(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "History of Lower Tidewater Virginia"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/historyoflowerti03whic 






",**! \ 



>k? „ 



THE HISTORY OF 

LOWER 

TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



THE HISTORY OF 

LOWER 

TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



FAMILY AND PERSONAL HISTORY 



lV ".■.,. mr>M Id*-"- 



,*> WOT R«WOW 



VOLUME III 



LEWIS HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, INC. 

N EW YORK 

'9 59 



Copyright 
Lewis Historical Publishing Company, Inc. 

•959 



wi»nm 




TWVa. 1 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



n 



JOHN SAMUEL ALFRIEND— Over forty 
years ago, John Samuel Alfriend began his career 
with the National Bank of Commerce, at Norfolk, 
and advanced steadily to the presidency of that 
organization, which he has held since 1942. He 
has held a number of other corporate connec- 
tions; has served as president of the Norfolk-Ports- 
mouth Clearing House Association; and has held 
a place of leadership in bankers' groups and com- 
munity organizations. 

Born at Norfolk on July 6, 1897, he is a son of 

e Reverend Richard Jeffery and Mary Emily 
(Hulme) Alfriend. After attending the public 
schools of his native city, John S. Alfriend was 
a student at Norfolk Academy from 191 1 to 1914. 
He is a graduate of the American Institute of 
Banking. 

Mr. Alfriend joined the staff of the National 
Bank of Commerce in 1914 as a messenger. Soon 
advanced to clerical positions, he engaged in such 
[ork until 1931, when he was promoted to cashier. 
fter serving as assistant to the president in 1936- 
!<)3~. he was then promoted to executive vice 
president and director. He became president in 
1942. In addition, Mr. Alfriend is director and 
president of the Commerce Corporation of Nor- 
folk. He is a director of Mutual Federal Savings 
and Loan Association, Chesapeake and Potomac 
Telephone Company of Virginia, Norfolk and 
Western Railway Company, and Southern Ma- 
terials Company, Inc. He also serves as a trustee 
of the Tidewater Virginia Development Council. 

As a banker, he is active in the Virginia Bank- 
ers Association, which he served as a member of 
its executive council in 1938- 1939 and as president 
in 1949-1950. From 1944 to 1947, he served on the 
executive council of the American Bankers Asso- 
ciation as member from Virginia, and he again 
held a seat on the council in 1952. He was a mem- 
ber of the executive committee, trust division, 
from 1949 to 1952, and was vice president of the 
Virginia branch of the national association from 
1950 to 1952. He is now serving on the Economic 
Policy Commission of the American Bankers As- 
sociation, his term being 1956-1959. 

Mr. Alfriend serves on the board of visitors of 
Virginia Military Institute, and on the board of 
advisors of the College of William and Mary in 
Norfolk. From 1942 to 1946, he was chairman of 
Virginia Region r, War Finance Corporation; and 
he was president of the Norfolk Community Chest 



in 1947-1948. In 1946 he received the King's Medal 
for Service in the Cause of Freedom and is an 
honorary member of the Guild of Macebearers, 
England. An Episcopalian, Mr. Alfriend is Senior 
Warden of the Church of the Good Shepherd. He 
was chairman of the restoration fund for Emanuel 
Protestant Episcopal Church and he has served 
for many years as president of the trustees of the 
funds of the Protestant Episcopal Church, Diocese 
of Southern Virginia. Mr. Alfriend serves on the 
Board of the Norfolk General Hospital. A member 
of the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce, he has 
served as its president; and he is a member of 
the Norfolk Chapter of the Sons of the American 
Revolution, Order of First Families of Virginia 
1607-1620, the Virginia Club, German Club, Nor- 
folk Yacht and Country Club. Princess Anne 
Country Club. In Richmond, he belongs to the 
Commonwealth Club and he is a member of the 
Farmington Club at Charlottesville. 

A veteran of World War I, Mr. Alfriend served 
with the 81st Company, Sixth Machine Gun Bat- 
talion, United States Marine Corps in France. 
Wounded in action on November 2, 1918, he re- 
ceive the Purple Heart. 

On June 17, 1922, John Samuel Alfriend mar- 
ried Harriet Lucille Sanderlin, and they are the 
parents of the following children: 1. Anne Boiling 
(Mrs. John M. Abhitt, Jr.). 2. Susan Bland. The 
Alfriend residence is at 142(1 Runny mede Road, 
Norfolk. 



ROBERT FREDERICK BALDWIN, JR.— 

The full three and a half decades of Robert F. 
Baldwin's business career has been identified with 
the Norfolk real estate and insurance firm of 
Baldwin Brothers — now Baldwin Brothers and 
Taylor, Inc. — of which he is the president. He 
is widely known as a legislator, who for the past 
ten years has been state senator in the General 
Assembly of Virginia. 

Born at Norfolk on January 22, 1900, he is a 
son of Robert Frederick and Elizabeth (Boykin) 
Baldwin. His father, who devoted his career to 
the real estate and insurance business, was one 
of the founders of the original firm of Baldwin 
Brothers, of which an uncle of Senator Baldwin 
was a co-founder. The younger Robert F. Baldwin 
received his early education in St. George's Ele- 
mentary School in Norfolk, later attended Norfolk 
Academy, and graduated from Maury High School 



I.OWl'R 111)1 \\ All R VIRGINIA 



in the same city in June 1916. lit then entered 
the University of Virginia. There his studies were 
interrupted by hi> induction into the army in 
Octobei 1918. He attended the Coast Artillery 
Officers Training School at Fort Monroe, Vir- 
ginia, as a candidate with the rank of private, and 
was honorabl) discharged from the service in 
December 1918. He then resumed his studies at 
the University of Virginia, where he received his 
of Bachelor of Arts in June 1919. During 
the scholastic year 1919-1920, he studied law there. 

On leaving the university, lie immediately be 
came associated with the real estate and insurance 
In in ni Baldwin Brothers, which had been founded 
l>\ his lather and uncle in 1896. He has been with 
ihi- organization ever since, through its change 
ol style to Baldwin Brothers and Taylor, Inc., 
which took place in 1935. He has been president 
since 1940. The agency has its headquarters at 
116 Brooke Avenue, Norfolk. 

In November 1937, Mr. Baldwin was elected a 
member of the House of Delegates of the Virginia 
General Assembly, took his seat in 1938, and serv- 
ed five terms through 1947. He was elected a 
member of the Senate in the General Assembly 
of Virginia in November 1947, and has served 
continuously in the Senate since that time. His 
present term expires December 31, 1959. 

Mr. Baldwin is a member of Delta Psi national 
fraternity, The Raven Society of the University 
of Virginia, and Phi Beta Kappa national scho- 
lastic honor society. He also belongs to the lodge 
of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 
In his home city of Norfolk he is a member ot the 
Norfolk Yacht and Country Club and the Virginia 
Club, and out-of-town memberships include Prin- 
cess Anne Country Club of Virginia Beach, the 
Commonwealth Club of Richmond, and Farniing- 
ton Country Club of Charlottesville. Mr. Baldwin 
and his family attend Christ and St. Luke's Pro- 
testant Episcopal Church in Norfolk. 

On June 4, 1938, in Norfolk, Robert Frederick 
Baldwin, Jr., married Myra Skinner Carr, daugh- 
ter of Charles Stuart and Pattie (Skinner) Carr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin make their home at [328 
Graydon Avenue, Norfolk, and they are the par- 
ents of two children: 1. Robert Frederick, 3rd, 
who was born in Norfolk on July 19, 1940. 2. 
Myra Stuart, born in that city on December 14, 
[942. 



MARSHALL WINGFIELD BUTT has had a 

lifelong interest in the history of the region in 
which he and his paternal ancestors, for nine gen- 
erations, were born. Much of his life has been 
devoted to research and the preservation of that 
history. 

A native of Portsmouth, he was born on June 



_■<>, i8i>ti, son of James William Sumner and Maude 
Murray (Marshall I Butt. His lather was a drug- 
gist, the proprietor of two pharmacies in Ports- 
mouth, one located at 518 Middle Street, the 
other at 234 High Street. He was a son of Holt 
Fairfield Butt, M. I)., who had served as a surgeon 
in the Confederate States Army; and a grandson 
oi Robed Bruce Butt, M. D., who had served 
as surgeon in the Virginia Militia during the War 
of icSu. Both the Doctors Butt were well-known 
I 'ortsmouth physicians. 

Receiving his early education in the public and 
private schools of Portsmouth, Marshall W. Butt 
completed his studies at Norfolk Academy. He 
began his business career as an assistant to the 
city engineer of Portsmouth, and this was inter- 
rupted a short time afterwards when he was first 
called to active military duty in 1916. As a mem- 
ber of the Norfolk Light Artillery Blues, Virginia 
.National Guard, he was ordered for duty in fed- 
eral service on the Mexican border. Only a few 
weeks after lie had returned home, the United 
States entered World War I, and he re-entered 
service as first sergeant of Grimes' Battery of 
Portsmouth. Arriving in France, he attended and 
graduated from Artillery School at the old French 
Cavalry School, Saumur, where he was commis- 
sioned a second lieutenant. He was assigned to 
duty with the 102nd Field Artillery, a component 
of the 26th Division, and participated in the Meuse- 
Argonne offensive. 

After the war, Mr. Butt was employed by the 
United States Shipping Board in Norfolk, Wash- 
ington, and New Orleans. Resigning in 1925, he 
established his own real estate business at Nor- 
folk and Virginia Beach, and this he operated 
successfully until the economic depression, when 
circumstances forced him to dissolve the firm. He 
re-entered the shipping business in 1941, with the 
Old Dominion Steamship Company; and in 1947 
entered federal civil service as an engineer in the 
design division at the Naval Shipyard in Ports- 
mouth. 

As a result of his lifetime avocational interest 
in the fields of historical research and library 
science, he was named to organize and establish 
the shipyard's technical library and the Shipyard 
Museum, both of which he now heads in the 
capacity of librarian and curator. 

Mr. Butt served as chairman of the Portsmouth 
Selective Service Board from 1940 to 1955. From 
1943 to 1950, he was chairman of the Portsmouth 
War History Committee. He served as vice chair- 
man of the Portsmouth Bicentennial Committee 
in 1952; and during 1956-1957, held the post of 
vice chairman of the Portsmouth-Jamestown Fes- 
tival Committee. 

Mr. Butt is the author of various papers on 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



3 



Virginia and local history, on naval history, or 
on library economics, which have been published 
as monographs or have appeared in periodicals. 
He is currently serving as president of the Ports- 
mouth Historical Association, and is a member 
of the Virginia Historical Society, the Associa- 
tion for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities, 
the Sons of the American Revolution, Church 
Historical Society, Naval Historical Foundation, 
American Association for State and Local History, 
Company of Military Collectors and Historians, 
Southeastern Museums Association and Special 
Libraries Association. 

In connection with his home city, he is active 
in the Portsmouth Chamber of Commerce, and 
is vice president of the Portsmouth Assembly. A 
life-loiiLv member of Trinity Protestant Episcopal 
Church, he has served as a vestryman and senior 
warden there. He is now historiographer of the 
Diocese of Southern Virginia. 

At Trinity Protestant Episcopal Church, on 
November 26, 1919, Marshall Wingfield Butt mar- 
ried Elsie Brooke Bagby, daughter of Richard 
Hugh and Ella Brooke (Cauthornc) Bagby. Mr. 
and Mrs. Butt have two children: I. Brooke Mar- 
shall, who was born on April 2, 1921. She is the 
wife of Edward S. Maupin, and the mother of 
one son: Edward Samuel Maupin, Jr. 2. Marshall 
Wingfield, Jr., who is a captain in the United 
States Army. He was born on May 29, 1925. Mar- 
ried to the former Miss Glenna Joyce Quinn, he 
has three children: i. Marshall Wingfield, 3rd. 
ii. Thomas Frederick, iii. Elizabeth Cameron. 

Mr. Butt's address is 214 Glasgow Street, Ports- 
mouth. 



WILLIAM RUFFIN COLEMAN COCKE— 

As a member of the Norfolk firm of Williams, 
Cocke, Worrell and Kelly, William R. C. Cocke 
devotes his attention particularly to those aspects 
of the law dealing with corporate and railroad 
practice. He served in a recent year as president 
of the Norfolk and Portsmouth Bar Association, 
and he is prominent in civic as well as profes- 
sional affairs. 

Born at Montgomery, Alabama, on December 
31, 1884, he is a son of William Ruffin Coleman. 
Sr., and Clara Vernon (Pollard) Cocke. Complet- 
ing his preparatory studies at Episcopal High 
School, where he was a student from T898 to 
1901, he entered Virginia Military Institute, and 
later transferred to the University of Virginia, 
where he completed both his advanced academic 
and his legal courses, finishing in 1909. He was 
admitted to the bar of the state of Virginia in 
that year, to the state of Washington bar the 
following year, and to the Alabama bar in 1913. 
Mr. Cocke began his practice in the Pacific 



Northwest, following his profession at Seattle from 
1909 to 1913. In the latter year he returned to his 
native Alabama, and practiced at Birmingham 
until 1929. There he was a member of the firm of 
Johnston and Cocke, which later became Cabaniss, 
Johnston, Cocke, and Cabaniss, representing rail- 
roads and other utilities and industrial firms. He 
was general counsel for the Seaboard Air Line 
Railway Company at Norfolk during 1929-1930, 
and in the latter year became counsel for its re- 
ceivers. He became general counsel of the re- 
organized Seaboard Air Line Railroad in 1946 
and remained in that position until August 1947, 
when he resigned to re-enter general practice as 
a member of the firm of Williams, Cocke, and 
Tunstall. Offices are in the Citizens Bank Build- 
ing. While conducting a general practice, the 
partners concentrate primarily on corporate rail- 
road and insurance law. After resigning Mr. Cocke 
acted as special counsel for Seaboard Air Line Rail- 
road Company, until January 1, 1954. The firm is 
counsel for the Virginia Electric and Power Com- 
pany, Virginian Railway Company, and Virginia 
Transit Company, and are local attorneys for a 
large number of insurance corporations, for Nor- 
folk and Western Railroad Company, Southern 
Railway Company, Chesapeake and Ohio Rail- 
road Company, for Chesapeake and Potomac Tele- 
phone Company, S. S. Kresge Company, South- 
ern Dairies, Ford Motor Company, and various 
other industrials. Mr. Cocke's partners are Leigh 
D. Williams, Lawson Worrell, Jr., Joseph L. Kelly, 
Jr., Jack E. Greer, and Thomas R. McNamara. 

A member of the Norfolk and the Portsmouth 
bar associations, Mr. Cocke was president of the 
latter group in 1954. He is also a member of the 
Virginia State Bar Association and the American 
Bar Association, the American Law Institute, 
and Phi Delta Phi legal fraternity. His social 
fraternity is Kappa Alpha, and he is a member of 
the Princess Anne Country Club and the Virginia 
Club. In his politics he is a Democrat. 

On October 7, 1909, William R. C. Cocke mar- 
ried Alice Watts DuBose, and they became the 
parents of the following children: 1. William Ruf- 
fin Coleman. 2. Breckinridge DuBose, who is de- 
ceased. 3. Dudley DuBose, and 4. Alice Barraud, 
twins. Alice is married to Edward Howard Good- 
win. Mr. and Mrs. Cocke live at 914 Graydon 
Avenue, Norfolk. 



JOHN DAVIS HATCH, JR.— Currently serv- 
ing as the director of the Norfolk Museum of 
Arts and Sciences, John Davis Hatch, Jr., brings 
to his task sound scientific training, and experi- 
ence as curator at several other locations, both 
in the East and the West. He is also the author 
of several studies on art and historical subjects. 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



Born at Oakland, California, on June 14, 1907, 
he is a son of the late John Davis, Sr., and Gethel 
(Gregg) Hatch. He completed his public school 
education in the state of his birth, and from 1926 
to 1928 was a student at the University of Cali- 
fornia. He later took graduate courses in Oriental 
studies at Harvard. Near East studies at Prince- 
ton, and in 1939-1940, American studies at Yale 
University. 

Mr. Hatch began his career as a landscape 
architect at Santa Barbara, California, in 1925, and 
continued in the same profession at Seattle in 1928. 
Later the same year he became executive secretary 
of the Seattle Art Museum, and he served as its 
director from 1929 to 1931. During 1930-1931, he 
was vice president of the Western Association of 
Art Museums. During the decade from 1930, he 
1940, Mr. Hatch prepared himself for his career 
by studying at a number of art museums both in 
this country and abroad. Meantime, he continued 
to acquire practical experience, serving from 1933 
to 1935 as assistant director of the Isabella Ste- 
wart Gardner Museum in Boston. From 1935 to 
1937, he surveyed traveling exhibits for the Car- 
negie Corporation. He was a founder of the South- 
ern Negro Colleges' co-operative exhibit group in 
193(1. and served as an adviser until 1941. Mr. 
Hatch was a founder of the American Artists 
Depository in 1938. He was appointed to the 
Commission on American Art Studies in 1941. 
From that year until 1948 he was active in various 
fund campaigns. 

In 1950 Mr. Hatch came to Norfolk and assumed 
his duties as director of the Norfolk Museum of 
Arts and Sciences. He established the American 
Drawing Annual in 1940, and has worked on the 
compilation of several works including "Historic 
Church Silver in the Southern Diocese of Vir- 
ginia" (1952); and "Historic Survey of Painting 
in Canada." He was the editor of "Parnassus" 
(1937-1939); "Early American Industries Chroni- 
cle" (1942-1949); and "Albany County (N.Y.) His- 
torical Association Record" (1941-1948). He is a 
member of the American Association of Museums. 

Mr. Hatch serves as trustee of Phelps-Stokes 
Corporation, and of the Nevada Company. He is 
a member of the Virginia Club of Norfolk and the 
Grolier Club of New York, and is a former vestry- 
man of St. Paul's Episcopal Church. 

On October 14, 1939, John Davis Hatch, Jr., 
married Olivia Phelps Stokes, and they are the 
parents of the following children: 1. John Davis, 
3rd. 2. Daniel Lindley. 3. James Stokes. 4. Sarah 
Stokes. The family lives at 700 Raleigh Avenue, 
Norfolk. 



JOHN LONSDALE ROPER, 2nd— As presi- 
dent and general manager of the Norfolk Ship- 



building and Dry Dock Corporation, John Lons- 
dale Roper, 2nd, heads an important industrial firm 
which bis father founded in 1916. He has had 
ample experience in its various supervisory and 
managerial positions, and has also found time for 
a constructive role in community affairs. 

Born at Norfolk on September 18, 1902, he is 
a son of George Wisham and Isabelle Place (Hay- 
ward) Roper. His father, who died at Norfolk on 
January 6, 1946, was vice president and general 
manager of the John L. Roper Lumber Company 
prior to 1916, when he organized the Norfolk Ship- 
building and Dry Dock Corporation. He served as 
its president until 1944. Beginning his education in 
his native city, John L. Roper, 2nd, attended Norfolk 
Academy and completed his secondary studies at 
Hill School in Pennsylvania. He then entered 
Princeton University, where he was a student until 
1921, majoring in engineering. He began his busi- 
ness career with the Southern Supply Company, 
on Water Street in Norfolk, and continued with 
that organization for three years. 

Since January 1, 1925, he has been identified with 
the Norfolk Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corpora- 
tion. Initially he served as an apprentice in the 
various phases of operations, and thus gained a 
solid groundwork useful to him in the more re- 
sponsible positions to which he rapidly advanced. 
He was elected vice president of the corporation 
in 1944, and became assistant general manager two 
years later, continuing in the vice presidency. In 
1955 he was promoted to executive vice president 
and treasurer, retaining the duties of assistant gen- 
eral manager. On July 1, 1956, he was elected 
president and general manager, thus filling the of- 
fice held by his father from 1916 to 1944. His im- 
mediate predecessor in office, the second man to 
head the corporation, was Crawford S. Rogers, 
who died on June 4, 1956, after holding the dual 
office since 1944. As president and general manager 
of one of Tidewater Virginia's largest industrial 
organizations, John L. Roper, 2nd, directs opera- 
tions of the company's three completely equipped 
ship repair and construction plants located on the 
southern and eastern branches of the Elizabeth 
River in Norfolk Harbor. 

Aside from his responsibilities in his own firm. 
Mr. Roper has through the years engaged in many 
civic and organizational affairs. He has long been 
active on behalf of the Norfolk Community Chest, 
serving as its president and campaign chairman in 
recent years. He serves on the boards of a number 
of civic and social organizations. He is a member 
and past president of the Virginia Club. He is one 
of five commissioners administering the multi-mil- 
lion-dollar program of the Norfolk Redevelopment 
and Housing Authority. He and his family attend 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



Christ and St. Luke's Episcopal Church. When 
time allows, he enjoys his favorite outdoor sports, 
golf, tennis, hunting and fishing. 

On April 7, 1916, John L. Roper, and, married 
Sarah Dryfoos of Hazelton, Pennsylvania, daugh- 
ter of Henry and Grace (Fogel) Dryfoos. They are 
the parents of three children: I. John Lonsdale. 
3rd, who was born on January 19, 1027. A graduate 
of the University of Virginia, with the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering, 
and a postgraduate degree in naval architecture and 
marine engineering from the Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology. He is now assistant to the 
general superintendent at Norfolk Shipbuilding and 
Dry Dock Corporation and holds office as assistant 
secretary. He married Jane Preston of Tazewell, 
and they have two children: John L., 4th, and 
Susan St. Clair. 2. George W., 2nd, born January 25, 
1928. He attended the University of Virginia for 
two years, majoring in electrical engineering, and 
like his older brother, is a graduate of the recog- 
nized apprentice school of the Norfolk Shipbuilding 
and Dry Dock Corporation. He is now assistant 
to the superintendent of its Norfolk plant. He mar- 
ried Jeanne Freeman of Norfolk 3. Isabel Fogel, 
born February 11, 1929. She attended Garrison- 
Williams School, Miss Turbull's School, and Old- 
field's School at Glencoe, Maryland. She is mar- 
ried to O. Ramon Yates of Norfolk, who is the 
manager of the Ashcraft-Wilkinson Company of 
Atlanta. The couple are the parents of three chil- 
dren: i. Maida Yates, ii. Anne Lonsdale Yates, iii. 
Isabel Roper Yates. Mr. and Mrs. John L. Roper, 
2nd, make their home at 1336 West Princess Anne 
Road, Norfolk. 



DONALD WOODS SHRIVER— Beginning his 
career in the practice of law in Norfolk, Donald 
Woods Shriver has since acquitted himself well 
in several positions of public trust, and he is now 
executive manager of the Norfolk Chamber of 
Commerce. He is active in Masonic and fraternal 
groups. 

Born in Baltimore, Maryland, on May 19, 1901, 
he is a son of Alfred, Jr., and Ida (Causey) 
Shriver. His father was district superintendent of 
The Pullman Company at Norfolk until his re- 
tirement in 1935. Both parents are now deceased. 
Donald W. Shriver spent most of his boyhood 
years in Norfolk and completed his secondary 
studies at Maury High School, where he gradu- 
ated in June 1918. Between 1919 and 1924 he at- 
tended the University of Virginia, spending two 
years in the liberal arts college and three years in 
law school. He graduated in 1924 with the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws. Admitted to the bar of his 
state, Mr. Shriver began his practice of law in 



Norfolk, and this professional pursuit remained 
his chief concern for a decade. 

Although he has never sought nor accepted can- 
didacy for public office, he held a succession of 
responsible appointive posts between the mid-i930s 
and the early 1950s. In 1934 he became collector 
of delinquent taxes for the city of Norfolk and 
held this position through 1941. With 1942 he began 
duties as first assistant city attorney and served 
until 1947, when he became real estate tax as- 
sessor for the city of Norfolk. 

Mr. Shriver left the tax assessor's post in 1951 
to assume his present duties as executive manager 
of the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce. His office 
is at 269 Boush Street. 

His fraternities are Phi Alpha Delta (law), 
Delta Sigma Rho (debating), and the Raven So- 
ciety, which he joined while at the LTniversity of 
Virginia. He is a member of Ruth Lodge No. 89, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; United Chap- 
ter of the Royal Arch Masons at Norfolk; and 
Grice Commandery No. 16, Knights Templar. He 
is also a member of the Virginia Club at Norfolk. 
He attends the Methodist Church. 

On October 28, 1924, in Norfolk, Donald Woods 
Shriver married Gladys Whitehead Roberts, daugh- 
ter of James and Lillie (Whitehead) Roberts. 
Mr. and Mrs. Shriver live at 517 Oak Grove Road 
and are the parents of two children: 1. Donald 
Woods, Jr., born December 20, 1927. 2. Jane Rob- 
erts, born on February 2, 1933. 



CLAUDE VERNON SPRATLEY— A lawyer 
who has devoted most of his career to public of- 
fice, Claude Vernon Spratley has served on the 
bench since 1936 as associate justice of the 
Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals. He is a resi- 
dent of Hampton. 

Born at Surry on July 16, 1882, he is a son of 
Peter Thomas and Fannie Howard (Sclater) Sprat- 
ley. After completing his public school education. 
Judge Spratley went on to advanced studies at 
the College of William and Mary, where he gradu- 
ated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts at the 
exceptional age of nineteen years, in 1901. In 1938 
the same college conferred on him the honorary 
degree of Doctor of Laws. Judge Spratley took 
his professional studies at the Lmiversity of Vir- 
ginia, where he received his degree of Bachelor 
of Laws in 1906. Admitted to the bar of the state 
of Virginia in that year, he began practice at 
Hampton, and was chosen city attorney there in 
1912, serving until 1923. 

His first experience on the bench came with 
his selection for the post of circuit judge, which 
he held from 1923 to 1936. In the latter year he 
became associate justice of the Virginia Supreme 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



Court of Appeals, and has served on the bench 
of that highest of state courts since. 

He is chairman of the board of Citizen's Na- 
tional Bank in his home city; and besides local 
and national bar associations, holds membership 
in Phi Delta Phi legal fraternity, Pi Kappa Alpha. 
and Phi Beta Kappa and the Raven Society of 
the University of Virginia. He is a member of the 
lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons and the 
higher bodies of the order, including the Ancient 
Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He 
is also a member of the Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks. Judge Spratley is a member 
of the Commonwealth Club of Richmond. He at- 
tends the Episcopal Church, and is a Democrat in 
his politics. 

On October 27, 1909, Claude Vernon Spratley 
married Eleshea Annie Woodward, and they be- 
came the parents of the following children: 1. Ka- 
therine Woodward, who is now Mrs. William 
Franklin Metts. 2. Anne Fletcher, who married 
Col. John F. B. Dice, of the U. S. A. F. 3. Claude 
Vernon, Jr., who married Frances Parker. 



LEWIS WARRINGTON WEBB, JR.— Since 

the beginning of his career as educator, Lewis 
Warrington Webb, Jr., has been identified with 
the Norfolk Division of the College of William 
and Mary. He is now professor of physics and 
Provost of the college, and he has a full and active 
schedule of organizational activities. 

Born at Norfolk on March 1, 1910, Mr. Webb is 
a son of Lewis Warrington, Sr., and Eleanor 
(Kelley) Webb. His father was a master electri- 
cian, who devoted much of his career to industrial 
work at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard. After com- 
pleting his studies in local public schools, the 
younger Lewis W. Webb enrolled at Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute. He graduated there in 1931 
witli the degree of Bachelor of Science in Elec- 
trical Engineering, and went on to advanced 
studies there, leading to the degree of Master of 
Science in Electrical Engineering the following 
year. 

It was at that time, in 1932, that Mr. Webb 
joined the faculty of the Norfolk Division, College 
of William and Mary, as instructor in physics and 
mathematics. Teaching these subjects remained 
his major interest for a decade, and in 1942 he 
became assistant director of the college. From 
1940 to 1946, he was in charge of directing the 
war training program there. In 1945 he assumed 
his present duties as professor of physics; and 
he was named director of the college in July 1946. 
In July 1957 he was named Provost of the college. 
Mr. Webb is active in professional organizations 
and learned societies, and has held positions of 



leadership in several of them. A member of the 
Virginia Academy of Science, he is past chair- 
man of its Physics Section, and he is also a mem- 
ber of the Society of American Military Engi- 
neers, the Virginia Society of Professional Engi- 
neers and Tau Beta Pi, a nationwide engineering 
and research organization. He serves on the board 
of directors of the Norfolk Chamber of Com- 
merce, and is a member and past president of the 
Engineers Club of Hampton Roads. As a Rota- 
rian, he has served as sergeant-at-arms, secretary, 
and first vice president of his local club, and is now 
president. He is a member of the Hampton Roads 
Sales Executives Club, which chose him its Sales- 
man of the Year in 1956. He is also a member of 
the Virginia Club and the Norfolk Yacht and 
Country Club. The Catholic Club at Norfolk se- 
lected him for their Brotherhood Award in 1958. 

Mr. Webb and his family attend the First Pres- 
byterian Church of Norfolk. He serves the con- 
gregation as superintendent of the Sunday school, 
and as a member of the board of deacons. 

At Portsmouth, on January 26, 1935, Lewis 
W T arrington Webb, Jr., married Virginia Faunt- 
leroy Rice, daughter of George Baynham and 
Esther (Carney) Rice. Mr. and Mrs. Webb are 
the parents of two children: I. George Randolph, 
born February 25, 1938. 2. Mary Lewis, born 
November 27, 1944. 



LOUISA CARRINGTON (VENABLE) KYLE 
(Mrs. William Emmett Kyle) — One of the Lower 
Tidewater's distinguished writers, Louisa Carring- 
ton (Yenable) Kyle (Mrs. William Emmett Kyle) 
is well known as a contributor to newspapers and 
magazines, both those of her native region and 
those of nationwide circulation. She is also active 
in civic, patriotic and cultural groups. 

Born Louisa Carrington Yenable in Norfolk, on 
August 11, 1903, she is the daughter of William 
Henry and Elizabeth Berkley (Wight) Venable. 
She began her education at St. George's Private 
School in Norfolk, and later attended Boush 
Street Public Elementary School and Maury High 
School in the same city. For her advanced studies, 
she went on to Mary Baldwin Seminary, now 
Mary Baldwin College, at Staunton, and later 
transferred to Lasell Seminary, now a junior 
college, at Auburndale, Massachusetts, of which 
she is a graduate. 

At St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Norfolk, on 
June 28, 1924, Miss Venable became the wife of 
William Emmett Kyle. He is a native of Norfolk, 
and the son of Edwin Dewess and Anne Wingate 
(Haigh) Kyle. A lawyer by profession, he has 
filled with distinction the offices of referee in bank- 
ruptcy for the federal district court. Mrs. Kyle 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



has been close to the practice of law since her 
earliest years, for her father, William Henry 
Venable, was for more than fifty years a distin- 
guished member of the Norfolk Bar. He had a 
considerable reputation as a trial attorney, and 
handled many important pieces of litigation. He 
was also prominent in civic affairs. The writer's 
husband has a record of professional and public 
service no less distinguished. Mr. and Mrs. Kyle 
are the parents of three daughters: I. Louisa 
Venable, who was born on April 24, 1925. She is 
the wife of Samuel Devereaux Hathaway of Sum- 
mit, New Jersey, and they have three children, 
surnamed Hathaway: i. Samuel D., Jr. ii. William 
Kmmett Kyle. iii. Katheryn Taylor. 2. Elizabeth 
Kyle, born January 30, 1928. She is now the wife 
of Dr. William Cooke Andrews of Norfolk. They 
^re the parents of three children: i. Elizabeth 
Randolph, ii. William Cooke, Jr. iii. Susan Car- 
rington. 3. Anne Wingate, born on June 12, 1932. 
She married Charles Ferrell Moore, Jr., of Nor- 
folk, and they have one child: i. Charles Ferrell, 
3rd. 

Mrs. Kyle emphasizes that in her career scheme, 
she has been a wife, mother and homemaker first, 
and writer second. But in the past several years 
she has achieved considerable prominence in this 
second calling, working as a freelance since the 
early 1950s. Since February 1953 she has con- 
ducted a column, "A Country Woman's Scrap- 
book," appearing weekly in the Norfolk "Vir- 
ginian Pilot," and is also a feature writer for that 
paper. She has contributed to "Commonwealth 
Magazine," "Nature Magazine," "Norfolk," the 
official publication of the city's Chamber of Com- 
merce, and "Norfolk and Western Magazine." She 
has also contributed to the Travel and Garden 
Sections of "The New York Times," and to 
"Garden Gossip," a magazine published by the 
Garden Club of Virginia. 

Her memberships include the Poetry Society 
of Virginia, Norfolk Society of Arts, Association 
for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities, and 
the Virginia Historical Society. She is also a 
member of the National Society of Colonial Dames 
of America, is a charter member of the Norfolk 
Junior League, and is active in Girl Scouts, Inc. 
She belongs to the Garden Club of Virginia, Vir- 
ginia Beach Garden Club, and the Monday Club 
of Norfolk. She and Mr. Kyle attend Eastern 
Shore Chapel, an Episcopal Church at London 
Bridge, and they make their home in that com- 
munity, at Alanton on Linkhorn Bay. 



C. LYDON HARRELL, JR.— An attorney at 
law who has practiced at Norfolk since his return 
from naval service in World War II, C. Lydon 



Harrell, Jr., has his offices in the Kresge Building 
at 236 Granby Street. He is serving as special jus- 
tice of Princess Anne County, and is active in 
many organizations including bar groups. 

Born at Norfolk on October 22, 1916, the lawyer 
is a son of Charles Lydon Harrell, Sr., and Ethel 
Theresa (Toone) Harrell. His father, a native of 
Sunbury, North Carolina, holds the degree of Doc- 
tor of Medicine, and has practiced in Norfolk since 
the beginning of his career. Now seventy-three 
years of age, he is serving the Red Cross blood 
bank in professional capacity. He took his degree 
at the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond. 
Dr. Harrell's first wife, the former Ethel Theresa 
Toone, a native of Richmond, died in February 
1926, at the age of thirty-five. Dr. Harrell married 
second, on June 8, 1927, Miss Lela Wilson, and 
they became the parents of one son, Samuel Wil- 
son Harrell, born October 2, 1928. He is a sales- 
man with Berkley Feed Corporation. Besides C. 
Lydon Harrell, Jr., two children were born of 
Dr. Harrell's first marriage. They are Edward 
Everett, born August 16, 1914, and Gordon Flet- 
cher, born March 16, 1919. The latter follows his 
father's profession. Graduating from Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia, he has practiced in Norfolk since 
1949. 

Reared and educated in that city, C. Lydon Har- 
rell, Jr., graduated from Maury High School in 
June 1934, then entered Randolph-Macon College 
at Ashland, where he received his degree of Bache- 
lor of Arts in 1938. Mr. Harrell next began his 
professional courses at T. C. Williams Law School, 
and there graduated with the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws in June 1941. He had passed his bar ex- 
amination, entitling him to practice law in the state 
of Virginia, in December 1940. War-time service in 
the United States Navy, however, deferred his 
commencing practice, since he went on active duty 
on July 28, 1941, about a month after he had gradu- 
ated from law school. Commissioned an ensign, 
he served in the Atlantic, the Pacific and the Medi- 
terranean. He won steady promotions in grade, and 
at the time he was separated from active service 
on May 1, 1947, he held the rank of lieutenant com- 
mander. He was promoted to the rank of com- 
mander on January I, 1953. He remains active in 
the Naval Reserve program, and is commanding 
officer of his Naval Reserve Division. 

At the time he began practice in his own name 
in the city of Norfolk, Mr. Harrell had had three 
months' experience working in a law office. He 
established his own firm in March 1947, and has 
since continued independently. In 1950, he was ap- 
pointed as Commissioner in Chancery for the Cir- 
cuit Court of Princess Anne County, and in 1955 
for the Court of Law and Chancery of the City of 



8 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



Norfolk, both of which offices he now occupies. 

In [952, Mr. Harrell became special justice of 
Princess Anne County, and serves in that office at 
the present time. He is a member of the Norfolk- 
Portsmouth Bar Association, the Virginia State 
Bar and Virginia State Bar Association, and the 
American Bar Association. As a veteran of World 
War II, he was one of the founders of the James 
Spalding Whitehurst Post of the Veterans of For- 
eign Wars, and is a past commander of that post. 
He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, and 
was for a lime the legal adviser for the Junior 
Chamber of Commerce. Active in the program of 
the Boy Scouts of America, lie is chairman of the 
Sea Scout Troop Committee at his church. 

Mr. Harrell is a Kiwanian, and a member of 
Owens Lodge No. 164, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, of which he is a past master. He is also 
a member of Norfolk United Chapter Xo. 1 of 
the Royal Arch Masons of which he is an officer; 
Grice Commandery of the Knights Templar; and, 
as a member of the higher bodies of the York Rite, 
also belongs to Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is active 
in fraternities, being a member of Phi Kappa Sig- 
ma, Omicron Delta Kappa and Tau Kappa Alpha, 
as well as Phi Beta Kappa national scholastic honor 
society. He is also a member of the McNeil Law 
Society of Richmond. 

Attending the Methodist Church, Mr. Harrell 
serves on its official board. He is interested in wel- 
fare work, and serves on the board of the local 
organization to combat tuberculosis. His sons are 
eligible for membership in the Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, as one of their forebears was a 
general in the Revolutionary War. The lawyer's 
favorite outdoor sports are spear fishing and base- 
ball. 

On February 5, 1943, C. Lydon Harrell, Jr., 
married Martha deWeese Guild, daughter of Harry 
Hickman Guild and Florence Ruth (deWeese) 
Guild. Her father spent much of his life in Oregon, 
and died during World War II. Her mother died 
when Mrs. Harrell was eighteen months old. Mrs. 
Harrell serves on the board of the local Parent- 
Teacher Association and is eligible for member- 
ship in the Daughters of the American Revolution. 
The couple make their home at 912 Westover Ave- 
nue. They are the parents of four children: I. 
C. Lydon, 3rd, who was born on January 20, 1945. 
2. John Morgan, born August 4, 1946. 3. Marshall 
Guild, born March 10, 1949. 4. deWeese Toone, 
born August 22, 1950. 



CAPTAIN GEORGE ALVIN MASSENBURG 

is now serving his fourteenth year as president of 



the Virginia Pilot Association, which has existed 
for just a decade short of a century, and which has 
been responsible for the safe passage of billions of 
dollars' worth of cargo through the territorial wa- 
ters of the commonwealth. He is a veteran of 
long service with this organization, and has al- 1 
been active in public affairs, distinguishing himself 
in a number of elective offices. 

Born at Hampton on September 19, 1894, he is 
a son of Virginius M. and Virginia (Satchell Mas- 
senburg. He received his education in the pubhc 
schools of Hampton, and began his career with 
the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock 
Company, by which he was employed from 1909 
to 1912. On October 1, 1912, he was appointed as 
apprentice in the Virginia Pilot Association; and 
completing his apprenticeship October 1, 1917. re- 
ceived his Master's license and First Class Pilot 
license. He has been with the organization eve" 
since, was elected its president in 1943, and still 
holds that office. 

Captain Massenburg's role in public affairs be- 
gan over thirty years ago. He was first elected to 
the General Assembly of Virginia in 1925, represent- 
ing Elizabeth City County and the City of Hamp- 
ton, and served continuously until 1950. While a 
member of the House of Delegates, he served on 
many important committees, including Appropria- 
tions, Chesapeake and its Tributaries, Moral and 
Social Welfare, the Privilege and Elections, and the 
Rules Committee, of which he was chairman. He 
was also a member of the Virginia Advisory Legis- 
lative Council, and the Governor's Advisory Com- 
mittee on the Budget. He was floor leader of the 
House of Delegates from 1936 to 1947, and was 
elected speaker for the 1947 and 1948 terms. 

Appointed to the State Port Authority in 1942. 
Captain Massenburg served until 1948, when the 
Division of Ports w'as created under the Conserva- 
tion Commission. He was then appointed a mem- 
ber of the Conservation and Development Com- 
mission on which he is still serving. In August 
1945, he was appointed to the Board of Visitors 
of Virginia Military Institute. In 1945, Governor 
Darden appointed him a member of his staff, and 
he has been reappointed by Governors Tuck, Battle 
and Stanley. He was chairman of the Democratic 
Party of Virginia from 1948 to 1952, when he 
resigned in order to devote more time to his busi- 
ness interests. 

During his many years of public service, Captain 
Massenburg has always stood for economy in gov- 
ernment, and played an active part in the reorgan- 
ization of his state's government, under the Hon. 
Harry F. Byrd. He supported other amendments 
proposed in 1948 under the Hon. William M. Tuck. 
He has been most active in the development of 



LOWKR TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



the Port of Hampton Roads and otlier Virginia 
posts, and, during his legislative term, assisted in 
the passage of many important hills for the im- 
provement of transportation facilities in Virginia. 
He also played an important role in securing the 
passage of the Bridge and Ferry Act of 1940, and 
later assisted in promoting the York River Bridge, 
the Rappahannock River Bridge and the Elizabeth 
River Tunnel, as well as the tunnel now under 
construction hetween Hampton and Norfolk. He 
was chief patron of the Craney Island Disposal 
Area legislation, as well as of the bill setting up 
the Hampton Roads Sanitation District Commis- 
sion. He has assisted many of the communities of 
Virginia in securing improvements for their rivers 
anil harbors. He has always actively supported the 
Virginia State Ports Authority. 

Captain Massenburg was enrolled in the United 
States Coast Guard Reserve (T) in 194-'. and, in 
June 1943, was elected president of the Virginia 
Riot Association. In September of the same year 
he received the rank of commander. In April 1945, 
lit- was promoted to captain in the United States 
Coast Guard Reserve (T), and in November of 
that year was honorably disenrolled. He served as 
a member of the National Assembly Board, United 
States Coast Guard League, and was the Fifth 
Naval District Representative of the League in 
1945-46. 

He is a member of the Virginia State, the Penin- 
sula, the Norfolk and the Portsmouth Chambers 
of Commerce, and is a director and member of 
the executive committee of the Hampton Roads 
Maritime Association. He is on the executive com 
mittee of the American Pilot Association, which 
he served as vice president for eight years; in 1956 
he was re-elected vice president. He is a director of 
the Tidewater Automobile Association, member of 
the Propeller Club of Norfolk and Newport News, 
past president of the Hampton Rotary Club, and 
a member of the National Rivers and Harbors 
Congress and the Virginia Ports Development 
Committee. 

Captain Massenburg is a member of the Com- 
monwealth Club of Richmond, Princess Anne Golf 
and Country Club, Norfolk Yacht and Country 
Club, and the Virginia Club, and is an honorary 
member of the Virginia Military Institute Alumni 
Association and the Hampton Yacht Club. He is 
a member of St. Tammany Lodge No. 5, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, and of the higher bodies 
of Masonry, including Khedive Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He 
also belongs to the lodges of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks and the Fraternal Order 
of Eagles. 

On October 19, 1918, Captain George Alvin Mas- 



senburg married Miss Carrie Wood of Hampton. 
They became the parents of three children: 1. 
Carrie Wood, born January 1, 1020. She married, 
first. Jack T. Love, who was killed in action while 
serving with the Fifth Army in northern Italy, in 
October 1944. She married, second, Robert H. Lear, 
and they make their home in Hampton. 2. George 
Alvin, Jr., who was born on April 15, [921. An 
ensign in the United States Naval Air Corps, lie 
was missing in action in the Battle of Saipan on 
June 19, 1944. 3. Edgar A., who was born on 
August 15, 19J5. He practices law in Hampton. 
Married to the former Miss Dolores Chenoweth of 
East Orange, New Jersey, he is the father of two 
children: Sharon and Gayle Massenburg. Captain 
Massenburg maintains his offices at the head- 
quarters of the Virginia Pilot Association, 325 
West Freemason Street, and his residence is at 
4605 Victoria Boulevard, Hampton. 



JAMES L. McLEMORE, SR.— One of the 
Lower Tidewater area's most respected and useful 
citizens over many years, the late James L. McLe- 
more, Sr., distinguished himself as lawyer, banker, 
and jurist. Before the turn of the century he lo- 
cated at Suffolk, organized the Bank of Suffolk, and 
later served as judge of the Second Judicial Cir- 
cuit and as a member of the Virginia Special Court 
ot Appeals. F'or more than half a century, he was 
an influential figure in finance and commerce, the 
bar and bench. A local journalist called him a 
"venerable link between the South of the recon- 
struction era and the mid-twentieth century." 

Born near Drewryville, in Southampton Coun- 
ty, on November 18, 1866, he was a son of Ben- 
jamin Franklin and Rosa Ann (Westbrook) Mcl.e- 
more. His father served for twenty years as clerk 
of the court in that county. Judge McLemore 
received his early education in country schools and 
in 1887 moved to the town of Jerusalem, now 
known as Courtland, where he became deputy 
clerk of the court. Meantime, in 1886, he had 
begun studies at Randolph Macon College, and 
in his two years there, he became a member of 
the Franklin Literary Society. He returned to 
Courtland, resumed his work in the office of clerk 
of the court, but in 1889 left again to enter the 
Law School of the University of Virginia. In 
one year he completed the professional courses 
offered at that institution and received his law de- 
gree. As an undergraduate at the university, he 
was a member of the Jefferson Literary Society, 
Sigma Chi fraternity, and the Raven Society, as 
well as Phi Beta Kappa, national scholastic honor 
society. 

During the six years following his admittance 
to the bar, Judge McLemore practiced at Courtland 



10 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



and Franklin. From 1893 to 1895 he was deputy 
court clerk under Judge Joseph B. Prince at the 
county seat of Courtland. He moved his practice 
to Suffolk in 1896. 

It was there that he began his second major 
career interest, banking. In 1899 he joined several 
other prominent local citizens, Thomas H. Bird- 
song (q.v.), A. Woolford, R. Howard, R. A. Pret- 
low, J. A. Pretlow. C. A. Shoop, and W. R. 
Withers, in organizing the Bank of Suffolk. They 
began with a capital of thirty thousand dollars 
and offices in a building on Washington Square. 
Judge McLemore assumed duties as the bank's 
first president and held office until 1951. It is now 
known as the National Bank of Suffolk. The 
change of name took place in 1910, and a new 
bank building was erected in 1917. 

In 1907 James L. McLemore added duties on the 
bench to his already full schedule of service. In 
that year. Governor Claude L. Swanson appointed 
him judge of the circuit court of the Second Judi- 
cial Circuit, which at that time included Norfolk. 
He served on the bench for thirty-three years and 
from 1924 to 1928 was a member of the Virginia 
Special Court of Appeals. Advancing years did not 
diminish his faculties, and in 1942 he assumed new 
managerial duties as executive vice president of 
the National Screen Company in Suffolk, continu- 
ing to serve actively until 1946. 

He served for some years as a member of the 
city council of Suffolk and was a charter member of 
the Rotary Club and an honorary member of the 
Tidewater Wholesale Grocers Association. He was 
a member and past president of the Suffolk Cham- 
ber of Commerce. As lawyer, he was a member 
of the Virginia Bar Association, and he also be- 
longed to the Portsmouth Executives Club. He 
was deeply devoted to the work of his church, the 
Main Street Methodist, and taught a men's Bible 
class there for over thirty-five years. In his honor, 
this group has been named the James L. McLe- 
more Bible Class. Fond of the out-of-doors, he 
had a reputation for skill with the rifle and fishing 
rod. In attesting to his qualities as a jurist, a writer 
reviewing his career in the columns of the Suffolk 
"News-Herald" said of him: "McLemore was not 
one to permit informality or lack of respect in a 
court room. He was known for maintaining dignity 
and order from the bench." 

On April 21, 1898, James L. McLemore married 
Mary Willis Pretlow, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. 
Thomas J. Pretlow of Southampton County. The 
couple became the parents of four children, two 
of whom died in infancy. The two living children 
are a daughter, now Mrs. Robert Matthews of 
Norfolk, and a son, James L., Jr., whose biogra- 
phical record accompanies. 

Judge McLemore's distinguished career ended 



on April 7, 1954, when he died at his home on 
Pinner Street in Suffolk. 



JAMES LATINUS McLEMORE, JR.— Fol- 
lowing in the footsteps of his father in both the 
legal and banking professions, James L. McLe- 
more, Jr., has spent some years in practice at 
Suffolk, served as a naval officer in World War 
II, and is now vice president of the National Bank 
of Suffolk. He has other business connections as 
well and takes a constructive part in his com- 
munity's organizational and church affairs. 

He was born at Suffolk on December 23, 1912, 
son of Judge James L. McLemore, Sr., whose 
biography is to be found in these pages, and Mary 
Willis (Pretlow) McLemore. His mother was a 
native of Southampton County, and died on April 
6, 1951. After attending local schools and gradu- 
ating from Suffolk High School in 1932, the young- 
er James L. McLemore entered Randolph Macon 
College, where he was a student for three years. 
He then transferred to the University of Virginia, 
studying there from 1935 to 1937, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar of the State of Virginia in De- 
cember 1938. He studied at the University of Rich- 
mond Law School and in 1940 received his degree 
of Bachelor of Laws there. 

From 1939 to 1941, Air. McLemore practiced at 
Suffolk, and he left in April 194 1 to serve in the 
United States Army. In May 1942 he was com- 
missioned an ensign in the United States Navy. As- 
signed to naval intelligence, he was stationed in 
India for twenty-three months. He was separated 
from the service in September 1945 as a lieutenant 
in the United States Naval Reserve, and resumed 
his practice of law at Suffolk. This was his major 
career interest for nearly a decade, but, in October 
1954, he assumed his present position as vice presi- 
dent of the National Bank of Suffolk. This bank, 
first known as the Bank of Suffolk, had been 
founded by his father and associates just before the 
turn of the century, and the elder McLemore was 
its president until 19,51. Besides this major business 
connection. James L. McLemore, Jr., is a director 
of the Benthall Machine Company. 

He is a member of the Suffolk Bar Association, 
the Nansemond County Bar Association, the Vir- 
ginia State Bar Association, Phi Kappa Sigma 
at Randolph Macon College, the Rotary Club, 
the American Legion post, and the lodges of the 
Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, all of Suffolk. Fond of the 
out-of-doors, he finds his favorite recreation in 
golf, hunting, and fishing, He is active in the 
Methodist Church and serves on its board of 
stewards. 

At Waverly, Virginia, on January 1, I94-. James 
L. McLemore. Jr., married Jane Warren Coul- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



1 1 



bourn of that city, daughter of Uriah Oscar and 
Elizabeth Barkley (Sykes) Coulbourn. Her father 
is deceased, but her mother is still living. Mr. 
and Mrs. McLemore are the parents of three 
children: i. James L., Ill, born on February 4, 
1945. 2. Elizabeth Warren, born February 7, 1948. 
3. John Coulbourn, born December 14, 1954. 



JAMES CAMPBELL CAUSEY, JR.— A civil 
engineer by profession, James Campbell Causey, 
Jr., U at present city manager of the city of Suf- 
folk. He is an official in many commercial cor- 
porations as well, and has worked effectively in 
community organizations. 

He is a native of Suffolk, Virginia, and was 
born on April 23, 1902, son of James C. and Mar- 
guerite (Crump) Causey. Beginning his public 
schobl education in local schools, he graduated 
from Suffolk High School, and went on to ad- 
vanced studies at Virginia Military Institute, 
where he received his degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Civil Engineering in 1924. Mr. Causey went 
to Florida to begin his professional career. His 
firs: position was as transitman on the board of 
commissioners, Everglades Drainage District, a 
department of the Florida state government. After 
continuing in that connection for one year, he 
becpme assistant engineer with the Moore Haven 
Engineering Company, at Moore Haven, Florida. 
The following year, 1926, he took a position as 
engineer with the Wallis Engineering Company, 
in the capital city of Tallahassee. Later in 1926, 
and in the early months of 1927, he was back in 
Virginia, engaged in timber surveys on behalf of 
the Surry Lumber Company at Sedley. For a 
short time in 1927, he was identified with R. G. 
Lassiter and Company, and later the same year, 
accepted appointment as bridge inspector with The 
Virginian Railway Company, a position he filled 
capably until 1932. 

He resigned to become city engineer of the city 
of Suffolk, continued in that responsible post for 
a decade, and from 1942 to 1946 was city manager 
in the same community. In 1946 he re-entered priv- 
ate industry, joining Myron Sturgeon Engineers 
at Norfolk as senior engineer until 1953. For two 
j-ears from 1953 to 1955, he was the senior partner 
of Causey and Weeks. His present address is Suf- 
folk, where he holds the position of city manager. 

In addition to his major occupational connec- 
tions, Mr. Causey is a member of the board of 
directors of A. B. Miner Company. He serves on 
the board of the Louise Obici Memorial Hospital 
in his home city, and he is a member of the Na- 
tional and the Virginia Fox Hunters' associations. 
Retaining active status in his profession, he is 
a registered civil engineer in the state of Virginia, 
and holds membership in the American Society 



of Civil Engineers, the Society of American Mili- 
tary Engineers and the City Managers Association. 
In his religious faith, Mr. Causey is an Episco- 
palian. 

On June 9, 1928, he married Margaret Urquhart 
Jordan. They are the parents of two children: 
James C. and Margaret Warren Causey, and 
they make their home on Riverview Drive in Suf- 
folk. 



HARVEY MILTON HOLLAND— In the 

course of his more than half a century with The 
Farmers Bank of Nansemond, Harvey Milton 
Holland has advanced to the presidency of this 
organization, which is the oldest bank in Suffolk. 
Mr. Holland is a native of Nansemond County, 
and was born on February 29, 1884, son of Charles 
E. and Susie (Jones) Holland. His father, born 
in the same county, engaged in the wholesale and 
retail feed and coal business in Suffolk, and for 
many years headed his own firm, C. E. Holland 
and Company. He lost his life in an accident in 
1894. His wife, the former Susie Jones, is also 
deceased. She too was a native of Nansemond 
County. 

Receiving his early education in the public ele- 
mentary schools of Suffolk and Suffolk High 
School, Mr. Holland took his advanced studies at 
Elon College in North Carolina. He first joined 
The Farmers Bank of Nansemond in 1904. The 
bank had been organized in 1869. It made its ap- 
pearance on the scene at the nadir of the 
Reconstruction period, and was founded by Col- 
onel John R. Copeland. It was on November 30, 
1869, that he and a few of his friends applied to 
Judge E. P. Pitts of the Circuit Court of Nanse- 
mond County for a charter. In the middle of 
the next month office space was rented, and 
January 1, 1870, saw the new Farmers Bank of 
Nansemond opening its doors. The first deposit 
was made on opening day by Colonel William 
Eley, in the amount of three hundred dollars. 
Toward the close of 1870, the bank purchased its 
own first home — the bank building on Main Street 
formerly occupied by the old Suffolk Savings Bank. 
This it occupied until 1899, when a building on the 
site of the present home, at 123 North Main Street, 
was occupied. Construction of the present bank 
building was begun in 1922, and the building was 
occupied in the fall of 1923. From January 15, 
1872, when the bank declared its first dividend, it 
has an unbroken record of dividend payments up 
to the present time. 

One of Colonel Copeland's associates, Willis S. 
Riddick served as the first president. He died 
in 1875 and was succeeded by Joseph Boothe. In 
1880, when Mr. Boothe died, Colonel Thomas W. 
Smith took office and served until 1883. At that 



i : 



LOWER TIDI WATLR VIRGINIA 



time Colonel Copeland resigned as cashier ami 
succeeded Colonel Smith as president. He resigned 
in i8t>_>, and was succeeded by Colonel E. E. Hol- 
land, who served until his death late in 1941. His 
tenure of nearly fifty years, far exceeding that of 
;m\ of the bank's other presidents, was followed 
by that of E. \Y. Staples, who took office in Jan- 
uary 1942. 

Mr. Holland, who began his connection with 
the hank in the capacity of clerk, was promoted 
to cashier in iyib, to succeed the late William H. 
Jones, Jr., whose biography appears elsewhere in 
this history. While Mr. Staples was president, he 
held the offices of vice president and cashier; and 
succeeded to the presidency at Mr. Staples' death 
in December 1947. He has served on the board 
of directors since 1917. 

Active in the organizational councils of his pro- 
fession, he is a member of the Virginia Bankeis 
Association, and has served as chairman of its 
Group 1. He is also a member of the American 
Bankers Association. A Democrat in his politics, 
he has never sought nor accepted candidacy for 
public office. He attends the Suffolk Christian 
Church. 

In Suffolk, on June 3, 1916, Harvey Milton Hol- 
land married Eloise Walton Jordan of that city, 
daughter of L. W. and Emma E. (Hall) Jordan. 
Both parents were natives of Virginia, and both are 
deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Holland have no children. 



JOSEPH W. LUTER, JR.— Smithfield hams 
have made the name of this Virginia community 
known throughout the United States. One of the 
men primarily responsible for their reputation is 
packing executive Joseph W. Luter, Jr., who foun- 
ded the Smithfield Packing Co., Inc., twenty years 
ago. He is a leader in other community enterprises, 
including real estate, banking and radio broad 
casting organizations, and has taken a lively and 
constructive interest in civic causes. 

A native of Smithfield, he was born on May ,31, 
1908, son of Joseph W. Sr., and Mattie (Brim 
Luter. His father, who was born at Ivor in South- 
ampton Count)-, on August 24. 1879, was a meat 
packer by trade. Mattie Britt, whom he married, 
was born in Smithfield on December 6, 1884, 
and died on March 2, 1947. Reared in Smithfield. 
the younger Joseph W. Luter attended public 
schools there and graduated from high school 
in 1925. His experience in the meat-packing 
industry predated the completion of his educa- 
tion, for at the age of twelve years he first 
went to work, on a part-time basis, in a meat- 
packing plant in Smithfield. wdiere he learned the 
business. After completing his studies, he joined 
the Gwaltney meat-packing firm, for which he 



worked in positions of increasing responsibility 
until 1936. 

In that year he began his own business in a 
small way; and his thorough knowledge of the 
industry, his valuable background, his business 
abilities and determination enabled him to build 
up an organization which holds a high-ranking 
place among the packers of the region. Smithfield 
Packing Company was incorporated in 1936, and 
he is its president. The present modern plant, 
located on Highway 10, was completed in 1946. 
There six hundred and fifty people are employed 
and the company operates one hundred and l\ve 
motor vehicles. The present production schedule 
calls for the slaughtering of nine thousand hogs per 
week, and the company packs and processes pork 
and pork products on a large scale, as well as the 
famed Smithfield hams. Besides this major business 
interest, Mr. Luter is also active in the manage- 
ment of the Luter Packing Company of Laurin- 
burg. North Carolina, which he serves as secretary- 
treasurer. 

He is president of the Smithfield Realty De- 
velopment Corporation, president of the Merchants 
and Farmers Bank of Smithfield, and a member of 
the board of directors of the Portsmouth Radio 
Corporation. Mr. Luter organized the group which 
gave Smithfield its Community Building, in which 
various organizations hold their meetings. He has 
taken an active part in the restoration of old St. 
Luke's Church, probably the first church structure 
in the nation still standing, which was built in 
1632. Mr. Luter is a Methodist and serves on the 
board of trustees of his church. He is fond of the 
out-of-doors, particularly boating and fishing. 

At Elkton, Maryland, on May 21, 1938, Joseph 
W. Luter, Jr., married Pearl Stockman Sykes of 
Smithfield, daughter of Daniel Webster Sykes, well 
known as proprietor of the Sykes Inn in that city. 
Mr. and Mrs. Luter have three children: I. Joseph 
W., 3rd, who was born on July 17, 1939. 2. Suzanne 
Stockman, born January 16, 1941. 3. Dorothy May. 
born February 1, 1946. 



WILLIS EVERETT COHOON— The Hon. 
Willis Everett Cohoou, who in private life is a 
lawyer at Suffolk, has served as a member of 
the Virginia General Assembly for a number of 
years, has held a number of committee posts, and 
has served with distinction as judge of civil, police, 
juvenile and domestic relations courts in his home 
city. Although his forebears for many generations 
had lived in his home region of Virginia, Mr. 
Cohoon himself was born at Montgomery, Ala- 
bama, on April 8, 1902, son of Thomas Willis and 
Goode (Jones) Cohoon. His father, a native of 
Nansemond Countv, Virginia, and born on the 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



'3 



family's ancestral plantation, was a commission 
broker. He is deceased, but his wife is still living. 

Records indicate that the Cohoon family has 
lived in Nasemond County at least since 1740. In 
that year, General John C. Cohoon of Nansemond 
County was born. He represented Nansemond 
County in the Virginia Legislature from 1820 to 
1823, and died in October of the latter year. His 
son, Captain John C. Cohoon, was born in Nanse- 
mond County on December 26, 1789. He became a 
prominent citizen of his county, served as sheriff 
for a long term, and represented the county in the 
Virginia Legislature from 1828 to 193 1 . He was 
master of ceremonies when the Marquis de La- 
fayette visited Suffolk in February 1825. Another 
member of the family, Samuel Cohoon, was vestry- 
man in the Upper Parish Colonial Church of 
Nansemond County in 1770. In the next century, 
a| Willis E. Cohoon was clerk of court from 1871 
to 1875. 

1 Reared in Virginia, Willis E. Cohoon, who was 
given the name of this last-mentioned ancestor, 
attended the public schools of his region and took 
his advanced studies at Alabama Polytechnic In- 
stitute and Virginia Military Institute. He com- 
pleted his studies for the bar, and was admitted 
to practice in 1931. He then began his private 
practice in Suffolk under his own name, and has 
continued there since. A member of the Suffolk- 
Nansemond County Bar Association, he was its 
president in 1937. He served as vice president of 
the Virginia State Bar Association in 1947. 

First elected a member of the House of the 
Virginia Legislature, to represent the citizens of 
Nansemond and Suffolk counties, in 1940, the 
Hon. Willis E. Cohoon served continuously until 
1947. He was returned to office in 1952, and has 
held his seat ever since. From 1944 to 1948, he 
served on the Virginia Advisory Legislative Coun- 
cil, and during the same four-year period he was 
chairman of the Virginia Recodification Commis- 
sion. Mr. Cohoon is active in the councils of the 
Democratic party. A member of the Democratic 
Executive Committee of the City of Suffolk, he has 
served as its chairman; and he holds membership 
in the Democratic State Central Committee. 

Serving in the United States Army at the time 
of World War II, he is a member of the American 
Legion, and he also belongs to the lodges of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order ol Elks and the 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. In the Elks, 
he has served as district deputy, and grand exalted 
ruler of the Grand Lodge of Virginia, and is also 
past exalted ruler of the lodge at Suffolk. His 
Masonic affiliation is with Lodge No. 30 at Suf- 
folk, and he is a member of the higher bodies, 
including the commandery of the Knights Tem- 
plar, and Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 



of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is a communi- 
cant of the Episcopal Church. 

In the Episcopal Church at Norfolk, on October 
30, 1926, Willis Everett Cohoon married Thelma 
Lee Bryant of Nansemond County, daughter of 
James Henry and Martha (Wellons) Bryant. Both 
of her parents are deceased. Mr. Cohoon's offices 
are in the Suffolk Bank Building. 



STEPHEN DAWSON CARNES, JR., is a 

young man who, after wartime service with the 
Navy and responsible posts with the federal gov- 
ernment, established his own business at Suffolk 
as an investment counselor. The offices of the firm 
which bear his name are at 115 North Saratoga 
Street. 

Born at Norfolk on October 6, 1922, he is a son 
of Stephen Dawson, Sr., and Gladys (Oliver) 
Carnes. Both parents are living, and his father is 
now retired from active business pursuits. The 
younger Stephen D. Carnes received his early 
education in the public elementary schools of Suf- 
folk, completed his courses at its high school in 
1941, and for one year was a student at Georgia 
Military Academy. He left there to enter wartime 
service with the Fleet Marine Forces and was in 
uniform for three and one-half years. After the 
war, he resumed his education, attending the Na- 
tional University of Mexico, in Mexico City, and 
transferred from there to a point closer to his 
native locality — the University of Virginia, where 
he completed his studies in 1949. 

Mr. Carnes began his civilian career in the 
employ of the federal government, working for 
two years on the staff of the House Expenditures 
Committee in Washington, D. C. In January 1951, 
he located at Suffolk, where he founded the firm 
of Carnes and Company, Investment Counselors. 
The management of this firm has been his major 
business interest since. Mr. Carnes is a vice presi- 
dent and member of the board of directors of the 
First Federal Savings and Loan Association, and 
he is a trustee of Blackstone College for Girls 
at Blackstone, Virginia. He is chairman of the 
Greater Suffolk Industrial Committee, an or- 
ganization working for the growth and better- 
ment of industry in the community. He was appoint- 
ed as a consultant, to the Department of Defense, 
in Washington, D. C, on July 1, 1954. 

Mr. Carnes is a Rotarian and a member of 
Delta Sigma Rho forensic fraternity and Sigma 
Phi Epsilon social fraternity. He attends Oxford 
Methodist Church and is a devoted lay w-orker 
in his denomination, a conference associate, and 
lay leader. 

Mr. Carnes is unmarried. He makes his home 
in Suffolk. 



'4 



I.OWFR TIDi WATKR VIRGINIA 



SHIRLEY THOMAS HOLLAND— A banker 
by profession, Shirley Thomas Holland has served 
the people of his district in the Virginia House of 
Representatives for the past decade. He was a 
founder of the Farmers Bank of Windsor, and is 
now its executive vice president. 

He was born in Holland, Virginia, on October 
8, 1896, son of Elisha Thomas and Annie L. Hol- 
land. After attending the public schools, he was 
a student at Elon College, and completed his 
formal studies at Massey Business College. At 
the outset of his career he turned his attention 
to banking, and was only twenty-three years old 
when he joined others, in 1919, in founding the 
Farmers Bank of Windsor. He has made his home 
in that city since, and in more recent years has 
entered the general insurance field, while continu- 
ing his banking connections. He operates an insur- 
ance agency under his own name in Windsor. Be- 
sides these two major business connections, he is 
a director of the Home Telephone Company of 
Smithfield, Virginia. 

Mr. Holland's first experience in public office 
began in 1922, when he was elected to the 
town council at Windsor. He served until 1945. 
From 1927 to 1945, he was a member of the 
County Democratic Executive Committee. Elected 
to the Virginia Legislature to represent the people 
of Isle of Wight, Nansemond and Suffolk coun- 
ties, he took his seat in 1946, and has continued 
in office since that time. 

Mr. Holland is a veteran of W'orld War I. As 
an active member of the Virginia Bankers Asso- 
ciation, he serves on its board of directors, and 
served as vice president in 1956 and president in 
1957. He is also a past president of the associa- 
tion's Group I. He serves on the board of trustees 
of Elon College. He is a member of the Ruritan 
Club, the Commonwealth Club of Richmond, and 
the lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 
In Masonry, he is a member of the chapter of 
the Royal Arch Masons, the commandery of the 
Knights Templar, and Khedive Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. A 
communicant of the Congregational Christian 
Church, Mr. Holland has served as its treasurer 
for thirty years, and is also a member of its 
board of deacons. 

On September I, 1920, Shirley Thomas Holland 
married Gladys Anne Elizabeth Joyner of Wind- 
sor, daughter of Crawley F. and Eva (Smith) 
Joyner. Her father was a merchant, and at one 
time served as mayor of Windsor. Mr. and Mrs. 
Holland became the parents of four sons: 1. 
Shirley Thomas, Jr., born July 13, 1921. In 1942 he 
graduated from Virginia Military Institute, and 
entered wartime service in the LInited States Army 
Air Corps. He was killed in action on September 



18, 1944, while serving as a pilot, with the rank of 
lieutenant. 2. Richard J., born August 12, 1925. He 
is now cashier of the Farmers Bank of \\ indsor. 
Married to the former Miss Jean Culpepper, he 
is the father of three children: i. Shirley Jean, 
ii. Richard )., Jr. iii. Gregory F. 3. Clarence A., 
born June 21, 1929. He is now a lieutenant in the 
United States Navy. He married Mary Elizabeth 
Burton, and they have one child: Mary Adrian 
Holland. 4. William E., who was born on March 
30, 1936. He is attending Virginia Military Institute. 



JAMES CRESAP SPRIGG, JR.— The name of 
Sprigg is identified with the packing and distribu- 
tion of nationally known meats and meat pro- 
ducts, and has been since James Cresap Sprigg, 
Jr., took over management of the Smithfield Com- 
pany, Inc., over three decades ago. This firm is 
now known as Smithfield Ham and Products 
Company, and he remains its president. 

Born at Garrett Park, Maryland, on November 
17, 1898, he is a son of James Cresap, Sr., and 
Grace Elizabeth ( Duryea) Sprigg. His father was 
a Lower Tidewater native born at Petersburg. He 
entered the real estate business in Washington, 
D. C, and in New York, and chose his bride 
from the Greater New York area, she being a na- 
tive of Glen Cove, Long Island. The deaths of the 
couple occurred only a month apart, hers on Feb- 
ruary 24, 1951, and his on March 25. 

The younger James C. Sprigg attended Phil- 
lips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire, one of 
the most exclusive of the old New England pre- 
paratory schools, and completed his preparatory 
studies at Shenandoah Valley Academy in Win- 
chester, Virginia, where he graduated in 1917. He 
entered military service for World War I. being 
assigned to the infantry, in which he was commis- 
sioned a second lieutenant. After the war he 
resumed his education, attending the University 
of Virginia for four years. 

At the outset of his career, Mr. Sprigg took a 
professional interest in geology, and was active 
in mine examination work and mine operation in 
Mexico for a period of five years. In October 
1925, he came to Smithfield and purchased the 
Smithfield Company, Inc., then as now engaged 
in the packing of Smithfield hams and other meat 
products. He has built up the company from a 
small operation to its present position of leader- 
ship among the producers of pork products, and 
Smithfield hams have become known throughout 
the nation. Besides this major product, the firm 
processes a full line under the Amber Brand and 
James River Brand labels, and distributes bacon, 
deviled and cooked ham, meat spreads, pork and 
beef barbecue preparations, turkey barbecue, chick- 
en Brunswick stew, beef stew, chili con carne. 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



'5 



beef and pork with gravy, and barbecue and meat 
sauces. The products are distributed among whole- 
salers by a staff of thirty-five salesmen. 

Mr. Sprigg is deeply interested in community 
affairs and in the historic background of the long- 
settled region in which he lives. He served on 
the board of directors of the restoration of St. 
Luke's Church, which is the oldest in the United 
States, having been built in 1632. He is a member 
of tile Society of the Cincinnati, and of Pi Kappa 
Alpha fraternity, and in his home city, belongs to 
the Rotary Club of which he is a charter mem- 
ber. He is a member of Princess Anne Country 
Club at Virginia Beach, Elizabeth Manor Coun- 
try Club in Portsmouth, and James River Coun- 
try Club in Newport News, these memberships 
being indicative of his favorite sport, golf. An 
Episcopalian, he is a communicant of Christ 
Church, and serves on its vestry. 

At Bel Air, Maryland, on June 26, 1941, James 
Crcsap Sprigg, Jr., married Maria R. Holt of New- 

t News, Virginia. She is the daughter of Saxon 
and Maria W. I Reynolds) Holt. 



po 

w 



EMMETT FRANCIS REESE, JR., M.D.— 
One of the veteran medical practitioners of the 
Lower Tidewater area, and one of its most es- 
teemed professional men, Dr. Emmett Francis 
Reese, Jr., began his practice at Courtland in the 
early years of the century. A remarkably versa- 
tile man, he has many interests outside of the 
medical profession, including an automobile dealer- 
ship, banking, and public office. 

Born in Southampton County on September 18, 
1877, Dr. Reese is a son of Emmett F. and Vir- 
ginia Mary (Bishop) Reese. His father was a 
native of Sussex County and a farmer. Receiv- 
ing his early education in the public schools and 
through private tutoring, the physician and bus- 
iness leader completed his preparatory studies at 
Randolph-Macon Academy at Bedford City. Ik- 
took his professional courses at the University 
College of Medicine at Richmond, where he re- 
ceived his degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1899. 
He spent one year's internship at the Retreat 
for the Sick in Richmond. 

On July 1, 1900, Dr. Reese commenced his 
general practice of medicine at Sebrell, Virginia, 
and in 1904 moved to Courtland, where he has 
conducted a general practice to the present time. 
With over a half-century of distinguished profes- 
sional service to his credit, he is universally held 
in high regard by his fellow citizens, to whose 
welfare he has selflessly devoted his efforts. He 
is a member of the American Medical Associa- 
tion, the Medical Society of Virginia and the Tri- 
County Medical Society. He serves on the staff 
of Raiford Memorial Hospital in Franklin. 



In 1903, the year before he settled permanently 
in Courtland, Dr. Reese acquired a pharmacy in 
the city, which he has since operated as Reese 
Drug Company. In April 1912, he became head 
of another important local business organization 
when he acquired the Ford sales agency for South- 
ampton County. This is known as Reese Motor 
Company, and it continues its successful existence 
under Dr. Reese in partnership with his nephew, 
R. G. Cobb. It is today the oldest Ford dealer- 
ship in Virginia operating continuously under 
the management of one proprietor. Dr. Reese is 
also a director of Southampton County Bank in 
Courtland. 

At one time, the physician and business leader 
served on the town council of Courtland, and 
he has also held the position of secretary of the 
county board of health. He served on the selec- 
tive service board in World War I. In his poli- 
tics he is a Democrat, and he attends St. Luke's 
Episcopal Church, being a senior warden at the 
present time. For this church, he just erected 
a parish house adjoining the church, and it is 
named in memory of Mrs. Reese, who died on 
November 14, 1955. 

She was the former Miss Lynie R. Ridley, 
daughter of John William and Betty (Goodwin) 
Ridley. The couple were the parents of cue son, 
Emmett F., 3rd, M.D. He took his degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts and Doctor of Medicine at the 
University of Virginia, and now practices in 
Courtland. He is married to the former Miss Vir- 
ginia Griffin. 

Besides his professional connections, Dr. Em- 
mett F. Reese, Jr., is a member of the Ruritan 
Club : -d Courtland Lodge No. 85, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons. 



DOUGLAS HOLDEN PULLEY— For many 
years, members of the Pulley family have been 
profitably engaged in cultivating the productive 
soil of Southampton County. Douglas H. Pulley 
1l.s continued in the tradition, making farming 
his major career interest. He now successfully 
operates over a thousand acres near Ivor. 

Born near that place on October 19, 1897, he 
is a son of Franklin Pierce and Cora Fannie 
(Stephenson) Pulley. His father was born in Isle 
of Wight Counts' and became a farmer in South- 
ampton County. He was also vice president of 
the Bank of Sussex and served for several years 
as Surry's justice of the peace. He is now de- 
ceased, as is his wife, the former Cora Fannie 
Stephenson. She was a native of Southampton 
County. 

Douglas H. Pulley attended the public schools 
of Ivor and also studied with a private tutor. 
He completed his secondary studies with one 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



year at William and Mary Academy at Williams- 
burg. He began his career in commercial pur- 
suits, working as clerk in a general store at Ivor. 
Shortly afterwards, however, he joined his fa- 
ther in the operation of the home farm. Follow- 
ing Franklin P. Pulley's death, he acquired this 
farm of about five hundred acres in his own 
name and has since purchased three additional 
farms with a total of five hundred twenty acres, 
His composite acreage of over a thousand acres 
is devoted primarily to the production of pea- 
nuts and corn, and he raises hogs and cattle as 
well. He now operates his holdings with the 
assistance of tenant farmers. 

Mr. Pulley is a former member of the Ruritan 
Club. He is a Democrat and attends the Baptist 
Church, where he served at one time as a mem- 
ber of the board of trustees. 

On June 24, 1920, at Ivor, Douglas H. Pulley 
married Gladys Herrin of that city, daughter of 
Robert M. and Otelia M. (Joyner) Herrin. Her 
father, a native of Southampton County, was the 
owner and operator of a general store at Ivor. 
Her mother was born in Isle of Wight County. 
Mr. and Mrs. Pulley have five children: 1. Robert 
H., who married Nancy Vaughn. They have two 
children: Jane and Butch. 2. Dan Pierce, who 
married Goldie Hodovan. They have two children: 
Douglas III and Jean. 3. James Marvin, who 
married Kathleen Barnes. They have two chil- 
dren: Bruce and Patty Page. 4. Douglas Herrin, 
wdio married Pat Black. They have two children: 
Douglas, Jr., and Terry. 5. Charles Merritt. 



MELVILLE ANDERSON MAXEY— For 
nearly all of his four decades as a member of 
the Virginia bar, Melville Anderson Maxey has 
practiced at Suffolk, and he has a distinguished 
record in public office as commonwealth's attor- 
ney. He is a veteran of World War I and is 
active in community and organizational affairs. 

Born at Benu's Church in Isle of Wight Coun- 
ty, he is a son of Robert Melville and Edna 
(.Bradley) Maxey. His father was a clergyman 
of the Methodist Faith and served for some years 
as pastor of the Main Street Methodist Church 
in Suffolk. Both he and his wife are deceased. 
Their son attended the publice schools of Vir- 
ginia, took some of his secondary studies at Suf- 
folk High School, and then enrolled at Trinity 
Fark School in Durham, North Carolina. For 
his advanced studies he entered Southern Uni- 
versity at Greensboro, Alabama, but he returned 
to his native state to study law at the University 
of Virginia, where he graduated in 1917 with the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

Shortly afterwards, he entered military service, 
and held the rank of sergeant in Company D of 



the 535th Engineers. In service for more than 
a year, he spent some time in France. 

Having been admitted to the bar in July 1917, 
Mr. Maxey began practice as soon as he returned 
from military service, choosing Suffolk as his 
location, tie has conducted a general practice 
there under his own name ever since. He is cur- 
rently serving his fourth term as commonwealth's 
attorney for the city of Suffolk. First elected to 
that office, he is now serving under an appoint- 
ment by Judge John K. Hutton. He is a mem- 
ber of the Virginia State Bar Association and 
the Suffolk and Nansemond County bar associa- 
tions. 

He is a Democrat in his politics and a mem- 
ber of the American Legion post, the Lions Club, 
the Executives Club of Portsmouth, and the lod- 
ges of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks and the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
both at Suffolk. He is identified with the higher 
bodies of Masonry, including the chapter of the 
Royal Arch Masons and the commandery of the 
Knights Templar. As a Shriner, he belongs to 
Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of No- 
bles of the Mystic Shrine. He is a communicant 
of Main Street Methodist Church, of which his 
father was once the pastor. 

At Suffolk on September 15, 1923, M. Ander- 
son Maxey married Hazel Walker of Suffolk, 
daughter of Raymond and Mary (Stockham) Wal- 
ker, both of whom are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. 
Maxey have two children: I. Mary Frances, who 
is a graduate of Brennan College and who now 
teaches at the University of Maryland in College 
Park, where she received her Masters degree. 2. 
Melville Anderson, Jr., who is a graduate of 
Randolph-Macon College, Ashland. 



CAPTAIN WILLOUGHBY WARREN CO- 
LONNA — For many years one of the leading 
figures in the ship repair industry of Norfolk and 
Tidewater Virginia, Captain Willoughby Warren 
Colonna has won wide recognition for his integrity 
of character and personal qualities. His business 
career has been characterized by vision, perse- 
verance and enterprise. His major interest has been 
the management of Colonna's Shipyard. Inc., of 
Norfolk, one of the oldest firms of its kind, which 
was founded by his father in 1879. W. W. Colonna 
was its president at the time of his resignation from 
this executive post in 1954. 

Details of the career of Charles Jones Colonna 
and of the firm he founded are contained in the 
accompanying sketch of Benjamin O. Colonna, 
who succeeds W. W. Colonna in the presidency of 
the company. Their mother was Margaret Okeson 
Dunston, a native of Norfolk, who died in 1892. 



—IK 




tS767st? 



LOWER TIDEWATl R VIRGINIA 



i7 



Captain W. W. Colonna was born on November 
6, 1882, in tbe old family homestead which stood 
on the site of the present shipyard. He received 
his education in the private school operated by 
Robert Gatewood in Norfolk, and at Norfolk Aca- 
demy, and went on to advanced studies at Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute, where he majored in mech- 
anical engineering. 

Mr. Colonna then entered his father's shipyard 
on a full-time basis, having received previous ex- 
perience there during his summer vacations and 
after-school hours. He served an apprenticeship as 
ship's carpenter under the supervision of his father. 
He also gained experience in other aspects of the 
firm's operations, including management, and when 
the business was incorporated in 1913, as the Colon- 
na Marine Railway Corporation, he became its 
president, with his brother Benjamin O. Colonna 
as ,vice president and Carl D. Colonna as secretary 
and treasurer. When the firm emerged under its 
present name of Colonna's Shipyard, Inc., in 1923, 
he remained its president, and continued as direct- 
ing head until he changed positions with his brother 
Benjamin, who has been president since 1954. while 
Willoughbv W. Colonna holds the office of vice 
president. Working as a team, they continue to 
expand the firm's facilities and to keep it in the 
front rank of East Coast ship repairing organiza- 
tions. It is one of the largest in its field still operat- 
ing under private ownership. It has served the cause 
of the nation's defense in two world wars, but adapts 
its productive potential equally well to peacetime 
needs. While it continues to fill government con- 
tracts, it attracts the larger part of its business 
from commercial interests. 

Willoughbv W. Colonna lias also been a do- 
minant influence in the development of Atlantic 
Fishing Company, Inc., in which other members 
of the family are also interested. With a fleet of 
three modern ships, this firm conducts extensive 
menhaden fishing operations all along the Atlantic 
Coast from North Carolina to Long Island. Mr. 
Colonna is vice president of this firm as well. 

He was formerly active as a member of Doric 
Lodge No. 44, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
Ionic Chapter No. 46. Royal Arch Masons, Grice 
Commandery No. 16, Knights Templar, and Khe- 
dive Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine. Fond of the out-of-doors, his 
favorite sports are fresh-water fishing and oper- 
ating his speed-boat. Also an aviation enthusiast, 
he owns an amphibious airplane which his son, 
Willoughbv W., Jr., pilots. His family home. "Oak- 
lette," situated on the eastern branch of the Eliza- 
beth River in Norfolk County, is one of the most 
attractive in the area. Captain Colonna is a com- 
municant of St. Bride's Episcopal Church. 



On July 4, 1908, at Elizabeth City, Willoughby 
Warren Colonna married, as his first wife, Miss 
Roberta Mansfield of Norfolk. They became the 
parents of four daughters: 1. Fannie Mae, who 
married Robert L. Beale, Jr., of Norfolk. 2. Dorothy 
Evelyn, who married Daniel H. Smith of Nor- 
folk. They now live in Tampa, Florida, and are 
the parents of three children: Patricia, Robin and 
Daniel H. Smith, Jr. 3. Eloise Roberta, who is the 
wife of Dr. Fred White, formerly of Norfolk and 
now practicing as a physician at Bluefield. This 
couple have two children: Rebecca and Bonnie 
Eloise White. 4. Virginia Mansfield, who married 
William F. Folkes, Jr., of Norfolk. They are the 
parents of three children: Berry. William H., Ill, 
and Ann Folkes. At Norfolk, on February 19, 1927, 
Captain Colonna married, second, Esther Pearl 
Daughtry of that city, daughter of George W. and 
Esther Pearl ( Eley) Daughtry. By this marriage 
he is the father of two more children: 5. Willoughby 
Warren, Jr., now superintendent of Colonna's Ship- 
yard, Inc. His career record accompanies. 6. Caro- 
line, who married Daniel H. Thrasher of Norfolk. 
They are the parents of two sons: Daniel H. and 
Warren Thrasher. 



