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Full text of "A history of Kidwelly"

Gc 

942.98019 

K46J 

1378330 




ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 




3 1833 00718 7930 



GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



. HISTORT 
• ... OF 
KWfFELLr 



PLATE I. 




hi ec, 

■J S 

I- o 

in ■« 

■< a- 

U e 

>■ 5 



History of Kidwelly 



REV. D. DAVEN JONES, B.A. 

Vicar of Kidwelly. 



With Illustrations. 



Nor rough, nor barren, are the winding ways 
Of hoar antiquity, but strewn with flowers.' 

Thomas War ton (1687 — 1745)- 



CARMARTHEN: 

PRINTED BY W. SPURRELL AND SON. 

1908. 



if-3^ 






137S330 



TO JOHN 

LORD BISHOP OF ST, DAVIDS 

THIS BOOK 

IS, BY PERMISSION, DEDICATED 

BY 

HIS OBEDIENT SERVANT 

THE AUTHOR 



PREFACE. 
— .^^.^— 

Kidwelly deserves a written history of its own. 

A Tragedy, in five acts, entitled, ' Gwenllian, or The 
Siege of Kidwelly,' by E. Andrews, published in 1841 ; 
a few facts embodied in an 'Appeal ' on behalf of the 
restoration of the parish church, by Hugh Williams, 
published in 1847 ; a Paper prepared by George T. 
Clark for the Cambrian Archaeological Association in 
1850, entitled, 'A Description and History of Kidwelly 
Castle,' published in ' ArchcBologia Cambrensis,' and 
twice reprinted in pamphlet form ; and some spas- 
modic and disjointed notices, mostly unauthentic, pub- 
lished in local newspapers, constitute the literature 
which appears to have been hitherto printed relative 
to the history of the ancient town and commote of 
Kidwelly, whose stirring annals extend back to the 
dim vista of the ages. 

The historical interest that clusters round the subject, 
and the perfunctory treatment it has hitherto received, 
must be my apology for presuming to present the facts 
which appear in the following pages, trusting, at the 
same time, that they may be of interest to my readers, 
and that my effort, however imperfect, may serve as 
a chronicle of achievements and events which should 
not be consigned to oblivion. 

I gratefully acknowledge my indebtedness to Arch- 
deacon W. Iv. Bevan for several valuable suggestions 
which he has kindly given me. 

D. DAVEN JONES. 



The Vicarage, Kidwelly, 
December 13, 1907. 



CONTENTS 



The Topographicai. Situation of Kidwelly . . . . i 

The Etymology of the Name . . . . . . 3 

Its Ancient History . . . . . . . , 6 

The Vicissitudes of its Castile . . . . . . 19 

The Manor . . . . . . . . . . 26 

LocAi, Military Levies . . . . . . . . 30 

Its Casti,e . . . . . . . . . . • • 32 

Its eari,y Christian Churches . . . . . . 41 

Its Priory . . . . . . . . • • 47 

The Situation of the Priory . . . . . . 50 

The Consecration of an ancient Cemetery . . 56 

The Vicariate . . . . . . . . . . 58 

Chantries . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 

Parish Church . . . . . . . . 64 

The Municipai< Borough . . . . . . ■ ■ 77 

Domestic Euildings and noted Famiues . . 82 

LOCAI, Cei<ebrities . . . . . . . . . . 87 

Local Public Men . . . . . . . . 93 

Local Nonconformist Chapels . . . . . . 98 

Local Industries . . . . . . . . 100 



CONTENTS. 

APPENDIX. 

A. PUNDAMENTAL DEED CONCERNING THE PRIORY .. Ill 

B. Charter of Fitzwilliam .. .. ., 113 

C. Charter of Maurice de Londres .. ..113 

D. Petition concerning the Tithes op Kidweixy i 14 

E. Sequestration of the Profits of the Church and 

Priory . . . . . . . . ..115 

F. Draft Lease regarding the Sai,e of the Tempor- 

alities of the Priory . . . . . . 116 

G. The Diversion of the Resources of the Chantry 119 
H. Charter of Henry, Duke of Lancaster, a.d. 1357 121 
I. Charter of Henry VI., a.d. 1444 . . . . 126 
J. An Exemplification of the original Charter 130 

K. An Exemplification of the original Charter, 

4 Edward VI. .. .. .. ..130 

L. Charter of James I., a.d. 1619 .. .. 131 

M. Charter of Queen Victoria, a.d. 1885 .. •• i57 

N. An Order in Council constituting St. Mary Kid- 
welly Within and St. Mary Without a United 
School District under Section 40 of the Ele- 
mentary Education Act, 1870 .. .. 165 



CONTENTS. 

II,I.USTRATIONS. 

Pi,ATE I. KiDWELi^Y Castle, after J. M. W. Turner. 

Pi:,ATE II- Kidwelly Parish Church, Woodcut. 

Plate ill. Kidwelly Castle : General View. 

Plate IV.* The same : Bird's-eye View. 

Plate v.* The same : General Survey. 

Plate VI.* The same : Plan. 

Plate VII.* The same : Sections. 

Plate VIII.* The same : Details. 

Plate IX.* The same : the Chapel. 

Plate X. The Vicarage House. 

Plate XI. Kidwelly Parish Church, from the North. 

Plate XII. i J The same : shewing Roof damaged by Fall 
OF Tower. 

Plate XIII. The same : the Nave. 

Plate XIV. The same : Chancel Windows. 

Plate XV. The same : Figure of Madonna and en- 

trance TO Mural Staircase. 

Plate XVI. The same : the Communion Plate. 

Plate XVII. The same : Sepulchral Recess. 

Plate XVIII. The same : the Sedilia and Piscina. 

Plate XIX. ^ The Seal of the Corporation. 

Plate XX.* Old Houses in Kidwelly. 



* By permission of the proprietors of 'Archaeologia Cambrensis.' 



ERRATA. 

Page 23, third line from foot — For Maude read Blanche. 
Page 25, tenth line — For Carberry read Carbery. 
Page 38, seventeenth Une — For The readlAn. 

ADDENDUM. 

Page 44, eleventh line, after ' near by,' read ' csimilar to that 
which still remains on Colman Farm.' 

ABBREVIATION. 
P.i?.0.— Public Record Office. 



PLATE II. 




KIDWELLY. 



ITS TOPOGRAPHICAL SITUATION. 




pDWElvLY is a town, a municipal borough, 
and a parish in the hundred and lordship 
of Kidwelly, and county of Carmarthen. 
The town itself is situate on the northern 
and southern banks of the lower course of 
Gwendraeth Fach (L,esser Gwendraeth) river, and nine 
miles to the south of Carmarthen. Iceland, in his Itiner- 
ary, gives it this quaint description — ' Ther is a litle 
Toune, now but newly made, between Vendraith Vaure 
and Guendraeth Vehan rivers, but hard upon Vendraith 
Vehan. Vendraith Vaur is half a mile of. Ther is 
betwixt new Kidwelly and the old, but a Bridge over 
I^itle Wendraith. The old Toun is pretily waullid, and 
hath hard by the waul, a Castel ; the old Toun is near 
al desolated, but the Castel is meately wel kept up. It 

longgid to the Duke of Lancastre The Castel 

is very fair, and double waullid. I saw there iii gates, 
and over one of them was the Ruine of a Fair Toune 
Haul, and under, a Prison. A peace of the new Toun 
was lateli burnid. The new Toune is three times as 
bigge as the old.' 

[A] 



2 HISTORY OF KIDWEr,I,Y. 

This description has reference to the condition of the 
town at about the middle of the i6th century, when 
Iceland wrote, and although it is a sad picture of de- 
cadence, it nevertheless proves that Kidwelly had been 
a place of considerable size and importance at an earlier 
period. 

The little town alluded to was that which grew up 
under the shadow and protection of the Norman Castle, 
and was on the left bank of Gwendraeth Fach river. 
This seems to have been originally built for the accom- 
modation of foreign settlers, consisting of French, 
English, and Flemings, introduced in consequence of 
the Norman occupation of the district (see Appendix A). 
On the other hand, the old town represented as having 
fallen into decay, was on the right bank of the river, 
and was probably the capital of the commote of Kid- 
welly, which, together with the commotes of Gwyr 
(Gower) and Carnwyllion, formed, at one time, what 
was known to the Kymry as Cantref Eginog, a con- 
stituent part of the third division of the ancient king- 
dom or principality of Dynevor, or Deheubarth (South 
Wales).* 



* ' Description of Cambria,' by Sir John Price, xix. 




HISTORY OF KIDWELI^Y. 3 

THE ETYMOLOGY OF THE NAME. 

ENNIUS, a monk of Bangor in North Wales, 
who is supposed to have written his ' Eulogium 
BritannicB ' in the 9th century, cites the name 
as Cetgueli* This form of the name appears also in 
' Liber Landavensis ' (p. 552), a compilation in the main 
of the former part of the 12th century. In ancient 
documents, such as the Patent Rolls, Charter Rolls, 
Close Rolls, and Inquisitions Post Mortem, the name is 
variously written, the variations being less instructive 
than grotesque. The distortions are, indeed, in some 
instances almost unrecognisable. These are examples — 
Kedewelli, Cadewely, Kadewely, Keddewelly, Kadd- 
welye, Kedwelli, Kydewelly, Keldwelby, Kedewelby, 
Kedewalli, Kydewely, Kedewely, Kedewelle, Kidewell. 

Iceland's etymology of Kidwelly may reasonably be 
rebelled against as being atrocious when he says, as he 
does in his Itinerary, that ' this place was called Cath- 
welli, that is Cattilectus, because Cattas once used there 
to make his bed in an oak.' 

In ' The Description of Pembrokeshire,' by George 
Owen, of Henllys, edited by Dr. Henry Owen, the editor 
states (p. 200) that Kidwelly was in Welsh called Cedweli, 
or Cadweli, and that the name is a tribal one ordinarily 
formed from the personal name Cadwal. This authority 
maintains that the town of Kidwelly borrowed its name 
from the castle, in whose surroundings it sprang up 
and that the castle took its name from the district in 

* Nennius and Gildas — San Marte's Ed., p. ^6. 



4 HISTORY OF KIDWElvIvY. 

which it was erected. Similar instances are given in 
which old Welsh district-names became attached to a 
town in the vicinity, such as Arnvystli, which is derived 
from Arwystl ; Builth from Buellt, or Biiallt ; Cardigan 
from Ceredigion ; Pembroke from Penhrog ; Brecknock 
from Brycheiniog ; Maesyfed from Maeshyfaidd ; and 
Laugharne from Talacharn. The objections to this 
theory are (i) that Cadwal is left unidentified, and 
seems to be unknown to history ; (2) that the last 
syllable in the word Cydweli is unaccounted for. 

The popular theory as to the etymology of the name 
Kidwelly is based on the import of the modern Welsh 
form Cydweli, which is represented to be a compound 
word consisting of the prefix cyd (con) wy=gwy (water), 
and li=lii (a stream). The meaning of the name accord- 
ing to this theory would therefore be, the conflue^ice of 
streams. And this derivation is supported by the physi- 
cal features of the locality, as the larger portion of the 
town, which is called ' the new town,' lies between the 
greater and lesser Gwendraeth rivers, which mingle their 
waters in an estuary about a mile from the town. 

Plausible though this theory may be, it does not 
sufficiently account for the earliest form of the name 
Cetgueli, as given by Nennius. 

It will have been observed that the name of both the 
local rivers is Gwendraeth (White-beach). This does not 
sound like a river name : it seems to refer to the traeth, 
or sandy level, across which the united rivers find their 
way to the sea, and which probably has been transferred 
from the plain to the rivers themselves, whose union 
forms the characteristic feature of the locality. If this 



HISTORY OF KIDWEI.LY. 5 

be SO, it is reasonable to suppose that the rivers had, at 
an early period, a name of their own, and this name 
possibly supplies an explanation of the two syllables 
welly, for the original form, as written by Nennius, 
Cetgueli, would be gueli, and this approximates closely 
to the well-known Gwili, of Abergwili. The first syllable 
cet, or as now kid, may be a form of cyd, signifying 
jimction, in which case Kidwelly would refer to that 
which is the special feature of the neighbourhood — the 
junction of the Gwelis. 

In his explanatory notes on the ' Siege of Kidwelly, ' 
by E. Andrews, the author states (p. 54) that the Gwen- 
draeth originally bore the name of Gwely. The early 
inhabitants of these parts seem to have been animated 
by a conservative spirit in naming the rivers, for the 
names afford little variation, and in some instances no 
variation at all, as, for instance, Teify, Towy, Tawy, 
and Taf. So, again, Cleddau is, as in the case of the 
Kidwelly rivers, shared by two streams, whose junction 
gave its Welsh name A herdaugleddau to Milf ord. 

It may, however, be objected that in the last-mentioned 
theory the ' g ' has been dropped out of Nennius's gueli, 
such not being demanded by the rule of initial mutation, 
inasmuch as cyd does not affect the radical form ; but 
the loss may have occurred from the practice of by-gone 
days. If therefore allowance be made for changes pro- 
duced by time and usage, it is quite possible that the 
name Kidwelly means the junction of the Gwelis as 
appropriate to the commote in the first instance, and 
subsequently to its capital. 




HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 

ITS ANCIENT HISTORY. 

'HE remotest antiquity of Kidwelly is suggested 
by some place-names which have been handed 
down through the ages to the present time. 
Among these are Y Maenllwyd Mawr (the great 
hoary stone) and Allt Cunedda (the hill of Cunedda). 
These names are so distinctive of two different epochs 
in the annals of ancient Britain as to justify the assump- 
tion that Kidwelly played a prominent part in each of 
them. 

y Maenllwyd Mawr is the name by which is still 
generally known a large enclosure on an eminence about 
half a mile from the town on the old road leading east- 
ward. Here there is what appears to be a Celtic barrow, 
or tumulus, intact, and of extraordinary size — 135 yards 
long, 6 yards wide, and 4 or 5 feet high — which has 
remained scientifically unexplored to the present time. 
This may originally have been a place of Goidelic in- 
terment, in which case it is not improbable that it 
became also a Druidic oratory, for the tomb then not 
unfrequently became the shrine ; but this double use 
of the position may also have been continued by the 
Brythons after they had embraced the Christian religion. 
Indeed, many of our Christian Churches have originated 
in this manner, and it is a most obvious transition from 
the tomb to the temple. The worship of the spirits of 
the dead at the one time would naturally grow into the 
worship of the Great Unknown in the other.* It is 

* Fergusson's ' Rude Stone Monuments.' 



HISTORY OF KIDWEl^IvY. 7 

probable that this transition took place here, for the 
very position became the site (as will be seen later on) 
of a Christian Church. The swampy condition of the 
lowlands at the remote period of the Celtic settle- 
ment in this island would naturally incline the 
settlers to select hillocks and mountainous districts 
for their abode. For this reason they are said to have 
assembled in the western parts of Britain, where the 
undulating nature of the country would appeal to them 
as most suited for their habitation and the rites of their 
religion. Relics of the Druidic worship and burial might 
therefore be expected to be found in elevated places, 
such as the position which Y Maenllwyd Mawr occupies. 
Druidism itself, in fact, was generally known as Y Maen 
(the stone).* There remains however, as might have 
been expected in a site under cultivation, no trace of 
the hoary stone, probably a megalithic monument 
commonly called a Cromlech, after which the enclosure 
is named. 

Allt Cimedda is the name given to the hill on the 
north-east of the town, which is supposed once to have 
been the site of a stronghold erected either by the chief- 
tain himself, whose name it bears, or by his sons, of 
whom Meirion and Ceredig, the grandfather of St. David, 
the Patron Saint of Wales, are the most familiar. It 
may be observed that in the Ordnance Map of 1842 the 
position in question is marked ' Ancient Fortress,' and 
excavations rendered expedient by agricultural pro- 
cesses bear indubitable testimony to the probability of 

* Morgan's ' British Kymry,' p. 58. 



8 HISTORY OF KIDWELI.Y. 

the existence at one time of a somewhat extensive 
fortification in this place. Now Cimedda, or Cuneddag, 
a prince of Strathclyde, and his sons are said by Nennius 
to have come into Wales from a district on the southern 
side of the Frith of Forth,* which the Picts eventually 
snatched from the Roman power, and which they made 
one of their most important settlements.! Nennius 
also statesj that Cunedda and his sons arrived in 
Wales 146 years before the reign of Maelgwn, one 
of the most astute princes of Cunedda's descendants, 
who died of the yellow plague a.d. 547. Hence it 
would appear that their advent followed closely upon 
the evacuation of Britain by the Roman legions. 
Cunedda became the Gwledig, or over-king of the 
Kymry, an office which was a revival and perpetua- 
tion of the Dux Briianniarum during the Roman 
occupation, and he is said to have wielded this power 
as far as the Severn Sea, a view of the extension of which 
Allt Cunedda commands. 

The general unrest among European nations in the 
5th and 6th centuries, which occasioned the withdrawal 
of the Roman legions from Britain, seems to have dis- 
turbed the peace in the south-western part of the island, 
where the Goidels and Brythons — two branches of the 
Celtic race — had already settled among the non-Aryan 
aborigines. The Goidels were probably the first Celtic 
settlers, and they became in course of time inoculated 
with the Druidic religion, which had previously belonged 

* Rhys's 'Celtic Britain,' p. 118. 

I Newell's 'Welsh Church,' p. loi. 

% Nennius and Gildas,' p. 72. 



HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 9 

to the pre-Celtic inhabitants, while the Brythons were 
driven hither at a later period, and seem neither to 
have been welcomed by the Goidels nor to have adopted 
their religious creed, as they are supposed to have re- 
mained polytheists, such as they were, when Julius 
Caesar (' De Bello Gallico ') first made their acquaint- 
ance. It would appear that the Brythonic intruders 
settled in this part in a strip of country which lay on 
the eastern bank of the river Towy extending south- 
wards to the sea,* and they are said by Nennius to 
have been coimtenanced by the northern conquerors, 
by whom the Goidels were driven out. It is also 
stated by Camden that this territory was for a long 
time possessed by the sons of Keianus, the Scot, and 
that they were expelled by Cunedda.f 

At the time when this onslaught was made by Cunedda 
and his sons on the Goidels, the district was known as 
Gwyr (Gower) and Y Tri Chwmmwd (the Three Com- 
motes), by which latter were meant Kidwelly, Carnwyll- 
ion, and Is-cennen.J This grouping formed the Swydd 
Gy dwell, a misprint for Gy dwell. ^ At another period, 
however, Kidwelly, Carnwyllion, and Gower seem to 
have been the three commotes belonging to the cantref 
of Ystrad Tywy or Eginog.|| Urien, the son of Cyn- 
varch, or Urien Rheged as he is otherwise called, is also 
associated by Welsh tradition with this, or a similar ex- 
ploit, for it is asserted that King Arthur sent this prince 

* Rhys's ' Celtic Britain,' p. 254. 
t Camden's 'Britannia,' translated by Gough, p. 504. 
% lolo MSS., p. 392. 
§ Myv. Arch. II., 623. || Powell's 'History of Cambria,' xix. 



10 HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 

of the Round Table with ten thousand men to recover 
the above-mentioned Three Commotes which Gihtiore 
Rechdyr, king of Ireland, had usurped in the time of 
Constantine the Blessed, the first British sovereign after 
the Roman evacuation, a.d. 406. Urien is credited 
with having conquered the Irish and put them to flight, 
and to have subsequently received the kingdom of the 
country which was called Rheged — supposed to be derived 
from anrheg, a gift. This comprised the district between 
the rivers Tawy and Towy, including Gower, Kidwelly, 
Carnwyllion, Iscennen, and Cantref Bychan, and is said 
to have been a free gift bestowed unanimously upon 
Urien by its ancient British inhabitants. * 

Rheged is represented in the lolo MSS. (p. 457) to 
have been included in the kingdom of Glamorgan. 
Subsequent, however, to the time of Hywel Dda, 
during whose magnificent reign the ancient British sub- 
divisions of Wales underwent a considerable modifica- 
tion, there arose incessant disputes between Morganwg 
(Glamorgan) and Deheubarth (South Wales), touching 
the limits of the rival dominions. The district known 
as Gower and the Three Commotes, including Kidwelly, 
constituted one of the debatable territories. Towards 
the latter part of the loth century ' Liher Landavensis ' 
(p. 502) presents the district between the mouth of the 
Wye and the mouth of the Towy as comprising the 
kingdom of Morgan Hen, king of Glamorgan. The 
Principality of lestyn ap Gwrgan, who succeeded to the 
throne of Glamorgan about the middle of the nth 

* lolo MSS., 457—467. 



HISTORY OP KIDWELLY. II 

century, is stated in the lolo MSS. (p. 391) to have 
embraced the district between Tawy and Towy. In 
either case Kidwelly would then be included in the 
kingdom or lordship of Glamorgan. 

Down to the year 11 33 the diocese of Irlandaff seems 
to have been co-extensive with the kingdom of Mor- 
ganwg, or with the Principality of Glamorgan, and there- 
fore the district above mentioned would also be within 
the see of lylandaff. This fact is attested even as late 
as the year 1130 by the following BuU of Innocent II., 
addressed to the ' Inhabitants of Gower, Kidwelly, 
&c.' 

' Innocent, Bishop, servant of the servants of God, to tiis sons, 
the clergy and people resident throughout the parishes of Gower, 
Kidwelly, Cantref-Bychan, Ystradyw, and Urgyng, health and 
apostohcal benediction. As our predecessor of happy memory. 
Pope Honorius, has by his writings ordered you to obey our 
venerable brother Urban, Bishop of Llandaff, so also we com- 
mand that you humbly render to him, as to your father and 
Bishop, obedience and reverence. 

' Given at the Palatine the 25th day of Feb., 1130.' 

The district in question became also a source of friction 
which eventually developed into litigation between the 
rival sees of Llandaff and St. Davids. The dispute, 
although repeatedly laid before the Pope, was not settled 
at Rome, nor until the death of Urban, bishop of lylandaff, 
which occurred when he was on a journey to Rome in 
the prosecution of the business in 11 33. The contest 
was then given up by the bishop of I^landaff, and 
Bernard, bishop of St. Davids, retained possession of 
the district, which has ever since been incorporated in 
the see of St. Davids. 



12 HISTORY OF KIDWEIXY. 

A local function (the consecration of an ancient 
cemetety), reference to which is made later on, induces 
the belief that the district in dispute had virtually ex- 
changed hands as regards diocesan limits between 1096 
and 1112. 

Rhys ap Tewdwr, who succeeded his father Tewdwr 
the Great as Prince of South Wales in 1077, had already, 
for the purpose of civil government, detached the district 
from Glamorgan, and had it annexed to his own domin- 
ion, and this probably was one of the chief causes of 
the imbroglio that ensued between Glamorgan and 
Deheubarth, and which resulted in the Norman conquest 
of Glamorgan and the Norman invasions and occupa- 
tion of Kidwelly. 

INTRODUCTION OF FOREIGN INFLUENCE. 

lestyn, lord of Glamorgan, was at enmity with Prince 
Rhys (an enmity probably arising out of this disputed 
territory) at the time when Eineon, son of Cadivor, son 
ofj[Collw\m, lord of Dyfed (Pembrokeshire), who had 
been implicated in a rebellion against Rhys, the reigning 
Prince, fled to Glamorgan for refuge. This Bineon had 
served as an officer in the English Army in foreign wars. 
In order to insinuate himself into the favour of lestyn, 
he volunteered, under certain stipulations (among which 
was a promise of lestyn 's daughter in marriage, with the 
lordship of Miskin for her dowry), to make a personal 
application to the King of England (William Rufus), 
with whom he professed to be in favour,* for military 

* lolo MSS., p. 393. 



HISTORY OF KIDWEI.LY. I3 

assistance to lestyn against Rhys ap Tewdwr. This 
negotiation resulted in the willing sympathy and active 
support of Robert Fitzhamon, a kinsman of William 
the Conqueror and Knight of the Privy Chamber to 
King William Rufus,* and twelve other Norman knights. 
These levied in England a formidable army, consisting 
of twenty-four squires and three thousand men,t which, 
having joined that of lestyn in the year 1090, marched 
together into the territories of the Prince of South Wales. 
Rhys ap Tewdwr, although then about 98 years of age, 
hastily raised an army and met the combined invaders 
near Brecon, where a sanguinary battle ensued with 
great slaughter on each side. The aged but still valiant 
prince was slain in the engagement, and history relates 
that with him disappeared the glory of the Principality 
of South Wales. { The object for which their aid had 
been requisitioned having been attained, the Norman 
knights, after being sufficiently indemnified by lestyn, 
made preparations for their withdrawal to England. At 
this juncture, however, Eineon, who had perceived that 
lestyn was disinclined to fulfil his engagement to him, 
hurried to Robert Fitzhamon and his lieutenants, and 
having reported to them this breach of faith, invited 
them in his desire for revenge, to return and dispossess 
lestyn of his lordship, advancing his unpopularity with 
his subjects as a plea.§ The mercenaries eagerly seized 
the opportunity of becoming combatants on their own 
account. lestyn, with the demoralised remnant of his 

* Powell, xxxii. f lolo Mss., p. 378. 

J Rhys's ' Celtic Britain,' p. 142. 

§ lolo MSS., pp. m, 380. 



14 HISTORY OF KIDWEI.LY. 

army, was attacked on Mynydd Bychan, or Cardiff 
Heath,* was hopelessly defeated, and had no alternative 
but to flee the country. 

' What evils has the want of love produced, 
My country can declare ; the want of this — 
Oh ! sad the thought ! spoiled lestyn of his all ; 
Fixed the Normans in Morgan wg's land ; 
Robb'd Cymry of their much lov'd soil ; 
Made fathers wilfully imbrue their hands 
Even in their children's blood ! ' 

Siege of Kidwelly. 

Having gained an easy victory, the Normans now 
proceeded to divide the spoil. The royal lordship of 
Glamorgan was appropriated by Robert Fitzhamon, and 
the fertile parts were distributed among his knights, 
while the perfidious Eineon was left only the worthless 
soil and hilly districts for his trouble. Of the knights 
among whom Glamorgan was partitioned was William 
de lyondres, whose family played a prominent part in 
the history of Kidwelly. His share was the Castle and 
Manor of Ogmore. Having secured this point of van- 
tage, the Norman knights lost little time in pushing 
forward their arms to the Principality of South Wales, 
now enfeebled by the fall of Rhys ap Tewdwr ; for the 
conquest of Wales, unlike that of England, was effected 
by private enterprise. 

NORMAN INVASIONS. 

Hardly indeed had the Normans been settled in 
Glamorgan before they made a descent, in the year 

* lolo MSS., p. 380. 



HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 



15 



1093, on Gwyr, Kidwelly, and Ystrad Towy, devastating 
all the country before them.* Whether William de 
Londres, lord of Ogmore, took an active part in 
this particular expedition does not appear, but he 
is said to have won from the Welsh, at some time, 
the lordship of Kidwelly and Carnwyllion,-}- and to have 
built a castle at Kidwelly. J Doubt is, however, cast 
on these assertions by the late R. W. Banks in his article 
on Early Charters in South Wales in ' ArchcBologia Cam- 
brensis ' (Series IV., vol. ix., p. 82), where it is contended 
that Henry I. was in possession of Kidwelly, Gower, and 
the Vale of Towy when he came to the throne in iioo. 
But if a fortress was erected at Kidwelly by this knight, 
its resisting strength could not have been great, as in 
the 3'ear 1094, when the garrison of Rhydygors, which 
for some time had overawed the Welsh, was scattered, 
the men of Gwyr (Gower) and these parts were en- 
couraged to make an effort to regain their liberty. The 
effort proved successful, for the Normans were put to 
the sword or driven out of the country. § Consequent 
on this rising a temporary deviation was made in the 
method of conquering Wales, for King William Rufus, 
on his return from Normandy in 1095, conducted a 
series of expeditions with the royal army, amid much 
ostentation into the marches of Wales. But, partly 
because his soldiers were miserably accoutred, and 
partly because of the strategical methods adopted by 
the Welsh, the royal army was repeatedly forced to 

* Powell, p. 117. t Ibid., xxxiv. J Ibid., p. 374. 
§ Powell, p. 118. 



l6 HISTORY OF KIDWElvI^Y, 

retire without having gained any advantage. The con- 
quest of Wales was again delegated to private enterprise, 
the chief feature of which was the erection of Norman 
Castles. By this means Wales became practically colon- 
ized by the military, so that each isolated movement 
of revolt on the part of the Welsh was immediately 
met by a local force. It will be seen that while the 
Saxon invasion hardly disturbed the equilibrium of this 
part of Britain, the history of Kidwelly in the middle 
ages is bound up with the Norman Conquest and its 
consequent exactitude and elaboration in the re-adjust- 
ment of things, both civil and religious. 

About the year iioi, or two years after the death of 
King William Rufus, Ystrad Tywy, Kidwelly, and 
Gower were bestowed by Henry I. on Howel ap Gronow.* 
From this fact it would appear either that William de 
Londres was merely in possession of the town of Kidwelly 
and its immediate vicinity, or that he was deprived by 
his new royal master of more extensive local property 
which might once have belonged to him. Howel ap 
Gronow was, however, killed in 1103 by the soldiers of 
the Norman garrison which had been re-established at 
Rhydygors Castle, f 

Probably at this time the Norman invasion of Gower, 
Carnwyllion, and Kidwelly, already referred to above, 
took place. It would appear that the Normans 
had left a garrison at Kidwelly, and had probably other- 
wise kept themselves in touch with this district since 
the invasion of 1093, although conflicting interests in 

* Powell, p. 124. t Ibid, p. 126. 



HISTORY OF KIDWElvLY. I7 

the interval amply show that the inhabitants were stiU 
in revolt against Norman domination. Another coup 
d'etat was therefore necessary in order to bring the 
Three Commotes (Carnwyllion, Kidwelly, and Iscennen) 
into definite subjection. It will be seen further on 
that Roger, bishop of Salisbury, Chief Justiciary 
and Treasurer to Henry I., was associated with this 
expedition. It is certain that this powerful minister 
was in possession of considerable property at KidweUy 
in the earlier part of the 12th century, and he is made 
to appear as lord of the Manor of Kidwelly in a docu- 
ment, which, although undated, must have been exe- 
cuted prior to the year 11 12, as Wilfrid (or ' Griff ri ' 
as he was known to the Welsh), bishop of St. Davids, 
who died in that year, is therein referred to as having 
given his consent to the consecration of a local cemetery 
provided for by the document (see Appendix A.). It 
is also equally certain that there was a castle in 
existence at Kidwelly at that time, for the document 
in question was drawn up at, and issued by Roger, from 
— ' the house of the Castle of Kedweli.' It is not 
indeed improbable that the castle which then stood was 
erected by Roger, bishop of Salisbury, for he became 
known to history as a great castle builder. He certainly 
built castles at Devizes, Sherborne, and Mahnesbury, 
which not only excited the jealousy of the barons, but 
were the admiration of Europe.* This, of course, could 
not have been the castle, the noble ruins of which still 
stand, as the style of architecture adopted in its con- 



* Hunt's 'Norman Britain,' p. 203. 
[B] 



l8 HISTORY OF KIDWEI^LY. 

struction was unknown at the beginning of the 12th 
century. It may therefore safely be assumed that this 
early castle, if it was built by Roger, was of a substantial 
character, and may have been the foundation on which 
the present castle was afterwards reared. Whether Wil- 
liam de lyondres voluntarily relinquished or was deprived 
of his interest in Kidwelly at this time, there seems 
little doubt that Roger was lord of the Manor and actual 
owner of its property in the first decade of the 12th 
century. Roger's sojourn at Kidwelly seems to have 
been brief, for William de lyondres was again in posses- 
sion of the manorial property in the year 11 13. 



HISTORY OF KIDWELI.Y. 



19 




THE VICISSITUDES OF THE CASTLE. 

fRYFFlTH ap Rhys ap Tewdwr, the rightful 
prince of South Wales, who, from fear of King 
Henry I., had been from his infancy brought 
up in Ireland, made his appearance in Wales in 
the year mo. The rumour of his arrival was spread 
in 1 1 12, and it was at length reported to the king that 
a son of Rhys ap Tewdwr laid claim to the Principality 
of South Wales. A price was put on his head by the 
king, who offered a tempting bribe to Gr5rffith ap Cynan, 
prince of North Wales, at whose court Gryffith ap Rhys 
was staying, for his betrayal. Gryffith ap Cynan was 
captivated by the king's overtures, and consented to 
grant his demand. The young Prince of South Wales 
fled to Aberdarron Church for sanctuary, and when the 
royal messengers came to apprehend him, the clergy 
refused to give him up ; whereupon he was conveyed 
by his friends to Ystrad Tywy. Here he declared open 
defiance to the King of England, and at length raised 
forces wherewith to attack the Normans and Flemings.* 
His primary attacks were made on I^landovery Castle, 
which belonged to Richard de Pwns, and Swansea 
Castle, which was built by Henry Beaumont, Earl of 
Warwick, but each proved unsuccessful. On his return 
from Swansea to Ystrad Tywy, he burned and destroyed 
all the country before him. He afterwards destroyed 
the town of Carmarthen and laid siege to its castle, 
which was not surrendered, although the governor, 

* Powell, pp. 142 — 144. 



20 HISTORY OP KIDWEI.I.Y. 

Owen ap Caradoc, was killed. Gryffith's forces having 
by this time gained considerable strength, he marched 
next on Gower, and William de lyondres and his soldiers, 
through whose territory the Welsh warrior had to pass, 
became so alarmed at his approach that they hastily 
forsook the Castle of Kidwelly. When Gryffith there- 
fore arrived here, he found the place deserted, and a 
large number of cattle without owners. He forthwith 
burnt down the castle, and made off with the booty.* 
About this time Gryffith ap Rhys was married to Gwen- 
llian, daughter of Gryffith ap Cynan, prince of North 
Wales. 

Maurice de I^ondres, as legal heir to the property, 
became lord of the manor of Kidwelly (see page 23), 
and at the death of Henry I. (1135) he owned a vast 
amount of property both here and elsewhere, and was, 
moreover, a powerful personage. He was the founder 
of Ewenny Priory, and between 1147 and 1176, during 
the episcopate of David, bishop of St. Davids, ' he gave 
and granted to God, and Saint Mary of Kedweli, and 
the monks of Schyrborne twelve acres of land around 
the Church of St. Cadoc, which adjoin the land of the 
aforesaid church of St. Mary ' (see Appendix C). 

As Gryffith ap Rhys had been a thorn in the side of 
the head of his family, so was Maurice de Londres 
destined to be harassed by the same prince ; for Giraldus 
Cambrensis records the fact (I. p. 168) that while Gryffith 
ap Rhys was absent in North Wales, whither he had 
gone to seek reinforcements from Gryffith ap Cynan, his 

* Powell, p. 146. 



HISTORY OF KIDWELI.Y. 21 

father-in-law, in support of his revolt against the Nor- 
mans in South Wales, his wife Gwenllian put herself 
at the head of an army, and marched on Kidwelly : 

' Gwenllian too, 
Who lov'd not self, but others ; who ever 
Shew'd herself the friend, the parent of her 
People.' 

The Siege of Kidwelly. 

' In I/ondres' tent the clarion sounds, 

With rapid clangour hurried far. 
Each hill and dale the note rebounds, 
And echoes with the shout of war.' 

After a hot engagement with Maurice de lyondres's 
Norman forces, which took up their position on the 
slope of a hill about a mile and a half north of Kidwelly 
on the west bank of Gwendraeth Fach river, which 
to this day is called the King's Wood, the Welsh, under 
Gwenllian 's command, were defeated, and GwenlHan 
herself, together with her son Morgan, was put to death 
The battlefield is still called Maes Gwenllian (the field 
of Gwenllian), and is situate on the eastern bank of 
Gwendraeth Fach river, opposite King's Wood. 

' GwenUian was, — is not ! A day 
Of gloom, of darkness shrouds my mountain-land, 
Now that its sun is set ! — The life-blood of 
The patriot-queen, this field, — that stream received ! 
Bewidowed of its feathered tribes, that fled 
Aghast from villainy so great, that wood 
In holy stillness mourns th' illustrious dead ! 
Less callous they than man ! 

Siege of Kidwelly. 

The date assigned to this battle by Dr. John Jones in 
his ' History of Wales ' (p. 321) is 1130. It certainly 



22 HISTORY OF KIDWEI.I.Y. 

must have been fought prior to 1136, as Gryffith ap 
Rhys is said to have died in that year.* 

A gHmpse is given into the private hfe of Maurice de 
I/Ondres by Giraldus Cambrensis (Vol. I. Chap. 9), where 
it is stated that he had a forest in the neighbourhood of 
Kidwelly, which was well stocked with animals and 
especially deer, to which he was partial, being very 
fond of venison. An episode is related by Giraldus in 
connection with Maurice's partiality to the deer, and 
that of his wife to the sheep, which, for its quaintness, 
is here given in literal translation : — ' His [Maurice] 
wife (for women are often very expert in deceiving men) 
made use of this curious stratagem. Her husband pos- 
sessed on the side of the wood next the sea, some exten- 
sive pastures and large flocks of sheep. Having made 
all the shepherds and chief people in her house accom- 
plices and favourers of her design, and taking advantage 
of the simple courtesy of her husband, she thus addressed 
him — " It is wonderful that being lord over beasts, you 
have ceased to exercise dominion over them ; and by 
not keeping your deer in order, do not now rule over 
but are subservient to them ; and behold how great an 
abuse arises from too much patience, for they attack 
our sheep with such an unheard-of rage, and unusual 
voracity, that from many they are become few, from 
being innumerable, only numerous." To make her story 
more probable she caused some wool to be inserted 
between the intestines of two stags which had been 
emboweUed ; and her husband thus artfully deceived, 
sacrificed his deer to the rapacity of his dogs.' 

* Powell, p. 158. 



HISTORY OF KIDWEI.LY. 



23 



After Maurice's death, the lordship of Kidwelly and 
the ownership of the castle seem to have passed to his 
brother, Thomas de I^ondres, and to have been trans- 
mitted down in that branch of the family until they 
were merged in the crown of England at the accession 
of Henry IV., as shown in the following genealogical 
table. 

THE GENEALOGY OF THE BRANCH OF THE DE 

LONDRES FAMIIvY AFFECTING THE LORDSHIP OP 

KIDWELLY. 

William de Londres 

I 
Simon 

I 
William 



Maurice de Londres, 
temp. Henry I. 



I I 

Thomas de Londres, Henry de Londres 

temp. John Archbp. of 

lord of Ogmore, Dublin 

Kidwelly, and East Garston 

Hawise {d. 2 Edw. I. Fine Rolls, 
A.D. 1244), m. Patrick de Cadurcis 
(under age 23 Henry III.), d. 1257 



Payne de Cadurcis, 

or Chaworth 
aged 13 in 1257: d. 
1278: in ward to his 
mother. Accom- 
panied Prince Ed- 
ward to the Holy 
^' Land. Of age 
ff2 Edw. I. Com- 
manded West Wales 
5 Edw. I. (no issue) 



Patrick [d. 1282) 

m. Isabel, dght. of 

William Beauchamp 

(Earl of Warwick) 



I I I 

Hervey Eva Anne 



Maud de Cadurcis (under age, 1294) m. 

Henry, afterwards Earl of Lancaster. She 

held Ogmore and Kidwelly (Pat. Rolls, 

22, 23 I). 

I 
Henry, Duke of Lancaster 

I 
Maude Plantagenet, 
m. John of Gaunt 



Henry IV., King of England. 



24 HISTORY OF KIDWEI^I^Y. 

The castle is said to have been demohshed again by 
Cadwgan ap Blethyn,* and to have been rebuilt in 1190 
by Lord Rhys, son of Grj^ihth ap Rhys ap Tewdwr by 
GwenUian his wife.f Unlike his father, who lived under 
the ban of the English monarch, I^ord Rhys was in 
favour with King Henry II., and enjoyed the peaceable 
possession of vast properties in Wales, which included 
the Dynevor demesne. He was, moreover, powerful 
by reason of his astuteness. The high esteem in which 
he was held by his countrymen is manifested in the 
following Funeral Verses to him, which are chronicled 
in ' The Remains concerning Ancient Britain ' by Camden 
(p. 400) : — 

' Nobile Cambrensis cecidit diadema decoris, 
Hoc est, Rhesus obiit ; Cambria tota gemit. 
Subtrahitur, sed non moritur, quia semper habetur 

Ipsius egregium nomen in orbe novum. 
Hie tegitur, sed detegitur, quia fama perennis 

Non finit illustrem voce latere ducem : 
Excessit probitate modum, sensu probitatem, 

Eloquio sensum, moribus eloquium.' 

Translation. 

' All Cambria mourns her noble Prince's fall ; for well 
She knows that with him fell her glory's diadem. 
Departed hence, he smiles beneath his native earth ; 
And yet departed never, he whose glorious name 
Shall Uve for aye, afresh upon the Mps of men ; 
Beneath the earth, and yet no earth can cover him. 
That noble prince, whom everlasting fame forbids 
To die. The greatness of his soul no one can tell. 
Whom nature with her gifts so bounteously endowed, 
That modesty with uprightness, with excellence 

* Dr. John Jones's 'History of Wales,' p. 321. 
t ' Giraldus Cambrensis,' Vol. I., p. 9 ; and PoweU, p. 209. 



PLATE in. 




HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 25 

Of mind, with eloquence of tongue, with purity 
Of soul, in rivalry contended each with each, 
And none surpassed.' — W. J. G. 

The castle was again destroyed by Lord Rhys's grand- 
son, Rhys ap Gryffith, and it shortly afterwards fell 
into the hands of the Crown.* 

It was granted by Henrs' VII. to Sir Rhys ap Thomas, 
and after being forfeited by his grandson, Rhj's ap 
Gryffith, it became the property of Richard Vaughan, 
Earl of Carberr}', and President of Wales, f from whom 
it has descended to Earl Cawdor, who now owns it, as 
well as the lordship of the manor of Kidwelly. 



* Dr. John Jones's 'History of Wales,' p. 321. 
t Ibid. 




26 HISTORY OP KIDWElvIvY. 



THE MANOR. 

"HE manorial property was managed by a reeve, 
or receiver, appointed by the lord of the manor. 
The translated extracts given below throw 

some light on the nature and extent of the manorial 

estate. 

DUCHY OF LANCASTER.— MINISTER'S ACCOUNTS. 

BUNDLE 584. NO. 9236.— P.R.O. 

Account of Roger Aylward, Receiver of Kedwellye, Cam 
[wylUon], Iskennyn, and Oggemour, from i Octr. 43 Edward 
III. to 9 Septr. next following, by his commission dated the 
said ist Octbr. (1369 — 70). 

Reeveship 0/ Kidwelly. — 'The reeve answers for 112* ej-"*, 
received from Richard Box, late reeve, for the arrears of the 
year 43 Edward III., and ^^19 received from John ap Holdon, 
reeve, for the issues of this year by one tally.' 

Sale of Wine. — '£11 received for 2 doUums of Gascon red 
wine remaining in the castle by the purchase of T. Hervey 
sold to the Receiver and John Oweyn.' 

Wages, Fees, and Annuities. ' ^^13 6 8 for the fee of WiUiam 
Banastre and John Lassels for the office of Steward of Kedwelley 
and Cam [wylhon] for the whole of this year. 100* paid to 
Richard de Burley for fee of the Constable of the Castle of 
Kedwelley as for the half of the year 44 Edw. III. 38"" 4'* paid 
to the same Richard for wages of the janitor of the Castle afore- 
said in part payment of 50* 8'' yearly. ^^15 paid to the same 
Richard for an annuity of £^0, granted to him for hfe, payable 
at Easter and Michaelmas. 6* 8'' paid to John Nykell, carpenter 
assigned by G. Foljamb and the whole Council, surveyor of the 
works within the lordship of Kedwelly and Iskennyn, as part 
payment of 13* 4'' yearly.' 

