, a native of Omaha 

and who is a daughter of Louis L. and Sally and daughter of John Bondesson, a native of 

(Graddy) Ferguson. Mr. and Mrs. Hunter Sweden, a retired lumber merchant and one of 

have three children— Sarah Graddy, Edith the old and well known citizens of that Ne- 

and Blanche. braska city. yiv. and Mrs. Walker are mem- 

Lyman Walker. — Judging by past achieve- bers of the Episcopal church, 
ment and prestige already attained, few of the Charles Henry Meng. — The Meng fam- 
young professional men of Covington have a il}' is of Teutonic origin. John Christopher 
more brilliant future before them than Ly- ^leng, the founder of this family in America, 
man Walker, one of the city's leading archi- was born in Alannheim, Germany, in 1697, 
tects. He is by birth an Ohioan, Zanesville, and married Dorathea Von Elsten on June 29, 
that state, having been the scene of his nativ- 1723. In 1728, with their two children, they 
ity and the date, April 22, 1880. He is the came to this country and settled in German- 
son of Richard B. and Lucretia (Morgan) town, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He 
Walker, the former a native of Maryland and brought with him testimonials of himself and 
the latter of Zanesville, Ohio. Richard B. "honorable housewife" from Samuel Michael 
Walker is one of Covington's prominent busi- Doughfs. a preacher of the reformation. On 
ness men, being engaged in the real estate and August 24, 1728, he took the oath of alle- 
brokerage business. He and his wife are the giance. A large Bible, which they brought 
parents of four children, of whom three sur- with them, and their letters and other records 
vive, Lyman Walker being the eldest. can be seen at the Historical Society, 130 Lo- 

Having attained only to his tenth year at cust Street, Philadelphia, 

the time of the family's removal from Zanes- From this union we have eight children, 

ville Mr. Walker received the greater part of The third, John Ulrich, born June 11, 1731, 

his common school education in Covington, married Sarah Calladay. We are uncertain 

He left his desk in the school room at an un- as to the exact date of the birth of Chris- 

usually early age, being only fourteen when he topher Meng, a son of this union and next in 

entered the office of an architect. His very lineal descent. 

evident cleverness in this line secured his pro- Christopher Meng was a captain in the 

motion and two years later he entered the em- Revolutionary war. He served in the Sec- 

pjoy of Samuel Hannaford & Sons of Cin- ond Batallion, Philadelphia Militia, was in the 

cinnati, with whom he remained for three battle of Brandywine and records speak of 

years, his services being of an eminently sat- him as having crossed in the boat with Gen- 

isfactory character. In igoo, although scarce- eral Washington. At the close of the war he 

ly having reached his majority, he entered the settled in Winchester, Frederick county. Vir- 

employ of the government as assistant super- ginia, and married Margaret Jones. 



1278 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

In 1780 Charles Ulrich Meng, next in line, ^Fadison and Walter Stephenson. Malvina 

was born in Winchester, Virginia and he niai vied EUwood Garrett Harrison, of Xenia, 

lived there till he was fifteen years of age, at Ohio, November 24, 1897. He died about a 

which time he moved to Woodstock, Shenan- year later; no issue. Walter Stephenson was 

doah county, Virginia. He married Victoria married to Sarah Amanda Jones, daughter of 

Tcbbs, daughter of Captain William and Vic- William S. and Emma Collins Jones, Octo- 

toria Haislip Tebbs. William Tebbs was a ber 5, 1910. 

captain in the Revolutionary war in a com- Mr. and Mrs. Meng live at their beautiful 
pany of Westmoreland militia. (See record country home, "Woodlawn," lying three quar- 
of service Old Military Acc't Book, page 776, ters of a mile east of North Middletown, 
in State Library. Richmond, Virginia.) Bourbon county, Kentucky. Mr. Meng is ac- 
Charles Ulrich Meng was a captain in the war tively engaged in the business of farming and 
of 1812, Scott's Regiment of Virginia Militia, stock-raising, which has occupied him since 
"Present on duty at Norfolk." (See Record the war. The Meng coat-of-arms is painted 
and Pension Office, Washington, D. C.) after the official designs of heraldic authori- 
Charles Ulrich Meng inherited great wealth ties of Germany, established by authoritative 
from his wife, Victoria Tebbs, and removed records as the true and only bearing of the 
to Brentsville, Prince William county, Vir- Mengs of that part of Germany from which 
ginia, the native home of his wife. There he John Christopher Meng went to America in 
practiced law and served as a Judge up to the the year 1728. The emblazonment consists 
time of his death, 1865. Nine children were of a shield and helmet, a mantle, a crest, and 
the issue of this marriage, Evelina, Ellen, a ribbon, and is very beautifully done in col- 
Charles H., James Madison, Sarah, Martha, ors. 

William, Edmond and Catharine. Hon. Raisbel C. Hieatt. — Most faithful 
James Madison Meng, the father of and efficient in public service, public-spirited 
Charles Henry Meng, was born February 22, and ever the friend of those causes likely to 
1812, at Brentsville, Prince William county, result in the attainment of the greatest good 
\'irginia. He was educated in Virginia and for the greatest number, of proved personal 
at the age of twenty-one years came to Bour- generosity, Hon. Raisbel C. Hieatt, county 
bon county, Kentucky, where he was en- judge of Franklin county, rightly enjoys a 
gaged in teaching school for over twenty large measure of popularity. This gentleman 
years in Bourbon and Nicholas counties. He was born in Franklin county, Kentucky, Jan- 
was married in Bourbon county, Kentucky, uary 5, 1855, and is the son of Louis Thomas 
in 1842, to Malvina F. Hall, who was a na- and Susan (Rupe) Hieatt. His father was 
tive of Bourbon county, born in 1822. She likewise born in Kentucky and was the son 
was the daughter of Henry and Fanny Tal- of Louis Thomas Hieatt, a Virginian. On 
bott Hall. There were two sons from this the maternal side Mr. Hieatt is bound by the 
marriage, Charles Henry and James August- strongest ties to the Blue Grass state, his 
us. Charles Henry was born April 25, 1843, grandfather, John Rupe, having been a Frank- 
and James Augustus, born in 1865, died Feb- lin county pioneer. His father was a farmer 
ruary 3, 1885, at the age of nineteen years, by occupation, and after residing for many 
Major James Madison Meng received his title years in Franklin county, removed to Shelby 
of major from mustering home troops before county, where he died in 1904, at the age of 
the Civil war. seventy-two years. The wife preceded him 
Charles Henry Meng attended the school by many years, her demise occurring at the 
taught by his father until the outbreak of the comparatively early age of thirty-six. Mr. 
Civil war. He was then about eighteen years Hieatt was one of a family of seven children. 
of age, tc: young to enlist in service without Judge Hieatt received a common-school ed- 
his parents' consent. It was owing to the ill- ucation and followed in the paternal foot- 
ness of his father that he was allowed to go steps in the matter of a calling. He experi- 
in the latter's place. He served during the enced a good deal of success in his agricul- 
four years' conflict in Company C, Sixth tural endeavors and continued in this line up 
Kentucky Cavalry, Morgan's command. On to the time he entered public office. He be- 
May 21, 1875, he was married to Sarah Kath- gan upon his public career when he was ap- 
erine Calvert, daughter of Walter Stephen- pointed county assessor by County Judge 
son and Louise Evans Calvert, her father be- James H. Polsgrove to fill the office to which 
ing a direct descendant of Lord Baltimore, Mr. Ambrose Quarles had been elected, that 
George Calvert, founder of Maryland. Mr. gentleman having died before entering upon 
and Mrs. Meng have five children, namely: its duties. This was in the year 1902. Mr. 
Calvert, Malvina, Charles McClelland, James Hieatt filled out the term and was then 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1279 



elected for an additional term of two years. 
While serving as county assessor he paid the 
widow of Mr. Quarles his salary, less actual 
expenses, out of respect to Mr. Quarles. His 
service was of such an efificient character that 
he was not allowed to go back to private life 
and in 1905 he was elected sheriff of Franklin 
county. After filling one term in this capacity 
he was elected county judge and has met with 
the most sanguine hopes of his many friends 
in the fulfillment of the duties of this ofifice. 

Ever since he became old enough to cast a 
ballot Judge Hieatt has given his loyal sup- 
port to the Democratic party. He is a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and of the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, and is a communicant of the Chris- 
tian church. On January 8, 1880, Judge Hie- 
att was united in marriage to Miss Katie Sar- 
gent of Franklin county. 

James H. Hazelrigg. — Among that coterie 
of eminently distinguished men whose posses- 
sion serves to justify Frankfort in the pride 
she takes in her citizenship no one occupies 
a firmer position than Judge James H. Hazel- 
rigg, former chief justice and member of the 
court of appeals of Kentucky. The achieve- 
ments of this gentleman in his profession en- 
title him to be reckoned as one of the ablest 
lawyers and jurists of the state, and the in- 
fluence of his personality is as potent and fine 
as his deeds have been. Public spirited and 
altruistic, and like most men of real weight, 
unostentatious, plain and direct, he enjoys 
wide-spread popularity and his friendship is 
valued by those fortunate enough to possess it 
as a pearl of great price. By many ties Judge 
Hazelrigg is bound to the South, his ancestors 
for many generations having lived and died 
in Dixieland, while he, himself, shouldered a 
musket at the age of fifteen and fought 
through the last year of the Civil war with 
General John Morgan, of the Confederate 
army. 

Judge James H. Hazelrigg was born upon a 
farm in Montgomery county, Kentucky, De- 
cember 6, 1848. His parents were George and 
Elizabeth J. (Greene) Hazelrigg. His father 
and his grandfather, Dillard Hazelrigg, both 
were natives of Bourbon county, Kentucky, 
and passed through the peculiar joys and 
hardships of the Blue Grass state pioneer. 
Judge Hazelrigg's mother was a Kentuckian 
also. Her father's name was Thaddeus 
Greene and his wife, who bore the maiden 
name of Mariah Kerr, was a native of North 
Carolina. When Judge Hazelrigg was but 
three years of age he had the misfortune to 
lose his mother by death and he was taken 
and reared by his grandfather Greene on a 



farm in Montgomery county. As soon as he 
was old enough he entered the common 
schools of his district and he also attended the 
school at Stoney Point, and after gaining his 
rudimentary education in this fashion he 
matriculated at what is now known as Tran- 
sylvania University, at Lexington, Kentucky, 
being graduated therefrom with the class of 
1871, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
Subsequently the degree of LL. B., was con- 
ferred upon him by both the Kentucky Uni- 
versity and the Central University. His edu- 
cation was interrupted by the great civil con- 
flict, which placed the entire country in a 
state of disquiet and alarm and made the usual 
process of life seem of secondary importance. 

In August, 1864, the boy who found the 
role of mere spectator to the great national 
struggle galling in the extreme enlisted in the 
Confederate army service, under the com- 
mand of Colonel E. E. Clay, whose regiment 
was a part of the forces of the famous Gen- 
eral John Morgan. He was present at the sur- 
render on May 2, 1865. At the conclusion of 
the war he set about completing his education, 
read law at Mt. Sterling and was admitted to 
the bar in 1873. He first hung out his shingle 
at Mt. Sterling and although still a young 
man became city attorney of Mt. Sterling, 
which honor was followed by that of his ele- 
vation to the ofiice of county judge of Mont- 
gomery county, which he held for over five 
years. After a number of years of activity 
in the profession of his choice, years distin- 
guished by constant advance and recognition, 
in November, 1892, he was elected judge of 
the court of appeals of Kentucky. For eight 
years he gave service of an eminent character 
to the duties of this ofifice, during which time, 
from 1899 to 1900, he was chief justice of the 
state. Since retiring from the court of ap- 
peals Judge Hazelrigg has practiced law at 
Frankfort and his achievements in a more 
private capacity have been befitting one of his 
mental and moral caliber. He belongs to that 
political party whose leaders find extreme 
gratification in referring to Judge Hazelrigg's 
section of the United States as the "Solid 
South," and he has always lent its measures 
and its representatives his -most effective 
support. Denominationally he is a member of 
the Christian church. 

Judge Hazelrigg was married on November 
5, 1872, the lady to become his wife and the 
mistress of his household being Miss Mat- 
tie Lauderman, of Lexington, Kentucky, 
daughter of James H. Lauderman. The 
following children are the fruit of this 
union : May Hooker, now Mrs. C. P. Chen- 
ault, of Frankfort ; Elizabeth, now Mrs. 



1280 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



Thomas A. Hall, of Frankfort; Emily, who 
married F. C. Bradley and is now deceased; 
and Dyke Lauderman, attorney-at-law, now 
associated in business with his father. The 
latter married the daughter of Colonel Charles 
E. Hoge, of Frankfort. 

Marion H. Dailev, D. D. S. — One of the 
leading representatives of the dental profes- 
sion in Kentucky is Dr. Dailey, who formerly 
served as a member of the state board of den- 
tal examiners and who has been engaged in 
the successful practice of his profession in 
Paris. Bourbon county, since 1893. In his 
investigation, study and practical work he ex- 
emplified the ultimate results to be gained in 
his profession, in both the laboratory and op- 
erative departments, of which marvelous ad- 
vances have been made within the time of his 
active practice, and his high professional 
standing is the true result of his unmistakable 
ability. 

Dr. Dailey was born in Jackson county, 
Kentucky, on the 19th of March, 1869, and is 
a son of Samuel C. and Mrginia B. (Minter) 
Dailey, both of whom were born in Virginia, 
the former of Irish and the latter of English 
lineage. They were reared to maturity in 
their native state, where their marriage was 
solemnized, and about the year i860 they re- 
moved to Kentucky, finally establishing their 
home in Jackson county, where the father 
purchased land and became a prosperous 
farmer and stock-grower. He brought to 
bear marked discrimination and progressive 
ideas in his chosen vocation and through his 
identification with the same gained definite 
success, the while he ever retained the invio- 
lable confidence and esteem of the community 
in which he established his home. He con- 
tinued to reside on the old homestead until 
his death, which occurred on the 21st of Au- 
gust. 1909, and there his widow still resides, 
being held in afifectionate regard by all who 
have come within the sphere of her gentle 
influence. Of the ten children, seven are 
living and concerning them the following brief 
data are here given — ^Hamilton H. is a suc- 
cessful farmer in Rockcastle county. Ken- 
tucky; Laucetta L. is the wife of Henry 
Sandlin, of Jackson county, this state ; Wil- 
son G. is a physician and surgeon and is es- 
tablished in the successful practice of his pro- 
fession in Alillersburg. Bourbon county ; Silas 
S. is a prosperous farmer of Rockcastle 
county; :\Iiss Alartha G. remains with her 
widowed mother on the old homestead ; Mar- 
ion H. is the immediate subject of this review; 
and Josephine I. is the wife of E. G. Sauls- 
berry, of Covington, this state. The father 



was a staunch Republican in his political al- 
legiance and his religious faith was that of 
the Methodist church, of which his widow 
likewise is a devout member. 

Dr. Marion H. Dailey was reared to the 
sturdy discipline of the old homestead farm 
and was afforded the advantages of the grad- 
ed school of Green Hill, Jackson county. 
That he made good use of his opportunities 
along scholastic lines is evident when it is 
stated that at the age of nineteen years he 
turned his attention to the pedagogic profes- 
sion, which he followed about two years in 
the schools of his native county, where he 
proved a successful and popular teacher. In 
1890 the Doctor was matriculated in the Lou- 
isville College of Dentistry, in which well or- 
dered institution he was graduated with dis- 
tinction in June, 1892, with the degree of 
Doctor of Dental Surgery. Soon after his 
graduation he located in Beattyville, Lee 
county, where he initiated the active work of 
his profession and where he remained until 
February, 1893, when he removed to Paris, 
in which thriving little city he has since been 
actively engaged in the work of his profes- 
sion. Here he has built up a large and repre- 
sentative business and he is recognized as the 
leading dental practitioner of Bourbon coun- 
ty, as well as one of the representative mem- 
bers of his profession in the state. 

He is an active and valued member of the 
Kentucky State Dental Society, with which 
he has been identified since 1893 and he has 
held official position in this organization al- 
most continuously from the time of identify- 
ing himself therewith. During the major 
portion of the period he has served as a trus- 
tee of the society and at the present time he is 
president, and is also president of the Blue- 
grass Dental Society. For five years he was 
a member of the state board of dental exam- 
iners and during this period he did all in his 
power to elevate the standard of his profes- 
sion in his native state. Dr. Dailey and his 
wife are most zealous members of the Presby- 
terian church in their home city and he has 
served as deacon in the same since 1904. He 
is an appreciative member of the time-hon- 
ored Masonic fraternity, in which he has 
served as worshipful master of Paris Lodge, 
Xo. 2, Free & Accepted Masons; high priest 
of Paris Chapter, No. 15, Royal Arch Ma- 
sons; and eminent commander of Coeur de 
Lion Commandery, No. 26, Knights Tem- 
plars. He is also affiliated with the adjunct 
organization, the Ancient Arabic Order of the 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, besides which 
he holds membership in the Independent Or- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1281 



der of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent & Pro- 
tective Order of Elks and the Knights of 
Pythias. 

At Paris, Kentucky, on the 3d of February, 
1904, was solemnized the marriage of Dr. 
Dailey to Miss Mary Lou Fithian, who was 
born and reared in Paris, this county, where 
her birth occurred on the 27th of July, 1880. 
She is a daughter of Edward R. and Mary 
(Heath) Fithian, well known and highly hon- 
ored citizens of Bourbon county, where Mrs. 
Fithian still maintains her home. Mr. E. R. 
Fithian died August 7, 1895. Dr. and Mrs. 
Dailey became the parents of two children — 
Virginia Cecil, who was born September 2, 

1906, and who died on the 27th of December, 

1907. and Louise Washington, who was born 
on the 8th of January. 1909. Dr. and Mrs. 
Dailey are prominent in connection with the 
leading social activities of their home city, 
where they hold an impregnable place in pop- 
ular confidence and esteem. 

Joseph Addison Sweeny, M, D. — A spe- 
cialist in the treatment of the diseases of the 
digestive system, Dr. Sweeny is engaged in 
the practice of his profession in the city of 
Louisville, where he retains a large and rep- 
resentative clientage and where he is recog- 
nized as a physician of fine attainments and 
marked discrimination. The Doctor has the 
distinction of being a scion of old and hon- 
ored families of Kentucky, where both his 
paternal and maternal ancestors settled in the 
early pioneer days. He has been a resident 
of Jefferson county, save for short intervals, 
from the time of his birth, and his success 
in the work of his chosen and exacting pro- 
fession has been on a parity with his recog- 
nized ability. 

Dr. Sweeny was born in the city of Louis- 
ville on the 19th of July. 1873, ^^^^ is a son 
of John T. and Catherine (Carpenter) 
Sweeny. John Talft'e Sweeny was born in 
Jefferson county, this state, on the 14th of 
November. 1847, and he here continued to 
maintain his home until the close of his life, 
his death having occurred while he was visit- 
ing in the city of Lexington, Kentucky, on the 
6th of September, 1884. He was a son of 
Rev. Joseph Addison Sweeny, who was one 
of the pioneer clergv^men of the Christian 
church in Kentuckv, where he followed the 
work of the ministry for many years and 
where he continued to reside until his death, in 
the fullness of years and well earned honors. 
He was an intimate friend of Rev. Alexander 
Campbell, from whose name the Christian 
church has been designated as the Campbell- 
ite church, and was an ardent supporter of 
that distinguished figure in the history of this 



denomination. Rev. Joseph Addison Sweeny 
was a native of Buckingham county, Virginia, 
in which historic commonwealth the family 
was founded in the Colonial days, and he came 
to Kentucky in the pioneer epoch, the family 
home being established in Jefferson county, 
with whose annals the name has continued 
to be closely identified during the long inter- 
vening years. 

John Talffe Sweeny, father of Dr. Sweeny, 
became one of the representative agricultur- 
ists and influential citizens of Jefferson county, 
where he was a leader in the ranks of the 
Democratic party and where he was called 
upon to serve in various positions of public 
trust. He was possessed of sterling qualities 
of mind and heart, was well qualified for lead- 
ership in thought and action, and wielded 
much influence in his community, where he 
ever commanded the fullest measure of pop- 
ular confidence and esteem. He was a zeal- 
ous member of the Christian church, as is also 
his widow, who still resides on the fine old 
homestead in Jeft'erson county. Mrs. Sweeny 
was born in Shelby county, this state, and is 
a daughter of Calvin and Lucinda (Tyler) 
Carpenter, members of families that were es- 
tablished in that section of the state at -a 
very early date. John T. and Catherine (Car- 
penter) Sweeny became the parents of five 
children, of whom Dr. Joseph A. was the 
first-born, and his two brothers and two sis- 
ters are living. 

Dr. Sweeny passed his boyhood and youth 
on the home farm and early began to con- 
tribute his quota to its work. After availing 
himself of the advantages afforded in the pub- 
lic schools of his home neighborhood he en- 
tered the Louisville Male High School, in 
which he was graduated as a member of the 
class of 1892. Soon afterward he became the 
confidential secretary and advisor of the late 
Captain William F. Norton, of Louisville, 
with whom he was long and intimately asso- 
ciated, having been with the Captain at the 
time of his death, which occurred in Cali- 
fornia, in 1903, at which time the Doctor was 
private physician to his venerable and hon- 
ored patron and friend. In preparation for 
the work of his chosen profession Dr. Sweeny 
entered the Louisville Hospital College of 
Medicine, in which he was graduated as a 
member of the class of 1902 and from which 
he received his degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine. He has taken post-graduate course in 
the leading clinics of Europe and has made 
a special study of the diseases of the diges- 
tive system, to which he now devotes prac- 
tically his undivided attention and in which he 
is a recognized authority. He lectured on 



1282 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



this class of diseases in the Louisville Medical 
College until the same was merged into the 
medical department of the University of Lou- 
isville, when he resigned his position. He 
is actively identified with the American Med- 
ical Association, the Kentucky State Medical 
Society and the Jefferson County Medical So- 
ciety. In the Masonic fraternity the Doctor 
has attained the thirty-second degree of the 
Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite and is also 
affiliated with the Ancient Arabic Order of 
the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He has not 
as yet assumed connubial responsibilities. 

C. Bruce Smith, M. D. — Among the able 
and representative physicians and surgeons 
who are lending dignity and honor to their 
profession within the borders of the fine old 
Blue Grass commonwealth is Dr. Smith, who 
is engaged in successful general practice at 
Millersburg, Bourbon county, where he has 
built up a large and substantial business, based 
alike on his marked technical ability and his 
personal popularity in the county that has 
been his home from the time of his nativity. 

Dr. Smith was born at Millersburg, the 
beautiful and thriving little city in which he 
now resides, and here he was ushered into 
the world on the 21st of June, 1864. He is 
a son of Dr. John Bruce Smith and Adalaide 
(Ball) Smith, the former of whom was born 
in New York and the latter in Kentucky. 
Dr. John Bruce Smith was educated in New 
York but finished his studies at the Univer- 
sity of Louisville. He then practiced in 
Fleming county, Kentucky, for two years, lo- 
cating in Millersburg in 1859. He had been 
m_ practice thirty-three years at the time of 
his death, April 6, 1892, at the age of fifty- 
six. His wife died December 27, 1898, be- 
ing then fifty-seven years of age. They were 
the parents of four children, as follows : Ef- 
fie L., who married S. C. Carpenter, of Mil- 
lersburg; Anna, who is unmarried and lives 
in Millersburg; C. Bruce, the subject of this 
sketch, IS next in order of birth; and Leroy 
B. died December 12, 1896, at the age of 
twenty-six years. 

He whose name initiates this article gained 
his rudimentary education in the public 
schools of his native place and supplemented 
the same by a course in the Kentucky Wes- 
leyan College, in Millersburg. In this insti- 
tution he was graduated as a member of the 
class of 1884, and from the same received the 
degree of Bachelor of Science. In Septem- 
ber of the same year he entered the medical 
department of the University of Louisville in 
which he completed the prescribed course 
and in which he was duly graduated in 1886 
with the well earned degree of Doctor of 



Medicine. As an undergraduate Dr. Smith 
was known as a most earnest and receptive 
student, and he made good use of the oppor- 
tunities aft'orded him, so that he came forth 
admirably fortified in the learning of his pro- 
fession, the while he had received due clinical 
experience. After his graduation the doctor 
showed much judgment by seeking his initial 
practice under the direction of an older and 
more experienced member of his profession. 
Under these conditions he was associated in 
practice about one year with Dr. Wheeler, an 
able physician then engaged in practice at Sal- 
yersville, Magoffin county. After this experi- 
ence Dr. Smith returned to his alma mater, 
the University of Louisville, in the medical 
department of which he completed an effect- 
ive post-graduate course. Thereafter he was 
engaged in post-graduate work in the Hospi- 
tal College of Medicine in Louisville for a 
period of five months, at the expiration of 
which he received appointment to the position 
of interne in the Louisville city hospital, 
where he remained fifteen months, during 
which he gained most valuable and diversified 
clinical experience. After leaving the hospi- 
tal Dr. Smith served sixteen months as assist- 
ant to Professor Thomas H. Stucky, who was 
incumbent of the chair of Materia Medica in 
the medical department of Central University 
of Kentucky. During this period Dr. Smith 
delivered class lectures on Materia Aledica in 
the Louisville College of Pharmacy, and he 
showed marked facility and discrimination in 
the educational work of his profession. 

In January, 1892, Dr. Smith returned to his 
native place, Millersburg, where he has built 
up a large ana representative practice and 
where his success and popularity set at naught 
all application of the scriptural statement that 
"a prophet is not without honor save in his 
own country." The doctor is a valued and in- 
fluential member of the Bourbon County 
Medical Society and is also identified with the 
Kentucky State Medical Society and the 
American Medical Association. He is now 
serving his fourth consecutive year as health 
officer of Millersburg, and he has been special- 
ly assiduous and exacting in the exercising of 
his official functions, through which the health 
of the community has been conserved in every 
possible way. Dr. Smith and his wife are 
valued factors in the best social life of the 
community. He is a member of the Christian 
church and Mrs. Smith of the Baptist, and he 
IS affiliated with the local organizations of the 
Masonic fraternity, the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Knights of the Alacca- 
bees. 

On the i2th of December, 1892, was sol- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1283 



emnized the marriage of Dr. Smith to Miss 
Maude V. S. Smedley, who was born at Mil- 
lersburg on the 14th of October, 1867, and 
who is a daughter of John G. Smedley, one of 
the venerable and honored business men of 
this place and one to whom a specific tribute 
is paid on other pages of this volume. Dr. 
and ]Mrs. Smith have one daughter, IMartha 
Adalaide, who was born August 4, 1895. 

John G. Smedley. — Numbered among the 
honored citizens and representative business 
men of Millersburg, Bourbon county, Mr. 
Smedley is entitled to definite recognition in 
this publication. He is junior member of the 
firm of Corrington & Smedley, who conduct a 
large and prosperous enterprise as dealers in 
general merchandise and whose well equipped 
establishment is one of the foremost in the 
thriving little city of Millersburg. 

Mr. Smedley views with a due measure of 
satisfaction the fact that he claims Kentucky 
as the place of his nativity and that in both 
the agnatic and maternal lines he is a scion of 
honored pioneer families of this favored com- 
monwealth. He was born at Carlisle, Nicho- 
las county, on the 20th of February, 1836, 
and is a son of Aaron and Catherine 
(Hughes) Smedley, the former of whom was 
born in Bourbon county, this state, and the 
latter in Nicholas county. The father de- 
voted the major part of his active career to 
merchandising and farming, and both he and 
his wife were residents of Bourbon county at 
the time of their death. They became the par- 
ents of six children, of whom five sons and 
one daughter are now living. 

John G. Smedley gained his early educa- 
tional discipline in the common schools of 
Bourbon county, where he was reared to ma- 
turity, and later he was afforded higher edu- 
cational advantages through attendance at 
Georgetown College, at Georgetown, this 
state. Prior to entering this institution he 
had initiated his experience m connection with 
the practical affairs of life, as he began clerk- 
ing in a general store in the city of Lexington 
when but fifteen years of age. After leaving 
college he went to the city of St. Louis, Mis- 
souri, where he held a clerical position in a 
mercantile establishment for some time. In 
1859 he took up his residence in Millersburg. 
Kentucky, where he engaged in the general 
merchandise business in partnership with his 
maternal uncle, James 'M. Hughes. This as- 
sociation was maintained for several years 
and Mr. Smedley then formed a partnership 
with James M. Batterton, with whom he con- 
tinued to be associated in the same line of en- 
terprise until the death of Mr. Batterton, 
about the year 1882. Shortly afterward he 



again entered into partnership with his uncle, 
Mr. Hughes, later he was associated for a 
time with Alexander Butler, and in 1897 the 
latter was succeeded by C. W. Corrington. 
Since that time the business has been success- 
fully continued under the firm name of Cor- 
rington & Smedley. Mr. Smedley has the dis- 
tinction of being the oldest merchant engaged 
in active business in IMillersburg, so far as 
years of active identification with local busi- 
ness affairs is concerned, and during more 
than half a century of dealing with the people 
of this community he has maintained an in- 
violable reputation for fair and honorable 
business methods and sterling integrity of 
character, the gracious result of which has 
been that no citizen commands a greater meas- 
ure of popular confidence and respect. 

Mr. Smedley has always done his part in 
the support of measures and enterprises pro- 
jected for the general good of the community, 
and while he has never sought or desired po- 
litical preferment he has accorded a staunch 
allegiance to the cause of the Democratic 
party. He is affiliated with Amity Lodge, No. 
40, Free & Accepted Masons, of which he is 
past master, and for the past half century he 
has been a zealous member of the Baptist 
church in Millersburg. 

At ^Millersburg, in the year 1861, was sol- 
emnized the marriage of Mr. Smedley to Miss 
Martha Boulden, who was summoned to the 
life eternal in 1872. Of this union were born 
two children — Claude, who died at the age of 
two years, and Maude S., who is the wife of 
Dr. C. Bruce Smith, of Millersburg, of whom 
specific mention is made on other pages of 
this work. In 1877 Mr. Smedley contracted 
a second marriage, having then been united 
to Mrs. Elizabeth (Boulden) Raines, widow 
of Dr. Henry Raines, who was one of the rep- 
resentative physicians and surgeons of Bour- 
bon county at the time of his demise. Mrs. 
Smedley passed away in the year 1892 and is 
survived by two children born of her mar- 
riage to yir. Smedley — Mary H., who is the 
wife of Dr. Ernest Boston, of San Antonio, 
Texas, and Graham B., who is engaged in the 
practice of law at ^lidland, Texas, and who 
is serving as prosecuting attorney of Midland 
county at the time of this writing, in 1910. 
The honored subject of this review now re- 
sides in the home of his son-in-law, Dr. C. 
Bruce Smith, and though venerable in years 
he is alert and vigorous, while he finds pleas- 
ure in being surrounded by leal and loyal 
friends in the community that has been his 
home and the scene of his well directed ef- 
forts during the long period of more than 
half a century. 



1284 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



CiiARLHs H. I)ii:tricii. — The subject of 
this sketch, now a citizen of Winchester, 
Kentucky, is a native of the Buckeye state, 
having been born in Fredericksburg, Wayne 
county, Ohio. September 19, 1)^49. ilis par- 
ents were John J. X. Dietrich and iCHzabelh 
(Boyer) Dietrich, both of whcmi were born 
near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. His grand- 
father. Jacob Dietrich, was a soldier in the 
American army in the war of the Revolution. 
His great-grandfather, a native of Germany, 
emigrated to America between 1745 and 1750 
and settled in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. 
Mr. Dietrich's father was a woollen manufac- 
turer, a business which he follow-ed for many 
years, both in Pennsylvania and in Ohio, to 
which state he returned about the year 1837. 

Charles H. Dietrich was reared in Wayne 
county, attending the schools of his native 
towm and later those of Defiance, Ohio, to 
w'hich city his parents removed their home in 
their later years. Upon the organization in 
1873 of the Ohio State University, of Colum- 
bus, Ohio, he entered it as a student and grad- 
uated in 1878. in the first class of that now 
famous institution. He had been engaged in 
teaching before he entered college and re- 
sumed that work soon after his graduation. 
His health failing he joined a party of pros- 
pectors in the winter of 1880 and went to New 
Mexico, where he worked as a United States 
mineral surveyor until the close of the year 
when he was engaged by the city school board 
of Hopkinsville, Kentucky, to organize and 
supervise the graded schools of that city. He 
entered upon the work at once and continued 
in charge of the schools until June. 1895. 
when he resigned to enter the service of the 
American Book Company, as their represent- 
ative in central and eastern Kentucky and this 
position he still holds. Mr. Dietrich has for 
many years been connected with the Masonic 
fraternity in Lodge, Chapter, and Command- 
ery, and has been honored by the order by 
election to office frequently. 

Mr. Dietrich acknowledged the worth and 
charm of Kentucky's daughters by marrying 
one of them — Miss Minnie R. Lander, daugh- 
ter of Wilson J. Lander, of Hopkinsville. 
Kentucky. She became his wife November 
28, 1883. She has made his home the ideal 
"Old Kentucky Home." They have been 
blessed with five children, Karl, Ruth. Lois, 
Aime, and Neil ; and theirs have been busy 
and useful lives such as lead to the establish- 
ment and maintenance of American life and 
the American nation. 

Giles Wright. — In the history of business 
development and of individual achievement 
Giles Wright is deserving of prominent and 



honorable mention, for from commencing on 
a small scale, he has caused the development 
of a lumber business of magnitude in this 
section of the state and has advanced to a 
leading position among the successful busi- 
ness men whose enterprise is leading to the 
rapid growth and improvement of the coun- 
try. The great forests of this and adjacent 
states furnish ample opportunity for repre- 
sentatives of the lumber industry, and the 
giant trees converted into building material 
are now being shipped to all parts of the 
country. 

Giles Wright was born in Lawrence county, 
Kentucky, January 6, 1867, the son of Cal- 
vin and Celina (Hilton) Wright, the former 
a native of Wise county, Virginia and the 
latter from Carter county, Kentucky. When 
a young man Calvin Wright in company with 
his older brother Henry and a younger one 
named James, came to Kentucky in the early 
thirties and located on Dry Fork, a branch of 
Little Fork river, in Lawrence county, Ken- 
tucky, and engaged in farming, making great 
improvements, building good homes and be- 
coming well fixed financially and influential. 
He died on the homestead in 1872 on August 
II, at the age of fifty-three years. During the 
Civil war he was a southern sympathizer but 
took no active part in the conflict. He was a 
member of the United Baptists as was also 
his wife, who is now living at Willard, Car- 
ter county, Kentucky. They were the par- 
ents of three children, one son and two daugh- 
ters, all living, the son being the eldest and 
but a child when his father died. 

Giles Wright was reared in his native coun- 
ty until he was thirteen years old, attending 
the common schools. He began work at this 
age on a farm and in public works and con- 
tinued in the same until 1889. In 1890 he en- 
tered the employ of Leatherber, Slade & Kel- 
ton. wholesale lumber, at Columbus, Ohio, as 
buyer and shipper for manufacturing and 
buying in the markets in Ohio, Kentucky and 
West Virginia and continued in this business 
until 1893, acquiring a thorough knowledge 
of this business in all its departments. He 
then began the manufacture and wdiolesale of 
lumber for himself at Ashland under the firm 
name of Kitchen & Wright, which firm exist- 
ed until 1897, when they dissolved partner- 
ship and Mr. Wright continued until 1902 
and then formed a partnership under the 
name of Giles Wright Lumber Co., B. B. Fan- 
ning being Mr. Wright's partner in the con- 
cern, which continued until 1906 and then 
incorporated into the Wright, Saulsberry 
Lumber Co., which continued until 19 10. 

On May i, 19 10, the Wright-Kitchen 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1285 



Lumber Co. was organized with a paid up 
capital stock of $75,000 and with the follow- 
ing officers: Giles Wright, President; J. H. 
Kitchen, A'ice-President and C. J. Kitchen, 
Secretary and Treasurer. The business has 
developed from small beginnings to its pres- 
ent proportions. During its early days it 
made about $40,000 a year and in 1910 
showed an increase of over $200,000 and 
from shipments of ten cars to sixty or seventy 
cars per month. It operates an eight foot 
single band mill at the Ashland plant, cutting 
thirty-tive thousand feet daily, making a spe- 
cialty of Kentucky oak timbers, length up to 
forty feet, and is one of the few mills 
equipped for such work, and employing about 
fifty men. This company owns timber land in 
Big Sandy district but buy principally on the 
market. 

In politics Air. Wright is a stanch Repub- 
lican and in 1909 was a candidate from his 
party to the state senate, the 32d senatorial 
district, but a large opposition majority pre- 
cluded his election. In social societies, he is 
a Mason, belonging to the Blue Lodge, Royal 
Arch Chapter, the Commandery and Shrine, 
all at Ashland. He married on September 2^], 
1891, Alollie Lee Kitchen, a native of Carter 
county, Kentucky, and a daughter of Charles 
Kitchen, of whom a sketch is published else- 
where in this work. Mr. and Mrs. Wright 
are the parents of five children, four of whom 
are living. Their names are: Lena Mabel, 
who died at the age of eleven years; Charles 
K. ; Lauretta ; Giles Edward ; jMollie Lee. 
Mrs. Wright is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. South. 