WILLOUGHBY WARREN COLONNA, JR. 

— Representing the younger generation of the Co- 
lonna family which has long been prominent in 
shipbuilding and repair operations at Norfolk, 
Willoughby Warren Colonna, Jr., is now super- 
intendent of the shipyard, and a member of the 
corporation's board of directors. He is also an 
official of the Atlantic Fishing Company, Inc., and 
his leadership in industry and community affairs 
won him the "Mr. Norfolk" award in 1955 and the 
"Mr. Virginia" award in 1957. He is a veteran of 
service in the United States Army. 

Born February 1, 1929, in Norfolk, he is a son 
of Willoughby Warren, Sr., and Esther Pearl 
(Daughtry) Colonna, both natives of Norfolk 
County, and grandson of the late Charles Jones 
Colonna, who founded Colonna's Shipyard in 1879. 
The elder Willoughby W. Colonna has been asso- 
ciated with the management of this shipyard since 
his graduation from Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
in 1906, and his career is the subject of a separate 
biographical sketch. 

Attending local schools, Willoughby W. Colonna, 
Jr., graduated from Maury High School in 1947, 
after which he served two years in the United 
States Army. On his return, he entered the College 
of William and Mary, Norfolk Division, which he 
attended for one year. He then served his ap- 
prenticeship in the family firm, Colonna's Ship- 
yard, Inc., as has been a tradition among the 
younger echelon of the company's prospective man- 



i8 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



agement For many years. In this way he familiariz- 
ed himself with all phases of operations, before 
assuming increasing responsibility in supervisory 
capacities. He was promoted to assistant super- 
intendent and in 1950, became superintendent of 
the shipyard, his present position. He has been a 
member of the corporation's board of directors 
since 1952, and is also a director of the Atlantic 
Fishing Company, Inc., another Colonna familj 
interest. 

A very versatile young man, Mr. Colonna is 
widely known for his achievements in boating, 
water-skiing, aviation, and athletics. It was pro- 
bably his excellent record in these lines which won 
him the "Mr. Norfolk" and "Mr. Virginia" awards, 
in 1955 and 1957, respectively. He is past state 
champion in water-skiing. An aviation enthusiast, 
he holds a private pilot's license for a single engine 
land and sea plane. He has also won recognition 
for his dramatic abilities, and his impersonations of 
Al Jolson in local minstrel shows has earned him 
popular acclaim. 

On April 7, 1953, at Portsmouth, Willoughby 
Warren Colonna, Jr., married Earlene Mary New- 
comb of Norfolk. They are the parents of one 
son: Willoughby Warren, III, who was born on 
August 20, 1955. Mr. and Mrs. Colonna are com- 
municants of Saint Bride's Episcopal Church at 
Berkley. 



BENJAMIN OKESON COLONNA, SR.— 

Three generations of the Colonna family have been 
identified with the management of Colonna's Ship- 
yard, Inc., of Norfolk. Benjamin Okeson Colonna, 
Sr., is now its president and general manager, and 
he is also active in other commercial interests, in- 
cluding the Atlantic Fishing Company, Inc., of 
which he is also the president. The firm which bears 
his family's name was founded in 1879, and pioneer- 
ed in the ship repair industry in Tidewater Vir- 
ginia. It is also one of the oldest industrial firms 
in the commonwealth, and one of the largest ship 
repair yards on the entire Atlantic Coast to be 
conducted under private ownership. 

Charles Jones Colonna, its founder, was born 
in the Eastern Shore district of Virginia in 1849, a 
descendant of early colonial settlers. He received 
a limited education and early in youth embarked 
upon a seafaring life and learned the trade of ship's 
carpenter. He came to Norfolk in the early 1870s 
and for a time was employed in that capacity by 
William A. Graves, who operated a ship repair 
yard on Water Street in Norfolk. In 1879 he began 
his own enterprise in a modest way. On one of his 
early bill heads appeared, "Chas. J. Colonna, Ship- 
wright, Spar Maker and Caulker." At that time 
all production work was done by hand, and the 



excellence of his work brought prosperity to his 
firm. Today Colonna's Shipyard is located on its 
original site of thirty-five acres on the eastern 
branch of the Elizabeth River in the Berkley Dis- 
trict of Norfolk. The site was originally that of 
the old Travis farm, an early land grant, and on 
this property for many years stood the old Colonna 
family home, erected in colonial days. It was there 
that Charles Jones Colonna reared his family and 
lived for many years. Later the residence was used 
as an office for the shipyard, and in 1935 was razed 
in the course of modernizing the yards. 

About 1907, Charles J. Colonna retired from 
most of his business duties and turned the man- 
agement of the business over to his sons, Carl 
Dunston, Willoughby Warren, and Benjamin 
Okeson. By 1912 the founder had resigned com- 
pletely from the organization; but Colonna's Ship- 
yard, Inc., stands today as a monument to his 
ability and character. In a true sense his personal 
creation, it is now directed by his sons and grand- 
sons. In the early days of the new management, 
the greatly expanded firm took the name of Colonna 
Marine Railway Corporation, in 1913. In 1923, three 
years after the death of the founder, the present 
title, Colonna's Shipyard, Inc., was adopted. His 
death occurred on March 3, 1920. His wife was 
the former Margaret Okeson Dunston, a native 
of Norfolk, who died in 1892. They became :he 
parents of five sons and one daughter: 1. John 
Wilkins, who is deceased. 2. Margaret Evelyn, who 
married, first, Henry F. McCoy, deceased, and 
married, second, Oscar F. Smith of the Norfolk 
Dredging Company. 3. Carl Dunston, secretary 
and treasurer of Colonna's Shipyard. 4. Willoughby 
Warren, former president and now vice president 
of the shipyard. 5. Edward Holt, deceased. 6. Ben- 
jamin Okeson, of whom further. 

Benjamin Okeson Colonna — or Captin Ben 
Colonna, as he is more widely known — was born 
on January 14, 1887, in the old Colonna homestead 
that stood on the site of Colonna's Shipyard. He 
was educated in the Robert Gatewood Private 
School in Norfolk and at Norfolk Academy. From 
his boyhood years he spent his after-school hours 
and summer vacations in the Colonna shipyard, 
and at the age of eighteen, entered the business 
on a full-time basis. He served his apprenticeship 
as ship's carpenter, became familiar with all phases 
of operations in the ship repair industry, and soon 
assumed responsibilities in general management. 
When in 1913 the firm became Colonna Marine 
Railway Corporation, he was made vice president; 
and when in 1923 the name Colonna's Shipyard, 
Inc., was adopted, he continued in that office. In 
1954 he succeeded bis brother, Willoughby Warren 
Colonna (q.v.) as president and general manager. 



LOWF.R TIDF.WA TER VIRGINIA 



19 



In both world wars, the corporation rendered 
outstanding service in repairing and refitting ships. 
In peace as well as wartime, it devotes its facilities 
to repair and refitting work on both steel and 
wooden vessels, and works on government con- 
tract as well as for commercial interests. It has 
complete equipment for this purpose, and a dry- 
dock capacity of five thousand tons. It normally 
carries three hundred and fifty names on its pay- 
roll. The principal officers of the corporation are 
Captain Ben Colonna, president and general man- 
ager; Captain W. W. Colonna, vice president; Carl 
D. Colonna, secretary and treasurer; Carl D. Co- 
lonna, Jr.. general superintendent; Benjamin O. 
Colonna, Jr., superintendent; and Willoughby W. 
Colonna, Jr., superindendent. The firm is a mem- 
ber of the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce, the Vir- 
ginia State Chamber of Commerce and the Hamp- 
ton Roads Maritime Association. 

Another Colonna family interest which plays an 
important part in the commercial life of Norfolk 
is the Atlantic Fishing Company, Inc. Of this firm 
too Benjamin O. Colonna is president, while Cap- 
tain Willoughby W. Colonna is vice president and 
Ben O. Colonna, Jr., is secretary. This firm was 
founded in 1925 and incorporated in 1947. It is 
extensively engaged in menhaden fishing, in the 
waters from Cape Fear, North Carolina, to Long 
Island. The company owns and operates three of 
the most modern vessels in Atlantic and Chesa- 
peake Bay operations. They are named the "Charles 
J. Colonna," the "W. W. Colonna," and the "B. O. 
Colonna." Atlantic Fishing Company's hauls in 
1954 had a value of over a million dollars, and 
! 955 operations grossed one million two hundred 
thousand dollars. It is one of the most modern 
and efficiently operating fishing enterprises in Vir- 
ginia. 

Beloved by his employees and associates, Cap- 
tain Colonna has a legion of friends in all walks 
of life. Among his hobbies is his collection of 
portraits of prominent citizens of Norfolk and 
Tidewater Virginia. He is known throughout his 
region and his industry as a gentleman, and a 
capable executive. He is a member of the Norfolk 
Yacht and Country Club and the Virginia Club of 
Norfolk, and is an active communicant of St. Paul's 
Episcopal Church of Norfolk. His favorite sports 
are fishing and boating. 

On January 5, 1909. at Tarboro, North Carolina, 
Benjamin Okeson Colonna, Sr., married Mary 
Glenn Perry of Elizabeth City, daughter of the 
late J. Walter and Alice (Wilson) Perry. The 
couple are the parents of two children: 1. Glenn 
Perry, who married William L. Boggs of Norfolk. 
They are the parents of a daughter, Glenn Perry 
Colonna Boggs. 2. Benjamin Okeson, Jr., super- 



intendent of Colonna's Shipyard, Inc., and secre- 
tary and treasurer of the Atlantic Fishing Company, 
Inc. He married Mildred Elizabeth McClellan of 
Norfolk, and they have a daughter, Carol Mc- 
Clellan Colonna. Captain and Mrs. Colonna reside 
at 632 Baldwin Place, Norfolk. 



BENJAMIN OKESON COLONNA. JR.— 

Representing the third generation of a family dis- 
tinguished in commercial leadership in the Lower 
Tidewater area, Benjamin Okeson Colonna, Jr., is 
a young Norfolk executive who has advanced to 
the positions of superintendent and member of the 
board of Colonna's Shipyard, Inc., and secretary 
and treasurer of the Atlantic Fishing Company. 

Born in Norfolk on April 18, 1922, he is a son 
of Benjamin Okeson and Mary Glenn (Perry) 
Colonna and grandson of Charles Jones Colonna, 
founder of the shipyard, whose wife was the former 
Margaret Okeson Dunston. His father is the sub- 
ject of an accompanying sketch, which also relates 
something of the history of the firms with which 
the younger Benjamin O. Colonna is identified. 
Receiving his education in the public schools of 
Norfolk, he graduated from Maury High School 
in 1 94 1. In the course of his school years, he had 
gained experience working in the family shipyard 
on a part-time basis, familiarizing himself with 
the operations of its various departments, and on 
his graduation, he joined the firm on a full-time 
basis. He served an apprenticeship in the machine 
shop and later became a leader in one of its working 
units — a connection affording valuable experience 
for subsequent managerial duties. He became super- 
intendent in 1945 and has been a member of the 
board of directors since 1952. As a member of the 
third generation of the family which has always 
conducted the operations of the long-established 
ship repair and refitting organization, he is carry- 
ing on the traditions of service and achievement 
laid down by its founder. In addition, in the family's 
menhaden-fishing organization, known as Atlantic 
Fishing Company, he holds the offices of secretary 
and treasurer. 

Mr. Colonna formerly served on the board of 
governors of the Propeller Club of the Port of 
Norfolk, in which he retains membership. He is 
also a member of the Norfolk Yacht and Country 
Club and like other members of his family, is a 
communicant of St. Paul's Episcopal Church. 
His favorite sports are sailboat racing and fresh- 
water fishing. 

On April 15, 1944. in old St. Paul's Episcopal 
Church in Norfolk, Benjamin Okeson Colonna. 
Jr., married Mildred Elizabeth McClellan of that 
city, daughter of the late Henry and Ruby (Rock) 



TWVa. 3 



20 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



McClellan. The couple are the parents of a daugh- 
ter, Carol McClellan Colonna, born July 23, IQ45- 



on June 21, 1905, and is now general superinten- 
dent of Colonna's Shipyard. His biographical record 
accompanies. 



CARL DUNSTON COLONNA— Treasurer of 
Colonna's Shipyard, Inc., Carl Dunston Colonna 
has been active in its management with his brothers 
since the retirement of their father, its founder. 

He was born on May 31, 1881, in the old Charles 
Jones Colonna family home, which was located on 
the present site of the shipyards. He is the eldest 
of the surviving sons of Charles J. and Margaret 
Okeson (Dunston) Colonna. Receiving his early 
education in the private schools of Misses Annie 
and Berry Carnes on Mulberry Street in Berkley, 
he later attended the Robert Gatewood School and 
Norfolk Academy. In early boyhood he became 
acquainted with the operations of the various 
departments of the ship repair firm, which had been 
founded by his father several years before his 
birth. In 1907 he joined the organization on a full- 
time basis as secretary and treasurer and has held 
that position through the days of the firm's ex- 
istence as Colonna Marine Railway Corporation 
and, since 1923, as Colonna's Shipyard, Inc. 

In his more active years, he was a great lover of 
the out-of-doors, particularly fishing and boating, 
and he has always taken an interest in travel. He 
was a member of the Virginia Club of Norfolk, 
the Hampton Roads Maritime Exchange, and is 
the oldest member of Doric Lodge No. 44, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. He was form- 
erly active in other York Rite bodies of Masonry 
and in Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a former 
member of the Lions Club. 

He is a lifelong Episcopalian, and was a com- 
municant of St. Paul's Episcopal Church of Berk- 
ley before the founding of St. Bride's Episcopal 
Church, in which he has since been active. He is a 
former treasurer and superintendent of the Sunday 
school and was a delegate to the diocesan councils 
for twelve years. He is now an honorary life mem- 
ber of the vestry of St. Bride's Church, with voting 
powers. 

Mr. Colonna is known among his host of friends 
as a man of cheerful and convivial nature and a 
stimulating conversationalist. 

On November 18, 1903, in St. Paul's Episcopal 
Church, Carl Dunston Colonna married Lois Pearl 
Sykes of Mount Pleasant, Norfolk County. Mrs. 
Colonna was the daughter of George W. and 
Marina (Barnes) Sykes. Her death occurred on 
June 11, 1953. She exerted a positive influence in 
the cultural and religious life of the community and 
was for many years a member of the choir at St. 
Bride's Episcopal Church. The couple became the 
parents of a son, Carl Dunston, Jr., who was born 



CARL DUNSTON COLONNA, JR.— Since his 
early youth, the career of Carl Dunston Colonna, 
Jr., has been identified with Colonna's Shipyard, 
Inc., and he is now general superintendent of that 
firm, which his grandfather founded and in which 
his father has held executive positions for many 
years. Representing the third generation of his 
family in the industry, he has a creditable record 
of achievement, to which he has brought the skills 
of modern business management and the know- 
how and respect for tradition which are the heritage 
of a firm nearly eighty years of age. The story 
of the founding and development of this firm is 
found elsewhere in these pages, in the annals of 
the Colonna family. 

Born in Xorfolk on June 21, 1905, Carl D. Co- 
lonna is a son of Carl Dunston, Sr., and Lois Pearl 
(Sykes) Colonna, and a grandson of Charles Jones 
and Margaret Okeson (Dunston) Colonna. His 
father is the subject of a separate sketch. Attending 
the public schools of Norfolk, the younger Carl 
D. Colonna graduated from Maury High School in 
1922, after which he attended Fishburne Military 
School. There he graduated in the Class of 1925. 
He continued his studies at the Washington School 
of Drafting, in Washington, D. C. 

When he entered Colonna's Shipyards (then 
Colonna Marine Railway Corporation) on a full- 
time basis, he served an apprenticeship in ship 
construction and repair, a prerequisite to be found 
in the records of the other executive leaders of the 
firm in both the younger and older generations. He 
became general superintendent of the shipyard in 
September 1940. He thus played a major part in 
preparing the firm for its role in serving the govern- 
ment during World War II and in adapting its 
facilities to peacetime production in the years which 
followed. Colonna's Shipyard still contracts with 
the government for work on vessels of various des- 
criptions, but draws the major portion of its work 
from commercial firms. Mr. Colonna serves on the 
board of directors of the corporation, as well as in 
the capacity of general superintendent. 

He is a member of the Society of Naval Archi- 
tects and Marine Engineers and the Engineers 
Club of Hampton Roads and, through Colonna's 
Shipyard, Inc., is affiliated with the Norfolk Cham- 
ber of Commerce, the Virginia State Chamber of 
Commerce, and the Virginia Manufacturers Asso- 
ciation. 

Apart from his trade connections, Mr. Colonna 
is a member and past worshipful master of Doric 
Lodge No. 44, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



21 



He is a communicant of St. Paul's Episcopal Church. 
On October 14, 1939, Carl Dunston Colonna, Jr., 
married Sarah Ruth Morgan of Newport News, 
daughter of the late Joseph T. and Sarah Ann 
(Morse) M organ. Mr. and Mrs. Colonna are the 
parents of a son, Carl Morgan, who was born on 
April 4, 1941. He is now a student at Oscar From- 
mel Smith High School, South Norfolk. The family 
residence is at 345 Kemp Lane, in Norfolk County. 



HAROLD WALTER CHANDLER— With 
banking experience dating back to World War I 
years, Harold Walter Chandler has spent most of 
his career with the First National Bank of New- 
port News and is now its president. He has taken 
a constructive interest in civic and political life. 

A native New Englander, he was born at Nor- 
way, Maine, on December 21, 1895, son of Walter 
S. and Abbie (Adams) Chandler. His mother too 
was born in that city, and his father at Bethel, 
Maine. Walter S. Chandler is now retired from 
business, and Mrs. Chandler is deceased. Harold 
W. Chandler attended the public schools of Bethel 
and graduated from Gould Academy in that city 
ii. 1914. He began his banking career there, enter- 
ing the employ of the Bethel National Bank and 
remaining on its staff for six months. He was 
next identified, for a period of one year, with 
the Rumford National Bank at Rumford Falls, 
Maine. His third connection was with the Augusta 
Trust Company of Winthrop, Maine, with which 
he remained for somewhat less than two years, 
leaving to enter the United States Army for serv- 
ice in World War I. 

Returning to civilian life after two years in 
uniform, Mr. Chandler located at Newport News, 
and there he first worked in the auditing depart- 
ment of Newport News Shipyard. After a year 
and one-half he left to return to banking, and 
it was at that time that he joined the staff of 
the First National Bank of Newport News. He 
began in the bookkeeping department, was soon 
promoted to auditor, and advanced through the 
positions of assistant cashier, cashier, and vice 
president, to become president of the First Na- 
tional Bank in January 1948. In addition to serv- 
ing as its chief executive and as a member of 
its board of directors, Mr. Chandler is a director 
of the Mutual Home and Savings Association. 

One of Mr. Chandler's major contributions to 
civic progress has been his work with the Penin- 
sula Boys' Club, of which he is currently trea- 
surer and a director. His interest in youth and 
in education is further indicated by his valuable 
service on the Newport News school board, of 
which he has been a member since 1952. Politi- 
cally , he supports the Democratic platform and 
candidates at the local and statewide levels, but 



has voted the Republican ticket in national elec- 
tions. He attends the Orcutt Avenue Baptist 
Church, where he serves as a trustee. He is a 
member of the James River Country Club and 
Peninsula Lodge No. 175, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons. 

On February 7, 1920, at Newport News, Harold 
Walter Chandler married Susie Marks of that 
city, daughter of Walter E. and Mae (Marable) 
Marks. Mr. and Mrs. Chandler are the parents 
of two children: 1. Virginia, who married Eu- 
gene Williams. They have three children: James, 
Kathryn, and John. 2. Harold Kimball, who mar- 
ried Eleanor Smith. 



HARRY LEIBE NACHMAN— Admitted to the 
bar of his state about four decades ago, Harry 
Leibe Nachman practices at Newport News as 
senior partner in the firm of Nachman and Nach- 
man. He has served for some years as city attor- 
ney, and exerts a vital influence in public af- 
fairs and political life, as well as taking a full 
role in organizational activities. 

The son of a Newport News merchant, Ray 
Nachman, and his wife, the former Mary Rich- 
mond, Harry Leibe Nachman was born in that 
city on August 29, 1895. His father is now de- 
ceased, although his mother is still living. The 
lawyer and public official attended the public 
schools of his native city, and graduated from 
high school there in 1913. He took his advanced 
academic work at the University of Virginia, and 
remained there to complete his professional cour- 
ses, taking the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 
1917. He had by that time been admitted to the 
bar of his commonwealth, in 1916; and when he 
graduated from law school, returned to Newport 
News to establish his practice. In his present 
firm 1 f Nachman and Nachman, his son Bert 
is his partner. Harry L. Nachman is a member 
of the Newport News-Warwick Bar Association 
and formerly served as its president. He is also 
a member of the Virginia State Bar Association 
and the American Bar Association. 

On January 1, 1945, he took office as city 
attorney of Newport News, on appointment, and 
he has served continuously since that time, dis- 
tinguishing himself by his abilities and his con- 
scientious discharge of his responsibilities. He is 
a Democrat, and formerly served as chairman of 
the election board in his city. He was at one 
time a member of the Newport News Democratic 
Executive Committee. 

Mr. Nachman is a veteran of World War I, 
having served in the United States Navy for 
twenty-five months. He is a member of Brax- 
ton Perkins Post No. 25 of the American Le- 
gion, has served as commander of that post, and 



22 



LOWER TIDI.WA TFR VIRGINIA 



is also past Judge Advocate for the State of 
Virginia. He is a member of the local gare of 
the Forty and Eight. His fraternity is Phi Ep- 
silon Pi, and he is a member of the Lodge of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and 
Peninsula Lodge No. 278, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons. A member of the higher bodies 
of Masonry, be belongs to the 'consistory of the 
Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite and Khedive 
Temp'e, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine, at Norfolk. He is of Jewish faith. 
On January 16, 1923, in Newport News, Harry 
L. N; -.hman married Sadye Cohen of that city, 
daughter of I. and Ida (Fisch) Cohen. Mrs. 
Nachman died on November 11, 1944. The cou- 
ple w re the parents of two children: 1. Bert 
A., who was born on September 29, 1925. He 
graduated from the University of Virginia, where 
he took both the Bachelor of Arts and the Bache- 
lor of Laws degrees, and he has practiced at 
Newport News since 1952, being a partner of 
his father. During World War II, Bert Nach- 
man served in the Naval Air Corps. 2. Betty, 
who was born on August 23, 1929; a graduate 
of Randolph-Macon Womens College with a 
Bachelor of Arts degree, she is married to Eu- 
gene Levin of Newport News, who is a gradu- 
ate of Duke University at Durham, North Caro- 
lina. 



JESSE J. PARKERSON— Since 1929, Jesse J. 
Parkerson has been president of the Merchants 
and Planters Bank of Norfolk, and his experience 
in his profession dates from the early years of the 
century. He joined the staff of the bank in 1902 
and has played a conspicuous part in its growth. 
Not only as a banker but as a progressive citizen 
and promoter of civic causes, he has proved his 
value to the area. 

Born July 23, 1884, in Berkley, Virginia, now a 
part of the city of Norfolk, he is a son of the late 
W. T. J. and Cherry (Martin) Parkerson. After 
attending public and private schools and a busi- 
ness college, he began his career in Berkley as a 
runner for the Merchants and Planters Bank on 
January 2, 1902. Advancing through the positions 
of bookkeeper and teller, he was made cashier on 
December 31, 1909, and was elected president on 
January 16, 1929. 

The Merchants and Planters Bank was the first 
financial institution to be established in that part 
of the city which lies across the eastern branch of 
the Elizabeth River. It opened its doors April I, 
1900. Founded through the efforts of Alvah H. 
Martin, Sr., and other progressive citizens, it be- 
gan its existence with a capital of thirty thousand 
dollars. Foster Black was its first president, and 
he was succeeded by Alvah H. Martin, who saw 



the bank's capital increased to fifty thousand dol- 
lars. Following the death of Mr. Martin on July 
5, 1918, Colonel S. L. Slover became its executive 
head. During his tenure of office, two branches 
were opened: the Campostella Branch, at Campos- 
tella Road and Springfield Avenue in 1924, and the 
South Norfolk Branch, Twenty-second and Liberty- 
Avenue, in 1927. In 1929, Colonel Slover was elec- 
ted chairman of the board of directors, and was 
succeeded in the presidency by Jesse J. Parkerson. 
By 1936, the bank's capital had risen to two hun- 
dred and fifty thousand dollars, with resources ex- 
ceeding four million dollars. Its amazing growth 
is reflected in its statement of April 10, 1956. Its 
subscribed capital of seventy-five thousand dollars, 
having been increased through the years by stock 
dividends of four hundred and twenty-five thou- 
sand dollars, now totals half a million dollars; and 
a surplus of one million two hundred thousand 
dollars, and undivided profits of ¥278,881.19, were 
reported. Deposits have grown to $19,973,044.48. 
In 1946, the Merchants and Planters Bank estab- 
lished another branch at 2501 Lafayette Boulevard. 
Another branch, known as the Little Creek Road 
Branch, on Little Creek Road, was opened for 
business in September 1956. In addition to its 
principal office, its four branches provide a wide 
range of services, and serve an ever-increasing 
number of customers, including business firms and 
industries. The bank has consistently cooperated 
with community and national projects. In the 
World War I period, it took an active part in the 
Liberty Loan campaigns and other Treasury De- 
partment projects. In World War II, it established 
a record of government bond sales exceeding six 
million dollars, and rendered valuable service in 
ration banking and payroll work for members of 
the armed forces as well as for civilian war work- 
ers. In addition to the name of Mr. Parkerson, its 
roster of officials include Alvah H. Martin, Jr., 
vice president and trust officer; J. Paul Smith, 
vice president and cashier; W. Mac Goodman, 
vice president; Harry A. Fruit, vice president; 
William E. Warren, vice president: Frank N. 
Wood, vice president; J. M. Jones, Jr., vice presi- 
dent; G. M. Old, assistant cashier; Luther L. 
Bondurant, assistant cashier: William H. White, 
assistant cashier; Nathan Sykes, Jr., assistant 
cashier; Franklin B. Austin, assistant cashier; 
Frances P. Britt, assistant cashier; Marjorie 
Quayle, assistant trust officer; Willis W. Stephen- 
son, auditor. Directors are H. G. Ashburn, W. P. 
Butt, William H. Darden, W. F. Duckworth, Ber- 
nard Glasser, Herman A. Hall, J. J. Joyce, Alvah 
H. Martin, Jr., W. J. Newton, G. C. Nicholas, 
Jesse J. Parkerson, W. D. Preston. Howard G. 
Privott, Stephen Richard, R. B. Rowland, Jr., J. 
R. Sears, S. L. Slover, J. Paul Smith, Samuel H. 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



! 3 



Thrasher, W. M. Townsend, J. F. Walker. Wil- 
liam E. Warren and Maxwell Zedd. 

Active in other business connections as well, 
Mr. Parkerson is treasurer and a director of the 
Chesapeake Building Association, and a director 
of the Security Insurance Agency, Inc. He is 
president and director of the South Norfolk Bridge 
Commission, a director of the Norfolk Chamber 
of Commerce, and a member of the Virginia State 
Chamber of Commerce, and as a bank executive, 
belongs to the Virginia Bankers Association and 
the American Bankers Association. In his own 
city he is a member of the Norfolk Executives 
Club, the Norfolk Yacht and Country Club, and 
Doric Lodge No. 44, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons. In Masonry he is a member of the higher 
bodies including the Ionic Chapter of Royal Arch 
Masons. In civic and philanthropic fields, he serves 
on the board of directors of the Central Young 
Men's Christian Association, as treasurer of the 
Norfolk area of the Virginia Society for Crippled 
Children, as a member of the lay board of the 
DePaul Hospital, and of the Pension Bureau of 
the city of Norfolk. He has been active in the 
Norfolk Community Chest fund campaigns; and 
during the World War II period, did outstanding 
work for the Norfolk War Finance Committee on 
behalf of the United States Treasury Department. 
A communicant of the Memorial Methodist Church, 
of Berkley, he formerly served on its board of 
stewards and as treasurer. 

On October 31, 1906, Jesse J. Parkerson mar- 
ried Emma Clark Markham of Elizabeth City, 
North Carolina, daughter of the late James C. and 
Emiline (Purdy) Markham, both of whom were 
born in North Carolina. Mr. and Mrs. Parkerson 
are the parents of one daughter, Lois, a graduate 
of Randolph-Macon College at Lynchburg, Vir- 
ginia. She married William E. Warren of Norfolk. 
Mr. Warren is vice president and director of the 
Merchants and Planters Bank of Norfolk, and is 
in charge of its Lafayette Boulevard Branch. Mr. 
and Mrs. Warren are the parents of one daughter, 
Ann Parkerson Warren. Mr. and Mrs. Parkerson 
make their home at 944 Larchmont Crescent, 
Norfolk. 



ROBERT McKINLEY GINDHART, SR.— As 

vice president and treasurer, and now as a mem- 
ber of the board of directors, of Noland Com- 
pany, Inc., of Newport News, Robert McKinley 
Gindhart, Sr., has been active in the manage- 
ment of what is probably the largest wholesale 
plumbing, heating, electrical and industrial sup- 
plies house in the world, operating thirty-two 
branch offices throughout the United States for 
distribution of its wide range of products. This 
fact makes it, of course, a major commercial or- 



ganization of the Tidewater area; and Mr. Gind- 
hart, as a respected business leader, has become 
influential in corporate affairs generally, and in 
the organizational and civic life of his city. 

He was born at Claremont, Virginia, on Au- 
gust ->3, 1896, son of Harry and Sarah Eliza- 
beth (McKinley) Gindhart. Both parents were 
natives of Philadelphia, and both are deceased. 
The executive received his early education in the 
public schools of Claremont, and graduated from 
its high school in 191 1. He then attended Mas- 
sey Business College in Richmond, and has also 
taken correspondence courses from LaSalle In- 
stitute. When this country entered World War 
I, he joined the United States Army, was in 
military service for about one year and spent 
eight months of that time in the combat areas 
of France. 

For one year after his return to civilian life, 
h; was employed by an automobile sales agency 
in Newport News, after wdiich he spent four 
years with Southern Shipyards in that city as 
assistant to the secretary-treasurer. 

In 1924, Mr. Gindhart joined the Noland Com- 
pany, Inc. Holding various positions with this 
supplies firm in the years which followed, he 
was promoted to treasurer in 1941, and the fol- 
lowing year was named vice president, while con- 
tinuing his duties as treasurer. He is now re- 
tired from these positions, but is still a member 
of the corporation's board of directors, of which 
he has been a member since 1938. At its head- 
quarters in New-port News, and more than thirty 
branch offices, Noland Company, Inc., employs 
a total of twelve hundred and fifty people. 

Mr. Gindhart is vice president and a director 
of Biggs Antique Company of Richmond, and a 
director of Citizens Marine Jefferson Bank of 
Newport News. He is a member of the Rotary 
Club, Hampton Yacht Club, Boumi Yacht Club 
of Baltmore, and the United States Power Squa- 
dron, Hampton Roads Chapter. These latter mem- 
berships emphasize his hobby, boating. He is 
the owner of a fifty-four-foot wheeler cruiser. 
Active in fraternal affairs as well, he is a mem- 
ber of the lodges of the Loyal Order of Moose 
and the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
Lodge No. 278. In Masonry he is also a mem- 
ber of the consistory of the Ancient and Accep- 
ted Scottish Rite at Newport News, and Khedive 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of the 
Peninsula Shrine Club. He is fond of golf and 
is a member of the James River Country Club. 
Mr. Gindhart is a Methodist in his religious 
faith, and in politics counts himself an indepen- 
dent. 

At Farmville, Virginia, on October 1. 1017, 



-4 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



Robert M. Gindhart, Sr., married Grace L. Dug- 
ger of that city, daughter of Benjamin and Lucy 
(Cliborne) Dugger. Mr. and Mrs. Gindhart have 
two children: I. Robert M., Jr., born on April 
17, 1919. 2. Harry K., who was born on Febru- 
ary 15, 10-'-'. Both sons served their country in 
World War II. 



ROBERT IRVING FLETCHER— In the 

course of his career, R. I. Fletcher has been iden- 
tified with various industries in various parts of 
the country. His connection with the Newport 
News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company pre- 
dates World War II, when that firm made such a 
significant contribution to the nation's defense. Mr. 
Fletcher now holds office as its financial vice presi- 
dent. 

He is a native of Malone, New York, and was 
born on February 27, 1890, son of Ernest Tilden 
and Mary Helene (Conley) Fletcher. Mr. Fletcher 
completed his advanced studies at the University 
of Pennsylvania where he received his degree of 
Bachelor of Science in 1921. In 1924 he was in 
New York City as staff accountant with the firm 
of Price, Waterhouse and Company, a connection 
in which he continued until 1928. He then accepted 
a position as comptroller with the Central Hudson 
Gas and Electric Corporation of Poughkeepsie, New- 
York : and from 1934 to 1936 was comptroller of 
the Long Island Lighting Company. He was man- 
aging accountant with R. G. Rankin and Company 
of New York City in 1937-1938. 

In 1939 he came to Newport News and joined 
the shipbuilding firm there. He began his connec- 
tion as comptroller, was named vice president in 
1947, and became financial vice president in 
1953. He is a member of the directorate and comp- 
troller of the Newport News Shipbuilding Com- 
pany Foundation, and comptroller of the Newport 
News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Pen- 
sion Fund. 

Mr. Fletcher has served as chairman of the In- 
dustrial Advisory Committee of the Virginia Sav- 
ings Bond Division, United States Treasury De- 
partment. He is a member of the American In- 
stitute of Accountants, the Controllers Institute of 
America, the National Associaion Accountants, and 
is a fellow of the Virginia Society of Certified 
Public Accountants. He became a Certified Public 
Accountant in the State of New York in 1928. He 
is a member of the Society of Naval Architects 
and Marine Engineers and is an associate member 
of the American Institute of Management. He is 
a member of the Engineers Club and the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania Club, both of New York City, 
and the James River Country Club of Newport 
News. 

Mr. Fletcher served in the Student Armv Train- 



ing Corps at the University of Pennsylvania, dur- 
ing World War I. 

On November 24, 1928, Robert Irving Fletcher 
married Gladys Caroline Ruhberg, and they are 
the parents of one daughter, Marjorie Ann, who 
is the wife of S. L. Burdick, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. 
Fletcher make their home on Douglas Drive in 
Hilton Village. 



JOHN BELL McGAUGHY— A partner in the 
internationally active firm of Lublin, McGaughy 
and Associates, Architects and Consulting En- 
gineers, John Bell McGaughy is one of the three 
men who drafted the Building Code of the City 
of Norfolk. His projects have included bridges, 
schools, shopping centers, commercial and indus- 
trial buildings, water and sewer systems, air fields, 
hospitals and other important construction work, 
both in North America and the eastern hemis- 
phere. His firm's head office is in Norfolk — at 220 
West Freeman Street. 

Born in Norfolk on November 5, 1914, Mr. Mc- 
Gaughy is the son of John Bell McGaughy, engi- 
neer and inventor, and Vivian (Coleman) Mc- 
Gaughy. After attending Norfolk's public schools, 
he spent two years, I933-I93S, at the L T niversity 
of Virginia. He then spent another year at the 
University of Mississippi and still another at the 
University of Alabama. He completed his educa- 
tion at Duke University, wdiere he was awarded 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engi- 
neering in 1938. 

Between the time he attended the University 
of Alabama and Duke University — the year 1936- 
1937 — Mr. McGaughy served as assistant to the 
Project Engineer of the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. After taking his degree at 
Duke, he was appointed technical assistant in the 
Civil Engineering Division of the United States 
Coast Guard at Norfolk. In 1939, he was made 
project supervisor of the National Youth Ad- 
ministration in Washington. D. C, and later the 
same year principal draftsman in the Corps of 
Engineers, United States Army, at Huntington, 
West Virginia. 

Before the end of 1939, Air. McGaughy went 
to still another Army post, that of associate en- 
gineer with the Quartermaster Corps in the Pana- 
ma Canal Zone. There he remained until 1941, 
when he was recalled to the Corps of Engineers, 
this time at Norfolk. L T ntil 1943 he served first 
as assistant engineer, then as associate engi- 
neer, then engineer and finally as chief of the 
Design Section. 

In 1943, Mr. McGaughy was appointed chair- 
man of the engineering faculty of the University 
of Virginia's Extension Department (night classes) 





.(A SJo^tf-^U 




LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



2 5 



and he served through 1945. In 1943, too, Mr. 
McGaughy and Alfred M. Lublin organized the 
firm of Lublin, McGaughy and Associates. In 
addition to their Norfolk headquarters, they main- 
tain offices in Washington, D. C; Paris, France, 
and Milano, Italy. Mr. Lublin, who works out of 
the Paris office, is in charge of European opera- 
tion^. Mr. McGaughy, however, is consulting en- 
gineer in charge of all engineering design for the 
firm, nationally and internationally. After serv- 
ing on the three-member committee which drafted 
the Norfolk Building Code, he was appointed to 
the Building Code Board of Adjustments and Ap- 
peals and is now serving his second five-year 
term on that Board. 

Mr. McGaughy's position in his profession is 
further attested by his present service as a vice 
president and director of the National Society of 
Professional Engineers and his former service as 
president of the Virginia Society of Professional 
Engineers. Member of American Society of Civil 
Engineers, and Society of American Military En- 
gineers. He is also a former president of the En- 
gineers Club of Hampton Roads. His other or- 
ganizations include the American Concrete Insti- 
tute; Theta Tan, the engineering fraternity; Phi 
Delta Theta, the national social fraternity: the 
Virginia Club and the Norfolk Yacht and Country 
Club. He is a Registered Professional Engineer 
in Virginia, North Carolina, Florida, and the Dis- 
trict of Columbia, and holds the certificate of the 
National Board of Engineering Registration. 

John B. McGaughy married Charlotte Edna 
Schwartz, daughter of Frank Herbert and Estelle 
(Barton) Schwartz, at Cristobal, Republic of 
Panama, on July 20, 1940. They have one son, 
John Bell, Jr., born on April 13, 1943. 



JOHN WESLEY KEEFE has held a number 
of official posts in industry in the Norfolk area. 
For more than a decade and a half he has been 
president of the Norfolk Brass and Copper Corpo- 
ration and director of a number of firms. 

A native of Norfolk, he was born on April 12, 
1897, son of the Rev. William Randolph and Mary 
Virginia (Gregory) Keefe. His father was a Bap- 
tist minister. Attending local public schools, John 
W. Keefe graduated from the local high school. 
He began his business career with the Norfolk 
Southern Railroad in 1913, but remained with that 
organization only a short time, joining the Virginian 
Railway Company later the same year. From 1916 
to 1919 he was with The Henry Walke Company, 
with which he remained until 1919, with the ex- 
ception of his period of service in World War I. 
During that time he held the rank of sergeant in 



the army, serving in headquarters company at Camp 
A. A. Humphreys. 

Mr. Keefe first joined E. Hogshire Son and Com- 
pany in 1919, and continued with the firm on a full- 
time basis through 1923. In 1924, he accepted a 
responsible position with the Taylor Parker Com- 
pany, with which he remained until 1928. He left 
to join the executive staff of R. A. Burroughs and 
Company as its vice president, a position he held 
until 1940. In that year, Mr. Keefe became presi- 
dent of the Norfolk Brass and Copper Corporation, 
which has been his major business connection since 
that time. He has been secretary of the Hogshire 
Corporation since 1932, and he has been secretary 
of the Norfolk, Baltimore and Carolina Line since 
1923. Other present positions include membership 
of the boards of directors of the Hogshire Corpora- 
tion, National Compound Company, Hogshire Tent 
and Awning Manufacturing Company and the Nor- 
folk, Baltimore and Carolina Line, as well as the 
Norfolk Brass and Copper Corporation. 

Mr. Keefe takes a lively interest in community 
life, being a constructive worker in civic causes. He 
is a member of the Kiwanis Club of Norfolk and 
attends the Central Baptist Church. 

On October 8, 1919, in Norfolk, John Wesley 
Keefe married Esther Catherine Hogshire, daugh- 
ter of Edward and Mattie M. (Blake) Hogshire. 
The couple are the parents of the following chil- 
dren: 1. William Edward, who was born on Febru- 
ary 23, 1923. 2. John Randolph, born May 31, 1928. 
3. Robert Duvall, born January 20, 1932. 



NATHANIEL JAMES BABB— The city of 
South Norfolk possesses a citizen of public spirit, 
enterprise and initiative in Nathaniel James Babb, 
long identified with the Norfolk Southern Rail- 
way Company, and now mayor of his city. 

A native of Norfolk County, he was born in the 
Deep Creek section on October 29, 1904, son of 
the late Fletcher Bald) and Alice Elizabeth (Whit- 
field) Babb of South Norfolk. His forebears in 
both lines arrived from England in colonial times, 
and were prominent in Nansemond and Isle of 
Wight counties. Fletcher Babb, who died in South 
Norfolk in 1940, at the age of sixty-four, was active 
in the lumber industry. He was a son of Nathaniel 
Babb, farmer and Confederate veteran, of Nanse- 
mond County. He was wounded in conflict with 
Northern forces in 1864. Alice Elizabeth (Whit- 
field) Babb, who now resides with her son, was 
born in Isle of Wight County, daughter of James 
P. and Elizabeth (Darden) Whitfield. Her father 
was a substantial planter and slave holder, who 
owned the Whitfield Plantation on Black Water 
River, and served in the Confederate States Army. 

Mayor Babb is the elder of two children born 



LOWER TIDEWATF.R VIRGINIA 



to his parents. He was three years old when the 
family moved to Ivor in Isle of Wight County, 
where they made their home until 1916. They then 
moved to South Norfolk. Following his elementary 
education, Nathaniel J. Babb attended South Nor- 
folk High School for three years, then went to 
work. While holding a position, he continued to 
attend evening classes at Maury High School, 
where he graduated. 

\t the age of nineteen he began his career in 
railroading, joining the Seaboard Air Line Rail- 
road Company at Portsmouth with which he re- 
mained for two years. On June 1, 1926, a position 
offered itself which presented fuller opportunities, 
and a chance for residence at South Norfolk, to 
which he was partial. This connection was with the 
Norfolk Southern Railway Company at its Caro- 
lina Junction Shops. During the thirty years since 
that time, Mr. Babb has been in the employ of the 
railroad. Identified with the mechanical department, 
he won promotions from helper to foreman of the 
car department, a position he has held since Janu- 
ary 1947. In the course of his three decades' tenure, 
he has missed few days because of bad health. His 
long connection with the Brotherhood of Railway 
Carmen of America shows a record of more than 
ten years of service as secretary of the local 
chapter. 

His interest in the principles of good municipal 
government led to his election, in June 1953, as 
a member of the South Norfolk city council. He 
began his four-year term in September of that 
year; and also in September 1953, his fellow coun- 
cilmen chose him from among their number as the 
man best qualified to carry the responsibilities of 
mayor. He was elected to a second term as mayor 
in September 1955. Under the city manager form 
of government, a five-year improvement plan has 
been formulated by the city manager and approved 
by the mayor and four other members of the 
council. The mayor votes last, and if the ballots of 
the other members are tied, his is the deciding vote. 
In recent years, through the annexation of Portlock 
and Riverdale, South Norfolk has more than 
doubled its population, which has made much long- 
range planning necessary. Maintaining a keen in- 
terest in the welfare and future prospects of his 
city, Mayor Babb has contributed much to the 
solution of its problems. He is a member of the 
Virginia League of Municipalities. 

He is very active in the South Norfolk Baptist 
Church, where he formerly served as superinten- 
dent of the Sunday school and a member of the 
board of deacons, and is still a teacher of the 
Welcome Bible Class. His hobby is gardening, and 
he produces both flowers and vegetables. 

On November 20, 1926, at Smithfield, Nathaniel 



James Babb married Martha Susan Stallings, 
daughter of the late Robert W. and Martha Susan 
(Jones) Stallings of Isle of Wight County. Mrs. 
Babb is active in cultural and religious affairs, 
being a member of the South Norfolk Baptist 
Church, president of its Women's Missionary 
Union, and superintendent of the primary depart- 
ment of the Sunday school. She is also active in 
the Women's Club of South Norfolk. Mr. and Mrs. 
Babb are the parents of a son, Robert Fletcher, 
born July 16, 1927. He graduated from South Nor- 
folk High School and received hi- degree of Bach- 
elor of Laws from Wake Forest College in 1949. 
Admitted to the Virginia bar at the age of twenty- 
two, he is now successfully engaged in an in- 
dividual practice at Portsmouth. He married Mary 
Evelyn Barham of that city. 



ARTHUR J. MORRIS was born in Tarboro, 
North Carolina, August 5, 1882. He first atten- 
ded private schools and later attended the Tar- 
boro Graded School from which he graduated 
with credit to himself. His parents then moved 
to Norfolk. Virginia, when he was about twelve 
years old. In the Fall of 1894 he entered the 
Norfolk High School from which he graduated 
in June 1897. He and two other scholars led 
the scholarship record at the Norfolk High 
School. In September 1897, he entered the aca- 
demic department of the University of Virginia 
from which he graduated, creditably, in June 
1899. He returned to the University of Virginia 
in 1899 and entered the law department from 
which he graduated with a degree of Bachelor 
of Laws in June 1901, with distinction. During 
that year he won several prizes in the law de- 
partment for his outstanding effort and finally- 
won the gold and diamond medal, that was struck 
in his honor by the Board of Visitors of the 
University of Virginia when he represented the 
Washington Literary Society in intercollegiate de- 
bate without a loss. It was awarded to him 
as the best debater of the Washington Literary- 
Society. He was also elected to Phi Beta Kappa, 
his senior year. He has since been elected to 
Phi Beta Kappa Associates, the national honor 
society of that fraternity. 

Arthur J. Morris began the practice of the 
law after passing the bar examination in Staun- 
ton, Virginia, the day McKinley was shot, Sep- 
tember 7, 1901. He was fortunate the first two 
years of his practice, having originated novel 
theories of the law affecting personal injuries re- 
sulting first from the dropping of the Monticello 
Hotel elevator and, second, from the fall of an 
awning of Jos. Brown & Sons store, which 
awning overhung the sidewalk on Main Street 
in Norfolk. From these two cases he made nearly 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



27 



twenty thousand dollars and the success of these 
two cases brought him a number of clients. He 
began his practice of law on the sixth floor of 
the Citizens Bank Building and, after the first 
year, he associated with him a lawyer by the 
name of Richard J. Davis from Portsmouth. He 
soon became a financial lawyer specializing in 
service to banks and engaging in corporation 
organization and re-organization. 

His corporation and financial practice grew 
more rapidly than usual so that after his third 
year he organized the firm of Morris, Garnett 
and Cotten. That firm included, besides Mr. Mor- 
ris, Theodore S. Garnett, a son of Judge Garnett, 
and a practicing lawyer in Norfolk, and Preston 
S. Cotten, formerly of Cottendale near Greenville, 
North Carolina, a graduate of the University of 
North Carolina. Richard J. Davis and Walston 
McNair, graduate lawyers, continued in the firm 
as associated assistants to Mr. Morris. 

A year or two after this development, because 
of the continued success of the new firm, Robert 
Randolph Hicks, a leading trial member of the 
Norfolk bar and several years older than his 
associates, at Mr. Morris' invitation, became a 
member of the firm at which time the firm name 
was changed to Hicks, Morris, Garnett and Cot- 
ten. Within a year after this development. Mr. 
Richard Mel. Tunstall, one of Norfolk's leading 
real estate and title lawyers, was likewise invited 
by Mr. Morris to join the firm. The firm name 
was again changed, on the following January 1, 
when it became known as Hicks, Morris, Garnett, 
Cotten and Tunstall. It was again recognized 
as one of the outstanding law firms in the City 
of Norfolk. 

In 1007, Mr. Morris was impressed with the 
fact that several people came to his office asking 
for small loans, that is loans from three hundred 
dollars to one thousand dollars. Thereupon, Mr. 
Morris asked these applicants why they came 
to a law office. They replied they had tried 
every bank in town and because they were not 
engaged in business the bank, in each and every 
instance, declined to make loans to individuals. 

As an illustration, the first man who came re- 
quested a loan of three hundred and fifty dollars 
incident to an operation that his wife had to 
undergo at St. Vincent's Hospital. He was em- 
ployed at the Norfolk and Western Railroad and 
had been there for eighteen years, making two 
hundred dollars a month. Every bank in town 
declined to make him a loan. After Mr. Morris 
investigated the fact and was convinced the man 
was honest and that his job was permanent, he 
persuaded the National Bank of Commerce, for 
which bank his firm was one of the counsel, to 
make the loan. Mr. Morris endorsed the note 



evidencing the loan. Others followed. Before two 
years were over he was personally guaranteeing, 
by endorsement or otherwise, forty-two loans 
aggregating twenty-six thousand dollars. These 
loans were held by several banks in Norfolk, 
with which Mr. Morris' firm was professionally 
associated or otherwise connected. 

One day, Mr. Garnett informed him, as a re- 
sult of a conversation with Mr. Nathaniel Bea- 
man, president of the National Bank of Com- 
merce, it would be more dignified if an out- 
standing member of a large and successful law 
firm would stop making this kind of loan. In 
fact, "The" Garnett, as he was usually called by 
his close friends, told Mr. Morris he would be 
glad when all these loans were paid off and Mr. 
Morris forgot this obsession of his. 

Shortly after this conversation, Mr. Morris 
paid off the loans even though for that substan- 
tial sum he had to borrow on his life insurance. 
However, all the loans were paid without loss 
to Mr. Morris. Then and there he decided that 
he was going to make a thorough research effort 
throughout these United States to find out why 
an honest man who needed a limited amount of 
credit was denied credit from any existing bank. 
To get the whole undertaking away from the 
law office, Mr. Morris rented space in the upper 
story of a building whose lower floors were oc- 
cupied by a wholesale shoe business. At one time, 
Mr. Morris had as many as twenty-one men and 
women employed who traveled all over the 
country, at his expense, to get the facts and 
answers to a questionnaire he had prepared for 
that purpose. As a result of this effort, in late 
1909 and 1910, Mr. Morris discovered that eighty 
per cent of the American people had no access 
to bank credit and that for their individual needs 
they were forced either to resort to friends, chari- 
table organizations, chattel loan companies (at 
high rates of interest), or undesirable loan sharks, 
at even higher rates of interest. 

In January 1910, Mr. Morris made up his mind 
he was going to start what he then called a 
"middleman's bank'' which would be a cross be- 
tween a regular commercial bank and these loan 
sharks and chattel loan companies. In his deter- 
mination to organize this "middleman's bank," he 
proposed to lend money primarily on an indivi- 
dual's character and earning power, said money 
to be repayable in weekly or monthly install- 
ments on terms consistent with his earning power. 
Mr. Morris was determined to limit such loans 
to human needs and necessities, until he reached 
a period of demonstration that justified extension 
of the loans to individuals for small business 
purposes. 

He discussed the matter among his friends and 



28 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



clients and almost to a man, including his father, 
they were skeptical. Many thought the idea was 
superb, but otherwise unsafe and impracticable. 
Mr. Morris has often said that if it had not 
been for the vision and encouragement that he 
received from his mother he probably would 
have given up what by that time had become 
an obsession and determination to succeed. 

With all these obstacles he found it difficult to 
organize the first bank. He finally agreed to start 
with twenty thousand dollars capital, half of 
which he put up and guaranteed against loss 
the remaining half which was put up by his 
friends. These friends became the first board of 
directors and Mr. Charles H. Ferrell became the 
first president of the first bank, which was then 
known as "The Fidelity Savings and Trust Com- 
pany of Norfolk, Virginia." 

When Mr. Morris applied to the State Corpora- 
tion Commission for a charter, he received the 
following letter from Judge Robert R. Prentiss, 
the chairman: 

Dear Arthur: 

I have carefully considered your application for a charter 
for your hybrid and mongrel institution. Frankly. I don't 
know what it is. It isn't a savings bank ; it isn't a state or 
national bank; it isn't anything I ever heard of before. Its 
principles seem sound, however, and its purposes admirable. 
But the reason that I am going to grant a charter is because 
I believe in you. 

The bank opened for business April I, 1910. 

It was during the first year of this company's 
existence that Mr. Morris began in the United 
States the first undertaking to finance, by install- 
ment payments, the purchase of automobiles. 
During the first eighteen months of the existence 
of the Fidelity Savings and Trust Company that 
institution loaned fifty-nine thousand dollars on 
installment purchase of motor cars, but at that 
time the board of directors limited such loans 
to cars bought by doctors, or other business in- 
dividuals, solely for business purposes, as disting- 
uished from pleasure cars. 

The organization of the Fidelity Savings and 
Trust Company was the beginning of the Morris 
Plan development throughout these United States, 
which has become one of the outstanding develop- 
ments in modern finance and which is now being 
copied by twelve thousand commercial banks. It 
is generally referred to now as "consumer bank- 
ing." It was not called "The Morris Plan" until 
after fourteen banks had been successfully or- 
ganized and were in operation, and until Mr. 
Morris went to New York in 1914, sponsored by 
Mr. Fergus Reid, to raise the money for a large 
corporation, capitalized from five million dollars 
to twenty-five million dollars, for the purpose 
of developing Mr. Morris' system of consumer 
credit. 



After the second bank was organized in 191 1, 
in Atlanta, Georgia, the "Atlanta Constitution," 
in several editorials and cartoons, referred to the 
organization of that bank as "Morris' Plan of 
Banking." 

When Mr. Morris went to New York in 1914 
with Mr. Reid and met some of Wall Street's 
outstanding financiers at a meeting held in J. P. 
Morgan's private office, one of those present was 
Mr. Willard Straight, a member of the firm of 
J. P. Morgan and Company. Over Mr. Morris' 
objections, he insisted that the system be known 
as "The Morris Plan System of Consumer Bank- 
ing" and that a trade mark be registered of a 
black diamond with white letters imprinted there- 
on as "The Morris Plan." 

As a result of this successful meeting in New 
York, Mr. Morris organized "The Morris Plan 
Corporation of America," with a paid-in capital 
to begin with at five million dollars and with 
authorized capital of fifty million dollars. Mr 
Morris describes the purpose of this large corpora- 
tion not alone for the larger development of The 
Morris Plan System throughout the United States 
by the organization of independent banks to be 
known as "Morris Plan Banks," but also to in- 
sure the "democratization of credit" among the 
people. 

This corporation organized over a period of 
time several hundred "Morris Plan Banks." When 
the commercial banks went into this business 
and became competitors to Morris Plan Banks 
it became necessary to change the corporate names 
of Morris Plan Banks to commercial names 
so that the Morris Plan Banks, in addition to 
developing consumer credit among the masses, 
could also obtain commercial credits and go into 
commercial banking, because on commercial de- 
posits no bank pays any interest. When they 
were all Morris Plan Banks they used the sav- 
ings deposits on which they paid interest at 
the beginning as high as three per cent and four 
per cent. 

The former Morris Plan Banks are known by 
commercial names and while sixty-five per cent 
of the business is still in consumer credit, with 
average loans less than one thousand dollars, these 
banks are also engaged in commercial loans to 
the extent of thirty-five per cent of their volume. 

Time and space do not permit a more complete 
story of the Morris Plan development. To date 
the Morris Plan System has loaned throughout 
these United States approximately ninety billion 
dollars to the honest American wage earners. 

The original bank, established with twenty 
thousand dollars capital, is now known as "The 
Bank of Virginia," with total resources of over 
one hundred and fifteen million dollars. The lar- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



29 



gest Morris Plan Bank, next to the original bank, 
is the "Industrial Bank of Commerce" in New 
York City, formerly known as "The Morris Plan 
Bank of New York." 

Mr. Morris is still active and is the active 
chairman of the board of The Morris Plan Cor- 
poration of America and is also active chairman 
of the hoard of the Industrial Bank of Commerce. 



RALPH HUNTER DAUGHTON— A lawyer 
and former legislator, Ralph Hunter Daughton has 
a reputation as one of the leaders of the movements 
which resulted in the legalization of boxing in Vir- 
ginia and of Sunday baseball and movies in Norfolk. 
He is a former president of the Piedmont League, 
a successful group in the professional baseball 
world, and at one time — as a Government agent- — 
ferreted out spies, saboteurs and anti-trust law vio- 
lators. Today he conducts an active law practice, 
with offices in the Essex Building, Norfolk, and 
continues to promote wholesome recreation for 
citizens of all ages and other progressive and cul- 
tural activities. 

Mr. Daughton was born in Washington, D. C., 
on September 23, 1885, the son of John B. and 
Martha (Hunter) Daughton. The fact that many 
men of the Daughton family went into the law 
undoubtedly influenced his decision to make that 
field his career. After attending public schools in 
(he national capital, he went to Pine Grove Aca- 
demy in Maryland. He prepared for the Bar at 
National University, Washington, and in 1907 was 
awarded the degrees of Bachelor of Laws and 
Master of Laws. 

He practiced in Washington for two years. Then 
he accepted appointment as a Special Agent with 
the United States Department of Justice. The unit 
to which he was attached later became famous 
as the Federal Bureau of Investigation, headed by 
J. Edgar Hoover. He worked as an "undercover 
agent" on anti-trust cases until ordered to Norfolk. 
Here he opened the first regional office of what 
is now the FBI for the area embracing Virginia, 
North Carolina and the Eastern Shore of Mary- 
land. At the same time he obtained admission to 
the Bar of Virginia and laid the groundwork for 
his present legal practice. 

When ordered to the Mexican border in 1020, 
Mr. Daughton resigned from the Department of 
Justice and began giving full time to his practice. 
Military law was his specialty. It was not long 
before Mr. Daughton was a leader in political and 
civic life. In 1933. he was elected to the State 
House of Delegates and served through 1938, when 
he was elected to the State Senate. This post he 
held until he was elected to the 78th United 
States Congress as a Democratic Representative 
from the Second Virginia District to fill the 



vacancy caused by the resignation of Winder 
R. Harris. At the same time he was elected to 
serve in the 79th Congress and continued in 
this post from November 7, 1944 to January 3, 
1947, being succeeded by Porter Hardy, Jr., also 
a Democrat. 

Mr. Daughton continued his public service in 
other fields. Always interested in boxing and base- 
ball and other sports, he was appointed Virginia's 
first State Boxing and Wrestling Commission 
chairman. For nine years he served as president 
of the Piedmont Baseball League. His appoint- 
ment as commission chairman was the result of 
his long and finally successful labors to legalize 
the ring sports in Virginia. When he also helped 
bring about removal of the bans in Norfolk against 
the playing of baseball and the showing of motion 
pictures on the Sabbath he achieved another life- 
long ambition. His own religious convictions are 
strong, however, and he is a charter member of 
the Larchmont Methodist Church of Norfolk. Also, 
he adheres to the religious tenets and other be- 
liefs of such organizations of which he is a mem- 
ber as the Lions Club of Norfolk (charter mem- 
ber); the Knights of Pythias; the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks and various Masonic 
bodies, including Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. With his 
wife, he makes his home at 5406 Hampton Boule- 
vard, Norfolk, and there indulges in two favorite 
hobbies — "working around the house" and garden- 
ing. 

Mrs. Daughton is the former Sue M. Taggart 
of Washington, D. C. She and Mr. Daughton were 
married in that city on February 20, 1912. 



ROBERT FRIEND BOYD— A member of an 
old American family whose sons have fought in 
many wars, including the Revolution, Robert 
Friend Boyd has himself been active in national 
defense and military programs. As a lawyer he 
has served the United States Marine Corps, as 
he is now serving the civilian community in the 
Lower Tidewater, with offices in Norfolk. He i? 
also active in Methodist Church programs. 

Born in Richmond on May II, 1927, Mr. Boyd 
is the son of Oscar Lindwood and Ruby (Friend) 
Boyd and, on his father's side, is the great-grand- 
son of Colonel Andrew Boyd of the Confederate 
forces and, on his mother's, the grandson of Dr. 
Ruben Butler Friend of Petersburg. His father is 
district manager in Norfolk for the General Foods 
Corporation. 

Robert F. Boyd was graduated from Granby 
High School, Norfolk, in 1946. Four years later 
he took the degree of Bachelor of Arts at the 
College of William and Mary and in 1952 that 
of Bachelor of Commercial Law at Marshall- Wythe 



3o 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



School of Law of the College of William and 
Mary. Commissioned in the United States Marine 
Corps in 1952, he became chief counsel to the 
General Court-Martial Board at the Marine Corps 
Base. Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, and emerged 
from the service in 1954 with the rank of captain. 
He retains this rank in the Marine Corps Reserve. 

Since 1954 Mr. Boyd has been in active practice 
in Norfolk and since January 1, 1957 has been a 
partner in the Norfolk law firm of Davis & Boyd. 
He is a member of the Norfolk-Portsmouth Bar 
Association, the Virginia Bar Association, the 
American Bar Association; the Wythe Law Club, 
of which he is past chancellor; Kappa Sigma fra- 
ternity, of which he was president in the year 1955- 
1956, and Tau Kappa Alpha, tihe national honorary 
forensic fraternity. His other organizations include 
the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce, Kiwanis Club 
of Norfolk, Junior Chamber of Commerce of Nor- 
folk, Marine Corps Reserve Officers Association, 
Sons of the American Revolution, in which he is 
vice president and serves on the board of mana- 
gers. Heroes of '76, National Sojourners, and 
various Masonic bodies, including Williamsburg 
Lodge No. 6, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; 
Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine, and the Suffolk Shrine Club. 
Mr. Boyd is serving on the board of directors of 
the Virginia Heart Association, is vice president 
of the Tidewater Heart Association, and is chair- 
man of fund raising for the Tidewater area. He is 
a member of the board of directors of William 
and Mary Law School Association as well as Wil- 
liam and Mary Alumni Association Norfolk Chap- 
ter. At the Park Place Methodist Church, he is a 
member of the Official Board and is general super- 
intendent of the Church School. 

Mr. Boyd married Sara Grace Miller on Sep- 
tember 20, 1952. The ceremony was performed in 
Wren Chapel, Williamsburg. Mrs. Boyd, a native 
of Holly Hill, South Carolina, is the daughter of 
Lawrence Elzie and Elizabeth (Copeland) Miller. 
Educated at Ashley Hall, Charleston, South Caro- 
lina; Northampton School for Girls, Northampton, 
Massachusetts, and the College of William and 
Mary, she holds the Bachelor of Arts degree. She 
was elected to Phi Beta Kappa and Delta Delta 
Delta. Mr. and Mrs. Boyd are the parents of two 
boys: Robert Friend, Jr., born on March 23, 1954. 
2. David Miller, born on October 5, I95S- 



CAMILLUS ALBERT NASH— To a distin- 
guished military career in the War Between the 
States, followed by an equally distinguished career 
with the "ancestor" of the present Virginia Na- 
tional Guard organization, the late Camillus Albert 
Nash, member of a family seated in Virginia for 
three hundred years, added a career of great use- 



fulness and significance in the commercial world 
and community affairs. At the time of his death, 
he was one of the outstanding citizens not only 
of the Lower Tidewater but the entire state. One 
firm he founded and headed, now known as C. A. 
Nash and Son. a building supply business, is opera- 
ted today by his son, William Herbert Nash, who 
is also well known in the region and its leading 
•city, Norfolk. Camillus A. Nash was active in 
chemicals, banking and finance, and other fields 
of interest. 

Born in Norfolk County on October 22, 1842, 
Camillus Albert Nash was the youngest son of 
Richard and Camilla (Joliffe) Nash. Educated in 
the public schools of the county, he proceeded, in 
war and peace, to add luster to the Nash family 
name. The name was brought to America by Thom- 
as Nash, who settled in Lower Norfolk County be- 
fore 1665 and who died in 1673. The successive 
generations were Thomas Nash, II (died 1735); 
Thomas Nash, III (died 1783); Thomas Nash, 
IV (died 1794), who was lieutenant of His Ma- 
jesty's Colonial Militia of Virginia, having so quali- 
fied in 1760, and lieutenant colonel of Virginia 
Militia in the Revolutionary War, and Caleb Nash 
(died 1827). Caleb Nash was the father of Richard 
Nash (died 1855), father of Camillus A. Nash. 

Colonel Nash, as he was to be known most of 
his life, enlisted, in July 1861, when in his nine- 
teenth year, in Company A, 61st Virginia Infantry 
Regiment, better known in the Lower Tidewater 
as the "Jackson Grays." He soon became first 
sergeant of this company and in June 1862, was 
elected second lieutenant. He was captain of the 
shore battery at Seawell's Point which sank the 
U. S. S. Minnesota prior to the engagement be- 
tween the C. S. S. Virginia (Merrimac) and the 
U. S. S. Monitor in March 1862. His organiza- 
tion was later attached to Mahone's Brigade, and 
he was twice wounded in its campaigns, first at 
the Crater in July 1864, and again at Davis Farm 
the following month. The latter, a leg wound, 
proved more serious, and he was detached tempor- 
arily for assignment to Mosby's Men. 

He was back with his old company at the time 
of Lee's surrender and was paroled at Richmond 
in May 1865. After the war, he continued his 
interest in military affairs and eventually became 
colonel of the old Fourth Regiment, Virginia Vol- 
unteers, forerunner of the present National Guard 
organization. Colonel Nash had three brothers, all 
of whom also served in the Confederate Army. 
They were Sergeant Cincinnatus A. Nash and Pri- 
vate Henry E. Nash, both of the "Jackson Grays," 
and Private John L. Nash of Company I, 15th 
Regiment. Virginia Cavalry. There was also a third 
cousin, Dr. Herbert M. Nash, a prominent Nor- 
folk physician, who served successively as surgeon 



TWVa. 4 




(^^^^^^C^^tJE^^C 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



?i 



of the 9th Virginia Regiment, surgeon of the 6ist 
Virginia Regiment, and chief surgeon of Artillery 
in the 3rd Corps. 

Upon his return to Norfolk after the war, 
Colonel Nash was employed by Thomas B. Row- 
land in the wholesale grocery business. In 1885 
he entered the building supply business under the 
firm name of C. A. Nash and Company, later C. 
A. Nash and Son, the name under which William 
Herbert Nash is operating the organization today, 
at 732 Granby Street. 

As time went on, Colonel Nash's business inter- 
ests multiplied. He served as vice president of the 
City National Bank, president of the American 
Fertilizer Company, president of the Hunter Chemi- 
cal Company, president of the Virginia-Carolina 
Supply Company, vice president of the Tidewater 
Building and Loan Association, and member of 
the boards of directors of both the Citizens Bank 
and the Virginia- Carolina Trust Company. 

In civic affairs he rose to the presidency of 
both the Norfolk Board of Trade and the Norfolk 
Business Men's Association and in other ways 
demonstrated his deep interest in community de- 
velopment. He served as deacon, trustee, and Sun- 
day school superintendent at the Freemason Street 
Baptist Church of Norfolk and was a member of 
the old Virginia Club, the Hampton Roads Yacht 
Club, and the Masonic order. He died on Febru- 
ary 19, 1905, at the age of sixty-three. 

Colonel Nash married twice. His first wife was 
Mary Fannie Nash, his third cousin, by whom he 
had two children: Albert Rowland and Annie Lee. 
Mary Fannie Nash died, and in 1876 Colonel 
Nash married Emma Peters Dey, daughter of Wil- 
liam Dey, by whom he had four children:!. Camil- 
las Albert, Jr., 2. Emma Dey, 3. Daisy Camilla, 
4. William Herbert. 



CHARLES MALONE FLINTOFF of Suf- 
folk is an insurance executive by occupation, vice 
president of the Suffolk Insurance Corporation. He 
is known to Masons throughout his state through 
his service as grand high priest, Grand Chapter of 
Royal Arch Masons in Virginia, and through his 
present post, grand junior warden of the state's 
Grand Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 

A native of Caswell County, North Carolina, he 
was born on January 24, 1903, son of Charles B. 
and Emma (Malone) Flintoff. Both parents were 
born in North Carolina, and both are deceased. His 
father was a farmer. Reared in his native North 
Carolina county, Charles M. Flintoff began his 
education in its public schools and later attended 
school in Danville, Virginia. He concluded his 
preparatory studies at Riverside Military Academy 
in Gainesville, Georgia. 

Mr. Flintoff followed the profession of civil en- 



gineering in North Carolina and Virginia until 
1929, working in the Departments of Highways of 
both states. In 1929 he came to Suffolk and joined 
the Suffolk Insurance Corporation. He became an 
officer in 1933, and today holds the positions of vice 
president and director. The firm, engaged in the 
general insurance business, was founded in 1923 
by a group of the city's business leaders. A. Taylor 
Darden is now its president. He served in 1957- 
58 as president of the Virginia Association of 
Insurance Agents. 

Besides his executive duties with his firm, Mr. 
Flintoff is a director of the Farmers Bank of 
Nansemond. A Rotarian, he is past president of 
his club, and he has served his church, the Epis- 
copal, as senior warden and vestryman. His favorite 
sport is golf, and he is a member of the Princess 
Anne Country Club at Virginia Beach. 

As a Mason, Mr. Flintoff is an honorary mem- 
ber of Hiram Lodge No. 340, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Mason, a member of the consistory of 
the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, honorary 
member of Mount Nebo Chapter No. 20 of Royal 
Arch Masons, a member of the Commandery of 
the Knights Templar, and a member of Saint 
Polycarp Conclave No. 69, Red Cross of Constan- 
tine. He belongs to Khedive Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He 
served as grand high priest of the state's Grand 
Chapter of Royal Arch Masons from 1948 to 1940; 
and assumed his present office as grand junior 
warden of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the Com- 
monwealth of Virginia in 1957 after a term as 
grand senior deacon. 

Charles Malone Flintoff was married in Suffolk, 
on December 27, 1932, to Eliza Prentis Causey of 
that city, daughter of James C. Causey, deceased, 
and his wife, the former Margaret Whitfield 
Crump. Mr. Flintoff's business address is 165 
North Main Street, Suffolk. 



WINSTON H. IRWIN— A former assistant 
commonwealth attorney for Norfolk County and 
World War II legal officer at the Naval Air 
Station in Norfolk, Winston H. Irwin is now prac- 
ticing law in that city, with offices in the National 
Bank of Commerce Building. Outside the legal 
profession, Mr. Irwin has a reputation in civic, 
sports, and social circles, as well as in the religious 
world. 

He was born in Lynchburg on May 27, 1003, the 
son of E. Fillmore and Ellen (Clark) Irwin. His 
father, also a native of Lynchburg, was a grocer 
there until bis death in 1905. at the age of fifty- 
five. The mother, born in Amherst County, died 
in 1952 at the age of seventy-four. 



3 2 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



Winston H. Irwin, brought to Norfolk in child- 
hood by his widowed mother, attended that city's 
public schools. In 1922 he was graduated from 
Maury High School. He then attended the Col- 
lege of William and Mary, taking the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in 1926. He also studied 
law at the college, but completed his training 
for the profession as an employee in the of- 
fice of the Clerk of the Corporation Court of 
the city of Norfolk. On July 15, 1929, he took 
and passed the Virginia State Bar Examinations 
and was admitted to practice. 

Until January 1940, he was in private practice 
in Norfolk. At that time he was appointed assis- 
tant commonwealth attorney for the city and he 
served in that capacity until October 22, 1942, 
when he was commissioned a lieutenant, senior 
grade, in the United States Navy. As legal officer 
of the Naval Air Station at Norfolk, he handled 
all courtmartial cases. He was released to inac- 
tive status as a lieutenant commander in the fall 
of 1945. 

He then opened his law office in the National 
Bank of Commerce Building. Mr. Irwin's activi- 
ties in community life led to his election to the 
presidency of the Kiwanis Club of Norfolk, the 
Pyramid Club of Norfolk, and the Norfolk Sports 
Club. He served on the board of deacotu. of the 
Knox Presbyterian Church of Norfolk and for 
several years taught in the Sunday school. Besides 
the organizations already mentioned, he is a mem- 
ber of the Norfolk- Portsmouth, Virginia, and 
American bar associations; the Norfolk Commis- 
sioned Officers Club; Ruth Lodge, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, holding the Thirty-second 
Degree in this order; Norfolk Yacht and Country 
Club; and Sigma Nu fraternity. 

Mr. Irwin married Mrs. Elise (Loewmer) Au- 
fenger, widow of Richard Aufenger and daughter 
of Charles and Roslyn Loewmer. Like her fa- 
ther, Mrs. Irwin was born in Harrisonburg. Her 
mother was a native of Baltimore, Maryland. 
Charles Loewmer operated a marble business 
which, having been founded in 1856, was one of 
the oldest in the Old Dominion. He headed this 
firm until his death on April 15, 1938. His widow 
died on September 10, 1941. Mrs. Irwin, who is 
prominent in welfare and cultural activities, ser- 
ves on the board of trustees of the Norfolk Sym- 
phony and Choral Association and the board of di- 
rectors of the Florence Crittenden Home. She is 
also active in the Daughters of the Confederacy, 
the Hermitage Foundation, and the Norfolk So- 
ciety of Arts. She is a graduate of Madison Col- 
lege, Harrisonburg. By her first marriage, she is 
the mother of two children: I. Richard Aufenger, 
who married Barbara Woodhouse. Thev have one 



son: Richard, III. 2. Patricia, wife of Richard W. 
Wilson of Richmond, mother of Mark and Scott. 
Air. and Mrs. Irwin make their home at 7301 
Apple Tree Lane, Algonquin Park. 



DONALD R. LOCKE— A civil engineer with 
long experience in the municipal field, Donald R. 
Locke is now city planning engineer for the 
City Planning Commission of Norfolk. He for- 
merly held a similar office for the County of Ar- 
lington. Today, in addition to discharging his du- 
ties in Norfolk, he serves as planning consultant 
to various other municipalities in the Old Do- 
minion. He is well known among the nation's city 
planners. 

Mr. Locke, a native of Rochester, New York, 
is the son of Charles William and Marie (Carey) 
Locke, both also born in that city. His father, 
who died in 1951, was an engineer with the Gen- 
eral Railway Signal Company of Rochester for 
about forty years. The mother died in 1907. Rear- 
ed in Arlington by an aunt, Emily J. Carey, the 
city planner attended the public schools of that 
city and Washington, D. C. For a time he attend- 
ed high school in the national capital, but comple- 
ted his secondary education at Devitt Preparatory 
School, from which he was graduated in 1926. In 
1930, he took the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Civil Engineering at George Washington Uni- 
versity. 

One of his long-time interests is the banjo and 
after he took his civil engineering degree, which 
was in the time of the depression, he turned a 
hobby into a temporary professional career. With 
a dance band he toured the country, in between- 
times working on The Washington Star. In 1932, 
the opportunity to enter the career for which he 
had prepared himself, engineering, presented it- 
self. He became a rodman for the Engineering 
Department of Arlington County. In 1944, he was 
made planning engineer for the City of Arlington 
and in May 1946, the City Planning Commission 
of Norfolk appointed him to his present office as 
city planning engineer. Through his consulting 
work Mr. Locke serves other parts of the Lower 
Tidewater and of Virginia as a whole. 

He is a Registered Professional Engineer of 
the Commonwealth of Virginia and a member of 
the National Society of Professional Engineers, 
American Institute of Planners and the American 
Society of Civil Engineers. Outside the profession 
he belongs to the Lafayette Club, of which he is a 
director; the Virginia Club and Lions Club of Nor- 
folk and the Cavalier Club of Virginia Beach. With 
his family he worships in the Episcopal Church 
(Christ and Saint Luke's Church of Norfolk). In 
politics he is a Democrat. Gardening is his hobby 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



33 



and his favorite sport is hunting in Maine and 
Canada. 

Mr. Locke married Shiela Bryan, daughter of 
Edgar S. and Yirgie (Taylor) Bryan, of Norfolk 
in November 1935. Mrs. Locke's father, a native 
of Baltimore, Maryland, was a seedsman and was 
the United States representative for a Netherlands 
seed concern. He died in 1933. Virgie Bryan, who 
was born in Hickory, Virginia, died in 1955- Mr. 
and Mrs. Locke live at 1465 Waylon Avenue, 
Norfolk. Mrs. Locke is active in the Lakewood 
Garden Club. 



J. PAUL MURPHY— The career he began as 
office boy with the Empire Machinery and Supply 
Corporation, following World War I, has led J. 
Paul Murphy to the presidency of that Norfolk firm, 
which is a major distributor of mill supplies and 
machinery, heavy hardware, iron and steel. He lias 
held important municipal and civic posts, and of- 
fices in organizations. 

Born in Davidson County, North Carolina, on 
September 9, 1899, Mr. Murphy is a son of Robert 
D. and Willie (Clodfelter) Murphy. Both parents 
were also natives of Davidson County. Mrs. Mur- 
phy now resides in Portsmouth. She survives her 
husband, who died in 1947 at the age of seventy- 
one. For a time, in the early years of his career, 
he was in the furniture manufacturing business at 
High Point, North Carolina. He later became a 
railway mechanic, and was with the railroad for 
twenty-five years, retiring a short time before his 
death. 

It was at High Point that J. Paul Murphy passed 
his boyhood years and began his public school ed- 
ucation. He completed his studies in the Norfolk 
County public schools, attended the Norfolk Coun- 
ty High School, and in 1919 joined the Empire 
Machinery and Supply Corporation in the capacity 
of office boy. He has been with the organization ever 
since, and advanced through the positions of book- 
keeper, billing manager and vice president to the 
presidency. He was elected to the chief executive 
office in 1954. 

Empire Machinery and Supply Corporation, 
which has its headquarters at 409 East Water Street, 
is a wholesale firm, which distributes heavy hard- 
ware, iron and steel products, and supplies and 
machinery essential for the operation of industry, to 
customers over a wide area, comprising the Caro- 
linas and Virginia. Forty people are employed at 
the home office in Norfolk, and there are ten 
traveling salesmen on the staff. Besides Mr. Mur- 
phy, the president, the management roster con- 
tains the names of J. Ross McNeal, treasurer, and 
B. P. Deans, secretary. 

Mr. Murphy is chairman of the Civil Service 



Committee of Portsmouth. He served on the board 
of directors and served two terms as president of 
the Young Men's Christian Association in Ports- 
mouth. He is a member of the James River Coun- 
try Club of Warwick and is a Kiwanian. Particular- 
ly active in his church, the Baptist, he serves cur- 
rently on its board of deacons and as treasurer of 
its building fund. He has been chairman of the 
finance committee at various times, and assistant 
superintendent of the Sunday school, in which he 
is now a teacher. Mr. Murphy serves the broader 
interests of his denomination. He is a member of 
the State Board of Missions and Education of the 
Baptist Church, and is treasurer of the Baptist 
Council of his home area. He finds a little time in 
his busy schedule for out-of-door sports, and his 
favorite pastimes are golf and hunting. 

Miss Annie Mary Harrell became the wife of 
J. Paul Murphy in a ceremony taking place on 
June 7, iyji. She is the daughter of Jobe and Cora 
(Mitchell) Harrell. Her father, born in North 
Carolina, operated a grocery store in Portsmouth. 
He died in August ni-'i. Mrs. Harrell was born in 
Portsmouth. Mr. and Mrs. Murphy are the par- 
ents of two children: 1. Minnie Kathryn, who was 
born on April 25, 1923. She is the wife of Robert 
B. Sawyer, who is store manager at Norfolk with 
the Empire Machinery and Supply Corporation. 
Mr. and Mrs. Sawyer reside in that city, and are 
the parents of a daughter. Linda Sue, who was 
born on February 15, 1948. 2. Mary Patricia, born 
on October 13, 1929. She married Lloyd Aguero 
of Rockville Center, Long Island, New York, who 
is now with the Newport News Shipbuilding and 
Dry Dock Company in Newport News, Virginia. 

Mrs. Murphy is active in the Women's Club of 
Portsmouth, and in the work of her church. She 
teaches in its primary department, and was for 
several years superintendent of the Baptist Wo- 
men's Missionary Union of Portsmouth. The couple 
live at 201 Broad Street in that city. 



VERNON ARTHELIA MOORE— Outstand- 
ing among the architects of Norfolk and the 
Lower Tidewater Virginia, Vernon A. Moore has 
to his credit a long list of important structures 
designed and built from his plans and specifica- 
tions. His talents and achievements have won 
him wide recognition. 

A native of Norfolk, he was born January 16, 
1907, son of Joseph A. and Mollie (Sharpe) Moore 
and one of six children born to their marriage. 
His father was a native of Wilson, North Caro- 
lina, and the son of Joseph Moore, who lived his 
entire life in the vicinity of Wilson, where he was 
a substantial tobacco farmer. Joseph Moore served 
in the Confederate States Army. His son Joseph 



34 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



A. Moore, the father of the architect, was engaged 
in the general building contracting business in 
Norfolk for many years until his retirement. He 
headed his own firm, and erected a number of 
apartment houses in the city. His wife, the former 
Mollie Sharpe, now deceased, was born at Wilson, 
North Carolina. 

Vernon A. Moore passed his boyhood in his 
native Norfolk, and received his early education 
in the elementary schools there, and at Maury 
High School. To prepare himself for his profes- 
sion, he then took a course of study at the Beaux 
Arts Institute of Design in New York City. He 
began his career with various architectural firms, 
working in Boston. New York, Philadelphia, and 
Miami, Florida. 

Returning to his native Norfolk after this early 
experience, he was the organizer of the architec- 
tural firm of Ferguson, Meakin and Moore. After 
about a year this partnership was dissolved, and 
in 1937, Mr. Moore established his own firm, 
which he has since operated under his own name. 
Offices are at 716 West 20th Street. 

Mr. Moore has played a considerable individual 
part in giving the city of Norfolk and the Lower 
Tidewater area attractive and intelligently designed 
new buildings. X T otable examples of his work in- 
clude the Norfolk Ledger-Dispatch Building, de- 
signed for Norfolk Newspapers, Inc.; the Ocean 
View Elementary School; Titustown Elementary 
School; Tucker Elementary School; Newport 
Avenue Elementary School; Alary Calcott Elemen- 
tary School; Lakehurst Elementary School; the 
Roberts Park Elementary School; the Robert Lee 
School addition; the Granby Elementary School; 
several defense housing projects including the Oak 
Leaf Park Project and the Merrimac Park Project; 
Norfolk Municipal Airport Building; the U. S. O. 
Government Recreation Center at Ocean View; 
Norfolk County Health Center; the Paul H. Rose 
Corporation stores; and Center Shops on 21st 
Street. He also designed the Intensive Treatment 
Center; the Park Place Methodist Church; the 
Epworth Methodist Church; and the Greek Ortho- 
dox Church. He has been selected as architect 
for the new Norfolk General Hospital Building, 
to be erected at an estimated cost of five and 
one-quarter million dollars. He has designed many 
of the fine private homes of the Norfolk area; 
and his work has been sufficiently varied in charac- 
ter to include plans for heating systems and 
store fronts, and designs for remodeling contracts, 
including that for the Thomas Nelson Hotel in 
Norfolk. 

