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Full text of "History of Kentucky"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

University of Pittsburgh Library System 



http://www.archive.org/details/historyofkentuck04inkerr 



History of Kentucky 



JUDGE CHARLES KERR 
Editor 




BY 

WILLIAM ELSEY CONNELLEY 
Author of "Eastern Kentucky Papers" 

and 

E. M. COULTER, Ph. D. 
Department of History, University of Georgia 



IN FIVE VOLUMES 



VOLUML IV 



THE AMERICAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

CHICAGO AND NEW YORK 

1922 



Copyright, 1922 

BY 

THE AMERICAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 





^y^i^i-yrUL^ K/ 




HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



James D. Black. Barbourville, judicial center and 
principal city of Knox County, claims as its most dis- 
tinguished citizen, James Dixon Black, former gover- 
nor of Kentucky, and foremost in connection with 
civic and business affairs in his home city and native 
county. He has secure vantage ground as one of the 
representative members of the Kentucky bar and at 
Barbourville he is president of the National Bank of 
John A. Black. 

James Dixon Black was born on the old homestead 
farm of his father, nine miles east of Barbourville, 
Knox County, on Big Richland Creek, and the date 
of his nativity was September 24, 1849. On this farm 
his father, John C. Black, died in the year 1876, his 
birth having occurred in South Carolina, in 1804. 
Alexander Black, grandfather of the ex-governor of 
Kentucky, was a native of Ireland, of Scotch-Irish 
lineage, and was reared and educated in his native land, 
whence, shortly after his marriage, he immigrated with 
his young wife to America and established his resi- 
dence in South Carolina, where he continued his asso- 
ciation with farm industry until his removal to the 
eastern part of Tennessee, whence he came as a pio- 
neer into Knox County, Kentucky, when his son John 
C. was a boy. He instituted the reclamation and de- 
velopment of what became one of the finest farm 
estates of this county, was influential in public affairs 
and general community life and was a commanding 
figure in connection with early stages of civic and 
material development and progress in Knox County, 
where he continued to reside, as an honored pioneer 
citizen, until the time of his death. 

John C. Black was reared to manhood in Knox 
County, where in all of the relations of life he wielded 
benignant influence during the course of a signally 
active and useful career. He became one of the most 
extensive and successful exponents of farm enterprise 
in this county, was originally a whig and later a 
republican in politics, and the only office in which he 
consented to serve was that of justice of the peace, of 
which he continued the incumbent several years. In 
Clay County, this state, was solemnized his marriage 
to Miss Clarissa Jones, who was there born in the 
year 1807, and whose death occurred on the old Black 
homestead farm, nine miles east of Barbourville, in 
1862. Of the children the eldest was Permelia, who 
was born in 1827, and who became the wife of Hiram 
Jones, the closing period of their lives having been 
passed on their home farm, in Laurel County ; Isaac 
J., who was born in the year 1829, was a farmer one 
mile east of Barbourville at the time of his death, and 
his was the distinction of having been a captain in a 
Kentucky regiment that gave valiant service in de- 
fense of the Union in the Civil war ; Samuel, who was 
born in 1831, likewise became a prosperous represen- 
tative of farm enterprise and he was a resident of 
Richmond, Madison County, at the time of his death, 
in 1919; Alexander, who was born in 1832, is a retired 
farmer residing at Richmond; Rhoda, born in 1834, 
the widow of Nathan McBee, and resides in Laurel 
County, where her husband was a representative farm- 



er ; David, born in 1836, was a substantial farmer of 
Madison County at the time of his death, in 1916; 
Isabella, born in 1838, died at Barbourville, and her 
husband, John Brogan, is now engaged in the bank- 
ing business at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma ; John A., 
born in 1842, resides at Barbourville, where he was 
formerly a leading merchant and where he became the 
most influential factor in reorganizing the private bank- 
ing business founded by John A. Black into what_ is 
now the National Bank of John A. Black, of which 
he became the first president, a capacity in which he 
served a number of years, since which he has lived 
virtually retired; Hiram was a prosperous farmer in 
Knox County at the time of his death; Alabama be- 
came the wife of William Hopper and died in Laurel 
County, where her husband is still actively engaged 
in farm enterprise ; James D., of this review, is the 
youngest of the children. 

Knox County's native son who was destined to be- 
come governor of this great commonwealth, gained his 
early education in the rural schools and a subscription 
school maintained at Barbourville. Thereafter he com- 
pleted a course in Tusculum College, situated four 
miles east of Greenville, Tennessee, in which institu- 
tion he was graduated as a member of the class of 
1872 and with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. It was 
a fitting recognition which his alma mater accorded 
to him many years later, when, in 191 1, Tusculum Col- 
lege conferred upon him the honorary degree of Doc- 
tor of Laws, he having marked the intervening years 
with substantial and distinguished service and achieve- 
ment. 

After his graduation in the college mentioned above 
Mr. Black returned to Knox County, and here he gave 
two years of effective service as a teacher in the 
public schools. In the meanwhile he gave much atten- 
tion to the study of law, and that he made definite 
progress in the absorption and assimilation of the 
science of jurisprudence is indicated by the fact that 
in August, 1874, he was duly admitted to the bar of 
his native state. Depending upon no fortuitious influ- 
ence, he proved his ability by successful work in his 
chosen profession, and for many years he has main- 
tained a place of acknowledged leadership as a member 
of the bar of Eastern Kentucky. His practice, which 
has been of representative order, has involved his 
appearance in connection with many civil and criminal 
cases of major importance, and he has extended his 
practice into the Supreme Court of Kentucky and the 
Federal courts of the state. The building in which he 
maintains his law offices, at the corner of Main and 
High streets in Barbourville, is a two-story brick block 
that is owned by him, and in his extensive practice he 
is now the senior member of the firm of Black, Black 
& Owens, in which his associates are his only son, Pit- 
zer D. Black, and his son-in-law, H. H. Owens. 

Mr. Black has long been a leader in the councils 
and campaign activties of the democratic party in 
Southeastern Kentucky, and in 1875, shortly after he 
had attained to an age that made him eligible for such 
office, he was elected representative of Knox and Whit- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



ley counties in the lower house of the Kentucky Legis- 
lature, in which he gave effective service during the 
session of the Centennial year, 1876, and proved him- 
self a resourceful working member of the House and 
of the various committees to which he was assigned. 
In 1884-5 he served as commissioner of the common 
schools of Knox County, and his versatility has been 
shown not only in his work as a public official and 
able lawyer, but also in his vital loyalty and liberality 
as a citizen. In 1911-12 he officiated as president of 
Union College, and during the latter year he was first 
assistant attorney general of Kentucky. He became, 
in 1915, the democratic candidate for lieutenant gov- 
ernor of Kentucky, to which office he was duly elected 
and in which he served until 1919. As lieutenant gov- 
ernor he presided over three full sessions of the State 
Senate and during one impeachment trial before that 
body. In May, 1919, by virtue of existing conditions, 
he became governor of the state, and in this high office 
he continued his executive service, with characteristic 
high sense of stewardship and with marked discrim- 
ination and circumspection, until the inauguration of 
Governor Morrow, in December, 1919, when he resigned 
the reins of government to the present chief executive 
of the state. During his brief regime as governor he 
punctiliously directed all routine affairs of the office 
and looked at all times to the safeguarding of the inter- 
ests of the state and its people, in which connection it 
is to be noted that, though there were many impor- 
tunities, he consented to pardon but very few crim- 
inals, his judgment as a lawyer of profound learning 
and long experience and his fine sense of justice causing 
him to avoid the executive clemency that the merits 
of cases presented to him did not fully authorize. Upon 
retiring from the office of governor iie served during 
1020 as chief prohibition inspector of Kentucky. Since 
that time he has given his attention to his law business, 
and he finds constant demands for his interposition in 
advisor capacity and as counsel in connection with im- 
|)ortant interests and law cases. Among his real-estate 
holdings are his fine home property, at the corner of 
Main and High streets in the city of Barbourville, and 
2,000 acres of coal land and other mineral land, in 
Whitley, Bell and Knox counties. The year 1921 marks 
the third consecutive year of Mr. Black's service as 
president of the National Bank of John A. Black, which 
had its inception in a private bank established many 
years ago by his brother, John A., its incorporation as 
a national bank, under the present title, having occurred 
.^pril 18, 1914. Judge W. R. Marsee and J. S. Miller 
are vice presidents of the institution, and W. R. Lay is 
its cashier. The bank has a capital stock of $30,000; 
its surplus fund and undivided profits aggregate $50,000, 
and its deposits are fully $850,000. Mr. Black is a direc- 
. tor of the Barbourville Cemetery Company. He has 
been a close and appreciative student of the history and 
teachings of the Masonic fraternity and is one of its 
prominent and honored representatives in his native 
state. His ancient-craft affiliation is with Mountain 
Lodge, No. 187, Free & Accepted Masons, at Barbour- 
ville, and he has served seven different times as mas- 
ter of this lodge, besides which he had the distinction 
of serving in 1880 as grand master of the Kentucky 
Grand Lodge of Free & Accepted Masons. His capit- 
ular membership is in Barbourville Chapter, No. 137, 
Royal Arch Masons, of which he has twice served as 
high priest. At London, Laurel County, he is affiliated 
with the council of Royal & Select Masters, and his 
York Rite circle is completed by his affiliation with 
Ryan Commandery, No. 17, Knights Templars, at Dan- 
ville. In the City of Louisville he holds membership 
in Kosair Temple of the Ancient Arabic Order 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He and his wife are 
earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Black was Lieutenant-Governor of Kentucky at 
the time when the LTnited States became involved 



actively in the World war, and with characteristic 
loyalty he gave his aid in the forwarding and support- 
ing of the various war activities in his native state, in 
which connection he made many patriotic speeches in 
Knox County and other counties of eastern Kentucky. 
He wielded much influence in furthering the campaigns 
in support of the government war-bond issues, savings 
stamps. Red Cross work, etc., and made his personal 
subscriptions touch hard upon the limit of his avail- 
able resources. 

In December, 1875, at Barbourville, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Black to Miss Mary Janette Pitzer, 
daughter of the late T. J. and Mary (Glass) Pitzer, who 
were residents of Barbourville at the time of theli' 
death, Mr. Pitzer having come to Kentucky from his 
native state of Virginia and having for many years 
been a leading merchant at Barbourville. Pitzer D., 
eldest of the children of Mr. and Mrs. Black, was born 
in the year 1881, was graduated in Centre College, at 
Danville, Kentucky, with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts, and thereafter he attended the law department 
of the University of Virginia. Since his admission to 
the bar he has been actively associated with his father 
in the practice of law at Barbourville. Miss Gertrude 
D. Black remains at the parental home and is a gradu- 
ate of the Woman's College at Danville, Kentucky, 
from which she received the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts. Georgia is the wife of H. H. Owens, the third 
member of the representative law firm of Black, Black 
& Owens. Mrs. Owens likewise received from the 
Woman's College at Danville the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. The family is one of prominence in the rep- 
resentative social life of Barbourville and Kno.x 
Count}', and the former governor has commanding 
place in the esteem of the people of not only his 
native county, but also of the state in general, for his 
ability and achievement mark him as one of Kentucky's 
distinguished citizens. 

John F. Lynch. In the years that immediately pre- 
ceded the Civil war and in the late '40s of the last 
century immigrants from the Emerald Isle came ii; 
large numbers to this country, owing largely to the 
unsatisfactory economic conditions prevailing at that 
time in Ireland. The Lynch family, of whom John F. 
Lynch is a descendant, was among the early settlers in 
Chilesburg, Kentucky. 

John F. Lynch, now engaged in farming and in the 
management of a general merchandise store and in 
the handling of grain, coal, seeds, etc;, at Chilesburg, 
lying six miles east of Lexington, was born near 
Chilesburg, a son of Patrick and Bridget (Walsh) 
Lynch, natives of Ireland, who came to this country 
when they were children and later married in Ken- 
tucky. Some time after the Civil war Patrick Lynch 
took up farming near Chilesburg, and continued along 
that line up to the time of his death, which occurred 
in 1904. His widow died in the following year. These 
worthy people were the parents of four sons and two 
daughters: Mrs. Thomas B. Adams, living at Brighton; 
Thomas, a farmer near Chilesburg; William, deputy 
county assessor, living at Lexington; John F., subject 
of this sketch ; James, living with his sister at Brighton ; 
and Anna, who died in March, 1910. 

John F. Lynch, who is now one of the prominent 
merchants of Chilesburg, received his early education 
in the district schools of his native place and later 
assisted his father in the operations of the home farm. 
Since 1896 he has been extensively engaged in farming 
on his own account. Up to the time of the death of 
the late John W. Christian, in 1903, Mr. Lynch and 
Mr. Christian carried on a general merchandise com- 
pany, also being engaged in the sales of grain, coal, 
seeds and other commodities, this business from the 
very beginning having met with a large measure of 
success. The members of the Christian family still 
have an interest in the business in which their father 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



was a partner, and the entire undertaking is now under 
the personal direction of Mr. Lynch. 

Apart from his commercial interests in the store Mr. 
Lynch is the owner of 600 acres of prime land, on 
which he carries on general farming, and in this line 
he is regarded as one of the most successful farmers 
in this part of the state. He is a director of the 
Phenix and Third National Banks at Lexington, to 
the affairs of which he gives close attention. He is an 
earnest member of the Catholic Church, to the good 
works of which he gives practical support. In frater- 
nal affiliation he holds membership with the Elks. Mr. 
Lynch has never been a seeker after political office, 
but gives a good citizen's attention to civic affairs and 
takes a warm interest in all projects designed to ad- 
vance the welfare of the community in which he has 
spent almost his entire life. 

George Clifton Leachman, M. D., iias responded to 
the routine duty of a capable physician and surgeon 
at Louisville for over twenty years. This has been 
important service in itself, but other attainments rank 
him as more than an ordinary member of his profes- 
sion. He has done his share in the educational de- 
partment of medicine and surgery, has helped advance 
the prestige of local hospitals and was an army sur- 
geon during the World war, while tw^o of his sons 
were in the navy. 

Doctor Leachman is the son of a physician and was 
born at Louisville, September 23, 1877, son of William 
Thomas and Lettia (Field) Leachman. His father, 
who was born at Danville, Kentucky, in 1834, was 
primarily educated in Washington County and in 1857 
graduated from the Medical Department of the Univer- 
sity of Louisville. From that time until a few years 
of his death, which occurred in May, 1906, he had an 
extensive general practice and for years was considered 
one of the ablest physicians of Louisville. He was a 
member of the Jefferson County and Kentucky State 
Medical associations, and for several years was a trus- 
tee of the Louisville city schools. His wife was 
born at Louisville in 18-14 and died in 1900. They had 
nine children : Silas F., of Chicago ; W. T., of Cin- 
cinnati; Edward, deceased; Theodore, of Louisville; 
Bessie, who married John Rosenbaum and died at the 
age of twenty-seven; Harry M., who died in 1919; 
Lettia, wife of Richard F. Watts, of Louisville; Ro- 
man, of Louisville; and George Clifton. 

George Clifton Leachman has lived practically all 
his life in Louisville, where he was educated in the 
grammar schools and the Male High School. He was 
only nineteen when he graduated in June, 1896, from 
the Kentucky School of Medicine, and from the date 
of his graduation until 1898 remained with the college 
as demonstrator of anatomy. Since 1898 he has had a 
practically uninterrupted program of professional work 
at Louisville. He was assistant professor of surgery 
and clinical surgeon at the University of Louisville. 
He has been visiting surgeon at the Louisville City 
Hospital and St. Joseph's Hospital for a period of 
twelve years. He is a member of the Jefferson County, 
State Medical and .American Medical associations, the 
Mississippi Valley Medical Association, and is a Fel- 
low of the American College of Surgeons, indicating 
his special attainments in surgery. Doctor Leachman 
was one of the first members of the Medical Advisory 
Board of the United States Army. Later he re- 
signed to take active duty with the Medical Corps 
and was in service from September 13, 1918, until 
December 15, 1919. He is a member of the United 
States Military Surgeons. In politics Doctor Leach- 
man gives his approval to candidates and policies ac- 
cording to his independent judgment. 

October 2, 1895, he married Margarita Antoinette 
Denunzio, a native of Louisville. Doctor and Mrs. 
Leachman, whose home is at 1127 Fourth Avenue in 
Louisville, are the proud parents of a family of ten 



children, named: Salvador J., William T., George 
Clifton, Jr., Bernard D., Louis F., Mary M., Margaret 
L., Helen L., Silas F. and Angeline N. 

The oldest son, Salvador J., was a member of Com- 
pany A of the First Kentucky Infantry during the 
Me.xican border difficulties, and saw service on the 
border for ten months. He was mustered out of the 
Federal service about two months before America de- 
clared war against Germany, and he. at once re-enlisted, 
joining the navy and became a fireman on the trans- 
port America. He was on this vessel when it took its 
first cargo of American troops to Brest, Altogether 
he made eleven trips in transport work across the 
Atlantic, and was in service until mustered out in 
March, 1919. He now lives at Nutallburg, West Vir- 
ginia. His wife was Clara O'Connell. 

The second son, William T. Leachman, enlisted a 
month after war was declared with Germany and be- 
came an apprentice seaman assigned to the battleship 
.Arkansas. He was with this ship in the North Sea 
for six months and was present at the surrender of the 
German fleet. After twenty-seven months he received 
his honorable discharge and is now living at Louisville. 
He married Catherine Gruesling. The third son, 
George C, Jr., was a member of the Reserve Officers 
Training Camp while a student in the Male High 
School of Louisville. 

George L. Danforth. The first wholesale dry goods 
house was established at Louisville nearly a century 
ago by Joseph Danforth. From that time to the pres- 
ent the family name has been signficant of the larger 
commercial enterprise of the city, and also of that 
liberal public spirit which has been responsible for 
some of the community's best institutions and stand- 
ards of civic progress. 

The Danforths came to America nearly two cen- 
turies before the first of the family reached Kentucky. 
Nicholas Danforth settled in the Massachusetts Bay 
. Colony in 1634, coming to America to seek religious 
freedom. He was one of the founders of Newtown, 
later Cambridge,. and was also identified with the early 
history of Harvard College. His son Thomas _ was 
deputy governor of Massachusetts and later president 
of the Province of Maine. His son Samuel was a 
clergyman distinguished in Massachusetts church 
history. 

From Massachusetts various branches of the family 
spread into adjoining sections of New England. One 
of the Revolutionary soldiers at the battle of Bunker 
Hill was Joseph Danforth, Sr., who married Elizabeth 
Barker and lived at Londonderry, Rockingham County, 
New Hampshire, when his son Joseph was born Janu- 
ary 21, 1792. 

This Joseph Danforth was reared and educated in 
New Hampshire, at the age of eighteen began his ap- 
prenticeship as a mechant at Boston, and for_ several 
years was an importing merchant in that city. In 
1815 he married Lucy Shaw Lewis, a lineal descendant 
of Mary Chilton, the first woman to step from the 
Mayflower to Plymouth Rock in 1620. In search of a 
location to build up a business in the far west Joseph 
Danforth visited Kentucky at a time when Louisville 
had less than 4.000 population. He came to the city 
in 1818 and later established himself in business as a 
general commission merchant and in 1823 founded the 
first wholesale dry goods house. He was associated with 
his brother, James B., in the business known as J. B. 
Danforth and Company, later known as Danforth, 
Lewis & Company, and finally as J. Danforth & Son. 
Joseph Danforth died at Louisville, November 26, 1885. 
His wife passed way August 10, 1859. 

One of their four children was Joseph L. Danforth, 
who was born at Louisville, January 21, 1821, and died 
October 29, 1887. only two years after the death of his 
father. Cultured New England parents gave him every 
advantage and facility for acquiring a liberal education, 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



and at the age of fourteen he entered Harvard Col- 
lege, remaining until he graduated in 1839. He se- 
cured his training in business at Philadelphia under 
his uncle, James B. Danforth, then head of the firm 
Danforth, Lewis & Company, and two years later 
went to New Orleans, were he was associated with his 
maternal uncle, George A. Lewis. He returned to 
Louisville in 1844 and became a member of the firm 
Danforth, Lewis & Company, and later junior partner 
of J. Danforth & Son. He was a merchant until 1853, 
when he became secretary of the Falls City Insurance 
Company, thereby transferring the business associa- 
tions of the family name to the field of fire insurance, 
with which it has been prominently related ever since. 
Joseph L. Danforth was elected president of the Louis- 
ville Board of Underwriters in 1861. He was largely 
instrumental in securing better fire protection for 
Louisville after the destructive fire of 1856. His name 
was associated with several important and philanthropic 
enterprises of the city during his time. In 1866 he was 
elected president of the Board of Education, and was 
largely instrumental in introducing manual training 
into the high school in 1870. He was one of the foun- 
ders of the Home for Aged Women, and on his ad- 
vice this institution was merged into the Cook Benevo- 
lent Institution, and he was one of its trustees. He 
was one of the organizers of the Home of the Friend- 
less, established in 1869. From 1854 until his death he 
was a prominent member of the Church of the Mes- 
siah, Unitarian, and in politics was a democrat. 

May 12, 1845, Joseph L. Danforth married Miss 
Frances A. E. Ward, of Boston. Her great-grand- 
father was Gen. Artemus Ward, who was a president 
of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and was one of the 
first major generals appointed by the Continental Con- 
gress during the Revolution. He was a member of 
Congress from Massachusetts from 1791 until 1795. 
Mrs. Joseph L. Danforth died November 19, 1898, at 
the age of seventy-six. She was the mother of five 
children : Florence Ward, who was married to H. 
Victor Newcomb ; Josephine Lewis; Antoinette, wife 
of Charles Freeman Smith ; George Lewis ; and Sallie 
Ward, who married Charles Thurston Johnson. 

George Lewis Danforth, only son of Joseph L. Dan- 
forth, was born at Louisville, July 24, 1854, and for 
many years has been prominent in insurance circles, 
succeeding to the business established by his father as 
J. L. Danforth & Company. He entered that busi- 
ness after completing his education in the public schools 
of Louisville. Like his father, he is a past president 
of the Louisville Board of Fire Underwriters. From 
1877 to 1844 he was vice president and general man- 
ager of the New Albany Rail Mill Company. He was 
one of the promoters of the Louisville Southern Rail- 
way. In his public relations he has been prompted by 
the same broadly constructive spirit of his father and 
grandfather, and has readily enlisted his time and 
means in behalf of movements to promote the genera! 
welfare of the city and state. He is a democrat, and 
a member of Christ Episcopal Church. 

February 13, 1877, he married Miss Florence Standi- 
ford, a native of Louisville. They became the parents 
of five children : Nannie S., who died at the age of 
eleven years ; Marie Antoinette, George Lewis, Jr., 
Florence and Standiford. 

Elisha David Standiford, father of Mrs. George L. 
Danforth, was another distinguished citizen of Louis- 
ville. He was born in Jeff^erson County, December 28, 
1831, and died July 26, 1887. His father, Elisha Standi- 
ford, was a successful farmer in Jefferson County. 
His mother, Nancy (Brooks) Standiford, grew up 
from early childhood in Louisville when it was a fron- 
tier settlement. Elisha D. Standiford was educated in 
public schools, in St. Mary's College near Lebanon, 
Kentucky, studied medicine, graduating from the Ken- 
tucky School of Medicine, and for several years en- 
gaged in practice. The profession was not altogether 



congenial and he soon turned his attention to farm- 
ing. Possessing a scientific mind, eminently practical 
in business affairs, he carried on his agricultural opera- 
tions in a way to justify the assertion made by the 
Louisville Courier Journal at his death "that he was 
in the broadest sense the best and most successful 
farmer in Kentucky." Much that he did gave a new 
impetus and set a new standard copied and widely 
followed by Kentucky farmers for a generation or 
more. As a manufacturer and financier he was inter- 
ested in the Red River Iron Works and the Louis- 
ville Car Wheel Company, serving as president of 
both these great industries. From 1870 to 1885 he was 
president of the Farmers and Drovers Bank. In 1873 
he was made vice president of the Louisville and 
Nashville Railroad Company, and two years later was 
chosen president, an office he held until 1879. During 
his administration the road was not only extended in 
mileage but its operating efficiency tremendously in- 
creased. He was one of the original projectors and 
was largely instrumental in keeping alive the project 
of building the Louisville Southern Railway, the con- 
struction of which was finally started in 1885. For a 
number of years he was president of the Louisville 
Bridge Company. 

He was a man of large affairs who enjoyed keenly 
the great contests of partisan politics, though he was 
never in politics for his selfish advantage and had no 
needs of the rewards of political office. For several 
terms he was a member of the Louisville Board of 
Education, was elected to the State Senate in 1867 
and re-elected in 1871, in 1872 was sent to Congress by 
the Louisville District, serving one term in the Forty- 
third Congress, where some of his speeches attracted 
nation-wide attention. At the time of his death in 
1887 he was a candidate for election to the United 
States Senate. Doctor Standiford was distinguished by 
many lofty qualities of character and intellect, by his 
achievements in business, and by his friendships. At 
his death he left one of the largest estates ever pro- 
bated by a citizen of Louisville. His first wife and the 
mother of Mrs. Danforth was Miss Mary E. Neill, 
who died in 1875, leaving five children. 

Merritt Drane. While growing up on a Kentcky 
farm, Merritt Drane applied himself to the science of 
surveying and civil engineering, and has been a well- 
qualified representative of that profession for over 
thirty years. He has done much of the important work 
of his profession in and around Louisville and is the 
present county engineer of Jefferson County. 

His birth occurred on his father's farm in Shelby 
County April 7, 1865. He is a son of Albert and Selinda 
(Hinton) Drane, both natives of Shelby County, where 
the father was born in 1841 and the mother in 1842. 
Albert Drane was reared and educated in Shelby 
County and spent his active life there as a farmer. He 
made a specialty for some years of the breeding of 
Cotswold sheep. He voted independently and was a 
member of the Baptist Church. Both he and his wife 
died at the age of sixty-five. Of their five children 
four are living, Merritt being the second in age. Mer- 
ritt Drane's maternal ancestors came to America in 
Colonial times and settled in Maryland. There were 
seven brothers who established the family in that state. 
Air. Drane's •great-grandfather, Evan Hinton, was an 
early settler in Shelby County, and his homestead, pat- 
ented to him by the United States Government, has 
never passed out of the Hinton family. 

Merritt Drane acquired his education in public 
schools and at old Eminence College, where he showed 
his proficiency in mathematics and kindred branches. 
He qualified for work as a civil engineer at the age 
of twenty, and for three years was employed by the 
South Pittsburg City Company in Tennessee. From 
there he came to Louisville, and for nineteen years 
was a civil engineer in the employ of the Kentucky 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



Title Company. He was then elected and served in 
1908-09 as county surveyor of Jefferson County. Fol- 
lowing this he practiced as a civil engineer on his own 
account for a number of years, and in November, 1917, 
was elected county engineer, the duties of which office 
still engage him. He is a member of the Louisville 
Engineers and Architects Club and the American 
Society of Civil Engineers. He also belongs to the 
Louisville Board of Trade, is a member of Louisville 
. Lodge No. 400, F. and A. M., King Solomon Chapter, 
R. A. M., Louisville Commandery No. i, K. T., Kosair 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine, and Louisville Lodge 
No. 8 of the Elks. 

June 17, 1909, he married Clara Lindeman, a native 
of Cincinnati. They have one daughter, Laura Selinda. 

Ezra Offutt Witherspoon, M. D. Numerous dis- 
tinctions have attended the professional career of Doc- 
tor Witherspoon, one of the very earnest and capable 
physicians and surgeons of Louisville. Doctor Wither- 
spoon has been a leader in various forms of public 
health work. He represents the third generation of a 
family that has been identified with the medical pro- 
fession of Kentucky for well upwards of a century. 

His grandfather was Dr. John Witherspoon, who 
was one of the early day physicians at Lawrenceburg 
in Anderson County. He was not only a good doctor 
Init a good business man, and was one of the founders 
of the J. & J. A. Witherspoon Bank, later known as 
the Anderson Countj' Deposit Bank and finally the 
.Anderson National Bank. He was also associated with 
others in a pioneer transportation enterprise, both 
freight and stage, between Louisville and Frankfort. 

The second generation of this family was repre- 
sented by Dr. Oran Hawes Witherspoon, who was 
born at Lawrenceburg, Kentucky, June 14, 1842, and 
was a resident of that community practically all his 
life. He died January 5, 1901. He acquired a liberal 
education, attending the common schools, the Kentucky 
Militarj' Institute, and graduated from the Jefferson 
Medical College of Philadelphia in 1865, and in the 
same year received a diploma from Bellevue Medical 
College of New York. He took up his professional 
work at first in association with his father, whom he 
succeeded in practice at Lawrenceburg, and was a 
leader in his profession in Anderson County for over 
forty years. He was honored with the office of presi- 
dent of the Anderson County Medical Society, was 
health officer for Anderson County one term and also 
physician to the City of Lawrenceburg. He was a 
member of the Masonic fraternity and in politics a 
democrat. Dr. Oran H. Witherspoon married Mary 
Edmonia Offutt, who was born in Scott County, Ken- 
tucky, February 4, 1845, and is still living. 

Ezra Offutt Witherspoon, only child of his parents, 
was born at Lawrenceburg October 3, 1878, and entered 
his profession equipped with a liberal education and 
training and the honorable traditions set by his father 
and grandfather. He attended public school at Law- 
renceburg, completed his literary education in George- 
town College, Kentucky, and in 1901 graduated from 
the Hospital Medical College of Louisville. Besides 
the opportunities presented by his practicing experi- 
ence Doctor Witherspoon has a number of times at- 
tended courses and clinics in New York, Philadelphia 
and Baltimore. For seven years he was connected 
with the faculty of the Hospital Medical College, be- 
ginning as assistant in chemistry, was for two years 
professor of inorganic chemistry, and for six years 
professor of proctology. For a year he was an interne 
in the Gray Street Infirmary and in November, 1909, 
was appointed assistant health officer of Louisville, 
an office he filled for eight years. He is a former pres- 
ident of the Alumni Association of Hospital Medical 
College. 

While for several years he has been busy with an 
extensive private practice. Doctor Witherspoon con- 



tinues an interest in public health work. He has been 
a member of the staff of the City Hospital and the 
Home for the Incurables. He is a member of the 
Society of Physicians and Surgeons, the Jefferson 
County Medical Society, Kentucky State Medical 
Society and American Medical Association. He has 
served as state medical director for the Modern Wood- 
men of America. 

Doctor Witherspoon is a member of the Phi Chi 
fraternity. Falls City Lodge No. 376, F. and A. M., 
King Solomon Chapter No. 5, R. A. M., Louisville 
Commandery No. i, K. T., and Kosair Temple of the 
Alystic Shrine. He is a democrat and a member of 
the Pendennis Club. October 14, 1908, he married Nell 
E. Newman, a native of Bardstown, Kentucky, and 
oldest child and only daughter of the eight children 
of William H. and Minnie (Elliott) Newman. 

Charles D. Rodman. In life insurance circles at 
Louisville, Charles D. Rodman holds a prominent and 
responsible position as the result of over a quarter of 
a century's work and experience. He is general agent 
at Louisville for the Northwestern Mutual Life Insur- 
ance Company of Milwaukee. His agency in produc- 
tion ranks well up with the largest of the company. 

He was born in Curdsville in Daviess County March 
14, 1875, son of Thomas V. and Minerva Jane (Smith) 
Rodman, the former a native of St. Joseph, Kentucky, 
and the latter of Virginia, who as an orphan at the 
age of twelve with her two brothers and one sister 
came in a road wagon to an aunt's in Henderson 
County, Kentucky. The father, who died in 1879, was 
educated in St. Mary's College, Kentucky, was a Cath- 
olic all his life and for many years an active merchant 
at Curdsville. He also served several years as sheriff 
of Daviess County. The mother, who died in 1912, is 
survived by one sister, Mrs. Ann Lett, of Henderson. 

Charles D. Rodman was also educated in St. Mary's 
College. Before entering and after leaving college he 
did various kinds of work. His first money, 10 cents 
a day, was earned in a tobacco factory. Later he 
worked on a farm, in a brick yard, at a sawmill, sawed 
and rafted logs, but at the age of twenty-one came to 
Louisville, collected doctors' bills, sold a book written 
by negroes to negroes, and sold his first life insurance 
for the W^estern and Southern Life Insurance Com- 
pany of Cincinnati, Ohio, an industrial or weekly pay- 
ment plan company. He was with that company about 
eight months and then joined the rank of agents of 
the Northwestern Mutual Life at Louisville, in which 
company's service he has been continuously. In 1904 
the company assigned him the important responsibility 
of establishing its first office in the then Territory of 
Arizona. He located at Phoenix as general agent, and 
remained there until 1906, when, in accordance with 
his uncle's wishes and the endorsement of the com- 
pany, he cancelled his Arizona contract and returned 
to Louisville and formed a partnership with his uncle, 
Dr. H. D. Rodman, which continued to May 31, 1916, 
at which date Doctor Rodman retired and Mr. Rod- 
man accepted his present responsibilities as general 
agent. He has probably been a general agent a greater 
number of years than any man of his age with the 
company. 

He is an active member and a past president of the 
Louisville Association of Life Underwriters. He or- 
ganized the Life Insurance Men of Louisville to sell 
Liberty Bonds during the World war. He organized 
and was the first president of the Exchange Club, a 
weekly luncheon civic organization. He is a member 
of the Pendennis Club, is a Catholic, and in politics 
is a democrat. His wife was Alice M. Joyce, a native 
of Ludington, Michigan. They have one son, William 
Joyce- Rodman. 

William R. Roberts, whose fine homestead farm 
is situated in Jessamine County, near the Fayette 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



County line and 61^ miles south of the City of Lex- 
ington, is a popular representative of one of the old 
and well known families of this favored section of 
the Blue Grass state. This ancestral homestead, on 
the Nicholasville Turnpike, was formerly owned by 
Rankin Roberts, Sr., grandfather of him whose name 
initiates this paragraph. The grandfather here owned 
a landed estate of 700 acres, and here he erected the 
substantial brick house which is still in use and in an 
excellent state of preservation. The building was 
completed about the year 1840, the brick utilized in 
its erection having been manufactured on the farm 
itself, and from the place having been taken the timber 
utilized in all exterior and interior woodwork of the 
building. 

Rankin Roberts, Sr., was born near Brannon Station 
in Jessamine County, on the 26th of June, 1799, a date 
that indicates conclusively that he was a member of 
one of the early pioneer families of this locality. He 
was a son of Thomas and Sarah Roberts, the former 
of whom was born in Virginia, in 1755, and the latter 
of whom was born in North Carolina. The death 
of Thomas Roberts occurred March 26, 1830, and that 
of his wife on the 29th of November, 1834. Thomas 
Roberts reclaimed and developed one of the best of 
the pioneer farms in this section of the state and did 
well his part in the furtherance of the social and ma- 
terial progress, and prosperity of the community. His 
name merits high place on the roll of the honored 
pioneers of Central Kentucky. Of his children the 
eldest was Joseph, who was born March 4, 1776, and 
the second son was Rankin, Sr., who, on the 17th of 
October, 1828, married Miss Nancy Jones. Within a 
short time thereafter Rankin Roberts and his wife 
established their residence on the old homestead now 
owned by the subject of this sketch, and here they 
occupied the present house from the time of its erection 
until their deaths, Mr. Roberts having passed away 
July 24, 1877, and his widow having survived until 
April, 1885. Their daughter Susan became the wife 
of Peter Force, of Henry County, and was forty-five 
years of age at the time of her death, Mary, Emma, 
Belle and Florida all died in young womanhood, vic- 
tims of consumption, and none of them had mar- 
ried. James A., who was born October 8, 1841, died 
on the sixty-fifth anniversary of his birth. John, 
another brother, was familiarly known as Jack Roberts, 
and was a buoyant and genial personality, a man of 
sporting proclivities, and he died in 1S48, in his sixty- 
third year. Rankin died at the age of seventy years, 
he having owned a part of the ancestral landed estate. 
His son Handley is engaged in the wholesale hard- 
ware business in the City of Chicago. 

James A. Roberts was united in marriage, in No- 
vember, 1875, to Miss Rosa B. Oldhan, daughter of 
Hiram D. Oldhan, of Madison County, and she passed 
to eternal rest on the 12th of January, 1919. James 
A. Roberts became the owner of a valuable farm com- 
prising about 350 acres, and has gained marked suc- 
cess as a vigorous exponent of agricultural and live- 
stock enterprise, with special attention given to the 
raising of cattle and swine and the breeding of fine 
Kentucky trotting horses. He has raised such stand- 
ard bred horses for fully twenty years, and has sold 
the major number of the horses when they were colts. 
He is a member of the Providence Christian Church, 
as was also his wife. His father, Rankin Roberts, 
Sr., was well advanced in years when he likewise 
became a member of this church, and that he did not 
readily lose some of the proclivities of his more un- 
regenerate days is indicated by the following amus- 
ing incident. On one occasion the clergyman and a 
number of the church brethren called at the Roberts 
home to pass an hour or two. When the clergyman 
finally suggested a brief session of prayer Mr. Roberts 
replied : "I think that would be a d d good idea." 

James A. and Rosa B. Roberts became the parents 



of three children who attained to years of maturity, 
William Rankin, of this review, being the eldest of the 
number and the only son. The two daughters, Nancy 
Belle and Florida Mason, have been twice married 
but have no children, and they now reside with their 
brother on the old home farm. William R. Roberts 
has been twice married. His second wife was Mar- 
garet Duncan. Their one son, James Oldhan, aged 
nine years (1920), and the three children of Handley 
Roberts, of Chicago, are thus the only children repre- 
senting the Roberts family in that generation. Hand- 
ley Roberts' children are two sons and one daughter. 

William R. Roberts and his two sisters are associ- 
ated in the ownership of the old homestead, and he has 
specialized in the raising of standard bred horses, which 
he has sold as colts. He is a republican in politics, as 
is also his cousin Handley, of Chicago, but his father 
and grandfather both gave allegiance to the demo- 
cratic party. 

James Harvey Hester, M. D. While he began his 
career as a general physician and surgeon, after sev- 
eral years Doctor Hester availed himself of oppor- 
tunity to perfect his skill in handling affections of the 
eye, ear, nose and throat, and since he located at 
Louisville his practice has been entirely confined to 
that specialty, and he is one of the leading authorities 
in this branch of medicine and surgery in Kentucky. 

Doctor Hester was born at Greenville, Muhlenberg 
County, Kentucky, May 24, 1879, son of Thomas S. 
and Naicissur (Creal) Hester. His mother was born 
in Green County, Kentucky, in i860, and his father in 
Hart County in 1852. They have seven children, and 
the family circle has not yet been broken by death. 
Doctor Hester is the oldest child. His father was 
reared and educated in Hart County, and after farm- 
ing for a time became a merchant at Blanco and since 
1912 has lived retired. He is a republican and a mem- 
ber of the Christian Church. 

Doctor Hester attended public school in Hart County, 
Kentucky, graduated in 1897 from the high school of 
Millerstown, and being without means to satisfy im- 
mediately his ambitions for a medical career he turned 
to teaching, a vocation he followed four years, and 
from 1901 to 1904 was in the mercantile business at 
Roseburg. 

Doctor Hester then entered the medical department 
of the University of Louisville, graduating with the 
class of 1907. For four years he engaged in general 
practice at Munfordville, but in 191 1 abandoned his 
practice and for about two years devoted all his time 
to special instruction and experience. He attended the 
Manhattan Eye and Ear Hospital of New York City, 
also the Chicago Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat College 
and Chicago Post-Graduate School of Medicine. He 
was appointed and served one year as house surgeon 
of the Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary. It was with 
this training and unusual equipment that Doctor Hes- 
ter returned to his native state and located at Louis- 
ville to take up his special work, including diseases of 
the eye, ear, nose and throat. He is a member of the 
Louisville Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Society, and 
also of the Jefferson County, Kentucky State, Southern 
and American Medical Associations. Doctor Hester is 
an outdoor man, and when his professional duties 
permit enjoys the sports of tennis, fishing and swim- 
ming. He is affiliated with Willis Stewart Lodge No. 
224, F. and A. M., also with the Scottish Rite and 
Kosair Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He is a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Church and a republican. 
November 14, 1915, Doctor Hester married Mary E. 
Veatts, a native of Virginia. They have two children. 
May and Raymond H. 

Henry Hamilton Lewis is vice president of the 
Lewis Implement & Seed Company of Louisville. 
While the present corporate form is comparatively 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



new, the business is one of the oldest of its kind in 
Kentucky, and is one with which the Lewis name has 
been identified for half a century. 

Mr. Lewis, who was born at Louisville September 26, 
1870, is the only child of Frederick Nantz and Mar- 
garet Frances (Hall) Lewis. The ancestry of this 
branch of the Lewis family is traced back to Colonel 
Robert Lewis, a distinguished Welshman who is said 
to have held the last castle in Wales against the Eng- 
lish Government. He had two sons, Robert and Field- 
ing, and Fielding immigrated to America and was a 
soldier on Washington's staff in the war for Colonial 
independence'. Fielding Lewis married General Wash- 
ington's only sister, Bettie Washington, and both of 
these distinguished personages belong in the ancestral 
line of the Lewis family of Louisville. The history 
of the Lewis family in Great Britain can be traced 
back in unbroken line to the time of Alfred the Great. 

The grandparents of Henry Hamilton Lewis were 
John Buford and Marion (Nantz) Lewis, both of 
whom were born in Washington County, Kentucky. 
They had three children, two sons and one daughter, 
the oldest being Frederick N. John B. Lewis for a 
number of years had some extensive interests in the 
silver mines of Colorado. 

Frederick Nantz Lewis was born at Springfield, 
Washington County, Kentucky, February 22, 1846. His 
wife was born in Bullitt County, Kentucky, March 29, 
1848, and died January 29, 1913. He received a public 
school education and in 1S63 was appointed deputy 
clerk of the Circuit Court of Marion County and 
later deputy county clerk of Washington County. He 
removed to Louisville in 1865 and was an, employe of 
Bondurant, Todd & Company in the implement and 
seed business until 1871. In that year he and O. S. 
Gage bought the Todd interests, making the firm Bon- 
durant, Lewis & Gage, while in the fall of the same 
year Mr. Bondurant sold out, leaving the firm as Lewis, 
Gage & Company. Subsequently Mr. Lewis and H. D. 
Hanford bought the Gage interests, and after the death 
of Mr. Hanford in 1891 the firm was Lewis & Cham- 
bers. The Chambers interests were acquired in July, 
1918, and at that time the Lewis Implement & Seed 
Company was incorporated. Frederick N. Lewis, 
though seventy-five years of age, is still active in the 
business as president, but a part of the management 
devolves upon his son, the vice president. The father 
is an active member of the Baptist Church, is an inde- 
pendent democrat and a member of the Pendennis 
Club of Louisville. 

Henry Hamilton Lewis was born about the time his 
father became a partner in the business, and during 
his youth and early manhood he was given every op- 
portunity to acquire culture and an education fitting 
him for the responsibilities of a business career. He 
attended school at Louisville, both public and private, 
and prepared for college in Phillips Andover Academy 
at Andover, Massachusetts, and from there entered 
Harvard University with the class of 1894. He left 
university before graduating, and for two years trav- 
eled in Europe. On his return to Louisville he became 
associated with Lewis & Chambers, and when the busi- 
ness was incorporated under the present title he be- 
came vice president. 

Mr. Lewis is a member of the Presbyterian Church, 
the Pendennis Club, the Louisville Country Club, and 
is an independent democrat. He has not scattered 
his associations either in business or socially, neverthe- 
less he is one of the best known citizens of Louisville. 
October 24, 1900, he married Miss Helen Lapham Rock- 
well, daughter of Charles Le Roy and Helen (Lapham) 
Rockwell. Her parents were both born in New York 
State and are now deceased. Her grandfather, Jerome 
Lapham, was one of the pioneer lumbermen of North- 
ern New York and interested in the pulp and paper 
business at Glen Falls, New York. Later he was presi- 
dent of the Glen Falls Fire Insurance Company at 



Glen Falls. Mrs. Lewis is the second in a family of 
two daughters and one son, two of whom survive. 
The two children of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis are Margaret 
Lapham and Helen Hamilton. 

Roy Read Hargan, cashier of the Farmers National 
Bank of Hodgenville, represents the third successive 
generation of the Hargan family in the commercial 
life of that locality. 

He was born at Hodgenville February 10, 1881, a son 
of Jacob and Eliza (Gates) Hargan, both natives of 
LaRue County. His great-grandfather, Daniel Har- 
gan, was a native of Virginia and founded the family 
in LaRue County in pioneer times. Benjamin J. Har- 
gan, grandfather of the Hodgenville banker, was one 
of the prominent citizens of the county, a merchant at 
Hodgenville, and also owned extensive tracts of farm 
lands. Jacob Hargan followed merchandising through- 
out his active career, was a member of the Christian 
Church and voted as a democrat. His wife, Eliza 
Gates, was a daughter of John B. Gates, of Virginia 
ancestry, and who moved to LaRue County from Hart 
County. Mrs. Eliza Gates Hargan is living at Hodgen- 
ville at the age of si.xty-two and is a member of the 
Baptist Church. 

Roy Read Hargan is one of two children, a sister 
being deceased. He was reared and educated in 
Hodgenville and as a youth took up merchandising 
with his father. In 1907 he became identified with 
the LaRue County Deposit Bank, and has been with 
that institution ever since, the Deposit Bank being 
succeeded by the Farmers National Bank. Mr. Har- 
gan has been cashier since 1914. He is a democrat, a 
member of the Baptist Church and a Knight Templar 
Mason. 

In 1902 he married Miss Terry O'Brian, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Washington O'Brian. They have three 
children : Virginia, Lynda and Frances. 

Henry Irvin Fox. An attorney whose attainments 
have advanced him to a high position in the Louisville 
bar, Henrj- Irvin Fox was reared and educated in that 
city and has been employing his time and talents dil- 
igently within the strict lines of the law for the past 
fourteen years. 

He was born in Jeft'erson County, Kentucky, May 
19, 1882, son of Henry and Matilda (Katzman) Fox, 
also native Kentuckians. Henry Fox supports the 
republican ticket in politics. He is the father of two 
sons, Arthur, who married Eva Dixon, and Henry I. 

Henry I. Fox attended the public schools of Louis- 
ville and was graduated from the law department of 
the University of Louisville in 1907. He was admitted 
to the bar the same year and has been engaged in 
general practice, his offices being in the Louisville 
Trust Building. He is a member of the Louisville, 
Jefferson County and Kentucky State Bar Associations. 
Fraternally he is affiliated with Abraham Lodge No. 8, 
F. and A. M., King Solomon Chapter, R. A. M., De- 
^lolay Commandery No. 2, K. T., Kosair Temple of 
the Mystic Shrine, and Louisville Lodge No. 8 of the 
Elks. Mr. Fox is a republican and a member of the 
Presbyterian Church. 

October 21, 191 1, he married Genevieve Stroud, a 
native of Canada. They have two daughters, Mary 
Elizabeth and Sarah Katherine. 

Benjamin B. and Thomas C. Goodwin are popular 
bachelor brothers whose fraternal association has con- 
tinued specially close, as they maintain partnership 
relations in the ownership and management of the fine 
old homestead farm on which their honored father 
continued his residence until his death, this excellent 
rural estate being situated seven miles east of the 
City of Lexington and near the Village of Chilesburg, 
which is the postoffice address of the brothers. They 
have continued to maintain the prestige of the place 



10 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



as one of the well-ordered and productive farms of 
Fayette County and are known as loyal and progressive 
citizens. 

Benjamin B. Goodwin was born August 4, 1872, and 
Thomas Coleman Goodwin was born November 7, 
1876, and from the time of their births they have 
maintained their home in Fayette County. They are 
sons of Thomas Coleman and Mary E. (Bryant) Good- 
win. Thomas C. Goodwin was born in Fayette County, 
on a farm about one mile distant from the present 
home of his sons to whom this sketch is dedicated, 
and the date of his nativity was January i, 1844. He 
was a son of Joseph Graves and Lucy (Graves) Good- 
win and a grandson of Graves and Frances (Graves) 
Goodwin, whose two sons were Joseph and Benjamin. 
The names of the Goodwin and Graves families have 
been prominently and infiuentially linked with the his- 
tory of Fayette County since the early days. Thomas 
C. Goodwin was reared on the old farmstead which 
was the place of his birth, and his entire life was 
marked by close and effective association with farm 
enterprise. In 1869 he was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary E. Bryant, who was born and reared in Jessa- 
mine County, a daughter of Joel Bryant. Joel Bryant 
was one of twelve sons, and the old home farm which 
was long the stage of his activities is now owned by 
his son Buckner, the place being situated on the Nich- 
olsville Turnpike. It was on this farm that Mrs. 
Mary E. (Bryant)' Goodwin was born. In 1870 
Thomas C. Goodwin and his brother Joseph G. re- 
ceived a valuable farm estate as an inheritance from 
their father, and in 1879 the brothers made an equitable 
division of the property. Thomas C. thus became the 
owner of 200 acres, and his brother purchased a farm 
four miles east of Lexington, where he passed the 
remainder of his life, his son Benjamin H. still re- 
maining on this farm. From 1879 until the close of 
his life Thomas C. Goodwin gave his personal super- 
vision to his well-improved farm estate, upon which 
he erected the present main part of the substantial 
house that adorns the place and is occupied by his 
sons Benjamin B. and Thomas C, Jr., of this sketch. 
Mr. Goodwin was a successful stock-raiser and gave 
special attention to the feeding of cattle. His interests 
were ever centered in his home, his church and his 
business, and he so ordered his life as to merit and 
retain the unqualified confidence and good-will of his 
fellow men. With no desire for political activity, he 
gave loyal support to the principles of the democratic 
I)arty, and he served many years as deacon and elder 
in the Macedonia Christian Church, of which his wife 
likewise was a devout member. He was seventy years 
of age at the time of his death, June 27, 1914, and his 
wife passed away at the age of thirty-six years, on 
the 17th of July, 1887. 

The Graves and Goodwin families have been closely 
linked by marriage in various generations. Frances 
Graves became the wife of Graves Goodwin, and she 
was one of a family of six daughters, whose brothers 
were Joseph and Benjamin, mentioned in a preceding- 
paragraph. Eliza T., another of the sisters, became 
the wife of Robert J. Key; Kittie married Doctor 
Chinn, the grandfather of Asa Chinn, a well-known 
resident of Lexington at the present time ; Adeline 
became the wife of a Mr. Cartright; Polly married 
Lloyd Goodwin; Ellen became the wife of Re\. Buford 
.Allen, a clergyman of the Baptist Church; Lizzie mar- 
ried Samuel Coleman, and one of their children was 
the late Dr. Benjamin Coleman. 

Thomas C. and Mary E. (Bryant) Goodwin became 
the parents of four children: Benjamin, B.; Mattie 
Graves, wife of William D. Hamilton, who is in the 
United States internal revenue service at Lexington ; 
Thomas Coleman, Jr. ; and Robert Graves. Robert G. 
Goodwin, the youngest son, likewise is a prosperous 
farmer in Favette Countv. He married Miss Ada 



Fishback, and they have two children, Robert and 
Jane Belle. 

Benjamin B. and Thomas C. Goodwin have main- 
tained a partnership alliance in the operations of the 
old home farm since the death of their father, and 
by purchasing the interest of the other heirs they have 
come into full ownership of the valuable property. 
Their energies are directed to diversified agriculture 
and the raising and feeding of livestock, and in the old 
home they maintain bachelors' hall, with an excellent 
housekeeper, the while they tcre ever ready to extend 
the hospitality of this attractive home to. their many 
friends. Both were afforded the advantages of the 
schools of their native county, and they have become 
progressive and successful representatives of pro- 
ductive farm industry in this favored section of the 
old Blue Grass State. They are aligned in the ranks, 
of the democratic party and are active members of the 
Macedonia Christian Church. 

William L. Davis is one of Fayette County's farm- 
ers who have come up to independence through the 
avenue of renting and eventually ownership of land. 
The home farm of Mr.. Davis is twelve miles south of 
Lexington, and it is a place of well-ordered industry 
and one that has made money for its owner without 
any of the frills of fancy farming. 

Mr. Davis was born in Jessamine County October 
i-i, 1870, son of John P. and Mildred Frances (Spears) 
Davis. His mother is a sister to Mrs. Leroy Land of 
Lexington. John P. Davis, a brother of the late 
Thomas A. Davis, died March 30, 1911, on his home 
farm near Spears, in his seventy-second year. That 
old homestead has since been sold. His four chil- 
dren were : William L. ; Miranda Elizabeth, wife of 
Perry H. Bronough, near Nicholasville ; Riley Spears, 
of Fa3'ette County; and Charles J., a farmer near 
Union Mills in Jessamine County. 

William L. Davis grew up on the home farm, grad- 
uated from the common schools, and at the age of 
twenty-three began renting a portion of his father's 
farm. At that age he married Ella H. Hisle, who 
was also twenty-three. She was a daughter of LeRoy 
Hisle, a farmer, stock trader and drover of Estill 
County, now living retired with Mr. and Mrs. Davis. 
Mr. Davis continued renting land for twenty years in 
Fayette County and in that time by his thrift and 
energy acquired the capital to become a farm owner. 
In 1917 he bought the old James Viehl farm of 2o6'/< 
acres. The transaction is one that indicates some of 
the changes in land values in this section of the state. 
He paid $130 an acre for the land, but subsequently 
sold it for $230 an acre. He hardly made the sale 
before he became dissatisfied with the transaction, 
and a few months later he bought die farm back at 
$2.so an acre and is its satisfied proprietor today. In 
the meantime he had owned a neat home and another 
farm elsewhere. His business is the production of 
staple crops of corn, wheat and tobacco, and every 
year he feeds a large bunch of hogs. 

Mr. and Mrs. Davis have four children, all at home: 
William Lee, a partner with his father; Jessamine 
Mitchell ; Sarah Frances ; and Preston Perry. 

Ch.krliis .-Xli'.ert Johns was a Lexington merchant 
whose business ability and personal character were 
closely united and brought him abundant esteem and 
a highly profitable business for many years. 

In 1889 he opened his drug store at the corner of 
Main and Walnut streets, where it has been a land- 
mark and a center of the very best service in that line 
ever since. He had previously been in business on 
Broadway. His entire life was devoted to the drug 
business and to the cultivation of his friends and 
his civic interests at Lexington. 

He was born in Lexington March 19, 1848, and died 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



11 



in that city March 8, 1920. He was educated in pub- 
lic schools and at the age of sixteen went to work 
in a drug store, and for over half a century his daily 
work was in the field of drugs. He took an active 
part in public matters, was liberal in his donations to 
church and charities, was a member of the Episcopal 
Church and a democrat. 

The late Mr. Johns bought the corner on which his 
business is still continued by his sons in 1889, at which 
time he built a three-story building, and later on ad- 
jacent land comprising a 675^2 foot frontage he erected 
another three story building. He also bought land 
in the rear extending to Walnut Street, with 100 feet 
of frontage on that thoroughfare, and since his death 
his sons have carried out his plans by erecting a two- 
story brick and concrete building. These improvements 
make one of the very valuable properties in Lexing- 
ton. The corner is opposite the postoffice and also 
the new Lafayette Hotel. The late Mr. Johns for a 
number of years took his vacations in company with 
a select party of friends hunting or fishing in the 
lakes and woods of Canada. Of that company not 
one is now left in Lexington. In 1882 Charles Albert 
Johns married Alice Gilmore, a native of Lexington, 
where she is still living. She is an active member 
of the Presbyterian Church. Of her four children 
Alice is the wife of J. M. Lyle, a farmer at Lexington, 
and they have two children, Alice Maxwell and James 
Albert Lyle. The three sons are Andrew, Albert and 
Gerard, the last being a student in Kentucky University. 

The business is now carried on by Andrew and 
Albert Johns. Both are registered pharmacists while 
Albert is a graduate in chemistry from the University 
of Virginia and also attended the Carnegie Institute of 
Technology at Pittsburgh and the Louisville College 
of Pharmacy. Both became associated with their 
father before his death and they have continued the 
same atmosphere of good will and desire to serve 
which has long made the business so popular among 
Lexington people. Albert Johns is a member of sev- 
eral college fraternities and the Kiwanis Club, while 
Andrew is an Elk and Mason. The brothers enjoy 
the same kind of sport as their father, and in vacation 
times go to the mountains and river sections of East- 
ern Kentucky and elsewhere. Andrew Johns mar- 
ried Rena Christian, daughter of E. C. Christian and 
has a son Andrew, Jr. Albert Johns married Mary 
McKinney, whose father is magistrate of the Seventh 
Fayette County District. 

Luther H. Davis. Eleven miles south of the Court 
House in Lexington, on Taits Creek Pike, is located 
the country home and establishment of Luther H. 
Davis, a citizen of the highest character, a capable 
farmer and business man, and representing one of the 
old and leading families of Jessamine County. 

Mr. Davis was born in Jessamine County June 23, 
1854. His birth occurred within a mile of his present 
home. His father was Thomas A. Davis, who spent 
his last years retired at Nicholasville, where he died 
in 1912, at the age of eighty-two. His children were : 
Emma J., Alice and Cora, all unmarried and living at 
Nicholasville ; Bettie, wife of J. E. Phelps, a real 
estate man at Lexington ; Susan, who died in Fayette 
County in 1910, wife of A. C. Downing, who now 
lives at Lexington ; Thomas R., a farmer in Jessamine 
County ; Robert A., a dairyman on Taits Creek Pike ; 
and Luther. 

Luther H. Davis grew up at his father's old home 
and helped in the management of the farm until he 
was thirty-one. At that date he married Miss Edna 
Stagg, of Jessamine County, who died a little more 
than a year later. Until 1892 Mr. Davis did farming 
as a renter, and in that year bought his present home, 
the old Martin place of eighty-five acres. The house 
is one of the oldest in the community. The farm 
many years ago was owned by a member of the Bibb 



family, and later by the Baker family. It is said that 
the Bakers erected the house. There were two broth- 
ers, Allen and David Baker. The latter, who died a 
bachelor when in advanced years, conducted a tannery, 
harness and saddlery shop, distillery and other enter- 
prises on the farm. When David Baker was quite an 
old man he once called two young men to him, 
Thomas A. Davis and Frank Johnson, and requested 
that they carry a large sum of money he had accumu- 
lated in his house to Lexington and deposit it in the 
bank. The money was in gold and silver, and the 
saddle bags were so heavy with the coin that they 
broke, allowing the pieces to roll about in the dirt, 
though all was eventually recovered. On this old farm 
Mr. Davis is performing his business duties as a suc- 
cessful farmer and stock man. He is a democrat and 
has been a member of the Baptist Church since he 
was sixteen years of age. 

In 1890 he married Miss Rosa Turner, of Shelby 
County, daughter of George and Jennie Prewitt Tur- 
ner, the former of Shelby County and the latter of 
Jessamine County. Mr. Davis by his first marriage 
had one daughter, Lula, wife of F. R. Parks, a com- 
mercial salesman at Lexington, and they have one son, 
F. R., Jr. The children of his second marriage are : 
Prewitt, who is a farmer on the DeLong Pike in 
Fayette County and by his marriage to Edna Thomp- 
son has a daughter, Elizabeth Rose, and a son, Luther, 
Jr. ; Robert, who lived at home and died at the age of 
twenty-two; and Virginia, still at home with her 
parents. 

W. N. King, whose home is one of the desirable 
old country places of Fayette County, seven miles south 
of Lexington, on the Walnut Hill Pike, the old Robert 
Todhunter farm, is essentially a business man, and has 
been a merchant and manufacturer for many years. 

He was born near Olive Hill in Carter County, Ken- 
tucky, June 17, 1879. His father, J. N. King, who died 
at his home at Newfoundland, Kentucky, at the age 
of seventy-three, spent the greater part of his life 
as a wholesale and retail merchant at Ashland, Ken- 
tucky, where the business is still continued by a son. 
W. N. King was reared and educated at Ashland and 
for fifteen years was in the general merchandise busi- 
ness at Soldier, Kentucky. For the past ten years he 
has been extensively engaged in the operation of the 
limestone quarry and the crushing and grinding of 
limestone for agricultural and industrial purposes. 
His organization has three plants in operation, with a 
capacity of fifty carloads per day. Much of the output 
is crushed rock for road ballasting purposes, and 
about five cars of crushed limestone are shipped daily 
for_ agricultural use. It is a growing and successful 
business. Mr. King is also a stockholder in a tobacco 
warehouse, and at his home place south of Lexington 
he carries on operations as a general farmer, having 
458 acres in his farm. 

As the age of twenty-nine Mr. King married Miss 
Effie W. Kitchen, of Ashland, Kentucky. They have 
two children, Justine and Billie, Jr. Mrs. King is an 
active member of the Woman's Club and other societies. 
Her father, Charles Kitchen, is a lumber manufac- 
turer and wholesaler with the firm of Van Sant, 
Kitchen & Company, operating mills in North Carolina, 
Tennessee and Virginia. He is also president of the 
Second National Bank of Ashland, Kentucky. 

Robert Peter. The services of the late Dr. Robert 
Peter as an educator and scientist enriched the cul- 
tural life of Kentucky, and while he was not a native 
son he was one of the state's most eminent men. 

He was born in Cornwall, England, in 1805, and at 
the age of twelve was brought by his parents. Robert 
and Johanna Peter, to Maryland. His parents subse- 
quently removed to Pittsburgh, where his father died. 
Doctor Peter was educated in Pittsburgh, in 1828 was 



12 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



naturalized as an American citizen, and that year at- 
tended the Rensselaer Polyclinic Institute at Troy, 
New York. During 1829 he gave a course of lectures 
in natural sciences and during 1830-31 was lecturer 
on chemistry at the Western University of Pennsyl- 
vania. Rev. B. O. Peers had opened an Eclectic school 
at Lexington, and Doctor Peter accepted an invitation 
to come to Lexington as a teacher and partner in the 
enterprise. In 1832 he was appointed assistant in the 
chair of chemistry at Transj'lvania University, and in 
March, 1833, was promoted to professor of chemistry 
in Morrison College, one of the institutions of Transyl- 
vania. He also read medicine, did some valuable work 
in the cholera epidemic of 1833, and in 1834 was 
awarded his diploma as a Doctor of Medicine. In 
1838 he was elected to the chair of chemistry and phar- 
macy in the Medical School of Transylvania Univer- 
sity, and so continued until that department of the 
school was closed in 1857. In the meantime, from 
1850 to 1853, he was a lecturer at the Louisville Med- 
ical College. He was largely instrumental in promot- 
ing the first geological survey of the state, preparing 
the memorial presented by the various agricultural 
societies to the Legislature in 1853, and advocating such 
a survey. The work was started in 1854, with Dr. 
David Dale Owen as chief geologist, and it was con- 
tinued under his direction until the death of Doctor 
Owen in i85o. Doctor Peter was connected with the 
survey as chemical analyst. During the Civil war he 
was surgeon in charge, with the rank of major, at 
three Government hospitals. After the war he became 
professor of chemistry and physics in Kentucky Uni- 
versity and A. and M. College. In 1873 he resumed 
his laboratory work in connection with the geological 
survey, under Doctor Shaler, and also resumed lec- 
tures at the Agricultural College, and at Morrison Col- 
lege the work of that institution was resumed. For 
a number of years he was professor of materia medica 
and of physics and chemistry at Transylvania. 

Dr. Robert Peter passed away April 26, 1894, at the 
age of eighty-nine, and had continued his lecture work 
until he was eighty-seven. Out of his broad and 
diversified knowledge and investigations he contributed 
regularly to scientific journals, writing on chemistry, 
botany, horticulture and agriculture, was at one time 
assistant editor of the Farmers Home Journal, was 
editor of Volume 10 of the Transylvania Medical 
Society's Transactions, and also used his pen fre- 
quently to advance every worthy object associated with 
the welfare of Lexington. He served as a member of 
the City Council, and was requested to become a can- 
didate for mayor, but was not a seeker of public hon- 
ors. At an early date he realized and advocated the 
development of the mineral resources of Kentucky, 
especially along the Big Sandy. He died before this 
development was fairly started. In many ways his 
ideas and opinions were in advance of the time. In 
educational afifairs he advocated special scientific train- 
ing in preference to the standards of the old classical 
courses, and lived to see the rigid curricula of higher 
institutions of learning greatly reformed. However, 
on the subject of women he was not in accord with 
modern ideas, and believed that the place of -woman 
was in the home. As a young man he taught in an 
Episcopal Sunday School, but later became liberal in 
his views, though always a supporter of churches. 
He was a member of many philosophical and scientific 
societies, and while of a social nature he reluctantly 
participated in formal social afifairs. 

In 1835 Doctor Peter married Miss Frances Dallam. 
They lived in Lexington until 1867, their residence 
being at the corner of Market and Mechanic streets, 
and they then moved to what is now known as the 
Peter Farm, seven miles from Lexington on the New- 
town Pike. This farm is a part of the old Meredith 
grant, belonging to the family of Mrs. Robert Peter. 



The Meredith grant was assigned to Colonel Samuel 
Meredith by the State of Virginia for his military 
services in the French and Indian war. He never 
occupied it himself, but it was eventually taken pos- 
session of by his son. Major Samuel Meredith. Colonel 
Samuel became colonel of the first regiment raised at 
Richmond, Virginia, for service in the Revolution. He 
married Jane Henry, a sister of Virginia's great orator, 
Patrick Henry. Colonel Meredith had his home at 
Amherst, Virginia, and most of his Revolutionary 
service was in the Carolinas. 

Major Samuel Meredith came out to Kentucky with 
his family in 1790. Three years previously he had 
sent some slaves and a manager to improve the Mer- 
edith grant, and thus a home was ready for him when 
he arrived. Major Meredith married Miss Elizabeth 
Breckenridge, a sister of Attorney-General John Breck- 
enridge in Jefferson's cabinet. 

Of the children of Major Meredith, his daughter 
Jane Meredith died unmarried in old age. The sec- 
ond daughter, Letitia P., became the wife of Major 
William S. Dallam, whose father. Gen. Richard Dal- 
lam, was an officer of the Flying Squadron in Mary- 
land during the Revolution. Major Dallam after his 
marriage became a prominent financier at Lexington, 
and died at the age of seventy-five. His widow spent 
her last years at the old Meredith grant, and she also 
died at seventy-five. She was the mother of three 
daughters, the oldest being Frances Paca Dallam. 
Letitia Preston Dallam, the second, died at the age 
of eighty-nine and was the wife of William N. Robb, 
for many years sergeant at arms in the State Legis- 
lature. Elizabeth Meredith Dallam, the third of the 
children, became the wife of James O. Frazer and 
they moved from Kentucky. The Dallam home at 
Lexington entertained many prominent men, including 
President Monroe, a personal friend of Major Dallam, 
they having met while Mr. Monroe was ambassador 
to France. Major Dallam died in December, 1845. 

Frances Paca Dallam, the oldest daughter of Major 
Dallam, was married to Dr. Robert Peter when about 
twenty years of age, and for forty years she lived at 
the old homestead. The house that is now the home 
of her children was built in the early '20s, and at that 
time stood about two miles from Russell Cave Pike, 
but is now about midway between Mount Horeb Pike 
and the Newtown Pike. The original Meredith grant 
contained about 3,000 acres, but has since been greatly 
reduced. 

Mrs. Peter died in 1907 in her ninety-second year. 
She lived to a vigorous old age, keeping in touch with 
matters of home and elsewhere, and was always very 
fond of society. She inherited the old homestead and 
lived there forty years, Doctor Peter going back and 
forth between the home and Lexington every day to 
attend his professional duties. 

The children of Doctor Peter and wife were : 
Letitia Dallam, who was a musician and prominent in 
musical circles at Lexington and died when past eighty; 
William, who died in boyhood; Benjamin Dudley, who 
spent his life at the old farm and died unmarried at 
the age of seventy-two ; Frances Dallam, who died at 
the age of eighteen; Miss Johanna, who still lives at 
the old home and collaborated with her father and 
since his death completed the History of the Transyl- 
vania University Medical Department, which has been 
I)ublished as one of the Filson Club papers ; Robert, 
who left Kentucky when a yotmg man and became 
interested in mining in Colorado, where he died ; Sarah 
Henry, who also lives at the homestead ; Arthur, a 
farmer, who died unmarried at the age of sixty-nine ; 
Hugh, the son who remains with his sisters at the home 
farm ; Alfred Meredith, mentioned on other pages as 
chemist of the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion; and Alice Meredith, who died at the age of 
eighteen. 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



13 



Matthew Love Akers, a prominent railroad official, 
has been a resident of Louisville for a quarter of a 
century and is also widely known through his inter- 
ests and activities as a horseman. 

Mr. Akers, who was born in Floyd County, Indiana, 
September lO, 1870, is descended from two families 
who became identified with the Ohio River Valley in 
frontier days, and his ancestry goes further back, to 
Revolutionary and Colonial times. The founder of the 
paternal line was Simon Akers, who immigrated from 
England to Virginia in Colonial times. For three 
years he was a soldier in the Virginia Continental Line 
during the Revolution. For that service he was granted 
land in Warrant No. 4985, issued to him at Williams- 
burg, Virginia, February 18, 1801. About 1812 he 
came west to Kentucky and Southern Indiana, and 
utilized his land grant in this section of the West. 
He died in Clark County, Indiana, March 19, 1819. 

His son, George Akers, was born in Virginia March 
30, 1791, and was a well-known citizen of Southern 
Indiana, serving as justice of the peace for many 
years. In 1832 he went to Texas, which was then a 
part of Mexico, lived there during the Texas Revolu- 
tion and the period of the Texas Republic, and died 
in the state December 16, 1859. 

The third generation of the family was represented 
by Hiram Akers, who was born in Shelby County, 
Kentucky, February 26, 181 1. He lived most of his 
life in Clark County, Indiana, vi^here he died May 
22, 1856. 

The fourth generation contained Reason Lawson 
Akers, father of Matthew Love Akers, of Louisville. 
He was born in Clark County, Indiana, January 9, 
1837, was educated in the common schools there and 
also in normal schools, and from 1862 to 1868 served 
as a surgeon in the United States Army. After the 
war he became a farmer, and was also a pioneer in 
the manufacture and development of the hydraulic 
cement industry. His associates in that enterprise were 
the well-known Louisville men, J. B. Speed and Dex- 
ter Belknap. Reason L. Akers was a close friend of 
Michael C. Kerr, the first Speaker in the House in the 
first Democratic Congress after the Civil war. He was 
a stanch democrat and a member of the Christian 
Church. 

Matthew Love Akers is the only child of his parents. 
His mother was Louisa Abraham Miller, who was born 
in Clark County, Indiana, July 13, 1847, and was mar- 
ried to R. L. Akers September 28, 1865. She is still 
living, while Reason L. Akers died in Clark County, 
Indiana, November 23, 1878. 

The maternal ancestry of Matthew L. Akers in- 
cludes some notable personages in the four generations 
preceding his mother. Her first American ancestor 
was Abraham Miller, who immigrated from Holland 
to Northampton County, formerly a part of Bucks 
County, Pennsylvania, in 1740. He acquired a large 
amount of land purchased from Richard Peters, and 
died in that county in 1752. 

His son, Abraham Miller, was born in Holland April 
I, 1735. He served during the French and Indian wars 
as a non-commissioned officer, was a member of the 
Committee from Northampton County in December, 
1774; a recruiting officer at Easton in June, 1775; cap- 
tain of Miller's Company of Thompson's Pennsylvania 
Rifle Battalion, June 25, 1775 ; a captain of Pennsyl- 
vania Militia in 1776; member of the Constitutional 
Convention of July 15, 1776; and after the close of the 
Revolution Governor Clinton appointed him the first 
judge of Tioga County, New York, on February 17, 
1791. Judge Miller died in Tioga County July 25, 
181S. 

The third generation was represented by his son, 
John Miller, who was born in Northampton County, 
Pennsylvania, in 1760, and died in Tioga County, New 
■S'ork, in .'Kpril, 1833. In spite of his youth he served 
as a private in his father's company in 1775, and after- 



ward continued in the same company when it became 
a part of the First Pennsylvania Continental Line. 
A number of years later this Revolutionary soldier 
was a member of the New York Assembly from 1804 
to 1807. He subsequently moved to Indiana, invested 
in land in that state, and was a member of the Indiana 
Legislature from Clark County during 1820-21. 

His son, Abraham Miller, maternal grandfather of 
Matthew L. Akers, was born in Luzerne County, Penn- 
sylvania, April 9, 1787, and died in Clark County, 
Indiana, April 22, 1867. He was a volunteer in the War 
of 1812, and was wounded at the battle of Tippecanoe. 
While a resident of Jeffersonville in Clark County he 
served as a member of the city council during 1841-44. 
He was more than seventy years of age when the Civil 
war broke out, but enlisted and served with the United 
States Naval forces on the Ohio, Mississippi and Red 
Rivers from 1862 until 1865. 

In Jefferson County, Kentucky, August 24, 1842, 
Abraham Miller married Louisa Owen, a daughter of 
John and Rebecca (Love) Owen. The middle name of 
Mr. Akers is Love. His great-grandmother, Rebecca 
Love, was a daughter of Matthew and Susannah (Ross) 
Love, who were married in Jefferson County, Ken- 
tucky, August 12, 1794. Matthew Love was one of the 
early magistrates of that county, and his home on 
Cane Run Road was one of the first brick houses 
erected in the county. The mother of Susannah Ross 
was Susan Oldham, a sister of John and William Old- 
ham. The Rosses and Oldhams came from Virginia 
to Kentucky as early as 1789. 

Up to the age of twelve Matthew Love Akers at- 
tended the common schools of Southern Indiana, and 
after that his education was under the direction of pri- 
vate tutors. At the age of sixteen he began railroad- 
ing with the Pennsylvania system. He was station 
agent at different points and in 1889 joined the Chesa- 
peake & Ohio as secretary to the general manager, and 
filled other positions until 1895, in which year he was 
appointed general agent for the Chesapeake & Ohio at 
Louisville. From igio to 1917 Mr. Akers was vice 
president and secretary of the Louisville and Jeffer- 
sonville Bridge Company, resigning that office when 
the railroad administration took over the railroad prop- 
erties. During the war he was chairman of publicity 
for the Railroad War Board in Kentucky. In 1908 
Mr. Akers reorganized the Louisville Soap Company, 
and was president of that local industry for three 
j^ears. 

Mr. Akers has always been a lover of good horses 
and has done much to promote Louisville's prestige as 
a great thoroughbred center. In 1907-1908 he was 
president of the Louisville Horse Show. In associa- 
tion with Mr. Alfred G. Vanderbilt he reorganized 
the Madison Square Garden Horse Show, which after 
the reorganization held the first exhibit in November, 
1909. 

Mr. Akers is a member of the Pendennis Club of 
Louisville, the Westmoreland Club of Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, and is a member of the Society of Colonial 
Wars and Sons of the American Revolution. He is 
an Episcopalian and a Democrat. On December 16, 
1901, he married Miss Frank Guthrie, a native of 
Louisville and daughter of Benjamin F. and Keziah 
(Pollard) Guthrie, the former a native of Woodford 
County and the latter of Henry County. Her parents 
both died in the year 1891. Both Mr. and Mrs. Akers 
had no brothers or sisters, and they have only one son, 
Frank Guthrie Akers, born in Jefferson County, Ken- 
tucky, December 9, 1902. 

Charle.s Sneed Williams, portrait and figure painter, 
whose work has been accorded international recogni- 
tion, has for practically all his life made his home 
at Louisville and is prominent among the men claimed 
for the citizenship of Kentucky. 

He was born at Evansville, Indiana, May 24, 1882. 



14 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



His parents were Bailey Peyton and Virginia (Sneed) 
Williams, the former born in Smith County, Tennessee, 
August ig, 1840, and the latter in the same locality in 
1844. Both of pre-revolutionary stock. His mother died 
in 1909. Charles S. is the youngest of seven children, 
six of whom are still living. His father was educated 
in Carthage Academy at Carthage, Tennessee, and soon 
afterward became a Confederate soldier in the army of 
General Bragg. He was captured at the battle of Mis- 
sionary Ridge, and thereafter until the close of the 
war was a prisoner at Rock Island, Illinois. He then 
returned to Tennessee, became a merchant, in 1880 re- 
moved to Evansville, Indiana, and shortly after the 
birth of his son Charles located at Louisville. He is 
now living retired at Cookeville, Tennessee. He is a 
democrat in politics. 

Charles S. Williams reared and educated in Louis- 
ville, attending the public scliools and graduating from 
the iVIanual Training High School in i8gg, and after 
leaving high school he studied art in Louisville. Later 
he was under some of the able masters of New York 
City, and then went abroad to London and for four 
years was a scholarship student in the Allan-Fraser 
Art College in Scotland, where he was graduated in 
1905. He remained in Scotland for some time develop- 
ing his abilit'es under private instruction, and also 
traveled in continental cities, 

Mr. Williams returned to Louisville in 1908, and that 
city he has since regarded as his permanent home. 
However, he has been much abroad, spending portions 
of the years 1910 to 1914 and again in 1919-21 in Euro- 
pean art centers. 

Mr. Williams has executed many notable portraits 
and landscapes, and his offerings have been accepted 
and have found place in exhibitions both in Europe 
and America. He is a member of the Union Interna- 
tionale des Beaux Arts, Paris, is first vice president of 
the Louisville Arts Club and for a number of years 
was chairman of the Art Committee of the Louisville 
Art Association. He is a member of the Art Club of 
Washington, D. C, and at Louisville is a member of 
the Pendennis Club. Mr. Williams is a democrat in 
politics. 

August 2J, 1912, he married Elsie Ellen Luke, 
who was born in Portsmouth, England, only child of 
William Joseph and Ellen (Cole) Luke. Her father 
was born in Portsmouth in November, 1862, and her 
mother in Devonshire, England. The two children of 
Mr. and Mrs. Williams are William Luke and Virginia. 

Alfred Meredith Peter. As chemist of the Ken- 
tucky Agricultural Experiment Station for the past 
thirty-five years, it is the good fortune of Professor 
Peter that the value of his scientific services has come 
to be widely appreciated by the agricultural interests 
of the state, in the advancement of which he has done 
work of incalculable value. 

He was born at Lexington, Kentucky, where he has 
his home today, May 25, 1857, son of Dr. Robert and 
Frances (Dallam) Peter. His father was a physician 
and also a distinguished educator, being professor of 
materia medica and of physics and chemistry in Tran- 
sylvania University. 

Alfred M. Peter was educated in the Academy 'and 
the College of Arts of Kentucky University, received 
his Bachelor of Science degree from the State Agri- 
cultural and Mechanical College of Kentucky in 1880 
and his Master of Science degree in 1885. In 1913 
the Kentucky State College bestowed upon him the 
well-merited honor of Doctor of Science. He has 
been devoted to scientific pursuits since early boyhood, 
and before his graduation he served from 1876 to 1878 
as instructor in Kentucky University. During 1880-81 
he was adjunct professor of chemistry and natural his- 
tory in the State Agricultural and Mechanical College, 
and from 1881 to 1886 was assistant chemist for the 
Kentucky Geological Survey. 



In addition to his duties as chemist of the Kentucky 
Agricultural Experiment Station he was acting director 
of this station from September 24, 1916, until January 
3, 1918, and since 1910 has been professor of soil 
technology in the State University of Kentucky. He 
was reporter on soils and ash for the Association of 
Official Agricultural Chemists in 1894-95, was a mem- 
ber of the State Board of Agriculture in 1917, and 
from 1904 to 1912 was supervising chemist of the 
Kentucky Geological Survey. Doctor Peter is a mem- 
ber of the American Chemical Society, is a Fellow of 
the American Association for the Advancement of Sci- 
ence, was a member in igi2 of the Eighth International 
Congress of Applied Chemistry, a member of the Ken- 
tucky Mining Institute, the Kentucky State Historical 
Society, is a member and former secretary of the Ken- 
tucky Academy of Science, and is a member of the 
Society of Chemical Industry, the American Associa- 
tion of University Professors, and the Alpha Chi Sigma 
college fraternity. 

On September 27, 1887, Doctor Peter married Mary 
B. McCauley, of Lexington. 

Mrs. M. Kate Oldham, whose attractive home is 
on the Harrodsburg Pike adjoining the City of Lex- 
ington at the south, is the widow of the late William 
E. Oldham, whose career was one of importance in 
itself and whose connections run back into the very 
earliest years of Kentucky history. 

William E. Oldham, who died at his home near 
Lexington October 21, 1910, was born at Shelbina, Mis- 
souri, son of Jefferson and Millie (Miles) Oldham. 
He was descended from one of two brothers, Edward 
and William Oldham, who came from Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, to America, and both participated as soldiers 
in the Revolutionary war. Edward at the age of seven- 
teen entered the Colonial army, and had seven years 
of service. For many years he lived on an island 
home which he owned in Chesapeake Bay, near Balti- 
more. His brother William came out to Bourbon 
County, Kentucky, in pioneer times, and died at Lex- 
ington at the age of fifty. 

The grandfather of William E. Oldham was Ed- 
ward Oldham, who was the second in a large family 
of thirteen children, several of whom are represented 
by descendants in Central Kentucky. Edward Old- 
ham was twice married, his third son being Jefferson 
Oldham, who was born in Kentucky, as was his wife, 
Millie Miles. After their marriage they moved to 
Missouri. 

When William E. Oldham was an infant his father 
died, and soon afterward he was brought to Kentucky 
to live with his grandfather, Edward Oldham, who 
owned and operated woolen mills at Sandersville, a 
place now known as Greendale in Fayette County, 
several miles north of Lexington, and was also owner 
of a valuable landed estate of several hundred acres 
in that vicinity. William E. Oldham grew up in his 
grandfather's home, acquired a thorough education 
and was well trained both as a farmer and business 
man. Edward Oldham was venerable in years at the 
time of his death, and his grandsons Edward Kibby 
and William E. were made administrators of his large 
estate, a part of which they inherited. 

In 1864 William E. Oldham married Miss M. Kate 
Lowman, of Lexington, where she was born and 
reared, being eighteen at the time of her marriage. 
Her parents were Thomas and Mary (Geers) Low- 
man. Her father died in 1849, a victim of the cholera 
epidemic that caused many deaths in the state within 
that year. Mrs. Oldham was carefully reared by her 
widowed mother, and is the only daughter and only 
survivor of four children. Her brothers, Thomas, 
Tlieodore and Lewis, were at the time of their deaths 
living in Lexington, where Thomas for many years 
was a grocery merchant and the other two brothers 
were painters by trade. Mrs. Oldham's mother con- 




x^ / c^T'-^^^J^ 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



15 



tinued to maintain her home at Lexington until the age 
of sixty-five. 

Shortly after his marriage Mr. Oldham established 
his residence on the old Thomas Payne farm on the 
Frankfort Turnpike in Fayette County. Later he sold 
this property and purchased the present Garrett Watts 
farm three miles south of Lexington. He sold the 
property to Mr. Watts in 1898. This farm comprised 
260 acres, and the residence was built by Mr. Old- 
ham about 1874. In 1898 Mr. Oldham bought the 
beautiful suburban home with house and ten acres of 
ground on the Harrodsburg Pike, which they named 
"Glenwood." The residence had been erected a short 
time previously by the former owner, William Day. 
Here Mr. Oldham lived virtually retired, though occa- 
sionally satisfying his spirit of enterprise by buying 
and dealing in livestock, a business that he had fol- 
lowed for many years, particularly the buying and ship- 
ping of cattle and sheep. He was one of the very 
successful leaders in agricultural affairs of Fayette 
County, and in all the relations of life was known as a 
man of thorough integrity, commanding unqualified 
popular confidence and esteem. He had no ambi- 
tion for public office, but had a record as a Union 
soldier and was always a stanch republican. 

In the Civil war he won promotion from the ranks 
to the office of first lieutenant in the Twenty-first 
Kentucky Infantry, commanded by Colonel Price, his 
company captain being C. W. Milward, who later was 
a colonel. Mr. Oldham was in service through a 
number of campaigns and battles until the close of 
the war. For many years he was affiliated with the 
Grand Army Post. Death came to him at the age 
of seventy, and he was laid to rest in the Lexington 
Cemetery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oldham were the parents of three 
children. Thomas, who died in June, 1910, about four 
months before his father, had been for a number of 
years in the United States Internal Revenue Service 
at Lexington. The only daughter, Mary, is the wife 
of Thomas W. Price, and they live at the Oldham 
home on the Harrodsburg Pike. Mr. Price has long 
been interested in thoroughbred Kentucky horses. 
Mr. and Mrs. Price have one child, Robert Francis, 
now a student in the Lexington High School. The 
youngest of Mrs. Oldham's children, Jefferson, died 
in his twenty-first year, while a student at the Univer- 
sity of Kentucky. 

Llewellyn Sharp, to whom this memoir is dedi- 
cated, was a native of Kentucky, where he passed his 
entire life and where he rendered admirable account of 
himself in connection with civic and industrial progress. 
He became the owner of one of the fine old landed 
estates of Fayette County, the old Boggs homestead, 
ten miles southeast of the City of Lexington, and this 
property is still owned by his daughters. The fine old 
brick mansion, with its solid walls, attractive Colonial 
architecture and spacious rooms, is said to have been 
erected by Mr. Boggs, the original owner of the prop- 
erty, more than a century ago. This stately old house, 
in admirable preservation and now equipped with mod- 
ern improvements, including running water and elec- 
tric lights, is situated in a beautiful little valley and 
is scarcely visible from the present thoroughfare that 
passes the property, this road having been constructed 
years after the house had been built. In the imme- 
diate proximity are fine springs of pure and sparkling 
water, from whose unfailing sources the home has 
been supplied for generations. Ensconced amid idyllic 
surroundings, this historic mansion, half-hidden from 
the public highway and maintaining its atmosphere of 
patrician exclusiveness, is one of the landmarks of 
Fayette County. The widow of Mr. Boggs became 
the wife of Clayton Curl, and they resided on the 
old Boggs homestead until their deaths. The place 
was then sold to Dr. George O. Graves and his son- 



in-law, George O. Tibbs, and in 1882 the property 
passed into the possession of Llewellyn Sharp. The 
original area of the estate contained 685 acres, but at 
the time of its purchase by Mr. Sharp the farm com- 
prised 335 acres. Mr. Sharp made the place the stage 
of vigorous and successful enterprise in the domain 
of agriculture and stock-growing, and to the property 
his daughter Lillie (Mrs. John H. Stevens) later added 
by the purchase of an adjoining tract of no acres, so 
that the area of the estate is now 445 acres. The 
three daughters own the original tract purchased by 
the father. 

Llewellyn Sharp was born in Fayette County, Ken- 
tucky, and passed the closing years of his life on the 
fine old estate described in the foregoing paragraph. 
His character and achievement gave him inviolable 
place in popular confidence and esteem. His grand- 
father on the paternal side passed his entire life in 
the beautiful Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, the orig- 
inal American progenitor having settled in the Old 
Dominion State in the Colonial period of our national 
history. James Sharp, father of Llewellyn, came from 
Virginia to Kentucky and eventually made his way 
to Missouri, but he returned to Kentucky and estab- 
lished his home in Fayette County, where he passed 
the remainder of his life and where he died at an 
advanced age. 

As a young man Llewellyn Sharp wedded Miss Julia 
Flannigan, daughter of James and Julia (Curry) Flan- 
nigan, of Fayette County, and she still resides on the 
old homestead with her daughter Lillie, wife of John 
H. Stevens. Of the children, the eldest is Lizzie, who 
is the wife of Charles H. Overly, of Lexington; 
Charles remained on the old home place until his 
death, at the age of thirty-five years ; Llewellyn, Jr., 
resides in the City of Lexington; and Lila and Lillie 
are twins, the former married and residing on Wood- 
land Avenue in the City of Lexington, and the latter 
being the wife of John H. Stevens, of whom more 
specific mention will be made in later paragraphs. Mrs. 
Stevens remains on the old home place, which is 
jointly owned by her and her two sisters, and here she 
accords to her loved and venerable mother the deepest 
of filial solicitude. Mrs. Stevens personally main- 
tains a general supervision of the business and prac- 
tical operations of the fine farm estate, which is given 
over to diversified agriculture and the raising of ex- 
cellent grades of livestock. 

John Hubbard Stevens, who is one of Kentucky's 
prominent and successful breeders of fine horses of 
thoroughbred type, was born in the immediate vicinity 
of Boonesboro, Kentucky, and on the old home place 
of his father stands the fine old monument erected to 
the memory of the great frontiersman, Daniel Boone, 
the property being now owned by Doctor Williams, of 
Richmond, Virginia. Mr. Stevens is a son of Thomas 
Stevens, who for several years maintained his resi- 
dence on his fine old farm on the Richmond Turnpike, 
six miles distant from Lexington, where he died at 
the age of sixty-two years, his father, John Stevens, 
having been a pioneer settler in Kentucky and having 
been eighty-one years of age at the time of his death. 
Thomas Stevens made his Fayette County estate, known 
as Walnut Hill Stock Farm, the stage of specially suc- 
cessful enterprise in the raising of thoroughbred 
horses, and he was one of the representative breeders 
and turfmen of Kentucky. He raised the best type 
of thorougbred and standard-bred horses, many of 
which he sold at high figures, and he was a prominent 
factor in the leading racing circles of the country. 

From his boyhood days John H. Stevens had close 
association with the raising of fine horses, and for 
many years he held precedence as a successful breeder 
and owner of thoroughbred and standard-bred horses, 
a field of activity in which he has abated his enter- 
prise in later years, largely owing to the decline in 



16 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



turf affairs under present Governmental restrictions. 
He and his wife maintain on the old estate of the lat- 
ter's father the generous hospitality for which the 
place has long been celebrated, and he is one of the 
well-known and distinctively popular citizens of Fay- 
ette County. 

Mr. Stevens married Miss Lillie Sharp, a daughter 
of the late Llewellyn Sharp, to whom this memoir is 
dedicated, and they have one son, John Hubbard Ste- 
vens, Jr. 

Wallace McClelland. Lovers of horseflesh and 
breeders of thoroughbreds will have no difficulty in 
identifying Wallace McClelland, now living about six 
miles south of Lexington, as one of the well-known 
McClelland family who for several generations have 
been prominent in the life of this part of Kentucky. 

Wallace McClelland was born August 29, 1847, on 
the old home farm place on Nicholasville Pike, within 
four miles of Lexington. He is a son of James M. 
and Lucy (Wallace) McClelland, both natives of Jes- 
samine Count}', the former a son of William McClel- 
land, also of the same farm, and who in his day was 
a well-known citizen of this part of Kentucky, as was 
his son, James M. James M. McClelland was a noted 
follower of horses and races, and in his time he did 
his share of betting and was considered a success 
in picking winners. He died at the age of sixty-six. 
During the Civil war he served as assistant quarter- 
master inider Gen. Kirby Smith, of the Confederate 
army. He superintended the transportation of 1,600 
head of cattle from Kentucky to Knoxville, Tennessee, 
and delivered the cattle to Gen. Braxton Bragg. 

Wallace McClelland was reared on his father's farm, 
on which he worked for some years, and was educated 
in the schools of his home neighborhood. About 1878 
he gave up farm work and became a trainer of thor- 
oughbred horses, proving a success in that line. His 
two brothers, Johnnie and Byron McClelland, devel- 
oped into expert race riders and followed the circuit 
for nearly twenty years. Wallace McClelland was as- 
sociated with Byron for the greater part of this period, 
and Byron became a noted horseman and one of the 
best judges of a colt likely to make a racer, some of 
his trained animals bringing as high as $35,000. He 
died in 1898. 

Following the death of his brother Wallace Mc- 
Clelland left the race track and secured his present 
farm. While actively engaged with horses, he was 
successful in training some of the best runners, and 
became an expert in that line. He concedes, how- 
ever, that his brother Byron was his equal in all re- 
spects. Mr. McClelland has not altogether lost his 
old interest in horseflesh and is still a judge of a good 
racer. He follows fishing with keen enjoyment. 

In 1883 Wallace McClelland was united in marriage 
to Mattie J. Bond, of Lexington, and to this union 
three sons and two daughters were born : Byron and 
John, living at home, the former engaged in the chem- 
ical departrnent of agriculture under Federal control ; 
Francis, living in Lexington; Sarah, at home; and 
Mrs. Joseph Phelps, living near her father. John 
McClelland served with the United States army in 
France during the World war. He was in the en- 
gagements in the Argonne Forest and in St. Mihiel, 
serving with the First Field Artillery. Although these 
engagements were among the most strenuous and 
bloody of the whole campaign in which Americans 
participated, young McClelland came out without a 
wound. 

Joseph H. Smith, whose home is ten miles south of 
Lexington, on the Walnut Hill Pike, is one of the 
most active, progressive and successful farmers and 
stockmen in this section of the state. He has been in 
the livestock business practically since early boyhood. 

He was born in Madison County, Kentucky, April 5, 



1888, a son of Thomas J. Smith, who is now a retired 
farmer at Lexington, Kentucky. Joseph H. Smith grew 
up on a farm, had a common school education, and 
at the age of seventeen began raising, feeding and 
handling livestock, cattle, sheep and hogs. At his farm 
south of Lexington he has built up an extensive in- 
dustry, feeding much stock for export and also for the 
local butcher trade. He has made a success of this 
business and has confined his attention almost en- 
tirely to the farm. However, he is a director in the 
Guaranty Bank & Trust Company of Lexington. 

Mr. Smith at the age of thirty married Miss Jane 
Land, whose father, Charles Land, is pre'sident of the 
Guaranty Bank & Trust Company of Lexington. Mrs. 
Smith possesses the intellectual and social qualities to 
make her an ideal head of the beautiful country home 
in which she and Mr. Smith reside. 

W. J. Lavin, M. D. For over a quarter of a cen- 
tury Doctor Lavin has been a successful country physi- 
cian practicing in a large community south of Lexing- 
ton and in the same community where he was born 
and reared. His home is on the Richmond Pike, on 
rural route No. 10 out of Lexington and yj^ miles 
south of that city. 

Doctor Lavin was born in that locality March 21, 
1870. His father, Thomas Lavin, came when a young 
man from Ireland and married in Fayette County, Ken- 
tucky, Catherine Shearen, also a native of Ireland, and 
was brought to the United States when a child. 
Thomas Lavin carried on an extensive enterprise 
as a farmer in Fayette County, and died at his old 
homestead at the age of seventy. His four daughters 
still live in the old home, and his son, C. A. Lavin, 
operates a general store in the same locality. 

Dr. W. J. Lavin attended St. Mary's College near 
Louisville, took a business course in Smith's College 
and studied medicine in the University of Louisville, 
graduating in 1893. Since that date he has looked after 
the welfare of his clientage around the old home, and 
for some seven or eight years conducted a store, car- 
rying a general line of drugs and other supplies. He 
is a member of the various medical societies, and for 
four years was physician at the County Infirmary. 

Doctor Lavin is independent in politics and takes 
no special interest in partisan controversies. He is a 
member of St. Paul's Catholic Church at Lexington. 
In 1907 he married Margaret Gallaher, a native of 
Kno.xville, Tennessee, who came to Kentucky with her 
parents. She attended college at Knoxville. They 
have two children, Catherine and Allen. 

Robert Worth Bingham, president of the Louisville 
Courier-Journal Company and the Louisville Times 
Company, is a lawyer by profession, has been a member 
of the Louisville bar twenty-three years, and his name 
has long stood for distinctive leadership in the city's 
life and affairs. 

Judge Bingham is a graduate of the noted Bingham 
School of Asheville, North Carolina. This school, 
one of the oldest preparatory schools in America, is 
the only school for boys in the United States which 
has been administered by three successive generations 
of headmasters for over a quarter of a century. 

Bingham School was founded in 1793, at Wilming- 
ton, North Carolina, by Rev. William Bingham, a native 
of Ireland, graduate of the University of Glasgow in 
1778, who came to the United States in 1785, and eight 
years later founded the school in the management of 
which he was succeeded by his son William J. in 1825, 
by his grandsons William and Robert after 1857, and 
since 1873 the head master of the school has been 
Col. Robert Bingham, father of the Louisville pub- 
lisher and lawyer. Col. Robert Bingham was born 
at Hillsboro, North Carolina, September 5, 1838, was 
prepared for college by his father, graduated from 
the University of North Carolina in 1857, at once took 




J^jj^<^^,(^^ 



■^eJr 



X 



HISTORY OF KICNTUC'KY 



17 



his place in the management of the Bingham School, 
and except for the four years of his duties as a Con- 
federate soldier has been connected with this school 
uninterruptedly. Besides building up this splendid 
institution of learning, Colonel Bingham for many 
years has been a power in promoting educational prog- 
ress all over the South, more particularly in his home 
state, and has long enjoyed the reputation ol being one 
of the most scholarly and broad-minded men of the 
South. Colonel Bingham married Delphine Louise 
Worth, who died in 1886. Her father, John M. Worth, 
was a pioneer cotton manufacturer in North Carolina, 
was state treasurer in 1877, and was a brother of 
Jonathan Worth, a governor of North Carolina. 

Robert Worth Bingham, who was born in Orange 
County, North Carolina, November 8, 1871, graduated 
from his father's school in 1888, the University of 
North Carolina in 1890, also attended the University 
of Virginia, and the law department of North Carolina 
University, and in i8g6 entered the law school of the 
University of Louisville. He graduated in 1897, and 
also took a short course in law at the University of 
Michigan. 

Judge Bingham began his law practice at Louisville. 
In 1903 he was appointed and in the following year 
elected county attorney of Jefferson County, serving 
until 1907. In the latter year the governor appointed 
him mayor of Louisville, a position he held several 
months. In 191 1, also by appointment from the gov- 
ernor, he was made chancellor of the Jefferson County 
Circuit Court. These public duties have been dis- 
charged from a sense of civic obligation, incidental 
10 his busy professional and business career. 

Besides being president of two of Kentucky's lead- 
ing newspapers Judge Bingham is a director of the 
American Creosoting Company, of B. F. Avery & 
Sons Company, Louisville Trust Company and National 
Bank of Kentucky. Since 1900 he has been president 
of the Kentucky Children's Home. He is a member of 
the Louisville, Kentucky State and American Bar as- 
sociations, is an independent democrat, a York and 
Scottish Rite Mason, and a member of the Episcopal 
Church. He belongs to the Alpha Tau Omega fra- 
ternity, the Pendennis, Country and River Valley 
clubs of Louisville, New York Yacht Club, the Uni- 
versity Club of Chicago, and the Metropolitan Club of 
Washington. 

On May 20, 1896, Judge- Bingham married Eleanor 
E. Miller, of Louisville. She was a granddaughter of 
Dennis Long, founder of the firm Dennis Long & Com- 
pany. On November 15, 1916, Judge Bingham married 
Mrs. Mary Lily Slagler, of New York. His three 
children, all by his first marriage, are Robert Norwood, 
Henrietta Worth and George Barry Bingham. 

James S. Rexick, whose death occurred in the City 
of Havana, Cuba, on the i-ith of February, 1917, had 
gone to that tropical island to pass the winter, and 
had passed several preceding winters in Florida. Mr. 
Renick was one of the substantial exponents of agri- 
cultural industry in Clark County, Kentucky, where he 
had given special attention to the growing of tobacco 
and hemp upon a large scale. He was one of four 
brothers who inherited the large and valuable landed 
estate of their grand-uncle, the late Abram Renick, in 
Clark County, and it was on his portion of this val- 
uable estate that he conducted his vigorous and suc- 
cessful enterprise as an agriculturist. This fine rural 
estate, which was the home of his widow and son, is 
situated five miles northwest of Winchester, the judi- 
cial center of Clark County. 

James Scott Renick was born in Bourborn County, 
Kentucky, on the 28th of March, 1862, and he was a 
representative of one of the old and influential fam- 
ilies of the North Central part of Kentucky. He re- 
ceived excellent educational advantages in his youth, 
and remained in his native county the greater part of 



the time until his marriage, in 1884. Thereafter he 
continued his residence upon his fine farm property in 
Clark County until the close of his life, and he was one 
ijf the progressive and highly esteemed citizens and 
men of affairs in Clark County. He was a stalwart 
advocate and supporter of the principles of the demo- 
cratic party, but the only public office in which he con- 
sented to serve was that of justice of the peace, of 
which he was the incumbent at the time of his death. 
He was a leader in the modern system of tobacco and 
hemp culture in this section of the state, and had made 
a close study of tobacco growing in Cuba, besides 
which he was associated with Louisville dealers in the 
handling of tobacco. In company with his brother 
Abram he continued the maintenance of the fine herd 
of Shorthorn cattle that had been established by their 
grand-uncle, the late Abram Renick, and from the 
herd they made exhibits at numerous fairs and stock 
shows. Mr. Renick took great pride and interest in his 
live-stock enterprise and made the same a special fea- 
ture of his farm industry until he sold his stock to his 
Ijrother Abram. During the last two years of his 
residence in Clark County he lived practically retired 
at Winchester, owing to impaired health, and it was in 
an effort to recuperate his physical energies that he 
went to Cuba, where his death occurred, as previously 
noted. Mr. Renick was a member of the Presbyterian 
Church, as is also his widow, and he was affiliated with 
the Winchester Lodge of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. The property which he received as a 
bequest from his grand-uncle has been in the posses- 
sion of the Renick family for thirty-five years, and the 
beautiful old mansion on the place was erected more 
than a century ago by General Pendleton, the place 
having continued until recent years to be known as 
the old Pendleton house. 

An atmosphere of romance and youthful independ- 
ence attaches to the record of the marriage of Mr. 
Renick. He was a youth of twenty-two years when, 
in 1884, he eloped with Miss Princess Sutherland, of 
Clark County, to the City of Cincinnati, Ohio, where 
their marriage was solemnized on the 24th of Decem- 
ber of that year. Mrs. Renick was born and reared 
in Clark County and is a daughter of David and 
Catherine (Grimes) Sutherland. Her paternal grand- 
parents, Lewis and Elizabeth (Berry) Sutherland, were 
born and reared in Virginia, and within a short time 
after their marriage they came to Clark County, Ken- 
tucky, where they passed the remainder of their lives, 
Lewis Sutherland having been eighty-two years of age 
at the time of his death and his wife having passed 
away at the age of seventy-five years. Mr. Sutherland 
was a successful agriculturist and influential citizen, 
was a loyal democrat and active in public affairs in 
the community, though he never became ambitious for 
or consented to serve in political office. David Suth- 
erland was born and reared in Clark County, and here 
he and his wife continued to reside until their deaths, 
both having passed away prior to the marriage of 
their daughter Princess, who was but seventeen years 
of age at the time of her romantic marriage and whose 
education had included a course in Winchester Col- 
lege. To Mr. and Mrs. Renick was born one son, 
Harry Phelps Renick, the date of whose nativity was 
September 28, 1890. He was afforded the advantages 
of excellent preparatory schools, including the Mooney 
School at Knoxville, Tennessee, and then entered the 
University of Kentucky. At the university he became 
affiliated with the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity, 
and he holds membership also in the Masonic frater- 
nity and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 
He has had the active management of the old home 
farm since the death of his father, and which he has 
made the stage of vigorous and progressive enterprises 
as an agriculturist, with special attention giverf _ to the 
growing of corn and hemp. By reason of his con- 
nection with such productive enterprise he was refused 



18 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



service in connection with the nation's military opera- 
tions in the late World war, but was a loyal and zeal- 
ous supporter of the various local war activities and 
did well his part in food-production industry, a matter 
of primary importance in connection with American 
participation in the war. Mr. Renick married Miss 
Laurie Bruce Duty, who died five years later and who 
left no children. On January 5, 1921, he married 
Miss Katherine Williamson, of Paducah, Kentucky. 
With his mother Mr. Renick holds membership in the 
Presbyterian Church at Winchester. 

ELLERBfi; Winn Carter was one of the well-estab- 
lished members of the Louisville bar for nearly a 
decade. He practically abandoned his professional 
routine for nearly three years while in the army on the 
Mexican border and during the war with Germany, 
and after his honorable discharge he entered business 
rather than resume the work of his profession. He 
is organizer and president of the Carter Guarantee 
Brokerage Company, a Kentucky corporation with 
home office in the Louisville Trust Building. 

Mr. Carter was born in Bibb County, Alabama, 
March 23, 1884, a son of William Douglas and Julia 
Reese (Winn) Carter. His father was born at Louis- 
ville January 8, 1861, while his mother was born in 
Alabama December 9, 1862. They were married in 
Birmingham June 15, 1882, and Ellerbe W. is the first 
of their five children. William D. Carter is a very 
prominent lawyer. He was educated both in the literary 
and law departments of Washington and Lee Univer- 
sity of Virginia, graduating as a lawyer in 1880. He 
was admitted to the Virginia bar at Fredericksburg, 
where for many years he has enjoyed a high rank as 
an attorney. He is a member of the various bar as- 
sociations, is a past eminent commander of Fredericks- 
burg Commandery of Knights Templar, and a member 
of the Episcopal Church. 

Ellerbe W. Carter was reared at Fredericksburg, 
Virginia, received his A. B. degree from Fredericks- 
burg College in 1904, and for over a year after leaving 
college he traveled abroad in Europe as a means of 
finishing his liberal education. He spent about two 
months in Rome, two months in Geneva and the Swiss 
mountains, and also traveled extensively in England 
and Scotland and France. On returning to the United 
States he entered the law school of the University of 
Virginia and graduated in 1907. He practiced in the 
Virginia courts until 1910, when he came west and 
began practice at Louisville, and there was no impor- 
tant interruption to his professional duties in that city 
until June, 1916. 

Having in the meantime become identified with the 
National Guard of Kentucky, he was called to duty 
in the Federal service during the Mexican troubles. 
June 19, 1916, as captain, Co. B, First Kentucky In- 
fantry, he was sent to Fort Thomas, Kentucky, and 
still later recruited Company C at Covington and in 
the Big Sandy Valley of Kentucky. After recruiting 
the companies he took them to Fort Bliss, Texas, and 
remained on the Mexican border until the early spring 
of 1917. At the beginning of the war with Germany 
he was stationed at Camp Taylor with his company, 
and later was sent to Camp Shelby, Mississippi, and 
on July 16, 1918, was commissioned major of artillery. 
He received intensive training in the Field Artillery 
School of Fire at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and in Sep- 
tember, 1918, went overseas with the 38th Division. 
He landed at Liverpool, crossed England and entered 
France at Cherbourg, and was on duty at several points 
in France until the signing of the armistice. He then 
returned to New York and to Camp Taylor and re- 
ceived an honorable discharge May 29, 1919, nearly 
three y«ars after his first call to Federal service. 

Major Carter two days after his honorable discharge, 
on May 31, 1919, organized the Carter Guarantee 
Brokerage Company. This company began Wsiness 



with $30,000 paid up capital, and its capital is now 
$325,000. At the close of the first year's business the 
resources of the company aggregated $864,583. Other 
officers and directors of the company are Philip Cole, 
vice president ; George R. Burks, secretary and treas- 
urer; Marion E. Taylor, and Owsley Brown. In 
April, 1920, Mr. Carter also organized at Nashville, 
Tennessee, the Carter Acceptance Company, with a 
paid up capital of $150,000, and he is also president of 
this corporation. 

Major Carter is an active member of the American 
Legion, is affiliated with Falls City Lodge No. 376, 
A. F. and A. M., Highland Chapter No. 150, R. A. M., 
and the Knights Templar Commandery No. i. He is a 
member of the Pendennis Club, the Louisville Boat 
Club, Louisville Country Club, and in politics is a 
republican. 

On July 7, 1910, he married Nancy Hall Pearson, 
a native of Charleston, South Carolina, and only child 
of John and Daisy (Hall) Pearson, the former a native 
of South Carolina and the latter of Virginia. Mr. 
Pearson was a well-known lawyer and former judge. 
Mr. and Mrs. Carter have two children, Ellerbe, Jr., 
and Nancy. 

Charles Whitner Milner, junior member of the 
well-known Louisville law firm of Humphrey, Craw- 
ford & Middleton, is rapidly becoming a prominent 
figure in some of the law controversies of his city 
and state, in which his able judgment and ability to 
provide the solution of many complexities have proven 
his right to be numbered among the rising members of 
his calling. Mr. Milner as a lawyer, conducting cases 
from their earliest consultation through their prepara- 
tions in his office and the conflicts at the bar to the 
final engrossment after the last decree of the last 
tribunal, is systematic, patient and vigorous, and these 
qualities with his natural talent have contributed to his 
success. 

Mr. Milner was born at Atlanta, Georgia, September 
15, 1887, a son of Benjamin C. and Mary Ann (Whitner) 
Milner. His father, born at Barnesville, Georgia, in 
i860, was educated at the University of Georgia, and is 
now one of the leading civil engineers of Atlanta and 
chief engineer of the Georgia Highway Board of Com- 
missioners. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church 
and maintains independent views as to political ques- 
tions. Mrs. Milner was born at West Point, Georgia, 
in 1861, and she and her husband are the parents of 
four children: Charles Whitner, Benjamin C, Jr., Jean 
and Cobb. 

Charles Whitner Milner received his early education 
in the public schools of Atlanta, following which he 
entered Center College, Danville, Kentucky, from which 
he was graduated with the class of 1907- Having 
decided upon a career in the law, he then prosecuted 
his legal studies in the law department of the Uni- 
versity of Louisville, and was graduated with his degree 
of Bachelor of Arts with the class of 1909. In that 
same year he was admitted to practice before the state 
bar of Kentucky, and at once came to Louisville, where 
he has since been advancing steadily in his calling, 
and where for the greater part of the time he has been 
associated with his present concern, Humphrey, Craw- 
ford & Middleton, known as one of the forrnidable 
combinations of the city. Mr. Milner's practice is gen- 
eral in character, and he is equally at home in the va- 
rious branches of his calling. He is a valued, inter- 
ested and active member of the Louisville Bar Associa- 
tion and the Kentucky State Bar Association. With 
his family he maintains membership in the Second Pres- 
byterian Church. Mr. Milner is a democrat in his 
political allegiance, but has sought no favors at the 
hands of his party or from his fellow-citizens. 

On December 29, 1909, he was united in marriage 
with Miss Josephine Hudson, who was born at Dan- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



19 



ville, Kentucky, a daughter of H. A. and Allie 
(Salter) Hudson, natives of this state and agricultural 
pepple of Boyle County. Mrs. Milner is the fourth in 
order of birth in a family of five children, of whom 
two are living. To Mr. and Mrs. Milner there have 
been born two children : Charles Whitner, Jr., and 
Benjamin Hudson. 

Thomas D. Clines, educated for the law, is a banker 
by experience, and for eight years had the important 
financial responsibilities of the ofifice of county treas- 
urer of Jefferson County. 

Mr. Clines was born in Jefferson County, November 
1 6, 1882, a son of Thomas P. and Mary (Manning) 
Clines. His father, a native of London, England, was 
reared and educated there, was a civil engineer by 
profession, and as a young man located at Louisville, 
where he practiced his profession until his death, in 
1899, at the age of fifty-nine. He was a member of 
the Engineers Club of Louisville and a republican in 
politics. His wife was born in Ireland and died in 
January, 1920, at the age of fifty-seven. They had three 
children, Thomas D. being the oldest. John M. married 
Gertrude Howe and has three daughters, named Mar- 
garet Mary, Dorothy and Joan. Mary Sophia is the 
wife of Joseph Hund and has a son, Joseph, Jr. 

Thomas D. Clines was reared and educated in Louis- 
ville, attending St. Xavier's College with the class of 
1899. He afterward took the course of the Jefferson 
Law School, graduated LL. B. in 1905, and for about 
a year was regularly engaged in his professional work. 
In 1906 he entered the employ of the First National 
Bank of Louisville, and was with that institution until 
1912. During 1912-13 Mr. Clines was assistant cashier 
nf the Commercial Bank & Trust Company, and in 
April of the latter year was elected county treasurer 
of Jefferson County, and by re-election had charge of 
the treasury and funds of Jefferson County for eight 
years, his term e:jpiring April 5, 1921. Both as a 
Dublic official and as a thoroughly loyal private citizen 
Mr. Clines gave all the aid he could to the Government 
in the prosecution of the late war. As general sec- 
retary he had charge of the Knights of Columbus 
organization and activities at Camp Taylor. He was also 
chairman of the Labor Committee of the National 
Council of Defense and was one of the popular "Four- 
Minute" speakers in Louisville. He is a district deputy 
of the Knights of Columbus, belongs to Louisville 
Lodge No. 8, B. P. O. E., is a member of Mackin 
Council Young Men's Institute, the Audubon Country 
Club, the Louisville Automobile Club, Order of Al- 
hambra, and politically is a democrat. 

On September 21, 1905, Mr. Clines married Miss May 
Higgins, a native of Louisville, where her parents, Wil- 
liam M. and Hattie (Hyde) Higgins, reside. Both her 
father and mother were born in New York State. Mrs. 
Clines is the third of their eight children. The five 
children born to Mr. and Mrs. Clines are Thomas D., 
Jr., William Manning, Hugh Higgins, Mary Eileen and 
Hattie Catherine, all residing at Audubon Park, Louis- 
ville, Kentucky. 

Argus David Willmoth, M. D. Aside from the 
important service he has rendered through the routine 
work of his profession at Louisville Doctor Willmoth 
has earned distinction by his educational work in med- 
icine and surgery, his contributions to scientific litera- 
ture, and by the tremendous energy that has enabled 
him to look after many interests that seldom find a 
place in the career of a busy medical practitioner. 

Doctor Willmoth was born in Hardin County, Ken- 
tucky, October 24, 1874. The Willmoths came from 
England and were Colonial settlers in Virginia. His 
grandfather, Louis Willmoth, came with his parents 
from Virginia when young and located in Washington 
County. Kentucky. The parents of Doctor Willmoth 
were William and Parmelia (Klinglesmith) Willmoth, 



the former born in Hardin County in 1851. They had 
two sons, A. David and Robert Lee. Important inter- 
ests of the Willmoths for several generations have 
been stock farming and the breeding and training of 
thoroughbreds. In 1919 Doctor Willmoth and his 
father and brother, Robert L., established the Ridge 
Spring Farm in Hardin County. This is a model dairy 
farm and has become widely known for its herd of 
pure blood Jerseys. 