John Dye. — The lineage of the subject of 
this review, although of foreign ancestry, be- 
speaks long and prominent identification with 
the annals of American history, while repre- 
sentatives of the name have shown that intrin- 
sic loyalty and patriotism which has led them 
to take an active part in the great conflicts 
through which the republic was established 
and has been perpetuated. 

John Dye, deceased, wdio was born near 
Cold Springs, Campbell county, Kentucky, 
Alarch 23, 181 1, was a worthy representative 
of one of the old pioneer families of Ken- 
tucky, whose ancestors figured prominently 
in the early history of America. On the Dye 
side he was descended from Laurens Duyts, 
who w'as born in Denmark in 1610, emigrated 
to America in company with Jonas Bronk via 
Holland in the ship "Erie of Troy," which 
arrived at New Amsterdam in 1639, borough 
of Bronx, New York city, taking its name 
from Jonas Bronk. Laurens Duyts had three 
children baptized in New Amsterdam, the sons 



being Jans and Hans. Descendants of Jans 
took the name of Dies and Deys. Hans mar- 
ried Marritze Satyrs, by whom he had Janus 
Deay, who was baptized in 1671. Marritze 
Satyrs died and Hans Laurens, as he was 
known, married Mrs. Sarah Fountain, widow 
of Anthony Fountain, by whom he had among 
other children, John Dey or Dye, born about 
1690. John Dey or Dye settled in Middlesex 
county. New Jersey, in 1725, bought land there 
that year and by his will, dated October i, 
1750, and recorded in libra E, folio 496, he 
names his wife Ann, sons John, David, Will- 
iam, James, Vinson, Joseph and daughters 
Anne and Catherine. The will of James Dye, 
dated June 6, 1764, recorded in libra H, folio 
427, mentions his brother Vinson and father 
John Dye, and names his wife Sarah and his 
sons James, Andrew, David, John and Benja- 
min and daughters Mary, Rachel, Anne and 
Sarah. Of the last named children, James, 
the oldest son, was the father of Isaac Dye, the 
latter being the father of the subject of this 
review. 

Isaac Dye was born and reared in Middle- 
sex county. New Jersey, where he married 
Martha Perrine on February 19th, 1794, and 
where several children were born. In 1805, in 
company with his family and that of his fath- 
er-in-law, he emigrated to New Bethel, Ohio, 
but not long afterward he located near what is 
now Cold Springs, Campbell county, Ken- 
tucky, and engaged extensively in farming, be- 
ing among the pioneer families of Campbell 
county. He continued farming for a number 
of years and then located in Newport and en- 
gaged in the coal business, which he continued 
until his death, which occurred in the '50s, 
his wife having preceded him by several years. 
They were the parents of eleven children, none 
of whom are living at the present time. 

John Dye, our subject, was reared on the 
farm near Cold Springs and prior to his mar- 
riage, when quite a young man, spent several 
years working on flat-boats on the Ohio, Mis- 
sissippi, Black and White rivers in Arkansas 
and elsewhere and, in fact, made his start that 
way. In the meantime he bought a farm near 
the old homestead, and on May 28, 1840, mar- 
ried Mary Ware and engaged in farming the 
most of his life. He died at the home of his 
son, J. Frank Dye, in Highlands, back of New- 
port, in 1885, at the age of seventy-three years, 
his widow surviving him until 1892 when she 
died at the age of seventy-three years. They 
were the parents of six children, three sons 
and three daughters, of whom two are living at 
the present time. Of these children, James 
Israel, the eldest son, who was born April 19, 
1844, enlisted in the Confederate army under 



1286 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



General Humphrey Marshall early in 1863. 
He was consigned to the Tenth Kentucky 
Mounted Riflemen, under Captain Ben Bell, 
was later transferred to the command of (gen- 
eral John S. Williams then to General Giltner 
and last to General John Morgan on the latter 's 
last raid in Kentucky and was captured at Mt. 
Sterling early in 1864 and sent to Johnson's 
Island. Early in 1865 he was exchanged by 
request. His eagerness to return to the front 
induced him to conceal his real disability and 
through exposure in the hard trip and lack of 
nourishment and medical attention he lost his 
health, which resulted in his death in Newport, 
July 9, 1865, one month after his arrival home. 
He said he weighed one hundred ninety-seven 
pounds when captured and one hundred seven 
when he was released. 

John Frank Dye. the second son and fourth 
in order of birth of the children of John Dye, 
was born May 23d, 1850. He was reared on 
the farm in Campbell county and later located 
in Covington, where he was engaged in the 
grocery business for several years. After a 
residence in Chicago, where he was engaged 
in railroad work, he returned to Kentucky and 
located in Newport, where in 1884 he organ- 
ized the Newport Sand Bank Company, with 
a capital stock of $50,000 for the purpose of 
mining and shipping high grade moulding sand 
of superior quality, which was mined from 
the hills adjoining Newport. He was the pio- 
neer in this line of industry and built up an 
extensive business, later increasing the capital 
stock of the company to $100,000 and the busi- 
ness to extensive proportions, a ready sale 
being found throughout the United States and 
Canada and parts of Europe. The Newport 
Sand stands to-day without an equal in the 
United States, on acocunt of its strength and 
fine surface qualities. He was for many years 
a progressive and successful business man and 
citizen of Newport, active in promoting the 
best interests of the city. He married Vir- 
ginia Boyd, October 15, 1877, by which union 
the following children were born: Lee Earl, 
deceased, James Elmer, deceased. Alma My- 
ra, deceased, John Frank, Jr., Cleveland H., 
David Dudley and George Wilbur. The moth- 
er of these children died April 6, 1891, and the 
father later married Cora Van Duzen, by 
whom one son was born, E. W. Van. 

Air. Dye was tlie founder and organizer of 
The Daylight Building and Savings Associ- 
ation in 1908, of Newport, of which he was 
the active head and president until his death, 
May 19, 1910. He was a member of the First 
Baptist_ church. Newport, for many years and 
active in church work, where he was deacon 
and superintendent of the Sunday-school many 



years. At the time of his death he was a resi- 
dent of Cincinnati and a member of the Ninth 
Street Baptist church. 

(jeorge Washington Dye, the third son of 
John Dye and fifth child in order of birth, was 
born on the homestead in Campbell county 
October 30, 1853. and reared there. When a 
young man he became bookkeeper for a whole- 
sale and retail house in Covington. In 1880 
he removed to St. Louis and was in the rail- 
way business for seven years, where he be- 
came chief clerk in the auditor's office of the 
Wabash Railway for several years. In 1887 
he was transferred to Chicago, where he con- 
tinued until 1889, when he accepted the posi- 
tion of auditor and treasurer of the Jackson- 
ville and St. Louis Railway, with offices at 
Jacksonville, Illinois. Ten years later he was 
promoted to general freight and passenger 
agent of the same and continued in that posi- 
tion until the road was bought by C. B. & Q. 
Railway Company in 1904, when he became 
general agent of the latter, but two years later, 
in 1906, resigned to accept the position of 
manager and secretary of the Newport Sand 
Bank Company, in which he became a stock- 
holder. Upon the death of his brother he was 
elected president and treasurer of the com- 
pany and still continues in that position. He 
was married in 1888 to Adelaide Haslett, a na- 
tive of Illinois, reared and educated in Chi- 
cago. In politics Mr. Dye formerly was an 
adherent of the Democratic party but of late 
years has transferred his allegiance to the re- 
publicans. 

Joseph E. Wells, M. D. — Since 1896 has 
Dr. Joseph E. Wells been an active practi- 
tioner in the medical profession at Cynthiana. 
He has gained wide recognition as a skilled 
physician and surgeon and stands in the front 
rank in the medical fraternity in Harrison 
county. Kentucky. Dr. Wells was born at 
Mount Olivet, Nicholas county, now Robert- 
son county, Kentucky, on the 25th of Octo- 
ber, i860. He is a son of Dr. Riley and 
Elizabeth (Brown) Wells, both of whom were 
likewise born in Nicholas county, the father 
October 5, 1830, and the mother Alay 17, 
1840. Dr. and Airs. Riley Wells became the 
parents of two children — Joseph E., the im- 
mediate subject of this review; and Mary, 
widow of Richard Ridgley, of Mount Olivet, 
Kentucky. Dr. Riley Wells was summoned to 
eternal rest on the 17th of April, 1901. and 
his cherished and devoted wife, who still sur- 
vives him, now maintains her home at Alount 
Olivet. 

William Wells, paterhal grandfather of him 
whose name initiates this review, was born in 
Pennsylvania, in 1800, and he died in the 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1287 



Blue Grass state in 1872. He married Miss 
Matilda Collins and they located on a farm 
in Nicholas county, where they passed the 
residue of their lives and where they reared 
a family. Riley Wells was reared to the in- 
vigorating discipline of the home farm and 
after completing the curriculum of the public 
schools of Carlisle and Flemingsburg he at- 
tended an Academy in Bracken county, Ken- 
tucky. Thereafter he became interested in 
the medical profession and was matriculated 
in the Eclectic Medical College, in the city of 
Cincinnati, Ohio, in which he was graduated 
as a member of the class of 1858. He initi- 
ated the active practice of his profession at 
Mount Olivet and there gained high repute 
as a skilled physician and surgeon. In his 
political convictions he endorsed the cause of 
the Republican party, in the local councils of 
which he was an active factor, being a mem- 
ber of the Republican County Committee. 
He was pension examiner at one time and 
during the war was offered a position as sur- 
geon of a regiment; this he refused, prefer- 
ring to remain at home. His sympathies were 
with the north. He began life with practic- 
ally nothing in the way of worldly goods but 
at the time of his death he left an estate of 
some eight hundred acres of most arable Blue 
Grass land. He was president of the Mount 
Olivet National Bank from the time of its es- 
tablishment until his death. He was a fine 
financier, an able doctor and a public-spirited 
citizen and no one in Robertson county was 
accorded a higher degree of popular confi- 
dence and esteem than he. The maternal 
grandfather of Dr. Joseph E. Wells, of this 
review, was John Brown, a native of Tennes- 
see, who came to Nicholas county, Kentucky, 
as a young man : he was long a prominent 
farmer and stock-raiser in that county. 

Dr. Joseph E. Wells was reared and edu- 
cated at Mount Olivet, to whose schools he is 
indebted for his preliminary educational 
training, later supplementing the same with 
more advanced study in the University of 
Kentucky, at Lexington. In 1878, however, 
he decided to follow the vocation of his fa- 
ther and accordingly was matriculated in the 
Ohio Medical College, at Cincinnati, in which 
well ordered institution he was graduated as 
a member of the class of 1881, with the de- 
gree of Doctor of Medicine. Immediately 
after his graduation he returned to Mount 
Olivet, where he became associated with his 
father in the practice of his profession. In 
May, 1896, however, he severed his connec- 
tions in that place and removed to Cynthiana, 
where he enjoys a large and lucrative patron- 
age and where he stands at the head of his 



profession in this section of the state. For 
eight years after coming to Cynthiana he was 
a member of the firm of Givens & Wells and 
for the ensuing eight years he was a member 
of the firm of Givens, Wells & Moore. In 
November, 1909, however, the partnership al- 
liance was dissolved and all three doctors be- 
gan individual practice. In connection with 
his life work Dr. Wells is a member of the 
Harrison County Medical Society ; the Ken- 
tucky State Medical Society, of which he is 
president in 191 1; the American Medical As- 
sociation ; the Mississippi Valley Medical 
Society ; the Southern Surgical Society ; and 
the Kentucky ^^lidland Society. 

On the 15th of May, 1883, was recorded 
the marriage of Dr. Wells to Miss Bessie R, 
Peckover, who was born at Nicholasville, 
Jessamine county, this state, in 1864. She is 
a daughter of Dr. E. J. and Jane (Ridgly) 
Peckover, the former of whom was a well 
known dentist in Cynthiana, Kentucky, for a 
number of years. Dr. and Mrs. Wells have 
one child — Bird Martin, who is now the wife 
of Dr. C. R. Rice, of Augusta, Kentucky. 

Dr. Wells is the owner of considerable 
farming land in Robertson county, Kentucky. 
In politics he is a stalwart in the ranks of the 
Republican party, in which he has been an in- 
fluential factor in this section of the state. He 
has never aspired to public office of any or- 
der, preferring to give his undivided atten- 
tion to the exacting demands of his profes- 
sion. In the grand old Masonic order he has 
passed through the circle of York Rite Ma- 
sonry, holding membership in the lodge, chap- 
ter, council and commandery, in the latter of 
which he is past eminent commander of Cyn- 
thiana Commandery. He is also affiliated 
with the Knights of Pythias, in which he is 
past chancellor commander of Quinby Lodge, 
No. 58; and he is a charter member of Lodge 
No. 438, Benevolent & Protective Order of 
Elks. He and his wife are zealous members 
of the Christian church, in which he has long 
been a deacon. Dr. Wells is a man of broad 
information and great kindliness of spirit, a 
man whose life has ever been characterized 
by good deeds and noble thoughts. As a citi- 
zen he is sincere and straightforward and is 
well deserving of the high regard in which he 
is held in Harrison county. 

B. T. RiGGS. — ^As manager of the Crown 
Jewel Milling Company, at Cynthiana, Ken- 
tucky, Capt. B. T. Riggs holds prestige as one 
of the leading business men in Harrison 
county, having resided in this city for nearly 
two score years. He was a valiant soldier in 
the Civil war and is a man whose veracity 
and altruistic tendencies make him a promi- 



1288 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



nent and influential citizen. He was born at 
Paris, liourbon county, Kentucky, on the 25th 
of February, 1839, and is a son of Benjamin 
and Agnes -M. (Wilson) Riggs, the former 
of whom was born on the eastern shore of 
Maryland, in 1799, and the latter claimed 
Faln'iuuth, Pendleton county, Kentucky, as 
the place of her nativity, the date of her birth 
being January, 1801. The father was sum- 
moned to the life eternal in November, 1839, 
and the mother died at b'almouth, Kentucky, 
in 1875, at the age of seventy-four years. As 
a youth Benjamin M. Riggs learned the trade 
of silver smith and jeweler, at i'hiladelphia, 
Pennsylvania, whence he came to Kentucky 
about the year 1820 or 1822. In 1823 was 
solemnized his marriage to ]\Iiss Agnes M. 
Wilson, and immediately after that event lo- 
cation was made at ^lillersburg, Bourbon 
county. Subsequently the family home was 
established at Paris, where Mr. Riggs passed 
the residue of his life and where he was iden- 
tified with the work of his trade until his 
death, in 1839, at the age of forty years. Of 
the eight children born to INIr. and JMrs. Riggs, 
but four are now living, namely — Julia, who is 
the widow of Robert Scott, of Falmouth, 
Kentucky; W. B., who was a Union sym- 
pathizer during the Civil war and a gallant 
soldier in that sanguinary struggle, as a mem- 
ber of the Fourth Kentucky Infantry ; he 
now resides at Covington, Kentucky ; x\gnes, 
who is the wife of N. S. Dickerson, of Fal- 
mouth. Kentucky ; and Captain B. T., the im- 
mediate subject of this review. 

In 1 84 1, shortly after the death of her hon- 
ored husband, Mrs. Riggs removed from 
Paris to Falmouth, her old girlhood home, 
and there she continued to reside until her 
death. She was a daughter of James and Ag- 
nes (Pickett) Wilson, both of whom were 
natives of Culpeper county. A'irginia, whence 
they came to Kentucky in the early pioneer 
days, location being made near Falmouth, 
where they became eminently well-to-do 
farmers. James Wilson and a brother saw 
service in the war of the Revolution and 
Samuel Wilson was an active participant in 
the War of 181 2. 

Captain Riggs was a child of some two 
years of age at the time of his mother's re- 
moval to Falmouth, Kentucky, where he 
availed himself of such advantages as were 
afforded in the common schools and where he 
grew to maturity. In 1858. when nineteen 
years of age, he went to Williamstown, Ken- 
tucky, where he procured a position as a clerk 
in a general store. At the time of the incep- 
tion of the Civil war he was fired with en- 
thusiasm for the cause of the Union and en- 



listed as a soldier in Company G, Eighteenth 
Kentucky Infantry, on the lOth of Novem- 
ber, 1861. As a i)rivate he began service un- 
der Captain II. W. Fggleston. December 23, 
1 86 1, he was ijrcmioted to the rank of Second 
Lieutenant and on the i6th of January, 1863, 
he was made first lieutenant, becoming captain 
on the i8th of March, 1863. He was taken 
prisoner by the Confederate forces at Chicka- 
mauga, on the 20th of September, 1863, and 
was held in duress at Libby prison for a 
period of seven months, at the expiration of 
which he was transferred to Danville, Mr- 
ginia, thence to ]\Iacon, Georgia, later to 
Charleston. South Carolina, and finally to Co- 
lumbia, South Carolina. On the 29th of No- 
vember, 1864, he escaped from the latter place 
and made his way to the Union army, joining 
his regiment at Goldsboro, North Carolina, in 
the latter part of December, 1864. In making 
his escape from prison he traveled steadily 
for twenty-two nights out of twenty-three. 
He participated in the battle of Richmond, 
Kentucky, Hoover Gap, Tennessee, and 
Chickamauga, in all of which he saw hard 
service. He had his clothing cut by bullets 
many times but was never seriously wounded. 
At the close of the war he received his honor- 
able discharge, being mustered out of service 
at Louisville on the i8th of July, 1865. When 
peace had again been established he returned 
to Williamstown, Kentucky, where he re- 
mained until the spring of 1870, when he came 
to Cynthiana, where he was appointed govern- 
ment ganger, retaining that position until 
January i, 1882. 

In the year last mentioned Captain Riggs, 
in companv with W. C. Musselman, purchased 
the Licking \'alley Milling Company, wdiich 
concern was operated for a short time by the 
firm of Riggs & Musselman. Messrs. Riggs 
& ^Musselman conducted the institution until 
1888 and upon the death of Capt. Musselman 
the firm was changed to Riggs, Garnett & Co., 
concerning the history of wdiich the following 
extracts are taken from an article which ap- 
peared in the souvenir supplement of a local 
paper, under date of November 11, 1905. 

"One of Cynthiana's earliest industries was 
the business conducted in the large and sub- 
stantial building now occupied by the Crown 
Jewel Milling Company. * * * This 
splendid milling plant, owned and operated by 
the firm of Riggs, Garnett & Company, in- 
cludes a large grain elevator, coal yard and 
public scales. 

"The mill has an interesting history. In 
1809 the mill building was erected by a com- 
panv for a woolen factory, and it was so used 
until 18 18, when General Josephus Perrin 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1289 

moved his cotton mill into it and thus occu- James C. Dedman^ commonwealth attorney 

pied it until 1825. During these years one for the eighteenth judicial district, is one of 

story was frequently rented for public meet- the leading members of the legal fraternity 

ings and entertainments, it having the largest in his part of Kentucky and in every depart- 

rooms in Cynthiana. It was used for storage ment of life, one of the most valued factors 

for some years and in 1845 John Harmon in the citizenship of Cynthiana. He is the 

Frazer bought it for use as a whiskey ware- scion of one of the fine old families of the 

house. Gray & Cox next purchased the prop- south and. by his own fine record upholds the 

erty, then J. A. Cook & Woolford, then C. B. prestige of his race. James C. Dedman was 

Cook, in 1865. then Peck & Van Hook, in born in Woodford county, Kentucky, near 

1866. Ben Potts entered the firm but he soon Alidway, October 23, 1869, and is the son of 

sold his interest to J. W. Peck & Company; Robert Dedman, of Fayette county, this state, 

after the firm had established a flouring mill. The life of the elder gentleman was coincident 

^ilessrs. Riggs & Musselman purchased the with that of General Ulysses S. Grant, his 

mill, in 1883 ; and in 1888, after Mr. ]\Iussel- birth occurring April 27, 1822, the same day 

man's death, the firm became Riggs, Garnett that the great general was born, and his death 

& Company. in August. 1885, a few weeks after Grant died. 

"The property was purchased July, 1905, His wife. ]\Iary Remington, born in Harrison 
by a stock company, incorporated as the county, Kentucky, in 1839, survived him for 
'Crown Jewel Milling Company,' and the di- more than a score of years, her demise taking 
rectors selected as Treasurer and Manager, place January 17. 1907. They were the par- 
Captain B. T. Riggs, who has been a member ents of three children, the subject and a sister, 
of the firm since 1882. ^Ir. Lark Garnett is — Bessie, wife of R. E. Lair, of Cynthiana, 
president of the company, and J. F. McDaniel, Kentucky, surviving. By a previous marriage 
secretary. Messrs. C. D. Linley and John to a Miss Kay, of Fayette county, Robert 
McDaniel, Jr.. are bookkeepers, and Mr. C. F. Dedman became the father of seven children, 
Eichhorn, an experienced man, is head miller." but one of the number being deceased. 

In addition to his business interests Captain Mr. Dedman's grandfather Dedman was a 

Riggs is president of the board of education, native of the state of \^irginia. who came to 

of which he has been a member since 1893. the Blue Grass state and located in Fayette 

He is an elder in the Presbyterian church, in county. There his son Robert was reared and 

whose faith he was reared, and in a fraternal received a common school education. While 

way he is affiliated with the Independent still a young man he decided upon a change of 

Order of Odd Fellows, and with the Alasonic residence and removed to Woodford county 

order, in which he holds membership in the where he engaged for six or eight years in the 

lodge, chapter and commandery^ of the York distilling business. He eventually turned his 

Rite branch. In politics he has been a staunch attention to farming, being variously located 

Republican ever since his earliest voting days in Bourbon, ^Mercer and Woodford counties, 

and as a loyal and public-spirited citizen he and dying in Mercer county. After his death 

has done much to advance the general welfare his widow removed to Cynthiana where she 

of the community, in which he has elected to lived for the residue of her life, 

maintain his home. He is a man of broad in- James C. Dedman was reared amid the 

formation and deep human sympathy, a man pleasant rural surroundings of his father's 

who is generous in his impulses, genial and farm in Mercer county and attended the dis- 

kindly disposed toward all in trouble or trict school, supplementing his educational 

distress. discipline with attendance at the high school 

On the 26th of April, 1866, Captain Riggs of Cynthiana. While still a youth he con- 
was united in marriage to Miss Kate Kerr, eluded to adopt the profession of law as his 
who was born in Fayette county, Kentucky, on own and he began his preparation under Hon. 
the 31st of October, 1841, and who is a daugh- A. H. Word and Judge Kimbrough, noted 
ter of John and Rachel (Fry) Kerr, both of members of the Kentucky Bar, and then en- 
whom were likewise born in Fayette county tered the Cincinnati Law School from which 
and both of whom are now deceased. Captain he was graduated in June, 1892. He immedi- 
and Mrs. Riggs have four children, concern- ately located in Cynthiana in the same office 
ing whom the following brief data are here he occupies at the present time and there 
incorporated : Edna remains at the parental went through the usual experiences of the 
home; Kerr T. is lieutenant of the Fourteenth young lawyer, no matter ho\v briliant and 
Cavalry at West Point; Catherine Theo re- well equipped, while awaiting a clientage. He 
mains at home; and one died in infancy. proved successful and in the fall of 1904 sig- 



1290 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



nal mark of the confidence he had inspired in 
the community was given in his election to the 
office of comonwealth attorney for the eight- 
eenth judicial district, comprising the counties 
of Harrison, Nicholas, Pendleton and Robert- 
son. He first assumed the duties of his office 
January i, 1905. was subsequently re-elected, 
and is now serving his second term. He is 
one of the stanchest and truest of Harrison 
county Democrats, and has subscribed to the 
articles of faith of the party since his earliest 
voting days. He and his wife are members of 
the Christian church and fraternally he is af- 
filiated with the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, No. 438. 

On December 2, 1897, Mr. Dedman inaugu- 
rated a happy life companionship by his union 
with Mary E. Ashbrook, born in Cynthiana, 
Kentucky. September 23, 1870. They are the 
parents of three children, namely: Thomas 
Ashbrook, born January 12, 1899; Sarah, born 
October 4, 1900; and Helen H., born Janu- 
ary 17, 1904. 

Mrs. Dedman is a daughter of Thomas 
Veach Ashbrook, born near Cynthiana, Ken- 
tucky, August 22, 1828, and died September 
30, 1874. He was educated in the district 
schools of his native county and reared upon 
a farm, becoming familiar with all the details 
of agricultural work under the guidance of 
his father and in the school of practical ex- 
perience. He continued engaged in this oc- 
cupation until some few years after the termi- 
nation of the Civil war, when he removed to 
Cynthiana and there he and his brother, Felix 
G. Ashbrook, embarked in the distillery busi- 
ness, the plant built by them being known as 
the Ashbrook Distillery Company. They built 
up a large and flourishing business, which 
still exists, it being known at the present time 
under the same name. T. V. Ashbrook was 
a man of much prominence in his community 
and he was several times elected mayor of 
Cynthiana. He was for several years presi- 
dent of the school board and for years he 
was an active member of the Christian church. 
As a farmer, business man, city official, church 
member and official, and husband and father, 
he was reliable, honest and true. In politics 
he was Democratic and very faithful to his 
party. He had plenty of courage and pluck 
and when threatened with arrest if he dared 
to vote at the time of the Civil war, he fear- 
lessly walked to the polls and cast his ballot. 
He was placed under arrest with a negro 
guard, but was soon released. 

September 3, 1857, Mr. Ashbrook married 
Artemesia Belles, a native of Indianapolis, 
Indiana, in which city her birth occurred Feb- 
ruary 10, 1832. This worthy lady passed on 



to her reward October 7, 1904, at her home 
in Cynthiana, her age at the time of her de- 
mise being seventy-two years. They were the 
parents of the following seven children : Sal- 
lie Veach, residing in Cynthiana; Dorcas San- 
ders, wife of R. B. Hutchcraft, of Paris, 
Kentucky ; Felix Sterling, Sudie, Elizabeth and 
Earl, all deceased; and Mary E., wife of Mr. 
Dedman. Mrs. Ashbrook was a daughter of 
John James Belles, who was born October 26, 
1781, and died June 5, 1839. Her mother was 
Dorcas Sanders and she was a daughter of 
John and Sarah (Grant) Sanders, the latter 
in turn being a daughter of William Grant and 
Elizabeth Boone, the latter a sister of the fa- 
mous Daniel Boone. 

William Grant was a son of William Grant 
I, of Scotland, who married Margery Varnon, 
of Ireland, a widow with one son. Her father 
was a rich man with an elegant household and 
many servants and she, being badly treated at 
home, ran away to America, where she met 
the young Scotchman, William Grant, and 
married him. Young Grant's name was in re- 
ality Douglas. In the land of the thistle he 
had had bestowed upon him a grant of land 
for a deed of bravery and was thenceforth 
called the "Grant" Douglas, to distinguish hira 
from others of the same name, and when he 
came to America he assumed the name of 
Grant. William Grant II was born in Penn- 
sylvania, in February, 1726, and died in Fay- 
ette county, Kentucky, in 1804. 

Thomas V. Ashbrook's father, Aaron Ash- 
brook, was born in Fayette county, Kentucky, 
in 1796 and died in 1855 from cholera in' 
Harrison county, Kentucky. He was married 
February 18, 1817, his wife, Sallie Veach, 
having been born in Harrison county, Ken- 
tucky in 1798, and died November 16, 185 1. 
They were the parents of seven children. 
Aaron Ashbrook began life in moderate cir- 
cumstances as a farmer on Indian Creek. He 
remained there until 1821 when he removed 
to Mill Creek, Harrison county, and there 
lived until his death. By thrift, industry and 
excellent management he accumulated an ex- 
ceedingly large property and gave to each of 
his children four hundred and fifty acres, 
while at his death seven hundred more were 
divided among them by the terms of his will. 
His wife, Sallie Veach, was a daughter of 
Thomas and Jane (Hufif) Veach, and Thomas 
Veach was a son of John Veach, and his wife, 
Jane Stewart. Aaron Ashbrook's father, 
Felix Ashbrook, was born in Virginia and 
died in Harrison county in 1843 ^^ the age of 
seventy-five years. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Elizabeth Todd, was born in Mary- 
land, and died September, 1838, at the age of 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1291 



seventy years. Aaron Ashbrook was born, 
lived and died in the Old Dominion. Felix 
Ashbrook was one of the valiant soldiers who 
held the fort at Boonesburg in the war of 
1812. 

John C. Mason Day is well known in busi- 
ness circles throughout the state for succeed- 
ing in all of his undertakings. He and his 
brothers inherited large tracts of timber land, 
but instead of becoming what is known as 
"land poor," as so many who did the same 
have become, Mr. Day has emerged a wealthy 
and influential citizen. The business methods 
by which he has done this can not fail to in- 
terest the commercial world. 

Mr. Day was born June 3, 1859, the son of 
William Day, who was born in Alorgan coun- 
ty, Kentucky, August 21, 1821, and who died 
in Breathitt county, January 28, 1884; the 
mother of our subject, Phoebe Elleanor Gibbs, 
was born in Breathitt county, January 30, 
1825, and died June 11, 1862. The grandfa- 
ther was Jesse Day, born at New River, Vir- 
ginia, [anuary 13, '1802, and he died in Mor- 
gan county, Kentucky, April 21, 1883. His 
wife. Margaret Caskey, was born in Morgan 
countv, Kentucky, May n, 1802, and died in 
the same county in 1884. The Caskeys were 
of Huguenot origin. They came to Ken- 
tucky from New York in wagons, settling first 
on Flat Creek, near Mt. Sterling, in :\Iontgom- 
ery county, but moving shortly afterwards 
to Morgan county, where they located on the 
Licking river one and one-half miles from 
West Liberty. The first of the name in Ken- 
tucky had run away from his uncle John to 
whom he was apprenticed in New York, and 
tried to join the Revolutionary army when 
only twelve years old. but was promptly re- 
turned to his proud but worried uncle. 

When W'ashington was first inaugiirated 
IMargaret Caskey's mother took part in the 
celebration as a flower girl. She and her 
mother called on Lady Washington. Owing 
to the straitened times existing after the Rev- 
olution, they had little finer}- in which to 
adorn themselves, and when telling about it 
years after, would never fail to describe the 
pride which prompted, and the difficulty w^hich 
met her mother in her efiforts to make up 
their homemade silk dresses so as to make a 
worthy appearance. Another point in the 
story, as she was accustomed to tell it. was 
that' when they were ushered into the august 
presence of the first lady of the land, she was 
quietly knitting in the corner by the fire-place 
and continued to knit during the whole of the 
call. They brought with them over the moun- 
tains china and utensils rarely found in the 
back woods at that time, some of which are 



still preserved with pride by the family, our 
subject owning a beautiful old fashioned tea- 
pot. 

Mr. Day's great-grandfather, John Day, 
was born June 28, 1760, in Lunenburg coun- 
ty, Virginia, and died on July 16, 1837, in 
Morgan county, Kentucky. He served 
throughout the Revolution, enlisting first in 
October, 1776, when only sixteen years _ of 
age, and being mustered out for the last time 
in September, 1781. He served under Col- 
onels Joseph Cloyd, William Preston and 
others and took part in a number of engage- 
ments with the British and Torys in his sec- 
tion. The last three years he served as spy 
or Indian ranger, which speaks well for the 
woodcraft and discretion possessed by a boy 
of nineteen. Before the Revolution his fam- 
ily suffered, on one of the inroads of the 
Shawnee Indians, a terrible massacre, several 
of them being killed or captured. This made 
such an impression that the story has been 
handed down to the present day generation. 
The wife of this Revolutionary hero, named 
Rebecca Howe, was a woman of great force 
of character. She was born October 11, 1765, 
in Pennsylvania, and died IMarch 17. 1856, 
while a resident of Morgan county, Kentucky. 

Our subject's maternal grandfather was 
Nathan Gibbs, born October 12, 1793, in 
Burke county. North Carolina, and died No- 
vember 12, 1882. His wife was Jane Lipps, 
born August 14, 1797, and died April 24, 
1867. John Gibbs, the father of Nathan, was 
born in South Carolina March 3, 1755, and 
died March 15, 1847, a resident of Breathitt 
county, Kentucky. While living in Burke 
county. North Carolina, in 1780, he enlisted 
in the Revolution and served three months 
under Capt. Clark; and in 1781 he was again 
called out and served several months under 
Capt. John Couley. John Gibbs was a mem- 
ber of' the Legislature of North Carolina dur- 
ing the Revolutionary war and came to Ken- 
tucky over the Cumberland Gap road bring- 
ing his household effects on pack horses. _ His 
wife, Hannah ^^luchmore, was a cousin of 
Daniel Boone, and was born February 8, 
1757. and died ]\Iarch 17. 1850. 

All of ^Ir. Day's ancestors above noted 
were farmers and leading men in their time 
and section. William, his father, was reared 
on a farm in ^lorgan county, and educated at 
private schools. He married on the i8th oi 
Tune, 1844, and bought land, most of which 
was virgin forest. Here he lived and fol- 
lowed farming until his death, at which time 
he owned ten thousand acres of timber land. 
In 1859 he was elected to the legislature of 
his state on the Democratic ticket and served 



Vol. Ill— 10 




4JI 



oyj 



^^uc mum 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1293 

which have had direct bearing upon the com- dent of the reorganized company, to the man- 
mercial and industrial activity and progress agement of which he devotes considerable 
of the communities in which he has lived. of his time. He is also president of the Mays- 
Mr. Pearce was born in Maysville, Mason ville Water Company, and is completing his 
county. Kentucky, March 14. 1856, the son of fifth term as treasurer of Mason county. Mr. 
the late Charles B. Pearce, who for over forty Pearce is a popular member of several social 
years was one of the prominent bankers of clubs, is a prominent member of the lodge of 
Kentucky. Charles B. was born in Poplar Elks and was president of the Kentucky Elks 
Plains, Fleming county, Kentucky, May 27, Association in 1909. He is also a charter 
1823, and died May 14, 1905. He was the member of the Pendennis club of Louisville, 
son of William Pearce. who was a native of In 1881 Mr. Pearce married Miss Lizzie, 
New Jersey and the son of Samuel Pearce, daughter of Colonel W. N. Haldeman, of Lou- 
who came over from England and settled at isville. She died in 1883, leaving one son, 
Little Egg Harbor, New Jersey, and served Walter Haldeman Pearce. Mr. Pearce's see- 
as a soldier in the Revolutionary war. Will- ond marriage was to Roberta White, daughter 
iam Pearce was the Kentucky settler, and lo- of Thomas P. White, a merchant of Louis- 
cated in Fleming county, was twice married ville. To this union two sons have been born : 
and left a large family of children. The Charles Duke Pearce Jr. and Thomas White 
mother of our subject was Maria Shultz. a Pearce. His life record displays an active 
native of Maysville, Kentucky, and the daugh- connection with many interests which have 
ter of Christian Shultz, who came to Kentucky been directly beneficial to the city and which 
from Pennsylvania and married Charlotte in their influence have been far reaching and 
Lee, a daughter of General Henry Lee of Vir- effective. Both his public and private life 
ginia, who settled in Mason county, Kentucky, have been characterized by the utmost fidelity 
Charles B. Pearce organized the private bank to duty and he stands as a high type of hon- 
of Pearce & Wallingford. Maysville, of which orable citizenship and straightforward man- 
he later became the sole owner, and converted hood ; enjoying the confidence and winning the 
it into the State National Bank of Maysville, respect of all with whom he has been brought 
becoming cashier and so continuing for many in contact in business and in public life. 
years. James T. Highland. — No story of fiction 
Charles Duke Pearce attended the Mays- contains more exciting chapters than can be 
ville private schools and was prepared for found in the life records of our subject and 
college in Baltimore, Maryland. He attended his immediate ancestors. Pioneer life, the 
the University of Virginia from 1873 to 1876, hardships incident to the struggles necessary 
then graduated from Columbia Law School, in the lives of those who have the determina- 
New York city, in 1878. He began the prac- tion to wrest from the primal earth their 
tice of law in Louisville in 1879. In 1881 he birthright and only to be conquered by a great 
became connected with the Avery Manufac- will, hard work, courage and persistence, are 
turing Company of Louisville and in 1883 all in the history of these brave men. Space 
made a business trip around the world for forbids an extended account of these and only 
that concern. While on this trip Mr. Pearce a short sketch can be given of what if extend- 
made an exhibit of their goods at the India ed would be a most interesting volume. 
Exposition held at Calcutta and was awarded James T. Highland, an agriculturist in 
a gold medal. Alontgomery county, Kentucky, was born 
On January i, 1885. Mr. Pearce became January 5, 1840, the son of Denman and Su- 
vice president and business manager of the sanna (Johnson) Highland. The father was 
Courier-Journal Newspaper Company of Lou- born December 19, 1804. and died in April, 
isville, and so continued until 1895. During 1884. lie was the son of Denman and Ame- 
the month of November, 1895, Mr. Pearce ha Highland, who emigrated from Maryland 
removed his residence to Maysville and in to this state near the close of last century and 
1900 succeeded his father as cashier of the settled in Bourbon county, on the waters of 
State National Bank, a position he still holds. Hinkston creek, not far from ]\IcGinnis' 
He has become identified with several com- Ford. They had fourteen children, the sub- 
panies and business enterprises, including his ject's father being the sixth at the time of 
directorate of the Citizens Life Insurance their settlement. The forests were in a state 
Company. The Citizens National Life In- of nature, with scarcely a tree missing, and 
surance was organized in November, 1909, the cane grew luxuriously and many kinds of 
and Mr. Pearce became vice president of the wild animals infested the country. It was a 
same. The above companies were merged in beautiful country, but the establishment of 
1910, Mr. Pearce continuing as vice presi- homes in this region therefore meant sacri- 



1294 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



fices, hardships and often death and but few 
courageous frontiersmen had dared to locate 
within its borders, so the work of progress 
and improvement remained to the future, and 
there was httle promise of early development. 
They were very poor and had but two horses, 
one of which the wolves killed and the other 
became entangled in wild grape vines and in- 
jured so it died, liut, fortunately for them, 
a horse had strayed from some remote settle- 
ment and as no owner could be found the 
neighbors, knowing of their misfortune and 
consequent distress, insisted on their taking 
and using the horse, which they did and were 
thus enabled to support their young and grow- 
ing family. They erected their rude house not 
far from a spring of water and when it was 
finished and they had become the happy in- 
mates they erected in that humble house an 
altar unto the Lord, at and around which they 
dedicated their house to the Lord. They 
were members of the Methodist church and 
were truly pious people. Being poor and 
schools scarce, with but poor teachers, our 
subject's father had to stay at home and 
work, altogether receiving only a few months' 
instruction. When he became of age he left 
home to make his own living. The morning 
he started his father followed him to the gate, 
and as he bade him goodbye he placed a half 
dollar in his hand and said, "This, my son, 
with the blessing of God is all I have to give 
you." He went immediately to Rodger dem- 
ons, who lived at that time in Montgomery 
county, near Mi. Sterling, and engaged to 
work for him for seven dollars a month. Af- 
ter one year he went to Illinois, where he re- 
mained one year, then returned to Kentucky 
and worked one year for Mr. demons. 
Sometime during the year he formed the ac- 
quaintance of Miss Susanna Johnson, and on 
February ii, 1830, they were married. They 
began life very poor, her father giving her a 
little colored girl and a few things with which 
to begin housekeeping. 