Surrounding Mr. Moore in his well-appointed 
offices at 716 West 20th Street in Norfolk is a 
staff of capable and co-operative workers, each 
well trained and proficient in his specialty. The 



organization operates smoothly and efficiently, as 
the products of the firm indicate. 

Mr. Moore was one of the directors of the 
original Virginia Society of Architects. He is a 
member of the American Society of Heating and 
Ventilating Engineers. Apart from these profes- 
sional connections, he is a former member of the 
Norfolk Kiwanis Club, and belongs to Norfolk 
Lodge No. 1, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 
He holds the Thirty-second degree as a Scottish 
Rite Mason, and belongs to Khedive Temple, An- 
cient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 
He is a member of the Epworth Methodist Church. 
For recreation he enjoys golf. 

On February 19, 1926, at Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, Vernon A. Moore married Velma A. Mor- 
rison of Hastings, Florida. They are the parents 
of four children: I. Joseph Arthelia. 2. Luvinia 
Dolores. 3. Vernon Edward. 4. Carl Nelson. The 
family's home is at 1420 Lafayette Boulevard, 
Norfolk. 



CLARENCE BAIRD ROBERTSON— Through 

his participation in important business enterpri- 
ses and in virtually every major economic, cultural 
and social field, including public service, education 
and health and welfare, Clarence Baird Robertson 
of Norfolk has become an outstanding citizen not 
only of the Lower Tidewater but the entire South. 
He is president of the Robertson Chemical Corp- 
oration, producers and sellers of sulphuric acid, 
superphosphate, fertilizer materials and commer- 
cial fertilizers, as well as pure Nova Scotia land 
plaster and prepared and burned shell lime. He 
serves and has served in various offices or as 
a director in numerous organizations, including 
the Commission of Higher Education for Norfolk, 
the Norfolk Chapter of the American National 
Red Cross and the Norfolk Community Chest. 
Norfolk General Hospital, American Plant Food 
Council, National Fertilizer Association and Vir- 
ginia Manufacturers, to mention only a few. His 
reputation is urban, rural and maritime. 

Mr. Robertson was born at Salem, Virginia, on 
September 1, 1891, the son of Beverly Holcomb 
and Anna McDonald (Baird) Robertson, and neph- 
ew of Walter H. Robertson, founder and late 
president of the Robertson Chemical Corporation. 
After attending public schools, C. B. Robertson 
entered Hampden-Sydney College, where he re- 
ceived the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1915. He 
is also the holder of the Algernon-Sydney Sul- 
lavan Medallion awarded by the college. He studied 
law for a year at Washington and Lee University. 

In 1916 Mr. Robertson joined his uncle in the 
Robertson Chemical Corporation. He began as a 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



35 



clerk and rose step by step to his present office. 
His first big promotion came in 1920, when he 
was elected secretary of the corporation and a 
member of its board of directors. He had mean- 
time been working as a foreman and then superin- 
tendent. In 1931, lie was promoted to vice presi- 
dent and the same year was elected president. 
For many years, too, he has been on the board 
of the Atlantic and Danville Railroad. 

Mr. Robertson's earliest public service was in 
the nation's armed forces in World War I. He 
was with the Coast Artillery, emerging as a sec- 
ond lieutenant in the Reserve. His record since 
then has included service as a deacon and presi- 
dent of the Men's Club of the First Presbyterian 
Church of Norfolk; trustee of Hampden-Sydney 
College; director of Lees-McRae College, Banner 
Elk, North Carolina; director of the Norfolk 
Chamber of Commerce; director of the Hampton 
Roads Maritime Exchange; director and member 
of the executive committee of the American Plant 
Food Council, Washington, D. C: president, di- 
rector and member of the executive committee of 
the Norfolk Community Chest; director and mem- 
ber of the executive committee, Norfolk Chapter, 
American National Red Cross; vice president and 
director and member of the executive committee 
of Virginia Manufacturers; director of the Bonney 
Home for Girls; director and treasurer of the 
Norfolk Museum of Arts and Sciences; president, 
director and member of the executive committee 
of the Norfolk General Hospital; member of the 
Commission of Higher Education for Norfolk; 
chairman of Civil Defense for the local manu- 
facturing industries in World War II; director of 
the Norfolk Young Men's Christian Association; 
second vice president and director of the Rotary 
Club of Norfolk; director of the National Fertili- 
zer Association; and a member of the executive 
committee of the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce. 

In addition to the organizations already men- 
tioned, Mr. Robertson is a member of Pi Kappa Al- 
pha and Omega Delta Kappa fraternities, Princess 
Anne Country Club at Virginia Beach, Norfolk Ger- 
man Club, Norfolk Yacht and Country Club, Com- 
missioned Officers Club, Virginia Club, Cavalier 
Beach and Cabana Club, the Masonic fraternity, 
American Legion, Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion, and Norfolk Executives Club. His office is 
in the Wainwright Building, Bute and Duke 
streets, Norfolk. His factories are located in Nor- 
folk and South Hill, Virginia, and at Raleigh, Wil- 
mington and Statesville, North Carolina. 

Mr. Robertson married Claudia Baldwin Pol- 
lard in Norfolk in October 1953. They have one 
daughter, Claudia Pollard (known to all as "Pol- 
ly"), who was born in Norfolk in July 1954. The 



Robertsons live at 1424 West Princess Anno Road, 
Norfolk. 



STEWART R. WHITEHURST is president 
of the Whaley Engineering Corporation, a Nor- 
folk firm established in 19 19. The firm specializes 
in the design and construction of specialized pre- 
cision machines, and as its head, Mr. Whitehurst 
must bring together rare technical skills and out- 
standing managerial abilities. He has held his 
present position for nearly twenty-five years. 

A native of Norfolk, he was born on January 
8, 1895, son of Stewart Judson and Ella (Davis) 
Whitehurst. Both parents were also born in that 
city. It was there that Stewart R. Whitehurst 
received his public elementary and high school 
education, attending Maury High School for three 
years. He then entered Virginia Polytechnic In- 
stitute at Blacksburg, where he was a student 
for another three years, majoring in mechanical 
engineering. He served in the United States Navy 
during World War I, holding the rank of lieuten- 
ant, junior grade, and following the end of the 
war, he returned to Norfolk in 1919. He immedi- 
ately joined associates in forming the Whaley 
Engineering Corporation — although it was not 
known as a corporation until some years later. 
The other co-founders were Edward A. Whaley 
and Joseph A. Wright. Edward A. Whaley and 
Company, as it was first referred to, took its 
name from a brilliant mechanical engineer and 
scholar, a graduate of Princeton University, who 
brought the vision and creative leadership on 
which its early progress depended. He continued 
to head the firm until his death in 1931. The 
following year the business was incorporated as 
the Whaley Engineering Corporation with Stewart 
R. Whitehurst as president and treasurer. He has 
filled both positions since that time. The other 
officials are C. W. Pollard, vice president, who 
became assocated witli the firm in 1925; and Mrs. 
Barton J. Downs, secretary, whose tenure with 
the company dates from 1928. Since its founding 
the company has had its headquarters at 3200 
East Princess Anne Road. One of the leading 
engineering firms of the Lower Tidewater region 
of the state, the Whaley Engineering Corporation 
has rendered outstanding service to industry in 
war and peacetime. In its shops are designed and 
built intricate machines of various types, and pre- 
cision tools for application throughout the me- 
chanical field. Most of its work is done on con- 
tract, and a large number of these contracts have 
been with the United States Government. During 
World War II, it carried out a large amount of 
special precision engineering for the United States 
Navy, the Air Corps and the Maritime Commis- 
sion, as well as for private industry. On its pay- 



36 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



roll at the present time are about forty highly 
skilled employees; and they as well as the manage- 
ment take just pride in the organization for which 
they work, and a personal interest in maintaining 
standards of integrity and quality production. 

Mr. Whitehurst is a member of the American 
Society for Metals, the American Welding Society, 
and the Engineers Club of Hampton Roads. Aside 
from these technicians' groups, he is also a mem- 
ber of the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce, the 
Norfolk Yacht and Country Club, the Princess 
Anne Country Club, and is a communicant of 
Christ and St. Luke's Episcopal Church of Norfolk. 

On April 28, 1928, at Norfolk, Stewart R. 
Whitehurst married Elizabeth Irwin Baldwin, 
daughter of Robert F. and Lizzie (Deans) Bald- 
win of that city. Mr. and Mrs. Whitehurst are 
the parents of two children: I. Stewart R., Jr., 
a graduate of the University of Virginia in the 
Class of 1955. He took his degree of Bachelor 
of Arts in Economics, and is now a student of 
architecture at the University of Virginia. 2. Eliza- 
beth Baldwin, a graduate of Maury High School 
in 1955, and now a student at Holden Arms 
Junior College in Washington, D. C. 



FRANK S. SAGER — The president of the 
Norfolk Coal and Oil Company, Inc., Frank S. 
Sager is also a civic leader in the city where he 
has resided since 1909. He takes a particular in- 
terest in young people and their welfare, as reflec- 
ted in the institutions to which he gives his 
assistance. The business firm he heads is one of 
the city's oldest in continuous operation, having 
been founded in 1892. 

A native of Washington County, Maryland, 
Mr. Sager was born in the community of Beaver 
Creek on January 23, 1879, son of Aaron D. and 
Mary E. (Rohrer) Sager. He is descended from 
forebears who resided in that county over a great 
many years. His father rendered long service on 
the bench as judge of the orphans' court of Wash- 
ington County, and died at Funkstown, Maryland, 
in 191 5, at the age of seventy-four. His wife, the 
former Mary E. Rohrer, died there in 1922. 

Of the eight children born to this couple, Frank 
S. Sager is the third in order of birth. He passed 
his boyhood in his native community, and in his 
youth often fished in Antietam Creek, near the 
famed battlefield. Following his graduation from 
high school in 1899, he began his career with the 
United States Railway Mail Service out of Balti- 
more, and remained in this work from 1900 until 

1909. 

In July 1909, he came to Norfolk, and entered 
the retail coal and oil business in the employ of 



the Norfolk Coal and Ice Company, which had 
been established in 1892. In 1925 the firm sold 
its ice business, and tightened the organization, 
dealing only in fuels. It was at that time that 
the present name, Norfolk Coal and Oil Company, 
Inc., was adopted. Mr. Sager had become a mem- 
ber of the firm in 1921; and soon after it was 
incorporated, he was named its president. The 
first location of the business was at 545 Front 
Street, and in the early days of its existence the 
company supplied coal from there to ships in the 
Norfolk Harbor, in addition to its large retail 
trade. In 1949, the present headquarters at 1090 
West 35th Street were occupied. As retail dis- 
tributors of coal, fuel oil and kerosene, the com- 
pany confines its operations to the Norfolk area. 
From the days of delivery by horse and wagon 
down to the present, when a fleet of modern 
trucks serve the customers, the business has thriv- 
ed, and attributes much of its success to long- 
standing friendships and good customer relations 
on which confidence is founded. In many instan- 
ces, it is serving the third successive generation 
of customers within a single family. In addition 
to Mr. Sager, the president, the firm's officials 
are Sam H. Ferebee, vice president, and Leigh 
C. Ferebee, secretary and treasurer. All have long 
records of service with the company. George Fere- 
bee, who died in 1943, was also active in manage- 
ment for many years. 

In the career of Frank S. Sager, public spirit 
and a deep humanitarian interest have been con- 
tinuous motifs, as evidenced by his cooperation 
with community projects and organizations. For 
the past quarter of a century, he has served as 
treasurer of the Female Orphan Society of Nor- 
folk. He is a member of the board of management 
of the Bonney Home for Girls, at 403 Mantes 
Street. He is a past president of the Norfolk 
Council of Social Agencies, and past chairman of 
the board of management of the Navy Young 
Men's Christian Association. He is still serving, 
after many year' tenure, on the board of directors 
of the Norfolk General Hospital. In former years 
he helped organize the Norfolk Community Chest, 
and was active as campaign manager, or co- 
manager of its fund campaigns. He was one of 
the group which organized the Boys' Club of 
Norfolk. A member of the Chamber of Commerce, 
he formerly served as a director. He became a 
member of the Norfolk Rotary Club in 1919, and 
served as its president in the term extending from 
1921 to 1923. He belongs to the Virginia Club and 
the Princess Anne Country Club. He is also ac- 
tive in trade circles, and is a member and past 
president of the Norfolk Coal Exchange. 

Mr. Sager is fond of the out-of-doors, particu- 
larly hunting and fishing. He is a communicant 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



37 



of the Ghent Methodist Church, serves on its 
board of stewards, and was a member of its 
building committee when the present church was 
erected. 

On June 19, 1909, Frank S. Sager married Mar- 
garet Harrell Ferebee, the ceremony taking place 
at Norfolk. Mrs. Sager was the widow of Samuel 
Ferebee, one of the founders of the Norfolk Coal 
and Oil Company, Inc., and was the daughter of 
the daughter of Sam B. Harrell, prominent cotton 
broker of Norfolk, and his wife, the former Susan 
Leigh of that city. Mrs. Sager died in 1932. 

A student of philosophy, Mr. Sager has always 
taken a deep interest in the problems of his fellow 
men, and his fine human spirit and understanding 
have manifested themselves in countless ways. His 
vitality and warmth of personality have won him 
a legion of friends. 



JOHN STRODE RIXEY— As a former presi- 
dent of the Norfolk-Portsmouth Bar Association, 
John Strode Rixey maintains a position of leader- 
ship in the legal profession in the Lower Tidewater. 
A partner of his brother, James Barbour Rixey, 
he is a member of the law firm of Rixey and 
Rixey, with offices in the Citizens Bank Building, 
Norfolk. Air. Rixey, a veteran of World War I, is 
actively interested in national defense and civic 
projects and is an outstanding member of the con- 
gregation of the First Presbyterian Church of Nor- 
folk. 

He was born in Culpeper, seat of Culpeper 
County, on July 24, 1890, and is the son of John 
F. and Ellen (Barbour) Rixey. Both his parents 
were also natives of Culpeper County. His father, 
who was both farmer and lawyer, served in the 
National House of Representatives for twelve 
years. He practiced law in Culpeper, but spent the 
last twelve years of his life in Congress and in 
Washington, D. C. For some years he was Common- 
wealth Attorney for the County of Culpeper. He 
died in 1907 at the age of fifty-two. Ellen Barbour 
Rixey died in 1944. 

John Strode Rixey spent the formative years of 
his life in the national capital, receiving much of 
his early education in its public schools. He then 
attended Hampden-Sydney College. Transferring 
to the University of Virginia, he took the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts in 191 1 and that of Bachelor 
of Laws in 191 2. 

Mr. Rixey began the practice of law in Clarks- 
burg, West Virginia, in 1912. Subsequently, he 
spent a year and one-half in practice in New York 
City. When the United States entered World War 
I, he applied for and was granted a commission as 
a second lieutenant. In his two-year career with 



the Army's Seventy-seventh Division, he rose from 
that rank to lieutenant colonel. Honorably dis- 
charged in 1919, he returned to Virginia and at 
Berryville, in Clarke County, practiced for one 
year. In 1920, he moved to Norfolk, where, with his 
brother, he established the law firm of Rixey and 
Rixey. John Rixey operates a farm in Culpeper 
County. Besides the Norfolk-Portsmouth Bar As- 
sociation, of which he is a past president, he is a 
member of the Virginia Bar Association. In poli- 
tics, he is a Democrat. An elder emeritus of the 
First Presbyterian Church of Norfolk, Mr. Rixey 
taught in its Sunday school for twenty years. 

Mr. Rixey married Barbara Franz James in Dan- 
ville on November 10, 1928. They have two chil- 
dren: 1. Ellen, born in 1932. She is the wife of 
John W. Barber, Jr., a native of Charlotte, North 
Carolina, who is in the building supply business 
in Charlotte. 2. Joan, born in 1935. In 1956, she 
was in school in Delaware. The Rixey home is at 
820 Graydon Avenue, Norfolk. Mrs. Rixey is active 
in the Norfolk Garden Club. 



W. ROY BRITTON, of South Norfolk has long 
been constructively identified with the industry 
centered in the distribution of agricultural pro- 
ducts. As co-founder, owner and directing head of 
the Growers Exchange of South Norfolk, he has 
brought to his firm extensive practical experience 
and a wealth of ideas, and has been eminently 
successful in his endeavors. He has given impetus 
to truck farming in the Norfolk area, and has 
served his community exceptionally well as chair- 
man of the South Norfolk school board. 

He is a native of the city where his business 
is centered, born there on November 3, 1900. the 
oldest of four children of George Thomas and 
Hattie (Wallace-Jones) Britton. The family de- 
rives its name from the province of France from 
which its forebears came, and is to be found 
in ancient British and early American records, in 
the various forms of Bretan, Bretun, Bretton, 
Brettun, Bretagne, Brytayan, Britagne, Briton, 
Briten, Britin, Britane, Britan, Britten, and Brit- 
tan as well as Britton. The last spelling is most 
commonly found in America today. It is believed 
that forebears came to England from France with 
the followers of William the Conqueror in 1066; 
and bearers of the name in its various forms are 
to be found in the records of English counties at 
early dates, for the most part among the landed 
gentry. Among the earliest American settlers were 
those in Virginia. George Thomas Britton was 
born in Hertford County, North Carolina, and 
in his early manhood located at South Norfolk. 
He later removed to Hickory, where he engaged 



38 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



in farming. In iqij lie took his family to Greens- 
boro, North Carolina, where for a number of 
years he was engaged in the retail grocery busi- 
ness. He retired several years before his death in 
1954. He was a son of James Peyton Britton, 
planter and merchant of Hertford County, North 
Carolina, and a veteran of Confederate service, 
whose wife was Annie Sessions, a native of Hert- 
ford County, North Carolina. Hattie Wallace 
Jones Britton, the mother of the South Norfolk 
executive, was born in Shippensburg, Pennsylva- 
nia, and died at Greensboro in 1948. Her father 
served in the Union Army and was of Scottish 
descent. Her mother was of Welsh descent. 

\Y. Roy Britton was less than a year old when 
his family moved from his native South Norfolk 
to Hickory. Virginia. There he passed his early 
boyhood, and attended the one-teacher country 
school nearby. When he was in his thirteenth 
year, they moved to Greensboro, and there he 
completed his formal education. In his youth he 
worked in his father's retail grocery store, and 
secured a basic knowledge of food retailing. At 
the age of twenty-six he returned to his native 
South Norfolk and found employment with the 
Smith-Douglas Company, Inc., a well-known fer- 
tilizer and farm supply house. After he had spent 
five years with this organization, its president saw 
the need for a department through which he 
could aid the growers who were his customers, 
and many of whom were in financial straits due 
to the depression. W. Roy Britton was selected 
to manage such a department, which a year later 
became the Growers Exchange. 

Founded October 25, 1932, the Growers Ex- 
change of South Norfolk was incorporated with 
Ambrose W. Burfoot as its first president. With 
the resignation of Mr. Burfoot a year later, Mr. 
. Britton succeeded him as its president. The firm 
continued as a corporation until 1943, when the 
old company was liquidated. Retaining the firm 
name of Growers Exchange, Mr. Britton continued 
the business as a partnership until August 1, 1954, 
when he bought the other interests. He has since 
been sole owner. 

Growers Exchange has become one of the out- 
standing organizations of its kind in the Tidewater 
region, and its "G-E" brand is a familiar label 
in vegetable markets throughout the Southeast. 
Besides raising vegetables on a considerable acre- 
age of its own, the firm acts as distributor for 
other growers, and buys hundreds of carloads of 
potatoes and other vegetables each year. Spinach 
is one of its best-known commodities, and has 
been distributed through the New York and other 
big markets. 

A careful student of industrial trends, Mr. Brit- 
ton is a business man of progressive vision, going 



along with worth-while new ideas in operation, 
and originating many of these ideas himself. 
Growers Exchange has a modern and well-equip- 
ped packing house, with eighteen thousand square 
feet of floor space, ample siding for railway cars, 
and a platform for trucks. In the packing plant 
are to be seen many of Mr. Britton's innovations 
in practice. He was one of the first to install 
scales at every station along the packing belt, to 
enable packers to assure full weight. The latest 
grading and washing machines are part of the 
firm's equipment, including a device built especial- 
ly for stripping kale and clipping spinach to be 
sold to repackers. Early recognition of the re- 
packing trend prompted the development of these 
machines. Growers Exchange is now featuring 
vegetables for repackers, paying particular atten- 
tion to quality and grade. 

Mr. Britton is a member of the United Fresh 
Fruit and Vegetable Association of America, and 
no one in the industry takes a greater interest in 
the solution of problems involved in the distribu- 
tion of this produce. He has also taken a vital 
interest in community projects. For the past nine 
years he has served as a member of the South 
Norfolk school board, and for seven of these years 
has been chairman of the board. During these 
years, the population of South Norfolk has doub- 
led, with the annexation of Portlock and River- 
dale, and he has played a leading part in securing 
a modern school system to keep pace with the 
growth. In the course of his tenure, the Oscar 
Frommell Smith High School and the George 
Washington Carver High School have been built, 
as well as several elementary schools. Mr. Britton 
is a devoted church worker, a member of the ves- 
try of St. Bride's Episcopal Church. He is a mem- 
ber of the lodge of Benevolent and Protective Or- 
der of Elks No. 38. His hobby is taking motion- 
pictures. 

On October 31, 1921, at South Norfolk, W. 
Roy Britton married Helen Chillson, daughter of 
the late Harry B. and Clytie (Miller) Chillson. 
Her father was a native of Connecticut and her 
mother of North Carolina. Mr. and Mrs. Britton 
are the parents of three children: 1. William Roy, 
Jr., a graduate of the College of W r illiam and 
Mary and of Virginia Theological Seminary. Or- 
dained an Episcopal minister, he formerly served 
as rector of St. Paul's Episcopal Church at Smith- 
field, Virginia. He is now a partner in the interior 
decorating firm of Neal Thomas of Norfolk. 
William Roy Britton, Jr., married Elise Lemley 
of Kingsport, Tennessee, and they are the parents 
of a daughter, Lisa Rebecca. 2. Jean Carolyn, who 
married Maurice Price of Kentucky, a career of- 
ficer in the United States Navy. 3- Janet Con- 
stance, attended the College of William and Mary 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



39 



at Williamsburg and is married to George Wilson 
of Los Angeles, California. 



THOMAS PESCUD CHISMAN— The voice 
of the Xational Broadcasting Company on the 
Virginia Peninsula to which residents of the 
Lower Tidewater are listening more and more 
is Radio Station WVEC and its companion, 
WVEC-TV. The founder and president of the 
corporation which operates these two stations is 
Thomas Pescud Chisman, a veteran of World 
W'ar II and the Korean War. 

Mr. Chisman, who was born in Hampton on 
December 8, 1921, is the son of Samuel Reade 
and Mary Lee (Cannon) Chisman. His father, 
also a native of Hampton, died in 1933. The 
mother, born in Norfolk, survives him. Thomas 
P. Chisman, reared in Hampton, attended its pub- 
lic schools. He was graduated in 1939. Four years 
later he took the degree of Bachelor of Arts at 
the University of Virginia and in the same year, 
1943, studied at Columbia University, New York 
City. 

In the next four years Mr. Chisman was an 
officer in the United States Navy, with which 
he served in the Atlantic Theater of Operations, 
emerging in 1946 with the rank of lieutenant, 
junior grade. With the outbreak of war in Korea, 
he returned to the armed forces, this time as 
a captain in the United States Army assigned 
to the Air Defense of Washington, D. C. He 
was on active duty for two years. 

In 1947, Mr. Chisman organized the Peninsula 
Broadcasting Corporation at Hampton and he 
has since been its president. His two stations, 
WVEC-AM and WVEC-TV, maintain offices and 
studios at 1940 Pembroke Avenue, Hampton, and 
812 Twenty-first Street, Norfolk, and employ six- 
ty persons. Mr. Chisman, active in community 
life, is a former member of the vestry of St. 
John's Episcopal Church of Hampton and is a 
member of the Rotary Club of Hampton. His 
fraternity is Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

He married Martha Pamela Merritt of Char- 
lottesville in Miami, Florida, on October 2. 1943. 
She is the daughter of Colonel and Mrs. W. B. 
Merritt. The Chismans have four children: 1. 
Thomas Pescud, Jr., born on March 28, 1945. 
2. Martha Pamela Merritt, born on February 8, 
1947. 3. Lila Elizabeth. 4. Anne Meriwether Mi- 
chie, born on August 21, 1955. Their home is at 
113 Powhatan Parkway, in Hampton. 



JAMES WASHINGTON REED, M.D.— Doc- 
tor James Washington Reed of Norfolk rose to 
prominence as a public servant as well as a phy- 
sician. He was a vigorous leader in the cause of 
civic progress and gave much time and service for 



humanity. As councilman and as mayor, he initiat- 
ed changes which have proved of distinct benefit to 
the city. 

Dr. Reed was born on April 9, 1888 in King 
William County, son of James Thomas and Alice 
Lenora (Trimmer) Reed. He was a descendant 
of the Pollard and Ragland families of Hanover 
County, Virginia. He received his early education 
in the schools of King William County and com- 
pleted his preparatory studies at West Point Aca- 
demy, West Point, Virginia. He took his pre- 
medical course at the College of William and Mary, 
Williamsburg. In 1910, he took a course at the 
Rush Medical School, sponsored by the University 
of Illinois in Chicago. He entered the Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia, Richmond, where he received his 
degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1912. Dr. Reed 
interned at old St. Vincent's Hospital in Norfolk 
and began private practice at Appalachia, but in 
1914 he moved to Ocean View, then a suburb of 
Norfolk, where he centered his practice through- 
out his career. He quickly won a place in the life 
of the community and his professional qualifications 
earned him recognition among his colleagues and 
private citizens as well. He built up an extensive 
general practice in medicine and surgery. Through- 
out his career he kept pace with advancements in 
medical science, frequently attending medical cli- 
nics and professional meetings. In 1926, he took 
special postgraduate courses with a group attend- 
ing the Interstate Post Graduate Assemblies in 
Vienna and other medical centers in Europe. He 
served devotedly and unstintingly, and never spar- 
ed himself when called, particularly in cases of 
emergency. The thought of personal comfort and 
convenience never caused him to ignore a call 
from the sick. For more than thirty years. Dr. Reed 
was active as a member of the staff of St. Vincent's 
;.nd De Paul Hospitals and served as surgeon for the 
Virginia Electric and Power Company for many 
years. He was consulting physician at the Norfolk 
Community Hospital. In June 1913, he was ap- 
pointed surgeon of the Louisville and Nashville 
Railway, the Interstate Railway and the South 
Western Railway with headquarters in Appalachia. 
He served as Health Officer of Norfolk County 
from 1914 to 1917. He was a member of the Nor- 
folk County Medical Society, the Virginia State 
Medical Society, the Seaboard Medical Association 
and the American Medical Association. Dr. Reed 
took genuine pleasure in his life's work of healing 
and regarded his high calling with love, pride and 
zeal. 

Devoted to his community, he became widely 
known for his leadership in Norfolk's civic and 
governmental affairs. He became the first represen- 
tative in the city's government from any of the 



4° 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



area annexed to the city in 1923. He was first 
chosen a member of the Norfolk City Council in 
March 1934, by unanimous vote of the Council to 
fill the unexpired term of Colonel Samuel S. Slover, 
who had resigned. Dr. Reed was re-elected four 
times by popular vote; and he was named vice 
president of the council on September 1, 1940. 
Four years later, when Captain Joseph D. Wood 
resigned in mid-term, Dr. Reed was chosen mayor 
of Norfolk and served in that capacity until 1946. 
The physician left a magnificient record of public 
service. Few other men have devoted so much 
time and energy to the interests of the community. 

Dr. Reed also took an active part in the work of 
the Episcopal Church of the Advent where he 
served as vestryman. He was a member of Ruth 
Lodge No. 89, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; 
Au!d Consistory of the Ancient and Accepted Scot- 
tish Rite; and Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He was a 
member of the advisory council of the Norfolk 
Chapter, Grand Council, Order of DeMolay. In 
addition he was an honorary member of the Ocean 
View Lions Club, and a member of Lodge No. 
38, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Fond 
of the out-of-doors, he enjoyed hunting and fishing 
expeditions whenever time allowed. 

On October 29, 1913, Dr. James Washington 
Reed married Hazel Jane Weaver of Newport 
News, daughter of Christian Kreider and Elton 
Ann (Smith) Weaver. Mrs. Reed is a descendant 
of the Dobson, Freeman and Rowe families, early 
settlers in Gloucester, Virginia. Over the years, 
Mrs. Reed has been active in civic and religious 
affairs of the city, having served as a board mem- 
ber for the Girl Scouts, The American Red Cross, 
and the Anti-Tuberculosis League of Norfolk. She 
has done volunteer work as a Gray Lady. Mrs. 
Reed is a communicant of the Episcopal Church 
of the Advent and is a member of the Woman's 
Reading Club of Norfolk. Dr. and Mrs. Reed be- 
came the parents of three sons and one daughter: 
1. James Weaver, born November 5, 1914; he grad- 
uated from the College of William and Mary, taking 
his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1935. He then en- 
tered the Medical College of Virginia and in 1939 
received his degree of Doctor of Dental Surgerv 
there. He entered the United States Army Air 
Corps in 1940. Assigned to the Dental Corps, he 
helped establish dental clinics at various air bases. 
At the time of his separation from the service in 
1945, he held the rank of lieutenant colonel, which 
rank he still holds in the L T .S. Air Force Reserve. 
Dr. James Weaver Reed now practices in Nor- 
folk and is a member of the staff of De Paul Hospi- 
tal. He is a Thirty-second degree Mason, member 
of Khedive Temple. He is a member of the Ameri- 



can Dental Association, Virginia Dental Associa- 
tion, and Tidewater Dental Association. He is a 
member of the Princess Anne Country Club. He 
married, first, Sara Elizabeth Iobst, who died on 
February 27, 1941. They were the parents of one 
son. Frederick Forrest, who was born April 16, 
1935- Dr. Reed married, second, Frances Evelyn 
Smith, a native of Lynchburg, and they have three 
children: i. John Arthur, born October 17, 1950- 
adopted. ii. Benjamin Thomas, born February 29, 
1952-adopted. iii. James Weaver, Jr., born Novem- 
ber 17, 1952. They attend St. Andrew's Protestant 
Episcopal Church. 2. Thomas Christian, born Au- 
gust 5, 1916. He was in his senior year at Hampden- 
Sydney College when he was killed in an automo- 
bile accident on April 1, 1939. 3. Constance Eliza- 
beth, and 4. Richard Courtney, twins, born Jan- 
uary 20, 1920. Constance is a graduate of the Col- 
lege of William and Mary where she took her 
degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1942. She is active in 
parish secretarial work and participates in the cul- 
tural affairs of Norfolk. She is a member of the 
Great Bridge Chapter of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution, American Association of Uni- 
versity Women-Norfolk Branch, Delta Delta Delta 
national sorority-Norfolk Alliance, Norfolk- Ports- 
mouth Panhellenic Association and is a communi- 
cant of the Episcopal Church. Richard Courtney 
Reed, youngest son of Dr. and Mrs. Reed, is a 
graduate of Virginia Military Institute, where he 
completed his pre-medical course in 1942 and re- 
ceived his degree of Bachelor of Science. He then 
entered the Medical College of Virginia and in 
1945 took his degree of Doctor of Medicine there. 
He interned at De Paul Hospital, after which he 
entered private practice in Norfolk. For two years 
he served in the United States Air Force with 
the rank of captain. He is on the staff of De Paul 
Hospital, Leigh Memorial and Norfolk General 
hospitals and is a member of The American Medi- 
cal Association, Virginia State Medical Society, the 
Norfolk County Medical Society, The American 
Academy of General Practice, the Virginia Acade- 
my of General Practice, and the Tidewater Chapter 
of General Practice. He is a Thirty-second degree 
Mason, member of Ruth Lodge No. 89, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, Khedive Temple, the 
Norfolk-Portsmouth Virginia Military Institute 
Alumni Club, Chi Phi medical fraternity, and the 
Norfolk Yacht and Country Club. He attends 
Royster Memorial Presbyterian Church and serves 
on the board of deacons there. Dr. Richard C. 
Reed married Elizabeth LeGrande File of Beckley, 
West Virginia, and they are the parents of two sons: 
i. Richard Courtney, Jr., born July 6, 1948. ii. Wil- 
liam Washington, born March 30, 1952. 

Dr. James Washington Reed continued his in- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



4' 



terest in civic and professional programs until his 
death September 23, 1952. 



AUBREY RAY PENTECOST, JR.— As an 

architect, Aubrey Ray Pentecost, Jr., has made 
tangible contributions to Norfolk and Tidewater 
Virginia whose value is measured in millions of 
dollars. His contributions to the beauty and moder- 
nity of these communities, not so readily evaluated, 
identify him as one of the region's most useful 
professional men. He has to his credit a list of 
designs for important structures too long to give 
in full in this brief biographical sketch. His work 
has been characterized by great variety, and pro- 
fessionally he is not influenced by any one school 
of architecture. He has always placed utility, or 
fitness of purpose, above ornamentation or strik- 
ing effects, although beauty of design is ever pres- 
ent. 

The firm of A. Ray Pentecost. Jr., wholly owned 
and operated by him, was established in Norfolk 
in 1948, solely as an architectural organization, and 
in this capacity it has served private, commercial, 
and municipal, state and federal government in- 
terests both in and outside of the state of Virginia. 
Associated with Mr. Pentecost, in his well-ap- 
pointed offices on the second door of the Nick 
Wright Building, 21st Street and Colonial Avenue, 
is a group of well-trained and experienced specia- 
lists. Broad technical education and ample experi- 
ence are to be found in the background of his 
own career, and he has earned wide recognition in 
his profession. 

Born April 12, 191", at Nelson, Virginia, Mr. 
Pentecost is a son of Aubrey Ray, Sr., and Ida- 
bell (Nelson) Pentecost. His father was born in 
Person County, North Carolina, and in the early 
years of his career, was a general building con- 
tractor. For the past two decades he has served 
as chief of police of Lawrenceville, Virginia. Ida- 
bell Nelson, whom he married, was born in tin- 
community of Nelson, which was named for her 
family. They had large plantation interests in that 
vicinity. 

A. Ray Pentecost, Jr., graduated from Law- 
renceville High School in 1935. He attended Perry 
Business College before entering Virginia Poly- 
technic Institute, where he graduated in 1942 with 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Architectural 
Engineering. The following year he took his degree 
of Master of Science in Architectural Engineer- 
ing at the same school. He began his professional 
experience in 1943 as a naval architect, P-3, in the 
employ of the Norfolk Navy Yard at Portsmouth, 
and in that capacity, designed heating, ventilating 
and air conditioning systems for naval vessels. He 



left in 1945 to join S. Russ Minter, a Cumberland, 
Maryland, architect, as chief draftsman. The fol- 
lowing year he spent several weeks in Washington 
and Richmond, studying architectural and engineer- 
ing requirements and rules in the Federal Housing 
Administration offices. In 1946-1947, he was as- 
sociated with the firm of Rudolph, Cooke and Van 
Leeuwen, Architects, in Norfolk. 

He left to form his own firm. A. Ray Pentecost, 
Jr., in 1948, and within a relatively short time, had 
built up one of the largest general architectural 
firms in Norfolk. Outstanding examples of his work 
include the following housing projects: Lafayette 
Shore, Norfolk (19481 sin hundred forty-four units; 
Ocean Lake, an eighty-four-apartment project at 
Virginia Beach; Camp Allen Apartments, four hun- 
dred units for the United States Navy, on which 
he worked with E. Tucker Carlton in 1951 ; Little 
Creek Apartments, four hundred units also for the 
Navy — also with Mr. Carlton in 1951; and Ocean 
View Apartments. His designs for educational in- 
stitutions have included an addition to Liberty Park 
School (1950); Bayview- Elementary School (1953) 
and Granby High School addition (1950), both 
for the city of Norfolk; Granby High School ad- 
dition, physical education plant, and new kitchen 
and cafeteria facilities (now in the process of con- 
struction); Maury High School addition (1953); 
Oscar Frommel Smith High School (1954): 
George Washington Carver High School (1953); 
( Iscar Frommel Smith High School Stadium 
(1955); South Hill Elementary School (1955); VVa- 
terford Elementary School addition (1955); Provi- 
dence Elementary School (1956); Little Creek Ele- 
mentary School addition, at Princess Anne (1955); 
Aragona Elementary School (1956); Seatack Ele- 
mentary School addition at Princess Anne (1955); 
New Lakewood Junior High School, Norfolk 
(1956); in association with Joseph B. Courtney, 
architect. Also, in association with the architectur- 
al linn of Walford and Wright, Mr. Pentecost 
made the designs for Virginia State College, a 
project completed for the State of Virginia in 1954 
at a cost of nearly two million dollars. For the 
various religious denominations in his area, Mr. 
Pentecost has designed the Bayview Baptist Church 
at Norfolk (1952); Lawrenceville Baptist Church 
(K»54); Talbot Park Baptist Church (1954); Ca- 
mellia Acres Presbyterian Church, Norfolk (1055); 
First Methodist Church. Norfolk (1955); Chesa- 
peake Avenue Methodist Church, South Norfolk 
(1955); Norview Baptist Church, Norfolk (10551: 
Central Baptist Church, Norfolk (1953); and First 
Congregational Christian Church, Portsmouth 
(1955). Commercial projects for which he performed 
the architectural work have included showrooms 
and warehouse for Norfolk Paints Stores (between 



TWVa. 5 



4 2 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



1950 and 1954); Pontiac Corporation; Nick Wright 
Motor Company showrooms and office in Norfolk 
(1950); parts department for the same company 
0955); H. D. Motor Company showrooms, Surry 
(1949); Edward L. Nelson warehouse, Norfolk 
( x 955); Louis Legum Furniture Company building, 
Norfolk (1955); Economy Foods warehouse, Nor- 
folk (1950); Mutual Federal Savings and Loan As- 
sociation office building (1955); Merchants and 
Planters Bank Building, Little Creek Road Branch 
(1955). Recreational facilities he has designed in- 
clude the Beazley Recreation Center, Portsmouth 
(1950); Armed Services Y.M.C.A., Portsmouth 
(1949); Y.W.C.A. Activities Building, Norfolk 
(t953); swimming pool for Norfolk's Boys' Club 
(1954). Other projects include structure for Subur- 
ban Enterprises, Norfolk (1954); J. B. Denny Of- 
fice Building, Norfolk (1953) ; and the W. L. Hughes 
Office Building in that city (1954). He was engaged 
in the planning stages of Norfolk's Coca-Cola 
bottling plant, and the twelve-story Rennert Garage 
Corporation Building at Monticello in which pro- 
ject he was associated with Mr. Courtney. He has 
also designed a number of fine residences, and other 
structures for private interests. 

Mr. Pentecost is a member of the American In- 
stitute of Architects, which has conferred on him 
its Medal for General Excellence in Architec- 
ture. He is also a member of the Society of 
American Military Engineers, and his fraternities 
are Tau Sigma Delta (honorary architectural), Tau 
Beta Pi (national honorary engineering) and Phi 
Kappa Phi (national scholastic). At Norfolk, he 
holds membership in the Executives Club, Norfolk 
Rotary Club, Norfolk Yacht and Country Club, 
and attends Talbot Park Baptist Church. Among 
the outdoor sports, he prefers fishing. 

At Danville, Virginia, on March 5, 1943, A. Ray 
Pentecost, Jr., married Elizabeth Smith, daughter 
of Arthur Webster and Anna (Smith) Smith of 
that city. Mrs. Pentecost is a graduate of Strafford 
College of Music in Danville. The couple are the 
parents of two children: I. Ellen Elizabeth, born 
March 30, 1946. 2. Aubrey Ray, III, born July 14, 
1953- The family resides at 1530 Blanford Circle, 
Lockhaven, Norfolk. 



LEON CURTIS HALL— The place of Leon 
Curtis Hall, president of the Norfolk Savings and 
Loan Corporation, is firmly established in the 
financial, business and civic circles of Norfolk and 
Tidewater Virginia, of which he is a native. With 
a wide reputaton as a banker, he has served as 
president of the American Industrial Bankers As- 
sociation; and his devoted and effective efforts in 
civic and welfare causes have won him the respect 



of his fellow citizens. A man of high principles and 
humane motivations, he is popular for his personal 
qualities as well. 

A native of Great Bridge in Norfolk County, 
Mr. Hall was born on April 1, 1907, son of George 
Magruder and Minnie (Wood) Hall. His father 
died November 1, 195 1, but Mrs. Hall survives and 
maintains her home in the Great Bridge communi- 
ty. George M. Hall conducted a general merchan- 
dise store there, and also engaged in farming. Leon 
C. Hall graduated from Great Bridge High School 
in 1925 and continued his education at the College 
of William and Mary. There he was a student for 
two years, and majored in business administration. 
In 1925 he began his career in banking. 

He first joined the staff of the Merchants and, 
Planters Bank in the Berkley section of Norfolk, 
beginning in the humble capacity of runner and 
earning advancement on his own merits. In 1930 
he left to join the Norfolk Savings and Loan Cor- 
poration. He began there as a bookkeeper, and ad- 
vanced steadily to the executive ranks, becoming 
president of the institution in 1953. In the early 
years of his connection, he attended Norfolk Col- 
lege Night School for a period of four years, and 
there studied business administration and law to 
better equip himself for banking and general com- 
mercial responsibilities. In the meantime, he had 
been promoted from bookkeeper to investigation 
officer, and subsequently became assistant manager. 
From 1939 until 1942, he served as acting manager 
of the bank, and in the latter year was promoted to 
secretary, continuing his duties as manager. He 
became executive vice president in 1948, and held 
that office until his promotion to the presidency 
in 1953- 

A member of the board of directors of the Ameri- 
can Industrial Bankers Association, Mr. Hall served 
as president of this national body in 1952. During 
1943-1944 he was president of the Virginia Indus- 
trial Bankers Association, and he continues to serve 
on its board of directors. In 1950-1951, he served 
on a subcommittee of the Virginia Advisory Legis- 
lative Council. 

Mr. Hall is a member of the Norfolk Chamber 
of Commerce, member and past president of the 
Lions Club, and member and past treasurer of the 
Norfolk Executives Club. He has long been active 
on behalf of the Salvation Army, and now serves 
as a member of its Virginia State Advisory Board. 
He is a member and past chairman of the board 
of stewards of Park Place Methodist Church of 
Norfolk. 

In Masonry, he is a member and past master of 
Owens Lodge No. 164, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, and of the higher bodies of the Scottish 
Rite. Holding the Thirty-second degree, he belongs 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



43 



to Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of Norfolk. 

On February 21, 1931, at Norfolk, Leon Curtis 
Hall married Margaret Birsch, daughter of the 
late John M. and Margaret (Thomas) Birsch. Her 
father was a general building contractor at Black- 
stone, Virginia. Mr. and Mrs. Hall make their home 
at 6145 Eastwood Terrace, Norfolk, and they are 
the parents of two children: 1. Leon Curtis, Jr., 
horn January 15, 1934. Taking premedical courses 
at Hampden-Sydney College, he graduated there 
in 1956, and is now pursuing his medical studies 
at the University of Richmond. 2. Margaret Agnes, 
who was born on July 15, 1940; now a junior at 
Maury High School. 



CHARLES T. ABELES— Through his contri- 
bution in various fields of human endeavor, Charles 
T. Abeles of Norfolk has become a well known 
citizen of the Lower Tidewater. He is active in 
transportation, the legal profession, cultural pro- 
grams, civic work, and education. Associated with 
the Seaboard Airline Railway for nearly four de- 
cades Mr. Abeles is now the road's senior general 
attorney, and among the community offices he 
holds is that of chairman of the Norfolk Commis- 
sion of Higher Education. 

Mr. Abeles was born in Saint Louis, Missouri, 
on July 22, 1891, one of the seven hoys (he was 
a twin) of the family of J. David and Emily 
(Taussig) Abeles, both of whom were also natives 
of Saint Louis. J. David Abeles, who died in 1920 
at the age of seventy-two, was in the real estate 
business in that city. The mother died in 1898. 

Charles T. Abeles received his early education 
in his native city. Graduated from Smith Academy, 
a private school, in 1907, he matriculated at Har- 
vard University. In 1913 lie took the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts and in 1916 that of Bachelor of 
Laws in the Harvard Law School. As coxswain 
and captain of the varsity crew in 1913, he made 
a reputation in intercollegiate circles. 

Upon taking his law degree in 1916, Mr. Abeles 
returned to Saint Louis and, gaining admission to 
the Missouri Bar, began practice as an associate of 
the law firm of Boyle and Priest. He was with this 
firm from September 1916, until April 191". The 
United States having declared war against the 
Central Powers that month, he enlisted in the Navy. 
Until February 1918 he was assigned to patrol 
work off the Atlantic Coast. In this period he rose 
in rank to chief boatswain's mate. His next as- 
signment was to the Office of Naval Intelligence, 
with which he served until his honorable discharge 
in May. 1919. 

Mr. Abeles' Naval career led, indirectly, to his 
career with the Seaboard Airline Railwav. He was 



appointed an attorney for the railway when he left 
the Navy in 1919. In 1926 he was promoted to 
solicitor and in 1934 to assistant general solicitor. 
From 1938 to 1943 he was general attorney and in 
1943 he became senior general attorney. In 1956 
he was appointed general solicitor in charge of 
law. His office is in the Seaboard Airline Railway 
Building in Norfolk. 

In the years Mr. Abeles has been serving with 
the railroad he has been one of Norfolk's most 
active citizens. From 1946 to 1950 he was president 
of the Norfolk Forum, and he is now chairman of 
the Commission on Higher Education, president 
of the Norfolk Service Men's Club and a director 
of the Norfolk Museum of Vrts and Sciences, Com- 
munity Concert Association, Feldman Chamber 
Music Society, and DePaul Hospital. He worships 
in the Episcopal Church and is a Democrat. 

Mr. Abeles married Sally Pope Taylor, daughter 
of Richard Calvert and Cecilia Ashton (Delihant) 
Taylor, in Norfolk on May 8, 1926. Mrs. Abeles, 
a native of Norfolk, is well known in civic welfare 
programs there. She is on the boards of directors 
of the Norfolk Community Chest and the Norfolk 
Council of Social Agencies. Her father, who was 
born in Norfolk, was active in the general mer- 
chandise business in his native city for many years. 
He died in 1910. Her mother, a native of Chicago, 
Illinois, died in 1943. Mr. and Mrs. Abeles have 
two children: 1. Charles Calvert, born on Novem- 
ber 3, 1929. He is a lawyer who took his profes- 
sional degree at the University of Virginia. 2. Sally 
Taylor, born on August _»8, 1932. She is a graduate 
of Manhattanvillc College. New York City, and 
of The Sorbonne, Paris, France. The Abeles' home 
is at 1307 Daniel Avenue, Lochhaven. 



ALEXANDER HERBERT BELL— A former 
United States Collector of Customs for Virginia, 
Alexander Herbert Bell has thrice been elected 
city treasurer of Norfolk. Well known and influ- 
ential among the municipal officials of the state, 
he is also prominent in the civic and social life of 
the Lower Tidewater. His Naval service in World 
War I, followed by a profound interest in national 
defense, has made him active in veterans' affairs 
and in the work of the armed forces committee 
of the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce. 

Alex H. Bell, as he prefers to be called, was 
born in Norfolk on November 14, 1890, into a 
family which established itself in the South in 
colonial days. His father, also a native of Norfolk, 
was Norman Bell, who joined the Confederate 
Army when he was sixteen years old, in 1861. 
Assigned to duty as a clerk to General Robert E. 
Lee, he was with the commander-in-chief at the 
surrender at Appomattox. Upon his return to Nor- 



44 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



folk after the war. lie entered the cotton business 
ami for many years until his death served as 
superintendent of the Norfolk and Portsmouth 
Cotton Exchange in Norfolk. He died on October 
jo, 1916, at the age of seventy-four. The city 
treasurer's mother, Ellen (Herbert) Bell died in 
August io-'.s. 

Alex H. Bell grew up in Norfolk and there 
received his education. He was seventeen when 
he, too. went to work in the Norfolk and Ports- 
mouth Cotton Exchange. With the declaration of 
war by Congress in April 1917, he left his job 
to enlist in the Navy. He rose to the rating of chief 
petty officer, serving mostly on ships which carried 
supplies to the American Expeditionary Force in 
France. At the time of his separation from the 
service in February 1919, he was a chief yeoman, 
a rating he retained in the Naval Reserve until 
June 1921. 

From 1919 to 1942 Mr. Bell was engaged in the 
general insurance business in Norfolk. In those 
years he became prominent in community life and 
the Democratic Party. On February 3, 1942, he 
was appointed collector of customs for all the 
ports of Virginia and this office he held until ap- 
pointed, in February 1948, to fill out an unexpired 
term as city treasurer of Norfolk. In 1949, he was 
elected to that office, and re-elected in 1953 and 
1957. Thirty-six persons are employed in his office. 

Air. Bell has served as president of the Municipal 
Treasurers' Association of Virginia, the United 
Memorial Day Association, the Norfolk German 
Club and the Old Town Club of Norfolk. He is a 
member not only of the armed forces committee 
of the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce but of such 
ex-servicemen's organizations as the American 
Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars. Also, he 
belongs to the Sons of the American Revolution 
and the Norfolk Lodge of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. At his church, St. Paul's 
Episcopal, he has served several terms on the vestry 
and for ten years was superintendent of the Sunday 
school. Fishing and hunting are his favorite sports. 

Mr. Bell married Elizabeth Jernigan, daughter 
of Hunter and Elizabeth (Bayton) Jernigan, in 
Norfolk on January 16, 1918. Mrs. Bell was born 
in Bertie County, North Carolina, her mother in 
Princess Anne County and her father also in 
Bertie County. Mr. Jernigan, a cotton merchant, 
was president of J. W. Perry and Company of 
Norfolk for many years. He died in 1921, his 
widow in 1942. Mr. and Mrs. Bell have two children: 
1. Elizabeth Jernigan, born in April 1923. She is 
the wife of Commander Charles D. Robison of 
the United States Navy and a graduate (June 1942) 
of the Naval Academy at Annapolis. They are the 
parents of three children: i. Charles D., Jr., born 



in 1946. ii. Alexander Bell, born in 1949. iii. Liza, 
born in 1951. 2. Alexander, born on April 11, 1927. 
He enlisted in the United States Navy when he 
was seventeen and served until the end of World 
War II. He married Jeanne Yates of Norfolk and 
they have one son, Alexander Herbert, II, who was 
born in January 1956. The senior Mr. and Mrs. 
Alex H. Bell make tlieir home at 1400 Westover 
Avenue, Norfolk. Mrs. Bell is a member of the 
Junior League of Norfolk and the Norfolk Garden 
Club. 



CHARLES HUTCHINSON McCOY— A cer- 
tified public accountant with offices in the Royster 
Building in Norfolk, Charles Hutchinson McCoy 
has long maintained a high professional level in 
accountancy. His varied interests have made him 
a prominent citizen of Norfolk. 

He was born in that city on November 12, 1901, 
son of the late George W. and Lena (Holland) 
McCoy. His forebears settled in Virginia in col- 
onial times. George W. McCoy was a marine engi- 
neer, a commissioned officer in the Norfolk Light 
Artillery Blues, and an organizer and partner of 
the Smith and McCoy Shipyard of Norfolk, pre- 
decessor of the Norfolk Shipbuilding and Dry Dock 
Corporation. He was a man of unusual ability and 
attainments, although he was only thirty-eight years 
old when he died in 1912. He was descended from 
a family of planters, surveyors and manufacturers. 
His mother was an Ellington, and her family was 
connected by marriage to those of Elliott, Waddel, 
Rice and Flippin. Members of the family in each 
generation served their country. P. Alexander El- 
lington was in the Confederate States Army. John 
Wesley Ellington served in the War of 181 2. David 
Ellington served in the Revolutionary War, and his 
father, John, furnished supplies to the Continental 
Line during that conflict. Another John Ellington, 
on March 8, 1712, surveyed both sides of Elling- 
ton's Branch on orders from the court of Prince 
George County. This John Ellington obtained a 
land grant of two hundred acres, and later for 
another three hundred and forty acres. His first 
patent was for land in Prince George County, 
granted by King George in 1707. Lena (Holland) 
McCoy, the mother of Charles H. McCoy, attended 
Norfolk College for Young Ladies. She was des- 
cended from Daniel Holland of Ireland, and Jane 
Salter of Pennsylvania; also Samuel James Frost 
of Chester and London, England, and the Hutchin- 
son family of Liverpool and Virginia. 

Charles Hutchinson McCoy graduated from 
Maury High School in Norfolk in 1922. He at- 
tended Virginia Military Institute and graduated 
from Pace Institute in New York, where he major- 
ed in accounting. He was associated with the Vir- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



45 



ginia Electric and Power Company of Norfolk for 
a matter of three months. He then entered the 
Norfolk accounting firm of Frederick B. Hill and 
Company, with which he remained for several years. 
In 1934 ne became a certified public accountant, 
having passed the examination given by the Vir- 
ginia State Board of Accountancy. Subsequently 
he became a partner with the late E. P. Dallas 
in the accounting firm of E. P. Dallas and Com- 
pany of Norfolk, and their association continued 
until the death of Mr. Dallas in 1939. 

At that time, Mr. McCoy formed his own firm 
under the name of Charles H. McCoy, Certified 
Public Accountant, with offices in the Royster 
Building. Besides its practice of public accounting, 
the firm acts as tax advisor. It has built up a 
large clientele among commercial and industrial 
organizations in Tidewater Virginia. Mr. McCoy 
is licensed to practice before the United States 
Treasury Department and the Board of Tax Ap- 
peals (now the United States Tax Court). He is 
a member of the American Institute of Accountants, 
and the Virginia Society of Public Accountants. 

Mr. McCoy is a Kiwanian, and a member of the 
Norfolk Yacht and Country Club, the Cavalier 
Beach Club, the Virginia Military Institute Sports- 
man's Club, the Virginia Military Institute Alumni 
Association and the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce. 
Affiliated with the Free and Accepted Masons he 
is a member of Ruth Lodge No. 89, and Grice 
Commandery No. 16, Knights Templar, and Khe- 
dive Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine. He is a communicant of the 
Church of the Good Shepherd. His favorite outdoor 
sport is boating. 

On March 23, 1935 at Norfolk, Charles H. Mc- 
Coy married Anne Griffin, daughter of the late 
William J. and Alberta (Evans) Griffin. Her father 
was owner and manager of the Eastern Transporta- 
tion Company of Manteo, North Carolina, owners 
and operators of passenger and cargo vessels in 
North Carolina. Mrs. McCoy was born at Manteo 
and graduated from Greensboro College in North 
Carolina. She took graduate courses at the Col- 
lege of William and Mary, and also religious studies 
at Randolph-Macon College. She is active in the 
cultural and religious affairs of Norfolk, and is past 
president of the Meadowbrook Parent-Teacher 
Association. She has also served as president of 
the Women's Auxiliary of the Church of the Good 
Shepherd, and she is a member of the Lockhaven 
Garden Club, the Hermitage Foundation, the Nor- 
folk Museum of Arts and Science, the Myers 
House, the Auxiliary of the Norfolk General Hos- 
pital, the Goodwill Guild, Norfolk Symphony 
Orchestra Auxiliary, and has been active in the 
Red Cross, Community Chest, March of Dimes and 



other charity campaigns. Mr. and Mrs. McCoy are 
the parents of two children: I. Charles Hutchin- 
son, Jr., born in Norfolk on December 12, 1936. 
He attended public schools in Norfolk and Staunton 
Military Academy, and graduated from Oxford 
Academy, Pleasantville, New Jersey, in 1954. He is 
now a student at Lenoir-Rhyne College, Hickory, 
North Carolina, where he majored in business ad- 
ministration. 2. Eleanor Evans, born in Norfolk on 
June 30, 1938. She attended public schools in Nor- 
folk and is now a student at Holton Arms School 
in Washington, D. C. For seven years she attended 
Preston School of Dance, and received her diploma 
there in 1954. In 1953 she won Psi Mu Nu fra- 
ternity's designation, "Miss Psi Mu Nu of 1953." 
She has studied art with Mrs. Fanny Taylor and 
Professor Jozsef Orsolya. The Charles H. McCoy 
family residence is at 1536 Blanford Circle, Norfolk. 



JOHN E. WOOL, SR.— The John E. Wool 
Lumber Company, Inc., of Norfolk, was founded in 
T 943 by the man whose name it bears. Engaged 
in the manufacture, wholesaling and retailing of 
pine and hardwood lumber, it has established a 
second location at Virginia Beach, and has grown 
steadily into one of the outstanding lumber and 
building materials firms in the greater Norfolk area. 
Specializing in industrial lumber, it also distributes 
a complete line of Grade A building materials 
throughout Norfolk and Princess Anne counties 
as well as in Norfolk, Portsmouth and Virginia 
Beach. The main office and plant are at 1000 East 
Berkley Avenue Extension, while the Virginia 
Beach branch is located at 1317 Birdneck Road. 
The Norfolk plant was erected in 1946, and it is 
an interesting fact that the five-acre site which it 
occupies was bought in 1877 by John E. Wool's 
maternal grandfather, Captain Darius Webb Todd, 
a seafaring man, following his retirement. In its 
operations as an industrial lumber firm, the John 
E. Wool Lumber Company manufactures kiln-dried 
pines and hardwoods, in addition to acting as re- 
tail and wholesale distributor of flooring, plywood, 
wallboard and sheet rock. It stocks a complete 
line of building materials which include window 
units, siding, hardware, roofing, and paints. The 
Virginia Beach branch, which was established in 
1952, is managed by John E. Wool, Jr. John E. 
Wool, Sr., is president and treasurer of the cor- 
poration; Joseph C. Wool is vice president and 
secretary, and John E. Wool, Jr., is vice president. 

The founder and president has been identified 
with the lumber industry in its various phases since 
1924. He was born October 28, 1905, at Portsmouth, 
son of the late Theodore Jackson and Annie Esther 
(Todd) Wool. His father was born in New York 



4 6 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



State, and his forebears had come to this country 
from England in early colonial days. Several mem- 
bers of the family served the cause of the colonies 
in the war of independence. In his early boyhood, 
Theodore Jackson Wool came to Virginia with his 
parents, who settled at Petersburg. He received 
his early education in the McCabe School in that 
city, and after completing his studies at Hampden- 
Sydney College, he entered the University of Vir- 
ginia where he graduated with the degree of Bach- 
elor of Laws. For half a century prior to his 
death in 1943, he engaged in the individual practice 
of law, specializing in corporate and real estate 
practice. In the early years of his career he main- 
tained his home and office in Portmouth, and later 
relocated in Norfolk where he remained until his 
death. He was a leader in sponsoring the James- 
town Exposition at Norfolk. When this exposition 
closed, he was among the far-sighted men who 
realized that the site was ideal for naval purposes, 
and was active in securing its use to that end. In 
1908, after Congress had failed to act on a pending 
bill to purchase the property, he joined others in 
organizing the Fidelity Land and Investment Cor- 
poration, which bought the former exposition 
property for two hundred and thirty-five thousand 
dollars, and following the outbreak of World War 
I, when its value finally came to be realized, he 
helped negotiate its sale to the government, pre- 
facing the construction of the great naval base 
there. Annie Esther Todd, whom he married, was 
born in Portsmouth, and died at Virginia Beach 
in 1955, at the age of eighty-three. The couple 
became the parents of five children: 1. Todd, a 
retired tobacco industry executive. He served as 
vice president, secretary and director of P. Lorillard 
and Company of New York. 2. Esther, unmarried 
and a resident of Virginia Beach. 3. Theodore 
Jackson, who is deceased. 4. John E., Sr. 5. Joseph 
C, vice president and secretary of the John E. 
Wool Lumber Company. 

John E. Wool, Sr., received his early education 
in the Robert E. Lee Elementary School, attended 
Maury High School for one year, then continued 
his secondary studies at Fishburn Military School. 
He completed his education with a course in ac- 
counting at Eastman's Business College in Pough- 
keepsie, New York. 

He began his career in the lumber business in 
1924 with the old North Carolina Pine Association. 
He continued with this firm for two years, then 
entered the employ of the Addington-Beaman 
Lumber Company of Norfolk, representing this 
firm in various capacities for seventeen years. After 
working in the office for a time, he went on the 
road as traveling salesman, with the Eastern Shore 
of Virginia, Maryland and Delaware as his ter- 



ritory. He later covered a Virginia territory from 
Gordonsville to the east coast, buying and selling 
lumber for Addington-Beaman. The year prior to 
his resignation to form his own company, he as- 
sisted Mr. Addington and Mr. Beaman in the Nor- 
folk office. He became widely and favorably known 
in the lumber industry. 

He left in 1943 and the same year the John 
E. Wool Lumber Company was formed. His ex- 
cellent background and varied experience in the 
industry were useful in building a vital and grow- 
ing organization. He is active in the wider circles 
of his colleagues, being a member of the Con- 
catenated Order of Hoo-Hoo, a lumbermen's 
organization, the Virginia Builders Materials As- 
sociation, the Cavalier Beach Club, the Surf Beach 
Club, and the Norfolk Chapter of the Virginia 
Society, Sons of the American Revolution. He at- 
tends the First Presbyterian Church of Virginia 
Beach. 

On January 16, 1920, John E. Wool, Sr., mar- 
ried Margaret Hanley of Princess Anne County, 
daughter of Theron and Buttia P. Hanley. The 
couple are the parents of two sons: 1. John E., Jr., 
attended Virginia Polytechnic Institute. He serv- 
ed with the United States Army Engineers in 
World War II, and is now vice president of the 
John E. Wool Lumber Company and manager of 
its Virginia Beach branch. 2. Theodore Jackson, 
3rd, attended Virginia Military Institute. The Wool 
family resides at Virginia Beach. 



FINLAY FORBES FERGUSON, JR.— Fol- 
lowing in the footsteps of his father, the late Fin- 
lay Forbes Ferguson, Sr., noted architect of Nor- 
folk, Finlay F. Ferguson, Jr., has added credit and 
prestige to an old and distinguished family name, 
long honored in Norfolk. 

He was born in Norfolk on August 6, 1908, 
son of Finlay Forbes, Sr., and Helen (Evans) 
Ferguson. The family is of Scottish origin, and 
is descended from Finlay Forbes Ferguson, the 
immigrant, who was born in Fife, Scotland, in 
1752. He came to Norfolk with his two brothers 
during the colonial period, and he died in that 
city in 1812. From the immigrant ancestor, the 
line of descent runs through Finlay Forbes (2) 
Ferguson, who served as mayor of Norfolk in 
1 856- 1858, having previously held the office of 
assessor and commissioner of revenue. His son, 
Charles Martin Ferguson, a native of Norfolk and 
grandfather of Finlay Forbes Ferguson, Jr., was 
a Norfolk business man early in his career. He 
later lived retired in comfortable circumstances, 
and died in 1904 at the age of fifty-two. He mar- 
ried Mary Fitzgerald, a native of Baltimore, Mary- 
land, who lived out her life in Norfolk. 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



47 



Their son, Finlay Forbes Ferguson, Sr., was 
born in Norfolk on November 18, 1875. He at- 
tended Norfolk Academy, and received his degree 
of Bachelor of Arts from Hampden-Sydney Col- 
lege. He later attended Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, where he received his degree of Bache- 
lor of Science in Architecture in 1898. As one of 
the noted architects of Norfolk, he was associated 
with the architectural firm of Ferguson, Cabrow 
and Taylor, which later became known as Fer- 
guson, Cabrow and Wrenn, and, after World War 
I, as Peebles and Ferguson. In his later years, 
and until his death in 1936, he carried on an 
individual practice. He won wide recognition for 
his designs of institutional structures, and he drew 
the plans for many of Norfolk's outstanding build- 
ings, among them the First Presbyterian Church, 
Ghent Methodist Church, Ohef Sholom Temple, 
Royster Building, Norfolk Museum of Arts, Nor- 
folk Newspapers Building, Inc., and the Virginia 
Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond. He was ac- 
tive in civic and community affairs, being past 
president of the Virginia Chapter of the American 
Institute of Architects, and a member of the Ki- 
wanis Club and the lodge of Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons. In Masonry, he held the Thir- 
ty-second degree. He attended the Presbyterian 
Church, which he served as a deacon. 

Finlay Forbes Ferguson, Sr., married Helen 
Evans, who was born in Norfolk where she con- 
tinues to reside. She is a daughter of Captain Rich- 
ard Evans and Fannie Day (Atkinson) Evans, for- 
merly of Smithfield, who lived out their lives in 
Norfolk. Finlay F., Sr., and Helen (Evans) Fer- 
guson became the parents of two children: t. 
Finlay Forbes, Jr. 2. Frances Ferguson, a gradu- 
ate of Vassar College. She married James Allen 
Carney, prominent general building contractor of 
Norfolk, whose career record is also to be found 
in this publication. 

Finlay Forbes Ferguson, Jr., attended St. Geor- 
ge's School, a private school in Norfolk, until 
1922, and from 1923 to 1927, Woodberry Forest 
Preparatory School at Orange, Virginia. In 1928 
he worked for his father's firm, Peebles and Fer- 
guson, Norfolk architects; and from 1929 to 1931 
he attended the University of Virginia, taking 
courses in its Department of Architecture, and 
at Beaux- Arts Institute of Design, New York 
City. At the university he was a member of Sig- 
ma Chi fraternity and the Academy Honor Society. 

A student of colonial architecture, Finlay For- 
bes Ferguson, Jr., was associated with Colonial 
Williamsburg, Inc., Williamsburg, Virginia, as a 
designer engaged in the reconstruction and res- 
toration of the city. He worked there from 1931 
to the autumn of 1933. During 1934 he was in 
charge of the Norfolk area for the Historic Ameri- 



can Homes Survey, and during the same year 
was in charge of the restoration of Fort Macon, 
Moorehead City, North Carolina, for the State 
Parks Board. 

In the years from 1935 to 1938, he was again 
associated with his father, and was responsible 
for the design of the Virginia Museum of Fine 
Arts at Richmond and other public buildings. In 
1939 he rejoined Colonial Williamsburg, Inc., and 
engaged in the same work as he had previously 
done with that organization until 1943. Mr. Fer- 
guson then entered the United States Navy for 
wartime service, and was commissioned a lieuten- 
ant, serving until 1946. He got a chance to fur- 
ther his professional experience while in service, 
designing special devices, some of an aeronautical 
nature. 

Since 1948, Mr. Ferguson has practiced his pro- 
fession independently at Norfolk. He is registered 
to practice in Virginia, Maryland and North Caro- 
lina. He has continued to specialize in colonial 
architecture and restoration work, and has done 
extensive research to enable him to achieve au- 
thenticity in his efforts. He has been commissioned 
on many projects of restoration, including the 
Thoroughgood House in Princess Anne Country; 
Eastern Shore Chapel in that county; Upper Bran- 
don in King George County; St. Paul's Episcopal 
Church at Edenton, North Carolina; Old Trinity 
Church, Cambridge, Maryland; and Chippokee, in 
Surry County, Virginia. His architectural work 
has also included the design of many beautiful 
modern structures. He is a member of the Virginia 
Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. 

His professional interests are paralleled by an 
interest in historical matters. He is an associate 
member of the National Trust for Historical Pres- 
ervation at Washington, D. C, and as a member 
of the Norfolk Museum of Arts, he has served 
on its board of trustees since 1947. Mr. Ferguson 
is a communicant of the First Presbyterian Church 
of Norfolk. His hobbies are ship modeling and 
painting. 

In the Church of the Good Shepherd in Norfolk, 
on November 23, 1939, Finlay Forbes Ferguson, 
Jr., married Anna Redfern, who was born at Alon- 
roe, North Carolina, and reared in Norfolk. She 
is a graduate of Sweet Briar College, and is ac- 
tive in cultural and civic affairs in Norfolk. Mrs. 
Ferguson is a member of the Junior League of 
Norfolk, the Little Theatre, and Children's Thea- 
tre which she served as president in 1956. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ferguson are the parents of a 
daughter, Anne Stuart Ferguson, born in Wash- 
ington, D. C, on March 23, 1944. 



GEORGE ATWILL BROUGHTON— The 

president of the Old Dominion Marine Railway 



48 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



Corporation of Norfolk, George Atwill Broughton 
has been with this firm since 1916, and has played 
a major part in its growth and development. Lo- 
cated in Norfolk Harbor at the junction of the 
southern and eastern branches of the Elizabeth 
River, with Chestnut Street, Berkley, Norfolk, as 
its address, the corporation is one of the Tide- 
water's major firms engaged in shipbuilding', mar- 
ine and industrial repairs, conversion, and as steam 
and diesel engineers. Thoroughly equipped for its 
work, with modern facilities, which include two 
marine railways, with capacities of one thousand 
and three thousand tons, three wharfs or piers, 
eighteen feet wide and five hundred feet long, for 
mooring vessels, the company is extensively en- 
gaged on contracts with both commercial firms 
and government. It operates floating equipment 
for down-river work, and has on its payroll about 
three hundred employees skilled in the various 
trades. The Old Dominion Marine Railway Cor- 
poration is closely integrated with the industrial 
development of Norfolk and Portsmouth and has 
a most creditable record of service in time of 
peace and war. 

George A. Broughton, its executive head, was 
born October 23, 1878, at Portsmouth, the son of 
the late George Washington and Mary Elizabeth 
(Bunting) Broughton. His father was an employee 
of the Navy Yard, Portsmouth, having served for 
a time aboard United States revenue cutters and 
United States Navy vessels. George A. Broughton 
attended public and private schools, and gradu- 
ated from the Portsmouth Academy. 

During school vacations he worked in the Navy 
Yard, Portsmouth, one summer in the boiler shop, 
one summer in the shipfitters department and one 
summer in the yards and docks department under 
the docking master. He began his career in the 
business world with the Norfolk Iron Works, 
Norfolk, in 1896 as assistant bookkeeper and 
draftsman. Having a desire to study mechanical 
engineering, he subsequently served an apprentice- 
ship as a machinist. After serving three years in 
the machine shop and on outside jobs, he was 
assigned a conversion job away from the city fit- 
ting out a side wheel vessel to be delivered to 
Mexico. He had under him supervisors, machinists, 
carpenters, boilermakers, shipfitters and laborers, 
men much older than himself. The vessel was 
changed over from jet condensers to surface con- 
densers. He made all the drawings, ordered all the 
necessary equipment, supervised the installation 
and ran the test trial on the vessel before it left 
this country. He continued in the employ of the 
Norfolk Iron Works, serving as outside foreman, 
until he resigned May 16, 1016. 

Having gained valuable industrial experience, 
and confident of his abilities in managing an enter- 



prise of his own, he entered into partnership with 
W. A. Larmotir, naval architect, N. G. Holland, 
J. H. Woodington, P. C. Hastings, R. A. Hutchins 
and Alex Warren, Sr. 

The Old Dominion Marine Railway Corporation 
was incorporated under the laws of the State of 
Virginia in 1909, by Alex Warren, Sr., and others, 
and was taken over in 1916 by the above men- 
tioned gentlemen. All the above associates have 
departed except J. H. Woodington. Mr. Brough- 
ton has held the following positions with this 
company: vice president and superintendent of 
shops, vice president and superintendent of the 
engineering department, vice president and treas- 
urer, and treasurer, purchasing agent and general 
manager. 

All outstanding stock was bought December 
31, 1954, by George A. Broughton, Elwood S. 
Wood, Jr., and F. H. Gaskins. On January 1, 1955, 
the following officers were elected: George A. 
Broughton, president; Elwood S. Wood, Jr., vice 
president and general manager; F. H. Gaskins, 
treasurer; and Jennie S. Reed, secretary. 

Active in community and fraternal affairs Mr. 
Broughton is president of the Pearl Street Cor- 
poration and a member of the Norfolk Chamber 
of Commerce, The Propeller Club of the United 
States, Port of Norfolk, The Hampton Roads 
Maritime Association of Norfolk. He is also a 
member of Portsmouth Naval Lodge No. 100, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; a charter 
member and past master (1923) of America Lodge 
No. 330, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; a 
member of Mount Horeb Royal Arch Chapter 
No. 11, Royal Arch Masons; and a member of 
Portsmouth Commandery No. 5, Knights Templar, 
Portsmouth, of which he is a past eminent com- 
mander. He is also affiliated with Khedive Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. He was superintendent engineer for the 
Costner, Curren, Bullitt Steamship Company while 
serving the Old Dominion Marine Railway Cor- 
poration. He was past president of the Interna- 
tional Association of Machinist Lodge No. II, 
Norfolk, of which he holds a withdrawal card 
dated 1918, and past president of the Norfolk 
Shipyard Association (this association is not ac- 
tive at this time). He is a communicant of the 
Central Methodist Church of Portsmouth, having 
served on the board of stewards and was secretary 
of the board for a number of years. 

His vigorous personality, abilities and power of 
decision have been reflected in each of his endeav- 
ors and he has always held, and acted on, the 
belief that anything can be accomplished if one 
brings sufficient energy and determination to its 
fulfillment. 

On November 3, 1904, at Portsmouth, George 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



49 



A. Broughton married Miss Blanche L. Bur- 
roughs, daughter of Richard B. and Mary (Carey) 
Burroughs of that city. Mrs. Broughton died 
March 31, 1953. The couple became the parents of 
a daughter, Dorothy, who was born July 2, 1908. 
In 1928 she graduated with the degree of Bache- 
lor of Arts from the College of William and 
Mary, Williamsburg, where she had majored in 
English. On May 19, 1956, she became the wife 
of Kenneth J. Brennan of Portsmouth, who is 
with the Merchants and Farmers Bank of that city. 
Mr. Broughton's residence is at 915 Leckie 
Street, Portsmouth. 



WAVERLY RANDOLPH PAYNE, M.D., 
F.A.C.S. — An exceptionally full career in the prac- 
tice of medicine is that of Dr. Waverly Randolph 
Payne, who resides in Newport News and has his 
offices at 91 Twenty-ninth Street. He was born 
at Midlothian, Virginia, on July 28, 1899, son of 
Lee Winston and Pearle Bernard (Duffer) Payne. 
His father, who was a general contractor, died 
on September 2, 1946. 

Dr. Payne completed his secondary studies at 
Midlothian High School, after which he spent two 
years as a premedical student at the University of 
Richmond. He took his professional courses at the 
Medical College of Virginia, and on his gradua- 
tion there in 1923, received his degree of Doctor 
of Medicine. Dr. Payne completed his internship 
at the Medical College of Virginia Hospital and 
at Elizabeth Buxton Hospital at Newport News. 
He did postgraduate work at the New York Ly- 
ing-in Hospital and was resident obstetrician and 
gynecologist at the Jersey City Hospital (now 
Jersey City Medical Center and Margaret Hague 
Maternity Hospital). He practices at Newport 
News, and specializes in gynecology. He is chair- 
man of the department in the specialty and vice 
president of the hospital staff at Riverside Hos- 
pital; is attending gynecologist at Mary Immacu- 
late Hospital; and is consulting gynecologist at 
Whittaker Memorial Hospital in Newport News, 
at Dixie Hospital in Hampton, and at the United 
States Navy Hospital in Portsmouth, Virginia. 

A diplomate of the American Board of Obste- 
trics and Gynecology and a fellow of the American 
College of Surgeons, Dr. Payne holds membership 
status in a number of other professional organiza- 
tions. He is a member, and has served as president, 
of the Newport News Medical Society, the Penin- 
sula Academy of Medicine and the Seaboard 
Medical Association; he is also a member of Tri 
State Medical Society, the Medical Society of 
Virginia, and the American Medical Association. 
As a member of the Southern Medical Association, 
he recently served as councilor for Virginia. 



Among the specialty societies, he is a member and 
past president of the Virginia Obstetrical and 
Gynecological Society; president of the South At- 
lantic Association of Obstetricians and Gynecolo- 
gists; member and past president of the Southern 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Society; member of 
the American College of Obstetrics and Gyneco- 
logy, which he serves as chairman for Virginia; 
and member of the American Association of Ob- 
stetricians and Gynecologists. He is a member of 
the board, and past chairman of the professional 
education committee, of the American Cancer 
Society, Virginia Division; a member of the medi- 
cal advisory committee of the Virginia Association 
for Planned Parenthood; and a member of the 
medical advisory committee of the Committee of 
Selective Service. Dr. Payne also serves on the 
board of visitors of the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia; on the board of trustees of the Medical 
College of Virginia Foundation; and on the board 
of trustees and past president of the Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia Alumni Association. A member 
of the Virginia State Board of Examiners, he is 
currently serving as its president. He is likewise 
a member of the Gynecological Faculty of Saluda 
Postgraduate Assembly. 

Dr. Payne is now president of the Peninsula 
Chapter of the Virginia Cancer Society, and also 
a member of the board of directors of the Penin- 
sula Chamber of Commerce. He is a member of 
the James River Country Club of Warwick and 
Newport News, the Chamberlin Club of Hampton, 
and the Commonwealth Club and Downtown Club, 
both of Richmond as well as the Golden Horse 
Shoe Club of Williamsburg. In his politics, he is 
a Democrat and he attends the First Baptist 
Church at Newport News. 

In 1918, Dr. Payne served as a private in the 
L T nited States Army, being in the Student Army 
Training Corps. 

At Clinton, South Carolina, on June 28, 1924, 
Dr. Waverly Randolph Payne married Lafayette 
Johnson, daughter of George Lafayette and Ella 
(Bullock) Johnson. Both of her parents are de- 
ceased. Dr. and Mrs. Payne make their home on 
Chesapeake Avenue in Hampton, and they are the 
parents of three children: 1. Mary Lou, who was 
born on April 30, 1925. She is now Mrs. John E. 
Hatten. 2. Margaret Lee, born May 24, 1928, wife 
of Nelson T. Overton. 3. Ann Randolph, born 
July 20, 1936. 



HUGH WELLFORD JOHNSTON— As the 

present commissioner of revenue for Norfolk Coun- 
ty, Hugh Wellford Johnston has capably served 
since 1952 in an office previously held by his father, 
the late Hugh Johnston. He is a civil engineer by 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



training, has had industrial and professional ex- 
perience, and has proved himself an exceptionally 
efficient public servant in the office he has filled 
since 1952. 

Born September 8, 1908, in Berkley Ward, Nor- 
folk, he is a son of Hugh and Lucy (Mason) John- 
ston. His father was a native of Edgecombe Coun- 
ty, North Carolina, and, while still quite young, 
came to Norfolk County, Virginia. He received his 
early education at Churchland Academy and later 
graduated from old Richmond College, now the 
University of Richmond. In the early years of his 
career he became editor of the "Norfolk County 
Democrat." Long active in the public affairs of the 
county, he was honored with several positions of 
public trust. He served as deputy clerk of Norfolk 
County from 1919 to 1924 and was previously high 
constable of Norfolk City. He was first elected 
commissioner of revenue in 1924 and, by successive 
re-election, continued in that office until his death 
in 195 1. Through his role in public affairs, he be- 
came widely known throughout Tidewater Vir- 
ginia, where he had a legion of friends in all walks 
of life. He is remembered as a man of integrity and 
of a delightful personality. 

His son, Hugh W. Johnston, received his early 
education in Norfolk County, graduating from 
Churchland High School in 1926. He then entered 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute, from which he grad- 
uated with the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
civil engineering in the Class of 1930. When he had 
completed his courses there, he went to work for 
the McClintic-Marshall Corporation, a steel-fab- 
ricating firm with which he remained for two years. 
At the end of that time, the depression forced 
retrenchment in that organization, and Mr. John- 
ston left to enter the employ of the United States 
Government, as a civil engineer in the Indian Serv- 
ice. For two years he worked on government pro- 
jects which took him to the Dakotas and to New 
Mexico. 

Returning to Virginia in the mid-l930s, he con- 
tinued in Ills profession as civil engineer there, as 
an employee of the Norfolk Southern Railway 
Company. He later left that organization to accept 
a similar post with the Seaboard Air Line Railroad, 
continuing on its payroll until 1952. 

Having made the race for the office of com- 
missioner of revenue for Norfolk County in 195 T, 
the year of his father's death, Hugh W. Johnston 
defeated a popular opponent and began his first 
term in January 1952. In the election of 1955 he 
was returned to office, and began his second term 
in January 1956. An exceptionally able and ef- 
ficient public official, he has justified the confidence 
of his fellow citizens and is carrying on in the fine 
tradition established by his father. He is every- 



where respected for his personal qualities and for 
his devotion to high principles both in public office 
and in the other phases of his life. 

Mr. Johnston is a member of Blue Lodge, An- 
cient Free and Accepted Masons; Hunter's Num- 
ber 156, at Blacksburg; and the Ruritan Club, 
which he served as president in 1956. He is a 
licensed civil engineer in Virginia and North Caro- 
lina and a member of the Commissioners of the 
Revenue Association of Virginia, of which he was 
secretary and treasurer for the 1956-1957 term. 

At St. Michael's, Arizona, on January 26, 1935, 
Hugh H. Johnston married Frances Wallace, 
daughter of John and Mary (Spring) Wallace of 
Waterbury, Connecticut. The couple are the parents 
of three children: 1. Frances, born October 3, 1941, 
attending Churchland High School. 2. Mary, born 
March 6, 1943, also a student at Churchland High 
School. 3. Susan, born April 13, 1946, attending 
Churchland Elementary School. The family resides 
at Locust Point in Norfolk County, and Mr. John- 
ston's office is in the Norfolk County Courthouse 
at Portsmouth. 



LAWRENCE WARREN I'ANSON— Judge of 

the Court of Hustings for the City of Portsmouth 
since June 1941, Lawrence Warren I'Anson has 
won a place of esteem as an attorney, public of- 
ficial, and civic leader. His achievements, and the 
wide recognition of his integrity of character, led 
to his selection as Portsmouth's First Citizen in 
1946. 

Born in that city on April 21, 1907, Judge I'Anson 
is a son of James Thornton and Emma (Warren) 
I'Anson. His father was yardmaster for the Belt 
Line Railroad in Portsmouth for a number of years 
and died on May 18, 1954. Emma (Warren) I'Anson 
survives and resides in Portsmouth. Receiving his 
early education in the schools of that city, Judge 
I'Anson graduated from Wilson High School in 
1924. He received his degree of Bachelor of Arts 
from the College of William and Mary in 1928 
and went on to professional studies at the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, graduating there with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Laws in 1931. 