Purchase of Millstones, &■€-. — ' Twelve new millstones bought 
from John I,assels, two of them were dehvered for Caddoc- 
mulne, two for the mill beneath the castle, and two for Morleis- 
mulne, two for Conmulne, one for Melyncoyd, and three remain 
at les bakes. 5 3* 4'' paid by him for the expenses and stipends 
of various men of law of Wales (diversorum hominum de lege 



HISTORY OP KIDWELLY. 27 

Wallens) for the reversion of a certain judgment where he is 
responsible to the lord for £6 13 4 in the Welsh court this year. 
22*, the expenses of the Receiver and John Jordan for going to 
Haverford, le Dale, le Nangle, Swynsey, and several other ports 
to stay ships for the passage of the lord to Gascony, by letters 
of the king, and letters of the said lord Duke (Lancaster). 22* 
paid to John Jordan sent from Ked welly to London to the 
council of the lord to certify the council of the death of William 
Banastre, and other affairs, and returning, namely 22 days at 
I' per day. And 5* paid to Thomas Frankeleyn for going from 
KedweUy to Plymmouth for business of the lord with letters 
of the steward and auditors.' 

DUCHY OP LANCASTER.— MINISTER'S ACCOUNTS. 

BUNDI^E 573- NO. 9063. — P.R.O. 

The reeve accounts for the following items : — 

Rent of Assize. — ' 6* 8'' for 20 days' work at ploughing in 
Penbrey at the lord's board, price of the ploughing 4"*. 5* i r|^<* 
for 71^ days' work carrying hay, price of work i"*. 3/6 for 84 
days' hoeing corn at \'^. 34* 2^'' for 205 days' work reaping 
com, price of work beyond reprises 2''. 104+ days' cartage of 
corn, price of the work beyond reprises 2''. 41 days for carriage 
of rods to the weir of Towy at +''. 84 days for repairing weir. 
The rent (4'') of a cottage and 12 acres of land which Thomas 
Hervy took, before the council of the Lord Henry, late Duke 
of Lancaster, by rent and custom, to hold to him and his heirs 
as appears in the account for 34 Edw. iij.' 

Issues of the Manor. — ' 9* for the meadow called Selkemede. 
6* for the crop of the meadow called Anevellmede, with the 
pasture by the ox-house let to John Oweyn. 8^* for the pasture 
beneath the castle — nothing this year because it is in the hands 
of John Oweyn, farmer of the mill within his farm by writing 
of the lord John, late Duke of Lancaster. 4* for issues of the 
herbage of the ' exterior garden " let to Richard Bitterley for 
a term of 5 years. 3* for the issues of the herbage and fruit of 
the " inner garden " near the castle sold to the abovesaid Richard 
this year. 4* 5+'^ for the farm of Dovecot at 6' 8' yearly. 1 1" 4'' 
for farming a certain weir called Sully weir let to Thomas Hopkyn 
for a term of 12 years. 13' 4' for the farm of the Pulhng MiU. 
12' for the pasture of Bourgh heuedes. 13' 4'' for the farm of 
the rabbit warren of Caldecote let to Meredith Don and Hoell 



28 HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 

ap David Lloyd. 13*4'' for the farm of the Fulling Mil called 
Bordeculle. 26' for the farm of 6} acres at Puttecroftes let to 
Thomas Fogour ; and 3" for the pasture between the groves, 
sold to WiUiam Moritz. Also £17 15 7 for the farm of 2 water 
mills, called " IMiddlemuUe " and " Caddokesmulle " let to John 
Oweyn this year by the Steward and Receiver, and the said 
John will repair the mills, with the ponds at his own costs, 
except the great timber, the millstones, the brass, and the iron, 
which the lord shall find, as appears in the last account for the 
year next preceding. 66' 8' for the farm of 2 water mills called 
" Morlesmulle " and " Cowemiille " let to levan Vaughan, and 
Rees ap Moritz, for a term of 5 years.' 

The rents of Assize include such items as these in lieu of rent — 
' 3 lbs. of pepper at i' i' ; and 4 fbs of cummin at 4" ; and 12 
horse shoes with nails at i'.' 

Kidwelly Fach. — The manor of Kidwelly, as will be 
seen from the following reference, pushed its possessions 
to the very gates of Carmarthen, a circumstance which 
may account for the fact that the district on the right 
bank of the river Towy at Carmarthen is still known 
as * Kidwelly Fach.' 

' To Gilbert Talebot, justice of South Wales. Order not to 
intermeddle further with 50 acres of meadow and 80 acres of 
marsh in the lordship of KedeweUi, but so that the King shall 
re-enter the premises if anything be found to estabhsh his right 
thereto, as lately, at the suit of Henry de Lancastr, earl of 
Derby, showing that Patrick de Chaworth was seised at his 
death, in his demesne as a fee, of 100 arces of meadow, and 100 
acres of marsh in that lordship, as parcel of his manor of Ked- 
ewelM near the town of Kermerdyn, and the premises were taken 
into the hand of Edward I. at Patrick's death by reason of the 
minority of Matilda, Patrick's daughter and heir ; the Earl's 
mother, whose heir he is, the King's ministers asserting that 
they were parcel of the King's demesne of Kermerdyn, and the 
Earl beseeching the King to order them to be restored to him, 
the King ordered the justice to take an inquisition on the matter, 
by which it is found that the meadow and marsh near Kaer- 
merdyn are 80 acres of meadow and 80 acres of marsh, and 



HISTORY OF KIDWElvLY. 29 

they are in the lordship of Kedewelli as parcel of the manor of 
Kedewelli, and are not parcel of the lordship nf Kaermerdyn, and 
that Patrick died seised of the said meadow and marsh, in his 
demesne as of fee, as of parcel of the said manor ; and that the 
meadow and marsh were taken into the hand of Edward I. as 
aforesaid, and that they are the right of the Earl, and are held 
of the king by homage as parcel of the said manor ; and that 
Matilda was Patrick's next heir, and the Earl has besought the 
King by his petition before him and his Council in Parhament, 
to cause his hand to be amoved from the meadow and marsh ; 
and the writ, inquisition, and petition being exhibited and read 
in Parhament before the great Council, it is agreed by that 
Council that the King's hand shall be amoved.' — Close Rolls, 
14 Edw. III., April 8, 1340. 




30 HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 



LOCAL MILITARY LEVIES. 

HE following extracts show the contributions 
demanded of Kidwelly from time to time to 
the royal army. 

' Esegarston [East Garston, Berks]. The manor [extent 
given] with the advowson of the church, held of the king in chief 
by serjeanty, as member of Kaddwelye, viz. : — with the garrison 
of Kaddwelye to lead the vanguard of the king's army, when- 
ever he shall go into West Wales with his army, and the 
rearguard in returning.' — Inquisitions — Writ 23 Sept. 2 Edward 
I., 1274.—P.R.O. 

' Esegarston [East Garston]. The manor, including ' 'scepes- 
cot " and " cherichscot,' with the advowson of the church, 
held of the king in chief by serjeanty of finding one armed horse- 
man with his horse barbed with iron, during the whole time the 
king shall remain with the army in the land of Kedwelly. — Maud 
his daughter, aged i at the Feast of the Purification last is his 
next heir.' — Inquisitions, Berks, Saturday after St. James the 
Apostle, ii. Edward I., 1283. — P.R.O. 

' Commission to Walter de Beysyn to array 1500 Welsh foot, 
to wit, in the parts of Brecon 400 : in the parts of Castle Maud 
300 : in the parts of Buelt and Hir very ton 500 : and Trecastle 
(de partibus trium castrorum), KedwelU and Monmouth 300. 
And to Master de Clune, king's clerk, to pay their wages until 
they come to the king.' — Patent Rolls, 26 Edward I., April 8, 
129S.— P.R.O. 

' Request to Henry de Lanc[aster] for 100 footmen in his 
lands of Kedewelby [sic] and Kadewalthan [Carnwyllion] . ' — 
Close Rolls, ii. Edward II., July 28, 1317. — P.R.O. 

' Commission to WiUiam le Blound and Robert de Hunteleye 
to raise 400 footmen from the lands of Kedewelly and Kayrwath- 
lan [CamwyUion] ; with like mandate to Henry de Lancastre, 
or his bailiff. ' — Patent Rolls. Membrane 28. 15 Edward II., 
Feb. 14, 1^22.— P.R.O. 



HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 3I 

'A mandate, issued to all persons of commotes, lands, and 
cantreds, to come properly armed to the king's assistance in 
the Scotch expedition, as their laudable assistance lately given 
when the king was pursuing the rebels in the Marches of Wales, 
makes the king confident they will be ready to do so. A claim 
is hereby made on the Cantred of Kedwelly, and the commote 
of Kamegwelhaun [CarnwyUion].' — Patent Rolls, 15 Edward II., 
June 10, 1322. — P.R.O. 

The lordship of Kidwelly entailed the conduct of the 
king's army — ' with its banners and aU its train through 
the middle of the country of Neth to lyOghor, whenever 
the king or his chief justice came into these parts of 
Kidwelly.'* 



* Camden's ' Britannia,' p. 504. 



32 HISTORY OF KIDWEI.I.Y. 



THE CASTLE. 

^^L ID WELLY justifiably rejoices in the possession 
jKL^ of a Norman Castle which in point of gigantic 
and symmetrical proportions, and present good 
state of preservation, may be considered as unrivalled 
in this part of South Wales. It occupies a com- 
manding position on the right bank of the Gwendraeth 
Fach river, and nearly opposite the parish church and 
the site of the priory. 

The age of the present Castle. — It has been observed 
that there was a castle in existence at Kidwelly in the 
early part of the 12th century (see page 17). This must 
have been of the Norman style of architecture, but as 
this style cannot be traced in the present building, even 
the oldest portions of the structure which now stands 
must have been built in a subsequent period. The inner 
ward, together with its drum towers, and the west wall 
of the chapel, are generally supposed to be earlier than 
the rest of the castle. The hall, which the inner curtain 
embraces, was, however, a later addition, as the flat- 
tened surface of the south-east tower, which was a pro- 
vision for its gable, indicates. The earliest date assigned 
to the inner ward is the second decade of the 13th century. 
Although the imsubstantial character of the entrances 
to the inner ward suggests that the outer fortification 
was contemplated in the original design, the mural 
towers, and the uniting walls of the outer ward were 
probably of a later date. The great gate-house is of a 
still later date. Its architecture is that of the early 



PLATE IV. 




PLATE V. 



\ ~ N. 



. o o 

% o o 



O 



,•„. / '^ 



'i:., ■ ' /f 



■A 



Kidwelly Castle. 



PLATE VI. 




PLATE VII. 













•i- 



4.^'T 






•te^ -- 



-Q^t5T-:in 



,??"■:"-' 



PLATE VTTI. 




KIDWELLY CASTLE. 



PLATE IX. 




KIDWELLY CASTLE: THE CHAPEL. 



<^: 



HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 33 

perpendicular, and therefore it could not have been built 
before the end of the 14th century. 

Its general arrangement. — Professor A. E. Freeman, in 
a paper read by him at Cardiff,* thus describes the 
castle : — ' The general outline of Kidwelly Castle is 
much more than merely grand and striking ; it ap- 
proaches very nearly to the nature of an architectural 
composition. Four massive round towers surround the 
keep ; two others flank the great gate-way ; a design 
sufficiently regular to be caught and understood by a 
person not acquainted with castellated technicalities, 
while the shiftings and different groupings of so many 
towers produce an endless variety of picturesque effects.' 

As may be seen from the plan of the castle, the forma- 
tion of the building is practically semi-circular, the 
curve being flanked with a moat, and its chord supplied 
by nature with a cliff and the Gwendraeth Fach river. 
A survey of the castle was made by Mr. George T. Clark 
for the purpose of a paper which he prepared for the 
Cambrian Archaeological Association in 1850.! Accord- 
ing to this survey, which principally forms the basis of 
the description here given, the castle measures 440 by 
90 to 130 yards, and stands on about three acres of 
ground. 

The Inner Ward. — The principal entrance to this 
ward, which has a portcullis groove, is in the south 
curtain. A quadrangle 80 yards square is formed by 
the four curtains, together with the drum towers, which 
form caps to the angles. The north-east and south-east 



[c] 



* 'Arch. Camb.', New Series, Vol. I., p. 57. 
f 'Arch, Camb.' 



34 HISTORY OF KIDWEI.LY. 

towers are joined to the outer wall which is built on the 
precipitous edge of a cliff. The latter tower is also 
attached to the chapel, and has an outlet to the curtain 
of the outer ward which leads to the great gate-house. 
Three of the inner curtains are six feet thick and i8 feet 
high, and they have a rampart walk with parapets 
pierced at intervals with loops. The eastern curtain 
is, however, narrow and low, the cliff having evidently 
been considered to be a good defence on this side. In 
addition to the reception hall and the chapel, the inner 
ward contains the kitchen and a spacious refectory. 
The towers are 30 feet in diameter and 44 feet in height 
with battlements. Their walls are 9 feet thick, and 
each has a well-staircase and three lofts with loopholes 
and doors opening on the ramparts of the curtains. 
Three of the towers had wooden floors, while the north- 
west one is vaulted. This latter tower is directly acces- 
sible from the kitchen and from the porter's lodge along 
a rampart on the wall, whence it is called the ' Porter's 
Prison,' and incisions in the stucco of the chambers of 
this tower, such as may be seen in the Tower of lyondon 
and many other places of mediaeval confinement, to- 
gether with the fact that its chambers are vaulted 
throughout, would suggest that it was used as a prison. 

The Hall and the Retiring-room, which were in a line 
with each other, occupied the whole of the space on the 
east side of the inner ward. The south end of the hall 
rested against the south-east tower. The height and 
pitch of the roof may still be traced. The west wall of 
the chapel formed a portion of the east side of the hall, 
and a projection in the east curtain looks as if there 



HISTORY OF KIDWElvI^Y. 35 

had been a small chamber attached to the hall. The 
west wall of the hall has disappeared. The length of 
the hall is 60 ft., and the width 25 ft. The retiring- 
room, which adjoins the hall and north-east tower, is 
30 ft, long, and the same width as the hall. Here in 
the east wall is a loop, and near it the carved remains 
of the base of a chimney. 1378330 

The Kitchen and Refectory are opposite the hall and 
retiring-room respectively. The kitchen is 30 ft, long 
by 17 ft. wide. It has a large fire-place at each end, 
and a window which opens on the outer ward. A third 
small fire-place may also be seen in the south end. 
The doorway in the east wall has been made narrower 
than it was originally, an arrangement which may have 
been devised to obviate opening a door of unnecessary 
width in serving hot dishes. The refectory probably 
occupied the square space, 45 ft., to the north of the 
kitchen and bounded on two sides by the north and 
west curtains. 

The Chapel. — In the paper already alluded to 
Professor E. A. Freeman gives this description of 
the chapel : — 

' The Castle chapel is a triumph of art ; a building amply- 
satisfactory, both in an ecclesiastical and architectural point of 
view, has room found for it in a structure purely miHtary, with- 
out in the least interfering with the genmne character of the 
latter. The chapel forms the upper story of three in a building 
projecting from the main hne of the Castle towards the east, 
and as this building terminates in a semi-hexagon, an apex is 
at once provided for the chapel. It is lighted by single trefoil 
lancets, whose small size and deUcate execution at once call 
attention to this portion of the building as something distinct 
from the rest, without forcing it on the view in an inharmonious 



36 HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 

prominence. Just the same is the effect of the admirably 
selected form and position. And the effect is heightened by the 
addition of a square projection to the south, whose upper story 
forms a vaulted chamber, which has clearly been the sacristy. 
Within, the whole architecture, perfectly plain, yet exquisitely 
finished, is precisely what that of a mihtary chapel should be.' 

It measures 26 ft. long by 18 ft. wide. Its height from 
the base of the outer projection is 56 ft., and from the 
inner surface 25 ft. In the north-east corner is a spiral 
staircase connecting the different floors. The ground 
floor of the chapel tower is below the surface of the 
interior of the castle, and is in communication with the 
adjoining hall by means of a staircase. The second 
floor was on a level with the hall, with which it also 
communicates. In the apex on the south side is a 
piscina, and near it a sedilia. In the south wall a door 
opens into the sacristy, and to the v/est of the door is 
a recess with a stopped loop. In the north wall there 
are also a door and loop, both of which are blocked. 

The age of the Chapel, although a disputed point, may 
approximately be decided by the style of architecture 
adopted in its construction. While some authorities 
claim that the style is early English, and others that it 
is early Decorated, all seem to agree that it was erected 
between a.d. 1290 and 1310. 

The outer ward contains the two gate-houses which 
are opposite each other, and are connected by an outer 
curved curtain in which at intervals there are mural 
towers 30 ft. high and 22ft. in diameter. This curtain 
is 330 ft. long, 6 ft. thick, and 20 ft. high, and has a 
rampart walk. The great gate-house is a massive pile 
80 ft. by 50 ft., and 62 ft. high. The gateway is 11 ft 



HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 37 

by 8 ft., and the moat at the threshold is 12 ft. deep. 
On either side of the main entrance is a conical 
tower 24 ft. in diameter at the base, and 20 ft. at 
the top, and over the entrance are three flat arches 
built into the wall to relieve the mass of masonry. 
The portal is roughly vaulted and has a portcullis 
groove at each end, as well as three apertures for 
gratings. The square tower, called Pigin, on the north- 
west angle of the block, is a later addition. This 
is 93 ft. high and was probably used as a watch tower. 
On each side of the portal are dungeons and guard- 
chambers, the latter having loopholes overlooking the 
main entrance. Another room on the right has a coni- 
cal fountain beneath the surface, two recesses, and a 
sewer room. The first floor of the great gate-house is 
reached by a staircase from the outer court, over the 
porter's lodge, as well as by a spiral staircase in the 
square tower, and has four rooms, to one of which are 
large windows opening into the outer court. This has 
also a fire-place, as well as that which adjoins it. The 
third room was used for working the portcullis, and the 
fourth is a kitchen with a large oven. Unlike the other 
rooms on the first floor which had wooden floors, this 
room is vaulted, and has an outlet to the east rampart 
leading to the south-east tower. The second floor, also 
reached by spiral staircases, contains a large room with 
windows opening into the outer court, and several 
smaller apartments which, judging from the stuccoed 
walls and sculptured ornamentation, were used as state 
bedrooms. 

The garrison seems to have been provided for by two 



38 HISTORY OF KIDWELI.Y. 

detached buildings in the outer ward, one to the west 
of the inner ward, measuring 65 ft. by 30 ft., and the 
other to the north of the inner ward, against the east 
curtain, and near the northern gate-house, measuring 
60 ft. by 35 ft. 

There is also a bakehouse against the curved curtain 
to the west of the lesser gate-house, with a large oven 
intact. Ivike the mural towers, the lesser or northern 
gate-house is rudely built, and bears the marks of rough 
handling. 

The Barbican stood on an elevated position immedi- 
ately opposite the main entrance to the castle, with the 
moat and drawbridge between. The foundations show 
that it was a semi-circular construction. 

The outer Gate-house still retains its principal features. 
This also seems to have had its drawbridge and ditch. 
The illustration of this gate-house is among Grose's col- 
lection. 

Royal Visitors. — The Castle of Kidwelly has from time 
to time been graced by visits from reigning monarchs. 
The first royal visit seems to have been made by King 
John, to which the following reference is made in the 
' History of Margam,' by Dr. Walter de Gray Birch : — 

' Eang John visited Margam Abbey on two occasions in the 
year 12 10, prior and subsequent to his expedition into Ireland. 
Setting out from Westminster, 8th May, and passing through 
Odiham, Winchester, Marlborough, and Bristol, the king was 
at Neath on Friday, 21st May, Cardiff, Tuesday 25th May, 
Margam and Swansea 28th May, and Haverford on the last 
day of the month. The return journey was commenced at 
Dubhn, Tuesday, 24th August ; the king reached Fishguard 
Thursday, 26th August ; Haverford and Kidwelly on the follow- 
ing day.' 



HISTORY OF KIDWELIvY. 39 

King Edward I. paid a visit to Kidwelly in the year 
1285, as will appear from an Inspeximus, 9 Richard II., 
Feb. 18, 1386 — ' Confirmation, in favour of the burges- 
ses of Kardigan, of a charter dated at Kidwelly 9 Decem- 
ber, 13 Edward I., being a grant and confirmation to 
them of the lands and customs hitherto enjoyed by the 
burgesses of Kermerdyn, and divers liberties.'* 

King Richard II. visited the town in the year 1394, 
whence he issued the Charter of which the following is 
an abstract — ' Grant for life to Richard Mareys of the 
office of porter of the Castle of Bristol, at the supplica- 
tion of the present holder John Dawe.'| 

The same king paid a visit to Kidwelly in 1398 — 9, 
for in the Minister's Account of the manor of Kidwelly 
which appears below, it will be seen that ' the late king 
Richard II.' spent a night in the castle. 

' Duchy of Lancaster — IVIinister's Accounts. Bundle 573, 
No. 9063. — P.R.O. A memorandum dated 3 Feb. 22 Richard 
II. [1398 — 9]. John Wilkyns, Reeve, answers for "one pipe 
of wine r jmaining in the castle after the departure of the late King 
Richard, and sold by Walter Castell for 20' and more, it is said.' 

When John of Gaunt, Duke of I^ancaster, died. King 
Richard seized the duchy estates ; then the new Duke 
(afterwards Henry IV.) came over from abroad, and 
raised a rebellion in England ; and King Richard, then 
in Ireland, came hurriedly over to England, landing at 
Milford Haven. It is probable that this was the occa- 
sion when he took a night's shelter, en route, at the 
castle. 

* 'Charter Rolls,' 13 Edward I., No. 147, P.R.O. 
t Patent Rolls, 18 Richard II., (Kidwelly Castle), Sep. 13, 1394- 



40 HISTORY OF KIDWELIvY. 

The following translated abstract from the same Min- 
ister's Account may be of interest, as it gives some 
details connected with the preparations for the king's 
visit : — 

' Nails bought for mending the Castle bridge 3''. The wages 
of six labourers hired to mend the said bridge for one day and a 
half, taking per day 4'' =3. Cleaning the chambers of the Castle 
this year by various hired men, 8'. Nails called ' bordenails ' 
bought for the wine cellar 3'. Wages of a man for cleaning the 
Castle ditch (fossam), 4''. For stable racks within the Castle, 
2'. Carriage of rods for making the said racks from Wennalth, 
8\ A bucket for the fountain within the Castle, 2'. Two men 
hired for one day to clean the kitchen of the lord, 8'. Straw 
and htter bought for the beds of the officers of the lord, and 
rushes to spread in the rooms, 12'. Removing Ume from the 
gate, 8'. Nails called " spikynnes " for the racks in the stable, 
3'. Removing the great gates of the Castle, 5''. Finding fuel 
to one man for this year, 8 '. Carrying the old gates of the Castle 
into the Castle, 4'. Making several new locks in the Castle, 2\ 
and in fuel bought this year for Richard, late King of England, 
passing the night in the Castle, 4. Carriage of the said fuel 
from Wennalth into the Castle, 8". Carrying that fuel into the 
house, 6'. Carrying the fuel out of the house for the purpose 
of cleaning the house, 4'. Rushes bought to spread in the rooms 
for the said Richard, late king, 12'. Roofing the stable by several 
men hired for that purpose, 16'. Straw bought for the stable 
and the beds for the coming of the Receiver and carriage of the 
same, 16'. Cleaning the rooms for the same, 8'. Rushes bought 
to spread in the rooms, 3'. Seventeen yards three-quartei'S 
cloth of white flax for one towel containing 8 yards, one towel 
containing 6 yards 3 quarters, and one towel containing 3 yards — 
price per yard, 2\ And for 8 yards of other cloth of flax for 
two " bordecloths " for the officials, price per yard, 6'. For 
serving the ministers of the lord within the Castle, and for the 
stock of the said Castle, 8' 11'. Sum, 39' 8'.' 




HISTORY OF KIDWELI^Y. 41 

THE EARLY CHRISTIAN CHURCHES. 

^UNEDDA Wledig, who was of Cymric race, was, 
moreover, a Christian, and the ancient British 
Church which was evolved from its predeces- 
sor, the Romano-British Church, owes its estabHsh- 
ment, in a large measure, to this worthy chieftain, and 
his noble family.* St. David, the founder, and first 
Bishop of the see which bears his name, was the great- 
grandson, on his father's side, of Cunedda. St. Cadoc, 
whose genealogy is somewhat enveloped in mystery, is, 
however, stated to have been the son of Cuneglasos or 
Cynlas, lord of Glamorgan, who was grandson of Cun- 
edda's son Einion.f St. Teilo is also said to have been 
a descendant of Ceredig, another son of Cimedda.f so 
that this celebrated saint too belonged to the same 
illustrious family, being a great nephew of St. David. § 
History relates the intimate association of St. Teilo with 
St. David, both in his studies under Paulinus in his 
monastery at Ty-gwyn-ar-Daf (Whitland), and in the 
development of the British Church. || 

Churches were dedicated to St. Teilo and St. Cadoc 
in the parish of Kidwelly, the crude walls of one of 
which still remain, and are known as Capel Teilo 
(Teilo's Chapel), and the site of the other is preserved 
by the name whereby a farm and district are still called 
Llangadog (The Church of Cadoc) and Waungadog (Cadoc's 

* 'lolo MSS.', p. 909. 

t Ibid., p. 171. I Newell, p. jj. 

§ Archdeacon Bevan's 'History of St. David's,' p. 5. 

II 'Liber Landavensis,' pp. 334, 335. 



42 HISTORY OF KIDWEI.I.Y. 

meadow). By a charter, preserved in the Pubhc Record 
Office, a grant was made by Maurice de Londres of 
twelve acres of land around the Church of St. Cadoc, 
and adjoining the lands of St. Mary for the salvation of 
his own soul, and those of all his ancestors, in the hearing 
of his son William de L,ondres, and in the presence of 
specified witnesses.* This charter is undated, but as it 
is addressed to David, bishop of St. Davids, the tran- 
saction must have occurred between a.d. 1147 and 1176, 
as this could have been the only period within the life- 
time of the donor when a David (Fitzgerald) was bishop 
of St. Davids. 

Probably most of the ancient churches in Wales were 
called after the names of their actual founders, f and 
were not dedicated as modern churches are to departed 
saints. The dimensions of the local ruin of the church 
known as St. Teilo's, show that it was a small church, or 
oratory, and such as might only be expected to have 
been a mere out-post, like its sister church lylangadog, 
of the monasteries of St. Davids and Llandaff. This 
being so, Kidwelly would seem to have afforded accom- 
modation for Christian worship as early as the seventh, 
if not the sixth century, when the above Welsh saints 
flourished. It may, however, be contended that Chris- 
tian Churches of that age were constructed of wattle 
and mud, with hides for roofing, and not with stone, 
but as far as the ruined Church of St. Teilo is concerned, 
the writer cannot acquiesce in the belief in the backward 
stage of civilisation in which the contention would place 

* See Appendix C. f Newell, p. 146. 



HISTORY OF KIDWELI.Y. 43 

the local Brythons at this time. It must be remembered 
that the church in question lay, not only on one of the 
great inter-tribal roads between Caerleon and St. Davids, 
which the later inhabitants of early Britain formed, but 
that it was also on the main Roman line of communica- 
tion which led westwards from Gloucester through Caer- 
went, Caerleon, Cardiff, Neath, and L,oughor to Carmar- 
then, and about midway between the two latter places, 
at each of which there had been a Roman station. It 
is therefore improbable, in view of the facilities for inter- 
course with the highly civiHzed Romans which their 
very geographical position would afford them, that the 
Brythons of the district would have remained ignorant 
of the art of stone building at that period. However, 
if these local churches had originally been erected with 
less enduring materials than stone, either from insuffi- 
cient knowledge of the art of stone building, or from 
sentiment, there is no doubt that in the case of the one 
called after St. Teilo, the original was replaced by a 
stone structure whose ruins are still existent. Subse- 
quent to the beginning of the eight century, when foun- 
dations of Welsh saints closed, the Mihangel or Michael 
dedications began, and the numerous Llanfihangels 
regularly distributed over Wales show that this dedica- 
tion not only became popular, but that it also became 
a Welsh dedication. Tradition states that on the site 
of Maenllwyd-mawr already referred to, there stood a 
church called Llanfihangel , and the farmer on whose 
land the site is, testifies that he has come upon stone 
foundations of a substantial nature there, and that a 
large stone slab, with a chamfered edge, measuring 7 ft. 



44 HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 

by 15 in., and 7 inches thick, was carted from the site 
to the precincts of his own house, where it now serves 
as a bridge across a brook at the entrance to the farm- 
yard. Its size and appearance would suggest that it 
was a large window-sill. It could not have been a 
Druidical relic, as by Druidic principles no monolith 
was allowed to be touched by any iron or metal instru- 
ment.* There is, moreover, in close proximity to Maen- 
llwyd-mawr a well, which still goes by the name of 
Ffynon Mihangel (Michael's Well). There was also 
until recently a columbarium or pigeon house near by. 
The well is on the sea side of the road which intersects 
it from Maenllw>'d-mawr, and the columbarium was 
between the latter and Waungadog. 

All Saints' Church. — In all probability the site of the 
present parish church was previously occupied by an 
earlier church. The Welsh of by-gone ages sometimes 
dedicated their churches to numerous saints without 
specifying the names of their patrons, such as Llansaint, 
Llandeusant, Llantrisant , and Llanpumpsaint. A refer- 
ence made by Dugdalef gives credence to the pro- 
bability of a pre-existing church here, for it is stated 
that ' Richard Fitzwilliam gave to Sherborne Mon- 
astery the Churches of St. Ismael, and Penalt, of All 
Saints' at Kidwelly, and St. Hlthut at Penbray ; all in 
the diocese of St. Davids, with all that appertain to 
them ' (see Appendix B.). The Church of Penallt 
is denoted by that description ; and the ancient churches 
belonging to Kidwelly are located either by the ruins 

* Morgan, p. 57. 
•j- 'Mon. Angl.', Vol. IV., p. 65, No. ii. 



HISTORY OF KIDWELI.Y. 45 

that still remain, by tradition, or by place-names which 
have been handed down. Besides, All Saints' Church 
is cited as the church of the territory of Kidwelly, by which 
appellation it may be concluded to have been the Mother 
Church of the district. There is no evidence, either 
traditional or otherwise, to establish the location of this 
particular church, as there is in the case of the other 
two churches above mentioned. It may therefore be 
assumed to have been a predecessor of the existing parish 
church on the same spot. It may, however, be con- 
tended that the reference to All Saints' Church points 
to lylansaint, in the parish of St. Ishmael ; but Llansaint 
does not seem to appear in any ancient documents which 
have reference to Kidwelly. Besides, as St. Ismael, and 
even Penalt and Penhray are named as contributaries, 
the area which the churches of Kidwelly served appears 
to have been at that time almost co-extensive with the 
present ecclesiastical parish of Kidwelly ; or, as the 
jurisdiction of the Incumbent came to be called ' Kid- 
welly within, and without the Borough.' The assump- 
tion of a pre-existent church accords also with the age 
of the church which now stands, whose style of archi- 
tecture forbids an earlier period than the latter part of 
the 13th century to be assigned to it. It is also probable 
that the former church was the one which is said to have 
been burnt down, together with the town and the 
religious houses, by Prince lylewelyn, a.d. 1222, when 
he surmised that the Magistrates of Kidwelly intended 
to betray him to William Marshall, Earl of Pembroke.* 

* Powell, p. 248. 



46 HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 

Documentary references are made to ' the Church of St. 
Mary, Kidwelly,' in a period which was anterior to that 
which the architectural style of the present church in- 
dicates. It may therefore be assumed that the former 
church was, under Norman sway, re-dedicated to St. 
Mary, which probably would have been done after a 
temporary restoration. 

At the time when the Taxation of Pope Nicholas IV. 
was made, in the year 1291, or thereabouts, the church 
of Kidwelly seems to have been an ecclesiastical Rectory 
merged in the Priory, and was at that time taxed, or 
valued as being of the yearly value of twenty marks 
(£13 6s. 8d.). 

The Deanery of Kidwelly. — The following account from 
the Taxation of Pope Nicholas (p. 273) shows the extent 
of the deanery of Kidwelly, together with the value of 
its component churches, at the end of the 13th century — 

Taxatio Archidiacoiiatus de Kermyrdyn. 



Bcclesia de Kedewely 


■ £13 6 


8 


,, Lanetly 


10 





,, Penbrey 


. 6 13 


4 


„ St. Ismaele 


. 6 13 


4 


,, Landevaylok 


. 13 6 


8 



At this period lylanelly included the parishes of Dafen 
and Felinfoel, and the parish of I^langendeirne was in- 
claded in that of lylandefeilog. 



M 



HISTORY OF KIDWElvI-Y. 47 



THE PRIORY OF KIDWELLY. 

PRIORY of the Benedictine order was founded 
at Kidwelly by Roger, bishop of Salisbury, in 
the year 1130, for a Prior and two monks. 
This was annexed as a cell to the monastery of 
Sherborne Abbey, in Dorset.* As the founder figured 
rather prominently in the concerns of Kidwelly at this 
time, it may be interesting to dwell, very brieflj^ on his 
personality. This noted ecclesiastic, whom Henry I. 
appears to have met during his sojourn in Normandy, f 
was a priest of a church in Caen, and was destined to 
become a notable factor in the history of England 
during that reign, for he was appointed the Chief Justici- 
ary and Treasurer, and was soon made bishop of Salis- 
bury. The affairs of State were practically in his hands, 
and the confidence reposed in him was not misplaced, 
for his elevation was fully justified by his capable ad- 
ministration. In his zeal for the spread of his royal 
master's dominion, he is supposed to have crossed over 
to Gower, with some other adventurers, and to have 
proceeded along the coast through CarnwyUion to Kid- 
welly, districts whose inhabitants, in spite of previous 
invasions, still remained unsubjugated, and resentful of 
Norman intrusion. Kidwelly seems to have had special 
attraction for him, and he evidently secured from his 
sovereign a grant of the district for himself. { It is 
certain that he had possessions at Kidwelly in the former 

* 'Notitia Monastica.' f William Malmesbury, p. 441. 

% 'Arch. Camb.', Series IV., Vol. ix., p. 82. 



48 HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 

part of the 12th century, as it is stated by Dugdale* 
that by an Imprimatur of David, bishop of St. Davids, 
a carucate of land (probably the site of the future Priory) 
at Kidwelly, with the land called Mount Solomon (a 
corruption possibly of Mynydd Sulen), extending to the 
sea, was given, free of all consuetudinary payments, to 
the Abbey of Sherborne, in the reign of King Henry I., 
by Roger, bishop of Salisbury ; Turstan, or Thurstan, 
being at that time Prior (sic) (see Appendix A.). 
This dignitary was consecrated Abbot of Sherborne in 
the year 11 22. In the Taxation of Pope Nicholas IV., 
A.D. 1291 (p. 276), it is stated — 

' Prior de Kedwelly habet apud Kedwelly unam carucatam 
terrae cum redditu et perquisitis £2 10/-. Exitus animalium, 
Prior habet quinque vaccas. — exitus 5/-. Summa £2 15/-.' 

That is — ' The Prior of Kidwelly has at Kedwelly one carucate 
of land with rent and perquisites £2 10/-. Issues of the animals. 
The Prior has five cows. — Issues 5/-. Total £2 15/-. 

The temporalities belonging to the Priory in the 26th 
year of King Henry VIII. are stated in ' Valor Eccles- 
iasticus ' (vol. IV., 412) to have been as follows : — 

Translation. 

' Cell of the Priory of Kydwylly. — John Godmester, Prior 
there, has in temporal tenements, with demesne lands there 
£6 13 4 by the year. And it is worth in churches there, with 
the chapels annexed, ^^31 6 8. Sum of the total, ^38. There- 
from, for the tallage of the lord the King yearly, payable at the 
exchequer of Kedwelly 10/-. Also in yearly pension payable 
to the Abbot of Shirbome, 40/-. And in the ordinary visita- 
tion there, 40/-. And in fee of the Steward there yearly, 40/-. 
In the fee of the bailiff and receiver there yearly, 40/-. 

* 'Mon. Angl.', pp. 64, 65. 



HISTORY OF KIDWElvIvY. 49 

Sum of the deductions . . . . £16 o o* 

And so there remains clear . . . . 29 10 o 

The tenth thereof . . . . . . 2190 

A document preserved in the Public Record Office 
relates a protracted ecclesiastical proceeding, dated in 
1428, wherein the prior and convent of Kidwelly claimed 
of certain persons two parts of the tithes, real and per- 
sonal, and particularly of wool, milk, cheese, and lambs, 
arising on certain lands within the bounds and limits of 
the parish of St. Mary of Kidwelly, as rectors of the 
same ; and by this suit the said tithes were awarded 
to the prior and convent as rectors. The basis of the 
judgment on which the prior's petition was laid is given 
by Dugdalef (see Appendix D). 



* This is evidently a misprint, and should have been £S 10 o. 
I 'Mon. Angl.,' Vol. IV., p. 66, Num. V. 



50 HISTORY OF KIDWELIvY. 



THE SITUATION OF THE PRIORY. 

JT has been persistently asserted that the ancient 
ruins at Penallt, between Kidwelly and the mouth 
of the river Towy, and about a mile from the 
former, are those of the Priory of Kidwelly. But 
this must be regarded as a mere conjecture, as there 
appears to be no evidence whatever in its favour. Docu- 
ments frequently refer to the ' Church of Penallt,' but 
never to the Priory of Penallt. Moreover, the ' Church 
of Penallt ' is made to appear as distinct from the Priory 
of Kidwelly and its dependent churches, as those of St. 
Ishmael and Pembrey. The situation of Kidwelly Priory 
must therefore be sought for elsewhere. Happily there 
is abundant evidence, documentary and otherwise, in 
favour of associating the site of the priory with the ruins 
which may still be seen on the left bank of the Lesser 
Gwendraeth, and hard by the east boundary wall of 
the present parish churchyard. It is said that ' beggars 
are no choosers.' On this principle the monks had to 
be content with what land was granted to them for 
monastic purposes by Norman landowners, which, as a 
rule, was a tract of waste and unfertile soil. And it 
was no inconsiderable item in the regime of the monks 
to bring the land given them to the highest pitch of 
cultivation. The monks of the religious house of Kid- 
welly, however, do not seem to have been dealt with in 
a niggardly spirit, and this may be accounted for by the 
fact that the donor of the land which they possessed 
was, as has been stated, himself an ecclesiastic, viz., 



HISTORY OF KIDWElvI^Y. 5I 

Roger, bishop of vSalisbury ; who in apportioning his 
grant appears to have carefully considered the require- 
ments of the institution ; such as its contiguity to the 
existing church (which generally was the centre around 
which all monastic establishments clustered, and also 
to a stream (see Appendix A), for its convenience. 
It has been already observed that the real property 
enjo5^ed by this religious community, consisted of a 
canicate of land — a term which the Normans introduced, 
and which meant a plough-land [caruca) that might 
be ploughed with one team of oxen in a year. The land 
now covered by the gardens attached to the tenements 
in Ivady vStreet was, within living memory, known as 
' the priory fields.' Ample evidence is also supplied by 
the proceedings at the Prior's Court held at Kidwelly, 
that the land now occupied by I^ady Street, or St. Mary 
Street, belonged to the prior. The following extracts 
from the ' Court Rolls,' in the Public Record Office, 
together with their bearing on the subject, may not be 
uninteresting as showing the condition of social life, the 
tenure of property, and the adjustment of differences, 
in those days. It may also be inferred from the proper 
names how the Welsh — who, at the dedication of a local 
cemetery at the beginning of the 12th century, had 
evidently become sullen, and who, either from choice 
or compulsion, had kept aloof from the foreign colony, 
which consisted of French, English, and Flemings (see 
Appendix A) — began to intermingle with the foreign 
settlers. 



52 HISTORY OF KIDWEI^IvY. 

COURT ROtL, PORTFOLIO 21 5. NO. 39. — P.R.O. 

' At the Court of the Prior of Kedwelly, held on Thursday 
next before the Feast of St. Margaret the Virgin — a.d. 1311. 

' Thomas Cas offers himself against WilUam Portereve in a 
plea of a convention, and demands from him half a cow. They 
are given a day, Sunday before the Feast of St. Margaret, the 
Virgin. 

' William Portereve has the entry to the tenement which was 
that of WilUam Bronygt, and pays for entry 10/-. Pledges 
John Portereve and Bernard Coqus, and has in payment two 
calves, and the residue at the Feast of All Saints. 

'At the Court of the Prior of Cadwelly held on the morrow of 
the Feast of the Purification of the Blessed Mary, the Virgin — 
A.D. 131 1. 

' Walter Bernard is summoned to answer the Prior concerning 
a tenement which he has deprived him of, and because nothing 
can be found whereon to distrain him, therefore it is determined 
that it shall be seized into the hands of the Prior. 

* J ohn Owen and Lucy Weron have tomorrow to come to some 
agreement, and unless they can agree the aforesaid Lucy must 
be attached to the suit of the aforesaid party. 

' John Howen brings a complaint against Lucy Weron, and 
because he does not prosecute his suit, he is amerced, and Lucy 
Weron goes quit. 

'At the Court of the Prior of Kadwelly held on Wednesday 
next after the Feast of S. Barnabas, the Apostle — a.d. 13 12. 

'Agnes Sekeryn widow of Maurice Sekeryn brings a plea of 
trespass against Thomas Gower ; is amerced six pence. — Pledge 
Elias Kiste. 

'At a Court held on Saturday next before the Feast of St. 
Margaret the Virgin, 35 Edw. III. 

' John Pitifier, Thomas Brounyng, WilHam Portrese, and 
Adam Crompe are convicted at the suit of the lord (the Prior) 
for trespass made by their beasts at Gabcrofte in the lord's 
com, therefore they are amerced twelve pence. 

'At the Court of Robert Fyfhyde, Prior of Kedwelly held on 
Monday next after the Feast of St. Peter, 1 1 Richard II. 

' To this Court came Agnes ap Owen widow and surrendered 
into the hands of the Prior her tenement which is situated in 
a street called Sentemarestret [St. Mary, or our Lady Street] 
next to the tenement of a certain Herr ap Mad : on the one part, 
and the tenement of John Malier on the other part, and upon 



HISTORY OF KIDWEl^IvY. 53 

this levan ap Res Wyt appeared, and gave to the said Prior a 
fine of 20/- to have entry into the said tenement for the term of 
his life, and Welthian his wife ; and after their decease to remain 
to their daughter Margaret for the term of her hfe, paying there- 
for yearly to the Prior, and his successors 2/- at two of the three 
principal terms, namely Piaster, and S. Michael, by equal portions, 
and doing one day's harvest and another at hay-making, and 
rendering therefor the rents and services due and customary. 

' To this Court came James Richard and Johan Dayo his wife, 
and surrendered into the hands of the Prior their tenement 
which is situated in a street called Syntemarystret between the 
tenement of levan ap Yanto on the east and the tenement of 
a certain Herr ap Mad on the west, and upon this came Walter 
Weysy, and gave to the said Prior a fine of 16/- to have the entry 
into the said tenement for the term of his Ufe ; and Isabell his 
wife, and after their death to remain to their son Jolin for his 
life ; paying therefor yearlj' unto the Prior and his successors 
2/- at Easter and St. Michael, by equal portions and doing one 
day's harvest, and one day haymaking, and service therefor 
due and customary. 

' To this Court came Elena Bik, and gave the Prior for a fine 
forty shilhngs for a tenement which is situated by that of levan 
ap Owen on the south and that of John Canan on the east. 

' To this Court came John Pretefer and Elan his wife and 
gave to the Prior for a fine forty shilhngs to have the right of 
entry into the tenement of Mabely Schynner for the term of 
their lives, which tenement is situated in Seyntmarestrete by 
the tenement of levan ap Yanto on the east, and that of John 
Stoke on the west for the term of their Hves.' 