They lived on her father's farm, on the 
waters of Somerset Creek, for five years, af- 
ter which they bought a small farm in the 
bridge's neighborhood. The subject of our 
sketch still has the deed to this farm, dated 
1837. They lived here for one year, when 
they sold out to go to Indiana, but his wife 
thinking it best to remain in Kentucky, he 
bought a small farm, on which he lived forty- 
nine years, adding to it as he was able. They 
were the parents of nine children, four of 
whom are living: Mrs. Fannie Henry, a 
widow living in Montgomery county, Ken- 
tucky; our subject; Mrs. Maria Boyd, a 
widow living in Montgomery county, Ken- 



tucky ; Mrs. Leo Gaines, a widow in Mt. 
Sterling, Kentucky. He was a devoted hus- 
band and a fond and affectionate father, a 
kind and obliging neighbor and a most worthy 
and excellent citizen. He was a man of large 
natural and practical good sense, industrious, 
economical and one of the best financiers in 
the country. Starting in life poor, by his in- 
dustry, perseverance and good management 
he accumulated a goodly portion of this 
world's goods. 

Before he began to divide his property 
among his children he had bought and paid 
for five hundred acres of land and at the time 
of his death he had advanced twenty-seven 
thousand dollars to his children. He was 
truthful, honest and just, firm in his convic- 
tions of right and prompt in his discharge of 
all his duties as a citizen. He never had a 
lawsuit, never took a drink at a bar, played a 
card or carried a concealed weapon in his life. 

Just after he joined the church he took a 
decided stand against every form of vice and 
maintained it until his death. In November, 
1830, Brother "Raccoon" John Smith was 
conducting meetings at Somerset, near his 
house, and at the close of the meeting seven- 
teen were baptized, after which Brother Smith 
preached at night. At the conclusion of his 
discourse our subject's father requested the 
preacher to baptize him on the following 
morning, and on being asked at what hour, 
said, "I want to be baptized with the rising 
of the sun that I may arise to walk in new- 
ness of life." Accordingly at a very early 
hour next morning the thick ice was cut 
away and as the sun came up from behind the 
eastern hills he was baptized. He united 
with the church of Somerset and was a mem- 
ber for forty-seven years, forty-five of which 
he was an elder and for a number of years he 
did the baptizing for his church. He was a 
rigid disciplinarian, an earnest and faithful 
worker in the social and prayer meetings and 
for a number of years consecutively he did 
not miss a single meeting of the church and 
kept it up until a short time before his death, 
when his age and other infirmities kept him 
confined to his room. Being a great lover of 
the Bible and having been a constant reader, 
and having heard so much preaching and his 
house having been for fifty years the preach- 
er's home, he had acquired a large amount of 
information concerning the scriptures. For 
several years he had prayed that he might die 
on Sunday and at the same hour of the day at 
which he had been baptized. Accordingly on 
Sunday, the 6th day of the month, at 4 
o'clock, he was stricken with paralysis and for 
two weeks was a great suflferer, and on Sun- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1295 



day, the 20th. just as the sun arose, the Lord 
answered his prayer and once more did his 
spirit rise to walk in a new Hfe. 

Our subject's mother, Susanna Johnson, 
was born January 27, 1809, in Alontgomery 
county, and died July 4, 1891. She was a 
daughter of Jacob Johnson, a native of Mary- 
land and one of tlie early pioneers of Ken- 
tucky. She became a member of the Baptist 
church at Somerset, at the age of thirteen 
years, and when the reformation took place in 
1827,' under the leadership of Elder "Rac- 
coon" John Smith, she joined the Christian 
church and was one of the charter members 
at Somerset. She was a sister of the late 
Colonel Thomas Johnson, who was prominent 
during the war and later served as state sen- 
ator. When Montgomery county was forest 
and canebrake, when the hiss and growl of 
wild animals broke the stillness where novy the 
locomotives scream, when the "log rollin's" 
and "wood pickings" were the incentives to 
social gatherings, Mrs. Highland was there 
an humble handmaiden in the Master's serv- 
ice, helping to plant the germ of Christian civ- 
ilization that blesses our population to-day. 

James T. Highland, our subject, spent his 
youth at work upon the farm, with the win- 
ters spent in school until 1856. When he was 
sixteen years old he was selected with anoth- 
er boy by Colonel Thomas Johnson to take a 
trip of eight hundred miles to New Orleans 
with a consignment of mules. These were 
driven over to Paducah, Kentucky, and then 
shipped by boat to New Orleans. This work 
young Highland followed, trading mules in 
Georgia, South Carolina, Alabama and Louis- 
iana, every winter until September, 1862. He 
enlisted in the Confederate army as a private 
• in Company B, Second Kentucky cavalry, 
with George W. Jackson, captain ; O. S. Ter- 
ry, major; and Thomas Johnson, colonel. 
In 1863 our subject was made assistant com- 
missary sergeant and served continuously in 
the compaigns of southwest Virginia, Ken- 
tucky and east Tennessee. Late in 1863 he 
went on raids around Pittsburg and Winches- 
ter and saw some real service. He was then 
transferred to the Georgian army and took 
part in the battles of Chickamauga, Mission- 
ary Ridge and in Wheeler's raid in the rear 
of Rosecrans' army. In January, 1864, 'Mr. 
Highland was with^ General John Morgan un- 
til his death, then with General Basil W. 
Duke until the close of the war, his parole 
dated May 2, 1865. 

After the war Mr. Highland returned to the 
old homestead, resolved to be a farmer, a 
temperance man, a Democrat and a Christian, 
all of which he has faithfully adhered to. 



His start in life was made on fifty acres of 
land given to him by his father and he has 
increased that until to-day he owns and ope- 
rates one thousand acres of fine land and also 
owns the old homestead. 

On December i, 1870, Mr. Highland mar- 
ried Nannie Furgeson, who died October 13, 
1882, and left four children: William P., 
Jesse P. and Charles, all residents of Mont- 
gomery, and Nannie, wife of Lester Lee, who 
resides with Mr. Highland. On September 6, 
1893, Mr. Highland married Mary E. Clay, 
who died January 15, 1900. Since 1884 Mr. 
Highland has been a director of Traders Na- 
tional Bank of Mt. Sterling, and at present 
is its vice-president. He has been a life-long 
member of Somerset Christian church and an 
elder since 1873. 

Henry Watson is one of Mt. Sterling's 
well-known and influential men, an attorney 
of note and a loyal son of the Blue Grass 
state. He was born in Estill county Septem- 
ber 19, 1862, and is a son of Samuel R. D. K. 
and Elizabeth (Hughes) Watson. The for- 
mer was born in Bath county, Kentucky, in 
1835, and died in Estill county in March, 
1906. The mother, also a native of Estill 
county, Kentucky, is still living at the age of 
sixty-four years. They became the parents 
of seven children, five of whom are living, the 
subject being the eldest. C. R., Fred, Ann 
(wife of Duncan Edwards) and Charles R., 
all reside in Estill county. Lofa, the wife 
of Dr. Sherman Lee, is a citizen of ^lont- 
gomer}' county. 

Mr. Watson's paternal grandfather,^ Thom- 
as Watson, was a Virginian, and his wife, 
Susan Sullivan, was born in Ireland. She 
came to Virginia when seventeen years of 
age, there met her husband, and after her 
marriage moved with him to Bath county. 
Later they came to Estill county, where the 
grandfather was accidentally killed. The fa- 
ther of the subject was a farmer and 
throughout the course of his life he was de- 
voted to the interests of the Republican party. 

Henry Watson, to quote from his own ac- 
count, was reared upon a farm hidden in the 
woods. He took advantage of common 
school opportunities, and remained upon the 
home farm until his eighteenth year, and 
when quite young was made deputy marshal 
of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, which position he 
held until he had the misfortune to lose a 
foot in an accident. He moved to Mt. Ster- 
ling in 1884, and has remained here to the 
present time and been identified with its vari- 
ous interests. Among these was the telephone 
business, and he has also been engaged in 
real estate enterprises. While interested in 



1296 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

the telephone business he assisted in organiz- were of Fleming county, the names of these 
ing the Independent Company in Winchester, worthy citizens being Henry Thomas and Su- 
Jackson, Beattyville, Richmond, Clay City and san (Bently) Cord. When the subject was a 
Alorehead, being, indeed, a pioneer in that line, young lad they removed to Mason county and 
He also owned a one-half interest in the Clay secured a farm, and it was amid rural scenes 
City Exchange. that his youth was passed. Upon a founda- 
For some years during his spare time Mr. tion consisting of the knowledge and discipline 
Watson had read law, and on April 17, 1896, to be obtained in the district schools he erect- 
he was admitted to tlie bar, and in the profes- ed a superstructure of higher education and 
sion his readiness in debate and mastery of in 1881 was graduated with the degree of 
any subject he handles entitles him to much bachelor of arts from the Kentucky Classical 
consideration. His ability and trustworthi- and Business College, and also availed him- 
ness have been honored and recognized by the self of the advantages of a correspondence 
gift of several public offices. He served four course conducted by the Bryant and Stratton 
years on the city council, and was at one time Business College of Louisville, Kentucky, 
revenue agent for Montgomery county. Ken- After teaching for two years in the county 
tucky. He enjoys no small amount of popu- schools he received the degree of A. M. from 
larity as a lodge man, being a member of the Hiram College at Hiram, Ohio. He then 
Knights of Pythias and of the Ancient Or- started a school at May's Lick and devoted 
der of United W^orkmen, having three times his energies to its instruction for a time. In 
been elected grand foreman of the Grand 1887 he accepted a position as bookkeeper at 
Lodge of Kentucky. He is a member of the Owington and in 1890 removed to Hazel- 
Christian church and has given life-long alle- green, Wolf county, Kentucky, where he as- 
giance to the policies and principles of the sumed charge of a mission school conducted 
Democratic party, being willing to undertake by the Christian Women's Board of Missions 
any mission within his power for the sake of of the Christian church. This school, which 
the cause. began its existence with eleven pupils, through 
In November, 1882, Mr. Watson laid the his good judgment and unflagging zeal even- 
foundation of a happy married life by his un- tually became one of the best schools in the 
ion with Frances Frazer, daughter of Aaron state. 

and Matilda (Adams) Frazer. This estimable In 1906 Mr. Cord came to Mt. Sterling and 
lady was born in i860 and died in September, established a school to which he gave the title, 
1905, her nativity having occurred in Estill Collegiate Institute, this opening with sixty- 
county. The subject and his wife were the eight pupils. The new and modern building 
parents of five children, three of whom are which housed it was completed in September, 
living at the present day. These three sons, 1909, but he lived to enjoy its advantages only 
Carlyle B.. Wilton C. and Clancy, are at a few months. For years he had been an 
home. Mr. Watson was a second time mar- elder in the Christian church and in 1890 he 
ried, on August 21, 1906, the lady to become was ordained and during his residence at 
his wife being Miss Florence Joyce, a daugh- Hazelgreen preached in connection with his 
ter of Richard Joyce, of Clark county. Ken- school work. His charges were Camargo and 
tucky, and a native of IMontgomery county, Somerset churches, and he discoursed before 
Kentucky. They have one child, a little Somerset congregations on Sundays and be- 
daughter named Laura Elizabeth. fore Camargo church on the afternoons on al- 
WiLLiAM Henry Cord.— In the death of ternate Sundays. One of the fields in which 
William Henry Cord not only the community his influence was most potently known was in 
in which his interests were centered but the Sunday-school work, in which he took a 
entire state of Kentucky lost a splendid citi- heart-felt interest, and he was president of 
zen of the truest type, an educator of the most the Sunday-school Association of this dis- 
enlightened character, and the Christian trict. 

church, of which he was a presiding elder A man of large physical presence and splen- 
and an ordained minister, one of its pillars, did physique, his strength was great and he 
Born in Mason county November 6, 1864, on had never been ill in his life, so that his drop- 
April 10, 1910, when in the prime of life, he ping dead in the school room was an even 

"Gave greater shock to his many devoted friends 

His body to the pleasant country's earth, than it might otherwise have been. He was 

And his pure soul unto his captain, Christ, a prodigious worker of the type who never 

Under whose colors he had fought so long." give to themselves a spare moment and he lit- 

The parents of William Henry Cord were erally worked himself to death. His death 

both Kentuckians and both father and mother cost the community one of its best educators 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1297 



and honored Christian citizens, but his mem- 
ory will remain green for many a day. 

On June 15. 1887, Mr. Cord laid the foun- 
dation of an ideally happy married life by his 
union with Edith Ireland, born September 5, 
1866 at Bainbridge, Indiana. She is the 
daughter of Thomas A. and Susan (Black) 
Ireland, the father born in Owen county, 
Kentucky, February 26, 1826, and died in 
1888, and the mother born in Bourbon county 
in 1835. She survives and makes her home 
with Mrs. Cord. Mr. and Mrs. Ireland unit- 
ed their hands and fortunes in marriage m 
the year 1852. In Ferbuary, 1846, the father 
enlisted at Georgetown, Kentucky, and served 
as a cavalryman during the Mexican war. 
Less than a decade later when the question 
which had been debated on thousands of plat- 
forms, which had been discussed in countless 
publications, which thundered from innumer- 
able pulpits, and caused in their congrega- 
tions the bitter strife and dissension to which 
only cases of conscience can give rise, was 
about to be settled in the life and death con- 
flict upon the battlefield he enlisted in a com- 
pany in the Confederate service and was made 
captain, the company being a part of Hum- 
phrey Marshall's command. He was cap- 
tured near Nashville, Tennessee, put in prison 
for a while and then taken to Louisville, 
where for fourteen months he was incarcer- 
ated at Camp Chase. He was ill and in gen- 
erally serious condition of health and his 
brave and faithful wife journeyed to Wash- 
ington, D. C, where she obtained a personal 
interview with President Lincoln and a par- 
don for him. With this she returned to Lou- 
isville, secured her husband's release and took 
him to her former home in Indiana, where he 
recovered his health. They subsequently re- 
turned to Owington. Mrs. Ireland, as said 
before, still lives to tell of her meeting with 
"Father Abraham," whom she adores and 
venerates beyond all other heroes. For eight 
years previous to the Civil war Mr. Ireland 
was sherifif of Owen county and for twenty- 
four years was county clerk. 

Mrs. Cord was educated at North Middle- 
town, Kentucky, and spent one year at North 
Traverse, Missouri. She proved a helpmeet 
to her husband in no uncertain sense and from 
1890 to 1899 assisted him in the school at 
Hazelgreen, teaching music among other 
things. They became the parents of three 
children, all sons, whose names are Robert, 
Raymond and'Wilham. 

Robert Cord, the eldest son, was born June 
9, 1888, at Owington, Kentucky, and received 
his education under the tutelage of his fa- 
ther. He graduated at Hazelgreen when six- 



teen years of age and then matriculated at the 
Transylvania University at Lexington and 
was graduated there. He taught at Mt. Ster- 
ling and was principal of the city schools at 
the time of his father's death. Upon that sad 
event he also assumed the responsibilities of 
his father's place and conducted both until the 
close of the school year. He has now perma- 
nently taken up his father's work where it 
was left and expects and hopes to carry on 
the work as it was started, his character and 
ability making this indeed fortunate for all 
concerned. 

John O'Kelly, of Ashland, Boyd county, 
Kentucky, is a loyal and public-spirited citi- 
zen and is decidedly one of the most enter- 
prising manufacturers and business men of 
this section of the fine old Blue Grass state. 
He is president of the O'Kelly Brick Com- 
pany and is president and general manager of 
the John O'Kelly Construction Company, 
both of which concerns were exploited and 
incorporated by him. 

A native son of Ashland, Mr. O'Kelly \yas 
born on the 30th of April, i860, and is a scion 
of fine old Irish stock. His parents, Michael 
and Margaret (O'Kelly) O'Kelly, were both 
born in Galway county, Ireland, the former 
in 1822 and the latter in 1825. The father 
was reared to maturity on a farm in his na- 
tive land and when twenty-three years of age, 
in 1845, he decided to seek his fortunes in the 
New World, emigrating to the United States 
in the year 1845. He embarked on a sail boat 
and spent six weeks on the voyage, eventually 
landing at New Orleans, Louisiana, whence 
he went to Mobile, where he remained for a 
short time. About 1852 he came to Kentucky, 
locating in Mason county, where he secured a 
position in connection with railroad construc- 
tion, having charge of men for contractors on 
one of the early railroads. Subsequently he 
established his home at Maysville and in 1854 
he came to Ashland, w^hich town was just be- 
ing platted. Here he engaged in the general 
contracting work on his own responsibility 
and continued to be identified with that line 
of enterprise until his death. At tirnes he 
carried on extensive business projects, includ- 
ing railroad work, streets, country roads, etc. 
For about twenty years he was interested in 
a general merchandise business at Ashland. 
While at Maysville, Kentucky, he met and 
married his wife, who was a neighbor and 
playmate of his youth in Ireland. Michael 
O'Kelly was summoned to the life eternal on 
the 25th of July, 1895, at the age of seventy- 
three years, and his cherished and devoted 
wife, who long survived him, passed away on 
the I2th of March, 1907, at the age of eighty- 



1298 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



two years. Mr. and Mrs. O'Kelly became the 
parents of seven children, five of whom are 
living. 

John O'Kelly was the fifth in order of birth 
in a family of seven children and he received 
his early educational training in the parochial 
schools ^of Ashland. While still a youth he 
was associated with his father for a couple of 
years in contracting work and later he entered 
a nail mill, where he worked as nail feeder 
for about four years. On attaining to his 
legal majority he began to do contract work 
on his own account and for two years he was 
in partnership with the late Judge Savage. 
During 1884-5 ^^^'- O'Kelly had charge of the 
city street department, having been appointed 
to that position by the city council. In 1886 
he engaged in the livery and ice business, in 
which enterprise he was eminently successful, 
following the same for some eight years. In 
1895 he purchased the harness and buggy 
business from John B. Sanford and operated 
the same for four years, and in the meantime, 
in 1897, he became the owner of a small brick 
yard, which has since been developed into an 
immense, thriving concern. In 1905 the man- 
ufacturing of fire brick was added to the lat- 
ter project and at the present time, in 191 1, 
the daily capacity of the brick plant is twelve 
thousand fire brick and thirty thousand red 
brick. It is a maca<lam brick manufacturing 
plant and the article produced is of the very 
best quality, the business territory covering 
northeastern Kentucky and West Virginia. 
The market for the fire clay and the fire brick 
is principally in the south, largely Alabama 
and Georgia, although some shipments are 
also made to Illinois. The plant was operated 
in the name of John O'Kelly until 1905, when 
it was incorporated under the laws of the 
state with a capital stock of fifty thousand 
dollars, its first official corps consisting of : 
John O'Kelly, president; Edward O'Kelly 
(deceased), vice president and general man- 
ager; Thomas J. Brady, secretary and treas- 
urer. The board of directors was as follows : 
John O'Kelly, T. J. Brady, Edward V. O'- 
Kelly and J. M. Hutton. At the present time 
E. V. O'Kelly is vice president and general 
manager and the concern is known under the 
name of the O'Kelly Brick Company. At the 
same time that the above company was 
formed Mr. O'Kelly organized the John O'- 
Kelly Construction Company, with a capital 
stock of twenty-five thousand dollars, for the 
purpose of building street railways, streets, 
sewers, etc. The latter concern was the out- 
growth of the contracting business which Mr. 
O'Kelly had carried on for a number of years, 
during which time, in 1901, he constructed the 



electric car line from Parkersburg, West Vir- 
ginia, to Marietta, Ohio, connecting those two 
places with a splendid rapid transit line. The 
Construction Company of which ^Ir. O'Kelly 
of this sketch has always been the head has 
successfully engineered many large contracts 
in general railway contracting in steam and 
electric lines, and it is one of the best known 
concerns of its kind in the state. 

In his political convictions Mr. O'Kelly has 
always been aligned as a stalwart in the ranks 
of the Democratic party, in the local councils 
of which he has long been an important and 
active factor. In 1885 he was appointed deputy 
county clerk, in which office he served with the 
utmost proficiency for two years, at the expi- 
ration of which he resigned in order to ac- 
cept the position of deputy sheriff. In the 
latter capacity he served for four years when, 
in 1892, he was elected sherifif of Boyd coun- 
ty. In 1894 he was candidate for re-election 
to the office of sheriff but owing to the nor- 
mal Republican majority in this section he 
met with defeat. Fraternally he is affiliated 
with the Knights of Columbus and in his re- 
ligious faith he is a zealous communicant of 
the Catholic church. Mr. O'Kelly 's remark- 
able success in life is the outcome of his own 
well directed endeavors. He is a man of 
marked business ability, great thrift and un- 
usual perseverance — a veritable captain of in- 
dustry. As a citizen, business associate and 
friend his life has been irreproachable and he 
is extensively known as a man of high ideals 
and fine moral fiber. 

On the 25th of October, 1886, was solem- 
nized the marriage of Mr. O'Kelly to Miss 
Margaret Moriarity. a native of Ashland and 
a daughter of Patrick Moriarity, who was 
long a pioneer citizen and well known business 
man in Boyd county. Mr. and Mrs. O'Kelly 
have two children, concerning whom the fol- 
lowing brief data are here incorporated — Ed- 
ward v., who is now associated with his fa- 
ther in business, was graduated in the local 
parochial schools and in Georgetown Univer- 
sity, at Washington, D. C. ; and Marguerite, 
who is now attending the Winona Seminary, 
at Winona, Minnesota. Mrs. O'Kelly is a 
woman of inherent graciousness and refine- 
ment and .she is also a communicant in the 
Catholic church. 

JosiAH Moss Terry.— The ancestry of 
Josiah Moss Terry as far back as their history 
can be traced in the annals of America are 
noted for the sterling traits of character which 
mark the valuable citizen of this great republic. 
At all times they have been ready to uphold 
righteous and just laws, to promote the welfare 
of the land of their nativity, and, if needful, to 




mf ^ 





tjba i^siff roxi 
»0BLIC LIBRA! 






HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1299 



lay down their lives on the altar of her liberty 
and maintenance. 

Josiah Moss Terry, treasurer and secretary 
of the Sinking Fund Commission of the city of 
Louisville, is a native of the Blue Grass state, 
having been born in Glasgow, Barren county, 
Kentucky, on March ii, 1843, the son of John 
and Mary Jane (Moss) Terry. Mr. Terry, our 
subject, is the descendant of an old and dis- 
tinguished American family, and a brief ac- 
count of his immediate ancestors will not be 
inappropriate in this sketch. His great-grand- 
father, Nathaniel Terry, of Antrim Parish, 
Halifax county, Virginia, was appointed a 
justice of the peace by Governor Dinwiddie, 
and afterwards sheriff of the county. He was 
for some years a member of the House of 
Burgesses, a member of the Virginia Conven- 
tion of May 6, 1776, and was present when 
Patrick Henry made his famous speech on that 
occasion. His bonds as sheriff of Halifax 
county, given to George HI, are still on record 
in the archives of Virginia. The records also 
show that he presided in the last court held by 
the justices under King George IH, April term, 
1776, and at the first court held under the 
commonwealth of Virginia, July 18, 1776. His 
military record in the Revolutionary war is as 
follows : Nathaniel Terry, Virginia, First 
Lieutenant, Fourteenth Virginia, December 2, 
1776. Regiment designated Tenth Virginia, 
September 14, 1778. Captain Lieutenant, 
March 12, 1779. Regiment Quartermaster, 
March 31, 1779. Captain, December 15, 1779. 
Taken prisoner at Charleston May 12, 1780. 
Transferred and sent to Virginia, February 12, 
1 781, and served until the close of the war. 
His son, William Morris Terry, was the grand- 
father of Josiah Moss Terry and was a pioneer 
of Kentucky, settling in Todd county at an 
early date. John Terry, the father of our sub- 
ject, came to Louisville with his family when 
Josiah was quite young and engaged in mer- 
cantile business. 

Josiah M. Terry received his education in 
the schools of Louisville and began a business 
career in 1859. In 1862 he was appointed a 
captain of commissary of subsistence in the 
United States army, which position he held 
until 1865, when he resigned from the service. 
During his connection with the department a 
very large part of the supplies for the entire 
Federal forces passed through Mr. Terry's 
hands. After his resignation, he entered his 
father's grocery store in Louisville and con- 
tinued there until January i, 1873. On August 
I, 1875, Mr. Terry was chosen treasurer and 
secretary of the Sinking Fund Commission, 
which position he now holds. 

Ever true to the duties of citizenship, taking 



a lively interest in all that affects the welfare of 
his city and state, it is but natural that Mr. 
Terry should have been called upon to serve in 
positions of distinctive public trust and respon- 
sibility. His purpose has ever been commend- 
able, his actions manly, his conduct sincere and 
above all his life has been influenced by a 
sense of conscientious obligation concerning 
his relations to his fellow men and his duties 
of citizenship. 

Rev. N. N. Gosselin. — The life of the sub- 
ject of this sketch has been one of signal ac- 
tivity and devotion in the field of his labor and 
he has worked for the good of his parish and 
his fellow beings along the paths of upright- 
ness, religion and education with a zeal which 
has made his life one worthy of emulation. 
He .has ;no-t only shown marked capability and 
earnestness in his clerical work but has mani- 
fested an administrative ability which has 
been potent in insuring the temporal welfare 
of his parish, and he is held in high esteem for 
his devotion to the cause and for his able 
service in his holy calling as a priest of the 
church. 

Father Gosselin, pastor of the Holy Family 
Catholic church at Ashland, was born in St. 
Pierre D'Orleans, Quebec, Canada, in 1846, 
the son of Laurent and Marguerite (God- 
bout) Gosselin, also natives of Canada, whose 
ancestors came from Normandy and were of 
French descent. His father was a farmer and 
he and his wife made their home in Canada 
during their lives. Our subject was reared 
on the farm and assisted through many 
days of hard work. He attended the pa- 
rochial school and later became a student 
at Quebec and also at Bourbonnais, Illinois, 
at St. Viateur College. He graduated and 
was ordained in 1882 for the diocese of Cov- 
ington, Kentucky. He was appointed assist- 
ant priest at Ashland, Kentucky, of the Holy 
Family Parish in 1882, and a year later be- 
came pastor at Verona, Kentucky. In 1886 
he was sent to Jellico, Tennessee, and two 
years later returned to Ashland as pastor, 
where he has since remained. To his energy 
is due much of the good and successful condi- 
tion of the church and parish affairs generally. 

It will be interesting to read a slight sketch 
of the history of the church with which Fa- 
ther Gosselin has been connected for over 
twenty-two years. Prior to the organization 
of the church in Ashland -missionary services 
were held by Bishop Gilmour, of Cleveland, 
and Father Oswald, of Covington, Kentucky,- 
the latter being the first missionary there. In 
1854 a lot was bought by Father O'Neil at the 
time Ashland was laid out, and in 1856 a 
small brick church was built, which was later 



1300 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

used for school purposes. The first resident this resume of his career will be read with 

priest was Father H. G. Allan in 1859, sue- interest to all who have had cognizance of his 

ceeded by Father Lambert Young in 18O3, the efforts, 

next in turn being Father Mclnerny. John Henry Mason is a man held in high 

In 1867 the foundation of the new church respect and consideration in this part of Ken- 
was laid by Father C. L. O'Brien, and was tucky, the worthy son of a father whose name 
completed by him in 1876. Under his ad- stood for citizenship of the highest character, 
ministration he bought most of the lots which At present one of the foremost agriculturists 
now comprise the entire city block occupied and cattle raisers of Montgomery county, he 
by the church and buildings. The church is has in the past been identified with many im- 
still in use and is one of the finest in the town, portant enterprises, among these being the 
Father O'Brien did much in developing the founding of that well-known sheet, the Mt. 
early work in the church. In 1878 Father L. Sterling Advocate. Mr. Mason was born in 
G. Clermont became pastor and governed the the county which still claims his residence, 
parish until 1888, and during this time he the date of his nativity having been Septem- 
built the parochial residence. Father Cler- ber 2, 1843. He was the son of Captain John 
mont was a man much beloved by all who Mason, whose career will be briefly sketched 
knew, and came in contact with him. In 1878 in ensuing paragraphs, and of his wife, whose 
begins the record of events that have been maiden name was Elizabeth Henry, 
accomplished by the Sisters of St. Frances, Mr. Mason's father was summoned to the 
those women whose entire lives are devoted to life eternal when he was a lad but twelve 
others and their needs. The beginning was a years of age and he was reared by his guard- 
school established in the old church building ian, William Scott. He received his education 
and a small frame structure. The school pro- in the private school of I. W. Fox, and his 
gressed to such an extent that more accom- youth, like that of the other young men of the 
modation was necessary and in 1891 the pres- day, was marred by the bitter strife and dis- 
ent fine, modern, two-story brick school sension which preceded the Civil war, when 
building was erected, under the administration about every fireside in the land, in the conver- 
of Father N. N. Gosselin, who succeeded Fa- sation of friends and neighbors, and deeper 
ther Clermont in 1888 and has continued to still, in the secret of millions of human hearts, 
"crve ever since. the battle of opinion was waging. When the 

The sisters have accomplished much good; first guns were fired at Fort Sumter Mr. Ma- 
Sister Matilda had the honor of establishing son twice tried to enlist, and failing, returned 
the first school ; Sister Anastasia is still the home. 

principal and head of the commercial depart- He married very early, before he became 

ment, which she established fifteen years ago, eighteen years of age, Margaret C. Nelson 

and she has no doubt done more for the sue- becoming his bride on March 13, 1862. Mrs. 

cess of the school than any other person of Mason was born at Grassy Lick and is the 

the acknowledged benefactors of the institu- daughter of William and Ann (Smith) Nel- 

tion ; Sister Assisi, who is the head of the son. 

musical department, which position she has Compared to the usual young couple Mr. 

held for a number of years, is one of the and Mrs. Mason were very well equipped 

most successful teachers in the school. There when they cast their barque upon the seas of 

is also a primary department in connection matrimony, having about three thousand dol- 

with the school. In 1900 the sisters' residence lars in capital, and before Mr. Mason had 

was built by Father Gosselin, the building and reached his twentieth year he also owned 

grounds modern and up to date. The parish about two hundred acres of land. Their home 

and congregation are prosperous and in a most place .was that of Mrs. Mason's father and she 

encouraging condition, and consists of about had twenty-five acres in her own right. There 

two hundred families. the subject began his agricultural endeavors 

Father Gosselin has contributed largely to and by the exercise of hard work and thrift 

the development and success during the past he came to own seven hundred acres of fine 

twenty years to the schools and church, dur- land. 

ing which time the beautiful grounds and In 1885 Mr. Mason removed to Louisville 

modern buildings have been established. He to educate his children, but found the step to 

has been indefatigable in promoting the have been inexpedient in some respects, for 

growth both of the temporal and spiritual he was too far away from his farm to be able 

welfare of the parish over which he is placed to give it sufficient oversight. Consequently 

in charge, a man of high intellectuality, his in 1886 he brought his goods and chattels to 

life has been useful as a priest and man and Mt. Sterling, where for two years he dealt in 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1801 

tobacco. It was in 1890 that he and Dr. C. about the year 1785. With his family this 

W. Harris organized and founded the Mt. pioneer settled in Fayette county, but the son 

Sterling Adz'ocate, which was speedily recog- who was also his namesake settled in Mont- 

nized as a live and progressive publication, gomery county when young and there fol- 

and they successfully presided over its des- lowed building and contracting. By the exer- 

tinies until the year 1893, when they sold it. cise of infinite energy, thrift and industry he 

Some one has defined success as accepting accumulated money enough to purchase a 

the worst that fate can deal and winning cour- farm two miles northwest of Mt. Sterling, and 

age from it and not despair, and by this test upon this homestead he kept "bachelor's hall" 

Mr. [Mason has been the most successful of for many years and dispensed a most generous 

men. His career had previously been plain hospitality. He was a man of business acu- 

sailing, but now through a disastrous invest- men and far sighted in his farming, and he 

ment in mining stock he lost at one time fif- was convinced of the advisability of keeping 

teen thousand dollars, having sold his farm in the best breed of horses, cattle, sheep and 

the meantime. The hard times of 1893 also jacks. It was one of his keenest interests and 

crippled him severely, but in the face of these at one time he paid the unprecedented price 

trials he never lost his courage. In 1893 he of five hundred dollars for an imported Me- 

had sufficiently recovered from his losses to rino ram, while it was likewise his distinction 

purchase two hundred and seventy-five acres to introduce the breeding and rearing of jack 

of his old farm, and upon that tract he and and jennet stock in Montgomery county. 

his family took up their residence. This he He was a loyal patriotic American, of the 

has improved to the highest point and it is sort the nation likes to call typical, and his 

considered to be one of the best kept and patriotism was by no means of the merely 

cleanest farms in the county. For some years rhetorical order. In 1813, at the time of the 

before he left his farm Mr. Mason was en- war with Great Britain, he raised a volunteer 

gaged in the Short Horn cattle business, and company of which he was made lieutenant, 

his particular pride at the present is his corn, He accumulated property and at one time was 

which has taken several premiums. He en- the owner of more horses and lots in Mt. 

gages for the most part in general farming. Sterling than any other one man, and many of 

Mr. and Mrs. Mason have given twelve these at his death passed as a heritage to his 

good citizens to the United States, two of children. 

them being deceased. The following is an In 1824, through the failure of Colonel 
enumeration : Nelson, a citizen of Bourbon Thomas Dye Owings, to whom he was largely 
county ; Dr. C. L., who is deceased ; James boimd as surety, he became involved in finan- 
F., who lives in DeSoto, Kansas ; Anna, wife cial troubles from which his sound practical 
of J. C. Ramsey, a resident of Winchester, sense and unconquerable will rescued him 
Kentucky; Elizabeth, wnfe of W. H. Ramsey, without serious loss. Colonel Owings' failure 
of Montgomery county, Kentucky ; Robert was for sixty thousand dollars. 
A., of Grassy Lick, Kentucky ; Fannie J., de- The distinguishing traits of Captain Ma- 
ceased ; Talitha Cuma, wife of C. D. Powell, son's character were his indomitable courage, 
of Florida; Mary P., wife of Oliver Howell, his love of truth, his freedom from guile and 
of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky ; Luther, of Mont- his devotion to his friends — truly an equip- 
gomery county ; Allie F., wife of Herbert ment difficult to surpass in nobility. If his 
Coppage, of Chicago, Illinois; and W. A., of friends had faults Captain Mason was the last 
Montgomery county. Mr. and Mrs. Mason to see them and he never deserted them in 
are members of the Grassy Lick Methodist their hour of need, and although he may have 
Episcopal church, South, and are generous been implacable toward his enemies, he was 
supporters of its many good causes. He is never unjust to them. Politically he was a 
part and parcel of the so-called "Solid South," Democrat of the straightest type, a state's 
having ever given allegiance to the Democrat- rights man of the Jefifersonian school. His 
ic party. stability and worth were recognized and he 
Captain John Mason, father of John Henry was elected and served Montgomery county 
Mason, was a native of Virginia, having been in the lower branch of the legislature. Many 
born in Spottsylvania county, Virginia, Feb- years before his death this estimable gentle- 
ruary 29, 1776. shortly after the shot w^as man joined the Christian church, and he died 
fired "which echoed round the world." His a consistent member of its communion on Au- 
parents were John and Anna Shirley, the fa- gust 25, 1855. 

ther being a Revolutionary soldier, who at the Captain Mason married late in life, the 

close of the war emigrated to Kentucky, prob- noble woman who became his wife and the 

ably setting stake in the Blue Grass state mother of his children being Elizabeth, the 



1302 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



daughter of Captain John and Rebecca Henry. 
The marriage of Captain and Mrs. Henry was 
celebrated September 22. 1836, and six cliil- 
dren were born to them. Anna l)ccanie the 
wife of of James \V. Cluke, of Caldwell coun- 
ty, Kentucky, and survives him. Emily mar- 
ried J. D. Hazelrigg and lives in Mt. Sterling. 
Elizabeth, widow of H. G. Hurt, resides in 
Montgomery county. John H. was the fourth 
in order of birth. Andrew J. died in 1854. 
James W. resides in Montgomery county. 
Mrs. Mason married again, her second hus- 
band being William M. I'atton and the date 
of their union May 14. 1857. To this union 
was born one son. now deceased. 