He began his private practice of law in Ports- 
mouth and in 1938 commenced his career in public 
life when he assumed duties as commonwealth at- 
torney for the city of Portsmouth. He continued 
in that office until 1941, and in June of that year, 
he ascended the bench as judge of the Court of 
Hustings for the city of Portsmouth. His has been 
a career of distinction and conspicuous public serv- 
ice. He is a member of the Norfolk-Portsmouth 
Bar Association, the Portsmouth-Norfolk County 
Bar Association, and the Virginia State Bar As- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



5' 



sociation, and he is past chairman of the judicial 
section of the state organization. 

Prominent among the alumni of the College of 
William and Mary, Judge I'Anson holds member- 
ship in Phi Beta Kappa, national scholastic honor 
society; Omicron Delta Kappa, national leader- 
ship fraternity; Pi Kappa Alpha; and the F. H. C. 
Society. For five years he was president of the 
Portsmouth Young Men's Christian Association 
and served for seven years as its vice president. He 
is past chairman of the Portsmouth Chapter of 
the American Red Cross; past director of the King's 
Daughters' Hospital (now Portsmouth General 
Hospital), and past president of the Portsmouth 
Kiwanis Club. He served as the first president of 
the Portsmouth Executives Club, was one of the 
organizers of the Community Chest of the Ports- 
mouth area, and is a member of the board of 
trustees of Virginia Baptist Hospital. 

Judge I'Anson also serves as president of Beazley 
Foundation, Inc., a charitable, religious, and edu- 
cational foundation. He is president of the Founda- 
tion Boys' Clubs, Inc.; president of Foundation 
Boys' Academy, Inc.; and a director of Beazley 
Community Center, Bynum Recreation Center, and 
the City Dental Clinic. He is a member of the Coun- 
cil of Higher Education of Virginia, of the Judicial 
Council of Virginia, and of the Advisory Board of 
the American National Bank of Portsmouth. He 
is a member of the Portsmouth Chamber of Com- 
merce and of the board of directors of the Ports- 
mouth and Norfolk County Building and Loan As- 
sociation. A member of the Port Norfolk Baptist 
Church, he has taught the men's Bible class since 
•933- 

In recognition of his public accomplishments, 
business and professional leadership, and valuable 
civic work, Judge I'Anson was honored in 1946 
by being voted Portsmouth's First Citizen. 

On August 5, 1933, the Hon. Lawrence Warren 
I'Anson married Miss May Frances Tuttle, daugh- 
ter of Dr. and Mrs. C. O. Tuttle. They have two 
children: 1. Lawrence W\, Jr., born September 5, 
1936, a graduate of Duke University, where he 
was a member of the Naval Reserve Officers 
Training Corps. 2. May Frances Tuttle, born 
November 21, 1942. 



RICHARD FRANKLIN WELTON, JR.— In 
his more than a quarter-century as head of one of 
Tidewater Virginia's great merchandising organ- 
izations, Richard Franklin Welton, Jr., brought the 
firm of Smith and Welton, Inc., to its present 
imposing place in Norfolk's business life. He took 
a significant part in the commercial and civic affairs 
of both Norfolk and Portsmouth, and made con- 
tributions of value to both communities. He was 



admired for his integrity of character, and his 
career exemplified the qualities of vision, persever- 
ance and courageous enterprise which distinguish 
the finest type of business leader. 

He was not the first member of his family active 
in the management of this long-established Norfolk 
department store. His father, Richard Franklin, 
Sr., was a founder of Smith and Welton. He was 
born at Hicks Ford, now Emporia, in Greenville 
County, Virginia, on July 18, 1869, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. J. L. Welton who brought their family to 
Portsmouth in 1881. R. Frank Welton, as the senior 
bearer of the name was known, was in his early 
teens when he entered the employ of W. T. Simcoe, 
and he received his first lessons in merchandising 
in Mr. Simcoe's Portsmouth store. In the course 
of the next ten years, he was employed in several 
other merchandising firms. In December 1890, he 
joined Thomas Lawrence in organizing the firm of 
Lawrence and Welton, and they engaged in the 
men's furnishings business in Portsmouth. In the 
spring of 1898, they relocated their store in Nor- 
folk, where they opened at 218 Main Street, the 
present location of the Selden Arcade. Meantime the 
scope of operations had been increasing, and by 
1902 additional space had been obtained to accom- 
modate a ready-to-wear and an exclusive dress- 
making department. During that year, Mr. Law- 
rence sold his interest in the business to Cosmos 
Smith, and the firm adopted its present name of 
Smith and Welton. Mr. Smith became vice presi- 
dent of the firm when it was incorporated in 1914, 
and served in that capacity until his death in Oc- 
tober 1921. 

In 1909, the store was moved into the Dickson 
Building at Granby and Tazewell streets to keep in 
step with changing shopping trends. After absorb- 
ing three stores in this building, the firm expanded 
to occupy adjoining premises as well. Smith and 
Welton, Inc., moved to its present location at 300 
Granby Street in 1917, and there undertook its 
largest expansion program, which involved the 
addition of many departments. 

R. Frank Welton continued as president of Smith 
and Welton. Inc., until his death in September 
1922. For over thirty years he had devoted his 
energies and abilities to the development of the 
business which bears his name. The growth of the 
store during his lifetime reflected to a great extent 
the energy and integrity which characterized his 
career. He was an earnest worker on behalf of 
every movement to promote the development and 
prosperity of Norfolk, and of Portsmouth where 
he made his home. 

R. Frank Welton married Benna Barrett, and 
their son, Richard Franklin, Jr., was born on May 
5, 1893, at Portsmouth. He received his early edu- 



5- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



cation in the public schools of that city, completed 
his preparatory studies at Fishburne Military Aca- 
demy, and in 1915 graduated from Virginia Mili- 
tary Institute with a degree in civil engineering. 
During World War I, he served in the United 
States Army with the rank of lieutenant. He was 
assigned to the 60th Infantry, Fifth Division, which 
saw action on the Western Front with the American 
Expeditionary Force. He participated in the bitter 
fighting of the Meuse-Argonne and St. Mihiel cam- 
paigns in France, and when the war was ended, 
served for a time in the army of occupation in 
Germany. 

On his return from military service, Mr. Welton 
entered the insurance and real estate business with 
his uncle, Charles R. Welton, who is now .deceased. 
On the death of his father in 1922, he left to join 
Smith and Welton, Inc., representing the second 
generation of the family in its management. Named 
president of the corporation in 1936, he served 
until his death. Concerning his career as executive 
head of the department store, a local newspaper 
commented: 

The record is one of intelligent, alert, and vigorous man- 
agement and promotion. Mr. Welton was imaginative and 
far-sighted and progressive. He organized well, distributed 
responsibility wisely, studied improvements carefully, and kept 
in stride with what was being thought and done in the 
merchandising world. 

Mr. Welton had, in addition, a clear awareness of both 
the customers and the employees of the department store. To 
his employees he was thoughful and generous, especially to 
the older ones. Toward his customers he showed a friendly 
and personal attitude even when the department store had 
grown to large proportions. He was insistent on clinics and 
seminars for the sales staff, maintained unusually good rela- 
tions with manufacturers, and played an important part in the 
broad mercantile growth of the Norfolk and Portsmouth region. 

All these are the attributes of sound merchandising. Mr. 
Welton exemplified them, and put them into effect with 
personal modesty, emphasizing the department store and not 
its chief executive, fn important respects the institution that 
stands today is his monument. This was a useful career that 
is largely responsible for a signal achievement in Norfolk's 
growth. 

In his role of worker for a better community, Mr. 
Welton backed every worthwhile civic and welfare 
cause. As a veteran of World War I, he was a 
member of the American Legion, and he also held 
membership in numerous other organizations. 

On November 27, 1917, Richard Franklin Wel- 
ti in, Jr., married Miss Alice Boardman of Balti- 
more, Maryland. They became the parents of a 
son, Richard F., Ill, who is now head of the de- 
partment store and who is the subject of an ac- 
companying sketch; and of a daughter, now Mrs. 
William S. Anderson of Virginia Beach. At the 
time of his death, which occurred in May 1956, he 
had six grandchildren. 

On his death, the editorial columns of a local 



newspaper carried this tribute to the man, expres- 
sing recognition of his place in the community: 

For more than 35 years . . . Richard Franklin Welton, Jr., 
had played a part in the business life of both Norfolk and 
Portsmouth. He had close associations with these cities all 
his life, and as business man and citizen he made contributions 
to both . . . During the years of Mr. Welton's direction, the 
department store which bears his name expanded and developed 
and kept abreast of the times. Mr. Welton devoted himself 
closely to the operations of this establishment. It required 
sound business judgment and alert, aggressive merchandising 
policies to make it one of the best known and most respected 
department stores in this part of the state. It has made its 
own contribution to Norfolk's commercial development during 
the years when this development has been greatest. And this 
represents in large measure a personal contribution by the 
man who was its head for so many years. A community always 
is the loser when such a man dies, particularly when death 
comes as in this case at an age at which we should have been 
able to look forward to many years of useful life. 



RICHARD FRANKLIN WELTON, III— Rep- 
resenting the third generation of his family in 
the management of Norfolk's oldest and largest 
department store, Richard Franklin Welton, III, 
is now president and general manager of Smith 
and Welton, Inc. He was born June 12, 1919, in 
Baltimore, Maryland, the only son and older child 
of Richard Franklin, Jr., and Alice (Boardman) 
Welton. .His father, former head of the department 
store and subject of an accompanying sketch, died 
recently. Mrs. Welton, a native of Baltimore, sur- 
vives him and makes her home at 320 Sycamore 
Road, Portsmouth. 

In that city, where the family has long main- 
tained its residence, Richard F. Welton, III, passed 
his boyhood years. He attended the public schools 
and in 1936 graduated from Churchland High 
School. He then entered Virginia Military Insti- 
tute, from which he graduated in 1940 with the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. 
As his father had done before him, Mr. Welton 
began learning the merchandising business through 
part-time and summer-vacation work in the vari- 
ous departments of Smith and Welton, Inc. 

In 1941 he joined the staff as a regular employee, 
after gaining additional experience in merchandis- 
ing and store operation with Rich's, in Atlanta, 
Georgia. A short time afterwards, however, his 
career was interrupted by service in the United 
States Coast Guard, which he entered with an 
ensign's commission in May 1941. When this coun- 
try entered World War II, he went on anti-sub- 
marine duty aboard the cutter Dionne. He later 
served as instructor in anti-submarine warfare at 
the Lmited States Coast Guard Academy in New 
London, Connecticut. Thereafter he was assigned 
to active duty in the Pacific aboard the assault 
transport Bayfield. After four and one-half years 
of service, he was separated from active duty in 




TWVa. 6 



#~jlv 7 u/^z^ 



/// 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



53 



November 1945, holding at that time the rank of 
lieutenant commander. 

On resuming civilian life, Mr. Welton imme- 
diately rejoined Smith and Welton, Inc., which 
at that time confined its operations to the main 
retail outlet at Granby and Market streets. He 
took up duties as general manager and assistant 
to the president. In the course of his connection 
with the organization, he has played a major role 
in the expansion of the business. He took part in 
planning the 1949 addition to the downtown store 
which put ten thousand square feet of floor space 
under its roof; and also in the establishment of 
two branch stores, one at Wards Corner, and one 
at Virginia Beach. The resort branch, located in the 
Mayflower Shopping Center, was opened in 1951 
and enlarged in 1955. The Wards Corner store has 
been in operation since the fall of 1952. In keeping 
with this progressive policy of expansion, Smith 
and Welton's third branch store was recently open- 
ed at the Janaf Shopping Center, at Military High- 
way and Virginia Beach Boulevard in Norfolk. 
The main store at Granby and Market streets, 
which was first occupied in 191 7, lias been ex- 
panded to eighty thousand square feet of floor 
space. In all its operations, Smith and Welton, Inc., 
now has nearly five hundred employees on its 
payroll. 

On May 31, 1956, shortly after the death of his 
father, Richard Franklin Welton, III, was elected 
to the presidency of Smith and Welton, Inc. He is 
also general manager of the firm, and in his dual 
executive role, is capably carrying on the fine tradi- 
tions of the firm, which for over threescore years 
has been a commercial landmark of the Norfolk 
area. 

Mr. Welton finds time to be active in various 
phases of community life. He is first vice president 
of the Norfolk Retail Merchants Association, and 
a member of the board of directors of the Norfolk 
Chamber of Commerce. He is currently serving as 
second vice president of the city's Community 
Chest. He is a member of the Governor's Tax Com- 
mission. He serves on the boards of directors of 
the Norfolk Academy and the Norfolk General 
Hospital and is a director of the National Bank of 
Commerce. Since his student days at Virginia Mili- 
tary Institute, he has been a member of Kappa 
Alpha fraternity. He is a member of the Princess 
Anne Country Club, and he and his family are 
communicants of the Galilee Episcopal Church of 
Virginia Beach. The department store executive is 
fond of outdoor sports, particularly hunting and 
fishing. 

On June 26, 1943, at Chestertown, Maryland, 
Richard Franklin Welton, III, married Elizabeth 
Beck, daughter of S. Scott and Mackey (Perry) 



Beck of that community. Like her husband, Mrs. 
Welton takes a lively interest in community affairs. 
She is a member of the Junior League of Norfolk 
and the Bay Colony Garden Club. The couple are 
the parents of four children: I. Elizabeth Beck, 
born August 28, 1944. 2. Nancy Boardman, born 
May 10, 1946. 3. Catherine Mackey, born July 7, 
1947. 4. Richard Franklin, IV, born December 26, 
1950. The family resides in the Bay Colony at 
Virginia Beach. 



CHARLES SYER, JR.— As president and gen- 
eral manager of Charles Syer and Company, of 
Norfolk, Charles Syer, Jr., heads one of the city's 
oldest business establishments, now observing its 
seventy-seventh anniversary, which was a pioneer 
in food brokerage. From the time of its founding 
in 1881, the firm has continued under the manage- 
ment of three successive generations of the Syer 
family. 

Charles Syer, Jr., who represents the third gen- 
eration, was born May 28, 1902, in Portsmouth, 
son of Charles, Sr., and Grace Lee (Watts) Syer, 
and grandson of Charles Syer, the founder, for 
whom the firm is named. He was a native of 
England and first came to this country in the 
course of an ocean voyage he had taken for his 
health. Arriving in Portsmouth, he was impressed 
by the possibilities of the Tidewater area and set- 
tled permanently in that city, living there until 
his death in 1893. Twelve years before that time 
he had founded the firm of food brokers. He 
also took an interest in civic and public affairs, 
both at Portsmouth where he lived and at Nor- 
folk where he established his business. He served 
as sheriff of Portsmouth. 

His son, Charles, Sr., was born in 1875 in 
Portsmouth. Early in life he joined his father in 
business, and although he was only eighteen at 
the time of the elder man's death, he was able 
soon afterwards to assume full responsibilities for 
its management, which he carried until his own 
death on October 13, 193 1. Under his capable di- 
rection the business grew into one of the largest 
of food brokerage firms, maintaining offices in 
Wilmington, North Carolina; in West Virginia; 
and other cities, as well as at Norfolk. Charles 
Syer, Sr., had other commercial interests as well, 
and was active in community affairs at Ports- 
mouth, where he maintained his home. He was 
a member of the board of directors of the Sea- 
board National Bank of Norfolk, was first vice 
president of the old Norfolk-Portsmouth Chamber 
of Commerce, and served several terms on .the 
Portsmouth city council. He was a member of the 
Rotary Club in that city, of its Benevolent and 



54 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



Protective Order of Elks lodge, the Princess Anne 
Country Club, and the Norfolk Yacht and Country 
Club. He was at one time a lay leader in the 
Virginia Conference of the Methodist Church and 
served on the board of stewards of the Monumen- 
tal Methodist Church of Portsmouth. 

Charles Syer, St., married Grace Lee Watts of 
Portsmouth, who continues to maintain the family 
home at 1035 Naval Avenue in that city. They be- 
came the parents of five children, four of whom 
are living, the eldest having died in infancy. The 
surviving children are: 2. Charles, of whom fur- 
ther. 3. Mary Virginia, who married Henry S. 
Lewis of Norfolk. 4. George Watts, who is now 
engaged in the real estate business at Virginia 
Beach. 5. Lee Crawford, of London Bridge, Vir- 
ginia, also active in the management of Charles 
Syer and Company. 

Charles Syer, Jr., directing head of the firm, 
passed his boyhood in Portsmouth, where lie re- 
ceived his early education, graduating from Ports- 
mouth High School in 1918. He then entered Vir- 
ginia Military Institute, from which he graduated in 
[922 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. When 
he completed his courses there he was commis- 
sioned a second lieutenant in the United States 
Army Reserve Corps, but did not go into active 
military service. 

Following in his grandfather's and father's foot- 
steps, he entered the firm of Charles Syer and 
Company, and when his father died in 1931, suc- 
ceeded him as head of the firm. In the course of 
the intervening years, he has successfully directed 
the operations of this long-established firm. 

As food distributors, the company is principally 
engaged in sugar brokerage, with a trade terri- 
tory covering the state of North Carolina and 
southern Virginia, with jobbers, chain stores, and 
industrial users as its main outlets. Over the years, 
Charles Syer and Company has maintained its 
headquarters in Norfolk, and its present address 
is 1215 East Water Street. 

Active in civic and community affairs, Charles 
Syer, Jr., is a member of the board of directors 
of the Seaboard Citizens National Bank of Nor- 
folk and also serves on the board of the Leigh 
Memorial Hospital of that city. He is a member 
of the National Sugar Brokers Association. A 
member of the Virginia State Chamber of Com- 
merce, he is also active in the Portsmouth and 
the Norfolk chambers and is a past director of 
the latter group. He is a member of the Virginia 
Club of Norfolk, Princess Anne Country Club, 
and the Monumental Methodist Church of Ports- 
mouth. 

Until eleven years ago, he and his family re- 
sided in Norfolk County, and since then they have 
made their home at Crystal Lake, Virginia Beach. 



There they attend the Galilee Episcopal Church. 
Mr. Syer's favorite sport is golf. 

On October 27, 1928, at Churchland, Charles 
Syer, Jr., married Virginia Hathaway Ballard, 
daughter of John W. and Effie (Hathaway) Bal- 
lard of that city. She is a graduate of West Hamp- 
ton College in Richmond and is active in com- 
munity affairs, being a member of the Virginia 
Society of the Daughters of the American Revo- 
lution, the Virginia Beach Garden Club, the Eliza- 
beth Garden Club, and the Baptist Church. The 
couple are the parents of two children: 1. Charles, 
IV, born October 26, 1931, at Portsmouth. He is 
a graduate of Princeton University, where he re- 
ceived his degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1953, and 
is now attending Harvard School of Business Ad- 
ministration. He has served in the United States 
Army and retains the rank of first lieutenant in 
the Army Reserve Corps. 2. John Ballard, who 
was born on February 22, 1939, at Portsmouth. 
He attended Norfolk Academy and is now a stu- 
dent at Episcopal High School, Alexandria, Vir- 
ginia. 



HENRY CLAY HOFHEIMER— Building ma- 
terials executive Henry Clay Hofheimer holds of- 
ficial posts in over a score of corporations, in ad- 
dition to Southern Materials Company of Norfolk, 
which has long been his major business interest. 
One of the most influential business leaders of the 
Tidewater region, he also holds office in a number 
of national and regional builders' groups, and has 
taken a constructive role in welfare, educational 
and cultural causes. 

A native of Norfolk, he was born on December 
28, 1906, son of Julius Caesar and Bessie (Hirsch- 
ler) Hofheimer. After attending local public 
schools, he entered the University of Virginia, where 
he graduated in 1928 with the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. In September of that year he joined the 
Haycox Concrete Corporation in Norfolk as its 
secretary-treasurer, and in April 1930, became presi- 
dent of Hofheimer Concrete Corporation. He re- 
mained at the head of this firm for a decade, and 
in June 1940, became a partner in Hofheimer Con- 
struction Company, continuing until October 1945. 
In addition, from February 1939, to December 1946, 
he was president of Highway Contractors, Inc. All 
of the above firms were Norfolk organizations, but 
in November 1944, Mr. Hofheimer became a part- 
ner in an Altoona, Pennsylvania, concern, the Cava- 
lier Coal Company. From January 1936, until June 
1940, he was secretary-treasurer of Seaboard Motor 
Company, Inc., of Norfolk, and from June 1940, to 
November 1943, held the same offices in Cavalier 
Motor Company, Inc., of that city. 

Mr. Hofheimer's connection with Southern Ma- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



55 



terials Company, Inc., of Norfolk, began in 1945. 
He served as secretary-treasurer and member of 
the board of directors, until 1954, when he was 
elected chairman of the board, a position he has 
held since. Since 1949 he has been chairman of the 
board and director of Atlantic and Danville Rail- 
way Company. At the present time he holds the 
offices of president and director of the following 
corporations, the year in which his connection be- 
gan being indicated in parentheses: Southern Block 
and Pipe Corporation (1946); Peninsula Block Cor- 
poration (1952); Southern Lighterage Corporation 
(1947); National Realty Corporation (1934); Con- 
cord Realty Corporation (1934); Marshall Manor, 
Inc. (1940); Tidewater Shopping Center, Inc. 
(1952); and Southern Shopping Ceuiter, Inc. 
( 1955 1. All of these are Norfolk organizations with 
the exception of Peninsula Block Corporation of 
Newport News. Mr. Hofheimer has served as 
secretary-treasurer and director of Southern Light- 
weight Aggregate Corporation since 1947; of Caro- 
lina Solite Corporation since 1953; and of Atlantic 
Warehouse Corporation since 1944, all Norfolk 
firms. Since 1938 he has been treasurer and director 
of Cavalier Realty Corporation; and he is secre- 
tary-treasurer and director of Concrete Pipe and 
Products Company, Inc., of Richmond (since 
: 949) ; Superior Masonry Units, Inc., of Richmond 
(since 1952); Cavalier Coal Company, Inc., of A1- 
toona, Pennsylvania (since 1950); and Spectra- 
Glaze Corporation of Richmond (since 1950). From 
the years indicated, he has held the office of direc- 
tor of Southwestern Financial Corporation of Dal- 
las, Texas (1954); director of Texcrete Structural 
Products Company, also of Dallas (1955); secre- 
tary-treasurer and director of Georgia Solite Cor- 
poration of Cedartown, Georgia (1953); secretary- 
treasurer and director of Southern Brick and Sup- 
ply Company of Richmond (1955); director of 
Texas Industries, Inc., of Dallas (1950); National 
Bank of Commerce of Norfolk (1951); secretary- 
treasurer and director of Portsmouth Radio Cor- 
poration of Norfolk (1953). He has been a partner 
in the investment firm of Bache and Company of 
Xew York City since February 1956; and in the 
same month became a director of First Colony 
Life Insurance Company of Lynchburg. An im- 
portant recent industrial connection is his post as 
chairman of the board of Ingrain Concrete Com- 
pany of Jacksonville, Florida, to which he was 
elected in December 1955. Also in 1955 he became 
a director of Rice's, in Norfolk. 

Active in the Norfolk Builders and Contractors 
Exchange, Mr. Hofheimer was its president in 
1939; and from 1942 to 1948 he served on the board 
of directors of the Highway Contractors' Division 
of the American Road Builders Association. He 



was a director of the American Road Builder^ As- 
sociation in 1947. He served as secretary-treasurer 
and director of the Virginia Road Builder^ As- 
sociation from 1942 to 1948, and has since been 
regional vice president of the Association. All of 
these offices he has filled without compensation. 
He is a member of the American Society of Mili- 
tary Engineers and the Hampton Roads Post of 
that organization. 

In his home city, Mr. Hofheimer has served as 
vice chairman of the Norfolk City Planning Com- 
mission; first vice president of the Norfolk Cham- 
ber of Commerce; member of the board of trustees 
of Norfolk Academy for Boys; and also as trus- 
tee of the Norfolk Museum of Arts and Sciences. 
He likewise serves on the boards of trustees of 
the College of William and Mary Endowment 
Association, the Virginia Foundation for Inde- 
pendent Colleges, Norfolk Society for the Preven- 
tion of Cruelty to Animals, and on the board of 
trustees of both the Student Aid Foundation of 
the University of Virginia and the alumni associa- 
tion there. He is a member of the regional scholar- 
ship committee of the University of Virginia: 
member of the board of directors of the Norfolk 
Symphony and Choral Association; second vice 
president and member of the Executive Committee 
of Norfolk General Hospital. 

He is a member of the Hague Club and the 
Lafayette Yacht and Country Club, both of Nor- 
folk, and of the Cavalier Beach Club and Surf 
Beach Club, both of Virginia Beach. 

On September 26, 1931, Henry Clay Hofheimer 
married Elise Nusbaum, They are the parents of 
three children: 1. Elise Bessie. 2. Linda. 3. Clay. 



R. EDWARD HAWKS' varied role in the busi- 
ness life of Portsmouth has included several execu- 
tive offices. He is president of Welton, Duke, and 
Hawks, Inc., a general insurance, real estate, and 
property management firm; is president of the 
Portsmouth and Norfolk County Building and 
Loan Association; and is treasurer of the Ports- 
mouth Hotel Corporation. A progressive business- 
man and civic leader, his activities are varied and 
extensive and have constituted a vital force in his 
city. 

Born November 6, 1902, in Portsmouth, Mr. 
Hawks is a son of Edward Bascomb and Mary 
Victoria (Welton) Hawks of that city. Both par- 
ents are living and are descended from families 
long established in Virginia. Edward B. Hawks, 
now over ninety years old, was born in Peters- 
burg and early in his career came to Portsmouth 
to work. About the turn of the century, he en- 
tered the hardware, paint, and building supplies 
business at Portsmouth, in partnership with E. W. 



56 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



Maupin, Jr. He continued active in the partnership 
until his retirement. 

Edward B. and Mary Victoria (Welton) Hawks 
became the parents of three sons: I. Richard Ed- 
ward, of whom further. 2. Otis Jefferson, now 
treasurer of the Standard Hardware Company of 
Portsmouth. 3. Charles Welton, secretary and 
treasurer of Welton, Duke, and Hawks, Inc. 

R. Edward Hawks received his early education 
in the public schools of Portsmouth and was a 
member of the first graduating class of Woodrow 
Wilson High School in 1920. Continuing his edu- 
cation at Virginia Military Institute, he graduated 
there in 1924, receiving the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. 

He began his business career as a clerk in the 
firm of Charles R. Welton, a general insurance 
and real estate agency in Portsmouth. With the 
organizing of the firm of Welton, Duke, and Hawks 
in 1928, R. Edward Hawks became its secretary 
and treasurer, with Charles R. Welton as presi- 
dent and C. J. Duke as vice president. In 1935 
Mr. Duke left the firm to become bursar of the 
College of William and Mary, at Williamsburg. 
When Charles R. Welton died in 1937, Mr. Hawks 
succeeded to the presidency and has held that of- 
fice ever since. Other officers as of 1957 are Stock- 
ton P. Fleming, vice president, and Charles Wel- 
ton Hawks, secretary and treasurer. 

Mr. Hawks has been president of the Ports- 
mouth and Norfolk County Building and Loan 
A-sociation since 1948. When it was first organ- 
ized in 1939 Mr. Hawks became secretary and 
treasurer, and later he became director and treas- 
urer of the Portsmouth Hotel Corporation, owners 
of the Governor Dinwiddie Hotel (formerly Hotel 
Portsmouth), the most recently constructed in the 
Norfolk-Portsmouth area. He serves on the board 
of directors of the American National Bank of 
Portsmouth. 

Vitally interested in good municipal govern- 
ment, he served as a member of the city of Ports- 
mouth Planning Commission, and he recently com- 
pleted a four year term, 1952-1956, on the Ports- 
mouth City Council. He is a member and director of 
the Portsmouth Industrial Foundation and is also a 
member of the board of the Chamber of Com- 
merce. Active in Rotary, he was president of the 
club at Portsmouth in 1946-1947. He is a member 
of the Elizabeth Manor Country Club and of 
Lodge No. 82, Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. He attends Monumental Methodist 
Church. Fond of the out-of-doors, he is particu- 
larly partial to swimming and fishing. 

On February 9, 1929, in Norfolk, R. Edward 
Hawks married Frances Conwell, a native of 
Delaware and daughter of the late William W. 
and Elizabeth (Megee) Conwell. Mr. and Mrs. 



Hawks are the parents of two children: 1. Frances 
Conwell, born January 31, 1933. She is married 
to Lieutenant Robert William Wentz, Jr., of the 
United States Marine Corps, now stationed at 
Camp Pendleton, California, and they are the par- 
ents of a daughter, Ashley Conwell. 2. Mary Wel- 
ton, born September 4, 1935. She attended Ran- 
dolph-Macon Womens College in Lynchburg and 
married Robert Milton Schlemmer, lieutenant jun- 
ior grade, United States Navy. The family home 
is at 302 Park Road, Portsmouth, and Mr. Hawks' 
office at 407 Court Street in that city. 



RICHARD NEWMAN— Senior partner in the 
Newport News law firm of Newman, Allaun, and 
Bateman, Richard Newman has practiced in that 
city for about twenty-five years. He has held 
office as city attorney, has been active in Demo- 
cratic politics, served as an army officer in World 
War II, and is active in a number of business 
connections. 

Mr. Newman is a native of New-port News, 
and was born on April 2, 1906, son of Richard 
Wynne and Frances Love (Plummer) Newman. 
His father, born in James City County on July 
21, 1874, entered the insurance business in New- 
port News, and died in that city on April 24, 
1936. Frances Love Plummer, whom he married, 
was born in Vance County, North Carolina, on 
June 4, 1877, and died on December 29, 1944. Re- 
ceiving his early education in the public schools 
of Newport News, Richard Newman graduated 
from high school there in 1924. He then entered 
Virginia Military Institute, where in 1928 he com- 
pleted his courses and received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. His Bachelor of Laws degree 
was conferred by the University of Virginia in 
1931. Meantime, in 1930, he had been admitted 
to the bar of Virginia. 

Since he completed his professional courses at 
the state university, Mr. Newman has practiced 
in his native city of Newport News, with the 
exception of the years in World War II service. 
He is now the senior member of the law firm 
of Newman, Allaun, and Bateman. His partners, 
William E. Allaun, Jr., and Fred W. Bateman 
are the subjects of sketches in this work. The 
firm, which has offices in the Melson Building, and 
at 244 Warwick Road, Warwick, takes cases be- 
fore the state and federal courts and conducts a 
general practice. 

Mr. Newman began his public career by be- 
coming assistant city attorney of Newport News 
in 1947, which office he held until 1956. when 
he moved to the city of Warwick. For four 
years he was chairman of the Newport News 
Democratic Executive Committee. His business 
connections include the positions of vice presi- 




OiQw^f^ 1 ^ 



LOWER TIDEWATER YIRGIMA 



57 



dent and director of Mutual Home and Savings 
Association, and directorship of the Peninsula 
Memorial Park Association. He is a trustee of 
the War Museum of Virginia. Himself a veteran 
of World War II, Richard Newman entered the 
service of the United States Army on July 4, 
1942, and was separated from the forces on Au- 
gust 11, 1946. He was commissioned a captain 
at the time of his enlistment, and advanced to 
the rank of lieutenant colonel while serving in 
the European Theater of Operations. 

A member of the Newport News - Warwick 
Bar Association, Mr. Newman served as its presi- 
dent in 1950-1951. He is also a member of the 
Virginia State Bar Association and the Ameri- 
can Bar Association. Music is Mr. Newman's 
hobby, and for many years he was president of 
the Peninsula Choral Society. He has also been 
active in the Peninsula Orchestra Association. 
As a veteran he is a member of the American 
Legion and the Veterans of Foreign Wars. He 
attends St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, and is 
vice president of its Men's Club. His fraternity 
is Theta Chi. 

At Lexington, on July 20, 1946, Richard New- 
man married Elizabeth Jarman of Crozet, daugh- 
ter of William M. and Pearl (Ligon) Jarman. 
Both of her parents are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. 
Newman have two children: 1. Elizabeth Fran- 
ces, born November 22, 1947. 2. Richard, Jr., 
born October 12, 1950. 



WILLIAM E. ALLAUN, JR.— Newport News 
attorney William E. Allaun, Jr., has taken a 
constructive role in the life of his city. In addi- 
tion to his private practice, he is an official of 
several corporations and serves on the Airport 
Commission. 

Born in Norfolk on October 17, 1914, he is 
a son of William E., Sr., and Ann R. (Finch) 
Allaun. Both of his parents are still living. His 
father, who is now retired, is a native of Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. His mother was born in 
Richmond. In the Hawkins (maternal) line, his 
forebears have owned property in Newport News 
since the seventeenth century. William E. Allaun, 
Jr.. received his education in private schools — 
the Browning School in New York City and 
the Taft School in Watertown, Connecticut. He 
graduated from the latter in the Class of 1931. 
He then entered Yale University, where he re- 
ceived his degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1935. In 
1939 he took his degree of Bachelor of Laws from 
Harvard University, and he was admitted to the bar 
of the commonwealth of Virginia the same year. 
He has also been admitted to practice before the 
United States Tax Court. Mr. Allaun began prac- 
tice in Newport News and, with the exception 



of the years of World War II, has been active 
professionally in that city since. He is a mem- 
1-." of the firm of Newman, Allaun, and Bate- 
man, with offices in the Melson Building. This 
organization, which engages in a general practice 
before state and federal courts, also has an of- 
fice on Warwick Road in Warwick. Mr. Allaun's 
partners are Richard Newman, and Fred W. Bate- 
man. Henry G. Mullins III and RutherforJ C. 
Lake, Jr., are associates. The firm has a variety of 
clients, including Century Industries, Inc., Royal 
Indemnity Company, Peninsula Airport Com- 
mission, United States Fidelity & Guaranty Com- 
pany, American Casualty Company, Hilton Shop- 
ping Center, Southland Shopping Center, Globe 
Indemnity Company, Endebrock-White Construc- 
tion Company, Hampton Roads Towing Corpora- 
tion, Finch Trust Estate, and Finch Corporation. 

Mr. Allaun has been secretary of the Peninsula 
Airport Commission since it was founded in 1946. 
The following year he became special attorney of 
the county of Warwick, and this public office 
too he has since held. He was absent from New- 
port News at the time of World War II, serv- 
ing in the United States Navy, in which he ad- 
vanced from ensign to lieutenant. He was in 
uniform for over three years. 

Active in the American Bar Association, Mr. 
Allaun serves on its Committee on Taxation of 
Estates and Trusts. He is also a member of the 
Virginia Bar Association and the Newport News- 
Warwick Bar Association. As a business leader, 
he holds membership on the boards of several 
corporations. He is a Democrat in his politics 
and a member and past president of the Rotary 
Club. Other memberships include the American 
Legion, Post No. 25, of which he is past com- 
mander, the Hampton Roads German Club, of 
which he is past president, and the James River 
Country Club. An Episcopalian, he attends St. 
Stephen's Church. 

The former Madeleine Elliott Huffman of New- 
port News became the wife of William E. Al- 
Lun, Jr., in a ceremony in her native city on 
April 11, 1942. She is the daughter of Edward 
and Beatrice Glass (Stratford) Huffman. The 
couple are the parents of two children: 1. Samuel 
Plummer, born Januiry 6, 1947. 2. William E., 
Ill, born August 25, 1953. 



T. DAVID FITZ-GIBBON, A. LA.— The posi- 
tion which T. David Fitz-Gibbon occupies among 
his colleagues in the architectural profession may 
be measured somewhat by the fact that he is a 
former president of the Virginia Chapter of the 
American Institute of Architects. He has won ad- 
ditional stature through his work on an official 
committee which simplified and organized the 



5§ 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



plumbing code for the City of Norfolk and his 
service on the Plumbing Appeal Board and the 
Electrical Examining Board. Many structures of 
great beauty and utility, residential, industrial, com- 
mercial, religious and educational, stand in various 
parts of Norfolk and elsewhere as monuments to 
his craftsmanship. 

Mr. Fitz-Gibbon, a native of the region he serves, 
was born in Norfolk on April 12, 1895, the son 
of Thomas Shanahan and Mary (Cregan) Fitz- 
Gibbon. His father, who was a grocer and who 
served on the Norfolk City Council, came to Ameri- 
ca with his parents from Ireland. T. David Fitz- 
Gibbon's mother was born in Maryland on May I, 
1870, and died in Norfolk on March 12, 1948. His 
father was born in Limerick, Ireland, on April 24, 
1864, and died in Norfolk on January 2, 1938. He 
was the son of David Fitz-Gibbon and an uncle 
of Dr. Maurice Fitz-Gibbon, who was a prominent 
physician in Norfolk. 

The architect began his education at St. Mary's 
Academy, Norfolk, where he was graduated in 
1908. He spent the next year at Mount St. Joseph's 
College, Baltimore, first pursued the study of archi- 
tecture at the Maryland Architectural Institute, 
also in Baltimore. He followed up with architectur- 
al studies at the Carnegie Institute of Technology 
in Pittsburgh and in the next seven years served 
as draftsman and architect with various firms. 

In 1921, Mr. Fitz-Gibbon participated in the 
formation of the firm of Carlow, Browne and Fitz- 
Gibbon, with which he was associated until 1936. 
Since that year he has been in practice independ- 
ently, with offices in the Royster Building. When 
he was with the firm of Carlow, Browne and Fitz- 
Gibbon, Mr. Fitz-Gibbon collaborated in the de- 
sign of the Virginia Electric Power Company's of- 
fice building, the DePaul Hospital, the First Luth- 
eran Church of Norfolk and the Larchmont School. 
In association with other architects he designed 
the Norfolk Civic Auditorium, the Catholic High 
School of Norfolk, the Norfolk Museum of Arts 
and Science Building and others and was consulting 
architect in the development of the Young Park 
Housing Project of the Norfolk Redevelopment 
and Housing Authority, with its one thousand 
units. He designed the remodelings of banks and 
other commercial structures as well as numerous 
residences in Norfolk and other cities. Among his 
"solo credits" are the Norfolk headquarters of 
the Virginia Electric Power Company, the Smith 
Douglas Office Building in Norfolk, the Colonial 
Avenue Branch of the National Bank of Commerce 
of Norfolk, the sixteen-story Mayflower Apartment 
Building at Virginia Beach, the Ocean Garden 
Apartments at Ocean View, the Grandy Park 
Housing project of the Norfolk Redevelopment 



and Housing Authority and the James Barry Rob- 
inson Home for Boys, to name only a few. 

In 1945 he served on the Norfolk City Committee 
for Compiling the Plumbing Code and since 1946 
has been on the Plumbing Appeal Board and the 
Electrical Examining Board. Since 1945 he has 
been chairman of the board of trustees of the 
James Barry Robinson Home for Boys. Besides 
the American Institute of Architects, he is a mem- 
ber of the Princess Anne Country Club at Vir- 
ginia Beach, the Engineers Club at Hampton Roads 
and is a communicant of the Star of the Sea Roman 
Catholic Church at Virginia Beach. 

Mr. Fitz-Gibbon makes his home at 313 Fifty- 
first Street, Virginia Beach. 



ELDRIDGE HALL WHITEHURST— As vice 

president, director and general manager of the 
Curtis Bay Towing Company of Virginia, Inc., 
Eldridge Hall Whitehurst plays a prominent part 
in the water transportation industry centered in the 
Norfolk area. The company has its headquarters 
at Roanoke Dock in that city. 

Mr. Whitehurst is a native of Norfolk, born on 
April 29, 1896 of Scotch-Irish descent, and son of 
William Fountain and Henrietta (Culpepper) 
Whitehurst. His father, who was born in Camden 
County, North Carolina, was a son of John White- 
hurst, a planter of that place, and came to Norfolk 
as a young man. There he was active as a marine 
engineer until his retirement, several years before 
his death. He was a Mason, and both he and his 
wife were active members of the old Park Avenue 
Baptist Church. Mrs. Whitehurst, the former 
Henrietta Culpepper, was descended from an old 
Virginia family. Her death occurred at Norfolk 
on March 1, 1950, in her ninetieth year. 

The youngest of the children born to his parents, 
Eldridge Hall Whitehurst passed his boyhood years 
in Norfolk and attended local schools. He then 
took a business course at Davis Wagoner Business 
College. In World War I he served in the United 
States Navy, and afterwards began his career with 
the Wood Towing Corporation of Norfolk. This 
firm was founded in May 1920, by Joseph Downing 
Wood. From a modest beginning with one small 
tug and a water craft, the company expanded its 
operations along the Atlantic coast from Trenton, 
New Jersey, to Jacksonville, Florida, ultimately 
operating a flotilla of fifteen tugs. Mr. Whitehurst 
became secretary and treasurer of the Wood Tow- 
ing Corporation, and played an important part in 
the firm's growth throughout the years. He con- 
tinued in his executive capacity until the Wood 
Towing Company's interests were acquired with 
the forming of The Curtis Bay Towing Company 
of Virginia, Inc., on February 7, 1951. When the 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



59 



new organization came into being, he became as- 
sociated with that organization and on January I, 
1954, assumed his present responsibilities as vice 
president, director and general manager. The Curtis 
Bay Towing Company of Virginia, Inc., an in- 
dependent corporation, is affiliated with The Curtis 
Bay Towing Company of Baltimore, Maryland, 
and The Curtis Bay Towing Company of Pennsyl- 
vania, with headquarters in Philadelphia and Cap- 
tain H. C. Jefferson is its president. One of the 
best-equipped organizations in its field, the Vir- 
ginia firm operates a flotilla of fifteen superior tugs, 
dispatched by radio-telephone, with twenty-four- 
hour service. It serves shipping in the Hampton 
Roads, Chesapeake Bay and Delaware River areas 
with efficiency and dispatch, at all hours and under 
all weather conditions. The company's diversified 
fleet of modern tugs insures adequate power for 
every job, whether bringing in an ocean liner or 
moving harbor craft. There are about two hundred 
and fifty employees on the payroll. 

Besides his duties as executive of this firm, El- 
dridge Hall YVhitehurst has found time to serve 
actively in civic organizations promoting progress 
and development in Norfolk and Tidewater Vir- 
ginia. He is a director and treasurer of the Hamp- 
ton Roads Maritime Association, and director of the 
Tidewater Virginia Development Council. He is a 
director of the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce, and 
during the year 1956, served as president of 
the Propeller Club of the Port of Norfolk. He 
is a member and past president of the Cosmopolitan 
Club of that city; a member of the Virginia Club 
of Norfolk, the Norfolk Yacht and Country Club 
and the Princess Anne Country Club. He is affiliat- 
ed with Ruth Lodge No. 89, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons; Norfolk Chapter No. 1 of the 
Royal Arch Masons; Grice Commandery No. 16, 
Knights Templar; and Khedive Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He 
is a communicant of the First Presbyterian Church 
of Virginia Beach. 

Mr. YVhitehurst is fond of all outdoor sports. 
He particularly enjoys watching college football 
games, and frequently participates in a round of 
golf with his friends. 

On October 18, 1921, at Norfolk, Eldridge Hall 
Whitehurst married Edith A. Winslow, daughter 
of the late Augustus and Mattie P. (Jordan) Wins- 
low of that city. Mr. and Mrs. Whitehurst are the 
parents of three children: 1. Eldridge Augustus, 
born May 26, 1923. He is a graduate of Virginia 
Military Institute, from which he received his 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering, 
and he took his degree of Master of Science in 
Highway Civil Engineering at Purdue University. 
He is now director of Highway Research at the 



University of Tennessee. A veteran of three years' 
service in the United States Marine Corps, he holds 
the rank of captain in the Marine Corps Reserve. 
Eldridge A. Whitehurst married Nell Webb of Vir- 
ginia Beach, and they have two children: i. Anne 
Winslow. ii. Eldridge Augustus, Jr. 2. William 
Alvin, born August 6, 1928. He graduated from 
Virginia Military Institute with the degree of Bach- 
elor of Science in Civil Engineering, then entered 
the United States Air Force, serving as radar officer 
of a B-36 and holding the rank of first lieutenant. 
Now a resident of Norfolk, he is associated with 
the Southern Materials Company. He married 
Elizabeth Louene Waite of Virginia Beach, and 
their two children are: i. Susan Hall. ii. William 
Alvin, Jr. 3. Evelyn Jane, born April 14, 1931. She 
is a graduate of the College of William and Mary 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and is married 
to Robert Edward Royall Huntley of Winston- 
Salem, North Carolina. He is a graduate of Wash- 
ington and Lee University, from which he received 
his degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1957. Mr. and 
Mrs. Eldridge H. Whitehurst make their home on 
Lee Road, Bay Colony, Virginia Beach. 



COLONEL CHARLES BARNEY BORLAND 

has brought to the service of the city of Norfolk 
the qualities of faith, vision and organizational 
ability, and these have been important to the 
modern development of the region's largest city. 
He is currently serving as general manager of the 
Hampton Roads Sanitation District. 

He is a native and lifelong resident of Norfolk, 
where he was born on January 8, 1886, at the home 
of his parents at 44 York Street. They were the 
late Thomas Riscius and Carrie (Barney) Borland. 
His father was born in 1844 at Murfreesboro, North 
Carolina, and at the age of seventeen he left school 
to enlist in the Confederate States Army. He served 
in Company K, Ninth Virginia Infantry, and was in 
General George Edward Pickett's command at the 
Battle of Gettysburg, where he was wounded. He 
later served with the Army of Northern Virginia, 
until the end of the war at Appomattox Court- 
house. With the return of peace, he entered the 
law department of the University of Virginia. From 
the time of his graduation until his death in 1900, 
he was a prominent member of the Norfolk bar, 
and during the administration of President Ben- 
jamin Harrison, served as United States District 
Attorney. He was also at one time Common- 
wealth's Attorney for Norfolk City. His wife, the 
former Carrie Barney, was born in Mobile, Ala- 
bama, and died at Norfolk in 1927, at the age of 
eighty. Both she and her husband were members 
of the old Christ and St. Luke's Episcopal Church. 

The third of four children born to his parents, 



6o 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



Charles B. Borland attended Norfolk Academy, 
and Horner Military School at Oxford, North 
Carolina. After graduation, he worked for a time 
in the cotton business, later for a life insurance 
agency, and then as a railway clerk. Having joined 
the Virginia National Guard in 1908, he was on 
the rolls of the Fourth Virginia Infantry at the 
outbreak of World War I. Holding the rank of 
captain, he was later assigned to the 112th Field 
Artillery, 25th Division. He went overseas in June 
1918, and was promoted to the rank of major, and 
served with his command in the American Ex- 
peditionary Force in France for fifteen months. 
With the reorganization of the 29th Division fol- 
lowing the war, he was commissioned a lieutenant 
colonel in the infantry, and named assistant chief 
of staff of that division, a unit of the Virginia 
National Guard, on January 20, 1923. He was 
national commander of the 29th Division Associa- 
tion in 1936-1937, and his participation in veterans' 
affairs has continued through the years. Colonel 
Borland is a past commander of Post No. 392, 
Veterans of Foreign Wars, and of Police and Fire 
Post No. 120 of the American Legion. He was 
chairman of the procurement committee of Citizens 
Military Training Camps for Norfolk for twelve 
years. He is presently a member of Post No. 3160, 
Veterans of Foreign Wars; Julius F. Lynch Post 
No. 35, American Legion; and the Military Order 
of the World Wars. 

In October 1919, Colonel Borland began his long 
record of public service with the city of Norfolk 
when he was appointed inspector of police. In the 
fall of 1920 he received his first appointment as 
chief of police of Norfolk, and in July 1922, was 
made director of public safety. In the early years 
of his public career he served twice as chief of 
police, and on September 16, 1938, was appointed 
city manager, also serving as director of public 
safety, chairman of the Port of Norfolk Traffic 
Commission, and director of finance for the city. 
He continued to direct the administration of these 
departments of the municipal government until he 
resigned on January 1, 1946. The many accomplish- 
ments of his administration have been of lasting 
benefit to Norfolk, and he was responsible lor 
initiating changes which have gone far toward 
modernizing the city. He introduced the Taber Plan 
for reorganizing its financial structure, which re- 
sulted in a reduction of almost half a million dollars 
per year in its debt service. It also enabled the city 
to restore depression pay cuts to its employees, 
and to continued municipal finances on a pay-as- 
you-go basis without increased tax burden. The 
pension plan for city employees, one of the most 
progressive in the United States, was put into 
effect. In a program for giving police protection in 



the city's Negro areas, Negroes were admitted to 
the police force in 1941, and have proved them- 
selves efficient in their law-enforcement duties. 
Colonel Borland's administration covered the years 
of World War II, wdien special problems arose 
from the great increase in the city's population 
attendant on the growth of industries with defense 
contracts. 

After his retirement in 1946, he became executive 
vice president of the Jamestown Corporation, pro- 
ducer of the Williamsburg historical drama, The 
Common Glory, second oldest of the outdoor 
dramas still running in the South. He returned to 
Norfolk in May 1947, and was at that time ap- 
pointed to his present position as general manager 
of the Hampton Roads Sanitation District Com- 
mission. His offices are in the Board of Trade 
Building, Norfolk. The commission has jurisdic- 
tion over an area of about eleven hundred and sixty 
square miles. Its territory on the north shore in- 
cludes Hampton Roads, Newport News, Warwick 
and Hampton, and on the south shore the city of 
Norfolk, the Washington and Western Branch 
districts, the northern half of the Deep Creek Dis- 
trict of Norfolk County, the Kempsville and Lynn- 
haven districts of Princess Anne County, and areas 
of Nansemond and Isle of Wight counties. The 
present commission consists of Chairman E. T. 
Gresham of Norfolk, who has served in that post 
since 1946, and J. C. Morris of Warwick (vice 
chairman since 1950), G. A. Treakie of Norfolk 
County (1948), Charles R. Nickerson of Hampton 
(1954), and Robert F. Ripley (1956). It is the 
responsibility of the commission to establish the 
policies under which the staff operates. As general 
manager of the commission, Colonel Borland heads 
a force of thirty-three administration and office 
employees, and eighty-four engineering and oper- 
ating employees. They operate a far-reaching sys- 
tem with a total valuation of thirteen and one-half 
million dollars, sixty-eight miles of trunk lines, 
thirty-three pumping stations and three large 
sewage-treatment plants. Annual revenues from the 
system's sixty thousand users totals about one and 
a half million dollars annually. Nearly all of this 
goes for the operation of the system, and the 
commission's finances are consistently "in the 
black." 

Colonel Borland is a member of Owens Lodge 
No. 164, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; John 
Walter Chapter No. 68, Royal Arch Masons; Grice 
Commandery No. 16, Knights Templar; and Khe- 
dive Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of Charity 
Lodge No. 10, Knights of Pythias, and Lodge No. 
38, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and 
Lodge No. 39, Loyal Order of Moose. For twenty 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



years he was active in the Rotary Cluh in Norfolk. 
Active in the League of Virginia Municipalities, he 
was its president for the 1928-1929 term, and he 
was chairman of the Norfolk Chapter of the Amer- 
ican Red Cross from 1932 to 1936. He has also 
served as trustee of the Norfolk Community Fund, 
and also as trustee of the Norfolk Council, Boy 
Scouts of America. He was chairman of the council 
from 1927 to 1930. His interest in youth groups 
also led to his serving as director of the Boys' Club 
of Norfolk. He has held offices in the state, national 
and international police chiefs' organizations, and 
in public safety groups. An Episcopalian, he is a 
communicant of the Church of the Good Shepherd, 
and formerly served as a member of its vestry. His 
favorite sport is deep-sea fishing. 

A man of charming personality and a fine con- 
versationalist, Colonel Borland has a wide acquaint- 
ance and a legion of friends throughout Virginia, 
and he has often appeared as toastmaster or master 
of ceremonies, at public gatherings. 

On August 4, 1917, in the Little Church Around 
the Corner, in New York City, Colonel Charles 
Barney Borland married Grace Odend'hal of Nor- 
folk, daughter of the late Joseph S. and Herbert 
(Cason) Odend'hal. They make their home at 14 12 
Trouville Avenue, Norfolk. 



MICHAEL MORZYCKI MORA has been a 
resident of Norfolk since 1954, when he came to 
the city to assume duties as general manager of 
the Norfolk Port Authority. He lias since held 
this post with the port's promotional agency, which 
was created in 1948 to stimulate commerce here. 
The authority maintains a traffic department to 
protect the existing favorable rate differentials and 
to seek other advantages; a research and statistical 
department to maintain statistical data and conduct 
special studies; a publicity department to advertise 
the port's advantages among shippers and man- 
ufacturers and a commerce department, which 
solicits cargo at home and abroad. In addition, the 
Port Authority also operates the Norfolk Municipal 
Airport. 

Born June 29, 1896, Mr. Mora is a native of 
the Kujawy area of Poland which was then a part 
of the Russian Empire. He is a son of the late 
Sir Witold Morzycki Mora, and of Christine ( Ko- 
morowski) Mora who still resides in her native 
Poland. Sir Witold Mora was a skilled mechanical 
engineer who retired several years before his death 
in 1940, at the age of eighty. For many years 
he was director for Russia of the electrical equip- 
ment manufacturing firm known as the A. E. G. 
Company in Berlin, and his work took him to 
many parts of Europe and Asia. His only trip to 
the United States was as a delegate representing 



central Europe's boiler and machinery industry at 
the Columbian Exposition, held at Chicago in 1893. 

Michael M. Mora received his education in Eur- 
ope, attending the Second Normal School and the 
Polytechnic Institute, both at St. Petersburg (now 
Leningrad), Russia (now U. S. S. R.). He majored 
in electrical engineering. During the World War I 
period, he was exempt from military service, being 
engaged in wartime production work in Russia. 
Following the Russian Revolution, which culminat- 
ed in 1918 in the establishment of the Soviet, he 
came to the United States to make his home, and 
soon became a naturalized citizen. 

He took his first position here, in 1919. as rep- 
resentative of the LJnion of Polish Power Plants, 
and continued in that connection until 1921, when 
he became the New York partner of the Canadian 
underwriting firm of A. H. Martens and Company. 
In 1925 he returned to the employ of the Polish 
government as chief of the Commercial Division 
of the Consulate General of Poland, in New York. 
In 1929 he re-entered private industry, accepting 
appointment as vice president of the Foreign Trade 
Securities Company, Ltd., which had offices in 
Paris, Berlin and other major cities as well as in 
New York; and he was also active in the foreign 
exchange brokerage business until J934- For the 
next decade he was vice president and treasurer of 
Parish Petroleum Corporation and associated com- 
panies in Louisiana and Texas. 

With the end of World War II in 1945, Mr. 
Mora took a position as executive assistant chief 
of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation 
Administration mission for Poland. The following 
year he was named world trade development di- 
rector of International House in New Orleans, 
Louisiana. He served in this position for five years, 
then once again returned to private industry as 
vice president of the Colonial Trust Company of 
New York. From 1952 to 1954, he was vice presi- 
dent of the Foreign Trade Assistance Corporation 
of America, which also has its headquarters in 
New York. 

Mr. Mora then came to Norfolk, and since June 
15, 1954, has served most capably as general man- 
ager of the Norfolk Port Authority. He is a mem- 
ber of the Export-Import Club of Richmond, the 
North Atlantic Ports Association, American As- 
sociation of Port Authorities, Committee for Nation- 
al Import Policy, Hampton Roads Foreign Com- 
merce Club, the Virginia State Chamber of Com- 
merce and the Society of American Military Engi- 
neers. In his own city he belongs to the Rotary, 
Norfolk Executives Club, the Virginia Club, and 
the Propeller Club of the Port of Norfolk. His 
hobby is collecting cigarette lighters. 

On October 2, 1926, in Greenwich, Connecticut, 



6i 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



Michael Morzycki Mora married Anja Pregot, who 
was born in New York City of Polish descent. Mr. 
Mora's business adress is 500 Board of Trade Build- 
ing, Norfolk. 



ARUNAH OTTO LYNCH— Norfolk County's 
treasurer, A. O. Lynch, has a long and creditable 
record in public service. He served as common- 
wealth attorney for Norfolk County from 1928 
until July 8, 1954, when he resigned to accept 
appointment to complete the unexpired term ot 
Robert A. Robertson as county treasurer. He was 
elected to succeed himself for a full four-year 
term beginning January 1, 1956. He is well quali- 
fied for his position by education, experience, and 
general administrative ability. 

He was born April 1, 1888, in Camden County, 
North Carolina, son of the late Willoughby and 
Mary DeLena (Knight) Lynch. His father was 
a lumberman long associated with the John L. 
Roper Lumber Company, at one time one of the 
largest lumber producers of the Tidewater region. 
A. O. Lynch grew up on the home farm in Nor- 
folk County and received his primary education 
in the Wallaston Grammar School. He graduated 
from Leaksville-Spray Institute at Leaksville, 
North Carolina, then entered the old Richmond 
College, now the University of Richmond, from 
which he graduated with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts in 191 1. On completing his courses there, 
he taught English at Fort Union Military Acad- 
emy until 1915. 

In September of that year, with a career in law 
in mind, he returned to the University of Rich- 
mond as an instructor in English and concurrently 
studied law. He received his Bachelor of Laws 
degree from the university in 1917. After his gradu- 
tion, he and a few other classmates were designa- 
ted to work with the International Young Men's 
Christian Association in setting up Young Men's 
Christian Association recreation buildings in mili- 
tary training camps throughout the United States. 
Mr. Lynch's own assignment took him to Fort 
McPherson, Georgia. When the United States en- 
tered World War I, in April 1917, he enlisted as 
a private in the United States Army at Atlanta. 
He was assigned to duty in the Quartermaster 
Corps and stationed at the War Prison Barracks 
No. 1 at Fort McPherson. It was in this prison 
encampment that the German crews of the two 
famous German raiders, "Kronprinz Wilhelm" and 
"Prinz Eitel Friederich," were detained. The two 
vessels, which carried a total of about one thou- 
sand men in their crews, were interned at Ports- 
mouth in 19 1 5, prior to America's entry into the 
war. After his service at the barracks, Mr. Lynch 
was promoted to sergeant first class and assigned 



to duty in charge of making out payrolls in the 
Finance Department. In May 1919, he was com- 
missioned a second lieutenant and sent to Camp 
Lee, to organize the 320th Service Battalion, Quar- 
termaster Corps. With this battalion he left New- 
port News in July 1918, for overseas duty and 
landed at Brest, France, in August. Following a 
year's service with the American Expeditionary 
Forces and the army of occupation, he was honor- 
ably discharged at Newport News on August 2, 
1919, with the rank of second lieutenant. 

Returning to civilian life, Mr. Lynch took the 
Virginia State Bar examination and was admitted 
to practice in August 1919. In December of that 
year he entered the employ of the Guarantee Title 
and Trust Corporation as title examiner. He con- 
tinued with this firm, winning promotions to posi- 
tions of responsibility, until January 1928. He then 
resigned to accept appointment as commonwealth 
attorney, leaving a position as assistant manager 
of his firm. 

He had had twenty-six years' experience in 
the public attorney's post to his credit when Rob- 
ert A. Robertson, county treasurer of Norfolk 
County, died in office. Mr. Lynch was named to 
the post and resigned from his previous post on 
July 8, 1954, to accept. His present term expires 
in i960. 

In all his years of public service, Mr. Lynch 
has faithfully and skillfully performed his duties, 
and has always regarded his work as a trust en- 
abling him to serve his fellow citizens. His valu- 
able experience in the field of human relations has 
been particularly helpful. 

Active in civic and fraternal affairs, he is a 
member of the Norview Lions Club, which he 
helped organize and which he served as president 
during 1947-1948. He is a member of Ruth Lodge 
No. 89, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, in 
Norfolk; Norfolk United Chapter No. 1, Royal 
Arch Masons; and Grice Commandery No. 16, 
Knights Templar, which he served as commander 
in 1937-1938. He was grand commander of the 
Grand Commandery of Virginia in 1944-1945. He 
is a member of Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine in Norfolk. 
A communicant of the First Baptist Church in 
that city, he was a teacher of Fidelis Bible Class 
for twenty-seven years until his resignation on 
October I, 1956. As a lawyer, Mr. Lynch belongs 
to the Norfolk-Portsmouth Bar Association and 
Virginia State Bar Association. His fraternities are 
Delta Theta Phi, legal, and Kappa Sigma, social. 
Mr. Lynch is also a director of the Southern Bank 
of Norfolk and the Bank of Cradock. 

On April 8, 1922, in Baltimore, Maryland, Aru- 
nah Otto Lynch married Viola Lena Walter of 
Lancaster, Pennsylvania. They are the parents of 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



63 



two children: I. Richard Walter, born October 
27, 1923. He is now assistant manager of the 
Southern Materials Corporation of Norfolk. He 
married Mary Fleet Graves of Portsmouth, and 
they are the parents of two children: i. Margaret 
Louise, ii. Katherine Viann. 2. Margaret Viola, 
born June 30, 1930. She too works for Southern 
Materials Corporation of Norfolk, being employed 
in its payroll department. Mr. and Mrs. Lynch 
make their home at 2507 Old Drive, Norfolk Coun- 
ty, and his office is in the County Court House, 
Portsmouth. 



FORREST W. COILE— As a founder of the 
architectural and engineering firm of Williams, 
Coile & Blanchard and Associates, and its pre- 
decessor, Williams, Coile & Pipino, Forrest W. 
Coile began his architectural career on the Virginia 
Peninsula in 193 1. Since then he and his partners, 
A. Byron Williams and W. Boyce Blanchard, have 
seen their once small office grow into a large or- 
ganization of architects and engineers who handle 
the design of many large construction projects an- 
nually, both here and abroad. 

Mr. Coile, who came to Newport News just 
shortly before the partnership was formed, was 
born at Johnstown, Ohio, on September 20, 1905, 
the son of the late Frederick A. and Pearl (Coe) 
Coile. As the only son of a building contractor 
Coile's architectural education actually began in 
the early years of his life as an apprentice mason 
in his father's business at Mount Vernon, Ohio. 
Upon graduation from Mount Vernon High School 
in 1923, Coile entered the architectural school at 
the Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh 
where he completed his studies in 1927. That same 
year he left for France to continue his architectural 
training at the Ecole Americaine des Beaux Arts, 
Fontainebleau, receiving their diploma upon com- 
pletion. 

After Mr. Coile returned from France he went 
to Pittsburgh and to the office of architect 
Douglas D. Ellingon. A short while later Ellington 
moved his practice to Asheville, where they were 
primarily engaged in the design of municipal and 
school commissions. Three years later Mr. Coile, 
with an associate, Basil A. Pipino, came to New- 
port News to join the firm of A. Byron Williams, 
who was then practicing architecture on the Pen- 
insula. In 1932 the firm of Williams, Coile & 
Pipino was founded. 

The period immediately preceding World War 
II brought the firm's architectural and engineering 
abilities into full play. With the nation geared for 
defense production and the immediate need for 
almost every type of construction, Williams, Coile 
& Pipino, as it was still known, began to increase 



its staff considerably as they were called upon 
time and again to provide the complete design 
work for large scale housing projects, hospitals, 
schools, airfields, industrial projects, and naval 
and military construction programs. Along with 
this expansion the organization also increased the 
number of services available to their clients to in- 
clude all phases of civil engineering, mechincal en- 
gineering, electrical engineering and master 
plumbing. Proving themselves capable, not only in 
building construction, the firm's activities have in- 
cluded such projects as roads, sewers, gas and 
water systems, power plants, electrical distribution 
systems, site improvements and planning and many 
other related projects. 

Basil A. Pipino died in 1943; Mr. Coile and 
Mr. Williams, however, continued as partners and 
in 1948 they took in W. Boyce Blanchard, a mech- 
anical engineer, as Director of Engineering. The 
organization has been known by the names of the 
three men since that time. 

Williams, Coile & Blanchard and Associates, 
employing a large staff of technical men, now 
operates their home office in the building they own 
at 3415 Virginia Avenue, Newport News, Virginia. 
They also have branches in Portsmouth, Virginia, 
and Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Coile was absent for three years during 
World War II serving in the Corps of Engineers 
and the General Staff Corps of the Army of the 
United States. Serving as a lieutenant colonel in 
the European Theater of Operations, Coile earned 
the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal, Order 
of the British Empire, Croix de Guerre avec 
Etoile de Vermeil, and Officer de l'Order de La 
Couronne Belgium. 

Professionally, Mr. Coile holds a corporate 
membership in the American Institute of Archi- 
tects. He is a registered architect in the states of 
Virginia, North Carolina, Florida, Maryland, 
Massachusetts and the District of Columbia. He 
also holds a certificate of Senior Classification with 
the National Council of Architectural Registration 
Boards. In addition to his connection as a partner 
in Williams, Coile & Blanchard and Associates, 
he serves on the board of directors at the Bank 
of Warwick. He is a member of the James River 
Country Club, Sigma Nu social fraternity, attends 
Hilton Christian Church and is a Democrat in 
his politics. 

Forrest W. Coile was married in 1950 to Eloise 
Lane of Washington, D. C, the daughter of 
Thomas Herbert and Sara Clayton Lane. Mr. 
Coile is the father of a son by a previous marriage, 
Forrest W., Jr., also an architect with Williams, 
Coile & Blanchard and Associates, who was born 
in 1930. Mr. Coile resides at 205 River Road in 
Warwick, Virginia. 



TWVa. 7 



64 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



ABE ARTHUR BANGEL— A prominent mem- 
ber of the Portsmouth-Xorfolk bar for many years, 
Vbe Arthur Bangel is senior member of the firm 
of Bangel, Bangel, and Bangel. Engaged in the 
general practice of law, the firm acts as legal 
counsel to many important interests. Associated 
as partners in the firm are the senior member's 
two sons, Stanley J. and Herbert K. Both are 
graduates of the Law School of the University of 
Virginia. 

A. A. Bangel, as he is best known, was born 
on Christmas Day, 1894, in New York City, and 
is a son of the late Harris and Bertha Bangel. His 
parents moved to Portsmouth in 1898, and there 
Harris Bangel became a successful merchant. He 
spent the remaining years of his life in the city. 
A. A. Bangel received Iris early education in the 
public schools of Portsmouth and graduated from 
Portsmouth High School in 1912. For his law 
studies he entered National University in Wash- 
ington, D. C, where he received his degree of 
Bachelor of Laws in 191 5. Admitted to the Vir- 
ginia State Bar, he began private practice in Ports- 
mouth in the same year. In 1917 his career was 
interrupted when he entered the United States 
Army Corps of Engineers for service in World 
War I. Following the close of the war, he resumed 
law practice at Portsmouth, where he has since 
continued successfully. 

As an able attorney, he has won wide recogni- 
tion for his professional attainments. Extensively 
engaged in a general practice, the firm of Bangel, 
Bangel, and Bangel deals with a considerable var- 
iety of cases. Its senior member holds member- 
ship in the Portsmouth-Xorfolk County Bar As- 
sociation, the Virginia State Bar Association, and 
the American Bar Association. 

He has business interests outside of his law 
practice, including the presidency of Portsmouth 
Newspapers, Inc., publishers of the Portsmouth 
Times. He is a member and past president of the 
Suburban Country Club of Portsmouth and be- 
longs to Lodge No. 38, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and Post No. 37, American Legion. 
His religious affiliation is with Gomley Chesed 
Synagogue of Portsmouth. 

On March 9, 1924, Abe Arthur Bangel married 
Florence Block of Norfolk. They are the parents 
of two sons: 1. Stanley Jerome, born July 16, 
1925, at Portsmouth. He graduated from Woodrow 
Wilson High School in 1942 and received his de- 
gree of Bachelor of Laws from the University of 
Virginia in 1947. He was admitted to the Virginia 
State Bar in that year and joined his father's law 
firm. A veteran of service in the United States 
Navy, Stanley J. Bangel was commissioned an 
ensign in June 1945, and served with the Atlantic 
Fleet until his separation from the service in June 



1946, His professional affiliations include the 
Portsmouth- Norfolk County Bar Association, the 
Norfolk-Portsmouth Bar Association, the Virginia 
State Bar Association, and the National Associa- 
tion of Claimants Compensation Attorneys. He 
has served as vice president of the last-named 
group since 1953. He is also associate editor of 
the National Association of Claimants Compensa- 
tion Attorneys Journal. In his own city he be- 
longs to the Portsmouth Chamber of Commerce, 
is a member of the board of directors of the 
Suburban Country Club, and belongs to Gomley 
Chesed Synogogue. On December 22, 1946, Stan- 
ley J. Bangel married Frances Dorf of Ports- 
mouth, and they are the parents of two children: 
i. Karen Lynne, born April 24, 1949. ii. Keith Har- 
rison, born March 2j, 1952. 2. Herbert Kay, born 
in Portsmouth on May 29, 1928. He received his 
early education in the public schools of Church- 
land and Portsmouth and graduated from Woodrow 
Wilson High School in June 1944. He then en- 
tered the University of Virginia, where he re- 
ceived the degree of Bachelor of Science in June 

1947, and the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 
February 1950. He was admitted to the Virginia 
State Bar on August 25, 1949, and then became 
a member of the law firm of Bangel, Bangel, and 
Bangel. His professional affiliations are with the 
Portsmouth-Norfolk County Bar Association, Nor- 
folk-Portsmouth Bar Association, Virginia State 
Bar Association, American Bar Association, and 
the National Association of Claimants Compensa- 
tion Attorneys. Locally he is a member of the 
Portsmouth Cosmopolitan Club, the Chamber of 
Commerce, and Lodge No. 898, Loyal Order of 
Moose. He serves on the boards of directors of 
the Portsmouth Sports Club and the Suburban 
Country Club and also on the board of Gomley 
Chesed Synogogue. He is also president of the 
Men's Club of the synagogue. On November 14, 

1948, Herbert Kay Bangel married Carolyn Kros- 
kin of Norfolk. They are the parents of two child- 
ren: i. Nancy Jo, born March 12, 1951. ii. Bradford 
Jay, burn July 12, 1954. 



WILLIAM PLUMMER WOODLEY— One of 

Norfolk's civic leaders as well as an industrial 
executive, William Plummer VVoodley is president 
of The Columbian Peanut Company, with general 
offices in the Wainwright Building. Widely known 
in the industry, and possessing a sound know- 
ledge of every aspect of the business which he 
heads, Mr. Woodley has been identified with the 
management of the firm since his graduation from 
the law department of Washington and Lee Uni- 
versity in 1928. 

The company itself, which is the largest miller 
of raw peanuts in America, with mills in Virginia, 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



North Carolina, Georgia and Alabama, had its be- 
ginning in Norfolk in 1892, and was organized by 
John L. Roper of that city and his associates. The 
original charter was granted in June 1893, and the 
company is still operating under this charter and 
subsequent amendments. The initial capitalization 
of the enterprise was twenty-two thousand dollars. 
The company's first plant occupied an entire block 
located on Water Street in Norfolk, which was at 
that time the center of the peanut-milling industry. 
As production increased, cultivation of the nut was 
extended to North Carolina and by 1904 the in- 
dustry was becoming centered around Suffolk, 
which was a more central point. In that year, The 
Columbian Peanut Company (which took its name 
from the fact of its founding in the year of the 
Columbian Exposition) built a modern plant at 
Suffolk. It operated this plant until 1913, when it 
was sold to the John King Peanut Company. A 
short time later, the firm erected another modern 
plant in Suffolk and this it still operates. Prior to 
'9'3. a policy of building mills scattered through- 
out the producing areas had been inaugurated, for 
the convenience of growers in disposing of their 
crops, plants being operated at Enfield, North 
Carolina, Tarboro, North Carolina, Petersburg and 
Stony Creek, Virginia. Large storage warehouses 
were also built to promote a more orderly distribu- 
tion of the crop to the trade; and this network of 
plants and warehouses made possible the modern- 
day growth of the peanut industry in Virginia and 
North Carolina. The Columbian Peanut Company 
continued to expand rapidly, and built cleaning 
and shelling plants in many of the rural com- 
munities of the peanut belt. 

Julius P. Woodley became manager of the com- 
pany soon after its organization, and was presi- 
dent from 1913 until his death in 1928. The com- 
pany's rapid growth came about largely through 
his initiative and determination; and his efficiency 
in developing widespread markets for the product 
was also a factor in the strides made by the entire 
industry. At about the end of World War I, the 
farmers of the Southeastern states began the cul- 
tivation of peanuts; and in 1919 The Columbian 
Peanut Company erected its first plants in Georgia, 
Florida and Alabama. After the death of Julius 
P. Woodley in 1928, the company was reorganized 
and its capital stock increased. At that time H. 
C. Smither became president. He was one of the 
pioneers in the development of the peanut industry, 
having handled the crop for growers in connection 
with his commission business in Norfolk prior to 
1900. He continued as directing head of the com- 
pany until his retirement in 1947, and was suc- 
ceeded in the presidency by William P. Woodley, 
who has since filled that office most capably. 
Other officers at the present time are T. J. White; 



and W. L. Paullin, vice presidents; L. C. Bren- 
nan, treasurer; and Edna West Adams, secretary. 
The present thirteen cleaning and shelling plants 
are located at Ahoskie, Elizabethtown, Enfield, 
Scotland Neck and Tarboro, North Carolina; Suf- 
folk and Wakefield, Virginia; Bainbridge, Fort 
Gaines, Pelham and Shellman, Georgia; and Enter- 
prise and Ozark, Alabama. 

The career of William P. Woodley has been 
characterized by exceptional foresight and pro- 
gressiveness — traits which are combined with a 
humanitarian spirit, revealed in sound employee 
relationships and in his cooperation with com- 
munity projects and organizations. He is a native 
of Suffolk, and was born on July 25, 1904, son of 
James Lawrence and Mary Alice (Hassell) Wood- 
ley, both natives of eastern North Carolina. His 
father, who had settled in Suffolk in 1901, was 
long identified with the management of The Co- 
lumbian Peanut Company. He died in that city in 
193°. His widow continues to maintain the family 
home there. Attending the public schools of Suf- 
folk, William P. Woodley graduated from Jeffer- 
son High School in 1922. He attended the College 
of William and Mary at Williamsburg for one 
year, then entered Washington and Lee Univer- 
sity, where he took his professional courses and 
graduated in 1928 with the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws. 

Foregoing a career in the law, he immediately 
became associated with The Columbian Peanut 
Company as vice president. Early in his career, 
he became familiar with various phases of opera- 
tions at Suffolk, and in Georgia and Alabama, 
and was for a time the manager of the Enterprise 
plant in the latter state. In 1932 he interested him- 
self in the sales operations of the business in Chi- 
cago, continuing there until December 1933. He 
then returned to Norfolk, where he has since made 
his headquarters at the company's home offices. 
As president since 1947, he has adhered to a high 
standard of leadership in the industry, in which 
he has won widespread recognition. He is a mem- 
ber and past president of the National Peanut 
Council, and he has served on the distributors' 
committee of the National Association of Manu- 
facturers. Besides his major business connection, 
he is a member of the board of directors of the 
National Bank of Commerce of Norfolk. 

Active in civic affairs, he was recently appointed 
executive vice president of the Tidewater Virginia 
Development Council. He is a member and past 
director of the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce, 
and a past president of the Norfolk Council of 
Social Agencies. A director of the Norfolk General 
Hospital, he served as president of the board from 
1948 to 1950. He is also on the Board of Conserva- 
tion and Economic Development for the State of 



66 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



Virginia. During- the World War II period he 
served on the Norfolk Selective Service Board, 
and he has been active in many worth-while pro- 
jects for community betterment. He is an active 
member of the First Presbyterian Church. He is 
a member ' of the Virginia Club of Norfolk, the 
Norfolk Yacht and Country Club, the Princess 
Anne Country Club and the Cavalier Beach Club. 
His favorite sport is golf. 

On January 9, 1937, at Norfolk, William Plum- 
mer Woodley married Margaret Cornelia Mc- 
Dowell, daughter of the late William P. and Nealie 
( Sylvester) McDowell. Dr. McDowell was a promi- 
nent pediatrician of Norfolk, who died in Decem- 
ber 1955. Mrs. McDowell's death occurred in 1933- 
Mrs. Woodley attended Peace College at Raleigh, 
North Carolina. She is a member and past presi- 
dent of the Junior League of Norfolk, a member 
of the Garden Club of Norfolk, and attends the 
First Presbyterian Church. The couple live at 
7700 North Shore Road, Lochhaven. 



LEIGH GILROY HOGSHIRE— The numerous 
activities and interests of Leigh Gilroy Hogshire 
have made him a familiar and influential figure in 
the development of the Tidewater area and the 
state at large. As president and manager of the 
Norfolk, Baltimore and Carolina Line, Inc., which 
maintains its general offices and terminal at 937 
East Water Street, Norfolk, he has for a third of 
a century given leadership in the field of freight 
transportation through a combination of water-and- 
truck service, a form of service in which Mr. Hog- 
shire pioneered on the East Coast. An affiliate of 
the older line is the N-B&C Motor Lines, Inc., of 
which Mr. Hogshire is also president and man- 
ager and which has implemented the land, or truck- 
ing, phase of the Hogshire operations. In World 
War II, the vessels owned by Mr. Hogshire's en- 
terprises were taken over by the Government for 
military duty and since then these enterprises have 
expanded to multiply the services it had been ren- 
dering shippers and the general populace. There 
are now division offices and terminals at Baltimore, 
Maryland; Charleston, South Carolina; Beaufort, 
North Carolina; Richmond, Virginia, and Wilming- 
ton, North Carolina. Besides heading these two 
large businesses, Mr. Hogshire is a director of 
the Seaboard Citizens National Bank of Norfolk, 
treasurer of the Hogshire Tent and Awning Man- 
ufacturing Company, Inc., and president of the 
Hogshire Corporation of Norfolk. He is an out- 
standing figure in traffic circles, in Chamber of 
Commerce activities and in the maritime world. 

Born in Norfolk on July 18, 1897, Mr* Hogshire 
is the son of Edward and Martha M. (Blake) Hog- 
shire. His father, a native of Princess Anne County, 



was a member of an Irish family which had settled 
in America in colonial days. He was prominent in 
the business life of Norfolk for many years and 
was the founder of the Hogshire Tent and Awning 
Manufacturing Company, Inc. He died in Norfolk 
in October 1932, Martha Blake Hogshire, born in 
Gloucester County, Virginia, the daughter of 
Thomas B. and Rebecca (Coleman) Blake, was a 
resident of Norfolk for sixty-five years and a 
charter member of the LeKies Memorial Methodist 
Church. She died in Norfolk on August 23, 1956, at 
the age of eighty-three. The surviving children are 
one daughter, Mrs. John W. Keefe, and three sons, 
Russell B. Hogshire, Thomas E. Hogshire and 
Leigh Gilroy Hogshire. 

After attending Norfolk's public schools — he was 
graduated from Maury High School in 1015 — Leigh 
Gilroy Hogshire took a course in the Eastman 
Business School at Poughkeepsie, New York, and 
in 191 7 began his career with the Hogshire Tent 
and Awning Manufacturing Company, Inc. His 
first job was in the ship supply department in Nor- 
folk and Newport News. He later became treasurer 
of this business. 

On January I, 1923, Mr. Hogshire founded the 
Norfolk, Baltimore and Carolina Line, Inc., and 
has been its president and manager since then. At 
the outset the line provided an all-water freight 
service between Norfolk and Eastern North Caro- 
lina ports. As stated by Mr. Hogshire, the basic 
policy of his company from the start has been to 
provide the public with a reliable and economical 
method of handling freight shipments, to protect 
the public's interests and to safeguard the goodwill 
of its patrons. The success of the line is proof that 
it has achieved these objectives. 

A factor in this success has been the loyalty 
and cooperation of the employees, for since the 
beginning there have been few changes in key 
personnel. Most of the present officers have been 
with the line many years, some even from the day 
operations were started. The same is true of a 
majority of the ship and truck personnel and those 
employed in shore capacities. The present officers, 
besides Mr. Hogshire, are: Hal G. Williams, ex- 
ecutive vice president; T. E. Hogshire, treasurer; J. 
W. Keefe, secretary; E. J. Tunney, traffic man- 
ager: J. L. Fanell, assistant traffic manager; R. S. 
Baum, assistant secretary and treasurer; J. P. 
Harper, general agent, and C. A. Cocke, general 
claim agent. 

When the company started in 1923, its vessels 
were diesel-propelled, with freight decks partly 
housed and fitted with mast and boom for over- 
head loading and discharge to and from lower holds 
through hatches in the open sections of the main 
decks. This type of ship was the best available 
in those days. At the time, Norfolk was a large 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



67 



cotton port. In addition, much tobacco moved into 
the area for storage. In 1925, to supplement the 
service between Norfolk and Eastern North Caro- 
lina and to provide service between Norfolk and 
Baltimore, the company began operations between 
these last two ports. At first the service was on a 
twice-a-week basis; then every other day and final- 
ly daily. The Baltimore-Norfolk service utilized 
larger ships without mast and boom, but with 
freight decks completely housed and fitted with side 
ports, elevators and other mechanical equipment 
to handle cargo into and out of holds. 

By this time the motor truck was becoming of 
age and the advantage to the shipper of a tie-in 
between the company's water service and truck 
transportation was obvious. With the company's 
Baltimore service inaugurated and thereby in a 
position to serve Eastern North Carolina ports 
from both Norfolk and Baltimore, consideration 
was given to the idea of using trucks to serve 
interior points adjacent to these Carolina ports and 
thereby establishing a water-truck service that 
would enable these interior points to enjoy lower 
freight charges resulting from use of the Inland 
Waterway. Such a service would combine the 
economy of water transportation with the flexibility 
and other advantages of truck transports. 

In 1926, the water-truck service was begun 
through the port of New Bern, North Carolina. 
This served the New Bern area and inland points 
as far off as Kinston and Goldsboro, North Caro- 
lina, and was the first water-truck service on the 
East Coast. Later this water-truck service was ex- 
tended to cover the inland territory adjacent to all 
ports served by the company, including Norfolk and 
Baltimore. Thus came into being the N-B&C Motor 
Lines, Inc. This firm obtains a major part of its 
revenue from business handled in conjunction with 
the water line, although there is a substantial all- 
truck operation. The new company handles a large 
fleet of pickup and delivery and over-the-road 
equipment, including tandem and single-axle trail- 
ers, both flats and vans of conventional and high- 
cubic types. It owns garages and repair shops for 
the maintenance of this equipment. 

Between 1925 and 1935, cargo between Baltimore 
and North Carolina was transferred at Norfolk. 
Ships between Baltimore and this city proceeded 
no further south than Norfolk and those between 
North Carolina and Norfolk no farther north than 
Norfolk. At that time all this was practical and 
the most economical, in view of the fact that the 
Balimore-North Carolina operation was not suf- 
ficient to support a through operation. In 1932, 
however, the Inland Waterway was completed as 
far south as Wilmington, North Carolina, and the 
following year the company began serving this 



port. By 1935 tonnage to this area had increased 
sufficiently to justify a direct all-water service be- 
tween Baltimore and North Carolina ports with 
stops at Norfolk to pick up and discharge Norfolk 
cargo. 

