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HI.-TORY OF LA l'OKTE COUNTY 



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Before purchasing a Piano or Organ elsewhere, call upon 

or correspond with me and I will give you Prices 

that no other Dealer will Duplicate. 




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ADVERTISEMENTS. 



S. C. WHITING, M. D., 



HOMEOPAT 



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LA PORTE. 



OFFICE AND RESIDENCE 



No. 7 WEST JEFFERSON ST., 



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DQPJL /HP MICHIGAHJIYEHUES. 



HISTORY OF LA I'OBTE COUNTY. 



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SAVINGS BANK, 

Organised August, 1871, under State Authority. 



ALL INVESTMENTS MADE AS REQUIRED BY THE STATE LAW. 

Every Depositor a Stockholder. 



Exclusively a Savings Bank for the People. 

Xo Connection with other Banks. 

All net earnings divided among the depositors. 

No. 60 Michigan Ave., La Porte, Ind. 



TRUSTEES 



JOHN SUTHERLAND, DR. T. IIKiDAY, 

BEN A.I AH STANTON. T. W. BUTTERWORTH, 

FRED'K BAUMGARTNER, SAMUEL DOWNING, 

SHEPHERD CRUMPACKER. 

OFFICERS: 

JOHN SUTHERLAND, Prest. 

DR.T. HIGDAY, IvicePrests 

BENAJAH STANTON, J v ice riesis - 

J. II. VINING, Cashier. 

Open daily from y to 12 A. A/,, and from 1 to _/ P. M. y 
and from 6 to 8 P. M. % on Set tui'days. 

Dividends Computed from the 1st of each Month. 

. . i . and Ja\ .... 0] each Year. 



( )\ -..]■ $30,000.00 of dividends paid depositors, and always at eight per 
cent, per annum, semi annually since the Bank started business, ana it 
now has an interest account and surplus of $12,000, sufficient to pay 
three moredividends to all its present depositors at the same rate. Assets 
personally examined by Examining Committee, at least twice a year, 
and by Auditor of State as required by Law. 






ADVERTISEMENTS. 



ep. KING3 



DEALER IN 



DRY GOODS 



■A.3STD 5=^-1 



CARPETING, 



Nos. 66 and 68 MICHIGAN AVE., 



LA PORTE IND. 



The largest Dry Goods and Carpeting estaolishment in LaPorte County; 

The size of the Double-Store being forty-six feet 

front, by eighty feet deep. 

Polaski King, the proprietor, has been proprietor in this establish- 
ment for thirty-one years. In addition to the Dry Goods and Carpeting, 
there is a Merchant Tailoring department connected with the establish- 
ment. Goods are sold at the lowest prices. 

TErilvIS CASH. 



Ill -TORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



E-^cinecc Ects/bllelied. IE56. 



WASHINGTON WILSON. S. P. FRASER. 



WILSON & FRASER, 



:j?-i,zes i^ 



-*HARD AND SOFT^- 



Wood Lumber, 



>hinghs, Xath % ^qn;tre (limber, 



TS, POSTS, &C. 





C<C OFFICE AND YARD.CO 



81 W. MAIN COR. CHICAGO ST., 



X_i_A_ POETE, I3STID. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



• R B. ALLEN, 

Gardener and Florist, 

GARDE^ON THE EAST SIDE OF PINE LAKE, 

LA PORTE, - - INDIANA. 



Has for sale all kinds of Vegetables in their Season, 
AND STRAWBERRIES, 

Raspberries, Blackberries, Grapes and other Fruits 

in great abundance. 



He is Prepared to Supply the Home Market, and 
can do so on Short Notice. 



His Facilities in the way of 



GROUNDS, HOTBEDS AND GREENHOUSES, 

are Extensive, and under the Finest Cultivation. 



All in want of pure, fresh' Vegetables, Fruits and Floweis, should 
give him a call. Bouquets, Wreaths, Crosses and Floral designs of any 
description, furnished to order on short notice. 



$ HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

OTHE STATE FIREO 

Insurance Company, 



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LA PORTE, - - INDIANA, 



Organized, Oct. 1,1875. 



CAPITAL, - - $150,000.00. 



HON. JASPER PACKARD, Rrest. 
L. A. COLE, Vice Rrest. 

(BEN J. W. G00VHUE, Secy. 

HON. MORTIMER NYE, Treas. 

H. C. SHANNON, Assistant Sec'y. 



DIRECTORS 



HON. JASPER PACKARD, HON. MORTIMER NYE. 

L. A. COLE, H. H. 13LODGETT. 

F. W. MEISSXER. H. ZAIIRT, 

s. E. TAYLOR. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



9 



J. L. BOYD, 





BUGGIES. SLEIGHS, &C. 

Shop, Near the High School (Building, 

LA PORTE, INDIANA. 




. T. BLLw, 

^tiormij dt |W, 

Rooms 5 and 6 Alexander Block, 

J^^^LA PORTE, INDIANA. 

DR. GEO. M. DAKIN, 

Gives Especial Attention to the Treatment of all 

Chronic Diseases, 

c~^^ And Diseases of ^^?~i 

WOMEN AND CHILDREN, 

Also Proprietor of DR. DAKIN'S IMPROVED CATARRH REMEDY. 

Sen.5. to SCiaao. for Circular. 



10 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

A. P. Andrew, Jk. Abram P. Andrew. 

A. P. Andrew, Jr. & Son, 

BANKERS, 

Opposite the Court House, La Porte. 



We do a General Banking Business. 

We give depositors the best of security, namely 

— personal liability to the full extent of all 

our real estate and personal property. 



Of all those who regard perfect security as the first consideration, 



WE PAY INTEREST BY SPECIAL AGREEMENT. 



I 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 11 

THE LA PORTE 

CWEEKLYO 

CHRONICLE! 

PUBLISHED EVERY TUESDAY 









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? 



La Porte, Indiana. 



It Supports the Principles of the Republican Party, but never 
descends to personal abuse of political opponents. 

It is a first-class family newspaper, its general miscellaneous articles 
being interesting, useful, and morally pure. 

A gentleman distinguished in the literary world says of the Chroni- 
cle : " Papers, like people, may be either clowns or gentlemen, and the 
(Chronicle belongs to the latter class. 



'o K 



Established July 18th, 1874. 



TEEMS: $1.50 Per Year in Advance- 
CIRCULATION f^OW L/VRGE/lND CONSTANTLY INCREASING. 

As an Advertising Medium the Chronicle has 
not its equal in the County. 



12 




HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

)STEAM, BOOK/ND JOBCVO 





No. 37 Michigan Avenue. 



This Establishment is supplied with a number of Fast Steam Presses, 

and the most complete assortment of Xew and Beautiful Type, 

Borders, Cuts, Rules, and all conveniences for doing all 

kinds of Plain and Ornamental Printing, to be 

found between Toledo and Chicago. 

WOrjKDONEWELLAHD LESS THAN CHICAGO PRICES. 

WE KEEP ON HAND A COMPLETE STOCK OF 

Card Boards, Ruled Letter <md 1,111 Head Paper, Fine White 
and Colored Jobhi n< j Papers^ Black and Colored Inks, j'c. 

Being; Practical Printers of long Experience, 

We feel Justified in Warranting Perfect Satisfaction. 

BEMEMBEB THE PLACE, 

CKO. 37 MICHIGAN AVENT7EO 



LA PORTE. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



ZZs-ba.blish.ed 18S8- 



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PAINLESS CURE 




Recommended by the Medical Faculty, 



This Antidote enables the patient to discontinue the use of Opium in 
any form, at once, without pain or inconvenience, and without any inter- 
ruption of ordinary business. It rebuilds the broken constitution, and 
restores the nervous system to a healthy condition. 

DISCOVERED IN THE YE/R 1868. 

The only Painless Cure ever Discovered. 

• 

DR. COLLINS' REFERENCES l.\ LA PORTE, IND. 

S. E. Taylor, Steam Printer and Publisher. 

T. A. Holland, Publisher Holland's Directories. 
Fred 'k "West, Druggist. 
Ed. Rathbun, Livery. 

Edward Vail, Jeweler. 

V. W. Axtell, Prop'r Teegarden House. 
Judge Niles, Dr. L. C. Rose, 

Wm. M. Scott, Photographer. 

Major Fraser, GeiTl Packard, 
R. S. Morrison, Cash'r 1st Nat. Bnk. 



e^THERIAKI:^ 

A magazine of one hundred pages, containing a full description of the 
Antidote, and many other articles of interest to Opium Eaters, is issued 
quarterly, and will be sent free of charge to all interested. 

Address, 

DR. SAMUEL B. COLLINS, La Porte, lnd. 

SEE OPPOSITE PAGE.^7) 



14 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



-DEALERS IX— 



CLOTHING* DRY GOODS 

Hats and Cans, and Furnishing Goods. 

DOUBLE STORE, 11 & 13 E. MAIN STREET. 

An uninterrupted business experience of upwards of twenty years, besides other advantages, enables 
us to offer the public as good inducements in the above branches as any other house. 
We keep the largest stock of READY-MADE CLOTHING AND PIECE GOODS, suitable 
for men and boys in this part of the State. By manufacturing largely ourselves, we aim to suit the 
exact wants of the people, and furnish better made goods. 

In Hats, Caps, Furnishing Goods and Irunks, v:e keep a most complete 

assortment. 

Our DRV GOODS DEPARTMENT is amply stocked with everything desirable. Dry Goods 
have not been so cheap before in fifteen years. We are guided by the policy of 

" Quick Sales and Small Profits." 

J$£*\\'c respectfully solicit a share of your patronage. 

DAVIDSOII BROS. 
ELECTRO-THERAPEUTIC. 

Mr s. Dr. M . JL. Steverxs' 
ELECTROPATHIC AND HYGIENIC 

INSTITUTE. 



Mrs. Dr. Stevens takes pleasure in announcing to the public that 
she has established the above-named Institute at La Porte, Ind., and is 
prepared to treat all kinds of Acute, Chronic, Uterine and Xervous 
Diseases on scientific principles by Electro-Thermal, Vapor and Sulphur 
Baths. 

INSTITUTE LOCATED OX 

Corner of Indiana Avenue and Harrison Street. 

Consultation free, charges moderate. 

Patients received in the Institute. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 15 

GEO. C. DORLAND, 

t 

CONVEYANCER, 



REAL ESTATE A^D ip^CE 



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AMracts of Title to all Lands in LaPorte County, 

Reliable Insurance at Reasonable Rates. 
OFFICE: ROOM NO. 1 STATE BANK BUILDING, 

LA PORTE, INDIANA. 



The La Porte Wheel Company, 

(ESTABLISHED 1870,) 



'rtcultural Wheels, 




HUBS, SPOKES, PLOW HANDLES, 

NECK-YOKES, AX HANDLES,&c. 

Also Grain Cradles 

of THE 

GRAPE-VINE AND TURKEY-WING PATTERNS. 

.A-Xi so rr eze 

"LA PORTE CUPPER" Corn Plow and Cultivator. 



16 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



SCOTT 



IS THE — 



PHOTOGRAPH 



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NOR 



INDIANA. 



Opposi-be -blie Court House, 

OC. G- DOWLIWGpC 

And Dealer in Gents' Furnishing Goods, 
22 W. Main Street, Opp. Court House, La Porte. 

Several years experience in the Merchant Tailoring business enables me to offer special induce- 
ments to those requiring first-class Clothing. Satisfaction guaranteed, and competition defied, as to 
Style, Fit, and general appearance of the work done by me. I claim and maintain that my work is 
superior to anything in my line in Northern Indiana. 

^^Give me a trial and I will prove it. 

C. C. DOWLINC. 

COL- D. BRAND.CO 

— DEALER IN — 

DRY GOODS AND GROCERIES, 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, 

Clo-bh-ing, and Gerrbs' Furm'flhirig Goods, 
Crockery, Qi2.eens-wa.re, Hardware, <5cc 

KINGSBURY, IND. 

PHOTO-ARTIST, 

No. 17 East Main Street. La Porte. 



inconstantly grows in popularity with the people. 

iggMIis work £ives tlie best of satisfaction. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



17 




CORNER MAIN i MONROE STS. 



"THE OLD RELIABLE." 



Situated in the Centre of the Business part of the City. 



C. A. BARD, 




In Basement niter S. E. Taylor & Co.'s Printiig Office, 



opt©, 1'ixd. 



Tfk Jtai *$ I01* 



0§, 



OOAND ON REASONABLE TERMS.CO 



18 



HISTORY \ POR >UNTY 



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Manuf T5 of and Dealers in 




OOTS@ SHOES' 



ah z;*:z:::"z l::;z :r 



SLIPPERS. GA 




I RUBBER GOODS. 



Tneir Goods are First-Class, and th.eir 
Prises are 2R.easor5.able. 

All are InM to Call a:d Eiamiae then Ml 

Stock is always flill anfl in irreat varieti-. 

OPPOSITE COTJH.T SOTJSS. 





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3M* zrvKiKif , 




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LA PORTE COUNTY, 



INDIANA. 



AND ITS 



to\v::ships. tct :;d cities. 



B N 



JASPER PACKARD 



S. E. Taylor ic Company. Stkam Printer?. 






20 



HISTORY OF LA POKTh COUNTY 



I 

165553 

astor.l: nd 

TILL 




C$f%tfe Wnitt Warfts Bitth&ttta* 



P^rected in the Year 1870. 




DEDICATION 



To thk Pioneers of. La Porte County who yet remain among 
us, like the last leaves upon the trees at the approach of winter, 
who pitched their tents here when the prairies and groves were the 
home only of the savage and the wild beast, and who planted the 
first seeds of civilization, of material progress, and learning and 
religion, this volume is respectfully inscribed by 

Thk Author. 



History of La Porte County. 



PREFACE 



Local histories are the basis of general history. They supply 
all its popular elements. The great mass of people study historical 
details only by restricted localities. Few read the immense volumes 
of the history of past ages, and almost forgotten lands, but all 
desire to know something of the history of their own country, their 
St:ite or their county. With a view to supplying such local infor- 
mation in a permanent form for preservation, so far as it relates to 
La Porte county, this history is prepared. The facts concerning 
the early settlement of the county are fast fading from the memory 
of men. The pioneers are disappearing from our midst. Death is 
busy: and with the passage of a few more year-, none will be left 
who were eye witnesses to the time when our prairies and gro\ 
cxi<tp(l in their virgin loveliness untouched by the plow or the ax. 
The material facts for such a history a9 this musl come largely 
from the men who made it. and unless written now or very soon, it 
never can be written. Great labor is involved in the work of its 
preparation, much more than there would be. if its basis was docu- 
mentary; but it has been undertaken, notwithstanding other duties 
have pressed very heavily, in order to supply whal seems to be a 
public need. It aims simply to be a repository *X facts, most of 
which would, in a few more years be entirely lost. To obtain these 
facts of local, historical interest, and put them in a form for perma- 
nent preservation, is the object of these pag< No county in the 
State is more worthy of having its history preserved, both on 
account of the men who settled it. and tin- rich ami fruitful lands 



PREFACE. 28' 

which became theirs to occupy. The county has within it elements 
of wealth and prosperity which are yet largely undeveloped. There 
.is latent wealth hidden away in every part of it. from the sand 
ridges on the north, across the prairie belt of the center, to, and 
including, the Kankakee marshes on the south, which will yet 
prove the richest and most productive soil of our county. The 
avenues of an extensive commerce are at our doors. Besides the 
eight railroads which cross the county in various directions, a good 
harbor is opened at Michigan City, giving access to the great lakes, 
and bringing into our midst a large share of the trade which floats 
on this broad highway. But the harbor is yet in its infancy ; and 
as it is extended and made more commodious, the commerce of the 
lakes will seek it. and bring the products of the Lake Superior iron 
mines, and the pine forests of Michigan for shipment southward and 
eastward by rail, the facilities for which ace ample at Michigan City.. 
A heavy business is now done in this line, but it may be increased, 
ten-fold, until the entire county shall feel the spur of enterprise and 
rise into a new lii'e, for which there is abundant motive and oppor- 
tunity. 

The county, largely agricultural, ha-- by no means developed its 
full powers in this respect. The soil, naturally productive, might 
be made to produce fir more than it now does, and being so much 
nearer the eastern markets, with abundant means of transportation, 
our farmers possess very decided advantages over those of Illinois, 
Iowa and Wisconsin. Higher farming would produce larger crops 
and heavier profits to the acre. The man who cultivates two hun- 
dred acres, taking from them respectable crops of wheat and corn, 
would realize far larger net gains if he took the same amount of 
products fronTono hundred acres. And it could readily be -lone by 



improved systems of cultivation and the addition of fertilizing mate- 
rial to supply the exhaustion annually occasioned by the growing 
crops. With a more vigorous growth of crops, stimulated by fertil- 
izers, and better cultivation, there would he less damage occasioned 



24 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

by insects, and the freezing of winter, and a degree of certaintv 
might be given to the farmer's crops which they do not now possess. 
The farmer should study the best methods of fighting his enemies, 
and beyond doubt one of them is to secure a stronger and more 
rigorous growth. It is not extravagant to say that the rich farming 
lands of this county might readily be made t • produce double their 
present product. 

The county does not reach half way up to its real power of pro- 
duction, and the future will teach lessons which men seem slow to 
learn. Double the productive capacity of this county. and there 
will be prosperity as yet undreamed of. Population would increase, 
enterprise would take absolute control, and every interest and indus- 
try in the countv would flourish. Farmers should not depend 
Bolely on wheat and corn, and thus be brought very low when the 
winter's cold and early frost, blast and destroy. Larger production 
and greater variety of products will leave them always a source of 

O.I 

income. 

Agriculture and manufactures, in such a region as this, ought to 
be made to work together; and when people are actulated by a 
proper local pride, each one will exert himself to stimulate business 
enterprise, open new channels of industry, and advance the county 
in all its material interests, bv every means within bis reach. It is 
hoped that a history which shall recall many old and tender associa- 
tions, which shall show the energy and spirit of enterprise which 
characterized the men who went before us, will stimulate to emula- 
tion of their example, ami incite us to make a wiser and better im- 
provement of the privileges we enjoy in the noble heritage which we 
hold in this favored spot of earth. 

In the preparation of this history, accuracy has been diligently 
sought for: yet it can scarcely he expected that i: will be wholly 
free from errors. Men differ in the statement of the same fact. 
Thev differ as to dates and men, and it has been found that in some 
instances no two men could be found to agree; and sometimes the 



PREFACE. 25 

•discrepancies in the statements have been very embarrassing. But 
in most instances documentary evidence has been found to settle the 
question. Yet an occasional error may remain, and if so, it is 
believed that the great difficulty of obtaining the facts amidst a mass 
of conflicting statements will be duly appreciated, and the proper 
allowances be made accordingly. 

When the preparation of this History was first begun, it was not 
anticipated that the book would extend much, if any, beyond one 
hundred page*, but it has grown upon the hands of the writer, until 
it has reached its present dimensions, and a large compilation of 
material remains on hand, which would have been interesting, but 
which the size of the book has compelled me to omit. In making 
my researches, I have found everywhere an earnest disposition to 
aid me, by furnishing valuable information. Among many to 
whom I find myself indebted for favors of this kind, I taking pleas- 
ure in naming Simmon Ritter, Thompson W. Francis, W. D. Wood- 
ward, Mrs. W. F. Miller, George Ames, W. H. Goodhue, and Hon. 
J. H. Winterbotham for the history of Michigan City and Michigan 
township, the harbor and the penitentiary; John Beatty, Dr. J. H. 
White, Daniel Low, Gen. .Joseph Orr, George Seffens, John Provolt 
and his aged mother, since deceased, L. C. Van Dusen, George 
Bosserman, A. W. Vail, W. H. Winchell, George S. Dennison, 
Joseph McLellan, Levi J. Benedict, Ren. Brand, and Esq. Rey- 
nolds for various parts of the county : Fred'k West, P. King, Hon. 
Wm. Andrew, Capt. A. P. Andrew, Jr., and others for the county 
in general, and La Porte in particular ; Rev. John Benny, for the 
history of the Baptist church ; Rev. Geo. M. Boyd, for the history 
of the Methodist church ; Rev. Dr. John F. Kendall, for the history 
of the Presbyterian church ; Dr. George M. Dakin for the history 
of the Christian and Unitarian churches ; Dr. W. R. Godfrey for 
the history of the Episcopal church at Michigan City, Maj. W. G. 
Peck for the history of the, congregational church ; Charles Spaeth, 
county clerk, for assistance in the examination of records in his 



26 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

office; Dr. E. J. Church, auditor, and Joseph Jackson, deputy 
auditor, for like attentions in the auditor's office; Thos. Jernegan, of 
Michigan City Enterprise for information regarding the newspap* 
of the county; George W. Brizee for valuable assistance in gather- 
ing-information concerning the several townships, and many others, 
for whose cheerful kindness, I am sincerely grateful. 

The delay in bringing out the work has been occasioned by the 
increase of size so far beyond my first anticipations, and by ;i con- 
stant and increasing pressure of other duties, duties which did not 

admit of intermission or neglect. 

The book now goes forth, in our national centennial year, to 
the people, for whom it was written, in the earnest hope that it will 
not be unacceptable. Jasper Packard. 

La Porte, Tnd.. -May. 1876. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



27 



Established in i860. 





m 









V 



Importi r and Jobber of 



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In Original Packages 



.Z^SSTID O^ESST STOCK. 



T^Till duplicate any 



chased in. Chicago. 



pur- 



Send for Price List. 



28 HISTORY OF LA PORTB COUNTY. 

D. C. DECKER, 



DEALER IN 



Enalish Earthen Ware 



Of the Best Makes. 



Jfrench (^Ifitut, funded mid filuin, ([able 

(falniswan of all hinds. 

AND THE LARGEST Al^D FINEST STOCK OF 

AMPS AND CHANDELIERS IN, THE CITY. 

ALSO COMPLETE STOCK OF 

French Glass Shades, Silver Ware, Cutlery, Fine 

Bohemian Goods, <&c, &c. 



Give me a call and I know I will please you. : 



CONTENTS: 



Preface 22 

CHAPTER I. 

The County in General 34 

CHAPTER II. 

Kankakee Township 44 

CHARTER III. 

Scipio Township 52 

CHARTER IV. 

New Durham Township 68 

CHAPTER V. 

Michigan Township 82 

CHAPTER VI. 

Centre Township 98 

CHAPTER VII. 

Pleasant Township 118 

chapter vm. 
Wills Township 121 

CHAPTER IX. 

Springfield Township 127 

CHAPTER X. 

Galena Township 132 

CHAPTER XI. 

Clinton Township 138 

CHAPTER XII. 

N oble Township 146 

CHAPTER XIII. 

Coolspring Township 153 



:><l HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

CHAPTER XIV. 

Hudson Township '. .' 158 

CHAPTER xv. 

Tnion Township 168 

CHAPFER XVI. 

Cass Township 176 

CHAPTER XVII. 

Dewey Township 182 

CHAPTER XVIII. 

Hanna Township 18-5 

CHAPTER XIX. 

Lincoln and Johnson Townships 189 

CHAPTER XX. 

Count}* Officers 196 

CHAPTER XXI. 

Politics 200 

CHAPTER XXII. 

Politics, continued 235 

CHAPTER XXIII, (ERROR XVIIl). 

First Elections 271 

CHAPTER XXIV, (ERROR XIX). 

Politics of the City of La Porte 279 

CHAPTER XXV, (ERROR XX). 

Military Record 289 

CHAPTER XXVI, (ERROR XXI). 

Church Record 400 

(HATTER XXVn, (ERROR XX Vl). 

Inventions and Discoveries 436 

I EAPTER XXVIII, (ERROR XX VII). 

Professions and Business 444 

« EAPTER -XXIX. (ERROR XXVIIl). 

Newspapers 4.59 

CHAPTER XXX, (ERROR XXIX). 

One Hundred years ago and now 465 



ERRATA. 31 



ERRATA 



On page 52, sixth line from top, read "Springfield for "Michi- 
gan." 

On page 67, last word on the page, read "life" for "fiel," and 
in last line of preceding paragraph for " C. N. Evans," read I. N. 
Evans. 

On page 61, thirteenth line from bottom, for "1833' read 
1836. 

On page 154, seventeenth line from bottom, for " 1833 ' read 
1834. 

Oh page 400, for subject of Chapter, supply the words "Church 
Record." 

For correction of errors in numbering chapters see table of 
contents. 



32 BI8T0RY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

H. W. JOSEPH & CO., 



DEATirSS 12" 



Millinery and Fancy Goods, 

And Victor Sewing Machine, 

Main Street, off. Court House, - LATOfcTE, INDIANA. 
Terms Strictly Cash, and Prices Low. 

ADELBERT L. BROWN, 

Notary Public and Gonveyangi? 

ABSTRACTS OF TITLE 

To all Real Estate in La Porte County furnished at reasonable rates T 

Notes and Accounts promptly collected, Titles 

examined, Deeds and Mortgages prepared 

and acknowledgments taken. 

Old and Reliable Insurance Companies Represented. 



$50,000 to loan on 5 yrs. time at 9 per cent, interest secured by mortgage. 

Rooms I &. 2 over New York Hat Store. 

L.A rOIVTE, HT3DIA1TA.- 









rx v v i,^-» j[ , 



Hionecr druggist aqtl %ookseller f 

ESTABLISHED it - 

Wall Paper and Curtains a Specialty. 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



CHAPTER I. 

THE COUNTY IN GENERAL. 

The county of LaPorte, comprises all that region of country 
which is bounded on the north by Lake Michigan and the State of 
Michigan ; on the east by St. Joseph county ; on the south by 
Stark county, the Kankakee river separating the two counties, ex- 
cept on the east end of the southern boundary, where the river is 
wholly within LaPorte county ; and on the west by Porter county. 
It possesses a great variety of soil and external characteristics. 
The whole north side of the county is well timbered, the timber belt 
extending from St. Joseph county on the east to Porter on the 
west. The timber consists of oak, ash, sugar and soft maple, elm, 
walnut and many other species, the whole forming a source of 
wealth, of which far too little account is taken, and great wasteful- 
ness has been the result. Formerly the region bordering the lake 
was well covered with beautiful white pine ; but this valuable tree 
has almost wholly disappeared, being cut off for lumber. This tim- 
ber country is from ten to fifteen miles in width, and much of the 
soil, especially on the eastern end, is deep and rich, rivaling the 
loam of the prairie in fertility. Approaching the lake, sand pre- 
dominates, and the country becomes more broken and hilly, consist- 
ing of sandy ridges, which on the lake shore are in many places 
almost wholly destitute of vegetation. The sandy soil of Spring- 
field, Michigan and Coolspring townships, though not so rich as 
that of the heavier timber land farther to the east, in Galena and 
Hudson, is yet especially adapted to certain kinds of crops. Potatoes 
raised on it are of superior quality, and all kinds of fruit, even 
peaches, do well, the crop being more certain to endure the winter's 
cold than in the open prairie. The soil is warm, products come 
forward early and rapidly, and are easily cultivated. Through the 
centre of the county from east to west, the prairie belt extends. 



34 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

This prairie is dotted with beautiful groves of valuable timber, some 
of them containing hundreds, even thousands of acres. The soil in 
prairie and grove is of excellent richness and fertility, and gives to 
this county its reputation of being one of the great wheat growing 
counties of the State. It is equally as well adapted to corn as to 
wheat, perhaps better, if the fact is considered that wheat is some- 
times injured by the freezing of winter. This however seldom oc- 
curs, and the total destruction of many fields in the last rigorous 
winter, is almost wholly without precedent. Commencing on the 
northern border of the prairie, several notable examples lying in the 
immediate vicinity of LaPorte, there are many small lakes scatter- 
ed throughout the prairie belt, some of them of charming beauty. 
In all the elements of beauty and utility, this region is unsurpassed 
in the "West. The soil is a black sandy loam resting on a subsoil of 
gravel and sand. It is easily cultivated, and has the capacity to 
withstand drouth for weeks. No more attractive region for the 
farmer is anywhere to be found : and with a higher cultivation than 
they now receive, these lands would produce crops that would as- 
tonish those who have lived on them the longest. 

Passing southward beyond the prairie belt, the Kankakee marsh- 
es are reached. In the early times, these were largely covered with 
water, but they are gradually drying out, and the plow is each year 
making encroachments on these valuable lands, and the area of cul- 
tivation approaches the river more and more nearly. They form 
an extensive grazing field for cattle during the summer, and thou- 
sands of tons of hay are made upon them every season : but when 
through natural processes, aided perhaps by ditching, they have all 
become dry enough to cultivate, they will be among the most valua- 



ble lands in the State, especially for the raising of corn. To a great 
depth the soil is composed of decayed vegetable matter, and is, of 
course, of wonderful richness. Those portions of them which have 
become dry enough for the plow now produce crops of corn which 
the higher lands of the prairie seldom equal. Around the edges of 
the marshes there is an abundance of timber. White and Red oak, 
and hickory ; and occasionally there is a tamarack swamp. There 
are indications of iron in many places, and speaking on the subject 
of the Kankakee marshes, the State geologist Prof. E. T. Cox, says 



THE COUNTY IN GENERAL. 35 

in his report for 1873 : "Bog iron ore occurs in considerable quan- 
tities in the marshes along the Kankakee, and when some plan has 
been devised for converting the peat, with which it is associated, 
into fuel adapted to use in a blast furnace, each may add to the val- 
ue of the other, and naturally tend to bring the much abused 
Kankakee marsh into more favorable notice." 

The highest ridge of land in the county is two miles north of the 
city of LaPorte. The summit is, by barometric measurement, 270 feet 
above Lake Michigan, which is eleven miles distant. This ridge 
divides the waters which reach the Atlantic ocean by way of the 
great Lakes and the St. Lawrence river, from those which flow to 
the gulf of Mexico through the Kankakee, Illinois and Mississippi 
rivers. Northward of the summit, the land descends gradually to 
the lake, the surface being marked with elevations called "lake 
ridges," which are nearly parallel to the present lake shore. Ac- 
cording to Prof. Cox, "these ridges of sand mark the ancient shore 
lines of the lake, where its subsidence was arrested for a greater or 
less period of time." That this remark is true, is mads clear from 
the evident fact that the same process is going on at Michigan City, 
and elsewhere on the lake shore. The waves constantly bring up 
from the lake bottom, and land upon the beach, the countless parti- 
cles of sand. The water recedes and the sand is left to drv. Then 
the wind takes it and drives it like drifting snow to the first barrier 
of trees and bushes, where it is checked, and begins to accumulate, 
forming a ridge. The vegetation, well-rooted, reproduces itself, 
growing to the top as the sand rises, and finally a range of hills is 
the result of the combined action of wave and wind on the moving 
particles of sand. Thus the "lake ridges" are now being formed; 
and so were fashioned, ages ago, those which are now far inland. 
Here again we quote from Prof. Cox, who says : 

"The first ridge, along the present shore line, rises above the 
water level from thirty to eighty-five feet, this is broken at irregu- 
lar intervals by valleys at oblique angles, and occasionally a tall 
peak rises many feet above its fellows, a space of half a mile suc- 
ceeds this ridge, having an elevation of fifteen to twenty feet ; on 
this is built the town of Michigan City. The top of the second 
beach or ridge is fifty feet, and the half mile of valley beyond is 



I 
36 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



thirty-five feet above the water. The third beach is forty-five feet,, 
the fourth is ninety-five and the fifth is two hundred and twenty- 
five feet above the lake. It may be remarked that the fourth 
beach line contains a considerable amount of gravel, perhaps indi- 
cating a fixed water level for a comparatively long period of time. 

The shallow portions of the present lake, near the shore, are uni- 
formly floored with sand, but in the deep central areas the bottom 
is composed of stiff, tenacious clay, intercalating partings or pockets 
of sand, from whence, probably, comes the supply which is. con- 
stantly, being filled up and drifted about the shores by the wind. 
It may be inferred that the ancient lake was governed by a like law, 
as the railway cuts which traverse these wide, descending shore 
lines, frequently discover beds of clay, (the Erie clay of Canadian 
Geologists) and wherever this clay is pierced by wells, the supply of 
water is found in the sand partings. 

No continuous sand ridges are found bevond the fifth from the 
lake, though for some distance further inland the valleys and hol- 
lows are, more or less, floored with this wave-washed material. The 
lakes in the vicinity of LaPorte are south of the water-shed and no 
evidences are traceable of their having been a part of ancient lake 
Michigan since the subsidence of the glacial sea."' 

Prior to the year 1829 the tract of country which is now the 
county of La Porte, was without a white inhabitant. In all the 
"West, prolific in beauty, there was not a lovelier region ; but it was 
in the sole possession of the red man, who roamed at will over the 
prairies, and encamped in the groves, living on the game and fish, 
which were abundant on the land and in the sparkling lakes. But 
in the year 1829, intruders began to arrive. First of all, came the 
widow Benedict and her family, and settled in what is now Xew 
Durham township, not far from the present town of Westville. 
Three or four others in the same year settled near the same locality; 
the widow Shirley and family settled in the present Scipio town- 
ship, and Joseph W. Perkins, a trapper, and Asa M. Warren, 
settled in the northeast corner of the county, in what is now Hud- 
son township. A more particular account of the settlers willjbe 
given in connection with the history of the townships wherein they 
founded their homes. The county was unorganized, and though more 



THE COUNTY IN GENERAL. 37 

settlers came in 1880, and 1831 ; and at the beginning of 1832, 
there were more than one hundred families in the county, yet they 
were substantially a law unto themselves, for they were still without 
a county organization. On the 9th day of January, 1832, the 
State Legislature passed an act in which it was provided, "That 
from and after the first day of April next, all that tract of country 
included in the following boundaries shall form and constitute a new 
county, to be known and designated by the name and style of La- 
Porte county, to-wit: Beginning at the State line which divides the 
State of Indiana and Michigan territory, and at the Northwest cor- 
ner of township No. 38, North of Range No. 4, west of the second 
principal meridian, thence running east with said State line to the 
centre of Range No. 1, west of said meridian ; thence South twenty- 
two miles ; thence west parallel with the said State line twenty-one 
miles; thence north to the place of beginning." 

The act also named commissioners, one each from the counties 
of Allen, Fountain, Clinton, Tippecanoe and Ripley, to fix the seat 
of justice for the new county, and directed that they should meet at 
the house of David Pagin in said county, and "immediately proceed 
to the discharge of the duties assigned them by law." 

Their duties were discharged as prescribed ; and a writ of election 
having been issued from the executive department of the State, an 
election was held and a Board of county commissioners elected con- 
sisting of Chapel W. Brown, Elijah H. Brown, and Isaac Morgan. 
Thus the county was organized, and ready to take its place among 
the other counties of the State. It is related that when the act for 
the incorporation of the county was before the legislature, a repre- 
sentative from one of the older counties, arose to inquire what out- 
landish name it was they were about to give the new county, and he 
desired to know what it meant. He was told that the word was 
French for "Door" or "Gate," and took its origin from a natural 
opening through the timber of a grove leading from one part of the 
prairie to another. "Well then," said he, "why not call it Door 
county, at once, and let these high-flown, aristocratic French names 
alone?' But his advice was not followed; and the county, as sub- 
sequently the city, received the beautiful name, "LaPorte," instead 
of being forever heralded to the world as Door county, and Doorburg. 



38 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

The first Board of commissioners of LaPorte county met on May 
28th, 1832, at the house of Geo. Thomas ; and Chapel W. Brown, 
Elijah H. Brown and Isaac Morgan presented their certificates of 
election. These certificates were signed by the sheriff of the county, 
and on the back of each certificate is endorsed the oath of office, the 
oath being administered by the sheriff. 

Benjamin McCarty was the acting sheriff, and there being no 
clerk, the Board appointed Geo. Thomas the clerk elect of the cir- 
cuit court, "clerk of the Board for the time being." 

The first act of this first session of the Board of commissioners, 
was to order the division of the county into three townships. All 
that part of the county lying east of the line which divides ranges 
two and three was named Kankakee township, and was designated 
as Commissioner's district No. 1. The whole of rancre three was 

O 

constituted another township and named Scipio, and was designated 
as Commissioner's district No 2 ; and range four was constituted a 
third civil township, New Durham, and was designated as Commis- 
sioner's district No. 3. 

This order establishing the townships was followed by orders 
directing that elections should take place on the 16th of June fol- 
lowing, that a justice of the peace should be elected in and for each 
township, and that elections should be held as follows : In Kankakee 
township at the house of N. B. Nichols, with John Wills for in- 
spector; in Scipio township at the house of Capt. A. P. Andrew, 
with A. P. Andrew for inspector ; and in New Durham township at 
the house of Elisha Newhall, with Elisha Newhall for inspector. The 
Board also ordered that Benj. McCarty be appointed commissioner 
of the three per cent, fund; William Clark, county surveyor ; Jesse 
Morgan, lister of taxable property, and Aaron Stanton county 
treasurer. 

Thus the county commenced business, forty-three years ago from 
the 28th day of the month of May, 187."'. The settlers were yet 
few in number: most of the rich lands of the countv were untouched 
by the plow; the ax had scarcely visited the beautiful groves that 
dotted the prairies; and though the pioneers were poor in purse, 
they were rich in energy, and were surrounded by a wonderful 



THE COUNTY IN GENERAL. 39 

wealth of beauty in the luxuriant groves, the flower-clad prairies, 
and the lakes that here and there sparkled in the landscape. 

The Board of commissioners met again on the 2d day of July in 
their second regular session. At this session Nathan B. Nichols 
was appointed "Collector of State and County taxes for the year 
1832;" and it is curious to note this order among the acts of the 
Board at this session : "Ordered that all springed carriages are 
deemed by this Board as pleasure carriages and taxable under the 
law regulating and collecting the revenue." Rates of taxation were 
fixed on certain kinds of property, and among them horses were to 
be taxed at thirty-seven and a half cents per head, work cattle 
eighteen and three-fourths cents, gold watches fifty cents, silver 
and composition watches twenty-five cents, pleasure, or "springed" 
carriages, fifty cents, and brass clocks fifty cents. At this session 
John Barnet was appointed constable for New Durham township, 
and Joseph P. Osborn for Scipio township ; and Andrew Burnside 
was appointed county treasurer. It is worthy of note also that at 
this session Jesse Morgan "was allowed the sum of eleven dollars 
for assessing the county of LaPorte for the year 1832." 

At the November term following, Charles Ives was appointed 
county agent, and at the January term 1833, he was directed to 
sell at public or private sale, the lots donated for the use of public 
buildings ; and at the March term 1833, the following appears among 
the proceedings of the Board of Commissioners : "Ordered that the 
elections of Scipio township which were formerly held at the house 
of A. P. Andrew, shall now be held at the town of LaPorte, where 
the courts of said county are usually held." 

It has already been mentioned that Jesse Morgan was allowed eleven 
dollars for assessing the taxable property of the county for 1832. It 
is an indication that population was increasing, that an allowance 
was made to the same man for the same work, of twenty dollars, in 
1833. A. G. Polke was at this time Sheriff of the county. 

At this session of the Board, on the Tth day of May, 1833, an 
order was made directing the county agent to advertise the letting 
of the court house contract. 

On the 21st of August, 1833, a special term of the commissioners' 
court was held, at which a contract was made between the Board of 



40 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

commissioners, consisting of Elijah H. Brown, Daniel Jessup and 
Alexander Blackburn, of the first part, and Simon G. Bunce of the 
second part, for the building of a court house. The building was 
to be forty feet square, of brick, to be located in the centre of the 
public square, and was to cost $3,975. It was to be crowned with 
a cupola three stories in height, the first to be nine feet high, twelve 
feet square, with a round window in each side and a fancy sash. 
The second story of the cupola was to be an octagon, ten feet in 
height, with a window on each side, closed by a Venetian blind, and 
the corners ornamented with turned columns, and a "suitable sized 
urn" to stand over each corner of the square first story. The third 
story was a dome, six feet six inches in height, to be covered with 
tin, and on this was to be a shaft six feet six inches high above the 
top of the round dome : and let into the top of the shaft, was to be 
an iron bar or spire holding at its connection with the shaft a cop- 
per ball, two feet in diameter, "laid with gold leaf:" halfway from 
there to the top another copper ball, one foot in diameter, and on 
top of the spire a wooden ball, painted black, and six inches in 
diameter. 

The men who founded the countv were not destitute of a desire 

to manifest a little pardonable pride in behalf of a county which 
they could then very well understand was to become one of the 
wealthiest in the State : they determined that the court house should 
be something more than four plain walls, and should be an attract- 
ive building, creditable to their taste as well as to the nece.-sarv 
spirit of economy that prevailed among them. 

To illustrate the manner in which taxes were levied and revenue 
raised, specific taxes on various kinds of property have already been 
alluded to. There were also license taxes, as is shown bv the 
record of the Board of Commissioners at the September term 1833. 
It was ordered that a license issue to Thomas M. Morrison to "vend 
merchandise in the countv of LaPorte." J. F. & W. Allison were 
licensed at the same rate to "vend merchandise :" and also to "keep 
a tavern in the town of LaPorte."' "Rates fifteen dollars." Sen- 
eca Ball was licensed to "vend merchandis in the town of La- 
Porte: and Elijah Casteel was licensed to keep a grocery in Michi- 
gan City at a rate often dollars. Wm. Clements also, was lie 
to ''vend merchandise in the town of LaPorte." 



THE COUNTY IN GENERAL. 41 

At this session, on the 4th day of September, New Durham town- 
ship was divided so that "all that tract of country lying in towns 
37 and 38" should constitute a new township, to be called Michi- 
gan. Up to this period there were but three townships in the 
county, each extending entirely across it from North to South. 
The order was now broken, and we shall see as we proceed, how 
other townships were carved out of the original three, until now 
there are nineteen. 

It is said that roads are evidences of civilization, and promoters of 
it. The pioneers of this county early saw the necessity of having 
easy access to all parts of the county, and with contiguous counties. 
Anions; the first acts of the countv commissioners was the estab- 
lishment of county roads, at the request of the inhabitants; and they 
did not hesitate to expend money on the Yellow river road, leading 
from Marshall county to Michigan City. They also authorized 
Matthias Redding to keep a ferry across the Kankakee, on the line 
of this road, no bridge having yet been built. This road and ferry 
did much to advance the county in population, as it made Michigan 
City the market for all the country as far south as Logansport. 

These early pioneers were subjected to many hardships, incon- 
veniences and deprivations; but not more than are incident to all 
new countries. There were fewer circumstances of this nature to 
complain of than may be found in the early settlement of most new 
countries, for the rich prairies, covered only with grass and flowers, 
which seemed smilingly to invite the plow of the husbandman, and 
the groves furnishing abundance of timber for fencing, insured the 
cultivation of many acres, and abundant returns, the very first year 
of settlement. It is true that at first they had to travel to Berrien, 
Mich., to procure the grinding of their Avheat and corn, but this 
state of things soon gave place to grist mills and saw mills, and 
other conveniences within the limits of the county; and as the 
region became better known it settled up very rapidly. It is proba- 
ble that no other county in the State received accessions to its 
population more rapidly in its first five years than did LaPorte. It 
was a veritable "land of promise," which, if not "flowing with milk 
and honey," yet possessed a soil of unsurpassed richness, and when 
" tickled with a hoe (or plow) would laugh with a harvest." The 



42 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

settler on lands exclusively timber must undergo years of wearisome 
toil, before he has subdued nature to his purposes. He who settles 
on the immense prairies of the farther west, finds himself embar- 
rassed for the want of fencing material, but here the open prairie 
required only fencing and plowing to ensure a crop : and the timber 
in abundance stood close at hand. Nature had brought into juxta- 
position the two elements of the farmer's need ; and it was to him 
as it is to the iron manufacturer, when he finds the ore and the coal 
in adjoining veins. The consequence was that settlers poured in 
with great rapidity; and the hardships of pioneer life soon gave 
place to the facilities of agreeable intercourse, educational privileges, 
and all the advantages of an intelligent and hospitable society. 

But with the advent of a mixed society, it could not be expected 
that all would render such strict obedience to law as to render penal 
institutions unnecessary ; and accordingly at a special term of the 
commissioners' court held on the 16th day of November, 1833, it 
was ordered that Charles Ives, the county agent, make out plans 
and specifications : that he file the same in the clerk's office, and 
advertise for sealed proposals for the building of a county jail. On 
the 20th day of December the contract for building a jail was let to 
Warner Pierce for the sum of §460. Yet there are facts which 
would indicate that there could have been but little immediate use 
for the jail. Mr. Geo. Thomas, the clerk of the county, certified to 
the Board of commissioners that "the fines assessed by the circuit 
court of December, 1833, amount in all to §7.00; §5.00 against 
James Lockhart on an indictment for retailing liquor to an Indian 
§2.00 against Calvin Lilly for retailing liquors without license; 
and the docket of Elisha Newhall, a justice of the peace, shows that 
the only fine he assessed during the year was §1.00 against Willis 
Hughes for profane swearing; and Wm. O. Ross, justice of the 
peace, reports a fine of §1.00 assessed against George Buell for 
••profane swearing." It is hoped that this was all the " profane 
swearing" that took place in the county; but it is scarcely probabl 
that such was the fact. If so, it would perhaps be taken as evidenc 
that there has been progress in the wrong direction. 

In the Spring of 1834 the county exhibited marked progress am 
prosperity. Roads had been laid out in all parts of the count 






THE COUNTY IN GENERAL. 43 

schools were opened, many broad acres were under cultivation, 
courts of justice were established, numerous houses were erected in 
LaPorte and Michigan City, modest farm-houses dotted the prairies 
in every direction, and the tide of immigration was rolling in un- 
checked. The comforts of life were fast being added to the mere 
necessaries ; and contentment and happiness took up their abode in 
the dwelling of nearly every settler. Everything around them 
indicated a prosperous future, and they rejoiced that they had found 
so fair a region for the building up of homes for themselves and their 
children. 

At the May term of the commissioners' court, 1834, the records 
show a document which seems to carry back the thought a hundred 
years beyond the time of its date. It is a relic of the ''black laws" 
that so long disgraced the statute books of Indiana, by which any 
person of color, coming into any county of the State was required 
to furnish bonds that he would not become a county charge. The 
disgraceful act has become a part of the history of Indiana, and 
LaPorte county contains at least one illustration of it. Here is the 
record : 

••Now come Alexander Blackburn and Israel Markham, over- 
seers of the poor, and make report : We, the undersigned overseers 
of the poor for Kankakee township, La Porte county, respectfully 
report that we have taken bond and security of Wm, Greenwood 
alias Randall, a free black man, immigrated into this county, as 
required by law, and that we have acted on no other business. 

[Signed,] A. Blackburn, I q p 

Israel Markham, j 

LaPorte, 5th May, 1834. 

Having now followed the progress of the county to May 1834, 
and seen it organized, and presenting evidences of prosperity on 
every hand, the townships separately, and the cities and towns will 
next demand attention. 



44 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



CHAPTER II. 

KANKAKEE TOWNSHIP. 

The present Kankakee township lies in Congressional township 
No. 37, range two west, and is located chiefly on Rolling Prairie. 
This township was one of the original three which formed the entire 
county, and included the whole of range two, and all of range one 
that lies inside of La Porte county. Other townships have been 
carved from it. until now it is reduced to the precise limits of the 
Congressional township No. thirty-seven. 

The first settlers came to the township in 1830. 

Aaron Stanton, Benajah Stanton, Philip Fail and Richard Harris 
came in company from Union county in this State, and arrived in 
Centre township in February 1830. Aaron Stanton brought two 
hired men with him. They proceeded at once to put up a cabin 
upon the farm now occupied by Moses Stanton, where they all 
lived together. In the spring the ground was broken and a crop 
put in. After harvest Aaron Stanton returned to Union county 
for his family, which he brought with him the same year, and Philip 
Fail, who had his wife with him when he came, took up a claim 
and built a cabin on section 18, in the township of Kankakee, which 
was in the same neighborhood with the Stantons. This was the 
first cabin built in that township, and was erected in the fall of 
1830. In the month of October of that year, Benajah S. Fail. 
son of Philip Fail was born. He is said to be the first male white 
child born in the township or county. 

On the 24th day of May 1831, Ezckiel Provolt, David Stoner, 
Jesse West, Arthur Irving and a man named AVillets. arrived in 
the township with their families. They came from the vicinity of 
LaFayette, and were on the road eighteen days — a rather tedious 
iourney. On one occasion when the party had finished a day's 
journey. Mrs. Provolt rode back to the camping ground of the 
previous night to procure a fire with which to cook the evening meal. 

The first night after the arrival of the party, they encamped upon 



KANKAKEE TOWNSHIP. 45 

the land now occupied by A. J. Bowell, about one half mile north 
of the depot. The next day the party moved to the site of what is 
now the village of Rolling Prairie or Portland. There Ezekiel 
Provolt put up a log cabin and his family moved into it. Soon 
after, Jesse West and Arthur Irving built cabins near that of 
Provolt. 

In the same year Daniel Murray, Chapel W. Brown, Emery 
Brown, Jacob Miller, John Garret and James Hiley moved into the 
township. 

In the spring of 1832, Alex. Blackburn, Solomon Aldrich and 
Charles Ives with their families moved into the township and com- 
menced making improvements. Myron Ives had preceded them, 
arriving in the fall of 1831. In the month of May of that year, 
the Blackhawk war had broken out, and runners came from Chica- 
go, spreading stories to the effect that Indians were advancing upon 
the settlers. All was alarm and confusion, and they fled in dismay 
to Terre Coupee prairie in St. Joseph county, where a large number 
congregated at the house of a settler by the name of Egbert. A 
short time after, another panic took place and the settlers again re- 
turned to the same prairie, and part of them, about forty, took refuge 
in a school house, where they slept over night. The next day a 
company of soldiers moved westward on a reconnoissance. This 
reassured them, and they mostly returned homeward in the rear of 
the command. In June following the land sale took place, and 
while most of the men were gone to attend it, another rumor came 
of advancing Indians. The women were alone and unprotected, 
but they had become used to such reports and but few left their homes. 

After the successful termination of the Blackhawk war, the set- 
tlement of the township became so rapid that the old settlers could 
not keep pace in the formation of acquaintances, with the new 
comers. Among those arriving at this time were Leonard Cutler, 
Nathan B. Nichols, Joseph Reynolds, and Ebenezer Russell. Pre- 
vious to this period, neighbors were such as resided five or even ten 
miles apart, and they visited each other at such distances as readily 
as now at a half mile. The products of the soil and the contents of 
the larder were free. Those who had plenty gave to their less 
prosperous neighbors as cheerfully as if they had been members of 



46 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

their own family. The prairie was a flower garden, the woods 
were filled with game, wild fruits were abundant and honey could 
be found plentifully in the forests. There was much enjoyment 
among the people. They were bound to each other by ties which 
we now can little appreciate, ties of mutual dependence, protection 
against Indians, and the common deprivation of many of the com- 
forts which come to older communities. Mrs. Ann Eliza Pro volt, 
was one of the pioneers, and from her are gathered many of the facts 
in the history of this township. She is enthusiastic over the beauty 
of the country, and the happiness of the people at that time. 

The first religious services of which we have any account, was by 
the Presbyterians at the cabin of Alex. Blackburn, upon the place 
now occupied by Miner Nesbit. This took place sometime in the 
month of November, 1832. Services were performed by Rev. 
James Crawford, of the Wabash ceuntrv. There were but seven 
members. The next summer Mr. Crawford came again, and com- 
pleted the organization of the church, which had then increased to 
twenty members. James Blair, Wm. 0. Ross, David Dinwiddie and 
Myron Ives, were chosen and installed elders. The last two were 
ordained. The meetings were held in a log school house on the Xiles 
road. Mr. Crawford died in Iowa about three years ago, aged eighty- 
six years. Among the settlers of 1834, were William Sharp, 
Asa Pease, J. M. Heckman, Zenos Preston, Jacob Wagner, and a 
family named Blood. 

During 1834 a school house was put up on the Michigan road. 
It was constructed of logs, opposite the place now occupied by 
John Provolt. Difficulties had arisen regarding its location. From 
every point of the compass there were settlers who wanted it near 
their dwellings. After it was finished, a man named Emerson, was 
employed to teach. Before his term was completed, the school 
building was burned in the night. Another was soon afterer ected, 
and the same spot is now occupied by a frame school house. 

In 1835, a large number of Indians encamped for a time on the 
Kankakee marsh, probably five hundred of them ; but they soon 
passed on to the westward. From that time on, only scattering 
parties were to be seen, until all had left the country. The first 



KANKAKEE TOWNSHIP. 47 

death occurred this year. It was a child named Stoner, aged 

three weeks. It was buried on A. J. Bowell's farm. 

A tragedy occurred in this township in 1837, resulting in 
the death of an estimable young man, who was murdered for 
money. There were two young men in the township, one of whom 
was Joshua M. Coplin, and the other was named Scott. Coplin had a 
sum of money due him in Virginia, in amount, somewhere between 
$500 and §600, and they started eastward together. Scott stopped 
at the house of his mother in Lucas county, Ohio, and Coplin went 
on to Virginia, the State of his nativity, and having procured the 
money, four hundred dollars of which was in silver, and the balance 
in gold, undertook his return. Coplin stopped at the house of 
Scott's mother on his way, and stayed over night, and the next day 
started towards home. Scott followed, and overtaking Coplin, rode 
with him, each being on horse-back, until within less than a mile of 
Coplin's house, when he shot him dead and took possession of the 
money. Scott fled, but was followed, captured and placed in con- 
finement at LaPorte. The murder took place on the second day of 
February 1838, between a quarter and half mile of Jedediah Aus- 
tin's, and on the farm now owned by him, about eleven o'clock at 
night. The report of the pistol with which the deed was accom- 
plished, was heard by several. The body was found the next morn- 
ing by James Andrew, who lived in the vicinity. Scott was soon 
after tried, found guilty, and hung near LaPorte on the fifteenth 
day of June of the same year. Coplin's age when murdered, as 
inscribed on his tombstone, was nineteen years, three months and 
twenty days. 

From this period, it would be impracticable to trace all the arrivals 
in the township. Containing a splendid body of land, settlement 
was rapid, farms were opened in every direction ; and the number 
of inhabitants was such that some of them began to think of the lo- 
cation of a village. The town of Byron was accordingly laid out, 
and a plot of it recorded on the 22d day of May 1837. Its location 
as designated on the record, was the south part of the east half of 
the northeast quarter of section fifteen, in township thirty-seven, 
north of range two west. It was laid out upon lands of Stephen G. 
Hunt and Hiram Oram. An addition was laid out, and recorded 



4* HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

on the 25th day of August, A. D., 1840, by Elias Lowe, on the 
southeast quarter of section sixteen, same township and range. 

In the summer of 1835, there was but one cabin on the site of 
the town of Byron, and that was owned by William Hunt. In the 
fall of that year another was built, on the south side of the road. 
The first frame building was a store built by Amzi Clark, on the 
south side of Chicago street, in the fall of 1835, and spring of 1836. 
It was destroyed by fire in March 1873. Clark kept store in this 
house about a year, when he sold out to Oram & Phillips. It after- 
wards passed into the hands of Stewart & Lillie, and they sold out 
to Willis Peck, who in turn sold to Fraser c\: Campbell. 

A postoifice was established in this locality in 1835, which was 
moved to Rolling Prairie in 1853. It was first kept in a log cabin, 
on Chicago street, near Amzi Clark's store. The first postmaster 
was S. G. Hunt. 

W. F. Talbot built a frame house in the village in 1836, which 
was used for a blacksmith shop, and also as a residence for his family. 
In 1841 W. G. Hickman erected a building for a store, where he 
sold goods for a time, and then sold to Lowe & Young. 

The first school house in Byron was built by subscription. It 
was erected in 1841, and the first school was taught by Joseph M. 
Salisbury. In 1847 a man named Wilber, commenced building a 
hotel on the south side of Chicago street. Before it was finished, 
he sold it to Charles Lebo, w T ho moved it to the north side of the 
street and completed it. Lebo kept it three years and sold it to W. 
G. Hickman. I. N. Whitehead bought out Hickman in 1852 and 
kept the hotel five years. 

Stewart & Lillie built a warehouse at Byron in the year 1S47, 
which was situated on Chicago street, and large amounts of grain 
were stored in it. At that time Byron was quite a large wheat 
market, considerable business being done in its purchase and 
sale. 

Before the Northern Indiana railroad was built, Byron was a 
town of much importance. Its trade was large. The travel 
through it was great, the merchants prospered and there was un- 
usual activity on its streets for a town of its size. The railroad 
killed it. Its streets are deserted. There is neither store, black- 



KANKAKEE TOWNSHIP. 49 

smith shop or tavern, within its limits. The first and only church 
in the place which was built by the Methodists in 1849, has been 
pulled down and moved away. It contains not more than half of 
its former population, and its residences are occupied mostly by: 
farmers who work on the neighboring lands. 

Had the railroad passed through the place, the village of Byron. 1 

would have lived and flourished ; but when it passed by to the north 
of it, a new town, and the death of the old, was the natural result ; 
and so the town of Rolling Prairie came into being. This is de- 
scribed in the survey as being in the northeast quarter of township 
number thirty-seven, north of range number two west. 

The first house built upon the town site of Rolling Prairie was 
erected by Ezekiel Provolt in the spring of 1831. This was followed 
by two others, put up by West and Irving. When the land came into 
market in 1832, and was sold at public sale, W. J. Walker bid in the 
premises upon which these settlers were living, and allowed them to 
remain there for a time in consideration of the improvements they 
had made. Ezekiel Provolt did not therefore remove to the present 
home of the family, until in the year 1834, when John Reynolds 
moved into the vacated cabin. The Northern Indiana road was 
built to where the town now stands in January 1852. It reached 
LaPorte on the 10th day of that month and year, the last four miles 
of track being laid on that day and the cars coming into the city in 
the evening. The little cluster of cabins was known as Nauvoo y 
until a survey was made and recorded on the 26th day of November 
1853. Walker gave the village the name of Portland, which is to*- 
day the only legal name as recognized under the laws of the State, 
though the postoffice is called Rolling Prairie, and the railroad com- 
pany have given that name to the station. 

On plat book No. 1, page 108, of the county records, can be 
found an addition without date or description, other than the plat 
itself. Twelve lots of this addition are bounded on the north by 
Walker street, on the east by Prairie street, on the south by Michi- 
gan street, and on the west by Maple street. The main part of the 
addition is bounded on the north by Michigan street, east by the 

boundary line of the northwest quarter of section eleven, south by 
the Northern Indiana railroad, and west by the county road. This, 
the first addition, was laid out by W. J. Walker. 

4 



50 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

On the 1st day of September 1855, B. P. Walker filed a plat for 
an addition to Portland, embracing eight blocks in section eleven. 
On the 6th day ot December 1855, hf; .:.:..• iiis second addition, 
embracing seven blocks, and on the 23d dav of January 1858, he 
filed a third and a fourth addition. 

A steam saw mill was built in Rolling Prairie in 1852. It wi 
erected by a company compos jd of John Drummond, A. J. Bo well 
and J. II. Fail, wlio SjlJi it to Johnson <fc Folant in the Fall of 
1855. They in turn sold to Jesse H. G. Coplin in 1857, and he in 
1858 added a grist mill to the snw mill. An explosion occurred in 
this mill in 1860, which killed Thomas Lewis, and caused the loss 
of an arm to Frederick Knight. Coplin was slightly injured. B. 
F. Huntsman bought this mill in 1863, and in 1868 it was burned, 
but rebuilt the same year by Mr. Huntsman. 

The first frame house in Portland was built by W. J. AValker, in 
the year 1853, and was rented by him to Ross & Organ. It was 
used by them for a store, and John H. Kierstead attended to the bus- 
iness. Kierstead afterwards bought the firm out, and run the store 
on his own account. It has since been moved about one hundred 
feet north of its former location, and is still used as a store and kept 
by E. L. Prince. It is located on Depot street. About the time 
the store was built, Nathan Smith erected a frame dwelling on 
Michigan street. This he sold, and the next year built another on 
Depot street. The depot was built in 1853. In 1851, the Chris- 
tian denomination erected a church, which was the first built in the 
village. In 1859, Kierstead built a store which burned down in 
February 1867. He sold the lot to David Hoffman, who again sold 
to W. B. Stevens. Stevens rebuilt in 1870. The Presbyterian 
church was built in 1857, and the Methodist Episcopal in 1865. 
The brick store now occupied by J. P. Nesbit, was built by G. W. 
Bolster, in 1870, and the store of Joseph D. Cassell, was erected in 
1872. 

The village of Rolling Prairie is pleasantly located, and com- 
mands a fair amount of business for a place of its size. It contains, 
at the present time, one bakery, two blacksmith shops, two boarding 
houses, one cooper, two carpenters, two clergymen, three dry goods 
and grocery stores, one drug and grocery store, one depot agent, one 



KANKAKEE TOWNSHIP. 51 

dress maker, one feed store, two grain merchants, one hardware 
store, one harness maker, one lumber dealer, one music teacher, one 
meat market, one fruit nursery, two painters and glaziers, two phy- 
sicians, two shoe shops, one steam saw mill, two telegraph operators, 
two wagon makers, and many very pleasant residences, some of 
which display considerable architectural beauty. The population 
is about four hundred. 

Among the old settlers of Kankakee township whom we have not 
yet named were John Garrett who arrived in the Spring of 1830 ; 
Jacob Miller, who came probably in 1832 ; Daniel Murray and 
Emery Brown, 1830 ; Geo. W. Barnes, Ludlow Bell, Dr. Bowell, 
James Drummond, J. Austin, Benj. DeWitt, and the families of 
Harvey, Salisbury and Whitehead. These were all old settlers, some of 
whom are still living. Many more cazin at an early day, but those 
are not named as " Old Settlers '' who came to the township later 
than 1832. Among those who have lived long in the township, and 
most of whom still reside there, are Samuel Downing; J. S. Hollo- 
way; David Bush, and his brothers, Isaac, now dead, and Abram, 
whose home is at present in Chicago ; Lewis Griffith ; J. H. Kier- 
stead, now in LaPorte; Benj. Finley; Miner Nesbit; Calita and 
Enoch L. Preston ; Jesse Blake ; A. H. Miller, now residing in La- 
Porte; Moses Burhans; C. L. 0. Bell; and the Hickmans, Prouds, 
Wagners, Irelands and Darlingtons. These are, the majority of 
them, engaged in agricultural pursuits, and for this employment 
there can scarcely be found anywhere a more favored locality than 
Kankakee township. The soil is the rich prairie loam ; and timber 
and water are abundant. 



52 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY 



CHAPTER III. 

SCIPIO TOWNSHIP. 

Scipio township, like Kankakee was one of the three original 
townships of which the county of LaPorte consisted at its organiza- 
tion; and its limits were range three, the entire length of the 
county from north to south. Its present limits are Congressional 
township thirty-six, range three. The rest of its original territory is 
embraced in Centre and Michigan on the north, Noble and Hannah, 
and a small part of Union on the south. 

The first settlers in Scipio township were Adam Keith and fami- 
ly, and Lewis Shirley and his mother, who arrived on the sixth day 
of July, 1829. The Keith family were originally from Pennsylva- 
nia ; but the little colony named came from Ohio to this county. 
In the month of October in the year of their arrival, Keith Shirley 
was born. He was the first child born in the township, and is 
believed to be the third born in the county. 

In the year 1830, a man named Welsh and his son, a youth of 
eighteen or nineteen years, settled at Door Village. They built 
a cabin and procuring some liquors, opened a trade with the 
Indians and did a very fair business. At first the liquor was of a 
quality to please the noble red man. It would "make drunk come 
quick." Finally the elder Welsh became dissatisfied with the 
amount of his profits, and desiring to amass a fortune in the Bmall- 

r possible length of time, began to dilute the "firewater" from a 
spring. Though not as a general thing very fastidious about their 
edibles, this action on the part of Welsh in relation to their favorite 
beverage, excited their indignation. At last a party of young 
braves visited his cabin, and rolling out the barrels knocked out the 
heads with their tomahawks, and spilled the precious fluid upon the 
_ ound. This little incident so worked upon the feelings of the 
father and son that they left the township and removed to Chicago. 
On the thirtieth day of May 1830, Elizabeth Keith, wife of Adam 
Keith, died. It was the first death in the township. Among the 
settlers of this year were Daniel Jessup and Joseph Osborn. 



SCIPIO TOWNSHIP. 53 

In 1831 Arba Heald, Mr. Phillips, Mr. Whittaker, John Gar- 
wood, Elijah Brown, Stephen Bray ton, Hugh McGivens, Wm. 
Adams, James Anscum, and John Gattis, became settlers. Gen. 
Joseph Orr purchased land but did not stay — he returned the next 
year in time to take part in the Blackhawk war. 

During the same year (1831) a body of Sac Indians passed 
through the township on their way to Detroit. A number who 
were in advance of the main body, stole three horses from Arba 
Heald. He followed them a few miles, but as he was on foot gave 
up the chase as useless. When the main body came up a day or two 
after, they were stopped and the larceny reported to the chiefs. After 
a council had been held, it was agreed to give an order on Col. Dav- 
enport, Indian Agent at Rock Island, Illinois, for the value of the 
stock taken. Mr. Heald afterwards went to the agency to get his 
money. Instead of paying it, measures were taken to get the hor- 
ses. They were procured and driven into the town. They had 
been badly used in hunting buffalo, their ears being split and their 
tails cut off. Having received his horses, Mr. H. proposed to re- 
turn on the following morning, but during the intervening night, 
the best one of them was again stolen. This he never recovered 
nor any pay for it, as the Blackhawk war put an end to the Indian 
annuities — at least so far as thev were payable this side of the 
Mississippi. During this year the first wedding took place — Adam 
Keith married Hannah Harris, daughter of Richard Harris. 

In the year 1832, Christopher McClure, Arthur McClure, Lewis 
Keith, John Broadhead, Peter White, and Thomas W. Sale moved 
into the township. During the spring of this year, there were but 
two cabins in Door Village, one of which was occupied by Arba 
Heald, and the other was vacant, it being the one vacated by the 
Welshes, after the exploit of the Indian crusaders. The McClures 
occupied this vacant cabin, while they were building residences on 
their land one mile north of the village. The day after it was com- 
pleted the Indian scare commenced. 

The Sac Indians were never kindly disposed to the American 
people or government. As far back as the war of 1812, they took 
up arms against the United States, and favored the British. In rec- 
ompense for this, they were receiving an annuity in Canada. Their 



54 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

place of crossing was at Detroit, and the trail they pursued ran 
through New Durham township, and Door Village in Scipio. It is 
most probable that their intercourse with the Canadians, year after 
year, had anything but a good effect in quieting their ancient ani- 
mosity against our people. 

In May 1832, Mr. Owen, the Indian agent at Chicago, sent 
word to Arba Heald that the Indians had commenced hostilities on 
Hickory creek, a short distance from that city, and advised the 
settlers to prepare to repel any invasion that they might make. 
Hostilities had commenced in other parts of the State of Illinois on 
Rock river and near Dixon. The alarm proved, as is almost inva- 
riably the case, to have been greatly exaggerated. The hostile acts 
were upon Indian creek, and a family by the name of Hall were 
murdered, with the exception of two girls, who were carried into 
captivity. 

Heald having sent word over the prairie, a large number assem- 
bled at Door Village. They had been hurrying in during the night, 
and in the morning a meeting was called in order to consult upon 
taking means best calculated to promote their mutual defense, when 
from a mistaken idea of the cause of the confusion, a stampede took 
place and about half the company started their teams eastward; 
some not stopping except for rest and their meals, until they had 
reached Cincinnati. Many did not return until the next year. 
Fortv-two men remained and built works for their defense. These 
consisted of a ditch, earthworks and a palisade, one hundred and 
twenty-five feet square. Upon two of the angles, there were block- 
houses, which commanded the sides. This fort, as it is called, * - 
built under the direction of Peter White, who had acquired some 
previous knowledge in the building of such works. It was comple- 
ted in three days from the time of its commencement, when its 
occupants felt comparatively safe. It was located abont a half-mile 
east of Door Village, on the lands of Lewis Shirley, near the road, 
and its site is plainly discernible at this time. 

Amid all the turmoil and confusion, there was one woman who 
preserved her courage and assumed a defiant air, which gained for 
her the character of a heroine. It was Mrs. Arba Heald. With 
two rifles, two axe- and two pitchforks, -lie barricaded herself in 



SCIPIO TOWNSHIP. 55 

the cabin on her husband's farm, and neither threats nor persuasion 
could induce her to'go into the fort. She declared she would kill 
six Indians before they took possession of her home. She would 
have doubtless fought them alone if thev had disturbed her. 

Soon after the fort was finished, a block house was built very 
near where Albert S. Hall now resides on section thirteen, south- 
east of Round grove. This was built under the direction of Judge 
Lemon. 

On the second night after the fort near the village was commen- 
ced, it was thought best to send out a scouting party. Three men 
were selected, but Christopher McClure was the only man who per- 
formed the duty. He hid his gun behind a tree, and traveled in 
the direction of New Durham. Possessing a desire to create an 
excitement, he returned after a time with a sensational report, which 
made full as much bustle and turmoil as he expected. 

General Joseph Orr purchased lands in Scipio township in 1831. 
In the month of May 1832, he came to take charge of and improve 
his possessions, which were situated on the line of Scipio and Center, 
being partly in both. He had previously, in 1827, been commis- 
sioned a Brigadier General, by Gov. Ray, and being present when 
the fort was building and the stampede took place, wrote to the 
governor giving him an account of what had happened, and then 
repaired to Chicago to ascertain, if possible, whether any real 
danger threatened the inhabitants of this vicinitv. There he had 
an interview with Major Whistler, who commanded Fort Dearborn. 
After conference with that gentleman, he made certain recommend- 
ations and forwarded them to the governor of this State, and then 
started for the headquarters of General Atkinson, who was in com- 
mand of a force sent against the Indians. After interviewing Gen- 
eral Atkinson, General Orr returned to Chicago, where he received 
the following order : 

Executive Department, Indianapolis, 26th June, '32. 

Sir: — You will, upon the reception of this order, organize a 
company of volunteer Mounted Rangers, to be employed along the 
western line of our frontier, for the term of three months — keeping 
up an intercourse between our Wabash settlements and Chicago, by 
selecting suitable stations near the immediate settlements, and keep- 
ing out parties of observation with daily communication. 



56 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

This corps you will either take command of yourself, or commit 
it to an officer to be selected by the company, with the understand- 
ing that your official services will be expected in your division, in 
the event that a call is made from the United States officer in the 
Northwest, on the militia of the State. 

Provisions, forage, etc., you will provide until funds are provided 
for that purpose. N. Noble. 

To Major General Joseph Orr. 

Upon the receipt of the above order. Gen. Orr proceeded to raise 
a, company of eighty-eight men, including officers, and reported by 
letter, first " to the commandant at Fort Dearborn, or Indian agent. 
Chicago," from Kankakee, under date of July 7th, 1832. and after- 
wards from Hickorv creek, Julv tenth, to General Winfield Scott. 
The following is an extract from a letter from General Orr to Gen- 
eral Scott : 

"Sir: — I herewith enclose a copy of an order from the governor 
of Indiana, under which a company of rangers has been raised, and 
placed on the line between the Wabash and Chicago. 

In pursuance of that order, volunteers were called for to rendez- 
vous at Attica, Indiana, on the second instant, and at which place 
a company was organized as follows, to-wit : 

Joseph Orr, commandant. 

Eliakim Ashton. first lieutenant. 

Jesse Davidson, second lieutenant. 

Henry Slabens, third lieutanant. and eighty-four non-commis- 
sioned officers and privates. 

VYe marched from Attica on the evening of the third, and read 
the Iroquois (Hubbert's trading house) on the fifth instant. I left 
a small corps of observation, fourteen in number, under command 
of Lieutenant Davidson. With the balance of the company. I 
reached this place on yesterday. To-day I Bent a detachment to 
the Door Prairie, from which they will return by the way of Kan- 
kakee and Iroquois rivers, and be in camp in five or six da; 
Meantime we shall traverse the country in different directions with 

■ 

other detachments, so that at the end of a week. I hope to be able 
to render a satisfactory account of things along the line committed 
to our charge. 



SCIPIO TOWNSHIP. 57 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Joseph Orr, 

Commander Corps Ind. Mounted Volunteer Rangers. 

The following is an extract from General Scott's reply: 

Headquarters Northwestern Army, ) 

Chicago, July 2, 1832. J 

*1* *i* *4» ""i* ^* *£? *JL? 

JjS <(^ ^* ^* ^* *T* *T* 

I rely upon your zeal and patriotism to quiet all apprehensions 
among your men, for their safety against cholera. As soon as I 
shall be able to separate the sick from the healthy, on board the 
several steamers, and be certain that there will be no danger of a 
further spread of cholera, I shall want to commence operations, and 
then your mounted men will be of great value to the service. 

Let me hear from you if you have anything interesting to 
communicate. 

In haste, I remain, with great respect, your obedient servant, 

, Winfield Scott. 

To Gen. Orr, Commanding Indiana Volunteer Rangers. 
Much correspondence passed between General Scott, and Captain 
Orr, and the following is given as showing the purpose of the 
commanding general, and his estimate of the Indiana company of 
Mounted Rangers. 

Headquarters Northwestern Army, ~| 

Chicago, July 20, 1832. / 

Sir: — I wrote to you the day before yesterday by Lieutenant Tup- 
per of the United States Marines, who happened to be passing 
towards your camp. 

I have now to acknowledge vour communication of the nine- 
teenth, which is satisfactory. I have no doubt that your fine 
company will do honor to the state of Indiana, and the country 
generally, if it should, under your command, come in contact with 
the enemy. 

I still think of marching upon the immediate theatre of opera- 
ations about the twenty-sixth, and shall wish you to accompany me 
with your command. Having no hope that any other detachment 
of regular infantry will arrive, I shall only have Maj. Whistler's 
small command of uninfected, and unsuspected troops to accom- 
pany me. 

Gen. Atkinson, on the seventeenth, was preparing to march 
again upon the enemy with some hope of bringing him to action 
about the twenty-first. If the Black Hawk succeed in avoiding a 



58 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

battle he may retreat from Milwalky along the lake Michigan in 
this direction. In that event we might meet him, and though our 
force would be small, we might, nevertheless, effect something. 

I have only four tents here. Four hundred and fifty were to 
have followed in one of the steam boats now no longer expected, 
and I have no surgeon for the field. I am glad to learn that you 
have a few tents for your own men, and a good physician or sur- 
geon. I can furnish you with baggage wagons, and shall order sub- 
sistence to follow us from this place; nevertheless it will be desirable 
that you take from your camp, rations for three or five days. We 
will meet on the route, say within four or five miles of this place. 
But I shall send an officer down to you to arrange all those points. 

About the twenty-sixth, then, I wish you to have your whole 
company assembled ready to march, and in the meantime let me 
hear from you. I only wait till then in hope that tents and a phy- 
sician may arrive, and for wagons and horses which I know will be 
here. 

I remain with great respect, your obedient servant, 

Winfield Scott. 

P. S. The cholera is subsiding fast in the fort, and many of the 
sick are getting well ; but on account of your volunteers, and those 
with General Atkinson, I shall not take a man of the detachment 
that has had the disease. We all here believe it not contagious. 

w. s. 

Capt. Jos. Orr, Commanding Indiana Mounted Ranger-. 
Camp Hickory Creek. 
The movement of Gen. Scott and his command did nut take 
place as contemplated, owing probably to the retreat of Black 
Hawk to the Mississippi, and on the fourth day of August Gen. 
Orr wrote to the Commanding officer at Fort Dearborn as follow- : 

Camp at Hickory Cheek, August 4, 183:2. 

Sir: — I wish you to send me by the bearer. Mr. Edmuodson, a 

sergeant of my company, for the use of the company, one keg of 
rifle powder. It would be preferred in canisters if convenient. We 
camp to-night on the lake shore some six miles from Chicago. 
Have taken this trip in order to lessen the dulness of a camp and 
will return probably to-morrow. 

Having been disappointed in even a prospect of seeing the enemy, 
we have no desire to continue in service for the mere pay of sol- 
diers, and therefore would be pleased witli tin- earliest intimation 
that our services could be dispensed with. I have written to Gov. 



SCIPIO TOWNSHIP. 59 

Noble to that effect and hope the step will receive your approbation 
and that of the commanding general in the Northwest, as well as 
your aid in effecting it. In the event of our discharge please say 
what disposition you would have us make of the public property in 
our possession. I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 
Joseph Orr, Commanding 
Company Indiana Mounted Volunteer Rangers. 

The company was soon after disbanded, as appears from the fol- 
lowing letter of Gov. Noble, to Gen. Orr, which also shows the 
result of the war. 

Indianapolis, Ind., August 6, 1832. 

Dear Sir : — The LaFayette mail of Saturday, brought me your 
letter of the twenth-ninth, and that of the eighteenth instant was 
handed me by Mr. Bryant. 

The enemy having fled beyond the Mississippi, and an army 
under a skillful general being in possession of the country between, 
the frontier is entirely secure from an approach of a hostile charac- 
ter ; you will therefore withdraw the company under your command 
from their present position, and upon reaching a suitable point, dis- 
band it. 

I regret exceedingly that the boys have not had an opportunity 
to achieve more, but as circumstances forba'le it, you must all return, 
content with the reflection that you were ready to meet danger, 
have done your duty, and that your fellow citizens approve your 
conduct, so far as you have been permitted to act. 

I am, sir, respectfully your obedient servant, 

N. Noble. 

This alarm, by which it was supposed the cruelties of Indian war- 
fare would be visited upon the infant settlements of LaPorte 
county, was occasioned by the supposition that the Sac Indians 
would retreat into Canada instead of going beyond the Mississippi, 
and as their trail passed through the county, the peril appeared to 
be imminent. 

After the close of the war, the township of Scipio settled up more 
rapidly than before, and during the fall of 1832, many settlers 
moved into the township. Arthur McClure was elected justice of 
the peace this year. During these early times, Rev. James Arm- 
strong preached at different houses in the township, and, either this 
year or the following, his example was followed by Revs. Sherwood, 
St. Clair and Holmes. 



60 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

A man lived in this town during this period by the name of 
Shadney or Chaudonia. He was of mixed Pottawatomie and 
French blood, and had come here from Detroit. When the Michi- 
gan road was proposed from Madison, on the Ohio river to Michi- 
gan City — two hundred and seventy miles — the Indians had agreed 
to relinquish their title to one section of land for each mile that was 
built through their country. The State construed the agreement to 
mean one section per mile, for the entire length of the road. The 
Indians hearing that such would be the interpretation, became 
quite indignant, and were about preventing the surveyors from 
running out anv more land. Shadnev's influence with them was 
very great and his services were brought into requisition. He pro- 
cured an ox, a quantity of whisky was furnished, a barbecue and a 
drunken spree was the consequence, in which a large number of 
Indians participated, and the affair passed by without any further 
trouble. For his services in this matter, the United States govern- 
ment gave him a patent of section twenty-eight. It may well be a 
query at this time whether the authorities of the general govern- 
ment would feel warranted in rewarding any person for getting 
Indians drunk, no matter what the advantages accruing might be. 

Gen. Orr sent for this man Shadnev, and consulted him when 
the fort was built at Door Village, as to the probabilities of the Sac 
Indians following their old trail. He gave it as his opinion that 
they would not, and future events justified his conclusion. 

Many reports not creditable to the reputation of Chaudonia have 
been circulated. It is difficult to determine at this day just how 
much truth there may be in them. He is said to have had an Indi- 
an wife, having- left a white wife at Detroit, and that after the death 
of the Indian woman, the lawful wife came on from Detroit. He 
had great influence with the Indians, which the government after- 
wards recognized. In 1835 or 1836 he removed to St. Joseph 
county, where his widow and some of his descendants still reside. 
In regard to the charges which have been made against him, the fol- 
lowing letter from a distinguished citizen of South Bend, who has 
been many years a clerk in the General Land Office at Washington, 
will be found interesting. 

Washington, D. C, May 20, 1875. 



I no TOWNSHIP. 61 

// n. Jasp< r Packard: 

Sir : I have been much pleased, in reading from time to time, 
your very Interesting reminiscences of the early days in LaPorte 

mty, as published in your valuable paper, the LaPorte 
Chronicle. 

The object of this letter however, is to notice an item in your re- 
miniscences of Scipio township, in LaPorte county, published in 
your issue of the 17th of November, 1874, in relation to a Mr. 
"Shadney," who "lived on section twenty-eight." Your notice of 
him does not leave a very favorable impression of his moral char- 
acter. I shall not undertake to speak of his character prior to my 
knowledge of him in L883, the year 1 moved into St. Joseph coun- 
tv. but more particularly of his history as a soldier and eo-worker 
in behalf of the United States, in the early Indian and British wars 
in the northwest territory. 

■ 

His name as known among the Indian- was Shaderny, but his 
proper name was .John B. Chaudonia. 

The section of land number twenty-eight, referred to, was allot- 
ted to him by the treaty with the Pottawatomie Indians, held on 
the Tippecanoe River October 26th, 1832. This section was after- 
wards sold by him to George W. Allen and Reuben Allen, to whom 
the deed was approved by the President June 15, 1844. After the 
sale of the land, which was made soon after the treaty, Mr. Chau- 
donia settled near South Bend, in St. Joseph county, where I knew r 
him in 1833 and up to his death, which occurred in 1837. At the 
time of my acquaintance with him his ••white" wife was then with 
him, by whom he had two children, Charles B., and Mary L.; both 
are now dead. Mary married a Frenchman bv the name of Breset, 
and had three children, one of whom. Edward, I knew well. He 
served faithfully in the late war of the rebellion, and was severely 
wounded. Charles B., is also dead: he also left children, one of 
whom, Charles T., was also in the late war, of the rebellion and 
served faithfully to the end of the war and was honorably dis- 
charged. Both of these grandchildren now live in South Bend, and 
with the latter, his grandmother, the widow of John B. Chaudonia, 
is now living at an advanced age, highly respected. 

After the death of John B. Chaudonia, his widow, Mary B. 



62 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Chaudonia, petitioned Congress to pass an act. granting her and two 
children one section of land for services rendered by her husband 
to the United States during the late war, the war of 1832. After 
some delay a report was finally made May 11. 1846, in her favor. 
The report is as follows : 

" The Committee on Public Lands, to which was referred the 
petition of Mary L. Chaudonia, of the county of St. Joseph. Indi- 
ana, praying Congress to pass an act granting to her and her two 
children a section of land, for services rendered by her husband to 
the United States prior to and during the late war, have had the 
same under consideration, and now report : 

That, from the petition and papers in this case, it appears that, 
upon the petition of John B. Chaudonia, a half breed Pottawatomie 
Indian, the Committee on Indian Affairs in the Senate, in 1832. 
reported a bill granting a section of land to the petitioner, in con- 
sideration of his services rendered to the United States during the 
late war, but upon which no further action iitia heeii La I. 

Previous to the late war, at the massacre oi the '."Kites by the 
Indians at Chicago, where an indiscriminate butchery oi thcu: i •"•:: 
place, without regard to age or sex, Chaudonia, by his human j ex- 
ertions, saved the life of the captain in command at this post, and 
the life of the captain's lady also. He espoused the cause of the 
United States at the commencement of our difficulties with Great 
Britain, and continued in the service of this country (with the ex- 
ception of a few months while he was in a British prison) until the 
close of the war ; and, after the war was ended, he rendered very 
important services to the United States on different occasions. 

Chaudonia, at the commencement of the late war. being young, 
active, enterprising, and daring — understanding well the manners 
and customs of the Indians — being well skilled in their mode of 
warfare, admitted into their secret councils, and possessing an influ- 
ence over them that tio one else, who favored the American cause, 
did — all these circumstances combined gave him the power of ren- 
dering: to the United States greater services than anv one else at 
that time, which he at no time omitted to exercise when it was 
necessarv to save either the lives of the citizens of the United 
States, or their property, from destruction. During the existence 



SCIPIO TOWNSHIP. 63 

of the war his life was devoted to our cause, and his property freely 
sacrificed for the safety and protection of our citizens. 

Since the death of the said John B. Chaudonia, which occurred 
in the year 1837, his widow, for herself and children, petitions 
Congress to pass an act granting to them a section of land, for and 
in consideration of the services rendered by her late husb&ucl io the 
United States. 

The committee being well satisfied of the truth of all the facts 
above stated — regretting that so just a claim should have been so 
long neglected, . thereby permitting the widow and children of so 
meritorious a man to drag out life in penury and want — hereby 

report a bill for their relief, and recommend its passage without 
delay. 

The above report was accompanied by a letter from the late 
Gen. Lewis Cass, addressed to the Hon. A. S. White, then our 
senator in Congress. The letter will speak for itself, as follows : 

"Washington, D. C, Jan. 8, 1843. 

Sir : In answer to your letter, I beg leave to state that I know 
J. B. Chaudonia well. He served many years under my orders 
both in peace and war, and in trying circumstances rendered great 
services to the United States. 

Some of the events of his life were almost romantic, and at all 
times he was firm and faithful, Could I give you an exact narra- 
tion of all he did, there would be a unanimous conviction in Con- 
gress that something should be done for his family, which I under- 
stand is destitute ; but the subject has passed, in a great degre from 

my memory, and I must content myself with a few prominent 
facts. 

Chaudonia was a half-breed Pottawatomie. His uncle, Topene- 

bee, was the chief of the tribe, and was an old man of great in- 
fluence. 

From the commencement of our difficulties with Great Britain, 
Chaudonia espoused our cause, notwithstanding the exertions of the 
British agents to seduce him to their interest, as he was an active, 
fearless young man, with connection in the tribe; they were ex- 
ceedingly desirous to gain him, but their efforts were useless. 
From the first to the last he never swerved in his attachment. He 



64 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

was present at the massacre of the garrison of Chicago, where I 
have always understood he saved the life of Captain Heald, the 
commanding officer, and the lives of others also. 

He was apprehended by the British, and imprisoned at Maiden, 
whence he escaped — a party was sent in pursuit of him headed by 
his uncle, a Canadian. He killed his uncle and fled into the Indian 
country. 

Here he exerted his influence for us, and induced Topenebee and 
other Pottawatomie chiefs to come to the council of Greenville in 
1834. which was held by General Harrison and myself, and where 
a peace was made which detached many Indians from the British 
interest. 

From Greenville he accompanied me to Detroit, for which place 
I marched a considerable force of Indians for the relief of that fron- 
tier, which was then suffering from the invasion of hostile Indians. 
I had no white troops with me, and my position was therefore dif- 
ficult and dangerous. 

Chaudonia conducted himself with great energy and propriety, 
and rendered me the most essential service. 

I believe he was in the various engagements on the northwestern 
frontier, and, I think, at the battle of the Thames. 

He attended the treaties for the purchase of land, and always 
aided the commissioners in their efforts, and I can say from person- 
al knowledge that General Harrison had the same opinion of him 
that I had, and I have no doubt, were he alive, he would with 
pleasure bear witness to the good conduct and fidelity of Chaudonia. 

With great respect, I am Sir, your obedient servant, 

Lewis Cass. 

Hon. A. S. White, U. S. Senate." 

Accordingly a bill was passed which was approved March 3, 
1847, granting a half section to the widow, Mary L. Chaudonia, 
and one quarter section each to Charles B. Chaudonia and Mary 
L. Breset, children of said Marv L. and John B. Chaudonia. 

I write this for the purpose of placing an old and respected resi- 
dent of LaPorte county, and also of St. Joseph county, properly 
before the public, and trust it may find a place in your valuable 
collection of reminiscences. Truly Yours, 

Charles M. Heaton. 



SCIPIO TOWNSHIP. 6& 

The first school in tha township was taught by Caroline Holmes, 
in the year 1833. It was in a log school house on the southeast 
edge of Door Village grove, on the lands of Arba Heald, and now 
owned by Daniel Kimball. In the winter following, it was taught 
by a man named Good. 

In 1835, Avery Freeman, Aaron Kidder, Levi Black, Alva 
Mason and T. B. Cole came from Washington county, New York,, 
and settled in Scipio. 

In 1836, Asaph Webster, who resided in Noble, on section six, built 
a saw mill. It was on Mill creek, in the southwest part of Scipio, 
and within about five rods of the township line. This is the only 
mill of which there is any account, and the old settlers say there 
has been no other. 

The only town in Scipio township is 

DOOR VILLAGE. 

It seems to have been laid out in 1836. It is located on the 
school section (sixteen), and the sub-division was made under the 
direction of the County Commissioners. It is pleasantly located 
on Door Prairie, in the midst of a rich farming country ; but the 
business of the place is now less than it was many years ago, its 
vicinity to LaPorte causing it to fall behind in the competition for 
business patronage. The following exhibit will give a fair idea of 
the business of the place from the beginning. 

The first cabin built in Door Village, was by Welsh and his son, 
who sold intoxicating liquor to the Indians in 1830. In the spring 
of 1832, Arba Heald built a cabin in what is now the village. The 
Methodist church was built in 1833. It was a frame building, and 
the Rev. James Armstrong was the first man who preached in it. 
In the same year, Good & Homing opened a store, selling dry 
goods and groceries. They continued business but a few months. 
The concern successively passed through the hands of Morrison, 
Hoag, Michael O'Hara, Willis & Robinson, Closser, and Rose, who 
discontinued the business in 1862. The first frame house was built 
by Mr. Morrison, in 1833. Hiram Parker built a tavern. It has 
since been torn down. Theodore Parker commenced wagon mak- 
ing in the same year. W T m. Harris started a blacksmith shop in 
1834. In 1835 a man by the name of Cobb, carried on black- 

5 



Q6 HISTORY OF, LA PORTE COUNTY. 

smithing. Mr. Branson commenced shoe making in 1836, and 
continued in the business two or three years. Joseph liar wood w 
a carpenter and joiner, and did business in the village. In 1837. 
Dr. Hall moved into the township. He bought and occupied the 
property now owned by J. B. Higgins. He died in 1838. In 
this year, (1837) John and William Reed started a blacksmith shop. 
They continued business a your or a little more. Hiram Carter 
opened a grocery store. Nelson Bennett had a blacksmith shop 
where the Methodist parsonage now stands, in 1838. He had car- 
ried on that business about ten years in the village, when he re- 
moved to Union Mills. George Tower started the business of 
tailoring, and continued from 1838 to 1840. At the same time 
Albert Currier who was brother in-law of Tower, was engaged in 
shoe making. During this year (1838), Orrin Willis, was post- 
master, and a shoe maker named Harmison, commenced business. In 
1839 J. B. Higgins commenced shoe making and continued in the 
business fifteen years. The same year, Dyer Smith started a black- 
smith and wagon shop, as did also Bigsbee k Co.. who continued it 
about a year. Mr. Higgins was afterwards justice of the peace, 
and was postmaster several years, when he finally resigned and Mrs. 
Cooley was appointed in 1874. 

In 1840 Chester Heald carried on a foundry and made iron cast- 
ings of various kinds. He also manufactured thrashing machines. 
In the same year Joseph Austin had a spinning wheel manufactory, 
and in it a lathe for turning wood, which he run by means of two 
dogs. He sold out to Samuel Hall. This year the Baptist church 
was built, and Elder Spaulding was the first pastor. Greorge and 
William Parkinson carried the mail from LaPorte to Valparaiso for 
many years. 1852 N. P. Huckins put up an establishment and 
made fanning mills. In 1847 Samuel Hall opened a tavern on the 
south side of the road. In 1< S 41> Samuel Cox built a very good 
tavern, which burned down the next year. At the sanu- time John 
Parkinson commenced the business of wagon making and black- 
smithing. Nathan Thurber commenced shoe making and continued 
in the business four or five years. Leland Lockwood commenced 
blaeksmithing and wagon making in lSoo. and J. B. Higgins opened 
a small store, the same year. In 1855 Samuel Hall built the 



SCIPIO TOWNSHIP. 67 

tavern now occupied by Mathew Riley. In 1864 Mr. Smith com- 
menced making bed mattresses. In 1869 Thomas Doyle com- 
menced blacksmithing. In 1870 Claus Peterson opened a shoe 
shop to which he has added a small store. 

Others who settled early in this township were 'Joseph Osborn 
and Wm. Adams, who came in 1830 ; Elijah Brown, John Broad- 
head, Peter White, and Mr. Melville, who all came in the year 
1832, or prior thereto ; Elmore Pattee who settled in*1833 ; N. W. 
Closser, and Isaac S. Evans, who came in 1834; also Irwin, Mason 
and McCray in the same year; Aaron Kidder in 1835; Lewis A. 
Wilkinson in 1836. Jacob R. Hall, whose death recently occurred, 
settled in 1833, having come from Cass county. 

Some of the leading citizens in point of the number of years they 
have lived in the township, are James Forrester, and Samuel 
Harvey, who have been members of the State Legislature, as was 
also Jacob R. Hall, in 1855; Wm. A. Banks, Joseph McLellan, 
Alexander and Henry P. Crane, Daniel Kimball, D. P. Shoemaker, 
John W. Andrew, S. K. Pottinger, W. B. Hammond, Alexander 
Van Pelt, Chas. Knott, A. C. Hall, C. Simmons, Andrew McLel- 
lan, C. N. Evans, and A. J. Rogers. 

These represent but a few of the present population which com- 
prises an intelligent and enterprising people. Occupying as they 
do one of the richest portions of land in the county, the whole of it 
convenient to a market at LaPorte, they are a highly favored com- 
munity, and will no doubt continue to improve in wealth, intelli- 
gence, enterprise, and all the comforts, and even luxuries of civilized 
fiel. 



68 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



CHAPTER IV. 

NEW DURHAM TOWNSHIP. 

New Durham township is one of the original three which formed 
the county when organized, and it then embraced all of range four, 
within the limits of LaPorte county. Since then its territory has 
been diminished to form Coolspring and Michigan on the north, 
and Clinton, Cass and Dewey on the south. It now occupies con- 
gressional township thirty-six, the civil township being commensu- 
rate with the congressional, that is, exactly six miles square. This 
township was named by Miriam Benedict, mother of Levi J. Bene- 
dict, who chose for it the name of the place of her nativity. Dur- 
ham, Greene county, New York. The first settlers were the Bene- 
dict family ; Henly Clyburn, who had married Sarah Benedict in 
Illinois, and Thomas Clyburn. This was the first white family that 
settled in the county. It is possible that there mav have been 
trappers, hunters or traders before them, but they were not settlers, 
and removed as soon as game became scarce, and the land was cleared 
up. Xone of these had their families with them, or if so, they had 
Indian wives, and were more nearly identified with the aborigines 
than the white-. 

Stepen S. Benedict, together with Miriam Benedict his wife, and 
his children, Joseph H. Benedict, Alpha M. Benedict, Levi J. Ben- 
edict, John K. Benedict. Holland Benedict. James W. Benedict 
and Sarah Benedict, migrated from Durham, Greene county. Xew 
York, in the year 1827, and moved to Illinois. They stopped a 
short time at Chicago, and from thence moved to Ottowa. where 
Stephen S. Benedict died. In February of 1>>^'.». the family started 
for Chicago. They remained there but a few days, when they re- 
sumed their journey in an easterly direction, and arrived in Xew 
Durham township on the fifteenth lay of March 1829, accompanied 
bv Henlv Clyburn. After their loner and tedious journey with an 
ox team, the snow being a part of the time eighteen inches deep, 
they encamped about sixty rods northerly of the grounds upon 
which the Westville railroad depot now stand-. 



NEW DURHAM TOWNSHIP. 69 

Previous to their arrival at this point the little company had 
managed to send i ord to Pokagon prairie, in Berrien county, Mich- 
igan, that they wanted assistance in putting up a log cabin, and in 
accordance with such request, Samuel Johnson and William Eahart 
had arrived at the designated point a day before the party encamp- 
ed. These men were pleased with the country, and after assisting 
in the erection of a couple of cabins, went back to Michigan and 
returned with their families in the following April, bringing Jacob 
Inglewright with them, who made a claim of the farm now owned 
by Hon. C. W. Cathcart. In the same year Charles Whittaker 
and James Whittaker settled on section twenty-three. Wm. H. 
Shirley came the same year with his family. On the sixteenth day 
of July, the first white child in the county was born. It was 
Elizabeth Miriam Clyburn, daughter of Henly and Sarah Clyburn. 

In 1830 Wm. Garwood entered threu hundred and twenty acres 
of land on section fourteen, in the vicinity of New Durham, and 
moved on to it with his family. A large number of Ottowa and 
Pottawatomie Indians were encamped in this vicinity, but they gave 
the settlers very little trouble. They bought the surplus crops 
paying for them in furs, etc. These were converted into cash, by 
sale to the agents of the American Fur Company. With this 
money many of the early inhabitants were enabled to pay the gov- 
ernment for their lands, when thev would have found it verv diffi- 
cult to have done so without such a market. Onlv one instance is 
known of the Indians having committed any depredations, and that 
was the killing of an ox belonging to Henly Clyburn. For this he 
eventually received the cash, by having it stopped out of their annu- 
ities at Chicago, where they were paid. Some idea of the remoteness 
of neighbors, the scarcity of stock, and the consequent inconvenience of 
the loss of the ox may be formed, when it is related that Clyburn was 
obliged to solicit the loan of a voke of oxen from the Carev mission, 
located at Niles, Michigan, in order to make up a breaking team. 

Among the settlers who came to New Durham township in 3 831 
was Alden Tucker, who settled on section thirteen ; but this was a 
comparatively dull year for settlement and there were not many 
arrivals. The vear 1832 witnessed the arrival of manv more. 
Among them were Josiah Bryant and family, Jeremiah and Jona- 



70 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

than Sherwood, Charles Campbell, and Wilson Malone. In this 
year, Rev. James Armstrong, the pioneer Methodist preacher, con- 
ducted the first religious services in the township. It was in this 
year that the Black Hawk war broke out, a full account of which, 
as affecting La Porte county and people, is given in connection with 
the history of Scipio township. 

The settlers had been told by the Ottawas and Pottawatomies 
that "as soon as the leaves on the trees became as large as a squir- 
rel's ear," it was the intention of the Sacs to invade the settlement 
and murder the inhabitants. During the month of May, rumors 
came from Chicago bringing tidings of the approach of their ene- 
mies. The settlers left their homes and retreated to Door Village, 
to the block house, where they stopped until all appearance of 
danger was passed. They then returned to their homes. 

During this year the land sales occurred at LaFayette. There 
was no preemption law, and settlers had much difficulty with spec- 
ulators who over-bid them when the land was exposed at public sale. 
This occurred in many instances where the settlers had expended 
all their means in making improvements. Much of the land thus 
situated and located in New Durham, went as high as five or six 
dollars per acre. 

On the first day of January 1833, Rachel B. Carter opened the 
first school ever taught in the township. It was in one side of a 
double log cabin on the farm of Wm. Eahart, on section twenty-two. 
She had eighteen scholars. Among them were Levi J. Benedict, 
Wm. Garwood, and several by the names of Morgan and Eahart. 
In November 1834, she married a man named Jacobus. She is still 
living, apparently strong and healthy, and does not appear so old 
as her history would seem to indicate. From her is gathered a part 
of the facts contained in this narrative. 

When Miss Carter was teaching this school, Indians of various 
ages would come to the cabin, wrapped in their blankets, and stand 
for hours without uttering a word or making a motion, while they 
gazed curiously at the proceedings. Then they would glide away 
as noiselessly as they came. L'pon one occasion, an Indian woman 
called "Twin Squaw," informed Rachel that the Indians intended 
to kill all the whites, as soon as the corn was knee high. Rachel 



NEW DURHAM TOWNSHIP. 71 

replied that the white people were well aware of the intentions of 
the Indians, and taking up a handful of sand, said that soldiers 
were coming from the East as numerous as its grains to destroy 
the Indians before the corn was ankle high. The next morning 
there were no Indians to be found in the vicinity, and it was several 
months before they returned. An Indian told Rachel, at one time, 
that they liked a few whites with them to trade with, to act as 
interpreters, and that they learned many useful things of them ; 
but when they commenced coming, they came like the pigeons. 

The aborigines had a far different idea of propriety from that 
which we entertain. They had a burial and dancing ground north 
of Petro's grove, upon what is now the land of Lucas Hixon. As 
late as 1835, this ground was made use of for the purposes named. 
During this year a specimen of Indian justice took place, which 
shows that they had a very clear idea of what attorneys term 
"exemplary damages." An Indian had chopped a tree in a pigeon 
roost, for the purpose of obtaining "squabs," and when it fell it 
killed a pony belonging to another member of the tribe. A coun- 
cil was called, and after a great deal of consultation, and all the 
forms relating to the administration of justice had been gone through 
with, a decision was made to the effect that the carelessness of the 
offender entitled the aggrieved Indian to receive two ponies in the 
place of the one killed. The judgment of the court was complied 
with. There were no writs of error, no supersedeas, or certiorari 
known to their code, and the same court had both original and 
appellate jurisdiction. 

The Ottowas and Pottowatamies were anything but neat and clean 
in their habits, and in their culinary department they exercised 
but little care. James M. Ray, an old settler, relates that in 1836, 
there were some five hundred of them camped in and about West- 
ville. At one time he passed a party of them who had captured a 
turtle and a coon. The former wns thrown alive upon a bed of 
coals, and held with sticks until it was dead. The latter was put 
into a camp kettle ar.d cooked with very little dressing. The In- 
dians insisted that Ray should partake of their feast, but the cook- 
ing excited little appetite for him. 

In the years 1834 and 1835 settlers came rapidly, and the gov- 



72 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

<errimeut land was nearly or quite all purchased. In 1835, Leonard 
Woods, now of Michigan City, opened a store at Cathcart's grove. 
He sold goods on credit in small amounts, to supply the immediate 
wants of the settlers ; and he never lost a dollar from having trusted 
the pioneers, though many of them were strangers to him. 

In 1836 an inhabitant of New Durham named Pelton, started 
for the West with a considerable sum of money. Soon after start- 
ing he was waylaid, murdered and robbed. A man named Staves 
was arrested and tried for the crime, and being found guilty he was 
hung at Valparaiso, the murder having been committed in Porter 
county. 

The growth of the township was not confined to the opening of 
farms, although farming was the leading industry. In 1839 
Israel and James Jessup built a saw mill which was the first 
one erected in the township. It was near the present town of Otis. 
In 184-4 Henrv Herrold built another saw mill south of Otis. It 
was run by water, and the site is now owned by W. F. Cattron k 
Co. In 1815 Philander Barnes built a mill about a mile west of 
Otis. In 1852, Capt. Jo. Davis and his son, Caleb Davis, built a 
steam saw mill in New Durham township, a mile and a quarter north 
<of the village of New Durham. In the year 1854 or 1855. ir was 
sold to Wm. S. Medaris, who moved it to a point near the railroad. 
It now belongs to the Medaris' heirs. Other industries grew up 
and flourished; but they existed more especially in the villages, and 
will be described in the proper place. In the year I860, a boy * 
named .^andon was drowned in a pond near Medaris' mill, by the 
sinking of a canoe in which he and another boy were sailing. The 
place where the pond was, is now dry land. In 1867, Patrick 
Daily was killed by Patrick Dunn, a dispute having occurred 
between them. The deed was performed by Dunn having struck 
Daily with a wood rack stake. Dunn was indicted for murder, and 
tried at the April term of the circuit court of 1868. The defense 
set up was self-defense, and the jury rendered a verdict of " Not 
guilty.'* 

Union chapel, the first place for religious worship in the township 
was erected in 1839, on section thirty-four. Prior to this time 
public religious services were held in the school houses, in private 



NEW DURHAM TOWNSHIP. 73 

houses, and sometimes in the beautiful groves which abound in the 
township. In the month of May 1862, a most remarkable murder 
occurred in New Durham township, about a mile and three-quarters 
north of Westville. A man named Fred. Miller, had been missing 
from his home several days, and his dead body was found upon the 
shores of Lake Michigan. He had evidently been murdered. Mil- 
ler was a German, and some of his countrymen had their suspicions 
that his wife was a party to the deed, and they hung the woman a 
short time, for the purpose of extorting a confession. She told them 
that John Poston had committed the murder in her presence, and 
had promised to marry her if she would not denounce him. Poston 
was arrested and brought before Alfred Williams, Esq., for examin- 
ation on the thirty-first day of May, but the evidence of the woman 
was so contradictory and unsatisfactorv that the magistrate felt 
constrained to acquit him. Poston afterwards joined the army. 

Near New Durham there are two mounds, of the kind con- 
structed by the former inhabitants of this continent. They were 
formerly, within the memory of the oldest inhabitants, of the height 
of six feet, but from being cultivated and otherwise disturbed, are 
not as much elevated as formerly, though plainly .discernible. 

In the spring of 18 [3, Bugbee, Luff & Palmer commenced build- 
ing a paper mill on Reynolds' creek, three quarters of a mile west 
of Otis, on the L. S. & M. S. railroad. In the spring of 1874, 
Mr. Palmer sold out his interest to Daniel Webster, of Illinois. 
During the last summer, Mr. Bugbee sold out to his sister, Mrs. 
Owen. H. D. Luff purchased Mr. Webster's interest on the first 
of September. The mill is now owned by Mr. Luff and Mrs. Owen. 
It is doing a very fine business, making a ton of straw board each 
■day. A little village is springing up in the vicinity, and it is pos- 
sible that the local historian of half a century hence, may have use 
for this item. 

Another paper mill has also more recently been built near Otis 
by W. F. Cattron and others. It is situated on a branch of the 
Calumet, on the L. N. A. & C. railroad. The building is of brick 
and the machinery is propelled by both steam and watyr power. 

In this township there are four villages, Westville, Otis, Holmes- 
ville and New Durham, or ''Pin Hook," the oldest of which is 



74 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

NEW DURHAM. 

As early as the year 1837, this place had grown to be something 
of a village, and a postoffice was established with Wm. Taylor as 
postmaster; but it was not until the loth day of April, 1847, that 
a plat of the village was filed in the office of the county recorder, 
by Joseph Davis. 

The first house built in New Durham was a log cabin erected for 
a store, by Leonard Woods in the year 1834. During the next 
year, Hiram Wheeler and Woods were in partnership in the mer- 
cantile business in that place. Woods sold out to William Taylor, 
and moved to Cathcart's grove, where he opened another store. 
Taylor seld out to Horner, who kept it ten years. Horner s-ld to 
Bill Jennings. In the year 1856, A. G. Standiford and D. C. 
Standiford bought the concern. This partnership continued about 
one year, and then D. C. Standiford continued the business alone 
about three years, after which he sold to Asahel Reynolds. Rey- 
nolds sold to Henry Cole, who continued in business until 1863. 
The store was then discontinued. 

In 1837, Henry Harding opened and kept a hotel in the village, 
and in 1838 Wm. S. Medaris carried on a wagon manufactory, and 
W. B. Webber a blacksmith shop. They were run in connection 
with each other, and were upon the sites now occupied by Wm. 
Pathe and Michael Burgher, for the same purpose. In the fall of 
1839, James Flood and Wm. Johnson opened a tailor shop. They 
succeeded David Christman. 

In 1843, Richard Smith commenced the business of boot and 
shoe making and continued it until 1855. In 1846 Dr. A. G. 
Standiford commenced the practice of medicine in the town and 
vicinity. He was the first physician who resided there. In 1847 
a church was built in New Durham by the Methodist denomination, 
and the first minister was Rev. J. J. Cooper. Rev. Mr. Parrott. 
previous to that time, had conducted religious services for the 
Methodists. 

Archibald McAllister commenced the business of harness making 
in 1846, and Capt. Joseph Davis opened a store in 1847, but going 
the next year to California, the store was closed in 1849. About 
this time Daniel Pangborn commenced blacksmithing. 



NEW DURHAM TOWNSHIP. 75 

Wm. B. Webber bought out Wm. S. Medaris' wagon shop in 
1850, and carried it on four years. He at the same time bought 
out Amos Perrin's blacksmith shop. In the year 1852, he manu- 
factured one hundred and fourteen wagons and buggies, and 
mounted three hundred steel plows. 

In 1854, a frame school house was built in New Durham, which 
has since been replaced by a substantial building of brick. In this 
year also the postoffice was removed from New Durham to Beaver 
Dam, and Sylvester Goff was appointed postmaster. This was an 
indication of the decline of New Durham, and the railroad having 
reached Westville, the pioneer town of the township ceased to be a 
place of any importance. Many of its buildings have been moved 
away. Some of them have gone to Westville. and some are used 
for farm houses. Though the town is gone, the rich lands of the 
prairie remain, a constant source of wealth. 

During the days of her prosperity New Durham had a rival. At 
the crossing of the old Chicago road and plank road, at the head of 
Flood's grove, little more than a half mile distant, John Arm- 
strong opened a very good dry goods and grocery store, and Henry 
Herrold a blacksmith shop. For a lon^ time there was considerable 
jealousy between the inhabitants of the two places. The citizens 
of the Flood's grove settlement gave New Durham the cognomon of 
"Pinhook," and the good people of the latter place retorted by 
naming the settlement of their neighbors. '• Squatham." 

Reckoning from the time when the first house was built, the next 
oldest town in New Durham township is 

HOLMESVILLE. 

This place was laid out upon the lands of of Hiram Holmes. The 
plat was filed for record on the second day of October, 1855. It is 
described as being in the northeast corner of the southeast quarter 
of section four, township thirty-six, north of range four west. 

In the year 1833, Jacob Bryant built a saw mill where that of 
Henry Larry now stands. He also built the first dwelling house, 
which was a frame, the boards being sawed out at the mill. The 
house is now occupied by John Moorman. 

After this no other building was erected until after the location 
of the railroad in 1850. In that year Mr. Prosser built a part of 



76 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

the house now occupied as a dwelling and store by Adolph Schaffer. 
Prosser sold goods in the building. In 1852 an addition was made, 
and it was opened as a public house. 

In the year 1851, John H. Armstrong bought the saw mill and 
other property of Jacob Bryant. Immediately afterwards he sold 
to Hiram Holmes. In the year 1860, Samuel S. Davis bought out 
Mr. Holmes. 

A postoffice was established at Holmesville in 1852. kept by 
Prosser, but was discontinued in 1856. In 1853 a warehouse was 
built by the Michigan Southern railway company ; and the house 
now occupied by Samuel S. Davis was built by Hiram Holmes. 
Wm. Booth also built a house here in 1856. and Charles Moorman 
built another in 1857. Francis Burkliardt bought the hotel 
property in 1856. He died in 1869. His heirs have rented to 
Adolph Schaffer who carries on a store in the building. 

Holmesville has become somewhat noted for accidents and cas- 
ualties. Two suicides have occurred here, one of a German who 
had boarded with Burkhardt, and the other an emigrant woman, 
who was on the journey to the west with her family. Four men 
have been killed here on the railroad, a Mr. Marshall, a Mr. Eaton, 
a deaf and dumb n:an, and a man who was drunk and had lain 
down upon the track in the night. In 1862 there was a collision 
at Holmesville between a freight and an express train, which did 
much damage to the trains, but killed no one, and in 1866 a train 
was thrown from the track by a cow. By this accident several per- 
sons were very seriously injured. 

OTIS. 

The settlement of this place was commenced in 1851, but no 
plat of the town was recorded until 1870, when Solomon Tucker, 
on the 20th day of April, of that year, acknowledged and filed a 
plat for record. The description says that LaCroix " is laid out in the 
south part of the northwest quarter of section five, township thirty- 
six, north of range four west, in LaPorte county, Indiana." 

On the 27th day of June 1874, Mr. Tucker also filed a plat for 
an addition laid off "in the south part of the northwest quarter of 
section five, township thirty-six, north of range four west, in La- 
Porte countv. Indiana." 



NEW DURHAM TOWNSHIP. 77 

Otis was first known as Salem Crossing. This name was given to 
it by the Michigan Southern railroad, and when the postoffice was 
established, and Matthias Seberger appointed postmaster, that name 
was adopted by the department at Washington. The Louisville, 
New Albany & Chicago railroad, however, insisted upon calling it 
LaCroix, and when Solomon Tucker laid out and platted the town 
upon this land, he availed himself of the proprietor's right to give 
it a name, and upon our county books it is only known as LaCroix. 
Having two names, some of the inhabitants thought it best, as a sort 
of compromise, to give it a third, which should supplant the other 
two, and suggested the name of the representative in congress from 
this district, and for a time it was called Packard. Upon the rec- 
ommendation of that gentleman, however, in 1872, the name of the 
office was changed to Otis. Matthias Seberger was the first settler 
in Otis, arriving there in 1851. In the year 1853, the Michigan 
Southern, and Louisville, New Albany and Chicago railroads were 
completed, and he acted as agent for both of them. In 1854 
Geo. R. Selkirk opened a grocery store, and in the same year B. 
Parker and Isaac Weston erected a hotel which was kept by Parker. 
Henry Wing bought it in 1857, and kept it until 1865. This 
covered the period of the war when the patronage of the hotel was the 
greatest. In those days, soldiers and others going southward from 
northeastern Indiana were obliged to go to Salem Crossing, and 
thence southward over the L. N. A. & C. line. This kept the hotel 
well filled most of the time. 

Solomon Colby opened a blacksmith shop in 1858, and in 1859 
F. Harriman established a meat market. Matthias Seberger opened 
the first general store in the same year. 

In 1861, a saloon was built and kept by Jasper Fleming, not, 
however for the sale of intoxicating liquors. In 1867 Seberger & 
Wing engaged in the business of merchandising in partnership. A 
wagon and blacksmith shop was established in 1870 ; and Dr. 
Clark R. Warren commenced the practice of medicine, being the 
first resident physician. 

The Methodist Episcopal church had the first regular preaching 
in 1870, and in 1872 a Roman Catholic church was built by the 
Polanders who. are settled in the neighborhood. 






78 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



The business of the village of Otis consists of two blacksmith ; 
shops ; one carpenter ; one depot agent ; two druggists ; three gen- 
eral stores, dry goods, groceries, crockery, etc.; one hotel; one l 
market ; two physicians ; two shoemakers ; one tailor ; one tele- 1 
graph operator; one undertaker, and one wagon maker. 

WESTYILLE. 

Westville is the most important town in New Durham township, 
being a place of considerable business, and a heavy grain market. 
The original town of Westville was located on the northwest quarter 
of section twenty-nine, in township thirty-six, range four west, by 
W. and J. A. Cattron, and the town plat was recorded on the first 
day of May, 1851. Afterwards an amended plat was filed by which 
seven lots were added to the original plot. On the eighth day of 
July, 1863, Henly Clyburn filed for record an addition embracing 
forty-five lots. James Concannon filed a plat for an addition 
embracing one hundred lots, on the twenty-first day of June, 1865. 
Smith's addition of ten lots, was made on the fifth day of June, 
1858, and Clyburn's second addition, embracing twenty-two lots 
on the fifteenth day of June, 1858. Ray's addition consisting of 
eleven lots was recorded February 10, 1868. 

"Westville is favorablv located on the Louisville, New Albany and 
Chicago railroad; and has had a steady growth from the time of 
the completion of the railroad. 

The first permanent residence on the present site of V\ estville 
was a frame house, built by Henly Clyburn in 1836, James M. 
Ray doing the carpenter work: and the first store was one kept by 
John and William Cattron. at a part <-f the town known as the 
"Four Corners." It was opened in 1*48; and in 184 ( .». D. M. 
Closser opened a dry goods and grocery store. In 1850 Jesse 
McCord commenced the business of blacksmithing. Bell Jennings 
opened a general store in 1851. In this year, there were two num- 
bers of a paper called the Westville Free Press issued. L. P. 
Williams was the editor. He afterwards went to Nashville, where 
he edited an agricultural paper, until near the beginning of the war, 
when returning to the North, he entered the Union army, and 
attained the rank of Major. He now resides in Washington, 
D. C. 