The proceedings at the last court prove that the land 
in the immediate neighbourhood of the parish church 
belonged to the prior, as St. Mary Street (now called 
lyady Street), which runs parallel with the church, is 
specified as being within his ownership. The ruins 
already referred to are also in the vicinity of the same 
church, and therefore it is unnecessary to identify with 
the priory any other situation than this. And lycland, 
in his Itinerary, says — ' In the new Toune is only a 



54 



HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 



Chirche of our lyadi ; and by this is the Celle of Blake 
monkes of Shirburne. Ther the Prior is Patron of our 
lyadi Church.' The foregoing judicial transactions also 
show that although some of the priory land still 
remained under cultivation, a considerable portion of it 
was let out for tenements. This, of course, would 
enhance the value of the property ; and generally, as 
monastic property increased in value, and the frugality 
of the monks enabled them to store up their material 
resources, their chief pride, whether of the Benedictine 
or Cistercian Order, consisted in the erection of magni- 
ficent churches to the glory of God. The production 
of the present Parish Church is therefore not improbably 
due to their noble and self-denying zeal. 

A list of the Priors of Kidwelly. — A diligent search 
among the original documents at the Public Record 
Office has yielded, as a result, the names of eight priors, 
which are here given, together with the years in which 
they respectively filled that capacity. 

A.D. 

Galfridus de Coker . . . . 1301 

Robert Dunsterr . . . . 1346 

John Flode . . . . . . 1361 

Robert Fyfhyde . . . . 1428 

John Shirborn . . . . 1482 

John Henstryge . . . . 1490 

John Whitchurch . . . . 1520 

John Godmyster . . . . 1537 

This list appears to give the names of the priors, in 
consecutive order, for 236 years, but it would appear, 
judging from the date of the foundation of the priory 



HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 55 

(a.d. 1130) that Prior Galfridus de Coker was preceded 
in the office by others whose names and years of office it 
has proved too difficult to ascertain. There is no doubt 
that John Godmyster was the last prior, as he held the 
office at the Dissolution.* 

The Dissolution of the Priory. — When the Priory of 
Kidwelly was suppressed, the Rectory, in which it was 
merged, fell into the hands of the Crown, and the mon- 
astic temporalities were disposed of by lease in the year 
35 Henry VIII. (a.d. 1544) to certain persons of the 
name of George Ashe and Robert Meyrick, yeomen, and 
purveyors of wine to the king, for twenty-one years. 
This lease, a copy of which is given in Appendix 
F, is in the Public Record Office, and gives a 
minute description of the tithes thereby demised, to- 
gether with the places whence they arose. Among the 
leased possessions, the following details are specified : — 
the site of the priory, all buildings, edifices, curtilages, 
granaries, cemeteries, pleasure-ground, orchards, gar- 
dens, and fish-ponds ; and the reserved rent for the 
whole of the property involved is stated to have been 
£30 6s. 4d- Among the exceptions, however, is one of 
a yearly pension of £8 to the vicar, f 



* Dugdale ' Mon. Angl.', Vol. IV., p. 66. 
t Iceland's 'Itin.', Vol. V., p. 23. 




56 HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 



CONSECRATION OF AN ANCIENT 
CEMETERY. 

"HREE days after the date of the deed whereby 
certain lands were given by Roger, bishop of 
SaHsbury, to Sherborne Abbey , the same 
donor set apart and consecrated a cemetery at Kid- 
welly, ' with the license and consent of Wilfrid, bishop 
of St. Davids ' (see Appendix A). The document in 
question is undated, but the citation of the name of 
the bishop who then held the see of St. Davids helps to 
assign an approximate date both for the grant of land 
and consecration of the cemetery. Wilfrid was the last 
Welsh bishop of St. Davids before the Norman rule, and 
he appears in the official list of bishops of St. Davids 
under his Welsh name of Griff ri.*' He was also known 
as Jeffrey as well as Gryffyth.'\ He died in 1112, and 
was only succeeded two years afterwards by Bernard, 
the first Norman bishop of St. Davids. { The date of 
the document referred to, and therefore of the consecra- 
tion of the cemetery, must have been prior to 11 12. 
And as Wilfrid held the see from 1096 to iii2,§ the con- 
secration must have taken place between those dates. 
Henry I. did not come to the throne till 11 00, and as 
Roger only came into prominence during his reign, these 
local transactions must have occurred between the years 

* 'St. Davids Diocesan Directory.' 

t Newell's 'History of the Welsh Church,' p. 167. 

% Archdeacon Sevan's ' History of St. Davids,' pp. 59, 61. 

§ Ihid., p. 249. 



HISTORY OF KIDWElvLY. 57 

1 1 00 and 1112. This cemetery probably occupied the 
property which is numbered 760 in the Ordnance Map 
of 1880, and 62 in that of 1907, and which adjoins the 
lylansaint road about 300 yards from the castle where 
the deed was executed. This enclosure is, moreover, 
stiU generally known as Mynwent Domos — St. Thomas's 
cemetery. 

It is not improbable that there was an oratory pro- 
vided for this place of interment, a circumstance which 
would account for the tradition which claims that there 
was an ancient chapel on the site. 




58 HISTORY OF KIDWElvIvY. 



THE VICARIATE OF KIDWELLY. 

'HB provision of a yearly pension of £8 to the 
Vicar (see p. 55) shows that there was a Vicari- 
ate at Kidwelly when the priory was dissolved ; 
and in the ecclesiastical suit, already referred to, there is 
a strong presumption in favour of the previous exis- 
tence of a vicariate, as it may be assumed that the 
third portion of the tithes which was not laid claim to by 
the prior and convent, belonged then to the vicar. 
There seems, however, little doubt that the vicariate 
of Kidwelly existed at the beginning of the 14th century, 
for in a Court Roll (portfolio 215, No. 39, P.R.O.) 
appears this entry : — 'At the Court of the Prior of Ked- 
welly, held on the day of S. Kalixtus, Pope and Martyr, 
A.D. 1310 — Nicholas Kyngman excuses himself against 
Thomas Cas on plea of debt by Thomas, the Vicar.' 

(i) As vicarages are generally supposed to have been estab- 
lished in the eighth year of Henry II. (a.d. 1162), ' Alwyn ' may 
not have been vicar according to the general acceptation of the 
term, but he is specifically denominated as ' the Priest of the 
town ' in the deed whereby a grant of land was made by Roger, 
bishop of Salisbury, to Sherborne Abbey, probably wathin the 
first decade of the 12th century (see Appendix A). 

(2) The appointment of John Grifiith was made subject to 
the condition that ' an annual pension of 26s. 8d. be reserved to 
the previous Incumbent (John Chayny) till he be appointed to 
a cure.' — Bishop's Register. 

(3) Roger Prichard was Fellow of Jesus College, Oxford. 

Vicarage House. — This residence was built in 1895, 
in accordance with plans prepared by Mr. Thomas 
Arnold, architect, lylanelly. The total cost of the 
building was ;^i8o4. 



PLATE X. 







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HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 59 



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60 HISTORY OF KIDWEI^LY. 



CHANTRIES. 

"HERE was a chantry at Kidwelly which is 
known to have been dedicated to St. Nicholas, 
and there would seem to have been more than 
one. It is explicitly stated in the Minister's Accounts 
of the Duchy of lyancaster, kept at the Public Record 
Office, that there was a chantry ' within the walls of 
the Castle of Kidwellj',' as the following translated 
abstracts prove : — 

BUNDLE 584. NO. 9236. 

'Account of Roger Aylward, Receiver of Kedwelly, Carn : 
Iskennyn, and Oggemour ; from i Octob. 43 Edward iii. to 
9 Septr. next following, by his commission dated the said ist 
Oct. (1367—70). 

' Item, 74' 4'^ paid to Thomas Davy, Chaplain of the Chantry 
•within the Castle of Kedwelly for this year, for his salary, and 
for finding bread and wine, and candles, as well for himself, as 
for a certain monk to celebrate within the Chantry of the said 
Castle for the same time.' 

BUJJDivE 573. NO. 9066. 

' Item, allowed to the accountant for bread and mne and 
candles, to be provided daily throughout the year for i mass 
in the Chantry within the Castle to be celebrated by the Prior 
and monks of the Priory of Kedwelly, 6' 8'.' 

The dedication of this chantry is not given, but it is 
improbable that in a purely military establishment, 
such as the castle was, the chantry would have been 
dedicated to St. Nicholas ; for this saint — presumably 
the Bishop of Myra — is the patron of scholars and mar- 
iners.* Sea-faring, with its important branch of ship- 

* Owen's ' Saiictoyale Catholicum.' 



HISTORY OF KIDWEl.r.Y. 6l 

building, which is known at a later period to have 
become, in no small measure, a means of livelihood to 
the local community, had probably been the develop- 
ment of centuries, and the association between the nature 
of the people's employment and St. Nicholas might well 
have commended itself to the consideration of the 
founder in his selection of a patron for his chantry at 
Kidwelly. It would therefore be more natural to seek 
the location of this chantry within the precincts of the 
parish church rather than in the castle, which would 
necessarily have been prohibited to civilians. There 
is also a further and more palpable reason against 
assigning this chantry to the castle, for by an Act of 
Parliament passed in the first year of Edward VI., cap. 
14, all foundations of chantries, chapels, and guilds 
which had not been in the actual possession of King 
Henry VIII., were given to the king. At the dissolu- 
tion of the chantries, the property belonging to the 
chantry of St. Nicholas was seized by the Crown, and 
disposed of under a lease dated 12th March, 3 Edward 
VI., to a certain John Goodale, for a term of 21 years, 
from Easter, 1548, upon payment of a total rent of 
45/- (see Appendix G). This lease would hardly 
have been necessary if the castle chantry had been 
that of St. Nicholas, as it would already have been 
Crown property, the castle and lordship of Kidwelly, 
which had been held by the De I^ondres family, having 
passed into the Duchy of I^ancaster when Maud de 
Cadurcis, who held Ogmore and Kidwelly, was married 
to Henry, Earl of L,ancaster. Maud's property 
accordingly was annexed to the Crown, through the 



62 HISTORY OF KIDWElvIyY. 

Duke of lyancaster, and Blanche, who was married 
to John of Gaunt, when Henry IV. succeeded to the 
throne of England (see the genealogy of the de lyondres 
family, p. 23). The fact also that the priests of the 
castle chantry were, as has been seen, paid direct by 
the local receiver of the Duchy, is itself an acknowledg- 
ment that it was an institution which belonged to the 
Duchy of lyancaster, now merged in the Crown, and 
for which the Crown held itself responsible. 

It may, moreover, be said that chantries were most 
frequently formed within existing churches, such as the 
ends of aisles, as is the case in St. John's Church, Brecon, 
and many other ancient churches which may be cited ; 
or in cruciform churches, such as the Parish Church 
of Kidwelly, in the transept. It is beyond doubt that 
the south transept of the latter church is a distinct 
appendage to the main building. In fact, it is called 
the Mansel Chapel to this day. Whether the Mansel 
family (of Muddlescwm) within the parish originally 
erected it does not appear ; but a mural tablet, which 
may still be seen there, records the fact that it was, at 
any rate, restored by one of that name. The inscription 
is as follows : — ' Near this place lieth the body of the 
Reverend Mr. John Mansel of this town, M.A., and late 
Vicar of Pembrey, who departed this life the fifth day 

of December, 1766 : aged 73 years This Chappel 

was rebuilded in the year 1767 at the expense of the above 
John Mansel.' 

In this transept chapel, near the south-east angle of 
the inner wall, there is a good specimen, well preserved, 
of a piscina, and there are two tombs formed, and arched 



HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 63 

in the south wall. Archaeologists have frequently 
pointed out the shortness of the transepts as being 
one of the peculiar features of the church, inasmuch as 
they are not symmetrical with the other proportions 
of the original dimensions of the present church. This, 
therefore, as well as the fact that the end centre of one 
is about three feet out of line with that of the other, 
supports the theory of their being mere annexations. 
Chantries, when formed within parish churches, were 
screened off with traceried wood-work from the main 
building, but no trace of this can be discovered in the 
arch which divides this chapel from the church. In 
the shafts of the arch which separates the north tran- 
sept from the nave, however, regular sockets, which 
have been stopped, may still be seen on both sides. 
Besides this, while making excavations in the year 1903, 
preparatory to laying down a heating apparatus, a sar- 
cophagus was discovered beneath the surface in this tran- 
sept. As the chantry, or chantry chapel, became the 
tomb of the founder, it is not improbable that this was 
the receptacle of the mortal remains of the founder for 
whom masses were said in this particular chantry. The 
prima facie evidence, therefore, afforded by these dis- 
coveries, favours the theory that the north transept 
was once used as a chantry, and the foregoing considera- 
tions have likewise an equal tendency to prove that 
this was the position of the ' chantry of St. Nicholas.' 



64 HISTORY OF KIDWEI.I.Y. 



THE PARISH CHURCH. 

tT would seem, as has been already observed (see p. 
44), that the present parish church was erected on 
the foundation of a previous edifice which probably- 
had been a temporary restoration of the church 
which is said to have been burnt down, together with 
the town, by Prince I^lewelyn in the year 1222.* It 
was one of the comparatively few monastic churches 
which were preserved at the suppression of the mon- 
asteries, and permitted to remain as the church of the 
parish ; the priory churches of Brecon and Monkton 
being similar exceptions in the diocese of St. Davids. 
It is dedicated, as might have been expected under the 
circumstances, to St. Mary ; for the Marian dedication 
became popular under Norman influence, and the Marian 
churches, as they are called, were generally found in 
towns, and under the shadow of the Norman castles, 
as well as in secluded places in connection with Cister- 
cian Monasteries. In his ' History of the Diocese of St. 
Davids,' the Venerable Archdeacon Bevan, who at all 
times is a most trustworthy authority on any subject 
he has written upon, whether historical, archaeological, 
or otherwise, thus describes the church — ' Kidwelly 
Church may be cited as the best example, among paro- 
chial churches, of the Decorated Style in this diocese, its 
distinctive features being the large span of its nave, its 
spacious chancel, short transepts, and lofty tower sur- 
mounted by a graceful spire.' Among the papers 

* Powell, p. 248. 



PLATE XI. 




KlDWELL ,- i'Aix'.'^H CHI 



M THL NORTH^ 



From a Photograph by Mr James Henry Davies, Kidwelly 



PLATE XII. 




KIDWELLY Parish Church. 
Roof damaged by fall of tower, i884. 



PLATE Xni. 







D, e 



PLATE XIV. 




S "^ 



D, ~i 



HISTORY OF KIDWElvIvY. 6$ 

handed down to the present incumbent is a somewhat 
exhaustive report made by Sir George Gilbert Scott, 
after a careful personal survey of the church in the year 
1854, in view of a projected restoration of the edifice 
at that time. It is as follows : — 

' The church is one of the most remarkable in South Wales, 
and though retaining many of the features characteristic of the 
district, it would appear, as far as its details are concerned, to 
be the work of an architect from some other neighbourhood. 
It consists of a nave of the extraordinary span of 33 feet in the 
clear, without aisles, small north and south transepts, and an 
ample chancel, forming altogether a simple and uniform cross. 
The tower stands at the north-western angle of the nave, form- 
ing a north porch, opposite which is an ordinary porch on the 
south side. There is also an ample sacristy, or vestry, on the 
north side of the chancel. 

' The plan is, however, not precisely of its original form, as the 
nave has been very considerably shortened, so that the tower 
and the porch, instead of being, as at present, at the western 
angles, were formerly about midway between those angles and 
the transepts. 

' Though the tower would appear at first sight of earher date, 
I am inchned to beheve that the whole church (excepting, of 
course, alterations and mutilations of comparative modern 
periods) is of one age, and that it was erected, on one uniform 
design, about the end of the reign of Kdward II., or early in 
that of Edward III. 

' The chancel and the tower are the only parts which now 
show very distinctly the original character of the church. They 
appear at first sight to differ greatly in style, the chancel having 
rich flowing tracery in its windows, while those of the tower are 
of a severe lancet form. On close examination, however, I am 
led to the conclusion that this is not the result of any difference 
in their dates, but merely of a desire for the one feature to be 
as rich, and the other as simple, as their means on the one hand, 
and the style of the period on the other, would permit. I draw 
this conclusion from the following evidence : — There is so strong 
a resemblance between the mouldings of the doorways (includ- 
ing both of those in the tower) and the arches into the chancel 
and transepts, as to prove them all to be of one age. As, there- 



66 HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 

fore, the window tracery of the nave is gone, it might be objected 
that the nave, with the transept and chancel arches, may be 
all of earher date than the chancel itself. I find, however, a 
loophole on the south side of the nave, distinctly agreeing with 
the style and age of the chancel ; and, on further examination, 
I find another in the staircase of the tower, with an ogee arch, 
pointing at the same age. These indications, taken in connec- 
tion with the perfect unity of the general plan, convince me 
that the whole is of one date, and that the lancet windows of 
the tower are merely the result of economy. 

' The tower, however, though so severely simple, is a very 
noble structure ; it is of great size, and is surmounted by a good 
spire, perfectly plain and unperforated. It unites, externally, 
the usual type of its period with that more distinctly character- 
istic of the district, particularly in retaining the liigh battering 
basement so constant in Welsh towers, though the angles are 
flanked with two buttresses. The lower story of the tower, 
internally, is vaulted ; it is faced with rough stone, and has a 
singularly picturesque character. The nave is perfectly simple 
in its character, both within and without. The windows have 
been reduced to mere arched openings by the destruction of 
the mullions and tracery, excepting only the west window, 
which, dating only from the shortening of the nave, is a late 
perpendicular window of rude character. The only remaining 
internal features of the nave are the three great arches, which 
are of a very bold and good character, and the doorways, which 
are simple, but good. The transepts are in much the same 
condition with the nave ; that on the south side, however, has 
one window retaining its mulHon, but apparently not of the 
original date. This transept has several arched recesses for tombs, 
and several sepulchral slabs have been found in both transepts. 

' The chancel is the portion which not only was, from the 
first, the most highly finished, but which retains most of its 
original beauty. The east window was of five hghts, but un- 
happily, its mulHons and tracery have been removed, and I 
fear its design will, with difficulty, be recovered from the frag- 
ments scattered in diiferent parts of the borough. On the south 
side, however, two windows retain the whole of their tracery, 
and the other a portion of it ; all are of excellent character. 
On the north side the windows are blocked, but one seems 
nearly perfect. The sediha and piscina are perfect, and of very 
good design. 



HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 67 

' The vestry has been in a great measure re-bnilt on the old 
foundation. It has formerly been of two stories. The stairs 
to the upper story remain, with a very perfect traceried loop- 
hole opening into the chancel. On the other side of the vestry 
door are well moulded octagonal brackets for hghts. 

' The chancel arch is segmental, and very low, not extending 
above the height of the side walls of the nave. There is a rood- 
stair, the entrance of which is blocked up, but it would appear 
as if it must have opened over the chancel arch, over which 
the rood-loft may probably have extended, an arrangement 
which would account for the lowness of the arch. 

' The roofs are throughout of late date. That to the chancel 
is the best, but appears to be about the time of James I. ; that 
to the nave is probably of the last century (i8th), but is in many 
parts decayed, and hardly safe. 

' The walls are of massive thickness, and are generally in a 
sound state. 

' The parapet of the tower is nearly all gone, and the upper 
part of the spire has been re-built so badly as to destroy its 
symmetry. 

Consequent upon the catastrophe which befel the 
parish church in the year 1884, when the spire was 
struck by Hghtning, and the top masonry was hurled 
through the roof of the nave, the defective and dilapi- 
dated work alluded to in the above report has been well 
and substantially restored under the direction of Messrs. 
Middleton and Prothero, Architects. The spire, which 
had been but indifferently rebuilt after a similar catas- 
trophe in the 17th century, to which the registers bear 
witness, has now been restored to its original and 
symmetrical proportions, and at a renovation in 1904 
it was also pierced. The west window, complained 
of as ' being of a rude character,' has been replaced by 
a perpendicular window of good style and workmanship. 
The other windows of the nave have also received new 
mullions, though not the original tracery ; and the roof of 



68 HISTORY OF KIDWEI.I.Y. 

the nave, which could only have been placed on massive 
walls, cannot but appeal to the admiration of all who 
observe it, as well as reflect much credit on the designers. 
It will have been noticed that the period assigned by 
Sir Gilbert Scott to the building was ' about the end of 
the reign of Bdward II., or early in that of Edward III.' 
This would mean the former part of the 14th century. 
This contention, however, has not remained unchal- 
lenged, for Dr. Freeman, the once celebrated antiquary, 
who accompanied the members of the Cambrian Archaeo- 
logical Association in their visit to Kidwelly in August, 
1875, maintained that the church had a 14th century 
nave added to a 13th centurj^ tower.* Mr. Edward 
Laws, F.S.A., of Tenby, at a visit of the same associa- 
tion in August, 1906, also held that certain portions of 
the chancel, such as the rich moulding of the piscina 
and the tracery of the small circular loophole in the 
opposite waU, point distinctly to the early English 
style of architecture. 

Sir Gilbert Scott, even, had some hesitation in arriv- 
ing at the conclusion that the whoe church belonged 
to one age, on account of a seeming difference between 
the architectural style adopted in the tower and in other 
parts of the building. His eventual decision was, in 
fact, the result of a more minute scrutiny of the various 
portions than was primarily instituted by him ; and it 
was based on the testimony borne by the resemblance, 
in the first place, between the mouldings of the tower 
doorways and those of the chancel and transept arches ; 

* ^Carmarthen Journal,' August 37, 1875. 



HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 69 

and secondly, between the loophole in the staircase of 
the south wall of the nave, and another in the stair-case 
of the tower, which have similar arches, and are therefore 
claimed to be contemporaneous. The transition from 
the Early English to the Decorated style seems to have 
been so gradual that it is said to be impossible to draw 
a sharp line of demarcation between them. So imper- 
ceptible is the transition in its various stages, that each 
style may be sub-divided into early, middle, and late, 
the early being often mixed with the previous style, and 
the later dragging on to the subsequent one.* There 
seems, therefore, to be no reason, in the case of this 
church, which by a consensus of opinion, belongs to the 
incipient stage of the Decorated period, viz., the latter 
part of the 13th or the former part of the 14th century, 
why the Early English Style should not yet have lingered 
in the transition to the Early Decorated. 
lis Architectural Features. — These are — 
(i) The numerous stair-cases in the walls. 

(2) The peculiar lowness of the chancel arch. 

(3) The segmental character of the main arches. 

■ (4) The great breadth of the nave, and absence of 
aisles. 

(5) The abrupt terminations of the transepts. 

(6) The number of its sepulchral recesses. 

There are four stair-cases within the walls of the build- 
ing. The one in the south wall of the nave possibly 
constituted an approach to a rostrum whence the Epistle 
was read, and the one, the entrance to which is gained 

* Parker's 'Introduction to Gothic Architecture,' p. 161. 



70 HISTORY OF KIDWEr,I.Y. 

from the north transept, probably led to a similar 
rostrum whence the Gospel was read. The stair-case 
near the angle formed by the pillars of the chancel and 
south transept arches is a spiral one, and led to the 
rood-loft above. To the right of the entrance to this 
stair-case is a stoup which probably was used for ablution 
before any ascent to the rood-loft was made. The other 
stair-case is in the main wall of the sacristy, or vestry. 
This starts from what originally was the first floor, and 
the traceried loophole already referred to, opens into 
it, thus serving as a window, and possibly also as a 
squint, for it is not improbable that the first floor of 
the sacristy was used as an anchoret cell, where a recluse 
found his or her permanent home. The tracery of the 
circular loophole represents a wheel, and is indicative 
of the flight of time. 

Anchorages were frequently attached to a church, and 
were occupied by anchorites that belonged to a religious 
order, and bound, of their own free will, by a vow of 
seclusion. Female recluses often made their abode in 
such cells, partly for protection, and also for the sake 
of religious advantages which such a location would 
naturally afford. The doors of the cell were either locked 
or blocked up with masonry under the authority of the 
head of the order to which the inmates belonged, either 
for a period of years or for life. The cell generally had 
three shuttered windows, one opening into a chamber 
for the anchorite's attendant, another through which 
any necessary communication with the outside world 
could be made, while the third looked, as the loophole 
in this instance does, into the sanctuary of the church. 



HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 7I 

The peculiar lowness of the chancel arch may be ac- 
counted for by the presumption, which is borne out by 
the height of the spiral stair-case, that the rood-loft, 
extended above the arch. The segmental formation of 
this, and the other main arches, effect an angle with 
the pillar abruptly, and have no continuous imposts 
nor capitals to the shafts. The corbels on which rested 
the canopy over the loft are still preserved in the wall. 
The change of mouldings also at the junction is con- 
sidered by Dr. Freeman to be rare in England, and is 
reminiscent of later French work.* 

The extraordinary breadth of the nave, without 
aisles, is also thought by the same authority to belong 
to some south Gaulish church. 

The transepts start direct from the nave, and not 
from a central tower, as is usually the case in monastic 
churches, and their unsymmetrical abruptness, supports 
the contention which has already been made, that they 
are mere annexations to the main building. 

There are, altogether, six arched sepulchral tombs. 
Two of these are in the chancel, two in the south chapel, 
and two in the nave. Those in the chancel and nave 
have no monumental slabs, but one of those in the 
south chapel is occupied by a recumbent effigy of one 
who might have been a local domina, with an illegible 
inscription, and the other by a slab bearing an incised 
cross supposed to belong to the 15th century, but which 
has been appropriated by a comparatively modern alder- 
man of the borough. It is probable that the sepulchral 

* 'Arch. Camb.', Series IV., Vol. vi., p. 412. 



72 HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 

arch in the north wall of the sacrarium was used as a 
recess for entombing the rood, or the Crucifix in the 
rood-loft during the interval between Good Friday and 
the morning of Easter Day. There is also a monument, 
now placed in an erect position in the south chapel, of 
a civilian, clad in the tunica talaris, which is said to belong 
to the 14th century.* 

Figure of the Madonna and the Infant Saviour. — The 
church rejoices in the possession of a imique figure of 
the Virgin, crowned, bearing the infant Saviour, and a 
bird, in pure white alabaster, a good specimen of 15th 
century art. The sculpture is, however, considerably 
mutilated, both by reason of exposure to the elements 
in Puritanical times, and rough handling. The head of 
the child is gone, as well as the left arm of the Virgin. 
One of the birds and a section of the lower part are also 
wanting. Still, sufficient is left to give a fairly accurate 
idea of its pristine beauty. It was once lodged in the 
niche above the door of the south porch, where, within 
living memory, women curtsied to it on entering and 
leaving the church. From this position, however, it 
was taken down in the year 1875, seemingly to the 
chagrin of many of the parishioners, and was cursorily 
buried in the churchyard, whence it was, on remon- 
strance, again unearthed and placed in the tower. It 
is now in the sacristy awaiting restoration. Its original 
position would seem to have been the niche in the wall 
on the south side of the east end of the nave, where it 
proudly stood beneath the rood-loft, and above the 
approach to the spiral rood-stairs. 

* ^Arch. Camb.', Series IV., Vol. vii., p. 412. 



PLATES XV. 




b t, 







PLATES XVI. 





PLATE XVII. 




2^. 






PLATE XVIIl. 




SQ 



"t S 









HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 75 

The Church Plate. — The inventory of goods pertain- 
ing to the church which was returned by the Commis- 
sioners appointed for that purpose at the beginning of 
the reign of Edward VI. (1552), included the following : — 

2 chalices of silver, partly gilt. 

A small cross of silver, partly gilt. 

A censer of silver. 

A pyx of silver. 

4 bells, great and small. 

One chalice, in the hands of Morys ap Rhys, Gent. 

Nothing is now known of these accessories. The 
oldest existing vessels are a silver chalice and paten, 
both dating from the reign of Queen Elizabeth. The 
chalice bears the following inscription in I^atin : 
' Poculum * Eclesie * de * Kyd welly * 15 * 74/ and is 
pronounced by connoisseurs to be one of the best speci- 
mens of Elizabethan ecclesiastical plate in the diocese 
of St. Davids. 

The Registers. — The parochial records extend back to 
the year 1626, and there are what appear to be extracts 
from a previous register. These latter date from the 
year 1586. All the entries down to a.d. 1733 are in 
I^atin, and are in bold and legible caligraphy. 

The systematic registration of baptisms, marriages, 
and burials was only established at the end of the reign 
of Henry VIII. A royal injunction was issued by 
Thomas Cromwell, Vicar-General, Sept. 29, 1538, de- 
manding the incumbent of every parish to ' keep one 
book or register, which book he shaU, every Sunday, 
take forth, and in the presence of the churchwardens, 
or one of them, write and record in the same all the 



74 HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 

weddings, christenings, and burials made the whole 
week before.' The first register books seem to have 
been of paper, but in 1597 i^ was enacted that every 
parish provide itself with a parchment book, into which 
the entries in the paper registers were to be transcribed. 
This enactment will therefore account for the entries 
which appear at the beginning of the earliest parchment 
register of Kidwelly, for they are probably copies made 
from a previous record book. 

One of the records in the local registers is specially 
interesting, not only as a chronicle of an imtoward 
event, but also as conveying an antiquated atmospheric 
idea. It is as follows : — 

' Upon the 29th day of October 148 1, the steeple of Kidwelly 
fell downe by lightning and a clap of thunder between one and 
two o'clock in the afternoon. — From lightning and tempest ; 
from battle and murder, and from sudden death, Good I/ord, 
deliver us.' 

Church Restoration. — Consequent on the lightning dis- 
aster of 1884, the measure of church restoration adopted 
and carried out was comprehensive, and involved an 
outlay of £1813 8s. id. 

Church Bells. — For many years the belfry of the 
parish church has contained a peal of bells. It used to 
be a common saying that ' Kidwelly bells were heard 
at Swansea,' and this is accounted for by a local tradition 
which states that the bells which had been originally 
intended for Kidwelly were taken by sea to Swansea. 
However, if the tradition in reference to a confusion in 
the consignment of the local bells be founded on fact, 
Kidwelly has now received ample compensation in the 



HISTORY OP KIDWEI.I.Y. 75 

splendid pipe organ which was purchased at a reasonable 
price in 1907 from the vicar and churchwardens of St. 
Mary's Church, Swansea. The following extract from 
The New Monthly Magazine for March i, 1820. may be 
of interest, inasmuch as it shows that the bells were 
formerly swung, and that some were re- cast about the 
time when the notice appeared in the above periodical. 
' The inhabitants of Kidwelly were highly entertained 
on the 24th ult. by the revival of church bell-ringing, 
having for many years been destitute of that gratifying 
melodious music, in consequence of four bells out of the 
original peal being broken, which deficiency was sup- 
pHed by John Kingston, bell-founder, of Bridgewater 
by four new ones.' 

The present peal consists of six bells, and are fixed 
for chiming only, it being thought that this method 
would conduce to the safety of the tower masonry. 
They were re-cast by Charles Carr, lytd.. Bell-founders, 
Smethwick, in 1902, at the cost of fi^o, and were dedi- 
cated, together with a new altar and reredos, by the 
Lord Bishop of St. Davids on May 3rd of the same 
year. 

The Town Clock. — This is also in the church steeple. 
When the tower was struck b^' lightning in the year 
1884, the interior workings were badly damaged, and 
the clock was stopped for several years. In 1902, how- 
ever, it was restored, and the dials were raised to a 
higher elevation at the expense of the municipal cor- 
poration, in commemoration of the Coronation of King 
Kdward VII. 



76 HISTORY OF KIDWEI,I,Y. 

ST. TEIIvO'S MISSION CHURCH. 

This was erected in 1892 to supply the spiritual needs 
of residents of Mynydd-y-Garreg. The site, which 
originally was a leasehold, was converted into freehold 
property in the year 1902. 




HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 'J'J 



THE MUNICIPAL BOROUGH 
CHARTERS. 

'ONSlDERABIvE facilities were given in the reign 
of Henry I. towards the attainment of munici- 
pal privileges in England, and also in those 
parts of Wales which had been colonised, as Kidwelly 
was, by Norman settlers. The feudal system was intro- 
duced into the government of towns after the Conquest, 
and the English rights of sac and soc were understood 
to imply a manorial estate. 

The first charter to Kidwelly was granted by Henry 

I. to Roger, bishop of Salisbury, and lord of the manor, 
between 1103 und 1112. Practically, it was a provision 
for the freedom of the lord, and the immunity of the 
men of his demesne, from tolls and consuetudinary dues. 
This charter appears to have been confirmed by Henry 

II. to William de London, and his son William secured 
its confirmation from King John in 1205, and again 
from Henry III. in 1228.* 

Sometimes the example of the king was followed by 
the lords who granted charters to their towns, and they 
often obtained permission from the Crown to grant 
greater privileges than in their own right they could do. 
. The charter which Henry, Duke of Lancaster, and 
lord of the manor of Kidwelly, granted to the town in 
1357!, is a local instance of this beneficence. This may 

* 'Arch. Camb.,' Series IV., Vol. ix, p. 82. 
f 30 Edward III. 



78 HISTORY OF KIDWEI.I.Y. 

more strictly be regarded as a grant of certain rights 
and privileges of quite secondary importance, and ex- 
emption from certain tolls, than a regular charter. 
Reference to its provisions is made in the Appendix. 

Down to this time no charter had been given which 
contained a hint of corporate existence. 

In 1444, however, a charter was granted by Henry 
VI. which definitely provided for incorporation, and 
which, in this sense, may be regarded as the original 
Charter of Kidwelly (see Appendix). 

In 1541, on the application of the mayor of Kidwelly, 
the previous charter was confirmed by Patent of Henry 
VIII., dated February 20, in the 32nd year of his reign. 

In 1551, the same charter was again confirmed by 
Patent of Edward VI., dated May 20, in the 4th year 
of his reign. 

In 1619, a new and elaborate charter was granted to 
the borough by James I., dated July 16, in the i6th 
year of his reign.* This is the charter by which the 
borough was governed in the 17th, i8th, and 19th cen- 
turies, until it was replaced by the last charter. The 
full text of the charter of James I. is given in the Ap- 
pendix. 

In 1885 the latest charter was granted, a copy of which 
is also given in the Appendix. 

It is sad to relate that the originals of all the early 
charters are lost ! 

Although efforts have been made to recover that of 
James I., as an old minute book of the corporation 

* 'Arch. Camb.', Series III., Vol. iii., p. i. 



HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 79 

testifies, all attempts to regain possession of it have so 
far been futile. This document can hardly be of any 
use or value to any private individual, while to the mayor 
and corporation, its rightful custodians, it would be a 
priceless possession. In the hope, therefore, that this 
book may help in the quest, an appeal is made to any of 
its readers who may have some knowledge about its 
whereabouts to acquaint the municipal authorities with 
the fact. It need hardly be said that anyone who would 
vouchsafe such information as might lead to its recovery, 
would confer an inestimable boon on the ancient borough. 
Publicity is hereby given to a clue provided by a repre- 
sentation which is placed on record at the foot of the 
minutes of the Hall Day held at the Guildhall of the 
borough on Friday, July 18, 1783 : — 

' Whereas one of the Charters of this borough was delivered 
to Mr. Pember, an Attorney at Gloucester, to be given in evidence 
in a cause there depending, wherein he was concerned, and Mr. 
Pember having in answer to a letter sent him by the Town 
Clerk, informed us that he delivered the said Charter to Mr. 
Leonard Bilson Gwyn, in order to be returned to this corpora- 
tion, and that he has his receipt for the same ; and several 
apphcations having been made to the said Mr. Leonard Bilson 
Gwyn to dehver up the said Charter, he hath given for answer 
that he had delivered the same to the late Mr. Lewis Rogers 
in his hfetime. And whereas, on inspecting the Town Chest, 
the said charter is not to be found therein, and if the fact (sic) 
be true, that the same charter was dehvered to Mr. Lewis Rogers, 
it probably must have remained (not being found in the chest) 
among his papers, which papers are in the custody or power of 
Mr. Gwyn, but it appears to us that Mr. Gwyn has, since the 
death of Mr. Rogers, confessed the said charter was in his custody. 
It is therefore ordered that appUcation be made to the Court of 
King's Bench in the next Michaelmas term for a mandamus to 
be directed to the said Mr. Leonard BUson Gwyn, to shew cause 
why he should not deliver up the said charter to the corporation. 



80 HISTORY OF KIDWEI.I.Y. 

And that it be referred to the Mayor, Recorder, and Justice, 
-with the assistance of the Town Clerk, to consider and prepare 
the necessary means for such apphcation. And they are to lay 
the same before the Council at a future meeting thereof. And 
it is further ordered that the Town Clerk do cause a copy of this 
Order to be dehvered to the said Mr. Gwyn, that he may prevent 
the necessity of the apphcation to the Court of King's Bench, 
if he thinks proper.' 

Unhappily, Gwyn's expulsion from the aldermanic 
chair by the unanimous vote of the council, on the plea 
of non-residence, is recorded in the same document. 
This seems to have aggravated a difference which had 
arisen between him and the corporation in 1780 by 
reason of the refusal, on the part of the latter, to renew 
to him a lease of the tin mills, a refusal which afterwards 
was made subject to a lawsuit. I^eonard Bilson Gwyn 
was mayor in 1779. He seems to have resided latterly 
at Swansea ; and in a document, reference to which is 
made in the minutes of the Hall Day held July 23, 
1787, Eliza Maria Wigley is represented to have been 
his daughter. In 1788 the corporation renewed the 
lease formerly granted to Gwyn in the name of Gabriel 
Powell, of Gellihir, Glamorganshire. 

The Seal and Arms of the Borough. — It will be seen 
from the illustration that this is a somewhat inelegant 
heraldry, and its conception appears to be due to a mis- 
apprehension of Iceland's extraordinary etymology of 
the name Kidwelly (see page 3), for Iceland's mythical 
Cattas seems to have been taken for a cat ! 

Markets and Fairs. — Two markets and one fair were 
established by charter as far back as the latter part of 
the 13th century, as testified by the following extract : — 



PLATE XIX. 



^^'vrjT^^ 




^^^^Sr^^' 



SEAL OF THE BOROUGH. 



From a Photograph by Mr James Henry Davies, Kidwelly 



HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 8 1 

' Grant to Payn de Chaworth, and his heirs, of two weekly- 
markets at Keddewelly, in the March of Wales ; one on Tuesday, 
and the other on Saturday ; and of a yearly Fair there on the 
[vigil] of the Feast, and the morrow, of St. Mary Magdalen, 
and the five days following.' — Charter Rolls, 52 Henry III., 
Oct. 22, 126S.—P.R.O. 

The markets and fairs were leased to the bailiff of 
the town 22 Richard II., Feb. 3, 1398, for 30s. yearly.* 

The markets have now been discontinued on account 
of the proximity of Carmarthen and lylanelly, and the 
travelling facilities between Kidwelly and those towns ; 
but fairs are still held on the following dates : — St. 
Luke's fair, Oct. 29 (hiring and pleasure). Gwenllian 
fair, first Monday in December (cattle and pigs). Aug- 
ust fair, August 3rd and 4th (cattle first day, pigs second 
day). May fair, first Tuesday after the 20th of May 
(horses, cattle, and pigs). The last named was estab- 
lished in the year of the Coronation of King Edward 
VII. 



* ' Duchy of Lancaster — Minister's Accounts.' Bundle 573, 
No. 9063.— P.R.O. 




82 HISTORY OP KIDWELI^y. 

DOMESTIC BUILDINGS, AND NOTED 
FAMILIES. 

OTH Celts and Saxons were content with the 
crudest architecture, and an advance of this art 
amongst them came through foreign influence. 
It remained, therefore, for the Normans, and Flemings 
who followed in their wake, to hand down to posterity 
what still remains at Kidwelly of mediaeval archi- 
tecture, domestic as well as ecclesiastical. Among the 
domestic remains may be mentioned two mansions, 
lylechdwnny and Muddlescwm. 

Llechdwnny (Donne's Refuge). — Ivlechdwnny is one of 
the few mansions marked in Speed's map of Carmar- 
thenshire in 1610. The ruins of this mansion are on an 
eminence which overlooks Kidwelly, and about two 
miles to the north-east of the town. The walls that 
still remain show that it was an oblong building, the 
length extending from south to north. It is 55 yards 
long by 36 yards wide, and is now occupied by an 
orchard. At the north-east angle a round tower may 
still be traced, and there is a corresponding projection 
at the south-east angle, where probably another round 
tower stood. Adjoining the mansion on the east is a 
fruit garden which covers 2 acres, and which is inclosed 
by a wall 9 ft. high and 2 ft. thick. It is lined through- 
out with 4 in. red brick-work. On the east side there 
is a terrace extending from the north to the south wall, 
and at each end of the terrace there was a round tower 
corresponding to those at the north-west and south- 
west angles of the mansion proper. The garden towers 



HISTORY OF KIDWELI^Y. 83 

would command a magnificent view of the Vale of Towy 
on one side, and of Kidwelly and the sea on the other. 

Muddlescwm (Middlescombe) . — Beyond the ruined 
walls which rise only a few feet from the ground, but 
which stiU give an accurate idea of the proportions of 
the mansion, nothing remains except the granary, some 
outhouses, and the farmhouse, still known as Muddles- 
cwm, which formerly was the attendant's haU of the 
mansion, and which remains intact. The area covered 
by the mansion is 33 yards by 25 yards. The thickness 
of the walls is 2 ft. 2 in. The principal entrance is at 
the south-west angle, which is now blocked by an out- 
building. There is another entrance at the north-east 
angle which seems to have been surmounted by a turret. 
The foundations of the ground chambers are still trace- 
able. Adjoining the north wall of the mansion is the 
fruit garden, measuring 28 yards square, and surrounded 
by a wall built of red brick throughout on a stone founda- 
tion. The thickness of the wall is 21 ins., and the height 
9 ft. The granary is to the south of the principal 
entrance of the mansion, and the precincts stiU preserve 
the pebble pavement. The approach is also pitched, as 
well as a way opposite the mouth of the outer entrance, 
which leads through the middle of the field to the sup- 
posed site of lylanfihangel Chapel. 

These two mansions have been rendered historic by 
reason of the celebrated families that resided in them. 
The pedigrees of these families, between which there 
was much inter-marrying, are given by Mr. George T. 
Clark in his ' Genealogies of Morgan [Margam] and 
Glamorgan,' thus : 



84 HISTORY OF KIDWEI.I.Y. 

' Harry of Bryncoch, married ist Margaret, daughter of Wil- 
liam Thomas, of Oldcastle ; 2nd EUzabeth, daughter of Morgan 
Dun of Kidwelly (p. 103). 

' Morgan Gwyn, m. Mary dr. of Howel Jenkin-ychan of Kid- 
welly, and had i David, 2 John, 3 Owen Gwyn, of the Old Bailey 
had (a) Elizabeth, {b) Ann : 4 Maude, who married WilUam David 
Meredith of Kidwelly (p. 207). 

' Morgan ap levan Gwyn m. Margaret dr. of Howel ap Jenkin 
Vychan of Kidwelly, and had i Owen Gwyn, 2 David, 3 Maud 
m. William ap David ap Meredith of Kidwelly (p. 208). 

' Maud (daughter of Sir Robert Vaughan of Tretower) m. 
Henry Dunn of Kidwelly (p. 239). 

' Sir Thomas Morgan of Langstone and Pencoyd in Llan- 
martin, 1482 — Issue i Sir William, 2 John, whence Morgan of 
Caerleon, 3 Henry, 4 PhiUp, whence — 

Morgan of Kidwelly (p. 320). 

' Philip Morgan of Klidwelly, fourth son of Sir Thomas of 
Pencoyd, married a daughter of Sir Rhys ap Thomas, and had 

1 WilMam Morgan, who had 2 Henry Morgan, father of 3 Walter 
Morgan (p. 325). 

' Morgan of Muddlescombe. — Treherne Morgan of Muddles- 
combe, High Steward of the Commote of Kidwelly and of Pem- 
broke : he built the house of Llandilo-Abercowyn ; m. Jenet 
dr. and co-h. of Harry Dwn of Picton. Issue — i Harry, 2 Owen, 
3 Anthony (whence a branch), 4 EHzabeth, 5 Sysly, 6 Ann, 7 
Catherine. 