Doctor Willmoth was reared on a farm, and he also 
employed his time and energies to the end of acquir- 
ing a liberal and thorough education and preparation 
for his chosen career. He attended public and private 
schools, has the degree Master of Arts from the Uni- 
versity of Louisville, and in 1896 graduated from the 
Louisville Medical College. He has spent much time 
during the past quarter of a century attending clinics 
and keeping in touch with advanced ideas in medicine 
and surgery in New York, Chicago and other great 
medical centers. After graduating he practiced for 
several years in Hardin County, but in 1899 removed 
to Louisville, where his special attainments have 
brought him enviable rank both as a physician and sur- 
geon. For the past fifteen years his practice has been 
largely limited to surgery and diseases of women. 

He has served as lecturer on surgery and four years 
as professor of surgery and clinical surgery in the 
Kentucky School of Medicine. For two years he was 
professor of surgery in the medical department of 
Kentucky University, and also for two years was in the 
University of Louisville. He has been visiting sur- 
geon to the Louisville City Hospital and St. An- 
thony's Hospital, and for three years was owner and 
editor of the American Practitioner and News, a med- 
ical publication at Louisville. He is also author of a 
number of special reports and treatises on medical and 
surgical subjects. He was for three years a member 
of the Jefferson County Board of Health, for one term 
was president of the Southern Medical Association, is 
a former president of the Louisville Clinical Society, a 
member of the Jefferson County, Kentucky State and 
American Medical associations, and belongs to the 
Muldraugh Hill Medical Society and the Mississippi 
and Ohio Valley Medical Society. He is a member 
of the Louisville Commercial Club, is affiliated with 
Preston Lodge No. 281, F. and A. M., Eureka Chapter 
No. loi, R. A. M., DeMolay Commandery of the 
Knights Templar and Kosair Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine, and also with Louisville Lodge No. 8, Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks. 

His first wife was Maggie Brown, daughter of Wil- 
liam Brown, of Meade County. She died in 1905. 
Doctor Willmoth married Edna L. Cralle, daughter of 
Shelby and Ella Cralle. They have one daughter, 
Louise Cralle. 

William T. Muir, now and for m^any years past 
conducting an extensive farm located about five miles 
east of Lexington, Kentucky, is a member of the 
well-known Muir family who for many generations 
have been identified with the life and activities of this 
part of the state. 

Klex. Thomas, of White Sulphur, Kentucky, follow- 
ing the close of the Civil war, moved to Fayette 
County. A daughter of his brother, Frank Thomas 
(Mary Elizabeth), had been married to a Mr. Kentiey, 
who died in that county, and she later married William 
Muir, who was reared in Fayette, and they spent their 
whole married life on the present Muir farm, where 
her father's last days were lived and where he died 
when he had passed his eightieth year. 

William Muir erected a part of the present home, 
and he and his brother, Thomas Muir, owned about 
1,200 acres of land in this district and about i,2or 
acres at White Sulphur, dividing the farming opera- 
tions between tiiem. They were well established as 
stockmen and were breeders of show horses, which 



20 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



they exhibited at leading shows, and they kept large 
numbers of export cattle, the partnership continuing 
until the death of William. The widow of the latter 
took up the partnership and remained in the business 
for ten years, when Thomas Muir sold out and later 
bought a small place at Muir Station. He retired 
from active work, lives a bachelor life and is now in 
his seventy-fifth year. Mrs. William Muir continued 
to operate the place until her death in 1916. The chil- 
dren are: Mrs. B. M. Herndon, of Georgetown, and 
William T., the subject of this sketch. 

William T. Muir was born on October 25, 1880, and 
now resides on the old home place, where he operates 
250 acres of prime land. For a few years he bred 
some thoroughbred horses, produced good racers, and 
carried off many honors with his exhibits. He is now 
engaged in general farming, to which he devotes his 
whole attention. He is a supporter of the democratic 
party, as were his father and uncle. The latter were 
members of the Baptist Church, while William Muir 
is an earnest and regular attendant on the services 
of the Christian Church. 

On March 5, 1910, William Muir was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Edna Gianini, a daughter of Arthur 
Gianini, a well-known architect of Cincinnati, where 
his daughter was born. Mr. Gianini is at this time 
holding an appointment with the Hendricks Moore 
Company of Lexington. Mrs. Muir is also a member 
of the Christian Church. 

Samuel Muir, brother of William and Thomas Muir, 
lived at Muir Station, which place was named in his 
honor, and there he spent his whole active life. He 
had three sons : W. W., a tax collector, living at 
Lexington ; Ed. G., a medical doctor, living at Pawnee 
Rock, Kansas ; and Henry, who farmed in Fayette 
County up to the time of his death. His widow now 
lives in Scott County, this state. 

GicoRGE Christian. On the Fayetre County thor- 
oughfare, now known as the Christian Turnpike, about 
one-half mile from the Richmond Turnpike, is to be 
found the attractive rural home of George Christian, 
who has here resided since his early childhood and 
is a representative of one of the old and honored 
families of the county. His farm is situated ten miles 
south of Lexington, and the house occupies a sightly 
elevation, so that there is afforded therefrom a fine 
view of the beautiful surrounding country. Mr. 
Christian was born at Athens, Fayette County, on the 
27th of March, 1858, and is a son of William and 
Martha (Nichols) Christian, both likewise natives of 
Fayette County. John Christian, grandfather of the 
subject of this review, was one of the sterling pioneers 
and substantial farmers of this county, and here his 
death occurred when his grandson was still a boy. 
George Christian was but two years old at the time 
when his parents established their home on the farm 
which is his present place of residence, and his father 
here remained until he was well advanced in years, 
when he retired from the farm and established his 
residence in the City of Lexington, where he died in 
1914, at the patriarchal age of ninety-two years, secure 
in the high esteem of all who knew him. His wife 
died at the age of sixty-five years, and of their eleven 
children nine attained to years of maturity. Of the 
ininiber seven are now living and the daughter Bettie, 
who remained a maiden, was sixty-five years of age 
at the time of her death in October, 1920. The old 
homestead farm of 200 acres came into the possession 
of George Christian after the death of his father, as 
he then purchased the interests of the other heirs. 
He was reared to manhood on this fine old farm- 
stead, which is thus endeared to him by many gra- 
cious memories and associations, and he had assumed 
the active management of the place many years prior 
to the death of his father. The present substantial 
and commodious house on this farm was erected by 



his father, and the turnpike which passes the place 
and bears the family name was formerly known as 
the Evans Mill Road, as it led to the old-time Evans 
grist-mill, which was operated by water power and 
which was three miles distant from the Christian home- 
stead. All traces of this old mill have now dis- 
appeared. Mr. Christian gained his youthful educa- 
tion in the schools of his native county, and has 
continuously been associated with the activities of the 
old home farm, of which he is now the owner. He 
has taken loyal interest in everything pertaining to the 
welfare of the community, and while he has not been 
associated with so-called practical politics he has given 
staunch allegiance to the democratic party. 

Mr. Christian was thirty-five years of age at the 
time of his marriage to Miss Susie Davis, daughter 
of Joseph and Sally (Bailey) Davis, whose old home 
place was on the Kentucky River at the mouth of 
Jack Creek, in Fayette County, Mr. Davis having there 
established his residence about the year 1865 and both 
he and his wife having there remained until their 
deaths. Mr. and Mrs. Christian have six sons : Wil- 
liam, Clarence, Joseph, Thomas, John Moss and 
George, Jr. All of the sons remain at the parental 
home and are associated in the work and management 
of the farm except Clarence, who is married and is in 
service as a member of the Fortieth United States 
Infantry, of which command he was a member during 
the nation's participation in the late World war. 

Fr,\nk W. Mimms is both a farmer and banker of 
Todd County, and his enterprise and character have re- 
flected additional honor upon one of the old and hon- 
ored names of this portion of the state. 

His family was brought to Kentucky from old Vir- 
ginia by his grandfather, a native of that state. His 
grandfather developed one of the early farms of Todd 
County, and was living near Trenton when he died 
suddenly while on a visit in ClarJesville, Tennesssee. 
He married Miss Kimbrough, who died in Todd 
County. John C. Mimms, father of the Trenton banker, 
was born in Todd County June 6, 1847, and spent all 
his life in the county. He owned a large amount of 
farm land, tilled the soil and managed his affairs most 
creditably and successfully, and also served as magis- 
trate of the Trenton district. He was a democrat and 
for years gave abundantly of his means and his in- 
fluence as a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. He died at Trenton February 7, 1909. His 
first wife was a Miss Cross, who died in Todd County, 
leaving two daughters: Mary, wife of W. J. Dickinson, 
a farmer and bank director at Trenton ; and Lucy, wife 
of R. M. Boswell, pastor of the Christian Church of 
Georgetown, Kentucky. The second wife of John C. 
Mimms was Donie Smith, who was born in Todd 
County in i860 and is now living at Louisville. Their 
only son is Frank W. Her daughter Johnnie, who died 
at the age of thirty years, at Louisville, was the wife 
of C. E. Carmack, a. resident of that city but a travel- 
ing representative for the Boy Scout work. 

Frank W. Mimms was born in Todd County March 
27, 1884, and before taking up the serious duties of 
life had a thorough education. He attended the public 
schools of Trenton, was graduated in 1902 from the 
Vanderbilt Training School at Elkton, and spent the 
year i9q2-03 in Vanderbilt University at Nashville. He 
is a member of the Kappa Sigma college fraternity. 
On leaving university Mr. Mimms took up the dutie.v 
of the home farm for three years, and since moving to 
Trenton has kept in close touch with agricultural 
matters in Todd County and is secretary and treasurer 
of the Trenton National Farm Loan Association. Two 
and a half miles west of Trenton he has a fine general 
crop and stock farm of 275 acres, and has made his 
mark in stock raising circles as a breeder of Angus 
cattle. 

'Mr. Minuus has been a iiu-niber of llie hanking 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



21 



fraternity of Trenton since 1906, when he became as- 
sistant cashier of the Bank of Trenton. He resigned 
that post in October, 1908, to become assistant cashier 
of the Planters Bank, and since 191 1 has been the 
cashier of that institution. He has been with it almost 
since the establishment of the bank, which was started 
with a state charter in February, igo8. This is one of 
the stronger banks of Todd County, has a capital of 
$30,000, surplus and profits of $26,000, and deposits of 
$220,000. The officers are : E. F. Camp, president ; J. 
W. Chestnut, vice president ; and F. W. Mimms, cashier. 

Mr. Mimms was deeply engrossed in all patriotic 
movements in Todd County during the World war, 
working both as a banker and private official to pro- 
mote the success of Libert Loan and other campaigns. 
He gave a large amount of time from his business 
and private affairs to do this work. For the past twelve 
years he has been a trustee of the Town of Trenton, 
is a steward and treasurer of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, a democrat in politics and affiliated with 
Bethel Lodge No. 20, A. F. and A. M. The home where 
Mr. Mimms and his family had lived for a number of 
years was burned November 6, 1919. 

He married at Trenton in icx)6 Miss Etta Bacon, 
daughter of P. E. and Etta (Dickinson) Bacon. Her 
mother is still living at Trenton, where her father died. 
P. E. Bacon was a farmer and also proprietor of the 
flour mill at Trenton. Mrs. Mimms is a graduate of 
Georgetown College of Kentucky. They have two 
daughters, Dorothy, born March 10, 1910; and Mary 
Edloe, born September 26, 1914 

Robert Letcher Henderson. The members of the 
Henderson family from whom Robert L. Henderson, 
subject of this sketch, is descended, are among the 
oldest and most representative citizens of Lexington 
and the Muir Station district, where tor many genera- 
tions they have been identified with the agricultural and 
social life of this part of the State of Kentucky, the 
present member of the family in no wise departing 
from the best traditions handed down by predecessors. 
The family first settled here in the 1790's. 

Robert Letcher Henderson, now living near Muir 
Station, about nine miles east of Lexington, was born 
on the farm April 28, 1853, a son of James and Susan 
(Hardesty) Henderson. James was a son of Thomas 
Henderson, whose father settled on this farm when 
he (Thomas) was a lad of twelve years. Thomas was 
postmaster at the old station, and dropped dead on 
the porch of the station, July 6, 1868, being then 
eighty-five years old. He married two sisters, Ruth 
and Jane Galloway, oldest and youngest of seven sis- 
ters. Six children were born of these two unions, 
five by the first marriage, Samuel G., William, James, 
Mary and Rebecca and one by the second marriage, 
Nancy. Samuel G. married twice and lived in Shelby 
County. He had two children by his first wife, John 
T. and William, and two by his last wife, Samuel S. 
and Sarah Ellen. William died when a young man. 
James died on June 6, 1866, at the age of forty-seven 
years. He married Susan Hardesty, and two children 
survive him, Robert L. and Mary Rebecca, the latter 
of whom married James Perkins. Mary remained 
single and died at Chestnut Grove in Shelby County, 
aged eighty-six years. Rebecca married Thomas Wise 
and had three children, Henry T., William, and Ella. 
Nancy married George Lynn and moved to Indiana. 
After his death she moved back to Shelby County, and 
she died at Chestnut Grove. 

Robert L. Henderson bought out the interests of the 
other heirs on the old holding and it is now exclusively 
operated by him with the exception of one share. 
In 1889, when he was then thirty-six years of age, 
he was united in marriage to Kate Zimmerman, a 
daughter of Thomas Zimmerman, of Lexington, and 
one of the well-known printers of that city. They 



have become the parents of one daughter, Dorothy 
Vernon, now in school. Mr. Henderson has erected a 
substantial modern brick house, which is not only 
pleasant and attractive in appearance, but is a very 
desirable home, and here he and his family are com- 
fortably situated. 

Beall Brothers. Two miles northeast of Winchester 
is one of the finest farms of the famous Blue Grass 
region of Kentucky, owned and operated by Beall 
Brothers, three of whom have conducted their inter- 
ests in common for many years and through their 
united efforts, each with some special ability, have 
been able to direct the affairs of one of the largest 
farms of Clark County on a very profitable scale. 

The Beall brothers are Huston, Milton P. and T. S. 
Beall. They are the sons of Thomas Garrett and 
Margaret (McClure) Beall. Their grandparents were 
Leonard and Mary (Rash) Beall. Leonard Beall was 
a native of- Kentucky and spent a long and active 
life as a farmer two miles from Kiddville. He died 
ill 1886, at the age of eighty-nine, and his wife, Mary, 
died at the age of sixty-five. Leonard Beall for the 
last five years of his life lived with his only daughter, 
Sally. She was born December 4, 1837, and is still 
living near the old home, being the widow of Samuel 
T. Hadden, whom she married in 1852. Leonard Beall 
and wife had five sons : William R., who never mar- 
ried and died at the age of eighty-two, and was a 
soldier in the Mexican war ; Edward Young, who died 
a bachelor at the age of sixty-five, having made his 
home for thirty years with Mrs. Hadden; Thomas 
Garrett ; Martin Luther, who lived on the Richmond 
Pike near Lexington and his son Edward is a citizen 
of Lexington; and Ambrose Dudley, who died at the 
age of thirteen. 

Thomas Garrett Beall was born near Kiddville, 
August 13, 1826, and died December 2, 1902. His 
earlier activities as a farmer were carried on at a 
place three miles east of Winchester, on the Rucker- 
ville Pike, but about 1877 he moved to the Mount 
Sterling Pike, two miles northeast of Winchester. 
Here he owned 130 acres and later acquired 370 acres 
and in 1885 moved to another portion of the farm on 
the same pike. He was a prosperous farmer, a stanch 
citizen, and active in church and other affairs. He 
married in middle life Margaret McClure, who died 
January 25, 1913. Their family consisted of the three 
sons comprising the Beall brothers partnership. 

These brothers have been steadily increasing their 
holdings until they have 775 acres in one body, im- 
proved with seven sets of buildings. There is per- 
haps no better instance to be found in the Blue Grass 
region of a large farm more capably and efficiently 
managed. 

Huston Beall married Hattie Connor and has a son, 
Huston, Jr. He is affiliated with the Knights of 
Pythias, and the Bealls as a rule are members of the 
Christian Church. 

Hon. Joshua Dever Powers. Kentucky is justly 
proud of the long list of its sons who have achieved 
national as well as state distinction. In that list there 
has been a growing appreciation for many years of the 
high character of the Louisville financier, Joshua Dever 
Powers, who is the only Kentuckian ever chosen presi- 
dent of the American Bankers Association. He is a 
lawyer by profession, practiced law actively in connec- 
tion with other business affairs for many years, but for 
a considerable period his chief attention has been di- 
rected to the financial management of the Common- 
wealth Life Insurance Company, of which he is 
president. 

Mr. Powers, whose versatility and resourcefulness 
have been tested in many trying and important respon- 
sibilities, was born at Hawesville, Hancock County, 
Kentucky, October 17, 1844. His grandfather, Stephen 



22 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



Powers, was a native of the North of Ireland. He 
immigrated to America in 1771, first settHng at EIH- 
cott's Mills, Maryland, and later becoming a pioneer of 
the new state of Ohio. The father of the Louisville 
financier was also named Stephen Powers. He was 
born at Wilmington, Ohio, February 22, 1821, and from 
Ohio he moved to Hawesville, Kentucky, in 1842 and 
for many years was a leading merchant of Hancock 
County. He died in November, 1902, at the age of 
eighty-one. At Hawesville he married Emily Noble 
Schrader, who was born there in 1824. Her parents, 
James and Susan Schrader, were natives of Louisiana 
and had settled at Hawesville in the early twenties. 
Mrs. Emily Powers died in 1858, when her son Joshua 
was fourteen years of age. 

Up to that time he had attended private schools at 
Hawesville. After the death of his mother he came 
under the instruction of the eminent Kentucky educator, 
James Kennedy Patterson, now president of Kentucky 
University. He was taught by Professor Patterson at 
Greenville, Kentucky, and at the outbreak of the war 
between the states was a student in Georgetown Col- 
lege. War coming on, that college was suspended and, 
returning to Hawesville, Joshua Powers helped in his 
father's store as a clerk. During 1864-65 he was em- 
ployed by a wholesale dry goods firm at Louisville. 
After the war he returned to Louisville and formed a 
-partnership with his father under the firm name of 
S. Powers & Son, a business that continued until 1884. 
In the rneantime Mr. Powers had diligently prosecuted 
his studies as a lawyer and was admitted to the bar in 
1873. In that year he was chosen to the Lower House 
of the Kentucky Legislature. As a lawyer his practice 
was at Hawesville until 1877, when he removed to 
Owensboro, and was one of the eminent lawyers of the 
Owensboro bar for a quarter of a century. In that time 
he was associated with several well known attorneys, 
being a partner of the late Judge G. W. Williams, under 
the firm name of Williams & Powers, until 1884, then 
in the firm of Powers & Miller until 1885, as Powers. 
Atchison & Miller until 1887, as Powers & Atchison untii 
1896, and finally as senior member of Powers & Ander- 
son until Mr. Powers retired from active practice in 
1902. 

Mr. Powers abandoned the formal duties of his pro- 
fession in order to remove to Louisville and discharge 
the heavy burdens which had been accumulating for a 
number of years in his business and financial relation- 
ships. Few Kentuckians have had delegated to them a 
greater variety of business responsibility, and it is to 
the disparagement of none that few have so faithfully 
and with such resourcefulness discharged these obliga- 
tions. Mr. Powers first became a figure in Kentucky 
banking when he was elected in 1884 as president of the 
First National Bank of Owensboro. He held that office 
until he removed to Louisville in 1902. At Louisville he 
organized the National Trust Company, now the United 
States Trust Company, and was president of the former 
in 1907. In 1905 he took the leading part in organizing 
the Commonwealth Life Insurance Company, and has 
been its first and only president. Under his direction 
this has grown to be Kentucky's largest and most popu- 
lar life insurance company. 

Undoubtedly it is on the constructive side of finance 
and business that Mr. Powers has rendered his greatest 
service. Besides building up a great life insurance com- 
pany and several banks he projected and built and was 
the principal owner of the Owensboro Street Railway 
in 1893 ; was president of the Owensboro Wharf Boat 
and Transfer Company from 1885 to 1895; and in 1888 
organized the Hancock Deposit Bank of Hawesville, his 
native town. He has the distinction of having built and 
ovvned the Owensboro Bell Telephone Company plant, 
this being the second telephone exchange installed in 
Kentucky. Later he assisted in the organization of the 
Harrison Telephone Company of Owensboro. In 1892, 



with several other gentlemen, he projected and built the 
Louisville & Henderson Railroad, serving as its vice 
president for several years. At one time he was Owens- 
boro legal representative of the Louisville & Henderson 
and the Louisville & Nashville railroads. 

Besides the honor of being the only Kentuckian ever 
chosen as head of the American Bankers Association, 
Mr. Powers had another notable honor from that or- 
ganization in the fact that he was twice elected a mem- 
ber of its Executive Council. He was first chosen to 
this position in 1889. After serving the constitutional 
limits of three years he was absent from the council 
during 1903. In 1904, while not even in attendance at 
the annual convention, he was chosen a member of the 
Executive Council for a second term of three years. In 
190S he was elected chairman of the council. In 1906 
he was elected vice president of the association and the 
culminating honor of being elected president came in 
1907. 

He has a number of financial and industrial interests 
in Louisville and the state, though the actual manage- 
ment of the Commonwealth Life Insurance Company 
commands his utmost allegiance and most of his time. 
He has in the truer sense of the word been a distin- 
guished public servant, though he has been very little in 
politics. President Cleveland in 1893 appointed him to 
the office of internal revenue collector at Owensboro. 
His jurisdiction embraced thirty-five counties of the 
state. Mr. Powers was appointed a member of the 
Board of Trustees of the Louisville Free Public Library 
in 1913 for a term of four years. He was reappointed 
for a second term, and from April, 1919, to April, 1921, 
was vice president of the board. 

This record, though brief, cannot but suggest the 
fundamental strength of Mr. Powers' personal character, 
an unassailable integrity, and a breadth of mind and 
soundness of judgment that have fully earned him the 
great responsibilities he has carried. 

On October 19, 1865, Mr. Powers married Clara 
Hawes. She was the youngest daughter of Hon. Albert 
Gallatin Hawes, who from 1847 to 1849 represented the 
Second Kentucky District in Congress. Mr. Powers is 
proud of all his children, grandchildren and even great- 
grandchildren, now living in homes widely scattered, 
and among these descendants several have earned dis- 
tinction as soldiers. His oldest child, Stephen Powers, 
has for many years been a resident of Las Vegas, New 
Mexico, where he is superintendent of a public utility. 
By his marriage to Neville Pendleton his children are: 
Joshua D., who married Lois Hidden and was a first 
lieutenant of infantry during the war ; Rosalie P. and 
Mary S., both teachers in New Mexico ; Robert B., who 
served as a private in the cavalry ; Ruth P., Katherine 
and Martha G., still attending school. Albert D. Powers, 
fiscal agent for the Photoplay Association at Fort Worth, 
Texas, married Ethel Bryant, and their children are : 
J. Bryant, a newspaper editor in British Honduras ; 
Ethleel B., wife of Charles Ingelky, of British Hon- 
duras ; and Albert H., who is in the oil business at 
Tampico, Mexico. Col. Robert B. Powers, the third son, 
graduated from West Point Military Academy in 1896, 
was a captain in the Seventh Regiment of Cavalry and 
in the regular army service twenty-four years, received 
two promotions during the war, to major and later to 
colonel, and recently was relieved of active service, 
though retaining the rank and pay of colonel subject to 
call to duty. The fourth son, Joshua D., Jr., is a farmer 
in Daviess County, Kentucky, and by his marriage to 
Bessie L. Young has two children : Josie D. and J. D. 
Powers 3rd. Jay Clay Powers, who married Lena Budd 
and has a daughter, Laura Lucille, was a major during 
the World war, saw active service in France, and is 
now a resident of Dallas, Texas. John H. Powers, a 
wholesale grocer at Lexington, married Florence 
Whipple. Thomas McCreery, the next in age, servedin 
the United States Aviation Corps in Scotland as in- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



23 



spector over five divisions, where he met with a serious 
accident while on duty, his plane collapsing at a height 
of 700 feet, and he was sent to the London Infirmary 
and suffered from wounds nearly a year before recovery. 
He is now an actor on the stage with home at New 
York. The two daughters of Mr. Powers are Jessie C. 
and Emily H. Jessie is the wife of Dr. Hugh Kim- 
berly, of Owensboro, Kentucky, and the mother of a 
daughter, Sarah Ray. Emily is the wife of Eugene 
Iglehart, a practicing lawyer at Indianapolis, Indiana, 
and their children are Emily, Eugene and Robert 
Iglehart. 

Arthur Loomis, an architect of specially high attain- 
ments and one who now stands among the leading 
representatives of his profession, is a native of West- 
field, Massachusetts, but since early youth has been 
closely identified with affairs in the City of Louisville, 
within which it has been his aim to attain a secure 
place in the popular confidence and esteem as one of 
the leading citizens. 

Arthur Loomis comes of old New England stock. The 
progenitor of the Loomis family in America was Joseph 
Loomis, who came to America in 16,^9, a Puritan from 
Braintree, England, and settled in Windsor, Connecti- 
cut. The genealogy of the family is authentically traced 
back as far as the fifteenth century to John Loomis, a 
man of distinction, who was the father of Joseph Loomis, 
the founder of the family in America. 

Many of the Loomis family are enrolled among the 
heroes of the Revolutionary War, among them being the 
great-grandfather of Arthur Loomis, and his great- 
great-grandmother was the first white child Ixirn in 
Plymouth, Massachusetts. 

Several of America's ablest scientists and scholars 
have borne the name of Loomis. One of them, Mahon 
Loomis, a dentist by profession, as early as 1868 dem- 
onstrated before officials of the Smithsonian Institute 
the practical operation of a "Wireless Telegraph" nearly 
thirty years before wireless telepathy was heralded to 
the world as a new and modern invention. 

Mr. Loomis is a son of Dr. John Loomis and Clarissa 
C Robinson) Loomis, the former of whom was born at 
Russell, Massachusetts, and the latter at Pembroke, 
New Hampshire. 

Dr. John Loomis, his father, was a graduate of both 
the Eclectic and the Homeopathic Schools of Medicine, 
and was the oldest practicing physician of Clark County, 
Indiana, coming from Massachusetts in 1861. He was 
a man of sterling character and strong intellectual pow- 
ers. He had no ambition for public life, but was 
prominent in supporting movements for the community 
betterment. Doctor Loomis voted for nineteen whig 
and republican candidates for President, casting his first 
ballot for Henry Clay and his last for Charles Hughes 
in 1916. He was keenly interested in the various in- 
cidents of the World war, and was well preserved, both 
mentally and physically, when he passed away, having 
attained the patriarchal age of ninety-nine years and 
seven months. 

Acquiring a good practical education in the public 
schools, Arthur Loomis entered the office of Mr. C. J. 
Clarke, one of the most prominent architects in Ken- 
tucky and the Middle West. His boyhood foreshadowed 
his later years, for in school he displayed that faithful 
industry that has been so important an element to his 
success. Thoroughly reliable in all things, the quality 
of his work was a convincing test of his personal worth, 
and the forming of the firm of Clarke & Loomis in 
1891 was a merited recognition to Mr. Loomis' ability 
as an architect and his standing among the profession. 
Mr. Loomis has had, always, a fondness for books per- 
taining to art, and to that art he devoted the enthusiasm 
of years of study with results that have made his pro- 
fession a medium for the expression of a creative and 
fine artistic ideals. 

Vol. IV— 3 



His work is best exemplified by many important build- 
ings and beautiful residences throughout Kentucky and 
the three Fall Cities, among these, the Speed Block, 
Fourth and Guthrie, the Todd Office Building, J. Bacon 
& Son's store building. Levy Brothers' store building, 
Medical College of the University of Louisville, Shelby 
Park Library, Envangelical Zion Church, St. Peters Re- 
formed Church, St. Matthews Envangelical Church, the 
First Presbyterian Church, the Nurses Home, Norton 
Memorial Infirmary, as well as the residence of former 
Governor Wilson of Kentucky, residence of the poet 
Cale Young Rice, the Third Avenue residence of the 
late A. T. Hert, the Caldwell residence, St. James Court, 
formerly the Conrad residence, and many other struc- 
tures in and about Louisville bear testimony to Mr. 
Loomis' ability in artistic designing. 

In the Blue Grass region might be mentioned the 
department store of Welsh and Wiseman, Danville, and 
the residence of Mr. Field McLeod, Versailles, St. Paul's 
Episcopal Church, the Public Library, the Citizens Trust 
Company Building, the First National Bank and the 
High School .building in the neighboring City of Jeffer- 
sonville, Indiana, and St. Luke's Protestant Episcopal 
Church, Anchorage, Kentucky, are also Mr. Loomis' 
work. 

Mr. Loomis is a member of the American Institute of 
Architects, is former president of the Kentucky Chapter 
of that institute and a delegate in 1908 to their National 
Convention held in Washington, D. C. ; is a director of 
the Louisville Art Association, and he also is a member 
of the Pendennis Club. 

Mr. Loomis has the honor of being one of the only 
two honorary members of Louisville Lodge No. 400, 
Free and Accepted Masons; is a Royal Arch Mason, 
being a past high priest; is a Knights Templar, being 
a past eminent commander; a member of the Scottish 
Rite, and of the Order of the Mystic Shrine, and is 
also a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. 

On December 9, 1902, Mr. Loomis was married to 
Miss Carrie Dorsey, of Jeffersonville, Indiana, the 
daughter of Captain J. C. Dorsey, who belonged to the 
prominent Maryland Dorsey family, and who for many 
year.s was superintendent of the Louisville and Jeffer- 
sonville Ferry Company. 

Alvin Tobias Hert. The death of Alvin Tobias Hert 
in June, 1921, was an event recognized as significant by 
practically all the metropolitan newspapers of America 
which carried the news prominently displayed. Alvin 
Tobias Hert was in fact a national character. The re- 
publican party for years had regarded him as one of 
its most influential chieftains. While it was chiefly his 
political prestige that made him a national figure, he 
also stood in the front rank of American business men. 

Mr. Hert was of Kentucky ancestry, though a aative 
of Indiana. He was born at Owensburg, April 8, 1865, 
a son of William and Isabel (Owen) Hert. His father 
was of Virginia stock. From Crab Orchard, Kentucky, 
he moved to Indiana and opened a general store at 
Owensburg. William Hert was a native of Barren 
County, Kentucky. 

Alvin T. Hert acquired a public school education in 
Indiana, attafided the Bloomfield Academy, and while 
still a schoolboy assisted his father in the store. As a 
youth he was ambitious, studious, energetic, faithful in 
performance, constantly reaching out for larger oppor- 
tunities of usefulness. After his early commercial 
training in a store he became Indiana salesman for a 
Louisville shoe house. He had a merchandising busi- 
ness in Brazil, Indiana. His first active connection with 
politics began at Brazil, Indiana, where in 189S he was 
elected and served as mayor of that city. 

At Bedford, Indiana, November 20, 1893, Mr. Hert 
married Miss Sallie Aley. It was a true union of hearts 
and all the interests that affected them mutually, and 



24 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



it is said that Mrs. Hert supplied a modest part of the 
captial with which Mr. Hert established himself as a 
merchant at Brazil, and in all subsequent years he never 
took a business or political step without advising with 
her. 

From 189s until 1902 Mr. Hert was superintendent of 
the Indiana Reformatory at Jefifersonville. The connec- 
tion that placed him among the constructive American 
business men of his age proceeded from his organization 
of the American Creosoting Company in 1904. This 
company opened its first plant at Shirley, Indiana. For 
several years before his death this corporation, of which 
Mr. Hert was president, operated fifteen plants in the 
United States, some of the allied companies being the 
American, Indiana, Shreveport, Colonial, Federal and 
Georgia Creosoting Companies. The company also had 
a supervising interest in a Canadian company. Mr. Hert 
was chairman of the Board of the American Tar Prod- 
ucts Company and was president of the Southern 
Motors Company and director of the American Security 
Company of New York and the National Bank of 
Kentucky. 

While performing the arduous duties of building up 
these industries Mr. Hert was interested in politics, and 
when he reached a stage in his career where he found 
himself with the opportunities to enter personally into 
the larger domain of politics he did so with a vigor 
and equipment that soon brought him a place among the 
leaders. In 1916 he was made republican national com- 
mitteeman from Kentucky, and during the campaign 
of that year was western campaign manager for Charles 
Evans Hughes. In 1920 he was re-.elected national 
committeeman from Kentucky, and was a leader in the 
national convention that year and influential in the 
group of delegates who brought about the nomination 
of Warren G. Harding. He was a member of the 
Republican E.xecutive Committee of five and adviser to 
Will H. Hays in the management of President Harding's 
campaign. After the election he consistently refused 
some of the distinctive honors of politics, declining 
appointment as an ambassador, also as the President's 
representative on the Government Reorganization Com- 
mittee. 

The late Mr. Hert was a Knight Templar Mason, a 
member of the Pendennis Club, Louisville Country 
Club, Chicago Club, Union League Club of Chicago, 
Columbia Club of Indianapolis, and was a member of 
the Episcopal Church. He maintained a modern country 
home known as Hurstbourne, and was interested in the 
practical side of farming. His business offices were in 
the Columbia Building at Louisville. 

William Pratt Dale in his mature career has 
achieved high standing and a large business as a Louis- 
ville lawyer. He is a native of Kentucky, and his an- 
cestry includes several of the state's early and prom- 
inent families. 

He was born on his father's farm in Shelby County 
June 19, 1877, a son of William B. and Lizzie (Pratt) 
Dale. His grandparents, B. H. and Julian Ann (Scearce) 
Dale, were also natives of Kentucky, the former a 
pioneer farmer of the state, actively affiliated with the 
Baptist Church, and a democrat in politics. Of their 
five children William B. was the oldest and was born 
in Shelby County, October 25, 1856. He was engaged 
in farming in his native county until 1889, when he en- 
tered the wholesale wool and hide business at Louis- 
ville as a member of the firm M. Sabel & Sons. He 
was also a democrat and Baptist. Lizzie Pratt, wife of 
William B. Dale, was born at Lexington and died in 
1889, her son William Pratt, the Louisville lawyer, be- 
ing the oldest of three children. The second child died 
in infancy and the youngest is Julian K. Dale, Ph. D., 
a resident of Peoria, Illinois. Lizzie Pratt was a daugh- 
ter of William M. and Mary Ellis (Dillard) Pratt. 
William M. Pratt was born at Fanner, New York, in 



1817, graduated in 1835 from the Hamilton College, 
now Colgate University, and in 1838 came to Kentucky 
and located at Lexington and for years was one of the 
leading ministers of the Baptist Church in that city. 
He was also president of the Board of Trustees of 
Georgetown College. He died in 1897, at the age of 
eighty. His wife, Mary Dillard, was born in Fayette 
County, Kentucky, in 1825 and died in 1907, the mother 
of five children. Mary Dillard was a daughter of Rev. 
R. T. Dillard, who came to Lexington from Virginia 
and served as one of the early superintendents of public 
instruction in Kentucky. Rev. Mr. Dillard married 
the granddaughter of Ambrose Dudley, who also came 
out of Virginia and settled at Lexington during the 
closing years of the eighteenth century. 

William Pratt Dale spent the first twelve years of 
his time on his father's farm in Shelby County, where 
he attended country school. He completed his edu- 
cation in the ward schools of Louisville, graduated 
in 189s from the Boys High School of that city, then 
went east to Princeton University. He received his 
A. B. degree from that university in 1899, and the 
following year graduated with the LL. B. degree from 
the University of Louisville. Since then for two 
decades he has been busily engaged in the general 
practice of his profession at Louisville, where his 
offices are in the Lincoln Building. He is a member 
of the Louisville, Kentucky State and American Bar 
associations, and along with his profession has en- 
deavored to exercise a helpful influence in civic affairs. 
During the World war he was Federal director for 
Kentucky of the United States Employment Service. 
Mr. Dale is a member of the Pendennis Club, the 
Louisville Country Club, the River Valley Club, the 
Chess and Whist Club, and in politics is a democrat. 

On November 7, 1914, he married Elizabeth Bur- 
nett, daughter of Judge Henry Burnett, of Louisville, 
a distinguished Kentuckian whose life is the subject 
of an article on other pages. Mr. and Mrs. Dale 
have one son, William Pratt Dale, Jr., born July 4, 
igig. 

Joseph William Porter, for many years actively 
identified with banking at Lexington, is best known 
because of his public spirited performance and un- 
selfish devotion to a number of causes that essen- 
tially express the general welfare of the community 
and state. The impelling force in his career has been 
a constant regard for the good of institutions and the 
better citizenship of his locality. 

Mr. Porter was born in Nicholas County, Kentucky, 
December 9, 1862, a son of James Harvey and Nan- 
nie Dazey (Neal) Porter. His first American ances- 
ter was Joseph Porter, a native of Londonderry, Ire- 
land. Mr. Porter's great-grandfather was the founder 
of the family in Kentucky. His grandfather, Joseph 
Porter, was a native of Fleming County. James H. 
Porter in 1863 moved to Fayette County, and he de- 
voted the rest of his years to farming and also served 
as a magistrate of the Bell School District, and while 
he gave a good account of himself in this office he 
was not regularly in politics as a seeker for public 
honors. He voted as a democrat. He died at his 
country home at the age of fifty-five and his widow 
survives him at the age of eighty-six. Joseph W. was 
the oldest of three children. His sister Belle is Mrs. 
W. J. Shearer, of Erlanger, and his sister ' Rika is 
Mrs. T. S. Hagan, of Richmond. 

Joseph William Porter attended country schools, 
graduated in 1882 from Transylvania University in the 
Liberal Arts course, and in 1886 received the Master 
of Arts degree. For eleven years he was one of the 
faculty of Hamilton College at Lexington, professor 
of Latin and mathematics. He also conducted the 
Transylvania Printing Company, printers of stationery 
and other supplies. Mr. Porter's active identification 
with the First and City National Bank continued for 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



25 



fourteen years. In 1906 he joined the First National 
Bank, and for seven years was cashier of the consoli- 
dated First and City National Bank, finally resigning 
his post in 1920, but is still a director. For the past 
ten years Mr. Porter has been a curator and chairman 
of the executive committee of Transylvania Univer- 
sity. For one year he was president and three years 
•rcretary of the Board of Commerce. He is prominent 
ill Rotarian circles both in the state and nation, and 
was formerly district governor for the Thirteenth Dis- 
trict, comprising Kentucky and Tennessee and was 
active in organizing rotary clubs over this district. 
Kor five years he was secretary of the Board of Park 
Commissioners. It was during his connection with 
ihe board that a substantial beginning was made of 
I ark development at Lexington, as a result of which 
I he city has its pretentious Woodland Park and two 
small parks. Mr. Porter was president of the Ayles- 
ford Land Company which platted the Aylesford sub- 
division and built many residences contributing to the 
general plan of improving one of the handsome resi- 
dential sections of Lexington. Mr. Porter was also 
active in and for one year president of the Kentucky 
State Development Association. During that time there 
was held at Washington the Conference of Governors 
;hrough invitation by President Roosevelt, and Mr. 
Porter was one of the three Kentucky delegates se- 
lected to attend the conference by Governor A. E. 
Willson. In politics he is a democrat, but with strong 
independent tendencies and is a member of the Chris- 
tian Church. 

\t the age of twenty-nine he married Miss Mary 
Shropshire, and they shared the incidents of life to- 
gether for twenty-seven years, until the death of Mrs. 
Porter in 1919. Her great-grandfather was Abner 
Shropshire, who served as a soldier in the Revolution- 
ary army and was an early settler of Kentucky. Her 
father, Alexander Harcourt Shropshire, was a son of 
James Harvey Shropshire, of Bourbon County. Mr. 
r'cirter has one daughter, Dazey Moore, now Mrs. 
Thomas Bullitt McCoun, of Frankfort. His grand- 
daughter is Josephine Porter McCoun. 

Lee Congleton is the owner of one of the large 
and valuable landed estates of Fayette County, and 
within the comparatively short time since this prop- 
erty came into his possession he has so improved it 
as to make it one of the model places of this famous 
Blue Grass region, even as he has shown remarkable 
progressiveness in his operations as an extensive agri- 
culturist and stock-grower, and has provided the most 
modern accessories and equipment for the furtherance 
of both departments of farm industry. Mr. Congle- 
ton has been associated with business and industrial 
enterprises of broad scope and importance, and his 
ability and the success which he has achieved mark 
liim as one of the most progressive and influential 
figures in connection with civic and industrial affairs 
in Fayette County. In his farm enterprise he was 
ably seconded by his son, Conley, whose individual 
residence was likewise on the fine estate just men- 
tioned. This son died in February, 1921. Claude and 
Ernest, two other sons, are now assisting him on the 
home place. 

Lee Congleton was born in Lee County, Kentucky, 
on the 23d of February, 1871, and is a son of Isaac 
and Delilah (Brendenburg) Congleton. Isaac Congle- 
ton likewise was born in Lee County, to which county 
liis father, Isaac, Sr., had removed from Wolfe County, 
in which latter the family was founded in the pioneer 
days. Isaac Congleton, Jr., finally removed to Estill 
County and established his home on a farm near 
Irvine, the County seat, but later he returned to Lee 
County, where he is still actively associated with farm 
industry. 

Lee Congleton was afforded the advantages of the 
public schools of his native county and was reared 



to the sturdy discipline of the farm, in which connec- 
tion he gained practical knowledge which has been 
of great value to him in his independent operations 
as an agriculturist and stock-grower. His resource- 
fulness and energy were shown early in his career, 
when, while continuing his farm enterprise, he en- 
gaged in rafting timber down the Kentucky River 
from Lee County to Frankfort. In 1896 he purchased 
the general store of his father-in-law, John T. Brewer, 
at Sturgeon, Owsley County, Mr. Brewer having there 
been engaged in business for twenty years. Mr. Con- 
gleton continued this enterprise ten years, and then, 
in 1906, became associated with Thomas and William 
T. Williams, bankers at Irvine, in the buying of 
standing timber. In the buying of this timber land 
Mr. Congleton was the active manager or superin- 
tendent of the business, and in the cutting of the 
timber and manufacturing of the same the firm em- 
ployed a force of more than 100 men. Under the 
direction of Mr. Congleton five mills were operated 
by his firm, including two mills devoted to the manu- 
facturing of staves for beer barrels. Operations were 
successfully continued four years under the original 
partnership alliance, and Mr. Congleton then acquired 
the interests of his associates and expanded the scope 
of operations by manufacturing staves for oil barrels 
as well as those for beer. The enterprise involved 
operations in a number of Kentucky counties, includ- 
ing Lee, Jackson, Laurel, Clay, Estill and Wolfe. In 
the manufacturing of staves Mr. Congleton utilized 
a large amount of white oak timber, and much stump- 
age of this type was made available. Two of his 
sons eventually became associated with him in the 
substantial and prosperous industrial enterprise, which 
is still continued on a large scale. At one time the 
enterprise of which Mr. Congleton was thus the 
executive head represented the largest production of 
beer barrel staves in the entire United States, the 
l>roducts being sold to coopers in carload lots. The 
business is now conducted under the firm name of 
I-ec Congleton & Sons, and the year 1920 recorded the 
production by the firm of 1,500,000 staves for oil 
barrels. 

In 1916 Mr. Congleton leased a large tract of coal 
land in Perry County, and in connection with the min- 
ing enterprise thus instituted he constructed a rail- 
road extension to connect with the L. & N. Railroad, 
this line being sold, after successful operation, to the 
railroad coinpany, and constituting an important 
division. 

In 1918 Mr. Congleton purchased 1,000 acres of 
fine Blue Grass land in Fayette County, the tract being 
divided into three farms, and for this property he 
paid at the average rate of $200 an acre. With charac- 
teristic vigor and progressiveness he at once insti- 
tuted the improvement of the property, on which he 
has erected four large barns of the best modern type, 
and also four silos of large capacity. In 1920 he 
completed the erection of the fine modern house which 
he now occupies, besides erecting three large tobacco 
barns. On the estate Mr. Congleton feeds an average 
of TQi head of cattle, and he still continues his active 
association with the Elk Stave Lumber Company at 
Rig Creek, Clay County, the business being in charge 
of his eldest son, Claude. In the midst of his varied 
and exacting business affairs Mr. Congleton has shown 
in his civic loyalty the same liberality and progressive- 
ness, and while he has had no desire to enter the 
arena of practical politics he has given a staunch 
allegiance to the democratic party. 

Mr. Congleton was twenty years of age at the time 
of his marriage to Miss Mary F. Brewer, daughter 
of John T. Brewer, of Owsley County, and they be- 
came the parents of thirteen children, Claude, Conley 
("deceased), Ernest, Horace (deceased), Walter, Isaac, 
Joe, Clinton, Ralph, Martha (deceased), Eva, Ruth 
and Frances Lee. Three of the sons, Claude, Ernest 



26 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



and Walter, were in the nation's military service in 
connection with the late World war, and Ernest was 
with his command in France at the time when the war 
came to a close. Claude and Ernest are actively asso- 
ciated with their father in the management of the 
splendid farm estate in Fayette County. 

Capt. Brinton B. Davis for the past eighteen years 
a resident of Louisville, is an architect whose repu- 
tation and work are known throughout Kentucky and 
several adjoining states. Architecture was the work 
that elicited his chief enthusiasm as a boy, he took 
it up with earnestness as a student and apprentice, 
and through it has satisfied his ambition for con- 
struction achievement. 

Captain Davis, who is held in high esteem in a 
number of civic organizations at Louisville, was born 
at Natchez, Mississippi, January 23, 1862, a son of 
Jacob B. and Mary (Gamble) Davis. His father was 
born in Westchester County, New York, in 1828, and 
died in 1874, vvhile his mother was born in 1841, 
in Dublin, Ireland, of Scotch parentage, and died 
in 1912. Captain Davis grew up in his native city, 
where he attended the public schools, also Eustice 
Academy, a noted educational institution, but served 
his architectural apprenticeship in New York City. 
Subsequently he was associated with some of the 
leading architectural firms of Chicago and St. Louis, 
and began his real career at Paducah, Kentucky. 
While there he organized and became captain of a 
company which was a part of the Third Kentucky 
National Guard, and in 1898 went with the regiment 
when it was mustered into the United States service 
for the Spanish-American war. He was with his 
company in several training camps of the United States 
and participated in the Cuban campaign for four 
months. The war over, he returned to Paducah and 
resumed business, but in 1903 rernoved to Louisville. 
As an architect Captain Davis has planned and super- 
vised the construction of many large and costly pub- 
lic and private buildings in Louisville, Paducah, Bow- 
ling Green and in many towns and cities throughout 
the state, in Illinois, Tennessee, Georgia, Mississippi 
and elsewhere. He is a Fellow of the American 
Institute of Architects. He is a life member of the 
Louisville Board of Trade, past president of the 
Louisville Commercial Club and while president (1912- 
13) was responsible for the change in the school law 
governing the public schools. He is also past presi- 
dent of the Kentucky Chapter, American Institute of 
Architects, is president of the Louisville Convention 
and Publicity League, also director of the Pendennis 
Club. During the past twenty years he has contributed 
numerous articles to architectural journals. 

Captain Davis is a prominent Mason, being a past 
master of Plain City Lodge No. 449, F. & A. M., at 
Paducah ; past high priest of Paducah Chapter, R. A. 
M.; past eminent commander of Paducah Comman- 
dery, Knights Templar, but is now a member of 
DeMolay Commandery No. 12, K. T., at Louisville. 
He is also a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason 
and a member of the Grand Consistory and belongs 
to Kosair Temple of the Mystic Shrine. Politically 
he is a democrat. 

On February 23, 1889, Captain Davis married Miss 
Clara Gwin Benbrook. They have two daughters, 
Gladys, a student in the Sargent School at Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, and Mildred, attending the Louisville 
High School. 

Richard H. Menefee is a well-known Louisville 
business man, formerly a merchandise and grain 
broker, but now identified with one of the chief gen- 
eral insurance agencies in the city. 

Mr. Menefee is a native of Louisville, born Decem- 
ber 3, 1877, a son of Richard Jouett and Elizabeth 
Williamson (Speed) Menefee. His father, who was 



born in Lexington, Kentucky, July 25, 1836, was four 
years of age when his father died, and he acquired 
only a limited education in the Louisville schools. 
At the age of fourteen he accompanied his widowed 
mother to Chicago, and there went to work in the 
crockery and glassware department of H. G. Hurley 
& Company. This company was one of the oldest 
of their kind in the Middle West, and he continued in 
(heir service for several years. Later, at Cincinnati, 
Ohio, he engaged in the commission business with 
tlie firm of McFerran & Menefee. About two years 
later the Civil war broke out and he was appointed 
paymaster in the United Sta-tes army. Following the 
war he returned to Louisville and spent his last days 
retired. He died in July, 1893. His wife was born 
in Louisville, March 11, 1847, and died in 1917. Five 
of their six children are still living, Richard H. being 
the second in age. 

Richard H. Menefee was educated in the Male High 
School at Louisville, graduating in 1896. For about 
two years he was employed as clearing house clerk 
by the Citizens National Bank. In April, 1898, he 
volunteered in the First Kentucky Regiment of In- 
fantry for service in the Spanish-American war. He 
was sergeant major, later first lieutenant, then bat- 
talion adjutant at Chickamauga Park, accompanied his 
command from Newport News to Porto Rico, was on 
that island from August I to August 15th, on garri- 
son duty, and was also aide de camp on Gen. Guy 
V. Henry's staff. Mr. Menefee was mustered out in 
July, 1899, and then returned to Louisville. In Janu- 
ary, 1903, he entered the merchandise brokerage busi- 
ness as R. H. Menefee & Company. In 1909, with 
the same firm title, he engaged in the grain elevator 
and warehouse business, but retired from that in 
January, 1916, and became associated with J. S. Gray 
& Sons in the general insurance business, with offices 
in the Columbia Building. 

Mr. Menefee is a member of Fall City Lodge No. 
376, F. and A. M., belongs to the River Valley Club 
and in politics is a republican. On April 21, 1910, 
he married Edith Norton, a native of Louisville and 
daughter of George C. and Jessie (Swope) Norton. 
Her father was born in Georgia and her mother in 
Kentucky, and Mrs. Menefee is the second of five 
children. The two children of Mr. and Mrs. Menefee 
are Sarah Jouett and George Norton. 

William H. Harris was born at Lancaster in Gar- 
rard County, Kentucky, October 18, 1867, a member 
of an old Kentucky family. His father, Elijah W., 
and his grandfather, Elimiel, were both born in the 
same county. Elijah Harris was for many years a 
merchant at Lancaster, and for the past eight years 
has been police judge. The mother of William H. 
Harris was' Catherine Adams, of Garrard County. 

William H. Harris lived in his home county, ac- 
quired a common school education, and at the age of 
seventeen entered a railroad office to learn telegraphy. 
He became an employe of the Louisville & Nashville 
in 1887, and has had a succession of increasing re- 
sponsibilities. For nearly eighteen years he was freight 
agent for the company at Carlisle, Kentucky. For a 
decade he was freight agent at Paris, and since Feb- 
ruary, 1916, has been freight agent at Lexington, 
where he has the management of all the traffic in the 
yards and the local offices, with about fifty-five em- 
ployes. Mr. Harris has given his time and strength 
unreservedly to his duties as a railroad man. He is 
a republican voter, he and his wife are members of 
the Presbyterian Church, and she takes much part in 
church societies. Mr. Harris is a Knight Templar 
Mason, is a past master of Paris Lodge No. 2, and has 
sat in the Grand Lodge and attended Knight Templar 
Conclaves. Every vacation for a number of years 
he and a party of old friends from Paris have taken 
their outings on Georgian Bay in Canada. At the age 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



27 



of twenty-six Mr. Harris married Anna Scudder, of 
Carlisle, Kentucky. 

Perry B. Miller was United States attorney for 
the Western District of Kentucky from July, 1914, to 
September, 1919, with his official headquarters at Louis- 
ville. Upon his resignation he established offices in 
the Marion E. Taylor Building in Louisville. 

Mr. Miller was born in Logan County, February 15, 
1867, a son of William Henry and Sarah Elizabeth 
(Price) Miller. His father was born in Logan County, 
and was long a man of prominence in Western Ken- 
tucky. His mother died in 1881 and his father died 
in 191 1. They left four children surviving: John 
W., J. J. and Irene, Perry B. being the youngest. All 
the children are now living. 

Perry B. Miller graduated from Bethel College at 
Russellville in 1886, taught school awhile and took up , 
the study of law and was admitted to the bar in 1889. 
He began practice at Morganfield and handled a large 
and important clientage as an individual until 191 1. 
In that year he formed a partnership with Henry D. 
Allen, under the name of Allen & Miller, which con- 
tinued until his appointment as United States attor- 
ney. During those years the law practically absorbed 
all his time and energies and fully satisfied his ambi- 
tion. He was interested in politics chiefly for the 
sake of his friends. Early in his career as a lawyer 
he became an intimate friend of Senator Ollie M. 
James. They began practice in Western Kentucky 
about the same time and handled many important 
cases either as associates or on opposite sides. Dur- 
ing this professional and personal association Mr. 
Miller discovered many of the qualities of heart and 
mind and statesmanship of Mr. James, later recognized 
by the entire nation. Senator James in turn evidently 
had a high admiration of the ability of Mr. Miller 
as a lawyer, since without the knowledge or solici- 
tation ' of Mr. Miller he recommended his appoint- 
ment to the president as United States attorney for 
the Western District of Kentucky. That appointment 
was made and confirmed by President Wilson, and he 
entered upon his official duties July I, 1914. 

Mr. Miller was city attorney of Morganfield from 
1894 until 1896, was mayor from 1896 to 1900, and in 
1912 was a delegate to the Democratic National Con- 
vention at Baltimore. He resigned his post as United 
States attorney in September, 1919, and has since en- 
joyed an extensive private practice at Louisville in 
the Federal and State courts. 

He served as a trustee of Bethel College from 1904 
to 1908, and was a member of the Educational Board 
of the Morganfield High School from 1908 to 1915. 
He is a member of the Baptist Church and is a past 
master of Morganfield Lodge No. 66, F. & A. M., 
and a" member of the Royal Arch Chapter and the 
thirty-second degree of Scottish Rite. 

On April 29, 1891, Mr. Miller married Camille R. 
Waggener, daughter of John M. and Sallie (Hughes) 
Waggener. Her parents were both natives of Ken- 
tucky. Her father died in January, 1917, at the age 
of seventy-seven, and her mother is still living. Mrs. 
Miller is the second of four children. Her father 
was for eighteen years county clerk of Union County 
and for twenty-five years cashier of the Bank of 
Union County. Mr. and Mrs. Miller have two chil- 
dren : the daughter, Mary Willis, graduated from Ox- 
ford College for Women in Ohio in 1911, and is 
the wife of Arthur F. Shuey, a graduate of the Bos- 
ton ScTiool of Technology and of Harvard University, 
and they now live at New Orleans. They have two 
sons, John Miller Shuey and Henry Miller Shuey. 
Henry Miller graduated from Center College in 1915, 
and was a soldier throughout the period of the World 
war. He is now in the real estate business in Louis- 
ville. 



Col. Richard Menefee Redd, proprietor of "Eothen" 
farm, two miles north of Lexington, on the George- 
town Pike, is a cultured Kentyckian, and well known 
over the Blue Grass region as a former Confederate 
soldier, a successful planter and farmer, and a splen- 
did representative of the sturdy and virile race of 
Redds who came to Kentucky almost at the beginning 
of its history. 

The Redds are a Virginia family. Samuel B. Redd 
was born at Hanover, Virginia, January 4, 1779, and 
came to Kentucky at the beginning of the nineteenth 
century, settling at Lexington, in which city he died 
January 30, 1857. He married Dorothy Bulloch, who 
was born in 1783, and died about 1815. His second 
wife, Sarah Rodes, died in 1859, leaving no children. 
By the first marriage he had two sons. Waller Bul- 
loch and Thomas S. Thomas S. Redd became an 
attorney, and practiced law in Texas, where he died. 
He had one daughter and two sons, Maj. Thomas S. 
and John, both of whom were Confederate soldiers, 
and John lost his life while in the army. 

Waller Bulloch Redd was born September 16, 1806, 
and died in 1844. He was a graduate of Transylvania 
University and practiced law at Lexington. In 1831 
he married Rebecca Allen, whose family owned what is 
now "Eothen" farm, on which stands one of the 
oldest residences in the county. The Allen family, 
including Mrs. Redd, removed to Lafayette County, 
Missouri, in 1857, and later Eothen farm came into 
possession of the Redd family. 

Samuel Bulloch Redd, oldest child of Waller Bul- 
loch Redd, was born in 1833 and died in 191 1. He 
never married. He served as a sergeant major in 
the First Missouri Cavalry, under Gen. Joe Shelby, 
was all through the war, and afterward became a 
rancher in Texas. He died in Kentucky in 1911. He 
is remembered as a noted fox hunter, and usually 
kept a pack of hounds for the chase. William Allen 
Redd, who was born in 1835 and died in 1916, was 
in the same regiment with his brother, held the rank 
of captain, was twice captured, was confined at Camp 
Douglas, Chicago, and afterward returned to Missouri, 
where he married and where he lived until his death. 

The third child, Thomas James Redd, was born in 
1836 and died in 1848. The next in age was the late 
Oliver Frazer Redd, whose career is more particularly 
noted in this article. His younger brother is Col. 
Richard Menefee Redd. The youngest of the family, 
Waller Bulloch Redd, died in infancy. 

Oliver Frazer Redd was born November 13, 1838, 
and died February 19, 1916. He was also a captain 
in the Confederate army on Joe Shelby's staff, was 
twice wounded and had three horses shot under him. 
At the close of the war he went to Mexico with 
General Shelby, but subsequently returned to Ken- 
tucky. Col. Richard Menefee Redd had served in the 
same regiment with his brothers and came out of the 
war on crutches. All the family returned to Ken- 
tucky after the war except William Redd. Oliver 
Frazer Redd married Miss Margaret Warren, of Mis- 
souri. By their union they had three children. Re- 
becca Allen died in 1920, wife of Dr. Claud Trapp, 
of Lexington. Mrs. Trapp is survived by three chil- 
dren, Catherine, wife of Capt. Alden Waite ; Francis, 
a civil engineer at Lexington ; and Marie, wife of 
William Brooks. Lee Warren Redd was married in 
1897 to Edward J. Nally, the distinguished telegraph 
official who is president of the Radio Corporation of 
America. Mr. and Mrs. Nally have two children, 
Mary Lee, wife of Lieut. Frederick H. Hahn, of New 
York City ; and Julian, a college student. Margaret 
Allen Redd became the wife of Thomas B. Warren 
and is survived by one son, Oliver Warren, now of 
Los Angeles, and they had two children, Fanny Frazer 
born in 1882, and Oliver Frazer, born in i88n. 

Oliver Frazer Redd's second wife was Kate Frazer. 



36 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



Oliver Frazer, father of Mrs. Kate Redd was a dis- 
tinguished portrait artist who lived for many years at 
Lexington. He studied, under Jewett, spent much time 
abroad in the art centers of Europe, was a co-wsrker 
with the noted Healy for four years at Florence, Italy, 
and afterward continued his profession at Lexington, and 
some of his' most noted work is preserved at the 
family home in Fayette County. Oliver Frazer mar- 
ried Martha Mitchell, daughter of Dr. Alexander 
Mitchell, of Franklin. Oliver Frazer died in 1864, 
at the age of fifty-six, and his widow died at the age 
of eighty-seven. They reared four children : Bessie, 
who also was an artist of much ability and died at the 
age of seventy-five; Fanny; Kate, widow of O. F. 
Redd, the only survivor of her father's family; and 
Nanny. 

Ruth Menefee Redd, a daughter of the late Oliver 
Frazer Redd, exemplifies many of the literary and 
artistic interests of her family. She is a violinist, 
is a leader in musical activities, and is active in 
church and Sunday School work at Belmont Chapel, 
being superintendent of the Sunday School. She gave 
practically her entire time to Red Cross work during 
the World war, and her life has been a continuous 
devotion to the welfare of her community, where she 
is justly popular. 

Col. Richard Menefee Redd for many years held 
the office of county assessor. He has been one of the 
prominent members of the Belmont Chapel, and he 
and his late brother were both active in politics. For 
many years they carried on an extensive business 
as dealers in cattle and exporters of live stock. Colonel 
Redd is adjutant of the J. C. Breckenridge Camp of 
the United Confederate Veterans. 

Marvel Mills Logan, whose name is familiarly 
associated with prominent Kentuckians as former at- 
torney general of the state and former chairman of the 
Kentucky State Ta.x Commission, has been a lawyer 
for a quarter of a century, and since retiring from pub- 
lic office has been busied with many legal and business 
interests at Louisville, in which city he resides. 

Mr. Logan was born at Brownsville, Edmonson 
County, Kentucky, on his father's farm, January 7, 
1874. He is a great-grandnephew of Gen. Benjamin 
Logan, one of the conspicuous pioneer characters of 
Kentucky. His parents were Gillis Franklin and 
Georgiana (Houchin) Logan. His father was born 
in Hardin County. Kentucky, in 1832 and died in 
1915, and his mother was born in Edmonson County 
in 1849 and died in 191 1. They were the parents 
of seven sons and three daughters, Marvel M. being 
the third child, and all but one of the children are 
still living. The father spent his active life as a 
farmer. He was educated in private schools and was 
always very fond of books and literature, never cared 
for public office, was a Baptist and voted as a demo- 
crat until i8q9 and after that as an indeoendent. 

Marvel Mills Logan was educated in public and pri- 
vate schools, and studied law with Senator J. S. Lay 
and A. A. Sturgeon at Brownsville. He was admitted 
to the bar in 1896, and engaged in practice at Browns- 
ville from that year until 1912. In the meantime his 
abilities as a lawyer had commanded wider attention 
than in a local practice, and in 1912 he was called 
to the staff of the attorney general of Kentucky as 
first assistant. He held that post under Attorney 
General James Garnett until 1916. In 1917 he was 
elected attorney general as Mr. Garnett's successor, 
but resigned early in his term, on June I, 1917, to 
accept the appointment as chairman of the Kentucky 
State Tax Commission. This office he also resigned, 
on December i, 1918, and has since been busily en- 
gaged in practice at Louisville. He was associated 
with Eli H. Brown under the name Brown & Logan 
until October i, 1920, and since then has been a 



member of the firm Logan & Myatt, his partner being 
D. O. Myatt. 

Mr. Logan is vice president of the Kentucky Rock 
Asphalt Company and president of the Green River 
Oil and Mineral Company, and his law firm repre- 
sents both these corporations and also the Vinson- 
Kolb Company and other important interests. Mr. 
Logan is a member of the Kentucky State Bar Asso- 
ciation, belongs to the Pendennis Club at Louisville, 
is a member of the Baptist Church and is a past state 
grand master of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and present grand representative to the Grand 
Lodge. He retains his Masonic affiliation with the 
lodge at Brownsville, is a member of the Royal Arch 
Chapter and Knights Templar Commandery at Frank- 
fort, and also belongs to Frankfort Lodge No. 530 
of the Elks. 

On September 25, 1896, he married Miss Delia Hay- 
don, of Glasgow Junction, Kentucky. She was born 
in Edmonson County, youngest and only surviving 
child of Wiley J. and Amanda (Hume) Haydon, both 
of whom are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Logan 
have four children : Victor H., Agnes, Leland and 
Ralph Hunter. 

William Richakdson Belknap, who died June i, 
1914, was for many years president of the Belknap 
Hardware and Manufacturing Company of Louisville, 
one of the largest concerns of its kind in the coun- 
try. It is a business founded by his father, William 
B. Belknap, and the family name has been promi- 
nently associated with the commercial and civic life 
of Louisville for eighty years. 

The American history of the family goes back to 
the early years of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, when 
a Belknap came from Liverpool and settled at Lynn, 
Massachusetts, and later at historic Salem, where he 
died in 1643. His son, Abraham Belknap, became a 
member of the Haverhill Colony in November, 1677. 
Among his four sons was Samuel Belknap, who mar- 
ried an aunt of Robert Morris, a signer of the Dec- 
laration of Independence. The next generation of the 
family was represented by Joseph Belknap, whose son 
William was born at Haverhill, Massachusetts, about 
1740. His son, Morris Burke Belknap, was born in 
Massachusetts, June 25, 1780, and died in Livingston 
County, Kentucky, July 26, 1837. He married Phoebe 
Locke Thompson, who died in Arkansas, February 5, 
1873. Morris B. Belknap left the old home in Massa- 
chusetts in 1807 and first located at Marietta, Ohio, 
where he was a pioneer in the development of the 
iron industry west of the Alleghenies. In 1816 he 
moved to Pittsburgh, and was influential in promoting 
some of the first rolling mills in that city. In 1827 
he prospected the ore fields of the Cumberland and 
Tennessee rivers, traveling on horseback, and later 
organized the capital for the building of iron furnaces 
in Stewart County, Tennessee, and at Nashville. 

His son, William Burke Belknap, founder of the 
business known as the Belknap Hardware and Manu- 
facturing Company, was born at Brimfield, Massachu-" 
setts, May 17, 181 1, and was educated at Pittsburgh. 
At the age of sixteen his father delegated him the 
the responsibility of transporting the household goods 
from Pittsburgh to Tennessee and the duty of 
securing new machinery for the iron furnace in the 
West. He embarked the property on a flatboat, which 
had to be unloaded at Louisville and portaged around 
the falls. He was associated with his father for sev- 
eral years in the iron business, and at the age of 
nineteen began his independent career at Hickman, 
Fulton County, Kentucky, as a general merchant. 
With other associates he developed a business which 
became well known along the Lower Mississippi, and 
continued to prosper until the panic of 1837. 

In 18-IO William B. Belknap re-established himself 
at Louisville as agent for a firm of Pittsburgh manu- 







/V/^?Z5W. 



«-M^ 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



29 



facturers of nails and boiler plate. In 1847 he and 
Capt. Thomas C. Coleman bought a rolling mill and 
began the manufacture of bar iron, an industry with 
which he continued to be identified for many years. 
He had also organized W. B. Belknap & Company as 
dealers in iron and heavy hardware, his business part- 
ner for several years being his brother Morris Locke 
Belknap. Later he acquired full control of the busi- 
ness and incorporated it as the Belknap Hardware & 
Manufacturing Company. This corporation as whole- 
salers represented some of the largest manufacturers 
of standard hardware and metal equipment in the 
United States, and the company also entered the 
field of manufacturing and was interested in a num- 
ber of manufacturing industries. It would be diffi- 
cult to name one of the great commercial enterprises 
centered at Louisville that did more to give the city 
its prestige as a commercial metropolis. William B. 
Belknap was also at one time president of the South- 
ern Bank of Louisville. He died February 24, 1889, at 
the age of seventy-eight. He was a Unitarian in re- 
ligious faith. 

William B. Belknap married in 1843 Mary Rich- 
ardson, who was born in Lexington, June 11, 1821, 
and survived her. honored husband many years. Her 
father, William Richardson, was a prominent Louis- 
ville banker, for many years president of the Northern 
Bank of Kentucky. One of their sons was the late 
Col. Morris B. Belknap, who was born in 1856 and 
died in 1910. He was for many years vice president 
of the Belknap Hardware & Manufacturing Company 
and did much to promote and develop the business 
at home and abroad. As a youth he joined the Ken- 
tucky National Guard, and served as lieutenant colonel 
and as colonel of the First Kentucky Volunteer In- 
fantry in the Spanish-American war, participating in 
the Porto Rico campaign. In 1903 he was the re- 
publican candidate for governor of Kentucky. He 
married Lily Buckner, only daughter of Gen. Simon 
B. Buckner, one of Kentucky's famous governors. 

William Richardson Belknap was born at Louisville, 
March 28, 1849, and was only sixty-five j'ears of age 
at the time of his death. He was educated in public 
and private schools. One of his early instructors was 
the noted Kentucky divine. Rev. Stewart Robinson. 
He graduated in 1866 from the Male High School, and 
in 1869 received the Bachelor of Science degree from 
Sheffield Scientific School of Yale University. He 
remained at Yale a year in post-graduate study, and 
then returned to Louisville to join his father's busi- 
ness, W. B. Belknap Sz: Company. In 1880 the Belknap 
Hardware & Manufacturing Company was incorpo- 
rated, at which time he became vice president and 
in 1882 became president. He served as president 
of this great corporation and guided its affairs with 
particular attention and ability for twenty-eight years. 
In May, 1910, he resigned and accepted the post of 
chairman of the board. 

He is also remembered as one of Louisville's gen- 
erous and public spirited citizens. He served as vice 
president of the Associated Charities of Louisville, 
was vice president of the Kentucky Humane Society, 
jiresident of the Commercial Club and honorary life 
member of the Commercial Club, and was a trustee 
of Berea College. He had much to do with building 
up the Louisville Young Men's Christian Association. 
He was a charter member and for twenty years secre- 
tary of the Salamagundi Club, and was a ruling mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Church. 

On December 2, 1874, Mr. Belknap married Alice 
Trumbull Silliman, whose father was the distinguished 
Yale professor, Benjamin Silliman. She died in 1890. 
In February. 1894, he married Juliet Rathbond Davi- 
son, daughter of Charles G. and Emily Andrews 
Davison. Mr. Belknap's children, all by his first mar- 
riage, were five in number: Eleanor, who became the 
wife of Lewis C. Humphrey; Alice S., who married 



Dr. Forbes Hawkes ; Mary, wife of George H. Gray, 
an architect ; William B. ; and Christine, who married 
C. B. Onnycastle. 

William B. Belknap, professor of economics of the 
University of Louisville, bears a name that for sev- 
eral generations has been prominently associated with 
the commercial history of Louisville, though his own 
life has been devoted largely to scholarship and the 
broad service open to the educator and man of letters. 

He was born at Louisville, April 18, 1885, son of 
the late William R. Belknap. As a boy he attended 
the Louisville public schools, including the Manual 
Training High School, and completed his higher educa- 
tion both in Harvard and Yale University. He held 
the John Harvard Fellowship at Harvard, and his 
work in economics won him the Ricardo prize scholar- 
ship at the same university. He also took special work 
in economics at the University of Chicago. 

Mr. Belknap is a member of the American Econo- 
mists Association, the Yale College Club, New York 
Club, Harvard Club of Boston, the Pendennis Club 
and Louisville Country Club, Louisville Boat Club, 
and is a member of the Zeta Psi fraternity of Yale 
and of the Phi Beta Kappa. He is a trustee of 
Berea College, an honor and responsibility delegated to 
him after the death of his father. He is a member 
of the Presbyterian Church, and is affiliated with Fall 
City Lodge No. 376, F. & A. M. 

During the World war Mr. Belknap was a captain in 
the American Red Cross and had overseas duty from 
April to December, 1918. He then resumed his duties 
as professor of economics at the University of Louis- 
ville. Mr. Belknap also owns and supervises the opera- 
tions of a large farm of 750 acres in Oldham County. 

Charles Crooks Patrick. The Patrick family came 
to Fayette County, Kentucky, at the very beginning 
of the nineteenth century. There have been three 
successive generations of capable farmers and good 
citizens, and Charles Crooks Patrick represents the 
third. He is one of the largest land owners in the 
Blue Grass region around Lexington, and has been 
active as a live stock breeder, a tobacco grower and 
an energetic factor in a number of enterprises affect- 
ing the welfare of the community at large. Mr. Pat- 
rick lives four miles west of Lexington, on the old 
Frankfort Pike. 

His grandfather, Charles Patrick, came from Albe- 
marle County, Virginia, to Kentucky with his family 
about 1801, settling in Fayette County and buying land 
at $10 an acre. His place of settlement was near old 
Bethel Presbyterian Church, eight miles north and 
west of Lexington. He had visited Kentucky in 1798, 
spending some time at Lexington and Crab Orchard. 
Crab Orchard was then a central point for the meet- 
ing of prospectors preparatory to returning over the 
mountains. Such parties usually effected an organiza- 
tion sufficient to ward off danger of Indian attack. 
Charles Patrick arrived just too late to meet one such 
party, and it was waylaid by Indians and several of 
its members killed. Charles Patrick improved a good 
farm and was a planter and slave owner. He married 
a Miss Black, who died about a year before him. He 
passed away in 1852. Their children to grow to ma- 
ture years were : George Moffatt, who moved to Texas 
and his only son was killed ; Mrs. Mary Graves, who 
also moved to Texas ; Samuel and John, who went 
to Illinois ; William, who died at Lexington in old 
age ; James, who was the father of Charles Crooks 
Patrick; Benjamin, a graduate in law who died in 
young manhood ; Mrs. Dorcas Benton, who removed 
to Missouri ; Priscilla, who became the wife of Ben 
Crenshaw and lived and died near the old home ; 
Charles Christian, whose home was with his brother 
James and who died unmarried. 

James Patrick was born in 1820, and after leaving 



30 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



the old home place he bought land at Elkchester 
and in 1868 acquired the Steele farm. He continued 
buying until he had 600 acres in a body, and carried 
on farm operations on a large scale. He had served 
as a director of the Lexington City Bank, now the 
City Bank of Lexington. In politics he was a whig, 
a Know Nothing and a republican. He supported the 
Bell and Everett ticket in i860 and subsequently be- 
came a warm admirer of Lincoln and a stanch re- 
publican. He was a Home Guard during the Civil 
war. He was one of the Kentucky abolitionists, al- 
ways had the courage to speak his opinions, and was 
a man of high standing in the community. He served 
as an elder in the Christian Church. James Patrick 
died in 1900, at the age of eighty years. He was 
born March 17, 1S20. His wife was Fanny Crooks, 
who was born June 17, 1820, and survived her hus- 
band fifteen years, passing away in May, 1915, at the 
age of ninety-five, and retaining her mental faculties 
almost to the end. She was reared a Presbyterian 
and never changed her faith. She was born at Sharps- 
burg, Bath County, Kentucky, but before her mar- 
riage had lived with her brother William near Bethel 
Church, Kentucky. Jarries Patrick and wife had four 
children. The daughter, Margaret D., is Mrs. Wil- 
liam Steele, of Woodford County. Dinsmore is the 
widow of John Steele, who was killed in a railroad 
accident about twenty-four years ago, and she lives 
on a farm adjoining that of her brother Charles C. 

Charles Crooks Patrick was born at Elkchester, July 
7, 1861, and spent his boyhood on the old farm. At 
the age of twenty he took charge of his father's 
place, and still keeps the old homestead practically in- 
tact so far as area is concerned. In 1902 he bought 
his present place, about two miles from the old farm. 
There are 670 acres, and altogether his ownership 
extends to about 1,600 acres. His present home was 
erected by Hugh Asher, of Bell County, in 1900. Mr. 
Patrick in former years was a breeder of thorough- 
bred horses on a small scale and bred some fine 
trotting horses. The famous Prince Hermis, a great 
winner on the track, was sold from his farm as a 
yearling. On the whole his operations have been 
divided among the interests of general tarming, and he 
has grown grain, tobacco, sheep and cattle. An active 
associate with him in his farming enterprise is his 
nephew, James Patrick, a stepson of William Steele. 
James Patriclc was left $4,000 by James Patrice, Sr., 
and grew up in the Patrick home. 

Mr. Patrick is a director of the Union Bank. He 
helped organize the old Burley Tobacco Company, a 
holding company, and was a director and member of 
the executive committee. He also organized the Bur- 
ley Tobacco Company of Lexington, which took over 
the local interests of the old company. This is a 
warehouse company, storing tobacco and doing a 
strictly commission and storage business. Mr. Patrick 
is manager of the warehouse, which has the largest 
capacity of any in the world. The capacity is such 
as to enable 4,200 baskets of tobacco to be exposed 
for sale at once. The company has 500 stockholders, 
all tobacco growers. During 1920 the buildings were 
enlarged so as to double the former capacity, and the 
company has about sixty employes during the season. 
Mr. Patrick has about ninety acres in tobacco on his 
own land, this being cultivated by tenants. 

Mr. Patrick was elected and served two terms in 
the State Legislature. He has never sought political 
honors, and after two terms declined a renomination. 
He was nominated as a republican, did not spend a 
dollar nor ask a single man for his vote, and was 
elected in a democratic county. His party was in the 
minority in the Legislature, but he did some effective 
work in committees. Mr. Patrick and wife are mem- 
bers of the New Union Christian Church. He has 
always been a lover of outdoor life and the sport of 



hunting, and some years ago, when he owned 400 acres 
in Oklahoma, he made many excursions to that state. 

At the age of thirty Mr. Patrick married Miss 
Caroline Wolcott Moore, of Fayette County, who was 
twenty years of age at the time of her marriage. Her 
father, W. R. Moore, is a retired citizen of Lexing- 
ton. Mr. and Mrs. Patrick have two children : Dins- 
more, wife of William Conant, living at the Patrick 
farm. Mr. and Mrs. Conant have one child, Mary 
Wolcott. The only son is Charles Crooks, Jr., at home. 

James S. Ciienoweth, M. D. The name Chenoweth 
has been an honored one in medical circles in Jeffer- 
son County and Louisville for half a century or more. 
During thirty years of that time Dr. James S. Cheno- 
weth has been burdened with unusually heavy duties 
and responsibilities as a physician and surgeon, and 
at the same time has done much work in behalf of 
medical education and advancement of medical 
standards. 

His father was Dr. Henry Chenoweth, who be- 
longed to one of the earliest families to settle around 
Louisville. His life was a continuous devotion to 
his profession from early manhood until his closing 
years. Dr. James S. Chenoweth was born in Jefferson 
County, November 6, 1867, and as a youth made a 
definite cho'ice of the profession of medicine for a 
career. He was educated in Rugby School of Louis- 
vilje and in 1889 received his medical degree from 
the University of Louisville. He followed that with 
further study in New York City and in Europe, and 
began his professional career in 1890. Recently he 
completed thirty years of continuous practice and 
service as a physician and surgeon in his home city. 
Doctor Chenoweth was for six years demonstrator of 
surgery at the University of Louisville, acted as visit- 
ing and consulting surgeon in the Louisville City Hos- 
pital, as surgeon to the Deaconess Hospital, and is one 
of the twelve men in his profession, with special inter- 
est and proficiency in surgery, who comprise the old 
Louisville Surgical Society, a society limited to a 
membership of twelve. Doctor Chenoweth is a mem- 
ber of the Jefferson County, Kentucky State and 
American Medical associations, and is also identified 
with several popular social organizations, including the 
Pendennis, Country and Salmagundi clubs. 

Doctor Chenoweth married Mary Creel. Her father 
was Buckner M. Creel, of Louisville. They have two 
daughters, Nancy Creel and Helen Bullitt. The lat- 
ter is still in school. Nancy is the wife of Alexander 
Heyburn, and has one daughter, Margaret L. 

Isaac Wolfe Bernheim. The acknowledged pres- 
tige of Americans in almost every branch of human 
achievement is largely due to the spirit of advance- 
ment which urges them onward and upward. The 
possession of this ambition to gain imposing pre-emi- 
nence is shared by all who attain to positions of promi- 
nence. The humblest laborer may develop into a man 
of high standing, provided he possesses the ability to 
forge ahead. Many a life has been reconstructed from 
small beginnings, for few of the really able men of the 
country have been born with the proverbial "golden 
spoon" in their mouths. To reach the heights a goad 
of necessity is required, and it was this goad which, 
entering into the life of Isaac Wolfe Bernheim when 
he was a young man, imbued him with the ambition to 
become a leader and enabled him to develop his 
natural gifts, which have made him a leading capital- 
ist, foremost citizen and prominent philanthropist of 
Louisville. 

Mr. Bernheim was born at the old family home- 
stead in Schmieheim, Baden, Germany, November 4, 
1848, a son of Leon Solomon and Fanny (Dreyfuss) 
Bernheim, the former born at Schmieheim, September 
19, i8o8, and died in January, 1856, and the latter 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



31 



born at Altdorf in June, 1826, and died in 1889. Leon 
Solomon Bernheim passed his entire life as a mer- 
chant in Baden and was a man who was held in high 
esteem because of his integrity. At the age of five 
years Isaac Wolfe Bernheim started to attend the pub- 
lic schools, and when he was ten years old entered a 
graded school at Ettenheim, four miles from his 
home. This daily walk of eight miles, minus an over- 
coat or underclotliing, in severe winter weather was a 
great hardship to the lad, but he manfully continued 
it for three years, when, in the fall of 1861, he was 
apprenticed to a commercial house, where he served 
for three years in order to lay the foundation for a 
commercial career. Although he worked industriously 
and faithfully, he received no compensation for his 
labor, but during the three years earned enough money 
through outside office work at nights and on Sundays 
to pay for his clothing. His term of apprenticeship 
ended November 29, 1S64, by which time he had be- 
come imbued with a love of industry, was self-reliant 
and had great respect for the practice of economy. 

.Securing employment as clerk with a firm at Mann- 
heim, he was granted a salary of twenty-five gulden 
per month, which when converted into American money 
would be about $11. Naturally it required genuine 
financial skill to make both ends meet. He soon de- 
cided that he was called upon to bear too much work 
for too little pay, and accordingly determined upon a 
change, although the opportunity did not present itself 
until August, 1865, when he obtained a position with 
Gebrueder Elkan at Frankfort-on-the-Main, whole- 
sale dealers in knit goods and one of the leading firms 
in that line in that city. This position he had secured 
through correspondence, and his first appearance in 
the office of the company left an indelible impression 
upon his memory. Mr. Bernard Elkan, after looking 
the aspirant over, decided that he was both too young 
and too small for the position at stake, but the en- 
thusiasm and earnestness of the youth finally won the 
day and he was granted his request to receive a 
trial. The salary in this position was greater than 
what he had received at Mannheim, -but it was still 
only by the closest economy that he managed to pull 
through. Needing an overcoat and other clothing, he 
pawned his little silver watch, a gift from his grand- 
father, and thus, at the age of seventeen years, found 
the means with which to buy the first overcoat that 
he had ever owned. While it was the custom of the 
firm not to grant salary raises until the expiration of a 
year of service, Mr. Bernheim was given a raise on 
New Year's Day, 1866, and his work was evidently 
appreciated, as he was entrusted with more important 
tasks and was making rapid headway. His career 
was suddenly interrupted in the early summer of 1866, 
when Bismarck declared war upon Austria, and, Frank- 
fort being very close to the scene of the early hostili- 
ties, felt war's grim influence, commerce being stopped 
and business houses cutting down expenses and dis- 
charging employes by the wholesale. Gebrueder Elkan 
also reduced their force to the minimum, three-fourths 
of the clerks being let go, hut Mr. Bernheim was 
retained. 

In mid-summer, when the battles of Langensalza and 
Aschoffenburg were being fought near Frankfort, and 
while Prussia was concentrating her forces near the 
Bohemian frontier preparatory to striking the terrible 
blow at Sadowa which resulted in the dismemberment 
of Austria as a separate German state, there appeared 
at Frankfort two Americans who were forced to stop 
over because the railroad had for the time being dis- 
continued its regular passenger service. One of these, 
Mr. M. Livingston, an uncle by marriage of Mr. Bern- 
heim hunted up his nephew with whom he spent part 
of a day and the whole of the following day. He and 
his companion Mr. Moses Kahn, of Paducah, Kentucky, 
had left Europe as young men, and the fact that they 
were returning rich in purse impressed the youth with 



the idea of making his way to America in search of 
his fortune. Seeing the youth's bent, Mr. Livingston 
offered to give him a position in his cotton and knitting 
yarn mills in New York, and to pay his passage fare, 
and in October, 1866, Mr. Bernheim resigned his posi- 
tion, leaving that city to visit his mother. 

In March, 1867, Mr. Bernheim left home, taking pas- 
sage on the 23rd of that month at Bremerhaven on the 
steamer Hansa. He came in sight of land April 7, 1867, 
and on landing at New York started out to find his 
uncle's factory, which was located on Spring street, 
near Broadway. Night came on before he could find 
the factory, and he accordingly went back to Castle 
Garden, where he remained until the next morning, 
April 9, when he was successful in finding the firm of 
M. Livingston & Company. This concern, in common 
with many others, had suffered reverses during the 
Civil war, and his uncle was unable to place him in the 
business, but a friend of Mr. Livingston, John Weil, of 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, appeared in New York at 
this time and the problem of his employment was 
solved. His uncle bought for him on credit, agreeing to 
see that the goods were paid for, a stock of Yankee 
notions, needles, pins, spool thread, socks, suspenders, 
handkerchiefs and ladies' stockings, and May 3, 1867, 
with his newly-made friend, Mr. Weil, the lad left New 
York for Wilkes-Barre to start his career as a peddler. 
Mr. Bernheim's affairs prospered from the start. He 
was ambitious, determined, industrious and courteous, 
made a favorable impression and big sales, and by 
October, 1867, was able to purchase a horse and wagon, 
which enabled him to carry on his business on a some- 
what larger scale. When winter came on he located at 
Overton in Bradford County, a cross-roads town of 
Pennsylvania, where he remained until the following 
spring. On May 5, 1868, he started for Paducah, to 
which city his uncle had moved, and as that city had 
no eastern outlet by rail he made the journey via Pitts- 
burgh and Indianapolis to Cairo, and thence by boat lie 
Paducah, where he arrived May 7. There he met his 
uncle, Benjamin Weille, and at that time became book- 
keeper and second salesman for his uncles, who were 
doing business as Livingston & Weille. In the fall of 
the same year Mr. Bernheim engaged with Loeb & 
Bloom as bookkeeper at forty dollars a month, and 
from that time forward his salary was raised from time 
to time. On January i, 1872, with his brother, Bernard 
Bernheim and Elbridge Palmer, he engaged in the 
wholesale liquor business at Paducah, under the firm 
name of Bernheim Brothers, Mr. Palmer being a silent 
partner. After three years Mr. Palmer's interests were 
purchased, and in T87S the firm name was changed to 
Bernheim Brothers & Uri, Nathan M. Uri having 
Ixiught an interest in the business. This firm continued 
until 1889, when Mr. Uri withdrew. 

During the first fifteen years of its life this business, 
from a modest beginning, developed to such an extent 
that it established itself all over the South and into 
parts of the West and Northwest. In 1888 the business 
was still further enlarged, when it was transferred to 
Louisville and more traveling salesmen were engaged, 
a move that helped to extend the business from Maine 
to Texas and from New York to California. In March, 
T896, the company suffered heavy losses by fire, their 
distillery and bonded warehouses at Pleasure Ridge hav- 
ing been destroyed in a conflagration. How the business 
had grown may be seen in the fact that in 1888 the 
volume of its trade aggregated barely $350,000 per year, 
and in 1903, when the partnership was dissolved, there 
was organized the Bernheim Distilling Company, with 
a paid-up capital of $2,000,000, all of which was em- 
ployed to take care of its tremendously increased trade. 
Isaac W. Bernheim, of the corporation, acted as presi- 
dent. As his interests grew Mr. Bernheim became 
identified with other large enterprises. 

He has always been a temperate man himself, and 



32 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



April 17, 1895, while addressing the annual convention 
of the National Wine and Spirit Dealers' Association 
at St. Louis, Missouri, in his capacity of president of 
that body, came out in a strong plea for temperance. 
His charities have been numerous and his benefactions 
many. On September 18, 1899. he presented to the 
City of Louisville the Jefferson Monument, a handsome 
bronze statue in heroic size of Thomas Jefferson. On 
May 30, 1910, he presented to the State of Kentucky, 
at Frankfort, a bronze bust of Abraham Lincoln, and 
January 17, 1907, he presented the Hebrew Union Col- 
lege with its library building. The Jewish Hospital of 
Louisville has been recently endowed with a fund of 
$100,000. A statue of Abraham Lincoln has only re- 
cently been given by him to the City of Louisville. 
It will be the work of George Barnard of New York 
and will be unveiled during the spring of 1922. Many 
other benefactions also stand to the credit of this fore- 
most citizen and philanthropist. Mr. Bernheim is now 
retired from active affairs. National matters have 
known little of his character, but his community has 
benefited by his residence, and in business and civic 
life he has worked constructively and effectively. He 
is a man who has made and kept friends who have been 
attracted to him through a likeable personality and be- 
cause of his deep personal interest in their welfare. 

On September 23, 1874, Mr. Bernheim was united in 
marriage with Miss Amanda Uri, a native of Paducah 
Kentucky, and to this union there have been born four 
sons and three daughters. 

Thomas Piatt. Brookdale Farm on Greendale Pike, 
seven miles northwest of Lexington, has under the pro- 
prietorship of Thomas Piatt long been one of the pro- 
ductive centers for some of the famous Kentucky live- 
stock, though Mr. Piatt regards himself as a general 
farmer. He has handled and bred some excellent 
thoroughbreds, and the shipping of colts to eastern 
markets is still a feature of Brookdale farm industry. 

Mr. Piatt was born at Paynes Depot in Scott County, 
Kentucky, November 4, 1877, son of A. D. and Eliza- 
beth (Payne) Piatt. He grew up on a farm, and after 
the common schools finished his education with a busi- 
ness course in Lexington. 

Mr. Piatt has lived at Brookdale since 1899. The 
main portion of this farm is 200 acres, given him by 
his maternal grandfather, Augustus Payne, who gave 
each of his grandchildren a farm. Mr. Piatt out of the 
fruits of his enterprise has extended the area of Brook- 
dale Farm, and also has 150 acres four miles away, 
so that his total land holdings aggregate 450 acres. For 
several years prior to igo8 he was associated in the 
thoroughbred horse business with Col. Milton Young, 
and is now a partner with his brother-in-law, J. D. 
Carr, in thoroughbred breeding. The two farms, Piatt's 
and Carr's, adjoin, and Mr. Piatt has supplemented 
some of the enterprise which gives the name Carr 
justifiable prominence in the Kentucky thoroughbred 
circles. The Piatt home is located on an elevation, so 
that the home and grounds present a beautiful picture 
in the landscape. 

At the age of twenty-one Mr. Piatt married Miss 
Nancy Carr, a sister of J. D. Carr. They have two 
children, Thomas Carr and Nancy Elizabeth. Thomas 
C, who lives on his grandmother's farm near Payne's 
Depot, married Jane Gorham. The Piatt family are 
members of the Bethel Presbyterian Church. 

John Webb, Jr., was a highly esteemed and widely 
known citizen of Lexington and of Kentucky. He was 
a son of John Webb, Sr., and was born in the old 
stone house on the Webb farm May 9, 1858. In early 
life he was a shoe merchant at Paris, Kentucky, and 
was a very genial and popular citizen with hosts of 
friends everywhere he went. 

On November 7, 1905, he married Annie Price, mem- 



ber of the prominent old Price family of Lexington. 
They lived on the old Webb farm for a time and for 
four years at the Price homestead west of Lexing- 
ton. Mr. Webb then went to California, making the 
overland trip by automobile. He started to drive 
back, but was taken ill in Arizona and died at Hutchin- 
son, Kansas, May 20, 1918. He was a memljer of the 
Presbyterian Church and was fond of hunting and 
other diversions. 

Mrs. Webb, who lives in Lexington, is a daughter 
of John Fry Price. She still holds an interest in 
the old Price farm just west of Lexington, and that 
land was subdivided under her direction. The house 
is on the Price farm, and was built in 1807 from 
brick made on the land. It was one of the first brick 
residences in Fayette County. It was historic for 
many reasons. Lafayette was entertained at the house 
over night during his visit to Kentucky in 1827. The 
hostess was John Fry Price's grandmother Fry, who 
with her husband, John Fry, are buried in the yard. 
There was a porch all around the old house, and this 
was used by the local militia for drilling on rainy 
days. The old structure is still included in the resi- 
dence as it now stands, one of the finest of the old 
homes. 

John Fry Price was born in 1834, son of William 
Price, a native of London and of Welsh parentage 
who came to Kentucky as a youth and died at Lex- 
ington at the age of twenty-nine. He was well edu- 
cated and a man of high standing in the community, 
deeply philanthropic and interested in the unfortunate. 
John Fry Price spent most of his life on the farm 
west of Lexington and was founder of the business 
now conducted as S. S. Price & Company, pork and 
beef packers. Mrs. Webb is an active member of the 
First Presbyterian Church, of the Y. W. C. A. and 
of the alumni of Sayre College, and belongs to the 
state chapter of the Daughters of the Arnerican Revo- 
lution. She is famous for her musical ability. 

Isaac Gess. While more than thirteen years have 
passed since Isa^c Gess, a well-known stock breeder of 
the Parker's Mill Pike, five miles south of Lexington, 
was called to his final rest, he lives in the memory of 
his many friends as a high type of loyal citizen and 
progressive, reliable business man. He never faltered 
in the performance of any task that was rightfully his, 
and in all his business transactions, far-reaching and 
effective as they were, he never sought to benefit by 
the misfortune of others. His life was actuated by high 
ideals and spent in close conformity therewith, his 
teaching and his example were ever inspiring and help- 
ful, and his humane sympathy and charity brought men 
to him in the ties of strong friendship. 

Mr. Gess was born February 27, 1847, on a farm on 
the Richmond Pike, ten miles south of Lexington, a 
son of John and Mary A. (Spurr) Gess, the latter an 
aunt of Levi Spurr, a sketch of whose career and 
family appears elsewhere in this work. John Gess, Sr., 
the grandfather of Isaac Gess, was born in Virginia, and 
in 1800 married Lydia Winn, coming to Kentucky in 
the same year. During the War of 1812 he fought as 
a soldier in the United States forces, and after the 
close of that struggle returned to his farming occupa- 
tions in Kentucky, in which he continued to be engaged 
during the rest of his life. After his death his son, 
John Gess, Jr., secured the home place near Athens, 
and continued its operation until his death at the age 
of thirty-three years. His wife survived him a number 
of years and was sixty-six at the time of her demise. 
They were the parents of six children : A daughter who 
died in childhood ; a son who died in young manhood ;■ 
John Winn and James William, twins, born in 1843 ; 
Isaac, of this notice; and Anna, who married R. N. 
Offut, of Harrison County, Kentucky, who became a 
merchant of Lexington, in which city he and his wife 
both died, without issue. 




%Z..M4i^^ 




^ 



^K?4 



/K, 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



33 



John Winn Gess and James William Gess were among 
the best-known citizens of Fayette County. Twins, 
they bore such a striking resemblance each to the other 
that in youth and young manhood it was practically im- 
possible for strangers, and even their intimate friends, 
to tell them apart. From boyhood they were insep- 
arable, constant companions, and so intimate was their 
relationship that they carried but one purse between 
them. When the war between the states came on they 
joined the redoubtable Morgan and took part in the 
various exploits and escapades of their intrepid leader. 
They were captured on several occasions, at various 
places, and finally were imprisoned at Camp Douglas, 
whence John, making his escape, walked back to the old 
home, where he again joined his brother. For many 
years they lived together at the home place, being only 
separated by death when, in 1894, John, who had mar- 
ried, passed away. This separation lasted but a short 
time, for James felt his brother's loss so keenly that 
lie cared to remain no longer, and several months later 
he too, passed away. John Winn Gess married Martha 
Tomblin, of Georgia, whose brother he had known while 
in the army, and of their children two survive : Mary 
Belle, the widow of William R. McDonald, residing at 
Mr. McDonalds' old home at Cuthbert, Georgia, with 
three sons, William Ross, James Winn and Marion ; 
and Annie, the widow of Dr. Philip H. Lane, a noted 
neurologist of Philadelphia, who died in 1920, without 
issue. 

Isaac Gess spent his boyhood and youth on the home 
farm and secured his educational training in the rural 
schools of his home community. He was married 
June 7, 1876, to Mary C. Webb, daughter of John and 
Margaret D. (Haynes) Webb, and a half sister of the 
late Thomas Haynes, a history of whose life will be 
found in the sketch of Miss Elizabeth Frances Haynes, 
elsewhere in this work. Soon after his marriage Mr. 
Gess moved with his bride to the farm now occupied by 
his widow, on Parker's Mill Pike, five miles south of 
Lexington, knowns as the Springbank Dairy Farm. 
This property at that time boasted of no improvements, 
and for a time Mr. and Mrs. Gess faced numerous 
hardships in developing a paying and comfortable enter- 
prise. This was duly accomplished, however, through 
industry and good management, and under Mr. Gess' 
direction the farm soon became famous for its trotting 
horses, which Mr. Gess sold on the strength of their 
breeding. Likewise he kept a herd of Jersey cattle, and 
in both departments of his work achieved an excellent 
success. He continued to carry on his prosperous 
activities until his death, which occurred August 30, 
1907. He was a man of public spirit and progressive 
inclinations, and while he never sought public office he 
took a keen and helpful interest in local matters and 
gave his support to worthy movements. Interested 
chiefly in his home and his farm, he had few outside con- 
nections in the way of fraternal or other associations, 
but was a man of friendliness and sociability, one who 
had no trouble in making or keeping friends. His loss 
was one which affected his community deeply. 

Following her husband's death his widow took over 
the reigns of management, which she has handled in 
afi entirely capable and successful manner. Known as 
an able business woman, she has made the dairy the 
feature of the farm rather than the breeding of horses 
and cattle, although she has maintained the fine herd 
i>f Jerseys, for which she finds a profitable market. In 
her dairy business she has a large retail trade among 
private customers, and her business transactions are 
carried out in a manner at once highly efficient and 
straightforward. In other matters she keeps well posted, 
and possesses a mind not only naturally active but well 
cultivated. Her home, while not a pretentious one, is 
neat, well kept and valuable, its desirability being en- 
hanced by its attractive situation, while the 140 acres 



which are included in the estate are composed of some 
of the best land in the county. 

LAWRE^'CE S. Leopold. A successful practitioner in 
the field of corporation law must be not only a broad 
and alert memJjer of his calling, but an astute and far- 
sighted business man. His is preeminently the domain 
of practical law, in which sound fact and absolute logic, 
fertility of resource and vigor of professional treatment 
are usually relied upon, rather than ingenious theory 
and oratorical gifts. When to these qualities are added 
the graces of oratory and the humor, geniality and un- 
failing courtesy of a gentleman the main traits have 
been set forth of the prominent and popular corporation 
lawyer, Lawrence S. Leopold, of Lc)uisville. 

Mr. Leopold was born at Louisville, December 6, 1872, 
a son of Simon and Sophie (Oppenheimer) Leopold. 
His father, who was born in 1842, was a successful 
manufacturer of tobacco at Louisville until his early 
death in 1879, at the age of thirty-seven years. He was 
a democrat in politics and a member of Louisville Lodge 
No. 400, Free and Accepted Masons. His mother, who 
was born at Nashville, Tennessee, still survives her 
husband, as do the two children. The younger of his 
parents' children, Lawrence S. Leopold, secured his 
early education in the public schools of Louisville, fol- 
lowing which he pursued a course at the University of 
Louisville, from which he was duly graduated with the 
class of 1893. His studies were further prosecuted at 
Harvard Law School, where he received his degree of 
Bachelor of Laws in 1895, and in that year was admitted 
to the bar of Kentucky and immediately started practice 
at Louisville, where he now maintains offices at No. 
1610 Inter Southern Building. _ 

Mr Leopold's practice has been mainly of a corpora- 
tion character, and he has been one of the main factors 
in the organization of a number of leading companies. 
Since 1917 he has been president of the South Louisville 
Bank He was one of the organizers and is a director 
of the Greater Louisville Savings and Building Associa- 
tion In 1917 he was appointed attorney for the United 
States Public Health Service, and through his efforts 
there was established a rigid quarantine of all venereal 
diseases, a ruling which in its enforcement proved an 
extremely beneficial public service. Mr. Leopold has 
been attorney for the State Board of Health since 1918 
and is a member of the faculty of the Public Health 
Board of the schools of Louisville. He belongs to the 
Kentucky State Bar Association. A leading democrat, 
he has not sought favors of his party, but was a mem- 
ber of the executive committee of the Democratic Cen- 
tral Committee of Jefferson County, and one of the 
strong and active members of the city and county 
democracy. As a fraternalist he holds membership m 
St George Lodge No. 329, Free and Accepted Masons; 
Grand Consistory of Kentucky, thirty-second degree, 
and Kosair Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles Mystic 
Shrine • and Louisville Lodge No. 8, Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. He belongs also to the Harvard 
Club and to the Standard Club. 

Mr. Leopold was married March 30, 191.1, .to Miss 
Irma Schwabacher, who was born at Louisville, and 
to this union there have been born three children: 
Helen Sophia, Katherine L., and Robert L. 

William Barnfather Eagles was born on his ma- 
ternal grandfather Hawes' farm in Daviess County, 
Kentucky, August 28, 1869. He is a son of Albert 
James and Kate Coleman (Hawes) Eagles. Through 
his mother he is descended from two old American 
families, the originators of which were Samuel Hawes 
and James Taylor. These families have long been 
represented in Virginia and Kentucky. Mr. Eagles 
mother was born in Daviess County, October 4, 1841. 
and died November 6, igo6. Albert James Eagles was 



34 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



born in Sussex County, England, in 1835, and was 
educated at the University of Oxford. In 1861 he 
came to this country. Later he went west to St. 
Louis, then to Shelby County, Kentucky, and was a 
talented teacher in this state for several years. In 
Daviess County, Kentucky, he was employed as a 
teacher in the Hawes family. After his marriage there 
he became a general merchant and tobacconist at Yel- 
vington, Kentucky. He lived retired several years 
before his death, which occurred June 10, 1880. He 
was a member of the Episcopal Church. He and his 
wife had three children : Hawes, William B. and Ma- 
rianne, wife of William S. Luckett. 

William B. Eagles grew up in Western Kentucky, 
but finished his college and professional education 
at the University of Virginia. He was graduated 
A. B. in 1893 and received his LL. B. degree with 
the class of 1894. Returning to Kentucky, he was 
admitted to the bar the same year and has been in 
continuous practice at Louisville. He has always kept 
to the lines of general practice, and has pursued his 
professional work with no important diversions into 
politics or business. He is a member of the Louis- 
ville Bar Association, the Kentucky State Bar associa- 
tion and the Lawyers Club. He also belongs to the 
Pendennis Club, is a Mason, a member of the Broad- 
way Baptist Church and in politics is a democrat. 

January i, 1908, Mr. Eagles married Elizabeth Ba- 
con Parsons, of Louisville, Kentucky. Their two chil- 
dren are William Barnfather, Jr., born August 26, 
iQio, and Julia Mayes, born November 27, 1912. 

George G. Fetter. Through a period of more than 
a century and through four successive generations 
the name George Fetter has been significant of the 
best commercial abilities and civic character in the 
City of Louisville. George G. Fetter is a grandson of 
the pioneer George Fetter and a son of George G. 
Fetter, who was one of the most prominent men in 
the early pork packing industry of Louisville. Mr. 
Fetter himself is distinguished by his connection with 
a number of business institutions at Louisville, espe- 
cially the George G. Fetter Company, manufacturing 
printers, binders, stationers and dealers in office sup- 
plies, a business that has been steadily growing under 
iiis direction for thirty years and in which his son 
George G. Fetter, Jr., is vice president and general 
manager. 

The first George Fetter was born in New York 
State, of Knickerbocker and Revolutionary ancestry. 
He married Lydia Griffith, of Welsh descent. Leaving 
New York, he lived in Baltimore, then in Pennsylvania, 
and early in the last century came to Louisville, where 
his wife died in 1814, and he a few years later. 

Their son, George G. Fetter, was born at Wells- 
burg, Virginia, October 6, 1809, was a child when 
brought to Louisville, and after the death of his 
parents was sent to college at Bloomington, Indiana, 
by his uncle Daniel Fetter. Before completing his 
college course he returned to Louisville and began his 
career as an employe in the postoffice under Post- 
master John T. Gray, whose daughter he subsequently 
married. From the postoffice he became teller in the 
Bank of Louisville, and in 1840 established a whole- 
sale grocery house as George G. Fetter & Company, 
his associates being his brothers Daniel and Roderick 
Fetter. But the chief field in which his activities 
were engaged and the source of his wealth was pork 
packing. For a great many years his organization 
contributed a large share of the tremendous volume 
of pork packed along the Ohio River and sent down 
the river to markets in the South. He continued a 
factor in the Louisville packing industry until his 
death on May 21, 188"!. He contributed several inven- 
lions to the por'k packing business, one of them being 
the circular railway, which served to speed the opera- 
lion of the packing plant. 



George G. Fetter married Catherine M. Gray on 
February 11, 1841. Her father, John Thompson Gray, 
previously referred to, was a cousin of James Monroe 
and was appointed postmaster of Louisville by Mr. 
Monroe when President. Her mother was Mary 
(Ormsby) Gray, daughter of Peter Benson Ormsby, 
one of Louisville's most distinguished early citizens. 
He was born in County Sligo, Ireland, was liberally 
educated, and possessed large means. He and his 
brother Judge Stephen Ormsby, who also became 
prominent at Louisville, came on to America on ac- 
count of their participation in the Irish rebellion headed 
by Robert Emmet. Ormsby Avenue in Louisville was 
named for this family. Peter B. Ormsby and his 
daughter Mary gave the ground for Christ Church 
Cathedral on Second Street and also for Grace Church 
in Gray Street, and the family later gave ground for 
All Saints Church in Park Street. Mrs. Mary Gray 
was the founder and contributed generously to the 
support of the Episcopal Orphan Asylum at Louisville. 

Mrs. George G. Fetter died in 1907. Her children 
were: Mary, who became the wife of Robert Steele; 
Lydia, who married Maj. James Wharton; Virginia, 
wife of Gen. Amos Stickney, of the United States 
Engineer Corps ; Ormsby G., who married Fanny 
Smith ; George G., head of the George G. Fetter Com- 
pany; and Selena G., who for many years was a popu- 
lar figure on the American stage and became the wife 
of Edwin Milton Royle, a noted actor and playwright. 

George Griffith Fetter was born at Louisville, Feb- 
ruary 18, 1857. He is a graduate of the Louisville 
Male High School, and his active business career 
covers a period of more than forty years. He was 
first with the Louisville pig iron merchants, George 
H. Hull & Company, later a traveling salesman for 
a Cincinnati house, and in 1882 was made manager 
of a branch in Chicago. 

Air. Fetter having returned to Louisville, organized 
in 1885 the George G. Fetter Printing Company. The 
present George G. Fetter Company was incorporated 
July I, 1891, and though the business in the first few 
years was entirely local in scope it has for several years 
been the largest concern of its kind in Kentucky. Mr. 
Fetter has both his sons, George G., Jr., and John B. 
Fetter associated with him in this company, while H. 
C. Wedekemper is treasurer and E. C. German, sec- 
retary of the company. In 1896 the Fetter Company 
was awarded the contract for public printing in Ken- 
tucky, and through the business gave capable service 
to the state for more than ten years. 

Mr. Fetter has enjoyed many substantial relation- 
ships with finance and business and civic affairs. He 
was one of the organizers and president of the Ma- 
jestic Theater Compary of Louisville, a director of 
the Citizens Life Insurance Company, of the Louis- 
ville Automatic News Vending Company, and in 1907 
organized the George G. Fetter Lighting and Heating 
Company. Through his ancestry Mr. Fetter is a mem- 
ber of the Kentucky Sons of the American Revolution 
and the Society of Colonial Wars. He is a member 
of the Pendennis Club, and has served as vestryman 
of St. Paul's Episcopal Church. 

He married Miss Amanda Burks, a native of Jeffer- 
son County, Kentucky, where her father, John Burks, 
was one of the wealthy citizens. Four children were 
born to their marriage, Amy and Roderick, the first 
two dying in infancy. The others are the sons already 
mentioned. George G. Fetter, Jr., married Eleanor 
Crenshaw, of Mississippi, and they have one daugh- 
ter, Amanda B. The son John B. Fetter married Nell 
Herrig. 

William Wesley Gre.\thouse, one of the well- 
known citizens of Fayette County, had to achieve 
success by working hard and earnestly for it, was left 
an orphan, largely educated himself, and one of the 
chief satisfactions he has derived from his prosperity 




^^T^Oj^s^^Oyc 




HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



35 



has been his ability to assist each of his large family 
of children to acquire the substance of a liberal edu- 
cation and go into professions or business well equipped 
for adequate and competent performance. 

Mr. Greathouse, who lives on a farm three miles 
west of Lexington, on the Leestown Pike, was born 
in Brown County, Ohio, October 20, 1853, only child 
of Wesley and Catherine (Wallis) Greathouse. His 
mother was born in Ohio, of Scotch parentage, and 
her ancestry goes back to the famous Scotch clan 
of Wallace. The Greathouse family is of English 
origin, and one of its early members was an English 
earl. William Greathouse, father of Wesley Great- 
house, settled in Ohio from New England. 

William Wesley Greathouse was only six years old 
when his mother died, and his father died several 
years earlier. Up to the age of eighteen he lived with 
his maternal grandparents, and he afterward repaid 
their care by keeping in touch with them as long as 
they lived. He had a common school training, and at 
the age of twenty began teaching in Bracken County, 
Kentucky. He taught there twelve winter sessions, 
and all his teaching' was done in two districts. In 
the meantime he improved his own educational facili- 
ties by attending Normal school in summer sessions 
at Winchester, Ohio. As a teacher he received about 
$40 a month, and he also boarded among his patrons. 
Mr.' Greathouse inherited a farm in Brown County 
and devoted the summer seasons between school work 
to its cultivation. As a youth his ambition was to 
become a physician, but his general health did not 
permit of his attaining that purpose. 

On January 26, 1881, in Bracken County, Mr. Great- 
house married Ellen Buckley. She had been one of 
his pupils and was sixteen at the time of her mar- 
riage, Mr. Greathouse being twenty-seven. He had 
boarded at the Buckley home for two years while 
teaching. In the meantime he had sold his Ohio 
land and then bought a farm near the Buckley place 
in Bracken County and devoted his energies to its 
management for ten years. In i88g he moved to the 
Blue Grass section around Lexington, bought a farm 
in Woodford County, and owned it and prospered 
while living there for nearly thirty years. In 1919 
Mr. Greathouse sold his farm in Woodford County, 
believing that the pinnacle of high priced land had 
been reached, and he is now temporarily renting the 
farm of the late John H. Payne, three miles west of 
Lexington, his purpose being to reinvest his capital 
to good advantage when land prices have somewhat 
declined. He has been successful as a general farmer, 
and tobacco has always been a prominent crop. He is 
a breeder of Chester White hogs, and has the founda- 
tion of one of the fine herds of that stock. Mr. Great- 
house has never participated in politics, and away from 
home and farm his chief interest has been church and 
Sunday School. He became a Sunday School worker 
when a boy, and out of his efforts while living in 
Bracken County came the organization and building 
of the church chapel. He has been active in both 
county and state Sunday School organizations. 

Mr. and Mrs. Greathouse have a family of eleven 
children, all living and most of them established in 
independent careers. The oldest is a professional 
nurse. Elsie, who spent two years at the University 
of Kentucky, is a graduate nurse and the wife of R. J. 
Talbott, of Lexington. William Wesley, who spent 
four years at the University of Kentucky, is a farmer 
and dealer in tobacco. Joseph Feli.x spent four years 
in Kentucky University and graduated with honors 
in 1915 from the Northwestern University Law School 
at Chicago and not long afterward entered the Officers 
Training Camp at Fort Sheridan, where he received a 
lieutenant's commission. He was sent overseas and was 
wounded in the foot and was in a hospital at the time 
of the armistice. He is now engaged in the practice of 
law at Fort Worth, Texas. Tillie B., the next in age. is 



a professional nurse and a member of the faculty ot 
the State University. Both Jessie and Tillie were army 
nurses in France, and Jessie was the first Kentucky 
nurse to be awarded medal service button. John D. 
Greathouse is also a lawyer, in practice at Minneapolis, 
Minnesota. Catherine is employed in an office at Lex- 
ington, while the next three children, Benjamin P., 
Elizabeth and Carrie, attend the University Model 
High School, while the youngest in the family is 
Vernon. 

Lafon Allen has practiced law at Louisville, his 
native city, a quarter of a century. The firm Barret, 
Allen & Attkisson, of which he is a member, is notable 
for the exceptional abilities represented in its member- 
ship, and in extent and importance of its practice is 
one of the chief law firms of the state. 

Mr. Allen was born in Louisville, August 2, 1871, 
son of Charles James Fox and Caroline (Belknap) 
Allen. His father, though also educated for the law, 
was for many years a leading Louisville business man. 
He was born at Pittsfield, Massachusetts, August 14, 
1834, was a graduate of Yale University in 1855, also 
of the Harvard University Law School, and was en- 
gaged in practice in Louisiana until the outbreak of 
the Civil war. He was then commissioned a captain 
•in the paymaster's department of the United States 
army, and was assigned to duty at Louisville until the 
close of the war, having been in the meantime pro- 
moted to major. After the war he became associated 
with William B. Belknap in the wholesale hardware 
business, and was vice president of W. B. Belknap & 
Company when he retired in 1900. He was an inde- 
pendent in politics. The death of Major Allen oc- 
curred at Louisville, June 8, 191 1. His wife, Caroline 
Belknap, was born at Louisville in September, 1846, 
and died in 1897. All their five children are living, 
Lafon being the second in age. 

Lafon Allen also claims Yale as his alma mater, 
having graduated A. B. in 1893. In 1894 he received 
the degree LL. B. from the law school of the Uni- 
versity of Louisville, and, beginning practice, con- 
tinued his professional work as an individual until 
1910, when he became associated with Alexander G. 
Barret and Eugene R. Attkisson under the firm name 
of Barret, Allen & Attkisson. Mr. Allen is a promi- 
nent member of the Kentucky State and American Bar 
associations. He is a member of the Pendennis Club, 
Louisville Country Club, is a republican and a Pres- 
byterian. 

September 21, 191 1, he married Emma Hunter 
Powell, a native of Cleveland, Ohio, and daughter of 
Dr. Hunter H. and Emma (Baker) Powell. The 
parents were both born at Winchester, Virginia, and 
are now deceased. Of their three children Mrs. Allen 
is the second in age. Mr. and Mrs. Allen have two 
daughters, Elizabeth P. and Caroline B. 

James R. Duffin. On the basis of his "achievements 
James R. Duffin might very properly be asserted one 
of the most successful corporation lawyers in the 
country. While he has attended to the legal matters 
involved in the organization or reorganization of hun- 
dreds of business concerns, he has supplied more than 
legal advice, and supplied much of the creative and 
constructive energy through which the firm or cor- 
poration has prospered. Perhaps the outstanding 
achievernent of his career and the institution with 
which his name is most prominently associated is the 
Inter-Southern Life Insurance Company, which has 
been the largest and most successful Kentucky com- 
pany engaged in insurance. He has been president of 
the company for the past ten years. 

Mr. Duffin was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, December 
30, 1870. His great-grandfather, Randall Duffin, came 
from Ireland to Pennsylvania in Colonial times, and 
with a brother served as a patriot soldier in the 



liG 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



Revolution. The family early became ideutiried with 
the steel and iron business in Western Pennsylvania, 
and the grandfather of the Louisville business man, 
Roge-r H. Duffin, was president of the first rolling mill 
company established at Cincinnati. He was also asso- 
ciated with his sons in railroad contracting, and they 
built many sections of the Pennsylvania Railroad. 