NEW DURHAM TOWNSHIP. 79 

The railroad was completed in 1853, and a depot was built, which 
gave the first business impetus to the place. During this year a 
steam grist mill was built by James Haskell. This was sold and 
moved away about the year 1860. 

In 1853 a Methodist church building was erected which is now 
owned by the Catholics. The Christian church was built in 1859, 
and Elder H. Z. Leonard was the first pastor. The Methodist 
church was built in 1867-8 out of means arising from a generous 
bequest made by a large-hearted christian man and public-spirited 
citizen, Daniel West, who died a few years ago, honored and 
respected by all who knew him- He also made a handsome bequest 
to the lodge of Odd Fellows, and with it a good hall was built in 
1868. 

In the year 1855, Jacob J. Mann & Co., built a reaper and 
mower establishment, and made a machine patented by themselves. 
The concern did a good business up to the time of the death of the 
senior member of the firm. 

The first number of the Westville Herald was issued on the 
second day of May A. D. 1856, by C. G. Townsend and Alfred 
Townsend. The partnership continued only until the following- 
August, when the office was sold to a company composed of Samuel 
Burns, Henly Clyburn and James Concannon. Townsend con- 
ducted it until November, when Chas. G. Powell took charge of it, 
and having bought out the proprietors, removed it to LaPorte in 
the month of August 1859. 

In the year 1858, Tobias Miller built a steam grist mill. After 
being sold several times it was owned by Mrs. Sloan Martin, in 
1870, when it was burned. 

In the fall of 1862 a bedstead factory was started by Reynolds, 
Weaver and Smith. Weaver continued with the firm until 1865. 
The other members of the firm continued in the business until 1869, 
when they sold out to Charles Ruggles, who changed the business 
to that of manufacturing wooden bottom chairs, which is now car- 
ried on to a considerable extent, and in the year 1864, a machine 
shop was put in operation and run by Charles W. Carter. 

On the 14th day of February 1864, a meeting of citizens was 
held at the new school house to take into consideration the propriety 



80 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

of incorporating Westville. Azariah Williams acted as chairman r 
an<l W. L. Webster as secretary. 

Win. B. Webber moved that preparatory steps toward getting the 
town incorporated be taken, and the chair then on motion appointed 
the following committee to carry out the objects of the convention : 
Wm. B. Webber, James Concannon, Wm. C. Martin, D. C. Stand- 
iford and W. L. Webster. 

At the September term of the county commissioner's court, held 
at the court house on Friday, the ninth day of September, A. D., 
1864, it was ordered by the board that in the matter of the applica- 
tion of the legal voters of Westville, it appeared that a majority of 
the legal voters in said town are in favor of its incorporation and 
that the law has been fully complied with, and that said town be 
and is hereby incorporated. 

The first election under the act of incorporation took place on the 
loth day of September, and the annual charter election on the 16th 
day of November following. 

The first council consisted of W. L. Webster, D. C. Standiford, 
and Wm. C. Martin, Mr. Webster being elected president. G. L. 
Thompson was the first clerk. 

James Dolman, Sen., and James Dolman, Jr., erected a grist 
mill near the railroad track, in 1872, and the next year sold it to- 
E. and N. Dolman. 

Cattron's hall and building was finished in 1873. It is a hand- 
some building and the hall is a credit to the town. 

Perhaps the one institution of which Westville may most justly 
feel proud is the excellent public school which is recognized as one 
of the best not only in the county, but in all northern Indiana. 
Several years ago, it was brought up to a high standard by Prof. J. 
G. Laird, and has successfully maintained it ever since. The school 
has been bo successfully managed that many persons have attended 
it, from adjoining counties. It is an honor alike to those who have 
conducted it, and the people who have given it a cordial support. 

It is not within the province of this history to give all the busi- 
aess changes that may have occurred. It aims to present the 
county as it has been, and also as it is at present: and the follow- 
ing gratifying exhibit of the business of Westville is given. 



NEW DURHAM TOWNSHIP. 81 

Two attorneys; two bakeries; two barber shops; two blacksmith 
shops; one butcher shop; two brick masons; sixteen carpenters; 
one chair factory ; two dry goods, clothing and grocery stores ; one 
well driver ; one express agent ; one gunsmith ; four grocery stores ; 
two hotels ; two hardware stores ; six harness makers ; two insur- 
ance agents; two justices of the peace; one jeweler and watch 
maker ; one livery stable ; three milliners ; four physicians ; two 
painters; four plasterers; one pump manufacturer; two restau- 
rants ; one saloon ; two saw mills ; one stationery store ; three shoe 
makers ; Two tailors ; one undertaker and two wagon manufactories. 
There is also a Hook and Ladder company ; a lodge each of the 
Masons and Odd Fellows ; four churches, Baptist, Christian, Meth- 
odist and Catholic ; and an efficient corporation government, con- 
sisting of a council, with president, treasurer and clerk, assessor and 
marshal. 

There are others now living in the township who came very early to 
the county. Hon. Charles W. Cathcart made a settlement in 1831, 
and has long been a distinguished citizen, honored in many ways by his 
fellow-citizens. He twice represented the district in congress, and 
has always borne a prominent and leading position in public affairs. 
Evan Henton came to the county in 1832, and now resides in West- 
ville. A. M. Jessup arrived in 1832. John P. Noble, Eliza Cole, 
Henry N. Cathcart, W. F. Cattron, John Warnock and J. R. Reed 
reached the county in 1833. M. S. Wright, M. W. Robertson, 
Ralph Loomis, C. R. Robertson, Wm. W. and W. L. Webster and 
Shep. Crumpacker came in 1834. J. M. and J. G. Warnock, and 
James M. Ray arrived in 1835. 

It is impracticable to name later arrivals. The township is 
thickly populated, and except Centre and Michigan townships, casts 
a larger vote than any other township in the county. 

The fertility of the soil in this township is unsurpassed and its 
farmers are prosperous. Among those who have held official posi- 
tions is Hon. Geo. Crawford, a leading agriculturist of the township. 
He has been several times a member of the State Legislature, serv- 
ing in both the Senate and House of Representatives ; he served 
also two years as a member of the State Board of Agriculture. 
Though now at an advanced age, he is yet an influential, active 

6 



82 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

and useful citizen. Other well-known citizens of the township are 
Alfred Williams, John P. Cathcart, Azariah Williams. Dr. B. B. 
Freeman, Dr. T. Travel, Isaiah Thompson, Mrs.JM. M. Duncan, 
H. Van Zandt, Daniel McKillips. M. W. Ray, I. D. Martin, L. R. 
Cole, Wash. Concannon. Mr. Armitage, and Dr. C. P. Cathcart. 
John P. Cathcart has served many years as county surveyor. 



CHAPTER V. 

MICHIGAN TOWNSHIP. 

At the regular term of the commissioners' court, on the fourth 
day of September 1833, the following order was parsed by the 
board : 6i Ordered that Xew Durham township be divided by the 
line dividing townships thirty-six and thirty-seven, and that all that 
tract of country lying in township thirty-seven and thirty-eight con- 
stitute a new township, to be called Michigan township." A divis- 
ion was afterwards made rf this territory so that the present Michi- 
igan township consists only of the fractional congressional township 
thirty-eight, which is so far diminished bv Lake Michigan on the 
north that it contains but fourteen whole sections and six fractional 
sections, leaving it the smallest township in territory £there is in the 
county, with one exception, that of Hudson. The soil of the town- 
ship consists almost wholly of sand ridges. These were at one 
time covered with a fine growth of White pine timber, which has 
entirely disappeared, having been cut oif for lumber. 

One of the earliest settlements in Michigan township, outside of 
Michigan City, was at Scott's mills, where Mr. James # M. Scott erected 
a saw and grist mill. This was the first flouring mill that was built 
in the township. It was located on Trail creek one mile and a half 
from Michigan City, and was completed in 1834. It was a large 
fine mill, and supplied a great extent of country with bread, pur- 
chasers coming all the way from Chicago, Rockford, Joliet and 
Galena, in Illinois. The proprietor was able to purchase wheat at 
sixty cents per bushel, and sell his flour at ten dollars per barrel. 
The first saw mill in the township was built by John Walker, father 



MICHIGAN TOWNSHIP. 83 

of Maj. Benj. P. Walker of LaPorte. John Cheney and John Rit- 
ter, the Shreves, Sanfords and Yan Winkles were all old settlers, 
having reached the county at a very early day. 

Owing to the sparseness of the population of Michigan township 
outside of the city, its history is chiefly the history of 

MICHIGAN CITY. 

The land on which Michigan City, is now located was purchased 
of the government in 1831, by Isaac C. Elston, of Crawfordsville, 
Indiana, and he laid out the town in October, 1832. The town site was 
one that was rather forbidding, much of it being low and swampy. A 
growth of pine trees covered most of the spot, and there were some 
sugar maple trees. Trail creek slowly made its way over the 
sands to the lake, winding around by the very foot of Hoosier Slide, 
a deep sluggish stream, which was obstructed by a bar at the 
mouth, where so little water passed over that a person ^could readily 
cross it on foot. Yet it was believed that at this point a "harbor 
could be made. Hence the purchase made by Major Elston, and 
all the subsequent operations towards building up a city, and a har- 
bor on the great lakes, for Indiana. The line between Indiana and 
the territory of Michigan was formerly some distance south of where 
it was afterwards located, shutting Indiana off entirely from all har- 
bor facilities, and depriving her as a State, of all the benefits to be 
derived from the vast commerce of the great northern lakes. This 
boundary was disputed, and it was finally settled by adopting a 
boundary that would give this State a position on the coast of lake 
Michigan; and the counties of LaPorte, Porter and Lake, are 
bounded on the north by its waters. 

The first settlers in Michigan City arrived in 1833, and it may 
readily be presumed that they found few attractions to welcome 
them. To their view there was presented only sand hills and 
swamps. Hoosier Slide towered up many feet higher than now, 
while below it and around about there was only glistening sand, and 
further back, across the creek that passed through the woods, and 
which was still the abode of wild beasts, a low, wet, swampy tract of 
country occupied all the locality. It would have been discouraging 
enough only for the prospect that a city would one day arise there 



84 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

in spite of adverse circumstances, and a harbor that should be to 
Indiana what the harbor at Chicago is now to Illinois. Animated 
by this belief, settlers rapidly arrived, filled with the spirit of enter- 
prise, and commenced the work of improvement. 

From the best information obtainable, it seems that Jacob Fur- 
man and B. F. Bryant put up a log cabin in August, 1833, on the 
present site of Peck's corner, which was probably the first house 
erected in the place. Mrs. W. F. Miller, who is older in date of 
arrival than any other person now living in Michigan City, states 
that her father, Samuel Flint, arrived there with his family in 
October, 1833. when she was five years of age : and the Flint tarn- 
ily was the third to arrive. There was then but one frame building 
in the town, erected, it is said by Samuel B. Webster: and Mr. 
Flint erected the second one for a dwelling house. The presence 
of Indians was no unusual event, but they were friendly, and Mrs. 
Miller remembers having often played with them as a child. The 
two or three dwelling houses were located in the woods, and sugar 
was made from the maple trees surrounding them. There wore no 
streets yet opened, and only foot paths led from house to house. 

In the month of June, 1833, Thompson AY. Francis arrived. He 
did not remain, but went to LaPorte, staving there until the month 
of November, when he journeyed to St. Joseph, Michigan, and 
worked at his trade there until the Spring of 1834. He then on the 
10th day of March went to Michigan City, and made a permanent 
settlement. He found there Joseph C. Orr, and Samuel Miller. Orr 
built a tannery in 1834. and lived first in a log house which stood on 
the present site of Ames & Holliday's drug store, which he used as a 
sort of hotel, and where many a traveler found rest and refreshment, 
though the surroundings were somewhat rude. He afterwards 
moved to New Cincinnati, on the Wisconsin river, where he is still 
living. Miller was a forwarder, and occupied a log building on the 
ground where the old brick packing house now stands. Francis was 
a carpenter, and built, or assisted in building many of the older 
houses now in the city. 

About the time of the arrival of the Flint family in October, 

■ 

1833, Geo. W. Selkirk came. He has been many years engaged 
in farming, and now resides in Coolspring township. At this time 



MICHIGAN TOWNSHIP. 85 

onlv an old Indian trail connected Michigan City and LaPorte, but 
the Michigan road had been laid out, and the laborers were then at 
work upon it. Until this was completed there was no road into the 
city, and the only communication with the world was out over the 
waters of the lake, by means of the occasional arrival and departure 
of a vessel. Vessels of ordinary size could not reach the wharf, but 
were obliged to anchor out in the lake at some distance, and land 
merchandise by means of lighters. This continued several years, 
to the time when the improvement of the harbor began under the 
BUpervision of the United States. 

George Ames and Leonard Woods reached the place in 1834; 
and in 1835 came M. Romel, a native of Germany; Simon Ritter 
from Seneca county, New York: Deacon W. Peck, from New 
York: W. W. fliggins, from Connecticut. Judge "Woodward a jus- 
tice of the peace, and first postmaster; Hiram and Richard Inman; 
Jacob Bigelow; David Burr: Benjamin James ; W.Moody; Allen 
James: Robert Stewart: Quick, Peak, Western and many others. 
In the winter of the same year C. B. Blair arrived. 

During this year and the next, settlers came rapidly, and the 
young town began to exhibit considerable stir and business activity. 
Sprague and TealJ were in the place in 1834. Teall was engaged 
in the business of merchandising, and they afterwards became stage 
proprietors in partnership, having purchased the line from Mich- 
igan City to Chicago. Capt. Eliakim Ashton, who was a sol- 
dier under Gen. Orr, came very early, perhaps in 1834; and also 
Asa Harper, who now lives in Coolspring township. He came to 
the county in 1833, and assisted in surveying the town of Michi- 
gan City, the plat of which was recorded September 17, 1833. 

Two hotels were built in 1834. The first one was put up by 
Lofland and Taylor, and was situated near the harbor; the other 
was built by Samuel Olinger, Thompson Francis doing the carpen- 
ter work. Soon afterwards Hiram Inman built the Stockton house 
near the present school house number one, on Pine street, and 
before the close of 1836, there were still other hotels — the Mansion 
house, City Hotel, Exchange, on Sherman's corner, Farmers' 
Hotel, Washington House and Lake House; also the Western 
Hotel which stood out near where the State prison is at present 



f 
$6 . HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

located. The hotels -were all full, and business of all kinds, in 1836, 
was in a flourishing condition. W. D. Woodward, who came to the 
place in that year, states that there were nearly three thousand 
inhabitants. This probably includes the hundreds of transient peo- 
ple; but it is certain that during the three years 1834, 35 and 36, 
the growth of the town was rapid beyond what seems possible now. 
The prospect of building the leading harbor on the lakes animated 
every settler, and disseminated a spirit of enterprise that seemed 
likely to create a great city in spite of every obstacle. They who 
first peopled Michigan City were pushing, active, intelligent and 
enterprising men. Some of them became the heaviest business men 
at that time in the State. Thev were chieflv from the eastern 
States ; and with them, to suggest a business enterprise was to see 
it accomplished. The arrival of vessels became more and more fre- 
quent, and it was an interesting sight that at such times always occur- 
red, to see men, women and children flocking to the wharf to witness 
the coming in of the lighter, which was the link of communication 
between all large vessels and the shore, some actuated by mere 
curiosity, and others to renew their faith in the great commercial 
importance of the place in the not distant future. 

Samuel Miller commenced merchandising in 1833, then Teall in 
1834, and in the same year James Forrester also. These men built 
ware houses as did also Wm. S. Clark, who first clerked for Teall. 
In 1836, James Forrester brought a cargo of salt into the place on 
the schooner " Post Boy," which was the earliest shipment of the 
kind. The first warehouse was built by Miller, and the second one 
by Hobart, and others speedily followed built by Moore, Burr, 
Sleight & Gould, Jabez R. Wells, and C. B. Blair. Blair's stood on 
the pier, which he also built. The ware houses stocd down near the 
present harbor, and the greater part of the business was in the 
vicinity of where the depot now stands. The steamers Ward, 
Champion, Geo. Dole and others made regular trips, and the com- 
mission and forwarding business became active and heavy. The 
town was the great grain depot for all northern Indiana, and wheat 
was brought in from even as far south as Marion county. At the 
end of 1836, besides the numerous warehouses and commission 
and forwarding houses, there were twelve dry roods stores. Jacob 



MICHIGAN TOWNSHIP. 87 

Haas and Daniel Brown were merchants in 1835, and Eliakim and 
Gallatin Ashton in 1836. The son of the latter is now one of the 
leading business men of the place. Among others engaged in the 
business of merchandising were John Barker, Henry Carter, J. G. 
Sleight, Mr. Wendover, and Shedd & Turner. George and Fisher 
Ames opened a hardware store in 1835. There are only two persons 
now living in Michigan City who have been there longer than Mr. 
Geo. Ames. These are Mrs. W. F. Miller, and T. W. Francis. 
Chas. W. Henry, the father of the late Wm. Henry, who lived near 
Kingsbury, was a merchant in 1835; also D. and N. W. Lower in 
the same year, and Sleight & Moon, and W. Barbee. R. Coudon 
commenced the Stove, Tin and Sheet Irion business, under the firm 
name of Burke & Coudon in 1837, and continued the business on 
his own account from 1838. 

The first school house in the city was erected in 1834, Thompson 
Francis was its architect and builder. It was used as a church also. 
At that time there were no regular church services ; but preachers 
frequently stopped over Sunday in the place, not desiring to travel 
on the Sabbath, when they were drafted into the service of an 
extemporized congregation. The first teacher was probably a Mr. 
McCoy, who taught in the building alluded to ; and from the begin- 
ning of that early time, the school system of the city has grown, 
until now the schools of the place are flourishing and eminently 
useful ; and a building has been erected which is one of the finest in 
the State, in towns which are no larger than Michigan City. 

The first building exclusively for church services was erected by 
the Protestant Episcopals. It was built in 1835 or 36, and stood on 
Pine Street, between fourth and Market streets. Afterwards a 
church was erected by the Methodists, on Pine between second and 
Michigan streets, which was removed to its present location on 
Franklin street many years ago. The present Episcopal church 
edifice was erected later ; then the Catholics built, and after them 
the Congregationalists, and last of all, the Presbyterians. These 
all now receive good congregations on the Sabbath. A Baptist 
church was built in 1837. 

On the eighth day of July, 1835, the first number of the Michi- 
gan City Gazette was issued. It was established by J. S. Castle. 



88 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

The material for the printing of the paper was shipped from Buf- 
falo around the lakes to Michigan City. Mr. Castle and family go- 
ing by boat to Detroit, and thence by team to Michigan City, where 
they arrived in June. 1835. They were accompanied by Polaski 
Kino-, of LaPorte. who was "Printer's Devil." after the office w 
opened. This was the first paper published in LaPorte county. It 
opened as a Democratic sheet, but afterwards, passing into the 
hands of Samuel Miller, with James Stewart as editor, it became 
the servant of the Whig party. A more complete history of this 
newspaper, with the others of the county, will be given in another 
chapter. 

In 1838-40, there was a literary institution in the city, which 
occupied a building three stories in height. It was called the 
Michigan City Institute, and its Principal was Rev. James T rwner. 
He was assisted by a Miss Ward, now Mrs. Wyllis Peck, and Miss 
Coit. who was a sister of Mrs. Towner. It was a useful institu- 
tion: but not sufficiently successful pecuniarily to ensure a long 
life for it. It was soon suspended, and the building, which stood on 
Franklin street, corner of Boston was removed from that locality 
become the Lake house, which was burned several years ago. 

In the year 1836, on the fourth dav of Jul v. a vessel, the Sea 
Serpent, was brought in over the bar. and this circumstance was 
made the occasion for a day of rejoicing. The vessel was pushed 
and towed, the citizens aiding, some considerable distance up the creek, 
and the enthusiasm found expression in a way that was more appli- 
cable to those "good old times' 9 than to the present evil dav-. A bar- 
rel of whisky was rolled out and set up on end. Then the head a. - 
knocked in. a nail was driven partly in the side, and a tin cup v. 
hung on it, when every man helped himself, and it may be presumed 
that no one failed to partake of his full share of the Liquid. It was 
a general spree, in which every man "lent a hand." 

It was in this year L836), that the work of improving the harbor 
began, Congress having at its precedii _ sess made an appropri- 
ation of $20,000 for this purpoa The wrork was begun without 
much delay, under the immediate supervision of Capt. "V\ ard B. 
Burnet, of the engineer bureau. The following year an appropria- 
tion was made of $30,000, and the further work on the harbor v. 



MICHIGAN TOWNSHIP. 89 

placed in charge of Capt. Stockton. These two appropriations 
were made while Jackson was yet President. The third came dur- 
ing the administration of Martin Van Buren. It was made to cover 
the two years 1838 and 1839, and the amount of it was $60,733.- 
39. Capt. Stockton continued in charge ot the harbor work, until 
1841, when he was succeeded in this duty by Maj. J. R. Bowes, of 
the Engineers. 

The next appropriation made by Congress was during the admin- 
istration of President Taylor, probably in 1849. It was for the 
sum of $25,000; and a fifth appropriation of a like amount was 
made in 1852. With the first three appropriations much valuable 
improvement was made. Materials were purchased, such as timber, 
stone and iron, piles were driven, dredge and scows built, neces- 
sary buildings erected, and all preparations made for pushing 
the work forward with the utmost expedition. Piers were built into 
the lake until a depth of eighteen feet of water was reached, and the 
channel was partially dredged out, so as to admit vessels of two 
hundred tons easily and safely inside the harbor between the piers. 
But more than one-half the nronev derived from the first three 
appropriations was expended for materials, shops, the dredge, horses, 
scows, etc., including more than $20,000 worth of hewn oak tim- 
ber. To obtain any benefit from all this, it was necessary that the 
appropriations should have been continued until the completion of 
the work. But several years were allowed to intervene between the 
third and fourth appropriaf.on^. During all this period everything 
about the harbor stood still. The shops were closed up ; the horses 
were sold for a small part of the original cost; the dredge, scows 
and tenders, tied up in the stream, were going rapidly to decay ; 
the splendid lot of oak timber, which cose more than $20,000 either 
rotted or was sold to individuals at less than one-fiith of its cost to 
the government ; the unfinished pier, left to the mercy of wind and 
wave, was soon seriously damaged. 

At last the fourth appropriation was made, and was all expended 
in patching up the waste and destruction of the previous years ; and 
then the work ceased. There was no more money, and that which 
had been thus expended might as well have been cast into the lake, 
so far as the harbor was affected by it. The remains of the material, 



90 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

the tools and implements were all sold for a mere trifle, and the 
buildings were carried away, or fell gradually to pieces. The 
dredge, its engine taken out, was moved into the stream, where it 
sunk. It was afterwards raised and sold for fifty dollars, its original 
cost being $28,000. The scows and tenders, more fortunate than 
the dredge, were driven by a flood into the lake, and lost. 

Several more years intervened, when a fifth appropriation of 
$25,000 was made, which seems to have been used in destroying 
what little was yet left of the former work. A new outfit of tools 
and some material were purchased, and the remainder was expended 
in making a futile experiment with a new kind of crib, which was 
sunk without the support of piles. It proved a total failure, and 
was dashed to pieces by the storms and ice of the succeeding winter. 
To build the new crib, the stone which had been placed in the old 
pier were removed and made use of; and they too, were all washed 
away and lost, leaving literally not one stone upon another to tell 
the story of the many thousands of dollars that had been sunk in 
the sand and water. 

From this date, during more than fourteen years, the harbor was 
abandoned by the government ; and it lay a useless wreck, stranded 
on a bar worse than that at the harbor's moutli — the foolish, waste- 
ful policy of stopping work at the very time when worK was neces- 
sary to preserve that which had already been done. The cribs so.«n 
washed partially away, the channel filled up with sand, and the 
fond dream of a good harbor at Michigan City, was only a dream, to 
all outward appearance; the chances of anything ever being accom- 
plished, seeming far less than when in 1836, the Sea Serpent entered 
Trail creek amidst the enthusiastic plaudits of the people. The 
facts concerning these futile efforts to make a harbor, are obtained 
from the notes of Mr. Wm. H. Goodhue, who pertinently says, 
"Hope, for a season," bade Michigan City farwell. 

But the despondency was not to last. The energetic spirit of 
enterprise which characterized the men who had built up Michigan 
City, still animated them ; and they determined that with the opening 
and opportunity for a harbor at their doors, they would not sit 
quietly down, fold their arms, and close their eyes, and let the 
sands cover them. Thev resolved to build a harbor themselves. 



MICHIGAN TOWNSHIP. 91 

In 1865, they obtained from Congress a relinquishment of the 
remains of the old works, and the right to build where they had 
been. Then they organized the "Michigan City Harbor company," 
and in 1866 and 1867, having procured heavy voluntary subscrip- 
tions from the citizens, they proceeded with the work, expending in 
a most judicious and economical manner, more than one hundred 
thousand dollars. Two piers were built into the lake one thousand, 
and one thousand two hundred feet respectively, which were strong 
and well secured, supported by piles driven through the sand, and 
into the tough blue clay, which forms the bottom of the channel. 
The entrance was two hundred feet wide, and the water was at that 
point from fifteen to twenty feet deep. Thus they proved what had 
been doubted, that a permanent harbor could be made, and then 
having expended all their available means, and finding it impracti- 
cable to obtain further subscriptions, they applied to Congress to 
finish the work which they had so well begun, and that body in 
1867, granted them §75,000. With this assistance, the work was 
pushed forward with energy and success, under the supervision of a 
government officer, Capt. E. Bennett; and the next year, 1868,. 
the Secretary of war, out of the general appropriation for rivers 
and harbors, allotted §25,000 to Michigan City. In the spring of 
1839, Congress again made a general appropriation for rivers and 
harbors to be distributed by the Secretary of war, and out of it this 
harbor received §32.500. This amount, with the unexpended bal- 
ances of the former appropriations, enabled Capt. Bennett, who so 
managed the funds entrusted to his charge that not a dollar was 
misapplied or wasted, to extend, enlarge and ueepen the channel 
until vessels of ordinary draft could enter it with ease and safety; 
and a large trade arose in lumber, iron ore, lath, lime, plaster, salt, 
and other heavy commodities. It was evident that with further 
enlarged facilities, a large commercial trade would center at this 
point. 

But while the harbor was of vast importance to Michigan City as 
a commercial point, it was clear that a good harbor here would be 
of equal importance to the general commerce of the lakes. The 
chief of the bureau of engineers Gen. A. A. Humphrey became 
convinced of the necessity of its use as a harbor of refuge for lake 



92 HISTORY Or LA PORTE COUNTY. 

shipping, and he recommended to Congress increased appropria- 
tions for this purpos The work was not neglected, but each year 
in succession an appropriation has been obtained, ranging from 
515,000 to $50,000, the latter sum being allowed first with a 
view to beginning work on an outside harbor, or harbor of refuge ; 
and this has been the regular annual appropriation ever since. 
The commerce invited by this harbor, has been steadily growing, 
and is larger the present year than at any other time since the first 
vessel entered it. 

Under the direction of Capt. Manning, an officer of the enginee a, 
the government work on the outside harbor is being vigorously 
pushed forward the present season, and the inside harbor is being 
enlarged by dredging out further up the creek, in order to meet the 
wants of a rapidly growing trade. The latter work is done by the 
corporation of Michigan City; and the early dream of a good har- 
bor and a large commmercial port bids fair at last to be realized. 

The first physician who settled in Michigan City, was Lee H. T. 
Maxon, who came in 1835. Other physicians who came early to 
the place were Doctors DeWitt, Strong, Chas. Palmer, and S. Pul- 
ford. Among the first lawyers were J. Pi. Wells: A. W. Eno- : 
Hathaway and Chapman : and Thomas Tyrrell, who disappeared. 
and was never heard of afterward-. Later came Thornton <.v. Orr. 

Besides the hotels already named, there was the Franklin, and 
Genesee House. The labor on the latter was paid for in < ienesee, 
Michigan, or " wild cat" money, and a little later the Jewell Hon 
was erected by Mr. H. Jewell, who still resides in the city. The 
Franklin, which stood on Schoeneman & Ashton's corner was kept 
by Mr. Jewell during the Harrison campaign. The Lake House 
was kept awhile by Ainsworth & Jewell. The " Ignited States ' 
also was kept by Mr. Jewell for a time. About the same time. 
Sweetland & Pulford were the landlords of the Exchange. 

From 1836 to 1841. the forwarding and commission business was 
carried on bv Sleight & Gould, whose location was down near the 
harbor: Samuel Moore, who was succeeded by J. & C. Hitchcock, at 
the bend of the harbor, occupying what was known as the Moore 
warehouse; E. Folsom & Co.: Wm. S. Clark: C. B. & L. Blair: 
Goodhue & McAdoo. The principal merchants were, for the same 



MICHIGAN TOWNSHIP. 93 

period, Viele & Brother, on Ames' corner; A. Chittenden, who 
was succeeded by C. B. & L. Blair; Shedd & Turner; Carter & 
Barker; McKnight & Co.; James McAdoo ; Fisher Ames & Co.; 
Harvey Treusdell ; Cole, Peck & Co., in sheet iron and stoves; and 
Ames & Holliday, druggists. 

y^rom 1837 to 1844, Michigan City was the principal grain mar- 
ket for Northern Indiana, wheat being received from as far south as 
the central portion of the State. Huge caravans of ox teams, with 
two and three yoke of oxen to a wagon, would come in, sometimes 
thirty or forty such teams together. The supplies for all this large 
extent of country were purchased here. The same teams which 
conveyed the wheat to market, would return laden with goods for 
the home merchants. It was not uncommon for three hundred 
teams to arrive in one day. The trade of the place was necessarily 
large and prosperous: but the advent of railroads at points further 
south cut off much of the business of Michigan City, by furnishing 
a grain market elsewhere ; and this, together with the suspension of 
work on the harbor, as before related, opened a somewhat gloomy 
prospect, which was considerably relieved by the arrival of the 
Michigan Central, and Louisville, New Albany and Chicago rail- 
roads ; and quite dissipated by the re-opening of the harbor from 
1867 to 1872. / 

There are at Michigan City five railroads, four of which have one 
terminus each at this point. These are the Michigan Central, 
which reached here in 1850, and the next year erected valuable 
machine shops; the Louisville, New Albany and Chicago which 
entered the city in 1853, and put up a fine freight depot and other 
buildings ; the Joliet cut-off, which is owned and run by the Michi- 
gan Central, but has a separate track ; the Michigan Lake Shore, 
which runs by the side of the Michigan Central to New Buffalo, 
where it diverges to the north; and the Indianapolis, Peru and 
Chicago road which was completed through from LaPorte in 1871. 
These railroads make the city quite a railroad centre, and afford 
facilities for the shipment of lumber and other commodities arriving 
by vessel. 

The Northern State prison was located at Michigan City in the 
year 1857, and with an appropriation of $50,000 made by the Leg- 



9-1 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

islature of that year, work was commenced at once. The contract 
for constructing the cell house, and some of the other buildings, and 
the outside wall, was let to D. J. Silver; and a part of the labor of 
construction was performed by convicts from the Southern peniten- 
tiary. The land occupied by the prison was purchased of Chauncy 
B. Blair, who sold the State ninety acres, eight and one-half acres 
of which are enclosed by the outside wall. This wall is twenty-five 
feet in height, three and one-half feet in thickness at the bottom, 
and two feet at the top. It is built of brick and covered by a stone 
coping four feet in width. At each corner there is a tower, construct- 
ed of stone. These towers are handsome structures, and give an 
air of tasteful elegance to the huge wall. Within the enclosure 
are the cell house, the deputy warden's house, a building con- 
taining the dining room, wash room, kitchen, chapel, hospital, and 
State repair room ; five shops, two of which are one hundred feet 
each in length, one a hundred and fifty feet, another, one hundred 
and sixty feet, and the other, two hundred feet in length ; and two 
engine houses and a blacksmith shop. On the outside of the wall 
is the warden's residence house, and two houses for the dwellings of 
guards. The Artesian well supplies an abundance of water for all 
fire exigencies ; but it is so impregnated with mineral substances as 
to be unfit for drinking or culinary purposes. 

The first warden was Col. Seelye, then Mr. Iddings of Fort 
Wave, next Thomas Wood, who was succeeded by Hon. W. W. 
Higgins, of Michigan City, and he in turn by the present warden, 
Mr. Charles Mayne. It was under the administration of Mr. Hig- 
gins that the prison first became self-supporting. 

Hayward & DeWolfe were the first who entered into a contract 
for prison labor. They were engaged in the business of cooperage. 
Soon after Elisha Murray took a contract for prison labor, for the 
manufacture of wagons and carriages. He was succeeded by Finch 
& Barker. In the year 1867, Hon. J. H. Winterbotham bought 
into a contract with Jones and Chapin, and in 1869 bought them 
out. The firm is now that of J. H. Winterbotham & Sons. They 
work one hundred and fifty convicts, and are engaged in cooperage, 
and the manufature of carriage and buggy bodies, and sleighs. 
Their sales are very heavy, amounting to §150,000 annually. 



MICHIGAN TOWNSHIP. 95 

Pord & Johnson also have a contract for, and work one hundred 
and fifty convicts. They are engaged in the manufacture of chairs, 
and their sales amount to about $125,000 annually. Some of their 
products have been shipped to Japan. They commenced business 
in 1870. There is also a cigar manufacturer who now has a con- 
tract, and employs some convict labor. 

The prison was completed in 1868, but the number of convicts 
has become larger than was intended or expected, and an additional 
cell room is now very much needed. There are three hundred and 
eighty single cells, and there are at present in the prison four hun- 
dred and eighty-seven convicts. The State has already taken steps 
to secure the additional cell room, an appropriation of §40,000 for 
this purpose having been obtained last winter, through the exertions 
chiefly of State senator J. H. Winterbotham. 

This prison has fully paid all its own expenses since the begin- 
ning of the administration of Warden Higgins ; and has been ex- 
ceedingly well managed both in its business conduct as affecting the 
public, and in its interior conduct as affecting the prisoners. In 
the matter of the successful and economical management of its 
business affairs, it has had no superior in the United States, and 
perhaps the same may be said also, of its course of prison discipline, 
which has certainly been most admirable. 

The car factory was originated and begun by Sherman, Haskell 
& Co., who ^manufactured freight and passenger cars. It has done 
a large business most of the time since its erection. The firm after- 
wards changed to Haskell, Barker & Aldrich, and then to Haskell 
& Barker. It is now incorporated under the name of the Haskell 
& Barker Car company. The factory made cars for the govern- 
ment during the war, sometimes emplying four hundred men. 

The fisheries of Michigan City have been quite extensive, and 
there is still a large annual catch made. Lyman Blair sometimes 
packed as high as $40,000 worth of White fish in a year. The 
years of the greatest catch of White fish and Trout were 1856 and 
1857. There are now five or six boats engaged in the fishing 
trade. 

The packing of beef and pork was prosecuted by E. Folsom & 
Co., from 1841 to 1845, also by C. B. & L. Blair, and James Mc- 



96 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Adoo. Since the opening of the harbor, the lumbering business has 
become the leading industry of the place. Several heavy firms are 
engaged in it, and their trade is larger this year than in any pre- 
vious year. A great deal of iron ore is also received, for the Law- 
ton Iron company, located near New Buffalo. The company pur- 
chases from Couden & Roberts. 

There are only two buildings now standing on the spot where 
they stood in 1835. The old building which was used both as a 
school house and church stands now on Franklin street. Wood- 
ward was the first postmaster. The first light house keeper was old 
Mr. Harrison, but the present keeper, Miss Colfax, has had charge 
of it longer, and has discharged her duties more satisfactorily to the 
government, than any of her predecessors. 

The Elston survey of Michigan City was located on the fractional 
section twenty-nine. Large sales were made by the original propri- 
etor previous to 1836 ; and in that year he sold his entire remaining 
inderest to the Michigan City Land companay. This company was 
represented by Wm. H. Goodhue, and Wra. Teall, as trustees, until 
1841, when it was dissolved. The plat of Michigan City was filed 
for record in October, 1833 ; and in 1836 it adopted a city organ- 
ization, and elected Willys Peck the first mayor. He ran as an 
anti-slavery whig, against Wm. Teall, Democrat, and was elected, 
the "Whigs being then as they were for many years afterwards, in a 
decided majority. Since the location of the Elston survey, additions 
have been filed to Michigan City as follows : 

An additional plat was filed by Major Elston soon after his first 
survey was recorded. 

Burr's addition was recorded April 25, 1836. 

Orr's addition was recorded April 30, 1836. 

Waddell's addition stands of record on the books of the county 
recorder, but the date is not given. 

A\ est addition was made by a company and stands recorded in 

the year 1836, on the 2i*th day of some month, which is omitted. 

East addition was made by a company probably in 1836, but the 
date of recording is not given. 

Miller's addition is recorded. No date given, but from dates 
which precede and follow the record of it, it must have been made 
in 1< S 37. 



MICHIGAN TOWNSHIP. 97 

Duncan's addition was made at an early period. 

Orr & Cobb made an addition which was recorded January 16, 
1838. 

The Michigan City Land company's addition of water lots was 
filed for record October 1, 1841. 

Blair's additton was recorded February 28, 1856. 

Bigelow and Winship's addition was recorded October 4, 1858. 

South addition was made by a company and recorded May 26, 
1866. 

Southwest addition was made by a company and recorded May 
21, 1873. 

DeWolf's South addition was made and recorded June 16, 1873^ 

Orr and DeWolf's addition was recorded September 3, 1873. 

The last addition made to Michigan City is that of Wm B. Mc- 
Cartney, and consists of over five hundred lots. 

The population of Michigan City was less for a few years after 
1836, than it was during that year, the stringency of 1837 and the 
few following years, having affected unfavorably the business pros- 
pects here as well as elsewhere over the country. After the year 
1840 population began to increase again, and there have been grad- 
ual accessions ever since. There is a larger population at present 
than ever before, the inhabitants now numbering between five and 
six thousand. 

Michigan City has been subject to many vicissitudes, her pros- 
pects at times seeming to be very bright, at other times gloomy in the 
extreme; but the leading business men of the place have never 
abated one jot of heart or hope. When a bright future seemed to 
offer, they have energetically set themselves to meet and improve 
its opportunities ; when the prospect was forbidding, they resolutely 
met the emergency, by themselves opening new avenues to prosper- 
ity. And they are beginning to have their reward. 



98 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



CHAPTER VI. 

CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 

At the organization of the county, the present Centre township 
was wholly included in the limits of what was then Scipio, which 
extended from the southern to the northern boundary of the county, 
and was the central township of the three into which the county was 
divided. But a division of it was made at an early period. The 
Board of county commissioners, at their regular meeting on the fifth 
day of November, 1833, passed the following order: 

" Ordered that the township at present known by the name of 
Scipio be divided by the line dividing townships thirty-six and 
thirty-seven, and that all north of said township line compose a new 
township to be called Centre township and that Aaron Stanton be 
appointed inspector of elections, and John Stanton and Win. Bond 
be appointed overseers of the poor in said township of Centre." 

Changes have occurred in the limits of Centre township as thus 
designated, until at the present time it occupies sections one and 
two of township thirty-six, range three, and all of township thirty- 
seven except the northern tier of sections, which are now a part of 
Springfield township. 

The first settlement made in this township was by Aaron Stanton 
on the twenty-eighth day of March 1830. He settled on section 
twenty-four, about two miles north of the eastern boundary of the 
city of La Porte. Philip Fail came at the Bame time, and settled 
on the same section but removed in the Fall to Kankakee town- 
ship. Wm. and Stephen Clement arrived in the township in the 
fall of 1831, and soon afterwards opened a store within the limits 
of the present city of La Porte. Benajah Stanton hauled goods for 
them from Niles, Michigan. Wm. Clark came in 1830, and made a 
settlement on section twenty-three, but did not bring his family 
until the fall of 1831. Adam Smith arrived in the fall of 1830. 
The Blakes, Landon, Wheeler, the Balls, John B. and Charles 
Fravel, Wilson Malone, Wm. Stanton and family, and Alfred 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 99 

Stanton, all arrived very early. At the land sales at Logansport, 
James and A. P. Andrew Jr., bought land in section two, township 
thirty-six. They also bought land of Jesse Morgan, Wm. Thomas and 
Richardson, who had arrived earlier. In the year 1831, William and 
Jesse Bond settled on the east side of the township. John Garwood 
reached the county in 1831, and Brainard Goff in 1832. 

Settlers now began to arrive in great numbers. There was no 
part of the county more attractive than much of that which is now 
Centre township. The north part of it was well timbered; and on 
the south and west were broad reaches of rich prairie land, dotted 
with beautiful Burr oak groves. In prairie and woodland, were 
many sparkling lakes, the loveliest of which lay near the site chosen 
for the town of LaPorte. 

In 1831 Col. W. A. Place made a preliminary visit to LaPorte 
•county, and being well pleased with the country, he determined to 
make it his home. He brought his family and settled in Centre 
township in October, 1832. He was here early enough to help 
build the first log cabin put up in LaPorte. It was built for George 
Thomas, and stood near where the depot of the Lake Shore railroad 
is now located. 

The population of Centre township exclusive of the city of La- 
Porte, is about 1200, consisting of intelligent and industrious citi- 
zens, engaged almost wholly in agricultural pursuits. In the imme- 
diate vicinity of LaPorte, there are several small fruit farms, and 
market gardens, which supply the city with fruit and vegetables dur- 
ing the season, and from which many products are shipped to 
Chicago. For the township generally, wheat, corn, oats and pota- 
toes are the staple products. Much attention has been given to 
providing means for the education of the children of the township, 
and in every school district there is a good school house. 

About two miles north of the city of LaPorte, in Centre township, 
on the heights bordering the east side of Pine lake, is Pine Lake 
cemetery. It contains forty-seven acres, and is perhaps the most 
lovely spot in the county. For the beauty which nature has given 
it, there can scarcely be found in the whole country a more charm- 
ing place. It is controlled by an association, which was organized 
sunder a State statute in the year 1855. Gilbert Hathaway was the 



100 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

first President of the association and Don J. Woodward. Secretary 
and Treasurer. Gen. Joseph Orr was President of the association 
several years, resigning the position only a few months'ago ; and the 
valuable and tasteful improvements of the grounds are**due in a 
great measure to his energy and public spirit, and the correct taste 
which he brought to the work of beautifying this resting 
place of the dead. Visitors to the place are always delightedVith 
its diversified scenery, looking out upon the lake in front, 
and resting on a dark green back-ground of woods, while all between 
presents gentle elevations, quiet vales, and winding walks and car- 
riage drives. Nature furnished here a happy ground work of beauty ; 
and the hand of art, judiciously and tastefully employed, has per- 
fected the work, rendering this sacred city of the dead, a place of 
loveliness and solemn delight, as well as of sad and holv memories. 
In Centre township there is no town except the city of 

LA PORTE. 

LaPorte, the county seat of LaPorte county,*is situated on the 
Lake Shore and Michigan Southern, and Indianapolis. Peru and 
Chicago railroads.. It is fifty nine miles east of Chicago, and 
twelve miles from the lake port at Michigan City, whith which it is 
connected by rail. For beauty of situation LaPorte is unsurpassed. 
East, south and west lie spread out, the rich prairie lands, inter- 
spersed with groves; and on the north, coming up to the edge of 
the city is a chain of small lakes, gem-like in their beauty, the most 
noted of them being Clear lake, Stone lake and Pine lake. It is 
not strange that those who first came, should have beheld in this 
spot the place for a town which should be the county seat of the 
county. It may readily be imagined that when nature only, had 
visited the lakes and groves and prairies of this locality, the 
dullest and most unsusceptible of minds must have been touched 
with its beauty. 

LaPorte is situated on what was known as the "Michigan Road 
Lands." They were sold at the land sales at Logansport in the 
month of October, 1831 ; and Walter Wilson, Hiram Todd, John 
Walker. James Andrew and Abram P. Andrew Jr., bought four hun- 
dred acres of them with a view to laving out a town which should 
be the capital town of the county. The town was laid out and the 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 101 

original survey made in 1833. There were already a number of 
settlers in the place. Joseph Pagin had arrived in 1831 and built 
a house on the east side of Clear lake, near where the ice house 
now stands which replaced the burned brewery. Still earlier, in 
the year 1830, Richard Harris and George Thomas came, and built 
cabins within the present city limits. The cabin of Thomas stood 
near the present location of the Michigan Southern depot, and it isi 
said that his neighbors erected it for him on a Sunday. Wilson 
Malone who now lives in Porter county says he was the first person 1 
to sleep in this house, before it was occupied by the family of Mr. 
Thomas. In the winter of 1832-3, there were but three families in 
LaPorte, which were those of George Thomas, Richard Harris and 
Wilson Malone. Oak groves occupied the present site of the city, 
and when the Spring opened, and the wild flowers covered the future 
streets, and the trees were covered with foliage, and the green 
sward carpeted the earth, approaching to the very edge of the bright 
and unvexed waters of Clear lake, it formed a picture to charm the 
eye and captivate the heart of the lover of Nature, whether savage 
or civilized. 

The intrusion of Geo. Thomas into the sylvan beauty of the spot I 
was the signal for the advent of still more, and many a noble 
Burr oak fell, and manv a flower was crushed under the feet of 
the sturdy pioneers who came to make homes and build a city. 
Thomas' house was constructed of slabs procured from a steam saw 
mill which Capt. Andrew had erected a short distance west of the 
town. It was in this house that the first session of the board of' 
county commissioners was held. The first cabin soon had compan- 
ions; and in 1834 there were fifteen houses on the ground which 
was to be occupied by the future town. Business was opening.,' 
Mechanics, merchants and professional men began to arrive. 
Charles Fravel came in 1832. The Blakes, and a man by the name 
of Lily kept the first hotels. John and Wm. Alison, Hiram 
Wheeler, John B. Fravel, Dr. Ball and Nelson Landon, were mer^ 
chants in 1832 and 1833. Seth Way and Charles Ladd were 
dwellers in tents in those days like Abraham of old, and they fol- 
lowed the business of breaking up the sod of the prairie for the 
farmers who had fixed their homes at various points between La- 



102 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Porte and Westville, and elsewhere in the county. In March, 
1833, Thompson W. Francis, now of Michigan City, came to La- 
Porte to work as a builder and carpenter. He built the hotel which 
was kept long afterwards by Capt. Levi Ely. 

At the September term of the commissioners' court, 1833, a 
license was granted to J. F. & W. Allison to keep a tavern in 
LaPorte, and also to vend merchandise. Licenses were granted also 
to Wm. Clement and to Seneca Ball to vend merchandise. At the 
March term, 1834, a license was granted to H. & T. Wheeler to 
vend merchandise, and a license to Wm. Clement "to vend foreign 
and domestic liquors and groceries." 

At the September term of the same year, Amzi Clark was 
licensed to vend merchandise, also Absalom Walters; and Noah 
Newhall "to keep a tavern;" and at the November term following, 
A. & A. W. Harrison were licensed to vend merchandise. At the 
March, term, 1835, Wm. Clement was licensed to keep a tavern, 
and R. B. Hews and Hiram Wheeler to vend merchandise. 

In 1835, licenses were further granted to McCarty & Howell, 
John Brown and Thomas H. Phillips; and to Daniel D. Rathbun, 
Oliver ShirlefF, Grover & Williams, John A. Fletcher and Mordecai 
Cross, to keep tavern. A license was also granted at the November 
term in this year, to Sherwood k, Hixon, "to vend wooden 
clocks." 

In 1836, James Gibson, Arthur McClure, Samuel Darlington 
and Conrad^EverLart were licensed to keep tavern ; and McCarty 
& Howell andfEli Hays to vend merchandise. 

A hotel which was kept by Mr. Blake stood on Brown's corner, 
the one now occupied by ]Eliel's drug store. Afterwards General 
Brown himself kept a hotel there. The old wooden buildings which 
were the predecessors of the present brick structure, and which were 
burned a few years ago, were built by Gen. Brown. 

In laying out the town the original proprietors, Wilson, Todd, 
Walker and the Andrews, donated every alternate lot to the county 
for the purpose of enabling it to erect a court house and other pub- 
lic buildings. The lots were sold on easy terms, and during the 
years 1835 and 1836, the population largely increased. The 
Michigan City Gazette of July 22, 1835, in speaking of LaPorte 






CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 103 

denominates it as "this flourishing village." A land office was 
opened here in 1834 or 1835, with Major Robb, Register, and John 
M. Lemon, Receiver. James Whittem was a clerk in the land 
office. 

Among lawyers first admitted to practice in LaPorte were Win. 
0. Ross June 10, 1833 ; John B. Niles, December 16, 1833; John 
S. Lacy, December 16, 1833; Win. Hawkins, December 16, 1833; 
Robert Merrifield, October 13, 1834; B. B. Taylor, October 17, 
1834; Wm. C. Hannah, October 18, 1834. In 1835, there were 
Charles McCleese, and John H. Bradley; in 1836, Myron H. 
Orton, Jabez R. Wells, G. A. Everts, Thomas Tyrrell, N. W. Sax- 
ton, and A. W. Enos; and in 1837, Andrew L. Osborn, Gilbert 
Hathaway, J. W. Chapman, and E. A. Hannegan. Some of these 
lived in Michigan City. 

In the month of July, 1838, the first newspaper that was estab- 
lished in LaPorte was sent out to the people of LaPorte and other 
counties. It was published by J. M. Stuart, and S. C. Clisbe, and 
was called the •' LaPorte County Whig, and Porter, Ln^e, and 
Marshall Counties Advertiser." Stuart & Clisbe conducted it only 
about a year, when it passed into the hands of Capt. A. P. Andrew, 
Jr. It was a staunch Whig paper, hoisting in 1840 the names of 
Harrison and Tyler, for the election o[ whom, and the candidates of 
the Whig ticket throughout, the editor of the Whig labored with 
zeal and energy and much efficiency. Stuart went to Michigan 
City, where he obtained control of the G-azette, the politics of which 
he changed from an earnest advocacy of the Democratic party to 
become the champion of the Whigs. 

Prior to 1840, a Democratic paper was established by Joseph 
Lomax, which was called the LaPorte Herald. The campaign of 
1840 was warmly contested, and not less so here than elsewhere. 
The town and county of LaPorte participated fully in the political 
spirit and feeling that characterized the campaign. The Herald 
gave an enthusiastic support to Van Buren ; the Whig, with equal 
earnestness, supported Harrison. Its columns were ornamented 
with a log cabin, the cut of which was made by a gunsmith of 
LaPorte. 

In the year 1833, the first school house was built. It was a 



104 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

humble beginning, but educational privileges have gone on increas- 
and improving until now the system of graded free schools is the 
pride of every citizen. The graded schools were established in 
1856, in which year a school building was erected in each ward, each 
of them having a primary and secondary department. Four of these 
buildings were of brick two stories in height. After the first term 
under the graded system a grammar department was opened which 
was taught in an old frame building belonging to W. D. Farnsworth, 
which stood not far from the present location of the High School 
building. The teachers in the various schools were R. M. Johnson, 
A. T. Bliss, Jasper Packard, Mrs. J. Packard, Miss. 0. M. Tibbits, 
Miss Emma Chandler, Miss M. A. Kent, and Mrs. Steele. The 
schools grew in strength and influence, and usefulness, under the 
wise management which they have fortunately always received, and 
a High School department was soon organized which was first 
taught by Jasper Packard. The first board of trustees were Gilbert 
Hathaway, Amzi Clark and B. P. Walker, who were succeeded by 
John B. Niles, James Moore and Ferdinand Roberts, and these by 
Win. C. Hannah, L. Crane and Rev. Geo. C. Noyes. under whose 
administration the present High School building was erected. 

In 1863, this commodious school building was constructed, and with 
its completion, and the continued successful management and conduct 
of the schools, the educational advantages of LaPorte are of the 
highest kind. So excellent have been the public schools that from 
the time of the inauguration of the graded system, it has been im- 
possible for private or select schools to be maintained -tor any 
great length of time, though several have been in operation at 
different times that were well worthy of support. Such were those 
especially ot Mrs. Holmes who now conducts a fine school for young 
ladies in Springfield, Illinois; of T. L. Adams, just prior to his 
acceptance of the position of Superintendent of the public schools ; 
and the Technic and Training school of W. P. Plielon, all of which 
had to Yield before the steady upward march of the admirably con- 
ducted free school-. These have never been more successful than 
during the present year under the superintendence* of Mr. B. L. 
Swift, with J. R. Goife, and Misses Lyon and Crittenden as teachers in 
the High School, and an efficient corps of teachers in all the other 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 105 

departments. The present board of trustees are Messrs. Donly 
Foster and Early. 

In the winter of 1840-41, a charter was obtained from the State 
Legislature, through the exertions of John H. Bradley who was 
then a member from LaPorte, for a school of high rank to be called 
the LaPorte University. The charter was drawn by Wm. Andrew, 
and provided for an institution that should have a literary, a medical 
and a law department. The next year the law department was 
organized under the charge of Judge Andrew, who received quite a 
large class of students. The medical department was organized in 
1842. The building in which classes were f ~st opened stood where 
Davidson's marble-front store is now locate.!. A good building was 
afterwards erected on the square immediately south of the present 
High School building, and here the school progressed with a fair 
degree of success. The medical faculty consisted of the following 
gentlemen : 

Geo. W. Richards, M. D., Professor of Theory and Practice of 
Medicine. John B. Niles, A. M., Professor of Chemistry. 

Daniel Meeker, M. D., Professor of Anatomy and Physiology. 

A. B. Shipman, M. D., Professor of Surgery. 

Nicholas Hard, M. D., Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of 
Women and Children. 

E. Deming, M. D., Professor of Materia Medica. 

Levi F. Torrey, M. D., Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

In 1848-9, J. Adams Allen, M. D., became Professor of Materia 
Medica; George W. Lep, M. D., Demonstrator of Anatomy; and 
Tompkins Higday, M. D., Professor of Physiology and General 
Pathology. 

Dr. G. A. Rose was the President of the board of trustees, dur- 
ing a large portion of the time of the existence of the school, and 
among the trustees were Wm. C. Hannah, Secretary, John B. 
Niles, Treasurer, Rev. Wm. Andrew, Daniel Meeker, Rev. F. P. 
Cummins and Ezekiel Morrison. Tompkins Higday was Registrar 
in 1848-9. The name of the institution was changed to the "Indi- 
ana Medical College," and there were in 1846-7, one hundred and 
four students, in 1848-9, one hundred and one. 

The names of manv of the students are familiar in Northern 



106 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Indiana, and some of them have become distinguished throughout 
the State, and in other States. 

In the year 1843, the literary department of the university was 
organized. There was then at LaPorte, a school called the Lan- 
casterian Academy of which Rev. F. P. Cummins was principal, in 
which, besides a thorough English course including Philosophy, the 
Natural Sciences, and the higher Mathematics, there were taught 
Latin, Greek, German and French. This institution had but a 
brief existence. It is worthy of note that the circulars issued for the 
purpose of advertising this academy, stated that board could be 
obtained in LaPorte for from one dollar to one dollar and fifty cents 
per week. When it was determined lo organize the literary depart- 
ment of the LaPorte University, application was made to Prof. Cum- 
mins, to merge his school in it, as such a move would be likely to 
make it successful from the start. To this proposition he assented 
and in connection with Rev. Mr. Marshall, pastor at the time, of 
the Presbyterian church, he opened this department of the Univer- 
sity. But it seems not to have met with the success which its 
friends anticipated and hoped; it languished, and died. 

The medical school continued to flourish for some years; but 
there grew up other schools which withdrew support from it. The 
medical department of the Michigan University was opened, the 
Rush Medical college at Chicago, a similar institution at Indianapo- 
lis, and one at LaFayette ; and finally the managers of the LaPorte 
school determined to suspend the lectures. This occurred in 1851; 
and the suspension proved to be a final ?losing up of the school. 
The building was afterwards occupied as a literary academy, which 
was conducted by Prof. Churchman, a blind man, and an excellent 
teacher. It was a school for girls only, and it was a flourishing 
institution until it was burned in the winter of 1855. The institu- 
tion was never re-opened, and the graded free school system having 
been adopted in 1856, and proving so eminently successful, there 
has been less need for private schools of any kind. For several 
years, the only private schools of importance, besides those hereto- 
fore mentioned, have been the schools of the German Lutheran 
church, and the Catholic Sisters. 

There has never been a time in the history of LaPorte, when 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 107 

education failed to receive a large share of the attention of the leading 
citizens. Private schools have been at times well supported, and 
since the present system of graded schools came into existence, the 
whole people have cheerfully met the taxes necessary for the re- 
quired buildings, which are expensive and valuable, for the salaries of 
first-class teachers, and all the other incidental outlay. 

The earliest physicians to settle in LaPorte were Doctors Dinwid- 
die, Timothy Everts, Daniel Meeker, and G. A. Rose, who arrived 
in, or prior to, 1835. They were followed by Abram Teegarden, 
who came in 1837, J. P. Andrew, Geo. L. Andrew, T. Higday, L. 
Brusie, Thos. D. Lemon L. C. Rose and others. 

The first ministers of the Gospel who came to .LaPorte, will be 
mentioned in connection with the history of the various church denom- 
inations in another chapter. 

LaPorte has always been ably represented in the professions. 
The pastors of the churches have generally been men of culture, 
and intellectual power ; and many of her practitioners of law and 
medicine have occupied high rank in their profession, and enjoy a 
reputation co-extensive with, and even beyond the State. 

In the year 1835, A. W. Harrison was postmaster. This was 
during the presidency of Andrew Jackson, but soon after the inaug- 
uration of the new administration of Martin Van Buren in March, 
1837, a change was made in the postoffice here, Dr. Thos. D. 
Lemon, being appointed. He held the office continuously until the 
beginning of the administration of Abraham Lincoln, in 1861, when 
Geo. B. Roberts was appointed on the recommendation of Schuyler 
Colfax, then the Representative in Congress from the ninth congres- 
sional district of Indiana. He held the office until after the assas- 
sination of Mr. Lincoln made Andrew Johnson, President. 

One of the most popular and useful institutions of LaPorte is the 
Library and Natural History association, which has been in exist- 
ence since 1863. It has continued to strengthen in public favor, 
until the present time, and its history will not be without interest 
now, and in the future. In 1868 the author of this work was 
requested by the association to prepare a sketch which should em- 
body the history of the institution. This he afterwards read to the 
board, and it was placed on file as one of its permanent records. The 



108 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

substance of that report is herewith presented; and is as follows: 
u On the fifth day of May, 1868, Wm. Niles, Esq., offered a reso- 
lution before the board of directors of the LaPorte Library and 
Natural History association, which was unanimously adopted, re- 
questing me to prepare a historical sketch on the origin, history, 
present condition, prospects and purposes of that association. 

Various controlling events have prevented an earlier compliance 
with the request of the board, but now at this late day, I have the 
honor respectfully to submit the following facts and thoughts on the 
important subjects named in this resolution. 

At the beginning of the year 1863, LaPorte was a city of nearly 
eight thousand inhabitants. As a people we claimed to be civilized, 
enlightened, refined and educated: and vet there was not among us 
a reading room of any sort, and no library except the McClure, to 
which but few had access: so few that it was practically without 
any influence on the community. A reading room, exhibiting on 
its tables the earnest thoughts and activities of the present in the 
current periodicals of the day, and a library containing the ripened 
wisdom of the past and the present are means of education, espe- 
cially to the young, whose utility cannot be estimated. 

Here was a great and pressing want unfilled, and there were a 
few, who, seeing and feeling the need of an institution that should, 
in some degree, meet the wants of the people, determined to organ- 
ize a Library association, that would, at slight expense, furnish 

books and periodicals to ali who might choose to avail themselves of 
its privileges. 

It was believed that such an association would be influential in 

developing a literary taste, by cultivating a habit of reading, and 
that it would become a powerful educator of the people, positively, 
by stimulating the growth of the mind and promoting learning and 
scholarship, and negatively, by furnishing a pleasant and useful 
place of resort, to largely counteract the evils of vicious pleasures 
and associations: and on the 16th day of March, 1863, an organi- 
zation was effected by the adoption of a constitution, and the elec- 
tion of the following full complement of officers : 

President, Wm. C. Hannah; Vice President. James Moore; Re- 
cording Secretary, Wm. Xiles; Corresponding Secretary. Rev. Geo. 
C. Xoyes; Treasurer, Fred West. 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 109 

Directors— Wm. H. H. Whitehead, Dr. N. S. Darling, Ezekiel 
Morrison, Dr.,L. C. Rose, Simon Wile, James Lewis, 0. Wilson 
and Charles Paine. 

The association thus organized was incorporated under the name of 
the "LaPorte Reading Room and Library Association." 

Negotiations were entered into with the McClure Working Men's 
Institute, which finally resulted in the transfer by that association to 
this, of all the books and other property of the former. The terms 
of the contract were such as to convey to the new association all the 
property of the old, to be held and used by it forever, or during its 
existence, with reversion to the McClure association in case of the 
dissolution of the new organization, upon the payment of the debts 
of the Institute amounting to fifty-five dollars, and the grant to each 
of its members of a membership for one year in the new association. 
This result was highly gratifying, as it at once gave to the Library 
association a permanent footing, enabling it to start with seven hun- 
dred volumes, many of them standard works in history and English 
literature. With this handsome nucleus at the start, around which 
to gather other works, until a large library should be founded, the 
attempt to build up a noble educational power in our midst, ceased 
to be an experiment, and became an assured success. 

I pause here in the course of this sketch, to notice an event that 
carried sadness to the heart, not only of the members of the associa- 
tion, but of all our people. On the 16th day of March, James 
Lewis had been } elected as one of the board of directors, and on the 
fourth day of May, when the board held their regular meeting for 
the month, his place was vacant ; death had invaded that active life, 
and sadly and unanimously the board passed the following preamble 
and resolutions: 

Whereas, By the death of our associate, Mr. James Lewis, this 
board has lost a valued member, whose worth we would commemor- 
ate in the records of this association, therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we recognized in Mr. Lewis an upright and gen- 
erous citizen, ever in earnest to advance the welfare of the commu- 
nity in which he lived, whether at the cost of mo ney or of personal 
exertion. 

Resolved, Thatjve tender to Mrs. Lewis and the family of the 



110 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

deceased our respectful and sincere sympathy in their bereavement. 

Mr. Lewis died on the 23d day of April. 1863^ He was an 
upright and enterprising citizen, a faithful friend, a zealous member 
of this association, and a devoted christian. 

On the 11th day of May, the board of directors submitted their 
first report to the association. In it they speak very encouragingly 
of the condition and prospects of the work before them, and although 
they find some difficulties and discouragements in the way. yet they 
say, and very truly, that "these difficulties ought to weigh as noth- 
ing in comparison with the great need and importance to the whole 
community of an undertaking like the one upon which we are glad 
to believe, we have now successfully entered." 

At the meeting of the association on the 11th of May, it was 
necessary according to the constitution, to elect officers for the 
ensuing year. The election resulted as follows : 

President, Win. C. Hannah; Vice President, James Moore; 
Recording Secretary, Wm. Xiles; Treasurer, Fred West; Corres- 
ponding Secretary, Rev. G. C. Noyes. 

Directors. — Andrew L. Osborn, Charles Paine, Ezekiel Morrison 
Jacob Zook, W. H. H. Whitehead, 0. Wilson, and Landon C. 
Rose. 

The association seemed now fairly equipped for a race of useful- 
ness; but its early promise was doomed to undergo a blighting 
check. The meeting of the 11th of May adjourned with a prospect 
of vigorous growth before the young foundling. The members must 
have been too sanguine, and reposed too much confidence in the 
powers of the child, for they left it to run alone until the 26th of 
the following October, and then holding one brief meeting, a dark 
and impenetrable interregnum occurs of more than a year, from the 
26th of October, 1863, to the 6th of December, 1864. This seems 
to have been the "dark age" of our association's history. It was 
even darker than the night of the middle ages, for then the monks 
in their gloomy cells did not permit learning quite to perish from 
the earth, and history penetrates the gloom of that cavernous night; 
but over those forgotten months of our society's life, whose record is 
forever lost, an impenetrable shadow has fallen, and nothing but the 
fiat of Omnipotent Power proclaiming "Let there be Light," could 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. Ill 

disperse the gloom. It must have seemed to the friends of the asso- 
ciation that its light had gone out forever. But the usefulness of 
such an institution had become known ; and although the old officers 
and board of directors would seem to have been somewhat discour- 
aged, they determined not to stand in the way of any others who 
might be willing to try to give new vitality to the association. On 
the 6th day of December, 1864, the officers and members of the 
board, each and all resigned, and others were elected to fill the 
vacancies so created; and the organization commenced its new exist- 
ence with the following officers : 

President, L. Crane; Vice President, C. G. Powell; Treasurer, 
Wm. M. Scott; Corresponding Secretary, Rev. J. P. Ash; Record- 
ing Secretary, T. L. Adams. 

Directors.— Dr. Geo. M. Dakin, H. B. Weir, Dr. W. L. Mc- 
Kahan, John M. Hood, Rev. J. H. Lee, Mr. Baker and A. J. 
Redding. 

As an indication of the vigorous manner in which the new board 
commenced their work it is worthy of note that at this meeting a 
committee of one was appointed to "prepare the Reading Room for 
occupancy by to-morrow." The work was done, and meetings have 
been held regularly at the Society's rooms from that time to the 
present. 

On the 6th day of November, 1865, the first movement was made 
towards renting the pleasant rooms now occupied by us ; and on the 
20th of the same month they were occupied and have given the 
association a home, and our people a useful and attractive place of 
resort for more than three years. At the meeting of November 
20th, 1865, it was, with characteristic energy, resolved to "pledge 
ourselves as individuals te see the work carried through." This 
feeling has ever since actuated the directors, and the consequence 
has been the continued growth and prosperity of the association. 
Since the year 1864, a leading feature of the Society has been a 
course of lectures each winter. These have been given by the lead- 
ing men of the country, authors, poets, statesmen and divines. The 
lectures have embraced a wide variety of subjects, travels, history, 
national affairs, social reforms, the woman question, in fact almost 
every subject that engages the American mind at the present day. 



112 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

These lectures, while not highly remunerative to the Society, have 
been an agreeable means of instruction for the people, most of them 
having been of a high order of merit, and worthy to have been 
' heard by far more than availed themselves of the privilege. 

The growth of the library has been constant if not rapid. 
Handsome donations of books have been received from Morgan H. 
Weir, Benj. F. Taylor, L. Crane, and others, and in each of the 
last four years there have been additions by purchase, of from two to 
three hundred volumes. 

On the sixth day of April, 1868, a movement was commenced for 
the collection of a cabinet under the superintendence of Dr. T. 
Higday : and on the fifth day of May last the following preamble 
and resolution presented by Wm. Niles, Esq., were unanimously 
adopted : 

Whereas. It is proposed to form a collection of specimens in 
illustration of the natural sciences, and those interested in the 
matter desire to place the collection in the rooms of the association, 
if the donation will be accepted, 

ResolvecL that the association will accept such donations if made, 
and will preserve the collection, and increase it from time to time 
so far as can be done consistently with its leading objects. 

For their cheerful co-operation in this feature especially, of our 
association, both by liberal donations, and by labor in arranging 
the specimens in the cases, too much praise cannot be awarded to 
Drs. T. Higday, Geo. L. Andrew, Henry Holloway. H. B. Wilcox, 
and Messrs. Fred'k West. Samuel J. Fosdick and E. Gr. McCollum. 

Thus, from a beginning attended by doubts and fears, and 
through a history checkered by sunshine and cloud, we reached the 
society's present condition. At no previous hour has the prospect 
been fairer than now. Five lectures of a course of six have left us 
nearlv forty dollars ahead, and this in a season when lectures nearlv 
everywhere have failed to pay. Our cabinet, in illustration of the 
natural sciences, is neatly and tastefully fitted up. and though not 
large, is well worthy the attention of the curious The reading 
room, furnished with all the leading magazines of the day. draws 
to the rooms daily large numbers of busy readers, and every night 
the rooms are crowded with the young of both sexes, quietly and 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 113 

studiously securing information that will be a practical benefit 
during their lives. The library numbers probably over two thous- 
and volumes, consisting of many of the choicest works of the English 
language; history, biography, poetry, travels, science, light litera- 
ture, philosophy, belles lettres, and every variety of reading to 
please every variety of taste. We have lived down the stale 
calumny that we are a political institution, and all classes of our 
people, without regard to party, sect or creed, have a warm side for 
the LaPorte Library and Natural History Association. Our 
prospects may be best told by our past history and present condi- 
tion. We cannot doubt that our darkest days are over. The out- 
look before us is brighter and smoother than the backward look 
over the past. I look down the future, and see a long career of 
usefulness. I see our library expanding until these rooms grow 
narrow. The rich burden of thought here collected invites all our 
people to come and drink at the Pierean fount, not in little stinted 
sippings, but in vigorous draughts, that cheer the soul, enlarge the 
mind, and develope manhood. These thoughts are not fanciful, they 
are the grand possibilities of the future, and will be the gift of a 
generous now to the swift approaching then. 

The purposes of this association may be summed up in one word 
— improvement. The improvement and development of man, as an 
individual, and as a member of the community. Our purpose is to 
educate, to develop thought, to enlarge and strengthen the mental 
powers, to purify the heart, to furnish rational and wholesome 
amusement, to make every man a better and stronger man, and 
every woman a better and more cultivated woman, to develop in 
the young a taste for reading, and make them acquainted with the 
great thoughts of the great authors who have honored the English 
tongue. 

One of the most striking characteristics of our civilization, one 
which has worked deepest, and is destined to have the most lasting- 
impression, is the general diffusion of knowledge. We are pre-emi- 
nently a reading people, and the privilege is not confined to a few. 
All participate. The morning paper follows the man of business to 
the breakfast table. The last monthly throngs the rail-car and 
steamboat. The latest novel enters the parlor of the opulent, and 

8 



114 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

wrings the tears from eyes that never wept before ; while every 
avenue of life is penetrated by the ubiquitous newspaper. News — 
north, east, west, south, the tidings are borne. Over hill and valley 
speed the messengers of the press. The palace of the rich, and the 
log hut of the pioneer, are alike objects of their visitation. Histor- 
ies are multiplied. The dramatic touches of Macaulay, and of 
Bancroft, Prescott and Motley, give to historic composition all the 
charm of works of the imagination. All must read, young and old, 
male and female, man of leisure and man of business. There is no 
escape; the world is busy; it moves, so must man — every man — or 
he is left behind in a moment. It is our purpose to supply, as far 
as possible, this popular demand. 

A celebrated English divine and philosopher lays down five 
eminent means whereby the mind is improved in the knowledge of 
things. These are observation, reading, instruction by lectures, 
conversation and meditation. 

The first of these methods of improvement our association furnish- 
es, to a limited extent, by our cabinet of specimens illustrative of 
the natural sciences. Our library and reading room supplies the 
second, and the third is reached through our annual course of 
lectures. 

These are our objects — to supply three of the methods of enlarg- 
ing, informing and strengthening the mind. With some degree of 
pride we point to the past; and we look forward hopefully to en- 
larged usefulness in the time to come." 

Since the date of the above sketch which w T as written in February, 
1869, the Library :<nd Natural History association has continued 
to prosper. When Dr. Samuel B. Collins completed his marble 
front building on Michigan avenue, he generously offered to fit up 
the third story of the new building, and donate to the Library asso- 
ciation the free use of it for five years. The offer was accepted, and 
soon afterwards, the removal was effected, and these fine rooms, are 
still occupied, the five years lease not having yet expired. 

Early in 1874, a movement was made to secure a permanent 
home for the Library. Gen. Joseph Orr, proposed to the Library 
board and citizens, that if they would raise the sum of $6,000 he 
would purchase and donate to the association the building known a - 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 115 

the old Presbyterian church, the lot, and the half-lot adjoining on 
the north, amounting to $4000. Immediately active measures were 
begun for the raising of $6,000 by voluntary subscriptions, and 
these were finally successful. The money was subscribed, one-half 
of it paid in, and the property was conveyed to the association when 
an unfortunate disagreement occurring between Gen. Orr, and the 
board of directors of the Library association, in regard to the future 
arrangement of the building, and the manner in which the accumu- 
lated fund should be expended, the movement was abandoned, and 
the property was re-conveyed to Gen. Orr. Most of the money that 
had been paid in was suffered to remain in the treasury of the 
Library association, and many re-subscribed the amount still 
unpaid, the whole forming a large fund which is held by the board, 
and is now at interest, ready for use when an opportunity offers for 
the purchase of property that shall make a desirable and comforta- 
able home for the library. It is much to the credit of the citizens of 
LaPorte that an institution of this kind has received such constant 
and liberal support. 

In the year 1852, the Michigan Southern and Northern Indiana 
railroad was completed to LaPorte, and was extended rapidly to 
Chicago. Prior to this in 1839, the Buffalo and Mississippi rail- 
road was projected, much grading was done upon it through the 
county, and the board of county commissioners, in obedience to the 
petition of citizens subscribed for stock to the amount of $100,000. 
Onlv here and there a cut or an embankment remains to tell of the 
broken hopes of the people. 

In 1856, the Cincinnati, Louisville and Chicago railroad, now 
the Indianapolis, Peru and Chicago, was built between LaPorte and 
Plymouth. The gaps between Plymouth and Rochester, and 
Rochester and Peru were afterwards filled, thus giving LaPorte 
direct communication southward, as she already had to the east and 
west. In 1871, that part of the road between LaPorte and Michi- 
gan City was completed, and thus LaPorte is situated on the lead- 
ing line of railroad between the East and Chicago, and the principal 
line in Indiana from the lase to the south. 

The rich farming country surrounding LaPorte has been the chief 
cause of its growth, though its manufactures, always an element of 



116 HISTORY OF LAPORTE COUNTY. 

prosperity, have been by no means insignificant. The machine 
shops of the Michigan Southern railroad were located here immedi- 
ately upon the completion of the road, and continued here until 
1870, when the machinery was removed to Elkhart. The build- 
ings are now occupied by the LaPorte Car factory. There have 
been several foundries, and establishments for the manufacture of 
machinery and agricultural implements of various kinds. The prin- 
cipal ones are now those of the Rumelys, who manufacture separa- 
tors and steam engines; James N. Brooks, who makes grist mill 
machinery and engines, and that of John W. Ridgway, which was 
burned a few months since and is now being rebuilt. There have 
been two paper mills in LaPorte, one of which failed and the other 
was burned and never rebuilt. The building of the former is 
now occupied by the LaPorte Wheel factory, which is prospering. 
The bedstead factory of Mr. Fred. Meissner has for many years 
been successful, and the chair factory under the management of 
"Washington Wilson is doing a prosperous business. There arc two 
woolen factories, each of them doing good work, three flouri> 
mills and numerous wagon and blacksmith shops, which altogether 
give employment to a large number of hands. Within a few years 
past, a heavy trade has arisen in the ice that is taken from the 
lakes in the winter. The houses for its storage dot the borders of 
the lakes in every direction. It is chiefly taken from Stone. Clear 
and Fish Trap lakes. There is a Chicago firm engaged in the b 
iness, M. Thompson & Co.; a Louisville company; John Hilt & Co., 
of LaPorte, and others of this city. Many thousands of tons a 
taken oft' each winter, and it is shipped extensively to Chicago, and 
the South. This is a flourishing business, and gives employment to 
many laboring people in winter when work is often especially need- 
ed, and difficult to obtain. 

There are fifteen church edifices in LaPorte, Methodist. German 
Methodist, Presbyterian. Baptist, Episcopalian, three Lutheran, two 
German and one Swedish, Swedenborgian, Christian, two Catholic, 
Friends 1 meeting house, Jewish Synagogue, and Colored. T! 
church first built in LaPorte was bv the Methodists in 1837. The 
edifice now occupied by the Disciples, and known as the Christian 
church was built by the Presbyterians in 1*4:2. The Episcopalians 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 117 

* 

•erected their house of worship in 1845. It has been remodeled and 
much enlarged since that time. The present Baptist church edifice 
was built in 1859. The latest church building erected was that of 
the Presbyterians on Michigan avenue, which was completed in 1871. 

The original survey of LaPorte has received many additions, the 
most important one, and the largest, being that of Capt. A. P. 
Andrew, Jr., on the south side of the city. The area of LaPorte 
contains now not less than eight hundred acres, and a population 
numbering about eight thousand. In 1835 there were but fifteen 
houses within the present limits of the corporation. A city govern- 
ment was adopted in 1853, and William J. Walker was the first 
mayor, who was elected to the office, and qualified on the fifth clay 
of August 1853. His successors to 1861, were William Millikan, 
1855: Fred'k McCollum, 1857; Wm. H. H. Whitehead, 1859; 
Daniel Noves, 1861. Dr. L. C. Rose was elected in 1871, and 
served two terms, and Mortimer Nye was elected in 1873, and again 
in 1875. The city is divided into five wards, each represented in the 
city government by two councilmen. There are in the city more than 
one hundred business houses, gas works, ,Holly water works, a 
variety of manufacturing establishments as already mentioned, 
machine shops and foundries, tanneries, six hotels, numerous board- 
ing houses, many secret and benevolent associations, and many 
elegant residences, with well kept and tasteful grounds surround- 
ing them. Taken altogether, LaPorte is unquestionably the hand- 
somest city in Northern Indiana, if not in the State. Its wide and 
well shaded streets, its long rows of dark green maples, its groves 
and lakes and charming drives present attractions which are seldom 
equaled. 

LaPorte has had a steady but not rapid growth ; and all its busi- 
ness has been on a stable basis. Panics and stringency in the 
money market affect her business interests comparatively little. 
Her banks, of which there are five including the Savings bank, are 
safely conducted, and when two years ago the great financial crash 
came upon the country no merchant or banker in LaPorte was 
touched. All weathered the storm easily and safely. Beautiful for 
situation, safe in her business interests, and enjoying superior edu- 
cational advantages, LaPorte is a most desirable place for a residence, 
combining the health of the country with the privileges of the city. 



118 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



CHAPTER VII. 

PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 

At the March term, 1834, of the commissioners' court, on the 
third day of March, the board passed the following order: On mo- 
tion of Wm. Holmes, Kankakee township is divided by the line run- 
ning east and west between townships thirty-six and thirty-seven, 
all that part south of said line in said count}- to constitute and form 
a new township of the name of Pleasant, that the house of Oliver 
Classon shall be the place appointed to hold elections for said town- 
ship, and that James Webster be appointed inspector of elections 
until the April annual election, or until his successor be elected and 
qualified." These limits have since been diminished by the forma- 
tion of Union, Lincoln and Johnson townships, until at the present 
time Pleasant township contains only the two 'northern and two 
central tiers of sections of township thirty-six. range two west. 

Prior to the opening of this region to settlement, Pleasant town- 
ship was one of the most attractive parts of the county. Its rich 
and flower-clad prairies, its groves of noble forest trees, its numerous 
small lakes, and flowing streams, combined to form a spot of unsur- 
passed beauty. After the settlement of the county began, this por- 
tion was not long permitted to remain in its pristine condition. In 
the year 1831 or 32. James Webster came from Virginia and set- 
tled on section one, in the northeast corner of the township. His 
son-in-law, James Highley, came at the same time. The next year, 
Silas Hale and Oliver Classon settled on section twenty-tv In 
1833, John Wilson arrived from Ohio, and Andrew Harvey and 
Asa Owen. Valentine Nicholson came early, and Benjamin Butter- 
worth was present and bought land in the township at the land 
sales, but settled in the edge of Scipio township. Ralph Loomis 
arrived in Pleasant township, April 19th 1834, and in the same 
year came George S. McCollum and Samuel Stewart. Stewart 
bought land in sections four and five, and his home was only two 
miles from LaPorte. James Van Yalkenburgh and a number of 



PLEASANT TOWNSHIP. 119 s 

others came in^l835. On the 26th day of May, 1836, George Bos- 
serman arrived on a prospecting tour, located and secured three 
eighties of land, some of the best in the county ; then returned to his 
former home, and reached the township again on the 1st day of 
December, 1836, in company with his brother-in-law, J. G. Mc- 
Caskey. There were then in the township, besides those named, 
Griffin Treadway, John I. Crandall, Geo. C. Havens, W. A. Piace, 
Stephen Norton and others. The following may also be named as 
early settlers ;^W. W. Burhans, Ziba Bailey, D. E. and I. B. Cop- 
lin, Wm. Everhart, John V. Rust, G. W. Stewart, J. R. Stewart, 
Charles W. Wing, Seth Way, Curtis and John B. Travis, and other 
members of that family, and the Lomax family. 

The first school house built in the township was known as "Old 
Charity." A number of those interested were opposed to having it 
on the site where it was built, and they put it on wheels or rollers, 
and moved it to another place which suited them better. Then the 
other party hitched on to it one day (or night) and pulled it back to 
its former location. A second time it migrated; and thi^ time it 
was run on the top^of a stump, so as to fasten it; but it wis after- 
wards pried^or cut loose, and was made to take two or three more 
journeys, before 'the dispute was settled and the migratory school 
house was permitted to have a permanent abiding place. Since 
that early day, great advancement has been made in educational 
facilities, and the interest shown in the subject of education, especially 
during the last twenty-five years has been most creditable. In 
1850 there was not a good school house in the township. There 
were schools, but the houses where they were taught were inconve- 
nient, comfortless, well-ni^h worthless structures. Now there are 
five school houses, all of them good ones. 

In the year 1835 or 36, Mr. Whitmer built a saw mill on the 
Little Kankakee, ^on land now owned by Mrs. Burson. Root & 
Graham also built one on the same stream, and about 1850, the 
Websters put up another. 

The first church in the township was Salem Chapel, built by the 
Methodists in 1853. The earliest preachers in the township were 
Elder St. Claire, Campbellite ; Elder Spalding, Baptist; and Rev. 
Geo. M. Boycl, Methodist. 



120 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

On the 9th day of March, 1836, an order was made by the Board 
of commissioners dividing Pleasant township, so that all that part 
of it which lies east of a line drawn from the northwest corner of 
section one, south to the county line, should be known as Madison 
township. This does not seem to have been satisfactory to the peo- 
ple, and at the succeeding term of the commissioners' court, the 
order was rescinded. 

The Little Kankakee river runs through the northeastern part of 
the township, crossing sections two, one and twelve. The Indian- 
apolis, Peru and Chicago railroad crosses the township diagonally 
from southeast to northwest, and the Chicago and Lake Huron rail- 
road crosses the southeast corner. The former road has located a 
station in the southeast corner of section fifteen, called Stillwell. 
In 1870, a postoffice was established at Stillwell, kept by A. J. 
Wair, but after two or three years it was discontinued. The lands 
of this township consist mostly of fine arable prairie, with plenty of 
timber for all ordinary purposes. Immense crops of corn, wheat and 
oats are easily raised, and a part of the township is excellent for stock 
raising. The leading industry, almost the only one, is agriculture, 
and its farmers are uniformly prosperous. 



WILLS TOWNSHIP 121 



CHAPTER VIII. 

WILLS TOWNSHIP. 

Wills township consists of twenty-four sections in Range one, and 
the eastern tier of sections of Range two, township thirty-seven. A 
portion of the congressional township, of which Wills forms a part 
lies in St. Joseph county, twelve sections on the east and northeast 
of Wills township being thus cut off from LaPorte county. As 
originally constituted it included all of the present Hudson town- 
ship, and six sections on the east side of Galena, extending to 
the Michigan line. Its six southeastern sections were then in St. 
Joseph county. The township was organized and its boundaries 
designated on the same day with Pleasant township, both being- 
carved out of the original township of Kankakee. On the third 
day of March, 1834, at the regular March term of the Board of 
county commissioners, the following order was passed : 

" On motion of Henry F. Janes for a division of Kankakee town- 
ship and to form the township of Wills in the northeast corner of 
said county, bounded as follows, to-wit : Beginning at the southeast 
corner of section thirty-three, township thirty-seven, north of range 
one west, thence north with the county line to the northeast corner 
of LaPorte county, thence we«t with the county line to the section 
line one mile west of the range line dividing one and two west, 
thence south with said section line to the south side of township 
thirty-seven, thence east to the place of beginning, and that the 
house of Wm. West shall be the place for holding elections in said 
township, and that Henry F. Janes be appointed inspector of 
elections." 

The first settlers of Wills township were John Wills and his sons, 
Charles, Daniel and John E., who reached the township in the year 
1830. They made a home on section six at the site of what is now 
called " Boot Jack." This was undoubtedlv the first settlement of 
a family, but Asa Warren claims to have been the first man in the 
township, having come in 1829. Other settlers came in 1830. 



122 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Among them were Andrew Shaw, Joseph Lykins, John Sissany, 
and John S. Garroutte; and in 1831 there came James Wills. Mat- 
thias Dawson, David Stoner, Dr. Chapman and others. In the 
month of February of this year a sad accident occurred, which was 
long remembered by the pioneers. 

Mary, wife of John S. Garroutte. had been to the house of a man 
named Garwood, -,where the village of Hamilton now stand.-, in St. 
Joseph county, to visit his wife, who was sick. The day was clear 
and cold, and, on her return, she stopped at the house of John 
Wills. After resting a short time, she continued her journey home- 
ward. The wind, in the meantine, had arisen, and the snow drifted 
in sheets. She dismounted from her horse and sought by walking, 
it is thought, to promote warmth. She was overcome, however, by 
the cold, and the next morning her body was found in the timber, 
near the bend of Plumb grove, upon the farm now owned and occu- 
pied by Geo. W. Zigler. The mail carrier, who was traveling upon 
snow shoes, declared that when he discovered the body, the next 
morning, a wolf was traveling directly for it. and that he scared the 
animal away. Her son, is now a merchant at Carlisle Hill. 

John Hefner r arrived in the township, probably in 1832. and 
Joseph Starrett bought an "Indian Float," and settled on it in 
1833. Jacob Gallion. Jesse Willett, Nimrod and Jesse West, and 
J. Clark, all came very early. 

In the month of March, 1834, John Bowell came from Clark 
county, in this State, and made his home in Wills township. He 
brought with him his wife and children, consisting of the widow< 
Drammond and Miller, Dr. B. C. Bowell. A. C Bowell and A. J. 
Bowell. In November following, James Drammond, son-in-law of 
John Bowell, came with his wife. John Bowell died on the 10th 
of April, 1866, and Elizabeth, his wit'.', one week previously. Both 
were buried on the same spot, as near as it could be ascertained, 
where they first encamped in the township. During this year 
(1831) Joseph Lykins put up the first frame hou- at was erected 
in Wills. It was built in the northea>t part of the township. 

George Hunt with a family of six s<»n< arrived in 1835 : and in that 
year a trading post was opened by an Indian named Rice, at the 
little settlement on section six. Rice left with the Indians in 1836. 



WILLS TOWNSHIP. 123 

The little settlement became known as Boot Jack, which name it 
Still retains, probably from the manner in which the roads converged 
into the hamlet. Andrew Shaw, however, gives a different account 
of the naming of the place. He says that upon one occasion a 
drunken tramp came to town, and stopped at the tavern. He was 
finally turned out of doors and refused any more whisky, whereupon 
he turned his maudlin eyes upon the guide board, which resembled 
that very necessary accompaniment of a gentleman's lodging apart 
ments, and exclaimed, "I christen this place Boot Jack." 

In the year 1851, a tavern was opened by a man named Kellogg, 
who also kept a few articles of merchandise for sale. John Parker 
afterwards kept a tavern, and subsequently sold out to Tom Nichols. 
There is now no hotel or store in the place. It was never surveyed 
and recorded as a town. 

In the year 1835, John Wills, James Wills, Asa Warner, John 
Sissany, Andrew Shaw, David Stoner, Jesse N. West, Howell 
Huntsman, Mr. Kitchen, Dr. Chapman, Matthias Dawson, George 
Hunt, John Bowell, Asher White, Edmund Jackson, Joseph 
Lykins, John Sutherland, Joseph Starrett, Wm. Ingraltam, Scott 
West, John Hefner, Jesse Sissany, Wm.- Nixon, Wm. West, Gabriel 
Drollinger, Andrew Fuller, John Vickory, Nimrod West, Jacob 
Glygeau, Jonathan Stoner, John Clark, Geo. Beishaw, Samuel Van 
Dalsen, Martin Baker, Jesse Collum, John Galbreath, Benj. Gal- 
breath and Mr. Gallion, were residents of this township, besides 
others whose names it is not now easy to obtain. 

On the 13th day of June 1836, Elder T. Price, of Edwardsburgh, 
Michigan, and Elder T. Spaulding, of LaPorte, organized a Baptist 
church at the house of James Hunt, and the names of the following 
persons were enrolled as members : James Hunt, John Salisbury, 
Matthias Dawson, Nancy Hunt, Martha Hunt, Catharine White- 
head, Sarah Mason, Phoebe Hunt, Clarrissa Canada, Sabrina Salis- 
bury, Alsie Dawson and Martha Whitehead. 

In the year 1837, a Baptist church was built on the grounds of 
George Beishaw. The eighth day of April had been fixed for that 
event. On the sixth clay of May, next following, the trustees re- 
ported that they had gone as far as they could, and wanted money 
to procure boards for flooring and ceiling. On the first of July 



124 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

after, they reported that a .sufficient amount had been subscribed. 
The log chapel -was torn down in 1843, and a new frame church 
built near it. Where the old church stood, there is now a school, 
house. Both are on the southeast quarter of section thirteen. 

On the 12th day of May 1837, plats were filed with the county 
recorder for the village of Independence. The description of the first, 
on book E, page one, locates it in the northeast quarter of the south- 
east quarter of section twenty-eight, township thirty-seven, north of 
range one west. Of the second plat on page three, the description 
embraces that part south of Sac street and west of Main street. 
The acknowledgement was made by Asa Egbert, agent for his part 
and attorney for Wm. C. Pellett, and is further described as being 
in the southeast quarter of the southeast quarter of section twenty- 
eight, township thirty-seven, north of range one west. 

Anterior to this time a survey had been made for a proposed 
canal through the town, and a railroad known as the Hardenburg 
line, had also been surveyed. The road was to cross the canal at 
this point, and the early settlers of Independence, in their dreams. 
saw visions of immense wealth. Real estate speculation was. there- 
fore, rife for a season. 

In the year 1*3.3. a man named Andrew Fuller, started a little 
store in the locality, selling dry goods, groceries, etc. He kept the 
establishment about a year. In the same year a cabinet shop waa 
started bv Elias Axe. 

A man named Baker oriirinallv owned the town, and had it laid 
out. He was also a trader. In 1836. Wm. C. Pellett bought him 
out, goods and lots, and started a very respectable country store. 
After Pellett had made his record of the town in 1837, he sold out 
to John Vickory and Timothy Losey and they kept up the establish- 
ment about a year. 

John Hampton built a blacksmith shop in 1830. and continued 
doing work in his line something over a year. 

In 1< X 37, Sparrow commenced the boot and shoe business. T. 
Chapman opened a wagon maker's shop, and Wm. Oostello a tailor- 
ing establishment. During the same year. Benjamin Galbreath and 
John Galbreath; his son, built two mills in the vicinity of Independ- 
ence — the one a grist and the other a saw mill. They had come to 



WILLS TOWNSHIP. 125 

the settlement during a very wet time, and imagined they had a fine 
water power. Both mills and dams were built at the same time. 
The grist mill was started first, with one run of stone. The son, 
John Galbreath, succeeded in grinding three sacks of corn, when the 
water power was gone forever, for it was the first and last time it 
was used. There is now no stream whatever where this enterprise 
was undertaken. The father succeeded in sawing three small logs. 
The next year both mills were torn down. 

In the year 1845, Thomas Fisher and Jonathan Du iley built a 
steam saw mill at Independence. It was kept running until the 
year 1841, when it was sold to Thomas Hooton, James Hooton, 
Theodore Boardman and David Williams, and moved to Puddle- 
town. 

There is now nothing to distinguish Independence from the sur- 
rounding country. Even its ruins have beeen gathered up for fuel. 
When it became evident that they were to have neither railroad nor 
canal to stimulate its growth, its enemies rejoiced, and gave it the 
name of Sac Town. Andrew Shaw, who resides at Boot Jack, 
claims the honor of so naming it. When the Northern Indiana 
road was projected and being built, all towns near, but off its line, 
were ruined, and Independence, or Sac Town, shared the fate of' 
others. 

Still another settlement in Wills township received a distinctive 
name with some prospect that it might become a village. This is 
Puddletown, the name of a little hamlet situated on Puddletown 
lake, on section nine. It contains a steam saw mill, a store, a shoe 
shop and a good school house. When the township was surveyed 
the lakes were meandered and several small fractions falling into the 
hands of different owners, neighbors were consequently nearer than 
in other localities. In 1851 the machinery of the steam saw mill 
which was formerly at Independence, was removed to this point. 
It has since passed through several hands. The firm of Boardman, 
Williams and the Hootons sold out to James Parnell and Wm. 
Houghton; they sold to Martin Uga and Aaron Miller; it was 
again sold to Edwin Picket, and he sold to James N. and Lorenzo 
Dow Davidson, in the fall of 1868. It regains in their hands at 
the present time. 



126 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

In 1856, Manford Waters and F. D. Dugan started a blacksmith 
shoo, and continued to run it about three years. 

In the year 1857, L. C. Van Dusen started a shoe shop, and in 
1872, he added a grocery store and continues to do business in each 
to the present time. 

A postoffice was established here in 1862, with J. W. Culp as 
postmaster, but it was discontinued after two years. A good school 
house was built in the place in 1868 which is quite creditable to the 
citizens of the locality. 

An accident occurred here in 1871, by which a man named Mat- 
thew Feather lost his life. He was in the mill, when a piece of 
scantling flying from the saw struck him, and crushed his skull, 
penetrating his brain and killing him instantly. 

Puddletown has never been surveyed and laid out, and there is 
no recorded plat of it. It cannot be considered even a village, but 
it furnishes neighborhood conveniences, and serves to add to the bus- 
iness and resources of the township. 

Of those now living in the township, B. C. Bowell is a physician 
and surgeon, Henry Brown is a retired farmer; Jonathan Drulinei 
is a farmer and auctioneer; Philip Haussauer is a farmer and lum- 
berman; Joseph Hostetler is a farmer and stock dealer: Wm. S. 
Hastings is a farmer and Baptist preacher ; Isaac Miller is a farmer 
and German Baptist preacher; John W. Zigler is a farmer and 
stock dealer, and the trustee of the township : and there are numer- 
ous successful farmers, among whom may be mentioned, Wm. 
Alfont, Horatio Wilcox, Jacob Stoner, Joseph Reese, A. J. Par- 
nell. Elijah McClellan, R. J. Mills, Harry Bennett. B. F. Brown, 
Peter Bunton, W. H. Carr, E. CosgriiF, Gabriel Drollinger, Obadiah 
Dawson, A. D. and John France, David Harris, Wm. II. Hunt. J. 
A. Hastings and C. H. Harris. 

The surface of Wills township is generally rolling, and is splen- 
didly diversified with timber and prairie. The land is rich and pro- 
ductive, and the inhabitants are an enterprising, intelligent and 
prosperous people. 



SPRINGFIELD TOWNSHIP. 127 



CHAPTER IX. 

SPRINGFIELD TOWNSHIP. 

Springfield township was organized on the sixth day of January 
1835, the Board of county commissioners on that day making the 
following order: " On petition of Judah Learning and others, it is 
ordered by the Board that all the territory in range three west, in 
the county of LaPorte, and north of sections number thirteen, four- 
teen, fifteen, sixteen, seventeen and eighteen, in township thirty- 
seven, in said range, shall compose a new township to be called and 
known by the name of Springfield township, and it is further order- 
ed that an election he held at the house of Judah Learning in said 
township, on the last Saturday in this month for the purpose of 
electing a justice of the peace for said township ; and it is further 
ordered that Judah Learning be and he is hereby appointed inspect- 
or of elections in the township of Springfield in the county of 
LaPorte." 

Thus as originally organized, Springfield township occupied all 
of congressional township number thirty-eight, except the six sec- 
tions and the six half sections which are in the State of Michigan, 
and the first twelve sections of township thirty-seven. It has since 
been diminished to the extent of one tier of sections on the south 
side, which became again a part of Centre township, and the bound- 
ary line between Centre and Springfield is the north side of sec- 
tions, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven and twelve, of township number 
thirty-seven, range number three west. 

The first white settler in the township was Judah Learning. He 
came in the year 1831, and settled where the village of Springville 
now stands, and was the first justice of the peace. He built the 
first cabin, and afterwards the first frame house which is now stand- 
ing, and in a good state of preservation. It is the building occupied 
by Benjamin Rhodes. Abram Cormack and Daniel Griffin were 
early residents, and as near as can be ascertained, lived in the town 
the first year of its settlement. 



128 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

In 1832, John Brown, Joseph Pagin and his sons, Erastus Quivey, 
John Ilazleton and Charles Vail, became settler-. Mr. Vail erect- 
ed a saw mill on section thirty-one. During this year the first 
school house was built and the school was taught by Miss Emily 
Learning; it was situated eighty rods west of the village of Spring- 
ville. The Methodists had services about this time, when Mr. Rose 
and Mr. Griffith took the lead in the exercises. There were a 
many who attended the meetings of the Baptists, Mr. Marks con- 
ducting the services. There was no regular place of worship for 
either, and meetings were held sometimes in school houses, at other 
times in dwellings, and not unfrequently out of doors. 

In 1833, the town of Springville was surveyed by Daniel M. 
Learning upon the lands of Judah Learning. During this year 
Gilbert Rose, Hiram Griffith, John Griffith and Erastus Quivey be- 
came settlers. Quivey built the mill on section one, now known as 
the Ross mill. 

In 1834, Ingraham Gould, Michael Fall, Ezekiel Blue, Abner 
Ross, Anron Conklin, John Johnson, Henry S. Allen, John White, 
Mr. Ross, A. N. Shipper, Mr. Lewis and Josiah Redding became 
settlers. Joseph Pagin built' a grist mill, which was run until it 
was worn out. About the same time David Pagin built another 
mill on the same stream about a mile and a half below the old one. 
During this year Elder Tucker, the first male teacher, took charge 
of the school near Springville. 

James V. Hopkins came to the township in 1835, but settled 
afterwards in Michigan City. 

During the year 1835, the school house near Springville was 
burned : the first wedding took place, Abner Ross marrying Esther 
Rose; Jacob Early built a mill upon section twenty-eight, which 
has been worn out and rebuilt several times, the last time bv E. S. 
Organ. In October of this year Charles Vail built a saw mill, 
Erastus Quivey assisting in its construction. Hopkins worked at 
the business of a carpenter, and also made brick, designing to build 
a tavern, but sold to Ingraham Gould. Prior to 1837. many more 
had come into the township, among them being Samuel Lehr, John 
Mason, Lemuel S. Fitch. Alfred Stanton, John Blue and Michael 
Fall. 



SPRINGFIELD TOWNSHIP. 129 

In the year 1839, John and Joseph Pagin built a mill between 
the two already erected by the Pagins, and a distillery was put 
up further down the stream. About the same time Lewis Pagin 
erected a building, and introduced machinery for the carding of 
wool. Abram f Fravel ^built a mill on section thirty-five, in 1840, 
and David Hoover put up a dwelling the same. year. In 1835 a 
church was built at Ross' mill by the Christian denomination. 
This was afterwards sold to the Dunkards, who now own it. Joseph 
Dauphine erected a steam saw mill in 1860. There are two villages 
in this township, the oldest one being named 

SPRINGVILLE. 

This village takes its name from a large spring of pure, cold 
water, which flows out in great abundance. It was laid out by 
Daniel M. Learning for Judah Learning, who was the original pro- 
prietor of the soil, and the plat was filed for record on August 19, 
1835. 

Prior to this, in 1834, Gilbert Rose had started a store in the 
village, Ingraham Gould a tavern, and Abner Ross a blacksmith 
shop. A postoffice was established in the year 1835, which was 
kept until 1863, when it was discontinued. During most of the 
time of its existence, it was kept by D. K. Brickett, who com- 
menced the business of boot and shoe making in 1837, and con- 
tinued it until 1853. Aaron Conklin established a tannery in 
1835, and after conducting it four years, sold out to Leslie Rose. 
He in turn sold it to Ira C. Nye who conducted the business sue-, 
cessfully for many years. 

In the year 1838, Gould & Alvord opened a general store, sell- 
ing it the next year to Russell & Torrey, who sold in 1841 to Rose 
& Conklin. In 1842, Rose purchased Conklin's interest, and con- 
ducted the business alone. During the year 1838, Alpheus Thur- 
ber commenced shoe making and continued the business four or five 
years. In 1845, Ingraham Gould put up a turning lathe ; and for 
many years did a large busines in the manufacture of bedsteads and 
other articles requiring its use. 

In the year 1848, Gould sold his tavern to Michael Hargin, who 
kept it eight years and gave up the business, since then there has 
been no hotel in Springville. In 1850, a steam saw mill was built 

9 



130 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

by Martin & Hill, who after running it about a year sold 'it, and in 
1855, it was removed to section fifteen. In 1874, this mill was 
totally destroyed by fire, but has been rebuilt and is now owned by 
Peter Hack. 

In the year 1850, Gilbert Rose sold his store to Orrin Rose, but 
in 1860, the mercantile busines in Springville was closed, and for 
several years there was no store in that place. In 1868, John 
Schoening opened a shoemaker's shop, and has since added thereto 
a small store. 

Like some other towns in the county, Springville has seen the 
time when the expectations of her people were raised to the highest 
point, and visions of future greatness flitted across the minds of her 
citizens. One of the lines of the Northern Indiana railroad, now 
the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern, was run through the town, 
and for a time it looked very probable that it would pass through 
the county touching that point. The probability of Springville be- 
coming the county seat was freely discussed. In 1850, a plank 
road company was organized, and farmers and townsmen subscribed 
liberally. The project was to build a plank road east to South 
Bend, and west to Michigan City. It was commenced but never 
finished, though much money had been expended upon it, and a 
large part of it was planked. The adoption of the railroad line 
running through LaPorte, seemed to discourage the inhabitants and 
no eifort to promote the growth of the town has since been made. 

The other village in Springfield township is 

- CORYMBO. 

Corymbo is situated in the northwest quarter of the norths 
quarter of section eighteen, township thirty-eight, north of range 
three west. The plat was acknowledged by Craigie Sharpe, Jr.. 
and filed on the 19th dav of August, 1873. Twelve log and frame 
houses have been erected, only three of which were occupied in 
October 1874. In 1861, a postoffice was established and Craigie 
Sharpe, Jr., appointed postmaster. It has since been discontinued. 
Large quantities of wood have been cut in the surrounding groves, 
and immense quantities of it are to be seen piled up along the rail- 
road track. The men who reside in this village, are either work- 
men engaged on the Michigan Central railroad, which runs through 



SPRINGFIELD TOWNSHIP. 131 

the town, or are woodchoppers who gain their livelihood in the sur- 
rounding timber. There was a steam saw mill in the village 
last year, but it has been removed. There has been a store, but it 
has ceased to exist, and the prospect for building up a town there 
is not very nattering. 

For several years between 1835 and 1844, a gang of counterfeiters 
infested this township. The leaders were two men known as Van 
Velser and Stroud. There was a cabin surrounded by a dense 
thicket of willows and other shrubbery, situated on a dry knoll in a 
marsh, about a mile northwest of the town, where the coinage of 
bogus money was carried on. From this point it was scattered 
broadcast over the country. Van Velser was finally detected, and 
and sent to the State prison, where he died, and Stroud is reported 
to have been lynched in Illinois for horse stealing. 

Two railroads touch the township, the Michigan Central crossing 
the northwest corner, and the Indianapolis, Peru and Chicago, the 
southwest corner. The soil of the township is generally sandy, too 
much so to be equal to some other parts of the county in the pro- 
duction of grain, but it is well timbered, and its warm, sandy soil is 
highly favorable for fruit raising. This occupation engages much 
of the attention of the inhabitants. There are some marshes in the 
township, which are excellent grazing ground for cattle, and which 
with proper care, could be made to produce abundance of hay. The 
resources of the township are yet undeveloped, but it contains ele- 
ments of wealth in its timber, its capacity for stock-raising, the pro- 
duction of fruit and potatoes, and fair returns of grain. 

Some portions of the township are quite thickly settled, and the 
inhabitants have shown a sufficient interest in education, to cause 
the erection of a good school house in every neighborhood. Among 
those who now live, or but recently lived in this township, and who 
came early to the county, are Calvin W. Hayes, who is a farmer 
residing near Springville; E. S. Organ, who is a farmer and saw 
mill owner, came to the county in 1836, and has held various posi- 
tions of official trust ; J. S. Vardeman, a miller, who came in 1836 ; 
John A. White, a native of the county, born in 1836; Elihu 
Bishop, a farmer, born in the county in 1835 ; and Edward King, 
who came from Ohio to this county in 1832. 



132 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



CHAPTER X. 

GALENA TOWNSHIP. 

On the 9th of March, 1836, at the regular March term of the 
Board of county commissioners, the following order was made: 
"Ordered that Kankakee township be divided, and that part of said 
township lying in township thirty-eight, in range two west, form a 
judicial township to be known by the name of Galena, and that 
there be an election held in said township, on the first Monday of 
April next, tor the purpose of electing two justices of the peace for 
said township, and that Joshua Jordan be appointed inspector of 
elections for said township, and that the elections be held at the 
house of Geo. W. Barnes." 

This township consists of twenty-four whole sections, and 
six half sections, one tier and a half of sections of the congressional 
township thirty-eight being in the State of Michigan. The order 
of the Board of commissioners would indicate that the whole con- 
gressional township is included in Galena; but this is not the case, 
because of the obstacle of the boundary of Michigan encroaching 
upon it to the extent of the width of a section and a half. 

George W. Barnes is supposed to be the oldest settler in Galena ; 
his biography is obscure, as he died about thirty years ago, leaving 
no descendants. Tradition says that he was a native of the State 

it 

of Maine, and from thence migrated to Cleveland, Ohio ; that he 
was a married man, but never brought his family to his new home. 
Whether his wife refused to follow him into the depths of the forests. 
or if they parted from domestic infelicity, is not known. He was a 
man of uncommon nerve and force of character, possessing traits 
which made him eminently fit for a pioneer of civilization ; and he 
came to Galena township in the year 1833, and at once went to 
work with that untiring energy for which he was always distinguish- 
ed. In the same year came Whitman Goit, Sliubal Smith, Richard 
Miller, Sylvanus James and John Talbot. These men all selected 
claims and commenced making improvements the same year. 



GALENA TOWNSHIP. 133 

Daniel Baldwin, Aurea and Basil S perry, Wm. Waldruff, Sans 
H. Austin, Byron Cadwalader, John Morrow, Joshua Jordan, 
Elijah Bishop, Micajah Jones, John Cooper, Ephraim Cooper, Jesse 
Jones, Oliver Porter, James Paddock, Charles Francis, Joseph Ful- 
ler, James Jones and Abram Purcell, were added to the list of set- 
tlers in 1834. Of these Wm. Waldruff was one of the earliest, as 
his widow says that when they came, there were but five white men 
in the township. In the same year came also John and Ephraim 
Cooper, and Joseph Henderson. Joseph Wallace, the Martin fam- 
ily, the Weeds, Mr. Morrill, and Edwin Jordan, brother of Joshua, 
were early settlers. 

In the year 1834, John Talbot built a saw mill in the northeast 
part of the town. Before it was completed he took Whitman Ooit 
into partnership with him. This was the first mill that was built. In 
the same year the first child, a son to William Waldruff, was born. 

In the year 1835, George W. Barnes built his saw mill. It was 
situated in the southwest part of the township. The elections were 
held there. During this year Mathew Mayes had a blacksmith shop 
at Mayes' Corners. It was the first in the north part of the county. 
Shubal Smith w T as carrying on a wagon shop about a mile west of 
that point. A man named Purcell put up a lathe for turning 
wooden bowls on Mud creek, near the school house known as Mud 
creek school house. He was a Very eccentric man and his 
machinery was in part original. The attempt was a failure. Joseph 
Winch afterwards bought the concern out, and made split bottomed 
chairs and spinning wheels at the shop. The number of settlers 
who came this year was quite large, and embraced the names of 
Jacob Heckman, James Catterlin, Robert Kennedy Smith, Lewis 
Weed, Mathew Mayes, Hiram Bement, Samuel Vance, John Rod- 
man, Jedediah Austin, James Wilson and Hiram Catterlin. Martin 
Bates came this year and bought land, but went away and did not 
return and improve it until 1840. 

The first school house was built of logs on the land of Theodoric 
Heckman, in the year 1836, and Amanda Armitage was the 
teacher. In January, Walter Brown and Ezra Brown came into 
the township, Kellogg Shedd on the 5th day of June, John Brewer 
and Henry Brewer in September. During the year, Abraham 



134 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Burcham. Julius Tappan, Levi Paddock and Elder Caleb B. Davis, 
pastor of the Christian church arrived. Hiram Russ came in 1837. 

Solomon Palmer built a saw mill in 1838, and in the year 1840, 
James Winch came and put up a turning establishment on Barnes' 
creek, where he made hubs, bedposts and almost all kinds of wood 
work which required turning. He also made spinning wheels. 
He was a Free Will Baptist preacher, and died in 1853. The prop- 
erty was sold to W. W. Francis and brothers, and they built a grist 
mill on the site. 

Previous to 1841, religious services had been held at the school 
houses, and private houses. Shubal Smith had acted as an exhor- 
ter or local preacher of the Methodist denomination, while occasion- 
ally a regular clergyman, Rev. Mr. Armstrong, paid the township 
a visit. Previous to the time above named a minister named Posey 
had been assigned by the conference to administer to the spiritual 
wants of that denominaiion in Galena. He directed his influence 
among his brethren to induce them to build a chapel for a place of 
religious worship, and a day was assigned for all to turn out from far 
and near, to accomplish this object. At the appointed time they came 
from distances as great as eight or ten miles, and worked steadily 
for a week, when a very comfortable and commodious log chapel 
was completed. It was built upon an acre of ground given by 
Whitman Goit for the purpose, and named Posey chapel in honor 
of the founder. It has since been torn down and rebuilt, a frame 
structure occupying the place of the old one. The Mount Pleasant 
M. E. church was built in 1844. Lamb's chapel, so named after 
Mr. Lamb, who appropriated the land, is situated at the junction of" 
the town line and LaPorte road-. It is a frame building about the 
size of an ordinary school house which it very much resemb; It 

was built by subscription of the people of the neighborhood in 1854. 
The Christian denomination is largely represented, and in 1865, 
they completed a very fair church edifice. It is located on the 
southwest quarter of section twenty, and Rev. Caleb B. Davis is the 
pastor. 

In 1841, Willis Wright and John Wright put up a turning lathe 
about a mile and a quarter west of Caleb B. Davis*. They ran it 
four or five years and sold it to E. S. Dodds. who continued the 



GALENA TOWNSHIP. 135 

business for some years, until the machinery became worn out and 
worthless. In the same year Loami She:ld started a small wagon 
shop about three quarters of a mile east of where Centre school 
house now stands. 

In the year 1846, Charles Francis & Son built a saw mill on 
Galena creek, a mile and a quarter above Barnes' mill. 

In 1848, Wm. Waldruff and Hiram Bement built a saw mill 
about three-fourths of a mile below Barnes' mill, on the Barnes 
branch of Galena creek. Waldruff afterwards sold out his in- 
terest to Ira L. Barnes. Bement and Barnes sold to Richard 
Etherington. 

John B. Smith started a wagon shop in 1849, on the farm be- 
longing to R. K. Smith, on the road from LaPorte to New Buffalo. In 
the summer of the same year, Valentine F. Smith built a small 
turning shop on a stream emptying into the Galena, about a mile 
and a half west of Winch's shop. Mr. Smith continued the busi- 
ness until the spring of 1854. 

In January, 1852, Whitman Goit, one of the first settlers, and a 
good and enterprising man, who had filled many important local 
positions in his township, was accidently killed by the falling of a 
tree, while he was engaged in getting out railroad ties. On the 
fifth day of March next following, Kellogg Shedd was accidentally 
killed by the tipping over of his wagon loaded with saw logs, while 
on his way to Barnes' mill. This accident occurred near Centre 
school house. The untimely death of these two men was deeply 
regretted by the early settlers and their friends, of whom they had 
many in the county. 

In the year 1854, R. B. Goit and Wia. Ingersoll, rebuilt the old 
Talbot saw mill which had gone to decay; In 1857, Truman Barnes 
built a wagon shop about a mile north of the Centre school house ; 
in 1858, the Francis brothers built a grist mill about a quarter of a 
mile below Waldruff & Bement's mill. It is known as the Finley 
mill. It was the first and only one erected in the township ; in 
1859, Nathaniel Barmore opened a general store near Barnes' mill. 
He sold out to Valentine F. Smith, in the spring of 1854. Smith 
remained about eighteen months in that locality, and then moved to 
Mayes' corners. There he kept the store for a time when he sold 



136 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

out to Peter H. Hess. Hess kept up the establishment between 
two and three years and then abandoned mercantile pursuits. This 
store, opening at the mill and closing at the corners, was the first, 
last, and only attempt at merchandising in the township. 

In the spring of 1857, Valentine F. Smith built a steam saw mill 
about forty rods west of Mayes' Corners. He had in connection 
with it a shingle mill and barrel heading factory. It was burned 
in the fall of 1862. This was the first steam mill put up in the 
township. 

In the year 1869, Dorf & Kenton erected a steam mill in the 
southeast part of the township, a little west of Mount Pleasant. 

A steam saw mill w r as moved from Rolling Prairie to Galena dur- 
ing the summer of 1874 by Shaw & Johnson. It stands by the 
roadside about one-half mile north of Lamb's chapel. 

Some thirty years ago there occurred an incident near the pres- 
ent locality of the last named mill, which has been almost forgotten, 
as there are none left of kin to the family in the township. There 
came from the State of Missouri a large, powerful man, bearing the 
name of William Mathews. He was noted for his quiet, unobtru- 
sive manners, and was industrious and devotedly attached to his 
only boy, a child of some six summers. One day he was cutting 
timber while the wind was blowing a perfect gale. He had chopped 
at the trunk of a tree as much as he thought prudent, and step- 
ped back a few yards to take a view of the situation, when suddenly 
he heard a crackling noise, and saw the tree falling. His child was 
at his side. Between saving himself and his boy he hesitated not a 
moment. He grasped him and with one effort of his herculean arm, 
cast the child bevond danger. In an instant more that brave 
father's heart had cased to beat, and he lay upon the earth a crushed 
and bleeding corpse. The widow sold the property and moved 
away: where, none in the neighborhood know. 

On the loth day of August, 1874, Galena was visited by a fear- 
ful storm of hail and wind, which did great damage to the standing 
crops. Thousands of fruit and forest trees were uprooted or broken, 
fences were blown down, barns were demolished and dwellings un- 
roofed. The thunder kept up one continuous roar, heard above the 
rushing of the mighty winds and the crash of falling timber. The 



GALENA TOWNSHIP. 137 

lightning was one ceaseless blaze. Hail as large as pigeons' eggs 
came down in sheets, and cut the standing corn in pieces. It occur- 
red at about five o'clock in the morning, and never since the first 
settlement of Galena, had such a storm, effecting such immense loss, 
visited the township. 