' Harry Morgan of Muddlescombe m. Margaret dr. of Henry 
Wogan. Issue — i WilUam, 2 John, 3 Treherne, 4 Thomas, 5 
Ellen, 6 Catherine, 7 Ann. 

' WilUam Morgan of Muddlescombe m. Catherine dr. of WilUam 
Thomas of Llangathen. Issue — i Henry, 2 Thomas (1596), 3 
Mary, 4 Liws, 5 Blanche. 

' Henry Morgan m. EUzabeth dr. of Morris Rhys ap Morris 
ap Owain ap Gryflfith ap Nicholas of Llechdonni. Issue — i 
Mary co-h. m. Anthony son of Sir Edward Mansel of Margam. 

2 Catherine (1596) m. Francis, son of Sir Edward Mansel, and 
had (a) Walter, (b) Anthony, (c) Francis, [d) Richard, [e) John, 
(/) Mary, {g) Jenet.' 

Anterior to the beginning of the 15 th century Ivlech- 
dwnny belonged to a family of the name of Gwyn- 



HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 85 

I^loide. At this time the last named family was sum- 
marily deprived of the patrimony through outlawry, 
and the property was bestowed on the Donne family, 
as the extract given below will show — 

' Grant for life to the king's esquire John Donne, of all lands, 
late of Griffin ap Walter ap levan in the commots of Kedewelly 
and Carnewalthan [CarnwylUon] , and a mansion with all enclosed 
demesnes round it, late of Wilham Gwyn ap Rees Lloide in the 
commot of Kidewelly, forfeited to the king on account of their 
rebelHon, to the value of 20 marks yearly, so that he answer 
for any surplus and stay in person armed with one archer in his 
company during the rebelhon in South Wales on the safe-custody 
of the Castle of KedeweUy, and the country adjacent, without 
wages or reward.' — Patent Rolls, 5 Henry IV., Dec. i, 1403. 

The Donne family, said to have descended from 
Meurig, prince of Dyfed, seems to have inter-married 
also with the family of Rees of Kilymaenllwyd, whose 
original residence is said to have been Llechdwnny. 
At one period the last-named family bore the name of 
Bowen, or ab Bowen, and is supposed to have descended 
from Owen, the second son of Gryffith ap Nicholas of 
Dynevor, who was uncle to Sir Rhys ap Thomas, the 
celebrated Captain of South Wales.* 

The following genealogical table, communicated by 
Mr. G. R. Brigstocke, Ryde, gives a later succession 
of the lylechdwnny family : — 

' Rees Bowen, of Llechdwnny, married Catherine, daughter 
of John, son of Henry Morgan, of Muddlescwm. 

'Morris Bowen, do. 161 5, m. Maud, dr. of Sir John Wgan, 
of Bwlston, Pembs. 

' Mary, dr. of Morris Bowen, do., m. John Brigstocke, who 
purchased I^lechdwnny from his father-in-law. 

* ' Burke's Visitation of Seats and Arms, 1852,' Vol. II. 



86 HISTORY OF KIDWEI<I.Y. 

' Owen Brigstocke, do. 1657, m. Jane, dr. of Sir Wm. Vaughan, 
Torycoed, Llangendeime. 

'William Brigstocke, do. 1713, m. Winifred, dr. of Robert 
Byrt, Llwyndyris, Cardiganshire. 

' Owen Brigstocke, do. 1746, m. Anne, dr. of Dr. Edward 
Browne, NortMeet. 

' William Brigstocke, do. 1751, m. Mary, dr. of Francis Lloyd, 
Glyn, Llangendeirne. 

' Owen Brigstocke, do. 1778, m. Anne, dr. of John Williams, 
Bwlchygwynt, Mydrim. 

' William Owen Brigstocke, do. 183 1, m. Anne, dr. of Edward 
Probyn, Newland, Gloucester. 

' WilUam Owen Brigstocke, do. 1861, s.p. 

' Rev. John Brigstocke, do. 1858, m. Catherine Mary, dr. of 
Sir William Champion de Crespigny, Bart.' 

It will have been observed that the original name of 
the Muddlescwm family was Morgan, its patronymic 
being exchanged by marriage at the end of the i6th 
century for that of Mansel (see page 84). A record 
kept in the parish register states that Francis Mansel 
was created baronet on the 14th day of January, 1621. 

Domestic Flemish Architecture. — Several good speci- 
mens of this quaint architecture are preserved in some 
of the dwelling houses in the town. Its chief features 
are the semi-detached chimney shafts which are built 
against the side of the house, and the outside stair-case. 
Illustrations of two of these are siven. 



PLATE XX. 




OLD HOUSES IN KIDWELLY. 



8^ 



HISTORY OF KIDWELI.Y. 87 



LOCAL CELEBRITIES. 

IDWKlylyY may well be proud of the production 
of a goodly number of men who from time to 
time have distinguished themselves in court 
circles, diplomacy, literature, and administrative capa- 
city. Among these may be mentioned the following : — 

Master Walter Hogas of Kidwelly, parson of the Church 
of Rostyen, was nominated attorney for one year, for 
the purpose of going beyond the seas with the king.* 

William Wrench of Kidwelly was appointed by Letters 
Patent deputy, during pleasure, to the office of chief 
butler in the port of Southampton.! 

Geoffrey Kydwelly was appointed, during pleasure, 
surveyor of all the king's castles, lordships, manors, and 
lands, and the subsidy, ulnage, and forfeiture of cloth, 
in the counties of Somerset, Dorset, Devon, and Cornwall, 
and receiver of the same ; rendering his account yearly 
at the exchequer, with authority to enquire into the 
value of the premises, and certify thereon to the king 
and council. J 

Maurice Kydwelly was appointed to a similar office 
in the counties of Hereford, Gloucester, Worcester, Wilts, 
Oxford, and Berks, and the town of Bristol. § 

Philip Morgan, Kydwelly, received an appointment 
for life as the king's attorney-general in all the king's 

* 'Patent Rolls,' 3 Edward III., May 20, 1329. 

t ' Patent Rolls,' 5 Edward III., Feb. 23, 133 1. 

X 'Patent Rolls,' 12 Edward IV., Aug. 4, 1472, 

§ Ibid. 



88 HISTORY OF KIDWElvI^Y. 

courts of record in England and Wales, receiving the 
accustomed fees, with power of appointing clerks and 
officers under him. * He was also appointed in the suc- 
ceeding reign, deputy of the king's kinsman Francis, 
lyord lyovell, chief butler of England, in the port of 
Pole, and ports and places adjacent, receiving the ac- 
customed fees.t Tradition also associates this local 
worthy with the early stages of the plot originated in 
an interview, at Brecon, during the progress of the Wars 
of the Roses between John Morton, bishop of Ely, and 
Henry Stafford, duke of Buckingham, which had for 
its object the reconciliation of the Houses of York and 
Lancaster, by inviting Henry, earl of Richmond — the 
future Henry VII. — to accept the Crown of England, on 
condition that he marry Elizabeth of York ; and it is 
stated that Philip Morgan was one of the messengers 
sent in 1483 to Henry, then in honourable custody in 
Brittany, with the details of the plot. 

In a life of Henry VII. submitted for review to the 
late Mr. James Routledge, an author and man of letters, 
who was by marriage closely connected with Kidwelly, 
occurs this passage : — ' Henry determined to land in 
this district. He had received messages from one Morgan 
of Kidwelly, a lawyer, that Rhys ap Thomas, a valiant 
captain of South Wales, and another named Sir John 
Savage, were ready to take his part ; and he had every 
reason to believe that his uncle Jasper Tudor, on his 
re-appearance in that country, would be at once greeted 
as Earl of Pembroke, notwithstanding his attainder.' 

* ' Patent Rolls,' Edward V., May 28, 1483. 
t Ibid., I Richard III., March 5, 1484. 



HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 89 

This information is communicated by the late reviewer's 
widow. The authorship of the history alluded to is 
not given, but the statement is probably correct, seeing 
that Philip Morgan was not only important and in- 
fluential in affairs pertaining to the accession of Henry 
VII., but was also married to a daughter of Sir Rhys ap 
Thomas (see page 84). 

Morgan's connection with the plot at this stage is, 
moreover, corroborated by the following abstract from 
' Hall's Chronicle,' edit. 1809, p. 410 : — 

' But in the meane season there came to the Earle (Richmond) 
a more joyfuUer message from Morgan Kydwelly learned in the 
temporall lawe whiche declared that Ryce ap Thomas, a man 
of no less valyauntnes than actyuitee, and John Savage, an 
approved captayne woulde, with all their power be partakers 
of his quarell.' 

This is also repeated verbatim by ' Holinshed Chronicle,' 
Vol. III., p. 434. (Edit. 1808) sub anno 1485. 

Sir Harry [Morgan'] of Kidwelly, a celebrated litter- 
ateur who flourished between 1400 and 1430 : probably 
Harry Morgan of Muddlescombe (see p. 84). 

leuan Detilwyn, a Welsh bard of remarkable genius, 
was a native of Kidwelly, resident at Pendeulwyn within 
the parish. The name Dillwyn is supposed to have 
derived from him.* He flourished between 1450 and 
1490. Although generally distinguished by his poetical 
effusions and attainments, he was a man of many parts, 
and of a highly cultured mind. By virtue of a commis- 
sion of Edward IV., Aug. 12, 1460, he was one of the 
the ' foure cheyffest men of skyll within the provynce 

* lolo MSS., p. 332, Note 2. 



90 HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 

of Sowth Wallys,' who were cited to Pembroke Castle 
to decide ' the progenie and descent of the honourable 
name of the Herberts/ Earls of Pembroke. Having 
scrutinized, among other ' auncyent wrytyngs ' the docu- 
ments of Margam Abbey and Ystrad Fflur [Strata 
Florida], and many soche other Bookys and Warrantes 
of Awthoryty,' the commissioners made their return to 
the king in four languages — Latin, Welsh, French, and 
English.* The other commissioners were — Howell, the 
son of David, the son of levan, the son of Rhys ; Howell 
Surdwall ; levan Brechfa.t leuan Deulwyn was a bard 
of the chair of Glamorgan. In 1470 he was a disciple 
of Meredydd ap Rhosser in that chair, and in 1480 he was 
himself the president of the chair, and lorwerth Fyng- 
Iwyd, lyCwys Morgan wg, and Harri Hir, his disciples. J 
Seven of Deulwyn 's poems are published in ' Gorch- 
estion Beirdd Cymnc,' pp. 127 — 142. ' Marwnad Syr 
Rhisiart Herbert, a las yn y maes ym Mambri ' — ' An 
Elegy to Sir Richard Herbert, who fell on the field of 
Banbury ' — is one of the published poems, selections 
from which are here given in the original — 

' Y warr gronn orau o gred, 
Herbert hir, byrr y torred ; 
Mae'r oes oil, yn marw os art, 
Mis yw'r oes, am Syr Risiart. 
O brau Duw a wnaeth ynn brad ni 
Mwya unbrad, fu' Mambri : 
Mai o Grist, ymmil y Grog, 
Y mae f'oerchwedl, am Farchog. 

* ' Hanes Llenyddiaeth Gymreig, 1300 — 1650,' by R. J. Prys 
(Gweirydd ap Rhys), p. 249. 
•j- ' Fenton's Historical Tour through Pembrokeshire,' p. 340. 
% ' Dr. John Jones's History of Wales,' pp. 225. 



HISTORY OF KIDWElvIvY, 9I 

Maddau un, ym oedd anodd, 
Na bai yn fyw, neb un fodd ; 
Ni byddent, Ddwywent, yn ddig 
Bettai obaith, bod tebyg.' 

Gorchestion Beirdd Cymru, p. 135. 

leuan Deulwyn is included by Tudur Aled in the same 
category with Nanmor and Dafydd ap Edmwnt, thus : — 

' Bwrw Dafydd, gelfydd dann gor, 
Bwrw ddoe'n un Meistr, Bardd Nanmor ; 
Bwrw Deulwyn y bardd olaf 
Blodeu Cerdd, ba wlad y caf ? 
Tair awen, oedd i'r Triwyr, 
A fai les i fil a wyr.' 

Gorchestion Beirdd Cymru, p. 249. 

Sir John Yarford, lyord Mayor of lyOndon in the civic 
year 15 19 — 1520, is represented in 'Mund's Chronicle' 
(1611) to have been a mercer, and a son of William 
Yarford of Kidwelly. 

leuan Tew leuanc. Another eminent bard of Kidwelly 
who flourished from 1560 to 1590. He wrote a poem 
in 1590 to Dr. WiUiam Morgan, bishop of St. Asaph, 
who translated the Bible into the Welsh language.* 
This is a specimen of leuan Tew leuanc's verse and 
sentiments — 

' A gair Duw yn egored aeth, 
Yn deg o'i enedigaeth ; 
Duw a enynodd dawn unwaith 
Doctor anhepcor o'n hiaith, 
Yn deg o niwl a'n dug ni, 
Ac i Ian y goleuni ; 

* ' Hughes's Life and Times of Bishop William Morgan,' pp. 
150, 151. 



92 HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 

Mae Doctor a rhagoriaeth, 

Morgan wych, mab Mair, a'i gwnaeth ; 

Blaenor, gynghor y gangell, 

Bugail yw heb ei well.' 



■ Piau helpu o'r pulpud, 
Llyna faeth lie ni fethodd, 
I/lygad Llanrhaead llawn rhodd ; 
Ffrwythder ieithoedd ffraeth draethai 
Ffynon heb na thro na thrai.' 



Doctor i gael rhagor rodd 
Yw y gwr a'i hagorodd ; 
Esgob a fydd ddydd a ddaw.' 



John Davies of Kidwelly translated 'A History of the 
Caribby Islands,' 2 vols., in 1666. In 1671 he also trans- 
lated from the French 'A Treatise on Ceremonies of the 
vacant see, or a True Relation of what passes at Rome 
upon the Pope's death ; with the Proceedings in the 
Conclave, for the election of a new Pope ; according to 
the Constitutions and Ceremonials. As also the Corona- 
tion and Cavalcade.' 

John Griffith, B.D., was born at Kidwelly on Jan. 9, 
1772. He was the son of a Welsh yeoman, educated 
at the Grammar School, Carmarthen. From here he 
proceeded to Emmanuel College, Cambridge, where he 
obtained a scholarship and several college prizes in each 
year of his residence. He graduated B.A. in 1795 First 
Senior Optime ; M.A. in 1798 ; B.D. in 1805, having 
been elected Fellow of his College. On reference to the 
Tripos Ivist it will be seen that John Griffith is the only 
Honour man of the College in his year, Kmmanuel being 



HISTORY OP KIDWELLY. 93 

an easy-going fashionable College, where undergraduates 
were an idle set of well-to-do young gentlemen. He 
was appointed minor canon of Ely in 1890, became 
later epistler and auditor, and also bishop's surrogate 
for wills, as well as marriage licenses. He was preferred 
to the benefice of St. Mary's, Ely, which he held until 
1827, when he accepted the perpetual curacy of Stunt- 
ney, which he held until his decease. He was also 
chaplain of the Bishop's Gaol, and sinecure rector of 
Fulbourne. He had sprung, as has been seen, from a 
comparatively humble origin, and he made the best of 
his opportunities. He knew the value of money, and 
his responsibility as trustee thereof. He dowered many 
connections, unknown to him, who had to be sought 
out from the fastnesses of the Welsh mountains and the 
antipodes. In his will he left £1000 to found a charity 
' for two widows, or two spinsters, or a widow and a 
spinster, born in the borough or parish of Kidwelly ; 
females of irreproachable character, with a preference 
always in their choice of such as may have seen better 
days, and shall have been reduced in their circumstances 
through unavoidable misfortune.' The trustees ap- 
pointed under the will are the vicars for the time being 
of Kidwelly, St. Ishmael, and lylandefeilog. 



Kidwelly has also given birth to the following public 
men : — 

Thomas Job, a Calvinistic Methodist minister of Conwil, 
was born at Rogerlay, Kidwelly, in 1825. He was 
educated at a school at Carmarthen kept by a David 



94 HISTORY OF KIDWKlvLY. 

Aaron, and afterwards became a pupil of Archdeacon 
Williams's school in the same town. In 1847 he went 
to Trevecca College, and was ordained at Carmarthen 
in 1855. He became Ysgrifenydd y Cyfarfod Misol in 
1869, an office to which he was re-appointed in 1871. 
In 1873 he was elected Llywydd Cymanfa Ddirwestol 
Gwent a Morganwg. In 1897 he accepted the title of 
D.D. from Gale University, U.S.A. 

William Rees, sometime curate of Ystradgynlais, re- 
ceived his rudimentary training at the National School, 
Kidwelly. From here he went to Carmarthen Grammar 
School, and then to I^ampeter Grammar School. He 
graduated B.A. at St. David's College, I^ampeter, in 
1 87 1, and was ordained deacon in the same year. 

John Rees, vicar of Tylorstown, Glamorgan, educated 
at the National School, Kidwelly, and Carmarthen and 
Cirencester Grammar Schools. He took his certificate 
in Divinity at Queen's College, Birmingham, in 1871. 
Ordained deacon 1872, priest 1877, curate of Gelligaer 
1872-8, curate of Ystradyfodwg 1879 — 86. 

Richard Richard, Great Western Railway agent at 
Glasgow, received his early training at the National 
School, Kidwelly. He was appointed in succession 
G.W.R. station master at I^ydney, Bridgend, and Cardiff, 
at which latter place he also became superintendent of 
the goods department. 

John Rees, chief accountant of the Salvation Army, 
was born at Colman Farm, and was a pupil of the Castle 
School, Kidwelly. 

John Williams, medical practitioner at Ferndale, Gla- 
morgan, received his primary education at the National 



HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 95 

School, Kidwelly, of which he became a pupil teacher, 
and his secondary education at the Grammar School, 
Carmarthen. He entered St. David's College, lyampeter, 
in 1884, where he gained first class (ordinary) at respon- 
sions, and first class (honours) in science at moderations. 
He migrated to the University of Edinburgh in 1886, 
where in due course he obtained the diplomas M.B., 
CM. 

David Thomas Griffiths, vicar of Irlantrisant, was edu- 
cated at the Grammar School, Carmarthen, and Uni- 
versity College, Aberystwyth. In 1888 he was elected 
to an exhibition of ;^ioo per annum, tenable for 3 years 
at Jesus College, Oxford. He took first class at modera- 
tions in i8go in the Honour School of Mathematics, 
being the first student of Jesus College who had taken 
this first class for ten years, only six others in the whole 
University having done so in this year. He graduated 
B.A. first class Mathematical Honours in 1892, and took 
his M.A. in 1895. He became curate of St. Peter's, 
Carmarthen, in 1893 ; senior Mathematical Master of 
Denstone College, 1897 ; rector of Bagendon, Glos., 
1899 ; rector of lylandow, and vicar of Colwinstone, 
Glam., 1900. 

John Howell Knight Griffiths, medical practitioner at 
Fulham, I^ondon. Educated at the Grammar School, 
Carmarthen, and University College, Aberystwyth, 
whence he proceeded to Edinburgh University. Here 
he took his M.B., CM., in 1895, and M.D. in 1897. He 
also underwent a course of training at Charing Cross 
Hospital. 

Thomas Roberts Griffiths, medical practitioner at Kid- 



96 HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 

welly, was educated at I^landovery School, 1886 — 9, 
whence he proceeded to University College, I,ondon, 
where he qualified in 1900 M.R.C.S., ly.R.C.P. 

William Griffiths Williams, rector of Peterston-super- 
Kly. Educated at the Castle School, Kidwelly (of 
which he became pupil teacher), and privately. He 
entered St. David's College, lyampeter, in 1893. Gradu- 
ated B.A. (2nd class) in 1896. He has also kept his 
terms at Oxford. Ordained deacon 1896, priest 1897. 
Curate of Aberavon 1896 — 1900 ; St. Mary's, Reading, 
1900 ; Headington, Oxon., 1901 ; and Buckhurst Hill, 
Essex, 1901 — 3. 

Thomas Charles Evans, curate of Cwmllynfell, Gla- 
morgan. Educated at the Castle School, Kidwelly, 
Park-y-Velvet Academy, 1884, Presbyterian College, 
Carmarthen, 1886. Having served two English pastor- 
ates in the Presb3rterian connexion, he joined the com- 
munion of the Church of England. Ordained deacon 
1900, priest 1 90 1, by the bishop of lylandaff. He was 
Crawley's prizeman at his priest's examination. 

William James Gravell, chaplain of St. Michael's Col- 
lege, lylandaff. He received his early training at the 
National School, Kidwelly. His education was con- 
tinued at Queen Elizabeth's Grammar School, Carmar- 
then, in 1891, and Oswestry Grammar School, 1892 — 6. 
He entered St. David's College, lyampeter, 1896. Here 
he took first class (Classical Honours) at moderations, 
and again first class (Classical Honours) at his finals, 
becoming senior scholar of his College, 1898 — 9. He 
was appointed assistant master of Edgbaston Prepar- 
atory School in 1899 — 01. Classical master of St. David's 



HISTORY OF KIDWEI,I.Y. 97 

College School, Lampeter, in 1901 — 5. He received 
deacon's orders in 1903, and was ordained priest in 1904. 
Chaplain of St. David's College, lyampeter, 1903 — 4. 
Chaplain of St. Michael's College, Aberdare, 1906. 

Henry John Thomas, a solicitor practising in Cardiff, 
received his early education at the National School, 
Kidwelly. 

George Rogers Davies, minister of Bryn Seion Baptist 
Chapel, Upper Cwmtwrch, Glamorgan, Educated at the 
Castle School, Kidwelly, whence he proceeded to the 
Old College School, Carmarthen, and University College, 
Cardiff. He was ordained in 1903. 

John Beynon, minister of Hermon CM. chapel, Skewen. 
After receiving his primary education at the National 
School and Mountain School, Kidwelly, he continued 
his education at the Old College School, Carmarthen, 
and Collegiate School, Pontypridd. He entered Cardiff 
University College in 1901 ; Trevecca College in 1903. 
He was ordained in 1907. 



IG] 



gS 



HISTORY OF KIDWElvIvY. 




LOCAL NONCONFORMIST CHAPELS. 

'A PEL Sul (Independent, originally Presbyterian) 
was erected in 1785 on a site granted by a certain 
David Jones, of Pistyllgwyn, under a lease for 
a term of 999 years, at the nominal rent of one shilling 
a year. The interior was renovated in 1873, and again 
in 1905. 

WST OF MINISTERS. 



David Davies 

John Abel 

David Jones 

William Castellan Jenkins 



1794 
1824 
1867 



Morfa Chapel (Calvinistic Methodist) was built in 
1830 on a site granted by the Municipal Corporation 
of Kidwelly under a lease for a term of 999 years, at 
the annual rent of 5/-. The present chapel took the 
place of a previous building where the Calvinistic Meth- 
odists had worshipped since the year 1786. Morfa 
Chapel was re-built and enlarged in 1907. 



I.IST OF MINISTERS. 



David Bowen 
David Griffiths . . 
John Evans 
Thomas Lloyd 
David Geler Owen 
Wilham Peregrine Jones 
Wilham Whitlocke Lewis 



1832—52 

1857 

i860 

1869 

1871 

1889 

1906 



Bethesda Chapel (Welsh Wesleyan) was built in 1816 
on land granted by Karl Cawdor and the Municipal 
Corporation of Kidwelly under concurrent leases for a 



HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 99 

term of 999 years, at the annual rents of 2/6. It was 
re-built in 1832 and renovated in 1895. 

LIST OF MINISTERS. 
(No return.) 

Siloam Chapel (Baptist) was erected in 1821. It was 
rebuilt in 1892. 

LIST OF MINISTERS. 



John Reynolds 
George Reynolds 
John Reynolds 
Hugh Robert Jones 



1834 
i860 
i86r 
1902 



I" Joint 



Horeh Chapel (Calvinistic Methodist) was built in 
1843 on land granted by the Municipal Corporation of 
Kidwelly under a lease for a term of 999 years, at the 
nominal rent of one shilling a year. It was enlarged 
in 1873, when interior fittings were added. 



LIST OF MINISTERS. 



Thomas Lloyd 
David Geler Owen 



1871 



English Wesleyan Chapel. This was built and pre- 
sented to the Wesleyan Conference by the late Mr. 
Jacob Chivers in 1866. 

LIST OF RESIDENT MINISTERS. 



Joseph Wigham 


. . 1866 


Nehemiah Smith 


.. 1867—8 


Jabez Chambers 


.. 1869 — 71 


Joseph Shrimpton 


.. 1872—4 


Samuel W. Beard 


.. 1875 




100 HISTORY OP KIDWELLY. 



INDUSTRIES OF KIDWELLY. 

'LOTH Manufacture. — There seems little doubt 
that in the 14th century cloth-making and full- 
ing was a considerable industry at Kidwelly. 
Among the issues of the manor accounted for by the 
Receiver of the Duchy of I^ancaster in the year 1369 — 70 
(see page 28), 13/4 wa? received for ' the farm of the 
Fulling Mill,' and a similar amount is also accounted 
for as rent for ' the fulling Mill called BordecuUe.' 
In the 1 2th century it is known that the population of 
the town and district of Kidwelly consisted of the 
French [Norman'^], English, and Flemings (see Appen- 
dix A), seemingly to the exclusion of the Welsh. 
The Flemish settlers in this country are accredited 
with having introduced the manufacture of worsted 
and woollen fabrics and the art of dyeing.* While, 
therefore, the Norman-French and English would con- 
stitute themselves the guardians of the district, it is 
probable that the industrial occupation among the com- 
munity devolved on the Flemings, and that they selected 
the industry for which they had the greatest aptitude. 

Marine Commerce. — Reference has already been made 
to the shipping industry of the town (see pp. 60, 61,), 
That Kidwelly was, at an early period, of some import- 
ance as a sea-faring town there is little doubt, as the 
following records testify ■ — 

In 1229 permission to trade with Gascony was given 

* 'Hewlett's Post Norman Britain,' p. 15. 



HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. lOI 

by patent of Henry III. ' to Robertus de Cadewely, 
magister navis ' — Robert of Kidwelly, ship-master.* 

The commodities which appear chiefly to have con- 
stituted the early marine commerce of the town were 
corn and general provisions for the victualling of the 
garrison as shown by this record — 

' Safe-conduct until Michaelmas for Eudo-la-Zusche, con- 
veying by water, corn and other victuals by his own sailors 
from Bridgewater, Totnes and Dartmouth, to Pembroke, Kaer- 
merdyn, Kedewelly, and Sweyneseye, for the support of those 
persons who are there on the king's expedition against LlewelUn 
son of Griffin, and his accompUces in rebelHon, the said sailors 
to bring with them in going and returning, letters patent of 
the said Eudo as to the said victuals, and the persons to whom 
they are to be conveyed, and also those persons to whom they 
have been deHvered or sold : and the said com and victuals 
by no means to be converted to the support of the said rebels.' — 
'Pat. Rolls,' 5 Edward I., Feb., 1277. 

The nature of the cargoes is stated in the following 

record : — 

' I,icense for John Benet and Thomas Davy, burgesses of 
Llanstephan, to buy 100 quarters of wheat, 100 quarters of 
barley and salt, 100 quarters of beans and peas, 100 quarters 
of malt and rye, 60 quarters of oat flour, 60 tuns of wine, ale, 
honey, and cider, and fish, and herrings, in England ; to take 
the same to Kedewely and Llanstephan for the victualHng and 
garnishing of those towns, and the king's lieges there, so that 
they send into chancery from time to time letters testimonial 
of the delivery of the same under the common seal or seals of 
the good men of those towns.' — 'Pat. Rolls,' 6 Henry IV., Jan. 
23, 1405. 

The extent of the shipping industry here at the 
beginning of the 15th century may be gathered from 
this reference : — ' Protection for one year for the bur- 

* ' Pat. Rolls,' Henry III., 1229. 



102 HISTORY OF KIDWELI^Y. 

gesses, merchants, and mariners of Kedewelly, going 
to England, Aquitaine, and Ireland to trade, and for 
their men, ships, goods, and merchandise.'* 

At the time, however, when Camden published his 
' Britannia ' (1586), the harbour is stated to have been 
almost choked up with sand-banks, f 

In more modern times the local shipping was again 
materially developed by Thomas Kymer, a gentleman 
who appears to have come here from Pembroke about 
the year 1766. This capitalist built small docks at 
Kidwelly, and constructed a short canal to the Gwen- 
draeth Valley. The old minute book of the corporation 
already referred to, as well as the registers of the parish 
church, bear testimony to a revival of local shipping 
in the i8th century. The former records the admission 
to the Burgess Roll of a large proportion of mariners, 
while the latter contain entries of the burial of many 
sailors. There were at least three quays here where 
ships were laden and unladen. Of these one only still 
exists ; the other two, of which there is hardly a trace 
left, were called the ' I^adies ' (Kymer) quay,' which 
was adjacent to the 15th century bridge that spans 
Gwendraeth Fach, and ' Coney quay ' on the right 
bank of Gwendraeth Fawr, above the Commissioner's 
bridge, which was built at a later date (1842). Among 
the minutes of the Hall Day, held in the Guildhall of 
the borough June 9, 1794, appears the following order 
in reference to the construction of the latter quay : — 

* ' Pat. Polls ' 4 Henry IV. [Carmarthen], Sep. 28, 1404. 
t ' Camden's Britannia,' p. 504. 



HISTORY OP KIDWElvIvY. IO3 

' Upon the petition of John Bishton of Thilsall in the 
county of Salop, Esqr., Samuel Botham of Tong, in 
the same county, and Charles Phillips of the town of 
lylanelly, gentlemen, for a grant of a spot of ground 
for constructing a Quay and other buildings upon. It 
is ordered that the said John Bishton, Samuel Botham, 
and Charles Phillips have a grant of a certain spot of 
ground under Coney Hill in the parish of St. Mary, 
Kidwelly, in the tenure and occupation of John Hall, 
yeoman, from the river Gwendraeth Vawr 177 ft. in 
breadth up to the lodge of Herbert Ball, Esqr., leaving 
a passage of 8 ft. wide for cattle to pass and re-pass 
from one common to the other, for the term of 42 years : 
paying yearly to the corporation the sum of {2 2 o.' 

Ship-building also was carried on at Kidwelly in the 
same period, for the records of the corporation at the 
end of the i8th century show that ship-wrighis and 
carpenters were included among the qualified burgesses 
of the borough. Moreover, a ship-building yard is 
known to have stood on the site now occupied by the 
English Wesleyan Chapel. It is said that the last ship 
built here, named ' The Sarah Jane,' 100 ton, was a 
brig which belonged to a Capt. Thomas, and that when 
the vessel was launched, a cannon which was fired 
lurched and killed one man. During the French re- 
volution a number of small traders, several of whom 
were from Kidwelly, sailed under convoy to different 
foreign ports, and were captured, together with their 
vessels, by the French. The above-mentioned Capt. 
Thomas and his son are said to have been detained as 
prisoners in French territory for 7 or 8 years. The 



104 HISTORY OF KIDWElvI^Y. 

following minute of the Hall Day held Aug. 3, 1781^ 
also provides an instance of the capture by the French 
of a Kidwelly mariner at this time of general unrest : — 
' John Britton of Northam, in the county of Devon, 
Mariner, having been admitted a burgess of this borough 
(Kidwelly) and sworn in on the 20th day of July, 1772, 
and he having this day personally appeared in this 
court, informed the council that he lost his certificate 
of being a burgess, on being lately taken hy the French. 
It is therefore ordered that the Town Clerk do make 
out a new certificate for the said John Britton.' 

The canal constructed by Thomas Kymer was in- 
tended to convey coal from the anthracite pits in Gwen- 
draeth Valley to Kidwelly harbour. The canal is now 
disused, but a mineral railway, parallel with its bed, 
extends from the Gwendraeth Valley coal pits to the 
harbour, as well as along the canal extension to Burry 
Port. A large number of miners employed in these 
pits reside at Kidwelly, and are daily conveyed by the 
railway back and fore to their employment. The quan- 
tity of coal exported from Kidwelly now is insignifi- 
cant, as most of it is taken to Burry Port and vSwansea 
for shipment. 

Tin-plate Manufacture. — This industry was estab- 
lished at Kidwelly prior to 178 1, for in that year the 
Municipal Corporation of Kidwelly granted a renewal 
of the lease of the Tinmills, as appears from the follow- 
ing minute of the proceedings of the corporation at a 
Hall Day held on the ninth day of May, 1781 : — 'Exe- 
cuted a renewed Lease to I^eonard Bilston Gwyn, 
Esq., of the Tinmills, at which time he paid the sum 



HISTORY OF KIDWElvIvY. IO5 

of five guineas into the hands of Mr. John Stephens, 
the Chamberlain, for such renewal.' A tablet still 
preserved in the wall at the end of the office of the pre- 
sent Tinworks bears this inscription : — ' These tin- 
works, the oldest in the kingdom were re-built by 
Haselwood, Hathaway and Perkins, Anno Dom. 1801.' 
In one particular, however, the accuracy of this state- 
ment is called in question, as Pontypool is acknowledged 
to have actually been first in the field in the manufac- 
ture of tin-plates. Originally the smelting was done at 
the Old Forge already referred to, but the mills appear 
to have always stood on the site which has continuously 
been occupied by the concerns of successive tin-plate 
companies down to the present time. The above firm 
relinquished the proprietorship in favour of a Mr. 
Vaughan, who was succeeded by a Mr. Hay. The works 
was purchased by Henry Reed Downman, who having 
worked it for some years, failed, and retired to Carmar- 
then about the year 1845. After a period of idleness, 
Messrs. Ricketts and James repaired the two water- 
wheels with a view of re-starting the works, but their 
good intentions do not appear to have proceeded beyond 
repairing the machinery. One mill was again put into 
operation, and a Puddling and Balling Forge was erected 
by Hugh Downman, a brother of the above-mentioned 
Henry Reed Downman. This gentleman, in order to 
avoid failure, called in a partner of the name of Briggs. 
The old forge had now fallen into disuse. Under this 
firm, known as Messrs Downman and Briggs, one water- 
mill was kept working for several years. This company 
also in their turn shared the unhappy experiences of 



I06 HISTORY OF KIDWELLY. 

their predecessors, and went into liquidation. The works 
at this time was taken over by Mr. Crawshay Bailey 
(with whom Downman was connected by marriage), 
and was kept idle for several years. Mr. Jacob Chivers, 
who was interested in a tin-works in Spain, at length 
appeared on the scene, and in 1858 bought the works 
from Mr. Crawshay Bailey. Down to this time the 
machinery had been propelled by water power. Mr. 
Jacob Chivers was joined by Mr. Thomas Bright as a 
working partner, and it was under the auspices of this 
firm that the first steam engine was put up at Kidwelly. 
The old Puddling and Balling Furnaces were now aug- 
mented with a charcoal forge, with hollow fires and a 
helve hammer, and two mills were added to the exist- 
ing one. With a view of extending the building, Mr. 
Jacob Chivers purchased the reversion of the lease of 
the property on which the works stood from the Munici- 
pal Corporation of Kidwelly. The firm now became 
known as that of ' Messrs. Chivers and Son.' A coke 
forge, with a steam hammer, was substituted for that 
of charcoal, and two mills were added, so that there 
were now altogether five mills. Mr. Jacob Chivers 
withdrew, and the management devolved on Mr. Thomas 
Chivers, his son, who constructed six new mills. In 
1888 the works was purchased by the ' Gwendraeth 
Tin-plate Co., lytd.' It exchanged hands again in 1899, 
when it was bought by the ' Kidwelly Iron, Sheet, and 
Tin-plate Co., Ltd.' In 1900 the old works, comprising 
five mills, was demolished, and the company went into 
voluntary liquidation in 190 1. In 1904 the new works 
became the property of the ' Kidwelly Tin-plate Co., 



HISTORY OF KIDWElvI^Y. IO7 

Ltd.' There are, at the present time, seven excellent 
mills in constant operation, which, together with the 
dependent departments, possess the most modern ap- 
pliances. With Col. Wright as chairman, and Mr. 
John Thomas as managing director, it is generally- 
agreed that the works has never been so flourishing. 
It affords emplo3ntnent to 350 hands. 

Lime-kilns. — Minutes of the Corporation bear record 
to the establishment of lime-burning on Mynyddy- 
garreg in the latter part of the i8th century. At a Hall 
Day, Sept. 19, 1785, the following order was made: — 
' That a lease be granted to Walter Mansell and Edward 
King, of a certain part of Mynyddygarreg, for erecting 
a I^ime-kiln, for the term of three lives, at the yearly 
rent of one shilling, to be paid the Chamberlain for the 
time being, yearly — the parties not to sell any lime.' 

At another Hall Day, May 31, 1790, there is also 
this reference — 'A lycase is granted to Herbert I^loyd, 
his heirs and assigns, for the term of three lives, of a 
portion of Mynyddygarreg, whereon to erect a I^ime- 
kiln.' At later dates more extensive lime-kilns were 
constructed by Mr. Owen Bowen, of London, and the 
late Mr. Alexander Young. All the kilns have now 
been closed. 

Silica-brick Manufacture. — The mineral wealth of 
Mynyddygarreg has attracted several capitalists, who, 
from time to time have been engaged in converting its 
silica stones into fire-bricks and sand. The credit of 
being the pioneer in this industry is given to William 
Edwards, of Swansea, who is said to have constructed 
the first local brick-works in the year 1858, He was 



I08 HISTORY OP KIDWEI.I.Y. 

followed by Messrs. Frederick and Jenner, who con- 
tinued his business. In 1865 Messrs. Redford and 
Harris built a second brick-works, and were succeeded 
by Messrs. H. and H. E. Smart. A third was built 
by the late Alderman Stephens, while a fourth was 
erected by the late Mr. Alexander Young. The last 
three are stiU at work, and turn out a considerable 
quantity of bricks and prepared sand, which are con- 
signed to large industrial centres at home and abroad. 



APPENDIX. 



APPENDIX A. Ill 



APPENDIX A. 

Dugdai^e's Monasticon Anglicanum. Vol,. IV., 
pp. 64, 65. Num. I. 

Translation. 

' To all sons of holy mother, the church, who see or hear these 
present letters : David, by Divine permission Bishop of St. 
Davids, and the Chapter of the same place, greeting. Know ye 
that we have inspected, and diUgently examined divers muni- 
ments and writings, and also confirmations touching the Abbey 
of Shyreburne, and the priory of Cadwelle, not cancelled, not 
abohshed, not in any part thereof corrupted, from word to word, 
in form following : — 

' In the name of the Lord, Amen., in the one thousand three 
hundred and first year of the same on the fifteenth day of the 
month of October in the fifteenth indiction, in the eighth year 
of the Pontificate of the Most Holy Father and Lord, the Lord 
Boniface, by Divine Providence, Pope, in presence of my notary 
within written, and of the witnesses underwritten for this spe- 
cially called ; the rehgious man Sir Geoffrey de Coker, Prior of 
Cadweli, in the diocese of St. Davids, in the Church of St. Paul, 
London, put in, in writing, and read a certain gift and grant 
made by the lord Roger, by the grace of God at one time Bishop 
of Sahsbury, to the Church of the Blessed Mary of Shereburne, 
and to Turstan, Prior of the said church, and to his successors 
regularly succeeding him, according to the form and tenor con- 
tained in the text of the foundation of the Church of the Blessed 
Mary of Shyreburn, of which gift such is the tenor. 

' In the name of the Holy and undivided Trinity ; I, Roger, 
by the grace of God, Bishop of Sahsbury, for the health and 
safety of my lord Henry the King, and Matilda the Queen, and 
of their sons, with their consent, and for the health of my soul, 
and of my parents, and of my ancestors, Do give to the Holy 
Church of Shyrborn, and to Turstan the Prior (sic) and to his 
successors regularly succeeding him. One Carucate of land at 
Cadweli, as I have surveyed the same, that is to say : from the 
new ditch of the new mill by the stream which thither flows down 
in winter as far as the house formerly of Balba, and thence to 



112 APPENDIX A. 

the stream, running by the middle grove as far as the road, and 
from the road, as the said stream runs in to the sea. And the 
whole hill, which is called Mount Solomon as far as the open 
sea on the other side, as a certain pool stretches as far as the afore- 
said road : Paid and qmt, and free from impediment of servants, 
and secular exaction, and service, and all tithes, in oats, in 
calves, in pigs, in lambs, in cheese, and in fish, and in pannage 
of swine. And, I grant that they may have their own swine 
quit from pannage, and wood in my forest, and have pasture of 
their animals with my demesnes, many clerks and laymen 
seeing and hearing, whose names here are underwritten : Ralph, 
the chaplain ; Roger, the sub-deacon ; Humphrey, the bishop's 
brother ; Osmund, the steward (dapifer). Aylric de Halver, 
Richard Latimer, Hyldebrand, Comaldus, the butler, William 
de Limd, Roger de Reigni, Richard FoHot, Robert the old 
steward, and Robert his son, WilHam the Constable, WiUiam 
Esturmyt, Ralph son of Warin, Robert de Sagio, Robert de 
Meyer, and Walter his brother ; Picot, Geoffrey Rufus, Robert 
Niger, PhiUp de Beaufo, Osmund son of Everard, Roger Foliot, 
Henry son of Walter de Poterna, Alberic de Felgeriis, Edmund 
who then kept the Castle of Cadweli, Alwyn, the priest of the 
town. 

' This gift was made on the 14th kalends of August in the 
house of the Castle of Kadweh by the witness of these, and of 
many others whose names I know not. — 

' After the third day, the lord Roger, the Bishop, with the 
license and consent of Wilfrid Bishop of St. Davids, dedicated 
the cemetery in the said place, and in the same dedication by the 
authority and consent of the said bishop, all the burgesses, both 
French, English, and Flemings, gave their tithes of Penbray and 
of Pennalth by the witness of all those [persons] above mentioned. 

' These were put in, and read on the day and at the place 
above said ; there being present Thomas de Beverlace, Walter 
de Chigam, clerks ; Richard Dunaing, and John Welewe, spe- 
cially called and questioned as to this matter, and being wit- 
nesses.' 



APPENDICES B AND C. II3 



APPENDIX B. 

Dugdale's Monasticon Angucanum. Vol. IV., 
p. 65. Num. II. 

CHARTER OF RICHARD, SON OF WILLIAM— 
FITZWILI.IAM. 

Translation. 

' To Bernard, by the grace of God, Bishop of St. Davids, 
and to all sons of holy church, Richard son of Wilham, Greet- 
ing. Know ye all that I, for the good of my soul and 
[the souls] of my ancestors and successors, and for the love 
of Henry my son, monk of the Church of Schyrborn have 
given and granted to the aforesaid Church of Schyrborn, the 
abbot and convent of the same place, in alms, my churches 
which are in your diocese. To wit, the Church of Saint Ismael 
at Pennalt, and the Church of All Saints in the territory of Cadweli, 
and the Church of Saint Elthute at Penbray with the chapels, 
lands, tithes, and all their adjuncts to possess by perpetual right, 
and lest (which God forbid), I or any of my heirs should claim 
any right or lordship except advowson in these churches or 
their appurtenances, and to the end that our beloved brethren 
of the aforesaid church of Scherborn may freely and quietly 
for ever possess them, we confirm this our gift by the attestation 
of our charter and by the affixing of our seal.' 



APPENDIX C. 

Dugd ale's Monasticon Anglicanum. Vol. IV., 
p. 65. Num. III. 

CHARTER OF MAURICE DE LONDRES. 

Translation. 