To provide this service Mr. Hogshire found it 
necessary to acquire floating equipment suitable to 
navigate both Chesapeake Bay and the Inland 
Waterway with sufficient draft to be seaworthy in 
the Bay and at the same time shallow enough to 
transverse the Waterway. Due to the requirements 
of Chesapeake Bay shipping, the new ships were 
unable to operate up the shallow rivers adjacent to 
the Inland Waterway and a great many river points 
had to be eliminated from direct all-water service. 
Water-truck service through the larger and deeper 
ports was substituted. This type of operation con- 
tinued until early 1942 when, because of World 
War II, the Federal Government took over most of 
the company's vessels. Only two vessels were left 
in the Norfolk-Baltimore service and a few small 
chartered vessels which served Wilmington and 
Charleston, South Carolina. By 1947, a majority 
of the company's vessels had been returned, but 
water transportation had undergone such a change 
in the war years that it was necessary for the 
company to revise completely the service south of 
Norfolk. 

The first step was the elimination of the all-water 
service to North Carolina ports other than Wil- 
mington. These ports, together with inland points 
that had been served through them, were now given 
a water-truck service through Norfolk. This pro- 
vided the much faster and more frequent service 
to which the public had become accustomed and 
was demanding. Eventually, all-water service to 
Wilmington was discontinued and water-truck serv- 
ice through Norfolk substituted in order to meet 
the demand. 

By 1947 it was also apparent that the company's 
floating equipment had become antiquated and that 
new handling methods developed during the war 
necessitated a complete revision of handling and 
operating methods. The use of cargo pallets, to- 
gether with mechanical equipment suitably de- 
signed to transfer cargo in this manner, had be- 
come an economic necessity. The change meant the 
acquisition of new vessels having large cubic ca- 
pacity with cargo decks free of structural obstacles 
and designed to accommodate and transport safely 
cargo stowed on pallets. The company's ware- 
house had to be strengthened throughout and re- 
designed to accommodate this type of operation. 
Floors had to be made sufficiently strong to with- 
stand the abuse and to carry the loads of large 
fork lifts. 

This program was started and in the early part 



68 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



of 1949 the first new-type ships were added to the 
company's fleet. These vessels were designed pri- 
marily to accommodate cargo-loaded pallets, but 
they were also built to handle cargo loaded in the 
over-the-road vehicles and capable of being hand- 
led as trailer ships when required. Since then the 
company has added three tugs and three large cubic- 
capacity barges especially designed for push-type 
propulsion in the Inland Waterway and for towing 
in Chesapeake Bay. This equipment is used in the 
Charleston service — the most modern inland water- 
way equipment afloat today. Today, cargo received 
from railroad cars or from trucks is placed on 
pallets at the company's terminals and is not touch- 
ed again until at the port of destination it is de- 
livered to truck or railroad car for delivery to the 
consignee. In many instances the pallets are loaded 
at the shipper's warehouse and unloaded at the con- 
signee's warehouse. 

In all of his enterprises Mr. Hogshire is deter- 
mined to achieve similar modernity, economy and 
quality of service. Besides his activities in the var- 
ious firms in which he is an officer or director, he 
is a member and past president of the Propeller 
Club of the Port of Norfolk; member of the Na- 
tional Propeller Club of the United States; mem- 
ber and past president of the Norfolk-Portsmouth 
Traffic Club; member of the Associated Traffic 
Clubs of America and the New York Traffic Club; 
former vice president and member of the board of 
directors of the Hampton Roads Maritime Com- 
mission; member and former director of the Nor- 
folk Chamber of Commerce; and member of the 
Virginia State Chamber of Commerce. He is a for- 
mer member of the Rotary Club of Norfolk. In 
World War II, Mr. Hogshire served on the Ad- 
visory Council of the Office of Defense Transpor- 
tation. He is also a member and past director of 
the Norfolk Yacht and Country Club and a mem- 
ber of the Princess Anne Country Club; Norfolk 
Lodge No. 1, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; 
Norfolk Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Grice Com- 
mandery. Knights Templar, and Khedive Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. He worships in the LeKies Memorial Meth- 
odist Church of Norfolk. His favorite sports are 
golf, fishing and boating. 

On September 21, 1929, in Norfolk, Mr. Hogshire 
married Olive B. Toler of that city. By a previous 
marriage, Mr. Hogshire has one daughter, Dorothy 
Leigh, the wife of J. P. Harper, prominent at- 
torney and member of the Virginia House of De- 
legates, of Norfolk. Mr. and Mrs. Harper have 
two children: 1. John P. "Jack" Harper, Jr. 2. 
Penelope Harper. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leigh G. Hogshire make their 
home at Bird Neck Point, Virginia Beach. 



WILLIAM EDWIN THOMAS— The president 
and general manager of the Thomas Marine Cor- 
poration of Norfolk, William Edwin Thomas, may 
be said to have been born to the business in 
which lie engages. His great-grandfather estab- 
lished the family tradition in the shipbuilding and 
repair industry in the Nineteenth Century, building 
wooden sailing schooners at Portsmouth. His son, 
William E.'s grandfather, carried on the tradition, 
and it was he who, in the early years of this cen- 
tury, founded the Thomas Marine Railway in 
Berkley. When he retired his son, Emmett Morris 
Thomas, took over management of the plant. There 
William Edwin Thomas, representing the fourth 
generation, gained his early experience in the 
various phases of Shipbuilding and ship repair 
work while he was still a high-school student. Al- 
though only thirty-three years of age at the time 
this is written, he is president and general man- 
ager of Thomas Marine Corporation, and capably 
directs a compact and highly efficient organization. 

Thomas Marine Corporation has a modern plant 
located on the eastern branch of the Elizabeth 
River in the heart of Norfolk, at 127 Boush Street. 
It has a well-equipped machine shop and wood- 
working shop, capable of servicing various types 
of ships and small-boat repair. This includes work 
on tugs, barges and yachts. Launch service and 
adequate portable machinery and equipment are 
maintained ready for around-the-clock use, for the 
repair of vessels in the Hampton Roads area. Ad- 
jacent to the plant facilities is berth space capable 
of accommodating ocean-going vessels for repair. 

A native of Norfolk, William E. Thomas was 
born on June 23, 1923, son of Hunter V. and the 
late Ruth (Burroughs) Thomas who died in 1926. 
Hunter V. Thomas worked within the framework 
of the family's industrial tradition, being a ship- 
wright in Portsmouth. As a youth, William E. 
Thomas made his home with his uncle, Emmett 
Morris Thomas. Graduating from Maury High 
School in 1941, he supplemented his public school- 
ing through courses in engineering and drafting at 
the Virginia Polytechnic Institute Extension School, 
and at the same time held a position in the Nor- 
folk Navy Yard as a draftsman until 1942. 

He then enlisted for wartime service in the 
Merchant Marine as an apprentice seaman, and 
served overseas, on supply vessels in the Mediter- 
ranean, Indian Ocean, Persian Gulf and North At- 
lantic. He continued in these duties until released 
from active service in September 1946, witli the 
rank of lieutenant, junior grade. 

Returning to civilian life, Mr. Thomas entered 
the employ of his uncle, Emmett Morris Thomas, 
who owned and operated the old Thomas Marine 
Railway Plant in Norfolk. He continued in this 
connection until his uncle's death in 1947, when 





^> K^~&~~m- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



69 



the firm was acquired by Southern Materials Cor- 
poration of Norfolk. At that time the name was 
changed to the Virginia Shipyard Company, and 
William E. Thomas remained as vice president 
until the latter part of 1050. He left to found his 
own firm, Thomas Marine Corporation, which be- 
gan operations in January 195 1. With his experi- 
ence and naturally acquired abilities in the ship 
repair field, he has succeeded in making his com- 
pany representative of the firms in the trade. 
Workmanship and dependable, economical service , 
have provided the basis for rewarding growth. 

Active in civic and community affairs, Mr. 
Thomas is a member of the Hampton Roads 
Maritime Association, the Norfolk Chamber of 
Commerce, and Portsmouth Naval Lodge No. 100, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. A member 
of the higher bodies of Masonry, he belongs to 
William Chapman Chapter No. 74, Royal Arch 
Masons; Portsmouth Consistory of the Royal Arch 
Masons; Scottish Rite and Khedive Temple, An- 
cient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine 
in Norfolk, and the Portsmouth Shrine Club. He 
is also a member of the Elizabeth Manor Country 
Club of Portsmouth and the Downtown Club of 
Norfolk. His favorite sport is golf. He attends 
Monumental Methodist Church in Portsmouth. 

On February 27, 1944, in Portsmouth, William 
Edwin Thomas married Dorothy Jean Bozeman 
of that city, daughter of Walter and Sue (Cain) 
Bozeman. The couple are the parents of three 
children: 1. William Edwin, Jr., born November 

2, 1946. 2. James Morris, born January 24, 1950. 

3. Wayne Gregory, born August 20, 1955. The 
family resides at 304 Wake Forest Road, Ports- 
mouth. 



RICHARD LAFAYETTE WOODWARD, JR. 

— A businessman whose varied interests have been 
centered in Suffolk, Virginia, Richard L. Wood- 
ward, Jr., recently completed a term as mayor of 
his city. He is currently serving as president of 
the Tidewater Virginia Development Council. 

Born at Suffolk on July 31, 1888, he is a son of 
Hersey Woodward, Sr., and Augusta Eppes Saund- 
ers Woodward. Richard L. Woodward attended 
the public schools of Suffolk through the eighth 
grade. About 1905- 1906 he served in the Seventy- 
first Virginia Regiment of the National Guard. Mr. 
Woodward began his career with the Tidewater 
Railroad Company in 1905, which company is now 
the Virginian. He entered the lumber industry in 
1906 with the Suffolk Lumber Company and in 
1908 became associated with the Montgomery 
Lumber Company, of which he later became vice 
president. For one year he was associated with 
the North Carolina Pine Association, during which 



time he wrote a short history of the varieties of 
uses of the North Carolina pine. He was president 
of the Farmville- Woodward Lumber Company, 
also of Suffolk, from 1929, which he helped to 
organize, and held the vice presidency of the 
Montgomery Lumber Company and the presidency 
of the Farmville- Woodward Lumber Company 
until his retirement. He was also president of 
Woodward Drug Stores, of Hampton, Virginia, 
and owner of the Woodward Farm Equipment 
Company of Suffolk. He serves as director of the 
First Federal Savings and Loan Association in 
that city. 

In 1949 Richard Lafayette Woodward, Jr., was 
elected to the Suffolk City Council and in 1951 
became mayor of Suffolk. He resigned from that 
office effective July I, 1955, the same date on 
which he retired from his business connections. 
He was appointed to the Advisory Council on Vir- 
ginia Economy by Governor Thomas B. Stanley 
in September 1956. Another recent connection is 
Mi'. Woodward's service as president of the Tide- 
water Virginia Development Council, to which he 
was elected July 13, 1956. This is a non-profit 
organization devoted to the industrial development 
of Tidewater Virginia, concerning itself with the 
growth of trade and manufacture in Princess 
Anne, Norfolk, Nansemond, Isle of Wight, and 
Southampton counties and the cities of Virginia 
Beach, Norfolk, South Norfolk, Portsmouth, and 
Suffolk and the towns of Franklin and Smithfield, 
as well as the counties of Accomac and Northamp- 
ton. The presidency of the council is a non-re- 
munerative position. 

A member of the Virginia Farm Equipment 
Dealers Association, Mr. Woodward served as its 
president in 1950. He is a member of the Princess 
Anne Country Club of Virginia Beach, the Path- 
finders Club of Norfolk, and the Downtown Club 
of Richmond. He is a communicant of Saint Paul's 
Protestant Episcopal Church at Suffolk. In 1956 
Mr. Woodward received the Cosmopolitan Award 
as First Citizen of the city of Suffolk and Nan- 
semond County, and the same year he received 
the first and only honorary life membership in the 
city of Suffolk and Nansemond County Chamber 
of Commerce. 

At the Little Church Around the Corner in 
New York City on October 16, 1907, Richard L. 
Woodward, Jr., married Gladys Alida Delves, 
daughter of John Adolphus and Alice Letitia 
(Browne) Delves. Mr. and Mrs. Woodward be- 
came the parents of the following children, r. 
Richard Delves, born November 6, 1910, now 
deceased. He married Myrnie Brown of Williams- 
ton, North Carolina, and had four children: Dickie 
Anne, Myrnie Brown, Virginia Alida, and Richard 
D., Jr. 2. Gilbert Hume, born on June 8, 1917. 



70 



LOWER TIDEWATKR VIRGINIA 



He married Helen Stuart Hensley of Ashville, 
North Carolina, and they have two children: 
Stuart Delves and Charles Hensley. Colonel Wood- 
ward is a graduate of the United States Military 
Academy at West Point and is stationed in Wash- 
ington, D. C. 3. John Delves, who was horn on 
December 23, 1924. He married Nona Holmes 
of Lindhurst. Long Island, New York, and they 
have three children: Richard L., IV, John D., Jr., 
and Allison Holmes. His hobby is the develop- 
ment and showing of horses. 



of Frederick H. and Anna (Johnson) Taylor. Mr. 
and Mrs. Yann are the parents of two daughters: 
1. Mary Taylor, who married the Rev. Samuel S. 
Odom. They have one daughter, Marguerite Tay- 
lor Odom. 2. Anna Wright, attending Mary 
Washington College at Fredericksburg. 



JOHN ROBERT VANN— Since his return 
from military service in World War I, John Robert 
Vann has been identified with the American 
Bank and Trust Company of Suffolk, and is now 
its president. His leadership has been much in 
evidence in community affairs, and the organiza- 
tional life of the region. 

He is a native of North Carolina, born in the 
town of Winton on October 17, 1890, son of 
Henry B. and Sallie S. (Wright) Vann. His father 
was an undertaker. Until he entered military serv- 
ice at the time of World War I, he remained a 
resident of Winton, attending its public elementary 
and high schools, graduating from high school 
there, and beginning his banking career on the 
staff of the Merchants and Farmers Bank of 
Winton, of wlvch his uncle, John E. Vann, was 
the president. He continued with that organiza- 
tion from 191 1 until 1918. 

Mr. Vann then enlisted for military service in 
World War I. He was assigned to Company D, 
306th Ammunition Train, a component of the 81st 
Division, and served overseas from August 1918, 
until July 1919. He held a sergeant's rating, and 
participated in the Meuse-Argonne offensive. 

When he returned to civilian life, he came to 
Suffolk, where in August 1919, he joined the Amer- 
ican Bank anil Trust Company. He began his con- 
nection with this hank in the capacity of teller. 
He became cashier in 1940, and in the same year 
was admitted to membership on the board of 
directors. In January 1955, he was promoted to 
the presidency of the bank — the third man to hold 
that office since its founding in 191 2. 

As a veteran of World War I, Mr. Vann is a 
member of Post No. 57 of the American Legion, 
and serves as finance officer at the present time. 
He is a member of Suffolk Lodge No. 30, Free 
and Accepted Masons; Commandery No. 5 of the 
Knights Templar at Portsmouth; and Khedive 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine, at Norfolk. He is a Democrat 
in his politics, and as a communicant of the First 
Baptist Church, serves as treasurer. 

In Suffolk on April 3, 1926, John Robert Vann 
married Ruth A. Taylor of that city, daughter 



GEORGE FRANKLIN WHITLEY, JR.— A 
lawyer practicing at Smithfield since 1942, George 
Franklin Whitley, Jr., has capably filled public 
office throughout that period as trial justice of Isle 
of Wight County. He was absent during World 
War II serving as a naval officer. 

Mr. Whitley is a native of Smithfield, and was 
born on September 30, 1912, son of George 
Franklin, Sr., and Eunice (Minton) Whitley. His 
father, born in Isle of Wight County on Novem- 
ber 6, 1879, took his degree of Bachelor of Arts 
at Elon College and graduate work at the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. After receiving his 
degree of Bachelor of Laws at the University of 
Yirginia, the elder George F. Whitley began 
practice in Smithfield in 1905, and continued there 
until his death in 1942. He was at one time com- 
monwealth attorney, and was trial justice at the 
time of bis death. Eunice Minton, whom he mar- 
ried, was born in Nansemond County, and she is 
still living. 

George F. Whitley, Jr., attended the public 
schools of Smithfield and graduated from high 
school there in 1929. In 1933 he took his degree 
of Bachelor of Arts at the University of Richmond, 
and entered the University of Virginia for his 
professional studies, taking his Bachelor of Laws 
degree there in 1936. He had been admitted to 
the Virginia bar in 1935; hut went to New York 
City to begin his practice, being admitted to 
the bar there in 1937. He remained until 1942, being 
associated with the law firm of White and Case, 
with offices at 14 Wall Street. 

He returned to Smithfield in 1942. hut a short 
time afterwards entered the service of the United 
States Navy. He was in the Pacific Theater of 
Operations for one year, serving two years in the 
United States Navy, and held a lieutenant's commis- 
sion at the time of his separation from the service. 

Mr. Whitley has practiced at Smithfield since 
his return from the war. His father having died in 
I94_\ he began practice under his own name. In 
November 1942, he had been appointed trial justice 
of Isle of Wight Count}', and he resumed his tenure 
on the bench when he returned from naval service. 
His position now as of the present writing is 
judge of the Isle of Wight County Court. Con- 
ducting a general practice of law, he has offices 
at 117 South Church Street, Smithfield. He is 
a member of the Virginia State Bar Association. 





AAi& 



QL^^ 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



7' 



He has become active in the city's business 
life as well, and serves on the board of directors 
of the Smithfield Ham and Products Company, 
Inc., and the Merchants and Farmers Bank. Mr. 
Whitley is a Democrat in his politics. He is a 
member of Phi Delta Phi legal fraternity, Phi 
Kappa Sigma social fraternity, and, in his own 
city, the Rotary Club and the Ruritan Club. He 
attends Smithfield Baptist Church, which he serves 
as trustee and treasurer. His hobby is music and 
his favorite outdoor sport is golf. 

On October 9, 1937, in Smithfield, George F. 
Whitley, Jr., married Alice Rowell, daughter of 
James R.. Jr., and Grace (Warren) Rowell. The 
couple are the parents of two daughters: I. Lelia 
Brock, who was born on September 3, 1943. 2. 
Sue Warren, born July 29, 1947. 



FRANK BATTEN— In Virginia's largest mar- 
ket, which centers around Norfolk and Portsmouth, 
the media of information, education and interpreta- 
tion with which Frank Batten is associated exercise 
tremendous influence. Mr. Batten is publisher of 
The Virginian-Pilot and Ledger-Star in Norfolk 
and Portsmouth. In addition, he is vice president 
and a director of the company which operates Nor- 
folk's AM and TV station, WTAR, and a director 
of the National Bank of Commerce. In extending 
his activities beyond the publishing and broadcast- 
ing and banking businesses, Mr. Batten has become 
prominent in community organization projects, 
health and welfare work and civilian and national 
defense. 

Like his forebears, Mr. Batten is a native of 
Norfolk, the family having long been identified 
with affairs of Tidewater-wide significance. He was 
born on February II, 1927, and is the son of Frank 
and Dorothy (Martin) Batten. Both parents were 
also born in Norfolk. The father, a banker, died 
when he was twenty-eight. Mr. Batten is the grand- 
son of the late Alvah H. Martin, founder of the 
Merchants and Planters Bank, and prominent in 
Virginia politics. 

The publisher began his education in the public 
schools of Norfolk and continued at Culver Mili- 
tary Academy, from which he was graduated in 
1945. In 1950, he took the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts at the University of Virginia and two years 
later the degree of Master of Business Administra- 
tion at the Harvard Business School in Boston. 

Mr. Batten began his newspaper career in 1947, 
when he obtained a summer job on the news staff 
of what was then called The Ledger-Dispatch. 
Until he completed his education he continued work- 
ing summers, chiefly as a reporter, on this paper. 
For a time he varied his experience by serving as 
an advertising salesman. In 1952, after taking his 



Master's degree, he went to work on a full-time 
basis, this time as a salesman in the advertising 
department. 

With this rounded experience behind him, Mr. 
Batten was appointed assistant secretary-treasurer 
of Norfolk Newspapers, Inc.. in 1953. Later he 
was made vice president and in 1954 was elected 
publisher of The Virginian-Pilot and Ledger-Dis- 
patch. With the purchase of The Portsmouth Star 
in 1955, the names of the papers whose operations 
he directs became The Virginian-Pilot and Ledger- 
Star. Norfolk and Portsmouth and their environs 
are thorough- covered by the Norfolk and Ports- 
mouth editions. Futher coverage of the territory, 
which has a devoted following of hundreds of thou- 
sands of listeners and viewers, is gained through 
WTAR-AM and WTAR-TV, in the management 
of which Mr. Batten also has a leading voice. As 
a director of the National Bank of Commerce of 
Norfolk, which merged with the Merchants and 
Planters Bank in 1957, Mr. Batten continues an 
association begun by his grandfather. 

Through his other interests Mr. Batten served 
as chairman of the International Naval Review 
which assembled warships from all over the world 
in Hampton Roads in 1957: as secretary, treasurer 
and a trustee of the William and Mary Foundation; 
as a director of the Norfolk General Hospital and 
the Norfolk Community Chest, and as lieutenant 
in the United States Naval Reserve. In the years 
I95S-I9S7 he was treasurer and in 1958-1959 vice 
president of the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce 
and he served two years as general chairman of the 
Norfolk Azalea Festival. 

Mr. Batten is married to the former Jane Neal 
Parke. He makes his home at 802 Graydon Avenue, 
Norfolk. His office is at 150 West Brambleton 
Avenue in that citv. 



SIDNEY S. KELLAM— Among the Lower 
Tidewater's leaders in the insurance field, Sidney 
S. Kellam has won recognition in the course of 
his thirty years' experience in Princess Anne Coun- 
ty. During most of that time, he has been a partner 
in the Kellam-Eaton Insurance Company, an 
agency with headquarters at 3113 Pacific, Virginia 
Beach. Mr. Kellam has been active in a number 
of local organizations; has held office as county 
treasurer; and has been an influential figure in the 
councils of the Democratic party. 

He was born at Princess Anne on July 6, 1903, 
son of Abel E. and Clara O. (Eaton) Kellam. His 
father, who was born in Northampton County, 
Virginia, on July 6, 1849, was for twenty years 
clerk of court in Princess Anne County. He was 
the owner and operator of a lumber company 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



there. His death occurred on January I, 1926. Clara 
O. Eaton, whom he married, was born in that 
county on May 6, 1870, and she survives her hus- 
band. 

Sidney S. Kellam attended the public elemen- 
tary and high schools of Princess Anne County, 
and in his early years worked on a farm owned by 
his father. He left to take a position in the machine 
shops of the Seaboard Air Line Railroad in Ports- 
mouth, working there for a year and a half. 

In 1925 he entered the insurance business in 
Princess Anne County, and after five years' ex- 
perience, determined to go into business for him- 
self. It thus came about that in 1930 he organized 
the Kellam-Eaton Insurance Company, of which 
he has since been a partner. The agency has been 
located at Virginia Beach since it was founded, 
and in 1954 the partners built their present modern 
office building at 3113 Pacific Avenue. In addition 
to selling general insurance policies, the organiza- 
tion has branched out into the real estate business. 
Mr. Eaton, the other founding partner, died in 
r 937> and Mr. Kellam's partners at the present time 
are his brothers, Harold B. and William P. Kellam. 

The insurance executive has also become an in- 
fluential figure in banking in the area. One of the 
organizers of the Bank of Virginia Beach, he is a 
member of its board of directors and of its ex- 
ecutive committee. He is also a director of the 
Virginia Beach Federal Savings and Loan Asso- 
ciation. He is secretary and treasurer of the Sea 
Realty Corporation, a shopping center; secretary 
and treasurer of Beach Land, Inc., also a shopping 
center; and secretary and treasurer of Holiday 
Sands Motel, on the ocean front. 

A Democrat, Mr. Kellam served as treasurer of 
Princess Anne County for nineteen years, resign- 
ing in 1950 to accept appointment as head of the 
Department of Conservation and Development of 
the State of Virginia. He resigned from that office 
in turn in 1953. He is now chairman of the Demo- 
cratic Committee of the First Congressional District. 
He has been a delegate to every state convention 
of his party since 1932, and a delegale to two 
National Democratic Conventions as a Delegate- 
at-large from the State of Virginia. 

Active in the Virginia Beach Rotary Club, Mr. 
Kellam formerly served as its president. He is also 
a member of the Princess Anne Country Club, and 
of the Commonwealth Club of Richmond. Affiliated 
with the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, he is 
a member of Princess Anne Lodge No. 25 in Nor- 
folk; United Chapter No. 1 of the Royal Arch 
Masons; the consistory of the Ancient and Ac- 
cepted Scottish Rite; and Khedive Temple, An- 
cient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 
He attends the Methodist Church. 

Mr. Kellam is a member of the Advisory Council 



on Naval Affairs, and is a director of the Virginia 
State Chamber of Commerce. 

In Princess Anne, on January 21, 1933, Sidney 
S. Kellam married Odie A. Butt of that city, daugh- 
ter of William T. and Eliza (Flanagan) Butt. The 
couple are the parents of two daughters: I. Jane 
Butt, who was born on September 27, 1938. She 
attends Mary Washington College. 2. Elizabeth 
Ann, born on May 23, 1945. 



HAROLD BLANTON KELLAM— As a part- 
ner in the Kellam-Eaton Insurance Company of 
Virginia Beach, Harold Blanton Kellam has taken 
a prominent place among the insurance executives 
of the Lower Tidewater area. He is also an of- 
ficial of the K. and E. Corporation; is currently 
serving as president of the Virginia Beach Cham- 
ber of Commerce; and has taken roles of leader- 
ship in other community groups, in welfare organ- 
izations, and in church work. 

One of the sons of Abel Erastus and Clara 
(Eaton) Kellam, he was born in Princess Anne on 
November 7, 1912. An older brother, Sidney S. 
Kellam, whose record is also in this volume, is a 
founding partner of the Kellam-Eaton Insurance 
Company, as is another brother, William P. Kel- 
lam. Their father, a native of Northampton Coun- 
ty, was born on July 6, 1849. He became the pro- 
prietor of a lumber concern at Princess Anne; and 
for two decades he served as clerk of court in his 
county. His death occurred January 1, 1926, and 
he is survived by his wife, the former Clara O. 
Eaton, who was born in Princess Anne County on 
May 6, 1870. 

Attending the public schools of Princess Anne, 
Harold B. Kellam graduated from Kempsville High 
School in 1931. For one year he was a student at 
Atlantic University, and he then transferred to the 
College of William and Mary, which he also at- 
tended for one year. He then took courses at Nor- 
folk College, a business school. 

In 1934 he began his business career with the 
Reliance Life Insurance Company in Norfolk, con- 
tinued in this connection until 1937, and was then 
transferred to that company's Florida office in 
Jacksonville. He remained there until June 1944. 
Mr. Kellam joined the Reliance organization as 
assistant cashier, and advanced to a district man- 
agership. 

In 1944 he returned to the Tidewater area and 
joined the Kellam-Eaton Insurance Company. It 
had been founded in 1930 by Sidney S. Kellam and 
M. Claude Eaton. The latter died in 1937, but the 
organization has retained his name in its title. 
Besides selling general insurance policies, the firm 
also deals in real estate. Its address is 31 13 Pacific 
Avenue, Virginia Beach, where it has occupied 
modern offices in a building erected in 1954. Mr. 



. . :->Y*- 




LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



73 



Kellam is a partner in the firm, with his two 
brothers. 

Besides this major business connection, he is a 
director of the K. and E. Corporation, a holding 
company. He is a past president of the Retail Mer- 
chants Association of Virginia Beach and Princess 
Anne County. Likewise actice in the leadership of 
the Virginia Beach Chamber of Commerce, he was 
elected its president to take office in January 1956, 
and continues to fill that post at the present time. 
He is also past president of the Rotary Club. His 
charitable and community work has included serv- 
ice through the Virginia Beach Chapter of the 
American Red Cross, which he formerly served as 
chairman. 

A Methodist in his religious faith, Mr. Kellam 
attends the church of that denomination in Vir- 
ginia Beach. For the past twelve years he has 
taught a men's Bible class, and is now chairman of 
the official board. He is a Democrat in politics. 

At Franklin. Virginia, on June 26, 1937, Har- 
old B. Kellam married Frances Marion Arthur of 
that city, daughter of Dr. William Hardy and 
Elizabeth (Lawless) Arthur. Her father was a den- 
tist. Mr. and Mrs. Kellam have two children: 1. 
Harold B., Jr., who was born on September 20, 
1945. 2. Elizabeth Hardy, born on July 9, 1948. 



JAMES BUCKNER MASSEY, JR.— The Nor- 
folk Academy in Norfolk is one of the oldest 
educational institutions in the United States. 
Founded in 1728, it has had a history reflecting 
the history of Norfolk, as noted on other pages 
of this History of Lower Tidewater Virginia. The 
periods of prosperity and the periods of depression, 
the years of war and peace through which Nor- 
folk passed as she grew from a tiny village to 
a great seaport, have had a direct effect upon 
the life of the school. And the school, in turn, 
from its earliest years, has played a vital role in 
the life of Norfolk. The institution has maintained 
this outstanding position in recent years partly 
because of the leadership of the prominent educa- 
tor who has guided it since 1950 — James Buckner 
Massey, Jr., A.B., M.A., D.Sc. Mr. Massey's re- 
putation is not confined to the educational world. 
He is active in cultural programs and in health, 
welfare and recreational work and is well known 
in Presbyterian circles. 

Mr. Massey was born in Augusta County, Vir- 
ginia, on March I, 1913, the son of the Reverend 
James Buckner and Grace Davies (McLaughlin) 
Massey. His father was a Presbyterian minister 
for forty-seven years. At the time of his death 
in January 1953, he was Professor of the Bible 
at the Hampden-Sydney College, Hampden-Syn- 
ney, Virginia. Of Scottish origin and member of 
a family which settled in the Colony of Carolina 



long before the Revolution, he was the son of 
Benjamin Henry Massey of Fort Mill, South Caro- 
lina, who served as postmaster of that community 
and was a farmer and a Confederate veteran of 
the War Between the States. The educator's mo- 
ther, a native of Pocahontas County, West Virginia, 
continues to maintain the family home in Hamp- 
den-Sydney. Her father was Andrew McLaughlin, 
also of Scottish descent, who was a planter in 
Pocahontas County. He was descended from early 
Colonial families of that region, members of which 
served in the Continental Army in the Revolu- 
tion and in the nation's armed forces in later wars. 

James Buckner Massey, Jr., who is the third 
of the five children born to his parents, attended 
the elementary schools of Prince Edward County, 
Virginia. In 193 1, he was graduated from the 
Farmville High School. Subsequently, he studied 
for one year at Hampden-Sydney College and 
then entered Erskine College at Due West, South 
Carolina, where he was awarded the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1935. 

He began his pedagogical career in the public 
school system of Blackstock, South Carolina. He 
was a teacher there in the school year 1935-1936. 
In the following year he taught in the public 
schools of Crewe, Virginia, and in the year 1937- 
1938 in those of Farmville, Virginia. He then 
joined the faculty of the Episcopal High School 
at Alexandria, Virginia, as teacher and coach for 
the year 1938-1939. 

In 1939, Mr. Massey pursued graduate work 
in education at the University of Maryland, where 
he took the degree of Master of Arts in 1940. 
In the next ten years — except for the period he 
was with the armed forces in World War II — 
Mr. Massey was a member of the faculty of The 
Gilman School, a secondary education institution 
in Baltimore, Maryland. He enlisted in the United 
States Navy as an apprentice seaman in 1942 
but rose through the ranks to lieutenant, senior 
grade, the rank he was holding at the time of his 
separation in 1946. In the course of his service 
with the Navy, Mr. Massey was a member of the 
staff of the Eastern Sea Frontier, with headquar- 
ters in New York City, and later, for two years, 
was aboard attack-cargo ships in the Pacific Thea- 
ter of Operations. 

From 1946 to 1950 he was, of course, back with 
The Gilman School in Baltimore. In 1950, he re- 
signed to accept his present post as headmaster 
of the Norfolk Academy. This institution now 
occupies a spacious area of eighteen acres on the 
northwest corner of Newport Avenue and North 
Shore Road, in the northern suburbs of Norfolk. 
On this extensive property, which is sufficient for 
all school needs, school buildings and athletic fields 
have been built. With a present-day enrollment 



TWVa. 



74 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



of three hundred, the school is organized into two 
divisions — known as the Lower School and the 
Upper School. 

The Lower School, with a separate organiza- 
tion in its own buildings, consists of classes known 
as forms, which correspond to the grades in the 
average public school. The Upper School has six 
forms, of which the first is the lowest, correspond- 
ing to grades seven through twelve in the public 
schools. The sixth form is the senior graduating 
class. The headmaster, Mr. Massey, is in direct 
charge of both schools and under his supervision 
there is a full-time teaching staff of twenty men 
and women and three part-time teachers. The acad- 
emy is a member of the Independent School As- 
sociation and is fully accredited by the Virginia 
State Department of Education and the Southern 
Association of Secondary Schools and Colleges. 
Its graduates are accepted by colleges and uni- 
versities throughout the country. 

Mr. Massey is himself a member of Phi Kappa 
Delta fraternity, the Torch Club of Norfolk, the 
Rotary Club of Norfolk and other groups. He 
serves on the board of directors of the Travelers 
Aid Society of Norfolk, on the board of trustees 
of the Norfolk City Library and on the National 
Council of the U. S. O. Also, he is a member of 
the Session (elder) of the First Presbyterian 
Church of Norfolk and has long been active in 
Boy Camp work in West Virginia, Virginia, Maine 
and New Hampshire. 

On July 26, 1941, at Crewe, Virginia, Mr. Massey 
married Helen Thomas Collings, daughter of the 
late Thomas James Collings and Helen Thomas 
(Luke) Collings of that city. Mrs. Massey, whose 
father was a banker and railroadman, is a gradu- 
ate of the College of William and Mary, where 
she was granted the Bachelor of Arts degree. She 
taught in the public schools of Virginia and Mary- 
land and was also a member of the faculty of The 
Gilman School. She is active in cultural and re- 
ligious affairs in Norfolk and is a member of the 
First Presbyterian Church. Mr. and Mrs. Massey 
have four children: 1. James Buckner, III, born 
on November 1, 1944. 2. Thomas Collings, born 
on February 12, 1948. 3. Joseph Price, born on 
December 10, 1950. 4. Elizabeth River Massey, 
born June 14, 1957. 



CHARLES BRINSON CROSS, JR.— An at- 
torney by profession, whose practice is in Ports- 
mouth, Charles Brinson Cross, Jr., is now serv- 
ing as a member of the General Assembly of Vir- 
ginia from Norfolk County and South Norfolk, an 
office to which he was. elected on the Democratic 
ticket. 

A native of Portsmouth, he was born on March 
10, 1914, son of Charles Brinson, Sr., and May- 



wood (Bland) Cross of that city. His father, who 
is now deceased, was for many years active in 
the heavy construction industry as head of the 
firm of C. B. Cross and Company, Inc., with head- 
quarters in Norfolk. 

The younger Charles B. Cross received his early 
education in Portsmouth, where he attended pub- 
lic schools and graduated from Woodrow Wilson 
High School in 1930. He attended the College of 
William and Mary, Norfolk Division, until 1932, 
then transferred to Washington and Lee Univer- 
sity at Lexington, where he received his degree 
of Bachelor of Laws in 1936. 

Admitted to the bar, he began his private prac- 
tice of general law at Portsmouth in that year and 
continued until 1941, when he was called to active 
duty in the United States Navy. Commissioned an 
ensign, he was assigned to duty with Naval Intelli- 
gence and was stationed at various times in Wash- 
ington, D. C; Brooklyn, New York; Norfolk; and 
Portsmouth. He was separated from active duty 
in September 1945, with the rank of lieutenant 
commander, which he held in the United States 
Naval Reserve. 

Returning to civilian life, Mr. Cross resumed 
his general practice at Portsmouth, where in the 
succeeding years he won wide recognition for his 
professional abilities and his public spirit. Besides 
his private practice, he is commissioner in chancery 
for the Circuit Court of Norfolk County and the 
Circuit Court of the City of Portsmouth, and also 
for the Corporation Court of South Norfolk. In 
1955 he was elected to the General Assembly of 
Virginia on the Democratic ticket and is serving 
as a member of the House of Delegates from 
Norfolk County and South Norfolk. 

As a lawyer, he is a member of the Norfolk- 
Portsmouth Bar Association, the Portsmouth-Nor- 
folk County Bar Association, and the Virginia 
State Bar Association. His fraternities are Kappa 
Alpha and Phi Delta Phi. A member of the Ki- 
wanis Club of Portsmouth, Mr. Cross was its 
president in 1942. He is a member of Post No. 
37 of the American Legion and of Lodge No. 276, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. In Masonry, 
he is identified with the Portsmouth Valley Scot- 
tish Rite organization and. as a holder of the Thir- 
ty-second degree, is a member of Khedive Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. 

Among his civic responsibilities, Mr. Cross serv- 
ed as chairman, in 1948-1949, of the Portsmouth 
Chapter of the Amerian Red Cross. He is a com- 
municant of the Park View Methodist Church. 

On April 19, 1944. Charles Brinson Cross, Jr., 
was married to Eleanor Royce Phillips, daughter 
of Roy Franklin and Mable Starr (Gibson) Phil- 
lips of Norfolk. Mr. and Mrs. Cross are the parents 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



75 



of two children: I. Martha Eleanor, who was 
born on January 30, 1952. 2. Charlotte Marie, born 
December 2y, 1953. The family resides at Church- 
land. 



CAMPBELL ARNOUX— President and gener- 
al manager of WTAR Radio Corporation of 
Norfolk, Campbell Arnoux has headed the broad- 
casting station at that city since January 1934. 
and assumed his present duties as president of 
the corporation in October 1946. He began his 
career in the radio field thirty-five years ago, 
when the industry was in its infancy, working in 
such varied capacities as announcer and program 
director in Texas; and in the intervening years, 
has made many valuable contributions to the ad- 
vancement of radio broadcasting and televising. 
He has won nationwide recognition in both fields, 
and few men have served the industry as long 
and ably as he. 

Mr. Arnoux was born in New York City on 
January 13, 1895, son of the late Anthony A. and 
Susan Elizabeth (Campbell) Arnoux. His mother 
married, as her second husband, Albert D. Evans 
of Texas. His father too was a native of New 
York City and was a prominent lawyer and writer 
who died in 1932. He was a descendant of Cap- 
tain Jean Arnoux, a native of France who served 
with distinction on behalf of the colonies in the 
American Revolution. He remained here, and set- 
tled at Vergennes, Vermont, removing to New 
York City in 1805, where he established a mer- 
cantile business. He died there in 1822. In the 
maternal line, the broadcasting executive is des- 
cended from James Campbell, a native of Scot- 
land who settled in Petersburg in 1795. He mar- 
ried Jeanne Victoire de la Porta, a native of France 
and a daughter of the Due de la Porta, who was 
executed at the time of the French Revolution. 
Another Virginia ancestor in the maternal line 
was. Michael Woods, who settled in Albemarle 
County in colonial times, and built Blair Park, 
ancestral home of the Woods family. Both the 
Woods and the Campbell families of Virginia later 
migrated to Kentucky, and still later to St. Louis, 
Missouri. Susan Elizabeth (Campbell- Arnoux) 
Evans was born at Paducah, Kentucky, and was 
reared in St. Louis, where she arrived with her 
family at an early age. She now makes her home 
at Fort Worth, Texas. 

Campbell Arnoux was four years of age when 
the Campbell family moved from New York City 
back to St. Louis, and he was ten when they 
located in Fort Worth. Attending the public ele- 
mentary schools of St. Louis, he completed his 
grade and high school education in the Texas 
city, and went on to the University of Texas at 
Austin, where he was a member of Delta Kappa 



Epsilon fraternity, and served as issue editor of 
the "Daily Texas," the university paper. 

He began his business career with the Fort 
Worth "Record" as a news reporter, and during 
World War I, served as second lieutenant in the 
Fifth Texas Cavalry. He was also a civilian in- 
structor in aerial observation during that period. 
Following the war he traveled around the world 
as free-lance correspondent for two years. Re- 
turning to St. Louis in 1921, he became assistant 
publicity director with the Southwestern Division 
of the American Red Cross. He also served as 
a member of the field staff, Disaster Relief Serv- 
ice, of the Red Cross, with headquarters in St. 
Louis. 

In April 1922, Mr. Arnoux entered the radio 
broadcasting field as first program director and 
chief announcer of Station WBAP, the "Star- 
Telegram" station at Fort Worth, Texas. In id_'4 
he established Station KTHS at Hot Springs, 
Arkansas, of which he became manager, and he 
continued as its directing head until January 1934, 
when he moved to Norfolk to assume general 
management of Station WTAR. This is Virgin- 
ia's oldest radio station, and the most powerful 
in the Norfolk area. In October 1946, he was made 
president of WTAR Radio Corporation, and 
still heads this firm which is responsible for the 
management of the station. Since he assumed his 
managerial duties with the Norfolk broadcasting 
organization, he has held temporary posts as vice 
president of Station WTRD in Richmond ( 1037- 
1940), and as advisor to Station WPID, Peters- 
burg. Virginia (1938-1940), in addition to his Nor- 
folk duties. He is now a member of the board of 
directors of Norfolk Newspapers, Inc. 

In 1950, Mr. Arnoux built Station WTAR - 
TV, and inaugurated televising there. He continues 
to operate that station as well as the radio facili- 
ties of WTAR. Under his guidance, color tele- 
vision as well has been introduced to the Lower 
Tidewater area, and a region extending beyond 
Richmond and over much of eastern North Caro- 
lina. 

Many times honored for his progressive leader- 
ship in the broadcasting industry, Campbell Ar- 
noux was elected chairman of the TV board of 
directors of the National Association of Radio 
and Television Broadcasters at that group's thirty- 
fourth annual convention held in Chicago in June 
1956. During 1955 he served as vice chairman of 
the national organization, which lists some four 
thousand members representing fourteen hundred 
radio stations, three hundred television stations 
and four networks. He was a member of the 
National Association of Broadcasters' board of 
directors from 1945 to 1951; was delegate to the 
Congress of the Inter-American Association of 



76 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



Broadcasters, convening in Mexico City in 1946; 
and since 195 1, has been a member of the tele- 
vision board of directors of National Association 
of Radio and Television Broadcasters, to which 
he was recently elected chairman. He was pre- 
viously vice chairman of that board, and he served 
as chairman of the TV Finance Committee, and 
as member of the General Finance Committee, of 
the national association in 1954-1955. In 1956 he 
was co-chairman of its Convention Committee; 
and he is now a member of the Pension Committee 
and chairman of the Circulation Study Committee. 
Active in the Virginia Association of Broadcasters, 
he formerly served on its board of directors. He 
is a member of the Associated Press Broadcasters 
Association, a member of the Television Bureau 
of Advertising and of its board of directors, a 
member of the Radio Pioneer Club, and secretary 
of the newly organized Television Pioneer Club. 

Campbell Arnoux's varied schedule of civic and 
social activities include membership in the Rotary 
Club, of which he is past president; and in the 
Norfolk Symphony Orchestra and Choral Associa- 
tion, of which he is first vice president. He is 
interested in work with youth, and is past vice 
president of Tidewater Council, Boy Scouts of 
America. He serves on the advisory committee of 
the Norfolk Civic Auditorium, and is a member 
of the board of directors of the Norfolk Commun- 
ity Chest. A communicant of the First Presby- 
terian Church of Norfolk, Mr. Arnoux serves on 
its board of deacons. He is a member and past 
president of the Virginia Club, and a member of 
the Princess Anne Country Club, the Commis- 
sioned Officers Golf Club and the Norfolk Yacht 
and Country Club, all of Norfolk, and the Farm- 
ington Country Club of Charlottesville. 

< Mi June 30, 1925, Campbell Arnoux married 
Natalie Brigham. They make their home at 7408 
Cortlandt Place, Meadowbrook, Norfolk, and are 
the parents of two children: I. Suzanne, who is 
the wife of John C. Peffer of Norfolk. 2. Patrick 
Campbell, now with Station WSPA - TV of 
Spartanburg, South Carolina. 



HAROLD HUDGINS— With a background of 
many years' experience in the cotton industry, 
Harold Hudgins of Norfolk has served for the 
past decade as personnel officer and civil service 
secretary to The Civil Service Commission. He 
is a native of Norfolk, and was born on January 
17, 1895. son of Claude Laurens and Nancy (Hope) 
Hudgins. His father was a departmental supervisor 
in the Old Dominion Steamship Company. He at 
one time served as sheriff of the City of Norfolk, 
being elected to that office in 101,1. 

Harold Hudgins attended the public schools of 



Norfolk and graduated from Maury High School 
there. He then entered Randolph-Macon College 
at Ashland, Virginia, as a member of the Class of 
191 7, but did not remain to graduate. At the time 
of World War I, he entered the service of the 
Tinted States Army. Entering as a private, he was 
assigned to the 11 6th Infantry Regiment, a com- 
ponent of the 29th Division, and he advanced 
through the noncommissioned grades to the rank 
of captain in the infantry. He remained in service 
about two years, and received his honorable dis- 
charge at Camp Dix, New Jersey, on April 1, 1919. 

In September 1919, Mr. Hudgins entered the 
cotton business, as an employee of the firm of 
Rodgers and Company, and continued in the broker- 
age and export phases of that industry for many 
years. In 1946 he became personnel officer and 
civil service secretary of the City of Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia. 

As a veteran of World War I, he is a member 
of Post No. 35 of the American Legion at Norfolk. 
He is an Episcopalian in his religious faith. 

At Suffolk, on June 12, 1917, Harold Hudgins 
married Gladys Virginia Parker, daughter of Hen- 
ley Milson and Julia Riddick (Parker) Parker. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hudgins are the parents of three 
children: I. Harold, Jr., born February 18, 1919. 

2. Julie Ann, wdio was born on February 5, 1923. 

3. Thomas Parker, born February 1, 1925. Mr. 
Hudgins' office is in the City Hall Annex, Nor- 
folk. 



GEORGE H. CURTIS. Ill— Member of a 
family which has long been identified with the 
industrial life of Norfolk, George H. Curtis, III. 
is vice president of the Curtis Marine Company, 
Inc. A native of Norfolk, be was born on January 
14, 1924, son of George H. and Hannah (Rodman) 
Curtis. His maternal grandfather. Colonel W. B. 
Rodman was general counsel for the Norfolk and 
Southern Railway from 191 2 until 1944, when he 
retired. He had also practiced law in Washington, 
North Carolina. He died in 1947, surviving his 
wife by a quarter-century. George H. Curtis, Jr., 
was born in Portsmouth. He served in the United 
States Navy in World War I and in 103 1 estab- 
lished the Curtis Marine Company, of which he has 
remained president. He is a member and past presi- 
dent of the Propeller Club of the Port of Norfolk 
and a member of the Lions Club. His marriage to 
Hannah Rodman took place in April 1921. She is 
the daughter of Colonel W. B. and Adelaide (Ful- 
ford) Rodman. Both of her parents were born in 
Washington, North Carolina. George H. Curtis, 
Jr., and Hannah (Rodman) Curtis became the 
parents of three children: 1. Adelaide, born in 1922. 
She is the wife of Charles E. Snyder, Tr., who is 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



77 



secretary-treasurer of the Curtis Company. 2. 
George H., Ill, born January 14, 1924. 3. Lee 
Ann, born April 22, 1936. She is attending the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. 

George H. Curtis, III, completed his secondary 
studies at Woodberry Forest School at Orange, 
Virginia, and went on to the University of Mich- 
igan, where he took his degree of Bachelor of Arts 
in 1948. He immediately began his career with Cur- 
tis Marine Company, Inc., beginning work in sub- 
ordinate positions in the shop to gain experience. 
He became treasurer of the corporation in 1950, 
and vice president in 1953. 

The Norfolk firm deals in marine supplies and 
equipment and also stocks related industrial lines. 
It acts as agent for the sale of Allis-Chalmers prod- 
ucts, carrying its line of engines, and represents 
Pyrene, C-O-Two, and Twin Disc Clutch Com- 
pany, Westinghouse Air Brake Company, and Wil- 
lard Battery Company. Headquarters are at 554 
Front Street, and a branch office is maintained at 
Richmond. There are forty people on the payroll. 

Mr. Curtis interrupted his studies at the Uni- 
versity of Michigan at the time of World War II 
to serve in the United States Navy. As an enlisted 
man, he saw action in the South Pacific and received 
his discharge on April 10, 1946. He is a member of 
the Propeller Club and the Norfolk Yacht and 
Country Club and Monogram Club, and his fra- 
ternity is Alpha Delta Phi. He is a communicant 
of the Episcopal Church and has served on the 
vestry of his congregation, Christ and St. Luke's. 
Fond of active sports, he is especially partial to 
boating and fishing. 

Mrs. Curtis is the former Mary F. McNamara, 
daughter of John A. and Estelle (Welch) Mc- 
Namara. Her father, who was born in St. Louis, 
Missouri, is a construction engineer and now resides 
at Tucson, Arizona. He served in the army in 
World War II. Mrs. Curtis' mother, a native of 
Chicago, is now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Curtis 
were married on May 21, 1949. They are the 
parents of two children: 1. George H., IV, who 
was born on January 20, 1952. 2. Margaret Lee, 
born July 14, 1954. The family resides at 1446 Mal- 
lory Court, Norfolk. 



JEFFERSON SINCLAIR SELDEN, JR.— 
Selden's Dairy Farm, one of the show-places 
of the Virginia Peninsula, has been contributing 
to the physical and economic health of the popu- 
lace under the aegis of the Selden family since 
1902. A partner in the ownership of this large 
enterprise and manager of all its operations, Jef- 
ferson Sinclair Selden, Jr.. is also prominent in 
the business, civic, social, and religious life of 



the Peninsula, especially in and around Hampton; 
in dairy trade circles; in health and welfare acti- 
vities; and in Kiwanis International. He serves 
as an officer or as a director of various corpora- 
tions in many fields of business. 

Mr. Selden was born at Hampton on April 23, 
1909, the son of Jefferson Sinclair and Mary 
Cooke (Roane) Selden. He is one of four chil- 
dren, all of whom are living, the others being 
Robert Francis Selden; Mrs. Mary Catherine Sel- 
den Ramsey, wife of the Reverend R. R. Ramsey, 
and Harry Wythe Selden. The senior Mr. Selden 
was born on a farm in Gloucester County, Vir- 
ginia, on February 14, 1875. For a time he, like 
his own father, was a farmer. Then he acquired 
a boat which he operated in the transport of 
oysters from his native county to Baltimore, 
Maryland. In 1902 he moved to Hampton and 
purchased a farm which he developed into the 
dairy business which now bears his family name. 
His wife, who was born in Gloucester County 
on April 27, 1874, died on December 5, 195 1. 

The younger Jefferson S. Selden attended 
Hampton's public schools and was graduated 
from the Hampton High School in 1927. He was 
only seventeen when he took over operation of 
the Selden Dairy and Farm. This was immediately 
after taking his diploma. He had, of course, 
worked with his father in the business from an 
early age. He was accepted as a full partner in 
the ownership four years later, when he was 
twenty-one years old, and he has continued to 
own the half interest to this day. As manager 
of the business, he has built it to the point 
where it operates with about three hundred-fifty 
head of milking cows and heifers producing more 
than six hundred gallons of milk daily and an 
additional two hundred head of beef cattle. He 
supervises more than one thousand nine hundred 
thirty-seven acres, of which one thousand two 
hundred are under cultivation. Having acquired 
the Paynes Island Estate on the Rappahannock 
River, comprised of one thousand and fifty acres, 
in 1957. Besides feed for the cows, he raises 
other crops for market. The dairy and farm are 
located on Military Highway No. 250, Hampton. 
In addition to the production of milk on the 
farm, the Selden interests operate a processing 
plant for retail distribution of its own milk and 
about five hundred gallons purchased daily from 
regular producers. Numerous homes in Hampton 
and elsewhere on the Peninsula are served by 
the Selden Dairy. 

Besides Selden's Dairy, Mr. Selden is active 
as a director in the Merchants National Bank 
of Hampton; as president of the Glu-Pen Cor- 
poration of Virginia and the Kirby Refining Cor- 
poration of Severn, North Carolina; as a direc- 



78 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



tor of Florida Orange Stores of Newport News 
and Warwick; as a director of Hampton Hotels, 
Inc.; and as a member of the Limited Partnership 
of Sussex at the Hampton Housing Development. 

Through his church and civic work Mr. Selden 
has had opportunity to speak to more than two 
hundred different clubs and other organizations 
on a multitude of topics, and he is in great de- 
mand as a speaker. He serves on the board of 
trustees and is treasurer of Dixie Hospital at 
Hampton, is on the board of directors of the 
Peninsula Industrial Commission, and is a for- 
mer vestryman at Saint John's Episcopal Church 
of Hampton as well as former president of its 
Bible Class. He is a former director of the 
Hampton Chapter of the American National Red 
Cross and the Hampton Community Chest, the 
Retail Merchants Association of Hampton, and 
the Peninsula Executives Club. A past president 
of the Kiwanis Club of Hampton, he is also 
past lieutenant governor of the old four division 
of the Capital District of Kiwanis International 
and past governor (1952) of the Capital District 
itself, this district being composed of the Ki- 
wanis Clubs of Virginia, Delaware, Maryland, 
and the District of Columbia. In addition to the 
organizations named, he is a member of the Pe- 
ninsula Chamber of Commerce, is on the board 
of directors of Virginia State Chamber of Com- 
merce, and is a member of the Virginia State 
Dairymen's Association. He has a reputation as a 
collector of coins and stamps. A Democratic ad- 
herent when voting, he has no political aspira- 
tions of his own. However, through every medium 
available to him, he keeps well informed on cur- 
rent history and politics, on the local, state, and 
national levels. 

Mr. Selden married Sarah Isabella Dellinger 
of Lincolnton, North Carolina, daughter of Ro- 
bert H. Dellinger, who in 1956 observed his nine- 
tieth birthday, and the late Laura Eugenia ( Lof- 
tin) Dellinger. The wedding ceremony was per- 
formed at St. John's Episcopal Church in Hamp- 
ton. Mr. and Mrs. Selden have one son: Jeffer- 
son Sinclair Selden, III, who was born in Hamp- 
ton on December 25, 1942. 



FAIRFAX M. BERKLEY— During much of 
his career in the rewarding profession of educa- 
tion, Fairfax M. Berkley has been identified with 
the city of Norfolk public school system. He is 
assistant principal of Blair Junior High School, 
and is widely known in educators' circles, having 
served as president of the Norfolk Education As- 
sociation. He has also been active in Virginia's 
historical groups. 

A native of Berkley, in Norfolk County, Fair- 
fax M. Berkley was born on January 18, 1906, the 



youngest of six children born to Waverley Lee, 
Sr., and Judith Elizabeth (Ferebee) Berkley. The 
family is of English origin, and in the paternal 
line is descended from John Berkley, who came 
to the Virginia Colony in the late Seventeenth 
Century and settled in Fairfax County. There his 
descendants became substantial planters. The line 
comes down in successive generations from John 
Berkley through William (1), William (2), Ben- 
jamin, John Walker, Lycurgus, Waverley Lee, 
Sr., and Fairfax M. Berkley. The Ferebees are 
also of English lineage, descended from John 
Ferebee, surveyor, who laid out the town of Nor- 
folk in 1680. The family have been prominently 
identified with the development of that town since 
Colonial times. From John, the Ferebee line des- 
cends through Thomas, William, Thomas Cooper 
(1), Thomas Cooper (2) and Judith Elizabeth 
1 Ferebee) Berkley. Lycurgus Berkley, for whom the 
town of Berkley was named, was born in Fairfax 
County in 1827, and came to Norfolk in 1847. For a 
number of years he was a partner in the firm of 
Berkley, Miller and Company, wholesale dry goods 
merchants of Norfolk. Following his marriage to 
Eliza Middleton, only child of Captain John S. 
Middleton of Ferry Point, Norfolk County, he 
made his home at Ferry Point. There he acquired 
considerable property, and on this land founded 
the town which bears his name, platting the 
streets and lots, and taking a leading part in its 
development. He donated sites for the building of 
churches, and gave the various denominations fi- 
nancial support as well. With the incorporation of 
the town in 1870. it was named in his honor, and 
subsequently, in 1906, was annexed by the city of 
Norfolk. L3-curgus Berkley died in 1881 and his 
wife in 1004. Their son, Waverley Lee Berkley, 
Sr., was born August 18, 1861, at Ferry Point. In 
the early years of his career he entered the dry 
goods business, and later headed the retail furni- 
ture firm of W. L. Berkley and Company. He re- 
tired from business several years before his death 
on February 6, 1922. He was vice president of 
the Merchants and Planters Bank and president 
of the Berkley Permanent Building and Loan As- 
sociation, which he had helped to organize in 
1886. It is now the Home Federal Savings and 
Loan Association. He was active in Masonry. He 
had been reared in the Methodist Church, but 
after his marriage became a member of St. Paul's 
Episcopal Church of Berkley, which he served as 
senior warden. 

His wife, the former Judith Elizabeth Ferebee, 
was a daughter of Thomas Cooper Ferebee of 
Currituck County, North Carolina, and Mary Eli- 
zabeth (Wallace) Ferebee of Norfolk County. She 
was born April 26, 1865, and died June 19, 1939. 
Waverly Lee and Judith Elizabeth (Ferebee) 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



79 



Berkley were the parents of six children: 1. Percy 
Cooper, born 1887, died 1929. 2. Judith Ferebee, 
who married Richard C. Owen. He is a retired 
member of the firm of Foote Brothers and Com- 
pany of Norfolk. 3. Helen Middleton, who mar- 
ried David A. Dashiell, retired traffic manager for 
F. S. Royster Company of Norfolk. 4. Waverley 
Lee, 2nd, whose biography is included in this work. 
5. John Wallace (died in infancy). 6. Fairfax M. 
Fairfax Berkley's family roots go deep into the 
history of Norfolk and Tidewater Virginia. He 
is a descendant of Sir George Yeardley, Governor 
of Virginia in 1618 and of Adam Thoroughgood, 
who came to Virginia in 1621 from King's Lynn, 
in the County of Norfolk, England, and whose 
beautiful home on the Lynnhaven River is one of 
the oldest houses in Virginia. Mr. Berkley's great- 
great-great-great-grandfather. Cornelius Calvert, 
was for forty years an alderman and twice mayor 
of the Borough of Norfolk. 

Attending public schools of Norfolk and gradu- 
ating from Maury High School in 1923, Fairfax 
M. Berkley matriculated at the College of William 
and Mary in Williamsburg. There he graduated 
in 1927, taking his degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
At William and Mary, he was a member of the 
following national honorary fraternities: Omicron 
Delta Kappa (leadership), Sigma Upsilon (liter- 
ary), Theta Alpha Phi (dramatic), Phi Delta Gam- 
ma (forensic). Pi Gamma Mu (social science). In 
1933 ne took his degree of Master of Arts at 
Columbia University, New York City. He has also 
attended the University of Virginia Graduate 
School and the Sorbonne, in Paris, France. 

Meantime, in I9?7, he began his teaching career, 
and throughout his nearly three decades in the 
teaching profession, he has been with the Norfolk 
school system. He has taught English, French 
and Spanish, and since 1942 has served as assist- 
ant principal of Blair Junior High School. A mem- 
ber of the Norfolk Education Association, he was 
elected its president and served from 1950 to 1952. 
He is a member of the Virginia Education As- 
sociation and the National Education Association, 
and he has been a delegate to several state and 
national conventions. 

His interest in Virginia history is indicated in 
his membership in the Virginia Historical Society, 
the Association for the Preservation of Virginia 
Antiquities (of which he is Director of the Nor- 
folk Branch), the Order of Cape Henry 1607 
(life member), and the Virginia Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution, of whose Nor- 
folk Chapter he has served as secretary and was 
the president in 1951. He is frequently called upon 
to speak on historical subjects before civic groups, 
and is an effective advocate of good citizenship. 
A communicant of St. Andrew's Episcopal Church 



of Norfolk, he formerly served as superintendent 
of its Sunday school, in which he still teaches. He 
was formerly a member of St. Bride's Episcopal 
Church, having served as register and vestryman. 
He has served on the vestry of St. Andrew's 
Church, is a lay reader, and since 1948 has served 
as sponsor of the crucifers of the church. 

His interest in the youth of Norfolk extends 
beyond his daily contacts in school and in church. 
Since 1946 he has been advisor to the West Chap- 
ter of the Maury High School Hi-Y Club, meet- 
ing with this group of boys one evening each week 
during the school year, and assisting them in their 
sponsorship of the annual Maury Regatta, the 
only sail-boat races in the country which are 
sponsored entirely by high school students. 

He is a member of the board of governors of 
the Girls' Club of Norfolk, and a director of the 
Norfolk Mental Health Center. 

Mr. Berkley is unmarried, and resides at 708 
Baldwin Avenue, Norfolk. 



CLYDE WARREN COOPER— A member of 
the Portsmouth and Norfolk County bar for the 
past thirty years, Clyde Warren Cooper is en- 
gaged in general practice at Portsmouth. Born 
in Norfolk County on July 2. 1893, he is the young- 
est of six children born to Warren Ward and 
Sarah Elizabeth (Whitson) Cooper. Both parents 
were natives of North Carolina, and both are now 
deceased. His father came to Norfolk County in 
1885 and devoted the remaining years of his life to 
farming there. 

Clyde W. Cooper received his early education 
in the public schools of Norfolk County and the 
city of Norfolk. He began his career as an office 
employee with the Seaboard Air Line Railway in 
Norfolk, in 1910, and continued in this connection 
until 1917. During these years he attended even- 
ing classes at Norfolk College, taking business and 
law courses. In 191 7 he entered the employ of the 
Portsmouth Cotton Oil Corporation and held vari- 
ous positions in clerical and sales capacities until 
1929. In that year the Portsmouth Cotton Oil 
Corporation was acquired by the Procter and Gam- 
ble Manufacturing Company. 

Meantime, Mr. Cooper had continued to study 
law and on December 15, 1928, was admitted to 
the Virginia State Bar. In 1930 he entered the 
private practice of his profession at Portsmouth. 
In the course of the intervening years, this prac- 
tice has brought him large responsibilities, and he 
serves a number of corporations and other large 
interests. He is counsel and a member of the 
board of directors of the American National Bank 
of Portsmouth and is attorney for the Portsmouth 
Redevelopment and Housing Authority, the Vir- 
ginia Electric and Power Company, and the Uni- 



8o 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



ted States Fidelity and Guaranty Company of Balti- 
more, Maryland. 

Professionally, Mr. Cooper is affiliated with the 
Portsmouth-Norfolk Bar Association, the Ports- 
mouth and Norfolk County Bar Association, and 
the Virginia State Bar Association. Active in civic 
affairs, he is a member of the Portsmouth Rotary 
Club, which he served as president in 1954. He is 
a member and past master of America Lodge No. 
330, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Ports- 
mouth; Lodge No. 82, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks; and a member of the Princess 
Anne Country Club and the Farmington Country 
Club of Charlottesville. He attends Monumental 
Methodist Church in Portsmouth. 

In the World War II years, Mr. Cooper was 
appointed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to 
a dollar-a-year post as chairman of the many war 
bond sales campaigns in the Portsmouth-Norfolk 
County area. He was also attorney for the local 
rationing board. He was also appointed chairman 
of a special Selective Service board in Portsmouth, 
which it was necessary to establish because of 
the large influx of defense workers of draft age. 
Governor Darden also appointed Mr. Cooper, dur- 
ing this period, to head a local campaign for army 
relief. He has served his city as a member of various 
boards active in the fund-raising drives of the Ports- 
mouth Community Chest. 

The sound professional preparation and the lof- 
ty ideals which have made Mr. Cooper an out- 
standing lawyer have also made him one of Tide- 
water Virginia's most valuable citizens. 

At Portsmouth, on March 14, 1925, Clyde War- 
ren Cooper married Margaret Chapman Wishart, 
a native of North Carolina and daughter of A. T. 
and Margaret (Chapman) Wishart, of Isle of Wight 
County. Mr. and Mrs. Cooper make their home at 
5 Court Street, Portsmouth. Mr. Cooper's offices 
are in the Colony Theater Building. 



JAMES WILLIAM BOLDING's role in the 
business affairs of Portsmouth is that of senior 
partner in one of the region's better-known invest- 
ment firms, Bolding and Company, which has its 
offices in the Portsmouth Hotel Building on Din- 
widdie Street. As successors to the firm of James 
\\ . Bolding, the present partnership was organized 
on November 1, 1954. Mr. Bolding's son is junior 
partner and accountant. The investment advisers 
hold membership in the Philadelphia-Baltimore 
Stock Exchange, and associate membership in the 
Boston Stock Exchange. 

A native of Dublin, Texas, James W. Bolding 
was born on November 27, 1898, son of William 
G. and Mary Anne (Weatherby) Bolding. His 
father was a prominent wholesale grain merchant 



of Comanche, Texas. James W. Bolding. Sr., re- 
ceived his education at Howard Payne College, 
St. John's College, and the American College of 
Life Underwriters. He came to Portsmouth in 
1920, while on active duty in the L'nited States 
Navy. Naval service was to comprise a consider- 
able part of his career, and he was in uniform 
until 1932, when he was separated from the serv- 
ice and became active in the business life of the 
Tidewater Virginia area. 

In the years which followed, he engaged in var- 
ious business operations which included the Penn- 
sylvania-Norfolk Tire Company. He founded this 
firm, which opened stores in Norfolk, Portsmouth, 
and Suffolk. He also headed the J. W. Bolding 
Coal Company, with coal yards in Cradock and 
Norfolk. These business interests Mr. Bolding sold 
just prior to this country's entry into World War 
II. when he was recalled to active service in the 
United States Navy. He served throughout the war 
and was again honorably discharged in 1945. 

When he returned to peacetime pursuits and to 
the Lower Tidewater area, Mr. Bolding entered 
the life insurance field, as representative of the 
Metropolitan Life Insurance Company in Ports- 
mouth, and he later became general agent for the 
Franklin Life Insurance Company, with headquar- 
ters in the same city. Trained and experienced in 
administrative and legal procedures relating to in- 
vestments and securities, he entered the invest- 
ments business in 1947 in Portsmouth, operating 
his firm as James W. Bolding, Investment Broker. 
In October 1954, he became a member of the Phila- 
delphia-Baltimore Stock Exchange. On November 
1 of that year, he was joined by his son, James W., 
Jr., who has since been a partner in the firm which 
has been renamed Bolding and Company. 

The organization, which has assets totaling near- 
ly sixty thousand dollars, acts as agents in the 
purchase of stock exchange securities. United States 
Treasury and municipal bonds, utility and bank 
stocks. It provides custodianship and advisory serv- 
ice and makes appraisals and analyses to assure 
clients maximum benefits from investments. The 
firm holds membership in the Portsmouth Chamber 
of Commerce as well as the Philadelphia-Baltimore 
Stock Exchange. 

James W. Bolding, Sr., married Elizabeth Mer- 
riken, and they are the parents of three children: 
1. James William, Jr., born at Portsmouth on 
September 9, 1921. He attended the public schools 
of Portsmouth and in 1946 graduated from the 
United States Coast Guard Academy. He has also 
taken courses at the University of Georgia and 
is thoroughly trained in investment procedures and 
securities analysis. He began his career with his 
father, and they formed Bolding and Company in 
1954. The younger James W. Bolding married, 





■^y^r^'^«c-*»A_ 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



81 



on June 8, 1946, Mary Elizabeth Danaher of Grosse 
Pointe, Michigan, and they are the parents of four 
children: i. James William, III, born on October 13, 
194S. ii. Evelyn Elizabeth, born November 7, 1949. iii. 
Martha Mary, born May 7, 1952. iv. Patrick Dana- 
her, born April 7, 1954. 2. Donald B., born at, 
Portsmouth on November 28, 1924. He graduated 
from Purdue University, taking the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering, 
and is now a resident of Houston, Texas, where 
he is associated with Texas Foundries, Inc. On 
August 28, 1946, he married Margaretta Reeve, 
and they are the parents of: i. Sophie Elisa, born 
September 21, 1950. ii. Margaretta Reeve, born 
September 19, 1952. iii. Dona Elizabeth, born Oc- 
tober 3, 1954. 3. Bruce Merriken, born at Ports- 
mouth on October 8, 1931. He took his degree of 
Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering at 
Purdue University and is now with the Newport 
News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corporation. 
He was married on September 10, 1955, to Patri- 
cia Ohlin. 



MAJOR McKINLEY HILLARD— Lawyer, 
former member of the General Assembly, and cur- 
rently county clerk of Norfolk County, Major 
McKinley Hillard has in the course of his long 
record of public service proved himself an excep- 
tionally able and conscientious professional man 
and public servant. Personal traits of friendliness, 
courtesy, and kindliness, complementing his in- 
dustry and high ideals, have earned him a place 
as a respected leader of community and county. 

A native of Morgan County, Tennessee, he was 
born on October 23, 1896, son of Mandiville Erv- 
ing and Clare Elizabeth (Rich) Hillard. Despite 
his birthplace outside the state, Mr. Hillard's par- 
ents spent the greater part of their lives in Nor- 
folk County, and his father was active in lumber 
manufacturing operations and farming. From 1915 
until his death in 1938, he served as justice of the 
peace. Major McKinley Hillard passed his boy- 
hood in the Deep Creek section of Norfolk Coun- 
ty, attended public schools there, and graduated 
from Deep Creek High School in 1915. Continu- 
ing his education at the College of William and 
Mary in Williamsburg, he graduated there with 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in 1920 and went 
to the University of Richmond for his professional 
courses, taking his Bachelor of Laws degree there 
with the Class of 1926. In that year he was ad- 
mitted to the Virginia State Bar. 

Service in World War I had intervened during 
Mr. Hillard's student years. In 1918 he enlisted 
as a private in the United States Coast Artillery 
and was honorably discharged in November of 
that year, following the signing of the armistice. 



At that time he was attending officers' training 
school. 

Following his graduation from law school and 
admission to the bar in 1926, he began the pri- 
vate practice of law in Portsmouth and, in the 
course of the years since that time, has won wide 
recognition for his professional abilities, as well 
as for his public spirit. 

Major M. Hillard first entered public life in 
1927, when he was elected to the Virginia House 
of Delegates from Norfolk County. He served as 
a member of the House during the regular ses- 
sions of 1928 and 1930 and also during the special 
session occurring between those years. In 1931 he 
was elected a member of the Virginia State Senate 
from the Third Senatorial District and served with 
distinction until his resignation in 1954, to accept 
appointment to his present position as county 
clerk of Norfolk Count). 

In his role in public affairs, Mr. Hillard has 
exercised a considerable influence at both the 
county and the state levels. During his years in 
the State Senate, he occupied a position of emin- 
ence and leadership. He was a member of many 
important committees, including the Roads and 
Internal Navigation Committee, the Agriculture, 
Mining, and Manufacturing Committee (both of 
which he served as chairman); the Fish and Game 
Committee, and the General Laws Committee. 

Mr. Hillard is a member of the Portsmouth- 
Norfolk County Bar Association and Virginia 
State Bar Association. Apart from his professional 
connections, he holds membership in the Ports- 
mouth Chamber of Commerce; the Deep Creek 
Ruritan Club, Lodge No. 82, Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks; Lodge No. 898, Loyal Or- 
der of Moose; and American Legion Post No. 37. 
He attends Deep Creek Baptist Church. 

On November 26, 1921, Major McKinley Hillard 
was married at Deep Creek to Mary Frances Cher- 
ry of that place. They were the parents of three 
children: I. Major McKinley, Jr., born August 
28, 1922. He took his pre-law studies at the Col- 
lege of William and Mary and his legal training 
at the University of Richmond, thus paralleling 
the educational record of his father. He received 
his degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1949 and now 
practices at Portsmouth, with offices in the Colony 
Theater Building. Major M. Hillard, Jr., married 
Marion Tonkin of Portsmouth, and they are the 
parents of two children: i. Susan Jewett. ii. Major 
McKinley, III. 2. Merle Cherry, who is deceased. 
She married Philip Shaw of Portsmouth, and they 
had a son, David Hillard Shaw. 3. Irving Hillard, 
who died in infancy. 



J. RIVES WORSHAM — President of the Old 
Dominion Peanut Corporation of Norfolk, J. 



82 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



Rives Worsham is also an outstanding civic leader. 
He is a man of wide interests, both business and 
civic, and is highly esteemed in Norfolk. Pos- 
sessing the qualities of foresight and progressive- 
ness, he combines these traits with a humanitarian 
spirit which is much in evidence in his work with 
community projects and organizations. 

Born at Petersburg, Virginia, on January 28, 
1891, he is a son of Timothy W. and Evelyn 
(Blick) Worsham, both natives of Prince George 
County, Virginia. Both families, of English origin, 
attained prominence in colonial Virginia, and have 
provided the state with leadership each genera- 
tion since. Timothy W. Worsham was among 
the pioneers in the peanut industry in Norfolk, 
where he was a partner in the United States 
Peanut Company and the Atlantic Peanut Com- 
pany. He died in Norfolk in 1913 at the age of 
forty-nine. His wife, the former Evelyn Blick, con- 
tinued to reside in Norfolk until her death in 
1949. Both are buried in the historic Blanford 
Cemetery in Petersburg, Virginia. They became 
the parents of two children: 1. J. Rives. 2. Laura 
Evelyn, who married Allen J. Clay. He died in 
1940. 

J. Rives Worsham received his early education 
in Norfolk, and attended the old Norfolk High 
School. He continued his education at Randolph- 
Macon College, where he was a member of Sigma 
Phi Epsilon, Sigma Upsilon, and Tau Kappa 
Alpha fraternities. Following in the footsteps of 
his father, he began his career in the peanut indus- 
try. For a time he was employed by the Colum- 
bian Peanut Company, and was general manager 
of the Peanut Growers Association. 

In 1924 he became secretary and treasurer of 
the Old Dominion Peanut Corporation, and con- 
tinued in these positions until 1945, when he be- 
came president on the death of his partner. The 
corporation was founded in 1913, and manufactures 
candies as well as processing, packaging, and distri- 
buting peanuts. Many of its candies are made with 
peanuts, such as its peanut brittle and chocolate 
peanuts, and it also produces cocoanut candies 
and hard candies. The brand name these products 
carry is "Betteryet," by which they are favorably 
known to wholesale and retail outlets, and indivi- 
dual consumers, throughout the southern and 
eastern states. The company, which has enjoyed 
steady growth through the years, normally em- 
ploys about seventy-five persons. In addition to 
Mr. Worsham, the president, the officials of the 
corporation are G. L. Dinsmore, vice president 
and secretary; J. Rives Worsham, Jr., vice presi- 
dent and treasurer; and Donald Underbill, office 
manager. 

Besides this major business connection, Mr. 
Worsham is a director of the Southern Bank of 



Norfolk and of the Bank of Norview. For his 
proven abilities in dealing with civic and public 
affairs, he has been honored with many positions 
of public trust. He is admired as a man of great 
vitality and qualities of leadership, and his help 
is always sought when there is a difficult task 
to be faced. He served on the Norfolk City Coun- 
cil from 1940 to 1948, and part of that time was 
vice mayor of the city. From 1948 to 1950 he was 
a member of the City Planning Commission. He 
is a member and chairman of the Norfolk Port 
Authority, member and past president of the Nor- 
folk Central Young Men's Christian Association, 
and past director and presently national councillor 
of the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce. He is also 
a member and past vice president of the Virginia 
State Chamber of Commerce. At the present time 
he is serving as chairman of the board of directors 
of the Norfolk General Hospital, which is now 
erecting a new nine-story building at a cost in 
excess of five million dollars. Mr. Worsham is 
also a member of the board of trustees of Ran- 
dolph-Macon College, and serves on the board of 
the Virginia Foundation of Independent Colleges. 

He is a member and past president of the Nor- 
folk Rotary Club, and a member of the Norfolk 
Yacht and Country Club and the Princess Anne 
Country Club. He is a member and past chairman 
of the board of stewards of the Ghent Methodist 
Church. His hobby is civic service, and he has 
aided many worthwhile causes on a statewide as 
well as citywide basis. 

At Richmond, Virginia, on October 3, 1914. J- 
Rives Worsham married Martha Wise Sutherland 
of Richmond, daughter of Irviu L. and Sallie 
(Wise) Sutherland, both of whom are now de- 
ceased. Mrs. Worsham is active in cultural affairs, 
her particular interest being the Virginia Society 
of the Daughters of the American Revolution. 
She is a member and past regent of Great Bridge 
Chapter of the organization, in Norfolk, and is 
also a member of the Colonial Dames of the 
Seventeenth Century, the Daughters of Colonial 
Wars, and the Ghent Methodist Church. Mr. and 
Mrs. Worsham are the parents of two children: 
1. J. Rives, Jr., born August 31, 1 9 1 5 , at Rich- 
mond. He graduated from Virginia Military In- 
stitute, taught at Augusta Military Academy, then 
entered Air Corps service in World War II. At 
the war's end he held the rank of major. Since 
returning to civilian status, he has been with the 
Old Dominion Peanut Corporation, and is now 
vice president and treasurer. He married Nancy 
Hudson Jones of Detroit, Michigan, and they are 
the parents of two children: i. James Rives Wor- 
sham, III. ii. Nancy Hudson Worsham. 2. Audrey 
Wise, born in Norfolk on December 31, 19^0. 
She is a graduate of Randolph-Macon Women's 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



83 



College, and is now the wife of Dr. David C. 
Whitehead, a physician practicing in Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia. They are the parents of three children: i. 
Sallie Wise. ii. David Calloway, iii. Martha Wise 
Whitehead. 



JOHN L. CARTER— A civil engineer hy pro- 
fession, who received his training at the University 
of Alabama, John L. Carter is president of the 
Carter Contracting Company, Inc., which has its 
headquarters at 106 West Olney Road in Norfolk. 
Its predecessor firm, Carter-Hassell Contracting 
Company, Inc., was founded in November 1946, 
by Mr. Carter in partnership with Thomas R. 
Hassell, Jr.; this firm was incorporated in October 
1952. At that time Mr. Carter became its president, 
and Mr. Hassell vice president. Experiencing steady 
growth, the company took a prominent part in the 
general building operations of the Greater Nor- 
folk area and Tidewater Virginia. At the time of 
its liquidation in 1957 there were one hundred 
people on its payroll, engaged in all types of con- 
struction operations — industrial, commercial, in- 
stitutional, municipal and residential as well as 
government projects. It erected many important 
structures, including the Boiling Park Elementary 
School, Ocean View Elementary School, Mary Cal- 
cott Elementary School, Liberty Park Elementary 
School, Chesterfield Heights Elementary School 
addition; two additions to Granby High School; 
addition to the United States Naval Hospital at 
Portsmouth; United States Navy Sports and Rec- 
reation Center on Hampton Boulevard; Cape 
Charles Air Force Base Sports and Recreation Cen- 
ter; United States Army Guided Missile Station 
at Norfolk; Little Creek Naval Officers' Quarters 
comprising sixty units; Princess Anne County 
Clerk's Office Building; Atlantic and Pacific Tea 
Company supermarkets at Ocean View and Rich- 
mond. In 1 95 1 the company completed in ninety 
days an immense project which involved the crat- 
ing of seventy-six shiploads of equipment and ma- 
terials used in establishing the Thule United States 
Air Force Base in Greenland. Carter-Hassell Con- 
tracting Company, Inc. was liquidated on January 
'. '957, and a new corporation formed in the name 
of Carter Contracting Company, Inc., which is 
continuing the same type of work that Carter- 
Hassell Contracting Company, was engaged in. 

John L. Carter, former president of the Carter- 
Hassell Contracting Company, and now president 
of Carter Contracting Co., Inc., was born on Oc- 
tober 18, 1913, at Scott, in Johnson County, Georgia, 
son of Marvin C. and Elizabeth (James) Carter. 
On his paternal side he is descended from an Eng- 
lish family which settled in Virginia in early colo- 
nial times, and migrated to Georgia in the early 
antebellum period. John G. Carter, grandfather of 



the construction executive, was a planter, and served 
in the Confederate States Army from Johnson 
County, Georgia. Marvin C. Carter was born in 
that county, and continues active as a farmer and 
civil engineer, now making his home in Scott, 
Georgia. His wife, the former Elizabeth James, 
who died in 19 16, was descended from an early 
antebellum family who for many years lived near 
Macon, Georgia. 

Receiving his early education in the public schools 
of Scott, John L. Carter graduated from Vidalia 
High School in Georgia in 1930. He attended the 
University of Georgia during the next academic 
year, majoring in forestry. From 1935 to 1942 he 
was with the Mobile District of the United States 
Corps of Engineers, and it was during this time, 
while engaged on a dam project on the Warrior 
River at Tuscaloosa, that he entered the University 
of Alabama to complete his education in civil en- 
gineering. By attending classes from eight in the 
morning to three in the afternoon, and continuing 
his work with the Corps of Engineers from four 
until midnight, he was able to continue his educa- 
tion. He graduated at the University of Alabama 
in the class of 1940, receiving the degree of Bach- 
elor of Science in Civil Engineering, and was li- 
censed to practice as a professional engineer by 
the state of Alabama. 

From 1942 to 1944 he was with Pan American 
Airways as office engineer, with headquarters at 
Recife, Brazil, engaged in establishing airfields in 
South America for the United States Government 
and Pan American and Panagra airlines. Returning 
to the United States in 1944, he continued his pro- 
fessional work as civil engineer at the United States 
Naval Air Station in Norfolk, continuing there until 
the close of the war. The following year, as in- 
dicated above, he became co-founder of his own 
firm, Carter-Hassell Contracting Company, which 
was later dissolved, his firm now being known as 
Carter Contracting Company, Inc. 

Mr. Carter holds membership in the Associated 
General Contractors of America and the Norfolk 
Chamber of Commerce. His fraternity is Delta Tau 
Delta, and he is a member of Virginia Beach Lodge 
No. 274, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; John 
Walters Chapter No. 68, of the Royal Arch Ma- 
sons; Grice Commandery No. 16, Knights Templar; 
and Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine in Norfolk, being a 
Thirty-second-degree Mason in Auld Consistory 
of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite in that 
city. He is a member of the Cavalier Beach Club, 
Lafayette Yacht Club and the Virginia Beach 
Methodist Church. His favorite outdoor pastimes 
are fishing and hunting. 

On May 23, 1933, at Savannah, Georgia, John 
L. Carter married Bernice Watkins, daughter of 



84 



LOWTR TIDEWATKR VIRGINIA 



William M. and Cordia (Hancock) Watkins of 
Brunswick, Georgia. Mrs. Carter is a graduate of 
the University of Alabama, from which she re- 
ceived the Bachelor of Arts degree, and she for- 
merly taught in the public schools of Georgia and 
Alabama. Mr. and Mrs. John L. Carter are the 
parents of a daughter, Lynn Bernice, who was 
born at Tuscaloosa, Alabama, on November 14, 
1940. The family resides at 1 1 1 Eighty-eighth Street, 
Virginia Beach. 