Among those now living in the township or recently there, who 
came early to the county, are Win. C. Cummins and E. W. Davis 
who came in 1833; J. H. Francis, Luke Francis, W. W. Francis, 
Scipha Foster and Zachariah Teeter, who came in 1834 ; H. E. 
Smith, Charles Morrow, W. W. Fuller and Hiram Bement, Jr., 
who came in 1835; and Benjamin Brewer, Win. W. Finley, Mor- 
rison Paddock, James Padiock and Samuel Wilson, who came in 
1836. The township is now well settled, and among the well- 
known citizens are Enos Weed, who made a settlement in 1837, is a 
farmer, and has served as a county commissioner ; McDonald 
Shead, who is a farmer, and served as a soldier in the forty-eighth 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry, during the war of the rebellion ; Mar- 
tin Bates, an old and respected citizen, a farmer who came from 
Hampshire county, Mass., in 1840; E. S. Cadwell, a farmer, who 
has been justice of the peace and trustee of the township; Oliver 
Marston who came from Erie county, New York, in 1843, and Alex- 
ander B. Austin who enlisted in the forty-eighth Indiana Volunteers, 
and served during most of the late war, attaining the rank of Captain. 

When Galena township was first settled, it was almost entirely 
covered with timber. Its surface is rolling and in some places 
hilly. The soi) is loamy, warm, and produces well. It is well 
adapted to the raising of fruit; and peach and apple orchards are 
very common. Some of the finest timber in the county may be 
found in this township. There are many fine farms in Galena, but 
to clear the land and make it available for cultivation has been the 
work of years. 

There are great difficulties in getting at the facts relating to the 
early settlement of a township like Galena, which do not present 
themselves in one located upon a prairie, where it often happens 
that the settler can stand upon the top of his cabin and at a glance 
take in its entire boundaries. Citizens from its extreme parts rarely 
met except at general elections. No attempt has been made to lay 



138 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

out a village, and the county records are unincumbered with any 
survey made for this purpose. There has been no common point 
for convivial meetings within its limits, where men have lounged 
away their hours in telling for the hundredth time the tale of their 
early trials and privations. It is the boast of the citizens that 
intoxicating liquors have never been sold as a beverage within their 
township. Crime and poverty have been almost entirely unknown. 
The inhabitants have nearly all been tillers of the soil, generally 
religiously inclined, hardy and industrious, frugal and honest. 

The township has been slower of developement than in the case 
of those townships located on the prairie; but when once man's 
labor has subdue, i the obstacles to cultivation, it receives a rich 
reward. Crops are more certain to yield a return ; and the result 
is that Galena township having a soil naturally of great depth and 
richness, is becoming one of the wealthiest and most prosperous sec- 
tions of the county. 



CHAPTER XI. 

CLINTON TOWNSHIP. 

From the date of the organization of the county until March 9th, 
1836, Clinton township was a part of Xew Durham ; but on that 
date, at their March term, the following order was made by the 
Board of county commissioners: •"Ordered that New Durham 
township be divided by the line dividing congressional townships 
thirty-five and thirty-six, north of range four west, and that all that 
part of said township formerly comprising congressional township 
thirty-five, north of range four west form a new township for judi- 
cial purposes, to be known by the name of Clinton township, and 
that there be an election held in this township on the first Monday 
of April next, for the purpose of electing two justices of the peace 
for said township, until the next annual election for township 
officers, and that the election for said township be held at Charles 
Eaton- >hop." 

There has been no change in the limits of the township since that 
time. The south side of Clinton was then the boundary of the 



CLINTON TOWNSHIP. 139 

county, but it has since been extended to the Kankakee river by 
act of the legislature, and two more townships have been organized. 

In its physical characteristics, Clinton township shows much diver- 
sity. The larger portion of its area is prairie, but there are groves 
of timber, and on the south and east are sandy "barrens "' with oak, 
as the principal timber growth. Hog creek runs across the town- 
ship from north to south, watering a large part of it ; and most of 
the land is of an excellent quality, the prairie soil being similar to 
that in other parts of the county, and the "barrens'' producing 
fine crops of grain. Taken altogether, it is regarded as one of the 
most desirable parts of the county, of great productive capacity and 
convenient to market, three railroads, the Lousiville, New Albany 
and Chicago, Chicago and Lake Huron, and Baltimore and Ohio, 
passing across it, the first from north to south, and the other two 
from east to west. 

Of the early settlers Isham Campbell is said to have been the 
first. He made his home on the west side of Hog creek in the year 
1832, and in the Fall of the same year Andrew and Edmund Rich- 
ardson made a settlement, taking land on section nine. 

In 1833, Nathaniel Steel, R. Prather, Levi Reynolds, John 
Osborn, Wm. Niles, Lemuel Maulsby, Richard Williams, Thomas 
Robinson, and Stephen Jones, a Methodist minister, came into the 
township and became residents. John Warnock located his claim 
this year on section four, but did not move on it, on account of 
sickness in his family, until the ensuing spring. 

In 1834. the list of settlers was quite large and embraced John 
Reynolds, T. J. S. Hixon, Simeon Tuley, John Small, Matilda 
Tuley, James Haskell, Jonathan Osborn, John Warnock, Phineas 
Small, John and Charles Eaton, Hezekiah Robertson, Daniel Rob- 
ertson, Wm. Eaton, Jacob Iseminger, Wm. Wilson, John Small, 
James Reeves, Samuel Maulsby, Walter Livingston, L. Richardson, 
John Clark, John Lewis, Jesse Marshall, John Wilman, Orange 
Lemon and Benj. J. Bryant. 

William Wilson who came this year, located Indian floats on sec- 
tion nine and ten. These floats were in the nature of land war- 
rants, save that they contained no provision for the protection of 
actual settlers. They were issued to half-breed Indians, but being 



140 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

made assignable, found their way for the most part, into the hands 
of speculators. Mr. Wilson honorably paid the settlers on the two 
sections for all the improvements they had made. 

For the year 1835, we have the following record of settlers to 
present: Wm. T. Harding, Joseph "Wright. Thomas Patterson, 
Richard Williams, Perrin Scarborough, Jonathan Williams, Herbert 
Williams, Horace Pinney, Sen., Horace Pinney, Jr., Wm. Pinney, 
David Pinney, Abijah Bigelow, David Congdon, Benjamin Maulsby, 
Luke Ashley, Mr. Heaton, Dr. Philander Loomis, John Bailey, 
Mr. Heath (deaf and and dumb), and Dr. Whitcoinb. who is said to 
have been the first resident physician. 

Mr. Doolittle and Mr. Johnson were early settlers, coming prob- 
ably in 1834 or 35. 

In 1837, Christian Richardson. Lemuel Brush, Richard Robert- 
son, Sen., John Koontz, Gideon Long and Adam Iseminger. settled 
in Clinton ; Wm. Snavely came in 1839, and in 1810 John Robin- 
son, Isaac Powell and Dr. Bement arrived. The year 1838 is 
somewhat memorable as the "sickly season." Bilious complaints 
were prevalent, and very few escaped. There were not enough 
remaining well, properly to care for the sick. E. S. Gardner moved 
into the township in this year. 

In 1843, Nathaniel Davis, a Congregationalist minister, and well 
known as an ardent advocate of temperance, and an original Aboli- 
tionist, made the township his home. Dr. Cobb also arrived the 
same year. 

A log church was built on section ten. in 1844, which afterwards 
caught fire and burned down. It was built bv the Methodists and 
was called Hickory Chapel. Wiley B. Mack was the first minister 
who officiated within its walls. He was succeeded by Rev Mr. Oakes. 
Rev. R. Hargrave was also one of the earliest preachers here. This 
Hickory log chapel was succeeded by the present Clinton chapel, 
which was built in 1860. 

The culture of mulberry trees and the raising of silk worms at one 
time engaged considerable attention in the township. The follow- 
ing will be found in book C, of the proceedings of the commissioner's 
court, page twenty-six : 

" It is ordered by the board that Potter Doolittle be allowed the 



CLINTON TOWNSHIP. 141 

sum of two dollars and twenty-five cents as a bounty on fifteen 
pounds of silk co-coons, as per the certificate of Wm. Moorman, a 
justice of the peace of LaPorte county." Potter Doolittle was a res- 
ident of Clinton, and the foregoing order was made in September, 
A. D. 1846. 

HASKELL STATION. 

In the year 1854, A. Culver purchased two hundred and forty 
acres of land in section twenty, in Clinton township. It being 
favorably located on the Louisville, New Albany and Chicago rail- 
road, he conceived the idea of laying out a town in case a sufficient 
number of persons were attracted to the locality to warrant it. He 
did not commence as many have done by having it platted and filed 
in the recorder's office before any evidence of a village was visible, 
and afterwards subject himself to the mortification of leaving upon 
the countv records an enduring monument of a vanished air cas- 
tie. From its location it seemed to be a good point for a store, and 
he gave to samuel Brush an acre upon condition that he would open 
one. This Mr. Brush did in the year 1855, and he continued in 
the mercantile business at that place until 1863, when he died. 
John Ferris bought out the estate, both real and personal, of the 
administrator, continued the business until 1867, and sold to 
Wm. D. Crothers. It soon after passed into the hands of Mr. 
Sopris and from him to Thomas L. Hoadley, who discontinued the 
business in 1870. 

In the year 1857, a postoffice was established at the station, and 
Samuel Brush was apppointed postmaster. The present postmaster 
is Thomas L. Hoadley. 

In 1858, David Carpenter commenced blacksmithing. 

In 1861, a warehouse was built by Samuel Brush, and considera- 
ble grain was shipped from this point, but the construction of east 
and west roads has diverted the grain trade in a great measure from 
the south. In 1871 this warehouse was struck by lightning and 
burned. Haskell never ranked as a town. No plat of it was ever 
recorded. It is only a hamlet — having had a store, blacksmith 
shop, grain depot, postoffice, and being a railroad station. 

BIGELOW. 

Abijah Bigelow moved into Clinton township in the year 1835, 



142 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

and soon after proceded to put up a grist mill, which he completed 
in 1837. He brought a small colony with him who were mostly 
Canadians. 

In the year 1836, Wm. T. Harding opened the first store in that 
place. After he had fairly commenced he took as a partner, a man 
named Bogart, and while Harding was attending to his farm Bogart 
sold the concern to one Bentley. A litigation ensued which result- 
ed in Bogart's being sent to jail and Bentley 's getting away with the 
goods. 

During the year 1837, the town was recorded in the informal 

manner so common in those times. It embraced twenty-eight 
blocks, described as being in township thirty-five, range four west. 
in the southwest quarter of section twenty-one. 

In 1837. a Frenchman who was known by the name of "Bushee," 
started a blacksmith shop. During the same year Arnold Sapp 
had a cabinet and jobbing shop, and in 1838, a postoffice was 
established and Wm. T. Harding had the contract for carrying the 
mail. 

In the year 1848, the 'people became tired of their own organiza- 
tion, and among the records of the September term of the county 
commissioners' court of that year, we find the following : 

"Now comes Hubert Williams and motions that his petition here- 
tofore filed, to-wit: On the 21st day of July, A. D., 1848, for the 
vacation of the town of Bigelow's Mills be now taken up. Where- 
upon the board, upon due consideration, being satisfied from the 
affidavit of said Hubert Williams, that manuscript notices of the 
pending of said petition had been set up in three of the most public 
places in said town, thirty days previous to the present session of 
this board, containing a description of the property to be vacated, 
do order the said town to be vacated." 

John Closser started a store at Bigelow's Mills in 1848, and 
afterwards sold out to Soper & Metcalf. They did business for a 
time, and then sold to Henry Brush. Samuel Hammond bought 
out Brush in 1861. Perrin Scarborough started a wagon shop in 
this year ; in 1852, Frank Howell started a blacksmith shop near 
where Frank Knight's house now stands, and in 1854, Mr. Gordon 
had a gunsmith shop to which he added a stock of goods the ensuing 
year* 



CLINTON TOWNSHIP. 143 

The Bigelow mill having been sold to John Closser, and by him 
to John "Wright, passed into the hands of Henry Harding in 1854. 
He built a store also, and had a general assortment of goods. Mr. 
H. continued the business until 1874 when he died, and John War- 
nock, as administrator of the estate, sold the property to Abram 
Sovereign, who disposed of it to Mr. Boler. 

In 1864, J. Jacobson carried on the business of harness making. 

The postoffice at Bigelow was discontinued in the year 1868. 

The following incident occurred in the year 1835. Wm. T. 
Harding and A. G. Webster of Noble township, were brothers-in- 
law, and put in crops together, some corn on Webster's claim, and 
buckwheat on that of Harding. After the corn came up the ground 
squirrels commenced digging it, and some arsenic was obtained to 
destroy them. A part of it was used and the remainder was laid 
away in Webster's clock. During the following summer, Harding 
procured some calomel and after having used a part of it, put the 
remainder away in the same place where the arsenic had been stored. 
After this, Harding returned to Ohio, from whence he had migrat- 
ed, for his family, consisting of his wife, two sons and three daugh- 
ters, and returned with them in the latter part of September. The 
first day after his arrival, he went to Webster's house, who, with his 
wife, were absent visiting the newly arrived family. Harding's 
oldest daughter being unwell, he went to the same clock to procure 
the calomel to administer it to her. Going to his own home with it, 
he related to Mrs. Webster what he had done. After Mr. and Mrs. 
Webster had returned, the former went to the clock to wind it as he 
had usually done, and missing the arsenic, and being informed by 
his wife what had become of it, ran all the way to Harding's, hoping 
to arrive before any of it had been taken. He was too late. Fif- 
teen minutes before he came, the oldest daughter had taken a dose, 
and Harding had also done the same a moment before his arrival. 
Lamp oil, being the only article at hand to serve as an emetic, was 
administered. The father was saved, but the daughter died before 
morning. This was the first death that occurred in the township. 

At an early date in the settlement of Clinton, a hog dealer pass- 
ed through the township, and in doing so, lost a number of his 
drove. They ran wild and multiplied. There were very few 



144 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

enclosures, and the early settlers allowed their swine to run at large 
also, each preferring to have his own private mark upon his stock, 
and each desiring to have his share of the wild ones which were run- 
ning about promiscuously. An old settler states that it was won- 
derful how soon a porker could be dressed and packed away by the 
residents on the creek after it was shot. They had a habit of first 
cutting off the ears, or of even skinning the animal when dead to 
avoid identification, and the crack of a rifle had scarcely ceased to 
echo over the prairie before this was all accomplished. Finally, an 
immense amount of litigation was the consequence, and one of the 
settlers expended all his means, involving one hundred and sixty 
acres of land, his stock, house and home, in lawsuits growing out of 
the uncertain proprietorship in swine. This circumstance probably 
gave name to the creek which flows through the township. 

On the 27 day of November, 1865, James Woods shot and killed 
John Lohm, a German resident, in the west part of the township in 
the Osborn and Small neighborhood. Woods and Wm. Fulton had 
been drinking, and had just returned from Westville in a state bor- 
dering upon intoxication. When in the neighborhood we have 
described, they encountered a party of Germans who had been husk- 
ing corn and were returning with loaded wagons. Woods ordered 
them to halt, to which no attention was paid. Fulton then said to 
him: " Why don't you shoot." Woods then drew a revolver and 
discharged it, the ball passing by those who were on the first wagon, 
and took effect in the body of John Lohm, inflicting a mortal wound 
from the effects of which he died in a short time. The men were 
said to be strangers to each other, and had had no previous difficul- 
ty. Both Woods and Fulton were indicted at the April term of the 
circuit court, 1866, and were tried in April, 1867. Woods was 
convicted of murder in the second degree and sentence! to the pen- 
itentiary during the term of his natural life, and Fulton of man- 
slaughter, and sentenced for thirteen years. 

On the 14th day of March, 1869, Nicholas Aker, a boy fourteen 
years and eight months old, was playing witli a gun with two 
younger brothers, when taking it up to blow into the muzzle, it acci- 
dentally went off, killing him instantly. On the 7th day of Nov. 
1874, August Kopelsi, a boy fourteen years and eight months old, 



CLINTON TOWNSHIP. 145 

who resided with his father, Frank Kopelsi, a resident of Bigelow., 
was out duck hunting. In walking along he held the muzzle of his 
gun under his arm. Striking the lock accidentally, the cap explod- 
ed and the contents of the gun nearly tore the arm from his body. 
He died in less than an hour afterward. 

In the two cases abovu narrated of death from the use of fire 
arms, both boys were nearly of an age at the time the accidents in the 
cases occurred, the difference being but ono day. 

On the 6th day of November, 1874, Frank Knight, a young man 
who resided at Bigelow, met with an accident at Mansfield, Ohio, 
which cost him his life. He was employed on the Pittsburg and Ft. 
Wayne railroad, and while engaged in uncoupling cars, fell between 
them. One car passed over a leg cutting it off. He lived only 
three hours and and a half after the accident occurred. He was a 
very promising young man, and his death was much deplored by a 
large circle of friends. His age at the time of his death was twenty 
years, ten months and twenty-seven days. 

Among those who have recently lived in Clinton township or 
who now live there, and who came early to LaPorte county, are 
Wm. Steele, a native of the county, born in 1830 ; Thomas Gar- 
wood, born in the county in 1833 ; Wm. Snavely, who came to the 
county in 1833, emigrating from Virginia; R. R. Richardson who 
came from Washington county, Indiana, in 1833; Charles G. & 
Thomas L. Eaton, Benjamin V. Fogle and Jacob Iseminger, who 
came in 1834; W. C. Allen and John Iseminger, in 1835; 
Wheeler Bentley, and E. C. Reynolds a native of the county, in 
1846 ; Wm. Pinney and Amenzo Mann in 1837 ; W. H. Beahm, a 
native of the county, 1839; and C. R. Burch, born in the county 
in 1840. These are, nearly all of them, successful farmers, agricul- 
ture being the chief industry of the township. The township is well 
settled with an industrious, intelligent and thriving people. The 
interests of education have not been neglected ; there is a school 
house for each neighborhood, and the children of the pioneers' chil- 
dren enjoy advantages of schools and churches, and social and 
neighborhood intercourse, of which the early settlers were in a large 
measure deprived ; but which they fully appreciated, and took meas- 
ures to secure for those who should come after them. 

IO 



14»'> HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



CHAPTER XII. 

NOBLE TOWNSHIP. 

Noble was a part of Scipio township until the 9th day of March, 
1836, when at the March term of the commissioners' court of that 
year the Board made the following order: 

" Ordered, that Scipio township be divided by the line dividing 
townships thirty-five and thirty-six, north of range three west, and 
that all that part of said township formerly comprising congressional 
township number thirty-five north, form a new judicial township, 
to be known by the name of Noble township, and that there be an 
election held in said township on the first Monday of April next, 
for the purpose of electing justices of the peace for said township, 
and that Arthur McClure be appointed inspector of elections for 
said township, until the next annual election of township officers, 
and that the election for said township be held at the house of John 
McLane." 

Since that time the east boundary of the township has been 
changed so that sections one and twelve, three-fourths of section 
thirteen, one-half of section twenty-four, and nearly one-half of sec- 
tion twenty-five, are now a part of Union township, a singular 
departure from the congressional township boundary, for which there 
does not seem to be any good reason. The first settlers in Noble 
township were Horace and Lane Markham. who came into the 
township in the Fall of 1831, aud claimed laud near Union Mills, 
Horace a short distance north of the town, and Lane a little to the 
west — both being on section eight. Little is known in regard to 
either of these families, as they moved away many years ago. Even 
the name of the creek, which was formerly called Markham's has 
been changed to Mill creek, and there seems to be nothing left to 
perpetuate the name of these pioneers. Bird McLane and John 
McLane purchased their land during the year 1832. Joseph Whea- 
ton became a resident in 1832, and laid out the town of Union 
Mill?, 



NOBLE TOWNSHIP. 147 

In the year 1833, the McLanes settled in the township, and the 
same year came William, Samuel, Michael and Edward O'Hara, 
Admiral, Peter and Ira Burch, Wright and Silas Loving, Isaac 
Johnson, Warren Burch, Mr. Fowler, and Jeremiah Perkins. In 
1834, Joseph Sterritt settled on Dormain prairie, having come to 
the county and stopped at Rolling prairie in 1833. In 1834 
Richard Worrall and Samuel Mitchell came also. A settlement 
was commenced at the same time in the northwest part of the town- 
ship. On the 7th day of November, A. G. Webster made a claim 
of the northwest quarter of section six, upon the banks of Spring 
creek and built a cabin. John Harding claimed the northwest 
quarter of the same section, and A. Logan the southeast. Horace 
Wood and Elizabeth McLane were married this year. This is 
said to have been the first wedding that took place in the township. 

In 1835, Henderson Nickell, Dr. Everts, Timothy Everts, 
Gustavus Everts, Sidney S. Sabin, Theodore M. Wells, John 
Barclay, Israel Underwood, John Goldsmith, Richard Goldsmith, 

■ Goldsmith, Sen., and Benj. Shaw became settlers. A. G. 

Webster, E. S. Harding and John Wakefield built a shool house on 
Webster's farm in the Fall of this year, and Rachel Carter who 
taught the first school in New Durham township, filled a like posi- 
tion here. She commenced in January A. D., 1836. This school 
in early times, was very jealous of its reputation, and particularly 
in relation to the art of spelling correctly, and many were the 
attempts of the neighboring districts to excel in this respect. It 
was particularly distinguished for the number of teachers who fitted 
themselves for that profession in the little log structure. The fur- 
niture was made from logs split and planed off with grub hoes. From 
such material the seats and desks were manufactured. The fire 
place and doors occupied one entire side of the house. The floor 
was made of puncheons, manufactured in the same manner as the 
seats and desks. In this place many of the active business men of 
our county received the rudiments of their education. 

In 1836, John C. Reed settled on section seven, and Asaph Web- 
ster on section six. The latter built a saw mill, which the division 
of the township brought a few rods over the line into Scipio. Dur- 
ing the year a Baptist church was organized in the log school house 



148 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

in the "Webster district." It was known by the name of "Spring 
creek Old School Baptist church." Elder A. Neal of Porter county 
perfected the organization. The following were the names of the 
members: Asaph Webster, E. S. Harding, John Harding, A. A. 
Cole, Ariel Wakefield, Ameluna Webster, Mary Harding and Polly 
Harding. A. A. Cole and E. S. Harding were the first resident 
elders of the church. A. G. Webster was church clerk from its 
organization until it ceased to exist in 1854. He was also one of the 
first township trustees, and filled the office of justice of the peace 
two successive terms. 

Russell Harvey settled on section ten in 1837. John F. Allison 
was a teacher in this year, and afterwards justice of the peace. 

In 1837, Dr. Everts commenced the practice of medicine. He 
had three sons who followed him in the profession. Their names 
were Eudorus, Orpheus, and Carroll; in 1838, Allen Cummings 
commenced carpentering, most of the time employing from eight to 
twelve hands; in 1839, a saw mill was built by John Johnson & 
Bro., about three-quarters of a mile below Union Mills, on Mill 
creek ; in 1840, Jacob Early commenced building a large distillery 
on Mill creek. It was finished in 1842. He did a very large bus- 
iness. In 1852 it caught fire and was burned; in 1843, Logan A. 
Wakefield erected an ashery upon the farm of A. G. Webster, and 
entered into the business of manufacturing pear] and potash. It 
did not prove a successful undertaking and was abandoned in 1846: 
in 1847, a new school house was built bv George Hall, on Mill 
creek; in 1873, the Free Methodists built a church at Indian 
Point. In the same year the Chicago & Lake Huron railroad was 
finished through the township; and in the year 1874, the Balti- 
more and Ohio railroad was built. 

It was at one time proposed to build a village about a mile from 
the site of Union Mills, and ir was platted accordingly and called 
Belmont. The following record, without date, is found in book C, 
page one hundred and fifteen, of the county records. It was evi- 
dently filed in 1836, from its location in the book: 

"Plat of the town of Belmont. LaPorte county. Indiana, laid off 
upon the northwest corner of section twenty-one, and the southwest 



NOBLE TOWNSHIP. 149 

corner of section sixteen, township thirty-five, north of range three 
west, by Ward Blake and Abram Charles." 

In 1838, a blacksmith shop was started by John Decker who 
continued in business about five years. 

In 1840, a store was opened by Samuel Smith and Lover- 
man. They continued to do busines in that line about two years, 
and then gave it up. Belmont never made any very great strides 
towards being a point of importance, and when Union Mills began 
to develope in its growth, it went out of existence as a town. 

UNION MILLS. 

Joseph Wheaton built the first house on the site of this town in 
1832. The plat of the village was not placed on record until 1849, 
on the 7th day of December. The record is as follows : 

"The village of Union Mills represented by the annexed plat, is 
situated in the southeast corner of section eight, and the southwest 
corner of section nine, in township thirty-five, north of range three 
west of the second meridian. Surveyed June 14, 1849. 

State of Indiana, "I 
LaPorte County, j 

Be it Known that on the fifth day of November, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-nine, personally appeared before me the 
undersigned, a justice of the peace, within and for said county, by 
authority of law, duly commissioned and qualified, Robert Wierm, 
Geo. Butt, Chas. Fessenden, Lewis Stevenson, Allen Cummings, 
Russell N. Bennett, E. W. Fessenden, Michael O'Hara, B. Elliot, 
Eudorus Everts, Wm. J. Wheaton, proprietors of the town of Union 
Mills, and acknowledged the within plat to be their act and deed for 
the purpose of having the same recorded. 

Given under my hand and seal the day and year above written. 

Jeremiah Perkins, 

Justice of the Peace." 

The grist mill at LTnion Mills was commenced in 1837, by Dr. 
Sylvanus Everts, and was finished in 1838. He continued to run 
it 'about three years, and then sold it to Bell & Gray. It after- 
wards reverted to Dr. Everts on account of a failure to make pay- 
ment, and he, wishing to dispose of it, got up a stock company and 
sold the shares at fifty dollars each. George Butt bought up all the 



150 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

shares, and sold again in 1856. In 1866 J. P. Teeple bought it. 
It is now carried on by Hamilton & Teeple. 

In 1838, there were only five log cabins at the Mills. They 
were owned by Dr. Everts, Josiah G rover, Lewis Stevenson, Levi 
Smith and Joseph Wheaton. 

Levi Smith put up a block house and used it as a .-tore in 183 

In 1840, William Bills put up a frame house on lot number five, 
and had a store in it. He built a frame house for a residence nn 
the same lot. Lewis Stevenson erected a store, and put in it a gen- 
eral assortment of goods. It was upon the lot now occupied by F. 
A. Freeman as a store. During this year a man by the name of 
Clement had a cooper shop in the village and did a fair business. 
R. M. Bennett commenced blacksmithing. 

A shoemaker shop was started by Elisha Thayer in 1841 ; also 
a drug store by Lewis Stevenson ; Mr. Cowan opened a wagon shop 

in 1842. In 1843, William Winters and Rogers carried on 

the business of tailoring. They were in business four or five years 
together. Isaac Johnson worked for them and continued in the 
business. 

In the year 1844, the Presbyterian church was built — it having 
been organized by Rev. F. P. Cummins. The succeeding ministers 
havebeen Rev. Mr. Evans, McCrea, Fisher. McKinney, Elliott 
and Smith. In this year, Stephen and William Clement built 
a store and stocked it, James Westervelt acting as their agent. 
Some two years after. Michael OTIara and A. Cummins bought it. 
After continuing in the businss two years, Cummins sold out to 
Ben Elliott, and he sold to O'Hara at a later date. Thomas Alli- 
son bought a general stock of goods and entered into business, 
which he continued from ten to twelve years. Anson Harvey com- 
menced harness making, and a postoffice was established with Lewis 
Stevenson for postmaster. At that time but one mail each week 
from LaPorte was afforded, and the department offered only seven 
dollars per quarter for its transportation. No one being desirous 
of securing the contract, some of the leading citizens, who were 
anxious to have mail facilities, drew lots as to who should perform 
the duty. The unfortunate person upon whom the lot fell w 



NOBLE TOWNSHIP. 151 

Allen Oummings. A frame school house was erected during this 
year. 

In 1848, Ben Elliott built a store and put in a general stock of 
goods. In 1860, Dr. Egbert commenced the practice of medicine. 
Peter Kannable started a wagon shop, and Wheaton a blacksmith 
shop. In 1852, Dr. Higley commenced the practice of medicine. 
In 1854, Morton & Booth built a shop and commenced the boot and 
shoe business. In 1857, Wheaton who had formerly been engaged 
in the same business at Union Mills, but had migrated to Missouri, 
returned and opened another shop. In 1858, Dr. Crumpacker 
commenced the practice of his profession at Union. The Advent 
church was built during this year. Rev. F. M. Berrick was the first 
pastor. Augustus Block started a wagon shop in 1860, and still 
continues in business. In 1864, Burdet Turner opened a meat 
market. Mr. Berridge opened a gun shop in 1866. In 1859, W. 
F. Williams commenced blacksmiths ng. Joseph Bailey bought out 
Morton & Booth and started in the boot and shoe business, which 
he still continues, and Miss Samantha Church opened a drug ! -tore. In 
1872, Dr. Meredith commenced practice, and Mrs. Almira Turner 
opened the Turner house for the accommodation of the public 
This is the first hotel the town has had. 

In 1872, McClure & McClung built a store and stocked it with a 
general assortment of goods. Heron & Wilcox opened a drug store. 
H. Smith started a tin shop which he has since sold to N. D. 
McCormack. The Chicago and Lake Huron railroad was finished 
to the town in this year. 

In 1874, Drs. Heron & Wilcox embarked in the practice of medi- 
cine in the town. Pope C. Weed and Henry Booth commenced 
harness making. Bennett & Moreland opened a meat market. In 
this year the Baltimore and Ohio railroad was finished close to the 
town, the crossing being but a few rods from its outside limits. 

Since the completion of the two railroads, Union Mills has taken 
a new start and no town in the county outside of the cities, has to 
all appearance, a more encouraging prospect in the future. 

The business of the town may be briefly stated as follows : One 
attorney; one banking agent for Ernest, Prussing & Co., of 



152 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY 

Chicago; one barber; three blacksmith shops; two meat markets; 
two brick masons ; seven carpenters ; one cider mill ; three dry 
goods, grocery and clothing stores ; two drug stores ; two dress- 
makers ; one well driver ; one express agent ; one general shipper 
and dealer in butter, eggs, etc.; one grain buyer and freight agent; 
one grist mill ; one hotel ; two harness shops ; two insurance agents ; 
two justices of the peace; one livery stable; one milliner; one 
notary public; five physicians; two painters; two plasterers; one 
saw mill ; one telegraph operator ; one tin shop ; and three wagon 
shops. There are also two churches, Presbyterian and Advent. 

Stimulated by the railroads the following additions have been 
made to the town : Deets' addition, laid off on the east side of 
Union Mills, and recorded April 23, 1875; and the addition of 
Fredrickson, Hamilton, Way and Deets. recorded on the 1 8th day 
of May, 1875. 

A new town has also been laid off at the junction of the rail- 
roads, bv Charles F. Wells, and Theodore H. Wells, which was 
recorded on the eighth day of April, 1875, and is called Wellsboro. 

Xoble township holds one of the finest bodies of land in the 
county ; chiefly consisting of prairie, with a soil rich and exceed- 
ingly productive. No other portion of the county has been more 
prosperous. Advantageously located for market conveniences, since 
the completion of the Baltimore and Ohio, and Chicago and Lake 
Huron railroads through its limits, its developement and prosperity 
must be greater in the future than in the past. It is watered by 
Mill creek, which passes diagonally across the township from the 
northwest to the southeast, by a smaller creek or two, and by 
several small lakes. To the advantages of the soil and location, 
the people have added facilities for education, and have erected a 
sufficient number of good school houses to supply the needs of their 
children. 



COOLSPRING TOWNSHIP. 153 



CHAPTER XIII. 

COOLSPRING TOWNSHIP. 

The territory embraced in Coolspring township, was a part of the 
original township of New Durham. By the subsequent division it 
became a part of Michigan township, remaining thus until the 9th 
day of March, 1836, when the following order was made by the 
Board of county commissioners : 

"Ordered that Michigan township be divided by the line between 
towns thirty-seven and thirty-eight, range four west, and that part 
of Michigan township comprising town thirty-seven, range four 
west, form a judicial township to be known by the name of Cool- 
spring township, and that there be an election held in said township 
on the first Monday of April next for the purpose of electing two 
justices of the peace for said township, and that Nathan Johnson 
is appointed inspector of elections for said township, and that the 
elections for said township be held at the house of Nathan Johnson." 

It has-been very difficult to ascertain who was actually the first 
settler of Coolspring township, or precisely in what year he came. 
Those who have been consulted differ in regard to the matter. 
Some state that Nathan Johnson was the first settler, others that it 
was a man bv the name c f John or Isaac Luther, while still others 
claim Arba Heald as the first settler. It is probable that these all 
settled in the same year, which must have been the year 1833, and 
having gone into different sections of the township, the parts of 
which were not readily accessible to each other in those early times, 
each neighborhood believes its own first settler was first of all. 
Arba Heald went from Scipio township, oi which he was one of the 
earliest settlers, into the southwest part of Coolspring, and erected 
a saw mill not far from Beatty's corners. Nathan Johnson made 
his improvements at Waterford, which it is said ihat he laid out as 
a village, and Luther settled nearer the central part of the town- 
ship. Mr. Wm. Forrester states that he has often seen the remains 
of the Luther cabin in the neighborhood of where he resides. But 



154 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

whoever may have been foremost in making a settlement, it is cer- 
tain that there were very few inhabitants in the township prior to 
1836. In that year there were in the township, Maj. Eliphalet 
Pattee, Thomas Forrester, John Jacobus, Thomas Sharp. George 
Smith, George Bentley, John F, Decker, Abram Langdon, Nathan 
Johnson, Arba Heald, John Van Meter. John Dysard. John Bcatty, 
Purdv Smith, the Whitakers, Daniel Reed, John Glimeand Ebenezer 
Palmer. Palmer was the first justice of the peace in the township. 
Beatty had been engaged in the Black Hawk war, passed through the 
county on his way to Chicago in 1832, and made his settlement in 
1833. Arba Heald preceded Beattv in the timber of the southwest 
part of the township, and, in connection with Daniel Reed, erected 
a saw mill, the first in that locality, probably in the year 1833. 
John Dysard must have come in 1835. He -till lives in the town- 
ship, and is a farmer and stock raiser, also a successful fruit cultur- 
ist. George Bentley, the father of Ambrose Bentley, who resides 
on the old homestead, and of Dr. G. J. Bentley. of Michigan City, 
ran a saw mill for General Joseph Orr, which was one of the earliest 
erected in the township. Elisha Mayhew owned an interest with 
Orr in this mill, and afterwards Orr and Standiford owned it in 
company. This mill was built in 1833, but Arba Heald's had been 
erected a few months previously. Orr and his partner put up a 
wool carding machine also. This afterwards passed into the hands 
of Samuel Weston, who built a grist mill in the same place, which is 
now owned and run by James Mason and his father. Nathan John- 
son built a saw mill at Waterford, which some claim to have been 
the first erected in the township : and in 1836 he built another. Gen. 
Orr thinks the first saw mill in the township was built at Waterford 
by Walker ,v Johnson. A man by the name of Bowen bought the 
Waterford property, and put up a distillery, which was run several 
re very successfully. The property passed through several 
hands, a grist mill was erected and run in connection with the dis- 
tillery. This was finally closed and the grist mill continued to run 
until about 187", when it was burned. Then Casper Kuhn bought 
the site, erected another mill, and has run it successfully ever 
since. 

Asa Harper made improvements in the township in 1835, but 



COOLSPRING TOWNSHIP. 155 

was then living at Michigan City and did not move into the town- 
ship until several years after. John F. Decker lived at or near 
Waterford, and died in 1844. He was the father of John F. 
Decker now of LaPorte. 

The first store in the township was at Waterford. It was opened 
by Mr. Bowen, and in about six weeks thereafter was closed by his 
creditors. This was probably in 1836. Since that time there 
have been several in the place, which have all been successively 
closed up. A postoffice was opened at "Waterford in 1838, and 
kept by a man named Sears. This was afterwards moved to the 
hotel about a mile south of Waterford, and was discontinued in 
1865. 

The great amount of timber in Coolspring township early invited 
the erection of saw mills ; and there were others built besides those 
already named. John Beatty and Purdy Smith -put up one in 
1833 or 34, in the southwest part of the township. In 1836, Aaron 
Stanton built a flouring mill in the township which his son Alfred 
purchased and managed from 1838 to 1842, when he sold it and 
went to Oregon. Orr's mill and Stanton's also, were on Spring 
creek, a branch of Trail creek. The mill which Nathan Johnson 
built later now belongs to the Timm brothers. 

Schools were opened early, probably in 1835 or 36 ; and Eben- 
ezer Palmer is supposed to have been the first teacher. Rachel 
Jacobus also taught very early, and Wm. Forrester remembers Maria 
Sharp as his first teacher. In 1837 or 38, Wm. C. Talcott went 
into the township, and taught a school near Waterford. He was a 
Universalist preacher, and probably the first to preach in the town- 
ship. There have been services by other denominations, especially 
the Methodists and Presbyterians, usually held in the school houses, 
until about 1855, when a church was built, a very good one, near 
Waterford, by the Presbyterians, which is really a union church, 
being occupied by various denominations in common. This is the 
only church edifice hi the township. 

The villages of the township are Waterford and Beatty's Corners. 
But little business has ever been done at either place, the most im- 
portant business enterprise being the flouring mill at Waterford. 
At B atty's Corners there are now no indications of a town ; and the 



156 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

site is a part of the farm of George R. Selkirk. The place was 
laid off as a town in 1842 bv James Whittem. who divided two 
acres into town lots. A black smith shop was opened by a man 
named Collins, and one Dr. Bosley worked at wagon making. A 
hotel was built, and kept by Enoch Brewer about two years-. He 
afterwards removed to Pulaski county, and kept a hotel at Medary- 
ville. A. B. Wolf kept the hotel at Beatty's Corners for a time, 
but it has long been closed. Only one lot was ever sold in the 
town, and finally George R. Selkirk bought the whole plat, an 
instance not very common, of the purchase by one man, of an entire 
town. 

Coolspring is well watered by small creeks in nearly every part 
of it, affording many excellent mill privileges ; and good timber 
being abundant, these opportunities have been largely improved; 
and although a vast amount of timber has been cut off, yet there is 
still large quantities remaining. The entire township is timbered, 
no prairie land being within its limits. The timber con>i-ts of 
oak. ash, maple, walnut, poplar, beech, hickory and other varieties. 

There is a great deal of good land in the township, and some 
also that is thin and poor, consisting of the sand originally, perhaps, 
thrown up from the lake. But most of the soil can be made to pro- 
duce very good crops of corn, wheat and potatoes : and for fruit it 
cannot be surpassed in the county. Farmers have been generally 
successful and are quite prosperous. Educational privileges have 
not been neglected, and there are at the present time five ■_ -chool 
houses in the township. 

When the township was first settled, it was one of the wildest 
parts of the count . There was abundance of game, 2 of 

deer and turkeys, and even wild bears. The latter sometimes car- 
ried off pigs and hogs at night. The Indians were still in the 
country, and came freely to the huts of the settlers, but never 
molested them in any way, either in person or proper On one 

occasion Mr. John Beatty, when out hunting came near shooting 
an Indian, supposing the red-skin to be a deer. The Indian n 
up and exhibited himself unmistakably, just in time. Had the acci- 
dent occurred it might have resulted in arousing the hostility of the 
savages, and placing in peril the lives of the settlers. 



COOLSPRING TOWNSHIP. 157 

In die year 1836, a sad accident occurred, resulting in the death 
of Amos Smith, son of Purdy Smith, a lad about ten years of age. 
His father, with others, was chopping trees in the forest, and 
the boy was engaged in carrying water to the men, when just as he 
came to where the laborers were engaged, a falling tree struck a 
high stub or body of another tree, which sprang back, and in fall- 
ing, struck down the lad, and killed him instantly. 

Among those who now live in the township, and who came early 
to the county are Hiram and N. W. Blackman, farmers, and the 
latter a cooper; A. L. Booth, a farmer; Richard Cross and Amos 
Thorpe, farmers and cider makers; Reuben Chapin, fruit grower 
and farmer; John Dysard, a farmer and stock raiser; Wm. Fores- 
ter, farmer ami grain buyer; Elder L. Fogle, Christian preacher 
and farmer; Robert Curran and C. G. Dalgren, farmers; Asa Har- 
per, Augustus C. and M. J. iiubner, Wm. Lumbard, S. C. Perry, 
and John Zahrn, farmers and stock raisers; Joseph Eddy, tailor 
and farmer; John Ebert, mason and contractor; A. B. Hunt, 
farmer; D. L. Jackson, farmer and cooper; Casper Kuhn, proprie- 
tor of Waterford flouring mill; Daniel Low, farmer and fruit 
grower, and for many years trustee of the township ; F. M. Taylor, 
proprietor of flouring mill ; James L. Monahan, farmer and dealer 
in fruit trees ; Albert Mudge, a farmer, and several years township 
assessor; Z. W. Palmer, farmer and speculator; A. B. Wolf, farmer 
and carpenter; Dennis Purvis, G. R. Selkirk, G. W. Van Dusen, 
Wm. Sohn and John Windland, farmers; B. N. Shreve, township 
trustee and lumberman; Eli Smith, fanner and cooper, and Jacob 
H. White, physician and surgeon, residing at Waterford, the first 
and only resident physician in the township. 

The township has quite a large population. It is even more 
thickly settled than some portions of the prairie, for the farms are 
not so large, and neighbors are brought more closely together. The 
New Albany and Chicago railroad passes across the west side of the 
township, the Michigan Central cuts the northwest corner, and the 
Indianapolis, Peru and Chicago, the northeast corner, but there is 
no railroad station within the limits of the township. Otis furnishes 
the market for the southwest part, LaPorte for the southeast, and 
Michigan City for all the north side. With markets all around, 



158 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

with a soil reasonably productive, excellent for fruit, and abund- 
ance of choice timber, the inhabitants of this township may expect 
continued prosperity. 



CHAPTER XIY. 

HUDSON TOWNSHIP. 



The township of Hudson was included within the limits of the 
original township of Kankakee, and on the organization of Wills 
was a part of that township, and so remained until the 11th day of 
May, 1836, on which day at the May term of the commissioner-' 
court the following order was made: 

''Ordered by the board, that all that tract of country formerly 
belonging to Wills township, that lies in township thirty-eight, 
north of range one and two west, in LaPorte county, constitute a 
township for judicial purposes, to be known by the name of Hud- 
son township — that the elections for said township be held at the 
house of James F. Smith — that John L. Ross be, and is hereby ap- 
pointed inspector of elections, and that John Baker be, and is here- 
by appointed constable of said township, until the next annual elec- 
tion of township officers." 

Hudson is the smallest township in the county, containing only 
twelve sections and three half sections. Adjoining Michigan on 
the north, and St. Joseph county on the east, the six northern sec- 
tions of congressional township thirty-eight, range one, and one-half 
the next tier of sections are in the State of Michigan; and the eae - 
ern half of the congressional township is in St. Joseph county. 
Thus Hudson township contains considerably less than one-half the 
congressional town-hip in which it lies. In sections twenty-eight, 
twenty-nine, and thirty, is Hudson or Du Chemin lake, a beautiful little 
sheet of water, not far from two miles in length, and averaging half 
a mile in width, the shores of white sand, its borders surrounded 
by mighty forests, luxuriant with vegetation, its waters pure and 
clear, and filled with the finest fish. The western side of Terre 
Coupee prairie extends into Hudson township on the east; but the 



HUDSON TOWNSHIP. 159 

larger part of N it consists of land formerly well timbered. With the 
progress of settlement a great deal of the finest timber has been 
-cut oft'. 

To Joseph W. Lykins, a Welshman, is generally accorded the 
honor of being the first white settler, though there is some doubt 
upon this point, for Joseph Bay was found to be a resident at the 
same time with Lykins, by the first white inhabitants. Lykins was 
connected with the "Cary Mission," the headquarters of which 
were at Niles, Michigan. He came from that place when the 
branch was established on Du Chemin lake. The first heard of him 
however, he was boarding with Joseph Bay, who was keeping 
house, and had a squaw for his wife. Bay had come from the 
Wabash country with a drove of cattle, and herded them in the 
vicinity. Lykins would, under the circumstances, be more likely 
to have obtained the reputation of being the first white settler than 
Bay, even were it the fact that the latter came first, for the reason 
that he was engaged in a more public business, and had no alliance 
with the Indians, with whom Bay would be likely to be classed. 

Asa M. Warren states that he found the parties as described, in 
1829, and that the mission house had already been erected of hewed 
logs, and was situated within twenty feet of where Andrew Avery's 
mill now stands, and close to the lake. There is some doubt as to 
whether Warren is not mistaken in regard to the date of his coming, 
but none are found* to dispute it with any tangible evidence, except 
an old gentleman named Barzilla Druliner, who resides on the road 
between Hudson and Hamilton. He savs that Warren came from 
Warren county, Ohio, in the Fall of 1830, and he, himself, came 
from the same place in the Spring of the same year. Upon the 
other hand, Warren does not claim to be the first white settler — an 
object of ambition which might be an inducement to antedate the 
time of his arrival ; and furthermore, he kept accounts of his black- 
smithing with the Indians, for whom he made tomahawks and other 
implements. The dates reach as far back as 1829. There is a 
mistake somewhere between these old gentlemen, both of whom are 
honest and intelligent. 

To accept the statement of Asa Warren, during the Fall of 1829 
there were as residents of the territory now known as Hudson town- 



160 HISTORY. OF LA PORTE CQUKTY. 

ship, Joseph W. Lykins, Joseph Bay, Asa M. Warren and family, 
and the Indians, one of whom, "Jack Jones," kept a small trading 
establishment. The buildings erected consisted of the branch mis- 
sion house and Bay's cabin, both of which were upon the present 
site of the village of Hudson. 

o 

It will be remembered that the name of Asa M. Warren is con- 
nected with the early settlement of Wills. This is accounted for by 
the fact that Hudson was originally a part of that township, and 
also because Warren's farm is situated in both. He at first resided 
in what is now Hudson, then moved to the bank of a lake on the 
same farm in what is now Wills. This was done because he had 
struck no water in digging for a weil where he now resides. Upon 
this lake he put up a blacksmith' shop, and was known by the 
Indians as "Wishtean Bish." The Blacksmith bv the Lake. When 
he had succeeded in getting water in Hudson, he moved back to his 
first home. It is thus that he becomes associated with the early 

settlement of both townships. 

j. 

In 1830, Nathan Haines settled in the township not far from the 
lake. The mission school was taught by Robert Simmerwell, an 
Indian, who was assisted by his wife, a white woman. Indian chil- 
dren and whites attended together, and among the latter were some 
of the elder children of Mr. Haines. 

The Indians who inhabited the country abound Hudson, were 
composed of various tribes. They were principally Pottawatoinies, 
Menoininees, Chippewas, and Ottowas. Topanebee, the head chief, 
lived on the ^t. Joseph river, where the great proportion of them 
wintered. A few years after the advent of the whites, this chief 
died and was succeeded by his son. who bore the name and title 
of his father. 

The Indians had many petty chiefs, among whom were Sogganee 

and Micksobbee. the latter of whom lived in the w Is, on the south 

side of the lake. When the Indians were removed. S<'ir^;mee went 
to southern Kansas with them, but soon returned, saying that he 
could not live there — there was no sugar tree, lie had been in the 
habit of making maple sugar. He was a strict Roman Catholic, 
and when given anything to eat. would never touch it until he had 
made the sign of the cross. In his latter days, he was taken care 



HUDSON TOWNSHIP. 161 

of at the Catholic institution of Notre Dame, near South Bend. 
There the old chief died and was buried. Sogganee had been a 
great brave in his day. He was at the battle of Tippecanoe, and 
upon one occasion he became very angry at Benjamin Hicks, Esq., 
for alluding to the Indian defeat upon that occasion. The Indians 
were all very kind, and seemingly well disposed toward the early 
settlers of Hudson. 

In 1831, W. W. Cleghorn visited the vicinity of the lake. He 
did not come with the intention of settling, but buying furs. No 
change had taken place, and he describes the state of things in the 
township just as related above. He knew only the settlers named, 
and pronounces the appearance of the country extremely primitive. 

In 1832, many of the Indians were removed to the Osage river 
country, in southern Kansas. Cleghorn accompanied them, having 
obtained a license from the general government to trade with them. 
He did not return to this country with the intention of making his 
permanent home until 1853, though he owned property on the 
banks of the lake where he now resides. 

By the year 1833, many settlers sought homes in Hudson town- 
ship, and a village, known at the time as Lakeport, but the name of 
which was afterwards changed to 

HUDSON, 

began to be recognized in the surrounding country as a place of 
importance. There is not a town in the county more pleasantly 
located. It is situated on the east side of Hudson lake, sloping 
gently towards the shore, and under more favorable circumstances, 
might have become a town of considerable importance. This place 
was once the rival of LaPorte, and indeed, a formidable one, for the 
trade ot the north part of the county. In 1833 its growth com- 
menced. In that year the first school house after the mission, was 
built there. The school was taught by a man named Edwards. 
Charles Egbert opened a very respectable store in the same year. 
John D. Ross and a man named Jewett, started a blacksmith shop; 
Samuel Elliott carried on the business of coopering, and James 
F. Smith commenced keeping a tavern — the first one in the 
township. 

1 1 



162 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

In 1834, Garret Bias built the first steam saw mill that had been 
put in operation in the town, and James F. Smith erected the first 
frame house. Bias run his mill until 1838, when he traded it for 
seven acres of land inside the corporate limits of Chicago, which 
were sold for taxes. The machinery went to Rockford, Illinois. 
During this time a postoffice was established, and A. L. Wheeler, 
who had become a merchant in the place, was the first postmaster. 

In 1835, the town was in the full tide of prosperity. It had two 
taverns, for Garret Bias had opened one; stages were arriving and 
leaving at all hours, the streets were filled with an eager and busy 
throng, farmers came to buy and dispose of their produce, and it 
seemed as though no town in the vicinitv of Hudson could ever 
compete with it in its steps towards commercial prosperity and 
growth. 

Among those who were settlers in the township at the time were 
Benj. Hicks, Wm. Conner, Evan Hobson, James Bailey, Mr. Shay, 
Mr. Gould, Elmore Emmons and Asher White. 

During the year 1836, A. L. Wheeler sold his store to Foster & 
Reynolds. Alexander Cassiday opened his blacksmith shop ; Dr. 
Jared Chapman established himself as physician: a pottery was 
built by Samuel Rowe, and one of those speculative bubbles which 
at the time, crazed the heads of the wisest men had culminated. It 
was the building of a canal from the city of Toledo, Ohio, to New 
Buffalo on Lake Michigan. When the news came that this enter- 
prise had been chartered, and there was a probability of its success, 
Hudson was wild with excitement. The people from the surround- 
ing country assembled in the town, all the musical instruments of 
which the country could boast were brought into requisition, tar bar- 
rels were burned and speeches made. But alas for poor Hudson. 
Even if such a canal had been practicable, the financial crash of 
that year put a quietus upon all their hopes and expectations. The 
excitement produced had caused property owners to charge the most 
unreasonable prices for their lots, and those who would otherwise 
have been earnest and industrous workers for the settlement, were 
driven to other parts to establish themselves in business. During 
this year the postoifice was discontinued, to the great indignation of 



HUDSON TOWNSHIP. 163 

the citizens, who laid the matter to the trickery of their neighbors 
in the village of New Carlisle. 

In the year 1837. Andrew Avery commenced building a saw mill. 
The power used by him was of rather a novel kind. On the east 
bank of Du Chemin lake, the land is quite high for some sixty rods, 
it then sinks below the level of the lake. Through this mound it 
was proposed to dig a ditch. A large force of men were employed, 
and after an immense amount of work, a canal was perfected through 
which the water ran to the depth of four feet. With this power he 
contrived to run 'a wheel. For a while he succeeded very well, but 
like all the lakes in the country, it became less in volume as the 
land was cleared up, the timber cut off and the sod broken, until 
two years after, the project was entirely abandoned. The lake is 
now at least four feet below its former level. During this year 
Robert Stanfield opened a tailoring establishment, and four large 
stores were in operation, not little trading posts, but they were well 
stocked with all kinds of goods, and an immense trade was carried 
on. The monetary crash had impeded the growth of the town, but 
the people were not disheartened. They still believed in the Michi- 
gan canal, and that its construction was only a matter of time, and 
the panic of temporary duration. 

In 1838, Andrew Avery's saw mill commenced operations, Wm. 
Sheridan embarked in the business of cabinet making arid Richard 
Smith had a shoe shop. Garret Bias 'organized a full independent 
military company, of which he was made captain, and Andrew 
Avery lieutenant. They carried government muskets with flint 
locks. Dnring the same season, Dr. Chapman opened a general 
store. 

During the year 1839, Hon. John Reynolds went to Washington 
and had the postoffice re-established. A grist mill was attached to 
the Avery mill, and a firm formed, consisting of Andrew Avery, 
Salem Huntington, Richard Hicks and James F. Smith. Smith 
did not long continue connected with it, but retired, and the busi- 
ness was continued under the firm name of Huntington, Avery & Co. 
It was during this year that the water running from the lake into 
the canal became insufficient for propelling the machinery. In the 
same year a distillery was started by John Hobart. 



164 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

In 1840, Andrew Avery bought out the saw and grist mill, and 
moved it to near where it now stands. Ox power was used as a 
motive power. Thos. Wood started a tailor shop and continued in 
business the next four years. 

In December of the same year, there occurred a murder at this 
town, which for a time created a great deal of excitement, not only 
in the town of Hudson, but in the county. Charles Egbert had 
formerlv been a merchant in Hudson, and an active business man. 
He had a tavern stand at one time on the road which runs along 
the south part of the township line. This hotel had done a good 
business, but Smith had made efforts to get a direct road through to 
LaPorte, cutting ? off all travel from Egbert's place, and was successful. 
The parties had disputes at different times thereafter. On the even- 
ing of the 5th of December, Egbert went into Smith's bar room. 
He had on the same day purchased a dirk-knife at the store of John 
Reynolds. After sitting near the door for a time, he arose and 
turned as if to go out, but really to open the knife, and then 
advanced towards Smith, who raised a chair to defend himself. 
Andrew Foster, who afterwards said he did not see the knife, caught 
Smith's chair, while Egbert inflicted two stabs, one in the left arm, 
the other penetrating Smith's heart, who died in a few minutes. 

There is much misunderstanding in relation to the facts of this 
case, especially as to dates, even among those who witnessed the 
tragedy, and hence there is copied here, the following record from 
the docket of the justice who heard the case: 

STATE OF INDIANA, ^ 

vs. VOn charge of Murder. 

Charles E<;ijert. J 

"On the 5th day of December, 1841, Andrew Foster a Justice of 
the Peace of LaPorte county, on view issued a State warrant, re- 
turnable before said Foster or any other justice of said county, and 
on the 6th day of December, 1841, John C. Hale, constable of said 
county, returned the said warrant before me, R. Munday. a Justice 
of the Peace of said county, and also the body of said Charles 
Egbert, and on motion of Defendant's counsel, the examination is 
continued until the 7th day of December, 1841, at one o'clock p.m. 
At the time set for the examination, comes the plaintiff, by Wm. C. 
Hannah, M. H. Orton, and G. Hathaway; and the defendant in 



HUDSON TOWNSHIP. 165 

person, and bj his counsel, J. A. Liston and G. A. Everts, and 
after hearing two of the witnesses on the part of the State, the ex- 
amination was continued until the 8th day of December, 1841, at 
nine o'clock a. m. At the time set forth, December 8th, 1841, the 
defendant is brought into court and after hearing more testimony on 
the part of the State, the examination is continued until the 9th 
day of December, 1841, at 'nine o'clock a. m. At the time set the 
defendant is again brought into court, and after hearing the balance 
of the testimony on the part of the defendant, the cause is continued 
until December 10th, 1841, at nine o'clock a. m., for the argument 
of the counsel. At the time set, to-wit : December 10th, 1841, 
the defendant is brought into court, and after hearing all the testi- 
mony and fully examining all things touching this case, it is consid- 
ered that the defendant give bail in the sum of five thousand dollars 
and himself in the like sum, for his appearance on the first day of 
the next circuit court, or in default thereof to be sent to the com- 
mon jail of said county, and thereupon the defendant gave bail in 
the sum required, by giving Elisha Egbert, Paul Egbert and Jacob 
Egbert. Whereupon the defendant was discharged. 
Given under my hand and seal. 

R. MUNDAY, J. P. 

Egbert never appeared. He fled to Texas — then not a part of 
the United States — where he lived until after the close of the 
rebellion, deeply regretting his rash act. He became a religious 
man and a Methodist class leader. In September 1844, a scire 
facias was sued out. Finally an arrangement was made with the 
governor of the State, by which the administrators of John Egbert, 
who had died, should confess judgment in the sum of $1,000, after 
which the bond was canceled. The confession was made, and a 
stay of execution taken for one hundred and eighty days. In the 
meantime an appeal was taken to the supreme court. The case was 
not finally disposed of until 1853, when the judgment was set aside. 
The decision may be found in the fourth Indiana Reports. 

In 1842, Andrew Avery's mill was burned. He went to work 
immediately and put up another, using ox power, often as many as 
five yoke of oxen. From this time the course of Hudson has been 
downward. 

In 1845, Wm. Ferguson opened a boot and shoe store, and in 
1851, Abel Whitlock bought a stock of goods and opened a very 



166 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

respectable store, and in 1852, Avery's ox mill was turned into a 
steam mill. The railroad came through Hudson and made its depot 
at New Carlisle a mile and half distant, a town which Hudson a few 
years before, had looked upon with sovereign contempt. This was 
the last blow that was needed to destroy this once thriving 
village. 

In 1854, Early k Avery built a steam saw and grist mill, and 
also opened a general store. Soon afterwards Early sold out to 
Solomon Stevens. This store successively passed into the hands of 
Perkins, Cassiday, Smith, and back again to Avery, who failed in 
1857. It was during this year that the postoffice was finally 
discontinued. 

In 1869, Ed. Perry started a shoe shop, and in 1870 Avery's 
steam mill was burned. Of course he built another immediately, 
where it now stands, and he has since added to it stones for a grist 
mill. In June 1874, the school house at Hudson was burned b'y 
an incendiary. Peter Harris was arrested for the crime, and 
after being tried in the September term of the circuit court was 
acquitted. A new brick school house is now being built. Hudson 
never had a church. 

There is nothing more to tell concerning the village of Hudson, 
which can now scarcely be called a village. Railroads having 
destroyed the great stage routes, that town which is not on a rail- 
road is abandoned by the world, and necessarily sinks to decay. 
Hudson has undergone this fate, and in an aggravated form. 
Daily, many trains thunder past the "deserted village," but none 
stop, and the few inhabitants who are left, and who remember the 
great expectations of Hudson can only sigh over what ••might have 
been." 

There are two churches in Hudson township, both built in 1867. 
one being Methodist Episcopal, and the other Methodist Protestant. 
The former is called the Maple Grrove chnrch. 

A large part of the township is well adapted to agricultural uses, 
and farming is the leading industry. A few are engaged in stock 
raising, and there are several saw mills and a liouring mill, as 
already mentioned. Amon«_ f those now living in the township are 

•/ Cor 

Andrew Avery who still runs the flour and saw mill ; Fleming Rey- 



HUDSON TOWNSHIP. 167 

nolds, who came from Wayne county in 1833, and is a successful 
farmer; Moses Emery, a successful farmer who came in 1845; 
Wm. Galbreath, a farmer who came in 1838 ; Jesse Haines, already 
named as one of the earliest settlers, now a farmer and stock 
raiser; Alexander Hicks a farmer and a saw mill owner; J. M. 
Miller, a farmer and stock dealer ; Esquire Wm. Thomas, M. D. 
Solloway, Obadiah Walker, J. A. Davidson, G. W. Druliner, 
Alexander Cassiday, Daniel Cowgill, W. A. Dickey, Henry Brown, 
and several families of Hickses. 

Lee Solloway came from England and settled here in 1850. He 
died August 12th, 1874. One of the county papers says of him: 
"It is with sincere regret that we record the death, on Wednesday 
night of last week, of Mr. Lee Solloway, who had been long a resi- 
dent of Hudson township in this county. His death was wholly 
unexpected by his friends, up to within a few hours of its occurrence, 
though he had been sick for a few days previously. Mr. Solloway 
was fifty years of age, and settled in this county twenty-four years 
ago, in the township of Hudson, where he has since resided. He 
was a good and useful citizen, and his death will long leave a sense 
of loss in the community where he was best known." 

Though the expectations Hudson village once had of becoming a 
large town, have been disappointed, yet there are in the township 
elements of prosperity which will still remain. Much of the soil is 
rich and productive, and there is still a great deal of very fine tim- 
ber. The people are generally prosperous ; a high degree of intelli- 
gence prevails, and it cannot be doubted that the future has in store 
greater rewards for the industry of the inhabitants than those which 
have been yielded them in the past. 



168 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY 



CHAPTER XV. 

UNION TOWNSHIP. 

The township of Union includes the whole of the Congressional 
township number thirty-five, range two west, the twelve southern 
sections of township thirty-six, same range, sections twenty-five 
and thirty-six, and part of sections twenty-six and thirty-five of 
township thirty-six, range three west, and sections one and twelve, 
and part of sections thirteen, twenty-four and twenty-five in town- 
ship thirty-five, range three west. It thus contains fifty-two sec- 
tions find five parts of sections, and is the largest township in the 
county. At the organization of the county the territory embraced 
within its limits was in the township of Kankakee as then consti- 
tuted, with a narrow strip in Scipio. When Pleasant township was 
organized, most of this territory became a part of that township, 
and so remained until the 4th day of March, 1840, when the Board 
of commissioners' at their regular March session made the following 
order : 

" On petition of sundry cititizens of the townships of Pleasant. 
Scipio and Noble, for the formation of a new township : 

It is ordered by the Board that a new township be formed by 
taking off a part of the above named townships, to be known 
by the name of Union township, and to be bounded as follows, to- 
wit: Beginning at the Centre or half mile stake on the north side 
of section twenty-six, in township thirty-six, north of range three 
west, on a road, thence south along said road on the open line of 
sections twenty-six, thirty-five, two, eleven, fourteen, twenty-three, 
wenty-six and thirty-five to the south line of township thirty-five, 
thence east along said town line to the southeast corner of township 
thirty-five, range two west, thence north on range line to the north- 
east corner of section twenty-five, township thirty-six, range two 
west, thence west on the section line to the place of beginning. 

Ordered that an election be held at the place of holding elections 
in Union township for the purpose of electing one justice of the 



UNION TOWNSHIP. 169 

peace of said township on the first Monday of April next, and that 
Abraham Reynolds is appointed inspector of elections for said town- 
ship of Union until his sucessor is elected and qualified, and that 
the elections for said township be held for the present at the house 
of George W. Reynolds in said township." 

Since that time there have been several changes of boundaries 
effected, until now it occupies the territory already designated, and 
includes a part of the congressional township on the north in which 
Pleasant township is located, and on the west includes a part of the 
congressional townships naturally occupied by Scipio and Noble 
townships. 

The Kankakee river passes diagonally across the southeastern 
part of Union township, so that a large part of it is Kankakee 
marsh. Two other smaller streams run southward across the west- 
erly part of the township, which furnish several valuable mill sites. 
These creeks unite about two miles south of Kingsbury, and finally 
empty into the Kankakee in the northeast corner of Hanna town- 
ship. Three railroads traverse Union township. The Indianapo- 
lis, Peru and Chicago railroad barely touches it in the northeast 
corner, less than one mile of the road being in the township ; the 
Chicago and Lake Huron road passes diagonally across seven 
sections in the northwest part of the township, and has a station at 
Kingsbury; and the Baltimore and Ohio crosses the township from 
east to west near its centre, crossing the Kankakee river within its 
limits and near its eastern border. Door prairie extends into Union 
township from the west, and Stillwell prairie from the north ; and 
thus some prairie land of as excellent a quality as any in the county 
lies in this township. 

The Kankakee marsh lands will eventually become far more val- 
uable than they are now, though at present they are valuable, for 
stock raising purposes. There is considerable timber in the town- 
ship, chiefly oak, growing in sandy soil, strips of which lie along- 
side, and extend into, the marshes. This is the poorest land in the 
township, and aside from the timber is the least valuable. These 
sandy "barrens'' and the marshes, occupy about three-fourths of 
the area of the township. 

In the latter part of 1831, or the early part of 1832, the first 



170 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

settler came to the township, and built a small cabin near the pres- 
ent residence of D. H. Norton. This was Thomas Stillwell, from 
whom the prairie takes its name. He was a "border man," and it 
is said that he loved the company of Indians better than that of the 
whites. He was some time without white neighbors in the town- 
ship, for it was not until 1833 that John Winchell came with his 
family, and the township really began to be settled. John and 
Henry Vail came in the same year. Winchell built a small log 
grist mill, and the Vails erected one also. Several other settlers 
arrived during this year. Among them were Henry Mann, whose 
children still live in the township; Henry Davis, the father of 
Handy Davis who kept the first store in Kingsbury ; Theodore 
Catlin, some of whose relatives still reside in the county; Daniel 
Finley; Mr. Kingsbury, from whom the village derives its name; 

Curtis and Joshua Travis; and probably also Daniel Low, who 
soon afterwards went to Michigan City, and now lives in Coolspring 
township. 

In the year 1834, Charles W. and M. S. Henry, came from 
Geneva, New York, and settled in the township, and in the same 
year came Harrison Winchell, and Norris J. Winchell. Handy 
Davis came this year also, and some of the Catlins, Joseph G. and 
Mead Catlin. the latter of whom was an Advent preacher. David 
H. Norton arrived the same year. Norton and the two Wine-hells, 
Norris J. and Harrison, still reside in the township. Lyman Win- 
chell, a son of John Winchell, and David Winchell went to Califor- 
nia in an early day, and died there. Nathaniel Thurber arrived 
this year also and Darius Sayles. A Mr. Skinner, who afterwards 
came to Union township, made a settlement this year in Noble, on 
the place now owned by Ira Way. Joseph Callison, long a resident 
of the township, had arrived the year before, but made his settle- 
ment in the edge of Noble. Jesse Winchell also, was one of the 

tiers of 1834. He occupied a place which was afterwards owned 
by Mr. Travis; but he left the township and now lives in Wisconsin. 
There were still other settlers in this year, among them, Win. Wal- 
bridge, who now lives in Wisconsin ; Col. Josiah Grover, now of 
Valparaiso: Gustavus Everts, who was the second Judge of the 
Circuit court : Wesley and John Diggins ; and two brothers named 
Page, who were both old bachelors. 



UNION TOWNSHIP. 171 

In the year 1835, there were so many arrivals that it would be 
quite impossible to note them all. Among them were Jacob Early, who 
lived many years in the county and until his recent death in the city of 
LaPorte; and Dr. Sylvanus Everts who was the first physician in 
the township. Timothy Everts arrived in the same year, but settled 
in the edge of Noble township, and afterwards removed into Union. In 
this year a man by the name of Farmer arrived and opened a black- 
smith shop in the township. He died in 1838, during the u sickly 
season." His was the first blacksmith shop opened in the township. 
Ephraim Barney also, who now lives in the " South Woods" came 
in 1835, and George W. Reynolds who now lives in Kingsbury, 
and is a justice of the peace. He settled in Kingsbury May 4, 
1835, when there were but two others in the place, Farmer, the 
blacksmith, and Davis, the merchant. Reynolds worked at the 
carpenter trade, and put up the first buildings erected in Kings- 
bury. The store building now occupied by L. D. Brand, was built 
by him in 1836, and in the same year he put up four other frame 
buildings. 

George W. Reynolds' father, Abram A. Reynolds, came to Union 
township in 1836, arriving in the month of June. He died in 
March 1874. In the same year there came among others, Jeremiah 
Hiser, whose widow still lives in the township ; Daniel Shaw, now 
in Michigan City; Rensselaer Shaw, who died in 1873; Jacob 
Fravel, who still resides in the township ; Isaiah Atkins, still living 
on his original location ; and John Evans, whose widow and 
daughter are still in the township. 

In 1834 or 1835, David Winchell built a saw mill, which was the 
first one erected in the township. In the Spring of 1835, Jacob 
Early bought Winchell's mill, and moved to the township in July. 
Early replaced the log grist mill with a frame structure, which 
stood about thirty years. This was finally pulled down, the prop- 
erty having been sold to H. P. Lans, who built the present mill. 
This is the one at Kingsbury, and is now owned by Mrs. Bodley, of 
Cincinnati, a sister of the Butterworth brothers. 

As already mentioned Henry and John Vail built the first mill 
in the township. This was in 1833. It was a log structure and 
in 1837, they replaced it with a frame. Then they added to it a 



172 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

fulling mill and distillery, and in 1838 a wool carding machine also. 
John Vail died of apoplexy, the property passed into the hands of 
Lot and Edward Vail, and they sold it to Moses Butterworth about 
eight years ago. He still owns the property, but the carding 
machine, fulling mill and distillery were long ago discontinued. 
The only village in the township of Union is 

KINGSBURY. 

This village was laid out in 1835. The following is the rec 
as shown in the office of the county recorder : 

State of Indiana, 1 
LaPorte County, j 

"Personally came before me, the undersigned, recorder of deed-, 
within and for the county aforesaid, Henry Davis, the proprietor of 
the town of Kingsbury, and acknowledged the filing of the above 
plat for record, February 6. 1838. 

B. SpurlocKj R. L. C." 

The first store in Kingsbury, as already mentioned, was opened 
by the father of Handy Davis. Theodore Catlin clerked for him, 
and managed the business of the store. After the death of Davis, 
Jacob Early opened a store in the village, and a man named Paul 
Clay was his clerk. Afterward, Polaski King opened a general 
store. Fred'k West of LaPorte, was his clerk, and managed the 
business for him at Kingsbury. 

This store was sold to Preserved Wheeler, then it passed into the 
hands of Hiram Burlingame who sold to McClung £ Reynolds. 
They sold to John Page, and he sold to Albert S. McLane. He 
died in 1871, and Timothy McLane kept a store awhile, lie after- 
wards removed the most of his stock to Union Mills, and sold the 
remainder to L. D. Brand, who opened his store January 1. 1871, 
and has kept it ever since. Another general store was opened by 
Chapman >S: Craft in the Spring of 1874. McLane & McClung were 
also engaged a short time in selling goods in partnership. 

Theodore Catlin was the first postmaster, and George W. Rey- 
nolds carried the mail to and from LaPorte twice a week, at a dol- 
lar a trip. The route was afterwards extended from Kingsbury to 
Union Mills, Bigelow's Mills, and Tassinong in Porter county, and 
when the Bigelow postoffice was discontinued, the mail route was 



UNION TOWNSHIP. 173 

changed from Union Mills to Hanna, on the Pittsburgh, Fort 
Wayne and Chicago railroad. The entire route has since been dis- 
continued, all the postoffices located upon it, now being supplied by 
the railroads. Albert S. McLane was postmaster at Kingsbury 
during the time he sold goods there, and upon his death in 1871, 
L. D. Brand was appointed and still holds the office. 

Farmer was the first blacksmith in Kingsbury, and there are now 
two, Robert Mecum and Charles H. Ingram. Besides the two 
blacksmiths at Kingsbury there are three others in the township, 
one at Catlin's corners, one at Chatauqua corners, and one at 
Big Island. 

John W. Dexter kept the first tavern, in the same building now 
called a hotel. It has always been known as the Kingsbury hotel. 

The first school house in the township was built at Kingsbury in 
1834. It stood where the Baptist church now stands, and the first 
church was built just across the street where the school house is 
now located, they having since changed places. 

A drug store was established in the place January 1, 1875, by 
W. W. Wilcox. A two story frame building was erected in 1860 
or 61, by the Masonic fraternity, the second story of which is occu- 
pied as a Masonic Hall and Lodge room. In 1872, a two story 
school building was erected, under the superintendence of Edward 
Hawkins, who was then township trustee. The upper story of this 
building is used as a town hall. The village church belongs to the 
Baptist denomination which held meetings in the township proba- 
bly earlier than any other church organization. Meetings were 
held at school and private houses until the erection of the church 
edifice at Kingsbury, which occurred about 1852. Besides this Bap- 
tist church, there is a Methodist church building at Mann's corners 
which was built about 1860, and the Lutherans (German), have 
erected a church edifice during the present year. 

What has now been mentioned, including the two grist mills, a 
repair shop for guns, clocks, etc., several carpenters, and the ship- 
ping interest at the railroad station, constitutes the present business 
of the village. The people of the vicinity had long been anxious to 
secure the passage of a railroad through Kingsbury ; and in 
1873, their wishes were gratified by the completion to and through 



174 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

the town, of the Peninsular Railroad of Michigan, now called the 
Chicago and Lake Huron railroad. This has given a much 
brighter outlook to the business prospects of Kingsbury, as it has 
already become quite a shipping point for grain from the surround- 
ing farms. 

George W. Reynolds was the carpenter who built the first frame 
house in Kingsbury, and it is now occupied as a dwelling by his 
son-in-law, Mr. D. P. Grover. Grover succeeded Edward Hawkins 
as trustee of the township in 1872, and in 1874, H. P. Ellsworth 
was elected to this position. There are five school houses in the 
townshio, all of them s;ood and comfortable buildings. One of the 
first school teachers in the township was Joel Butler who was elect- 
ed County Auditor in 1843. Rev. Phineas Culver was the first 
Baptist preacher, and Elder Holmes the first Christian preacher. 
Rev. James Armstrong, who was sent as a missionarv to LaPorte 

o 7 t/ 

county, and who settled on a farm near Door Village, preaching in 
all the country round about, was probably the first Methodist to 
preach in the township. 

Some of the celebrated "Indian Mounds" are found in this town- 
ship on section twenty-one. Considerable excavations have been 
made in them through the efforts chiefly of Dr. T. Higday of La- 
Porte: and a number of interesting relics have been found which 
are on exhibition in the rooms of the Natural History association. 
The relics obtained must be of a very remote date, as on some of 
the mounds trees were found growing, nearly two feet in diameter. 
They are undoubtedly of Indian origin, but when they were made, 
by what tribes, or for what purpose, are problems whose solution can- 
not readily be given. 

Agriculture is the leading industry of this township, which to- 
gether with that of stock raising constitutes nearly the whole em- 
ployment of the people, the township being well adapted to these 
two connected branches of industry. 

Among the prominent farmers of the township, most of whom 
have lived here many years, are Abel Vail, W. W. Travis, W. H. 
and N. J. Winchell, Isaiah Atkins, J. A., G. W. and E. Travis, 
Win. L. McDonald, Wm. Reynolds, Win. P. Page, Joseph Schoff, 
Moses Vandermark. H. E. and S. J. Norton, F. B. Miller, Henry 



UNION TOWNSHIP. 175 

. W. Miller, Joseph Hiser, S. S. Hay, Daniel N. Hay, Thomas 
Hiser, Hugh Glasgow, Wm. H. Geer, James Good, Theodore 
Hupp, A. E. Barney, R. D. Craft, 0. H. Chapman, Daniel B. 
Collings, Wm. Crow, Wm. S. Cox, J. Dudley, W. W. Demyer, D. 
P. Closser, E. S. Ellsworth, W. Ewing, and Franklin S. Grover. 

Among those who are farmers and stock raisers are Hosea Barnes, 
Wm. Demyer, Charles Donicheck, A. P. Lilly, John Moyer, and 
others. Noah Travis is a farmer and a saw mill owner; George 
W. Reynolds is a farmer and a justice of the peace; Moses Butter- 
worth is a farmer, miller and grain buyer; E. J. Dicks is a farmer 
and stock dealer, and D. P. Grower a farmer and former township 
trustee. The only physician in the township is Dr. H. N. Ellsworth. 

Union township has scarcely begun to be developed. Its product- 
ive capacity might be increased far beyond its present measure; 
and when the marshes are drained as they will be in time, they will 
unfold a body of land of wonderful productiveness. With a con- 
venient market for grain and hay, these products must continue to 
increase from year to year, while the raising of stock also will be- 
come a more and more important and profitable pursuit. With a 
continuance'of the enterprise already exhibited by the inhabitants, 
the growth of the township in wealth and influence is sure. 



176 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



CHAPTER XVI. 

CASS TOWNSHIP. 

The territory embraced in the present townships of Cass, Dewey 
and Hanna, was originally a part of Stark county : but the inhabi- 
tants living north of the Kankakee river, were put to great incon- 
venience to reach their county seat, being obliged to go around by 
the way of Lemon's bridge near the centre of the east side of the 
county. To remedy the difficulty an appeal was made to the State 
legislature, and that body passed the following act, approved Jan- 
uary 29, 1842, "for the attachment of a part of Stark county to the 
countv of LaPorte." 

" Sec. 1. Be it enacted bv the General Assemblv of the State of 
Indiana, That all that . part of Stark county which lies north of 
the Kankakee river be, and the same is hereby attached perma- 
nently to the county of LaPorte. 

Sec. 2. This act to be in force from and after its passage." 

Thus all the territory named was made a part of LaPorte county. 
While it formed a part of Stark county it was known as Van Buren 
township; and this name was retained upon the whole of it until 
the organization of Cass, which took place on the 12th day of June, 
1848, the Board of county commissioners having on that day made 
the following order : 

"It is ordered by the Board upon the petition of sundry inhabi- 
tants of Van Buren township that said township be divided by run- 
ning a line north and south upon the range line dividing ranges 
three and four, and that the part west of said line, and south of the 
township line dividing townships thirty-four and thirty-five, and in 
LaPorte county, be called Cass township, and be numbered sixteen 
upon the tax duplicate, and 

It is ordered by the Board that Alexander Campbell, be and he is 
hereby appointed inspector of elections in Cass township, that Clark 
Meeker be and is hereby appointed constable of said township, and 
that Moody Kimball and W. McLane be and are hereby appointed 



CASS TOWNSHIP. 177 

fence viewers of said township to serve until the next annual 
election for township officers and until their successors are duly- 
qualified." 

As thus organized, the township embraced also the present town- 
ship of Dewey ; and the limits of VanBuren township were reduced 
to that portion lying east of the designated line between ranges 
three and four. This part of VanBuren contained very few inhabi- 
tants, not enough to make it advisable to hold elections, and they 
applied to the Board of commissioners to be attached to and made a 
part of Noble township, and accordingly that body on the 11th day 
of March, 1850, made the following order : 

"Now come sundry citizens of VanBuren township and present 
their petitition to be attached to Noble township. It is therefore 
ordered by the Board that said VanBuren be so attached to the said 
Noble township, and that the boundaries of the said Noble township 
shall be as follows, to- wit: Beginning at the northwest corner of 
section number six, in township number thirty-five, north of ranges 
three west, and running south on the range line to the Kankakee 
river, thence up the said river to the township line between town- 
ship number thirty-four and township number thirty-five, thence 
west on said last mentioned township line to the southeast corner of 
section number thirty -five in township number thirty-five, north of 
range three west, thence north to the township line between town- 
ships number thirty-five and number thirty-six, thence west on said 
township line to the place of beginning." The territory thus added 
to the township of Noble afterwards was organized as Hanna town- 
ship. VanBuren township ceased to exist with the passage of the 
order above quoted. 

When the question of a name for the new township arose, those 
of the inhabitants who were of the Whig faith in politics desired it 
should be called Harrison, while the Democrats preferred the name 
of Cass. It was decided to draw lots, and Walter Livingston and 
John Wills were selected for the drawing. Wills, who was a Dem- 
ocrat, won, and Cass became the name of the township. 

The very wet condition of Cass township at an early period, ren- 
dering a large portion of its territory little less than a marsh, hin- 
dered settlement, and it was not until 1839 or 1840, that any 

12 



178 HISTOM' OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

settlers made their homes here. Peter Wooden, and Abraham 
Eahart were foremost in the settlement of Cass, coming about the 
time named. Jeremiah Wilson also was one of the earliest, but 
finally made his home in the edge of Clinton township. Ximrod 
West was an early settler in VanBuren township, but by the divis- 
ion was left in that part which is now Hanna township. The Con- 
cannons, James and Thomas, also came earl)'-, and Wm. Smith. 
Wm. Batterson, John Wills, and his sons, Charles, John and David: 
Isham Campbell, Adam Leeper, Alexander Campbell, Bishop 
Brockway, E. Y. Waters, Dr. John F. Tilden, and James and 
Richard Cannon. Augustus W. Vail settled at Morgan Station or 
Callao in 1844, and Hon. Edward Evans, the present representa- 
tive to the State legislature has been a resident of the township 
more than twenty -five years. Sixteen years ago, John Harris 
arrived, and population has gradually increased from that time for- 
ward. A large German population has settled in the township, 
and their industry has ma ie them a very useful class of inhabitants. 
In addition to those already named, the following persons are 
successful farmers in the township ; Henry Bowman, who is a native 
of Prussia, and came to this county in 1853; L. M. Shurte, from 
Butler county, Ohio, and A. J. Shurte, from Cass county, Michi- 
gan, who came to the county in 1846 ; S. B. Rundlett, a native of 
this county; and J. H. Cannon, who came from Porter county in 
1843. Mrs. M. M. Beckley is a farmer and stock raiser; J. 0. 
Burner is a druggist and grocery dealer, and J. T. Sanders is a 

railroad agent, telegraph operator and dealer in Agricultural 
implements. 

There have been three villages in Cass township ; Callao, Rozelle 
and Wanatah. 

CALLAO. 

This village is known also as Morgan Station. It is situated on 
the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago railroad, and was laid oft' 
in 1859, by Wm. Taylor. 

The following is the record: "Field notes of survey of the town 
of Morgan, situated in the southwest quarter of the southeast quar- 
ter of section two, township thirty-four, north of range four west, 
commencing at a point five hundred and eighteen feet north of half 



CASS TOWNSHIP. 179 

mile stake on south line of described section, thence east eight 
hundred and sixty-eight feet, thence north one hundred and sixty- 
one feet, thence eighty-four degrees and twenty minutes, west eight 
hundred and seventy-eight feet, thence south three hundred and 

twenv-eight feet to place of beginning. Surveyed and platted by 
W.A.Taylor, May 29, 1859." 

The first merchants in this village were Wm. A. Taylor and Wm. 
McLane; they also put up warehouses and purchased considerable 
grain. An attempt was made to build a steam mill, but the propri- 
etor dying, his work was never completed. Some years ago, 
August Gruening started a blacksmith shop, and still follows that 
occupation. Three years ago, Charles Scarborough opened a store, 
and continued in business two years. Wm. A. Taylor was the first 
postmaster of Callao. In 1864. A. W. Yail was appointed, and 
resigned in 1872. He was succeeded by Charles Scarborough who 
still holds the office. In 1862 or 63, Mrs. Batterson kept a hotel, 
and Dr. John F. Tilden has been located there as a physician since 
1846. A Methodist church was erected at Callao about 1858 or 59. 

R0ZELLE. 

This village was laid out by its proprietor, Joseph Unruh, and 
the plat was recorded in 1859. The following is the record : 

" State of Indiana, \ ( 
LaPorte County, j 

Before me Daniel W. Long, justice of the peace in and for said 
county, this 22d day of January, 1859, appeared Joseph Unruh, 
and acknowledged the execution of the within plat and that he filed 
the same in the recorder's office for record. The same is the west 
half of the northeast quarter of section number eight, in township 

thirty-four, north of range number four west. 

Daniel W. Long, J. P. 

Filed January 24, 1859." 

The village was located about a mile south of Wanatah, on the 
Louisville, New Albany and Cnicago railroad. There never was 
much business done in the place, nearly all of it by Unruh, who was 
a merchant there, and grain buyer ; and when he removed his stock 
and buildings to Wanatah the rest of the town followed ; and there 
now remains only a railroad water-house. 



180 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

WANATAH. 

The town of "Wanatah "was laid out b} T T. A. E. Campbell. Ruel 
Starr, Joseph Unruh and Wm, Unruh; the survey was made by T. 
C. Sweeney and the town plat was recorded September 7. 1865. 
Its growth commenced a few months prior to the time when the 
Pittsburgh, Ft. Wayne and Chicago R. R. was completed which was in 
the year 1857. The business of the place now consists of one hotel; 
one flouring mill ; seven dry goods and grocery stores ; one drug 
and grocery store : two boot and shoe shops; five blacksmith and 
wagon shops, three of which manufacture new wagons, the other 
two being repair shops ; one tailor shop ; one millinery store ; two 
harness shops; one carpenter shop and furniture store; one lumber 
yard; two hay presses, one of which pressed in 1874. one thousand 
tons of hay; one agricultural, and agricultural implement store: 
two saloons; two butcher shops; one produce shipper and general 
dealer; one grain dealer; three physicians, one of whom is a lady: 

one plasterer: one real estate and insurance agent: three telegraph 
operators, and two railroad stations. 

The first general store was kept by Joseph Unruh who moved 
from Rozelle, a nrlle south of Wanatah, at the time of the comple- 
tion of the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago railroad. Unruh's 
building was used as a store and dwelling house also, and he after- 
wards opened it as a hotel which he kept until about four years ago 
when he sold out to Mitzner k, Conitz, who still keep the store, 
and removed to Chicago. Unruh also built a flouring mill in the 
year 1867. It was erected for a warehouse, but concluding to 
make of it a mill, he put in three run of stones, and it is now one 
of the best flouring mills in the count Emil L. Keil, the present 
owner, was for some time in Unruh's employment in the manage- 
ment of the mill, and purchased it in 187". 

The first house in Wanatah was erected by a man named Hyde, 
for a dwelling hou- A Mr. Protsman built the first hotel, some 
time before the town was surveyed and platted. This building is 
now Gallert's saloon. A hotel was also kept a short time by a man 
named Louderback. Frank McCurdy built the McCurdy house in 
1865. He sold it in 1874 to Robert Whitlock, and on the 0th day 
of January, 1875, it was burned. It was immediately rebuilt by 



CASS TOWNSHIP. 181 

Whitlock, and was opened July 22, 1875, under the name of the 
Wanatah House. 

The first physician in the village was Nelson Ward. After hav- 
ing been in Wanatah some time he removed to LaFayette, but after- 
wards returned. His wife has since studied medicine at Ann Arbor, 
Michigan, and now practices with him. Dr. B. F. Janes afterwards 
settled in the place. 

The German Lutherans have built a very good church edifice in 
Wanatah, but other denominations have held services of late years 
in the "Enterprise" school house, which was built by a company of 
citizens in 1870. It was a stock company and most of the shares 
are now owned by F. McCurdy. An effort is at this time being 
made to induce its purchase by the township. 

Wanatah is situated on Hog creek, at the crossing of the Pitts- 
burgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago, and Louisville, New Albany and 
Chicago railroads. It is in the open prairie, which a few years 
ago, it would have been difficult to cross on horseback or with a 
team without sticking fast in the mire. Now the land all around is 
dry,- much of it is under cultivation, and is very productive. As 
the surrounding country becomes more developed, the trade of 
Wanatah must increase, furnishing as it will, the market place for 
all the grain and hay of the southwest part of the county. Even 
now its business is considerable, but is certain to advance just in 
proportion to the growth of the country around about. 

In the township outside of Wanatah, there are two churches, the 
German Methodists having built one two and a half miles south of 
the village. The Lutherans also have erected a church building at 
the same place. 

There are seven school houses in the township, showing a good 
degree of interest among the people in the matter of education. 
When Dewey was organized, the trustee of Cass was left in the new 
township, and Augustus W. Vail was appointed to fill the vacancy, 
and at the succeeding election, Edward Evans was elected trustee. 
Richard Cannon has been trustee of the township; and James Can- 
non also for several successive years. Emil L. Keil is the present 
trustee. Hog creek passes through the township across the western 
side running out of this township into Porter county. The land is 



182 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY 

generally of an excellent quality, perhaps two-thirds of the town- 
ship consisting of rich, deep prairie soil. On the north and east, 
there are groves of timber, chiefly oak. Some portions of the Kan- 
kakee marsh lands reach up into the township from the south, and 
southeast, and these arms of the prairie are intermingled with 
sandy ••barrens; " but the marsh is excellent mowing land, and is 
becoming each year more capable of cultivation. The sandy por- 
tions take readily to clover, and can thus be made rich and valua- 
ble land-. The most successful grain crop is corn, though wheat 
and oats do well, and it may be said that Cass township is likely t'» 
become one of the richest agricultural districts of the countv. The 
population is enterprising and industrious, is increasing year by 
year, and a bright future for the towmship is promised. 



CHAPTER XVII. 



DEWEY TOWNSHIP. 



The territory of tin- township was a part of that which formerly 
belonged to Stark county. It was then in VanEuren township, and 
when Cass township was organized, was a part of that township. 
and so remained until June 8, 1860, when the Board of county com- 
missioners directed its organization into a new township. The fol- 
lowing is the record, made at the June term, 1860: 

" In the matter of the Erection ] 
of Dewey Township. j 

And now comes Patrick Huncheon. and files the petition of him- 
self and others, citizens of this county and residents of congressional 
township thirty-three, north of range four west, praying that s 
much of Cass township in said county as lies south of the north line 
of said congressional township, be set off from said Casa township, 
and erected and organized into a separate township for civil pur- 
poses, and it appearing to this Board of commissioners that the con- 
venience of the inhabitants residing in said part of said township, 
requires that the same be so set apart, and erected into a township 
for civil purp< - -. lo hereby set the same off and detach it from the 



DEWEY TOWNSHIP. 183 

?aid township of Cass, and do hereby erect and organize the same 
nto a township for civil purposes by the name and style of Dewey 
;ownship of LaPorte county, with the following boundaries, to-wit : 
Beginning at the northeast corner of said congressional township 
lumber thirty-three, and running thence westward along the north 
ine of said township to the west line of LaPorte county, thence 
southwardly along the west line of the county to. the south line of 
:he county, thence eastwardly along the south line of the county to 
:he east line of said congressional township, thence along the east 
line of said congressional township to the place of beginning, and 
that the same now is and henceforth shall be a body politic and cor- 
porate by the name and style aforesaid, and all elections held in said 
township shall be held at the school house on section three in said 
township, and whereas the office of township trustee for the town- 
ship of Dewey in this county, is now vacant, it is hereby ordered 
that Patrick Huncheon be and is hereby appointed trustee for said 
township, to hold said office until the next annual township election 
and until his successor shall be elected and qualified, and that he be 
required to give bond and security to the aceptance of the auditor, 
pursuant to the statute in such case n.ade and provided, and it is 
also further ordered that upon demand after the execution of said 
bond, the trustee of Cass township, and all other officers who now 
have or into whose hands shall come any funds arising or accruing 
from school lands in said township, or any monies arising from 
assessments for road purposes upon lands in said township of 
Dewey, or any other funds properly belonging to said township, for 
school, road or other township purposes, shall pay the same and every 
part thereof to the said trustee of Dewey township." 

Thus Dewey township embraces all of township thirty-three, 
range four west, lying north of the Kankakee river, and part of 
three sections of town thirty-two, in the same range, being bounded 
on the south by the river, on the west by porter county, on the 
north by Cass township, and on the east by Hanna township. 

Two railroads cross the township. The Louisville, New Albany 
and Chicago crosses it from north to south, and the Chicago and 
Great Eastern* or Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis, enters the 
township near the southeastern corner and curves through it so as 



184 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

to ( pass out not far from the centre of the west side. The railroads 
cross each other in the northeast corner of section seventeen; and 
here there is a station, a freight depot, telegraph office, etc., and a 
few business houses. 

A large part of this township is Kankakee marsh, and was form- 
erly, at every rise in the river, inundated as far north as LaCrosse 
where the railroad crossing is ; but hundreds of acres of these wet 
lands have been redeemed by drainage, and each year from natural 
as well as artificial causes, the reclamation is going on, and once 
under cultivation, the land will prove exceedingly fertile. At pres- 
ent there are thousands of acres of good mowing land, which alone 
renders it valuable, owing to the increasing demand for hay. 

The township is settled chiefly by Germans. George P. Schim- 
mel is probably the first one who made a settlement. He arrived 
on the first day of January, 1854, though Jacob Schauer came 
about the same time, and possibly was foremost. Lewis and Michael 
Besler were among the first settlers in the township. Patrick and 
Richard Huncheon have been in the township eighteen years, and 
are large landholders, farmers and stock dealers. James Lougee 
has been in the township seventeen years and is a farmer and heavy 
stock dealer. Elias Osborn, also an early settler, is a farmer and 
stock dealer. He resides about half a mile west of LaCrosse, and 
has been postmaster since 1868, when the postoffiee was established. 
In the same year the depot was removed from old to new LaCrosse. 
The Great Eastern railroad was finished fifteen vears a2;o, and in 

%, CD ' 

1862, a German Catholic church was built. Philip Schimmcl 
opened a store in 1874. The first school house was built on Hog 
island eighteen years ago, and the first teacher was a Miss White. 
Patrick Huncheon was the first trustee, and holds that office at 
present. James Lougee has been trustee during several of the 
intervening years, one or the other of them having held that posi- 
tion ever since the township was organized. 

A large part of the land in Dewey township is held by non-resi- 
dents, which will probably result in retarding settlement, and thus 
prove an injury to the township. With the reclamation of the 
marsh lands this township will become exceedingly productive, but 
its full capacity will be developed only by actual settlers, occupying 



HANNA TOWNSHIP. 185 

small tracts of land. Among the large holders of land in this town- 
ship who are non-residents, are J. W. Glidden, A. Long, S. M. 
Lockwood, and J. C. Lattimer. 

The principal industry of the township is farming and stockrais- 
ing combined. James S. Long is thus engaged; and Orville 
Adams, who is also a teacher. Among the leading German inhab- 
itants are the Beslers, J. A. and "Wm. Rosenbaum, George P. 
Schimmel, C. W. Rudolph, F. W. Kruger and C. Wagner. 

The present population has exhibited much enterprise in the 
work of bringing the land into cultivation, and their reward has 
been such that the people are fast becoming prosperous. 



CHAPTER XVIII. • 

HANNA TOWNSHIP. 

Hanna township comprises all that part of townships thirty-three 
and thirty-four that lies in LaPorte county, and with the single 
exception of Union, is the largest township in the county. It is a 
part of the territory which was detached from Stark county, as 
related in a preceding chapter. It then formed a part of Yan- 
Buren township, and upon the organization of Cass township out of 
the limits of VanBuren, was attached to and made a part of Noble, 
which was its condition until the 11th day of March, 1861, when, 
on the petition of the citizens, the Board of county commissioners 
made the following order : 

"In the matter of Petition 1 
for New Township. J 

And now come sundry free holders, residents of LaPorte county, 
and present their petition in these words, to-wit : To the Honorable, 
the Board of commissioners of LaPorte county, Indiana. The 
undersigned citizens and resident free holders of the part of Noble 
township comprised within the boundaries of congressional townships 
number thirty-three and thirty-four, north of range number three 
west, would respectfully represent to your honorable body that it 
would be for the interest and convenience of the citizens of said 



186 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

townships to have the following described district of country formed 
into a new and distinct civil township, to-wit: Beginning at the 
northwest [corner of congressional township thirty-four, north of 
range number three west, and running east along the township line 
between towns thirty-four and thirty-five, of ranges number three 
and number two, till said line strikes or intersects the Kankakee 
river, thence along the channel of said Kankakee river, in a south- 
westerly direction to a point where the township line running north 
and south between towns thirty-three range three, and thirty-three 
range four west, strikes or intersects said river, thence north along 
said township line between said towns thirty-three and thirty-four 
range three, and towns thirty-three and thirty-four range four west. 
to the place of beginning. Your petitioners would also further ask, 
that the name of said civil township be "Hanna," and your peti- 
tioners will ever pray. Sign 

Chandler Palmer, and others. 

And the Board after due consideration of the matter, grant the 
prayer of the petitioners, and order that the above district of country 
be formed into a new township, to be called Planna. and the Board 
appoint Charles H. Rowley as trustee of said township. 

The earliest settlers on the territory which is now Hanna town- 
ship were Emanuel Metz. Nimrod West. Wm. West, Sen.. Amster- 
dam Stewart. Andrew J. Chambers, Wm. Tyner, Charles Strong, 
Thomas Hunsley ; the two sons of Metz. Isaac and Joseph ; and the 
three sons of Chambers, Preston. Obadiah and Andrew J. These 
all came to the township in, or prior to 183 ( .'. At that time Hanna 
township was a part of Stark county, and formed part of the town- 
ship of VanBuren. When these men settled here, the prospect 
could not have been very inviting, although they made their homes 
beyond the limits of the Kankakee marshes. They were on the 
upland across which the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago rail- 
road now passes, but out towards the river it was one continuous 
marsh, subject to overflow whenever the river was high, and which 
was so miry that it was almost impossible to cross it with a team or 
on horseback. But they had faitli in the future and resolutely 
went to work to make homes for themselves and their children. 
The locality of their settlement was an isolated neighborhood, and 



HANNA TOWNSHIP. 187 

neighborly ties were strong among them. Even tenderer ties arose 
and Amsterdam Stewart and Susan Metz were married, which was 
the first marriage that occurred in the township. Settlement has not 
been rapid in this township, but there has been a gradual increase 
of population until, at the present time, the inhabitants number 
between five and six hundred. Noah S. Rowley and his sons, 
Charles H. and Samuel settled in the township twenty-two years ago. 
John Lawrence came in 1843, and bought out Charles Strong. Hyatt 
and Austin settled at an early period at Chamber's Landing. More 
recently the brothers Charles, David and John E. Wills moved into 
the township from Cass. The Lloyds have been here not far from 
twenty years. Geo. Lawrence came probably in 1843. He and John 
Lawrence both came from England. Other leading; citizens of the 
township are C. J. Bunnell, present township trustee; Thomas 
Mitchell, George Trimmingham, Erasmus Whitney, James Bell- 
more, Wm. Wilson and Hiram X. Wilson, who are farmers, that 
being the leading industry of the township, in connection with 
stock raising;. William Brown is a farmer and stock dealer: Julius 
T. Keil is a farmer and stock raiser, and also has a store in the 
village of Hanna; B. F. Moore, John Pratt, Clark R. Richards 
and E. F. Whitney are farmers and stock raisers ; Stephen Frech- 
ette is a boot and shoe maker ; Charles Frechette is a manufacturer 
of wagons, sleighs and agricultural implements ; David Wills car- 
ried the mail from 1865 to 1871, between LaPorte and Hanna Sta- 
tiomby way of Kingsbury and Union Mills, and is now a dealer in 
agricultural implements; W. H. West is a farmer and carpenter; 
Charles Wills is county commissioner; Z. T. Horine and E. N. 
Spahr are physicians; George S. Dennison, and Lucius Avery 
are merchants ; Isaac T. Lloyd is express and freight agent, post- 
master and telegraph operator. 

The only village in the township is 

HANNA. 

It is situated on the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago rail- 
road, and contains a population of about two hundred. There 
are three merchants, two blacksmiths, one shoe shop, one wagon 
factory, one cooper shop, two hay presses, one saloon, two ware- 
houses, and depot and station house and other railroad buildings. 



188 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

The town plat of Hanna was laid off and surveyed in 1858. and 
contained fortv-two acres and eighty one-hundredths, in section 
eight, township thirty-four, north of range three west, and was filed 
for record by N. and J. West. The following is the record: 

" State of Indiana. ] 
LaPorte County, J ' 

Before me the recorder in and for said county. Nimrod West, one 
of the proprietors of the within named town acknowledged that he 
filed this plat for record on the 1 f th day of December, 1858. 

A. Hupp. R. L. C." 

In 1859, Young's addition was laid off in the west half of the 
northeast quarter of section eight, town thirty-four, range three 
west. 

Clark R. Richards and Charles Fessenden opened the first store 
at Hanna in 1858, directly after or at the time of the completion of 
the railroad to the town. Wm. H. Bowers was the first postmaster, 
but did not hold it a great while, when Isaac T. Lloyd v. 
appointed, and has held it ever since. George S. Dennison opened 
a store on the first day of September. 1865, and is still engaged in 
the business of merchandising. The merchants are all grain buyei 
and Hanna is quite a market for grain in the southern part of the 
county, situated, as it is. on one of the main trunk lines to the 
east. There is one school house in the village, and here all relig- 
ious meetings are held, there beinL r no church edifice in the town- 
ship. The Methodists and Free Methodist- hold frequent servjc 
and a movement is at present on foot for the erection of a church 
building. 

There are three school houses in the township, the oldest being 
the one at the town of Hanna. The first trustee was Charles H. 
Rowley, by appointment of the commissioners when the township 
was organized. The first one elected to the place was Noah S. 
RowL He was succeeded by Adam Vinnedge, who has since 
removed to Plymouth. T. W. Allison was the next trustee, and 
he was succeeded by C. J. Bunnell, v. ill holds the office. 

Three-fourths of the land of the township is Kankakee marsh, 
though much of this is now under cultivation, and is becoming fine, 
rich land. The drying out process is going on each year, aided by 



LINCOLN AND JOHNSON- TOWNSHIPS. 189 

some ditching, and the area of tillable land is enlarging year by 
year; while that portion of the marsh which is not yet dry enough 
to cultivate is mostly excellent mowing land, and with the constant 
and increasing demand for hay, is becoming valuable. Hanna 
township is just beginning its development, and the outlook is 
favorable for its future prosperity and wealth. 



CHAPTER XIX. 

LINCOLN AND JOHNSON TOWNSHIPS. 

These two townships with the exception of the strip of territory 
which formerly belonged to St. Joseph county, formed a part of the 
original township of Kankakee, and upon the organization of Pleas- 
ant township were included within its limits. During this time and 
until 1850, the centre of range one formed the boundary between 
LaPorte and St. Joseph counties ; but by an act approved January 
14, 1850, a strip of territory described as follows : "Beginning at the 
present county line, at the northwest corner of section twenty-two, 
township thirty-seven, north of range one west, thence with the 
north line of said section and that of section twenty-three to the 
northeast corner of said section twenty-three, thence south with the 
section line, until it shall strike the Great Kankakee river, thence 
with said river to the present county line," was taken from 
St. Joseph and attached to LaPorte county. Subsequently at the 
June term of the commissioners' court in the same year, by an 
order of the Board, that part of the designated territory, which lay 
east of the township of Wills, consisting of six sections was attached 
to that township, and the remainder was made a part of Pleasant 
township, the latter being a part of the present township of Lincoln. 
The territory embraced in these two townships extends from the 
north line of township thirty-six, southward to the southern bound- 
ary of the county, and from the line which divides ranges one and 
two, to St. Joseph county on the east, being five sections in width 
on the north, four sections in the centre, and three sections in width 
in that part which lies south of the Kankakee river. 



190 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

This territory was detached from Pleasant township in 1861, the 
Board of commissioners having on the 12th dav of March of that 
year, made an order for the erection of Anderson township, as 
follow- : 

"In the matter of Petition of 
George Bosserman and others 
for a Xew Township. 

And now come sundry free holders residents of LaPorte county 
and present their petition in the following words, to-wit: To the 
Honorable Board of commissioners of the county of LaPorte, and 
State of Indiana, Greeting : We the citizens and free holders of 
town thirty-six, north of range two west, would represent to your 
honorable body, that they haye labored under great inconvenience 
in consequence of the present geographical condition of said town- 
ship : we therefore ask you to make the following change, to-wit : 
To set off all that part of towns thirty-five and thirty-six, range one 
west, that is now attached to town thirty-six, range two west, and 
form a new township out of the same, and also to set back all that 
part of town thirty-six. range two west, that is now attached to 
town thirty-five, range two west, and also that part of the same that 
is now attached to town thirty-six. range three, or Centre township. 
and we will ever pray. Signed. 

George Bossermax, and others. 

The Board after due consideration of the matter, grant the prayer 
of the petitioners, and order that J. B. Lewis be appointed trustee 
of said new township which township will be known by the name of 
Anderson township, and their elections will be held at Maples 1 
school house." 

This order prove:! unsatisfactory to many of the people affected 
by it. and they immediately took steps to haye it set aside. Much 
feeling was aroused on the Bubject, and the sentiment against the 
chancres effected would seem to haye been well-nieli universal. A 
special session of the commissioners' court was called to meet on the 
23d day of March, and when they met, petitions poured in upon 
them not only from the old townships whose territory was dimin- 
ished, but also from the new township, asking for the vacation of 
the obnoxious order. No less than nine petitions were received, all 
of them largely signed: from R. Shaw, and others; Isaac Butter- 
worth, and others : M. Mover, and others : Joshua Layman, and 



LINCOLN AND JOHNSON TOWNSHIPS. 191 

others; Geo. W. Woodburn, and others; Ash Burdick, and others; 
Isaac Livengood, and others; John B Travis, and others, and 
Joseph Ewing, and others. With such an overwhelming expression 
against the former action of the Board, it was deemed advisable to 
vacate the order, and accordingly the following action was had on 
the 23d day March, 1861 : 

" In the matter of Vacation of I 

Order creating Anderson township, j 

Now come Isaac Butterworth and others and file their petition 
for the vacation of the order made at the last regular term of the 
Board creating a new township called Anderson, and changing the 
boundaries of Union, Pleasant and Centre townships ; and after 
hearing the evidence and due inspection of said petitions, the 
prayer thereof is granted, and said order in all things vacated." 

The boundaries of the townships remained as thus determined 
until the year 1866. In that year, on the 13th day of March at 
the regular term of the Board, the following orders were passed: 

u In the matter of the forma- ] 
tion of Lincoln Township. J 

It was ordered by the Board, that township thirty-six, north of 
range one west is hereby set apart for a civil township, and shall be 
entitled to all the priviledgeS as such, and the same is hereby called 
Lincoln township." 

"In the matter of the forma- ] 
tion of Johnson Township. J 

It was ordered by the Board that township thirty-five, north of 
range one west, is hereby set apart as a civil township and shall be 
entitled to all the privileges as such, and the same is hereby called 
Johnson township." 

The Board then made further orders directing that Joseph B. 
Lewis should be appointed trustee of Lincoln township, and Jared 
McDaniel trustee of Johnson township. There were other orders 
made at the same time, affecting the boundaries of Union, Scipio 
and Pleasant townships, and to these the same opposition arose that 
has been noted in the case of the formation of Anderson township. 
These latter orders were finally repealed ; but the orders directing 
"the formation of Lincoln and Johnson townships have remained in 



192 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

force ; and as the people are well satisfied with the preseut arrange- 
ment, no further change is likely to take place. 

The townships of Lincoln and Johnson embrace all of township 
thirty-six, range one, (Lincoln), and township thirty-five, range one, 
(Johnson), that lies in LaPorte county. The Kankakee river forms 
part of the eastern and southern boundary ol Lincoln and runs 
diagonallv across the northern end of Johnson from northeast to 
southwest. Mud lake, which is really but a spreading out of the 
river borders both the townships near the boundary line between 
them, and Fish lake lies wholly in Lincoln near the centre of the 
township ; and Little Kankakee river passes through it, and empties 
into the Great Kankakee near its southern boundary. The Chicago 
and Lake Huron railroad crosses Lincoln township in an easterly 
and westerly direction ; and the Indianapolis, Peru and Chicago 
railroad crosses the northeast corner of Johnson, and the Baltimore 
and Ohio runs east and west across its central part. Fish lake, 
near the centre of Lincoln, is of very peculiar shape. It is divided 
into four parts connected by narrow passages or straits, each of 
which have received distinctive names. The extreme upper part is 
called Upper Mud lake, and is nearly circular in form with the out- 
let towards the northwest into Upper Fish lake. This part is much 
larger, and curves so as almost to double back upon itself, and has 
its outlet towards the southwest into Fish lake, which is about one 
mile in length, and is connected by a narrow passage with Lower 
Mud lake. The outlet of the entire body is into the Little Kanka- 
kee. Upper Mud lake is on the south side of section sixteen: 
Upper Fish lake is in sections sixteen and seventeen; Fish lake is 
mostly in section twenty, Lower Mud lake is in sections twenty 
and twenty nine. There are several other smaller lakes in Lincoln, 
isolated and having no outlet. 

The first settlement made in Lincoln township seems to have 
been by a man named Mutz, and Levi Little who settled on the 
north side of Fish lake about 1834, but John Yickory came about 
the same time. George Sparrow entered land in the township in 
1835; and sold out in 1840 to John Lingard. A man by the 
name of Smith had come in early and sold in 1838 to a Dr. Losey. 
Carson Siddles was an early settler, and Newlove Laybourn came 



LINCOLN AND JOHNSON TOWNSHIPS. 193 

in 1835. A man by the name of Saunders also came this year. 
E. Arbergast settled in 1836; John Davis and John Dare in 1838; 
Samuel Stevenson, a former township trustee, Sharp, Bronson, 
Maple, Warren, Canada and Wrightman in or about the year 1841. 
George W. Woodburn settled on section eighteen in 1847 ; John, 
Andrew. Peter and James Harness and their father, came to the 
township about 1840. and John Divine in 1841. t John B. McDon- 
ald came in J 836. and was one of the first teachers in the township. 
The first lady teacher was Miss Elizabeth Vickory. The first saw 
mill was built on Spring run, which is now called Mill creek, a 
small stream coming down from the northward and emptying into 
Upper Fish lake. A postoffice was established during the present 
year, near where the railroad crosses this creek : it is called Mill 
creek, and Wm. H. Collom is the postmaster. 

There is in this township considerable swamp and Kankakee 
marsh land : but a large part of the township is dry, and contains 
some excellent farms. Among the farmers of Lincoln township are 
James Waxham, E. Thompson, Frederick Steelo, Jacob Snyder, F. 
M. Rowell, James H. Davis, Jacob S. V. Burton, and Robert V. 
Armstrong. Amstrong came to the county of LaPorte in 1832. 
Davis is a blacksmith as well as farmer, and came to the county 
in 1834. 

One of the first settlcrs/in Johnson township was Major John M. 
Lemon. He rebuilt the bridge over the Kankakee river about 
1846, and kept it as a toll bridge many years. The first bridge 
was built bv John Dunn as earlv as 1831 or 32. Samuel Smith 
came to this township, and settled south of the Kankakee in 1842; 
Edward Owens made improvements on the school section, and sold 
to Samuel Harmison about 1843; Martin Smith arrived in 1843; 
Wm. Mapes, and Charles Palmer settled here about 1846; and 
Landon Carlyle came in 1851. He has been trustee of the town- 
ship. The first school house in Johnson was built on section six- 
teen about a mile and a half south of the river; and a church was 
erected in 1874, on what is called the "Island." Among the farmers 
of this township are Geo. W. Corner, Jr., P. Flaherty, Wm. Robin- 
son, Asa Jackson, Henry George and B. F. and Ira F. Place. 
They own the old Lemon property at the bridge, and a great deal 

\ 



194 HIST< RV OF I ■ : i NTT. 

of surroundin i land, some of which they have brought into 

cultivation, and of the rest have made excellent mowing land. 
They are large stock raisers, and also put up, press, and ship la; _ 
quantiti B. F. Place has foi sral years been the town- 

- ee. 

•vn-liip embraces one-half only of Congressional town- 
ship thirty-five, the other half being in St. Joseph counl It lies 
almost wholly on the south side of the Kankakee.' but two whole 
sections and three parts of sections being on the north side of that 
river. As in the case of Lincoln, and all the townships border 
on the Kankakee, much of the land is marsh; the remainder con- 

5ts mostly of oak ''barrens, " and is too sandy for the highest pi - 
ducing capacity. The marsh land will eventually be the b< and 
every year the arable area is increased. When once drie . and 

brought into cultivation these lands will have no superior for the 
production of corn and gras 

"With this survey of Lincoln and Johnson, the history of the 
townships, separately and in detail, is concluded. What foil 
will be applicable to the county as a whole. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 195 



CHAPTER XX. 

# COUNTY OFFICERS. 

As stated in a former chapter, LaPorte country was organized in 
1843, the act of incorporation for the county having passed the 
State legislature and been approved January 9th of that year. It 
is as follows: 

Section 1. u Be it enacted by the G-eneral Assembly of the State 
Indiana, That from and after the first day of April next, all 
that tract of country included in the following boundaries shall 
form and constitute a new county, to be known and designated bv 
the name and style of LaPorte county, to-wit: Beginning at the 
state line which divides the State of Indiana and Michigan territory, 
and at the northwest corner of township number thirty-eight, north 
of range number four, west of the principal meridian ; thence run 
ning east with said State line to the centre of range number one, 
west of said meridian: thence south twenty-two miles ; thence west. 
parallel with the said state line, twenty-one miles ; thence north to 
the place of beginning. 

Sec. 2 That the new-county of LaPorto shall, from and after 
the said first day of April next, enjoy all the rights and privileges, 
benefits and jurisdictions which to separate and independent counties 

or may properly belong or appertain. 

Sec. 8. That Samuel Lewis of the county of Allen, Isaac 
Coleman of the county of Fountain, Andrew Ingraham of the 
county of Clinton, Levi Thornton of the county of Tippecanoe, and 
Merritt S. Craig of the county of Ripley, be, and they are hereby 
appointed commissioners agreeably to the act entitled " An act fixing 
the seats of justice in all new counties hereafter to be laid off." 
The commissioners aforesaid shall meet on the second Monday 
Mav next, at the house of David Pagin, in said countv of LaPorte. 
and shall immediately proceed to the discharge of the duties assigned 
them by law. And it shall be the duty of the Sheriff of Carroll 
county to notify said commissioners, cither in person or by w 



196 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

of their appointment, on or before the first day of April next. And 
for such services he shall receive such compensation as the board 
doing county business in said county of LaPorte may, when 
organized, deem just and reasonable, to be allowed and paid as other 
county claims. 

Sec. 4. The Circuit Court and the board doing county basin - 
when elected under the writ ot election from the executive depart- 
ment, shall hold their sessions as near the centre of the county as 
a convenient place can be had until the public buildings shall have 
been erected. 

Sec. o. The agent who shall be appointed to superintend the 
sale of lots at the county seat of the county of LaPorte shall receive 
ten per centum out of the proceeds thereof, and pay the same over 
to such person or persons as may be appointed by law to receive the 
same, for the use of a county library. 

Sec. 6. The county of LaPorte shall be attached to the county 
of St. Joseph for representative purposes. 

Sec. 7. The board doing county business may. as soon as elected 
and qualified, hold special sessions, not exceeding three during the 
first year after the organization of said count}", and shall appoint a 
lister, make all necessary appointments, and do aid perform all 
other business which might have been necessary to be performed at 
any other regular ---ion, and take all Unnecessary steps to collect 
the State and count v revenue , any law or usage to the contrary 
notwithstanding." 

Under this act a writ of election was issued, and Chapel W. 
Brown, Elijah II Brown and Jesse Morgan were elected commis- 
sioners, Benjamin McCarty sheriff, and <l Thomas clerk. 
The commissioners met on the 28th day of May, 1832, and organ- 
ized by the election of Chapel W. Brown as presjdenl of the Board, 
and Ge Thomas <-lerk. They also appointed John Wills 
inspector of elections for Kankakee township; A. I'. Andrew, Jr., 
inspector for Scipio, and Elijah Newhall inspector for New Durham. 
Benjamin McCarty, the sheriff, was appointed commissioner of the 
three per cent, fund: Wm. Clark, county surveyor; Aaron Stan- 
ton, county treasurer, and Jesse Morgan, lister of the taxable prop- 
erty. At the July term Nathan B. Nichols was appointed collector 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 197 

of the State and county tax for the year 1832. At this term the 
commissioners selected grand and petit jurors as follows, which were 
the first selected in the county. Those selected for grand jurors 
were. Andrew Burnside, Leonard Cutler, George W. Barnes, Sam- 
uel Weston. John Melville, Wm. Phillips, John W. Cole, Joseph 
Orr. Arthur Irwin. Nathaniel Steele, Arba Healcl, Robert Simmer- 
well. John Whittaker, Joseph Osborn. Richard Harris, Ira Rich- 
ardson, David Stoner, Joseph W. Lykins. 