Captain Mason received his education in 
the old Transylvania College at Lexington, 
from which famous institution he was gradu- 
ated. He was a contractor at one time, work- 
ing in Frankfort, Kentucky. In addition to 
his service in the war of 1812 he also served 
in the Mexican war. as a member of the 
Twenty-eighth Kentucky Regiment, and he 
later served as captain under Andrew Jack- 
son. 

Hugh W. Poage. — In the city which rep- 
resented his home during practically his en- 
tire life occurred the birth and death of Hugh 
William Poage, who was descended from the 
old pioneer Poages, of Scotch-Irish ancestry, 
who immigrated to the United States in the 
early Colonial era of our national history and 
representatives of whom were prominent in 
public afifairs in Virginia, whence a colony 
came to Kentucky about the year 1781. Con- 
cerning the Poage family further data are 
given in the sketch dedicated to Hugh Calvin 
Poage, father of him whose name introduces 
this review. 

Hugh William Poage was born at Ashland, 
Boyd county, Kentucky, on the 22d of 
August, 1854, the year the city was founded 
and platted. His death occurred on the 3d 
of June, 1904. He was the oldest child of 
Hugh Calvin and Sarah (Davenport) Poage, 
and concerning his brothers and sisters the 
following brief record is here incorporated — 
Nannie Rebecca died at the age of six months ; 
Minnie is the wife of J. H. Eba and resides 
at Ashland ; Margaret Anna is on the stafif of 
the Ashland Daily Independent and main- 
tains her home in this city; Thomas Hoge is 
a druggist in the city of Chicago, Illinois; 
James is an attorney in the same city; Vir- 
ginia is the wife of F. R. Henderson, a whole- 
sale grocer at Ashland ; Katharine is the wife 
of E. H. Townsend, of Cleremont county, 
Ohio; Louise is a popular and successful 
teacher in the public schools of Boyd county, 
Kentucky ; and Robert H. is a resident of Los 



Angeles, California. Mr. Poage, of this 
notice, received but meager educational train- 
ing in his youth and when eighteen years of 
age he began to work on the wharf boat at 
Ashland, continuing to be thus engaged for 
several years and eventually serving in the 
capacity of freight clerk and collector. Dur- 
ing 1875-6 he was employed at the Buena 
Vista and Princess Iron furnaces by the firm 
of Culbertson, Means & Culbertson, leading 
iron manufacturers at that time. From 1883 
to 1885 he worked in the internal revenue of- 
fice of central Kentucky and while thus en- 
gaged he began the study of law. On retir- 
ing from the revenue service he returned to 
his home in Ashland, where he was admitted 
to the bar of the state in December, 1886, 
after examination by Circuit Judge John M. 
Burns, Colonel L. T. Moore and Colonel F. 
H. Bruning. He initiated the active practice 
of his profession at Ashland and in a short 
time succeeded in building up a large and 
lucrative clientage, in whose behalf he ex- 
erted his every energy, proving an able and 
versatile attorney and skilled counselor. In 
1890 he was elected to the ofihce of city at- 
torney of Ashland and in 1893 he was chosen 
as his own successor for a term of four years. 
Subsequently he was elected to fill the unex- 
pired term of W. S. Hager as county judge, 
to which office he was later re-elected, being 
incumbent thereof at the time of his death, 
in 1904. He had previously served with the 
utmost efficiency as a member of the city 
council, in which connection he did much to 
advance the general welfare and to introduce 
various needed improvements for the good 
of the city. 

During his residence in Ashland Judge 
Poage was engaged in the insurance business 
for some twenty-six years and at the time 
of his demise he had the oldest agency in the 
city. He was a man universally admired, 
respected and beloved by his fellow men, was 
genial, jovial, the acme of honesty and gen- 
erally a prime favorite in the city which so 
long represented his home. He was a splen- 
did lawyer, a sagacious politician and above 
all a friend to the poor and downtrodden. 
Politically he was a staunch Republican and 
he manifested a deep and sincere interest in 
public afifairs early in life, doing much for 
the success of his party and for the victory 
of his political friends. In a fraternal way 
he was affiliated with the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen, the Knights of Pythias 
and the Knights of the Maccabees, in each of 
which he was a valued and appreciative 
member. 

On the ist of April, 1881, was celebrated 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1303 

the marriage of Judge Poage to Miss Lau- Ironton. To Mr. and Mrs. Poage has been 

retta Shaw, a native of GalHpoHs, Ohio, and born one daughter, Sarah Ehza. 

a daughter of John W. and Ariadne (Jef- John J. K. Montague.- — It is especially 

fers) Shaw. The paternal grandparents of fitting that in a work giving the history of 

Mrs. Poage were early pioneers in the old the men of the state and of many cities of 

Buckeye state, where representatives of the that state, that the chief executive of one of 

family were identified principally with agri- those cities should have especial mention, and 

cultural pursuits. Judge and Mrs. Poage be- with that view it is with pleasure that the 

came the parents of two children. — Paul, who name of John J. K. Montague, the mayor of 

is clerk of the circuit court in Boyd county ; Catlettsburg, is presented to the readers of 

and Judith, who is now the wife of Harry these biographies as a man who has met with 

Brooks Vaughan, of Cincinnati, Ohio, where creditable success in politics, business, social 

he is employed on the editorial staff of the life and finances. A short resume of his life 

Cincinnati Enquirer. Judge Poage was sum- will be appropriate and meet with the ap- 

moned to eternal rest on the 3d of June, 1904, proval of his friends. 

at which time the city sufifered the loss of John J. K. Montague was born in Dover, 
one of its most loyal and public-spirited citi- Mason county, Kentucky, on May 4, 1849, 
zens, one whose highest ambition had ever the son of William W. and Mary S. (Wat- 
been to foster progress and development and son) Montague, natives of Cumberland 
to be of service to his fellow men. Mrs. county, Virginia, where they were reared, 
Poage is now living in Ashland, Kentucky. and they were married in Brown county, 

Paul Poage was born at Ashland, January Ohio, in which place they resided a short 
I, 1882. and in this city he was reared and time, next removing to Mason county. Ken- 
educated, his schooling consisting of such ad- tucky, in 1837. The father was a dealer in 
vantages as were afforded in the public and tobacco in Virginia, where he also worked 
parochial schools. After being graduated in at carpentry. In 1850 he located near Cat- 
the local high school he entered Washington & lettsburg, where he operated a small country 
Lee University at Lexington, Virginia, where store for several years and in 1870 was 
he was registered as a student for two years, elected jailer of Boyd county, locating in 
at the expiration of which he was matriculated Catlettsburg that same year, and helped the 
in Center College, at Danville, Kentucky, in office for four years. He died in Catletts- 
the law department of which excellent in- burg in 1886, at the age of eighty-four years, 
stitution he was graduated as a member of When a young man he was captain of a mi- 
the class of 1905, with the degree of Bachelor litia company for several years, but was never 
of Laws. Immediately after graduation he in active service, and was always known as 
resided at Lexington, Kentucky, for a time captain and recognized as one of the best 
and he then returned to Ashland, where he drill masters in this section. During the 
began the practice of his profession. The Civil war the Captain's sympathies were with 
day he opened his law office in this city he the southern cause, but he opposed secession, 
earned a fee of twenty-five dollars. He con- He was a member of the Christian church, 
tinued in active practice until his election as as was also his wife, who died at the age of 
clerk of the circuit court of Boyd county, eighty-four in 1898. They were the parents 
in the fall of 1909, since which time he has of eight children, three of whom are dead, 
devoted his entire attention to the responsi- the subject of this sketch being the seventh 
bilities of his office. He is an uncompromis- in order of birth. 

ing Republican in his political proclivities and John J. K. Montague was reared in Boyd 
his future holds great promise for a splendid county, Kentucky, receiving his preliminary 
political career. He is a member of the Phi literary education in the public school and 
Kappa Psi college fraternity at Washington later attending Powell Academy. When a 
& Lee University, and is a member of the young man he began the study of law in 
Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks at Judge G. N. Brown's office, Catlettsburg. and 
Ashland. The religion of the Poage fam- was admitted to practice in 1873. He opened 
ily has ever been of the Presbyterian de- an office in Catlettsburg and has been in act- 
nomination. • ive practice ever since. ]\Ir. Montague is a 

On the 6th of July, 1906, Mr. Poage was member of the Kentucky State Bar Associa- 

united in marriage to Aliss ]\Iargaret Helen tion. In politics he is a Democrat and an 

Bester. a native of Ironton, Ohio. She is a active worker for the party, for many years 

daughter of William J. Bester, who was the chairman of the County Committee. He 

formerly engaged in the iron business at was county attorney for two terms, from 



1304 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1882 to 1890, and in 1893 was appointed 
postmaster under President Cleveland and 
served four and one-half years. In Novem- 
ber, 1897, Mr. Montague was elected mayor 
and served one term of four years, and in 
1909 was again elected to that ofifice, without 
opposition, for another term of four years. 

Mr. Montague is a Mason, belonging to 
the Blue Lodge and Royal Arch Chapter. 
In 1885, April 21st, he was married to Vir- 
ginia A. Williams, a native of Missouri, 
reared and educated in Boyd county, Ken- 
tucky, a daughter of the late Samuel P. Wil- 
liams, of an old Kentucky family. They are the 
parents of three daughters : John Immogene, 
Mary Mercedes and Grace Anna, the latter a 
graduate of Oxford College, Oxford, Ohio. 
Mary M. married Dr. W. S. Gilmer of Pu- 
laski, Virginia. Mrs. Gilmer formerly taught 
music at Russell College, Lebanon, Virginia, 
having received a thorough musical education 
at Converse College. Spartanburg, South Car- 
olina. Mr. ^lontague is a member of the 
Christian church. 

Robert Minter Ferguson, to whose life 
history we now direct attention, has by ear- 
nest endeavor attained a marked success in 
business affairs, has gained the respect and 
confidence of men and is recognized as one of 
the distinctively representative citizens of 
Louisville. He is the manager of the Travel- 
er's Insurance Company's branch office at 
Louisville, Kentucky, for the liability depart- 
ment, and manager for the Traveler's In- 
demnity Company with offices in the Paul 
Jones Building. 

Mr. Ferguson was born on the 24th of 
September. 1872, in Goodson (now Bristol), 
Virginia. He is the son of Samuel Robert Fer- 
guson who was a native of Norfolk, Virginia, 
he being the only child of Samuel Ferguson, 
who himself was an only child. The mother 
of our subject was Annette Cornelia Drum- 
mond, who was a native of Petersburg, Vir- 
ginia, the daughter of Samuel Drummond, 
who was a native of France, of Scotch par- 
entage. The family had lived in France for 
over one hundred years, having refugeed from 
Scotland at an early date. Samuel Drum- 
mond was a special envoy of the Confederate 
government to France, and died from cold con- 
tracted when running the blockade on his re- 
turn to this country. In 1871 the parents re- 
moved to Bristol, Virginia, the father engag- 
ing in the hardware business, in which he con- 
tinued for thirty years. After the death of his 
wife, in 1904, he removed to Birmingham, 
Alabama, where he now resides. 

Mr. Robert M. Ferguson received his pre- 
liminary schooling in the public schools, fur- 



ther pursuing his studies at King's College, 
Bristol, and at Emory and Henry College. 
He became a stenographer, and while active 
in that line, studied law and was admitted to 
the bar. He was later made claim agent of 
the Virginia Iron, Coal and Coke Company. 
In 1 901 he became claim investigator for the 
United States Casualty Company in New 
York city. In ]\Iay, 1902, he became adjuster 
for the Traveler's Insurance Company at In- 
dianapolis for Kentucky and Indiana. On the 
nth of January, 1903, he came to Louisville 
to take his present position. 

Mr. Ferguson is a Mason in high standing, 
and in his life exemplifies the teachings of the 
craft, which is founded upon the principles 
of the brotherhood of mankind. He is a past 
master of Shelby Lodge, No. 162, F. & A. M., 
Bristol, Virginia, past high priest of E. H. 
Gill Chapter, No. 50, R. A. M., of Bristol, 
Virginia, past grand high priest of the Grand 
Royal Arch Chapter of Virginia, past emin- 
ent commander, Johnson Commandery, No. 
14. Knights Templars, of Virginia and by affil- 
iation past commander of Louisville Com- 
mandery, No. I, K. T., Thirty-second degree 
Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, Grand Con- 
sistory of Kentucky, and a member of Kosair 
Temple, N. M. S. He is also grand aide-de- 
camp of the Grand Consistory of Kentucky, 
A. A. S. R., and second lieutenant of Kilwin- 
ning Council, Knights Kadosh, No. i. 

Mr. Ferguson married Miss Delle Lockett, 
the daughter of Captain E. F. Lockett, of 
Crewe, Nottoway county, Virginia. To them 
have been born the following children : Lucy 
Lockett, aged ten years, Robert Minter Jr., 
and Cornelia Drummond, twins, aged two 
years. In religion Mr. Ferguson is a Metho- 
dist and his wife is a Baptist. Mr. Ferguson 
is a man of excellent business and executive 
ability and has that keen discrimination and 
sagacity in business affairs which, when com- 
bined with energy and industry, leads to suc- 
cess, and the company which he represents 
finds him a valued factor in the control of 
their business in this section. 

Rev. Zephaniaii Meek. — The life of the 
Rev. Zepaniah Meek demonstrates that if a 
man is determined to rise in the world there 
is nothing that can prevent it. and as an il- 
lustration of this a sketch of his career will 
be of use and therefore beneficial to all young 
men. 

Rev. Meek was born in Johnson county, 
Kentucky, on April 4, 1833, the son of Isaac 
and Sarah (Ward) Meek, natives of Vir- 
ginia, the former born August 20, 1810, and 
died in Johnson county, Kentucky, October 
28, 1878, and the latter, born October i, 181 1, 



ffta Atin rotii 



^ 






HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1305 



and died July 9, 1880. Isaac ^leek came to 
Kentucky when young with his parents, who 
settled in Johnson county and later went to 
Arkansas, where they made a home, the 
father of Isaac being William Meek. Isaac 
grew to manhood in Johnson county, Ken- 
tucky, married there and settled at the mouth 
of Greasy Creek, where he made a home for 
the remainder of his life. His wife was the 
daughter of Shadrach and Louisa Ward, and 
was a woman of strong mind and great force 
of character, of sweet Christian spirit, a 
model of industry, thrift and economy, rear- 
ing a large family of sons and daughters. 

Amid pioneer surroundings in the hills of 
northeastern Kentucky, our subject, Zephan- 
iah Meek, the second son. grew to manhood. 
He had few opportunities for an education 
in his boyhood, but he supplemented the lack 
of high school and academies by reading and 
studying the best books he could borrow, and 
by systematic study he was at the age of 
thirty superior in knowledge and mental cul- 
ture to almost anyone his age in his native 
county. His religious independence in early 
youth was so marked as to cause him to pass 
the door of the church of his own people to 
enter communion with one more liberal and 
broad in doctrine and discipline. In early 
life he taught school and during those days 
married Alary Jane Davis, a member of an 
honorable pioneer family of Sandy Valley. 
She, by her solid sense, wise counsel and fer- 
vent piety proved herself a worthy helpmeet 
all along the road of their married life. He 
with his young wife after a few years in the 
country settled in Paintsville, the county seat 
of Johnson county, where he acted as county 
and circuit clerk and was for several years 
engaged in mercantile pursuits, in the mean- 
time adding to his fund of knowledge by 
every means possible. 

Upon attaining manhood Mr. Meek was 
licensed to preach in the Methodist Episcopal 
church. South, the only organization of 
Methodism above Louisa from the separation 
in 1844 to the war period in 1864, and he 
was regarded as a strong man in the church. 
In 1865, soon after the close of the Civil war, 
Mr. Meek moved to Catlettsburg and made 
some investments. In the spring of 1867 he 
started the "Christian Observer," which later 
became the "Central Alethodist," as an organ 
of his church. This paper soon took a high 
rank and became the leading paper of the 
church, and by his able editorial management 
attained a large circulation and became a prof- 
itable property. Mr. Meek continued to be 
editor and publisher until about 1898, when 
he sold and the plant was removed to Louis- 



ville and finally to Lexington, where the pa- 
per is still published as the "Central Method- 
ist Advocate." He was the oldest editor in 
point of continuous service of the religious 
press in Kentucky. 

After retiring from the paper he became 
manager of the telephone system at Catletts- 
burg for about two years and then engaged 
in the feed business, in which he continued 
with success until his death, which occurred 
on September 4, 1909, at the age of seventy- 
six years and six months, after a long, active 
career, an energetic worker in business and 
church affairs. He was a traveling elder in 
his conference but only took such pastoral 
charges as were within reach, selecting en- 
tirely new territory to perform ministerial 
workj his many labors being too pressing to 
allow constant work iu pastorate. He re- 
ceived the degree of D. D. from the Kentucky 
Military Institute, Farmdale, Kentucky, in 
18&5, and was elected leading delegate to 
the general conference by the Western Vir- 
ginia Conference in 1885, which met at Rich- 
mond, Virginia, in May, 1886. Rev. Meek 
is survived by his widow and children. 

Of the latter Rev. Lafayette Meek, the first 
born, was educated a year at the East Ken- 
tucky Normal, at Millersburg, Kentucky, but 
transferred to \''anderbilt University, where 
he pursued a varied course, and finally fin- 
ished at the School of Theology. He went 
into the Tennessee conference and from the 
commencement was successful in ministry, but 
being stricken with typhoid fever, was taken 
to his father's house, accompanied by his 
young wife with her infant, and he died Oc- 
tober 2, 1885, at the age of thirty-one. 

Davis Meek, the oldest living son of Rev. 
Zephaniah Meek, was born in Paintsville, 
Kentucky, November 25, 1858, and came with 
his parents to Catlettsburg when fourteen 
years old, where he grew to manhood and 
has since resided. He attended school and the 
Eastern Kentucky Normal at Catlettsburg and 
later attended the Kentucky Military Institute 
near Frankfort. He was associated with his 
father in the newspaper work and other busi- 
ness interests for many years and since the 
latter's death has continued the feed business 
which was previously incorporated as "The 
Z. Meek Company." He married twice, first 
to Lodema Coates, from which union six 
children were born, five of whom are living. 
A twin daughter died at the age of eight 
months, and the others are Beulah, Lena, 
Sophia, John Wesley and Ray. Mr. Meek's 
second marriage was to Mamie Wyatt, by 
whom there was one daughter, Edith 
Augusta. 



1306 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

In politics Mr. Meek is a Democrat. He Ohio, now a suburb of Cincinnati. In part- 
is a member of the Modern Woodmen and nership with his brother, C. H. Gartrell, he 
Knights of the Maccabees, he having served engaged in the dry-goods trade on Fifth 
several years as record keeper of the latter, street. Cincinnati, and later sold out and be- 
He and his wife are members of the Method- came a partner of Moses Crigler and ope- 
ist Episcopal church. South, and he is a mem- rated successfully in dry goods on lower 
ber of the official board. Market street for many years. He became a 

Henry Clay Gartrell. — For a number of very energetic and successful business man 
years Henry Clay Gartrell was numbered and engaged in many enterprises, and with 
among the representative and prominent busi- others built and owned steamboats which 
ness citizens of Ashland, Kentucky, and in were operated on the Ohio river. During the 
his death the entire community felt that an Civil war an immense business was trans- 
irreparable loss had been sustained by the acted with the government in transporting 
public and the city had lost one who had de- soldiers, supplies, etc. After the war he sold 
voted his best efforts to the upbuilding of out his mercantile and river interests, and 
public interests and had achieved an enviable all others as well, and retired from active 
distinction in the dift'erent departments of business life. 

life. He had been intimately associated with In the meantime he had located at Ash- 
several of the leading industries of the local- land, at the time the town started in 1854, 
ity. his genius and indubitable talent as a and bought property at the first lot sale, and 
financier and business manager resulting in in consequence became interested in real es- 
the prosperity of these enterprises. His en- tate speculation, buying and selling much 
tire career was marked by signal integrity, property successfully during the early years 
justice and honor, and no word of detraction of rapid development - following the Civil 
was ever heard from those who knew him war. His wife owned about seven hundred 
well. acres adjoining Ashland along the upper Ohio 

Henry Clay Gartrell was born on a farm river, and they built a handsome brick resi- 

near Winchester, Virginia, May 23, 1825, the dence thereon, which is now within the city 

son of Richard and Maria (Karney) Gar- limits of Ashland, near what is known as the 

trell, both natives of Virginia, where they underground crossing of the electric railway 

were reared and married and soon afterward and the C. & O. Railway. This house was 

came to Kentucky and located near Lexing- built in 1855, but during the Civil war they 

ton. A few years later they removed to took up their residence in Ashland proper, 

Missouri, settling near Palmyra, where they where Mr. Gartrell lived until his death in 

secured a large tract of land and owned many 1870. While he was actually retired from 

slaves. In 1832 a cholera epidemic prevailed active business for several years previous to 

and they lost many of their slaves and also his death, he was still active in many trades 

members of their family, the mother of Rich- and deals up to the time of his demise. He 

ard Gartrell among the number. She was a accumulated a large estate, owning among 

widow and accompanied her son and family other properties the ground on which the 

from A^irginia to Kentucky and Missouri. Norton Iron works were built, which was 

Soon after this epidemic Mr. Gartrell sold out sold to that company in later years. 
and removed to Dubuque, Iowa, making there In politics Mr. Gartrell was originally a 

a permanent home and becoming extensively Whig of the old school. He never aspired to 

interested in lead mining, in which he con- nor held an office, his entire interest being 

tinued until his death, which occurred in given to business, in which he displayed ac- 

Dubuque. tivity and sagacity. One of his brothers. 

Our subject was an infant when he was Charles Harris Gartrell, served for a time in 
taken west by his parents and he grew to the Union army in the Civil war, but con- 
young manhood in Dubuque, Iowa, receiving tracting a severe cold, lost his eyesight and 
a good education. He was about twelve years was brought home by our subject from Cum- 
old when his father died, and when he was berland Gap. which trip required several 
eighteen he went to St. Louis and entered weeks to accomplish, owing to the difficulty 
the large mercantile establishment of Mr. in getting through the lines. 
Lisle, a prominent man and an old friend of Mr. Gartrell married on October 25, 1853, 
his father. Here young Gartrell also had at Louisa, Kentucky, Miss Eliza J. Pogue, 
advantages both in good schooling and the born on the farm where she now lives in 
opportunity of acquiring a thorough knowl- Boyd county, Kentucky, March 20. 1835. the 
edge of merchandising. A few years later he daughter of John H. and Sarah A. (Moore) 
joined his mother and sister in College Hill, Pogue. the former a native of Mason county, 



I 



I 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1307 

Kentucky, and the latter from Philadelphia, father and others in the Amanda Charcoal 
Pennsylvania, a sister to the late Colonel L. furnaces, one of the early institutions of this 
T. Moore of Catlettsburg, of whom a sketch kind in the Ohio Valley in Kentucky. Later 
is given elsewhere. The Pogue family was he disposed of his interest on account of his 
among the pioneer families of Kentucky, first religious scruples in connection with Sunday 
settling at what now is Plarrodsburg, Ken- work and engaged in farming in Mason coun- 
tucky, William Pogue being the founder of ty, but lived but one year, dying from yellow 
the family in this state and the grandfather fever at the age of forty-four. His neigh- 
of John II. During pioneer days he was with bors had taken produce to New Orleans by 
Daniel Pjoone and helj^ed build the fort at river and contracted the disease. John H. 
1 larrotlsjjurg. While hunting with a party Pogue was an elder in the Presbyterian 
of companions he was surprised by an Indian church, and very devout, and, acting accord- 
attack and although on horseback was shot ing to his sense of duty, administered to the 
in the midst of the canebrake and fell from victims and thus became afflicted with the 
his horse. His companions escaped, but later disease. His wife also contracted the same, 
returned with reinforced numbers, secured the but recovered and finally died at the age of 
wounded man and took him to the fort, wdiere sixty-seven. Her husband died when they 
he (lie<l. His wife was Ann Kennedy, who had only been married four years, leaving her 
was the mother of three children, two daugh- one child, Eliza J., now the widow of H. C. 
ters and one son, born in the fort, the oldest Gartrell, who resides on a fine estate about 
daughter. Ann Pogue. being the first white midway between Ashland and Catlettsburg. 
female child born in Kentucky. The son, Portions of the seven hundred acres left her 
Robert Pogue, was reared amid frontier from the estate of her grandfather Pogue 
scenes at Harrodsburg and when a young have of late years became residence proper- 
man removed to Mason county, Kentucky, ties in the development of this region, thirteen 
when it was a part of Virginia, locating on acres having been recently bought by the gov- 
a farm near Limestone, now Maysville, where ernment for dam No. 29 in the Ohio river im- 
lie acquired a large landed estate in time and provement. 

owned many slaves, also built a fine stone Mr. Gartrell and wife were the parents of 
mansion and surroundings. For a number of seven children, five of whom are living, 
years previous he had followed the profes- They are as follows : Anna G., widow of 
sion of surveying, and, visiting many parts of William Kerr, formerly a banker and hard- 
the state in connection with his work, he be- ware merchant of fronton, Ohio ; Viola, wid- 
came familiar with the desirable places and ow of former Judge M. H. Houston, of Ash- 
his settlement was due to former knowledge, land; Virginia, wife of Judge Tho'mas Cher- 
He also served as survevor general of this rington, of fronton, Ohio, recently retired, 
section when it was part of X^irginia. He after serving twenty-six years on the circuit 
raised a regiment for the war of icSi2 and be- court of that state and many years as superior 
came a colonel. Colonel Pogue was present judge; Harry C, at home; Ethelbert Hop- 
at the battle Thames and witnessed the death kins, secretary and general manager of the 
of Tecumseh. One of his sons, John H., Ashland Fire Brick Company. He also man- 
served with him during that struggle and was ages his mother's aft"airs and is largely inter- 
lieutenant of his company. ested in the company of which he is active 
Prior to the time Robert Pogue enlisted head and manager. He is a member of the 
in the war of 1812 the family name was Presbyterian church at Normal and active in 
spelled Poage, but this name was spelled support of the same, being also the superin- 
Pogue on government records and commis- tendent of the Sunday-school, for which in 
sions and from that time forward he adopted fact he is largely responsible in maintenance, 
the latter method, as have also his descend- as the Gartrell family were actively identified 
ants. The family was descended from the with its organization. 

old Augusta county, Virginia, Poages. Rob- Frank R. Henderson is the secretary and 

ert Pogue passed his life on his plantation business manager of the firm of Kitchen, 

near May's Lick. He married Jane Hopkins, WHiitt & Company, Ashland, Kentucky, which 

a native of Augusta county, A'irginia, by position indicates something of the scope of 

which union there were four sons and three his efforts. A man of resourceful business 

daughters. Of the above children John H. ability, he stands among those whose keen 

Pogue was the father of Mrs. H. C. Gartrell. discrimination not only enables them to rcc- 

He was the oldest son and removed from the ognize the opportunities of the present, but 

plantation to XIason county, Kentucky. Dur- also the exigencies of the future, and his work 

ing early years he became part owner with his is proving a substantial and important ele- 

voi. ni— 11 



1308 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



ment in the upbuilding and development of 
the coniniunily. as embodied in the carefully 
conducied business methods of managing a 
large and important concern. 

Mr. Henderson was born in Hanging Rock. 
Ohio, on June 14. 1865. the son of Thomas 
and Ivlizabeth (Aloore) Henderson, the for- 
mer a native of Maryland and the latter born 
in Tennsylvania. The father learned the 
moulder's trade in l^altimore and when seven- 
teen years old left there, going to Hirming- 
ham, Alabama, but soon afterward went to 
Hanging Rock. Ohio. He had learned his 
trade well and was an expert moulder and 
worked with various furnaces in the Hanging 
Rock region. In 1837 he moulded the iron 
water pipes which were the first laid in the 
city of New Orleans, which were shipped 
down the river from old Pine Grove furnace 
near Hanging Rock. As an unknown boy 
looking for a situation, he secured a job 
doing the above work after a practical failure 
by the furnace people to make such castings 
after sending to the east for experts. Being 
successful from the first, he soon had entire 
charge of the work. 

In 1844 he started in for himself and 
formed the firm of Martin Henderson & 
Company, which conducted a foundry at 
Hanging Rock for many years and built up a 
large business. Mr. Henderson sold his in- 
terests in 1883 and retired to Ashland, where 
in 1884 he founded a wholesale hardware 
business and was so engaged until his death, 
which occurred in 1898, at the age of eighty- 
two years. His wnfe died many years previ- 
ously, having been the mother of six children, 
five of whom are living, our subject the fifth 
in order of birth. 

Frank R. Henderson was reared at Hang- 
ing Rock, Ohio, receiving a good education 
in the public and high schools, the latter be- 
ing the first in the state. He accompanied his 
parents to Ashland at the age of seventeen 
and soon after entered the hardware store 
with his father, later becoming a salesman for 
the tirm, in which connection he traveled 
through northeastern Kentucky for eleven 
years. During the panic of 1893 it became 
difficult to transact much business in the hard- 
ware line and he conceived the idea of organ- 
izing a wholesale grocery store, considering it 
one of the absolute necessities of life, and 
therefore organized the present company dur- 
ing those days, and has made of it a great suc- 
cess. It started in a small way. but the devel- 
opment was rapid and in 1904 it had an in- 
corporated capital stock of one hundred thou- 
sand dollars, with the following officers from 
the first and which are serving at the present 



time: James H. Kitchen, presideni, William 
B. Whitt, vice-president, James B. King, 
treasurer, and l<"rank R. Henderson, our siib- 
ject, secretary and general manager. In 
1898 the present large modern building was 
erected, thirty by one hundred feet, three sto- 
ries and basement, and ware-rooms, fifty by 
one hundred feet. Eight salesmen are em- 
ployed on the road, covering portitms of Ken- 
tucky, Ohio and West X'irginia. 

In politics Mr. Henderson is a Republican 
and is interested in the upbuilding of the town 
and conscientiously performs his share of du- 
ties as a citizen. Among these services was 
his membership of the council. He is a Ma- 
son, belonging to the Blue Lodge, Royal Arch 
Chapter, Commandery and Shrine, all of Ash- 
land. In 1887 Mr. Henderson married Vir- 
ginia Poage, a native of Ashland, a daughter 
of the late Hugh Calvin Poage, a representa- 
tive of one of the oldest Kentucky families 
and of wdiom a sketch appears elsewhere in 
this history. Mr. and Mrs. Henderson have 
one son, Ihomas Allen, and are members of 
the Presbyterian church. 

Thomas H. Bullington. — Among the 
representative citizens and business men at 
Ashland, Kentucky, whose ultimate success in 
life is the outcome of their own perseverance 
and well applied endeavors. ]\Ir. Thomas 
Henry Bullington holds a foremost place. 
With absolutely nothing to start life — not 
even a fair education — he has grappled with 
the various obstacles and vicissitudes which 
have encumbered his path and eventually 
made of success not an accident but a logical 
result. He was born in Kanawha county. 
West \'irginia, on the 30th of June. 1856, and 
is a son of David H. and Matilda E. (Rob- 
erts) Bullington. the former of whom was a 
native of Spottsylvania county. \"irginia, and 
the latter of Henry county. \'irginia. When 
a lad of si5<:teen years of age. David H. Bul- 
lington walked across the Blue Ridge moun- 
tains, carrying with him as a means of pro- 
tection an old flint-lock gun given him by his 
father, this heirloom being now in the posses- 
sion of him whose name introduces this 
sketch. After crossing the mountains he lo- 
cated in what is now Kanawha county. West 
\ irginia, in Kanawha valley, where he bC- 
cured work as a carpenter. This was in the 
latter '30s, when the earl)- salt industry in the 
Kanawha valley was developing rapidly. In 
that region was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. I^ullington to Miss Matilda E. Roberts 
and there they engaged in farming. During 
the Civil war Mr. Bullington's sympathies 
were with the cause of the Union and for" 
that reason he was compelled tn leave his 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1309 



home in Kanawha county. Accordingly the 
father with his family in 1863 set out for the 
state of Ohio, hut on arriving at Mason City, 
West Virginia, where the Federal forces had 
a recruiting station, the family home was 
there maintained during the troublous days 
during and after the war. Mr. BuUington re- 
mained at Mason City, working at the carpen- 
ter's trade until 1875, when he returned to 
Kanawha county, where he passed the residue 
of his life, his death having occurred on the 
2d of August, 1904, at the venerable age of 
eighty years. His cherished and .devoted wife 
passed away on the 22d of March, 1904, at 
the age of seventy-seven years. She had lo- 
cated in West Virginia when a child, having 
come hither with her parents. Three broth- 
ers of David H. BuUington were gallant sol- 
diers in the Confederate army in the Civil 
war and two of them sacrificed their lives for 
the cause of the South. David and Matilda 
BuUington became the parents of six sons 
and four daughters, eight of whom are liv- 
ing, Thomas H., of this review, having been 
the fourth in order of birth. 

Thomas H. BuUington was a child of about 
eight years of age when the family removed 
to ^iRson county. West \'irginia, and he 
walked barefoot across the mountains, driv- 
ing a bob-tailed cow. He was associated with 
his father in the work of carpentering during 
the sojourn in that section, and, while he 
learned a trade, he received absolutely no ed- 
ucational training, having attained to his 
eighteenth year with no notion of reading or 
writing. The family was poor and the stren- 
uous war times made consistent schooling of 
any sort an utter impossibility. Later, how- 
ever, he attended a private school and for a 
time was a student in a night school. 
Through hard application and extensive read- 
ing he gradually managed to gain a practical 
education and to-day he is one of the best 
posted men in this section of the fine old Blue 
Grass state. When eighteen years of age he 
severed the ties which bound him to home and 
started out by himself down the Ohio river in 
a boat, finally locating at Ashland, Kentucky, 
where he worked for several months at any 
odd jobs he could find to do. In the spring 
of 1876 he was employed to take a load of 
hoop poles to New Orleans on a flat boat 
down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers. So 
successful was he in his first venture that he 
was sent on another trip in the following au- 
tumn. While in New Orleans he secured a 
job working in the timber swamps in Louisi- 
ana and was identified with that line of enter- 
prise for the ensuing six months, at the ex- 
piration of which he returned to his home in 



West A'irginia. The result of this work was 
the first money he had ever saved and while 
at home he presented his father with one hun- 
dred dollars of his earnings. He was then 
twenty-one years old. In 1877 he returned 
to Louisiana, making his home at Centerville 
for several years, there working at his trade 
and at building and contracting on a large 
scale, in which he was very successful. In 
1878-9 an epidemic of yellow fever swept the 
district where he resided but he managed to 
escape the same. In the spring of 1880 he 
returned to Ashland, Kentucky, where he was 
engaged in the work of carpentry for five 
years, at the expiration of which he went to 
Florida, where he spent two years as master 
builder on the Jacksonville, Tampa & Key 
West Railway, which was in process of con- 
struction at that time, and in connection with 
which he built machine shops, round houses, 
bridges, depots, etc. He had about three hun- 
dred men under his management and made a 
decided success of the work entrusted to his 



care. 