WILLIAM J. MISSETT— From the beginning 
of his career, William J. Missett has been a news- 
paper man. He has worked at his profession both 
north and south of Mason and Dixon's Line and 
came to Suffolk in 1943 to serve as editor and 
publisher of the "Xews-Herald." 

Born at Carbondale, Pennsylvania, on November 
3, 1911, he is a son of William S. and Gertrude 
V. (Hennigan) Missett. Both parents are still 
living, and his father is a retired railroadman. At- 
tending the public elementary schools of Carbon- 
dale and graduating from high school there in 
1929, William J. Missett entered Saint Thomas 
College at Scranton, Pennsylvania, for his ad- 
vanced studies. There he graduated in 1933 with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. He began his work in 
the newspaper field at Scranton, joining the staff of 
the "Republican" of that city in 1934 and leaving 
in 1936 to accept a position with the Oswego 
"Palladium-Times." 

In April 1941, he moved to West Virginia, 
where he became identified with the Beckley News- 
paper Corporation at Beckley. He worked for that 
news publishing hrm in responsible capacities 
through December 1942 and on January 3, 1943, 
began his duties with the Suffolk "News-Herald." 
In addition to being editor and publisher of the 
paper, he holds the office of president of the 
publishing company. The "News-Herald" is suc- 
cessor to the old Suffolk "Herald," which was a 
weekly paper. It has been continuously published 
as a daily since March 1923. 

Active in the Chamber of Commerce, Mr. Mis- 
sett formerly served as its president. He is a 
member of the Rotary Club and a communicant 
of Saint Mary's Roman Catholic Church. His fa- 
vorite outdoor pastime is boating. 

At Archbald, Pennsylvania, in 1938 William J. 
Missett married Kathryn McAndrew of that city, 
daughter of James T. and Kathryn (Movies) 
McAndrew. Mr. and Mrs. Missett are the parents 
of the following children: 1. William, Jr. 2. Thomas 
F. 3. James A. 4. John B. 5. Mary Kathryn. 



NORBORNE TUCKER POARCH— For near- 
ly forty years, Norborne Tucker Poarch has been 



identified with the lumber industry in its various 
phases. His entire career has been spent with the 
Camp Manufacturing Company, and he has played 
an important part in the company's logging oper- 
ations, and in shaping its policies on timber con- 
servation in Tidewater Virginia. The firm has its 
headquarters at Franklin, and Mr. Poarch is its 
area manager at Whaleyville. There he has de- 
monstrated a large degree of civic spirit, and has 
been prominently identified with the public affairs 
of Nansemond County. 

Mr. Poarch was born near Lawrenceville, Vir- 
ginia, on August 2", 1898, son of the late John 
Henry and Annie Elizabeth (Davis) Poarch. His 
father operated a general store in Brunswick Coun- 
ty, Virginia, for many years prior to his death in 
1931, at the age of seventy-three. He was a son 
of Peter L. Poarch of Brunswick County, who 
was an extensive planter and a slaveholder, and 
who served the Confederate cause by furnishing 
supplies for the Confederate States Army. Annie 
Elizabeth (Davis) Poarch was a native of Bruns- 
wick County and daughter of Robert E. Davis, a 
planter who also served the Confederate forces in 
the commissary department. Mrs. Poarch died in 
1905. 

One of eight children born to his parents, Nor- 
borne Tucker Poarch passed his boyhood years in 
Brunswick County and received his education in 
the public schools there. In April 1917, he began his 
long connection with the Camp Manufacturing 
Company as foreman of logging operations in 
Brunswick County. With his excellent background 
of experience in the various phases of logging oper- 
ations, he assumed increasing responsibilities in the 
large-scale activities which the company has long 
been carrying on in the Tidewater area. Since May 
1925, he has resided in Nansemond County, and as 
area manager, he directs the firm's operations both 
in this part of the Tidewater region and in east- 
ern North Carolina. Besides supervising logging 
operations, he has also had charge of tree con- 
servation practices, including those on the vast 
tree-farm holdings of the company. 

Since 1935, Mr. Poarch and his family have made 
their home on White Marsh Road, one mile south- 
east of Suffolk. That city is the center of a vast 
timberlands area comprising nearly forty thousand 
acres of the Great Dismal Swamp. 

Always constructively interested in the cause 
of conservation in relation to forest products and 
tree-farm operations, he has for a number of years 
been an active member of the Southern Pulpwood 
Conservation Association. He is also active in the 
life of his community. He serves on the board of 
directors of the Bank of Whaleyville. which is the 
subject of a sketch in this history. He is now 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



85 



serving his third term as a member of the Nanse- 
mond County board of supervisors from the Cy- 
press District. From 1935 to 1942 he served as 
deputy sheriff of Nansemond County. He is a mem- 
ber of Welcome Lodge of the Knights of Pythias 
in Suffolk, Norfolk Lodge No. 128 of D. O. K. K.. 
and the Cypress Ruritan Club. 

As an active member of West End Baptist 
Church of Suffolk, Mr. Poarch served as a member 
of its board of deacons from 1949 to 1955. He is 
past president of the Progressive Men's Bible Class, 
and is a member of the church finance committee. 

On December 18, 1919, at Weldon, in Halifax 
County, North Carolina, Norborne Tucker Poarch 
married Elma Louise Bowen of Brunswick County, 
Virginia, daughter of Peter Y. and Irene (Tatem) 
Bowen. Both of her parents were also natives of 
Brunswick County, and both are now deceased. 
Like her husband, Mrs. Poarch is an earnest worker 
in the West End Baptist Church. She is chairman 
of the Nansemond County Home Demonstration 
Club. The couple are the parents of two children: 
1. Frances Elizabeth, who was born on April 9, 
1921. She took her degree of Bachelor of Arts at 
the College of William and Mary in Blacksburg, 
and she formerly taught in the public schools of 
Norfolk and Nansemond County. She is now mar- 
ried to Jesse Darden Langston of that county, who 
is a veteran of naval service in W T orld War II and 
now a partner in the Langston and Conley Grocery 
Company at Whaleyville. They are the parents of 
two children: Nancy Low and Jesse Darden Lans- 
ton, Jr. 2. Norborne Tucker, Jr., born January 5, 
1925. He is a graduate of Suffolk High School and 
a veteran of World War II, having served with 
the Third Army under General George S. Patton 
in the European theater. He participated in the 
Battle of the Bulge. He is now a partner in the 
Langston and Conley Grocery Company of 
Whaleyville, and is also engaged in logging oper- 
ations. He married Margaret Wilkins of Suffolk, 
and they are the parents of two children: Nor- 
borne Tucker, III, and Judith Wilkins Poarch. 



MARION TIMOTHY PLYLER, JR., M.D.— 

By the high calibre of his professional service and 
his constructive efforts as a citizen, Dr. Marion 
Timothy Plyler, Jr., has earned the confidence and 
respect of the residents of Whaleyville and his 
county. He has centered his practice there since 
1940, and while he has conducted a general practice 
of medicine, he has devoted particular attention to 
diseases of the lungs and thoracic diagnosis. 

Dr. Plyler was born August 4, 1909, in Wash- 
ington, North Carolina, son of Dr. Marion Timothy, 
Sr., and Epie Duncan (Smith) Plyler. His father's 



degree was that of Doctor of Divinity, and he was 
a Methodist clergyman. The Plylers are of German 
descent, and their forebears who first arrived in this 
country settled in Pennsylvania. They moved to 
North Carolina, however, before the Revolution. 
The grandfather of the Whaleyville physician and 
surgeon was Robert Conrad Plyler, a planter, who 
married Sarah Kimball. Their son, Marion T. Ply- 
ler, Sr., D.D., was born September 14, 1867, in 
Iredell County, North Carolina. He received his 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts 
from Trinity College and also took a Master of 
Arts degree at the University of North Carolina. 
His degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred by- 
Duke University. He served several pastorates in 
North Carolina Conference of the Methodist 
Church, and from 1927 until his death on March 
24, 1954, he was editor of the North Carolina 
Christian Advocate. During that period he made 
his home at Durham. He was a distinguished scholar 
and the author of several books. His wife, the 
former Epie Duncan Smith, was born in Gates 
County, North Carolina, and died at Durham on 
January 28, 1956. She was a daughter of LeRoy 
Lee and Eliza (Norfleet) Smith. Her father was a 
lawyer and a planter of Gatesville, North Carolina, 
who served several terms in the State Legislature 
and was a delegate to the Democratic National 
Conventions of 1912 and 1916, wdien Woodrow 
Wilson was nominated. His wife, the former Eliza 
Norfleet, was descended from families resident in 
Virginia and North Carolina from colonial times. 

Marion T. Plyler, D.D., and Epie Duncan 
(Smith) Plyler became the parents of nine children, 
of whom two died in infancy. Dr. Marion T. Plyler, 
Jr., was fifth in order of birth. He passed his boy- 
hood in several localities in which his father held 
pastorates, and in 1926 graduated from high school 
in Raleigh, North Carolina. He then entered North 
Carolina State College and followed a one-year 
premedical course there with three years at Duke 
University, where he received his degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts in 1930. He continued his professional 
studies at Duke University Medical School, where 
he graduated in 1934 and received his degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. He then interned at the North 
Carolina Tuberculosis Sanatorium at McCain. 
North Carolina, for one year and spent a second 
year's internship at St. Vincent de Paul Hospital 
in Norfolk. He then concluded still another year as 
intern at North Carolina Sanatorium. With this 
excellent background of professional preparation, 
Dr. Plyler began his career with the North Carolina 
State Board of Health, in the Division of Indus- 
trial Hygiene and Diseases of the Chest. 

After a year in the service of the state, he began 
private practice at Nashville, North Carolina, in 



TWVa. y 



86 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



1937, and remained there until May 1940. Since that 
time he has centered his practice in Whaleyville, 
rendering skilled professional service to a large 
circle of patients, his practice extending over much 
of Nansemond County and into adjacent Gates 
County, North Carolina. 

Always uppermost in Dr. Plyler's program of 
living is his profession. He is a deep student of 
medicine, a fact which has won him wide recogni- 
tion in his specialty, diseases of the chest and 
thorax. In 1952 he completed a postgraduate course 
in this field at Duke University and is a member 
of the American College of Chest Physicians. 

On May 1, 1955, Dr. A. McRay Jones of Nor- 
folk joined Dr. Plyler in practice. Dr. Jones receiv- 
ed his degree of Doctor of Medicine from the 
Medical College of the University of Virginia in 
1952 and interned at St. Vincent de Paul Hospital 
in Norfolk. On April 1, 1956, the two physicians 
opened a modern and well-equipped clinic at 
Whaleyville. This was constructed primarily to give 
the community the latest and most efficient medical 
services, which it had previously lacked. The com- 
pletely air-conditioned building of ten rooms has 
x-ray equipment, a fully equipped laboratory, and 
full examination and pharmaceutical facilities. 

Dr. Plyler also serves on the staff of Obici Mem- 
orial Hospital at Suffolk. He is a member of the 
Tri-County Medical Society, the Virginia State 
Medical Society, the Seaboard Medical Society, 
the American Medical Association, and the Amer- 
ican Trudeau Society, which is devoted to the 
study and control of tuberculosis. His medical fra- 
ternity is Phi Chi. 

The physician has long taken an interest in civic 
affairs. While a resident of Nashville, North Caro- 
lina, he served as president of its Lions Chili in 
1939. A member of the Ruritan Club of Whaley- 
ville. he was its president in 1950. For the past eight 
years he has served on the Nansemond County 
school board. He is a member of the board of 
stewards and the board of trustees of the Metho- 
dist Church at Whaleyville. 

On July 31, 1937, Dr. Marion Timothy Plyler, 
Jr.. married Alma Odell Blanchard, a native of 
Gates County, North Carolina, and daughter of 
James P. and Pauline (Eure) Blanchard. Mrs. 
Plyler is a graduate of the University of North 
Carolina in Greensboro, from which she received 
her degree of Bachelor of Arts with the Class of 
1930. She formerly taught in the public schools of 
Greensboro, for five years, and in the schools of 
Ahoskie, North Carolina, for two years, the profes- 
sion of teaching occupying the years between her 
graduation and her marriage. She is a member of 
the Methodist Church at Whaleyville and the 
Women's Club of Suffolk, and she serves on the 



Women's Auxiliary of the Obici Memorial Hos- 
pital. 

Dr. and Mrs. Plyler are the parents of two chil- 
dren: r. Marion Timothy, III, who was born on 
April 23, 1938. He is now attending Hargrave 
Military School at Staunton, Virginia. 2. Martha 
Blanchard, who was born November 11, 1943. She 
is now a student at Whaleyville Junior High 
School. When time allows, Dr. Plyler enjoys the 
outdoor sports of fishing and hunting. 



PAUL DeYOE WOODWARD— A man whose 
tangible contributions to Norfolk and Virginia as 
a whole may be measured by the millions of dollars, 
Paul DeYoe Woodward has also made, through the 
science of architecture, a contribution to the beauty 
and progress of the city which cannot so easily be 
measured. Although still a young man by the stand- 
ard of his profession, he has won a distinctive 
place in its ranks. He has served as president of 
the Virginia Chapter of the American Institute of 
Architects, and has to his credit a long list of 
structures which he has designed either as an in- 
dividual architect, or in association with Oliver and 
Smith of Norfolk. His talents and achievements 
have won him national recognition. His work has 
been characterized by a variety of styles and domin- 
ated by no one school of architecture. Always he 
has placed utility and fitness for a specific purpose 
as first considerations, and perhaps for this very 
reason, esthetic beauty has also identified his work. 
Born on December 13, 1917, in Norfolk, he is 
a son of Edward N. and Laura (DeYoe) Woodward. 
His father was born at Williamsport, Pennsylvania, 
of English descent. His forebears had lived in 
Sullivan County. Pennsylvania, from colonial times. 
A civil engineer by profession, Edward X. Wood- 
ward came to Norfolk as a construction engineer to 
direct the building of the Lone Star Cement Cor- 
poration's plant in the southern part of the city. 
He died at Chuckatuck, Virginia, in 1949. In the 
maternal line, Laura (DeYoe) Woodward, the 
mother of Paul D. Woodward, is of French descent, 
her forebears having settled in New York State at 
an early period. She continues to maintain the 
Woodward family home at Chuckatuck. In his 
mother's family, many members in recurrent gen- 
erations have been prominent in the building and 
contracting fields. 

The second of four children born to his parents, 
Paul D. Woodward passed his boyhood in the 
village of Chuckatuck, and graduated from Suf- 
folk High School in 1935. He then entered Vir- 
ginia Polytechnic Institute at Blacksburg, and grad- 
uated there with the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Architecture in 1940. He continued his studies 




0a^3$ry£. 



ff-t^-tCAK-<^C^^_ 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



87 



at the University of Pennsylvania Post-Graduate 
School of Architecture, and prior to entering mili- 
tary service for duty in World War II, was em- 
ployed as a draftsman in the firm of Williams, 
Coile and Pipino, Architects, of Newport News. 

Commissioned a second lieutenant in the infantry 
in I'M-, lie served four years, spending most of that 
time in combat service in the European Theater of 
Operations. He was separated from the service in 
1946, with the rank of lieutenant colonel. He had 
participated in the North African campaign with 
the Second Corps Combat Team, attached to the 
Fifth Army, and later he participated in the Tuni- 
sian, Sicilian and Italian campaigns, pushing up 
the Italian peninsula with the Fifth Army troops 
to the Brenner Pass on the Italian-Austrian frontier 
and into Austria before the war's end. He was 
wounded three times, and was awarded the Purple 
Heart and two oak-leaf clusters. His other mili- 
tary decorations included the Silver Star and the 
Bronze Star with one cluster, awarded for meri- 
torious service in ground operations against the 
enemy. 

Returning to civilian life, Mr. Woodward left his 
distinguished record of military service behind him 
and took up the profession for which he had pre- 
pared himself. From 1946 to 1948 he was associated 
with the architectural firm of Joseph H. Saunder, 
of Washington, D. C. He came to Norfolk in 1948, 
and there formed his own architectural firm. Since 
entering private practice as Paul D. Woodward, 
Architect, he has received many important com- 
missions, involving millions of dollars in construc- 
tion costs. The list includes a wide variety of struc- 
tures — commercial buildings, warehouses, industrial 
plants, schools and other institutional structures, 
municipal buildings, apartments and housing pro- 
jects, churches, and residential construction 
throughout the Southeast from Virginia to Florida. 
The following are specific examples from these 
various types of building designs which have come 
from his boards. Commercial projects: Alexandria 
Motors, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia; Blair Motor 
Company, Suffolk; Smith and Welton's Specialty 
Shop, Norfolk; Shopping Center, Norfolk; Bay- 
side Shopping Center, Princess Anne; Broadway 
Department Store, Newport News; Lerner Shops, 
Inc., Norfolk. Warehouses and industrial: Comico 
Products plant; Alexandria Dairy plant; Geophysi- 
cal Instrument plant; Security Van and Storage 
warehouse; Eberwine Brothers' canning plant; Soil- 
tone fertilizer plant; office and shop building for 
the Rural Electrification Administration; United 
Foods warehouse, Jacksonville, Florida; coal load- 
ing facilities for the Chesapeake and Ohio Rail- 
road, Newport News. The churches and schools 
he has designed have included: Church of Galilee, 



Virginia Beach; Meadowbrook Elementary School, 
Norfolk; Baptist Temple Church, Alexandria, Vir- 
ginia; St. Clements Church in that city; Mount 
Zion Church, Berkley, Virginia. Institutional and 
municipal construction: Isle of Wight Courthouse; 
and the Tri-County Health Center, and Sewage 
Treatment Plant, both at Jacksonville, Florida. 
Apartments and housing: Norfolk Redevelopment 
and Housing Authority projects to a value of one 
million six hundred and seventy thousand dollars; 
Federal Housing Administration projects totaling 
two million dollars; other such projects at Nanse- 
mond totaling two hundred and sixty-five thousand 
dollars. He has planned residential construction in 
Virginia and Florida totaling four and a half mil- 
lion dollars in value. 

In addition to conducting a private practice, Mr. 
Woodward has been, since 1950, a member of the 
firm of Woodward, Oliver and Smith, who operate 
jointly an architectural organization specializing 
in military installations. In this connection, he has 
designed numerous projects, valued at many mil- 
lions of dollars. These have included the following 
structures: construction at Fort Eustis, for the 
United States Army, of twenty barracks, regimental 
headquarters, warehouses and motor pools; Naval 
Amphibious Base at Little Creek, Virginia (bar- 
racks, ammunition building, Beach Group adminis- 
tration building, operations building, signal tower, 
landing craft administration building, utility build- 
ing, incinerator plant, parking areas, athletic field, 
etc.); and construction at Naval Ammunition De- 
pot, Portsmouth, which included ammunition quali- 
ty evaluation laboratory, fire station building, truck- 
weighing station, and railroad- and waterfront 
work. 

As an architect, Mr. Woodward is a member 
and director of the Virginia Chapter, American 
Institute of Architects, and served as its president 
in 1955. He is also a member of the Society of 
American Military Engineers, the National As- 
sociation of Home Builders, and, in his own city, 
the Chamber of Commerce. He attends the Epis- 
copal Church. He retains his rank of lieutenant 
colonel in the Reserve Corps, United States Army, 
and is presently serving as commandant of the 
Norfolk Reserve Officers School. His artistic 
talents extend to landscape painting. 

On February 5. 1942, at Suffolk, Paul D. Wood- 
ward married Evelyn Eberwine of that city, daugh- 
ter of Vernon G. and Gladys (Windsor) Eberwine. 
Mr. and Mrs. Woodward have two children : Roger 
Paul and Susan Woodward. 



JOHN KENDRICK HUTTON— One of Suf- 
folk's veteran attorneys, John Kendrick Hutton 
practiced there from 1912 to 1940. Since 1940 he 



ss 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



lias been serving as judge of the Second Judicial 
Circuit, with jurisdiction comprising Nansemond 
and Southampton counties and the city of Suffolk. 

Born at Bristol on April 3, 1888, he is a son 
of Alson and Margaret (Kendrick) Hutton, and 
grandson of Robert and Steel (Edmundson) Hut- 
ton. both natives of Washington County, Virginia, 
where they spent their entire lives. Robert Hutton 
was a farmer. His son Alson was born in Wash- 
ington Count}- and graduated from Emory and 
Henry College, later receiving his degree of Mas- 
ter of Arts at the University of Virginia. He be- 
came an educator, being on the staff of Southwest 
Virginia Institute (now Virginia Intermont Col- 
lege) in various capacities. He served as super- 
intendent of schools and civil engineer at Bristol. 

In the public schools of that city. Judge Hutton 
began his education, and he also attended his 
father's school in Russell County. He later ma- 
triculated at Richmond College, taking the classical 
course there. He received his degree of Bachelor 
of Arts in 1908, while also completing one year's 
study in the law school. He took his degree of 
Bachelor of Laws in 191 1, having in the meantime 
taken one year's work in the law school of the 
University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, and having 
also taught at Hargrave Military Academy, Chat- 
ham, Virginia, during the first year of the school's 
existence. While completing his law course, he 
taught for a year in Richmond Academy. 

On January 1, 1912, he was admitted to the 
bar and established his home in Suffolk and com- 
menced practice in association with S. E. Everett, 
who was Commonwealth's Attorney for some time. 
They continued their professional connection for 
five years, and in 1917 Mr. Hutton joined another 
partner, Job R. Saunders, in forming the firm of 
Saunders and Hutton. Together they continued 
practice until 1940. 

Meantime, in 1933, John K. Hutton was elected 
by the city council to the position of city attorney 
for the City of Suffolk. He has been a loyal mem- 
ber of the Democratic party since he reached vot- 
ing age, and during the presidential campaign of 
1936, was chosen elector from the Second District. 
In the late 1930s he served a's chairman of the 
Democratic Committee in the City of Suffolk. 

In 1940, Mr. Hutton was elected by the Vir- 
ginia General Assembly to the office of judge of 
the Second Judicial Circuit, to succeed James L. 
McLemore. He has occupied the bench to the pre- 
sent time, and has distinguished himself in his 
court duties, demonstrating a very sound know- 
ledge of the law, coupled with fairmindedness and a 
thorough understanding of people. 

He is an honorary member of the Virginia State 
Bar Association and the Suffolk-Nansemond Coun- 



ty Bar Association. He has served on the boards 
of directors of the local Chamber of Commerce and 
the Suffolk School Board, and was the first presi- 
dent of the Lions Club in Suffolk. A communicant 
of the West End Baptist Church, he has served 
on its official hoard. 

Judge Hutton has been married twice. His first 
wife was Delha Miller Dudley, wdio died in Febru- 
ary 1940. Of this marriage there are two daughters: 
Margaret E. (Mrs. G. B. Hume) and Jean (Mrs. 
J. C. Lentz). In 1941 he married Margaret Trot- 
man of Suffolk, daughter of E. Pelham and Mary 
(Butler) Trotman. By this second marriage he is 
the father of two children: John K., Jr., born 
September 18, 1942, and Mary Pelham, born Febru- 
ary 20, 1950. 



WILLIAM W. McCLANAN, JR., has been 
active in the management of several of Virginia 
Beach's business organizations. One of the organ- 
izers of Radio Station WBOF, he is now treasurer 
of Virginia Beach Broadcasting Corporation and 
the Virginian Television Corporation. He has like- 
wise held office in local municipal and organi- 
zational connections. 

A native of Virginia Beach, he was born on April 
25, 1914, and is a son of William Walter, Sr., and 
Ora Virginia (Land) McClanan. Both parents were 
born in Princess Anne County and both are now 
deceased. In association with others, the elder 
William W. McClanan built and operated the first 
wholesale and retail ice plant in Virginia Beach, 
under the name of Virginia Beach Ice Company. 
It was also he who with others, was responsible for 
the construction of the Methodist Church in that 
community in 1QI3. 

The younger William W. McClanan attended 
the public schools of Virginia Beach and was a 
student at Oceana High School in Princess Anne 
County from 1928 to 1932. From 1933 to 1935 he 
attended Emory and Henry College at Emory, 
Virginia. 

Mr. McClanan was employed by the Virginia 
Beach Ice Company from June 1935, until Decem- 
ber 1936. He worked temporarily for the Town of 
Virginia Beach until May 7, 1937, at which time he 
opened a dry cleaning and laundry business known 
as the Atlantic Cleaners and Laundry Service. He 
has operated this business continuously to the pre- 
sent time, and over the years has expanded it to 
cover all services connected with the industry, in- 
cluding fur storage and rug cleaning. He fills the 
offices of secretary and treasurer of the corpo- 
ration. 

In 1945, he became a charter member of the 
board of directors of the Bank of Virginia Beach, 
and still serves in this capacity. He is currently 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



89 



president of the Norfolk-Portsmouth Dry Cleaning 
and Laundry Association. In 1954, Mr. McClanan 
participated in the organization of Radio Station 
WBOF at Virginia Beach, and lias been a member 
of its board of directors since its beginning. He 
is now its treasurer, and also treasurer of Virginian 
Television Corporation, and of the Virginia Beach 
Broadcasting Corporation. 

Since 1946, the dry cleaning and broadcasting 
executive has been a member of the Virginia Beach 
city council. He was president of the Virginia 
Beach Chamber of Commerce from 1949 to 1952, 
and president of the Virginia Beach Sports Club 
from 1950 to 1953. He was a member of the Rotary 
Club from 1939 to 1954, and has been a member 
of the Princess Anne Country Club since 1943. 
From 1952 to 1954 he was director and general 
chairman of the Virginia Beach Open Golf Tourna- 
ment. A devoted and active communicant of the 
First Presbyterian Church, he was president of the 
Edward M. Bardy Bible Class during 1948-1949. 

At Blountville Tennessee, on May 28, 1935, Wil- 
liam W. McClanan, Jr., married Elizabeth Porter- 
field of Glade Spring, Virginia, daughter of Thomas 
and Elizabeth (Miller) Porterfield. The couple are 
the parents of two children: 1. Susan Russell, born 
March 13. 1938. 2. William Walter, born February 
26, 1943. 



OTTO NORFLEET BALLANCE— Founded 
early in the nation's worst depression to meet 
major economic and social needs in Tidewater life, 
and since then guided by some of the nation's ablest 
financiers, The Southern Bank of Norfolk is today 
one of the South's strongest financial institutions 
and a major factor in the community and state it 
serves. Associated with the bank since it opened 
its doors for business on September 12, 1932, and 
for more than a year with its predecessor, the 
Southern Savings and Finance Company, Otto Nor- 
fleet Ballance is now its executive vice president, 
a member of its board of directors and a permanent 
member of its executive committee. He is also 
vice president and a director of the Bank of Nor- 
view, Bank of Norview Building, Inc., and Bank 
of Cradock and is a familiar figure in many phases 
of life in the Norfolk-Portsmouth area. Some of 
his hobbies, notably public speaking, have contribu- 
ted to his reputation. 

Born in Norfolk on February 20, 1912, Mr. Bal- 
lance is the son of the late Joseph S. and Janie N. 
Ballance. His father was a native of Currituck, 
North Carolina, his mother of Suffolk, Virginia. 
The former, associated with the Norfolk and West- 
' ern Railway for forty-eight years, was a foreman 
at Lambert's Point at the time of his death on 
May 5, 1953, at the age of eighty-three. The mother 



died on April 3, 1954, at the age of sixty-six. 

Otto N. Ballance received all his early education 
in Norfolk. In 1930, he was graduated from Maury 
High School. Later he spent two years in study, 
by correspondence, with the Blackstone Institute 
of Chicago, Illinois, majoring in law, and, subse- 
quently, specialized for his present field by study 
with the American Institute of Banking, taking 
such courses as commercial law, negotiable instru- 
ments and analyzing financial statements. 

Mr. Ballance, a World War II veteran, served 
two "hitches" with the armed forces. He enlisted 
for a three-year period in the Virginia National 
Guard in 1929 and served through 1931, attached 
to the 1 nth Field Artillery, 29th Division. In 1943, 
he took a leave of absence from the bank to serve 
in the United States Infantry. He was with the 
famed Third Army overseas, serving in England, 
France and Germany and participating in five major 
campaigns — Normandy, Northern France, Arden- 
nes, Rhineland and Central Europe. He received 
his honorable discharge after the German sur- 
render in 1945. Today he is active in Norfolk Post 
No. 3160, Veterans of Foreign Wars. 

Mr. Ballance was still with the Virginia Na- 
tional Guard when he began his financial career. 
In 1930 he went to work for the Morris Plan Bank 
in Norfolk, an institution now known as the Bank 
of Virginia. In 1931, he resigned from that post to 
accept appointment to the staff of what was then 
called the Southern Savings and Finance Com- 
pany, but which, on September 12, 1932, was 
chartered as the Southern Bank of Norfolk. He 
has been with that institution ever since and has 
made an acknowdedged contribution to its growth 
and strength and thereby the entire Tidewater area. 

It was in 1936 that Mr. Ballance took his first 
important step upward in the banking organization. 
Elected assistant cashier that year, he was later 
in the same year assigned to duty as manager of 
the bank's Ocean View Branch. 

In 1943, just before he took his military leave, 
Mr. Ballance was elected an assistant vice presi- 
dent, but he remained as manager of the Ocean 
View Branch, the post to which he returned upon 
leaving the armed forces in 1945. Four years later 
he was elected vice president and transferred to 
the bank's main office and the following year, 1950, 
was elevated to the executive vice presidency. Also 
in 1950 Mr. Ballance was elected a member of the 
bank's board of directors. 

In 1953 Mr. Ballance was named vice p^sident 
and a director of both the newly-organized Bank 
of Norview and its estate holding corporation, the 
Bank of Norview Building, Inc. Then, in 1955, 
an additional office was bestowed upon him: the 
vice presidency and membership on the board of 



90 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



directors of the newly-organized Bank of Cradock, 
Cradock- Portsmouth. 

Mr. Ballance's banking experience has covered 
virtually all phases of banking. It began with his 
service as depositor's ledger bookkeeper (individual, 
commercial and savings) and continued with w : ork 
as paying and receiving teller, note teller, collection 
teller, general ledger bookkeeping, auditing, branch 
management, personnel management, loans (per- 
sonal, commercial, consumer credit. F.H.A.-Title 
I, real estate, automobile and general collateral); 
experience in presiding over executive committee 
and board of director meetings in the absence of 
the president and chairman of the board; and. in 
addition to his present general responsibilities, as- 
signment to duties as operations and personnel of- 
ficer for the bank's main offices and six branches. 

In the community at large, Mr. Ballance has been 
a member of the Lions Club of Ocean View since 
1936 and has served that club as president two 
terms. He is now an International Counsellor of 
the International Association of Lions Clubs. Also, 
he is a member of the Norfolk Chamber of Com- 
merce, the Virginia State Chamber of Commerce, 
Norfolk Vaclit and Country Club, Virginia Club, 
American Institute of Banking and Personnel Ex- 
ecutives Club, in addition to the Veterans of 
Foreign Wars. His hobbies and recreations in- 
clude public speaking, law, audit controls, per- 
sonnel relations, golf, baseball, football, horse- 
back riding and basketball. 

Mr. Ballance married, in Norfolk on October 27, 
1933. Ruth Merritt. They have one daughter, Mary 
Sue, born in Norfolk in 1943. Their home is at 9329 
Buckman Avenue, Norfolk. 



WILLIAM JOSEPH STORY, JR.— Since 
r 949, William Joseph Story, Jr., has capably served 
as superintendent of schools at South Norfolk. 
Born in Courtland. Southampton County, on De- 
cember 28, 1909, he is a son of William Joseph 
and Lena L. (Rudisil) Story. His father, also a 
native of Southampton County, was descended 
from colonial families of Virginia. He was prom- 
inent in the affairs of Courtland, and for a time 
was cashier of a bank. He also engaged in the 
real estate business, and served for some years 
as postmaster of Courtland. He died there on 
August 1, 1952. His wife survives him and still 
lives in that city. 

One of seven children. William J. Story, Jr., 
graduated from Courtland High School in 1926. 
He attended the College of William and Mary, 
Atlantic University, and Elon College, and in 
June 1934, received his degree of Bachelor of 
Art- at Elon, which is in North Carolina. 

He began his career as educator in the capacity 



of assistant principal of Bassett High School in 
Henry County, and continued there from Sep- 
tember 1934. to June 1936. He then joined the 
faculty of Cradock High School in Norfolk Coun- 
ty, and served until June 1939, as English teacher 
and football coach. His next appointment took 
him to Granby High School in Norfolk, where 
he taught history and coached football until June 
1944. He was then named assistant principal of 
the school, and continued in that capacity, and 
as football coach, until March 1946. Thereafter 
until June 1948, Mr. Story served as head foot- 
ball coach at Davidson College in North Carolina. 

He returned to Norfolk in September 1948, and 
during the next academic year, served as assistant 
principal at Maury High School. He had mean- 
time been taking advanced courses at the College 
of William and Mary, and received his degree of 
Master of Education there in June 1949. The fol- 
lowing month he was appointed superintendent 
of schools at South Norfolk, and has held that 
position since. At the time he became superinten- 
dent, the enrollment of students in the elementary 
and high schools of South Norfolk stood at six- 
teen hundred; but the community is a rapidly 
growing one. and with the annexation of Portlock 
and Riverdale more than doubling the population. 
Mr. Story had to provide adequate school facilities 
for forty-six hundred pupils, the 1956 enrollment. 
A program formulated in 1949 by the school 
board and city leaders set afoot building projects 
commensurate with the needs of the growing city. 
In 1955, the Oscar Frommel Smith High School 
was completed, one of the most modern in the 
state. The George Washington Carver High School 
had been erected in 1953, and it too is an out- 
standing example of modern architecture and effi- 
cient design. In addition to these schools, there 
are six elementary schools and the South Norfolk 
Junior High School under Mr. Story's supervi- 
sion, and on their combined teaching staffs are 
one hundred and ninety-seven teachers. The South 
Norfolk school system is today recognized as one 
of the most modern and efficient in the state. In 
the administration of Mr. Story have arisen the 
problems stemming from the Supreme Court de- 
cision calling for the desegregation of schools, and 
he has brought clear-headed and dispassionate 
leadership into a troubled situation. 

Mr. Story is a member of the National Educa- 
tion Association and the Virginia State Education 
Association. In 1952 he was vice president of the 
Virginia Superintendents Association, and is active 
in the South Norfolk Education Association. He 
is vitally interested in youth work even apart from 
his teaching and administrative duties, and former- 
lv served on the board of directors of the Boys 
Club of Norfolk. As a former coach, he retains 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



9' 



his interest in competitive outdoor sports — foot- 
ball, basketball and baseball — and he is also fond 
of swimming. 

On June 12, 1937, in Portsmouth, William J. 
Story, Jr., married Louise Woodhouse, daughter 
of Kenneth B. and Grace (Hudgins) Woodhouse 
of that city. Mr. and Mrs. Story are the parents 
of two children: 1. William Joseph, III, born 
March 4, 1938. He is a graduate of Oscar From- 
mel Smith High School, where he was active in 
athletics and a member of the football team. 2. 
Chandler Woodhouse, born June 1, 1944. 



ROBERT DRAUGHON WILSON— Chartered 
by the Commonwealth of Virginia in July 1952, 
the Tidewater Plywood Corporation of Norfolk 
has, in an amazingly brief period, moved into a 
foremost position among firms in its field in the 
Southeastern States. Its founder, president and 
treasurer is Robert Draughon Wilson, who has 
had a long and varied career in this field and who 
is well known not only in his business and the 
construction industry in general but also in the 
civic and religious life of the Lower Tidewater. 
His is a well known name among those of the 
Quaker faith in the Old Dominion. 

Mr. Wilson was born at High Point. North 
Carolina, on March 22, 1919, the son of the late 
L. Floyd Wilson and of Mattie (Draughon) Wil- 
son of High Point. His father, who died in 1951, 
was for many years associated with the Beeson 
Hardware Company of High Point. He was a 
son of Jesse Clark Wilson, schoolmaster of the 
Providence Quaker School of Randolph County, 
North Carolina, whose ancestors were Quakers 
of Dutch and Scotch-Irish extraction who settled 
in the Tarheel State in colonial times. One of the 
three sons born to L. Floyd and Mattie (Draugh- 
on) Wilson, the president of the Tidewater Ply- 
wood Corporation spent his boyhood at High 
Point. He was graduated from the High Point 
High School in 1936 and then entered Guilford 
College in North Carolina. He was graduated from 
this institution in 1940 with the degree of Bache- 
lor of Arts in Economics. 

Mr. Wilson's first position, which was with the 
Carborundum Corporation, gave him ample op- 
portunity to test the academic preparation he had 
obtained for the business world. He spent eighteen 
months in the corporation's automotive products 
division. His next position, that of traveling rep- 
resentative for the Ohio Knife Company of Cin- 
cinnati, provided him with his initial experience 
in the plywood field and hence furthered his pre- 
paration for successful operation in that field. His 
work required that he call on veneer and plywood 
manufacturers and paper mills in the eastern part 



of the United States and Canada. When he left 
the knife company, he became a field representa- 
tive for the Associated Plywood Mills, Inc., of 
Eugene, Oregon, with headquarters in Charlotte, 
North Carolina. Later he joined the staff of the 
United States Plywood Corporation of Knoxville, 
Tennessee. He resigned from that firm to form 
his own enterprise, the Tidewater Plywood Cor- 
poration, in Norfolk. 

Since it began operations in July 1952, the firm, 
as wholesale distributors of fir plywood — both 
decorative and structural — hardwood plywood; 
hardwood plywood wall paneling ("Panawall") ; 
laminated flooring ("Parkay"); high-pressure plas- 
tic laminate ("Nevamar"); prefinished wallboard 
paneling ("Marlite") ; glue, mouldings and insula- 
tion products ("Celotex") and cedar shingles, has 
made an acknowledged contribution to its industry 
and the construction business. 

Its charter authorized a capital stock of one 
hundred thousand dollars. The original officers 
were Robert D. Wilson, president and treasurer; 
Mattie D. Wilson, vice president, and John G. 
Frazier, Jr., secretary. H. C. Warick, who serves 
as sales manager, joined the company in November 
1 952. He was formerly with The Southern States 
Iron and Roofing Company, a wholesale building 
materials firm. In December 1952. the company 
purchased the inventory of the Norfolk branch of 
the Dixie Plywood Company, whose headquarters 
are in Savannah, Georgia. This firm was consoli- 
dating its units and was joining the Norfolk unit 
with that in Atlanta. Sales and operations of the 
Tidewater Plywood Corporation were made from 
the Dixie location on Forty-sixth Street, Norfolk, 
until January 1, 1953, when Tidewater moved into 
its new building at Argonne Avenue Extension 
and the Virginia Railway right-of-way. The new 
building was occupied under lease arrangements. 
Available were two four thousand foot-square sec- 
tions, adjoining each other, to be used for office 
and warehouse. 

The ensuing months of the first year were 
spent in an aggressive effort to become established 
with the dealers and other customers in the area 
and in making contacts with supplying mills on 
the West Coast. Efforts were successful and the 
company produced a profit the first year, despite 
the usual first-year obstacles. The most significant 
fact of the first year of operation was that the 
company had in that year become the largest 
wholesaler of plywood in the Tidewater area of 
Virginia. 

Progress in sales and profits continued in the 
second year, though there were unusual market 
conditions, punctuated by price wars and by 
strikes. 



9 2 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



In the third year of operation, the company had 
become a smooth-working operation with an ex- 
perienced staff. Delivery demands were of such 
nature as to require four trucks as compared to 
the one used piece of equipment used in the first 
year. Sales continued to rise and demands on the 
company for its products were greater than could 
be housed in the quarters then in use and pre- 
viously considered plans for a new and larger 
warehouse facility were put into action. In that 
year, the authorized capital stock was increased 
from one hundred thousand to three hundred thou- 
sand dollars. 

In April 1956, as part of its expansion program, 
the company moved to its new modern warehouse 
and office on its own site of three and one-half 
acres at 3563 Argonne Avenue. It is descrihed as 
the most functional warehouse and office in the 
wdiolesale building materials field in Eastern Vir- 
ginia. It is located at an easily accessible point 
adjacent to the Virginia Railway and is centralized 
for the trading area of Norfolk. The plant is of 
concrete block and brick construction, with seven- 
teen thousand five hundred square feet of open 
warehouse storage free of posts or columns. The 
building is platform, or freight-car, level, with 
more than two hundred lineal feet of platform for 
receiving and discharging materials. Three freight 
cars can be placed alongside the building at the 
rail siding, while four trucks can be loaded out 
at the same time from the front platform. A con- 
crete ramp is provided for "drive-in" ease of trucks. 
Office and display space is attractively furnished 
in plywood paneling, thus contributing to the sales 
promotion of the company's products. Driveways 
and parking areas are large and are paved for 
complete utilization in all weather conditions. 

By gearing its local plywood promotion to na- 
tional manufacturers' advertising, furnishing sales 
aids and literature and actively participating in 
home shows in Norfolk. Mr. Wilson's company, 
as a wholesale distributor, is helping its retail out- 
lets generate sales leads in the entire Tidewater. 
Periodically the company arranges meetings with 
individual dealers and their sales organizations. 
The company also stages "Do-it- Yourself" shows 
and other aggressive promotional programs which 
reach the dealer, home owner and architect. More 
than ninety-five percent of material sold is ulti- 
mately used in residential and commercial con- 
struction. Using plywood as a nucleus around 
which a large group of allied building products 
are sold, the firm has forged to the top in its 
field in an exaraordinarily short period. 

In addition to warehousing and distributing ply- 
wood and allied products, the Tidewater Plywood 
Corporation serves as a wholesale broker for di- 



rect car-lot factory-to-customer shipments. Sales 
are made to recognized lumber and building ma- 
terials dealers, hobby shops, cabinet shops, furni- 
ture and fixture manufacturers, home prefabri- 
cation firms and to large-scale contractors estab- 
lished by volume purchase as wholesale buyers. 

As head of this large operation, Robert D. Wil- 
son has become widely known both in his field 
of business and in his community. Through his 
firm lie is a member of the Tidewater Chapter 
of the National Home Builders Association and the 
Norfolk Chamber of Commerce. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Rotary Club of Virginia Beach, the 
Princess Anne Country Club, the Cavalier Yacht 
and Country Club, the Virginia Breakfast Club 
(a division of International Christian Leadership) 
and other organizations. He is active in the Vir- 
ginia Beach Friends (Quaker) Meeting House 
and is interested in all out-door sports, particularly- 
boating, golf, swimming and football. His home 
is on Pinewood Road, Virginia Beach. 

On June 28, 1941, at Woodland, North Carolina, 
Mr. Wilson married Helen Louise Brown, daugh- 
ter of David H. and Christine ( Frazier) Brown 
of that community. Mrs. Wilson's father, a busi- 
ness man and farmer at Woodland, and her mother 
are members of the Quaker faith. Mrs. Wilson 
attended Guilford College. She is a recorded min- 
ister in the Quaker faith, and is a member of the 
Junior League in Norfolk. She and her husband 
have two children: 1. Robert Draughon, Jr., born 
on September 3, 1943. 2. Diane Clark, born on 
July 30, 1944. 



NATHANIEL BEAMAN, III— An institution 
with resources of nearly $34,000,000, the Southern 
Bank of Norfolk has, in addition to its large com- 
mercial, savings and installment loan departments, 
an extraordinarily active trust department. In 
charge of that department is Nathaniel Beaman, 
III, the bank's vice president and trust officer, who 
brings to his oflfice training and experience in the 
two fields of greatest importance in trust work — 
banking and the law. Mr. Beaman, the son and 
grandson of bankers, has also in his background, 
experience in the military service of the nation, for 
he has served twice with the United States Navy, 
and is now a lieutenant senior grade in the United 
States Coast Guard Reserve. 

Mr. Beaman was born in Norfolk on April 29, 
1925, the son of Robert Prentis and Salome (Sling- 
luff) Beaman. Also a native of Norfolk, Robert 
Prentis Beaman was associated with the National 
Bank of Commerce of Norfolk most of his work- 
ing life. He was its president for an aggregate of 
eleven years. He began his career with the bank 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



93 



immediately upon completing his education, but 
had already done some work on its staff in summer 
vacation periods. He left the bank temporarily in 
1925, at which time he was serving as vice presi- 
dent. Until 193 1 he engaged in the investment busi- 
ness. In that year he returned to the bank as its 
president. In 1940 he received the award as Nor- 
folk's "first citizen." He retired in 1942 and died 
in 1953 at the age of sixty-one. In his record was 
service as a captain of Field Artillery with the 
American Expeditionary Force in France in World 
War I. 

Nathaniel Beaman's mother, a native of Balti- 
more, Maryland, is now associated with William 
and Mary College at Norfolk. She is well known 
in social and educational circles. Nathaniel Beaman, 
grandfather of the Southern Bank's vice president, 
served as president of the National Bank of Com- 
merce for thirty years. Also, he was mayor of 
Norfolk. The present Nathaniel Beaman's great- 
uncle, the Honorable Robert R. Prentis, served as 
chief justice of the Commonwealth of Virginia 
following a career as lawyer and judge of the 
Circuit Court. 

Mr. Beaman attended Norfolk Academy, at which 
his father had also been a student, and then Staun- 
ton Military Academy, from which he was gradu- 
ated. For a time he was at Virginia Military In- 
stitute. In February 1945, he took the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts at Duke University. The following 
May he was commissioned an ensign in tin- 
United States Navy and assigned to active duty. 
He served on a destroyer in the Pacific. When re- 
leased to inactive status, he returned to Duke Uni- 
versity for legal training and in January 1949, 
was awarded the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

For a time after his admission to the Bar of 
Virginia, he practiced his profession with the law 
firm of Breeden and Hoffman in Norfolk, but he 
was recalled to active duty with the Navy. This 
time he served two years with the Office of Naval 
Intelligence, attached to the staff of the Chief of 
Naval Operations. 

Upon his return to civilian life, Mr. Beaman was 
appointed public relations officer of the trust de- 
partment of the First Citizens Bank and Trust 
Company at Raleigh, North Carolina. In 1953 he 
was promoted to associate trust officer of this 
institution. In 1954 he resigned to do postgraduate 
work in taxation at William and Mary College. 
In 1955, he was elected vice president and trust 
officer of the Southern Bank of Norfolk and has 
since devoted himself to the duties of that office. 
He is a member of the Rotary Club of Norfolk, 
the Virginia Bar Association, American Bar As- 
sociation, Norfolk Chamber of Commerce and Kap- 
pa Alpha Order and Phi Delta Phi legal fraternity. 



In politics he is allied with the Southern Demo- 
crats. He worships at St. Andrew's Episcopal 
Church of Norfolk, where he serves as a member 
of the vestry and chairman of the finance com- 
mittee. 

Mr. Beaman married Elizabeth Middleton Das- 
hiell of Norfolk on December 2$, 1950. Mrs. Bea- 
man is the daughter of David and Helen (Berkley) 
Dashiell, both also natives of that city. Mr. Das- 
hiell, who was born in 1886, retired in January 1956, 
after many years as traffic manager of the F. S. 
Royster Guano Company. Mr. and Mrs. Beaman 
have three children: 1. Nathaniel, IV, born on 
November 19, 195 1. 2. Elizabeth Johns, born on 
December 13, 1954. 3. William Prentis, born on 
August 2^, 1956. The Beaman home is at 5335 
Rolfe Avenue, Norfolk. Mr. Beaman's headquarters 
are in the main office of the Southern Bank of Nor- 
folk — at Granby and Main streets. 



JOHN HENRY POWELL— A- soon as he 

had completed his law courses, John Henry Powell 
of Suffolk became county clerk of Nansemond 
County and has capably filled that position through- 
out the twenty-seven years since that time. This 
is an office which has been identified with the 
Powell family, for his father held it before him. 
John H. Powell takes a lively interest in political 
affairs and in the programs of various organiza- 
tions, in several of which he has held office. 

The attorney and public official is a native of 
Nansemond County, where he was born on March 
22, 1908, son of Paul Jones and Sallie B. (Simons) 
Powell. His father too was a native of the Tide- 
water region, born in Isle of Wight County on 
April 11, 1876. A farmer and later a merchant, he 
lir^t held public office as commissioner of revenues 
for Nansemond County and was clerk of the 
county for two years prior to his death on Sep- 
tember 11, 1930. Sallie B. Simons, whom he mar- 
ried, was born in Nansemond Count}-. She died 
November 9, 1941. 

After attending the public schools of Myrtle 
and Windsor, John Henry Powell graduated from 
Windsor High School in 1924. He went to the 
University of Richmond for his advanced aca- 
demic and professional studies and took his degree 
of Bachelor of Laws there in 1930. He had been 
admitted to the bar of the state of Virginia on 
July 15, 1929. In the year he completed his law- 
studies, his father died, and a few days later, on 
September 20, 1930, he was appointed by Judge 
James L. McLemore to succeed Paul J. Powell 
in the office of county clerk. He has continued in 
that position since, with offices at Suffolk. 

A Democrat in his politics, he has been secre- 
tary of the Nansemond County Democratic Ex- 



94 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



ecutive Committee since March, 193 1. He is active 
in Ruritan International and was president in 1943. 
He is also a past president of the Suffolk Lions 
Club, and a member of the Executives Club and 
Purdie Lodge No. 70, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons. His fraternity is Phi Delta Theta, and 
he is also a member of the Sons of the American 
Revolution. Mr. Powell has been a devoted worker 
in hi> church, the Baptist. He formerly served as 
deacon and has also been a trustee and superin- 
tendent of its Sunday school. Fond of the out-of- 
doors, he takes a great interest in fishing. 

In Lexington on November 9, 1940, John Henry 
Powell married Eleanor McClung of that city, 
who was a daughter of Dr. Hunter and Eugenia 
Cameron (Harmon) McClung. Both of her par- 
ents are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Powell have 
four children: 1. Eleanor, born August 15, 1941. 
2. Jean Cameron, born January 19, 1944. 3. John 
Henry, Jr., born September 30, 1946. 4. Paul Hun- 
ter, born August 18, 1954. 



CHARLES CLINTON CARPENTER— Well 

known throughout the Southeastern States in the 
field of heavy construction, the Carpenter Con- 
struction Company, Engineers and Contractors, of 
Norfolk, owes its existence and success to Charles 
Clinton Carpenter and the high-caliber professional 
and technical men whom he has selected as his 
associates. Mr. Carpenter's broad experience in 
his field has enabled him to give guidance to a 
wide variety of projects in many areas. A Naval 
officer in World War I, he has since engaged 
in much Governmental work without neglecting 
opportunities to accept contracts in the strictly 
civilian field. He has held positions of leadership 
in various trade and professional organizations 
and in public and private groups devoted to the 
development of the Lower Tidewater. 

Mr. Carpenter was born in Norfolk on Novem- 
ber 11, 1893, the son of the late Charles R. and 
Rebecca Wilmot (Cox) Carpenter. His father, a 
native of Chicago, Illinois, died in Norfolk in 
1925. Early in his career he came to the Lower 
Tidewater and thereafter was active in the lumber 
industry in Norfolk. For a time he was associa- 
ted with the John L. Roper Lumber Company. 
Later, he carried on independent operations which 
extended into New York and the New England 
States. Rebecca Wilmot Cox Carpenter, born in 
Franklin, Virginia, died in 1915. 

Through part of his early life C. C. Carpenter 
lived in Massachusetts. He was graduated from 
the Summerville High School, Summerville, Mas- 
sachusetts, and then matriculated at the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology at Boston. He took 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engi- 



neering there in 1916, and immediately afterward 
began his career with the firm of Morris Knowles, 
Engineers, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He was 
assigned to the firm's Government Army Camp 
projects and was engaged on these until he en- 
listed in the United States Navy in 1918. Com- 
missioned an ensign he served as a line officer 
until the end of World War I. 

When he returned to civilian pursuits, Mr. Car- 
penter became associated with the engineering 
firm of H. P. Converse Company of Boston as 
superintendent of construction on Government 
projects in the Norfolk area and on bridge con- 
struction across the Connecticut River at Spring- 
field, Massachusetts. 

In 1922, Mr. Carpenter settled permanently in 
his native city. At that time he became a member 
of the firm of Carpenter and Petrie Inc., contrac- 
tors. In 1934 he founded the Carpenter Construc- 
tion Company, with general offices in the Na- 
tional Bank of Commerce Building. A. Carl 
Schenck. who received the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Civil Engineering from the University 
of Alabama in 1934 and whose life is reviewed 
on other pages, has been associated with the firm 
as executive engineer since 1942. 

The company covers a wide area in the heavy 
construction field and has, to some extent, special- 
ized in marine construction. Its "credits" include 
bridges, docks, piers, bulkheads, foundations, sew- 
age and water treatment plants, underwater and 
overhead utilities, extensive waterfront, harbor and 
river improvement projects in Government, indus- 
trial and municipal work and core-boring in soil 
investigation work for foundations. In World War 
II, the firm was engaged primarily in construction 
for the armed forces. 

A Registered Professional Engineer in Virginia 
and other states, Mr. Carpenter is active in the 
American Society of Professional Engineers. He 
is past president of the Hampton Roads Engi- 
neers Club and the Virginia Chapter of the As- 
sociated General Contractors of America and serv- 
ed on the boards of directors of the Virginia State 
Chamber of Commerce, the Norfolk Chamber of 
Commerce and the Hampton Roads Maritime 
Commission. His other affiliations are with the 
Norfolk Yacht and Country Club, Princess Anne 
Country Club, the Cavalier Beach Club and the 
Galilee Episcopal Church of Virginia Beach. His 
favorite sport is sailing. His home is at Bay 
Colony. Virginia Beach. 

Mr. Carpenter married Phyllis Stamp of Grand 
Rapids, Michigan, in Norfolk on May 6, 1925. 
They have two children: 1. Charles Jerould Car- 
penter, who took the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Civil Engineering at his father's Alma Mater, 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



95 



the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in 1954, 
and soon thereafter was commissioned a lieutenant 
in the Corps of Engineers, United States Army, 
and was stationed at Camp Leonard Wood, Mis- 
souri. He is now associated in his father's firm. 2. 
Sylvia Joyce Carpenter. 



A. CARL SCHENCK— As executive engineer 
of the Carpenter Construction Company, Engi- 
neers and Contractors, of Norfolk, A. Carl Schenck 
has furthered a reputation in the heavy construc- 
tion industry begun when he entered the engi- 
neering profession a quarter of a century ago. 
In his background is experience in the railroad 
world and with the Stone and Webster Engineer- 
ing Corporation, with a special record of accom- 
plishment in maritime construction work. Like 
the firm with which he has been associated since 
1942, Mr. Schenck is known throughout the South- 
eastern States. 

He was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on 
July 31, 1910, the son of the Reverend A. C. Schenck 
and the late Hattie (Ritter) Schenck. His father. 
who has served as a minister of the Lutheran 
Church all his working life, is now pastor of the 
Geigertown, Pennsylvania, Lutheran Church. 

Reared in Germantown, A. Carl Schenck received 
his early education in the public schools of that 
community. He was graduated from high school 
in 1928. Before continuing his education, Mr. 
Schenck began his career as an employee of the 
[Philadelphia and Reading Railroad Company. He 
worked in that line's construction department in 
Philadelphia until 1930, when he resigned to enter 
the University of Alabama, where he took the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 
in 1934. At the university he was elected to Tau 
Beta Pi, the honorary engineering fraternity. 

From the time he won his degree in 1934 to 
1942, Mr. Schenck was engaged as a civil engi- 
neer with the Stone and Webster Engineering 
Corporation of Boston. He worked on construc- 
tion projects in Louisiana; Chicago; Bridgeport, 
Connecticut; and Richmond and Norfolk, Virginia. 
In 1942, he resigned from Stone and Webster 
to accept appointment as executive engineer of 
the Carpenter Construction Company. Since then 
he has played a prominent part in the work of 
this outstanding construction firm. The Carpen- 
ter Construction Company was founded in 1022 
by C. Clinton Carpenter, the noted engineer who 
continues as the directing head of the firm and 
whose biography appears in another section of 
this history. The firm is extensively engaged in 
heavy construction in all the Southeastern States. 
Its completed projects include bridges, docks, 
piers, bulkheads, foundations, sewage and water 



treatment plants, underground and overhead facil- 
ities, extensive waterfront, harbor and river im- 
provement projects in Government, industrial and 
municipal work and soil investigation work. 

In the year 1956-1957, Mr. Schenck served as 
president of the Tidewater Chapter of the Vir- 
ginia Society of Professional Engineers. He is also 
past president of the Engineers Club of Hampton 
Roads. His other organizations include the Norfolk 
Chamber of Commerce, the Virginia State Cham- 
ber of Commerce, the Norfolk Yacht and Country 
Club, and the Virginia Club of Norfolk. He wor- 
ships in the First Lutheran Church of Norfolk and 
his hobbies are gardening and golf. 

On July 6, 1934. at Lake Wales, Florida, Mr. 
Schenck married Eloise Williams of that com- 
munity and daughter of Dr. William B. Williams, 
dental surgeon, and Elena (Register) Williams. 
Mr. and Mrs. Schenck have two children: 1. Nancy 
Elizabeth, born on May 31, 193d. 2. Jean Gray, 
born on July 21, 1939. 



CLARENCE EDWARD FOREHAND has 
encompassed in his varied career the occupations 
of farmer, retail grocer and soldier, as well as 
his present profession of banking. He is president 
and general manager of the South Norfolk Loan 
Corporation, which he oraganized, and he has also 
served as mayor of his city. 

Born May 13, 1913, in South Norfolk, he is :i 
son of George W. and Huldah P. (Howell) Fore- 
hand. The Forehand family originally came from the 
eastern part of North Carolina, and for a number 
of years they have been prominently identified 
with the development of South Norfolk. George 
W. Forehand was engaged in the retail grocery 
business there, and was also a farmer. He died 
in 1950. His wife, the former Huldah P. Howell, is 
now a resident of Danville, Virginia. 

The youngest of their three children, Clarence 
E. Forehand graduated from South Norfolk High 
School in 1930. He attended the College of Wil- 
liam and Mary. Norfolk Division, for two and a 
half years, majoring in agriculture. Outstanding 
as an athlete, he was a member of the varsitj 
football team, and its captain in 1934. After leav- 
ing college, he played semi-professional football 
for several years, and has retained a deep interest 
in the game. 

He began his career as a farmer in the vicinity 
of Hickory, Norfolk County, and continued to 
cultivate his acreage there until he was called 
into active service in the army in 1941. In July 
r 933. he had enlisted as a private in the Virginia 
National Guard, and had advanced to the rank 
of second lieutenant by 1940. serving in Battery 
B, 1 nth Field Artillery. When he entered active 



9 6 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



service at the time this country was preparing for 
defense in the face of the fascist threat from 
abroad, his unit became a component of the 20th 
Division. He attended Fort Sill School of Fire, 
and went overseas as an officer in the Sixth Corps 
artillery staff. He served through the North Afri- 
can campaign, the Italian campaigns including 
the Salerno and Anzio beachhead actions, and 
later the campaign in southern France, being at 
various times with the Fifth and the Seventh Arm- 
ies. He was wounded during the southern France 
invasion, and was awarded the Purple Heart, as 
well as a Bronze Star for meritorious conduct in 
ground operations against the enemy. At the close 
of the war he took over command of the 493rd 
Field Artillery Battalion in Austria. He won suc- 
cessive promotions, in the course of his combat 
experience, to the rank of lieutenant colonel, and 
was separated from active service in January 1946. 

Resuming his civilian life, Mr. Forehand again 
turned his attention to farming near Hickory, and 
he also entered the retail grocery business at 
South Norfolk. In June 1955 he organized the 
South Norfolk Loan Corporation, and has since 
served as president and general manager of this 
thriving banking concern. 

A man of many activities, his interest in good 
government led to his election as a member of 
the city council of South Norfolk in 1947, with 
the change of the city charter to the city manager 
form of government. He served two terms on the 
council, and of this total of eight years, was mayor 
for six. It was during his administration that the 
population of South Norfolk was doubled with the 
annexation of Portlock and Riverdale, and emerged 
from an overgrown town to a city with a popula- 
tion of over twenty thousand. This placed heavy 
demands upon the abilities of the mayor. Many 
reforms were instituted in all municipal depart- 
ments, and planning for the future drawn up. A 
comprehensive program of school construction was 
undertaken, giving the city two new high schools, 
which with other developments, gave South Nor- 
folk one of the best school systems in the state. 
A court house was erected, a comprehensive sys- 
tem of street improvements undertaken, and a plan- 
ning commission, housing authority and recreation 
bureau established. 

Refusing candidacy for re-election, Mr. Fore- 
hand withdrew from active public life in 1955, 
and has since devoted his time to business inter- 
ests. At the present time these are centered largely 
in his management of the South Norfolk Loan 
Corporation. 

He has retained his interest in military affairs, 
and in December 1946, took command of the reac- 
tivitated 111th Field Artillery, Virginia National 
Guard. In October 1954, he became commanding 



officer of the newly activated 615th Antiaircraft 
Artillery, also a state National Guard unit. He 
is active in veterans' affairs, and is a member of 
American Legion Post No. 108, Veterans of For- 
eign Wars Post No. 2163, and the J. Robert Gra- 
ham Post of the Disabled American Veterans. 

He is also a member of South Norfolk Lodge 
No. 339, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, the 
Auld Consistory No. 3705. Ancient and Accepted 
Scottish Rite, the Valley of Norfolk, Orient of 
Virginia, and Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is also 
a member of the National Guard Association, and 
attends the South Norfolk Baptist Church. His 
favorite form of recreation is golf. 

At South Mills, North Carolina, on August 26, 
'939. Clarence E. Forehand married Frances Gariz- 
zard, daughter of Eugene Hinton and Edna (Gard- 
ner) Garizzard, of Boykins, Virginia. Mrs. Fore- 
hand is a graduate of Sarah Leigh Hospital School 
of Nursing. She is a member of the Portlock Gar- 
den Club, the South Norfolk Woman's Club, the 
Sarah Leigh Alumnae Association and the South 
Norfolk Baptist Church. The couple are the par- 
ents of two children: 1. Clarence Edward, Jr., born 
October 8, 1942. 2. Mary Margaret, born March 
4. 1947- 



JAMES CECIL WHICHARD is vice president 
of the National Bank of Commerce of Norfolk. 
He was born September 2, 1898, at Whichard. in 
Pitt County, North Carolina, son of the late Willis 
Robert, Jr., and Ella (Keel) Whichard, and grand- 
son of Willis R. and Mary Ann Amanda ( Gurga- 
nus) Whichard of Pitt County. The town of Which- 
ard was long the ancestral home of members of this 
family. There Willis R. Whichard, Sr., conducted 
a general store and served as postmaster. He was 
also a substantial farmer, and a man of considerable 
influence in the community. Willis Robert Which- 
ard, Jr., was for many years a resident of Norfolk, 
where his death occurred on January 28, 1933- 
For a time he was associated with Whichard Broth- 
ers, Inc., a wholesale dry goods firm in that city, 
which had been established in 1900. From 1919 
until his death, he served as secretary of Khedive 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine, and of the Scottish Rite bodies at 
Norfolk. His wife, the former Ella Keel, died there 
on March 8, 1934. 

Attending the public schools of Norfolk, James 
Cecil Whichard graduated from Maury High School 
in 191 7. As a member of the Virginia National 
Guard, he entered active military service in April 
of that year, the month this country entered World 
War I. After being stationed at Norfolk until 
September, he accompanied his unit to Camp Mc- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



97 



Clellan. Anniston, Alabama, where it became a 
component of the 29th Division. He was stationed 
at Camp Green, Charlotte, North Carolina, from 
January until March 1918, then shipped overseas 
with the 29th Division, serving with the American 
Expeditionary Forces in France. He was later at- 
tached to the Provost Marshal's Office at Langres 
on military police duty, from October 1918, to 
June 1919. Several months later, he was honorably 
discharged at Camp Lee, Virginia. 

On his return to civilian life, Mr. Whichard en- 
tered the employ of the Chesapeake and Potomac 
Telephone Company in Norfolk, with which he 
continued until November 1919. He was next em- 
ployed by the Standard Oil Company of New Jersey 
in the Norfolk area, but remained with the petro- 
leum firm only until February 1920. At that time 
he began his career in the banking profession, 
joining the staff of the Trust Company of Norfolk, 
which in January 1927, was acquired by the present 
National Bank of Commerce. Having worked his 
way up through positions of increasing responsibili- 
ty in its various departments, he was promoted to 
the vice presidency in 1955. 

Mr. Whichard is a member of the Virginia Bank- 
ers Association and the American Bankers Associa- 
tion. Apart from his professional connections, he 
is a member of Ruth Lodge No. 89, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, the Scottish Rite bodies of 
Norfolk, and Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, which his 
father served long and faithfully as secretary. He 
is also a member of the Royal Order of Jesters, 
the Royal Order of Scotland, the Norfolk Yacht 
and Country Club, the Pyramid Club, the Norfolk 
Sports Club, and the Downtown Club of Norfolk. 
As an active and interested member of the business 
community, he belongs to the Chamber of Com- 
merce, and he attends the First Christian Church. 

On July 8, 1922, James Cecil Whichard married, 
as his first wife, Grace L. Moseley of Norfolk, who 
died on March 11, 1936. They were the parents 
of one daughter, Frances Moseley, born December 
9, 1923. She married Frank G. Odenheimer, III, 
and they are the parents of two children: i. James 
Whichard. ii. Carolyn Egerton. Mr. Whichard mar- 
ried, second, on July 13, 1937, Catherine G. Mc- 
Carrick. To their union three children were born: 
Catherine, on March 20, 1939; Susan Willis, born 
July 31, 1940; and Amanda Ann, born April 24, 
194^. 



CLAIBORNE R. BRYANT— Associated with 
the National Bank of Commerce of Norfolk for 
three decades, Claiborne R. Bryant is now a vice 
president of that institution and is in charge of 



its Virginia Beach Office. His name is associated 
with progressive activities in the Virgnia Beach 
community, for he served in leadership capacities 
for nearly a score of years with the Chamber of 
Commerce and for many years was an elder and 
deacon of the First Presbyterian Church. He has 
also held a variety of posts with civic groups and 
is active, as a director or officer, in a half 
dozen business enterprises, including the Virginia 
Beach Federal Savings and Loan Association, 
Bell Road Enterprises, Inc., Paragon Corpora- 
tion and Sheridan Corporation. 

Mr. Bryant was born on a farm in Isle of 
Wight County on November 12, 1908. His parents 
were John Dwight and Dora E. (Crumpler) Bry- 
ant. The father was born in Southampton County, 
the mother in Isle of Wight County. After many 
years as a farmer in Isle of Wight County, John 
D. Bryant moved to Norfolk. There, until his 
retirement, he worked for the Virginia Railroad. 
He died on August 21, 1942. His widow resides 
in Virginia Beach. 

Claiborne R. Bryant spent most of his early 
life in Norfolk. Following his attendance at the 
public schools in that city, he joined the staff 
of the National Bank of Commerce, and has since 
graduated from the American Institute of Bank- 
ing. He was attached to the head office in Nor- 
folk for nine years. On February 15, 1935, he was 
transferred to the Virginia Beach office in a cleri- 
cal capacity. On March 26, 1952, he was made vice 
president. To the duties of this office he has added 
those of a directorship in the Virginia Beach Fed- 
eral Savings and Loan Association, the secretary- 
ship of the Bell Road Enterprises, Inc., and the 
vice presidency of the Paragon and Sheridan 
corporations. 

In 1938 Mr. Bryant was elected to the board 
of directors of the Virginia Beach Chamber of 
Commerce. He served on the board until he re- 
tired in 1956. In 1952 and 1953 lie had served as 
vice president and in 1954 as president of the 
chamber. In October 1956 he was appointed to 
serve on the Advisory Council on Naval Affairs 
for activities in his immediate district. He was the 
first president of the Virginia Beach Rescue 
Squad, holding that office for two years, and 
he continues active in the organization. From 
1954 to 1956 he was vice president of the 
Virginia Beach Parent-Teacher Association. He is 
a director of the Virginia Beach Sports Club and 
also a member of the Lions Club of Virginia 
Beach, the Princess Anne Country Club, the Vir- 
ginia State Chamber of Commerce, and various 
bodies of the Masonic order, including the Vir- 
ginia Beach Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons; Norfolk Chapter No. 1, Royal Arch Ma- 



9 8 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



sons; Grice Commandery Xo. 16, Knights Tem- 
plar, and Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, Virginia Beach; 
and Princess Anne Shrine Club. He remains an 
influential member of the congregation of First 
Presbyterian Church of Virginia Beach, where for 
so long he served on the boards of deacons and 
elders. In politics Mr. Bryant is a Republican. 
Hunting and golf are his major recreations 

Mr. Bryant married Emily Morris Davis in Nor- 
folk on February 20, 1932. Mrs. Bryant is the 
daughter of Adred Judson and Laura (Morris) Da- 
vis, who were born in North Carolina. Mr. Davis 
operated a marine shipyard for the repair of hulls 
and other marine facilities. He died in 1912, his 
widow in 1944. Mrs. Bryant is a teacher in the 
Sunday school at the First Presbyterian Church 
and a member of the Linkhorn Park Garden Club. 
She and her husband have two sons: I. Judson 
Dwight, born on April 28, 1942. 2. Stuart Ray, 
born on January 16, 1944. The Bryants make their 
home at 106 Laurel Lane, Virginia Beach. 



BERNARD B. SPIGEL— A noted architect of 
Norfolk, Bernard B. Spigel has performed an im- 
portant community service through his activities 
in the design and construction of structures for 
institutional, commercial, church, school and club 
use. His talents and achievements have won na- 
tional recognition and his work has been marked 
by an immense variety, and by mastery of the prin- 
ciples of design. Structures which he planned stand 
in many localities in Virginia and eastern North 
Carolina. 

Born March 10, 1895, in Henrico County, Vir- 
ginia, Mr. Spigel is a son of Moses and Sarah 
(Betaieg) Spigel. His lather was a native of Aus- 
tria, and early in his career was engaged in tobacco 
planting in Roumania. Marrying there, he came 
to \merica shortly afterwards, and located in 
Henrico County, Virginia. There he continued as 
a tobacco planter for several years. Shortly after 
the turn of the century, he moved his family to 
Norfolk, where for a time he was a merchant on 
Church Street. He later located in Bedford, Vir- 
ginia, and at the time of his death was living in 
retirement in Norfolk. His wife died in that city 
in 1934- 

Of the nine children born to his parents, Bernard 
B. Spigel is next to the youngest. He graduated 
from Maury High School in 1912, ami continued 
his education at Carnegie Institute of Technology 
for the following four years. There he majored in 
architectural engineering. The course of study which 
he was taking normally requires live years, but 
his professional training was interrupted when this 



country entered World War I, and he enlisted in 
the United States Army Corps of Engineers. He 
served eighteen months with the American Ex- 
peditionary Forces in France, and for a time was 
attached to the 27th Division. He was honorably 
discharged in the spring of 1919 at Camp Dix, 
New Jersey, holding at that time the rank of cor- 
poral. 

Returning to Norfolk, he began his career in 
architecture with the Norfolk firm of Neff and 
Thompson, and in 1920 left to form his own firm 
under the name of Bernard B. Spigel, Architect. 

Over a period of thirty-five years, since he es- 
tablished his own firm, Mr. Spigel has been recog- 
nized as a top-flight architect. Examples of Ins 
work are to be seen in many Norfolk buildings 
and elsewhere in Virginia and eastern North Caro- 
lina. A complete listing of the major public build- 
ings whose plans have come from his boards can- 
not, of course, be included here. Outstanding among 
them are a number of school structures, com- 
pleted or in the course of construction, in Norfolk, 
Norfolk County, Princess Anne County and else- 
where in the state; health centers in Princess Anne, 
Brunswick, Greenville and Sussex counties and 
the City of Norfolk; shopping centers in Walnut 
Hills, Petersburg, Newmarket, Newport News, 
Rodman, Portsmouth, Ward's Corner, Norfolk, and 
Food Fair at Virginia Beach Boulevard, and a 
shopping center located at 31st Street between 
Pacific and Arctic avenues, Virginia Beach. He 
has designed numerous housing and redevelopment 
projects in Norfolk, Portsmouth, Richmond, Wil- 
liamsburg, and Yorktown. He has also designed a 
number of army and navy installations in Tide- 
water Virginia. He drew the plans for the First 
Baptist Church at Williamsburg, the Great Bridge 
Lutheran Church, Oceana Air Base Chapel, the 
chapel at Little Creek Naval Amphibious Base, the 
Norfolk Yacht and Country Chili, the Commis- 
sioned Officers Golf Club, the Chief Petty Officers 
Club, the Norfolk Motor Company, Inc. building, 
the Colonial Chevrolet Corporation's building, Rice 
Fashion Corner, Inc., Smith and Welton building 
and many stores and branch bank structures in 
the greater Norfolk area. Mr. Spigel has received 
national recognition in theater design, and was 
selected as one of twenty architects in the nation 
to serve on the Linked States Theater Advisory 
Board. He designed Loew's State Theater in Eliza- 
beth City, North Carolina. During World War 
II. Mr. Spigel was very active in the provision 
of housing for war workers, for United States Navy 
and all emergency housing, giving of his talents 
both day and night. 

As an architect-member of the Princess Anne 
County Planning Commission, Mr. Spigel designed 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



99 



the multi-unit administration and cultural center in 
Princess Anne. The long-range project calls for 
the erection of seven additional buildings. Archi- 
tecturally, the new buildings must conform to the 
existing colonial-type structures. When the new 
courthouse is completed, the old courthouse, por- 
tions of which were constructed in r 691 , will 
be turned over to the Virginia Historical Society, 
for the preservation of historically significant docu- 
ments and relics. 

Surrounding Mr. Spigel in his well-appointed 
offices in the Kresge Building is a staff of capable 
and experienced workers, each proficient in his 
field of specialization. The organization operates 
smoothly and efficiently. Air. Spigel is a member 
of the American Institute of Architects, the So- 
ciety of American Military Engineers, Norfolk 
Chamber of Commerce, Hampton Roads Post of 
the American Legion, and the Tidewater Anglers 
Club, Dudley's Duck Hunting Club, the American 
Camellia Society, the Urban Land Institute, Nor- 
folk Lodge No. 10 of the Knights of Pythias, and 
Ohef Sholom Temple. Mr. Spigel is listed in Who's 
Who in the South and Southwest. His favorite 
sports are duck hunting, deep-sea fishing and grow- 
ing camellias. 

By his first marriage, Mr. Spigel is the father 
of a daughter, Lucy. She is a graduate of the Col- 
lege of William and Mary, holding the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. She married Frederick Herman 
of New York, who received his degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy from Harvard University and is now 
associated with the architectural firm of Bernard 
B. Spigel. They are the parents of Bernard Lania 
and Lucy Fredericka Herman. Mr. Spigel mar- 
ried, second, Enid Wilby, a native of Kentucky. 
The family resides on the Lynnhaven River at 
London Bridge. 



HONORABLE HERMAN WHITE— An at- 

torney-at-law who has practiced at South Norfolk 
since 1933, the Honorable Herman White has also 
served continuously, since 1935, as judge of the 
civil and police court of South Norfolk. His at- 
tainments have earned him wide respect and ad- 
miration, as have his splendid personal qualities 
and his thorough devotion to the highest princi- 
ples of thinking and living. 

Born on a farm at Askewville, near Windsor, 
in Bertie County, North Carolina, on January 27, 
•895. Judge White is the only child of Kader and 
Luritha (Miller) White. Both parents were also 
natives of that county. Of Irish origin, the White 
family settled in the vicinity of the historic "Eden 
House," Bertie County, during the colonial era. 
Kader White, who died in 1900 at the age of 
thirty-one, was a cotton farmer, and a son of 



Jonathan White, planter and Confederate veteran. 
Luritha (Miller) White, lived in Bertie County 
until December 1912, then moved to South Nor- 
folk, Virginia, and died there on March -', 1936. 
Of English extraction, she was a daughter of 
Jesse Miller, a planter. 

Herman White passed his boyhood on the farm 
and attended the one-teacher country school near- 
by, know as the "Old Cobb School." As his father 
died when he was five years old, the responsibili- 
ties of farming fell early on his shoulders, and 
he managed the home acreage until he was eigh- 
teen years old. He then left the farm to enter the 
employ of the Greenleaf Johnson Lumber Com- 
pany of South Norfolk, and later completed a 
business course in the Davis-Wagner Business 
College in Norfolk. 

At Portsmouth, on July 26, 1917, he enlisted 
in Company K, 4th Virginia Infantry, which was 
later merged with Machine (lun Company, 116th 
Infantry, at Cam]) McClellan, Anniston, Alabama, 
and became a part of the 29th Division, for serv- 
ice in World War I. As a private, first class, he 
served with his unit in the American Expeditionary- 
Forces in France, and took part in the Argonne 
Forest offensive. He was honorably discharged 
at Camp Lee, Virginia, on May 27, 1919. 

Returning to South Norfolk, he entered the 
employ of the American Agricultural Company, 
and for a time sold life insurance. Meantime, he 
was preparing himself for his career in law by 
studying during the evenings, and taking courses 
at the Norfolk College Law School. In 1933 he 
graduated there with the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws. Admitted to the Virginia bar, he devoted his 
full time to his profession, establishing offices in 
South Norfolk and engaging in a general practice. 
His judgments and hi-~ integrity in private prac- 
tice brought him the opportunity for public office, 
and an appointment as judge of the trial justice 
court by the South Norfolk City Council in 1935. 
He was reappointed to successive terms by the 
Council until, with the change in the city charter, 
he was appointed to his present office of judge 
of the civil and police court by Judge Jerry G. 
Bray, Jr., of the corporation court. His term 
runs until 1959. 

With over twenty years' continuous service on 
the bench, Judge White has demonstrated a keen 
sense of justice and fairmindedness, and has won 
more than a local reputation. His duties are wide 
and varied, and under his jurisdiction come the 
civil court cases, in addition to which he presides 
over the police court, traffic court and the juvenile 
and domestic relations court. He is a member of 
the Norfolk and Portsmouth Bar Association and 
the Virginia State Bar. 

Active in veteran's affairs, he is a past com- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



mander of Post No. 472, Veterans of Foreign 
War-., and is a member of Tidewater Post No. 
2163, V. F. \Y., at South Norfolk, serving as 
quartermaster. He was formerly a member of 
the Civitan Club, and is a member of the lodges 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the Loyal Order of Moose. He attends the South 
Norfolk Baptist Church. The Judge's favorite 
sports are baseball and football, and he also is 
fond of fishing. 

Twice married, he chose as his first wife. Miss 
Edna Lee Dobbs of Gadsden, Alabama. They 
were married there on September 11, 1920, and 
she died at South Norfolk October 9, 1947. They 
were the parents of two children: 1. Betty Lou, 
who married J. Winston Blanke of Norfolk. 2. 
Edna Verrell, who married Bernice Owens of 
Rocky Mount, North Carolina, now of Crowns- 
ville, Maryland. They are the parents of one son: 
Herman Langley Owens. Judge White married, 
second, Sarah Elizabeth Snow, who was born in 
Bertie County, North Carolina, in a ceremony 
taking place at Fox Hall, Norfolk County, on 
April -, 1948. She is very active in church work 
and is an ordained minister of the Assembly of 
God Church, serving as a minister in the First 
Assembly of God Church, Suffolk. She has one 
son, A. F. Snow, who is in his twenty-first year 
with the United States Coast Guard, serving at 
the present time at Radio Washington. He and 
his wife, Ellie Snow, have one child, Cheryl Snow. 



IRVIN REID — After a long and varied career 
in banking, Irvin Reid became president of the 
Citizens Marine Jefferson Bank of Newport News 
in 1950. A native of Elizabeth City, North Caro- 
lina, he was born on April 18, 1897, son of 
Edmond Chauncey and Mary Elizabeth (Price) 
Reid. His parents too w'ere natives of North Caro- 
lina, born in Pasquotank County. His father, a 
farmer, died in May 1949, and Mrs. Reid sur- 
vived him only until October of the following 
year. 

In public and private schools of Elizabeth City, 
Irvin Reid received his early education. He la- 
ter took extension courses from the College of 
William and Mary, and, in the line with his career 
preparation, the course sponsored by the Ameri- 
can Bankers Association, at the Graduate School 
of Banking at Rutgers University in New Jersey. 
Graduated in 1939, he is now serving as a mem- 
ber of the schools thesis examiners; also recently 
appointed by American Bankers Association 
President Welman as a member of the school's 
Boa. d of Regents. 

Mr. Reid began his career, however, as a sales- 
man for the Reynolds Tobacco Company. After 
several months in this position, he entered the 



banking field by joining the staff of the Schmelz 
National Bank of Newport News. He remained 
with that organization until 1928 w'th the ex- 
ception of five months during the World War 
period, when he was in military service. From 
1928, he was in the investment banking business 
in New York City and Washington, D. C, for 
somewhat more than two years with the Na- 
tional City Company, a subsidiary of the Na- 
tional City Bank of New York City 

About 1930, he returned to Newport News, 
and there became identified with the Morris 
Plan Bank of Virginia, remaining on its staff 
until 1934. At that time he formed his con- 
nection with Citizens Marine Jefferson Bank, 
with which he has continued since. He held vari- 
ous position^ ot responsibility, including that of 
assistant cashier, before becoming president of 
the bank in 1950. He has been a member of the 
bank's board of directors since 1947. 

Mr. Reid is also a director of the Newport 
News Cemetery Corporation, and serves on the 
board of the Virginia Peninsula Association of 
Commerce, and in this organization holds the 
position of assistant treasurer. He is also a 
member of the Virginia State Chamber of Com- 
merce and the United States Chamber of Com- 
merce. He is treasurer and a member of the 
board of the Peninsular Industrial Committee. 
Mr. Reid served in 1957 as chairman of the 
United Community Fund for the Newport News- 
Warwick Hampton area. As a banker, he is a 
member of the American Bankers Association, 
and formerly served as chairman of Group No. 
1 of the Virginia Bankers Association; also a 
member of Virginia Bankers Association Board 
of Directors. Mr. Reid is a member of the 
Board of Managers of Riverside Hospital also 
it's secretary and treasurer. He is a member 
and past president of the Rotary Club, on the 
Board of Tidewater American Automobile Asso- 
ciation and has served on the board of trustees 
of Newport News Lodge No. 315, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. He is also affiliated 
with the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
being a member of Peninsula Lodge No. 278; 
the consistory of the Ancient and Accepted Scot- 
tish Rite at Newport News; and Khedive Tem- 
ple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mys- 
tic Shrine. His other memberships include the 
Propeller Club, the James River Country Club, 
tiie Golden Horseshoe Club at Williamsburg, 
Virginia, and American Legion Post No 25. His 
favorite sport is golf. Mr. Reid is an Episcopa- 
lian, attends Saint Paul's Church, and formerly 
served on its vestry. 