James M. Duffin, father of James Richard, was 
born in Cinciiniati in 1841 and died July Jy, igixj. He 
served with the rank of major in the Quartermaster's 
Corps during the Civil war, and his brother, Daniel 
O. Dufiin, was also in the same war. He spent his 
active career as a general merchant and his last days 
were spent in Louisville. He married Margaret 
Manion, who died in 1878. Her father, R. G. Manion, 
was a railroad civil engineer, and at one time was 
associated with the Duffins in railroad contracting. 
Margaret Manion was born July 2, 1846. 

James Richard Duffin was the second of three chil- 
dren, and the only one to reach mature life. He spent 
most of his youth in Crawford County, Indiana, where 
he attended common schools and four years at the 
Merengo Academy under Prof. J. M Johnson. He 
took the literary and law courses at Central Normal 
College, at Danville, Indiana, receiving his law degree 
with the class of 1890. Central Normal College has 
bestowed only one honorary degree, and James R. 
Duffin was the recipient in 1907. After graduating " 
from college he was elected and served four years as 
superintendent of schools of Crawford County, and at 
that time was the youngest county superintendent of 
schools in the state and the youngest man to ever 
hold that position in Crawford County. He also took 
an active part in democratic politics while in Indiana, 
and from the age of twenty-one to twenty-seven was 
a member of the Indiana State Central Committee. 
.'\fter the expiration of his term as school superin- 
tendent he began the practice of law at English, In- 
diana, but in 1898 located at Louisville. In 1909 he 
formed a partnership with Augustus E. Willson, who 
vvas later elected governor of Kentucky, which neces- 
sitated a dissolution of the partnership. During their 
association they were regarded as among the leading 
firms of commercial and corporation lawyers south of 
the Ohio River. 

During the twenty odd years he has been in Louis- 
ville the responsibility has devolved upon Mr. Duffin 
of assisting in the reorganization or organization of 
1,284 corporations, and giving all of them a lease of 
life and prosperity. He became a stockholder and 
director in a large number of these corporations. 

On January i, 1911, Air. Duflin effected the reorgan- 
ization of the Inter-Southern Life Insurance Company, 
and since then has been president of the Inter-South- 
ern. This company now stands thirty-fifth in size 
among all the life insurance companies of the United 
States, and it has steadily grown and prospered from 
year to year. As president of the company Mr. Duffin 
took the leading part in securing the construction, in 
1912, of the Inter-Southern Building, as the home 
of the company and one of the largest and finest office 
structures in Louisville. 

Mr. Duffin was also organizer of the old Dominion 
Oil Company, and made it the largest concern of its 
kind in the Kentucky oil territory. After promoting 
it to success he sold it to the Standard Oil interests. 
Mr. Duffin as a lawyer, business man and citizen has 
done much to promote the industrial progress of 
Louisville, and has had among his clients many of the 
prominent banking houses and individual capitalists, 
among all of which he has enjoyed the highest pro- 
fessional and personal esteem. 

At the present time he is completing one of the 
most beautiful homes in Kentucky in his home City of 
Louisville. Since coming to Louisville he has not 
taken an active part in politics. He is a member of 
the Comrnerical Club, the Masonic Order and the 
First Christian Church of Louisville He married 



Miss Clara M. Boman, daughter of John Boman, of 
Leavenworth, Indiana. Their two children are James 
Everett and Thelma M. Duffin. 

Ernest B. Hillf.nmeyek is one of the fortunate 
young Kentuckians whose careers and interests identify 
them with the beautiful Blue Grass districts around 
Lexington. He is owner of a first-class improved 
farm in Fayette County, is one of the leading local 
producers of tobacco, and is a highly skillful farmer, 
an educated gentleman, and one of the public spirited 
citizens of his community. 

Air. Hillenmeyer, whose home is on Greendale Pike, 
four miles north of Lexington, was born in Fayette 
County, January 6, 1880. His father is Hector F. 
Hillenmeyer, the veteran nurseryman and farmer whose 
career is made the subject of an article on other pages 
of this publication. 

Ernest B. Hillenmeyer attended the schools of Fay- 
ette County, and is a graduate of Assumption College 
at Sandwich, Ontario. For seven years he was asso- 
ciated with his father on the farm and in the nursery, 
and has a technical knowledge of the nursery busi- 
ness, though individual choice has largely led him into 
the general branches of agriculture. 

Fifteen years ago he started his independent efforts 
as a farmer, at which time he acquired the Break 
Payne farm of 125 acres. He now has 157 acres in 
his farm, and while he grows some stock his chief 
money crop is tobacco. He is a stockholder in Tat- 
tersall's Tobacco Warehouse at Lexington. Mr. Hillen- 
meyer and family enjoy one of the beautiful locations 
around Lexington, and eight years ago he erected a 
substantial country home on the farm. 

He has been much interested in educational ques- 
tions, and in 1920 was elected a member of the County 
Board of School Commissioners. Mr. Hillenmeyer is 
a republican and is affiliated with the Knights of 
Columbus and is a member of St. Paul's Catholic 
Church. In 1913 he married Miss Matilda Scott, 
daughter of L. A. and Ellen (Curtis) Scott, the lat- 
ter still living. The father, who died in January, 1916, 
was for many years a teacher in St. Paul's School. 
Airs. Hillenmeyer is a graduate of St. Catharine's 
.'\cademy. They have one daughter, Eleanor Curtis 
Hillenmeyer. 

Charles Whitney Moore. Of Kentucky thorough- 
bred breeders perhaps none have been distinguished 
by more discriminating choice and care in the selec- 
tion and handling of horses with the true qualities of 
greatness than the proprietor and owner of Mere Hill 
Stud Farm, Charles Whitney Moore. American horse- 
men everywhere know this farm and its proprietor 
directly or indirectly, since for thirty years or more 
he has devoted his energies exclusively to the produc- 
tion of the highest class of thoroughbreds. 

Mr. Moore, whose noted farm is two miles from 
Lexington, on the Newtown Pike, was born on Rus- 
sell Cave Pike, six miles from Lexington, December 
27, 1857. He grew up on a farm and began his career 
as a breeder of saddle horses. For a time he was in 
the merchandise business, but for the past thirty-five 
years has been a breeder and owner of race horses. 
He has owned and occupied the Mere Hill Farm since 
1886. Mr. Moore has had horses of great performance 
on the track. He bred Exterminator, one of the best 
long distance runners, whose purses aggregated more 
than $100,000. Other noted animals owned by him 
and sold as yearlings were Harron, Roljert Bradley, 
Intense and White Plume. The sire of these is Mc- 
Gee, which he still owns and keeps on his farm. Mr. 
Moore has from twenty-five to thirty brood mares, 
and his annual production of colts is about twenty, 
most of which are disposed of at private sales and 
some are sent to the eastern markets. He was a part 
owner in the noted Sweep, a racer and stud, and he 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



37 



also had Ingoldsby from the Keene stables, a great 
sire used at Mere Hill until his death. Mr. Moore 
has a farm of 170 acres. He is a member of the 
various horse associations. 

Mr. Moore married Martha Withers. Her father, 
Gen. W. T. Withers, late of Lexington, was noted in 
trotting circles, a^id his old home. Fair Lawn, is at 
the head of North Broadway. He came to Kentucky 
from a Mississippi plantation. General Withers owned 
Admont, Aberdeen and Happy Medium, all great trot- 
ting horses, two of which remained on his farm and 
after his death Aberdeen was sold. General Withers 
during his life issued an annual catalog of his horses. 
Mr. and Mrs. Moore have two sons and two daugh- 
ters. Their daughter Virginia is the wife of Adolphus 
Rice, a native of Harlan, Kentucky, where his father 
was a banker, and Adolphus for a number of years 
was connected with the National City Bank in New 
York City and is now manager of its branch at Per- 
nambuco, Brazil. Miss Ida Harrison Moore is at 
home. William Temple is a graduate of Transylvania 
University, a practicing attorney at Gulf Port, Mis- 
sissippi, and married Miss Bell, of Mississippi. Charles 
Whitney Moore, Jr., now associated in business with 
his father, spent eighteen months in France as a mem- 
ber of the Three Hundred and Twenty-sixth Field 
.Artillery. 

J. D. AND T. B. Carr arc the joint owners ,and 
proprietors of Cresswood Stock Farm, and personally 
and through their establishment have achieved a splendid 
reputation among American thoroughbred horse men, 
and some of Kentucky's finest thoroughbreds have been 
associated in some part of their career with Cresswood. 

This noted stock farm of Fayette County is six and 
three quarters of a mile northwest of Lexington, on 
Spurr Pike. The farm itself comprises 517 acres in 
one body of as beautiful and fertile blue grass land as 
could be found anywhere in the state. With such a 
large body of land the business is obviously one of 
general farming, but the specialty for a number of 
years of Carr Brothers has been the breeding and 
raising of thoroughbreds, a business with which their 
name has been associated for thirty years. They sell 
much of their stock as yearlings at the Saratoga market, 
and the products of Cresswood Stock Farm commands 
a premium and an enhanced value because of the 
widely known reputation of the Carr Brothers. The 
brothers keep about fifty thoroughbred animals on the 
farm and send about fifteen to market each year. An- 
other feature of their business is boarding horses for 
other breeders, and they have handled a large number 
of brood mares and track horses for other owners. For 
two years the head of the Cresswood stud was Rock- 
view, one of Major Belmont's famous horses from 
Nursery Stud. Carr Brothers sold Rockview to A. B. 
Hancock, of Paris, Kentucky, and he is still on the 
Hancock farm and one of his yearlings recently sold 
for $14,000. The successor of Rockview and the lead- 
ing sire at Cresswood is Delhi, who under the Keene 
colors won $116,000, more money than any other son 
of Ben Brush, his sire. This animal is owned by J. D. 
Carr and Thomas Piatt. In sales the Carr Brothers 
have stood as high as any other breeders in the state. 
They have never gone into racing, and they have de- 
veloped a business that was never on a better financial 
basis than at present. 

Both the Carr brothers were born in Fayette County. 
They are sons of Thomas D. and Sarah E. (Clark) 
Carr. Their grandfather was named Thomas Carr, son 
of Charles Carr, and both spent their lives near Walnut 
Hill, Charles dying at the age of ninety-two. Thomas 
Carr married Nancy, daughter of General James Dud- 
ley, the hero of the War of 1812, who lived to the age 
of ninety-two. Thomas D. Carr moved to what is now 
the Cresswood Stock Farm in 1884, and lived here until 



his death, about ten years ago. He was a general 
farmer and at one time deputy sheriff of the county. 
His wife, Sarah, was a daughter of Enoch Clark of 
New Jersey, who in company with David A. Sayre came 
from St. Louis to Lexington. Enoch Clark was a car- 
riage maker in Lexington, while his companion became 
a banker. Enoch Clark achieved wealth, was owner of 
much valuable city property, and died when about 
eighty years of age. His carriage business was con- 
tinued by his son August Clark until he died. Enoch 
Clark married Judith Duerson, of Virginia, and she 
died soon after him. Sarah E. Carr was reared in 
Lexington and is the mother of three children, John 
Dudley, Thomas B. and Nancy Cobb. The daughter is 
the wife of Thomas Piatt, living on a farm adjoining 
Cresswood, and also a well known Kentucky horseman. 
J. D. and T. B. Carr have never been in politics, 
being democratic voters only. J. D. Carr is a bachelor, 
while Thomas B. married Mary Banks Brooks. The 
residence on Cresswood Stock Farm is a modern brick 
home, erected about ten years ago, and is one of the 
most attractive in that section of Fayette County. 

Joseph H. Lane. Even a cursory survey of the larm 
estate of Mr. Lane on the Clay's Mill Turnpike in 
Jessamine County, eight miles south of the City of 
Lexington, reveals that he is an able and progressive 
representative of agricultural and livestock industry 
in this favored section of his native state. He was 
born at Harrodsburg, judicial center of Mercer County, 
Kentucky, on the 2Sth of January, 1845, and though be 
has now passed the psalmist's span of three score years 
and ten he retains marked mental and physical energy 
and finds satisfaction in giving close personal super- 
vision to the varied activities of his farm. He is a 
son of Dr. Joseph Lane, who was born in the City of 
Dublin, Ireland, and who was a boy when he accom- 
panied his widowed mother to Anierica. They remained 
for an interval in the Dominion of Canada, but soon 
made their way to Kentucky. Here he was reared to 
manhood, and after preparing himself thoroughly for 
the medical profession he was for thirty years engaged 
in active general practice at Lawrenceburg, Anderson, 
County, though at the time of the Civil vvar local 
prejudice caused him to leave the state. Union sym- 
pathizers having criticized him and subjected him to 
indignities by reason of the fact that two of his sons 
entered the Confederate service. He was imprisoned 
for a time, and upon his release he went to Terre Haute, 
Indiana, where he continued in the successful practice 
of his profession until his death, about ten years later. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Malonia Vaughn, 
died at Harrodsburg, Kentucky, at the time of the 
Civil war. Of the children three sons and four daugh- 
ters attained to maturity, two sons being Frank and 
Joseph H. The sisters all died in young womanhood, 
two of them having married and one, Nettie (Mrs. 
Utz), having formerly resided in the City of Chicago, 
but is now a resident of the State of Texas, her chil- 
dren being three in number. Frank Lane was a gallant 
soldier of the Confederacy in the Civil war, in which 
he served as a member of the Second Kentucky In- 
fantry. He was captured at Fort Donelson, but was 
soon afterward exchanged, and he resumed his place 
with his regiment. He was wounded while participating 
in the Battle of Murfreesboro, and also in the Battle 
of Peach Tree Creek, and his injuries caused minor 
disability during the remainder of his life. He was 
with his regiment in the command of General Johnston 
at the time of that officer's surrender. He was color- 
bearer of his regiment, and thus was in the thick of 
the fray in all engagements in which the command par- 
ticipated during his tenure of this position. After the 
war he married Miss Alice Bradley, but they had no 
children. He was for some time engaged in the retail 
grocery business, first at Frankfort and later at Mid- 



38 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



way, but he died in the state of Florida when but fifty- 
four years of age. 

Joseph H. Lane was reared principally at Lawrence- 
burg and was afforded good educational advantages in 
his youth. When the Civil war was precipitated he 
could not long restrain definite expression of his loyalty 
to the cause of the Confederacy, and in 1862 he en- 
listed in the command of General John Morgan, the 
famous Confederate raider. In an Ohio raid Mr. Lane 
was captured by the enemy, July 18, 1863, and he was 
thereafter held a prisoner of war at Camp Douglas, 
in the City of Chicago, until February, 1865, when his 
exchange was effected and he was enabled to rejoin his 
regiment, which was at that time under command of 
General Basil Duke, the gallant General Morgan hav- 
ing met death in battle. After the surrender of Gen- 
eral Lee at Appomattox the cavalry regiment of which 
Mr. Lane was a member succeeded in making its way 
in North Carolina, the hope being to join and reinforce 
the command of General Johnston, but that officer sur- 
rendered before the Kentucky regiment arrived. 

After the close of the war Mr. Lane was associated 
with farm enterprise in Woodford County about six 
years, and he thereafter was a clerk in his brother's 
grocery store at Frankfort until the time of his mar- 
riage, February 25, 1875, to Miss Mattie Barkley. In 
the following year he removed with his bride to Jessa- 
mine County and established his residence on his 
present farm, the old homestead of his wife's father, 
the late William Barkley. The place had at that time 
been in possession of representatives of the Barkley 
family for more than a century. On this farm the 
original dwelling of Mr. and Mrs. Lane was a house on 
the Harrodsburg Turnpike, about one mile distant from 
the present place of residence. Mrs. Lane had re- 
ceived a tract of 131 acres as a hertiage from her 
father, and the old house which was the origiiial farnily 
home figured as one of the landmarks of this section 
of the state. In this dwelling Mrs. Patsy Barkley, 
grandmother of Mrs. Lane, died when more than 100 
years of age. 

While continuing his residence on the farm Mr. 
Lane conducted for a period of twelve years a grocery 
store at South Elkhorn, two miles distant, and for six 
years thereafter he was engaged in the same line of 
business in the City of Lexington. In 1898 he returned 
to the farm, where he has since remained and where 
he has carried on successful operations as an agri- 
culturist and stock-grower, besides which he was for 
a number of years a breeder of fine trotting horses, a 
number of which he exploited in turf events. Mr. 
Lane is a stalwart in the camp of the democratic party, 
and is actively affiliated with the United Confederate 
Veterans, through the medium of which he has kept in 
touch with his old comrades in arms and vitalized the 
more gracious memories of his military career. He 
and his wife are zealous members of the Christian 
Church at South Elkhorn. Mr. and Mrs. Lane have 
two children : Frank, a bachelor, remains at the parental 
home and has active charge of the farm. Margaret is 
the widow of William Lafayette Sickles, a representa- 
tive of the same family as was General Sickles, a dis- 
tinguished officer in the Civil war. William L. Sickles 
was chief clerk in the offices of the Chicago & Alton 
Railroad in the City of Chicago at the time of his 
death, in 1906, and his widow now resides at the old 
home. Their only child. Lane Barkley Sickles, nine- 
teen years of age (1920) volunteered for service in 
the United States Navy and was assigned to duty on 
the flagship Pennsylvania, on which he continues to 
?erve at the time of this writing. 

To William L. Barkley, father of Mrs. Lane, a 
memorial tribute is paid in the following biography. 

William L. Barkley was one of the venerable na- 
tive sons of Jessamine County at the time of his 



death and was an honored representative of one of 
the sterling pioneer families of this county. Here he 
was born on the loth of January, 181 1, and here his 
death occurred in 1886, when he was seventy-five years 
of age, his wife likewise having been seventy-five years 
of age at the time of death. 

Mr. Barkley was a son of George Barkley, who was 
born in Jessamine County on the 7th of December, 
1782, a son of John Barkley, who was numbered 
among the earliest settlers in this section of the state. 
George Barkley married Miss Martha E. Higbee, who 
was born January 13, 1780, a daughter of John H. 
Higbee, who built and operated one of the early saw 
mills and pioneer distilleries at South Elkhorn, Fay- 
ette County. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. George 
Barkley was solemnized in 1806, and he was but thirty- 
three years of age at the time of his death. His youth- 
ful widow remained on the home farm and reared her 
four children with the utmost maternal devotion, the 
two sons having been John K. and William L. Mar- 
garet, the elder daughter, became the wife of Wil- 
liam Clark, who was engaged in the practice of law 
at Nicholasville for a number of years and who 
later resided on his large and valuable farm on the 
Nicholasville Turnpike, in Jessamine County, where 
his death occurred, his widow having passed the clos- 
ing period of her life in the City of Louisville. Mary, 
the younger daughter, became the wife of John Lafon, 
a substantial farmer of Jessamine County, and she 
was sixty years of age at the time of her death. 

John Barkley, the elder son, maintained his home at 
Danville and as president of the Southern Railroad, 
passing through that city, he was instrumental in hav- 
ing the fine towers erected at the high bridge over 
the Kentucky River where crossed by the line of this 
railway. He was in middle life at the time of his 
death, he having been killed in a runaway accident 
while driving a spirited team. His son William resides 
in the City of Louisville, and his daughter Mary be- 
came the wife of Rev. William Brown, a Presbyterian 
clergyman in that city. 

Mrs. Martha E. (Higbee) Barkley had come as a 
bride to the farm now owned by her granddaughter, 
the wife of Joseph H. Lane, of whom individual men- 
tion is made on other pages of this publication, and 
after the death of her husband she erected the fine old 
house which still adorns the homestead, the closing 
years of her life, however, having been passed in the 
home of her son William L., who then resided on the 
Harrodsburg Turnpike in Jessamine County. Mrs. 
Barkley, a gracious gentlewoman who was revered by 
all who knew her, passed to the life eternal at the 
venerable age of eighty-two years. On the walls of 
one of the rooms in the house which she erected,, as 
above noted, there hangs an oil portrait of her when 
she was somewhat more than forty years of age, and 
it is needless to say that the same is treasured by her 
granddaughter, Mrs. Lane. 

William L. Barkley was reared and educated in his 
native county and as a young man he wedded Miss 
Adaline Stout, a daughter of David R. and Delilah 
(Higbee) Stout, her mother having been a daughter 
of John H. Higbee, mentioned in a preceding para- 
graph. In addition to his successful association with 
farm industry, Mr. Barkley operated a distillery and 
powder mill at South Elkhorn in Fayette County. He 
divided his estate of 600 acres among his children, but 
retained 300 acres in the home farm, on which he and 
his wife resided at the time of their deaths. Of their 
children the eldest is Martha, wife of Joseph H. Lane, 
who is the subject of a personal sketch on other pages; 
Margaret C. is the widow of John Steele and resides 
at Nicholasville ; John is a prosperous farmer in the 
State of Oklahoma, near Paden, and his property is 
well within the oil district in that section of the state; 
Ada became the wife of Dr. F. O. Young, of Lexing- 
ton, and died at the age of fifty-one years; Eugenia. 




{/ y la^Cg!^tyy\ 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



39 



tlie wife of George Hutchison, died at the age of 
forty-five years; William L., Jr., who was fifty years 
of age at the time of his death, married Miss Prue 
Blackburn, who survives him, as do also their three 
cliildren, Ada Belle, Louise C, and Steele. 

Reverting to the genealogy of the Barkley family, 
it is to be recorded that John Barkley, the Kentucky 
pioneer, was born in County Derry, Ireland, in 1747. 
Upon coming to America he first located in Lancaster 
C-'ounty, Pennsylvania, whence in 1798 he removed to 
Buckingham County, Virginia, and it was about the 
oiiening of the nineteenth century that he settled in 
Jessamine County, Kentucky, where he remained until 
iiis death, July 23, 1828. The maiden name of his wife 
was Susannah Lucas. Their son Samuel was born in 
1776 and came to Jessamine County, Kentucky, in 1804, 
In which year was here solemnized his marriage to 
Miss Jane Singleton, a daughter of Moses Singleton, 
who was another of the honored pioneers of this sec- 
tion of the state. 

George Rowe Smith, who in a few years has gained 
a creditable position in the Lexington bar, started his 
career as a coal miner, following that occupation while 
paying his way through college and university. 

He was born at Central City, Muhlenberg County, 
Kentucky, January 16, i8go, a son of George and 
Martha E. (Rowe) Smith, residents of Central City. 
His father was' born at Edinburgh, Scotland, was edu- 
cated in Edinburgh College, learned the art of sculp- 
ture, and was twenty -two years of age when he came 
to the United States. His home has been at Central 
City, Kentucky, since 1885, and he is still engaged as 
a farmer and merchant. He is an elder in the Pres- 
byterian Church and in politics a republican. Martha 
E. Rowe was born in Ohio County, Kentucky. She 
is the mother of six children : Helen D., wife of John 
Neil; Mabel, wife of Victor Lawton; Henry, who died 
in infancy; George R. ; Emma, wife of A. B. Christian; 
and Martha M., wife of A. B. Hotchkiss. 

George R. Smith during his boyhood at Central 
City attended public schools. His father was not a 
man of wealth and he could not command the funds 
to take him regularly through college. At the age of 
fifteen he went to work as a coal miner, and continued 
at intervals in that work until he was past twenty. 
While in the mines he utilized all his spare time in 
stud)', and his example was not only profitable to 
himself but inspired an ambition for learning in some 
of his fellow workmen as well. As a coal miner he 
jiaid his way through the University of Kentucky, 
maintaining a high standing in his classes and taking a 
Iiart in athletic afifairs as well. He graduated in 1915 
with the LL. B. degree, and since then has been in 
active practice at Lexington. He is a member of the 
law firm Smith & Rej-nolds, with offices in the Trust 
Building. 

Mr. Smith is a member of the Lexington Bar As- 
sociation and the Kentucky Bar Association, is a dem- 
ocrat, and is affiliated with Central City Lodge No. 
(■>7^. F. & A. M., and the Knights of Pythias. 

November 27, 1915. he married Ella AL Clark, a 
native of Rockcastle County, Kentucky, oldest of the 
si.x children, five of whom are still living, of Granville 
W. and Maggie (Ballard) Clark. Her father is a 
Fayette County farmer, a member of the Christian 
Church and in politics a republican. 

J. T. J.'\CKsax. A third of a century ago J. T. JacT<- 
son made his first modest efifort as a retail lumber 
merchant at Lexington. He is one of the oldest lum- 
ber dealers in the state and his personal energies have 
been the means of broadening his business until it is 
now conducted on a large scale, involving manufac- 
turing as well as distributing facilities, and also a 
complete organization for contracting and building. 

For the past six years it has been conducted as the 



J. T. Jackson Lumber Company, of v/hich Mr. Jack- 
son is practically the sole owner. He began business 
in 1888. The facilities now include planing mills for 
the manufacture of all interior finish, moldings, sash 
and door and other lines of mill work. He handles 
all grades of lumber and builders' supplies. The busi- 
ness has $125,000 invested, and the range of its service 
and activities covers all the Blue Grass country. 

J. T. J?ckson was born in Bullitt County, Kentucky, 
December 11, 1863. His grandfather, John Jackson, 
was a Virginian who settled at an early day in Shelby 
County, Kentucky, and was a farmer in Shelby, Spen- 
cer and Bullitt counties, dying in the latter county. 
His son, James William Jackson, was a native of 
Shelby County and succeeded to the ownership of the 
old Bullitt County homestead. James W. Jackson died 
when past eighty. His wife, Sarah Holloway, was a 
native of Spencer County, Kentucky, and died in mid- 
dle years. 

J. T. Jackson grew up on a farm and lived there 
until he was about twenty-five years of age. He fin- 
ished his education in Transylvania University, which 
he attended in 1883-84. He was on the farm until 
1888, when he came to Lexington and opened a small 
lumber yard on West Short Street. He continued in 
business at that location for twenty-five years, but in 
the meantime had secured the grounds where his pres- 
ent plant is located. For several j'ears past a large 
part of his business has been contracting. He is the 
contractor for the new boys' dormitory of the Univer- 
sity of Kentucky. His building superintendent is H. G. 
Garner, a civil engineer. Mr. Jackson keeps from 
twenty to sixty men employed in his business. 

At one time he served as a member of the board of 
education, and is a substantial citizen whose interests 
go out to every worthy enterprise in Lexington or his 
state. He is a deacon of the Central Christian Church. 
.'\t the age of twenty-three Mr. Jackson married Sallie 
Hughes, of Frankfort, who died leaving two sons ; 
William Hughes, now a lumber dealer at Danville, 
Kentucky, and J. T., Jr., associated with his father's 
office. Mr. Jackson married for his second wife Mar- 
garet Sellier, of Lexington, and they have one daugh- 
ter, Elizabeth Holloway, now a student in the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky. 

Grover Cleveland Thompson, who was an educator 
before he was a lawyer, has for eight years given his 
undivided time to the practice of his profession at 
I^exington as a member of the firm of Thompson & 
Thompson in the Fayette National Bank Building. His 
earlier associations were with Lawrence County, Ken- 
tucky, where the Thompsons have been a prominent 
family for several generations. His grandfather, John 
Thonipson. was a son of Martin Thompson, Jr., who 
was also born in Lawrence County. Martin Thomp- 
son, Jr., was a son of Martin Thompson, Sr., who 
settled in Lawrence County, near Yatesville, about 1800, 
having come from Wise County,_ Virginia. John 
Thompson was second lieutenant in the Forty-fifth 
Kentucky Volunteers of the Union Army, served two 
terms as sheriff of Lawrence County and was one of 
the influential democrats of that section. During his 
time a school was established at Caney Fork, and in 
that old schoolhouse Grover C. Thompson and his 
three brothers, Linzy, Leo and Earl, all had their first 
experience as teachers. John Thompson died in 1904, 
at the age of seventy-seven. He was the father of 
eleven children. 

Of these the fourth in age is James Franklin 
Thompson, who was born in Lawrence County, 
July 2?, i860. He married Amanda Watson, who 
wa.s born August 17, 1865. James Franklin Thomp- 
son acquired a public school education and was suc- 
cessfully engaged in farming and stock raising until 
1018, when he retired and is now living at Ashland, 
Iventuckv. For four terms or sixteen years he served 



40 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



as deputy county clerk. He is a democrat and an Odd 
Fellow. He and his wife had eleven children, two of 
whom died in infancy. The others are : Linzy O., 
senior member of the law firm of Thompson & 
Thompson at Lexington and a special agent of the 
United States Department of Justice; Grover C. ; Ev- 
erett S., who lives at Ashland, Kentucky; Leo, who 
was a teacher and at the time of his death, at the age 
of twenty-three, was a student of Kentucky University; 
Earl D., a resident of Akron, Ohio ; Dewey, of Ash- 
land ; Ruth, Eunice and Kermit, still at home. 

Grover Cleveland Thompson was born in Lawrence 
County, on his father's farm, January lO, 1885, soon 
after the first election of Grover Cleveland to the 
Presidency. After attending local schools he was a 
student in the Normal School at Blaine, Kentucky, 
attended a business college at Cincinnati, Ohio, and 
then entered the Southern Normal School at Bowling 
Green, Kentucky, from which he received his Bach- 
elor of Science degree in 1907. He taught three terms 
in his native county and from 1907 to 1909 was prin- 
cipal of the high school at Gilbert, Louisiana, and then 
completed his law studies in Kentucky University, 
graduating with the degree of LL. B. in 1910 and 
being admitted to the Fayette County bar and before 
the Kentucky Court of Appeals in June of the same 
year. However, for three years more he continued his 
work as an educator, being principal of the high 
school at Waynesboro, Mississippi, two years, and 
principal of the high school at Brooksville, Mississippi, 
one year. In 1913 he located at Lexington, and has 
since been associated in practice with his brother 
Linzy. So_ far he has sought no political responsibilities 
or distinctions and has given all his time to his profes- 
sion. He is a member of the Lexington Bar Asso- 
ciation, the Kentucky State Bar Association, the Com- 
mercial Law_ League of America and the American 
Bar Association. He is a democrat, and a member of 
Immanuel Baptist Church. 

May 19, 1909, he married Virginia Lee Gill, also a 
teacher, who was born at Clinton, Mississippi, a daugh- 
ter of Charles and Mittie (Lee) Gill. Her parents 
are native Mississippians and living. Mrs. Thompson 
is the second of their eight children, three of whom 
are still living, William J. Gill being superintendent 
of the Louisiana Training Institute at Monroe, Louisi- 
ana, and the younger brother, D. D. Gill, being a 
physician at Gilbert, Louisiana. Her father is now a 
retired farmer at Gilbert, Louisiana, and is mayor of 
Gilbert. He is a democrat and a Baptist. Mr. and 
Mrs. Thompson have one son, Grover C., Jr., who was 
born March 19, 191 1, at Gilbert, Louisiana. 

Charles Lsrael Stewart, general manager of the 
Lexington Herald, was born at Bunn's Level, Harnett 
County, North Carolina, May 14, 1869. He is the son 
of James B. and Mary Anne Byrd Stewart. His 
father, who was a farmer, country merchant and gin- 
ner, died_ when the son was two years old, and his 
mother died when he was ten. After his tenth year 
he was brought up in the family of an uncle, John D. 
Pegram. He attended local schools, Jonesboro High 
School and Buie's Creek Academy. At the age of 
eighteen he became a country school teacher, and a 
little more than a year later became a partner in the 
publication of the first newspaper ever printed in his 
native county. He and his partner purchased and 
installed the first printing office in the county. For 
the last half of 1889 he was employed on the Twin 
City Daily, now the Sentinel, of Winston-Salem. In 
January, 1890, he went to Charlotte as a reporter on 
the Chronicle, now the Observer. In August of that 
year he went to Roanoke, Virginia, as a reporter for 
the Times. He lived in Roanoke for the greater part 
of the period, from August, i8go, to April, 1897. He 
spent the greater part of 1892 in Winston-Salem on 
the Sentinel and in Washington as correspondent for 



a number of North Carolina papers. In Roanoke he 
served as news editor of the Times and as editor of 
the Evening World. He went to Kentucky in April, 
1897, when the Louisville Dispatch was established, 
becoming managing editor. He was appointed editor 
of that paper in 1899, and for the last few months 
of its existence was editor and manager. In the 
spring of 1900, after the suspension of the Dispatch, 
he was emploj^ed as editorial writer on the Louisville 
Evening Post, serving in that capacity for two years. 
He was night editor and managing editor of the Louis- 
ville Herald for a year, and was for a year on the 
editorial staff of the Philadelphia Public Ledger. 

Mr. Stewart left the Ledger in 1905 to become 
associated with the Lexington Herald, remaining here 
until November, 1909, when he went to Enid, Okla- 
homa. He published the Enid Morning News for 
nearly six years and returned to the Herald in 1916. 
He planned and supervised the erection of the Herald 
Building and purchased and supervised the installa- 
tion of the Herald plant. During the greater part of 
his association with the Herald he has had supervision 
of all departments and contributed to its editorial 
columns. He directed the Herald's handling of the 
Peace Conference and wrote a weekly analysis of the 
progress of the conference. He is the author of a 
short catechism on the Covenant of the League of 
Nations that was used extensively as a campaign 
document in the presidential campaign of 1920. 

On January 11, 1910, he married Margaret O'Brien, 
daughter of Patrick O'Brien and a native of Clark 
County, Kentucky. They have three children, Charles 
Thomas, Mary Carolyn and Margaret O'Brien. ■ Mr. 
Stewart is a Rotarian, a Fourth Degree Knight of 
Columbus, president of the Lexington Associated 
Charities, a director of the Lexington Board of Com- 
merce, member of the Paper Committee of the Amer- 
ican Newspaper Publishers' Association, chairman of 
the Paper Committee, and first vice president of the 
Southern Newspaper Publishers' Association. He will 
probably be elected president of the latter organization 
at its annual meeting in the summer of 1922. 

Richard Baylor Hickman, of the Baylor Hickman 
& Company and the Ewald Iron Company, of Louis- 
ville, has given most of the years of his active life to 
the iron business, both as a manufacturer and mer- 
chant. He is one of Kentucky's foremost business 
men, and his enterprise has been reflected in many 
public activities. During the World war he was a 
commissioned officer of the Red Cross abroad, and 
served the Government in several important confi- 
dential capacities. 

Mr. Hickman was born at Elkton, Todd County, 
Kentucky, November 12, 1865, a son of Lawson B. 
and Georgeann (Baylor) Hickman. The Hickman 
family has been in Kentucky for considerably more 
than a century. His father was born in Fayette 
County in 1816, and was educated for medicine at 
Philadelphia. He practiced for many years, and in 
1870, when his son was five years of age, located at 
Hopkinsville. His prominence in the profession is in- 
dicated by the fact that at one time he served as 
president of the Kentucky State Medical Association. 
A large part of his work in his profession was done 
gratuitously, especially among the poor. He was 
ardently devoted to his work, without considering its 
financial rewards. He was a member of the Masonic 
fr^ernit}', attended the Presbyterian Church, and was 
a democrat in politics. He died in 1891. His wife 
was born in 1821, in Logan County, Kentucky, and 
died December 10, 1918, when within three years of 
the century mark. Of her thirteen children Baylor 
is the youngest, and only two others are now living. 

Baj'lor Hickman was educated in a private military 
school, and at the age of sixteen began his working 
career in a tobacco factory at 50 cents a day. The 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



41 



opening for a permanent career came at the age of 
nineteen when he joined the R. L. Coleman Company, 
pig iron manufacturers and dealers at St. Louis. He 
was with that firm about three years, and for a sim- 
ilar time with Hall Brothers, pig iron dealers at Louis- 
ville. After that experience he entered the liusiness 
for himself under the firm name of Hickman, Cousen 
Company. After the deatii of Mr. Cousen in i8gi 
Mr. Hickman organized the Hickman-Williams Com- 
pany, and was its president until 1913, when he re- 
signed his office and sold most of his stock in the con- 
cern. He then bought the Ewald Iron Company, and 
has since been president of this organization. The 
Ewald Iron Company are iron manufacturers, spe- 
cializing in the product widely known as Tennessee 
Charcoal Bloom Iron, a product familiar to the iron 
industry since 1844. Mr. Hickman is owner of the 
business known as Baylor Hickman & Company, deal- 
ers in pig iron, coke and other metals. He is also a 
director of the National Bank of Kentucky and presi- 
dent of the Pittsburgh Fuel Company. 

He is a former president of the Pendennis Club of 
Louisville, serving in that office two terms, is a mem- 
ber of the Louisville Country Club, the River Valley 
Club, the Chess and Whist Club, the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and the Louisville Lodge of 
Elks. He is a member of the Second Presbyterian 
Church and a democrat in politics. 

On March 21, 1888, Mr. Hickman married Stannye 
Ormsby, a native of Jefferson County, Kentucky, and 
daughter of Benson and Eustasia (Cates) Ormsby, 
both natives of Kentuckj'. Airs. Hickman was the 
second of five daughters. Six children were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Hickman. The first died in infancy; 
Helen C, the second, is the wife of Clifton Rodes, 
of Glenview, Kentucky, and they have a daughter, 
Stannye Baylor Rodes ; the third child, Stannye, died 
in infancy; Mary Lee is the wife of Charles S. Blak- 
ley, an officer in the United States Army now stationed 
at Fort Leavenworth, and they have a daughter, 
Stannye Ormsby Hickman Blakley. The son, Baylor 
Ormsby Hickman, was educated in the St. Paul 
School at Concord, New Hampshire, and later attended 
Yale University and then became associated with his 
father as vice president and engineer of tests in the 
iron industry. In 1917 he enlisted in the Marine Avi- 
ation Corps, was trained at the Boston School of Tech- 
nology and at Miami, Florida, and was in the service 
until the close of the war. The younger child, Wil- 
liam Ormsby, died at the age of sixteen, in 1916. 

Mr. Hickman gave little thought to his private busi- 
ness affairs during America's participation in the 
World war. He was especially interested in the work 
of the Red Cross. While at Washington and as the 
result of an interview with Mr. H. P. Davison, chair- 
man of the Council of the Red Cross, he secured 
permission for his two daughters to establish at Louis- 
ville the first Red Cross lunch room in the United 
States. His daughters made a conspicuous success of 
this patriotic venture, and were able to turn over to 
the Red Cross treasury about a thousand dollars profit 
every month of operation. In July, 1918, Mr. Hick- 
man went overseas with a congressional committee for 
the purpose of getting special information for the use 
of the United States Government. During this trip 
he was at the battle front of the American army. 
Later in the same year he again returned to Paris, 
and was commissioned a captain in the Red Cross and 
remained in that service overseas until the signing of 
the armistice. 

Mr. Hickman's home is at Glenview, formerly the 
Glenview Stock Farm, nine miles from Louisville. It 
is one of the most attractive homes of Jefferson 
County. 

Emmett M. Dickson, who is engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession at Paris, judicial center of 



Bourbon County, has secured status as one of the rep- 
resentative members of the bar of Central Kentucky, 
and in his career he has achieved high reputation as a 
vigorous and resourceful trial lawyer and well-forti- 
fied counsellor. Mr. Dickson is a scion of patrician 
Southern stock, the Dickson family having been 
founded in North Carolina in the Colonial period of 
our national history and representatives of the name 
having later become prominently and mfluentially con- 
cerned with the settlement and the civic and material 
progress of the State of Tennessee, where the County 
of Dixon was named in honor of the family. The 
paternal great-grandparents of the subject of this re- 
view were numbered among the pioneers of what is 
now Dickson County, Tennessee, where the grandsire 
became a pioneer physician and surgeon and a citizen 
of prominence in community and general public 
affairs. 

He whose name initiates this sketch was born in 
Tipton County, Tennessee, on the 21st of July, 1856, 
and is a son of Rev. Joseph A. Dickson, D. D., who 
likewise was born in Tennessee and who became a dis- 
tinguished clergyman of the Presbyterian Church. In 
1871 he became pastor of the Presbyterian Church at 
Millersburg, Bourbon County, Kentucky, where he con- 
tinued his earnest and effective service for twelve 
years. He then accepted the call to the pastorate of 
the Presbyterian Church at Pine Bluff, Arkansas, and 
he passed the final period of his long and gracious 
life in the home of his son, Emmett M., of this re- 
view. He was born September 9, 1835, and passed 
to the life eternal on the i8th of June, 1910, — a man 
who had labored long and earnestly in the vineyard 
of the Divine Master and who was revered by all 
who came within the sphere of his influence. Doctor 
Dickson had first prepared himself for the legal pro- 
fession, and prior to his marriage had engaged in 
the practice of law at Covington, judicial center of 
Tipton County, Tennessee. His deep religious con- 
victions and fervent zeal later led him to consecrate 
his life to the ministry of the Presbyterian Church, 
which he honored alike by his ability and his worthy 
service. His wife, whose maiden name was Mary 
Catherine McCain, was born in Tipton County, Ten- 
nessee, where she was reared and educated. In her 
gentle and kindly life she most effectively supple- 
mented the earnest pastoral service of her husband, 
and she died at Pine Bluff, Arkansas, in 1892, her 
birth having occurred in 1837. Of the surviving chil- 
dren it may be recorded that Charles B. Dickson, 
D. D. S., is engaged in the practice of his profession 
at Ashland, Kentucky; that May is the wife of Wil- 
bur Garvin, of Lawton, Oklahoma ; and that Emmett 
M., of this review, is the eldest of the number. 

Emmett M. Dickson was afforded the advantages 
of the Kentucky Wesleyan College at Millersburg, in 
which he completed a preparatory course, and there- 
after he entered historic Hampden-Sidney College in 
Virginia, in which he completed the classical course. 
Thereafter he read law in the office and under the 
perceptorship of his uncle, W. S. McCain, a leading 
member of the bar of Little Rock, Arkansas, and 
upon his return to Kentucky he was admitted to the 
bar at Paris, Bourbon County, in the year 1876. He 
has here continued in active general practice during 
the long intervening years, and is now one of the 
honored and veteran members of the bar of Bourbon 
County. His first professional coadjutor was Judge 
John A. Prall, and their partnership alliance continued 
about four years — until the death of Judge Prall. 
Thereafter Mr. Dickson was associated in practice 
with Judge Quincy Ward until the latter's death in 
1890. Since that time Mr. Dickson has continued in 
the individual practice of his profession, in which he 
has appeared in connection with much important liti- 
gation in the courts of this section of the state. He 
has been for a quarter of a century attorney for 



i2 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



the Louisville & Nashville Railroad, and has had 
charge of much of its legal business throughout 
Central and Eastern Kentucky. Mr. Dickson ap- 
peared as attorney for the contestants in the celebrated 
Renick will case in Clark County, and in this cause 
he was associated with a number of other leading 
attorneys of the state, the while the opposition 
arrayed an equally strong corps of representative 
lawyers. Another important will case with which Mr. 
Dickson was identified in a professional way was that 
of the estate of Thomas Woodford, of Bourbon 
County, Hon. Joseph Blackburn and other distin- 
guished Kentucky lawyers having likewise been iden- 
tified with this case. 

Though he has been unwavering in his allegiance 
to and the work of his profession, the civic loyalty 
and public spirit of Air. Dickson were shown effec- 
tively during his service as representative of Bourbon 
County in the State Legislature in the sessions of 1891, 
1892, 1893, 1894 and 1895. He has proved a staunch 
and efTective advocate of the principles of the demo- 
cratic party, in behalf of which he has been a resource- 
ful public speaker in many spirited campaigns. For 
three years he gave characteristically effective service 
as master commissioner of the Bourbon County Cir- 
cuit Court. He and his wife are earnest and zealous 
members of the Presbyterian Church in their home 
city. 

In June, 1880, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Dickson to Miss Mary Blanton, daughter of Rev. 
L. H. Blanton, D. D., chancellor of Central Univer- 
sity and a brother of the late Prof. Joseph Blanton. 
Mrs. Dickson was afforded the advantages of Miss 
Baldwin's Seminary for young women at Staunton, 
Virginia. Mr. and Mrs. Dickson have but one child, 
Lizette, wife of Durand Whipple, who is a leading 
lawyer at Little Rock, Arkansas, and who served 
two years in France as judge advocate general for 
the American Expeditionary Forces in the late World 
war. 

Charles C. Stoll. In the forty years since he 
graduated from high school at Louisville, Mr. Stoll 
has concentrated his energies on one line of business, 
oil, acquired his early training and knowledge through 
a number of j'ears of association with the Standard 
Oil Company, but for a quarter of a century has been 
an independent dealer and refiner. He built up the 
business individually, but in later years has had the 
good fortune to associate with him his four sons. 
The Stoll Oil Refining Company at Louisville is there- 
fore a family business, Mr. Stoll and his sons being 
all actively associated with the management. 

Mr. Stoll was born at Louisville April 23, 1861, 
son of C. Christian and Elizabeth (Acker) Stoll. His 
parents established a home at Louisville in 1840, and 
his father for many years was a fruit and vegetable 
merchant. Charles C. Stoll graduated from the Louis- 
ville Male High School in 1880, and the next year 
entered the service of the Standard Oil Company. 
He received many promotions in the Southern branches 
of that corporation, and was in the service altogether 
fifteen years. 

In i8g6 he organized an independent oil company 
known as the Charles C. Stoll Oil Company, and from 
year to year extended his trade facilities and connec- 
tions over a large district around Louisville. In 1917 
the Stoll Oil Refining Company was incorporated, with 
$500,000 of capital. The company maintains a refinery 
at Louisville, and manufactures a varied line of petro- 
leum products and has distributing branches and 
agencies throughout Kentucky and other states. Mr. 
C. C. Stoll is president, and his four sons are George 
Stoll, vice president; Berry V. Stoll, vice president; 
William A. Stoll, treasurer ; Charles E. Stoll, assist- 
ant secretary, while Albert S. Prinz is secretary of 
the corporation. The son, George J. Stoll, married 



Lorena Johanbeke, and Mr. Stoll has two grandsons, 
Charles W. and George Junior. 

One of the successful business men of Louisville, 
Mr. Stoll is also one of the very generous and public- 
spirited citizens. At one time he was president of the 
Citizens League, was a member of the Board of Pub- 
lic Works under Mayor Grinstead, is a trustee of 
the LTniversity of Louisville, was the founder and 
first president of the Churchman's Federation of 
Louisville, was one of the organizers and is a trustee 
of Lincoln Institute, and is a member of the Louis- 
ville Industrial Foundation. He is also actively iden- 
tified with the Board of Trade and other organizations. 

Arthur Krock. Some of the larger responsibilities 
and some of the distinctive achievements of the 
"fourth estate" are properly credited to Arthur Krock. 
He began his career in 1906, fifteen years ago, as a 
police reporter at Louisville. By 1908 he had become 
night editor of the Associated Press at Louisville. 
Every successful newspaper man covets the honor and 
experience of Washington correspondent, and he held 
that post for the Louisville Times in 1909 and in 191 1 
for the Courier-Journal. After six years at the source 
of national political news Mr. Krock returned to 
Louisville in 191 5 as editorial manager for the 
Courier-Journal and Louisville Times. Since then he 
has done much to shape the editorial and news pol- 
icies of those two great papers. He is a director of 
both papers, and since April, 1919, has been editor-in- 
chief of the Times. 

Mr. Krock was one of the American journalists who 
went to Paris at the time of the Peace Conference in 
1918-ig, and while there contributed a number of 
syndicated articles to the American press. It is sig- 
nificant of his standing as a journalist and his force- 
fulness in getting things done that he was selected 
as one of the three American members of the Inter- 
Allied Press Committee of fourteen which prevailed 
upon the Peace Conference to adopt a policy of open 
sessions. 

In 1920 Mr. Krock, at the personal request of Gov- 
ernor James Cox, was chosen first assistant to the 
chairman of the National Democratic Campaign at 
the democratic headquarters. Mr. Krock is a member 
of the Associated Press for the Louisville Times, is 
a member of the Delta Sigma fraternity, the Penden- 
nis and Country clubs of Louisville, and the Gridiron 
Club of Washington. 

On April 22, 191 1, he married Marguerite Polleys, 
of St. Paul, Minnesota. She was born at Madison, 
Wisconsin, a daughter of Thomas A. and Louisa 
(Ashby) Polleys, her father a native of Trempealeau, 
Wisconsin, and her mother of Newburg, New York. 
Her parents are still living. Her father is tax com- 
missioner for the Chicago & Northwestern Railway 
Company. Mrs. Krock is the only child of her par- 
ents. Mr. and Mrs. Krock have one son, Thomas 
Polleys Krock, who was born at Washington, D. C, 
January 21, 1912. 

Arthur Krock has spent most of his life in Ken- 
tucky, and until he began his career as a newspaper 
man his home was chiefly at Glasgow, Kentucky, 
where his grandfather, a pioneer merchant, located 
early in the 19th century. He was born November 
16, 1886, a son of Joseph and Caroline (Morris) 
Krock. He completed his education in the Lewis In- 
stitute of Chicago, where he received a diploma as 
Associate in Arts in 1906. Joseph Krock, his father, 
was born in New York City May i?, 1859, while the 
mother was born in Kentucky November 25, 1864. 
They were married August 11, 1885, and Arthur is 
their only child. Joseph Krock was educated in New 
York, and in 1884 moved to Louisville and subse- 
quently lived in Chicago, Illinois. He has been an 
accountant all his life. 




Mr. and Mrs. M. G. Wilson 
Log House and Present Residence 



}J ISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



43 



Martin Goi.dkn \Vii,s(in, than whom tlicre is no citi- 
zen better and more favorably known in Daviess 
County, is a native son of Kentucky. He was born 
in Bath County July 29, 1847, a son of James and 
Polly Ann (Golden) Wilson, both of whom were born 
in Virginia, but were married in Kentucky. Mr. Wil- 
son's paternal grandfather, Uriah Wilson, was a pio- 
neer settler in Bath County, Kentucky, but after living 
a few years in that county he removed to Owen County, 
and there continued to reside until his death. In his 
day he took a prominent part in the Indian warfare, 
for the Indians were so savage that when he first 
came to Kentucky he and his family had to live in the 
fort at Lexington for a time. The Wilsons have been 
noted for their longevity, but Mr. Wilson's father, 
who was a strong southern sympathizer, ardently 
espousing the cause of the Confederacy, was killed in 
1861, when he was but forty-two years of age, on 
account of his outspoken views with reference to the 
war. His wife died in 1862. They had three sons, 
Martin Golden, William Henry and James Uriah, and 
one daughter, Rachel F. Wilson. The mother of these 
children was the father's second wife. By his first 
marriage he was the father of two daughters. By 
occupation he was a farmer, and resided in Owen 
County. 

It was in Owen County that Martin G. Wilsc^n was 
reared, and there he lived until he was thirty years 
of age, working as a farm hand. He also worked 
as such in Indiana and Missouri, sometimes not re- 
ceiving more than $10 a month and his board. On 
March 10, 1878, Mr. Wilson was united in marriage 
with Miss Nancy Mullen Fightmaster, the ceremony 
being performed in Scott County, Kentucky. They 
were very poor and in debt to the amount of $600. 
Realizing that if they were to make good in life it 
would be best to strike out, and this brave young couple 
left Scott County on March 28, 1878, and eighteen days 
after they were "married they reached a log cabin in 
the woods in Daviess County which stood on a farm 
now owned by Mr. Wilson. This cabin still stands, 
and Mr. WiL>on intends that it be preserved as long 
as any of its timbers hold together, as a memorial 
of the early days of struggle and accomplishment. 
When they came here Mr. Wilson had a three year 
lease on 120 acres of land, of which only twenty-five 
acres had been cleared. Two years later, he bought 
tliis tract • of land. He toiled unceasingly, only stop- 
ping long enough to secure a modicum of sleep, food 
and to keep the Sabbath, and gradually cleared the 
land of the dense forest. In those days the only 
method for draining the land was with ditches, and 
he dug the necessary ones, later putting in tiling, and 
placed it in a high state of cultivation. Not only did 
lie improve his original farm, but other land which 
he later jjurchased, as his means permitted, until his 
homestead now includes 320 acres, which is in as fine 
an agricultural district as Kentucky affords. He has 
truly been a developer of farm lands, for in addition 
to his home farm he owns so much land as to be en- 
titled to a place among the most extensive farmers of 
the count.v. This land has all been cleared and de- 
veloped by him, and it is estimated that he has cleared 
more acres than any other one man in Daviess County. 
Beginning his career here, a poor man and in debt, 
tlie outlook would have discouraged most men, but 
when he and his faithful wife settled in that lonely little 
cabin in the woods the conviction came to him, "here 
we will live and die, and succeed we must." As he 
l)rospered he paid his debts and then began to invest 
in more land. W^ien reverses came, as they did, he 
rallied with all the more vigor, and his life career 
jilainly proves what a young man may accomplish, no 
matter how poor he may be, if he will but do and dare. 
In addition to farming Mr. Wilson has bought and 
sold thousands of head of livestock, and has special- 
ized in handling cattle, in this branch of business 



forming a wide circle of acquaintances in Daviess ana 
adjoining counties. The log cabin was his home for 
many years, but later on he built a handsome frame 
residence that was burned in 1913. It was at once 
replaced by a modern brick structure. Affer forty- 
two years of happy wedded life Mrs. Wilson was 
called by death from her husband's side, in 1920. 
In early life they both jcjined the Baptist Church, 
but later united with the Cumberland Presbyterians. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wilson became the parents of the fol- 
lowing children: Orlie Daniel, Robert Lee, James Rus- 
sell, Grover Cleveland and George William. 

George William Wilson is a veteran of the great 
war, having entered the service of his country, and 
been stationed at the Great Lakes Training School; 
but was not sent overseas, the signing of the armistice 
coming before the expiration of his period of train- 
ing. .Mthough not permitted to get into action, his 
service is none the less meritorious, for he offered 
himself at the time he went in defense of his govern- 
ment, and had the occasion demanded would have ren- 
dered good account of himself and his section of the 
country. 

Jkre p. Slli.iv.vx. a Lexington wholesale grocer, 
Jere P. Sullivan has had a long and active experience 
in ipercantile affairs in his native state, and is one of 
the business men of the modern generation who is prop- 
erly admired for his success and character. 

Mr. Sullivan was born at Lexington December 7, 
1864, son of Dennis and Ellen (Donovan) Sullivan. 
His parents were natives of County Cork, Ireland. His 
father lived to the age of eighty-seven and his mother 
to ninety-one. They were married in London, England, 
where their first three children were born, and the 
family came by sailing ship to New York City. Seven 
other" children were liorn after they reached America, 
and altogether seven grew to adult years. For some 
years the family lived at Hartford, Connecticut, where 
Dennis Sullivan was employed by the Colt's Arms 
Manufacturing Company. He then removed to Lex- 
ington, Kentucky, and for thirty years was one of the 
earnest and hard-working citizens and later retired. 
He was active in the Catholic Church, and helped Imild 
St. Paul's Qiurch at Lexington. Politically he was a 
democrat. 

Jere P. Sullivan acquired his early education in St. 
Paul's parochial school, attended Transylvania University 
and his first employment was as driver of a delivery 
wagon for the grocery house of Sculley & Yates. For 
two years he was travelling on the road, one year for 
R. H. Innes & Company. Mr. Sullivan then entered 
the general merchandise business at Centerville, Bour- 
bon County, and for twenty-three years was one of the 
live and enterprising factors of that community. In 
1909 he returned to Lexington, and has since been in 
the wholesale grocery business. He is also engaged in 
farming in Bourbon County, near Centerville. 

Mr. Sidlivan has been a business man and has had 
ro inclination for the honors and responsibilities of 
public office. He votes as a democrat, and is a member 
of St. Paul's Catholic Church. November 21, 1894. he 
married Nellie Dundon, who was born in Bourbon Coun- 
tv, Kentucky. Thev are the parents of five children : 
Mary, wife of R. T. Thornton, of Buffalo, New York, 
and "the mother of one son, Roger Sullivan; Ellen; 
Ruth, who married Henry Maloney, of Lexington; John 
and Agnes. 

W. Lor..\N She.\rek was educated for the law, has 
been a member of the Kentucky bar since 1910, but 
his principal business has been insurance, and with 
offices in the Fayette Bank Building at Lexington he 
has done much to promote the business of the North- 
western Mutual Life Insurance Company over this 
section of Kentucky. 



44 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



Mr. Shearer was born in Wayne County, Kentucky, 
August IS, 1885, son of William Francis and Mary 
Caroline (Frost) Shearer. His parents were both 
natives of Wayne County, his father born in 1847 and 
his mother in 1856. William F. Shearer spent his 
active life as a merchant and farmer at Gap Creek, 
thirty-five miles away from the nearest railroad. He 
died June 19, 1908. He was a member of the Masonic 
fraternity, his wife was an Eastern Star, in politics 
he voted as a republican, and the family were members 
of the Baptist Church. The mother died May 2, 1901, 
and of her nine children four are still living, W. Logan 
lieing the fourth in age. 

W. Logan Shearer acquired his early education in the 
public schools of Wayne County, also attended a private 
normal school there, and gained his advanced training in 
Georgetown College, Transylvania University, and was 
graduated from the law school in 1910 and admitted to 
the bar in May of the same year. He then became 
associated with the Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance 
Company of Milwaukee, and on the basis of his proved 
record of efficiency was appointed associate general 
agent at Lexington in 1916. 

Mr. Shearer also served a term in the Legislature, 
being elected in 1909 from the 36th District. He is a 
republican in politics, is a member of the Board of Com- 
merce, the Kiwanis Club, the First Baptist Church, the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and in Masonry 
is affiliated with Lexington Lodge No. I, A. F. and A. 
M., Lexington Chapter No. i, R. A. M., Webb Com- 
mandery No. 2, K. T. and Oleika Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine. 

February 12, 1914, he married Nell Campbell McCoy, 
daughter of James Lawrence and Emma (Lewis) Mc- 
Coy, natives of Kentucky. Her father is editor of the 
Pikeville News at Jackson, Kentucky, and also has a 
farm on Slate Creek and is a breeder of Duroc hogs. 
Mrs. Shearer was the second of three children, the other 
two being Lewis A. and Edward M. McCoy. Mr. and 
Mrs. Shearer have three children : Mary Lewis, Nell 
McCoy and William Logan, Jr. 

Richard F. Brasher. While he grew up on a farm 
and while his people have been substantially identified 
with the agricultural interests of Christian County for 
a long period of years, Richard F. Brasher left the 
farm as a youth, learned telegraphy, and continuously 
for twenty years or more has been identified with the 
Louisville and Nashville Railway Company, and has 
risen to the responsibilities of supervisory agent at 
Hopkinsville. 

He was born in Christian County, January 24, 1880. 
His paternal ancestors were Scotch and Irish aud were 
Colonial settlers in North Carolina. His father was born 
near Crofton in Christian County in 1837, and has lived 
in that one community practically all the eighty odd 
years of his life, and has devoted his energies to the 
tasks and responsibilities of farming. During the Civil 
war he was a Union soldier, serving with the Seven- 
teenth Kentucky Infantry at Shiloh, where he was 
wounded in the neck by a minnie ball, at Chickamauga, 
Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge and many other 
campaigns and battles, and was twice again wounded be- 
fore the war was over. Since the Civil war he has 
always voted as a republican. He has been an active 
worker in the Christian Church. He married Victoria 
Woodruff, who was born near St. Charles in Hopkins 
County, Kentucky, in 1847 and died near Crofton, in 
the old home, in June, 1917. Of her three children 
Richard F. is the youngest. Lula, the oldest, died in 
Christian County at the age of forty years, and her 
husband, G. C. Croft, is still living in the county as 
a farmer. The other son, C. B. Brasher, is a farmer in 
Christian County. 

Richard F. Brasher attended the country schools 
near his old home and was on the farm to the age of 



seventeen. He then entered the local freight office at 
Crofton, learned and practiced telegraphy at every op- 
portunity and leisure moment, and after a year was put 
on the payroll of the Louisville and Nashville as an 
extra operator and assigned duties at various places 
along the line in Kentucky for six months. For a year 
and a half he had a permanent place at Empire, Ken- 
tucky, as station agent and as an employe of the Empire 
Coal Company. Then came another period of eight 
months of work as operator and extra agent, when the 
company assigned him to duty at Henderson as operator 
and bill clerk. In 1907 he was promoted to chief clerk, 
and remained at Henderson until he was transferred to 
Earlington, Kentucky, as agent, and in June, 1916, came 
to Hopkinsville as supervisory agent. He has been 
continuously in the service of the Louisville and Nash- 
ville since he began his career as a railroad man. His 
offices are in the freight depot on Ninth Street. 

Mr. Brasher also owns a portion of the old homestead 
farm near Crofton. He is a republican, a member of 
the Baptist Church, and in Masonry is affiliated with 
Jerusalem Lodge No. 9, A. F. and A. M., at Henderson, 
Henderson Chapter No. 65, R. A. M., Henderson Com- 
mandery No. 14, K. T., and Rizpah Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine at Madisonville. 

In 1910, at Henderson, he married Miss Alice Board, 
a daughter of Walker and Roberta (Head) Board, her 
mother still living at Louisville. Her father, now de- 
ceased, was a farmer and merchant. Mrs. Brasher is a 
graduate of the Henderson High School. The older 
child of Mr. and Mrs. Brasher is Margaret Lee, born 
June 13, 1915, and the younger is Alice Woodruff, born 
April 25, 1921. The family live on a farm on Dixies Bee 
Line, one and one-half miles north of Hopkinsville, 
and operate a dairy. 

William Powhatan Winfree still handles an oc- 
casional case as a lawyer, and by virtue of half a 
century's residence and practice at Hopkinsville is the 
oldest member of the local bar. For many years he 
has also been prominent in the real estate business. 

Mr. Winfree, who is a Confederate veteran and who 
served as a bodyguard of General Forrest, was born at 
Gallatin in Sumner County, Tennessee, January 28, 
1843, and is of old Virginia ancestry. There were 
three Winfree brothers, French Huguenots, who after 
the massacre of St. Bartholomew fled to Virginia, where 
the family has been represented for many generations. 
Mr. Winfree's grandfather was Woodson Winfree, who 
spent his life as a planter and slave holder in Powhatan 
County, Virginia. Shurvin Trent Winfree, father of 
the Hopkinsville lawyer, was also a native of Powhatan 
County, was born in 1819, and soon after his marriage 
came west and in 1842 settled in Gallatin County, 
Tennessee, where he was a farmer. In 1846 he moved 
to Christian County, Kentucky, and was a well known 
resident of that county the rest of his life. Before the 
war he owned many slaves and conducted a large 
plantation. He died at Casky in Christian County in 
1902. He was a democrat and a Baptist. His wife 
bore the maiden name of Elmira Atkinson. She was 
born in Powhatan County, Virginia, in 1822 and died 
in Casky County in 1905. This venerable couple had 
a large family of fourteen children. The oldest is Wil- 
liam Powhatan Winfree. Brief mention of the others in 
order of birth is also made herewith. John W. was 
a farmer and merchant with stores both at Casky and 
Hopkinsville, and died at Casky at the early age of 
thirty years. James H., who was born in 1846, is in 
the insurance business and a resident of Antioch, 
California. George W., who died at Casky at the age of 
fifty, was a farmer, and his death was due to accidental 
injuries received in a threshing machine. Virginia, 
who died at the home of her brother William at Hop- 
kinsville in 1918, was a resident of California, widow 
of N. E. Grey, who for a number of years was a hotel 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



45 



proprietor in California. Irene, who died at Richmond, 
California, in 1919, had as her first husband Henry 
Durrat, a school teacher who died at Hopkinsville, and 
her second husband was a Mr. McMurray, a merchant 
also deceased. Florence, who died at Richmond, Cali- 
fornia, at the age of forty years, was the wife of Mr. 
Callmon, still living at Richmond, a bookkeeper. Bessie 
died at San Francisco, California, aged forty, wife of 
James M. Grey, a San Francisco lawyer. Susie, who 
died at Martinez, California, at the age of fifty years, 
was the wife of Pat Cunningham, now employed as a 
bookkeeper in San Francisco. M. F. Win free is a re- 
tired farm owner at Hopkinsville. Thomas S. is con- 
stable at Hopkinsville. Alex A. is a merchant at Los 
.A.ngeles, California. Carrie died at Richmond, Califor- 
nia, aged fifty years, wife of John Boyle, who is a book- 
keeper at Richmond. Julius R. was a very Successful 
farmer of Christian County, and died at the early age 
of thirty-five, his widow, whose family name was Faxon, 
being a resident of Memphis, Tennessee. 

William Powhatan Winfree was about three years of 
age when his parents moved to Christian County and 
he grew up in a country district, attended the country 
schools, and was prepared for college at Clarksville, 
Tennessee. He had been made proficient in Latin and 
Greek and other studies, and was ready for junior 
class in college when the war came on and he went 
into the Confederate army. October 8, 1861, he en- 
listed in the First Kentucky Cavalry, under Col. Ben 
Hardin Helm. This organization was disbanded a year 
later and he then enlisted in the Second Kentucky 
Cavalry. He was at the battle of Perryville, Kentucky, 
in 1862, and in the entire campaign between the two 
armies engaged in struggle for control of the state. He 
was at Chickamauga, where he served as first sergeant 
and a member of General Forrest's bodyguard, and 
was a follower of that great cavalry leader the re- 
mainder of the war. He was wounded in the arm at 
Winchester, Tennessee. The war over, Mr. Winfree 
returned to Christian County and at once took up the 
study of law, which he diligently prosecuted until he 
was admitted to the bar in January, 1866. He began 
practice at Hopkinsville, but soon after his marriage, 
in 1870, he moved to Linn County, Kansas, and practiced 
law and edited a weekly newspaper for two years. With 
that exception he has been an active member of the 
Hopkinsville bar for all the years since the war. A large 
share of his attention has been engaged by his increas- 
ing real estate business. He has owned a great deal 
of property in and around Hopkinsville, and owns the 
office building in which his own offices are situated on 
Court Street, also a modern residence on the corner of 
Virginia and Sixteenth streets, this home having been 
recently remodeled, and he has three other business 
buildings in Hopkinsville and formerly owned several 
farms near the city. 

Mr. Winfree has been a vigorous democrat and as 
a member of the minority party in Christian County, 
has helped make political history. In 1878 he was can- 
didate for county attorney, and while at the time the 
republican majority was normally fifteen hundred, he 
lost the election by only two hundred. In 1882 he 
was elected county judge, and while his opponent had 
previously been elected by fifteen hundred, Mr. Winfree 
won the election by a margin of eleven hundred votes. 
He also served two terms as city attorney of Hopkins- 
ville. He is an elder in the Christian Church, is present 
commander of Ned Merriweather Camp of the United 
Confederate Veterans, and is affiliated with Hopkins- 
ville Lodge No. 37, A. F. and A. M. 

In Hopkinsville in 1870 Mr. Winfree married Miss 
Carrie Bradshaw, daughter of B. W. and Juliette (Hop- 
son) Bradshaw. Her father was a Kentucky farmer. 
Mr. and Mrs. Winfree had six children : Lula W., 
who was born in January, 1871, and is the wife of 
James H. Ware, a farmer near Hopkinsville; Virginia 



W., Mrs. Allen Hardison, living with her father; W. 
P., Jr., a young lawyer who had won an enviable degree 
of success in his profession and who died at Hopkins- 
ville at the age of thirty; John W. an insurance man at 
Hopkinsville ; Ben S., in the garage business at Hop- 
kinsville; and James Bradshaw, connected with the 
Imperial Tobacco Company of Hopkinsville. 

James Johnson Claiborne. One of the prominent 
county officials of Christian County is James Johnson 
Claiborne, sheriff, but for many years he has been 
well known in the county through other activities, and 
a stanch citizenship has made him invaluable to the 
substantial interests of the community. 

He was born at Hopkinsville, October 4, 1886. His 
paternal ancestors were Irish and were early settlers in 
Virginia. His father, J. E. Claiborne, was born near 
Richmond, Virginia, in 1850, was reared in his native 
state, and as a young man came to Christian County, 
Kentucky, and settled on a farm. Farming has been his 
regular vocation, and he still lives on his homestead 
two miles north of Hopkinsville. His farm is a valu- 
able one of 125 acres. In connection with farming for 
a number of years he cried sales as an auctioneer and 
was also a road contractor. In politics, though a native 
Virginian, he is a republican. For a time he was a mem- 
ber of the police force of Hopkinsville and necessarily 
lived in the city during that official service. He has 
owned and sold several farms in Christian County. 
J. E. Claiborne is affiliated with Pearl City Camp 
No. 5, Woodmen of the World. He married Melissa 
(Johnson) Anderson, widow of William Henry Ander- 
son. She was born in 1848, six miles north of Hopkins- 
ville, and died at the home of her son James J. in 
January, 1920. By her first husband she had one son, 
R. M. Anderson, who is a carpenter and builder at 
Hopkinsville. The children of her second marriage were 
five in number. The oldest, Hewitt Henry, died at 
the age of five years, and the next two were daughters 
who died in infancy. The fourth is James J., while 
Ed, the youngest, is connected with the Nortonville 
Coal Company of Nortonville, Kentucky. 

James Johnson Claiborne lived in Hopkinsville until 
he was twelve years of age, and during that time had 
the advantages of the common schools. He is a man 
esteemed among all his acquaintances for his breadth 
of mind and cultivated intellect, but his education has 
been largely self-acquired and is due to study and 
reading of good books and contact with men of affairs. 
After leaving school he worked as a farm hand, 
and while his father was in the road contracting 
business handled the responsibilities of the home farm. 
At the age of twenty-one he supplemented his early 
education by one term in the McLean College at Hop- 
kinsville. Mr. Claiborne was for seven years a member 
of the Kentucky State Militia, being finally mustered 
out with the rank of second lieutenant. He was called 
to active duty in 1907 during the night rider troubles, 
and was on duty six months, until July, 1908. He 
was then appointed deputy sheriff under Sheriff J. M. 
Renshaw, and was in that position two years and six 
months. The next six years he was connected with 
the Williamson Transfer Company of Hopkinsville. 
Following that he served a year as sergeant of the 
police force and then, returning to the home farm, 
operated a dairy business for a year. It was while 
on the farm that he was elected sheriff, in November, 
1917, and has been engaged in the responsible perforrn- 
ance of the duties of that office since January, 1918, his 
term being four years. Before and after his election 
as sheriff he took a prominent part in all local war 
activities. Mr. Claiborne owns a suburban home with 
fifty-five acres of ground near Hopkinsville, and this 
place is well known for its registered hogs, horses and 
cattle. He has sold some of his fine stock over several 
states. He also owns a dwelling on North Main 



46 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



Strtet in Hopkinsville, and his outside investments make 
him a stockholder in the McCauley Moving Picture Com- 
pany of New York City and the Parker Rubber Com- 
pany of Indianapolis. Mr. Claiborne is a republican, 
is a Baptist, and is affiliated with Hopkinsville Lodge 
No. yj, A. F. and A. M., is a captain of the Uniformed 
rank of Knights of Pythias, is a past consul commander 
of the Woodmen of the World and a member of the 
Elks Lodge No. 545. 

On July 8, 1912, at Springfield, Ohio, Mr. Claiborne 
married Miss Katherine Trimmer, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. D. W. Trimmer, still living at Springfield. Her 
father has been continuously in the service of the 
International Harvester Company for thirty years. Mrs. 
Claiborne is a graduate of Dennison University of Ohio, 
an J came to Hopkinsville as teacher of French and 
Latin in the Bethel Woman's College. Mr. and Mrs. 
Claiborne are the parents of five children : Malissa 
Elizabeth, born in 1913; Muriel, who died at the age 
of ten months; Wilma Katherine, born February 20, 
1917; Jane, born January 4, 1920, and Clarice Virginia, 
born March 15, 1921. 

Ira Dorman Smith. Except for the time he was 
in the Naval Aviation Service during the World war 
Ira Dorman Smith has been a practicing Hopkinsville 
attorney for ten j'ears, a former county attorney of 
Christian County, and has achieved distinctive prom- 
inence in his profession and in the citizenship of that 
part of Kentucky. 

He belongs to an old American family, of English 
descent. The family for several generations lived in 
Virginia. His grandfather, Joseph Thomas Smith, 
was born in Virginia in 1830 and for many 3'ears was 
a successful and well-to-do farmer near Fairview in 
Todd County, Kentucky. At one time he owned a 
portion of the plantation on which Jefferson Davis 
was born. He retired from his farm in 1887 and 
moved to Hopkinsville, where he died in 1900. His 
wife was Mary Jane Littell, who was born in 1840 
and died at the age of eighty in November, 19JO, at 
her home, 206 East Sixteenth Street in Hopkinsville. 

Ira L. Smith, father of the attorne}', is a prominent 
Hopkmsville banker. He was born at the old home- 
stead in Todd County in 1861, was reared there, grad- 
uated from Vanderbilt University at Nashville in 1882, 
and in 1884 came to Hopkinsville, where he began his 
banking career as a bookkeeper in the old Planters 
Bank and Trust Company. He was promoted to as- 
sistant cashier and after assisting in organizing the 
trust company was treasurer and manager of the trust 
department. In 191G he became cashier of the City 
Bank and Trust Company, and he is now vice presi- 
dent of that institution. He has long been a prom- 
inent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, serving as treasurer of the church for many 
years. He is teacher of the Men's Bible Class, and 
his leadership and enthusiasm have developed this 
class until it is the largest Sunday School class in 
Hopkinsville. He is an independent voter. His home 
is at 221 East Sixteenth Street. Ira L. Smith married 
Miss Aurine Williams, who was born in Alabama in 
1863 and was reared at Uniontown in that state. Ira 
Dorman is the oldest of their three children. Thomas 
Littell Smith is assistant cashier of the City Bank 
and Trust Company of Hopkinsville. Mary Evelyn 
is the wife of Alvan H. Clark, a Hopkinsville lawyer. 

Ira Dorman Smith, who was born at Hopkinsville 
May 17, 1889, attended the public schools of his native 
city, graduating from high school in 1905, and then 
entered his father's alma mater, Vanderbilt Univer- 
sity, at Nashville, and received his Bachelor of Science 
degree in igio. In the meantime he had also been a 
student in the law department, and was admitted to 
the bar in the year of his graduation. He is a mem- 
ber of the Phi Delta Theta college fraternity. Mr. 



Smith Ijegan practice at Hopkinsville in 1910, and was 
in partnership with J. S. Bassett, under the firm name 
of Bassett & Smith, until 1912. In 1913 Mr. Smith 
entered the race for county attorney, was elected in 
November of that year, and began his four-year term 
January I, 1914. While county attorney he continued 
liis practice in partnership with Joseph C. Slaughter. 

Not long after leaving the office of county attorney 
Mr. Smith entered the Government service, in May, 
igiy, training for naval aviation. He was given his 
preliminary training at the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, later at the Pensacola, Florida, Flying 
School, and in October, 1918, was commissioned with 
the rank of ensign. Subsequently he was given special 
work with the Bureau of Standards at Washington, 
and in December, 1918, was relieved from active duty, 
bnt is still held as a Naval Reserve. Following the 
close of the war he returned to Hopkinsville, and has 
busied himself with a large general practice. He is 
now a member of the firm McKenzie & Smith, his 
partner being James A. McKenzie, and their offices 
are in the Summers Building on Main Street. 

Mr. Smith is a Democrat and in May, 1920, was 
appointed a member of the Democratic State Cen- 
tral Committee for the Second Congressional District. 
He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, and in 1918 served as exalted ruler of Hop- 
kinsville Lodge No. 545 of the Elks. He is also a 
member of Evergreen Lodge No. 38, Knights of 
Pythias, is a member of the Hopkinsville Business 
Men's Association and the State Bar Association. 

Mr. Smith now lives with his parents at 222 East 
Sixteenth Street. He was married at Hopkinsville 
in 1914 to Miss Viola Williams, daughter of Dr. M. W. 
and Margaret (Bell) Williams, residents of Hopkins- 
ville. Her father for many years was a practicing 
dentist bnt is now giving his attention to the breeding 
of thoroughbred horses. Mr. Smith bad the misfor- 
tune to lose his wife by death December i},, 1918, 
about the time he came out of the army. 

Ethelukrt D. Owen has resisted all nomadic im- 
pulses and has shown his good judgment by main- 
taining in his native county a close and effective 
alliance with the basic industries under the influence 
of which he was reared and of which he is now a sub- 
stantial representative in Fayette County, his fine old 
homestead farm being situated six miles northeast of 
Lexington. 

In the house which is his present place of abode 
Ethelbert Dudley Owen was born on the 24th of De- 
cember, 1861, and he is a son of the late Thomas and 
Susan (Matthews) Owen, the former of whom was 
born at North Middletown, Bourbon County, this state, 
in the year 1806, and the latter was born in Fayette 
County, January 3, 1824, a daughter of Samuel and 
Mary (Kemper) Matthews, whose marriage was here 
solemnized, Samuel Matthews having likewise been a 
native of Fayette County, within whose borders his 
pr-rents settled in the early pioneer dajs. The father 
of Samuel Matthews died when a comparatively young- 
man, and his widow later married a Fayette County 
man named Lowe, both having here remained until 
their deaths. Thomas Owen, who died in 1866, at 
the age of sixty years, was a son of Robert and Nanc)' 
(Foster) Owen, whose marriage was solemnized in 
Kentucky. Robert Owen was born and reared in Vir- 
ginia and was one of the pioneer settlers in the vi- 
cinity of North Middletown, Bourbon County, where 
both he and his wife died when venerable in years. 
Of their three sons Jonathan became an extensive 
farmer in Bourbon County and his death occurred at 
Paris, that county, his daughter Nancy being the wife 
of Watt Gage, of Winchester, Clark County. Thomas, 
father of the subject of this sketcli, was the next 
younger son. George remained on the old homestead 
farm in Bourbon County, and since his death the place 




Thomas Owen 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



47 



has passed out of the possession of the family. Of the 
daughters, Mrs. Lydia Ellsberry removed to Missouri; 
Mrs. Nancy Smith went with her husband to Texas ; 
Sally became the wife of Cameron Hearn and both 
remained in Kentucky until their deaths ; and Mary 
married Greenup Dejarnet, both having been residents 
of Bourbon County at the time of their deaths. 

As a young man Thomas Owen married Miss Emma 
Firman, of Bourbon County, and soon afterward they 
came to Fayette County, where he purchased a part 
of the farm now owned and occupied by his son 
Ethelbert D., of this sketch. Mrs. Owen died as a 
young woman and left no children. In 1842 Mr. Owen 
married Miss Susan Matthews, who was eighteen years 
of age at that time, he having been thirteen years 
her senior. A man of vigor and enterprise, Thomas 
Owen has signallj- prospered in his activities as an 
agriculturist and stock-grower, and to his original 
farm he added until he became the owner of a valu- 
able landed estate of 800 acres, all in one body. In 
1858 he erected the present substantial house on this 
homestead, and in that year his daughter Martha was 
born in the new domicile, which is now one of the 
venerable and attractive architectural landmarks of 
the county. This house, with several Doric columns 
extending to the height of the second story, is a pleas- 
ing specimen of pure Colonial architecture, and it faces 
the railroad line which was constructed through this 
locality in 1890. The handsome old Colonial mansion 
is the most imposing residential structure between Lex- 
ington and Winchester, and it has been both in the 
past and at the present time known as a center of 
gracious hospitality. Since the construction of the re- 
cent turnpike past the property this house has been 
left one-half mile from the thoroughfare, and a private 
road leads from the turnpike to the fine old home. 

Thomas Owen gave special attention to stock farm- 
ing and raised cattle upon a somewhat extensive scale. 
He was a staunch advocate of the principles of the 
republican party, and though not formally identified 
with any religious organization he gave liberal sup- 
port to both the Methodist Episcopal and the Baptist 
churches of the community, his wife having been a 
zealous member of the latter. Of the children of the 
second marriage eight attained to years of maturity : 
Robert remained a bachelor and continued to reside 
on the old homestead until his death, at the age of 
seventy-two years ; Mary did not marry and was thirty- 
five years of age at the time of her death ; Nancy, who 
is the widow of B. A. Lowe, resides on the home 
farm and has two children, Susie, the wife of Edwin 
Hisle, a farmer on the Maysville Turnpike in Fayette 
County, and they have two children, Owen McClure 
and Robert Edwin, and Miss Lena, who remains with 
her widowed mother; Emma remained on the old home 
farm until her death and was an invalid for six years 
prior to her demise, October 17, 1920, at the age of 
sixty-nine years ; Miss Fannie likewise remained at 
the old homestead, and here she died at the age of 
fifty-two years ; Miss Martha owns and resides upon 
a part of the old homestead farm ; Ethelbert D., sub- 
ject of this sketch, was the next in order of birth and 
occupies the fine old home mansion of which mention 
has been made, the domestic economies being in charge 
of his widowed sister, Mrs. Lowe, and her daughter 
Lena; Addie, the youngest of the children, resides 
with her sister Martha in their own house on the old 
homestead, and they gave devoted care to their sister 
Emma during the closing years of her gentle and gra- 
cious life. The father, Thomas Owen, took into his 
home the five young sons of his sister Sally, who 
died when they were children, these boys having been 
Robert, John, Frank, William and James. Of the 
number only James is now living, and he maintains 
his home in the City of Ithaca, New York. The 
Kemper and Foster families, of which the subject of 
this review is a lineal representative, were founded 



in this section of Kentucky in the early pioneer days, 
and members of both families found refuge in the 
old fort at Bryant Station at the time when Indians 
were a menace to the early settlers of the locality. 

Ethelbert D. Owen has remained continuously on 
the old homestead, received good educational advan- 
tages in his youth and is one of the enterprising and 
progressive representatives of farm industry in his 
native county, where he has a circle of friends that 
is limited only by that of his acquaintances. He has 
had no predilection for political activity but is aligned 
with the ranks of the republican party. In 1899 he 
married Miss Martha 'Alford, of Fayette County and 
their devoted companionship continued twenty years, 
at the expiration of which the gracious ties were sev- 
ered by the death of Mrs. Owen, on the 24th of De- 
cember, 1919, no children having been born of this 
union. 

IsADORE M. Bloom, M. D., who for a quarter of a 
century has held a chair in the Department of Med- 
icine in the University of Louisville, is a man of distin- 
guished attainments in both the science and profession 
of medicine and surgery. His career has been one 
of unselfish service and supplements the record of 
his honored father, for many years one of Louisville's 
foremost business men. 

His father was the late Nathan Bloom, who was 
born in Bavaria in 1827 and came to the United States 
in the early '40s. At Louisville in 1851 he married 
Rosina Kling, who was born in the Province of Lor- 
raine in 1827. By talents that amounted to genius 
and by sheer force of industry Nathan Bloom made 
himself one of the recognized great merchants of the 
Ohio Valley. For many years he was head of the 
firm of Bamberger, Bloom & Company, one of the 
largest wholesale drygoods establishments in the 
South. From Louisville this firm did business over 
all the Southern States and in Indiana and Ohio. 
Nathan Bloom was more than a successful business 
man. While he never cared for public office, he gave 
his sincere and liberal support to every enterprise cal- 
culated to advance his home city. A few years be- 
fore his death the plan was projected of holding a 
great exposition at Louisville. A committee ap- 
proached Mr. Bloom and asked that he head the list 
of subscriptions for $10,000. His response was imme- 
diate and was for just twice the sum the committee 
asked. That was typical of his liberality on all such 
occasions. He early became interested, at a critical 
period, in the Public Library Association, later known 
as the Polytechnic, serving as its vice president, and 
was one of the four men who preserved its existence 
by personally pledging a large sum of money for its 
maintenance as a free public library. For many years 
he was vice president of the Library Board. His 
death occurred in 1887. While thirty-four years have 
elapsed, his memory is still cherished by all interested 
in the institutions and causes with which his name 
was so liberally identified. He was a real constructive 
force in the welfare and upbuilding of Louisville. 
Of his nine children, six are still living, Isadore N. 
being the fourth in age. 

Doctor Bloom, who was born at Louisville October 
27, 1858, had every advantage that wealth and his strong 
inclination for studious pursuits could bestow. He 
attended the public schools, the Male High School, 
graduated A. B. from Yale University in 1878, and 
in 1881 was graduated from Harvard College of Med- 
icine. The following four years he was in Europe 
in post-graduate study and research in many of the 
famous medical centers of the old world. He then 
returned to Louisville and engaged in private prac- 
tice and in 1895 was elected to a chair in the Medical 
Department of the University of Louisville, and has 
given a large part of his time and talents to that work. 

In 1888 Doctor Bloom was elected a member of the 



48 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



Louisville School Board and served four years. In 
1908 he again became a member, and two years later, 
when the Board of Education was established by the 
new state law, he was one of the five members of 
the reorganized board elected, and that public serv- 
ice has been continued until he is now in his third 
term and is president of the board. 

Doctor Bloom has served two terms as president of 
the Young Men's Hebrew Association of Louisville 
and is now an honorary member. In 1916 he was 
elected president of the Associated Western Yale 
Clubs, including all clubs between Buffalo and Denver. 
He is a member of the Yale Club of New York City, 
the Pendennis Club of Louisville, and is independent 
in politics. 

Doctor Bloom married Miss Fannie Corinne Peix- 
otto, a native of Cleveland, Ohio, and daughter of 
Benjamin F. and Hannah (Straus) Peixotto, the for- 
mer a native of Ohio and the latter of Kentucky. 
Her father was for eight years United States min- 
ister to Roumania. Mrs. Bloom, who is the oldest 
of nine children, had a daughter, Nathalie, who died 
in infancy, and her one living child is Nathan P. 
Bloom. Nathan P. Bloom graduated from Yale Uni- 
versity with the class of 1913 and is now sercretary 
of the Adler Manufacturing Company. He married 
Miss Dessa Ellis, of Indiana. 

Charles C. Mengel, one of the early presidents of 
the Louisville Board of Trade, a past president of the 
Pendennis Club, manufacturer and business man, has 
been a resident of Louisville nearly half a century, 
and his business interests in Kentucky and abroad and 
his character and activities as a citizen give him a 
distinctive place among the eminent Kentuckians. 

He was born at Gloucester, Essex County, Massa- 
chusetts, October 29, 1856, a son of Charles C. and 
Jane (Potter) Mengel, the former a native of Saxony, 
(jermany, and the latter of Massachusetts, of Scotch 
parentage. For many generations the Mengel family 
were woolen manufacturers at Gera, Saxony, carry- 
ing on the business established there by Michael Men- 
gel during the sixteenth century. Colonel Mengel's 
father was born at this old manufacturing town in 
Saxony, and after coming to America was prominent 
in the tobacco industry as an exporter of seed leaf 
tobacco. 

Charles C. Mengel was educated in the public 
schools of Brooklyn, New York, and was nineteen 
years of age when he came to Kentucky in 1875. For 
a time he was associated with the manufacture of 
plug tobacco. Since 1877 his chief business has been 
box manufacture and the importation of mahogany 
timber and lumber. One concern of which he has 
l)een president is the largest in the world manufac- 
turing boxes, and he was vice president of one com- 
pany which was foremost in the production, export 
handling and use of mahogany timber, its operations 
reaching to the west coast of Africa and Yucatan, 
where the company developed and owned railroads and 
other facilities for logging and milling the mahogany. 

Colonel Mengel has also served for many years as 
a director of the National Bank of Kentucky at Louis- 
ville. He was for several years a director in the 
Louisville Board of Trade before being unanimously 
elected president. Under his leadership the board 
reached the acme of its efficiency and helpfulness in 
protecting and promoting the interests of the mer- 
chants and business men of Louisville. Colonel Men- 
gel has never been a seeker for political honors. He 
served on the Louisville Board of Waterworks and 
the Louisville Board of Sinking Fund Commissioners. 
He is a staunch republican and prepared and circu- 
lated a pamphlet which did much to influence the 
working men of Louisville against the heresy of free 
silver. 

While president of the Louisville Board of Trade 



Colonel Mengel reorganized the Louisville Legion. 
After the Cuban war this was known as the First Ken- 
tucky Regiment. He was unanimously elected its 
colonel, accepting the honor only temporarily, but 
while in command he had charge of the regiment dur- 
ing the bitter factional troubles in Kentucky politics 
through the years 1899-1900. The regiment was on 
duty at Frankfort during a portion of that period. 

Colonel Mengel has always deeply appreciated the 
honor conferred upon him when he was elected presi- 
dent of the Pendennis Club, one of the most prominent 
social organizations in the South. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Salamagundi Club of Louisville. On Jan- 
uary 12, 1882, he married Miss Emily Mason Tryon, 
who was born and reared in Louisville. Her father. 
Captain Frank Tryon, was a gallant Confederate offi- 
cer, was captured at the surrender of Fort Donelson, 
but later participated in the battle of Stone River, 
where he was killed. Five children were born to 
Colonel and Mrs. Mengel: Julia Morsell, wife of Dr. 
Cuthbert Thompson; Jane Potter, wife of Arthur 
Dwight Allen; Charles C, Jr., who married Mary 
Anderson Kelly, a daughter of Col. Robert Kelly; 
Emily T. ; and Frank Tryon Mengel. 

William S. Vick. It is a well authenticated fact 
that success comes as the result of legitimate and well 
applied energy, unflagging determination and persever- 
ance in a course of action when once decided upon. 
She is never known to bestow her largesses upon the 
indolent and ambitionless, and only those who seek 
her untiringly are recipients of her blessings. In 
tracing the history of the influential business man and 
representative citizen whose name introduces this 
sketch, it is plainly seen that the prosperity which he 
enjoys has been won by commendable qualities, and 
it is also his personal worth that has gained for him 
the high esteem of those who know him. 

William S. Vick, a member and general manager 
of the wholesale grocery firm of W. S. Vick Grocery 
Company at Owensboro, was born on his father's farm 
in Muhlenburg County, Kentucky on April 30, 1864, 
and he is one of ten children who blessed the union 
of Jacob M. and Eliza J. (Williams) Vick. He was 
reared on the home farm, where he had abundant op- 
portunity for the cultivation of physical strength, but 
during which period he had but a limited opportunity 
for a school education, having attended school but 
little after his thirteenth year. He remained with his 
parents until twenty years old, when he started out 
on his own account, his first employment being in a 
livery stable in South Carrollton, Kentucky. Later he 
became the proprietor of a stable at Central City, 
which he operated until September, i8go, when, at 
about the time of his marriage, he went onto the 
road as a traveling salesman for an Owensboro whole- 
sale grocery concern. He proved a distinct success 
in that line of work and continued to represent Owens- 
boro and Evansville, Indiana, establishments for 
almost thirty years. A few years ago Mr. Vick or- 
ganized at Owensboro the W. S. Vick Grocery Com- 
pany, in which he had a considerable interest, though 
he continued his work as a traveling salesman. In 
the fall of 1919 he sold his interest in the W. S. Vick 
Grocery Company, but retained the name of the com- 
pany, under which arrangement he organized, in 
March, 1920, the present wholesale grocery concern 
of W. S. Vick Grocery Company, of Owensboro, of 
which he is the manager and which is already doing 
a very gratifying business. Since 1900 Mr. Vick has 
been a resident of Owensboro. 

In September, 1890, Mr. Vick was united in mar- 
riage with Jennie Gordon, of South Carrollton, and 
they are the parents of two children, Gordon, who is 
associated with his father in business, and Helen, who 
is attending school. 

Politically Mr. Vick was formerly a democrat, but 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



49 



for several years has as a rule supported the men and 
measures of the republican party. He is a member of 
the Travelers Protective Association. He has always 
been deeply interested in whatever tended to pro- 
mote the prosperity of his chosen town and county, 
and because of his business ability and his excellent 
personal qualities of character he enjoys to a marked 
degree the good will and esteem of his fellow citizens. 

Samuel Thomas Fruit is a well-known lawyer of 
Hopkinsville, is present county attorney of Christian 
County, and for twenty years has been well known 
in educational, legal and official afTairs. 

This is one of the oldest families of Christian 
Coimty. It originated in Wales, and the Fruits were 
Colonial settlers oi North Carolina. The great- 
grandfather of the present county attorney was Thomas 
Fruit, who settled in Christian County more than a 
century ago. Thompson C. Fruit, grandfather of 
Samuel T. Fruit, was born in Christian County in 
iSio, spent his life as a farmer there and died in 1889. 
He married Elizabeth Underwood, who was born in 
Christian County in 1822 and died in 1884. Her father, 
Samuel Underwood, was also born in Christian County, 
and spent his life in one of the farming communities 
of the county. 

Capt. Samuel Thomas Fruit, Sr., father of the 
county attorney, was born in Christian County in 1838 
and spent all his life there. For many years he carried 
on a large farm, and exhibited all the qualities of a 
successful and enterprising agriculturist. In 1862 he 
enlisted in the Union armj', joining the 25th Kentucky- 
Infantry, whicii later was consolidated with the 17th 
Kentucky Regiment. He was in Company G of the 
latter regiment, and fought at the battles of Shiloh, 
Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain and Missionary 
Ridge. He was under the command of General Grant, 
and for much of the time his division commander 
was General Thomas. He was a republican, served 
as justice of the peace, and died in Christian County, 
highly honored and respected, in 1905. Captain Fruit 
married Victoria Clark, who was born in Christian 
County in 1844 and is still living on the old homestead 
seven miles northeast of Hopkinsville. She was the 
mother of nine children. James, the oldest, was a 
farmer and died in Christian County in 1908. His 
twin brother, Albert, lived on the home farm and 
with his brothers, Joseph and Chester, managed it for 
their mother. Joseph is the third of the family. 
Lizzie died unmarried at the old home in 1918, and 
she had a twin brother who died in infancy. Georgia 
is unmarried and lives with her mother. The seventh 
in age is Samuel T. Fruit. Chester is the eighth in 
the family, while Mary, the youngest, died at the age 
of two years and seven months. 

Samuel Thomas Fruit was born on the old home- 
stead February 10, 1877, and acquired a rural school 
education, supplemented by advantages partly of his 
own obtaining, which gave him a thoroughly liberal 
education. He pursued literary studies in the South 
Kentucky College at Hopkinsville and for four years 
was a student in the Southern Normal School at Bowl- 
ing Green. In 1900 he began teaching in Christian 
County, but the following year was appointed and 
served as deputy sheriff. From 1902 to 1905, inclusive, 
he resumed his work as a teacher and then pursued 
the law course of Cimiberland University at Lebanon, 
Tennessee, graduating with the LL. B. degree in June, 
1907. The fall and winter after his graduation he 
taught school, and in 1908 took up the practice of law 
at Hopkinsville, and has been busily engaged with a 
general civil and criminal practice since that time. 
From April, 1909, until January, 1910, he served as 
jailer of Christian County. He was selected county 
attorney in the fall of 1917 and began his duties in 
January, 1918, and the first year of his four-year term 
coincided with the period of the World war, and he 



was ex-officio identified with many local war activ- 
ities. He was one of the leading speakers over the 
county in behalf of various war drives, and also gave 
much of his lime cheerfully and without remunera- 
tion to the work of filling out questionnaires for 
drafted soldiers. He was candidate for Circuit judge 
of the Third Judicial District in 1916, being nom- 
inated on the republican ticket, but was defeated in 
this strong democratic district. He is a past grand of 
(jreen River Lodge No. 54 of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Fruit, whose home is at 752 East Ninth Street, 
married at Nashville, Tennessee, July 23, 1912, Mrs. 
Delia (Myers) Johnson. She was the widow of 
W. W. Johnson, who at the time of his death was 
jailer of Christian Count}'. Her parents, now deceased, 
were S. H. and Salina (Cavanah) Myers, her father 
a well-known farmer and stock raiser. Mrs. Fruit 
has one child by her former marriage, Raymond John- 
son, who is a farmer living six miles southwest of 
Hopkinsville. 

Louis Eixis. The manufacture and distribution of 
artificial ice is a business vitally linked with the wel- 
fare and comfort of every progressive community. 
Louis Ellis, of Hopkinsville, has devoted practically 
all the years since he left school to the business and 
profession of manufacturing and distributing pure ice, 
and is secretary, treasurer and general manager of the 
Ellis Ice and Coal Company, an industry that was 
established by his father many years ago. 

Mr. Ellis was born at Hopkinsville, December 15, 
1882, and is of Scotch-Irish ancestry. His grand- 
father, William Ellis, was born at Baltimore, Mary- 
land, in 1810, and in early life came west to Hopkins- 
ville, Kentucky, where he was married and where for 
a time he followed his trade as a tailor and later 
was a general merchant and finally in the flour mill- 
ing business with his two sons. Forest and Lee Ellis. 
He died at Hopkinsville in 1896, having spent his last 
days in retirement. He married a Miss, Harrison, a 
native of Hopkinsville. 

Forest Ellis, father of Louis, was born at Hopkins- 
ville in 1852, spent all his life in that city and died 
there in 1897. At the beginning of his career he was 
engaged in the hardware business two years. Subse- 
quently he was in the flour milling business witt) his 
father and brother until the inill was burned in 1888. 
Soon afterward he and his brother, Lee, employed 
their capital and their enterprise to establish and build 
the ice manufacturing plant at Eleventh and Railroad 
streets, and he was actively associated with that busi- 
ness until his death. Politically Forest Ellis was a 
republican. He married at Madisonville, Kentucky, 
Miss Lucy Jagoe, who was born in Muhlenburg 
County of this state in t86i and is still living at Hop- 
kinsville. She was the mother of four children: Edna, 
wife of W. J. Glover, a property owner at Hopkins- 
ville: Louis: Margaret, wife of Thomas W. Smith, a 
tobacconist now connected with the British-American 
Company living at Rio de Janeiro, South America ; 
and Lucille, wife of Robert S. Maxey, who lives at 
Chicago and is western representative for a wholesale 
underwear firm. 

Louis Ellis acquired his education in the public 
schools of Hopkinsville and left school at the age of 
eighteen to enter the ice plant, and by daily work 
and observation learned every phase of the business, 
including the technical operation of ice making as 
well as the sale and distribution of the products. 
Since 1908 he has been secretary, treasurer and man- 
ager of the company, which was incorporated as the 
Ellis Ice & Coal Company in that year. This is the 
largest ice making plant in western Kentucky between 
Bowling Green and Paducah. J. W. Downer is pres- 
ident of the company, and Mr. Ellis holds the other 
official places of the corporation. The plant has a 



50 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



capacity of sixty-five tons of ice per day, while it also 
has 1,000 tons storage capacity. Besides supplying 
Hopkinsville City with ice, the plant supplies various 
communities from Morton's Gap on the north to 
Trenton on the south, and from Fairview on the east 
to Cerulean on the west. 

Mr. Ellis is a republican, a member of the Christian 
Church, the Travelers Protective Association and 
Hopkinsville Lodge No. 545 of the Elks. He lives 
with his mother at 909 South Main Street. In 191 1, 
at Evansville, Indiana, he married Miss Elizabeth 
Hannon, daughter of Doctor and Mrs. Elizabeth Han- 
non. Her mother is still living at Indianapolis. Her 
father was a physician and surgeon at Scotland, In- 
diana. Mr. Louis Ellis has one daughter, Elizabeth, 
born January 19, 1913. 

George Byron Powell. The stanch qualities of the 
Powell family have been exemplified in the citizenship 
of Christian County for several generations, and it 
was only natural that the abilities of George Byron 
I owell were called from his regular vocation of farm- 
ing to the responsibilities of public office. Mr. Powell 
was elected county clerk when the World war was in 
progress, and since his election has made his home 
in the county seat of Hopkinsville. 

He was born near the Fruithill section of Christian 
County, July 26, 1863. In that community the Powells 
have lived for upwards of a century. His grandfather, 
George W. Powell, brought the family from North 
Carolina and acquired some of the land in the Fruit- 
hill section, where he developed a pioneer farm and 
where he lived the rest of his life. William H. Pow- 
ell, father of the county clerk, was born in North 
Carolina in 1820, and was only a few years old when 
brought to Christian County, Kentucky. He was 
reared and married there, and in his mature years de- 
veloped a large and profitable farm at Fruithill, and 
remained in that vicinity until his death in 1867. He 
was allied with the republican party in politics, and 
was one of the very active Baptists in his community. 
He was also affiliated with the Masonic fraternity. 
William H. Powell married Sarah L. Henderson, who 
was born in the northern part of Christian County in 
1823 and died near Fruithill in 1900. Of her five 
children, George Byron is the youngest ; Mary E., the 
oldest died in 1910, wife of Z. T. Gamble, who is a 
farmer living near Fruithill ; James Harvey was a 
farmer and died near Fruithill in 1873 ; Presley Aus- 
tin combined merchandising with farming and died 
near Fruithill in 1879, and Delilah Jane died at the 
age of sixteen. 

George Byron Powell spent his early life and many 
of his mature years in the Fruithill section of Chris- 
tian County. He attended the rural schools, and after 
passing his majority bought the interest of his sister, 
Mary, in the old homestead farm, and has owned and 
operated this property ever since. He is proprietor 
of 480 acres, and directs it as a well diversified farm. 
His farm is a mile south of Fruithill. He lives there 
and gave his special attention to the work of the fields 
until he began his official duties at the county seat. 

Mr. Powell has always been an active member of 
the republican party in Christian County. He has 
been a busy man, and has only a brief though very 
capable public record. He served three and a half 
years, from 1889 to 1892, as justice of the peace. He 
was elected county clerk in November, 1917, and be- 
gan his official term in Januarj', igi8, for four years. 
By virtue of his office he was identified with much 
of the war program. He is an elder of the Christian 
Church. At Hopkinsville he owns a modern home 
at 522 North Main Street. In October, 1884, Mr. 
Powell married at Springfield, Tennessee, Miss Par- 
rie L. West, daughter of J. H. and Salina (Grace) 
West, both now deceased. Her father was a Christian 
County farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Powell had five chil- 



dren, including: Walter L., who operates the home 
farm for his father ; George Estell, a merchant at 
Hopkinsville; Vernie Belle, who died at the age of 
eighteen; and Lucian, a railroad man living at Nash- 
ville, Tennessee. 

Charles Strother Grubbs. In the field of general 
law, as also in his specialty of insurance and corpora- 
tion law, one of the most eminent figures of the 
Louisville bar during the past thirty-eight years has 
been Charles Strother Grubbs. Judge Grubbs has 
fairly earned his position in the law, since he has been 
for many years not only an earnest student of its 
general principles, but also a persistent and well re- 
warded seeker into the details of his specialties. Dur- 
ing his long and honorable practice at Louisville he 
has been a faithful conserver of all the interests con- 
fided to his care and fine judgment, and has perfected 
a career that deserves a lasting place in the history of 
the bar. 

Judge Grubbs was born at Maysville, Kentucky, 
April II, 1848, a son of Rev. William M. and Zerelda 
(Stamper) Grubbs. He comes of distinguished an- 
cestry. His paternal great-grandfather, Higgason 
Grubbs, was one of the early settlers of what later 
became Madison County, Kentucky, coming here about 
1780 from Albemarle County, Virginia. He was one 
of the trustees of Boonesboro (1787), at one time 
residing in the Fort at Boonesboro. He was a repre- 
■■'.entative from Madison County in the two conven- 
tions (1787-1788) at Danville, and in 1792 in the First 
Constitutional Convention. In 1790-91 he was a mem- 
ber of the Virginia Legislature from Madison County, 
Kentucky, and at various times after the state was 
admitted into the Union was a member of the House 
of Representatives. He died in 1830. His wife was 
Lucy Harris, also a native of Virginia. John Grubbs, 
the grandfather of Charles S. Grubbs, was born in 
Madison County, but in early life removed to Logan 
County, Kentucky, of which he was a representive in 
the Kentucky Legislature for one term and was also a 
prominent and influential citizen of his community. 
The maternal grandfather of Judge Grubbs was Jona- 
than Stamper, a well known divine of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church in Kentucky for many years. 

Rev. William M. Grubbs was born in 1815, and 
received his primary training in the public schools. 
At the age of twenty-one years he entered upon his 
labors as a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
and spent his entire life in that calling, dying in 1894, 
at the age of seventy-nine years. During the Civil 
war he served for three years as chaplain of the 
Twenty-sixth Regiment, Kentucky Volunteer Infantry. 
Mrs. Grubbs was born in Kentucky in 1817, and died 
in 1892. Of the seven children in the family Charles 
S. was the fourth in order of birth, and only he and 
a sister, Mrs. E. L. Olcott, are living. 

After securing his preliminary training in private 
schools Charles S. Grubbs attended Bethel College, 
Russellville, Kentucky, and completed his law course 
in the University of Louisville, from which he was 
graduated in 1870. He began practice at Russellville, 
and in 1874 was elected county judge of Logan County, 
an office to which he was re-elected subsequently 
and in which he served two terms. In 1882, at the 
expiration of his second judicial term, he came to 
Louisville and established himself in practice, in which 
he has been engaged successfully ever since, and with 
the exception of special appointments as Circuit judge 
he has not since been in public life. As noted, he 
specializes in insurance and corporation law, and has 
been attorney for several large railways and other 
corporations. Although absolutely devoted to the cause 
of his client in whatever field he has worked, Judge 
Grubbs has never forgotten the ethics of his profes- 
sion or stooped to unworthy means to gain an ad- 
vantage. By close study and through his familiarity 




^-^^A^ 




-pt^J^fi^ut^ix^c^^, 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



51 



with the wide range of legal lore he has usually forti- 
fied his position with so many facts and precedents 
that only the leading practitioners can successfully 
cope with him, and he has won more than a majority 
of his cases. Judge Grubbs is a member of the Protest- 
ant Episcopal Church and for many years has been a 
vestryman and warden in Calvary Church, Louisville. 
In politics he is a democrat. 

On September 5, 1876, Judge Grubbs married Miss 
Nannie Rodman, a daughter of Gen. John Rod- 
man, a distinguished lawyer of Frankfort, Kentucky. 
Their only child was the late Rodman Grubbs, whose 
brief career well deserves the tribute contained in the 
individual record following. 

Rodman Grubbs. In the abundance of his interests 
and thoroughness of his service Rodman Grubbs ex- 
pressed a full rounded life within the comparatively 
brief period of years allotted him. 

He was born at Russellville, Kentucky, June IS, 1877, 
only son and child of Charles S. and Nannie Rodman 
Grubbs. He was graduated from the University of 
Virginia in both the academic and law courses, and 
entered into partnership with his father under the 
firm name of Grubbs & Grubbs in 1901. He at once 
entered into his father's large and important insurance 
and corporation practice with keen and marked ability. 

He was a close student, an able lawyer, who, loving 
his profession, made no effort to enter public life. 
Some years ago he was for a short time judge advo- 
cate of the First Kentucky Regiment (Louisville), with 
the rank of captain. When war with Germany was de- 
clared, being unable to stand the physical examination 
required in order to enter the army, he gave much time 
and attention to local board work, during substan- 
tially the entire period of enlistment being Government 
appeal agent. 

In addition to this service there was thrown upon 
him by reason of the absence of certain associates 
a large amount of work including certain intricate 
cases for a group of the largest life insurance com- 
panies, which work he brought to a successful con- 
clusion. 

The proceedings of the annual meeting of the Ken- 
tucky State Bar Association in July 1920, of which 
he was a member, contain this reference : 

"He was a clear thinker, had a love for the study of 
law, was successful in general practice and especially 
well informed in matters on insurance law. For many 
years he prepared the law notes for the Insurance 
Field of Louisville, and in the last few years of his 
life was engaged in the most difficult of life insurance 
litigation, requiring a thorough knowledge of certain 
actuarial intricacies, which he mastered and was re- 
garded as more expert in than any other practitioner 
at the Louisville bar. 

"His ideals and ethics were excellent. He enjoyed 
the full confidence and esteem of the bench and his 
brethren of the bar of Louisville and throughout the 
State." 

The issue of the Insurance Field of April 2, IQ20, 
closes a sketch of the life of Rodman Grubbs with 
this tribute : 

"Mr. Grubbs was a man of high integrity and great 
power of application. His advice to this paper on 
questions of insurance law and practice was remark- 
ably useful to inquirers all over the country. Modest, 
unassuming, bold in thought and skilful in procedure, 
he was just entering upon a very large and important 
practice and responsibilities when stricken. Person- 
ally he was a gentleman of wide reading and culture, 
and a delightful, thoughtful companion. He was a 
member of the Pendennis Club and of the Louisville 
Country Club, and had been secretary of the latter for 
some years. He was a famous golfer locally. In his 
death has passed away a gentleman greatly beloved, a 
lawyer of marked success and widening promise and 

Vol. IV— 6 



a man of chivalrous purity of character and noble 
ideals." 

After a long illness, but only brief disability, he 
died in Louisville on Sunday, March 21, 1920, of perni- 
cious anemia, and on March 23rd, after a service at 
Calvary Episcopal Church, of which he was a member, 
was buried in the beautiful cemeter3' at Frankfort, 
Kentucky. He never married. 

Louis Seelbach. One of the greatest hotels in the 
south dignifies and honors the name Louis Seelbach, 
and stands as the fruit of his genius and many years 
of service as a hotel man at Louisville. 
• Louis Seelbach came to Louisville more than fifty 
years ago. He is now one of that city's oldest as 
well as most successful business men, and his career 
throughout has been one of devoted loyalty, not only 
to his business but to the welfare and progress of the 
Kentucky metropolis. He was born in Rhenish Bavaria, 
Germany, April 12, 1852, a son of Louis and Johanna 
(Raquet) Seelbach. In his native land he acquired not 
only a common school education Init also the advantages 
of a gymnasium or collegiate institute at Frankenthal. 
He was seventeen when in 1869 he came to America, and 
during the same year located at Louisville. His first 
employment in the city was in the historic Gait House, 
then one of the best known hotels in the South. He not 
only made himself a popular figure in the management 
during his five years there, hut also extended his per- 
sonal acquaintance and used his opportunities to acquire 
a thorough technical knowledge of hotel management. 
Leaving the Gait House he opened the first Seelbach 
restaurant and cafe, at the corner of Tenth and Main 
streets. His modest establishment soon had an over- 
flowing patronage, and five years later he broadened 
his business and sought a new location at the corner 
of Sixth and Main streets, opening what was at that 
time hailed as the best equipped and most elaborate 
restaurant and cafe service in the city. This new 
chapter in the Seelbach hotel history in Louisville 
opened in 1880, and in that location new facilities were 
added from time to time until in 1900 the old Seelbach 
was thoroughly remodeled and was continued as an 
institution thoroughly deserving of its old and steady 
patronage. 

However, this was not to be the climax of Mr. Seel- 
bach's career as a hotel man. A few years later he 
and his two brothers, Charles and Otto, planned, 
organized and financed a project which began in 1903 
and was completed on May I, 190S, with the opening of 
the magnificent Seelbach, at that time undoubtedly one 
of the most elaborate hotels in the south, and even 
today standing as one of the very first not only in point 
of equipment and service but in affording all the es- 
sentials of a high class hotel. The Seelbach was con- 
structed under Louis Seelbach's personal supervision, 
and exemplifies many details approved by his long ex- 
perience and mature judgment. The Seelbach is a ten- 
story fireproof building of steel and stone, in the heart 
of Louisville's modern business district, and covers 
ground 216x105 feet. 

With the opening of the new Seelbach the old house 
at Sixth and Main streets was re-christened the "Old 
Inn." The Seelbach Hotel Company, of which Louis 
Seelbach is president, is a corporation for the manage- 
ment of several of Louisville's foremost hotels. The 
Company acquired the old Victoria at the corner of 
Tenth and Broadway, remodeled it and gave it a serv- 
ice in keeping with the other two hotels of the company. 

Throughout the half century of his residence Mr. 
Seelbach has been a thoroughly constructive citizen 
and upbuilder of Louisville, where his is one of the 
most honored names. He has long been a popular 
member of business, social and civic organizations, has 
served a number of years as a director of the Board of 
Trade, the Convention and Publicity League, and is 



52 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



a director of the Citizens Union National Bank. He 
is a democrat in politics and has served as a park com- 
missioner for twenty years, and as such did much import- 
ant and unremunerated work toward realizing the 
plans for a "City Beautiful." 

On November 28, 1888, Mr. Seelbach married Miss 
Marie H. Durbeck, a native of Knoxville, Tennessee, 
who was reared and educated in Louisville. Her father, 
Capt. J. G. Durbeck, was a soldier and officer in the 
Union Army during the Civil war, and for many years 
lived at Louisville. Mr. and Mrs. Seelbach have three 
children : Louis, Jr., William Otto and Mary Helen, 
all of whom are married, and there are three grand- 
children. 

Robert S. Ambrose. Though at the time he left 
high school he did not have a dollar in capital and had 
no wealthy family connections or influential friends to 
start him, Robert S. Ambrose learned the lumber busi- 
ness by steady and diligent application, has neglected 
no opportunities in his upward climb, and is now sole 
owner of one of the largest lumber yards in western 
Kentucky, with a complete equipment of buildings, 
sheds and offices. This business is at Hopkinsville, but 
for many years Mr. Ambrose was in the lumber busi- 
ness at Henderson. 

He was born in Grayson County, Kentucky, June 29, 
1874. His grandfather, Lewis Ambrose, was a native 
of England and as a young man came to America and 
settled in Ohio County, Kentucky, where in the course 
of time he developed some extensive holdings in farm 
lands. He died in Ohio County, during the Civil war. 
His wife was a Miss Chapman, a member of an Ohio 
County family of that name, where she spent all her 
life. Benjamin W. Ambrose, father of Robert S., was 
born in Ohio County in 1841 grew up there and lived 
as a farmer, and in 1886 moved to Daviess County, 
Kentucky, and in 1890 to Henderson, where he lived 
retired until his death in 1917. He was a Confederate 
soldier during the war between the states, enlisting al- 
most at the beginning of the struggle in a Kentucky 
regiment at Madisonville. He participated in the battles 
of Shiloh, Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Missionary 
Ridge and Vicksburg. He was once wounded in the 
arm, and was in a hospital for some time. He was 
also taken prisoner near the end of the war, and was 
confined near Chicago until the surrender of Lee. In 
politics he was a stanch democrat, and was one of the 
leading members of the Baptist Church in his community 
Benjamin W. Ambrose married Elizabeth Paris, who 
was born in Ohio County in 1852 and is now living 
at the city of Henderson. She was the mother of the 
following children : Alice, the oldest, died unmarried 
at the age of twenty-two and the next two were twin 
daughters, Matilda and Edith, both of whom died at 
the age of nineteen. Edith was the wife of Sidney 
McCann, a carpenter at Henderson, now deceased. 
The next in the family is Robert S. Lillian, who died 
at Henderson at the age of thirty, married Charles 
Cecil, now foreman in a cotton mill at Henderson. 
Claude died at Henderson at the age of twenty-one 
and Birdie, the youngest, is the wife of Leon Busby, 
a railroad man living at Henderson. 