' To David, by the grace of God, Bishop of St. Davids, as lord 
and spiritual father and to all the pastors of holy church. 
Maurice de Londres his obedient in all places, greeting and 
Lh] 



114 APPENDIX D. 

exhibition of sincere affection. Be it known to you and all 
worshippers of God that I have given and granted to God and 
Saint Mary of Kedweli and to the monks of Schyrborne twelves 
acres around the Church of St. Cadoc which adjoin the land of 
the aforesaid church of St. Mary. Moreover this gift is made 
for the health of my soul, and of all my ancestors, WilUam de 
I^ondres my son hearing and granting and giving with me. These 
being witnesses, Owan, the knight, and EUas and Robert de 
Pennard and Walter de Reigni, and Paen and WilHam de Man- 
ner, and Nicholas de Almaro. Runciaus and Osmund rectors, 
and Geoffrey Long and Randulph the clerk and many others. 
May your sublimity flourish with you.' 



APPENDIX D. 

DuGD ale's Monasticon Anglicanum. Vol. IV., 
p. 66. Num. V. 

PETITION CONCERNING THE TITHES OF KIDWELLY. 

Translation. 

' In the name of God, Amen. Before you Master John Car- 
marthen, Ucentiate in laws and Commissary of the most reverend 
in Christ, the father and lord John by the grace of God Bishop 
of St. Davids in this behalf specially deputed, brother Robert 
Fyfhyde of the order of St. Benedict, Prior of the Priory of 
Kedwelly, in the diocese of St. Davids, both say and in law 
declare against Sir John Sandon calhng himself chaplain and 
pretended procurator of the dean and chapter of the new College 
of Leicester, in the diocese of Lincoln, and also against Thomas 
Jenkyn, Phihp Davy and John David, laymen of the aforesaid 
diocese of St. Davids, and against whomsoever suing for them 
in lawful judgment, that whereas he, the aforesaid brother 
Robert the Prior, his precedors and predecessors were in pos- 
session, or as if of right of receiving, two parts of all the tithes 
peacefully, qxoietly, for a time and for times to which the memory 
of man is not to the contrary, as well real as personal what- 
soever arising, and chiefly of milk, wool, and of lambs, in respect 
of a certain small piece of land commonly called Coldicot, and 
within the bounds and limits of the parish church of the Blessed 
Mary of Kedwelly manifestly situated, of which church, the 



APPENDIX E. 115 

aforenamed Prior, his precedors and predecessors, is and were 
Rector or Rectors. Nevertheless, the aforesaid Sir John Sandon, 
Thomas, PhiHp and John have spoiled or caused to be despoiled, 
the aforesaid brother Robert the prior aforesaid of ten lambs 
(price y 4'') five pounds weight of wool (price 15') and three 
stone of cheese (price y), and held such spoil ratified and Hke- 
wise accepted by name of their deed to the great peril of their 
souls, and to the no small prejudice and damage of the aforesaid 
brother Robert, Prior of the Priory beforesaid and of his Priory. 
Wherefore the said Prior prays that the things to be proved in 
that behalf being proved in his own name and of his priory or 
of his church beforenamed, the same Sir John Sandon, Thomas 
ap Jankyn, Philip Davy and John Davy be by you the lyord 
Judge aforesaid sententially and definitely condemned in ten 
lambs (price 3" 4') five pounds weight of wool (price 15') and 
three stone of cheese (price 3 ), if they exist, otherwise in twenty 
four shilhngs of good and usual money, and also in the damages 
and costs and interest, and to be restored to the said prior and 
his church really with effect the aforesaid two parts of all the 
tithes, and to be reduced and reinstated to their former state, 
and perpetual silence to be imposed on the beforesaid Sir John, 
Thomas, Phihp, and John and the same to be compelled to 
desist from molestation perturbation, and disquieting, and 
further to be done and estabUshed what justice shall require 
always saving the benefit of the law in all things.' 



APPENDIX E. 

DUGD aide's MoNASTICON AnGIvICANUM. Vol.. IV., 

p. 66. Num. VI. 

SEQUESTRATION OP THE PROFITS OP THE CHURCH 
AND PRIORY OF KIDWEI/I.Y. 

Translation. 

' Richard, by divine permission bishop of St. Davids, to our 
beloved in Christ Sir John Griffith perpetual Vicar of Kydwelly, 
and Robert Fraunce a layman of the said parish, grace and bless- 
ing. Whereas we elsewhere lawfully proceeding, have been 
led to sequestrate all and singular the fruits, tithes, oblations, 
profits, and emoluments whatsoever to the parish church of 



Il6 APPENDIX F. 

the Blessed Mary the Virgin of Kydwelly, and to the priory of 
the same town belonging, or in whatsoever manner appertaining, 
as well because the said priory is much bound in debt, as also 
"because the aforesaid church is suffering from great and manifest 
decay, as by the tenor of these presents we do sequestrate, justice 
demanding and advising the same, therefore to pubhsh such 
our seqxiestration in the parish church aforesaid, and also in 
other neighbouring parish churches during the solemnities of 
masses and other divine celebrations whilst the greater number 
of the people congregate therein, and also to demand, levy, 
collect, and receive all and singular the aforesaid fruits, tithes, 
oblations, revenues and emoluments whatsoever, and the same 
levied, collected, and received to distribute and expend in the 
reparation of the house of the priory and chancel of the church 
of the Blessed Mary the Virgin before written, until they shall 
be, and may be sufficiently repaired to you in whose fidehty and 
circumspection and industry very greatly in the Lord we have 
confidence, we do commit to you by these presents our 
functions and full power in the Lord, and do appoint you 
such our sequestrator and depute as our keepers. So that you 
be careful to shew a full faithful and entire account to us, and 
to our oflficers of all and singular, the emoluments received by 
you. In witness whereof the seal is appended to these presents, 
vsrhich at present we use for causes, to endure only during our 
good pleasure. 

' Dated 20th day of the month of April in the year of our 
Lord one thousand five hundred and twenty four, and in the 
first year of our consecration. ' 

APPENDIX F. 

DRAFT LEASE, PRESERVED IN THE PUBLIC RECORD 
OFFICE UNDER WHICH THE TEMPORALITIES OP 
THE PRIORY OF KIDWELLY WERE SOLD. 

Tfanslation. 

' This Indenture made between the most excellent Prince and 
lord, the lord Henry the Eighth by the grace of God of England 
&c. of the one part, and George Aysshe and Robert Myryk, 
yeomen. Purveyors of wines of the lord the King of the other 
part. Witnesseth that the said lord the King by the advice of 



APPENDIX F. 117 

his Council of the Court of the Augmentation of the revenues 
of his crown has deHvered granted and to farm let to the afore- 
said George and Robert the house and site of the late Priory 
or cell of Kydwelly in the county of Carmarthen and all the 
houses, edifices, curtilages, barns, cemeteries, orchards, apple- 
orchards, gardens, ponds, fishponds, land and soil whatsoever 
being within the site and precincts of the same late priory or 
cell, and all those lands and pastures called Oldehall containing 
by estimation 4 acres, and the land called Fraunces Parke con- 
taining by estimation i acre, and the land called Mill Parke 
containing by estimation 4 acres, and the lands called Verne 
Parke containing by estimation 4 acres, and the lands called 
Long Parke containing by estimation i acre, and the lands 
called Skynner's Parke containing by estimation i virgate, and 
the land called Brodelande Parke containing by estimation 4 
acres, and the land and pasture called Wenwell Parke contain- 
ing by estimation 3 acres, and one Httle grove called Therne 
containing by estimation 4 acres, with all their appurtenances 
in Kydwelly in the said county of Carmarthen to the said late 
Priory or cell at one time belonging and appertaining, and also 
the whole Rectory of Kydwelly in the said county of Carmar- 
then to the said late Priory at one time belonging and apper- 
taining, and also all and all manner of tithes of sheaves and 
corn and grain and tithes of wool and of lambs and other tithes 
and oblations whatsoever in Estbayly, Moone parisshe, Lleghwen, 
Welchienfeld, Penwarne, the Holway, Horsestonefelde, the 
Croftes, Westhill, Westayly, and Middel Bayly, in the said 
county of Carmarthen and all the tithes of 2 mills in Kydwelly 
in the said county of Carmarthen, and the whole yearly pension 
issuing from the Rectory of Penbray to the said late Priory or 
cell of Kydwelly at one time belonging and appertaining and 
being parcel of the possessions thereof : which same priory or 
cell of Kydwelly belonged and appertained to the late monastery 
of Shirborne in the county of Dorset now dissolved. Except 
however always and to the said lord the Iving, his heirs, and 
successors altogether reserved all gross trees and woods of in 
and upon the premises growing and being, and the advowson 
of the Vicarage of the parish church of Kydwelly aforesaid. To 
have and to hold the aforesaid site of the said late Priory and 
the aforesaid Rectory lands, meadows, feedings, pastures, tithes 
and other the premises with the appurtenances except before 
excepted to the aforesaid George Aysshe and Robert Myryk 



Il8 APPENDIX F. 

and their assigns from the Feast of St. Michael the Archangel 
last past until the end of a term and by a term of 21 years thence 
next following and fully to be completed, rendering therefor 
yearly to the said lord the King his heirs and successors Thirty 
Pounds Six shillings and Four Pence of lawful money of England 
at the Feasts of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary 
and St. Michael the Archangel or within one month after either 
feast at the Court aforesaid by equal portions to be paid during 
the term aforesaid. And the aforesaid lord the King wills, and 
by these presents doth grant that he his heirs and successors 
from time to time will discharge acquit and defend the said 
George and Robert and their assigns from all rents fees annui- 
ties and sums of money whatsoever issuing from the premises 
or to be paid or thereupon charged or to be charged, except 
from the rent above by these presents reserved and except from 
a certain yearly pensioyi of eight pounds issuing from the Rectory 
aforesaid and to the Vicar of the parish church of Kydwelly afore- 
said yearly to be paid, and except nine shilhngs and nine pence 
for synodals and procurations of the said church yearly to be 
paid to the Archdeacon of St. Davids for the time being, against 
what persons soever, and cause all houses and edifices of the 
premises in timber only from time to time as often as and when- 
soever it shall be necessary and convenient to be well and suffi- 
ciently repaired sustained and maintained, and will sustain and 
support the whole repair of the chancel of the parish church 
of Kydwelly aforesaid from time to time. And the aforesaid 
George Aysshe and Robert Myryk do grant by these presents 
that they and their assigns wiU support and sustain all neces- 
sary repairs of the premises, except in the timber aforesaid and 
except the repairs of the chancel aforesaid from time to time, 
and will pay the said yearly pension of eight pounds payable 
to the Vicar of the said church of Kydwelly and the said nine 
shilhngs and nine pence yearly payable to the Archdeacon of 
St. Davids for the time being from time to time, and will discharge 
the said lord the King his heirs and his successors therefrom 
during the term aforesaid. And the aforesaid lord the King 
further willeth and by these presents doth grant that it shall 
well be lawful to the aforesaid George Aysshe and Robert Myryk 
and their assigns from time to time to take receive and have 
of in and upon the premises by assignment and supervision 
of the surveyors and other officers of the lord the King there 
for the time being competent and sufficient hedgebote, fyerbote, 



APPENDIX G. 1 19 

ploughbote, and cartbote there and not elsewhere, yearly to 
be expended and used during the term aforesaid. Provided, 
nevertheless, always that should the aforesaid rent happen to 
be in arrear not paid in part or in all by the space of one month 
after any day of the payment thereof above limited if in due 
manner demanded, that then and thenceforth this present lease 
shall be void and had for nought, any clause or article in the 
same contained to the contrary thereof notwithstanding. In 
witness whereof to one part &c. to the other part &c. Dated 
at Westminster the twenty eighth day of January, in the thirty 
fifth year of the reign of the said lord the King.' 



APPENDIX G. 

DUCHY OP LANCASTER. 

Reference — Draft Lease £^. 

[This lease is preserved in the Pubhc Record Office, and is 
that under which the property which once belonged to the 
Chantry of St. Nicholas at Kidwelly was disposed of at its 
dissolution.] 

Translation, 

' This Indenture made between the most excellent prince and 
lord, the lord Edward the Sixth by the grace of God of England 
France and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and on earth 
of the Enghsh and Irish church supreme head, of the one part, 
and John Goodale of the other part. Witnesseth that the 
aforesaid lord the King by the advice and assent of his Council 
of his Duchy of Lancaster has granted dehvered and to farm 
let to the aforesaid John all that the late Chantry of St. Nicholas 
in Kydwelly in the county of Carmarthen now dissolved, and 
all the lands tenements and hereditaments to the said late 
Chantry belonging or appertaining and hereafter recited, that 
is to say : One tenement and 4^ acres of arable land and i^ 
acre of meadow in Pengwern lately demised to Thomas John 
Yghne. And also i park containing 5 acres in Melyonfelde 
lately demised to Robert John ap HoU. And 9 acres of arable 
land in Basslake now or lately in the tenure or occupation of 
John Gower. And also i tenement in Westhill and 3 acres of 
arable land now or lately in the tenure or occupation of John 



120 APPENDIX G. 

GruflPyth. And i burgage and i tenement and i acre of land 
near Saynt Sondaye's Well now or lately in the tenure or occupa- 
tion of John Perotte. And also 2 acres of arable land l5dng 
near Cadocke's Mill in the tenure of John Rowe. And 3 acres 
of arable land lately demised to Nicholas Fraunce. And also 
10 acres of arable land in Bronnehill in the tenure of Maurice 
Dyer. And 1^ acre of land l5ring in Almanne Redinge in the 
tenure of William John Richarde. And also 3 acres of land 
called Ringes landes in the tenure of William Robert. And i 
close containing 5 acres lying in Stockewill lately demised to 
Thomas Johnes. And also i^ acre of land lying in Hustede in 
the tenure of Grufi&n John Dd. Thomas. And 2 acres of arable 
land there in the tenure of Maurice Perott. And also i^ acre 
of arable land Ij^ng near Somer Wey in the tenure of Robert 
J hones. And i messuage in Kydwellye in the tenure 
of Nicholas Robert. And also another messuage there in the 
tenure of John Walter. And i^ acre of arable land lying in 
Westhill in the tenure of Thomas Hallesbume. And also r 
parcel of land in Aries in the tenure of Jeyn Dd. ap Dd. And 
also 3 parcels of land called Ridgies-in-le-Shill in the tenure of 
Dd. Thomas. Which same Chantry lands, tenements, heredita- 
ments, and other the premises to the said Chantry belonging were 
lately given and granted to the said lord the King and his heirs 
by authority of a certain Act, of Chantries to fall into the hand 
of the said lord the King, lately enacted and provided. To 
have and to hold the Chantries aforesaid and other all 
and singular the premises above expressed and specified 
with the appurtenances to the aforesaid John Goodale and 
his assigns from the Feast of Easter last past before the date 
of these presents until the end of a term of twenty one years 
thence next following and fully to be completed. Rendering 
therefor yearly to the aforesaid lord the King and his heirs 
Forty five Shillings of lawful money of England in form follow- 
ing :— 



Tenement. 


Tenant. 




Quantity. 


Re 
s 


:nt. 
d 


Pengwern 


Thomas John Y 


ghne 


6 acres 


6 





Melyonfelde 


Robert John ap 


HoU. 


5 „ 


5 





Basslake 


John Gower 




9 „ 


3 


2 


Westhill 


John Gruffyth 




3 » 


6 


4 


Saynt Sondayes 


Jeyne Perotte 




I » 


2 





Cadocke's Mill 


John Rowe 




2 „ 


2 






APPENDIX H. 



121 



Tenement. 


Tenant. 


Quantity. 


Rent. 
S ^ 


Arable land 


Nicholas Fraunce 


3 „ 


2 


4 


Bronnehill 


Maurice Dyer 


lO ,, 


3 


4 


Almanne Redinge 


William John Richard 


li „ 


I 


o 


Ringes landes 


WilUam Robert 


3 » 


3 


4 


Stockewill 


Thomas J hones 


5 „ 


5 


o 


Hustede 


Gruffin Jhon Dd. Thomas 


li „ 


I 


o 


Arable land 


Maurice Perott 


2 „ 




lO 


Somer Wey 


Robert J hones 


li „ 


I 


o 


Messuage 


Nicholas Robert 
John Walter 




I 


2 
lO 


Westhill 


Thomas Hallesbume 


I* „ 




4 


Aries 


Jeyne Dd. ap Dd. 


I parcel 




2 


Ridgies-in-le-Shill 


David Thomas 


3 parcels 




2 



45 o 
' Given at Westminster, on the 12 th day of March 3 Edward 



VI. 



Examined by the Court. 
Examined by George Haydon.' 



APPENDIX H. 



A.D. 1357. 
12 p. Annunciation 30 Edward III. 

Attested Copy of a Copy of one of the Kedwelli Charters. 

' To all those to whom this writing shall come or may concern 
Henry Duke of Lancaster Earl of Derby of Nicole & of Leicester 
& Seneschall of England Greeting in God know ye that we 
having seen the Charter of our most dear ffather Henry Earl 
of Lancaster & our most dear Mother Maud his wife whom God 
preserve in these words To All those to whom this writing shall 
come or may concern Henry of Lancaster Lord Mordume of 
Kedwelly & of Carn Wathlan & Maud our dear wife Greeting 

in the Lord know ye the Burgesses of 

our Borough of Kedwelly ....&.... freely to have .... 
from time whereof memory is not to the contrary all the ffran- 
chises & free Customs under written ffirstly that all the Bur- 



122 APPENDIX H. 

gesses of our sd Borough & their heirs & their assigns having 
paid every year to us & our heirs for each Burgage in the sd 
Borough twelve pence stirUng at the two terms in the year that 
is to say at the feast of St Michael Six pence and at the feast 
of Easter six pence except all that rent of which we are seized 
And that all the afsd Burgesses & their heirs & assigns who shall 
dwell in our said Borough accdg to each mans proportion shall 
account to our hundred of KedwelU once in every fifteen days 
for the sum justly due before the setting of the sun before those 
who have lawfully possessed ov:r hundreds which have been 
granted by our Letters patent and not before any others whom- 
soever unless they be by us or by our Seneschall of KedwelU 
appointed for that purpose And that none of the afsd Burgesses 
nor of their heirs nor of their assigns shall be fined for any tres- 
pass more than twelve pence in any case relating to us or our 
heirs for our Disheritance or our mainprize or the mainprize of 
our heirs or for fforestall homsoken felony, Pountbruche, Dis- 
seisin raising Hue & Cry & spilling of blood, of which things 
if any of the said Burgesses their heirs or their assigns shall 
be attained by the award and Judgment of four persons whom- 
soever they be they shall be fined according to the nature of 
the trespass & all these fines shall be rated in our sd Hundred 
Forsprys Lastyns & Disseisins by force & arms & recovery shall 
be adjudged by fines before ourselves or before our heirs & not 
before any body else whomsoever unless it be by our special 

order & command And that their of each of the afsd 

Burgesses of their heirs & of their assigns of what age soever 
he may be at such seizin & of other the tenements of which his 
ancestor died seized & possed without giving any thing to us 

or our heirs for such seizure other than as afsd And 

that if the sd heir be dispossessed or fined by any other 

except those that have a right And that the afsd Burgesses 
their heirs & ass" shall peaceably at all times have common 
of Pasture as much as in us he for all their beasts as well for 
their pigs and goats as for all others without pannage & without 
any other customs in all those our Lordships of KedwelU & 
Carn Wathllan within the forest & without the borders of our 
forest of Pencoyd of Kevengorarth & Kothlyndysagh & our 
premises in Dalkynadan & in Wenhold our pasture in Glyn 
each at the feast of the assumption of our Lady as well as at 
the feast of Saint Andrew And to tiU and depasture in our 
Demesnes of KedwelU of Carn Wathlan of St Ishmael & of 



APPENDIX H. 123 

Coldcote & the rents thereof as usual to be paid to us And that 
we & our heirs shall be at Hberty to make our profits of our 
said land except the land enclosed within all the parks round 
our sd Borough And saving to the sd Burgesses their heirs & 
ass' sufiicient pasture & free entry & free seizin to the same 
pasture for all their Cattle afsd at their pleasure in the manner 
following as far as they chuse in going to & returning from or 
depasturing their said Cattle from sun rise to sun set except 
in the places afsd And that the afsd burgesses their heirs & ass" 
shall at all times have houseboot & shipboot in all those our 
woods of KedwelH & of Carn Wathlan by raising and taking 
the same from our forests & lands afsd And that they shall 
have fireboot & hayboot in our wood of Glynusen the decayed 
Wood there as well as the decayed Wood in any other place 

whatsr and besides the other woods there they shall 

pay houseboot & shipboot in the same wood as they shall so 

raise & take from our Foresters & not otherwise 

notwithstanding any thing that shall be herein found to the 

contrary & Shipboot in in coming to our 

said Lordship of Kidwelli to serve our sd Borough 

& that they shall not sell nor remove any part thereof out of 
our said Borough by fraud to the damage of us or of our heirs 

And that they shall have for houseboot & Turbary 

both within & without our said forest the lands of 

Kidwelli & Camwathlan or Scontol & the Turbary which shall 
be found in the places hereinafter mentioned And that they 
shall have in time of Harvest their swine free of pannage in all 
our woods of KidwelU & Carnwathlan save our forests & woods 
underwritten And that they shall have free hberty to fish in 

all our of Kedwelh and Carnwathan in such places 

wherein they have been accustomed to fish and to take the 
same as of right except in our particular ponds and fisheries 
And if the afsd Burgesses or their heirs or their assigns or any 
of their servants shall commit any trespass either v/ithin or 
without the said forest or our Lands afsd that they shall make 
amends at the porch of our Castle at Kidwelli by the Inquest 
of six freeholders or of six Burgesses of our said Borough or 
upon the testimony of our foresters there and that the trespass 
shall be accounted for according to the nature of the sd trespass 
And that none of the afsd Burgesses nor of their heirs nor of 
their assigns shall be detained within the porch of our said 
Castle at Kidwelh for any trespass that he may have commit- 



124 APPENDIX H, 

ted if he shall be able to procure sufficient mainprize for the 
same but if the same cannot be done then & in such case he 
shall not be replevysable And that the afsd Burgesses their 
heirs & ass' shall elect the provost of our said Borough in the 
next Hundred after the feast of St Michael for whom they shall 

be answerable in so doing the office belonging to 

which provost shall serve us in our said borough to execute 
and return the Attachments and to receive the tolls & rents 
and fines there and to execute our orders as far as shall belong 
to his office within our said Borough without being charged 
to any other office And if the servant of any of the afsd Bur- 
gesses or of their heirs or ass' shall have these effects his master 

shall proceed as in cases of felony for the same 

proper shall be forfeited & that his Master his effect 

for forfeitures if he the sd ser- 
vant or any other may be enabled to take the said 

effects so seized & that if they are challanged within a year 
& a day & that he can make it appear that the same felony 
was not done by the order nor by the aid or privity of him And 
that if any of the afsd Burgesses their heirs or ass' shall die 
without making a will his known son & heir shall have the 
substance of his father so dying without disturbance or chal- 
lange of us of our heirs And that if any of the afsd Burgesses 
or of their heirs or their ass' shall have purchased in open day 
before his neighbours of Kidwelh manner of mer- 
chandize & the same merchandize shall be challanged as dis- 
honestly purchased that they shall sustain no loss by the 
merchandize there purchased so that they can prove that they 
did not know that the same were fraudulently obtained And 
that the afsd Burgesses their heirs & their ass' shall attend 
us & our heirs if occasion shall be in going through all the Inner 
Precint of Gales and that they shall give unto us & to our heirs 
reasonable surety on the first of August after their departure 
from our said Borough if they do not remain within the same 
Borough And that they shall attend our Seneschall of Kedwelli 
when we or our heirs shall come to our said Borough if needs 
may be thro' the interior part of the whole of the afsd Precinct 
of Gales at our reasonable expences in the form aforesaid And 
that they shall attend our Seneschall thro' all the inner part 
of our Lordship of Kedwelli & Carn Wathllan when need shall 
be in time of war And that if the said Seneschall shall go beyond 
the Bounds of our sd Lordship in such perambulation he shall 



APPENDIX H, 125 

then return to the sd Lordship on the first of August & not 
before & if he does not perform this wilUngly or that he acts 
contrary to us or to our heirs & to our reasonable direction 
in the form underwritten that then the Seneschall & all 
the sd Burgesses of our said Borough shall chuse people of the 
same Borough who shall be more sufl&cient according to the 

form afsd & not in nor any others who shall not be 

to do this there at all times that our sd Borough 

may be sufft hundred of Kedwelli in 

the form underwritten & if we or our heirs or any of 

shall take or cause to be taken any of the aforesaid 

their heirs or ass' of their Goods or of their chattels & that 
this shall be of such things as shaU be to be sold & not of any 
others. And if this cannot be done of their good Will & that 
whensoever it shall be taken it shall be paid within four days 

& if that cannot be immediately paid within 

our the time which we shall neither take nor cause 

to be taken any thing else except that which shall be taken 
there so far as that the same shall plainly appear to us to be 
their assetts For which cause we the aforesaid Henry and Maud 
all the afsd Franchizes & free customs there found by the afsd 
Inquest do grant & confirm for us & for our heirs to the afsd 
Burgesses of our said Borough of Kedwehi & to their heirs & 
to their ass" for ever in the form underwritten And do hereby 
grant unto them for us & for our heirs all the advantages & free 
customs that they have or were accustomed to have as the same 
have been heretofore granted In Witness whereof we have 
hereunto set our seal Witness Sir Thomas De Blound Sir Wm 
De Cantelou Richard De Ryvers our Seneschall of KidweUi 
Phihp de Skenfryth, Richd de Penres John de Botyler, Giffeo 
Dun Cadugan ap Griffith Dani Malefaunt & others Given at our 
Castle of Kidwelh the 12th day next after the feast of the as- 
sumption of our Lady in the year of Iving Edward Son of King 
Edwd the 2nd Which franchises gifts grants places usages & 
customs afsd according to the Charter of our most honored 
father & mother we the afsd Henry Duke of Lancaster do give 
grant confirm ratify & approve for us & for our heirs to the 
afsd burgesses of our Borough of KedwelU & to their heirs & 
to their ass" from henceforth for ever in manner afsd And if 

the sd Burgesses have not enjoyed the franchises 

afsd We will & grant for us & for our heirs that the afsd Bur- 
gesses their heirs & their ass" shall be at Hberty to enjoy them 



126 APPENDIX I. 

or And we the afsd Henry & our heirs 

the afsd Franchises grants usages and customs afsd to the afsd 
Burgesses & their heirs and their ass" do grant & confirm for 
ever In Witness whereof we have put our seal to this our writing 
Given at our Castle of lycycester the 12 day next after the An- 
nunciation of our Lady in the 30 year of the reign of King Edward 
the 3d after the Conquest. 
Attested as a true Copy of a Copy 

of this Charter, this 4 day of 

April 1792, by us, 

Amos Clarke, 1 Clerks to Mr. Foulkes, 



a 



John Browne, ) Hart St, Bloomsbury." 



APPENDIX I. 

A.D. 1444. 

' Henry by the grace of God King of England and France 
and Lord of Ireland To all to whom these presents shall come 
greeting Know ye that we considering in what manner the Bur- 
gesses of our Borough and Town of Kidwelly in South Wales 
within our Dutchy of Lancaster have manifoldly suffered no 
small losses and burnings of their houses and divers oppres- 
sions which the Welchmen of their mahce heretofore have often 
brought upon them & that therefore the sd Town which is an 
ancient Borough of our said Dutchy is now in a manner waste 
and desolate for the want of Burgesses there dweUing, and wil- 
ling therefore as well for the assistance and rehef of the sd Town 
and Borough of Kidwelly as of our County more amply to 
provide for the convenience peace & quiet of the sd Burgesses 
have granted and by these presents Do grant to the sd Bur- 
gesses and resiants within the sd Town and Borough of Kidwelly 
to their heirs and successors that they shall have a Commonalty 
amongst themselves and that the said Burgesses on the morrow 
of the Epiphany of our Lord next ensuing may chuse from 
among themselves one Mayor and two Baihffs who after they 
shall have been elected shall take their Corporal Oaths in the 
Exchequer of Kidwelly before the Receiver or Auditor there 
then being for the due performance and execution of the Offices 
of Mayor and BaiUffs from the sd Morrow of the Epiphany to 
the next Sunday after the feast of St Michael the Archangel 



APPENDIX I. 



127 



then next ensuing and the said Mayor and BaiUffs thus elected 
the sd Offices of Mayor and Baihffs for the sd time shall perform 
and execute and that the said Burgesses their heirs and Suc- 
cessors from thenceforth may elect from among themselves a 
Mayor and 2 Baihffs once every year that is on the next Sunday 
after the feast of St Michael the Archangel who immediately 
after they shall have been thus elected and sworn to the due 
performance of their sd Offices in the sd Church before the 
Receiver or Auditor there for the time being the Offices of Mayor 
and Baihffs there duly may perform exercise and execute And 
if it happens that any Mayor or Baihff should die within a year 
after such election that then the sd Burgesses their heirs and 
successors may chuse from among themselves one other Mayor 
or other Baihff or Baihffs in the place of him or them so dying 
who have taken the oath as aforesd may do & execute the Office 
of Mayor or of Baihff or BaiUffs for all the remaining part of that 
year And that 2 Officers to be chosen by the Mayor of the sd 
Town for the time being may have and carry each of them 
one Mace with our arms of our said Dutchy engraved on it 
And that the sd Mayor and Baihffs thus elected and officers 
and commonalty of the sd town and Borough be one incorporate 
body and fully capable and fit to purchase lands and tenements 
and other possessions for themselves and their successors by 
the names of Mayor Baihffs and Commonalty of the Town and 
Borough of Kidwelly and that by the sd names they may plead 
and be impleaded answer and be answered and have perpetual 
succession. We have also granted to the sd Burgesses their 
heirs and successors for ever our Town and Borough aforesaid 
with the market and fairs of the sd Town and Borough Stallage 
pickage tolls and all other customs profits and commodities 
thereunto belonging also tolls of the country and rent of Assize 
and all lands escheated in the Town and Borough aforesaid 
We have also granted to the sd Burgesses their heirs and succes- 
sors that they shall have a Court or Hundred of Kidwelly and 
all fines issues and amerciaments in the sd Court or Hundred 
forfeitures and other perquisites and advantages thence pro- 
ceeding or to the sd Hundred or Court in any way appertaining 
or belonging And that the Mayor of the sd Town then being 
may hold before him all Pleas real personal and mixed to the 
sd Hundred belonging or any wise appertaining as well concern- 
ing lands & tenements situate in the sd Town and Borough as 
other lands and tenements without the sd town and Borough 



128 APPENDIX I. 

-which are of Burgage tenure as of debts trespasses reckonings 
agreements and other contracts and causes whatsoever within 
the said Town and Borough and their precincts arising as also 
pleas of piepowder and fairs at the suit of any person whatso- 
ever prosecuting or desirous to prosecute before them by writ 
or without writ as fully and perfectly as our Stewards or the 
Stewards of our Ancestors there being were accustomed to hold 
pleas so that neither Steward Bailiff nor other Officer of us or 
of our heirs shall on any account intermeddle with the sd Hun- 
dred or with the holding of any pleas to the sd Hundred be- 
longing or which ought of old to belong And that the Mayor 
BaiUffs and Commonalty of the said Town their heirs and Suc- 
cessors by the Bailiffs of the sd Town for the time being shall 
have Returns of all writs and precepts of us and our heirs Jus- 
tices escheators and others our Judges or those of our heirs 
whomsoever and executions of the said writs and precepts in 
all pleas real personal and mixed and all causes within the said 
town and Borough and the hmits and precincts of the same 
as well in the Borough as in the Forensia within the four ancient 
crosses that compass the said Town so that neither escheator 
Steward or other Bailiff or Minister of us and our heirs within 
the said town and Borough nor in any other place within the 
said hmits and precincts thereof shall enter to make any execu- 
tion or on any other account interfere And that the Mayor 
and BaiHffs of the said town for the time being be Justices 
for preserving of the Peace for us and our heirs within the said 
Town and Borough and precinct thereof as well in the Borough 
as in the foreland within the sd four Crosses and that they shall 
have full power to hear and determine all things belonging to 
the Office of Justice of the Peace to be executed within the Town 
and precincts aforesd so that no Justice Steward Constable or 
other Officer of us or of our heirs shall enter the sd Town and 
Borough or precincts of the same to do & execute there any 
thing that belongs to the office of Justice of the Peace We have 
also granted to the sd Burgesses their heirs and successors that 
they shall have or may chuse from among themselves every 
year on the day aforesd One Coroner who having taken the 
usual oath may do and execute all that belongs to the Office 
of Coroner in the sd Borough and precincts thereof And further 
of our more abundant grace We have granted for us and our 
heirs that the sd Burgesses their heirs and successors their 
Servants and also the tenants of the sd Burgesses their heirs 



APPENDIX I. 129 

and Successors residing within the Town and Borough afsd 
shall not in future be impleaded or forced to answer before 
any Judges or other Oflficer of us or our heirs on any indictment 
accusation or Appeal of Treason or for trespasses rectis injiiriis 
misprisons or other crimes or offences whatsoever or in any 
actions or pleas real personal and mixed at the suit of us and 
our heirs or of any other person whatsoever in any Court within 
the Lordships of Kidwelly CarnwilUon and Iskennen except in 
the sd Hundred or before the Justices in eyre of us and our heirs 
when they shall come into those parts and shall not nor shall 
any of them be convicted or tried within the said Lordships 
by any foreigners but by entire Enghshmen of the sd Borough 
and not by any Welshmen for ever We have also granted to 
the sd Burgesses their heirs and successors that no fair or market 
be kept in the vicinity of the sd Borough within the distance 
of 5 miles of the same and that no wares merchandizes or victuals 
be exposed to Sale in any Pubhck Place within the sd 5 miles 
but in the Borough itself except Bread and Beer bought in 
the said Borough which afterwards may lawfully be sold with- 
out the Borough by such as have bought within the Borough 
except flesh and fish cut up in Uke manner first bought within 
the sd Borough and except milk cheese eggs Poultry and such 
like small victuals which may be lawfully bought and sold in 
the houses of those to whom such small Victuals belong so than 
they shall not be exposed to Sale in any pubhck place withit 
the said Borough And that the market of the said Town be kept 
within the walls of the sd Town in the usual and accustomed 
place on Wednesday and Sunday in every week and not other- 
wise as it used to be done And that they may have before the 
sd Mayor and Baihffs in the Hundred of the said Town cog- 
nizance and punishment of all and singular the offenders in 
regrating and forestalling of all wares and victuals of such as 
are desirous of frequenting the market of the said Town for the 
provision and supply of our Castle there and the sd Town and 
to impose fines on them according to their deserts which fines 
are to be levied at the option of the said Burgesses their heirs and 
successors And that they may have cognizance and punishment 
of breach of assize of Bread and Beer and of other broken victuals 
in the sd Town and Borough and Assize of weights measures 
and balances within the sd Town and Borough so that no Steward 
or Marshal of our Household or of our heirs or Clerk of the 
market Justice or any other whatsoever shall enter or interfere 



130 APPENDICES J AND K. 

in any wise with the Assize of those measures weights and 
bjilances or any other thing which belongs to the office of Clerk 
of the Market to be done and executed within the sd Town and 
Borough And that it shall be lawful for any Burgess of the sd 
Borough his heirs and successors to hold what he has purchased 
in the sd Borough as his Chattels and by his last Will bequeath 
them accordingly to whomsoever he shall chuse And that neither 
the sd Burgesses their heirs and successors within the said 
Borough during their residence there shaU contribute to any 
payments concerning any customs grants aids tallage or fines 
whatsoever granted or to be granted through the whole realm 
to us and our heirs unless in the sd Borough with the Burgesses 
where they are conversant as they were used to pay and that 
none of the said Burgesses their heirs and successors their tenants 
or Vassals within our land and power shall be distrained or 
attached for the debt or trespass of any of his neighbours unless 
he be a principal Debtor or Surety & whosoever shall be the 
Surety of another shall not be compelled to pay so long as the 
principal debtor has wherewith to pay and that the Court of 
Welshmen and foreigners and Sessions which were wont to be 
held within the sd Town and Borough of Kidwelly may hence- 
forth be held there for ever according to usual custom rendering 
therefore yearly to us and our heirs by the hands of our Receiver 
of Kidwelly for the time being ^^26 1 3' 4' at the feasts of Easter 
and St Michael the Archangel by equal portions for aU Services 
customs and demands In witness whereof we have caused these 
our Letters to be made patent Given under our Seal of our 
said Dutchy at our Castle at Windsor the 8th day of December 
in the 22nd year of our reign by BUI signed by the Kings hand 
and sealed with the signet of the Eagle.' 



APPENDIX J. 

' An exempHfication of the original Charter, at the instance 
of Philhp Morgan, Mayor of Kidwelly, by Patent of Henry the 
Eighth, 20th February, 32nd year of his reign.' 



APPENDIX K. 

' An exemplification of the original Charter, by Patent of 
Edward the Sixth, 20th May, 4th year of his reign.' 



APPENDIX I,. 131 



APPENDIX L. 

A.D. 1619. 

' James by the Grace of God of England Scotland France 
and Ireland King Defender of the faith &c. To our beloved 
and right trusty Sir Humphrey May Knt Chancellor of our 
Duchy of Lancaster Greeting We command you that under the 
seal of our said Duchy of Lancaster you cause our letters to be 
made patent in form following — The King to aU to whom &c. 
Greeting Whereas our Borough of KidweUie in our County of 
Carmarthen is a very ancient and populous Borough & the 
Mayor Baihffs & commonalty of the sd Borough by divers sevl 
names have had used and enjoyed divers Hberties franchises 
immunities customes preheminences and heredits as well by 
divers charters and letters patent of divers our Predecessors 
& Ancestors late Kings of England Dukes of Lancaster & others 
as by reason of divers prescriptions usuages & customs in the 
same Boro of old time used had and accustomed And whereas 
our beloved subjects the now Mayor BaiUffs and Burgesses of 
the Borough afd have humbly entreated us that as far as in us 
lies we would for the better rule & improvement of the said 
Boro' graciously extend our royal Grace and munificence to them 
the sd Mayor Baihffs and Burgesses of the Borough afd in this 
behalf And that we would vouchsafe to reduce constitute or 
create anew the sd Mayor Baihffs and Commonalty of the sd 
Borough by which name or names they have soever they have 
been heretofore incorporated into one body corporate & pohtic 
by the name of the Mayor Aldermen & Baihffs & Burgesses 
of the Boro of Kidwelly in the County of Carmarthen with 
the addition of certain Hberties privileges immunities & franchises 
as shall to us seem most expedient We therefore willing that 
for ever hereafter one certain & undoubted method be had in 
the same Boro the hberties & precincts of the same of in & upon 
the keeping of our peace & the rule & Government of the same 
Boro & our people there dweUing and others thereto resorting 
And that the same Boro be hereafter perpetual & remain a Boro' 
of peace & quietness to the fear & terror of evil doers & to the 
encouragement of the good and that our peace & other acts 
of Justice & good government may be the better there kept & 
done And hoping that if the Mayor Baihffs & Commonalty of 



132 APPENDIX h. 

the Boro afsd do of our Grant enjoy greater & more ample 
liberties dignities & priviledges they will then think themselves 
more especially & cogently bound to do to us our heirs & succes- 
sors what services they are able of our special Grace certain 
knowledge & mere mocon Have willed ordained constituted & 
granted & Do by these presents for us our heirs and successors 
wiU ordain constitute grant and declare That our afsd Boro 
of Kidwelh in our coy of Carmn be and remain at all times 
for ever hereafter a free Boro of itself And that the Mayor Bail- 
iffs & commonalty of the Boro of Kidy as afsd their successors 
& also the Burgesses & inhabitants of the same Boro by what- 
soever name or names they were theretofore incorporated & 
whether they have been incorporated or not from henceforth 
for ever be & by virtue of these presents shall be one body 
corporate & pohtic in Deed fact & name by the name of the 
Mayor Alderman Baihffs and Burgesses of the Boro of Kidwelly 
in the Coy of Carmarthen & these & their successors by the 
name of Mayor Alderman Baihffs & Burgesses of the Boro of 
Kidy in the County of Carmarthen We do by these presents 
for us our heirs & successors really & fully erect make ordain 
constitute confirm declare & create one Body corporate & 
politic in deed fact & name & that by the sd name they have 
perpetual succession And that they & their successors be & at 
all times hereafter shall be by the name of Mayor Aldermen 
Baihffs & Burgesses of the Boro of Kidwelly in the County of 
Carmarthen persons fit & capable in Law to have purchase 
receive and possess lands tenements meadows feedings pastures 
liberties priviledges franchises Jurisdictions and Heredits to 
them & their successors in fee & perpetuity or for the term of 
life or fives or of years or any otherwise howsoever & also goods 
& chattels & all other things whatsr of what kind nature sort 
or quafity soever. And to give grant demise & assign the same 
lands tenements heredits goods chattels & to do & execute all 
other acts and things by the name afsd And that by the name 
of Mayor Alderman Baihffs & Burgesses of the Boro of Kid- 
welfie in the County of Carmarthen they may plead be impleaded 
answer & be answered defend & be defended in whastr courts 
& places & before whatsr Judges & Justices & other persons 
& ofl&cers of us our heirs & successors in aU & singr Actions 
Pleas Suits Causes Matters & demands whatsr or what kind 
nature or sort soever they may or shall be in the same manner 
& form as^any other our liege subjects within this our Kingdom 



APPENDIX L,. 133 

of England being persons fit & capable in Law or any body Cor- 
porate within this our kingdom of England may & can have 
purchase receive possess give grant & plead & be impleaded 
answer & be answered defend & be defended And that the 
afsd Mayor Alderman Bailiffs & Burgesses of the Boro afsd & 
their successors may have for ever a common seal to be kept 
for the doing of all Business whatsoever of them & their suc- 
cessors And that it shall & may be lawful for them the said 
Mayor Alderman Baihffs & Burgesses of the Boro afsd & their 
successors for the time being to break change & make anew 
the sd seal from time to time as shall to them seem most ex- 
pedient And further we will & do by these presents for us our 
heirs & successors grant to the afsd Mayor alderman Baihffs 
& Burgesses of the Boro afsd & their successors that there shall 
& may be from henceforth for ever in the Boro afsd one of the 
Burgesses of the Boro afsd to be elected in manner & form 
in these presents hereafter specified who shall be & be named 
the Mayor of the Boro afsd And that there may & shall be in 
like manner withen the Boro afsd two of the Burgesses of the 
sd Boro to be elected in manner in these presents hereafter 
mentd who shall be & be named & called the BaiUffs of the Boro 
afsd And that there may & shall be within the Boro afsd twelve 
of the better & more responsible burgesses & inhabitants of the 
Boro afsd to be elected & appointed in manner in these pre- 
sents hereafter mentd who shall be named & called Alderman 
of the Boro afsd And that in Uke manner there may & shall 
be within the sd Boro other twelve of the more responsible & 
discreet burgesses of the Boro afsd to be elected in mmer in 
these presents also hereafter mentd who may & shall be called 
the principal Burgesses of the Boro afsd which sd princl Bur- 
gesses & Baihffs to be so from time to time nominated & elected 
may & shall be from time to time aiding & assisting to the 
Mayor & Alderman of the sd Boro for the time being in all 
causes Businesses & things in any wise touching or concerning 
the Boro afsd And further we will & do by these presents for 
us our heirs & successors grant to the afsd Mayor alderman 
Bailiffs & Burgesses of the Boro afsd & their successors that 
the Mayor Alderman Baihffs & principal Burgesses of the Boro 
afsd for the time being or the Mayor part of them (of whom 
we will that the Mayor for the time being shall be one) shall 
& may have full power & abiUty of founding constituting or- 
daining making & estabhshing from time to time such Laws 