On January 17, 1924, at Newport News, Irvin 
Reid married a resident of that city, Miss Sarah 



LOWER TIDI AYATFR VIRGINIA 



I'ardy, who is a daughter of George T. and 
Ida Car, dine il'orter) Hardy. Both of her parents 
are deceased. 



WILSON JENKINS BROWNING— As foun- 
der and owner of W. J. Browning Company, with 
offices in the Royster Building in Norfolk, Wil- 
son Jenkins Browning heads one of the region's 
outstanding coal and shipping agencies. As a busi- 
ness and civic leader, he has been influential in the 
affairs of Norfolk and Tidewater Virginia for over 
thirty years. After varied experience in early 
youth, he entered the export coal field, in which 
he was well established when his firm was founded. 
This background, knowledge and managerial abili- 
ty have won the organization its place of leader- 
ship in the shipping and export trade. 

A native of the Faucett Community in Halifax 
County, North Carolina, Mr. Browning was born 
on June 3, 1906, son of William Levi and Carrie 
f Jenkins) Browning. His parents were both na- 
tives of North Carolina, and spent their lives in 
Halifax County, where William L. Browning de- 
voted himself to farming. Wilson J. Browning 
attended a three-teacher country school in his 
native community until he was fourteen, then left 
home to seek his career. He first took a position 
with the Roanoke Rapids Power Company as a 
laborer on the construction of the first power line 
extending from Roanoke Rapids to Weldon. After 
several months on this project, he joined the staff 
of the E. B. Glover Funeral Home in Roanoke 
Rapids. 

In January 1924, he was attracted to railroad 
work, and until September 1926, was employed by 
the Seaboard Air Line Railroad, beginning as an 
office boy and becoming a way-bill clerk. At the 
end of this period, he joined the Raleigh Smoke- 
less Fuel Company. This was his first connection 
in the field which has been his vocation. He re- 
mained with the firm until November 1927, after 
which he joined the Wyatt Coal Sales Company 
of Newport News, which firm later moved its 
offices to Norfolk. There Mr. Browning became 
manager of the firm, with his headquarters in that 
city. 

During the World War II period, his services 
were loaned to the United States War Shipping 
Administration, for which he directed statistical 
work in Norfolk, of value in the war effort. At 
the same time he continued to direct operations 
of the Wyatt Coal Sales Company. Following the 
war he devoted himself exclusively to the manage- 
ment of the firm until it was liquidated in 1054- 
He had meantime become an outstanding figure 
in export coal and shipping circles, and in 1946 
put his broad experience to good use by founding 
the W. J. Browning Company of Norfolk, of 



which he is sole owner and manager. The firm is 
active not only as coal and shipping agents, but 
as a charterers representatives and owners agency. 
The founder has built up his organization to a 
position of leadership in its field, and it has be- 
come an important factor in the economic life of 
the ports of Greater Hampton Roads and Lower 
Tidewater. 

A member of the Hampton Roads. Wholesale 
Coal Association, Mr. Browning served as its 
president in 1938- 1939. He is also a member of the 
Hampton Roads Maritime Association, and serves 
on its committee on port charges and customs. 
He is a member of the Norfolk Chamber of Com- 
merce, the Lions Club and other civic groups, and 
has been an active supporter of the Community 
Chest and the American Red Cross fund-raising 
campaigns, as well as of other programs for civic 
betterment. He is a communicant of the Ghent 
Methodist Church, and was formerly president of 
its Men's Bible class. He is a member of Owens 
Lodge No. 164, Ancient Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, and Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, in Norfolk. 

At Newport News, on December 3, 1935, Wilson 
Jenkins Browning married Mary Rose of Elberton, 
Georgia. They are the parents of two children: I. 
Mary Katharine, horn June 8, 1938. She is a stu- 
dent at Longwood College, Farmville. 2. Wilson 
Jenkins, Jr., born May 29, 1942; now attending 
Blair Junior High School in Norfolk. The family 
resides at 6000 Wcstwood Terrace, Norfolk. 



MACIE V. MARLOWE— An Air Force veteran 
of World War II, Macie V. Marlowe is now en- 
gaged in the practice of law in Norfolk. He is active 
in professional organizations and in civic and vet- 
erans affairs. His office is in Suite 417, Board of 
Trade Building. 

Born in Richmond on July 25, 1921, he is the 
son of the late Macie V. and Blanche Mae (Jones) 
Marlowe. Both bis parents were also natives of 
the capital. The attorney began his preliminary 
education in Richmond and completed it in Nor- 
folk. Graduated from Dunlap High School in 1939. 
he spent the next three years at the College of 
William and Mary. Before he had an opportunity 
to take his preprofessional degree, he withdrew 
from the college to enlist in the United States 
Arm)- Air Forces, and he served from February 
1942 to January 1947, most of that time in the 
European Theater of Operations. 

Upon his separation from the service, Mr. Mar- 
lowe resumed his education at the College of Wil- 
liam and Mary. In 1948, he was awarded the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts and in 1950 that of Bachelor 
of Laws. Upon his admission to practice as a 



102 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



member of the Virginia State Bar that year, he 
became an associate of Louis B. Fine, the Norfolk 
lawyer and business man. They were engaged in 
practice together for two and one-half years. At 
the end of that period Mr. Marlowe established an 
independent practice, with offices of his own. He 
is a member of the American, Norfolk and Ports- 
mouth and the Virginia State bar associations. He 
also belongs to the William and Mary Alumni As- 
sociation, American Legion, Norfolk Junior Cham- 
ber of Commerce, The Waltonians of the Izaak 
Walton League of America and the Norfolk Lodge 
of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 
He worships in St. Paul's Episcopal Church of Nor- 
folk and is a Democrat. Fishing and golf are his 
chief diversions. 

Mr. Marlowe married Catherine Woolard in Nor- 
folk on July 25, 1955. Mr. Marlowe is the father 
of two children: 1. Susan Elizabeth. 2. Macie V., 
Jr. Their home is at 1553 West 50th St., Norfolk. 



CYRUS WILEY GRANDY— When in 1037 the 
late Cyrus Wiley Grandy was awarded the Distin- 
guished Service Medal as the City of Norfolk's 
"first citizen," public recognition was given to a 
man who for many years had served his native 
community in numerous valuable ways. He was 
an investment banker active in a variety of other 
financial and commercial institutions of the city 
and a leader in health and welfare and cultural 
activities and in municipal beautification endeavors. 
His interests cut across every phase of life in the 
Lower Tidewater and he won widespread respect 
and affection. 

Cyrus Wiley Grandy, the third of his name, was 
born in Norfolk on December 5, 1878, the son of 
Cyrus Wiley and Mary (Selden) Grandy. He com- 
pleted his education at the University of Virginia 
in 1902, and then went to Wall Street, in New 
York City, to join the staff of Moffat and White, 
brokers. He remained there until 1905, when he 
returned to Norfolk. After that he was engaged 
in the cotton and investment banking business, as 
well as other commercial endeavors, the rest of 
his life. 

Mr. Grandy was president of C. W. Grandy and 
Sons, Inc., cotton brokers; director and vice presi- 
dent of the National Bank of Commerce of Norfolk; 
director and secretary of Lamberts Point Docks, 
Inc.; director and member of the executive com- 
mittee of Priddy and Company, fertilizer manu- 
facturers, and a director of the Mutual Assurance 
Society of Virginia. 

As a community leader, Mr. Grandy served as 
president of the Norfolk Association of Commerce; 
chairman of the Norfolk Chapter, American Na- 



tional Red Cross; vice chairman of the Norfolk 
Redevelopment and Housing Authority; president 
and a director of the Norfolk Community Chest; 
president of the Norfolk Orchestral Association; 
president of the Howard Association; member of 
the executive committees of the Navy Young 
Men's Christian Association of Norfolk and the 
Norfolk United Service Organizations; president 
of the Mary F. Ballentine Home for the Aged; di- 
rector of Jackson Field Home; president of the 
Norfolk Museum of Arts and Sciences and the Nor- 
folk Academy; and member of the Norfolk Plan- 
ning Commission. He also belonged to the Vir- 
ginia Chamber of Commerce and the Chamber of 
Commerce of the United States, the Norfolk Yacht 
and Country Club, the Princess Anne Country 
Club, the Virginia Club, the Colonnade Club of 
Charlottesville, and the St. Anthony Club of New 
York City. His death occurred on May 21, 1955. 
Cyrus Wiley Grandy married Mary Carter Ran- 
dolph in Millwood, Virginia, on February 18, 1914. 
They became the parents of three children: 1. Mary 
Carter, now Mrs. Hartwell H. Gary, Jr., of Lynch- 
burg. 2. Caroline Selden, now Mrs. S. Heth Tyler, 
Jr., of Norfolk. 3. Cyrus Wiley, IV, who was born 
in Norfolk on March 22, 1920. He is the subject 
of the biography that follows. 



CYRUS WILEY GRANDY, IV— A member of 
one of the illustrious families of the Tidewater, 
Cyrus Wiley Grandy, IV, has been maintaining 
the family's contribution to economic, civic and 
cultural development of the region, particularly in 
Norfolk and Portsmouth. He is an officer or di- 
rector in three business organizations, the Invest- 
ment Corporation of Norfolk, Portsmouth Radio 
Corporation and Mutual Assurance Society of Vir- 
ginia, and maintains his headquarters with the first 
named in the Selden Arcade, Norfolk. He is a 
director of six organizations in the health and wel- 
fare field, two of which he also serves as treasurer. 

Air. Grandy was born in Norfolk on March 22, 
1920, the son of Cyrus Wiley and Mary Carter 
(Randolph) Grandy. C. Wiley Grandy, IV, as 
he prefers to be known, was educated at the Nor- 
folk Academy, Episcopal High School of Alexandria 
and the University of Virginia. 

In 1941 he joined the staff of the National Bank 
of Commerce in Norfolk. The following year, how- 
ever, the nation having entered World War II, 
he was appointed a member of the Office of Stra- 
tegic Services and for the next three years served 
in Washington, D. C, and New York City. In 
1945, he joined the Investment Corporation of 
Norfolk, later becoming vice president and secre- 
tary. He has discharged the duties of these offices 
since then. He is assistant secretarv of the Ports- 




9lf<f^^4~ 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



10-, 



mouth Radio Corporation and a director of the 
Mutual Assurance Society of Virginia, which main- 
tains its home office in Richmond. 

fn the fields of education, health, welfare and 
cultural advancement, Mr. Grandy is a trustee and 
treasurer of the Norfolk Academy and the Nor- 
folk Museum of Arts and Sciences and a director 
of the Mary F. Ballentine Home, Norfolk Com- 
munity Fund, the Virginia Division of the American 
Cancer Society and the Norfolk General Hospital. 
He is a former vestryman at Christ and St. Luke's 
Protestant Episcopal Church of Norfolk and is a 
member of the Norfolk Yacht and Country Club, 
Princess Anne Country Club, Virginia Club, and 
the Norfolk German Club. 

On November 13, 1943, in Washington, D. C, 
Mr. Grandy married Ann Sterrett, daughter of the 
Reverend Henry Hatch Dent and Helen (Black) 
Sterrett. They are the parents of three children: 1. 
Carter Randolph, born on October 27, 1944. 2. 
Cyrus Wiley, V, born on June 12, 11)4(1. 3. Hatch 
Dent Sterrett, born on April 24, 1950. Mr. and 
Mrs. Grandy and their children make their home 
at 1421 West Princess Anne Road, Norfolk. 



WILLIAM POWHATAN HUNT— Since 1942 
William Powhatan Hunt of Hampton has been 
a member of the Atlantic States Marine Fisher- 
ies Commission and since 1954 of the Adminis- 
trative Board of the Virginia Biological Labora- 
tory. Behind these appointments, all made by 
Governors of Virginia, lies Air. Hunt's leader- 
ship in such industries as the nil, fishing, fuel, 
and marine transportation and his alert, active 
interest in progress and in the welfare not only 
of the Lower Tidewater but the entire state. 
Mr. Hunt's principal business is the Hunt Oil 
Company, a distributor for the Sinclair Refin- 
ing Company, with headquarters in Hampton. 
But he is also interested, as officer or partner, 
in the Peninsula Oil Company, Inc., Hunt Crab- 
meal Company, W. P. Hunt Company, Hunt 
Fuel Corporation, and the Pennant Oil Corpora- 
tion and, as a director, in the Merchants National 
Bank of Hampton. 

He was born in York County on January 25, 
1907, the son of Powhatan King and Mary Eliza- 
beth (Freeman) Hunt. His father, a leading fig- 
ure in the seafood wholesale and retail trade, 
was born in that county on April 20, 1874; the 
mother was born in the same county on Januarv 
15. 1879, and died in Hampton on August 20, 
1938. Powhatan K. Hunt has operated in the 
seafood business under the name of P. K. Hunt 
and Sons since 191 1. 

William P. Hunt began his education in the 
public schools of York County. When the family 



moved to Hampton he transferred to the schools 
of that community and in 1927 was graduated 
from the Hampton High School. For about one 
year after receiving his diploma, he worked for 
his father. In 1929 he and a brother, Everett 
Freeman Hunt established the Hunt Oil Com- 
pany as a partnership. In 1949 the brother died. 
Since then William P. Hunt has operated the 
business alone. This Sinclair distributorship, with 
headquarters at the foot of Ivy Home Road in 
Hampton, employs nine persons. He participated 
in the founding of the other companies, being 
secretary and treasurer of the Peninsula Oil Com- 
pany. Inc., founded in 1934; secretary and treas- 
urer of the Hunt Fuel Corporation, founded in 
1949; secretary and treasurer of the Pennant Oil 
Corporation, founded in 1053; and partner in the 
Hunt Crabmeal Company, founded in 1938, and 
W. P. Hunt Company, a marine transportation 
business, founded in 1939. He has been a direc- 
tor of the Merchants National Bank of Hampton 
for many years. 

Mr. Hunt, an active Democrat, was first ap- 
pointed as a representative from the Common- 
wealth on the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries 
Commission by Governor Darden in 1942. Each 
successive Governor has reappointed him. It was 
Governor Stanley who, in 1954, appointed him 
to the Administrative Board of the Virginia Bio- 
logical Laboratory. He is a member, also, of the 
Kiwanis Club of Hampton, the Hampton Ger- 
man Club, the James River Country Club, Hamp- 
ton Yacht Club, and Downtown Club of Rich- 
mond. With his family he worships in the First 
Presbyterian Church of Hampton. Boating and 
Fishing are his favorite sports 

On November 21. 11)31, in Hampton, Mr. Hunt 
married Elizabeth Britt Miller, a native of that 
city and daughter of Colonel Albert Sanford and 
Elizabeth Britt (Brown) Miller. Colonel Miller 
died on April 2, 195(1: his widow survives him. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hunt have two children: 1. William 
Powhatan, Jr., born on December 30, 1942. 2. 
Katherine Conover, born on April 13, 1946. 



FRED L. HART — After early experience in 
newspaper work and drug store management, Fred 
L. Hart of Suffolk came into prominence in the 
lower Tidewater's broadcasting industry as exe- 
cutive head of Station WLPM. His broad inter- 
ests include directorship of a North Carolina 
broadcasting corporation and of a local bank as 
well. 

Born at Suffolk on March 25, 1909, he is a son 
of Fred L., Sr., and Hannah (Dawson) Hart. His 
father, who built up the Nansemond Drug Com- 
pany, died in 1934, but Mrs. Hart is still living. 
Their son attended the public schools of Suffolk, 



io 4 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



graduated from high school there in 1927, and 
for two years was a student at Virginia Military 
Institute. He began his business career on the 
staff of the Norfolk newspaper, "Virginian-Pilot," 
but left two years later to succeed his father in 
the presidency of the Nansemond Drug Company 
in Suffolk. The elder Fred Hart had founded the 
firm, and headed it until his retirement. The son 
continued to manage it successfully until 1940; 
but feeling that this was not the field to which he 
cared to devote his career, sold the firm to other 
interests in that year. 

Meantime, in 1938, he had organized the Suffolk 
Broadcasting Corporation, which began operating 
its radio station with the call letters WLPM, on 
1450 kilocycles. The station has become known 
as "The Voice of the World's Largest Peanut 
Market.'' The transmitter and executive offices 
are located in the Radio Building, on Highway 
460 near Suffolk. Mr. Hart has been president of 
the corporation, and general manager of the 
station, since it was founded. 

His other business interests include director- 
ship of the Kinston Broadcasting Company of 
Kinston, North Carolina, and directorship of the 
New Hanover Broadcasting Company of Wilming- 
ton in that state, of which he is also the vice 
president. He serves on the board of the National 
Bank of Suffolk. 

In past years, Mr. Hart has served as president 
of the Retail Merchants Association, and of the 
local Chamber of Commerce. He is also a past 
president of the Rotary Club of Suffolk, and is 
a member of the lodge of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. He and his family 
attend Main Street Methodist Church. 

At Suffolk, on November 30, 1940, Fred L. 
Hart married Margaret Simpson of Elizabeth City, 
North Carolina. The couple are the parents of 
one son, Fred L., 3rd, who was born on May 
24, 1944. 



PHILIP ELLIS FRANKFORT of Franklin be- 
gan his career with the Camp Manufacturing Com- 
pany, and, with the exception of the time he 
spent in the Air Corps in World War II, he has 
been with that firm since. He advanced to the 
vice presidency and also served on the board of 
directors of that corporation until its recent merger 
with Union Bag Corporation. He has continued 
with the merged organization to date. He is inter- 
ested in civic work and serves on the local hos- 
pital board. 

Born at Franklin on May 25, 1919, he is a 
son of Harry McQuade and Elise (Ellis) Frank- 
fort. His father, who was a salesman, died in 1953, 
but his mother is still living. Attending the public 
schools of his native city, Philip E. Frankfort 



graduated from high school there in 1936. He then 
entered Virginia Polytechnic Institute, where he 
received the degree of Bachelor of Science in In- 
dustrial Engineering in 1940. 

As mentioned above, Mr. Frankfort's career be- 
gan when he joined the Camp Manufacturing 
Company at Franklin. This was on his graduation 
from Virginia Polytechnic Institute. He left not 
long afterwards to enlist for wartime service in the 
United States Army Air Corps, in which he was 
commissioned a captain. He spent ten months in 
the European theater and was separated from the 
service in October 1945. 

Rejoining Camp Manufacturing Company, he 
advanced to positions of executive responsibility 
in the years following the war and in March 1956, 
was named vice president in charge of the firm's 
lumber and woodlands division. He was also a 
director. 

A Rotarian, Mr. Frankfort is past president of 
his club, and he is a member of the board of the 
Raiford Memorial Hospital and a member of the 
Franklin Town Planning Commission. He is a 
member of Cypress Cove Country Club, and his 
favorite sport is golf. Attending the Methodist 
Church, he serves his congregation as a steward. 

In his home city of Franklin, on March 1, 
1941, Philip E. Frankfort married Otys Rae Har- 
grave, daughter of B. V. and Lillian (Slade) Har- 
grave. Both of her parents are living. Mr. and 
Mrs. Frankfort are the parents of four children: 
I. Courtney Stewart, who was born on January 
1, 1942. 2. Margaret Ellis, born July 15, 1943. 3. 
and 4. Philip Rae and Ellis McQuade, twins, who 
where born April 16, 1948. 



WALTER C. SHORTER— Returning from 
World War II service as a colonel in the army, 
Walter C. Shorter devoted himself to industrial 
pursuits at Franklin. He is now vice president 
and general sales manager of the Union Bag-Camp 
Paper Corporation, is vice president and director 
in the Stocker Manufacturing Company in New 
Jersey, and serves on the boards of several 
Chicago firms. 

A native of Callands, in Pittsylvania County, 
Virginia, he was born on August 16 1902, son of 
Charles Booker and Olivia (Wyatt) Shorter. He 
completed his secondary studies at Whitemell 
High School, Whitemell, Virginia, where he grad- 
uated in 1919. In that year he entered Virginia 
Military Institute. He was in the Reserve Officers 
Training Corps while a student there, and he 
graduated with honors in 1923 with the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering. 
During 1923.1924 he served as tactical officer at 
the Institute, and held the rank of second lieu- 
tenant in the Officers Reserve Corps. He remain- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



105 



ed in the Reserves until 1942 when he was called 
to active duty. 

Meantime, in 1924, he began his career in in- 
dustry as chief chemist with the Columbian Paper 
Company at Buena Vista, Virginia. The following 
year he left to join International Paper Company 
of New York City, as sales manager in its Spe- 
cialties Division. He continued to reside in that 
city, and to serve in that position, until he re- 
turned to active military service in 1942. 

When recalled to duty on February 24 of that 
year, he was commissioned a major in the Field 
Artillery, and for a time served as chief of the 
War Production Board and Office of Price Ad- 
ministration Liaison and Industry Service Sec- 
tions Purchases Branch of the War Department. 
He was sent to London in June as a lieutenant 
colonel in the Field Artillery, and served as liai- 
son officer between the General Purchasing Office 
of the United States and the British War Office. 
In October 1942, he became chief of the Supply 
Branch, G-4, with the Headquarters, S.O.S., of 
the United States Army at Cheltenham, England, 
holding the rank of colonel. In June 1943, he was 
named deputy general purchasing agent for the 
United States Army in the European Theater of 
Operations, being in charge of the offices in Lon- 
don and the Iberian Peninsula. From April 
through May 1945, he was stationed in the Pen- 
tagon Building in Washington. At present, Walter 
C. Shorter hoids the rank of Colonel, Field Artil- 
lery (Inactive), in the Officers Reserve Corps. 
He was awarded the Bronze Star, and the Order 
of the British Empire, Military, for his wartime 
achievements, and the Military Cross of the United 
Daughters of the Confederacy has also been con- 
ferred on him. 

While still in civilian life, Mr. Shorter served 
the War Production Board as a do!lar-a-year 
man, in liaison work, as deputy director of the 
Paper Branch, as chief of the Containers Branch, 
and finally as assistant director of Industry 
Branches supervising lumber and building mate- 
rials, plumbing and heating, medical supplies, 
technical equipment and containers branches of 
the War Production Board. He was with the 
War Production Board from 1940 to 1942. 

After returning from the war, Mr. Shorter 
settled in Franklin, where he was vice president 
and director of the Camp Manufacturing Com- 
pany, until May 7, 1958, when he became vice 
president and general sales manager of the Union 
Bag-Camp Paper Corporation of New York City. 
He is also vice president and director of Stocker 
Manufacturing Company of Netcong, New Jersey, 
and a director of the United Wallpaper Company, 
Newberry Realty Company, and Trims, Inc., all 
of Chicago, Illinois. He is president of Kraft 



Paper Manufacturers Export Association, and 
president of Kraft Paper Association, Inc., both 
of New York. 

Mr. Shorter's career has also included teach- 
ing experience. During 1923-1924 he was assistant 
professor of mathematics at Virginia Military 
Institute, and from 1926 to 1928, instructed in 
mathematics at evening sessions of the College of 
the City of New York. 

He is a member of the Commonwealth Club of 
Richmond, the Golden Horseshoe of Williams- 
burg, the Union League Club of New York, the 
American Club of London, England, Sleepy Hol- 
low Country Club of Scarborough-on-Hudson, New 
York, Cavalier Club of Virginia Beach, Cypress 
Cove Country Club of Franklin, and Stockbridge 
Golf Club of Stockbridge, Massachusetts. He is 
affiliated with the Ancient Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, and is a member of the Ruritans and the Ro- 
tary, Virginians Society of New York, V. M. I. 
Club of New York, Army Ordnance Association 
of Washington, D. C, The Quartermaster Associ- 
ation of that city, the Military Order of Foreign 
Wars, the Fellowship of U. S. -British Comrades, 
and the Salesmen's Association of the Paper In- 
dustry. He is a Baptist in his religious faith. 

At Joliet, Illinois, on May 20, 1931, Walter C. 
Shorter married Mrs. Evelyn Noska Douglass, 
daughter of George A. and Margaret (Peasley) 
Noska. He has a son, Walter Wyatt Shorter, and 
a daughter, Margaret Ann Shorter; also a step- 
son, Leon Forest Douglass, 3rd. 



HUGH LARRABEE DOUGHERTY— The 

president of The Atlantic Permanent Building and 
Loan Assiciation, Inc., of Norfolk, Hugh Larra- 
bee Dougherty is also prominent in a number of 
other business and civic connections, including the 
vice presidency of the Peoples Insurance Agency, 
and directorship of the Norfolk Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

He was born in Norfolk on February 13, 1899, 
son of William Brewer and Bessie (Gibbs) Dough- 
erty. His father, who died at Norfolk in 1942, was 
for more than half a century closely associated 
with the banking and business affairs of that city. 
In 1894 he was one of the founders of The At- 
lantic Permanent Building and Loan Association, 
and continued as an executive officer and director 
throughout the years. He was president at the 
time of his death. He was also an officer and di- 
rector of the old Peoples Bank and Trust Com- 
pany, which later merged with the Seaboard Citi- 
zens National Bank of Norfolk; and of the Peoples 
Insurance Agency, Inc., of Berkley and Norfolk. 
His wife, the former Bessie Gibbs, died in 1944. 

Hugh L. Dougherty attended the local schools of 
Norfolk and graduated from Maury High School 



io6 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



in 1917. He then took a business course at East- 
man Business College, Poughkeepsie, New York. 
In 1018 he began his career with the Peoples In- 
surance Agency, Inc., and the Peoples Bank and 
Trust Company of Norfolk. 

In 1928 he was elected to the board of directors 
of the Atlantic Permanent Building and Loan As- 
sociation, and since 1946 has been an executive 
officer, serving as executive vice president until 
his election to the presidency in 1953. As one of 
the oldest financial institutions in Norfolk, founded 
in 1894, the Association enjoyed a steady growth 
from the start, and lias met thrift and home-loan 
requirements which have increased apace with the 
growth of the Greater Norfolk area. With a his- 
tory now covering- a period of over threescore 
years, it has provided millions of dollars yearly 
in loans secured by first liens to carefully selected 
local borrowers. Over the years, the Association 
has made it possible for many thousands of fami- 
lies in the Norfolk area to become home owners, 
and has helped additional thousands to enjoy the 
rewards of thrift. As one of the strong financial 
institutions of the Greater Norfolk area, it listed 
assets of over sixteen and one-half million dol- 
lars at the close of business, November 30, 1056. 
On that date the one hundred and twenty-fourth 
consecutive dividend was paid to members. The 
Association is a member of the Federal Savings 
and Loan Insurance Corporation and the Federal 
Home Loan Bank System. Besides Mr. Dougherty, 
officers are J. H. Costenbader, chairman of the 
board; R. W. Porter, vice president; W. G. Brink- 
ley, secretary-treasurer; Jerry M. Fleming, assist- 
ant secretary; J. Paul Smith, assistant treasurer. 

In addition to the beautiful modern home office 
building at 740 Boush Street, occupied in Decem- 
ber 1954, The Atlantic Permanent Building and 
Loan Association has a branch office at 123 West 
Berkley Avenue; and a site for a future branch 
has been acquired at Little Creek Road and Tide- 
water Drive, Norfolk. 

In addition to his responsibilities as president 
of this financial firm. Hugh L. Dougherty is vice 
president of the Peoples Insurance Agency, Inc., 
of Norfolk. The Association is a member of the 
Virginia Building, Savings and Loan League, and 
he is a past director of the United States Savings 
and Loan League. 

Active in civic and community affairs, he is a 
member and past president of the Lions Club of 
Norfolk; serves on the board of directors of the 
Norfolk Chamber of Commerce; and is a member 
of the Norfolk Yacht and Country Club and the 
Princess Anne Country Club. A member of Doric 
Lodge No. 44, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
he also belongs to other Masonic bodies, including 
Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles 



of the Mystic Shrine. He is a member of the 
Ghent Methodist Church of Norfolk and is past 
chairman of the Official Board there. As a veteran 
of military service, he is a member of American 
Legion Post No. 35. 

His military record goes back to 1926, when he 
became a member of the Virginia National Guard. 
As captain in the tilth Field Artillery, a com- 
ponent of the 29th Division, he served in the 
European theater during World War II. At the 
time of his separation from the service, at Fort 
Bragg, North Carolina, in February 1946, he held 
the rank of colonel. 

On October 29, 1924, at Norfolk, Hugh L. 
Dougherty married Miss Effie Griffin, daughter 
of the late Arthur L. and Effie Ola (Taylor) Grif- 
fin of that city. Mrs. Griffin lives in Norfolk. Mr. 
and Mrs. Dougherty are the parents of two child- 
ren: I. Hugh L., Jr., born April 15, 1932. He 
graduated from Virginia Military Institute with 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering, 
and is now serving as a lieutenant in the United 
States Marine Corps overseas. 2. Effie Lee, born 
June 29, 1935. She is now a student at Eastman 
School of Music, Rochester, New York. The fami- 
ly's home is at Windsor Point, Norfolk. 



THOMAS HENRY BIRDSONG— Having 

made his way to the front rank of Suffolk indus- 
trialists, as owner of the firm which bears his 
name and an executive of other organizations, the 
late Thomas Henry Birdsong was chosen by his 
fellow citizens for the responsible posts of city 
councilman and mayor. He was a native of the 
area, and was born on August 22, 1867, son of 
Sidney A. and Georgiana (Hall) Birdsong of Isle 
of Wight County. 

Attending local schools, Mr. Birdsong complet- 
ed his formal education at private school, and 
early in his career entered the peanut industry. 
He formed his own organization, T. H. Birdsong 
and Company, of Courtland, in 191 1, and dealt 
not only in peanuts but in cotton and farm supplies. 
In addition to his major business connection, he 
was part owner of the Holland Supply Company 
of Holland, Adams Grove Supply Company of 
Adams Grove, and had other interests in Court- 
land and Emporia. He was one of the organizers, 
and an officer, of the National Bank of Suffolk. 

Mr. Birdsong's wide knowledge of the peanut 
industry, and his popularity among the ranks of his 
colleagues, led to his election as president of the 
Virginia Cooperative Peanut Association. He act- 
ed as manager of its affairs. He was well and 
favorably known by peanut growers throughout a 
wide area of Virginia and the Carolinas. 

He was first called to the service of his city of 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



107 



Suffolk by petition, when the nonpartisan city- 
manager form of government was adopted. He 
served on the city council from the time it was 
formed until two years before his death. This was 
a total of twelve years. On the death of Mayor 
J. H. Macleary, Mr. Birdsong was chosen the 
city's chief executive. He held that office for eight 
years. 

Active in the civic and organizational life of 
his city, T. H. Birdsong, Sr., was a charter mem- 
ber of the Suffolk Rotary Club, and was an earnest 
worker for the American Red Cross and other 
charitable groups. He was a communicant of Main 
Street Methodist Church. 

On April 15, 1895, Thomas Henry Birdsong 
married Miss Martha McLemore of Southampton, 
daughter of B. F. and Rose (Westbrook) McLe- 
more, and sister of Judge James L. McLemore. 
The couple became the parents of five sons: I. 
Thomas Henry, Jr., who was born on May 6, 
1898. 2. William McLemore, born on March 20, 
1900. 3. Hall Franklin, born on October 5, 1902. 
4. Harvard Russell, born April 7, 1909. 5. McLe- 
more, born on December 12, 191 1. The sons are 
subjects of ensuing separate biographical sketches. 

The death of the industrialist, municipal and civic 
leader occurred on October 5, 1933. 



THOMAS HENRY BIRDSONG, JR.— From 
the early years of his career, Thomas Henry Bird- 
song, Jr., has been active in those business inter- 
ests so long and prominently identified with his 
family — dealing in farm supplies, cotton and pea- 
nuts. He is vice president and assistant secretary- 
treasurer of T. H. Birdsong and Company, an 
executive of Birdsong Storage Company, Inc., and 
an official of other corporations. He has headed 
his city's Planning Board for a number of years. 

Born in Courtland, Virginia, on May 6, 1898, 
he is a son of Thomas Henry, Sr., and Martha 
(McLemore) Birdsong. His father, the subject of 
an accompanying sketch, headed T. H. Birdsong 
and Company, which was founded in 191 1. From 
this original firm developed the dealership in farm 
supplies, and the transactions in cotton and pea- 
nuts, in which the Birdsongs have assumed leader- 
ship. The younger T. H. Birdsong attended the 
public schools in Courtland, and graduated from 
Suffolk High School in 1916. He then entered 
Randolph-Macon College, where he completed his 
courses in 1920. Despite the fact that he had 
completed his college studies in the conventional 
four years, he had taken time out from his studies 
to serve in the LTnited States Army at the time of 
World War I. 

When he finished college in 1920, he immedi- 
ately joined the firm of T. H. Birdsong and Com- 



pany, then headed by his father. In the course of 
his connection with the organization, the company 
has operated a peanut mill at Courtland, but this 
burned down in 1938. The following year, the 
erection of the present mill at Suffolk was begun. 
Located on Factory Street, it is the center of 
the firm's processing operations at the present 
time. The processing and wholesaling of peanuts 
is carried on by the Birdsong Storage Company. 
It employs over two hundred people, and its of- 
ficers are Harvard R. Birdsong, president; H. F. 
Birdsong, vice president; W. M. Birdsong, sec- 
retary-treasurer and T. H. Birdsong, Jr., president 
and assistant secretary-treasurer. 

In addition to his executive connections with 
the Birdsong interests, T. H. Birdsong, Jr., is a 
director of the Old Dominion Peanut Corporation, 
Pretlow Peanut Company, Inc., and Albemarle 
Peanut Company, Inc. In 1950 he served as presi- 
dent of the Suffolk Chamber of Commerce. He has 
been a loyal and effective worker on the Suffolk 
Planning Board, of which he has served as chair- 
man for a number of years. 

One of Mr. Birdsong's foremost community in- 
terests is scouting. He is a member of the National 
Council of the Boy Scouts of America, and also 
serves on the board for Region No. 3, whose 
jurisdiction covers several southern states. He has 
also been a devoted worker for the Methodist 
Church, serving on its board of stewards and as 
superintendent of its Sunday school. He is a mem- 
ber of Courtland Lodge No. 85, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, in Southampton, the Lions Club, 
Princess Anne Country Club at Virginia Beach, 
and Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity. 

At Benns Church in Isle of Wight County, on 
January 3, 1923, Thomas Henry Birdsong, Jr., 
married Virginia Wishart of that county, daugh- 
ter of A. Thurston and Margaret (Chapman) 
Wishart. The couple are the parents of one son: 
Thomas H., 3rd, who was born on February 14, 
1927. He received his degree of Bachelor of Arts 
at Randolph-Macon College in 1950, and married 
Annette Jones of Suffolk. They have two children: 
i. Thomas H., 4th. ii. Virginia Corinne. 



WILLIAM McLEMORE BIRDSONG is a. 

lawyer by training, and he has brought his profes- 
sional knowledge and managerial abilities into the 
service of the Birdsong industrial interests. Primary 
among these is the Birdsong Storage Company, 
Inc., of which he is secretary and treasurer. He 
serves on the boards of a number of other corpora- 
tions, and he has also held public office. 

Born March 29, 1900, at Courtland in Southamp- 
ton County, he is a son of Thomas Henry, Sr., 
and Martha (McLemore) Birdsong. He attended 



IOc 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



the public schools of his native city and Suffolk, 
and graduated from Suffolk High School in 1918. 
For his advanced studies, he entered Randolph- 
Macon College, where he was enrolled for two 
years, and in 1920 transferred to the University 
of Virginia. He remained to receive both his Bach- 
elor of Science and his Bachelor of Law* degrees 
there, graduating in 1925. 

Prior to his college studies, Air. Birdsong had 
entered the United States Army for World War I 
service. Assigned to the infantry, he attended the 
Officers Training School at Camp Lee, Virginia. 

After he left the University of Virginia, he was 
admitted to the state bar, in 1925, and practiced 
.it Suffolk until 11143. In that year he assumed the 
office* of secretary and treasurer of Birdsong 
Storage Company. Besides his connection with 
this firm, he serves on the boards of directors 
of the American Cold Storage Corporation, Old 
Dominion Peanut Corporation, Pretlow Peanut 
Company. Inc., Albemarle Peanut Company, Inc., 
National Screen Company, Inc., and the National 
Bank of Suffolk. 

For a number of years while he was practicing 
as a lawyer, William M. Birdsong served as assist- 
ant Commonwealth attorney of Nansemond Coun- 
ty. For several years he was city attorney of Suf- 
folk. He is a member and past president of that 
city's Chamber of Commerce, a member of the 
Rotary Club, and of the Princess Anne Country 
Club of Virginia Beach and Elizabeth Manor 
Country and Golf Club at Portsmouth. A com- 
municant of the Methodist Church, he has served 
as chairman of its board of stewards. His fratern- 
ities are Phi Delta Phi, legal, and Phi Kappa 
Sigma. 

At the University Chapel in Charlottesville, on 
November 5, 1932, William McLemore Birdsong 
married Mabel Yancey Brooking, daughter of E. 
L. and Mabel (Fitzpatrick) Brooking of Chat- 
tanooga, Tenneseee. The couple are the parents 
of three sons: t. William M., Jr., born on January 
5, 1934. 2. Cabell Brooking, born September 4. 
io 35- 3 George Yancey, born November S, 1939. 



HALL FRANKLIN BIRDSONG— Identified 
with the Birdsong Storage Company at Suffolk 
for the past decade and a half. Hall Franklin 
Birdsong now holds the office of vice president 
of the corporation. He has other corporate in- 
terests as well, and has served as city councilman. 

Like the other brothers identified with the man- 
agement of this long-established family organiza- 
tion, he is a native of Courtland, and was born 
on October 5, 1902, son of Thomas H., Sr., and 
Martha ( McLemore) Birdsong. His father and 
brothers have biographical sketches in this work. 



Hall F. Birdsong completed his public school 
studies at Suffolk, graduating from high school 
there in 1921. He went to Randolph-Macon Col- 
lege for his advanced studies, and received his 
degree of Bachelor of Arts there in 1925. 

Mr. Birdsong began his career with the firm of 
T. H. Birdsong and Company in Courtland, his 
father's organization, which had been established 
in 1891. After a year with the company, he moved 
to Emporia, Virginia, and for thirteen years served 
as manager of the Adams Grove Supply Company 
there. 

In 1940 he came to Suffolk, and became a part- 
ner in the Birdsong Storage Company, a major 
operator in the peanut industry, in a city in which 
the storage, processing and distribution of this 
product has great economic significance. When 
the company was incorporated, he became vice 
president, and has since served in that capacity. 

He is also a leader in the banking field, serving 
as president of the Old Dominion Investors Trust. 
Inc., of Suffolk. He is a director of the Old Do- 
minion Peanut Corporation, the Pretlow Peanut 
Company, Inc., and the Albemarle Peanut Com- 
pany, Inc. 

A Democrat in his politics, Mr. Birdsong has 
served two terms on the Suffolk City Council, his 
tenure covering the years from 1948 to 1935. He 
was president of the local Rotary Club for the 1956- 
1957 term, and is a member of the Elizabeth Manor 
Golf and Country Club and Phi Kappa Sigma 
fraternity. He attends the Main Street Mehodist 
Church. 

On February 12, 1927, in Suffolk, Hall Franklin 
Birdsong married Elizabeth West of that city, 
daughter of Joshua C, Jr., and Katharine (Bea- 
mon) West, both of whom are deceased. Mr. and 
Mrs. Birdsong have two children: 1. Elizabeth 
West, who married G. R. Joyner, Jr. They have 
one daughter, Nancy. 2. Hall Franklin, Jr.. now 
serving as a naval air cadet at Pensacola, Florida. 



HARVARD RUSSELL BIRDSONG— The 

youngest of the brothers engaged in the manage- 
ment of the Birdsong Storage Company at Suffolk, 
Harvard Russell Birdsong is its president, an 
office he has held for nearly a decade. He also 
heads three other firms in the area, and serves on 
various boards of directors. He has filled posts 
in the service of his church and of the local school 
system. 

Born April 7, 1909, in Courtland, he is a son 
of Thomas H., Sr., and Martha (McLemore) 
Birdsong. His father's and brothers' sketches ac- 
company. After attending the public schools of 
Suffolk, and graduating from high school there 
in 1927, Harvard R. Birdsong enrolled at Ran- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



109 



doIph-Macon College, where he was a student 
for two years. He left to begin his business career 
with the Birdsong Storage Company, then a 
partnership. It was later incorporated, and lie 
became its president in 1947. He is also president 
of the American Cold Storage Corporation of Suf- 
folk, the Benthall Machine Company of Suffolk, 
and the Pretlow Peanut Company of Franklin, and 
serves on the boards of directors of each. He is 
also a director of the Albemarle Peanut Company 
of Edenton, North Carolina, and of the Farmers 
Bank of Nansemond, at Suffolk. 

From 1941 to 1943, Mr. Birdsong served on the 
Suffolk school board. Active in the Main Street 
Methodist Church, he has served on its board of 
stewards. He is a Rotarian, and a member of the 
Princess Anne Country Club of Virginia Beach. 
His favorite outdoor sport is golf. 

At the Episcopal Church in Suffolk, on October 
I2 » !93S. Harvard Russell Birdsong married Mary 
Taylor Withers of Suffolk, daughter of John 
Thornton and Phoebe (Jones) Withers. The couple 
are the parents of three daughters: r. Sally Ann, 
born April 30, 1938. 2. Susan W., born May 16, 
1941. 3. Alary Harvard, born December 7, 1946. 



HARVEY B. McLEMORE, JR.— The McLe- 
more family of Courtland has a long tradition of 
service in public office. For nearly seventy years 
its members in three generations have continu- 
ously filled the position of county clerk, and Har- 
vey B. McLemore is making this important pub- 
lic responsibility his life work. He is also identi- 
fied with banking, and with service to church and 
to community organizations. 

Born at Courtland on December 12, 1903, he 
is a son of Harvey B. and Pattie (Williams) 
McLemore. His paternal grandfather, Benjamin F. 
McLemore, was clerk of Southampton County 
from 1887 to 1909, and the elder Harvey B. McLe- 
more succeeded to this position, serving until his 
death in January 1934. He was also president of 
the old Bank of Southampton, and held a number 
of civic posts. His wife, the former Pattie Wil- 
liams, survives him. 

The younger Harvey B. McLemore attended 
public schools at Courtland and graduated from 
Suffolk High School in 1921. For two years he 
was a student at Randolph-Macon College. Early 
in his career he became associated with his father 
in the work of the Southampton County clerk's 
office, and assisted the elder man until his death 
early in 1934. At that time Harvey B. McLemore, 
Jr., succeeded him as county clerk, a position he 
has filled most capably throughout the more than 
two decades since that time. 

Mr. McLemore is a director of the Southamp- 
ton County Bank at Courtland. He is a member 



and past president of the Ruritan Club, a member 
of Cypress Cove Country Club, and attends Court- 
land Methodist Church, where he has served as 
chairman of the official board. His fraternity is 
Phi Kappa Sigma. During the 1955-1956 term, 
Mr. McLemore filled the office of president of 
the Virginia Court Clerks Association. He is a 
Democrat in his politics. His favorite outdoor 
sport is golf. 

On June 27, 1936, at West Point, Virginia, 
Harvey B. McLemore married Alyce Page Adams, 
of King William County, daughter of Charles R. 
and Julia Page (Alexander) Adams. Both of her 
parents are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. McLemore are 
the parents of two children: 1. Harvey B., 3rd, 
who was born on February 21, 1939. 2. Anita 
Page, born August 13, 1943. 



SAMUEL ELIBA POPE— A farmer by oc- 
cupation, with large acreage in Southampton 
County, Samuel Eliba Pope has served his fellow 
citizens during the past decade as a member of 
the Virginia House of Delegates. His extensive 
land holdings near Drewryville have long been 
in the family, his father, Franklin Pierce Pope, 
having begun farming there in 1885. A native of 
Southampton County, Franklin P. Pope was born 
in 1852 and died in January 1916. He married 
Hattie Drewry, also a native of Southampton 
County, and their son Samuel was born on the 
family farm on May 18, 1905. 

Receiving his early education in Southampton 
County public schools, Samuel E. Pope later en- 
tered Randolph-Macon College. There he took 
his degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1926 and after- 
wards took postgraduate courses at Virginia Poly- 
technic Institute. 

Mr. Pope taught school at Winchester for one 
year. Since 1929 he has engaged in farming on the 
acreage which has been in the family for seventy 
years. This is known as the Royal Oaks Farm. 
It originally consisted of holdings of one thousand, 
seven hundred fifty acres, of which Mr. Pope now 
owns about eight hundred fifty. There he grows 
peanuts, sweet potatoes, corn, cotton, hogs, and 
beef cattle. Besides his agricultural interests, he 
serves on the board of directors of the South- 
ampton County Bank at Courtland. 

In 1946 Air. Pope was first elected to the Vir- 
ginia House of Delegates. He has been re-elected 
five times, holding office continuously to the pre- 
sent. He is now chairman of the House Agricul- 
tural Committee. In 1952 he was a delegate to the 
Democratic National Convention. 

He is a member of the Farm Bureau, the Ru- 
ritan Club, and the lodge of Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons. In Masonry, he is a member of 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



tilt' higher bodies, including the chapter of the 
Royal Arch Masons and the commandery of the 
Knights Templar. His fraternity is Kappa Alpha. 
A communicant of the Drewryville Methodist 
Church, Mr. Pope serves on its board of stewards. 
He is fond of the out-of-doors and his favorite- 
sport is bird hunting. 

At Live Oak, Florida, on June 3, 1933, Samuel 
Eliba Pope married Sara Holt White of that place- 
She is the daughter of Jack and Addie (Phillips I 
White. Mr. and Mrs. Pope have three children: 1. 
Sara Anne, born on October 20, 1934. She mar- 
ried John A. Richman of Richmond. 2. Nancy 
Elizabeth, born September 20, 1938. She is now 
a student at Duke University, Durham, North 
Carolina. 3. Samuel, Jr., born March 12, 1941. 



thematics. 2. Marilyn Jane, born July 18, 1929. She 
is the wife of Richard Rotroff, and they have 
three children: i. Thomas, ii. Jeffry. iii. John. 



EVERETT GAIL McDOUGLE has to his 
credit a record of over three decades of loyal and 
effective service to the Chesapeake and Ohio Rail- 
roads. Most of these years have been spent in 
the North; but after a short time in Richmond, 
he went to Newport News in 1951, and in 1957 
became assistant vice president of operations in 
Huntington, West Virginia. He has taken an 
active interest in lodges and businessmen's groups. 

Born at Fulton, Indiana, on March 26, 1904, he 
received his public sjhool education in his native 
city, graduating from Fulton High School in 1922. 
On September 29 of that year, he began his long 
connection with the Chesapeake and Ohio Rail- 
road at Peru, Indiana, in the capacity of clerk. 
He held various clerical positions with the com- 
pany on its Chicago Division during the years 
which followed, his assignments taking him to 
various locations betveen Chicago and Cheviot, 
Ohio. 

In 1947, Mr. McDougle came to Virginia and 
settled in Richmond, where he held the position 
of assistant superintendent until 1951. On April 1. 
of that year he came to Newport News to assume 
duties as assistant superintendent there, and he 
was promoted to superintendent on April 1, 1954. 
On Jure 16, 1957 he was appointed as assistant 
to vice president at Richmond, Virginia, and moved 
to Huntington, West Virginia, on July 16, 1957. 

Mr. McDougle belongs to Peru, Indiana, Chap- 
ter No. 62 of the Royal Arch Masons. He is 
also a member of the Propeller Club of the United 
States. He attends the Methodist Church. His 
hobby interests are sports and gardening. 

At Peru, Indiana, on June 11, 1927, Everett 
Gail McDougle married Bernice Welch of that 
city, daughter of John and Ora (Saunders) Welch. 
The couple are the parents of two children: 1. 
Paul Everett, born May 25, 1928. He graduated 
from Purdue University in 1949 with an engineer- 
ing degree, and now holds a Master's degree in ma- 



JAMES EDWARD PARKER'S varied business 
career has included positions of responsibility in 
industry, public utilities, the insurance field, and 
petroleum production. After nearly a decade as 
part owner of an oil company, he became president 
of the First Federal Savings and Loan Associa- 
tori of Suffolk late in 1955. He remains active in 
fuel oil distribution, heading his own firm. 

He was born at Suffolk on February 5, 1907, 
son of James E. and Lula Virginia (Williams) 
Parker. Both parents were born in Nansemond 
County, and both are now deceased. James E. 
Parker was a merchant in Suffolk. The younger 
James E. Parker attended the public schools of 
that city and graduated from Suffolk High School 
in 1927. Immediate entry into industry attracted 
him more than an advancd education, and the 
successful course of his career indicates that the 
decision was, in his case, a wise one. He entered 
the employ of the Planters Nut and Chocolate Com- 
pany of Suffolk, and remained with that organ- 
ization for a year and a half. At the end of that 
time he began a sixteen-year tenure with the 
Virginia Electric Power Company in its sales 
and accounting departments. Some of the com- 
mercial activities of Mr. Parker's busy career 
overlap. He was for three years engaged in sales 
work for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Com- 
pany, and during the same period developed his 
interest in the petroleum industry. He was for 
nine years part owner of the Southern Oil Com- 
pany of Suffolk. He continues to own and operate 
Parker Fuels, distributing fuel oil to a number of 
retailers in the Suffolk area. 

In August 1955, James E. Parker began his 
duties as president and manager of the First Fed- 
eral Savings and Loan Association, of which he 
is also a director. His varied business experience 
made him an excellent choice for this post, and 
he has done a creditable job in guiding the bank 
to new standards of service. Its financial resources 
are also advancing steadily under his direction. 

Mr. Parker is a Democrat in his politics. He is 
a member and currently the vice president of the 
Kiwanis Club, and a member of the lodges of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Suffolk 
Lodge No. 685, and the Free and Accepted Masons, 
Hiram Lodge No. 340. He attends Oxford Meth- 
odist Church and serves on its board of stewards. 
Fond of the out-of-doors, he is partial to sports 
associated with the waters of this coastal region, 
particularly boating and fishing. 

In Suffolk, on September 23, 1939, James Ed- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



ward Parker married Mary Sue Rawds of that 
city, daughter of Dr. Japheth E. and Emma (Hol- 
land) Rawls. Mr. and Mrs. Parker have three 
children: i. Mary Sue, born on February 22, 1942. 
2. Ann Elizabeth, born February 22, 1946. 3. James 
Edward, 3rd, horn November 27, 1948. 



H. KENNETH PEEBLES— For the past forty 
years, H. Kenneth Peebles has been identified 
with the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry 
Dock Company, and is now vice president in 
charge of purchases. He holds other responsible 
position- as well, being on the board of a bank, 
and chairman of the Peninula Airport Commission. 

Born at Oswego, New York, on May 27, 1895, 
be is a son of Hubert J. and Annie E. (Longley) 
Peebles, both of whom are deceased. H. Kenneth 
Peebles attended the public schools of his native 
city, and graduated from Oswego High School 
in IQ12. He then entered Cornell University at 
Ithaca, New York, and there, in 1916, received his 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Mechanical En- 
gineering. 

The same year he came to Newport News, 
and began his career with the Newport News 
Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, with which 
he has remained ever since. After holding various 
positions over the next two decades, he was placed 
in charge of purchases in 1937, and was promoted 
to the vice presidency in 1956, retaining his for- 
mer responsibilities. 

Mr. Peebles is chairman of the Peninsula Air- 
port Commission and is a member of the board of 
directors of the First National Bank of Newport 
News. He is an independent in his politics, and 
attends St. John's Episcopal Church in Hampton. 
He is a member of the James River Country Club. 

On June _'3, 1927, at Newport News, H. Ken- 
neth Peebles married Dora Lee Gray of that 
city, daughter of James E. and Dora (Bunkley) 
Grav, both of whom are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. 
Peebles have no children. 



DAVID DICK'S entire business career has been 
identified with the Newport News Shipbuilding 
and Dry Dock Company, in which he now holds 
the responsible office of purchasing agent. Promi- 
nent in civic connections, he is currently chair- 
ma. ■ of the Newport News Redevelopment and 
Housing Authority, and formerly served as presi- 
dent of the Virginia Peninsula Association of Com- 
rrerce. 

Mr. Dick is a native of Newport News, where 
he was born on July 20, 1898, son of Robert 
Murray and Annie (Miller) Dick. Both of his 
parents came to this country from Scotland, 



his father having been born at Grenoek ami his 
mother at Port Glasgow. Robert M. Dick arrived 
in the United States in 1894, and from 1896 un- 
til his death in 1945, he was a shipbuilder with 
the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock 
Company. Mrs. Dick survived him by two years, 
a. id died in 19^7. Attending the public schools of 
Newport News, David Dick graduated from high 
school there in 1914. He then began his career 
with the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry 
Dock Company, but continued bis education 
through evening courses at the College of William 
and Mary. 

Beginning his connection with the company as 
an apprentice, Mr. Dick subsequently became a 
draftsman. He left at the time of World War I 
to -irve in the United States Army, being assigned 
to the 48th Infantry Regiment. His military career 
lasted one year, and he held the rank of corporal 
at the time of his honorable discharge. 

Resuming his connection with the Newport 
News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company after 
the war. he advanced from draftsman through 
various supervisory positions, and became assis- 
tant purchasing agent in 1939. He continued in 
that capacity until January 1956, when nc was 
promoted to purchasing agent of the company. 

Mr. Dick has been chairman of the Newport 
New- Redevelopment and Housing Authority 
since 1945, and is a director of the War Memorial 
Museum. A Republican in his politics, he has 
served as secretary of the Newport News electoral 
board since 1931. He is a member and past presi- 
dent of the Virginia Peninsula Association of 
Commerce, member and past president of the 
I. ions Club, and a director of the Newport News 
Boys' Club. He also holds membership in the 
Propeller Club of the Port of Newport News, 
the James River Country Club and the May 
Club. He and his family attend the Second 
Presb3"terian Church, and he serves his congre- 
gation as a trustee. His favorite pastime is garden- 
ing. 

On December 3, 1927, at Newport News, David 
Dick married Agnes Broaddus of Monticello, 
Georgia, daughter of John and Ida (Hatfield) 
Broaddus. The couple have two children: 1. Wil- 
liam Murray, who was born on October 5, 1935, 
and is now attending Hampden-Sydney College. 
2. Agnes M;.e, born October 21, 1940, now at- 
tending Mary Baldwin College. 



CLAUDE O. PRICE— With a record of forty- 
six years of loyal and effective service to the 
Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Com- 
pany, Claude O. Price now heads the company's 
traffic, scrap sales and fuel procurement operations. 
He is a native of Prince Edward County, and 



I 12 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



was born on January 16, 1894, s °n of Alexander 
Powhatan and Alice Baker (Irving) Price. Both 
of his parents were also born in Prince Edward 
County, his father in 1849 and his mother on 
December 13, 1856. His father was a farmer, and 
later became an exporter of hardwoods to the 
European market. He was one of the first grow- 
ers of bright-leaf tobacco in Virginia. His death 
occurred on February 2j, 191 1. Mrs. Price died 
in 1952, in her ninety-sixth year. 

After attending the public schools of Newport 
News, and graduating from high school there in 
1912, Claude O. Price began his connection with 
Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Com- 
pany on a permanent basis. He had worked in 
the firm's shipfitters' department the preceding 
summer, and on June 26, 1912, began his full-time 
connection in the Weight Department. He con- 
tinued to supplement his formal education through 
evening courses taken at the College of William 
and Mary, Extension Division. 

He continued to work in the Weight Depart- 
ment, where he won steady advancement, until 
May 15, 1923, and he was then transferred to 
the office of the Material Department. Since Jan- 
uary 1, 1940, he has served in the Purchasing De- 
partment as head of traffic, scrap sales and fuel 
procurement. 

During the World War II period, Mr. Price 
served capably as chairman of the Elizabeth City 
County selective service board. He is an indepen- 
dent Democrat in his politics. Active in Masonry, 
h is a member of Peninsula Lodge No. 278, of 
which he was master in 1921-1922. He was district 
deputy grand master of the Masons in 1932, and 
is a member of St. John's Chapter No. 57, Royal 
Arch Masons, and Hampton Commandery No. 
16, Knights Templar. He is also a member of 
Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine, in Norfolk. Attending Cen- 
tral Methodist Church in Hampton, he is a member 
of its official board, and has been the lay leader 
for the past seven years. Mr. Price is fond of the 
o.it-of-doors, his favorite sport being fishing. 

At Hampton, on May 30, 1923, Claude O. Price 
married Nell G. Hudgins of that city, daughter 
of Wesley Skidmore and Ruth L. (Tennis) Hud- 
gins. Her father was born in York County and 
her mother in Elizabeth City County, Virginia. 
Mr. and Mrs. Price have one son, James H., who 
was born at Hampton on November 15, 1926. 
He married Mildred Charnock of Tangier, Vir- 
ginia, and they have three sons: James H., Jr., 
Charles C, and Robert K. 



and Dry Dock Company in 1940, and is now its 
treasurer. He is also a bank official, and a mem- 
ber of a number of local organizations. 

Born in Harnett County, North Carolina, on 
May 6, 1905, he is a son of William Fulton and 
Peiinie. Eudora (Harrington) Lanier. His father, 
also a native of Harnett County, is still living 
at the age of eighty years. He has followed 
farming as his occupation. Mrs. Lanier died in 
1947. Attending the public schools of Lillington, 
North Carolina, Thomas Leon Lanier graduated 
from high school there in 1924. He then en- 
tered the University of North Carolina, where 
in 1928 he graduated with the degree of Bache- 
lor of Science in Business Administration. He 
went to New York City to begin his career in 
accounting, and there joined the firm of Has- 
kins and Sells, which he later left to become 
associated with Arthur Andersen and Company. 
His successive connections with these Certified 
Public Accounting organizations continued until 
1940. He himself passed his examination as Cer- 
tified Public Accountant in New York in 1934. 

He left that city to come to Newport News 
in 1940, and there joined the Newport News 
Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company in the ca- 
pacity of assistant to the comptroller. In 1950 
he was promoted to the post of treasurer of the 
corporation, which he has since held. 

Mr. Lanier is a director of the Warwick Na- 
tional Bank, treasurer and trustee of the Penin- 
sula United Fund, and member of the Regional 
Executive Committee of the Boy Scouts of Ameri- 
ca. He is a member of the Peninsula Execu- 
tives Club, the James River Country Club, and 
the Propellor Club of the Port of Newport News. 
He is a Presbyterian in his religious faith, and 
a Democrat in his politics. His principal hobby 
is farming. 

At Kipling, North Carolina, on September 2, 
1934, Thomas Leon Lanier married Nell John- 
son of that town, daughter of Robert T. and 
Ottie Mae (Utley) Johnson. The couple are the 
parents of three children: 1. Nancy Nell, and 2. 
Thomas Leon, Jr., twins, who were born on 
January 1, 1938. 3. Robert Fulton, born Novem- 
ber 16, 1945. 



THOMAS LEON LANIER— After beginning 
his career as a public accountant, Thomas Leon 
Lan: -r joined the Newport News Shipbuilding 



HAROLD TOWNSEND BENT'S entire career 
was spent with the Newport News Shipbuilding 
and Dry Dock Company, and he was vice presi- 
dent of the corporation, and works manager, 
until his retirement in March 1957. He has had 
sound training as well as ample experience, hold- 
ing a degree in naval architecture and marine 
engineering. 

Born at Boston, Massachusetts, on February 
4, 1892, he is a son of George Edgar and Anna 




/6*yu, -/3 *~.f* 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



113 



Belle (Townseiid) Bent. His father, who was 
born in Amherst, Nova Scotia, was a painter 
and decorator by trade. He is now deceased, as 
is Mrs. Bent, who was a native of Sangerville, 
.Maine. In his early years, Harold T. Bent at- 
tended Parker Primary School and Grant Gram- 
mar School in Watertown, Massachusetts, and 
completed his secondary studies at Mechanic 
Arts Higli School in Boston, now known as 
Boston Technical High School, where he gradu- 
ated in 1910. For his advanced training, he en- 
rolled at one of the best-known technical schools 
in the country, Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology at Cambridge, where he graduated in 
h j 1 4 with the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering. 

He came to Newport News in 1915, joining 
the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock 
Company on July 6 of that year. He served as 
staff supervisor until 1927, and was then promoted 
to assistant superintendent. He became superin- 
tendent in 1932, and served in that capacity un- 
til 1946, when he was made production manager. 
In 1954, ^' r - Bent became works manager of 
the vast shipbuilding installation at Newport News, 
and he was promoted to vice president of the 
corporation in January 1955, while continuing 
his duties as works manager. He retired March 
1. 1957- 

He is a member of the Society of Naval Archi- 
tects and Marine Engineers. He served the 
Hampton Yacht Club as commodore for five 
years, was co-founder of the Hampton Roads 
Power Squadron, a unit of the United States 
Power Squadrons, and was its commander for 
the first five years. He is also a member of the 
Propellor Club, James River Country Club, and 
Peninsula Lodge No. 278, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons. In Masonry he is a member of 
the higher bodies, including St. John's Chapter 
of the Royal Arch Masons, Hampton Comman- 
dery of the Knights Templar, and as a Thirty- 
second degree Mason, the Khedive Temple, An- 
cient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. Mr. Bent and his family attend the Epis- 
copal Church. 

A short time after he had come to Newport 
News, Harold T. Bent made the acquaintance 
of Mary Elizabeth Smith of Newport News, and 
they were married in Newport News on June 
20, 1918. She is the daughter of Levin James 
and Georgie (Plummer) Smith. The Smith family 
is an old family in Warwick Count)-. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bent have a son, Harold Townsend, Jr., 
who was born on December 6, 1920. He gradu- 
ated from Georgia School of Technology with 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in physics. 
Married to the former Miss Elsie Elizabeth Sun- 



derland of Decatur, Georgia, he is the father of 
two children: 1. Samantha Townsend Bent, born 
in 1945. 2. John Galbraith Bent, born in 1952. 



RALPH BENJAMIN DOUGLASS, chairman 
of the board of Smith-Douglass Company, Incor- 
porated, and an official of other organizations 
of the Norfolk area, was born at Alexander City, 
Alabama, on May 6, 1891, son of Frazier Michel 
and Georgia Emma (Barnes) Douglass. He com- 
pleted his education at Massey Business College 
in Birmingham, Alabama. 

Mr. Douglass left his native state in 1915, mov- 
ing to Savannah, Georgia, thence to Raleigh, North 
Carolina. Coming to Norfolk in 1919, he accepted 
appointment as vice president of the Eastern Cot- 
ton Oil Company, and held that office until 1927, 
when he joined as a partner Oscar F. Smith in 
the Smith-Douglass Company, Incorporated. He 
was vice president of this Norfolk firm until 1950, 
serving as president from 1950 until August 1957, 
at which time he became chairman of the board. 

He was chairman of the Organizing Committee 
and first chairman of the Executive Committee 
of the American Plant Food Council, Inc., Wash- 
ington, D.C. He was one of the organizers of the 
Plant Food Institute of North Carolina and Vir- 
ginia and served as one of its early presidents 
and from 1938 to 1050 was on the board of directors 
of this organization. Mr. Douglass is director of 
the Virginia Polytechnic Institute Educational 
Foundation, and of the Agricultural Foundation 
of North Carolina State College. He serves on 
the boards of the Hampton Roads Maritime Ex- 
change and the Seaboard Citizens National Bank. 

During the World War II years, Mr. Douglass 
was a consultant in the chemical division of the 
War Production Board. Active in the Virginia 
Manufacturers Association, he served on its board 
of directors and as a member of its executive 
committee. In his home city, he is a director and 
member of the executive committee of Norfolk 
General Hospital, and the Norfolk Community 
Fund. He is a member and vice president of the 
National Tax Equality Association. 

Mr. Douglass is a member of the Norfolk Yacht 
and Country Club, and the Princess Anne Coun- 
try Club of Virginia Beach, and the Common- 
wealth Club of Richmond. He is a Methodist in 
his religious faith. 

In Luverne, Alabama, on May 20, 1912, Ralph 
Benjamin Douglass married Renova Beard, daugh- 
ter of John M. Beard and Emma Beall Beard. 
Mrs. Douglass died in January 1951. The couple 
were the parents of two daughters: 1. Dorothy, 
who is the wife of Lucius J. Kellam of Belle 
Haven, Virginia. They have two children, Dorothy 



II 4 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



Douglass and Lucius James, III. 2. Rebecca, who 
married George Walter Mapp, Jr., an attorney 
in Accomac, Virginia. They have three daughters: 
i. Mildred Douglass, ii. Margaret Aydelotte. iii. 
Carolyn LeCato. Mr. Douglass makes his home 
at 1337 West Princess Anne Road, Norfolk. 



cia Ann, born July 9, 1936. 2. Richard Alan, 
born December 9, 1940. 



WALTER T. RILEE— From the early years 
of his career, Walter T. Rilee has followed the 
profession of banking. He has been with the 
Bank of Hampton Roads, in Newport News, 
since it was chartered under that name, and has 
advanced through the various executive positions 
to the presidency. 

Born in Gloucester County on September 28, 
1908, the bank executive is a son of Walter Lee 
and Clara Lee (Soles) Rilee, both natives of 
Gloucester County. Walter L. Rilee was for 
many years engaged in the insurance business 
at Newport News and is now retired. In that 
city, Walter T. Rilee received his public school 
education and graduated from high school in 
June 1927. In lieu of advanced academic studies, 
he began his practical business experience, join- 
ing the staff of the Citizens Marine Bank of 
Newport News in September 1927, in the posi- 
tion of runner. He advanced to posts of greater 
responsibility with that organization in the course 
of his connection, which continued until 1934. 

At that time, Mr. Rilee joined the Industrial 
Loan and Investment Corporation and a few 
months later, in October 1934, it received its 
charter from the state to operate as a bank. 
In 1935 trie present name, Bank of Hampton 
Roads, was adopted. At that time he held the 
position of assistant cashier, and he was later pro- 
moted to cashier and subsequently to vice presi- 
dent, while retaining his duties as cashier. After 
a period of time in the position of executive 
vice president, Mr. Rilee was named president 
of the Bank of Hampton Roads in 1954. He is 
also a member of its board of directors. 

Besides bankers' organizations, Mr. Rilee is 
a member of Peninsula Lodge No. 278, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masor.s, the chapter of the 
Royal Arch Masons, commandery of the Knights 
Templar, consistory of the Ancient and Accepted 
Scottish Rite, and the Khedive Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, 
the Lions Club, and James River Country Club. 
The family worships at Congregational Christian 
Church. Mr. Rilee's favorite outdoor pastime is 
golf. 

At Hampton on April 20, 1935, Walter T. Rilee 
married Mary Ann Moore of that city, daughter 
of Floyd W. and Sallie (Crockett) Moore. The 
■.ouple are the parents of two children: r. Patri- 



JAMES ASHBY DANIELS of Newport News 
has rounded out a quarter of a century in the 
accounting profession. He is_ now the senior part- 
ner in the firm of Daniels, Turnbull and Free- 
man, and maintains offices in the Melson Build- 
ing. He is a director of the Bank of Hampton 
Roads and is active in local organizations. 

Born in Isle of Wight County on March 18, 
1903, Mr. Daniels is a son of William A. and 
Mamie (Ashby) Daniels, both of whom were 
natives of that same county. His father, a far- 
mer, died on August 29, 1939, and his mother 
died on December 29, 1949. James A. Daniels 
began his education in the public schools of his 
native county and graduated from Carrollton 
High School in the Class of 1919. He then stud- 
ied accounting at Newport News Business Col- 
lege and was the first graduate of that insti- 
tution to pass the state board examination as 
a Certified Public Accountant. 

In 1932, shortly after he had begun his pro- 
fessional career, he became partner in the firm 
of Edmondson, Daniels and Willett, and this 
organization of public accountants continued in 
existence until July 1, 1945. Then Mr. Daniels 
practiced under his own name until January 1, 
1957. In addition to heading his firm, he car- 
ries business responsibilities as director and comp- 
troller of the Citizens Rapid Transit Company 
of Hampton and, as stated before, as a director 
of the Bank of Hampton Roads, in Newport 
News. He has been secretary of the bank's 
board since its founding. 

Mr. Daniels is a Democrat in his politics and 
is a member of the Lions Club and James River 
Country Club. He and his family attend Grace 
Methodist Church. Fond of the out-of-doors, 
the accounting executive follows the sports of 
boating, fishing, hunting, and golf. 

On February 19, 1926, at Richmond, James 
A. Daniels married Elva S. Epperson of Hali- 
fax County, daughter of John E. and Susan 
(Shelton) Epperson. The couple are the parents 
of two sons: 1. James A., Jr., born August 4, 
1928. He married Miriam White of Warwick, 
and they have two children: William Scott and 
Susan Stafford. 2. Robert S., born February 14, 
1940. 



J. CARGILL JOHNSON— Most of the years of 
J. Cargill Johnson's business career have been 
identified with the Newport News Shipbuilding 
and Drydock Company, a major industry of the 
Lower Tidewater, which is referred to elsewhere 
in these pages. For over a decade and a half, 




/£C~~<:/': 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



'5 



he has held the position of assistant personnel 
manager there, and has been active in other 
business connections and in public office as well. 

Born in Prince George County on May 31, 
1894, Mr. Johnson is a son of Julius S. and 
Mary 1 Bland) Johnson. His father, also a native 
of Prince George County, was a railroadman, 
and Mary Bland, whom he married, was born 
in Petersburg, Virginia. Both parents are now 
deceased. J. Cargill Johnson received his public 
school education in Newport News, graduating 
from its high school in 1912. He began his 
career with the Newport News Shipbuilding and 
Drydock Company in 1912. After holding various 
positions of increasing responsibility, he was pro- 
moted to assistant personnel manager in 1940, 
and in addition, he is president of the Newport 
News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company Credit 
Union. 

Mr. Johnson is a director of the Citizens Mar- 
ine and Jefferson Bank of Newport News. He 
is currently serving on the Virginia State Game 
Commission, to which he was appointed by 
Governor Stanley. He is a Democrat in his poli- 
tics, and attends the Episcopal Church. He is 
fond of hunting and golf, and is a member 
of the James River Country Club. 

At Hampton, on June 28, 1924, J. Cargill John- 
son married Frances L. Myers of Johnstown, 
Pennsylvania. The couple are the parents of two 
sons: 1. J. Cargill, Jr., who graduated from the 
College of William and Mary and is now with 
the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock 
Company. 2. Roper Bland, attending Georgia In- 
stitute of Technology. 



T. PARKER HOST— With many years in the 
shipping industry to his credit, T. Parker Host 
of Newport News now heads his own steam- 
ship agency and brokerage business. In addition 
to being chief executive of T. Parker Host, Inc., 
he is also president of the Tidewater Stevedor- 
ing Corporation. He has served as mayor of his 
city, and is a veteran of Air Corps service in 
World Wars I and II. 

Born at Newport News on October 2, 1892, 
he is a son of Lewis Clinton and Abbie (Jones) 
Host. His father, a native of Hampton, Virginia, 
spent most of the years of his active career with 
the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad, and died in 
February 1935. Airs. Host is still living. She is 
a native of Portsmouth. T. Parker Host attended 
the public schools of his native city and the 
University of Virginia. 

Prior to 1923, he worked for various shipping 
firms, and with ample experience and confidence 
in his own abilities, he left the employ of others 
to start his own steamship agency and brokerage 



business in that year. The firm which he foun- 
ded has enjoyed a steady growth, and in 195 1 
was incorporated as T. Parker Host, Inc., with 
Mr. Host as its president. Officers are in the 
Chesapeake and Ohio Terminal Building in New- 
port News, and a branch is operated in the 
Western Union Building in Norfolk. Mr. Host 
has been president of the Tidewater Stevedor- 
ing Corporation since 1925; and through his con- 
trol of these two interrelated organizations, is 
an influential figure in the industrial life of Lower 
Tidewater. 

A veteran of both World War I and World 
War II, Mr. Host served in the Air Corps in 
both conflicts. In the first war, he held the rank 
of second lieutenant, and spent over two years 
as a pilot, serving in France and the Army of 
Occupation in Germany. At the outbreak of World 
War II, he returned to the Air Corps as a major, 
later attaining the rank of lieutenant colonel. 
After a service of three and one-half years in 
the United States and North Africa he returned 
to Newport News and his shipping business. 

A Democrat in his politics, Mr. Host became 
vice mayor of Newport News in 1936 and serv- 
ed until 1940. He then became mayor, and most 
capably discharged the duties of that office until 
February 1942, when he resigned to enter the 
Air Corps. At the present time, he is serving 
as vice consul of the Norwegian government in 
his city, and in recognition of his services, has 
been honored with the title of Knight of the 
Order of St. Olaf, conferred by the King of 
Norway. 

Mr. Host is a member of the Virginia Club 
of Norfolk and the James River Country Club. 
His fraternity is Sigma Alpha Epsilon and he 
is a member of the lodge of the Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons. He and his family attend 
the Presbyterian Church. Boating is his favorite 
outdoor sport, and among the quieter pastimes 
he enjoys bridge. 

On July 6, 1921, in Newport News, T. Parker 
Host married Jane Hamilton Shearer of Hampton, 
daughter of James and Margaret (Findlay) Shea- 
rer. Mr. and Mrs. Host have two children: 1. 
Jane Hamilton, now Mrs. T. V. Moore, Jr., 
of Miami, Florida, and the mother of two sons: 
i. Parker Host Moore, ii. John Hamilton Moore. 
2. T. Parker, Jr., who is associated with his 
father in business. He married Janet Peebles 
and they have two children: i. T. Parker, III. 
ii. David Findlay. 



ABNER S. POPE — In the course of his career 
in banking, which dates back five decades. Abner 
S. Pope advanced to the presidency of the Sea- 
board Citizens' National Bank. He held that office 



n6 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



for twenty-four years, and is now chairman of the 
board. 

A native of Newsoms, Virginia, Mr. Pope was 
born on March I, 1883, son of Joseph B. and Jennie 
B. (Prince) Pope. He received his education in 
preparatory schools in Richmond, graduating 
from Richmond College with the degree of Bach- 
elor of Science in 1903, and came to Norfolk in 
1909. In 1912, at the age of twenty-nine, he became 
cashier of the Seaboard National Bank. He re- 
mained in that position until 1919, and thereafter 
until 1922, served as president of the Savings 
Bank of Norfolk. Mr. Pope then returned to the 
Seaboard National Bank, as vice president, and he 
also served on its board of directors from 1922. In 
1932 he was elected to the presidency of the bank, 
and served until January 1956, when he was 
elected chairman of the board. 

Interested in community welfare causes, Mr. 
Pope is a member of the board of the Norfolk 
General Hospital, and he also serves on the board 
of the Tidewater Hospital Association. He is a 
member of the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce, 
the Norfolk Country Club and the Princess Anne 
Country Club. 

On April 10 1907, Abner S. Pope married Rosa 
Virginia Smith of Richmond, Virginia, daughter of 
Dr. W. R. L. and Nannie (Bowman) Smith. Mr. 
and Mrs. Pope are the parents of the following 
children: 1. Margaret, now Mrs. E. L. Woodard 
of Hickory. North Carolina. 2. Nancy, who is 
the wife of Haley F. Shuford. They too live in 
Hickory, North Carolina. 3. Virginia, who mar- 
ried Charles F. Burroughs, Jr. Their home is in 
Norfolk. Mr. and Mrs. Pope have ten gr.-ind- 
children. Their own home is at 1515 Hampton 
Boulevard, Norfolk. 



HENRY LEWIS BOONE— The president of 
W. A. Hall and Company, Inc., of Norfolk, Henry 
Lewis Boone has been continuously identified with 
the general building field in that city since 1927. 
A thorough craftsman in all phases of construc- 
tion, he has played a vital part in the upbuilding 
of Norfolk during the period of its greatest growth. 

He was born on December 29, 1900, in Northamp- 
ton County, North Carolina, son of Joseph Colon- 
na and Jossie (Pulley) Boone, both natives of 
that county, which has been the seat of the Boone 
family for several generations. His father, a far- 
mer, died July 2, 1950. He was a son of Henry 
Thomas Boone, farmer and veteran of service in 
the Confederate States Army, who had spent his 
life in Northampton County. Jossie (Pulley) 
Boone continues to maintain the family home 
there. 

It was at this farm homestead that Henrv Lewis 



Boone passed his boyhood years, and he attended 
the public schools in Jackson, North Carolina. At 
the age of eighteen he began his apprenticeship 
in the carpenter's trade in Northampton County, 
and worked on various projects in that vicinity 
for the following four years. At the age of twenty- 
two he located at Boykins, Virginia, where he 
continued in the construction trade until 1927. In 
March of that year he came to Norfolk and entered 
the employ of John H. Pierce, prominent build- 
ing contractor. Mr. Pierce died in 1929, and at 
that time Mr. Boone joined W. A. Hall, Sr., in 
his construction firm, as a superintendent. In 1941 
he became a partner with the elder Mr. Hall 
until his death in August 1950, and the following 
month Mr. Boone became a partner of Mr. Hall's 
son, W. A. Hall, Jr., in organizing the present 
contracting firm, W. A. Hall and Company, Inc., 
which has its office at 255 Monticello Arcade. He 
is senior partner and president of the corporation; 
and Mr. Hall, whose biography accompanies, is 
secretary and treasurer. In the little more than 
a half-decade of its existence, the firm has com- 
pleted a number of important projects, the major 
ones being listed in Mr. Hall's sketch. 

Fond of outdoor life, Mr. Boone is especially 
partial to hunting, and to enjoy the sport at its 
best, he acquired interests in Knots Island in 
eastern Princess Anne County, where he main- 
tains a boat house. 

On December 24, 1924, at Petersburg, Virginia, 
Henry Lewis Boone married Courtney Stephens, 
daughter of Frank and Noney (Gray) Stephens 
of Southampton County, Virginia. Her mother 
is now deceased. Mrs. Boone is a member of the 
[ngleside Garden Club and Squires Memorial 
Presbyterian Church. The couple are the parents 
of a daughter, Geraldine Courtney, born Novem- 
ber 14, 1939. 



WILLIAM ALFORD HALL, JR.— Norfolk in 
recent years has been the scene of extraordinary 
growth and modernization. In every section of the 
city are to be found buildings erected by W. A. 
Hall and Company, Inc., as well as numerous 
remodeling projects for which this firm has con- 
tracted. William Alford Hall, Jr., is secretary and 
treasurer of this firm, which has its offices in the 
Monticello Arcade, Norfolk. He, with Henry L. 
Boone, founded the company in September 1950, 
and both brought to its managment a splendid 
background in the building and contracting field 
in the Greater Norfolk area. The gratifying suc- 
cess of the firm results from this accumulation of 
experience, and a quality of service and workman- 
ship which distinguish it in the building field. 

William A. Hall, Jr., was born February 7, 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



"7 



1907, at Burkeville, Virginia, son of the late Wil- 
liam Alforrl, Sr., and Margaret Belle (Carter) 
Hall. His father was a prominent building con- 
tractor of Norfolk, who was born on February 8, 
1871, in Loudon, England. At the age of fourteen 
he came to this country and first made his home 
in St. Augustine, Florida. There he learned the 
trade of ship's carpenter, and also engaged in com- 
mercial fishing on the Indian River between St. 
Augustine and Fort Pierce, Florida. In the early 
years of the century he moved to Thomasville, 
Georgia, where he farmed for several years before 
selling his holdings and moving to Burkeville, 
Virginia. While living there, he served as rural 
mail carrier, covering a twenty-seven mile route 
with horse and buggy, and he supplemented his 
earnings by farming. With this country's entrance 
into World War I, in 1917, he accepted employ- 
ment as ship's carpenter in the shipyard at West 
Point. Virginia, and before the end of the conflict 
had been promoted to assistant superintendent of 
construction. In the early months of 1910, William 
A. Hall, Sr., took his family to Norfolk, and for 
several years was in charge of a boat repair yard 
at Atlantic City. In 1923, he joined the well- 
known building contracting firm of John C. Pierce 
of Norfolk, as superintendent of construction, and 
he continued in this connection until the death of 
Mr. Pierce in 1929. In that year he formed his 
own company as YV. A. Hall, General Building 
Contractor of Norfolk, and in the years which 
followed, until his death on August 28. 1950, was 
one of the city's leaders in the construction field. 
Under his supervision, the firm erected many im- 
portant commercial structures of the Norfolk area, 
including a number of branch bank offices for 
the National Bank of Commerce, and a number 
of store-front remodeling projects in the down- 
town section around Granby Street. 

William -\. Hall, Jr., received his early educa- 
tion in the public schools of Burkeville, West 
Point and Norfolk. He graduated from Randolph- 
Macon Academy at Bedford, Virginia, in 1925, and 
attended Virginia Polytechnic Institute for one 
year, majoring in chemical engineering. From 1926 
to 1935 he was employed by the well-known oil 
corporation. The Texas Company, at its Norfolk 
office, resigning to enlist in the United States 
Army. His tour of duty included assignment to 
a horsedrawn artillery outfit, and in 1939, as a 
technical sergeant, he took part in reorganizing 
the Fourth Infantry Division into the first motor- 
ized outfit in the United States Army, at Fort 
Benning, Georgia. He served in the 42nd Field 
Artillery Battalion. In December 1941, his division 
was transferred to Camp Gordon, Georgia, where 
he was stationed until July 1942. He then entered 



Officers' Candidate School at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. 
Commissioned a second lieutenant in the Artillery 
Corps, he was attached to the Eighth Training 
Regiment at Fort Sill until his separation from 
the service on December 5, 1945. 

Returning to Norfolk after the war, William A. 
Hall, Jr., entered his father's construction firm 
as a carpenter, and he later served as superinten- 
dent of various building projects. His father died 
in August 1950, and on September 1, Mr. Hall 
joined Henry L. Boone in forming the present 
firm, W. A. Hall and Company, Inc. Mr. Boone, 
who is the subject of an accompanying sketch, 
is president, and Mr. Hall secretary and treasurer. 

Engaged in all types of construction work, com- 
mercial, industrial and institutional, the company 
has numbered among its projects many important 
structures, including an addition to Bayside Ele- 
mentary School; addition to the Francis E. Wil- 
lard Elementary School; addition to the Meadow- 
brook Elementary School; the Cavalier Lodge, 
addition to the Cavalier Hotel: the bar and ban- 
quet room of the Cavalier Hotel; the Holiday 
Sands Motel, which is also at Virginia Beach and 
is the first privately constructed lift-slab job in 
Virginia: the Norfolk Federal Savings and Loan 
Association's branch office at Ward's Corner; the 
Bank of Commerce's branch office at 20th and 
Colonial Avenue; and many store buildings at 
Ward's Corner shopping center. The firm is a 
member of the Norfolk Builders and Contractors 
Exchange and the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce. 