In 1887 Mr. BuUington returned to Ash- 
land, where he continued contracting and 
building until the panic of 1893, when all 
business subsided. During that period he 
built the First Presbyterian church, the Ma- 
sonic Temple, the Preston Block and some of 
the finest residences in the city. In the mean- 
time, in 1888, he had engaged in the under- 
taking business, hiring a manager for his es- 
tablishment. After retiring from his con- 
tracting and building business, however, he 
devoted his entire time and attention to this 
new enterprise, building up one of the largest 
and most profitable concerns of its kind in 
Boyd county. In 1890 he constructed a two- 
story brick block, where he conducts his busi- 
ness, and later he erected a fine modern resi- 
dence on the adjoining lots. In connection 
with his undertaking establishment he carries 
a large stock of picture frames, mouldings 
and decorations and for many years he has 
dealt in tents, awnings, etc. He is also the 
owner of a baggage and hack line in this city 
and he has extensive real-estate holdings 
which are most valuable. 

In politics Mr. BuUington accords a staunch 
support to the Republican party in national 
afifairs but in local matters he is non-partisan. 
He is a man of broad-minded and public- 
spirited tendencies and while he has never 'as- 
pired for public office of any description he 
has ever manifested a deep and sincere in- 
terest in all matters touching the general wel- 
fare of the community. Fraternally he is one 
of the most prominent Masons in Kentucky, 
holding membership in Poage Blue Lodge, 



1310 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



No. 325. Ancient Free & Accepted Masons; 
Apperson Chapter. No. 81. Royal Arch Ma- 
sons ; and Ashland Comniandery, No. 28, 
Knights Templars, of which he is a charter 
nieniher. I le is also affiliated with the ad- 
junct organization, the Ancient Arabic Or- 
der of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. El 
Hasa Tenijile, of which he is also a charter 
member. He is a valued and appreciative 
member of the Knights of Pythias and the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and he 
and his wife are zealous members of the 
Methodist h'lnscopal church. 

On the 15th of July. 1879. at b>anklin, 
Louisiana, Mr. Bullington was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Ida P. Chambless, who was 
born and reared in Missouri and whom Mr. 
Bullington met while she was making a visit 
in Louisiana.' She is a daughter of Grief 
Chambless. who was born in South Carolina 
and who is now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Bul- 
lington have one son. Henry Harrison, who 
was born at Ashland, to whose public and 
private schools he is indebted for his prelim- 
inary educational training, which was later 
supplemented with a course of four years in 
the Kentucky State Military School at Louis- 
ville, in which excellent institution he w^as 
graduated at the head of his class, May 25, 
1 9 10. He was commissioned on the 2d of 
July, 1910, second lieutenant and sent to the 
Philippines, leaving on the 20th of July, 1910. 

Argus David Willmoth, A. M., M. D.— 
Among the most successful physicians and sur- 
geons of the city of Louisville is numbered 
Argus David Willmoth, who is a native son 
of the "Blue Grass" state, having been born 
in Hardin county, Kentucky, on the 24th day 
of October, 1874, the son of William and Par- 
melia (Klinglesmith) Willmoth. His father 
was born in Hardin county. Kentucky, in 185 1, 
the son of Louis Willmoth, a A'irginian who 
came with his parents from Virginia, settling 
in Washington county, Kentucky. The Will- 
moths have been farmers and a few genera- 
tions back w^ere noted as breeders and trainers 
of thoroughbred race horses. The parents of 
our subject are still residing on the old home 
farm in Hardin county. Their children are: 
Doctor Willmoth and Robert Lee, the latter 
residing on the home farm with his parents. 

Dr. Willmoth passed the years of boyhood 
and youth on the farm engaged in the usual 
avocations of boys "around the farm," and at 
the same time laying in a splendid foundation 
of education on which to build his future pro- 
fession. His early acquirements in the literary 
line were obtained in the public and private 
schools, and he was then matriculated in the 
University of Louisville, from which he was 



graduated with the degree of A. M., and still 
later from the Louisville Medical College, 
with the degree of M. D.. in 1896. After hav- 
ing passed through the regular collegiate 
courses the Doctor supplemented these with 
extensive post graduate courses in New York, 
Philadelphia, Baltimore and Chicago. That 
same year Dr. Willmoth established himself 
in Rineyville, Hardin county, and entered in- 
to the practice of medicine, meeting with re- 
markable success and securing a large prac- 
tice all over that community. His success en- 
couraged him to seek a larger field for his 
efforts, and with that in view he came to Louis- 
ville in 1899, located and established himself, 
and at once took rank with the successful 
physicians of the city. Since 1906 the Doctor 
has confined himself to the specialty of dis- 
eases of women and practice of surgery and 
his reputation is of the highest rank in this 
profession. 

Upon the Doctor's locating in Louisville he 
was at once tendered the appointments of 
various professorships and has accepted the 
following: Appointed lecturer on surgery in 
the Kentucky School of Medicine ; in 1900 was 
appointed professor of surgery and clinical 
surgery in the Kentucky School of Medicine, 
holding that position for four years, resigning 
to accept the chair of surgery in the medical 
department of the Kentucky University, which 
position he held for two years and then re- 
signed. He is visiting surgeon to the Louis- 
ville City Hospital, and to St. Anthony's Hos- 
pital. He is an ex-president of the Louisville 
Clinical Society, and a member of the Jeffer- 
son County Medical Society, the Kentucky 
State Aledical Society, the American Medica'l 
Association, the Muldraugh Hill Medical So- 
ciety and the Mississippi and Ohio Valley Med- 
ical Society. Dr. Willmoth is also a member 
of the Jefiferson County Board of Health. 

In social clubs and societies he takes an ac- 
tive and interested part, belonging to the 
Louisville Commercial Club. In the honorable 
order of Masons he belongs to Preston Lodge, 
No. 281, F. & A. M., Eureka Chapter, No. loi, 
R. A. M. and to DeMolay Commandery, 
Knights Templars. 

Dr. Willmoth. with his manifold duties, 
still finds time to do considerable literary work. 
For three years he was owner and editor of 
the "xA.merican Practitioner and News," a 
medical publication of Louisville, and at the 
present time he is engaged in writing a text 
book on "Post Operative Treatment." 

Dr. Willmoth's first wife was Maggie 
Brown, the daughter of William Browai of 
Meade county, Kentucky. She died in 1905. 
wMthout issue. His second marriage w^as to 



Hi KtW TOtt 
PUBLIC UBRAHI 



ii 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1311 



Edna L. L'ralle, the daughter of Shelby and 
Ella Cralle. As may be seen, the Doctor's 
life is a busy one, full of occupation with his 
professional duties, his clubs and lodge, his 
literary contributions and, not the least, the 
constant and incessant study that a good phy- 
sician and surgeon must necessarily devote to 
all the new discoveries, theories and inven- 
tion of appliances in order to keep up with the 
advance. That he does all this and more is 
shown by his splendid practice and the con- 
fidence and friendship of all those who are 
associated with him. 

Lewis Frank Zerfoss. — With a clear, 
well-trained mind and a large share of profes- 
sional enthusiasm, Lewis Frank Zerfoss, a 
well-known attorney of Ashland, Kentucky, 
has achieved distinguished success in his legal 
career and won prominence in social and po- 
litical circles. He was born in Harrisburg, 
I'ennsylvania, January 2, 1862, the oldest 
child in a family of eight children. 

His father. Samuel Ernest Zerfoss, was a 
life-long resident of Hummelstown, Pennsyl- 
vania, his birth occurring in that city in 1839, 
and his death in 1906. He was engaged in 
the steam heating and plumbing profession, 
and carried on a substantial business for a 
number of years. He served as a soldier dur- 
ing almost the entire period of the Civil war, 
at the battle of Gettysburg being wounded by 
a rifle ball in the right leg. He married Fan- 
nie Bowman, who spent her brief life of 
twenty-seven years in Hummelstown, Penn- 
sylvania, passing away in 1878. 

Reared to manhood in his native city, Lew- 
is Frank Zerfoss attended the graded and 
high schools, and after his graduation from 
the Lock Haven Normal School attended the 
( Gettysburg College three years. Fitted for a 
professional life, he subsequently taught 
school in different capacities for twelve years, 
nine years of the time teaching in Pennsyl- 
vania. Locating in Bedford, Kentucky, in 
1888, he was there engaged in educational 
work for three years, dtiring wdiich time he 
spent his leisure in reading law. Admitted to 
the bar in Bedford, Kentucky, in 1891, Mr. 
Zerfoss was there successfully engaged in the 
practice of his profession twelve years. In 
1903 he transferred his residence to Ashland, 
Boyd county, where he has a large and remu- 
nerative practice and holds a position of note 
among the leading lawyers of the city. He is 
a member of the Kentucky State Bar Associ- 
ation, and interested in all of its progressive 
movements. 

A loyal supporter of the principles of the 
Democratic party, Mr. Zerfoss is prominent 
in political matters, and is now chairman of 



the Ashland Board of Health. In 1907 he 
was Democratic candidate for the state leg- 
islature in a district containing a Republican 
majority of nine hundred, and was defeated 
by unly fifty-nine votes. This district com- 
prises Boyd and Lawrence counties, and he 
carried Boyd county, which has a Republican 
majority of eight hundred, by ninety-seven 
votes, the result of the election showing the 
popularity of Mr. Zerfoss as a man and a 
citizen. While living in Trimble county he 
served as county superintendent of schools for 
eight years. Fraternally he belongs to the 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons ; to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows; to the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; 
and to, the Knights of the Maccabees. Reli- 
giously' he 'i/- a member of the Baptist church, 
while'bvsi'.wife belongs to the Alethodist Epis- 
copal church. South. 

Mr. Zerfoss married, in 1889, Lizzie S. 
Peak, a daughter of Hon. W. F. Peak, of 
Bedford, Kentucky, a well-known and re- 
spected man who has long been prominent in 
the public affairs of Trimble county. Three 
sons have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Zer- 
foss, namely : Karl, Tom and George. 

Edg.xu Browne Hager. — One of the most 
accomplished and cultured men that ever 
graced the Kentucky bar, Edgar Browne Ha- 
ger, of Ashland, Boyd county, has won dis- 
tinguished prestige during his professional 
career, his vigorous mentality, scholarly at- 
tainments and comprehensive knowledge of 
the law winning for him an enviable record. 
A thorough master of the legal rules and rul- 
ings, his powers of expression are broad, 
keen and clear, while his judgment is clear 
and impartial, and his integrity is unim- 
peachable. He was born at Paintsville, John- 
son county, Kentucky, December 7, 1868, a 
son of Samuel Patton Hager, in wdiose sketch 
on another page of this work further parental 
and ancestral history may be found. 

Obtaining the rudiments of his education 
in the public schools of Paintsville. Edgar B. 
Hager came with his parents to Ashland, 
Boyd cotmty, Kentucky, in April, 1881, and 
in the schools of that county continued his 
studies for a few years, in 1884 becoming a 
student at the Beech Grove Academy. Go- 
ing to Millersburg, Kentucky, in September, 
1885, he matriculated at the Kentucky Wes- 
leyan College, from which he was graduated 
with the degree of A. B. in June, 1888. Dur- 
ing the following fall and spring Mr. Hager 
served as superintendent of the city schools 
of Catlettsburg, Kentucky, a position that he 
resigned to take up the study of law, for 
which he was well adapted by nature and 



1312 HISTORY OF KKXTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

talents. luitcring the I'.ostun University he has recently been elected as imperial rep- 
Law School, in lioston, Massachusetts, in rcsentative to the Imperial Council of the 
September. iSS.;, he pursued the full course Xoblcs of the Mystic Shrine, which will 
of study, and in |unc. 1891, was graduated meet in Rochester, New York, in July, 191 1. 
from that institution with the degree of LL. lie is likewise past exalted ruler of Ashland 
B. In llie same month he was honored by Lodge, No. 350, B. P. O. E. 
his old alma mater, the Kentucky Wesleyan Endowed with a splendid physique and a 
College, which conferred upon him the de- frank, open countenance, Mr. Hager com- 
gree of A. M. mands attention wherever he goes; and by 

Admitted to the Kentucky bar in August, his genial nature and his cordial and mag- 

1891. Mr. ITagcr immediately began the prac- netic personality, wins friends among all 

tice of his profession in Ashland, Kentucky, classes of people. His natural endowments 

and has since made rapid strides in his ca- are conceded by all, and there is no more 

reer. success having been his from the start, adroit and skilful lawyer in the state, and no 

Becoming general counsel for the F. G. Ox- more powerful and eloquent advocate in the 

lev Stave Companv in January, 1893, he was state than he. 

located in Chattanooga, Tennessee, until Joseph Franklin Stewart. — A prominent 

June, 1894. when he resigned the position figure in the legal circles of Ashland, Joseph 

"and returned to Ashland, which has since Franklin Stewart has made the most of his 

been his home. His legal skill and ability be- opportunities, achieving distinction in his pro- 

ing already known and widely recognized, he fession and building up a remunerative prac- 

soon controlled altogether the largest and tice. A son of John Marshall Stewart, he 

best business of any lawyer in the vicinity, was born at Boltsfork, Lawrence county, 

and during his practice here has been em- Kentucky, May 14, 1872. His grandfather, 

ployed on one side or the other wdth nearly Absalom Stewart, came from Y^irginia, his 

every criminal case of importance in Boyd native state, to Kentucky in the early forties, 

county. Talented and cultured, as a speaker Settling in Lawrence county, he took up land 

Mr. Hager represents the best fruit of the on the Bear Creek branch of the Big Sandy 

higher civilization, being eloquent, logical and river, and on the farm which he redeemed 

forceful in his utterances, and one to whom from its pristine wildness spent the remainder 

it is a pleasure and a profit to listen. of his days, passing away about 1878, aged 

Mr. Hager married, June 21, 1898, Lucie three score and ten years. As a young man 

Vinson Prichard, a Kentucky belle, the beau- he was identified with the Whigs, but later in 

tiful daughter of Mr. and "Sirs. Richard J. life became a stanch adherent of the Repub- 

Prichard, of Louisa; Kentucky. The union lican party. He w^as a man of deep religious 

was a most happy and congenial one; but in convictions, and an active member of the 

the zenith of the wedded happiness the Methodist Episcopal church. South, 
angel of death invaded their household, on Born in Virginia, John Marshall Stewart 

January 20, 1902. bearing Mrs. Hager to the was but a child when his parents migrated to 

realms beyond. She left to her husband two Kentucky. Reared on the home farm, he 

bright and charming children, namely: Ed- learned the trade of a stone mason when 

gar Browne Hager, Jr.. born December 2, young, and became very successful as a rail- 

1899; and Virginia Patton Hager, born way contractor and builder. He built many 

March 23, 1901. miles of railroad in his day, his work being 

A sound Democrat in his political affilia- chiefly with the Chesapeake and Ohio Rail- 

tions, Mr. Hager takes an abiding interest in way, with the Big Sandy branch of that road, 

local, county, state and national affairs, and and on the Norfolk and Western Railway. 

is_ one of the finest political orators and one He made his home for many years at Bolts- 

of the best campaigners in all Kentucky. fork, but now% retired from active pursuits, 

Prominent in the business, fraternal and resides at Rush, Boyd county, Kentucky. He 

social life of the community in which he re- married Martha Isadore Merritt, who was 

sides, :\Ir. Hager is widely known, and he has born in West Virginia, a daughter of Rev. 

hosts of friends throughout the state. He Malachi Merritt, a Baptist minister, their 

is a ]VIason of high degree, and is a promi- marriage being solemnized November i. 1870. 

nent member of the Elks. He is past master at her home in \\'est Virginia. She died Au- 

of Poage Lodge, No. 325, F. & A. I\L ; past gust 16, 1908, aged fifty-seven years. Eight 

high priest of Apperson Chapter. No. 81, R. children were born of their union, seven of 

A. M. ; past commander of Ashland Com- whom are now, in December, 1910, living, 
mandery. No. 28. K. T. ; past potentate of The oldest child of his parents. Joseph F. 

El Hasa Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., of which Stewart attended the district schools" as a bov. 



yiSTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1/518 



and early became initiated into the mysteries 
of agriculture. His father being away from 
home much of the time, the management of 
the home farm devolved to some extent on 
him from his boyhood days. He had ambi- 
tions, however, for a professional career, and 
for eleven years he taught school in Law- 
rence. Boyd or Carter counties. Turning his 
attention to the study of law in 1900, Mr. 
Stewart was graduated from the law depart- 
ment of the Southern Normal University at 
Huntingdon, Tennessee, in 1901, with the de- 
gree of LL. B. Locating soon after in Ash- 
land. Boyd county, he has been in active prac- 
tice here since, and by a systematic applica- 
tion of his abilities to his chosen profession 
has won splendid success as a lawyer. As a 
stanch Republican in politics, Mr. Stewart 
takes an intelligent interest in public afifairs, 
having served as secretary of the Republican 
County Committee, and having at one time 
been his party's candidate for county judge. 
Fraternally he is a member of the Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons and of the Knights 
of the Golden Eagle. 

On IMarch 2, 1897, Mr. Stewart was united 
in marriage with Cosa Shepherd, a native of 
Lawrence county, Kentucky. Fler father, Da- 
vid Shepherd, was a native of X'i.ginia. as 
was his wife, whose maiden name was Fran- 
ces Lambert. "Sir. and ^Nlrs. Stewart are the 
parents of two children. Paul K., born July 
20. 1902 ; and Alphonsine, born April 4. 
1905. Both ^h. and Mrs. Stewart are con- 
sistent members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and are bringing up their children in 
the same religious belief. 

Hex. William Wirt Culbertsox. — A 
man of undoubted ability and energ}-. with a 
broad capacity for commanding and directing 
large enterprises. Hon. William Wirt Culbert- 
son. of Ashland. Boyd county, Kentucky, has 
met with unlimited success in his various unr 
dertakings and is now enjoying a well-earned 
leisure in his declining days. A resident of 
that city for forty years, he has taken an ac- 
tive part in promoting and advancing its ma- 
terial growth and prosperity, filling positions 
of honor in the municipality and representing 
his constituents in the State Senate and in 
Congress. Honor and integrity are synony- 
mous with his name, and he enjoys the con- 
fidence, regard and esteem of his fellow-men. 
A son of Samuel Culbertson, he was born in 
Greenwood. Alifflin county. Pennsylvania, 
September 23. 1835. and is a lineal descend- 
ant of a family of Scotch Covenanters. 

During the reign of Charles the Second of 
England, who was styled the ''Merry Mon- 
arch." three brothers named Culbertson. 



faithful Covenanters, migrated from Scotland 
to the north of Ireland. A descendant of one 
of these brothers, one Samuel Culbertson, 
came to America in 1736, and settled in Ches- 
ter county, Pennsylvania. His son, Colonel 
John Culbertson, brigade inspector of the 
Pennsylvania Militia, was the grandfather of 
Hon. W. W. Culbertson. 

Brought up and educated in his Pennsyl- 
vania home. Samuel Culbertson, Mr. Culbert- 
•son's father, learned the details of the mer- 
cantile trade in his father's store while clerk- 
ing, and when ready to start in business for 
himself opened a store at Greenwood, Penn- 
sylvania. Selling out soon after his marriage 
he removed to West Union, Adams county, 
Ohio, where he continued as a merchant for 
a time. The panic of 1837 proved very disas- 
trous to his business, and in 1838 he migrated 
with his family to Washington county, Iowa, 
where he served as county judge for four 
years and continued his mercantile undertak- 
ings, selling goods to the Indians under the 
protection of United States troops. Going 
from there with his family to Greenup, Ken- 
tucky, in 1844, he assumed charge of the 
Greenup furnace. Subsequently returning to 
Adams county, Ohio, he spent his last days 
in West Union. On September 15, 1834, he 
married Ann Kennedy, and to them five chil- 
dren were born, four sons and one daughter, 
William W. being the youngest child. 

But three years old when his parents re- 
moved to Ohio, William Wirt Culbertson ac- 
quired a practical education in the public 
schools of Ironton. and while yet in his teens 
clerked in his father's store at Greenup Fur- 
nace, later holding a similar position in Adams 
county, Ohio. He was afterwards a store- 
keeper at Clinton Furnace, subsequently be- 
ing clerk and manager of a store at Ohio Fur- 
nace, in Lawrence county. Ohio. 

In 1861, inspired by patriotic enthusiasm, 
Mr. Culbertson raised a company of soldiers 
and was made captain of Company F, Twen- 
ty-seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was 
at the front in many engagements of impor- 
tance, including the battles at Lexington, Alis- 
souri. Blackwater. Springfield and Island No. 
10 ; the sieges at Corinth and luka ; the sec- 
ond engagement at Corinth ; and was with 
Sherman in the beginning of his famous 
march. Mustered out in the spring of 1864, 
Captain Culbertson soon afterward took 
charge of Pine Grove Furnace and of the 
Buena Vista Furnace in Kentuck}^ He sub- 
sequently became part owner of the latter 
property as a member and the treasurer and 
superintendent of the firm of Culbertson, 
Means & Culbertson. to which his brother 



1314 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANJj 

Kennedy also l)clonge(l. This enterprising promoter of many of its more important in- 
firm subsequently built a new furnace, located dustrial and business enterprises, serving as a 
about ten miles from Ashland. Kentucky, stockholder and director in each. Always 
christening it "The Princess," a venture that taking an intelligent interest in the affairs 
proved successful. The large and sujjcrior oi the city, he has l)een very active in real 
output of all the furnaces with which Mr. estate development and improvement, and in 
Culbertson was connected in those days was addition t(j having built many modern resi- 
due cntirelv to liis untiring energy, sound deuces erected "The Elms," the finest modern 
judgment and jirogressive spirit. He was a])artment building in this section of the Blue 
likewise associated with numerous beneficial (]rass state. 

projects, having built the .Ashland b^erry and- Following in the footsteps of his father, he 
having been a stockholder in the Big Sandy is a stanch Republican, actively interested in 
Companv. in a wholesale and retail drtig es- municii)al and party affairs, and stands for 
tablishment, and in the Ashland b'oundry honesty and stability in politics and public 
Companv. of which he was president and sec- matters. On January i, 1910, he was ap- 
retary. pointed by the council as city treasurer for a 
Taking up his residence in Ashland in 1871. term of two years, and is serving with char- 
Mr. Culbertson has filled various positions of acteristic fidelity and ability in that capacity, 
eminence and responsibility, having been He was appointed by Governor Willson as a 
mayor of the city and state senator. Al- delegate to represent Kentucky at all meet- 
though a straightforward Republican in pol- ings of the Lincoln Centenary Committee, and 
itics. he was elected to congress in 1882 from at the Lincoln Centenary, held at the Lincoln 
his district, which was a Democratic strong- farm in Larue county February 12, 1909, 
hold, an honor showing his popularity with all when the cornerstone of the Lincoln Memo- 
people. In 1886 he was tendered the nomin- rial was laid and the old log cabin and farm 
ation for congress by acclamation, but de- were dedicated. President Roosevelt being 
clined the honor. He has served as chairman the chief of ceremonies and the principal 
of the Republican District Committee, and speaker of the day. 

in 1876, 1880 and 1884 was a delegate to the On January 27, 1897, Mr. Thomas M. Cul- 
Republican national convention. At the Re- bertson was united in marriage with Mary 
publican convention held in Chicago in 1880 Pollard, who was born in Boyd county, Ken- 
he \vas one of the old guard of three hundred tucky, which was likewise the birthplace of 
and six which faithfully espoused the nom- her parents, William H. and Rachel V. (Pow- 
ination of General U. S. Grant for president, ers ) Pollard, neither of wdiom are now liv- 
He belongs to the Ohio Commandery of the ing. Two children have been born of their 
Loyal Legion. union, Mary Margaret and Sarah A'irginia. 

Mr. Culbertson married, in February, 1865, Both he and his wife are members of the 
Sarah Jane Means, a daughter of Thomas W. Presbyterian church, of wdiich he is a trus- 

Means. Of the three children born of this tee. He is also one of the trustees of the 

union two died in infancy, one. Thomas Ashland cemetery, and is a member of the 

Means Culbertson, is living. Mrs. Sarah J. Loyal Legion. 

Culbertson passed to the higher life Septem- Embry L. Swearingen. — As president of 

ber 19, 1874, in early womanhood. Mr. Cul- the Kentucky Title Savings Bank & Trust 
bertson subsequently married for his second Company and of the Kentucky Title Corn- 
wife Lucy Hardie, and they are the parents pany and as chairman of the Board of the 
of five children, namely : William Wirt. Jr., First National Bank of Louisville, Embry 
Henry Hardy, Lucia Robertson, Samuel Ken- Lee Swearingen holds precedence as one of 
nedy and Jupiter Ammon. the essentially representative financiers and 

Thomas Means Culbertson was born No- business men of the state, and this fact, as 
vember 13. 1870. at Hanging Rock, Lawrence coupled with his high standing as a loyal and 
county, Ohio, but was reared in Ashland, public-spirited citizen, makes him specially 
Kentucky, where he obtained his elementary eligible for consideration in this publication, 
education. Completing his early studies at whose province includes such recognition of 
the Georgetown University, in Washington, the sterling citizens of his native state. 
D. C. he was subsequently storekeeper at Mr. Swearingen was born at Mellwood, on- 

Pine Grove Furnace for two years, after Cox's creek, in P.ullitt county. Kentucky, on 
which he was for two years secretary of the the 27th of January, 1863, and is a son of 
Ashland Fire Brick Company. Public-spirited George W. and Alary (Embry) Swearingen, 
and progressive, he has been actively identi- both of whom were likewise natives of Ken- 
fied with the upbuilding of Ashland and a tucky. The Swearingen family is of distin- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS ' 



1315 



guished and patrician Holland Dutch extrac- 
tion, and the original progenitor in America 
was Gerret \'an Swearingen, one of the 
younger sons of a nobleman in sturdy Hol- 
land. He was sent to America as captain of 
vessel laden with supplies for the Dutch col- 
ony at New xA.msterdam, the nucleus of New 
York city, in 1656. The vessel was wrecked 
and lost on the Atlantic coast of America and 
Captain \'an Swearingen then abandoned the 
sea and settled in Maryland, where he took 
up his abode in the same year that marked his 
voyage to America. He was a native of 
Beemsterdam, province of North Holland, 
and his wife, whose maiden name was Bar- 
bara De Barett, was born at \'anenciennes, in 
the lowlands of Holland. Their descendants 
were found numbered among the soldiers tak- 
ing part in the early Indian wars, the war of 
the Revolution and the war of 1812. The 
founder of the family line in Kentucky was 
one who came from Maryland to this state 
and settled in Bullitt county in 1804. His 
son William, grandfather of the subject of 
this sketch, became a wealthy and influen- 
tial farmer and slaveholder in Bullitt cotmty, 
and his wife, whose maiden name was Julia 
Crist, was a daughter of Hon. Henry Crist, 
who was a pioneer Indian fighter in Kentucky 
and who served continuously in the Kentucky 
legislature from 1795 until 1806, after which, 
from i8og to 181 1. he represented this state 
in the United States congress. George W. 
Swearingen was reared and educated in Ken- 
tucky and the major part of his active career 
was one of close identification with the Mell- 
wood Distillery Company. He founded and 
built up the Union National Bank of Louis- 
ville. He was one of the honored and influ- 
ential citizens of Louisville at the time of his 
death, which occurred in 190 1. His wife is 
still with her son the subject of this sketch. 
Both were members of the Presbyterian 
church, and in politics he was a stanch advo- 
cate of the principles of the Democratic party. 
Embry Lee Swearingen, whose name forms 
the caption of this article, was fitted for col- 
lege at the Rugby school in Louisville, and in 
1878 he was matriculated in the historic old 
University of Virginia, at Charlottesville. 
His health became much impaired, however, 
and he was compelled to leave the university 
soon after entering the same. After a year's 
respite from study he returned to the Univer- 
sity, where he continued his studies for three 
years and in which he was graduated in a 
uumber of the academic schools. After leav- 
ing the University Mr. Swearingen initiated 
his active business career by locating in the 
city of Philadelphia, where he engaged in 



the manufacturing of hosiery and other knit- 
ted goods. He remained in the Pennsylvania 
city about one year and at the expiration of 
this period he returned to Louisville, where 
he established a plant for the manufacturing 
of hosiery, woolens and jeans. This was one 
of the first factories of the kind in the south, 
and under the efifective administration of Air. 
Swearingen the business was developed into 
one of wide scope and importance, thus con- 
tributing materially to the industrial prestige 
of the Kentucky metropolis. To this enter- 
prise Mr. Swearingen continued to give the 
major part of his time and attention for a 
period of eight years, at the expiration of 
which he assumed the position of general 
manager of the Kentucky Title Company, in 
which he became one of the heaviest stock- 
holders and of which he was elected president 
in 1895. He has continuously served as chief 
executive of this important corporation since 
that time, and in 1900 the business was ampli- 
fied and extended by the organization of the 
Kentucky Title, Savings Bank 81 Trust Com- 
pany. The company is incorporated with a 
capital stock of $350,000, exercises most ben- 
eficent functions in the various departments 
and is one of the strong and popular financial 
institutions of the state. 5lr. Swearingen 
has other capitalistic interests of important 
order, and has for many years been a di- 
rector of the L^nion National Bank of Louis- 
ville. He is known as one of the broad- 
minded, progressive and substantial business 
men of Louisville, where he has ever com- 
manded a secure advantage place in popular 
confidence and esteem. His political allegi- 
ance is given to the Democratic party, of 
wdiose cause he is a stanch supporter, though 
he has never manifested aught of ambition 
for public office. He lends his aid and influ- 
ence in the furtherance of enterprises tending 
to advance the civic and material progress 
and prosperity of his home city, to whose ev- 
ery interest he is loyal. He and his wife hold 
membership in the Presbyterian church and 
he is identified with various social and frater- 
nal organizations of prominence. 

In 1887 Mr. Swearingen was united in 
marriage to Miss Lalla Robinson, the only 
daughter of Lawrence Robinson, of Louis- 
ville, and a granddaughter of Rev. Stuart 
Robinson, D. D., a distinguished member of 
the clergy of the Presbyterian church. In the 
maternal line Mrs. Swearingen was a great- 
granddaughter of Hon. William Owsley, who 
was governor of Kentucky from 1844 to 1848 
and who served as judge of the appellate 
court of the state from 1812 to 1828. She 
died in 1897. leaving two children, Lalla Rob- 



1310 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

inson and George W. Swearingcn. In 1901 seat of Clarksburg, where he operated a tan- 
Mr. Swearingen married Miss Ada Badger, nery for several years. Later he disposed of 
of Chicago. Her mother was of the well that business and purchased a tract of tim- 
known Sheridan family so prominent in ber land, where he erected and operated a saw 
Louisville many years ago. Ller father re- mill for many years. He died on his farm 
moved from Louisville to Chicago in 1859, near Clarksburg in August, 1867. He and 
where he was for many years in the banking his wife, whose maiden name was Mary Wal- 
business. lace Bishop, became the parents of six chil- 

George T. Willim. — As president of the dren — four boys and two girls — of whom 
Citizens' Bank at Vanceburg, George T. Wil- Thomas H., father of George T., was the 
lim is a potent force in the financial world fifth in order of birth. Thomas H. Willim 
in Lewis county, Kentucky. In addition to was reared to adult age on the home farm, 
his varied banking interests he is treasurer of which he later inherited and on which he con- 
Lewis county at the present time, in 191 1, tinned to reside during the residue of his 
and in that important position he is giving a life, his death having occurred in 1895. He 
most able administration of the fiscal afifairs married Melissa R. McKellep, who survives 
of the county. her honored husband and who now maintains 

The Citizens' Bank of Vanceburg was or- her home at Valley, Kentucky, and to this 

ganized in October, 1903, with a capital stock union were born nine children, seven of whom 

of fifteen thousand dollars. The first of- are living in 191 1. 

ficers and directors instrumental in organiz- Seventh in order of birth of his parents' 

ing the same were as follows : Edward Wil- nine children, George T. Willim grew up on 

lim, president ; George T. Willim, cashier ; the old paternal homestead and he received 

W. W. Willim, John P. Willim and W. C. his preliminary educational training in the 

Halbert, directors. Through uniform growth district schools, later supplementing that dis- 

and development the bank has reached its cipline by a course of study in Riverside Sem- 

present financial status and to-day it holds inary, at Vanceburg, Kentucky, and by a 

prestige as one of the leading monetary insti- commercial course at Nelson's Business col- 

tutions in eastern Kentucky. On the 7th of lege at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

November, 1907, Edward Willim retired from When twenty years of age he secured a posi- 

the presidency of the bank and at that time tion as bookkeeper in the Deposit Bank at 

George T. Willim, of this review, was elected Vanceburg and he continued incumbent of 

president, with George M. Thomas, Jr., as that position until the organization of the 

cashier to fill his vacancy. The deposits of Citizens' Bank, in 1903, since which time he 

the bank amount to one hundred and forty- has been connected with the same, first as 

one thousand dollars and the surplus and un- cashier and since 1907 as president, as previ- 

divided profits amount to four thousand and ously noted. In politics Mr. Willim is aligned 

• seven hundred and fifty dollars. A three per as a stalwart supporter of the principles of 

cent dividend is declared semi-annually and the Republican party. He is a former mem- 

the loans and discounts amount to eighty thou- ber of the Vanceburg city council and in 1909 

sand dollars. he was honored by the fiscal court with elec- 

i\Ir. George T. Willim was born on a farm tion to the office of treasurer of Lewis county, 
near Vanceburg, on the 4th of October, 1874, He is acquitting himself most creditably in 
and he is a son of Thomas H. and Melissa R. discharging the duties incident to his present. 
(McKellep) Willim, both of whom were office and he is also trustee of the jury fund, 
born and reared in Lewis county, Kentucky. Mr. Willim is a man of fine intelligence and 
Harry Willim, grandfather of him to whom extraordinary executive and financial ability 
this sketch is dedicated, was a native of Eng- and in all his business and personal transac- 
land, whence he emigrated to the United tions he is widely known as a man of honor- 
States as a young man. He brought with able and straightforward conduct. He is af- 
him a large stock of queensware from Eng- filiated with various fraternal and social or- 
land, intending to engage in business in New ganizations of representative character and 
York city, but the ship on which he took his religious faith is in harmony with the 
passage was wrecked and everything on board teachings of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
was lost, the passengers being compelled to while his wife is a devout member of the 
swim ashore. Traveling overland to Virginia, Christian church. 

Harry Willim went down the Ohio river on In July, 1898, Mr. Willim was united ^n 

a boat to Kentucky and it was on this trip marriage to INIiss Emma Jones, who is a na- 

that he met his future wife. Subsequently tive of Lewis county and who is a daughter of 

he settled in Lewis county, at the old county Rufus N. and Sallie (Voiers) Jones, the 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1317 

former of whom was long a prominent busi- and representative clientage and where he 
ness man at Vanceburg. No children have gained distinctive prestige as one of the lead- 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Willim. ing members of the bar in eastern Kentucky. 