134 APPENDIX L. 

statutes rights ordinances & constitutions as to them or the 
Major part of them (of whom we will that the Mayor for the 
time being shall be one) shall accordg to their sound discretion 
seem good wholesome profitable honest & necessary for the 
good rule & Government of the Boro afsd & of all the Officers 
Ministers Artificers Burgesses inhabitants & residents of the 
sd Boro & for the declg in what manner & order they the sd 
Mayor Aldern Bailiffs & princl Burgesses of the Boro afsd & 
all & singr other the officers ministers artificers Burgesses & 
Inhabitants of the sd Boro for the time being shall use carry 
& demean themselves in their offices duties ministries & Busi- 
nesses within the afsd Boro the hberties & precincts thereof 
And also for the better preservation Government Disposition 
letting & demising of the Lands tents possons & hereditaments 
& of the Goods & chattels of the afsd Mayor Aldermen Baihffs 
& Burgesses of the Boro afd & other matters & things whatsr 
touching or in anywise concerning the Boro afd or the estate 
right & intt thereof And that the Mayor Alderman Baihffs & 
princl Burgesses of the Boro afd for the time being (of whom 
we will that the Mayor for the time being shall be one) so often 
as they shall found make & estabhsh such laws rights ordinances 
& constitutions in form afsd may make ordain hmit & provide 
such pains punishments & penalties by imprisonment of the 
Body or by fines amerciaments or by either of them towards 
& upon the offenders against such statutes laws rights ordin- 
ances and constitutions or any or either of them as to them the 
sd Mayor Aldermen Bailiffs & principal Burgesses of the Boro 
afd for the time being or the major part of them (of whom 
We will the Mayor shall be one) shall appear to be meet neces- 
sary fitting & requisite for the observation of the sd laws statutes 
ordinances & constitutions And shall & may levy take & have 
the same fines & amerciaments without the hindrance of us 
our heirs or successors or of any the officers & ministers of us 
our heirs or successors whomsr All & singr which laws statutes 
rights ordinances & customs so as afsd to be made We Will 
shall be observed under the punishments to be therein contd 
So nevertheless as that the afsd Laws rights ordinances statutes 
constitutions pains punishments and imprisonments be reason- 
able & not repugant nor contrary to the Laws statutes liberties 
rights & customs of our Kingdom of England And for the better 
exeon of our will & Grant in this behalf we have assigned nomin- 
ated constituted & made & do by these presents for us our heirs 



APPENDIX L,. 135 

& successors assign nominate constitute & make our beloved 
Thomas Babington Esqr one of the Burgesses of the Boro afsd 
to be the first & now Mayor of the Boro afsd to continue in 
the same office from the date of these presents until the Monday 
next after the feast of St Michael the Archangel next ensuing 
& from thence until one or of the Aldn of the Boro afsd shall 
be in due mmer elected preferred & sworn to the office of Mayor 
of the Boro afsd accdg to the ordinances & provisions hereafter 
in these presents expressed & decld if he the sd Thos Babington 
shall so long hve We have also assigned nominated constituted 
& made & by these presents for us our heirs & successors assign 
nominate & make our beloved J no Howel Maurice Dyer Henry 
Fisher Master of Arts, Hugh Dyer, David Dyer Jno Aylwarde 
Wm Gardner Griffithe Bowen, Jno Fisher Dd WilUams Griffith 
Rowe David King Burgesses of the Boro afsd to be the first & 
now aldermen of the Boro afsd to continue in the sd office of 
Aldermen of the Boro afsd during their natural Uves unless 
for misgovernment or for misbehaviour in that behalf or for any 
other reasble cause they or any of them shall in the mean time 
be amoved from that office We have also assigned nominated 
constituted & made & do by these presents for us our heirs 
& successors assign nominate constitute & make our beloved 
Wm Gardner & Owen Bowen Gentn Burgesses of the Boro 
afsd to be the first & now Bailiffs of the Boro afsd to continue 
in that office from the date of these presents until the Monday 
next after the feast of St Michael the Archangel now next en- 
suing & from thence until two others to the office of BaiUfFs 
of the Boro afsd shall in due mmer be elected preferred & sworn 
accdg to the Ordinances & provisions in these presents expressed 
& decld if they the sd Wm Gardner & Owen Bowen shall so 
long Hve We have also assigned nominated constituted & made 
& do by these presents for us our heirs & successors assign 
nominate constitute & make our beloved Owen Bowen Jno 
Dyer Daud Dyer Jno PhilHps Maurice Fisher David Mansell 
Walter Rice Wm ColHn Heny John, Thos Walter David Merton 
& Maurice Rice to be the first & now princl Burgesses of the 
Boro afsd to continue in that office during their natural fives 
unless for misgovernmt or for misbehaviour in that behalf 
or for any or reasble cause they or any of them shall in the 
mean time be amoved therefrom And further we will & do by 
these presents for us our heirs & successors grant to the before 
named Mayor aldermen Bailiffs & Burgesses of the Boro afsd 



136 APPENDIX L. 

& their Successors that the Mayor Aldermen Bailiffs & princl 
Burgesses of the Bore afsd for the time being or the Major part 
of them (of whom we will that the mayor of the Boro afsd for 
the time being shall be one) shall & may from time to time & 
at all times hereafter have the power faculty & authy yrly for 
ever in & upon the Monday next after the feast of St Michael 
the Archgel of naming & electing & that they shall & may name 
& elect one of tha Aldermen of the Boro afsd to be Mayor of the 
same Boro for & during one whole year then next follg And 
that he after he shall as afsd be nominated the Mayor of the 
Boro afsd before he shall be admitted to execute that ofiSce 
shall take his corporal oath in the Guild hall of Kidwelly before 
the last mayor his predecessor well & faithfully to execute 
that ofl&ce And that after he shall have so taken such oath he 
shall & may execute the ofi&ce of Mayor of the Boro afsd until 
Mondy next after the feast of St Michael the Archgl then next 
follg & from thence until one or of the Aldn of the sd Boro 
shall be in due mmer elected preferred & sworn into that office 
accdg to the ordinances & provisions in these presents expd 
& decld And moreover we will & do by these presents for us 
our heirs & succrs grant to the afsd Mayor Aldermen BaiUfis 
& Burgesses of the Boro afsd & their succrs that the Mayor 
Aldn BaiUfFs & princl Burgesses of the Boro afsd for the time 
being or the Major part of them (of whom we will that the 
Mayor shall always be one) shall & may at all times hereafter 
have power faculty & authority yearly for ever in & upon the 
Mondy next after the feast of St Mchl the Archgl of electg & 
nominatg & that they shall & may elect & nominate two of the 
princl Burgesses of the Boro afsd to be the BaiUffs of the sd 
Boro for & during one whole year then next follg And that they 
after they shall be so as afsd elected & nominated the BaiHffs 
of the Boro afsd befe they shall be admitted to execute that 
office shall each of them take his Corpl Oath in the Guildhall 
of Kidwelly afsd befe the Mayor of the Boro afsd for the time 
being well & faithlly to execute the sd Office of BaiUffs of the 
Boro afsd And that after they shall have so taken such oath 
they shall & may execute the office of Baihffs of the Boro afsd 
until the Mondy next after the feast of St Michael the Archgl 
then next follg & from thence until two others of the princl 
Burgs of the Boro afsd shall in due mmer be elected preferred 
& sworn into the office of BaiUffs of the Boro afsd accdg to 
the ordinances & provisions in these presents expressed & deled 



APPENDIX L,. 137 

And moreover we will & do by these presents for us our heirs 
& successors grant to the afsd Mayor Aldn Bailiffs & Burgss 
of the Boro afsd & their succrs that if it shall happen that the 
Mayor of the Boro afsd for the time being shall at any time 
die within one year after he shall be preferred & sworn into the 
office of Mayor of the Boro afsd That then it may & shall be 
lawful for the Aldn BaiUffs & princl Burgesses of the Boro afsd 
for the time being or the major part of them to elect & prefer 
one other of the Aldermen of the Boro afsd into the office of 
Mayor of the Boro afsd And that he to be so as afsd from time 
to time elected & preferred shall have & exercise that office 
during the remr of the same yr havg first taken his Corpl oath 
in the Guildhall of Kidwy afsd befe two or more of the Aldn 
of the sd Boro for the time being well faithfully & rightfully 
to execute the sd Office & so as often as the case shall happen 
to which sd Aldn or any two or more of them for the time being 
(as the case happens) we do by these presents for us our heirs 
& successors give & grant full power & authority to administer 
such seasble oath to the pson to be so nominated & elected 
Mayor of the Boro afsd well & faithfully to exte the sd Office 
& that witht any o' or fur writ want or grant to be from us 
our heirs or succrs in this behf. procured and obtd And further 
we will & do by these presents for us our heirs & succrs grant 
to the afsd Mayor Aldn Baihffs & Burgesses of the Boro afsd 
& their succrs that if it shall happen that the BaiUffs of the Boro 
afsd for the time being or eir of them shall at any time die within 
one year after they shall be preferred & sworn into the Office 
of Baihffs of the Boro afsd or be removed from that Office (which 
sd Baihffs or any of them for misbehaviour in the sd office 
or for any or reasble cause) by the Mayor Aldn & princl Burgs 
of the Boro afsd for the time being or the major part of them 
(of whom we will the Mayor shall always be one) we will shall 
be removable that then & so often as it shall & may be Iful 
for the Mayor Aldn & princl Burgs of the Boro afsd for the 
time being or the major part of them (of whom we will the 
Mayor shall be one) to elect & prefer one other or two others 
of the princl Burgs of the Boro afsd into the office or offices 
of Bailiff or Baihffs of the Boro afsd And that he or they so as 
afsd elected & preferred may have & exercise the office of Baihff 
or Bailiffs of the Boro afsd during the remr of the same year 
havg iirst taken their Corpl Oaths in the Guildhall afsd before 
the Mayor of the Boro afsd for the time being & so on as often 



138 APPENDIX I,. 

as the case shall so happen We also will & do by these presents 
for us our heirs & successors grant to the afsd Mayor Aldermen 
BaiUffs & Burgesses of the Boro afsd & their succrs that so often 
as it shall happen that any of the Aldermen of the Boro afsd 
for the time being shall die or be amoved from their office wch 
sd Alderman or any of them for misbehaviour in their office 
or for any other reasble cause by the Mayor & the Major part 
of the rest of the Aldermen Bailiffs & princl Burgesses of the 
Boro afsd for the time being we will shall be answerable that 
then & so often it shall & may be lawful for the Mayor Aldemen 
BaiMffs & princl Burgesses of the Boro afsd or the major part 
of them (of whom we will the Mayor shall be one) to elect & 
nominate one or more other or ors of the Baihffs or princl Bur- 
gesses of the Boro afsd for the time being within a convenient 
time after such death or amoval in the place or places of him 
or them the sd Alderman or Aldermen so happg to die or be 
amoved And that he or they after he or they shall be so as afsd 
elected & preferred into the office of Aldn or Alden of the Boro 
afsd may have & exercise the sd office during his or their natural 
life or hves unless he or they shall in the mean time be amoved 
in form afsd for misbehaviour or any other reasble cause havg 
first taken their Corporal oaths in the Guildhall of Kidwelly 
afsd befe the Mayor of the Boro afsd for the time being well 
& faithlly in & by all things to execute the sd office & so on 
as often as the case shall so happen And if it shall happen that 
any or either of the princl burgs of the Boro afsd for the time 
being shall die or be amoved from that office (which sd princl 
Burgesses and any of them for misbehaviour or any other 
reasble cause by the Mayor & major part of the Aldn & Bailiffs 
& the rest of the princl Burgesses of the Boro afsd for the time 
being we will shall be amovable) that then & so often it shall 
& may be Iful for the Mayor Aldn Baihffs & princl Burgesses 
of the Boro afsd or the major part of them (of whom we will 
the Mayor shall always be one) to nominate elect & prefer one 
or more other or others of the Burgesses or inhabitants of the 
Boro of Kidwelly afsd within a convenient time after such 
death or amoval in the place or places of him or them the 
sd princl Burgess or Burgesses so happg to die or be amoved 
to continue in office during his or their natural hfe or hves 
unless he or they shall in the mean time be amoved in form 
afsd for misbehaviour or o" reasble cause havg first taken their 
corpl oaths at the Guildhall afsd before the Mayor of the Boro 



APPENDIX I,. 139 

afsd for the time being well & faithfully to execute the sd office 
& so on as often as the case shall so happen And further we will 
that from henceforth there shall be for ever within the Boro 
afsd one sufficient & discreet man of the Burgesses of the sd 
Boro who shall be called the Chamberlain of the Boro of Kid- 
welly afsd And for the better execution of our will in this behalf 
we have assigned nominated constituted & made & by these 
presents for us our heirs & successors assign nominate constitute 
& make our beloved Robert JoUife to be the first & now Cham- 
berlain of the Boro afsd to continue in the sd office during the 
pleasure of the Mayor Aldn BaiUfFs & princl Burgesses of the 
Boro afsd for the time being or the major part of them (of whom 
we will the Mayor of the sd Boro shall always be one) first tak- 
ing his Corporal Oath before the Mayor of the Boro afsd well 
& faithlly to exte the sd office And if it shall at any time happen 
that the Chamberlain of the Boro afsd for the time being shall 
die or be amoved from the sd Office (which sd Chamberlain 
we will shall be amovable for any reasble cause at the pleasure 
of the Mayor & the major part of the Aldn Baihfi's & princl 
Burgesses afsd for the time being) that then it shall & may be 
lawful for the Mayor Aldn Baihffs & princl Burgesses of the 
Boro afsd or the major part of them (of whom we will the Mayor 
shall be one) to nominate elect & prefer one other of the Bur- 
gesses or Inhabitants of the Boro afsd within a convenient 
time after such death or amoval to be Chamberlain of the Boro 
afsd to continue in the sd office during the pleasure of the Mayor 
& major part of the Aldn Baihffs & principal Burgesses as afsd 
first takg his corpl oath in form afsd in the Guildhall afsd And 
so on as often as the case shall so happen But we will & do 
by these presents for us our heirs & succrs ordain constitute 
& declare that no person shall at any time hereafter be admitted 
to the office of Mayor Aldn Baihfi^ Princl Burgess or Chamber- 
lain of the Boro afsd unless he be an inhabitant & resident 
within the Boro afsd the Hberties or precincts thof nor shall 
execute any of those offices longer than he is inhabg & residing 
within the same Boro the hberties or precincts thof any thing 
in these presents contd to the conty notwithstg Also we will 
& do by these presents for us our heirs & succrs grant to the 
afsd Mayor Aldn Baihffs & Burgesses of the Boro afsd & their 
Successors And we do hkewise ordain constitute & declare 
that all lands tents & hdts as well in the Boro afsd as in the 
outparts within the four ancient crosses by the circuit of the 



140 APPENDIX 1,. 

same Boro be from henceforth for ever within the liberties 
limits circuits precincts & bounds of the sd Boro And that the 
sd Boro with such hberties Hmits circuit & precinct shall be 
a free Boro of itself distinct & separate from any or Ldship 
City Boro or Town in the afsd Coy of Carmarthen And fur 
we will & do by these presents for us our heirs & successors 
grant to the afsd Mayor Aldn BaiUfls & Burgesses of the Boro 
afsd & their succrs that whensr & as often as any of the Bur- 
gesses free men as Inhabitants of the Boro afsd shall be resply 
elected & preferred in due manner & accdg to the true Interest 
of these presents to the office or offices of Mayor Aldn Baihffs 
principal Burgesses or Chambn of the sd Boro havg notice by 
the Mayor of the sd Boro for the time being to him or them 
respecty given to have & exercise the sd offices or any of them 
to which he or they shall be so elected & preferred & shall deny 
& refuse to take upon themselves the same that then & so often 
it shall & may be lawful for them the sd Mayor Aldn & princl 
Burgesses of the Boro afsd for the time being or the major 
part of them (of whom we will that the Mayor shall be one) 
to tax & impose upon all & singr such person & persons or as 
afsd denying or refusing the offices afsd the sums foUg (i.e.) 
Upon such persons denying or refusing to take upon himself 
the office of Mayor of the Boro afsd to which he shall be so 
elected & preferred as afsd the sum of £6 of Iful money of Eng- 
land & upon every such person or persons denying or refusing 
to take upon thselves the office of Aldn of the Boro afsd £4. 
of lawful money of England & upon every person denying & 
refusing to take upon himself the office of Baihff of the Boro 
afsd £;} of lawful money of England & upon every person deny- 
ing & refusing to take upon himself the office of Principal Bur- 
gess of the Boro afsd £2 of hke moy & upon every person denying 
& refusing to take upon himself the office of Chamberlain of 
the Boro afsd £2 of lawful money of England and shall & may 
levy have & rece the Fines so taxed & imposed from time to 
time by distress of the Goods & chattels of such persons so 
denying & refusing & of every of them or orwise by action 
suit or plaint to the use of the afsd Mayor Aldn Bailiffs & Bur- 
gesses & their succrs & the Comonalty of the Boro afsd witht 
acct or any other thing to be therefore to us our heirs or succrs 
in any wise rendered pd or done And further we will & do by 
these presents for us our heirs and succrs grant to the afsd 
Mayor Alderman Bailiffs & Burgesses of the Boro afsd & their 



APPENDIX I,. 141 

succrs that the Mayor Aldn Baihffs & princl Burgesses of the 
Boro afsd for the time being or the major part of them (of whom 
we will the Mayor of the Boro afsd for the time being shall be 
one) shall & may have power of nominating & electing & that 
they shall & may from time to time for ever nominate & elect 
one upright & discreet man to be chief steward of the Boro 
afsd to continue in the said office during the pleasure of the 
Mayor & the Major part of the Aldn Baihffs & princl Burgesses 
of the Boro afsd for the time being first takg his Corpl Oath 
before the Mayor of the Boro afsd for the faithful execn of the 
said office Also we have assigned ordained made & constituted 
& do by these presents for us our heirs & successors assign 
make ordain & constitute our beloved Henery Fleetwood Esqre 
to be the first & now recorder of the Boro afsd to have & exer- 
cise the sd Office during his natural Life by himself or his suffi- 
cient Deputy which sd Deputy of the afs Hy Fleetwood shall 
take his corpl Oath before the Mayor for the time being well 
& faithfully to execute his office And further we will & do by 
these presents for us our heirs & succrs grant to the afsd Mayor 
Aldn Baihffs & Burgesses of the Boro afsd for the time being 
or the major part of them (of whom we will that the Mayor 
shall be one) shall & may have power & authority of nominating 
& electing & that they shall & may from time to time nominate 
& elect one upright & discreet man learned in the Laws of Eng- 
land who shall be & be called the Recorder of the Boro afsd 
which sd Recorder so nominated & elected shall take his cor- 
poral oath before the Mayor of the Boro afsd for the time being 
to execute his sd office of recorder of the Boro afsd in all things 
relating thereto And we do by these presents for us our heirs 
& successors assign ordain make & constitute our beloved Henry 
Fleetwood Esqre to be the first & now Recorder of the Boro 
atd to have & exercise the sd office during his natural Ufe by 
himself or by his sufficient Deputy the afsd Henry Fleetwood 
first taking this Corpl Oath befe the Mayor for the time being 
well & faithfully to execute the sd Office And that after such 
Oath so taken he shall exercise & execute the sd Office by him- 
self or by his sufficient Deputy learned in the laws of England 
such Deputy havg taken the Hke oath in mmer afsd durg the 
pleasure of the Mayor & the Major part of the Aldermen Bail- 
iffs & princl Burgesses of the Boro afsd for the time being And 
that the Recorder of the Boro afd or his sufft Depy to be from 
time to time nominated & elected shall be from time to time 



142 APPENDIX L. 

aiding & assisting to the Mayor of the Boro afsd for the time 
being in all matters & things which in the Court of Record 
of the Boro afsd shall be from time to time pleadable & deter- 
minable & shall do & execute all things which to the office of 
Recorder do belong or appertain in as ample manner & form 
as any other recorder in any Boro or Town incorporate within 
this Kingdom of England doth & may execute by virtue of the 
office of Recorder We have granted moreover & by these presents 
for us our heirs & successors grant to the afsd Mayor Aldn 
BaiUfIs & Burgesses of the Boro afsd & their succrs that the 
Mayor & Recorder of the Boro afsd the Depy of the sd Recorder 
in his absence for the time being & also one of the Aldn of the 
Boro afsd to be yearly & from time to time nominated & elected 
by the Mayor Aldermen & Baihfifs & Princl Burgesses of the 
Boro afsd for the time being or by the Major part of them may 
& shall be & each of them may & shall be for ever hereafter 
Justices of us our heirs & succrs to preserve & keep & shall 
cause to be preserved and kept the peace of us our heirs & succrs 
in the Boro afsd & the circuit & precincts thereof which sd Re- 
corder & his depy & the afsd Alderman to be elected as afsd 
& each of them shall take his Corpl Oath befe the Mayor for 
the time being & two aldermen of the Boro afsd for the time 
being well & faithfully to execute the Office of Justices of the 
peace And that the sd Mayor & Recorder in his absence togr 
with the afsd Alderman to be nominated & elected a Justice 
of the peace as afsd or any two of them (of whom we will the 
Mayor of the Boro afsd for the time being shall ba one) shall 
have full power & authority to enquire concg all trespasses 
misprisons & other misdemeanors & inferior offences defaults 
& articles whatsr done moved or committed or hereafter to 
be had done or committed within the Boro afsd the Hberties 
or precincts thereof which befe the Keepers & Justices of the 
peace in any County of our Kingdom of England may & ought 
to be enquired into So Nevertheless that they any or either 
of them shall not in anywise hereafter proceed in the deter- 
minon of any treason misprison of treason murder or felony 
or of any other matter touching the loss of Ufe or Umb within 
the Boro afsd the hberties & precincts thereof witht the special 
mandate of us our heirs or succrs And that no Justice of the 
peace of us our heirs or succrs shall in anywise enter to do 
or execute any thing within the afsd Boro the hberties or pre- 
cincts thereof which to the Office of Justice of the peace be- 



APPENDIX r,. 143 

longeth to be then done Also we will & do by these presents 
ordain & appoint that the Mayor of the Boro afsd for the time 
being before he be admitted to execute the sd office of Justice 
of the Boro afsd shall take his Corpl Oath rightfully & faith- 
ftilly to execute the sd office & the oath in that behalf provided 
& required to be taken by Justices of the peace by the laws 
& statutes of this our Kingdom of England befe his predeces- 
sor the last Mayor of the Boro afsd who shall be then hving 
And that every person after he shall go out of the office of Mayor 
of the Boro afsd by virtue of these our letters patent shall & 
may have full power & authority of giving & administering 
such oaths as afsd to the Mayor of the Boro afsd for the time 
being his succr without any o'^ warrant or commission to be 
obtained or procured from us our heirs or succrs And that the 
recorder & last predecessor of every Mayor of the Boro afsd 
for the time being & each of them shall take his Corpl Oath 
rightfully & faithfully to execute the office of Justice of the 
Peace & the oath in that behf provided & reqxaired to be taken 
by Justices of the peace by the Laws & statutes of this Kingdom 
of England before the Mayor of the Boro afsd for the time 
being & that the Mayor of the Boro afsd for the time being 
having first taken his oath in form afsd shall & may by virtue 
of these presents have full power & authority of giving & ad- 
ministering such oaths as afsd to such Justices of the peace 
or any of them without any other warrant & commission to 
be obtained or procured from us our heirs or succrs We have 
also given & granted & do by these presents for us our heirs 
& succrs give & grant to the Mayor of the Boro afsd for the 
time being full power & authority of giving & administering 
reasonable oaths as well to the Aldermen Bailiffs Princl Bur- 
gesses Chief steward recorder & his Depy Chambn Town Clerk 
Serjeants at Mace as to all others the officers appted or to be 
appted by virtue of these presents for the true & faithful exeon 
of their officies resply & that witht any o" writ or warrant to 
be hereafter in any wise procured & obtained from us or our 
succrs And further we will & do by these presents for us our 
heirs & succrs grant to the afsd Mayor Aldn BaiUffs & Bur- 
gesses of the Boro afsd & their succrs that they & their succrs 
from henceforth for ever shall have within the Boro afsd the 
liberties & precincts thereof one prison or Goal for the detain- 
ing in carcerating & safe custy of all & singr person or psons 
attached or to be attached & to be adjudged in the sd Goal 



144 APPENDIX I,. 

or prison to be in anywise found within the Boro afsd the liber- 
ties or precincts thof there to continue until they shall be thence 
delivered by due course of law. And that the Baihffs of the 
Boro afsd for the time being be & shall be Keepers of the same 
Goal And further we will & do by these presents for us our heirs 
& succrs grant to the afsd Mayor Aldn BaiUfi & Burgesses 
of the Boro afsd & their succrs that the Mayor or recorder or 
his Depy in his absence & the Aldn afsd being as is afsd Justices 
of the peace within the Boro afsd or two of them (of whom we 
will that the Mayor of the Boro afsd for the time being shall 
be one) shall & may by their warrant in writg signed & sub- 
scribed with their proper hands send such psons who shall be 
hafter taken annested attached or found in the Borough afsd 
the liberties or precincts thereof for treason murder felony 
manslaughter or robbery done or to be done or for suspicion 
of felony to the Common Goal of our Coy of Carmn there to 
remain & to be tried & answer for their offences before the 
Justices of us our heirs or succrs assigned or to be assigned 
to hear & determine such misdemeanors committed in the sd 
Coy or the Justices assd or to be assd to deliver the Goals of the 
sd Coy of Carmn Wilhng & by these presents for us our heirs 
& succrs commanding as well the sheriff of the Coy of Carmn as 
the keeper of the Common Goal of the sd Coy for the time being 
that they & each of them upon such warrant by the afsd J ustices 
of the peace within the Boro of Kidwelly for the time being 
or by any two of them (of which we will that the Mayor shall 
be one) to be made & directed to them or either of them to 
rece & safely keep all such pson & psons so as afsd by the afsd 
Justices of the peace within the Boro afsd to be hereafter taken 
arrested attached or found in the afd Boro of Kidwelh the 
liberties or precincts thof for the afsd murder manslaughter 
or C robbery or felony done or to be done or for suspicion of 
felony & so as afsd sent to the afsd common Goal of the Coy 
of Carmn afsd there to continue to be tried & answer before 
the Justices of us our heirs & succrs for the time being assd or 
to be assd to hear & determine such misdemeanor committed 
in the sd Coy or the Justices for the time being assd or to be 
assd to deUver the Goal afsd & these our letters patent or the 
enrollment thof shall in this behalf be to the afsd Sheriff & 
Keeper of the Common Goal of the County of Carmn for the 
time being a sufficient warrt & discharge Also we will & do 
by these presents for us our heirs & succrs grant to the afsd 



APPENDIX I,. 145 

Mayor Aldn Bailiffs & Burgesses of the Boro afsd & their succrs 
that it shall & may be Iful for the Mayor & Recorder of the Boro 
afsd for the time being & the Deputy of the sd Recorder in his 
absence & of the afsd Aldn elected & to be elected as afd a Jus- 
tice of the Peace within the Boro afsd or any two of them (of 
whom we will the Mayor for the time being shall be one) from 
time to time for ever hereafter to have hold & keep in some 
convenient place within the Boro afsd General Sessions of the 
Peace & in the same sessions to do execute handle hear & deter- 
mine all & singr acts matters Businesses causes & things whatsr 
in as ample mmer & form as any other our Justices within 
any County City Boro or Town Incorporate within this Kingdom 
of England may & can do execute handle hear & determine 
the same without any other warrt or grant to be from us our 
heirs or succrs in any wise obtained prosecuted or sought. So 
Nevertheless that they do not proceed to the determinon 
of any treason misprison of treason murder or felony or of any 
other matter touching the loss of Ufe or Umb witliin the Boro 
afsd the liberties or precincts thereof. And further we will 
& do by these presents for us our heirs & succrs grant to the 
afsd Mayor Aldn Bailiffs & Burgesses of the Boro afsd & their 
succrs that they & their succrs shall & may from henceforth 
for ever have within the Boro afsd a discreet & fit person who 
shall be & be called the Steward of the Boro afsd & for the better 
execn of our will & grant in this behalf we have afsd nominated 
constituted & made & do by these presents for us our heirs 
& successors assign nominate make & constitute our beloved 
John Howell to be the first & now steward of the Boro afsd 
to continue in the sd office during the pleasure of the Mayor 
Aldn BaiUffs & Burgesses of the Boro afsd for the time being 
or the major part of them (of whom we will the Mayor shall 
be one) which sd J no Howell & every o' pson hereafter to be 
elected & nominated to the office of Steward of the Boro afsd 
befe he shall be admitted to execute the sd office shall take 
his corpl oath before the Mayor of the Boro afsd for the time 
being well faithfidly & rightfully in & by all things to do & 
execute all & singr those things which belong to the office of 
Steward of the Boro afsd & that from time to time & at all times 
after the death or amotion of the afsd J no Howell it shall & may 
be Iful for the Mayor Aldn BaiUffs & Burgesses of the Boro 
afsd for the time being or the Major part of them (of whom 
we will the Mayor shall be one) to elect & prefer one other up- 



146 APPENDIX L,. 

right & discreet man to be steward of the Boro afsd to continue 
in the sd office during pleasure as afd first takg his corpl Oath 
in form afsd & so on as often as the case shall so happen And 
that the afd Mayor Aldn Baihflts & Burgesses of the Boro afsd 
& their succrs shall & may from henceforth for ever have in 
the Boro afsd one upright & discreet man to be elected in manner 
hafter mentd who shall be called the Town Clerk of the Boro 
afsd And for the better exeon of our will & grant in this behalf 
we have assigned nominated constituted & made & do by these 
presents for us our heirs & succrs assign nominate constitute 
& make our beloved Mchl Cubbydge to be the first and now 
Town Clerk of the Boro afsd to continue in the sd ofiice during 
the pleasure of the Mayor Aldermen Baihffs & Burgesses of 
the Boro afsd for the time being or the major part of them 
(of whom we will the Mayor of the Boro afsd shall be one) which 
sd Michl Cubbydge & every C pson hafter to be nominated 
& elected to the office of Town Clerk of the Boro afsd before he 
shall be admitted to execute the sd office shall first take his 
corpl oath before the Mayor afsd for the time being well & 
faithfully to execute the sd office of Town Clerk of the Boro 
afsd & that he shall & will do & execute all & singr those things 
which belong to the office of Town Clerk of the Boro afsd And 
that from time to time & at all times after the death or amotion 
of the afsd Michl Cubbydge it shall & may be Iful for the Mayor 
Aldn Bailiffs & princl Burgesses of the Boro afsd for the time 
being or the Major part of them (of whom we will the Mayor 
for the time being shall be one) to elect & prefer one other up- 
right & discreet man learned in the laws of England to be Town 
Clerk of the Boro afsd to continue in the sd office during the 
pleasure of the Mayor Aldermen Bailiffs & Chief Burgesses of 
the Boro afsd for the time being or the Major part of them 
(of whom we will the Mayor shall be one) first takg his Corpl 
oath in form afsd & so on as often as the case shall so happen 
And further we will & do by these presents for us our heirs 
& succrs grant to the afsd Mayor Aldn BaiUffs & Burgesses 
& their succrs that there shall & may be from henceforth for 
ever in the Boro afsd two Officers who shall be & be called 
Serjeants at Mace which sd Serjeants at Mace shall be attend- 
ing from time to time upon the Mayor of the Boro afsd for 
the time being & shall be from time to time nominated & elected 
by the Mayor of the sd Boro for the time being And that they 
so elected & nominated to the offices of Serjts at Mace shall 



APPENDIX L. 147 

be in due manner sworn well & faithfully to execute the sd 
office before the Mayor of the Boro afsd for the time being & 
we do depute that they the sd Serjeants at Mace shall bear 
& carry gilt or silver Maces engraven & wrought with our arms 
in all places within the Boro afsd the liberties & precincts thereof 
before the Mayor of the Boro afsd for the time being & that 
the afsd Serjeants at Mace be Ministers at the Hundred Court 
& of our Court of Record within the Boro afsd to execute the 
processes distresses mandates & precepts of the sd Courts in 
due mmer & accdg to the exigency of right & law & shall do 
& execute all & singr other things wthin the Boro afsd the 
liberties & precincts thereof which are customarily and lawfully 
done & executed by Serjts at Mace in any other Boro or Town 
incorporate within this Kingdom of England And further of 
our more ample special grace certain knowledge & mere mocon 
We will & do by these presents for us our heirs & succrs grant 
to the afsd Mayor Mdn BaiUffs & Burgesses of the Boro afsd 
& their succrs that they may have the court or hundred of Kid- 
welly & that they may have hold & keep the Hundred Court 
of Kidwy from time to time once every Tuesday three weeks 
yearly for ever to be holden before the Mayor & Steward of 
the Boro afsd for the time being or one of them & that he and 
and they shall & may in the same Court have hold handle hear 
& determine all & singr such & the like plaints pleas suits actions 
matters & things whatsoever as in the same court by any o"" 
pson or psons or before any o'' pson or psons htofore have been 
had holden handled heard & determined by any Iful means 
usuage or custom whatsr & by such & the like process & means 
as within the sd Hundd of Kidwelly have been htofore used 
as in any Iful mmer ought to be used & that witht the hindrance 
molestation or disturbance of us our heirs or succrs whatsr 
And further we will & do by these presents for us our heirs 
& succrs grant to the afsd Mayor Aldn BaiUffs and Burgs of 
the Boro afsd & their succrs that they & their succors shall & 
may have hold within the Boro afsd a Court of Record before 
the Mayor & recorder of the sd Boro for the time being or eir 
of them or their sufft Depys in some convenient place within 
the Boro afsd the hberties & precincts thereof on Monday in 
every 15 days & so on from 15 days to 15 days for ever & that 
they the sd Mayor & Recorder of the sd Boro for the time being 
or one of them by themselves or by his or their sufift depy or 
depys shall have full power & authy from time to time of hearg 



148 APPENDIX I,. 

& determing in the sd Court by Plaint in the same Court to be 
levied on all & all manner of Debts accts covts contracts tres- 
passes vie & armiss or orwise done or to be done in compt of 
us our heir or succrs covts detainers contempts frauds & o' 
actions & things real psonal & mixed wheresr within the sd Boro 
of Kidwy & the Umits bounds & liberties thereof in any wise 
arising or to arise happg or to happen provided such debts 
accts contracts covts trespasses & o" actions & pleas do not 
exceed the sum or value of ;^200 & that the sd Mayor & recorder 
of the Boro afsd or eir of them or his or their depty for the time 
being upon such contempts pleas plaints & actions shall & may 
have power faculty & authority to implead the Defts agst whom 
such plaints pleas or actions shall happen to be moved or levied 
in the afsd Court by summons attacmt or distringas to be directed 
to the Serjeants at Mace of the sd Boro for the time being & 
for want of chattels & lands of such Defendts within the Boro 
afsd or the liberties thereof where or by wch they cannot be 
summoned attached or distrained to attach or take their bodies 
accdg to the customs used in any or Boro or Town within this 
Kingdom of England & separately to hear & determine all & 
singr the actions pleas & plaints afsd & to bring into Court 
& determine by the same processes judgments & exeons of 
Jdgmts whby the Uke pleas are in the sd Boro or in any other 
Boro or Town incorporate brought into Court & determined 
& may hope & do exeons of the sd processes & Judgments by 
the Serjeants at Mace afsd And further we will & firmly enjoin- 
ing do by these presents for us our heirs & succrs order & commd 
the Steward & under Steward of us our heirs & succrs of our 
I/dship of Kidwy for the time being that they & each of them 
do from time to time hold & keep & cause to be holden & kept 
all & singr the Courts leet of the afsd Lordsp of Kidwy that 
is to say of the Commotes of Iskennen Cornewallan & Kidwelly 
& all the Courts called the Month courts of the Commote of 
Kidwy within the Boro afsd & not elsewhere any statute act 
usage custom or prescription or any o"^ matter cause or thing 
to the conty thof notwithstg And Whereas the Lord Henry 
the 6th late King of Engd by his letters patent sealed with 

his seal of the Duchy of Lancaster bearing date 

did grant that the burgesses of the Boro afsd their heirs & succrs 
& their servants also the tents of the sd Burgesses their heirs 
& succrs residing within the Boro afsd or any of them shod 
not at any time thafter for ever be convicted or tryed within 



APPENDIX L. 149 

the Ldshps of Kidwy Cornwallan & Iskennen by any Foreign- 
ers but by entire Englishmen of the sd Boro & not by Welshmen 
as by the sd letters patent among other things more fully & 
manifestly appears And Whereas we are informed that part 
of the now Burgesses & inhabitants of the Boro afsd are Welsh- 
men by reason whereof many strifes & inconveniences do arise 
in the Boro afsd by means of the afsd Grant we therefore wilhng 
that such strifes & inconveniences within the Boro afsd may 
from henceforth be for ever taken away of our more abundant 
special grace certain knowledge & mere mocon do will & by 
these presents grant to the afsd Mayor Aldn Baihffs & Burgs 
of the Boro afsd & their succrs & their servants & also their 
tenants within the Boro afsd residing shall not nor shall any 
of them from henceforth be convicted or tried within the Ldships 
of Kidwy Cornwallan & Iskennen but by the Burgesses of the 
Boro afsd as well entire Welshmen as Englishmen the afsd 
letters patent or any or matter cause or thing whatsr to the 
conty thof in any wise notwithstg Also we have grtd & do by 
these presents for us our heirs & succrs of our special grace cer- 
tain knowledge & mere mocon grant to the afsd Mayor Alder- 
men Baihffs & Burgesses of the Boro afsd & their succrs that 
the Mayor of the Boro afsd for the time being be and shall be 
the Escheator Coroner & Clerk of the Market of us our heirs 
& succrs within the Boro afsd the hberties & precincts thereof 
& that the afsd Thos Babington the now Mayor of the Boro 
afsd be the first & now Escheator Coroner & Clerk to the Market 
of us our heirs & succrs within the Boro afsd the hberties & 
precincts thereof to continue in the sd offices until he shall cease 
to be Mayor of the Boro afsd And that the Mayor of the Boro 
afsd for the time being shall & may have full power & authy 
to do execute within the Boro afsd the limits & precincts thof 
all & singr those things which to the offices of Coroner Escheator 
& Clerk of the Market or any or either of them resply do belong 
or ought to be done & exted by the laws stats & customs of 
our Kingdom of Engd havg first taken the sevl oaths before 
the last Mayor for the time being well & faithfully to exte the 
sd sevl offices And that no other Coroner escheator or Clerk 
of the Market of us our heirs or succrs shall presume to enter 
or in anywise howsr to interfere to do any thing that to the 
offices of Coroner Escheator & Clerk of the Market resply or 
any or eir of them belongeth in the Boro afsd the hberties & 
precincts thof unless for want of a Mayor of the Boro afsd or 



150 APPENDIX I,. 

his Deputy or Minister for the time being And further of our 
more abundant special grace certain knowlge & mere mocon 
we will & do by these presents for us our heirs & succrs grant 
to the afsd Mayor Aldn Bailiffs & Burgesses of the Boro afsd 
& their Succrs that they & their succrs from henceforth for 
ever may have hold & enjoy all & all mmer of goods & chattels 
waived & strayed & all & all mmer of goods & chattels of all 
& singr felons fugitives felons of themselves & those put in 
exigent & Deodands & all forfeitures of all & singr the tents 
Burgesses inhabits & residents of the Boro afsd the hberties & 
precincts thereof & all other Goods & chattels forfeited & to be 
forfeited in the Boro afsd the hberties & precincts thof from 
time to time happg Coming increasing or arising & that it shall 
& may be Iful for them the sd Mayor Aldn Baihffs & Burgss 
of the Boro afsd & their succrs by themselves or their ministers 
witht the hindrance of us our heirs or succrs or of any the ofi&cers 
or ministers of our said heirs & succrs to be seized & possed 
of the Goods & chattels of other the pmes afsd & to rece & retain 
the same to the use of them the said Mayor Aldn Bailiffs & 
Burgss of the Boro afsd & their succrs We have also given & 
grtd & do by these presents for us our heirs & succrs give & 
grant to the afsd Mayor Aldn Bailiff & Burgesses of the Boro 
afsd & their succrs that they & their succrs may from hence- 
forth for ever have all & all mmer of fines issues & amerciaments 
for trespasses contempts defaults & o'' offences whatsr from 
time to time happening coming or arising within the Boro 
afsd the hberties and precincts thereof from the Exchr of us our 
heirs & succrs within the Boro afsd the liberties & precincts 
thof happg or arisg to be levied by the Baihffs of the Boro afsd 
for the time being So that no Sheriff under Sheriff Bailiff or 
any or Minister of us our heirs or succrs may enter into the Boro 
afsd the hberties or precincts thof for anything to their of&ces 
resply belonging to be in that behalf done unless for want of 
Baihffs of the Boro afsd for the time being And further we will 
& do by these presents for us our heirs & succrs grant to the afsd 
Mayor Aldn Baihffs & Burgesses of the Boro afsd & their succrs 
that the Mayor Aldn Baihffs princl Burgesses & other the Bur- 
gesses & free men of the Boro afsd the liberties or precincts 
thof & their succrs or any or either of them shall not be put 
or impanled to appear in any Juries of Assize recognizances or 
Inquisitions whatsr befe ye Justices of us our heirs & succrs 
assigned or to be assd to take the Assizes or writs of Nisi Prius 



APPENDIX I,. 151 

in the Coy of Carmn or befe any o' Justices of us our heirs or 
succrs whomsr assigned or to be assigned to take the assizes 
or writs of Nisi Prius in the Coy of Carmn or befe any other 
Justices of us our heirs or succrs whomsr assigned or to be as- 
signed to hear & determine treasons felonies & other misde- 
meanors or before any Eschr Coroner or Clk of the Market of 
us our heirs or succrs out of the Boro afsd the hberties or pre- 
cincts thereof nor shall they or any of them in anywise forfeit 
any issues or amerciaments on that acct to us our heirs or succrs 
unless they or any of them have lands & tents out of the sd 
Boro the hmits & precincts thereof for which he or they ought 
to be chged & that the Mayor of the Boro afsd for the time 
being & his succrs as long as they shall continue in the office 
of Mayor & also the Aldn Baihffs & princl Burgesses of the sd 
Boro for the time being so long as they shall continue in the 
offices of Aldn Baihffs & princl Burgs of the sd Boro shall not 
nor shall eir of them be put or empannelled to appear befe 
us our heirs or succrs or any of the Judges or Justices of us our 
heirs or succrs at Westminster in any Juries of Assize or In- 
quisition whatsr nor shall they or any of them forfeit any Issues 
or amerciaments on that acct to us our heirs or succrs in anywise 
but they & every of them shall from time to time for ever be 
thof quit & dischgd & also all fines & amerciaments for trespasses 
defaults contempts & o'' Debts whatsr as well of all men as of 
aU the Burgs & Inhabits of the afsd Boro the hmits hberties 
or precincts thof as well before us our heirs & succrs & befe 
any the Judges & Justices of us our heirs & succrs in any court 
of us our heirs & succrs at Westmr as befe the Justices assd 
& to be assd to take the Assizes & delr the Goal or the Justices 
assd or to be assd to hear & determine trespasses & o" misdemrs 
& o'' the Justices of us our heirs & succrs whomsr And that it 
shall be Iful for them the sd Mayor Aldn Baihffs & Burgesses 
of the Boro afsd for the time being & their succrs by thselves 
or their Ministers to levy perceive & have the sd fines issues 
& amerciaments witht the obstruction or hindrance of us our 
heirs or succrs whomsr And further of our more ample special 
Grace certain knowledge & mere mocon we have given & grtd 
& do by these presents for us our heirs & succrs give & grant 
to the afsd Mayor Aldn Baihffs & Burgs of the Boro afsd & 
their succrs that they & their succrs from henceforth for ever 
shall & may have the return of all writs precepts bills & war- 
rants of us our heirs & succrs & the exeon thof & also of sum- 