The petit jurors were, Wm. Morgan, Alfred Stanton, Charles 
Campbell, Adam G. Polke, Jeremiah Sherwood, Myron Ives, Lewis 
Shirly. Wm. Bond, Sen., Jesse Morgan. Jacob Coleman, James 
Nixon, Charles West, Samuel Harbinson, Stephen . Brayton, 
Arthur McClure, Daniel Jessup, Ezra Tyler, Asa Warren, Adam 
Keith, Charles Egbert, Ilenlv Clyburn, Samuel Smallwood, Basil 
S perry. John Wills. 

The jurors thus designated were not called on to serve. The 
first grand jury that actually served, was composed of the following 
citizens: Arthur McClure, John Stanton, Emery A. Brown. 
Noble McKinstry, Gaines Munger, John Carter, Jonathan Sher- 
wood, Peter White. Josiah Bryant. Martin Baker, Elijah Stanton, 
Aaron Stanton. Wm. Thomas. Wm. Stanton, James Highly; and 
the first petit jury that served was composed as follows: Philip 
Fail. Ezekiel Provolt, Peter Lowe. Elisha Newhall, Henry Carpen- 
ter. Roswell Muncie, Wm. C. Thrall, John Garrard, Absalom 
Rambo, Wm. Garrard. John Garwood and Jonathan Morgan. 

The Clerks of the county, and the years of assuming the duties 
of the office have been as follows: George Thomas, 1832; William 
Hawkins, 1835; Thomas P. Armstrong, 1846: Yolney W. Bailey, 
1853: James Moore, 1857, re-elected, 1860 : James H. Shannon, 
1865; Charles Spaeth, 1873. 

The Sheriffs have been Benjamin McCarty, 1832; Adam G. 
Polke, 1834: Sutton VanPelt, 1836; Wm. Allen, 1840; John M. 
Clarkson, 1842; Harrison F. Hinkley, 1844: Joshua S. McDowell. 
1846: Herman Lawson. 1850: Wm. Allen, 1852; Wm. H. H. 
Whitehead. 1854. re-elected, 1856: Joshua S. McDowell, 1858, 
re-elected and died in office; Stephen P. Mead. 1861, and re-elected, 



198 HISTORY 01 LA PORTE COUNTY 

1863; Ithamar D. Phelps. 1865. re-elected, 1867; Daniel L. 
Brown, 1870, re-elected, 1872 ; Edward Hawkins, 1874. 

The collectors down to the year 1840, were Nathan B. Nicln - 
1832; Adam G. Polke, 1833; Wm. Hawkins. 1*34: C. \V. 
Brown, 1835; Abram Hupp. 1836; N. W. Saxton, 1837: Alfred 
Lomax, 1838: Wm. Allen, 1839. and Willys Peck. 1840. The 
Treasurers for the same period were Aaron Stanton. I s ' 32: and 
others. 

The Treasurers since 1840, combining both Treasurer and C 
lector, have been Willard A. Place, 1840: John M. Lemon. 1847, 
and re-elected, 1850: Edmund S. Organ, 1*52. and re-elected: 
Abel D. Porter, 1857, and re-elected; Reginald H. Rose. 1861, 
and re-elected: D. C. Alexander, 1805. and re-elected: Mark 
Allen. 1869, and re-elected ; George Mecum, 1873, and re-elected. 

The Recorders have been George Thomas. January, lb32: W in. 
Hawkins, 1835; Burwell Spurlock, 1842, and re-elected: Willard A. 
Place, January. 1856; Anderson Hupp. April. l v 56, and re-elected, 
1860; Wm. Copp, 1864: Henry C. Brown, 1868, and re-elect 
1872. John H. Organ was elected Recorder in 1874, but has i 
taken possession of the office, the four years of the preceding Recorder 
not having yet expired. 

The Auditors have been John D. Colling-. L841; Joel But! . 
1843: Andrew J. Wair. 1848, and re-elected. 1852; Reuben 
Munday. by apppointment of commissioners, 1858; John Walton, 
1858. and re-elected. 1802: Jasper Packard. 1866. resigned V 
Harvey R. Harris, appoint' commissioners, March. •. and 

elected 1870; Edward J. Church, 1874. 

The county Surveyers have been Wm. Chirk, ; James Bradley, 

; J. H. Wilson, 1847: Elam Clark. 1849; John P. Cathcai . 

1852; Daniel M. Learning. 1854, and re-elected; Elisha L. Bennett. 
1858: E. H. Learning, I860; John P. Cathcart, 1866; Daniel 
Kennedy, elected. 1 v 72. but never qualified; Hiram Burner, 1874. 

The Coroners have been John G. Newhouse, 1842; Jesse Wj 
son. 1840: Andrew J. Wair. 1848; Francis A. McDowell. 184': 
Edmund S. Organ, 1850; Henry W. Fox. 1854; Robert G. Jam-.-. 
1856; Luther Brusie, 1858; Ludwig Eliel, 1860. and re-elected. 
1862; held the office until 1874; Darwin T. Brown, 1874. 



COUNTY OFFCERS. • 199 

The Assessors or Appraisors of Real Estate, have been Wm. K. 
Anderson, 184(3: Joseph B. Lewis, 1848; Abram Hupp, 1851; 
Joseph Orr, 1849: Abram Westervelt, 1863; Edmund S. Gardner, 
1868; Jaeob Folant elected 1872. 

The following are the names of those who have been Judges of 
the various courts held in this county. 

Judges of the Circuit Couri : Gustavus A. Everts, Samuel C. 
Sample. John B. Xiles, Ebenezer M. Chamberlain, Robert Lowry, 
Thomas S. Stanfield. Albert G. Deavitt, Andrew L. Osborn. Thomas 
S. Stanfield. Judges of the Court of Common Pleas: Herman 
Lawson, Wm. C. Talcott, Elisha Egbert, Edward J. Wood, and 
Daniel Noye- Probate Judges: Chapel W. Brown, Jabez R~ 
Wells, Gilbert Hathaway and M. K. Farrand. Associate Judges:; 
Jacob Miller, Judah Learning, Charles W. Henry, Clinton Foster, 
Gustavus A. Rose, Willard A. Place. Abner Bailey and William 
Andrew. 

The Boards of county commissioners from the organization of the 
countv in 1832, have been constituted as follows: Chapel W. 
Brown, E. H. Brown and Isaac Morgan; C. W. Brown, E. H. 
Brown and Daniel Jessup ; E. H. Brown, Daniel Jessup and Alex- 
ander Blackburn ; Daniel Jessup, Alexander Blackburn and Aaron 
Stanton; Daniel Jessup, Aaron Stanton and John Clark; Daniel 
Jessup, Andrew Burnside and Thomas J. Foster ; Daniel Jessup,. 
Thomas J. Foster and Willard A. Place; Willard A. Place, Elia- 
kim Ashton and Stephen G. Hunt; Aaron Stanton, Stephen G." 
Hunt and Eliakim Ashton; Aaron Stanton, Stephen G. Hunt and 
Henly Clyburn; Henly Clyburn, Benjamin Beard and Phineas 
Hunt; Benjamin Beard, Phineas Hunt and James McCord; Ben- 
jamin Beard, Abiel Lathrop and Abijah Bigelow; Charles Vail, 
Abiel Lathrop and Hezekiah Robertson; Hezekiah Robertson, 
Benjamin Butterworth and Abiel Lathrop; West Darling, Christo- 
pher McClure and Abiel Lathrop; Abiel Lathrop, Christopher 
McClure and Alfred Stephens; Christopher McClure, Alfred 
Stephens and Samuel Burson; Christopher McClure, Samuel Bur- 
son and Joel Butler; Chistopher McClure, Samuel Burson and 
John F. Allison; Chistopher McClure, Samuel Burson and Mark 
Allen; Christopher McClure, Mark Allen and George C. Havens: 



200 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Mark Allen, Jackson Hosmer and James Drummond ; James 
Drummond, Jacob R. Hall and Jackson Hosmer; Jackson Hosmer. 
Aquilla W. Rogers and Orlando F. Piper: Aquilla W. Rogers, 
Henry J. Rees and Asa M. Warren: Asa M. Warren, Elam Clark 
and Henry J. Rees; Henry J. Rees, Isaac B. Coplin and Sidney 
S. Sabin; S. S. Sabin, Isaac B. Coplin and John Warnock: S. S. 
Sabin, Isaac B. Coplin and John P. Cathcart; Isaac B. Coplin, 
Wm. O'Hara and John P. Cathcart; Isaac B. Coplin, Wm. O'Hara 
and Reynolds Couden; Isaac B. Coplin, Sidney S. Sabin and R. 
Couden ; Enos Weed, John Sutherland and Simon P. Kern ; Enos 
Weed, Simon P. Kern and Benajah Stanton; Enos Weed, Simon 
P. Kern and Charles Wills: Charles Wills, B. S. Fail and Hazard 
M. Hopkins: Charles Wills, B. S. Fail and Wm. Schoeneman. Mr. 
Schoeneman was appointed at the September term 1875, to fill the 
vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Hazard M. Hopkins. 



CHAPTER XXL 

POLITIC-. 



Like all other intelligent communities in the United States, the 
people of LaPorte county have participated with earnestness in the 
various political contests that have agitated the country at large. 
and have had also their own local political agitations. The county was 
organized in the same year in which Andrew Jackson was a candi- 
date for a second term of the Presidency, but the population was so 
sparse at the time that very little strife was engendered. The atten- 
tion of the pioneers was concentrated on a more pressing necessity 
— that of obtaining a livelihood, and establishing homes for them- 
selves and families. An election was held under the special act for 
the incorporation of the county, but it does not appear that political 
questions arose. There was then no paper published in the county, 
and no political leaders had arisen to effect an organization of 
the parties, which were Democrat and Whig. In the year 1835, 
the Democrats secured an organ bv the establishment of the Michi- 
gan City Gazette, and that year was one of extraordinary political 



POLITII 3. 201 

activity, and seems to have been the first during which there was 
much agitation of this kind in LaPorte county. The questions 
were partly local, and partly State and national. Some of the set- 
tlers had settled on and improved government lands in 1834, but 
not securing a pre-emption right, the lands were about to be bought 
at the approaching sales, by those who would bid higher than the 
government prices, thus >ecuring the lands already settled upon, 
and compelling the settlers to pay more than the sum at which they 
were held by the government. This aroused a strong feeling, and 
public meetings were held by the citizens in different parts of the 
county to take such action as seemed to them expedient. The pro- 
ceedings of one of these meetings, for a better understanding of the 
subject, is here presented entire, as it appeared in the Michigan 
City G tte, of July 22, 1835: 

"Township 35, N. Range 4 West, Julv 15, 1835. 

At a large and respectable meeting of the inhabitants of township 
number thirty-five, north of range four west, convened for the pur- 
pose of devising some measures for the purpose (which is intended 
by settlers), of protecting what they consider to be their honest 
claims, R. J. Moody was called to the chair and Ephraim Safford 
appointed secretary. 

After a spirited discussion as to the most proper manner of pro- 
ceding, it was on motion, 

'. Tli at a committee of two be appointed to meet the con- 
vention of the whole on the 5th of September next at LaPorte. 

Resolved. That James Haskell and Marcena Clark be said 
committee. 

Resolved^ That a committee of one be appointed to receive the 
number of each settler's claim and make them known at the day of 
sale. 

Resolved. That Ephraim Safford be the committee for that 
purpose. 

Resolved^ That no man is justified in claiming more than one 
quarter section ; that being the quantity given by the pre-emption 
law, and that the committee be not permitted to enter more than 
one on his list. 

Resolved, That all settlers shall make known their claims previ- 
to the first Monday in August next, to the committee. 

\ 



202 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Resolved, That this meeting abide the decision of the general 
convention at LaPorte, on the 5th of September next. 

Resolved, That the proceedings of this meeting be published in 
the Michigan City Gazette." 

Ephraim Safford, Ransom G. Moody, 

Secretary. Oh. a inn an . ' ' 

The same paper contained this editorial commenl : 
"The settlers, it will be perceived, who improved government 
lands in 1834, and who have not the benefit of a Pre-emption Right, 
are holding meetings in their different townships for the purpose of 
appointing two delegates therefrom, to meet in convention at La- 
Porte on the 5th of September, previous to the land sales. The 
object of which is, to secure to them, the rights which their neigh- 
bors now enjoy — their lands at government price." 

That this question was carried into the county politics is indicated 
by the following from the Gazette of the date mentioned : 

* ; We were somewhat surprised, not long since, to hear a gentle- 
man, in a public meeting, express his utter abhori and conten I 
that the people should take it upon themselves to call, and organize 
primary meetings in their different towns and counties, for the pur- 
pose of choosing whom it should be to take the management of their 
public affairs. As for ourseh/es, we can see no impropriety in the 
matter at all — but on the other hand we think them to be of essen- 
tial service. We see notices of meetings on every side of us, for 
the purpose of securing to individuals, who came to this county 
when it was a mere wilderness, their lands at government price — 
and which we think is all right. The main argument, however, 
with the gentlemen, why they should not be held, is, because it has 
not been the practice heretofore ; it must be confessed that it is a 
powerful one, and one which the good sense of this community will 
not pay much regard to, however injuriously he may think them 
to be." 

Though the national election could not have been held until the 
next year, yet the Gazette which was a Democratic paper, displayed 
at the head of its columns, the names of Martin VanBuivn for Pre- 
ident, and Richard M. Johnson for Vice President. It contains 
also the following announcements of candidates in connection with 



POLITICS. 203 

• notice that the election would be held on the first Monday in 
Augus 

"We are auth say, that the Hon. E. A. Hannegan, our 

present and worthy member in congress, is again before the people 
of this district, composed of the counties of Vermillion, Parke, 
Montgomery, Fountain, Warren, Tippecanoe, Carroll, Clinton, 
White. Parker, LaP irte, St. Joseph and Elkhart for re-election." 

•*We are authorized to say that David H. Colerick is a candidate 
the State senate from the district composed of the counties of 
Allen. LaP >eph. Elkhart, LaGrange, Huntington and 

Wabash." 

"We are requested to state that "William G. Ewing, is a candidate 
for the Star.' Sen te i'rom the counties of Allen, LaPorte, St. Joseph, 
Elkhart. LaGrange, Huntington and Wabash." 

" We are authorized t< that Jonathan A. Liston is a candidate 

for member of assembly from this and St. Joseph counties." 

Besides these, there were announcements for county offices; 
Hiram Wheeler and Joel Butler, for Register; George Swope, 
Joseph F. Reynolds and Burwell Spurlock for Recorder; James 
M. Scott for Associate Judge; and Eliakim Ashton for Commis- 
sioner. On the 18th of Jul} 7 , Mr. Samuel Miller of Michigan City 
was nominated for representative to the State legislature, by a 
Democratic convention held at the village of Lakeport, or Hudson, 
of which Charles Egbert was chairman, and Benjamin Woodward, 
secretary. There were two other candidates, who came up before 
the people without submitting their claims to a convention. On 
this matter the Gazette remarked: 

" Felloiv Citizens: You have now before vou, three candidates 
for representative in the next legislature of this state, two of which 
are what is called, stump or self-nominations, and one nominated by 
the people. Samuel Miller was nominated by ; .he unanimous vote 
of a respectable meeting, believing him to be the most efficient man, 
and best qualified to represent the interest of this community in the 
next legislature, which nomination was again submitted to a conven- 
tion of the electors of the two counties, convened at a considerable 
distance from his and the other candidate's residence, where he 



204 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

again received the nomination for representative in the next 
Assembly. 

In selecting Mr. Miller for their candidate, thev think thev have 
presented to the public a person worthy of their votes — one who 
has lin confidence of the people — one whom the people know and 
have known for a lono- time to he a friend to his country , constitu- 
tion and laws. Mr. Miller's avocations have been such, that prob- 
ably few persons have the practical knowledge of the situation, loc - 
tion, and wants of the country that he has. while his business 
habits, and Republican predilections, render him worthy the suf- 
frages of a free people." 

The two other candidates alluded to in the address were Jonathan 
A. Listen and Charles W. Cathcart. Mr. Cathcart issued an 
address to the people of LaPorte and St. Joseph counties, and 
because of its frank statement of the position which he occupied on 
public questions, and the lucid exposition given of the sir - of 
political discussion at the time, it is here presented entire, as it was 
published in the Michigan City Gazette: 

"to the voters of titk district composed of st. joseph a.nd 

la port;-: counties. 

Fellow Citi By the request of a very respectable number 

of my friends, I was induced during the last spring, to suffer my name 
to be used as a candidate to represent this district in our next legis- 
lature, and at the first opportunity which occurred, the meeting of 
the circuit court in LaPorte county, I. in conformity with the cus- 
torn of the country, mounted tin- stump and informed my follow 
citizens then assembled, that thev might consider my services at 

< • 

their disposal. 

Thus, having appeared before the public, it is my duty as well 
a pleasure, to express my views upon such prominent matt* 

may be subject to legislative action, claiming for them only that 
consideration, which the honest convictions of one individual may 
entitle him to — for our whole scheme of gbvernment bein^r founded 
on the principle that all power is inherent in the people, and as the 
representative agency is made use of merely on account of the diffi- 
dulty, indeed even the impossibility of the affairs of the public being 



POLITICS. 205 

acted upon deliberately, by the people, en masse, it is evident that 
the representative should suit his course to the wishes of his con- 
stituents, according to their views of the manner in which they may 
see proper to have their interests attended to, and that as near as he 
does this, so near will he come to the fulfillment of the trust reposed 
in him. 

Having thus, fellow citizens, acknowledged the entire dependence 
of the representative upon the instructive power of his constituents, 
I will give you my views as frankly and as freely as possible. 

A bill commonly called the 'ad valorem bill,' which passed dur- 
ing our last session, is, I conceive unjust, and partial in its opera- 
tion, bearing with peculiar hardship, upon this part of the State. 
and is but a. mocking of its title, which is made use of, apparently, 
to impose a disagreeable potion under a palatable name ; but I am 
convinced that a system of taxation, based upon the principle that 
every man must pay to the government that protects him and his, 
in proportion to the value of his estate, is one which is entireh 
reasonable and just. 

Another bill, commonlv called the 'mammoth bill,' making vast 
and indeed unlimited appropriations to works of internal improve- 
ment, only failed during the last session, after a warm and pro- 
tracted debate — -after which a bill 'to provide for the further 
prosecution of the Wabash and Erie canal,' and for other purposes, 
and an act supplemental, passed and received the signature of the 
governor, which provides for the survey of a vast scheme of canals, 
railroads, etc., as well as for the prosecution of the Wabash and 
Erie canal, to the navigable part of the Wabash river. 

The cost of those works, should they all be completed, must 
overgo $29,000,000, and of this sum, not one cent is contemplated 
to be expended on this side of the Wabash river; and though it is 
more than probable, that but a part of those works, may be expected 
to be completed, still it must be evident, that many of the routes 
which were ordered to be surveyed, are of comparative insignifi- 
cance, when compared with a route or routes, which would have 
connected our northern waters, with a southern thoroughfare, and 
that the neglect of the. interest of the north part of this State, in the 
provisions of that bill, was. a gross instance of partial legislation. 



206 HI-TORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

The experience of other States has dei rated the advanta \ 

to be derived from a judiciously disp tem of internal improi 

ments, and the policy that would dictate the abandonment of su 
a scheme, would be as fallacious as the late act is partial 
extravagant. 

The disposal of the three per cent, fund will continue to re 
the utmost attention, on the part of the members from the n 
counts It is no doubt known to all, that the three per cent, fund 
originates from an agreement with the general government, upon 
our entering the Union, as a free and sovereign State, that the pub- 
lic lands shall not be subject to taxation, until the expiration of 
five years after they have been sold by the general government, in 
consideration of which the United States make grants .sundry to t. 

i to. among which are five per cent upon the proceeds of the sales of 
the public lands within this State, which is to be applied to works of 
internal improvement, three per cent, being subject to the c< 
of our legislature. Now, this being the case, what plan of distribu- 
tion among the different counties, so j st. o appropriate to each, 
the amount accruing upon the sales of land within that county': 

Thinking, fellow citizens, that we should all know at least e: 
of the law. to keep clear of it, I am in hopes of seeing our coram 

well a ttute law put into such a form, that it may be more 
commonly diffused and known among us. ich » 3 been 

in agitation before our legislature, and believing it would save 
half the litigation - hearti wishes for ts 

3S. 

The next apportionment will a a matt i 

de 

. . is at 

with an incre u - will of coursi 

in a more commanding p of the nortr « 

mite with ■ uth in all judicious 3ch ■ es of inl ■ il i' 

mem. will be ra it such gdari , 

l ' iaT 
partial legislation, <n pre 1. i 

In . or rather our want of them.. ,. i '-. 

less to say inn g go man^ Luments <»{* our ne ] i . .v, 

. ana as the 

dit.on m thi - "^. v ,f the diffi- 

legislative interference. p | lbIic bejng 






POLITICS. 207 

There are many other subjects, fellow citizens, which are no 
doubt of importance, but believing I have touched, though slightly, 
those subjects most generally interesting to the citizens of this dis- 
trict, I shall detain you no longer with the enumeration of matters 
of less general interest. 

With feelings of peculiar delicacy, I must, fellow citizens, here 
remark that as regards national politics, I have ever been the 
unwavering friend of the leading principles .of the present adminis- 
tration : I look npon them as the emanation of the purest patriotism, 
and while I disdain the low bickering of party strife, still I must 
exercise the right of every freeman, to avow his sentiments. This 
avowal, fellow citizens, I make, not with a view of enlisting the 
partiality of a single voter; I do it merely because if silent on 
this point, I may probably be charged with want of frankness, a 
charge I must be indulged in saying, to me. peculiarly painful. 

Fellow citizens, I have but to offer to your acceptance such com- 
mon place qualifications as a life of much vicissitude has engendered, 
and an assurance that the good f the district, the whole district, 
shall be my aim, should I be so fortunate as to gain your preference. 
But fellow citizens, if in your better judgment you should prefer 
another, I must take this opportunity to assure you, and him, that 

he lias my warmest wishes for his success in the furtherance of the 

i, 

welfare of this district. 

Charles W. Cathcab d. 
LaPorte, July 20. 1835." 

The campaign was wage.i vigorously throughout, and resulted in 
■e election of the candidates of the Whig party, in this county. 
rp; u illustrating the newspaper tone of the time and t{n_> terms 
oyero . use of by political opponents we take some extracts from the 
to be e l P ers tnen published in LaPorte. On the 28th day of 
more t\\' iev - 1839, the Whigs held a convention, and the next issue 
to be cc ja, l >or ^ e He ra ldy published by Joseph Lomax and edited by 
which w T10W °f * ne Chicago Times, contained the following comments 

cance, wh 

, -, " ARISTOCRATIC CONVENTION, 

connected t 

that the ne<> r ^ a .) 7 ' 28 th December, the Aristocrats of this county. 
provisions of convention in this place. They previously made many 



- 18 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

loud calls, both through their papers, and also through the medium 
of hand bills. And when the great day arrived, it turned out. as 
many of their great things do — a poor shabby convention. 

When the convention was organized. Mr. J. Bigelow. one of the 
leading Abolition fanatics of this county, was appointed one of the 
\ ice Presidents of the meeting. This is a fact that is worth being 
remembered by the people. It shows that the boasted patriotism 
of the Aristocrats of LaPorte county, is capable of courting the 
Abolition faction, for the purpose of adding some little to their 
strength. Was the ancient republican virtue, and the law-abiding 
principles of the American people, ever more grossly outraged 
than the cherishing of such inhuman and insurrectionary principles, 
as those advocated by ihe Abolitionists, which were approved and 
sustained, in a measure, by this Aristrocratic convention, in the 
selection of one of its officers? This shows that in this county, 
there is a close connection, reciprocity of feeling, and identity of 
sentiment.-, between the opposition party and the Abolition faction 
— if not an entire amalgamation and identity." 

There is much more of the article, and in it occurs such terms as 
"black-hearted falsifiers," "ignorant brawh "long-faced hypo- 

crites," and '•foul mouthed slanderers." The LaPorte county 
Whig, edited by A. P. Andrew, Jr., replies, and says, among other' 
things: "We would ask in all candor, if it is looked upon as a 
necessary qualification that an editor of a party newspaper should 
indiscriminately abuse all who do not agree with him or his party in 
politic-:' and closes with the pungent query, "Does the editor of 
the Herald use such epithets by order of the party, or does he do 
it the natural way ? " • . 

The year, L840, was a warm campaign year. Martin VanBuren 
and Richard M. Johnson were again the candidate- of the Demo- 
cratic party for President and Vice President. The Whig party 
had nominated Gen. Wm. Henry Harrison and John Tyler. 
Tilghman A. Howard was the Democratic candidate for Govern* . 
and Samuel Bigger the Whig candidate. Other candidates of the 
Democratic party, as their names appeared in the LaPorte Herald 
were Edward A. Hannegan, for Congress; Charles W. Cathcart, 
for State Senator: Willard A. Place, for Representative; Win. M. 



POLITICS. 209 

Patterson, for Sheriff; Abram Fravel, for School commissioner; 
Dr. DeWitt Strong, for County commissioner. At the head of the 
columns of the LaPorte county Whig, stood the names of the Whig 
candidates for President, Vice President and Governor; and for 
Congress, Henry S.Lane; for State Senator, Sylvanus Everts; 
for Representative, Daniel Brown; for Sheriff, Wm. Allen; for 
School commissioner, Abel Lomax ; for County commissioner, Henly 
Clyburn. 

While in this campaign most of the voters delighted to call them- 
selves either W T higs or Democrats, or rather Democratic Whigs, and 
Democratic Republicans, there were a few who boldly took upon 
themselves the then odious name of Abolitionist. It required con- 
siderable moral courage to do so. In this county there was but a 
mere handful, apparently not enough to induce either party to 
court their favor. Had their numbers been greater it is probable 
there would have been efforts made by one party or the other to 
secure their votes. It is amusing to see how shy of any possible 
taint on this score both parties were. An Abolitionist was a polit- 
ical leper, whom it was dangerous to touch. In this general feeling 
of the country toward them, the parties as they existed in LaPorte 
county shared. One week in March, 1840, the LaPorte Herald 
has a thrust at the W 7 hig newspaper in these words: "The LaPorte 
county Whig says not one one word condemnatory of Abolition;' 
and the next issue of the Whig replies in these words: "Nor one 
commendatory of Abolition." The one party was an open and 
avowed enemy ; the other refused to be a friend. 

Betwen the two great political parties, the feeling became sharp 
and stirring. The LaPorte county Whig secured a "log cabin' 
wood cut, and from that time on, the Whig was illustrated with a 
log cabin. Dr. Fosdick's ingenuity was called into requisition to 
make the cut, and it illustrated not only the newspaper, but the 
campaign as well. Some bitterness also arose between individual 
men of the two parties. On Saturday previous to the 4th of July, 
1840, Hon. Henry S. Lane spoke in LaPorte, which was the 
occasion of some remarks in the Herald of a personal nature, and 
which were declared afterwards by the Whig to be a reflection on 
the ladies who attended the speech. On the morning of the 4th, 

H 



210 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

just as the audience were leaving the court house, after hearing an 
oration, Mr. Joseph Lomax, one of the editors, and the publisher 
of the Herald, was attacked by a prominent member of the Whig 
patty with a cane because of the asserted insult published in the 
Herald in regard to the ladies who attended the Lane speech. Mr. 
Lomax drew a knife and stabbed twice, when the parties were separ- 
ated, without any serious injury to either. Doubtless the affair 
never would have occurred except under circumstances of high party 
spirit and rancor. In the Herald of the 11th of July, Mr. 'Lomax 
published a long statement concerning the affair over his own 
signature, one sentence from which will serve to show the political 
nature of the quarrel. After recounting several reported instances 
of the mobbing of Democratic editors, he adds: "In this place, 
LaPorte. the Federalists are the most abandonee^ reckless, hyi - 
critical, murderous, and lost to every noble, honorable, virtuous 
feeling, of any other community with which I am acquainted; and 
within the last few years I have traveled through nine States of the 
Union." All which can now only excite a quiet smile, but then no 

doubt was highly commended by one party, while it embittered the 
already aroused feeling of the other. 

The Senatorial convention which nominated Sylvanus Eve 
was held at Valparaiso on the 28th day of March, and was presided 
over by Solon Robinson, then of Lake county, with James Blair 
of Porter and Alexander Blackburn of LaPorte. Vice Presidents, 
H. S. Orton and Samuel I. Anthonv, Secretaries. Anions other 
resolutions the following was adopted: "That we have our politi- 
cal log cabin already raised, that next August we will roof it in. 
that next November we will chink Locofocos into the cracks, a 
that next March we will move into it." This resolution was 
printed in the 117//// in large capitals. On the 11th of April the 
Whig county convention was held, and as matter of local history, 
its proceedings are here given in full, as reported in the Whig: 

"WHIG COUNTY CONVENTION. 

According to previou notice the delegates from the several town- 
ships of this county, met in convention at the court house, in La- 
Porte, on Saturday the 11th inst., at one o'clock P. M. 

The convention was called to order bv Oscar A. Barker, when on 



POLITICS. 211 

motion of Gen. Joseph Orr, the Hon. Gustavus A. Rose, was 
elected President, and Abel Lomax Vice President of the conven- 
tion, and Andrew L. Osborn of Michigan City, and Elijah Mayhew 
of LaPorte, were appointed Secretaries 

The president then proceeded to the calling of delegates by town- 
ships, when the following gentlemen appeared and produced their 
credentials, and took their seats as members of the convention, 
to-wit : 

From Centre Township. — John C. Reid, Joseph Orr, Jehiel 
Wasson, Stephen Holloway, John Hobson, Gustavus A. Rose, Jacob 
P. Andrew, William Clark, Edmund B. Woodson , George Swope, 
Clinton Foster and Elijah Mayhew. 

From Michigan Township. — William H. Goodhue, Jonas Clark, 
Warren Cole, Samuel Booth, Samuel Mower, Oscar A. Barker, 
Horace Burr, Andrew L. Osborn, Chauncey C. Blair and Eliakim 
Ashton. 

From Neiv Durham Township. — James McCord, Henly Clyburn, 
Holland Benedict, Lemuel Robinson and James M. Ray. 

From Scijrio Township. — Daniel Closser, Lewis C. Andrew, 
Elnathan Gregory, Thomas W. Sale, John M. Barclay and David 
G. Rose. 

From Noble Township. — William A. Webster, Horace Pratt, 
Theodore H. Wells and Josiah Grover. 

From Pleasant Township. — George C. Havens, Jacob M'Casky, 
Abel Lomax and James Webster. 

From Springfield Township. — Mr. Atwater, J. F. Jones, Phineas 
Hunt and Jesse Jones. 

From Hudson Township. — John Reynolds and Andrew Avery. 

From Union Township. — Patrick S. Weed, N. M. Catlin, 
Charles W. Henry and Miles S. Henry. 

From Kankakee Township. — Jacob Wagner, Myron Ives, Ezekiel 
Provolt, Michael Brand, Chapel W. Brown and Daniel Murray. 

From Wills Township. — Jasper S. Hunt, Henry Williamson, 
Charles Carmichael and William H. H. Whitehead. 

From Clinton Township. — William S. Harding, Abijah Bigelow, 
T. B. Patterson and E. Williams. 

From Coolspring Township. — Nathan Johnson. 



212 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

No delegates appearing from Galena township, 

On motion of Chapel W. Brown, it was resolved that Byron 
Cadwallader and James Catterlin represent said township in this 
convention. 

On motion of Gen. Joseph Orr, it was resolved, that in all cases 
where townships are not fully represented in this convention, that 
the delegates present from such townships, be authorized to fill such 
vacancies by the appointment of individuals from the same town- 
ships, or that they may be authorized to give the whole number of 
votes to which said townships are entitled. 

On motion of Gen. Orr, the following resolution was unanimously 
adopted. 

' Resolved, That the convention now proceed to nominate by 
ballot, a suitable person to run for Representative, each delegate 
voting as his name is called.' 

Whereupon, Daniel Brown, of Scipio township, having received 

on the first balloting a majority of all the votes, it was on motion of 
Gen. Orr, 

' Resolved, (unanimously), That Daniel Brown, be recommended 
to the Whigs of this county, as a suitable person to represent them 
in the next legislature.' 

On motion of William Clark, it was 

Resolved, That the convention now proceed to nominate by ' 
ballot a suitable person to be run for Sheriff, at the ensuing August 
election, each delegate voting when called. Whereupon. William 
Allen having received a majority of all the votes, it was on motion 
of Gen. Orr, 

1 Resolved, That William Allen be recommended to the Whigs 
of LaPorte countv. as a suitable man for Sheriff of said county*' 

The convention then proceeded to nominate a suitable person to 
he supported for County commissioner, Whereupon, llenly Clyburn, 

having received a majority of all the votes given, it was on motion 
of James Clark, 

• Resolved, (unanimously), That Henly Clyburn be recommended 
to the Whigs of this county, as a suitable candidate for the office of 
Countv commissioner, for district number three.' 

The convention then proceeded to nominate a suitable person to 
be run for the office of School commissioner, Whereupon, Abel 
Lomax, having received a majority of all the votes given, it was. 



POLITICS. 213 

'Resolved, (unanimously), That Abel Lomax be recommended to 
the Whigs of this county, as a suitable candidate for the office of 
School commissioner, at the next August election.' 

The nominations having all been made, on motion of Warren 

Cole, the following resolutions were unanimously adopted, to-wit: 

'Resolved, That all the Log Cabin boys present be invited to 
take part in this convention.' 

Edmund B. Woodson, Es<|., offered the following resolution, which 

was unanimously adopted, to-wit: 

'Resolved, That a committee of six citizens of LaPorte county, 
he appointed to address an invitation to Gen. Harrison, to meet the 
young men of Indiana, at the Tippecanoe battle ground, on the 
29th of May next, and to request his attendance there, if he can 
possibly do so, consistently with his public and private duties, and 
that said committee report the result of their correspondence, by 
publication in the Whig papers of this county, as soon as possible. 
Whereupon the following gentlemen were appointed said committee, 
Abram P. Andrew, Jr., Charles W. Henry, Edmund B. Woodson, 
James M. Stuart, Gen. Joseph Orr and John Walker. 

The convention was then favored with a short but spirited and 
eloquent speech by Charles W. Henry. Esq., which being concluded, 
on motion it was resolved, that the proceedings of this convention 
be published in all the Whig papers of this county. 

On motion the convention the): adjourned. 

G. A. Rose, President. 

A. L. Osborn, I o > Abel Lomax, Vice President." 

77 ^ r > oec vs. 

E. Mayhbw, j J 

On the 13th, the Monday following, the Democratic county con- 
vention was held, and its proceedings as reported in the Herald, 
were as follows: 

"LAPORTE COUNTY DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 

On Monday the 13th of April, 1840, the Democrats of this county 
met pursuant to previous notice. 

On motion, Col. John Moore was called to the chair ; Dr. S. 
Pulford and Mr. Samuel Treat, Vice Presidents; and Joseph Lomax 
Secretary. 

On motion of Thomas D. Lemon, the convention nominated the 
following committee, to choose officers for the convention : 



214 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY 

Abner Bailey, of Centre ; John Wills, of Wills ; William Wright, 
of New Durham ; Jabez R. Wells, of Michigan ; Isaac Jessup, of 
Kankakee; Ephraim Barney, of Union; John I. Crandall, of 
Pleasant; A. Foster, of Hudson; Day Jones, of Coolspring ; Niles 
Gregory, of Scipio, and Gilbert Rose, of Springfield. 

The committee retired, consulted, returned, and reported the fol- 
lowing officers: 

John I. Candall, President; Schuyler Pulford. Samuel Treat, 
Alee Presidents; Joseph Lomax, Charles H. Averill, Secretaries. 

The convention adopted the report, and the officers took their 
seats. 

Mr. Enos stated the object of the convention. 

On motion ot Mr. Enos the convention appointed the following 
committee to draft resolutions expressive of the sentiments of the 
delegates of this county ; viz : 

Alonzo W. Enos, Gilbert Hathaway, Robert Stewart, Wilber F. 
Storey, William Wright, John Wills, A. A. Reynolds. Nathan B. 
Nichols, John Moore, and Thomas Norris. 

On motion of Mr. Storey the convention adjourned for one hour. 

The convention met. 

On motion of W. F. Storey, all Democrats present, were invited 
to participate in the deliberations of the convention. 

On motion of Mr. Hathaway, the convention resolved to nomi- 
nate candidates for this county at this convention. 

Mr. Enos commenced reading the resolutions, reported by the 
committee, when, on motion of Mr. Stewart, it was resolved that a 
vote of the convention should be taken upon each resolution, as it 
should be read. The following resolutions were then read and 
adopted, viz: 

Resolved, That the Federal party of 1*4'). is the same identically 
with the Federal party of 1798 and 1800. To prove it let facts 
answer. Alexander Hamilton, the founder and head of the Federal 
party, openly avowed and publicly maintained, that the people were 
not capable of self government — that the people were "turbulent and 
changing, and seldom judged or determined right, and that nothing 
but a permanent body of life legislators could check the impudence 
of Democrat The Federal party have always been in favor of a 

National Bank — they maintain that a national debt is a national 



POLITICS. 215 

* 

blessing, and acting upon this principle, the present Federal party 
openly advocate the assumption of the State debts by the general 
government, thereby creating a debt of two hundred millions of 
dollars — they are in favor of an extensive system of internal 
improvements to be carried on by the general government — they are 
in favor of a h-igh tariff, and monopolies of every grade and charac- 
ter — they support the old Alien and Sedition laws, and at a recent 
date they were clamorous for the odious and proscriptive gag-law, 
introduced into the Senate of the United States by a Federal cham- 
pion — they are opposed to the safe keeping and disbursements of 
the public revenue in the only safe and constitutional way, to guard 
the people against great loss, and the government from irresponsi- 
ble depositories — in short the Federal party oppose every measure 
of relief, proposed by a Democratic administration — but, propose 
nothing themselves to mitigate the evils of which they complain. 

Resolved, That the Democratic party repudiate all of these Fed- 
eral doctrines and oppose them as being dangerous to constitutional 
freedom and the existence of Republican institutions. . 

Resolved, That as Democratic Republicans of the old school, we 
feel deeply impressed with the great importance of the approaching 
elections; conscious of the zeal, power, and untiring efforts of the 
Federal party, their combinations of individual and corporate 
wealth — their lavish expenditures of money, and reckless course 
to accomplish their object, however base, their dishonest and dis- 
honorable attempts to create panics and circulate falsehoods — their 
attempted deceit to palm themselves off as 'Democratic Whigs.' 
while they support all of the old Federal doctrines — conscious of 
their immense power for doing evil, we have become alarmed for 
the safety of our government and the perpetuity of our free institu- 
tions, and deem it our highest privilege and first duty, thus early, 
to assemble, in order to adopt such measures as will be most likely 
to produce union, concert of action, and a vigorous effort for the 
contest of 1840. 

Resolved, That our confidence in the ability and integrity of 
Martin Van Buren, President of the United States, remains unim- 
paired. His decided stand in favor of true Democratic principles, 
his open and frank avowal of opinions, upon all subjects of deep 
interest to the people, entitle him to the continued confidence and 
support of every Democrat. 

Resolved, That we are in favor of the Independent Treasury 
Bill, recently passed by the Senate of the United States, and recom- 
mend it to the careful perusal and candid reflection of every Repub- 



216 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

lican in this county, as the only safe and constitutional method of 
collecting and disbursing the government revenue. 

Resolved, That the unfounded assertions and miserable party 
slang of the Federalists, that 'the present administration, by its 
wicked and ruinous policy, has deranged the currency — destroyed 
the commerce, and brought distress and ruin upon the country,' is 
as false as it is infamously base; such idle declamation and false 
clamor is designed for party effect, to make early impression-, 
corrupt the public mind, and gratify depraved party feeling. 

Resolved, That the cry of the Federal party against 'office- 
holders,' can have no effect in this county or elsewhere, and illy 
becomes the self-styled Whig party of this State. For eight long 
years or more, the Federalists have been in power in this State, 
and during the whole of that period, they have most faithfully acted 
upon the principle, that to the 'victor belong the spoils.' They 
have clutched every office within their reach, and fattened upon the 
spoils thereof, to the removal and exclusion of Democrats who were 
honest, faithful and capable. No opportunity has been permitted 
to pass unimproved, to hurry from office the most capable men of 
the Republican party, to make room for Federal demagogues, and 
the cormorant cravings of incompetent brawling partisans. Still 
this same Federal party, is constantly crying out against the 
'office holders.' 

Resolved, That when the Federal party came into power in this 
State, there was an overflowing treasury, the credit of the State was 
unlimited, and unimpaired, taxes were light, and cheerfully paid; 
industry received an ample reward, and our young and rapidly 
growing State was advancing steadily, and prudently onward, to 
that high rank among her Bister States, to which she was justly 
entitled. But in an evil hour, the siren song of Federalism won 
its way to the heart, and grained the support of many a true Repub- 
lican. The reign of Federalism commenced, and its progress for 
the last eight years, has beeo onward, until the last cent is drained 
from the treasury. The State has become bankrupt, and her credit 
wholly destroyed; a wild and reckless spirit of legislation b 
involved us in a debt of millions, increased our taxes until they are 
exorbitantly high, and plunged the State in debt to carry out a 
system of improvement.-, thai will cripple the energies, eat up the 
wealth, and destroy the prosperity of the State for the next half 
century. 

Re8olv< dj That the people are too intelligent, not to perceive the 
danger into which Federal misrule has led them. Now is emphati- 



POLITICS. 217 

cally the time for the people to arise in their might, and hurl from 
office those who have basely deceived them — sacrificed their dearest 
interests, and sold their right inheritance for a miserable mess of 
pottage, and put in their place, men of long experience and tried 
integrity, men who are imbued with Democratic principles, wise in 
counsel, energetic, yet prudent in action, and who will stay the tor- 
rent that threatens to overwhelm us in irretrievable ruin. 

Resolved, That as the friends of free government, we feel it to 
be our duty to oppose the election, to any important office, of every 
person whose notions of government and public policy are not 
founded in the fundamental principles of Democracy, and that in the 
future, in the exercise of the rights of freemen, we will be more par- 
ticular in selecting the sentiments of all inclividals for office, as to 
the cardinal doctrines of Republicanism. 

Resolved, That in Tilghman A. Howard, as a candidate for Gov- 
ernor of this State, we have an honest man, a prudent statesman, 
an inflexible and consistent Democrat, and one who is well qualified 
to stand at the helm of our State affairs, at a time so peculiarly dif- 
ficult, and trying as the present. 

If we wish to redeem our State from the depths of degradation to 
which she is already sunk, let us make one bold and determined 
effort, and rallying around the standard, whereon is subscribed 
'Howard and Reform,' march boldly on to victory in the approach- 
ing contest. 

Resolved, That we approve of the convention to be held at Delphi 
in this district, on the 18th day of April inst., for the purpose of 
putting in nomination a suitable person to fill the vacancy soon to 
occur in the seventh congressional district, by the resignation of the 
Hon. T. A. Howard, our present representative. 

Resolved. That although we are willing to abide by the nomina- 
tion that will be made at the congressional convention, to be holclen 
at Delphi on the 18th inst., and to cheerfully cast our votes for the 
same, yet we are decidedly in favor of the nomination of the Hon. E. 
A. Hannegan, and earnestly recommend him to the support of said 
convention, believing him to be eminently qualified to discharge 
the high duties of the office of congressman. 

Resolved, That it is the imperious duty of every Democrat to see 
that there is a perfect and thorough organization in every township 
in the county. We well know, that it is by constant and untiring 
vigilance only, that we are enabled to guard our liberties, and pro- 
tect our civil rights ; why then slumber at our posts, and remain 
inactive, when both are violently assailed by Federalism, and danger 



218 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

threatens us on every side? Democrats! awake to a sense of duty, 
organize in every township, and take a bold stand for reform and 
constitutional liberty at the coming election. 

Resolved, That we consider the notion that 'solvency of a bank 
does not depend upon the amount of specie in its vaults ' and that 
•the banks suspend to relieve the suiferings of community,' as great 
discoveries in political economy, well worthy the consideration of the 
wise and good, and that the inventors are justly entitled to the 
honor of knighthood. 

Resolved, That we heartily approve the nomination of our worthy 
and faithful late Senator, the Hon. Charles W. Cathcart. for re-elec- 
tion, and that we will use all reasonable endeavors to insure his 
success. 

During the consideration of the resolutions, the convention was 
addressed bv Messrs. Enos and Cathcart. 

On motion of Mr. Stewart, the convention then proceeded to bal- 
lot for a candidate for Representative from this county to the State 
legislature. On the first ballot it appeared that Willard A. Place 
had a majority of all the votes given. So he was declared duly 
nominated for that office. The convention then unanimously chose 
William M. Patterson for Sheriff. Abram Fravel for School com- 
missioner, and Dewitt Strong for County commissioner. 

On motion of W. F. Storey, the convention proceeded to the 
appointment of delegates to the congressional convention. The fol- 
lowing were appointed: 

Wilher F. Storey, William W. Taylor, Joseph Lomax. Nathan 
W. Low, Lawson Hough. John M. Lemon. Thomas D. Lemon, 
Gilbert Hathaway, John Cissne and Ithream Taylor. 

On motion of Mr. Stewart, all delegates who could not attend, 
were authorized to fill their vacancies, provided they should do it 
with good Democrats. 

Messrs. Enos and Wells, addressed the convention. 

On motion of Mr. Enos, 

''. That Federal principles are like Harrison victor: 
few and far between — and made to suit party customs; and that 
Harrison's battles, so gloriously won. according to the tactics of 
the Federal party, are like his principles, wholly unknown and un- 
heard of. 



POLITICS. 219 

On motion of Mr. Storey, the following Central committee for this 
county, was appointed. 

Samuel Treat, Abner Bailey, Joseph Lomax, Daniel Frye and 
Lawson Hough. 

On motion of Mr. Enos. 

Besolved, That the thanks of this convention, be tendered to the 
presiding officers thereof, for the able and impartial manner in which 
they have discharged their respective duties. 

On motion of Mr. Enos, it was resolved that the proceedings of 
this convention shall be signed by the officers, and published in the 
LaPorte Herald. 

The convention adjourned. 

John I. Crandall, President, 

Joseph Lomax, 1 c , . Schuyler Pulford, 1 , r . ^ , ,, 
n v a.t T ,t, ttt r Secretaries. m ' V Vice Pre s. 

(J. K. Averill, j Samuel Treat, j 

The Herald contained the following comment on the proceedings 
of the convention : 

•'LaPorte county Democratic convention. On last Monday we 
had the largest political convention that probably was ever held 
in the county. The Democrats have commenced operations in 
the right spirit. We have great hopes of overturning the oppres- 
sive bank aristocracy of this much abused county. The people are 
tired of the wretched management of our public aifairs. If large 
conventions are indicative of the strength of parties, then the Dem- 
ocrats of LaPorte county have greit reason to rejoice. The names 
of the nominees may be found at the head of this column. We had 
a numerous, a spirited, a well-conducted, a real, genuine, first-rate, 
glorious convention. And what is still better, every thing passed 
off in the most harmonious feeling, that could have been wished. 
Without further comment, it is enough to say the convention was 
Democratic, in every sense of the word. The oppositionists cannot, 
in truth, speak thus of their last Saturday's convention." 

On the 16th of April there was a meeting of the Whig young 
men of Centre township held at the court house, and to show the 
enthusiasm for "American liberty burning in their bosoms," the 
proceedings of the meeting are here given. The resolutions were 
probably drawn by Myron H. Orton. 






220 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

"The meeting of the Whig young men of Centre township, pursu- 
ant to public notice, was held at the Court House on the 16th day of 
April and notwithstanding the unfavorable state of the weather, the 
assembly was large and respectable. 

On motion of Mr. M. W. Patton, M. II. Orton, was called to the 
chair, and M. A. Allen appointed secretary. 

The object of the meeting having been stated by the chair, on 
motion of M. A. Allen, a committee of six was appointed to draft 
resolutions expressive of the sease of this meeting, and the following 
gentlemen were appointed said committee : Messrs. Jesse Wasson. 
Jeremiah Early. Jason Holloway, John W. Reid, M. W. Patton, 
and H. Rodifer, who after retiring a few moments, reported the 
following preamble and resolutions : 

Whereas, We, the Whig Young men of Centre township, do 
most candidly lament the present depressed state of the times, rendered 
doubly lamentable by the suddenness of the transition from a state 
of prosperity, unparalleled in the history of nations, to the verge of 
bankruptcy; a state of prosperity presenting a spectacle of wonder 
and astonishment to the old world, of an infant colonv shaking off 
the shackles of tyranny, assuming in the short space of sixty- four 
years a standing among the first nations of the old world, vieing 
with them in the cultivation of the arts and sciences, in the promo- 
tion of manufactures, and the extension of commerce; far surpassing 
them in mineral and agricultural resources, and in being blessed 
with a government better adapted (when properly administered), to 
secure the happiness of the people than any other that has >ver 
existed; from being seated upon the pinnacle of national prosperity 
at once the pride and envy of the world, we have been hurled head- 
long down the treacherous cliffs of experiments, and are now grovel- 
ling in the valley of ruin and despondency We have become 
objects of contempt and derision to foreigners, and the slaves and 
vassals of those whose legitimate sphere is the Bervice of the people; 
and, whereas, in this great revolution, which has taken place in 
' our national condition, we recognize the fruit of the present imbe- 
cile and corrupt administration: and whereas, we deprecate the 
election of Martin Van Buren to the Presidency of the United 
State-, as the finishing stroke of a political scheme that will sap the 
citadel of libertv ; and whereas in the Praetorian band of office 
holders which infest our land, the sworn vassal of the lord of the 
manor, we recognize a system of bribery and corruption calculated 



POLITICS. 221 

to destroy the purity of the elective franchise, and to render the 
votes of freemen a merchantable commodity ; and, whereas, actua- 
ted by sentiments of gratitude to the immortal achievers of our 
independence, and to the illustrious framers of our constitution, we 
consider ourselves bound by the mutual ties of honor and consan- 
guinity to transmit, unimpaired, this glorious inheritance to poster- 
ity ; and whereas we consider the course of the present administra- 
tion opposed to the spirit and tenor of the constitution, and pregnant 
with consequences disastrous to our prosperity, ruinous and 
destructive to our interest, and subversive of civil liberty; And 
whereas, being heartily tired of experiments and experimenters, we 
most heartily desire to return to the old and tried method of admin- 
istering the government upon the principles laid down in the consti- 
tution, and upon which the administration of Washington and 
Jefferson were modeled ; Therefore, 

Resolved, That the young men of the United States are to be the 
future props of the American Republic, and upon their intelligence 
and patriotism will depend the security of the ark of our political 
liberty and the dearest interests of the civilized globe, and that in 
order to give our minds and our feelings a thorough training pre- 
paratory to one of the first political battles we shall be called upon 
to fight next August and November, we will visit and participate in 
the object of the thousands who will meet on the battle field of Tip- 
pecanoe, on the 29 of May next, and that even now in comtemplat- 
ing the scene that will be there exhibited, our minds expand, and 
our bosoms dilate with emotions of pride and patriotism, and we 
congratulate ourselves upon the fact, that there is virtue enough 
among the people to purge the Republic of swindlers, robbers, 
spoilsmen and all corruption. 

Resolved, That in the opinion of this meeting, the present is a 
period in the history of our country in which every young man who 
feels the least spark of American liberty burning in his bosom, 
ought to come manfully forward to the support of the people's log 
cabin candidate for the Presidency. 

Resolved, That we place implicit confidence in the Hero of Tip- 
pecanoe for a speedy deliverance from the present embarrassments 
of our country, and a just compensation for the produce of the 
farmer, and the labor of the mechanic. 

Resolved, That we, the young men of LaPorte county, in our 
humble sphere, will use all honorable means within our power, to 
elevate to the Presidency the Cincinnatus of America, trusting that 
he will not, in the evening of his days, obscure the splendor of his 



222 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

former actions; and that by his known honesty, integrity and patriot- 
riotism, he will elevate us to our former prosperity and enhance our 
glory among the nations of the earth. 

Resolved, that we heartily approve of the plan of holding a con- 
vention on the Tippecanoe 1 tattle ground on the 29th of May next, 
and also recommend a general turn out of the Young Men of this 
county on said occasion. 

Besolved, That on the 29th of May next, the Tippecanoe Club 
of LaPorte will proceed to the battle field of Tippecanoe; that we 
will take our bread, bacon, hard cider and our tents, and all the 
paraphernalia of the camp along with us, together with a large ban- 
ner upon which shall be inscribed, Retrenchment and Reform, Log 
Cabin, Hard Cider, and No Quarter. 

Resolved, That the Tippecanoe Club will meet again on the 26th 
day of April, at the Court House, and that a general attendance of 
the young men of this county is requested. 

Besolved, That the proceedings of this meeting be published in 
the LaPorte county Win';/. 

M. H. Ortox, President, 
M. A. Allen, Secretary." 

In April, a charter election was held at Michigan City, which 
resulted in a Whig victory; and the Q-azette of the 15th, gave an 
account of the rejoicings on the occasion, which were of the most 
enthusiastic character, the Democrats having carried the previous 
election. The following quotation from that paper is given as illus- 
trative of the demonstrative proceedings : 

"THE BALL IN MOTION. 

Yesterday was a proud day for the friends of Harrison and 
Reform in tin's city. At an early hour, before the opening of the 
polls, the Brig Constitution passed through our streets appropriately 
decorated with banners and mot iocs, and manned bv a hardy set of 
brave Whig tars, under the command of Mr. James P. Pendill. 
From the foremast streamed the broad banner of * \V. 11. Harrison." 
and from the mainmast streamed a flag bearing the motto * Harrison 
and Tyler.' At the stern of the Brig was a flag bearing the words, 
'United we stand, divided we fall.' 'Go the straight ticket.' The 
stars and stripes waved proudly over all, and as the Brig passed 
through our streets, the citizens sent up long and loud huzzas, 
whilst the brass band enlivened the scene by the various tunes which 



politics. 223 

they played on board the Brig in the true Whig spirit. In the 
rear of the boat followed a host of true Harrison voters; and 
when the poll was opened, proceeded to the place and deposited 
their votes in order, which made our opponents look rather streaked. 
As the Brig passed along we noticed a brave son of the ocean 
heaving the lead, and singing out the soundings ; and as the Brig 
approached the poll, we could hear him singing out 'Land Ho.' 
To the tempest-tossed mariner this is always a welcome shout, and 
to the friends of the constitution it was doubly so. For years a 
proud and haughty dynasty has lorded it over the rights and 
interests of the people, and we have never been cheered by the 
sight of a safe anchorage until the gallant Harrison was selected as 
Pilot with the prospect of promotion to Commander of the next 
voyage. Since then from all quarters we have the cheering new-, 
' Land Ho.' Let us push forward to victory and success. 

The entire Whig ticket was elected by handsome majorties. The 
following is the ticket: 

Mayor, John Francis; Recorder, William H. Goodhue; Alder- 
men, Chauncey B. Blair, James McAdoo, George R. Selkirk 
Daniel E. Garnsey, Reynolds Couden; Treasurer, Fisher Ames; 
Assessors, Horace Burr, Wyllis Peck, Henry 0. Carter; Collector, 
Joshua S. McDowell ; Constable, Joshua S. McDowell. 

Let us 'keep the ball in motion.'" 

It will be observed that while the Democratic convention pre- 
sented fully its platform of principles, the Whig party did not. 
The reason of this is probably found in the fact that a meeting of 
the Whigs had been called in the preceding December, at which 
the views and principles on which they entered the campaign of 
1840 were fully set forth. The proceedings of that meeting were 
published in the Whig, and they are here given in full, that the 
precise position of each party may be seen, as in this county they 
contended for supremacy in that most famous of all our political 
contests. 

"whig meeting. 

Pursuant to a call of the Whig Central Committee, a meeting 
was held at the Court House in LaPorte on Saturday the 28th 



224 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

instant. The meeting was called to order by the appointment of 

Mr. John C. Reid, as President, J. M. Barclay and J. Bigelow as 

Vice Presidents, and J. M. Stuart, Secretary. 

The object of this meeting having been stated by Mr. John B. 

Niles, it was, on motion, 

Besolved, That a committee of seven be appointed to report res- 
olutions expressive of the objects of this meeting; whereupon the 
Chair appointed J. H. Bradley, J. M. Stuart, 0. A. Barker. Gar- 
land Rose, A. P. Andrew, Jr., D. Closser and Charles W. Henry, 
said committee ; who, after having retired a few moments, reported 
the following preamble and resolutions, which were unanimously 
adopted : 

The Whig citizens of the county of LaPorte, now assembled in 
county meeting, in pursuance of a call of our Central committee, 
deem it proper again to express ourselves in relation to the matters 
which prompt our political action ; and about which, as freemen of 
the Republic, we are soon to be called on to act. We have seen, 
with regret, the course pursued by our rulers for several of the past 
years, a course demonstrating, as it developes itself, its own fatal 
effects upon the prosperity of our common country. The wide felt 
depression of all the energies of business, the prostration of trade, 
the utter worthlessness of the products of agriculture, and the conse- 
quent ruin now depending above the head of almost every business 
man, heretofore by us so often warned of and foretold, as sure results 
of the late conduct of our general administration, are now unfortu- 
nately too obvious, to even the most unimjuiring mind, to need any 
remark from us. 

Experiments, which in their results, prove so deleterious to a 
whole community should never be tried. They cause always great 
confusion and much distress in the trial, and the gain from them, 
when successful, scarcely ever compensates for the loss sustained in 
producing that success. But a few years ago, within the memory 
of almost the youngest here, the path of the business man was even 
and unobstructed. The currency of the Union firm, stable, and 
built upon a foundation not easily shaken ; fluctuated only under 
the slight influence of our foreign trade. Our labor and the pro- 
ducts of the soil, then not only found a market, but their price.. 



politics. 225 

when realized was of certain and definite value. Now from the 
general derangement ot money matters, not only have we no market, 
no price of certain availability, but even in the uncertain one, some- 
times presented, we are not sure that we shall receive any equiva- 
lent for what we sell. That which is money and valuable at one 
point of the Union, is valueless, or nearly so at another. 

What has produced this state of affairs is now easily answered. 
Who has brought about the production is not more difficult to 
designate. 

A restless, ruleless disposition not to be content with enough of 
good, to take prosperity in its common even disposition, to follow 
in any beaten track, plain and proven safe and of easy passage, and 
a bold adventurous determination in the executive of the Union, 
unguided by reason and unrestrained by law, are the causes to 
which all these evils owe their origin. When, by the overwhelming 
force of public opinion, President Jackson became the executive of 
the Union, that public opinion owed its origin to a deep seated 
belief that a reform was necessary in the expenditures of the country, 
and that proper economy had been lost sight of by former rulers. 
How far this great desideratum of those times has been achieved, 
now every one knows. Instead of retrenchment and reform, we 
have been compelled to witness a most profligate and unwarrantable 
waste of the public money, mad schemes of finance and obstinate 
persistence in them after failure has been evident, a loose adminis- 
tration of public affairs having for its object, more to reward parti- 
sans than to protect the public, and a consequent loss of millions to 
the country by entrusting it in the hands of men wholly irresponsi- 
ble, and in many cases, notoriously dishonest, are matters that have 
successively developed themselves for the last eight years, until it is 
feared that as a nation, we have suffered in our character for mor- 
ality and integrity, much more under the present dynasty, 
independently of any other loss or evil than under all former admin- 
istrations. We have seen the whole fabric of political principle 
upon which Andrew Jackson mounted into power, entirely swept 
away. The internal improvement of the Union, an object first in 
importance in all other countries is here, by his fiat an abandoned 
and forbidden thing. The protection of the industry, the produc- 

15 



226 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

tion and manufactures of our own citizens has followed in its wake, 
and so far as the last measure is concerned, our people and their 
resources, are thrown prostrate before, and completely subservient 
to, the production of foreign and servile countries. 

The destruction of the tariff allows England to compete with us 
in our own market, and with the labor of its slaves to undersell our 
citizens, while that same country will not permit us to land an 
article of our agricultural products (other than cotton which it can- 
not produce), upon its shores. 

Measures like these marked the administration of Andrew 
Jackson, and their effects are written unfortunately, too legibly in 
the present condition of a groaning people. 

Martin Van Buren, his chosen and appointed successor, came 
into office avowedly to follow in his predecessor's footsteps. How 
well he has done so, let the continued derangement of the currency, 
the daily appointments of purchased partisans, the hundreds of 
defaulters, the notorious insolvencv of the treasurv, and last and 
orreatest, the utter disregard of the wants and interests of the 
people, in the leading measures of his administration, answer. 

When we see an unhallowed distinction made in the payment of 
equally just debts, when the office-holding partisan demands the 
gold for himself, but pays to his laboring man what he calls rags, 
we are led to ask if it is Republicanism that prompts him? 

When by daily annunciations, dishonesty and crime arc charged 
upon public agents and public men, and when investigation is 
feared. we see the administration by a traitorous and destructive 
usurpation of power, attempt, aye. almost succeed, to disfranchise, 
to trample upon, to strike from the Union a faithful patriotic state, 
whose very field is saturated and red with the blood of the revolution, 
whose every valley teems with the memory of victory and freedom; 
are led to ask if it is in the hearts of freemen longer to let such 
things be. We answer, and we do hope and believe our whole country 
will join us in the answer, No. We think we see in the flag of the 
opposition, so triumphantly unfurled, bearing the honored names of 
iiarrison and Tyler, a unanimous and unequivocal answer. No. 

Let us then once more unite ourselves fur an effectual and radical 
change. Let us show by the unanimity of our action, that we have at 



politics. 227 

i 

heart the common good, and that all other and minor considerations 
have yielded to a deep determination to hurl the present adminis- 
tration from power, and that object and that only we will unceas- 
ingly pursue. 

In the nomination of William Henry Harrison, we hail a 
harbinger of better times. He comes before us for our suffrages 
fresh from the ranks of the people, unpolluted and uncorrupted by 
power, untrammeled by any pledges. 

He is now as he has always been, one of the people — mingling 
with them in their common affairs — estimating by personal experi- 
ence, their wants and their enjoyments; and/possessing by these 
means, one of the greatest requisites for a ruler. For more than 
forty years he has been subjected to the ordeal of public opinion, 
and in all that time, in whatever station he was placed, whether as 
governor or governed, we find no charge of corruption or dishonesty 
attached to him, even by his enemies. 

As the Governor of the Northwestern territory he has conferred 
more benefit upon the West, than all other rulers besides, and in his 
whole career in that official capacity under the successive appoint- 
ments of Presidents Jefferson and Madison, his whole aim was to 
increase the power and prosperity of his country, to render it a 
peaceable, happy and profitable home to its people, without in one 
solitary instance, looking towards his own personal aggrandizement. 

Of his conduct as a soldier in defence of his country, it is not 
necessary for us here to speak. We live upon the ground where his 
battles were fought, and if any shall seek information of him there, 
we refer them to the hundreds around us, who shared those battles 
with him. Go ask of them, and if there can be found one solitary 
brave man who bared his bosom at the side of Harrison, in that 
strife, whose blood at a charge of dishonor against his general, will 
not boil, and his spirit leap to hurl back the charge in the teeth of 
the slanderer, then let his character rest upon the opinion of that 
single man. 

The battle fields of Tippecanoe, of Fort Meigs and of the Thames, 
present to the world unperishable monuments of his fame as a 
soldier, and upon that evidence he may safely rest. 

As a statesman, he stands the admitted equal of those with whom 



228 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY 

he has acted, and calumny itself has never dared to assail him 
there. 

The latter part of his life has been occupied in agricultural pur- 
suits — retired from the world, a private man, seeking no place or 
power, he has devoted himself to the business of agriculture, nnd in 
that position he is found when now called upon by the unanimous 
voice of the largest convention ever assembled in the Union, to 
assume the office of President of the United States. With the 
decision of that convention we most cordially agree. To the candi- 
dates then presented to us, we pledge our undivided Bupport: 
Therefore. 

Resolved, That as citizens of Indiana, we know no man to whom 
we are under greater obligations as a people than to Wm. Henry 
Harrison, nor any one whose virtue and talents more entitle him 
to our undivided support for the office of President of the United 
States. 

Resolved, That we hail the nomination, of the Hon John Tyler 
of Virginia, for the office of Vice President of the United States. as a 
covenant between the North and the South, and we shall look upon 
his election as evidence that our government will be administered 
upon the principles of the times of Washington and Jefferson, when 
patriotism held the place, now unsurped by party. With such can- 
didates as Harrison and Tvler we shall not onlv achieve, but we 
shall merit success. 

Resolved, That the letter of Senator Foster of Tennessee, in 
answer to the instructions of a party legislature of his State, i- just 
such a response as we hope every Whig would make to such 
instructions. "Tis a fit answer from a patriot to such servile pon- 
derers, for their official master-. 

Resolved, That we approve of the plan of holding a State conven- 
tion at Indianapolis, on the 16th of January. 1n4<>. for nominating 
candidates for Grovernor and Lieutenant Governor, and an electoral 
ticket, and that W. W. Higgins, -I. M. Barclay. Dr. S. Evert-. S. 
Stewart, M. Osborn, S. Vanpelt, <'. W. Henry. Miles J. Henry. -J. 
H. Bradley, William ("lark. J. M. Stuart and W. J. Walker, be 
appointed delegates to represent the county of LaPorte in said Stat.' 
convention, with power to supply any vacancy in their own body. 

Resolved, That our delegates to the State convention be instructed 
to present the name of Abraham P. Andrew, Jr., to the convention 
as a candidate for elector of President and Vice President, for 
northern Indiana. 



politics. 229 

Resolved, That we recommend the holding of a convention of 
delegates from the several counties, in March next, at Valparaiso, in 
Porter county, to nominate a Whig candidate to be supported by 
us for Senator, from this senatorial district, and that Josiah Grover, 
of Noble township, 0. A. Barker of Michigan, W. H. H. White- 
head of Wills, John Reynolds, of Hudson, Gilbert Rose, of Spring- 
field. A. Blackburn, of Kankakee, Dr. Whitcomb, of Clinton, D. 
G. Rose, of Scipio, James M. Ray, of New Durham, Samuel Stewart, 
of Pleasant, Wm. Allen, of Centre and David Harmon of Galena, 
be appointed delegates to represent LaPorte county in said convention. 

Resolved. That a committee of three residing in LaPorte county 
be appointed to correspond with other counties in relation to hold- 
ing the said senatorial convention, with authority to agree upon the 
exact time for holding the convention; whereupon, the chair 
appointed Dr. S. Everts, C. W. Henry and Reuben Munday, Esq., 
said committee. 

On motion, Resolved. That Jacob Early, John B. Niles, D. 
Closser, Wm. Andrew. John H. Bradley, Joseph Orr, Aaron 
Stanton, M. H. Orton and Henry Fredrickson, be appointed a 
central committee for this county, for the ensuing year. 

On motion, Resolved, That the proceedings of this meeting be 
signed by the President, Vice Presidents, and countersigned by the 
clerk, and published in the LaPorte County Whig and Michigan 
City Gazette. 

John C. Reid, President. 

J. BlGELOW, | ir -p . , 

J. M.Barclay, } Vice Presidents. 

J. M. Stuart, Secretary.'* 

The feeling towards those who were opposed to slavery, and were 
hence called "Abolitionists' 1 has already been alluded to ; and it 
is thought advisable to present here further evidence of the feeling 
that existed towards these sincere and conscientious men. In the 
LaPorte Herald of March 7, 1840, there appeared a long article 
entitled "Abolitionism," written by Wilber F. Storey, one of the 
editors, and now the editor-in-chief, and proprietor of the Chicago 
Time*. The following passages are copied from that article: 

•'During two weeks past considerable excitement has existed in 
this county in consequence of the presence of two emissaries or 
missionaries sent from some hot-bed of Abolitionism to enlighten 
the benighted inhabitants of Indiana on this nefarious subject, 



230 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Pursuant to notice previously given a few (there are but few in the 
county), of these "friends of the poor negro," met at the Court 
House in this place, on Monday the 26th inst. 

The notice of this meeting we are sorry to say, was published in 
this paper. When we published the Herald we did not admit any 
of their notices or proceedings into our columns, for die reason that 
we believed the Abolitionists to be no better than traitors to their 
country. Mr. Lomax, however, admits them when a subscriber to 
the paper requests it. For our own part, if we published a paper 
we would not wish to have a single abolition subscriber: and we 
hope the Democratic party will use every means to drive them out 
of the ranks, if there be any in. But an Abolitionist cannot con- 
sistently be a Democrat. 

We have heard the question frequently asked why such a swarm 
of abolition lecturers are overrunning the country, and how they 
support themselves ? We think we can satisfactorily answer the 
question. There is a society in existence which is styled the 
'American Anti-Slavery Society.' By some means this society 
obtains large amounts of money. Well, for money, a large number 
of loafers, who are too indolent to earn their bread honestly, can be 
found who will travel about the country and lecture on abolitionism. 
Their salary is usually about four or five hundred dollars per year, 
and their expenses paid. But it must be recollected their expenses 
are very trifling, as they are instructed to practice a system of 
sponging wherever they go. Our readers will therefore observe 
that it is from no honest motive that they lecture on abolition. 

We hope that if we are again troubled with abolition loafers, the 
people of the county will meet in convention, pass resolutions on 
the subject, and appoint a committee to request them to leave town. 
We think it a very proper course to pursue. If they do not obey 
the will of the people, coercive measures will be proper. 

W. F. S 

Thus is presented as fully as the facts can be obtained from 
original documents, the principles and attitude of parties in L;i- 
Porte county in the year 1840. Party feeling was up to fever 
heat. The Democrats held the national administration, and the 
prestige of official power, the President, Martin Van Buren, being 



POLITICS. 



231 



a candidate for re-election. The greater degre of enthusiasm was 
called out by the Whigs, whose candidates "Tippecanoe and Tyler 
too' were the theme of song and shout and many a log-cabin dis- 
play. The candidate for congress in each party was a man of 
brilliant parts. E. A. Hannegan, candidate of the Democratic 
party, was a captivating speaker, and a lawyer who at the bar had 
few superiors. Henry S. Lane the Whig candidate was then in the 
vigor of his manhood and a popular speaker of great eloquence, 
swaying an audience almost at his will. These two candidates 
made a thorough canvass of the district, speaking at all available 
points. Col. Lane spoke at various points in LaPorte county, as 
did also his Democratic competitor, evoking the highest enthusiam 
of their respective retainers. Senatorial, representative and county 
candidates all worked with a vigor and earnestness that had never 
before been equaled. The election for State and county officers 
came on in August, and the Whigs were victorious. 

The county vote in detail at the election in August was as fol- 
lows for each candidate: 

Vote 

1004 

1009 

1015 

1013 



Democrat. 
Tilghman A. Howard. 
Benjamin S. Tuley, 
Edward A. Hannegan. 
Charles W. Cathcart, 
Willard A. Place, 
Wm. M. Patterson, 
DeWitt Strong, 
Abram Travel, 



Whig. 
Governor, Samuel Bigger, 
Lt. Governor, Samuel Hall, 
Congress, Henry S. Lane, 
State Senator, S. Everts, 
Representative, Daniel Brown, 963 
Sheriff, William Allen, 941 

Commissioner, Henly Clyburn, 994 
School Com. Abel Lomax, 577 

Independent, John B. Fravel, 

At the Presidential election in November, the Harrison electors 
received one thousand and sixty-nine votes, and the Van Buren 
electors six hundred and thirty-nine votes. 

Having now presented very fully the position of parties in 1840, 
and shown the efforts put forth by each to win success, there is 
here exhibited a rapid glance at the state of parties in the county 
from the date of the first election for President ever held in the 
county, the 7th day of November, 1832. In the August preceding, 
an election was held for the purpose of electing a State Senator, a 



Vote. 
778 
770 
760 
765 
809 
832 
774 
481 
692 



232 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Representative in the State legislature, one Sheriff, one Coroner, 
one Probate Judge, one justice of the peace and one school com- 
missioner. Seventy-seven votes were cast at this election, and 
where party lines were drawn on any candidates it resulted in a 
slight majority for the Whig, Samuel Hanna having received a few 
vote? more than his competitor, Pleasant Harris. At this election 
Elisha Egbert and George Crawford were the opposing candidates 
for Representative to the State legislature. At the presidential 
election in November, one hundred and fifteen votes were cast, and 
the following are the names of the persons who voted: 

George Cline. Wm. C. Thrall, James Holder. John Morgan, Isaac 
Morgan, John Carter, John Barnet, Wm. Garwood, Gaines Munger. 
Win. Morgan. Jesse Sherwood, Wm. White, Josiah Bryant, Charles 
Campbell, Samuel Weston. Charles West, Joseph Orr. Nathaniel 
Steele. Levi Garwood. Alden Tucker. John Davis. Elisha Newhall, 
Jonathan Sherwood. John Broadhead, James Hutching, Jeremiah 
Sherwood, Ezekiel Provolt, Myron Ives. Daniel Murray. Asa M. 
Warren. Elias Brown, Michael Brand. Jacob Miller. James Mc- 
Cormick. Absalom Holder. John Miller. Win. Miller. Jesse Willetts, 
Amos Dyer. Arthur Irwin, John Wills, Basil Sperry, Aurea Speriy. 
Levi Brown. John Ireland, Joseph Lykins. Wm. Ireland. Alexan- 
der Blackburn. Andrew Shaw. James Nixon. Emerv A. Brown. 
Philip Fail, Sanford Utley, Jesse M. West. Henry F. Jones, John 
Jones, Nathan B. Nichols, James Highley, Gamaliel Druliner, Wm. 
Thorp. Edmund Luther, Barzilla Druliner. George Thomas, A. P. 
Andrew. Jr.. Benjamin McCarty, Adam Thornton. Jacob Coleman. 
John Sailor. Richard Harris, Christopher McClure. Wm. F. Hor- 
ton. Absalom Rambo, Orra Morse. Ira Robinson. Wm. McCarty. 
Joseph Osborn, Wilson Malone. Elijah EL Brown. Wm. Phillips, 
James Andrew. John Whitaker, John Stanton, Arba Heald, Elijah 
Stanton, Joseph P. Osborn. Adam G. Polke. Joshua Wilson. Adam 
Keith, Charles Morley, Wm. Thomas. James Thomas, Samuel Har- 
mison, Samuel Hoover, Stephen Bray ton, John Coleman, R. S 
Morrison, Lewis Shirley. In Kankakee township, John Wills was 
inspector; Ezekiel Provolt and Myron Ives were the clerks, and 
Nathan B. Nichols and Asa M. Warren the judges. In Scipio 
township, the inspector was A. P. Andrew. Jr.: the judges were 



politics. 233 

Charles Morlev and Ira Richardson, and the clerks were Samuel 
Hoover and R. S. Morrison. For New Durham township, the 
inspector was Elisha Newhall ; the clerks were James Hutchins and 
Joseph Orr, and the judges were Wm. Morgan and Wm. Garwood. 

Of the votes cast fifty-nine were for the electors for Henry Clay, 
and fifty-six were for the electors for Andrew Jackson. 

The next annual election was held on the 5th day of August, 

1833. Edward A. Hannegan and Albert S. White were candidates 

for congress, and White received a small majority in this county. 

There were several candidates for Representative to the State legis- 
lature, among them George Crawford, who led all the rest. 

The tally paper for the election held in LaPorte county on the 
4th dav of August. 1834, shows that Noah Noble received three 
hundred and twenty-eight votes for the office of Governor, and James 
G. Reed one hundred and fifty, which probably exhibits the rela- 
tive strength of the two parties at the time. The largest vote cast 
for any candidate was for the candidate for Governor, and the vote 
could not have been controlled by local influences, as in the case of 
the countv candidates, the result on whom was divided between the 
two parties. 

At the annual election in 1835, while the Whig candidates for 

county offices were elected, the county went Democratic on candi- 
dates for Congress, State Senator and Representative to the State 
legislature. For Congress, E. A. Hannegan received six hundred 
and twelve votes, and James Gregory one hundred and sixty-three : 
for State Senator D. H. Colerick received two hundred and ninety- 
three votes, and Wm. G. Ewing two hundred and seventy-seven; 
for Representative in the State legislature, Charles W. Cathcart 
received four hundred and thirty-three votes, Samuel Miller two 
hundred and twelve, and J. A. Liston one hundred and thirty-four. 
The annual election of 1836, was held on the first day of August, 
and the Whig candidates were generally successful in the county, 
though the vote was very close, Gustavus A. Everts receiving four 
hundred and sixty-eight votes for State Senator, and David Evans 
four hundred and sixty-seven. There were six candidates voted for, 
for Sheriff, and Sutton VanPelt received three hundred and twenty- 
four votes and Dudley Avery three hundred and one, while the vote 
of others was small. 



234 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Another presidential election occurred in November of this year. 
The candidates were Martin Van Buren and Gen. Harrison. The 
VanBuren electors received four hundred and ninety votes, and the 
Harrison electors four hundred and fifty-two votes. A. P. Andrew, 
Jr., was one of the electors on the Whig ticket. The returning 
board for LaPorte countv at this election consisted of Adam G. 
Polke, Ezra Tyler, O. W. Brown, Jacob Droiii, Gale Martin, John 
Mather and Wm. Ruby. There was also an election this year for 
associate judge, at which Elisha Newhall received one hundred and 
sixty two votes and Gustavus A. Rose, two hundred and eight 
votes. 

At the August election of 1837. the Whigs were victorious. 
David Wallace received seven hundred and thirty nine votes for 
Governor against two hundred and two for John Dumont. For 
Congress Albert S. White received seven hundred and one votes 
against two hundred and twenty three for Nathan Jackson. For 
State Senator John H. Bradley received five hundred and seven 
votes against four hundred and sixty-seven for Charles W. Cathcart. 
For county offices, the Whigs, with one or two exceptions, were 
elected. 

In 1838, the Whigs were again successful, and in 1840, the 
elections all resulted in their favor, as already shown in detail. 

The contest of 1840, was one of the most excited campaign years 
the country has ever witnessed. This county was aroused in full 
proportion to the vehement state of public feeling elsewhere: and 
never before in the county, had there been so active a political con- 
flict. With one exception, that of the independent candidate for 
school commissioner, the Whigs elected all their candidates, and 
LaPorte county Avent. bo went that year, the State and the Nation. 
If there was any rejoicing over the result, when it was known that 
there was victory all around the sky, and if there was any profuse 
drinking of hard cider, which is highly probable, the fact must be 
left to rest within the knowledge of those who participated. 



politics. 235 



CHAPTER XXII. 



politics. — Continued. 



On the 3d day of May, 1841, an election for Representative in 
Congress was held in the District of which LaPorte was a part, 
then the seventh, and the candidates were Henry S. Lane and John 
Brice, the former the Whig candidate, and the latter the Demo- 
cratic. LaPorte gave three hundred and ten majority to the Whig 
candidate, the total vote being seven hundred and seventy-nine for 
Lane, and four hundred and sixty-nine for Brice. Of the town- 
ships, Centre, Michigan, Scipio, Noble, Pleasant, Wills, Clinton. 
Union, Galena and Kankakee gave Whig majorities, and Spring- 
field, Hudson and New Durham Democratic majorities. At the 
following August election some of the Democratic candidates were 
elected. At that time the county elected two Representatives to 
the State legislature, and for the different candidates the vote was 
as follows: J. W. Chapman, eight hundred and fifty-one; J. H. 
Bradley, six hundred and ninety-eight; A. Blackburn, five hun- 
dred and six; G. A. Everts, three hundred and twenty-three. For 
Probate Judge the vote stood, for J. R. Wells, seven hundred and 
fifteen ; S. Stewart, six hundred and fifty-four. For County Auditor. 
J. D. Collings received four hundred and seventy votes; J. M. 
Barclay, four hundred and forty-seven ; S. G. Hunt, two hundred 
and thirty-three; and Abram Fravel, two hundred and fifteen. 
For County Treasurer, W. A. Place received eight hundred and 
forty votes, and Wyllis Peck five hundred and seventy-seven. For 
County Commissioners in the first and second Districts. P. Hunt 
and B. Beard were elected by handsome majorities. P. S. Weed 
was elected Assessor without opposition, J. G. Newhouse was 
elected Coroner over J. Bigelow by six majority, and S. Treat, J. 
C. Reid and John B. Niles were elected county Seminary Trustees* 



236 HISTORY OF LAPORTE COUNTY. 

The county was evidently still Whig in politics as was manifest 
the vote on the candidates for Representatives. 

The August election of 1842, was again for county offices only. 
and the vote for the leading candidates was as follow-: For Rep- 
resentatives, J. H. Bradley, eight hundred and thirty-nine: John 
Francis, eight hundred and fifty-four; John Chapman, seven hun- 
dred and seventy; A. B. Brown, twenty-n.ne. For Sheriff. J. M. 
Clarkson. seven hundred and ninety-five: Win. Allen, seven 
hundred and eighty. For Commissioner first District. Phin< - 
Hunt, one thousand and twenty-eight: -Jacob V. Heckman. two 
hundred and ten. For Recorder. Burwell Spurlock, one thousand 
two hundred and one: J. F. Reynolds, one hundred and fifty-six; 
J. W. Teeple. fifty-one. 

The election of 1843. was for Governor, Lieutenant Governor, 
Congress, State Senator, Representatives, County Auditor. County 
commissioner. School commissioner. Assessor, Coroner, and Prose- 
cuting attorney. The parties having candidates in the field were 
Democrat, Whig and Abolitionist. The Whig candidate for Gov- 
ernor, Samuel Bigger, received eight hundred and thirty-nine vote- 
to six hundred and ninety-nine for James Whitcomb, and fifty-four 
for Elizur Doming. The Abolitionist candidates throughout 
received about fifty votes each. For Lieutenant Governor. John 
H. Bradlev, received seven hundred and ninetv-two votes and Jes 
D. Bright seven hundred and sixteen votes. For Congress. Samuel I 
Sample received eight hundred and forty-one vot£s and Ebenezer 
M. Chamberlain six hundred and ninety-six vote-. For State 
9 nator Svlvanus Everts received eiuht hundred and twenty-one 
votes and J. W. Chapman seven hundred and seventeen votes. For 
Representatives Wm. Allen received eight hundred and twenty- 
eight votes. Ferdinand Roberts seven hundred and ninety-seven 
votes. Charles W. Cathcart seven hundred and thirty-six votes and 
James l>radley six hundred and ninety-three votes, -lames Mc- 
Cord and Hezekiah Robertson were candidates for County com- 
missioner, and McCord was elected: Joel Butler and Joseph 
Lomax were candidates for County Auditor, and Butler was electe<l : 
Thomas B. Cole and Samuel Treat were candidates for Assessor, 
and Treat was elected: E. B. Woodson and D. M. Learning were 



politics. 237 

candidates for School commissioner, and Woodson was elected: 
Orrin J. Minor and John Closser were candidates for Coroner, and 
Minor was elected; Reuben L. Farnsworth and Michael C. Dough- 
erty were candidates for Prosecuting attorney, and Farnsworth 
received one hundred and thirty-two majority. With few excep- 
tions, the Whig candidates were elected, the average majority being 
one hundred. 

The abolitionist candidates were, for Governor, Elizur Deming: 
for Lieutenant Governor, Stephen S. Harding; for Congress, Jacob 
Bigelovv: for State Senator, Robert Stewart: for Representatives. 
Theodore Catlin and Herbert Williams; for County commissioners. 
Jonathan Williams; for School commissioner, Elnathan Gregorv : 
for Assessor. Mead Catlin ; for Coroner, Judson Sawin : for Countv 
Auditor, A. *Bigelow. 

At the August election of 1844, J. M. Barclay and A. L. Osborn 
were elected Representatives to the State legislature, over Samuel 
Treat and Thomas P. Armstrong by small majorities. W. A. 
Place was elected Countv Treasurer over David G. Rose by two 
hundred and forty majority. Harrison Hinkley was elected Sheriff 
over Wm. Allen by twenty-eight majority. George H. Haven> 
was elected Assessor over Foster by forty -four majority. J. S. 
McDowell was elected Coroner over John Closser bv thirty-four 
majority. A. Lathrop, Charles Yail and H. Robertson were 
elected County commissioners, over J. V. Hickman, Mark Allen 
and A. Bigelow. The Abolitionist or Libert v candidates were, for 
Representatives, Jesse Jones and Wyllis Peck: for Sheriff, Joshua 
R. Shedd : for < 'ountv Treasurer. Ingraham Gould : for Assessor. 
Theodore Catlin; for Commissioners, Joel Lewis, Judson Sawin 
and Herbert Williams : for Coroner, Jonathan Williams. In thi> 
year political strife ran high. A President of the United States was 
to be elected and the electoral tickets were before the people to be 
voted on in Xovember. Besides the two great parties, the Aboli- 
tionists also presented an electoral ticket. Among the elector> 
were many well known names. Henry S. Lane and Joseph G. 
Marshall were electors at large on the Whig ticket, and among the 
District electors were George G. Dunn, Richard W. Thompson and 
Horace P. Biddle. The Democratic electors at large were Graham 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

N. Fitch and James G. Read; and among the District electors were 
Samuel E. Perkins, Paris C. Dunning, Henry W. Ellsworth and 
Charles W. Cathcart. They all canvassed actively, making numer- 
ous speeches for their respective chiefs, Henry Clay and James K. 
Polk. If the result of that great combat had depended on LaPorte 
county, Henry Clay would have been numbered among the Pre>i- 
dents of the United States, for the Whig electors received in this 
county a vote of one thousand and nine, to eight hundred and thirty- 
one votes for the Democratic electors, and fifty-three votes for the 
Abolitionist electors, whose candidate was James G. Birney. 

At the August election of 1845, LaPorte county went Demo- 
cratic on candidates for Congress, Charles W. Cathcart receiving a 
majority of thirty-nine over Samuel C. Sample. For Representa- 
tives Andrew L. Osborn and J. S. Carter were elected over W. W. 
Higgins and William M. Patterson. For Associate Judges William 
Andrew and Abner Bailey were elected. For Clerk, Thomas P. 
Armstrong was elected over John M. Barclay. For Coroner, 
Jesse Wasson was elected over A. J. Wair, and tor County commis- 
sioner, Abiel Lathrop was elected over Whitman Goit. all by small 
majorities. 

At the August election of 1846, Joseph G. Marshall was the 
Whig candidate for Governor, and James Whitcomb, the Demo- 
cratic, and the vote of LaPorte county was nine hundred and 
forty-three for Marshall, and eight hundred and sixty-seven for 
Whitcomb. For Lieutenant Governor, Alexander S. Stevenson 
received nine hundred and fortv-three votes, and Paris C. Dunning 
"i"-lit hundred and sixty-one. For State Senator. Andrew L. 
Osborn received nine hundre i and ninety-seven votes and John M. 
Lemon seven hundred and ninety-eight. For Prosecuting attorney, 
.Iiuiics Bradley received eight hundred and ninety-four votes, and 
Joseph H. Mather, nine hundred and one votes. For Representa- 
tives, Samuel Stewart and F. VV. Hunt were elected over William 
Wright and Jacob G. Sleight, by less than one hundred majority 
each. West Darling and Christopher McClure were elected com- 
missioners over John Wills and Samuel Treat; Joshua S. Mc- 
Dowell was elected Sheriff over H. F. Hinkley by ninety-one 
majority, and W. K. Anderson was elected over Mark Allen for 



politics. 239 

Assessor by fifty-three majority. The Liberty party, with wonder- 
ful courage kept up its organization and had a full ticket in the 
field, and polled this year an average of sixty-three votes in the 
county, the largest vote yet given. The candidates of that party 
for county officers were, Representatives, George Sawin and T. N. 
West; for County commissioners, Alva Mason and Jonathan 
Williams; for Sheriff, A. H. Mathews, and for Assessor, Jesse 
Jones. The Liberty party candidate for State Senator was Robert 
Stewart. 

At the election of 1847, held on the 4th day of August, the 
count v went Democratic on candidates for Congress. Daniel D. 
Pratt, was the Whig candidate and received in this county nine 
hundred and thirteen votes to nine hundred and ninety-seven for 
Charles W. Cathcart, the Democratic candidate. F. W. Hunt and 
Myron H. Orton were elected Representatives to the State legis- 
lature over J. G. Sleight and William Taylor by majorities of about 
one hundred each. John M. Lemon was elected Treasurer at this 
election, receiving nine hundred and seventy-seven votes, to nine 
Jiundred an 1 sixty-one for Willard A. Place. Alfred Stephens was 
elected County commissioner by a small majority over West Dar- 
ling; and A. J. Wair was elected Coroner over John F. Decker, by 
a majority of eighty-seven. 

The year 1848, brought with it a lively campaign. It was the 
year when General Taylor was the candidate of the Whig party for 
President, and General Lewis Cass candidate of the Democrats. 
Martin Van Buren was the candidate of the Free Soil party. Of 
course party line? were more closely drawn than in other years when 
national interests were not at stake ; but in LaPorte county, local 
considerations affected the result in August to such an extent that 
some candidates were elected from each of the two leading political 
parties, the Democrats generally leading. Willard A. Place and 
F. W. Hunt were elected Representatives over A. Ainsworth and A. 
H. Robinson, Place receiving a majority of one hundred and forty- 
six and Hunt a majority of five. Andrew J. Wair was elected 
Auditor over Joel Butler by a majority of one hundred and thirty- 
three. J. R. Wells was elected Probate judge over William C. 
Hannah. James Bradley was elected Prosecuting attorney over 



240 HISTnRY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Myron H. Orton. J. IS. McDowell was elected Sheriff over W. D. 

Shumway by four hundred and eighty-nine majority. Samuel 
Burson was elected County commissioner over A. Lathrop and 
Joseph B. Lewis was eclected Assessor over R. Shaw by nineteen 
majority. The political excitement did not terminate with the 
local election in August, but increased until the Presidential election 
in November. Perhaps the most significant circumstance attending 
this campaign and election was the growth of the Free Soil senti- 
ment, the county giving two hundred and twenty-six vote- for the 
Van Buren and Adams electors, the candidates of that party for the 
Presidency and Vice Presidency. The Whig electors received one 
thousand and twenty-seven votes, and the Democratic eight hun- 
dred and eiffhtv-three votes, the county groins for Tavlor and 
Fillmore by one hundred and fortv-four majority over Cass and 
Butler. On the electoral ticket of each party these were men who 
have become distinguished in the history of the State. Among the 
Democratic electors there were Robert Dale ( )wen. Cyrus L. Dun- 
ham, Charles H. Test and Graham N. Fitch: among the Whig 
electors wdre Joseph G. Marshall. Godlove S. Orth. Lovell H. 
Rousseau and Daniel D. Pratt : anion sc the Free Soil electors, were 
H. L. Ellsworth, James II. ('ravens. Greorge W. Julian and John 
H. Bradley. The canvassing of the whole State was constant, 
thorough and able. Passions were deeply stirred, for more ;md 
more were questions arising out of the institution of slavery coming 
to the surface, and although both the old parties endeavored to 
ignore such questions, yet, like the ghost of murdered Banquo, 
they would not "down." 

At the August election in L849, the county went Whig by an 
average majority of one hundred and fifty. The vote on candi- 
dates for Governor were, for John A. Matsoii. Whig, one thousand 
one hundred and two, and for .Joseph A. Wright, Democrat, nine 
hundred and fifty-nine: for Lieutenant Governor, Thomas S 
Stanfield, WTiig, one thousand one hundred and five, and James H. 
Lane. Democrat, nine hundred and fifty-four; for Representative* 
in Congress, Williamson Wright, one thousand one hundred and 
twenty-seven. Graham X. Fitch, nine hundred and fifty-seven; for 
State Senator. Abram Teesrarden. Whig, one thousand one hundred 



POLITICS. 241 

and sixty-one, and William W. McCoy, Democrat, nine hundred 
and one ; for Representatives in the State legislature. Alex. H. 
Robinson and William Millikan, Whigs, were elected over W. 
A. Place and Jacob R. Hall; for Probate judge, Mulford K. 
Farrand, Whig, was elected over Gilbert Hathaway, Democrat : 
for County commissioners, John F. Allison and Christopher Mc- 
Clure were elected over Win. Fry and Alfred Stephens; for 
Recorder, Burwell Spurlock was the only candidate; for Coroner 
F. A. McDowell was elected over R. K. Crandall. 

The election of August, 1850, resulted in the election of some of 
the candidates of each of the two parties. For delegates to the 
constitutional convention, John B. Xiles, Alexander Blackburn. 
Charles W. Cathcart and E. 1). Taylor were the candidates, and 
they received votes as follows: Niles, nine hundred and ninety- 
three; Taylor, one thousand and two: Cathcart, nine hundred and 
thirtv-one, and Blackburn, eight hundred and thirtv-nine. For 
Representatives in the State legislature, William Millikan and 
James Bradley were elected over Alexander H. Robinson and 
Jacob R. Hall; for Treasurer, John M. Lemon was elected over 
William Taylor; for Sheriff, H. Lawson was elected over Jesse 
Mathis by twenty-nine majority only ; for County commissioner 
Mark Allen was elected over John F. Allison: for Coroner, E. S. 
Organ was elected over F. MeCollum, and for Assessor, Joseph B. 
Lewis was elected over John S. Jessup. 

At the regular election held on the first Monday of August, 
1851, the Whigs carried the county by a small majority, averaging 
less than one hundred. The candidates for Congress, were Schuy- 
ler Colfax and Graham X. Fitch, and the former received of the 
votes of LaPorte county, one thousand and seventy-three, the 
latter one thousand and sixty-six. For the Legislature, F. W. 
Hunt was elected over James Bradley; for Clerk, Volney Bailey 
was elected over A. W. Henley : for County conrmissioner, George 
C. Havens was elected over James Drummond by ten majority; for 
Assessor, John S. Jessup was the only candidate. At this election 
the new constitution was voted upon, and LaPorte county gave one 
thousand seven hundred and sixty-nine votes for its adoption, to 
one hundred and thirty two votes against it. That section of this 

16 



242 HIS! >RI T LAPORTE COUNTY. 

- itution which provide*] for the exclusion of "n< . - and 
mulatto* m the Mate was submitted t< separate i ind 

although il is net pleasant to write it. yet the truth must be told 
that for this barbarous measure there were one thousand three hun- 
dred and thi; _ht vote-, and only six hi; ad thirty-five 
it. And yet perhaps there shoul ing of gratifica- 
tion that so large a vote was - against it, for it was certainly 
much larger in proportion to the whole vote than in many other 
of the State, and. indicated that the _. nd idea of freedom for 
all men. was taking root, and giving prom: a golden harvest. 
How men ha own since that day! grown in the kn Ige of 

aning of Liberty, in the knowled human 

and of a genuine political manhood. that six 

hundred and thirty-five v I s. 

■ 

This was the year when Schuyler C a candidate for 

- the first tim The convention by which he was nomi- 

» 

nated. was he] I Plymouth on the 28th day of Mav. The Demo- 
crate of the District had met a few days previously* on the 22d day 
of May. at the same place, and nominated Graham N. Filch : 
re-election gress. To show the position of par: d public 

questions at this time there is here presented the resolutio 
adopted by the two conventions held at Plymouth. The Demo- 
cratic convention adopted as its platform of principles, the following 
•lutioi 

•• A*. *,.//•. -/. Hiat the cardinal principles of the Democratic party 

are to be found in th- lutions of 17'. ,s . drawn by Jef o ami 

Madison, and reaffirmed by the National conventions of 1836. 1840, 
[4 and V s -. . that \ _ 1 them as the touchs :' our 

politieal faith : that we will be governed by them in our political 
action, ami that we place our nominee fo ;resa upon the broad 

platform thus erect' 

Res L That we al y the letter ami spirit of the Consti- 

tution, ami that we will stand by each and all of its c mpron 3 
and therefore recognize the binding force of every clans . Tie 
delivery of fugitives from labor included . and w< rd any action 

• i 

quarter, North or South, that tends t" weaken or estrange 
our . igh allegiance to its - tlemn provision-. - [ually faithless and 
treasonable." 



politics. 243 

The Whig convention adopted a much longer platform of princi- 
ples. Their resolutions were as follows : 

"Resolved, That the Whigs of the ninth Congressional District, in 
convention assembled, tender to each other their pledge of fidelity 
to the cause, and devotion to the principles for which they have so 
long labored. 

Resolved, That our position remains unchanged; no interference 
with the domestic policy or peculiar institutions of sister States ; no 
extension of slave territory; no diffusion of an institution which it 
is believed tends to degrade labor and blight industry, over more of 
National soil than it now covers; no countenancing of disunion 
sentiments whether at the North or South ; but devotion, unfalter- 
ing and unconditional devotion to our glorious Union, in any event, 
under all circumstances, despite all contingencies. 

Resolved, That although we may not agree upon each and every 
one of the measures passed by the last Congress, known as the com- 
promise measures, yet we regard them as designed to settle the 
questions specified in them, and that we are of the opinion that the 
good of the country requires that the settlement should remain 
undisturbed until time and experience shall show that a change or 
modification of them is necessary to avoid evasion or abuse; and 
that we hold, in the language of Henry Clay, on making his report 
from the committee of thirteen, that ''Congress ought, while on the 
one hand securing to the owner the fair restoration of his property, 
effectually to guard on the other against any abuse in the applica- 
tion of the remedy," being satisfied that it is not unsafe for either 
individuals or nations to rectify wrong by the substitution of right, 
and that the crowning glory of law is its protection of the rights 
of the weak as well as its enforcement of the just claims of the 
strong. 

Resolved, That the thanks of the nation are due Millard Fillmore 
and his Cabinet for the promptness and efficiency with which they 
have maintained the public faith, and for their determination to 
execute the laws at every hazard, and preserve unsullied the honor 
and integrity of the Nation ; and that this administration deserves 
the confidence and support of the Whig party. 

Resolved, That so far from the prosperity so confidently pre- 
dicted by our opponents being realized by the working of the 
present tariff, we see, instead of the high prices for grain that were 
promised, a depression in rates almost unparalleled ; instead of an 
increase in the rewards of labor, factories and mills all over the land 
stopping, and thus operatives ceasing to purchase of the farmer. 



244 BISTORT OF LAPOETE COUNTY 

compelled to resort to agriculture themselves, and becoming rivals 
in producing instead of being consumers, thereby tending still 
further to depress prices by the superabundance thus created: and 
instead of the wealth of the world pouring in as was prophesied, a 
balance of trade against us of §50,000,000 in a single year, and the 
shipment of over $3,000,000 per month in hard coin from but one 
port to Europe, saying nothing of the millions upon millions of 
bonds and loans negotiated abroad, all hereafter to be paid 
for in cash and nothing else, attest to every man willing to 
see. that all the avails of our hardy miners in California, with an 
amount equally large in addition is taken from us for the benefit of 
foreign manufacturers, who rejoice and thrive over the prostration 
of our industrial enterprises. 

Resolved, That Congress should, in arranging the detail- oi 
tariff, not only seek to raise sufficient revenue for the support of 
Government, but at the same time discriminate so judiciously in 
the duties upon foreign imports, as to promote all the industrial 
interests of our own country: that all legislation which tends to the 
developement of our own resources, or the diversification of labor 
into different pursuits, or the building up of a home market for 
agricultural products on our own soil, or the carrying out of the 
emphatic declaration of Jefferson that "to be independent for the 
comforts of life, we must fabricate them ourselves; we must place 
the manufacturer by the side of the agriculturist,"' is eminently 
beneficial in its character and conduces to the prosperity, the prog- 
ress, the wealth and the real independence of the Nation: and 
that the present tariff should be so modified, a- recommended by 
President Fillmore and Secretary Corwin, as to make it conform 
to the above principles, and render it what the tariff of the I nited 
States should b< — incidental protection to our own labor. 

ResolvoK That it is the duty of congress to make liberal appro- 
priations for the improvement of the Rivers and I [arbors of the A\ est 
;i- well as for those of the South and East; that our internal com- 
merce floating on fresh water, should have equal benefits and equal 
protection with that extended so liberally to the external, or salt 
water commerce of the country, and that no false excuses about ;i 
bill including works of ;( local character will be any justification 
with the people of the West, for denying them that, which, though 
lono; and justly claimed, has been so often defeated by the vetoes of 

Ova • 

Democratic Administrations, or the more recent wilful factiousness 
of Democratic Senators. That this District has peculiar claims 
upon the National Legislature in this respect, being directly inter- 



POLITICS. 245 

ested in the Harbors at Michigan City and St. Joseph ; and that it 
should send a member to represent their claims who can have per- 
sonal influence with his colleagues sufficient to procure for them, 
the vote of at least one other member of his own party from his 
own State. 

Resolved, That we deprecate all those contrivances, whether 
under or without the cover of law, which wink at the pilfering of 
the Government treasury under the pretense of constructive mileage, 
long mileage, Ritchie claims and other kindred absorbents : that 
constructive mileage should be abolished totally and forever ; the 
present exorbitant rate of mileage, so greatly disproportioned to 
the expense of travel, reduced at least one-half, and computed, not 
by the easiest but the nearest route; and public contractors com- 
pelled to live up to their obligations without importunate appeals to 
be allowed hundreds of thousands of dollars in addition. 

Resolved, That we are in favor of reducing letter postage to a low 
rate, and the entire abolition of the franking privilege, leaving the 
government and congressmen to pay their own postage the same as 
private citizens. 

Resolved, That as Whigs, we sympathize with the struggles of 
the masses now going forward in the old world, to throw off the 
shackles which have so long bound them ; and to assert that equality 
and independence which we regard as man's birthright. 

Resolved, Unanimously, that we recommend to the voters of 
this Congressional District, Schuyler Colfax, the candidate this day 
nominated, with the assurance to all that he is honest, and would 
scorn to betray them, or violate pledges which lie may make, 
capable, possessing talents and a zeal in their exercise which must 
be valuable to the district, and creditable to the councils of the 
Nation, should he be elected, and faithful to the constitution of the 
country, regarding its observance as the bond of our union, the 
guarantee of our national welfare, and the means of promoting 
internal peace, and hushing the voice of faction and discord amongst 
our jarring members." 

The resolutions of the two parties given above, exhibit the issues 
which divided them this vear and also in the Presidential 
campaign which was soon to follow. The Whig convention at 
Plymouth was presided over by Andrew L. Osborn ; Wm. Millikan 
was one of the Secretaries. Mr. Treadway was on the committee 
to report permanent officers of the convention, and Mulford K. 
Farrand was made chairman of the District Central committee. 



246 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

The convention seems to have been a most harmonious one. Mr. 
Colfax was nominated unanimously, and the resolutions were unan- 
imously adopted. On the 4th day of June, the LaPorte Whig 
contained the following call for a county convention : 

"RALLY WHIGS ! COUNTY CONVENTION!! 

In consequence of there being but few in attendance at the con- 
vention on Saturday the 2oth, the nomination of candidates for 
State and county officers for this county, was postponed. The cen- 
tral committee have therefore appointed Saturday, the 14th day of 
June next, as a day upon which to hold a Mass County Conven- 
tion in LaPorte, to nominate a candidate to represent this county 
in the next legislature, and also to nominate candidates for county 
officers. Every Whig in the county is requested to attend. Let 
the townships all be fully and fairly represented. 

The meeting will be organized at 11 o'clock. A. M. 

D. G. Rose, J. B. Fravel, 

Edward Vail, Wm. Millikan, 

Whig Central Committee. 
LaPorte, May 27, 1851." 

The result of the election which followed has already been given. 

The year 1852, was fraught with much deeper inter litically. 

Franklin Pierce was the Democratic candidate 
Winfield Scott the Whig candii hn i\ Hale the Free 

Soil candidate. The candidates for I 

Wright, Democratic, and Nicholas McCarty 'id the full 

complement of State officer- was roted for. Norman 

Eddy was the Democratic candidate, and Horace P. Biddle, the 
Wl: The candidates for Judge of the ninth judicial circuit, 
James Bradley and Thomas infield; for Jud^ art of 

common pleas, Herman Lawson and Mnlford K. Farrand wer 
candidates; for Prosecutin of the circuit court. IK J. 

Woodward and John M. 'Wilson were the candidates; tor Proscut- 
ing attorney of the common pleas, the candidates were Daniel No} 
and A. Dickson; for Representative, the candidates were John C. 
Walker and Franklin W. Hunt: Samuel Burson and Wm. Allen 
were candidates for Sheriff; Ambrose W. Henly and Volney W. 



politics. 247 

Bailey were candidates for Clerk; Mark Allen and Edmund S. 
Organ were candidates for Treasurer; Jackson Hosmer and Win. 

CD ' 

H. Goodhue were candidates for Commissioner ; John P. Cathcart 
and Elam Clark were candidates for Surveyor; Henry Fox and E. 
E. Annis were candidates for Coroner. The new constitution was 
in force and the general annual election was for the first time held 
in October. At this election the Democrats succeeded in revolution- 
izing the county, giving a majority to nearly all their candidates. 
They held the county also at the Presidential election in November, 
giving a majority of one hundred and eleven to the Democratic 
electors. But at this election the Free Soil party cast one hundred 
and thirty-six votes tor the Hale and Julian electors. Among ihe 
Whig electors were Schuyler Colfax, Richard W. Thompson, John 
Coburn, David Kilgore, Nathan Kimball, Pleasant A. Hackleman 
aid Henrv S. Lane: and among the Democratic electors, Wm. 
Grose, Ebenezer Dumont, James H. Lane and John A. Hendricks. 
There were a few exceptions to the general Democratic victory at 
the October election. Thomas S. Stanfield received a majority of 
or.e hundred and sixty-eight over James Bradley; Mulford K. Far- 
rand received a majority of sixty over Merman Lawson ; William 
Aden was elected Sheriff over Samuel Burson by twenty-six 
majority: Volney W. Bailey was elected Clerk over A. W. Henly 
by one hundred and twenty-six majority; and Edmund S. Organ 
wts elected Treasurer over Mark Allen by one hundred and eight 
one majority. All the rest of the Democrats received majorities 
ranging from forty to one hundred. When it was ascertained that 
as LaPorte county went, so went the State, it was not strange that 
the LaPorte Commercial Times, edited by John C. Walker and 
John W. Holcombe, should insert at the head of its columns, the 
traditional rooster. The rooster occupied his place but looked 
though he was waiting for the result of the November election 
before he ventured to crow. When that came it gave him the 
opportunity. The Times expressed itself in these words over the 
result in October ; 

"nine guns for pierce and king! ! 
Sufficient returns have come in from the elections in Indiana, 
Ohio and Pennsylvania, to indicate the greatest victories ever won 



248 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

by the Democratic party. Each of the States has rolled up over- 
whelming majorities, ranging from twelve to twenty thousand. Let 
the Whigs shut their eyes as they will, and ostrich-like, thrust their 
heads in such twigs of comfort as they can find; let them discover 
as many local issues as the} 7 choose, and contrast the present major- 
ities with past votes for Governor; let them reduce the figures as 
low as they will, and count the votes on steamboats and railroads 
the great fact cannot be blinked, that the prestige of victory and all 
the omens of triumph cluster around the banner of Democracy. X i 
one will believe the miserable subterfuge that the Whig parts- 
regarded the late elections as of no importance, and made no effort- 
to win the battle. Were it so, such shameful abandonment of the 
post of duty would most surely prove them unfit to be trusted with 
the destinies of the nation. But they did work, with all the frensy 
of desperation, and their labors were all fruitless: the aspiration 
of the age and the instincts of the people were against then. 
Maine and North Carolina. Iowa and Missouri. Indiana, Ohio and 
Pennsylvania, Florida and South Carolina have taken their po 
in the line of battle, and will not alter in November, the glorious 
war cry, which they have so proudly Hung on the breeze in Augist 
and October. 

Indiana is the banner State. Governor Wright's majority is 
probably near twenty thousand. In 1849 it was less than ten 
thousand — clear gain of ten thousand. Ten Democrats and oi.lv 
one Whig elected to Congress. In the Legislature there is probably 
on joint ballot a Democratic majority of fifty members. 

Dr. Norman Eddy, Representative elect in our own District, 
received a majority in every county. 

Herman Laws m. our present Sheriff, is elected Judge of the 
court of common pi i this District, consisting of LaPorte, Porter 

and Lake counties. Majority two. One hundred and fifty-three 
ballots containing the name of James K. Farrand, were thrown out 
as informal. 

In the late election, LaPorte county polled two thousand five 
hundred and eighty-eight votes, distributed as follows among the 
various townships, Michigan ; two hundred and eighty-eight ; Sprung- 
field, seventy four: Galena, seventy-three; Hudson, eighty; Cool 



politics. 249 

Spring, eighty-three ; Centre, seven hundred and forty ; Kankakee, 
one hundred and forty-five ; Wills, one hundred and twenty-one ; 
Pleasant, four hundred and twelve; Scipio, one hundred and fifty- 
five: New Durham, one hundred and sixty -four; Clinton, one hun- 
dred and twenty-four; Noble, two hundred and ten; Union, one 
hundred and sixty; Cass, twenty-nine." 

It seems quite evident that in 1852, there was a Democratic tidal 
wave which rolled over not LaPorte county alone, but the whole 
country. The result sounded the knell of the Whig party. It was 
broken up and never again rallied. New departures were taken, 
and out of the disorganized material of which the Whig party was 
composed, augmented by numerous accessions from the anti-slavery 
sentiment of the Democracy, the Republican party was at length 
formed; and parties became divided squarely upon issues growing 
out of slavery. 

At the election of October, 1853, only a few more than one 
thousand and six hundred votes were polled in LaPorte county. 
The field seems to have been yielded to the Democrats without a 
struggle. The only officers to be elected were Reporter of the 
supreme court, County Auditor and two Commissioners. The vote 
stood as follows: For Reporter. supreme court, A. G. Porter, nine 
hundred and ninety-nine votes and James W. Gordon six hundred 
and thirty votes ; for County Auditor, Andrew J. Wair, one thou- 
sand and fifteen votes, John S. Allen four hundred and three, and 
Abram Fravel two hundred and twentv votes : for Commissioners, 
James Drummond, nine hundred and ninetv-six votes, Jacob R. 
Hall, one thousand and seven votes, Phineas Hunt, six hundred 
and seventeen votes and Joseph Orr six hundred votes. 

The election aroused no political feeling; and very little was said 
about it in the press. The following mild utterance is from the 
LaPorte Times, and is about all that was said concerning the 
election of 1-858 : 

"OCTOBER ELECTION. 

For some weeks we have had the name of Albert G. Porter at 
the head of our columns as the Democratic nominee for Supreme 
Court Reporter, and we would now call attention to the importance 
of that office, and the election of a fit and competent man to dis- 



250 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

charge its duties. Mr. Porter, as appointee of the Governor, has 
already manifested his entire capacity, and if elected, will do credit 
to the position. There is but one fear on the subject of the October 
election, and that is that the Democracy will nor think this matter 
of electing a Reporter of sufficient importance to induce them to 
the poll-. This should never be! Let the people show their will 
on every occasion of this kind, for if they do not, there are 
opportunities left open for now and then a most shameful defeat. 
We shall notice this election again." 

New questions now arose, growing out of the Know-Nothing 
excitement and the agitation which attended the passage of the 
Nebraska Bill, and repeal of the Missouri compromise, and at the 
October election of 1854, the average majority against the Demo- 
cratic party was three hundred. The election was for State offi - 
except Governor and Lieutenant Governor, Representative in Con- 
gress, Prosecuting attorney for the circuit court, and also for the 
court of common pleas. Representative to the State legislature and 
several other county officers. The candidates for Cor: . were 

Schuyler Colfax, and Norman Eddy 1 Colfax received one thou- 
sand seven hundred and twenty-nine, votes to one thousand three 
hundred and ninety-nine forEd>: The candidal ut- 

y attorney in the circuit court, were Morgan II. Weir and Don 
J. Woodward, and Weir received tnree hundred and nine majority. 
James A. Thornton was the Democratic candidate for common 
pleas Prosecutor against Wm. C. Talcott. and Talcott received a 
majority of two hund. id forty-five votes. Jacob R. Hall \ 

elected Representative to th< re legislature against John I 

Walker; Edmund S. Organ was elected County Treasurer agaii 
Orpheus Everl Vm. II. II. Whitehead was beriff ov< 

H. P. Lans; the candidates for County commissioner, were 0. F. 
Piper and James Drummond, and Piper was elected: the candidal 
for Com, irveyor, were Daniel M. Learning and John P. Cat 

cart, and Learning was elected: and Henry W. Fox was elected 

roner against Wm. Fry. 

Not much interest was manifested by the people of the county in 
the election of 1 as there were no officers to be elected except a 

Recorder and three Commissioners. Only about one thousand and 



POLITICS. 251 

nine hundred votes were cast, although there were probably thirty- 
two or thirty-three hundred voters in the county. The Democrats 
were successful and elected all their candidates by majorities ranging 
from ninety-one to two hundred and fifty. Anderson Hupp was elected 
Recorder against Burwell Spurlock, and Asa M. Warren, Aquilla 
W. Rodgers, and H. J. Reese were elected Commissioners against 
Samuel Harvey, Abram Westervelt and George Crawford. 

Prior to 1856, the anti-slavery sentiment of the country had 
become consolidated. It took the form of opposition to the exten- 
sion of slavery into the territories of the United States, and resulted 
in the organization of the Republican party. The larger portion of 
the Whigs found themselves naturally in the new party, most of 
the Free Soilers united with it, and also the large anti-slavery ele- 
ment of the Democratic party. The first national convention of the 
new party met early in 1856, and nominated John C. Fremont for 
President and Wm. L. Dayton for Vice President. The candidates 
of the Democracy were James Buchanan and John C. Breckenridge. 
Oliver P. Morton was the Republican candidate for Governor of 
Indiana, and Ashbel P. Willard, the Democratic candidate. W. Z. 
Stewart was the Democratic candidate for Congress and Schuyler 
Colfax had been nominated by the Republicans for re-election. M. 
H. Weir was the Republican candidate for State Senator, and 
Herman Lawson, the Democratic candidate; and for Judge of the 
court of common pleas, the candidates were William C. Talcott, 
Republican, and Daniel Noyes, Democrat. The candidates for 
county officers were as follows, the Democratic candidate for each 
office being first named : For Representative to the State legisla- 
ture, William R. Bowes and George Crawford; for Clerk, C. W. 
Mead and James Moore ; for Treasurer, Seth Eason and Abel D. 
Porter; for Sheriff, Nathan Kell and Wm. H. H. Whitehead; for 
Surveyor, John P. Cathcart and Daniel M. Learning; for Coroner, 
Wm. Fry and R. G. James, and for Commissioner, A. W. Rogers 
and El am Clark. 

The Republicans were victorious. The vote was the largest that 
had ever -been cast in the county, the total number being four 
thousand five hundred and sixty-three; and the Republican candi- 
dates were all successful by majorities ranging from fifty, to one 



252 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

hundred and forty-nine. On State officers the average majority 
was one hundred and five. The majority of Mr. Colfax was one 
hundred and thirty. Morgan H. Weir's majority was one hundred 
and twenty-two. Whitehead's majority was one hundred and 
forty-nine. 

* 

The canvass for the Presidential nominees was still kept up. and 
in November. LaPorte county cast a still larger vote than in October, 
the whole number of votes being four thousand eight hundred and 
nineteen. Of these the Republican electors received two thousand 
five hundred and thirty-three votes, the Democratic electors two 
thousand two hundred and thirty-nine votes, and there were forty- 
five votes cast for a third electoral ticket. Daniel D. Pratt was the 
Whig elector for the ninth District, and Orpheus Everts the Dem- 
ocratic elector. The whole campaign was one of intense interest 
and excitement, and although the Republican party was defeated 
in its first national contest, and in most of the States, yet the large 
vote it cast, and its many local victories, served to consolidate it and 
prepare it for future success. 