Samuel E. Bruce. — The Deposit Bank at In his politcal convictions he was a staunch 
Vanceburg, Lewis county, Kentucky, was in- advocate of the principles and policies of the 
corporated in 1887, with a capital stock of Whig party and he served for one term in 
twenty-five thousand dollars, but that amount the state legislature. He died, comparatively 
was reduced to fifteen thousand dollars in young, at A'anceburg. He married Amanda 
1900. Although organized in 1887 the bank Bragg, a native of Lewis county, Ken- 
did not begin to do business until 1889. The tucky, and a daughter of Captain Thomas 
first officers and directors who were directly Bragg, who was an officer in the old Virginia 
responsible for the establishment of the bank State Line. Captain Bragg married Lucy 
were as follows : Socrates Ruggles, presi- Blakemore, three of whose brothers were gal- 
dent; A. H. Parker, cashier; and S. S. Riley, lant and faithful soldiers in the war of the 
P. P. Parker and T. S. Clark, directors. In Revolution. Captain Bragg came to Ken- 
191 1 the deposits amount to one hundred and tucky with Colonel Christopher Greenup soon 
ten thousand dollars ; loans and discounts, after the close of the war for independence, 
ninety-one thousand dollars ; surplus and un- They both had large land grants in Kentucky 
divided profits, six thousand dollars ; real and both were accompanied by families, 
estate, three thousand dollars ; dividend, five Captain Bragg located on the Ohio river, in 
per cent semi-annually. This substantial the region which now marks the corporate 
monetary institution controls an extensive limits of Vanceburg, his large tract of land 
business in the financial world of Lewis embracing practically the entire site of the 
county and since 1904 Samuel E. Bruce has present city. He operated salt wells and some 
been incumbent of the office of cashier of the early iron furnaces and continued to main- 
bank, tain his home in this section until his death, 

Samuel E. Bruce was born on a farm as did also his wife, who lived to the patri- 
eligibly located three miles distant from archal age of one hundred years. 
X'anceburg, Lewis county, Kentucky, the Henry Clay Bruce, father of the subject 
date of his nativity being September 22, 1858. of this review, was born and reared in Lewis 
He is a son of Henry Clay and Mary Eliza- county and while still a mere youth became a 
beth (Conner) Bruce, the former of whom pilot on a steamboat, later becoming clerk and 
was likewise born in Lewis county and the finally captain. He spent thirty years on the 
latter of whom was a native of Greenup river, operating principally between Cincin- 
county, Kentucky. The Bruce family is of nati and New Orleans. After retiring from 
pioneer origin in the old Blue Grass state, river navigation he engaged in the general 
the founder of the family in Kentucky having merchandise business at \"anceburg, continu- 
been John Bruce, great-great-grandfather of ing to be identified with that line of enter- 
him to whom this sketch is dedicated. He prise until 1906. He died in 1909, at the age 
was born in Culpeper county, Virginia, of eighty-five years. He represented Lewis 
where was solemnized his marriage to Miss and Mason counties in the state senate in the 
Elizabeth Clay, whose father was the grand- sessions of 1882 and 1884 and it was due 
father of the renowned Henry Clay, of Ken- largely to him that in the one hundred day 
tucky. Soon after the close of the war of the fight for the United States senate Joseph 
Revolution. John Bruce decided to seek his Blackburn was eventually successful. It is 
fortunes further west and accordingly came interesting to note that he was one of the 
to Kentucky, locating at Lancaster, Garrard first Democrats ever elected to the state senate 
county, where he was a prominent attorney from his section. His wife was a daughter 
and a successful agriculturist. He and his of Major William Conner, a native of Ire- 
wife passed the residue of their lives at Lan- land and a member of a pioneer family in 
caster, at which place their remains were Kentucky. Major Conner was a small child 
interred. Alexander Bruce, grandfather of at the time of his parents' emigration to the 
Samuel E.. was one of the several grand- United States. Location was made in Bath 
children of John Bruce, and his birth oc- county, Kentucky, to the public schools of 
curred at Lancaster. His father dying while which place the young William was indebted- 
he was very young, Alexander Bruce came for his early educational training. Subse- 
to Lewis county, where he studied law and quently he studied law in James Todd's store 
where he was admitted to the bar. He initi- at Vanceburg, in which establishment he was 
ated the active practice of his profession at employed as a clerk. Practically the only 
Vanceburg. where he rapidly built up a large law books to which he had access were Black- 



lols 



IIISIOUV Ui' KENTUCKN' AND KENTUCKIANS 



stone's Commentaries. He was actively en- 
gaged in the practice of his profession at 
(irecnup for a number of years and he soon 
became one of the leaders in the state both 
at the bar and in public life. He was pos- 
sessed of that versatility and rare brilliancy 
of mind so characteristic of the well educated 
Irishman antl in connection with the affairs 
of his chosen vocation he was for seventeen 
terms a member of the state legislature, serv- 
ing both as representative and as senator. 
To Mr. and J\Irs. Henry Clay l^ruce were 
born six children, all of whom are living and 
concerning whom the following brief data are 
here incorporated: Sidney is now the wife of 
Richard F. Cruce, a brother of the present 
(1911) governor of Oklahoma, and they re- 
side at Gentry. Arkansas; Mary is the wife 
of W. F. Alexander, of Tampa, Florida; 
Thomas L. maintains his home at Sherman. 
Texas; Samuel E. is the immediate subject of 
this review ; William E. is a prominent phy- 
sician and surgeon at Herberton, West Vir- 
ginia ; and John L. resides at San Antonio, 
Texas. The mother died when these children 
were young, and Air. Bruce afterward married 
Casandra E. Caines, of Vanceburg. There 
was one child by this marriage, Mrs. Elsa B. 
Kline, of \'anceburg. 

Samuel E. Bruce was reared to adult age 
at Vanceburg, and after completing the pub- 
lic schools of this place he engaged in the 
mercantile business and for several years was 
identified with the same in Arizona and 
Texas. Returning to Vanceburg in 1888, he 
was engaged in the general merchandise busi- 
ness with his father for the ensuing twenty 
years, and in the meantime, in 1904, he was 
elected cashier of the Deposit Bank at Vance- 
burg. in which position he has proved himself 
a man of excellent judgment and marked 
financial ability. In politics he is an ardent 
Democrat and while he has never manifested 
aught of ambition for politcal preferment he 
is loyal and public-spirited in his civic atti- 
tude, ever doing all in his power to advance 
the best interests of the community and of the 
state at large. In the time-honored Masonic 
order he is afifiliated with Polar Star Lodge 
No. 363. Free & Accepted Masons; and with 
Burns Chapter, No. 74, Royal Arch Masons. 
He and his wife are devout members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. South, and they 
hold a high place in the confidence and es- 
teem of their fellow citizens. 

In 189 1 Mr. Bruce was united in marriage 
to Miss Josephine Smith, who was born at 
Florence, Kentucky, the place immortalized 
ar. "Stringtown-on-the-Pike." To Mr. and 



.Mrs. Bruce have been born three children, 
.Mildred. Mary and Alexander. 

Ci:oKGK W. Stami'er. — \'igor, enterprise 
and persistency — these are the qualities which 
make for success and these are the character- 
istics which have dominated the career of 
George \V. Stam])er, who through his own ef- 
forts built the ladder by which he has climbed 
to affluence. He has been identified with 
farming, blacksmithing, merchandising, lum- 
bering and banking and in each of these enter- 
prises his success has been on a parity with 
his well directed endeavors. He has also been 
an important factor in connection with public 
utilities and as a citizen he holds a high place 
in the confidence and esteem of his fellow 
men. 

George Washington Stamper was born on 
a farm in Lewis county, Kentucky, on the 26th 
of December, 1850, and he is a son of George 
W. and Catherine (Dyer) Stamper, the for- 
mer of whom was a native of North Carolina 
and the latter of Morgan county, Kentucky. 
John Stamper, grandfather of him whose 
name initiates this review, was born, reared 
and married in North Carolina and in the 
early '20s he emigrated to Kentucky, locating 
on the Kentucky river in Wolfe county, where 
he engaged in farming. He and his wife, 
whose maiden name was Sallie Stamper, and 
who was a cousin of her husband, raised a 
familv of ten children, most of whom were 
born in Kentucky. The father of George W., 
Jr., was the first born and he was an infant 
at the time of his parents' removal to the Blue, 
Grass state. When, he was fifteen years of 
age the family home was established in 
Carter county, and there he grew to 
manhood, married, and in 1845 engaged 
in agricultural pursuits on a farm near 
Olive Hill, Lewis county. He was very 
industrious, an excellent farmer and business 
man and in due time he accumulated a com- 
petency. About 1865 he opened a store on 
his farm, continuing to be identified with the 
general merchandise business for the ensuing 
twenty-five years. His death occurred on 
his old homestead in 1905, at the venerable 
age of eighty-two years. He was a stalwart 
Democrat in his political convictions and he 
served for several years as justice of the peace. 
His wife was summoned to eternal rest in 
1898, at the age of sixty-eight years. She 
was a daughter of Francis Dyer, of Morgan 
county, Kentucky. Mr. and ]\Irs. George W. 
Stamper became the parents of twelve chil- 
dren — five boys and seven girls, nine of whom 
are living in 191 1, and of the number the sub- 
ject of this review was the third in order of 
birth. 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1319 



George Washingto/ii Stamper, Jr., passed 
his vouth in a manner similar to that of the 
farmer boy of that day, attending- the district 
school during the winter months and working 
on the home farm during the summer seasons. 
When he had attained to the age of sixteen 
years he entered his father's store, where he 
learned the details of general merchandising 
and he continued an inmate of the parental 
home until he had reached his legal majority. 
Thereafter he worked in a blacksmith shop 
for a time and was engaged in farming on 
his own account for a couple of years, 
at the expiration of which he started 
a general store on a small scale on 
Grassy creek. This store, which he still 
owns and operates, has been doing busi- 
ness for the past thirty-five years. For thir- 
ty-three years Mr. Stamper was the able in- 
cumbent of the office of postmaster at Head of 
Grassy and he was one of the oldest postmas- 
ters, in point of continuous service, in this 
section of the state. He also became inter- 
ested in the timber business while located on 
Grassy creek, and he was for many years en- 
gaged in the stave business and in other en- 
terprises most successfully. In 1888 he es- 
tablished his residence at V'anceburg and in 
the following year he organized the Stamper 
Stave & Lumber Company, which carried on 
an extensive trade for nine years, at the expi- 
ration of which that firm was dissolved and 
Mr. Stamper continued in the lumber busi- 
ness in partnership with his brother, Joshua 
Stamper. Two years later, in 1900, he be- 
came a member of the firm of Johnson & 
Stamper, the same engaging in the railway 
tie business, getting out railway tie§ at various 
points in this section of the state. This busi- 
ness is now controlled by Johnson & Stamper, 
who are successors to the Elliott Tie Com- 
pany, which conducts its operations on the 
Little Sandy river. The annual output of 
this concern is from two hundred thousand to 
five hundred thousand ties. 

In September. 1889, Mr. Stamper laid the 
foundation of his present large mercantile es- 
tablishment at \"anceburg by opening a gen- 
eral store in one room. This concern has 
grown to such gigantic proportions that it now 
occupies space equivalent to nine ordinary 
store rooms, the stock consisting of every- 
thing found in a modern department store 
except hardware. All Mr. Stamper's success- 
es are due to his indefatigable energy and 
great business ability and it is no exaggeration 
to say that he is one of the greatest hustlers in 
the state. In addition to his other interests 
he owns several fine farms in the Ohio valley 
and he has extensive real-estate holdings in 



Vanceburg, where he has constructed a num- 
ber of residences and the majority of the bus- 
iness block he now occupies. He was one 
of the organizers of the Deposit Bank at 
Vanceburg, of which he is president at the 
present time and in which he is one of the 
heaviest stockholders. At the time of the 
building of the local electric plant he was 
elected president of that corporation, of which 
position he is still incumbent. . He is a man 
of tremendous vitality and most extraordi- 
nary executive capacity. Beginning with 
practically nothing in the way of worldly 
goods, he has grasped his opportunities as 
they appeared and made of success not an ac- 
cident but a logical result. To-day he is rec- 
ognized as one of the biggest financiers in 
eastern Kentucky and his fair and honorable 
methods in all his business dealings have 
gained to him the highest regard of his fellow 
citizens. 

Mr. Stamper is a loyal Democrat in his po- 
litical proclivities, but he has not had much 
time for political activity, having been a mem- 
ber of his first convention in 1910, at which 
time his influence was felt in no slight degree. 
In the Masonic order he has passed through 
the circle of the York Rite branch, holding 
membership in Polar Star Lodge, No. 363, 
Free & Accepted Masons ; and Maysville Com- 
mandery. No. 10, Knights Templars. He and 
his wife are devout members of the Christian 
church, to whose charities" and benevolences 
he has ever been a liberal contributor and in 
whose faith his children have been reared. 

In 1872 was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Stamper to Miss Sophia W. Staft'ord, a 
native of Carter county and a daughter of 
Sylvester Stafiford, a farmer who served in 
the Union army in the Civil war and who died 
in service. Mr. and Mrs. Stamper have eight 
children, namely — Rebecca, Cinda, William 
}.. James E., Cora Mae, Julia, Bessie L. and 
Marie, all of whom were born in Lewis coun- 
ty and all of whom were afiforded excellent 
educations. 

Orville p. Pollitt, the present popular 
and efficient incumbent of the office of county 
clerk of Lewis county, Kentucky, is now 
serving his fourth term in office, and in dis- 
charging the duties incident thereto is acquit- 
ting himself with all of honor and distinction. 
^Ir. Pollitt was born at Portsmouth, Ohio, on 
the i8th of September, 1871, and he is a son 
of James and Lucy C. (Parker) Pollitt, both 
natives of Lewis county and both members 
of old Kentucky families. Alexander H. 
Pollitt. paternal grandfather of the subject 
of this review, was born and reared in Mary- 
land, whence he came with his parents to 



1320 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



Lewis county in an early day, location being 
made on a farm. James Pollitt stuilied law 
as a youth and became an eminent practitioner 
of his profession in Lewis coimty and in 
Portsmouth, Ohio, lie was summoned to the 
life eternal at the age of forty-seven years, his 
death having occurred at Portsmouth in 1885. 
He served as judge of Lewis county for sev- 
eral terms immediately after the close of the 
Civil war and was very prominent in public 
affairs during his life-time. ITis widow, who 
still survives him, now maintains her home at 
\'anceburg. Air. and Mrs. fames P^ollitt be- 
came the parents of two children, of whom 
Orville P. is the only one living in 191 1. 

Mr. Pollitt of this review was a lad of Imt 
fourteen years of age at the time of his 
father's death. He was reared to maturity 
at Portsmouth, his education consisting of 
such advantages as were afiforded in the pub- 
lic schools of that place. He also attended 
school at \'anceburg and after leaving school 
he worked on a farm for a short time. In 
1888 he was appointed deputy clerk of Lewis 
county, remaining in tenure of that office 
until the fall of 1897, ^t which time he was 
elected county clerk, of which latter office he 
has continued incumbent during the inter- 
vening years to the present time, this being 
his fourth term in office. His administration 
has been characterized by good judgment and 
staunch devotion to the duties at hand and it 
is worthy of note here that in the last election 
he met with no opposition in either the pri- 
maries or in the election proper. 

In politics Mr. Pollitt is a staunch advocate 
of the principles and policies for which the 
Republican party stands sponsor and he has 
ever been an ardent supporter of all measures 
and enterprises projected for the good of the 
community. In a fraternal way he is affili- 
ated with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Junior Order of the United 
American Mechanics. In his religious faith 
Mr. Pollitt is a devout member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. He is unmarried. 

Walter S. Hatfield, M. D. — Compared 
with every other profession that of medicine 
ranks foremost in the way of human helpful- 
ness. It requires great ability and innate talent, 
and in addition to these a spirit of sacrifice 
and genial kindliness must ever be in evidence 
ready to inspire faith and hope in each and 
every patient. Possessed of these qualities. 
Dr. Hatfield has gained prestige as one of the 
leading physicians and surgeons in Kenton 
county. He was born near South Bend, Indi- 
ana, on the 23d of June, 1854, and is a son 
of Abel Janny and Martha (Zigler) Hatfield, 
the former of whom was a native of Wayne 
county, Indiana, and the latter of Virginia. 



The llatfield family traces its ancestrv back 
to Welsh origin, the great-grandfather, Jonas 
Hatfield, having emigrated from W^ales to the 
United States in the year 1773, when but nine 
years of age. He first settled in Pennsylvania 
and later removed to Kentucky, where he was 
united in marriage t(j Miss Rachel Janny. 
They became the parents of several children 
and after a time established their home in 
Dayton, Ohio. In 1810 they removed to 
Green's Fork, on White River, Wayne county, 
Indiana. There Jonas Hatfield passed the resi- 
due of his life, his death having occurred in 
181 3. During the major portion of his active 
business career he was engaged in agricultural 
pursuits. Of his children, Nathan E. Hatfield 
was the grandfather of the Doctor; he was 
born at Dayton, Ohio, in 1804, and he es- 
tablished his home in St. Joseph county, In- 
diana, in 1830, being a pioneer farmer in that 
county. He married Emily Roe and they had 
eleven children, nine of whom attained to 
years of maturity. Nathan was summoned to 
the life eternal in March, 1875, at the age of 
seventy-one years, and his cherished and de- 
voted wife passed away in 1882, at the age of 
seventy-one years. Abel Janny Hatfield was 
the eldest of their eleven children and he was 
born on the loth of June, 1828. He married 
Martha Zigler. a native of Virginia, where her 
birth occurred in February, 1830, and whence 
she accompanied her parents to St. Joseph 
county, Indiana, in 1838. Her father was 
Samuel Zigler and he followed farming until 
1866, at which time he became interested in 
the sawmill and lumber business, continuing 
to be identified with that line of enterprise 
until his death, which occurred in 1874, at the 
age of seventy-four years. His wife was 
Margaret Garwood and she died in 1883, at 
the age of seventy-three years. Abel Hatfield 
passed most of his life in St. Joseph county. 
Indiana, being a mere infant at the time of 
his parents' removal to that county. He was 
a farmer, horticulturist and apiarist and he 
died in 1897, in his sixty-ninth year, his wife 
having passed to her reward September 26, 
1 86 1. Of their six children all but one are 
living. Dr. Walter S. Hatfield being the third 
in order of birth. 

Dr. Hatfield was reared and educated in 
his native county, his rudimentary training 
being sup]:lemented by a course in the high 
school at Niles, Michigan, where his parents 
resided from 1864 to 1874. In 1880 he be- 
gan the study of medicine, under the able pre- 
ceptorship of Dr. John Maurer, of South 
Rend, Indiana. In 1880 he was matriculated 
in the Hahnemann Medical College, at Phil- 
adelphia, Pennsylvania, and in this excellent 
institution he was graduated as a member of 






i 






HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1321 



the class of 1882. duly receiving his degree 
of Doctor of Medicine. He initiated the prac- 
tice of his profession at Benton Harbor, Mich- 
igan, and later he was engaged in practice at 
South Bend. Indiana. Jn the fall of 1883 ^^^ 
removed to Covington, Kenton county, Ken- 
tucky, where he has built up a large and lu- 
crative practice and where he has since main- 
tained his home with the exception of two 
years, which he spent in the city of Cincinnati, 
Ohio. He is a member of the Kentucky State 
Society of Homeopathy, the Southern Homeo- 
pathic Society and the American Institute of 
Homeopathy. In politics he accords a staunch 
allegiance, to the principles and policies of the 
Republican party but he has never been a can- 
didate for political honors, preferring to give 
his entire time and attention to the exacting 
demands of his profession. He has ever 
shown a deep interest in all movements pro- 
jected for the general welfare of the commu- 
nity and he is held in high confidence and es- 
teem by his professional confreres, as well as by 
his fellow citizens. Both he and his wife are 
popular factors in connection with the best so- 
cial activities of their home city. 

On the 29th of August. 1887. was solem- 
nized the marriage of Dr. Hatfield to ]\Iiss 
Elizabeth Heron, who was born in Toronto, 
Canada, and who is a daughter of John and 
Sarah (Dunkin) Heron, both of whom were 
natives of England, where their marriage took 
place and whence they emigrated to Canada. 
In 1863 they removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, 
where John Heron died about one year later. 
'Sirs. Heron died in 1889, in Covington. Ken- 
tuck^y. James Heron, a well known furniture 
dealer in Cincinnati, is a brother of Mrs. Hat- 
field. Dr. and Mrs. Hatfield became the par- 
ents of three children, one of whom died in 
infancy. Walter H., who was born on the 
26th of August. 1888, is now a student in 
Hahnemann Aledical College, in the city of 
Philadelphia, being a member of the class of 
191 1. James E., the other son, is attending 
school in Covington. He was born on the 
1 2th of July, 1 89 1. 

Ch.\rles Kitchen is the president of the 
Second National Bank of Ashland, Kentucky, 
besides being engaged in various other im- 
portant business interests, and the history of 
his family connections and of his business 
career will prove an interesting chapter in the 
annals of Kentucky. Mr. Kitchen was born 
on a farm in Carter county, Kentucky, fotir 
miles from W'illard, on January 28, 1845, the 
son of Andrew J. and Winnie (Bays) 
Kitchen. The former was a native of Green- 
brier county, W^est Virginia, of English an- 



cestry, and the latter was born in Scott 
county, \'irginia, of Scotch-Irish descent. 

Andrew Kitchen, the grandfather of our 
subject, was a native of Greenbrier county, 
West X'irginia, then old \'irginia, but left 
there about 1830 and brought his family to 
Kentucky, locating on a farm in Carter 
county, near Willard, becoming an agricultur- 
ist, well known and respected, and continu- 
ing in that business the remainder of his life. 
He became an extensive farmer and slave 
owner and raised large quantities of corn, 
which foimd a ready market throughout that 
section. Soon after coming to Kentucky, he 
was elected to the legislature, served one term, 
being a leading Democrat. He had served in 
the war of 1812 in a Mrginia regiment and 
was known thereafter as Major Kitchen. 

Andrew J. Kitchen, the father of our sub- 
ject, w^as reared in Carter county on the home- 
stead, where he became a farmer and in which 
occupation he passed his entire life, dying at 
the age of seventy-four. He was a justice of 
the peace for many years and known far and 
wide as Squire Kitchen. His widow survived 
him for several years, dying in March, 1908, 
at the age of eighty-four years. She was the 
mother of ten children, two of whom are 
dead, our subject being the second in order 
of birth. 

Charles Kitchen was reared on the farm 
in Carter county and early in life was dis- 
ciplined to the tasks of hard work in the hills 
of Kentucky. He was a boy when the Civil 
war broke out, and during that strenuous 
]:!eri()d educational advantages were almost at 
a standstill and Mr. Kitchen was enabled to at- 
tend school for only a few weeks of each year. 
He was at the home place until a young man 
and in the fall of 1865 engaged in the mer- 
chandise business for himself near Leon, then 
known as Deer Creek postoffice, the postoffice 
being in his store and Mr. Kitchen was post- 
master for many years. Later he bought a 
farm of two hundred acres from his grand- 
father, on which a store was located. He con- 
tinued farming and merchandizing very suc- 
cessfully for many years, and during that 
time bought more land adjoining, having 
twelve hundred acres in one piece besides 
farms in other places. He has a hobby for 
farming and enjoys that branch of industry 
in all its phases. He still continues to in- 
crease his holdings, and at one time owned 
over two thousand acres of land. 

In 1880 Mr. Kitchen engaged in the lumber 
and saw mill business, building a mill at Leon 
on the bank of Little Sandy river, buying logs 
in Elliott county and floating them to the mill. 



1322 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



He has been in this line of manufacturing 
lumber ever since and is one of the leaders in 
Kentucky, his business having increased to 
enormous proportions. In i8yS he became 
interested in lumber manufacturing at Ash- 
land and engaged with a ])artner under the 
hrm name of \ an Sant. Kitchen & Company, 
which owns a large mill at Ashland, one at 
Alayhan, West \'irginia, and a small one on 
the Kentucky river. They recently bought 
tlie poplar timber on twenty-seven thousand 
acres of limber land in Breathitt county, Ken- 
tucky, which is being shipped by train loads to 
the mills in Ashland. 

Mr. Kitchen helped organize the Second 
National Jjank at Ashland and has been a 
director from the Hrst and is now president of 
the same. His business interests are widely 
scattered, but such is his enei-gy and the cog- 
nizance of the fact that a man to prosper must 
attend personally to his affairs that he su- 
pervises his various interests while he has 
been able to continue his residence at Leon, 
Carter county. 

In politics Mr. Kitchen is a stanch Demo- 
crat. At the time of the election of the State 
Board of Equalization by vote of the people 
he was elected from his congressional district 
and served one term of two years. During 
the early days of Carter county he served as 
school superintendent of that county. Mr. 
Kitchen is a member of the Masonic order, 
allied with the Blue Lodge in Grayson and 
with the Royal Arch Chapter and the Com- 
mandery, Knights Templar in Ashland. In 
February. 1866 he was married to Loretta 
King, a native of Carter county, Kentucky. 
They are the parents of ten children, of whom 
nine are living. Their names are: James H., 
Ida May, Mollie Lee, John W., Icy Myrtle, 
Effie Winnie. Lula Belle. Lottie Florence and 
Charles J. Jr. One son, Andrew William, 
died at the age of two years. These children 
were all raised in their native county, well 
educated and all married and settled in life 
except Lottie Florence, who is still at home. 
Mr. Kitchen and family are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. South at Leon. 
Mrs. Kitchen died in May, 1904, and he was 
again married in 1910, to Nellie B. Golden, 
of Normal, Kentucky. 

James H. Kitchen is connected with such 
a diversity of business interests, that a short 
sketch of his life will indicate something of 
the extent and scope of his efforts. A man of 
resourceful business ability, he stands among 
those whose keen discrimination not only en- 
ables them to recognize the opportunity of the 
present but also the exigencies and possibili- 
ties of the future, and his work is proving a 



substantial and important clement in the up- 
building and development of that section of 
the country which is fast becoming a great 
center in commercial and industrial life. 

Mr. Kitchen, vice-president of the Wright- 
Kitchen Lumber Co., of Ashland, Kentucky, 
was born in Carter county, Kentucky, Janu- 
ary 8, 1867, the son of Charles and Loretta 
(King) Kitchen, a sketch of Charles Kitchen 
being printed elsewhere in this work. James 
H. was reared on the farm in Carter county 
and being the oldest of ten children, went to 
work at an early age on the farm and in the 
store at Leon, for his father, and later became 
a partner of his father's under the firm name 
of Chas. Kitchen & Son, which continued suc- 
cessfully for twenty-five years and which suc- 
cess was due in no small way to the business 
foresight and sagacity of James. 

He is still interested in the store and lands 
in that section, but has not confined his at- 
tention entirely to that one branch of indus- 
try. He continued to make his home in Car- 
ter county until 19 10, when he located at Ash- 
land. In 1895 Mr. Kitchen entered into part- 
nership with Senator W. B. Whitt and organ- 
ized a wholesale grocery at Ashland, under 
the firm name of Kitchen, Whitt & Co., and 
three years later incorporated with a capital 
of $100,000 and rapidly enlarged to the pres- 
ent proportions, and lead this line in north- 
east Kentucky. The officers elected at the 
first are still in office : J. H. Kitchen, presi- 
dent ; W. B. Whitt. vice-president ; J. B. 
King, secretary ; F. R. Henderson, general 
manager. 

Mr Kitchen for several years has been in- 
terested in manufacturing staves in Carter 
county and also for several years has been a 
member of the Kitchen Lumber Company 
which owns twenty thousand acres of timber 
land in North Carolina. In January. 1910. 
in connection with his brother Charles, he 
bought an interest in a large Itimber concern 
at i\shlarid, then known as the Wright, Sauls- 
berry Lumber Company and the same was in- 
corporated as the Wright. Kitchen Lumber 
Company, with a capital stock of $75,000. 
The officers are Giles Wright, president ; J. 
H. Kitchen, vice-president ; Chas. Kitchen, Jr., 
secretary and treasurer. This firm operates 
a large saw mill at Ashland on the Ohio river, 
the logs coming from what is known as Big 
Sandy territory, the capacity of the mill being 
thirty-five thousand feet daily. It ships lum- 
ber to all parts of the country, making a spe- 
cialty of oak and poplar, and employs about 
forty men in the mill and yards at Ashland. 

In 1 oli'ics ?'.Tr. Kiicben i-; in sympathy with 
the Democratic party. For twenty-three 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1823 



years he was Postmaster at Leon, Carter coun- 
ty, having the post office in the store. So- 
cially, he is a member of the Masonic order, 
l^eing connected with the Blue Lodge No. 145, 
at Grayson and the Royal Arch Chapter, No. 
81 Commandery and No. 28 Elhasa Temple 
of the Shriners at Ashland. 

On May 17, 1888, Mr. Kitchen was mar- 
ried to Florence Pope, of Leon, Kentucky, 
and they are the parents of seven children : 
Nadia, Bessie, Bertram, Maud, James Jr., 
Charles and Lauretta, and parents and chil- 
dren are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. South. 

William P. Wornall. — In the matter of 
definite accomplishment in connection with 
the great industry of agriculture William P. 
Wornall has gained vantage ground and is 
numbered among the representative farmers 
and stock-growers of the younger generation 
in Bourbon county, which has been his home 
from the time of his nativity and in which he 
is held in unqualified confidence and esteem. 

Concerning the genealogy of the Wornall 
family the following data are here incorpo- 
rated. The original progenitors of the name 
in America were Roby and Edyth Wornall, 
who were of English ancestrv and who were 
Colonial residents in Virginia. Their son 
Thomas, born December 13, 1775, died No- 
vember 3, 1838, was prominent in public af- 
fairs during his life time. He was sherifl'. 
a member of the Kentucky house of repre- 
sentatives from Clark county in 1809, and was 
a colonel in a Kentucky regiment in the war 
of 1812. On the 24th of January, 1797, was 
recorded the marriage of Thomas Wornall to 
Miss Susan, a daughter of John Bowen and 
Susan (Rion) Bowen. She was born Janu- 
ary 21. 1777. and of the ten children born to 
this union eight grew to maturity, namely, — 
Richard. Eliza Ann, Alfred, Thomas, James, 
Nancy Tucker, Perry and Susan Rion. Rich- 
ard, the first born, went to Missouri, locating 
near Westport Landing, now Kansas City. 
He married Judith Ann Glover, who had been 
raised by John Bristow. and she died in Mis- 
souri. Subsequently Richard married Mrs. 
Mary Harrison, mother-in-law of General 
John S. "Cerro Gordo" Williams. By his 
first wife he had three children, of whom Eli- 
za died unmarried ; as did one son Thomas. 
The other son. John Bristow, moved early in 
life to Westport, Missouri ; he served in the 
^Missouri state senate from 1870 to 1874 and 
w'as prominently mentioned for governor of 
the state. He took an active part in the 
affairs of- the Baptist church, was for many 
years moderator of the Blue River Association 
and was long president of the board of trus- 



tees of William Jewell College, at Liberty, 
Missouri. He had four sons, one of whom, 
Thomas ]., was in Missouri state senate from 
1004 to 1908. John Bristow Wornall had 
three other sons, Francis Clay, John B., Jr., 
and Charles Hardin. 

Eliza Ann, the second child of Thomas and 
Susan (Rion) Wornall, married a Mr. An- 
derson, of Winchester, Kentucky ; they had 
no children. Alfred, the third child, married 
Lucinda Hedges and he was summoned to 
eternal rest in 1836, being survived by one 
son Alfred, who served in the Confederate 
army during the Civil war and who married 
Margaret Llamilton. He died September 19, 
1908, and was not survived by any children. 
Thomas, Jr., the fourth in order of birth of 
the above-mentioned children, married Re- 
becca Beau and had two children, James W., 
who wedded Sophia Edwards, had no off- 
spring; and John T., who married first Ann 
Ewalt and later Mrs. Redmon : The latter 
union was prolific of one son, John T., Jr., 
now of Lair Station, Harrison county, Ken- 
tucky. James Rion Wornall, fifth child of 
Thomas and Susan Wornall, married Anne 
Moore, of Winchester, Kentucky: They had 
two daughters, the elder of whom, Eliza, 
married Joseph Croxton, of near Winchester, 
and has four children, Anne, Carrie Lee, Jo- 
seph and Clay ; and the younger of whom, 
Ann Clay, married William Buckner, of Bour- 
bon county, Kentucky, and became the mother 
of three children, Thomas Moore, James Mon- 
roe and Lucy. Nancy Tucker Wornall, sixth 
child of Thomas and Susan Wornall, was unit- 
ed in marriage to Samuel (Graybeard) Clay, 
of Bourbon county: They had four chil- 
dren, of whom Alfied died in youth; Thomas 
Henr>' married Fannie Conn Williams, of 
Paris, Kentucky, and has four children, 
George Williams, Thomas Henry, Jr., Naunine 
and Alfred ; Susan Elizabeth married Cassius 
M. Clay, Jr., prominent in politics and candi- 
date for governor of Kentucky, in 191 1 : They 
had four children, Brutus J., Samuel H., An- 
nie L. and Sue ; James Eldred Clay, fourth 
child of Nancy T. W. Clay, married Elizabeth 
Alexander, of Paris, Kentucky, and had five 
children. Belle Brent, Naunine, James E., Jr., 
Samuel and Charlton. Perry Wornall, 
youngest son of Thomas and Susan R. Worn- 
all, was born October 12, 1819, and married 
Elizabeth Ewalt, daughter of Samuel and Syn- 
thia (Pugh) Ewalt and half sister of Ann 
Ewalt, who married John T. Wornall, as pre- 
viously noted. They had two sons, Samuel 
Ewalt. born March 27, 1846, and Thomas 
Parker, born December 13, 1847, and died 
November 23, 1891. Samuel Ewalt Wornall 



Vol. Ill— 12 



X32i HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

now resides in the vicinity of Kansas City, 1)on county on the 2nc\ of March, 1879. and is 
Missouri. He married AHce W. iJuchanan a son of '1 homas 1'. and Catherine (Kate) K. 
of Louisville, Kentucky, and they became the (Spears) Wornall, both of whom were like- 
parents of four children. Rowen B., Eliza- wise natives of this county, where the former 
beth. Douglas 15. and I^dyth. Thomas Park- was born on the 13th of Xovember, 1847, and 
er Wornall married Kate Spears, of Paris, the latter on the 2nd of August, 1852. Their 
Kentucky, and had one son, William Pugh to marriage was solemnized on the 27th of Oc- 
whom this sketch is dedicated. Susan Rion, tober, 1875. Thomas P. Wornall was a son 
youngest child of Thomas and Susan Worn- of Perry and h^lizabeth (Ewalt) Wornall, 
all. married Francis Povall Clay, a brother of Ijoth of whom were natives of Kentucky and 
Samuel (Graybeard) Clay, wdio married her the former of whom was a son of Roby and 
sister, Nancy Tucker Wornall, as already Susan (Rion) Wornall. Thomas W. was a 
noted. To this union were born four chil- son of Roby and Edith Wornall, who were 
dren who grew to maturity. Of these, the numbered among the sterling pioneers of the 
oldest, William Henry, married Emma Spears, old J^lue Grass state. After his marriage 
sister of Kate P. Wornall, and they have two Thomas P. Wornall resided upon and oper- 
sons living. ]\Iatt, of South Omaha, Nebraska, ated the fine old homestead farm of his father, 
and Roby. of Lexington. Kentucky; Francis five miles west of Paris, until 1884. when he 
P.. Jr.. the next child of Susan and Francis purchased land and established his home upon 
P. Clay, married Emily Miller and has two the farm now owned by his son, William P., 
sons, Horace Miller and Francis Depew ; the the subject of this review. This well im- 
third child. Nannie, wedded Walker Buckner proved farmstead comprises three hundred 
and they have four children — Walker Jr., and ninety acres and is eligibly located five 
Woodford, Susan C. and William ; Oliver miles east of Paris, on the Steele turnpike. 
Perry, the youngest child of Susan R. W. Here the father continued to maintain his 
Clay and Francis P. Clay, married Willie home until his death, which occurred on the 
Kearns. and they have one child. Eleanor. 23rd of November. 1891. He was a man of 

The original seat of the Wornall family in impregnable integrity in all the relations of 
Kentucky was the home of Thomas and Susan life and was one of the highly esteemed and 
(Rion) Wornall. the same having been locat- representative citizens of his native county, 
«ed in Clark county, six miles north of Win- where he conducted agricultural operations 
Chester, near the Paris and Winchester pike, and stock-growfng upon an extensive scale 
Of their children three, Perry, Nancy and and where he also built up a successful enter- 
Susan, removed to Bourbon county, near prise in the buying and shipping of live stock. 
Paris, this state. One son. Richard, went to On the 23d of January, 1900. his widow be- 
Missouri but later returned to Kentucky, came the wife of J. William Bedford and they 
where his death occurred about the year 1862, now reside about eight miles east of Paris, 
near Winchester, in Clark county. His son. where Mr. Bedford has a valuable farm. 
John B.. has numerous descendants near Kan- Thomas P. and Catherine K. (Spears) Worn- 
sas City, Missouri, where he once resided, all became the parents of only one child, Wil- 
Samuel E. Wornall, son of Perry, and his liam P., to whom this sketch is dedicated, 
children also reside near Kansas City. Mis- William P. Wornall was reared to the stur- 
souri. Thomas Wornall. Jr.. son of Thomas dy discipline of the home farm and after 
and vSusan Wornall. removed to Harrison availing himself of the advantages of the 
county, Kentucky, where his grandson, John academy, conducted by William L. Yerkes, at 
T. (Tom) Wornall, lives, at Lair Station. Paris, he continued his studies in the Univer- 
His family and that of William P. Wornall. sity of Kentucky, at Lexington. He was but 
of near Paris. Kentucky (son of Thomas twelve years of age at the time of his father's 
Parker W^ornair),.are the only representatives death and while a mere boy he assumed much 
of the W'ornall family in Kentucky that bear responsibility in connection with the home 
the name. farm, upon which he has continued to reside 

The foregoing genealogical data includes until the present time and upon which he 
many of the best families in Kentucky, nu- has conducted most successful operations as 
merous of the descendants being mentioned a general agriculturist and stock-grower. His 
individually on other pages of this work, industry and good management are on a par- 
Following is a brief sketch of \Mlliam Pugh ity with his progressive methods and he is 
Wornall. whose name introduces this article, one of the able and popular business men of 
Further data are inserted here tracing his his home county. His political allegiance is 
direct descent. given to the Democratic party ; he is affiliated 

William Pugh Wornall was born in Bour- with Paris Lodge. No. 373. Benevolent & Pro- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1325 

lective Order of Elks ; and he is a devout age at the time when she was summoned to the 
member of the Christian church. His wife hfe eternal. She was a daughter of Rev. 
is a member of the Presbyterian church and William jolinston, who was a pioneer clergy- 
she also is a member of the Daughters of the man of the Baptist church and who was well 
American Revolution. known throughout northern Kentucky and 

On the nth of April. 1901, Mr. Wornall southern Indiana, throughout which section 

was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth B. he long labored with all of zeal and consecra- 

Woodford, who was born in Bourbon county tion in the work of his chosen vocation. He 

on the ist of July. 1880. and who is a daugh- was born in Ireland and was reared in the faith 

ter of Benjamin and Alice (Brooks) Wood- of the Catholic church. His father was a suc- 

ford. Air. and Mrs. Wornall became the cessful manufacturer of linen in the Emerald 

parents of four children, two of wdiom died in Isle, but at the age of seventeen years young 

infancy, unnamed; William P., Jr., was born Johnston ran away from home and finally em- 

on the 24th of June. 1904; and B. Woodford igrated to America. He was a man of alert 

was born on the 13th of June. 1909. mentality and for a time he was engaged in 

Wn.LiAM J. Rice. — In the thriving village the practice of law, a profession which he 

of Ghent, Carroll county, Mr. Rice is found soon abandoned to enter the ministry of the 

numbered among the representative citizens Baptist church, in connection with the work 

and most progressive and popular merchants of which he traveled extensively throughout 

of his native place, and he is a scion of the the northern part of Kentucky, as well as in 

third generation of the family in Kentucky, the southern counties of Indiana. He passed 

where his paternal grandfather established his tlie closing years of his life at LaPlata. Ma- 

I'lome in the pioneer days. con county. Missouri. He was twice married 

William Johnston Rice was born at Ghent, and the maiden name of his second wife (the 
Carroll county, on the 17th of March, 1865, mother of Mrs. Elizabeth Rice) was Cobb, 
and is a son of David R. and Elizabeth (John- David R. and Elizabeth (Johnston) Rice were 
ston) Rice, the former of whom was born in both earnest and consistent members of the 
Montgomery county, this state, and the latter 1 baptist church, and his political support was 
at Aurora. Dearborn county. Indiana. The given to the Democratic party. The only child 
lineage of the Rice family is traced back to is he to whom this sketch is dedicated, 
staunch German origin and family tradition William J. Rice passed his boyhood and 
gives ample authority for the statement that youth in Ghent and was afforded the advan- 
the early representatives of the name in tages of an excellent private school and this 
America settled in the city of Philadelphia in discipline was supplemented by higher aca- 
the colonial epoch of our national history. Da- demic training in Georgetown College, at 
vid Rice, grandfather of him whose name in- Georgetown, this state. As a young man he 
troduces this article, was born and reared in w^ent to the city of Louisville, where he was 
the old Keystone state and he figures as the associated with John A. Stratton in the real- 
founder of the family in Kentuck}'. He made estate business for a period of eight years. He 
the overland journey from Philadelphia with then returned to Ghent and engaged in the 
team and wagon and numbered himself among general merchandise business, in which he has 
the pioneers of Montgomery county. Ken- since continued most successfully, under the 
tucky, where he later removed to Carroll firm name of W. J. Rice & Company. He ini- 
county, where he continued to be identified tiated operation upon a modest scale and as 
with agricultural pursuits until his death. Da- rapidly as circumstances justified he expanded 
vid R. Rice was a child at the time of the the scope of the enterprise until the establish- 
family removal from Montgomery county to ment now under his control is recognized as 
Carroll county, in which latter he was reared the leading department store of Ghent. Care- 
to manhood, in the meanwdiile receiving such ful and honorable business methods have 
advantages as were afforded in the common gained to the firm a large and appreciative pat- 
schools of the locality and period. He gained ronage, and the same is drawn from the fine 
prestige as one of the energetic, progressive section of country normally tributary to the 
and successful agriculturists and stock-grow- thriving village of Ghent, where Mr. Rice has 
ers of the county and with these lines of in- ever held the unqualified confidence and re- 
dustry he continued to be actively concerned gard of all who know him, — and it may well 
for many years. He passed the closing days be said that in this section of his native county 
of his life in the village of Ghent and was not to know William J. Rice is practically to 
fifty-two years of age at the time of his de- argue oneself unknown. Mr. Rice is intrin- 
mise. His devoted wife survived him by a sically loyal and progressive as a citizen and 
number of years and was sixty-one years of is an exponent of high civic ideals, as shown 



1326 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



in the earnest sup])ort given by him to all 
measures tending to advance the general weal 
of the community. In ])olitics he is found 
aligned as a staunch and intelligent supporter 
of the cause of the l\e])ul)lican party ; he is 
giffiliated with the Masonic fraternity, includ- 
ing DeMolay Commandery, Knights Templar, 
and Kosair Temple of the Ancient Arabic 
Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, in 
the city of Louisville ; and in his native vil- 
lage he holds membership in the lodge of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. While 
a resident of Louisville he also was actively 
identified with the local lodge of the benevo- 
lent & Protective Order of Elks, of which he 
was treasurer for four years. He and his wife 
are zealous members of the Baptist church in 
Ghent, and he has served as its treasurer for 
several years past. 