152 APPENDIX L. 

monses estreats & precepts And further we will & do by these 
pre.sents for us our heirs & succrs grant to the afsd Mayor Aldn 
Bailiffs & Burgs of the Boro afsd & their succrs that no Stranger 
or Foreigner (unless he be a freeman of the Boro afsd) shall 
from henceforth for ever sell or expose to sale any Goods wares 
or merchandizes within the Boro afsd the Liberties & Precincts 
thof orwise than by wholesale & other than all necessaries for 
the VictuaUing of the Borough afsd unless it be at the time of 
fairs & market to be holden within the Boro afsd nor shall hold 
any shop nor use any mystery occupon or manual act within 
the Boro afsd the liberties or precincts thof without the special 
licence of the Mayor Aldn Bailiffs & Burgesses of the Boro afsd 
or the major part of them (of whom we will the Mayor shall 
be one) in writing under their seal upon pain of the displeasure 
of us our heirs & succrs & under such o'" pains penalties & for- 
feitures as by the Laws & statutes of our Kingdom of Engd 
may be inflicted or imposed upon such offenders for their dis- 
obedience & contempt in that behalf And further we will & do 
by these presents for us our heirs & succrs give & grant to the 
afsd Mayor Aldn Bailiffs & Burgesses of the Boro of Kidwy 
afsd & their succrs the special Mcence & free & lawful power 
faculty & authority of havg purchsg receivg & possessing to 
them & their succrs for ever Manors Messes Lands tents Meadows 
feedings & Pastures Woods rectories tithes rents revenues & 
o"' hdts whatsr as well of us our heirs & succrs as of any o'' pson 
or psons whomsr which are not held immedly of us our heirs or 
succrs in Capite nor by Knights service nor of any o"' pson 
or psons by Knights service provided such manors messes 
lands tents & o" hdts do not exceed in the whole the clear yrly 
value of ;£200 above all chges & reprises The statute of Mort- 
main or any o'' stats act ordinance or proviso htofore had made 
ordained or provided or any o' matter cause or thing whatsr 
to the conty thof in any wise notwithstg We also give & do 
by these presents for us our heirs & succrs grant to each & 
every the subject & subjects whomsr of us our heirs & succrs 
special hcence & Iful & free power faculty & authy that they 
or any or eir of them may Ifully give grant sell demise or ahen 
to the afsd Mayor Aldn Bailiff and Burgs of the Boro of Kidwy 
afsd & their succrs any manors messes rectories tithes woods 
lands tents or o"" Hdts whatsr which are not holden of us our 
heirs & succrs immedly in capite nor by Knights service nor 
any other pson or psons by Knights service not exceedg in the 



APPENDIX L. 153 

whole the clear yearly value of £20 above all taxes & reprises 
The staf of Mortmain or any o' staf act ordinances or proviso 
htfore had made PubUshed ordained or provided or other matter 
cause or thing whatsr to the conty thof in any wise notwithstg 
And Whereas we are informed that within the Boro afsd the 
liberties & precincts thof 3 fairs are now holden & kept from 
time to time whof the memy of man is not to the contry are 
accustd to have been holden & kept yrly in divers sevl places 
(i.e.) one within the walls of the sd Boro on the feast of St. 
Magdalen another at Llangendeirne within 3 miles of the sd 
Boro & within the circuits & Hberties thof upon the Feasts of 
St James the Apostle & the 3rd within the walls of the sd Boro 
upon the feast of St Luke the EvangeUst & the Mayor & Com- 
monalty of the Boro afsd have been accustd to take & rece 
& do now take & rece all profits commodities Stallage Piccage 
tolls ToUage Customs & profits whatsr thence comg And that 
many inconveniences do arise because the sd fair now accustomd 
to be held at Llangendeirne afsd is not held & kept within the 
Boro afsd We desiring that the afsd Boro may be bettered of 
our special grace certain knowldge & mere mocon do will & by 
these prests for us our heirs & succrs do grant to the afsd Mayor 
Aldn Baihffs & Burgesses of the Boro afsd & their succrs that 
they & their succrs may from henceforth for ever have hold 
& keep within the Boro afsd as well the afs 3 fairsd yearly for 
ever upon the same days & times on which the same have here- 
tofore of old been accustd to be holden & kept as two other 
fairs to be hafter yrly holden the ist of the sd fairs to begin on 
the 13th day of May & to be kept & contd durg that whole day 
& the 2nd fair to begin on the 14th day of Octr & to be kept 
& continued durg that whole day togr with a court of Pie powder 
to be there holden at the time of all the afsd fairs & with all 
the liberties & free customs tolls stallage piccage fines amer- 
ciaments & all o"^ profits commodities advantges & emoluments 
whatsr to such fairs & court of Pie powder afsd belg appertgg 
happg or arisg And further of our more abundant sped grace 
certain knowlge & mere mocon we will & do by these presents 
for us our heirs & succors grant to the afsd Maj'or Aldn Baihffs 
& Burgesses of the Boro afsd & their succrs that they & their 
succrs shall & may henceforth for ever have hold & keep within 
the Boro afsd the hberties & precincts thof two markets in every 
week yearly for ever one of them to be holden & kept on Friday 
& the C on Tuesday within the Boro afsd for ever provided 



154 APPENDIX L. 

& upon Condon that the sevl markets now there holden & ac- 
custd to be holden on Wedy & Satdy be h after altogr taken 
away & discontinued & that at the time of the afsd Markets 
to be holden on Tuesday and Friday all & singr psons comg 
& resorting to the sd Markets may from henceforth for ever 
buy sell & expose to sale as well all & singr Goods wares mer- 
chandizes Grain & things whatsr as all & all manner of Cattle 
Hogs Sheep horses mares geldings & poultry & all & all mmer 
of o' animals & chattels whatsr hve or dead at their pleasure 
accdg to the laws customs & stats of this cur Kingdm of Kngd 
payg the toUs & customs thof due to them the sd Mayor aldn 
Baihffs & Burgs of the Boro afs for the time being to the pper 
use & behoof of them the sd Mayor Aldn Baihffs & Burgesses 
of the Boro afsd & their succrs for the relief of the poor inhabits 
of the sd Boro & o'' charges & exps of the sd Boro togr with 
the afsd Court of Piepowder to be there holden at the time 
of the sd Markets & with all & all manner of hberties & free 
customs tolls stallage Fines Amercts & all o" pfits commodities 
advantges & emoluments whatsr to such Markets and Court 
of Piepowder belg happg or arising Wherefore we wiU & firmly 
injoining do by these presents for us our heirs & succrs order 
& command that the afsd Mayor Aldn Baihffs & Burgss of the 
Boro afsd & their succrs may have hold & enjoy the sd fairs 
& Markets by these presents above grtd with all their profits 
accdg to the true intent of these presents %vitht the molestation 
disturbance or Grievance of us our heirs or succrs or any of 
the officers or Ministers of us our heirs or succrs whomsr So 
nevthless that the afsd Fairs & Markets or any or eir of them 
be not to the annoyance or prejudice of o"" fairs or markets 
there near adjoining And further of our more ample special 
grace & of our certain knowledge & mere mocon we have given 
granted pardoned remised & reled & do by these presents for 
us our heirs & succrs give grant pardon remise & rel to the afsd 
Mayor Aldn Baihffs & Burgs of the Boro afsd & their succrs 
All & singr rents issues revenues fee farms arrears rents & yearly 
profits whatsr due arising coming pyble & to be paid to us or 
any of our predecessors or ancestors Kings or Queens of England 
or Dukes of I^ancaster & to us not yet pd for or in respect of 
any lauds tents or hdts or any liberties or priviledges given or 
grtd to them the sd Mayor Aldn Baihffs & Burgs of the Boro 
afsd or any of their predecessors by whatsr name or names or 
hy whatsr incorporation they have been heretofore called or 



APPENDIX I,. 155 

incorpe To hold to them the sd Mayor Aldn Bailiffs & Burges- 
ses of the Boro afsd & their succrs for ever as of our Gift witht 
acct or any or things to be thfore to us our heirs & succrs in any 
■wise rendered pd or done And further we will & do by these 
presents for iis our heirs & succrs grant & confirm unto the 
afsd Mayor Aldn Baihl5s & Burgs of the Boro afsd & their succrs 
all & all mmer of hberties Franchises Immunities exemptions 
priviledges acquittances jurisdictions mills lands Tents meadows 
feedings void ground commons free fishing free warren Buildgs 
Rmnous places toll Country Rents & hdts whatsr by any letters 
patent or deeds of any or eir our Predecessors or Ancestors 
htofore grtd or confirmed which the Mayor Aldn BaiUffs & 
Burgs of the Boro afsd now have hold use & enjoy or which 
any of them or their predecessors by whatsr name or names or 
by whatsr Incorporation or by pretence of any Incorpn whatsr 
htofore have held used or enjoyed or ought to have use hold 
or enjoy of Este of Inhance by reason or pretence of any charter 
or letters patent by any of our predecessors or Ancestors late 
Kings or Queens of Engd or dukes of Lancaster in any wise 
htofore made grtd or confirmed or by any or Iful means Right 
title custom usage or prescription htofore IfuUy used had or 
accustd altho the same or any or eir of them have not been 
htofore used or have been abused or discontinued & altho they 
any or eir of them are or have been forfeited or lost To be had 
holden & enjoyed by the afsd Mayor Aldn BaiHffs & Burgesses 
of the Boro afsd & their succrs for ever Yielding thfore yearly 
to us our heir & succrs by the hands of the recr of Kidwy for 
the time being £1^. 14. o^. of Iful moy of Engd to be pd at the 
feasts of E^aster & St Michael the Archg by equal portions in 
lieu of all customs services & demands Wherefore we will & 
firmly injoining do by these presents for us our heirs & succrs 
order & commd that the afsd Mayor Aldn BaiUffs & Burgs 
afsd & their succrs shall & may fully & wholly for ever have 
use hold & enjoy all the hberties free customs priviledges author- 
ities jurisdictions & acquittces accdg to the tenor & effect of 
these our letters patent witht the obstruction or hindrance of 
us our heirs & succrs whomsr Willg that they the sd Mayor 
Aldn Baihffs & Burgs of the Boro afsd & their succrs or any 
or eir of them by reason of the premises or any part thof be 
not therein hindered molested vexed aggrieved or in any wise 
disturbed by us our heirs or succrs the Justices Sheriffs Escheat- 
ors or ors the Baihff or Ministers of us our heirs & succrs whomsr 



156 APPENDIX L. 

Willing & by these presents ordering & commdg as well the 
treasurer Chancellor & Barons of the Exchr at Westmr as ors 
the Justices & officers of us our heirs & succrs as also our Atty 
Genl for the time being & every of them & all or our Officers 
& Ministers whomsr that neir they nor any or eir of them do 
prosecute or continue or make or cause to be prosecuted or 
contd any writ or summons whereupon a warrant or any other 
our writ or writs or process whatsr do issue agst the afsd Mayor 
Aldn Baihffs & Burgss of the Boro afsd or any or either of them 
for any matters causes things offences claims or usurpations 
or any of them by them or any of them due claimed sued taken 
had or usurped before the makg of these presents WiUing also 
that the Mayor Aldn Baihffs & Burgesses of the Boro afsd & 
their succrs or any of them be not by any Justice Officer or 
Minister afsd in or for the due use claim or abuse of other hberties 
franchises & Jurisdictions within the Boro afsd the Hmits or 
precincts thereof before the makg of these our letters patent 
in any wise molested or hindered or compelled to render for 
them or any of them Also we will & do by these presents for 
us our heirs & succrs grant to the afsd Mayor Aldn Bailiffs & 
Burgesses of the Boro afsd & their succrs that they shall & may 
have these our letters patent as well under our great seal of 
England as under our seal of the Duchy of Lancaster in due 
manner made & sealed without fine or fee great or small in our 
Hanaper altho Mencon &c In Witness &c Given under our 
private seal at our palace at Westminster the 20th day of July 
in the i6th year of our reign of England France & Ireland of 
Scotland the sist 

' Edward Anthony. 
1 77 1, May 8. 

Translated from an office copy of the record 

said to be remaining in the Duchy Court of I^ancaster 

John Turman, Inner Temple Lane. 

Attested as a Copy of the Translation of this 
Charter this 4th day of April, 1792, by us, 



J 



John Browne,) Hart St, Bloomsbury. 



APPENDIX M. 157 



APPENDIX M. 

' VICTORIA by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of 
Great Britain and Ireland Queen Defender of the Faith To all 
to whom these Presents shall come Greeting Whereas by the 
Municipal Corporations Act 1882 it was enacted that if on the 
Petition to Us of the Inhabitant householders of any Town or 
Towns or District in England or of any of those inhabitants 
praying for the grant of a Charter of Incorporation We by the 
advice of Our Privy Council should think fit by Charter to create 
such Town Towns or District or any part thereof specified in 
the Charter with or without any adjoining place a Municipal 
Borough and to incorporate the inhabitants thereof it should 
be lawful for Us by the Charter to extend to that Municipal 
Borough and the inhabitants thereof so incorporated the pro- 
visions of the Municipal Corporations Act And it was furtSer 
enacted that every Petition for a Charter under the said Act 
should be referred to a Committee of the Lords of Our Privy 
Council (in the said Act called the Committee of Council) and 
that one month at least before the Petition should be taken 
into consideration by the Committee of Council notice thereof 
and of the time when it would be so taken into consideration 
should be pubUshed in the London Gazette and otherwise in 
such manner as the Committee should direct for the purpose of 
making it known to all persons interested And it was further 
enacted that where We by a Charter should extend the Munici- 
pal Corporations Acts to a Municipal Borough it should be law- 
ful for Us by the Charter to do all or any of the following things 
(a) To fix the number of Councillors and to fix the number and 
boundaries of the Wards (if any) and to assign the number of 
Covmcillors to each Ward and (b) To fix the years days and 
times for the retirement of the first Aldermen and Councillors 
and (c) To fix such days times and places and nominate such 
persons to perform such duties and make such other temporary 
modifications of the Municipal Corporations Acts as might appear 
to Us to be necessary or proper for making those Acts apphcable 
in the case of the first constitution of a Municipal Borough 
And that the years times and places fixed by the Charter and 
the persons nominated therein to perform any duties should 
as regarded the Borough named in the Charter be respectively 



ig8 APPENDIX M. 

substituted in the Municipal Corporations Acts for the years 
days times places ofl&cers and persons therein mentioned and 
the persons so nominated should have the Mke powers and be 
subject to the hke obUgations and penalties as the officers and 
persons mentioned in those Acts for whom they would be re- 
spectively substituted And that subject to the provisions of the 
Charter authorised thereby the Municipal Corporations Acts 
should on the Charter coming into effect apply to the Municipal 
Borough to which they should be extended by the Charter and 
where the first Mayor Aldermen and Councillors or any of them 
should be named in the Charter should apply as if they were 
elected under the Muincipal Corporations Acts and where they 
should not be so named should apply to their first election And 
whereas certain inhabitant householders of the Poor Law Parish 
of St Mary Kidwelly Within did in the month of September 
One thousand eight hundred and eighty three petition Us for 
the grant of a Charter of Incorporation And whereas such pe- 
tition was referred to a Committee of Our Privy Council and 
one month at least before the same was taken into consideration 
by the said Committee notice thereof and of the time when the 
same was so to be taken into consideration was duly published 
in the London Gazette and otherwise as directed by the Com- 
mittee And whereas Our Privy Council have recommended Us 
to grant this Charter of Incorporation We therefore as well by 
virtue of our Royal Prerogative as in pursuance of and in ac- 
cordance with the Municipal Corporations Act 1882 or any other 
Act or Acts and of all other powers and authorities enabling Us 
in this behalf by and with the advice of Our Privy Council Do 
hereby grant order and declare as follows (i) The District situ- 
ate within the Hmits set forth in the first Schedule to these 
Presents is hereby created a Municipal Borough by the name 
of the " Borough of Kidwelly " (2) The inhabitants of the said 
Borough of Kidwelly within the Hmits set forth in the first 
Schedule to these Presents and their successors Shall be and are 
hereby declared to be one body poUtic and corporate by the name 
of the Mayor Aldermen and Burgesses of the Borough of Kid- 
welly with perpetual succession and a Common Seal and may 
assume armorial bearings (which shall be duly enrolled in the 
Heralds College) and may take and hold any lands tenements 
and hereditaments which may be vested in them by Scheme 
under Part XL of the Municipal Corporations Act 1882 and 
such other lands and hereditaments as well without as within 



APPENDIX M. 159 

the Borougli as may be necessary for the site of the buildings 
and premises required for the official purposes of the Corporation 
and other the purposes of the Municipal Corporations Acts 
provided that such other lands do not exceed in value the amount 
of One hundred pounds by the year (3) The Mayor Aldermen 
and Burgesses of the said Borough shall have the powers author- 
ities immunities and privileges usually vested by law in the 
Mayor Aldermen and Burgesses of a Municipal Borough and 
the provisions of the Municipal Corporations Acts shall extend 
to the said Borough and the inhabitants thereof incorporated 
by this Charter (4) The number of Councillors of the Borough 
shall be twelve (5) For the purpose of making the Municipal 
Corporations Act 1882 applicable in the case of the first con- 
stitution of the said Borough We do hereby so far only as regards 
the first Burgess List first Burgess Roll and first election of 
Councillors Mayor Aldermen Auditors Assessors Town Clerk and 
Treasurer for the Borough fix and order as follows: — (a) The Town 
Hall in the Town of Kidwelly shall be the place at which any 
list notice or document required to be afl&xed on or near the 
outer door of the Town Hall is to be aflSxed and {b) Both in re- 
lation to the matters aforesaid and also in relation to any such 
election as aforesaid which it may be necessary to hold before 
a vahd election can be held under the Municipal Corporations 
Act 1882 Daniel Charles Edwards of Kidwelly aforesaid Sohcitor 
or in case of his death inabihty refusal or default Mansel Rees 
of Llanelly Sohcitor shall perform the duties of the Town Clerk 
and Thomas Morgan of Kidwelly aforesaid Gentleman or in 
case of his death inabihty refusal or default David Harries of 
Kidwelly aforesaid Gentleman shall perform the duties of the 
Mayor and the Assessors for revising the Burgess List and the 
separate list of persons quahfied to be Councillors and the said 
Thomas Morgan or in case of his death inabihty refusal or default 
the said David Harries shall perform the duties of the Mayor 
and Aldermen respectively as returning ofiicer and of the Mayor 
as summoner of the first meeting of the Council and of the 
Mayor or Chairman of the meeting for the election of the Mayor 
Aldermen Town Clerk and Treasurer And the said persons shall 
be substituted in the Municipal Corporations Act 1882 for the 
said Town Clerk Mayor Assessors Aldermen and Chairman re- 
spectively so far as relates to the matters aforesaid and (c) The 
first election of Councillors shall take place on the second day 
of November One thousand eight hundred and eighty five and 



l60 APPENDIX M. 

the first meeting of the Council of the Borough shall be held on 
the ninth day of November One thousand eight hundred and 
eighty five (6) The years and days specified in the second Schedule 
to these Presents shall be the years and days for the retirement 
of the first Aldermen and Councillors who shall retire in the 
manner and at the times therein designated (7) Subject to these 
Presents and the provisions and directions in the second Schedule 
thereto the provisions of the Municipal Corporations Act 1882 
shall apply to the determination of the qualifications of the 
first Burgesses the making out signing delivering inspection com- 
pletion pubhcation commencement and continuance of the 
First Burgess Lists and Burgess Rolls the claims objections 
and determinations with regard to the first Burgess Lists or 
Rolls the holding adjournments and decisions of the first re- 
vision Courts the nominations elections and continuance in 
ofl&ce of the first Mayor Aldermen Councillors Auditors and 
Assessors the appointment and continuance in office of the first 
Town Gerk and Treasurer the first meeting and quarterly meet- 
ing of the Town Council and all matters and things touching 
and concerning the above and the dates and times in the said 
Act mentioned shall be the dates and times on at during within 
or for which the matters aforesaid and the various acts and 
things in relation thereto shall take place be done be estimated 
or be calculated.' 

FIRST SCHEDULE. 

Metes and Bounds of the Borough. 

' The area of the Borough created by the Charter shall be co- 
extensive with the area of the old Borough which was co-exten- 
sive with what before the twenty fifth day of March one thousand 
eight hundred and eighty four was the area of the Poor Law 
Parish of St Mary Kidwelly Within.' 

SECOND SCHEDULE. 

' The one tliird of the Councillors who are elected by the 
smallest number of Votes shall go out of office on ist November 
1886 The one third of the Councillors who are elected by the 
next smallest number of Votes shall go out of office on ist Nov- 
ember 1887 The remaining one third of the Councillors shall 
^o out of office on ist November 1888 The one half of the Alder- 



APPENDIX M. l6l 

men who first go out of office shall be those who are elected by 
the smallest number of Votes and shall go out of office on gth 
Nov. 1888 The remaining one half of the Aldermen shall go out 
of office on gth November 1891 If any Councillors or any Alder- 
men have obtained an equal number of Votes or have been elected 
without a Poll so that it cannot be determined which of them 
has the smallest number of Votes the Council of the Borough 
shall at the first or second quarterly meeting and not later by 
a majority of Votes or in case of equahty of Votes by the casting 
Vote of the Chairman determine who are to go out of office at 
the times above specified respectively In witness whereof We 
have caused these Our Letters to be made Patent Witness 
Ourself at Westminster the twentieth day of July in the forty 
ninth year of Our reign By warrant under the Queen's Sign 
Manual 

' MuiR Mackenzie.' 



At the Court at Windsor, the 24th day of June, 1885. Present — 
The Queen's Most Excellent Majesty in Council. 

' Whereas there was this day read at the Board a Report 
of a Committee of the Lords of Her Majesty's most Honourable 
Privy Council dated the ist day of June 1885 in the words 
following — Your Majesty having been pleased to refer unto this 
Committee by Your Order in Council of the 23 rd day of August 
1883 the humble Petition of certain Inhabitant Householders 
of the Poor Law Parish of S. Mary Kidwelly within in the County 
of Carmarthen praying for the grant of a Municipal Charter 
of Incorporation The Lords of the Committee having taken the 
said Petition into consideration and being of opinion that a 
Scheme for the adjustment of the property rights and habilities 
of the existing Corporation of the Borough of Kidwelly and 
for other purposes would be necessary in the event of a Charter 
of Incorporation being granted their Lordships after reference 
to the Secretary of State and the Local Government Board 
settled a Scheme for those purposes which said Scheme they 
caused to be pubhshed in conformity with the provisions of the 
Mtmicipal Corporations Acts 1882 and not having received any 
Petition against the said Scheme their Lordships do agree 
humbly to report as their opinion to Your Majesty that it may 
be advisable for Your Majesty to confirm the said Scheme Her 



l62 APPENDIX M. 

Majesty having taken the said Report into consideration together 
with the said Scheme (a copy whereof is hereunto annexed) 
was pleased by and with the advice of Her Privy Council to 
approve thereof and to confirm and doth hereby confirm the 
said Scheme 

' C. I., peei,.' 



Municipal Corporations Act 1882. 
SCHEME FOR THE BOROUGH OF KIDWEI.I.Y. 

' Whereas by the Municipal Corporations Act 1882 it is enacted 
that where a petition for a Charter of incorporation is referred 
to the Committee of Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy 
Council and it is proposed by the Charter to extend the Munici- 
pal Corporations Act to the municipal borough to be created 
by the charter the said Committee of Council may settle a 
scheme for the purposes in the said Act named and containing 
such provisions as are in the said Act particularised And whereas 
certain inhabitant householders of the Poor Law Parish of St 
Mary Kidwelly Within in the county of Carmarthen have peti- 
tioned Her Majesty the Queen praying for the grant of a Charter 
of Incorporation And whereas the said petition for a charter 
has been referred to the Committee of Council and it is proposed 
to create the said district a municipal borough and to incor- 
porate the inhabitants thereof and by the Charter to extend 
the Municipal Corporations Acts to the municipal borough to 
be created by the charter And whereas Kidwelly is a place 
named in the Schedtde to the Municipal Corporations Act 1883 
and the area of the said place is coextensive with the area of 
the municipal borough proposed to be created by the said Charter 
And whereas by the Municipal Corporations Act 1883 it is en- 
acted that nothing in that Act shall prevent the apphcation to 
any place of any charter appl5dng the Municipal Corporations 
Acts which Her Majesty may be pleased to grant or affect any- 
thing done in pursuance of those Acts or any scheme thereunder 
and shall not affect the operation of any such charter thing or 
scheme save that nothing in the said Acts or scheme shall author- 
ise the estabUshment or continuance of any court for the trial 
of civil actions and that nothing in that Act shall affect the 
right to the benefit of any charity or shall alter or confer any 



APPENDIX M. 163 

power of altering the defined charitable purposes (if anj') to 
which any property was by law applicable at the passing of 
that Act And whereas the Mayor Aldermen Bailiffs and Burges- 
ses of the Borough of Kidwelly are a local authority within the 
meaning of Part XI. of the Municipal Corporations Act 1882 
And whereas the said Mayor Aldermen BaiUifs and Burgesses 
are a body corporate under and by virtue of certain royal charters 
And whereas the area of the proposed borough as part of the 
parish of Kidwelly was before the date of the commencement 
of this scheme within the district of the Llanelly Union as the 
rural sanitary authority of the said Union and the said guardians 
as such rural sanitary authority are a local authority within 
the meaning of Part XI. of the Municipal Corporations Act 
1882 and it is expedient that all property and liabiUties vested 
in or attaching to such rural sanitary authority should so far 
as the same relate to the area of the borough created by the 
charter be transferred to the new corporation in manner pro- 
vided by this Scheme And whereas the highways within the 
area of the borough created by the charter were before the date 
of the commencement of this Scheme repairable by the Kid- 
welly Borough Highway Board by rates levied within the borough 
under the provisions of the Acts relating to highways and such 
highway board is a local authority within the meaning of Part 
XI. of the Municipal Corporations Act 1882 and it is expedient 
that all property and liabiHties vested in or attaching to the 
said highway board should be transferred to the new corporation 
in manner provided by this Scheme And whereas it is expedient 
right and just that a Scheme should be settled pursuant to Part 
XI. of the Municipal Corporations Act 1882 containing the pro- 
visions hereinafter contained Now therefore the said Committee 
of Council have settled a Scheme containing the provisions 
herein and do hereby order and declare as follows (i) This Scheme 
may be cited for all purposes as the Borough of Kidwelly Scheme 
1885 (2) This Scheme shall come into operation on the day of 
the first meeting of the Council of the municipal borough created 
by the charter above referred to or at the date of its confirma- 
tion by ParHament or Order in Council whichever is later This 
date is herein mentioned as the " commencement of this Scheme " 
(3) The Mayor Aldermen BaiHffs and Burgesses of the said 
borough are herein referred to as the " Old Corporation " The 
corporation of the municipal borough created by the charter 
above mentioned is herein referred to as the " New Corporation " 



164 APPENDIX M. 

(4) The municipal borough created by the charter above referred 
to shall be placed immediately on from and after the day of 
the first meeting of the Council of the municipal borough afore- 
said within the jurisdiction of the Council of the said municipal 
borough as the Sanitary Authority and shall thereafter no 
longer be within the jurisdiction authority or district of the 
Rural Sanita:ry Authority of the Llanelly Union (5) Immedi- 
ately from and after the commencement of this Scheme the 
Old Corporation shall be and the same is hereby abohshed and 
shall thenceforth be dissolved and cease to exist together with 
all the franchises rights privileges powers jurisdiction authority 
and exemptions of the said Old Corporation and its members 
and oijficers as such of what kind soever they may be which have 
no pecuniary value (6) Immediately from and after the com- 
mencement of this Scheme the said Kidwelly Borough Highway 
Board shall be and is hereby abolished and shall thenceforth 
be dissolved and cease to exist (7) All property (not being pro- 
perty within the meaning of the second subsection of section 
4 of the Municipal Corporations Act 1883 applicable to charity 
or applicable to defined charitable purposes at the passing of 
that Act) of any kind whatsoever possessed by or vested in the 
Old Corporation or any person or body in trust for it or any of 
its members as such or applicable for the benefit or under the 
direction of the Old Corporation or any of its members as such 
shall vest in the New Corporation and (save as is hereinafter 
expressly directed) shall by the New Corporation be held and 
appUed exclusively for the municipal purposes of the municipal 
borough created as aforesaid and the pubhc benefit of the in- 
habitants of the said borough (8) All market property possessed 
by or vested in the Old Corporation and all liabihties attaching 
to the Old Corporation in respect of the same shall immediately 
from and after the commencement of this scheme vest in and 
attach to the Mayor Aldermen and Burgesses of the said munici- 
pal borough acting by the Council as the sanitary authority 
(9) All habilities which immediately before the commencement 
of this Scheme attached to and were enforceable against the 
old corporation or the property thereof shall attach to and be 
enforceable against the New Corporation so far only as the pro- 
perty vested in it under paragraph 7 may extend to satisfy 
such liabihties and no further (10) Any investigation legal pro- 
ceeding or remedy in respect of any debt habihty penalty or 
forfeiture due to or inciirred by or on behalf of the old Corpora- 



APPENDIX N. 165 

tion before the commencement of this Scheme may be continued 
prosecuted or enforced by or against the New Corporation so 
far only as the property vested in it under paragraph 7 may 
extend to satisfy such UabiUties and no further (11) Any sewers 
drains culverts water mains pipes or other sanitary works situate 
within the area of the borough created by the charter being the 
property of the Rural Sanitary Authority of the Llanelly Union 
and used by them for the purpose of the drainage water supply 
or cleansing of the said area and any liabiHties attaching to the 
said rural sanitary authority in respect of the said area shall 
immediately from and after the commencement of this Scheme 
vest in and attach to the Mayor Aldermen and Burgesses of the 
said Municipal Borough acting by the Council as the sanitary 
authority (12) All property and liabilities vested in or attaching 
to the Kidwelly Borough Highway Board shall immediately 
from the commencement of this Scheme vest in and attach to 
the New Corporation (13) The term " property " in this Scheme 
means and includes all property real and personal and all things 
in action and all rights of common or commonable rights and 
rights to toll and all franchises privileges and rights which have 
any pecixniary value and all charters records deeds books and 
documents all rights all claims to relief and all rights to avoid 
contracts or otherwise and includes any estate or interest legal 
or equitable in or in respect of any property so defined (14) 
The term " market property " in this Scheme means and includes 
rights to market tolls and all franchises privileges and rights 
relating to markets and all lands and premises used for the 
purpose of markets. 



APPENDIX N. 

At the Court at Balmoral, the 24th day of September, 1886. 
Present — The Queen's Most Excellent Majesty in Council. 

' Whereas there was this day read at the Board a Report of 
a Committee of the Lords of Her Majesty's Most Honourable 
Privy Council dated the nth day of September 1886 in the 
words following Your Majesty having been pleased to refer unto 
this Committee by Your Order in Coimcil of the 6th day of May 
1886 the humble Petition of the Municipal Corporation of the 
Borough of Kidwelly in the Coimty of Carmarthen praying for 



l66 APPENDIX N. 

a Scheme amending the Borough of Kidwelly Scheme 18S5 and 
for a Scheme under the Municipal Corporations Acts 1882 and 
1885 (for the adjustment of the property rights UabiHties &c 
of the St Mary Kidwelly United District School Board and for 
other purposes) their Lordships after reference to the Secretary 
of State the Local Government Board and the Education Depart- 
ment settled a Scheme for those purposes which said Scheme 
they caused to be pubhshed in conformity with the provisions 
of the Mnviicipal Cgrporations Act 1882 and not having received 
any Petition against the said Scheme their Lordships do agree 
humbly to report as their opinion to Your Majesty that it may 
be advisable for Your Majesty to confirm the said Scheme Her 
Majesty having taken the said Report into consideration together 
with the said Scheme (a copy whereof is hereunto annexed) was 
pleased by and with the advice of Her Privy Council to approve 
thereof and to confirm and doth hereby confirm the said Scheme 

' C. W. PeEi<.' 



SCHEME 1886 FOR THE BOROUGH OP 
KIDWELLY. 

' Whereas by an Order dated the fourteenth day of August 
one thousand eight hundred and eighty three made by the Lords 
of the Committee of the Privy Coiuicil on Education (hereinafter 
called the Education Department) under section 40 of the Ele- 
mentary Education Act 1870 the parishes of St Mary Kidwelly 
Within and St Mary Without in the County of Carmarthen were 
constituted a United School District for which pursuant to the 
provisions of the Elementary Education Acts a School Board 
was formed by the name of the St Mary Kidwelly United Dis- 
trict School Board And whereas by an Order of the Local Govern- 
ment Board under the Divided Parishes Acts dated November 
twenty third one thousand eight hundred and eighty three a 
part of the parish of St Mary Kidwelly Without was added to 
the parish of St Mary Kidwelly Within which alterations so made 
was agreed to by the Education Department so far as any School 
Districts were affected but such portion so added to the parish 
of St Mary Kidwelly Within was not included within the Muni- 
cipal Borough hereinafter mentioned and is hereinafter referred 
to as " The part of the parish of St Mary Kidwelly Within 
aforesaid And whereas on July twentieth one thousand eight 



APPENDIX N. 167 

hundred and eighty five Her Majesty was pleased by Charter 
to extend the Municipal Corporation Acts to and to create a 
Municipal Borough the parish of St Mary Kidwelly Within with 
the exception of the part of the parish of St Mary Kidwelly 
Within aforesaid " And whereas under Part XI. of the Municipal 
Corporations Act 1882 a scheme called the Borough of Kidwelly 
Scheme 1885 was settled for the said Municipal Borough and 
was confirmed by Order in Council on the twenty fourth day 
of June one thousand eight hundred and eighty five And whereas 
on the third day of May one thousand eight hiindred and eighty 
six the Municipal Corporation of the said borough did by the 
Council of the said borough present a petition to Her Majesty 
in accordance with section 218 of the Municipal Corporations 
Act 1882 and the School Boards Act 1885 petitioning for a 
scheme amending the said Borough of Kidwelly Scheme 1885 
and for a scheme under the Municipal Corporation Acts 1882 
and 1885 And whereas the said petition was referred to a Com- 
mittee of the Lords of Her Majestys Privy Council and such 
petition has been proceeded on as nearly as may be as if the 
same were a petition for a Charter extending the Municipal 
Corporation Acts to a Municipal Borough to be incorporated 
And whereas this Scheme was before being settled by the Com- 
mittee of Council referred to the consideration of the Education 
Department And whereas it is expedient right and just that a 
scheme should be settled pursuant to the Municipal Corporation 
Acts 1882 and 1885 containing the provisions hereinafter set 
forth Now therefore the said Committee of Council have settled 
a Scheme containing the provisions herein and do hereby order 
and declare as follows (i) This Scheme may be cited for all pur- 
poses as the Borough of Kidwelly Scheme 1886 (2) This Scheme 
shall be deemed to have commenced on the date of the commence- 
ment of the Borough of Kidwelly Scheme 1885 which date is 
herein mentioned as the commencement of this scheme and 
shall be in operation as soon as it is confirmed by Order in Council 
or Parhament as the case may be (3) This Scheme shall be 
construed as one with the Borough of Kidwelly Scheme 1885 
(4) Notwithstanding the creation of the said Municipal Borough 
the School Board for the said United District shall be and be 
deemed to have been and continue to be the School Board for 
the area originally included in the said United District by the 
name of the St Mary Kidwelly United District vSchool Board 
in aU respects to the same extent and in the same manner as 



l68 APPENDIX N. 

if at the time of the constitution of the said United District and 
of the formation of the School Board for the said United District 
by the Education Department the said borough of Kidwelly 
had been created a Municipal Borough and the said School 
Board had been formed and created for a United District of which 
the constituent districts were the said Municipal Borough the 
part of the parish of St Mary Kidwelly Within aforesaid and the 
parish -of St Mary Kidwelly Without by the name of the St. 
Mary Kidwelly United District School Board and as if so far 
as the portion of the said United District included in the said 
Municipal Borough is concerned the Local Rate and the Docal 
Authority had been the Borough Fund or Rate and the Council 
of the said Borough respectively and as it so far as the portion 
of the said United District included in the part of the parish of 
St. Mary Kidwelly Within aforesaid is concerned the part of 
the parish of St. Mary Kidwelly Within aforesaid had been ac- 
cording to the provasions of the Elementary Education Act 
1870 as amended by any other Act or Acts a parish by itself 
and everything in connection with the said Board and United 
School district shall be done had and construed accordingly 
and not othermse (5) All liabiUties and assets attacliing to and 
vested in the St. Mary Kidwelly United District School Board 
immediately before the commencement of this scheme shall be 
and continue attached to and vested in such Board and all 
charges charged immediately before the commencement of this 
Scheme under the Acts relating to Public Elementary Education 
or any of them on the poor rates or other rates or funds of the 
Constituent Districts of the said United District and the School 
Fund of the said United District shall be a charge upon the 
Borough Rate or Fund of the said borough and the Rate in the 
nature of a Poor Rate of the said part of the parish of St. Mary 
Kidwelly Within aforesaid (as if the same had been according 
to the provisions of the Elementary Education Act 1870 as 
amended as aforesaid a parish by itself) and the Poor Rate of 
the parish of St. Mary Kidwelly Without and the School Fund 
of the said United District respectively and not otherwise (6) 
Any Bye-laws in force at the date of this scheme in the said 
United District mads under the Acts relating to Public Ele- 
mentary Education shall be and continue in force (7) Any Act 
or omission done or made by the Education Department or the 
said School Board or the Council of the said Borough or any 
Justice since the date of the said Charter shall be deemed to 



APPENDIX N. 169 

have been lawfully done or made if it might have been lawfully 
done or made by the said Department School Board Council 
or Justice if no Charter had been granted or the said School 
Board had baen the School Board for the United District of 
which the Constituent Districts are the said borough the part 
of the parish of St. Mary Kidwelly Within aforesaid and the 
parish of St. Mary Kidwelly Without.' 



INDEX 



Aberdairon Churcli, 19 

Aberdaugleddau, 5 

All Saints' Churcli, 44, 45 

Allt Cunedda, 6, 7, 8 

Alwyn, ' Priest of the town,' 58, 

59 
Anchorages, 70 
Anchoret Cell, 70 
Ancient Fortress, 7 
Aquitaine, 102 
Arthur, King, 9 
Ashe, George, 55 

B, 

Bailey, Crawshay, 106 

Banbury, Field of, 90 

Barbican, The, 38 

Barrow, Celtic, 6 

Bells, Parish Church, 74, 75 

Benedictine Monks, 47, 54 

Bernard, Bishop of St. Davids, 
II, 56 

Bethesda Chapel, 98 

Bevan, Archdeacon — 
Description of Parish Church, 
64 

Beynon, Rev. John, 97 

Blanche Plantagenet, 23, 62 

Borough of Kidwelly — 
Charters, yj 
Seal, 80 

Boundaries, Dispute as to Dio- 
cesan, II, 12 

Bowen of Llechdwnny, 85 

Brecon, Priory Church of, 64 

Brecon, Chantry of, 62 

Brecon, Fall of Rhys ap Tewdwr 
at, 13 



Brecon, Pohtical interview be- 
tween Bishop of Ely and 
Duke of Buckingham at, 88 

Bright, Thomas, 106 

Brigstocke family, 85, 86 

Brittany, 88 

British Church, 41 

Britton, John, 104 

Brythons, 6, 8, 9, 43 



Cadivor, 12 

Cadoc, St., 41 

Cadoc, Church of, 20, 42 

Cadwal, 3, 4 

Cadwgan ap Blethyn, 24 

Caerleon, 43 

Caesar, Juhus, 9 

Canal, Gwendraeth Valley, 102, 
104 

Cantref Bychan, 10, 11 

Cantref Eginog, 2, 9 

Carber}', Earl, 25 

Cardigan, 39 

Carmarthen, i, 19, 28, 43 

CarnwyUion, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 
47,85 

' Carucate,' 48, 51 

Castle of Kidwelly, 32 
Its first erection, 15, 17 
Its vicissitudes, 19 
Age of present building, 32 
Its general arrangement, -tf-i, 
The Inner Ward, 32, 33, 34 
The Hall and Retiring-room, 

32, 34, 35 
The Kitchen and Refectory, 35 
The Chapel — its architecture and 
age, 35, 36 



INDEX 



171 



The Outer Ward, 32, 36 

The Bake-house, 38 

The Great Gate-house, n, 38 

The Barbican, 38 

The Outer Gate-house, 38 
' Cattas,' 3, 80 
Cawdor, Earl, 25 
Celebrities, Local, 87 
Celtic Tumulus, 6 
Cemetery, Ancient (consecration 

of), 12, 17, 56 
Ceredig, 7, 41 
Ceredigion, 4 
CetgueU, 3, 5 

Chalice of Parish Church, ■j'i, 
Chancel of Parish Church, 65, 66, 

67, 68, 69, 70, 71 
Chantries, 60, 61, 62, 64 
Charity, The Griffith, 93 
Charters, Municipal, -j-j, 78, 79, 

80 
Chi vers, Jacob, 106 
Chi vers & vSon, 106 
Cistercian Monasteries, 54, 64 
Clark, G. T.— survey of Castle, 

33 
Cleddau, The, 5 
Clock, Town, 75 
Cloth Manufacture, 100 
Coker, Galfridus, Prior, 54 
Collwyn, 12 
' Columbarium,' 44 
Commote of Kidwelly, 2, 5 
Commotes, The Three, 9, 10, 17 
Coney Quay, 102, 103 
Constantine the Blessed, 10 
Convent of Kidwelly, 49 
Cromlech, 7 
Cromwell, Thomas, ti, 
Cunedda, 6, 8, 9, 41 
Cydweh, 4, 9 
Cynlas, Lord of Glamorgan, 41 

D. 

David, St., Bishop, 7, 41 
Davids, St., Diocese of, 11, 44 
Dafydd ap Edmwnt, 91 
Davies, Rev. G. R., 97 



Davies, John, of Kidwelly, 92 

Davy, Thomas, Chaplain, 60 

Deanery of Kidwelly, 46 

Deer Park, 22 

Deheubarth, 2, 10, 12 

De Londres family. The, 23 

de Londres, Maurice, 20, 21, 22, 

23, 42 
de Dondres, Thomas, 23 
de IfOndres, WiUiam, 14, 15, 16, 

18, 20 
Devizes, Castle of, 17 
Dillwyn, 89 
Domestic buildings, 82 

Llechdwnny, 82 

Muddlescwm, 83 
Donne family. The, 85 
Downman, Henry Reed, 105 
Downman, Hugh, 105 
Downman & Briggs, 105 
Druidic oratory, 6 
Druidism, 8, 44 
' Dux Bntanmarum,' 8 
Dyfed, 12 

Dyfed, Meurig, Prince of, 85 
Dynevor demesne, 24 
Dynevor, Kingdom of, 2 



B. 