Robert S. .A.nibrose acquired his early education in 
the public schools of Henderson, graduating from high 
school in 1893. He gained his first knowledge of the 
lumber industry in a planing mill at Henderson, next 
went to a planing mill at Owensboro, where he re- 
mained a year, for six years was foreman of H. W. 
Clark's planing mill at Henderson, and in 1901 set up 
in the lumber business for himself at Henderson. He 
sold lumber in that city until October, 191S, when he 
moved to Hopkinsville and established himself in the 
lumber business with a complete new equipment of 
yards and offices on East Seventh Street, between Clay 
Street and the Louisville and Nashville Railway, and 



extending from Seventh to Eighth streets. He is sole 
proprietor of this business, and handles all classes of 
lumber and general building supplies. He is also a 
large property owner at Henderson, and his substantial 
prosperity has all been built up and acquired through 
a steady working career beginning a quarter of a 
century ago. 

Mr. Ambrose is a democrat, is a deacon in the Bap- 
tist Church at Henderson, is affiliated with Henderson 
Lodge of Elks and the I. O. O. F. and is a member 
of the Traveling Men's Association. 

Mr. Ambrose first married at Carmi, Illinois, in 
1893, Miss Catherine Lipp. She was born in Tell City, 
Indiana, and died at Henderson February 16, 1916. 
She was the mother of two children : Clyde S., who 
died at Henderson at the age of twenty-three years, and 
Irma, who was married in 1919 to Frank Koewler, a 
merchant at Henderson. On January 14, 1920, Mr. 
Ambrose married in Hopkinsville Mrs. Alberta (Hisgen) 
Moorefield, widow of Robert Moorefield and daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Hisgen. Her mother is still 
living, in Hopkinsville, where her father died. Her 
father was a painting and decorating contractor and 
a skillful artist in his line. 

Charles Moore Phillips. The wide-awake operator 
in realty in almost any section is able to accomplish 
results when business conditions are normal, and that 
many have availed themselves of advantageous circum- 
stances the prosperity of numerous communities and of 
"the individuals themselves conclusively prove. If this 
is true in the smaller localities how much more so is 
it at Louisville, where the wealth and industrial activ- 
ities of this section of the country are concentrated. 
One of those who has been instrumental in bringing 
about present substantial conditions is Charles Moore 
Phillips, who occupies a prominent place as an alert, 
capable and honorable operator. During his business 
career along this line he has handled millions of dollars 
worth of property, either as an individual or for cor- 
porations, and his name has been identified with the 
growth of the city for more than a quarter of a century. 

Mr. Phillips was born December 12, 1856, in Marion 
County, Kentucky, on his father's farm, which had been 
settled by the maternal grandfather of Charles M. Phil- 
lips, William Penick, a pioneer from Virginia of the 
year 1811. Felix Grundy Phillips, the father of Charles 
M., was born in Nelson County, Kentucky, in 1818, and 
received a good education at Lebanon, Kentucky, which 
qualified him for teaching. For a number of years he 
followed educational work as a vocation, and among his 
pupils at one time was J. Proctor Knott, the distinguished 
lawyer and congressman, at one time governor of Ken- 
tucky. Mr. Phillips later became a civil engineer, carry- 
ing out highway projects in Marion and adjacent counties 
and likewise engaged extensively in general farming. 
For about twelve years he served as county surveyor of 
Marion County. In politics he was a democrat. An active 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, he 
with others organized a Sunday school at Bradfordsville 
during the Civil war period, and it was through Mr. 
Phillips' efforts that the community of Bradfordsville 
adopted prohibition and maintained it continuously dur- 
ing the years that followed, having the distinction of 
being the only town to be dry in this locality for many 
years. Mr. Phillips died in 1885. He married Fannie 
Penick, who was born in Marion County in 1822 and 
died in 1889, and of their twelve children, five sons and 
four daughters grew to maturity, three dying in infancy. 

The next to the youngest of his parents' children, 
Charles Moore Phillips, attended Lebanon Academy, 
Columliia, Kentucky, and for three years taught school 
ill the rural districts. He then entered the law office of 
Knott & Harrison at Lebanon, where he studied under 
the preceptorship of J. Proctor Knott and William B. 
Harristin, and in 1 881 was admitted to the bar. For 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



53 



al)out six years he practiced his profession at Lebanon, 
and during this time conducted the Lebanon Standard 
and Times as owner and editor. Coming to Louisville in 
i88g, he identified himself with the real estate business, 
and in 1895 laid out a subdivision of Louisville, in that 
year also erecting the first all-residence apartment build- 
ing built at Louisville. In 1900 he organized the Louis- 
ville Title Company, of which he was general manager 
until 1919, and in that year was elected president, rie 
was likewise the organizer of the Louisville Industrial 
Foundation, the object of which was the attraction of 
manufacturing and other business interests to the city 
and the benefit of business interest in general. Mr. 
Phillips is a director in the Stimpson Steel Company and 
tlie Swiss Oil Company. Politically independent, he 
has never sought or cared for public office. He is an 
active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, belongs to the General Board of Missions and 
is a director in the National Church Insurance Company. 
Mr. Phillips represents a high type of citizenship and 
is regarded as one of the leading business men of 
Louisville, occupying as he does a high position in com- 
mercial and social circles. A man of broad conception 
of civic duty, he has proven beyond cavil his worth as 
a citizen and his ability and integrity as a man, and his 
influence reaches out far beyond his city. 

On October 27, 1883, Mr. Phillips married Miss Mar- 
garet Montague, who was born at Campbellsville, Taylor 
County, Kentucky, a daughter of Judge Robert and 
Margaret (Cox) Montague, lioth of whom are de- 
ceased. Judge Montague was born in Harding County, 
Kentucky, and served for a number of years as county 
judge of Taylor County. He was a democrat in politics 
and a member of the Baptist Church, to which belonged 
also his wife, a native of Green County, this state. Of 
the seven children in their family two died in infancy 
and two still survive, Mrs. Phillips having been the 
sixth child in order of birth. Six children have been 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Phillips: Nannie B., the wife of 
H. H. Constantine, of Clearwater, Florida, who has two 
r.ons, Phillips and Joseph ; Robert Montague, an electric 
engineer and sales manager of the Electric Control and 
Manufacturing Company of Cleveland, Ohio, who mar- 
ried Maud Martin ; Charles Moore, Jr., engaged in 
growing citrus fruits in Florida, who married Ella 
Casler, of Jacksonville, Florida, and has one daughter, 
Margaret; William Kendrick, engaged in growing citrus 
fruits in Florida ; Mary, who died at the age of ten 
years ; and Margaret A., who is attending Mary Bald- 
w in Institute in Virginia. 

J,\MES C. WiLLSON, head of the Investment Banking 
House of James C. Willson & Company, of Louisville, 
was born at Richmond, Kentucky, October, 22, 1884, 
a son of William M. and Agnes (Hanna) Willson. 
His father, born in Rockbridge County, Virginia, in 
1846, was educated at Washington and Lee University 
and was little more than a lad when he enlisted in the 
lirigade of Stonewall Jackson for service in the Rock- 
bridge Battery of the Confederate Army during the war 
between the states. He took part in all the engagements 
of his battery and served therewith until the close of the 
war, making a splendid record for bravery and faithful 
]>erformance of duty. In 1866 Mr. Willson, still a young 
man, came to Shelbyville, Kentucky, where lie began 
teaching school. Later he was one of the organizers 
of Central University, in which he became professor of 
Latin and Greek, and remained as such until his retire- 
ment in 1895, his last days being spent at Shelbyville, 
where he died in 1910. He was an elder in the Pres- 
byterian Church and in politics was a democrat. Mrs. 
Willson, who was born in Shelby County in 1859, fol- 
lowed her husband in death in 191 1. Of their children, 
<ine died in infancy and three sons and three daughters 
survi\e, Tames C. having been the third in order of 
l>irth. 



James C. Willson was educated in the public schools 
of Shelbyville, Kentucky. A republican in politics, 
he has taken an active interest in political affairs, and 
in 1919 was elected a member of the City Council, in 
which his work has been valuably constructive. He is 
a popular member of the Pendennis, Louisville Country 
and Chess and Whist and River Valley clubs and is 
a member of the Sons of the American Revolution. 
During the war period he was tireless in working for 
the various movements promulgated to assist in the 
success of American arms. He served as vice chairman 
for the Liberty Loan drives in the western district of 
Kentucky and took an active part in Red Cross work. 
Worthy civic movements have always found in him a 
stanch supporter. Mr. Willson's religious connection is 
with the Presbyterian Church. 

On January 2, 1913, he was united in marriage with 
Miss Marion Burman, who was born at Richmond, 
Kentucky, a daughter of Thompson S. and Bettie 
(Moran) Burman, natives of Kentucky, where the 
former is now living, the latter being deceased. Mrs. 
Willson is the younger of two children. Two children 
have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Willson : James C, 
Jr., and Bettie Moran. 

WiLLi.\M Peyton Kincheloe, banker, manager of 
the Louisville branch of the Federal Reserve Bank, 
is one of the prominent figures in financial circles in 
Kentucky, and is a brother of Congressman D. Kin- 
cheloe of the Second Kentucky District. 

Mr. Kincheloe was born in McLean County, Ken- 
tucky, on his father's farm, December 19, 1880, son 
of Robert McFarlin and Lucy Ann (Reeks) Kin- 
cheloe. His parents were both native Kentuckians. 
His grandparents, Thomas and Minerva (McFarlin) 
Kincheloe, were also born in Kentucky, and his grand- 
father spent his active life as a farmer in Daviess 
County, was a democrat and a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, South. The maternal grand- 
father of Mr. Kincheloe was Thomas Reeks, a well- 
known farmer in his time in McLean County. 

Robert M. Kincheloe was born in Rumsey, Muhlen- 
berg County, now McLean County, December 23, 1839, 
was educated in the schools there and for a nurnber 
of years was a successful teacher in country districts. 
Later he engaged in farming in McLean County and 
was a successful breeder of harness horses. He re- 
tired from his farm in 1900, and is now living at Sac- 
ramento in McLean County. He served as county 
assessor of McLean County eight years, and was a 
member of the State Legislature during the long ses- 
sion of 1891-92-93. He is active in the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, is a member of the Alasonic 
fraternity and a stanch democrat. His wife was born 
in Logan County and is now deceased. They were the 
parents of five sons and two daughters : Phoebe, wife 
of F. F. Gibson: Jennie M., widow of James R. Mor- 
gan; Thomas Thurman, who married Anna Gish; 
Charles Alexander, who married Margaret Bibb; Da- 
vid Haves, who was born in .1877, admitted to_ the 
Kentucky bar in 1899 and has practiced at Madison- 
ville, was elected to represent the Second Kentucky 
District in Congress in 1914, and was re-elected for 
his fourth consecutive term; William P., who is the 
sixth in age ; and Robert Duvall. 

William Peyton Kincheloe was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Daviess County, spent three years in 
school at Frankfort, graduated in 1899 from Sacra- 
mento Academy of his home county, and completed 
the work of the Bowling Green Business College in 
1900. For about three years he engaged in teach- 
ing and for four years was in the general merchan- 
dise business at Elk City, Oklahoma. Returning to 
Kentucky, be entered upon his banking career in Au- 
gust, 1905, with the, Home Deposit Bank at Central 
City as bookkeeper, was promoted to assistant cashier 



54 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



and when the bank became the First National Bank 
of Central City he was made cashier. He resigned 
this post in November, 1913, to become a national 
bank examiner, and the four years he spent in that 
office gave him a wide acquaintance among Kentucky 
bankers and a thorough knowledge of banking con- 
ditions. It was with the hearty support and com- 
mendation of Kentucky banking interests that he was 
appointed in August, 1917, as manager and chairman 
of the board of directors of the Louisville branch 
of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. He handled 
many of the details of organization of this branch, 
which was opened for business December 3, 1917-. 

Mr. Kincheloe on November 21, 1919, was appointed 
aide de camp on Gov. James D. Black's staff with the 
rank of colonel. He is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, is affiliated with Sacramento 
Lodge No. 735, F. & A. M. ; Central City Chapter 
No. 147, R. A. M.; Owensboro Commandery No. 15, 
K. T. ; and Mizpah Temple of the Mystic Shrine at 
Madisonville. 

September 11, 191 1, Mr. Kincheloe married Miss 
Blanche Muir, who was born in Ohio County, Ken- 
tucky, daughter of John A. and Margaret O. (Hunley) 
Muir. Her parents v\'ere also born in Ohio County and 
her father died in 1917, at the age of fifty-two and her 
mother is still living. Mrs. Kincheloe is the oldest 
of three sons and two daughters. Her father for 
many years was in the signal department of the Illi- 
nois Central Railway Company, was a democrat in 
politics and a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. Mr. and Mrs. Kincheloe have one 
son, William Peyton, Jr. 

J.\MF.s B. Brown. One of the largest banks in the 
South is the National Bank of Kentucky at Louisville. 
The president of this institution is James B. Brown, 
who has had a remarkable rise in business affairs from 
office boy through successive stages of banking until 
for the last twelve years he has been president or 
officer in half a dozen large financial and other insti- 
tutions at Louisville. 

Mr. Brown was born at Lawrenceburg, Kentucky, 
•November 28, 1872, son of Thornton and Paralee 
(McKee) Brown. On both sides of the house the 
family goes back to old Virginia, where his grand- 
father, John Benjamin Brown, was born and where 
his mother's grandfather, William McKee, was a na- 
tive. The maternal grandfather was also William 
McKee. 

James B. Brown was a boy when his parents moved 
to Shelbyville, Kentucky, where his father was a mer- 
chant many years. He was educated in the public 
schools and in 1887, at the age of fifteen, came to 
Louisville and found his first employment as an office 
boy with the Southern News Company. He was cash- 
ier of that company when he resigned to become 
cashier in the office of the city tax receiver. Four 
years later he was elected tax receiver, and performed 
the duties of that municipal office four years. 

In 1906 Mr. Brown was elected cashier of the First 
National Bank of Louisville, and on November 5, igo8, 
was made president of that institution. This post he 
resigned to become first vice president of the National 
Bank of Commerce, and at the death of Samuel Cas- 
sidy became president. In February, 1919, occurred a 
notable consolidation of Louisville banks, including the 
National Bank of Commerce, National Bank of Ken- 
tucky, German Bank, and the American Southern Na- 
tional Bank, making the National Bank of Kentucky, 
of which Mr. Brown was promoted to the post of 
|)resident. 

For many years he has been directly identified with 
a number of other local business concerns. He is 
vice president of the Louisville Gas and Electric Com- 
pany, a director of the Standard Oil Company, direc- 
tor of the Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph 



Company, a director of the Louisville Food and Provi- 
sion Company, and director of the Louisville Home 
Telephone Company. During the World war his finan- 
cial and business abilities were commandeered by 
President Wilson, who appointed him a member of 
the Capital Issues Committee, and he spent nearly a 
year in Washington during 1918-19. Secretary Mc- 
Adoo also appointed him state director for Kentucky 
of war savings. He was a leader in promoting the 
sale of Liberty Loans and the Red Cross and Y. M. 
C. A. drives. 

Mr. Brown was one of the organizers and a direc- 
tor in the Kentucky Jockey Club. He has served as 
president of the Board of Sinking Fund Commission- 
ers for Louisville, is a member of the Commercial 
Club and Elks, and a popular member of many local 
organizations. Mr. Brown married Miss Elizabeth 
Kennedy, whose father, Bud Kennedy, was for many 
years a well-known Louisville coal merchant. 

Albert B. Koett was actively associated with J. 
Robert Kelley at the beginning of the great industry 
now known as the Kelley-Koett Manufacturing Com- 
pany of Covington. Mr. Koett is vice president of this 
corporation, which owns the largest plant in the world 
exclusively devoted to the manufacture of X-Ray in- 
struments and apparatus. It was started in Coving- 
ton about a quarter of a century ago by Mr. Koett and 
Mr. Kelley, soon after the discovery of the X-Ray 
by the scientist Roentgen. This company has done 
more than any other organization to perfect the deli- 
cate and elaborate apparatus now found as an essential 
part of the equipment for the great hospitals, labo- 
ratories and many of the offices of individual surgeons 
and physicians. Apparatus manufactured by the Cov- 
ington Company represents the last word of perfec- 
tion in such equipment, and the fact that their machines 
are part of the equipment of the Mayo Brothers Hos- 
pital at Rochester, Minnesota, speaks for itself, though 
many other institutions almost equally well known se- 
cured similar equipments from the Kelley-Koett Com- 
pany. During the World war the plant was practically 
turned over to Government use, manufacturing port- 
able apparatus and other instruments on plans drawn 
and approved by Government experts for use in the 
battle area and the hospitals behind the lines. 

Albert B. Koett was born in Saxe-Weimar, Germany, 
May 28, 1863. His father. Professor C. Koett, was 
born in Saxe-Weimar in 1817, and at this writing was 
still living, aged one hundred and four years, his 
home being at Geisa, Saxe-Weimar. His active life 
was devoted to music, and he was a professor of that 
art. He is a Catholic in religion. Professor Koett 
married Mary Stehling, who was born in Saxe-Weimar 
in 1828, and died there in 1904. They were the parents 
of a large family of children : Edmund, a wine mer- 
chant who died at Frankfort, Germany; Albert B.; 
Caspar, owning a furniture factorv at Saxe-Weimar; 
Cornelia, who died at Denver, Colorado; Gustav, a 
modeler bv trade who lives at Norwood, Ohio; Mrs. 
Marv S^etter, wife of a machinist living at Riverside. 
Qtiio : Otto, a frp'jco painter and contr.^ctor with home 
at Seattle. Washington; Celia. wife of Fred Worley. 
a sterentyne onerator at Riverside. Ohio; Amand, 
a dru"T'st in Frankfort. Germany; Airs. Ida Reichard, 
whn li\-e'= at Tacoma, Washington, where her hus- 
h-ind ow"s p tailoring establishment: Leonard, a drug- 
gist at Frankfort. Germany; and Miss Josephine, who 
rernains at h"'ne caring for her aged father. 

Albert B. Koett grew up in Saxe-Weimar. attended 
tlie common schools to the aee of fourteen, following 
which be served a four years' apprenticeship at the 
sculntor's trade or art. He was employed as a sculptor 
•n Germany, but since 1884 has been a resident of the 
United States. For about a year he followed his pro- 
fession at Cincinnati, but in 1885 entered the service 
of the Wurlitzer Music Company of Cincinnati, and for 





' /3. // .^=^2^^ 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



55 



ten years was with that great musical instruments 
manufacturing concern. He left that business to join 
his enterprise and capital with Mr. Kelley in their ven- 
ture into a comparatively new and untried field, and 
together they have labored and built up and perfected 
an organization that not only ranks high in a com- 
mercial way, but is one of a unique interest among 
Kentucky's industries. 

Mr. Koett was for four years an active member of 
the Covington Board of Education. He is a republican 
in politics, is affiliated with Colonel Clay Lodge No. 
159, F. and A. M., Indra Consistory No. 2 of the Scot- 
tish Rite at Covington, and is a member of the Mystic 
Shrine at Frankfort. Aside from the great service ren- 
dered by his company to further the purposes of the 
Government in the World war he was associated with 
local citizens in carrying out war plans. He was one 
of the active canvassers for the sale of bonds and other 
Government securities. 

Mr. Koett owns a modern home in Covington at 515 
Russell Avenue. In 1887, at Harrison, Ohio, he mar- 
ried Miss Blanche Mott, a native of that town. She 
died at Covington, December 23, 1915. She was a grad- 
uate of the Harrison High School. Mr. Koett had 
four children : Ida, who died at the age of twenty- 
one the wife of K. frockett; Irene, who is married 
and lives at Newport News, Virginia ; Eva, married 
and living at Cincinnati ; and Ruth, a student in the 
Nazareth Academy at Nazareth, Kentucky. 

Graddy Cary is a native of Louisville, graduated in 
law twenty-one years ago, by individual work attracted 
attention as a successful young lawyer, and for a num- 
ber of years past has been a member of the very 
prominent Louisville firm of Burnett, Batson & Cary, 
which easily ranks with the leading law firms of the 
state. 

Mr. Cary was born in Louisville, April 6, 1878, son 
of Arthur and Fanny (Graddy) Cary. His father 
was born in Louisville, October i, 1841, and is now 
living, at the age of eighty, at Lexington. He grad- 
uated from the Louisville Law School in 1868, and 
from that year until i88g practiced law in Louisville. 
In 1889 he became general counsel for the Kentucky 
Union Railway Company and the Kentucky Union 
Land Company. Subsequently for a quarter of a 
century he was president of these two corporations 
until 1917, when on account of advancing years and 
with all the success that justifies it he retired from 
his profession and business. He is a republican and 
cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln in 1864. 

Fanny Graddy, mother of Graddy Cary, was born 
in Woodford County, Kentucky, in 1848, and died 
April 8, 1878, just two days after the birth of her 
only son and child. Arthur Cary, on February 12, 
1895, married the widow of D. D. Bell, of Lexington. 

Graddy Cary was educated in the public and private 
schools of Louisville, began his academic studies in 
Kentucky University in 1893, and in 1896 matricu- 
lated in Center College at Danville, from which he 
received his A. B. degree in 1898. Mr. Cary studied 
law in the University of Virginia, graduating with 
the class of 190G. For about a year he was in prac- 
tice at Lexington, and on September 2, 1901, located 
at Louisville, where for about three years he depended 
on his own talents and energies to build up a profes- 
sional clientele. In 1904 he became associated with 
Jijdge Homer W. Batson, under the firm name of 
Batson & Cary. This association has been continu- 
ous for seventeen years, and in January, 1910, Mr. 
Henry Burnett became head of the firm Burnett, Bat- 
son & Cary. Mr. Burnett is now practically retired, 
leaving the bulk of the large practice to Mr. Batson 
and Mr. Cary and their junior associates. 

Mr. Cary has found all the success to satisfy his 
ambition in the strict lines of his profession, and has 
never cared- for public honors. In 1909 he demitted 
from Fall City Lodge of Masons to become a char- 



ter member of Crescent Hill Lodge No. 820, F. & 
A. M. He is a member of the Kappa Alpha college 
fraternity and the Phi Delta Phi legal fraternity, and 
in politics is a republican. 

January 17, 1907, he married Miss Marie Burnett, 
daughter of Mr. Henry Burnett, head of Burnett, 
Batson & Cary. The history of Mrs. Gary's family 
is given on other pages of this work. Mr. and Mrs. 
Cary have two children, Arthur and Henry Burnett 
Cary. 

Oscar Fenley. As one of the chief centers of 
finance and comrnerce in the South, Louisville is the 
home of great institutions whose power and influ- 
ence reach out far beyond the limits of this state. 
One such institution is the National Bank of Ken- 
tucky, one of the largest and strongest banks in the 
South. The president of that bank for many years 
and now chairman of its board of directors is Oscar 
Fenley, who has been identified with Louisville bank- 
ing for half a century and became president of the 
bank after a long consecutive service of utmost fidelity 
and efficiency. 

Mr. Fenley was born in Jefferson County, Kentucky, 
June 25, 1855, son of John N. and Mary Elizabeth 
(Carr) Fenley. Mr. Fenley possesses the original 
deed to a farm in Jefferson County which was ac- 
quired by his ancestor, Isaac Fenley, who came from 
Virginia to Kentucky in 1790. This family farm is 
therefore one of the oldest in the continuous pos- 
session of one family in the state. 

Oscar Fenley was educated in the public schools 
of Louisville, and at the age of sixteen became a 
clerk in the Citizens Bank of Louisville. In the early 
years his superiors recognized in him a young man oi 
more than ordinary industry and alert comprehension, 
supplemented by a character that is a fundamental 
factor in a financial career. From 1888 for nine years 
Mr. Fenley was cashier of the Citizens Bank. In 
1896 he accepted the office of vice president in the 
National Bank of Kentucky, and in 1897 became presi- 
dent. He was president more than twenty years, and 
in February, 1919, resigned and accepted the chairman- 
shin of the board of directors. 

He is a former director of the Federal Reserve 
Bank of St. Louis, was president of the Louisville 
Clearing House in 1909 and 1910, and has been presi- 
dent of the Bourbon Stock Yards Company, Kentucky 
Public Elevator Company, a director of the Fidelity 
Trust Company, Louisville City Railway Company, 
and vice chairman ' of the Louisville City Sewerage 
Commission. He has been treasurer of the Board 
of Trade, is an active member of the Commercial 
Club, the Pendennis, Country, Chess and Whist clubs, 
and has been treasurer of Louisville Chapter of the 
American Red Cross since it was organized. 

In 1883 Mr. Fenley was united in marriage with 
Miss Alice Short, a daughter of William Short. She 
(lied in 1890, leaving one daughter, Elizabeth, who 
died in 1915. In June, 1897, Mr. Fenley married Miss 
Mary Johnston Woolley, daughter of Col. Robert W. 
Woolley, of Kentucky. They have one daughter, 
Mary Johnston Fenley, who is attending college. 

Fred For'cht. Of the prominent members of the 
Louisville bar none has achieved a more pronounced 
success than Fred Forcht. Attaining in his early 
youth a prominence which foretold a brilliant future, 
he has exceeded the hopes and predictions of his 
warmest admirers. His ability as a jury lawyer has 
carried his fame beyond the limits of this state, and 
his name is familiar to attorneys of prominence all 
oyer the United States, while the integrity and relia- 
bility which formed the foundation stone of his ca- 
reer have remained to complement his legal acumen 
and forensic skill. , 

Mr. Forcht is a native son, having been born in 
Louisville, October 15. 1876, son of Fred and Emma 



56 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



(Forcht) Forcht. Both his parents were natives of 
Hanover, Germany, who came to these shores in order 
to rid themselves of that Kaiserism and Prussian- 
ism which was already making its insidious influence 
felt in 1854, at which time the elder Forcht arrived 
in Louisville. Here he engaged in the packing busi- 
ness and was one of the pioneer pork packers of 
Louisville and for twenty years held a contract to 
supply meat for the United States Government. He 
became one of the city's widely known and very suc- 
cessful men. He enlisted in the Union army in 1861 
as a member of the Twenty-eighth Kentucky Foot 
Volunteers and served until discharged for disability. 

Fred Forcht graduated from the Louisvile High 
School in 1894 and from the Law School of the Uni- 
versity of Louisville in i8g6, this being followed by 
post-graduate work in law at the University of Vir- 
ginia. In the meantime he became connected with the 
law firm of O'Neal, Jackson & Phelps. In 1898 he 
and Mr. Phelps of this firm formed a partnership, 
which was terminated by the death of Mr. Phelps in 
1901. Mr. Forcht was then associated with William 
H. Field of Forcht & Field until the election of 
Mr. Field to the bench in 1909, since which date his 
work has been that of an individual attorney engaged 
in wide and diversified practice. 

A democrat in his political affiliations, he has served 
for many years without hope or desire for personal 
gains, having repeatedly refused to seek or accept 
any public office for pecuniary advantages. For eight 
years he served as democratic election commissioner 
of Jefferson County, and has aided in the work which 
has extended the influence and promoted the suc- 
cess of that organization. In 1919 he consented at a 
great personal loss to serve as local campaign manager 
for Governor Black, and when in 1920 it became 
apparent that Louisville's democracy had fallen into 
undesirable hands, he assisted materially in reorgan- 
izing the party and presided at the mass meeting in 
which the present city and county committee was 
elected. 

Throughout his career Mr. Forcht has given whole- 
hearted and capable support to the countless move- 
ments for the public good. During the war he acted 
as Government appeal agent in his district. He is now 
and has for some time served as attorney for the 
State Board of Health and the Jefferson County Medi- 
cal Society. Fraternally he is a Scottish Rite Mason 
and Shriner, a member of Lewis Lodge No. igi, 
F. & A. M., is an Elk, a Presbyterian, and a member 
of the County and State Bar associations. 

Mr. Forcht married Anna Hafenborfer, daughter 
of Christian Hafenborfer, of Louisville. They have 
one daughter; Leota, now eighteen years of age. 

Walter Pierce Lincoln, judge since 1910 of the 
Common Pleas branch of the Jefiferson Circuit Court, 
has had a career of genuine distinction and service 
both in the private and public aspects of his profes- 
sion as a lawyer. He became a member of the Louis- 
ville bar. May 30, 1877, and it was only a high sense 
of duty that impelled him to abandon a profitable and 
congenial practice to assume the responsibilities of 
the bench. 

He is a native of Louisville, was born on the south- 
east corner of Sixth and Jefferson streets, December 
17, 1857, son of Dennis and Catherine (Murray) Lin- 
coln. His parents were natives of Ireland, and on 
coming to America lived in Boston, where they were 
married, and toward the close of the '40s moved to 
Louisville. Dennis Lincoln was for many years a 
merchant tailor, and at one time was a justice of the 
peace. 

Walter P. Lincoln attended the parochial schools of 
his native city, the Xavierian Brothers School and 
the Louisville Male High School, and began the study 
of law under James F. Clay at Henderson. He was 



admitted to the bar at Henderson in May, 1877, but 
at once returned to Louisville to begin practice. From 
1880 for a period of thirty years Judge Lincoln 
was a member of the firm of Lincoln & Lieber. He 
enjoyed his work as a lawyer, and had a dignified 
and successful position which he had no desire to 
exchange for the cares and anxieties of politics. 

He first became a factor- in local politics in 1907 
when the Appellate Court disqualified all the officials 
elected by the City of Louisville and County of Jeffer- 
son. Governor Beckham had the responsibility of ap- 
pointing a new set of officers, and in his search for 
men of recognized fitness he chose Robert W. Bing- 
ham as mayor of Louisville and three times importuned 
Mr. Lincoln to accept the post of county judge. The 
tiiird time Governor Beckham presented the urgency 
of the situation in person to Mr. Lmcoln, and the 
latter reluctantly consented to accept the appointment, 
which carried with it in conjunction with Major Bing- 
ham the responsibility of appointing officers to all the 
other county and city departments. This task was 
carried out to the satisfaction of all interested in 
local government, and Judge Lincoln served as county 
judge from June until November, 1907. 

In 1909 he was elected to the Circuit Bench in the 
Common Pleas branch, and in 1915 was re-elected for 
the second term, in which he is now serving. 

Judge Lincoln has many of the interests of a culti- 
vated gentleman and scholar. His amateur enthusiasm 
in the study of chemistry brought him a Fellowship 
in the American Chemical Society. He was one of 
the charter members of the Knights of Columbus 
in the South, belongs to the Louisville Council of that 
order, is a member of the National Geographic So- 
ciety, the Pendennis and Juniper Hunting clubs, and 
for several years has spent his winter vacations hunt- 
ing in Florida. 

Judge Lincoln married Ida May Adams, a native of 
Rockcastle County, Kentucky. Her father, Capt. Jack 
Adams, was a captain in the Texas Rangers when 
Te.xas gained its independence, subsequently was in 
the United States regular army and Vi'ent through the 
war with Mexico. Judge Lincoln and wife have one 
daughter. May Adams Lincoln. 

A. W. Wood. In point of age, influence, well-de- 
served prestige and successful management one of the 
foremost newspapers of Western Kentucky is the Ken- 
tucky New Era, published in Hopkinsville. It was 
founded half a century ago, and for thirty years of 
its existence A. W. Wood, present proprietor and 
publisher, has been actively identified with its busi- 
ness management. 

Mr. Wood in addition to a successful career as a 
newspaper man has found many business and civic 
interests to enlist his services at Hopkinsville. 

He was born in that city October 25, 1869, and his 
own age practically coincides with the age of the 
New Era. His ancestors were Virginians, of English 
stock, and some of th.e family served in the Revolu- 
tionary war. His grandfather was Dr. Alfred C. 
Wood, who was born in Albemarle County, Virginia, 
in 1821, and died at Charlottesville in that state in 
1871. He spent a long and active career as a physician 
and surgeon. He married Martha W. Rogers who 
was born in Albemarle County in 1822 and died ai 
Hopkinsville, Kentucky, in 1908. 

The father of the Hopkinsville editor and publisher 
was the late Hunter Wood, who as a lawyer and citi- 
zen enjoyed a place of exceptional prominence in 
Western Kentucky for more than half a century. 
He was born in Albemarle County, Virginia, Novem- 
ber 2, 1845, and died at Hopkinsville, May 29, 1920, 
at the age of seventy-five. He grew up in the home 
of a country physician on a farm a few miles north 
of Charlottesville, and in the years before the war 
liad all the advantages of education bestowed upon 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



57 



sons of Virginia gentlemen. Early in the war he 
entered the Virginia Military Institute at Lexington, 
being too young to enlist, but before the war was 
over he and his fellow students volunteered and he 
participated in the battle of Newmarket, Virginia, 
May 15, 1S64, under the command of Gen. John C. 
Breckenridge of Kentucky. After the war he took 
up the study of law in the University of Virginia at 
Charlottesville, and in 1807 came to Hopkinsville, Ken- 
tucky, and soon made a place for himself at the bar 
of that city. He practiced for more than half a 
century. In 1870 he was elected county attorney of 
Crittenden County, serving four years, was then 
elected and for six years was commonwealth's attor- 
ney of his judicial district, in 1884 was a delegate 
to the Democratic National Convention of Chicago 
which nominated Grover Cleveland, and early in Mr. 
Cleveland's administration was appointed collector of 
internal revenue for the Second District. He re- 
mained in that office four years, and after that devoted 
his time and energies almost entirely to the private 
practice of his profession. He was a director of the 
Cristian-Todd Telephone Company, was a Knight 
Templar Mason, Odd Fellow and Knight of Pythias, 
and all his life a devoted member of the Episcopal 
Church, serving as vestryman of the church at Hop- 
kinsville for half a century. 

On December 16, 1868, Hunter Wood married Rosa- 
lie Nelson Green, who was born in Christian County, 
a daughter of John R. and Elizabeth (Nelson) Green, 
of Kentucky and Virginia ancestry. She is still liv- 
ing at Hopkinsville. Hunter Wood and wife had five 
children : A. Walker ; Elizabeth Wood ; Hunter, who 
bears his father's name and is also a member of his 
father's profession as a lawyer, living at Hopkins- 
ville; Grace, wife of E. A. Chavanne, state agent for 
the Royal Insurance Company, living at New Orleans ; 
and Hugh N., a civil engineer, living at Louisville, 
and chief . engineer for the Louisville, Henderson & 
St. Louis Railway Company. 

A. W. Wood graduated from the Hopkinsville High 
School in 1883, finished the course of the South Ken- 
tucky College in 1886, spent one year in the Univer- 
sity of the South at Sewanee, Tennessee, and con- 
tinuously since 1889 his activities and services have 
identified him with the newspaper business with the 
Kentucky New Era. In that year he became business 
manager of the paper and since 1900 has been sole 
proprietor. The New Era circulates and has a dis- 
tinctive influence all over Southwestern Kentucky, 
though most of its circulation is confined to Christian 
County. It is the official paper of that county, is a 
democratic organ, and as a publishing plant the New 
Era has one of the best and most up-to-date estab- 
lishments in Western Kentucky, the printing equipment 
including linotype, perfected presses, etc. 

Mr. Wood served eight years as auditor and treas- 
urer of the City of Hopkinsville, was a member of the 
city council two years, is now on the Board of Educa- 
tion, and is a director in the Bank of Hopkinsville 
He is a democrat and is affiliated with Hopkinsville 
Lodge No. Z7, A. F. & A. M., Evergreen Lodge No. 
38, Knights of Pythias, and as a citizen and publisher 
has the deepest interest in every matter affecting the 
welfare and prosperity of his city and county. 

He and his family live in a modern home at 747 
East Seventh Street. He married at Hopkinsville in 
1899 Miss Madge Fairleigh, daughter of Dr. Robert 
and Anna (Slaughter) Fairleigh, the latter still living 
in Hopkinsville. Her father, now deceased, was a 
prominent physician and surgeon at Hopkinsville, 
where he began practice soon after the Civil war. 
Mrs, Wood is a graduate of the Bethel Woman's Col- 
lege of Hopkinsville, receiving the B. A. degree from 
that institution. She is the mother of three children: 
A. W., Jr., in the sophomore class of the University 
of Pennsylvania; Thomas F., in the freshman year of 



Pennsylvania University; and Margaret, attending 
public school at Hopkinsville. 

E. H. Hester. Of the men whose business abili- 
ties, good workmanship and intelligent use of oppor- 
tunities have contributed to the upbuilding and devel- 
opment of the various thriving communities of Ken- 
tucky, one who has accomplished much for the good 
of his locality both as business man and citizen is 
E. H. Hester, the competent and reliable contractor 
and builder of Hopkinsville. During a career that 
has extended over a long period of years he has won 
and held the confidence of those with whom he has 
been associated, and the character and quality of his 
work evidence his pride in his craft and the public 
spirit which is a part of his personal make-up. 

Mr. Hester was born on a farm in Trigg County, 
Kentucky, October 13, 1871, a son of R. W. and Ella 
(Savells) Hester. Like many other families of this 
region, the Hesters originated in England, whence 
the original American progenitor immigrated to this 
country during Colonial times and settled in Virginia. 
The family was founded in Kentucky by the great- 
grandfather of E. H. Hester, a native of Virginia, 
who came at an early date to Trigg County and here 
passed the rest of his life in agricultural pursuits. 
His son, Henry Hester, was born in Virginia and was 
a youth when he accompanied the family to Trigg 
County. Here he followed in the footsteps of his 
father as a farmer, and died in 1878, at the age of 
seventy-two years, after an honorable and success- 
ful career. His first wife bore the maiden name of 
Miss Blanks, and was the grandmother of E. H. Hes- 
ter, before whose birth she died. 

R. W. Hester, father of E. H. Hester, was born in 
Trigg County, Kentucky, in 1842, and died at Cadiz, 
this state, in 1884. He was reared, educated and 
married in Trigg County, where he passed his entire 
career with the exception of about two years spent 
in Christian County. For the greater part of his 
career he followed agricultural operations, but during 
the last four years of his life applied himself to the 
trade of machinist. Mr. Hester was a man highly 
respected, but sought no public preference over his 
fellows, being content to lead a quiet life and to 
confine his activities to an exemplification of good 
citizenship. He married Miss Ella Savells, who was 
born in 1854, in Trigg County, Kentucky, and died 
at Hopkinsville in 1916. They became the parents 
of four children : Gertrude, who died in 1900, as the 
wife of the late J. J. Thomasson, a carpenter of 
Paducah, who had been formerly a farmer in Trigg 
County; Hallie, who died in 1912, at Hopkinsville, as 
the wife of W. H. Nixon, a carpenter and builder; 
E. H. ; and W. H., a contractor and builder of Hop- 
kinsville. 

E. H. Hester acquired his education in the rural 
schools of Trigg and Christian counties, his school- 
ing ending when he was fourteen years of age, at 
which time he began working for his father on the 
home farm. He continued thus employed until he was 
nineteen years of age, and then began to learn the 
trade of carpenter in Christian County. In 1892 he 
came to Hopkinsville, where he applied himself to car- 
pentry and building, and this city has continued to 
be his home and the scene of his activities and suc- 
cess. In 190S he began to devote himself to building 
and contracting, and in this field has built up the larg- 
est individual «ontracting business in Christian County. 
His offices are situated at 106 South Virginia Street. 
Among other structures Mr. Hester has built the 
City Bank of Hopkinsville, the First National Bank 
of this city, the Rex Theatre and many large busi- 
ness houses, residences and factories. He is the owner 
of a farm two miles southwest of Hopkinsville, on 
which he carries on general farming and stockrais- 
ing, and where his home is located. Mr. Hester is a 



58 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



director of the Building and Loan Association and 
has other connections. During his earlier years he 
served as chief of the Hopkinsville Fire Department 
for four years, and his support has always been given 
to worthy measures. This was particularly apparent 
during the World war, when he gave unstintingly to 
the various causes and worked personally in their 
behalf. Mr. Hester is a member of the Christian 
Church, and for some years has acted in the capacity 
of deacon therein. As a fraternalist he is affiliated 
with Green River Lodge No. 54, I. O. O. F., and 
Evergreen Lodge No. 38, K. P. 

In 1903 he was married in Trigg County, near 
Cerulean Springs, to Miss Verna Brandon, daughter 
of John and Helen (Phillips) Brandon, farming peo- 
ple of that community, both of whom are now de- 
ceased. To this union there have been born five 
children : Edward, born April 7, 1904, a sophomore at 
the Hopkinsville High School; Gertrude, who is a 
member of the freshman class of that school ; and 
William, Harry and Dorothy, who are attending the 
graded schools of Hopkinsville. 

James Hunter Bell, one of the enterprising farmers 
and highly esteemed citizens of Daviess County, lives 
two miles east of Owensboro. He was born in the 
City of Louisville, Kentucky, December 6, 1844, and is 
a son of William and Louisa (Ewing) Bell. William 
Bell was born at Glass Loch, County Monahan, Ire- 
land, in 1790, and died in Daviess County, Kentucky, 
in 1865. He was a son of John and Elizabeth (Dob- 
bin) Bell, the former of Irish and latter of French 
origin, and both of them lived and died in Ireland. 
The name Bell is of Scotch origin, and Adam Bell hav- 
ing emigrated from Scotland to Ireland as early as 
1689. 

William Bell came to the United States when he 
was nineteen years old, and first lived at Reading, 
Pennsylvania, but later moved to Harrodsburg, Ken- 
tucky. Still later he resided at Shelbyville and Louis- 
ville, Kentucky. At Harrodsburg and Shelbyville he 
was engaged in merchandising, and when he went to 
Louisville became interested in the wholesale dry goods 
trade, and from 1827 until 1844 remained in that line. 
In the latter year he sold his business and came to 
Daviess County, where he bought a farm of 1,000 acres 
of land to the East of Owensboro, and here he lived 
out the remainder of his life, a period of twenty-one 
years, during that time devoting himself to the pursuit 
of agriculture. He was twice married, his first wife 
having been Mary Allison, whom he married at Shel- 
byville, and she bore him the following children: 
John, Robert, William and Mary E. For his second 
wife, William Bell married at Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, Louisa Elizabeth Ewing. She was born at 
Trenton, New Jersey, May 24, 1804, and died Decem- 
ber 3, 1888. Her parents were Maskell and Jane 
(Hunter) Ewing, the former, born in 1758, serving as 
a soldier in the American Revolution. He later be- 
came a lawyer and died in 1825. His parents were 
Maskell and Mary C. (Paget) Ewing, and his grand- 
parents were Thomas and Mary (Maskell) Ewing. 
Thomas Ewing was the American progenitor of the 
family, having come to this country from Glasgow, 
Scotland, in 1718, after a period of some years spent 
in Ireland. Upon his arrival in the American Colonies 
he located at Greenwich, New Jersey. The Bells and 
Ewings have been Presbyterians in religious faith and 
are noted for strong force of character, high standards 
in living and thrift and industry. 

James Hunter Bell and a sister, Louisa, his senior, 
were born of the second marriage of William Bell, and 
he was only a month old when his parents moved to 
Daviess County, and since then he has made it his 
home. He received a good elementary education, and 
was a student in college when his father died in 1865. 
Leaving his studies, he came home and assumed charge 



of the homestead, and has never been without farm- 
ing interests since that time, although for eight years 
he was one of the owners and the manager of the 
Daviess County distillery, and from 1896 to 1904 was a 
buyer, rehandler and exporter of tobacco. 

On November 5, 1872, James Hunter Bell was united 
in marriage with Elizabeth Woolfolk, of Daviess 
County, who died in 1880, having borne her husband 
four children. On October 17, 1882, Mr. Bell was 
married to Miss Emily Craig, a native of Daviess 
County, and a daughter of Robert and Mary Jane (Mc- 
Henry) Craig. Her father was a native of Scotland 
and her mother of Ohio County, Kentucky. The fol- 
lowing children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Bell : Mary, 
who died in 1920, and Nannie, James Hunter, Ewing 
Craig, Lienor C, (now Mrs. Birk), Robert Maskell, 
Edward Hobbs Luckett, all of whom are living. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bell are members of the Presbyterian 
Church. In politics he is a democrat. Their house 
is one of the oldest in Daviess County, and is a hewn- 
log structure, plastered and weather-boarded, of Co- 
lonial style, and here a generous hospitality is ex- 
tended to the many friends of the family. Mr. Bell 
is a progressive man both in his business and civic 
ideas, and is proud of his family, community, state and 
nation. 

Richard H. Holland. In 1916, after a career of 
great activity, varied accomplishment and signal use- 
fulness, Richard H. Holland retired from business 
affairs at Hopkinsville, the city which had seen the 
birth of his business career in 1881. For many years 
Mr. Holland was the owner and operator of the 
Holland Opera House, and in addition to that enter- 
prise his name was identified with numerous other 
concerns, all of which benefited by the strength of 
his ability and the wisdom of his judgment. 

Mr. Holland was born on a farm in Christian 
County, Kentucky, February 26, 1857, a son of John 
S. and Lucy (Palmer) Holland, being a member of 
an old family of Colonial Virginia. His father was 
born in 1831, in the Old Dominion state, and was 
a child when brought by his parents to Christian 
County, where he grew to manhood and was mar- 
ried. For some years Mr. Holland was engaged in 
farming in the same county, 2'/^ miles from Pem- 
broke, and while he was still comparatively a young 
man when he died, in 1867, had already become suc- 
cessful and was the owner of a 350-acre property. 
He was a stalwart democrat in his political views and 
a strong churchman of the Presbyterian faith. Mr. 
Holland married Miss Lucy Palmer, who was born in 
1833, in Kentucky, and died on the home farm in 
1858. There were only two children in the family: 
Lynn McCauley, who died when young in Christian 
County, and Richard H. 

Richard H. Holland received his education in the 
rural schools of Christian County and in Bethel Col- 
lege, Russellville, Kentucky, and following his gradu- 
ation from the latter institution he was unemployed 
for one year. From 1875 until 1881 he operated the 
home farm and in the latter year came to Hopkins- 
ville, where he built the Holland Opera House, a two- 
story structure situated at 108-110-112 Main Street, 
which he still owns. This he operated with success 
until 1916, at the close of which season he retired 
from activity and ceased to rent his house for the 
purpose of presenting performances. During the many 
years that Mr. Holland was connected with theatrical 
ventures he furnished the people of Hopkinsville with 
the best of entertainment securable, and was instru- 
mental in having many high-class performers and 
companies visit the city. 

He is a director in the Hopkinsville Milling Com- 
pany and treasurer and director of the Pennyroyal 
Fair Association, which holds the biggest annual fairs 
in Kentucky outside of the City of Louisville. The 




^f7/&^ 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



59 



Pennyroyal Fair Grounds are situated on the forty- 
acre property belonging to Mr. Holland, adjoining 
Hopkinsville on the south. He is also the owner of 
500 acres of land, including the old home place, situ- 
ated ■2V2 miles west of Pembroke, at the site of Salu- 
bria, Kentucky, widely famed for its healthful sul- 
phur springs. Mr. Holland is a democrat in politics, 
and formerly served for four years as a member of 
the city council of Hopkinsville. He is unmarried. 

Dennis B. Blackford. A farm eight miles south- 
west of Lexington, in the northern part of Jessamine 
County, now owned and occupied by Dennis B. Black- 
ford and his mother, has for many years been noted 
for its livestock and agricultural enterprise. It is also 
a landmark in Kentucky history, its original owner 
having been one of the companions of Daniel Boone, 
and Dennis B. Blackford is a descendant of that pio- 
neer ancestor. 

The great-grandfather of Dennis B. Blackford was 
Benjamin Blackford, who was born in Ohio Territory 
in 1760. He was an early settler in Kentucky and 
died near Nicholasville in Jessamine County in 1842. 
Benjamin Blackford married Katherine Sadusky, 
whose father was Anthony Sadusky, and lier grand- 
father was a native of Poland and an early settler 
m Virginia. Nathaniel Blackford, son of Benjamin 
and Katherine, was born near Nicholasville, Kentucky, 
December iS, 1799, and died February i, 1877. He 
married Rebecca Sadusky, who was born in Jessamine 
County in 1812 and died in November, 1897. Her 
parents were Ephraim and Anna (Evans) Sadusky, 
both life-long residents of Jessamine County. Jacob 
Sadusky, father of Ephraim, was a Virginian and was 
a companion of Daniel Boone, above referred to. For 
his services in surveying Kentucky lands Jacob Sa- 
dusky received a grant of 2,000 acres on the waters 
of Stinking Creek, and that original grant includes the 
Blackford farm mentioned at the beginning of this 
article. Jacob Sadusky lived and died on this tract 
and was buried on the farm. He married Jemima 
Voss, a native of Virginia. In the pioneer times she 
was captured by Indians, was held a prisoner foi 
several days, and to her death carried on her head a 
scar caused by an Indian tomahawk. Jacob Sadusky 
died when past ninety years of age. Ephraim Sa- 
dusky's first wife, Anna Evans, died when her daugh- 
ter Rebecca was a child. He married for his second 
wife Hettie Collins. Rebecca Sadusky was born De- 
cember 21, 1812, and died November 3, 1897, and for 
many years her welfare was looked after by her son 
John H. Blackford. The old home on the Black- 
ford farm was erected in 1843 by Nathaniel Blackford. 

John H. Blackford was born on that farm August 
5, 1841, and during his life he became one of Ken- 
tucky's famous horsemen. He devoted his chief time 
and energies to the breeding of trotting stock. He 
also trained and raced his horses, had a training 
track on his farm, and for a number of years had 
a string of horses that followed the Blue Grass cir- 
cuit. One of his noted horses was Hindu Wilkes, 
with a record of 2:2o>^, and which sold for $10,000, 
one of the highest prices then paid for a trotting horse. 
John H. Blackford married Ellen Tilford Burns. 
Mrs. Blackford was born in Fleming County, Ken- 
tucky, August 5, 1853, daughter of Dennis and Mary 
A. (Wilson) Burns. Her parents both died in Flem- 
ing County in 1877. Her grandparents were Enoch 
and Susan (Rice) Burns. Enoch's father, Dennis 
Burns, was a native of Scotland and died in Bath 
County, Kentucky. 

John H. Blackford died January 4, 1898, at the age 
of fifty-seven. He and his wife had only one son, 
Dennis B. Blackford, who was born on the present 
farm January 12, 1876, and has lived in one house 
practically all the days of his life. He inherited his 
father's love for horses and as a young man entered 



upon a program of breeding and training for the 
track«on an even more extensive scale than his father 
had conducted operations. Once on driving a first- 
class horse in a race and being distanced, he went 
home very despondent, and was greeted by his mother, 
who had seen the race, with a smile. She said she 
was delighted he was shut out as she had prayed for 
that very outcome. Realizing the earnestness of her 
opposition, Mr. Blackford at once abandoned racing, 
sold his race stock at a sacrifice, and since then has 
-levoted himself entirely to substantial farming inter- 
ests. For a number of years he has been a wheat 
dealer, not engaged in the speculative trade, but buy- 
ing wheat outright and storing for an advance in 
price, and his operations in this market have on 
the whole been very profitable. 

Mr. Blackford now owns 750 acres of the original 
Sadusky grant of 2,000 acres, and this land has never 
been out of the Sadusky family and its heirs for 140 
years. The farm is devoted to general agriculture 
and live stock. Mr. Blackford for a number of years 
has been a Kentucky hog grower. In early years 
he sold hogs at 2.)4 cents a pound, though an offset 
for the low price was the fact that labor cost only 
50 cents a day. Out of his efforts at farming and 
business he has acquired the generous acreage above 
noted, frequently going in debt for his additional pur- 
chases. He has usually grown tobacco on from twen- 
ty-five to forty acres, the crop being handled by 
tenants. Mr. Blackford sends to market annually 
about fifty head of cattle and from 100 to 150 head 
of hogs. He is a director of the Farmers Exchange 
Bank of Nicholasville. 

He has never married and has always shared the 
home of his mother, who has long been a member of 
the Mount Pleasant Baptist Church. The family have 
always been democrats. Mr. Blackford is a Knight 
of Pythias. His vacations are usually spent with rod 
or gun in the mountains. 

Clyde H. Whaley. The value in business of con- 
centrating one's forces upon a given line of activity, 
of correctly gauging its importance among the needs 
of the world and keeping pace with the ever-changing 
conditions surrounding it, is confirmed anew in the 
career of Clyde H. Whaley, a successful wholesale 
grocer of Hopkinsville. While he has been identified 
with his present business only since 1917, Mr. Whaley 
has had broad and practical experience in lines closely 
allied with his present one, and is known well and 
prominently to the trade in this part of Kentucky. 

Mr. Whaley was born at Waapun, Wisconsin, July 
9, 1883, a son of Frank and Emily (Holden) Whaley, 
and a member of a family which originated in Eng- 
land and was founded in America during Colonial 
times when the first ancestor in this country settled 
in the State of New York. The first American an- 
cestor on the maternal side was Jonathan Fayerbank, 
who came to Dedham, Massachusetts, in 1633 and 
built the Fairbanks House in 1636, which still stands, 
being the oldest frame building in America today. 
William Whaley, the grandfather of Clyde H. Whaley, 
was born in New York State, in 1820, and during a 
long period of years was engaged in farming in his 
native commonwealth. In later years he removed to 
Ladoga, Wisconsin, where he became the proprietor 
of a hotel and where his death occurred about 1880. 
Frank Whaley was born in New York, in 1844, and 
as a young *man engaged in farming in the vicinity 
of Oneida, that state. In 1876 he removed to Wau- 
pun, Wisconsin, where he resumed agricultural opera- 
tions and where he became an extensive and success- 
ful farmer and prominent and influential citizen. He 
died there in 1893. Mr. Whaley was a republican 
and was fraternally affiliated with the Odd Fellows 
and the Modern Woodmen of America. He married 
Miss Emily Holden, who was born in New York State 



60 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



in 1847, and who survives him as a resident of Long 
Beach, California. Four children were born tp Mr. 
and Mrs. Whaley : Florence, the wife of Arthur Pynch, 
a retired business man of Spokane, Washington; Leila, 
the wife of William Heme, foreman in a knitting 
mill at Long Beach; George H., half-owner and man- 
ager of the Portland Tire Company, of Portland, 
Oregon ; and Clyde H. 

Clyde H. Whaley received his primary education 
in the public schools of Waupun, Wisconsin, where 
he was graduated from the high school with the class 
of 1902, following which he entered the University of 
Wisconsin, at Madison, and completed his junior year. 
In 1906 he entered upon his business career in the 
advertising department of the National Biscuit Com- 
pany, where for one year he had charge of a crew 
of men, and then went on the road for this big cor- 
poration. It was while thus employed that he first 
came to Kentucky, in 1907, and the state made such 
a favorable impression upon him that he adopted it 
as his own and it has been the scene of his subse- 
quent activities and successes. On leaving the Na- 
tional Biscuit Company's employ Mr. Whaley identified 
himself with a brokerage business at Hopkinsville, and 
while thus connected gained a comprehensive knowl- 
edge of commercial conditions. When the opportunity 
presented itself, in 1917, he took immediate advan- 
tage of it and launched himself upon a career as a 
wholesale grocer, a field of activity in which he has 
attained distinctive and well-merited success. The 
business has enjoyed a constant and steady growth 
and at this time is the largest enterprise of its kind 
in Christian and the surrounding counties. The offices 
and warehouse are situated at 110-112 East Sixth 
Street, in a building owned by Mr. Whaley, he being 
also the owner of a comfortable home on Walnut 
Street, corner of Seventeenth, one of Hopkinsville's 
modern residences. In politics Mr. Whaley is a demo- 
crat, and his religious faith is that of the Christian 
Church, while fraternally he holds membership in 
Hopkinsville Lodge No. 545, B. P. O. E. He was a 
liberal contributor to and active worker in behalf of 
all war movements during the time of his country's 
great need. 

In 1908, at Hopkinsville, Mr. Whaley married Miss 
Hallie Johnson, a graduate of the Hopkinsville High 
School and a daughter of William and Eliza (Boyd) 
Johnson, who reside on Seventeenth Street, Hopkins- 
ville, Mr. Johnson being identified with the Forbes 
Manufacturing Company. Mr. and Mrs. Whaley are 
the parents of three children : Clyde H., Jr., born 
August I, 1909; Emily, born February 16, 1914; and 
Hallie Helen, born February 23, 1921. 

W. A. Long learned the carpenter and general con- 
tracting business as a young man, and for the past 
thirty-five years has been identified as a technical ex- 
pert with all the manufacturing and contracting inter- 
ests of the Forbes Manufacturing Company of 
Hopkinsville. He is general superintendent of this 
company, a business that employs several hundred men, 
and includes the manufacture of lumber, building sup- 
plies, mill work, wagons and also a general contracting 
business. 

Mr. Long, who is one of Hopkinsville's most sub- 
stantial and public spirited citizens, was born near 
that city in Christian County, December 20, 1857. 
His father, George W. Long, was born in the same 
county in 1835. He learned the carpenter's trade, 
and did some building work in the county prior to 
the Civil war. During the Civil war period he lived 
in Macoupin County, Illinois, but in 1866 returned and 
located at Hopkinsville. where he was actively iden- 
tified with his trade and business until his death in 
1910. In politics a democrat, he bad the distinc- 
tion of being the first member of that party elected 
to office in Christian County following the Civil war. 



He served twelve years as county jailor. He was a 
member of the Baptist Church, and was a charter 
member of Green River Lodge No. 54 of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows at Hopkinsville. 
George W. Long married Mary C. McGlasson, who 
was born in Virginia in 1836, and died at Hopkins- 
ville in 1912. W. A. Long is the oldest of the three 
children living at this writing (1921). There were 
three of the family who died in childhood. Georgia 
is the wife of John W. Tunks, a carpenter and builder 
at Hopkinsville, and Nellie is the wife of Stonewall 
Morris, a Hopkinsville shoemaker. 

W. A. Long acquired most of his education in the. 
rural schools of Christian County, attending school 
regularly to the age of eighteen. He also worked 
with his father and, possessing a real mechanical in- 
stinct, he became thoroughly proficient as a carpenter 
and builder before reaching his maturity. In 1885 he 
became superintendent of works for the old firm of 
Forbes & Brothers, lumber manufacturers and con- 
tractors, and has been with that business, now the 
Forbes Manufacturing Company, ever since. He is a 
director as well as general superintendent of the 
company, is a director in the Hopkinsville Realty Com- 
pany, and a director in the Hopkinsville Building and 
Loan Association. He has supervised an immense 
amount of construction in Western Kentucky, and at 
Hopkinsville was a contractor for all but one of the 
modern school buildings, including some of the very 
best in the state. He was builder of the fine new high 
school for colored children, one of the most attractive 
in design and construction in the state. 

The public school system of Hopkinsville owes a 
great debt to Mr. Long, not only through his services 
as a builder, but by his sincere interest in the schools, 
officially expressed during the fifteen years he was 
trustee. For two terms he was chairman of the board 
of trustees. He is a democrat in politics, and is a 
prominent member of the First Baptist Church, being 
senior deacon. He is affiliated with Green River 
Lodge No. 54, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and Evergeen Lodge No. 38, Knights of Pythias. He 
is a trustee of the Jennie Stuart Memorial Hospital. 
He was a subscriber of his personal means and other- 
wise influential and helpful in behalf of the various 
war activities. He and his family reside at 814 East 
Seventh Street, where he has a neat and substantial 
home erected through his own facilities as a con- 
tractor. 

At Hopkinsville in 1886 he married Miss Maggie E. 
Wiley. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Wiley, live 
at Hopkinsville, her father being a retired cattle dealer. 
Mrs. Long is a graduate of the South Kentucky Col- 
lege of Hopkinsville. They have one son, Herschel 
A., born August 9, 1888, one of the honored ex-service 
men of Hopkinsville. He graduated from the high 
school in his native city, received the A. B. degree 
from Center College at Danville, and was in the First 
Officers Training Camp at Fort Benjamin Harrison, 
Indianapolis. He left there with a lieutenant's com- 
mission and saw eleven months of overseas duty, and 
while connected with the Army of Occupation reached 
Berlin. He received his honorable discharge as a 
first lieutenant in February, 1920. 

Bethel B. Veech. In business and financial circles 
of Louisville the name of Bethel B. Veech is asso- 
ciated with enterprises of importance and magnitude, 
to the management and directorship of which he has 
devoted his marked and distinctive capabilities. His 
connections are numerous, but he is perhaps best 
known because of his identification with the United 
States Trust Company, of which he was one of the 
organizers, and of which he has been president since 
1004. 

Mr. Veech was born in Jefferson County, Kentucky, 
on the old family homestead which was the birthplace 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



61 



of his father, April 12, 1861, a son of Richard Snow- 
den and Mary (Nichols) Veech. The Veech family 
was founded in Kentucky by the great-grandfather of 
Bethel B. Veech, who was born in Ireland and was 
an early emigrant to Virginia, whence he came to 
Kentucky. He was one of the early civil engineers 
of the state, became a man of prominence and wealth, 
and founded in Jefferson County a family whose mem- 
bers have taken an important part in the development 
of the industries and institutions of the state. The 
grandfather of Mr. Veech was John A. Veech, who 
was born at an Indian fort, on Bear Grass Creek, 
Jefferson County, Kentucky, known as Dutch Station, 
and the property is now the home farm of his grand- 
son. Bethel B. John A. Veech married Olivia Win- 
chester, who was also born in this county, and they 
became the parents of two daughters and one son. 

The only son of his parents, Richard Snowden 
Veech was born on the old home place, April 21, 1833, 
and received good educational advantages as became 
the son of a rich planter, attending the local schools 
and Center College, Danville, Kentucky, from which 
institution he was graduated with the class of 1852. 
On leaving collegiate halls he engaged in farming, 
with which he concerned himself until 1869, and at 
that time organized the Farmers and Drovers Bank 
at Louisville, an institution of which he acted as cash- 
ier up to 1881. In that year, with other men of fore- 
sight and courage, he reorganized what was then 
known as the Louisville, New Albany and Chicago 
Railway, now the Monon Route, of which he was 
president until 1885, when he disposed of his holdings 
and retired as president. At that time he had bought 
some 3,000 acres of land, on which he indulged his 
love of country life at the same time applying himself 
to the breeding of fine horses, he being an admirer 
of these animals. His farm became one of the most 
famous stock farms in the country and its animals 
were in great demand from all over the country. Mr. 
Veech was a stanch democrat until 1896, when he cast 
his vote for William McKinley. He was a lover of 
home and the country life, so that politics did not 
appeal to him and he never sought public office. He 
was a practical churchman and one of the founders 
of the Presbyterian Church located at Crescent Hill. 
He was likewise one of the founders of the United 
States Trust Company and a member of its board 
of directors up to the time of his death, which oc- 
curred September 18, 1918. Mr. Veech married Miss 
Mary Nichols, who was born at Danville, Kentucky, 
in 1833, and died in 1905, and to this union there were 
born six children, all living. Bethel B. being the third 
in order of birth. 

Bethel B. Veech attended the private schools of 
Louisville and Center College, Danville, and after his 
graduation from the latter in 1882 engaged in farming 
on his father's property. He was thus occupied until 
1897, in which year he became manager of the real 
estate department of the Louisville Trust Company, 
a position which he retained until 1902. With his 
father and others Mr. Veech then perfected the 
organization of the United States Trust Company of 
Louisville, which threw open its doors for business 
April I, 1902, and Mr. Veech at that time became 
vice president. He discharged the duties of that 
office until 1904, when he was elected president, and 
has retained that office to the present time, directing 
the affairs of the institution in a manner that has 
contributed materially to its success and to his own 
prestige as a financier. He is a member of the Second 
Presbyterian Church, and has several social and fra- 
ternal connections, including membership in the Pen- 
d&nnis and Louisville Country clubs. In matters of a 
political nature he maintains an independent attitude. 

Mr. Veech was married October 22, 1885, to Miss 
Eliza Quigley, who was born at Louisville, a daugh- 
ter of Edward and Fannie (Elston) Quigley, natives 



of Kentucky, and both of whom are deceased. Mrs. 
Veech is the second in order of birth in a family of 
four children. Mr. Quigley was a well-known banker 
of Louisville, being senior member of the firm of 
Quigley & Morton. To Mr. and Mrs. Veech there 
have been born three children : Elston, the wife of 
William M. Otter, with three children. Bethel B., Ann 
M. and Elston ; Eleanor, who died at the age of 
twelve years ; and Mary, who died in infancy. 

Henry Stites Barker has had a range of service 
and honors such as are seldom bestowed even upon 
members of the legal profession, which has long been 
looked to for leadership and inspiration in business 
as well as in civic affairs. 

Judge Barker was born in Newstead, Christian 
County, Kentucky, July 23, 1850, son of Richard 
Henry and Caroline M. (Sharp) Barker. The Barkers 
were of English ancestiy, settled in Virginia, and 
soon after the close of the Revolution came to Ken- 
tucky. Richard H. Barker was a native of Todd 
County, Kentucky, and a successful lawyer in Chris- 
tian County, where he died in 1853. Caroline Sharp 
was a native of Christian County, and her father Dr. 
Ma.xwell Sharp moved to Kentucky from Virginia. 

Henry Stites Barker was only three years old when 
his father died, and he grew up and acquired his 
early education in the public schools of Louisville. 
He also attended Kentucky University at Lexington, 
and following his university career returned to Louis- 
ville and studied law. He was admitted to the bar 
in 1874 and at once engaged in practice at Louisville. 
For several years he was associate"d with his brother 
M. S. Barker and later as a member of the firm 
Kohn & Barker until 1888. He had securely estab- 
lished himself as an able and successful lawyer before 
he accepted any of the honors open to his profession. 
In 1888 he was elected city attorney of Louisville, 
was twice re-elected and held that office until 1896. 
In 1897 he was elected judge of the Circuit Court of 
Jefferson County, and from the Circuit Bench was 
elevated to the Court of Appeals by election in 1902. 
Judge Barker was one of the able Appellate judges 
of the state until 191 1, when he was called to the 
unusual role and the difficult administration of the 
University of Kentucky as president. He became 
president of the university and moved to Lexington 
January I, 1911, and guided the institution through 
an important period of its development, until Sep- 
tember, 1918. On retiring from the university Judge 
Barker resumed his residence at Louisville and his 
active practice as a lawyer in that city. 

Judge Barker is a republican in politics and a mem- 
ber of the Christian Church. May 22, 1886, he mar- 
ried Kate Sharp Meriwether of Clarksville, Tennessee, 
daughter of Capt. Edward Meriwether. Mrs. Barker 
was born and reared in Todd County, Kentucky. 

James Clark, Jr. Trained faculties and an enlight- 
ened understanding gained through long association 
with a certain line of endeavor in these modern days 
contribute materially not only to individual growth and 
success but to the development of large enterprises. 
In manufacturing circles of Louisville the name of 
James Clark, Jr., head of the James Clark, Jr., Electric 
Company, is synonymous with dignified capability and 
sterling integrity. From small beginnings he has built 
up an enter^ise of recognized importance, and while 
so doing has also been a factor in bringing about the 
development of an important line of industry. 

Mr. Clark was born at Louisville, August 29, 1869, 
a son of James and Jessie (La Nauze) Clark, and a 
grandson of William and Isabella (Stevenson) Clark. 
The grandparents were natives of Scotland, where 
William Clark was known as a laird or landholder. 
James Clark, the elder, was born at the old home near 
the Shutterflit, near Beith, County Renfrew, Scotland, 



62 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



May 25, 1830, the sixth in a family of thirteen children. 
He was about eight years of age when he accompanied 
his parents to America, and after a short stay in the 
United States went with them to Canada, where the 
grandfather was also a landholder, having a large 
farm. James Clark secured his education in the schools 
of Canada, but when seventeen years of age decided 
to make his own way in the world and accordingly left 
home. When he had been only a lad he had shown 
the traits of thrift and originality. A bitter child- 
hood experience was his failure to collect the money 
for a crop of turnips which he had raised for a man 
in town. When he was thirteen years of age it was 
his duty to do the churning of the butter, a long 
and arduous task for which he had little liking. Put- 
ting his ingenuity to work, he fashioned a treadmill, 
and, making use of the power generated by his several 
dogs was able to churn the butter in much quicker time 
and without the expenditure of personal effort. On 
leaving home he spent some time at Erie, Pennsylvania, 
where he was interested in the tobacco industry, and 
in 1849 went to Pittsburgh, and then made his way 
down the Ohio River to Louisville. Here he engaged 
in the banking and tobacco business, and was the first 
vice president and one of the organizers of the First 
National Bank of Louisville, which was the first na- 
tional bank to be organized south of the Ohio River, 
its number being log. It is still in existence. He was 
also one of the organizers of the Ohio Valley Tele- 
phone Company, with which he continued to be identi- 
fied until his retirement in 1898, and his death oc- 
curred at Louisville in April, 1902. He was a prom- 
inent member of the old Louisville Legion, later the 
First Kentucky Regiment, was president of the Pen- 
dennis Club one term, and for many years was a mem- 
ber of the Board of Trade. Originally a whig, he later 
adopted the principles of the republican party. Mr. 
Clark's chief recreation was fishing, although he was 
a great lover of nature in all its aspects and had a 
passion for flowers. A man of kindly impulses and 
large heart, he won the devotion and affection of his 
associates, and his death was mourned by a wide 
circle of sincere friends. The wife of James Clark 
was born at Ellichpur, Deccaen Brenka, India, in 1837, 
a daughter of George La Nauze, an officer in the Brit- 
ish Army, who died in India. She left her native land 
in a sailing vessel, and, going around the Cape of 
Good Hope, landed with her mother in Ireland, where 
she spent her girlhood from her third year. For her 
education she went to Edinburg, Scotland, where for 
a time she was a pupil under Professor Bell, the father 
of Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the Bell 
telephone. As a young woman she resided in Beith, 
Scotland, where she met and married Mr. Clark. She 
died November ig. 1908, the mother of seven children, 
of whom two died in infancy. 

James Clark, Jr., the fourth in order of birth of 
his parent's children, attended the public and private 
schools of Louisville and graduated from the Boston 
Technical College in i8go. At that time he secured a 
position with the Ohio Valley Telephone Company, 
with which he remained two years, then embarking in 
the electrical business with L. H. Cooper, under the 
firm name of Cooper & Clark. When Mr. Cooper re- 
tired from the business Mr. Clark reorganized the con- 
cern as James Clark, Jr.. & Company, and in 1907 
incorporated the business as lames Clark, Jr., Electric 
Company, its present style. The store and office of this 
concern are located at 520 West Main Street, while 
the factory is at Shelby and Bergman Streets. The 
business is the manufacture of electrically-driven tools, 
motors, generators and supplies, and Mr. Clark has 
been successful in building up a large and profitable 
business, in the management of which he is exercising 
splendid judgment and recognized ability. He is a 
member of the Pendennis, Louisville Country and Ro- 
tary clubs and the Board of Trade. His religious faitli 



is that of the Episcopal Church, and in politics he is a 
republican. 

On October 14, 1903, Mr. Clark was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Lucinda Hardin Helm, who was born 
at Louisville, a daughter of James Pendleton and Pattie 
A. (Kennedy) Helm, natives of Kentucky, the former 
deceased and the latter still a resident of this city. 
Mrs. Clark is the third in a family of four children. 
She and her husband have two sons : James Clark III, 
and Kennedy Helm Clark. 

Joseph Lazarus. Among the men re-elected to the 
Kentucky Legislature in 1919, one whose previous 
record, general qualifications for ability and character 
gave every ground for constructive work was Joseph 
Lazarus, who has been engaged in the practice of 
law at Louisville since 191 1. Mr. Lazarus, a veteran 
of the World war, has the reputation of being an 
indefatigable worker, combining scholarship with ac- 
tive energy and forceful personality. These qualities 
have been much esteemed in the legislative body, where 
Mr. Lazarus is now majority floor leader. 

He was born at Lewisburg, Tennessee, November 
8. 1891, a son of Simon and Flora (Rossett) Lazarus. 
His father, born at Cincinnati April 21, 1859, was 
educated in the public schools of his native city, 
where he first engaged in the manufacture of clothing 
in partnership with his father, David Lazarus. Later 
he removed to Columbia, Tennessee, where he was 
engaged in the merchandise business until 1904, then 
coming to Louisville, where he has since concerned 
himself with the same line of business activity. Mr. 
Lazarus is one of the substantial merchants of Louis- 
ville, and is held in general esteem because of his 
integrity and sterling traits of character. He is a 
republican in his political allegiance, but has not 
sought public office. He belongs to Louisville Lodge 
No. 14, Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, and is a 
member of the Congregation Adath Israel. Mr. Laza- 
rus was married at Memphis, Tennessee, to Miss Flora 
Rossett, who was born at Nashville, Tennessee, Octo- 
ber I, 1866, and to this union there have been born 
four children: Louis, who died in infancy; Etta, the 
wife of Edward L. Klein, an attorney of New York 
City; Joseph; and Leah, the wife of A. J. Schanfar- 
ber, an attornev of Cleveland, Ohio. 

After attending the public schools of Louisville 
loseph Lazarus enrolled as a student at the Jeflferson 
School of Law at Louisville, from which he was 
duly graduated with the class of 191 1. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar in that year and at once engaged 
in the practice of his profession at Louisville, con- 
tinuing therein until he enlisted, August 27, 1917, in 
the United States army for service in the World war, 
and went to Fort Benjamin Harrison. Indianapolis, 
Indiana, where he was commissioned a first lieutenant. 
Transferred to Camn Funston. Kentucky, he became 
a member of the Eightv-ninth Division, and went over- 
seas with the Eight Hundred and Sixth Regiment, 
Pioneer Infantry, landing at Brest in September, 1918. 
He then went forward to the advance sector of the 
Meuse-Argonne, where he was stationed with his com- 
mand when the armistice was signed, following which 
he returned to the ITniled States nnd at Camp Dix. 
New Jersey, received his honorable discharge April 
28. 1919. He is an active and valued member of 
Jefferson Post of the American Legion. 

After he had enlisted in the army, and while he was 
in training. Mr. Lazarus was elected, in November, 
I0T7, state representative from the Forty-eighth Legis- 
lative District of Kentucky, and in 1919 was again sent 
from the same district, now the Fifty-fifth Legislative 
District, to the Kentucky Legislature, at this time being 
elected majority floor leader. His work in that body 
has been constructive in character and he is accounted 
one of the active and result-obtaining representatives 
who work with clear minds and far-seeing judgment 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



J3 



for tlie attainment of laws and measures that will 
benefit the state and its people. Mr. Lazarus is a 
thirty-second degree Mason, belonging to the Grand 
Consistory of Kentucky and to Louisville Lodge No. 
400, A. F. & A. M. ; Louisville Lodge No. 8, B. P. 
O. E. ; and Louisville Lodge No. 14, Lidependent Or- 
der of B'nai B'rith. He holds membership also in 
the Standard Club, the Louisville Bar Association, the 
Kentucky Bar Association and the Congregation Adath 
Israel. He is a republican in politics. Mr. Lazarus 
maintains offices at No. 817 Inter-Southern Building, 
and has a large, growing and important law practice. 

Earl Stimson Gwin is one of the prominent finan- 
cial figures in Kentucky and Southern Indiana, has 
been an executive officer in banks at New Albany and 
Louisville for a dozen years or more and is now first 
vice president of the National Bank of Kentucky. 
While his financial and business connections make him 
widely known all over the Ohio Valley, he also has 
many personal friends who have followed with admi- 
ration his rising fortunes from messenger boy to bank 
president. 

Mr. Gwin was born in an attractive and historic 
country village in Sullivan County, Indiana, the Town 
of Carlisle, on September 7, 1875, son of Charles 
Polk and Isadora (Alsop) Gwin. His father was a 
native of New Albany, Indiana, and spent the greater 
part of his active business career in that city. He 
was interested in public affairs, was a Methodist and 
a democrat. He died at Augusta, Georgia, in 1913, at 
the age of sixty-eight. Isadora Alsop was born at 
Carlisle in Sullivan County in 1848 and is still living. 
Earl S. is the third of four children, three of whom 
are living. 

The first public school he attended was in his native 
Village of Carlisle. Later he was in school at New 
Albany. In 1890, at the age of fourteen, he began 
his real career as a messenger with the Second Na- 
tional Bank of New Albany. His salary was $3 a 
week. From the first he regarded his services as in- 
dispensable to that institution, and in time the bank 
came to the same view, evidenced in successive pro- 
motions until February, 1908, when he was chosen as 
president. He remained as president of the New Al- 
bany Bank until June, 1914. While a resident of New 
Albany he served nine years on the Board of 
Education. 

Mr. Gwin came to Louisville to become president 
of the .American National Bank, which one year later 
absorbed the Southern National Bank and continued 
under the name of the American Southern National 
Bank. On February 3, 1919, the American Southern 
was -consolidated with the National Bank of Kentucky 
and National Bank of Commerce, and at the reorgani- 
zation Mr. Gwin was elected first vice president of the 
National Bank of Kentucky, one of the largest and 
strongest financial institutions in the South. 

Mr. Gwin was honored with election to the office of 
president of the Indiana Bankers Association in 
1911-12. He was a member of the Executive Council 
of the American Bankers Association in 1913-14. Mr. 
Gwin is a director of the Louisville Railway Company, 
Inter-Southern Life Insurance Company, is vice presi- 
dent and director of the Tennessee Jellico Coal Cor- 
poration, a director of the New Albany Veneering 
Company, a director of The Navco Hardwood Com- 
pany of Mobile, Alabama, and vice president and a 
director of the Gwin Motor Sales Company, New 
-'Mhany, Indiana. 

During the war he was a member of the Kentucky 
State Council of Defense and was Kentucky state 
chairman of the Liberty Loan organization of the 
Eighth Federal Reserve District throughout the war. 
Mr. Gwin is a democrat in politics, is a member of 
the Pendennis, Louisville Country, the Rotary Club 
and the Old Colony Club, being on the National Advis- 



ory Council of the last named club. He is a member 
of the Board of Trade, the Transportation Club, Jef- 
ferson Lodge No. 38 F. & A. M., -and the Second 
Presbyterian Church. 

November 5, 1896, Mr. Gwin married Martha A. 
Cadwalader, of New Albany. She is the only living 
child of John H. and Maria A. (Brewer) Cadwalader, 
both natives of Indiana. Her father died in 1920, 
after a long and active career as a dry goods merchant 
at New Albany. Mr. and Mrs. Gwin have one daugh- 
ter, Jewett C. 

Lewis Yakborough Johnson, who is manager of the 
Louisville branch office of the American Surety Com- 
pany of New York, is widely known at Louisville and 
over the state as a former newspaper man long asso- 
ciated with the Courier-Journal and also for his some- 
time active part in republican politics. 

Mr. Johnson was born in Jefiferson County, Ken- 
tucky, December 13, 1878, son of Charles V. and Vir- 
ginia (Headley) Johnson. His father was born at 
Louisville in 1847 and his mother in Fayette County, 
Kentucky, in 1849. Charles V. Johnson is one of 
Louisville's veteran business men. Educated in the 
Male High School, he was in the tobacco business 
for a number of years after leaving school. Subse- 
quently he established an important business at Louis- 
ville as an importer of woolen goods from England 
and for a number of years this has been the chief 
business of its kind in Louisville. Charles V. Johnson 
is a republican without aspirations for office, is a 
member of the Episcopal Church, and his favorite' 
recreation is fishing. He and his wife have three 
children : Virginia ; Margaret, wife of David E. Mur- 
ray ; and Lewis Y. 

Lewis Y. Johnson also attended the Male High 
School of Louisville, graduating with the class of 
1897. He was then eighteen, and almost immediately 
he sought an opportunity to break into the field of 
journalism, and for about a year was a reporter for 
the Louisville Evening Post. He was then taken on 
the staff of the Courier-Journal, and for about fifteen 
years was reporter and copy reader for that great 
southern newspaper. In 1912 Mr. Johnson _ kft the 
Courier-Journal to become an active associate with 
his father in the woolen cloth business. In 1914 he 
resumed his duties with the Courier-Journal for about 
nine months, and then for about a year was connected 
with an insurance paper. 

In 1916 Mr. Johnson was assistant to A. T. Hert, 
western manager of the republican campaign of that 
year. The following year, in November, 1917, Mayor 
George W. Smith appointed Mr. Johnson as chairman 
of the Board of Public Safety of Louisville. He has 
been in charge of the branch office in the Lincoln 
Savings Bank Building as manager of the American 
Surety Company since February I, 1918, and handles 
the business of this corporation for Kentucky and 
Tennessee. 

Mr. Johnson is a member of the Pendennis Club, 
Chess and Whist Club, Wranglers Club, Louisville 
Automobile Club, and is a republican and an Episco 
palian. 

Maurice H. Thatcher. For more than three years 
of the period when construction work was af itsheight 
in the digging of the Panama Canal, Maurice _H. 
Thatcher wa« head of the Department of Civil Admin- 
istration of the Canal Zone. He was_ the youngest 
member of the Isthmian Canal Commission. This was 
a great honor and responsibility, but with his name 
there have always been associated qualifications for 
large responsibilities, and a tirelessness of effort and 
loyalty to duty that have enabled him to distinguish 
his incumbency in many official relations, and also his 
career as a lawyer. 

Mr. Thatcher, whose home has been at Louisville 



64 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



since igoo, was born at Chicago, August 15, 1870, 
the son of John C. and Mary T. (Graves) Thatcher, 
during the temporary domicile there of his parents. 
The Thatcher family was established in New England 
as early as 1630. John C. Thatcher was a native of 
New London, Connecticut, while his wife was born 
in Davidson County, near Nashville, Tennessee, her 
parents being Tennesseeans who, sliortly after her 
birth became residents of Kentucky. 

During the youth of Mr. Thatcher his father died, 
and his mother made her home in Butler County. 
Kentucky, the home of her parents. Mr. Thatcher 
was brought to Kentucky during his infancy, and has 
resided in Kentucky practically the whole of his life, 
except for the period he resided on the Isthmus of 
Panama. He spent his early years on the farm in 
Butler County, engaged in farm work and attending 
the country schools of his community At the age of 
fourteen he left home and at Morgantown, in Butler 
County, learned the printer's trade ; and followed 
this work for a while; and then, until his majority, 
alternated in work on the farm and in the county 
offices of his home county, and in attendance at school 
at Morgantown. Shortly after reaching his major- 
ity he was nominated for the office of Clerk of the 
Circuit Court of Butler County, and was thereupon 
elected, and served in this position from January I, 
1893, until the summer of 1896, when he resigned to 
accept an appointment in the office of the Auditor of 
Public Accounts at Frankfort, Kentucky. He served 
under this appointment about two years, and con- 
tinued his law studies, theretofore begun. Upon ex- 
amination before judges of the Kentucky Court of 
Appeals in 1898, he was admitted to the bar, and from 
1898 to 1900 was Assistant Attorney-General of 
Kentucky. 

In the fall of 1900 Mr. Thatcher removed to Louis- 
ville and entered upon the practice of his profession. 
In May, 1901, he was appointed Assistant United 
States Attorney for Kentucky. Later in the same year 
the -state was divided into two Federal Court districts, 
and he remained as Assistant United States Attorney 
for the Western District until August i, 1906, when he- 
resigned and resumed, in Louisville, the general prac- 
tice. While Federal attorney, among other duties, he 
had in charge the investigation and successful prosecu- 
tion of a number of very important cases of violations 
of the Interstate Commerce and Civil Service laws. 

In 1907 he was chairman of the Kentucky Repub- 
lican State Legislative Committee, and was also a 
member of the Republican State Campaign Committee 
and a member of the Louisville Republican Campaign 
Committee, and was active in all the work of these 
committees, and materially contributed to the sweep- 
ing Republican victories in Louisville and Kentucky 
that year. As a recognition of this work. Governor 
Willson, upon his election in that campaign, offered 
Mr. Thatcher the appointment of State Inspector and 
Examiner for Kentucky. Mr. Thatcher accepted the 
appointment, and served in this office from March, 
1908, until the spring of 1910. and rendered notable 
service. He is said to have collected from public 
officers of the state during the two years of his tenure 
as State Inspector and Examiner, more monev due the 
state than his predecessors had collected during all 
the years of the histor}' of the office before. He also 
made exhaustive investigations of the penal and char- 
itable institutions of the state and filed exhaustive 
reports of his work, with the result that many wrongs 
and defects in the conduct of these institutions were 
cured. His work was of such efficient character that 
he is said to have put the office of "State Inspector 
and Examiner" on the map of Kentucky. Mr. 
Thatcher, just prior to his appointment to this position, 
was manager of the campaign of Governor Wm. O. 
Bradley for the United States Senatorship, which 
campaign resulted in Governor Bradley's election in 



one of the most stirring and stubborn political fights 
ever waged in Kentucky. 

On March 28, 1910, President Taft selected Mr. 
Thatcher for appointment as a member of the 
Isthmian Canal Commission, and his appointment was 
confirmed by the Senate on April 12, 1910. By direc- 
tion of the President he was immediately placed in 
charge of the Department of Civil Administration of 
the Canal Zone, as its head, and thus served through- 
out his incumbency, which extended to August 8, 
1913. The popular title of his office was "Governor 
of the Canal Zone," and that title will describe his 
work, which included the general supervision of all 
of the civil divisions of the Canal Zone Government, 
including the police and prisons, fire protection, posts, 
customs, and revenues, public works, schools, steam- 
vessel inspection service, law enforcement, collection, 
assessment, and disbursement of the taxes and rev- 
enues of the Canal Zone Government, the drafting of 
laws for the Canal Zone, etc. 

A published comment on his work as Governor of 
the Canal Zone, while he was still in office, is as 
follows : "During his administration of the civil 
affairs of the zone the "schools have been consoli- 
dated and their efficiency increased ; a system of grad- 
ing zone prisoners has been installed with beneficial 
results ; roads, streets, trails, and other public im- 
Ijrovements have gone forward as rapidly as public 
funds permitted ; the work of the divisions of police, 
fire protection, and posts has been marked by high 
efficiency ; law and order among the seventy or eighty 
thousand people of the zone, made up of every race 
and tongue, have been maintained, while the great 
work of 'digging the ditch' has proceeded; and 
throughout the various branches and offices making 
up the Department of Civil Administration economy 
has been practiced, and the expenditures have been 
judiciously made." 

In addition to the general duties just indicated, 
Gover;ior Thatcher represented the Isthmian Canal 
Commission and the Canal Zone Government in all of 
their relations with the Republic of Panama, and with 
the diplomatic and consular officers of other countries 
accredited to, and residing in, the Republic of Panama. 
This branch of his work was discharged in such a 
manner as to fully protect the interests of the Amer- 
ican Govermnent, and, at the same time, so as to win 
the esteem and affection of the Panamanians and the 
foreign representatives in Panama. 

For over three years Governor Thatcher resided in 
the Canal Zone. When he went to the Zone to begin 
liis official duties he took with him his bride, whom he 
married May 4, IQIO, the day he left Kentucky for 
his Isthmian work. She was Miss Anne Bell Chinn, 
of Frankfort, Kentucky. Her father, Mr. Frank 
Chinn, is a prominent lawyer of Frankfort. Mrs. 
Thatcher, during her Isthmian residence, learned to 
speak the Spanish language with great fluency, and 
this fact, together with her unusual social charms, ren- 
dered her very popular with the Spanish-speaking 
Panamanians. 

.^fter his return from the Canal Zone, Governor 
Thatcher resumed the practice of law at Louisville, 
where he has offices in the Realty Building. However, 
since his return to Louisville he has not pursued an 
uninterrupted professional career. From November, 
1917, to March i, 1919, he \^as a member of the Board 
of Public Safety for Louisville, and since March, 
1919, he has been Department Counsel for the city. 

Edmund Francis Trabue has been a Kentucky law- 
yer many years. His life has been devoted to his 
profession undisturbed by participation in politics and 
the responsibilities of public office. His talents have 
commanded for him a prestige as a lawyer that is 
recognized beyond the borders of his home state. 

His father, Stephen F. J. Trabue, was also an emi- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



65 



nent lawyer. He was born in Bourbon County, Ken- 
tucky, September 19, 1819, was educated in Transyl- 
vania University, and for upwards of half a century 
was a member of the Frankfort bar. He retired from 
practice in 1897 and died December 13, 1898. He was 
a Knight Templar Mason, a democrat, and a member 
of the Episcopal Church. He married Alice E. Berry, 
who was born in Henry County, Kentucky, November 
2, 183s, and died August 13, 1893. They were married 
June I, 1854, and the oldest of their six children, five 
of whom are still living, was Edmund Francis. 

Edmund Francis Trabue was born in the family 
home "Wehawken" in Franklin County, Kentucky, 
March 25, 1855. His education was carefully directed 
from youth. He received his A. B. degree from Ken- 
tucky Eclectic Institute of Frankfort in 1874, grad- 
uated in law at the University of Louisville in 1875, 
and in 1878 attended the summer school of the dis- 
tinguished John B. Minor at the University of Vir- 
ginia. Admitted to the Kentucky bar in 1875, he has 
practiced at Louisville, and for some years past has 
been senior member of the firm Trabue, Doolan, Helm 
& Helm. 

In 191 1 Mr. Trabue served as a member of the 
commission of the United States Circuit Court of 
Appeals of the Sixth Circuit to revise the Federal 
Equity Rules. He has been a member of the Amer- 
ican Bar Association since 1881, and is also a mem- 
ber of the American Society of International Law, 
the International Law Association, Kentucky State 
Bar Association and the Louisville Bar Association. 
He is an independent democrat in politics. He is a 
successful lawyer who has cultivated many interests 
outside his profession. He is one of the popular mem- 
bers of the Pendennis Club, the Salmagundi Literary 
Club, the Lawyers Club, Louisville Country Club, is 
a member of the Society of the Cincinnati of the State 
of Virginia, the Society of Colonial Wars, and the 
Sons of the American Revolution. 

October i, 1883, Mr. Trabue married Caroline Bul- 
litt Cochran, of Louisville. Their only child, Lucinda, 
is the wife of Dr. John Rowan Morrison, of Louis- 
ville. 

John McDougal Atherton. The many distinctions 
accorded John McDougal Atherton of Louisville rests 
partly upon his successful business career, but even 
more upon the sound judgment, constructive influence 
and work in public affairs and politics. 

He was born in LaRue County, Kentucky, April i, 
1841, of Scotch-Irish ancestry. His father was born 
in Virginia in 1771. His maternal great-grandfather, 
Alexander McDougal, was in the army of General 
Washington during the Revolution. John M. Ather- 
ton finished his work in the common schools at the 
age of thirteen, then entered Georgetown College in 
Kentucky, graduated at the age of seventeen, and for 
one session attended the law department of the Uni- 
versity of Louisville. As his subsequent career proved 
he had the qualities of mind and judgment well fitted 
for the highest responsibilities of the legal profession. 
However, ill health compelled him to abandon his 
ambition for a legal career and for a number of years, 
including the Civil war period, he lived on a farm. 
In 1867 he built a distillery in LaRue County, and the 
distillery was the nucleus of the Village of Atherton- 
ville. He was one of Kentucky's prominent distillers 
until he sold his interests in 1899. In 1886 he became 
president of the National Protective Association or- 
ganized at Chicago to oppose the adoption of state- 
wide prohibition, and at this time it will be interesting 
to recall the statement he subsequently made in the 
following words : "The association, at my urgent 
solicitation, advocated and secured the adoption of the 
policy of open discussion of prohibition on broad 
grounds, and every dollar expended by the association 
went to defray the legitimate expenses of this open 



discussion. Not a cent was spent during the exist- 
ence of that association in any unlawful or improper 
way." 

Mr. Atherton became a resident of Louisville in 
1873 and in 1881 was elected director of the Bank of 
Kentucky, now the National Bank of Kentucky, and 
eventually became the oldest member of its board and 
served both as president and vice president of the 
bank. He was also at one time a director of the Louis- 
ville Gas Company. In 1905 he was elected a director 
of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, and served 
until the railroad passed into the control of the At- 
lantic Coast Line. 

Soon after coming to Louisville he was made a mem- 
ber of the State Democratic Committee, was its chair- 
man, was a member and chairman of the City Demo- 
cratic Committee and also chairman of the Demo- 
cratic State Central Committee. While for so many 
years a power in the state party, he held only one 
elective ofiflce, as member of the Legislature from 
1869 to 1871, and during that time became associated 
with such distinguished Kentuckians as John G. Car- 
lisle, James B. McCreary and others. He was a mem- 
ber of all the state conventions of the party down to 
and including that of 1895. At that convention he 
opposed the adoption of the platform for free silver, 
and the platform as constructed contained a sound 
money plank, though the convention proved its incon- 
sistency by nominating P. W. Hardin, who in his open- 
ing speech advocated free coinage, thereby introducing 
dissension in the ranks of his party and permitting 
the election of W. O. Bradley as a republican governor. 
In 1896 Mr. Atherton was Kentucky delegate to the 
Democratic Sound Money Convention at Indianapolis, 
and actively supported the Palmer and Buckner ticket 
during that year. It will also be recalled that Mr. 
Atherton strenuously opposed the adoption of the con- 
stitution of 1891, on the grounds that its taxing pro- 
visions were inequitable in the distribution of burdens 
between personal property and real estate. 

Mr. Atherton participated actively in politics for a 
reason that most Americans will deem as sufficient 
today as when he explained it in the following words 
some years ago : "I do believe that the mass of bad 
government everywhere is the logical result of the 
indifference of active business men to the affairs of 
the community, state and nation ; as business expands 
the quality of government deteriorates as a rule over 
the country because business men take too little un- 
selfish interest in party matters and in the selection 
of candidates." 

Mr. Atherton married a daughter of Professor Far- 
nam, a member of the faculty of Georgetown 
College. 

His son, Peter Lee Atherton, has for many years 
been prominent in Louisville business life. He is 
president of the Prestonia Manufacturing Company, 
manufacturers of high-grade cabinet work, is a direc- 
tor in the Federal Chemical Company, has been vice 
president of the Lincoln Savings Bank & Trust Com- 
pany since 1918, and is president of the Louisville 
Realty Association. 

Peter L. Atherton has been one of the men most 
prominent in the promotion of Kentucky highway im- 
provement. From 191 1 to 1915 he served as president 
of the Central Lincoln Road Association, and in 191 1 
took part in the rebuilding of the Kentucky State Road. 
He was president of the Jackson Highway Association 
from 191S to 1919. In November, 1913, he was elected 
a member of the Legislature from Louisville, serving 
one term. He was a tax commissioner in 1912-13, 
and from 1906 to 1912 was chairman of the Sewerage 
Commission of the City of Louisville. Mr. Atherton 
is a stockholder in the Louisville Industrial Founda- 
tion and a member of the Louisville Lodge of Elks. 

By his first marriage Mr. Atherton has a daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Kelley Graham, whose husband is vice presi- 



66 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



(lent of the Irving National Bank of New York City. 
May 23, 1914, Mr. Atherton married Cornelia S. An- 
derson, a native of Louisville, daughter of Dr. Turner 
and Sarah (Simrall) Anderson. Her parents were 
both native Kentuckians and are now deceased. Mr. 
and Mrs. Atherton have three children, Sarah A., Cor- 
nelia and John M. second. 

George Allison Holl.and has earned a high place 
at the Kentucky bar, has practiced uninterruptedly 
for a quarter of a century and for many years at Lex- 
ington. Apart from his high merits as an able lawyer 
Mr. Holland is doubtless best known over the state at 
large through his many distinctions and services in 
Masonry, and for many years he has held important 
offices in the state bodies of Masonry. 

He belongs to a branch of the Holland family that 
has long been distinguished in medicine and letters 
and in other learned professions. One of the promi- 
nent members of the family in England was Philemon 
Holland, not only a physician of great reputation who 
took his degree at Cambridge, but a scholar whose 
fame has not diminished with the lapse of years. He 
was born at Chelmsford about the latter end of the 
reign of Edward VI. He was admitted a Fellow of 
Trinity College, Cambridge, and took his degree of 
M. A., in which he was incorporated at Oxford in 
1557. He made many translations and earned the 
title of "Translator General of the Age." It was in his 
fortieth year that he took his M. D. degree. Dr. 
Philemon Holland died February q, 1636, in the eighty- 
fifth year of his age. Among his translations was one 
of Livy, to which was added a supplement of the 
Second Decade of Livy which had been lost. This 
translation was printed in London in 1659, some years 
after the death of Doctor Holland, and an original 
copy is now in the possession of George Allison Hol- 
land of Lexington. A son of Philemon Holland, Henry 
Holland, acquired no little fame in the literary world. 
Only one of his works can now be found, although 
several are in the public libraries of London but are 
carefully guarded. Henry Holland edited "Heroo- 
logia Anglicana," a valuable collection of lives and 
portraits. Of this collection Hazlitt, author of "The 
Book Collector," says in connection with a number 
of other books named along with it : "How passing 
rich one would be with all these, and no more — rich 
beyond the greatest Bibliomaniacs, and beyond the 
possessors of the rarest and costliest treasures in 
book form." Among other early members of the 
family in England was a Chancellor of the Duchy of 
Lancaster, and several who held prominent political 
positions in the English Government in the i6th and 
17th centuries. 

The motto of the Hollands is "Respice, Aspice, Pros- 
pice." It is worth the time of students of the history 
of the Holland family to read "The Lancashire Hol- 
lands," a most interesting book issued in 1917 in Lon- 
don, England, and written by Bernard Holland, C. B., of 
Harbledown, near Canterbury. It will be found that 
the Holland famih' in England was a very distinguished 
family. Richard II, King of England, was a son of 
Joan Holland, Princess of Wales. His brother, John 
Holland, was e.xceedingly prominent during Richard's 
twenty odd years' reign. The Hollands of Upholland, 
of Sutton, of Denton, of Clifton, and Cheshire, of 
Wales, of Mobberly, of Conwav, of Sussex, etc., were 
leaders in the political and historic life of England 
during their time. Among them were earls, du'ces, and 
rren of renown in the field of letters and medicine. With 
one King of England to head the historic line, the 
Hollands of the present day have mucli to be proud of 
in the point of name and ancestry. The younger sons 
were generally ministers, doctors and men and women 
of reiparkable literary tendency, and it was from the 
lines of younger sons that the Hollands in America 
descended. 



It was during the Colonial period that three Holland 
brothers came from England and settled in Maryland, 
Virginia and South Carolina, from whom are descended 
the Hollands of three states. The celebrated author 
and poet. Dr. Josiah Gilbert Holland, belonged to the 
Virginia branch. The great-grandfather of George Al- 
lison Holland was John Holland, a native of Baltimore, 
whose father was one of the three brothers mentioned. 
His son, George B. Holland, gained high distinction 
as a Methodist minister, and was a brother of Dr. 
John W. Holland of Indianapolis, Indiana, a man of 
rare scholarly attainments and of professional skill. 
George B. Holland was born at Wellsburg, in what 
was then Western Virginia, July 26, 1806. He married 
Rebecca French, who was born in Ohio, August 9, 
1808, her parents Samuel and Elizabeth French, being 
natives of Pennsylvania. 

The father of George Allison Holland was William 
Allison Holland, who was born at Edmburg, Indiana, 
March 24, 1828, and was long prominent in journalism 
in Kentucky. He established in 1868 "The Consti- 
tutionalist" at Newcastle, and in 1872 removed that 
paper to Eminence, where it was published for many 
years under his ownership and absolute control until 
his death in 1903. On November 29, 1854, William 
Allison Holland married Eliza Jane Van Nuys. She 
was born at Campbellsburg, in Henry County, Ken- 
tucky, December i, 1838, a daughter of Denis Bois 
Van Nuys and Sarah Ann (Sams) Van Nuys. Of 
her family an old record reads as follows : "The name 
of Van Nuys was taken from the name of a village 
in Holland. The Van denotes noble rank. Auk Jan- 
sen Van Nuys, whose ancestors' birthplace was Nuys 
in Groutgen, Holland, came from Amsterdam in 1651 
to New Amsterdam, now New York, and afterwards 
settled in Flatbush in 1669. He was made Magistrate 
in 1673 and in 1674 was a delegate from the Dutch 
towns to confer with Governor Colve. His first wife 
was Magdalene Pieterse, who was buried in the burial 
ground of the Dutch Reformed Church in Brooklyn 
(now Fulton Street) and from whom descended, among 
others upon whom no stain rested, Isaac Van Nuys, 
who married Vrouchie Quick, whose son, James Van 
Nuys, served in the War of 1812 and who married 
Tiny Bois, daughter of Denina Bois and Anna Sebren. 
Their son Denis Bois Van Nuys married Sarah Ann 
Sams, and their daughter Eliza Jane Van Nuys mar- 
ried William Allison Holland. Auk Jansen Van Nuys 
married (second) Elizabeth Jans, widow of Jacob 
Clausens. Of the Van Nuys family, five were assassin- 
ated by the British during the War of the Revolution. 
These were Margareta, Magdalena, Elizabeth, Maria 
and Jacobus, all children of Janache Aukurts Van 
Nuys." The family records all speak of the Castle 
Van Nuys on the Rhine in Holland as having been 
built by Count Van Nuys and still belonging to this 
family. 

Another line of the Holland maternal ancestry in- 
cludes Joseph Kelly, who was born in Spottsylvania 
County, Virginia, January 29, 1767, and came to Ken- 
tucky in 1824. He was a captain in the War of 1812 
under General George Rogers Clark and General Wil- 
h'am H. Harrison, and took part in the battle of the 
River Raisin. Captain Joseph Kelly married Eliza- 
beth Mallory, who was born March 24, 1771,^ and died 
March 30, i8';o. Their daughter Parmelia Kelly mar- 
ried James Sams, of Virginia parentage, and their 
daughter Sarah Ann Sams became the wife of Denis 
Pn<s; Van Nuys, as noted above. 

William Allison and Eliza J. Holland had nine chil- 
dren, one of whom died in infancy. In addition to 
George Allison Holland a brief record of the others 
is ns follows: i: Mrs. Mattie (Holland) Homer, wife 
of W. H Homer, of New Albany, Indiana. 2: Edward 
Ramsey Holland, who married Minnie Wheat, and died 
leaving surviving him his widow and two children, 
Edward R. Holland, Jr., captain in the Anti-Air Craft 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



67 



Service, (who married Miss Dorothy Gage, of San 
Antonio, Texas), having spent the entire term of the 
war after the United States entered it in France and 
Belgium, and a daughter Jean. 3 ; Claude Van Nuys 
Holland, who married Emma, daughter of the late 
Governor Ira J. Chase of Indiana, and has two chil- 
dren : Chase Holland of San Angelo, Texas, (who 
married Miss Gladys McFarland, of San Antonio, 
Texas), and Lorena (Mrs. Henry Seeligson) of Dallas, 
Texas. 4 : Clarence S. E. Holland, a leading banker 
of Houston, Texas, married for his first wife Eliza- 
beth Traylor, by which union there were four children : 
Beulah Elizabeth Holland, who married Ernest Kings- 
well Smith, of Austin, Texas, now residing in New 
York City; Ora Vivian Holland, who married Oscar 
M. Lander, living on a ranch sixteen miles south of 
Victoria, Texas, and they have two children; Frank B. 
Lander, Jr., and Clarence Lander; Clarence Raymond 
Holland, who married Flora Stubbs, of Galveston, 
Texas, now residing at Victoria, Texas, and they have 
one son, James Holland; and Marjorie Holland, not 
married. His second wife was Miss Sarah Handy, of 
Mississippi. 5 : Guy Percival Holland, married a widow, 
Mrs. Rose (Callaway) Wilson, and they have one son, 
George Percival Holland. 6: Harold D. Holland who 
married Alma Fisher, now deceased, and his two chil- 
dren are Glover Allison Holland and Louise Holland. 
7: Mrs. Elizabeth Van Nuys (Holland) Cassity is the 
wife of Dr. John Cabell Cassity, a successful and skilled 
physician. They have one son, Dr. John Holland Cas- 
sity, who is just entering upon the practice of his pro- 
fession. 

George Allison Holland was born in Henry County, 
Kentucky, was well born and well reared, and the lives 
of his ancestors on both sides have been an inspira- 
tion in his individual career. His primary education 
was obtained at the Henry Male and Female College at 
New Castle and his collegiate training at Eminence 
College, at that time one of the leading educational 
institutions conducted under private management, which 
eventually succumbed before the competition of the 
State University, backed by unlimited public funds. 
Mr. Holland gained his A. B. degree from Eminence 
College, and several years later the institution con- 
ferred upon him the degree Master of Arts. He also 
graduated from the Law Department of the University 
of Louisville. Mr. Holland was trained in the news- 
paper business under his father at Eminence, and for 
two or three years was engaged in newspaper work, 
beginning with the old Louisville Commercial and 
later with the Courier Journal in the days when 
Emmett G. Logan was its managing editor, Henry 
Watterson, the editor, and that able and lovable gentle- 
man, Walter N. Haldeman, its publisher. 

For the practice of his profession Mr. Holland first 
located at Chattanooga, Tennessee, and remained in 
that city several years. Though he opened a law office, 
he soon returned to newspaper work and established 
the Chattanooga Sunday Argus, which he published for 
several years, until compelled to go West on account 
of his wife's health. While at Chattanooga he married 
Miss Jean Neilson Gillespie, daughter of Dr. Joseph 
S. and Penelope (Whiteside) Gillespie. Mrs. Hol- 
land finished her education at Vassar College. 

In January, 1895, Mr. Holland opened his law office 
at Eminence, Kentucky, and since that date has de- 
voted himself exclusively to law practice there and 
at Lexington. He was twice elected a member of the 
Kentucky Legislature from Henry County, but held 
no other office except that after locating in Lexington 
he served four or five years as a member of the City 
School Board. He has been a successful lawyer, and 
many years of practice have brought a prosperous condi- 
tion of his affairs. He has frequently sat as special 
judge of Circuit Courts in various counties through 
appointment by the governor. He was appointed spe- 
cial judge of the Fayette Circuit Court, and other 



Circuit Courts by Governor Beckham, and subsequently 
by Governors McCreary and Stanley. 

Mr. Holland is a member of all the Masonic bodies 
in Kentucky, both York and Scottish Rites. He is a 
past master of Eminence Lodge No. 282, A. F. and A. 
M., at Eminence, Kentucky, has his present lodge 
membership in Lexington Lodge No. i ; is past high 
priest of Eminence Chapter No. 121, R. A. M. ; is past 
master of J. P. Force Council, R. and S. M., at Emi- 
nence; is past eminent commander of Webb Command 
ery No. 2, Knights Templar, at Lexington ; is past 
grand high priest of the Grand Chapter of Kentucky 
and at this time is grand secretary of the Grand Chap- 
ter, and grand recorder of the Grand Council of Ken- 
tucky, R. and S. M., and is a permanent member of 
the General Grand Chapter of the Royal Arch Masons 
of the United States. He is also a past potentate of 
Oleika Temple of Mystic Shrine at Lexington and is 
a member of the Grand Consistory of the Kentucky 
Scottish Rite at Louisville. He is also affiliated with 
Lexington Lodge No. 89 of the Elks. 

Mr. Holland was chairman of a committee of five 
prominent Masons from the Grand Masonic Lodge of 
Kentucky, which committee raised among Kentucky 
Masons, one million dollars for the purpose of con- 
structing new buildings for the Masonic Widows and 
Orphans Home in Louisville. This was a feat unparal- 
leled in the history of Kentucky Masonry. 

Homer Ward Batson. Among the law firms of 
eminence and recognized strength at Louisville, few 
are held in greater respect than that of Burnett, Bat- 
son & Cary. A worthy member of this concern who 
has contributed to its prestige and success is Homer 
Ward Batson, whose career in the legal life of Louis- 
ville has been one of constant advancement and note- 
worthy achievement. Mr. Batson was born on his 
father's farm in Harrison County, Kentucky, Feb- 
ruary 20, 1876, a son of Robert Henry and Mollie 
Nancy (Robertson) Batson, natives of the same 
county. 

Robert Henry Batson was born in 1856. He at- 
tended the public schools of Harrison County, and 
afterward became a teacher in the rural districts and 
continued to be thus engaged for six or seven years. 
When he gave up his work in the schoolroom he 
turned his attention to the general merchandise busi- 
ness at Lancaster, where he still carries on a large 
business in drygoods and is one of the substantial 
merchants of the city. He is likewise prominently 
known in political circles and has served as chairman 
of the Republican County Central Committee of Gar- 
rard County. He is a leader of the Lancaster Chris- 
tian Church, to which Mrs. Batson also belongs. They 
are the parents of four children : Lula M., wife of 
J. W. Sweeney, of Lancaster; Homer Ward; Bessie, 
wife of Guy W. Davidson, of Lancaster; and Cecil, 
who is unmarried and resides at home. 

The public schools of Lancaster furnished Homer 
Ward Batson with his early educational training, after 
which he attended a private school for college prepara- 
tory work. He then enrolled as a student at the 
University of Kentucky, from which he received his 
Bachelor of Arts degree with the class of 1897, his 
law studies being prosecuted at the University of 
Michigan, ait Ann Arbor, where he was graduated 
in 1900, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of Kentucky in 1900, at that time 
he became associated with Governor W. O. Bradley, 
under the firm style of Bradley & Batson, and this 
partnership continued until 1905, when Mr. Batson 
associated himself with Henry Burnett and Graddy 
Cary in the present firm of Burnett, Batson & Cary, 
which has become one of the leading law firms of 
Louisville. Mr. Batson has reached a merited posi- 
tion of distinction in his calling, has a large and rep- 
resentative clientele and stands high in the confidence 



68 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



of his associates and the esteem of his fellow prac- 
titioners in the city and state. 

In 1907 Mr. Batson was appointed by Governor 
Augustus E. Willson as Circuit judge of the Common 
Pleas branch, First Division of the Jefferson Circuit 
Court, to complete the unexpired term of the late 
Judge Emmett Field. Mr. Batson has served as elec- 
tion commissioner for a number of years. He is a 
member of the Louisville Bar Association and the 
Kentucky State Bar Association, and in politics is a 
republican. He has a number o^f social and civic con- 
nections and holds membership* in the Michigan Uni- 
versity Alumni Association and the Louisville Country 
Club. With Mrs. Batson he belongs to the First Chris- 
tian Church of Louisville, and he is a member of the 
Board of Trustees thereof. 

On October 31, 1907, Mr. Batson was united in 
marriage with Miss Mary L. Welch, who was born 
at Nicholasville, Kentucky, a daughter of Dr. Squire 
and Nancy (Phillips) Welch. 

Henry Burnett performed all the duties of a busy 
lawyer for almost half a century before he relieved 
himself of the heavier burdens of professional life, 
and thereafter until his death on June 21, 1921, his 
name was nominally carried as senior member of the 
firm Burnett, Batson & Cary, one of the ablest law 
firms of Louisville. His own career was a notable 
contribution to the record of a Kentucky family of 
achievement for upwards of a century. 

His grandfather was Dr. Isaac Burnett, who was 
born in King and Queen County, Virginia, and came 
to Kentucky in 1830. A graduate of Transylvania 
College, for many years he practiced medicine, first 
in Christian County and later at Cadiz, and was a 
member of both branches of the Kentucky Legislature. 
His wife was Martha Garnett, of an old and promi- 
nent Virginia family. 

Henry C. Burnett, father of the Louisville lawyer, 
was born in Virginia in 1825, was educated in Hop- 
kinsville, Kentucky, admitted to the bar in 1849, and 
for over ten years was one of the leading members 
of the Kentucky bar. In 1856 he was elected to Con- 
gress, and by re-election served until the outbreak of 
the war. He resigned his place in Congress, returned 
to Kentucky, where he joined Col. W. C. P. Brecken- 
ridge in organizing the Eighth Kentucky Cavalry, and 
was an officer in that regiment during the siege of 
Fort Donelson. Following the surrender he and Gen- 
eral Floyd made their escape. At the session of the 
Provisional Legislature of Kentucky at Russellville in 
1 861 he and William E. Sims were chosen Kentucky's 
representatives in the Conference States Senate, and 
he served in that body at Richmond until the close 
of the war. On his return to Louisville he was in- 
dicted for treason, but the case was never prosecuted 
by the Federal authorities. He died September 28, 
1866. During the brief period between the close of 
the war and his death he practiced at Louisville with 
Judge John R. Grace, under the name Burnett & 
Grace. . Senator Burnett married Mary A. Terry. 
Her father was a prominent merchant of Cadiz. She 
was born in 1830, and now in her ninety-first year 
still enjoys remarkable health. She has two living 
children : Muscoe Burnett, of Paducah, and Mrs. W. 
B. Pace, of Louisville. 

Henry Burnett, oldest of the four children of his 
parents, was born at Cadiz, Kentucky, March 23, 1849. 
About the time he was ready to attend school the fam- 
ily moved to Washington, D. C. During the war 
period he was placed in the famous Bingham School 
in North Carolina, and in 1866 entered the University 
of Virginia, where he pursued his studies two years 
and received the A. B. degree. Only a sliort time 
before his death he declined on account of ill health 
an invitation to be president of his class during the 
Centennial at the University of Virginia. For about 



two years he taught Latin in the Bellevue High School 
near Lynchburg, Virginia, and while there studied law 
under the eminent Virginia lawyer and educator, 
James P. Holcomb. Mr. Burnett was admitted to the 
Kentucky bar in July, 1870, and for twenty-nine years 
was engaged in practice at Paducah. During that time 
he made his reputation as a lawyer practically state 
wide, and much of his legal clientage followed him 
to Louisville in 1900, where he succeeded George Davie 
in the firm of Humphrey & Davie, which until 1904 
was Humphrey, Burnett & Humphrey. Then for a time 
he was alone, and subsequently was joined by Homer 
W. Batson, who after his retirement became the active 
senior partner of the law firm of Burnett, Batson & 
Cary. Mr. Burnett finally retired from active practice 
in 1918. 

He was eminently successful in all branches of law 
work, was known for his many brilliant efforts as an 
advocate and as a speaker on general occasions, and 
while never concerned with the honors of politics he 
was devoted to the democratic party. He was a del- 
egate to the National Convention of 1880 when Han- 
cock was nominated for President, was chairman of 
the State Democratic Convention which nominated Mr. 
Luke P. Blackburn for governor, and for years was 
a member of the Democratic State E.xecutive Com- 
mittee. He was a member of the Louisville, Kentucky 
and American Bar Associations, and was a director 
of the American National Bank, the Lincoln Savings 
Bank and the United States Trust Company of Louis- 
ville. 

Outside of his profession many of his associates 
and friends were of a literary character. He was a 
member of the Pendennis Club, and until a short 
time before his death was a member of the Louisville 
Country Club and the Salmagundi Club. He was a 
past master of Paducah Lodge No. 127, F. and A. M., 
a member of Paducah Chapter, R. A. M., Paducah 
Commandery No. 11, K. T., was a past eminent com- 
mander of the Knights Templar and was a member 
of the St. Paul's Episcopal Church. 