The election of 1857 was without especial incident. It included 
county officers and Judge of the circuit court, Andrew L. Osborn 
being elected to the latter position by a heavy majority. The can- 
didates for county officers, were for Clerk, James Moore and John 
B. Fravel; for Sheriff, Wm. H. H. Whitehead and Nathan Kell : 
for Treasurer, Abel D. Porter and Seth Eason : for Auditor. John 
G. Laird and Thomas Pryce: for Commissioner first District. Isaac 
B. Coplin and Wm. W. Grarrard; for Commissioner second District. 
S. Sabin and Ilenrv P. Lans. Moore. Whitehead. Porter, 
Laird. Coplin and Sabin. all Republicans, were elected by major- 
ities iging from one hundred and fiftv to over four hundred. In 
the case of Laird and Prvce there was a contest on the ground that 
Laird had been elected to the office of Justice of the Peace, within 
four years, which would under the constitution prevent his holding 
any but a judicial office within that time. It was finally adjudged 
that neither party was entitled to the office, and Reuben Munday 
was appointed by the commissioners lerve until the next general 
election. 

Political excitement became warm again in 18-3 v . The ter 



politics. 253 

that were heard most in the party language of the day were 
''Lecompton Constitution.'" "Kansas," "Border Ruffianism," 
••Freedom of the Territories.*' "Non-Extension of Slavery." " Dred 
Scott Decision." All the State officers except Governor were to 
be elected, a member of Congress, and county officers. The Repub- 
licans carried the county on State officers by from five hundred 
and twenty to five hundred and sixty majority in a total vote of 
five thousand and twenty-six. Schuyler Colfax and John C. 
Walker were the opposing candidates for Congress, and the 
former's majority in the county was five hundred and sixty-five. 
Win. B. Biddle and James A. Thornton were the opposing candi- 
dates for Prosecuting attorney in the circuit court, and Biddle 
received a majority of five hundred and two. John Walton and 
Theophilus Fravel woe the opposing candidates for Auditor, and 
Walton was elected. Abel D. Porter was elected Treasurer over 
Truman T. Harris: Joshua S. McDowell was elected Sheriff over 
Levi Ely: Elisha L. Bennett was elected Surveyor over Munday 
Allen: Luther Brusie was elected Coroner over Henry Ellsworth: 
John Warnock was elected Commissioner over J. W. Butterfield. 
and Win. II. Scott and M. G. Sherman were elected Representa- 
tives over James Bradley and James Orr. The officers elect were 
all Republicans, and the majorities were generally over five 
hundred. 

The "off vear" of 1859 brought out a very light vote, the whole 
number cast being only two thousand eight hundred and thirty-five. 
There were but three offices to be filled: Prosecuting attorney 
common pleas court. Recorder, and Commissioner for the second 
District. Joseph At. Dow and Daniel Noyes were the candidates 
for Prosecuting attorney : and Dow, Republican, received a majority 
in this county of one hundred and eighty-four. Luther Mann. Jr.. 
was the Republican candidate for Recorder and Anderson Hupp the 
Democratic candidate for re-election. Hupp was elected by sixty- 
six maioritv. Sidney S. Sabin was elected Commissioner against 
Harvey Truesdell, Democrat. 

The country was now becoming deeply moved over questions 
which stirred the popular heart as none had ever done before. The 
storm had been gathering ever since the repeal of the Missouri 



2;">-t HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

compromise; the struggles in Kansas had deeply intensified the 
feeling of the people of the North', and John Brown's attempt upon 
Harper's Ferry had been skillfully managed so as to arouse and 
heat the people of the South. That the territories of the United 
States should be forever consecrate! to freedom was I <lemn 

determination of a large majority of the people of the North ; and 
that the boundaries of the institution of slavery should not be 
further enlarged. The South, seeking its perpetuation by means of 
enlarged political power, determined that it should not be restricted, 
but should have enlarged privileges. The questions dividing par- 
ties were thus chiefly sectional, and pointed directly to war. In this 
state of the public mind, the Republican party met in national con- 
vention in Chicago, and nominated Abraham Lincoln for President, 
and Hannibal Hamlin for Vice President. The Democratic party 
met at Charleston in South Carolina, and the ''fire-eating" element 
of the South, the better to secure their object, the dissolution of the 
Union, broke up the convention. The party afterwards met in the 
city of Baltimore, and there the same turbulent element divided the 
convention, and the result was the nomination of two Democratic- 
ticket.-. Stephen A. Douglas and Herschel V. Johnson for 
President and Vice President on the one side, and John C. Breck- 
enridge and Joseph Lane on the other. Henry S. Lane stood at 
the head of the Republican State ticket, as candidate for Governor 
and Thomas A. Hendriek-, at the head of the Democratic ticket. 
In the ninth District Schuyler Colfax was again the Republican 
candidate for Congress and the Democrats pitted against him the 
veteran Charles W. Cathcart. Daniel Noyes and Elisha Egbert 
were the opposing candidates for Judge of the court of common 
pleas. The candidates for county offices were as follow- : For 
Clerk, James Moore and C. C. Morrical: for Sheriff, Joshua S. 
McDowell and Richard Huncheon ; for Treasurer, Reginald II. 
Rose and Truman T. Harris : For Coroner, Ludwig Eliel and 
Robert Friedel; for Surveyor, Edward H. Learning and John P. 
Cathcart: for Commissioner, Isaac B. Coplin and Ephraim Barney; 
for Representatives to the State legislature, Samuel Harvey and 
Mason G. Sherman. Republicans, and Irwin S. Jessup and Henry 
P. Lans, Democrat-. The candidates for State Senator, were 
Abraham Teegarden and Henrv Higgins. 



politics. 255 



The position which the Republican party maintained on slavery 
questions may be seen in the following resolutions found in the 
State Republican platform of that year : 

"Resolved^ That we are opposed to the new and dangerous doc- 
trine advocated by the Democratic party, that the Federal consti- 
tution carries slavery into the public territories, and that we 
believe slavery cannot exist anywhere in this government; unless by 
positive local law, and that we will oppose its extension into the ter- 
ritories of the Federal Government by all the power known to the 
constitution of the United States. 

Resolved, That we are opposed to any interference with slavery 
where it exists under the sanction of State law, that the soil of 
every State should be protected from lawless invasions from every 
quarter, and that the citizens of every State should be secured from 
illegal arrests and search, as well as from mob violence." 

They also embodied the following in the platform: 

Resolved, That we regard the preservation of the American 
Union as the highest object and duty of patriotism, and that it 
must and shall be preserved, and that all who advocate disunion are, 
and deserve the fate ot, traitors." 

Other questions formed issues between the parties, but the chief 
and most important by far, the overshadowing ones, were those 
growing out of the institution of slavery and the attitude of the 
South with respect to it, and also towards the Union. Threats of 
secession in case of the election of Mr. Lincoln were freely made, 
and the leaders in the violence which characterized the proceedings 
in the South, were more deeply in earnest than the people of the 
North generally supposed. The campaign was distinguished, 
besides the usual processions and speeches, by a Republican organ- 
ization known as Wide Awakes, which adopted a simple uniform, 
and were provided with torch lamps, fixed on poles, and thus added 
much to the interest of night meetings. The company of Wide 
Awakes which existed in LaPorte, was drilled by Gen. Newell 
Gleason, in the manner of handling their lamp sticks according to 
the manual of arms. In one year from that time many of the same 
persons were drilling with arms, preparatory to fighting the battles 
of the nation against a section of country which had wantonly risen 



256 HISTORY OF LA POETE COUNTY. 

in rebellion. The political pulse beat high in both parties, great 
political gatherings were frequent, and processions and enthusiasm 
filled up the days and the nights. At length the day of the October 
election came, and the Republicans were completely successful. 
The average majority which the county gave on the State ticket was 
nine hundred and eighty-five. Colfax's majority for congress was 
one thousand and five. Egbert's majority for Judge was four hun- 
dred and seventy. Teegarden's majority for the State Senate was 
one thousand and three. The Republican majority on county 
offices was from seven hundred to one thousand majority. The 
whole number of votes cast was five thousand and fifteen. But the 
great event was still to occur — the Presidential election in November. 
At this election there were four electoral tickets in the field, those 
headed by the candidates already named, and the Union party 
ticket, headed by John Bell and Edward Everett. Each of them 
were voted for in this county- The countv filled three places on 
electoral tickets. John C. Walker was on the Douglas Democratic 
ticket for the State at large, James Bradlev was on the Brecken- 
ridge Democratic ticket for the ninth District, and John P. Early 
on the Bell and Everett electoral ticket for the ninth District. 
The Lincoln electoral ticket received two thousand nine hundred 
and sixty-seven; the Douglas ticket, one thousand six hundred and 
six; the Bell and Everett ticket, twenty-seven, and the Brecken- 
ridge ticket, four hundred and seventy-four, the number of votes 
cast being five thousand and seventy-four. The Republican 
majority over all was eight hundred and sixty; and over the 
Douglas-Democratic ticket, one thousand three hundred and sixty- 
one. < )n the next day after the election, the LaPorte Union had 
this to say: 

"LaPorte county is entitled to the Banner. Lincoln's majority 
in this county is probably one thousand tour hundred over Douglas. 
The Breckenridge vote in the county is about five hundred. 

In this city the vote was as follows : For Lincoln nine hundred 
and twenty-seven; for Douglas, three hundred and eighty-nine; 
Breckenridge, ninety-five, and Bell, seventeen. 

St. Joseph county gives Lincoln nine hundred majority. 

The result is better than we had hoped for; but we are none the 



politics. , 25T 

less delighted with it. We are anxious to spread the good news as 
soon as possible, and will not wait for further details." 

The night of the election day, the Republicans of the city of 
LaPorte met in Huntsman Hall, to receive and read the despatches, 
determining not to go to their homes until they should learn the 
general result. About eight o'clock the news began to arrive. 
Mishawaka reported Republican gains, and Calumet sent word that 
they had given Lincoln a majority of nineteen. Calumet, now 
Chesterton, had always before gone Democratic. These results 
started the cheers, and speeches were called for ; but no one felt like 
speaking then; as one expressed it, they "were too full for utter- 
ance and felt too good." Some news came from other portions of 
this State, from western Ohio and from Michigan, all bearing 
tidings of large Republican gains. This was all received with much 
glee; but the State which all were anxious to hear from was New 
York. The despatches began to drop in from small towns, and as 
it was not known how they had previously stood, there was no 
information conveyed. But at last the decisive despatches came 
showing that New York Avas safe for Lincoln, and that Pennsylva- 
nia's majority for him would be seventy thousand. This news 
created an enthusiasm such as it would be difficult to describe. 
Men were lifted up and carried around the hall on the shoulders of 
the multitude, there were shouting and singing, and a perfect shower 
of flying hats; strong men wept for joy, and laughed and shouted 
alternate^. The news from New England and other States that 
had been received meantime, settled it that the national victory was 
with the Republicans. Then about one o'clock in the morning, 
they departed to their homes. Men do not indulge in these enthusi- 
asms now, and the men of 1860 may be thought to have been 
grotesquely extravagant, but we should pardon something to the 
spirit of liberty, and to the new-born zeal for the young party which 
was enkindled by its first national victory. 

The vote of 1861 was light. None but county officers were to 
be elected, and the whole number of votes cast was two thousand 
eight hundred and sixty -nine. Of these, for Sheriff, S. P. Mead 
received one thousand four hundred and thirty-five, and Wm. Ever- 
hart one thousand three hundred and eighty-eight; For County 

i7 



258 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

commissioner, John P. Cathcart received two thousand five hundred 
and eight v-one votes and John Garwood, Sen., one hundred and 
seventy-five; for Representative to the State legislature, H. H. 
Roberts received nine hundred and thirty-eight votes, J. P. Dunn, 
eight hundred and thirty-nine, and Wm. B. Webber, five hundred 
and fifty. The attention of the whole people was concentrated on 
the war; and how well LaPorte county bore her part will be shown 
in a succeeding chapter. 

The election of 1862, was a more important one. The Union 
arms had met with reverses, and a somewhat gloomy feeling per- 
vaded the minds of the people. When the election came each party 
stood firmly by its candidates, for the campaign had aroused party 
feeling intensely. County and State officers, except Governor and 
Lieutenant Governor, were to be elected, and a Representative ia 
congress. For the latter office Schuyler Colfax and David Turpie 
were the candidates. They were both fine speakers, as the people of 
the District had already learned in the case of Mr. Colfax ; and it 
was perhaps the ability of Mr. Turpie in this respect that led the 
Democrats to nominate him as their candidate. They both can- 
vassed the District very thoroughly, speaking separately as well ad 
in joint discussions, and the result was a close drawing of party 
lines. A great many of the young men of the county had enlisted, 
and were now absent, and Mr. Colfax had mi.de many speeches in 
the District urging enlistments. By these enlistments, the number 
of votes cast was considerablv diminished, the total vote being; but 
four thousand five hundred and sixty-four. On candidates for 
Secretary of State, the county gave the Republican candidate, Wm. 
A. Peele, three hundred and sixty-two majority. Colfax's majority 
was three hundred and fifty-eight in the county. James Bradley 
and D. T. Phillips, were candidates for Prosecuting attorney, and 
Phillips received a majority in this county of three hundred and one. 
John Walton received a majority over Andrew J. Wair for Auditor 
of four hundred and one. The other Republican county candidates 
were elected by majorities of from three hundred and fifty to four 
hundred. L. Eliel was elected Coroner over A. K. Webster; R. 
H. Rose was elected Treasurer against Thomas Larkin ; E. H. 
Learning was elected Surveyor against Mortimer Nye: S. S. Sabin 



politics. 259 

was elected Commissioner against R. Shaw: and W. W. Higgins 
and James Forrester were elected Representatives against J. W. 
Butterfield and John C. Walker. For Prosecutor in common pleas 
court, William Andrew received a majority of three hundred and 
sixty-nine over R. L. Farnsworth. 

In the year 1863, the people of LaPorte county, gave more 
thought to the war and its prosecution than to any other subject. 
It filled all hearts and minds, and political questions were such as 
grew out of the great rebellion, and the method the government was 
pursuing to crush it out and restore the peace and unity of the 
nation. A county convention of the Republican party was held at 
the Court House on the 27th day of June, and it expressed the 
popular feeling in the following resolutions, reported from the com- 
mittee on resolutions, by Hon. Charles W. Cathcart: 

u Resolved, That the calamities of the present rebellion have been 
brought upon this nation by the infamous doctrines of nullification 
and secession, promulgated by Calhoun and denounced by General 
Jackson in 1832, as incompatible with the unity and integrity, 
power and glory of the American Republic. 

Resolved, That the war must go on with the utmost vigor, till 
the authority of the National Government is re-established, and the 
old flag floats again securely and triumphantly over every State and 
Territory of the Union. 

Resolved, That in the present exigencies of the Republic, we lay 
aside personal preferences and prejudices, and henceforth till the 
war is ended will draw no part}? - line, but the great line between 
those who sustain the government and those who oppose it — between 
those who rejoice in the triumph of our arms and those who rejoice 
in the triumph of the enemy. 

Resolved, That immortal honor and gratitude are due to our 
brave and patriotic soldiers in the field, and everlasting shame and 
disgrace to any citizen or party who withholds it; that, sympathizing 
with the army and its hardships, and proud of its gallantry, the 
lovers of the Union will stand by it, and will remember, aid and 
support those who are disabled, and the families of those who fall 
fighting for their country. 

Resolved, That confiding in the honesty, patriotism and good 
sense of the President, we pledge to him our support of his earnest 
efforts to put down the rebellion. 



260 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY 

Resolved, That the present Governor, 0. P. Morton, is an 
honest, aide public servant, and that his official conduct deserves 
and receives the approbation of all loyal people." 

The convention then proceeded to the nomination of candidates, 
which resulted in the selection of Stephen P. Mead, as the candi- 
date for Sheriff": Wm. Copp for Recorder; Abram J. Westervelt 
for Real Estate Appraiser, and Isaac B. Coplin for Commissioner. 
The Democratic candidates were, for Sheriff, Win. Everhart: for 
Recorder, James Overholtz; for Real Estate Appraiser. Willard A. 
Place, and for Commissioner. Jesse Coleman. Andrew L. Osborn 
was candidate for Circuit Judge, but had no opposition. The 
election resulted in the success of the Republican candidates. 
Mead's majority was <>ne hundred and seventy: Copp's majority was 
eighty-six : Westervelt's majority was two hundred and ninety-six; . 
and Coplin's was two hundred and ninety-seven. The whole num- 
ber of votes cast was four thousand four hundred and fifty. 
Judge Osborn receive! the entire vote. • 

The campaign of 1864, was one of much earnestness and depth 
of feeling. Abraham Lincoln was the Republican candidate for 
re-election to the presidency, and associated with him as candidate 
for Vice President was Andrew Johnson, the distinguished Union 
of Tennessee. Oliver P. Morton, elected by the Republicans Lieut. 
Governor in 1860, bad become Governor by the election of Henry 
S. Lane to the United States Senate: and was now the Republican 
candidate for re-election. Gen. George B. McClellan and Geo. H. 
Pendleton were the Democratic candidates for President and Vice 
President: and Joseph E. McDonald for Governor. Colfax and 
Turpie were again the candidate.- of their respective parties, for 
congress, and there was also full State and county tickets. Edwin 
<i. McCollum was the Democratic candidate for Prosecuting attor- 
ney, circuit court, against Aaron Gurney of Porter. Wm. Andrew 
was the Republican candidate for Common Plea- Pr tor ag; 

George L. Bitting Mulford K. Farrand and John B. Niles 

were candidates for State Senator, and Lawrence A. Stimpson, and 
E. Morgan Davis were Democratic candidates for Representatr 
to the State legislature against W. W. Higgins and John II. Willis. 
Jacob S. Martin and James II. Shannon were candidates for Clerk ; 



POLITICS. 261 

Ellis Michael and Durand C. Alexander for Treasurer; R. 0. Cran- 
dall and Ludwig Eliel for Coroner: J. W. Learning and E. H. 
Learning for Surveyor, and Jackson Hosmer and John P. Cathcart 
for Commissioner. 

The Republican candidates at the October election were all suc- 
successful. and by nearly uniform majorities, showing that in 
those war times there was very little scratching of tickets. Mor- 
ton's majority was four hundred and seventy-five, Colfax's majority 
was four hundred and fifty-eight, and the majority on county can- 
didates varied no more than from four hundred and fifty-nine to 
four hundred and seventy-three. The whole number of votes cast 
was four thousand nine hundred and sixty-nine, showing that a 
large number of voters were absent from the county. At the Presi- 
dential election in November the whole number of votes cast 
was four thousand eight hundred and eleven. Of these the Repub- 
lican electors received two thousand six hundred and sixty-six, and 
the Democratic electors two thousand one hundred and forty-five. 
Jame B. Belford was the Republican elector for the ninth District. 
Many of the leading men of the county were in the army, and the 
majority of the families of the county had one or more representa- 
tives there fighting in the nation's defense. Under such circum- 
stances, war questions formed the politics of the day, and the 
county newspapers were filled with the doings of the army, with 
discussions on the manner of conducting the war, on the policy of 
emancipation, and whether or not the war should be fought out to 
a successful termination, until the last rebel in arms had yielded, 
or whether peace should be sought through negotiation, and cessation 
of hostilities on the part of the government. The verdict of this 
county was unmistakably in favor of a vigorous prosecution of the 
war, until victory, complete and final, should rest with the nation. 

The election of 1865 did not possess much public or political 
interest, as there were but three officers to be elected, all of them 
for county offices. Ithamar D. Phelps and Amos Johnson were 
candidates for Sheriff, and Phelps, Republican was elected by a 
majority of seven hundred and twenty-eight. Johnson had been a 
Republican, but on this occasion had accepted a Democratic nomi- 
nation. Newell Gleason and Herman P. Lans, were candidates for 
Representative to the State legislature, and Gleason. Republican 



262 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

was elected by a majority of six hundred and nineteen; William 
O'Hara and George i I all were candidates for County commissioner, 
and O'Hara, Republican was elected by six hundred and nineteen 
majority. The whole number of votes was four thousand and 
forty-three. 

In 1866, the ^issues which divided parties arose from the 
work of reconstruction of the States lately in rebellion. The elec- 
tion was an important one, and party spirit once more ran high. 
State officers except Governor and Judges were to be elected, a 
member of congress, and county officers. Colfax and Turpie, a 
third time, were presented against each other by their respective 
parties as candidates for congress; and they made a very thorough 
canvass of the District, part of the time in joint discussion. Wm. 
H. Calkins, then of Porter county, was the Republican candidate 
for Prosecuting attorney, circuit court, against Edwin G. McCollum. 
Jasper Packard and Seth Eason were the candidates for County 
Auditor; Durand C. Alexander and John Druliner were the can- 
didates for Treasurer; Ludwig Eliel and Richard 0. Crandall were 
candidates for Coroner; John P. Cathcart and S. A. Van Dusen 
were candidates for Surveyor; Isaac B. Coplin and James Druin- 
mond were candidates for Commissioner; James B. Belford and 
Wm. W. Higcrins, Henry H. Walker and A. G. Standiford were 
candidates for Representatives; Wm. Andrew and George S. Sey- 
mour were candidates for Prosecuting attorney, court of common 
pie; The Republican candidates for county offices were all 

elected by majorities of from one hundred ami seventy-one to three 
hundred and sixty-five, in a total vote of five thousand six hundred 
and thirty-five. The average majority of oilier candidates wa& 
three hundred and twenty. 

The election of 1867, was for four county officers ;done. The 
candidates were as follows: For Representative, Orpheus Everts 
and Simon Wile; for Sheriff, Ithamar D. Phelps and John M. 
Clarkson; for Recorder. Henry C. Brown and Charles S. McClung: 
Commissioner, Reynolds Couden and .Jackson Hosnier. The 
Republican candidates were all successful. Everts by a majority 
of five hundred and eighty-six, Phelps by a majority of eight hun- 
dred and sixty-one, Brown by a majority of six hundred and fifty- 



politics. 263 

three and Couden by a majority of six hundred and fifty-six, in a 
total vote of three thousand six hundred and eighty-five. 

The year 1868 brought with it another presidential campaign. 
The Republican national convention met in Chicago, and nomina- 
ted the General of the army, Ulysses S. Grant, associating 
with him on the ticket, as the candidate for Vice President, 
Schuyler Colfax, who had for so many years represented the ninth 
District in congress. The nomination of Colfax rendered 
necessary the nomination of a new man for congress. A District 
nominating convention was held at Westville, and the choice fell on 
Jasper Packard, then the Auditor of LaPorte county. The Demo- 
cratic national convention nominated Horatio Seymour and Francis 
P. Blair, Jr.. for President and Vice President; and the District 
convention of that party met at Wanatah and nominated Mulford 
K. Farrand as the candidate for congress. Each party had in the 
field a full State ticket, Conrad Baker, who had become Governor 
by the election of Oliver P. Morton to the United States Senate, 
was the Republican candidate for Governor, and Thomas A. Hen- 
dricks was the Democratic candidate. The campaign was one of 
great activity. Each party was well organized, and both had great 
hopes of success. The Issues between the parties were still such as 
arose from the work of reconstruction, especially as it affected the 
condition of the colored race so lately manumitted; and others 
arising out of the proposed taxation of -the bonds of the United 
States and their cancellation with legal tender notes instead 
of gold. Discussions on these questions took a wi(Je range, and 
involved the attitude assumed by each toward the rebellion, during 
its progress. There were public speeches innumerable; the candi- 
dates for Governor canvassed the entire State; and in this District 
the candidates for congress held thirty-three joint discussions, speak- 
ing much oftener than that singly. When the election came on in 
October, it was found that the Democrats had made large gains in 
all parts of the State, LaPorte county, in like manner experienc- 
ing Republican losses. Yet the Board of canvassers having 
thrown out the vote of Dewey and Johnson townships, it still gave 
a Republican majority, the average of which was forty eight on the 
State ticket. The Republican county candidates were all elected 



"2(U HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

with two exceptions, and they received majorities ranging from 
four to forty-five. The Republican candidate for congress received 
eleven majority in the county. The candidates, besides those 
already named, were Daniel Noyes and Elisha Egbert, for Judge of 
common pleas; Thomas J. Wood and Win. H. Calkins, for Prose- 
cuting attorney, circuit court; for State Senator, James Bradley 
and LaFayette Crane: for Representative, Simon Wile and James 
L. Moody ; for Clerk, Charles Spaeth and James H Shannon ; for 
Real Estate appraiser, Jacob Folant and Edmund S. Gardner; for 
Treasurer, Truman T. Harris and Mark Allen : for Coroner, 
Walter R. Godfrey and Louis Eliel; for Surveyor, James E. 
Bradley and J. P. Cathcart; for commissioner, George Hall and 
Wm. O'Hara. There were two exceptions to the general Republi- 
can majorities; Simon Wile was elected Representative by twenty 
majority, and Truman T. Harris was elected Treasurer by four 
majority. There were of course, doubts as to the propriety of reject- 
ing the votes of Dewey and Johnson townships. Including these 
votes, the county gave a small Democratic majority: but there 
were many accusations of fraud, and notices of contest were filed by 
Allen against Harris for the Treasurership, by Thornton against 
Wile, by Crane against Bradley, by Hall against O'Hara and 
Shannon against Spaeth. Some of these cases were withdrawn 
before final decision, one was settled by compromise. Harris died 
before decision w r as finally rendered, and except in the case of the 
Treasurer, all of them remained as at first returned by the Board of 
canvassers. At the November election which followed, the vote of 
both parties was increased, the Democratic electors receiving two 
thousand eight hundred ami seventy-six votes and the Republican 
three thousand and sixty-four, making a total vote of five thousand 
nine hundred and forty, ami giving: the countv t<> the Republican- 
by one hundre I and eighty-eight majority. 

The next general election did not occur until October, 1870. 
when a full State ticket except Governor and Lieut. Governor, can- 
didates for congress, and for county officers were to be voted for. 
At this election Andrew L. Osborn was one of the candidates for 
Judge of the Supreme court, Jasper Packard was candidate for 
congress against Samuel I. Anthony. Democrat, of Valparaiso : 



politics. 265 

J. Bradley was the Democratic candidate for Circuit Judge against 
Thomas S. Stanfield; Wm. Schoeneman and Simon Wile were the 
opposing candidates for Representative in the State legislature, and 
the other candidates were, for Sheriff, Daniel L. Brown and 
Amenzo Mann: for Auditor, Harvey R. Harris and Charles 
Spaeth; for Treasurer, Mark Allen and Edmund S. Organ; for 
Recorder, Henry C. Brown and Francis Hobart; for Commissioner 
first district, Enos Weed and Eugene W. Davis ; for Commissioner 
second district, John Sutherland and Andrew J. Rogers: for Com- 
missioner third district, Simon P. Kern and John M. Clarkson; 
for Coroner, Louis Eliel and Bowen C. Bowell; for Surveyor, John 
P. Catchcart and James E. Bradle}^. The total vote cast was five 
thousand three hundred and twenty-six, and every Republican can- 
didate received a majority. The average Republican majority on 
the State ticket was two hundred and twenty-eight; the Republi- 
can candidate for congress received two hundred and fifty majority, 
and the majority on county candidates was Irom one hundred and 
twenty-eight to four hundred and eighty four. 

The next general election was held on the 8th day of October, 
1872. Candidates for all the State offices except Judges of the 
Supreme court, for Judge of the court of common pleas, for Prose- 
cuting attorney of both courts, for State Senator, for two Congress- 
men-at-large, for Representative in congress for the eleventh 
District, for Representative in the State legislature and joint 
Representative, and for all the county offices were to be voted 
for. The whole number of votes cast in the county was six 
thousand one hundred and seventy-two, the largest ever 
polled, and the Democrats were completely successful, the aver- 
age Democratic majority being one hundred and fifty. On 
the candidates for Governor, the vote was, for Thomas M. 
Browne, two thousand nine hundred and ninety-eight, for Thomas 
A. Hendricks, three thousand one hundred and seventy-three; on 
the candidates for Representative in congress the vote was, for 
Jasper Packard, three thousand and five, for John A. Henricks, 
three thousand one hundred and forty-five ; for Judge of common 
pleas court, the voce was, for Edward J. Wood, two thousand nine 
hundred and thirty-six, and Daniel Noyes, three thousand two 



266 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

hundred and forty-three: for State Senator the vote was, Mason G. 
Sherman, two thousand nine hundred and sixty-eight, and John H. 
Winterbotham, three thousand one hundred and seventv-nine ; for 
Representative in the State legislature, the vote was, Sidney S. 
Sabin, three thousand, George H. Teeter, three thousand one hun- 
dred and sixty-six: for Clerk, the vote was, Henry C. Shannon, 
two thousand nine hundred and seventy-eight, and Sharles Spaeth, 
three thousand one hundred and sixty ; for Sheriff, the vote was. as 
reported, Daniel L. Brown, three thousand and fifty-four, and 
DeWitt C. McCollum, three thousand and sixty; for Treasurer, 
John T. Sanders received three thousand and nine votes and 
George W. Mecum, three thousand one hundred and fifty-one: for 
Real Estate appraiser, Edmund S. Gardner received two thousand 
nine hundred and seventy-one votes and Jacob Folant three thou- 
sand one hundred and seventy; for Coroner, Ludwig Eliel received 
two thousand nine hundred and ninetv votes and Wm. F. Standi- 
ford three thousand one hundred and sixty-three; for Surveyor. 
John P. Cathcart received two thousand nine hundred and seventv- 
nine votes and Daniel Kennedv three thousand one hundred and 
forty-five ; for Commissioner first District, Enos Weed received two 
thousand nine hundred and ninety-six votes and Benajah S. Fail 
three thousand one hundred and ninetv-one: for Commissioner 
second District, Aaron Foster received two thousand nine hundred 
and twenty-five votes and Charles Wills three thousand two hundred 
and thirty-six; for Commissioner third District, Jacob Thornburg 
received two thousand nine hundred and ninety-six votes and 
Hazard M. Hopkins three thousand one hundred and thirty-three. 
Daniel L. Brown contested the election on the candidates for Sheriff 
and upon final adjudication was declared entitled to the office, a 
sufficient number of errors havirrj; been discovered to give him a 
majority of all the votes cast. 

The movement known as the Liberal Republican had this year a 
large influence politically, having virtually dictated the Democratic 
nomination for the Presidency, and tne platform of principles on 
which the campaign against the Republican party was conducted. 
But in the vote the power of the Liberal Republicans was felt 
chiefly at the October election. At the November election the 



politics. 267 

defections among Democrats were so numerous as to more than 
counterbalance the votes of the Liberal Republicans. The latter, 
in May, had nominated Horace Greeley and B. Gratz Brown as 
their candidate for President and Vice President ; and when, later, the 
Democracy met in national convention, they adopted the nomina- 
tions and the platform of the Liberals. The Republicans re-nomina- 
ted President Grant, and associated with him Henry Wilson, of 
Massachusetts as a candidate for Vice President. It is the exact 
truth to say that neither the ticket nor the platform furnished to 
the Democracy by the Liberal Republicans was at all such a ticket 
or platform as that party would have chosen for itself, had it pur- 
sued an entirely independent course. The disaffection was so great 
that a third ticket was nominated, at the head of which was Charles 
O'Connor, the distinguished lawyer of New York. This third 
ticket had very little strength in this county, or in the State, the 
disaffection among Democrats taking the form at the Presidential 
election of a refusal to vote at all. This is shown by the fact that 
the vote in LaPorte county for the Democratic electors in 
November, was 'three hundred and ninety less than for Hendricks 
in October. Wm. W. Higgins of this county was the elector on 
the Liberal Democratic ticket for the eleventh District. This ticket 
received in this county two thousand seven hundred and eighty- 
three votes; the Republican electors received two thousand nine 
hundred and three votes and the O'Connor electors seventeen votes. 

A special election was held in October, 1873, for Prosecuting 
attorney to fill a vacancy occasioned by the reorganization of the courts 
of the State. The candidates were James A. Crawley and William 
E. Pinney of LaPorte, and. George Ford of South Bend. Ford 
received one hundred and thirteen votes, Pinney two hundred and 
twenty-five, and Crawley one thousand one hundred and eighty. 

The election of 1874 was for State, county and township officers, 
and Representative in congress. There were three tickets in the 
field, Democratic, Republican and Independent, and the Democrats 
carried everything by very large majorities, except F. Nebelthau 
for Trustee of Centre township, and Julius P. Linard for Constable. 
At the head of the State ticket were Wm. W. Curry, Republican, 
John E. Neff, Democrat, and Isaac C. Stout, Independent; and the 



268 HISTORY OF LA l'ORTE COUNTY. 

vote stood, for Curry, two thousand three hundred and twenty-four, 
for Neff. three thousand two hundred and thirty -one and for Stout 
two hundred and thirty-four. The candidates for congress, were 
William H. Calkins, Republican, and Win. S. Raymond, Democrat, 
no Independent running for Congress in this District ; and the vote 
of this county was, for Haymond, three thousand two hundred and 
nine, and for Calkins two thousand four hundred and seventy-five. 
Andrew L. Osborn was a candidate for Judge of the Supreme court, 
and received two thousand five hundred and seventy votes, the 
largest given for any Republican candidate on the State ticket. 
For Prosecuting attorney, the candidates were James A Crawley, 
Republican, and George Ford, Democrat, no Independent candidate 
running. The vote of the county was for Crawley, two thousand 
three hundred and thirty-eight, and for Ford, three thousand two 
hundred and thirty-one. Each party had its candidate for Repre- 
sentative to the State legislature. They were Edward Evan.-. 
Democrat. Sidney S. Sabin and Amos Thorp. Evans received 
rhree thousand two hundred and sixteen votes, Sabin two thousand 
two hundred and seventy-eight, and Thorp two hundred and sixty- 
three. For the other county officers, the candidates and their votes 
were as follow- : 

FOR SHERIFF. 

Edward Hawkins. Democrat. ...... 2996 

Ithamar D. Phelps, Republican, ..... 2347 

John N. Fail. Independent. ...... 367 

FOR AUDITOR. 

Edward J. Church. Democrat. ...... ill!'' 

John D. Stewart. Republican. . . . . . _''-7 s 

John R. Stewart. Independent, . . . . .24. 

FOB TBE L8T7BEB. 

George W. Mecum, Democrat. ..... 328 

Charles S. Winship, Republican. ..... 2059 

John D. Hoover, Independent. ..... 339 

FOB RECORDER. 

John II. Organ. Democrat. ...... 3223 

Wm. P. Yarger. Republican. ..... 2252 

Ambrose P. White, Independent. ..... 284 



POLITICS. 



FOR CORONER. 

Darwin T. Rrown, Democrat, ...... 3242 

George J. Bentley, Republican, . . . . 2320 

FOR COUNTY SURVEYOR. 

Hiram Burner, Democrat, ...... 3196 

John P. Cathcart, Republican, ..... 2581 

FOR COUNTY ASSESSOR. 

Jacob Folant, Democrat, ...... 3276 

Joseph H. Francis, Republican, ..... 2242 

Wm. E. Creighton, Independent, ..... 327 

FOR COMMISSIONER. 

Charles Wills, Democrat. ...... 3218 

Benajah Stanton, Republican, ..... 2068 

George Mill, Independent, ...... 243 

This closes the review of the political history of LaPorte county, 
except to supply the omission of the year 1839, in which year, there 
was cast a total vote of one thousand two hundred and forty-six, 
and the Whigs were successful by an average majority of one hun- 
dred and twenty, Great pains have been taken to make the record 
as complete as possible, and it closes with the following recapitula- 
tion of the total number of votes cast at each election since the 
organization of the county : 

1832 April Election, 55 Votes. 






u 



.. 



1832 August 

1832 November 

1833 August 
1834 
1835 
1836 

1836 November 

1837 August 
1838 

1839 
1840 

1840 November 

1841 August 
1842 

1843 
1844 



77 
115 

478 

— — - 

i 10 

935 
942 
941 
1094 
1246 
1782 
1709 
1248 
1693 
1592 
1730 



270 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



1844 

184.-, 
1846 
1847 
1848 
1848 
1849 
1850 
1851 
1852 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1868 
1870 
1872 
187l! 
1873 
1874 



November Election, 



August 

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November 
August 

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October 

November 

October 

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ti 

cc 

November 
October 

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cc 

cc 

November 
October 

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a 



cc 

cc 



cc 
cc 
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cc 

November " 
October *' 



November 

October 

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November 
October Special 
Election 



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1893 
1756 
1873 
1910 
2011 
2136 
2061 
1920 
2139 
2588 
2961 
1629 
3128 
1900 
4563 
4819 
2999 
5026 
2835 
5015 
5074 
286: » 
4564 
4450 
4969 
4811 
4043 
5635 
3685 
5760 
5940 
5326 
6172 
5703 
1548 
5789 



Votes. 



FIRST ELECTIONS. 271 



CHAPTER XVIII. 

FIRST ELECTIONS. 

It will not be uninteresting to preserve here the record com- 
plete, of some of the first elections ever held in the county ; the 
names of those who voted then will be familiar to many still living, 
and their appearance will serve to revive many pleasant recollec- 
tions of the days gone by. 

The following is the notice issued by the acting Sheriff of the 
county, calling the first election and appointing it to be held on the 
second Monday in April, 1832 : 

"Notice is hereby given to the qualified voters of LaPorte 
county, Indiana; That by virtue of a late act of the legislature, 
laying off said county, and also a commission to me directed as 
Sheriff pro tern, as well as that of a writ of election from his excel- 
lencv, N. Noble, Governor of the State of Indiana, commanding me 
as Sheriff of said county, to hold an election at such place or places, 
as I may appoint in said county, on the second Monday in April 
next, giving ten days notice thereof. Therefore be it known that 
an election will be held at the house of Nathan B. Nichols, and 
also at the house of Arba Heald in said county on the second Mon- 
day in April next, for the purpose of electing two Associate Judges, 
one Clerk of the circuit court, a Recorder for the county and three 
County commissioners. Said election is to be held and conducted 
as general elections are, and the return of said election will be made 
to me at the house of Jacob Miller, on the Wednesday succeeding 
said election. 

The west half of Range one, west of the second principal meridian 
and all of Range two, will constitute one District, and the election is 
to be held at the said house of Nichols ; and Ranges three and four 
west, will form the second District, and the election will be held at 
A. Heald's at the Door prairie. 
Given under my hand this 29th day of March, A. D. 1832. 

Benjamin McCarty. 

Appointed Sheriff." 



272 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Under and in pursuance of this notice, elections were held at the 
two designated places in the county, the records of which are as 
follow- : 

•At an election begun and held at the house of Arba Heel 
[Arba Heald is intended,] in the county of LaPorte, and State of 
Indiana, on the' 9th day of April, 1832, for the purpose of electing 
two Associate Judges, a Clerk of the circuit court, a Recorder for 
said county and three County commissioners, being one of the 
election districts appointed by the Sheriff of said county by virtue of 
law. at which time and place the following number and named 
persons voted: 

William Morgan. Jesse Morgan, Elisha Newel, Alden Tucker, 
Adam Keith, John Welsh, Jonathan Morgan, Stephen Bray ton, 
Horace Markham, Wm. Phillips, Joseph P. Osborn, John White. 
William Thrall, Daniel Jessup, Isaac Morgan, Charles West, John 
Barnet, John Whitaker. Judah Learning, Joseph Osborn, Elijah H. 
Brown. Wm. Garwood, Lewis Shirley, James Huckins and 
Henly Clyburn." 

The returns are signed by James Hutchins and Judah Leaniii 
clerk.-. 

"At an election begun and held at the house of Nathan B. Nichols 
in the county of LaPorte and State of Indiana, on the 9th day of 
April, 1832, for the purpose of electing two Associate Judges, a 
Clerk of the circuit court, a Recorder for said county and three 
County commissioners, being one of the election Districts appointed 
by the Sheriff of said county by virtue of law. at which time and 
place the following number and named persons vx>ted: 

Charles Egbert, Lyman Robbins, Joseph Bay, Wm. H. McCarty, 
Asa M. Warren, Nathan B. Nichols, Jesse X. West. George W. 
Barnes, Arthur Irwin. Levi Brown. James High ley, John Wills, 
Peter Low, John Garrard. Ezekiel Provolt, Alfred Stanton, Wm. 
Clark, Elijah Stanton, Philip Fail. Amos Stanton, John Stanton, 
George Thomas, Joseph Lykins. Aaron "Stanton, Wm. F. Stanton, 
Michael Billings, Richard Harris. A urea Sperrv. Jacob Miller and 
Chapel W. Brown. 7 " 

The returns ^are signed by Jacob Miller, Alfred Stanton and 
John Wills, clerks. 



POLITICS. 21S 

After which the following return was made : 

14 At an election held pursuant to a writ of election directed to- 
me, as Sheriff of La Porte County, Indiana, on the ninth day of 
April, 1832. It appears from the returns of said election made to* 
me at the house of Jacob Miller, the proper place as appointed by 
me, and on the day recognized by law and within the proper hours. 
Jacob Miller for Associate Judge, received forty-two votes ; Judah 
Learning, tw r enty-three votes; Daniel Jessup, twenty-three; Elisha 
Newel, eight; Elijah H. Brown for County Commissioner, received 
forty-two votes; Chapel W. Brown, twenty-nine; Aaron Stanton, 
twenty-nine ; Isaac Morgan, thirty-five ; John Wills, four ; Joseph 
Lykins, fifteen votes. For Clerk and Recorder, George Thomas 
received forty-one votes ; and for Clerk, Jesse Morgan received 
twelve votes, and for Recorder he received thirteen votes : 
Judah Learning and Daniel Jessup having an equal number 
of votes for Judge, and casting lots the lot went in favor of Learn- 
ing. Chapel W. Brown and Aaron Stanton having an equal num- 
ber of votes for County Commissioner, lots being cast the lot went 
in favor of Brown. Such appears from the certificates of election 
as returned. Therefore Jacob Miller and Judah Learning are 
elected associate Judges for said County of LaPorte. Elijah H. 
Brown, Isaac Morgan and C. W. Brown are elected Commissioners 
for said County, and George Thomas is elected Clerk and Recorder." 

Other elections were held in 1832, as follows : 

SCIPIO TOWNSHIP. 

On the sixteenth day of June, an election was held for the first 
Justice of the Peace in Scipio Township. The following were the 
votes cast : A. P. Andrew, Judah Learning, Joseph Osborn, Ben- 
jamin McCarty, Christopher M. McClure, Ira Richardson, Elijah 
H. Brown, James Hutchins, Wm. M. Cort, Benjamin Dewitt, 
John Mann, Wm. Powers, I. M. Wilson, Jacob Coleman, Arthur 
McClure, Samuel Hardiston, Absalom Rambo, Stephen Brayton, 
Richard Harris, John Stanton, Arba Heald. Arthur McClure re- 
ceived sixteen votes and was declared elected Justice of the Peace. 
Absalom Rambo received three votes. The returns were signed by 
James Hutchins, Joseph Osborn and Elijah H. Brown, Judges, 
and Judah Learning and Wm. Gibson, Clerks. 

1 8 



274 HISTORY OF LA PORTK COUNTY. 

NEW DURHAM TOWNSHIP. 

The following is the first record of an election in New Durham 
township, after the County was organized : 

••Poll book of an election begun and held at the house of Elisha 
Newell, on the sixteenth day of June, 1832. The following per- 
sons voted in the following order for Justice of the Peace for New 
Durham Township, La Porte County, Indiana: Alden Tucker, 
Peter Lowe, Chas. West, John W. Cole, John Barnett, Wm. Thrall, 
William Garwood, Isaac Morgan, Jonathan Morgan, Joseph Orr, 
Nathaniel Steel, William Morgan, Daniel Jessup, Henly Clyburn, 
Elisha Newell. 

We the undersigned judges of the above election do certify the 

above to be a true poll book of the above election. 

Elisha Newhall, | 
Daniel Jessup, > Judges. 
Henly Clyburn, ) 

I. Barnett. \ clerU 
John W. Cole, / LlerKS * 

Not on the face, but as filing to the above returns there is the 
simple announcement: U E. Newhall elected,*' signed by G. Thom- 
as, C. L. C. C We are left in ignorance as to whether Mr. 
Newhall had a competitor, or how many votes he received." 

KANKAKEE TOWNSHIP. 

The first general election in Kankakee Township of which there 
any return on file is the one held on the sixth day of August, 
1832, when the candidates voted for were, for State Senator, Sam- 
uel Hanna, Pleasant Harris and Jeremiah Smith: for Representa- 
tive, Elisha Egbert, George Crawford, and Wm. Bissell; for Sheriff, 
Nathan B. Nichols, and Adam Gr. Polke : for Coroner, John Gar- 
rard; for School Commissioner, Wm. Clark: for Probate Judge. 
Benj. McCarty and Jesse Morgan ; for Justice of the Peace, Ezekiel 
Provolt. The names of the voters at this election arc James High- 
ley, E. A. Brown, Judah Learning, H. F. Janes. John Garrard, 
John Wills, Andrew Shaw, James McCormick, Charles Egbert, 
Asa M. Warren, Joseph Lykins, Joseph Bay, Jesse Wlllets, Lyman 
3, Samuel Webster. George W. Barnes, Jacob Miller. Alex- 
ler Blackburn. Aurea Sperry, Ezekiel Provolt. Levi Brown, 



politics. 275 

Wm. Clark, Noble McKinstry, Ohapel W. Brown, Jesse N. West, 
Martin Baker, N. B. Nichols, Michael Billings, Amos Stanton. 
At this election, John Wills was inspector, Ezekiel Provolt and 
H. F. Janes were Clerks, and Lyman Robbins and C. W. Brown, 
Judges. 

The first election held in Michigan Township occurred on the 
twenty-eighth day of September, 1833, at which twenty votes were 
cast for Justice of the Peace. The names of the voters are as 
follows : 

'•Elijah Casteel, Willis Hughes, James J^aughlin, George Olinger, 
seph C. Orr, James Knaggs, I. C. Elston, Wm. Conant, J. Bar- 
tholomew, Amos Dyer, Squire Clark, Eliakim Ashton, Samuel 
Masterson, Peter Ritter, Silas Gregory, B. Sims, James Waddle, 
Gilbert Baldwin, Caleb Nichols, Samuel Olinger. Of these votes 
James M. Scott received eight, and Samuel Olinger, twelve. The 
election was held at the house of Joseph C. Orr, who was the In- 
spector; and James Laughlin and Willis Hughes were Judges." 

SPRINGFIELD. 

■'At an election held on Monday, the sixth day of April, 1835, 
the house of Judah Learning in Springfield township, in LaPorte 
County, Indiana, for the purpose of electing one Justice of the 
Peace, one Constable, one or more Supervisors of roads, two Over- 
seers of the poor, two fence viewers, and one inspectoivof elections, 
where the legal votes given stand thus : 

Erastus Quivy, David S. Murray, Robert Wilkinson, Levi 
Young. Geo. Sanford, John Griffith, Judah Learning, Orrin Lewis, 
Harvey Learning, John Brown, John Wilbur, Timothy Fosdick, Asa 
Pease, Samuel J. Havens, Alfred Stanton, William Cormack, Jo- 
seph W. Foster. 

State of Indiana, La Porte, Co., 

We the undersigned, Inspectors and Judges of the within named 
election do certify that Joseph W. Foster, received fourteen votes 
for Justice of the Peace, and Harvey Learning received twelve votes 
for Constable; David T. Murray, fourteen votes for "Supervisor; 
Orrin Lewis, twelve ; Hiram Griffith, eleven ; Erastus Quivy, four ; 
Alfred Stanton, three; and John Smith one vote for Supervisor. 



U76 HISTORY 01- Li POB 

For Overseer of poor, Judafa Learning, eleven votes; John Ed • 
John Griffith, six; Win. Oormack, two. Fence Viewers, Wm. Cor- 
mack, thirteen votes; Erastus Quivy, nine; Hiram Griffith, I 
John Enos. one vote. For [nspector, Judah Learning, fourth 

votes; Timothy Fosdick, five votes for Constable. 

Given under our hands and Beals tl • th day of April. 

Judah Leaming, In- 
John Griffith, 

David S. Murray. 
Wm. Earmark, < p lprts „ 

Orrix Lewis, f e s 

• 

NOBLE. 

The first election held in Noble Township took place on tl 
day of April. 1836. There were to be chosen two Justices of 
Peace, one Inspector of elections, two Constables, two Fence 
ers, two Overseers of the poor, and tour Supervisors of highwa 
The following is the poll list in the order in which the votes vere 
cast : 

"John Pool, Arthur McClure, John S. Decker. Ward Bla 
Abraham Charles. Martin Houseman. Edward Kennedy, Call 
Worrell. T. H. Wells, Horace Wood. Wright Loving. Edw;; 

' DO 

O'Hara, Joseph Sterrett, Amos G. Webster, Silas Loving, John 
McLane, Samuel O'Hara, Timothv C. Everett. Wm. Callison, 
John Harding, Michael O'Hara, Samuel Sample, Ira Birch, Ri 
ard Worrell. Joseph Wheaton, Burton Sweringen, Niinrod Philli - 
David Powers. Thomas Burch, Calvin Burch. Admiral Bur- 
Samuel Higley. John Pratt, John F. Allison. John Marford, Johi 
Underwood." 

The elections resulted in the selection of the following to* 
officers : 

Justices. .John F. Allison, Josiah Grover, [nspector of Elect 

Arthur McClure ; Constables, John Pratt. Re/in Everts: Fence 
Viewers, John Pool, Horace Wood; Overseers of the Poor, Ad- 
miral Burch. Joseph Wheaton; Supervisors of Highways, David 
Powers, John Underwood. Joseph Sterrett. 

CLINTON. 

' The first election held in Clinton Township was on the r ourth 



politic 277 

day of April 1836. at the house of Charles Eaton. The officers to 
be elected were two Justices of the Peace, one Inspector of elections, 
two Constables, two Fence Viewers, two Overseers of the Poor, and 
one Supervisor of Highways. Twenty-six votes were cast by the 
following named persons in the order in which they are given: 
John Warnock. Daniel Robertson, Isham Campbell, John Eaton, 
James Tuley, John Bailey, Jeremiah Sherwood, Wm. 0. Vicory, Jno. 
Harris. Jonathan Grlimps, Jonathan Sherwood, Simpson Ray, 
David Ray. Peter Tuley, Joseph Morrison, Thomas Robinson, 
James Haskell Ira Richardson, John Moorman, Jacob Iseminger, 
Archibald Moorman, Ransom Maddy, Francis Morrison, Joseph 
< teborn, Thomas B. Patterson, Benjamin T. Bryant, Hezekiah 
Robertson, Worcester B. Heath, Charles Eaton, Abram Eahart, 
Lykins Richardson, Nathaniel Steele, Jonathan Middleton, Marsena 
Clark, Jonathan Osman, arid Aaron Wills." The following were 
the successful candidate.- : 

"Justices, Charles Eaton, John Warnock: Inspector, Charles 
Eaton ; Constables, Joseph Osborn, James Haskell ; Fence Viewers, 
Thomas Robertson. Hezekiah Robertson; Overseers of the Poor, 
Jeremiah Sherwood, Wm. Ray: Supervisor of Highways, Daniel 
Robertson." 

HUDSON. 

Hudson township was organized in May, 1836, and an election 
was held on the eighteenth day of the following June. The fol- 
lowing is the record: 

""At an election held on the eighteenth day of June. 1836, at 
the house of J. F. Smith, in Hudson Township, La Porte County, 
and State of Indiana, for the purpose of electing one Justice of the 
Peace for Hudson Township, where the legal votes stood thus: 
Daniel Cross, David Shay, Nathaniel Maynes, Enos Lewis, Elijah 
Phye, Jonathan Edwards. Royal Cuthbert, J. D. Ross, Joseph W. 
Lykins, Robert Davis, Benjamin Hicks, Benjamin H. Howell, 
John McCormick, Nelson Moody, John Caldwell, John McLaine, 
John S. Baker, Samuel N. Vance, Samuel Turner, Joseph Bay, 
Gabrielle Druilliner, A. L. Wheeler, Joseph Sisney, James M. 
Hepner, James Hatfield." 

hi the next page is the following: 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



.. T. 



Tally paper for an election held on the eighteenth day of June, 
1836, at the house of J. F. Smith, in Hudson Township. LaPorte 
County, Indiana, for the purpose of electing a Justice of the Peace. 
where the legal votes given stand thus : J. F. Smith, thirteen 
votes; Charles Egbert, twelve votes. 

State of Indiana, La Porte County. 

We, the undersigned judges of the foregoing election, do cert 
that James Smith received thirteen votes for the of the Justice 
of the Peace, and Chas. Egbert receive'! twelve votes for the same 
office. 

'Given under our hands and seals the eighteenth of June. 1 %• 



Walter Livingston. ) p1 „_ Vq ,- 
J. W. Collins, ^leiKs. 



John D. Ross, Inspector. 
Benjamin Hick-. ) Tll rW 
Joseph W. Lykins, f Jna S^ 



POLITICS OF THE CITY OF LA PORTE. 279 



CHAPTER XIX. 

POLITICS OF THE CITY OF LA PORTE. 

The incorporation of LaPorte as a village or town took place in 
the year 1835, and the following are the records appertaining 
thereto : 

On the fourth day of November, 1835, the Board of County 
Commissioners passed the following order : w * Ordered that in pur- 
suance of the statute, and the petition of the citizens of the town of 
LaPorte for the incorporating of said town, this day legally pre- 
sented, comprising in the opinion of the Board, two-thirds of the 
whole number of lesjal voters in said town, an election be held at 
the usual place of holding elections in said town, on Saturday tfye 
fourteenth day of November, inst. for the purpose of electing trustees 
of said incorporation." 

This is afterwards followed on the record by the following certifi- 
cate of the election of corporation Trustees : 

"State of Indiana, LaPorte County. 

We the undersigned, President and Clerk of an election held at 
the house of Robert S. Morrison in the town of La Porte, in the 
County of La Porte, and State of Indiana, for the purpose of elect- 
ing Trustees for the several wards or districts ill the incorporation 
of the town of La Porte, do certify that, (after we were appointed 
President and Clerk of and for said election, agreeable to the statute 
in such case made and provided,) Amzi Clark was duly elected 
Trustee for District No. 1; Jonathan M. Hacker for District No. 
2 ; William Clement, District No. 3 ; Hiram Wheeler, District No. 
4 ; and Jacob Haas, District No. 5 ; in the town of La Porte 
aforesaid: 

Given under our hands and seals this fourteenth day of Novem- 
ber, A. D., 1835. 

Wm. Dinwiddie, President, ss. 
Wm. Allen, Clerk, ss.'" 



> HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

The incorporation took place under Whig auspices, and the 
Board of Trustees remained of this party during most of the years 
that intervened between this time and the date when the town 
became a city. In the year 1852 a city charter was granted, the 
place having then a population of about 5,000. and in August of 
that year a charter election was held which resulted in the election 
of Wm. J. Walker, first Mayor of La Porte. This was a victory 
for the Whig party, and that party or its successor, controlled the 
administration of the city until 1856, Wm. Millikan being elected 
Mayor in 1855. But in May, 1856, the Democrats succeeded at 
the municipal election, and Benjamin Kress was elected. The 
next year the Democrats were again successful, electing Frederic 
McCollum Mayor, and Benjamin Kress the City Judge. Prior 
to this time, the Republican party here, as elsewhere, had 
acquired great strength. Most of the former Whigs and many 
Democrats now gave it their support, and at the city election in 
May, 1859, Wm. H. IT. Whitehead was elected Mayor; Asa A 
Whitehead Marshall, and the candidates for the other city officers 
were successful. A majority of the City Council was also™ Repub- 
lican. The next election occurred in May, 1861. and resulted in 
the general success of the Democratic ticket. Daniel Noyes being 
•elected Mayor, though Asa A. Whitehead, was re-elected Marshal, 
and a majority of the City Council remained Republican. On 
taking his seat Mayor Noyes made the following address: 

"Gentlemen of the Common Council: 

In entering upon the duties of the office of Mayor — although it 
may be somewhat of an innovation upon what has been the custom 
of my predecessors — I deem it not inappropriate to submit to you 
some suggestions in writing, forshadowing at lenst mv own views in 
regard to our future policy. We come into office untrammeled by 
party ties — being the representatives of no party organization, we 
have no partisan friends to reward or political foes to punish. 
Never since the organization of our City Government has there 
been a more favorable opportunity than the present for the inaugu- 
ration of that policy which shall redound to our common good, and 
bring about us those blessings which are the result of united and 
harmonious action. 



POLITICS OF THE CITY OF LA PORTE. 281 

The oaths which we have severally taken, require of us as our 
paramount duty, first: That we support and preserve inviolate the 
Constitution of our common country— next to that the Constitution 
of our State, and that last, though not least, we faithfully and 
honestly discharge the duties assigned us in our several capacities. 
For the accomplishment of those purposes let mutual forbearance 
and respect be mingled with all our deliberations — exercising to- 
wards each other that measure of kindness and good will which 
should always pervade those to whom are confided a common trust, 
and who are seeking the perfection of a common cause. 

The present deplorable and distracted condition of our National 
and State affairs — the unfavorable progress of the present season — 
the distress in financial circles — the universal paralysis of all busi- 
ness pursuits, all appeal to us in accents which we cannot disregard,, 
that our expenditures should be attended with prudence and econo- 
my. By this it is not intended to recommend a niggardly parsi- 
mony unbecoming an enlightened public policy, but rather that we 
r-heck that reckless spirit of extravagance which is a continued drain 
upon our Treasury, merely that it may appear that we are doing 
something. 

Our streets, w T ith a few exceptions, are in very fair repair ; and it 
is far better in my judgment to suffer what inconvenience must arise 
from them, in the situation in which they might be left after a judi- 
cious expenditure of the road fund, and perhaps a small outlay 
besides, than at the present crisis to burden our citizens with a 
heavy tax. and that, too, injudiciously expended. South Main 
and Monroe streets, undoubtedly need repairs, and possibly many 
others may; but I cannot dismiss this branch of the subject with- 
out enjoining upon the Street Committee that they see to it them- 
selves — that the right thing be done in the right place, and that it 
be done in such a manner as to be of lasting benefit to our city. 
It is of no benefit to our streets that a large force may be concen- 
trated upon them merely for the purpose of removing the earth 
from one locality to another, rendering them impassable for a time, 
or working them day after day without system, order or object; but 
let the most feasible plan for the accomplishment of the necessary 
repairs be first well matured by the committee in charge — let them 



282 HISTORY OF LA PORTE county. 

superintend the work themselves — know that the services are ren- 
dered, and certify to the bills themselves. If it be objected to this 
suggestion that it takes too much of the time of the committee, and 
is too great a tax upon them, I answer the objection by recommend- 
ing that they be reasonably compensated for all their time devoted 
to such service. 

It is highly probable also, that repairs to some extent, and of a 
substantial nature, will be required upon the public sewer. The im- 
portance of preserving this in substantial repair, and successful 
operation, must be evident to every one ; but as that is within the 
jurisdiction of the Street Committee further comment upon it 
this time is unnecessary. 

I recommend to the favorable consideration of the Council as 
complete an organization and continuance of the Fire Brigade of 
the City as the circumstances of the case will admit. The import- 
ance of this subject must also be so apparent to every reflecting 
mind that it can scarcely need more to engage the attention 
the Council, than barely to be brought to their recollection. 

I also recommend to the immediate attention of the Council that 
some disposition of the property formerly purchased as a pest house 
site, and also of the City jail, be made for the purpose of liquida- 
ting the present indebtedness of the City, or that the proceeds be 
devoted to the repairs of the sewer or some other purpose which 
will be of permanent benefit to the City. The City has a contract 
with the county of La Porte by which she has the use of t 
county pest house guaranteed to her free of charge, and I am 
unable to see any good or sufficient reason why the lots which the 
City long ago purchased for that purpose, and are now of no use or 
practical utility to her, should not be disposed of and the proceeds 
be devoted to some useful purpose. I also recommend tha t the 
Council seriously consider the propriety of selling the City Jail 
building, and also of entering into a contract, if necessary, with 
the County Commissioners, for the use of the County Jail in all 
such cases as may be required for City purposes. 

It is also in my opinion of great importance to the interest of 
the City, that the Council require that all the books and papers of 
the City, of whatever department, be kept strictly within the Coun- 



POLITICS OF THE CITY OF LA PORTE. 283 

cil room, and not be removed therefrom for any purpose like the 
accommodation of the officers of the several departments, or in fact, 
unless it be to obey some order of court. There can be no reason 
for removing any of the books or papers, unless it be merely to 
accommodate the officers, and the Council furnish convenient and 
suitable places for the transaction of all business — a receptacle for 
the preservation of their papers — and where their business is done 
is the proper place to keep the conveniences and necessaries for 
doing it. Any other system will certainly entail upon us the loss 
of important papers, furnish an excuse for the non-performance of 
duty, by the simple act of removing the books and papers necessary 
to the discharge of such duty, and in all probability become the 
source of great and irreparable injury to the interests of the City. 
As there are no regulations of the Council at present touching this 
matter I hope it will engage their attention without delay. 

I also desire to remind the Council of the necessity of requiring 
prompt and energetic action from officers and committees, that un- 
finished business may not accumulate upon our hands. 

Other matters of equal importance with those already enumera- 
ted, but which time is not given me now to mention, will be here- 
after made the subject of further communication. 

Daniel Noyes, Mayor. 
May 13, 1861." 

In May, 1863, the Republicans carried the city, electing all the 
city officers and a majority of the council. The officers elected were 
as follows : Mayor, Wm. H. H. Whitehead ; Treasurer, Thomas II. 
Phillips ; Marshal, John Thompson, Jr. ; Clerk, Richard G. Ran- 
dall. The city government was again reversed in 1865. At the 
city election in May, Daniel Noyes was elected Mayor: Simon 
Wile, Treasurer; John Hinsey, Marshal; Wm. Whitman, Clerk, 
and J. H. Merrill, Assessor, by a majority varying from seventy- 
six to one hundred and twenty-six. At the election in May, 1867, 
Daniel Noyes was re-elected Mayor, and the city government con- 
tinued Democratic. Simon Wile was re-elected as Treasurer ; 
Thomas S. Cogley was elected Clerk ; Andrew Saylor, Marshal, 
and Levi Ely, Assessor. This was an active and spirited contest. 
Morgan H. Weir was the Republican candidate for Mayor, and 



284 BISTORT OF LA PORTK COUNTY. 



# 



the voters on both sides were thoroughly aroused. The victory re- 
mained with the Democrats, their candidates receiving majorit 
ranging from eighty to one hundred and sixty. The council in- 
cluding those holding over, consisted of the following citizens. 
Holding over — Charles Fravel, Geo. W. Mecum, II. Treusdell, 
Reuben Munday, and Jacob Wile. Members elect — Davidson 
Patton, C. Hausher. Fred. Steigley, II. Druliner, H. Hausher. In 
the third and fourth wards, H. H. Benton and Hart L. Weaver 
contested the seats of Steigley and Druliner. having received an 
actual majority of the votes cast, but they never obtained the - 

At the election of May, 1869, a portion of each ticket was suc- 
cessful. For City Marshal, Andrew Savior, Democrat, was re- 
elected by seventy-four majority ; Levi Ely for Assessor, by thirteen 
majority: Dr. L. C. Rose was elected Mayor: Charles Peglow, 
Treasurer, and Nathaniel S. Paul. Clerk — all Republicar Ros 
majority was twenty-seven ; Peglow's forty-three ; Paul's twenty- 
three. The Democrats retained their majority in the council, electing 
their candidates as follows: from second ward. George W. Mecum: 
from fourth ward. Albert Ribbe and H. Peters: from fifth ward. 
D. Soutter. The Republicans elected Gavin Campbell in the fi] 
ward, and A. H. Robinson in the third ward, which together with 
those who held over, caused the council to consist of seven Demo- 
crats and three Republicans. 

At the city election in May, 1871, the Democratic candid;) 
were, for Mayor, Simon Wile; for Treasurer, Herman Hausheer; 
for Clerk, John H. Organ: for Marshal, John H. Ball; for \- 
sor, George Cochrane; and the Republican candidates were, for 
Mayor, Dr. Landon C. Rose, for a second term : for Treasurer, 
Charles Peglow; for Clerk. X. S. Paul: for Marshal, Oscar Mott; 
for Assessor, James Breen. The result of the election was such 
that neither party could claim a victory, a portion of the candidates 
on each ticket being elected. The contest was a very spirited one, 
both parties laboring for success with the greatest energy. The 
candidates were active, and the voters were generally aroused, and 
at the polls on the day of election : and though party spirit wa,> 
•considerably excited, yet it was, more than anything else the personal 
strength of the various candidates that-affected the result. Rose was 



POLITICS OF THE CITY OF LA PORTE. 285 

elected Mayor by a majority of 18; Jas. Breen was elected Assessor, 
by a majority of thirty-seven. The largest Republican majority 
was given for N. S. Paul, he having received 764 votes to five 
hundred and ninety-six, for the opposing candidate. Of the candi- 
dates on the Democratic ticket John H. Ball was elected Marshal, 
by a majority of fifty-six, and H. Hausheerwas elected Treasurer by 
four majority. Councilmen were elected as follows: first ward, 
D. D. Deffenbach, Republican; second ward, Washington Wilson,. 
Republican; third ward, Reuben Munday, Republican; fourth 
ward, Edwin G. McCollum, Democrat; fifth ward, C. Cook, Dem- 
ocrat. This result made the council a tie, as in the previous year 
at the w r ard elections, two Republicans, Samuel B. Collins and 
Robert S. Morrison, and three Democrats, S. S. Baker, Albert 
Ribbe and W. W. Finley, were elected councilmen. Thus one of 
the most hotly contested election campaigns in which La Porte ever 
engaged, resulted in as nearly a tie all around as was possible, 
though the balance was somewhat in favor of the Republicans. 

Passing over, as heretofore, the intermediate election, which was 
for councilmen alone, the city voting by wards, the next election to 
engage attention is that of 1873, when a full city ticket was again 
to be elected. The two were promptly in the field with their candi- 
dates, and every inch of ground was carefully canvassed. The 
candidates were, for Mayor, Mortimer Nye, and Capt. Abram P. 
Andrew; for Marshal, John H. Ball and Cyrus Shreeve; for Clerk, 
John H. Bradley and George M. Miller; for Treasurer, Herman 
Hausheer and Benj. Ash; for Assessor, Alexander Hunt and Reu- 
ben Munday ; councilmen 1st ward, D. Thrush and Jno. B. Moulton : 
second ward, Wash. Wilson, Ras Fetzer, S.A.Robinson and Chris. 
Hauser; third ward, John D. Hoover and Jacob Wile; fourth 
ward, E. G. McCollum, William Koppin and G. W. Abbott; fifth 
ward, Henry Wales and Chas. Kasbaum. The Democrats were 
completely successful, electing the entire city ticket and three out 
of six councilmen. The lowest majority was that of Nye against 
Andrew r for Mayor, which was twenty-five, the highest was that of 
Hunt against Munday, one hundred and eighty-nine majority. The 
Republicans carried the second and third wards and that was all. 
Dr. S. A. Robinson and Washington Wilson were elected in the 



286 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

ond ward by thirty-two majority, and John D. Hoover in the 
third by forty-four majority. The general result was to give the 
Democrats full control of the city government. 

The next general city election was held in May, 1875, and re- 
sulted in a partial victory for the Republicans. The Democrats 
having held the city government for some years past, and the whole 
county having gone heavily Democratic at the general election of 
1874, that party was very confident of a crushing victory and the 
Republicans correspondingly lacked confidence. It was somewhat 
difficult to find a prominent citizen who would consent to make the 
race for Mayor ; but after much persuasion Polaski King accepted 
the arduous and unpromising place. The ticket having then been 
completed, the Republicans five days before the election, went to 
work with an energy rarely equaled. The Democrats had nomina- 
ted the city officers for re-election with one exception, and they 
came to the work with an assurance begotten of former victories, 
and the admitted fact that on a straight party vote, they had a 
majority in the city. The result of the election was that while the 
Democrats elected the larger portion of the city officers, yet their 
expectations were not fully realized, the majorities being much 
lower than they anticipated, and their candidates for Clerk and 
Marshal being defeated. On the other hand the Republicans were 

well satisfied with their work that it was an easy matter to 
regard it as a victory. The following schedule, copied from the 
La Porte Chroxicle, gives in detail the vote cast for the several 
candidates, and it is here given because it is the report of the last 
• icy election, and presents the names of those who now compose the 
city government. 

Mayor. — Total number of votes cast, 1,458. First ward — King, 
147; Nye, 190; Nye's majority, 43. Second ward — King, 137; 
Nye, 131; King's majority, 6. Third ward — King 212; Nye, 
123; King's majority. 89. Fourth ward — King, 88: Nye, 163; 
Nye's majority 75. Fifth ward — King. 71: Nye, 196; Nye 
majority 12-". Total, King. 655; Nye, 803. Nye's majority 148. 

Clerk. — Total number of votes cast, 1.444. First ward — Dor- 
iand. 186 : Becher 145: Dorland's majority, 41. Second ward — 
Dorland 158: Becher. 107: Dorland's majority 51. Third ward 



POLITICS OF THE CITY OF LA PORTE. 287 

— Dorland, 241; Becher, 90; Dorland's majority 151. Fourth 
ward — Dorland, 87; Becher 162; Becher's majority 75. Fifth 
ward — Dorland, 80; Becher, 182; Becher's majority 108. Total, 
Dorland, 752 ; Becher, 692. Dorland's majority, 60. 

Treasurer. — Total number of votes cast, 1,450. First ward — 
Cochrane, 191 ; Hausheer, 144; Cochrane's majority, 47. Second 
ward — Cochrane, 130; Hausheer, 137; Hausheer's majority 7. 
Third ward — Cochrane, 229 ; Hausheer, 100 ; Cochrane's majority 
129. Fourth ward — Cochrane, 95; Hausheer, 156; Hausheer's 
majority 61. Fifth ward — Cochrane, 65; Hausher, 203; Haush- 
eer's majority 138. Total, Cochrane, 710; Hausheer, 740. 
Hausheer's majority, 30. 

Marshal. — Total number of votes cast, 1,457. First ward — 
Haverly, 192; Ball, 149; Haverly's majority 43. Second ward — 
Haverly, 165; Ball, 104; Haverly's majority 61. Third ward — 
Haverly, 232; Ball, 100; Haverly's majority 132. Fourth ward 
—Haverly, 114; Ball, 134; Ball's majority 20. Fifth ward— 
Haverly, 88; Ball, 179; Ball's majority 91. Total, Haverly, 
791; Ball, 6Q6. Haverly's majority 125. 

Assessor. — Total number of votes cast, 1,441. First ward — 
Xlockseiin, 148; Hunt, 181; Hunt's majority 33. Second ward 
— Klockseim, 130; Hunt, 137; Hunt's majority 7. Third ward 
Klockseim, 207: Hunt, 125; Klockseim's majority 82. Fourth 
ward — Klockseim, 101; Hunt, 147; Hunt's majority 46. Fifth 
ward— Klockseim 63; Hunt 202; Hunt's majority 139. Total, 
Klockseim, 649; Hunt, 792. Hunt's majority 143. 

Oouncilmen first ward. — Total, number of votes cast, 332. John 
F. Decker, Rep., 157; David Thrush, Dem., 175; Thrush's ma- 
jority 18. 

Second ward. — Total number of votes cast, 261. B. B. Arnold, 
Republican and Democrat, 214: Wra. Haferkamp, Independent, 
47; Arnold's majority 167. 

Third ward, long term. — Total number of votes cast, 259. Ed. 
Rathbun, Republican and Democrat, 259. No opposition — Rath- 
bun's majority 259. Short term. — Total number of votes cast, 
327; Fred West, Republican, 227: Jacob Wile, Democrat, 100. 
West's majority 127. 



288 HISTORY OF LA PORTE I OUNTY. 

Fourth ward. — Total number of vote* cast. 244. J. Curran, 
Republican, 86: A. Ribbe. Democrat, 158: Ribbe's majority 72. 

Fifth ward. — Total number of votes cast, 265. Chas. Lumi- 
quist, Republican. 69; Ch>ts. Bauer. Democrat, 196: Bauei 
majority. 127. 

This closes the review of the political history of La Porte. The 
elections of each alternate year have been omitted, as they were 
ward elections only and did not change the political complexion of 
the city administration proper. While yet a town, the Board of 
Trustees was generally Whig, and when the town became a city, it 
entered upon its city dignity under a Whig administration. Since 
the organization of the Republican party, the two existing parties 
have each borne a share in the administration of the citv govern- 
ment, the Democrats being in power the larger number of years. 
Various public enterprises have been undertaken and completed 
during this time, the most important of which are the excellent 
public school buildings, and the Holly water works, the latter 
having been inaugurated and completed under the administration of 
Mayor Rose. Under all administrations the effort has been 
keep the city clean and healthy, and this has been attended with a 
fair degree of success. It is not the province of this Hi- 
make political criticisms, and its author is glad to be able to say 
that under every administration much has been done that is worthy 
of commendation. 



and sixty-one, and William W. McCoy, Democrat, nine hundred 
and one ; for Representatives in the State legislature, Alex. H. 
Robinson and William Millikan, Whigs, were elected over W. 
A. Place and Jacob R. Hall; for Probate judge, Mulford K. 
Farrand, Whig, was elected over Gilbert Hathaway, Democrat; 
for County commissioners, John F. Allison and Christopher Mc- 
Clure were elected over Wm. Fry and Alfred Stephens; for 
Recorder, Burwell Spurlock was the only candidate; for Coroner 
F. A. McDowell was elected over R. K. Crandall. 

The election of August, 1850, resulted in the election of some of 
the candidates of each of the two parties. For delegates to the 
constitutional convention, John B. Niles, Alexander Blackburn, 
Charles W. Cathcart and E. I). Taylor were the candidates, and 
they received votes as follows ; Niles, nine hundred and ninety- 
three; Taylor, one thousand and two; Cathcart, nine hundred and 
thirty-one, and Blackburn, eight hundred and thirty-nine. For 
Representatives in the State legislature, William Millikan and 
James Bradley were elected over Alexander H. Robinson and 
Jacob R. Hall; for Treasurer, John M. Lemon was elected over 
William Taylor; for Sheriff, H. Lawson was elected over Jesse 
Mathis by twenty-nine majority only ; for County commissioner 
Mark Allen was elected over John F. Allison; for Coroner, E. S. 
Organ was elected over F. McCollum, and for Assessor, Joseph B. 
Lewis was elected over John S. Jessup. 

At the regular election held on the first Monday of August, 
1851, the Whigs carried the county by a small majority, averaging 
less than one hundred. The candidates for Congress, were Schuy- 
ler Colfax and Graham N. Fitch, and the former received of the 
votes of LaPorte county, one thousand and seventy-three, the 
latter one thousand and sixty-six. For the Legislature, F. W. 
Hunt was elected over James Bradley; for Clerk, Volney Bailey 
was elected over A. W. Henley; for County commissioner, George 
C. Havens was elected over James Drummond by ten majority; for 
Assessor, John S. Jessup was the only candidate. At this election 
the new constitution was voted upon, and LaPorte county gave one 
thousand seven hundred and sixty-nine votes for its adoption, to 
one hundred and thirty two votes against it. That section of this 

16 



242 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

constitution which provided for the exclusion of "negroes and 
mulattoes' from the State was submitted to a separate vote, and 

although it is nor pleasant to write it. yet the truth must be told 
that for this barbarous measure there were one thousand three hun- 
dred ami thirty-eight votes, and only six hundred and thirty-five 
against it. And yet perhaps there should be a feeling of gratifica- 
tion that so large a vote was cast against it. for it was certainly 
much larger in proportion to the whole vote than in many other 
parts of the State, and indicated that the grand idea of freedom for 
all men, was taking root, and giving promise of a golden harvest. 
How men have grown since that day! grown in the knowledge of 
the meaning of Liberty, in the knowledge of human brotherhood, 
and of a genuine political manhood. Let us be glad for that six 
hundred and thirty-five votes.. 

This was the year when Schuyler Colfax was a candidate for 
Congress the first time. The convention by which he was nomi- 
nated, was held at Plymouth on the 28th day of May. The Demo- 
crats of the District had met a few days previously, on the 22d day 
of May, at the same place, and nominated Graham N. Fitch for 
re-election to Congress. To show the position of parties on public 
questions at this time there is here presented the resolutions 
adopted by the two conventions held at Plymouth. The Demo- 
cratic convention adopted as its platform of principles, the following 
resolutions : 

" Resolved, That the cardinal principles of the Democratic party 
are to be found in the resolutions of 1798. drawn by Jefferson and 
Madison, and reaffirmed by the National conventions of 1836, 1840. 
1844 and 1< V 4. S : that we regard them as the touchstone of our 
political faith; that we will be governed by them in our political 
action, and that we place our nominee for* Congress upon the broad 
platform thus erected. 

Resolved, That we abide by the letter and spirit of the Consti- 
tution, and that we will stand by each and all of its compromises, 
and therefore recognize the binding force of every clause, (the 
delivery of fugitives from labor included), and we regard any action 
from any quarter, North or South, that tends to weaken or estrange 
our high allegiance to its solemn provisions, as equally faithless and 
treasonable." 



politics. 243 

The Whig convention adopted a much longer platform of princi- 
ples. Their resolutions were as follows : 

"Resolved, That the Whigs of the ninth Congressional District, in 
convention assembled, tender to each other their pledge of fidelity 
to the cause, and devotion to the principles for which they have so 
long labored. 

Resolved, That our position remains unchanged ; no interference 
with the domestic policy or peculiar institutions of sister States ; no 
extension of slave territory; no diffusion of an institution which it 
is believed tends to degrade labor and blight industry, over more of 
National soil than it now covers; no countenancing of disunion 
sentiments whether at the North or South; but devotion, unfalter- 
ing and unconditional devotion to our glorious Union, in any event, 
under all circumstances, despite all contingencies. 

Resolved, That although we may not agree upon each and every 
one of the measures passed by the last Congress, known as the com- 
promise measures, yet we regard them as designed to settle the 
questions specified in them, and that we are of the opinion that the 
good of the country requires that the settlement should remain 
undisturbed until time and experience shall show that a change or 
modification of them is necessary to avoid evasion or abuse; and 
that we hold, in the language of Henry Clay, on making his report 
from the committee of thirteen, that "Congress ought, while on the 
one hand securing to the owner the fair restoration of his property,' 
effectually to guard on the other against any abuse in the applica- 
tion of the remedy," being satisfied that it is not unsafe for either 
individuals or nations to rectify wrong by the substitution of right, 
and that the crowning glory of law is its protection of the rights 
of the weak as well as its enforcement of the just claims of the 
strong. 

Resolved, That the thanks of the nation are due Millard Fillmore 
and his Cabinet for the promptness and efficiency with which they 
have maintained the public faith, and for their determination to 
execute the laws at every hazard, and preserve unsullied the honor 
and integrity of the Nation ; and that this administration deserves 
the confidence and support of the Whig party. 

Resolved, That so far from the prosperity so confidently pre- 
dicted by our opponents being realized by the working of the 
present tariff, we see, instead of the high prices for grain that were 
promised, a depression in rates almost unparalleled : instead of an 
increase in the rewards of labor, factories and mills all over the land 
stopping, and thus operatives ceasing to purchase of the farmer, 



244 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY 

compelled to resort to agriculture themselves, and becoming rivals 
in producing instead of being consumers, thereby tending still 
further to depress prices by the superabundance thus created : and 
instead of the wealth of the world pouring in as was prophesied, a 
balance of trade against us of $50,000,000 in a single year, and the 
shipment of over $3,000,000 per month m hard coin from but one 
port to Europe, saying nothing of the millions upon millions of 
bonds and loans negotiated abroad, all hereafter to be paid 
for in cash and nothing else, attest to every man willing to 
see, that all the avails of our hardy miners in California, with an 
amount equally large in addition is taken from us for the benefit of 
foreign manufacturers, who rejoice and thrive over the prostration 
of our industrial enterprises. 

Resolved, That Congress should, in arranging the detail- of a 
tariff, not only seek to raise sufficient revenue for the support of 
Government, but at the same time discriminate so judiciously in 
the duties upon foreign imports, as to promote all the industrial 
interests of our own country : that all legislation which tends to the 
developement of our own resources, or the diversification of labor 
into different pursuits, or the building up of a home market for 
agricultural products on our own soil, or the carrying out of the 
emphatic declaration of Jefferson that ' : to be independent for the 
comforts of life, we must fabricate them ourselves : we must place 
the manufacturer by the side of the agriculturist," is eminently 
beneficial in its character and conduces to the prosperity, the prog- 
ress, the wealth and the real independence of the Nation: and 
that the present tariff should be so modified, as recommended bv 
President Fillmore and Secretary Corwin, as to make it conform 
to the above principles, and render it what the tariff of the United 
States should be — incidental protection to our own labor. 

ResolvoL That it is the duty of congress to make liberal appro- 
priations for the improvement of the Rivers and 1 1 arbors of the West 
as well as for those of the South and Ea>t: that our internal com- 
merce floating on fresh water, should have equal benefits and equal 
protection with that extended so liberally to the external, or salt 
water commerce of the country, and that no false excuses about ;i 
bill including works of a local character will be any justification 
with the people of the West, for denying them that, which, though 
long and justly claimed, has been so often defeated bv the vetoes of 
Democratic Administrations, or the more recent wilful factiousness 
of Democratic Senators. That this District has peculiar claims 
upon the National Legislature in this respect, being directly into]*- 



politics. 245 

ested in the Harbors at Michigan City and St. Joseph; and that it 
should send a member to represent their claims who can have per- 
sonal influence with his colleagues sufficient to procure for them, 
the vote of at least one other member of his own party from his 
own State. 

Resolved, That we deprecate all those contrivances, whether 
under or without the cover of law. which wink at the pilfering of 
the Government treasury under the pretense of constructive mileage, 
long mileage, Ritchie claims and other kindred absorbents; that 
constructive mileage should be abolished totally and forever; the 
present exorbitant rate of mileage, so greatly disproportioned to 
the expense of travel, reduced at least one-half, and computed, not 
by the easiest but the nearest route; and public contractors com- 
pelled to live up to their obligations without importunate appeals to 
be allowed hundreds of thousands of dollars in addition. 

Resolved, That we are in favor of reducing letter postage to a low 
rate, and the entire abolition of the franking privilege, leaving the 
government and congressmen to pay their own postage the same as 
private citizens. 

Resolved, That as Whigs, we sympathize with the struggles of 
the masses now o-oino- forward in the old world, to throw off the 
shackles which have so long bound them : and to assert that equality 
and independence which we regard as man's birthright. 

Resolved, Unanimously, that we recommend to the voters of 
this Congressional District, Schuyler Colfax, the candidate this day 
nominated, with the assurance to all that he is honest, and would 

irn to betray them, or violate pledges which lie may make, 
capable, possessing talents and a zeal in their exercise which must 
be valuable to the district, and creditable to the councils of the 
Nation, should he be elected, and faithful to the constitution of the 

mtry, regarding its observance as the bond of our union, the$ 
guarantee of our national welfare, and the means of promoting 
internal peace, and hushing the voice of faction and discord, amongst 
our jarring members. 

The resolutions of the two parties given above, exhibit the issues 
which divided them this year and also in the Presidential 
campaign which was soon to follow. The Whig convention at 
Plymouth was presided over by Andrew L. Osborn; Wm. Millikan 
was one of the Secretaries. Mr. Treadway was on the committee 
to report permanent officers of the convention, and Mulford K. 

rrand was made chairman of the District Central committee. 



I 



246 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

The convention seems to have been a most harmonious one. Mr. 
Colfax was nominated unanimously, and the resolutions were unan- 
imously adopted. On the 4th day of June, the LaPorte • ^Y | 
contained the following call for a county convention : 

"RALLY WHIGS ! COUNTY CONVENTION!! 

It: consequence of there being but few in attendance at the con- 
vention on Saturday the 25th, the nomination of candidates for 
State and county officers for this county, was postponed. The cen- 
tral committee have therefore appointed Saturday, the 14th day of 
June next, as a day upon which to hold a Mass County Conven- 
tion in LaPorte, to nominate a candidate to represent this county 
in the next legislature, and also to nominate candidates for coun 
officers. Every Whig in the county is requested to attend. L< 
the townships all be fully and fairly represented. 

The meeting will be organized at 11 o'clock, a. m. 

D. G. Rose, J. B. Fravel, 

Edward Vail, Wm. Millikax: 

Whig Central Committee. 
LaPorte. May 27. 1851." 

The result of the election which followed has already been given. 

The year 1852, was fraught with much deeper interest political 
Franklin Pierce was the Democratic candidate for President, G< 
Winfield Scott the Whig candidate, and John P. Hale the Frt 
Soil candidate. The candidates for Governor, were Joseph A. 
Wright, Democratic, and X! M< I . Whig, and the full 

complement of State officers was voted for. Fo Norman 

Eddy was the Democratic candidate, and Horace P. Piddle, the 
Whiff. The candidates for Judge of the ninth judicial circuit, w^ 
James Bradley and Thomas S. Stanfield; f< :" the court of 

common pleas. Merman Lawson and Mulford K. Farrand were ti 
candidates: for Prosecuting attorney of the circuit court, D. J. 
Woodward and John M. Wilson were the candidate-: for Proscut- 
ing attorney of the common pleas, the candidates were Daniel Noyes 
and A. Dickson: for Representative, the candidates were John < '. 
Walker and Franklin W. Hunt: Samuel Burson and Wm. Allen 
were candidates for Sheriff; Ambrose W. Henly and A'olney W. 



POLITICS. 247 

Bailey were candidates for Clerk : Mark Allen and Edmund S. 
Organ were candidates for Treasurer; Jackson Hosmer and Wm. 
H. Goodhue were candidates for Commissioner; John P. Cathcart 
and Elam Clark were candidates for Surveyor; Henry Fox and E. 
E. Annis were candidates for Coroner. The new constitution was 
in force and the general annual election was for the first time held 
in October. At this election the Democrats succeeded in revolution- 
izing the county, giving a majority to nearly all their candidates. 
They held the county also at the Presidential election in November, 
giving a majority of one hundred and eleven to the Democratic- 
electors. But at this election the Free Soil party cast one hundred 
and thirty-six votes tor the Hale and Julian electors. Among the 
Whig electors were Schuyler Colfax, Richard W. Thompson, John 
Coburn, David Kilgore, Nathan Kimball, Pleasant A. Hackleman 
and Henry S. Lane; and among the Democratic electors, Wm. 
Grose, Ebenezer Dumont, James H. Lane and John A. Hendricks. 
There were a few exceptions to the general Democratic victory at 
the October election. Thomas S. Stanfield received a majority of 
one hundred and sixty-eight over James Bradley ; Mulford K. Far- 
rand received a majority of sixty over 1 i ierman Lawson ; William 
Allen was elected Sheriff over Samuel Burson by twenty-six 
majority; Volney W. Bailey was elected Clerk over A. W. Henly 
by one hundred and twenty-six majority; and Edmund S. Organ 
was elected Treasurer over Mark Allen bv one hundred and eighty- 
one majority. All the rest of the Democrats received majorities 
ranging from forty to one hundred. When it was ascertained that 
as LaPorte county went, so went the State, it was not strange that 
the LaPorte Commercial Times, edited by John C. Walker and 
John W. Holcombe, should insert at the head of its columns, the 
traditional rooster. The rooster occupied his place but looked as 
though he was waiting for the result of the November election 
before he venturea to crow. When that came it gave him the 

opportunity. The Times expressed itself in these words over the 
result in October; 

"nine guns for pierce and king! ! 

Sufficient returns have come in from the elections in Indiana. 
Ohio and Pennsylvania, to indicate the greatest victories ever won 



248 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

by the Democratic party. Each of the States has rolled up over- 
whelming majorities, ranging from twelve to twenty thousand. Let 
the Whigs shut their eyes as they will, and ostrich-like, thrust their 
heads in such twigs of comfort as they can find; let them discover 
as many local issues as they choose, and contrast the present major- 
ities with past votes for Governor; let them reduce the figures as 
low as they will, and count the votes on steamboats and railroad-, 
the great fact cannot be blinked, that the prestige of victory and all 
the omens of triumph cluster around the banner of Democracy. No 
one will believe the miserable subterfuge that the Whig party 
regarded the late elections as of no importance, and made no effort- 
to win the battle. Were it so, such shameful abandonment of the 
post of duty would most surely prove them unfit to be trusted with 
the destinies of the nation. But they did work, with all the frenzv 
of desperation, and their labors were all fruitless; the aspirations 
of the age and the instincts of the people were against them. 
Maine and North Carolina. Iowa and Missouri, Indiana, Ohio and 
Pennsylvania. Florida and South Carolina have taken their posts 
in the line of battle, and will not alter in November, the glorious 
war cry, which they have so proudly flung on the breeze in August 
and October. 

Indiana is the banner State. Governor Wright's majority is 
probably near twenty thousand. In 1849 it was less than ten 
thousand — clear gain of ten thousand. Ten Democrats and only 
one Whiff elected to Congress. In the Legislature there is probably 
on joint ballot a Democratic majority of fifty members. 

Dr. Norman Eddy, Representative elect in our own District, 
received a majority in every county. 

Herman Lawson, our present Sheriff, is elected Judge of the 
court of common pleas in this District, consisting of LaPorte, Porter 
and Lake counties. Majority two. One hundred and fifty-tin 
ballot- <• mtaining the name of James K. Farrand, were thrown out 
as informal. 

In the late election, LaPorte county polled two thousand five 
hundred and eighty-eight votes, distributed as follows among the 
various townships, Michigan : two hundred and eighty-eight ; Spring- 
field, seventy-four: Galena, seventy-three; Hudson, eighty; Cool 



politics. 249 

Spring, eighty-three : Centre, seven hundred and forty ; Kankakee, 
one hundred and forty-five; Wills, one hundred and twenty-one; 
Pleasant, four hundred and twelve; Scipio, one hundred and fifty- 
five: New Durham, one hundred and sixty -four; Clinton, one hun- 
dred and twenty-four; Noble, two hundred and ten; Union, one 
hundred and sixty; Cass, twenty-nine." 

It seems quite evident that in 1852, there was a Democratic tidal 
wave which rolled over not LaPorte county alone, but the whole 
country. The result sounded the knell of the Whig party. It was 
broken up and never again rallied. New departures were taken, 
and out of the disorganized material of which the Whig party was 
composed, augmented by numerous accessions from the anti-slavery 
sentiment of the Democracy, the Republican party was at length 
formed; and parties became divided squarely upon issues growing 
out of slavery. 

At the election of October, 1853, only a few more' than one 
thousand and six hundred votes were polled in LaPorte county. 
The field seems to have been yielded to the Democrats without a 
struggle. The only officers to be elected were Reporter of the 
supreme court, County Auditor and two Commissioners. The vote 
stood as follows: For Reporter supreme court, A. G. Porter, nine 
hundred and ninety-nine votes and James W. Gordon six hundred 
and thirty votes : for County Auditor, Andrew J. Wair, one thou- 
sand and fifteen votes, John S. Allen four hundred and three, and 
Abram Fravel two hundred and twenty votes ; for Commissioners, 
James Drummond, nine hundred and ninetv-six votes, Jacob R. 
Hall, one thousand and seven votes, Phineas Hunt, six hundred 
and seventeen votes and Joseph Orr six hundred votes. 

The election aroused no political feeling : and very little was said 
about it in the press. The following mild utterance is from the 
LaPorte Times, and is about all that was said concerning the 
election of 1853 : 

"OCTOBER ELECTION. 

For some weeks we have had the name of Albert G. Porter at 
the head of our columns as the Democratic nominee for Supreme 
Court Reporter, and we would now call attention to the importance 
of that office, and the election of a fit and competent man to dis- 



250 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

charge its duties. Mr. Porter, as appointee of the Governor, has 
already manifested his entire capacity, and if elected, will do credit 
to the position. There is but one fear on the subject of the October 
election, and that is that the Democracy will not think this matter 
of electing a Reporter of sufficient importance to induce them to 
the polls. This should never be! Let the people show their will 
on every occasion of this kind, for if they do not, there are 
opportunities left open for now and then a most shameful defeat. 
We shall notice this election again." 

New questions now arose, growing out of the Know-Nothing 
excitement and the agitation which attended the passage of the 
Nebraska Bill, and repeal of the Missouri compromise, and at the 
October election of 1854, the average majority against the Demo- 
cratic party was three hundred. The election was for State officer- 
except Governor and Lieutenant Governor, Representative in Con- 
gress, Prosecuting attorney for the circuit court, and also for the 
court of common pleas, Representative to the State legislature and 
several other county officers. The candidates for Congress, Avere 
Schuyler Colfax, and Norman Eddy, and Colfax received one thou- 
sand seven hundred and twenty-nine, votes to one thousand three 
hundred and ninety-nine for Eddy. The candidates for Prosecut- 
ing attorney in the circuit court, were Morgan II. Weir and Don 
J. Woodward, and Weir received tiiree hundred and nine majority. 
James A. Thornton was the Democratic candidate for common 
pleas Prosecutor against Win. C. Talcott, and Talcott received a 
majority of two hundred and forty-five votes. Jacob R. Hall was 
elected Representative to the State legislature against John I 
Walker: Edmund S. Organ was elected County Treasurer agaii 
Orpheus Everts: Win. H. H. Whitehead was elected Sheriff over 
H. P. Lans: the candidates for County commissioner, were 0. F. 
Piper and James Drummond, and Piper was elected; the Candida; 
for County Surveyor, were Daniel M. Learning and John P. Cath- 
cart. and Learning was elected: and Henry W. Fox was elected 
Coroner against Wm. Frv. 

Not much interest was manifested by the people of the county in 
the election of 1< V 5.~>. as there were no officer^ to be elected except a 
Recorder and three Commissions Only about one thousand and 



POLITICS. 251 

nine hundred votes were cast, although there were probably thirty- 
two or thirty-three hundred voters in the county. The Democrats 
were successful and elected all their candidates by majorities ranging 
from ninety-one to two hundred and fifty. Anderson Hupp was elected 
Recorder against Burwell Spurlock, and Asa M. Warren, Aquilla 
W. Rodgers, and H. J. Reese were elected Commissioners against 
Samuel Harvey, Abram Westervelt and George Crawford. 

Prior to 1856, the anti-slavery sentiment of the country had 
become consolidated. It took the form of opposition to the exten- 
sion of slavery into the territories of the United States, and resulted 
in the organization of the Republican party. The larger portion of 
the Whigs found themselves naturally in the new party, most of 
the Free Soilers united with it, and also the large anti-slavery ele- 
ment of the Democratic party. The first national convention of the 
new party met early in 1856, and nominated John C. Fremont for 
President and Wm. L. Dayton for Vice President. The candidates 
of the Democracy were James Buchanan and John C. Breckenridge. 
Oliver P. Morton was the Republican candidate for Governor of 
Indiana, and Ashbel P. Willard, the Democratic candidate. W. Z. 
Stewart was the Democratic candidate for Congress and Schuyler 
Colfax had been nominated by the Republicans for re-election. M. 
H. Weir was the Republican candidate for State Senator, and 
Herman Lawson, the Democratic candidate; and for Jud^e of the 
court of common pleas, the candidates were William C. Talcott, 
Republican, and Daniel Noyes, Democrat. The candidates for 
county officers were as follows, the Democratic candidate for each 
office being first named: For Representative to the State legisla- 
ture, William R. Bowes and George Crawford; for Clerk, C. W. 
Mead and James Moore; for Treasurer, Seth Eason and Abel D. 
Porter; for Sheriff, Nathan Kell and Wm. H. H. Whitehead; for 
Surveyor, John P. Cathcart and Daniel M. Learning; for Coroner, 
Wm. Fry and R. G. Jame^, and for Commissioner, A. W. Rogers 
and El am Clark. 

The Republicans were victorious. The vote was the largest that 
had ever been cast in the county, the total number being four 
thousand five hundred and sixty-three; and the Republican candi- 
dates were all successful by majorities ranging from fifty, to one 



'2')'2 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

hundred and forty-nine. On State officers the average majority 
was one hundred and five. The majority of Mr. Colfax was one 
hundred and thirty. [Morgan H. Weir's majority was one hundred 
and twenty-two. Whitehead's majority was one hundred and 
forty-nine. 

The canvass for the Presidential nominees was still kept up, and 
in November, LaPorte county cast a still larger vote than in October, 
the whole number of votes being four thousand eight hundred and 
nineteen. Of these the Republican electors received two thousand 
five hundred and thirtv-three votes, the Democratic electors two 
thousand two hundred and thirty-nine votes, and there were forty- 
five votes cast for a third electoral ticket. Daniel D. Pratt was the 
Whig elector for the ninth District, and Orpheus Everts the Dem- 
ocratic elector. The whole campaign was one of intense interest 
and excitement, and although the Republican party was defeated 
in its first national contest, and in most of the States, yet the large 
vote it cast, and its many local victories, served to consolidate it and 
prepare it for future success. 

The election of 1.857 was without especial incident. It included 
county officers and Judge of the circuit court, Andrew L. Osborn 
being elected to the latter position by a heavy majority. The can- 
didates for county officers, were for Clerk, James Moore and John 
B. Fravel: for Sheriff, Wm. H. H. Whitehead and Nathan Kell ; 
for Treasurer. Abel D. Porter and Seth Eason: for Auditor. John 
<i. Laird and Thomas Pryce; for Commissioner first District. Esaac 
B. Coplin and Wm. W. Garrard: for Commissioner second District, 
Sidney S. Sabin and Henry P. Lans. Moore. Whitehead, Porter, 
Laird, Coplin and Sabin, all Republicans, were elected by major- 
ities ranging from one hundred and fifty to over four hundred. In 
the case of Laird and Prvce there was a contest on the ground that 
Laird had been elected to the office of Justice of the Peace, within 
four years, which would under the constitution prevent his holding 
any but a judicial" office within that time. It was finallv adjudged 
that neither party was entitled to the office, and Reuben Munday 
was appointed by the commissioners to ^Qvve until the next genei 
election. 

Political excitement became warm again in 1858. The ter 



politics. 253 

that were heard most in the party language of the day were 
"Lecompton Constitution," "Kansas," "Border Ruffianism," 
••Freedom of the Territories," "Non-Extension of Slavery," "Dred 
Scott Decision." All the State officers except Governor were to 
be elected, a member of Congress, and county officers. The Repub- 
licans carried the county on State officers by from five hundred 
and twenty to five hundred and sixtv majority in a total vote of 
five thousand and twenty-six. Schuyler Colfax and John C. 
Walker were the opposing candidates for Congress, and the 
former's majority in the county was five hundred and sixty-five. 
Wm. B. Biddle and James A. Thornton were the opposing candi- 
dates for Prosecuting attorney in the circuit court, and Biddle 
received a majority of live hundred and two. John Walton and 
Theophilus Travel were the opposing candidates for Auditor, and 
Walton was elected. Abel D. Porter was elected Treasurer over 
Truman T. Harris: Joshua S. McDowell was elected Sheriff over 
Levi Ely; Elisha L. Bennett was elected Surveyor over Mundav 
Allen: Luther Brusie was elected Coroner over Henry Ellsworth: 
John Warnock was elected Commissioner over J. W. Butterfield. 
and Wm. H. Scott and M. G. Sherman were elected Representa- 
tives over James Bradley and James Orr. The officers elect were 
all Republicans, and the majorities were generally over five 
hundred. 

The "off year" of 1859 brought out a very light vote, the whole 

%/ CD e/ CD ' 

number cast being only two thousand eight hundred and thirty-five. 
There were but three offices to be filled: Prosecuting attorney 
common pleas court. Recorder, and Commissioner for the second 
District. Joseph M. Dow and Daniel Noyes were the candidates 
for Prosecuting attorney : and Dow, Republican, received a majority 
in this county of one hundred and eighty -four. Luther Mann. Jr.. 
was the Republican candidate for Recorder and Anderson Hupp the 
Democratic candidate for re-election. Hupp was elected by sixty- 
six maiority. Sidney S. Sabin was elected Commissioner against 
Harvey Truesdell, Democrat. 

» 

The country was now becoming deeply moved over questions 
which stirred the popular heart as none had ever done before. The 
storm had been gathering ever since the repeal of the Missouri 



254 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

compromise; the struggles in Kansas had deeply intensified the 
feeling of the people of the North, and John Brown's attempt upon 
Harper's Ferry had been skillfully managed so as to arouse and 
heat the people of the South. That the territories of the United 
State- should be forever consecrated to freedom was the solemn 
determination of a large majority of the people of the North ; and 
that the boundaries of the institution of slavery should not be 
further enlarged. The South, seeking its perpetuation by means of 
enlarged political power, determined that it should not be restricted, 
but should have enlarged privileges. The questions dividing par- 
ties were thus chiefly sectional, and pointed directly to war. In this 
state of the public mind, the Republican party met in national con- 
vention in Chicago, and nominated Abraham Lincoln for President. 
and Hannibal Hamlin for Vice President. The Democratic party 
met at Charleston in South Carolina, and the "fire-eating" element 
of the South, the better to secure their object, the dissolution of the 
Union, broke up the convention. The party afterwards met in the 
city of Baltimore, and there the same turbulent element divided the 
convention, and the result was the nomination of two Democratic 
tickets, Stephen A. Douglas and Herschel V. Johnson for 
President and Vice President on the one side, and John C. Breck- 
enridge and Joseph Lane on the other. Henry S. Lane stood at 
the head of the Republican State ticket, as candidate for Governor 
and Thomas A. Hendricks, at the head of the Democratic ticket. 
In the ninth District Schuyler Colfax was again the Republican 
candidate for Congress and the Democrats pitted against him the 
veteran Charles W. Cathenrt. Daniel Noyes and Elisha Egbert 
were the opposing candidates for Judge of the court of common 
pleas. The candidates for county offices were as follows : For 
Clerk, James Moore and C. C. Morrical; for Sheriff, Joshua S. 
McDowell and Richard Huncheon : for Treasurer, Reginald H. 
Rose and Truman T. Harris : For Coroner, Ludwig Eliel and 
Robert Friedel; for Surveyor, Edward H. Learning and John P. 
Cathcart: for Commissioner, Isaac B. Coplin and Ephraim Barney; 
for Representatives to the State legislature. Samuet Harvey and 
Mason G. Sherman, Republicans, and Irwin S. Jessup and Henry 
P. Lans, Democrats. The candidates for State Senator, were 
Abraham Teejmrden and Henrv Hisjo-ins. 



politics. 255 

The position which the Republican party maintained on slavery 
questions may be seen in the following resolutions found in the 
State Republican platform of that year : 

"Resolved, That we are opposed to the new and dangerous doc- 
trine advocated by the Democratic party, that the Federal consti- 
tution carries slavery into the public territories, and that we 
believe slavery cannot exist anywhere in this government, unless by 
positive local law, and that we will oppose its extension into the ter- 
ritories of the Federal Government by all the power known to the 
constitution of the United States. 

Resolved, That we are opposed to any interference with slavery 
where it exists under the sanction of State law. that the soil of 
every State should be protected from lawless invasions from every 
quarter, and that the citizens of every State should be secured from 
illegal arrests and search, as well as from mob violence." 

They also embodied the following in the platform: 

Resolved, That we regard the preservation of the American 
Union as the highest object and duty of patriotism, and that it 
must and shall be preserved, and that all who advocate disunion are, 
and deserve the fate ot, traitors." 

Other questions formed issues between the parties, but the chief 
and most important by far, the overshadowing ones, were those 
growing out of the institution of slavery and the attitude of the 
South with respect to it, and also towards the Union. Threats of 
secession in case of the election of Mr. Lincoln were freely made, 
and the leaders in the violence which characterized the proceedings 
in the South, were more deeply in earnest than the people of the 
North generally supposed. The campaign was distinguished, 
besides the usual processions and speeches, by a Republican organ- 
ization known as Wide Awakes, which adopted a simple uniform, 
and were provided with torch lamps, fixed on poles, and thus added 
much to the interest of night meetings. The company of Wide 
Awakes which existed in LaPorte, was drilled by Gen. Newell 
Gleason, in the manner of handling their lamp sticks according to 
the manual of arms. In one year from that time many of the same 
persons were drilling with arms, preparatory to fighting the battles 
of the nation against a section of country which had wantonly risen 



256 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

in rebellion. The political pulse beat high in both parties, ^ r reat 
political gatherings were frequent, and processions and enthusiasm 
filled up the days and the night-. At length the day of the October 
election came, and the Republicans were completely successful. 
The average majority which the county gave on the State ticket n 
nine hundred and eighty-five. Colfax's majority for congres- \ 
one thousand and five. Egbert's majority for Judge was four hun- 
dred and seventy. Teegarden's majority for the State Senate v. 
one thousand and three. The Republican majority on county 
offices was from seven hundred to one thousand majority. The 
whole number of votes cast was five thousand and fifteen. But the 
great event was still to occur — the Presidential election in November. 
At this election there were four electoral tickets in the field, those 
headed by the candidates already named, and the Union party 
ticket, headed by John Bell and Edward Everett. Each of them 
were voted for in this county. The county filled three places on 
electoral tickets. John C. Walker was on the Douglas Democratic 
ticket for the State at lar^e. James Bradlev was on the Brecken- 
ridge Democratic ticket for the ninth District, and John P. Early 
<»n the Bell and Everett electoral ticket for the ninth District. 
The Lincoln electoral ticket received two thousand nine hundred 
and sixtv-seven: the Douglas ticket, one thousand six hundred and 
six: the Bell and Everett ticket, twenty-seven, and the Brecken- 
ridge ticket, four hundred and seventy-four, the number of votes 
cast being five thousand and seventy-four. The Republican 
majority over all was eight hundred and sixty; and over the 
Douglas-Democratic ticket, one thousand three hundred and sixty- 
one. ( hi the next day after the election, the LaPorte Union had 
this to say : 

•"LaPorte county is entitled to the Banner. Lincoln's majority 
in this county is probably one thousand four hundred over Douglas. 
The Breckenridge vote in the county is about five hundred. 

In this citv the vote was as follows: For Lincoln nine hundred 
and twenty-seven; for Douglas, three hundred and eighty-nini 
Breckenridge, ninety-five, and Bell, seventeen. 

Sr. Joseph county gives Lincoln nine hundred majority. 

The result is better than we had hoped for; but we arc none the 



MILITARY RECORD. 305 

5. Regiments will, if time permits it, be formed of companies 
from the same Congressional District. If time will not allow, com- 
panies will be assigned to regiments according to the date of tneir 
report, as above designated. 

6. Respect for the five regiments sent from Indiana to the 
Mexican war, and avoidance of historical confusion hereafter, re- 
quire that regiments should be numbered in order beginning with 
the sixth. 

7. Companies not already uniformed will take no step about 
uniforming until they know the regiment they are attached to. 

8. Arms will be distributed to accepted companies as soon as 
possible. If not distributed before marching to the place of ren- 
dezvous, patience must be exercised. 

9. If practicable, an inspecting officer will be sent to such com- 
panies, notice being given of the time of his coming. 

10. Accepted companies must not wait for arms, but begin their 
drill immediately. 

11. All communications touching arms, place of rendezvous, and 
organization, must be addressed to this office. 

12. Notice of time and place of general rendezvous will be given 

in future orders. 

Lewis Wallace, Adjutant Gen. Ind. Militia. 

On the same day, President Lincoln issued his call for 75,000 
men. But recruiting had already begun in La Porte ; from all over 
the county they came, and in a very few days, two companies were 
ready to take the field. From the Herald we take the following 
account of the departure of the first Volunteer company from La- 
Porte : 

"Last Monday morning was the time set for Capt. D. J. Wood- 
ward's company of volunteers to leave La Porte for Camp Morton, 
at Indianapolis, and at an early hour our streets became thronged 
with both our citizens and those from the country, to witness the 
interesting spectacle. The various fire companies and the German 
Rifle company were out, accompanied by Frisbee's silver band, and 
added much to the occasion. The company were drawn up in line 
in front of the Court House, and answered to the call of the roll, 
and received the warm congratulations of many sincere friends, 

20 



►6 BISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

after which they marched to the depot and went aboard the special 
train Diovided for the occasion to take them to the Crossing. The 
crowd at the depot was really immense, many of whom manifested 
decided sadness and grief at the parting of near and dear friends, 
perhaps never to see them more. We saw many weeping bitterly 
as they pressed perhaps for the last time the hand of a husband, 
brother or son, and bid him God speed in his noble undertaking. 
Capt. Woodward was particularly affected, as well as many of his 
company. At about half after nine o'clock the train started, amid 
the cheers of the vast multitude. The fire companies and many 
citizens went aboard the cars and accompanied the volunteers as 
far as the Crossing. Frisbee's Silver Band continued with the 
company to Indianapolis, where they intend to offer their servic 
to their country. 

This company is finely officered and contains as brave and trusty 
men as our county affords. Capt. Woodward makes a splendid 
officer and commands the respect of the whole company. Lieut-. 
Patton, Carter and Richards, are also of the right stripe, and worthy 
of the positions they severally occupy." 

This company united with the celebrated ninth Indiana Rc_ - 
ment under command of Col. R. H. Milroy, participated in the 
first campaign in West Virginia, and at the close of the three 
months' service returned to La Porte, and was reorganized for the 
three years' service. Before taking the field Capt. Woodward v. 
made Major of the Regiment; Lieut. Patton, Captain, and Second 
Lieut. Carter. First Lieutenant. Michigan City was also on fire 
with patriotic fervor, and organized and sent forward a company 
under command of Capt. Win. J I. Blake, which reached the ren- 
dezvous in time to gain admission into the ninth for the three 
month's service. The complete roster of these two companies will 
be given elsewhere in this history. But far more than enough 
came forward to fill up these two companies, and another company 
was speedily organized, and called the La Porte Zouaves: with the 
intention of gaining admission into Lew Wallace's Zouave Regi- 
ment, the eleventh Indiana. It serves to show how thoroughly the 
war spirit of the people of the whole State was aroused, that not- 
withstanding the La Porte Zouaves were ready on the fifteenth, yet 



MILITARY RECORD. 307 

they could not obtain acceptance. On Monday, the fifteenth of 

April, a telegram was sent to Gen. Wallace, to which the following 

reply was returned : "Zouave Regiment and requisition all full. 

Lew Wallace." 

Another despatch was sent, and the reply came: 

" To A. Teegarden : — No chance to get in — no more companies 

can be received. 

Lew Wallace." 

The members of the company still did not despair, and on the 
same night, they met and elected officers: James H. Shannon, 
Captain; H. M. Brusie, first Lieutenant, J. E. Sweet, second 
Lieutenant; A. H. Dustin, third Lieutenant; B. F. Coleman, 
Ensign; E. S. Abbey, first Sergeant; David Seeholtz, second 
Sergeant; Hiram Stewart, third Sergeant; Simon P. Montgomery, 
fourth Sergeant; S. R. Culp, first Corporal; Charles M. Berrick, 
second Corporal; N. M. Kinsley, third Corporal; Joseph Sutton, 
fourth Corporal. 

Much to their regret, they were unable to get into any regiment 
at the time, but most of them afterwards joined the twentieth regi- 
ment for the three year's service. The names of the members are 
here given in full: 

"J. H. Shannon, J. E. Sweet, E. S. Abbey, G. W. Fosdick, C. 
Fradenburgh, N. McKinney, L. Woodworth, H. M. Kendall, B. F. 
Coleman, 0. M. Harvey, A. B. Hendricks, W. H. Huntsman, L. 
M. B. Jones, Charles M. Berrick, John C. Holton, Mack Graham, 
Daniel S. Garlick, R. W. Comfort, Geo. R. Abbott, Harrison 
Stewart, Lewis Roberts, Willis Francis, Wm. Cannell, S. E. Hard- 
ing, Win. King, W. S. Stinchcomb, John W. Andrew, John C. 
Lloyd, Orson Howard, Wm. Hecker, Henry Hagenbuck, James D. 
Kent, Charles Clarkson, Michael Halsey, A. H. Lamb, Joseph 
Noll, Henry J. Weckerlin, Simon P. Montgomery, Samuel R. 
Culp, Dennis F. Vandusen, Clayton Price, J. D. Taylor, J. W. 
Carrier, Alonzo Sturges, G. J. Emery, John B. Catlin, T. C. 
Weed, Stephen K. Grover, Oscar Harris, Jesse B. Miller, Philetus 
Downing, Geo. Rodefer, Henry Guise, Thomas Hntchins, H. 
Austin, J. Biege, Wm. W. Weber, D. F. Beach, G. A. Whittaker, 
Wm. B. Smith, John H. Hendricks, Kenyon Hyatt, H. W. Brusie, 



308 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Lew J. Bryant, David Wright, Wm. H. Martin, Asher Proud, 
David Shultz, Timothy Mulqueen, Emulus Travis, John Mont- 
gomery, John T. Gulp, Cornelius Vandusen, Henry Cramer, Thomas 
Sloane, Scott Whitman, Jno. A. Sloane, Jno. Miller, Jasper Rhodes, 
R. P. Miles, Allen C. Austin, H. Burford, Jesse F. Bagley, Samuel 
Dustin, Thomas Cunningham, Wm. E. Alsop, John Gaa, P. V. 
Husten, N. B. Easton, A. B. Austin, Orrin Moon, Joseph Sutton, 
Wm. M. Bennett, Samuel Huston, Henry Steffer, Joseph Lloyd, 
Oscar Bear, Samuel Moser, David Pealer, Jas. N. Marvin, Ezra 
H. Gould, Thomas E. Chamberlain, James Halpin, Theo. Romans. 
Chas. A. Davidson, J. Fradenburg, Hiram Crawford, Geo. Storr-. 
Jas. Andrew, Alfred Fradenburg, Benj. Matchett. Henry Miller, 
W. C. Hall, Andrew Savior, Geo. Drawley, J. X. Cissna, E. J. 
Kelsey, C. D. Vanwagnen, Geo. W. Blackman, Chas. Barringer, 
Reuben Mapes, Wm. Shelley, Samuel Locker, John Blank."' 

Meanwhile the citizens were actively engaged in devising ways 
and means for the care of soldiers' families, and the wants and 
necessities of the men who were leaving home so suddenlv. without 
the opportunity to make proper preparations for their own comfort 
or that of their families. The following account of a meeting: of 
the citizens held on the twenty -fourth day of April will show how 
promptly and effectively they came into the great relief work, which 
continued during the entire war: 

" At a public meeting at Huntsman 1 Tall on Wednesday after- 
noon, twenty-fourth instant, to consult about the great crisis we are 
now involved in and how it had better be met, on motion of Gen. 
Orr, Hon. Chas. W. Cathcart was elected President. On taking 
the chair Mr. Cathcart responded to repeated calls in one of the 
most eloquent and patriotic speeches ever delivered in La Port* 1 
which was received with great demonstrations of enthusiasm. The 
following named gentlemen were selected as Vice Presidents: 
James Forrester. Jas. Bradley, A. L. Osborn. and Amzi Clark. 
John Millikan, C. G. Powell, and Wm. II. Scott were appointed 
Secretaries. 