East Garston, Berks, 23, 30 
Edward I., King, 39 
Edward II., King, 65, 68 
Edward III., King, 65, 68 
Edward IV., King, 89 
Edward VI., King, 61, 78 
Edward VII., King, 75, 81 
Edwards, William, 107 
Effigies, 71 

Eginog, Cantref of, 2, 9 
Eineon, son of Cadivor, 12, 13, 

14 
Eineon, son of Cunedda, 41 
EUzabeth, Queen, 73 
Enghsh, The, 2, 51, 100 
Brgyng, 11 

Evans, Rev. T. C, 96 
Ewenny Priory, 20 



172 INDEX. 

F, Gweli, The, 5 

Fairs, 80, 81 Gwendraeth, The, i, 2, 4, 31, 32, 

Feudal system t"/ 102, 103 

Fitzgerald, DaVid, Bishop of St. Gwendraeth Valley CoUieries, 

Davids, 20, 42, 48 ^ 102 104 

Fitzhamon, Sir Robert, 13, 14 R^f^j^^"' ^°' -^' ^4 

FitzwilUam, Richard, 44 Gwledig 8 

Flemings, The, 2, 19, 51, 82, 100 ^^Y"^, Leonard Bilson, 79, 80, 

Flemish domestic architecture, ^°4 

86 

Flemish industry, 100 H. 
Foreign influence. Introduction 

of, 12 Harri Cydweh, 84, 89 

Foreign settlement, 2, 100 Harri Hir, 90 

Frederick and Jenner, 108 Hathaway, 10 s 

Freeman, Professor — Hawise, 23 

His description of the Castle, Hazlewood, 105 

33 Henry I., King, 15, 17, 19, 20, 

His description of the Castle 47, 56, "jj 

Chapel, 35, 36 Henry II., King, 24, jy 

His description of the Parish Henry III., King, j-j 

Church, 68, 71 Henry IV.,' King, '23, 39, 62 

French, The, 2, 51 Henry VI., King, 78 

FulHng IMills, 27, 28 Henry VIL, King, 88, 89 

Henry VIII., King, 48, 61, yi, 7S 
Henry, Duke of Lancaster, 23 

G, Henry, Earl of Lanca.ster, 23 
Herbert, Sir Richard. 90 

Garrison, The vnctualling of the, Hogas, Master Walter, 87 

loi Honorius, Pope, 1 1 

Gaunt, John of, 39 Horeb Chapel, 99 

Geoffrey Kydwelly, 87 Howel ap Gronow, 16 

Glamorgan, Kingdom of, 10, 11 Howell Surdwall, 90 

Glamorgan, Lordship of, 10, 11, Hywel Dda, 10 

12, 14 
Godmyster, John, Prior, 48 

Goidels, 6, 8, 9 I. 
Goodale, John, 61 

Gower, 2, 9, 10, 11, 15, 16, 20, 47 lestyn ap Gwrgan, 10, 12, 13, 14 

Graven, Rev. W. J., 96, 97 levan Brechfa, 90 

Griffith, Rev. John, of Ely, 92, leuan Deulwyn, 89, 90, 91 

93 leuan Tew leuanc, 91, 92 

Griffiths, Rev. D. T., 95 Innocent II., Pope. 11 

Griffiths, Dr. J. H. K., 95 Inventory of Parish Church 

Griffiths, Dr. T. R., 95, 96 Plate, y^^ 

Griffri, Bishop of St. Davids, 17, lorwerth Fynglwyd, 90 

56 Ireland, 19, 39, 102 

Gryffith ap Cynan, 19, 20 Iscennen, 9, 10, 17 

Gryffith ap Rhys, 19, 20, 22, 24 Ishmael, St., 44, 45, 46, 50 



INDEX. 



173 



J. 

James I., King, 78 

Jeffrey, Bishop of St. Davids, 17, 

56 
Job, Thomas, 93, 94 
John, King, 77 
John of Gaunt, 39 

K. 

Kaermerdyn, 28, 29, 39, 46 
Kardigan, 39 
Keianus, the Scot, 9 
Kidwelly Fach, 28 
King's Wood, 21 
KilymaenUwyd, 85 
Kymer, Thomas, 102, 104 



Ladies' (Kymer) Quay, 102 

I^ancaster, Duchy of, i, 26, 27, 
39, 60, 61, 62 

Lancaster, Henry, Duke of, 23, 
27, 62, 77 

Lancaster, Henry, Earl of, 23, 61 

Lancet Windows, 35, 65 

Leland's description of Kidwelly, 
I, 2, 3 

Leland's Etymology of Kid- 
welly, 3 

Levies, MiHtary, 30 

Lewys Morganwg, 90 

Lightning disaster, 67, 74 

Lime-kilns, 107 

Llandaff, 1 1 

I/landefeilog, 46 

Llandeusant, 44 

Llandovery Castle, 19 

Llanelly, 46 

Llanfihangel, 43, 83 

Llangadog, 41, 42 

Llangendeirne, 46 

Llanpumpsaint, 44 

Llansaint, 44, 45, 57 

Llanstephan, loi 

Llantrisant, 44 

Llechdwnny, 82, 84, 85 

Llewelyn, Prince, 45, 64 

Loughor, 31, 43 



M. 

Madonna and Infant Saviour, 

Figure of, 72 
Maelgwn, 8 

MaenUwyd Mawr, 6, 7, 43, 44 
Maes GwenlUan, 21 
Malmesbury Castle, 17 
Manor of Kidwelly, 17, 18 
Manor of Kidwelly, Property of, 

26, 27 
Mansel Chapel, 62 
Mansel family, 62, 84 
Margam Abbey, 38, 90 
Marian Churches, 64 
Marine commerce, 100, loi, 102 
Markets and Fairs, 80, 81 
Marshall, WiUiam, Earl of Pem- 
broke, 45 
Matilda de Cadurcis, 28, 29 
Maude de Cadurcis, 23, 61 
Maurice de Londres, 20, 21, 22, 

23, 42 

Maurice Kidwelly, 87 

Mediaeval Architecture (domes- 
tic), 82 

Meirion, 7 

Meredydd ap Rhosser, 90 

Meurig, Prince of Dyfed, 85 

Meyrick, Robert, 55 

Mihangel, St., Chapel of, 43 

Mihangel, St., Well of, 44 

Milford, 5, 39 

Mihtary Levies (local), 30 

Miskin, 12 

Monasteries— 
St. Davids, 42 
Llandaff, 42 
Ty-gwyn-ar-Daf, 41 

Monkton Priory, 64 

Morfa Chapel, 98 

Morgan Hen, 10 

Morgan, Sir Harry, 84, 89 

Morgan, son of Gwenllian, 21 

Morgan, Philip, KidweUy, 84, 
87, 88, 89 

Morgan, Bishop William, 91 

Morganwg, Kingdom of, 10, 11 

Norton, John, Bishop of Ely, 88 

Moimt Solomon, 48 



174 



INDEX. 



Muddlescwm, 82, 83, 84 
Municipality of Kidwelly, "jj, 78, 

79, 80 
Mynydd Bychan, 14 
Mynydd Sulen, 48 
Mynyddygarreg, 76, 107 

N. 
Nanmor, 91 
Nave— Parish Church, 65, 66, 

67, 69, 71 
Neath, 31, 43 
Nennius, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9 
Nicholas IV., Pope, Taxation of, 

46, 48 
Nicholas^ St., Bishop of Myra, 

60 
Nicholas, St., Chantry of, 60, 61, 

63 
Norman conquest of Glamorgan, 

13, 14 
Norman invasion of Kidwelly, 

12, IS, 16, 17, 47 
Normandy, 15, 47 
Noted local families, 82 — 86 

O. 

Ogmore, Manor of, 14, 60, 61 
Owen ap Caradoc, 20 
Owen, Dr. Henry — etymology 
of Kidwelly, 3 



Parish Church — 

Original building, 64 

Dedication, 64 

Description by Archdeacon 

Be van, 64 
Survey by Sir George Gilbert 

Scott, 65 — 67 
Its Architecture and Features, 

65—69 
Chancel, 64 — 67 
Tower and Spire, 64 — 69 ; 

Nave, 65, 66, 67, 69, 71 
Windows, 65 — 67 ; Vestry, 

65, 67, 70 



Rood-loft, 6^, 70, 71, 72 ; 
Sepulchral recesses, 66, 71 

Effigies, 71, 72 ; Stair-cases, 
67, 69, 70, 71 

Chantry, 60 — 64 ; Side Chapel, 
62 

Transepts, 64, 65, 66, 71 ; 
Anchoret Cell, 70 

SediUa, 66 ; Piscina, 66, 68 ; 
Roofs, 67, 68 

Bells, 74, 75 ; Clock, 74 ; 
Plate, 71 ; Registers, 73, 74 

Restoration, 74 
Patrick de Cadurcis, 23, 28, 29 
PauHnus, 41 

Payne de Chaworth, 23, 81 
Pembrey, 44, 45, 46, 50 
Penallt, 44, 45, 50 
Pendeulwyn, 89 
Perkins, 105 
Picts, 8 

Piscina, Parish Church, 62, 66 
Plate, Parish Church, 72, 
Polytheists, 9 
Porter's Prison (Castle), 34 
Powell, Gabriel, 80 
Prior's Court, 51 — 53 
Priors, Wst of, 54, 55 
Priory of Ividwelly — 

Its Foundation, 47, 48 

Its Affihation, 47, 48 

Its Situation, 50, 53, 54 

Its Property, 48, 51, 55 

Its Dissolution, 55 

R. 

Rechdyr, Gilmore, King of Ire- 
land, 10 
Rectory, merged in the Priory, 

46, 49, 55 
Redford and Harris, 108 
Registers, 73, 74 
Rees of Kilymaenllwyd, 85 
Rees, Rev. Wilham, 94 
Rees, Rev. John, 94 
Rees, Mr. John, 94 
Reeveship of the Manor, 26 
Restoration of Parish Church, 74 
' Rheged,' 10 



INDEX, 



^7S 



Rhydygors Castle, 15, 16 

Rhys ap Gryffith, 25 

Rhys ap Tewdwr, Prince, 12, 13, 

14 
Rhys ap Thomas, Sir, 25, 84, 8 1;, 

88, 89 
Rhys, Lord, 24 
Richard II., King, 39, 40 
Richard, Richard, 94 
Ricketts and James, 105 
Roger, Bishop of Sahsbury, 47 

Lord of the Manor of Kid- 
welly, 17, 18, 77 

Founds the Priory, 47, 48, 51 

Consecrates local Cemetery, 56 
Rogers, Lewns, 79 
Roman occupation, 43 
Roman evacuation, 8, 10 
Romano-British Church, 41 
Rood-loft, 67, 70, 71, 72 
' Round Table,' 10 
Routledge, James, 88 
Royal Visitors, 38, 39, 40 
Rufus, King Wilham, 13, 13, 15, 
16 



Sacristy, 36, 65, 70 
Saints' Church, All, 44, 45 
Sarcophagus, 63 
Savage, Sir John, 88 
Saxon Invasion, 16 
Scots, The, 9 

Scott, Sir George Gilbert— 
His Survey of the Parish 
Church, 65 — 67 
Seal of the Borough, 80 
Sediha, 36, 66 
Sepulchral Tombs, 66, 71 
Severn Sea, 8 
Sherborne Abbe)', 20, 44, 47, 48, 

55, 58 
Sherborne Castle, 17 
Ship- building, 60, 61, 103 
' Siege of Kidwelly,' 5, 14, 21 
SiHca-brick Manufacture, 107 
Siloam Chapel, 99 
Smart, Messrs. H. & H. E)., 108 



Squint, 70 

Stafford, Henry, Duke of Buck- 
ingham, 88 

Stair -cases (Mural), Parish 
Church, 67, 69, 70, 71 

Stephens, Alderman, 108 

Strata Florida, 90 

Strathclyde, 8 

Sul, Capel, 98 

Sulen, Mynydd, 48 

Swansea, 19, 27, 38, 74, 80, loi 



Taf, The, 5 

Tawy, The, 5, 10, 11 

Taxation of Nicholas IV., 40, 41, 

42 
Teify, The, 5 
Teilo, St., 41, 43 
Teilo, St., Chapel of, 41, 42 
Teilo, St., Mission Church of, 76 
Tewdwr the Great, 1 2 
Thomas, Capt., 103 
Thomas de Londres, 23 
Thomas, Mr. H. J., 97 
Thomas, Mr. John, 107 
Thomas, St., Cemetery, 56, 57 
' Thomas the Vicar,' 58, 59 
Thurstan, Abbot, 48 
Tin-plate Manufacture, 104 — 

107 
Tithes of Klidwelly, Dispute 

about the, 49, 55, 58 
Tower and Spire of Parish 

Church, 64 — 69 
Towy, The, 5, 10, 11, 28, 50 
Trancepts, Parish Church, 64, 

65, 66, 71 
Tudor, Jasper, 88 
Tudur Aled, 91 
Tumulus, Celtic, 6 
Ty-gwyn-ar-Daf, 41 



U. 

Urban, Bishop of Llandaff, 1 1 
' Urien Rheged,' 9, 10 



176 



INDEX. 



V. William de Londres, 14, 15, 16, 

17, 20 
Vaughan, Richard, Earl of Car- WilHams, Dr. John, 94 



bery, 25 
Vestry, 65, 67, 70 
Vicarage House, 58 
Vicariate, 55, 58 
Vicars, I,ist of, 59 



Williams, Rev. W. G., 96 
Windows, Parish Church, 65 — 

67 
Wright, Col., 107 
Wye, The, 10 



W. 



Y. 



Waungadog, 41, 44 
Wesley an Chapel (English), 99 
Whitland, 41 
Wigley, Eliza Maria, 80 

Wilfrid, Bishop of St. Davids, Ystrad Tywy, 9, 15, 16, 19 
17) 55 Ystradyw, 11 



Yarford, Sir John, 91 
York, Ehzabeth of, 88 
Young, Mr. Alexander, 108 



.... LIST 
. . . . .OF 
SUBSCRIBERS 



UST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 



A. 

Aberdare, The Right Hon. Lord, Duffryn, Mountain Ash, 

Glamorgan. 
Abraham, Mr. D., Monksford, Kidwelly. 
Alban, Rev. D. T., B.A., Carmarthen. 
Andrews, IMiss, Wern, Kidwelly. 
Anthony, Mr. D. W., 12 Bridge Street, Kidwelly. 
Anthony, Mr. Edmund, 4 West End, Kidwelly. 
Anthony, Mr. Llewelyn, South End House, Kidwelly. 
Anthony, Mr. J. G., Paris House, Kidwelly (five copies). 
Anthony, Mr. John, Muddlescwm, Kidwelly. 
Anthony, Mr. S. H., Penlan, Kidwelly. 
Amett, Mr. J. E., The Library, Tenby (two copies). 
Arnold, Mr. Thomas, C.E., Llanelly. 
Arthur, Mr. J. E., Pinged Hill, Kadwelly. 
Avdd, Mrs., Laurel Bank, Whitehaven. 

B. 

Barker, Mr. T. W., Diocesan Registry, Carmarthen (two copies). 
Bartlett, Mr. Dan, Decorator, Carmarthen. 
Bate, Mr. W. H., Station Road, Kidwelly (three copies). 
Baynes, Mr. Neil, 120 Warwick Street, Eccleston Square, London, 

S.W. 
Bebb, Principal, St. David's College, Lampeter. 
Bell, Mrs., 5 Richmond Terrace, East Twickenham. 
Bevan, Ven. Archdeacon W. L., Ely Tower, Brecon. 
Beynon, Rev, John, Ardwyn, Wern Road, Skewen, nr. Neath, 
Beynon, Mr. Wm., Penygroes, Kidwelly. 
Bolton, Mr. H. C, Ivor Cottage, Burry Port, Pembrey (four 

copies) . 
Bonnell, Mr. D., Trimsaran. 

Boulton, Mr. J., Librarian, Free Library, Llanelly. 
Bowen, Mr. A. E., Town Hall, Pontypool (two copies). 
Bowen, Rev. Canon, Monkton Priory, Pembroke. 
Bowen, Mr. G. E., Rumsey House, Kidwelly. 
Bowen, Mr. John, 28 Monksford, Kidwelly. 
Browne, Mrs. R. P., Clentfield, Harborde, Staffs. 
Brigstocke, Mr. A., Blaenpant, Boncath, S.O., S. Wales (two 

copies) . 
Brigstocke, Mr. G. R., Ryde, Isle of Wight (four copies). 
Brigstocke, Mr. T. E., J. P., Carmarthen. 



LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 179 

Britten, Rev. Anthony, Gorslas Vicarage, Llandebie, S.O. 
Brodie, Mr. W. W., Cheriton, L,lanelly. 
Buckley, Capt., Castell Gorfod, St. Clears. 
Bulkeley-Owen, Rev. T. M., Tedsmore HaU, Oswestry. 
Bushell, Mr. W. D., Caldey Priory, Tenby. 



Cardiff Public Libraries, per Mr. John Ballinger, Librarian. 
Carmarthenshire Antiquarian Society and Field Club, per Mr. 

W. Spurrell. 
Cawdor, Earl, 7 Princes Gardens, London, S.W. (three copies). 
Chambers, Rev. R. H., M.A., Christ College, Brecon. 
Chandler, Mrs., The Valley, Narberth. 
Chappell, Mrs., Kidwelly. 

Charles, Mr. Wm., Brickyard Cottages, Kidwelly. 
Clarke, Dr. Ernest, London. 

Clarke, Mr. Henry, J. P., Cannon Hall, Hampstead, N.W. 
Cole, Mr. Walter S., 46 Water Street, Kidwelly. 
ColHer, Mr. Ernest, 22 Picton Place, Carmarthen. 
Comer, Mr. Fred., Glen Lyn, Stafford Road, Weston-super-Mare. 
Copp, Mr. Charles, Pendre, Kidwelly. 
Corbett, Mr. John, Stuart Bute Estate Office, Cardiff. 
Cuimington, Mr. B. Howard, Devizes. 

D. 

Davids, Mr. G. H., New Street, Kidwelly. 

Davids, Mrs., Lady Street, Kidwelly. 

Davies, Mr. A. O., Uplands, Carmarthen. 

Davies, Mr. C. M., Architect, Merthyr Tydfil (two copies). 

Davies, Rev. D., M.A., Rector of St. Andrews' Major, Dinas 
Powis, Cardiff. 

Davies, Rev. D., B.A., St. Paul's Vicarage, Llanelly. 

Davies, Rev, D., B.A., Devynock Vicarage, Brecon. 

Davies, Rev. Evan, Llangendeirne, Kidwelly. 

Davies, Mr. Evan, Llangadog Cottage, Islidwelly. 

Davies, Mr. Evan, Lady Street, Kidwelly. 

Davies, Mr. Evan John, Pleasant View, Kidwelly. 

Davies, Rev. E. J., B.A., Parsonage, Capel Bangor, nr. Aber- 
ystwyth. 

Davies, Mr. G. T., Corner House, Kidwelly. 

Davies, Rev. G. R., Upper Cwmtwrch, Swansea Valley. 

Davies, Mr. Howell, ' The Abbey,' Kidwelly. 

Davies, Rev. J. Alban, B.A., The Vicarage, Talley, Carmarthen- 
shire. 

Davies, Mr. James, Gwynfa Beesmy HiU, Hereford. 

Davies, Mr. J. H., M.A., 20 North Parade, Aberystwyth. 

Davies, Mr. J. H., Station Road, Kidwelly (three copies). 

Davies, Mr. John, Pehcan Hotel, Kidwelly. 



l8o UST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 

Davies, Mr. John, 2 Lady Street, Kidwelly. 

Davies, Rev. U., M.A., 9 Glanmor Place, Llanelly. 

Davies, Mrs., Plough Inn, Kidwelly. 

Davies, Mr., Caernewydd, Kidwelly. 

Davies, P.C., Police vStation, Kidwelly. 

Davies, Rev. R. W. F. Singers-, R.D., The Rectory, Llandrindod 

Wells. 
Davies, Mr. Saunders, Brickyard Cottages, Kidwelly (two copies). 
Davies, Mr. Silvanus, Stradey Arms, Llanelly. 
Davies, Mr. Thomas, Kidwelly Arms, Kidwelly. 
Davies, Rev. Timothy, Gartheli Vicarage, Felinfach, S.O., Cards. 
Davies, Rev. W., Vicar, Llanfihangel Abercowin, St. Clears. 
Davies, Mr. W. Dunn, West End Villas, ICidwelly (two copies). 
Davies, Mr. Wm., 38 Water Street, Kidwelly. 
Donaldson, Rev. a". E., M.A.„ Christ College, Brecon. 
Drummond, Mr. F. D. W., Edwinsford, Dlandilo. 

B. 

Edmondes, Ven. Archdeacon, Nolton Court, Bridgend, Gla- 
morgan. 
Edwards, Mr. D. C, SoUcitor, Llanelly (.six copies). 
Edwards, Mr. Watkin, M.B., 46 Albert Terrace, Middlesbrough. 
Edwards, Mr. Wm., 96 Oxford Street, Swansea. 
Evans, Miss Agnes, Old Vicarage, Kidwelly. 
Evans 
Evans 
Evans 
Evans 
Evans 
Evans 
Evans 
Evans 
Evans, 
Evans 
Evans 
Evans 
Evans 
Evans 
Evans 
Evans 
Evans 
Evans 
Evans 
Evans 



Evans 
Evans 
Evans 



Mrs. Angell, Clentfield, Victoria Road, Harborne, Staffs. 

Mr. Arthur, Lloyds Bank, Llanelly. 

Mr. D. J., Tanygraig, Kidwelly. 

Rev. D. D., B.D., Llangunnor Vicarage, Carmarthen. 

Miss, Old Vicarage, Kidwelly. 

Mrs. Colby, Carmarthen. 

Mr. E. Vincent, 64 Chancery Lane, London, W.C. 

Rev. E. W., B.A., Tremain Vicarage, Cardigan. 

Mr. Frank, 5 The Avenue, Carmarthen. 

Rev. George Eyre, Ty Tringad, Aberystwyth. 

Rev. H., Llangwm Rectory, Haverfordwest. 

Rev. J. O., B.A., Tretower Vicarage, Crickhowell. 

Mr. Lewis, 2 Gwendraeth Place, ICidwelly. 

Miss Martha, 12 Alstred Street, Kidwelly. 

Mrs. M. M., Old Vicarage, Kidwelly. 

Ven. Archdeacon, Carmarthen. 

Mr. Owen, Kymer Terrace, Kidwelly. 

Mr. Richard John, Tanygraig, Kidwelly. 

Mr. Stephen, 59 Water Street, Ividwelly. 

Rev. T. C, The Parsonage, Cwmllynfell, S. Wales (two 



copies) . 



Mrs. Greenfield Cottages, Kidwelly. 

Mrs., Greenfield Inn, Kidwelly. 

Rev. W. Eilir, The Parsonage, I,lancarfan, Cowbridge. 



Evanson, Rev. M., B.Sc, Merthyr Mawr Rectory, Bridgend. 



LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS. l8l 



F. 



Feltoe, Rev. C. L., D.D., Duxford. Rectory, Cambridge. 

Footman, Rev. W. 1,1., M.A., College School, lyampeter. 

Francis, Mr. W. J., Hazlemere, ICidwelly. 

Franklen, Mr. T. M., St. Hilary, Cowbridge. 

Fryer, Rev. A. T., St. James' Vicarage, Walthamstow. 



Gery, Mr. A. R., Solicitor, Royston, Court, Ferryside (three 

copies) . 
Gibbert, Mr. W., Water Street, Kidwelly. 
Gillespie, Mr. J., Glanmorfa Cottages, Kidwelly. 
Gillespie, Mr. W., 4 Gwendraeth Terrace, Kidwelly. 
Glascodine, Mr. C. H., 7 Abbingdon Gardens, Kennington, 

London, W. 
Gower, Mr. James, Cowpark Lane, Kidwelly (three copies). 
Gower, Mrs., Boot and Shoe, Kidwelly. 
Gower, Mr. W., Water Street, Kidwelly. 
Graham, Mrs., Moss Lea, Mossley Hill, Liverpool. 
Graham, Mr. W. J., CuUa House, Trimsaran, Kidwelly. 
Graven, Mr. D., Goitre, Kidwelly. 
Gravell, Mr. John, Green Alley, Kidwelly. 
Graven, Mr. J. D., Hamilton, Montana, U.S.A. 
Gravell, Mr. Lewis, Alstred Street, Kidwelly. 
Gravell, Mr. P., Nelson, Kidwelly (three copies). 
Gravell, Mr. W., Gordon Terrace, Kidwelly. 

GraveU, Rev. W. J., B.A., St. Michael's College, Llandaff, Cardiff. 
Gray, Mr. Thomas, J. P., Underbill, Port Talbot. 
Green, Rev. Prof. E. Tyrrell, St. David's College, Lampeter. 
Greenwood, Mr. H., Solicitor, Kidwelly. 
Greville, Mr. David, 12 Doughty Street, London, W.C. 
Greville, Mr. T., Maesderwen, Pontyberem, Llanelly. 
Griffith, Rev. John, Llangynwyd, Glamorgan. 
Grifi&th, Rev. Wm., Villa Master, 67a Hampton Road, Southport. 
Griffiths, Dr., Kidwelly (two copies). 
Griffiths, Rev. D., Llangranog Rectory, Henllan, Cards. 
Griffiths, Mr. John, Ferry Road, Kidwelly. 
Griffiths, Mr. Joseph, i St. Peter's Terrace, Cambridge. 
Griffiths, Rev. J. T., B.D., Brawdy Vicarage, Penycwm, S.O., 

Pembs. 
Griffiths, Mr. J. Wigley, F.G.C.M., Fehnfoel, Llanelly. 
Griffiths, Mrs., London House, Kidwelly (four copies). 
Griffiths, Mr. T., J. P., Glanmor, Burry Port. 
Griffiths, Rev. T. I4anspyddyd Vicarage, Brecon. 
Griffiths, Mr. Wm., Station Road, KidweUy. 



l82 IJST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 



H. 

Harries, Mrs., Alpine Villa, Kidwelly. 

Harries, Mr. D., Bryncaerau, Trimsaran. 

Harris, Mr. A., i Croft Terrace, Kidwelly. 

Harris, Mr. Eli, Water Street, Kidwelly. 

Harris, Mr. Evan, Greenfield Cottages, Kidwelly. 

Harris, Mr. Wm., Pinged Hill, Kidwelly. 

HeadJey, Rev. W., M.A., The Vicarage, Llanfihangel-y-Creuddyn, 

Aberystwyth. 
Hills-Johnes, Lieut. -Gen. f^ir, V.C, Dolaucothv, Llanwrda, S.O., 

S. Wales. 
Hitchings, Mr. B., Sea View, Kidwelly. 
Holmes, Mr. H. S., Training College, Carmarthen. 
Howell, Mr. D., Causeway Street, Kidwelly. 
Howells, Dr., Trimsaran, Kidwelly. 
Hugh, Mr. D. J., Bay View, Kidwelly. 
Hugh, Mr. WiUiam, Cobourg Hotel, Tenby. 
Hugh, Mr. William, Morley, Michigan, U.S.A. (two copies). 
Hughes, Mr.s., Cobourg Hotel, Tenby. 
Hughes, Mr. Christmas, Kidwelly. 

Hughes, Miss E., 9 Ferrj^ Road, Kidwelly (two copies). 
Hughes, Rev. Eynon, The Vicarage, Bettws Ivan, Beulah, S.O., 

Cards. 
Hughes, Mr. Samuel, Siding, Kidwelly. 
Hiighes, Mr. T. Oldham, 50 Lady Street, Kidwelly. 
Hughes, Col. W. Gwynne, D.L., J. P., Glancothi, Nantgaredig. 
Hybert, Mr. F. W., Trafalgar House, Conway Road, Cardiff. 



Innes, Mr. John, Old Road, Llanelly. 

Isaac, Mr. R. H., Station House, Kidwelly (three copies). 



James & Son, Messrs., Outfitters, Stepney Street, Llanelly. 

James, Mrs., 79 Hafod Terrace, Swansea. 

James, Mr. Hugh, Square Cottage, Pontyates. 

James, Rev. J. M., B.A., Llanstephan Vicarage, Carmarthenshire. 

James, Mr. James, Upper Mill, Kidwelly. 

James, Sergeant, Kidwelly. 

James, Mr. W. D., The Barbican, Kidwelly. 

Jenkins, Rev. D. A., M.A., Chaplain, AbergwiU Palace. 

Jenkins, Mr. John, New Street, Kidwelly. 

Jenkins, Rev. W. C, Pistyll-gwyn, Kidwelly (five copies). 

Jennings, Capt., Gelli-deg, Kidwelly. 

Jennings, Mr. R. E., 15 Palmeira Mansions, Brighton. 

John, Mss, Castle Hotel, Kidwelly. 



UST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 183 

John, Mr. Rees, Pleasant View, Kidwelly. 

John, Mr. Wm., Brynhyfryd, Trimsaran. 

Johns, Mr. Wm., 7 West End, Kidwelly. 

Johnson, Mr. Samuel, 38 Osborne Road, Pontypool. 

Jones, Mr. Archibald LI., Heolfawr, Kidwelly. 

Jones, Rev. B. H., B.D., Kilymaenllwyd Rectory, Login, S.O., 

Carmarthenshire. 
Jones, Rev. Chancellor, Bryn Road, Lampeter. 
Jones, Mr. Daniel H., Kymer Terrace, Kidwelly. 
Jones, Rev. D., B.A., Bangor Teifi Rectory, Llandyssul. 
Jones, Rev. D., B.A., The Vicarage, Pembrey. 
Jones, Mr. D. O., Castle School, I\idwelly. 
Jones, Rev. D. T., The Rectory, Loiighor. 
Jones, Rev. D. T., B.A., Hillside, Kidwelly. 
Jones, Rev. Ebenezer, M.A., The Vicarage, Llandovery. 
Jones, Mr. Edmund James, C.E., J. P., Fforest Legionis, Pont- 

neath Vaughau, Neath. 
Jones, Mss E. J., Christ College, Brecon. 
Jones, Mr. E. W., J. P., 6 Addison Road, Kensington. 
Jones, Miss E. G., Waungadog, KidweUy (two copies). 
Jones, Mr. George, n New Street, Kidwelly. 
Jones, Rev. Henry, B.A., Llandyfriog Vicarage, Newcastle 

Emlyn. 
Jones, Rev. H. R., 27 Ferry Road, Kidwelly. 
Jones, Rev. James, The Vicarage, Llandebie, Carmarthenshire, 
Jones, Mr. James, 25 Water Street, Kidwelly (two copies). 
Jones, Rev. John, M.A., St. Issell's Vicarage, Saundersfoot. 
Jones, Mr. John D., H.M. Head Postmaster, Carmarthen. 
Jones, Rev. J. H. Watkins, M.A., Christ Church Vicarage, 

Swansea. 
Jones, Rev. J. R., M.A., Dafen Vicarage, Llanelly. 
Jones, Mr. J. Wesley, New Road, Llanelly. 
Jones, Mr. Lems, Chemist, Kidwelly. 
Jones, Mr. Rhj's, Godrecoed, Neath. 

Jones, Rev. Thomas, B.A., Llanddarog Vicarage, Carmarthen. 
Jones, Rev. Thomas, Llaudefeilog Vicarage, Kidwelly. 
Jones, Mr. Thomas, Mountain School, Kidwelly. 
Jones, Rev. T. Geler, Llangennech Vicarage, Carmarthenshire. 
Jones, Mr. W., A.R.C.A. London, School of Art, Carmarthen. 
Jones, Mr. W., 76 Water Street, Carmarthen. 
Jones, Mr. W., Heolfawr, Kidwelly. 
Jones, Mr. W., Siding, KidweUy. 
Jones, Mr. W., Brynhyfryd, Trimsaran. 
Joyce, Rev. Canon, St. Deiniol's Library, Hawarden. 



K. 

Kenyon, The Right Hon. Lord, Gredington, Whitchurch, Salop. 



184 LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 



Laws, Mr. Edward, F.S.A., Brython Place, Tenby. 

Lewis, Mr. Charles R., Quay Street, Kidwelly. 

Lewis, Rev. H. Elvet, M.A., n Highbury New Park, London, N. 

Lewis, Rev. J. Pollard, B.A., Carew Vicarage, Pembroke. 

Lewis, Rev. Canon W., Ystradyfodwg Vicarage, Pentre, Glatn. 

Lewis, Sir W. T., Bart., The Mardy, Aberdare. 

Llandafif, The Very Rev. The Dean of, Glam. 

Llewellyn, Mr. R. W., Baglan Hall, Britton Ferry. 

Llewelyn, Mr. C. Venables, Llysdinam, Newbridge-on-Wye, 
Radnor. 

Lloyd, Mr. Charles, Wannifor, Maesycrugian, S. Wales. 

Lloyd, Mr. D., 30 Lady Street, Kidwelly. 

Lloyd, Mr. Henry, 59 Priory Street, Kidwelly. 

Lloyd, Mr. H. Meuric, Delfryn, Llanwrda, S.O., Carmarthenshire. 

Lloyd, Rev. Preb. J., Llanpumpsaint Vicarage, S.O., Carmarthen- 
shire. 

Lloyd, Mr. Thomas, Bell Inn, Kidwelly. 

Loosemore, Mr. W. J., Myrtle Cottage, Kidwelly. 

M. 

MaUphant, Mr. W. J., 28 Lady Street, Kidwelly (two copies). 

Martin, Mr. E. P., The Hill, Abergavenny. 

Mee, Mr. Arthur, Tremynfa, Llanishen, Cardiff. 

Meredith, Mr. Daniel, Brynhyfryd, Kidwelly. 

Meyrick Librarv, Jesus College, Oxford. 

Moore, Mr. G. W., Pen Illtyd, Llandaff, Glam. 

Morgan Brothers, Messrs., 3 Priory Street, Kidwelly (two copies). 

Morgan, Rev. D., B.A., Llanstepban Vicarage, Llyswen, S.O., 

Radnor. 
Morgan, Mr. D., Ffairfach Council School, Llandilo. 
Morgan, Rev. D. Watcyn, B.A., The Vicarage, Llanelly (two 

copies) . 
Morgan, Mr. Frank, Tutor, Keble College, Oxford. 
Morgan, Mr. John, junr., Gwenlhan, Kidwelly. 
Morgan, Miss, Orchard Villa, Kidwelly (two copies). 
Morgan, Mr. J. B., 50 New Road, Llanelly. 
Morgan, Mr. Tahesin, 12 Queen Chambers, Cardiff. 
Morgan, Mr. Wm., Hill Park, Trimsaran. 
Morgan, Lieut.-Col. W. LI., Bryn BriaUu, Swansea. 
Morris, Rev. John, M.A., The Rectorj'^, Narberth. 
Murphy, Mr. James, Lawrenny House, Kidwelly. 

N. 
Nevill, Miss, Fairfield, Llanelly. 
Nevill, Mr. W. Y., Fehnfoel, Llanelly. 

Newell, Rev. E. J., M.A., Neen Sollars Rectory, Cleobury Mor- 
timer, Shropshire. 



UST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 185 

Newman, Mr. Josiah, F.R. Hist. Soc, Oristano, Hatch End, 

Mddlesex. 
Nicholas, Miss, Ajalon Cottage, Kidwelly (two copies). 
Nicholas, Rev. W. L., M.A., The Rectory, Flint. 
Northcote, Mr. Fred., 34 Alstred Street, Kidwelly. 
Northcote, Mr. Richard, 52 Lady Street, Kidwelly. 



O. 

Oakwell, Mr. A. E., Heolfawr, Kidwelly. 

Owen, Rev. C. Fred., M.A., The Vicarage, St. Clears. 

Owen, Rev. D. Edmondes, B.A., Llanelwedd Rectory, Builth 

Wells. 
Owen, 'Rev. D. Geler, Alma Terrace, Kidwelly (two copies). 
Owen, Mr. Henry, Poyston, Haverfordwest. 
Owen, Rev. Canon R. Trevor, M.A., F.S.A., Bodelwyddan 

Vicarage, FUnt. 

P. 

PhilHps, Mr. D. Rhys, Puhhc Library, Swansea. 
Philhps, Mr. James, 10 Hill Street, Haverfordwest. 
Phillips, Mr. John, Caiiseway Street, Kidwelly. 
Phillips, Mr. J. W., Tower Hill, Haverfordwest. 
Phillips, 'Miss, The Cottage, Kidwelly. 

Philhps, Rev. Silas T., R.D., The Vicarage, Pembroke Dock. 
Philhps, Mr. Thomas, Aberporth, S.O., Cardiganshire. 
Poole-Hughes, Rev. W. W., M.A., Warden, The College, Llan- 
dovery (two copies). 
Price, Mrs., Glanmorlais, Kidwelly (three copies). 
Price, Mr. Fred. S., 2 Rose Hill, Swansea. 
Pritchard, Mrs., The Priory, Cardigan. 
Prys, Rev. J., Llanover, Abergavenny. 



R. 

Randell, Mr. Theophihis, 10 Woodend Road, Llanelly. 

Rees, Mr. Howell, J.P , 190 Newport Road, CardiflE. 

Rees, Rev. Hugh, P.. A., Llandyr}-, Kidwelly (two copies). 

Rees, Rev. John, Tylorstown Vicarage, Glam. (two copies). 

Rees, Rev. J. Lambert, B.Sc, IJanddowror Rectory, St. Clears. 

Rees, Mr. Thomas, The Mil, Kidwelly. 

Reynolds, Mr. George, Pembrey. 

Reynolds, Mr. Llywarch, B.A., Old Church Place, Merthyr 

Tydfil. 
Reynolds, Mr. Thomas, Bradford House, Kidwelly. 
Reynolds, Mr. Thomas, 27 Water Street, Kidwelly. 
Richard, Mr. Richard, 34 Randolph Gardens, Broomhill, Glasgow. 
Richards, Mr. D. C, Newport, Mon. 



l86 UST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 

Richards, Mr. D. M., Wenallt, Aberdare. 

Richards, Mr. W., Salt Rock Farm, Pembrey. 

Richards, Mr. W. J., Johannesburg. 

Roberts, Mr. J., 36 Lady Street, Kidwelly. 

Roderick, Mr. H. B., 19 Trumpington Street, Cambridge. 

Rogers, jNIr. John, Brook House, Kidwelly. 

Routledge, Mrs., 32 Alstred Street, Kidwelly. 

Rowlands, Mr. David, IJly Place, Kidwelly. 

Ri;msey, Rev. Lacy H., M.A., ijanstadwell Vicarage, Pembs. 



St. David's College, Lampeter, per The Librarian. 

St. Michael's College Library, per Rev. W. J. Gravell. 

Salmon, JNIr. D., Swansea Training College, Swansea. 

Shankland, Mss Annie, Bridge Street, Kidwelly. 

Sheppard, Mr. Frank, Kidwelly. 

Sinnett, Rev. W. H., M.A., IJangunider Rectory, Crickhowell 
(three copies). 

Smart, Mrs., Mountain View, Kidwellj^ (three copies). 

Spurrell, Mr. Walter, Carmarthen. 

Stephens, Mr. Alfred, Broomhill, Kidwelly (six copies). 

Stephens, Mrs., Arlais, Kidwelly (three copies). 

Sullivan, Mr. John, 5 Gwendraeth Terrace, Kidwelly. 

Svitton, Mr. C. W., Librarian, Public Free Libraries, Manchester. 

Swansea Pubhc Library, per Mr. D. Rhys PhilHps, Welsh Li- 
brarian. 

Swansea, The Right Rev. Bishop of, Cantreff Rectory, Brecon. 



Taylor, Major R. Weutworth, Selse}^ 

Taylor, Mr. T. Litton, Solicitor, Baling (two copies). 

Terry, P^^ev. W. A., Benthall Vicarage, nr. Broseley, Salop. 

Theakstpn, Mrs. H. Lloyd, Fir Grove, Menai Bridge, Anglesey. 

Thomas, Mr. D., Organist, Kidwelly. 

Thomas, Mr. D., 37 Gwendraeth Town, Kidwelly. 

Thomas, Mr. D. Llexxfer, Barrister-at-Law, Hendre, Swansea. 

Thomas, Mr. D. Lleufer, Librarian Royal Inst, of S. Wales, 

Swansea. 
Thomas, Rev. Evan, M.A., Llannon Vicarage, Llanelly. 
Thomas, Mr. Fred. G., George House, Llandilo. 
Thomas, Rev. Griffith, Troedybryn, Carmarthen. 
Thomas, Mr. Henry John, Solicitor, 78 Queen Street, Cardiff. 
Thomas, Rev. J., R.D., Laugharne Vicarage. 
Thomas, Mr. John, Velindre, Kidwelly (three copies). 
Thomas, Mr. John, Parc-y-llong, Kidwelly. 
Thomas, Mr. J. D. G., Emporium, Kidwelly. 



LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS. I87 

Thomas, Rev. J. LI., M.A., Aberpergwm Vicarage, Pontneath 

Vaughan. 
Thomas, Dr. J. Lynn, 21 Windsor Place, Cardiff. 
Thomas, Mrs., Broadlay House, Ferryside. 
Thomas, Rev. N., Llanbadarn Vicarage, Aberystwyth. 
Thomas, Mr. T., VeUndre, Kidwelly (two copies). 
Thomas, Mr. T., Myrtle Villa, Wellfield Road, Carmarthen. 
Thomas, Mr. Wm., 39 Lady Street, Kidwelly. 
Tredegar, The Right Hon. Lord, Tredegar Park, Newport, Mon. 
Tiirbervill, Col., Ewenn}' Priory, Biidgend, Glam. 



U. 

Ullock, The Misses, Quarry Howe, Windermere. 

V. 

Vaughan, Mr. Herbert M., Llangoedmore, Cardigan. 

W. 

Wade, Miss, Spilman Street, Carmarthen. 

Wakin, Mr. T. M. J., ' Portculhs,' H.M. College of Arms, Queen 

Victoria Street, E.C. 
Walters, Mr. Thomas, 40 Alstred Street, Kidwelly. 
Walters, Rev. T. R., R.D., The Parsonage, Carmarthen (two 

copies) . 
Waterhouse, Mr. W. J., Plas Waun Fawr, Tregaron. 
Wheldon, Mr. P. J., Nat. Prov. Bank, Carmarthen. 
Whitelev, Mrs., 11? Rouge Bomllon, Jersey. 
Wild, M'r. John, Pinged Hill, Kidwelly. 
Wild, Mr. Joseph, Pinged Hill, Kidwelly. 
Wild, Mr. Joseph, Hillside, Kidwelly. 
Wild, Mr. Thomas, Lady Street, Kidwelly (two copies). 
Wilkins, Mr. Wm., Mayor of Kidwelly (four copies). 
WiUiams, Mr. C, F.G.S., Springfield, Merthyr Tydfil. 
Williams, Rev. D., B.A., The Cottage, Ferryside. 
Wilhams, Mr. D., 71 Priory Street, Kidwelly. 
WiUiams, Mr. D., Trimsaran. 

Wilhams, Mr. Evan, 16 Alstred Street, Kidwelly. 
WiUiams, Mr. Frank, Pinged Hill, KidweUy. ; 

WiUiams, Mr. Henry, Anthony Hotel, KidweUy. ; 

WiUiams, Mr. Ivor, Burry Port. 
Wilhams, Mr. James, Pendre, KidweUy. 
WiUiams, Miss Jane, Greyhound, KidweUy. 
Wilhams, Sir John, Plas, Llanstephan, Carmarthenshire. 
WiUiams, Dr. John, Cynlais House, Femdale, Pontypridd. 
Wilhams, Mr. John, Gletwyn Farm, Kidwelly. ; 



l88 LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 

WiUiams, Mrs., Park Villa, Kidwelly. 

Williams, Miss, Bloomfield, Narberth. 

Williams, Dr. Owen, Burry Port (two copies). 

Williams, Rev. Canon R. Camber-, The Vicarage, Lampeter. 

Williams, Rev. R., M.A., The Vicarage, Llandilo. 

Williams, Rev. Roger, R.D., Llanedi Rectory, Pontardulais. 

Williams, Mr. R. E., County School, Llanllawddog, Llanpump- 

saint. 
WiUiams, Mr. T., Trimsaran. 
WiUiams, Mr. Thomas, Moat, Kidwelly. 
WiUiams, Mr. Thomas, Preswylfa, Kidwelly. 
Williams, Mr. Thomas, Gletwyn, Kidwelly. 
Williams, Mr. Wm., Coach-house, Kidwelly. 
Williams, Rev. W. G., B.A., The Rectory, Peierston-super-Ely, 

CardiflF. 
WilHams, Mr. W. James, Cambray House, Parade, Carmarthen. 
WiUiams, Mr. W. Rees, Medical HaU, Tylorstown, Clam. 
Wixcey, Mrs., Pinged HiU, Kidwelly. 
Worthington, Rev. D., Ivlangeitho Rectory, Cards. • 

Y. 

Young, Mrs., Glanmorfa, Kidwelly (three copies). 
Young, Mr. WilHam, Glanmorfa, Kidwelly (three copies). 



^^ 



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