On the 7th of January. 1903, Mr. Rice was 
united in marriage to Miss Ella Stucy, who 
was born and reared in the village of Ghent 
and who is a daughter of Frederick Stucy. 
a well known resident of Carroll county and 
a prominent tobacco dealer of this section of 
the state. 

NoRBOuRN Arterburn. — One of the most 
extensive land holders and most honored and 
influential citizens of Jefiferson county is Nor- 
bourn Arterburn, who resides on his splendid 
country estate in the village of St. Matthews. 
He is a scion of one of the sterling pioneer 
families of this county and is well upholding 
the prestige of the name which he bears, — a 
name that has been closely identified w^ith the 
civic and material upbuilding of Jefiferson 
, county. 

Mr. Arterburn was born on the old family 
homestead on Beargrass creek, Jefiferson 
county, on the 26th of February, 1857. The 
original representatives of the family in Ken- 
tucky were William and Rachel (Smoot) Ar- 
terburn, who removed from Shenandoah 
county, in the beautiful Shenandoah valley of 
Virginia, to Kentucky in the pioneer days. 
They made the voyage down the Ohio river on 
flat boats and landed at the mouth of Goose 
Creek, from which point they proceeded over- 
land to Beargrass creek, where they made per- 
manent settlement. Here William A. secured 
a large tract of wild land and instituted the re- 
clamation of the same. In the family were 
nine sons, all of whom were born in Ken- 
tucky except the eldest, and their names are 
here entered in order of birth, — Harrison, 
Burrus, Branham, Dennis, Norbourn, William 
C, Jordan, Tarlton and Covington. William 
Arterburn, the founder of the Kentucky 
branch of the family, continued to reside on 



his homestead until his death, in the prime of 
life, and upon his widow devolved the re- 
s])onsibility of rearing the nine sons. Well 
did she perform her task and her reward was 
ample, as in later years she was cared for by 
her children with the utmost filial solicitude. 
She attained to the venerable age of ninety- 
five years and her death occurred on the farm 
now occupied l)y her grandson, Norbourn Ar- 
terburn, whose name initiates this review. 

William C. Arterburn, the sixth son of 
William and Rachel Arterburn, was born on 
the old homestead on Beargrass creek, Jefifer- 
son county, in the year 1816, and his entire 
life was passed in his native county, where 
he died in 1901. He was reared under the 
conditions and influence of the pioneer days 
and contributed his quota to the arduous work 
of reclaiming the old homestead farm. He 
eventually became one of the most successful 
agriculturists and stock-growers of Jefiferson 
county and he was equally prominent as a 
trader and general business man. He was en- 
dowed with strong mentality and mature judg- 
ment and was thus able to direct his various 
enterprises in a most successful way, the while 
his course was governed by the highest prin- 
ciples of integrity and honor, so that he was 
not denied the fullest measure of popular con- 
fidence and esteem in the county which rep- 
resented his home throughout his long and use- 
ful life. He became a stockholder in many 
banking institutions and at the time of his 
death he was the owner of about eight hun- 
dred acres of farm land, besides much valuable 
real estate in the city of Louisville. He was 
well equipped for leadership in thought and 
action and was not only regarded as one of the 
ablest financiers of his day in Jefiferson county 
but also was known as a citizen of utmost loy- 
alty and progressiveness. — one who was ever 
ready to lend his influence and co-operation 
in support of all measures tending to advance 
the general welfare of the community. W'ill- 
iam C. Arterburn was twice married, his first 
union having been with Miss Cynthia Parks, 
who died when a young woman and who left 
no children. For his second wife he married 
Miss Sarah Rudy, who was born and reared 
in Jefiferson county and who was a daughter 
of George Rudy, who was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, of German lineage, and who became 
one of the early settlers of Jefiferson county, 
Kentucky, where he continued to reside until 
his death. Mrs. Sarah (Rudy) Arterburn 
was summoned to the life eternal in July, 
1893, ^^^^ ^^^^ became the mother of two chil- 
dren, of whom the subject of this review is 
the elder and the one surviving; Kate be- 



PUBLIC LIBRARf 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1327 



came the wife of James ]\IcBurney, of Louis- 
ville, where her death occurred, and she is sur- 
vived by three children. 

Xorbourn Arterburn gained his early educa- 
tional discipline in private schools in Jefferson 
county and supplemented this by a course in 
the public schools of the city of Louisville, 
where he completed the curriculum of the high 
school and where he also continued his studies 
for some time in the Rugby School. As he 
was the only son, he became associated with his 
father in the management of the home farm 
and other business interests after he left 
school and finally he assumed virtually the en- 
tire charge of his father's multifarious busi- 
ness aft'airs, thus continuing until his honored 
sire had been summoned from the scene of 
life's mortal endeavors. He succeeded to the 
ownership of the major portion of his father's 
property and as an evidence that he has him- 
self shown the same excellent business qual- 
ifications that brought success to his father 
it may be stated that he has increased his 
landed estate from eight hundred acres to 
one thousand acres, besides which he has 
amplified the other interests of the estate. 
He is a director of the United States Trust 
Company of Louisville, in which city he is 
also a large stockholder in the Louisville Trust 
Company, the Columbia Trust Company and 
the Southern National Bank. He is a pro- 
gressive and public-spirited citizen and while 
he has never sought or desired political office 
he accords a stanch allegiance to the cause of 
the Democratic party. 

In the year 1882 Mr. Arterburn was united 
in marriage to Miss Susan M. Hall, who was 
born at Shelbyville, Kentucky and who is a 
daughter of William C. and Emma (Ramsey) 
Hall. Concerning the children of this union 
the following brief record is entered. Will- 
iam Norbourn, who was graduated in Yale 
University, is the executive head of the firm 
of Wood, Stubbs & Company, extensive seed 
merchants in the city of Louisville. He mar- 
ried Aliss Ruth Herr and they have two chil- 
dren, — William Norbourn, Jr., and Elizabeth 
Adair. Frank Braham Arterburn, the sec- 
ond son, was graduated in the Kentucky Mil- 
itary Institute, is a bachelor and is associated 
in the work and management of the home- 
stead farm. Burton Hall Arterburn, who like- 
wise was graduated in the Kentucky Military 
Institute, is now engaged in the insurance bus- 
iness at Louisville, Kentucky. He married 
Miss Hazel Straffer, of Louisville. Kate, 
who was afforded the advantages of Hamilton 
College, at Lexington, this state, is now the 
wife of H. A. Collins, of O'Bannon Station, 
Jefferson county, and they have one daughter. 



— Sarah Louise. Crawford Arterburn at- 
tended the Kentucky Military Institute and a 
manual training school and commercial col- 
lege in the city of Louisville, and he is now at 
the parental home. Paul Rudy Arterburn, the 
youngest of the children, is a member of the 
class of 1912 in the Kentucky Military In- 
stitute. 

TiLFORD T. Metcalf, M. D. — There is al- 
ways room at the top for the man who takes 
life earnestly and endeavors with determina- 
tion, in spite of every disadvantageous sur- 
rounding, to work his way to a position in 
which he will be the peer of any man, and to 
such a man we have a particular pleasure in 
introducing our reader. Tilford T. ]\Ietcalf 
has fulfilled all the dreams of a youthful am- 
bition and a resume of his life will not only 
be interesting but instructive. 

Dr. Metcalf, of Independence. Kentucky, 
was born in Grant county, Kentucky, July 29, 
i860, the son of Tilford and Matilda (Loom- 
is) Metcalf, who were also natives of Grant 
county. His father was a merchant in Grant 
county for many years and died there in 1871, 
his wife preceding him in death in the year 
1867. They were the parents of two children, 
both of wdiom are living, our subject and Min- 
nie, wife of P. \'allandigham, of Crittenden, 
Kentucky. The father had been previously 
married to a Miss Mann, a native of Pendleton 
county, Kentucky, by wdiom he had nine chil- 
dren, six living at the present time. His third 
marriage was to Anna Newman, a native of 
Cincinnati, and of this marriage there was one 
child, now deceased. 

Dr. Metcalf was the younger of the two 
children resulting from the second marriage, 
his mother dying when he was seven years 
old. He was reared in Grant county, receiv- 
ing a common-school education, and is in 
every way a self made man and educated by 
his own efforts. Until he was nineteen years 
old he lived and worked on a farm at home. 
But his ambition was not content with what 
seemed to him a mediocre sort of living, and 
with a definite end in view he began the study 
of medicine with Dr. J. M. Chambers, of In- 
dependence, Kentucky, for whom he had 
worked as a boy and later entered the Ohio 
^ledical College at Cincinnati, graduating in 
1883. at which time he was five hundred dol- 
lars in debt for his medical education. But 
he now had the adequate preliminaries and 
started in fearlessly to work out his destiny, 
in life. He began to practice in Independence 
with his preceptor, with whom he remained 
for a year and since then has continued alone, 
building up a large and paying business. He 
has been successful in more ways than this 



1328 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



alone. In connection uitli his practice he car- 
ried on farming- and has gradually accumu- 
lated land until he now owns three farms, all 
under cultivation and aggregating about four 
hundred and seventy-five acres. Dr. Aletcalf 
has also made a specialty of stock, raising 
high grade cattle and tobacco extensively. The 
home farm of two hundred and forty-five 
acres adjoins Independence. In politics Dr. 
JMetcalf has taken an active part, being a 
stanch Democrat and for the past sixteen 
years has served as county treasurer of Ken- 
ton county. lie is a member of the Elks at 
Covington, also the Knights of Pythias, in 
which latter he has passed the chairs and been 
a representative at the Grand Lodge. Dr. 
Metcalf has taken an important part in the 
organization of several companies ; he was 
one of the organizers of the Latonia Deposit 
Bank and served as director two years ; helped 
organize the Equitable Bank and Trust Com- 
pany at Walton. Kentucky, and has been a 
director since the first; helped organize the 
People's Savings Bank and Trust Company, 
Covington. Kentucky, and is now a director, 
and also helped organize the Central Savings 
Bank and Trust Company at Covington. 

Dr. ]\Ietcalf in 1889 married Anna Belle 
Stephens, a native of Kenton county, Ken- 
tucky, and a daughter of Thomas Stephens, 
a farmer and pioneer who resides in Coving- 
ton. Dr. Metcalf and wife have two children, 
Nellie K. and Helen L. 

William A. Price.— Few residents of Er- 
langer have been more actively connected 
with its upbuilding and progress than William 
A. Price, president of that substantial and 
conservative institution, the Erlanger Deposit 
Bank. The executive ability of Mr. Price and 
his gift of making ideas splendid realities was 
never more fully demonstrated than in the 
active part he played in the organization of 
the bank. It was incorporated in 1892 with 
a capital stock of fifty thousand dollars, Mr. 
Price being one of the first directors as well 
as organizers. The officers who first 
commanded the destinies of the new concern 
were W. H. Baker, president, and F. A. Utz, 
vice-president. The present officers are as 
follows: Mr. Price, president; E. H. Blank- 
enbeker, vice-president ; L. P. Aylor, J. T. 
Cravens, W. P. Baemon, James A. Huey, Jos- 
eph A. Graves, F. A. Utz and O. 'M. Rogers, 
directors. 

Air. Price was born in Boone county Feb- 
ruary 24. 1850. and is a son of Albert and 
Frances (Souther) Price, the former a native 
of Woodford county and the latter of Boone 
county. The Prices are an old and honored 
Kentucky family and settled in Woodford 
county at an early day, later locating in Boone 



county. Albert Price was a pioneer and one i 
of those who brought the splendid untamed 
acres to productiveness. He passed to the 
Great Beyond while living on the homestead 
in Boone county, his years numbering fifty- 
three. His wife died there many years after- 
ward, at the age of seventy-seven. They gave 
four children to the state, the subject being 
the tliird in order of birth. 

William A. Price passed his early years 
upon his father's country estate and received 
his education in the public and private schools 
of the locality, finishing his educational dis- 
cipline at an academy in Virginia. His early 
career was devoted to agriculture, for a good 
many years carrying on operations in this line 
in Boone county. In 1894 he made a radical 
change and one which has proved satisfactory 
in the extreme, by locating in Erlanger and, 
as before described, engaging in the banking 
business. 

Mr. Price is Democratic in his political pro- 
clivities and is one of Erlanger's public spir- 
ited citizens, keeping well informed as to is- 
sues of the day and giving his support to such 
measures as in his opinion will result in gen- 
eral advancement and well being. He and his 
wife are members of the Christian church and 
are active and liberal in its good works. 

In 1871, Mr. Price was united in marriage 
to Miss Anna M. Graves, a native of Kenton 
county. She is a daughter of Milton Graves, 
a Kenton county farmer who subsequently re- 
moved to Boone county, where he died. To 
the subject and his wife have been born three 
children — Milton Carl. Alonzo B. and Warren 
Albert, the latter of whom died at six months. 

David Howard McKinley, M. D., is one 
of the young physicians of Winchester, quite 
recently come into practice, but with un- 
bounded ambition, talent, a splendid educa- 
tion, a mind and understanding receptive to 
learning and thus conducing to all the latest 
and most modern improvements and discoveries 
in this field of science there can be no doubt 
of his success and that farther afield than his 
home town his name will be known in the 
future. 

Dr. McKinley was born in Winchester, 
Kentucky, November 20, 1884, the son of Dr. 
I. H. Floward McKinley. who was born in 
Spencer county, Kentucky, January 11, 1853, 
and who died in his office in Winchester. Ken- 
tucky, April 14, 1908. His father, David, was 
a native of Spencer county, Kentucky, and his 
father was James McKinley, a native of Ire- 
land, who came to Kentucky among the early 
pioneers. Our subject's father was reared on 
a farm and was educated at the common 
schools, supplementing this with a course at 
the Elizabethtown school, from which he was 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1329 



graduated. Then with the view of making 
mechcine his life study and profession he went 
to Louisville and studied the necessary course 
and graduated from the Hospital College m 
1878 and further increased his knowledge and 
gamed experience by becoming an interne in 
the Louisville City Hospital, in which position 
he remained until the spring of 1879, when he 
came to Winchester, Kentucky. 

In that city he formed a partnership with 
Dr. Hub Taylor, which lasted for ten years, 
and from that time practiced by himself. His 
wdiole life was devoted to his profession and 
he met wdth deserved success, an extensive 
patronage and a host of warm friends. He 
served for a term on the school board and 
was an elder in the Presbyterian church for a 
number of years. The Doctor was a promi- 
nent member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and of the Masonic Order. He 
was a distant relation of the late President 
:\IcKinlev, but while differing from him in 
politics, "in that the Doctor w^as a Democrat, 
still the hne characteristics which distin- 
guished the one were most notable in the 

other. . 

Dr. I. H. McKinley married Lucy Tallif- 
fero. who was born in Winchester, Kentucky. 
April II, 1854, a descendant of the old Tallif- 
fero and Hickman families who were promi- 
nent in the early history of Kentucky. ^ To 
this union three children were born: Susie 
N., the wife of S. T. Davis, living in Win- 
chester; David Howard, our subject; and 
Margaret Alyette, wife of Floyd Clay, of 
Winchester. 

David Howard McKinley. our subject, was 
reared in Winchester and received his literary 
education first at the common schools, then 
in the Kentucky Wesleyan College, from 
which he graduated in 1899, afterw^ard dur- 
ing the years 1904-05. at the University of 
X'irginia and finally graduated from the Louis- 
ville Medical school. After completing this 
complete course of instruction. Dr. McKinley 
entered into the practice of his profession wath 
his father, wdiose untimely demise we have 
mentioned and wdio was greatly mourned by 
a wide circle of friends. The young Doctor 
alreadv has shown that he is a worthy fol- 
lower m his father's footsteps, than which no 
finer testimonial can be expressed. 

I. H. MacNeill. D. D.— It is with a full 
appreciation of all that is demanded and of 
the carefulness that must be accorded each 
statement, and yet with a feeling of satisfac- 
tion, that we endeavor the task of touching 
briefly upon the details of the record of the 
character of the able and devoted pastor of 
the First Christian church of Winchester, 



Kentucky. He has been an indefatigable and 
zealous worker in promoting both tlie tem- 
poral and spiritual growth of the parish over 
winch he is placed in charge, while his intiu- 
ence in diocesan affairs has been potent for 
good. 

Rev. J. H. MacXeill is in his fourth year 
of service for the First Christian church of 
Winchester, Kentucky. He was born on 
Prince Edward Island, Canada, in 1857, the 
son of John MacNeill, w'ho was born on the 
island of Colonsay off the coast of Scotland. 
He was educated in the University of Glas- 
gow, ordained in the Baptist church and sent 
to Canada while a young man. Here he met 
with and married Barbara McDonald, who 
was also Scotch. He spent his life there w^ork- 
ing for the church and died at the age of 
seventy-seven years, active until his death. 
His wife lived to the age of eighty-three years. 
They were the parents of ten children, seven 
sons of whom are living. 

Rev. J. H. MacNeill received part of his 
education in a grammar school and Normal 
college of his island home, where he taughc 
school for five years. He entered the Bible 
college of Kentucky University, now Tran- 
sylvania, in 1882, from which he graduated in 
1886. He preached for two years and three 
months in Louisville, Kentucky, and from 
there went to Rushville, Indiana, wdiere he 
preached for eleven years, building up a great 
church of nine hundred members and erecting 
a fine church and brick parsonage. From 
Rushville he went to Muncie, Indiana, where 
he spent three fruitful years. At the persist- 
ent "call," thrice repeated, of the church at 
Kokomo, Indiana, he removed to that impor- 
tant center, where he remained for six years 
and where he built one of the finest church 
houses in the state, costing over forty thou- 
sand dollars and where he also lead in the 
building up of probably the largest Bible 
school then knowm among the disciples, with 
an average attendance of over six hundred. 
In 1907 Rev. J. H. MacNeill begin his pres- 
ent ministry, where he has the love and re- 
spect not only of his own people but of the 
entire community. 

On May 29, 1888, our subject was married 
to Tennie H. Croman who was born in Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, and reared in Louisville, Ken- 
tucky. Four children have been born to this 
union; Homer, in business in Winchester, 
Kentucky, and Frank and Josephine, at home, 
lohn Ir.'died when two and one-half years of 

It will be appropriate to mention some facts 
about the church over which Rev. J. H. Mac- 
Neill is at present presiding, as it is one of the 



1330 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

oldest Christian churches in the state, dating ary pastors: at Jubbulpore, India; Albuquer- 

back ahnost to the beginning of the '"Kestora- que, New Alexico; Hazel Creen, Kentucky, 

lion movement" begun by ihonias and Alex- and a station on the foreign held not yet se- 

ander Campbell in 1809. The mother and lected by the women of the church who have 

grandmother of the venerable Llder James recently become a "Living Link." 

VV. Harding, who was born in 1823 and who , The missionary and benevolent ofiferings of 

still lives in Winchester, were charter mem- the church amount each year to almost that 

bers. The date of the organization is un- contributed to local work. For almost a cen- 

known but Elder William Morton was the tury this splendid church has been a dominant 

organizer. The original membership was factor in the religious life of the city and 

comi)osed mahdy of a few people from "Old county, standing for the safety of property, 

Friendship" Baptist church, which was lo- the conservation of peace, and the purihcation 

cated where the Winchester cemetery now is. and exaltation of human life. Its influence 

1 he congregation built its hrst house of wor- for good canot he measured until time shall 

ship in 1837 and in 1845 ^ "^w site was pur- be no more. 

chased, and a building erected. Thirty years William W. Tarvin, AI. D. — Through his 
afterward a new building, which continued prestige as one of the leading physicians and 
for many years to be the largest and hnest surgeons of his native city of Covington, Dr. 
house of worship in the city, was erected on Tarvin .gives effective contradistinction to 
the same site. It continued to be the home the scriptural statement that "A prophet is not 
and workshop of the church until destroyed without honor save in his own country." He 
by hre in February, 1908. During these thirty has been engaged in the successful practice 
years and more, from 1837, Elder Aylette of his profession in Covington for nearly a 
Raines of Paris, Kentucky, preached for the quarter of a century, during which he has re- 
congregation once a month, serving Paris and tained a large and representative clientele, and 
North Middleton at the same time. besides which he has kept in close touch with 
The membership at this time was made up the advances made 'in both branches of his 
largely of country people, the population of profession. 

Winchester being only about two hundred and William Woodward Tarvin was born in 
hfty as late as 1839. The names of many of Covington, on the nth of August, 1864, and 
the prominent families nov/ so well and hon- is the only child of Richard J. and EmmH. 
orably known in Clark county are to be found (Wiley) Tarvin, the former of whom was 
on that early roster. Many of the famous born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and the latter in 
preachers of those times held meeting for the Campbell county, Kentucky. The lineage of 
church, among them, John T. Johnson, John both families is traced back to stanch English 
A. Gano, Dr. Hopson, Moses E. Lard, Benj. origin, and the first representative of the Tar- 
Franklin, John I. Rogers and J. W. McGar- vin family in America here took up their res- 
vey. "Raccoon" John Smith and Alexander idence in 1760; they were Dunkards in their 
Campbell also preached a few times. Follow- religious faith and associations. The Wiley 
ing are some of the later ministers of the family was early founded in the state of New 
congregation: J. B. Briney from 1871-1874, York, and the greater number of its members, 
J. B. McGinn 'from 1875-1877, B. F. Clay as well as those of the Tarvin family, have 
from 1877-1880, H. T. Wilson from 1880- been honest and unpretentious representatives 
1882, I. C. Tully from 1883-1885, J. W. Mc- of the great basic art of agriculture. Richar 1 
Garvey and Mark Collis during "1886. H. W. J. Tarvin, father of the Doctor, now resides 
Elliott 1887, J. S. Kendrick 1888-1891, I. J. in the city of Cincinnati, Ohio, where he is 
Spencer 1892 and 1893, W. S. Keene from secretary and treasurer of the Stacy Manu- 
1894 until his death in April, 1898, T. B. facturing Company, one of the important in- 
W'alker from 1898-1901, C. J. Armstrong dustrial concerns of that city. His first wife 
from 1902-1907 and J. H. MacNeill who is died in 1888 and he subsequently married Miss 
still serving the church. The membership is Josephine Storch ; the union being without is- 
now over seven hundred and fifty, its Bible sue. 

school numbers over six hundred and they Dr. Tarvin was reared to maturity in Cov- 

now worship in one of the finest church edi'- ington, to whose public schools he is indebted 

fices in the state, erected in 1908 at a cost of for his early educational training._ Asa boy 

about seventv-five thousand dollars. It is a and young man he was employed in a station- 

thoroughlv equipped twentieth centurv church ery store in this city and, in preparation for 

plant. This church is intelligently and enthu- the work of his chosen profession he began 

siasticallv missionary. Besides its own minis- the study of medicine under the able pre- 

ter and his assistant it supports four mission- ceptorship of Dr. Charles Kearns. of Coving- 



•UBiiC LIBRAR* 



MT«;^ 






HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1381 



ton, of whom specific mention is made on 
other pages of this work. In October, 1882, 
he was matriculated in the Ohio Medical Col- 
lege, which is now the medical department of 
the University of Cincinnati, and in this in- 
stitution he was graduated as a member of 
the class of 1886, duly receiving his well 
earned degree of Doctor of Medicine. He 
forthwith opened an office in his native city, 
and during the intervening years he has held 
a secure place as one of the representative 
members of his profession in Covington, where 
he controls a general practice and where he 
has specialized in surgery, in which he has 
been particularly successful. He is one of the 
valued members of the Campbell-Kenton 
County Medical Society, of which he has 
served as president, and he is also actively 
identified with the Kentucky State Medical 
Society and the American Medical Association. 
He is physician of the Protestant Children's 
Home and is a member of the medical staff of 
St. Elizabeth's Hospital. For seven years he 
served as city surgeon and jail physician of 
Covington, and for fifteen years he held the 
position of county coroner. In politics the 
Doctor accords a stanch allegiance to the 
cause of the Democratic party, and on its 
ticket he was elected county coroner on four 
different occasions. He is at the present time 
d member of the board of health of Covington. 
Mrs. Tarvin is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. South. 

On the 14th of January. 1885. Dr. Tar- 
vin was united in marriage to Miss Lulu 
H. Marsh, who was born and reared in Cov- 
ington and who is a daughter of Euclid W. and 
Emma (Krupper) Marsh, both of whom were 
likewise born in Covington, where their re- 
spective parents settled in the pioneer days, 
having come hither from \'irginia. Euclid W. 
Marsh was a prominent tobacco merchant in 
Covington, and his father likewise had been 
identified with this line of enterprise. Dr. 
and Mrs. Tarvin have one daughter. Rebecca 
M.. who is now the wife of John T. Ranshaw, 
of Covington. 

Fames A. Booxe. — The efficient clerk of 
Clark county is James A. Boone, who since 
1888 has been a resident of this particularly 
favored portion of the state. He is indeed a 
Kentuckian of Kentuckians. being descended 
m a collateral line from the very stock which 
produced that famous pioneer. Daniel Boone. 
Mr. Boone is an enterprising business man 
and a lodge man of wide acquaintance and 
popularity, his membership extending to no 
less than six organizations. 

He was born Januarv 24. 1867. the names 
of his parents being John and Amanda 



(^Dodd) Boone. The father was born in 
Harrison county, Indiana, and died February 
14, 1882, aged torty-four years, ihe mother, 
wlio was a native Virginian, is seventy-three 
years old and makes her home in the tioosier 
state. The paternal grandfather, Craven 
Boone, was a native of Alontgomery county 
and one of its pioneers. At an early day lie 
removed to Harrison county, Indiana, and 
took a tract of wild land, which he pro- 
ceeded to clear and bring to a state of cultiva- 
tion. Boone township in that county bears 
his name, this being appropriate from the fact 
that in the community in which he made his 
home for so many years he was a factor foi 
good. He was a man of some eccentricities 
and hewed his own tomb out of the solid rock 
upon his farm, his remains being therein in- 
terred after his demise. The lather was a 
good citizen who followed the agricultural line 
throughout the course of his life and who was 
gathered to his fathers at his home in In- 
diana. 

It was amid the simple, wholesome surround- 
ings of the farm that ^Ir. Boone was reared 
and "in addition to an all-round practical train- 
ing he secured a common school education. In 
.March, 1882, when fifteen years of age, he 
began working in a dry goods store in La- 
conia, Indiana, and here he got his start in life 
and learned those lessons of industry and 
thrift which have since stood him in good 
stead. In October, 1888, he came to Winches- 
ter, Kentucky, and secured employment in a 
clothing store owned by A'. Bloomfield, which 
position he held until 1893. He later gave up 
this work and for a time conducted a general 
merchandise store at Beckmerville, Clark 
county. Kentucky. He sold this in 190 1 and 
went to Hardin county. Kentucky, where he 
bought a farm and operated it for eight 
months. He was not a timid soul to fear 
change and he again sold his property and 
worked in the Winn Furniture Company's es- 
tablishment for a time. This he continued 
until his election in November, 1905, as county 
clerk of Clark county, in which important ca- 
pacity he is now serving his second term. He 
is passionately devoted to the policies and 
principles of the Democratic party and for 
several years has been a central committee- 
man. 

Mr. Boone's numerous and important lodge 
affiliations have been previously referred to. 
First and foremost he is a member of the an- 
cient and august order of r^Iasons. and be- 
longs to the Order of tl^e ]\Ivstic Shrine at 
Lexington, Kentuckv. Other fraternal orders 
which claim his loyal allegiance are the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows ; the Knights 



1332 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



of I'ythias; the Redmen ; the Modern Wood- 
men of America ; and the Woodmen of the 
World. 

Air. Boone laid the foundation of a house- 
hold of his own when on February 17, 1893 
he was united in the holy bonds of matrimony 
to Elizabeth Powell, a native of Clark county, 
Kentucky. Mrs. Boone was born in 1873 and 
is the daughter of J. H. and Susan (Kindred) 
Powell. Her parents are both Kentuckians, 
the father a native of Clark county and the 
mother of Madison. They are retired agri- 
culturists and now make their. home at Win- 
chester, enjoying in leisure the fruits of their 
previous industry. The father is sixty-eight 
years of age and the mother, sixty-five. The 
two daughters of the subject, Ada Lee and 
.Millie I., are at home. Mr. and Mrs. Boone 
are members of the Baptist church. 

fosEPH A. Miller. — This venerable and 
honored citizen and representative business 
man of Millersburg has the distinction of be- 
ing the only living grandson of that sterling 
pioneer of Bourbon county, John ]\liller, who 
was the founder of the village- of Alillersburg. 
which perpetuates his name. The family has 
been prominent in connection with the civic 
and material development and upbuilding of 
this favored section of the state, and more 
complete genealogical record concerning the 
same may be found in the sketch dedicated to 
Dr. William M. Miller, on other pages of this 
work, so that a repetition of the data is not 
demanded in the present connection. 

Joseph A. Miller was born at Alillersburg, 
Bourbon county, Kentucky, on the 19th of 
February. 1832, and is a son of Alexander 
and Martha (Harris) Miller, both of whom 
continued residents of Bourbon county until 
they were summoned to the life eternal, secure 
in the high regard of all who knew them. 
Joseph A. Miller was reared to the sturdy dis- 
cipline of the home farm and after availing 
himself of the advantages of the common 
schools of the locality and period he was en- 
abled to prosecute his higher academic studies 
in old Transylvania University, in the city of 
Lexington, this state. He continued to be 
actively identified with agricultural pursuits 
until 1873, when he established his home in 
Millersburg and engaged in the grocery busi- 
ness, in which he successfully continued for 
more than a quarter of a century. Upon re- 
tiring from this line of enterprise he engaged 
in the retail hardware trade, with which he 
has since been actively concerned, and his es- 
tablishment controls a large and representa- 
tive patronage, based upon his honorable meth- 
ods and dealings and upon his unqualified 
personal popularity in the county which has 



ever been his home and the stage of his ear- 
nest and worthy endeavors. Mr. Miller has 
been inlluential in connection with civic afifairs 
of a local order, has served as township trus- 
tee for more than twelve years, and has held 
other minor offices of trust. His political al- 
legiance has ever been given tO' the Democratic 
party and he has kept well informed concern- 
mg the questions and issues of the hour. Mr. 
Miller rendered gallant service as a loyal sol- 
dier of the Confederacy in the Civil war. in 
which he served for three and one-half years, 
as a member of the Ninth Kentucky Cavalry, 
in the command of Colonel Breckinridge. 
Mr. Miller participated in a number of the 
important battles marking the progress of the 
great conflict between the north and south and 
took part in innumerable skirmishes and other 
minor engagements in which his command 
was involved. He was never wounded, but 
was once captured by the enemy, who held 
him in duress for a period, at the expiration 
of which he was exchanged. His continued 
interest in his old comrades is shown by his 
membership in the United Confederate Veter- 
ans' Association. Mr. and Mrs. Miller are 
zealous members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, South, and both are held in the high- 
est regard in their home city and county. 

In Mason county, this state, on the 14th 
of December, 1872, was solemnized the mar- 
riage oi Mr. Miller to Miss Sallie M. Best, 
who was born and reared in that county and 
who is a member of one of the pioneer fami- 
lies of that section. 

William Wallace Thompson. — The 
death of William Wallace Thompson on No- 
vember 27, 1901. deprived Mt. Sterling of a 
citizen who for many years had been a prom- 
inent factor in business, banking and agricul- 
tural circles, and in all three fields he left his 
mark as an enterprising and upright supporter 
of the best interests of the community. He 
was born in Mt. Sterling August 30. 1843. the 
son of Charles G. and Caroline (Smith) 
Thompson, and of the four children of that 
union none survive. On the maternal side 
Mr. Thompson was of pioneer stock. Hi'^ 
great-grandfather. Enoch Smith, was one of 
three men to whom Montgomery county was 
allotted by grant, from Governor Benjamin 
Harrison, of Virginia. His father was twice 
married, the second wife being Mary O'Rear, 
who is now living in Mt. Sterling at the age 
of eighty vears. This union was also fruitful 
of four children, two of whom are living at the 
present time, namely: Charles G.. of Mt. Ster- 
ling, and Emma, wife of George Coleman, of 
the same place. 