Patriotic and eloquent speeches were made by Judge Osborn, 
Wm. Frazier of Illinois, and Wm. J. Walker, all of which had the 
true ring in them. The foil* -wing preamble and resolutions wore 
offered and after being read were unanimously adopted: 



MILITARY RECORD. 309 

Whereas, In certain States in this Union, an armed rebellion 
has been organized, having for its avowed object the overthrow of 
the government of the United States; and, whereas, the authors 
and leaders of this rebellion have, by violence, seized several forts 
and arsenals belonging to the United States, and have plundered 
the government of large sums of money, arms and other property ; 
and, whereas, Fort Sumter, belonging to the United States, and 
over which the government had exclusive jurisdiction, has been 
besieged by a large army of rebels, and assaulted by a destructive 
cannonade, until the heroic Maj. Anderson, and his little, but gal- 
lant band, exhausted by hunger and fatigue, were compelled to haul 
down the national flag and surrender the fortress into the hands of 
armed traitors; and, whereas, the President of the United States, 
in obedience to his constitutional obligations has called upon the 
loyal States to aid him in the enforcement of the laws, in the recov- 
ery of the national property and the preservation of the govern- 
ment; therefore, 

Resolved, That we the citizens of La Porte County, now assem- 
bled, without distinction of party, will to the utmost of our ability 
aid the President of the United States, with men and means, in 
crushing this rebellion, in the recovery of the national property, in 
the preservation of our government and in the enforcement of its 
laws. 

Resolved, That this meeting, in view of the unsettled and alarm- 
ing condition of our national affairs, recommend that volunteer com- 
panies may be organized in every convenient district in La Porte 
County, and that they be officered, drilled and held in readiness to 
meet any call that may be made by the Governor of this State or 
the President of the United States for volunteers. 

Resolved, That all patriotic citizens who are willing to contribute 
to the support of the families of our volunteers during their absence 
be invited to call on Harvey Truesdell, Sutton Vanpelt and Henry 
Lusk, the committee on the volunteer fund and subscribe such an 
amount as they are willing to give for such object. 

Resolved, That all who are willing to contribute blankets, and 
comforts or clothing for the use of volunteers be requested to leave 
them with the Mayor of the city of La Porte, who will mark them 
and if not used will return them to the donors of said articles. 

M. H. Weir read the following resolutions which were adopted by 
a unanimous vote : 

Resolved, That our Senator and Representatives in the State 
Legislature from this county be requested to use their utmost 



310 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY, 

endeavors, to procure the passage of a law. at the present extra 
session, so amending the act of 1852 pertaining to the duties and 
powers of the County Commissioners as to enable the Commission- 
ers of the different counties of this State, in their discretion to 
appropriate money from the County Treasury, to aid in the support 
of the families of such of the Indiana volunteers of 1861, and during 
the present troubles, as shall stand in need of such aid. 

R> /. That the Secretary of this meeting be instructed to 

forward a copy of the above resolution to our Senator and each of 
our Representatives at Indianapolis. 

At this stage of the proceedings Gen. Orr stated that the citizens 
here had authorized those volunteers who resided in the country 
and wished to remain in La Porte while preparing to go away, to 
board at the hotels of the city, and that in so doing there was an 
accumulated debt due to said hotel keepers of one hundred and sixty 
dollars, about half of which had been paid — the balance he proposed 
should be made up at once, which was done in a few minutes. This 
was independent of the relief fund for the families of the volunteers. 
The Union Mills band was present and discoursed fine music at times 
during the meeting." At a previous meeting, the following proceed- 
ings were had : 

"Mayob's Office. April 19th, 1861. 

The subscribers to the fund for the support of the families of 
Volunteers to aid in the suppression of the Southern rebellion, met 
for the purpose of forming an organization in furtherance of the 
object of such 'subscription. 

The Mavor was called to the chair. On motion. W. C. Hannah. 
H. TruesdelLHenry Lusk and S. Van Pelt were appointed a com- 
mittee to report at a subsequent meeting a plan for the collection 
and disbursement of the funds that have been, and may be. subscribed. 

The meeting then adjourned till tomorrow at ten o'clock a. m. 

April 20th: — The meeting was called to order pursuant to ad- 
journment. < > i i motion. A. L. Osborn was electe-l Chairman, and 
AY. B. Biddle was chosen Secretary. 

The committee heretofore appointed to devise a plan for the 
collection and disbursement of funds, as a report, submitted the 
following propositions : That each volunteer be requested to report to 
the Mayor, the number, names, ages, sexes and place of residence 



MILITARY RECORD. 311 

of his family ; and in case they shall fail to furnish the same the 
information shall be obtained from other reliable sources. 

That a committee of three citizens be appointed by this meeting 
whose duty it shall be to collect and expend the money which has 
been, or shall be, subscribed for the purpose aforesaid. 

That said committee shall from time to time inquire into, and 
keep themselves advised of the situation and wants of said families, 
and to provide for and supply all such necessary wants during the 
absence of such volunteers. 

That the said committee be authorized to make assessments pro 
rata upon the subscriptions, and to collect the same as often as may 
be necessary to defray the expenses of providing for such families in 
the manner aforesaid. 

That the committee shall have general powers and discretion in 
the collection and management of said fund, and in the disburse-, 
ment of it, and may appoint as many assistants as they may deem 



necessarv. 



S. Vanpelt, 
H. Lusk, 
9 H. Truesdell, 

W. C. Hannah. 

On motion, the report was concurred in. It was moved and 
seconded that Harvey Truesdell, Sutton Vanpelt and Henry Lusk 
constitute said committee, which motion prevailed. 

A motion to empower said committee to fill all vacancies which 
may occur therein, was carried. 

On motion, it was resolved that if any person who has subscribed 
to said relief fund shall enlist as a soldier, such person shall be 
released from his subscription. 

On motion, J. A. Caldwell, C. Fredrickson, and John Suther- 
land, were appointed a committee to collect money to furnish vol- 
unteers with such clothing as may be necessary for their present 
use, and to pay other incidental expenses. 

W. C. Hannah presented the following resolutions: 

Resolved, That the General Assembly of this State be requested 
to enact a law at its special session about to convene, authorizing 
the Boards of County Commissioners of the several counties of this 
State to make such appropriations of money from time to time, 



312 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

to be paid out of their respective county treasuries, as they 
may deem necessary and proper for the support of the families of 
such citizens of their respective counties as shall enroll themselves 
as volunteers, and be mustered into the service of the United States, 
to aid in the suppression of the Southern rebellion. 

Resolved, That copies of the foregoing resolution be forwarded 
by the Chairman and Secretary of this meeting to the President of 
the Senate and speaker of the House of Representatives. 

On motion the resolutions were adopted. 

The meeting then adjourned. 

A. L. Osborn, Chairman. 
"W. B. Biddle, Secretary. 

Such was the spirit which animated the people of La Porte 
county, when the first notes of war broke upon the country. The 
great heart of the people was enlisted. The young and middle-aged 
came forward by hundreds, and stepped promptly into the ranks 
for the nation's defense. The women were aroused, and all over the 
county relief societies were organized, and from that time forward 
during all the months and years of the war, their solemn vigils 
were kept, and they refused to know relaxation or weariness in 
their noble work of supplying comforts to* diseased, and wounded, 
and suffering men. Citizens whose age or circumstances prevented 
them from bearing a part in the heat and burdens, and dangers of 
the field, freely contributed of their means, to aid the families of 
those who went out and might never return, and many of whom 
left their bodies in the soil of the South. To all this, there were 
some exceptions. There were those, not many, but some, who 
expressed the hope that the soldiers might never return, who knew 
for them no better name than "Lincoln hirelings," and who refused 
to aid the grand cause by money, or work, or word. Their punish- 
ment has long since come. It is that they never can leel the pride 
which swells the heart of him or her who helped to prevent the 
nation's overthrow. They must always hold concealed within their 
breasts, the humiliating knowledge that the glorious triumph was 
achieved without their assistance, and in spite of their sympathy 
with a rebellion which had for its object the dismemberment of 
the nation. 

It is quite impossible to follow each man who went from La Porte 
county into the service of his country. It would involve the whole 



MILITARY RECORD. 



313 



history of the war, of every campaign East and West, and of a large 
proportion of the battles that were fought, for in nearly every part 
of the great field of operations, the soldiers of La Porte county were 
to be found. The writer has thought best therefore, after detailing 
the first magnificent uprising of our people, noi to indulge in many 
general remarks, but to give a list complete of the soldiers who en- 
listed from this county, with the military history of each, as far as 
it has been practicable to obtain it, together with a brief history of 
each regiment that was organized in this county, or contained as 
much as one full Company from the county. This will include the 
following regiments and batteries, the Ninth, Fifteenth, Twenty- 
ninth, Forty-eighth, Seventy-third, Seventy-fourth, Eighty-seventh, 
One Hundred and Twenty-eighth, Twelfth Cavalry ; Fourth, Fifth 
and Twenty-first batteries. This register will be made up from the 
report of the Adjutant General of the State, Gen. Wm. H. H. 
Terrell, to which work we are also largely indebted for the historical 
account of the regiments and batteries named. The residences of 
the men of the Batteries named are not given in the report, and 
hence it is possible that our list herein will not be as complete and 
accurate as is desirable, though very few, if any of the names will 
be omitted. It will be a surprise to many to see the long roll of 
names which indicate better than anything that could be said, how 
grandly La Porte county upheld the hands of the government, when 
bloody treason attacked the integrity of the Union. These lists of 
names are replete with eloquence greater than language can com- 
mand, showing the power of a tree people, and that La Porte coun- 
ty, in the nation's great crisis furnished no mean army in itself. 

NINTH REGIMENT— THREE MONTHS SERVH7 



• 


COMPANY " 


B." 


•' 


Niemer, Gus. April 25, 


61; 


1st Serg't, 


mustered out 


Jones, Byron C. " 




Sergeant, 




a 


Copp, Wm. " 




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Fry, Robert " 




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James, John " 




Corporal, 




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Ward, Wm. " 




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Young, Henry " 




Musician, 




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Durham, James H. " 




a 




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314 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



Allen, Hiram April 25, 61; 
Ashton, Simon 
Baldwin, James 

Bemiss George 
Boothroyd, Edward 
Brockway, Asahel 
Brothers, Elisha 
Butterfield, John" 
Burns. John 
Crainer, John 
Felt, Orson B. 
Forbes, George 
Fowler, John D. 
Fraser, Wm. W. 
Gline Nelson 
Glnck, Louis 
Gluck, Frederick 
Hamilton, Robert 
Hall, William 
Harding, Joseph 
Hainer, Daniel 
Hieshler, Adam 
Hildebrand, Francis " 
Jones, Henry 
Lockwood James, 
McCormick, James 
McClurg, Thomas 
Miller, Talcott 
Noseworthy, Wm. 
Ogden, George 
^eabody, Samuel 
to aiu Morris 
ment has n T iam 
which swelC hn T 
nation s oven 
breasts, the h lc 
achieved without 
with a rebellio 
the nation. m 

It is quite imp*, 
county into the sen 



mustered out July 29, '61. 



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MILITARY RECORD. 315 

Smith, Henry April 25, '61; mustered out July 29, '61. 

Thompson, Nelson " " " 

Thornton William " 

Thornton Samuel 

Vanostrand, Jerome " " " 

Vesper, Augustus " " " 

Wilcox, Wm. R. " " " 

Wilson, James " 

Wood, Henry H. 

Young, Charles 

COMPANY "F." 

Stebbins, Frank Apr. 24,'61; 1st Serg't, mustered out July 29, '61. 

Andrews, John W. 

Wing, Seneca 

Wetherby, Chas. J. 

Brashaw, Walter, 

Wilbraham, Joseph 

Merritt, Wm. H. 

Miner, David 

Collins, James 

Stanton, Alonzo B. 

Anderson, Charles 

Bailey, Lorene M. 

Barts, John 

Barnes, Jackson 

Barnes, John 

Baker, David 

Boyd, George 

Brink, John 

Brisack, Judson F. 

Brown, Calvin C. 

Butler, Newton 

Conant, Edwin C. 

Conant, Albert S. 

Cox, Samuel T. 

Cubben, Edward 

Finley, James 

Fosdick, Aaron 

Gast, Peter 

Gates, Columbus 

George, Amos 



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316 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



George, William Apr. 24, '61 ; 

Hallock, Elias B. 
Hauserman, August 
Hendrickson, Cam 
Hosier, Harrison 
Holland, Stephen C. 
Holliday, William 
Johnson, Andrew 
Koon, Henry 
Kreighbaum, Edwin 
Lewis, Charles 
Low, Simon 
Lyman, Henry 
Lynn, Swen 
Maloon, George W. 
McCollum, Benj. F. 
Milliken, Jared L. 
Morenas, Burr 
Morehead, Samuel 
Munger, Ira A. 
Oaks, Eli 
Peterson, John M. 
Phillips, Lyman 
Pierce, Smith D. 
Reynolds, David B. 
Reynolds, Stephen 
Rollins, Stephen 
Rudd, William 
Sampson, Newland 
Soulter, John M. 
Shaw, Wm. H. 
Smith, Charles L. 
Snyder, John 
Sales, Charles A. 
Stokes, Clayton, 
Thornton, Robinson 
Turner, Perry 
Van Alter, William 
Van Acker, George 
Van Ostrand, Isaac 
Van Wert, William 
Walter, Henry 
Warner, Cyprian G. 



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mustered out July 24-, '61. 

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MILITARY RECORD. 317 

Sam'l 0. Gregory, Served but was never mustered. 

Ed. L. Ephlin, April 27; Fife Major, mustered out July 29, '61. 

Don. J. Woodward, " 26; Major, mustered out with Regiment. 

Daniel Meeker, " 30; Surgeon, mustered out with Regiment. 

Mason G. Sherman, " 30; Asst. Surg. " " 

Wm. H. Blake, " 25; Capt. B. 

Thos. J. Patton, " " F. " 

AsahelK. Bush, " 1st Lieut. B. " " 

George H. Carter, " " F. « 

Alson Bailey, " 2nd Lieut. B. " 

Joseph Richards, " " F. " 



NINTH REGIMENT— THREE YEARS SERVICE. 

COMPANY "B." 

McCormick, James 1st Serg't, promoted 2d Lieut. 

Butterfield, John Sept. 5, '61; Ser't, dischg'd June 12, '62 — wo'ds. 
Craner, John " " Promoted 2d Lieut. 

Leonard, Isaac N. " " Promoted 2d Lieut. 

Young, Charles " " Killed, Chiam'ga, Sep. 19, '63. 

Gluck, Lewis C. " Corporal; Reduced at own request; 

mustered out Aug. 27, '64. 
Vesper, Augustus Sept. 5, '61; " Vet.; must, out Sept. 28, '65. 
Bartlett, Jonas " " Wou'd Shiloh; dis. July 1, '62 

Dunham, George A. " " Dis. May 5, '62 — disability. 

Roberts, Lewis " " Wou'd Shiloh ; died May 8, '62 

King, Leverett E. " " App'd Serg.; Cap'd Chicamau- 

ga; must, out Aug. 27, '64. 
Franklin, Benj. Sept. 5,' 61; " App'd 1st Serg.; died at Mich. 

City, Oct. 15, '63; wounds received at Chicamauga. 
Mills, Gordon, Sept. 5, '61; Wagoner, dis'd Aug 5/62 — disability. 
Andrews, Daniel W. Sep. 5,'61; Ap'd Ser.; must, out Aug. 27, '64. 
Barnes, James P. Sept. 5, '61 ; Veteran, must, out Sept. 28, '65, as 

absent sick at Indianapolis. 
Bales, Nathan W. " Discharged March 10, '63 — disability. 
Beekman, August " Mustered out Aug. 27, '64. 
Bingham, Warren C. " Wo'd Chicamauga, mus. out Aug. 27, '64 
Blackman, Geo. W. " Wou'd Shiloh; Discharged July 8, '62. 
Bolton, Robert " Killed at Shiloh, April 7, '62. ' 

Butler, Calvin 0. " Vet.; deserted New Orleans, July 12, '65. 
Clarkson, Julius L. " Wou'd at Shiloh ; Dis. June 20, '62. 
Disbrow, Lemuel S. " Vet.; Killed at Kenesaw, June 20, '64. 



318 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



Donnell, Robert Sept. 5,'61 : Veteran ; mustered out Sept. 28, '< >•". 



Earle, George 
Edwards, Gus. H. 
Ensign, Richard P. 
English, Carlos 
Fvler, Sheldon H. 
Galloway. Harry H. 
Gordon, James 
Gluck, George C. 
Guenther, Henry 
Harrold, David 
Holmes, Peter D. 
Hunt, Otis 
Hall, Thomas 
Jackson, Andrew B. ' 
Lanphier, DeWitt C. ' 
Lindley, James S. 
Lyon, Amos A. 
Mack. James 
Mason, Elmore S. 
Malev, Dennis 
McDonald, Alex. L. 



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Died. Cheat Mt., Va., Oct. 30, '61, disease 

Died June 4, '64; Wou'd rec'dat Dallas. 

Vet.; app'd Corp.; must, out Sep. 28/65. 

Discharged July 8, '62. 

Dis. Oct. 17 '62— disability. 

Dis. May 5, '62 — disability. 

Vet.; app'd Corp.; mus. out Sep. 28. '65. 

Mustered out Aug. 27, '64. 

Discharged Aug. 5, '65. 

Discharged, disability. 

Vet.; mustered out Sept. 28, 65. 

Died at Huntsville, Ala., Aug. 2, '62. 

Discharged Jul} T 8, '62 — disability. 

Vet.; mustered out Sept. 28, '6o. 

Mustered out Aug. 27, '64. 

Deserted at Louisville, Oct. 8, '62. 

Cap. at Chicm'ga; mus. out Oct. 15, '64. 

Vet.; died July 4, '64 ; wo'd re. Kenesaw. 

Mustered out August 27, '64. 

App'd Sergt.; mustered out July 6, '60. 

Veteran; " " " 

Vet.; app'd Serg., 1st Serg., Serg. Maj. ; 



McGuigan Thos. F. 

must, out Sept. '65. 
Miller, George Sept. 5,'61; Discharged May 27, '62 — disability. 



Mitchell, Isaac F. 
Murswick, Charles 
Pettis, Morris E. 
Phelps, Eli F. 
Pierce, Allen L. 
Pierce, Chester G. 
Pollard Henrv H. 
Replogle, John 
Ring, Joshua 
Rood, Leonard 
San ford, Albert 
Shawn, John R. 
Sutton Etsel A. 
Sutton, William L. 
Sweet, William 
Teeple, Charles B. 
Thompson, Gus. A. 



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Mustered out Aug. 27, '64. 
Vet.: killed at Atlanta, Aug. 20, '64. 
Woun'd Shiloh; discharged June 2, '62. 
Wou'd Chica'ga; must, out Aug. 27. '64. 
Veteran: must, out Sep. 28, ^65. 
Wou'd at Shiloh: dis. June 27. '62. 
Mustered out Aug. 27. '64. 

C< U u 

Discharged Nov. 28, '61 — disability. 
Discharged June 28, '62 — disability. 
Died Cheat Mt., Dec. 20,'62— disease. 
Discharged, October 28, '61 — disability. 
Mustered out Aug. 27, '64. 

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Transferred to V. R. C, Oct. 29, '63. 
Wou'd Shiloh; discharged June 20, '62. 
Veteran : deserted at New Orleans. 



MILITARY RECORD. 



319 



Tozier, Reuben Sept. 
Trigg, James 
Trull, Andrew J. 
Van Winkle, Levi 
Vesper, John 
Warnock, Chas. C. 
Webster, Wm. B. 
Wilcox, Stephen 0. 
Williams, Lewis 
Williams, Evan 
Williams, John 
Williams, Wm. T. 
Wilson, Canning 



5,'61 ; Transferred V. R. C, Feb. 19, '63, 
" Vt.; ap'd Hsp. Ste'd; mus. o. Sep. 28, '65. 
" C'p Chica'a ; killed Indi'lis, by pro guard. 

" App'd Serg't; must, out Aug. 27, '64. 
" Mustered out Aug. 27, '64. 

Discharged Oct. 30, '61 — disability. 
" Dis. May 26, '63 ; wo'd rec. at Sto. River. 
6i Wou'd at Greenbrier; dis. Jan. 21, '62. 

Veteran; mustered out Sept. 28, '65. 
" Wou'd Shiloh; discharged July 8, '62. 
" Died, Fetterman, Va., Jan. 29, '62 — dis'e 
" Discharged June 3, '62 — disability. 

Aug. 21, '62— disability. 
Bartlett, Jonas H. Jan. 15,'63: Wou'd, Chicm'ga; dis. July 25, '64 
Collins, Elijah March 26, '63; Desert. May 20, '63, ret. Apr. 5, '64, 

deserted April 29, '64. 
Donnell, John Feb. 20, '64; Mustered out Sept. 28, '65. 
Garland, Benjamin " " " as absent sick. 

Garland, Peter " " " 

Harrold, Joseph Dec. 20,'61; Wou'd Shiloh; must, out Dec. 20, '64. 
Harrold, Thornton F. " Killed, Kenesaw, June 20, '64. 
Hart, Lewis A. Feb. 20, '64; Wounded Atlanta, August 20, '64; 

mustered out May 24, '65. 
Herbert, Clarence Feb. 20, '64; Mustered out Sept. 28, '65. 
Myers, Nelson E. " Ap'd Corporal; Sergeant; mustered 

out September 28, '65. 

COMPANY "0." 

Peasley, Charles Sept. 5,'61; Veteran; deserted Nov., '64, returned 

Feb. '65, mustered out September 28, '65. 
Peasley, David Sept. 5, '61; Des. from June 26 to Aug. 29, '62, 

and Dec. '64 to March '65; veteran, must, out Sept. 15, '64. 

COMPANY "D." 

Ottomeier, Ferd. Sept. 7, '61; Wo'd Kene'w; must, out Sep. 6, '64. 
Shannon, Thomas H. " Deserted October 24, '62. 



COMPANY "E." 
Hamilton, James Sept. 5, '61 ; Capt'd at Chicamauga, Sept. 19, 63. 



Harrel John 



Deserted June 28, '62. 



320 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



DRAFTED. 

Lindley, John Oct. 7, '64; Mustered out June 20, '65. 
Pease, John F. Nov. 29, '64; " " July 24, '65. 

COMPANY "G." 

McCreery, Alvin 0. Sept. 5, '61; Vet.; mustered out Sept. 28, '6b. 
Robinson, Christo'pr " Wou'd and Captured at Chicamauga. 
Rust, Dennis M. " Dis. March 11, '62— disability. 

RECRUITS. 

Dingeman, Albert Feb. 10, '64; Vet.; must, out Sept. 28. '6o. 
Paul, Nathaniel S. Feb. 20, '64; Dis. for pro. 128th Rg. Nov. 19/64 

COMPANY "H." 

Hill, Elijah B. Sept. 5, '61; Woun'd Buffalo Mt.; app'd Wagoner, 

also Corporal; veteran; mustered out Sept. 28, '65. 
Matott, Fabian Sept. 5, '61; Mustered out Sept. 6, '64. 
Sleight, Matthew " Died Jan. 4,'63; wo'd rec. at Stone River. 
Sleight, Henry B. " Vet.; app'd Corpl., mus. out Sept. 28, 'Qo. 
Woods, James " Mustered out Sept. 6, '64. 
Young, Win. H. H. " Discharged Nov. 6, '61 — disability. 

RECRUITS. 

Bloom, Henry March 2, '64; Mustered out Sept. 28, '65. 

Payne, William Feb. 20, '64 ; Discharged Dec. 29, '62— disability. 

COMPANY "I." 

Ames, Simon Sept. 5, '61; Vet.; trans. 1st U. S. Eng. July. 15,'64 

Sherman A. G. W.; " Mustered out Sept. 6, '64. 

Ephlin, Edward L. Jan. 25, '64; Unassigned Recruit. 

Storms, Sylvanus D. Sept. 26, '64: Unassigned Substitute. 

Stephens, Silas " - w " 

Blake, William H. Sept. 27, '62; Major, promoted Lt. Col., Col., 

and resigned April 16, 1863. 
Carter, George H. Sept. 5, '61 ; Cap. pro. Maj.; ms. out Jan 11, '65 
Patton, Thomas J. " ' Adj.; killed at Shiloh. April 7, '62. 

Meeker, Daniel " Sur.; res'd for pro.; com. by W. D. 

Sherman, Mason G. " Ass't Surgeon, promoted Surgeon. 

Gilmore, Alexander W. March 28, '62; Ass't Surg.; died at Camp, 

Harker, Tenn., March 13, '65. 



MILITARY RECORD. 321 

Edward L. Ephlin, March 25, '65; 2nd Lieutenant. 

William Copp, Sept. 5, '61; Capt. res. Sep. 28, '62, w'drec. Shiloh. 

Joseph W. Harding, fi; 1st Lieut.; promoted Captain; resigned 

April 22, '63 ; re-entered service as 1st Lieut, in 155th Reg. 
James McCormick, Sept. 29, '62; 2nd Lieut., promoted 1st Lieut., 

and Captain; resigned June 2, '63. 
John Craner, March 4, '63; 2d Lt., promoted 1st Lt. and Captain. 
Isaac N. Leonard, May 24, '63 ; 2d Lieut., promoted 1st Lieut. 
Lewis S. Nickston, Dec. 12, '61; IstLt.; killed, Chi'gaSep. 19,'63 
Leonidas A. Cole, Sept. 5, '61 . 1st Lieut., promoted Captain. 
Wm. H. Merritt, " 2nd Lt., pro'd 1st Lt. and Captain. 

Charles S. Morrow, " 1st. Lt., hono'bly dis. Aug. 21, '62. 

Edward Cribben, Sept 1, '62; 2nd Lieut., promoted 1st Lieut. 
Samuel Dustin, Dec. 17, '63; 1st Lieut., resigned Jan. 25, '65. 
Jacob Snyder, March 30, '65.; 2nd Lieut. 
Rev. Henry Smith, Nov. 4, 63; Chaplain; Resigned, July 28, '64. 



COMPANY "F."— NINTH REGIMENT. 

Brown, Moses C. Jr. Sept. 5, '61 ; 1st Serg.; App'd Sergeant Maj.: 

dis. April 8, '62. 
Crebbin, Edward " Ser.; promoted 2nd Lieutenant. 

Ball, Thomas L. " Wo'd Gr. Brier, dis. Nov. 22,'62 

Shepherd, Leander C. " Ap'd 1st Serg't; pro. 2d Lieut. 

Hosier, Harrison " Discharged Jan. 15, 63. ' 

CORPORALS. 

Dustin, Samuel Sept 5, 61; Ap'd Serg.; 1st Ser.; pro. 1st Lieut. 

Strong, William C. " Ap'd Corporal; disch'd Sept. 17, '62. 

Barnes, Charles A. " Ap'd Corp.; red'd; mus. o. June 6, '65 

Emery, George J. " Vet.; app'd Serg., red'd, dis.; wounds. 

Evans, Joseph " Ap'd Serg.; wo'd Chica'ga; mus. out 

Sept 6, 64. 

McDonald, Alex " Died, Nashville, March 31, '62. 

Snyder, John " Died at Annapolis, Md., Jan. 31, '63. 

Hollister, Walter D. " Vet.; captured; must, out June 26, '65 

Price, Alfred " Musician ; disch. April 15, '62 ; dis'y. 

PRIVATES. 

Allsop, William E. Sep. 5,'61; Wo'd Chic'ga; mus. out Sept. 6, '64* 
Bailey, Loring N. " Died at La Porte, Ind., March 3, '63. 

Bell, James " Died, New Albany, Oct. 18, '62. 

21 



322 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



Beeson, Benj. F. Sept. 5, 
Beeson, Willis 
Berdine, David H. 
Billings, John D. 
Borberg, Otto 
Burgher, Nelson 
Burget. John 
Bunnell, Nathaniel F. 
Carrier, John W. 
Carr, William H. 
Cotton, William S. 
Curtis, William L. 
Curtis, Leander 
Culph, John T. 
Doremus, James A. 
Douglass, George D. 
Edinger, Jacob 
Elliott, Henrv E. 
Fields, Joseph 
Garinger, Solomon 
Gonyer, Ozias 
Graham, William H. 
Hammons, Charles 
Harris, Martin 
Harmon William L. 
Hausem an, August 
Herrold, Henry 
Hentz, Michael 
Hodges Sephen 
Hulderman, John H. 
Jewitt, David N. 
Milroy, Edwin R. 
Miller, John 
Miller, William 
Myers, John 

sunstroke. 
Niles, Edwin R. 
Nimerick, John 
Nugent, John 
Payne, Ansell F. 
Palmer, Romaine H. 
Pangborn, Walter H. 



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'61; Vet.; app'd Corp'l; mustered out. 
Vet.; died, Valparaiso, Feb'y 24. '64. 
Discharged Nov. 14, '61. 
Mustered out Sept. 6, '64. 
Ap'd Corp.; killed, Chic, Sep. 19, '63 
Mustered out Sept. 6, '64. 



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Died, Tygarts Valley, Va., Nov. 3,'61 
Dropped from rolls as deserter. 
Vet.; mustered out Sept. 28, '65. 
Died at Fetterman, Va., Jan. 30, '62. 
Mustered out Sept. 15, '64. 
Died, Fetterman, Va., Jan. 25, '62. 
Mustered out Sept. 15, '64. 
Deserted, Murfresboro, Aug. 9, '62. 
Dis. April 15,'62; dis'y. [Sep. 24/63 
Died Oct. 11. '63; wo'dsrec. Chatt'ga 
Mustered out Sept. 5, '64. [28,'65. 
Vet.; ap'd Corpl., Sei\; mus. out Sep. 
Dese'd Readvville, Ten., May 29/63. 
Trs. to 4th IL S. Cavalry, Dec. 1, '62. 
Died, Evansville, Ind. 
Deserted, Louisville, Oct. 1, '62. 
Discharged June 21, '62; disability. 

" [28, '65. 
Vet.; ap'd Corp., Serg.; mus. out Sep. 
Mustered out Sep. 6, '64. [Sep. 6, '64 
Ap'd Corp.; wou'd Chicm'a; must, out 
Captured, Chicamauga. 
Vet.; must, out Sept. 28. '65. 
Vet.; died Blue Springs, April 13, '64. 
Died at Naseville, Feb. 26, '63. 
Deserted at Louisville, Oct. 1, '62. 
Trs. to 4th U. S. Cavalry, Dec. 1, '62. 
Died, Laurel Hill, Va., Sept. 24, '61; 

Mustered out Sept. 6, '64. 
Discharged June 1, '63; disability. 
Veteran; must, out Sept. 28, '65. 
Discharged Sept. 10, '62; disability. 
Mustered out Sep. 6, '64. 
Killed. Buffalo, Mt., Dec. 13, '61. 



MILITARY RECORD. 



323 



Porter, James L. Sep. 5, '61 
Prew, Allick 
Pratt, William H. 
Reed, John 
Reed, Charles 
Reville, Charles 
Rhear, John 
Riker, John 
Robey, James N. 
Roberts, Jacob F. 
Servis, George A. 
Snider, Jacob 

pro'd 2d Lieut. 
Stork, John 
Statler, Jacob 

Chicamauga. 
Strong, Levi 
Surface, Samuel F. T. " 
Thompson, Alonzo 
VanAuken, George 
VanTassell, John D, 
Vail, William T. 

out Sept. 28, '65. 
Warwell, Dolphus 
Watterman, Josiah C. ' 
Wagner, George 
Wharhob, Henry D. 
Whipple, Abner S. 



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;jDischarged June 14, '63; disability 
Died, Cheat Mt., Nov. 17, '61. 
Mustered out Sept. 19, '64. 
Discharged Nov. 13, '61. 
Dis. April 15; '62; disability. 
Dis. Sept. 17, '62 
Died, Cheat Mt., Nov. 21, '61. 
Mustered out Sept. 15, '64. 
Died, Fetterman, Va., Jan. 21, '62. 
Mustered out May 8, J 6o. 
Died, Fetterman, Va., Feb. 2, '62. 
Appointed Corp'l, Serg't, 1st Serg't; 

Discharged April 15, '62; disability. 
Disch'd Jan. 27, '64; wounds rec'd at 

Captured at Chicamauga. 
Discharged Nov. 4, '61 ; disability. 
Died, Fetterman, Va., Feb. 5, '62. 
Mustered out Sept. 15, '64. 
Veteran; mustered out Oct 27, '65. 
Vet'rn; app'd Corp'l, Sergt.; mustered 

Discharged Jan. 9, '63; disability. 
Died, Fetterman, Va., Jan. 24, '62. 
Mustered out Sept. 15, '64. 
Died, Fetterman, Va., Jan. 18, '62. 
Mustered out Sept. 6, '64. 

RECRUITS. 



Craft Edward March 23, '62; Discharged July 18, '62; disability. 
Dolph, Joseph 0. April 30, '62; Died Pittsburg Land'g, May 3,'62. 
Layton, Charles H. Feb. 17,'64; " Nashville, March 13, '64. 
Lane, Oliver Feb. 25,'64; Ap'd Corp.; des. N. Orleans, July 11, '65. 
Louis, William H. March 23,'62; Des., Athens, Ala., July 15, '62. 
Madden, Patrick April 5, '64; Ap'd Corp'l, red'cd, imps'nd; must. 

out March 14, '66. 
Rice, Vincent Feb. 20,'64; Mustered out Sept. 28, '65. 
Shaw, Wm. H. March 23, '62 ; disability. 
Stokes, Clayton " 4, '64 ; Mustered out Sept. 28, '65. 
Turk, Timothy M. Feb. 20,'64; Mustered out Sept. 28, '64. 
Vaughn, William C. " " " 



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324 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



ELEVENTH REGIMENT. 

COMPANY "B.- 
White. Joseph Oct. 3, '64; mustered out July 26, '6r>. 

COMPANY "II." 

Wright, David Aug. 31, '61; Vet.; mustered out July 26. 
Smith, John Oct. 12, '64. Unassigned Recruit. 
Thoma-. Wm. 



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THIRTEENTH REGIMENT. 

McBride, John Jan. 3, '65; Recruit; mustered out Sept. 5, '65. 

COMPANY "K." 

Sent, Martin March 17, 'Qd; Mustered out Sept. 5, '65. 
Whalen, Edward Feb. 17, '65; 



FIFTEENTH REGIMEENT. 

COMPANY "G.- 
Foster, Joel W. June 14, '61; 1st Serg., promoted 2nd Lieut. 
Smith. John H. 
Graham, Thomas N. 
Park, Ervin 11. 
Cole, William L. 



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Sergeant. 



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mustered out June 25, '64. 
promoted 2d Lieutenant. 



CORPORA 






Blank, John 
Burns, John L. 
Westphal, Max 
Robinson, John L. 
McDonald, Sam'] I). 

May 31, '64. 
Baer, Jacob June 14. til 
Thompson, John W, 
Zener. I Jalvin I». 
Brookwalter. Wm. 
Shelley, Jacob M. 
McDonald, Peter 



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App'd Serg.; must, out June 25, '64 
Discharged Oct. 10, '61 — disability. 

Nov. 1 ( .'. ■• 

Oct. 10, ■■ A 

Appointed Serg.; vet.: trans. 17 1 

charged Oct. 22. '61 — disabilit 
Mus. out • I une 25, 64 as private. 
I discharged, 1864. 
Musi'n Des. Louisville, Oct. 1, 

" Vet.: trs. 17 R|. May 31, 
Wag'n; disch. Oct. 22. '61— di- 




MILITARY RECORD. 



325 



PRIVATES. 



Anffier, H. N. June 14, '61 
Bennet, Daniel H. lt 
Black, John S. 
Bryant, Levi J. 
Brookman, Charles C. " 
Brown George H. 
Burns, Edward M, 
Burns, Israel F. 
Burns, Henry " 

Burford, William H. " 
Burket George W. " 
Casbier, Elmer 
Carr, Samuel 
Cox, Peter 
Crawford, John 
Douglas, Robert 
Fagenbaum, John 
Fisher, Isaiah 
Frank ey, August 
Garveston, John A. " 
Gerdes, Frederick " 
Hammond, Amos " 

Harmon, James G. 
Henton, George 



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Hedges, John C.- 
Hogle, James B. 
Isay, Egidius D. 
Jackson, Marion 
Jamison, Ninian 
Jones, David 
Kelly, William D. 
Krug, Robert 
Lamphire, Silas 
Lastner, William 
Lewis, John 
Little, Cleaveland C. " 
Lowry, Henry A. 
Lucas, Calvin R. 
Marklin, Herman 
Matchet, Benjamin 
Macher, Nicholas 



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Mustered out June 25, '64. 

Ap'd Q. M. Ser.; dis. Feb. 63— dis'y. 

Mustered out June 25, '64. 



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Died, Nashville, Feb. 14. '64. . 
Killed, Mission Ridge, Nov. 25, '63. 
Mustered out June 25, '64. 
App'd Corp'l must, out June 25, '64. 
Discharged June 16, '62 — disability. 
Deserted, Nashville, March 25, '62. 
Mustered out June 25, '64. 
Discharged Aug. 9, '62— disability. 
Discharged June 25, '64. 
App'd Serg.; mus. out June 25, '64. 
Mustered out June 25, '64. 
Killed at Stone River, Dec. 31, '62. 
Discharged Dec. 24, '62 — disability. 
Mustered out June 25, '64. 
Transferred to V. R. C. Feb. 24,'64. 



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Mustered out June 25, '64. 
App'd Corporal; dis. Feb. 4, '63. 
Des. Ind'ls, on furlough Apr. 29/64. 
Mustered out June 25, '64. 
Discharged ; — disability. 

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Vet,; trsfcl. 17th Reg., May 21, |64. 
Ap'd Corp'l; must, out June 25, ,'64. 

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Deserted Sept. 17, '61. 
Killed in action. 
Mustered out June 25, '64. 
Discharged Aug. 14, '61 — disability. 

Nov. 6, '62 
Discharged Dec. 12. '62. 
" 24, '62. 
Died, Louisville, July 18, '63. 
Mustered out June 25, '64. 
Drowned, Nov. 29, '61. 
Discharged July 24, '61 — disability. 
Killed, Mission Ridge, Nov. 25, '63. 



26 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUKTT. 



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Maxwell. A. F. June 14. '61 : 
McNess, James C. 

Miller. Jacob V. 
Moser. Samuel 
Moon. John 0. 
Madge, ' >■■ _ P. 
Murphy, John H. 
Myers, Jasper 
Nc yes, Charles 
Page. Lewis C 

Reel. Madison 
Reynard. William P. " 
Richards, Samuel 
Row*. G rge H. 
Rose, John " 

Ru:h. Martin 
Saxon. Anthony M. " 
Saxon. Charles W. " 
5 yler, Alexander 
Schane. Char" " 

n. Herman 
She] . Lemuel 
S .ehan. Jam 
Smith, Eugene L. 
St rie. James E. 
Stein, Pet- 
Sutton. II 
Taylor. Charles L. 
Thomas, William 
T :..-. kins, I ►aniel W. •• 
Truax. Charles F. 
Walter-. Benry D. 

zner. Beniamin 1 
Weidabnsh, Henry " 
Wheeler. I ►scar 

ilson, Daniel H. 
Wilkes, Martin K. 
William-. •' hn W. 
"W ilson, Alexander 
W clever. John 

0-1. L •.••■•■ - 



.. 
.. 

u 
it 

.. 
.. 



. . 



Diseh. Jan. 12. '63 — disability. 
Ap'd 1st Srg.; mus. out June 25, 
Discharge Sept. 17. 'oi — disability. 
Mustered out June 25, ,; 4. 
Tnmafer'd V. R. C., April 10, 
Discharged Sept. 11/62 — iisabilil 
Mnsi I out June 25. '04. 
Died in Hospital. Corinth. Miss., 
Deserted, Nashville, March. 25, 
Veteran; trans' d 17th R. May 31. 64. 
Ap I Corj .: must, out June 2o. '64. 
Discharged Pel : — lisal ility. 

Died, Murfi \ - 

Diseh a I Ami 11, - — lisal 
Mnsi 1 out June 25, '64. 
Discharged, July 14/62 — lisabi] 
Nov. 19. '61 



.. 



.. 



Dee jrted, L is He, ( t.1, 2. 
Mustered out June 25, '64. 
A] /rporal: disch. July 1 . 

Discharge 1. i^ ; 4. 
Disch rged D I — lis bility. 

Dee I L, L tisvill 
Discharged, July 14. '62 — - ity. 
June 12, _. 
I Corp.: must, out June -' 
Miss _ •* River. Dec. 31, 
Discharged Dec. 30, '61 — ii-ability. 

I discharged, Feb. 4. 

Deserted, Louisville, I I -t. 1, ' - 

Mnsi 1 out June 25, ,; 4. 
Killed. Missi n Ridge, N 
Transferred V. K. ''.. .\ 2 
Discharged Ang. 11, '62 — Usability. 

-erted. Chattanooga. Apr. 29, '64. 
Must- it June 25, ; 4. 






.. 



.. 



Discharged, Nov. 19, '61 — lisal 



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a a 

u a it 



MILITARY RECORD. 327 

RECRUITS. 

Green, Andrew J. June 14, '61 ; Deserted. 

Mudge, LeanderFeb. 17, '62; Died, Evansville, May 20, '62. 

Maxwell, Robert Aug. 30, '62; Transfer'd 17th Reg., May 31, '64. 

Sheldon, Jonathan Oct. 31, '62; 

Thurber, Elmer Feb. 19, '62; 

Thurber, Joseph B. Sept. 16, '62; 

Vannote, Jonathan Feb. 8, '62; Dis. Dec. 16, '62 — disability- 

Vannote, John Feb. 8, '62; Trs. 17th Regiment, May 31, '64. 

OFFICERS. 

William M. Webber, May 2, '62; 2nd Lieut.; promoted Quarter- 
master; mustered out June 29, '64. 

Rev. John M. Whitehead, July 15, 1862; Chaplain; mustered 
out June 29, '64; term expired. 

Gideon Wonsetler, Nov. 8, '62; Ass't Surgeon; must, out June 29, 
'64; term expired; re-ent. serv. Sur. 3d Reg. Hancock's Corps. 

Joel W. Foster, Sept. 10, '61 ; 2d Lieut,; pro. 1st Lieut, and Capt.; 
killed at the battle of Stone River, Dec. 31, 1862. 

John H. Smith, Dec. 2, '62; 2d Lieut., pro. 1st Lieut, and Capt.; 
mustered out June 29, '64 ; term expired. 

William L. Cole, Dec. 25, '62; 2d Lieut., promoted 1st Lieut. 

Thos. N. Graham, March 9,'63 ; 2d Lt., ms. out June 29, '64 ; trm. ex. 

Reuben S. Weaver, June 14, '61; 1st Lt., resigned March 24, '62. 

Samuel Burns, " Captain, " Aug. 1, '62. 



SEVENTEENTH REGIMENT— THREE YEARS SERVICE. 

COMPANY "C." 

Heiser, Frederick W. June 12, '61; Vet.; mus. out Aug. 8, '65. 



Mackey, William H. 
Marvin, James N. 
McGraham, McBrown 
McKinstry, Nelson 
Milner, Jesse B. 
Weed, Theodore C. 



Discharged Oct., '61; disabil'y. 
Veteran; must, out Aug. 8, '65. 
Vet.; must, out Aug. 24, '65. 
Mustered out June 20, '64. 
Vet.; must, out Aug. 8, '65. 



COMPANY "D.' ; 



Martin, Henry J. April 2, '64; Mustered out Aug. 8, '64. 



128 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

COMPANY "E." 

Simmons, Enoch Sept. 20, '64; Drafted, mustered out July 8, *65, 

COMPANY "F." 
Paddock, Homer June 12, ,61 ; Transferred to Company K. 

COMPANY "I." 

Adler, Matthias Nov. 14, '64 ; Died, April 4, '65. 

Ashton. Marion Oct. 29, '64; Draf d ; must, out Aug. 8, '65. 

Bramer, John " 14 " " " 

Biggs, Austin " 26 " " " 

Baugher, Peter Nov. 11, '64; Substitute; " May 30, '65. 

Keneirar, John Sept. 20. '64; Drafted; mustered out July 8, : Ql>. 

Kasner, William March 12, " " " Aug. 8, '6 

Losier, Alpheus Oct. 24, " Substitute; must'd out 

Lair, John March 11," 

McLain. Israel D. Oct 20, " 

Mow, John A. " 15, " 

Peoples, Robert " 24, " Drafted; must, out July 14, 'G~ 

Sever, Alpheus " 21, " " " Aug. 23. " 

Naylor, James " 3, '64. 

Drury, John T. March 12, '63; 1st Liet., honorably dis. June 1, '64. 



u 



TWENTIETH REGIMENT— THREE YEARS SERVICE. 

COMPANY "E." 

Abbey. Edward S. July 22, '61 ; First Sergeant. 

Crawford, Hiram " Sergeant; promoted 2nd Lieut. 

Thompson, Jolm C. " 

Muir, William R. " " " 

Woodworth. Leonard " 

Lamb, Alonzo H. " Corporal; Mort. wou'd Gettsburg. 

Bingaman, David N. " 

Fonstel. Charles " " 

Hinstis, George F. " " 
Martin. William H. 

Behan, Samuel E. " " 

Cissna. Isaac N. " Must, out July 2 1 .'. '64 as private. 

Easton. Nathan B. " Captured Spottsylvania ; mustered 
out May 3, '65. 



MILITARY RECORD. 



329 



Smith, Thomas J. July 22/61 ; Musician; Veteran. 
Bixby, Warren D. " 

20th Regiment, re-org. 



transferred 



Powers, John 



u 



Wagoner. 



PRIVATES. 



Aldrich, Charles July 22, '61. 

Barkhurst, Amos " Mustered out July 29, '64. 



u 
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a 
a 
U 
a 
a 
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u 



Cap. Fredrk'bg; mus. out July 29/64. 



Vet.; trans. 20th Reg.; re-organized. 



Bartow, John D. 
Bingaman, John M. 
B,iser, Daniel 
Briley, Elias F. 
Bruch, Philip 
Burke, Michael 
Burns, Royal S. 
Carney, Matthew 
Carr, Frazee 
Drake, George 
Eberly, Jacob 
Egan, Michael 
Farnsworth, Edward M." 

'61; of wounds received in action before Richmond. 
Fraunberg, Chris. July 22/61; Promoted 2nd Lieutenant. 
Fuller, Warren 



u 



u 



.. 



Mustered out July 29, '64. 

a a a 

Died in hospital, N. Y. Harbor July 9, 



a 









Gallegan, Michael 
Griffin, Patrick 
Goodenough, Francis H." 
Goodsell, Henry M. 
Hackett, David 
Hatfield, William C. 

20th Reg. re-org. 
Helmouth, Henrv 
Hendricks, John H. 
Hickman, Benjamin F. 
Hollingsworth, Reuben " 
Johnson, George W. 
Jones, Charles E. 

out May 22, '62. 
Kennard, David 
Kistler, John J. 
Legyard, William B. 
Lewalter, John 



Vet.; transf. 20th Reg., re-organized. 
Killed, Gettysburg. 



" Vet.; wou'd North Anna; transferred 



a 

a 

a 



a 



Killed, Gettysburg. 

Vet.; transf. 20th Reg., re-organized. 

Cap. Mine Run ; mus. out Mar. 18/65. 

Capt'd Chicomicomico Island; must'd 



Mustered out July 29, '64. 



330 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



Logan, William July 22, 
Louder, William H. 
Lytle, John T. 
Magnesun, Israel 
March, John 
McAnany, Peter 
McFey, Bernard 
Morrow, James 
Murphy, Edward 
Orb, Fernando C. 
Paddock, Harvey S. 
Parker, George M. 

out May 22, '62. 
Peeler, David 
Phillips, Oscar 
Price, Salathiel C. 
Raber, Samuel 
Reynolds, Christopher 
Richards, Benjamin F, 
Richardson, Arthur 
Riley, Leonard 

out May 22, '62. 
Ruff, Lawrence 

out May 22, '62. 
Sabin, Orlando W. 
Scanlan, Dennis 
Shay, Cornelius 
Smith, Andrew J. 
Smith, Frederick 
Smith, Stephen R. 
Smith, William 
Snyder, Eli 

out May 22, '62. 
St. Clair, Nathan 
Swingle, John W. 
Tappan, Noah M. 
Taylor, John D. 
Travis, Curtis 
Vandusen, Cornelius 
Vandusen, Dennis F. F." 
Vandusen, Henry H. 
Verrel Stephen 



•61, 



a 
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it 

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a 
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it 

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it 

it 

C< 
it 

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it 

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Vet.; transf. 20th Reg., re-organized. 



Vet.; transf. 20th Reg., re-organized. 
Mustered out July 21>, '64. 



Veteran. 

Capt'd Chicomicomico Island; must'd 

Veteran. 

Killed, Gettysburg. 
Mustered out July 29, '64. 



a 



a 



a 



Capt'd at Chicomicomico Island ; mus. 



u 



a 



a 



a 



Vet.; transf. 20th Reg., re-organized. 



Capt'd Chicomicomico Island : mus. 



Killed at Gettysburg. 
Mustered out July 29, '64. 

Vet.; transf. 20th Reg., re-organized. 

Veteran. 

Mustered out July 29, '64. 



a 
u 
a 
a 



MILITARY* RECORD. 331 

Washburn, G. W.July 22,'61; Mustered out July 29, '64. 

Watson, Frank " 

Weed, Charles F. 

Whiteraft, Thomas 

Whitney, Henry M. 

Williams, Frank 

Wilson, Ellicott " Wo'd Wilder's ; mus. out July 29/64. 

Winch, Marquis R. " Mustered out July 29, '64. 

Young, William " 

Zimmerman, Thomas " 

Zimmerman, William " Vet.; promoted 2d Lieut., Co. "Gr." 

» RECRUITS. 

Andrews, Abram C. Jan. 27, '62. 
Hannah, Andrew J. Dec. 2, '63. 
Layton, John Jan. 27, '62. 

COMPANY "F." 

Travis, Curtis Feb. 20, '64; Veteran; mustered out July 12, '65. 
Bruch, Phillip Jan. 2, 

COMPANY "H." 

Bixbey, Warren D. Feb. 20, '64; Mus'n; vet.; mus. o. July 12, '65. 

COMPANY "K." 

Thorp, Love Jan. 7, '64; Vet.; must'd out July 12, '65; disability. 
Warner, William Feb. 21, '64 " « 

Myre, John, L^nassigned Recruit. 

OFFICERS. 

James H. Shannon, July 22, '61; Captain, prot'd Maj., Lieut. Col.; 

resigned June 5, '63; re-entered siervce as Col. 138th Regt. 
Orpheus Everts, July 22, '61; Trs. tore-org. Rg.; mus. out with Rg. 
John E. Sweet, " 2nd Lieut., pro. 1st Lieut, and Capt.; 

mustered out Oct. 8, '64, term expired. 
John W. Andrew, July 22, '61 . 1st Lt., killed, Richm. June 20,'62. 
Hiram Crawford, July 1, '62; 2d Lieut., pro. 1st. Lt., mus. out Oct. 

8, '64, term expired. 
Wm. R. Muir, Nov. 21, '62; 2d Lieut.; resigned Jan. 17, '63. 
Christoph Fraunberg, Jan. 18, '63; 2d Lieut., pro, IstLt.; must'd 

out Oct. 10, '64. 



32 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Wm. Brown. 2d Lieut.: must, out on consolidation Oct. 2 14. 
Harvey S. Paddock, Dec. 14. '64: 2d Lieut, promoted 1st Lieut., 
and mustered out with Rear. 



TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT. 

TX ASSIGNED EECnUI'i 

Davis. David E. Sept. 23. '64. 



Golden. William 


« . 


22 


'64. 


Goram. John 


.. 


• • 




Hashbacker. Leonard" 


- 


L 


Hall. Horace T. 


.. 


23. 




Moran, Thomas 


• • 


23, 


'04. 


McGrath, Thoma- 


* • 


23. 


'64. 


Reed. George 


.. 


24. 


'64. 



TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT— THREE YEARS SERVICE. 

COMPANY "F." 
Mills, Charles Oct. 16, '64; Recruit. 



TWENTY-SEVENTH REG.— THREE YEARS SERVICE. 

McKahin, John July 5, '62; 2d Lieut.: promoted Capt.; resigned 

March 14. '63; re-entered service . of 138th Res 



TWENTY-NINTH REGIMENT— THREE YEARS SERVICE. 

Morey. Ira S. Aug ■ (ua'r-master ; . v . 

Tvmeson. Cornelius " '61 : Commissary Sergeant. 

Griffith. John C. Sept. 13: Hospital Steward: prot'd Asst. Sa 

COMPANY "A." 

Berger. Nelson Jan. 3. <;.",; Recruit; mus. out Dec. 2. . substitute. 
Van Ankin. Geo. L. •* 

COMPANY "C." 

Coglev. Thomas S. Aug. 30, '61; 1st Sere;.; dis. Dec. 30, '62 



MILITARY RECORD. 



333 



Nevins, Walter Aug. 27, '61; Serg., died Nolin, Ky., Nov. 14, '61. 
Burch, Leroy S. •• •• Murfreesboro, May 14, '63. 

Gates, Columbus Aug. 26, '61 ; •■ mustered out Aug. 26, '64. 

Van Wert, William •■ •■ disch. Dec. 30, '62, disability. 

CORPORALS. 

Lock, Samuel L. Aug. 30, '61; Deserted April 30, '62. 
Beach, David F. Aug. 27, '61; Died May 26,'62, wo'd rec. Shiloh. 

Reduced, disc. Nov. 6, '63. 
Des. and ret'r, mus. out Sep. 2, '64. 
Discharged Feb. 26, '63, disability. 

Nov. 10, '62 
Must. out. Aug. 26, '64, as Serg't. 
Musician ; discharged July 23, '62. 

16, 



Booth, Henry L. 
Shoemaker, F. A. Sept. 3, 
Matchett, Benjamin ,l 4, 
Williams, Davis Aug. 27, 
Shoemaker, Daniel •• 
Brink, James W. •• 30, 
Comfort, Richard W. Sep. 9 
Chappell, John II. 



Wagoner, transferred, Co. "I." 

PRIVATES. 

Backhaus, William Oct. 3, '61; Mustered out Oct. 2, '64. 

Barnes, Fernando C. Aug. 27, " " •• 26 •• 

Batch, Frank Sept. 2, •■ Vet.; must, out Dec. 2, '65, Sergt. 

Batch, John 

Boardman, Sam'l H. Sept. 9, 

Bowen, Isaac W. Aug. 27, 

Bookhout, Chas. H. Sept. 16, 

Burdick, John Sept. 26, 

Burdick, Lor ay M. 

Budd, Henry C. Sept. 4, 

Burch, Gilford D. Aug. 30, 

Bryant, David P. Sept. 15, 

Brown, Bergen H. Aug. 30, 

Corkins, Charles Sept. 4, 

Crane, William H. Sept. 7, 

Crane, Alexanders. Sept. 19, 

Dorland, George C.Sept. 19, 

Fessenden, Geo. W.Sept. 10, ■ 

Goodman, Jeremiah Oct. 15, ■ 

Grover, Peter Aug. 27, 

Hendricks, August. Sept. 21, ■ 

Holtorf, John C. Aug. 27, 

Holmes, Harvey 

Huffman, James M. Sept. 18, • 

Hull, Adam Sept. 19, • 



Mustered out Sept. 8, '64. 

Ap. Ser.; mis'g in action, Chicm'a. 

^et.; mus. out Dec. 2, '65 as Serg. 

• • • • • • 

Discharged June 11, '64. 
Killed at Shiloh, April 7, '62. 
Veteran; mustered out Dec. 7, 7 65. 

Cap. Chi'm.; mus. out Feb. 20, '65. 
Discharged May 15, '62'; disability. 
Discharged Dec. 30, '62; 
Discharged July 2, 62; 
Mus. out with Regt. as Q. M. Sergt. 
Discharged July 12,'62; disability. 
Mustered out Sept. 26, '64. 
Veteran; mustered out Dec. 2, } 6b. 
Discharged — '62; disability. 
Discharged July 23, '62 " 
Veteran; deserted Aug. 2, '65. 
Veteran ; mustered out Dec. 26, '65. 
Mustered out Sept. 26, '64. 



334 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



Johnson, John W. Aug. 31, '61 ; Vet.; mus. out Dec. 2, '65, as Corpl. 
Jessup, Benjamin F. Sept. 9, •• Discharged. 

Killed at Shiloh, April 7, '62. 



Kish, Stephen Sept. 3, 
Lawrence, George 
McLane, Alonzo Sept. 22, 
McLane, Richard Sept. 21, 
Mandeville, Jac.W. Aug. 30, 
Mandeville, R. S. Aug. 27, 
Marr, Thomas 
Michael, John H. 
Miller, Alonzo Sept. 17, 
Nelson, James M. Sept. 20, 
Preston, James H.Sept. 9, 
Romans, Theo. D. Sept. 11, 
Shafer, John Sept. 5, 

Shoemaker, J. W. Aug. 27, 
Sigrider, Adam 
Taylor, Wm. W. Sept- 3, 
Toyne, William Sept. 21, 
Troxel, Jacob A. 
Vanderwalker, M. Aug. 30, 
Wickharri, C. J. Sept. 19, 
Winchell, F. M. Aug. 27, 
Worden, Clinton F. 



Discharged ; disability. 

Died Sept. 21, '62. 

Killed at Stone River, Dec. 31, '62. 

Discharged; disability. 

wounds rec. at Shiloh. 

Promoted 2d Lieutenant. 

Vet.; mus. out Dec. 2, '65, 1st Serg. 

Discharged ; disability. 

Veteran; mustered out Dec. 2, '6r>. 

Discharg. July 12, '62; disability. 

Mustered out Feb. 16, '65. 

Must, out Feb. 20, '65, as Sergeant. 

Pro. Captain 7th Cavalry. 

Killed at Stone River Dec. 31, '62. 

Vet.: mus. out Dec. 2, '65 as Corpl. 

Discharged Dec. 12, '62 ; disability. 

Vet.; mas. out Dec. 2, '65, as Sergt. 
Discharged ; disability. 
Veteran; mustered out Dec. 2, J Q5. 
,Died at Nolin, Ky., Jan. 12, '62. 









RECRUITS. 

Burch, Philander C.Jan. 13, '62; Dis. 63; wounds rec, Stone River. 
English, William Feb. 13, '64; Mustered out Dec. 2, '65. 
Love, Albert P. Feb. 16, '65; 

COMPANY "G." 

Coffin, Griffin A. Sept. 5, '61; 1st Serg., promoted 2d Lieut. 
Sturges, Alonzo Feb. 21, •■ Serg.; dis. June 24, '62; disability 
Holland, John E. •■ •• •• 23, •• 

CORPORALS. 

Bushnell, Orsamus Sept. 27, 61 ; Died Fb. 2, "63; wo'd rec. Sto. Rh . 
Beahm, James 0. Oct. 1, •• Veteran; pro. 1st Lieut. (\ "41 

Reduced ; must'd out Aug 57, \- "4 . 

Dischar'd June 24. '62; » i2abi v. 



Harris, Oscar Aug. 27, 

Martin, Hiram H. 
Weed, Catlin Sept. 12, 

Aug. 27, 



Steel, Austin 



Musician. 



MILITARY RECORD. 



335 



PRIVATES. 



Blackwell Chas. H. Aug. 29, '61; Vet.; mustered out Dec. 2, '65. 



Aug. 27, 
Sept. 15, 
Sept. 17, 
Aug. 27, 
Oct. 1, 



Billfer, John 
Bennett, John A 
Baxter, Harrison 
Bishop, Charles 
Clark, David C. 
Coilins, George A. Sept. 12, 
Charlesworth, H. Sept. 12, 
Clymer, Henry Aug. 27, 
Davis, Chris. L. Sept. 21, 
Dunn, Henry Aug. 27, 

Eggenburger, Andrew •• 
Evans, Sherry 
Grice, David Sept. 17, 

Hunt, Michael Sept. 30, 
Huntly, John F. Sept. 7, 
Hyde, Kenyon Aug. 30, 
Lehman, John ' Sept. 6, 
Lewis, Charles Aug. 30, 
Lightfoot Simeon Aug. 27, 
Love, David M. Sept. 2, 
Love, James 

McCormack, Aug. 29, 

McDonald, Sept. 7, 

Megraw, James C. Oct. 1, 
Mackey, Philander Aug. 27, 
Maudlin, Benj. S. Oct. 15, 
Morton, Geo. W. Sept. 6, 
Norwood, Edward Oct. 15, 
Palmer, Sylvanus Oct. 15, 
Plummer, John W. Oct. 1, 
Popp, Conrad Sept. 21, 

Roberts, Hugh Aug. 27, 
Rollins, Stephen A.Aug. 27, 
Rhodes, David Aug. 27, 
Saybould, William Sept. 13, 
Sharpe, Benj. F. Aug. 29, 
Sent, Martin Sept. 20, 

Snyder, Michael Oct. 15, 
Trull, Willard Sept. 17, 
Tennis, William Sept. 28, 



Missing Chicmga. Sept. 19, '63. 
Disch. Dec. 9, '62 : disability. 
Disch. March 13, '63 ; disability. 
Deserted Oct. 9, '62. 
Mustered out Sept. 26, '64. 
Vet.; must, out Dec. 2, '65, as Serg. 
Mustered out June 26, '65. 
Promoted 2d Lieutenant. 
Discharged May 20,'62 ; disability. 
Vet.; mus. out Dec. 2, '65 as Corpl. 

• • • • ■ « 

Vet.; died Augusta Ga.,Oct. 24,'65. 
Discharged Feb. 22, '62 ; disability. 
Mustered out Sept. 26, '64. 
Deserted Aug. 1, '63. 
Cap. Chicm.; mus. out Feb. 27, '65. 
Trans, to V. R. C, Dec. 19, '63. 
Mustered out Sept. 26, '64. 
Dis. — , '64, as exchanged nrisoner. 
Trans. U. S. Navy Sept. 1, '63. 
Vet.; must, out Dec. 2, '65. 
Discharged Dec. 12, '62; disability. 
Died at Nashville, Jan. 8, '63. 
Mustered out Aug. 27, '64. 
Discharged April 27,62; disability. 
Mustered out Sept. 26, '64. 
Died at Nashville, Sept. 18, '62. 
Deserted Oct. 19, '61. 
Discharged June 18, '62 ; disability. 

• • • • J / •• •• 

• • *• "Ik •• •• 

Died at Chattanooga, Nov. 30, '63. 
Vet.; must, out Dec. 2, '65, Serg't. 
Must, out Sept. 26, '64, as Serg't. 
Vet.; deserted July 27, '65. 
Mustered out Sept. 26, '64. 

Transferred to V. R. C. '63. 

Died at Nashville. 
Deserted Oct. 9, '62. 



336 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Towleton, Henry Oct. 24, "61 ; Vet.; must, out Dec. 2, '•' 

Williams, Geo. W. Aug. 27, ■• Discharged March, 11, '63; disab'y. 

Ward, James Aug. 27, •• Died, And's'ville. pris. Oct. 1, '64. 

Warnock, Allen W. Oct. 1, •• Discharged June 1, '63; disability. 
Watson, John C. Oct. 7," . •■ Dec. 1, '62; 

Wheaton, Joseph W. •■ 9, •• Yet.; mustered out Dec. 2, '65. 

Woodard, George ■• 12," Discharged Oct. 10, '62: disability. 

RECRUITS. 

Black, William Feb. 17, '64; Died at Chattanooga July 4, '64. 

Baker. John D. •■ Must, out Dec. 2, '65, as Corporal. 

Batch, Joseph April 4, '64; 

Closser, Orren L. Feb. 17, ■■ 

Costello, James 

Culp, Shelton L. Mar. 10, •• 

Clarkson, Wm. T. Jan. 3, '65; •■ ■■ ■• drafted. 

Fogus, Jasper Feb. 17, '64; Died, Dec. 9. '64 at Nashville. 

Finlev, Albert A. •■ •• Must, out Sept. 21, '65, as Corpr'l. 

Firll, Thos. W. •• 18, » •• Dec. 2, '65. 

Fields, John D. April 4, •• •• 

Humble, B. Jan. 3, '60; •• " ** drafted. 

Harding.. H. G. Mar. 10, '64; 

Kramer, Andrew Jan. 3, '65', " July 18, '65, drafted. 

Moore, John Feb. 16, '64; ■■ Dec. 2. 

Moore, Thomas Feb. 17, •■ Deserted Oct. 15, '65. 

Moore. William ■• ■• Died, Chattanooga, July 10, '64. 

Nome, Artemas ■• 18, ■• Must'd out Dec. 2. '65, as Corporal. 

Wells, Americus ■• 17, ■■ ■• " •• Musician. 

York, Robert J. June\20, '63 ; 

COMPANY "H." 

Brainard, Gilbert Sep. 12,'61; Sergeant; discharged July 23. '6 

PRIVATES. 

Barnes, John Nov. 7. '61; Discharged May 2, '62. 
Bowden, E. L. Sept. 12, ■• Deserted Oct. 9, '61. 

Lehmer, Isaac ■■ •• Discharged April 19, '63. 

Moore, Andrew J. •■ 25, ■■ Captured, Stone River, Dec. 31, '62. 

Noricks, William Aug. 27. •• Trs. Co. "L,"dis. Sept. 13/62; disy 



MILITARY RECORD. 337 

Sulkman, Wm. Sept. 25/61 ; Dropped from rolls Aug. 18, '62. 

Thompson, Phil. Aug. 27, •■ Died at Camp Nevin, Ky. 

Wilber, Seth Sept. 25, •• ;• •• •• Jan. 24/62. 

RECRUITS. 

Barlett, Daniel Dec. 31, '61; Discharged May 15, '62; disability. 
Dixon, Richard H. ■• 4, ■• •■ March 7, '63. 

English, William Jan. 1, '62; •• June 1, '62. 

Haskins, John A. •• 2, •* Transferred to a G." 
Liggett, Joseph Nov. 28,'61 ; Discharged March 7, '63. 
Meeker, Frank Dec. 10, ■• Vet.; must, out Dec. 2, 'Q5 as Sergt. 
Robinson, John W. *■ 31, •• Discharged Aug. 5, '62; disability. 
School, Joseph ■• 9, ■■ 

COMPANY "I." 

Flucard, John Aug. 29,'61; 1st Serg.; disch. Dec — ,'61; disability. 

PRIVATES. 

Conway, Patrick Aug. 27,'61 ; Deserted Sept. 28, '62. 
Eavers, John •• •■ Died at Shiloh, April 26, '62. 

Tucker, Charles F. •• 30, ■; Promoted 1st Lieut. Co. "A." 
Tennis, John Oct. 31, •• Recruit; mustered out Nov. 6, '64. 

COMPANY "K." 

Parker, Geo. W. Sep. 20/61; Corporal; discharged Feb. 22, '62. 

OFFICERS. 

S. 0. Gregory, Aug. 27, •■ 2d Lieut.; pro. Capt. Co. ^F.," trans. 

to Co. "C," promoted Lieut. Col. and Colonel. 
James L. Angell, Aug. 30, '61; Adjutant, resigned, Aug. 20, '62. 
Griffin A, Coffin, May 16, '62; 2d Lieut., pro. 1st Lieut, and Adju. 

honorably dicharged January 7/65. 
Samuel A. Bagley, May 5/65; Adju.; must, out with Regt., pro. 

from Sergeant 5th Cavalry. 
Asa H. Matthews, Aug. 27/61; Quartermaster, died April '62. 
Lorenzo S. Keene, Oct. 24, •• Asst. Surgeon; promoted Surgeon; 

resigned Jan. 7, '63. 

Tompkins Higday, ; Surg.; commissioned Jan. 29, '63. 

L. C. Rose, ; Comis. Apr. 26, '62, ad. Ast/Surg. 

Theophilus Fravel, ; Commiss'ed April 22, '65, as Asst. 

Surgeon, declined May 12, '65. 
Thomas Marr, March 27, '65; 2d Lieutenant, 
Charles F. Tucker, Jan. 17, •• 1st 

22 



• 



338 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Patrick Hays, April 11. "64; 1st Lieutenant: promoted Cantain. 
Fred. A. Clark, Aug. 27, '61; Capt., resigned April 10. '64. 

Silas F. Allen. wo'd Shiloh, res. Feb. 11/64. 

George W. Maloon. •• •• 2d Lieut, pro. 1st Lieut, and Capt.; 

honorably discharged Nov. 16, '64. 
John W. Vanderhoof, Feb. 6, '63; 2d Lieut., resigned 1863. 
Christopher L. Davis, May 2, •• •• promoted 1st Lieut.; 

resigned Nov. 14, '64. 
Frank Stebbins. Aug. 27, '61; 1st Lieut., promoted Capt.: killed 

at Murfreesboro, Dec. 31, '62. 
John S. Fosdick, Aug. 27. c 61; Capt., resigned May 16, 62. 
Oscar B. Rockwell, March 27. 65: Captain. 
John Cutler. May 17, 1862: 2d Lieut., pro. 1st Lieut, and Capt.; 

killed at Chicamauga, Sept. 19, '63. 
Edwin Henderson, April 4/63 ; 2d Lt.. pro. 1st Lt., res. Nov. 13,'64 
Lafayette Keys, Jan. 17. '65; 1st Lieutenant, promoted Captain. 



THIRTIETH REGIMENT— THREE YEARS SERVICE. 

COMPANY "C." 
Joseph S. Murray, Jan. 12, '63; Wagoner; must, out Nov. 25, 'iy-i. 



THIRTY-SECOND REGDIENT. 

OFFICERS. 

Jacob Langacher, May 1, '64; 2d Lieut.; prom'd Capt.; honorably 

discharged June 27, '65. 
Anion Sherman, Aug. 24, '64; 2d Lieut.: promoted 1st Lieut. 
Edward Hecker, March 



THIRTY-THIRD REGIMENT— THREE YEARS SERVICE. 

COMPANY "D." 

RECRUITS. 

Guthrie, David B. Feb. 6, '65; Mustered out July 21. '6 
Jacobus, Francis Oct. 13, '64; " " " 

Smith, Lewis • " 15, •• 



MIIflTARY RECORD. 339 

COMPANY "K." 

RECRUITS. 

Alexander, Andrew H. Jan. 4, '65; Must, out July 21, '65; subst. 
Newburn, William March 3, " " " " 

Dowdell, William " 9, " " " « 

OFFICERS. 

James H. Durham, Sept. 6, '61; Adjutant; resigned Oct. 17,62. 



THIRTY-FOURTH REGIMENT— THREE YEARS SERYICE. 

COMPANY "E." 
Montgomery, Jasper M. Sept. 21, '63; Mustered out Feb. 3, '66. 



THIRTY-FIFTH REGIMENT— THREE YEAR8 SERYICE. 

COMPANY "B." 

Sherkey, John Dec. 12, '61; Corporal; mustered out Feb. 16, '65. 

PRIVATES. 

Hays, Andrew Dec. 12, '61; Mustered out Nov. 6, '64. 

Murphy, James " " Died at Andersonville, Oct. 14, '64. 

Murphy, Francis " " " " '•' 31, " 

O'Donnell, Edward " Mustered out May 29, '65. 

Parkinson, Amasa " Killed at Stone River, Jan. 2, '63. 

Snyder, Adam " Mustered out Oct. 22, '64. 

Sheppard, John " Vet. ; trans'd to U. S. Inf. Nov. — '62. 

RECRUITS. 

Burgess, James April 30, '62; Musterd out March 1, '65. 

Bell, Edward " Deserted '62. 

Flinn, James Feb. 12, '62; " June 63. 

Scott, Timothy Jan 11, 6F>; " - k 21, 6b; Substitute. 

COMPANY "C." 

Smith, Thomas Dec. 11, '61 ; Serg.; Mustered out Oct. 16, '64. 
Barton, John " " disc. March 25,'63; disabil'y. 

Smith, Edward H. " Corp.; mustered out Oct. 16, '64. 

Brown, Thomas M. " " Disc. April 19, '63; disabil'y. 

Williams, Jacob Dec. 11, '61; Wagoner, disc. March 10, '62; dis'y. 



840 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



Allen, William 
Bishop, Joseph 
Briggs, Luther 
Hart. Bartholomew 
Mush, Charles 
Morrison James L. 
McCollum, Frederick 
Murphy, Henry 
O'Brien, Patrick 
Parker, Jesse 
Phillips, Albert 
Ryan, Thomas 
Rickes, Richard 
Riley, Thomas 
Steuben. Matthias 
Taber, Wm. D. 
Wagoner, John 
Whiteman, Charles 
Q. M. Sergeant. 



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PRIVATE-. 

Promoted 2d Lieutenant. 
Mustered out Oct. 16, '('4. 
Died at Louisville Feb. 12. »'»2. 
Dropped from rolls Aug. 18, '62. 
Killed at Stone River Jan. '63. 
Discharged Feb. 7, 63; disability. 

Aug. is. 62; 
Dishonorably disc. April 8, '63. 
Discharged April 21, '64: disability. 
Died at Nashville May. <>2. 
Yet.; mustered out Sept. 7. '65. 
Discharged Sept. 63; disability. 
Discharged Feb. 22,63; disability. 
Deserted Nov. <>1 . 
Discharged Aug. 4, 63; disability. 
Died at Louisville, '62. 
Discharged May. '62. 
Yet.: mustered out Sept. 30, '65 as 



COMPANY "1. 



Whiteman. William Dec. 20. '61 
Taylor, John W. 
Lockard, Samuel 
Long, John 
Armstrong. Aaron G. 



.. 



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.. 



a 



1st Serg.: promoted 2nd Lieut. 
Serg.; discharged; disability. 

" \ et.; promoted 1st Lieut. 
Transferred Y. R. C— .62. 
Deserted July 6. '62. 



COKPOKALS. 



1'ierce, Dennison S. Dec. 2<). : 61 
Scullv, Andrew J " 

Timmons, Robert 
Carter, Charles 
Mackey, William M. 
Rerrold, Wesley L. 
Wolf, Peter 
Whalen, James J. 
Lvman, Porter 

* 

Stone River, Jan. 2, '63 
;i< lmes, Harvey 



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I 



: Discharged Aug. 21, <i4: disab'y. 
Promoted 2d Lieutenant. 
Died. Louisville, Ky., Dec. 29, '62. 
Mu>tered out .Ian. 1 2, '65. 
Vet.; trs. 1". S. Eng's Aug. 27, '64. 
Discharged — .'6)2: disability. 
Vet.; mustered out Sept. 30, '65. 
Discharged — .'62: disability. 
Musician: app'd Sergt.; killed at 

Wagoner; Dis. — ."»'»2: disability. 



MILITARY RECORD. 



341 



PRIVATES. 



Anderson, Thomas Dec. 20, '61 ; Died, Mumfordsville, Ky., — , '62. 



C ranee, Jacob 
Clark, John 
Davis, Benjamin 
Fitzpatrick, William 
Gurnee, John 
Gauser, Christian 
Graham Henry 
Herrold, Joseph S. 
Havens, Kelsey 
Hamilton, Luther 
Higgins, Joseph McK 
Kelley. William H. 
King, Lyman A. 
Lyman, Henry 
Lawrence, Sidnev R. 
Lemm, George 
Lennon, Daniel 
Moore, Levick 
Mecum, Samuel 
Owens, John 
Parker. Lewis 
Reed, Frederick 
Ritenour, David C. 
Ritenour, Solomon 
Riteman, George 
Rose, Christopher 
Romine, Sampson B. 
Rhodes, Jasper 
Shoup, Daniel F. 
Sevfonor Andrew 
Timmons, Martin 
Wilbert. Reuben 
Walker, James 
Whiteman, George 
Zimmerman, Daniel 



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Discharged — , '62; disability. 
Never reported to company. 
Discharged — , '61; disability. 
Veteran; deserted Feb. 19, '64. 
Died at Mumfordsville, Ky. — ,'62. 
Mustered out Dec. 12, '64. 
Deserted Nov. — , '61. 
Died at Mumfordsville, Ky. — ,'62. 
Veteran; mustered out Sept. 30,65. 
Vet.; dis. May 17, 'So: disability. 
Deserted from hospital, — , '62. 
Vet.; pro. 2d Lieutenant. 
Deserted — , '62. 

Vet.; mus. out Sep. 30, '65, 1st Srg. 
Died at Bardstown, Ky., — , '62. 
Discharged — , '62; disability. 



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Killed at Stone River, Jan. 2, '63. 
Discharged — , '62; disability. 






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Vet.; mustered out Sept. 30, '65. 
Vet.; transferred V. R. C. 
Vet.; mustered out Sept. 30, '65. 
6i . must, out Sept. 30, 'Q5, Corp. 
Sent to Insane Asylum, Wash., '62. 
Mustered out Dec. 19, '64. 
Discharged — , '62. 
Vet.; mus. out Sep. 30, '65 as Serg. 
Died Feb. — ,'63, wo'd Stone River. 
Deserted July 6, '62. 
Discharged — . '62 ; disability. 
Never reported. 



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Discharged — ,'63; disability. 



RECRUITS. 



Brown, Otto Jan. 20, '65; Deserted June 16, '65; substitute. 
Custer, John P. " 14, " Died at New Orleans July 8/65; subst. 
Daily, James June 17, '63 ; Deserted May 26, '65. 



342 HISTORY OF LA PROTE COUNTY. 

Schneider, Wm. Jan. 17, '65; Mustered out Sept. 30. '65: substitute. 

Tyrrell, Gilbert R. " 26,'04; Trs. to V. R. C. Oct. 8, '64; wounds. 

Wixon, Wm. S. July 15, kt Mustered out Sept. 30, '65. 
Winsby, Joseph Jan. 28, " " " " 

OFFICERS. 

John C. Walker, Dec. 11, '6\ ; Colonel. 

John \V. Cummins, " 1st Lieut.; resig'd March 23, '63. 

William Allen, June 17. '63; 2d " pro. 1st Lieut, and Capt. 

resigned July 2, '65. 
William Hipwell, Dec. 11, '61; Capt.; resigned Nov. 26, '62. 

Solin Scully, ; 1st Lieutenant. 

Charles E. Galezio, Dec. 11, '61; 2nd Lieut.; resigned July 2&,'62. 

William Whiteman, April 5, '63; 2d Lieut., pro. 1st Lt. and Capt. 

Samuel Lockard, Julv 19, '64; 1st Lieut., must, out with Regiment. 

William H. Patton, Dec. 11, '61; 2d " 

William Kelly, May 1, '65; 

Richard W. Cummins, Jan. 2, '62; " resigned April s . '62. 

Thomas Price, Nov. 15, '61; Capt.: dismissed March 18, '63. 



THIRTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT— THREE YEARS SERVICE. 

COMPANY "C." 
Selvage, Wm. II. Oct. 17, '(34: Recruit; mus. out June 26,' 65, draf. 

COMPANY "D." 
Huntly, Nehemiah Nov. 10, '64; Dis. June9,'65; disability; draft. 

COMPANY <E." 

Kenzie, Isaac Nov. 10, '64; Mustered out July 15, '65; drafted. 

Miles, John Oct. 27. u Never reported to company. 

Michael, Abraham Nov. 10, '64; Mustered out Julv 15,'65; drafted. 

Matthews, John Oct. 27. " " " June 26, 

COMPANY "I." 

RECRUITS. 

Buel, Edwin P. Sept. 2<S, '64: Mustered out July 1~>. '65; drafted. 

Kile, Ransom Nov. 10, 64: 

Russell, Thomas Sept. 2s. '64; 

Trager, Charles Oct. 27, " Died at Washington, June 8, '65. 

Van Loom, Samuel M. Oct. 26, '64; Must. July 15, '65; drafted. 



MILITARY RECORD. 



343 



FORT ^OND REGIMENT— THREE YEARS 8ERYICE. 



COMPANY "B." 

Cole, Nelson V. Sept. 19, '63; Mustered oat July 21, '65. 

COMPANY "0." 

RECRUITS. 

Blocher, John H. Sept. 19, '63; Mustered out July 21, 65. 
Denny, Milton J. April 8, '64; " " drafted, 

Fletcher, Jesse Oct. IT. June 18, '65 

Husselman, John Sept. 27, 
Hissong, Jacob " 

Kinneball, Jonas Oct. 9, 



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COMPANY "D." 



Burdick, Francis M. Nov. 24, '64 
Grooms, Benjamin Oct. 18, 
Grooms, James " 28, 

Moler, Andrew Nov. 22 
Michler, Joseph Sept. 28, 
Newcomer, Edward Nov. 17, 
Newer, John W. " 11, 

Neel, Samuel " 23, 

Peach, Charles Oct. 11, 
Reynolds, John B. Nov. 22, 
Shaur, John B. " 

Scroggs, Daniel C. " 23, 
Stellman, Solomon Oct. 29, 
Shero, Noah W. Sept. 24, 
Worthley, Albert H. Nov. 16, 
Zimmeth, John Nov. 11, 



Must out July 15, '65; substit. 
" 21 



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" June 18, '65; drafted. 

substit. 



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July 13, 
June 18, 


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substit. 
drafted. 



COMPANY "E." 



RECRUITS. 



Ackley, Jacob Sept. 19, '63; Mustered out Julv 21, '65. 
Bunnell, George B. Nov. 24, '64; " 

Eberly, Jacob " u " June 18 " substitute. 

Wells, Theodore H. Sept. 19, '63; " July 21 " 



344 



HISTORY OF LA PROTE COUNTY. 



COMPANY "F." 

Jones, Allen A. Nov. 12, '64; Mustered out June 18, '65; drafted. 

Knight, Joseph Nov. 20, 

Kenneger, Philip Oct. 14, 

Kroh, Michael Oct. 29, 

Kettle, Peleg Nov. 1,4, 

Mingos, Balsar " 

Marion, Orson Nov. 23, 



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substit. 



Deserted June 25, '65. 

COMPANY "G." 

Burgett, Philip Dec. 25, '63: Recruit, mustered out Julv 21, '65. 
Brown, William Feb. 15, '64; 
Jones, Aaron T. Aug. 13, '62; 



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COMPANY "H." 



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Big, John Dec. 30, '63; Mustered out Julv 21, '65 

Bumstead, Wm. F. " " 

Brown, Wm. March 12, '64; " 

Brown, Daniel L. " 23, " " 

Campbell, Benjamin F. Dec. 30, '63 

Clark, Erskine C. 

Carpenter- Daniel March 12, '64; 

Fessenden, George N. Sep. 19, '63: 

Grover, Stephen K. Dec. 30, 

Harvey, Anson " 

Merrill, Wallace Oct. 14, '64; 

Mishler, Daniel " 26, 



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Martin, William Sept. 20. 
Nichols, John Oct. 26, 
O'Hara, Martin Nov. 26, 
Price. James K. Nov. 16, 
Purley. William Sep. 20, 
Ricker. George Nov. 11, 
Rayhouser, Messiah " 16, 
Stuntz, John Oct. 14, 
Snyder, Philip Nov. 16, 
Sneckenberger, John " 
Shell, John 

Turner, Francis April 28, 
Titus, Horace W. Dec. 30,'63; 
Teeple, Charles B. " 



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drafted, 
substitute. 
June 18, '6b; drafted. 
" " substitute. 

Never reported to company; substir. 
Mustered out July 21, '65; drafted. 
June 18, 
July 21 . 



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substitute, 
drafted. 

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MILITRAY RECORD. 345 

Tinkham Lorenzo Nov. 16, '64; Mustered out June 18, '65; drafted. 

Wise, Barnard Dec. 30, '63; 

Wilson, Milton H. Mar. 12, '64; 

Warden, Charles G. Dec. 30/63; " 

Wantzel, John Nov. 23, '64; 

Whitmer, Adam Oct, 14, " 

Winnegar, George " 27, " 

Wolf, Samuel Nov. 16 

Wilson, Isaac 

Ward, Philip J. " " " June 25, '65; ' 

COMPANY "I." 

RECRUITS. 

Arbite Henry Feb. 19,'64; Mustered out July 21, '65 ; drafted. 
Coleman, Benj. F. Jan. 9, " " June 18, " as Serg't. 

Cross, Dallas P. Feb. 18," * " " " as Corporal. 

Fradenburg, Spencer Feb. 27,'64; " July 21. " 

Richards, Clark R. Sept. 12 '63; " " " 

COMPANY "K." 

Leslie, John H. Dec. 16, '63. Mustered out July 21, '65. 
Pyle. Abraham C. Aug. 20, '63; " " " 



FORTY-FOURTH REGIMENT— THREE YEARS SERVICE. 

COMPANY "A." 
Crow, John T. Nov. 22, '61; Vet.; mustered out Sept. 14, f 6^. 

COMPANY "H." 
Elya, Orson Nov. 22, '61; Discharged. 



THIRD CAVALRY— (FORTY-FIFTH) REGIMENT. 

Brusie, Luther Oct. 22, '61; Ass't Surg.; resigned Nov. 29, '62. 



FORTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT. 

Collins, Samuel B. March 16, '64; Recruit; must, out June 14,'65. 
Gaddis, John W. Jan. 3, •• •• v July 15, •• 



346 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

COMPANY "C' 

Brand, Nelson S. Dec. 24, '61: 1st Sergeant; promoted 2d Lieut. 
Chambers. George N. •• Vet.; must, out July 15,'65; Serg. 

Richards, Daniel Oct. 8, '62; Mustered out July 15. '65. 
Waxham, Alfred Dec. 24, '61; Died at Paducah, Ky., A P r - 27/62! 

COMPANY "D." 

Falk, Charles Jan. 1, '62; 1st Serg.; promoted 2d Lieutenant. 
Smith, Charles L. " SergV. died, St. Louis, Mo.. July 15. '68 

Austin, Alexander B. " " promoted 2d Lieutenant. 

CORPORALS. 

Squier, Edwin V. Jan. 1, '62; Vet.; mus. out July 15, '^< r >. Sergeant 

Warner, Willard 

Johnson. Andrew 

Winch, Flavius J. 

Haradon, Charles W. 

Walker, Frank 

York, John 



Died at Evansville, Aug. 8. '62. 
Killed at Corinth. Oct. 4, 
Musician; deserted Sept. '63. 
Wagoner; Vet. mus. out July 15, 'I 



c 
PRIVATES. 



Brinkerhoff. Herman C. Feb. 1,'62; Died May 17,63: wou'd rec. 

Champion's Hill. 
Brown. Elijah B. Feb. 11, '62: Died, Memphis, Aug. 7. '•)->. woud's. 
Clark, Lewis Jan. 1, » Trans, to V. R. C. Nov. 22. 'i^. 
Craig, Abel M. •• 30, » Died, Paducah, Ky., March 1. '62. 
Fogus, Abram •• 1, ■■ Discharged Feb. 23, '63. 
Francis, Nath'l •• 27, » Trans, to V. R. C. Nov. 22, '63. 
Frame, Noah Feb. 10, •• Vet.; mus. out July 15, '65. as Corp'L 
Hutchinson, Jno. R. Jan. 1, 62: Discharged. 

Loomis. Chauncey ■• Vet.; dis. Aug. 21, '64; disability. 

McCormick, William ■• Discharged March 18, ? 63* 

Merrill, Alonzo - Trs. to V. R. C, Nov. 22, '&■). 

Nick, Jacob •• Killed at Iuka, Sept. 19, '62. 

Robinson, William •• Vet.; must, out July 15, '65. 

Scott, Zimri •• Died at home Jan. 1, '62. 

Skead, McDonald •• Vet.; mus. out July 15, ^-'i. 

Shead, George W. 

Smith, Charles R. Feb. 1, '62; Discharged Aug. 8, '62. 
Spang, Joseph Jan. 1, '62; Vet.; must, out July 15, 'I 
Stock dale, William 
Tappan, Julius C. •• ■• disch. May 26, '65; disability. 



MILITARY RECORD. 



347 



Taylor, Henry Jan 20, '62; Killed at Iuka, Miss., Sept, 19, '62. 
Teeter, Ren wick Jan. 27, •• Vet.; must. July 15, '65, as Serg't. 



Teeter, Philip F. Feb. 17, 
Teeter, William •■ 19, 
Teeter, Walter Jan. 27, 
Warner, Cyprian]G. Jan. 1 
Warner, James Harvey " 
Welch, Josiah 
West, Ebenezer C. Jan. 20. 



Killed at Iuka, Miss., Sept. 19, '62. 

Discharged May — , '63. 

Died, Memphis, Tenn., July 22/63. 

Trs. to V. R. C. Sept. —'63. 

Discharged Jan. 25, '63. 

Died on hospital boat, June 27, '63. 

Discharged Jan. 21, '63. 

RECRUITS. 

Burgland, Oiof March 18, '64; Must, out July 15, '65, princ. Musi. 
Brewer, John W. Feb. 24, •• ■• ■• •• Corporal, 

Hews, William H. Oct. 6, '62; 
Johnson, Andrew Mar. IS. '64; 

OFFICERS. 

Tompkins Higday, : Additional Assistant Surgeon. 

Daniel Crumpacker, Dec. 24, '61; Captain, resigned July 9, '62. 
Orson Wilson, Jan. 1, '62; Captain, resigned Jan. 22, '63. 
Derrick Brinkerhoff, •• 2d Lieut., pro. 1st Lieut, and Cap.: res. ■ 

July 22, '63. 
Jasper Packard, •• 1st •• Co. D., prom. Capt. Co. B., 

and Lieutenant Colonel 128th Regiment. 
Peter J. Howe, May 20,'65; 1st Lieut.; must, out with Regiment. 
Alexander B. Austin, May 1, '64; •• Co. D., pro. Capt. Co. C; 

mustered out with Regiment. 
Alvah H. Palmer, Dec. 17, '64; •■ must'd out with Regiment. 
Nelson S. Brand, July 21, '62; 2d Lieut; resigned Dec. 10, 62. 
Charles Falk, ; 2d Lieut.; died wounds, received at Corinth, 



FIFTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT— THREE YEARS SERYICE. 

COMPANY "D." 



RECURITS. 



Albert, Martin G., Oct. 21, '64; Discharged June 25, '6^. 



Cramer, Jonathan 
Chase, John H. 
Coleman, Stephen 
Cusick, David 
Freese, William 



Mustered out 



348 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



German. John W. Oct. 21/64; Discharged July 25, '65 : drafted. 

Ht?gg, Eli •• •• June 

Helminger. Philip •• •• July 

Kreighbaum. Andrew ■• June 

Miser. John 

McDuffie, Henson •■ •• July 

Me?ssersinith, Ephraim 

Ryan, Joseph •• June 

Roning. Abraham 

Rilev, iibsalom 

Rice, Francis A. 

Strohecker. Ada:.i 

Tavlor, Jerrod 

t. 

Warner, William 

COMPANY "F." 

Hindman. James Oct. 21, '64: Mustered out July 6, '65. 

Steele. Eli •• •• •• 2~>, •■ 



FIFTY-NINTH REGIMENT— THREE YEARS SERVICE. 

COMPANY "G." 

RECRUITS. 

. Bennett. Samuel Feb. 15, '65; Mustered out July 17. '65; drafted. 

Chambers, Elias Dec. 9, '64: 
Dawson. George 
Gallegan, Joseph H.Jan. 21.- • 
Rebstock, Samuel 

COMPANY "H." 

McLaughlin, Andrew April 30, '<>-: Vet.; must, out July IT. '65, 

RECRUITS. 

Baker, Warren. March lo, 64; Mustered out July IT. '65. 
Davis, Samuel D. April 28, '62; Mustered out July 1T. '65. 
Heldrith. Daniel March 15, '64; 
Pease, Charles B. •• •• •• •■ Serg't. 

COMPANY "K." 

RECRUIT^. 

Blessing. Lewis Jan. 6, '65; Mustered out July 17. "6v>: substitute. 



MILITARY RECORD. 



349 



Dawson, George Dec. 9,'64; Mustered out July 17, '65; drafted. 

Lunday, Frederick 

Mc Gee, Elisha --'62: 

John E. Simpson, April 27, '62; Cap.: pro. Maj.: raus. out with Rg. 



SEVENRY-THIRD REGIMENT— THREE YEARS SERVICE. 

COMPANY "A." 

Johann, Peter Aug. 16, '62; Mustered out July 1, '$5. 

COMPANY "B." 

Monday, John W. Aug. 16/62; 1st Serg.; pro. 2d Lieutenant. 
Penwell, Lewis T. •■ Serg't; mustered out July 1, '65. 

Boyee, Lourine S. •• ■• dis. Nov. 29, '92; disability. 

Kierstead, James II. •■ ■■ promoted 2d Lieutenant. 

CORPORALS. 

Hoover, George Aug. 16, '62; Mus'erd out July 1, '65, as private. 



Powell, Walter 
Frazier, Thomas 
Bentz, Frank 
Graham, Charles E. 
Walker, Obadiah 
Wells, Americus 
Wells, Hannibal 
Mix, Elon 



Sergeant. 
Died, Cincinnati, 0., Jan — , '63. 
Mustered out July 1, '65. 
Des'ted, Columbia, Ky., Oct. 25,'62. 
Mus. out July 1,'65, as 1st Sergeant. 
Mus'n ; discharged June 9, '63. 

died, Louisville, Aug. 26, '62. 
Wag.; died, New Albany, Ind., — '62. 



PRIVATES. 



Ballou, Ambrose Aug. 16, '62; Died, Nashville, Tenn., Dec. 20, "63. 



Beuford, William 
Berkstahler, August 
Bogardus, William B. 
Bo wen, Alexander 
Bowen, Benton 
Briggs, Francis W. 
Burlet, Joseph A. 
Cassaday, William L. 
Clark, Horace 
Colman, John 
Coll or, Henry 
Coll or. Luther 



Feb. 9, '63. 
Discharged March 27, '63. 
Trans, to V. R. C. Oct. 30, '63. 
Must, out July 1, '65, as Corporal. 
Discharged March 27, '63. 
Discharged Jan. 2, '63. 

April 22, '63. 

Nov. 4, '62. 
Must, out July 1,'65. 

as Corporal. 
Died, Nashville, Tenn., Dec. 11, '62. 



350 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY 



Cooper, William Aug. 16. 
Coppock, Nathan W. 
Cornelius, Ephriam C. ■• 

Gro«s, James 
Davidson, Giles 
Drown, John W. 
Dolph, David 
East n, William P. 
Fields, Lorenzo 
Frazier, Milton E. 
Freeze, Christopher 
Harris, Levitus 
Havnes, Francis D. 
Huntley, Henry E. 
Jeffreys, John 
Jennison, Charles 
Josling, Henry 
Kanible, Charles F. 
Lamb, Orrin C. 
Lamb, Jonathan E. 
Lav, Sebastian 
Lee, William S. 
Leanland, Victor W. 
Lenhart, Elias 
Lucher, Samuel 
Manderville, Daniel B. •• 
Marble, Miner S. 
Moore, Samuel 
Mott. Alva 
McMellen. Matthew 
0' Brian. James 
Olin, Clifford 
Oliver, Albert 
Phillips, Christian 
Perry, Edward I. 
Rodgers, Willard D. S." 
Seymore, Mortimer 
Shade, William 
Sherman. George 
Sherwood, Albert 
Shultz, Henry 
Stanton. Judah L. 



'62; Discharged Oct. 26, '63. 
Discharged Nov. — , '62. 
Died, Nashville, Tenn., Aug. 12,'63. 
Discharged July 4, '64. 
Died at Gallatin, Tenn., Dec. l4,'62. 
Des. at Louisville, Ky., Feb. 10, '68. 
Died, Murfreesboro, T., Apr. 15, '63. 
Died, Nashville, Tenn., Apr. 14, '68. 
Mustered out July 1, '65. 
Discharged Feb. 28. '63. 
Mustered out July 1, '65. 



Discharged Dec. 26, '68. 

Des. at La Porte, Ind., June 16, '63. 

Trans, to Y. R. C, June 30, '63. 

Must, out July 1,'65, as Com. Sersf t. 



Mustered out July 1, '*i">. 
Discharged Nov. 19, '62. 
Mustered out July 1. '65. 
Died at Gallatin, Tenn., Dec. 24. '62. 
Des. at Lexington. Ky., Sep. 1. '62. 
Discharged Jan. 13, '63. 
Mustered out July 11. '65. 

1, •• - Corp'l. 
Des. Oct. 25/62; retur. March 3,'64. 
Mustered out July 1, '65. 

Trans, to V. R. C. Dec. 8, '63. 
Mustered out July 1, '<>•"). 
Discharged Jan. 21. '64. 

Nov. 2D, '62. 

Feb. 15, '64. 

Died at Gallatin, Tenn., Feb. 24, '63. 

* • •• •• • • 

Mustered out July 1, '65. 

mm • • • • 

Discharged March 3, '63. 



MILITARY RECORD. 353 

Styles, Hezekiah Aug. 16. '62; Died at Triana, Ala., Oct. IT, '64. 

Stotts, Mayze •• Died, Nashville, Tenn., Feb. 16, '63. 

Smith, Alvin H. ■• Discharged July 22, '63. 

Warner, Croyden •• Mustered out July 1, '65. 

WaXwin, Walter A. ■■ Died at Nashville, Tenn., Dec. 7, '62. 

Western, Charles B. ■• Must'd out July 1, '65, as Sergeant. 

Westbrook, Frederick *■ Mustered out July 1, '65. 

White, Benjamin S. 

Williams, Isaiah ■• •■ 11, •'• 

Winchell, Ralph •• Died at Nashville, Tenn., Dec. 8, '63. 

Zimmerman, Jacob " Mustered out July 1, '65. 

Zell, Frederick J. •• Discharged. 

RECRUITS. 

Boyce, Laurin S. Feb. 11, '64; Transf. to 29th Regt., July 1, '65. 
Dixon, Jacob Oct. 7, " 

Hawley, Price W. Feb. 11, •■ 
York, Robert J. June 20,'63; 
Young, Philip L. Mar. 18,'64 ; 

COMPANY "C." 

Steele, Austin Aug. 16, '62; Mustered out July 1, '65. 

COMPANY "K." 

Reynolds, William Aug. 16,'62; 1st Sergt., promoted 1st Lieut. 

SERGEANTS. 

Fairchild, Ezra Aug. 16, '62; Trans. V. R. C, Oct. 4, '63. 
Harding, Benjamin •■ Discharged May 20, '63. 

Reynolds, Silas H. •• •• •• 15, '65. 

Denny, Joseph •• Mustered out July 1, '65. 

CORPORALS. 

Halhday, William Aug. 16,'62; Discharged April 3, '63. 

Weston, Carey I. •■ Killed at Stone River, Dec. 31, '62. 

Hammond, John E. •• Trs. Miss. Mar. Brig., Mar. 25,'63. 

Beatty, Sidney •• Mustered out July 1, '65. 

Kilburn, Henry •• ■■ •• ■• as Sergt. 

Clark, Jonathan D. •• Died Huntsville, Ala., Nov. 26, '64. 

Culver, John A. ■• Died Nashville, Tenn., Dec. 12,'62. 

Linza, Andrew J. r Mustered out July 1, '65. 

Swinney, Charles •• Mus'n; kil'd, Perrysville Oct. 8, '62 

Jernegan, Edward ■■ •• discharged March 19, '63. 

Peck, Miles W. r Wagoner; killed at Stone River. 



350 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



PRIVATES. 



Allen, Hiram F. Aug. 16, '62 

Augustine, Christian 

Bales, Thomas C. 

Barnard, Job 

Behan, Robert 

Bennett. Hiram M. 

Bird, Henry 

Boothe, George 

Bowen, James 

Cope, James 

Carr, Shannon 

Clement, William H. 

Corser, True 

Corser, Anthony B. 

Deeds, Leroy 

Doing, James R. 

Donaldson, William 

Donnell, William 

Donnell, Joseph 

Ferris, James J. 

Gibson, John W. 

Goodwin, Clayton S. 

Gordon, Galathia 

Halladav. John G. 

Hammond, James R. 

Harsfield, James 

Hart, Franklin N. 

Hernngton, Henry B. ■■ 

H err old, John 

Houston, Rufus 

Houston, John 

Howard, Thomas 

Jacobus, John G. 

Kettle, James J. 

Maulsby, Clark F. 

McAulife, Michael 

McFadden. August 

McNeil, Joseph 

Myers, Charles 

Myers, Frederick 

Neville, John 



i Died at Silver Springs, Nov. 19, '62. 
Killed at Stone River, Dec. 31, '62. 
Mustered out July 1, '65. 
Must, out Julv 1, '65, as 1st Serge't, 

• • • • • • 

Discharged March 2. '63. 

Miss'g Day's Gap, Ala. Apr. 30, '63. 

Must'd out July 1, '65, as Corporal. 

Discharged June 5, '65: wounds. 

Discharged March 2, '63. 

Miss'g Day's Gap, Ala.. Apr. 30,'63. 

Mustered out Julv 1, '65. 

Died, Nashville, Tenn., Dec. 14, '62. 

Died at Gallatin, Tenn., Jan. 8, '63. 

Must, out July 1, '65; as Corporal. 

Discharged Oct, 29, '63. 

Must, out July 1, '65, as Corporal. 

Mustered out Julv 1, '65. 
Died at Nashville, Dec. 6, '62. 
Dis. Oct. 19, '63, as Corpr'l; wounds. 
Discharged Dec. 29, '62. 
Discharged Aug. 11, '63; wounds. 
Mustered out Julv 1, '65. 
Discharged Feb. 16, '63. 

21, •• 
Mustered out July 1, f 65. 

• • • • • ■ 

Discharged Dec 20, '62. 
Mustered out Julv 1. '65. 
Died at Danville.' Ky., Oct. 24, '62. 
Mustered out July 1, '65. 

• • • • • • 

Discharged Jan. 21. '63. 
Discharged Feb. 18, '63. 
Died at Nashville. Jan. 12, "63. 
Mustered out July 1. '65. 
Discharged June 10. '65. 
Discharged Aug. 25. '62. 
Mustered out July 1. '^o. 
Mustered out July 1, '65, as Serg't. 
Mustered out July 1, '65. 



MILITARY RECORD. 



853 



Perly, George Aug. 16, '65; Mustered out July 1, '65. 
Petro, John M. 



Petersdorf, Julius 
Petersdorf. Franklin 
Peterson, William H. 
Quinn, Michael 
Quirk, Thomas 
Reed, James V. 
Reynolds, Thomas 
Reynolds, John A. 
Robinson, Robert L. 
Romine, James A. 
Root, Hiram S. 
Shanly, John 
Shreve, Franklin M. 
Smith, Andrew J. 
Stephens, Justice F. T. 
Thornton, Samuel 
Tuttle, Frederick H. 
Warren, Charles 
Webster, William W r . 
Webster, Amos G. 
Welch, James 
Williams, Clinton 
Williams, John 
Williams. John M. 
Williams, Harrison H. 
Williams, Leander P. 



Deserted June 15, '63. 

Nov. 4, '62. 
Killed at Stone River, Dec. 31, '62. 
Discharged Feb. 27, '64. 
Mis'g in act'n Lexington, Sept. 1, : 62. 
Discharged Feb. 18, '63. 
Died at Nashville, Jan. 1, '63. 
Must, out July 1, '65, as Corporal, 
Discharged March 26, '63. 
Mustered out July 1, '6o. 
Died near Glasgow, Kv., Nov. 5, '62. 
Deserted Feb. 20, '63. 
Died at Nashville, Dec. 9, '62. 
Mustered out July 1, '65. 
Killed at Stone River, Dec. 31, '62. 
Mustered out July 1, '65. 
Died near Nashville, Dec. 6, '62. 
Died a tf Nashville. March 4, '63. 
Discharged April 20, '63. 
Must'd out July 1, '65, as Corporal. 
Transfrd. to V. R. C, April 6, '64. 
Mustered out July 1, f 65. 
Deserted Dec. 1, '62. 
Must'd out July 1, '6b^ as Sergeant. 
Must'd out July 1, r 65 y as Corporal. 

•• Q. M. Serg't. 

RECRUITS. 



Birt, John M. Oct. 27, '62 ; Mustered out July 1, '65. 

Denham, William Mar. 5, '64; Trs. to 29th Regiment, July 1, '65. 

Finch, Silas Sept. 21, - Mustered out July 1, '65. 

McCray, James S. March 5," Trs. to 29th Regiment, July 1, '65. 

Thornburg, Orlistus W. Mar. 5,'64; 



Williams, Charles N. 



OFFICERS. 



Gilbert Hathaway, Aug. 22, '62; Col.: killed in action, near Rome, 

Ga., May 2, '63. 
Ivin N. Walker, •• 16, ■• Capt., pro. Major and Lieut. Col.; 

resigned July 4, '64, for disability. 

23 



354 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Joseph llagenbuck. Aug. 16, '62; 2nd Lieut., prom'd 1st Lieut, and 

Adj.; must, out with Regiment. 
John A. Frazier, Feb. 26/63; Chaplain, resigned April 1, '65. 
Wilson Pottinger, March 24/63; Asst. Surg.; resigned Dec. 24/63 
George C. Gladwyn, Aug. 16/62; Captain; resigned Feb. 5, '63. 
Theodoric F. C. Dodd, •• 1st Lieut.; promoted Captain, 

resigned Nov. 14/63. 
John W. Munday, March 6, '63; 2d Lieut, pro. 1st Lieut.; resigned 

May 26, '65: cause, business affairs. 
James H. Kierstead, May 12, '64; 2nd Lieut., promoted 1st Lieut. 

mustered out with Regiment. 
.Albert A. Carley, Feb. 7, '63; Captain, wounded at Day's Gap, 

April 30, '63; supposed to be dead. 
Ithamar D. Phelps. Aug. 16. '62; 1st Lt. pro. Cap.; mus. out w. Rg. 
William Reynolds. Feb. 18. 63: •• res. Julv 23/64, disability. 

John Butterfield, Aug. 16, '62; 2*1 ■• » Jan. 9, '63. 
Leander P. Williams, March 1, '63; id Lieut, promoted 1st Lieut.; 

Brevetted Major; mustered out -\- ith Regiment. 



SEVENTY-FOURTH REGIMENT— THREE YEARS SERVICE. 

COMPANY ; G." 
Brown, Horace H. Aug. 9, '62; Deserted Sept. 11, '62. 



FOURTH CAVALRY (SEVENTY -SEVENTH) REGIMENT. 

COMPANY <E." 
Hazelton, Sidney S-, Jr. Aug. 8,'62; Co. Q. M. Ser.; died Sep. 1,'63. 

SERGEANT-. 

Hays, Thomas W. Aug. 6, '62; Promoted 2d Lieutenant. 
Smith, George F. •• 5 ■■ Discharged Jan. 15, '62. 
Collier, Charles " 6 " Mustered out June 29, '6o. 

Dunham, Edward A. •• 9 ■■ Died at Scottsville, Ky., Dec. 3, '62. 
Woodley, Mahlon B.-- 8 ■• Must, out June 29, '65, as private. 

CORPORALS. 

Chamberlain, Sylvester Aug. 7, '62: Discharged Jan. 20, '63. 
Kell, Nathan Aug. 6, '62; Mustered out June 29, '65, as Sergeant. 
Farley, Henry C." 8, ■• •■ ■• " ••private. 



MILITARY RECORD. 



355 



Ray. James A. •• 
Wilson. John K." 
Clarkson, Julius •■ 
Rhodda, William* • 
McBride, Win. B- 
Spencer. Baldon G. 
Halpin, William 
Lloyd. Henry T. 
Plan. Eli 



9, 62; Discharged Feb. 8, '65. 



9. 
6, 

5, 
6. 



4 



Austin, Jedediah Aug. 
Allen, Erasmus 
Beckman. Lewis 
Burgwedel, Herman ■■ 
Butteriield, Robert 
Bentz. Joseph W. 
Barker, Levi M. 
Belden. Marshall 
Barnard. Uriah W. •• 
Brown, John A. 
Coffey, John 
Conant, Edwin R. 
Campbell, Thomas 
Downing, David 
Duninnoton. W. H. •• 

err * 

Delana, Thomas 
Dunn, Francis M. 
Fradenburg, J as. T. •• 
Freese. Henry 
Grice, James H. 
Harlow, Theodore M." 
Hubner, August. C. ■• 
Hite, Lewis 
Herlihe, Daniel F. ■• 
Hagenbuck, William ■• 
Hanson, Oloff 
Jenkins, Samuel 
Johnson, William 
Kull, Jacob F. 
Lyon, Dennis 
Lee, Elijah T. 
Lamphier, Edson H. •• 



6 



13 

8 
8 
9 
6 
9 
6 
6 
9 
6 
5 
7 
9 
6 
7 
6 
8 
9 
7 
6 

<-r 
i 

6 
4 
4 

8 



Died at Murfreesboro, Term., Feb. 16, '63. 
Died at Nashville, Tenn., March 19,'63. 
Bugler; discharged March 13, '62. 

June 8, '64. 
Farrier and blacksmith ; dis. Nov. 12, '62. 

•• May 2, '65. 
Saddler; Mustered out June 29, '65. 
Wagoner: 

PRIVATES. 

'62: Discharged Dec. 22, '62. 

Mustered out June 29, f 65. 

• • • • « • 

Discharged Dec. 9, '62. 
Discharged Jan. 22, '63. 
Mustered out June 29, '65. 
Died at Knoxville, April 25, '64. 
Discharged Feb. 10, '63. 
Must'd out June 29, '65, as Corp'l. 

• • • • • • 

Died at Chicago, 111., Oct. 31, '64. 
Mustered out June 29, J 6fy. 

• • • • • • 

Killed near Knoville, Aug. 14, '63. 
Mustered out June 29, '65. 

• • • • • • 

Deserted Oct. 29, '62. 
Mustered out June 29, '65. 



9. 

6, 
6, 
9 



••as Corp'l. 

• • • • • • 

Trans, to V. R. C, Feb. 16, '64. 
Killed, Mt. Wash'n, Ky. Oct. 2,'62. 
Died, Nashville, Tenn., Feb. 27, '65. 
Mustered out June 29, '65^ as Corp. 



" blacksmith. 






HISTORY OK 1,A !»ok'n; COUNTS. 



Muck, Joseph Aug. 8, '62 
Marsden, Wm. H. 6, " 

KcKinney, Henry 
Ott, Jacob 
Peabody, Wm. F. 
Reynolds, Elisha B. 
Riley. Isaac 
Rice, Augustus A . 
Sawver, Isaac 
Sawver. Horace 
Sheldon, Joshua W. 
Seekamp, Herman H 
Shreves. Cyrus D. 
Tulev, David 
Taggart, Eugene T. 
Vannote, James L. 
Witt, Isaac 
Waggoner. Milton 
Walton, Albert J. 
Wilson, Weslev W. 
Wilbraham, Jo. W. 
Willard, Henry H. 
Walkerton, Chas. G. 
Wilbraham, Wm. 
Wood, Edgar J. 
Zenor, Melville C. 



8, 

9, 
10, 

9, 

•'• 
6, 



9, 
5, 

9, 

9, 

9, 

1, 
13, 

4, 

1, 



Must out June -!'. '65, as Sergeant. 
Discharged Nov. 28, '63. 
Transf'dto V. R. C. Sept. 20, '63. 
Must'd out June - ( .». '65, as Corp'l. 
Killed at Rutherford Creek. '63. 
Discharged Nov. 14. '62. 
Discharged Nov. 28, '63. 
Mustered out June li- 1 . '65. 

as i torpT. 

Discharged Nov. 1 1. '62. 
Mustered out June 29, '65. 

••as Serg't. 



Died Bowling Green. Kv. Oc. 21,'62 
Transferred, V. R. C. Jan. 15, '64. 
Mustered out June 29, '65. 

Discharged June — . '65. 

• Killed, Mt. Washington. Oct. L,'62. 
Mustered out June 29, '65. 

• Transfd to V. R. C, Sept. 21 '63. 

May i. '64. 

OFFICERS. 

Nathan Earlywine Aug. 12.'«)i ) : Capt., pro. Major, res. for good of 

- rvice, Mar. 26/63. 
Wm. A. Woodward. •• IstLt., pro. Cap.; res. Apr. 29/63 

Gilbert H. Kneeland, Sept. 5/62; 2d ■; ■• ■■ mus. out with Rg. 

Sidney S. Hazelton, " " died Sept. !.' 63. 

Thomas W. Hays, May 1, '04: •■ •■ must'd out with Regiment. 



9 



EIGHTY-THIRD REGIMENT— THREE YEARS SERYICE. 

COMPANY -K.-- 

Lynch, Owen Oct 7, '64: Trans. 48th Re^., May 30, '65; drafted. 
Ludwig, Charles •• 



MILITARY RECORD. 



357 



COMPANY "F." 
McGrah, John Oct. 19, '64; Mustered out Aug. 14,'65; substitute. 

COMPANY "K." 

RECRUITS. 

Compton, Gilbert Oct. 20, '64. 

Garner, David ■ •■ 

Graffis, Abraham Oct. 17, Transf. to 48th Regt., June 1, '65. 

" V. R. C, May 31, '65. 

•• 48th Regt., June 1, '65. 



Harrington, Enos " 


20. 


Pixter, Peter 


20. 


Snyder. William 


18, 


Snivel \\ Daniel V. •■ 


20, 


Stiver, Aaron 


20, 


Stiver, John J. 


20, 


Silence, James 


18, 


Velilen, Peter 


20, 


Yawky, John 


20. 


Yarin, John 


• 20, 



Died, Jeffersonville, Ind. Jan. 14/65 
Transf d to 48th Regt., June 1, '65. 



EIGHTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT -THREE YEARS SERVICE. 

COMPANY "A." 

BIymer, Wra. S. Sept. 19, '63; Transf d to 42d Regt. June 9, '65. 

COMPANY "B." 
Cole, Nelson V. Sept. 19,'63; Transf d to 42nd Regt. June 9, '65. 

COMPANY -'C." 
Bloker, John H. Sept, 19, '63; Recruit ; trs. to 42d Rg. June 9,'65 

COMPANY "D." 

Grooms, Benjamin Oct. 28, '64; Recruit; trs. to42d Rg. June 9,'65. 
Grooms, James 

COMPANY "E." 

Ackley, Jacob, Sept, 19, '63: Transferred to 42d Reg. June 9, '65. 
Wills, Philip H. 

COMPANY "F." 

YanAnkin. Charles Sept, 19/63; Transf. to 42d Regt. June 9, '65. 



358 



HISTORY 01 LA PROTE COUNTY. 



COMPANY "G." 



Harding Solomon E. Aug. 
Stockman, Isaac S. 
Dowd, John H. 
Harding, Thomas D. 

Dunham, George A. Aug. 
Scholts, David 
Dudley, Henry H. 
Miller, Jacob V. 
Sales, Thomas A. 
Burden, James 
Hooten Benjamin F. 
Culp, Johnson W. 
Closser, Jerome B. 

Berget, Charles Aug. 31, 
Billman. William 
Baker, Henry 
Casgriff, Arthur 
Croll, August 
Cherry, Joseph 
Cole, Andrew 
Cannel, John F. 
Cloper, Joseph A. 
Chronister, Joseph A. 
Campbell, Charles 
Cruzan, William 
Cornell. Charles 
Dunn. Henry 
Day. Alden E. 
Dauphin. Nicholas 
Dudlev. Milton 
Davis. Jamea II. 
Fogle, Jacob R. 
Fisher. Thomas 
Fessenden, Major 
Gilfoyle, Michael 
Garner, John 
Graves, William H. 
Jacobus, Andrew J. 



31/62 ; 1st Seg.; kil'd. Chicm. Sep. 20. 

Serg't; discharged Nov. 3, '63. 

must, out June 10, '65. 

discharged Nov. L3, '63. 

OOKPOBAIiS. 

31/62 : Died, Manchester, Ten. July 4,'63 
Died at LaPorte, Ind. Dec. 7,'63. 
Mustered out June 10, '65. 
Discharged March 20. '63. 
Discharged April 29, '6^. 
Hied, Tunnel Hill, Ga. Dec. 9,'62. 
Music.; died, Indi'lis, July 15/63. 

discharged July 30, '63. 
Wagoner: " Jan. 29, '63. 

PRIVATES. 

62; Must, out June 10/05. as Corporal. 
Discharged. 