In 1882 he married Miss Suzanne Henderson Dal- 
lam, daughter of L. Clay and Susan (Soaper) Dallam, 
of Henderson, she being the oldest of their five chil- 
dren. Her father was at one time president of the 
Henderson National Bank. Her grandfather, William 
Soaper Henderson, was the distinguished Kentuckian 
for whom the City of Henderson was named. Mrs. 
Burnett and three children survive : Elizabeth is the 
wife of W. F. Dale, a Louisville lawyer, and their 
.'■■on, W. P., Jr., is one of the five grandsons surviving 
Henry Burnett. Marie Burnett is the wife of Graddy 
Cary, junior member of the law firm Burnett, Batson 
& Cary, their two sons being Arthur and Henry Cary. 
Suzanne, the youngest child, is the wife of George A. 
Robinson, Jr., well known in Louisville fire insurance 
circles, their two sons being George A. and Burnett. 

Alfred Brandeis. Brandeis has been a name of 
commercial and social prominence in Louisville nearly 
f.eventy years. The only representative of the second 
generation of the family still in Louisville is Alfred 
Brandeis, a veteran grain merchant, head of a busi- 
ness that was established by his father and one of 
the oldest and most extensive grain firms in the South. 
Alfred Brandeis is a brother of the distinguished 
Justice Louis' D. Brandeis, who was also born in 
Louisville, and whose career, though he left his native 
city at the beginning of his professional career, is 
appropriately sketched on the following pages. 

.Mfred Brandeis was born at Louisville March 23, 
1854, son of Adolph and Frederica (Dembitz) Bran- 
deis. His father was born in Austria and his mother 
in Prussia, and both came in the same year, 1849, 
to America. Adolph Brandeis located at Louisville 
in 1852 and became a member of the pioneer grain 
firm Brandeis & Crawford. The business was later 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



69 



conducted as A. Brandeis & Son, and after the death 
of Adolph Brandeis in 1906 it was continued with his 
son, Alfred, at the head. Alfred Brandeis was one 
of four children and acquired a substantial education 
in private schools at Louisville. He was twenty-four 
years of age when he was taken into partnership in 
the firm of A. Brandeis & Son, and for over forty 
years has been active in the management of the in- 
creasing fortunes of that widely known grain firm. 
The great volume of business transacted by this firm 
lias probably contributed more than anything else 
toward making Louisville a great grain market. Mr. 
Alfred Brandeis was one of the organizers of the 
Louisville Board of Trade, and has been one of the 
directors and leading members of that organization 
for thirtj'-four consecutive years. 

On account of his prominence in the grain trade 
early in America's participation in the World war he 
was one of the business men associated with war 
administration measures, and from 1917 until August 
23, 1920, gave his time without compensation and de- 
fraying his own expenses to the duties of chief of the 
cereal enforcement division of the LTniled States Food 
Administration at Washington. 

Mr. Brandeis was one of the organizers of the Lin- 
coln Savings Bank & Trust Company, and was a direc- 
tor of that institution until 1918, when he resigned. 
He is a stockholder in the Louisville Industrial Foun- 
dation, a member of the Pendennis Club, the Louis- 
ville Country Club, Traffic Club and Quindecim Club. 
His favorite recreation is supervising his farm six 
miles from Louisville, known as the Ladless Hill 
Farm. It is a place with all the modern improve- 
ments and attractions of a country home, and is noted 
for its full-blooded Duroc swine and other fine stock. 

In 1884 Mr. Brandeis married Miss Jennie Taussig, 
of St. Louis, Missouri. Her father was William 
Taussig, builder of the St. Louis bridge over the Mis- 
sissippi, of the Union Station at St. Louis, and one 
of the organizers of the St. Louis Terminal Railway 
Association. Mrs. Brandeis is a sister of the distin- 
guished scholar and foremost American authority on 
political economy, F. W. Taussig of Harvard Univer- 
sity. Mr. and Mrs. Brandeis have four daughters, 
A dele, Amy, Frances and Jean. The daughter. Amy, 
is the wife of Professor William H. McCreary of the 
Louisville High School, and they have two sons, 
Alfred B. and Bruce McCreary. The daughter, Jean, 
is the wife of Charles G. Tachau, a rising young busi- 
ness man of Louisville and very prominent in social 
welfare work. 

Louis D. BR..\NnEis, justice of the United States 
Supreme Court, was born in Louisville and received 
his early education there, though he gained his great 
distinctions after leaving his native city. His brother, 
.'Mfred Brandeis, is one of Louisville's foremost busi- 
ness men. 

Judsje Brandeis was born at Louisville November 
i.^, i8;6, and was educated in the grammar and high 
schools of liis native city. He graduated from the 
Harvard Law School in 1878, was admitted to the 
bar in 1870, and from 1879 until 1916 practiced as a 
lawyer at Boston. Most Americans are familiar with 
some of the most conspicuous interests in which 
Judge Brandeis' role as an advocate and counsellor 
has been involved. As a lawyer he achieved national 
and international fame as attornev before State and 
United States Supreme courts in behalf of an advanced 
program of social and industrial legislation. He was 
counsel in 1910 for Mr. Glavis in the celebrated Bal- 
linger-Pinchot investigation and in the same year 
was chairman of the Arbitration Board in the New 
York Garment Workers' strike. From igoo to 1907 
he was employed in preserving the Boston Municipal 
Subway System and establishing the Boston sliding- 
scale gas system. For a period of seven years, from 



1907 to 1914, he was one of the leading counsel for 
the people in proceedings involving the constitution- 
alit}' of the Oregon and Illinois women's ten-hour laws, 
the Ohio nine-hour law, the California eight-hour law 
and the Oregon minimum wage law. Other important 
cases in that period of his career involve the Massa- 
chusetts Savings Bank insurance and in opposing the 
New Haven monopoly of transportation in New Eng- 
land. In 191 1 he was counsel for shippers in the 
advance freight rate investigation for the Interstate 
Commerce Commission, during 1913-14 was special 
counsel for the Interstate Commerce Commission in 
. the second advance freight rate case, and in 1915 was 
special counsel for the Government in the Riggs Na- 
tional Bank case. 

January 28, 1916, President Wilson sent to the Sen- 
ate the appointment of Louis D. Brandeis as an asso-. 
ciate justice of the United States Supreme Court. 
The Senate delayed confirmation of the appointment 
several months, and Judge Brandeis did not assume 
office until June 5, 1916. Judge Brandeis has been a 
prominent leader in the Zionist movement. He is 
author of "Other People's Money," "Business a Pro- 
fession," and numerous articles on public franchises, 
scientific management, labor problems, railroads and 
trusts, savings bank insurance. Judge Brandeis mar- 
ried Alice Goldmark, of New York, March 23, 1891. 

W. B. Anderson, president of the Acme Mills, Inc., 
is one of the substantial men of Hopkinsville, and his 
corporation ranks among the leaders in its line in this 
part of the state. Mr. Anderson was born at Clarks- 
ville, Tennessee, July 14, 1892, a son of W. B. Ander- 
son, Sr., and a member of an old American family of 
Scotch-Irish descent. 

The elder W. B. Anderson was born at Springfield, 
Tennessee, in 1845, where he was reared and lived 
until he moved to Clarksville, Tennessee, where he 
still lives. For a number of years he was actively 
interested in the tobacco industry and served as presi- 
dent of the Northern Bank of Clarksville, but is now 
retired from active participation in business affairs. 
Politically he is a democrat. He married Lula Point- 
dexter who was born in 1861, at Clarksville, Tennes- 
see. Their children were as follows : Kate, who mar- 
ried H. L. Daniel, a grain merchant of Nashville, 
Tennessee; Sarah, who married I. J. Roseborough, a 
dealer in men's furnishings at Hopkinsville ; Louise, 
who married J. L. Von Glahn, a civil engineer, resides 
at Spartanburg, South Carolina ; W. B., Jr., who was 
the fourth in order of birth; B. H., a veteran of the 
great war, in which he served as a first lieutenant, and 
who resides at Clarksville, Tennessee. 

W. B. Anderson, Jr., attended the public schools of 
Clarksville, Tennessee, and then took a three years' 
course in the Southern Presbyterian University at 
Clarksville, but left it in 1910 to go into the grain 
business at Nashville, Tennessee, and was there for 
two years, but in January, 1913, came to Hopkinsville 
to become president of the Acme Mills, Inc., which 
position he still holds. 

The Acme Mills, Inc., were built in 1905 and are 
the largest flour mills between Evansville, Indiana, 
and Nashville, Tennessee, and Lexington, Kentucky, 
and Memphis, Tennessee, and south to New Orleans, 
Louisiana. This company is incorporated, and the 
present officials are W. B. Anderson, president ; J. M. 
Neblett, secretary and treasurer. The mills and offices 
are located on Campbell Street, and they have a capac- 
ity of 1,000 barrels per day, and 150 tons of molasses 
feed. Employment is given to sixty people. 

Mr. Anderson is a democrat. He belongs to Hop- 
kinsville Lodge No. 545, B. P. O. E. His residence 
is on Hopper Court. During the late war he took 
a public-spirited interest in the local war work, and 
was a liberal subscriber to all of the drives. 

In April, 1914, Mr. Anderson was married at Clarks- 



70 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



ville, Tennessee, to Miss Lilly Ferguson, a daughter 
of P. T. and Anna Ferguson, residents of Clarksville, 
where Mr. Ferguson is carrying on a men's furnish- 
ings business. Mrs. Anderson was graduated from 
Fairmont College, Washington, District of Columbia. 
There are no children. 

J. M. Neblett, secretary, treasurer and general man- 
ager of the Acme Mills, Inc., of Hopkinsville, is one 
of the most alert and dependable business men of 
Christian County, and is a moving factor in the flour 
industry of this part of the state. He was born near 
Clarksville, Tennessee, November 15, 1869, a son of 
Joseph R. Neblett, and grandson of Mac Neblett, who 
was born in Virginia, where the family was established 
in Colonial days, when representatives of it came to 
America from Scotland. While a young man Mac 
Neblett came west into Tennessee and became one of 
the early farmers of Montgomery County, where he 
died prior to the birth of his grandson, and his wife, 
whose family name was Keesee, died about the same 
time. 

Joseph R. Neblett was born in Virginia February 
6, 1844, and died at Clarksville, Tennessee, February 
5, 1919. When he was a boy his parents moved to 
Montgomery County, Tennessee, and he was there 
reared, educated and married, and spent practically 
all of his life in that region, becoming one of the 
most extensive and successful farmers. In politics 
he was a democrat. The Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, held his membership, and he was one of the 
most active supporters of the local congregation. For 
many years he belonged to the Knights of Honor. 
During the war between the two sections of the coun- 
try his convictions led him to enlist in the Confed- 
erate army, first in a Tennessee regiment, but he was 
later transferred to one from Virginia. He was 
wounded during the campaign against Atlanta and 
severely injured, and he took part in other important 
engagements earlier in the war, including the battles 
at Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge and Chicka- 
mauga. Joseph R. Neblett was married to Anna Mary 
Staton, who was born in Virginia in 1847, and died 
at Clarksville, Tennessee, December 11, 1918, having 
spent her entire life in and about Clarksville. Their 
children were as follows: J. M., who was the eldest 
born ; Emmett, who is engaged in the timber and 
logging business, lives at Little Rock, Arkansas; 
Emma, who is the widow of Rev. W. T. Thorburn, a 
clergyman of the Presbyterian Church, resides in 
Texas ; Clara, who married Arthur Moore, proprietor 
of a butchering business at Clarksville, Tennessee; 
Pearl, who married William Ussery, died near Clarks- 
ville, Montgomery County, Tennessee, in 1896, being 
survived by her husband, who is engaged in farming 
in that county; Dee, who died in 1896, when seventeen 
years old; Marvin, who died in 1902, when twenty-one 
years old; Nina, who is unmarried and lives at Clarks- 
ville, Tennessee; Richard, who lives in Oklahoma; 
Anna, who married Sydney Lyle, a farmer of Mont- 
gomery County, Tennessee ; Mattie, who married 
Walter Corlew, a farmer of Montgomery County, 
Tennessee. 

J. M. Neblett attended the public schools of Clarks- 
ville, Tennessee, and was graduated from its high- 
school course in 1887, following which he went to 
Dyer County, Tennessee, and for three years clerked 
in a country store. Returning to Clarksville, he was 
bookkeeper for a wholesale and retail grocery store, 
and in 1902 became bookkeeper for the Dunlop Milling 
Company and also acted as assistant manager and 
secretary. In this connection he gained a thorough 
knowledge of the milling business, and when he came 
to Hopkinsville, in 1913, to assume his present re- 
sponsibilities, he was able to do so in a highly capa- 
ble manner, and to bring about almost immediate re- 



sults. The Acme Mills, Inc., are the largest of their 
kind in a territory which extends Irom Evansville, 
Indiana, to Nashville, Tennessee, and from Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky, to Memphis, Tennessee, and thence to 
the Gulf. This company, which is incorporated, owns 
the mills, erected in 1905 on Campbell Street, Hop- 
kinsville, where the offices are also located. In addi- 
tion to the daily capacity of 1,000 barrels of flour per 
day, the mills also put out 150 tons of molasses feed 
each day. Mr. Neblett and W. B. Anderson, the 
president, constitute the officials. The company em- 
ploys sixty persons at all times, and this is one of 
the leading industries of Christian County. Mr. Neb- 
lett is a director of the Forbes Manufacturing Com- 
pany of Hopkinsville and the Mogul Wagon Com- 
pany of the same city, and owns a farm two miles 
south of Hopkinsville. 

In politics he is a democrat. He belongs to the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and for the past 
eighteen years has been a steward. His residence is 
on Alumni Avenue. During the late war he took an 
active part in all of the drives for funds, and was 
chairman of the Christian County Committee for the 
Fourth Liberty Loan. He made a direct appeal for 
voluntary subscriptions, and the quota of $654,000 
assigned the county was not only raised, but when the 
campaign was closed the amount subscribed was found 
to be $800,000. This is the only case of a campaign 
for the bonds being successfully carried out without 
solicitations, and reflects credit alike upon Mr. Neb- 
lett's management and the generosity and patriotism 
of his fellow citizens. He also served as chairman 
of the Christian County Committee having charge of 
the drive for the Salvation Army, and this, too, was 
fully subscribed. 

On February 6, 1896, Mr. Neblett was married at 
.A.dairville, Kentucky, to Miss Nell Sinnnons, a daugh- 
ler of Dr. D. G. and Alice (Moss) Simmons, who 
reside at Hopkinsville. Doctor Simmons is a retired 
physician and surgeon of high standing. Mr. and 
Mrs. Neblett have the following children : Brenda, 
who was born December 20, 1896, married Oscar L. 
Bass, secretary and manager of sales of the Mogul 
Wagon Company, and lives at Hopkinsville; Walter, 
who was born July 13, 1899, is attending the Chicago 
Art Institute; and Robert T., who was born July 13, 
1902, holds an office position with the Acme Mills, 
Inc., and lives at Hopkinsville. 

Mr. Neblett is not only a practical millman, but 
he has a firm grasp of affairs generally and a high 
sense of civic responsibility. While his time and 
attention are occupied with the many duties pertain- 
ing to his business, he is never too busy to take up 
matters relative to the city, and it is safe to say that 
no wholesome movement is put on foot without he 
gives it due consideration and his generous support. 
He is proud of his city and anxious to see it expand 
in every direction, and therefore willing to exert him- 
self to assist in bringing about such a desirable state 
of affairs. His energy and practicality in his business 
relations have resulted so favorably that the Acme 
Mills are recognized as being synonymous for high 
quality and dependability in point of service. 

Cromwell Adair. Few Kentucky lawyers are still 
living who handled their first professional cases before 
the war between the states. One of these is the ven- 
erable Cromwell Adair of Morganfield, who was a 
member of the bar of Union County in 1859, and prac- 
ticed almost continuously until comparatively recent 
years. 

His own life has been one of usefulness and dis- 
tinction, and he is a grandson of Governor John .A.dair 
of Kentucky. John Adair was born in South Caro- 
lina in 1757, came to Kentucky in 1786, settling in 
Mercer County, was a leader in the Indian wars, com- 





iTHUu-tyit ^cL^iy^-r^ 



^ci 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



71 



raanded the Kentucky troops in the battle of New 
Orleans at the close of the War of 1812, and in 1820 
was elected governor of the state. 

Cromwell Adair was born in Harrodsburg, Mercer 
County, July 18, 1831, a son of William and Eliza- 
beth (Cromwell) Adair. His father, who spent his 
active life as a physician, was a native of Harrods- 
burg, and his wife was a native Virginian. When 
Cromwell was six years of age, in 1837, his parents 
moved to Union County, and he grew up on a farm 
in Western Kentucky. He acquired a high school edu- 
cation at Henderson, spent four years m Hanover Col- 
lege in Indiana, where he graduated in 1854, and for 
two years following was a teacher at Caseyville, Ken- 
tucky. 

Mr. Adair was admitted to the bar in 1859. He 
remained in the county seat of Union County engaged 
in practice until 1864. He was a southerner in sym- 
pathy, though not in favor of the war and secession, 
and on account of the turmoil occasioned by the great 
strife he removed from Kentucky in 1864 and spent 
about a year at Watertown, New York. Returning to 
Morganfield in 1866, he resumed the practice of law, 
and for many years was closely associated with much 
of the important litigation in Union County. 

He has always been a stanch democrat in politics. 
He was elected a member of the Legislature in 1876 
and re-elected. Some years later he was twice elected 
a member of the State Senate, and was in the Senate 
when the present Constitution of Kentucky was 
adopted. As a citizen he upheld the best interests 
of his home community and state, has been a suc- 
cessful lawyer, and has had much to do with farming 
and banking in his section of the state. 

On November 13, i860, Mr. Adair married Miss 
Kate Cromwell. They have traveled the journey of 
life together for over sixty years. 

Chesley Hunter Searcy. His fellow members of 
the Louisville bar and an important share of the pub- 
lic know and appreciate the exceptional abilities and the 
very able work performed by Mr. Searcy as a law- 
yer. He has been active in general practice for over 
fifteen years at Louisville. With his professional repu- 
tation secure Mr. Searcy has given much time latterly 
to politics, not for himself but for the good of his 
party, and was one of the leaders most prominent in 
republican campaigns, both in 1919 and 1920. 

Mr. Searcy was born at Louisville, December 14, 
1881, son of John and Rosa (Colter) Searcy. His 
father, who was born in Anderson County, Kentucky, 
in 1844, enlisted as a youth in the Union army in the 
S8th Indiana Infantry, and served with that regiment 
in all its campaigns and battles, and when he was 
mustered out he was first lieutenant of his company. 
After the war he came to Louisville and for a num- 
ber of years was in the wholesale grocery business. 
He died in 1906. John Searcy was a republican and 
took an active part in the Masonic Order, being 
affiliated with DeMolay Commandery of the Knights 
Templar. He was a member of the Christian Church. 
Mrs. John Searcy is now past seventy, having been 
born in Washington County, Kentucky, in 1850. Ches- 
ley Hunter is the fourth of her seven children, all 
living. 

' Chesley Hunter Searcy was educated in the gram- 
mar and high schools of Louisville, attended Vander- 
bilt University at Nashville, and in 1904 received his 
law degree from the University of Louisville. He 
acquired his first knowledge of public men and legis- 
lative affairs while serving as a page in the Kentucky 
State Legislature in 1896, at the age of fourteen. 

From 191S to 1917 Mr. Searcy was chairman of 
the republican organization of Louisville. The. splen- 
did results secured in the campaign of 1919 are largely 
credited to his effective labors as chairman of the 
Republican State Central Committee. In the spring 



of 1920 he was elected chairman of the State Central 
Committee and in July of that year chairman of the 
Republican State Campaign Committee. 

In Masonry Mr. Searcy is affiliated with Excelsior 
Lodge No. 258, F. and A. M., King Solomon Chapter 
No. 5, R. A. M., DeMolay Commandery No. 12, K. T., 
Kosair Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Louisville, 
Louisville Lodge No. 8 of the Elks, and is a member 
of the Sigma Chi College fraternity of Vanderbilt. 
He is also a member of the Pendennis Club and the 
Pasttime Boat Club. 

February 16, 1906, he married Mary Lillia Black, 
a native of Henry County, where her parents, Charles 
A. and Fannie (Seebolt) Black, also were born. Her 
mother is still living, Mrs. Searcy being her only 
child. Her father, who died April I, 1913, at the age 
of fifty-five, was a farmer in Henry County, a mem- 
ber of the Masonic fraternity and the Christian 
Church, and in politics was first a democrat, but 
finally a republican. 

James A. McKenzie has been established in the 
practice of law in the City of Hopkinsville since 1908, 
and has secured a good standing at the bar of his 
native county. He was born in Christian County, of 
which Hopkinsville is the chief town and judicial 
center, on March 17, 1878. He is a scion of one of 
the old and influential families of the county, and his 
father was a distinguished citizen, whose character 
and achievements conferred honor upon the old Blue 
Grass commonwealth. James A. McKenzie, Sr., father 
of the subject of this review, was born in Christian 
County,_in the year 1840, and became familiarly known 
as "Quinine Jim," owing to his strenuous advocacy 
of the bill removing the tariff on quinine. His father, 
William Washington McKenzie, was born in North 
Carolina, in 1803. He became one of the substantial 
agriculturists and landholders of this county, and was 
one of the county's most 'venerable and honored cit- 
izens at the time of his death, in 1894. He represented 
the county as a member of the State Legislature, was 
a leader in the local councils of the democratic party, 
and served many years as justice of the peace. The 
original representatives of the McKenzie family in 
America came from Scotland to this country prior 
to the war of the Revolution. As a young man Wil- 
liam W. McKenzie wedded Miss Sophia Stevenson, 
who passed her entire life in Christian County, where 
the family was founded in the pioneer days. The late 
Hon. Adlai Stevenson, of Illinois, who served as vice 
president of the United States, was a first cousin of 
James A. McKenzie, Sr., father of the subject of this 
review. After the death of his first wife William W. 
McKenzie married Miss Elizabeth Ewing, who was 
born in Christian County in 1805, and who here re- 
mained until her death, in 1868. Of this union James 
A. McKenzie, Sr., was a son, and on the maternal 
side he was a first cousin of Hon. James S. Ewing, 
who served as United States minister to Belgium ■ 
under the administration of President Cleveland. Mr. 
McKenzie was also a nephew of Hon. Andrew Mc- 
Cormick, who served as judge of the United States 
District Court in the State of Texas. William Wash- 
ington McKenzie was a son of Andrew McKenzie, who 
was born at Dingwall, Scotland, whence he immigrated 
to America Snd established his residence in North 
Carolina, where he passed the residue of' his life 
and where he became a prosperous agriculturist and 
extensive land-owner. 

An able advocate of the principles of the demo- 
cratic party, James A. McKenzie, Sr., became one 
of its leaders in Western Kentucky and was called 
to serve in many positions' of distinctive public trust. 
He was for two years representative of Christian 
County in the State Legislature, was secretary of state 
under the administration of Governor Proctor Knox, 
and served three terms as a member of the United 



72 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



States Congress, besides which he was a member of 
the Kentucky commission representing the state at 
the World's Columbian Exposition in 1893 at Chicago. 
Further honors came to him, as he served as United 
States minister to Peru, under the administration of 
President Cleveland. He was a man of fine charac- 
ter and exceptional intellectuality, and was well quali- 
fied for the leadership which he long held in the 
formulating and directing of popular sentiment and 
action in his native state. He was affiliated with Long- 
view Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
Long View, Kentucky, and served at one time as 
grand master of the Masonic Grand Lodge of Ken- 
tucky. He was a communicant of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church. When the Civil war began he en- 
tered the Confederate service as a member of a Texas 
regiment, and he continued with his command until 
he was wounded in the battle of Fort Donelson, which 
incapacitated him for further service in the field. 

As a young man James A. McKenzie, Sr., married 
Mrs. Amelia (Parrish) Blakey, who was born in Chris- 
tian County, Kentucky, in 1839, and whose first hus- 
band was a practicing physician and surgeon at 
Montgomery, Alabama, at the time of his death. Mr. 
and Mrs. McKenzie became the parents of ten chil- 
dren. Parrish was twelve years of age at the .time 
of his death ; William died at the age of eight years ; 
Gilmer, at the age of three years; and Atherton, at 
the age of ten years ; Mary Louise became the wife 
of Hubert P. Potter, who was engaged in the bank- 
ing business at Bowling Green, Kentucky, at the time 
of his death, and she is now the wife of Professor 
J. B. Browder, who holds the chair of classical lan- 
guages in Chestnut Hill Academy in the City of Phil- 
adelphia, Pennsylvania ; Katherine Amelia is the wife 
of H. Lamar Monarch, who is engaged in the whole- 
sale coal business in the City of Richmond, Lidiana ; 
James A., Jr., immediate subject of this review, was 
the next in order of birth, and is the youngest of the 
children. 

James A. McKenzie, Jr., is indebted to the rural 
schools of Christian County for his preliminary edu- 
cational discipline, and later he attended Major Fer- 
rell's High School for young men in the City of Hop- 
kinsville. He then entered Centre College, at Dan- 
ville, and in this institution he was graduated in 1898, 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. In 1900 he was 
graduated in the law department of the same insti- 
tution, which conferred upon him at this time the sup- 
plemental degree of Bachelor of Laws. While a stu- 
dent at Centre College he became affiliated with the 
Kappa Alpha fraternity. His graduation in the law 
schools was virtually coincident with his admission to 
the bar of his native state, and for five years there- 
after he was engaged in active practice at Bowling 
Green. He then made a radical change of environ- 
ment by removing to the City of Seattle, Washington. 
where he continued in practice two years. He then, 
in igo8, established himself in practice at Hopkinsville. 
Mr. McKenzie maintains his well appointed offices in 
the Summers Building, at the corner of Court and 
Main Streets, and has as his partner Ira D. Smith, 
under the firm name of McKenzie & Smith. 

Mr. McKenzie has never faltered in loyal allegiance 
to the cause of the democraatic party, in the council 
and campaign activities of which he has been a prom- 
inent factor in Christian County. He holds member- 
ship in the Kentucky State Bar Association, in which 
he is serving as a member of the committee on mem- 
bership, is affiliated with Hopkinsville Lodge No. 545, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and also 
with the local organizations of the Masonic fraternity, 
and both he and his wife hold membership in the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mr. McKenzie's 
attractive and hospitable home is situated at 200 East 
Sixteenth Street, and in his native county he is the 
owner of two fine farms, with an aggregate area of 



400 acres. He has taken most lively interest in the 
promotion of agricultural progress in Christian County, 
as he has also in all other matters tending to advance 
the civic and material welfare of the community. He 
is secretary and treasurer of the Christian County 
National Farm Loan Association, representing the 
Federal Farm Loan Bank at Louisville. During the 
nation's participation in the World war Mr. McKenzie 
engaged in advancing the various governmental loan 
drives and in the furtherance of other measures for 
the upholding of war activities. He made a tour 
through various parts of Kentucky to urge and ad- 
vance the ultimate production of food crops, and did 
much to advance this important industrial adjunct dur- 
ing the climacteric war period. He is at the present 
time one of the most progressive members of the 
Christian County Farm Bureau. 

In the year 1907, at Bowling Green, Kentucky, was 
solemnized the marriage of Mr. McKenzie to Miss 
Mary J. Willis, daughter of George and Sarah (Pot- 
ter) Willis, the former of whom was a representative 
banker and citizen of Bowling Green at the time of 
his death, and the latter still resides in that city. Mrs. 
McKenzie was graduated in Potter College at Bowling 
Green, and her gracious personality has made her a 
popular figure in the representative social life of Hop- 
kinsville. Mr. and Mrs. McKenzie have three chil- 
dren, whose names and respective dates of birth are 
here recorded: Mary Willis, March 22, 1908; James A. 
(Ill), April 5, 1911; and Sarah Amelia, September 
25, 1918. 

Shelby Lewis Peace. The personal influence and 
financial stability of Shelby Lewis Peace, of Hopkins- 
ville, are the result of industrious application to busi- 
ness affairs. During an active and diversified career 
he has been identified with several lines of business 
industry, and at present finds himself at the head of 
the largest concern of its kind in Christian County, 
the Foulks Coal Company. 

Mr. Peace was born at Hopkinsville, November 11, 
1885, a son of W. H. and Sallie B. (Foulks) Peace. 
The family is of Scotch origin and has been estab- 
lished in America since Colonial times. Henry Shelby 
Peace, the grandfather of Shelby L. Peace, was born 
near Nashville, Tennessee, and spent his life in that 
state, where he was the owner of a large plantation, 
on which a part of the City of Lebanon now stands. 
This he operated with slave labor, he being the owner 
of over 100 blacks, and his operations were greatly 
successful. He died at Nashville before the birth of 
his grandson, as did also his wife, who prior to her 
marriage was a Miss Taylor, of North Carolina. 

W. H. Peace, father of Shelby L. Peace, was born 
at Lebanon, Tennessee, in 1852, and was reared in his 
native city, where he secured employment with the 
Louisville & Nashville Railroad. For a number of 
years he was a station agent and operator with this 
company at various points from Nashville to Hen- 
derson, Kentucky, but was still a young man when 
he settled at Hopkinsville, where he was married. 
This city continued to be his home during the re- 
mainder of his life, for the greater part of which he 
was freight agent for the Louisville & Nashville Rail- 
road. He died at Hopkinsville in 1912, in the faith 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, of which 
he had been a life-long member. Mr. Peace married 
Miss Sallie B. Foulks, who survives her husband and 
is a resident of Hopkinsville. Mrs. Peace was born 
in 1861, at Hopkinsville, and belongs to a family 
which originated in England and the American ances- 
tors of which settled in New Jersey and Pennsylvania 
prior to the outbreak of the Revolutionary war. E. L. 
Foulks, the maternal grandfather of Shelby L. Peace, 
was born in 1821, at Belleville, Illinois, and as a young 
man applied himself to the art of photography. In 
1858 he settled at Hopkinsville, as a pioneer business 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



73 



man, and opened a studio. He continued his con- 
nection with that line of enterprise until some years 
after the close of the war between the states, in 1870 
becoming identified with the coal business. He was 
the founder of the Foulks Coal Company, and con- 
tinued as its active head until his death in 1917, at 
Hopkinsville. He was one of his city's stable and 
reliable men of business, and one who was held in the 
highest esteem by his associates and contemporaries. 
Mr. Foulks married Miss Sarah Browder, who was 
born in 1823 at a rural point in Logan County, Ken- 
tucky, and died at Hopkinsville in 1899. Two chil- 
dren were born to W. H. and Sallie B. (Foulks) 
Peace: Shelby Lewis; and Addie, the wife of C. O. 
Wagner, a veterinary surgeon of Elkton, Kentucky. 

The educational training of Shelby L. Peace was 
acquired in the public schools of Hopkinsville, where 
he was graduated from the high school with the class 
of 1902, when seventeen years of age. Following in 
the footsteps of his father, he secured employment 
with the Louisville & Nashville Railroad Company, 
worked his way up from the bottom, was station 
agent at Springfield, Tennessee, for one year, and then 
was made cashier at Hopkinsville. After six years 
with that company he went to Philadelphia, in 1908, 
and during that and the following year was cashier 
for a brokerage firm. Coming back to Hopkinsville, 
in 191Q he took charge of the business which had 
been founded by his maternal grandfather, E. L. 
Foulks, in 1870, and is now owner of the Foulks Coal 
Company, the largest concern of its kind in Christian 
County, with yard and offices situated at Fourteenth 
Street and the Louisville & Nashville Railroad tracks. 
Mr. Peace is accounted one of the energetic and capa- 
ble business men of his city and is widely and favor- 
ably known to the coal trade, being president of the 
Retail Coal Dealers' Association. He is independent 
in his political views and has no aspirations for politi- 
cal preference, but is a citizen of public spirit and a 
supporter of all worthy movements. During the war 
period he was very active in local affairs and liberally 
supported the measures which were inaugurated to 
assist the country in its time of need. He has several 
fraternal and social connections, and resides in a 
modern home at No. 712 South Clay Street, Hopkins- 
ville. 

In 1907, at Springfield, Tennessee, Mr. Peace was 
united in marriage with Miss Hazel Dean, daughter 
of James and Lizzie (Kirke) Dean, both now de- 
ceased, Mr. Dean having been formerly a member 
of the Board of Trustees of Robertson County, Ten- 
nessee. Mr. and Mrs. Peace are the parents of three 
children: Harold, born February 6, 1912; Marshall, 
born June 17, 1914; and Marguerite, born April 10, 
1920. 

James Pendleton Helm, who died at Louisville 
March 30, 1910, was one of a family group whose 
name for over a century has been synonymous with 
unselfish public leadership, lofty character and distin- 
guished attainments in Kentucky. 

His great-grandfather, Thomas Helm, after his serv- 
ice as a lieutenant with Virginia troops in the Revolu- 
tion, came to Louisville in 1780, and the following 
year established Helm Place in Hardin County, on 
land granted him by Virginia. George Helm, his son, 
was born in 1774 and devoted his active life to his 
farm and plantation in Hardin County. He was also 
a member of the Legislature. His wife was Rebecca 
Larue, of a pioneer Kentucky family, and one of their 
nine children was John La Rue Helm. 

John La Rue Helm, who was twice governor of 
Kentucky, was born at Helm Place, July 4, 1802. He 
studied law under Ben Tobin, was admitted to the bar 
in 1823, and for sixteen consecutive years was county 
attorney of Hardin County. Elected to the Legis- 
lature in 1825, he served eleven years, and for five 



sessions was speaker of the House. From 1844 to 
1848 he was in the State Senate, after which he was 
elected lieutenant governor, and when Governor John 
J. Crittenden resigned in 1850 to become attorney 
general under President Fillmore, Mr. Helm suc- 
ceeded him, being the eighteenth governor of Ken- 
tucky. He resumed private practice in 1851, and in 
1854 was chosen president of the Louisville & Nash- 
ville Railroad Company. He effected a complete trans- 
formation in that road's financial affairs, also rehabili- 
tated the material equipment and laid the basis for 
its subsequent prestige as one of the great Southern 
transportation systems. He left the office of railroad 
president in i860. During the war he maintained a 
neutral position. His son, Ben Hardin Helm, was 
killed at Chickamauga while a brigadier general in 
the Confederate army. Governor Helm was again 
sent to the State Senate after the war. In 1867 he 
was elected by an overwhelming majority as governor. 
On account of illness he was inaugurated at his home. 
Helm Place, September 3, 1867, and five days later 
his distinguished career was ended by death, so that 
he never entered upon the active duties of his term. 

In 1830 Governor Helm married Lucinda Barbour 
Hardin. Her father, Benj. Hardin, of Bardstown, 
was one of Kentucky's great lawyers. She died in 
1885, leaving two sons, John L. and James P. One 
of the daughters became the wife of Judge Horatio 
W. Bruce of Louisville. 

James Pendleton Helm was born at Helm Place 
January 7, 1850, and graduated with the law degree 
from the University of Louisville in June, 1870. He 
practiced law nearly forty years, and for over twenty 
years of that time had as a partner his nephew. Helm 
Bruce, and after 1897 his son, Thomas Kennedy Helm. 

His service as a lawyer and citizen can most ap- 
propriately be reviewed by quoting from some of the 
many articles that appeared in Louisville newspapers 
after his death. 

"Mr. Helm won success early," to quote from the 
Evening Post. "To an unrivaled knowledge of the 
law and unwearying application and strong common 
sense he united the business qualities which, if he 
had devoted himself to business alone, would have 
made him a giant in finance or a great railroad builder. 
He won a position as attorney for the Louisville and 
Nashville Railroad, and for more than thirty years 
he acted as one of the chief legal advisers of this 
finely managed Kentucky corporation. Mr. Helm rep- 
resented the Louisville & Nashville Railroad in the 
state courts, before the Court of Appeals and in many 
important cases before the Supreme Court of the 
United States. In fact, no small part of the great 
success of the Louisville & Nashville Railroad has 
been due to the work of James P. Helm as its legal 
adviser. 

"Mr. Helm's unusual abilities early attracted to him 
all the business he could handle, and many of the 
large corporations and banks of the city contended 
with each other for his services as counsellor. In 
banking law Mr. Helm was noted as one of the fore- 
most authorities of the country, and it is said that 
no banker in the United States was more familiar with 
every phase of the banking system than was he. He 
was repeatedly employed by the State Bankers' Asso- 
ciation, for wliich he did fine work, and of which for 
many years he was general counsel. He was also for 
years the attorney for several of the largest banks 
in the city; he had for many years been the general 
counsel of the Louisville, Henderson & St. Louis Rail- 
road. He acted as attorney for the Kentucky Heat- 
ing Company in all its long fight with other corpo- 
rations. He was attorney for both the Louisville 
Home Telephone Company and the Kentucky Wagon 
Works and for scores of other corporations. He was 
a director of the Fidelity Trust Company from the 
time of its organization until his death. 



74 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



"As a lawyer Mr. Helm was noted for his wisdom 
in counsel, his caution, his sound judgment and his 
unvarying fairness. When once the lines of battle 
were formed, however, he was a stern and unyield- 
ing fighter. He never knew what it was to quit. He 
fought for his client as if his life was at stake, and 
he frequently came back to his office from the court 
room worn out by his fiery energies. In pleading 
Mr. Helm was noted for his extraordinary lucidity, 
his grasp of the real point at issue, his ability to cover 
a complicated case in a few points. These qualities 
were frequently noted by the justices of the Supreme 
Court of the United States, by whom Mr. Helm was 
highly esteemed for a quarter of a century. 

"lames P. Helm was reared a democrat of the old 
school, and he remained a democrat until 1896, when 
he declined to support Mr. William J. Bryan. In 
1899 he was one of the leaders in the campaign against 
the election of Governor Goebel. After 1899 for a 
time his chief interest in politics centered in an effort 
to secure honest elections." 

A tribute that expresses in condensation many of 
the opinions voiced by individuals and bar associa- 
tions is the following taken from an editorial at that 
time : 

"Much as we may admire James P. Helm's attain- 
ments at the bar, his spotless character, the keenness 
and breadth of his intellect, the lucidity of his mind 
and his brilliant professional success, his services to 
the public must be ranked higher than anything else. 
This service was not rendered in office nor for office. 
Politics and the business of government were not of 
themselves attractive to him, but he never hesitated 
even after ill health had fallen upon him to take his 
place, and it was always the; first place, in any serious 
fight his fellow citizens were making for better gov- 
ernment. 

"None of Mr. Helm's works will survive longer or 
will be of such endearing benefit as that last splendid 
fight of his as senior counsel for the fusion contest- 
ants and chairman of the Committee of One Hundred 
in the litigation following the election of 1905. To 
that service he gave many months of his time and 
not a little of that vitality which was slowly worn 
away by his unceasing activities. His was the master 
mind that directed that remarkable piece of litiga- 
tion, his the voice that in words of classic simplicity 
finally laid before the highest court in the state the 
full story of that election in such terms as could not 
be resisted. The final victory in that case was the 
climax of James P. Helm's career. He won many 
cases that were financially more important, but in 
the contest cases he acted as the spokesman and leader 
of disfranchised citizenship, and he gave to that lead- 
ership the best work of a singularly broad and useful 
life. 

"Mr. Helm was a great lawyer, a great advocate, 
a wise counsellor and one of the best business men 
that ever lived in this community. Had he given his 
entire attention to business he would have ranked 
with any of the great captains of commerce. He 
understood not only the banking laws but the system 
of banking as do none but the most successful finan- 
ciers. At the bar he made his client's cause his own, 
and he did for his client everything that he would 
do for himself and no more. No one ever heard of 
James P. Helm advising a corporation how to break 
the law or to evade legal requirements. His profes- 
sional career was as pure and free from blame as his 
personal life. His was an honored name that grew 
more honored by his life and work. 

"No one ever wore more worthily the hard earned 
honors of a noble profession. He was a great lawyer 
because he was a great man first, and a good man 
before greatness ever seemed to him a hope or a 
possession. Today let the young men at the bar honor 
his memory and emulate his character, for character 



is more than greatness, more than fame, more than 
anything else attainable." 

January 14, 1874, Mr. Helm married Miss Pattie A. 
Kennedy, who was born at Louisville March 18, 1854, 
and is still living in that city. Her father was Thomas 
S. Kennedy. James P. Helm and wife had four chil- 
dren : Thomas Kennedy Helm, whose career as a 
lawyer is sketched following ; Katharine H., wife of 
Dr. Samuel H. Halley, whose home is near Lexing- 
ton, their children being Alice B., Anne, and Samuel 
H., Jr. ; Lucinda H., who is the wife of James Clark, 
of Louisville, and has two children ; and James P., 
Jr., who married Dorothy Walker, of Brooklyn, New 
York, and has three children, James P., Ill, George C. 
and Jean. 

Thomas Kennedy Helm. For almost 100 years 
Helm has been a conspicuous name in the bar of 
Kentucky, and for almost 150 years as builders in 
Kentucky's development. 

Thomas Kennedy Helm was born November 18, 
1874, in Jeff'erson County, at the homestead of his 
maternal grandfather, Thomas S. Kennedy,- and was 
reared and educated in Louisville, attending the Rugby 
School from 1885 to 1 891, Washington and Lee Uni- 
versity from 1891 to 1895, and after taking the sum- 
mer law course at the University of Virginia studied 
during the two following years in the law office of 
Helm & Bruce, and attended and graduated from the 
law department of the University of Louisville in 1897, 
being awarded the Edward Thompson Prize for the 
best thesis on a legal subject and the Faculty Prize 
for the highest class standing. 

On July I, 1897, he became a member of the firm 
of Helm, Bruce & Helm, which continued until 1907, 
when with his father the firm was continued as Helm 
& Helm, and after the death of James P. Helm in 
1910, James P. Helm, Jr., became a partner, and this 
firm consolidated July i, 1918, with that of Trabue 
& Doolan under the style of Trabue, Doolan, Helm 
& Helm. All of these firms have held a front rank 
in the bar of Kentucky. 

November 14, 1900, Mr. Helm married Elizabeth 
Tebbs Nelson, who was born on the family home- 
stead in Clark County, Kentucky, daughter of George 
B. and Katherine Tebbs Nelson. Her father is a 
lawyer at Winchester, Kentucky, and is well known 
for his services both at the bar and on the bench. 
The four children of Mr. and Mrs. Helm are Patty 
Anderson, George Nelson, Katherine Tebbs and 
Thomas Kennedy, Jr. 

Mr. Helm's activities have been unusually diversified. 
As a lawyer he has appeared in much of the most 
important litigation of his time in Kentucky and else- 
where, covering a wide range of subjects. In con- 
nection with corporate organizations and reorganiza- 
tions, the court in sustaining one of them said: "It 
was brilliantly conceived and boldly executed"; and 
of another, "In such circumstances something had to 
be done, and we can conceive of nothing which would 
have been fairer or more advantageous to all con- 
cerned"; a testimonial presented to him is inscribed: 
"A slight token of appreciation of services rendered 
a Free Press in numerous libel suits 1897-1903"; 
and to these might be added countrywide litigation 
involving United States patents, Kentucky land law 
and all phases of railroad litigation, the banking law 
and a victory for warehousemen of Kentucky by which 
the Supreme Court held unconstitutional an act which 
imposed upon them taxes amounting to about 
$15,000,000. He is general counsel of the Kentucky 
Bankers Association, the Kentucky Wagon Manufac- 
turing Company, and many of the corporations here- 
after named of which he is director ; and is also local 
attorney for the Louisville & Nashville Railroad Com- 
pany, the Louisville, Henderson & St. Louis Railway 
Company; an associate district attorney for the Illinois 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



75 



Central Railroad Company and the Chicago, Indianap- 
olis & Louisville Railway Company. 

Mr. Helm has justified the reputation of his ances- 
tors for combining business acumen and legal ability, 
and is much sought after as business adviser. He is 
director in and also on the executive committees of 
the following successful corporations : Louisville 
Trust Company, Federal Chemical Company, Louis- 
ville Public Warehouse Company, Rome Railway & 
Light Company, Lidiana Cotton Mills, Puritan Cordage 
Mills, Liberty Coal & Coke Company, Louisville Title 
Company, and a director in several other corporations. 

Mr. Helm is independent in politics and has always 
declined to accept public office, except for serving in 
1907 as chairman of the Board of Public Works of 
Louisville, but his response to civic duty has always 
been generous. From 1899 to 1917 he was secretary 
and director of the Newsboys' Home of Louisville 
and took an active part in the forming of the Juvenile 
Court laws and the laws relating to delinquent and 
dependent children. He was one of the organizers 
and for many years the president of the Tavern Club 
and later vice president of the Pendennis Club, and 
in 1916 and 1917 was a director of the Board of Trade 
of Louisville, and in 1921 a member of the City Gov- 
ernment Committee of Louisville to suggest reforms 
in the city charter. Since 1914 he has been an active 
member of the Chapter of Christ Church Cathedral 
and a member of the Diocesan Council of Church 
Extension. During the war times he was an active 
member of the Legal Advisory Committee and chair- 
man of the Home Service Section of the American 
Red Cross, succeeding to the chairmanship of the 
Executive Committee of the Louisville Chapter. 

Mr. Helm is a member of the Louisville Bar As- 
sociation, the American Bar Association and the Ken- 
tucky Bar Association, the latter of which elected 
him its president in 1907, he being the youngest mem- 
ber ever to be so honored; and also a member of the 
Phi Kappa Psi ; the T. N. E. ; Louisville Commandery 
No. I, K. T. ; Kosair Temple of the Mystic Shrine; 
and of the Pendennis Club; Louisville Country Club; 
Les Cheneaux Club, Michigan ; Salamagundi Literary 
Club ; and various hunting, fishing and gun clubs. 
He is also a member of the Society of Colonial Wars, 
having entered upon both paternal and maternal lines, 
and of the Sons of the American Revolution, as well 
as several patriotic organizations. 

Helm Bruce. In the thirty odd years since his 
admission to the bar, Helm Bruce, of Louisville, has 
achieved most of the substantial honors open to the 
able lawyer who confines himself strictly to his pro- 
fession. His success and dignified standing in the 
bar and the ranks of citizenship would seem to justify 
the laws of inheritance, since his name indicates his 
relationship with some of the oldest and most illus- 
trious families of Kentucky and kinship with some 
of the state's greatest lawyers and public men. ^ 

He is of Scotch ancestry and his first American 
ancestor was a Scotch merchant who settled in Vir- 
ginia before the Revolution. A son of this Virginia 
merchant was John Bruce, great-grandfather of the 
Louisville lawyer. John Bruce came from Virginia 
to Kentucky and died in Garrard County, at the age 
of seventy-nine in 1827. He married Elizabeth Clay, 
daughter of Henry Clay, Jr., of Virginia. Alexander 
Bruce, his son, was a farmer, merchant, lawyer and 
mill owner in Lewis County, Kentucky, and repre- 
sented his county in the Legislature in 1825-26. Alex- 
ander Bruce married Amanda Bragg, a native of 
Lewis County. Horatio W. Bruce, their son, and 
father of Helm Bruce, was one of Kentucky's ablest 
lawyers and public leaders. He was born in Lewis 
County February 22, 1830, and died at Louisville Jan- 
uary 22, 1903. He was educated in private schools, 
and while he never attended college or university his 



unflagging study gave him a mastery of many subjects 
of learning, including Latin and mathematics. From 
the age of sixteen until 1849 he clerked in a general 
store, then taught school and studied law, and was 
admitted to the bar in 1851 and began practice at the 
age of twenty-one. His early years as a lawyer were 
spent in Fleming County, which he represented in 
the Legislature in 1855-56, and was then elected com- 
monwealth attorney for the Tenth Judicial District. 
He resigned this office and removed to Louisville in 
December, 1858. For several years he was active in 
the whig party, supported the candidacy of Bell and 
Everett in i860, and at the beginning of the war was 
identified with the State's Rights party. He was a 
member of the Southern Conference at Russellville, 
Kentucky, in October, 1861, following which he at- 
tended the Sovereignty Convention in November of the 
same year, and helped organize the provisional state 
government under which Kentucky was admitted to 
the Confederacy. In January, 1862, he was elected 
to the Confederate Congress, and was re-elected in 
January, 1864. When the war was over he resumed 
practice at Louisville, and in 1868 was elected circuit 
judge of the Ninth Judicial District. He was ap- 
pointed chancellor of the Jefferson Chancery Court 
in January, 1873, and soon afterward elected for the 
unexpired term and re-elected for a full term in 1874. 
He resigned in March, 1880, to become attorney for 
the Louisville & Nashville Railroad, and at the time 
of his death, twenty-three years later, was general 
attorney for that corporation. One evidence of his 
broad scholarship is the fact that he was elected in 
1872 to a professorship in the law department of the 
University of Louisville, and was a member of the 
faculty about eight years. 

Judge Bruce married Miss Elizabeth Barbour Helm 
on June 12, 1856. She was born in Helm Place in 
Hardin County and was a granddaughter of Ben 
Hardin, of Bardstown, and a descendant of Elizabeth 
Barbour, a double first cousin of Governor James 
Barbour of Virginia and Justice Philip Barbour of 
the United States Supreme Court. Mrs. Bruce was 
born in Hardin County in 1836, and died in 1913. Of 
her two sons and six daughters, five are still living, 
Helm Bruce being the third child. 

Through his mother Helm Bruce is a grandson of 
Governor John L. Helm of Kentucky. As one of the 
oldest and most distinguished of Kentucky's families 
only brief reference may be made to the family of 
Governor Helm. His grandfather, Thomas Helm, 
was a lieutenant in the Revolutionary war, serving 
with Virginia troops, and in 1780 came to Louisville 
and the following year established Helm Place in 
Hardin County, on land granted him by the State 
of Virginia. His son, George Helm, was born in 1774 
and married Miss Rebecca La Rue, of another noted 
pioneer Kentucky family. Their son, John La Rue 
Helm, was born at Helm Place July 4, 1802, studied 
law under the pioneer character, Ben Tobin, was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1823, served for sixteen consecu- 
tive years as county attorney of Hardin County, was 
elected to the Legislature in 1825, and served eleven 
years altogether, five sessions as speaker of the House. 
He was a mernber of the State Senate from 1844 to 
1848, and was then elected lieutenant governor, and 
when Governor John J. Crittenden resigned in 1850 
to become attorney general under President Fillmore, 
Mr. Helm succeeded and was the eighteenth governor 
of the state. After his term expired in 1851 he re- 
sumed practice and in 1854 was elected president of 
the Louisville & Nashville Railroad Company. That 
road was practically bankrupt, but he reorganized its 
financial affairs and rehabilitated the material equip- 
ment and laid the basis for its subsequent prestige as 
one of the great Southern railroads. He resigned as 
president of the railroad in i860. His son, Ben Hardin 
Helm, became a brigadier general in the Confederate 



76 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



army and was killed at Chickamauga. After the war 
he was again sent to the State Senate, and in 1867 
was elected by an overwhelming majority as governor. 
On account of his illness he was inaugurated at his 
home, Helm Place, September 3, 1867, and five days 
later his distinguished career was ended by death. 
Governor Helm married Lucinda Barbour Hardin in 
1830. Her father was Ben. Hardin, one of Kentucky's 
great lawyers. She died in 1885. The four sons 
of Governor Helm were : Ben Hardin, George, John 
L. and James P. The latter was for many years a 
leader in the Kentucky bar and died at Louisville, 
March 29, 1910. 

Helm Bruce was born at Louisville, November 16, 
i860. He was educated in the public schools of his 
native city, and then entered Washington and Lee 
University at Lexington, Virginia. He was graduated 
with the A. B. degree in 1880, and while in the uni- 
versity won two scholarships and was also orator of 
the University Literary Society. Returning to Louis- 
ville, he studied law in the university, was graduated 
LL. B. in 1882, and admitted to the bar in the same 
year. In law school he received a medal on his 
thesis "Contributory Negligence." Mr. Bruce in 1884 
formed a partnership with his distinguished uncle, 
James P. Helm, mentioned above, and their firm con- 
tinued twenty-two years, vuitil 1906. For the follow- 
ing four years Mr. Bruce practiced alone and in igio 
became senior partner of the firm Bruce & Bullitt, 
his partner being William Marshall Bullitt. 

Mr. Bruce is a director of the First National Bank 
of Louisville and of the Kentucky Title Savings Bank 
& Trust Company. He is independent in politics. 
He is a former trustee of his alma mater, Washington 
and Lee University. 

December 17, 1886, Mr. Bruce married Miss Sallie 
Hare White, who was born at Lexington, Virginia. 
Her father. Prof. James J. White, for many years 
held the chair of Greek in Washington and Lee Uni- 
versity. Mrs. Bruce is also a descendant of Samuel 
McDowell, the pioneer Kentuckian, who was president 
of the convention that adopted the first constitution 
of Kentucky in 1792. Mr. and Mrs. Bruce had four 
children : James W., who married Eldith Campbell ; 
Louise Reid, who died in 1904, the wife of John W. 
Price, Jr. ; Elizabeth B. and Helm, Jr. 

William Allen Bush, M. D. During the fifteen 
years that William Allen Bush, M. D., has been a 
member of the medical profession of Clark County 
lie has emphasized in his life and work not only the 
thoroughness of his training and profundity of his 
knowledge, but also those characteristics which must 
be possessed by a physician if he hopes to succeed. 
Doctor Bush's professional experiences have included 
service in war and peace, a general private practice 
and community labor as proprietor of Bush's Hospital 
at Winchester, and in each direction has achieved 
results that have stamped him as one of the skilled 
and learned practitioners of this county. 

Doctor Bush was born August 21, 1870, in Clark 
County, at Ruckerville, a son of Jonas R. and Sally 
(Webber) Bush. Nelson Bush, the great-grandfather 
of Dr. W. A. Bush, was born at Orange, Culpeper 
County, Virginia, and as a lad of five years was brought 
by his parents to Kentucky, the family settling near 
the old fort at Boonesboro, although on the north side 
of the river, the fort "being on the south side of the 
stream, in Madison County. Nelson Bush secured a 
Iiroperty three miles east of Ruckerville, upon which 
he followed farming throughout his life, being suc- 
ceeded in its ownership by his son, grandson and 
great-grandson, the last named, Dr. Enoch R. Bush 
of Wincliester. being the present cnvner. He is a 
l.rother of Dr. W. A. Bush. Allen W. Bush, grand- 
father of Dr. W. A. Bush, was born on this farm, on 
which he spent his life, and in addition to carrying 



on agricultural pursuits was one of the prominent 
auctioneers of his day. He was large in physique, 
weighing 300 pounds, had a forceful personality, and 
possessed a great voice, which could be heard for 
a long distance. In his early years he served as sheriff 
of Clark County. His death occurred on his farm 
when he was fifty-four years of age. Mr. Bush mar- 
ried Polly Robinson, and among their children was 
Jonas R. Bush, who was born on the home farm, 
December 7, 1849. Like his father, he engaged in 
farming and as an auctioneer, having inherited the 
latter's great voice, and in igoi came to Winchester. 
He was later elected clerk of the Circuit Court of 
Clark County, but died in office six months later, June 
26, 1910. He was the father of five children : Wil- 
liam Allen, of this notice; Nora, who died at the age 
of twenty-eight years, as the wife of J. B. Conkwright, 
leaving one daughter, Bessie, who is society editor of 
the Lexington Leader ; Elton, who died at the age of 
nineteen years; Wheeler, who died in childhood; and 
Enoch Robinson, M. D., a practicing physician of Win- 
chester, a biography of whose life appears elsewhere 
in this work. 

After attending the public schools, William A. Bush 
took a course in a private school at Winchester, taught 
by Prof. Tate Irvine, under whose instruction he de- 
rived a new insight into life and received inspiration 
and encouragement that decided him to make every 
endeavor to succeed, in spite of all obstacles. To the 
lessons which he received under this tutelage and the 
magnetic personal influence of that remarkable teacher 
lie credits much of his subsequent success. Of twenty 
boys who were his classmates all have made their mark 
in life, and of these seventeen have become profes- 
sional men. 

From the time he was nineteen years' old Doctor 
Bush taught school for twelve years, including a pe- 
riod in the graded school at Ford, Kentucky, at that 
time an important lumbering village. He then pur- 
sued his medical studies in the medical department of 
Transylvania University (the Kentucky University) at 
Lexington, and was graduated with the degree of Doc- 
tor of Medicine in 1905. He at once entered upon his 
medical and' surgical practice at Winchester, and from 
1906 until 191 1 was associated in practice with his 
brother. Dr. Enoch R. Bush. In 1916 he opened Bush's 
Hospital at Winchester, a modern structure with twen- 
ty-four rooms and accommodations for fifteen patients. 
Doctor Bush took a clinical course at Chicago, in the 
American Hospital, and in Mayo Brothers' Hospital, 
Rochester, Minnesota, and not a little of his success 
dates from these excellent clinical courses. The per- 
fect system of the Mayo's gave him an insight into 
the most advanced thought as applied to diagnosis, 
treatment and hospital conduct. When the United 
States entered the World war Doctor Bush was ap- 
pointed a member of the draft board of Clark County, 
as medical examiner, but subsequently enlisted in the 
United States Army Medical Corps, and was sent to 
Camp Greenleaf November i, 1918. At Chickamauga 
Park he was assigned to military surgery and ordered 
to the Hoboken port of embarkation, being assigned 
later to Debarkation Hospital No. 3, New York City, 
where the returned wounded were given care. He re- 
ceived his honorable discharge May 27, 1919, with a 
captain's commission, and at that time returned to 
Winchester, where he reopened his hospital in July, 
1919. He was appointed by the chief medical examiner 
at Washington, District of Columbia, as examiner for 
the discharged soldiers to determine upon compensa- 
tion, and also for vocational training, and is in charge 
of this work at Winchester. He is now acting as 
assistant surgeon, under the civil service commission, 
as officer in charge of the United States Public Health 
.Service at Winchester. 

Doctor Bush holds membership in the Clark County 
Medical Society, the Kentucky State Medical Society, 




(^.A J^,^,Mh. 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



77 



the Southern Medical Society, the American Medical 
Association and the Association of Military Surgeons, 
and is a life member of the Surgical Club of Minne- 
sota. He is a past master of the Masonic Blue Lodge, 
high priest of Royal Arch Masonry, eminent comman- 
der of the Knights Templar, a Scottish Rite Mason 
of the Consistory of Louisville and a member of the 
Mystic Shrine. He has allied himself with movements 
which have had for their object the advancement of 
the general welfare, and has affiliated himself with 
other public-spirited citizens in civic enterprises making 
for higher education and better citizenship. He is a 
member of the Christian Church. 

At the age of twenty years Doctor Bush, although 
not possessed of a dollar, eloped to be married to Miss 
Pora Oliver, daughter of Simpson and Betty (Emer- 
son) Oliver, pioneer farming people of Clark County, 
who are now both deceased. Again, when he gradu- 
ated from medical college, Doctor Bush spent his last 
money to buy a cigar. But he had one of the kindest 
and most sympathetic of fathers, who stood ready to 
assist him and who all through life was a companion 
and kind counsellor, whose worth can never be fully 
appreciated or estimated. Four children have been 
born to Doctor and Mrs. Bush : Ruth, Dora and Jonas, 
who reside with their parents; and Ella, who died at 
the age of twenty-four years. 

Samuel B. Kirby, for seventeen years chancellor of 
I he Jefferson County Circuit Court at Louisville, has 
been known as one of the able lawyers of the city 
forty years, and his life has been one of unusual honor 
and service both in and out of his profession. 

Judge Kirby was born in Brunswick County, Vir- 
ginia, March 9, 1859, of English and Scotch-Irish line- 
age. The family came to America in Colonial times 
and several of the Kirbys were soldiers in the Revo- 
lution. Samuel T. Kirby, father of Judge Kirby, 
was a native of Brunswick County, Virginia, served 
in a Virginia regiment in the Confederate army and 
after the war moved to Louisville, where he remained 
an honored citizen until his death in 1893, at the age 
of seventy. He married Ellen Alice Colgan, a native 
of Baltimore, Maryland. She died in 1895, and they 
were survived by five children, four sons and one 
daughter. 

Samuel B. Kirby was about six years of age when 
the family came to Louisville, and all his early educa- 
tion was acquired in the local public schools. At 
the age of nineteen he began the study of law under 
Judge Emmet Field, for many years judge of the 
Common Pleas Division of the Jefferson Circuit Court. 
He continued his studies in 1879 in the University of 
Louisville Law Department, graduating LL. B. in 1880, 
and the subsequent years have been marked by an 
earnest devotion to the most exacting professional 
standards and successful experience covering a wide 
field of general law practice. Judge Kirby had long 
been securely established in his profession before he 
entered public life. He was elected and served from 
1901 to 1903 as county attorney of Jefferson County, 
and in 1903 was chosen judge of the Chancery division 
of the court. He was re-elected in 1909 for another 
six year term, and in 1913 was elected for the term 
which in 1921 will give eighteen years of consecutive 
service as chancellor. 

Judge Kirby has also been vice president of the 
Commonwealth Life Insurance Company of Louisville 
and of the John P. Morton Company. He is a mem- 
ber of the Pendennis Club, the Commercial Club, the 
Kentucky Consistory of Scottish Rite Masons and 
Kosair Temple of the Mystic Shrine, is an Elk and in 
politics always a stanch democrat. He is a member 
of the Baptist Church, while Mrs. Kirby is an Epis- 
copalian. 

April 27, 1897, Judge Kirby married Miss Harriet 
Griswold. She was born and reared in Louisville, 



and her father, Alexander Griswold, for many years 
was president of the John P. Morton Company. The 
three children of Judge Kirby are Samuel, Alexander 
G. and Mary Ellen. 

Charles Gibson Miudleton is a native of Louis- 
ville, born February 22, 1883, and was reared and edu- 
cated in that city. 

John Middleton, the father of Charles G., was born 
in 1842, in Henry County, Kentucky, where he was en- 
gaged in farming. For about ten years he concerned 
himself with tilling the soil, and while thus engaged 
became interested in the raising of tobacco. Going to 
Louisville, he applied himself to manufacturing to- 
bacco, but subsequently went into the soap business 
as a manufacturer, being president of the Louisville 
Soap Company for many years. In 1919 he disposed 
of his holdings in that industry and became president 
of the Middleton Preserving Company, a position 
which he holds at this time. He is one of the influ- 
ential and highly respected business men of Louisville. 
He belongs to the Pendennis and River Valley clubs, 
and to Christ Episcopal Church, and in politics main- 
tains an independent attitude. Mr. Middleton mar- 
ried Bettie Summers, who was born at Louisville, 
and who still survives, as do their three children : 
Charles Gibson, Arthur H. and John S. 

Charles Gibson Middleton was educated in the 
graded and high schools of Louisville, and for his 
more advanced mental training entered the University 
of Virginia, where he pursued both academic and law 
courses and graduated in 1905. He at once entered 
upon the practice of his profession at Louisville, and 
after some years became a member of his present 
firm, Humphrey, Crawford & Middleton. The firm 
is engaged in the handling of corporation business 
largely, and offices are maintained in the Inter-South- 
ern Bank Building. Mr. Middleton is generally ac- 
counted a lawyer of fine talents and much energy. 
He is a director in the Standard Oil Company, and 
personally is of a social nature and greatly popular 
with his fellow-members in the Pendennis, Louisville 
Country and River Valley clubs. He is a republican 
in his political affiliation. 

On June 6, 1912, Mr. Middleton was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Anita Gheens, who was born at Louis- 
ville, a daughter of Charles W. and Mary (Figg) 
Gheens, her father being a capitalist of this city. Mrs. 
Middleton is the youngest of four children, and she 
and her husband have two children, Charles Gib- 
son, Jr., and Edwin Gheens. During the World war 
Mr. Middleton joined the United States Naval Flying 
Corps, May 11, 1918. 

William Wait Crawford, a member of the law firm 
of Humphrey, Crawford & Middleton, has been ac- 
tively connected with the Louisville bar for twenty 
years, during which period he has gained a substan- 
tial reputation as a close student of the law and a 
painstaking, able and strictly reliable lawyer. At 
various times in his career he has been honored by 
election to the high offices in the organizations of 
his calling, and during the past ten years has been 
treasurer of the Kentucky State Bar Association. 

Mr. Crawford was born at Louisville, September 2, 
1878, a son of William Wait and Mary (McCallum) 
Crawford, natives of this state, where the latter re- 
sides. There were five children in the family, of 
whom William W. is the third in order of birth, and 
of whom three are living. William W. Crawford, 
the elder, was engaged in the iron business for a num- 
ber of years and for a long period was secretary 
and treasurer of the Sneal & Company Iron Works, 
but at this time is retired. 

William Wait Crawford, the younger, received his 
early education at Louisville, and after his gradua- 
tion from high school entered the law department of 



78 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



Louisville University, from which he was graduated 
with the class of 1901. At that time he entered upon 
the practice of his profession at Louisville, later be- 
coming a member of the firm of Gibson & Crawford, 
subsequently becoming associated with one of the old- 
est law firms in the city, Humphrey, Crawfcwd & 
Middleton, his associates being ex-Judge Alexander P. 
Humphrey and Charles G. Middleton. The offices of 
the firm are in the Inter-Southern Bank Building. 
In addition to his regular practice Mr. Cravvford has 
given a large portion of his time to corporation work, 
and is attorney for the Pennsylvania Railway, the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railway, the American Tobacco 
Company and other large concerns. Few men are 
more widely known among the general practitioners 
of the state than is Mr. Crawford, who is a past 
president of the Louisville Bar Association and a vice 
president of the American Bar Association, and who 
for the past ten years has been treasurer of the Ken- 
tucky State Bar Association. He is a past master of 
Loruisville Lodge No. 400, F. & A. M., and a member 
of the Pendennis and Louisville Country clubs. His 
political affiliation is with the republican party. 

Mr. Crawford was married September 23, 1903, to 
Miss Mary LeClair Lovelace, who was born at 
Slaughtersville, Kentucky, daughter of Samuel H. and 
Dora Ashby Lovelace, and the second in order of 
birth in a family of five children. Mrs. Crawford's 
father is a minister of the Methodist Episcopal faith. 
Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Craw- 
ford : Malcolm, Loraine and William Wait, Jr. 

Rogers Clark Ballard Thruston. The possessor 
of this name has long enjoyed enviable distinctions 
in the business, professional and social affairs of his 
native City of Louisville. His interests as a scien- 
tist, historian and officer of patriotic organizations 
have afforded him a wide scope of influence through- 
out his home state and even nationally. 

He was born at Louisville, November 6, 1858, son 
of Andrew Jackson Ballard and Frances Ann Thrus- 
ton. In 1884, at his mother's request, he added her 
family name to that which he previously bore. 

Mr. Thruston is descended from men who fought 
as soldiers on both sides in the American Revolution. 
One of his ancestors was an officer (not a Tory) in 
the British army, stationed at Fort Pitt at the time 
of his marriage. Later he returned to England and 
died on his estate there. Six other ancestors fought 
in the war for independence on the side of the Colo- 
nists, and one of them was only eleven years and 
seven months old when he served in his father's com- 
mand at the battle of Piscataway, near Perth Amboy, 
New Jersey. 

Mr. Thruston's great-grandfather, Bland Ballard, 
was a pioneer Kentuckian and was killed by the 
Indians in 1788 near Shelbyville. 

The grandfather of Mr. Thruston was James Bal- 
lard, who was born in Spottsylvania County, Virginia, 
in 1763, was a member of the expedition of George 
Rogers Clark in 1779 against the British and Indians 
in the west and later was stationed at the falls of the 
Ohio, at the present site of Louisville. James Bal- 
lard married in 1788 Amy Leman, and had seven 
children by that union. In 1803 he married a second 
time, wedding Susannah Cox, who was born in 1785 
and died in 1858. James Ballard died in 1849. By 
his second marriage he had ten children, the seventh 
being Andrew Jackson Ballard. 

Andrew Jackson Ballard was born in Shelby County, 
Kentucky, in 1815, and died at Louisville in 1885. 
He was reared on his father's farm in Shelby County, 
was educated for the law, and practiced at Louisville. 
At the beginning of the Civil war, as a Union man, 
he was appointed in 1861 clerk of the United States 
Circuit and District courts at Louisville, and held 
that office until he resigned in 1870. His brother, 



Bland Ballard, was at the same time appointed judge 
of the United States District Court for Kentucky, 
and served as such until his death in 1879. A. J. Bal- 
lard was also in the Kentucky Legislature one term 
as a republican, and declined a renomination. In 
politics he was first a whig and later a republican, 
and was a member of the Episcopal Church. His 
wife, Frances Ann Thruston, was born in Louisville 
in 1826, and died in 1896. They were married in 1848, 
and of their four sons and one daughter all but one 
son reached mature years, Rogers Clark being the 
youngest child. 

Mr. Thruston graduated from the Sheffield Scien- 
tific School of Yale College, now Yale University, 
with the class of 1880, and then took a post-graduate 
course of one year. For a time he was engaged in 
business at Louisville, but soon abandoned that for 
a life of scientific pursuit. Nearly all of his time 
since 1882 has been devoted to geology, mine engi- 
neering, metallurgy and historical work. In 1882 he 
became metallurgist and assistant geologist of the 
Kentucky Geological Survey, resignmg that post in 
1887 to engage in private work. In 1889 he became 
superintendent of the Land Bureau of the Kentucky 
Union Land Company and in 1895 became manager of 
the Big Stone Gap Iron Company. He is a director 
of the United States Trust Company and also of 
the Ballard & Ballard Company, both of Louisville. 

Mr. Thruston never married and devotes his time 
to scientific, historical and patriotic work. He be- 
came a member of the Kentucky Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution, January 17, 1890, was 
elected its president in 191 1, and president-general of 
the National Society in 1913, and re-elected in 1914. 

Besides this unusual distinction and service Mr. 
Thruston served from 1909 to 191 1 as governor of 
the Society of Colonial Wars in the Commonwealth 
of Kentucky. He is a member of the Virginia So- 
ciety of The Cincinnati. Mr. Thruston has under- 
taken on his private initiative and as a member of 
several organizations much work of an historical na- 
ture. His studies have given him distinction as an 
authority on the history of the United States flag. 
He is vice president of the Filson Club and a mem- 
ber of several national, territorial, state and local 
scientific and historical societies and social clubs. 

Mr. Thruston has twice been honored with election 
as president of the Yale Alumni Association of Ken- 
tucky and is a member of the Executive Committee 
of the Alumni Advisory Board of Yale University. 
He was the first chairman of the Louisville Chapter 
of the American Red Cross for Kentucky in 1917, 
serving during the first year of the war, and resigning 
to become assistant manager of the Lake Division of 
the American Red Cross for Kentucky in January, 
1918. 

Charles Franklin Ogden is one of Kentucky's re- 
publican congressmen in President Harding's admin- 
istration, and qualified for his second term in March. 
1921, as representative of the Fifth Kentucky Dis- 
trict, including his home City of Louisville. Mr. Og- 
den began his first term in 191 9, when the control 
of Congress shifted from the democrats to the re- 
publicans, and was one of the able members from the 
Middle West during that time. He lakes to Congress 
the experience of a highly qualified lawyer and a 
citizen who has enjoyed much prestige at Louisville, 
where he has practiced law for a quarter of a century. 

Mr. Ogden represents an old Kentucky family, 
though he was born at Charleston, Indiana, February 
4, 1874. His parents, Floyd G. and Mary (Pounds) 
Ogden, were both born in Jefferson County, Ken- 
tucky. His grandfather, Edmund Ogden, was a na- 
tive of New York City and early established a home 
at Oilman's Point in Jefferson County. The mater- 
nal grandfather was Squire Hezekiah Pounds, who 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



79 



was born in Spencer County, Kentucky. Floyd Ogden 
for the greater part of his life lived on a farm and 
was engaged in farming activities, and is remembered 
as a successful inventor. Among other devices which 
he patented were the corn dropper and a churn. He 
had removed to Indiana when about thirteen years of 
age, but at the time of his death was a resident of 
Louisville. He died April 21, 1907, in his sixty-seventh 
year. 

Charles F. Ogden grew up in his mother's native 
community, Fishersville in Jefferson County, and ac- 
quired a high school education both at Louisville and 
at Jeffersonville, Indiana. In 1896 he received the 
LL. B. degree from the University of Louisville. 
In 1894 he had become a law student in the office 
of A. E. Willson, later governor of Kentucky, and 
remained in that office as a student and practicing 
attorney for seven years. He began practice in 1897, 
and in 1901 formed a partnership with James P. 
Edwards under the firm name of Edwards & Ogden. 
This firm in 1907 became Edwards, Ogden & Peak, 
the additional member being Judge R. F. Peak. 

Mr. Ogden served as a non-commissioned officer 
in the old Louisville Legion, and in 1898 was com- 
missioned captain of Company H of the Eighth United 
States Volunteers and was on duty for eleven months 
during the Spanish-American war. For many years 
he has been active in the republican party, and in 

1897 was elected on the republican ticket to repre- 
sent Louisville in the Legislature, serving during the 
session of 1898-99. He was republican candidate for 
county attorney in 1901 and for the Senate in 1902. 
During succeeding years his reputation as an able 
lawyer steadily grew, together with a widening ap- 
preciation of his exceptional qualifications for public 
leadership. In November, 1918, as candidate for Con- 
gress from the First Congressional District, he won 
the election by a majority of 1,084. On November 
2, 1920, he was re-elected for the Sixty-seventh Con- 
gress by a majority of 12,600. 

Mr. Ogden is a member of the Christian Church. 
His home in Kentucky is at Anchorage and his law 
offices are in the Realty Building at Louisville. In 

1898 he married Miss Lulu Whiteside, of Bloomfield, 
Kentucky, daughter of Albert Whiteside. They have 
a son, Willson, born in 1902. 

John Alexander Serpell was educated as a civil 
engineer, was associated with his father, an eminent 
engineer in railway construction, for a time, but has 
most nearly approximated his ambition for achieve- 
ment and has doubtless done most for the world as 
owner and developer of the famous Colonel-Orion 
herd of Duroc hogs. Wherever the Duroc strain has 
achieved recognition and appreciation there is also 
some knowledge of the splendid work done by the 
Mayfield Farm at Lexington, Kentucky, as a source 
of some of the finest representatives of this strain. 

Mr. Serpell is a native Kentuckian. born August 31, 
1884, a son of John Rogers and Alice (MacDougal) 
Serpell. His father was born in Maryland near the 
City of Washington in 1847, and is now living re- 
tired at New Albany, Indiana. The mother was born 
at Louisville, Kentucky. They had two children, John 
A. and Alice May. The latter is the wife of J. W. 
Harnett, Jr., of New York City. John R. Serpell 
was largely self educated, trained himself as a civil 
engineer, worked for railroads, did railway construc- 
tion on different lines, and at the age of thirty-three 
had progressed so far in his profession that he had 
the contract for building the Denver and Rio Grande 
Railway through the peculiarly difficult Marshall Pass, 
where are exemplified some of the finest achievements 
of railroad engineering. Later he carried out exten- 
sive contracts for other roads, including the Virginia 
Railway, the Chesapeake & Ohio, the Louisville & 
Nashville, the Norfolk & Western. He was a rail- 



way engineer and contractor until 1909, when he re- 
tired. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church 
and in politics was independent. 

John Alexander Serpell was educated in Center Col- 
lege at Danville, Kentucky, and in the University of 
Virginia at Charlottesville. At the age of nineteen 
he became associated with his father m railroad build- 
ing, and continued that line of work until his father 
retired from the profession in 1909. 

Mr. Serpen's achievements as a hog breeder have 
been the result of a little more than ten years of 
experience, close study, and courageous and fore- 
sighted enterprise. He began this work on the George- 
town Pike in Fayette County. He probably derived 
at least one advantage from not being a practical hog 
man, in that his enthusiasm and courage were not 
dimmed by experience. He believed that there was a 
good opening for pure bred stock of the highest quali- 
fications, and he founded his herd by paying an un- 
precedented price of $3,000 for a pure blood boar. 
Many practical men derided him as a reckless young 
man indulging in a fancy regardless of expense. But 
that was the real beginning of the great Colonel- 
Orion herd on the Mayfield Farm of today. This 
herd is now headed by two of the greatest Duroc 
boars, Ultimus and Golden Orion King. Competent 
judges have pronounced Ultimus one of the most 
perfect representatives of the Durocs and the truest 
breeder and perpetuator of the Duroc characteristics. 
Mr. Serpell has refused $40,000 for this great boar. 

He remained on his farrfi on the Georgetown Pike 
until 1918, when he bought the old Tom Moore home- 
stead, one of the historic places of Fayette County, 
on the Russell Cave Pike, 6Y2 miles from Lexington. 
The house is representative of the best period of 
old Kentucky Colonial architecture, a prominent fea- 
ture being the Colonial pillars in front, while most 
of the interior finish is priceless black walnut. The 
home was built in 1833, and it was in the continuous 
ownership of the Moore family until 1912, when it 
was acquired by the noted Kentucky horseman, the 
late J. B. Haggin, who in 1917 sold to John E. Mad- 
den, also a prominent turf man. Mr. Serpell bought 
the home from Mr. Madden in 1918, and since then 
has invested large sums in re-equipping it as a hog 
breeding ranch, and in that respect it is regarded 
as one of the most complete hog farms in the United 
States. Hog breeders all over the United States know 
the Mayfield Farm at least by the reputation of its 
products, and hundreds of visitors from different 
states attend twice each year the sales, one of which 
is held in January and the other in August. At the 
August sale in 1920 a bred sow sale, a total of forty- 
five lots, brought over $13,000, an average of $290, 
the highest price for an individual being $950. The 
buyers at this sale came from widely scattered por- 
tions of the Union, some from Florida and others as 
far away as Minnesota, from which it is possible to 
calculate in a measure the tremendous influence ex- 
erted upon the hog raising industry by the Mayfield 
Farm. 

On July 6, 1916, Mr. Serpell married Jane Matilda 
Farrell. She was born in Lexington, a daughter of 
Hon. Edward P. and Jane (McCarty) Farrell. Her 
mother is still living. Her father was long a promi- 
nent member of the Lexington bar. Mrs. Serpell is 
the second of three daughters, the other two being 
Josephine and Judith. Mr. and Mrs. Serpell have 
two children: John Alexander, Jr., and Edward P. 

A. F. Wheeler. Among the mercantile concerns of 
Lexington the A. F. Wheeler Furniture and Home 
Furnishings store at North Limestone and Short 
Street is a notable institution in itself and is interest- 
ing for its history of development and the personality 
and business genius of the man who has promoted 
and built it up from modest beginnings. 



80 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



Mr. Wheeler entered the furniture business inde- 
pendently at Lexington in 1901 and the first year his 
sales totalled about $10,000. The sales for 1920 reached 
the satisfactory volume of $300,000, and every year 
there has been some advance and enlargement, and 
the business and stock now represent an investment 
of about $150,000. There are twenty-five employes in 
the large store at Lexington. Mr. Wheeler also has a 
branch store at Paris, Kentucky, and is owner of half 
an interest in the Wheeler Brothers furniture busi- 
ness at Indianapolis, Indiana, a concern that was estab- 
lished twelve years ago, his brother F. B. Wheeler 
liaving personal charge of that store. 

A. F. Wheeler was born on a farm near Cynthiana, 
Kentucky, August 4, 1871. His father George M. 
Wheeler is one of the good farmers of that county. 
He was born in the county at the old Wheeler home- 
stead. In the yard of that old homestead he saw 
when a lad a small maple switch planted, which is 
now a broad-spreading sugar maple tree. George M. 
Wheeler served in the Union army as a soldier. 

A. F. Wheeler left the farm at the age of eighteen, 
and coming to Lexington went to work for his half- 
brother J. T. Wheeler, a local furniture merchant. 
The first four weeks his wages were $2.00 a week 
and he boarded himself. His salary was then raised to 
$5.00 a week, and the highest salary he ever received 
was $8.00 a week. While on the farm he had been 
taught economy and thrift, and he put these lessons to 
good use in his work at Lexington and impossible 
though it may seem saved $250 from his wages. In 
1897 he and Frank Ott and J. A. Barlow formed a 
partnership, each putting up $250, and establishing the 
Blue Grass Furniture Company. They were in busi- 
ness together for several years, the company being dis- 
solved in 1901 and each partner starting independently. 

Mr. Wheeler is a progressive merchant and has been 
a student of conditions and has always endeavored to 
furnish utmost satisfaction in the quality of goods 
and in the service to his customers. At first he did 
largely an installment business but this has been modi- 
fied since until his store is now conducted on the 
standard plan. 

Mr. Wheeler married Miss Jimmie Thompson of 
Bourbon County, daughter of a well known farmer 
of that county J. H. Thompson. They have one daugh- 
ter, Loraine. Her first husband was Henry Fearing 
and by that marriage she has one daughter Helen Cecil 
Fearing who is now Mrs. A. V. Smith. Mr. Wheeler 
is one of the public spirited men of Lexington. While 
he has never indulged in breeding or the owning of 
horses, he has been much interested as an outsider in 
the performances and fine qualities of Kentucky trot- 
ting stock. 

James Calvin Milam grew up on a Kentucky farm, 
and almost as soon as he left school became inter- 
ested, so far as his capital and experience would per- 
mit, in the thoroughbred industry. While he has 
done a great deal of business as a buyer and seller, he 
lias become famous among horsemen as a breeder, 
trainer and owner of a string of horses whose achieve- 
ments are known from the Atlantic to the Pacific. 

Mr. Milam was born at Sheffield, Alabama, July 17, 
1872, a son of William A. and Martha (Winfrey) 
Milam. His father was born at Cartersville, Georgia, 
and was a cotton planter and dealer in cotton. He 
died in 1895, at the age of fifty-four. He was a 
Baptist, a memjjer of the Masonic Order and Knights 
of Pythias, and a democrat but never a seeker- for 
public ofiice. His wife, Martha Winfrey, was born 
in Rome, Georgia, and died in 1899, at the age of 
forty-nine. James C. Milam was the third in a large 
family of fourteen children, nine of whom grew up 
and seven of whom are still living. 

James C. Milam attended public school at Sheffield, 
Alabama, also the Miss Mary Bibbs private school at 



Corinth, Mississippi, and at the age of nineteen estab- 
lished his first real relationship with the thoroughbred 
industry. He began breeding in 1900. He has handled 
the product of some of the greatest racing stables 
in the United States. Mr. Milam was the fortunate 1 
purchaser of Extramont, who won the Kentucky I 
Derby a week later, in 1917. Another horse he owned 1 
was Merrick, winner of sixty-four races and for the 
past seven years has been enjoying an honorable re- 
tirement on Mr. Milam's farm. Another horse was 
Komurasaka, winner of the Sea Gull handicap at Brigh- 
ton Beach in 1898, being the only filly entered in that 
race. Another of his horses was Red Leaf, winner of I 
m.any handicaps. Some others whose achievements are I 
well known on the American turf were Loreta M., Com- ' 
modore, Embroidery, the only horse to win the St. 
Leger cup and the Louisville cup in the same year, 
and Loraine, winner of the Oaks at Churchill Downs 
in 1920. His Star of Danube took some of the 
valuable stakes at Latonia in 1912. Other horses 
trained or owned by Mr. Milam were Prince Gal, 
Bell Clem, Midnight Sun and Dan McKei*na. 

Mr. Milam has served on the board of directors of 
the Kentucky Racing Association, is a member of the 
Kentucky Jockey Club, the Lexington Club, and is 
owner of one of the most highly equipped and at- 
tractive general farms in the Blue Grass region, lo- 
cated 3V2 miles from Lexington. He has 300 acres 
and is an extensive grower of tobacco, corn, hay, cat- 
tle, sheep and hogs. Mr. Milam is a democratic voter 
and a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

On October 12, 1904, he married Miss Bell Scott 
Simpson, who was born in Fayette County, a daugh- 
ter of James and Bell (Scott) Simpson. Her par- 
ents were both born in Jessamine County, Kentucky, 
and her father in early life was a carriage maker at 
Nicholasville, was a director in the bank at Nicholas- 
ville, and subsequently became a well known farmer 
in Fayette County. He died October 12, 1913, at the 
age of seventy-two. Mrs. Milam was one of two chil- 
dren and the only one to reach maturity. 

John Robert Hagyard. Among the horsemen, cat- 
tle raisers and stockmen generally of the Blue Grass 
section of Kentucky the name Hagyard signifies the 
highest degree of skill in veterinary surgery. The 
first veterinary of that name was brought here on a 
special mission more than forty years ago, and re- 
mained to practice his profession, and for many years 
was associated with his two sons. One of these sons, 
John Robert Hagyard, who rather recently retired 
from the active work of his profession, is now giv- 
ing all his time to what has long been his chief en- 
thusiasm and hobby, the breeding and raising of fine 
horses at his farm, the Seldmer Farm, five miles 
from Lexington on the Russell Cave Pike. 

John Robert Hagyard was born in County Peel, 
Ontario, March 16, 1855. His parents, Edward 
Thoinas and Esther (Horsley) Hagyard, were both 
born in Yorkshire, England, his father July 24, 1822, 
and his mother in 1827. They were married after 
coming to Canada, and of their nine children five are 
living. The mother died in 1880 and the father in 
1902. Edward Thomas Hagyard finished his educa- 
tion in Edinburgh, Scotland, where he attended Pro- 
fessor Dick's Veterinary College. He practiced for 
several years in Yorkshire, and in 1849 came to County 
Peel, Ontario, where his reputation became estab- 
lished as a successful veterinarian. He continued his 
work there until 1875. In that year he was called 
to Kentucky on an important case by B. B. Groom. 
Mr. Groom some years previously had paid $8,000 
in England for a Shorthorn bull, known as the 8th 
Duke of Geneva. This valuable animal was stricken 
with some puzzling malady and its owner had called 
in the ablest veterinaries of Kentuclcy, also the well- 
known Professor Smith from Toronto, Canada, but 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



81 



all failed to restore the health of the bull. It was 
as a final alternative that Edward T. Hagyard was 
summoned, and in a reasonable length of time the 
animal had recovered under his treatment. Thus by 
one case his reputation as a veterinary became widely 
known among Kentucky stockmen, and from 1876 he 
remained in the state, practicing at Winchester until 
1878 and after that living at Lexington. For many 
years he was employed on a regular salary by leading 
cattle breeders, and every two weeks visited their 
farms and inspected their cattle. For a number of 
years he was associated with his sons, E. W. and 
John R. Hagyard, under the name E. T. Hagyard & 
Sons, and did not give up the active work of his 
profession until a short time before his death. While 
living in Canada he held a chair in the Ontario 
Veterinary College at Toronto. He was a liberal in 
English politics and a member of the Episcopal Church. 

John Robert Hagyard early made a choice of his 
father's profession. He attended the public schools 
of Canada, the high school at Brompton, and grad- 
uated from the Ontario Veterinary College with the 
class of 1875. For a year he practiced at George- 
town, Ontario, and then, in 1876, came to Kentucky 
with his father and, as already noted, was associated 
with the elder Hagyard in practice for many years. 
In 1878 he was also the chief veterinary surgeon for 
the celebrated Kentucky horseman, the late J. B. Hag- 
gin, and after Mr. Haggin's death continued in charge 
of the health of the Haggin stock until 1916. At the 
same time he continued a general practice and gave 
up the heavy demands of his profession only in 1918. 
Since then he has lived on his farm on the Russell 
Cave Pike, known as the Seldmer Farm. He has 
bred some notable horses, many with established rec- 
ords, including Bessie Bonehill, 2 :05^4, a world record 
for mares. Lotts Watts, a trotting mare with a 
record of 2:o6j4; Lula Arion, 2:08^; Doubling Lodge, 
2:0954; Sledmere, a stallion with a record of 2:10 and 
winner of thirty-six races; and Sir Tattam, 2:i2'4, 
besides many others. 

Mr. Hagyard is affiliated with Lexington Lodge No. 
8g of the Elks and in politics is a democrat. On 
January 10, 1883, he married Miss Ella B. Nichols, 
who died in 1899. On December 25, igoi, he mar- 
ried Lula D. Potts. Four children were born to their 
marriage, and the two now living are Mary Potts 
and Helen Horsley. 

Andrew Applegate Baxter, M. D. The medical 
profession of Meade County has as one of its ablest 
exponents Dr. Andrevv Applegate Baxter of Branden- 
berg, whose skill and position are unquestioned. He 
was born near Corydon, Harrison County, Indiana, 
on the farm of his parents, September 17, 1866, a son 
of John R. and Jane (Applegate) Baxter, both of 
whom were natives of Indiana. The name Baxter is 
of Scotch origin, and its representatives came to Vir- 
ginia at a very early day from Scotland, and later to 
Indiana. Many Baxters, who trace back to the same 
family, reside in Kentucky and Indiana. The Apple- 
gates have been represented in Indiana for some gen- 
erations. John R. Baxter was a farmer of Harrison 
County, and lived to be seventy years of age. His 
wife died at the age of sixty-six years. They reared 
a family of seven sons and two daughters, all of 
them growing up on the homestead. 

Doctor Baxter attended the country schools and 
then took a business course in the normal school at 
Valparaiso, Indiana, for which he earned the money 
by teaching school. He earned money in the same 
way so as to take a scientific course in the Holbrook 
Normal College at Lebanon, Ohio, and then took 
up the study of medicine at the Hospital College of 
Medicine at Louisville, Kentucky, and was graduated 
therefrom in June, 1890, with the degree of Doctor 



of Medicine. On August i, 1890, he located at Con- 
cordia, Meade County, Kentucky, where he remained 
until February I, 1891, on that date moving to Paynes- 
ville, Kentucky, and there spent three years. For the 
subsequent twenty-four years he was at Guston, Meade 
County, and in April, 1918, came to Brandenberg, 
where he has since remained. He belongs to the 
County, State and National Medical associations, and is 
now secretary of the Meade County Board of Health 
and surgeon of the Louisville, Henderson & St. Louis 
Railroad. During the late war he was war examiner 
of the soldiers, having volunteered for the service, 
but was not accepted. He is a Royal Arch Mason, an 
Odd Fellow, and belongs to the Modern Woodmen of 
America and Royal Neighbors. In poltics he is a 
republican and is very active locally, now being chair- 
man of the Republican County Central Committee, of 
which he has been a member for the past quarter of a 
century. He is a member and ruling elder of the 
Presbyterian Church. 

In 1888 Doctor Baxter was married to Miss Ella S. 
Lopp, of Harrison County, Indiana, and they have 
two children, namely : Elsie May, who is th'e wife of 
Ernest Stith ; and Andrew Edwin, who is attending 
the Brandenberg High School. Doctor Baxter is a 
man of steadfast character and high principles, and 
his rise in his profession has been steady and legiti- 
mate. All his life he has manifested great interest 
in the progress of his community where he has been 
living, and has never shirked any responsibilities which 
have been placed in his capable hands. Personally he 
is well-liked, and both as a professional man and citi- 
zen holds the full confidence of all who know him. 

Frazier Lawson Hamby. The importance of good 
roads is now generally recognized, and every progres- 
sive community has set on foot movements for secur- 
ing the building and maintenance of highways which 
will be a credit to them and a source through which 
they may benefit by being brought into contact with 
the great centers of industry and commerce. In order 
that this work may be carried on systematically and 
according to modern standards there are specifically 
designated officials who are placed in charge of the 
movement, and one who has won approval for what 
he has accomplished as such is Frazier Lawson Hamby, 
road engineer of Christian County, and one of the 
leading men of his part of the state, now an honored 
resident of Hopkinsville, but for a number of years 
closely identified with the agricultural life of his 
county, where he still retains large holdings of farm 
lands. 

Frazier Lawson Hamby was born in Christian 
County, Kentucky, September 20, 1880, a son of L. W. 
D. Hamby and grandson of Philip Hamby, who was 
born in North Carolina in 1799. At a very early 
day he came to the farm where his son was born, 
in Christian County, being the pioneer of his family 
into Kentucky. Here he was married to a Miss Croft, 
a native of North Carolina, and both died in Chris- 
tian County, he passing away in 1885. The Hambys 
are of Scotch-Irish descent and came to the Ameri- 
can Colonies long before the American Revolution, 
in which some of them participated, going into the 
Colonial army from North Carolina, where the family 
had been established. 

The father of Frazier Lawson Hamby, L. W. D. 
Hamby, was born in Christian County, in 1832, and 
died in this county in 1902, having been reared, edu- 
cated and married here, where his entire life was 
spent. He developed into one of the successful farm- 
ers, operating upon a large scale, and for many years 
was a tobacconist. A republican, he was elected on 
his party ticket a justice of the peace and held that 
office for two terms. A Universalist, he was a strong 
and earnest supporter of the local congregation of that 



82 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



faith, and lived up to its highest ideals jiist as he 
did those of Masonry, he being a zealous member of 
the local lodge of that fraternity. 

L. W. D. Hamby was married to Cynthia Renshaw, 
who was born in November, 1838, in Christian County, 
on the old home farm of her parents. She survives 
her husband and is residing on her farm, which is 
located eight miles north of Hopkinsville. The chil- 
dren born to L. W. D. Hamby and his wife were 
as -follows : Omar, who died in Christian County at 
the age of twenty-two years; Frank, who went to 
Sulphur Springs, Texas, when a young man, was mar- 
ried there and became a large cotton farmer, and there 
he died when forty-six years of age; Harvey, who has 
been an invalid for the past thirty years ; George, who 
is in the employ of the American Glass Company, 
lives at Elgin, Illinois; Harrison, who was a farmer 
of Christian County, died in this county when thirty- 
six years old; Belle, who married J. M. Cansler, a 
farm operator, lives at Hopkinsville; Laura, who mar- 
ried T. M. Walker, an employe for the past twenty 
years of the St. Bernard Mining Company, lives at 
Earlington, Kentucky; Elizabeth, who married Louis 
Hamby, a farmer, resides in Christian County; and 
Frazier L., whose name heads this review. 

Frazier Lawson Hamby attended the rural schools 
of Christian County and the Southern Normal School 
of Bowling Green, Kentucky, and was graduated from 
the teachers' training course in 1900. For the subse- 
quent ten years he was engaged in teaching in the 
rural districts of Christian County, and then from 
1910 to 1914 was engaged as a contractor and builder 
in Christian County. For the following four years 
he devoted himself exclusively to farming, although 
prior to that had been interested to a more or less 
degree from the time he was twenty-one years old, 
at which time the control of his father's homestead 
was turned over to him, and he now owns that prop- 
erty. In January, 1918, he was appointed county road 
engineer for a term of two years, and was re-ap- 
pointed for another term in 1920. His offices are in 
the county building. From 1913 to 1917 Mr. Hamby 
rendered efficient service as a member of the Chris- 
tian County Fiscal Court. In November, 1917, he 
was elected to the Upper House of the State As- 
sembly, but lost out through a technicality, as he had 
not resigned the office of justice of the peace before 
the election. He carried both Christian and Hopkins 
counties, being the only republican to carry the lat- 
ter for the office of state senator. Mr. Hamby is also 
a Universalist. He belongs to Larkin Camp No. 12482, 
M. W. A. Mr. Hamby owns a modern suburban resi- 
dence just north of the city limits, set in a three- 
acre lot, in which are beautiful shade trees, and here 
he maintains a comfortable home. 

In February, 1906, he was married at Clarksville, 
Tennessee, to Miss Vida Walker, a daughter of J. 
M. and Nancy (Grant) Walker. Mr. Walker is a 
retired farmer and makes his home with Mr. and 
Mrs. Hamby, but Mrs. Walker is deceased. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hamby became the parents of the following 
children: Lyman, who was born January 27, 1912; 
Mary Lee, who was born November 3, 1913 ; Rolla 
Evan, who was born January 2, 1918; and Edwin P., 
who was born November 26, 1919. 

Mr. Hamby is one of the thoroughly representa- 
tive men of his neighborhood, and takes a deep pride 
in it and everything pertaining to its welfare. Practi- 
cally all of the mature years of his grandfather's life 
were spent in Christian County, and he and his father 
found in it ample opportunity for congenial employ- 
ment and satisfactory development, so it is but nat- 
ural that he should feel as though it were the garden 
spot of the world. A man of strong convictions, 
he has never been afraid to live up to them, and his 
sturdy independence, sterling integrity and earnest- 



ness of purpose have won for him the confidence and 
respect of all with whom he is associated, even though 
all of them may not agree with his opinions. 

Jesse Crawford Waller has made a prominent name 
for himself in Western Kentucky as an educator, and 
for two years has been superintendent of the city 
school system of Hopkinsville. He represents an old 
family of Louisiana, though the Wallers on first com- 
ing from England settled in Spott.sylvania County, 
Virginia. 

His grandfather, Harris Waller, was born and spent 
his life as a planter in Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana, 
and owned and cultivated a large estate there. He 
married Olive Watson, who was born in 1806 and 
died in 1888, having likewise spent her life in Tangi- 
pahoa Parish. 

It was in that parish and on the old plantation that 
Jesse Crawford Waller was born December I, 1878. 
His father, Jesse Crawford, Sr., was born there in 
1834 and died in November, 1878, as a victim of the 
yellow fever. His death occurred, it will be observed, 
about a month before his son and namesake was born. 
He had spent his rather brief career as a planter on 
the old homestead. He was a democrat and a mem- 
ber of the Baptist Church. The maiden name of his 
wife was Fannie Magee, who was born in Tangipahoa 
Parish in 1846 and died there in 1886. She was the 
mother of four children : Homer, who represents the 
third generation in the ownership and management of 
the old plantation home in Tangipahoa; Harris, who 
died in infancy; and a daughter who also died in 
infancy; and Jesse C, the youngest. 

Jesse C. Waller attended public schools in his native 
parish, also an academy, and has been a successful 
teacher from the time he was twenty-one years of age. 
The first three years he taught in the rural schools 
of his native parish. At intervals of his school work 
he has taken advanced studies until he holds several 
degrees. He spent one year in Mississippi College at 
Clinton, another year at Tulane University, New Or- 
leans, and for four years was a student of George- 
town College at Georgetown, Kentucky. He received 
his A. B. degree from Georgetown in 1907. After a 
year of residence he was graduated with the A. B. 
degree from the University of Chicago in 1908, and 
in that year was elected superintendent of schools of 
Georgetown, Kentucky, thus returning to the city 
where he had spent several of his delightful student 
years. For nine years he was active head of the 
Georgetown schools. In the meantime for four suc- 
cessive summers he went East to Columbia University 
in New York, and in 1914 his advanced studies were 
rewarded with the Master of Arts degree by Colum- 
bia. In August, 1918, Mr. Waller was elected superin- 
tendent of schools at Hopkinsville. He is at the 
head of one of the largest city school systems in the 
state, having four school buildings, a staff of thirty- 
nine teachers and with 1,200 scholars enrolled. 

Mr. Waller takes a prominent part in the activities 
of the State Educational Association, is a member of 
the National Education Association, is a democrat in 
politics, and is a teacher of the Men's Bible Class 
in the Baptist Church at Hopkinsville, and for five 
years was on the board of deacons of the church at 
Georgetown. He is affiliated with Mt. Vernon Lodge 
No. 14, A. F. & A. M., at Georgetown. During the 
war he was a member of various local committees 
assisting in Red Cross, Y. M. C. A. and other cam- 
paigns. 

Mr. Waller, whose home is on East Ninth Street, 
married at Georgetown Miss Nora Lee Pullen, daugh- 
ter of W. E. and Mary Ellen Pullen, residents of 
Georgetown. Her father is a retired merchant. Mrs. 
Waller is a graduate of Mrs. Sallie Burgin's School 
of Music, and is a skilled instrumentalist and promi- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



83 



nent in musical circles at Hopkinsville. Mr. and Mrs. 
Waller have two children : Eleanor, born August 17, 
1908; and J. C, Jr., born December 23, 1918. 

Simon Wolf. Without force of character no man 
can hope to achieve eminence, regardless of what 
path he chooses in life. His aims may be high, his 
principles excellent and his plans brilliant, but unless 
he possesses the characteristics of vim, energy and 
strength to make practical his ventures his efforts will 
be in vain. Lexington has given to the State of 
Kentucky some of its most virile men, and numerous 
branches of industrial industry have been developed 
by them to large proportions. The dry goods trade 
is one that has attracted a number of individuals 
possessing the characteristics noted, and among them 
one who has won deserved prominence and success 
is Simon Wolf, senior member of the firm of Wolf, 
Wile & Company, and a leader in various movements 
pertaining to the betterment of civic conditions. 

Mr. Wolf was born at Hall, Wurtemberg, Germany, 
March 23, 1865, a son of L. and Jettie (Strauss) 
Wolf, natives of that country, where the father spent 
his life as a merchant and died in 1888, at the age of 
seventy-one years. Mrs. Wolf survived her husband 
two years and was sixty-six years old at the time of 
her demise. Of the nine sons and three daughters 
in the family, six sons and one daughter are living. 

The ninth in order of birth of his parents' chil- 
dren, Simon Wolf secured a private and high school 
education, and at the age of sixteen years, in 1881, 
came to the United States and located at Owensboro, 
Kentucky, where his elder brother, Aaron, was en- 
gaged in business. Simon served as bookkeeper and 
clerk for his brother for about seven years, and then 
became bookkeeper for Wile Brothers, an Owensboro 
concern. After i^ years, in June, i8go, he came to 
Lexington, where he became a partner in the firm of 
Kaufman, Straus & Company, this being the firm 
style until 1912, when Mr. Wolf and Dolph Wile, who 
had entered the same business in 1902, bought the 
enterprise, the business having since been known as 
Wolfe, Wile & Company. The business was started 
at 256 West Main Street, in a small store, where it 
continued to be located for twelve years, then being 
moved to 322 West Main Street. On January 11, 
1921, the establishment was completely destroyed by 
firt. Since then temporary offices have been located 
in the Leader Building. They have closed a long time 
lease on what is considered the choicest piece of 
business property in Lexington. The new location will 
be the Hernando Building, directly adjoining the 
Phoenix Hotel, of this city. Improvements are now 
being made and the building, in part, will be ready 
for occupancy by September, 1921. In the near future 
the company expects to make considerable building 
additions, which will give them a store size 61 by 247^2 
feet, with four floors and a selling basement. When 
these additions are complete the firm will have a 
modern and up-to-date department store that will com- 
pare favorably with anything in this section of the 
country. It will be approximately twice the size of 
their former structure. 

Mr. Wolf is widely known as a substantial busi- 
ness man, and his judgment is sound, while his sa- 
gacity is of the keenest. While he never sacrifices a 
safe conservatism to personal ambitions, he has al- 
ways sought honorable advancement. Few men can 
speak with more authority upon the dry goods busi- 
ness, and he has proven his ability on more than one 
occasion to handle the grave problems which arise 
in the conduct of large enterprises. He is generally 
recognized as a man of force of character. His busi- 
ness connections are numerous, and he is a director 
in the First and City National Bank of Lexington 
and a stockholder in the Lexington Hydraulic and 
Manufacturing Company. Mr. Wolf has always been 

Vol. IV— 9 



interested in civic aflfairs, and has never hesitated 
to advocate those measures and principles that he has 
believed are best for his city and country. Accepting 
modern ideas, he gives his support to movements along 
material, intellectual and moral progress, and his chari- 
ties are many. He is president of the Lexington 
Federation of Jewish Charities and a member of the 
board of trustees of Good Samaritan Hospital. Po- 
litically he is a democrat, and fraternally is affiliated 
with Devotion Lodge No. 160, F. & A. M. ; Phantom 
Lodge No. IS, K. P.; Lexington Lodge No. 89, B. P. 
O. E. ; and the Order of B'nai B'rith, holding mem- 
bership also in the Rotary Club and the Chamber of 
Commerce. 

Thomas Floyd Smith, whose entire mature career 
has been devoted to the paper business, wholesale and 
manufacturing, is president of the Louisville Paper 
Cornpany, and a man justly prominent in civic and 
business affairs. 

He was born in Jefferson County, Kentucky, August 
31, 1868, a son of Captain Thomas Floyd and Blanche 
(Weissinger) Smith. His great-grandfather, Colonel 
Thomas Floyd Smith, married Emelie Chouteau 
daughter of August Chouteau, who was one of the 
conspicuous pioneer citizens of St. Louis, Missouri. 
The Chouteau home was one of the first established 
in that city. The grandfather of the Louisville busi- 
ness man was also Colonel Thomas Floyd Smith, who 
married a relative of Colonel John Floyd, one of the 
historic characters of early Kentucky. Grandfather 
Smith was an intimate friend of Jefferson Davis and 
Zachary Taylor. 

Captain Thomas Floyd Smith was born in Missouri 
in 1835, was reared in that state and in Kentucky, and 
was commissioned a first lieutenant in the United 
States Army by Jefferson Davis, then secretary of 
war. At the outbreak of the war between the states 
he was commissioned a captain in the Confederate 
army. He was one of the organizers of the Washing- 
ton Guards, a famous military company of St. Louis, 
Missouri. After the war Captain Smith located in Old- 
ham County, Kentucky, where he devoted the rest of 
his years to farming and planting. He was a lover of 
fine horses and had some noted stock on his place. He 
was also an ardent sportsman, and found his recreation 
in hunting big game. He was a democrat, and a 
member of the Masonic fraternity. Captain Smith 
died in 1890. His* wife, Blanche Weissinger, was born 
in Jefferson County, Kentucky, in 1848 and died in 
1897. Of their six children two died in infancy, and 
the four still living are: Amanthis Bullitt Smith; 
George Weissinger Smith, present mayor of Louis- 
ville; Anna, wife of Frank C. Carpenter; and Thomas 
Floyd, youngest of the family. 

Thomas Floyd Smith was educated in the schools 
of Oldham and Jefferson counties, and the first money 
he ever earned was picking grapes at fifty cents a day. 
He became connected with a wholesale paper concern 
at Louisville at the age of nineteen, and subsequently 
was one of the organizers of the Louisville Paper 
Company, of which he has been president and acting 
head for many years. This is one of the largest 
wholesale paper concerns in the South, and has branch 
offices in many southern cities. Mr. Smith served two 
terms as president of the Central State Paper Dealers 
Association, and also is a past president of the Na- 
tional Paper Trade Association, which includes in its 
membership all the large paper manufacturers of the 
United States. 

For many years Mr. Smith has been associated 
with Louisville's business and civic affairs. He served 
three terms as president of the Louisville Board of 
Trade. He was one of the organizers and vice presi- 
dent of the Louisville Industrial Foundation. He was 
one of the commission appointed by the mayor to 
raise a million dollars for the building of a Memorial 



84 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



Auditorium and had active charge of the financial 
campaign for that purpose. He is a trustee of two 
schools in Jefferson County, the Rogers Clark Ballard 
School, and the Jacobs (Colored) School. Mr. Smith 
is a republican voter, and a member of the Presbyte- 
rian Church. 

On April 26, 1898, he married Mary Bruce, a native 
of Louisville, and daughter of Horatio W. and Eliza- 
beth (Helm) Bruce. Her mother was a daughter of 
Governor John Helm of Kentucky and granddaughter 
of Benjamin Hardin, the eminent Kentucky lawyer. 
Judge H. W. Bruce was chief attorney for the Louis- 
ville and Nashville Railway at the time of his death. 
He was elected by the Provision Legislature of Ken- 
tucky to a seat in the Confederate Congress. Mr. and 
Mrs. Smith have two children : Bruce, a student at Yale 
University; and Thomas Floyd, the fourth of the 
name in as many successive generations. 

Rev. Robert K. Massie. Occasionally there comes 
into the world a modest but intensely earnest man 
who wrests from his every-day surroundings the vic- 
tory of noble achievements. This has been the for- 
tune of Rev. Robert K. Massie, dean of Christ Church 
Cathedral, Lexington, who during the years that he 
has held this pastorate has won a firmly-established 
place in the affection and reverence of his parish- 
ioners and gained merited recognition as a construc- 
tive force in movements of civic importance. 

Dean Massie was born at Charlottesville, Virginia, 
in 1864, a son of Nathaniel Hardin and Eliza Kinloch 
(Nelson) Massie. His parents, natives of Virginia, are 
both deceased, his father having passed away in 1880, 
when fifty-six years of age, and his mother dying in 
1887, when sixty-five years old. Nathaniel H. Massie 
was a graduate in law of the University of Virginia 
and was one of the prominent members of the bar at 
Charlottesville, where he was also well and favorably 
known in banking circles as president of the Char- 
lottesville National Bank. Of the five children, of 
whom Robert K. is the youngest, two are living. 

Robert K. Massie attended private schools in Char- 
lottesville, and after further preparation enrolled as a 
student at the University of Virginia, from which he 
was graduated in 1888. He spent the following three 
years in preparation for the Episcopal ministry at 
Virginia Theological Seminary, and was a member 
of the graduating class of 1891, a class noted for 
the brilliancy of its members. Dean Massie then 
secured valuable and interesting experience as a mis- 
sionary to Shanghai, China, but in 1895 was forced to 
return to the United States, the climate of the Orient 
not having agreed with Mrs. Massie's health. After 
two years as rector of Meade Parish, Upperville, Vir- 
ginia, he was appointed to the chair of Ecclesiastical 
History, Canon Law and Christian Missions in his 
theological alma mater, where he remained until his 
appointment to the pulpit of Christ Church Cathedral 
of Lexington, being inducted into office February 2, 
1913, by Bishop Lewis W. Burton. 

Dean Massie, as noted, has been a strong and re- 
sult-attaining force in various movements pertaining 
to the elevation of Lexington's moral and civic spirit. 
His work in connection with his church and with the 
Parish House, which has become a great institution 
under his guidance, has been of a nature demanding 
his attention and energies to a great extent, but he 
has found the time and the inclination to associate 
himself with other men of public spirit and enlight- 
ened views in work of civic improvement. He has 
held the presidency of the Lexington Ministers' Union 
for one term, was chairman and leading spirit of the 
Vice Commission, which after a year's work succeeded 
in closing the segregated district of Lexington, and 
was vice president and a member of the executive 
committee of the Associated Charities of Lexington 



and Fayette County from 1914 to 1917. He was one 
of the charter members of the Community Service 
Association of Lexington and Fayette County, and is a 
former president of the Kentucky Conference of Chari- 
ties and Correction. 

Soon after his gradution from the Virginia Theolog- 
ical Seminary Dean Massie was united in marriage 
with Miss Harriet Ross Milton, of Clark County, 
Virginia, who, like her husband, belongs to one of the 
oldest families of Virginia and one which has given 
the Episcopal Church some of its most distinguished 
ministers. Two children have been born to this union: 
Robert K., Jr., M. A., graduate of the University of 
Virginia, 1916, who has recently established a school 
for boys at Lexington; and Francis M., M. D., 1919, 
University of Virginia, who was an interne at St. 
Luke's Hospital, New York City in 1920 and 1921. 

Charles A. Segner. The life of a professional or 
literary man seldom exhibits any of those striking 
incidents that seize upon public feeling and fix at- 
tention upon himself. His character is generally made 
up of the aggregate of the qualities and qualifica- 
tions he may possess, as these may be elicited by the 
exercise of the duties of his vocation or the particular 
profession to which he may belong. Charles A. Seg- 
ner, managing editor of the Louisville Herald, may 
not form an exception to this general rule, but it is 
known that since he has attained maturity, his life 
has been one of laborious professional duty, and the 
high distinction he has attained as a journalist is 
evidence enough that these qualities have not been 
planted on barren soil. 

Mr. Segner was born at Lafayette, Indiana, Octo- 
ber 17, 1878, a son of Joseph and Isabelle (VanAllen) 
Segner. He secured his education in the public and 
high schools of Lafayette and for a short time at- 
tended Purdue University, leaving that institution to 
join the staff of the Lafayette Evening Call, of which 
paper he was city editor one year. Subsequently he 
was city editor for one year of the Muncie (Indiana) 
Star, but returned to Lafayette as managing editor 
of the Call, a position which he retained for two 
years. Mr. Segner then went to Indianapolis, where 
he spent ten years with the Indianapolis Star, at va- 
rious times holding the positions of state editor, night 
editor and assistant managing editor, and from Indian- 
apolis came to Louisville in 1913 to become man- 
aging editor of the Herald, succeeding W. K. McKay. 

Mr. Segner was married August 16, 1903, to Miss 
Clara E. Weyher, daughter of Dr. R. F. Weyher, pro- 
fessor of German at Purdue University. Mr. Segner 
is a member of the Masons and of Louisville Lodge 
No. 8, B. P. O. E. He makes his home in the Char- 
mant Apartments. 

Charles Raphel Thompson, a member of an old 
and well known Kentucky family, was a practical 
farmer in Fayette County for several years, but his 
chief business connections have been as a buyer and 
shipper of mules, and he is one of the prominent 
men in this line of business in the South. 

Mr. Thompson was born on his grandfather's farm 
in Fayette County, August 20, 1872, a son of Malcolm 
and Bettie (Royester) Thompson. His parents were 
both born in Kentucky. His father was born in Lex- 
ington, September 21, 1842, was educated in the com- 
mon schools at Lexington, for a number of years 
was profitably engaged in agriculture, but for about 
thirty years was a general merchant at Payne Depot 
in Scott County, Kentucky. He finally retired and 
lived at Lexington until his death in April, 1918. 
He was for many years a deacon in the Baptist Church, 
a republican in politics, and a man of a distinctive 
influence in every community where he lived. His 
wife, Bettie Royester, was born in Boyle County, Ken- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



85 



tucky, December 8, 1851, and is still living. She was 
the mother of four children: William R., Charles R., 
Clifton L., and Malcolm, Jr., who died in infancy. 

Charles R. Thompson spent his boyhood days chiefly 
in Scott County, where he attended the Bethel School. 
He was trained to farm work, and at the age of seven- 
teen took the direct responsibility for handling a farm 
and a stock business in Fayette County. During the 
next six years his interests were chiefly identified with 
his farm. Since then he has been buying and shipping 
mules, and for several years found his principal mar- 
ket at Atlanta and Augusta, Georgia. In 1901 he lo- 
cated his business headquarters at Lexington, and he 
is associated with the noted Gentry brothers, and in 
1903 the firm became Gentry & Thompson. This is 
an organization well financed and equipped for the 
buying and handling of mules, and their connections 
reach out to nearly all sections where mules are raised. 
As a firm they have been extensive shippers to Cuba 
and all through the Southwest and eastern states. 
During the World war this firm bought and sold for 
the English and American governments a number of 
thousands of mules for army purposes. 