The years of Mr. Thompson were tender 



HISTORY OI' KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1333 



when he became an orphan and after the age 
of fourteen he received no more schoohng. 
Any deficiency in education he well reniedie-i, 
however, for he was a natural student and read 
a g"reat deal, becoming a well posted man, far 
superior in this respect to many whose educa- 
tional advantages has been many times as 
great. When fourteen years of age he found 
It necessary to face the real issues of life. His 
first stock in trade consisted of a horse and 
wagon, this being the nucleus of what came 
to be a small livery stable. Later he clerked 
in a dry goods store for a few years and for a 
time operated a dry goods store of his own, 
which he ultimately sold. He made a radical 
change by entering the Exchange Bank, where 
he assumed the office of cashier and for seven 
years he continued in this capacity. He sub- 
sequently resigned and organized The Trad- 
ers' Deposit Bank (now The Traders' Na- 
tional) and for fifteen years held a similar 
position with that substantial concern. In 
1898 Mr. Thompson retired and devoted the 
remainder of his life to farming. He owned 
a splendid farm of seven hundred acres on the 
Maysville pike, fertile in soil, well situated and 
beautiful in natural scenery. None was more 
truly a successful, selfmade man than he, 
everything which he secured or achieved being 
absolutely through his own efiforts. The fine 
agricultural property which he left at his death 
is now conducted by the sons who remain at 
home. In his political alleijiance ^Ir. Thomp- 
son was a Republican and he was a member of 
the Christian church, having been a deacon in 
the same. 

Mr. Thompson laid the foundation of an 
ideal married companionship on June 6, 187 1, 
when he was united in the holy bonds of mat- 
rimony to Minerva Quisenberry, who was born 
in Clark county January 31, 1853. Mrs. 
Thompson was a daughter of Thomas J. Quis- 
enberry, also a native of Clark county, who 
departed this life in March, 1881, aged fifty- 
nine years, and his wife. Frances Bybee, was 
also born in this favored portion of Kentucky 
in 1832, her demise occurring in 1895. The 
marriage of this worthy pair was blessed by 
the birth of eight children, ^Ir. Thompson's 
wife being the third in order of birtli. The 
eldest child, ]\Iary Jane, died in February, 
1905. She was twice married, her first hus- 
band being Richard Duerson, of Winchester, 
Kentucky. Her second. Dr. David L. Proc- 
ter, of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky. The only son, 
Joseph T., resides in Winchester, Kentucky, as 
do three daughters. Laura is the wife of 
Christy Bush ; Elizabeth is Mrs. Charles B. 
Stewart; Emma is the wife of Woodson Mc- 
Cord. Miss Ilia, seventh in order of birth and 
Lula, the voungest. and wife of Edward Fox, 



still live 'upon the ancestral farm settled by 
their grandfather, Joel Tandy Quisenberry. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Thompson were born 
seven children and four of them are living at 
the present day. The daughter, Mary Fran- 
ces, is the wife of James Kennedy of Alt. Ster- 
Hng; William Lois and his wife, Leila Prew- 
itt, live upon their farm near Prewitt station, 
in Montgomery county. Joseph W. and Paul 
are upon the homestead, in whose cultivation 
•these two estimable young citizens unite. 

John W. Burns, M. D.— For fullv a score 
of years Dr. John W. Burns was engaged in 
the active practice of his profession in this 
section of the fine old Blue Grass state, but in 
1906, on account of impaired health, he was 
forced to give up his work, in which his suc- 
cess was of most distinguished order. He is 
now living in Carlisle, Nicholas county. He 
was born at Georgetown, Brown county, Ohio, 
on the 9th of September, i860, and is a son 
of William and Elizabeth (Duckworth) Burns, 
the former a native of Ireland, whence he em- 
igrated to America as a young man. and the 
latter a native of Montgomery county, Ken- 
tucky. William Burns w^as reared and edu- 
cated in Ireland and on his arrival in the 
United States, he lived for a time in Robert- 
son county, Kentucky, where his marriage was 
solemnized. Som.e time after his marriage he 
removed to Georgetown, Ohio, where he fol- 
lowed the work of his trade, that of carpenter 
and contractor. He was twice married and 
by his first wife became the father of three 
children — Alonzo, wdio is now deceased ; Mary 
E., who is the widow of John Stewart and 
who resides at Cane Ridge, Kentucky ; and 
John W., of this review. Mrs. Elizabeth Burns 
was summoned to the life eternal in 1864, 
after which William Burns married again and 
reared a large family of children. He re- 
moved to Cincinnati. Ohio, where he owned 
and operated a lumber yard for a number of 
years prior to his death. When civil war was 
precipitated upon a divided nation he tendered 
his services in defense of the Union and gave 
valiant service throughout the war in an Ohio 
regiment. 

John W. Burns was a child of but four 
years of age at the time of his mother's death, 
after which sad event he was taken into the 
home of his maternal grandfather, William 
Duckworth, where he w^as reared and educa- 
ted. William Duckworth was born in Charles- 
ton. South Carolina, whence he came to Mont- 
gomery county, Kentucky. He married Susan 
Liggett, a native of Montgomery county and 
they established their home in Harrison 
county, wdiere they purchased a farm some 
ten miles north of Cynthiana. It was on this 



1884 



iiiSTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



fine old estate that the child John W. was 
nurtured and his early educational training 
was received in the country schools of Harri- 
son county, this discipline heing later effect- 
ively su[)plemented by attendance in the Au- 
gusta graded schools. In September, 1880, 
he was matriculated in the Ohio Medical Col- 
lege, at Cincinnati, and in this excellent insti- 
tution he was graduated as a member of the 
class of 1883, duly receiving the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. Immediately after his- 
graduation he came to Nicholas county, look- 
ing for a location. His worldly possessions at 
that time consisted of a horse and saddlebags. 
After examining the held at Bethel and 
Alooreheld he decided to locate at East Un- 
ion, where he entered upon the practice of his 
profession. He was young and enthusiastic 
about his work and in a short time succeeded 
in building up a large and lucrative patronage, 
liis skill and ability being on a parity with his 
wonderful energy. He rapidly gained recog- 
nition as an able physician and surgeon and he 
continued in active practice in Nicholas county 
until 1906, in which year he was compelled to 
retire on account of ill health. 

While actively identified with agricultural 
pursuits Dr. Burns believed in the raising of 
thorough-bred stock and he made a specialty 
of short-horn cattle and Shropshire sheep. His 
wife was most successful in the breeding of 
bronze turkeys and Wyandott chickens. 

On the 23d of April, 1889, was solemnized 
the marriage of Dr. Burns to- Miss Nannie L. 
Knox, who was born at East Union, this 
state, on the 26th of April, 1863. She is a 
daughter of George D. Knox, who was a na- 
tive of Bourbon county, Kentucky, the date 
of his birth being September 29, 1831. He 
was a son of David and Rebecca (Baxter) 
Knox, the former of whom was likewise a na- 
tive of Bourbon countv, where his birth oc- 
curred February 13, 1804, and where he died 
on the 27th of September, 1879. He was a 
son of Samuel and Margaret (Donnell) Knox, 
both of whom were born in Pennsylvania. 
Samuel Knox was a preacher by vocation and 
he was born in 1775 and died in 1865, being a 
son of David and Hannah (Warson) Knox, 
natives of Dublin, Ireland. The mother of 
George D. Knox, father of Mrs. Burns, was 
born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, on the 
13th of February 1804, and was a daughter 
of Edward and Rebecca (Davis) Baxter, the 
former of wdiom was born in ^Maryland, De- 
cember 5, 1750, and died April 2, 1826, and the 
latter of whom was born July 12, 1767, and 
died Tanuarv 10, 1818. George D. Knox was 
the oldest child in a familv of seven children 
and he was educated in the common schools 



of Nicholas county, where he initiated opera- 
tions as a farmer. On the 5th of November, 
185O, he was united in marriage to Miss 
.Vmanda Boardman, who was born in Nicholas 
county, September 12, 1831, and who passed 
from this life in 1889. Her husband died in 
1899. Mrs. George D. Knox was a daughter 
of Abner and Mary (Cross) Boardman. Ab- 
ner Boardman was born in Bourbon county, 
Kentucky, April 16, 1801, and died in Nich- 
olas county, on the 29th of August, 1875, and 
his wife, who was likewise a native of Bour- 
bon county was born on the 3d of January 
1806, and died on the 30th of January, 1878. 
Mr. and Mrs. George D. Knox became the 
parents of five children, of which number Mrs. 
Burns is the only one now living. 

Though never a seeker of political prefer- 
ment Dr. Burns has ever accorded a staunch 
allegiance to the principles and policies for 
which the Democratic party stands sponsor 
and he has contributed in generous measure to 
all matters projected for the general welfare 
of the community. He is a loyal and public- 
spirited citizen and is held in high esteem by 
his fellow men. He and his wife are devout 
members of the Christian church, to whose 
charities and benevolences he has given most 
generously. 

Frank Feiir. — The great empire of Ger- 
many has contributed a most valuable element 
to the cosmopolitan social fabric of our Amer- 
ican republic, which has had much to gain and 
nothing to lose from this source. Among 
those of German birth and ancestry who have 
attained to success and precedence in con- 
nection with business affairs in the city of 
Louisville was the late Frank Fehr, who was 
a citizen of sterling character, honored by all 
who knew him and infiuential in both civic 
and industrial affairs in the city that so long 
represented his home and in which his death 
occurred on the 15th of March. 1891. 

Frank Fehr was born at Zinsweiler, Ger- 
many, in the year 1841, and in his native land 
was reared to maturity, there receiving the 
advantages of the excellent common schools 
and also learning the brewery business under 
most favorable conditions. Dependent upon 
his own resources, he determined to establish 
his home in America, where he felt assured 
he could find better opportunities for the win- 
ning of success and independence through his 
individual efforts. As a young man he emi- 
grated to the United States and he landed in 
the city of Baltimore. He passed some time 
in various eastern cities and then made his 
way to Chicago, wdiere he was employed for 
a period. . He next went to Cincinnati and 
from that citv he removed to Madison, In- 




(^^^kt^/^ ^<^^^ 






MTSA, L£«®:< 






HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 1835 

diana. to assume charge of a brewery. In spirited as a citizen and enjoyed marked pop- 
1868 Mr. Fehr came to Louisville, Kentucky, ularity in both business and social circles in 
where he took the practical management of his home city. He attained to the thirty- 
the plant of the Phoenix Brewing Company, second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scot- 
In October, 1872, he leased the old Otto brew- tish Rite of the Masonic fraternity, was affil- 
ery for a term of fifteen years, and through iated with the local organizations of the 
his excellent management of the business, with Knights of Pythias and Knights of Honor, 
the unvarying excellence of the products of was identified with the Firemen's Benevolent 
the plant, he built up a most successful enter- Association and held membership in other 
prise and developed one of the best brewing civic organizations of representative character, 
plants in this section of the country. When On April 23, 1867, Mr. Fehr was united in 
the brew^ery was destroyed by fire, in 1876, he ■ marriage to Miss Katherine Stegner, of Cin- 
purchased the site of the old plant, borrowing cinnati, who survives him, as do also two sons 
money for this purpose, and there erected a and one daughter. The elder son, Frank, is 
thoroughly well equipped and substantial president and general manager of the Con- 
plant that has since been known as the Fehr sumers' Company, as has already been noted 
brewery. He made of success not an accident in this context; Andrew Fehr is engaged in 
but a logical result, and he became one of the the same business in Louisville, being the as- 
substantial capitalists of the city. He was a sistant general manager; and Elizabeth, the 
man of insuperable integrity of purpose, and only daughter, is the wife of Mr. George W. 
his word was ever as good as his bond. He Kremer, treasurer of the Central Consumers 
built up the business of his brewery until it Company. 

took precedence of other enterprises of the Samuel K. Veach. — A prominent merchant 
kind in the city and he retained virtually sole at Carlisle, Nicholas county, Kentucky, is 
control of the same until a consolidation of Samuel K. .Veach, who here conducts one of 
brewing interests was efifected under the title the most up-to-date haberdasheries in the en- 
of the Consumers' Company, of which the tire county. He is interested financially in 
Fehr brewery is the main plant and of which various large business concerns in this section 
Frank Fehr, Jr., son of the original owner is of the state and is a man whose loyalty and 
now the president, having held this office since public spirit are of the most insistent order. 
1908. and being numbered among the repre- He was born in Augusta, Bracken county, 
sentative business men of the city. The presi- Kentucky, on the 27th of August, 1852, a son 
dent of the company is also its general mana- of Peter and Elizabeth (Keene) Veach, the 
ger, and both as a citizen and as a progressive former of whom was born in Harrison county, 
business man he is well upholding the high this state, on the loth of April. 1820, and the 
prestige of the honored name which he bears, latter at Augusta, Bracken county, in 1824. 
The subject of this memoir was a man of Elizabeth Keene was a daughter of Samuel 
fine mentality and cultured tastes. He was a Keene, who was born at Georgetown, Ken- 
student of scientific subjects and took special tucky, and who married Minerva Hamilton, a 
interest in mechanics and the fine arts.. He native of Bracken county. The maternal 
was ever appreciative of his stewardship as a grandfather of Elizabeth Keene was John 
successful business man, and his heart was so Hamilton, a sergeant in the Revolutionary war 
attuned to human sympathy that he was ever and one of the early pioneer settlers of 
ready to lend his aid in the support of worthy Bracken county. Samuel Veach, father of Pe- 
charities and benevolences of a general order, ter Veach and grandfather of him whose name 
the while his private benefaction, invariably initiates this review, was born in Harrison 
unostentatious, were extended with liberality county, Kentucky, in 1791, and he was sum- 
and earnestness. He was in the most signifi- moned to the life eternal in 1867, at the age 
cant sense the architect of his own fortunes, of seventy-six years. His wife, whose maiden 
his life was one of consecutive industry and name was Mary Diltz, was likewise a native 
generous accomplishment, and he so lived as of Harrison county, where her birth occurred 
to merit and enjoy the high regard of all with in 1794, and she was seventy-six years of age 
whom he came in contact. No shadow of at the time of her death, in 1880. She was a 
wrong or injustice touches any period of his daughter of David Diltz, of Pennsylvania, who 
long and useful career and he won success wedded Elizabeth Marr, a daughter of the 
through normal and legitimate avenues of en- Earl of ^Tarr who, on account of religious 
terprise. At the time of his death he was rec- views, emigrated from Scotland to America 
ognized as one of the most substantial capi- and settled in the old Keystone state of the 
talists of Louisville. He was a Democrat in LTnion. Samuel V^each was a son of John 
his political adherence, was liberal and public- Veach and Jane (Hufif) Veach, both natives 



1336 



HISTORY OI'" KI':.\TL'CK\' AND KENTUCKIANS 



of Pennsylvania, where was solemnized their 
marriage and whence they came to Harrison 
county, Kentucky, establishing their liome 
three miles east of Cynthiana some time be- 
tween 1776 and 1780. Jane (Huff) \'each 
was an exceedingly well educated woman for 
those days. She died in 1835. A time after 
his advent in Kentucky John V'each made a 
trip to \ irginia in order to ol:)tain the gold 
with which to pay for his land in ilarrison 
cottnty, carrying the money back in saddle 
bags. This land was later owned respectively 
by the son and grandson of John and a por- 
tion of it is still in the possession of some mem- 
bers of the \'each family. The Veach family 
are of Welsh descent and Jeremiah \'each, 
father of John, was the founder of the family 
in America. Samuel \'each, grandfather of 
Samuel K., of this sketch, was a Methodist 
Episcopal preacher by vocation and was a cir- 
cuit rider in central Kentucky in the early 
days. His son Peter was reared and educated 
in Harrison county and before his marriage he 
removed to Bracken county, where he pur- 
chased land and became a most successful 
farmer. In 1891 he retired from active par- 
ticipation in business life and resided in Car- 
lisle during the residue of his life, his death 
having occurred in May, 1908. His cherished 
and devoted wife was summoned to the life 
eternal in 1872. They were the parents of 
seven children, concerning whom the following 
brief record is here incorporated — Airs. Mary 
Frank is a widow and resides at Augusta, 
Kentucky ; Samuel K. is the immediate sub- 
ject of this review ; Mrs. Kitty Patterson is 
a widow and maintains her home in the city of 
Indianapolis, Indiana ; Richard S. resides in 
Grant cotmty, Kentucky ; William lives in 
Ohio; Mrs. Julia Shrout resides in California; 
and Henry is a minister in the Christian church 
in Pittsfield. Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Peter 
Veach were members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church and in politics he accorded a 
staimch allegiance to the cause of the Demo- 
cratic party. 

Samuel K. Veach was reared to maturity at 
Augusta, Kentucky, to whose public schools 
he is indebterl for his early educational train- 
ing. When fifteen years of age he be2"an his 
business career as a clerk in a dry-goods store 
at Augusta and in 1874 he went to Portsmouth, 
Ohio, where he was employed as a clerk for 
two years. In 1878 he established his' home 
in Carlisle, where he was employed as a clerk 
until January i, 1882, in which year the firm 
of Smith & Veach was formed, this concern 
conducting a general clothing store. In 1901, 
when Mr. Smith retired from the business, Mr. 
Veach purchased his interest in the same and 



now conducts the clothing, shoe and furnishing 
store of Carlisle. On the lOth of T'ebruary, 
1883, Mr. \'each was instrumental in the or- 
ganization of the Nicholas County Building 
& Savings Association, of which substantial 
financial institution he was elected secretary 
and of whiclT office lie is still incumbent. He 
is a stockholder in the Farmers' Bank of Car- 
lisle and has served for three terms on the 
city council, b'or sixteen years he has been a 
member of the school board of Nicholas 
county, serving part of the time as chairman 
of the board. His political support is given to 
the Democratic party and in a fraternal way 
he is affiliated with the Knights of Pythais. 
having become aligned with the same in 1878, 
and he is a valued member of the Masonic or- 
der, holding membership in the xAncient Ara- 
bic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine, in Olaka Temple at Lexington, Ken- 
tucky. In the latter organization Air. \'each 
has filled all the chairs in the state Grand 
Lodge and he is past grand master of the Grand 
Lodge of Kentticky, he being one of the most 
prominent Masons in central Kentucky. He 
is a loyal member of the Alethodist EjMscopal 
church and his wife affiliates with the Chris- 
tian church. 

On the 19th of April, 1881, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Veach to Miss Molly E. 
Fisher, who was born at Carlisle. Kentucky, 
on the 29th of April, 1855, she being a daugh- 
ter of A. R. and Susan F. (Rogers) Fisher, 
both of whom are now dead. Mr. and Mrs. 
Veach have three children — Howard K.. who 
is associated with his father in the work and 
management of the store ; and Frances L. and 
Elizabeth, both of whom are students at Mount 
Holyoke College, in Massachusetts. Mr. 
Veach is a man of broad intelligence and un- 
questioned integrity. He has done much to 
advance th& general welfare of the community 
in wdiich he has elected to maintain his home 
and he holds a secure place in popular confi- 
dence and esteem. 

Innes B. Ross. — A distinguished attorney 
of Carlisle, Nicholas county, Kentucky, and a 
citizen who has given most efficient service in 
various public offices of local order is Innes 
B. Ross, who is a native of this citv, where his 
birth occurred on the 2qth of July, 1871. He 
is a son of the late William Parks Ross, who 
was a prominent lawyer and banker of Carlisle 
during his life time. He was a son of Green- 
berry and Martha (Parks) Ross and he was 
born at Carlisle on the nth of August. 1825. 
Greenberrv Ross was a native of Bourbon 
county. Kentucky, whence he removed to 
Nicholas county, about 1818, continuing to re- 
side here until Ids death. March 29, 1856. He 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1337 



was a tailor by trade and subsequently devoted 
his attention to agricultural pursuits. The 
grandfather of William i'. Ross was Samuel 
Ross, a ]\larylander of English extraction 
who settled in Bourbon county, Kentucky, in 
the pioneer days. William I'arks Ross was 
reared to the sturdy discipline of the home 
farm and availed himself of the best educa- 
tional advantages atiforded in the county. 
W'lien twenty-one years of age he turned his 
attention to teaching, although his father 
wished to make a tailor of him. In 1846 he be- 
gan reading law, under the able preceptorship 
of Fitch AJunger. an able lawyer at Carlisle. 
He made rapid progress in the assimilation of 
the science of jurisprudence and was admit- 
ted to the bar of the state in 1848. at which 
time he entered upon the practice of his pro- 
fession at Carlisle, this place continuing to 
represent his home until his death. He soon 
built up a large and representative clientage, 
taking a foremost position at the bar and be- 
coming one of the most prominent lav^yers in 
the county. In 1851 he was elected the fir.st 
judge of Nicholas county, under the workings 
of the new constitution, and he also held the 
office of master commoner for a number of 
years, though he was never incumbent of a 
political office, strictly speaking. He devoted 
himself most assiduously to the demands of 
his profession but still had time to give atten- 
tion to various business affairs which came to 
his notice. He was a stockholder in and was 
one of the organizers of the Deposit Bank of 
Carlisle, of which he was president from 1870 
until a short time prior to his death, having re- 
signed on account of ill health. 

In i^olitics judge Ross was origin ?lly an old- 
line \\'hig and after the dissolution of thai 
party he maintained an independent attitude, 
giving his support to men and measures meet- 
ing with the approval of his judgment. Dur- 
ing the Civil war he was an ardent Union man. 
being violently opposed to secession. His re- 
ligious views coincided with the tenets of the 
Presbyterian church, in the various deuart- 
rnents of whose work he was deeply inter- 
ested. He was a man of fine professional, per- 
sonal and social habits, a man of impregnable 
integrity of character, and he was one of the 
most substantial and useful men in Carlisle. 

Judge Ross was twice married, his first union 
being to Aliss Columbia Neal, a daughter of 
John Neal, of Nicholas county. The wedding 
ceremony was performed in February, 1853, 
and the young wife was summoned to the life 
eternal on the 29th of January, 1857. She was 
.-urvived by one son, John N., who is now 
cashier of the Deposit Bank of Carlisle. In 
1862 was solemnized his marriage to Aliss 



Elizabeth Davis, born in Woodford county, in 
1835, and died on the i8th of July, 1910, at 
Carlisle. To this union were born six chil- 
dren, namely — Columbia, who was the wife of 
F. B. Lindsay, of Nicholas county. Kentucky ; 
Henry E. and Mamie, twins, the former an 
attorney at Lexington and the latter a resi- 
dent of Millersburg, Kentucky, she having 
married E. M. Ingles; William P., who is a 
merchant at Carlisle; Martha, who is the wife 
of G. F. Templeman, of Carlisle ; and Innes B., 
the immediate subject of this sketch. 

Judge Ross was summoned to the Great 
Beyond on the 29th of December, 1900. and 
concerning the estimate placed upon him as a 
man and citizen a few extracts taken from an 
article written by the pastor of his church at 
the time of his death are here incorporated. 
This article appeared in a current number of 
the Carlisle Mercury under date of January 
10, 1901. 

Judge William P. Ross realized in his life 
that which is the ideal of many but a realty 
with but few, to-wit : The satisfaction of pass- 
ing his days without being assailed by goading 
criticism. lie represented the unusual specta- 
cle of a man living nearly seventy-five years 
in the ])lace of his birth and occupying a con- 
spicuous position through fifty-two years of 
his life as a public man, without having pointed 
at him the shafts of detraction or awakening 
annoying resentments. It was his well poised 
mind and his equanimity of temper which thus 
shielded him from what has ruthlessly as- 
sailed others. He was far from being a perfect 
man, for there is no perfection in human char- 
acter, yet he came as near to the most attract- 
ive ideal of such perfection as any man who 
has gathered about him the affection and ad- 
miration of his fellow men. He was free from 
a censorious spirit, and the writer of this, who 
has known him for many years, never heard 
him utter an unkind criticism of any one. His 
convictions were as solid as adamant, and nei- 
ther fear nor favor could shake them from 
him. yet he tried to estimate human conduct 
in the light of that charity which "hopeth all 
things, which beareth all things, which is not 
easily provoked, which thinketh no evil." 

He exercised a commanding influence over 
men. not as the result of a conscious ambition 
or a studied purpose, but rather from an in- 
stinctive homage the world awards men of ex- 
alted character and uncorruptible principles. 
Possibly if he had cherished more personal 
ambition he would have filled a broader place 
than that which he occupied. For in the re- 
quisites of mental gifts and wide attainments 
and high moral conceptions he had few supe- 
riors and was fitted to adorn any place within 



1338 HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 

the ^ift of liis fellow citizens. lUit he chose a tion. He is also trustee of the Carlisle graded 

sphere more congenial w ith his tastes than schools, and holds other positions of trust and 

dizzy elevation would have been. honor. 

Judge Ross was a man swayed by a con- On the 15th of June, 1897, was celebrated 
science enlightened by the truth and spirit of the marriage of Mr. Ross to Miss Sallie Par- 
God. His ambition to be right and do right ker, who was born in Bourbon county on the 
was the paramount incentive, and he counted 15th of June, 1873, and who is a daughter of 
not the cost in the attainment of so noble an William T. and Jane (Smith) Parker, natives 
end. * * * * Qf IJourbon county, where the father is a large 

But his most sterling and shining quality land owner and is actively identified with ag- 

was his religious character. He united with the ricultural pursuits. Mr. and Mrs. Ross have 

Presbyterian church in this city February 5, one son, John Parker Ross, born on the 15th 

1871, and was elected and ordained ruling elder of October, 1900. Mr. Ross is a man of keen 

^larch 19, 1876. He was a careful student of perception and extraordinary executive abil- 

the doctrines and history of the great denomi- ity and is widely known for his fair and hon- 

nation to which he belonged, and tried as best orable business methods and unquestioned in- 

he could to glorify Christ through the love and tegrity. 

devotion of his individual life. * * * His W. J. Kennedy. — In connection with an in- 

place in the home and in the church is vacant, dustrial enterprise of marked scope and an im- 

but a mansion has been filled in Heaven. portance the subject of this review has attain- 

Innes B. Ross was reared to maturity at ed a high degree of success and is known as 
CarHsle and after completing the curriculum one of the representative business men of 
of the common schools of that place he was Nicholas county, Kentucky, of which he is a 
matriculated in the Kentucky Wesleyan Col- native son. W. J. Kennedy owns and con- 
lege, at Millersburg, Kentucky. When twenty trols the destinies of that prosperous and ever- 
years of age he entered his father's law office growing concern, The Carlisle Milling Com- 
and was there engaged in study and reading pany, these flour mills consuming over fifty 
until 1892, in August of which year he was thousand bushels of wheat each year and pro- 
admitted to the bar. He entered upon active ducing a high quality of flour. Mr. Kennedy 
practice as a partner of his father, this mu- was born February 12, 1843, ^^d is the son of 
tually agreeable alliance continuing until the A. J. and SaHie Ann (Hillock) Kennedy, 
latter's death. In 1905 the firm of Holmes & both of these worthy people having been born 
Ross was established, this being now one of in the same county as their son. A. J. Ken- 
the best known law firms in the state. In pol- nedy was born on Christmas day, 1821, and 
itics Mr. Ross is aligned as a stalwart sup- died at the age of seventy years. The mother 
porter of the cause of the Democratic party was born but nine days later than her husband, 
and he has done much to advance the general (January 2, 1822) and she is still living in the 
welfare of the county. He has been incum- very house in which she began housekeeping 
bent of the position of city attorney for the as a young bride. The year of their marriage 
past ten years and he holds secure vantage was 1842 and they began farming, and con- 
ground in popular confidence and esteem. In tinned agricultural operations successfully un- 
a fraternal way he is a member of the time- til the demise of the husband and father. The 
honored ^Masonic order. Quite a coincident in mother is, as was the father, an earnest and 
facts and dates is as follows : Greenbury Ross consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal 
was master of Daugherty Lodge, F. & A. M., church, South. Their union was cemented by 
in 1825, at Carlisle, Kentucky, when William the birth of six children, three of whom are 
Parks Ross was born ; and William Parks alive at the present day. Mr. Kennedy is the 
Ross was master of the same Lodge in 1871 eldest: John resides in Harrison county. Ken- 
when Innes B. Ross was born. Innes B. Ross tucky, and Bettie is the widow of W^illiam 
is master of this same lodge at this time ; thus Cottingham and makes her home with her 
three generations being master of the same mother. The Kennedy family were Nicholas 
lodge. Innes B. Ross is also a member of the county pioneers, the paternal grandparents of 
other Masonic bodies, and is a valued and ap- him whose name initiates this brief review 
preciative member of the Knights of Pythias being William and Mary (Breaks) Kennedy, 
and the Knights of the Maccabees. He is a both natives of Nicholas county. Glancing 
devout member of the Presbyterian church back two generations farther into the past we 
and his wife holds membership in the Christian find that the family originates in Scotland, the 
church. Mr. Ross is a director in the Deposit great-great-grandfather, David, a native of 
Bank of Carlisle and is also a director in the the "land o' cakes." having followed the gleam- 
Nicholas County Building & Savings Associa- ing of the star of hope for wider opportunity 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



1339 



from the shore of the new world. Upon his 
arrival in America he made his way to Vir- 
ginia and became a Revolutionary soldier. In 
1790 he made his way to Kentucky and settled 
in Nicholas county where he secured a tract 
of land, some of it still being owned by the 
Kennedys. 

W. J. Kennedy was reared upon his father's 
country homestead and received but a limited 
education. When eighteen years of age he 
found it necessary to face alone the serious 
issues of life and his first venture was in the 
capacity 'of a dealer in live stock, which he 
followed for a period of four years. In the 
fall of 1865 he went to Headquarters, Nich- 
olas county, and entered the mercantile busi- 
ness, conducting a general merchandise store 
for fifteen years. In 1880 he sold out and 
made a radical change by purchasing a farm 
near ]\Ioorefield, Nicholas county, where for 
six years he engaged in farming and tobacco 
growing. His residence in Carlisle and his 
identification with the industrial activities of 
the place dates from 1888. The Carlisle Mill- 
ing Company has a capacity of eighty barrels 
a day and, as before mentioned, consumes 
over fifty thousand bushels of wheat in the 
operations of a year. It is to such substantial 
and well conducted institutions that the pros- 
perity of Carlisle is owing. 

It is not, however, merely in an industrial 
capacity that the usefulness of Mr. Kennedy 
to the city must be measured, for he has also 
proved his efficiency as a public servant and his 
two terms as mayor of Carlisle were most sat- 
isfactory to the community in general. He 
has likewise been a member of the city council. 
He is connected with the great Masonic fra- 
ternity, belonging to Daugherty Lodge, No. 65, 
In the matter of religious faith he and his 
wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal church. 
South. 

Mr. Kennedy has been twice married. His 
first union was celebrated in November, 1865, 
the lady to become his wife being Eliza Smith, 
a native of Nicholas county, Kentucky. She 
passed to the Great Beyond January 4, 1888, 
her years being forty-three. She was the 
mother of six children, four of whom are liv- 
ing at the present day, as follows : Samuel, a 
citizen of Carlisle, Kentuckv; Claudia, wife of 
G. E. Smith, of Indianapolis, Indiana ; W. E. 
residing in Nicholas county, Kentuclcy ; and 
Warren, of Carlisle. Mr. Kennedy was mar- 
ried a second time to Mrs. Alice James, widow 
of S. A. James, their marriage occurring No- 
vember 15, 1892. By her previous marriage, 
Mrs. Kennedy had two children, one surviving 
— a son Harry who resides in Fayette county, 
Kentucky. There are no children by the sec- 



ond union. Mrs. Kennedy's maiden name 
was Alice Watson and she was a native of 
Bourbon county, her parents being Samuel and 
Lou (HoUaday) Watson. 

Charles M. Wise is a well-known farm- 
er-citizen of Nicholas county and of that fine 
type of Southern gentleman of whose pos- 
session Kentucky is so proud. He is the son 
of that well-remembered and highly respected 
agriculturist and friend of good education, 
John Wise. He is a veteran of the Civil 
war, that conflict serving as the dividing line 
between two vocations which have engaged 
his attention, he having been a merchant in 
his younger days and a farmer at the present 
time. Although still operating his lands, Mr. 
Wise at present resides at Carlisle. He was 
born in Fleming county August 6, 1835, and 
is the son of John and Mary (Prather) Wise. 
The former was born in Virginia, but came as 
a young man to Kentucky and located in Ma- 
son county, near Mays' Lick. During the war 
of 1812 he served as major in Poage Regi- 
ment, W'hich was raised in Mason county. He 
married for his first wife a Miss Shotwell, 
daughter of Major Shotwell of Mason county, 
and six children were born to them, all of 
them being now deceased. His second mar- 
riage, with Mr. Wise's mother, was celebrated 
in Fleming county, Miss Prather being a na- 
tive of that county. Of the four sons and 
four daughters who came to bless their home 
but four survive. Mr. Wise is the youngest 
of the four. The father removed to Fleming 
from Mason county about the time of his 
second marriage. He became a successful 
farmer and organized a school district, known 
as Wise's, before the time of the county school 
system. He was a man of progressive ideas 
and had the gift of making them fine reali- 
ties, and he was at the forefront in many of 
the beneficial campaigns of his day. 

Charles M. Wise was reared in Fleming 
county and there attended the common schools 
in which the majority of the young men of his 
time received what education they were to en- 
joy. At the age of sixteen he found it neces- 
sary to face the serious issues of life and 
began clerking in a store. A few years later 
he and K. Wood started a general merchan- 
dise store at Blue Lick Springs, and of this 
Mr. W^ise had charge until the fall of 1862. 
By that time the Civil war had proved to be a 
problem which could not be solved within a 
few weeks, as many had at first hoped, and 
■Mr Wise enlisted in Company B, of the Ninth 
Kentucky Cavalry, of which the well-beloved 
William Breckinridge was colonel. This was 
a part of Morgan's command and Mr. Wise 
was with him on his raid through Ohio. He 



Vol. ni— 13 



1340 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS 



partook of the varied fortunes of war and was 
captured when Morgan surrendered in 1863 
and sent on to Camp Chase, near Columbus, 
Ohio, wliere lie remained a short time. He 
Vv'as subsequently transferred to Johnston's Is- 
land, where he was held a prisoner until the 
close of the war. 

Upon returning home Mr. Wise found that 
the store belonging to him and his partner 
had been destroyed, and that the business of 
which he had believed himself the owner had 
evaporated into thin air. He accepted the 
situation philosopliically, but decided to aban- 
don the thought of a mercantile career and he 
began farming on his father-in-law's estate 
half a mile east of Carlisle. Later, when he 
found himself able, he purchased this and op- 
erated it and lived upon it continuously until 
1904, when he sold a part of it and removed 
with his goods and chattels to Carlisle, where 
he and his wife are enjoying in leisure the 
fruits of their former industry and where 
they have greater time and opportunity for 
the cultivation of those friendships of which 
they enjoy an unusual number. Mr. Wise 
still manages the cultivation of his farm. He 
has many times proved himself one of the 
most enlightened of the agriculturists of the 
locality. He is a life-long Democrat and he 
and his wife are faithful and consistent mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Wise was married in the month of 
February, 1858, the lady to become his wife 
being Sallie Long, a native of Nicholas coun- 
ty. She is the daughter of John and Nancy 
(Nesbit) Long. Her father, born in Nich- 
olas county November 27, 1800, died in 1883; 
and the mother, born near Carlisle, Pennsyl- 
vania, May 22, 1800, enjoyed even longer life 
than the husband to whom she was devoted, 
her demise occurring two years after his in 
the year 1885. They were the parents of two 
children, Mrs. Wise being the elder. A broth- 
er William, a veteran if the Confederate 
army service, resides in Nicholas county. 
Mrs. Wise's paternal grandfather, Elakin 
Long, was a native of Maryland, and his wife, 
Jemima Victor, was born in Nicholas county, 
I Kentucky, and passed on to her reward in Il- 
linois in 1864, her years numbering eighty- 
four. Her maternal grandfather, Nathan 
Nesbit, was born in Maryland, as was also 
his wife. They were Nicholas county pion- 
eers and when the country was new settled 
half a mile east of Carlisle, where the father 
purchased land, cleared it and improved it 
and made a tillable and valuable tract of it. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wise are the parents of five 
children, .The eldest child and only son, 
William ]., is a merchant and resides at Car- 



lisle. Nancy Lee is the wife of James Crock- 
ett, of Bath county; Betty is at home; Ida is 
the wife of Elliott Coliver and makes her 
home in Carlisle; and Effie Kate is at home. 

Mr. Wise renews old wartime associations 
as a member of Peter Bramlett Post, Confed- 
erate Soldiers of America, and since 1857 has 
been a member of the Masonic order, in which 
he takes no small amount of pleasure. Mr. 
and Mrs. Wise are among those fortunate 
pairs who have celebrated their golden wed- 
ding and are still permitted to enjoy an ideal 
life companionship. 

Samuel Patton Hager. — Although he en- 
tered upon the realities of life scantily 
equipped as regarded education and financial 
resources, Samuel Patton Hager, an honored 
and highly esteemed citizen of Ashland, Boyd 
county, possessed keen powers of discernment 
and discrimination and a splendid business 
brain, these amply supplying the deficiencies of 
book knowledge and wealth. With such steady 
purpose and disciplined plan has he wrough