Killed at Chicamauga, Sept. 19, '63. 
Died at Nashville, Tenn. Feb. 18, '64. 
Discharged March IT. '63. 
Died, Richmond prison, Va. Jan. — '64. 
Died, Chattanooga, Tenn. Sep. 30/63. 
Must, out June 10, '65, as 1st Serg't. 
Trs. to V. li. C; must, out June ; 5 ( ». 
Died at Nashville, Tenn. March 17,'63. 
Discharged Feb. 2, '63. 
Discharged Feb. 28, '63. 



Discharged -Jan. 20, '63. 

Died ar Stevenson, Ala.. .Jan. 30, '64. 

Must'd out June 10, '65. a< Corporal. 

Discharged Dec. 0. '62. 

Mustered out June 10, '05. 

Discharged Nov. 24. 62. 

Discharged Jan. 17. '63. 

Killed, Chattanooga, Ten., Nov. 25,< 

Discharged Feb. 1, '63. 

Killed at Chicamauga. Sept. 19, '63. 

Discharged duly 27. '63. 



Discharged Jan. 1\ 



'63. 



MILITARY RECORD. 



859 



Jones, Adam B. Aug. 31, '62; 

Jones, Aaron S. 
Lightfoot, Enoch 
Lightfoot, Eli H. 
Moore, Robert 
McNeal, Isaac " • 

Moore. Thomas 
Montgomery, Thomas •• 
Moffit. Ephraim 
McDonald, Ebenezer " 
Powers, Lewis 
Prince, Lyman 
Pointer. William 
Pointer, Thomas 
Rody, John 
Rogers, Amos 
Roach, Michael 
Rice, George 
Siddles, John A. 
Smootzer, Charles 
Sharp, Benjamin 
Stark. John 
Urquhart, George 
Vantassel, Alonzo 
Van tassel, Andrew 
Warburton, Peter 
Warmer, Orv 
Young, Martin 
Ames, James S. 
Burgett, Philip 
Miller, Jacob V. 



Mustered out June 10, '65. 

Mus. out June 10, '65 ; absent, no leave. 

Died at Stevenson, Ala., Oct. 10, '63. 

Discharged March 20, '63. 

Mustered out June 16. '65. 

Died at Nashville, Tenn., Jan. 2, '64. 

Discharged Jan. 25, '63. 

Mustered out June 10. 65. 

Died at Gallatin, Tenn... Jan. 25. '63. 

Discharged Feb. 20. '63. 



Died at Chattanooga, Nov. lo! 6? 



; •> 



&""> 



•• - Gallatin, Tenn. Dec. 10, '62. 
Killed at Chicamauga, Sept. 20. '63, 
Died at Chattanooga, Ten. Dec. 3, '63. 
Killed at Chicamauga, Sept. 20, '63. 
Trans, to Vet. Engineer Corps. 
Mustered out June 10, '65. 

• • • • * ■ 

Died at Danville, Va., Nov. 20, '64. 

Died at Chattanooga, Sept. 25, '63. 

Died at Louisville, Kv., Dec. 7, '62. 

Deserted Oct. 6, '62. 

Discharged July 13, '64. 

Must, out June 10, '65, as Corporal.. 

Discharged Dec. IT, '62. 

Killed at Chicamauga, Sept. 29, '63. 

Trs. to Marine Brigade, April 22, '64. 

Mustered out June 10, '(of). 

Recruit; trs. 42d Reg. June 9,'65; sub. 

Died, Lookout Mountain, Aug. 28, '64.. 



COMPANY "H." 

Selleck, John E. Aug. 31'62; 1st Sergeant, pro. 2d Lieutenant. 



Logan, Albert C. 
Loomis, Henry B. 
Martin, Alexander A. 
Weed, Chancellor 
Brown, Henry C. 

10, '65, as Serg. 
Way, Ira 
Post; n, John A. 



Sergeant, pro. 1st Lieutenant. 

discharged Jan. 10, '63. 
Corp.; transferred to V. R. C. 

•• •• •• •• 

Arm amputated: mus. out June 

Must'd out June 6, '65, as 1st Serg't. 
•• discharged Dec. 20, '62. 



360 



HISTORY OF LA PROTE COUNTY. 



Allen. Silas Aug. 
Ash. James G. 

Blackman. Homer 0. 
Blodgett. Henrv H. 
Bryson, Ephraim M. 

Carpenter. Leonard 

Carpenter. Emory 
Outlines John B. 
Ewinoj. William A. 
Fierce. Henry 
Fierce. William W. 
Finch, Eddv S. 
Fletcher. Franklin 
Gee, John F. 
Hall. Charles H. G. 
Hass, William 
Harsen, Sylvester D. 
Jones, John M. 
Linard. Daniel J. 
Lynch. Webster 
Mahanny, Daniel 
Manderville, Ab. C. 
Miller. Wm. S. 
Neihardt, William 
Nelson, Isaac X. 
O'Brien, James 
Pierson, James W. 
Pitcher. Alonzo 
Posten, Elias B. 
Pratt. Eugene A. 
Richards, Orrin M. 
Schermerhorn, J. C. 
Taylor. John S. 
Titus. Xelson J. 
Weed, Pope C. 
Wellman, Wilson R. 
Wilson, Jonathan H. 
Willis, William C. 
Woolev. Samuel 
Young, Andrew 



PRIVATE-. 

31, "02: Mustered out June 10. '65, as Serg't. 
Discharged Januarv 6, '64. 
Transf. to Eng'r Corps, July 2'.', '64. 
Died. Nashville. Term., March 31,'63 
Must'd out June 10, '65, as Corporal. 
Discharged Feh. 18, '63. 
Discharged Jan. 27. '63. 
Promoted Captain Company "I." 
Dropped as a deserter. 
Trans. V. R. C; mus. out June 29/65. 
Discharged. 

Mustered out June 10. '65. 
Discharged Jan. 22, '63. 
Discharged Feb. 27. •■ 
Died at Louisville. Kv.. Oct. 2. '63. 
Discharged Feb. 22. '63. 
Discharged. 

Mustered out June 13, '65. 

•• 15, *• 

•• 10. •• hosp. stew'd 
Discharged Feb. 17. "6o. 
Discharged March 29, '65, wounds. 
Died. South Tunnel, Ten. Nov. 19,'62. 
Mustered out June 10, '65. 
Transf. to Eng'r Corps, July 24. '64. 
Mustered out June 10, '65. 

as Corporal. 
Died, Chattanooga. Ten. (Jet. 11. '63 
Mustered out June 1<>. '65. 
Killed at Chicamauga. Sept. 19, '63. 
Discharged Feb. x . '63. 
Dropped as a deserter. 
Discharged Feb. 19, '63. 
Mustered out June 10. '<»•">. 
Trs. to V. R. C; must, out July 7, "• 
Discharged Dec. 28, '63. 
Mustered out June 10, '65. 

• * • • • • 

Discharged Feb. 15, '63. 
Mustered out June 10, '65. 



MILITKAY RKCORI). 



B61 



64. 

65. 



RECRUITS. 

Big, John Dec. 30, '63; Transf. to 42d Regt., June 9, '65. 

Brooks, Jacob •• Died ar Chattanooga, Tenn.. Feb. IT, 

Burnstead, Wm. T. Dee. 30/63; Transf. to 42d Reg., June 9, 

Brown, William March 12, '64: 

Brown, Daniel L. 

Campbell. Benjamin F. Dec. 30,'63; ■■• 

Clark, Erskine C. 

Carpenter. Daniel March 12/64: 

Dennison. George S. Sept. L9/63; 

Fessenden, George M. Dec. 30/63; ■■ 

Fessenden. HarrisoD C. Sep. 19, ■• 

Grover, Stephen K. Dec. 30, ■■■ •• ■• •• 10 

Green, Thomas : Mu tered out Aug. 1, '65. 

Harvey. Anson Dec. 30/63; Transf. to 42d Regt, June 9, '65. 

McKilven. William Sept. 24. "62: Mustered out June 10, '65. 

Morris. Morton P. Sept. 12. ■■ 

Teeple. Charles B. Dec. 30, '63; Transf. to 42d Reg., July 9, '65. 

Turner, Francis 

Titus. Horace W. April 8, '04; Trs. to 42d Reg. June 9/65, draft' d 

Wise, Bernard Dec. 30/63; 

Worden, Charles G. Dec. 30/63; Mustered out Aug. 18, r 65. 

Wilson. Milden H. March 12/64; Trsf. to 42d Reg't, June 9, '65. 

COMPANY "I." 

Billings, Elihu M. Sept. 12/62; 1st Serg.; died, Danville, Dc. 6/63 
McCollum. Dewitt C. •■ Serg.: pro. 1st Lieut, Co. "A." 

McCasky. Isaac W. •• ■■ discharged, wounds. 

Fox, George G. P. M. ••• •• mus. out June 10/65, Is Srg. 

Root, Edward 

CORPORALS. 

Robinson, Asa S. Sep. 12/62. 



discharged Jan. 2, '63. 



Lowe, William F. 
Sabin, Orlando W. 
Learn, William 
Johnson, Samuel V. 
Allen, William C. 
Copelin, James 
Bear, Benjamin E. 
Wilkinson, Clinton C. 
McNally, Silas 
Christeon, Abram 



Mustered out June 10, '65. 

Died at Chattanooga, Ten. Nov. 2/63. 

Mustered out June 10, '65. 

Discharged Jan. 20, '63. . 

Must, out June 10, '65, as Sergeant. 

Discharged April 1, '63. 

Trs. V. R. C; mus. out June 10/65. 

Music' n; discharged May 1, '63. 

trsf. to V. R. C. Aprtl 28/64. 
Wagoner; must, out June 10, '65. 



362 



HISTORY "1- J. A PORTE COUNTY. 



Armstrong, J. W. Sep. 
Carr, Sanford 
Carr, Smith 
Caler, Peter 
Craig, Or rin 
Crawley. James 
Crosby, Lyman B. 
Heald, George F. 
Homer, Isaac 
Irwin, James 
Johnson. William 
Jones. Calvin 
Jones, Erwin M. 
Kelly, Thomas 
Lane, Alonzo 
Lienen, John 
Lowe. Lewis M. 
Long, Wright 
Lyons, Jerome 
Maple. Benjamin 
Mason. Asa C. 
Matsol, Jacob 
Martin, Henry 
McClellan, Hiram M. 
Mead, William H. 
.Mills, Daniel S. 
Morris, Morton P. 
Mayer. < 'harles H. 
Pairot, David W. 
Penoyer, Joseph 
Philip. Henry 
Pike, William 
Proutsman, George W. 
Robinson. John H. 
Shellevitle, Joseph 
Shurte, Andrew J. 
Smith, Wilson P. 
Smith, Samuel P. 
Taylor, John II. 
Vail, Augustus W. 
Vandusen, Enoch 



PRIVATES. 

]-. 62: Must, out June 10, '65. as Sergeant. 
Died, Bowling Green Ky. Dec. 31/62. 
Mustered <>ut June 10. '65. 

Died at Nashville, Nov. 5, '63. 
Mustered out June 10, '65. 
Promoted 2d Lieut. Co. "K." 
Mustered out June I'K '65, as Cop'l. 
Discharged Jan. 14. '63. 
Discharged March 2, '63. 
Trs. V. R. C. April 14. '64. 
Deserted Jan. 30, '63. 

Discharged March 30, '63. 

Trs. Pion.Cops; died Nash. Nov.6,'63 

Discharged Jan. 1, '64. 

Miss'g, action at Chicma. Sep. 20. "63. 

Discharged Dec. 13, '62. 

Died at Gallatin. Tenn., Dec. 23/62. 

Discharged March 14, '63. 

Transf. to V. R. C, Feb. 15, '64. 

Must'd out June 10, '65, as Corporal. 

Died Oct. 6 '63; wounds. 

Discharged Jan. 1, '63. 

Mustered out June 21, '65. 

Discharged Dec. 2, '62. % 

Trans, to Co. "H." 

Deserted June 12. '6-i. 

Died at Gallatin, Tenn.. Feb. 4, '63. 

Died at Chattanooga, Oct. 24, '63. 

Deserted Feb. — /63. 

Mustered out June 1<>, '65. 

Transferred to V. R. C. Feb. 17/64. 

Discharged March ] 1. '63. 

Discharged March 1. '64. 

Transferred to V. \l. C. Jan. 1<». '64. 

Mustered out June 10, '65. 

Discharged Jan. 1, '63. 

Died at Danville., Ky.. Jan. 22, '63. 
Discharged Jan. 31, '63. 



MILITARY RECORD. 36B 

Vert. Nicholas Sept. 12, '62 ; Died at Nashville. April 1, '63. 

Wilson, William H. •■ Deserted Feb. — , '63. 

Wilson, William •• Discharged Dec. 27, '62. 

Wilson, Henry M. •• Died at Nashville, Feb. 24, '63. 

Wilkinson, Chauncey C." Discharged Jan. 8, '63. 

Wood, George W. •• Discharged Feb. 3, '63. 

Xander, John ■• Died at Gallatin, Tenn. Jan. 2, '63. 

Yost, Peter II. ■• Discharged Jan. 1, '63. 

RECRUITS. 

Arheit, Henry Feb. 18,'64; Mustered out Mav 30, '65. 
Burnstead, John A. Aug. 20, '63; Trsf. to 42d Regt., June 9, 'Q5. 
Coleman, Benjamin F. Jan. 7, '64: Trs. 42d Reg. June 9,'6f>. Serg't. 
Cross. Dallas P. Feb. 11, '64; •■ » •• ' Corp'L 

Fradenburgh. Spencer Feb. 27, '64; 
Powels, Levi W. Sept. 12. '62: Discharged Jan. 29, '63. 
Richards, Clark R. Sept. 9, '63; Transf. to 42d Regt. June 9, '65. 
Woodburn, Lewis N. Feb. 29, '64; Died at Chattanooga, Sep. 5, '64. 

COMPANY "K." 

UlSTASSIGNED RECRUITS. 

King, John, Aug. 22, '64. 
Lynch, Patrick, •■ 
Salisbury, Alfred B. Sept. 19, '63. 
Wells, Theodore H. 

OFFICERS. 

Newell Gleason, Sept. 2, '62; Lieut. Col., promt'd Col., Brevetted 

Brig. Gen.; mustered out with Regiment. 
Richard C. Sabin, Aug. 31, '62; Capt., prom. Major, Brevetted Lt. 

Col.; mustered out with Regiment. 
Henry Weller, June 4, '63; Chaplain, res. July 21, '64. 
Alanson T. Bliss, Aug. 31, '62; Capt.; resigned Feb. 15, '64. 
Theodore Woodward, ■■ •• 1st Lieut., resigned July 22, '63. 

Isaac S. Stockman, ; 2d Lieut., pro. 1st Lt., res. Apr. 6, '64. 

George Urquhart, Julv 14, '64 ; 1st Lieut.; mustered out with Reg. 
David W. Pratt, Aug."31,'62; 2d •• resigned April 15, '63. 

John F. Cannell, ; 2d Lieut.: mustered out with Regiment. 

Wm. B. Biddle, Sept 12, '62; IstLt. Co. kt I," pro. Capt. Co. ll H" 

Brev. Major; mus. out with Reg. 
Sloan D. Martin, Aug. 31, '62; 1st Lieut.; killed, Chicm. Sep. 19,'63. 
Albert C. Logan. March 1,'64; ■• •■ mustered out with Reg't. 

John E. Selleck, Dec. 20.'62; 2d - pro. Adj., res. Sep. 8, '64. 



364 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

[r;i Way, : 2d Lieut.; mustered out with Regiment. 

James A. Crawley, Sept. 12, '62; Capt.; resigned May 10, "04. 
DeWitt C. McCollum, April S,'64; 1st Lieut.: must, out with Keg. 
Abram C. Andrew, Sept. 12. '62: 2d ■■ killed a1 battle of 

Chicamauga, Sept. 20. '63. 
John W. Armstrong. : ■■ •• mas. out with Reg 



ONE HUNDRED AND FIRST REGIMENT. 

COMPANY "F." 
White, Crague Aug. 16, '62: Killed at Chicamauga, Sept. 19, '63. 



FIFTH CAY ALRY— NINETIETH REGIMENT. 

COMPANY "K." 
Bagley, Samuel A. Aug. 16/62; Corp.: pro. Adjut. 29th hid. Vol. 

PRIVATES. 

Boyd, Isaac Aug. 1~>. '62; Muste'd out June 21. '65, as Corporal. 

Whorwell. Geo. W. 9, ■• •• ■• 15, ■■ Sergeant. 

Wright. Milton W. •■ ■• Died at Indianapolis. March 22. '65. 



NINETY-NINTH REGIMENT— THREE YEARS SERYICE. 

COMPANY "A." 

Sly. Gilbert Aug. 2'J, ; 62: Mustered out June 5, '65. 
Williams, Alex. ■■ 12, •• •■ May 23, ■• 

Vandervert, August Aug. 14. '62; Died March 19, '63. 

COMPANY "K." 
Stone, Henry H. 

OFFICE};-. 

Richard W. Cummins, Nov. 1/62; Adjutant. 

James L. Cat-heart, Sept. 16, ■• Quarterm'r, mus. out with R 



SEVENTH < AVALRY— 119 REGIMENT. 

OFFICERS. 

Wm. H. Crane, Nov. 26, '64: 2d Lieutenant 



MILITARY RECORD. 



365 



John W. Shoemaker, Sept. 3,'63; Capt.; discharged June 30, '64. 
Thos. S. Goagley, Aug. 26, '64: 2d Lieut.; pro. 1st Lieut, and Cap. 



ELEVENTH CAVALRY— 126 REGIMENT. 



Vosburg, John, Bugler. 



TWELFTH CAVALRY— 127 REGIMENT. 

COMPANY "A." 



Alyea, Andrew Dee. 15/63: 

Aker, Jacob B. 

Bradley, Franklin 

Brown, William 

Blackman. George W. " 

Batterson, John 

Bennett. Sherman 

Black, Isaac 

Bickford, Thomas 

Gulp. William S. 

Coulter, Marcus 

Castello, Thomas 

Currie, James W. 

Chipman, John D. 

Coulter, Asby R. 

Dowd, Isaac F. 

Dyer, George 

Doty, Arthur Jan. 12, '64: 

Dyer, Jones 

Dyer, John 

Edmundson,Wm. M. Dec. 15, 

Eniigh, Jacob C. 

Fletcher, Franklin 

Grey, William 

Grey, John 

Gie, Frederick 

Geist, James S. Ap. 28, '64 ; 

Hendricks, A. B. Dec. 15/63 



PRIVATES. 

Mustered out Nov. 10, '65. 

Died at Columbus, Miss., June 4, '65. 

Mustered out Nov. 10, '65. 

Deserted Dec. 26, '63. 

Must, out Nov. 10, '65, as 1st Serg't. 

• • • ■ • • 

Corporal. 

Bugler. 
Trs. V. R. C; disch. Julv 1, ^b. 
Died at Huntsville. Ala., June 26/64* 
Mustered out Nov. 10, '65. 
Killed near Murfreesboro, Dec, 7/64. 
Died at La Porte, Ind., April 16, '64. 
Discharged July 6, '65. 
Mustered out Slept. 2, '65. 
Nov. 10, •• 



Aug. ( .'. 

•■ Nov. 10, 

•• May 28, 

&d" •' Nov. 10, 

Nov. 6, 

■• Nov. 10, 

Deserted Dec. 20, '63. 



Q. M. Sergt. 

as Corporal. 
as Bugler, 
as Wagoner, 
as Corporal. 



Discharged June 18, '64. 

Died at Tullahoma, Tenn., Nov. 18/64. 

Died at Kendallville, Ind,, May 8, '64. 



306 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



Holmes, Phila, Dec. 15, '63; Mustered out Nov. 10, '65. 



Hood, William M. 
Hendricks, Calvin N. 
Hensel, John 
Hensel. Adam 
Harrison, Wm. M. 
Hendricks, James J. 



- Sep. 22/65, Com. Sergt. 
•• Nov. 10. •• as 



as Farrier. 



Deserted Dec. 19, '63. 

Died, Willet's Point, N. Y. May 20, '6o 
Hobert. Jas. J. Jan. 12, '64; Mustered out Nov. 10, '65, as Saddler. 
Johnson, Jno. M. Dec. 15,'63 
James. John 
Kennedv. Thomas 
Kennard, Perry 
Larson, Christopher 
Lyon, William Jan. 12, '64; 
Morris, William P. Dec. 15, '63; 
McDonald, Wm. S. •■ 
McElrath, Lafayette B." 
Miller, Elmer 

Discharged Sept. 15, '64. 

Mustered out Nov. 10, '65, as Corp'l. 



Discharged Oct 14, '64. 

Mustered out Nov. 10, '65, as Serge 't. 



Morgan, George B. 

Maze, Alexander 

Mills, George B. 

Marr, James 

Mitchell, Wm. M. 

Massey, Lafayette Jan. 12, '64; 

Nelson, Benjamin Dec. 15, '63 ; 

Nelson, Nels P. 

Newlen. Emmet 

Price, Franklin E. 

Pratt, John S. 

Pinne} r , John H. 

Parkinson, J. D. 

Rambo, Wm. F. 

Reese, Sam'l McR. 

Revnolds, John Q. A. •• 

Shaw, Joseph H. 

Sinclair, Wm. W. 

Smith, Charles W. 

Tennis, John 

Thirkell, Francis M. •■ 

Tubbs, George M. 

Turney, Harvey B. 

Tuley, Henry 



•• Aug. 22, •• 
- Sept. 23, - 



•• Nov. 2. 

•• Julv 10, •• 

•• Nov. 10, *: 
Promoted 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out Nov. 10, '65. 
Died at Baton Rouge, La., May 7, 65. 
Discharged Sept. li>, '64. 
Mustered out Nov. 10,'65. 

•• Saddler Serg. 
Deserted Jan. 2, "64. 
Mustered out Nov. 10, '65. 
Died at New Albany, Ind., May 26,'64. 
Mustered out Nov. 10, ''dh, as Serge't. 

•• July 7, 

•• Nov. 10, •• 



MILITARY RECORD. 367 

Tulev. David Dec. 15/63; Mustered out Nov. 10, '65. 

Valentine. Henry M.Jan. 12/64; Desert. Feb. 10. •• 

Webber, Mark A. Dec. 15/63; Must, out Nov. 10, '65, as Sergeant. 

Webber, Frank C. " " " '■' Q. M. •• 

"Williams, Davis E. •■ Promoted 2d Lieutenant. 

Woodard, George -Ian. 12.04; Mustered out Nov. 10, '65. 

Zarr, Hiram Dec. 15, '63: 

Zarr, Charles " Died at Nashville, Tenn., Jan. 23, '65. 

COMPANY "E." 

PRIVATES. 

Griffin. Charles Jan. 12. (U: Must, out Nov. 10, '66. 

Green, Preston W. •■ •• - "as Wagoner. 

Johnson, John L. Dec. 12/63: •• •• " Corporal. 

Madden. Wm. H. July 12/64 :•• ■■ ■■ ■• Bugler. 

COMPANY k< F." 

Glines, Nelson Dec. 15, '63; Must'd out Nov. 10, '6b, as Corporal. 
Lowe, Benjamin F. Jan. 12. '04: Deserted Jan. 12, '64. 

COMPANY "M." 

Barto, Nathan S. Jan. 12, '64; Mustered out Nov. 10, '65. 

Drick, Christian " " " June ■• 

Graham, Henry S. ■■ '• " Nov. ■• 

Hartford. Spencer - Transf. to V. R. C. April 21, '6b. 

Myers, Daniel H. ■• Mustered out June 21, '65. 

Rollins, Charles " •• " Nov. 10, ■■ 

Rollins. George F. ~ " 

OFFICERS. 

Edward Anderson, Feb. 2, '64; Col.; mustered out with Regiment. 
Willys G. Peck. Dec. 1,'63; Capt,, pro. Maj.; must, out with Reg. 
Wm.'H. Calkins, March 26, '64: Major: ' 

Seth Loomis, Dec. 1, '63; IstLt., pro. Capt., andinus. out with Rg. 
Davis E. Williams, Aug. 1/64; 2d Lieut., pro. 1st Lt., and must. 

out with Regiment. 
Theophilus A. Fravel, Dec. 1. '63: 2d Lieut.; resigned July 19/64 
George W. Blackman ; 2d Lieut.; must, out with Regt. 



128 REGIMENT— THREE YEARS SERVICE. 

REGIMENTAL NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

Frazier, Dwight Dec. 15/63; Sergt. Major; prom. 1st Lieutenant. 



368 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Morey. Ira S. Dec. 1"). '63; Com. Sergt.; discharged. 

Mead, Frank D. •• Hospital Steward. •• June 2, '65. 

Collins, James II. •• Prin. Music'n ; mus. out April 10/66 

COMPANY -A. 

Sager. Jacob Dec. 15. '63; Discharged dan. 22. '65. 

COMPANY •('. 



Outhwaite, M. C. Dec. 1 
Richards. B. F. 
Monroe, S. 
Phillips. Perry 
Church. Charles D. 



5/63; 1st Sergeant, pro. 2d Lieutenant. 
Sergeant; must, out June 16, '65. 

• ■ • •• ■• •• 

promoted 2d Lieutenant. 

corporal -. 

Freeman. Milo " Discharged, wounds. May 8, '65. 

McClellan, George W. ■• Mus r 'd out Apr. 10, '66^ as Sergeant. 

Tompkins, Geo. Jan. 12. '64: Mortally wounded Aug. 16, '64. 

Record, George W. " Discharged April 11, '65. 

McClurg, Lewis Dec. 15,'63; Discharged June 12. '65. 

Wood, Carson ■■ Deserted Nov. 12. '64. 

Foster. Marcus Jan. 12.'<>4: Died Aug. 15, '64. at La Porte. 

illins, Jas. II. Dee. 15/64; Musi.: mus. o. Apr. 10. '66. Prin. Mus. 
Bennett. Seth S. " Mustered out May 26, '65. 

purv \n 

Burns, Andrew S. •• Mustd out Apr. 10, '66, a poraL 

Brown, Charles " Transferred to V. R. ! '. 

Burt, Abraham •• Mortaih wounded May - v . '64. 

Benhart, Fred •• Mustered out June s . '65. 

Bishop. John W. Jan. 12, "64: •• •• Apr. 10, '66. 

Baldwin, James Dec. 15, '63; Deserted Feh. 21. '64. 

Barcum Henry Jan. 12/64; Mustered out April 10, " 

Carlin, Lorenzo D. Dec. L5/63; •■ ■■ Sep. 2/65. 

Chamberlain, Joseph ■■ •■ •■ April 10, •• 

I arpenter, Sam'l E. ■■ Transf. to V. R. C. April 1, ,; ". 

Crane, James •• Died, July 25, '64. 

Crouch, John •• Mustered out April 10, '^56. 

Carroll, Eli P. 

Cissne, Robert 



MILITARY RECORD. 



369 



Cassady, George F. Jan. 12, '64; Must, out April 10/66, as Corp'l. 

Cunningham, Charles ■• •• •• June 8, '65. 

Deforest, William Dec. 15, '68; Deserted Dec. 27, '63. 



Promoted 1st Lieutenant. 
Mustered out April 10, (JU. 
Died Feb. 1, 'Qb. 
Mustered out June 5, l 65. 



m. 



63 



Mustered out with Regiment. 
Mustered out April 10, '66. 



Corp'l. 
Sept. 20, '65. 
April 10, '66. 
July 2, '65. 



Fraser, D wight 
Farley, Abraham 
Gardner, James 
Gardner, Absalom . ■• 

Griswald, James Jan. 12, '64 ; 

1 lager, John Dec. 15, '63; Mustered out April 10, 
Haus, John Jan. 12, '64; Died July 4, '64. 

Hyde, James W. " Trs. to V. R. C; ms. o. June 5^6b. 

llager, David ■• Mustered out April 10, '66. 

Johns, William S. Dec. 15, 
Jones, Edward 
Kinney, Albert 
Lampson, Wilson 
Lampson, James 
Lawrence, George 
Lloyd, Horatio Jan. 12, '64; 
Mandeville, John Dec. 15, '63. 
Moon, John •■ Mustered out June 16, '65. 

Morey, Ira S. •■ Dis. as Commissary Sergeant. 

McNett, Lyman •■ Died May 10, '65. 

Meade, Frank D. •• Dis. June 2, '65, as Hospital Steward. 

Nichols, John Jan. 12, '64; Must, out April 10, '66, as Sergeant. 
Oates, David •• Died, Washington, D..C. June 22, '65. 

Proud, Anthony •• Died of wounds, Dec. 1, '64. 

Plants, Jacob •• Must, out April 10, '66. as Sergeant. 

Parkinson, Wm. H. Dec. 15/63 •• 
Potter, James II . 

Parker, Lewis ■• Appointed Sergeant, Oct. 31, 64. 

Paddock, Solomon *• Mustered out Jan. 5, '66. 

Robinson, Enoch •• Discharged March 2, '65. 

Robinson, John •• Mustered out April 10, '66. 

Regan, Patrick ■■ Deserted Nov. 9, '64. 

Rodgers, James H. •• Mustered out April 10, '66. 

Reprogle, George 

Redding, Joseph •• Trans, to V. R. C. April 1, '65. 

Record, Jasper Jan. 12, '64; Deserted July 30, '64. 
Snyder, Delos Dec. 15, '63; Mustered out April 10, '66. 
Smith, Anderson 

Sprague, Seymour B. •• Des'td 12th 111. Cav.; ret. to comm'd. 

24 



370 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



Seymour, Mortimer Dec. 15, '63 Dest. 73d Regim't ret. to command. 

Sweet, James R. •• Must, out April 10, '66. 

Smith, Orrin Jan. 12, '64 ; ■■ •■ •• as Sergeant. 

Soper, David 

Suitor, Henry 

Shaw. Albert ■• Died April 12, '64. 

Slater, John H. •• Mustered out Oct, 20, '65. 

Slater, Delos Dec. 15, '63; » « April 10, '66. 

Thomas, Emanuel 

Vader, Jacob Jan. 12, '64; Died April 2, '64. 

Valkenburg. William •■ ■■ June 12, '64. 

Wilson, Isaac •• •• Juty 4, 

Whitney, David •• Must, out April 10, '66, as Corporal. 

Weed, Lewis L. 

Waters, William 

Waters, Samuel M. ■• •• ■• Dec. 18, '60. 

Zigler, William ••• •• •• April 10, '66. 

RECRUITS AND TRANSFERS. 

Allen, George W. Aug. 30,'62; Discharged Nov. 10, '62. 
Burns, Theodore Dec. 15, '63; Mustered out April 10, '66. 
Bright, George A. Jan. 11, '64 ; 

Church, Charles D. Discharged for promotion. 

Dodge, Tapley S. Nov. 13/64; Discharged Nov. 13, '65. 

Garris, John Jan. 8, '63; Mustered out April 10, '66. 

Gail, Virgil Dec. 17, •• 

Gadbury, William June 5, •■ 

Hack. Thomas Jan. 7, 64; 

Harper, James L. 

Harvey, Milton Nov. 23, '63 



Discharged Oct. 21, '6 

July 20, 
Mustered out April 10 



o. 



'6Q. 



Heistand, Isaac Oct. 26, '62 

Hill. Henrv Jan. 15, '63 

Inglesoll, Joseph Oct. 21, '62 

Inglesoll, Richard Dec. 30,'63; 

Johnson, William Oct. 21, 

Kelly, Migny Oct. 22, '62; 

Kinman, Thomas Nov. 11, '63; 

Kohnsey, John Oct. 21, '62; 

King, William Mav 11, ** Discharged March 12, 

Kelly, Joseph W. Jan. 25/63; •■ Oct. 9, '65. 

Luff, Samuel Jan. 9, 63; Mustered out April 10, •• 

Montgomery, Wm. Nov. 25, '62; Discharged Nov. 29, '65. 



MILITARY RECORD. 



371 



McCall. Wm. B. Jan. 11,'64; Mustered out April 10, '66. 

McBride, Geo. W. Nov. 5, •• 

Nail William Sept. 4, '63; 

Nicely, Wm. R. 

Petty. Madison C. Jan. 11, '64; 

Richie, William Dec. 28, '63; 

Sanders. Thomas Jan. 4, '64; 

COMPANY "E." 

Thomas, John M. Jan. 12, '64; Serg't; mustered out June 5, '65. 
Asher, Noah •• ■• Cor'l; must, out Apr. 10,'66, Serg. 

Himlire, Addis 
Lewis, Joseph S. 

COMPANY "H." 

Sanders, Philip March 18, '64; Trans, to V. R. C. Jan 15, '65. 
Sullivan, John •• 7, •• Mustered out April 10, '66. 

COMPANY "I." 

Unruh, William B. March 7, '64; 1st Sergt; discharged Oct. 2,'65, 

Commis'ed 2d Lieut. 
Fraser, Joshua G. •• 18, ■• Serg't; promoted 2d Lieutenant. 

Mecum, Samuel " 7, " *' must, out June 3, '65. 

Weed, Everett D. ■• 7, " Corporal; disc'd May 24, 

Hyde, Hiram •• 7, •• •• " Apr. 10, '66, Srg 

PRIVATES. 

Anderson, Wm. T. March 7, '64; Mustered out April 10, '66. 

Armstrong, Samuel H. ■• Died March 21, '64. 

Bachtel, David •• Died, Chattanooga, Sept. 16, '64. 

Campbell, William •• Mustered out May 19, '65. 

Davis, James G. March 18, '64; Discharged Oct. 20, '65. 

Fisher, Frederick 

Gallert, Chas. March 7, 

Gardner, James 

Gillam, George 



Mustered out April 10, '66. 



Halladay, Charles W. 
Helms, David 
Ivey, Richard J. 
McLane, George R. 
Mead, Mention 



v- 



18,- 



Died, Knoxville, T., Sept. 11,'64. 

• * • • • • 

Deserted May 30, '64. 
Must, out April 10, '66, as Corp. 
Died, Morgantown,N.C. Fb. 17,66 
Mustered out April 10, '66, Cop'l. 



372 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Nichols. Henrv March 7, '64: Deserted June 16. '64. 

Pottenger, James M. 18 Must, out April 10, '66. Corporal. 
Reed, Charles 
Record, Decatur 

Rulo, John B. •• Discharged June 3, '65. 

Seymour, Grant •■ Must, out April 10/66, as Corp'l. 

Ship, William •• Died, Louisville. Ky. May 14, 04. 

Shall, Frederick •• Mustered out April 10. '6ti. 

Sigler, Jacob 7 

Walsh, Benjamin •• Discharged Aug. 30, '64. 

Wilson, Robert •■ Clustered out April 10, 'CS. 
Wojahn, Charles 

OFFICERS. 

Jasper Packard, March 17, '64; Lieut. Col. promt'd Col.; brevetted 

Brig. General; mustered out with Regiment. 
Levi Ely, Dec. 15, '63; Captain; discharged Aug. 26, '64. 
Wm. Van Wert, •• 1st Lieut., prom. Capt.. res. Sept. 27, '65. 

Dwight Fraser, Nov. 13, '64; 1st Lieut., pro. Capt.; Brevetted Maj. 
Wm. C. Weir, Dec. 15, '63; Lieut.; mus. out with Regiment. 
Milton C. Outhwaite, Oct. 21, '65; 2d Lieutenant, ■■ 
Charles D. Church, March 18, '64; ■• •• prom. 1st Lieut.: 

mustered out with Regiment. 

Wm. B. Unruh, ; 2d Lieutenant. 

Joshua G. Fraser, Oct. 27/65: 2d Lieut.; mustered out with Regt. 
N. S. Paul. Nov. 18, "64; 1st Lieut, and Adj.; must, out with Ueg. 



12)th REGIMENT— THREE YEARS SERVICE. 

COMPANY "B." 

Young, John M. March 6, '64; Mustered out Aug. 29, '^y. 

COMPANY "I." 

Wilson, John March 7. '64; Deserted March 28, "65. 



138th REGIMENT INFANTRY— 100 DAYS SERVICE. 

COMPANY "B." 

Arnold, Garrett May 27, '64; Mustered out Sept. 30/64. 
Austin, C olden 



MILITARY RECORD. 



373 



Beal. Edward May 21 
Barnes, Philander 
Bridges, Dexter A. 

Burden, Leonard 
Burk. diaries K. 
Baine. Stephen 

< laldwallader, A. A. 
( lase, Decatur M. 

< !hase, Henry A. 

( Jonant, Henry ( . 
Croll, Theodore 
< Sutler, Austin 
Dakin, Philip R. 
i >< cker. John 
1 >onnell, James 
I Oniii. Albert 
Eliel, Henry 
Eli el, Louis 
Ervin, Charles L. 
Fry. Daniel 
Gaylord, Henry 

< rray, Enslev L. 

• »■ 

Hagenbuck, William 
Harvey, Henry 

Haines. Jacob R. 
Hebard, William 
Heller. James K. 
Hews, Charles 
Hucket. William 
Huntsman Horace 
Hupp, Frank A. 
Keen. John 
Leland. Ira S. 
Leonard. Charles H. 
Lewis, Charles P. 
Lonn, Xiles T. 
Ludlow. Stephen W. 
Mackey. James 
Mann/ Geo. C. 
Meade. Carl B. 
Milliken, Jared L. 
Millis, William J. 



64; Mustered out Sept, 30,'64. 



as Corp'l. 



as Serg't. 



as Corp'l. 



Musician. 



Musician. 



Hosp.Ste. 

as Corp'l. 
as Corp'l. 



as Corp'L 



as Corp' I. 



374 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Munday, H. M. May 27, '64; Mustered out Sept. 30,'64. 
Nelson, Emil R. 
Niles, Wm. B. 

Nourse. Henrv P. 

t/ 

Oakes, Reginald 

Osborn, Clark 

Parkell, James E. 

Porter, Henry W. 

Pottenger, Sam'l K. 

Regan, Francis •■ Never mustered. 

Register, Robert •■ Mustered out Sept. 30, '64. 

Reynolds, Elisha B. 

Reighard. Alonzo 

Rude, Stephen B. ■• •• •• ■• as Corp'L 

Rudd, William ■• ■• ■■ " as Serg't. 

Sanford, Roswell A. •■ •■ •• •■ as Serg't. 

Scully, Simon 

Shaw, William H. ■■ •• •* " aslstSrg. 

Sheldon. Arthur H. •• •• " " as Corp'L 

Shultz, Frank A. 

Snyder, George 

Stephens, Thomas 

Taylor, Henry H. 

Thomas, Joseph A. ■■ " "' as Corp'L 

Thomas, Henry B. 

Thomason, Andrew 

Vail, Isaac N. 

Vail, Walter S. 

Wells, Daniel M. 

Westervelt, James D. •■ 

Whitehead, Sumner A." 

Winchell, Herman 

Zenor, Edward 

Zimmerman. Joseph 

COMPANY "0." 

Freeman, Rufus L. May 27, '64; Mustered out Sept. 30, '64. 

COMPANY "D.- 
Andrews, James May 27/64: Mustered out Sept. 30, '64. 
Andrews, Frederick 
Ames, William F. 



MILITARY RECORD. 



07 - 



K 



«*e, 



Otis 



Klist, Charles 
Leeds, Walter 0. 
Morley, John B. 
McHenry, James 
Maynard, Henry 
Meachem, David 



.< 



Akins, Samuel May 27,64; Mustered out Sept. 30/64. 
Burnham, Joseph W. •■ 
Boothroyd, Joseph 

Bemmis, Charles E. 
Burbank, Jerome 

Baily, George II. 
Bronson, Warren J. 
Best. Martin 
Brewer. Enoch S. 
Cowden, William M. "■ 
Cobb, John B. 
Crandall, Clark C. 
Cohen, Samuel 
Conner, Francis 
Collen, Thomas 
Doran. Edward F. 
l>unn, Francis H. 
Didate, Emil G. 
Deming, Samuel 
Earl, Alfred 
Faulkner, William C. •■ 
Glazier. Charles H. 
Hitchcock, George II. ■• 
Hamilton, Robert 
Hoffman. Fred 
Hulse, Warren 
Herrold, William 
Holladay, Frank 
Herpolsheimer, W. G. " 
Higgins, Wm. G. 
Horner, Cornelius M. •• 
Hickman, Joseph S. 
Johnson, Samuel C. 
Jacobs, Francis C. 
Jernegan, Edward 



Com. Sergt. 



as ( Jorporal. 



as sergeant. 



as ( Jorporal. 



as Sergeant. 



as Wagoner, 



as Sergeant. 



as Musician. 



Never mustered. 
Mustered out Sept. 30,'64. 



as Corporal. 



376 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY 



al. 



as Senreant. 



as Musician. 



as Corporal. 



Miller, Joseph May 27, '64; Mustered out Sept. 30,'64. 

Miller. Charles E. ■* •• •• ■■ as Corpoi 

McLain, Andrew W. 

Meeeh, Oliver S. 

McColley, Thomas H. 

Owens, James Y. 

O'Neal, Frank 

Orr. John 

Poisel. Francis M. 

Pugh. Zephaniah 

Richard-. Jolm F. 

Reeve. William W. 

Roberts, Henry 

Stevens, James T. 

S el leek, William H. 

Smith. Adojph 

Snyder, Jules 

Tebottle, Fred 

Thompson. George B. 

Tansch, Joseph 

Vanderwalker, Emmet 

Vanlin, Nelson 

Whitner, David C. 

Woods, Henry H. 

Worthley, Albert H. 

Willev. "Rilev G. J. 

Willard, George G. 

Walker. George 

Williams, David L. 

Washburn, David E. 

Watson, David •• Never mustered. 

Zimmerman. William •• Mustered out Sept. 30, '64. 



as 1 st S^rgt. 



OFFICERS. 

Jas. H. Shannon, May 27, '64; Colonel; mustered out with Regi't. 

Wm. II. Patton. *• 1st Lt., pro. Cap.; mus. out wth Reg. 

Wm. W. Whitehead, •• 2d ■• - IstLt. 

Robert M. Carr, •• 2d •• 

John D. McKahin " Captain 

Philip L. Green, " 1st Lieutenant 



MILITARY RECORD. 



377 



143d REGIMENT INFANTRY— ONE YEAR SERYICE. 

Fargher, John H. Feb. 17, 'no: Must'd out Oct. 17, '6o, as Serg't. 



151si REGIMENT INFANTRY— ONE YEAR SERYICE. 

COMPANY "A." 

SERGEANTS. 

La Dour, Louis Feb. 7,'65; Must, out Sept. 19, '65, as 1st Serg't. 
Sturges, Alonzo 

Vesper. John Feb. 10, •■ 
Armstrong, Jno. II. Feb. 28, '65 •■ 



Hull. Adam Feb. 7, '( 

Travis. Emulus " 1<>. 

Mamleville. J. W. " 10, 

Mackie, Philander- 28, 

Anderson. Joseph •■ 23, 

Williams, George •• 10, 

Johnson. Laf. L. •• 10, 

Gay lord, Henry ■■ 7, 



CORPORALS. 

5; Mustered out Sept. 19, '65, Sergeant. 



Died at Louisville, Ky., May 26, '65. 
Deserted July 10, '65. 
Mustered out Sept. 19, '6b. 
Musician ; mustered out Sept. 19, '65. 

PRIVATES. 



Allen. Sam'] Feb. 7,'65; Mustered out Sept. 19, '65. 
Bemis, Chas. E. 13 

May 18, '65. 



Bunnel. Carey J. 10 
Burnham, Jo. TJ. 
Closser, Sylvanus M ■• 
Cram. Horace 
Couch man. D. S. 
Cox. Joseph H. 
Cox. Richard P. 
Copeland. Garland ■■ 
Creel. Theodore Jan. 23, '65 
Cherry, George 
Deraming, Charles 10, 
Dawson, Geo. A. 23,- 
Dawson, John 
Darling, Silas R. 25, 
Eddy. Joseph Feb. 10, 
Emigh, Frederick •• 



Pro. 2d Lieut. 
Mustered out Sept. 19, '65. 



•• Oct. 6,** 
Sept. 19, '65. 



~ July 28, • 

- Aug. 28, ■ 
•• Oct. 3, • 
•• Sept. 12,- 

- Sept. 19,- 



378 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



Flack, John Feb. 10, '65; Mustered out Sept. 19, '65. 

Hagerman, Geo. V. 7, 

Hall, Simon 

Hiscon, Alvin 

Harris, Calvin W. •• 

Hicks. Alvah J. •• Discharged July 24, 'Go. 

Hopkins, Joel •• Died at Nashville, Tenn., March 30, 

Hartford, T. E. Jan. 28,'65; Mustered out Sept. 19, '65. 

Hannon, Matthew •• 24 •• 

Hamilton, Robert Feb. 10" 

Jackson, Theodore " 

Jones, Wm. B. 

Lucas, Charles 7 

McLean, Robert 

McNeal, Amos 10, 

Ocker, Henrv 

Ocker, Wm. H. Jan. 25. 

Parker, N. 0. Feb. 10, 

Pierce, Daniel 

Pepple, George W. •■ 

Reed, William H. ■• 

Reynolds. Steph. G.13 

Stewart, John D. 5 

Salisbury, John 10 

Sheldon, Joseph Jan. 30, 

Shunk, F. R. Feb 10 

Sparrow, F. H. 

Stephens. Francis 

Thurber, Alonzo B. 

Travis, Brook 

Talton, George 

Wilson, William 9 

Wheeler, John Jan. 26, 

Weston, Francis Feb. 10. 

Webb, David M. ■■ 

Wolfe. Christ - 9, 

Zoss, Joi.u 1" 

COMPANY "E." 

CORPORALS. 

Eggleston, Daniel Feb. 17, '65: Must, out Sept. l!», "65. as Serg 
Robinson, John T. 18, Died at Tullahoma. May 15, '65. 

Osborn. Edward C. 17, Mustered out Oct. 18, '65. . 



Deserted March 8, '65. 
Mustered out Sept. 19, '6~>. 

• ■ • • • • 

Died at Nashville, April 1, '<6i>. 
Musted. out Sept. 19, y 65^ as Corporal. 
Died at Louisville, Ky., March 10, '65. 
Died at Nashville, Tenn., June 30, '65. 
Mustered out May 17, '6 
June 22, ■• 

•• Sept. 6, 

•• Sept. 19, 
Discharged May 29, 
Mustered out Sept. 19, 



• May 17. 

• Sept. 19, 



Discharged June 2 . 
Deserted May 23, 
Mustered out Sept. li>. 
•• June 1'.*, 
•• Sept. 19, 



MILITARY RECORD. 



879 



PRIVATES. 

Bowman, Henry Feb. 17, '65 ; Mustered out July -2, '65. 



Brewer, Timothy H. 

Colby, Ira 18, 

Hill, Leonard 17, 

McClure, Joseph 10, 

Petro, George 14, 

Smith, Henry 10, 

Williams. Milliken C. 14, 

Wolird, John H. 21, 
Wilkinson, Christopher ■■ 



Deserted* Aug. 11, '65. 
Died. Louisville, Ky., April 14,'65. 
Mustered out Oct. 4, '65. 
Sept. 19, 



Oct. 6, 
Sept. 19, 
Aug. 25, 



COMPANY i4 H." 

Hart, Franklin A. Feb. 28,'65; Mustered out Sept. 19, '65. 
Plumley, Amariah, 

COMPANY "I." 

Harbor, Oliver H. Feb. 14, '65; Mustered out Sept. 19, '65. 

COMPANY "K." 

Chase, Reuben Feb. 10, '65; 1st Serg., pro. 2d Lieutenant. 
Spaulding, John 21, Sergeant ; Must, out Sept. 19, '65.. 

Reynolds, David B. 19, Corporal: deserted Aug. 18, 

PRIVATES. 

Anderson, Henry C. Feb. 19,'65; Mustered out Sept. 19, 



Barker, William 20, 

Brooks, Boon 17, 

Brown, David J. 17, 

Buck, William 19, 

Burger, Michael 17, 

Conant. Henry 17, 

Campbell, James 10, 

Crowl, John F. 17, 

George, James 19, 

Jepson, Christopher 17, 

Johnson, John 17, 

Lambert, Asa J. 23, 

Nichols, Christopher 17, 

Ott, Joseph 17, 

Reynolds, James I. 19, 
Runion, Charles 



Deserted July 11, 
Mustered out Sept. 19, 



Died at Louisville, March 10. 
Discharged March 24, 
Mustered out Sept. 19, 



Oct. 5, 



■• as Corp 'I. 



380 



HISTORY OF LA PORTK COUNTY. 



Roberts. Hugh Feb. 
Simpson, Enos P. 
Smith, Harrison 
Vesper. John 
Whitnor, David C. 
Wvnn. Jesse 



3, 

IT, 
19, 
10, 
21, 

26. 



John E. Sweet, March 4, '65 
Michael Eagan. Feb 20, 
Sylvanus M. Closser. 24, •■ 
Louis La Dour. 
John B. Carr. 
John Scully, March 6, 
Reuben H. Chase, June 1," 
John Spaulding. Feb. 21. •■ 



'65; Must, out Sept. 19,'65. 

• • • • • • 

6, 
Transferred to Company "A." 
Must, out Sept. 19, '65. 

OFFICERS. 

Lieut. Col., must, out with Reg't. 
Cap. pro. Maj. ■• 
2d Lt. pro. IstLt. ■■ 
2d Lieutenant 

1st Lieut, rejected by Med. Examiner. 
2d Lt. pro. 1st Lt., died July 23, '65. 
2d Dr. pro. 1st Lt., mus out with Rg. 
Sergeant; musted. out Sept. 19, '65. 



155th REGIMENT INFANTRY— ONE YEAR SERVICE. 

COMPANY ^B.' 



Ash. William M. Feb. 11. 



14, 

13, 
9, 

9, 
13, 



13. 



Alexander, John 
Allen. Nathan 
Betke, August 
Burk. David A. 
Behuke, August 
Brooks, Solomon 
Brandt, William 
Bradley, Philander J. 14, 
Brown, William 14, 

Brown, Andrew P. 14, 
Bander, George W. 11. 
Burge, Orrin P. 11, 

Carr, George W. 14, 

Cramer, Levi 14, 

Coppock. Oliver D. 13, 
Comstock. James A. 11, 
Chandler, John E. 11, 
Dougherty, John A. 14. 
Dillman. Lemuel G. 13, 



PRIVATES. 

'65: Mustered out Sept. 4, '65, as Serg't. 

•• Aug. 4. 

• • •• •• •• 

•• •• •• •• 

Deserted Feb. 26, 
Mustered out Aug. 4. 

•• June 24, 
•• Sept. 4 



Aug 



4, 



May 11, 

Aug. 4. 



as Corpora!, 



MILITARY RECORD. 



381 



1 tennler, John Feb. 


13, 


bo: 


Dille, John 


19. 


• 


Ely, Henry C. 

■ 


i 




Fink. Peter C. 


9. 




Finch, John S. 


14. 


i 


Forrester, William 


13, 


i 


Forrester, James 


13. 




Fulmer, Marion 


13 


> 


1 rommons, Edwin 


13, 




Green, John H. 


14. 


i 


( rriggs, Benoni G. 


14, 


• • 


< raa, ( Joon 


9, 


• • 


( raa, John 


9, 


.. 


Hersberger, Moses 


14, 




Huffman, Frederick '. 


.. 


Hoover. Henry 


13, 


.. 


Hunt, Andrew B. 


1 3, 


.. 


Hollenbeck, Horace 


15, 


.. 


Harding, Joseph W. 


13, 


i< 


Hays, Ezra 




3 


Horstock, John 




21 


Jacoby. Gideon 




14 


Kronkright, Horace 




19 


Leroy. Joim S. 




14 


Lambert, Isaiah G. 




13 


Leroy. Moses 




.. 


Leroy, Augustus II. 




u 


Libey, John J. 




il 


McGoggy, Isaac B. 




a 


McGoggy, Daniel H 




a 


Miller, Philip 




u 


Miller, George W. 




a 


Miller, John A. 




23 


Marsh Horace 




13 


McGregor. William 




11 


Melcher, Joseph 




9 


Mackey, James H. 




u 


Nevin$, George 0. 




13 


Nash, James H. 




u 


Nichols, Thomas J. 




9 


Parker, William H. 




13 


Parker, John 




9 



Mustered out Aug. 4,'65. 



Deserted July 16, 
Mustered out Au^. 4, 



June 13, 
Aug. 4. 



.. 


.. 


.. 






.. 


.. 


.. 




a 


.. 


a 


June 


20, 


u 


ii 


(( 


Aug. 


4. 


a 


.. 


.. 


. < 




a 


ii 


a 


a 




a 



ii ii ii ii 

Promoted 2d Lieutenant. 
Mustered out June 5, '65. 



a 
a 


a 
a 


Aug. 4, 


a 

a 


.. 


a 


a 


a 


;. 


a 


ii 


u 


ii 

ii 

a 


a 
a 
a 


May 11, 

Aug. 4, 

a 


a 
a 

" as Sergeant. 


... 


a 


June 21, 


ii 


U 


a 


Aug. 4, 


" as 1st Serg. 


a 


a 


u 


" as Sergeant. 


a 


. . 


it 


a 


it 

u 


« . 


ii 
ii 


" as Corporal. 
a 


ii 
ii 

i. 


« . 
a 
a 


July 26, 
Aug. 4, 

a 


a 

u 


ii 


u 


a 


a 


ii 


a 


a 


a 


ii 


a 


a 


ti 


u 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


u as Sergeant. 


ii 


,i 


a 


tC 



.382 



HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



Pierce, Watson Feb. 
Pelton, Andrew J. 
Paul. Lewis 
Pierce. Francis M. 
Bush, George L. 
Ramsby, Allen 
Reillv." William 
Reeves, Charles H. 
Reekel, James F. 
Reamer, John W. 
Reeve, William W. 
Rush, Jacob S. 
Reprogle, William A. 
Richards, William E. 
Steele, John W. 
Smith, William P. 
Stanley, John 
Sager, Martin 
Shaw, Lemiah 
Stevens, Solomon 
Strawhacker, Samuel 
Smith, James K. 
Snell, Jefferson B. 
Thompson, Rice C. 
Thompson, Charles H. 
Teeple, Thomas H. B. 
Teeple, Wm. H. 
Thorp, Amos 
Timm. Michael 
Underwood, Daniel 
Vandusen, William 
Wilson, Channing 
W T ilson, James 
Wilson, James H. 
W T oodward, Horace 
Watson, Cyrus C. 
Wilson, Orrison 
Wolfenbarger. Philip 
Zimmerman, Joseph 

COMPANY "C." 

■Corn well, Jesse L. March 30,'65; Promoted Captain. 



9,'65; 


Mustered out Aug. 


4/65. 


a 


u 


it 


a 


a 


13 


a 


a 


a 


a 


14 


a 


a 


ti 


a 


a 


it 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a. 


a 


a 


a 


it 


a 


a 


a 


a 


ii- 


a 


a 










13 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


" as Corporal 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


u 


a 


it 


a 


a a 


14 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


u 










11 


a 


ii 


a 


a 


a 


ii 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


ti 


a 


a 


9 


a 


a 


a 


a 


13 


a 


a 


a 


a a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


9 










u 










13 


a 


a 


a 


a 


it 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


u it 


21 


a 


a 


a 


a 


19 


a 


a 


it 


a 


13 


Mustered 


out 


May 


17, " 


a 


Promoted 


2d Lieutenant. 


1 


Mustered 


out 


Aug 


4, '65. 


21 


a 


it 


(< 


a 


13 


a 


a 


May: 


n, " 


14 


a 


a 


Aug. 


i, " 


« 


Promoted 


2d Lieutenant. 


u 


Mustered out Aug. 


4, '65. 


13 


a 




a 


a 



MILITARY RECORD. 383 

Fanny. Frederick March 14, '65; Mustered out Aug. 4, '65. 
Jennings, Curtis « 30, " " " " 

Roseberry, Wm. II. " 11, " " 

Skinner, James " 11, " " " " 

West. Dion B. " 30, " Deserted April 2, 

COMPANY "G." 

PRIVATES. 

Battye, Uriah H. March 30,'65; Must, out Aug. 4, '65, Musician. 

Didat, Nicholas " 25, " 

Durand, Edgar H. " 21, " " " 

Haws, George " 18, " 



44 a a u 



u 



as Sergeant. 



Livings, John April 5, 

Porter, John March 18, Discharged May 18, " 

Werner, Ernst March 23, " Deserted April 12 

COMPANY U H." 

Cmnpton, George March 2, '65 ; Must, out Aug. 4, '65. 

Kiseminski, Casimir " 21, " " " 

Lee, Frank " 14, "' " " 

Onger, August Feb. 10, " " " 

Schaw, Leonard Jan. 26, 4t " " 

Timm, John A. March 16, « " " 

Tebottle, Fred Jan 26, " " 

Westfall, Frederick H. " 14 " 

COMPANY "L" 

Chalfant, Evan A. April 11, '65; Mustered out June 5, '65. 

OFFICERS. 

John D. McRahin, April 18, '65; Cap. pro. Lt. Col.; mus. o. with Rg. 
Elias M. Lowe, " 34, " 2d Lt. pro. Q. M.; 
Orrison Wilson, March 23, " Captain ; 
Joseph W. Harding, April 3, u 1st Lieutenant; 
Canning Wilson, March 23, " 2d 



U 44 

44 44 

44 44 

«4 44 



U. S. COLORED TROOPS. 



UNASSIGNED RECRUITS. 



Anderson, Ross Sept. 26, '64. 
Banks, George Oct. 15, " 
Burden, Thompson Sept. " 



384 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Bennett. John Sept. 13, '65; 

Caesar. Julius " 26, " 

Caldwell. Tillman " 13, " 

Evans, John Sept. 3, '64 : Mustered out May 29. '65. 

George. Wm. Oct. 4. " 

Johnson, William " 28, " 

Kemp. Henrv " 13, " 

Roberts. William " 22. " 



THIRD BATRERY. 

RECRUITS ASSIGNED BUT NOT BORXE OX THE MUSTER OUT ROLL. 

James. John Aug. 24, '61 : Died of wounds Oct. 7, 'Q'2. 



FOURTH BATTERY. 

Asahel. K. Bush, Sept. 30/61 : Capt.: discharged to enter Invalid 

Corps. Sept. 29, '63. 
Henry J. Willits, May 23, '62; 2d Lieut.: pro. 1st Lieut, and mus. 

out Oct. 6, '64. 
Geo. M. Lamb, Jan. ^^Qo; 1st Lieut.; mustered out with Battery. 
J. W. McCleary, Sept. 30/61; 1st Serg't, promoted 2d Lieutenant. 
Henry H. Woods, ,% Serg.; discharged July 10, '65. 

Thomas G. Ormrod, kl " Discharged May 20, '63. 

Harvey Turner " " Discharged June 10, '62. 

CORPORALS. 

Haddock, Joseph C. 

Lock wood, James 

Ward. William P. 

Macadoo, John u 

Richards, Robert 

(Mark, Samuel J. 

Bouchard, John B. " Artificer; discharged Dee. 14, '62. 

Pecore, Joseph " " " Nov. 16, '61. 

Potter. Benjamin C. " " - v July 2. '62. 

Holland. Ernest 

Dunn, John W. ; " Bugler; pro. 2d Lieut. 40th Reg't. 

Barber, Silas " Wag'r: died, Stevenson, Nov. 2. '63. 

PRIVATES. 

Albert, Peter " Trs. to V. R. C, Aug. —,'63. 

Alexander, John " Discharged Sept. 2, 

Arnold. Edwin V. " 



u 



MILITARY RECORD. 



385 



Ash ton, Simon R. Sept. 30/61 

Blair, Gorham B. 

Brown. Oscar D. 

Brock way. Asahel 

Copp, Eliphalet 

Cook, Charles 

Corey, Edmund 0. 

Cross, Norman B. 

Dewolfe, Joseph E. 

Doing, Hiram 

Disard, John 

Fasold, Harmon 

Forbes, George 

Forbes, Wallace W. 

Francis, Willis T. 

Gillespie, Micajah D. 

Glime, Nelson 

Goodhue, George W. 

Hainer, Robert II. 

Hainer, Daniel W. 

Harrold, James 

Hill, Edmund C. 

Hill, James 

Horn, Albert 

Huff, Mathias 

Jacobs, Edwin S. 

Johnston, George W. 

Jones, John 

Jones, Edward 

Kasbaum, Charles 

Lawrence, George 

Long, Gideon P. 

Low, Charles 0. 

Logan, Edmond J. 

Madaline, Ames 

Maze, Alexander 

Miller, Henry 

McLain, Andrew W. 

McLellan, Belding R, 

Nugent, Edmond T. 

Nugent, Thomas 

Olvaney, John 



; Discharged March 21/63. 



a 



a 



a 



a 



a 



a 



U 



.. 



.. 



u 



u 



a 



a 



a 



u 



u 



a 



u 



U 

a- 

a 
a 

a 
a 
a 

a 
a 
a 

Li 

a 

a 
a 
u 
a 
u 
u 
u 
u 
a 



a 



Dec. 14, '62, as Corporal. 



Died, Camp Wood, Ky., Feb. 8, '62. 
Discharged Feb. 17, '62. 



Discharged April 4, '64. 



Discharged Jan. 27, '63. 



Discharged July 2, '62. 
Mustered out Jan. 14, '65. 
Discharged March 28, '63. 
Vet.; mus. out Aug. 1,'65, 1st Sergt. 
Discharged April 11, '63. 

Killed, at Stone River, Dec. 30, '62. 



Discharged April 22, '63. 

Discharged Oct. 8, '62. 

Discharged Dec. 8, '63. 
Discharged Aug. 26, '63. 



Discharged March 4, '64. 

Discharged April 4, '62. 
Discharged Oct. 8, '62. 
Killed at Stone River, Dec. 31, '62. 
Killed at Perryville, Ky. Oct. 8,'62, 



25 



386 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Peabody, Samuel Sept. 30, '61. 

Perdoil, William " 

Reynolds, Oscar " Discharged Dec. 13, '62. 

Reynolds. Isaac " 

Richie. Dyer " 

Riley, Edward " Discharged Feb. 17. '62. 

Roberts, Henry R. " Discharged: date unknown. 

Selzer, Mathias " 

Shreve, Thomas " 

Sisson, John B. " " " " 

Smith, Edmond " Died at Murfreesboro, Jan. 9,'63. 

Small, James F. li 

Sperry, David V. u 

Sonenberg, Augustus w " 

Tremain, Russell " Discharged Feb. 1, '63. 

Vanauken, John " Veteran. 

Wells. Orrin W. 

Youngs, Henry A. " Transferred to V. R. C. 

RECRUITS. 

Barringer, John R. May 20, '63; Mustered out July 2<>. '65. 
Blessing, Michael Oct. 19, '64; " " Aug. 1, " 

Chipman, Frederick A. Nov. 14,'64; u " Nov. 14, '65. 



FIFTH BATTERY. 

Ellison, Jacob F. Nov. 22,'61; 1st Serg.. pro. 2d Lieut, and Is Lt. 

mils, out term exp. 

Allen Munday, Nov. 22, '61; 2.1 Lieut.: res. April 2<>. '63. 

Allen. Joseph M. •• Serg.; discharged Nov. 10,'64. 

Donley, David R. P. "• •• accid't killed, Humsville, Ala. 

June 25, '62. 

Miles. Richard P. " Corp.: discharged Jan. 19, '63. 



Kendall, llenrv M. 



. . 



•'• 



McCollum, Benjamin F." " must. out. Nov. 26, '64. 

Miller, ('laud I . " Bugler; discharged. 



- 

PRIVATES. 



Akely, L. W. Nov. 22/61; Mustered out Nov. 26, '64. 

Baumgartner, Albert " 

Beck ner. Joel " 

Blenk, Joseph " •• " 

Beckler, Henry " Discharged Nov. 12, '62. 



MILITARY RECORD. 387 

Backhaus, Cas. Nov. 22, '61 ; Died at Murfreesboro, Tn. July 12/63. 

Crance, McAdoo " Vet.; trans, to 7th Battery. 

Crance, Michael " Mustered out Nov. 26, '64. 

Donly, Joseph H. " " " " as Sergeant. 

Darlington, Wils. M." Discharged: date unknown. 

Everhart, John " Died at LaPorte, Ind., June 1, '62. 

Evans, Thomas " Mustered out Nov. 26, '64. 

Ehrich, Frederick " Killed at Perryville, Ky., Oct. 8, '62. 

Egner, John " Mustered out Nov. 26, '64. 

Forry, Abraham " Disch'd Jan. 29, '63, wounded, lost arm. 

Hupp, Ormond " Mustered out Nov. 26, '64. 

Hornebeck, Peter L." " 

Henry, William " Transf. to V. R. C. March 15, '64. 

Johnson, Benj. F. " Mustered out Nov. 26, '64. 

Kelley, Stephen " Veteran ; transf. to 7th Battery. 

Klocksiem, Charles " Mustered out Nov. 26, '64. 

Miller, Charles W. " Must, out Nov. 26, '64, as Corporal. 

Petit, Andrew " u " " 

Weckerlin, Henry J. a Vet.; transferred to 7th Battery. 

Donly, Wm. H.Jan. 11, '62; Recruit; trans, to 7th Battery. 

Hughey, Joseph Nov. 23,'61 " Mus. out Nov. 26,'64, as Q. M. Serg. 



THIRTEENTH BATTERY. 

Culp, Lewis F. April 1,'62; Veteran; mustered out July 10, '6b. 
Sherman, Aaron " 14, '64; Recruit " " " 

Slain, Jacob A. " " ' " " " " 

Selkirk, John Sept. 1, '64; 2d Lieut.; promo. 1st Lieut.; mustered 
out with Battery. 



FOURTEENTH BATTERY. 

Cox, Samuel T. Feb. 11, '64; Mustered out Sept. 1, '65. 
Lozer, Albert " 19, " " " " 



TWENTY-FIRST BATTERY. 

Fravei, Theophilus A. Sept. 9,'62; 1st Serg.; disch. March 22,'63. 
Ridgeway, Orville M. " Sergt.; must, out June 26, '65. 

Gordon, Charles M. " Artificer; disch. March 10, '64. 



388 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

PRIVATES. 

Aldrich, Isaac M. Sep. 9,'62; Discharged Feb. 10, '64. 

Chapman, Henry 0. " " March 3, '63. 

Chapman, Francis M. " " Jan. 1, •' 

Cunningham, Thos. W. " Mustered out June 26, '65. 

Davis, Reuben " Discharged March 23, '63. 

Elias, Charles F. " Mustered out June 26, '65. 

Fredzon, Charles " " " " 

Franee, Christian k ' " " " 

Franee, George B. " Discharged Oct. 27. '63. 

Hohner, Jacob " Died, Chicamauga, Sep. 20, '63, wods. 

Hulburt, John W. " Must, out June 26. '65, as Corporal. 

Klinefeldt, Carl 

Williams, Benj. F. 

Williams, George W. 

Wescott, Charles L. Died at Murfreesboro, Aug. 5,'63. 

RECRUITS. 

Gates, Columbus Nov. 23, '64; Mustered out June 26, 65. 
Reed, Peter R. March 4, " " May 11, 

Rodefer, Chas. E. Nov. 23," " June 26, 

OFFICERS. 

Win, W. Andrew, Sept. 9,'62; Capt.; dis. Sept. 16, '64. disability. 
Abram P. Andrew, " 2d Lieut.; promoted 1st Lieut, and 

Captain : mustered out with Battery. 



a u .- u 

u .. .. i. 

u 






TWENTY-THIRD BATTERY. 

McComber, Thomas Nov. 8, '62; Deserted Jan. 12. '63. 



ADDITIONAL NAMES 

OMITTED FROM FOREGOING LISTS, OB I \.\< < OUNTED FOR. 



Capt. Wm. II. Merritt, 9th Reg.; mustered out Sept. 28, '65. 

Charles W. White, 

Lemuel Cox, 15th Regiment. 

J. R. Williams, " 

Edward S. Abbey, 20th Reg: died in Libbey Prison, July 20, '62. 

Charles Aldrich. kt disch. Dec. 18, '62, wounds. 

Henry M. Goodsell, " " Nov. 23,'61 

David Hackett. 



MILITARY RECORD. 389 

Henry Holmouth, 20th Reg.; dich'd May 2, '63, disability. 

Alonzo H. Lamb, " died July 21, '63, wounds. 

Laurin S. Boyce, 29th Reg.; mus. out July 18, '65, as Hosp Stew'd. 

Wm. Dunham, " " " Dec. 20, '65. 

Wm. Z. Hasten, 155 Reg.; mustered out May 22, '65. 

James Six, 

Homer 0. Blackman, 1st U. S. Vet. Vol. Engineers, Artificer. 

Simon Ames, " " " " mus. o. Sep. 26,65 

Wm. Mackey, " " " " Artificer. 

Isaas N. Nelson, " " " " 

The foregoing pages exhibit more forcibly than any words of the 
writer, the vast service which La Porte county rendered in the war 
for the maintenance of the Union. Rightfully can the boast be 
made that few counties in the State manifested a greater devotion 
to the country. These long lists of names will stand in all coming 
time, speaking witnesses for the loyalty which dominated the hearts 
of the people. To complete th-j noble record, there is here given a 
brief outline of the service of each regiment that contained any very 
large number of the men of this countv. 

The Ninth regiment was organized and mustered for the three 
months service, at Indianapolis, on the 25th of April, 1861. Fore- 
most of all, it left Indianapolis for Western Virginia, on the 29th 
day of May, and bore a part in all the first campaign in that region, 
participating in the engagements at Philippi, Laurel Hill, and Car- 
rick's Ford. It returned home in the latter part of July, was re- 
organized at La Porte, and was mustered in for the three years 
service on the 5th day of September. Sent again to Western Vir- 
ginia, it took part in the battles of Green Brier, and Allegheny. 
In July 1862, it was transferred to Buell's arcy in Tennessee, was 
assigned to Nelson's division, and arrived on the battle-field of 
Shiloh, in time to participate in the second day's combat. Here 
Adjutant Patton was killed. The Ninth was active in all the work 
which followed in Tennessee and Kentucky, in the long marches 
after Bragg, in the engagements at Perryville, Danville and Wild 
Cat mountain, in the three days' battle of Stone river, in the bloody 
two days at Chicamauga, where Lieut. Nickston was killed, and the 
battles that freed Chattanooga from the grasp of Bragg's army, on 
the 24th and 25th of November, 186:5. On the 12th of December 



30" HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

1863, it re-enlisted as a veteran organization, and the men received 
a short veteran furlough. When this waa over the regiment re- 
turned to Tennessee, and "was ready to enter on the campaign 
against Atlanta in the Spring and Summer of 1864. It bore its 
full share of the work in all that hundred days of fighting, fought 
asiain and again at Columbia. Franklin and Nashville, and assistedin 
the pursuit of Hood's shattered army, following to Iluntsville, 
Alabama. Here it remained from the 6th dav of January to the 
loth of March. 1865, when it marched into East Tennessee and 
back to Nashville. It was soon afterwards moved to the vicinity of 
New Orleans, La., and the.x-e to Texas, where it remained until 
Sept. 1865, when ir was mustered out of service, and the men 
returned to their homes in Indiana. 

The Fifteenth regiment was mustered into the service of the 
United States for three years at LaFayette. on the 14th day of 
June, 1861, and its first campaign was in West Virginia, taking 
part in the operations at Rich Mountain, the repulse of Lee and the 
battle of Green Brier. On the 19th of November it was sent to 
Louisville, joined BuelFs arm}', and marched for Shiloh with that 
command, arriving during the progress of the battle, in which it 
engaged and rendered excellent service. It participated in the ad- 
vance on Corinth, was engaged in the pursuit <>t Bragg towai 
Cumberland Gap, was at the battle of Perryville and in many >kir- 
mishe> and engagements. In November, 1862, it w tied * 

the reorganized Army of the Cumberland under Elosecrans. It 
participated in the great battle of Stone riverin which it lost heavily. 
Here. Capt. Joel W. Foster was killed. It was a: Tullahoma, in 
the advance to Chattanooga, being in Wagner's division which waa 
the first to enter the city after ii- evacuation by the rebel army. 
Here it remained on post duty, until the latter part <>{" Novem- 
eer, 1863, when it bore a noble part in the fight at Mission Ridg 
losing l!<>- «.itt of 334 men engaged, i; then marched t<< Easl Ten- 
nessee to the relief of Gen. Burns • ;ir Knoxvill< It remained in 
this vicinity until February, 1864, when it went t<» Chattanooga. 
and did garrison dutv until the 16th of June, when it left for Indi- 
anapolis r >> be mustered out of the sen rm of three year- 



MILITARY RECORD. 391 

having expired. A portion of the regiment having re-enlisted as 
veterans, these were transferred to the Seventeenth regiment. 

The Twentieth regiment was organized at La Fayette in July, 
1861, and was mustered in for three years, at Indianapolis, on the 
22nd of that month. On the 2nd day of August it started for the 
field, and its first duty was in Maryland, guarding the Northern 
Central railroad. In September, it was sent to Hatteras Inlet, 
North Carolina. Ordered to Hatteras Bank, forty miles from the 
fortifications, it was attacked by an overwhelming force of the 
enemy; and being destitute of artillery, it was forced to fall back to 
the fortifications. On the 9th of November, it went to Fortress 
Monroe, where it remained until March, 1862, when it was sent to 
Newport News, where it participated, from the shore, in the engage- 
ment between the rebel iron-clad, Merrimac, and the United States 
ships, Cumberland and Congress. On the 10th of May it moved 
to Norfolk, assisted in its capture, and then joined the Army of the 
Potomac on the Peninsula. In all the battles on the Peninsula, 
this regiment bore a gallant part, and its losses were heavy. Lieut. 
John W. Andrew of La Porte, was one of those who fell. It 
was engaged also in the second battle of Bull Run, where its Col- 
one] was killed, and in the battle of Chantilly. The losses in the 
division to which it belonged had been so heavy, especially in 
officers that it did not participate in the Maryland campaign Avhich 
followed. But it was engaged at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, 
and the second day at Gettysburg, where it lost another Colonel, 
and many other officers and men. In all the pursuit of Lee it bore 
a prominent part, taking part in several sharp engagements, and 
was afterwards sent to New York to assist in the suppression of the 
threatened riots in that city ; but it was back again with the Army 
of the Potomac in time to participate in the engagements at Locust 
Grove and Mine river in November, 1863. On the 1st of January, 
1864, at Culpepper, Virginia, a portion of the regiment re-enlisted 
as veterans. In all the arduous service, and tremendous battles of 
the Army of the Potomac, after Grant became Commander-in-Chief, 
the Twentieth participated, from the time of the crossing of the 
Rapidan to the fall of Richmond, and the surrender of Lee, its 
last engagement being at Clover Hill, on the 9th of April, I860. 



392 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Then it marched to Washington, was moved thence to Louisville, 
and was mustered out on the 12th day of July, l< s, >-~>. 

The Twenty-ninth regiment was organized at La Porte, and mus- 
tered for the three years service on the 27th day of August, 1861. 
It moved for the field, and joined Gen. Rousseau at Camp Nevin. 
Kentucky, on the 9th of October. It participated iu the movement 
on Bowling Green and Nashville, and moved from the latter place 
to the Tennessee river, and was hotry engaged in the battle of 
Shiloh, being under fire more than five hours. In this battle it 
suffered severely. In the movement against Corinth, it sustained 
an active purr. ;md upon rhe evacuation of that place by the rebel-, 
it moved with Buell's army, into Kentucky, participated in the 
long pursuit of Bragg, returning to Nashville in December. L s 62. 
Marehino; out with Rosecrans' army toward Murfreesboro. it was 
engaged in the long three days battle of Stone river, losing heavily 
in officers and men. Among the slain on the first day, Dec. 31st, 
1862. was Capt. Frank Stebbins, of La Porte. It was engaged in 
the campaign which followed against Chattanooga, participating in 
the skirmishes at Lavergne, Triune and Liberty Gap. It was 
engaged both days in the great battle of Chicamauga. sustaining 
heavy losses. It was then stationed for a time at Bridgeport, Ala- 
bama, where on the 1st day of January. 1864, it re-enlisted as 
a veteran organization, and was sent home on veteran furlough. 
Returning to the field, it was stationed for a time at Chattanooga, 
and in December. 1864, went to Decatur, Alabama, wbere on the 
27th, it had a brisk skirmish with the enemy. Returning t<> Chat- 
tanooga, it remained there until May. 1865, when it moved t<> 
Dalton, Georgia, thence to Marietta, in October, and was booii 
after mustered out of service. 

The Thirty-fifth regimenl was organized at Indianapolis and 
mustered on the 11th of December, L861. On the loth it left for 
Kentucky, going to Bardstown where it remained six weeks in a 
camp of instruction, and then moved with Buell's army r<> Bowling 
Green and Nashville. From Nashville the regimenl moved to Mc- 
Minnville, and thence in September. L862, with Buell's army to 
Louisville, and afterwards in pursuit of Bra;^, participating in the 
skirmishes of the march, and the battle .»t" Perryville. On the 9th 



MILITARY RECORD. 393 

of December, 1862, it had a severe skirmish with the enemy at 
Dobbin's Ford, near Lavergne, while on a foraging expedition. It 
was in the battle of Stone river in each of the three days, sustaining 
a loss of one-third of its number. It participated in the march 
upon Chattanooga, and fought again at Chicamauga, sustaining 
heavy losses. On the 16th of December, 1863, it re-enlisted as a 
veteran organization, and received the usual furlough. It returned 
to Tennessee in February, 1864, and took part in all the operations 
of the historical Atlanta campaign, exhibiting on several occasions 
determined bravery and gallantry. It returned from Georgia into 
Tennessee to participate in the operations against Hood, fought at 
Franklin and Nashville, and followed in the pursuit of Hood as far 
as Duck river, when it was assigned to the charge of the pontoon 
train. It was now for a time at Huntsville, then at Knoxville, and 
returned to Nashville in the Spring of 1865. In June it was 
transferred with the 4th corps, to Texas, and in September was 
mustered out of service and returned home. 

The Forty-eighth regiment was organized at Goshen. It left 
for Paducah, Kentucky, in February, 1862, and remained there 
until May, when it moved up the Tennessee, and joining the left 
wing of the army under Pope, engaged in the siege of Corinth. 
After the evacuation of that strong-hold it followed in pursuit of 
the retreating rebel army as far as Boonville, Miss. On the 19th 
of September, after various marches and counter marches during the 
summer, it participated in the battle of luka, where it lost one- 
fourth of the number engaged, its Colonel, Norman Eddy, being 
among the number of the severely wounded. It fought again at 
Corinth on the 3d and 4th of October, and then took part in the 
pursuit of Price. It afterwards moved with Grant's army of West 
Tennessee, along the Mississippi Central R. R. as far as Oxford, 
and then marched to Memphis. Remaining here about two months, 
it was moved down the Mississippi, and took part in the operations 
which were designed to reach the rear of Vicksburg, engaging in 
the long, circuitous, and toilsome movement through the Moon lake 
passes, the Coldwater and Tallahatchie rivers, to Fort Pemberton 
on the Yazoo. Returning thence it passed with the main army 
below Vicksburg, crossed the river, and participated in all the 



394 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

movements for the reduction of that place, fighting at Raymond, 
Jackson and Champion Hills, on the 13th, 14th, and 16th of May. 
It took part in the assault on the rebel works at Vicksburg on the 
'2'2d of May. and was engaged in the trenches during the long siege 
of that place, which ended in its surrender <>n the 4th day of July, 
1863. The regiment was afterwards moved up the river to Mem- 
phis, and then marched across the country to Chattanooga, reaching 
there in time to participate in the battle of Mission Ridge. It as- 
sisted in the pursuit of Bragg's army: and in January. l s »)4, it 
re-enlisted, and returned home on veteran furlough, upon the expira- 
tion of which it returned to the field, and was at Huntsville. Alabama, 
until June, when it was moved to Cartersville, Georgia, and kept 
on duty there for the protection of Sherman's railroad communica- 
tions during the campaign against Atlanta. Upon the beginning of 
Hood's invasion of Tennessee, it moved with Sherman's grand army 
through Georgia to Savanah, It went thence to Beaufort. S. C, 
and then engaged in the campaign through the Carolinas to Raleigh. 
After the surrender of Johnson's army, it moved to Petersbug, 
Virginia, and thence to Washington, where after the grand review, 
it was transferred to Louisville, and mustered out of service on the 
15th of July, 1865. 

The Seventy-third regiment was organized at South Bend, and 
mustered into service on the 16th dav of August, 1862, with Gil- 
bert Hathaway, of La Porte, as Colonel. It was immediately or- 
dered to Lexington. Kentucky, from whence it marched to Louis- 
ville. was united to Buell's army, and engaged in the pursuit of 
Bragg, was at the fight at Chaplin Hills, and on the 7th of Novem- 
ber, surprised and drove the enemy out of Gallatin, Tenn. It then 
moved to Nashville, where it joined Rosecrans' army, and bore a 
distinguished part in the battle of Stone river, where it lost one- 
third of its number, and immediately after the battle was compli- 
mented by Gen. Rosecrans in person. On the 10th of April. 1863, 
it was assigned to Col. Streight's " [ndependenl Provisional Brig- 
ade." It moved down the Cumberland and up the Ten' to 
Eastport, Miss. Here it was mounted by impressments from the 
country, and moved to Tuscumbia, Alabama, and left that place on 
the -' s th of April on its hazardous expedition. The brigade was 



MILITARY RECORD. 395 

only 1.500 strong, and on the 30th of April, it was attacked at 
Day's Gap, by 4,000 rebel cavalry under Forest and Roddy, who, 
by a spirited charge, were driven from the field, losing their artil- 
lery. The rebels again attacked at Crooked Creek, on the same 
day, and were again repulsed. The provisional brigade was again 
attacked at Blount's Farm, Alabama, on the 2d of May, and here 
Col. Hathaway was killed while at the head of his men, cheering 
them on. Surrounded by superior forces, and nearly out of ammu- 
nition, Col. Streight was compelled to surrender. The men were 
soon forwarded north and exchanged, but the officers were kept in 
close confinement by the rebels nearly two years. For several 
months the men were in camp, and were then sent to Tennessee, 
where on the 28th of March, 1864, Major, afterwards Col. Wade, 
being released from rebel prison, assumed command of the regiment. 
During the Summer it was engaged in guarding the Nashville and 
Chattanooga railroad, and picketing the Tennessee river, rendering 
extremely important service. It defended Prospect, Tenn., during 
Wheeler's raid, and in the latter part of September was ordered to 
Decatur, Alabama, and from there to Athens. This place Col. 
Wade was ordered to hold, and at once he put it in a condition for 
defense. The rebels attacked on the 1st of October, 4,000 strong, 
while the garrison numbered 500. A demand for surrender was 
refused, and the next day the rebels retired. The regiment was 
then sent to Decatur, to assist in the defense of that place. It bore 
an honorable part in the repulse of Hood. In January, 1865, it 
was moved to ITuntsville, Ala., and placed on duty along the line 
of the Memphis and Charleston railroad, having frequent skirmishes 
with the enemy. It remained on this duty until the Summer of 
1865, when on the 1st day of July, at Nashville, it was mustered 
out of service. 

The Eighty-seventh regiment was organized at South Bend on 
the 28th of August, 1862. It was mustered in at Indianapolis, and 
on the same day proceeded to Louisville, Kentucky, and immedi- 
ately entered on the campaign with Buell's army, against Bragg, 
engaging in the battle of Perry ville. After the close of this cam- 
paign, it was engaged in various marches and skirmishes, and 
on the 23d of June, 1863, moved with the army of the Cumberland 



396 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

and engaged in the Summer campaign against Tullahoma, which 
j»lace it assisted in capturing, and them moved to Winchester, Tenn., 

and soon after, over the mountain* to Battle Creek on the Tenn 
river. It participated in the Fall campaign against Chattanooga, 
and bore an honorable and conspicuous part in the bloody battle >f 
Chicamauga, on the 19th and 20th of September, L863, wh< 
among its numerous losses, Lieut. Abram C. Andrew, of La Porte, 
was killed. Col. Newell Gleason was now in command of the regi- 
ment, Col. Shryock, its first Colonel, having resigned on the - s th 
of the preceding March. On the 25th of November it was in the 
front line of the brigade in the storming of Mission Ridge, and 
afterwards engaged in the pursuit of the enemy to Ringold, Ga. 
It was engaged in the expedition against Dalton in February, 1 s 'i4. 
and in the laborious campaign against Atlanta, it bore its full share 
of arduous duty, of march, skirmish and battle. It assisted in the 
pursuit of Hood after the fall of Atlanta, as far northward as GayL 
ville, Alabama. It then returned to Atlanta, and marched with 
Sherman to the sea, and back through the Carolinas to Goldsboro, 
N. C. Thence it went to Raleigh, remained there until after the 
surrender of Johnson's army, when it marched to Richmond, ^ ir- 
ginia. and thence to Washington, participated in the general review, 
and was mustered out of service on the 10th day of June, 1865. 

The One Hundred and Twenty-seventh regiment (Twelfth Caval- 
ry,) was organized at Kendallville. on the 1st of March. 1864, with 
Rev. Edward Anderson as Colonel. Earlv in May, the regiment 
proceeded to Indianapolis, and thence to Louisville and Nashville. 
It remained at the latter place three weeks, when it was ordered to 
Huntsville, Ala., and was assigned to guard railroad defi nses, and 
watch the country between the river and the railroad, which wai 
infested by guerillas and bush whacker-. In pursuance of this duty. 
the regiment became engaged in many skirmishes, losing considera- 
ble in killed and wounded. On the 15th of September, L864, it 
wa> ordered to Tullahoma, to garrison that post. Here it was con- 
stantly employed in watching the rebel General Forest, who was 
threatening Tullahoma with a large force, and with his forces it 
had several sharp skirmishes. Three companies, "C," ft D," and 
••II." wore at Huntsville. and assisted in the defense of that place 



MILITARY RECORD. 397 

against an attack of a portion of Forest's command on the 1st of 

October. It had other engagements with Forest's command at 

© © 

Murfreesboro and elsewhere, and proceeding to Nashville late in the 
Fall, it went into winter quarters. On Feby. 11, 1865, it embarked 
on board transport steair.ers. and went to Vicksburg. Miss., thence 
to New Orleans, arriving on the 12th of March, 1865. It next was 
sent to Mobile bay and participated in the operations against the 
defenses of Mobile. After the fall of Mobile, the regiment partici- 
pated in an extensive cavalry raid into Georgia, thence across 
Alabama, and to Columbus, Miss., where it arrived on the 20th 
day of May, 1865. From this place a portion of the regiment was 
sent to Grenada, Miss., and a parr to Austin, on the Mississippi 
river, while the remaining companies remained at Columbus. All 
were engaged chiefly in protecting government cotton and other 
property until they were ordered to Vicksburg, where the regiment 
was mustered out on the 10th day of November, 1865. 

The One Hundred and Twenty-eighth regiment was mustered 
into service on the 18th day of March, 1864, at Michigan City. 
On the 23d it left Michigan City by rail, and proceeded to Nashville, 
where it was assigned to Gen. Hovey's division, and at once started 
on the march to Charleston, East Tennessee, where it joined the 
23d corps under command of Gen. Schofield, and on the ,4th of May 
it left Charleston to enter on the one hundred days campaign 
against Atlanta. It participated in the movements about Dalton, 
Buzzard's Roost, and Rocky Face, and having moved with Sher- 
man's army through Snake Creek Gap, it shared in the battle of 
Resaca; and in all the subsequent campaign, in marching, flanking 
and fighting, it bore a distinguished part. On the 6th dav of June, 

© © ; or • ' 

1865, the Colonel, Richard P. De Hart, was wounded, and the 
command devolved on the Lieutenant Colonel during all the subse- 

o 

quent service of the regiment. After the fall of Atlanta, the regi- 
ment went to Decatur, Georgia, and on the 4th of October, it 
moved with its corps in pursuit of Hood, who was reported march- 
ing northward. Then Sherman's whole army moved after him, 
past Alatoona, Resaca, Rome, and as far as Gaylesville, Alabama. 
From this place the regiment marched with its corps to Chattanoo- 
ga, and thence to Nashville, whence it was pushed out hurriedly 



-308 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

toward Hood's new front, as far as Pulaski, Term. So soon as it 
was ascertained that Hood was crossing the Tennessee river, a new 
position was taken at Columbia. Three' days heavy skirmishing 
ensued, when the army under Schofield fell back to Franklin, where 
the regiment was engaged so hotly as to leave thirty-seven rebels 
dead in its front, though its own losses were few in number. I >n 
the 15th and 10th of December, it participated in the battle of 
Nashville, and assisted in the pursuit of Hood, driving his shattered 
and demoralized army beyond the Tennessee river. It moved next 
to Clifton on the river, where it embarked on steamers, and moved 
to Cincinnati, and thence by rail to Washington, and soon after to 
Alexandria, from whence on the 20th of Februarv it embarked on 
an ocean steamer, and landed at Morehead City, North Carolina, 
moving thence by rail to Newbern. It then moved up the railroad 
towards Raleigh, was engaged in the battle of Wise's Forks below 
Kinston, on the 10th of March, where it lost heavily, and after- 
wards marched to Goldsboro. It was then sent to LeXoir Insti- 
tute, where it remained until the 9th of April, when it moved to 
Raleigh, with the entire army, Sherman having come from the sea. 
It was on duty in the city of Raleigh when the news came ot the 
assassination, and it was only by extra vigilance that the city v 
saved from destruction. It was sent from Raleigh after the surren- 
der of Johnston's army, to Charlotte, and two months afterwards to 
Salisbury; where it remained in charge of the forty-three counties 
of Western North Carolina, until the 10th day of April. 1866, 
when it proceeded to Indianapolis, and was mustered out on the 
18th of that month, being the last in service, of the Indiana tro< 

The One Hundred and Fifty-first regiment was organized at 
Indianapolis. March 3, 1865, for one year's service, and did posl 
and garrison duty at Tullahoma and Nashville, Term., until the 
l'.Hh of September, when it was mustered out of service. 

The One Hundred and Fiftv-fifth regiment was organized at In- 
dianapolis, April 18, 18<>.~>, and moved thence to Washington, and 
Alexandria, and was soon afterwards assigned to garrison and post 
duty, in Maryland an i Delaware, remaining in service until August 

CD 

4th, 1865, when it was mustered out at Dover. Delaware. 

The Fourth battery of light artillery, was mustered into service at 



MILITARY RECORD. 399 

Indianapolis on the 30th day of September, 1861. It bore an 
eminent part in the campaigns of Buell against Bragg, Rosen- 
crans', including the bloody battles of Stone river and Chicamauga, 
and Grant's in the relief of Chattanooga, always rendering most 
efficient and valuable service. It was reorganized on the 14th day 
of October, 1864, and participated in the fight with Hood at Nash- 
ville. On the 1st day of August, 1865, it was mustered out of 
service at Indianapolis. 

The Fifth battery of light artillery was mustered in November 
22, 1861. It went to the front without delay, and in the month 
of March, 1862, it assisted in the capture of Huntsville, Ala. It 
bore an active and gallant part, in all the campaigns and operations 
of the armies of Buell, Rosecrans, Grant and Sherman, in the years 
1862, '63, and '64, in Tennessee and Georgia, participated in all 
the important battles, and innumerable smaller engagements and 
skirmishes. At Pine mountain Capt. Simonson was killed, and 
here a gun from this artillery killed the rebel General Bishop Polk. 
It was mustered out on the 26th of November, '64, at Indianapolis. 

The Twenty-first battery was mustered in on the 9th of Septem- 
ber, 1862, and immediately left for Covington, Ky. It engaged in 
a varied round of duty, in marches and skirmishes, in Kentucky 
and Tennessee. It was engaged at Hoover's Gap, Chicamauga and 
Mission Ridge in 1863. It was also in the fight at Nashville, on 
the 15th and 16th of December, 1864. On the 17th of September, 
1864, Capt. Wm. W. Andrew was discharged by reason of disabili- 
ty, caused by wounds, and Abram P. Andrew became Captain. 
On the 21st day of June, 1865, it was mustered out at Indianapolis. 



400 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 



CHAPTER XXI. 

METHODIST EPISCOI' A L. 

The history of the churches of LaPorte county, must for a portion 
of our people, if not all of them, posses a deep interest. The author 
has therefore been at great pains to make this record as complete as 
possible, In the search for facts on this subject, he was fortunate 
enough to enlist the interest of Rev. <J. M. Boyd, Presiding Elder 
of the La Porte district, who kindly furnished him the following 
paper, which gives a very full history of the Methodist Episcopal 
church in this county. 

We write partly from personal observation, having been on the 
ground as early as the fall of 1830, but mainly from official docu- 
ments, such as the minutes of the annual conferences, and the 
journals of the quarterly conferences. In some cases we have not 
been able to get access to such quarterly conference minutes, as was 
necessary to a full knowledge of the facts we desired to bring out in 
our historical sketch. 

In speaking of the year, the reader will bear in mind that we 
refer to the conference veal*, which in our conference has alwa 
commenced in the Fall when the annual session was held. 

Another fact to be mentioned here. is. that for the first fe?i yei 
the county was ecclesiasticallv connected with territory in other 
counties, the circuits being large. This will account for the fre- 
quent mention of other places not in the county. 

In the Fall of 1832 the first session of the Indiana conference 
was held, and the State was divided into five Presiding Elder's 
districts, the most northern of which was called Missionary District. 

To this. Rev. James Armstrong was appointed a< Presiding El- 
der, or as he is called that year in the minutes. Superintendent. It 
is due to the memory of that eminent minister to say that his dis- 
trict was a laborious one, extending from near Lafavette on the 
Wabash to Kalamazoo in the State of Michigan; and from the Ohio 



CHURCH RECORD. 401 

line on the east to Illinois on the west. This same Fall La Porte 
Mission was organized, and he received also the appointment of 
missonary thereto. By his arrangement as Presiding Elder, Boyd 
Phelps, who was stationed at Fort Wayne, and R. S. Robinson and 
G. M. Bostwick of St. Joseph Mission, supplied also La Porte Mis- 
sion, as Mr. Armstrong's extensive work gave him but little time 
to attend to the duties of the missionary- The number of members 
returned at the close of the year for the mission was one hundred 
and forty. Mr. Armstrong found when he came to the work, that 
a small class had been formed at a Mr. Aehart's near where West- 
ville now stands, by Jeremiah Sherwood, a local preacher who had 
preceded him in the county. This was the first class of Metho- 
dists formed in the county, if not the first Protestant organization 
of any kind. In the Fall of that year, Mr. Armstrong formed a 
class at Door Village, or on a log in the grove where the village now 
stands. This place like the land of Moruih, became consecrated 
ground. Here, during the next Summer, the infant church built a 
small chapel in which they worshiped for several years. It was 
erected on the site where the present church stands, and was the 
first house*of worship, built north of the Wabash River. Of the 
men who united with that class, but few T are alive. Lewis Keith and 
Thomas W. Sale still like veterans, linger among us. In 1833 the 
district was called North Western District, and Mr. Armstrong was 
Presiding Elder, and the mission was included in the South Bend 
circuit; Boyd Phelps being sent as the preacher, with Thos. P. Mc 
Cool as his assistant. This year several new societies or classes 
were organized in the county, La Porte I think was one, and an- 
other at Silas Hale's on Stilwell Prairie, and another at the house of 
Thomas Robinson in the south-west part of the county. The circuit 
was large, extending from South Bend to Michigan City, and from 
Niles, Michigan, to the west end of Door Prairie. The numbers 
returned at the conference were five hundred and eleven, but how 
many were in the county, we cannot say. At the close of this 
year, Rev. James Armstrong was called from labor to reward. He 
died in great peace at his home near Door Village, lamented by all 
who knew him, and his remains repose in the cemeterv at that 

26 



402 EIISTOR? OP LA PORTE COUN r . . 

place. Perhaps no man das ever died in the county whose loss 
was so universally fell . 

In the Fall of L834, the district was called La Porte District,— 
R. Hanrrave, Presiding Elder, and S. R. Ball and T. P. Mc 1 
preachers. In 1 s: )~>. the work was called La Porte Circuit, and R. 

. Meek was senl as preacher, with Elijah Barns as a supply. Tl 
• camp-meeting for the second time was held near Springville. 
It was an interesting meeting. In 1836. G. M. Boyd was appoint 
to the circuit with Stephen R. Jones as an assistant. This year I 
formed the class in the Galena woods at the house of Whitman Goit. 
Our preaching places were La Porte, Door Village, Robinson's, 
Warnock's, H. Clyburn's, near where Westville now stands: Van- 
Meter's, on the road from La Porte to Michigan City; Michigan 
City, Springville. Goit's, Wright's, near Rolling Prairie Station ; 
Griffin's School House, Silas Hale'-. Kingsbury, Admiral Burch's, 
and five other places outside of the county. 

This vear a Sabbath School was organized in La Porte, in which 
A. and J. B. Fravel took a deep interest. The latter gentleman 
in the absence ot a barber, cut the hair of the gentlemen, charging 
them a dime each, and appropriated the funds to purchase a library 
for the use of the school. 

The reader will pardon a little episode here. This year Daniel 
Webster, the eminent statesman, was making a tour through the 
West. It was on the fourth of Julv when he visited La Porte, and 
ihe little school was out in patriotic procession. Mr. Webster v- 

■aiding in his carriage addressing the citizen-, when the procession 
filed around the corner of the public square. Hi< eye caught the 
scene, and turning to the crowd he exclaimed, " There : fellow citizens , 
, the hope <>t' our country." The lips that uttered these words are 
sealed in death, but the truth of the utterance is manifest to all who 
observe the moral influence of the Sunday School on society. 

This vear our friends erected a small heat brick church on the 
corner lot now occupied in connection with the residence of Dr. 
Teegarden. Here they worshiped f or several years. In 1837. 
Boyd Phelps ana II. Van Order, were sent as circuit preachers. 
In 1838, Aaron Wood was appointed Presiding Elder, and R. Har- 
grave and J. B. Jenkins, preachers. This year Union Chapel, in 



CHURCH RECORD. 403 

the Robinson neighborhood was erected, and the Robinson and 
Warnock classes united there. This house was a prominent point 
for Methodists for several years until Westville and New Durham 
became central points, and by removal, death, and other reasons 
this place ceased to be a place of worship. The first Methodist 
Church at Michigan City was erected, I think, this year. In 1839 
the district was called South Bend District, — A. Wood, Presiding 
Elder, and Rev. Zachariah Games and G. W. Baker were appointed 
to the circuit. In 1840 the preachers were Z. Games and W. F. 
Wheeler. This year the circuit was confined to the limits of the 
county. In 1841 Wade Posey and G. W. Ames, brother of Bishop 
Ames, were the preachers This year a small chapel was built in 
Goit's neighborhood, and was called in honor of the senior preach- 
er. Posey Chapel. This was, in a few years, superceded by abetter 
house, called by the same name. It still is a preaching place with 
a small society of good men and women. It stands upon an eleva- 
tion commanding an extensive view of the country, and surrounded 
by the graves of some of the best and purest citizens, who have 
departed this life. 

In the Fall of 1842, W. H. Goode was appointed Presiding El- 
der, and A. Wood and L. W. Mimson, were the preachers. Mr. 
Goode went one round on his district and was transferred bv the 
Bishop to Arkansas, to take charge of missionary work, and A. 
Wood was re-placed on the district, and W. Griffith was employed 
in charge of the circuit. 

In the Fall of 1843, C. M. liolliday was appointed Presiding 
Elder, and W. L. Huffman the preacher. At this conference, Union 
circuit was formed, including the west end or half of the county, 
and 0. Y. Lemon and B. Winans were the preachers. Mr. Huff- 
man was left in charge of the rest of the territory in the county 
except Mount Pleasant and Posey Chapels. I am not able to give 
the time when Mount Pleasant Chapel was built, neither that of 
Lamb's Chapel. 

As the church increased, the interest in the Sunday School cause in- 
creased. The returns show an aggregate of three hundred and five 
scholars in the county. From the Fall of 1843 to 1856, all the 
^reaching places in the county east of La Porte, except Byron and 



404 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

McCasky's, were included in Terre Coupeo and other circuits, and 
served by the preachers appointed thereto. 

In 1844, J. B. DeMott was appointed to La Porte circuit. J. W 
Parrett to Michigan City, and S. Lamb to Union. This year the 
erection of Donnain church was commenced. but finished subsequently. 

In 1845, G. TV. Bowers wa e at to La Porte. Jacob Cazad 
Michigan City, and J. W. Parrett to Union. 

In 184<*». J. Daniel was appointed Presiding Elder. T. 11. Senix 
to La Porte. J. J. Cooper to Union, with Michigan ( ity attached 
thereto. 

In 1847 La Porte was made a station, with 11. C. Benson, pastor. 
Union circuit included Michigan City; and F. Taylor and J. Gr. D. 
Pettijohn were sent as preachers; and New Durham meeting house 
erected. 

In 1848 Mr. Benson was returned r <. La Porte. Th - rhe 

first instance of a preacher returnin 3ec ad year cutively 

to any charge in the county — such was the practical workings ot 
the itinerac-v. F. Taylor was also returned to Union circuit, with 
E. J. Kirk a^ junior preacher. 

In 1849 the appointments for the county were, W. Gra- 

ham; Union, Thos. C. Hackney. R. S. Li This vear the 

present church edifice was built at 1 1 • re. 

In 1850 J. \j. Smith was appointed Presiding Elder, and W. 
Graham to La Porte station. This ye irch no? 

in the city was erected, partly by the effo or and Presiding 

Elder as ministers, but mainly by the contribute - if the people, 
for the people had a mind to work. 

Union circuit wj ved this year by 1>. F. S and E. Hor- 
ner: K; iirv mission by L. Moore; Micl City by . 

in L851, J. Daniel was Pastor at La Porte; I oion and K'n 
bury, J. G. (/shorn. IK' remained but two signed 

his place, and T. P. Mathews was appointed preacln Mr. Osborn 
was a physician by profession, but turned his attention to the law, 
and died some two years since, an honored member of the bar at 
Plymouth. 

In 1852, .!. R. Tansey was stationed in La Porte, but being 
transferred at the end of the first quarter to California, J. 8. Don- 



CHURCH RECORD. 405 

alson was appointed in his place. W. P. Watkins was preacher on 
Kingsbury circuit. This year the church on the Plymouth road, 
known as Salem chapel, was built. For the next three years this 
work was filled by Presiding Elders and preachers from Rochester 
and South Bend districts. In 1853 S. Taylor was sent to 
La Porte. In the close of this year the North- West Indiana 
Conference, held its session in the city, Bishop Simpson pre- 
siding. This was a memorable time for our people and our 
friends, as they mingled with' the ministers from the different 
parts of the conference, and enjoyed the religious services of the 
occasion, especially the sermons of Bishop Simpson, and Dr. Peck, 
now one of our Bishops. It was the second time the conference 
held its session in this city : Bishop Morris having held one in 1846. 

In 1800. Union circuit was served by J. L. Donalson and Aaron 
Gurney: 1854, W. Hamilton and R, Bury; 1855, H. B. Ball and A. 
Fellows: 1856, F. Taylor, H. 0. Huffman. 

In the remainder of this paper we will notice the different charges 
in the county under their respective heads. 

In 1 854, W. Graham was appointed Presiding Elder, and G. W. 
Crawford stationed preacher in La Porte. Mr. Crawford was a 
young man of promise, but fell a victim to consumption in early 
life. 

In 1855, S. T. Cooper was appointed preacher, and served the 
church two years Under his labors a good revival of religion 
occurred, and many were added to the church, and a new parsonage 
was built. He was succeeded in the pastorate in 1857, by J. M. Stal- 
lard: 1858, B. Winans was sent as Presiding Elder, and P Wiley, 
now professor in Asbury University, as preacher. 

In 1859, A. A. Gee was stationed in the city; 1860, David 
Holmes, D. D.; 1861, Nelson Green; 1862, C. Skinner, The 
church and parsonage having by mismanagement become deeply 
involved in debt, Mr. Skinner had a hard, but to a good extent, a 
successful year. The church paid off several hundred dollars of their 
indebtedness. 

In 1863, S. T. Cooper, Presiding Elder: G. M. Boyd, Pastor. 
For three years Ave labored together with pleasure and profit. They 
were years of toil and anxiety, but of success. Over a hundred 



40 WRY OF i..\ PORT] i ' Y. 

ils were converted and added to the church, and th< ice of 

tlie debt on the church and parsonage, whi< e al hundred 

dollars, was paid off; and the audience room was th ^hly and 
beautifully refitted, and the annual conference held a pi ion 

therein, Bishop Ames presiding. 

In . J. Thrush came as pastor, but Btayed only 01 »r. 

Ih' served the church in South Bend one and a half years, and 
to Pennsylvania and died. a fini prea 

In 1867 J. Johnson was Presiding Elder, and remained on the 
district four years, during which time. L. C. Bu 
pastor two years; T. S. Webb one, and L. Nebeker, ob 

In L871. L. Xebeker was Presiding Elder, and remained two 
first of which .1. J ison was pastor. 1^72. W. M. 
Darwood was appointed pastor. 187 : >. (». M. Boyd, Presiding 
Elder — same pastor. In 1874, same Presiding Elder and pastor. 
Mr. ! Garwood's three years were characterized with some good revi- 
vals an$ addi: and with fine and tasteful church and jonage 
improvements. In 1875, the present pastor, J. H. Cissel, v 
appointed, with the same Presiding Elder. 

ROLLING PRAIRIE CIRCUIT. 

This circuit lay in the north and east parts of the coun nd 
when organized in 1856, embraced Pose; apel, Mount Pleasant, 
near where Rolling Prairie Stati< Laml apel, ' ait 

school house, Salem, Bald Hill, Byron, and some ot It 

was at the time included in South Bend district, with I. 
Presiding Elder, and W. Reeder and L. Moore, preacher-. In 
1857, same I . Elder, W. Reeder and C. L. Smith, preach- 

[n L858, T. S. tf bb, I og Elder. T. C. I 

i. W. Joyce, preache] At the fourth quarterly for 

this year, mea taken to divid circuit, which result) 

in the formation of La Porte circuit, of which we will speak here- 
after. 

In 1859 the c cuil • ■ ■■ tiled Portland, and ■■'. Barnes v. 
appointe 1 preacher. ;. eai Barnes is now a 

leading minister in Mi« . d conference. In L86] i!. C. Fraley 
was sent as tcher. In l v . Leach, who remained two years. 

In fche circuit was agaii I Rolling Prairie, and J. E. New- 



CHURCH RECORD. 40"3 

house was appointed pastor. He remained two years, during which 
time the church at Rolling Prairie was built. About or before this 
time, the neat little chapel was built at Maple Grove, by the efforts 
of W. Thomas and others. It is one of the most beautiful churches in 
the country. In 1867, J. H. Glaypool was sent as pastor. In 
1868, C. B. Mock, lie filled the circuit two years, and was suc- 
ceeded in 1870 by J. L. Boyd. In 1871, E. W. Lawhon was the 
pastor, and was succeeded the next two years by B. H. Bradbury. 
In 1874, F. Cox became pastor, and was followed in 1875 by the 
present pastor, G. R. Streeter. 

LA PORTE CIRCUIT TUK SECOND. 

This circuit embraces Salem, Bald Hill, Summit and Coolspring 
churches; the latter however belongs to our Congregational brethren 
though occupied by us as a place of worship. 

This circuit was organized in the Fall of 1859, John Leach as 
pastor. A good revival of religion attended the labors of Mr. 
Leach, and the society was so strengthened at Bald Hill, that they 
erected the chapel at that point. It is one of our best coun 
churches, though the membership has been very much reduced by 
deaths and removals. Mr. Leach was succeeded in 1860, by B. H. 
Bradbury, who remained two year^. lie was succeeded in 1862-Ji 
by N. Green; 1*64. J. H. Holloway; 1865, E. Holdstock;. 
1866-7 and 8, by M. Stolz. During his pastorate which was 
very successful, the church at Summit was built. It is a neat little 
brick house tastefully finished. In 1869, '70 and '71, J. H. Cissel 
was pastor. He was followed in 1872-3 by T. C. Hackney: 1874-5, 
A. B. Bruner, the present pastor. 

DOOR VILLAGE CIRCUIT. 

In the absence of official documents, we will assume that Union 
circuit was divided in 1856, and the east end was called Dormain 
circuit: W. Graham, presiding elder; J. W. Green, preacher. It 
contained Stilwell, Roselle, Marshall Grove, Dormain, and South 
America classes. I cannot inform the reader where the latter class 
was located, but I presume it was on the north end of this conti- 
nent, and somewhere in La Porte county. In 1857, this territory 
was called Door Village circuit, and W. S. Harker was sent as the 
preacher, who was returned the next year with B. Winans, presi- 



408 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

ding elder. In 1859, the circuit was placed in Plymouth district, 
J. Johnson, presiding elder; F. Cox, preacher. In 1860, same 
preachers. In 1861, B. Winans was again presiding elder; J. C. 
Mahin. preacher. In 1862. same presiding elder; B. H. Brad- 
bury, preacher. In 1863. S. T. Cooper, presiding elder: B. H. 
Bradbury, preacher. Mr. Cooper remained on the district four 
year-. In 1864, S. J. Kahler, preacher. In 1865, W. Hamilton, 
preacher. In 1866, J. Johnson, presiding elder; J. H. Cissel, 
pastor. In 1867. D. A. Grimes was appointed to the circuit. In 
1868, Thos. E. Webb. In 1869-70, T. C. Hackney was pastor. 
In 1871-2, L. Nebekcr. presiding elder: R. H. Sanders, preacher, 
who remained on the circuit three years. In 1873, Gn M. Boyd, 
presiding elder. In 1874, same presiding elder and preacher. In 
L875, same elder, with F. Mikels. pastor. During the adminis- 
tration of Rev. T. C. Hackney the church was refitted and beauti- 
fied in a very tasteful manner. During the second year of R. H. 
Sanders' term of service, the church at New Durham was also verv 
nicely improved and refitted. 

MICHIGAN CITY. 

From the commencement of this city, the Methodist Episcopal 
church held service there. In the sale of lots, Major I. C. Elston, 
of Crawfordsville, the proprietor, reserved and donated two lots for, 
the use of the church. 

In, or about the year 1838, the friends under the lead of Mr. 
Porterficld Harrison and others, erected a small frame church on 
the site donated. This served the society for several years, but the 
encroachment of the sand which threatened to bury the h >use, ren- 

« 

dered it an unpropitious place for a church, and the meuil ers aid 
by their friends, purchased the lot and built the present hous 
worship, and secured a pai ge ala . I am no - to the 

year this was done, but 1 believe Rev. \Y. I , or ( apt. Copp, 
"the fighting parson," as vas called during the rebellion, was 
the preacher at the tin 

For the want ^ necessary mean- >f information, 1 cannot tra 
the appointments at Michigan City from the time it was last 
disconnected from the circuit; but in 1853, as per conference min- 
utes. B. Winans was pastor. In 1854-5, J. G. Osborn : 1856, N. 



CHURCH RECORD. 409 

L. Brakeman; 1857, J. W. Green; 1858, H. Smith; 1859-60, W. 
Copp; 1861-2, L. C. Buckles; 1863, A. 0. Cunningham; 1864-5, 
J. L. Boyd: 1866-7, A. Wood; 1868-9-70, Thos. Meredith; 
1871-2, N. L. Brakeman; 1878, R. D. Utter; 1874-5, J. II. 

Clay pool. 

UNION MILLS CIRCUIT. 

This circuit as such was formed in 1878, and G. R. Streeter 
was sent as preacher. It embraced the vicinity of Union Mills, 
Hanna Station and Clinton chapel; but at the end of the year Union 
Mills was re-connected with Door Village circuit and Clinton chapel, 
to Westville. In 1875, the brethren having erected a very neat little 
church at Union Mills, a new circuit was formed and the present 
pastor, J. B. Smith, was sent. The year opened very pleasantly 
by the dedication of the Church, by Rev. J. H. Hall of Battle 
Ground. This circuit now embraces Union Mills, Hanna Station, 
Morgan Station and Wanatali. 

WESTVILLE CIRCUIT. 

In 1843, the first house of worship was built in this place by our 
people. It was served for several years by the preachers from Union 
circuit, but in 1857 it was organized as a circuit — F. Taylor, pas- 
tor. 1858, J. Johnson; 1859-60, Thos. Bartlett. This last year 
Clinton chapel was built. 1861, S. T. Cooper; 1862, J. E. New- 
house; 1863-4-5, M. L. Green; 1866-7, C. B. Mock; 1868, itwas 
made a station, and J. H. Claypool served as pastor for three suc- 
cessive years. 1871, R. H. 'Sanders: 1872-3, J. Johnson; 1874-5. 
W. P. McKinsey. 

In 1860, by the munificent will of Mr. West, some live thousand 
dollars were bequeathed to the church in Westville for the erection 
of a new church, and by the subscription of the friends in addition 
to this, the present comfortable church was erected, and a good 
congregation and sabbath school meet there every Sunday. 

From the commencement of the operation of the church in the 
county, the question of Sunday schools and Sunday school inter- 
ests have been prominent in her operations. It has been the advice 
in our discipline, and to a great extent our practice, wherever we 
could collect ten children together in a neighborhood there to organ- 
ize them into a school. In many places we have not been able to 



41" HISTORY OF LA PORTE < • DNTY. 

do this, bat have acted in conjunction with other churches, and 
members of no church. 

There are now in the county fifteen Methodist schools, with two 
hundred and fourteen officers and teachers, and one thousand four 
hundred and eighty-two scholars. The ex] es for these schools 
74, was $497.74. 

We have 1,018 members in the county; thirteen churches with 
probable valn< 1,700; six parsonages, valued at $9,750. 

The local preachers in the county . Le : . Moore, J. G. M 

Casky, .James Waxham and A. Cowgill. 

In connection with the Methodist church in La Porte com, 
there should be mentioned also, the German Methodist J: pal 

church at La Porte, -whose commodious church edifice stands on the 
corner of Clay and Harrison streets. The church i ain and 

neat frame structure. Over the entrance door are the words in 
German, "The Lord is in his holy Temple." The c -oration is 

German, and the services are conducted in that language. Ever 
since tin bion they have received the faithful ministratio 

of devoted pi . frequen I in accordance with the 

thodist practice. Rev. Wm. Keller is now the pastor. 

THE BAPTIST CHURCH. 

The fir-' Baptist church in La Porte county was organized in tl 
year 1834, an i was the fruit of the labors of Rev. Phineas Oolver, 
of Washington county, New York. It was located on Stillwell 
prairie. Elder Colver had come to this com relatives in 

the ye >, and while here commenced preaching in the Deigh- 

borho I, and gathered together a considerable cong gation. He 
left the e .ear. intending to return, but died be ed 

his - u home. This was known at the time and few yi 

afterwards as the La Porte Baptist church, and is so called in the 
minutes of the Northern Indiana Baptist As tion. Alter the 
ization of the church at the village of La Porte, the former 
became known as Kingsbury Baptist church: Rev. T. Spauldii 
was the firsl pastor. The church at La Porte was the fourth in the 
order of organization, being preceded by the church at Kingsbury, one 
at Rolling Prairie, organized in - : and one at Michigan Ci 
rganized in 1837, the last of which soon ceased to exis 



CHURCH RECORD. 411 

It seems that the early church records of the La Porte organiza- 
tion were destroyed and there is consequently some uncertainty 
attending the date of its organization, but it occurred probably in 
1838. At any rate it was prior to the meeting of the Association 
in 1839. The organization took place in the bric& church edifice r 
then owned bv the Methodists, which was situated on the lot now 
occupied by the residence of Dr. Teegarden. The arrival of Elder 
Benjamin Sawin in La Porte in 1838, is an event worthy of note in 
the history of this church. Soon after the arrival of himself and 
family, he opened his lion-'' for prayer meetings. It was the sickly 
year, and very many were inclined to seek the consolations of the 
Christian faith. -'Good Father Sawin,'" as he was afterwards for 
many years affectionately called began to preach in La Porte and 
the surrounding country *. and just previous to the organization of 
the church at La Porte, he was called to preside over the mother 
church at Kingsbury. The new organization was composed largely 
of those who were dismissed from the Kingsbury society for the 
purpose; and for a time it had no regular pastor. Rev. Mr. Bowles 
of Connecticut, preached for a time, but did not become the pastor 
in consequence of his wife's desire to return to the East. Preaching- 
was, however, secured with considerable regularity, though not 
always by preachers of the Baptist denomination. Among others 
who preached occasionally for this new society was the Reverend, 
or better known now, as Judge, Wm. Andrew. 