Mr. Thompson has been an interested citizen of 
Lexington, a worker for its welfare, and for two 
years was a member of the City Council. He is treas- 
urer of the First Baptist Church and in politics a 
republican. He has been a director of the Lexington 
Dry Goods Company since its organization. On June 
14, 1908, he married Miss Coralee Nunnelly, a native 
of Georgetown, Kentucky, and daughter of Hayes and 
Margaret (Porter) Nunnelly. Her parents were born 
in Missouri, are still living, and of their four children 
Mrs. Thompson is the oldest. Mr. and Mrs. Thomp- 
son have two daughters, Margaret Porter and Mary 
Elizabeth. 

Edward W. Hagyard has given more than thirty 
years to the practice of veterinary medicine, and in 
that time has cared for many of America's most fa- 
mous race horses, and is well known among horse- 
men and stock raisers generally. In recent years he 
has given his time to his veterinary hospital in 
Lexington. 

Doctor Hagyard was born in County Peel, Ontario, 
Canada, March 24, 1863, and his father before him 
was a distinguished veterinary. His parents, Edward 
Thomas and Esther (Horsley) Hagyard, were both 
born in Yorkshire, England, his father July 24, 1822, 
and his mother in 1827. They were married after 
coming to Canada, and of their nine children five are 
living. The mother died in 1880 and the father in 
1902. 

Edward W. Hagyard was about thirteen years of 
age. when his parents came to Lexington to live. In 
the meantime he had attended public schools in On- 
tario, was also educated in the Lexington schools 
and was sent for his professional preparation to the 
Ontario Veterinary College of Toronto. He was grad- 
uated with the class of 1888, and at once joined his 
brother, John R., and his father in practice at Lex- 
ington under the firm name of E. T. Hagyard & Sons, 
veterinary surgeons. He remained a member of the 
firm until 1896, when his skill and reputation secured 
for him the rather distinctive honor of being appointed 
chief veterinary surgeon at the celebrated race horse 
ranch at Hamilton, Montana, owned by the late Mar- 
cus Daly. He remained in charge of Mr. Daly's 
famous string of horses until 1902, when he returned 
to Lexington, and since then has established and 
developed what is known as the Hagyard Veterinary 
Hospital at 226-228 South Short Street. He has 
equipped this with all the facilities representing the 
most advanced thoughts and practice of veterinary 
surgery, and gives to it his personal direction and also 
has a competent staff of assistants. He is a member 
of the Kentucky State and American Veterinary Asso- 



ciation. He is affiliated with Lexington Lodge No. 
89 of the Elks and in politics is a democrat. 

On "July 22, 1899, Mr. Hagyard married Miss Louise 
Elliott, who was born at Hamilton, Montana, daughter 
of Lynde and Mary (Harris) Elliott. Her parents 
were natives of Illinois and pioneers in Montana. Her 
father was a ranchman, and lost his life in a noted 
Indian battle, known as the battle of the Big Hole 
in Montana in 1877. Mrs. Hagyard, who died in 1900, 
was the mother of three children, named Charles E., 
Esther Louise and Ruth V. 

James H. Cate, president of the Cate Milling Com- 
pany of Hopkinsville, Kentucky, has been identified 
with the business here since 1897, and during the long 
period of his connection with flour milling has be- 
come one of the best known figures in the industry 
in this part of the state. His career has been one 
of great industry and worthy accomplishment, and 
his business, in its growth from a modest beginning 
to its present large proportions, has reflected his un- 
tiring energy and high ideals of business honor. 

Mr. Cate was born at Owensboro, Kentucky, June 
29, 1864, a son of James and Mary (Phipps) Cate. 
The family originated in Wales, whence the first 
American ancestor came during Colonial times and 
settled in New York, and it was in that state, at 
Rochester, that James Cate was born in 1835. He 
was reared there, but in young manhood moved to 
Louisville, Kentucky, where he put up a woolen mill, 
subsequently starting the first power loom south of 
the Ohio River. Later Mr. Cate removed to Hart- 
ford, Ohio County, this state, where he was mar- 
ried, and then went to Owensboro and engaged in 
business as a manufacturer of woolen goods. In 1868 
he went to Rumsey, Kentucky, where he conducted 
his own woolen mill until 1892, in which year- he 
formed a partnership with R. Monarch and built a 
woolen mill at Owensboro, two years later retiring 
and disposing of his interests. He has since made 
his home with his son James H. at Hopkinsville. Mr. 
Cate is a democrat, a strong churchman of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal faith and a zealous Mason. He mar- 
ried Miss Mary Phipps, who was born in 1838, in 
Ohio County, Kentucky, and died at Rumsey in 1871, 
and they became the parents of three children : Fran- 
ces, who died as the wife of the late Dr. L. A. King, 
a dental practitioner of Henderson, Kentucky; James 
H. ; and Sarah Phipps, the wife of W. M. Armistead, 
an insurance man of Nashville, Tennessee. 

James H. Cate was given his educational training 
in the public schools of McLean County, Kentucky, 
and at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, from which 
institution he was graduated in 1887 with the degree 
of Bachelor of Science. During his college career he 
joined the Kappa Sigma Greek letter college frater- 
nity, in which he still retains membership. Follow- 
ing his graduation Mr. Cate engaged in the saw- 
mill and lumber business in McLean County for 
ten years, and in 1897 came to Hopkinsville and bought 
a flour mill situated on East Ninth Street, adjoining 
the present city limits. His elder son, James Cate, 
was later admitted to partnership and the business was 
operated as James Cate & Son until the mill was 
destroyed by fire September 2, 1918, following which 
an incorporation was effected to succeed the original 
incorporation of 1907, the articles of corporation were 
amended, and the business adopted the present style 
of Cate Milling Company. The present officers of 
the concern are : James H. Cate, president and general 
manager ; James Cate, treasurer : and George Cate, 
secretary. The present modern mills have a daily ca- 
pacity of 100 barrels of flour, 600 bushels of corn meal 
and ten tons of feed. 

Mr. Cate is a democrat, although not an active poli- 
tician. He has always supported worthy movements, 
particularly during the World war period, when he 



86 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



subscribed liberally and worked effectively in behalf 
of the local and national activities, and for six years 
has been a member of the Hopkinsville Board of 
Education. He is a member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church and superintendent of the Sunday School. 
The comfortable Cate residence occupies one of the 
finest residential locations of Hopkinsville, at loio 
East Ninth Street. 

In 1887, at Nashville, Tennessee, Air. Cate was 
united in marriage with Miss Anna Armistead, daugh- 
ter of G. W. and Annie M. (Harrison) Armistead, 
the latter of whom resides with her son-in-law, while 
the former, who was an editor and lecturer, is de- 
ceased. Mrs. Cate died in 1896, leaving five children : 
Annie, residing with her father, the widow of Frank 
King, Jr., a former cotton buyer in the South ; James 
H., Jr., who enlisted in July, 1918, in the United States 
army, was sent to Camp Taylor and commissioned a 
second lieutenant, and was given his honorable dis- 
charge in December, 1918, since which time he has 
been connected with the freight department of the 
Nashville, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad at Nashville ; 
John M., who enlisted in the United States army in 
May, 1918, was sent to Camp Taylor and detailed to 
an artillery corps, and was mustered out of the artil- 
lery service in November, 1918, since which time he 
has followed the profession of law at Nashville; 
Dr. William R., a practicing physician and surgeon in 
charge of Ivey Hospital at Sougdo, Korea, a Metho- 
dist institution ; and George H., who enlisted in the 
United States Navy, in May, 1918, was placed on the 
training ship New Orleans, and mustered out of the 
service in November, 1918, since which time he has 
been secretary of the Cate Milling Company at Hop- 
kinsville. In 1899, at Nashville, James H. Cate, Sr., 
married Miss Mary Lucenia Armistead, a younger sis- 
ter of his first wife, and to this imion there have 
been born the following children : Wirt M., a student 
at Emery University, Atlanta, Georgia ; Mary Lucenia, 
Elizabeth and Margaret, who are attending Hopkins- 
ville High School; Margaret, Dorothy, Wilbur and 
Frances, who are attending the graded schools; and 
Randolph and Martha, at home. 

Charles F. McKee, the efficient and popular cashier 
of the Bank of Hopkinsville, judicial center of Chris- 
tian County, has gained this important executive posi- 
tion through his own ability and effective service, and 
is one of the representative business men of the 
younger generation in his native city. He was born 
at Hopkinsville on the I7th of .^U(Just, 1888, and 
is a son of L. H. and Nannie CEHis) McKee, the 
former of whom was born in Christian County, in 
18.S4, and the latter was born in the State of Mis- 
souri, in i8'^6. Charles McKee, grandfather of the 
subject of this review, was born and reared in Vir- 
ginia and became one of the pioneer settlers of 
Christian County, Kentucky, where he improved and 
developed a valuable farm five miles south of Hop- 
kinsville, and where he and his wife remained until 
their deaths, when well advanced in years, both hav- 
ing been zealous members of the Cumberland Pres- 
byterian Church, and his political allegiance having 
been given to the democratic party. Charles McKee 
died prior to the birth of his grandson, Charles F., 
of this sketch. 

L. H. McKee was reared and educated in his 
native county and after his marriage he engaged in 
the grocery business at Hopkinsville, where he con- 
tinued as one of the representative merchants of the 
city for twenty years, and where he has lived virtually 
retired since 1908. He is a staunch supporter of the 
nrinciples of the democratic party, has long been 
known as a loyal and public-spirited citizen and has 
manifested deep interest in all things pertaining to 
the well-being of his home city. He is affiliated with 
the Masonic fraternity, and he and his wife hold 



membership in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. 
J. E., the eldest of their three children, is engaged 
in the banking business at Jonesboro, Arkansas ; Miss 
Jean remains at the parental home ; and Charles F., 
of this review, is the youngest of the number. 

In the public schools of Hopkinsville Charles F. 
McKee continued his studies until his graduation in 
the high school as a member of the class of 1906, 
and he then assumed the position of collection clerk 
for the City Bank of Hopkinsville. Six months later 
he took a similar post with the Bank of Hopkinsville, 
and his fidelity and effective service led to his pro- 
motion to the position of bookkeeper, of which he 
continued the incumbent until January i, 1918, when 
he was chosen cashier of this substantial and impor- 
tant financial institution of Christian County. In this 
executive office his administration has fully justified 
his advancement thereto, and his personal popularity 
in his native city is of unequivocal order — enhanced 
appreciably by the honor which he conferred upon the 
community by his service in the World war, as will 
be more fully detailed in a later paragraph. Mr. 
McKee accords unfaltering allegiance to the democratic 
party, is affiliated with Hopkinsville Lodge No. 54s, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and, as a 
bachelor, he remains at the parental home, 940 South 
Main Street. 

Mr. McKee entered the nation's military service on 
the isth of June, 1918, and after remaining three 
months at Camp Shelby, Mississippi, he was trans- 
ferred to Camp Mills, in the State of New York. 
With his command he sailed for France on the 27th 
of September, 1918, and upon his arrival, on the i6th 
of the following month, he was assigned to the 
Seventy-eighth Division of the American Expedition- 
ary Forces, stationed at Torcy. He continued in 
service in France, as a sergeant of his regiment, until 
he returned with his regiment to the United States, 
his arrival in his native land having occurred June 
6, 1919, and his honorable discharge having been given 
on the loth of that month. He then returned to 
Hopkinsville and resumed his interrupted service as 
cashier of the bank. 

Asa White Nickell, M. D. A specialist in internal 
medicine. Doctor Nickell by reason of an active pro- 
fessional experience extending over a quarter of a 
century, by his personal attainments, his contributions 
as a worker, teacher and writer on medical subjects, 
is easily one of the foremost physicians in Kentucky 
today. For the past fifteen years he has enjoyed a 
large practice and many interesting social and civic 
connections with the City of Louisville. 

He was born at Ezel in Morgan County, Kentucky, 
August 16, 1872, son of John Smith and Lou Ellen 
(Maxey) Nickell. His parents were born in the same 
locality, his father in 1848 and his mother in 1850. His 
mother died in 1881, and of her three children Doctor 
Nickell is the oldest. All are living except one. John 
S. Nickell was a farmer in early life and later became 
a merchant at Ezel. He served a term as sheriff of 
Morgan County, and while in office he effected the 
capture of an escaped prisoner who had taken refuge 
in the Ozark Mountains of Missouri. For this cap- 
ture he received a reward offered bv Governor Black- 
burn. He is now living on his farm in Morgan County. 
He is a leader in the Christian Church at Ezel, is a 
past master of Ezel Masonic Lodge No. 550, haying 
served as secretary of the Lodge for the past thirty- 
five years, and in politics is a republican. 

Asa White Nickell grew up in Morgan County, at- 
tended school there, and first fitted himself for the 
role of teacher. Altogether he taught seven years in 
the public schools. Doctor Nickell graduated from the 
Kentucky School of Medicine with the class of 1896. 
He distinguished himself as a student, receiving the 
honor award, consisting of gold medals of his class 




"^ — 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



87 



in 1895 for work in anatomy and in 1896 the honors 
for obstetrics. Doctor Nickell began the practice of 
medicine at Weston in Lewis County, West Virginia, 
and remained there attending a large practice in the 
city and central section of the state some six or seven 
years. While there he also served as a member of 
the Congressional Executive Committee for the First 
Congressional District of West Virginia. Also city and 
jail physician for that city. Doctor Nickell has al- 
ways been a close student, and after his graduation 
he attended the New York Polyclinic and the Chicago 
Polyclinic. 

His home has been at Louisville since June, 1905. 
For several years Doctor Nickell was associate pro- 
fessor of anatomy and diseases of women at the Ken- 
tucky School of Medicine. He has done post 
graduate work in his profession in Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity of Baltimo.re. He is a member of the Jeffer- 
son County, Kentucky State, Southern Medical and 
American Medical associations, is a member of the 
American Congress of Internal Medicine and has been 
a frequent contributor to medical literature. As a 
specialist in internal medicine he is frequently engaged 
for consultation work. 

Doctor Nickell is affiliated with Daylight Lodge No. 
760, F. and A. M., King Solomon Chapter No. 5, R. 
A. M., Louisville Lodge No. 8 of the Elks, is a mem- 
ber of the Louisville Board of Trade, Rotary Club, 
and a number of other fraternal, social and civic or- 
ganizations. For the past ten years he has been an 
elder and chairman of the Official Board of the Eden- 
side Christian Church, is one of the trustees of church 
property, and a member of the Central Committee of 
all Christian Churches at Louisville, serving that body 
as treasurer. Incidentally Doctor Nickell has acquired 
extensive real estate in Louisville. 

In May, 1905, he married Mary Louis Flanagan, 
daughter of Captain James and Laura (Plummer) 
Flanagan. Her parents were born at Grafton, West 
Virginia, where her mother is still living and where 
her father died in 1919, after a long and active career 
that made him one of the most prominent and be- 
loved men in that city. Mrs. Nickell is the oldest of 
five children, four of whom are still living. To the 
marriage of Doctor and Mrs. Nickell were born nine 
sons and daughters, two of whom died in infancy. 
The names of the seven living children are Minnie 
Louise, Dorothy White, Alice, Asa White, Jr., John 
Harold, Marjorie Lucille and James Newton. 

Joe McCarroll, Jr., who is giving very effective serv- 
ice as cashier of the City Bank & Trust Company of 
Hopkinsville, Christian County, was born in this city 
on the i8th of April, 1887, and is a representative 
of an honored old family vvhose name has been iden- 
tified with the history of Christian County for more 
than a century, as is evident when it is recorded that 
Charles Alexander McCarroll, grandfather of the sub- 
ject of this review, was born at Hopkinsville in the 
year 1818, his parents having been early settlers in 
this favored section of the Blue Grass State. Charles 
A. McCarroll became one of the substantial agricul- 
turists and influential citizens of his native county, 
attained to patriarchal age and passed the closing 
years of his life on his old homestead farm seven 
miles west of Hopkinsville, where he died in the 
year 1904. He was a stalwart in the local ranks of 
the democratic party, served at one time as deputy 
sheriff of his native county, became a member of the 
Masonic fraternity in 1847, and continued his affilia- 
tion therewith until his death, and both he and his 
wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. Mr. McCarroll organized a company for serv- 
ice in the Mexican war, but the command was not 
called to the stage of conflict. As a young man 
Charles A. McCarroll wedded Miss Ann Ellis, who 
was born in Sussex County, Virginia, in 1828, her 



family moving to Kentucky in 1831, and her death 
here occurred in the year 1893. Dr. John McCarroll, 
father of Charles A., was born in 1790, and reared in 
Botetourt County, Virginia, where the family was 
founded in the Colonial days, and he became one of 
the early settlers in the vicinity of Hopkinsville, Ken- 
tucky. Prior to coming to Christian County he had 
lived for a time in Lincoln County, this state, and 
in 1803 removed to Clarksville, Tennessee, where in 
1814 he entered the Government military service under 
Gen. Andrew Jackson, and took part in a vigorous 
campaign against the Cherokee Indians. He was a 
man of fine intellectual attainments, was a success- 
ful school teacher in earlier years, and eventually 
he prepared himself for the medical profession, of 
which he became a pioneer representative in Chris- 
tian County. Here he continued in active practice as 
a physician and surgeon for many years and here he 
died at a venerable age. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Elizabeth Kelly, was born in the Blue 
Grass section of Kentucky and she likewise was well 
advanced in years at the time of her death. Dr. John 
McCarroll was a son of John and Elizabeth (Graeme) 
McCarroll, the lineage of both tracing back to staunch 
Scotch origin. The McCarroUs removed from Scot- 
land into the north of Ireland and from the Emerald 
Isle came the original representatives in America, 
settlement having first been made by them in Pennsyl- 
vania in the early Colonial period of our national 
history. John McCarroll, born in 1757, went forth as 
a patriot soldier in the Continental line in the War 
of the Revolution, in which he served through three 
campaigns in Pennsylvania. He later established his 
home in Virginia, from there moved to Lincoln 
County, Kentucky, in 1803 moved to Clarksville, Ten- 
nessee, where he lived twenty years and from there 
moved to Dover, Tennessee. 

Judge Joe McCarroll, father of him whose name 
initiates this review, was born near Hopkinsville, in 
the year 1848, and is now one of the venerable and 
distinguished native sons of Christian County, where 
he still resides on his farm estate of 225 acres six 
miles west of Hopkinsville. Judge McCarroll studied 
law in the Louisville Law School and was admitted 
to the bar in March, 1873. He engaged in the practice 
of his profession at Hopkinsville, and has long been 
one of the representative members of the bar of his 
native county, of which he is now the dean in matters 
of years of continuous practice. He has been a leader 
in the local councils of the democratic party, is affili- 
ated with the Masonic fraternity and the Knights of 
Pythias, and is a zealous member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, as was also his wife, who 
passed to the life eternal in the year 1917. Mrs. Mc- 
Carroll, whose maiden name was Mary T. HoUoway, 
was born near Henderson, this state, and in her gra- 
cious personality represented the fine type of woman- 
hood for which the old Blue Grass State ever has 
been celebrated. Judge and Mrs. McCarroll became 
the parents of eight children : Ann died at the age 
of three years and John at the age of twenty-one 
years ; Charles, a mining engineer by profession, re- 
sides at Helena, Alabama, where he is associated with 
the Eureka Coal Company ; Joe, Jr., immediate sub- 
ject of this sketch, was the next in order of birth; 
Bascom died at the age of three years ; Robert holds 
a position in a bank at Van Nuys, California ; Graeme 
died at the age of six months : and William S. has 
active charge of his father's old homestead farm. 

Joe McCarroll, Jr., acquired his early education in 
the public schools of Hopkinsville, where he also at- 
tended South Kentucky College for one year. In 190S 
he became a messenger for the City Bank & Trust 
Company of Hopkinsville, in which institution he won 
advancement to the position of bookkeeper and teller, 
of which he continued the incumbent until 1918, when 



88 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



he was promoted to the office of assistant cashier. In 
1921 he was promoted to his present office, that of 
cashier. 

In political allegiance Mr. McCarroU is found 
aligned in the ranks of the Republican party, and he 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, in the faith of which he was reared. He is 
affiliated with Hopkinsville Lodge No. 2>7, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, and with Oriental Chap- 
ter No. 14, Royal Arch Masons. He gave effective 
service in the furtherance of the various war activ- 
ities in his native county during the nation's participa- 
tion in the World war, and was treasurer of the sec- 
ond Red Cross drive in the county. Mr. McCarroll's 
name is still found enrolled on the roster of eligible 
and popular young bachelors in his native county. 

C. W. HiSGEN, who is the leading painter and dec- 
orator of Hopkinsville, is a man who combines his 
perceptions of the beautiful and artistic with his prac- 
tical knowledge of his trade, with very satisfactory 
results, and in consequence of his skill has a very 
large patronage and has had some of the most im- 
portant contracts in his line in this locality. Mr. 
Hisgen was born at Hopkinsville, September 25, 1866, 
a son of C. H. Hisgen and grandson of Charles His- 
gen, who was born in Germany in 1827 and died at 
Albany, New York, in 1910. He was a portrait painter, 
and coming to the United States in the '70s, located 
at Albany, where he found appreciation for his art 
and attained to considerable local reputation. 

C. H. Hisgen was born at Leipzig, Germany, in 1844, 
and died at Hopkinsville in 1917. When he was sev- 
enteen years old he came to the United States, and 
upon landing, enlisted, as did so many of his country- 
men at that time, in the Union army and fought dur- 
ing the war between the North and the South, serving 
as a bugler. After the close of the war he came as 
far west as Evansville, Indiana, and there he made 
practical use of the artistic talents he inherited from 
his father and became a painter and decorator, spe- 
cializing in frescoing. A good business man, he suc- 
ceeded, and invested some of his earnings in a steam- 
boat enterprise. About 1864 he moved to Hopkinsville 
to decorate the new buildings for the State Asylum 
for the Insane, and continued to follow his trade as 
a painter and decorator, becoming the leading man 
in his line. First a democrat, he later became a re- 
publican. The Presbyterian Church held his member- 
ship, and he was a zealous member of Hopkinsville 
Lodge No. 37, A. F. & A. M. C. H. Hisgen married 
Emma Balsover, of English parentage, who survives 
him and lives at Hopkinsville. She was born at Ev- 
ansville, Indiana. Their children were as follows : 
C. W., who is the eldest ; Florence, who married 
Flavins Turner, an oil operator of Houston, Texas ; 
Victor Hugo, who is a painter and paper hanger and 
proprietor of Saint Charles Court, the leading apart- 
ment house of Hopkinsville, resides in this city ; 
Q. L., who is in partnership with C. W., lives at Hop- 
kinsville; Alberta, who married R. S. Ambrose, a 
lumber dealer of Hopkinsville; and John, who is a 
photographer of Valparaiso, Indiana. 

C. W. Hisgen first attended the public schools of 
his native city and then took the regular course at 
the South Kentucky College, from which he was grad- 
uated in 1885. Following this he entered the painting 
and decorating business, and has built up the leading 
business of its kind in Christian and surrounding 
counties. His workshop and offices are at 4I/2 South 
Main Street, and he owns his modern residence at 
611 North Main Street, where he maintains a com- 
fortable home. 

In 1888 Mr. Hisgen was married at Petersburg, In- 
diana, to Miss Ella Russ, born at Petersburg, a very 
highly educated lady. Mr. and Mrs. Hisgen have two 
children, namely : Lolla, who is married and lives at 



New Orleans, Louisiana, where her husband is an 
electrical engineer for the telephone company of that 
city; and Olivia, who is unmarried and lives at home. 
Mr. Hisgen is a democrat, but has not participated 
actively in politics. He is a Presbyterian. Fraternally 
he belongs to Pearl City Camp No. 5, W. O. W., at 
Hopkinsville. 

Joseph Addison Stucky, M. D. Through the versa- 
tile gifts and abilities of the family the name Stucky 
has long been prominent in the field of medicine and 
surgery in Kentucky, and Lexington is the home of 
two specialists in eye, ear, nose and throat diseases, 
father and son, the attainments and reputation of the 
senior Doctor Stucky having given him distinctive 
prominence among the great body of American spe- 
cialists in this field. 

Joseph Addison Stucky was born at Louisville, Sep- 
tember 6, 1857. His great-grandfather, John Stucky, 
was one of the very earliest settlers of that section 
of the state. Frederick Stucky, a son of John, was 
born in Jefferson County, Kentucky, in 1801. In the 
same community was born in 1827 Harry Stucky, who 
in 1846 moved to Louisville, and for a number of 
years was prominent in the affairs of that city, serv- 
ing a long term as clerk of the Chancery Court and 
also treasurer of the Sinking Fund. Harry Stucky 
married Sallie Kemp Sweeney, of Jeffersontown, Jef- 
ferson County. Both of their sons, Joseph A. and 
Thomas H., became physicians. 

Joseph A. Stucky graduated in medicine from the 
University of Louisville in 1878. He had attended 
the Louisville High School. For over forty years he 
has been in practice at Lexington. For nine years he 
was a general practitioner of medicine, and since then 
has given his attention and talents exclusively to the 
eye, ear, nose and throat and has been a recognized 
authority in that field. His prominence has been rec- 
ognized by members of the profession in general, and 
he is a former president of the American Academy 
of Ophthalmology and Oto-Laryngology, is a former 
president of the American Laryngological, Rhinologi- 
cal and Otological Society, former president of the 
Lexington Medical Society and Fayette County Med- 
ical Society, and is president of the Kentucky State 
Medical Society, the Mississippi Valley Medical So- 
ciety, Southern Medical Association and American 
Medical Association. He is author of many articles 
that have been published in medical journals, and for 
years has been a lecturer on public health and social 
welfare subjects, a Y. M. C. A. worker and lecturer. 
He is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons, 
and was a delegate to the International Congress of 
Surgeons in London in 1912. Doctor Stucky is a 
Mason and affiliated with other fraternities at Lexing- 
ton and in various social and civic organizations. Dur- 
ing the war he served as consultant on Medical Re- 
serve Corps. He is an independent democrat and 
prohibitionist, is an active meirber of the Church of 
the Disciples, and belongs to the Lexington and Fay- 
ette County clubs and the Kiwanis Club. 

At Lexington in 1881 Doctor Stucky married Miss 
Nellie McGarvey, whose father, Rev. Dr. John W. 
McGarvey, was a pioneer minister of the Church of 
the Disciples and at one time president of the Bible 
College of Transylvania. Si.x children were born to 
Doctor and Mrs. Stucky, one dying in infancy, the 
others being : John McG. ; William S. ; Lillie Estell, 
who married Harold Williamson ; Nellie McGarvey, 
wife of Arthur Chapman; and Harry Clarke, who 
married Mary Ellen Evans. 

Rev. Isaac Jesse Spencer. The clergy of the Chris- 
tian Church numbers among its members men of broad 
education, religious zeal and enlightened views, whose 
example and teaching exercise an influence for moral- 
ity that must be counted as constructive factors in 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



89 



advancing the interests of any community. Not alone 
are these men spiritual guides of their people, but they 
are also called upon to possess a large measure of 
the practicality that enables them to assist and teach 
in the ordinary events of life and to protect the inter- 
ests of their parishioners. Much, in fact, is demanded 
of those who choose the unselfish life of the Christian 
ministry. Not all, as in other walks of existence, are 
fitted by nature for the same sum of responsibility, 
and perhaps few have exerted a wider or more 
beneficial influence than has the Rev. Isaac Jesse 
Spencer, whose ministerial labors have extended over 
a period of nearly half a century, and who has been 
pastor of the Central Christian Church of Lexington 
for twenty-six years. 

Reverend Spencer was born in Belmont County, 
Ohio, a son of George and Elizabeth (Hogue) Spen- 
cer, natives of Ohio, the former of whom, an Ohio 
farmer, died in 1863, at the age of forty-six years, 
the latter surviving until 1912 and attaining the re- 
markable age of ninety-eight years. Isaac J. Spencer 
is the fifth in order of birth of a family of four sons 
and two daughters. Two of the sons, Joseph and 
William, served in the Union army during the Civil 
war as members of the Ninety-eighth Regiment, Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry, and both died of sickness con- 
tracted in the army camps. George Spencer, the father, 
was a Quaker, but, while a man of firm religious faith, 
was far from the popular conception of men of that 
meek and saintly creed. He was a great lover of fine 
horses, some of which were bred by Iiim on his farm, 
was an expert rifle shot, and, having a strong affec- 
tion for the chase, kept the best fox hounds in the 
county. Originally a whig in politics, he later adopted 
the principles of the democratic party. 

Isaac Jesse Spencer was given good educational ad- 
vantages, first attending the local public schools and 
later Hillsdale (Michigan) and Bethany (West Vir- 
ginia) colleges. He taught country schools two ses- 
sions before he entered Bethany College. He began 
his ministerial labors when still a youth, in April, 1872, 
at Bellaire, Ohio, although he did not graduate from 
Bethany College until three years later. His college 
career was a brilliant one, prophesying his subse- 
quent distinguished career, and he was valedictorian 
of his class. During tliis time he continued as pastor 
of the Christian Church at Bellaire, Ohio, where he 
built up and developed a strong congregation, and in 
later years returned to that city three times to hold 
Gospel meetings. In the autumn of 1877 he accepted 
a call to the First Christian Church of Baltimore, 
Maryland, where he spent two years, and, having im- 
paired his health, he went farther south, to Augusta, 
Georgia, later to Clarksville, Tennessee, and still later 
to Richmond, Virginia. During his service at Balti- 
more he was associated with the famous evangelist, 
Dwight L. Moody, for four months, and this associa- 
tion had a great influence upon his subsequent career 
and work, particularly in his evangelistic services and 
in the great value he came to place upon the Scriptures. 

In 1882 Doctor Spencer answered a call to become 
editor of the Missionary Weekly, published at Gor- 
donsville and later at Richmond, Virginia, a capacity 
in which he remained ten years, in the meantime 
preaching for country churches and conducting evan- 
gelistic meetings in various cities. In 1892 he ac- 
cepted the pastorate of the First Christian Church of 
Winchester, Kentucky, with health restored, where 
he remained two years, going then to the Broadway 
Christian Church, Louisville. In January, 1895, he 
was called to the Central Christian Church of Lex- 
ington, where he is now serving his twenty-seventh 
year as its minister, with a congregation of approxi- 
mately 1,700 people and with church buildings, includ- 
ing a fine educational plant, unsurpassed for beauty 
and convenience. He occupies an established position 



in the affection and reverence of his people, who not 
only look upon him as their spiritual guide, but as 
their instructor, advisor and friend. He is assisted 
by Rev. H. L. Pickerill, who is director of the church 
school and of the young people's organizations. 

During the entire period of his ininistry Doctor 
Spencer has made a strong feature of evangelistic 
work, and has held over 100 meetings of this character 
in Kentucky, Ohio, Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, 
Florida, Pennsylvania, Maryland, New York, Illinois, 
Indiana, Iowa, Texas, California, Mississippi, Tennes- 
see and Missouri. He has also found the time and 
inclination to take an active, effective and constructive 
part in local public affairs, and has exerted a wide and 
lasting influence through the labors of his pen, his 
virile and interesting contributions to the religious 
press and the local newspapers finding an attentive 
and receptive audience. He has attended and spoken 
many times at national conferences of the Christian 
Church in various cities, and has often been in de- 
mand at national interdenominational gatherings. He 
has been honored by either election or appointment 
to many positions of trust and responsibility, local 
and national, being a curator of Transylvania Uni- 
versity and Hamilton College; a director of the Good 
Samaritan Hospital; a member of the Board of Trus- 
tees of the National Board of Ministers' Relief, with 
headquarters at Indianapolis, Indiana ; a member of 
the board of the Christian Board of Publication, with 
headquarters at St. Louis, Missouri; and a member 
of the Board of Managers of the United Christian 
Missionary Society, with headquarters in the same 
city. For fifteen years he served as a member of the 
Executive Committee of the Foreign Christian Mis- 
sionary Society, and for twenty years was superin- 
tendent of the Sunday School of his own church. 

Doctor Spencer was married September 19, 1878, 
to Miss Louise Pendleton, who was born in Louisa 
County, Virginia, daughter of Dr. Philip B. Pendle- 
ton, a physician, farmer and merchant, and a member 
of one of the old and prominent families of the Old 
Dominion State. She was a niece of Dr. W. K. 
Pendleton, president of Bethany College. Mrs. Spen- 
cer has been an active and effective factor in church 
life 'and work. In 1908 she established the Workers' 
Monday Bible Class at the Central Christian Church, 
and for several years has held the Bethel Bible Class 
on Friday afternoons. Hundreds of mature and 
younger women have thus been taught and influenced 
by her. These classes are largely attended by women 
of all denominations, and the effect of their influence 
is something that, while it cannot be measured, can 
be felt in various ways in the betterment of civic, social 
and moral conditions. In 1895 Mrs. Spencer estab- 
lished what was known as a Missionary Bible Class 
for young men and women, and out of this class there 
have come numerous ministers and missionaries, who 
continue to express their appreciation of her valuable 
services as their instructor. 

Reverend and Mrs. Spencer have three daughters 
and one son : Jessie Pendleton, secretary of the Han- 
over Avenue Christian Church, and superintendent of 
the Elementary Department of the school of that 
church at Richmond, Virginia, who is a writer of 
talent, doing special work in the field of the proper 
training of children ; Howard Gale, a graduate of 
Richmond Law College and Transylvania Bible Col- 
lege ; Evelyn Holladay, a graduate nurse of the Pres- 
byterian Hospital, Chicago, who saw active service 
during the World war in France and later was sta- 
tioned at Coblenz, on the Rhine, Germany; and Julia 
Hogue, the wife of William B. Ardery, a lawyer and 
farmer of Bourbon County, Kentucky, with three sons, 
William S., Winston B., and Philip P. Under the 
preaching and teaching of Doctor and Mrs. Spencer 
thousands have been brought into the kingdom of 



90 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



Christ. They both regard the Bible, and their con- 
stant study of its teaching, as the chief secret of what- 
ever success has attended their united ministry. 

More than a thousand couples have been joined in 
the marriage covenant by Doctor Spencer in his resi- 
dence next door to the church to which he ministers. 

John Stites, since 1913 has been president of the 
Louisville Trust Company and has other official rela- 
tions with some of the leading financial and business 
concerns of the state, gained his early prominence as a 
practicing lawyer, and comes of a prominent family of 
Kentucky lawyers. The name Stites has had a digni- 
fied place in the Kentucky bar for more than a century. 

The first records of the Stites family go back to Hol- 
land, but for several generations they lived in England. 
Dr. John Stites was a follower of Oliver Cromwell, and 
with the restoration he left England and in 1658 landed 
at Plymouth, Massachusetts. The American branch of 
the family is therefore nearly three centuries old. John 
Stites' great-grandfather was a soldier of the American 
Revolution and was a physician and surgeon by profes- 
sion. The grandfather, Abraham Stites, was born at 
Elizabeth, New Jersey, October 8, 1782, became a law- 
yer, and his license to practice was signed by Governor 
DeWitt Clinton and Chancellor James Kent of New 
York. He practiced for several years in New York 
City, but early in the nineteenth century came to Ken- 
tucky and earned a high place in the early bar of the 
state. The wife of Abraham Stites was Ann Johnson. 

Their son, John Stites, father of the Louisville banker, 
was born in Georgetown, Kentucky, January 16, 1812, 
and became a highly accomplished lawyer and practiced 
for many years at Hopkinsville. He died July 10, 1896, 
at the age of eighty-four. He married Elizabeth Hunt, 
who was of English lineage, though her ancestors lived 
in Ireland before coming to the United States. 

John Stites of Louisville was born at Hopkinsville 
in Christian County, October 9, 1850, and with the ex- 
ample of his father and grandfather before him had 
no difficulty in making a choice of a profession. He 
attended school in Hopkinsville, studied law at the 
University of Louisville, graduating in 1874, and for 
twelve years was busied with the affairs of a general 
practice in that city. 

August I, 1887, he became connected with the Fidelity 
Trust Company as vice president, and later served as 
president and chairman of the board until January 7, 
191 1. At the latter date he became vice president, and 
in May, 1913, became president of the Louisville Trust 
Company, and in addition to the heavy responsibilities 
devolving upon him as head of this institution he has 
also served in recent years as president of the Eastern 
Park Land Company and the LaGrange Land Company, 
Ad Interim president of the Kentucky and Louisville 
Mutual Fire Insurance Company, and a director of the 
Louisville Railway Company, the Louisville Interurban 
Railway Company, the National Bank of Kentucky, 
Broadway Investment Company, Proctor Coal Company, 
and the Bourbon Stock Yards Company. 

Mr. Stites is one of the prominent laymen of the 
Presbyterian Church of the United States. He is treas- 
urer of the executive committee of Christian Education 
and Ministerial Relief, is director and treasurer of the 
Presbyterian Theological Seminary of Kentucky, is 
director of the Central University of Kentucky, and 
from 1908 to 191 1 served as president of the Interna- 
tional Sunday School Association. He is a sound money 
democrat, a member of the Civic League, and belongs 
to the Pendennis and Conversation clubs of Louisville. 
He is a trustee of the Louisville Free Public Library, 
was a member of the Board of Public Safety under 
Mayor Brigham, and for a number of years was a mem- 
ber of the School Board. 

On October 4, 1877, he married Mildred Ann Cheno- 
weth, of Louisville, a daughter of Dr. Henry Chenoweth. 
To their marriage were born nine children; seven of 



whom are living. The oldest, Helen C, is the wife of 
Dr. John G. Gill, and they live in the Panama Canal 
Zone. Their three children are Mildred A., John G., 
Jr., and Susan B. Gill. Mildred B. Stites is the wife 
of Joseph Gant, of Kansas City, Missouri, and is the 
mother of two children, named Elizabeth Lee and John 
S. John H. Stites, connected with the Louisville and 
Nashville Railway, married Louise Patterson, and is the 
father of Sarah Parkhill and Louise P. The fourth 
child, Susan B., died at the age of eighteen, while the 
fifth, Harry B., died at the age of twenty -eight. Eliza- 
beth H. is the wife of William M. Hannah, Louisville 
manager for the interests of the General Electric Com- 
pany, and they have a daughter, Frances. Francis B. 
Stites is in the milling supply business at Atlanta, Geor- 
gia. Ann Lenox is the wife of Dr. Charles Karraker, 
of Louisville, and their children are Charles W., Jr., 
and Ann C. The youngest of the family, James W., 
is a student in the University of Virginia. 

John Wh^liamson Price. Almost any individual can 
earn money, many save it, but those who can invest it 
wisely and conserve the interests of the community 
developing therefrom are considerably in the minority. 
Yet it requires considerably more ability to conduct large 
enterprises, upholding certain standards, safeguarding 
investments and protecting those dependent upon the 
operations of such concerns than it does to merely 
acquire money without any outside responsibility. In 
these days of heavy competition and the heavy con- 
centration of capital, there is a demand for wise finan- 
ciers that far exceeds the supply. One of these sound, 
reliable business men of Louisville, who has proven 
himself capable of every demand made upon his ener- 
gies and abilities, is John Williamson Price, first vice 
president of the Belknap Hardware & Manufacturing 
Company. 

Mr. Price was born October 4, 1854, at Lebanon, 
Tennessee, a son of John Williamson and Parthenia 
(Donoho) Price. John W. Price, the elder, was born 
in 1820, near Danville, Virginia, and for many years was 
a prominent merchant and planter at Lebanon, where 
he was held in the highest esteem by his associates. In 
his death, which occurred April 22, 1874, when he was 
fifty-four years of age, his city lost one of its honorable, 
upright and public-spirited citizens. He was a demo- 
crat in political affairs, but never cared for public office. 
His religious faith was that of the Cumberland Presby- 
terian Church. Mr. Price married Miss Parthenia 
Donoho, who was born near Murfreesboro, Tennessee, 
and died at Lebanon in 1882, at the age of sixty years. 
Of the fourteen children in the family, six sons and 
six daughters grew to maturity. 

The seventh in order of birth of his parents' children, 
John Williamson Price, the younger, secured his educa- 
tion in the private school at Lebanon, Tennessee, and his 
introduction to business methods and affairs came from 
his experience as a clerk in the hardware store of his 
father. When he had about reached his majority his 
father died, and the young man assumed ownership of 
the store, which he conducted with marked success until 
1881. In that year Mr. Price came to Louisville and 
purchased an interest in the hardware business of W. 
B. Belknap Company, then a comparatively small but 
very ambitious wholesale concern. This has developed 
into the Belknap Hardware & Manufacturing Company, 
Inc., of which Mr. Price is at this time first vice presi- 
dent, his associate officials being William Heyburn, 
president ; Harry S. Perkins, second vice president ; 
Richard 1. James, third vice president ; Joseph H. Scales, 
treasurer ; Charles W. Allen, secretary and general man- 
ager ; Frank Cassell, assistant secretary ; Wiley B. 
Bryan, assistant treasurer; D. E. Cross, comptroller; 
and Arthur D. Allen, W. C. Gibson and Luther R. 
Stein, directors. This business was founded in 1840 
and incorporated in 1880, and now maintains eleven 
warehouses, including harness factory, pipe, bolt and 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



91 



forge shop, and other buildings, covering a floor space 
of some twenty-four acres. The office of the concern 
is at No. 127 West Washington Street. 

Mr. PricQ is very heavily interested in coal lands and 
has large holdings in the mines of the Nelson Creek 
Coal Company in western Kentucky. He is a director 
in the Louisville Trust Company. Politically he main- 
tains an independent stand, and has never cared for nor 
sought public office, while his religious faith is that 
of the Presbyterian Church and he is a deacon in the 
Second Presbyterian congregation. He holds member- 
ship in the Board of Trade and belongs to the Louis- 
ville, City and Pendennis clubs. 

On December 4, 1878, Mr. Price was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Violet Baird, who was born at Hender- 
son, Kentucky, daughter of William D. and Catherine 
(Ready) Baird, both natives of Tennessee and both 
deceased. Mrs. Price is the second of three children 
born to her parents. To Mr. and Mrs. Price there have 
been born two sons and one daughter : Katherine, the 
wife of Henry B. Spencer, of Washington, D. C, presi- 
dent of the United Fruit Express Company and former 
vice president of the Southern Railway Company, who 
has three children, Violet, Louise and Saniuel ; John 
Williamson, Jr., a graduate of the medical department 
of the University of Pennsylvania, and now the leading 
surgeon of Louisville, who married Louise Bruce, who 
died leaving one son. Helm Bruce, after which Doctor 
Price married Barbara T. Atwood, daughter of L. R. 
Atwood, and has a daughter, Caroline ; and Charles B., 
a graduate of Yale University, and now buyer for the 
Belknap Hardware & Manufacturing Company, of 
Louisville, who married Florence Haldeman, daughter 
of Bruce Haldeman, for many years publisher and owner 
of the Courier Journal and Times newspaper. They 
have two children, Ann and Charles B. Price, Jr. 

Eugene R. Attkisson, a prominent member of the 
Louisville Bar, is a lawyer of fine attainments, with 
a large practice, and is also a man of broad culture 
and of the highest social standing. 

Mr. Attkisson was born in Madison County, Ten- 
nessee, October 31, 1873, son of John Rufus and Eliza- 
beth M. (Lanier) Attkisson. His grandparents came to 
Tennessee from Virginia. In the paternal line his 
English and Scotch ancestry included a number of 
ministers and lawyers. Through his mother he is 
of French and Irish stock, and that branch of the fam- 
ily included several physicians and individuals of liter- 
ary and artistic taste. In his ancestry might be found 
soldiers in the Revolutionary, Mexican and Civil wars. 

Concerning his father, who was a prominent physi- 
cian and planter, the following is copied from the 
Conferedate Veteran of Nashville : "Dr. J. R. Att- 
kisson answered the last roll call at his home in La- 
vinia, Tennessee, on December 29, 1905. He was born 
in Carroll County, January 8, 1845, and enlisted as a 
Confederate soldier in Company B, Fifty-fifth Ten- 
nessee Infantry, in July, 1861. His first service was 
at Columbus, Kentucky, and he was in the fort on the 
bluff during the battle of Belmont, Missouri. When 
Columbus was evacuated he went with his regiment 
to Island No. 10, and at the surrender of that place 
they were sent to a northern prison (Madison Wis- 
consin). After several months he was exchanged and 
was in all the fighting around Vicksburg, Port Hudson 
and Jackson, Mississippi. His regiment was made a 
part of the Army of the Tennessee at Dalton, Georgia, 
and until the 28th of July, 1864, he was in that mem- 
orable campaign of skirmishing and fighting in front 
of Atlanta, where he received a wound which ren- 
dered him unfit for field service. He was placed on 
hospital service and remained in that until the close ot 
the war. He then returned home, studied medicine, 
and was graduated from the Nashville Medical School 
in the spring of 1867. From the date of graduation 
he practiced his profession in his native town and sur- 



rounding country until his death, and was considered 
one of the best posted physicians of the state. 

"Doctor Attkisson was married to Miss Bettie Lanier 
in 1867, and his wife, two sons and three daughters 
are left. He was a charter member of Preston Smith 
Camp U. C. V. of Lavinia, of which he was a com- 
mander from its organization. He was also a prom- 
inent Mason and a consistent member of the church, 
leaving to his family a heritage of good deeds." 

Eugene R. Attkisson was reared at the old home 
at Lavinia, Tennessee, and acquired a classical and 
professional education by contact with several lead- 
ing colleges and universities. He attended Dixon 
Normal College, Vanderbilt University, and the Uni- 
versity of Tennessee, from which he received his 
Alaster of Arts degree in 1898. Mr. Attkisson holds 
his law degree from the University of Louisville, grad- 
uating in 1901, since which year he has been in active 
practice. In the meantime for seven years he was an 
instructor in Latin, Greek, German and French in 
various schools and colleges. During his professional 
career he also acted as professor of Kentucky Civil 
Code in the post-graduate course of the Jefferson 
School of Law. 

Mr. Attkisson has offices on the thirteenth floor of 
the Lincoln Bank Building. Besides his law practice 
he is a director in the Henry Vogt Machine Com- 
pany and in several mercantile corporations. He is 
a member of the Louisville, Kentucky State and Ameri- 
can Bar Associations, a member of the Board of 
Trade and Kappa Sigma fraternity, and president of 
the Louisville Alumni Association. He is affiliated 
with Lewis Lodge of Masons, King Solomon's Chap- 
ter, R. A. M., Louisville Council, R. & S. M., the 
Order of Rameses, DeMolay Commandery, K. T., the 
32d degree of Scottish Rite and Kosair Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine and St. Barnabas Conclave, Knights of 
Constantine. He is also affiliated with the Knights 
of Pythias, Knights and Ladies of Security, and the 
Woodmen of the World. He is a member of the 
Filson, Pendennis and Louisville Country clubs, is a 
Methodist, and in politics a democrat. 

Mr. Attkisson and family reside at 144S Third 
Avenue, Louisville. In 1901 he married Grace C. 
Dorney, daughter of William M. and Fannie Dorney, 
of Baltimore, Mar)4and. Their two children are Wil- 
liam Rufus and Frances Lanier Attkisson. 

Benjamin F. McClaid. Any man who can establish 
and build up a flourishing business in any line is a 
benefactor to his community, in that he has added to 
its prosperity and commercial and industrial importance, 
and proves that he is possessed of more than ordinary 
attributes. Benjamin F. McClaid. senior member of the 
firm of McClaid & Armstrong, owners of the largest 
monumental works between Louisville and Paducah, 
Kentucky, is one of the substantial and successful men 
of Hopkinsville. 

Mr. McClaid was born at Kenton, Ohio, October 21, 
1869, a son of Elias McClaid, who was born in Scot- 
land in 1828, and died at Kenton, Ohio, in 1900. He 
was brought to the United States when a boy by his 
parents, who located in Pennsylvania, and there he was 
reared, but went to Kenton, Ohio, after he had reached 
his majority, and there he was married and spent the 
remainder of his life, directing all of his efforts in the 
direction of farming. He was a democrat in his political 
faith. The Methodist Episcopal Church held his mem- 
bership, and he was a strong supporter of the local con- 
gregation. Elias McClaid married Nancy Draper, who 
was born near Kenton in Hardin County, Ohio, in 1839. 
She died near Kenton in 1874. Their children were as 
follows : Anna, who died at the age of two years ; 
Benjamin F., who was second in order of birth; Wil- 
liam F., who is a cabinet maker of Toledo. Ohio; and 
Roy, who is a farmer and resides at Paris, Ohio. 

Benjamin F. McClaid attended the rural schools of 



92 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



Hardin County until he was fifteen years old, at which 
time he started to work, and since then has been self- 
supporting. He learned the carpenter trade in Hardin 
County, and worked at it as an- apprentice for three 
years. For five terms he taught school in this same 
county, having improved himself by study, and then, 
in 1883, began working as a millwright, traveling all 
over the United States and for ten years visited every 
state in the Union. He then became a contractor and 
builder, and as such came to Kentucky, and from 1887 
until 1897, when he came to Hopkinsville, he was at 
Elkton. After coming to Hopkinsville he was foreman 
for the Forbes Manufacturing Company for six years, 
and then for ten years was city engineer. In igi2 he 
and E. H. Armstrong formed their present firm, with 
offices and yards at 509 North Main Street, which they 
own, and here they are carrying on the leading monu- 
mental business in this part of the state. Mr. McClaid 
is a democrat, and was clerk of Buck Township while 
a resident of Hardin County, but aside from that has 
not held public office. He is a member of the Baptist 
Church. A Mason, he belongs to Hopkinsville Lodge 
No. Z7< A. F. and A. M. He owns his modern resi- 
dence at 505 North Main Street, where he maintains 
a comfortable home, and also a dwelling on First Street. 
During the late war Mr. McClaid was a zealous par- 
ticipant in the local activities and subscribed to the limit 
for all of the drives and to the different bond issues. 

In 1887 he was married at Elkton, Kentucky, to Miss 
Ella B. Stinnett, a daughter of William and Sarah 
(Foqurean) Stinnett, both of whom are deceased. Mr. 
Stinnett was a farmer, operating in the vicinity of Elk- 
ton. Mr. and Mrs. McClaid have no children. 

William Thomas Woolfolk, head of the Woolfolk 
Coffee Company, Incorporated, of Lexington, is a busi- 
ness man of long and active experience in various Ken- 
tucky localities, and represents the old and prominent 
Woolfolk family of Garrard County, where his people 
were influential in molding and shaping the business 
and political affairs for a long period of years. 

Mr. Woolfolk was born in Garrard County. August 
II, 1865, son of Thomas Alexander and Mary Elizabeth 
(Tudor) Woolfolk. His mother is a native of Madison 
County and is still living, and of four children two 
survive, William T. being the oldest. 

Thomas Alexander Woolfolk was born in Cynthiana, 
Kentucky, September I, 1814, and was two years of 
age when his mother died, after which he was reared 
by his grandparents in Garrard County. His grand- 
father, Mr. Noel, had a negro boy, a slave, and the two 
being about of the same age became playmates and 
very fond of each other. Thomas A. Woolfolk acquired 
his lasting aversion to the institution of slavery because 
he had to witness the whipping of this slave boy. Con- 
sequently though of an old southern family and one 
imbued with the traditions of slaveholding, he came 
to manhood in every sense an abolitionist and in i860 
he and three other men in Garrard County cast their 
votes for Abraham Lincoln They were soon informed 
that they would be punished by the Night Riders, and 
although ready for such a visitation he never had to 
defend himself. His influence steadily extended until 
in 1864 President Lincoln carried Garrard County, and 
that county has been steadily republican ever since and 
is the only county in Kentucky of which that can be 
said. In different elections a number of the precincts 
have gone democratic, but the precinct containing the 
old home of Thomas A. Woolfolk has always cast 
enough republican votes to overcome the majority in 
other parts of the county. Thomas A. Woolfolk was 
a man of exceptional character, as these incidents prove, 
and qualified himself for public leadership. At the age 
of twenty-one he was given a horse and saddle by his 
grandfather. He sold these possessions to pay for his 
further education. He acquired most of his training 
by study at home by candle light at night. He also 



taught school, and as a man of superior education was 
often employed to write letters for the neighbors and 
make out deeds for the farms when sold. His chief 
occupation was farming, and he lived on one farm in 
Garrard County for fifty years. He was an active mem- 
ber of the Christian Church, and before he became 
affiliated with the republican party was a whig. 

William Thomas Woolfolk spent his early life on his 
father's farm in Garrard County, attended public school 
there, the Elliott Institute at Kirksville in Madison 
County, and left the farm at eighteen to become a 
teacher. He taught school three years, clerked in a gro- 
cery store at Lancaster, and in 1886 entered the general 
merchandise business for himself at Bryantsville. He 
was there about two years, then moved to Paint Lick 
and continued general merchandising until 1892, when 
he sold out and went to Winchester, where he was a 
furniture dealer and undertaker. Disposing of his in- 
terests at Winchester on February i, 1894, he moved 
to Lexington, where he has been actively identified with 
the commercial affairs for over a quarter of a century. 
For about two years he was a retail grocer, and then 
entered the wholesale grocery business associated with 
E. L. Martin under the firm name of Martin & Wool- 
folk. Subsequently selling his interests to Mr. Martin, 
he founded and carried on the Woolfolk Grocery Com- 
pany, also wholesale, but eventually preferred to do 
business along more special lines and organized the 
Woolfolk Coffee Company, Incorporated, which main- 
tains a plant and does an extensive business in the hand- 
ling of coffees, and the roasting and preparation of a 
number of well known and popular grades of coffee. To 
this business Mr. Woolfolk directs his active attention. 

He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, the 
Kiwanis Club, and fraternally is affiliated with Lexing- 
ton Lodge No. I, F. and A. M., Lexington Chapter 
No. I, R. A. M., Webb Commandery No. 2, K. T., 
Oleika Temple of the Mystic Shrine, and the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows. He and his family are 
active in the Central Christian Church, and in politics 
he is a republican, like his father. 

May 2, 1888, Mr. Woolfolk married Miss Mary 
Hogan, who was born at Bryantsville, Kentucky, a 
daughter of William J. and Margaret (Baughman) 
Hogan. Her parents were natives of Kentucky and her 
father died at the age of seventy-five. Her mother is 
still living, and of three children Mrs. Woolfolk is the 
second and one other is living. Her father was a well 
known farmer in Garrard County, and was a captain 
in the Union army during the Civil war. However, 
after the war he voted as a democrat, and was a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Church. 

Rev. Edward Garnett Batson Mann has given 
thirty-five years of consecutive service to the ministry 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in Kentucky. 
He has been pastor, presiding elder, evangelist, a prohibi- 
tion leader, has participated in many conventions of his 
church in this country and abroad and has manifested 
an apparently inexhaustible energy which has enabled 
him to sustain his power and effectiveness of service 
through increasing responsibilities every year. 

Rev. Mr. Mann is a son of Rev. Milton Mann, one 
of the great Methodist ministers of Kentucky in his 
day. Rev. Milton Mann was born in Kentucky, Novem- 
ber 28, 1828,' and died in 1903. The mother of Rev. 
E. G. B. Mann was Jennie Ricketts, who was born in 
1843 and died in 1866. 

Edward Garnett Batson Mann was born at Oddville 
in Harrison County, October 3, 1863, was educated in 
the public schools of Nicholas County, in the high school 
at Carlisle, attended the Carlisle Academy three years, 
and under Colonel Charles May took special training 
for three years. He attended Kentucky Wesleyan Col- 
lege during 1879-80. This college was then at Millers- 
burg, and its seat is now Winchester. He also gradu- 
ated at Smith's Business College at Lexington. In 1909 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



93 



was given the degree Doctor of Divinity. Rev. Mr. 
Mann joined the Kentucky Conference at the session of 
September, 1885, and his first charge was the Irvine 
Circuit in Estill County. His successive posts of duty 
as pastor or presiding elder have been : Pastor at 
Irvine, 1886-88; Vanceburg, 1888-89; Petersburg, 1889- 
90; Walton, 1890-91; Middlesboro, 1891-92; Newport, 
1892-96; Paris, 1896-1900; Nicholasville, 1900-02. He 
served his first term as presiding elder of the Mays- 
ville district in 1902-03, was then presiding elder of 
the Lexington district from 1903 to 1907, and from 1907 
to 191 1 was pastor of the First Church of Lexington. 
He then served again as presiding elder of the Mays- 
ville district from 191 1 to 1913. During his four years 
with the First Church at Lexington the beautiful stone 
church used by the congregation was erected. 

Rev. Mr. Mann was a delegate to the Interchurch 
Conference on Federation at New York in 1908, was 
a member of the Ecumenical Methodist Conference at 
Toronto, Canada, in 191 1; and was four times elected 
a delegate to the General Conference, which meets quad- 
rennially and legislates for the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. He was chosen a trustee of Kentucky 
Wesleyan College in 1899, and for many years served 
that body as president. During 1913-14 he served as 
president of the Southern Methodist Press Association. 

Mr. Mann in May, 1909, became editor of the Central 
Methodist Advocate, the official paper of the Louisville, 
Kentucky and Western Virginia Conferences. He was 
owner of the paper for a time, and besides editing it 
for eight years he, at the same time, engaged in his 
work as pastor or presiding elder. Each year in addi- 
tion he held ten evangelistic meetings, making a total of 
eighty such meetings during the eight years. These 
meetings were held in places as different as North 
Dakota and Michigan, and one as far south as Tampa, 
Florida. Those were strenuous years, requiring travel 
of between seven and ten thousand miles annually, and 
the preaching of between three hundred and fifty and 
four hundred sermons. Only a steadfast purpose, an 
abounding vitality and love of work could sustain a 
man through such tremendous exertions. 

Rev. Mr. Mann has always been active in civic and 
social reform movements, particularly in behalf of pro- 
hibition. He was the only minister in Kentucky who 
served as a member of the Democratic Forward League, 
an organization devoted to prohibition, and performing 
notably effective service in promoting the state prohibi- 
tion amendment and the national prohibition enactment. 
Rev. Mr. Mann married Catherine Friend, of Irvine, 
Kentucky, November 26, 1887. She died June 10, 1895. 
On July 12, 1901, he married her only sister, Ida May 
Friend. 



John William Gaines. In due proportion as the 
standards of living have risen so have those relating to 
the requirements for educators, and today this country 
leads the world with reference to the erudition and care- 
ful training of those who have been placed at the head 
of its colleges and universities, as well as those compos- 
ing the faculties of these same institutions. It is now 
such a generally admitted fact that the future of the 
student is determined by his training and the influence 
exerted upon him by his educators that much care is 
exercised in the selection of those to whom this training 
is to be entrusted. Mere educational prowess and de- 
grees are not deemed sufficient by the careful men com- 
posing the boards of these institutions. They insist upon 
the highest order of personal character, dependability, 
public service, and the power to win confidence and in- 
spire regard. Therefore, when a man is picked out 
from his fellows and offered the presidency of an old 
and long-established educational institution in a neigh- 
borhood noted for its learning and the high character 
of its people, an honor has been conferred upon him 
and the stamp of approval has been placed upon his 



former work. That all of this is true of John William 
Gaines, president of Bethel Women's College of Hop- 
kinsville, no one who knows him or has the privilege 
of examining into his methods will deny, and his ad- 
mirers are still more enthusiastic, and all of them are 
convinced that under his wise and experienced super- 
vision this favorite college of Kentucky is entering upon 
an era of remarkable development and progress. 

John William Gaines was born in Anderson County, 
South Carolina, June i, 1870, a son of John A. Gaines 
and grandson of Milton Gaines, a native of Virginia, 
where the Gaines had settled upon coming to America 
from Wales during the Colonial epoch of this country. 
Milton Gaines was a civil engineer, and brought the 
family into South Carolina, founding a home in Ander- 
son County, where he died. 

John A. Gaines was born in Anderson County, in 
January, 1833, and died in that county in November, 
1916, having spent his entire life there, and devoting 
himself to merchandising, in which line of endeavor 
he not only achieved a fair measure of success, but he 
also won prominence as a man of high character and 
public spirit. As a democrat he not only voted his party 
ticket, but gave careful consideration to the principles 
supported by it, just as he did to the Baptist Church, 
of which he was a consistent member. He was a zealous 
Mason and lived up to the highest conception of the 
ideals of that fraternity. With the outbreak of war 
between the two sections of the country he cast his lot 
with the south, and fought bravely and honorably for 
the "Lost Cause" throughout the period of the war, 
John A. Gaines was married to Susan Jane Cox, who 
was also born in Anderson County, South Carolina, in 
February, 1843, and she survives her husband and still 
lives in her native county. Their children were as fol- 
lows : J. T., who is a farmer and merchant, and lives 
at Marietta, Georgia; Dora, who died at the age of 
twenty years ; John William, whose name heads this 
review; Victoria, who is the widow of L. S. Dobbins, 
a farmer, and resides in Anderson County, South Caro- 
lina; Janie, who is unmarried, lives with her mother; 
Stonewall Jackson, who died at the age of seven years; 
and Lee, who is a farmer and business man of Anderson 
County. 

John William Gaines first attended the ruical schools 
of his native county, and then became a student of 
Furman University, Greenville, South Carolina, from 
which he was graduated in 1891 with the degrees of 
Bachelor of Science and Master of Modern Philosophy. 
During the subsequent year he took post-graduate work, 
specializing on mathematics, in the University of Vir- 
ginia at Charlottsville, Virginia, and for another year 
he attended the University of Chicago at Chicago, Illi- 
nois, continuing his special work in mathematics. 

In the meanwhile Mr. Gaines had entered upon his 
chosen profession, teaching during 1888 in the rural 
schools of Anderson County. He was then made prin- 
cipal of the Williamston High School at Williamston, 
South Carolina, and held that position for a year. His 
next position was that o'f principal of the public schools 
of Westminster, South Carolina, and he remained there 
for three years, leaving there to become principal of 
the Bamburg public schools at Hamburg, South Caro- 
lina. Closing two years of usefulness in that com- 
munity he went , to Welsh Neck Academy at Harts- 
ville, and for nine years remained its principal, during 
that period accomplishing some very effective work and 
leaving his impress upon the institution. He was then 
offered and accepted the position of superintendent of 
the city schools of Newnan, Georgia, and held it a year, 
when, in 1907, he was made president of Cox College, 
College Park, Georgia, and conducted its affairs for 
three fruitful years, leaving it to serve as dean of 
Shorter College at Rome, Georgia, where he remained 
until 1918. 

With the entry of this country into the great war 
Mr. Gaines felt that, although he was beyond the draft 



94 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



age, his duty called him into the service, and he joined 
the Young Men's Christian Association in March, 1918, 
and going to New York City was placed in charge of 
training "Y" secretaries for overseas duty. On January 
I, 1919, he went to Paris, France, where he continued 
his work, which was at all times arduous, for every 
secretary connected with this organization passed under 
his instruction. In the early summer of 1919 he went 
to Italy, where he continued the same line of work, not 
returning to the United States until in August, 1919. 
As soon as he was discharged he came to Hopkinsville 
to accept the presidency of Bethel Women's College, 
which had been tendered him by the Board of Trustees, 
who were anxious to secure the services of a man of his 
capabilities and distinction. 

In occupying this chair President Gaines may feel 
certain that his life of sincere endeavor is meeting with 
the reward his efforts deserve, for this is one of the 
institutions of the highest type, and the outcome of 
years of cooperation between the Baptists of Hopkins- 
ville, Bethel Assciation and the various eminent men 
and women connected with it since the initial move- 
ment in 1853. Associated with President Gaines are 
Miss M. E. Lindsay, A. B., dean; Mrs. B. F. Eager, 
A. B., principal, and a number of earnest educators in 
general and special lines, all of whom have the welfare 
of "Bethel" before them as their main object in life. 

President Gaines was reared a democrat, and when 
he came to man's estate found that his convictions were 
in accordance with his father's teachings. From boy- 
hood he has been a member of the Baptist Church, and 
he has served as a deacon. He belongs to the college 
fraternity Chi Psi, and is a member of the Masonic 
fraternity. His place of residence is at Bethel College 
on Fifteenth Street. 

In 1892 President Gaines was united in marriage at 
Westminster, South Carolina, to Miss Cora Matthewson, 
who was born at Walhalla, South Carolina, a most 
accomplished and cultured lady, a graduate of Green- 
ville College for Women, from which she received her 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. Her father, R. A. 
Matthewson, was a merchant of Westminster, South 
Carolina, but he is now deceased, and his wife has also 
passed away. President and Mrs. Gaines have three 
children, uamely: Carl Alexander, who was graduated 
from Mercer University, Macon, Georgia, with the 
degree of Bachelor of Science, took the full medical 
course at Johns Hopkins University at Baltimore, Mary- 
land, from which he was graduated with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicinje, and is now engaged in practice 
as head resident physician of Garfield Hospital, Wash- 
ington, D. C. ; Harold Matthewson, who is a student of 
the Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado; and 
Frances Marian, who is a student in the Hopkinsville 
public school. 

President Gaines is a man who demonstrates in every 
act the value of proper education and training. Fully 
realizing that a sound education strengthens the moral 
consciousness and tempers the soul "for life, he has 
always sought to awaken in his pupils a love for study 
and an appreciation of the benefits of honest applica- 
tion. From the day he opened his first school in Ander- 
son County he has been an inspiration for intellectual 
activities of the best kind, and has steadily risen from 
one post of responsibility to another, always proving 
himself able to discharge the added responsibilities. His 
work during the war was of such a character that 
justice cannot be done it in so brief an article as this, 
but the record he made will always stand to his credit 
and reflect favorably upon him as a man of high civic 
and patriotic ideals, as well as an educator and organ- 
izer of unusual parts. During his student days he 
learned to work for knowledge and hold on to what 
he learned, and he has never lost the habit, but is a 
close student to this day and a voluminous reader. He 
has the tact, courtesy, intelligence, sound judgment, the 
broader sense of community responsibility, great mental 



resourcefulness, combined with carefully trained facul- 
ties and a thorough knowledge of his work, and all 
of these characteristics, natural and acquired make him 
the right man in the right place, and one whose influence 
over plastic minds is powerful and always directed 
toward further achievement. 

Elijah H. Armstrong, junior member of the monu- 
mental firm of McClaid & Armstrong, is one of the 
reliable business men of Hopkinsville, and one who 
holds the confidence and respect of his fellow citizens. 
He was born in Christian County, eight miles north- 
west of Hopkinsville, on his father's farm, July I, 

1863, a son of Elijah Armstrong and grandson of Ben 
Armstrong, a native of South Carolina, who died in 
Christian County, Kentucky, before the birth of his 
grandson. It was he who brought the family into Ken- 
tucky from South Carolina, and he developed valuable 
agricultural interests in Christian County. He married 
Jean Brasher, who was born in South Carolina and died 
in Christian County. The Armstrongs came from Eng- 
land to South Carolina in Colonial times. 

The elder Elijah Armstrong, better known as Squire 
Armstrong, was born in Christian County in 181 1, and 
died on his farm in 1889. Always a farmer, he spent 
the latter half of his life on the farm on which his 
namesake son was born, and was the owner of 500 
acres of land at the time of his death, having been 
very successful. He was a democrat, and served as a 
magistrate for several terms. The Christian Church 
had in him a faithful and zealous member. He married 
Cinderilla C. Hamby, who was born in Christian County 
in 1819, and died on the same farm as her husband in 

1864. Their children were as follows : C. C, who died 
in Texas when seventy-six years old, having been a 
farmer and stockraiser at Abilene, that state ; Narcissa, 
who married I. A. Cook, a farmer residing six miles 
west of Hopkinsville; Carrie Ann, who married T. J. 
Owen, a farmer now deceased, died at Patonville, Texas, 
in 1910; Melissa Jane, who married John Marquess, a 
farmer, died in 1918, and her husband is also deceased, 
both of them passing away in Christian County; W. W., 
who is a farmer of Christian County ; B. P., who was 
a farmer of Christian County, died in 1912; Margaret 
A., who is the widow of Finis Renshaw, lives near 
Patonville, Texas, although her husband died in Chris- 
tian County, where he was a farmer ; Sarah A., who 
is deceased, married John Cotton, a farmer, who is also 
deceased, both of them dying in Christian County; and 
Elijah H., who was the youngest. 

Elijah H. Armstrong was reared on his father's farm, 
where he lived until he was twenty-five years of age, 
and during his youth he attended the rural schools. He 
then began farming for himself, and was so occupied 
until 1898, when he moved to Hopkinsville and served 
as chief of police for two years, and then for two years 
more was a policeman. Once more he was made chief 
of police, and so served for two years In 1904 he 
embarked in a transfer business and carried it on until 
1910, when he was appointed city jailer and held that 
position two years. In 1912 he and B. F. McClaid formed 
the firm of McClaid & Armstrong, and since then have 
conducted the monumental works at 509 North Main 
Street, the leading marble and granite works between 
Louisville and Paducah, Kentucky. The firm own tlieir 
plant. Mr. Armstrong is a democrat and served as a 
member of the City Council for four years and as 
county oil inspector for six years, and has always taken 
a deep and abiding interest in the welfare of his city. 
He belongs to the Baptist Church, and is active in it. 
Fraternally he belongs to the Modern Woodmen of 
America. He owns a modern residence at 411 North 
Main Street, which is a large, comfortable brick house. 

On April I, 1888, Mr. Armstrong was married at 
Clarksville, Tennessee, to Miss Alice V Perkins, a 
daughter of Capt. A. R. and Caroline (Renshaw) Per- 
kins, both of whom are deceased. Captain Perkins com- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



95 



manded a company in the Union Army during the war 
between the North and the South, and later on was a 
tobacco buyer, merchant and prominent business man 
of Hopkinsville, Kentucky. Mrs. Armstrong died at 
Hopkinsville September 17, 1896, having borne her hus- 
band the following children : Erma, who lives with her 
father; Garnett, who is a post office clerk at Albu- 
querque, New Mexico ; Cecil P, who is deceased ; and 
Cinderilla C, who married D. W. Ledford, a flour 
miller of Louisville, Kentucky. 

The star on the service flag of the Armstrong family 
turned to gold with the death of the gallant young offi- 
cer, Cecil P. Armstrong, while he was in the service of 
his country. He enlisted in the United States service 
in 1914, participated in the Mexican Border Campaign 
anl later was stationed at Lexington, Kentucky, where 
he died September 20, 1917. At that time he was acting 
maior, although his rank was that of second lieutenant. 
The cause of his death was appendicitis. His was deeply 
dejilored not only by his fellow officers and men, but 
by those in his old home who had taken a pride in him 
and his military service. 

William Rodes Estill is a son of William W. 
Estill, owner of the noted Elmwood Farm in Fayette 
County. Elmwood adjoins Elmhurst Farm, whose pro- 
prietor is Robert C. Estill. These farms are owned 
by brothers, long distinguished among Kentucky horse- 
men, and the farms have produced some of the most 
notable of Kentucky trotting stock. The careers of 
these men and something of what they have done to 
elevate the standards of livestock in Kentucky have 
been told elsewhere in this publication. 

Some years ago William W. Estill practically re- 
tired and turned the operation of Elmwood Farm over 
to his sons, William Rodes and J. S. Estill. The lat- 
ter son is now deceased and William R. is superintendent 
of the farm. He was born on that farm, and has had 
a life-long interest in the breeding and training of 
horses. So great an authority as John E. Madden says 
that William R. Estill is one of the best drivers of 
trotting horses who ever appeared on a track in 
Kentucky. 

Henry Harvey Fuson, principal since 1914 of the 
First District School at Covington, was born and 
reared in the shadow of the Cumberland Mountains, 
near the Cumberland Gap in Southeastern Kentucky, 
and throughout his notable career as an educational 
leader he has exhibited those admirable qualities long 
associated with the sturdy mountaineer of pure undi- 
luted American stock. 

Mr. Fuson was born, August 21, 1876, on Little 
Clear Creek in Bell County, five miles from Pineville, 
at the old homestead in the Fuson settlement. The 
family name is of French origin, but the family for 
a number of generations lived in Scotland, where the 
name was spelled Fuzon. They first settled in Vir- 
ginia and then moved over the mountains to Nash- 
ville, Tennessee, where many of the family still re- 
side. In various generations there have been law- 
yers, doctors and planters. The great-grandfather of 
the Covington educator was Thomas Fuson, who moved 
from Tennessee to Bell County, Kentucky. He came 
over the mountains as a companion of Boone. On 
the journey he was lost from his family, and being 
found by some hunters returned to his home near 
Nashville. When he came to Kentucky he settled at 
the head of Bear Creek, not far from the present Town 
of Chenoa. In his old age, while attempting to visit 
his people in. Tennessee, he was frozen to death on the 
top of Log Mountain. 

James R. Fuson, grandfather of Henry Harvey, was 
born near Nashville, in 1822, and married Lucinda 
Evans, who was born February i?, 1819, at the old 
Fuson settlement on Little Clear Creek. Their chil- 
dren were James A.; Letitia, Mrs. Elijah Smith, Wil- 



liam Lafayette, John Thomas, Beth A., Henry Jeflf and 
Eliza Jane. James A. Fuson, of this generation, was 
one of the first surveyors of Bell County, lived on 
his farm in the Fuson settlement, and the last years 
of his life were devoted to the raising of bees on an 
extensive scale. He died September 28, 1918. His 
brother, Beth A. Fuson, now a resident of Indianapolis, 
Indiana, for many years was a prominent merchant 
and in public affairs at Pineville, and is a former 
county judge of Bell County. 

John Thomas Fuson, father of Henry Harvey, was 
born in 1854, at the Fuson settlement, and married 
Sarah Jane Lee, who was born in 1856, on Big Clear 
Creek in Bell County. She was a member of the well 
known Virginia Lee family, and her grandfather, Han- 
cock Lee, was the founder of Lee's Station near 
Frankfort. Sarah Jane Lee was the fifth among the 
ten children of Philip and Mary (Bray) Lee. Her 
father died at the age of eighty-two and her mother 
at forty-five. Her brother, James Lee, was the first 
County Court clerk of Bell County when the county 
was organized in 1867, was a school teacher, su'-veyor, 
and a man of thorough education and very systematic 
and orderly in everything he did. He was a private 
in the Union army, was in the battle of Lookout 
Mountain and in Sherman's march to the sea. 

Henry Harvey Fuson is the oldest of eleven chil- 
dren. The others are: Thomas Sewell, a physician at 
Cumberland Gap, Tennessee; Cora Lucinda, who died 
of typhoid fever at the age of eighteen ; Mary Lee, 
Mrs. Willet Aimy, and she died at the birth of her 
first child, Lee Almy; Bertha Letitia, wife of D. H. 
Howard, of Harlan, Kentucky; Arthur Luther, a physi- 
cian at Cumberland Gap ; Verda Ray, living in New 
Mexico ; Van Whorton, with his father on the farm 
on Little Clear Creek; Effie, Mrs. Morris Adler, of 
Indianapolis; Maud, of Indianapolis; and Clara, teacher 
at Harlan. 

Up to the age of eighteen Henry Harvey Fuson 
lived on his father's hillside mountain farm, and as 
his strength permitted participated in the routine of 
its work while attending school. He was a pupil of 
the rural schools from 1883 to 1894, then spent one 
session in the Williamsburg Institute at Williamsburg, 
during 1895-97 attended the Pineville High School, and 
from 1897 to 1905 spent the winter and spring terms 
at Cumberland College at Williamsburg, usually teach- 
ing during the fall months. He graduated with the 
A. B. degree in 1905. Having determined to make 
education his life work, Mr. Fuson never regarded 
his own education as complete and while handling 
many important responsibilities has continued his stud- 
ies both privately and in higher institutions. The sum- 
mer of 1912 he spent in the University of Tennessee 
at Knoxville. Beginning in 1912, he attended both 
afternoon and evening sessions in the University of 
Cincinnati, and his work brought him the Bachelor of 
Science degree from that institution in 1920, and he 
has since received twelve credits leading to the Master 
of Arts degree from the same university. 

Mr. Fuson has a record of more than a quarter of 
a century as a teacher and school administrator. He 
taught in the rural schools of his native county from 
189s to 1901, was county superintendent from 1902 to 
1910, and for the following two years was superintend- 
ent of the city schools of Pineville. He was then 
principal of the district school at Covington in 1012- 
1914. After 1914 he was principal of the First Dis- 
trict School, and since 1918 has been principal of the 
First District School. 

Mr. Fuson was census enumerator of Bell County in 
1900. He has important business interests in Pine- 
ville, Kentucky, and from 1907 to 1910 was secretary- 
treasurer of the Central Coal Company, an operating 
company at Pineville. From 1911 to 1921 he has 
been secretary of the Martin Fork Coal Company, a 
leasing company at Harlan, and during 1917-18 was 



96 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



secretary, treasurer and general manager of the Fort 
Branch Coal Company at Fusonia in Perry County. 

During the last two months of the war he was a 
private in the Military Training Camps Association in 
the Division of Southern Ohio, and from 1918 until 
mustered out in 1921 he was private, corporal and ser- 
geant in Company D of the Kentucky State Guards. 
Upon being mustered out he was immediately mus- 
tered in as sergeant of the Kentucky National Guard, 
Tank Corps. 

Mr. Fuson is affiliated with Washington Council No. 
3, Junior Order United American Mechanics, Coving- 
ton Lodge No. 109, F. and A. M., a member of the 
First Baptist Church at Covington, of the Kentucky 
Folk Lore Society, the Covington Industrial Club, Cov- 
ington School Masters Club and Parents and Teachers 
Association of the First District School. 

He helped organize the County Superintendent's 
Section of the Kentucky Educational Association dur- 
ing its convention at Winchester in 1907, was elected 
in 1909 vice president of the Kentucky Educational 
Association, and has been a member of the Reading 
Circle of the association for a number of years. 

In this brief sketch it would be impossible to do 
justice to the high-minded, disinterested and capable 
record of Mr. Fuson. Some of his most interesting 
achievements were the result of his work in his home 
county. While at the head of the Pineville school 
system during 1910-12 he raised the teaching force 
from six to thirteen, doubled the school enrollment, 
and increased the building facilities to four instead 
of one, and also secured a bond issue for $30,000 for 
a new school building, which was erected after he came 
to Covington. When he was elected county superin- 
tendent in 1902 he went into the office determined that 
the schools should be conducted in the interest of the 
children and not at the will of local political factions. 
One of his first acts was to require real qualifications 
for the teachers. He revised the course of study, built 
many new schoolhouses, and was constant in his per- 
sonal supervision and interest in behalf of every school 
district. During his second term as superintendent, 
from 1906 to 1910, he established the first consolidated 
schools in the county, three in all, also the county high 
school, and was instrumental in holding the only 
quadri-county institute ever held in the state, being 
represented by Laurel, Knox, Whitley and Bell coun- 
ties. The First District School of Covington is the 
oldest school in the city, and the present building was 
erected in 1863, and is in the heart of the business 
district. As principal of this school Mr. Fuson has 
set many new standards and realized most of them in 
bringing the sthool system to a point where it compares 
favorably with the modern ideals of school manage- 
ment. He has perfected in modified form a system 
of pupil self government, has improved and broad- 
ened the course of study, and has secured the co- 
operation of a very eflfective Parents and Teachers 
Association, so that the school has come to be regarded 
as a real community interest. 

On May 25, 1906, at the Phoenix Hotel in Lexing- 
ton, Mr. Fuson and Sara Ellen Watson were united in 
marriage. Their only child, Ruth Maurine Fuson, is 
now in the fifth grade of the Covington public schools. 
Mrs. Fuson for ten years before her marriage was a 
successful teacher in Southeastern Kentucky, teaching 
schools in Pulaski and Whitley counties and in Mon- 
tana, and also had her home at Belgrade, Montana. 
Her father, John Watson, was formerly a resident 
of Somerset, Kentucky, was sheriff of Pulaski County, 
and died July 5, 1921, at the age of eighty-five years, 
at Three Forks, Montana. 

It would be difficult to find a man in Kentucky with 
a keener and more enthusiastic interest in things out- 
side of his daily routine of common life than Henry 
Harvey Fuson. He is an ardent fisherman and hunter, 
and has pursued these sports not only in the woods 



and streams of his native state, but in the woods of 
Michigan and on both coasts of Florida. He has 
found constant inspiration in the natural rugged beauty 
of Eastern Kentucky, and for years has expressed his 
observation and his sentiments in poetic form, and is 
the author of more than eighty poems, largely deal- 
ing with mountain scenery and pioneer events and per- 
sonalities. For years he has collected material bear- 
ing on the history and legends of Southern Kentucky, 
and in his scrap books of fifteen volumes, each cover- 
ing a year from 1905, he has preserved data that will 
go far toward constructing an appropriate picture of 
the historic section with which his own earlier life was 
identified. 

Milton Sanchez is a commercial genius, his record 
since coming to Lexington having fully demonstrated 
ample claims to such distinction. He is a merchandise 
broker, came here with practically no capital, and by 
his energy and remarkable knowledge of mercantile 
conditions has developed a business that aggregates 
values several times a million dollars annually. 

Mr. Sanchez was born at Donaldsonville, Louisiana, 
May 17, 1872, and was handicapped in early life by 
the death of his father when he was but a small boy. 
He is a son of Antoine and Dolores Sanchez, who 
were also natives of Donaldsonville, and both are 
now deceased. His father died at the age of thirty- 
five and his mother at forty-four. Milton was the 
second among five children, three of whom are still 
living. His father was a railway contractor, and 
helped build the Texas and Pacific Railway. He was 
a democrat in politics and a Catholic. 

Milton Sanchez had the advantages of public schools 
in his native town only until he was about twelve 
years of age and then had to go to work to help sup- 
port his widowed mother and two sisters. He clerked 
in stores, and managed to save enough from his earn- 
ings and also secure the necessary time to attend the 
Donaldsonville Business College. From the age of 
eighteen to twenty-three he was the responsible man- 
ager of a Louisiana sugar plantation, and following 
that became traveling salesman for a packing com- 
pany and was in that business until 1909. 

In 1909 Mr. Sanchez came to Lexington with only 
$35 in capital, and entered the merchandise brokerage 
business. He soon obtained recognition for himself, 
established an office and broadened his business, and 
has since built and still owns the largest general ware- 
house and storage building in Lexington at the cor- 
ner of Merino and Vine streets. This business does 
an aggregate of $3,000,000 worth annually. He has 
also been one of the organizers and is vice president 
of the Lexington Candy Manufacturing Company, or- 
ganizer and vice president of the Lexington Syrup 
Canning and Manufacturing Company, and an organ- 
izer and vice president of the Lexington Wholesale 
Drug Company. Thus he is identified in a most sub- 
stantial manner with the commercial life of Lexington 
and the state. 

Mr. Sanchez is affiliated with the Knights of Colum- 
bus, is a democrat and a Catholic. December 21, 
1897, lie married Odile Buquoi, also a native of Don- 
aldsonville, Louisiana. 

James Thomas Looney. For thirty years a large 
part of the citizenship of Lexington looked to one 
store and one location under one proprietor to supply 
their households with groceries and meats. This land- 
mark in the commercial district is at Main and 
Deweese streets, and the proprietor of the business is 
James Thomas Looney, one of the veteran merchants 
of the city. 

Mr. Looney has achieved success after a lifetime 
of effort, beginning as a boy when he was given the 
responsibility of running a railway locomotive before 
he reached his majority. He was born at Mount 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



97 



Sterling, Kentucky, June 17, 1867, son of Patrick and 
Margaret (Dorsey) Looney. His parents were both 
born in County Clare, Ireland, but were married in 
Mount Sterling, Kentucky. His father was born in 
1836 and came to this country when a young man by 
sailing ship. From New York he drifted west into 
Kentucky, and for several years worked at his trade 
as a stone mason. Later he became a contractor in 
railroad construction, and had the building of the first 
mile of railway out of Mount Sterling for the Louis- 
ville and Nashville, and also built the first mile of 
the K. & S. A. Railway, a narrow gauge line out of 
Mount Sterling. Some years later he resumed his 
business as a stone mason, and finally retired and 
spent his last years in Lexington, where he died in 
1901 at the age of sixty-five. His wife was born in 
1838 and died in 1910. They were very devout and 
sincere Catholics and the father was a democrat. They 
had a large family of eleven children, six sons and 
five daughters, and four sons and three daughters are 
still living. 

James Thomas Looney lived at Mount Sterling with 
his parents and made good use of the advantages of 
the schools in that town. The first money he earned 
was as water boy with a section crew for the E. L. & 
B. S. Railway. He was paid $6 a month. Later he 
worked in the sawmills in the mountains of Eastern 
Kentucky, and was an office boy for the K. & S. A. 
Railway at Mount Sterling. He was still only a 
youth in years when he was made a locomotive fireman 
with the K. & S. A. Railway, and served in that posi- 
tion for three years. Following that for about a 
year he conducted a restaurant at Mount Sterling, and 
then resumed work as a locomotive fireman with the 
Chesapeake and Ohio Railway, and at the age of 
twenty was promoted to locomotive engineer. For 
two years he remained in the service of the Chesa- 
peake and Ohio and resigned to come to Lexington 
and begin his long service as a grocery merchant. 
After a short time he established his store at Main 
and Deweese streets, and that has been his location 
now for thirty years. In addition to his well-managed 
and prosperous mercantile business Mr. Looney is a 
director in the Phoenix and Third National Bank, 
is president of the Mycoca Bottling Works, is a stock- 
holder in the Lexington Brewing Company, stockholder 
in the Lexington Wholesale Bakery Company, and is a 
trustee of St. Paul's Catholic Church and in politics 
a democrat. 

January 10, 1893, he married Miss Hannah Cecelia 
Houlihan. The two sons of their union are Raymond 
James and Leo Lawrence, both now associated with 
their father in the grocery business. 

Bailey Russell, cashier of the First National Bank 
of Hopkinsville, has had thirty-two years' experience 
with the uncompromising and accuracy-compelling 
methods of monetary science as revealed behind the 
counters of Kentucky institutions. As are all suc- 
cessful and reliable cashiers, he is methodical in his 
habits and practical in his ambitions. Steadiness of 
life's aim has been imparted to him by progenitors 
who braved the hardships and dangers of pioneer life 
in the state, and he himself is a product of the agri- 
cultural communities, having been born on a farm at 
Olmstead, Logan County, Kentucky, June 9, 1867, a 
son of John M. Russell. 

The Russell family is of Scotch origin, and the 
original ancestor of the family in this country settled 
at an early date in one of the states on the Atlantic 
Coast, where in 1797 was born George W. Russell, 
the grandfather of Bailey Russell. He married a 
Miss Bailey, and became the pioneer of the Russell 
family into Logan County, where he settled three 
miles southwest of Adairville and there was engaged 
in farming on a tract of about 600 acres of land until 
his death in 1880. The maternal grandfather of Mr. 



Russell, Beverly Crumbaugh, was the owner of the 
old Crumbaugh homestead, which was divided subse- 
quently among his children. He was a pioneer of 
Logan County, rounded out an honorable career, mar- 
ried a Miss Bailey, and died before the birth of his 
grandson. 

John M. Russell, father of Bailey Russell, was born 
in October, 1839, in Logan County, Kentucky, where 
he was reared and married and passed the active 
period of his life as a farmer, a vocation in which 
he achieved much success through industry and good 
management. In 1914 he retired from active pursuits 
and moved to Adairville, where his death occurred 
in May, 191 5. Mr. Russell was a man highly esteemed 
in his community, and was a stanch democrat in pol- 
itics, while his religious faith was that of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, South, of which he was an 
active and liberal supporter. He married Alice Crum- 
baugh, who was born in Logan County in 1846, and 
UM J '" ^??^.'. ^"^ *^y became the parents of three 
children: Bailey; Lillie, who is the wife of a farmer, 
C. P. Riley, residing at Olmstead; and Victoria, who 
married first James Gunn, a farmer, and after his 
death married James Pike, a railroad engineer of 
Adairville, Kentucky. For his second wife John M 
Kussell married Miss Mattie Townsend, who survives 
him as a resident of Adairville, and they had one 
daughter, Mary, the wife of S. H. Shields, an elec- 
trician of Nashville, Tennessee. 

Bailey Russell was educated in the rural schools 
ot Logan County and the South Kentucky College. 
Hopkinsville, but after spending one term in that in- 
stitution, gave up his studies at the age of twenty years 
and entered the City Bank of Hopkinsville, com- 
mencing his banking experience at the bottom of the 
nu f^r '" *"^ position of collection clerk. This he 
filled from June, 1887, until March, 1888, and in April 
^-.uH.^l^?'' yf?"" accepted a position as bookkeeper 
with the First National Bank of Hopkinsville, a con- 
cern with which he has been identified ever since. In 
1905. Mr. Russell was promoted to assistant cashier 
and in January, 1914, was made cashier of this insti- 
tution one of the strongest in the state for cities the 
size of Hopkinsville, and one which bears an excellent 
reputation in banking circles of the South and Middle 
VVest. Mr. Russell is known as a man of expert finan- 
cial ability and has the full confidence of his asso- 
ciates, who rely upon his judgment in matters of 
importance. He is treasurer of the Hopkinsville 
^uilding and Loan Association and treasurer of the 
Associated Chanties of Hopkinsville. While he re- 
tains an interest in the old home farm in Logan 
County, he makes his home at Hopkinsville, having a 
residence at 420 West Seventh Street. Mr. Russell's 
political allegiance is given to the democratic party 
and he served two years as representative of the 
Seventh Ward in the city council. He is a member 
ot the Episcopal Church, and, in addition to being 
junior warden and a vestryman, is a member of the 
Board of Church Trustees. Fraternally he is affiliated 
with Hopkinsville Lodge No. 545, E. P. O. E. He is 
a promoter of stable and conservative interests, and 
as a citizen and banker maintains standards in keep- 
ing with the best welfare of the community. During 
the World war era he took an active part in all local 
movements, and as recognition of his efforts in put- 
ting the Victory Loan "over the top" in his community 
was the recipient of a Liberty Loan medal, awarded 
by the United States Treasury Department. 

Mr. Russell was married January 28, 1903, at Hop- 
kinsville, to Miss Katherine Bachman, who was born 
at Hopkinsville. They have no children. 

Thomas Whitlock Morris, manager and treasurer 
of the Hopkinsville Water Company, is one of the 
worth-while men of Christian County, whose public- 
spirited ideas have found practical expression in his 



98 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



present business undertaking, but he has had a wide 
and varied experience which aids him in being one 
of the most useful members of his community. Mr. 
Morris was born twelve miles southwest of Hopkins- 
ville, on a farm in Christian County, June 23, 1868, 
a son of Edgar F. Morris, grandson of Augustus 
Morris, great-grandson of Eddin Norris, and a direct 
descendant of Robert Morris, an American financier 
and signer of the Declaration of Independence, born 
in Lancashire, England, January 20, 1734. Coming to 
America at an early age, he established himself as a 
merchant at Philadelphia, and became one of the very 
wealthy men of the Colonies. With the outbreak of 
the American Revolution he backed the patriot cause 
with his wealth, was elected to Congress in 1775, and 
in 1781 was appointed superintendent of finance. He 
died at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 8, 1806. Ed- 
din Morris was born in that part of Virginia now 
West Virginia, in 1790, and died on his farm in Chris- 
tian County, twelve miles from Hopkinsville, Ken- 
tucky, in 1875. He came to Christian County in 1816 
and developed large farming interests. He married 
Miss Sallie Edgar, a daughter of Capt. Thomas Edgar, 
of Virginia, and she was born in Virginia in 1790, 
and died in Christian County in 1872. Augustus Mor- 
ris was born on his father's farm in Christian County, 
and died on this same farm, when only twenty-two 
years of age. He married a Miss Johnson, of Dan- 
ville, Kentucky. It is claimed that the first of the 
Morris name in the Colonies was an orphan boy who 
came over as a stowaway, and was landed in New York 
City. He was adopted by a rich New York physician. 
Later he married and had ten sons, who scattered to 
different parts of the country. 

Edgar F. Morris, father of Thomas Whitlock Mor- 
ris, was born on the same farm as was his father and 
his own son in Christian County, in 1847, and he died 
at Hopkinsville in 1915. He was reared, educated and 
married in Christian County, where he was engaged 
in farming until 1881, but in that year moved to 
Clarksville, Tennessee, and had agricultural interests 
in its vicinity, and also carried on a teaming business, 
but in 1883 returned to Christian County and spent 
two more years on his farm. Moving then to Hop- 
kinsville, he was engaged in teaming for two years, 
and then went to work for the Louisville & Nashville 
Railroad Company as baggageman and watchman, and 
operated the pumping station for five years. He was 
then appointed lockkeeper, and for four years was 
stationed at Greencastle, fifteen miles below Bowling 
Green, on Barren River, but was then transferred to 
Rough River, and held the same position for three 
years at the lock, eight miles above Livermore, Ken- 
tucky. Once more he was transferred, and placed 
at Lock No. 5 on Green Rivr, sixteen miles from 
Bowling Green, and while tnere was stricken with 
paralysis, and his son brought him to Hopkinsville, 
where he lived for the remaining four years allotted 
to him. He was a democrat. The Southern Presby- 
terian Church held his membership, and he always 
gave a strong support to the local congregation. Dur- 
ing the war between the states he enlisted in the 
Confederate army, although not old enough to do so 
until near its close, and fought bravely for the "Lost 
Cause." He was married to Miss Bettie Northington, 
who was born in Kentucky in 1848, and died at Hop- 
kinsville in 1893. Their children were as follows : 
Eugene Augustus, who was a printer, died at New 
York City at the age of twenty-two years; Thomas 
Whitlock, whose name heads this review ; Hugh, who 
died at the age of three weeks ; Alcyone, who died 
at the age of twenty-one years; Augusta, who died at 
the age of twenty-two years. As his second wife 
Edgar F. Morris married Miss Madge Ellis, who sur- 
vives him and lives at Hopkinsville. They had one 
daughter, Eunice, who is the widow of Ed O'Brien, 
a veteran of the Spanish-American war and lock- 



keeper on the Green and Barren rivers. Mrs. O'Brien 
resides with her mother. 

Thomas Whitlock Morris attended the rural schools 
of Christian County and the graded schools of Clarks- 
ville, Tennessee. He then took an electrical and 
mechanical course with the International Correspond- 
ence School of Scranton, Pennsylvania, from which 
he received the degree of Electrical Engineer in 1910. 
Mr. Morris also had the advantage of three terms in 
the South Kentucky College. At different intervals 
between his school courses he worked on his father's 
farm, but after completing his collegiate course he 
came to Hopkinsville and pumped water for the Louis- 
ville & Nashville Railroad for several months and 
then at different intervals spent four years working 
at the printing trade with the Hopkinsville Ken- 
tuckian and the Kentucky New Era. For two years 
he was with the Clarksville Tobacco Leaf Chronicle. 
Mr. Morris then went with the Kentucky State Hos- 
pital at Hopkinsville as engineer, and held that posi- 
tion until 1897, when he was made engineer of the 
Hopkinsville Water Company. From time to time 
he was advanced, and is now manager and treasurer 
of the company. This is a private corporation and 
supplies Hopkinsville and vicinity with water. The 
officers of the company are as follows : W. T. Tandy, 
president; H. D. Fitch, of Bowling Green, vice presi- 
dent; T. W. Morris, treasurer and manager; Max B. 
Nahn, of Bowling Green, secretary. The offices are 
situated on South Main Street. A democrat in his 
political views, Mr. Morris has served on the School 
Board of Hopkinsville, and has done much to raise 
the standards of education in this locality. Early 
joining the Southern Presbyterian Church, he has 
always taken an active part in the local congregation 
and is now serving it as deacon and treasurer. Having 
long ago decided to make Hopkinsville his permanent 
home, he bought his comfortable modern residence on 
East Ninth Street. During the late war he was one 
of the zealous workers for the cause, and not only 
subscribed generously for Liberty Bonds himself, but 
solicited subscriptions from others. 

In 1895 Mr. Morris was married, in Rockcastle 
County, Kentucky, to Miss Ella B. Hurst, who was 
born in that county. Mr. and Mrs. Morris have two 
children, namely: Edith Elizabeth, who lives with 
her parents ; and Mary W., who is attending the pub- 
lic schools of Hopkinsville. Mr. Morris is a man 
who takes a deep pride in his company and his city. 
No worthy measure calculated to prove of benefit to 
his community ever lacks his hearty support, and he 
has inaugurated a number of movements of this nature 
and helped to carry them through to a successful 
completion. 

William Griffith McClintock in a business way is 
prominent in Bourbon County as member of the firm 
Caywood & McClintock, stock dealers and stock ship- 
pers, who have been responsible for the development 
of a large and important market centering in Paris 
for the handling of all classes of livestock. Mr. Mc- 
Clintock in a public way is known as the present 
efficient sheriff of Bourbon County. 

He represents an old and prominent family of this 
section of Kentucky and was born near Millersburg 
November 18, 1867, a son of Thomas and Addie (Grif- 
fith) McClintock. Thomas McClintock was born in 
1836, in the same house as his father, William Mc- 
Clintock. William McClintock and Sarah Patton were 
married in Kentucky, and they owned the old home- 
stead which later was owned by their son, Thomas.- 
Thomas McClintock spent his life in the same com- 
munity, but for twenty-five years owned and occupied 
another farm nearby. He was an extensive mule 
dealer, buying mules and driving them to various 
points in the South, and usually spent his winters at 
Atlanta. He died at Millersburg in 1914, at the age 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



99 



of seventy-eight, and his widow is still living in that 
town. They were neighbors in the same community 
before their marriage. Her father, William Griffith, 
was a stockman at Millersburg. Thomas McClintock 
and wife had eight children, seven of whom are still 
living: Lizzie, Mrs. Turner Perry, of Owensville ; 
Cora, who died in childhood ; William G. ; Miss Anna 
James, who is a prominent educator, proprietor of the 
McClintock School for Children at Hagerstown, Mary- 
land ; Bert, a livestock dealer at Paris ; Lela, wife of 
Charles R. Jones, and they live near the old home- 
stead in Nicholas County; Julian Allen, a minister of 
the Methodist Church at Richmond, Kentucky; and 
Ruth Shannon, who lives at home v/ith her mother. 

William G. McClintock acquired a good education 
in the local schools, and at the age of nineteen began 
his career as a trader and during the past thirty or 
thirty-five years has handled $1,000,000 worth of cattle, 
hogs, horses, mules and sheep. For two years he was 
in partnership with his father in business, but for the 
past ten years has been associated with Henry S. 
Caywood, of North Middletown. This firm pays out 
more than $1,000,000 annually for livestock, and their 
operations have given Paris a special distinction as a 
livestock market. They ship in many carloads for 
feeding purposes, frequently as high as 100 carloads 
of cattle. In connection with their business they 
operate a feeding farm of 100 acres near Paris. 

As the age of twenty-five Mr. McClintock, who 
from boyhood had manifested a keen interest in local 
aiiairs, was elected county assessor, and filled that 
office one term of four years. After an interim of 
eight years he was again elected to the same office 
for four years. Following that he became deputy 
sheriff under W. F. Talbott, and at the end of four 
years was elected Mr. Talbott's successor, and his 
present term as sheriff expires January i, 1922. He 
has done some effective work as a campaign manager 
in behalf of several democratic candidates. 

At the age of thirty Mr. McClintock married Ida 
Collier, of Millersburg, daughter of James and Re- 
becca Collier. Her father was a coal and grain dealer 
at Millersburg. While on a tour in Mexico, near 
Tampico, where he acquired 1,500 acres of land, he 
died, and his family still own that property. Mr. 
and Mrs. McClintock have three children : Thomas, 
Vallette, who is a student in the University of Chi- 
cago, and James, a high school boy. Mr. McClintock 
is a Presbyterian, and fraternally is affiliated with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of 
Pythias, Elks, Knights of the Maccabees and the 
Eagles. 

Patrick Henry Callahan. Stenographer at twenty, 
branch manager at twenty-five, general manager at 
thirty, president and proprietor at forty, president of 
the National Paint, Oil & Varnish Association at forty- 
five. A very plain and simple story illustrating like 
innumerable other instances of our country being still 
the "Land of Opportunity," for Mr. Callahan, regard- 
less of his success and activities, lays no claim to 
any exceptional abilities or virtues. 

In thirty years the Louisville Varnish Company has 
been developed from the smallest to one of the very 
largest in the varnish business, with branches in New 
York, Chicago and San Francisco, its output also going 
to South America and Africa and doing business in 
all parts of the world. Its most notable products are 
its famous "Fixall Finishes" for household and miscel- 
laneous work, and "Varnall," A-Varnish-For-All- 
Work, either inside or outside, to be used equally 
satisfactorily on pianos and furniture as well as on 
automobiles and railway coaches, which is the acme 
of triumph in varnish making skill. 

While a success in business of this magnitude re- 
quired close study and application, nevertheless it is 



in matters outside of business, all his friends agree, 
his greatest success has been obtained, for, after de- 
veloping a highly trained organization for his com- 
pany, he laid down his own lines as to how best to 
be a useful citizen. These plans include a methodical 
spending of half his time for business and the other 
half for matters outside his business, an enumeration 
of which activities might easily fill a volume, but a 
brief reference will show a useful career of service 
to his community and country, most of the work being 
along new lines of endeavor, all of which were his 
own initiative. 

Among the pioneers, who were employers, for a 
recognition of the human rights of employees so they 
would also have more of an interest in the manage- 
ment and profits of industry than they enjoyed with 
the old wage system, with his idea "Man was not 
made for Business, but Business was made for Man," 
Mr. Callahan in conjunction with Dr. John A. Ryan, 
author of "The Living Wage" and "Distributive Jus- 
tice," worked out the Ryan-Callahan Plan of Partner- 
ship which was put into practice in his own manufac- 
turing plant some years ago. This plan, which has 
been adopted by many progressive employers, is well 
known throughout the United States, as Mr. Callahan 
has lectured and presented papers on this most inter- 
esting subject of the day before the leading univer- 
sities, colleges, economic clubs and societies, has writ- 
ten articles, booklets and brochures galore on the 
subject, and has been asked to arbitrate and settle 
many of the important labor disputes in recent years. 
This economic industrial question and its proper solu- 
tion, which means so much to the peace and prosperity 
of our country, and Mr. Callahan's prominence in this 
field of endeavor for years, was the reason given by 
William Jennings Bryan in San Francisco in 1920 for 
presenting the name of Mr. Callahan as one of his 
nominees for the Presidency of the United States on 
the democratic ticket. 

President of the National Paint, Oil & Varnish As- 
sociation 1913-14. The association included in its 
membership all the leading members of his profession 
and business, during which time it increased in mem- 
bership and usefulness, and in a public manner Mr. 
Callahan launched the movement in all the large 
cities of the country to take the tariff out of politics, 
and his name and activities were so linked with this 
subject that in 1917, when a Tariff Commission was 
created by Congress, President Woodrow Wilson ten- 
dered the chairmanship to Mr. Callahan, which was 
regretfully declined in order to take up war work. 

Chairman Commission on Religious Prejudices 
1915-16. This was a movement by the Knights of 
Columbus, which Mr. Callahan feels was the most 
important of all his undertakings and was directed 
solely by him. Dr. Lyman Abbott, of the Outlook, 
said editorially that it was the most valuable and 
necessary commission of the day entering into a field 
and taking up a work that was so essential to the 
welfare of our country. It was altogether non-sec- 
tarian in its scope and not conducted for the benefit 
of any religion, its purpose being to improve the re- 
lationship between citizens of all creeds, the surveys, 
reports and recommendations being highly compli- 
mented by societies and citizens everywhere. 

Chairman of the Commission on War Activities, 
Knights of Columbus, 1917-18. This work probably 
brought Mr. Callahan more renown than any of his 
activities. Going to Washington and laying plans 
before the War and Navy departments, he outlined 
a plan of welfare work to meet certain delinquencies 
in the existing program and assumed personal direc- 
tion and supervision of creating and developing the 
"K. C. War Work" in this country and abroad, which 
in sixty days compared favorably with the work of 
agencies that had been going, sixty years, and inside 



100 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



of one year it was universally admitted to have sur- 
passed in service all other agencies engaged in war 
work. 

Chairman the United War Drive— Knights of Colum- 
bus Division, Fall, 1918. The largest sum of money 
ever contributed for any purpose was for the United 
War Drive, covering the requirements of the seven 
agencies engaged in welfare work, which idea and 
plan was first presented to the War Department by 
Mr. Callahan, representing the Knights of Columbus, 
and after participating in conferences in Washington 
and Chicago, undertook personally the organization of 
the State of Kentucky, making it a very great success. 

Chairman Kentucky High Cost of Living Commis- 
sion, 1919. The Department of Justice had no plans 
or suggestions ; and the Kentucky Division, headed 
by Mr. Callahan and his staff, worked out a plan of 
action entirely and altogether their own, and while 
it resulted in a great deal of embarrassment to the 
leading merchants of the city, nevertheless, through 
publicity and public opinion, every store on the prin- 
cipal streets, without exception, reduced their prices, 
and the Government and other states and cities sent 
representatives to Louisville to learn and adopt this 
plan. 

Chairman Administrative Committee of the Ken- 
tucky Democratic Organization, 1920. The state hav- 
ing gone republican by over 40,000 the previous fall, 
all leaders and factions of the party agreed upon 
Mr. Callahan to reorganize the state for the Presi- 
dential election, and in the very beginning he secured 
his friend, the late Marion E. Taylor, to be the joint 
chairman with him in a movement for this purpose. 
Mr. Taylor, who had been a large distiller, and Mr. 
Callahan a recognized leader of the dry forces, made 
such a coalition as to remedy the principal dissension, 
and this detailed work, which covered a period of 
several months, including conferences and banquets, 
was so successful that Kentucky was the only state 
in the Union to show a political reversal, and in the 
fall of 1920 went back into the democratic column. 

While Mr. Callahan has never offered for nor held 
office he has always been a staunch democrat and a 
colonel on the staff of the late Governor James B. 
McCreary, whom he accompanied for personal and 
official reasons to different parts of the country, 
notably the Baltimore Convention and the Perry Cen- 
tennial at Put-In-Bay. 

In the prohibition movement Mr. Callahan took an 
active and leading part from the very beginning in 
the State of Kentucky and in his own City of Louis- 
ville, bringing Bryan and other temperance leaders 
into the state and speaking and campaigning himself 
for many years, so that President Warren Harding 
recently sent him an appointment to represent the 
United States, at the expense of the Government, at 
an International Anti-Alcohol Congress held at 
Lausanne, Switzerland, August, 1921, which was also 
declined. 

Mr. Callahan was born at Cleveland, Ohio, October 
IS, 1866, a son of John Cormic and Mary Connolly 
Callahan. Mr. Callahan, Sr., was of the firm of 
Scheuer & Callahan, dealers and shippers of live- 
stock, but early in life, when President Abraham Lin- 
coln issued his call for volunteers at the outbreak of 
the Civil war, he was among the very first to respond, 
his name being in gold on the famous Cleveland Mon- 
ument. 

On January 20, 1891, Mr. Callahan was united in 
marriage with Miss Julia L. Cahill, who was born at 
Fremont, Ohio, and to this union there have been 
born three children, John M. and Robert E., both of 
whom are engaged in their father's business, and Edith 
Dee, who had the distinction of being one of the very 
few ladies at the Paris Peace Conference, attending 
the opening and subsequent conferences, representing 
the Catholic Press Association of the United States 



and Canada, her weekly letters reaching as high as 
2,000,000 copies a week, which correspondence has since 
been put in a bound volume called "Glimpses of the 
Peace Conference." 

Jeff D. Parrish. Though reared on a farm and en- 
gaged in farming in his early life, Jeff D. Parrish has 
devoted at least thirty years to the business and in- 
dustry of flour milling. He is now sole proprietor 
of the Clay Flouring Mill, and as miller, manager or 
owner has been identified with several milling prop- 
erties in this section of Kentucky. 

Mr. Parrish was born on a farm in Hopkins County, 
July 29, 1861, a son of Henry S. and Jane (Hester) 
Parrish. His parents were born and reared near 
Raleigh, North Carolina. His father was born June 
6, 1825, and died September 22, 1899, at the age of 
seventy-four, while the mother was born November 
21, 1831, and died August 21, 1900, at the age of 
sixty-nine. After their marriage three children, two 
sons and a daughter, were born in North Carolina. 
About seventy years ago the family came west and 
settled in Kentucky, in Hopkins County, where Henry 
S. Parrish continued his occupation as a farmer the 
rest of his life. He was always a staunch democrat 
in politics, and he and his wife were Missionary Bap- 
tists. In Kentucky they had eight sons and four 
daughters. It was a large family of children, and 
another interesting fact in that connection was the 
order of birth among sons and daughters. The first 
two children were sons and then came a daughter, 
and that order was maintained throughout. All of 
them except a son who died at the age of eleven grew 
to mature years and married. All of those that mar- 
ried except one son had children. 

JefT D. Parrish spent his early life on the home 
farm in Hopkins County, but had only limited oppor- 
tunities to secure an education, due no doubt to the 
large household and the necessity for work as soon 
as the children were old enough. He lived on the 
home farm and assisted his parents until he was 
twenty-two. 

Mr. Parrish was in the employ of W. M. Earless 
for seventeen consecutive years. Mr. Farless was a 
well-known mill owner. Mr. Parrish spent seven years 
with his mill at Hansen, and ten years at Provi- 
dence. Then for a little over a year he was in the 
employ of Justice & Wynn, flour millers at Provi- 
dence, eventually buying the interests of Mr. Wynn. 
He sold his business there and on September 23, 1914, 
moved to Clay, where he acquired an interest in the 
local flouring mill and ten months later became sole 
proprietor. The Clay Flouring Mill is a custom mill 
whose product enjoys a well-deserved reputation and 
is sold over all the surrounding country around Clay. 

Mr. Parrish has always been a hard worker and has 
led an exemplary life, free from bad habits and ex- 
pressive of good influence in behalf of every moral 
and educational institution. He is a member of the 
Missionary Baptist Church, is a democrat and is affili- 
ated with the Masonic Order and Modern Woodmen 
of America. In 1887 he married Miss Nannie Fer- 
guson. She died December 6, 1909, the mother of two 
sons, Thomas Lucien and John Arden. In 191 1 Mr. 
Parrish married Margaret Casner. His younger son, 
John Arden, was killed in 1912 while riding in an 
automobile which was struck by a train. His son, 
Thomas L., is now associated with his father in the 
milling business. 

William Ira Cook. One of the oldest and most 
substantial families in the community of Clay in Web- 
ster County is that of Cook. William Ira Cook was 
for many years identified with its mercantile affairs, 
and is now cashier of the Webster County Bank. 

He was born at Clay April 13, 1871, son of John D. 
and Emily O. (Jenkins) Cook. His father, who was 




1 




q.Wjdt-. 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



101 



born in that portion of Hopkins now Webster County, 
Kentucky, March 14, 1825, was a son of an early settler 
of Webster County who came from Tennessee. John 
D. Cook was a wagon maker by trade, followed that 
occupation and lived in Clay nearly fifty years, and 
was a quiet, unassuming, hard-working citizen who 
voted as a democrat and was faithful in his duties as 
a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. He died 
honored and respected at Clay at the age of eighty- 
seven. His wife, who is also a Missionary Baptist 
and is living at the age of seventy-eight, was born at 
Caseyville, Kentucky, a daughter of Wesley Jenkins. 
Three of her five children are still living. 

William Ira Cook has lived practically all his life 
in the town where he was born. He had a high school 
education, took the academic course at Providence, 
Kentucky, and for twelve years was successfully iden- 
tified with educational work in the local public schools. 
He began his business career as clerk in a store for 
four years, and later acquired a financial interest and 
was manager. Altogether his experience as a merchant 
at Clay covered a period of fifteen years. He was 
assistant cashier of the Webster County Bank from 
1918 to 1920, at which time he became cashier. 

Mr. Cook casts his vote as a democrat, is a Master 
Mason, is affiliated with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and is a member of the Missionary Bap- 
tist Church. In 1896 he married Miss Ida L. Smith, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sam B. Smith of Webster 
County. Five children were born to their marriage. 
The four still living are Lois D., an employe of the 
Webster County Bank; William A.; Samuel H.; and 
Carl S. 

Richard Spurr Webb, whose energies and the good 
management of whose mature career contributed many 
notable improvements to what is known as Stonely 
Farm situated on Greendale Pike three miles north of 
Lexington died August 8, 1921. Mr. Webb farmed for 
profit, but he also did his work with a view to con- 
structive permanence and to enlarge the comforts that 
are a proper proof of industry. 

He was born October 12, i860, and was a member of 
one of the old and honored families of Fayette County. 
He grew up at the homestead, attained his education 
in local schools, and except for five years spent in 
Indian Territory always lived in Fayette County and 
spent nearly all his years on the old farm. Originally 
the farm contained four hundred acres. 

The old stone residence was built by a Mr. Bell 
at least a hundred and seven years ago. The stones 
were laid in mud before mortar or cement was generally 
used. The building stands as solid today as ever, but 
in its interior comforts and arrangements, Mr. Webb 
effected many notable changes and improvements. 
He thoroughly modernized the house, installing electric 
light, hot water heat and other conveniences. An at- 
tractive feature is also an elaborate stone gateway and 
walled lane leading from the road to the house, con- 
structed during Mr. Webb's ownership and largely by 
his own labor. He was one of the successful farmers 
of Fayette County. 

Mr. Webb was the pioneer in the hemp industry in 
McGuiTey, Hardin County, Ohio. In 1910 he planted 
200 acres in hemp, and was very successful. He after- 
wards planted 600 acres every year for many years and 
made a fortune from it. He also invented an engine 
driven hemp brake that has materially reduced the 
cost of production, and his activities in the hemp in- 
dustry have been of material advantage to a large sec- 
tion of the country and have made fortunes for people 
who have followed in his footsteps. 

At the age of twenty-five Mr. Webb married Mary 
Gunn. Her father, W. A. Gunn, was one of the best 
known citizens of Lexington and a descendent of an 
old Colonial family. He was a civil engineer, an ex- 
pert in his profession, and his skill was such as to 



call his services into requisition when any highly im- 
portant work was to be done, either in land survey- 
ing or running the lines for railroad surveys. He was 
chief engineer on the survey of the Southern, now the 
Great Southern, Railroad, and continued in railroad 
work for many years. His home was always at Lex- 
ington and he surveyed many of the plats and addi- 
tions of that city. His work was a real public service, 
but he was never active in public offices. He died at 
a good old age, and his children, all living, are Fanny, 
Jennie, Clara, Mary G., William, a- mine owner at 
Middlesboro ; John, a civil engineer at Lexington ; 
and Robert. Thomas, who was a clerk in the Lexing- 
ton postoffice, died in May, 1921. 

Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Webb. Vir- 
ginia is the wife of Peyton Howard, a mechanic living 
at Lexington. Richard S. is a contractor, real estate 
man and dealer in automobiles at Lexington. Julia is 
the wife of Charles Marshall, of Akron, Ohio. John 
is continuing his education in the State University. 
Mrs. Webb takes an active part in the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church and is president of the Women's Home 
Missionary Society and superintendent of the Sunday 
school. Mr. Webb was a Presbyterian. 

Rev. John Willi.\m Porter. Among Kentucky's im- 
posing list of brilliant churchmen, Rev. John William 
Porter is distinguished as pastor and builder of vvhat is 
said to be the largest Baptist Church building in the 
world, and is head of an organization completely 
worthy of such a home. He is also prominent as 
editor of the Western Reporter, and as a preacher, 
lecturer and writer is one of the powerful influences 
in state and national affairs today. 

He was born in Fayette County, Tennessee, August 
8, 1863, a son of John Freeman and Martha Carolina 
(Tharp) Porter. His father was a native of North 
Carolina and his mother of Fayette County, Tennessee. 
His two grandparents owned 400 slaves and were 
among the wealthy citizens of the county. Col. John 
F. Porter was a prosperous planter and a man of 
unusual intelligence, while his wife was a first honor 
graduate of the Somerville Female College and an 
accomplished French scholar. Her father, B. H. 
Tharp, presented her with six slaves as a bridal pres- 
ent, and that deed of gift is still preserved by the 
family. 

John William Porter acquired a liberal education, 
attending Oxford University and the Law School of 
Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tennessee, where 
he graduated LL. B. in 1882. He began his career 
as a lawyer, and practiced with considerable success 
in Tennessee from 1882 to 1885. In 1890 he was 
ordained to the Baptist ministry, and in 1893 received 
the degree Th. G. from the Southern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary. Subsequent degrees conferred upon 
him are D. D. by Keiche College of Louisiana in 1900, 
LL. D. by Union University in Tennessee in 1913. 
During the thirty years of his active ministry Reverend 
Porter served successively in earlier years as pastor 
of the Baptist churches of Germantown and Collier- 
ville, Tennessee; of Pewee Valley, Kentucky; Mays- 
ville, Kentucky ; Newport News, Virginia, and since 
April, 1908, has been pastor of the First Baptist 
Church of Lexington. It was during his pastorate 
that the imposing edifice of this church was con- 
structed. The building is said to cover more ground 
than any Baptist building in the world. During the 
great $75,000,000 campaign recently concluded this 
church led all other churches in the state by more 
than $60,000. 

During his ministry Doctor Porter has been in- 
strumental in securing more than 10,000 additions to 
Baptist churches, and in connection with other work 
has been a leading evangelist. He is author of three 
books: "World's Debt to the Baptist," "Baptist Debt 
to the World," and "Evangelistic Sermons." He has 



102 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



preached the introductory sermon for the Southern 
Baptist Convention and has been president of the 
General Association of Baptists of Kentucky. He is 
president of the Baptist Book Concern of Louisville, 
an establishment which has more volumes in stock 
than any other denominational book house in the world. 

The Western Recorder, of which he is editor, is 
the oldest denominational paper south of the Ohio 
River and is published at Louisville. The Western 
Recorder took the initiative in the recent fight against 
the Interchurch Movement. Rev. Mr. Porter is a 
trustee of the Barberville Institute of Kentucky, the 
Hall Moody Institute of Martin, Tennessee, and of 
Georgetown College of Kentucky. He is president of 
the City Missionary Society of Lexington, a democrat, 
a Knight Templar Mason, a Knight of Pythias and an 
Odd Fellow. 

On July 21, 1891, Doctor Porter married Lillian E. 
Thomas. Her father, Capt. G. W. Thomas, was a mer- 
chant and planter of Germantown, Tennessee, for a 
long time served as mayor of that town and was 
also chairman of the Board of Deacons of the Baptist 
Church. Mrs. Porter, a woman of unusual beauty 
and of intellectual character, has been prominently 
associated with her husband in church work. She 
finished her education in the Blue Mountain Institute 
at Blue Mountain, Mississippi. To their marriage 
were born the following children : Martha Frances, 
now the wife of Mr. Morris Willis, of Lexington; 
Mary, who was married to Mr. Perry Rowe, of Lex- 
ington; John W., Jr.; Russell T. ; and Blanche Porter. 

J. Robert Kelley. The world's largest plant exclu- 
sively devoted to the manufacture of X-Ray apparatus 
for hospitals and surgical uses is at Covington — The 
Kelley-Koett Manufacturing Company. The founder of 
the business and president of the company is J. Robert 
Kelley, who some twenty odd years ago while in busi- 
ness at Boston became interested in the development 
and adaptation of X-Ray apparatus as an adjunct to 
surgery, a few years later established a small experimen- 
tal plant at Covington, and his company has since been 
instrumental in perfecting the elaborate mechanisms now 
an indispensable part of the equipment of every modern 
hospital. 

Mr. Kelley was born at Thessalia in Giles County, 
Virginia, November 17, 1871. His great-grandfather 
was a native of Dublin, Ireland, and settled early in 
life in Bland County, Virginia. The grandfather, Pres- 
ton Kelley, was born in Virginia in 1798, and spent all 
his life as a planter and slave owner in Bland County, 
where he died in 1881. He married a Miss Sublet, a 
native of Virginia, who died at Thessalia. Matthew 
W. Kelley, father of the Covington manufacturer, was 
born in Charlotte County, Virginia, in 1847, was reared 
there, was married in Montgomery County, and after 
that lived in Thessalia, where he was a farmer and 
manufacturer of wagons. He was one of the youthful 
volunteers in the Confederate army, was a private sol- 
dier for two years, participating in the battles of Chicka- 
mauga, Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge, and 
afterward was assigned to duty with the Commissary 
Department, in charge of wagon trains of supplies. He 
was a democrat, and one of his deepest interests was 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He died at 
Thessalia in 1901. His wife was Frances Turner, who 
was born at Radford in Pulaski County, Virginia, in 
1851, and died at Thessalia in 1889. She was of Scotch 
ancestry. Four of their children are still living. Thomas 
R. is a retired business man living on his estate near 
Baltimore. Rev. Charles W. Kelley was for a quarter 
of a century an active minister of the Holston Virginia 
Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 
and in later years filled the pulpits of the Centenary 
Church at Knoxville, Tennessee, and the Trinity 
Church at Chattanooga. During the World war, too 
old to enlist, he volunteered as a Y. M. C. A. secretary 



and had charge of all the Red Triangle work at Brest, 
France. Since the war he has lived on the old home- 
stead at Thessalia, Virginia. The youngest of the liv- 
ing children is Sarah Elizabeth, wife of J. W. Saylor, 
a prominent attorney at Knoxville, Tennessee. 

J. Robert Kelley had only the ordinary advantages 
of the schools of Giles County, Virginia, first attending 
the country schools and later Thessalia Academy. At 
the age of twenty he began learning telegraphy, and for 
two years served an apprenticeship in a company store 
at Bramwell, West Virginia. After that until 1895 he 
was in the retail shoe business at Huntington, West Vir- 
ginia, under the firm name of Robert Kelley & Com- 
pany. On disposing of this business he went west and 
for two and a half years was manager of a large shoe 
house at Butte, Montana. He spent about a year at 
Boston, Massachusetts, in an advisory capacity in a 
large shoe factory. 

Soon after the discovery of the X-Ray by Roentgen 
Mr. Kelley, foreseeing the great usefulness of the light 
as an adjunct in the medical and surgical field, employed 
his limited capital for experimental work, and after 
several years of not altogether encouraging experience, 
though confident of the future, he came to Covington 
and in 1902 opened a very small shop at the site of 
the .present great industry, 212 West Fourth Street. 
The business was later incorporated as the Kelley-Koett 
Manufacturing Company. Mr. Kelley and his associates 
have kept the business growing, and have invested an 
immense amount of money in experimental work and 
improvement of their devices until it is no exaggera- 
tion to say that the world now looks to the Kelley-Koett 
Company for any of the most efficient and improved types 
of machinery described under the general term of X-Ray 
apparatus. Mr. Kelly is president of the company, the 
vice president is Albert B. Koett, and the secretary- 
treasurer is G. Edward Geise. 

The nameplate of this manufacturing company at 
Covington is found on part of the equipment in many 
of the largest hospitals in the world, including that of 
the Mayo Brothers at Rochester, Minnesota. During the 
World war the Government sent a special committee 
to the Kelley-Koett plant at Covington, and the experts 
of the plant were set to work designing and elaborating 
special instruments and apparatus to meet the needs and 
specifications for war use, both in the field and in the 
base hospitals. All the X-Ray portable apparatus that 
proved such an invaluable asset to the American army 
surgeons in the trenches and in the hospitals were de- 
signed and developed at the Covington plant, the great 
cost of designing and re-arranging the facilities of the 
plant for the manufacture being borne by the company 
as a patriotic contribution. 

Mr. Kelley was also deeply interested in the success 
of the war as a patriotic citizen of Kenton County, and 
had charge of some of the drives for funds. Mr. Kelley, 
who is unmarried, is president of the Rotary Club of 
Covington, is a director in the First National Bank of 
Covington, a director in the Kentucky State Manufac- 
turers' Association, a member of the Citizens' Patriotic 
League, the Industrial Club, and Covington Lodge No. 
314 of the Elks. He is a prominent Mason, being affil- 
iated with Covington Lodge No. 109, F. and A. M., 
Covington Chapter No 35, R. A M., Covington Com- 
mandery No. 7, K. T., Indra Consistory No. 2 of the 
Scottish Rite, and Kosair Temple of the Mystic Shrine 
at Louisville. In politics he is independent. 

Hon. James Breathitt, an eminent attorney of Hop- 
kinsville, is one of the most distinguished men Chris- 
tian County has ever produced, and the county and city 
are proud of him and what he has accomplished. As 
attorney general of the state of Kentucky he wisely 
administered the affairs of his high office, and has in 
many other particulars lived up to the finest conceptions 
of his profession and the ideals of American manhood. 
His birth occurred at Hopkinsville, September 4, 1852, 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



103 



and he comes of a long line of distinguished ancestry 
which is traced back during the Colonial period of this 
country's history to representatives of the name who 
located in Virginia, coming here from Scotland. 

The paternal grandfather was James Breathitt, who 
was born in Logan County, Kentucky, to which the fam- 
ily had migrated at an early date from Virginia, and 
he died at Hopkinsville in the early '30s. Not only was 
he one of the early settlers of the city, but he was a 
distinguished lawyer and was commonwealth attorney 
for this section of Western Kentucky. His brother, 
John Breathitt, was elected governor of Kentucky in 
1832, and died at Frankfort, Kentucky, while in office. 
His son, John W. Breathitt, was born at Hopkinsville, 
and he died in this city in 1912, and he was the father 
of Hon. James Breathitt. 

John W. Breathitt was reared, educated and married 
at Hopkinsville, where the whole of his useful life was 
spent. During the early part of his life he was a planter 
and slaveholder, but later on he was a dry-goods mer- 
chant. During the war between the two sections of 
the country he espoused the side of the North, and 
served in the Third Kentucky Cavalry, in the Union 
army, with the rank of major. His period of service 
extended over the entire war, and among other engage- 
ments he participated in the battles of Nashville and 
Murfreesboro, and in all of the important ones in General 
Sherman's March to the Sea. After the close of the 
war he returned to Hopkinsville, and, being elected 
county clerk, held that office through successive elections 
for twenty years. For eight years succeeding his 
termination of office as county clerk he was county 
judge of Christian County. Other honors were accorded 
him, for he served as postmaster of Hopkinsville under 
Presidents Harrison and McKinley, and died while in 
office. All of his mature years he was a stalwart repub- 
lican and one of the leaders of his party in this part 
of the state. Early uniting with the Baptist Church, 
he continued one of the earnest and conscientious mem- 
bers of the local congregation at Hopkinsville until his 
death. A Mason, he belonged to Hopkinsville Lodge 
No. 37, F. & A. M. As a member of the Grand Army 
of the Republic, he had opportunity to meet his old 
comrades in arms both locally and at the annual encamp- 
ments. In fact he was a very prominent citizen, and 
one of the most popular men in Christian County, as was 
evidenced that whenever his name appeared on the 
republican ticket for any office he received the support 
of republicans and democrats alike, for all knew that 
no better man could be found for the office in question. 
He married Miss Katherine Webber, who was born 
at Hopkinsville in 1831, and died at this city in 1910. 
She was a daughter of Dr. Augustine Webber, one of 
the earliest settlers of Hopkinsville, and a very promi- 
nent physician and surgeon of Christian County. Mr. 
and Mrs. John W. Breathitt had the following children 
born to them : Payton S., who is a retired farmer of 
Hopkinsville ; Augustine, who is living retired at Hop- 
kinsville, was at one time deputy postmaster and also 
served as deputy county clerk ; Harvie W., who was an 
attorney and operator of a real-estate and abstract busi- 
ness at Hopkinsville, died at this city in 1906 ; Hon. 
James Breathitt, who was the fourth in order of birth ; 
Elizabeth S., who is unmarried, and lives at Hopkins- 
ville ; Caroline, who married Robert S. Green, a travel- 
ing salesman, lives at Hopkinsville ; John W., who was 
a merchant, died at Hopkinsville in 1895 ; and Katherine, 
who married Michael Griffin, a tobaccoist, of Murray, 
Kentucky. 

James Breathitt was reared in his native city and 
attended its schools until he was fourteen years of age, 
at which time he left school and for the subsequent 
three years worked on a farm. He was then appointed 
deputy sheriff of Christian County, and served as such 
for a year. His father then made him a deputy county 
clerk, and for several years he made himself useful 
to him, the elder man then serving as county clerk. By 



this time the young man began to realize the advantage 
of proper training and decided to study law. With this 
end in view he attended Cumberland University, and 
was graduated from its law department in June, 1877, 
with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. Immediately 
thereafter he returned to his old home and established 
himself in a general civil and criminal law practice. He 
is a man of commanding intelligence and forcefulness, 
and is a natural leader of men. His fellow-citizens 
early recognized this and elected him attorney for the 
City of Hopkinsville soon after his admission to the 
bar, and he served very capably for one term. In 1881 
he was elected to represent his district in the Lower 
House of the State Assembly, and served in the ses- 
sions of 1881 and 1882 and, being re-elected, served in 
those of 1885 and 1886. A man to whom increasing 
responsiblities come as a matter of course, and one who 
has always proven equal to every demand made upon 
him, no one was surprised when he was elected judge 
of the Third Judicial District to fill an unexpired term 
of two years, in 1897 and 1898, nor at his election to the 
office of county judge of Christian County in 1908 for 
a term of four years. In both offices he fully main- 
tained the dignity of the office, and rendered some very 
remarkable decisions which proved his knowledge of 
the law and his understanding of its interpretation. In 
1906 Mr. Breathitt was elected attorney general of 
Kentucky, and served with distinguished capability for 
four years, upon the expiration of his term of office 
returning to Hopkinsville and resuming his practice. 
His offices are located in the Bohn Building, opposite 
the Court House, at 2J/2 East Sixth Street. 

Mr. Breathitt is a consistent member of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church. During the late war he was one 
of the men of Christian County who exerted themselves 
to the utmost to assist in all of the local war work. 
He subscribed to all of the drives for war organizations 
and bonds to the limit of his resources. He owns a 
modern residence on South Virginia Street, which is 
one of the most attractive ones in the city. 

In 1889 Mr. Breathitt was united in marriage with 
Miss Olivia Thompson, of Hopkinsville, a daughter of 
G. V. and Olivia (Ellis) Thompson, both of whom 
are deceased. Mr. Thompson was a tobaccoist and a 
prominent man of Hopkinsville. Mrs. Breathitt was 
graduated from the South Kentucky College at Hop- 
kinsville. Mr. and Mrs. Breathitt became the parents 
of the following children: James, who attended Centre 
College of Danville, Kentucky, is an attorney and in 
partnership with his father ; John W., who has a tobacco 
business at Murray, Kentucky, resides at Hopkinsville ; 
Elizabeth O., who married Henry Stites, a railroad man, 
resides at Augusta, Georgia ; Edward T., who works 
with the National Harvester Company, lives at Evans- 
ville, Indiana; Louise, who is at home; Julia A., who is 
attending Georgetown College at Georgetown, Kentucky; 
and Robert Ewing, who is attending the Naval Training 
Camp at the Great Lakes, Chicago, Illinois. 

James Breathitt, Junior, volunteered in the naval avia- 
tion corps, and was trained in the aviation field at 
Boston, Massachusetts. The second son, John W. 
Breathitt, volunteered in the field aviation corps and was 
trained at Brooks Field, Texas, and commissioned a 
lieutenant. Edward T. Breathitt volunteered in the 
United States Navy, and was on the U. S. S. "Mon- 
golia." Few families have so remarkable a war record, 
and it is pleasant to realize that while all of the sons 
enlisted, all of them came out of the war uninjured. 

Mr. Breathitt is a man who has risen to great heights 
in his profession by his profound penetration, his power 
of analysis, the comprehensive grasp and strength of 
his understanding, and the firmness, frankness and in- 
tegrity of his character. Both as an attorney in private 
practice and a public official of high standing he has 
reflected honor on his profession, his community and his 
own character and knowledge, and he has few equals 
and no superiors. 



104 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



George Clifton Long. It is difficult for the biog- 
rapher to sketch in the brief summary review to which 
he is confined the full activities of the life of a man 
who has by reason of his enterprise and good citizen- 
ship impressed his personality upon a certain community. 
An active career, marked by constant advancement, 
presents an interesting study ; yet, to enumerate the 
various and varied steps by which the subject has arisen 
to the high position which is now his, to name in detail 
the minutiae of accomplishments which in his forward 
march have gathered and formulated finally into the 
complete and satisfactory whole, were to constitute a 
record which would far exceed the limits necessarily 
assigned to a work of this nature. The writer, there- 
fore, is called upon to restrict himself to noting only 
the salient points of a direct bearing. The career of 
George Clifton Long has been a long and honorable 
one at Hopkinsville and includes thirty-one years of 
faithful service to the citizens of this community in the 
responsible position of president of the First National 
Bank. 

Mr. Long was born while his mother was visiting 
at New Orleans, Louisiana, May 21, 1846, and is a son 
of Ga-briel Brown and Martha Elizabeth (Thomson) 
Long. His paternal grandfather, Gabriel Long, was 
born at Culpeper Court House, Culpeper County, Vir- 
ginia, and about 1808 came to Christian County, where 
he became a large owner of land, the present City of 
Hopkinsville occupying a part of the site of his farm. 
Here he engaged in agricultural pursuits during the 
remainder of his life and died prior to the birth of his 
grandson. He was married in Virginia to Lucy 
Slaughter, who was born at Culpeper Court House and 
died at Hopkinsville. 

Gabriel Brown Long was born in 1804, in Culpeper 
County, Virginia, and was a small child when brought 
by his parents to the locality of Hopkinsville, where he 
was reared, educated and married. On reaching his 
majority he adopted farming as his life work, and in 
this continued to be engaged during the remainder 
of his life, his death occurring in 1874. He was a 
republican in politics and fraternally a Mason, and 
he was a life-long and active supporter of the Chris- 
tian Church and held an official position therein at the 
time of his demise. He married Miss Martha Elizabeth 
Thomson, daughter of John Thomson, who was born 
at Georgetown, Kentucky, and died at Hopkinsville. He 
was a pioneer of Christian County and land holder in the 
southern part of this county. After many years of 
successful participation in farming he retired from 
active pursuits and settled at Hopkinsville, where he 
died. Ten children were born to Gabriel B. and Martha 
E. Long, of jyhom were : Gabriel B., Jr., who died in 
childhood at Hopkinsville; Lucy, who also died when 
a child ; Nannie, who died aged sixty-five years at 
Houston, Texas, as the widow of V. W. Crabb, a farmer 
and merchant who died at Hopkinsville ; Fannie, who 
died at Hopkinsville, as the wife of the late E. L. 
Campbell, a former farmer ; Kate, deceased, who was 
the wife of the late Dr. James A. Young, a former 
homeopathic physician of Hopkinsville; George Clifton; 
E. B., former president of the City Bank and Trust 
Company of Hopkinsville, who died at the age of sixty- 
eight years; Alexander, who died at Hopkinsville as 
a young man, when he accidentally shot himself; Smith, 
who met the same fate as his brother Alexander, dying 
in the same manner when still a young man ; and 
Thomas W., former cashier of the First National Bank 
of Hopkinsville, who died in igi6. 

George Clifton Long attended the rural schools of 
his native community, but received a large part of his 
educational training under the instruction of his mother, 
a splendid woman of scholarly attainments. Until he was 
twenty years of age he remained on the home farm, 
then becoming a clerk in a dry goods store at Hopkins- 
ville, where he received his introduction to business 
methods, where he remained for two years. For a 



short time at this period he served as deputy county 
clerk of Christian County, and was then made chief 
clerk in the internal revenue office, under James A. Wal- 
lace, internal revenue collector of the Second District. 
In 1869 Mr. Long entered the Bank of Hopkinsville as 
bookkeeper, and subsequently was advanced to assistant 
cashier, a position which he retained until 1874. He 
then embarked in the tobacco warehouse business, with 
which he was identified four years, and in 1882 assisted 
in the organization of the City Bank and Trust Com- 
pany, of which he became cashier, a position which he 
held until 1887. For something more than a year he 
was again engaged in the tobacco warehouse business, 
and in 1889 accepted the appointment as president of 
the First National Bank of Hopkinsville, which had been 
established the year previous. Mr. Long has remained 
as president of this institution to the present time, his 
fellow officials being : C. F. Jarrett, vice president ; 
Ed. L. Weathers, vice president ; Bailey Russell, 
cashier ; and Guy Starling and Robert L. Gaines, 
assistant cashiers. The capital of the bank is $100,000, 
surplus $85,000, and deposits, $1,100,000. Its banking 
house is situated on the corner of Main and Ninth 
streets. This institution has an excellent reputation in 
banking circles, a standing that has been built up 
under Mr. Long's administration and careful guidance 
and carefully guarded by him. He has other connec- 
tions and is president of the Hopkinsville Building and 
Loan Association, a position which he has held for a 
number of years, and is a stockholder in the Hopkins- 
ville Realty Company. The First National Bank was 
the first at Hopkinsville to start a drive during the 
World war, and throughout that period Mr. Long ex- 
cited himself to the limit as president of the institu- 
tion and in his private capacity as a citizen to further 
the movements inaugurated by the Government for the 
raising of funds to assist the cause of American arms. 
Mr. Long's political allegiance is with the republican 
party, although he has not been a seeker for personal 
preference. He and the members of his family belong 
to the Christian Church, in which he is a trustee and 
elder. He owns a modern residence at 1402 South 
Virginia Street, a comfortable and commodious home 
where the many friends of Mr. Long and his wife 
always receive a gracious welcome. 

In 1873, at Petersburg, Virginia, Mr. Long was 
united in marriage with Miss Sarah Rowlett, daughter 
of Thomas and Amanda (Abernathy) Rowlett, both 
deceased, Mr. Rowlett having been formerly a com- 
mission merchant and farmer at Petersburg. Mrs. Long 
received an advanced education in her youth and is a 
woman of numerous accomplishments. Five children 
have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Long: Elizabeth, who 
died in 1906, at Hopkinsville, as the wife of Dr. F. 
Manning Brown, a specialist in diseases of the eye, 
ear, nose and throat, in which he has gained something 
more than a local reputation; Henrietta, the wife of 
Dr. C. H. Tandy, a practicing dentist of Hopkinsville; 
Nannie, the wife of R. E. Coates, a druggist of Hop- 
kinsville; George C, Jr., secretary of the Phoenix 
Insurance Company, of Hartford, Connecticut, and a 
resident of that city; and Katherine, the wife of S. P. 
White, an attorney of Hopkinsville. 

Rev. Aloysius George Meyering. One of the schol- 
arly divines of Daviess County, Rev. Aloysius George 
Meyering, pastor of Saint Anthony's Catholic Church 
of Browns Valley, Daviess County, was born at Ro- 
chester, New York, August 28, 1871, a son of John 
and Catherine (Moeller) Meyering. His parents were 
natives of Germany. Reared in his native citv. Father 
Meyering received his literary education in Saint An- 
drew's Seminary of Rochester and his theological and 
philosophical training at Saint Bernard's Seminary. 
On June 11, 1808, he was ordained a priest by Bishop 
McQiiaid. Later he took a post graduate course at 
the Royal Imperial University of Innsbruck, Tyrol. 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



105 



Returning to the United States, Reverend Meyering 
came to Louisville, Kentucky, and was placed in charge 
of the missions at Irvington and Brandenburg, Ken- 
tucky, by the bishop of the diocese. In the fall of 
1902 he was made resident pastor of Saint Anthony's 
Church of Browns Valley, and in addition he attends 
the Saint Charles Church at Livermore and the Saint 
Joseph's Church at Central City, Kentucky. 

While it was a mission Saint Anthony's Church was 
attended by Revs. Fitzgerald and McConnel of Owens- 
boro, and they said mass and preached in homes un- 
til Reverend Meyering came here. In 1903, under 
the administration of Father Meyering, the old Saint 
Martin's Church house was removed to. the present site 
at Browns Valley, and reconstructed to meet the re- 
quirements of the parish. This edifice was enlarged in 
1910. The land on which it stands was acquired in 
1902. In 1903 a rectory was built, and was occupied 
January I, 1904. In 1913 Father Meyering established 
a parochial school with thirty-six pupils, and during 
the succeeding seven years this membership has been 
increased to 102 pupils. The modern two-story and 
basement frame building serves both as a school struc- 
ture and a home for the five sisters who are the 
teachers of the school. 

Reverend Meyering is a thorough-going priest, pro- 
gressive and popular, not only with his own people, but 
with all classes as well. At Central City the Saint 
Joseph congregation was but a mission when he began 
his attendance there, but now there is a fine church 
edifice, which is thoroughly ecclesiastical and of Eng- 
lish gothic style in construction. His work at Browns 
Valley, Central City and Livermore has resulted in 
gratifying results, having a school with three sisters 
at Livermore in charge, and his labors have been so 
increased that an assistant pastor is much needed. 

CoL. Andrew Cow.a.n was a resident of Louisville 
over half a century, locating in that city and be- 
ginning his business career soon after the Civil war, 
in which he had served with the highest distinction 
in all the ranks from private to colonel. The city of 
Louisville is permanently indebted to him for the rare 
constructive spirit which he exemplified. He was pri- 
marily responsible for the development of an adequate 
park system in the city, and his time and abilities 
were generously bestowed in various other lines of 
public spirit. As a business man he gave Louisville 
prominence as one of the great leather manufacturing 
centers of the country, and built up a business which 
is still continued by his son. 

Col. Andrew Cowan was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, 
September 29, 1841, and died at his home in Louis- 
ville August 23, 1919, at the age of seventy-eight. 
In 1848 his parents, William S. and Margaret Isa- 
bella (Campbell) Cowan, came to the United States 
and located at Auburn, New York, where he grew up 
and acquired his early education. He was in college 
at Aladison, now Colgate University, when the storm 
of civil war broke. He was the first student of that 
institution to respond to the call for volunteers issued 
by President Lincoln in 1861. The following day he 
enlisted as a private in what became Company B of the 
Nineteenth New York Infantry, mustered into serv- 
ice May 23, 1861. With this command he was on 
duty at Washington and in Virginia until September. 
He was then assigned to assist in raising the first New 
York Independent Battery, and was commissioned 
senior first lieutenant of the organization November 
23, 1861. This battery was at first in Gen. W. F. 
Smith's Division of the Fourth Corps Army of the 
Potomac, and subsequently the division became the 
Second Division of the Sixth Corps, and served as 
such until the end of the war. In April, 1862, he 
was promoted to captain, to rank from January of 
that year, and was the active commander of the bat- 
tery until December, 1864, when he was assigned to 



command the Artillery Brigade of the 6th Corps. For 
courage and gallantry at the battle of the Wilderness 
he was brevetted major and became commander of 
the Artillery Brigade following the battle of Cedar 
Creek. In the campaign preceding the surrender of 
Lee's army at Appomattox he was brevetted lieutenant 
colonel. He and his battery participated in all the 
important battles of the Army of the Potomac. He 
was severely wounded at Opequan Creek, near Win- 
chester, and at Gettysburg his battery was stationed 
in the center of Cemetery Ridge when Longstreet's great 
charge took place on the third day. The last engagement 
in which the battle participated was at Sailor's Creek, 
Virginia, three days before the surrender at Appo- 
mattox. 

After a continuous service of more than four years 
Colonel Cowan was mustered out June 23, 1865. In 
September, 1895, at the reunion of the Grand Army 
of the Republic at Louisville, Colonel Cowan was pre- 
sented by the surviving officers and soldiers of the 
battery with a handsome Sixth Corps Artillery Brigade 
badge, inscribed with his titles from private to Chief 
of Artillery Sixth Corps. 

Following a brief residence at Indianapolis Colonel 
Cowan came to Louisville July i, 1886, and with 
James E. Mooney and Charles H. Mantle established 
the firm of Mooney, Mantle & Cowan, wholesale deal- 
ers in leather, railway and mill supplies. Subsequently 
the business was reorganized as Andrew Cowan & 
Company, manufacturers and dealers in leather and 
leather belting, jobbers of railway and mill supplies, 
saddlery, hardware and automobile supplies, this being 
one of the largest firms of this kind in the middle 
west. Colonel Cowan remained the active head of this 
business until his death. He was also president of the 
National Oak Leather Company of Louisville, and vice 
president of the Louisville Leather Company, both 
leading industries of Louisville, and was a director of 
the National Bank of Commerce and the Fidelity and 
Columbia Trust Company. 

As a leader among local citizens in the matter of 
the establishment of a park system Colonel Cowan 
first presented his views before the Salmagundi Club. 
He was a member of the committee of that club 
to explain the plans to the Commercial Club, and sub- 
sequently did much of the work necessary to secure 
the approval of the Legislature to the Park Act. 
He was one of the first elected park commissioners, 
being chosen on a non-partisan ticket for three years. 
This commission began its work in 1891, purchasing 
the park lands and entrusting their development to the 
great landscape architect Frederic Law Olmstead. Col- 
onel Cowan was defeated for reelection as an inde- 
pendent candidate, but soon afterward was chosen to 
fill a vacancy on the Park Board and remained one 
of its valuable members until 1895. In 1907 he was 
again elected a member of the board on the Fusion 
ticket, and served as president of the board until he 
removed his residence beyond the city limits. 

Colonel Cowan also became deeply interested in the 
subject of industrial training as a feature of public 
school education. He brought this subject to the at- 
tention of the Conversation Club of Louisville, and sub- 
sequently used his influence as a member of the club 
committee and as a private citizen to secure the co- 
operation and action of the School Board. The plan 
was first tested with one class in the Male High School, 
and out of the movement came the Manual Training 
High School Building, donated to the city through 
the generosity of Mr. A. V. duPont. 

One of the strongest claims of philanthropy upon 
his time and means was the education of the blind. 
In 1897 he became a trustee of the American Printing 
House for the Blind at Louisville, an institution print- 
ing the text books used in all state schools for the 
blind, and was president of the printing house from 
1906 to 1918. He also served as president of the 



m 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



Kentucky Institution for the Education of the Blind 
from i8g6' to igoo, and again from 1908 to 1912. 
He served as a charter member and counselor of the 
Associated Charities of Louisville, trustee of the 
Louisville Free Kindergarten Association, the Business 
Woman's Club and other organizations of a similar 
nature. Colonel Cowan was an active republican, and 
was a delegate to the National Republican Convention 
at Chicago in 1908. He was a Baptist, being a member 
of the Broadway Church at Louisville. He was a mem- 
ber of the Grand Army of the Republic, served as 
president of the Society of the Army of the Potomac 
from 191 1 to 1916, was commander of the Ohio Com- 
mandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion 
from 1914 to 1916, and its junior vice commander 
in chief from 1915 to 1918, and was an honorary .mem- 
ber of the Kentucky Orphans Brigade. He was a life 
member of the American Citizens Association and at 
Louisville was active in the Pendennis, Salmagundi, 
Conversation and Filson clubs. 

On February 23, 1864, Colonel Cowan married Mary 
E. Adsit, daughter of Rev. Samuel Adsit, of Palmyra, 
New York. She died in September, 1867, leaving one 
son, Albert Andrew Cowan, who died April 4, 1917. He 
was for many years a member of the firm Andrew 
Cowan & Company. On January 15, 1876, Colonel 
Cowan married Anna L. Gilbert, of Utica, New York, 
a daughter of Elisha Morgan Gilbert, and by this 
union one son was born, Gilbert S. Cowan, of whom 
further mention is made. Mrs. Cowan still survives. 

Gilbert S. Cowan, a son of the late Col. Andrew 
Cowan and his wife, Anna L. (Gilbert) Cowan, was 
for many years actively associated with his father in 
business at Louisville, and since the death of his 
father has been president of Andrew Cowan & 
Company. 

He was born at Louisville October 24, 1876, and had 
every advantage of early training. He graduated from 
Yale University in 1898, and at once took an active 
place in the firm of Andrew Cowan & Company. He 
became secretary and treasurer of the National Oak 
Leather Company, filling that office for about fifteen 
years in addition to his other duties with Andrew 
Cowan & Company. He was vice president of the lat- 
ter, and on the death of his father in August, 1919, 
succeeded to the presidency. 

The son of a distinguished soldier, he was eager 
to do his part in the World war, and on June 12, 
1918, was commissioned a captain of the Quartermas- 
ter's Corps, and served until discharged January 31, 
igig. He is a memer of the Loyal Legion, the Amer- 
ican Legion and the Military Order of Foreign Wars. 
Mr. Cowan is a republican, and belongs to the Pen- 
dennis, Country and River Valley clubs. 

On June 5, 1901, he married Miss Mary Embry 
Curd, a native of Louisville and a daughter of James 
P. and Margaret (Swearingen) Curd. Mr. and Mrs. 
Cowan have two children, Gilbert S., Jr., and Embry S. 

Robert Cannon Judge. The most capable, success- 
ful and prominent men are not always those who start 
out in life with the ambition to achieve something 
especially great and famous, but oftentimes are the 
men who at the outset place due valuation upon honor, 
integrity and determination. Possessing these qual- 
ities as a capital, Robert Cannon Judge entered upon 
his business career when seventeen years of age. 
and during the course of years has won for himself 
a recognized position in the commercial world of Louis- 
ville, where he is vice president of the Peaslee-Gaul- 
bert Company. 

Mr. Judge was born at Louisville, January I, 1861, 
a son of Theodore and Laura C. (Cannon) Judge. His 
father, who was born at Frankfort, Kentucky, was a 
steamboat owner and a man well known in his day, 
but died before his career had fairly started, in 1862, 



while his mother, a native of Louisville, born in 1840, 
died in 1888. There were two children : Robert Can- 
non and Laura, the latter of whom died in infancy. 
The parents were members of the Episcopal Church. 
Robert Cannon Judge was only two years of age 
at the time of his father's death, and his boyhood 
knew much of hard work and struggle. He acquired 
his education by attendance at the public school, and 
when seventeen years of age secured a clerical posi- 
tion in the offices of the Franklin Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, a concern with which he was connected for about 
three years. He then entered the office of the Peaslee- 
Gaulbert Company, where his advancement was rapid. 
Starting as an office clerk, he was advanced to as- 
sistant bookkeeper and later to city salesman, from 
which latter position it was but a step to a traveling 
salesmanship, and for about twenty years he was one 
of the best known paint representatives on the road 
in the South. When he retired from traveling he 
took the position of secretary of the Louisville Lead 
and Color Company, which is a subsidiary concern of 
the Peaslee-Gaulbert Company, of which later concern 
Mr. Judge is now vice president. This company was 
established in 1867 by Charles Peaslee and George 
and J. W. Gaulbert, and deals in paints, oils, varnishes, 
brushes, window and plate glass, bottles, corks, incan- 
descent electric lamps, electric glassware, lamps, chim- 
neys, table glassware, fruit jars and rubber-fixt 
roofing. 

Mr. Judge is a director in the First National Bank 
and the Kentucky Title, Savings Bank and Trust 
Company. He never measures anything by the inch 
rule of self, but seeks to gauge all things by that 
expression of public opinion which has its founda- 
tion in the leadership of men and master minds. He 
claims no part in the development of the city, yet the 
extent and importance of his business interests have 
made him prominent in various circles of Louisville. 
Fraternally he is affiliated with the Elks and the 
Masons, and he belongs to DeMolay Commandery, 
K. T. It has been truly said, "Success is a relative 
term. It is not synonymous with money getting or 
knowledge getting. It means rather the result one 
attains by living a wholesome, full life. It is the at- 
tainment of right endeavor." Considered by that 
standard Mr. Judge is certainly a successful man. 

He married April 30, i88g. Miss Lucy Gray Rogers, 
daughter of Dr. Coleman Rogers, a well-known Louis- 
ville physician and surgeon of an earlier day. She 
died without issue in August, 1891. On December 22, 
i8g6, occurred his union with the present Mrs. Judge, 
formerly Miss Frances Bates Newman. 

Enoch Grehan. After many years of practical 
service in the ranks of journalism, with an experience 
ranging from reporter to managing editor, Enoch 
Grehan was called in 1914 to establish the Depart- 
ment of Journalism at the University of Kentucky, 
and has been at the head of that department ever 
since. 

His father was a scholar in his day, the late Ber- 
nard Newton Grehan, who died in 1907, at the age of 
eighty-two. Born in County Roscommon, Ireland, he 
was the son of a prominent Irish business man and 
manufacturer, and his early education was carefully 
supervised. At the age of seventeen Mr. Grehan 
came to America by sailing vessel landing at New 
Orleans. He soon afterward entered Bethany Col- 
lege, Virginia. Bethany College was a school founded 
by Alexander Campbell, the great theologian and 
founder of the Church of the Disciples. Bernard 
Grehan subsequently entered the ministry of the Re- 
formed Church and became a widely known preacher, 
a vocation he followed for seven years. While in the 
ministry he came to Kentucky, taught school in va- 
rious parts of the state, and subsequently became 
commissioner of schools during the regime of Dr. 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



107 



Robert Breckeiiridge. During much of the war he 
was employed as a trader for the Confederate Gov- 
ernment. The war over, he returned to Fayette County 
and continued teaching more or less every year until 
past seventy. He organized and conducted the first 
Teachers Institute in the State of Kentucky, and was 
frequently called the father of the Teachers Insti- 
tute. He was a scholar in Latin and Greek, and be- 
lieved those languages and mathematics the founda- 
tion of all education. During the '50s he wrote two 
books, one on Calculus and another on general 
branches of mathematics. He acted as moderator in 
the noted debate between Alexander Campbell and 
Bishop Purcell. He was a democrat in politics. 

Bernard Newton Grehan married Martha Gill, who 
was born in Fayette County, Kentucky, and died in 
1902, at the age of sixty-five. They were the par- 
ents of six children, three sons and three daughters, 
only three of whom are now living. The fourth in 
age is Enoch Grehan, born in Fayette County, May 
IS, 1870. He was carefully educated at home, also 
in the public schools of Lexington, and was gradu- 
ated with the degree of A. B. from Transylvania 
College, then Kentucky University, in 1894. During 
his senior year he represented Transylvania in the 
State Oratorical Contest, in which six colleges com- 
peted, and he won the diamond medal. One of the 
judges of the contest was the late Senator Goebel 
He was also class speaker at the commencement. Im- 
mediately on leaving college Mr. Grehan became a 
reporter for the old Lexington Press, and was em- 
ployed by that daily for three years. He then became 
city editor, and when the paper was merged with 
the Transcript he continued as city editor. When the 
Press passed into the hands of Samuel G. Boyle and 
later was purchased by Desha Breckenridge and its 
name changed to the Lexington Herald, Mr. Grehan 
became city editor of the paper. Subsequently he had 
been news editor of the Lexington Leader, and for 
six years held that position. Later he became editor 
of the Evening Gazette, but later still returned to the 
Herald as news editor, editorial paragrapher and 
dramatic critic. In 1914 he was invited by the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky to establish its Department of 
Journalism. During the university administration of 
President H. L. Barker he served as secretary of the 
board of trustees. He is also a member of the com- 
mittee on Memorial Buildings of the University. Mr. 
Grehan is editor of the State Press Bulletin, chair- 
man of the committee on University Publicity, member 
of the Athletic Council and member of the University 
Extension Committee. 

On January 20, 1903, he married Miss Jennie L. 
Embry, a native of Fayette County and daughter of 
Jacob L. and Allie (Beasley) Embry. Her mother 
was a native of Garrard County, Kentucky. Both 
parents are now deceased. Mrs. Grehan is the eldest 
of six children. 

Clarence Le Bus is easily one of the most distin- 
guished Kentuckians of the present generation. Prob- 
ably no one man has done more to influence and pro- 
vide the satisfactory solution of problems of agricul- 
ture, particularly as affecting the tobacco interests, and 
considering the tremendous results that have followed 
from his own enterprise and that of other members 
of his family it is possible to refer only briefly to 
his personal achievements at this point. 

His father was the late Lewis Le Bus, whose life 
was also one of great interest to Kentucky. Lewis 
Le Bus was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, in 
1834, his parents and grandfather having a few years 
previously come from Alsace, France. Lewis Le Bus 
acquired a substantial education, was a teacher for 
a time, and in 1855 came to Harrison County, Ken- 
tucky, where for five years he continued teaching. 
In i860 he married Martha Garnett, whose grand- 



father was Josiah Whittaker, a famous Methodist 
minister. 

Of Lewis Le Bus it. has been written that "always 
frugal, even the small compensation which he re- 
ceived as a teacher was not expended on himself, 
and each year enough was saved of his earnings to 
buy and pay for a few acres of land. His early man- 
ner of living he followed until he was thirty-five or 
forty years of age. He was never a speculator. Once 
an acre of land became transferred to him it became 
the property of his descendants. Either under his 
personal supervision or through tenants his holdings 
were made to produce their full capacity. With each 
successive year his acres increased until he had ac- 
quired between $2,500 and $3,000 in Bourbon and 
Harrison counties." He did what he could to sup- 
port the cause of the Union during the Civil war, 
served as sheriff of his county, was deputy collector 
of internal revenue for a time, and took an active 
part in republican party management, but his chief 
interest was farming, and his later investments in 
land and real estate gave him interests in Alabama 
and Ohio and in California. He removed to Los 
Angeles in 1893, and died at his home in the West, 
October 31, 1905. 

Clarence Le Bus, one of the several sons of Lewis 
Le Bus to reach mature years, was born in Harrison 
County, Kentucky, December 29, 1862, and under the 
supervision and direction of his father was well 
trained in the practical lessons of business. He also 
had a good education, but had to leave off his studies 
at the University of Michigan during his sophomore 
year on account of an affliction of the eyes. As a 
young man he learned farming, was employed in a 
general store, and after leaving university worked in 
the internal revenue collector's office, and in 1886 
became a solicitor for the Bodmann Warehouse Com- 
pany of Cincinnati, then one of the best known to- 
bacco warehouses in the West. He soon attracted 
the attention of tobacco buyers and producers because 
of the extraordinary knowledge he soon acquired and 
revealed concerning the quality of all the grades that 
were sold on the Cincinnati market, which was prin- 
cipally a Burley leaf market. But he was not satis- 
fied to be a buyer or dealer in tobacco alone, and 
even from youth his great ambition was for the crea- 
tive side of industry, mainly along the substantial lines 
laid down by his father as a land owner and farmer. 
Leaving the employ of the Bodmann Company and 
refusing some flattering offers, he returned to Harri- 
son County and devoted his energies to farming, 
studying the adaptability of the various soils ; and 
by the time he was thirty-five years of age he had 
acquired by purchase some 2,000 acres in Bourbon 
and Harrison counties for an average price of $40 
an acre. In selecting the land he desired his judg- 
ment was always unerring. He believed, as his father 
had believed, that land should be purchased to have 
and to hold and not to sell. Consequently he always 
bought the best. Results have amply vindicated the 
wisdom of his course, since the values of some of 
the land he bought twenty and thirty years ago have 
increased four or five and even ten fold. Two or 
three years ago Mr. Le Bus was credited with the 
ownership of about 12,000 acres of land, divided into 
nearly fifty farms. Much the greater part of it was 
employed for grazing purposes, and of the 3,000 acres, 
under cultivation 1,000 were in tobacco. His holdings 
are located in Harrison, Bourbon, Fayette, Henry and 
Bracken counties, and include some of the famous 
farms of the noted Blue Grass region, distinguished 
not only for their value and productiveness but also 
for the prominence of their owners. The beautiful 
olace where Mr. Le Bus and family have had their 
home for several years is the Hinata Farm, about 
five miles from Lexington on the Russell Cave Pike. 
As a farmer and land owner he has worked out some 



108 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



tremendous results affecting not only Kentucky but 
American agriculture, since his methods of manage- 
ment, of handling the soil and the crops are contribut- 
ing directly to the larger body of knowledge that 
must in the near future govern American agriculture. 
The achievements which have been most written about, 
however, are concerned with his prominence as a 
tobacco grower and leadership among the tobacco pro- 
ducers of Kentucky in reorganizing that industry to 
the end of protecting growers from the so-called to- 
bacco trust. 

Writing in the spring of 1917, Judge Charles Kerr 
outlined some of the larger achievements of Clarence 
Le Bus in the following paragraphs : "Fifteen years 
ago Kentucky tobacco could not be grown for the 
price for which it was then selling. Each year he 
produced his regular crops, however, believing some 
relief ultimately must be found. Finally, with that 
energy which has characterized all his undertakings 
he undertook to organize a pool among the producers, 
not for the purpose of an unlawful combination, but 
for the purpose of giving the producer a fair price 
for his product. At first the butt of ridicule, his 
purposes soon became apparent to the dealers and 
an eflfort was made to circumvent his activities by 
paying him a large price for his accumulated crops 
of several years. This he scorned and refused to 
sell, except through the society which he had 
organized. 

"At a time when the fortunes of all the Kentucky 
growers as well as his own hung in the balance he 
resolutely refused an offer which was within one 
cent a pound of what he asked. He Said the extra 
cent meant a million dollars to the producers of Ken- 
tucky and not until he got it did he consent to a sale 
of the holdings of the entire pool, his own included. 

"As president of the Burley Tobacco Company he 
has been a factor in the tobacco interests of Ken- 
tucky that has been felt alike by the producers and 
the buyers. With indomitable courage and deter- 
mination he created an organization which owns seven- 
teen warehouses, and besides these sales and storage 
houses it owns a tobacco factory in Louisville, manu- 
facturing a number of well known grades of smoking 
and chewing tobacco. 

"What this man of energy and purpose has done 
others might do. In the conduct of his business he 
has taken rank with creative wealth. Hundreds, per- 
haps thousands, of people have found lucrative em- 
ployment and the means of livelihood through the 
methods adopted by him in the conduct of his busi- 
ness. The value of tobacco and its prominence as a 
distinctive Kentucky product are due more to his ef- 
forts than to any one man in Kentucky. 

"What with attention to a systematic, intelligent 
management of Central Kentucky farming may be 
made to yield is abundantly exemplified in his suc- 
cess, and while he has acquired a large holding of 
the choicest lands in the state, the products of those 
lands have so increased in value through his efforts 
that it may be easier for others to accomplish what 
he has done than it has been for him. His career 
has been here recited in order that there might be 
created a wider interest in the productive value of our 
own Kentucky lands than may be found elsewhere. 
He has not succeeded without meeting discourage- 
ments that might have appalled one of less determina- 
tion. Like all positive characters, he has encountered 
opposition, but these he has met as becometh a man 
of dominant purpose and the results are worthy of 
the man." 

Clarence Le Bus in politics has been an independent 
republican, and is a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South. On November S, 1896, he mar- 
ried one of Kentucky's most beautiful women, Miss 
Mary Frazer, of a prominent old Kentucky family, 
daughter of Noah W. Frazer of Harirson County, 



while her mother was a daughter of Thomas E. Dun- 
lap of Shelby County. Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Le 
Bus have two children : Frazer Dunlap, born Octo- 
ber II, 1897, who married Elvina Stoll ; and Clarence, 
Jr. Frazer Dunlap Le Bus and Clarence Le Bus, Jr. 
are both actively associated with their father in his 
farming, and represent the third successive generation 
of the family in Kentucky agriculture. Both were 
born at the family home, then at Cynthiana, Kentucky, 
and both completed their literary educations in a pri- 
vate school at Asheville, North Carolina, but for 
several years have been busily engaged in the man- 
agement of the Hinata Farm. 

Wesley P. Dalton is one of the progressive and 
representative young business men of his native city, 
and the garage and automobile business in which he 
is associated with Latham Davis represents the most 
important, as well as the oldest, enterprise of this kind 
at Hopkinsville, the judicial center and metropolis of 
Christian County. Aside from the prestige which 
attaches to Mr. Dalton in connection with business 
activities in this city, his is the distinction of having 
given loyal and gallant service with the American Ex- 
peditionary Forces in France within the climacteric 
period of the great World war, as will be more fully 
noted in later paragraphs. 

Wesley P. Dalton was born at Hopkinsville, on the 
5th of October, 1896, and is a son of Hilliard M. and 
Cora Belle (Payne) Dalton. Hilliard M. Dalton was 
born near Springfield, Tennessee, where he was reared 
and educated, and he was a young man when he came 
to Hopkinsville, where he became a successful rock 
contractor and where he passed the remainder of his 
life. He was born in the year 1873, and was only 
thirty-three years of age at the time of his death, 
in 1906. He was a republican in political allegiance 
and was an active and earnest member of the Bap- 
tist Church, as is also his widow, who was born at 
Hopkinsville in 1877, and who still maintains her 
home in this city. Hilliard M. Dalton was a young 
man of fine personality, and his circle of friends was 
coincident with that of his acquaintances. He was a 
popular and appreciative member of Hopkinsville 
Lodge No. 545, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. He is survived by one child, — he whose name 
initiates this review. 

In the public schools of Hopkinsville Wesley P. 
Dalton continued his studies until his graduation in 
the high school as a member of the class of 1915, and 
for 2' '2 years thereafter he was a student in the 
celebrated Purdue University at Lafayette, Indiana. 
He was there pursuing his studies when the nation 
became involved in the World war, and he withdrew 
from the university to enter the service of his coun- 
try on the 1st of January, 1918. He was sent to 
Camp Sherman, Ohio, where he was in the Third Ofifi- 
ccrs' Training Corps and where he was assigned to 
the Eighty-third Division. On the 1st of May, 1918, 
he was transferred to Camp Jackson, South Carolina, 
and on the 23d of the same month he sailed for 
France, from the port of New York City. After his 
arrival in France he entered the Saumur Artillery 
Training School, on the loth of June, and on the 
19th of the following month he received a commis- 
sion as second lieutenant of field artillery. He was 
graduated in the Saumur Artillery School on the 28th 
of August, and was assigned to the air service, in 
connection with which he received special training as 
an aerial observer at Tours, where he was graduated 
in the training school October 30, 1918. With utmost 
loyalty and zest Mr. Dalton thus prepared himself 
for active service, and he further fortified himself 
by his effective work at the Second Aerial Observation 
School at Camp Souge, near the City of Bordeaux, 
where he assisted in training other young men for 
artillery and aerial-observation service, in both of 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



109 



which departments he had become exceptionally effi- 
cient. On the i8th of November he was assigned to 
service with the One Hundred and Fourth Aero 
Squadron, as an observer, and in this service he con- 
tinued during the remainder of his stay in France. 
He sailed for Jiis native land January i6, 1919, and 
landed on the 29th of that month. At Garden City, 
l.ong Island, he received his honorable discharge on 
the 3rd of February, and he then returned to his na- 
tive city, where he has since been actively engaged 
in the automobile business. He became one of the 
(jrincipals in the Dalton-Davis Motor Company, which 
maintained headquarters at the corner of Tenth and 
Liberty streets, and on the ist of January, 1920, he 
and his associate, Latham Davis, purchased the plant, 
offices and business of the Ideal Motor Company at 
208-210 North Main Street, where they own a modern 
and finely equipped garage, with well appointed offices 
and with all the facilities that mark the up-to-date 
establishment of the kind. This business is the oldest 
in the city, its inception having occurred in 1913, and 
it is one of the most substantial and important enter- 
prises of the kind in this section of Kentucky. Messrs. 
Dalton and Davis sold their original garage and busi- 
ness in February, 1920, about one month after assum- 
ing control of their present plant. 

Captain Dalton retains lively interest in military af- 
fairs and holds commission as captain of field artillery 
in the Kentuckj- National Guard. At the time of this 
writing, in the autumn of 1920, he is perfecting the 
organization of a battery of artillery in his home 
city. He is independent in politics, he and his wife 
hold membership in the Baptist Church, are popular 
factors in the representative social activities of the 
community and reside with his widowed mother on 
Alumni Avenue. 

On the 6th of November, 1919, was solemnized the 
marriage of Captain Dalton to Miss Elizabeth Cayce, 
daughter of Delbert D. and Rebecca (Dillman) Cayce, 
of Hopkinsville, where Mr. Cayce is president and 
general manager of the Cayce-Yost Company, con- 
ducting one of the largest hardware and agricultural 
implement establishments in this section of the state. 
Mrs. Dalton was reared and educated at Hopkinsville 
and was here graduated in the high school. 

Captian Dalton is a scion of an old and honored 
family of Tennessee, and prior to his birth his grand- 
father, Wesley Dalton, died at the old home near 
Springfield, that state. The original American progen- 
itors of the Dalton family came from Ireland and 
settled in Virginia prior to the War of the Revolu- 
tion. 

WiLLi.Mw Russell Stone was one of the worthiest 
and most highly esteemed citizens of the community 
south of Lexington, on the Fayette-Jessamine County 
line. He bought, owned and developed extensive farm- 
ing interests in that locality, and the home where he 
lived so many years amid the comforts he enjoyed is 
on the Nicholasville Pike, seven miles south of Lex- 
ingfon but in Jessamine Countj'. 

Mr. Stone was born near Lexington January 15, 
1843, and died August 20, 1920, in his seventy-eighth 
year. He was a son of James and Nancy (Russell) 
Stone. His grandfather, Jacob Stone, was a farmer 
and gentleman of the old school. James Stone spent 
his life as a farmer in this section of Kentucky and 
died when past eighty. He had two other sons, John 
Rogers and Barton W. Stone, the former going to 
Southern Kentucky, while Barton lived as a farmer 
in Fayette County. He was named in honor of the 
old pioneer minister Barton Stone, a close friend of his 
father, Jacob Stone. 

William Russell Stone married in 1864 Eliza Jane 
Robb, of Jessamine County, daughter of Joseph and 
Nancy (Jameson) Robb. Her present home is about 
four miles from the old Robb homestead, now occupied 



by her youngest brother, Benjamin F"., a bachelor, and 
her maiden sister, Bettie Filene. Soon after his mar- 
riage Mr. Stone moved to his present locality. The 
house was built by Rankin Roberts, but was still new 
when Mr. Stone acquired it. He had about sixteen 
hundred acres in various farms and more than a 
thousand in his home place, situated on the Nicholas- 
ville Pike and also intercepted by the Southern Rail- 
road and the Interurban. He also had a large farm 
in Fayette County, three miles nearer Lexington. Mr. 
Stone frequently remarked that he loved to make money 
and also to spend it, and that statement was really 
characteristic of his life and character. He was a 
hard worker, an intelligent manager, and thoroughly 
public spirited and generous in all his ways and in- 
terests. Some of his last thoughts and plans were 
directed toward repairing and rebuilding his residence. 
He was a stockholder in various banks and in a tobacco 
warehouse, and was one of the extensive tobacco 
growers in his section. He bought his land when 
prices were comparatively cheap, and always exercised 
a great deal of discretion in his investments. He was 
a voter but never an aspirant for public office. Out- 
side of his home and farm his sustaining interest for 
many years was the Providence Christian Church. He 
served it as an elder, was a liberal contributor to its 
maintenance, and also provided for it in his will. He 
was largely instrumental in securing the erection of 
the handsome new church building which stands just 
across the road from his home. His home was the 
place of entertainment for the preachers and was widely 
known otherwise for its generous hospitality. 

Mrs. Stone is now the oldest member in continuous 
years of membership of this church, having united 
with it when she was eleven years of age. Mrs. Stone 
has two children : Essie L., wife of A. M. Land ; and 
Willie Jeannette, Mrs. George L. Dale. 

George L. Dale has his time occupied by an exten- 
sive farming interest in Fayette County, but recently 
in order to educate his children moved his home to a 
place on the Nicholasville Pike, just out of the City 
of Lexington. He has a thoroughly modern new brick 
house, and from' that location is able to give personal 
supervision to his interests both in the country and 
in the city. 

Mr. Dale was born at Eminence, Kentucky, Novem- 
ber 19, 1880, a son of Alexander Campbell and Mary 
Elizabeth (Crum) Dale. His grandfather, Newton 
Dale, was born and lived all his life at Nortonsville in 
Woodford County, where he died when past seventy. 
The Dale family came from Virginia to Kentucky 
at an early day. Newton Dale had a family of six 
daughters and three sons. The daughters were: Jennie, 
who became the wife of Thomas Noah, who is still 
living, past eighty, at Frankfort; Lena, who lives at 
Charlesville, Tennessee, widow of Elijah Beach; Mit, 
of San Diego, California, widow of W. A. Broadhurst, 
a minister of the Christian Church ; Jerry, who married 
Jerry Dean, and both died in Texas ; Lulu, who became 
the wife of Silas Neal and both died in Woodford 
County; Anna was the wife of John Boone, who is 
still living, past eighty. The sons were Alexander 
Campbell, Benjamin, who married Sarah Neal and 
died in Oklahoma, and Noah. Benjamin first removed 
to Independence, Missouri, and thence to Oklahoma. 
Noah was a prominent minister of the Christian 
Church, a great evangelist, and did much work for 
that denomination in Indiana and elsewhere. 

Alexander C. Dale married Mary Elizabeth Crum 
in Oldham County, where he was reared. She is still 
living at Eminence, Kentucky. Alexander C. Dale was 
a farmer in Henry County and died in 1900. He had 
tv/o sons, the older, Horace Crum Dale, being cashier 
of the Deposit Bank at Eminence. 

George L. Dale was educated in the schools at Emin- 
ence, graduated from the Academy there under Pro- 



no 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



fessor C. M. Arnold, and also took a course in Transyl- 
vania University. After leaving college in 1899 he 
took charge of the home farm and remained there un- 
til 1903, when he married Miss Willie J. Stone. Mrs. 
Dale is a daughter of the late William R. Stone, one 
of the most successful farmers and one of the best 
known citizens of Fayette County, whose career is 
told in the preceding pages. Mr. and Mrs. Dale have 
two children, William Stone Dale, aged fourteen, and 
Mary Eliza, aged eleven. 

At her marriage Mrs. Dale's father gave her a farm 
in Jessamine County, five miles from the Stone home- 
stead. In 1908 they returned to the vicinity of the 
Stone farm and lived there until 1919, when they re- 
moved to the home near Lexington above noted. Mrs. 
Dale also has a place of five hundred and forty acres 
on Clay's Mill Pike, the old Sayre farm, which she in- 
herited from her father and which is one of the finest 
farms of the Blue Grass region. Mr. Dale in addi- 
tion to his farming interests is a director in the Burley 
Tobacco Company and a stockholder in Tattersall's 
Warehouse. He is a democrat in politics. 

Hon. Robert A. Cook, one of the distinguished mern- 
bers of the Christian County bar, now engaged in 
practice at Hopkinsville, is a man of broad outlook and 
wide experience, whose duties have been many and 
varied and included those pertaining to the office of 
assistant secretary of state for Kentucky. He was born 
in Christian County, February 3, 1874, a son of Isaac 
A. Cook, a native of Tennessee, born in 1840. 

Issac A. Cook was reared in Eastern Tennessee and 
lived in McMinn County, that state until he was twelve 
years of age. His parents then moved to the vicinity 
of Hopkinsville, and he assisted his father in the 
farm work and has always been engaged in farming, 
now owning a valuable farm of 20 acres located five 
miles west of Hopkinsville, where he carries on gen- 
eral farming and stockraising according to modern 
methods and with remarkably successful results. In 
politics he is a republican. Espousing the cause of 
the Union during the war between the two sections of 
the country, he enlisted in the Union army as a mem- 
ber of Company I, Seventeenth Volunteer Infantry, 
and later was in the Twenty-fifth Kentucky Volunteer 
Infantry, participating in the battle of Shiloh, where 
his brother, Wichliflfe Cook, was killed in action; the 
battles of Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge, and 
was with General Sherman in his March to the Sea. 
Isaac A. Cook was married to Narcissus Arrnstrong, 
who was born in Christian County, Kentucky, in 1847, 
and they became the parents of the following children : 
Walter, who died at the age of thirteen^ years ; Edward 
E., who is a liveryman, lives at Hopkinsville ; Robert 
A., who is the third in order of birth ; Charles W., who 
is a ranchman of Los Angeles, California ; James H., 
who is on his father's farm ; Clifton Pratt, who died 
at the age of twenty-three years, was a farmer; 
Ben H., who is mentioned at length below; and Essie, 
who married George Diuquid, an employe of the 
Standard Oil Company, resides at Hopkinsville. 

Ben H. Cook, brother of Robert A. Cook, and him- 
self a very prominent man, was born at Hopkinsville, 
March 2, 1889. He attended the local schools and the 
Kentucky State Normal School of Bowling Green, 
Kentucky, leaving the latter in 1910. He then taught 
school in Christian County until August 12, 1920, when 
he was appointed county superintendent of schools for 
Christian County, and is now holding that office. He 
is one of the highly educated men of this part of the 
state, and one of the most popular educators of his 
time. His offices are in the court house. His political 
convictions are the same as those of his father, and he 
is a republican. The Christian Church holds his mem- 
bership, and he is earnest in his support of the local 
congregation. During the late war Superintendent 



Cook was a zealous participant in the local activities, 
and was thoroughly in sympathy with them. 

On December 11, 1911, Ben H. Cook was united 
in marriage at Clarksville, Tennessee, with Miss Lady 
Gertrude Wright, a daughter of S. B. and Margaret 
(Hill) Wright, residents of Christian County, where 
Mr. Wright is engaged in farming. Mr. and Mrs. 
B. H. Cook have one daughter, Hilda, who was born 
February 12, 1918. 

Hon. Robert A. Cook first attended the rural schools 
of Christian County, but later became a student of the 
Western Normal School of Bowling Green, Kentucky. 
When he was twenty-one years old he began teaching 
school, and for four years taught in the rural schools 
of Christian County. He was then elected assessor of 
Christian County, and held that office for four years. 
By this time he was recognized as one of the leading 
young republicans of his district, and F. P. James, state 
auditor, appointed him his clerk in January, 1908, and 
he served as such until January, 1910, living at Frank- 
fort, Kentucky. For the subsequent two years he was 
assistant secretary of state under Ben L. Bruner, and 
for two years more was district deputy collector of 
internal revenue. His connections with all of these 
offices made him one of the best known men in his 
district, and he was the logical candidate of his party 
for the office of representative of the district to the 
Lower House of the State Assembly, and served in 
the session of 1916. 

On March i, 1916, Mr. Cook was appointed a mem- 
ber of the State Board of Control for charitable in- 
stitutions, and served as chairman of this board for 
three years, or until it was made a partisan board by 
the Legislature. In spite of his many and manifold 
duties and heavy responsibilities Mr. Cook in the mean- 
while studied law while he was engaged in teaching 
and at Frankfort, and was admitted to the bar before 
the Court of Appeals at Frankfort, Kentucky, in 1909. 
In 1914 he opened an office for the practice of his 
profession at Hopkinsville in the Bohn Building, at ■zYz 
East Sixth Street. His practice was somewhat inter- 
rupted by his official duties, but he resumed it in 1919. 
and is now connected with some very important juris- 
prudence, being recognized as an able lawyer and force- 
ful pleader. 

Like the other members of his family he is a member 
of the Christian Church. Fraternally he belongs to 
Hopkinsville Lodge No. 543, B. P. O. E., while profes- 
sionally he maintains membership with the Christian 
County Bar Association. He owns a modern residence 
at 1326 South Main Street, which is one of the most 
comfortable homes in the city, and has other real 
estate. During the late war he served as chairman- 
of the Red Cross drive in Christian County in 1918, 
and assisted in putting over all of the Liberty Loan 
drives, and subscribed to them all to the very limit of 
his resources, for he recognized the necessity for con- 
certed action on the part of the people in order that a 
speedy end be made to the disastrous war. 

On October 27, 1917, Mr. Cook was married at 
Clarksville, Tennessee, to Miss Mildred Buckner, a 
daughter of Frank C. and Harriet (Elliott) Buckner. 
Mr. Buckner was formerly a tobacconist and farmer, but 
is now deceased. His widow survives him and makes 
her home at Clarksville, Tennessee. Mr. and Mrs. 
Cook have no children. Mr. Cook has always had a 
distinct impulse toward the humanities among the lead- 
ers of thought, and has been an inspiration for activities 
of the best sort. Many have been the honors bestowed 
upon him, but he has always been equal to all of these 
responsibilities, and if others come to him, as without 
doubt they will, for he is not the kind of a man to stand 
still, his constituents may be sure that he will dis- 
charge them in the same capable and efficient manner 
that he has those in the past. He is accessible and 
sympathetic to those who seek his help, is a rarely 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



111 



gifted man, sincere and unselfish, patriotic and coura- 
geous, and has traveled far on the highway to fame 
and fortune, and at the same time has won a warm 
place for himself in the hearts of his fellow citizens. 

J. E. McPherson. It seems appropriate that the 
president of the oldest bank in Christian County 
and one of the soundest and most dignified financial 
institutions in Western Kentucky should be a veteran 
in service and experience. J. E. McPherson has been 
a factor in banking affairs at Hopkinsville for over forty 
years, and most of that time has been either cashier 
or president of the Bank of Hopkinsville. 

He is of Scotch ancestry, of an old Colonial Vir- 
ginia family, and was born at Lewisburg in what is 
now West Virginia December 15, 1857. His father, 
John W. McPherson, was born at Upperville, Virginia, 
in 1828, spent his early life at Lewisburg, and qualified 
as a lawyer and practiced in West Virginia. In 1859 
he moved to Christian County, Kentucky, and during 
the Civil war was engaged in a mercantile business 
at Newstead in that county. In December, 1864, he 
moved to Hopkinsville, and thereafter was one of the 
prominent members of the local bar until his death 
in 1897. He served four years as judge of the Com- 
mon Pleas Court of Christian County. For forty years 
he was an elder in the Presbyterian Church. He was 
a Democrat and a member of the Masonic fraternity. 
Judge McPherson married Margaret A. Withrow, who 
was born at Lewisburg, West Virginia, in 1830. and died 
at Hopkinsville in 1890. They had a family of six 
children : W. C. McPherson, who was express agent 
at Huntsville, Alabama, when he died in 1890, at the 
age of twenty-nine; Miss Mary W., of Hopkinsville; 
J. E. McPherson; Joel D., a traveling salesman living 
at Madisonville, Kentucky ; John W., clerk in a dry 
goods store at Hopkinsville; and H. L. McPherson, 
assistant cashier of the Bank at Hopkinsville. 

J. E. McPherson as a youth attended some of the 
country schools of Christian County, also the grade 
schools in Hopkinsville, but at the age of sixteen had 
to call his education finished and forthwith began earn- 
ing his own way and building that business career 
which has achieved such gratifying proportions and 
successes. For three years he clerked in a grocery 
store at Hopkinsvilleii for another two years kept 
books in a dry goods store, but at the age of twenty 
made his real start as bookkeeper for the Planters Bank 
at Hopkinsville. He held that post six and a half 
years and in July, 1884, was elected cashier of the Bank 
of Hopkinsville. Only twenty-six years of age, he 
was one of the youngest bank cashiers in the state. 
He steadily filled the office for more than a third of 
a century, until January I, 1918, when he was elected 
president. 

The Bank of Hopkinsville has a history. It is logically 
a descendant of one of the branches of the old Bank 
of Kentucky at Louisville. In July, 1865, an inde- 
pendent organization was effected to take over the 
assets of the old branch bank, and ever since then for 
fifty-five years the Bank of Hopkinsville has operated 
under a state charter. Its home at the corner 'of Seventh 
and Main Street was remodeled in icoS, giving it a 
modern bank building. The bank has a capital of 
$100,000, surplus and profits $53,000, while its deposits 
aggregate $i,coo,ooo. Besides Mr. McPherson as presi- 
dent, the present cashier is Charles F. McKee, and the 
assistant cashier, H. L. McPherson. 

Mr. McPherson is also secretary and treasurer of the 
South Kentucky Building & Loan Association of Hop- 
kinsville, one of the flourishing business concerns of 
Western Kentucky. He owns two business buildings 
in Hopkinsville besides his comfortable home at 1208 
South Main Street. He is a member of the State 
and American Bankers Association, is an elder in the 
Southern Presbyterian Church, is a democrat, and both 



as a banker and individual gave the full power of his 
influence and means to the prosecution of the war. 

In April, 1879, i" Christian County, he married 
Miss Sallie Glass, member of two of the distinguished 
pioneer families of Christian County. Her grand- 
father, Zacharias Glass, was one of the three founders 
of Hopkinsville, had one of the first stores in the town, 
and in other ways helped build up the community. Her 
maternal grandfather was Archibald Gant, another 
member of the trio who founded the city and was also 
an early merchant. Her parents were Posey and Mar- 
garet (Gant) Glass, now deceased. Her father for 
many years was engaged in farming in Christian 
County. Mr. and Mrs. McPherson have three children : 
J. G. McPherson, trust officer for the Fidelity & Colum- 
bia Trust Company at Louisville; Annie W., wife of 
George C. Howell, a hardware merchant at Richmond, 
Virginia ; and Charles J., who graduated with the 
Mechanical Engineer degree from Kentucky State Uni- 
versity at Lexington and is now practicing his profes- 
sion in Philadelphia. 

Louis Edward Hillenmeyer. To the lover of nature 
no occupation known to man furnishes more interesting 
possibilities than the nursery business. Recent develop- 
ments along this line have been as wonderful as they 
were formerly unexpected and unbelievable. Yet even 
to the man who labors faithfully to maintain standards 
already established and who has no time to explore 
in luring paths of promise there always is that satis- 
faction in accomplishment possible only when one works 
in collaboration with the elements of creation. Lexing- 
ton has had its share of careful, painstaking, earnest 
nurserymen, men who have delighted in their labor 
and who have contributed liberally to the knowledge 
of their vocation. Few, however, have become so well 
and prominently known during a comparatively short 
period of years as has Louis Edward Hillenmeyer, who 
is extensively engaged in the nursery business on the 
Georgetown Road. 

Mr. Hillenmeyer was born on his father's farm in 
Fayette County, November 22, 1885, a son of Hector 
and Mary (Ossenbeck) Hillenmeyer. A sketch of his 
parents' careers will be found elsewhere in this work, 
in the review of Hector Hillenmeyer, an old-time 
nurseryman and highly respected citizen of the Lex- 
ington community. Louis E. Hillenmeyer attended the 
public schools of Fayette County and Assumption Col- 
lege, Sandwich, Ontario, Canada, and then entered the 
University of Kentucky. During his college days he 
was one of the star athletes of his alma mater, and in 
1907 was captain of the varsity baseball team and 
president of the university athletic association. He has 
been vice president and a member of the executive 
committee of the Alumni Association and was chosen 
as a representative of the Alumni on the University 
Athletic Council for 1920 to 1924. While at college he 
belonged likewise to the Pi Kappa Alpha, Mister 13 and 
the Lamp and Cross Society. 

Graduating from the university with the class of 1907, 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, Mr. Hillenmeyer 
joined his father in the nursery business, this associa- 
tion continuing until 1910, when a partnership was 
formed between Louis E. and Walter W. Hillenmeyer 
in the same line, which has continued to the present 
time. Mr. Hillenmeyer is independent in political mat- 
ters, and with his family belongs to the Roman Catholic 
Church, which they attend with St. Paul's Congregation. 
He belongs likewise to the Lexington Rotary Club and 
the Board of Commerce. 

On June 26, 1912, Mr. Hillenmeyer married Anna 
Bain, who was born at Bismarck, North Dakota, a 
daughter of John W. and Lula (Kremer) Bain, natives 
of Kentucky. Mr. Bain was an auctioneer, and resided 
in this and other states. He and his wife had three 
children, all living, of whom Mrs. Hillenmeyer was 



112 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



the second in order of birth. Mr. and Mrs. Hillenmeyer 
have four children : Anna Bain, Louis Francis, Doro- 
thy Louise and Robert Hector. 

George Burgess Carey. Among the residents of 
Fayette County, Kentucky, who have built up highly 
creditable reputations and distinguished themselves by 
right and honorable living is George B. Carey, well- 
known contractor of Lexington, one of that body of 
representative citizens who have done so much for 
the upbuilding and development of this community. 
His prominence in the business world is conceded, 
and his deeds will speak for themselves, for he has 
been a man who has believed in helping others, in a 
general way at least, while laboring for his. own ad- 
vancement along material lines. 

George Burgess Carey is a native son of the old 
Blue Grass state, having been born in Lawrence 
County, Kentucky, on the Sth day of April, 1869, and 
he is the son of William and Emily (Burgess) Carey, 
the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Law- 
rence County, Kentucky. They were the parents of 
eleven children. William Carey was left an orphan 
at ten years of age and received his education in the 
common schools of Lawrence County, Kentucky, hav- 
ing spent his boyhood days on a farm in that county. 
On attaining mature years he engaged in farming 
and stock raising, and also followed the timber busi- 
ness to some extent, owning a saw-mill. General 
farming was his chief occupation, however, and in 
this he was so successful that in 1897 he was enabled 
to retire from active business pursuits. Politically 
he gave his support to the republican party, though he 
was never a seeker after public office. 

George B. Carey attended the public schools during 
his boyhood and then completed his educational train- 
ing in the University of Kentucky. Upon entering 
business on his own account he turned his attention 
to contracting and building in New York City, where 
he was engaged in construction work from 1895 to 
1897. He then turned his attention to street paving, 
being engaged in that line of contracting in Brook- 
lyn and New York City until 1903, with the excep- 
tion of a period of eighteen months which he spent 
in South America and Venezuela, building the first 
asphalt refining plant in the latter country. From 
1903 to 191 1 Mr. Carey was in Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, engaged in the construction of brick and asphalt 
streets, but in the latter year he came to Lexington 
and has since then been closely identified with con- 
tracting and building operations in this section of the 
country. He is in every way thoroughly qualified 
and equipped for this line of business, and has enjoyed 
an eminently satisfactory business since locating here, 
having done a vast amount of construction work of 
various kinds. 

Mr. Carey is also interested in a number of local 
enterprises in a material way, being a stockholder and 
director of the Guarantee Bank and Trust Company ; 
president of the Chinn Mineral Company; and a 
director of the Himyar Oil and Gas Company. He 
is also president of the Lexington Rotary Club. Po- 
litically he is a democrat, and his religious faith is 
that of the Presbyterian Church, his membership being 
with the Second Presbyterian Church in Lexington. 
Fraternally he is a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. 

On January 6, 1900, Mr. Carey was married to 
Jeuett Reed, who was born and reared in Lexington, 
the daughter of J. Henry and Amanda W. (Hocker) 
Reed, both of whom are now deceased. These par- 
ents were natives of Kentucky, the father born in 
Clark County and the mother in Lincoln County. They 
were the parents of three children, namely: James H.; 
Henry W., who died in young manhood ; and Mrs. 
Carey. J. Henry Reed was for many years a travel- 
ing shoe salesman and also engaged in the shoe busi- 



ness on his own account. He was a member of the 
Christian Church and a democrat in his political be- 
lief. To Mr. and Mrs. Carey has been born a son, 
George B., Jr., Mr. Carey is a public spirited man in 
all that the term implies, being interested in all enter- 
prises tending to promote the general welfare, with- 
holding his support from no movement for the good 
of the locality in which he lives. His personal re- 
lations with his fellow men have been mutually pleas- 
ant and agreeable, and he is highly regarded by all, 
being easily approached, obliging and straightforward 
in all the relations of life. 

J. Felix Heady. Of the progressive agriculturists 
who have contributed materially to the development 
of the farming industry in Daviess County during a 
long period of years one of the best known is J. Felix 
Heady, whose farm and home are located in the vi- 
cinity of Sorgho. Primarily a farmer, but like a 
number of other enterprising men of his county, he 
has engaged to some extent in specializing, and is 
known as a leading dealer in horses, a business which 
he has followed successfully for many years. 

Mr. Heady was born on a farm in Daviess County, 
Kentucky, October 29, 1859, a son of Thomas Frank 
and Caroline (O'Nan) Heady. His father was a na- 
tive of Nelson County and a son of John Heady, 
who was born in the same county, of Irish lineage. 
The mother was born in Daviess County and was 
a daughter of William O'Nan. Frank Heady was 
reared in Nelson County, but after his marriage en- 
gaged in farming in Daviess County, and there rounded 
out a long and honorable career in the pursuits of 
the soil, being a man widely known and highly re- 
spected. He and his worthy wife were devout Chris- 
tian people, and reared their nine children to lives of 
industry, sobriety and honesty. 

J. Felix Heady was reared on the home farm in 
Daviess County and given the advantages of attendance 
at the district schools in the home neighborhood. 
■He divided his time in his boyhood and youth between 
attending school and assisting his father and brothers 
in the work of the home place, and when he reached 
man's estate engaged in farming on his own account. 
In this connection he began dealing in horses, a field 
of operation in which he has continued to the present 
time, he being known as one of the able judges of 
horseflesh in his county and a man of reliability whose 
shrewdness is always tempered by his sense of fair 
play. Mr. Heady's farm is a model of modernity, 
with well-constructed and substantial buildings and 
up-to-date improvements of every kind, and the gen- 
eral air of prosperity which surrounds it evidences 
emphatically the ability and good management of its 
proprietor. 

Mr. Heady has been twice married, his first wife 
having borne the name of Catherine Woodward. She 
died, leaving eight children, and Mr. Heady married 
Miss Blanche Payne. They have no children. Mr. 
Heady is an energetic and valued member of the 
Daviess County Farm Bureau, and his only fraternal 
affiliation is with the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. With his family he belongs to the Catholic 
Church, and his political allegiance is given to the 
democratic party's principles and candidates. 

Lister Witherspoon, living in one of the most beau- 
tiful country homes in Woodford County, has for 
many years put his farm to productive use as a stock 
center, and has especially featured the breeding of 
trotting horses. One of the horses bred on his farm 
on the Versailles and Midway Pike, three miles north 
of Versailles, was Aldine, a team mate of the famous 
Maud S. This pair made a world's record as a team, 
being owned by W. H. Vanderbilt. Mr. Witherspoon 
is still active in the management of his 350 acres, and 
continues in recent years to sell young stock from his 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



113 



farm. He has never been interested in politics, but 
is a member of the Baptist Church. 

Mr. Witherspoon was born at Lawrenceburg, Ken- 
tucky, June 7, 1848. He is descended from Rev. Dr. 
John Witherspoon, one of the signers of the Declara- 
tion of Independence. His grandfather, Robert 
Witherspoon, was a Virginian, died in middle life, 
and was a pioneer of Kentucky. His wife was Martha 
Johnson. Lewis Johnson Witherspoon, father of Lis- 
ter Witherspoon, was born in Franklin County, Ken- 
tucky, in 1800, and graduated in medicine at Phila- 
delphia, being one of the first graduates to practice 
his profession in Kentucky. He continued his prac- 
tice at Lawrenceburg until his death at the age of 
fifty-two. His widow survived him two years. Lister 
Witherspoon was named in honor of the famous Doc- 
tor Lister. His mother was a sister of Martha Lillard, 
the second wife of Dr. John A. Witherspoon, half 
brother of Dr. Lewis J. Dr. John A. Witherspoon 
became the guardian of Lister Witherspoon. Martha 
Lillard was a daughter of Ephraim Lillard, who was 
a son of Captain John Lillard, of the Revolutionary 
army, and he in turn was a son of Benjamin Lillard 
of Virginia, who is said to have reached the remark- 
able age of 120 years before he died in Kentucky. 
Capt. John Lillard had eight children, seven sons and 
one daughter. The daughter was one of the ancestors 
of William J. Bryan. Capt. John Lillard was one 
of the minute men of the Revolution. Ephraim Lillard 
spent his life in Anderson County, Kentucky. 

Lister Witherspoon graduated in i86g from George- 
town College. On December 8, 1869, he married Miss 
Martinette Viley, daughter of Warren and Catherine 
Jane (Martin) Viley, an old and notable family of 
Woodford County. Mrs. Witherspoon was born near 
Midway, but since childhood has lived in the com- 
munity of her present residence. She grew up on the 
farm now owned by her brother Breckenridge Viley, 
just across the road from the Witherspoon estate. 
The present Witherspoon home is the old Kincaid 
property, and the house was erected by Powhattan 
Wooldridge of Louisville. It stands in a wonder- 
ful natural park, and a home of more comforts and 
greater natural beauty could hardly be found anywhere 
in the Blue Grass section. 

Mrs. Witherspoon's father, Warren Viley, was a son 
of Captain Willa and Lydia (Smith) Viley. His 
grandfather was born in Montgomery County, Mary- 
land, February 10, 1788, and married in Kentucky, 
.A.pril 6, 1813, Lydia Smith, daughter of Rodes and 
Eunice (Thompson) Smith. She was born January 
16, 1794, in Scott County, Kentucky. Capt. Willa 
Viley was a son of George and Martha Ann (James) 
Viley, of Montgomery County, Maryland, and moved 
to Scott County, Kentucky, in 1796. George Viley was 
a soldier in the War of 1812 and Capt. Willa was a 
captain of Kentucky militia. Captain Viley died 
March 28, 1865, in Scott County, and his wife died 
on June 13, 1869. Capt. Willa Viley was one of the 
pioneers among Kentucky's thoroughbred trainers and 
breeders. Warren Viley, father of Mrs. Witherspoon, 
was born August 3, 1817, and died January 19, 1902. 
February 27, 1838, he married Catherine Jane Martin, 
a daughter of William Holman Martin and Susannah 
Hale. She was born in Fauquier County, Virginia, 
while William Holman Martin was born December 
30, 1801, in Powhatan County, Virginia, his people 
moving to Scott County, Kentucky, while the Hales 
went to Franklin County, this state. Through much 
study and correspondence Mrs. Witherspoon has pieced 
out the family record of both the Martins and Vileys. 
The Martins are traced to Huguenots, and pioneers 
of Goochland County, Virginia. Anthony Martin, a 
son of Peter Martin, and grandson of John Martin, 
married Sarah Holman, and they were the ancestors 
of William Holman Martin. Mrs. Witherspoon's in- 
teresting researches have led to the discovery that the 



ancestors of her family included thirty-two kings and 
queens, entitling descendants to membership in the 
Order of the Crown, of which she is now a member. 
Mrs. Witherspoon has an elaborate amount of mate- 
rial and manuscript bearing upon the family genealogy, 
and she has also collected numerous copies of coats 
of arms. She is deeply interested in local and state 
history as well, and has been active in a movement 
to secure the publication of a monumental history of 
Woodford County. Mr. and Mrs. Witherspoon have 
three living children. Their son Lister died when 
twenty-one years of age. Warren, in the insurance 
business at Lexington, married Miss Lillie Fahs, of 
Virginia. Ellen Douglas married Moses Alton Buffing- 
ton, who is a coal merchant at Fall River, Massachu- 
setts. Ethel is the wife of O. L. Alexander, a native 
of Virginia and now a coal dealer in New York City. 

Erwin B.axtek Liles. Educational rt'ork is very ex- 
acting in the demands it makes on its devotees. Osten- 
sibly the duty of the educator is to instill a practical, 
working knowledge for each of his pupils, but equally 
important is his correlative though less direct function 
of instilling character and worthy precepts through his 
unavoidable personal influence. The first duty calls 
for a man of knowledge and specialized training; 
the second for a capable and conscientious person 
whose life and mode of living provide a fit criterion 
for the younger generation. When a man combines 
these attributes with progressive educational tenden- 
cies and necessary executive ability he has the quali- 
fications which fit him for the direction of a school 
system. Such a man is Erwin Baxter Liles, superin- 
tendent of schools of Henderson County and a resident 
of Henderson, who has been identified with educational 
work since the start of his career. 

Mr. Liles was born on his father's farm in Hender- 
son County, Kentucky, October 14, 1889, a son of 
John Baxter and Fannie (Hibbs) Liles. The name 
Liles is said to be of Scotch origin, the family having 
a strain also of Irish blood, and the early American 
ancestors being settlers of the Colony of Virginia. 
John Liles, the great-grandfather of Erwin B. Liles, 
was born in the Old Dominion, and was an early set- 
tler of Henderson County, where his son, Jack Liles, 
the grandfather of Erwin B., was born and spent his 
life as an agriculturist. John Baxter Liles was born 
in Henderson County and in his early years was a 
school teacher, but subsequently turned his attention 
to agricultural operations, and after a long and honor- 
able career is still living with his worthy wife on a 
farm in Henderson County. Mrs. Liles was born in 
Hopkins Count}', Kentucky, but was brought to Hen- 
derson County when twelve years of age and has 
lived here ever since. She and her husband are faith- 
ful members of the Christian Church and are highly 
respected in their community. They reared five sons 
and two daughters to maturity. 

Erwin Baxter Liles attended the country school in 
the vicinity of the home farm and subsequently the 
high school at Dixie. Later he was a student for two 
years at Prof. J. V. Poole's select school at Poole, 
Kentucky, for four years at the State Normal School, 
Bowling Green, and for one year at the Kentucky State 
University, supplementing this training by a business 
course in a commercial college at Lexington. When 
he was nineteen years of age he had commenced teach- 
ing school in the Henderson County public schools, 
and after being thus engaged for seven years was 
made assistant principal of the Smithland (Kentucky) 
schools. One year later he was offered the principal- 
ship of these schools, but declined in order to make 
the race for the office of superintendent of schools of 
Henderson County, to 'which responsible post he was 
elected in 1917. Mr. Liles entered upon the duties of 
this office in January, 1918, and has rendered highly 
efficient service. Under his administration much prog- 



114 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



ress has been made, and the system has been mate- 
rially bettered. Henderson County's first two consoli- 
dated schools having transportation were put in opera- 
tion under his direction. 

Mr. Liles was married in 191 4 to Miss Lola Tapp, 
a daughter of W. Lee and Ella (Pritchett) Tapp, of 
Webster County, and to this union there has been born 
one son, Thomas Jean. Mr. Liles is a valued member 
of the Kentucky Educators Association and has several 
otlier educational connections. His fraternal affilia- 
tions are with the local lodges of the Knights of 
Pythias and Masons, and he and Mrs. Liles are con- 
sistent members of the Christian Church. In political 
affairs he gives his allegiance to the principles and 
candidates of the democratic party. 

E. B. January, present mayor of the City of Paris, 
has had a long business association with that city, and 
in his business career has achieved a well deserved 
success. Over the state in general he is perhaps most 
widely known for his prominence in the Order of 
Odd Fellows, being one of its leading state officials. 

Mr. January was born at Caseville, Union County, 
Kentucky, September 27, 1858, and was only a few 
months old when his father, E. B. January, Sr., died. 
He then accompanied his widowed mother to Harrison 
County, and she died in 1854, while visiting in Paris. 
Her maiden name was Mary Elizabeth Thompson. 
The January family is a very old one in America, and 
one early record identifies it with Philadelphia as early 
as 1758. It is said that Thomas January was provi- 
sional governor of Philadelphia in that year. The 
family came to Kentucky about 1780, and an old deed 
to land in this state, recorded in 1783, is owned by 
Mr. January at Paris. Mr. January's grandfaher was 
Dr. Peter January, who was one of the early and 
prominent physicians of Lexington and is said to have 
built the first brick house in that city. 

After the death of his mother E. B. January and 
a brother remained in Paris, at the home of their 
sister, Mrs. John J. Shaw . E. B. was the youngest 
of seven children. He had limited advantages in the 
local schools and had to begin earning his own way 
as soon as possible. He recalls one interesting ex- 
perience when he was about seven years of age, as 
selling copies of the Cincinnati Commercial at 25 
cents apiece, these papers containing the news of Pres- 
ident Lincoln's assassination. When he was ten years 
of age he went to work to learn the tinsmith's trade 
under John J. Shaw. He was given board and clothes 
during his apprenticeship, and at the age of fourteen 
was doing the regular work of a journeyman, and so 
continued until 1890. At that time, just thirty years 
ago (1920) he and Nicholas Connell, another prac- 
tical tin worker, became associated m a partnership 
as tinsmiths and hardware dealers, and the firm of 
January and Connell has been in existence ever since. 
They are the leading contractors at Paris for cornice 
and roofing work, and have an expert force of four 
men constantly employed in that branch of their 
business. 

For many years Mr. January has been prominent in 
local affairs, serving eight years as police judge. He 
was then elected mayor and is now in the fourth year 
of his office. August 6, 1921, he was again elected for 
a four-year term over four opponents, having a 
plurality of 214 over the next highest candidate. He 
has made his administration significant through the 
laying out of new streets, the construction of sewers, 
and extension of other improvements and facilities. 
He is an advocate of municipal ownership for the 
various public utilities. At the present time Paris 
is supplied with light and water by private companies. 
He is a democrat, and served four years as chairman 
of the City Committee of his party. 

On October 26, 1880, at the age of twenty-two, Mr. 



January married Ella M. Fothergill, of Paris, where 
she was born, a daughter of W. W. Fothergill, a 
miller. Mrs. January died in Paris on June I, 1921. 
Her father died in 1858, when she was an infant. Mr. 
and Mrs. January had one daughter, Mary Russell, 
wife of Fred Woods, a railroad man at Lexington. 
Mr. January is the present grand warden of the 
State of Kentucky Grand Lodge of Odd Fellows, and 
the normal course of advancement will put him in 
the position of grand master of the Grand Lodge in 
1923. While in the Grand Lodge he brought in the 
proposition and secured its adoption for the estab- 
lishment of the Odd Fellows Home at Eminence, 
Kentucky. This was proposed in the Grand Lodge 
in 1907, and in 1916 the home was established at Emi- 
nence and Mr. January has been president of the home 
from the beginning. The Grand Lodge paid $10,000 
for the old college building at Eminence, and now has 
a well-equipped home for aged Odd Fellows and their 
wives, with accommodations for thirty, while the pres- 
ent number in the home are fourteen. For twelve 
years he has served as a member of the Orphans 
Home Board at Lexington, another institution of the 
Grand Lodge. He has been elected a representative 
every year since 1893 to the Grand Lodge, making 
twenty-nine consecutive years, and is also affiliated 
with the Encampment degrees and the Rebekahs. He 
is the oldest member of the local lodge of the Knights 
of Pythias in Paris and is also a Mason. 

Charles Aurell McMillan has for the past twenty 
years been accumulating a deserved reputation as a 
s.iccessful lawyer and leading member of the Bourbon 
County bar. He belongs to one of the older families 
of this section of Kentucky, where the name McMil- 
lan, sometimes spelled MacMillan, has been represented 
for considerably more than a century. 

His American ancestor was James McMillan, who 
was born at Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1733. For a brief 
time he was a student in Edinburgh University, but left 
his studies to come to America, and he served as a 
private with the Virginia forces during the struggle 
for independence, taking part in one of the western 
expeditions which reached as far as Illinois. In Fred- 
erick County, Virginia, he married Margaret White, 
daughter of Dr. Robert White, who had been a surgeon 
in the British army. It was in 1792 that James McMil- 
lan and wife came to Kentucky and located near Boones- 
boro. He became a land owner and farmer, and died 
in Clark County in 1799, his will being probated that 
year. He is one of the Revolutionary soldiers buried 
in Clark County. 

His son was Col. William McMillan, who died in 
Clark County in 1836. He served with the rank of 
colonel in the War of 1812, and his sabre is still pre- 
served by his descendants. Robert McMillan, a son of 
Colonel William, was born October 5, 1816, in Clark 
County, and died July i, 1891, at Paris, Kentucky. 
After his marriage to Miss Barcay he settled at North 
Middletown in Bourbon County, and eventually became 
one of the extensive farmers and land owners in that 
vicinity. In old age he retired to Paris. He had 
three children by his first marriage. Ann became 
the wife of Samuel Talbott, and she was the mother 
of Robert C. Talbott, a prominent attorney. William 
H. McMillan is living at Paris, a retired lawyer. Robert, 
who died in 1902, when about sixty years of age, 
served as a Union soldier during the Civil war and 
as a result of his service became paralyzed and blind. 
The second wife of Robert McMillan, son of Colonel 
William, was Armilda Stark, of Bourbon County. Her 
father was Jonathan Stark, of the Cane Ridge com- 
munity, who helped build at that point the first Chris- 
tian church in Kentucky, under the auspices of the 
great Alexander Campbell. Armilda McMillan was mar- 
ried December 9, 1846, and died at North Middletown, 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



115 



leaving one son, John T. McMillan. The third wife 
of Robert McMillan was Ruie Barnes, of Mason 
County, and she survived her husband. 

John T. McMillan, representing the fourth genera- 
tion of the family in Kentucky, was born and reared 
at North Middletown and studied dentistry with Dr. 
Robert Adair of Paris, and also graduated from the 
Ohio Dental College. He practiced at Paris and at 
North Middletown and for four years at Lexington, 
and became a man of prominence in his profession. 
He married Miss Sallie Clay Williams, daughter of 
Richard and Sallie (Gay) Williams. Her father was 
a native of Montgomery County, but for many years 
lived on a farm in Clark County and was a brother 
of the noted "Cerro Gordo" Williams. Sallie Gay Mc- 
Mullin was born in Clark County and survived her hus- 
band, Doctor McMillan, and lives with her son Charles 
A. at Paris. In addition to his professional interests 
Dr. John T. McMillan was deeply interested in the 
sport of racing and was a breeder of trotting horses, 
and some of them made excellent records on Kentucky 
tracks. 

There were four children in the family of Dr. John 
T. McMillan, Charles A. being the second. Elizabeth 
C, the oldest, is widow of Samuel B. Rogers, a lawyer, 
and she is now a court reporter at Lexington. Her hus- 
band's brother is superintendent of the Deaf and. Dumb 
Asylum at Danville. The two younger children are 
Armilda, wife of Joseph Varden, and Robert R. Mc- 
Millan, a dental surgeon at Paris, who married Mary 
Batterton, a sister of Judge George Batterton. 

Charles Aurell McMillan was born at Paris March 
28, 1878, attended the common schools of his native 
city, also was a pupil under Prof. W. L. Yerkes, and 
was a student in Transylvania University. He left 
school in March, 1898, to volunteer in Company E 
of the Kentucky State Guards for service in the 
Spanish-American war. Prior to this time he had 
been a member of the company for about four years. 
For a time he was a teacher at Ruddle's Mills, and 
later secured a clerkship in the Interior Department 
at Washington, and while there diligently employed 
his leisure in the law department of George Washing- 
ton University. He was admitted to the Kentucky 
bar and began practice prior to 1901, and in addition 
to handling a large general practice he served one term 
as county judge, retiring from office in 1920, and for 
four years was city attorney of Paris and also master 
commissioner of the Bourbon County Circuit Court. 
A stanch advocate of good roads, he was largely in- 
stiximental in establishing a nucleus of trucks owned 
by the county and operated for the conservation of 
crushed stone for road building purposes. Mr. McMil- 
lan was also honored as president of the State Associa- 
tion of County Judges. He has been active in state 
and county democratic politics. As a lawyer he has 
confined his practice almost entirely to civil and com- 
mercial law. During the late war he served as chair- 
man of the Bourbon County Draft Board. For some 
years he has been a member of the Presbyterian 
Church, and is a past master of Paris Lodge of Masons, 
No. 2, is a Knights Templar Mason, has attained the 
thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite, and is a mem- 
ber of the Shrine, and is also a member of St. Barnabas 
Council of the Knights of Constantine at Louisville, 
this being one of the fifty councils of that Masonic 
jurisdiction in the United States. He is also a member 
of Louisville Chapter of the Sons of the American 
Revolution. 

On August 9. 1921, he married Katherine M. Evans, 
a daughter of the late Dr. Thomas Evans, professor of 
chemistry in Cincinnati University. Her mother is 
now living in East Moriches, Long Island. 

William Frederick Link has for eight years been 
chief of police of Paris, and in that time has made 
the police department a model of efficiency and has 

Vol. IV— 12 



exemplified all the qualities of the best type of a peace 
officer, being shrewd, keen, expert and courageous 
and possessing all the physical and moral courage neces- 
sary for performance of duty. 

Mr. Link was born near Clintonville, Kentucky, July 
27, 1882, a son of Robert and America (House) 
Link. The great-grandfather of Chief of Police Link 
was named Frederick Link. He was a soldier under 
the great Napoleon, and after the overthrow at Water- 
loo came to America and settled in Laurel County, 
Kentucky, where his old home is still owned by his 
descendants on Rock Castle River. Frederick Link 
married a woman of the Cherokee Indian tribe, and the 
Government recognized the rights of his descendants 
in the distribution of lands in Oklahoma even as late 
as 1900. This Frederick Link lived to be 104 years 
of age, and he was the father of about twenty children. 
His son James spent his active life as a farmer and 
moved to the vicinity of Clintonville about 1870, and 
died there in 1908, at the age of seventy-three. James 
Link married Martha Jane Bailey, of Tennessee, who 
died in 1910, at the age of seventy-two. All of their 
eleven children are still living: Robert; Frederick, of 
Kansas City, Missouri; William, who has mining in- 
terests at Joplin, Missouri; Mollie, widow of William 
Abner, of Lexington; Lizzie, Mrs. Burton Hornbeck, 
of Shelby County; Mrs. Oscar N. Williams, of Fayette 
County ; Sarah, Mrs. Joseph Badkins, a farmer of Bour- 
bon County; George, of Bourbon County; John, of 
Covington, Kentucky; Samuel, of Kansas City, Kansas; 
and Ella, wife of William Hipshire, of Newport, 
Kentucky. 

Robert Link, father of William Frederick Lmk of 
Paris, is a well known merchant of that city, and for 
twenty years has been identified with the Link Grocery 
Company, an institution widely known and patronized 
both in town and surrounding country. He served sev- 
eral years on the Council and has always stood for 
high class physical improvements. He has been a mem- 
ber of the Masonic Order for forty years. His wife, 
America House, was reared in Laurel County, Ken- 
tucky. The children of Robert and America Link were: 
James R., who had been for some years interested in 
mining at Butte, Montana, died in 1912, at the age of 
thirty-seven; Mollie Pauline, wife of Holt Henry, a 
railway conductor with the Louisville & Nashville Rail- 
way, living at Paris ; William F. ; Charles B., who is 
in the clothing business at Kansas City, Missouri; Cora 
A., wife of George Deiterman, a building contractor at 
Paris; Junie M., wife of Herman Santeen, of Paris; 
Thomas B., a real estate operator at Kansas City, Mis- 
souri ; and Robert L., who served in France as a machine 
gunner and after his return to this country became man- 
ager of a department of the Winchester Repeating Arms 
Company at Providence, Rhode Island. 

William Frederick Link was only fifteen years of age 
when the Spanish-American war broke out, and nothing 
could restrain the ardor of his patriotism and he en- 
listed in Company I of the Second Kentucky Regiment. 
It is well established that he was the youngest volunteer 
in Kentucky and probably the youngest volunteer 
accepted during the war. He spent his time in training 
in camp at Chattanooga. After the war he entered the 
service of the Adams Express Company, beginning as 
railway messenger and later for several years was in 
the secret service department at Chicago, a work that 
was in line with special qualifications and gave an 
experience that has been invaluable to him in his later 
career as a police officer at Paris. He returned from 
Chicago to Paris in 1906, and for several years was 
associated with his father in the grocery business. _ Then, 
in 1910, he went on the local police force and in 1913 
received his popular election as chief of police. He 
was reelected in 1917, and his present term expires in 
1921. At this writing his candidacy is being strongly 
urged for the office of sheriff of Bourbon County, a 
position for which he has undoubtedly high qualifications. 



116 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



Mr. Link made his administration as chief of police 
distinctive through his effective work in clearing up the 
liquor and bootlegging element in Paris. He is a mem- 
ber of the Police Chief's Association, and has always 
kept in close touch with police and detective organiza- 
tions over the country. Chief Link is an outdoor man, 
and when his official duties do not prevent has always 
enjoyed outings in the woods with gun and rod. 

At the age of twenty-seven he married Miss Nora M. 
Insko, of Robertson County, Kentucky. They have one 
daughter. Hazel A., born in 1913. Mr. Link is affiliated 
with the Knights of Pythias, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Masonic Order, being a member of 
Covington Consistory and Oleika Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. His three 
brothers are also members of the Consistory and the 
Shrine. 

Rodman Russell, commissioner of public property 
for the City of Covington, has been an active business 
man in that community for ten years or more, and the 
energy with which he has looked after his business and 
his public spirit well entitled him to the confidence ex- 
pressed when he was chosen one of the city commis- 
sioners. 

Mr. Russell was born in Bridgeport, Kentucky, August 
[, 1878. His father is James B. Russell, now living at 
Cincinnati. Born at Frankfort, Kentucky, in 1839, and 
reared and married in that locality, he learned the trade 
of saddler and as a young man enlisted in the Confed- 
erate army under General Morgan and served all 
through the struggle. After the war he resumed the 
saddlery business and in 1893 removed to Cincinnati, 
and is still active as one of the leading harness and 
saddlery merchants of the city. While in Kentucky 
he was an active citizen of Franklin County, and for 
twelve years served as justice of the peace. He is a 
democrat, a member and deacon of the Baptist Church, 
and is affiliated with Latonia Lodge No. 746, F. and 
A. M. James B. Russell married Adelia Parker, who 
was born at Shelbyville, Kentucky, in 1853. Rodman 
is her oldest child. Miss Maude lives with her parents. 
Ray is a railway employe living at Louisville. Miss 
Annie is also at home. 

Rodman Russell spent his early life largely at Frank- 
fort, the Kentucky capital, attended public school there, 
and in 1895 graduated from the Cincinnati High School. 
He learned the trade of saddler and harness maker in 
Cincinnati, and continued active in that line of business 
for nearly a quarter of a century, until 1920. 

Mr. Russell has been a resident of Covington since 
igio. He was appointed commissioner of public prop- 
erty of Covington on June 17, 1920, and has since given 
all his time to his official duties. His offices are in the 
City Building. He interested himself in behalf of the 
various war causes, the sale of bonds and savings 
stamps, and was one of the vigilant and public spirited 
citizens during that period. He is a republican in poli- 
tics, a member of the Baptist Church, and is affiliated 
with Latonia Lodge No. 746, F. and A. M., and Indra 
Consistory No. 2 of the Scottish Rite. He is also a 
member of the Junior Order United American Me- 
chanics. 

Mr. Russell married Lou (Smart) Wells at Covington 
in 1900. She is a daughter of John and Belle Smart, 
the latter still living in Covington, where her father died. 
Her father for twenty years was a watchman at the 
Latonia Distillery. Mr. and Mrs. Russell have one 
daughter, Thelma, born February 14, 1905, now a 
student in the Covington High School. 

Frank Payne Drake. Many of the men whose in- 
fluence counts for most in the essential business life 
of Kentucky have their homes and chief interests in 
the country. One of them is Frank Payne Drake, an 
extensive general farmer and tobacco grower in Fay- 
ette County, but who is intimately associated with 



some of the leading commercial organizations at Lex- 
ington. His home is 5^ miles northwest of that city, 
on Leestown Pike. 

Mr. Drake was born at Paynes Depot in Scott 
County, Kentucky, December 18, 1861, a son of Abra- 
ham S. and Sarah C. (Elliott) Drake. His grand- 
father, Abraham S. Drake, was a native of New Jer- 
sey, married a Miss Prall, and they came to Kentucky 
on their wedding tour. The grandfather was a rope 
maker, and had his rope walk and cordage plant at 
the east end of the viaduct on West Main Street in 
Lexington. Some of the old building he used is still 
standing. His residence was on the site of the Leonard 
Hotel. He died when about sixty years of age, and 
his widow survived him to about ninety, spending her 
last years with her son, Abraham S. Abraham S. 
Drake, Sr., had a brother who went to Iowa and 
another who went South. The children of Abraham 
S. Drake, Sr., were: David, who was killed by light- 
ning when a young man while sitting in a hotel ; Ben- 
jamin S., a prominent minister of the Baptist Church 
who for years was pastor of the Cane Run Baptist 
Church and died at Mount Sterling; Simeon, who be- 
came a Lexington distiller and lived in New York; 
James, a real estate man of Lexington, who died in 
Florida ; Abraham S. ; Eliza, wife of James Slaughter, 
lived near Danville, Kentucky; and Julia, who was 
the wife of C. M. Thompson, of Fayette County. 

Abraham S. Drake, Jr., was born in 1823, at Lex- 
ington, and for the greater part of his life was a suc- 
cessful and much esteemed educator. He was a 
graduate of the law school of Transylvania University 
at Lexington, and for a number of years was asso- 
ciated in practice with James E. Beck. He had a farm 
in Fayette County and conducted a private school on 
his farm that enjoyed the highest standing among 
the institutions of learning of that day. He continued 
teaching until his health failed, and after that he 
lived on his farm on the old Frankfort Pike, seven 
miles from Lexington, where he died August 29, 
1889. His son, W. D. Drake, of Lexington, still owns 
the old homestead. His widow survived him a num- 
ber of years, and for about sixteen years spent her 
winters in Florida. She was born in 1830 and died 
in 1913. Of their eleven children, nine reached mature 
years; Hannah, who died at the age of twenty; Ernest 
Baylor Drake, who for many years was in the agricul- 
tural implement business at Lexington and is now re- 
tired; Mary, who became the wife of James Fisher and 
died one year after her marriage ; William Dudley, 
who owns and lives on the old farm; Frank Paylie; 
Abram S., who was a commercial salesman and died 
at Louisville, at the age of forty-five; Harry Lewis, 
a resident of Tarpon Springs, Florida; Emma C, wife 
of Ernest Meres, of Tarpon Springs, Florida; and 
Simeon Elliott, who is in the agricultural implement 
and automobile business at Lexington. 

Frank Payne Drake acquired most of his education 
in his father's school. In early life he took charge 
of the farm, but also learned telegraphy and was ap- 
pointed station agent at the Yarnelltown station near 
the old farm. He also opened a stock of goods and 
developed an extensive trade as a general merchant, 
acting in the meantime as railroad agent and postmas- 
ter. He continued this flourishing business from 1882 
to 1900. In the meantime, in 1888, he had bought a 
farm, which he also handled in addition to his other 
responsibilities. Since 1900 his time and energies have 
been chiefly devoted to his farming and the business 
interests connected therewith. About thirteen years 
ago he erected the attractive home on his present farm, 
which stands on land owned by Mrs. Drake's parents. 
This residence stands back about forty rods from the 
pike on elevated ground, and is one of the attractive 
and modern country homes of Fayette County. 

On June 26, 1895, Mr. Drake married Miss Mayme 
Klopf, daughter of John and Nannie (Ramsey) Klopf. 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



117 



Her father was a native of Germany, was a butcher 
by trade and in Kentucky was employed as a butcher 
by Lewis Ramsey, whose daughter, Nannie, he subse- 
quently married. Lewis Ramsey owned at one time 
about 1,300 acres of land and lived at Yarnelltown 
Station and was extensively engaged in the butchering 
business, having a plant at Lexington. Of this plant 
John Klopf was manager. John Klopf spent the last 
twelve or fifteen years of his life on the old farm, and 
died there March 25, 1920, at the age of seventy-three. 
His wife, Nannie, passed away in May, 1907, about 
a year after the present residence was completed. 
Mr. and Mrs. Drake own 350 acres. Mr. Drake is a 
well-known specialist in the raising of wheat and corn 
for seed. His seed wheat won the sweepstakes at the 
State Fair, and he has exhibited corn at the Interna- 
tional Stock Show at Chicago, and his grains have 
won many prizes both at local and many state fairs. 
Seed grains known to have been produced by Mr. 
Drake command ready sales all over Kentucky and 
other states. He is also a breeder of Poland-China 
hogs, and is actively identified with various agricultural 
organizations for advanced movements in farm life. 

Mr. Drake is a director of the Guaranty Bank of 
Lexington, is also a director of the Shelburne Ware- 
house Company at Lexington, and is a director and 
secretary and treasurer of the Fagwood Milling Com- 
pany of Lexington. He owns some business property 
in Lexington. In company with his brother, E. B., 
and Matt Asher he built a tobacco warehouse, the 
first in Lexington. The brothers subsequently bought 
the interests of Mr. Asher, and the warehouse was 
operated by the Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company of 
St. Louis and is now owned by that corporation. The 
construction of this warehouse gave a great impetus 
to Lexington as a central tobacco market. Mr. Drake 
was also a director and chairman of the committee 
for the building of the Central Warehouse Company's 
warehouse, and was active in its management until he 
sold his interests. He has been one of the leading 
individual tobacco growers in Fayette County for a 
number of years. 

Mr. Drake is vice president of the District Board 
of the Elkhorn Baptist Association, and for a quarter 
of a century has served as deacon of the Mount Ver- 
non Baptist Church in Woodford County, this church 
being five miles from his home. He is independent 
in politics and is affiliated with the Elks. Mr. Drake 
is a very popular business man and citizen, and few 
men in Fayette County can claim more loyal friends. 

Samuel Caldwell Brooks has given his active years 
to agriculture and the livestock industry, with sub- 
stantial results to himself and the various communities 
where he has lived. For a number of years he was a 
breeder and raiser of trotting stock. His fine country 
home during the past decade has been in Fayette 
County, on Greendale Pike, five miles northwest of 
Lexington. 

Mr. Brooks was born near Mount Sterling in Mont- 
gomery County, Kentucky, November 2, 1865, a son 
of James W. and Hannah E. (Magowan) Brooks. His 
grandfather was Samuel Brooks, of Massachusetts 
ancestry, and died comparatively early, as the result 
of an accident. James W. Brooks moved to Scott 
County about 1872 and bought the Matt Stone farm 
of 550 acres. He lived there until his death in June, 
1893, when about sixty years of age. His death was 
the result of falling from the roof of his residence. 
His widow, Hannah, survived him about fifteen years, 
and the farm was sold after her death. This old 
Brooks homestead was four miles north of Midway, 
on the county line in Scott County, on the South Elk- 
horn and near old Moore's Mill. 

Samuel C. Brooks spent his early life in that locality, 
was well educated and finished his schooling in Cen- 
tral University at Richmond. On November 10, 1886, 



he married Minnie Todd, he being twenty-one and his 
bride twenty. Her father was Capt. William Hacker 
Todd, who came from Howard County, Missouri, to 
Kentucky after the Civil war. Captain Todd married 
Ann Tabitha Phelps, then the widow of Col. David 
Waller Chenault. 

David Waller Chenault was born in Madison County, 
Kentucky, February 5, 1826. His grandfather, William 
Chenault, was a Revolutionary soldier and afterward 
a pioneer in Kentucky, and died on his farm near 
Richmond. David W. Chenault served in the Mex- 
ican war, and was living in Madison County and 
about thirty-six years of age on the day after the 
defeat of General Nelson's Federal army at Richmond, 
on Sunday, August 31, 1861. He was then commis- 
sioned colonel to raise a regiment, Joseph T. Tucker 
being lieutenant-colonel and James B. McCreary, 
major. On the loth of September the regiment was 
mustered in as the Seventh, but a few months later 
was made the Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry. It was 
immediately ordered to active duty and participated in 
the battle of Hartsville, Tennessee, December 9, 1862, 
and early in 1863 was in Morgan's raid into Kentucky, 
where he played an important part. The regiment 
was on duty until the end of the war. Colonel Che- 
nault was killed while leading his men in a charge on 
an abbattis, behind which was the Twenty-fifth Mich- 
igan, under command of Colonel Orlando H. Moore. 
His remains rest in Richmond cemetery. Mrs. Brooks' 
rnother spent most of her life in Madison County and 
died there in 1900, at the age of sixty-seven. Mrs. 
Brooks was born three miles from Richmond, on Lex- 
ington Pike. 

After his marriage Mr. Brooks conducted the old 
homestead farm until 1910, when he removed to his 
present place at Greendale Station. Here he continued 
general farming, is a stock grower and shipper, and 
has long been well and favorably known among Ken- 
tucky horsemen. The comfortable residence in which 
he and his family reside was erected many years ago 
by William Spurr. 

Mr. Brooks is a democrat, but has never participated 
in politics, and is a member of the Presbyterian Church. 
Mrs. Brooks is an active member of the Bethel Mis- 
sionary Society, has done her part in the suffrage 
movement, and was a leading worker in the Red 
Cross during the war. 

Mr. Brooks has three children : Lucille Caldwell is 
the wife of John A. Stevenson, a farmer, and they 
have one child, James T. James William Brooks is 
associated with his father in the management of the 
home farm. He married Marie E. Trapp, daughter 
of Dr. Claude Trapp. Anna Magowan Brooks is the 
wife of E. R. Webb, of Lexington. 

Major H. S. Hale. Achieving fourscore years is 
of itself an achievement, but Major Hale has infinitely 
more to his credit than a long life. He fought bravely 
on many battlefields of the South, was the first to hold 
the office of Graves County after the war, rendered 
conspicuous service to his State as State Treasurer, 
and for a quarter of a century was closely identified 
with the management of one of the largest banks in 
Western Kentucky, the First National Bank of May- 
field. He has exemplified all the best ideals of Chris- 
tian citizenship and manhood and his long life has 
been a course of duty performed and service rendered. 

He was born near Bowling Green in Warren County, 
Kentucky, May 4, 1836. The Hales came from England 
to Virginia in colonial times, and his great-grandfather 
was a Revolutionary soldier. His grandfather, Joshua 
Hale, though born in Virginia took up his early resi- 
dence in North Carolina and later came to Middle 
Tennessee where he spent his last years as a farmer. 
Nicholas Hale, father of Major Hale, was born in 
North Carolina and died in Graves County, Kentucky, 
in 1847. He gave his years to agriculture, was a demo- 



118 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



crat in politics, and a very enthusiastic member of the 
Christian Church. He married Rhoda Crouch who was 
born in Tennessee in 1807 and died in Graves County 
in 185 1. She was of Scotch-Irish ancestry. The chil- 
dren of Nicholas and Rhoda Hale were: William 
Harrison, born in 1829 and died in 1881, who spent his 
active career as a merchant ; Geraldine, who died at 
the age of sixty-eight in Graves County, having been 
twice married, her husbands being Rufus McCuen 
and George Thompson, both farmers; Nathan Perry 
born in 1833 and died in 1902, for many years a mer- 
chant at Murray in Calloway County; Major Henry 
Stevenson, who was the third son of the family; 
Bathsheba who died at the age of forty-five, wife of 
John T. Cary, a Graves County farmer; and Joshua 
David who was born in 1842 and died in 1892, having 
been a business man and lay preacher of the Christian 
Church. 

Major Hale was eleven years of age when his father 
died and fifteen at the death of his mother. He and 
his brothers and sisters found a good home with their 
uncle and aunt Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Hale of Graves 
County. He acquired his early education in rural 
schools, also attended the Mayfield Seminary and his 
training and environment were calculated to bring out 
the strong and self reliant virtues of his character. He 
completed his education at the age of twenty-lwo and 
for a time clerked in stores. 

He was twenty-five when the war broke out and 
in the first year he enlisted in the Seventh Kentucky 
Infantry, serving as captain one year, major two 
years, and finally was promoted to lieutenant colonel 
in command of the Third and Seventh consolidated 
regiments of Kentucky Infantry. Startmg at Columbus, 
Kentucky, he was with Gen. Leonidas Polk, was with 
Gen. Albert S. Johnston at Shiloh, with General Pem- 
berton at Vicksburg and Baton Rouge, with Gen. John 
C. Breckinridge at Jackson, with Generals Price and 
Van Dorn at Corinth and through a large part of his 
service was under the command of the great Confed- 
erate cavalryman Gen. Nathan B. Forrest, participating 
in Brice's Crossroads, Harrisburg and Old Town Creek. 
At Old Town Creek he was seriously wounded in the 
left hip. It was supposed to be a mortal wound but 
he was nursed back to health in the home of James 
Sykes at Columbus, Mississippi. On rejoining his 
command he was promoted by General Forrest to 
Lieutenant Colonel and filled that post during the last 
year. His final engagement was at Montevallo, Ala- 
bama, and he surrendered with Forrest at Columbus, 
Mississippi, in April, 1865. 

At the close of the war he returned to Graves 
County and for about a year was in the mercantile 
business at Boydsville and Lynnville. In 1866 he was 
elected sheriff of the county and by reelection in 1868 
filled the office for four years. In 1871 he was elected 
to the State Senate, representing the First Senatorial 
District four years. His service in the Senate was 
made notable by his work in introducing and securing 
the passage in 1873 of the Mayfield local option law, 
which became a law in that year. 

Immediately after leaving the Senate Major Hale 
solicited the capital stock and organized the First 
National Bank of Mayfield in the spring of 1875. He 
was elected its first president and for fifteen years 
he guided that institution through periods of financial 
stress and prosperity with the wisdom of a true finan- 
cier. It was his prominence as a banker that caused 
him to be called by Governor Buckner to the office 
of state treasurer in 1890. He served by appointment 
of the Governor two years and was then elected for 
a term of four years. Largely on his own responsi- 
bility he instituted the important reform of requiring 
banks to pay interest on state deposits, and thereby 
made the office of state treasurer self supporting and 
his reform, subsequently re-enforced by state law, 
is estimated to have saved a quarter of a million dol- 



lars to the state in the years since he instituted the 
practice. In 1895 Major Hale was nominated at the 
democratic convention for secretary of state. 

On returning to Mayfield he was agam called to the 
presidency of the First National Bank, and held that 
post of duty and responsibility for thirteen years until 
he accepted an honorable retirement in 1919. 

Major Hale helped found West Kentucky College at 
Mayfield in 1886 and has given his counsel and re- 
sources to many other enterprises that have promoted 
the growth and welfare of his home city. He became 
president of the reorganized Mayfield Woolen Mills 
about 1904. 

No interest could be said to have dominated his 
lifelong service in the Christian Church. He has been 
an elder in his church for many years, and has in fact 
been the chief support of that denomination in May- 
field. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, 
of Lexington Camp of the Confederate Veterans and 
in time of war as in peace has been associated with 
many movements in his home city and state. A large 
property owner he has distributed many of his pos- 
sessions among his children. 

Next to his patriotic devotion to the South his chief 
inspiration during the war was Miss Virginia Adelaide 
Gregory, who on November 8, 1865, soon after he had 
returned to civil pursuits, became his bride. She was 
born in Kemper County, Mississippi, in 1843, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Gregory. She graduated from 
the Female Institute at Columbus, Mississippi, in 1859. 
For nearly half a century she was the sharer of his 
home and the partner in his increasing success. Mrs. 
Hale died April 30, 1914. 

Major and Mrs. Hale reared the following children: 
.'Vlbert Sidney, who died at the age of eighteen ; Annie 
Belle, who never married and died at Mayfield, aged 
forty-four; Nathan A., born in 1870, now vice presi- 
dent of the First National Bank of Mayfield, and who 
for twenty-five years was its cashier ; William L., who 
is the present postmaster of Mayfield ; Mary E., wife 
of Dr. Edgar Odell Lovett, who since 1908 has been 
president of the Rice Institute at Houston, Texas, one 
of the largest institutions of higher learning in the 
South ; Henry S., Jr., an oil operator at Fort Worth, 
Texas ; and Joseph Theodore, who lives with his father 
and is assistant cashier of the First National Bank at 
Mayfield. 

William Dudley Drake is one of several brothers 
whose names have been conspicuously identified with 
the commercial and agricultural progress of Fayette 
County and the City of Lexington. His own time and 
abilities have been bestowed almost entirely on farm- 
ing, and his life has been largely spent at the old 
Drake homestead on Frankfort Pike, seven miles west 
of Lexington. 

Mr. Drake was born in Lexington July 10, 1859, and 
is a son of Professor Abraham S. Drake and grand- 
son of Col. Abraham S. Drake. His grandfather came 
to Kentucky from New Jersey and was a pioneer rope 
and cordage manufacturer at Lexington. His father, 
Abraham S. Drake, spent most of his life as an edu- 
cator, was also a lawyer in Lexington, and while 
living on his farm conducted a private school. William 
Dudley Drake was two years of age when his father 
moved to the farm in 1861. He grew up there, and 
in spite of the fact that his father was an educator he 
had limited advantages, never inherited any prop- 
erty, and as a youth began working for his father 
at wages of $15 a month or 57^ cents a day. He 
bought the interests of the other heirs in the old home- 
stead of 222 acres, and has since increased his farm 
to 350 acres. He paid as high as $150 an acre for 
some of the land, and for other portions he paid as 
low as $50. At his father's death he took charge of 
the farm, and when the old home was burned, leav- 
ing only the walls standing, he had the residence com- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



119 



pletely rebuilt. His father owned one of tlie best 
private libraries in the county. The fire apparently 
left the volumes untouched, but as soon as the debris 
was cleared away and the books exposed to air they 
fell to ashes. 

Mr. Drake has been a diversified farmer, and for 
a number of years has specialized in seed breeding. 
He has endeavored to fulfill the role of practical 
farmer, making permanent improvements and preserv- 
ing the fertility of the soil. The corn and wheat 
grown on his farm for seed purposes have long com- 
manded premiums. He won prizes on his Boone 
County White Corn at Blue Grass Fairs and State Fairs, 
and in i9-'0 he exhibited a variety of farm products 
at the International Stock Show in Chicago, includ- 
ing seed corn, blue grass, timothy, orchard grass, 
wheat, rye, barley and oats. At the Blue Grass Fair 
in 1920 he exhibited a hand of hemp which he him- 
self had broken forty-one years ago, and this exhibit 
was awarded a special prize. Mr. Drake is also a 
tobacco grower, cultivating thirty or forty acres to 
that crop. This crop is entirely in the hands of 
tenants. 

His farm is a body of very fine Blue Grass soil, 
and his residence stands back three-quarters of a 
mile from the pike, its site having been chosen be- 
fore pikes were built. 

Mr. Drake is married and has one daughter, Whit- 
ney Lee, wife of Alwyn W. Arkle, a clerk in the 
Bank of Commerce at Lexington and a grandson, 
Thomas Dudley Arkle. Mr. Drake has never sought 
office, though he has been active in various cam- 
paigns. He is a trustee and deacon of the Mount 
Vernon Baptist Church. He is fond of good stock, 
and as power for his farming operations has made 
it a practice to secure the best mules money will buy 
and has frequently sold mules at the top of the mar- 
ket. He enjoys vacations spent in hunting and fish- 
ing, and for sixteen winters has gone to Florida, where 
he participates in the sport of sea fishing. 

Edward H. Doak. While during recent years he 
has applied himself to the pursuits of farming, Edward 
H. Doak, agriculturist and magistrate, on the George- 
town Pike, 3^4 miles north of Lexington, has never 
given up his interest in the labors that occupied him 
during a former period of his career. From young 
manhood for a number of years he was actively iden- 
tified with matters pertaining to the reforming of 
young men and women who had strayed aside from 
the straight and narrow path, and wrung from his 
surroundings the victory of a noble achievement. Few 
institutions can be conceived more cheerless and de- 
void of all inspiration for anything ideal or elevating 
than reform institutions. It is true that charitable 
women and philanthropists have periodically brought 
their sunshine, kind words and good deeds to bear 
upon the lives of the inmates ; but for the keeper of 
such an institution to burden himself with the moral 
responsibility of those turned over to him, and to 
endeavor to return them to society as human beings 
with softened natures and worthy ambitions is some- 
thing out of the ordinary. In Mr. Doak the old ideas 
of the grim, unresponsive, cold-hearted and cold- 
blooded jailer were revolutionized, for, although he 
was always a strict disciplinarian, from the first he 
treated his charges as humans never beyond the pale 
of good influences, and there has never been one en- 
gaged in this kind of work who has so won the un- 
shaken confidence and affection of the so-called crim- 
inal element as Mr. Doak. 

Edward H. Doak was born July 11, 1869, at Green- 
ville and Tusculum College, four miles from Green- 
ville, Tennessee, son of William Smith Doak, D. D. 
The tradition is that Samuel and Jane Doak came 
from the north of Ireland about 1730. Their son, 
Samuel Doak, was born in Virginia in 1740 and grad- 



uated from a college in New Jersey in 1775. "As 
first apostle of education" and founder of the first 
institution of learning west of the Alleghenies he 
came to Tennessee before it was a state. In 1784 he 
was a member of the Constitutional Convention that 
formed the State of Franklin from North Carolina. 
He established Martin Academy, the first school west 
of the Alleghanies, at Salem, in 1785, this being four 
years previous to the founding of Transylvania Col- 
lege. It became Washington College in 1795, and he 
was its president until 1818, when he established Tus- 
culum Academy, and while acting as its president he 
preached in that region. He died in 1830. An en- 
graving of this distinguished pioneer educator now 
occupies an honored position in the home of his great- 
grandson, Edward H. Doak. 

He had worthy successors in both his son, Rev. Dr. 
Samuel W. Doak, and his grandson. Rev. William S. 
Doak. His son chartered Tusculum Academy as a 
college in 1844, and continued for many years as its 
president. He- died in 1875, when his son, William 
Smith Doak, who was born March 27, 1829, was called 
to succeed him. William Smith Doak graduated from 
the institution probably in 1851, was licensed to preach 
in 1853 at Somerset, Kentucky, and was one of the 
two graduates of Center College at Danville, Kentucky, 
in 1854. He and a Mr. Duncan were the first gradu- 
ates in theology to teach at London, Kentucky, where 
they likewise preached, and established there Laurel 
Seminary, with which Mr. Doak was connected until 
called to become president of the Greenville and Tus- 
culum College, which he served until his death, in 
1882. In the meantime he filled the pulpits at times 
of the Salem and Oakland Presbyterian churches, and 
for a time during the Civil war period also practiced 
medicine. William Smith Doak's brother, Alexander 
Doak, was his successor as president of Greenville 
and Tusculum College, which is a Presbyterian insti- 
tution. In 1854, at London, Kentucky, William Smith 
Doak, D. D., was united in marriage with Frances E. 
Banton, who was born at Barbourville, Kentucky, a 
daughter of John Banton and a niece of Judge Boyle, 
one of the early chief justices of Missouri. Mrs. 
^Doak, who survives her husband at the age of eighty- 
five years, was a teacher at London for several years 
before her marriage. To Mr. and Mrs. Doak there 
were born seven children : Julia, who taught for twenty 
years at Peabody Normal School and is now Mrs. 
Franklin Tabor, of Macon, Mississippi; John, who is 
engaged in farming in the vicinity of Macon; Belle, 
who died in 1883, at the age of twenty-two years; 
Robert, who is engaged in the practice of medicine at 
Nashville, Tennessee; Edward H. ; Addison Randolph, 
who died at the age of twenty-four years, while in 
charge of an academy at Sweetwater, Tennessee; and 
Mary Ellen, who is unmarried and has devoted her 
life to caring for her mother. 

Edward H. Doak attended the Greenville and Tus- 
culum College, and at the age of nineteen years entered 
the office of the Nashville (Tennessee) Industrial and 
Reform School, where he spent ten years. In 1897 
he established the Knox County Industrial School, at 
Knoxville, supervising the construction of the building 
and putting the institution into operation. He con- 
tinued as superintendent for about three years, or 
until 1899, when he was called to Lexington by the 
Board of the Kentucky Houses of Reform, then about 
to be located at Greendale, and made superintendent. 
This institution was formally opened November 22, 
1899, and at the start as inmates had six boys from 
the state penitentiary who had been pardoned by Gov- 
ernor Bradley. These boys assisted Mr. Doak, who 
at the same time received as charges forty men from 
the penitentiary. The great increase in Mr. Doak's 
work and the scope of his beneficent influence may be 
seen in the fact that at the end of his thirteenth year 
as superintendent the institution of which he was the 



120 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



head had 700 inmates. At the outset Mr. Doak's work 
was hard, discouraging and for the most part unappre- 
ciated. His considerate treatment of prisoners fre- 
quently met with ridicule, but his inborn nature of 
quiet, kind authority continued to assert itself, and 
during the years that he held the superintendency there 
was developed and placed in effective working order 
an agency for moral improvement, the effects of which 
are practical and the influences of which are immeasur- 
able. This work was accomplished by an earnest man 
who accomplished a splendid achievement in reclaim- 
ing many of his fellows to honesty, industry and whole- 
some living. Some of these he meets occasionally, and 
they unreservedly place to his credit the success which 
they have made of their lives, due to his kindly and 
sympathetic training, instruction and assistance. 

When he left reform work as a vocation Mr. Doak 
engaged in farming three miles north of the Court 
House, on the Georgetown Pike, where he had fifty 
acres, in addition to which he supervises the opera- 
tions on his two other farms. He is treasurer and 
an original director of the Shelburne Tobacco Ware- 
house, established in 1912, and for four months each 
year devotes his whole time to that business, where 
his presence is demanded in the office. This concern 
has sold as high as 7,000,000 pounds of tobacco, and 
has two houses, each with a capacity of 1,800 baskets 
and each demanding six square feet of space. This 
is an expanding business which has benefited much 
by Mr. Doak's advice, counsel and business abilities. 
He is a director in the Bank of Commerce and takes 
an active part in all the activities which make up the 
life of his community. Although a democrat in pol- 
itics, in a district normally republican by a 200 major- 
ity, he was elected magistrate by a plurality of 300, 
and is now serving his seventh year in that office. 
He has been a constant advocate of good roads, and 
among the many worthy accomplishments of his admin- 
istration are the asphalt pikes of his district, all of 
which have been built during his term of office. Re- 
cently he has received the democratic nomination for 
county judge of Fayette County. 

In 1893, at Nashville, Tennessee, Mr. Doak married 
Susie Lyle, who was born at Nashville, a daughter of 
Dr. Abner and Eliza (Sale) Lyle, natives of Chris- 
tian County, Kentucky. Doctor Lyle was engaged in 
the practice of medicine and surgery at Russellville, 
Kentucky, for a number of years, but later removed 
to Nashville, where he passed the remainder of his 
life and died, as did his worthy wife. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Doak there was born one son, Robert, who died 
at the age of six years. As a young woman Mrs. 
Doak taught in the public schools of Nashville, and 
was subsequently a teacher of shorthand. Her assist- 
ance was of invaluable service to her husband during 
the period that he acted as superintendent of the Ken- 
tucky House of Reform at Greendale, of which in- 
stitution she acted as matron, in addition to helping 
her husband with his multitudinous duties and teach- 
ing music to the inmates. 

William Worthington. Among the leading mem- 
bers of the legal profession in Kentucky is the gentle- 
man whose name forms the caption to this sketch, a 
man who has not only honored his profession, but who 
also has by common consent long been numbered among 
the representative men of his section of the state, ever 
holding the unequivocal confidence and esteem of the 
people among whom he has lived. 

William Worthington was born in Greenup County, 
Kentucky, on February 22, 1869, and is the last child 
in order of birth of the six children born to William 
Jackson and Catherine (Steele) Worthington. His 
father was born near Johnstown, Pennsylvania, in No- 
vember, 1833, and his death occurred in 1914, while the 
mother, who was born in Washington County, Virginia, 
in 1835, died in 1888. Three of the children are de- 



ceased, the survivors being, Annie, the wife of W. B. 
Strader, John Thomas and William. William J. Worth- 
ington was educated in the public schools of Pennsyl- 
vania and Ohio. While still a comparatively young man 
he became manager of an iron furnace, but later took 
up farming in Greenup County, Kentucky, having come 
to this state with his parents. At the outbreak of the 
Civil war he enlisted in the Federal cause and became 
captain of Company B, Twenty-second Regiment, Ken- 
tucky Volunteer Infantry, with which he served through 
the war. He became major of his regiment, and sub- 
sequently lieutenant-colonel, in which capacity he com- 
manded the regiment, and at the expiration of his period 
of service he was offered a commission as brigadier- 
general, but declined the promotion. He attained con- 
siderable prominence in the public affairs of his com- 
munity and state, having served three terms as a mem- 
ber of the State Legislature, one term in the Senate 
and two in the House. He continued his farming opera- 
tion until 1873, when he became part owner and manager 
of an iron furnace, continuing in that business for about 
ten years. He was then elected county judge of Greenup 
County, serving one term, at the end of which he again 
assumed the management of an iron furnace, continuing 
in that position for several years, or until his election 
to the office of lieutenant-governor of Kentucky, on 
the ticket with Governor Bradley. The remaining active 
years of his life were spent in farming and in the prac- 
tice of law, he having been a member of the bar from 
early manhood. Politically he was a republican, and 
his religious sympathies were with the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. 

William Worthington received his elementary education 
in the public and high schools of Greenup County, after 
which he attended the University of Kentucky. He 
then took a course in a business college, after which 
he accepted a position as stenographer with the well- 
known law firm of Breckinridge & Shelby, with whom 
he remained about seven years, serving one year as 
private secretary to Colonel Breckinridge. During this 
period he gave serious attention to the reading of law 
and also attended night law school at Georgetown Uni- 
versity. He was admitted to the bar in 1897, and at 
once established an office in Lexington, where he has 
been engaged in practice continuously since. For more 
than a dozen years Mr. Worthington served as referee 
in bankruptcy for the district composed of Clark, Fay- 
ette, Madison, Scott and Jessamine counties. A lawyer 
of acknowledged ability and a man of soundest integ- 
rity, he has long held a high place among his colleagues 
and in the community at large his influence has been of 
a most beneficent order. His character is the positive 
expression of a strong nature and he has achieved signal 
success in his calling. 

Mr. Worthington has been intensely public-spirited 
in his attitude towards all measures affecting the gen- 
eral welfare, supporting every movement which has 
promised to advance the material, civic or moral inter- 
ests of the people. He has served for a number of 
years as a trustee of the Kentucky Houses of Reform. 
Politically he is an earnest supporter of the republican 
party, while in religion he is a Presbyterian, having 
served as a member of the session of the First Presby- 
terian Church of Le.xington. 

On the 4th day of May, 1898, Mr. Worthington was 
married to Addie Swift Norwood, who was born in Fay- 
ette County, Kentucky, the daughter of Dr. Edward 
M. and Priscilla W. (Downing) Norwood, both of 
whom are deceased. They were natives, respectivc'y. 
of Massachusetts and Kentucky, and they became the 
parents of five children, Mrs. Worthington being the 
fourth in order of birth. Doctor Norwood was a sur- 
geon in the Union army during the Civil war and after- 
ward engaged in general farming and stock raising. He 
and his wife were members of the Presbyterian Church, 
and in politics Doctor Norwood was a democrat. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Worthington have been born two chil- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



121 



dren, William N. and Frank F. Personally Mr. Worth- 
ington is genial and approachable, and has a host of 
warm and loyal friends throughout this locality. 

William Thornton Lafferty. Forty years a lawyer, 
an active member of his profession in Harrison County 
and also at Lexington, Judge Lafferty is doubtless most 
widely known to the profession in Kentucky as Dean 
of the State University Law School, which he organ- 
ized and which he has made an institution of the high- 
est service in the training of well qualified members 
for the bar. 

Judge Lafferty was born at Cynthiana, Kentucky, 
March I, 1856, a son of John and Francis Elizabeth 
(Henry) Lafiferty. His father and mother were both 
natives of Harrison County, his father born in 1832 
and his mother in 1839. John A. Lafferty spent prac- 
tically all his life as a farmer in Harrison County. 
The only important exception Vas the four years of 
the Civil war, during which he was a gallant Confeder- 
ate soldier from the time he enlisted in August, 1861, 
in Company K of the 9th Kentucky Infantry, until the 
close of the war in 1865. Almost continuously he was 
under the command of that great Kentucky general. 
Colonel W. C. P. Breckinridge. He was wounded twice 
in the first battle in which he engaged, but soon re- 
joined his command and had the distinction of being one 
of the soldiers constituting the body-guard of President 
Jefiferson Davis and his cabinet when that distinguished 
party surrendered in Georgia. In after years he was 
several times called from his farm to the duties of pub- 
lic office, and for three terms, six years, served as sheriff 
of Harrison County. He began voting as a whig, and 
later became a democrat. He was a very active mem- 
ber of the Church of the Disciples. John A. Lafiferty 
died in igo6. His wife died in 1918, and of their twelve 
children eleven are still living, William T. being the 
oldest. 

William Thornton Lafiferty acquired his preparatory 
education in the Cynthiana Academy and the Smith 
Classical Institute of Cynthiana, and later graduated 
with the A. B. degree from the Kentucky Agricultural 
and Mechanical College, now the University of Ken- 
tucky. The University in consideration of his promi- 
nence as a lawyer and other distinguished services con- 
ferred upon him the A. M. degree in 1908. Judge Laf- 
ferty was admitted to the Kentucky bar in 1879 and 
forthwith engaged in a practice that soon brought him 
a l^rge clientage and many public honors. He filled the 
office of county attorney of Harrison County from 1882 
to 1886, and was judge of Harrison County from 1886 
to 1894. Then from 1894 to 1899 he practiced as a mem- 
ber of the firm Ward and Lafiferty, and was senior part- 
ner of the firm Lafiferty and King from 1899 to 1908. 

In 1908 he was called upon to organize the Law De- 
partment of the University of Kentucky, and when that 
school was opened he was Dean and conjointly with 
those duties he was also comptroller of the University 
from 1908 to 1915. 

Judge Lafiferty is a member of the Kentucky Bar 
Association, is a democrat, member of the Christian 
Church, and fraternally is affiliated with the Masons 
and Knights of Pythias. He was trustee of the Bible 
College of Transylvania University five years and for 
five years was trustee of the Agricultural and Mechan- 
ical College of Kentucky, serving as a member of the 
Executive Committee. He is a member of the National 
Educational Association, and in many ways has exerted 
a prominent influence in Kentucky educational as well 
as legal affairs. In Masonry he has enjoyed some dis- 
tinctive honors, being past master of his Lodge, past 
high priest of the chapter, past eminent commander of 
Cynthiana Commandery No. 16 of the Knights Templar, 
and also past chancellor commander of the Knights of 
Pythias. 

Judge Lafiferty married on November 20, 1889, Miss 
Maude Ward, of CjTithiana, daughter of Andrew Har- 



rison and Helen (Lair) Ward. To her ancestry and 
the career of her distinguished father a special memoir 
is dedicated elsewhere in this publication. Mrs. Lafferty 
is one of Kentucky's prominent women. She is chair- 
man of Kentucky History on the Board of the Kentucky 
Federation of Women's clubs, a post she has held since 
1915. In that capacity she has performed an important 
service in locating and cataloging the historical materials 
of Kentucky, and has inaugurated a plan of work for 
the Department of History, which is being carried out 
by the clubs over the state — a program that goes far 
to emphasize the value of history and awaken a new 
interest in the subject in all parts of Kentucky. Her 
plan of work is the more important because it gives first 
place to local and state history and sets in motion an 
organization of research and study from which will 
accrue a tremendous amount of true historical data and 
historical material hitherto unavailable to students of 
Kentucky history. Last but not least she is striving 
to arouse an interest in the possession and a pride in 
the preservation of the historic materials still in Ken- 
tucky — for future Kentuckians. Mrs. Lafiferty is also 
a member of the Filson Club, the Bradford Club, 
the Mississippi Valley Historical Association and the 
Ohio Valley Historical Association. 

Judge and Mrs. Lafferty reside at 127 Woodland 
Avenue in Lexington. To their marriage were born 
two children : Helen Ward, the older, graduated in 
1909 from the Hamilton Female College of Lexington, 
and in 191 1 completed the course of the Musical Conser- 
vatory of the same college. She is the wife of Benjamin 
Louis Nisbet, who graduated under Judge Lafiferty from 
the Kentucky University Law School in 191 5, and has 
since been engaged in the active practice of his profes- 
sion at Madisonville. Mr. and Mrs. Nisbet have one 
daughter, Helen Louise. The younger daughter of Judge 
and Mrs. Lafiferty was Kathleen L., who died at the age 
of eight years. 

Andrew Harrison Ward, father of Mrs. W. T. 
Lafiferty, of Lexington, was for many years a peer 
of Kentucky's ablest lawyers, was a citizen of re- 
markable integrity and purity of character, and, living 
to the age of eighty-nine, he was one of the last sur- 
vivors of a bar which still included Henry Clay and 
others when he began practice. 

Andrew Harrison Ward was born in Harrison 
County, Kentucky, January 3, 1815, and died April 16, 
1904. He was reared on a farm and had to exert his 
youthful energies in contributing to the support of 
his widowed mother and younger children, attending 
country schools and also old Transylvania University 
at Lexington. He began the study of law in 1842 
under Maj. James Curry at Cynthiana, and entered 
practice in 1844, just sixty years before his death, and 
he continued an active member of the bar for over 
half a century. He was elected to the Legislature in 
1863, and in 1865 the democrats nominated him for 
Congress from the Sixth Kentucky District. His 
friends attributed his defeat to the votes of Federal 
soldiers. He was renominated in 1866 and elected to 
fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Gen. 
Clay Smith, who became governor of Montana Terri- 
tory. Judge Ward cast his first vote for Henry Clay, 
and during the war was a Constitutional Union man 
and ever afterwards a democrat. 

Mrs. J. J. Haley, a sister of Champ Clark, has de- 
clared that Harrison County never had a more gifted 
son than Judge Ward. In her tribute to him published 
when he celebrated his eighty-eighth birthday, she said : 

"Could there be convened a council of men who 
had known him from his youth up to sit in solemn 
judgment and decide which is the greatest talent, there 
would likely be as many diflferent decisions as there 
were men. Looking at his leonine head and face and 
compactly knit frame, one would say, strength; listen- 
ing to his impassioned oratory, eloquence; to his flash- 



122 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



ing repartee, wit ; to a crushing argument, logic ; to a 
marvelous flight of fancy, imagination; to a startling 
array of historic facts and figures, memory; to an 
instantaneous solution of a test problem in abstruse 
mathematics and we say, 'Why here is a mathe- 
matician of the first order'; to one of his desultory 
talks — which are often prose poems — as he descants 
on fields and woods, telling in what nooks and cran- 
nies the first wild flowers are found, and what trees 
in the hedge burst their buds to the first smile of 
spring — we think we have summed him up at last and 
say, 'Lo, he is a poet!' The truth is there are as 
many A. H. Wards as there are moods and occasions, 
and though he may often be bewildering, prosy and 
dull he never is. Other men we know, and we admire 
their knowledge; they toil and strive and we admire 
their achievements ; but here is a man with such readi- 
ness, spontaniety and versatility, with such a complete 
mastery of his powers and he manipulates them as a 
conjurer does his 'properties' and with a magic touch 
opens to us new realms of fact and fancy." 

At the time of the death of Judge Ward the editorial 
columns of the Lexington Herald contained a tribute 
written by Col. W. C. P. Breckinridge which deserves 
quotation here. 

"Major Harry Ward, as he was known through Ken- 
tucky, was a law student in the office of Judge James 
Curry, who was the great-grandfather of the manager 
of the Herald. Our personal acquaintance with him 
began before the war, and a friendship was then com- 
menced which was never broken or impaired. We 
met him at the bar on numerous occasions ; we wgre 
quite often associated with him as counsel for the 
same clients, or on opposite sides. We also met him 
at political conventions, speaking with him from the 
same platform to the same meetings, and associated 
with him in the most intimate ways. While he was 
much our senior, our terms were such as to give us a 
fair insight into his character. His personality vvas 
unique; his individuality as strong as any man with 
whom we were ever acquainted. It does not describe 
this man to say of him, as you may of many thousands, 
that he was a brave, frank, upright gentleman. He 
was all of that. It does not give any fair portraiture 
to add that he was an excellent lawyer, a captivating 
and persuasive stump speaker, and a pracitioner of 
unusual power, though he was all of that. There 
was something about him that was individual and 
personal, so that no man ever came in contact with 
him who was not impressed by this strong individuality. 
He was one of the kindest, most charitable and gen- 
erous men we ever knew — charitable in its broad and 
noblest sense, thinking evil of no one, speaking evil 
of no one, but kindly in his judgment_ of all. We 
presume he never knew what fear was, either physical, 
intellectual or moral; and consequently he was a thor- 
oughly veracious man. We do not mean that he told 
merely the truth, but he lived a veracious life. His 
life was an open book. He had some gifts to a very 
high degree. His perceptive faculties were unusually 
quick. He seized the salient points in a case with 
almost lightning like rapidity, and he presented them 
with unusual power. While he had not the graces 
of some of our Kentucky orators, his manner was 
impressive, and through all he said he showed the 
power of his original individuality. His sarcasm was 
overwhelming: not either hitter or vindictive. His 
humor was irresistible, and he illustrated in his foren- 
sic and political speeches the points he desired to make 
with anecdotes, the most of which he made, that were 
not only apt and amusing, but told with wonderful 
attractiveness. He was a man of very strong na- 
ture, intense convictions and earnest likes and dis- 
likes, and he took no pains to conceal either. Of 
course, such a man living so long a life in a com- 
munity so fine, had influence, attracted to him warm 



friends and made some enemies. He was known all 
over Kentucky, and everywhere had the respect and 
confidence of the people and the friendship of the bar 
with those with whom he came into personal contact. 

"We have never known a kindlier man. We have 
never met a more sincere friend. We never knew a 
franker gentleman. In the practice of law he was 
scrupulous and punctilious. During his long and 
varied career we presume no one ever had occasion 
to doubt not only his strict integrity, but his care- 
ful observance of the etiquette and ethics of his pro- 
fession. 

"He was the last of a group of striking and rather 
remarkable lawyers who were, as was known in those 
days, the Circuit Court lawyers or riders of the cir- 
cuit. He was held to be at the bar at the trial of cases 
the full equal of the ablest of those lawyers of whom 
the Trimbles, Garrard Davis, Governor Robinson, 
Madison C. Johnson, John B. Huston, Richard Han- 
son, James Simpson and others were members. Those 
who heard him in any of the great criminal or civil 
cases that have been tried in the counties of Harri- 
son, Pendleton, Scott, Bracken, Bourbon, Clark, Mont- 
gomery and perhaps others during his long career will 
hold this tribute as being severely just and not ex- 
travagant or rhetorical. He was greater than anything 
he did ; his personality more attractive than anything 
he said. The man was larger, more lovable and more 
influential than either his utterances or his actions in 
whatever society he was, under all circumstances he 
exercised an influence, he evoked an interest and com- 
manded a power that was as great, if not greater, 
than anything he said in any formal speech either at 
the bar or on the stump. In his daily talk on the 
street, in the lobbies of the hotel, wherever he hap- 
pened to be, in whatever company he happened to fall, 
he was a man of striking influence and power. It was 
this quality or combination of qualities that made 
him so beloved and so influential; and in this tribute 
to his memory by one who long admired him and was 
always a friend we desire to call rather special atten- 
tion to this attractive personality." 

Judge Ward was three times married. His third 
wife was Miss Helen Lair, who was born in 1838 and 
is still living, and though past fourscore makes trips 
unattended between her home in California and her 
children in Kentucky. She is the mother of Mrs. W. 
T. Lafferty, Harry Ward, Mrs. W. U. Grider, Paul 
Ward and Ashley Ward. 

A great deal of Kentucky history centers in the 
Lair family and the old Lair homestead still care- 
fully preserved at Cynthiana, now the property of 
Mrs. J. K. Northcutt and her sister Miss Eliza Lair, 
who are descendants of the original owner and builder 
of this famous home, known as The Cedars. The 
great Lair estate, which once comprised nearly 1,000 
acres has been greatly diminished, but the Lair house, 
built in 1828, at a cost of $40,000, is still standing, one 
of the splendid types of the solid architecture of that 
period. It is in English baronial style of brick and 
cut stone. A short distance from the house is the 
old Lair family vault, hewn out of the solid granite 
and overlooking the Licking River. In this vault were 
placed the bones of the ill-fated pioneers of Ruddels 
Fort who were massacred by the British General Byrd 
and his savage allies in 1780 at the time of the first 
raids in Kentucky. Charles Lair caused the bones to 
be gathered, placed in stone cofiins and laid with his 
loved ones in the stone vault built just below the spot 
upon which the old fort stood. In 1775 Andrew Lair 
came from Rockingham County, Virginia, to Logans 
Fort in Kentucky. In 1791, the year before Kentucky 
was admitted, his two younger brothers, Mathias and 
John, came to Kentucky. John Lair was the father 
of Mrs. Helen (Lair) Ward. Recently a permanent 
organization of the descendants of the Lair brothers 



I 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



123 



has been formed, and the historian of the organization 
is Mrs. W. T. Lafferty, who was largely instrumental 
in effecting the organization. 

Thomas R. Gardner. The State of Kentucky, long 
famed for its wonderful horses, has produced few 
finer animals than those which have come from Tim- 
berland, for many years conducted as a leading breed- 
ing farm by Thomas Robinson Gardner. Here were 
born such famous race horses as Domino, Tommy 
Atkins, Havoc, Leonora Loring, Eva Rice and Elec- 
tioneer, all bred under the watchful eye, experienced 
care and infinite skill of Mr. Gardner, who from boy- 
hood has understood and loved horses, but who since 
the advent of the automobile racing industry has 
drifted more and more into retirement, with the 
gradual passing of the "Sport of Kings." 

Mr. Gardner was born in his father's farm in Clark 
County, Kentucky, April 17, 1853, a son of Thomas and 
Mary Ann (Ramsey) Gardner, natives of the same 
county, where his father was born in 1812 and died 
at eighty years of age, while his mother, born in 1816, 
passed away when seventy-eight years of age. There 
were four children in the family: William L., who 
died at the age of forty-five years ; Margaret H., who 
died at the age of sixty-five years, as the wife of 
James H. Scott; Rachael P., the widow of S. B. Red- 
man; and Thomas R. The father of these children 
passed his entire life in agricultural pursuits and never 
cared for politics, although he was a democratic voter. 
He and his wife were faithful members of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church. 

Thomas R. Gardner was educated in the public 
schools of Clark County and at Kentucky Wesleyan 
Institute at Millersburg, and after leaving school be- 
gan his association with his father in farming opera- 
tions. Following his marriage he settled in Fayette 
County, Kentucky, and for a time devoted himself to 
farming and subsequently stock breeding, and even- 
tually centered all his activities in the breeding of 
fast horses, a field in which, as heretofore noted, he 
gained wide success. For many years Timberland 
furnished some of the finest horseflesh in Kentucky, 
among its sires being Himgar, Fellowcraft, Paramatta, 
Longflight, imported Victory, imported Gonecoon, im- 
ported Massetto, Tenney, imported Goldcrest and Doc- 
tor McBride. For a long time Mr. Gardner was asso- 
ciated with Maj. B. G. Thomas, with whom he held 
annual sales of yearling colts at New York. The 
arrival and rapid development of the automobile, to- 
gether with the advent of automobile racing and the 
passage of laws legalizing the same, caused them to 
sell off all their stock with the exception of a few ani- 
mals, and Mr. Gardner disposed of the last of his in 
1920 and is now living in retirement at 128 East High 
Street, Lexington. During the many years that he 
was identified with the breeding and development of 
horses he was known for his high sense of honor, 
straightforward principles and unfailing integrity. 

Mr. Gardner is a devout member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, in which he has been a steward 
for twelve or fifteen years. He was a director in the 
Central Bank, later the Lexington Bank & Trust Com- 
pany and then of the Phoenix Third National Bank, 
of which he has been a member of the finance com- 
mittee for five years. His political affiliation is with 
the democratic party. 

In April, 1876, Mr. Gardner was united in marriage 
with Kate Henderson, who was born in Fayette 
County, Kentucky, a daughter of David B. and Martha 
Ann (Pettit) Henderson, farming people, who died 
when Mrs. Gardner was only a child, leaving three 
children, of whom two are living, Mrs. Gardner being 
the second in order of birth. To Mr. and Mrs. Gard- 
ner there has been born one child, Carrie G., the wife 
of William K. Bayless, and they have one son, Thomas 
Gardner, a graduate of Lexington High School and 



Culver (Indiana) Military Academy, class of 1919, 
who declined an appointment to West Point. 

Martin Thompson Kelly is a successful corporation 
lawyer now located in Lexington, whose practice has 
involved the legal affairs of a number of leading land 
and oil companies in Virginia and Eastern Kentucky 
and also in other states. 

Mr. Kelly was born at Shenandoah, Pennsylvania, 
January 4, 1875, a son of James J. and Louise B. 
(Thompson) Kelly. The parents were both born in 
Pennsylvania and in the same year, 1852, and the 
mother is still living at Chicago. Alartin T. is the 
third of twelve children, all of whom are still living. 
James J. Kelly, who died in 1916, was a man of great 
prominence in the Pennsylvania industrial field for 
many years. He was educated in that state and for a 
long time was superintendent for the Lehigh Valley 
Coal Company, having charge of their collieries Nos. 
I, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Later, at Pittsburgh, he was asso- 
ciated with the steel manufacturers Howe-Brown and 
Company as superintendent. Subsequently he designed 
and built the Colonial Steel Company's plant and con- 
tinued as its manager for several years. He also 
served as boiler inspector for Allegheny County, and 
was president of the Sally Cogins Gold Mining Com- 
pany in North Carolina and of the Longfellow Gold 
Mining Company of Idaho. Politically he was a 
stanch republican. 

Martin Thompson Kelly spent his early life in Pitts- 
burgh, where he attended public schools, also the 
Curry Institute, and prepared for his profession in the 
law department of the University of Michigan, from 
which he graduated in 1901. He was admitted to the 
Michigan bar the same year. For about a year he 
practiced at Morgantown, West Virginia. Coming to 
Kentucky, his home and offices were at Jackson for 
about eight years, where he represented some impor- 
tant corporations owning lands in Eastern Kentucky. 
Mr. Kelly has also lived at Pineville, Kentucky, and 
in 1917 came to Lexington. He has his offices in 
the Fayette Bank Building and is attorney for several 
oil, coal and land companies operating in Eastern Ken- 
tucky. He is a member of the Lexington Bar, at 
Lexington, and State Bar associations, votes with the 
republicans, is a member of the Catholic Church, is 
identified with the Chamber of Commerce, and during 
1920 was a member of the law faculty of Kentucky 
University. 

On June 26, 1909, Mr. Kelly married Anna May 
Osborne, daughter of Judge J. J. Osborne, of Cyn- 
thiana, Kentucky. She was the second of the seven 
children of her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Kelly have 
three children, Dorothy, Margaret and James J. 

Albert Benedict Oberst. One of the prominent 
younger members of the Owensboro bar, Albert Bene- 
dict Oberst has found ample exercise for his time 
and talents since beginning practice here nearly fifteen 
years ago. 

A native son of Kentucky, he was born at Owens- 
boro, November 7, 1883, one of the family of nine 
sons and two daughters of Andrew and Mary J. 
(Tennes) Oberst. Andrew Oberst who was born in 
Germany in 1853, left his native land at the age of 
fourteen, and in London, England, learned the baker's 
trade. At seventeen he came to the United States, and 
after a brief period in the State of New York located 
at Owensboro in 1872, where he has been an honored 
and respected resident for nearly half a century. At 
Owensboro he married Mary J. Tennes, born at Jasper, 
Indiana, in 1857, daughter of Paul and Josephine 
(Kieffer) Tennes, who were also of German ancestry. 
Paul Tennes moved to Owensboro in 1868 and was a 
successful brick maker, owning and operating a brick 
yard until his death in 1877. At that time Andrew 
Oberst, who for ten years had been in the bakery 



124 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



business, took the management of the Tennes brick 
business, and directed the plant for about thirty years. 
He is now retired. Andrew Oberst and wife reared 
their children in the Catholic faith. One of their sons 
was in the army during the World war. 

Albert B. Oberst attended parochial schools, gradu- 
ated from the Owensboro High School in 1903, and 
acquired his professional education in Notre Dame 
University at South Bend, Indiana, where he was grad- 
uated with the LL. B. degree in 1906. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar and began practice in his native city 
the same year, and following the lines of general prac- 
tice has achieved a very substantial clientele. 

In 1913 he married Miss Marie Elizabeth Wittgen of 
Evansville, Indiana. They are the parents of two sons, 
Paul Leo, and Charles Albert, and two daughters, 
Alma Elizabeth and Mary Emma. Mr. and Mrs. 
Oberst are members of the Catholic Church, and he is 
a past state deputy of the Knights of Columbus ; a 
member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks and the Country Club, retiring president of the 
Welfare- League, and is the first president of Commu- 
nity Service, recently organized in Owensboro. 

Nathaniel Lewis Bosworth. One of the best 
known and most successful physicians and surgeons 
of Kentucky is Dr. Nathaniel L. Bosworth, of Lex- 
ington. He has won success in life in a definite man- 
ner because he has persevered in pursuit of a worthy 
purpose, and is gaining thereby a most satisfactory 
reward. His life has been exemplary, and he has 
always supported those interests which are calcu- 
lated to uplift and benefit his community. He is the 
representative of honored old families of the Blue 
Grass state and stands as a sterling type of that class 
which has dignified and honored the community where 
he lives. 

Nathaniel Lewis Bosworth was born on his father's 
farm in Favette County, Kentucky, on the 12th day 
of April, 1869, and is the son of Benjamin and Mary 
(Cloud) Bosworth. His paternal grandparents, Na- 
thaniel Bosworth and wife, were among the pioneer 
settlers of Favette County, spending their days here 
on a farm. They reared a family of nine children. 
Beniamin Bosworth was born in Tennessee on July 
3, 183s, and died on June 10, 1906, while his wife, 
who was born in Kentucky on October 30, 1840, died 
on October 31, 1918. They were the parents of eleven 
children, of whom two died in infancy, the survivors 
being as follows : Henry M., who served as sheriff of 
Favette County, as auditor of the State of Kentucky 
and as treasurer of the state; I. Cloud, who mar- 
ried Minnie Gess: Harriett C. ; Joseph F., who rnar- 
ried Nora Veil; Nathaniel L., the immediate subject 
of this sketch; Charles C, who married Nellie Hardy; 
E. Powell, who married Virginia Griffith; Benjamin, 
who married Anne Graves ; and Mary. The father of 
these children came to Kentucky when a mere child 
with his parents and secured his education in the 
schools of Fayette County. On attaining mature years 
he engaged in farming and stock raising,^ which occu- 
pied his attention during his entire active life. He 
was a member of the Baptist Church, while in politics 
he was nominally a democrat, though he frequently 
gave his vote in support of the prohibition ticket, be- 
ing deeply interested in the efforts to eradicate the 
whiskey traffic. The subject's maternal grandfather, 
Robert Cloud, was a man of considerable prominence 
in the early history of Kentuckv, being one of the 
leading ministers of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
and a forceful and eloquent speaker. 

Nathaniel L. Bosworth was a student in the public 
schools of Favette County and the Kentucky _ State 
University, and having determined to devote his life 
to the medical profession he matriculated in the medi- 
cal department of the University of Louisville,^ where 
he was graduated with the class of 1892, with the 



degree of Doctor of Medicine. He then took a post- 
graduate course in the New York Polyclinic Institute, 
followed by two years of special post-graduate study 
in Europe, in 1899-1901, visiting the best clinics of 
London, Berlin and Vienna. On his return Doctor 
Bosworth entered upon the active practice of his pro- 
fession in Lexington, where he has long been recog- 
nized as one of the leading members of his profes- 
sion, his reputation extending far beyond the confines 
of his own locality. He is a member of the Fayette 
County Medical Society, of which he is an ex-presi- 
dent, the Kentucky State Medical Society, the Mis- 
sissippi Valley Medical Society, the Southern^ Medical 
Society and the American Medical Association. He 
rendered efficient service for several years as a mem- 
ber of the Board of Health of the City of Lexington. 

Politically Doctor Bosworth gives his support to the 
democratic party, while his religious faith is that of 
the Baptist Church. Fraternally he is a member of 
Lexington Lodge No. 89, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. 

On the 2ist day of October, 1903, Doctor Bos- 
worth was married to Mary E. Neale, who was born 
and reared in Lexington, the daughter of Capt. Wil- 
liam L. and Carrie B. (Goodloe) Neale, both of whom 
are deceased. She is the younger of two children 
born to her parents, the other being William, who 
died in young manhood. To Doctor and Mrs. Bos- 
worth have been born two children, Carolyn Goodloe 
and Nathaniel Lewis, Jr. In addition to his long and 
creditable career in one of the most useful and exact- 
ing of professions the doctor has also proved an 
honorable member of the body politic, rising in the 
confidence and esteem of the public, and in every 
relation of life he has never fallen below the dignity 
of true manhood, being essentially a man among men 
and commanding respect by innate force "as well as by 
superior ability. 

Rankin Clemmons was one of the most venerable 
citizens of Fayette County at the time of his death, in 
191 5, a few months prior to the ninetieth anniversary of 
his birth, and he had proved himself distinctly one of 
the world's constructive workers, with the result that he 
accumulated a valuable property. His integrity of pur- 
pose was never questioned, and for many years he ap- 
plied himself zealously to his farm operations and busi- 
ness affairs, his sagacity and judgment having made him 
a citizen of substantial order. He was a good neighbor 
and a loyal friend, unassuming in manner and tastes and 
indefatigable in his efforts to achieve the maximum suc- 
cess which his ability and environment made possible. 
He died at the home of a neighbor, C. B. Carby, near 
the old homestead farm five miles southwest of Lex- 
ington, on the Harrodsburg turnpike, a property now 
owned and occupied by his son-in-law, John C. Larkin. 

Mr. Clemmons was born on a farm near Brannon Sta- 
tion in Jessamine County, near the Fayette County line, 
and he passed the greater part of his long and useful life 
in Fayette County. As a young man he purchased the 
farm near which his death occurred, the substantial 
old brick house on the place having been erected long 
before the property came into his possession. Mr. Clem- 
mons was about forty years of age at the time of his 
marriage to Miss Virginia Brock, and their marital com- 
panionship of nearly forty years was broken by the 
death of Mrs. Clemmons, who passed away at the age 
of sixty years. 

The old home farm of Mr. Clemmons comprises 205 
acres, but through his own energy and ability he accumu- 
lated a splendid landed estate of 6,000 acres, one-half of 
this property being in Mercer Countv and the remainder 
in Fayette, Jessamine and Woodford counties. With in- 
creasing prosperity he added gradually to his landed 
possessions until he became one of the most extensive 
holders of farm property in this section of the state. 
On his home farm he gave special attention to the rais- 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



125 



ing of live stock, and he rented his other farms to 
tenants who met the approval of his judgment. He 
continued in the active supervision of his business af- 
fairs until his death and was in many ways a remark- 
able man. He left no will, and the settlement of his 
large estate was effected through the medium of the 
Probate Court. 

Of the children of Mr. Clemmons the eldest was 
Moliie, who was born in the old brick house on the home 
farm, and who was nineteen years of age at -the time 
of her marriage to John C. Larkin, of whom more spe- 
cific mention will be made in later paragraphs. She 
remained with her husband on the old home place until 
her death, November ii, 1917, at the age of fifty-four 
years. Robert, the only son, continued to be associated 
with his father in farm industry until his death, at the 
age of forty years. He married Miss Mattie Raibe, and 
they became the parents of four children, Mrs. Clemmons 
likewise being deceased. Virginia, the eldest of these 
four children, is the wife of Doctor Allen, a representa- 
tive physician in Mercer County. Edward resides in the 
city of Lexington. Mrs. Margaret Wilson and Mrs. 
Estabell Brown likewise reside in that city. Bettie, 
youngest of the children of the subject of this memoir, 
became the wife of James Shepard and was a resident 
of Lexington at the time of her death, she having 
had no children. Thus the children of the late Robert 
Clemmons and those of Mr. and Mrs. John C. Larkin 
are the only surviving immediate representatives of the 
Clemmons family. 

John C. Larkin was born in Hawkins County, Ten- 
nessee, on the i6th of April, i860, and was reared and 
educated in his native state. Impressed with the records 
he had heard concerning the famous Blue Grass district 
of Kentucky, he came to Fayette County as a youth of 
nineteen years and became associated with farm enter- 
prise near South Elkhorn. Finally he engaged in inde- 
pendent business as a market gardener, and he continued 
his activities in this field of enterprise for twenty years. 
During nine years of this period he resided in Jessamine 
County, and he retired from the gardening business to 
assume the active management of the home farm of his 
father-in-law, his wife having inherited this valuable 
property. Mr. and Mrs. Larkin erected on the place the 
handsome and commodious brick house which now 
adorns the farm, the same being situated on a gentle 
rise of ground and commanding a fine view of the sur- 
rounding country, besides which it stands forth as one 
of the pleasing features of the rural landscape of this 
section of Fayette County. Mrs. Larkin was not long 
permitted to enjoy the new and attractive home, as her 
death occurred nine months after the family had re- 
moved to the new house. In the hope of benefiting her 
health she had passed several months in Arizona, but 
she returned to Kentucky and passed the closing days 
of her life in the new house in which she had taken 
much pride. Mrs. Larkin is survived by ten children : 
William is one of the substantial farmers of Fayette 
County; Lizzie is the wife of Clarence Knight, of 
Mercer County; Georgia is the wife of Samuel Cecil, 
and they reside on a farm adjoining that of her father; 
Bertie is the widow of Gilbert Berryman and is now at 
home with her father ; James is a progressive farmer 
near South Elkhorn; and Bryant, Margaret, Virginia, 
Thomas and Charles are the younger members of the 
family circle at the paternal home. 

John C. Larkin is one of the vigorous and progressive 
exponents of farm industry in Fayette County and is 
loyal and liberal in community affairs. His political 
support is given to the democratic party. 

John Peter Fister. Engaged actively in the agri- 
cultural industry in Fayette County, where he is carry- 
ing on extensive operations as a tobacco grower and gen- 
eral farmer, is John Peter Fister. Mr. Fister, whose 
property is located on the Georgetown Pike, has passed 
his entire career in this locality, having been born on 



the farm which he now occupies December 10, 1882, a 
son of John N. and Annie (Grosser) Fister. 

John N. Fister was born in Alsace, France, in 
184s, the son of a small farmer in that province, 
and was brought up to agricultural pursuits which he 
followed until the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian 
war of 1870-71. He enlisted in a regiment from his 
home community and was the leader of a battery, 
but the overthrow of the Second Empire and the 
subsequent loss to Prussia by France of the province 
of Alsace-Lorraine caused him to decide to flee his 
native land. Accordingly he made plans with his 
friend, John Decker, to leave Paris and return tem- 
porarily to Alsace ; but, while Mr. Fister succeeded 
in leaving that city, Mr. Decker did not get away until 
1872, in which year they embarked for the United 
States and eventually reached their destination at 
New York City. 

After spending about two months in the metropolis 
Mr. Fister went to Cincinnati, which was his home 
for about a year, and he then came to Fayette County 
and engaged in truck gardening, first buying twenty 
acres and later adding to his holdings until he had 
over 500 acres of fine Blue Grass farming land. Dur- 
ing the remainder of his long and active career, until 
his retirement, he devoted himself uninterruptedly to 
the cultivation of his land, and never cared for public 
office. He died August 22, 1919, at the age of seventy- 
four years, in the faith of the Roman Catholic Church. 
In politics he was a democrat. Mr. Fister married 
Annie Grosser, who was born in Hamilton County, 
Ohio, and died November 13, 1902, at the age of fifty- 
one years. They became the parents of eleven children, 
as follows: Mary, the wife of Charles McKenna; 
James, who died at the age of eight years ; Frederick, 
of Bourbon County, Kentucky, who married Nettie 
Stuntebeck and has nine children; Margaret, the wife 
of Charles Schuemaker, with five children ; Joseph, 
who married Carrie Wolf and has five children ; John 
Peter; Rosie, the wife of George Keller, with four 
children ; Ferdinand, who died at the age of twelve 
years ; William, who married Elizabeth Decker and 
has two children ; Charles, who married May Rebbel 
and has four children ; and Julianna, who married 
Lorine Burke and has two children. 

John Peter Fister was given good educational ad- 
vantages in his youth, attending first St. Paul's parochial 
school and then spending two years at Assumption Col- 
lege, Sandwich, Ontario, Canada. When not en- 
grossed in his studies he was associated with his 
father in the work of the home property, and when 
only twenty years of age bought out his father's 
interest in the truck gardening business. After the 
death of the elder man, Mr. Fister started farming, 
and at the present time has 300 acres of the home prop- 
erty, all well-cultivated and highly productive Blue 
Grass land, which he devotes largely to the growing 
of tobacco, although he also has good corn crops and 
raises a number of hogs for the market. He is con- 
sidered one of the progressive and capable agricul- 
turists of his locality, and as a business man main- 
tains an excellent reputation for integrity. Mr. Fister 
is a member of the Roman Catholic Church, and in 
political matters maintains an independent stand. 

On October 4, 1904, Mr. Fister was united in mar- 
riage with Magdalena Schweichart, who was born in 
Mason County, Kentucky, and to this union there 
have been born seven children, of whom two died 
in infancy, the others being: Annie Theresa, Mary 
Cecelia, Henrietta, Julius and Claude V., all at home 
with their parents. 

Charles Alonzo Nevitt, M. D. The modern hospital 
is too often looked upon as a convenience or a luxury 
of the well-to-do. This theory is both unfounded and 
injurious. The modern hospital is not only the high- 
est development of science for the alleviation and 



126 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



cure of the swarming bodily ills of mankind, but a 
wonderful organization into which the best thought 
and experience of experts the world over have entered. 
Among the modern hospitals which are representative of 
the best tenets of medical science is that conducted at 
Elmwood, just outside the city limits of Lexington, 
by Dr. Charles Alonzo Nevitt. 

Doctor Nevitt was born in Meade County, Ken- 
tucky, on his father's farm, April 27, 1873, a son of 
Henry Clay and Catherine Elizabeth (McNamarry) 
Nevitt, natives of this state. Henry C. Nevitt was 
born in Meade County, May 24, 1845, and after at- 
tending the public schools entered Gethsemane Col- 
lege in Nelson County, from which he was duly 
graduated. He also attended Cecelian College in Har- 
din County, and on leaving that institution engaged in 
farming in Meade County. Mr. Nevitt was a great 
lover of fine horses, which he raised on his farm with 
other stock, and found much enjoyment in engaging in 
the chase with his fox hounds. He was a substantial 
agriculturist and highly esteemed citizen, a stanch 
democrat in politics, and a member of the Roman 
Catholic Church. His death occurred in October, 1882. 
On September 5, 1865, he married Elizabeth McNa- 
marry, who was born in Jefferson County, Kentucky. 
November 24, 1884, and survives him, and they had 
ten children, of whom three are deceased, the sur- 
vivors being: Edward H., John P., Charles Alonzo, 
Anna L., Richard O., Elizabeth and William G. 

Charles A. Nevitt was reared on the home farm 
and secured his primary education in the public schools 
of Meade County, subsequently attending Cecelian 
College in Hardin County, from which he was graduated 
in 1895 with the degree of Master of Arts. At the 
age of twenty-three years he was appointed county 
clerk of Meade County, serving 2V2 years, and then 
entered Louisville Medical College, from which he was 
graduated with the class of 1904, receiving the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine. At that time he engaged 
in practice at Brandenburg, Kentucky, but after one 
year was appointed second assistant physician at the 
Eastern State Hospital in February, 1905. In October, 
1907, he was made first assistant physician, and later 
was appointed superintendent of that institution, a posi- 
tion which he occupied for two years. Doctor Nevitt 
resigned to establish the Elmwood Hospital on the 
old J. R. Hugh homestead, known as Elmwood, one 
of the beauty spots of the Blue Grass region, one mile 
out from the Court House at Lexington, just outside 
of the city limits. Here he has since conducted a gen- 
eral hospital, which is modern in every respect, and 
which has won and held the confidence of the public. 
Doctor Nevitt is a skilled physician of recognized 
high standing, and is highly thought of by his fellow- 
members in the Fayette County Medical Society, the 
Kentucky State Medical Society, the Kentucky Val- 
ley Medical Society, the American Medical Associa- 
tion and the American Medical Psychological Society. 
He belongs to the Roman Catholic Church, holds 
membership in the Knights of Columbus, and in poli- 
tics is a democrat. 

Doctor Nevitt married Miss Pearl Wimp on July 11, 
1899, who died February I, 1913, leaving three chil- 
dren : Alice Pearl and Charles A., twins, and 
Dorothy W. 

George B. Batturton, present county judge of Bour- 
bon County, has been in county offices most of his pro- 
fessional career as a lawyer. He is a member of one 
of the old and prominent families of Bourbon County, 
and several of the present generation have gained en- 
viable distinction. 

Judge Batterton was born January 21, 1885, in Bourbon 
County, son of B. A. and Elizabeth (Boswell) Bat- 
terton. His grandfather, Benjamin Alfred Batterton, 
was also born in Bourbon County. The Battertons came 
to Kentucky about 1784 and acquired land on which 



some of the family have remained to the present date. 
B. A. Batterton has spent his life on a farm seven miles 
west of Paris, near Jacksonville. His wife, Elizabeth 
Boswell, was born in Harrison County, daughter of 
Gen. Bushrod Temple Boswell, a native of the same 
county and son of William Elliott Boswell, who came to 
Harrison County from Virginia about 1794. William 
Elliott Boswell was a colonel in the War of 1812 under 
Gen. Green Clay and saw some heavy hardships as a 
soldier, in some of the campaigns marching through 
water to the waist. He served as a member of the Ken- 
tucky Constitutional Convention and was a first cousin 
of Governor Issac Shelby. The family still retains some 
old letters throwing interesting light on men and affairs 
of pioneer Kentucky. Gen. B. T. Boswell served as an 
officer in the Mexican war, was too old for service in the 
Confederate army, and acquired his title as General from 
duty during Indian times. B. A. and Elizabeth Bat- 
terton had a family of four sons and one daughter. 
The oldest, Benjamin Alfred, went to the Philippine 
Islands as fiber inspector for the United States Bureau 
of Agriculture, was with the Navy Department in the 
Islands, and is now with a New York importing com- 
pany at Manila. Judge George B. is the second in age. 
Roy is a farmer in Bourbon County. The daughter, 
Mary, is the wife of Dr. R. R. McMillan, of Paris. The 
youngest. Bishop Batterton, enlisted soon after the dec- 
laration of the war against Germany, was with the 
Marine Corps, and accompanied the first 50,000 American 
soldiers to France. He was an expert rifle shot, and 
had won medals before going into the army. He was 
wounded at Chateau Thierry, also in the battle of Bel- 
leau Wood, and on July ig, 1919, while acting as a 
sharpshooter holding back a German advance, was fatally 
wounded and died the next day, while being transported 
to hospital. He was a member of the Seventy-sixth 
Company of the Sixth Regiment and was buried 
at Crepy, France. Captain Overton wrote a letter giv- 
ing the details of his death and praising his admirable 
conduct as a soldier. 

Judge George B. Batterton grew up on the family 
homestead in Bourbon County, attended private schools 
and also Center College at Danville, and graduated in 
law in 1906. He immediately began practice at Paris, 
and in 1910 was elected county attorney, filling that office 
consecutively until 191 8, when he was made county 
judge. Judge Batterton married Miss Ida Smith, a 
daughter of Wellington Smith, of Scott County. 

Fletcher Mann, proprietor of the Blue Grass Stock 
Yards Company at Lexington, has been identified with 
agricultural interests and with the handling of horses 
and mules for many years, and has won success through 
industry and individual ability. He was born on his 
grandfather's farm in Nicholas County, Kentucky, 
near the old Indian battle ground, March 19, 1856, 
a son of Milton and Margaret E. (Ricketts) Mann. 

Milton Mann, the paternal grandfather of Fletcher 
Mann, was born in Nicholas County, and there passed 
his life in farming, reaching the age of seventy years. 
His son, also named Milton, was born on the home 
farm in 1821 and as a young man followed his father's 
vocation of farming, but later went to college, was 
graduated at Greencastle, Indiana, and, being con- 
verted to the faith of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
was a preacher in the Kentucky Conference for four- 
teen years. Returning then to Nicholas County, he 
passed the rest of his life as a farmer and raiser 
of live stock, in addition to which he engaged in a 
general stock business. He was a democrat in his 
political faith. Mr. Mann died in 1893, at the age of 
seventy-two years. He first married Margaret E. 
Ricketts, daughter of William E. and Mariah (Leach) 
Ricketts, the former a native of Virginia and the lat- 
ter of Robinson (now Nicholas) County, Kentucky. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ricketts were farming people who 
reached advanced years and had a large family. Mr. 



i 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



127 



Ricketts became one of the prominent men of his day 
and locality, and served for some years as sheriff of 
Nicholas, Fleming and Robinson counties, Kentucky. 
Mrs. Mann died when her son Fletcher was a mere 
child, and her two other children, James E. and Mar- 
garet, died in infancy. For his second wife, Milton 
Mann married Jennie Ricketts, and they had two chil- 
dren : Dr. Edgar G. and Rev. Luther E. 

Fletcher Mann secured his education in the public 
schools of Nicholas County, where he resided on the 
home farm until reaching the age of twenty-seven years. 
At that time he went to Paris, Kentucky, where he 
embarked in the transfer and bus business, in addition 
to which he dealt in mules and horses. In 1907 he dis- 
posed of his interests there and came to Lexington 
where he bought the Blue Grass Stock Yards, of which 
he has since been the proprietor. He has shipped to 
the various large markets of the country and is doing 
a large and profitable business. Early in the World 
war he began to buy mules for the British Govern- 
ment, and later was engaged in a like capacity for the 
United States Government. While residing at Paris 
Mr. Mann served in official capacities in Bourbon 
County, and wherever his residence he has always 
been justly accounted a public-spirited and constructive 
citizen. As a business man he is highly thought of 
because of his known integrity. He belongs to the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and in politics 
is a democrat. 

In May, 1877, Mr. Mann was united in marriage 
with Miss Mollie D. Jones, a native of Kentucky, who 
died in igio, leaving three children : Howard Wilson, 
who married Mrs. Borland ; Edward K., who married 
Nettie Porter; and Lucy B., who married first Terrell 
Thompson, who died leaving one daughter, Wenntia, and 
after his death married Frank Bryan. In 1912 Mr. 
Mann married Miss Inez B. Glass. 

Paul Morphy Williams, Federal prohibition di- 
rector for Kentucky, with headquarters at Lexington, 
is the youngest man to hold such an office in any of 
the states of the Union. Mr. Williams though a 
young man is a veteran of the public service and has 
been in public affairs practically since boyhood. 

He was born in Gallatin County, Kentucky, October 
I. 1886, a son of D. O. Williams, who v/as born on the 
same farm though in Carroll County. Grandfather 
Joel Williams with his bride rode horseback over the 
mountains from North Carolina about 1832 and became 
one of the largest land owners in Carroll and Galla- 
tin counties, leaving each of his large family of chil- 
dren a generous farm. Aluch of this land is still in 
the family. He also owned land now included in Cin- 
cinnati. His old home was in Carroll County. He 
was a southern sympathizer and was frequently an- 
noyed by the Federal soldiers during the Civil war, 
and from exposure brought on during that period 
died when about seventy years of age. The life of 
D. O. Williams was spent as a farmer and stockman at 
the old farm, where he died in 1897. at the age of 
forty-nine. His widow, Frances Burnley Henry, 
whose father was a direct descendant of Patrick 
Henry, survives and lives at Detroit, Michigan. Mr. 
Williams' Christian names came through another 
branch of ancestry. Dennis Morphy was a Virginia 
settler from Ireland, and his Alasonic regalia is still 
owned by Paul Morphy Williams. He was a ship 
builder at Norfolk and married Jane Jackson, a cou- 
sin of President Andrew Jackson, and named the first 
son born James Monroe for the President, and the first 
daughter, Virginia, for his adopted state. One of his 
descendants was Paul Morphy, the celebrated chess 
expert. 

Paul Morphv Williams grew up on his father's farm 
and completed his education in American University 
at Harriman, Tennessee. When he was fourteen years 
of age he was a page in the House of Representatives 



at Frankfort. Later he was private messenger to 
Speaker Eli Brown, and was bill clerk in the 1908 ses- 
sion of the House during the Bradley-Beckham dead- 
lock. For two years he was a Pullman car conduc- 
tor in the Southwest, and on returning to Kentucky 
became field statistician in the State Department of 
Agriculture, serving four years under Commissioner 
Matt S. Cohen. During that time he visited every 
county in the state and compiled a great bulk of data 
on farm acreage, extensive variety of crops, and also 
did an important service in encouraging movements 
for the betterment of farm and rural life conditions, 
movements that are represented today in the County 
-Agency System. By these extended travels Mr. Wil- 
liams acquired a personal acquaintance all over Ken- 
tucky, and his acquaintance with Kentuckians is prob- 
ably unsurpassed in number. He was for two years 
assistant tax commissioner in Henry County, living at 
Newcastle, and his home has been at Newcastle since 
1916. While there he read law with H. K. Bourne, 
but never took the bar examinations. 

Mr. Williams was chosen Federal prohibition agent 
March I, 1920, in the Eastern District of Kentucky, 
and on the ist of June was made chief Federal agent 
for the Eastern District, with fifteen subordinates cov- 
ering sixty-si.x counties. The distinctive ability he 
showed in this office brought him promotion on No- 
vember 15, 1020, as Federal prohibition director for 
Kentucky. He has the chief administrative responsi- 
bilities in the enforcing end of the prohibition amend- 
ment, and has an office force of six at Lexington be- 
sides six field inspectors and subordinate agents in the 
different counties. 

Mr. Williams has been active in a number of demo- 
cratic conventions. He is a baseball fan, a thorough 
outdoor man and a member of the Baptist Church and 
Knights of Pythias. At the age of twenty-four he 
married I-yllian Clay Duncan, of Ghent, Carroll County. 

Louis DES CocNF.TS. From an early boyhood of 
comparative poverty and lack of opportunity Louis 
des Cognets many years ago achieved a position as 
one of the strongest and most influential business men 
of Lexington and the state. The foundation _ of his 
prosperity was laid as a producer and dealer in coal. 
For many years he was an active official in some of 
Kentucky's leading public utilities. 

Mr. des Cognets was born at Lexington March 
6. 1859, son of Hippolyte and Anna (Russell) des 
Cognets. His mother, who was born at Lexington in 
18^0, and died in 1902, was of distinguished lineage, 
being a daughter of Col. Thomas A. Russell of the 
noted family of Russell pioneers. Col. Thomas A. 
Russell married Sarah Lewis Garrard, who was a 
granddaughter oi James Garrard, that distinguished 
Kentuckian who was the only citizen to serve two 
consecutive terms as governor. He was the second gov- 
ernor of the state, elected in 1796 and was reelected 
in 1800. Hippolyte des Cognets was of a noble 
French family, and was the youngest brother of 
Count des Cognets, one of the oldest names of Brittany. 
Hippolyte des Cognets came to this country when 
finite young, graduated in medicine from Transylvania 
University at Lexington, later continued a post grad- 
uate course in medicine in Paris, France, and there- 
after practiced his profession with high skill and 
proficiency at Lexington. Kentucky, until his death at 
the early age of thirty-three. He was born in France 
in 1820 and died in 1862. He was the father of two 
sons, Thomas Jean, who died at the age of eight 
years, and Louis. 

Louis des Cognets, who was born at Lexington 
March 6. 1859, was only three years of age when his 
father died, and largely as a result of that circum- 
stance had to depend on his own energies and exertions 
to secure an education and make his start in the world. 
The first regular employment he had was as messen- 



128 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



ger boy with the banking firm of Grinstead & Brad- 
ley of Lexington. He remained with that institution 
continuously for about eleven years, in the meantime 
studying as opportunity presented, and working con- 
stantly to familiarize himself with the banking busi- 
ness. He was teller of the bank when he resigned in 
1884 and entered the retail coal business. During the 
past thirty-five years his holdings have become widely 
extended as a coal mine owner and operator, and for 
tlie handling of his large aggregate volume of coal 
production he maintains selling agencies in Cincin- 
nati, New York City and Minneapolis. 

He is a director in the First and City National 
Bank of Lexington, and was formerly connected witli 
the management of most of Le.xington's public utility 
corporations. He is former president of the Lexington 
Street Railway Company, former president of the 
Electric Light Company, former president of the Lex- 
ington Gas Company, and former president of the 
Lexington Ice Manufacturing Company. 

Mr. des Cognets is a democrat, is a member of the 
Second Presbyterian Church, and is affiliated with 
Le.xington Lodge of the Elks. On February 26, i88g. 
lie married Estelle McCarty, of Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. They have three children : Russell ; Estelle, wife 
of Hogan L. Yancey, now county attorney of Fay- 
ette County; and Louis. 

William M. Fister. One of the finely-cultivated 
properties of Fayette County is the farm on the 
Georgetown pike owned by William M. Fister, which 
has also the distinction of being a point of much 
historic interest as the site of the old Eagle Inn. 
Mr. Fister has gained his position as one of the pro- 
gressive young agriculturists of his county through 
industry and the intelligent use of modern methods. 
He was born on his father's farm in Fayette County 
June 7, 1888, and is a son of John N. and Annie M. 
(Grosser) Fister. 

John N. Fister was born in 1845, in Alsace, France, 
the son of a modest farmer of that province, and 
was reared to the pursuits of agriculture, which he 
followed until his career was interrupted by the open- 
ing of the Franco-Prussian war. Enlisting in a bat- 
tery of horse, he became its leader, but the days of 
1870 and 187 1 were dark ones for France, which was 
defeated in the great struggle and eventually lost 
the province of Alsace-Lorraine. Mr. Fister there- 
upon decided to leave the country, not feeling able 
to live under the rule of the invader, and made plans 
for leaving Paris with his friend John Decker. Whi'e 
Mr. Fister got away from that city safely and returned 
to his home in Alsace, Mr. Decker could not complete 
his plans until 1872, in which year the friends em- 
barked for the United States and eventually reached 
their destination of New York City. Mr. Fister spent 
two months there and then went to Cincinnati, whence, 
after a year, he came to Fayette County, Kentucky, 
and engaged in truck gardening, first buying twenty 
acres and later adding to his holdings until he had 
over 500 acres of fine Blue Grass land. From that 
time forward until his retirement he devoted himself 
without interruption to the cultivation of his land. 
He was a democrat in politics, but was satisfied with 
a quiet career and never sought public office. He was 
a member of the Roman Catholic Church, and died 
in that faith August 22, 1919, at the age of seventy- 
four years. 

Mr. Fister married Annie M. Grosser, who was born 
in 1851 in Hamilton County, Ohio, and died November 
13, 1902, in Fayette County, aged fifty-one years. To 
this union there were born eleven children, as follows : 
Mary, the wife of Cass McKenny; James, who died 
at the age of eight years ; Frederick, of Bourbon 
County, this state, who married Nettie Stuntebeck and 
has eight children: Margaret, the wife of Charles 
Schuemaker, with five children; Joseph, who married 



Carrie Wolf and has five children; John Peter, a pros- 
perous farmer of Fayette County, who married Mag- 
dalena Schweichart and has five children: Rosie, the 
wife of George Keller, with four children; Ferdinand, 
who died at the age of twelve years; William, who mar- 
ried Elizabeth Decker and has two children ; Charles, 
who married May Rebbel and has four children ; and 
Julianna, who married Lorine Burke and has two chil- 
dren. After the death of his first wife John N. Fister 
married Mrs. Clara Dirks, and they had one son, 
Victor. 

William M. Fister attended St. Catherine's Academy 
at Lexington, Mount St. Joseph's College at Delhi, 
Ohio, and Assumption College at Sandwich, Ontario, 
Canada. He spent his boyhood on his father's farm, 
and when he was but eighteen years of age began to 
work at the truck gardening business in association 
with his father. He was thus engaged until 1909, 
when he began traveling in the West, but after two 
years, during which he visited many important and 
interesting points,' returned to his home locality and 
engaged in farming on the Georgetown Pike, where he 
now has 315 acres of highly-productive Blue Grass 
land, which he devotes to general farming and tobacco 
raising. He is enterprising and industrious and has 
fairly won and held the esteem and confidence of those 
with whom he has come into contact. Mr. Fister 
belongs to the Roman Catholic Church, and in politics 
is a democrat. 

On October 22, 1913, Mr. Fister was united in mar- 
riage with Mary Elizabeth Decker, daughter of John 
and Margaret Decker, and to this union there have 
been born two children : John William and Richard 
E. Mr. Fister is the owner of the old Eagle Inn, 
built 150 years ago and still in good condition, although 
one of the oldest houses in Fayette County. It was 
here that the Marquis de Lafayette, the great French 
patriot, was entertained during his last visit to the 
United States, in 1824. 

WiLLi.^M David Watts, a retired business man and 
farmer of Le.xington, is living not .far from the scenes 
of the wilderness in which some of his ancestors, in- 
cluding his great-grandfather, had their first Ken- 
tucky e.xperiences 140 years ago. Few of the original 
families of Kentucky can claim a longer and more un- 
broken continuity of residence than that of Watts. 
When the pioneers of the family came to Kentucky, 
about twelve years before this section of the west 
was set off and formally dedicated as a new state, 
they established a home in a community known as 
Cross Plain, where in subsequent years the village of 
Athens grew up and was established. 

The founder of the family was David Watts, who 
was born in Virginia .\pril 20, 1761. He died Decem- 
ber 13, 183s, fifty-four years after coming to Ken- 
tucky. He married Ruth Twyman, who was born in 
Virginia, June 17, 1757, and died in Kentucky June 
6, 1837. Her father, George Twyman. who died in 
1822, at the age of eighty-nine, was living with his 
brother William Twyman in Albemarle County, Vir- 
ginia, about 1765. George Twyman and his wife, Mary, 
had the following children : Joseph, Samuel, Sarah, 
who became the wife of Sanford William Acaham. 
Elizabeth, who was the wife of William J. Wood, 
Agatha, wife of Robert Dearing, Ruth, who became 
the wife of David Watts, and James. 

The children of David Watts and wife were : Mary, 
born January 27, 1785, and died December 17, 1840; 
Elizabeth, born April 27, 1787, and died July 7, 1830; 
Sarah, born October 9, 1789; Millie, born July 31, 
1792, and died .August 27, 1819; Nancy, born Sep- 
tember 23, 1794, and died December 4, 1803; Garrett, 
mentioned in the following paragraphs ; and David, who 
was born October 12, 1800, and lived to be fourscore 
or more years of age. 

Garrett Watts, who carries the line of descent to 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



129 



William David Watts, was born November 24, 1796, 
and died February 3, 1873, and was therefore a native 
Kentuckian and spent his life largely in Fayette County. 
On November 4, 1818, he married Martha Twyman, 
who was born in Virginia December 29, 180 1, and 
died March 30, 1842. The record of their children is : 
Lucy R., born August 13, 1819, and died September 10, 
1841, was married May 11, 1837, to Walter C. Furger- 
son, and she left a child, named Martha Ann, who mar- 
ried a Mr. Lewis of Missouri; Margaret, born May 
19, 1821, died April 15, 1822; Elizabeth born March 
16, 1823, died July 18, 1843 ; William, born May 25, 
^L 1825, died November 7, 1839 ; David T. ; and George 
B born May 29, 1837, and died August 4, 1837. 
V David Twyman Watts, who represented the third 

B generation of the family in Kentucky, was born April 
I II, 1831, and died October 14, 1854, having spent his 
brief but active career as a successful farmer in Fay- 
r ette County. On November 15, 1849, he married Tali- 
tha Quisenberry, who was born in Clark County, Ken- 
tucky, December 19, 1824, and died February 3, 1885. 
They had two sons, William D. and Garrett. Q^rrett, 
the second, was born May 6, 1853, and is one of the 
prominent farmers and tobacco raisers in Fayette 
County. On January 13, 1886, Garrett Watts married 
Minnie Gay, a native of Woodford County, Kentucky, 
and they have four children, named Edith, David 
' T., William J. (who married Miss AUie Karsner of 
Fayette County) and Mattie Lee. 

It was on his grandfather's old homestead not far 
from Lexington that William David Watts was born 
October 2, 1851. As he grew to manhood he acquired 
a substantial education, and then devoted his efforts 
to the ancestral occupation of agriculture, and was 
one of the leading farmers of Fayette County for many 
' years, until he retired to his home in Lexington. In 
addition to his advantages in the public schools he 
attended Georgetown College. He has lived the life 
of an influential citizen but has never cared for public 
office. He has long been prominent in the First 
Baptist Church of Lexington, and in that great church 
organization has held the post of deacon for some 
fourteen or fifteen years and for a much longer period 
that of church clerk. In politics he regards himself 
as an independent, though usually he has voted the 
democratic ticket. 

On February 10, 1880, Mr. Watts married lyJiss Ella 
Chenault, of Madison County, and member of a very 
£ prominent family of Central Kentucky. Mrs. Watts 
m throughout her life expressed a kindly character in 
f devotion to home, children and all the good works of 
her community. She was long prominent and esteemed 
in the membership of the First Baptist Church at 
Lexington and was identified with its several auxiliary 
societies, and was especially interested in the work of 
the Sunday School. She died October 17, 1918, of pneu- 
monia following an attack of influenza. Mr. and 
Mrs. Watts were the parents of four children, the 
youngest having been born April 3, 1896, and dying 
three days later. The three children who came to 
mature years were all daughters. Lillian C. was born 
December 25, 1880, and on October 15, 1902, was mar- 
ried to William C. Smith, who died in May, 1908. He 
was the father of two children, Eleanor C. and William 
C. Smith, Jr. Mrs. Lillian Smith on November 5, 
1913, became the wife of Thompson R. Bryant, and 
they, have two children, Elizabeth Scobel and Thomp- 
son R. Bryant, Jr. 

The second daughter, Ethel, born December 7, 1882, 
was married December 8, 1903, to Harry M. Blanton, 
and they have three sons, William Watts, Harry M., 
Jr., and Harvey Chenault Blanton. 

The youngest daughter of Mr. Watts is Aileen, who 
was born January i, 1887, and was married to Harry 
G. Edwards June 16, 1909. Mr. and Mrs. Edwards 
likewise have three children, Harry G., Jr., Charles 
G. and Eleanor Chenault Edwards. 



Garrett D. Weathers was for forty years closely 
identified with the agricultural progress and develop- 
ment of Fayette County. For several years before 
his death, which occurred June 6, 1921, he had owned 
and occupied a beautiful country place near Briar Hill, 
seven miles northeast of Lexington. Success in gen- 
erous measure had rewarded his efforts, though death 
overtook him before he had completed the normal span 
of years and was consequently regarded as a calamity 
to the community as well as to his immediate family. 

The old family homestead where he was born June 
25, 1859, was adjacent to Avon Station in the ex- 
treme eastern part of Fayette County. He was a son 
of Albert and Sarah (Scott) Weathers. Albert 
Weathers was born December 20, 1822, and died in 
1880. His wife was born July 20, 1826, and passed 
away in 1914. They were married June 22, 1845, 
nearly seventy years before her death. Sarah Scott 
was a daughter of Thomas Scott, whose old home- 
stead is on the turnpike between Bryan Station and 
Briar Hill. She was a child at the death of her 
father, and the last of his family to pass away was 
Jane, wife of Granville Weathers, a brother of Albert. 
She died at her home near Avon in February, 1920. 
Some other details in the history of the Weathers 
family will be found on other pages of this publica- 
tion. The four children reared by Albert and Sarah 
Weathers were : J. Howard, who owned a farm ad- 
joining that of his brother Garrett D., and died in 
1895, his family still occupying the homestead ; Mary 
is the wife of John B. Roddick, an insurance man 
at Chicago; Garrett D. ; and Sally, of Danville, widow 
of Rev. S. D. Boggs, a Presbyterian minister. 

Garrett D. Weathers was reared on the home farm. 
He was twenty-one years of age when his father 
died, and thereafter gave his labors and energies to 
his widowed mother, assisting her in the work of the 
fields and the management of the estate. He gave 
her his utmost filial affection throughout the remain- 
ing years of her life. Eventually he acquired the 
ownership of a farm adjoining the old home place, 
and it was his desire to retain both in the family. 
Subsequently it became expedient to sell the old home- 
stead, and at the same time, in 1917, he sold both 
properties. He then bought the farm above men- 
tioned, and on which his last years were spent. This 
in earlier years was the home of Dr. Clifford Coons, 
who had erected the commodious residence subse- 
quently enlarged and remodeled before the death of 
Mr. Weathers. The farm comprises 118 acres and 
has been handled as an agricultural and livestock 
proposition. The late Mr. Weathers was not only a 
good farmer but a loyal citizen in all that touched the 
community interests, though never a seeker for any 
political honors. 

On October 27, 1887, he married Miss Laura Ruth 
Layson, who with three children survives him. Mrs. 
Weathers was born and reared in Bourbon County, a 
daughter of Z. M. and Sally Wilmott (Varnon) Lay- 
son. Her parents lived out their lives on the old 
home farm near Millersburg in Bourbon County. Her 
grandparents were Isaac and Polly (Moore) Layson, 
the former a native of Eastern Pennsylvania and was 
a child when brought to Kentucky. Polly Moore's 
ancestor was Patrick Moore, a native of Ireland who 
came to Kentucky from Virginia. Of the three chil- 
dren of Mrs. Weathers the oldest is Margaret Varnon, 
now a teacher in the high school at Danville, Ken- 
tucky, and formerly a teacher in the schools of Fay- 
ette County and for five years a missionary teacher 
in Pike County. The only son, Scott Layson Weathers, 
who was associated with his father in the manage- 
ment of the home farm and is now its responsible 
directing head, is an enthusiastic young agriculturist 
and is secretary and treasurer of the local Farmers 
Union. The younger daughter, Laura Ruth, finished 
her education in the University of Kentucky, is affili 



130 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



ated with Alpha Zeta sorority, and is a teacher in the 
Union High School near the old home. 

Walter C. Dodson has been an educator, has been 
in the railroad service and for. several years past has 
been cashier of the First State Bank of Eubank, Fulaski 
County. He is a native of Wayne County and the 
family have been there since pioneer times. The first 
Kentuckian of the family was his great-great-grand- 
father, a native Virginian, who moved over the moun- 
tains into Wayne County, Kentucky, and lived out his 
life as a farmer. An account of the Dodson family, 
carefully compiled, is presented on another page, in 
connection with the history of Walter Dodson's brother 
Marcus A. Dodson. The grandfather, George Dodson' 
was born in 1828 and died in 1908, and his name is still 
spoken with high respect in that county, and he was 
not only a good farmer but a good citizen and home- 
maker. His wife was Dorcas Young, likewise a 
native of Wayne County, born in 1838 and died in 1919 

J. M. Dodson, father of Walter C. Dodson, is still 
living at Atonticello in Wayne County, and was born 
near that town. He still gives his supervision to some 
extensive farming interests in that section. He also 
served two terms as assessor of Wayne County is one 
of the leading members of the Baptist Church there, 
IS a democrat and a member of the Masonic fraternity! 
J. M. Dodson married Janette C. Dodson, a distant 
relative. They have three children : Marcus A., cashier 
of the Peoples Bank of Science Hill in Pulaski 
County; Walter C; and Miss Flora, a foreign mission- 
ary of the Baptist Church at Canton, China. 

Walter C. Dodson, who was born in Wayne County 
October 28, 1884, grew up on his father's farm, and 
in the intervals of his teaching work acquired a liberal 
education, supplementing his advantages in the rural 
schools by attending the Kentucky State University at 
Lexington for four years, until 1907. His record as 
a teacher and administrative head of schools includes 
two years as principal of the grade school at English 
in Carroll County, one year as principal of the grade 
school at Bradfordsville in Marion County, one year as 
principal of the Russell Springs Academy in Russell 
County, and during 1908-11 taught in the rural schools 
of his native county. Beginning in 191 1, for seven 
years Mr. Dodson lived at Louisville, where he was 
employed in the general offices of the Louisville & 
Nashville Railroad. He left there in 1918 to accept 
the post of cashier of the First State Bank of Eubank. 
This institution was established in 1910, and has a 
capital of $15,000, surplus and profits of $14,500, and 
deposits of $90,000. Silas Wesley of Bethelridge is 
president, L E. Payne is vice president, W. C. Dodson, 
cashier, and Charles N. Wardrip assistant cashier. 

Mr. Dodson was a leader and instrumental in in- 
suring the success of the various drives for the sale 
of Liberty Bonds and other Government securities dur- 
ing the World war, and gave much of his time to 
patriotic affairs. He owns a home of every modern 
convenience on Main Street, votes as a democrat, and 
is a member of the Baptist Church. In 1908 at Madi- 
son, Indiana, he married Miss Eulah Wright, daughter 
of J. A. and Sarah (Marshall) Wright, residents of 
English, Carroll County, Kentucky. Her father is an 
employe of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad. Mrs. 
Dodson was a graduate of the high school at English. 
She died June 9, 1920. To their marriage were born 
three children: Francis R., on September i, 1910; 
Walter R., on May 11, 1914, and Marcus A., on Febru- 
ary 26, 1917. 

William Robert Laekin is of the progressive, mod- 
ern generation of farmers in Fayette County, and 
though _ educated and well qualified for the technical 
profession of electrical engineering he regards his 
status as an agriculturist a permanent vocation and 
one worthy of his best talents and energies. 



Mr. Larkin, whose home is on Keene Pike, seven 
miles south of Lexington, is a grandson of late Ran- 
kin Clemmons, whose interesting career is reviewed 
elsewhere in this publication. Mr. Larkin's present 
home is about a mile and a half from the old Clem- 
mons homestead, now occupied by his father, John C. 
Larkin, William R. Larkin was born at Nicholasville, 
February i, 1S85. He grew up on the farm, was 
well educated in the home schools, and studied elec- 
trical engineering by correspondence and also in the 
Kentucky University. At the age of twenty-eight he 
was appointed electrical engineer at the State Reform 
School at Greendale, and for three years had charge 
of all the machinery and equipment on the farm. He 
then returned home, and has since occupied his pres- 
ent place of eighty-six acres, formerly a part of the 
Rankin Clemmons estate, and inherited by him through 
his mother. Mr. Larkin has some of the noted Blue 
Grass soil, and is enjoying much of the prosperity of 
Blue Grass agriculturist. For the past two years he 
has also operated a garage at his country home, and 
has the local agency for the Liberty automobile. 

Mr. Larkin married at the age of twenty-eight Susie 
B. Grow, of South Elkhorn, a daughter of the late 
Squire Levi Grow, of Lexington. Mr. Larkin is a 
democrat, is affiliated with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias, and is also a 
member of the social order of the Knights of Pythias, 
Knights of Crescent. 

Samuel Ridley Ewing. Fealty to facts in the analy- 
zation of a character of a citizen of the type of Samuel 
R. Ewing is all that is required to make a biographical 
sketch interesting to those who have at heart the good 
name of the community, beca'use it is the honorable 
reputation of the man of standing and affairs more 
than any other consideration that gives character and 
stability to the body politic and makes the true glory 
of a city or state revered at home and respected in 
other localities. Mr. Ewing has long been numbered 
among .the representative citizens of his community, 
and it is eminently proper that specific mention be 
made of him in a work of this character. 

Samuel Ridley Ewing is a representative of one 
of the oldest and most respected families of Kentucky. 
His paternal grandfather, William Ewing, a native of 
Virginia^ came to Kentucky in 1833 and settled on a 
farm just west of Owensboro. His wife, who bore 
the maiden name of Rebecca Hay, was also a native 
of Virginia. They became the parents of four sons 
and two daughters, but only one, Samuel Ridley Ewifig, 
Sr., father of the subject, lived to attain considerable 
age. He was born in Virginia in 1825, was eight years 
of age when his parents came to and settled in Daviess 
County, Kentucky, and his death occurred in that 
county in 1883. He married Bettie Read, who was 
born in Russellville, Logan County, Kentucky, and, 
survived her husband, dying at Owensboro October i, 
1921, at the advanced age of ninety years. Her parents 
both died about the same time, when she was a mere 
girl, and she was partly reared by relatives in Owens- 
boro and by a family in the countr}'. She bore her 
husband two sons and three daughters. Samuel R. 
Ewing is the only surviving son, his brother dying in 
boj'hood. Mr. Ewing's father and grandfather were 
farmers by vocation and, resided on the farm where 
tiie grandfather settled when he first came to Daviess 
County. They both were members of the Cumberland 
Presbyterian Church. Grandfather Ewing served in the 
War of 1812 as a colonel, and ever afterward was known 
as Colonel Ewing. Mr. Ewing's mother is a member of 
the Catholic Church, to which he and his wife and their 
cliildren also belong. 

Samuel Ridley Ewing was born on the old Colonel 
Ewing farm in Daviess County on December 7, 1858, 
and was reared on the paternal homestead, receiving 
his educational training in the public schools. He has 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



131 



devoted much of his life to agricultural pursuits and now 
cultivates 1,400 acres of land, corn, tobacco and alfalfa 
being his principal crops. He is up-to-date and pro- 
gressive in his methods and has long been considered 
one of the leading farmers in his section of the country. 
He is also identified with the manufacturing interests of 
Owensboro, being a director in several of the largest 
successful manufacturing plants. He is a director in 
the National Deposit Bank, the largest bank in Western 
Kentucky. 

In 1888 Mr. Ewing was married to Ida M. Millett, 
a daughter of Maj. Joe Millett, of Daviess County, who 
was killed in the Southern Army during the Civil war. 
Of the eight children, six daughters and two sons, born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Ewing, Robert G. served in the United 
States army during the recent World war, being a 
member of the Student Officers' Training Corps, but 
was not ordered overseas. 

Politically Mr. Ewing is an independent democrat, 
and has never been a candidate for public office which 
paid a salary, but was elected and served on the City 
Council for two years and for a number of years was a 
member of the Electric Light and Water Commission, 
which operated the electric light and water plant. 
Owensboro's municipal water system (the best water 
system in Kentucky) was built while Mr. Ewing was 
on the City Council and stands as a testimonial to his 
devotion to his civic duties. He had the unique distinc- 
tion of having been nominated for re-election by both 
political parties of Owensboro after his service on the 
City Council. Fraternally Mr. Ewing is a member of 
the Knights of Columbus and the Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks. The Ewing home at 519 Locust 
Street, is probably the finest residence in Owensboro, 
being of splendid architectural design and absolutely 
modern in all its appointments, many of the latter 
features being the selection of Mrs. Ewing. This home 
is the center of a large social circle, among whom the 
Ewings are held in the very highest esteem. Mr. Ewmg 
has ever been a warm supporter of every movement 
having for its object the material, moral or civic ad- 
vancement of the community and is counted one of 
Owensboro's representative men. 

■ Benjamin F. Ceimm, whose well ordered activities 

in connection with agricultural and live-stock enter- 
prises have contributed to the maintaining of the high 
industrial status of his native county, was born in the 
old family homestead that stood on the site of his 
present attractive farm dwelling, 7J/2 miles east of 
Lexington, on the Winchester Turnpike, and he is a 
popular representative of one of the old and well 
known families of Fayette County. 

Benjamin Fielding Crimm was born on the i6th of 
September, 1879, and is a son of Benjamin M. and 
Louise (Hamilton) Crimm. Benjamin M. Crimm 
likewise was born in Fayette County, a son of Field- 
ing Crimm, who, with one of his brothers, came from 
Culpeper County, Virginia, to this section of Ken- 
tucky about a century ago. The brothers first set- 
tled on Jack's Creek, in Fayette County, _and_ there 
they erected a substantial stone house, which is still 
standing, on the farm now owned by Charles Land. 
The brothers became the owners of an extensive 
landed property, and the brother of Fielding Crimm 
became one of the representative citizens of Clark 
County, where he remained until his death. Fielding 
Crimm eventually became the owner of about 1,000 
acres of land in Fayette County, including the fine old 
homestead farm now owned and occupied by his 
grandson, Benjamin F., of this review. He was a 
vigorous and resourceful pioneer who aided definitely 
in the civic and industrial development of Fayette 
County, and the house which he erected on his home 
farm was destroyed by fire in 1880, the same having 
given place to the commodious rural dwelling which 



is now occupied by the subject of this sketch. Field- 
ing Crimm died in 1865, when venerable in years, and 
his wife likewise attained to advanced age. They 
became the parents of the following children : Susan, 
who married John Darnably, continued her residence 
in Fayette County until her death ; Martha and her 
husband, whose name was Weathers, both died on 
their farm near Avon, this county; Sally married Dr. 
Rozzell and they established their home in the State 
of Missouri, where they passed the remainder of their 
lives; and Benjamin M., father of the subject of this 
review, was the only son to attain to years of maturity. 

Benjamin M. Crimm passed his entire life on the 
old home farm and was a citizen whose worthy char- 
acter and substantial achievement made him one of 
the representative men of his native county in all that 
pertains to constructive service and civic loyalty. He 
was forty years of age at the time of his marriage 
to Miss Louise Hamilton, and his death occurred in 
1884, his widow passing to eternal rest in 1890. Mr. 
Crimm was well known as a breeder of fine trotting 
horses and high-grade Shorthorn cattle. Of the chil- 
dren of Benjamin M. and Louise (Hamilton) Crimm 
only three attained to maturity: Van P., who became 
a successful lawyer, died in middle life in the City 
of Denver, Colorado. He was graduated from Tran- 
sylvania University at Lexington, and thereafter com- 
pleted a course in the law department of this historic 
old University of Virginia, from which he received 
his degree of Bachelor of Laws. He was for sev- 
eral years associated in practice with Judge Bullock 
in the City of Lexington, and he had been one of 
the representative members of the bar of Denver, 
Colorado, for fifteen years prior to his death. As 
a young man he was active in political work in Ken- 
tucky, especially as a campaign speaker in support of 
the candidacy of Colonel Breckinridge for the office 
of congressman from the Seventh District. Clarence 
Hamilton Crimm, the next younger son, is engaged 
in the insurance business in the City of Chattanooga, 
Tennessee. Benjamin Fielding Crimm, of this review, 
is the youngest of the number. 

Of the three brothers it was Benjamin F. who re- 
mained with the parents on the old homestead farm, 
in the activities of which he became closely associated 
in his early youth. Like his brothers, he was afforded 
excellent educational advantages, including those of 
Transylvania College, in which institution he was 
graduated as a member of the class of 1896. He has 
had the active management of the old home farm, 
and has brought to bear the progressiveness and good 
judgment which make for maximum success in agri- 
cultural and live-stock enterprise. In connection with 
diversified agriculture he gives special attention to the 
breeding and raising of the best type of Duroc-Jer- 
sey swine. His farm now comprises about 100 acres 
of the valuable soil of Fayette County, and he takes 
loyal and helpful interest in all things pertaining to 
the civic and material welfare of his home commu- 
nity and native county. He has had no desire for 
public office and in politics maintains an independent 
attitude, especially in local affairs. He holds mem- 
bership in the old Macedonia Christian Church, about 
a mile distant from his home, and his parents like- 
wise were earnest members of this church. In the 
time-honored Masonic fraternity he has received the 
chivalric degrees of the York Rite, as a member of 
the Commandery of Knights Templar in the City of 
Lexington, where also he is affiliated with the vener- 
able Lexington Lodge No. i, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons. His Masonic affiliations are further 
extended to include his membership in the Ancient 
Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He 
was active and liberal in support of local agencies 
in connection with the nation's participation in the 
World war, and gave effective service in furthering the 
various drives in support of the various governmental 



132 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



loans. The popularity of Mr. Crimm is in no measure 
impaired by reason of the fact that his name is still 
enrolled on the list of eligible bachelors in Fayette 
County. 

William F. Hieatt is to be designated not only as 
one of the representative farmers of Fayette County, 
but also as a scion of an old and honored Kentucky 
family. His farm, well improved and under effective 
cultivation, comprises 251 acres of the tine Blue Grass 
land of Fayette County. It is situated on Bowman's 
Mill Turnpike, and is six miles southwest of the City 
of Le.xington. 

Lewis Hieatt, the founder of the Kentucky branch 
of the family, came in an early day from Virginia, 
proceeded down the Ohio River to Maysville, and 
thence made his way overland to Woodford County, 
where he obtained a tract of land south of Versailles, 
the county seat. He there reclaimed and developed 
the farm, which continued to be his place of residence 
until his death, when venerable in years. His son 
.'Mien became the owner of the old homestead and 
there remained until his death, when he was seventy- 
eight years of age. His remains rest in the old 
family graveyard on the farm, beside those of his 
parents, and this portion of the old homestead is still 
retained in the possession of the family. Harbin L., 
son of Allen, inherited the ancestral estate, which 
originally comprised about 250 acres, and there he 
passed his entire life as a prosperous farmer, he hav- 
ing been seventy-four years of age at the time of his 
demise, and the farm having been sold i)y their 
heirs after his death, save for the family burial plot, 
in which rest the mortal remains of himself and his 
wife. Harbin Lewis Hieatt married Miss Anna Fox, 
daughter of William Fox, of Mason County, and she 
preceded her husband to eternal rest by about twenty 
years. Allen Hieatt, father of Harbin L., was an only 
child, and he became the father of two sons and three 
daughters. Of the sons Benjamin died a bachelor, 
and thus it was through Harbin L., the other son, 
that the family name was perpetuated. Harbin L. 
and Anna (Fox) Hieatt became the parents of three 
sons and two daughters who attained to years of 
maturity, and of the number William Fox Hieatt, of 
this review, is the eldest; Benjamin Moore still re- 
sides in Woodford County; Allen is a resident of 
Danville, Boyle County; Katie is the wife of Andrew 
J. Hutchinson, of Warrensburg, Missouri; and Lucy 
is the wife of S. J. Bush, of Lexington, Kentucky. 
The parents were zealous members of the Presbyterian 
Church, and the father was unswerving in his support 
of the cause of the democratic party. 

William Fox Hieatt was born on the ancestral farm- 
stead in Woodford County, March 3, 1858, and was 
reared and educated in his native county. He became 
a representative farmer in Woodford County and also 
dealt extensively in tobacco in that county. He also 
became associated with others in the handling of Ken- 
tucky tobacco in the City of Louisville, and later he 
formed a partnership with his brother-in-law, William 
Riley, and established a loose-leaf tobacco warehouse 
at Danville, Boyle County, where he continued in 
business under these conditions about four years. For 
two years he was interested in coal mining operations 
near Beattyville, Lee County, but the negative success 
which attended this venture gave him a somewhat dis- 
agreeable financial experience in connection with this 
line of industrial enterprise. In 1909 Mr. Hieatt pur- 
chased and established his home on his present farm, 
on which he has made numerous improvements, in- 
cluding the erection of two barns for the storage of 
the large crops of tobacco which he raises on the 
place, this branch of farm enterprise being given spe- 
cial attention by him. Mr. Hieatt takes loyal interest 
in local affairs of a public order, is a staunch demo- 
crat and has served as judge at various elections. 



He has been for forty years an active member of the 
Presbyterian Church, and while a resident of his 
native county he was a member of the old church of 
this denomination at Versailles. 

The year 1893 recorded the marriage of Mr. Hieatt 
to Miss Nannie Riley, of Woodford County, and 
thereafter he had active charge of the old home farm 
from the time of his father's death until the property 
was sold. Mr. and Mrs. Hieatt became the parents 
of three children — Martha Fox, and Catherine Gray 
and Nannie, who are twins, the mother having died 
at the birth of these twin daughters. Martha F. taught 
three years in the public schools of Kentucky, and is 
now a teacher in a leading college for young women 
in the City of Birmingham, Alabama. Catherine G. 
is a popular teacher in the Picadome School in Fay- 
ette County ; and Nannie remains with her father and 
presides over the domestic and social affairs of the 
attractive home. After the death of Mrs. Hieatt, her 
mother, Mrs. Martha Gray Riley, assumed the care 
of the infant twin daughters, as well as the older 
daughter, and they in turn are according to her in 
her venerable years the most loving devotion. 

J. Ernest Cassidy. Among the citizens of Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky, to whom is vouchsafed an honored 
place in local history is J. Ernest Cassidy, a well- 
known business man of that city and whose record as 
a public official is one to which he can refer with a 
justifiable degree of pride. In his life history are 
found evidences of those peculiar characteristics that 
always make for achievement — sound judgment, per- 
sistency and fortitude — and as the result of such a 
life he has long been one of the best known, most 
influential and highly esteemed citizens of this locality. 

J. Ernest Cassidy was born January 16, 1867, in 
Fleming County, Kentucky, and is the oldest son of 
John T. and Laura Cassidy. He is the scion of one 
of Kentucky's old and respected families, the Cassidy 
family having been established in Fleming County at 
about the close of the Revolutionary war, and in the 
beautiful cemetery overlooking Flemingsburg lie buried 
five generations of his people. He is the great-grand- 
son of Michael Cassidy, the pioneer, who is so inter- 
estingly written of in Collins' "History of Kentucky." 
In an article written twenty years or more ago Judge 
J. Soule Smith used the following language: "Of his 
ancestors it is unnecessary to speak, since he has 
only claimed recognition for his own m.erits and sought 
friendship for his own personality. But they were 
of the stern and rugged sort, with the granite front 
for an enemy, and the violet growing in its crevices 
for a friend. Like almost all the early Kentuckians, 
they were strong and brave. 

"He was educated in the public and private schools 
of Fleming County, but found it necessary to engage 
in business before his maturity. So in 1886, when 
nineteen years of age, he opened a general store at 
Shawhan in Bourbon County, Kentucky. Here he 
met and married Miss Sallie Moore, daughter of Cap- 
tain Thomas E. and Sarah (Shawhan) Moore. His 
business in Shawhan prospered, but in 1891 he sought 
a wider field and came to Lexington, where he^ opened 
a cigar factory. 

"Mr. Cassidy, through an accident while hunting, 
lost one of his hands, but few would notice it. He 
has an artificial hand and so performs his duties (city 
clerk) that the absence of the natural member is not 
noticed. He is attentive to his duties, kind and cour- 
teous to every one without regard to color, social posi- 
tion or politics." 

Mr. Cassidy's father, John T. Cassidy, was a mer- 
chant and farmer of Fleming County for twenty years, 
and afterward devoted himself to farming in Bourbon 
and Fayette counties. It was on the farm that J. 
Ernest Cassidy learned the lessons of industry, energy 
and self-reliance which have made him a success in 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



133 



whatever field of activity lie has labored since. Mr. 
Cassidy served the City of Lexington sixteen years 
as mayor and city clerk, igoo to 1915 inclusive. His 
record as mayor was characterized by actions of the 
most constructive sort, and it is a matter of com- 
mon knowledge that the city made more substantial 
progress during his term of four years than during 
the previous twenty years. Among the things accom- 
plished by him during that eventful period may be 
mentioned the following: Built more than sixteen miles 
of asphalt streets; built the Jefferson Street and West 
Main Street viaducts; connected East Maxwell Street 
with High Street and Walnut Street with Seventh 
Street, at a cost of more than $250,000, without a 
bond issue; and the purchase of Duncan, Douglas and 
Gratz Parks. Since retiring from office Mr. Cassidy 
is devoting his time to his business interests. He 
built and owns the Aylesford Flats at the corner of 
Maxwell Street and Woodland Avenue, and here he 
is engaged in the grocery business, conducting what 
is generally known as the model grocery of Ken- 
tucky. He is recognized as a business man of more 
than ordinary soundness of judgment and executive 
ability, and the position he occupies today has been 
gained solely through his own individual efforts. 

Mr. Cassidy has always taken an interest in fra- 
ternal societies and is a member of Lexington Lodge 
No. I, Free and Accepted Masons; the Royal Ar- 
canum, the Knights of Pythias, the Improved Order 
of Red Men, the Modern Woodmen of America, the 
Knights of the Maccabees and the Sons of the Revo- 
lution. 

Mr. Cassidy resides at i-)6 East Maxwell Street, 
and he and his wife have been blessed with two chil- 
dren, namely: Laura, who is a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky and now holds a responsible posi- 
tion at Washington, District of Columbia, and John 
T., who is an alumnus of the University of Virginia 
and is now engaged in the practice of law. In placing 
the name of Mr. Cassidy in the front rank of the 
enterprising men of affairs of Lexington, whose in- 
fluence has always tended to the upbuilding of his 
city and the general advancement of the community, 
simple justice is done a fact recognized throughout 
the community by those at all familiar with his his- ■ 
tory and cognizant of the important part he has acted 
in local affairs. His career presents a notable ex- 
ample of those qualities of mind and character which 
overcome obstacles and win success, and because of 
his success and substantial qualities of character he is 
deservedly popular throughout the community honored 
by his citizenship. 

James H. Browning is a native Kentuckian who 
started life at the bottom of the financial ladder, has 
reared his family, provided home comforts and 
achieved a solid basis of prosperity by reliance 
throughout upon the medium of agriculture. He has 
been a persistent devotee of this, the oldest human 
occupation, for more than forty years. His farm is 
one of the attractive places in Fayette County, 314 
miles south of Lexington on Clays Mill Pike. 

Mr. Browning was born in Mason County, Ken- 
tucky, Septem.ber 14, 1857, son of William and Nancy 
(Wilson) Browning. His maternal grandfather was 
James Wilson. William Browning spent his active 
career as a farmer and died in Bourbon County at 
the age of sixty-five. 

James H. Browning grew up in Mason County, at- 
tended local schools and learned to work, but was 
practically without capital when at the age of twenty- 
two he married in Bracken County Miss Fanny Flor- 
ence Ellis. She was also born in Mason County, 
though at the time of her marriage her father, Wil- 
liam Ellis, lived in Bracken County. The first four 
years after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Browning 
lived on a rented farm in Bourbon County. He then 



bought and occupied for three years a farm in Gar- 
rard County, and moved from there to a place he 
bought near Nicholasville. He was in that one com- 
munity for eighteen years, and in 1910 moved to his 
present property near Lexington. This is the old John 
McLeod farm, contains 125 acres, and Mr. Browning 
paid $150 an acre, a price that then represented the 
top of the market for farm lands. However, a 
conservative valuation of the farm today would be 
nearer $450 an acre. The farm has good soil, is 
thoroughly productive and the home is a modern one, 
consisting of a brick house built by its original owner, 
Mr. McLeod. The house is lighted by an acetylene 
gas plant, and since acquiring the farm Mr. Brown- 
ing has added other buildings and varied improve- 
ments. 

He is a democrat in politics and is a member of 
the Epworth Methodist Church at Lexington. Mr. 
and Mrs. Browning have two daughters : Ola is the 
wife of J. F. Huffman, a real estate man at Lexing- 
ton and has two children, Mary Florence and Ann 
Lee. Bessie, the younger daughter, is the wife of 
W. J. Penn, a farmer near the Browning home. Mr. 
and Mrs. Penn have three children, named Eva, James 
Estill and Willabelle. 

Charles Francis McMeekin, the late proprietor of 
Oakwood Farm, three miles south of Lexington, on 
Clays Mill Pike, was distinguished among Kentucky 
horsemen for his remarkable judgment and insight into 
the possibilities and characteristics of young stock. He 
was not to any extent identified with the turf and track, 
but for many years was a breeder on a commercial 
scale, and a colt bred at Oakwood Farm commanded 
a premium in the market above its pedigree because 
of Mr. McMeekin's reputation for producing a long 
success of prize winners. 

Mr. McMeekin was born near Lexington. He was 
thirteen when his mother died, and he lived at home 
with his father on the farm. Mr. Wilgus the old 
time banker at Lexington assisted him in getting a 
start in the wool trade. He was associated with' 
James McCormick, and soon developed sound busi- 
ness ideas and bought wool all over the Blue Grass 
region. His success in that field enabled him to ex- 
pand into the thoroughbred horse industry, where he 
also achieved success. As a breeder he was associated 
for a number of years with Ed Applegate of Louis- 
ville and John McDonald of Lexington. He and Mr. 
.-Applegate together bought the 250 acres comprising 
the nucleus of Oakwood Farm, but Mr. McMeekin 
eventually became sole owner and acquired additional 
lands since incorporated in Oakwood Farm. Another 
business associate was Capt. Sam Brown, a close per- 
sonal friend of Mr. McMeekin. Mr. McMeekin was 
owner of "Sally of Navarre," a brood mare which 
after his death sold at a public sale for $20,000. A 
noted stallion on his farm was Fonso, which sired 
many excellent colts bringing good prices. It was 
his annual custom to sell eighteen or twenty choice 
colts in New York. Mr. McDonald and Mr. Mc- 
Meekin were still doing business together when they 
lost their lives in a train wreck in England. They 
were en route from London to purchase a stallion, 
their train being derailed at Salisbury and many of 
its passengers killed. Mrs. McDonald received life- 
long injuries in the same accident. This was Mr. 
McMeekin's first trip abroad. At that time Apple- 
gate & McDonald had stock at Oakwood, though the 
ownership of the farm was then vested in Mr. Mc- 
Meekin. He greatly improved the place during his 
tenure, building the present comfortable home, and 
the barns which are especially fitted for its character 
as a horse farm. Mr. McMeekin had many noted 
customers, and one of them depended upon him to 
pick a colt each year, and repeated this order for 
eight successive years. Only one purchase failed to 



134 



HISTORY OF KENTUCKY 



realize all the merits anticipated. Few American 
horsemen were ever so well gifted in judgment as to 
a colt's possibilities as Mr. McMeekin. He was pros- 
pered in his business affairs, and before his death had 
been planning to make investments in the mountain 
regions of Kentucky, a country for which he fore- 
saw a great future. He was never in politics and his 
chief interests were his home and family and farm. 
He had personal traits that attracted to him a great 
number of warm and admiring friends. Mr. Mc- 
Meekin acquired Oakwood Farm at about $125 an 
acre, but with the improvements he made there and 
the subsequent rise in values it is worth a great deal 
more today. 

At the age of twenty-five Mr. McMeekin married 
Mattie Craig, of Jessamine County, Kentucky, daugh- 
ter of Lewis Craig, a well known farmer of that sec- 
tion. She completed her education in Georgetown 
College. She became the mother of two children. 
The daughter, Catherine Lee, died at the age of 
twenty. The son, Charles Francis, lives with his 
mother at th'e old homestead. Mrs. McMeekin is a 
member of the First Baptist Church at Lexington. 

John Thomas McGibbons Carr is owner of one 
of the substantial country homes in the rich and 
beautiful section around Lexington. His place is three 
miles south of that city, on the Parker's Mill Pike. 
The prosperity he has enjoyed for himself and family 
has been earned by consecutive and faithful service 
beginning when he was a mere boy. He was a farm 
hand, and for many years, in an era of low prices, 
made progress as a farm renter. He combined the 
growing of crops with his trade as a carpenter, has 
done a large amount of contracting in his time, and is 
still one of the leading men of enterprise in the rural 
sections of Fayette County. 

He was born in Cynthiana, Kentucky, June 11, 1871, 
a son of James C. and Cynthia A. (Mattox) Carr. 
James C. Carr was a friend and admirer of John 
Thomas McGibbons, at one time a Kentucky con- 
gressman. It was in honor of the congressman that 
a son of the Carr family was named, at the special 
request of Mr. McGibbons. Mr. Carr, however, is 
universally known as "Mack" Carr. The Carr family 
was established in Kentucky from Pennsylvania by the 
grandfather of Mack Carr. James C. Carr was a 
Kentucky farmer, and after selling his farm in this 
state moved to Arkansas and bought 265 acres, but 
died less than a year after going there from conges- 
tive chills. He had served as a soldier in the Union 
army, in Company B of the Fortieth Infantry, and his 
widow received a pension. She was of Virginia an- 
cestry, and her father, Elijah Mattox, was a well- 
known farmer and distillery owner, and in the early 
days fed large numbers of cattle at his distillery and 
drove them east to market. Mr. Mattox was widely 
known as an interesting personality in that section of 
Kentucky, and died in advanced years. 

After the death of James C. Carr his widow re- 
turned to Kentucky from Arkansas and reared her 
four sons on a farm near Smithsonville. She died at 
Cynthiana at the age of eighty-five. Elijah R., the 
oldest of her sons, is a farmer at Millersburg, Ken- 
tucky ; Joseph W. farms in Boone County ; Mack is 
the third in age, and Daniel R. died at Indiana Harbor, 
Indiana, while a roller in the steel mills. 

Mack Carr at the age of sixteen came to Fayette 
County in order to receive better wages for his farm 
work. He spent one season in the employ of Lewis 
Nicholas, working for wages of from $10 to $26 a 
month, continued working out in that same locality 
five years and carefully saved his wages. It was as 
a farm hand that he came into the neighborhood 
where he lives today. As a carpenter he helped New- 
ton Peek build a dairy house within view of the 
present Carr place. By another neighbor, W. M. 



Sale, he was employed seven years. At the age of 
twenty-one Mr. Carr married Sidney Maxwell, of 
Owenton, a native of Owen County and daughter of 
James and Arminta (Reed) Maxwell. Mr. Carr spent 
altogether nine years on the Sale farm, seven years 
of the time as a renter. For ab