The Northern L diana Association met at Rolling Prairie in 
June, 1839, and Eider Sawin was chosen moderator. When the 
invitation was given tor the reception of churches, several were 
presented, among them being that at La Porte. The delegates were 
I. II. Evans, G. Sawin, 0. Mix, Samuel Gregory, and Elnath- 
an Gregory. The membership of the church was thirty. At the 
close of this associational meeting, two ef the preachers in attend- 
ance, Rev. Chas. Harding, formerly of Goshen, and Rev. Mr. Ford, 
of Middlebury began preaching in La Porte and the country around. 
Their meetings were largely attended, and resulted in a general 
spiritual revival. In a supplemental note to the minutes of the 
issociation for the year are the following words: li A glorious revi- 
val has commenced at LaPorte, since the sitting of the Association, 



Jr 1 12 HIsTORV OF LA PORTI COUNTY. 

which is spreading into all the country around. Over a hundred 
have been hopefully converted to God. The revival has extended 
eastward to Rolling Prairie." The reports at the next meeting of 
the association showed the oiost favorable results from these meet- 
ings. The membership of Rolling Prairie church was increas 
from twenty-one to fifty-five; Kingsbury from forty to seven- 
La Porte from thirty to ninety-one, and a now church just organized 
at Door Village was reported, with a membership of one hundn 
and ten. In the same year Elder Chas. Harding was selected as 
the pastor of the LaPorte church, the first who occupied that ] « m. 
For the purpose of laboring as home missionary, he resigned in the 
.second year of his pastorate. He died in 1843 and the association 
placed on record the following resolution: "That we have heard 
with deep regret of the death of our much-esteemed brother, Elder 
Chas. Harding, once a missionary of this association. The cause 
of truth has in him' lost an earnest advocate, and the church a faith- 
ful minister.' 

Iiev. Silas Tucker became the next pastor of this church in i s 4'>. 
and entered upon his duties in the month of Decemb had 

sisters living in the county, and while visiting them, had pre. 
here with so much acceptance that it resulted in his 
the second stated minister of the church. Soon after his arrival, a 
small building which stood on the north-west corner of Jackson and 

rth Main streets, belonging to the Disciple - pur- 

chased by che Baptists, enlarged to double its former siz< 1 was 
used f<>r many pea ■■ as the house of worship of the Baptist denom- 
ination The ministry of Elder Tucker extended over i 
about four and a half years, luring which time < ver one hundred 
were received into the church by imm . and the whole Dumber 

of members was increased to one hundred and ninetv-fiv The 

aignation of Elder Tucker being attributed to the action of 30 
of the members, considerable dissatisfaction was produced, and 
thirty-two asked for letters of dismission in consequence. 

For a time, the church was destitute of a pastor; but rhe one 
man to whom this society never Looked in vain. Father Sawin, 
preached two Sabbaths in each month. Elder Tucker became pas- 
tor of 'i :ine ''• -■ >nsin, and at his request, Rev. 



CHURCH RECORD. 418 

E. W. Hamlin, of Chicago, visited La Porte, and was soon after- 
wards, in 1846, settled as pastor of the church. He continued his 
labors here through the year 1847, and then resigned, as is said 
for the same reasons which induced the resignation of Elder Tucker. 
Good Father Sawin again supplied the pulpit temporarily. 

In the year 1849, Rev. Morgan Edwards, who was known as 
" the sailor preacher," united by letter with this church. The church 
was not at this time prosperous. By exclusions and dismissions, the 
number of the membership had been reduced from two hundred and 
seven to one hundred and twenty-four. Elder Edwards became pastor 
in June, and his labors as such ceased in Oct. of the same year. His 
religious labors, however, continued in different parts of the country, 
in Ohio, Michigan. &c, his home and family remaining in LaPorte, 
Not being engaged the entire } T ear in holding "protracted meet- 
ings," he was desirous of becoming pastor during the months in 
which he was not so engaged. Rev. R. H. Cook had been called 
as pastor, had accepted, and begun his work, which was contrary to 
the private wishes of Elder Edwards, and he brought to bear such 
influences that Elder Cook was induced to resign the pastorate, and 
did so July 12th, 1851. It w r ould seem that in the matter of his 
course in the church here, he was blameless. He died very sudden- 
ly in the Spring of 1«74. From the time of Elder Cook's resigna- 
tion until February, 1852, the church was temporarily supplied by 
different preachers, chiefly by Father Sawin, Elder Alexander 
Hastings, and Elder John Benny. At this time Elder Morgan 
Edwards was again called to the pastorate. His ministry was 
very irregular; and on the eighth day of May, 1862, the church 
book contains the following entry : 

- Resolved that we invite Elder Chandler to visit us with a view T 
of becoming pastor after the labors of Eld<T Edwards shall cease." 

Mr. Chandler's connection with this church proved to be an event 
of much prominence; and from a statement written by Rev. John 
Benny, we take the following: "The rail road was finished from 
the East only to La Porte at that time, and passengers halted for 
the night on their way east, while those journying west stopped at 
Michigan City, being conveyed there from La Porte; and by the 
return of the same carriages, the eastward bound passengers were 



414 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COl NIT. 

brought here, so as to prosecute their further journey by rail. Our 
hotel accommodations were at times unequal to the demands made 
upon them. Mr. Chandler arrived from the west at this time, and 
doI liking the crowded condition of the La Porte House, inquired 
for accommodations at a private house for the night, and was di- 
rected to Mr. Griffin Treadway's who had kept the largest hotel in 
the place on the corner where the Merrill House now stands. Mr. 
Chandler dressed with white cravat, and had the appearance of an 
eastern clergyman. He was welcomed by Mr. Treadway, and 
asked if he were not a preacher, and further if he belonged to I 
Baptists. The answer was in the affirmative. Mr. Treadway then 
asked if he could stay and preach a few weeks for the church. while- 
Elder Edwards went off to hold some meetings. Mr. Chandler 
replied that he could do so, if agreeable to Bro. Edwards and the 
church. And thus, without knowing anything of the man, of his 
ministerial standing or previous history, he took the place of the 
pastor, which he occupied for three weeks. This was in the early 
Fall of 1851 . Bro. Treadway, himself a Kentuckian, took much 
interest in the man whom he called ;; the Yankee preacher," going 
to the stores, and inviting people to hear the 'smart Yankee.' The 
result was that the little meeting house was well filled during the 
three weeks in which Mr. C. filled the pulpit.' 7 

There was a strong disposition manifested to call Mr. Chandler 
to the pastorate, but there was one member who opposed it on the 
ground that the doctrinal views of the new r preacher were not th 
of the Baptist denomination. He was overruled, and Rev. S. ( '. 
Chandler became the pastor in 1*52. He began his regular preach- 
ing in November, and displayed a great deal of ability ; but it 
became generally evident that his views of Christian doctrine did 
not accord with the orthodox faith as held by the Baptist denomin- 
ation. He pushed his own views by degrees, which appeared to be 
those of the Adventists. He held to the belief in the sleep of all 
the dead until the resurrection, including the whole man whose 
spirit is incapable of existence apart from the body. He denied 
the existence of a personal Holy Spirit, ;tnd of a personal Satan, 
and there were other points of his doctrines that to the orthodox 
were extremely heterodox. As was to be expected, his course 



CHURCH RECORD. 415 

aroused strong opposition to liis being allowed to preach any longer 
as the pastor of the Baptist church, and on the 12th day of Feby.. 
1853. it was resolved that he should not occupy the Baptist pulpit, 
after the following day. for which his appointments had been pub- 
lished. But his views were assented to by several members of the 
church, and they rented for him a hall in Allen's block, where he 
continued preaching for a time, when on the last Sabbath in the 
year 1853, he announced in the hall in the morning that he would 
preach in the church that afternoon. A boy was let in through a 
window ; he unbolted the doors ; the bell was rung, and Mr. Chand- 
ler preached, advocating the doctrines which he and his followers 
had espoused. The next regular church meeting was held Janu- 
ary 7. 1854. The venerable Elder Alexander Hastings was invited 
to occupy the chair, and by resolution unanimously adopted, six of 
the most prominent of those who had embraced Chandler's views, 
were excluded from the fellowship of the church. Among those 
thus excluded was Elder Leland, who had been pastor of the Bap- 
tist church at Door Village. 

In May, 1854, Rev. Gibbon Williams visited the church at La- 
Porte, and accepted a call tendered him to become pastor. He was 
a man of large experience, had been many years pastor of churches 
in the States of Maine and New York, but had lately been in the 
book trade at Indianapolis. He established a book store here, 
ostensibly for his son, but it took so much of his own time and 
attention, that inasmuch as the church needed a pastor as well as a 
preacher, he retired at the expiration of six months. The associa- 
tion met in 1855 at Valparaiso, and this church was reported with- 
out a pastor and that the total membership had declined to fifty-five. 
It was supplied for a few weeks by Elders Snyder and Hastings. 
In the Fall a member of the church, W. D. Wright, who had joined 
by letter from New York, was invited to occupy the pulpit, although 
not ordained as a preacher. A council was called for his ordina- 
tion, which was effected, and soon afterwards he received and ac- 
cepted a call from the church at Rolling Prairie. During this 
year thirty-four were added to the church, and the prospects of 
future prosperity and usefulness became brighter. 



416 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

On the 12th of April, 1857, Rev. J. L. McCloud commenced a 
successful pastorate; and the following year the report made to the 
association showed that fifty -four had been added to the member- 
ship. At this time the late venerable Oliver Wescott was the clerk 
of the church. During 1858, the church was occupied in building 
the edifice in which they now worship, and which was dedicated in 
the Fall of that year. Elder McCloud preaching the dedication dis- 
course. He resigned the charge of the church in October, 1860, 
after three vears and a half of devoted and able service. 

a/ 

In the year 1859, on the 6th day of April, good Father Sawin, 
who had been so intimately identified with the interests of the La- 
Porte church in all its history, was called from his labor on earth to 
his rest in Heaven. Between him and his fellow-laborer, Rev. 
Father Hastings, there had been an agreement that the latest survi- 
vor of the two should preach the funeral discourse of the one who 
was first to go. Accordingly, his aged brother preached the sermon 
at his funeral from the words selected by the departed; : " God forbid 
that I should glory save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ." 
Elder Hastings lived after this something more than three years, 
when he too passed away. 

Early in 1861, Rev. Henry Smith, who had been pastor of the 
Baptist church at Valparaiso, and then at Greensburg, took charge 
of this church as its pastor, and the next report to the association 
showed a still further increase of membership, which then numbered 
one hundred and seventy-seven. Elder Smith resigned in August, 
1863, having been invited by Col. I. C. B. Suman to become 
Chaplain of the Ninth regiment of Indiana Volunteer-, which posi- 
tion be accepted, and departed at once for his new field of labor. 

The la>t pastor of the church, and the present one, is Rev. J. P. 
Ash. He entered upon his work here in the month of April. 1864, 
having now nearly completed twelve years in his pastorate. His 
has been a ministry of eminent success and usefulness. Elder Ash 
is a man of great industry, laboring untiringly in the Master's 
cause. Besides preaching in his own church, morning and evening 
on Sunday, and superintending his Sabbath school, which is always 
in a flourishing condition, he preaches every Sabbath to the church 
at Door Village. 



CHUKCH RECORD. 417 

Concerning the Baptist church at Kingsbury, whose organization 
has been noticed, it may be added that after the death in 1837 of 
Elder T. Spaulding, who was its first pastor, Elder Benj. Sawin 
became pastor, dividing his labors between this and some other 
churches. Among the ministers who have at different times preach- 
ed to this church have been Elders Barns, Whitehead, Maxwell and 
Mills. In 1837, it had a membership of seventy. Of this number 
some were dismissed to aid in the formation of the La Porte and 
Door Village churches; some withdrew under the Second Advent 
influence, and at the last report the membership mustered but 
twenty-eight. In 1874 Rev. R. P. Stephenson was pastor who 
has been succeeded by Rev. I. W. Read. 

The Rolling Prairie Baptist church was organized in 1836. Elder 
Alexander Hastings was the first pastor, and labored for the church 
at different times during many years. Their first report to the 
association showed a membership of twenty-three. In 1862 they 
had one hundred and eighty-nine, which number is now somewhat 
diminished. Some of the ministers who have preached to this 
church have been Elders Sawin, Edwards, Whitehead, P. H. Evans, 
and a son of the first pastor, Rev. W. S. Hastings, who is now 
preaching there. 

The church at Door Village united with the association in 1840, 
reporting a membership of 110, the number being now much less 
than that. Among others who have preached here, are Elders 
Sawin, Hastings, Maxwell, Brayton, Post, Fletcher and Ash. 

The Baptist church at Westville was gathered and organized 
chiefly by the exertions of Elder J. M. Whitehead, who afterwards 
was appointed Chaplain of the Fifteenth Indiana Volunteers, and 
resigned the pastorate. Since that time the church has not been 
prosperous. In 1857, the number of the membership Avas sixty-one, 
which was ra.pidly increased, reaching one hundred and sixty-six in 
1861, yet although a good house of worship was erected, the mem- 
bership in 1874 numbered but nine. Since then Rev. J. C. Read 
has preached there, regular services are held, the number of the 

members has increased, and the prospect is more encouraging than 
it has been for several years past. 

The African Baptist church of La Porte joined the association in 

27 



418 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

loll. They have a membership of about twenty, and own and 
occupy, holding regular Sabbath services, a neat frame chapel, 
situated in the west end of the city. .The pastor is Rev. Henrv 
Gregory. 

The Baptist denomination has had several other preaching places 
in the county, in some of which there have been temporary church 
organizations, but without houses of worship. The work of the 
denomination is now confined 'to the six places named. 

PRESBYTER I AX. 

Presbyterian history in La Porte county dates back to the year 
1831. In the late autumn of that year, Mr. Myron Ives removed 
hither from Paris, 111., and settled upon Rolling Prairie in a log 
cabin, just east of the Little Kankakee, about one mile and a half 
west of the present railroad station of Rolling Prairie. He was the 
first Presbyterian in the county. In the May following, Mrs. 
Rebecca Ives, mother of Myron Ives, and his sister Mrs. Sarah 
Aldrich, came with their families and settled in the same neighbor- 
hood. About this time Alexander Blackburn, from the Carlisle 
church settled on a farm a little west of Rolling Prairie station. In 
the autumn of this year, Mr. Ives and Mr. Blackburn, went to 
Niles, Mich., each with a load of wheat. In the night, while wait- 
ing for the grinding of their grain, under the shadow of the forest, 
these two christian men held the first prayer meeting in the interest 
of the Presbyterian church in La Porte county. Soon after this, 
they instituted a Sabbath praver meeting, which met alternately at 
the cabin of each. There was yet no stated preaching, but in No- 
vember, 1832, Rev. James Crawford who was at that time pastor of 
a church in Crawfordsville, and gave half his time to missionary 
work, visited the county. He heard of the prayer meeting, sought 
it out, and was made welcome by the little company. In the cabin 
of Alexander Blackburn, Mr. Crawford preached the first sermon 
that was ever delivered by a Presbyterian minister in this county. 
In the following week, on the 28th day of November, 1832. a 
meeting was held in Mr. Blackburn's house to take steps for the 
organization of a Presbyterian church: and seven persons, Charles 
Mowlan, Myron Ives, Sarah Ives, Rebecca Ives, Sarah Aldrich, 
Alexander Blackburn and James S. Heninz, associated themselves 



CHURCH RECORD. 419 

together as the Presbyterian Church of La Porte. On the 13th day 
of July, 1833, the Church met in the house of Wm. P. Ross in La- 
Porte, at which time Mr. Ross and his wife Elizabeth, David and 
Marv Dinwiddie, and James, Elizabeth, Catharine and Isabella 
Blair, were received into the organization, raising the membership 
to fifteen. Of this number there remain at this time, connected 
with the church, Mr. Ives and Mrs. Dinwiddie Wilson, the latter 
of whom has been a member continuously from that day to this. 

On the 20th of the same month, July, 1833, a'fmeeting was held 
at the Kankakee school house for the purpose of choosing elders, 
and further organizing the church. James Blair, Myron Ives, and 
David Dinwiddie were chosen to the office. Alexander Blackburn 
was appointed clerk of the session, and continued to fill that office 
many years. The next day, Sunday, July 21st \ the first Commun- 
ion service was observed, and the ordinance of baptism was admin- 
istered bv Rev. James Crawford, Sarah Ives beino- the first infant 
baptized in the church. The name of the Presbyterian Church of 
La Porte was adopted as the title of the new organization, 
and it was received into the Crawfordsville Presbytery. The first 
delegate appointed to attend the Presbytery and the Synod of Indiana 
was Wm. P. Ross, who was instructed u to invite some minister to visit 
us, with a view of preaching to this congregation." This secured the 
services of Rev. John Morrill, who on the first of January, 1834, began 
a year's labor as the first regular supply of the church. He was paid 
three hundred dollars for his year's labors. The first recorded death 
occurred this year. It was that of Mrs. Sophia Fletcher. In 
1835, the church numbered a membership of fifty-six, and on the 
10th of May, in that year, it was visited by Rev. Wm. K. Talbot, 
who remained about six months. On the 20th of March, 1836, 
Alexander Blackburn was ordained an elder, and in May of that 
year, Rev. A. Carnahan visited the church by,' appointment of 
Presbytery, and held a five days service. His labors were so 
acceptable that a call was extended to him to become pastor, but 
which he declined. 

Up to this period, the church had no house of worship, which 
had subjected them to much inconvenience; but on the 26th day of 
May, 1836, "a vote was taken to build a meeting house, and 



420 HISTORT OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Messrs. Niles, Howell, Skinner, Strong and Blackburn, were 
appointed a committee to collect funds, choose a situation and i: ; an- 
age the whole affair." This led to the building on the corner of 
Prairie and Monroe streets, now occupied by the Christian church; 
but it was not until late in 1837 that any progress was made towards 
the building. On the 27th of May, 1837, Rev. Wm. K. Marshall 
received a call to become pastor of the church, which he accepted 
and was duly installed. He pushed the building project. A meet- 
ing was held at the Court house, and after discussion of the size 
and kind of building to be erected, a method of raising the funds 
proposed by E. Morrison was adopted. This was. to create ajoint 
stock company, the subscribers to receive the amount of their stock 
in pews. The estimated cost of the building was 36. 000. A com- 
mittee was appointed, consisting of E. Morrison, Amzi Clark. A. 
Blackburn andfone or two others, to secure subscriptions to the 
stock, arid*S.*Van Pelt was made the first Treasurer. These were 
the clavs of "Wild Cat" monev. and it was found verv difficult to 
collect the^subscriptions. Before the building was enclosed Morri- 
son, Clark and Howell had been obliged to make large advances 
from their private funds. This was in the Fall of 1840, and in 
1841 the church was sold to satisfy a builder's lien. Tr was pur- 
chased by Amzi C'ark, who held it in his own name, until it v 
finished. It was dedicated in 1 *1'2 or '43. and was deeded to A. 
Blackburn for the Old School Presbyterian church, with a condition 
in the deed, that if ever sold, the New School Presbyterians might 
purchase it in preference to all other parth -. There was a debt of 
!,000 on the building, and this became so burdensome, Mat in 
th< - ing of 1846, the trtis decided to sell the property. The 

ethodists made a proposition for purchase, but the terms of the 
deed stood in the way: and a New School church having been 
organized in 1844, by great efforts this organization raised the 
required sum and secured the church edifi#e, retaining it until 1868, 
when it Was sold to the Reformed Lutherans in anticipation of the 
building of the present commodious edifice on Michigan avenue. 

The Methodists had been occupying a snndl brick building on 
the corner of Jefferson and Monroe streets, now no longer standing; 
and having about the time of the sale of the Presbyterian edifice to 



CHURCH RECORD. 421 

the New School church, or a little later erected their present church 
building, they sold their former structure to the Old School or 
First Presbyterian church. It was occupied by that church for a 
period of about ten years. In 1862, they erected the building on 
the corner of Indiana avenue :md Harrison street. It was partially 
burned in Mav, 1869, but was immediately repaired and reopened 
for worship on the last Sabbath of the following August, and con- 
tinued to be the place of worship of the first church until the reunion 
of the First and Second churches, Oct. 31, 18 II. 

The pastorate of Rev. Wm, K. Marshall over the Old School 
or First church, began about the first of June, 183T. and contin- 
ued until the first Sabbath in October, 1844, which was the longest 
pastorate ever enjoyed by the First church. It was attended by a 
good measure of success. During the time, the membership of the 
church increased from ninety-six to one hundred and fifty. The 
first Deacons of this church were ordained September 12th, 1840. 
Thev were Andrew Nickell, Jacob Drum and Elijah Mount. After 
the cessation of the pastorate of Mr. Marshall, Rev. James Greer, 
became the stated supply ot the congregation, continuing in that 
relation nearly two years, when he was succeeded by Rev. John 
Steele. In October, 1849. the latter received a call to become 
pastor; but it Avas not accepted until the following April. He was 
installed on the 22d of September of the same year. In October, 
1851, Mr. Steele asked a dissolution of the pastoral relation, in 
order that he might remove to Rolling Prairie, to organize a church 
there. On the second Sabbath of the same month. Rev. F. P. 
Cummins, at the request of the church, began to preach for them. 
His services proved so acceptable that he soon received a call to 
become pastor, and was installed on the 14th day of June, 1858, 
when it was dissolved at Mr. Cummins' request. 

In the latter part of the year 1858, Rev. J. W. Hanna became 
acting pastor of the church and continued in this relation until the 
autumn of 1860. Late in the same vear, Rev. R. S. Goodman 
began preaching for this church, and continued his labors about five 
years, during which time the new church was built. Mr. Good- 
man's labors closed in October, 1865, and in October, 1866, the 
pastorate of Rev. L. C. Spofford began. He was installed on the 



422 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

24th of that month. He died on the 12th of April, 1869, dee] 
lamented by his people, and by the entire community. About a 
month later, the church building wa« burned, yet notwithstanding 
these sad events, on the first Sabbath in September following, the 
rebuilt church was dedicated, and Rev. L. M. Stevens began a 
pastorate which proved to be the last for that church as a separate 
organization. He was installed on the 22d day of November, and 
continued with the church until the union of the two churches was 
effected on the 31st day of October, 1871. 

It is now necessary to return to the year 1844, to review the 
history of the Second or New School church. This church was 
organized on the 3d dav of November in that vear. in a school 
house belonging to Rev. F. P. Cummins. Thirty members came 
into the new organization, twenty-six of whom were from the First 
church. Rev. S. N. Steele organized the church, and acted aa 
stated supply for one year. The organization of the church v>as 
completed by the election and ordination as elders of James M. 
Clark and Ellsworth B. Strong. Eleven months after the organi- 
zation the membership mustered fifty-one. 

In the Spring of 1846, Rev. John W. Cunningham began a long 
and useful course of labor with the church. On the 30th dav of 
May, l s -i-8, the Presbytery of St. Joseph received Mr. Cunningham 
from the union Presbytery of Tennessee, and also placed the Second 
church' of La Porte upon its roll. The next day, the new pastor 
was installed. In the first year thereafter, eighty-eight were added 
to the church, sixty-four of whom were received «^n profession of 
faith. The two years following also showed large additioi - -ind 
in the lust year of Mr. Cunningham's pastorate thirty-nine were 
added to the church on profession of faith. His pastoral relation 
was dissolved in June, !>-~> s . his labors having extended over a 
period of more than twelve years. 

In January, 1859, Rev. George 0. Novo- >..- invited to the 
vacant field, and his labors began on the 13th of the following 
March. He was i stalled May 15, 18< In April of the next 

year, the church reported a membership of 236. In 1866 an addi- 
tion of fifty was made on profession of faith, and the* membership of 
the Second church was then at the highest point it ever attained. 



CHURCH RECORD. 423 

It was near the close of Mr. Noyes' pastorate that the old church 
building was sold, and the initial steps taken for the erection of the 
new one. The pastorate of Mr. Noyes was a long and successful 
one, continuing until the 2d of November, 1868, when it was 
dissolved at the pastor's request, and on the 15th of the same 
month, his labors closed. 

On the 9th of May, 1869, the congregation extended a call to 
Rev. Wm. C. Scofield, which was accepted ; but lie was never 
installed. On the 9th of June, 1871, Mr. Scofield signified to the 
session his determination to retire from his labors at an early day r 
alleging the ill health of his wife as the cause, and he preached his 
last sermon on the Sabbath following the dedication of th-j new 
church edifice, July 23rd, 1871. Rev. John F. Kendall preached 
to the congregation on the following Sabbath, and on the 21st 
of August, a call was extended to him to become pastor of the 
church. After a brief delay this call was accepted, and his labors 
with the church began on the second Sabbath in October. Nego- 
tiations were in progress at the time for the union of the two 
churches, which were happily terminated on the 31st day of October 
by the consummation of the union under the name of "The Presby- 
terian church of La Porte." This vacated the former call to Dr. 
Kendall, and on the 12th of November, a meeting of the con- 
gregation was held, and he was unanimously invited to become 
pastor of the united church. The call was immediately accepted, 
and the installation took place June 4th, 1872. At that time the 
sermon was preached by Rev. Henry Kendall, D. D., of New York, 
brother of the pastor, charge to the pastor by Rev. R. Beer, of 
Valparaiso, and charge to the people by Rev. J. Q. Hall, of Michi- 
gan City. A new Board of Elders were elected for the united 
church, on the 23d day of November, 1871. The four foilowing 
were the first chosen, and they were requested to perform such 
duties only as might consist with their advanced age, Anson 
Gregg, A. P. Andrew, Sr., Amzi Clark, and Myron Ives. Five 
others were then elected for the active duties of the eldership, con- 
sisting of Wm. H. Boyd, Samuel Harvey, Julius Barnes, L. N. 
Frary, and E. D. Barrows. Only a few days afterwards Amzi 
Clark was called to his rest and reward. Father Andrew followed 



424 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

in a few months, and Anson Gregg shortly thereafter. T hev were 
all sincerely mourned by the church which held sollarge a place in 
their sympathies, their love and their prayers. 

The pastorate of Rev. John F. Kendall. D. D.. still [continues, 
and the relations between pastor and people are of the most cordial, 
harmonious, and affectionate character. The union of the two 
churches has been most happy. The elegant church building is 
paid for. there is a large and flourishing Sabbath school, and noth- 
ing seems to stand in the way of a higher degree of usefulness than 
at any former period. The eldership has remained unchanged since 
the death of the three venerable fathers named. 

An incident worth v of note in this record of the Presbyterian 
church of La Porte will conclude the story of its history. In the 
year 187-5, on June 22d, a special effort was made to bring together 
at the communion service of the church all the oldest members. 
When the appointed hour came those upwards of seventy years of 
age were requested to occupy the front seats. Thirteen responded to 
the request, and two others would have done so, but were detained 
at home bv ill health. Five of this number. Mrs. King, Mrs. 
Lemon. Mrs. Forsman. Mrs. Forrester, and Mr. Harmon, were 
over eighty years of age, and one of them, Mrs. King, the venera- 
ble mother of Polaski King, over ninety. The scene, especially for 
this new. western country, was a rare and impressive one. 

Bethel Presbyterian church of Union Mills is the second in age 

in the county. It was organized June 22, 1850, by Rev. F. P. 
Cummins, in the school house about two miles east of Union Mills. 
Mr. Cummins preached there until 1856. The original members 
numbered ten, of whom Mr. and Mrs. Joseph McPherson, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Bird McLane yet remain. It may here be stated that a New 
School Presbyterian church had been organized near Union Mills 
in 1845, but at the time when the present church was organized, it 
had ceased to exist. At the first meeting John Billington and 
John Moon, Jr.. were elected elders, but Mr. Moon declined to 
serve. In 1854, David Finley was elected to the office. In 1857, 
Mr. Billington died. Mr. Finley removed to Illinois, and Wm. Way 
was chosen and ordained to the office. He discharged its duties 
alone until 1870, when the session was enlarged bv the election of 
Job H. Northam. Seth Loomis and Amos Brown. 



CHURCH RECORD. 425 

The church edifice was erected at Union Mills in 1851, Rev. F. 
P. Cummins himself hauling from Michigan City much of the lum- 
ber used in its construction. 

Early in 1856 Rev. John Fisher became the minister of the con- 
gregation. He was succeeded the next year by Rev. J. M. McRae, 
who supplied also at the same time, the church at Rolling Prairie. 
Upon the cessation of Mr. Mc Rae's labors, the pulpit was vacant seve- 
ral years, when in July, '61, Rev. R. C. McKinney began to supply 
the f church. He was succeeded in 1863 by Rev. C. E. Evans, and 
he in 1867 by Rev. F. M. Elliott. He was installed in May, 1868. 
being the first regular pastor of the church. His labors closed in 
1871 ;*and in the summer of 1872, Rev. S. E. Smith began to sup- 
ply the vacant pulpit, and still remains there, although not an in- 
stalled pastor. Considerable additions were made to this church in 
1869 and 1870. Again in March, 1876, there was a decided 
awakening, when Mr. Smith was assisted in his labors by Rev. Dr. 
Kendall of La Porte. The church has been useful and influential, 
and its prospects for future usefulness are very encouraging. 

The Rolling Prairie church stands next in order of time. The 
first organization of a Presbyterian church in La Porte county took 
place, as has been stated, at the house of Alexander Blackburn, half 
a mile west of Rolling Prairie, but this organization became the 
First Presbyterian church of La Porte, and must not be confounded 
with that now existing at Rolling Prairie, which was organized in 
February, 1852, Rev. John Steele who had left the La Porte church 
for the purpose, heading the enterprise. Twenty-eight members 
were enrolled, many of them going from the church at La Porte. 
Alexander Blackburn and B. F. Piper, who had been elders in the 
La Porte church, and John S. Hawkins were appointed elders, and 
James Catterlin and Wm. Wetherhold deacons. Mr. Steele re- 
mained with the church a little over three vears. During this time 
sixteen of the original members had withdrawn, because of removals, 
among them Blackburn, and one of the other elders. James Cat- 
terlin was ordained elder, June 24, 1855, and still occupies the 
office. At the close of Mr. Steele's ministration the membership 
had increased to fifty, though it had lost some of the best and most 
zealous among them. June 27, 1856, Dr. T. D. Brown and Cor- 



426 HISTORY OF LA PORT:" I OUNTY. 

nelius Hermans were ordained elders; and following Mr. Steele, 
Rev. F. P. Cummins preached to the congregation a year or more, 
when Rev. J. M. McRae commenced in April, 1857, a period of 
labor with this church, extending over nearly two year-. His labors 
were successful, a revival was enjoyed and twenty-nine were added 
to the churr-h. During parts of the years 1860-1, Rev. F. P. 
Cummins again acted as supply for the church, and was afterwards 
succeeded in this duty by pastors at LaPoite. Rev. R. S. Good- 
man, and Rev. L. C. Spofford. Rev. Walter Forsyrlir. of South 
Bend, and Rev. J. Lowry. In the year 1869-70, Rev. J. H. 
Nevius, of South Bend, supplied the church regularly, and with 
much acceptance and usefulness. Daring the past year Rev. Henry 
Johnson a theological student of the seminary at Chicago, has 
preached once in four weeks. 

The church edifice was erected in 1857. and the membership now 
numbers about forty. 

The next Prrsbyterian church organized in the county was that 
at Wanatah. In "l870, Rev. F. M. Elliott, of Union Mills, found 
a few Presbyterians at Wanatah and formed them into a church. 
He preached to them while he remained at Union Mills, and has 

been followed in his labors there bv Rev. S. E. Smith. Mr. Frank 

«, 

McCurdy and Mi-. Orville Adams are the elders. They have no 
church edifice, and the number of the membership is less than 
twenty. 

T 1 youngest Presbyterian church in the county is that at Mich- 
gan Uity. Many years ago, the Congregational church at Michi- 
gan City was Presbyterian about one year, and there has alwa - 
been in the church an element which preferred the Presbyterian 
polity and system of church government, and in the early part of 
1871, a portion of the members took step- for the formation of a 
Presbyterian church. A meeting was held in March for genera) 
consultation, the result of which was <'i:;t twenty-nine person , at a 
subsequent meeting, held March 27th, asked for letters of dismis- 
s n. These adjourned to the house of C. H. Hall, and there re- 
solved to organize a Presbyterian church in Michigan City. On 
the Sunday following. April 2d, services were held for the fii 
time. Rev. ( . J iSantvoord of Chicago, preached. On the fol- 



CHURCH RECORD. 427 

lowing Sabbath, Rev. J. Q. Hall, of Minnesota, preached to the 
new organization, and was called to the pastorate on the 13th. Au- 
thority having been obtained from the Presbytery of Logansport, 
the church was duly organized on the 9th day of May, with a mem- 
bership of thirty-nine; and J. S. Ford, John Orr, J. A. Thornton, and 
Henry W. Johnson were elected elders. John Orr died on the 16th 
day of May 1873, and B. F. Sammons was elected to the vacant 
eldership. Thus this church began its existence. There were 
great zeal and earnestness among the members, a revival came in 
the winter following the organization, and the number of the mem- 
bership was increased to seventy-seven. There was an early deter- 
mination to erect a house of worship, steps were taken to this end 
in the summer of 1ST-, and on December 19th, the present church 
edifice was dedicated, a sermon being preached on the occasion by 
Rev. Arthur Mitchell, of Chicago. A large and nourishing Sab- 
bath school is connected with this church. Mr. Hall accepted the 
call which he had received, and was regularly installed pastor on 
the 5th day of June, 1S72. His pastorate still continues, and has 
been attended with a high degree of success and usefulness. 

LUTHERAN. 

The Evangelical Lutheran church at La Porte, was established in 
the year 1857. Several families of this faith were living in La- 
Porte, and they invited Rev. H. Wunder, of Chicago, to preach for 
them. This he did for a time, when they effected a church organi- 
zation, and called as their first pastor, Rev. T. Tram. He was a 
laborious and useful minister, and under his charge, the congrega- 
tion grew and flourished. They had no house of worship, and for 
some months, their services were held in a school heuse. They 
then built a small frame church on C. street. But the congrega- 
tion still grew, larger accommodations were necessary, and in 1863, 
they built the brick edifice which they now own and occupy, a 
handsome and substantial building. It is neatly finished, and sup- 
plied with all conveniences to make it attractive and comfortable. 
Rev. G. Kuechle was pastor for several years, after 1863. The 
present pastor is I. T. Neithemmer. There are one hundred and 
ninety families represented in the congregation. The society sup- 



428 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

ports its own schools, which number nearly three hundred pupii-. 
This church is known as St. John's Evangelical Lutheran. 

There has been for manv vears a Lutheran church organizat; 
it Michigan City, having a good house of worship, and a large 
congregation. Owing to some disagreement between the pastor and 
a portion of the church, which occurred in 1875. a division was 
recently effected, and a part of the membership retired. These 
will, without delay, proceed to the erection of a new house of wor- 
ship. 

There are many Lutherans also in other parts of the county. 
Attached to the La Porte charge, a number reside in the vicinity of 
Kingsbury, and have preaching three miles south of that village 
often as once a month. At Westville there are also quite a num- 
ber. They are without a house of worship, and are attached to 
the Lutheran charge at Valparaiso. In addition to these there is 
church edifice not far from Wanatah, which is occupied by a branch 
of the Lutheran church. The membership of the churches in this 
countv is attached to the Synod of Missouri. 

The St. Paul's Evangelical Reformed Lutherans also have 
church organization in La Porte, and a church edifice on M 
street, which was formerly occupied by the Disciple or Christian 
congregation. Rev. Jacob Linder is the pastor. 

The membership of the foregoing are all composed of persons of 

German nationality, and there is, in addition to them, in La Porte. 

i Lutheran church organization composed of persons of Swedish 

nationality. They own a church edifice on D street in Andrew- 

V ft/ 

addition, where regular services are held every Sabbath, by Rev. Gr. 
Lundahl. the pastor. 

CATHOLK . 

There are two Catholic church organizations and buildings in the 
city of La Porte. St. Joseph's Catholic church, (German.) and St. 
Peter's. (Irish). The latter is the older organization, its existence 
1 icing almost coeval with that of the city. Rev. Father Kilroy, 
who was a man of great force of character, and influence with his 
people, was many years the officiating priest. Rev. Father T. 0. 
Sullivan now ministers to this congregation, which is one of the 
argest in the city. Their house of worship is a neat frame struct- 



CHURCH RECORD. 42 ( -' 

ure which has been much enlarged since its foundation. It is situ- 
ated on Monroe street, and a school house is attached to the church, 

St. Joseph's church was organized into a Catholic congregation 
in 1858 by Rev. M. Scherer. The fine, substantial brick edifice 
which they occupy was built in 1859-60, and a school house was 
added soon afterwards. In 1865, Father Scherer went to another 
field of labor, and was succeeded as priest by Rev. S. Bartoz, 
of Polish descent. His health failing, he resigned in 1870, when 
Rev. John Oechtering, the present pastor, succeeded. Connected 
with this church are one hundred and twenty-five German and seve- 
ral Polish families. The church building is one of the best in the 
city. It is crowned with a steeple one hundred and thirty-five feet 
high, with two chime bells, weighing each one thousand pounds. 
The Sabbath school is a nourishing one, and numbers about two 
hundred children. 

At Michigan City there is a large Catholic church and congrega- 
tion, which was organized many years ago. Their house of worship 
is one of the best in the city, and the congregation probably the 
largest. 

At Otis, also, there is a Catholic church, with a small but neat 
church building. Most of the members are Polanders. 

DISCIPLE OR CHRISTIAN CHURCH. 

Of this denomination there are five congregations in La Porte 
county. The church at La Porte was established in 1837 by means 
of the efforts of Judge Wm. Andrew and Dr. Jacob P. Andrew. 
Their labors were earnest, unremitting and successful. The elders 
who have ministered to the church as pastors since that time have 
been John Thompson, Wm. Lane, M. N. Lord, Dr. C. G. Bartholo- 
mew, Ira J. Chase, James Haclsell, A. M. Collins, and Oscar F. 
Lane. The last named recently resigned the pastoral charge, and 
at this writing, (March, 1876, ) the congregation is without a pastor. 
For many years this society occupied the building on Main street. 
which is now occupied by the Reformed Evangelical Lutherans. 
The Lutherans having, in 1867, purchased the Second Presbyterian 
church building, they soon after exchanged with the Christian 
society, the latter desiring a larger edifice; and since that time the 
congregation of the Christian church has occupied the commodious 



430 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

house of worship on the corner of Prairie and Monroe streets. The 
congregation numbers about one hundred and fifty, and the deacons 
and deaconesses at present are T. J. Foster, A. P. Ireland, J. L. 
Bovd, Mrs. W. H. Calkins, Mrs. Angeline C. Wagner, and Mrs. 
"T. J. Foster. S. K. Pottenger and Isaac N. Whitehead are the 
elders. 

The society next in order of organization after that at La Porte, 
is the one at Westville, which was established in 1848 by John 
Martindale. The congregation numbers about one hundred. 
Among the elders whose labors they have enjoyed are Dr. C. G. 
Bartholomew, and Elder Edmundson. 

About the year 1850, a society of this church was established in 
>Galena township. It was reorganized in 187*2 by Elder Joseph 
Wickard. It has had the benefit of the labors besides others, of 
elders John Martindale, David Miller, Wm. Roe, Wm. C. Cum- 
mins, and Caleb B. Davis, who is the present pastor. The congre- 
gation numbers fifty. 

In 1854, a church society of this denomination was established at 
Rolling Prairie by John Martindale, which has been one of the 
most flourishing in the county. In 1874, it numbered one hundred 
and sixty. Since its organization, it has received the pastoral 
labors of Elders Komer, Sargent, Sharpless, Clendennin, Win. Roe, 
Jesse Roe, and Joseph Wickard. Among the prominent members 
of this church are Isaac 'N. Whitehead, Miner Nesbitt, and Abs 
lorn Bo well. 

Besides those already mentioned, there is a small congregation of 
Christians at Wanatah, which has generally received the ministra- 
tions of the pastors of the church at Westville. The aggregate 
membership of the Christians in the county is probably not far 
from five hundred. 

ZION'S CHURCH. 

The congregation of this church is composed of our Jewish citi- 
zens, the services being the Hebrew ritual, and their rule of faith 
the Scriptures of the Old Testament. They occupy a very neat 
synagogue or church on the corner of Indiana ave. and First street, 
where services are held .Fridav evenings and Saturday mornings. 



CHURCH RECORD. 431 

SOCIETY OF FRIENDS. 

Some of the pioneers of La Porte county were members of this 
denomination, among whom are the well-known families of the Stan- 
tons and Vails, who settled here as early as 1833. Some of them 
came from Ohio, and others from New Jersey, some also from 
Wayne county, Ind., and the State of North Carolina. They soon 
established a meeting in the " Quaker neighborhood," north of the 
city of La Porte. Here for many years their services were held, 
ceasing about 1860, owing to the deaths that had occurred, and the 
removal of others. Not long afterwards, about 1869, a neat brick 
church was erected in La Porte by the Friends. In this year, 
Jacob H. Vining came to La Porte from the State, of Maine, when 
the scattered families of Friends, some of whom belonged to the 
Orthodox branch of the society, and others to the "Hieksite' 
branch, joined together and established a meeting at La Porte in 
the new church. Jacob H. Vining became the preacher, and servi- 
ces have been held regularly ever since. This is known as an 
Orthodox meeting, though in fact, it is about equally divided between 
the two branches of Friends. 

SWEDENBORGIAN . 

This is called u The New Church," or the Society of "The New 
Jerusalem." It was organized in La Porte on the 14th day of 
June, 18o ( J. Nine years before, the doctrines inculcated by Eman- 
uel Swedenborg had been introduced to La Porte, chiefly through 
the instrumentality of Judge Chamberlain of Goshen. He had 
' made the acquaintance of Mr. and Mrs. James Andrew, Mrs. An- 
drew and her sister who was visiting her at the time, being believers 
in this faith. Mr. Chamberlain determined to secure some one to 
give lectures on this belief, and not long after this decision, in the 
year 1850, coming from Goshen, he brought with him Rev. Henry 
Weller. He was a man of far more than ordinary ability, and his 
lectures produced a profound and lasting impression. He continued 
preaching here, though not with regularity and when the society 
was organized, Mr. Weller was chosen pastor. He preached regu- 
larly to the society after this, except during the time when he was 
Chaplain of the 87th Indiana Volunteers, up to the date of his 
departure to the world of spirits, which occurred on the 9th day of 



432 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

June, 1868. His death was greatly mourned by his congregation., 
who had for him a sincere and heartfelt esteem and affection. Rev. 
Woodbury M. Fernald was pastor from June 1, I860 to May l r 
1870, when his labors ceased, and in 1874, he too passed away 
from earth. On the 1st day of October, 1871, Rev. Cyru> Scam- 
mon was appointed pastor, a position which he still hold-. The 
society occupies a plain but very neat temple, situated in the cen- 
tral part of the city. It has a membership of perhaps fifty; and 
its Sabbath school shows a still larger number. The following are 
stated as essential doctrines of the New Church: The Divinity of 
the -Lord; the Holiness of the Word, and the Life of Charity. 

PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL. 

There are two Episcopal churches in La Porte county, one at 
La Porte and one at Michigan City, the latter being one of the 
oldest church organizations in the county. They are known re- 
spectively as St. Paul's church, of La Porte, and Trinity church of 
Michigan City. St. Paul's was organized on the 25th day of July, 
1839. At the meeting for the organization, Rev. D. V. M. John- 
son, Rector of Trinity church at Michigan City, presided, and 
Franklin Thwing acted as Secretary. The officers elected were, 
for Wardens, John Hobson and Franklin Thwing ; for Vestrymen, 
James Whittem. J. R. Traver, Samuel Stewart, Thos. H. Phillips. 
Hiram Wheeler. T. B. Bell, Jacob Early and H. T. Holbrook. 
For some months after the organization, the Rector of Trinity 
church at Michigan City preached for the new church each alternate 
Sabbath. Early in 1840, Rev. Solon W. Manney waa settled as 
Rector, and his successors have been as folio v Rev. 11. W. 
Roberts. 1851; Rev. F. R. Half. 1852; Rev. W. E. Franklin. 
1854; Rev. A. Qregory, 1856 ; Rev. A., E. Bishop, 1862; Rev. 
J. H. Lee. 1864; Rev. F. M. Gregg, 1866: Rev. G. J. Magill, 
1870'; Rev. Chaa. T. Coer, 1875. After a. few months of very 
acceptable labor. Mr. Coer resigned: and the church is now, early 
in 1876, destitute of a Rector. A sorrowful event in the history 
of this church, was the death of Rev. W. E. Franklin, who in life 
was beloved, and in death was lamented by his parishioners. For 
several years, this church had no house of worship; but in 1845, 
the present edifice on the corner of Michigan avenue and Harrison 



CHURCH RECORD. 433 

street, was erected. It has since been enlarged and much improved. 
The communicants number about one hundred and fifty; and the 
value of the church property is estimated at $10,500. 

Trinity church at Michigan City was established in 1836, and 
its first Rector was Rev. D. V. M. Johnson. Some of those who 
have succeeded him are, Rev. G. B. Engle, now of Indianapolis; 
Rev. Henry Safford, now of Cold Water, Mich.; Rev. C.A.Bruce, 
Helena. Ark.; Rev. Win. H. Stoy, Logan, Utah; Rev. E. P. 
Wright, Sussex, Wis.; Rev. R. L. Ganter, Akron, Ohio; Rev. T. 
L. Bellam, Golden, Col.; Rev. J. F. Winkley, Westfield, Mass.; 
Rev. Dr. Reeves, now of Mich.; Rev. R. Brass, Pontiac, Mich. 
Rev. S. S. French, is the present rector. The number of communi- 
cants is about sixty. The church property consists of a quarter 
block at the corner of Franklin and Sixth streets, upon which 
stands the church edifice. The corner stone of the present^building 
was laid in 1858. It is a neat, wooden structure, on a brick and 
stone foundation, Its style is u Rustic Gothic." The rectory 
stands on the same lot. The total value of the property is about 
$15,000. 

The Wardens are at the present time, U. C. Follet, and W. R. 
Godfrey ; and the Vestrymen are Charles Tryon, L. B. Ashton, 
Elijah Behan, A. E. Martin, John Dixey, W. R. Bowes, and Wal- 
ter Vail. 

UNITARIAN. 

On the 22nd day of June, 1875, Rev. Dr. Robert Collyer, of 
Chicago, upon invitation of some of the citizens, and with a view to 
the formation of a church of that denomination, preached in La- 
Porte, and steps were at once taken for a proper organization, which 
has been successfully accomplished. Rev. Enoch Powell was in- 
stalled pastor on the 7th day of March, 1876, and the following 
Board of Trustees have been elected : Dr. George M. Dakin, Presi- 
dent; Charles G. Powell, Secretary; Mrs. N. S. Darling, Treas- 
urer; and L. Crane, Dr. T. Higday, Mrs. Kate Owen and Mrs. 
Sarah Fox. Regular services are now held at the Court House, 
and a flourishing Sabbath school has been organized. The follow- 
ing is the Bond of Union, which forms the basis of the church 
organization. 

28 



434 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

'•We, whose names are hereto subscribed, associate ourselves to- 
gether as a Christian church, for the purpose of moral and spiritual 
improvement, and of promoting truth and righteousness in the 
world, through the study, practice and diffusion of pure religion, as 
taught and lived by Jesus of Nazareth, — "Love to God and Love to 
Man." 

Recognizing the right of private judgment, and the sacredness of 
individual conviction, we require no assent to any other doctrinal 
statement as a basis of Christian fellowship, but we welcome all who 
desire to co-operate with us in advancing the Kingdom of God." 

THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH — MICHIGAN CITY. 

In the year 1835, Rev. John Morrill, of Massachusetts, who had 
been a short time at La Porte, came to Michigan City: and through 
his efforts a Congregational church was organized. Among other- 
who were present at the organization, there were Rev. John Mor- 
rill and hid wife, Mrs. Benjamin James, Jacob and Mrs. Bigelow. 
Mrs. Susan Sprague, Robert Stewart, and Joel Ferris. After the 
departure of Mr. Morrill, Reverends South, Chase and Townsend, 
preached for the infant society. The records of the church are 
very imperfect, but it seems that in February, 1840, a majority of 
the members preferred a Presbyterian form of government. A 
change was accordingly made from Congregational to Presbyterian, 
and the denomination was attached to the Logansport Presbytery. 
But the Congregational sentiment was still strong, and in October, 
1841, the former action was reversed. On the 23rd of September, 
at their own request, the Presbyterian church of Michigan City 
was dropped from the rolls of the presbytery. On the 5th of Octo- 
ber, a meeting was held at which Willys Peck was called to the 
chair and S. H. Turner appointed Secretary : and a resolution was 
adopted changing the form of government to the Congregational, 
and re-adopting the name by which the organization was first 
known, that of "First Congregational Church of Michigan City." 
It is probable that Rev. James Towner was at this time the pastor, 
but ceased to be, either at the change of name or shortly after: and 
Rev. Elnathan Davis supplied the pulpit. Mr. Towner died on 
the 2d day of March, 1844, at Michigan City. 

In 1842, Rev. John M. Williams preached to the congregation 



CHURCH RECORD. 435 

as "stated supply," and continued his labors with them until some- 
time in the vear 1844. A call was then extended to Rev. Erastus 
Colton, of Peoria, 111., which he accepted, and was installed Novem- 
ber 20th. At this time Willys Peck, John Bond and Joshua R. 
Shedd, were deacons. 

During the pastorate of Mr. Colton, in September, 1847. an in- 
cident occurred which is worthy of mention, as illustrating the 
cautious watchfulness of the church in the matter of domestic mor- 
als. A widow lady, Tabitha Stone was a member of the church, 
and in course of time married a Mr. Swenck. From some cause 
the marriage was not a happy one. She procured a divorce, and 
not long afterwards was married to a Mr. Hughes. A charge was 
promptly brought against her in the church, that she had violated 
Christian duty. It was brought in due form before the proper 
authority, and a hearing was had, when it was decided that " though 
she (Mrs. Hughes,) pleads civil custom and the practice of church 
members in self-justification, and asserts her ignorance of the bind- 
ing force of the divorce law given by our Savior in the Gospel as 
recorded by Matthew, and deems her act right, after reflection and 
prayer, yet in the opinion of this church, she erred in not delaying 
her acts of divorce and remarriage until she could inquire and come 
to a correct judgement. Her fault, however, not bearing evidence 
of wilfulness, but, it would seem, being a sin of ignorance, she is 
hereby admonished to sin no more, in a like act."' It is plain that 
the church did not wish the uxorious sister to fall into a habit of 
divorce and remarriage, or that the example she had given, should 
be followed by others. 

It will be seen that the Congregational church is one of the old- 
est in the county, and it is the only one of that denomination. It 
has enjoyed a fair degree of successful work, and has been presided 
over by some able pastors. Among others whose ministrations it 
has shared in later years, are Rev. Edward Anderson, who became 
Colonel of the Twelfth cavalry in 1864; Rev. Mr. Taylor, and the 
present pastor Rev. Mr. Kent. 

Some other church organizations have existed in the county; 
bit, destitute of church edifices, their church services have not been 
regular, and some of them at least have now no existence. Among 



436 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

these was a Weslevan Methodist society, which maintained regular 
services for a time, and also the United Presbyterian organization, 
which, under the pastoral charge of an excellent man. Rev. Mr. 
Clark, enjoyed a period of prosperity. The organization has long 
ceased to have regular services. 



CHAPTER XXVI. 

INVENTIONS AND DISCOVERIES. 

The progress of thought as directed toward discovery and inven- 
tion has had its full share of developement in La Porte county. 
Some of its most important achievements will be noted in this 
chapter. 

In 1848, Jacob J. Mann, who was carrying on a country wagon 
and blacksmith shop and his son, Henry F. Mann, who had learned 
the wagon maker's trade with his father, — invented a harvesting 
machine which cut the grain with a scolloped edge sickle, and by a, 
double series of toothed bands ; one series running on a level with 
the catting apparatus and the other series running up an inclined 
plane, carried the cut grain up the inclined plane and deposited it 
into a rotating receptacle where the sheaf was collected, ami thrown 
upon the ground in suitable condition for binding. Machines were 
made in 1848, and an application made for a patent which was 
issued to Jacob J. Mann and Henry F. Mann, June 19, 1849. In 
1849, ten of the machines were made and put into operation in the 
harvest of that year, but on account of some defects it was found 
necessary to make further improvements in order to make a practi- 
cally successful harvester. This occupied the minds of the invent- 
ors until 1853, when they made another machine embracing such 
improvements by filing a caveat in 1853, followed by an application 
for a patent in 1855, and the issue of the second patent to J. J. & 
H. F. Mann, June 3, 1856. The improved machine was exhibited 
at the Indiana State Fair held at La Favette in 1853, and was 
looked upon with so much favor by the farmers and examining com- 
mittee that it was awarded the first premium in competition wi'h 
the popular machines of that day. 



Inventions and discoveries. 437 

As is usually the case with inventors of valuable improvements 
there were many difficulties encountered by the Manns, inventors 
and patentees, but notwithstanding, they succeeded in building a 
considerable number of their machines for each harvest, and also in 
having some built by other parties, John D. Stewart, of La Porte, 
having built some, so that there have been made and used in the 
harvest field from 1,500 to 2,000 of the "J. J. Mann & Sons" 
reapers. This machine was put in competition with others at Fairs 
on many a hotly contested field trial, and almost universally 
came off with the highest honors. In many instances farmers have 
cut from sixteen to twenty acres of wheat in a day with one of 
them. 

Jacob J. Mann died in the early part of 1868 at Westville, Ind. 
II. F. Mann now resides in Pittsburgh, Pa., and as he has not 
abandoned his idea of improving agricultural machinery, is now 
engaged in developing a combined two wheeled mower and harvester, 
upon which the binders ride and bind. 

In 1861, H. F. Mann, then living in La Porte, lnd., invented 
and obtained a patent for improvement in breech loading cannon. 
He then proceeded to Washington to secure the adoption of his 
invention by the government, and in 1862, presented to the consider- 
ation of the goverment officers a 8 in. cast steel breech loading rifled 
field piece, which was tested under the direction of the late Admiral 
Dahlgren to the extent of five hundred rounds, upon the result of 
which he obtained an order for an eight inch rifle gun which 
was completed at Trenton, N. J., in September, 1863, and was fired 
ten proof rounds in October of that year. It was then removed to 
Washington and thence to Fortress Monroe, when it was fired 
twenty rounds in 1864, and in 1867 was again successfully tested 
under the direction of the late Gen. Rodman, chief ordnance con- 
structor of the government. In the early part of 1 874 at the ear- 
nest solicitation of Mr. Mann, the gun was removed from Fortress 
Monroe to the West Point foundry where it was bored up to eight and 
four-tenths inches and rifled, after which it was taken to the govern- 
ment proving grounds at Sandy Hook, N. Y. Harbor, where it has 
been tested under direction of a board of Ordnance officers with very 
satisfactory result^ using twenty-five to thirty*five pounds of pow- 



IBS HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

der and one hundred and seventy pound conical projectiles. The 
results obtained at this last firing compare very favorably with 
results obtained in this country and in Europe with government 
guns of the best standards. Mr. Mann is confident, and he has 
reason to be, that this gun will yet stand in the front rank in the 
armament of the fortifications of this country. 

Brooks' Turbine water wheel was invented in 1854. Improve- 
ments were from time to time made in it by E. B. Brooks and his 
brothers, and in 1871, M. A. Brooks took out a patent for an im- 
proved water wheel. The first one was made in La Porte by Brooks 
and Husselman. These wheels are now manufactured at the ma- 
chine works of J. N. Brooks, and they have been very extensively 
used in the West. 

In the year 1859, George W. Miles, of Michigan City, invented 
a Felloe Bending machine, which is now in use in the La Porte 
wheel factory, has been improved by that company, and proves to 
be a machine of great utility. The Wheel Company are also using 
a machine which is very ingeniously arranged for the shaving of 
spokes. It is the invention of W. W. Smith, of La Porte, and was 
produced by him in the year 1872. 

In the line of discoveries rather than inventions, there is to be 
noted especially the discovery of a remedy for what is called the 
opium habit, or the practice of eating opium, a habit which entails 
untold suffering on its victims. Until the year 1868, there seemed 
to be absolutely no remedy for this dreadful disease, if disease it 
may be called, and when the habit was once fixed, there was no 
relief but in the grave, which in most cases was soon reached. In 
the year 1868, a mechanic in La Porte, working at his trade, which 
was that of a brick-layer, discovered a remedy by which those who 
had fallen victims to this fearful habit might be able to save them- 
selves from a fate more terrible than that of the bound Prometheus. 

It had been frequently declared that the disease of opium eating 
was incurable. High medical authority had said so. Dr. Oppen- 
heim pronounced it "a fatal fascination never to be broken by any 
wily stratagem or open force whatsoever". Dr. Pidduck had said 
that the opium eater "can no more break away from the habit than 
the paralytic imbecile can throw off his lethargy," Dr. Elliotson 



INVENTIONS AND DISCOVERIES. 439 

" could not find the first instance of voluntary renunciation," and 
Dr. Palmer, of Ontario, had never even heard " of the first instance 
of permanent reformation after the habit had been confirmed." 
There seemed absolutely nothing to open the labyrinth of woes in 
which these poor victims wandered, not one ray of hope to cheer 
the desponding sufferer. 

But the time had come when this, like all other evils to which 
human flesh is heir, was to yield to a remedial agent of nature ; and 
it fell upon Dr. Samuel B. Collins to pioneer the way to freedom 
and happiness for this wretched portion of humanity. Another 
hidden secret of nature was given up, this time to a humble mechan- 
ic; and his voice was like a star in Egyptian darkness to those who 
had so long waited without hope. 

Dr. Collins has been practicing medicine since about 1860, and 
when he first made known his great remedy, it was received as most 
important discoveries have ever been, with incredulity and even 
ridicule. But there was a man in La Porte, in whom all had confi- 
dence, one of the first settlers of the place, a large property holder, 
and an eminently respectable and upright citizen. For years he 
had been afflicted with the opium habit, and was rapidly going down 
to the grave. He tried the Collins discovery, and was cured; and 
when he declared on oath that he took the remedy between the 18th 
day of July, and 13th day of December, 1868, when he found him- 
self absolutely and totally cured, there was no room to doubt the 
efficacy of the discovery. Prejudice, ridicule and incredulity all 
gave way before it, and the fortunes of Dr. Collins were made. 
Since then his course has been one of continued triumph. The 
fame of his remedy has gone all abroad, and is known at this time 
almost throughout the civilized world. As at the beginning, so 
still it continues to perform its work. From every quarter testimo- 
nials have come as to its efficacy, until a book larger than this 
volume might be filled with them. Almost from the home of Dr. 
Collins comes this: 

Union Mills, Ind., September 30th, 1872. 
Dr. S. B. Collins, La Porte, Ind., 

Dear Sir: — After taking a nostrum prepared by a 

for the opium habit, and being made very sick there- 



440 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

by at each dose, I concluded to try your remedy, having learned 
that you are the sole discoverer of a painless and permanent cure 
for the dreadful habit of opium eating. 

I am rejoiced that I did so, for after taking your remedv for 
about twelve months, I found myself, as I truly believe, entirely 
cured, and I am now comfortable without any medicine whatever. 

Like nearly all opium eaters, I first believed your remedy resem- 
bled the * * * * a sort of humbug, — but to my surprise and 
great joy I fouad it to be a perfect cure for the accursed habit. 

If any person desires to know more of this wonderful remedy by 
corresponding with me on the subject of my cure, I will cheerfully 
answer every question, and give all information in my power con- 
cerning the action of the remedy in my own case. 

I have lived in La Porte county for thirty-nine years, and had 
used morphine for about eight, at the time I commenced taking 
your remedy, consuming one bottle of it in from eight to nine days; 
but since taking the first dose of your medicine I have had no desire 
for any preparation of Opium whatever, and I now pronounce my- 
self entirely cured. I am confident that if any opium eater will 
write to Dr. Collins, giving him the exact amount of the drug used 
for a certain length of time, whether morphine, gum opium or laud- 
anum, and will follow the directions given upon the label of the 
bottles, he, like myself, will be delivered from the opium hell that 
no man can describe. 

I have a near neighbor who, after taking a few bottles of vour 
remedy was entirely freed from his terrible bondage, but like many 
others who have been cured by you, will not allow his name to be 
made public. 

Thanking you for the many favors you have conferred upon me 
and the great good you have done, and wishing you and your inval- 
uable remedy unbounded success, I remain very respectfully. 

John McLain. 

Amount of Opium used per month, 1920 grains: cured since 
July, 1872. 

A few other brief testimonials are selected and presented here: 

April 23, 1874. 

When I first went to you for consultation and conference with 
reference to my case, and after a full statement of facts, you did 
not promise to cure me under twelve months, and with tliat infor- 
mation I went under vour treatment, and I gave vou an exact and 
truthful statement of my case; and commenced to take your medi- 
cine as directed. The result was, you complete'! a permanent cure 



INVENTIONS AND DISCOVERIES. 441 

in a little over eis;ht months time. Almost five months have now 

CD *• 

passed since I left off taking your medicine, and I am a well, happy 
and prosperous man once again. Joy and gladness have come once 
more to our family circle, and driven forever away that sadness and 
grief and deep sorrow that had settled there because of my illness 
and bondage to that great task and slave-master, morphine. For 
eight long, weary, sorrowing years, it led me day by day for all that 
time, to satisfy the demands of habit entailed upon me by the 
doctors who attended me during my long illness in the summer and 
fall of 1864. 

Since the first Tuesday in October last, I have been in court 
every day here, and there, with but one or two exceptions, and I 
have had full strength of mind and body to enable me to conduct 
the matters and business there demanded of me. But for your aid, 
your skill, and your medicine, I never could have done such work. 
I tell you doctor, I am well again, I am what I have written you / 
am. You have done for me all and more than I have ever written 
you. That awfully heavy weight or load of profound grief and 
apprehensive sorrow that had for so long a time settled upon the 
hearts of dearly loved ones in my own loved home, because they 
saw through morphine the surely and swiftly coming of the sleep 
of death during the long night of the grave, has been completely 
removed, and now with light hearts and joyous, happy spirits, they 
move on and on through the hours of this life, never forgetting my 
great emancipation from the long and terrible bondage of that cruel 
but seductive poison — morphine. 

Marcus P. Norton. 

P. S. — When your treatment commenced, I weighed 184 pounds, 

now I weigh 220 pounds, in all 36 pounds of square and healthy 

gain. M. P. N. 

Amount of opium used per month, 1200 grains; cured since 
January, 1874. 

Napoleon, Ohio, December 10, 1874. 
Dr. S. B. Collins, La Porte, Ind.: 

Dear Sir: — It is now more than a year since I ceased to use 
either your antidote or opium in any form. My general health is 
greatly improved and improving. 

At a former time you published a statement of my case under the 
title of " Water Cure versus Home." I was certain then that your 
antidote would accomplish all that you promised. I have only now 
to say that this has been done in my case; also that it will do this 



442 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

in every case when it is taken according to directions. Sympathy 
and duty require me to make, and authorize you to' use this state- 
ment. Yours Truly, 

Wm. Sheffield, Banker. 

Amount of opium used per month, 7200 grains; has been cured 
since November, 1873. 

Franklin, Ga., January 24, 187. r >. 
Dr. S. B. Collins, La Porte, Ind.: 

Dear Sir: — It affords me great pleasure to say to you that you 
have cured me of eating opium. I had been eating it about three 
years. I used your Antidote about three months. I have used 
neither the Antidote nor any morphine in about three months, and 
now have no desire for either. ^ery Respectfully, 

Mollie E. Duke. 
P. S. — You can use the above in any way you please. 

Amount of opium used per month, 1200 grains; cured since 
October, 1874. 

Hundreds of such testimonials could be presented, but these must 
suffice. They abundantly show that Dr. Collins' discovery for the 
cure of the opium habit is no quack nostrum, but a veritable reme- 
dial agent, which does the work it professes to do, and which lias 
already brought sweet relief to many a one who had fallen into the 
lowest depths of horrid despair. 

The pecuniary returns of Dr. Collins have been commensurate 
with the importance of his discovery, and he spends his means 
freely nmong the people where he toiled as a laborer. He erected 
a few years ago, an elegant marble front building in La Porte, the 
third story of which he generously donated for five years to the 
Library association. He has advertised freely, and has met and 
still continues to receive his just reward. 



PROFESSIONS AND BUSINESS. 443 



CHAPTER XXVII. 

PROFESSIONS AND BUSINESS. 

In the preceding chapters, the beginning, growth and devel- 
opement of La Porte county have been stated. This chapter will 
present a general view of the business of the county, as it now 
exists. The number of those engaged in the various trades and 
professions in the villages throughout the county, has already been 
shown in connection with the history of the townships in which 
they are severally located. It has been found impracticable to 
obtain even an approximate estimate of the amount of the business 
transacted throughout the county, and it is impossible to do much 
more than state the number of business houses of the various branches 
of trade, and of those who are engaged in professional employments. 

The agricultural products of the county may be stated in round 
numbers at about the following: The number of acres of land in 
cultivation is 87,000; head of cattle, 19,000; horses, 8,000 ; mules, 
500; sheep, 10,500; hogs, 18,000; bushels of wheat raised, 485,- 
000; bushels of corn, 920,000; bushels of rye, 3,000; bushels of 
oats, 185,000; tons of hay cured, 5,000; bushels of barley raised, 
27,000; bushels of potatoes, 64,000. These amounts must be 
taken as an average for several years past, excluding the year 1875, 
as to wheat; for in that year there was perhaps less than one-third 
of a fair crop, the severity of the preceding winter having utterly 
destroyed many thousands of acres. 

THE BUSINESS OF LA PORTE. 

In the city of La Porte, there are three firms dealing in agricul- 
tural implements, two of whom sell most kinds of farm machinery, 
and do a large business in this line. The other firm manufactures 
and sells separators which are extensively used, and continue to 
have a large sale. Besides these several other parties manufacture 
various articles of farm machinery, such as gang plows, cultivators, 
rollers, &c. 



444 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

La Porte contains two book and stationery stores, and books are 
kept also in connection with two of the drug stores. Of the latter 
there are five. 

Frkd'k West keeps the drug store in the Alexander block on 
Indiana avenue, also a large assortment of books, stationery and 
many fancy articles, besides wall paper and curtains. Mr. West 
came to La Porte county in 1851, and engaged in teaching in Gale- 
na and Hudson townships. In 1852 he came to La Porte and 
entered the store of P. King, then on Main street. In 1853 he 
conducted Mr. King's branch store at Kingsbury, and remained 
with him until 1857, when he became one of the partners in the 
firm of L. C. Rose & Co., druggists, whose store was on the corner 
now occupied by Vail's jewelry store, where he continued until the 
destruction of the building by fire in the year 1870. Mr. West is 
now the oldest druggist in the county. (See advertisement. ) 

John H. P>r<;<;iE k Company, established the business of drug- 
gists in December, 1875, and have met with very encouraging suc- 
cess. Their place of business is on West Main street in Allen's 
block, the interior of Which has been fitted up and furnished so as 
to present a very neat and tasteful appearance. Mr. Buggie came 
to La Porte in 1873, but did not <zo at once into a business of his 
own. His experience in his business dates back ten years, covering 
nearly the whole of his active life; and his experience has been a 
thorough and valuable one. It is his earnest desire to build up an hon- 
orable reputation, and already his personal attention, which is unre- 
mitting, and his fair dealing, have borne fruit in a trade that has 
gone quite beyond his expectations, giving evidence that these char- 
acteristics will receive their due reward. (See advt.) 

In the line of dry goods there are no less than eight large and 
successful establishments, some of which have been in existence 
many years. 

Julius Barker "Bbb Hivb." This well known house Fas 

established in 1855, by .lames Lewis, who was succeeded in 1< v -»i 
by dames Lewis & Company, and by the present proprietor in L865, 
He has kept the u Bee Hive' ever since, always having a large 
jtock of'dry goods and fancy goods at the lowest prices. 

DBWlTT 0. DfiCKE The linn of J. JT. Decker & jBon com- 



PROFESSIONS AND BUSINESS. 445 

menced business in La Porte in the Fall of 1861. The Senior 
partner was connected with the firm nearly ten years, when he 
withdrew, leaving the business wholly in the hands of his son. From 
the beginning the business has been attended with marked prosper- 
ity. Mr. Decker has fully earned the reputation which he enjoys 
of being one of La Porte s most reliable and successful business men. 
This reputation has been earned by personal industry, and by hon- 
est and straight-forward dealing. His stock of dry goods is large, 
and in addition to this he keeps an extensive stock of crockery and 
glassware, which is fully up to the times in all its requirements, 
from that which is cheap to that which is most elegant in style and 
foremost in quality. In each department of his extensive business 
he is always able to accommodate every class of his customers, 
whatever their tastes or the quality of the goods they wish to pur- 
chase. (See advertisement.) 

The Pioneer Store of P. King. This is one of the oldest 
business houses in La Porte, having had its origin in 1845, through 
a branch at La Porte, of the Michigan City firm of Holbrook and 
King. The La Porte branch was under the supervision of Mr. A. 
D. Porter. The firm dealt in dry goods, groceries, hats and caps, 
millinery, &c, and they had a branch also at New Buffalo. In the 
Spring of 1849 this was sold, and Mr. King came to La Porte and 
took charge of the store here, while Mr. Holbrook retained the one 
at Michigan City. A year later, Holbrook sold to King, and re- 
tired from the mercantile business. Thus Mr. King's career as a 
merchant in La Porte county dates from 1845, making him the 
oldes^ merchant now in the countv. He came to Michigan City in 
the year 1835, when but twelve years of age, with J. S. Castle, 
and worked in the office of the Michigan City Gazette, the first 
paper published in La Porte county. From 1836 to 1838 he at- 
tended school and clerked in the store of Mr. Chittenden and Mr. 
Field, where he received a thorough mercantile education, fitting 
him for his life work. He was employed in the house of C. B. k 
L. Blair during parts of the years 1838-39, and from 1841 to 1845, 
when he formed the partnership with H. P. Holbrook. 

Mr. King built the store room now occupied by D. C. Decker, 
and occupied it twelve years, when having built the large double 



446 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

store on the post office corner, he moved his place of business to 
that locality, where he still remains, and is one of the most prosper- 
ous and succeesful merchants in the State, a prosperity which 1 
been attained by steady industry, honest dealing, and wise manage- 
ment. He has now associated with him in the business, his two 
efficient clerks, S. X. Haines and C. W. Kaber. (See advt.) 

Four stores keep crockery and glass-ware. 

Wm. Crawford, whose store is on Main street in Allen's block, 
commenced business in April. 1858, in a small building near the 
Chronicle office. He keeps a large stock of every variety of 
crockery and glassware, and lamps and lamp fixtures. 

DeWitt C. Decker. This gentleman is the successor of J. F. 
Decker and Son, he having been the junior partner of that firm. 
He deals in crockery and glassware, and dry goods, doing a large 
business in each. His business is noticed elsewhere at greater length 
and more in detail. (See advt.) 

Grocery stores abound in La Porte, there being altogether twentv- 
five, many of them having a large trade. 

Wm. H. Seward, who was engaged in this trade many years, in 
Allen's block, on Main street, closed out his stock and retired from 
the business in April. 1876. 

I. M. Millbr. occupies the corner store room in Allen's block, 
where he commenced the grocerv business in Februarv. 1 V T 
having purchased in connection with Willard P. Allen the stock of 
Henry & Orr, who preceded him. He afterwards bought out 
Allen and is now sole proprietor. He receives a large share of 
custom. 

In the boot and shoe trade there are seven firms, each doing 
quite an extensive business. 

Closser & Nelson. The firm of Heston & Closser commenced 
business at the present locality of Closser a: Xeison, the 28th day of 
October, 1868. Heston went out in August. 1872. and Wm. I 
^elson became a partner with Mr. Closser. the latter having exclu- 
sive control of the business. He has hail a large share of success 
in the trade, and the establishment has become well known, for 
reliable, fair and honorable dealing. (See advt.) 



PROFESSIONS AND BUSINESS. 447 

There are four clothing merchants, several merchant tailors, 
and six who deal largely in gents' furnishing goods. These three 
branches of trade are combined in the large store of J. Hamburger 
& Co., a firm which was established in April, 1875. The senior 
member of the firm began business in La Porte twentv-two rears 
ago. He continued about thirteen years, and was then out of 
business until his formation of a partnership with Mr. Henoch, and 
the opening of their present store. It has been their intention 
from the beginning to be able to supply this city and county with 
every article needed for gentlemen's wear, either ready-made, or 
made to order. The merchant tailoring department is in charge of 
a cutter who has no superior in his line. The firm have been emi- 
nently successful in their first year of business, and the prospect for 
a greater amount of business in the future is very encouraging. (See 
advt.) 

There are ten stores dealing in millinery and fancy goods. One 
of the most successful is that of H. W. Joseph & Co., who com- 
menced business in January, 1874, and directly afterwards moved 
into their present store on Main street, opposite the court house. 
The principal branch of their business is that of millinery. Even 
during the hard times of the last year, their sales have been large. 
They have lately added to their business the sale of the Victor 
sewing machine, and have already had a good run of trade. Doing 
a strictly cash business and thus being enabled to sell at the lowest 
possible prices, they are fast receiving from the public the favor 
which they merit. (See advt.) 

There are six flour and feed stores, though most of these are 
connected with groceries, only one being devoted exclusively to 
this trade ; two or three coal dealers ; six furniture dealers, some of 
whom manufacture largely for this and other markets ; four bake- 
ries ; ten butcher shops and meat markets ; four hardware merchants 
and dealers in stoves ; three ice dealers ; five dealers in clocks, 
watches and jewelry; twenty-six dealers in tobacco and cigars, 
either alone or in connection with some other trade, two of 
whom are extensive manufacturers of cigars; four dealers in pic- 
tures and picture frames, two large dealers in leather and findings ; 
two dealers in lime ; four sewing machine dealers ; nine milliners 



448 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

i 

and dress makers; seven restaurants; one eating house at the 
depot; nine boarding houses; twenty-four saloons; three under- 
takers; one firm of whisky rectifiers; one brewery; six billiard 
rooms; six barbers; two telegraph offices; two ladies' hairdressers; 
seven livery and feed stables; one express office; one gas and steam 
fitter; four harness makers; two coopers; two tanneries; four 
planing mills; one marble cutter and dealer in tomb stones; one 
portrait painter: two photographic establishments; three sign 
painters ; three manufacturers of a cure for the opium habit. There 
are four dealers in lumber. The oldest establishment is that of 
WlLSON & Fraser. The business was commenced by W. Wilson 
& L. Eliel in the year 1859. This partnership continued until the 
Fall of '71, when Mr. Eliel withdrew having some time previously gone 
into business in Chicago. Upon the dissolution of the partnership, 
Mr. Wilson continued the business alone, until February, 1873, 
when having become associated with the La Porte chair company, 
he was elected its president; and this position requiring a consider- 
able portion of his time, Mr. S. P. Fraser became associated with 
him in the lumber business, and is now its manager. The trade of 
the old firm was always successful, and under the present arrange- 
ment it has assumed still larger proportions. It is a fair example 
of what industry and wise business methods, such as constant vigi- 
lance and attention and fair dealing, will accomplish. In the 
Spring of 1874, Mr. Wilson formed a copartnership with R. S» 
Morrison in the coal trade, thus assuming additional responsibili- 
ties, all of which are fully met and mastered. Every different 
enterprise in which he has engaged has become prosperous, the 
three different interests in which he now has a share all being in a 
flourishing condition ; and each of them is worthy of high commen- 
dation for the efficiency, industry and integrity of all who are con- 
nected with them. (Seeadvt.) 

There are four hotels, the oldest and best known of which is 
The Teegarden House, kept by Y. W. Axtell. This house was 
built by Dr. A. Teegarden. It was completed, and opened in the 
year 1852 by Capt. Levi Ely, who remained in the house two years. 
He was followed by James Lougee, and he in turn by Lawson & 
Phelp-. They were in it a short time, when they were succeeded, 



PROFESSIONS AND BUSINESS. 449 

in 1856 by the present proprietor, who, with an exception of a single 
year, has kept it ever since. Under his administration the Teegar- 
en has reached and maintained a fine reputation as a first-class 
hotel, not second to any in the country in cities the size of LaPorte. 
(See advertisement.) 

Three newspapers are published in LaPorte, a further account of 
which is given in another place. Of these The Chronicle is the 
latest established, but has already secured a large circulation. 

There are three book and job printing establishments. Of these 
the latest established and that which does the largest business is the 
house of 

S. E. Taylor & Co., which was established in February, 1874. 
This firm does a large amount of book printing in addition to the 
usual job printing. They keep constantly on hand a full line of 
card board, ruled letter and bill head papers, and colored jobbing 
papers. This house is one of the most complete in the State, and 
their facilities for doing all sorts of work in their line are unsur- 
passed. The work done by them is always first-class in every res- 
pect. (See advt.) 

La Porte contains two establishments which deal in musical in- 
struments, pianos, organs, &c. 

Robert Scott has been engaged in this business since the year 
1872, and has succeeded, by his energy and activity in building up 
a large trade. He is able to furnish pianos and organs of all styles 
and prices, and of any manufacture, to order. His facilities for 
purchasing are such that he is able to sell on the most reasonable 
terms. Persons accustomed to the catalogue prices of the various 
houses throughout the country that manufacture musical instru- 
ments, will, if they consult Mr. Scott, be surprised at the figures he 
will show them, and the exceedingly liberal terms on which he deals. 
They will learn that these instruments can be purchased right here 
at home at a discount from catalogue prices that is simply aston- 
ishing. (See advt.) 

The manufactures of La Pcrte are considerable, though there is 
room for more. There are several cabinet makers: eight or ten 
wagon raid carriage makers, some of whom turn out a great deal of 
work ; an establishment for the manufacture of sash, doors and 

29 



150 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

blinds; one pump manufacturer; two makers of farm rollers; one 
saw mill : three flouring mills; one broom factory; the La Porte wheel 
company, for the manufacture of agricultural implement wheels, 
and other work ; an extensive bedstead factory: the La Porte chair 
company, for the manufacture of cane seat chairs; one car manu- 
facturing company; an extensive manufactory of separators, steam 
engines and other machinery; an establishment for the manufacture 
of castings and all sorts of mill machinery: two large woolen facto- 
ries; a fanning mill factory; a maker of wire fences; gas company 
and works, and the Holly water works. All the different mechan- 
ical employments are well represented. 

By the census of 1870, La Porte county employed in her manu- 
factures 883 hands; the capital invested was $653,340; wages 
paid §260,655; the value of materials used $699,841, and the value 
of productions 31,234,366. These have considerably increased 
since that time, but to what extent it has been impracticable to 
ascertain. 

E. Michael & Co., manufacture the Michael Fanning Mill. 
Mr. Michael commenced the manufacture of these mills in March, 
1859, and in 1869 Mr. G. P. Winn became associated with him 
under the firm name of E. Michael & Co. 

In the vear 18/4, they made eight hundred of their mills, in 
1875, one thousand, and will probably make eleven hundred during 
the year 1876. Their sales for the year 1875 amounted to 833,- 
O00, and the present year will no doubt exceed that figure. 

The enterprise of Mr. Michael and his partner is a most com- 
mendable one, and has deservedly been very successful. A large 
part ot their sales are made out side of La Porte county, hence it is 
one of those means so much needed for bringing money from abroad 
into this county. Every work of this kind adds largely and con- 

atly to the material wealth of the county. It is only the simple 
truth to say that this fanning mill lias no superior, and wherever 
known it finds ready sale. The firm have not tried to extend their 
sales much outside of the State, but they could easily do so, for the 
merits of the mill are such that a vastly increased number might be 
placed on the market. It will be a source of gratification to all 
who kn<»\v them, if their increase of products in the future shall 
exceed that of the past. 



PROFESSIONS AND BUSINESS. 451 

J. L. Boyd commenced the business of making light wagons, 
carriages and buggies in 1864, and has continued the work ever 
since. Always turning out work of the best quality, his orders 
have been equal to his ability to fill them. No one is ever disap- 
pointed in his work, as he uses none but the best material, and 
gives every piece his own constant care. It is much to say, that a 
man's customers are always honestly served, but it is perfectly true 
of Mr. Boyd. (See advt.) 

The La Porte Wheel Company. This company was organized 
in 1870, by Gregory, Turnbull & Griffin, and occupied the building 
where it is now located, the same which was built for a paper mill 
nine years ago. In 1872, Mr. Wm. Niles, having taken a large 
interest in the company, was elected president, and has given the 
enterprise a degree of prosperity that is very satisfactory. The 
products of the 'factory are about $75, 000 annually, and they con- 
sist of agricultural and buggy wheels, wagon and buggy spokes, 
woods for agricultural implements ; hammer, sledge, ax and plow 
handles; neck-yokes; single and double trees; Grape Vine and 
Turkey Wing cradles; "Clipper" combined corn plow, walking 
corn plow, cultivator and double shovel plow; files, and machine 
and blacksmith work, <fcc. The factory employs about seventy-five 
hands. (See advt.) 

In the immediate vicinity of La Porte there are several nursery- 
men, market gardeners and florists, whose industry has met with a 
fair reward. 

R. B. Allen, whose gardens and green-houses are handsomely 
located on the bank of Pine lake, commenced the business of gar- 
dening ten years ago; and four years ago, he established the green 
houses. With every year of his labors, he has added to his grounds 
and methods of cultivation, until now, he has in great abundance 
all kinds of small fruits, many apples and pears, a large and pro- 
lific vineyard, and every kind of early and late vegetables in their 
season. His green houses are crowded with plants and flowers, in 
almost endless variety, and he is able at the proper seasons to sup- 
ply almost any product that anyone is likely to desire, in the line of 
vegetables, fruits or flowers, whether bedding plants, or cut flowers, 
in bouquets, wreaths, crosses or any sort of floral design. (See adv.) 



452 HISTORY OF LA PORT! I OUNTY. 

There are five banks in LaPorte, each one of which is a sound 
institution. 

The La Porte Savings Bank. This institution was organized 
in the month of August, 1 S 71. under and by State authority. It 
is regularly inspected by the auditor of State as required by law; 
and all investments are made strictly according to the law of the 
State for the regulation of Savings banks. Every depositor becomes 
a stock holder to the extent of his deposit; and all net earnings are 
divide'l among the depositors. In framing the law on the subject, 
every precaution seems to have been taken by the Legislature, to 
render the Savings bank as near perfection in security for the 
deposit of money as 'it is possible for any institution to be made. 
The names of the officers and trustees of this bank are a guarantee 
that the provisions of the law will lie strictly observed. These 
consist of the following well-known citizens: Trustees. John Suth- 
erland. Dr. T. Higday, Benajah Stanton, T. W. Butterworth, F. 
Baumgartner, Samuel Downing, and Shepherd Crumpacker. Offi- 
cers — President, John Sutherland: A ice Presidents. Dr. T. Hig- 
day and Benajah Stanton: Cashier, J. H. Vining. Ft is ::'>t easy 
to compute the benefits to individuals and the community of a well- 
conducted Savings bank: affording as it does a convenient deposito- 

rv for money: and a method for safely and profitably investing it, 

«/ i .1.0 

and yet retaining it in a taxable and available condition. It is not 
flattery, but the simple truth to say that this bank under its wise 
management, has fulfilled all the conditions for the convenient and 
safe investment of surplus income. (See advt.) 

The banking bouse of A. P. Andrew, Jr. & Son was organized 
in the month of December, L869, and in November. l v 7-~>, the 
banking office was established in its present location on Main street, 
opposite the court houj A. P. Andrew. Jr.. or Capt. Andrew, 
he Tenerally knwwn, is one of the first settlers of La Porte, being 
one of the original ^proprietors of the site of the city. II<- n 
editor of the LaPorte County Tf *///// in 1839 and '40, and v. 
afterwards engaged in the banking business at Michigan City. He 
has always been successful in business. hi< ventures being marked 
by wisdom and prudence. Capt. Andrew, the younger, is the man- 
of the banking business, and be seems to have inherited the 



PROFESSION'S AND BUSINESS. 453 

prudent carefulness of his father. Together, they have made the 
bank an eminently safe and sound financial institution. Thev 
transact all' parts of a gener.il bulking business, and have the confi- 
dence of all who do business with and. through them. (See advt.) 

The professions are ably represented in La'Porte, in theology, 
law and medicine. The number of those in the clerical profession 
and the success of their labors will be learned from the chapter on 
the history of the churches of the county. Those engaged in the 
practice of the law number not less than twenty. Four of these, 
Andrew L. Osborn, John B. Niles, James Bradley and Mulford K. 
Farrand were among the earliest, as well as the ablest practitioners 
at the bar of La Porte. 

Wm. E. Higgins. Attorney at Law. was admitted to the bar 
at La Porte, May 5, 1860. He practices in all the courts of the 
State, and gives prompt and special attention to collections and 
probate business, also deals in real estate. 

Samuel E. Williams. Attorney at Law. He was admitted 
to the bar in La Porte. March 14, 1843. He transacts business in 
all the State courts, gives prompt attention ;to collections in this 
and adjoining counties and States, and settles estates and guardian- 
ships. 

Dan. Brown, Attorney at Law. Was admitted to the bar of 
La Porte in 1874. He was sheriff of La Porte county Irom 1870 to 
1874, having been twice elected to that office. He makes the col- 
lection of doubtful claims a specialty. Money to loan and all busi- 
ness of the profession attended to with promptness. 

A. T. Bliss, Att'y at Law. He was admitted to the bar in 
April, 1859, and has made a fine reputation for industry and the 
honest care which he bestows on all business and cases entrusted to 
him. He now has a fine practice, which he has secured by his own 
personal merits, and steady devotion to his profession. Since his 
admission to the bar he has been steadily engaged in his profession, 
except during several years of the war, when he was in the service 
of his country, where he held the rank of Captain. (See advt.) 

Irvin Van Wie, Att'y at Law. He was admitted to the bar 
of La Porte in April, 1872, and is rapidly building up a fine prac- 
tice. He is earnestly devoted to his profession, which he pursues 
with an assiduity that is sure to win success. All persons who 



454 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

entrust business to him will have it attended to with industry and 
faithfulness, and with careful attention to the interests of the client. 
For a lawyer who has so lately begun the practice, and where there 
is so much competition, Mr. Van Wie has had far more than ordi- 
nary success. (See advt.) 

MORTIMER Nye, Att'y at Law. Mr. Nye was raised in La- 
Porte countv, of which he is a native. He was admitted to the bar 
in the year lsij^, and has acquitted himself in such a manner as to 
build up a good practice. He was elected Mayor of the city on 
the Democratic ticket in 1873, and again in 1875, holding that 
office at the present time. Besides his law practice, he is engaged 
in the real estate trade and deals extensively inlands, having always 
on his books a large amount of city and country real estate for sale. 
Those who become his clients in the law, or have laud transactions 
with him will be certain to secure an honest and faithful attention 
to their business. (See advt.) 

There has recently been established here a 
Book Bindery by Mr. Chas. Bard, a needed enterprise, and one 
that is worthy of encouragement and liberal patronage. Air. Bard 
lias done the work of binding this history, and will no doubt give 
full satisfaction to those who give him work of this kind to do. He 
- an industrious young man and hopes to build up here an institu- 
tion that shall be permanent. This will be a benefit and conve- 
nience to the city, and it would be well for those who have binding to 
do, to consult their best interests and have it done at home rather 
than to send it away. (See advt.) 

There are ten or twelve insurance agents in La Porte, represent- 

g more than forty fire and life insurance companies, and half a 
dozen or more who furnish abstracts of title to real estate. Some 
of these agencies are held by attorneys at law, < thers follow exclu- 

ely the business of insurance. 

The State Fire [nsurance Company. This Company is lo- 
cated at LaPorte, it was organized in October 1875, and its charter 
rs date, January 26, 1876. It is a LaPorte enterprise, and its 
officers hope to build up here a company that shad take rank with 
the foremost of the great insurance organizations of the country. 
Their su - r lm> far has been all that could reasonably be expect- 



PROFESSIONS AND BUSINESS. 455 

ed. The business has been increasing rapidly, the most rigid econ- 
moy prevails in the management, and the prospect for future 
vigorous growth is clear and encouraging. 

George C. DoRLAND, real estate and insurance agent, and con- 
veyancer. Mr. Dorland commenced his present business in the 
the Spring of 1874. His previous training had been such as to 
qualify him for it, in more than an ordinary degree, he having 
been deputy recorder from 1866, until near the time when he went 
into business for himself. Thus he has been educated by years of 
training to the work in which he is now engaged, which in- 
cludes the making of deeds and mortgages, and furnishing abstracts 
'of titles. He will soon have completed a set of abstract books for 
all the lands in La Porte county. He was appointed a notary 
public, February 23, 1874. Those who entrust business to him 
will find it in safe hands. 

The medical profession is represented in La Porte by some accom- 
plished practitioners. One who was eminent especially as a surgeon, 
and who had been longer in La Porte than any other, Dr. Daniel 
Meeker, has recently died. There are now here about twenty phy- 
sicians, five of whom are Homoeopathic, one Eclectic, and the others 
Regular. There is also one lady physician. Three dentists should 
be added to the number. 

George M. Dakin, M. D. Dr. Dakin received his medical 
education at the Eclectic Medical Institute at Cincinnati, completing 
the prescribed course of study in the year 1852. For several years 
hi 1 practiced medicine at Princeton, 111., and in 1862 came to La- 
Porte, where he has been since that time, enjoying a large, labo- 
rious and successful practice. (See advt.) 

Mrs. M. A. Stevens, M. D. Mrs. Stevens, so well known to 

the people of La Porte, and indeed Northern Indiana, is an Eclectic 
physician of excellent standing and large and increasing practice. 
She commenced the practice of medicine twenty years ago, in Elgin, 
Illinois, from which place she went to Chicago, and in April, 1865 r 
came to La Porte. She remained here a comparatively brief period, 
when she went to Goshen, but in 1868 returned to La Porte and 
has practiced her profession here ever since. In her treatment, she 
makes use of Electro-thermal, Turkish, Vapor and Sulphur baths, 
and has been remarkably successful in the treatment of persons 



456 HI -TORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

suffering from acute, chronic or nervous diseases. She is a gradu- 
ate of the celebrated Dr. Trail's Ilygeio-therapeutic college, New 
York City. I See advt. ) 

S. C. WHITING, M. D., Homeopathic Physician and Surgeon. 
Dr. Whiting located in La Porte, April 22, 1876, coming from 
Vincennes, Indiana, where he had for many years enjoyed an 
extensive practice. He came at the solicitation of Dr. S. A. Rob- 
inson, who proposing to make a journey to Europe, chose Dr. 
Whiting to take charge of his extensive practice, with a view also 
to a future partnership. The following note from Dr. Robinson 

will more fully explain the arrangement, and the merits of Dr. 

Whiting. 

I take pleasure in introducing Dr. Whiting to my patrons, as the 
man I have chosen from among a large number of applicants as 
best fitted for the place, and the one I would prefer to have treat 
my friends and family during my absence. In the prime of life, a 
man of great energy and vigor, thoroughly qualified in, and wholly 
devoted to, his profession, he comes intending to make La Porte 
his permanent home, ami willing to work for you as I have done, 
day and night. He graduated at the Western Homeopathic Col- 
lege, Cleveland, 0., in 1855, after which he entered the University 
of New York and took a thorough Allopathic and Hospital course. 
He is a member of the American Institute of Homeopathy, and the 
Indiana State Homeopathic Society. For the last sixteen years he 
has been in very successful and active practice at Vincennes. Ind.. 
where his reputation is excellent, both as a physician and citizen. 
Dr. Whiting will have entire charge of the business from this time 
until my return from Europe, when our contract provides for an 
equal partnership. S. A. RoBrNSON. 

La Porte, April. 1876. 

The firm of Davidson Brothers was organized in January, 
l vt >7. and occupy the large marble front double store on Main 
street. The members of the firm, Ralph and August Davidson, 
have been in business in La Porte nearly, or quite twenty year-, 
and are well and favorably known to the people of the county. 
Ralph Davidson was a member many years ago of the old firm of 
Hamburger & Davidson, which will be remembered as a heavy cloth- 
ing establishment. The present firm has. from its organization, 
done a heavy business in its various lines of trade, and the brotlc ra 
have shown themselves remarkably successful business men. placing 



PROFESSIONS AND BUSINESS. 457 

them among the foremost of Northern Indiana, in enterprise and in 
prudent and honorable dealing. For further information see advt. 

C. G. Dowling has been in 'La Porte thirteen years. In Sep- 
tember, 1863, he was engaged as cutter in the "Bee Hive," where 
he continued six years and a half, when he formed a partnership in 
the merchant tailoring business with J:>seph Hagenbuck, under the 
firm name of Dowling and Hagenbuck. The partnership continued 
about three years when it was dissolved by mutual consent, and the 
business passed into the hands of Mr. Dowling who has continued 
it ever since, with success. He is well known as a superior cutter; 
and his work is so satisfactory that he has constantly ajrown in 
popular favor. He is courteous to customers, honorable in his 
•dealings, and is consequently prosperous in business. (See advt.) 

The photographic artists of La Porte, turn out as good work as 
can be obtained anywhere. 

Wm. M. Scott, is the La Porte pioneer in this business. His 
gallery was established in 1853, at the precise location opposite the 
court house, where it is now, commencing with the old style daguer- 
reotype. Mr. Scott has kept pace with all improvements in the art 
of taking sun pictures; and his enterprise has brought him corres- 
ponding success. 

J. W. Bryant opened in the business of taking ferrotypes in 
LaPorte, Sept. 16, 1868, in rooms in the balcony block, buying out 
the establishment of Charles B. Te'eple. About two years and a 
half thereafter, he moved to his present location, on the south side 
of E. Main street, and has pursued successfully the business of a 
photographic artist in its various branches, keeping fully abreast 
with every improvement made in the art. 

The business of Michigan City h is increased remarkably during 
the last five years, owing in large part to the impetus given to 
trade by the harbor improvements. Within that time a very ex- 
tensive lumber trade has been built up, and at the present time 
there are not more than two or three larger entrepots for lumber on 
the lakes than Michigan City. Six or eight heavy firms are en- 
gaged in this trade. Among them 

George Marsh is a heavy dealer, and has been in the trade three 
or four years, and his business has been on the increase from tho 



458 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

beginning. He deals in pine lumber, and ships southward on both 
lines of railroad. 

W. G. Peck is also one of the heaviest dealers in lumber at 
Michigan City. 

The business and commercial houses of Michigan City number 
more than fifty, and they are generally prosperous. A number of 
large manufacturing establishments give employment to numerous 
workmen. All the different mechanical, commercial and manufac- 
turing employments are successfully pursued by enterprising busi- 
ness men. 

Schoenemann lV Ashton. This is one of the leading grocery 
houses of Northern Indiana. They commenced business in 1867, 
and now occupy two large store rooms on Franklin street, one at 
the corner of Second street, the other at the corner of Sixth. 

The professions are well represented in Michigan City. The 
churches are supplied with able pastors, there are six attorneys at 
law, and nine physicians. There is also a sound banking house, 
three newspapers, the Enterprise, News, and Prison Reformer, 
and hotels sufficient to supply the wants of the travelling public. 

The Jewell House now kept by a very popular landlord. Har- 
vey R. Harris, was erected in 1853, by the elder Mr. Leeds, now 
deceased. It was opened by Mr. Pike, of Niles, Mich. At differ- 
ent times since it has had for landlords. Patterson, Child:. Layton, 
Crarv. Murtagh and Harris, the latter of whom took it when his 
term of office closed as auditor of the county. He is an excellent 
hotel keeper, and has added largely to the popularity of the house. 

The following notice closes the business review. 

-r T 

lEN Brand of Kingsbury, opened his store in that village. Jan. 
1 . 1 871 . and his business house may be said to be the lineal successor 
of several other stores that from time to time existed in Kingsbury. 
He is well known throughout the county, and his business is proba- 
bly greater than that of any other merchant outside of LaPorte and 
Michigan City. The coming of the railroad to Kingsbury, has 
_ en new impetus to the village, and the business of Mr. Brand has 
increased accordingly. See Advt.) 

It should have been stated in the chapter on inventions and dis- 
coveries, that Mr. Henry Mills, of Noble township, in the year 1857, 
invented the binding car attachment to the Mann reaper, for riding 
and binding, a contrivance which is now in almost universal use on 
reaping machine 3. 



NEWSPAPERS. 459' 



CHAPTER XXVIII. 

^ NEWSPAPERS. 

The first newspaper issued in La Porte county was the Michigan 
City Gazette, James S. Castle, editor and proprietor. The first 
number was issued in June, 1835. At a little later period James 
M. Stuart become connected with this paper, and for a time Sam- 
uel Miller owned it. Polaski King of La Porte, was the youngest 
boy in the office and was consequently the first printer's u Devil' 

in the county. The Gazette, after a somewhat checkered career, 
ceased to exist, probably in 1841. 

Following the newspapers at Michigan City, the Herald comes 
next into view. It was established by Richard Burley, during the 
existence of the Gazette, but its life was brief. It lived but little 
more than a year. In politics it was Democratic, while the Gazette 
was Whig, and as at that time the city was strongly of the latter faith 
in politics, the Gazette had the fairest opportunity for existence. 

For a time Michigan City was without a neAvspaper, when in 
April, 1846, Thomas Jernegan established the Michigan City News, 
and continued its publication until the office was burned in Sep- 
tember, 1853. Mr. Jernegan was post-master at the time, and did 
not resume the publication. In politics the Neivs was Democratic. 

Following the News., came the Transcript, a Whig newspaper 
which was established in the Summer of 1854 by Richard W. Col- 
fax. He disposed of his interest in the Spring of 1.855 to Hickock 
and O'Brien, and died in the Spring of 1856. The new proprietors 
changed the name of the paper to the Enterprise but did not con- 
tinue its proprietors longer than the close of that year. They were 
succeeded by L. B. Wright, who published it until April, 1859, 
when he sold to Thomas Jernegan, the present editor and proprietor. 
He has published it continuously since that time, except during a 

part of the war of the rebellion, when it was suspended from May, 
1863, to November, 1865. the editor having been appointed to 
the position of assistant paymaster in the navy. The Enterprise 
has for many years been Republican in politics. 



460 II [-TORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

In 1863, during the suspension of the Enterprise, M. & J. Cul- 
laton established the Michigan City Review, which they published 
one year. 

The Michigan City News was established in March. 1*7-") by J. 
F. Rowins. Soon afterwards, Mr. X. Conover became a partner, 
and then buying out Rowins, became the sole proprietor. In poli- 
tics the News is Democratic. 

The latest venture at Michigan City is the Prison Reformer, the 
first number of which was issued in March, 1876. It is edited and 
published by Rev. M. S. Ragsdale, moral instructor in the prison. 
and is devoted to prison reform and the reformation of prisoners. 

The first paper ever published in La Porte was " The La Porte 
Count}/ Whig, and Porter, Lake and Marshall Counties Adver- 
tiser." It was established near the beginning of June, 1838, by J. 
M. Stuart ard S. C. Clisbe, the first named being the conductor of 
the new journal. It was of the size of six columns to the page, 
which seems to have been the usual size of western papers at that 
day. Stuart continued the publication of the paper about a year. 
when it passed into the hands of Capt. A. 1*. Andrew. Jr.. who became 
proprietor and editor, continuing as such until his removal to 
Michigan City. 

July 29th, 1840 the Whig published the following notice: 

" Press for Sale. — The La Porte Count)/ Whig Press, with 
all the furniture and fixtures, is for sale. Time will be given, bv 
being well secured. A great bargain will be given. It is the best 
furnished press in Northern Indiana, and cost 81 500 in New York, 
about three years ago. 

A. P. Andrew. Jr. 

N. B. — It would be an object for a practical printer to continue it 
at this place. The subscription list is about five hundred — and 
might be easilv increased to double that number. The only cause 
of the present proprietor wishing to sell is his having removed to 
Michigan City. Letters addressed to James Whittem. Esij., La- 
Porte, or the subscriber, will be carefully attended to. 

Not long afterwards, the paper passed into the hands of T. A. 
Stewart, who conducted it several years, part of the time editing it 
himself, and at other times employing assistance ■<> do this work. 
Among others, there appears as editor in 1*4*2. the name of M. H. 
Or ton. Stewart still controlled the paper in the latter part of 



NEWSPAPERS. 461 

i 

1843. Johnson and Stewart appear as proprietors in 1844. The 
next change worthy of note occurred in 1845, when John Millikan 
became the proprietor. From that time on he controlled the paper 
until his sale to M. & J. Cullaton in 18(35 having associated 
with him a part of the time, his brother Wm. Millikan, who now 
publishes the Washington (Ohio) Herald, and Richard Holmes, who 
is at present publishing the Cass County (Mich.) Republican. Mr. 
John Millikan himself is now the business manager and local editor 
of the Marshall County Republican. In the year 1855 Mr. Milli- 
kan changed the name of his paper, the Whig party having ceased to 
exist as a political organization, and it was henceforth the LaPorte 
I 'nam, until purchased from the Cullatons by Chas. G. Powell, 
when it was merged in the Herald, then published by him in La- 
Porte,, and ceased to exist. This paper during its long and check- 
ered career, participated earnestly in all the Whig, and subsequently 
Republican contests of the times through which it passed. It fought 
gallantly in behalf of Harrison, Clay, Taylor, Scott, Fremont, 
Lincoln in two campaigns, and Grant. The first exciting campaign 
in which it engaged was that of 1840, when it was conducted by 
Capt. Andrew, who showed persistent pluck, spirit and ability. It 
had then for its newspaper and political antagonists in La Porte, the 
La Porte Herald, a paper which was established about the same 
time with the Whig. It was published by Joseph Lomax, and 
edited bv him and W. F. Storey, now of the Chicago Times, who 
was then engaged in the drug business in LaPorte, and was the 
heaviest advertiser among the business men of the place. The Her- 
ald continued to exist, but bv a rather uncertain tenure at times, 

until . In its conduct it frequently showed croppings 

out of the characteristics which now distinguish the Chicago Times, 
but its proprietor evidently found it difficult to make his enterprise 
a paying one. In 1840 the Herald contained a kb Loafer's Depart- 
ment," of which the following is a mild specimen. 

"On the 8th of September the postmaster at Greensboro inform- 
ed us that Abner Dickering refused to take the Herald from that 
office. He owes us $4.18. We have not heard from the dishonest 
rascal since." For weeks each issue contained two or three similar 
notices. The two LaPorte papers, the Whig and the Herald, in 
1840 and previously, engaged in a great deal of personal controver- 



462 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

sy. They Beem to have been accustomed to fire at each other 
constantly, and the small shot flew thick and fast. In a single 
issue of the Whig* that of June 17th. 1*40, there appear the follow- 
ing hits: "The editor of the Herald says 'he is not afraid of us.' 
Gruess he has not seen us for two or three week-." Capt. Andrew 
had just then recovered from a three weeks prostration with bilious 
fever, during which time John H. Bradley conducted the paper. 

"Do the patrons of the Herald approve the high-minded, / 
able course pursued by its editor towards political opponents*: — or 
would they prefer he should descend to low. scurrilous abus< 
some do ? " 

"Our neighbor of the Herald is informed that we cannot consent 
to sink the gentleman — any illustrious examples or precedents 
to the contrary notwithstanding." 

And the following from a correspondent who signs himself " Quiz. 

"The editor of the Herald thinks he could not gain anything by 
fighting with a skunk ! query, would he lose anything ? ' 

"The readers of the Herald lose nothing by the half-sheet opera- 
tion — thev have the essence, and therefore less will do for a dose ! 
Would not a quarter sheet ignite ? ' 

"The editor of the Herald complains that out of 720 subscribers 
only b6 have paid up. Does the editor not know that under a 
statute of our State, debtors can avail themselves of the defense of 
want of con sidera t io n.'' 

The next issue of the Herald contained the following: "Our 
neighbor of the Whig is informed that we are somewhat puzzled to 
conceive of the possibility of his sinking the gentleman any lower 
than he has already done." 

To which on the 24th of June the Whig responded: "Well, a 
very natural conclusion for Mr. Low-mux to come to, none having 
sounded bottom in those low latitudes more frequently than he has 
done, and not being able to drag us down with him, his conclusions 
are very rational that it cannot be done. It is believed that but 
for his crew, he would have foundered and gom down Long ago, 
and even the crew are dissatisfied, and threaten mutiny. We are 
told that one of the most prominent of his mates at the city said on 
seeing the first half-sheet Herald, 'he, (the editor,) ought to be run 
tii r«»ugh a smut mill.' 

The replies <»f the Herald were often more emphatic than polite 
and in many cases were such that they could not be quoted here 
with propriety. Such a course made a political campaign spirited 
and exciting, and was perhaps a necessity of the times. It may be 



NEWSPAPERS. 463 

doubted whether there has since been much improvement, if we 
take into consideration the treatment too generally accorded to can- 
didates for office. 

At the beginning of the 'year 1852, E. A. Graves established the 
La Porte Commercial Time*, afterwards called the Republican 
Times and then the Times, simply. This paper passed through 
many changes of management, and was owned probably longer by 
John C. Walker than by any other owner of the establishment. 
Before the year 1852 closed, John C. Walker and John W. Hol- 
combe were announced as the editors, and a year later, the paper 
was published by Walker, Holcombe & Everts. Dr. Orpheus 
Everts continued as principal editor during several years, and in 
1857, George H. Sweet was associated with him. After the con- 
gressional campaign of 1858, in which Col. Walker was a candidate 
for congress against Schuyler Colfax, he took personal control of 
his paper for a time. A little later it was edited by Flavius J. 
Clark, then by a young man named Palmer, and afterwards by 
Henry Higgins. who was its last editor. John S. Weller also was 
at two different times connected with it, once in 1852 or 53 as 
publisher, and for a time in 1860, as local editor. In the issue 
for November 10, 1860, John C. Walker offered the paper and 
office for sale, and announced that with that number the paper 
would be "temporarily suspended." The editor printed the follow- 
ing as his " valedictory. ' 

"By notice above it will be seen that the publication of the Times 
will be suspended until the proprietor, Col. Walker, can dispose of 
the office. This, of course, does away with the services of its editor. 
Eor one year and a half we have held converse with the readers of 
this paper — and it is with some regrets that we leave them now. 
We have endeavored to do something for the cause of Democracy. 
What little we have done has been done with earnestness, and with 
a strict adherence to principle. Short Good Bye's are the best, so 
we will shake hands and retire, assuring our friends that we will 
always be found on the side with the Democracy, battling for Dem- 
ocratic principles. To our brethren of the Press we say "farewell." 
We part in peace and friendship. Henry Higgins." 

The Times was a straight Democratic paper during all its exist- 
ence, and in the campaign of 1860 supported Stephen A. Douglas 
for President against John C. Breckenridge, the southern Demo- 
cratic candidate. 



464 HISTORY OF LA PORTE COUNTY. 

Not long after the suspension of the Times Piatt McDonald, now 
of the Plymouth Democrat established the La Porte Democrat. 
which was published during the war. and down to about 1867, 

when it ceased to exist. 

In the year 1856 C. Gr. and Alfred Town-end established the 
Westville Herald, a Republican paper, publishing it until Augus 
when they sold to a company, who afterwards sold our to ('lias. G. 
Powell. He removed the paper to I, a Porte. Afterwards, in 1>07, 
he purchased the LaPorte Union of M. & J. Oullaton, and consoli- 
dated the two papers under the name of the former. It is now 
owned by Charles Gr. Powell and Sims Major, and published under 
the name of the Herald Company. 

The La Porte Argus was established April 15, 1869, by John 
P. Stoll and Henry E. Wadsworth. It is Democratic in polities, 
and is now owned by Wadswortb and Kessler. 

The Chromcll:, owned and edited by Jasper Packard issued its 
first number on the 18th day of July, 1874. It was issued twice a 
Aveek until November 8th, 187"). when owing to the pecuniary 
stringency of the times, it became a weekly paper. It is earnestly 
Republican in its political views, and unalterably at enmity with 
the coiuin.ro custom of defaming and slandering men who haw been 

unfortunate enough to be entrusted with official position bv their 
fellow-citizens or the government. 

There have been several attempts to establish daily papers in 
La Porto . On January 3rd, 1859, B. I>. Root and Jasper Packard 
issued the first number of the Daily Union. Three months after- 
wards, Mr. Packard retired from it. By hard work. Mr. Root kept 
it alive perhaps two months longer, when it ceased to exist. The 
Cullatons made a similar attempt in L866, but it lasted only a 
week. On the eighth day of October, 1875, the present propri- 

r of the Chronicle determined to make another experiment of 
the same kind, and accordingly issued the Daily Evening Chronicle. 
At the end of two weeks, ir became evident that the receipts could 
not bo made to equal the expenditures, ami the new venture expired 
with the twelfth number. 

Besides those named, there was at one time a German paper 
published in Pa Porte; and John S. Weller published the Crisis, a 
Swedenborgian paper, which was a long time ably edited bv Uev. 
Henry Weller. 



ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO AND NOW. 465 



CHAPTER XXIX. 

ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO AND NOW. 

When first the foot of man pressed the soil of La Porte county, 
we know not, but it was more than one hundred years ago that the 
u pale face" first stood on these prairies and gazed on the beautiful 
groves, and lakes sparkling in the sunshine. It lacks but three 
years of two full centuries, since the first white man touched the 
limits of La Porte county. It is possible, even probable that it was 
still earlier than that when such an event occurred. In the year 
1671, the. Governor of New France officially sent Nicholas Parrot 
to explore the lakes. He came up Lake Michigan along the eastern 
shore, establishing posts, and took possession of the North-west, in 
the name of the ''Grand Monarque," the King of the French. It 
is not improbable that he came to the very apex of the lake, which 
would bring him to where Michigan City now stands, and entering 
the mouth of Trail creek, landed, and rested on the sands at the 
foot of Hoosier Slide, perhaps ascended to its summit, and planted 
there the standard of the cross, by which he took possession of the 
whole North-west for France. But there is no evidence to support 
the claim, and therefore the writer does not make it. It is certain, 
however that this territory, included now within the limits of La- 
Porte county, became then a part of the kingdom of France. It is 
appropriate that the name of our county should be French, since to 
that nation it first belonged, after the red man, whose title was 
older than that of any European nation. But if the supposition in 
regard to Parrot is not correct, it is certain that La Salle touched 
La Porte county in 1GT9. " Coming from Niagara around the lakes 
in canoes, La Salle and his companions passed up the St. Joseph 
river, to the portage near where now stands the city of South Bend, 
and taking up their canoes on their shoulders, they marched two 
miles to the head of the Kankakee river. Committing their canoes 
to the waters of that stream, they rowed down it as far as Cham- 
bers' landing, where they tied up and encamped for the night. No 



4GG lllStORY OF LA l'ORT'K COUNTS. 

doubt this was the first time a white man had ever slept on our soil. 
La Salle's explorations extended far to the southward, and on his 
return, he reached the lake somewhere between Trail creek and 
Chicago river. The supplies which he had expected did not 
meet him, and it was necessary to go after them. He chose the 
lake shore for a part of his journey, but diverged from it, and pass- 
ed across the county, following the old Indian trail through the 
centre of the locality of the present city of La Porte. To make 
sure of all this great western country for his august master, La- 
Salle also, as Parrot had done, took formal possession of it in the 
name of the King of the French, "from the mouth of the great 
river St. Louis, on the eastern side, otherwise called the Ohio, * 
as also along the river Colbert or Mississippi, and rivers which 
discharge themselves therein, from its source. * * ." Thus La- 
Porte county belonged to France until, by the treaty of 1763 the 
territory of which it was a part was ceded to Great Britain ; and 
thus it occurred that one hundred years ago La Porte county was 
a part of the possessions of the English nation, and the French mili- 
tary posts in the Northwestern territory, were occupied by British 
soldiers. But soon afterwards, General George Rogers Clarke, 
under authority of the State of Virginia, captured their posts, and 
this whole North-western territory was transferred to the proprie- 
torship of Virginia until by the ordinance of 1787, it became a part 
of the possessions of the United States. But in these changes of 
ownership, from Indian to French, from French to British, from 
British to Virginian, and from Virginian to Yankee, there was no 
change here. The summer's heat and winter's cold followed each 
other in unvarying succession, and there was nothing to break the 
solemn stillness of nature, save the growl of the wild beast, the 
fierce shout of the savage, or the rush and roar of winds and storms 
:is they passed over the prairie and woodland. Two hundred years 
ago, one hundred, even fifty years ago, the soil was unvexed by the 
plow, and the woodman's axe had never been heard. To have 
arisen over the county, would have been to look down on no settlers 
cabin or faintest trace of civilization; but instead, boundless emerald 
seas, and luxuriant groves. 



ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO AND NOW. 4G7 

" These the gardens of the desert — these 
The unshorn fields, boundless and beautiful, 
And fresh as the young earth ere man had sinned. 

Lo ! they stretch 
In airy, undulations far away, 
As if the ocean in the gentlest swell, 
Stood still, with all his rounded billows fixed, 
And motionless forever." 

Thus it all appeared to those who made here the first homes that 
were founded in these green gardens. Thus it appeared to James 
Andrew when he traversed the pathway from South Bend to La- 
Porte. Thus it looked to Wm. H. Winchell, when guided by a 
point in the distance, he drove his oxen from La Porte to the vicinity 
of Kingsbury. Thus Thompson Francis saw it, when he came to 
La Porte, found it a town of two or three houses, assisted in build- 
ing some more, then went to Michigan City to see only water and 
sand, went on to Michigan, and returned to Michigan City in the 
spring of the next year, 1834. So appeared this blooming country to 
all the pioneers, while yet they were so scattered as to make only 
here and there a rift in the loveliness of nature around them. 

But now! Here is an industrious population numbering many 
thousands. The wild grass and flowers that painted the prairies 
in richest hues have given place to fields of golden grain. The log 
cabins have been exchanged for stately mansions. The sickle and 
scythe and cradle and single shovel plow have been laid aside, and 
the reaper and mower and cultivator now reign in our fields. All 
the evidences of an enlightened civilization are everywhere visible. 
The school house stands in every neighborhood, and churches 
abound in every town and village. Two cities and eleven villages, 
and innumerable farm houses give evidence of the growth of popu- 
lation. Eight railroads, numerous vessels laden with iron and 
lumber entering our lake harbor, large commercial houses, great 
manufacturing establishments, many thousands of acres of improved 
farms, all bear witness that there has been vigorous growth in the 
past, and indicate yet greater rewards in the future for the various 
industries of the county. The early settlers who yet remain must 
look back upon the work which they begun so well with feelings of 
pride ; and the men of to-day can look forward with confident hope 
ot yet greater results, in material growth and in intellectual and 
moral developement. 

THE END. 



JAN 2 1939