On December 29, 1929, in Norfolk, William A. 
Hall, Jr., married Margaret Doris Bell, daushter 
of Andrew J. and Rosine (Dalton) Bell of Nor- 
folk. Her father is a retired Seaboard Air Line 
Railroad employee. Mrs. Hall is a graduate of 
Maury High School and Radford State Teachers 
College. They are the parents of four children: 
1 William Alford, III. He served with the Uni- 
ted States Army in the occupation of Japan and 
later in the Korean conflict. He is now a student 
at Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Norfolk Divi- 
sion. 2. Joseph Bell, a business man of Norfolk. 
He also served in the occupation of Japan and was 
wounded in the Korean conflict. 3. John Char- 
les. 4. Margaret Alford. The two younger child- 
ren are attending parochial school in Norfolk. 



WILLIAM O. SHERMAN, JR.— Norfolk Iron 
and Wire Works, a firm specializing in designing, 
fabricating, distributing and erecting structural steel, 
ornamental iron and wire work, has grown and 
prospered under direction of members of the Sher- 
man family. Its president today is William O. Sher- 
man, Jr. With office and plant at 3045 East Vir- 
ginia Beach Boulevard, Norfolk, this compact or- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



ganization offers years of experience in steel fabrica- 
tion and related lines, and employs over twenty- 
five skilled mechanics, machine operators and crafts- 
men. This is a creative and adaptable group, capable 
of working in many media and on a variety of con- 
tracts, and has subcontracted on a large number 
cit commercial, industrial, institutional and govern- 
ment projects. It takes just pride in its quality of 
service and workmanship. 

The original Norfolk Iron and Wire Works was 
established in 1905, A. L. Rible being one of the 
founders. Twenty-five years later, the firm of W. 
O. Sherman and Company was established as a 
sales engineering organization, distributiong steel 
products, and this concern acquired the properties 
of the Norfolk Iron and Wire Works in 1935. At 
that time, W. O. Sherman, Sr.. and J. E. Speight, 
associates in the Sherman organization, bringing 
many years' experience in related fields, formed a 
partnership for operating the newly acquired busi- 
ness. The partnership was dissolved in 1941 when 
W. O. Sherman, Sr., became sole owner. He con- 
tinued as directing head of the emergent Norfolk 
Iron and Wire Works (which had retained the 
older organization's name) until shortly before his 
death in 1951. He was then succeeded as the 
directing head of the corporation by his son. W. O. 
Sherman, Jr., who had already had extensive ex- 
perience in the industry. For many years he had 
spent his summer vacations working in the Nor- 
folk Iron and Wire Works, and entered the firm 
on a full-time basis in 1945. following his return 
from military service in World War II. Continuing 
its record of growth and service under his direction, 
the corporation is today one of the leading firms 
in its field in Tidewater Virginia. It was incor- 
porated in 1955, with W. O. Sherman, Jr., as presi- 
dent and manager: Mrs. Leota S. Prentiss, vice 
president and treasurer: and Mrs. Gale A. Sher- 
man as secretary. The present plant and offices on 
East Virginia Beach Boulevard were occupied in 
1941. 

William Ottie Sherman, Sr., who was directing 
head of the firm from 1935 until a short time before 
his death, was born in South Norfolk. He received 
his education through the secondary years in the 
public schools of that cit)', and beyond that point 
was self-educated. He became chief structural en- 
gineer of bridge design for the Seaboard Air Line 
Railroad at the age of twenty-six. and he later 
held important engineering positions with the archi- 
tectural and engineering firm of Neff and Thomp- 
son. He had responsible duties in connection with 
the building of a number of the important structures 
in Norfolk, including the Cavalier Hotel, the Roy- 
ster Building, the Wainwright Building and Maury 
High School. For a number of years, W. O. Sher- 



man, Sr., engaged in private practice as a civil en- 
gineer in Norfolk, and in 1930 formed the firm of 
W. O. Sherman and Company, a sales engineering 
organization which five years later acquired the 
Norfolk Iron and Wire Works. He was a member 
of the Hampton Roads Post of the Society of 
American Military Engineers, and of the Lions 
Club, and in earlier life he had been a Kiwanian. 
He attended the Ocean View Baptist Church. 

W. O. Sherman. Sr., married Leota Downing of 
Norfolk, who survives him. and to them three 
children were born: 1. Leota Carol, who married 
Joseph H. Prentiss of Norfolk. 2. William O., Jr. 
3. Esther Hope, who married Cecil J. McCary of 
Norfolk. By an earlier marriage, W. O. Sherman, 
Sr.. was the father of a son, Henry L. Scheuerman 
(who retains the original spelling of the family 
name). A resident of Norfolk, he formerly served 
as chief of police of South Norfolk, and is now 
an inspector with the Virginia State Police, in 
its Motor Vehicles Department. 

William O. Sherman, Jr., was born March 16, 
1923. in Norfolk, and graduated from Maury High 
School in 1942. For a year he attended Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute, Norfolk Division, and in 
1943 enlisted in the L T nited States Army Air Corps 
as an aviation cadet. After receiving his pre-rlight 
training, he became a technical student at Davidson 
College, North Carolina. He was separated from 
the service in 1945, and entered the Norfolk Iron 
and Wire Works on a full-time basis. Since his 
father's health was declining, he assumed an in- 
creasing measure of responsibility in management. 

When W O. Sherman, Sr., retired, his son was 
well equipped to assume the duties of chief executive, 
and during his tenure as directing head of the 
firm, which began in 1951, he has capably managed 
the firm and has undertaken an extensive expansion 
program. He incorporated the business in 1955. 
In addition to extensive government contract work, 
the firm is today engaged in many projects of a 
commercial, industrial and institutional nature. 
Among these have been the Foreman Field Stadi- 
um. Young Park Elementary School, and Talbot 
Park Baptist Church. 

Mr. Sherman is a member and secretary of the 
Subcontractors Association of Virginia, and a mem- 
ber of the Norfolk Junior Chamber of Commerce 
and the Lafayette Yacht Club. He is partial to 
fishing among the outdoor sports. 

On April 17, 1945, at Norfolk, William 0. Sher- 
man, Jr., married Gale Anselm, daughter of Wil- 
liam B. and Blanche (Gale) Anselm of that city. 
Mrs. Sherman is a graduate of Maury High School, 
Class of 1941, and attended the College of Wil- 
liam and Mary, Norfolk Division. The couple are 
communicants of the Freemason Street Baptist 




LO jJJa-O**' 6. LlJcuwjl^/ 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



'9 



Church. They are the parents of a son, William 
Ottie, III, who was born on July 31, 1947. 



JOHN WESLEY SNOW, JR.— The masonry 
contracting firm in Norfolk known by the some- 
what unusual name of Snow, Jr., and King, Inc., 
has been in existence for a little more than a 
decade. Under the executive direction of its presi- 
dent, John Wesley Snow, Jr., it has made steady 
and satisfactory progress upon the sound structure 
of a few basic principles: conscientious attention 
to detail, fine workmanship, and the employment 
of workmen who have a sound knowledge of their 
craft, masonry. It has an excellent reputation 
throughout the trade as well as among building 
owners and managers and contractors throughout 
the Tidewater area. It is today one of the largest 
firms concentrating entirely on masonry work, and 
on the impressive list of structures on which it 
has contracted are included the Sears Roebuck and 
Company's building in Norfolk; the Mayflower 
Apartments at Virginia Beach (which is the tallest 
residential building in the state); the new adminis- 
tration and classroom building of Norfolk Division, 
Virginia State College; the Norfolk Municipal Air- 
port's administration building; the Norfolk Cen- 
tral Young Men's Christian Association Building; 
the Greek Orthodox Church of Norfolk; the Mary 
F. Ballentine Home; and several public school 
buildings. It is working on the new Norfolk Gen- 
eral Hospital, scheduled for completion in 1957. 

John Wesley Snow, Jr., its co-founder, president, 
and treasurer, was born March 20, 191 7, at Hope- 
well, son of John Wesley, Sr., and Mabel (Bur- 
rows) Snow. His father, a native of Norfolk, has 
been prominent in the building trades for many 
years, and his grandfather, Thomas Snow, was also 
active in masonry contracting. John W. Snow, Jr., 
thus brings down to the third generation a con- 
scientious and craftsmanlike career interest in his 
business. His mother, the former Mabel Burruss, 
died in 1919, when he was only two years old. 

He passed his boyhood in several localities where 
his father was engaged in building projects and 
completed his secondary education at McKinley 
High School in Washington, D. C, where he 
graduated in 1936. He continued his education at 
the University of Maryland, where he was a student 
for two years, majoring in business administration, 
and he supplemented his advanced studies there 
by attending Benjamin Franklin School of Account- 
ing in Washington, D. C, for one year. 

He began his career in the construction field with 
the Virginia Engineering Company of Newport 
News and served his apprenticeship in bricklaying 
under his father, working in the latter's construc- 
tion firm. He continued with the Virginia Engi- 



neering Company until 1945, learning through prac- 
tical experience the many phases of masonry con- 
struction and the business aspects of contracting 
as well. 

With this excellent background he terminated 
his association with his father to form his own 
firm in Norfolk in 1945. As co-founder of Snow, 
Jr., and King, Inc., he became president and treasur- 
er of the firm and continues as its executive head. 
Its other officers are F. L. Detterman, vice presi- 
dent, and Mrs. Dorothy Mae Snow, secretary. Of- 
fices and warehouse are at 2415 Church Street, Nor- 
folk. The combination of experience and a con- 
scientious attitude toward its work has won Snow, 
Jr., and King, Inc., a reputation as one of the 
most reliable contractors in masonry construction, 
and the growth in its volume of business has con- 
tinued accordingly. The firm holds organizational 
membership in the Builders and Contractors Ex- 
change, Inc., of Norfolk, and the city's Chamber 
of Commerce. 

Mr. Snow is a member of the Virginia Subcon- 
tractors Association. His other memberships in- 
clude the Cavalier Beach Club, the Cavalier Golf 
Club, Sertoma International, and the Ocean View 
Lodge No. 335, Ancient Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons. In Masonry he is a member of the higher 
bodies of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, 
holds the Thirty-second degree, and belongs to 
Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. His favorite sports are boat- 
ing and golf. 

On February 10, 1940, at Pensacola, Florida, 
John Wesley Snow, Jr., married Dorothy Mae 
Bladen of Washington, D. C., daughter of the late 
John Bladen and his wife, the former Viola Stark. 
The family formerly lived in the nation's capital. 
but now reside in New York City. Mr. and Mrs. 
Snow are communicants of Christ Methodist 
Church, and they make their home at 18 Cavalier 
Drive, Linlier, Virginia Beach. They are the par- 
ents of two children: 1. Linda Barbara, born No- 
vember 16, 1943. 2. Thomas Michael, born March 
16, 1945. 



WILLIAM E. WARREN— Senior vice presi- 
dent of the National Bank of Commerce of Nor- 
folk. William E. Warren held the post of vice 
president and director of the Merchants and 
Planters Bank until its recent merger with the 
National Bank of Commerce. 

Born December 9, 1907, at Portsmouth, he is a 
son of John Lloyd and Etta (Minton) Warren. 
His father was descended from early colonial 
settlers on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, and is 
now retired, having spent his active life in farm- 
ing and livestock raising. Etta (Minton) Warren was 



120 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



born in Nansemond County, and her ancestry is 
also traceable to early colonial Virginia. 

William E. Warren passed his boyhood in Ports- 
mouth, where he graduated from Woodrow Wil- 
son High School in 1926. He continued his studies 
at William and Mary College at Williamsburg, 
where he graduated with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts in 1929. He then attended the Graduate 
School of the University of Virginia, where he 
majored in English. 

During the years from 1929 to 1932, he was a 
member of the teaching faculty of Christ Church 
Episcopal School for Boys in Middlesex County, 
Virginia. Continuing his career in educational 
work, he joined the public school system of South 
Norfolk, with which he remained as teacher, as- 
sistant principal and assistant superintendent from 
1932 to 1938. In the latter year he began his 
association with the Merchants and Planters Bank 
of Norfolk as assistant cashier and assistant mana- 
ger of the South Norfolk Branch. With the open- 
of the Lafayette Boulevard Branch in November 
1946, he was transferred there as its manager. In 
January 1955, Mr. Warren was elected to the 
board of directors of the Merchants and Planters 
Bank, and also became vice president, continuing 
as officer in charge of its Lafayette Boulevard 
Branch. On November 4, 1957, the Merchants and 
Planters Bank merged with the National Bank of 
Commerce of Norfolk and since that time Mr. 
Warren has held the position of senior vice presi- 
dent of the National Bank of Commerce. 

Since 1950. Mr. Warren has served as a mem- 
ber of the board of directors of the Chesapeake 
Building Association of Norfolk. He belongs to 
the Virginia Bankers Association, the American 
Institute of Banking and the Norfolk Chamber of 
Commerce. 

He is a member and past president of the Lafay- 
ette Business Men's Club, member of the Norfolk 
Yacht and Country Club, the Sigma Nu fraternity, 
and the Virginia Society of the Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution. He is entitled to membership in 
the last-named organization by right of direct 
descent in the maternal line from Colonel George 
Elliott of the American Continental Army of Vir- 
ginia. He is interested in all outdoor sports, es- 
pecially football. An Episcopalian, he is a member 
of the Church of the Good Shepherd. 

On March 31, 1934, at Norfolk, William E. 
Warren married Lois Sharber Parkerson of Nor- 
folk, daughter of Jesse J. and Emma Clark (Mark- 
ham) Parkerson of that city. Her father served 
as president of the Merchants and Planters Bank 
of Norfolk and is one of the community's out- 
standing business and civic leaders. Mrs. Warren 
is a graduate of Randolph-Macon Woman's Col- 
lege at Lynchburg, Virginia. Active in cultural 



and civic affairs, she is a member of the Church 
of the Good Shepherd, the American Association 
of University Women, the Virginia Branch of the 
International Order of King's Daughters, and the 
Lockhaven Garden Club. Mr. and Mrs. Warren 
are the parents of a daughter, Ann Parkerson, a 
graduate of Granby High School, and now attend- 
ing Randolph-Macon Woman's College at Lynch- 
burg. The family reside at 7414 North Shore 
Road, Norfolk. 



HORACE GODWIN ASHBURN, M.D., is 
well endowed with those qualities which best fit 
a man for the difficult profession of medicine. 
Family background played its part in his prepara- 
tion, for his father, the late Dr. William Beauregard 
Ashburn, was a prominent physician of Norfolk 
County. The elder Dr. Ashburn was born in 1861 
in Isle of Wight County and graduated from the 
Medical College of Virginia. As a general practi- 
tioner, he maintained his office in Berkley and South 
Norfolk from 1902 until his death in 1923. He mar- 
ried Geneva Godwin, who was born in Nansemond 
County in 1867 and died at South Norfolk in 1938. 
The descent of both can be traced back to the early 
days of settlement in Isle of Wight and Nanse- 
mond counties. 

To this couple, the son whom they named Horace 
Godwin was born in Franklin County on July 17, 
1893. He is the oldest son of his parents. Receiving 
his early education in Miss Minnie Tilley's Private 
School in Berkley, he later attended the public 
schools of that community and in 191 1 was a mem- 
ber of the first graduating class of Maury High 
School in Norfolk. He then entered the University 
of Virginia, where he received his degree of Bache- 
lor of Arts in 1914 and his degree of Doctor of Med- 
icine in 1918. He interned at the University of Vir- 
ginia Hospital for one year and the following year 
interned at St. Luke's Hospital in New York City. 
His senior year in medical college had coincided 
with this country's participation in World War 
I, and Dr. Ashburn was enlisted in the United 
States Army Medical Reserve Corps. 

In 1920 Dr. Ashburn began private practice in 
South Norfolk, where he has maintained his office 
since. In 1927 the Dr. H. G. Ashburn Clinic was 
erected at Jackson and Ohio streets, South Nor- 
folk, and this has since been the center of his 
practice. Early in his career, Dr. Ashburn began to 
specialize in the field of general surgery, and in 1932 
he was honored by being made a fellow of the 
American College of Surgeons. In his extensive 
practice of surgery, he has built a sound profession- 
al reputation and has won the commendation of 
his colleagues and the confidence of the public. 

He is a fellow of the Southeastern Surgical Con- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



121 



gress and a member of the Norfolk County Medical 
Society, the Virginia State Medical Association, 
the Seaboard Medical Society, the American Acad- 
emy of General Practice, and the American Medical 
Association. His college fraternity was Theta Delta 
Chi. An indefatigable worker, Dr. Ashburn has 
sacrificed his leisure hours to make opportunity 
for increasing his knowledge of medical science, 
and he has attained particular distinction in the 
field of general surgery. He is a member of the 
surgical staffs of the Leigh Memorial Hospital and 
St. Vincent de Paul Hospital and a member of 
the courtesy staff of the Norfolk General Hospital. 
Dr. Ashburn is one of those rare men who at- 
tain eminence in the professions, yet prove their 
exceptional abilities in business affairs as well. He 
is a member of the boards of directors of the Mer- 
chants and Planters Bank and the Home Federal 
Savings and Loan Association. He is a member 
of Doric Lodge No. 40, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons; Ionic Chapter of the Royal Arch Masons; 
Grice Commandery No. 16, Knights Templar; and 
Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of the 
Princess Anne Country Club, the Norfolk Yacht 
and Country Club, and St. Bride's Episcopal 
Church. When his demanding schedule of pro- 
fessional duties allows it, Dr. Ashburn enjoys es- 
caping into the out-of-doors on occasion and is an 
enthusiastic hunter and fisherman. 

In New York City, on October 17, 1922, Dr. 
Horace Godwin Ashburn was married to the for- 
mer Miss Serena Hankins of Spring Lake, New 
Jersey. She is the daughter of the late Paul and 
Fannie (Hankins) Hankins of Toms River, New 
Jersey. Mrs. Ashburn is a registered nurse, a 
graduate of St. Luke's Hospital in New York City. 
She is active in community affairs. She has rend- 
ered valuable service on the Women's Auxiliary 
of St. Vincent de Paul Hospital and is also active in 
the auxiliary of the Norfolk County Medical Socie- 
ty. She is an active member of St. Bride's Episco- 
pal Church. Dr. and Mrs. Ashburn are the parents 
of two children: 1. Horace Godwin, Jr., who was 
born on June 17, 1925. He is a graduate of Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute, from which he received the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture and 
Animal Husbandry. He is a veteran of World 
War II service with the United States Army Air 
Force. At the present time, Horace G. Ashburn, 
Jr., is engaged in livestock farming near Hickory 
in Norfolk County, and he is serving as president 
of the Norfolk Country Farm Bureau. He is mar- 
ried to the former Miss Paulette Pifer, of Win- 
chester, and they are the parents of three chil- 
dren: i. Paulette. ii. William Godwin, iii. Robert 
Sheffield. 2. Serena Ashburn, who was born on 



August 8, 1927. She is a graduate of St. Mary's 
Junior College at Raleigh, North Carolina, and of 
Mary Washington College of the University of 
Virginia. She holds the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts. She is married to Colonel R. B. Wilde of 
the United States Marine Corps, who is at present 
stationed in Washington, D. C. Colonel and Mrs. 
Wilde make their home in Arlington, Virginia. 
The family residence of Dr. and Mrs. Horace God- 
win Ashburn is at 713 Sparrow Road, on the 
eastern branch of the Elizabeth River near the 
city of Norfolk. The address of the clinic is Jack- 
son and Ohio streets in South Norfolk. 



PETER K. BABALAS, who began his practice 
in Norfolk in 1950, is now a partner in the firm 
of Babalas and Breit, Attorneys and Counsellors 
at Law, which has its offices in the Helena Build- 
ing at Plume and Granby. Both during and since 
World War II, he has served in the Army, and he 
is active in community and organizational life. 

Born July 8, 1922, in Boston, Massachusetts, 
Mr. Babalas is a son of Kostas and Catherine 
(Milonas) Babalas. Both parents were born in 
Greece, and his father came to this country in 
1915, locating at Manchester, New Hampshire, be- 
fore settling in Boston. In Manchester he and a 
brother operated a lumber yard. He entered the 
restaurant business in Boston and later continued 
in the same field at Waltham, Massachusetts. He 
retired in 1948 and now resides in Cambridge, 
Massachusetts. Mrs. Babalas also survives. Both 
were born in 1894. 

Reared in Boston and receiving his early educa- 
tion in its public schools, Peter K. Babalas gradu- 
ated from Rindge Technical High School in 1041 
and began his advanced education at Harvard 
University. In January 1943, he left his studies to 
enter the United States Navy as an air cadet, but 
not qualifying as a flyer, he left the Naval Air 
Corps and in May 1943, joined the United States 
Army. He served overseas, holding a commission 
as first lieutenant in the Infantry, and received his 
honorable discharge in April 1946. 

Mr. Babalas then resumed his studies at Har- 
vard University and took his degree of Bachelor 
of Arts there in 1947. He then came to Virginia 
and enrolled at the University of Virginia, where 
he took his professional courses and graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Laws in February 
1950. On August 25, 1949, he passed his examina- 
tion for admission to the bar of the state. He be- 
gan his practice of law in Norfolk in 1950, but 
the following year was called back into active serv- 
ice in the army and was stationed in Pennsyl- 
vania until 1952. He then resumed his practice at 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



Norfolk, continuing independently until January 
1954, when he formed the present partnership with 
Calvin W. Breit, whose biographical sketch ac- 
companies this. 

Taking a vital interest in the commercial life 
of his city, Mr. Babalas is a stockholder in several 
companies. He is a member of the Virginia State 
Bar Association, the Norfolk-Portsmouth Bar As- 
sociation, and the American Bar Association. Af- 
filiated with the Ancient Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, he is a member of Atlantic Lodge No. 2, 
and of the higher bodies of Masonry. Holding 
the Thirty-second degree, he is also a member of 
Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. He likewise belongs to the 
Norfolk lodge No. 38, of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias, and 
A. H. E. P. A., a progressive Greek-American 
group. Of Greek Orthodox faith, he attends the 
local church of that denomination and is currently 
secretary of its building fund. Interested in sports, 
he is a member of the Lafayette Country Club; 
the Norfolk Sports Club; the Izaak Walton 
League, Norfolk Chapter: and the Fraternal Order 
of Police Associates. His especial interests are 
hunting, fishing, and golf. 

Mr. Babalas attended Harvard University on a 
scholarship. During his most recent stint in the 
army, he was assigned to the Judge Advocate Gene- 
ral's Department and was stationed at the Army 
War College, at Carlisle, Pennsylvania. 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter K. Babalas reside at 115 
Beverly Avenue, Norfolk. She is the former Miss 
Lillie Macheras, daughter of Peter and Florence 
(Gianakis) Macheras, and both of her parents 
were born in Greece. They came to America early 
in the 1900s and located at Columbus, Ohio, where 
her father operated a restaurant, until his death 
in 1938 at the age of forty-two. Mrs. Macheras 
survives him and makes her home at Lexington. 
Mr. and Mrs. Babalas were married on December 
27, 1948. They are the parents of two children: 1. 
Marcia, born November 14, 1951. 2. Karen, born 
April 19, 1955. 



CALVIN W. BREIT— Member of the law firm 
of Babalas and Breit, with offices in the Helena 
Building in Norfolk, Calvin W. Breit is a young 
professional man who has proved himself a use- 
ful member of the community in civic as well as 
professional connections. A native of Newark, 
New Jersey, he was born on May 6, 1925, son 
of Albert and Henrietta (Kessel) Breit. Both 
parents were born in New York City, and his 
mother now resides in Norfolk. His father was 
a merchant in Newark and later in the state 
of Texas, and in 1940 he came to Norfolk and 



operated a store there until his death in 1953, 
at the age of sixty. He was a veteran of military 
service in World War I, having served in France 
with the American Expeditionary Force, and was 
discharged in 1919. 

Calvin W. Breit spent most of his boyhood 
years in Texas, beginning his public school edu- 
cation there and later attending schools in Oma- 
ha, Nebraska, and in Duluth, Minnesota. He 
graduated from high school in Duluth in 1940. 
He first came to Virginia to attend William and 
Mary College, Norfolk Division, but left his stud- 
ies in August 1943, to enter the United States 
Army. He served in Europe, was hospitalized, 
and was discharged in February 1946. He then 
resumed his studies at William and Mary and, 
after completing his advanced academic courses 
there, entered New York University Law School. 
At the end of one year in New York, he returned 
to Norfolk because of the illness of his father, 
and there he continued his law studies at the 
College of William and Mary. When he gradu- 
ated in 1951, he received both the Bachelor of 
Arts and the Bachelor of Civil Law degrees. 

Admitted to the bar, Mr. Breit began practice 
in his own name in 1951 and in 1954 formed 
the partnership with Peter K. Babalas, whose 
biographical sketch accompanies. He is a member 
of the American Bar Association, the Virginia 
State Bar and Virginia Bar Association, and the 
Norfolk-Portsmouth Bar Association. 

He takes a vital interest in community affairs, 
being a member of the Chamber of Commerce 
and the Junior Chamber of Commerce. Of Jewish 
faith, he is a member of B'nai B'rith. He is fond 
of hunting, fishing", and golf. 

On February 20, 1949, Calvin W. Breit mar- 
ried Mildred Jacobs of Petersburg, daughter of 
Max and Faye (Schoenbaum) Jacobs. Her father 
was a native of New York. Mr. and Mrs. Breit 
make their home at 142 Blake Road and are 
the parents of three children: I. Mitchell Mark, 
born June 25, 1951. 2. William David, born Octo- 
ber 23, 1952. 3. Jeffrey Arnold, born April 15, 1955. 



HAL J. LYON — Entering the theater manage- 
ment field after spectacular early successes as a 
musician Hal J. Lyon has been a leader in the 
business affairs of the Lower Tidewater area since 
he founded Lyon Realty Corporation, Hal Lyon 
Enterprises, and two amusement corporations in 
1930. He has headed these organizations since, 
and has become one of the East Coast's major 
owners and operators of motion-picture houses 
and of hotels. 

Mr. Lyon, who won his early reputation as an 
organist, was born at Waterloo, Iowa, on Sep- 
tember 16, 1909, son of Judson J. and Clara Maty 





.-u^~z^_- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



' 2 3 



(Parker) Lyon. He attended local public schools, 
and graduated from East Waterloo High School. 
In his early years he specialized in the study of 
music, and from 1921 to 1925 was a pupil of C. 
Albert Scholin at Waterloo, studying piano and 
organ. As early as 1923 he began earning his 
reputation as a prodigy of the organ keyboard, 
in Publix Theaters in Chicago. He continued his 
studies, however, being enrolled from 1925 to 1927 
at the American Conservatory of Music in Chicago, 
and learning organ and theory under Frank Van 
Dusen. As a "boy wonder" organist he was fea- 
tured from coast to coast between 1923 and 1929. 
He became an authority on organ accompani- 
ment to motion pictures, and wrote articles on 
this field of music specialization for "Metronome," 
"Musical Observer" and "Motion Picture Herald" 
magazines during 1926-1927. At the age of seven- 
teen he was Supervisor of Music for the Strand 
Amusement Company of Iowa. In 1944 he took the 
master course at Westminster Choir School in 
Princeton, New Jersey, and studied choral con- 
ducting under John Finley Williamson, and organ 
under Dr. Alexander McCurdy. He also took 
courses at Curtis Institute in Philadelphia, at 
Union Theological Seminary in New York City 
and under Dr. Clarence Dickinson. He was organist 
and choirmaster at Franklin Baptist Church from 
1930 to 1945, and continues active as a concert 
organist. During 1945-1946 he was minister of music 
at Pace Memorial Methodist Church at Richmond. 
Since 1946 he has been organist and choirmaster 
for all festival and special occasions at High Street 
Methodist Church, Franklin, Virginia, of which 
he has been a member since 1930. In 1954 he 
presented a large three-manual Wicks pipe organ 
and sixty-one-bell carillon to his church in honor 
of his mother. He also presented a carillon to 
the Franklin Baptist Church in 1939, while he 
was minister of music there. While on a tour of 
sixteen European countries in 1950, he played at 
regular services at Westminster Abbey, Notre 
Dame in Paris, and the Monastery of St. Francis 
of Assisi near Rome. 

Due to the critical illness of his wife Mr. Lyon 
was forced to abandon his musical career profes- 
sionally, and when he was twenty-one years of 
age, and much of his achievement in the field of 
music was still ahead of him, he came to Franklin 
in 1930 and launched his business career by sign- 
ing a lease on the Franklin Theatre. The building 
had been erected in 1921, and had been leased to 
various chains and independent operators for 
operation as a theater, but without satisfactory 
results. It was bankrupt at the time Mr. Lyon 
assumed management. Although he had had no 
business experience, and launched his enterprise 
in the teeth of the depression, he brought success 



to, the venture. He made many innovations during 
the next five years. On November 10, 1935, a 
new theater in Boykins was opened by the young 
entrepreneur. Within two years of that time, new 
prospects were apparent at Franklin, where a 
large paper mill had opened, attracting many new 
residents. This prompted him to erect the beauti- 
ful and modern Lyon's State Theatre on lower 
Main Street. Another motion-picture house was 
added to the chain on August 9, 1940, when an 
attractive modern theater in Waverly was built 
on a lot presented to Mr. Lyon by a group of 
twenty businessmen of that town. 

In September 1942, Mr. Lyon purchased the 
interest of the entire group of one hundred and 
eighty stockholders of the Franklin Amusement 
Corporation, which had built the Franklin Theatre 
in 1921. The Elco and Delta theaters in Ports- 
mouth were acquired by the Lyon circuit in 1946; 
and the year 1950 saw the addition of a three- 
hundred-car drive-in theater at Carrsville. 

Late in the 1940s, new scope and direction were 
given to Air. Lyon's enterprises when he turned 
his attention to the accommodation of guests and 
tourists visiting Franklin. On July 10, 1947, he 
acquired the R. A. Pretlow mansion on South 
High Street and a considerable portion of the 
Pretlow estate. The mansion was renovated in the 
style of an early nineteenth-century inn. With 
gracious overnight accommodations, and serving 
distinctive food in a charming setting, The Town 
House, as it has been named, has become one of 
our nationally famous inns. It was opened to the 
public on February 29, 1948, and a throng of over 
five thousand visitors from all parts of the Tide- 
water area and elsewhere attended the formal 
opening. Since that time, the inn has been accord- 
ed highest ratings in "Gourmet," Duncan Hines' 
publications, and the A. A. A. books. 

Mr. Lyon is president and general manager of 
Lyon Realty Corporation, Hal Lyon Enterprises, 
Inc., Franklin Amusement Corporation and Lyon 
Amusement Corporation. From 1937 to 1942 he 
was president of Franklin Housing Corporation. 
His offices are in Lyon's State Theatre Building. 
In recent years he has continued to expand his 
business interests to include a large guest ranch 
in Tucson, Arizona, a housing development in 
Phoenix, Arizona, and several hotels ranging as 
far afield as Honolulu, Hawaii. 

He of course retains his interest in music, being 
a life member of the National Federation of 
Music Clubs and the American Guild of Organists. 
Active in the Franklin Chamber of Commerce, he 
was its president from 1938 to 1943. He became 
a member of the Franklin Rotary Club in 1930, 
and in 1942-1943 served as its president. He has 
been a director of music at state, national and 



'-4 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



international Rotary conventions. In 1942-1943 he 
served as president of the Franklin Community 
Fund, Inc., and from 1944 to 1948, served as chair- 
man of the Southampton County Chapter of the 
National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. He 
was vice president of the Virginia Travel Council 
for 1955-1956, and is now on its board of directors. 
Since 1950 he has been a director of the Virginia 
Motion Picture Owners, and he was general chair- 
man of its annual convention held at the Hotel 
Chamberlain at Old Point Comfort in 1955. He was 
president of the Franklin Community Concerts As- 
sociation in 1952.1953. Since 1930, he has been 
a member of the Cypress Cove Country Club. 

On July 20, 1929, Hal J. Lyon married Marion 
Louise Basnight. They are the parents of a daugh- 
ter, Halouise, born May 13, 1930. She is now Mrs. 
Virgil Enlow McDowell, Jr., and the mother of 
two children: Michael Enlow McDowell, born 
May 26, 1952, and Lou Lyon McDowell, born 
February 28, 1954. Mr. Lyon's residence is op- 
posite the famous Town House. 



HOMER LENOIR FERGUSON— Newport 
News' influential and respected shipbuilding exec- 
utive, Homer L. Ferguson, was active in his 
chosen industry from the turn of the century 
until his recent death. He had served as presi- 
dent and as chairman of the board of the New- 
port News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company 
for many years, had other business interests as 
well, and was active in a diversity of organiza- 
tions. 

Born in Waynesville, Haywood County, North 
Carolina, on March 6, 1873, he was a son of 
William Burder and Laura Adelaide (Reeves) 
Ferguson. After completing his secondary stud- 
ies, he won appointment to the United States 
Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland. He 
graduated there in 1892, but instead of entering 
naval service, went overseas to continue his edu- 
cation at the University of Glasgow, where he 
graduated in 1895. In the later years of his life 
he received honorary degrees of Doctor of Com- 
mercial Science from Washington and Lee Uni- 
ver ity (1930), Doctor of Laws from the Uni- 
versity of Richmond (1932), Doctor of Engineer- 
ing from Worcester Polytechnic Institute (1933), 
Doctor of Science from Duke University (1933), 
Doctor of Engineering from Rensselaer Polytech- 
nic Institute (1937), and Doctor of Science from 
William and Mary College (1942). 

Mr. Ferguson began his career as assistant 
naval constructor at the Columbian Iron Works 
in Baltimore, Maryland, where he worked dur- 
ing 1895-1896. Thereafter until 1899, he was ad- 
viser with Wolff and Zeicker, at the Portland, 
Oregon, Navy Yard. He worked in the Navy 



Yard at Bremerton, Washington, during 1890- 
1900, then went to the opposite coast of the 
country, to take a position as superintendent of 
construction with the Bath Iron Works of Bath, 
Maine. 

It was thus with considerable experience in 
his field that the young man of twenty-nine came 
to Newport News in 1902, to accept a position 
as assistant superintendent of construction with 
the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock 
Company. After two years with the firm, he 
left for Washington, D. C, where he worked in 
the Bureau of Construction and Repair, 1904- 
1905. In the latter year he once again joined 
Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Com- 
pany, and was with the organization thereafter 
until the end of his life. He advanced rapidly, 
and in 1915 was elected president of the corpora- 
tion, and general manager. He served in both 
offices until 1937, when he resigned as general 
manager, but retained the presidency. He also 
continued as president after he had been elected 
chairman of the board in 1940, but resigned 
from the chief excutive's post in 1946. He re- 
mained board chairman to the end of his life. 

In addition to his major business interests, he 
was president and a trustee of the Mariners 
Museum of Newport News, and a director of 
tlie Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Com- 
pany of Virginia. 

A member of the Society of Naval Architects 
and Marine Engineers, Mr. Ferguson served as 
it> president during the 1928-1929 term. He was 
also a member of the Shipbuilders Council of 
America, the National Association of Manufac- 
turers, the National Industrial Conference Board, 
and the United States Chamber of Commerce, 
which he served as president in 1919-1920. He 
was an honorary member of the American Socie- 
ty of Marine Engineers, and of the Propeller 
Club of the United States. 

Mr. Ferguson was active in several learned 
societies. He served on the council of the Ameri- 
can Geographic Society, and was a member of 
Phi Beta Kappa national scholastic honor society. 
He belonged to the Engineers Club of New 
York, the Army and Navy Club of Washington, 
D. C, and the James River Country Club of 
Newport News. Active in fraternal affairs, he 
was affiliated with the lodges of the Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons and the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. He was an Epis- 
copalian. 

Mr. Ferguson received honors from foreign 
governments: the Diploma and Cross of the Le- 
gion of Honor, from France, and Belgium's 
Knight Commander, Order of Leopold II. 

September 23, 1896, Homer Lenoir Ferguson 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



' 2 5 



married Eliza Anderson Skinner, daughter of 
Thomas C. and Belle (Anderson) Skinner. The 
couple became the parents of six children: I. 
William McL., whose biography appears in this 
work. 2. Homer, Jr. 3. Charles Anderson (de- 
ceased). 4. Walter Post (deceased). 5. Isabel, 
who married Lyman S. Ayres. 6. Elise, who mar- 
ried Storer P. Ware. 

The death of Homer L. Ferguson occurred on 
March 14, 1953. 



WILLIAM McLEOD FERGUSON— For the 

past two decades, William McLeod Ferguson has 
practiced law at Newport News, and is now sen- 
ior member of the firm of Ferguson, Yates and 
Stephens, which has its offices in the First Na- 
tional Bank Building. Throughout the early 1940s 
he served with distinction as a member of the 
General Assembly of Virginia, and has held 
other public and political offices. 

A native of Newport News, he was born on 
March 4, 1906, son of Homer Lenoir and Eliza 
Anderson (Skinner) Ferguson. His father was 
a shipbuilder, who was for some years presi- 
dent of the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry 
Dock Company. He served for seventeen years 
in the United States Navy. William McLeod Fer- 
guson attended the public schools of Newport 
News through the first year of high school. In 1920 
he entered Episcopal High School, where lie 
graduated in 1924. In the fall of that year he 
entered the University of Virginia, and received 
his degree of Bachelor of Arts there in 1927, 
after only three years' study. During the aca- 
demic year 1927-1928 he attended Harvard Law 
School, then returned to the University of Vir- 
ginia, completing his professional courses in its 
lav/ school and graduating with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws in 1930. 

Admitted to the bar of the State of New- York, 
he began practice in September 1930, with the 
firm of Burlingham, Veeder, Clark, and Kupper, 
admiralty lawyers. He remained in this connec- 
tion until July 1936, then returned to his native 
Newport News and opened his private law office 
theie. He continued to practice independently un- 
til 1940, when he became a member of the firm 
of Skinner and Ferguson. This partnership was 
terminated by the death of Frederick H. Skin- 
ner in May 1944. In September of that year, 
Mr. Ferguson became a member of the firm 
of Montague, Ferguson, and Holt. This law- 
partnership was dissolved as of April 1, 1955, 
and on that date he became senior partner in 
a newly organized firm, Ferguson, Yates, and 
Stephens, Attorneys at Law. His partners are 
Richard T. Yates and J. Warren Stephens. 

Mr. Ferguson was first elected to the General 



Assembly of Virginia in 1940, and served until 
January 1946. A "Dixiecrat" in the national pre- 
sidential campaign of 1948, he served as elector 
for the Honorable Strom Thurmond. It was also 
in that year that he began his tenure on the 
Warwick school board, on which he has served 
since. 

Since his undergraduate days at the Univer- 
sity of Virginia, Mr. Ferguson has been a mem- 
ber of St. Anthony Hall. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Anglers Club of New York City, 
James River Country Club, the Press Club of 
Virginia, and the Royal Stag Hunt Club. He is 
a communicant of St. Stephens Episcopal Church 
in Warwick, where he serves as a trustee and 
member of the Vestry. 

In New York City on October 19, 1935, William 
McLeod Ferguson married Claire M. Murray, 
daughter of Joseph R. and Clara (Lane) Murray. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Ferguson five children have 
been born: 1. Clare Margaret, on November 21, 
1936. 2. William McLeod, Jr., born September 
2 3. '937- 3- Charles Anderson, 2nd, born January 
18, 1939. 4. Mary Josephine, born February 21, 
1940. 5. David Lane, born December 19, 1942. 



JAMES WENDELL CREEF, M.D.— Within 
a period of a few years, Dr. James W. Creef has 
built up an extensive general practice of medicine 
in South Norfolk. He is associated with Dr. Jerome 
Stanley Gross, also a general practitioner, and 
their offices are in the Creef-Gross Medical Build- 
ing at 1201 Jackson Street. Completed in Septem- 
ber 1956, and formally opened on November 1 of 
that year, it is the first modern office building con- 
structed specifically for the use of the medical 
profession in South Norfolk since 1927. It is a 
ten-room structure, completely air-conditioned with 
a Charleston Colonial brick-pattern exterior, and 
was designed and built with the most modern fa- 
cilities for the comfort of patients and utility of 
purpose. There are two suites in the building, 
and each suite has two examing rooms, a consul- 
tation room, and a rest room. At the front of the 
building is a large central waiting room, with the 
receptionist's desk built into a wall separating the 
waiting room from the central passageway. Behind 
the waiting room and passageway are a laboratory, 
first-aid room, and utility room. The modern equip- 
ment includes laboratory facilities, fluoroscope, in- 
tercommunication system for the receptionist, air- 
conditioning, baseboard heating, and a radio-phono- 
graph system to allow music to be transmitted 
through the building. Each room has a separate 
volume control for music. The Creef-Gross Medical 
Building is furnished to give it a homelike rather 
than an office or clinic atmosphere. 

Dr. James W. Creef was born July 30, 1917, 



126 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



near Hickory in Norfolk County, son of Seldon 
B. and Nancy (Basnight) Creef, both of Dare 
County, North Carolina. He attended the public 
schools of South Norfolk and in 1933 graduated 
from the South Norfolk High School. Some time 
elapsed between the time of his graduation from 
high school and his medical studies, and during 
this time he was engaged as an electrician at 
Norfolk Naval Shipyard. He began his advanced 
studies at the College of William and Mary, Nor- 
folk Division, where he was a student for one 
year (1933- 1934), and he continued his premedical 
studies at the University of Virginia. He received 
his degree of Doctor of Medicine from the Medical 
College of Virginia in 1952. Following his rotating 
internship at Norfolk General Hospital, Dr. Creef 
began his private practice of medicine at South 
Norfolk in July 1953. 

He is a member of the staff of the Norfolk- 
General Hospital and the courtesy staffs of the 
St. Vincent de Paul and Leigh Memorial hospitals. 
As a physician he holds membership in the Nor- 
folk County Medical Society, the Virginia State 
Medical Association, and the Tidewater Academy 
of General Practice. 

Apart from his professional connections, Dr. 
Creef is a member of South Norfolk Lodge No. 
339, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Ionic 
Chapter No. 46, Royal Arch Masons in Berkley; 
the consistory of the Ancient and Accepted Scott- 
ish Rite; and Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. The two 
last-named Masonic groups are in Norfolk. In his 
religious affiliation, he is a communicant of the 
Chesapeake Avenue Methodist Church of South 
Norfolk. Masonry and his church membership are 
the extent of his nonprofessional affiliations. 

In the Chesapeake Avenue Methodist Church on 
June 3, 1941, Dr. James Wendell Creef married 
Hallie Rose of Norfolk, daughter of Leo B. and 
Esther (Rogers) Rose of that city. The couple are 
the parents of two children: 1. Teresa Diane, born 
September 28, 1948. 2. Michael Seldon, born April 
18, 1956. The family resides at 603 D Street, South 
Norfolk. 



JEROME STANLEY GROSS, M.D.— Com- 
pleting his medical studies after his return from 
military service in World War II, Dr. Jerome Stan- 
ley Gross has practiced at South Norfolk since 
the beginning of his professional career. He is 
associated with Dr. James W. Creef in practice, 
with offices in the Creef-Gross Medical Building 
on Jackson Street. Dr. Creef is the subject of an 
accompanying sketch, in which is also to be found 
a description of the remarkable modern profession- 



al building which they built and occupy. Dr. Gross 
is active in hospital connections and professional 
groups. 

A native of Norfolk, he was born on May 21, 
1924, son of Michael and Ann Ruth (Spigel) Gross. 
Both of his parents were born in Baltimore, Mary- 
land. His father, who has been a resident of Nor- 
folk for many years, was a member of the firm of 
Gross Brothers, long active in the shoe-repairing 
business in that city. 

Dr. Gross received his early education in the 
public schools of Norfolk and graduated from 
Maury High School in 1942. He then entered the 
College of William and Mary, Norfolk Division, 
which he attended for one year. At that time his 
studies were interrupted by the call to the military 
service of his country. Assigned to the 17th Air- 
born Division, 'he served in the European Theater 
of Operations and on January 7, 1945, was severely 
wounded during the historic Battle of the Bulge. 
Following his hospitalization in England he re- 
joined his outfit and with them returned to the 
United States, where he was separated from the 
army at Fort Meade, Maryland, on November 6, 
1945- 

Resuming his studies at the College of William 
and Mary, he followed his premedical studies there 
for two years, then transferred to George Wash- 
ington University, where he received his degree 
of Bachelor of Arts in 1948, having majored in 
sociology. He next enrolled at the Medical College 
of Virginia and took his degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine there in 1952. He took a rotating internship 
at Norfolk General Hospital and in 1953 began his 
private practice of medicine in South Norfolk. 

Dr. Gross has been engaged in a general practice 
of medicine since that time, and he joined Dr. 
Creef in 1956. The two had been roomates at medi- 
cal school. The Creef-Gross Medical Building, to 
house their offices and full facilities for the diag- 
nosis and treatment of disease, was completed in 
September 1956, and opened on November I. In 
their general practice of medicine, the two physi- 
cians serve a large number of patients in all parts 
of Norfolk and Princess Anne counties. 

Besides his private practice, carried on at that 
address, Dr. Gross is a member of the staff of 
Norfolk General Hospital. He is a member of the 
Norfolk County Medical Society, the Virginia State 
Medical Association, and the Tidewater Academy 
of General Practice. 

Dr. Gross also holds membership in Lodge No. 
38, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and 
his religious affiliation is with Beth El Temple in 
Norfolk. His favorite sport is fishing. 

On June 6, 1950, at Richmond, Dr. Jerome S. 
Gross married Pearl Kline of Hazelton, Pennsyl- 





■**~*~*S/i 




LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



127 



vania, daughter of Sam and Minnie (Shloss) Kline, 
now residents of Princess Anne County. Dr. and 
Mrs. Gross reside at Avalon Terrace in that coun- 
ty. 



ROBERT EDWARD GIBSON— Since the be- 
ginning of his legal career, Robert Edward Gibson 
has practiced at South Norfolk. He has held of- 
fice as city attorney, and is now commonwealth 
attorney. He is a progressive young lawyer and 
an effective worker in civic groups as well. 

Born May 15, 1918, at South Norfolk, he is a 
son of Luther Harrison and Bertha (Bunnell) 
Gibson. His father was born in 1893 in the Rose- 
raont section of Portlock, which in recent years 
has been annexed to South Norfolk. He was des- 
cended from forebears long associated with the 
development of that area, but his own career came 
to an untimely end while he was still in his twen- 
ties, in an accident which occurred in 1921. His 
wife, the former Bertha Iola Bunnell, was a native 
of New Haven, Connecticut, and daughter of Al- 
bert A. and Maude Adelaide (Vibbert) Bunnell. 
She was descended from early settlers in Massa- 
chusetts and Connecticut. Following the death of 
her husband, she was married in 1924 to Dr. 
Luther Clyde Ferebee. Dr. Ferebee, who died at 
South Norfolk in 1952, was a prominent physician 
and surgeon, and distinguished himself in public 
office as well. He was a member of the General 
Assembly from 1914 to 1916; was sheriff of Nor- 
folk County from 1916 to 1920; and was county 
coroner from 1930 to 1942. He was influential in 
political circles. Mrs. Bertha ( Bunnell-Gibson) 
Ferebee died in South Norfolk in 1942. By her 
first marriage, to Mr. Gibson, she was the mother 
of two children: 1. Helen Virginia, who died Janu- 
ary 6, 1926. 2. Robert Edward. 

Graduating from South Norfolk High School 
in 1935, Robert E. Gibson continued his academic 
studies for three years at Hampden-Sydney Col- 
lege, and for a time was employed as a chemist. 
For his law studies, he entered the University of 
Richmond, where he received his degree of Bache- 
lor of Laws in 1948. The same year he began ac- 
tive practice at South Norfolk in association with 
the late Honorable Q. C. David, Jr., judge of the 
corporation court of South Norfolk. This partner- 
ship continued until January I, 1951. In addition to 
his general practice, Mr. Gibson served from 1948 
to 1950 as town attorney of Portlock, since merged 
with South Norfolk; and he was city attorney of 
the latter city from January 1, 1951, until March 
1, 1956. In November 1954, while serving in that 
office, he was appointed to his present post as 
commonwealth attorney in South Norfolk, to fill 
out the unexpired term of Jerry G. Bray, Jr., who 
had succeeded Judge Davis as judge of the cor- 



poration court. In 1947, Mr. Gibson served for a 
time as assistant trial justice of South Norfolk. 
Meantime, besides his many public duties, he capa- 
bly carries on a general practice of law, with 
offices at 1107 Poindexter Street. He is a mem- 
ber of the Norfolk-Portsmouth Bar Association 
and the Virginia State Bar Association. 

His fraternities are Delta Theta Phi (law) and 
Lambda Chi (honorary scholastic). Active in civic 
affairs, he is a member and past president of the 
South Norfolk Junior Chamber of Commerce, arid 
a member of the Lions Club and the Southside 
Business Men's Club. Since 1948 he has served as 
secretary of the South Norfolk Democratic party 
organization and was an alternate delegate to 
the 1956 National Democratic Convention in Chica- 
go, Illinois. He enjoys sports as a spectator, and is 
fond of fishing. He is a communicant of the Rose- 
mont Christian Congregational Church on Bain- 
bridge Boulevard. The Gibson family donated the 
site on which this church is erected, and Gibson 
Street, nearby, took its name from them. 

At Raleigh, North Carolina, on January 10, 1945, 
Robert E. Gibson married Margaret Elizabeth 
McHorney of South Norfolk. They live at 1401 
Earl Street in that city. 



HENRY STEELE LEWIS— Norfolk's publish- 
ing and broadcasting executive Henry Steele Lewis 
was for eight years president of Norfolk News- 
papers, Inc., publishers of the Virginian- Pilot and 
the Ledger-Dispatch, and also an official of WTAR 
Radio Corporation. Although educated as a chemist, 
he early turned his attention to publishing as a 
career, and learned the newspaper business under 
the tutelage and in close association with S. L. 
Slover, now chairman of the board of Norfolk 
Newspapers, Inc., and the late Paul S. Huber, 
whom he succeeded as president. While he shunned 
the spotlight, Mr. Lewis was always active, both 
as publisher and as private citizen, on behalf of 
charitable and civic enterprises. 

Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on May 25, 
1900, the publisher was the son of George H. and 
Regina (Steele) Lewis. He moved with his parents 
to Norfolk in 1903. His father, an electrical en- 
gineer, had been sent to that city to supervise the 
electrification of the Chesapeake Transit Company's 
line to Virginia Beach by way of Cape Henry. 
Henry S. Lewis received his early education at 
Norfolk Academy, and later attended Episcopal 
High School at Alexandria, Virginia. Then, as his 
father had done before him, he enrolled at Cornell 
University, Ithaca, New York. There he received his 
degree of Bachelor of Chemistry in 1923. The year 
he entered there, he was in the Reserve Officers 
Training Corps. 



TWVa. 13 



128 



LOWER TIDEW ATER YIROIMA 



After graduation from Cornell, Mr. Lewis was 
employed by the Dunlop Rubber Company in Buf- 
falo, Xew York, and Baltimore, Maryland. In April 
1926, he became associated with the Ledger-Dis- 
patch as assistant treasurer and assistant secretary. 
Seven years later he was elected secretary and 
treasurer of Norfolk Newspapers, Inc. In 1935, he 
took on the additional duties of business manager of 
the two newspapers, the corporation having mean- 
time acquired the Virginian-Pilot as well. In 1945, 
he was promoted to vice president, continuing as 
treasurer and business manager; and on October 
14, 1946, he was promoted to the presidency of 
Norfolk Newspapers, Inc., succeeding the late Paul 
S. Huber. 

Mr. Lewis proved himself an executive of modern 
and progressive views, and humane motivations. 
During his long association with the newspapers, 
he encouraged the granting of many benefits to 
employees, including hospitalization, insurance and 
retirement provisions. 

Mr. Lewis was vice president and treasurer of 
WTAR Radio Corporation. He was a director of 
Richmond Newspapers, Inc., Seaboard Citizens Na- 
tional Bank, as well as Norfolk Newspapers, Inc., 
Ledger-Dispatch Corporation, and WTAR Radio 
Corporation. He was secretary and assistant treas- 
urer of the S. L. Slover Corporation. 

He found the time to make a vital contribution 
to the civic life of Norfolk. For a number of years 
he was president of the Union Mission. He had 
worked effectively with the Tidewater Council, Boy 
Scouts of America, in which his father had long 
been a leader. He was a member of the Virginian 
Club, the Princess Anne Country Club, the Nor- 
folk Yacht and Country Club and Chi Phi frater- 
nity. An Episcopalian in religious faith, he attended 
Eastern Shore Chapel. 

On October 22, 1930, Henry Steele Lewis mar- 
ried Miss Virginia Syer of Portsmouth, daughter 
of Charles and Grace (Watts) Syer. The couple 
became the parents of a son, H. S. Lewis. Jr., born 
October 27, 1933. He graduated from Princeton 
University, and is now a medical student at the 
University of Virginia. 

Mr. Lewis' death occurred on October 24, 1954. 
The following appraisal of his place in the com- 
munity, appearing in the editorial columns of a 
local newspaper, conveys to us much of the charac- 
ter and nature of the man: 

Although Mr. Lewis never indulged in extremes of self- 
effacement, he avoided personal publicity and chose to play 
a highly important role in the life of the community with a 
quiet reserve that marked him in all his activities. Un- 
obtrusively, he gave his support and the support of the 
newspapers of which he was the head to a vast number of 
worthwhile community enterprises. An important part of his 
contribution to his times was the manner in which he 
directed the newspaper operations in the performance of the 



public service to which they are committed. 

The death of Mr. Lewis at an age when many more 
years of usefulness seemed sure to lie ahead, is reason for 
regret on the part of the business world of which he was 
a part, and is a cause of genuine sadness on the part of 
those both inside and outside the corporations with which 
he was connected who felt the influence of his personality 
and his kindly spirit. 



QUINTON CLARENCE DAVIS, JR.— Few 
men in the history of the Tidewater region have 
been held in as universal esteem and affection as 
the late Quinton Clarence Davis, Jr. As attorney, 
mayor, legislator, judge and civic leader he con- 
sistently bent his efforts toward the advancement 
of the commonwealth. He occupied a unique place 
in the affairs of South Norfolk, where his activities 
always centered. Known affectionately as Q. C., 
Judge Davis was one of the most striking personal- 
ities of his times. 

He was born in Pasquotank County, North 
Carolina, on September 9, 1884, son of Rev. Quin- 
ton C, Sr., and Sarah Elizabeth (Davis) Davis. 
Both parents were likewise natives of Pasquotank 
County, and his father was a Baptist clergyman, 
at one time serving as pastor of the South Nor- 
folk Baptist Church. He died at Eustis, Florida, 
in 1926. He was a son of John Smithson and Emma 
Virginia (Sawyer) Davis, and his father was a 
planter and surveyor in Pasquotank County. Sarah 
Elizabeth (Davis) Davis was the daughter of Wil- 
son Davis, a planter and a brick and stone mason, 
who built the first county courthouse in Pasquo- 
tank County. His wife was the former Elizabeth 
Halstead. Of Welsh origin, the Davises were 
among the families whose forebears had settled in 
Pasquotank County in colonial times. 

Judge Q. C. Davis attended the public schools 
of Virginia, Chester, Pennsylvania, and Maryland, 
and completed his secondary studies at Camden, 
Xew Jersey, where he graduated from high school. 
He then attended the University of North Caro- 
lina, but transferred to the University of Richmond 
to complete his professional studies, receiving his 
law degree there in 1912. He began his active 
practice in New Jersey, and in his early career 
was also a member of the Pennsylvania bar. In 
1914 he located at South Norfolk, and he also 
maintained law offices in Norfolk. He held the 
reputation in legal circles of being a forceful and 
colorful figure at the bar, particularly in his pre- 
sentation of a defense case. He took part in many 
notable cases. He possessed many of the traits of 
the earlier circuit-riding lawyers, who adopted an 
oratorical and dramatic style in the courtroom and 
political campaigns, who made frequent use of 
quotes from the Bible and other fundamental books, 
who acquired a shrewdness in appraising humanity, 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



129 



and who reflected much of the spirit which per- 
meates American humor. Excelling in these same 
traits. Judge Davis was recognized as without peer 
iii pleading his cases. He was active, zestful, 
argumentative, sometimes impish, often gleeful, 
and always warmly human. 

His election by the General Assembly to the 
judgeship of the new corporation court of the city 
of South Norfolk came to him as a logical honor 
after many years of practice. As judge of South 
Norfolk's first court of record, as the city became 
a municipality of the first class, he took the oath 
of office on April 12, 1952. In the editorial columns 
of the Portsmouth "Star," the following tribute was 
paid him, which also sketched something of his 
previous career in public life: 

Q. C. Davis, a practitioner at the bar for many years, him- 
self a former member of the General Assembly from .Norfolk 
County for ten years, South Norfolk's first Town Mayor in 
1919, and long its Town and City Attorney, had held the 
esteem of his neighbors in South Norfolk through a long life 
of service to them. His active churchtnanship, his devoted 
family life and his constancy in the cause of friendship, built 
in both business and political affiliation, gave him all that 
former political adversaries, who had now come to honor him, 
needed for their justification . . . O. C. Davis will not be 
fou«d lacking in the performance of judicial duty. On the 
other hand he will do honor to the bench over which he will 
preside. This tribute which is given in heartfelt measure also 
comes from columns that have not always been in accord with 
some political stands taken or followed by the new South 
Norfolk jurist. But the world has known that Q. C. Davis 
never faltered in loyalty to man or cause where favor had 
been accorded or trust placed in him. Indeed, what attribute 
could be superior ! 

He filled the important post of judge of the 
corporation court of South Norfolk until his death 
on August 31, 1054. This event came as a distinct 
shock to people throughout the state, as he had 
become widely known. Among the tributes to his 
memory was the following from the editorial pages 
of the Norfolk "Virginian- Pilot" of September 1. 
'954: 

The public record of Judge Davis is full of his activities, 
and nearly all of them — this too was characteristic — were con- 
centrated in South Norfolk which above all places he loved. 
There he was the town's first mayor, town and city attorney, 
legislator for several terms, political manager in local, district 
and to some extent in state affairs, and, late in his life, 
judge. There he was the center of nearly everything. And 
there he left his imprint on a community where everybody 
knew him and he knew everybody. But it is impossible to 
measure the life of a man like Q. C. Davis, Jr.. by official 
yardsticks. To an extraordinary degree the personality was 
the man. His death leaves a vacancy in South Norfolk that 
is not likely to be filled. 

The South Norfolk City Council passed a resolu- 
tion on the occasion of his death, which read in 
part: 



The lasting memory of Q. C. Davis, Jr., 



vill live and 



blossom and flourish in the hearts of his fellow citizens and 
it seems most appropriate to say at his death that "To live in 
the hearts of those we leave behind is not to die." 

In private affairs, Judge Davis was a member 
of the South Norfolk Baptist Church, the Civitan 
Club, Norfolk Lodge No. 38, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, the Berkley Red Men 
and Willie Lee Lodge No. 119, Knights of Pythias. 
His fraternity was Delta Theta Phi. 

In 1909, Judge Q. C. Davis married Lola Ger- 
trude Diggs, daughter of John Franklin and Susan 
(Morgan) Diggs of Mathews County, Virginia. 
Her father was a planter and served in Lee's Army 
of Virginia in the War Between the States. Lola 
Gertrude (Diggs) Davis died in South Norfolk on 
July 7, 1942. The couple were the parents of five 
children: 1. Virginia Marie, a graduate of West 
Hampton College. She married James Gardner 
Knowlton of Norfolk. Now residing in Atlanta, 
Georgia, they are the parents of two children: Jane 
Jones and Marie Gardner Knowlton. 2. Quinton 
Clarence. Ill, of South Norfolk. He attended the 
College of William and Mary, served in the United 
States Army in World War II, and married 
Thelma Creef of South X T orfolk. They are the pa- 
rents of a son, Quinton Clarence, 4th. 3. Rose 
Gertrude, who received her degree of Bachelor of 
Arts from Mary Washington College. She married 
John Hodges Morrisette, hardware merchant in 
the Berkley section of Norfolk. They are the 
parents of two children: Anne Davis and John 
Hodges Morrisette, Jr. 4. Emma Jane, who re- 
ceived her degree of Bachelor of Arts from Martha 
Washington College and was formerly active in 
public affairs, serving as a member of the South 
Carolina State Legislature. She married William 
Luther McDermott of Rock Hill in that state, and 
they are the parents of three children: Lola Davis, 
Emma Jane and William Luther McDermott. 5. 
Jefferson Davis, a graduate of Elon College and 
the College of William and Mary. During World 
War II he served in the United States Fifteenth 
Air Force in Italy, and is now a member of the 
faculty of Princess Anne High School. He married 
Janet Rowe of Hampton. Virginia. 

The stately Davis home at 1 106 Chesapeake Ave- 
nue was always one of the focal points of South 
Norfolk hospitality. There the judge reared his 
family and found his greatest joy in their company, 
as well as among his flowers and the books of one 
of the finest libraries in the region. He was very 
much interested in beautifying South Norfolk, and 
with W.P.A. workers during the depression, he 
made Lakeside Park a place of beauty. He had 
hopes of a museum for the park, and had collected 
many souvenirs and items of historical interest for 
display. 



'3° 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



High ideals of service to his fellowmen, both 
in private life and in positions of public trust, was 
a guiding star in the career of Judge Davis. Honor- 
ed and respected in his lifetime, he has won a 
secure place in the affectionate remembrance of 
an entire citv. 



ALLAN RANDOLPH HOFFMAN— Since 

the close of World War I, Allan Randolph Hof- 
r..an has operated his own business as ship agent. 
With headquarters at 23 10 West Avenue, New- 
port News, he serves as local representative of 
a number of the major steamship lines with 
piers at Hampton Roads. At present, he is serv- 
ing as chairman of the Newport News Port 
Commission. 

He was born at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
on June 27, 1892, son of Allan R. and Eliza- 
beth C. (Peterson) Hoffman. His father, also 
born in that city, on December 25, 1800, was an 
engraver by trade. He died on April 25, 1908, 
but his wife, the former Elizabeth C. Peterson, 
ij still living, being in her ninety-fifth year at 
the time of writing. She too is a native Philadel- 
phian. 

The family came to Newport News in Allan 
Randolph Hoffman's early years, and he received 
his education in the public schools of that city, 
graduating from its high school in 19 17. For two 
years he attended the College of William and 
Mary, and left to begin his business as a ship 
agent, forming the firm of Allan R. Hoffman 
and Company in 1919. The concern has con- 
tinued to operate successfully under that name 
to the present time. The Hoffman Building, which 
houses its offices, was erected by Mr. Hoffman 
in 1937. 

Since the Newport News Port Commission 
was formed in 1954. Mr. Hoffman has served 
as a member and is now its chairman. For 
nineteen years he has been a member of the 
local board of education. Besides his major busi- 
ness connection, he is president of the Trave- 
lers Aid Society, and vice president of the 
Tri-City Corporation and the Propeller Club 
of Newport News. He is a member of the 
Rotary Club and served as its secretary for 
several years. His other memberships include 
the James River Country Club and Peninsula 
Lodge No. 278, Ancient Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons. A member of the Newport News Consis- 
tory, Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, he 
holds the Thirty-second degree, and is a mem- 
ber of Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is an active 
communicant of Trinity Methodist Church. In 
his politics he is a Democrat. 

At Staunton, Virginia, on September 2, 1920, 



Allan Randolph Hoffman married Rose Collins 
Harman of that city, daughter of Ernest M. 
and Bettie (Collins) Harman. The couple are 
the parents of three children: 1. Rosellen, who 
is the wife of G. Guy Via, Jr. 2. Martha Eliza- 
beth, who married Walter W. Eames, Jr. 3. Al- 
lan R.. Jr. Mr. Hoffman has three grandchil- 
dren: G. Guy Via, 3rd, Rosellen Randolph \ ia, 
and Charlotte Christian Eames. 



EDWARD NELSON ISLIN— A little more 
than three decades ago, Edward Nelson Islin be- 
gan his career with The Bank of Virginia at 
Newport News, and he is now vice president, 
and manager of its Newport News office at 2805 
Washington Avenue. 

Born in that city on August 11, 1904, he is a 
son of John Alexander and Agnes (Smith) Islin. 
His father came to the South from Carbon County, 
Pennsylvania, and died on October 13, 1954. Agnes 
.Smith, whom he married, was a native of Glasgow, 
Scotland, and she died on April 11, 1941. Attend- 
ing the public schools of Newport News, Edward 
N. Islin graduated from high school there in 
June 1920. His advanced studies were taken at 
the College of William and Mary, where he gradu- 
ated with the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
19^5- 

In that year he joined the staff of The Bank 
of Virginia at Newport News. He held various 
positions there and at the bank's branches in 
Richmond and Roanoke, and was well qualified 
by his varied experience for the responsibilities 
of vice president, to which office he was named 
in 1944. At the same time he became manager of 
the Newport News office where he had begun 
hi- connection. 

Mr. Islin has taken a positive role in welfare 
work in his home city. He is past chairman of 
the Newport News-Warwick Chapter of the 
American Red Cross and is now serving as 
treasurer and member of the board. He was for- 
merly fund chairman of the Community Chest. 
He is a past president of the James River Country 
Club, and past president of the Newport News 
Rotary Club. His other memberships include the 
Lodge No. 315, Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, and Theta Delta Chi social fraternity. 
Mr. Islin is a Democrat in his politics, and a 
Methodist in his religious faith. He serves on 
the official board of the First Methodist Church 
of Warwick. Golf and fishing are his favorite 
sports. 

At Suffolk. Virginia, on October 15, 1927, Edward 
Nelson Islin married Mary Elizabeth Eley of 
that city, daughter of W. Hatcher and Beulah 
(Savage) Eley. The couple are the parents of 
one daughter, Elizabeth Eley, who is now the 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



'3' 



wife of Robert L. Saffelle, Jr., of Salisbury, North 
Cirolina. 



CRAWFORD STANLEY ROGERS— As pres- 
ident and general manager of the Norfolk Ship- 
building and Dry Dock Corporation, the late 
Crawford Stanley Rogers occupied a position of 
prominence in the public and civic affairs of his 
city, as well as in his industry. He contributed 
much to the advancement of his city, and in 
recognition of his place as one of Norfolk's "First 
Citizens," received the Cosmopolitan Club Award 
for 1954. 

Member of a distinguished American family, he 
was descended from colonial settlers in Virginia, 
and was born at Norfolk on September 27, 1885, 
son of Joseph Stanley and Addie Aurelia (Moore) 
Rogers. His father was a businessman of Norfolk, 
born there on September 26, 1859, and died in 
the same city on January 2, 1912. He was in 
turn a son of Crawford Rogers, a drygoods mer- 
chant of Norfolk and a veteran of Confederate 
service, who was born on January 6, 1837, and 
died September 7, 1920. He married Mary Eliza- 
beth Diggs, born March 11, 1837, died April 10, 
1916. Their marriage took place on April 28, 1858. 
William Diggs, great-grandfather of Crawford 
Stanley Rogers, was born September 2, 1809, and 
died September 13, 1866. His wife, Julia Anne 
(Foster) Diggs, was born February 10, 1813, and 
died January II, 1876; and her father, Isaac Fos- 
ter, was born in 1789, son of Captain Isaac Foster, 
who died in 1805. He served as a lieutenant and 
later as captain of a company under the com- 
mand of Captain Josiah Foster and Colonel John 
Peyton in the Revolution. He was in command 
of his company at Yorktown when Cornwallis 
surrendered. 

Addie Aurelia (Moore) Rogers was born No- 
vember 18, 1862, and died September 19, 1916. 
She was a daughter of Harvey and Julia (Father- 
ly) Moore of Norfolk. 

Completing his formal education in the public 
schools of Berkley Ward, city of Norfolk, Craw- 
ford Stanley Rogers began his career in 1903, 
with the Southern Railway, working in various 
positions until 1907. Thereafter until 1916 he was 
associated with the Garrett Wine Company of 
Norfolk as bookkeeper and secretary. 

It was in 1916 that Mr. Rogers formed the 
connection with Norfolk Shipbuilding and Dry 
Dock Corporation which was to continue for the 
duration of his career. He joined the organization 
in the capacity of assistant secretary; and during 
1925-1926, was general manager as well as assist- 
ant secretary. He was vice president and general 
manager from 1926 to 1944, and in the latter year 
became president of the corporation, continuing 



his duties as general manager. Under his capable 
management, the company grew into one of the 
major industries of Tidewater Virginia. During 
the World War II years, when its operations were 
at peak volume, there were about twenty-five hun- 
dred employees on the payroll. 

Norfolk Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corpora- 
tion had its beginning shortly after the turn of 
the century, when F. O. Smith and Charles Mc- 
Coy formed a partnership known as the Smith and 
McCoy Shipbuilding Company. Its plant was at the 
foot of the Campostella Bridge. With the death of 
Mr. McCoy several years later, the company be- 
came the F. O. Smith Shipbuilding Company; and 
when the other partner died in 1916, the plant was 
purchased by the present owners. Incorporation 
under the present name took place in 1916. Today, 
there are three completely equipped ship repair 
plants in the Norfolk Harbor, a twelve-thousand- 
ton floating dry dock, a five-thousand-ton Crandall 
railway, a four-thousand-ton floating dry dock, and 
three thousand-ton marine railways. These, effec- 
tively used by the company, play a large part in 
keeping Norfolk in the lead as a shipping center. 

The first president of the corporation when it 
was formed in 191 6 was George W. Roper, who 
became chairman of the board in 1945. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Rogers. 

Besides heading this large corporation, Mr. Rog- 
ers had many other interests. He served on the 
boards of directors of the National Bank of Com- 
merce, the Virginia State Chandler of Commerce, 
the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce, the Virginia 
Manufacturers Association, Norfolk Community 
Chest, Patriotic Education, Inc., the National As- 
sociation of Manufacturers, and Norfolk Industrial 
Commission. From 1948 to 195 1, he served as a 
director of the Norfolk City School Board; and 
over the same three year period, was a director 
of Tidewater Hospitalization Association. He was 
a member of Southern Industrial Relations Con- 
ference; and in 1954 became president of the 
Tidewater Virginia Development Council. He was 
a member of the board of directors of the Ship- 
builders Council of America, and chairman of the 
board of the Norfolk Port Authority. He was past 
chairman of the Hampton Roads Maritime As- 
sociation. 

During World War II, he was awarded a Cer- 
tificate of Service, for voluntary and noncompen- 
sated services rendered to the War Manpower 
Commission in the Hampton Roads area. In 
1952 he received the "Man of the Year in Indus- 
try" Award of the Norfolk Industrial Manage- 
ment Club — -a choice concurred in by the clubs 
of Portsmouth and Richmond. The Cosmopolitan 
Club of Norfolk selected him as First Citizen for 
1954. Mr. Rogers was a member of the advisory 



132 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



board of the College of William and Mary, Nor- 
folk Division, and of Virginia Polytechnic Insti- 
tute Extension. He served as co-chairman of the 
MacArthur Memorial Committee in 1951. He was 
chairman of the recruitment committee for teach- 
ers, Norfolk Public Schools; was president of 
Norfolk Servicemen's Club for Armed Services 
Personnel from 1951 to 1955; and was chairman 
of the board of the Norfolk Navy Young Men's 
Christian Association. In the service of the people 
of his home city, Mr. Rogers was a member of 
the Norfolk Tax Commission from 1946 to 1948; 
and in the latter year he became president of the 
Leigh Memorial Hospital. 

A member of the Kiwanis Club of Norfolk, he 
served as its president in 1940; and he was presi- 
dent of the Propeller Club of Norfolk during 1937- 
1938. He was a member of the Norfolk Executives 
Club, the Virginia Club, Norfolk Yacht and Coun- 
try Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine 
Engineers, and Berkley Lodge No. 167, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, of which he was past 
master. Active in the higher bodies of Masonry, 
he was a member of Ionic Chapter No. 46, Royal 
Arch Masons; Grice Commandery No. 16, Knights 
Templar; and Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. Another 
major organizational interest was the patriotic 
societies. He was a member and past president 
of Norfolk Chapter, Virginia Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution, and was a past presi- 
dent of the Virginia society as well. He was past 
vice-president-general of the South Atlantic Dis- 
trict, and a member of the board of trustees of 
the National Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution. 

Mr. Rogers was a communicant of Ghent Metho- 
dist Church, and served as chairman of the board 
of stewards in 1938- 1939. He was chairman of 
the committee whicli financed and built eight 
homes in Norfolk for retired Methodist ministers. 
Gardening was his hobby, and he was especially 
interested in floriculture, successfully raising ca- 
mellias and azaleas. 

On March 22, 1910, Crawford Stanley Rogers 
married Columbia Taylor Bott of Norfolk, daugh- 
ter of James A. and Georgie R. (Sturgis) Bott. 
Mr. and Mrs. Rogers became the parents of a 
daughter, Frances, who married James R. Coates 
of Norfolk, assistant vice president of Norfolk 
Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corporation. Mr. and 
Mrs. Coates are the parents of two children: 1. 
Crawford Rogers. 2. James Ironmonger Coates. 
The Rogers home is at 5315 Edgewater Drive, 
and Mrs. Rogers maintains a summer place at 
Blue Ridge Summit in Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Rogers' death, on June 4, 1956, deprived 
his region of one of its most capable and dis- 



tinguished industrialists, and his home city of a 
loyal and useful citizen. 

Of many resolutions passed and presented to 
Mrs. Rogers, we quote from one passed by the 
National Association of Manufacturers: 

Possessed of keen mind, his exceptional ability, his clear 
judgment and wise counsel combined with his high sense of 
honor commanded the respect of all those associates who had 
contact with him and the memory of his cheerful, kind and 
lovable qualities and sterling character will be an abiding 
inspiration to all those who enjoyed his friendship. 



WILLIAM ALLEN CHARTERS— A mortgage 
and investment banker whose entire career has 
been centered in Norfolk, William Allen Charters 
is now president of Investment Corporation of 
Norfolk. He is also an official of other corporations 
and is active in real estate development, civic 
causes, and welfare work. 

Mr. Charters is a native of Norfolk and was born 
on February 26, 1894. son of Charles Linwood and 
Elizabeth Frances (West) Charters. The financial 
executive received his entire formal education in 
the public schools of his city. He began his career 
in 191 2 with the Norfolk Bank for Savings and 
Trusts, which later became the Trust Company of 
Norfolk, and he remained with that oragnization 
until 1927. He has since been identified with the 
Investment Corporation of Norfolk, beginning his 
connection in the capacity of secretary-treasurer 
in 1927. He was named vice president in 194 1 and 
president in 1950. 

Mr. Charters is also president of Lakewood, 
Inc.; president and director, Norfolk-Justice In- 
surance Corporation; and vice president and di- 
rector, Nansemond Hotel. He is currently serving 
as chairman of the Employees' Retirement System 
of the city of Norfolk, and he is a member of the 
Board of Review for Real Estate Assessments for 
the City of Norfolk. He serves on the board of 
trustees of the Leigh Memorial Hospital, is on 
the board of directors of the Norfolk Chamber of 
Commerce, and attends the Church of the Good 
Shepherd. He is a member of the Princess Anne 
Country Club; the Virginia Club; the Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, Ruth Lodge No. 89; and 
Consistery and Khedive Temple, of the Shrine, in 
Norfolk. 

On July 12, 1924, William Allen Charters mar- 
ried Emma Jane Mercer. They make their home 
at 1302 Harmott Avenue. 



HENRY LESLIE LAM, JR.— One of the 

younger men practicing law in Norfolk, Henry 
Leslie Lam, Jr., who resides at Virginia Beach, 
has his own firm, with offices in the Board of 
Trade Building. He is a veteran of Air Corps 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



'33 



service in World War II, and has held responsible 
posts in veterans' organizations. 

Born November 21, 1922, in Norfolk, Mr. Lam 
is a son of Henry L., Sr., and Elizabeth (Bliss) 
Lam. Both of his parents are native Virginians, 
his father having been born at Goshen and his 
mother at Farmville. The elder Henry L. Lam 
was for twenty-five years with the Southern Sani- 
tary Company, of Norfolk, a wholesale dealer in 
janitors' and cleaning supplies, and advanced to 
the position of secretary and treasurer in that or- 
ganization. He died August 8, 1938, at the age of 
sixty-three. His wife, the former Elizabeth Bliss, 
lived to the age of seventy and died February of 
1949- 

Reared in Norfolk and receiving his early educa- 
tion there, Henry L. Lam, Jr., completed his prep- 
aratory studies at Augusta Military Academy at 
Fort Defiance, from which he graduated. He com- 
pleted his advanced studies after his service in 
World War II. Enlisting in the United States 
Army Air Corps in 1943, he was commissioned a 
lieutenant, and served as an instructor in flying. 
He received his honorable discharge on December 
5, 1945- 

Mr. Lam then resumed his education at Wil- 
liam and Mary College, took his degree of Bachelor 
of Arts there in 1950, and two years later received 
his degree of Bachelor of Civil Law from the Wil- 
liamsburg branch of the same college. Admitted 
to the bar of the state of Virginia in 1952, he began 
practice as an associate in the firm of Kellam and 
Kellam in Norfolk, and remained with that partner- 
ship until February 1955. He left to open his own 
office for a general practice of law, in the Board 
of Trade Building, Norfolk. He is a member of 
the Virginia State Bar and the Virginia State 
Bar Association, the American Bar Association, 
and the Norfolk-Portsmouth Bar Association. 

Active in the American Legion, Mr. Lam has 
held office twice as commander of Princess Anne 
Post No. 113. He is past Judge Advocate of the 
Department of Virginia of the Legion, and Grand 
Advocate of the Forty and Eight. He is a member 
of the Tidewater Automobile Association, the 
Wythe Law Club of the College of William and 
Mary (of which he is past president), the Air- 
craft Owners and Pilots Association, the Princess 
Anne Ruritan Club, and Phi Kappa Tau social 
fraternity. Mr. Lam and his family attend the 
First Presbyterian Church of Virginia Beach, and 
he serves as an usher there. 

In September 1942, Henry L. Lam married Edna 
Goodman of Mooresville, North Carolina, daugh- 
ter of Mack and Lelia Goodman. Her father is 
a retired farmer and lives in Mount Ulla, North 
Carolina. Mr. and Mrs. Lam have two children : 



I. Gary, who was born July 11, 1943, in Chico, 
California. 2. Bliss, born on April 8, 1948, in 
Norfolk. Mrs. Lam is active in church work, and 
is president of the Ladies Auxiliary of the Ameri- 
can Legion. 



GEORGE KEITH McMURRAN— In the in- 
surance business since the conclusion of his ac- 
tive wartime service in the United State Navy, 
George Keith McMurran is now vice president 
and general manager of the Newport News firm 
of Bowen Company. He is currently serving as 
an official of the Virginia Association of Insur- 
ance Agents. 

Born November 20, 1920, at Newport News, 
he is the son of Lewis A. and Agnes Barclay 
(Epes) McMurran. His father was also a native 
of the Lower Tidewater area, born at Ports- 
mouth. He trained as a lawyer and practiced at 
Newport News, where he died on January 12, 
1930. His wife, the former Agnes B. Epes, was 
born in Franklin, Kentucky, and died November 
I, 1949. Attending the public schools of his na- 
tive city, G. Keith McMurran graduated from 
Newport News High School in 193", and entered 
Washington and Lee University, where he re- 
ceived his degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1941. 
Shortly afterwards he enlisted for service in 
the United States Navy. In the course of his 
four years in uniform, he advanced in rank from 
ensign to lieutenant, junior grade, and lieutenant. 
Separated from active service in December 1945, 
he retains the rank of lieutenant commander 111 
the United States Naval Reserve. 

In January 1946, Mr. McMurran joined the 
general insurance firm, Bowen Company, with 
headquarters at 136 Twenty-eighth Street in New- 
port News. He has been its vice president and 
general manager since 1954. Active in the Vir- 
ginia Association of Insurance Agents since he 
entered the field, he now holds office as its vice 
president. 

In his home area he is a member of the 
James River Country Club, Hampton Roads Ger- 
man Club, and the Rotary Club at Warwick, 
and the Lafayette Gun Club. He is fond of the 
outdoors, his favorite pastimes being fishing, 
horseback riding and target shooting. Mr. Mc- 
Murran's fraternity is Pi Kappa Alpha. He is 
a Democrat in his politics. Active in the work 
of St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Newport News, 
he serves on its vestry, and he is secretary of 
the Standing Committee, Diocese of Southern 
Virginia. 

On July 7, 1945, at Newport News, G. Keith 
McMurran married Jane Beale Saunders of that 
city, daughter of Joseph H. and Lola (Beale) 
Saunders. Her father, who is deceased, was 



CH 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



superintendent of schools there. Mr. and Mrs. 
McMurran have one son, George Keith, Jr., who 
was born on July 23, 1951. 



GEORGE WINN GRANGER— Active in the 

building supplies industry from the beginning of 
his career, George Winn Granger is an official 
of the firm of Ranhorne and Granger, Inc., of 
Hampton, and of the firm bearing the same 
name at Williamsburg. He has held office in the 
Peninsula Building Exchange, and currently heads 
the Warwick Rotary Club. 

Born at Newport News on June 14, 1912, he 
is a son of George Llewellyn and Maude M. (Winn) 
Granger. His father is deceased, but his mother 
is still living. Attending the public schools of 
Newport News, George W. Granger (who is 
better known among his friends and business 
associates as Jack Granger) graduated from the 
high school in that city in February 1931. He 
then began a sixteen years' connection with Ben- 
son Phillips Company, a building supplies firm 
in Newport News, and held various positions in 
that organization, advancing to branch manager 
and sales manager. 

He left in 1947 to become a partner in his 
present firm, Ranhorne and Granger, Inc., a 
building supplies firm which has its headquarters 
at 1736 Pembroke Avenue in Hampton. Since 
that time he has held office as secretary and 
treasurer of the corporation. He is also secretary 
and treasurer of Ranhorne and Granger, Inc., a 
fuel distributing firm at the same address, and 
secretary and treasurer of Ranhorne and Granger, 
Inc., of Williamsburg, a building supplies firm 
which was opened in that city in March 1956. 

In the Peninsula Builders Exchange, Mr. Gran- 
ger held the office of president in 1955. He was 
president of the Rotary Club of Warwick for the 
I 95S-i956 term, and is a member of the James 
River Country Club. He is a Democrat, and at- 
tends the Calvary Baptist Church of Newport 
News. 

At Williamsburg, on February 27, 1937, George 
W. Granger married Evelyn Rogers. She was 
born in Hilton Village, now a part of Warwick, 
daughter of William R. and Estelle (Scheelky) 
Rogers. Mr. and Mrs. Granger have two chil- 
dren: 1. George Winn, Jr., who was born on 
August 28, 1942. 2. Allyson Lee, born March 
12, 1946. 



1900, Dr. Bradley is a son of Allen Marshall 
and Katherine (Dale) Bradley. His father too 
was a physician, who was born in Rich Valley, 
Indiana, and practiced in Chicago, Illinois. He 
died in 1928. Mrs. Bradley, a native of Dora, 
Indiana, is still living. Dr. Chester D. Bradley 
attended the public schools of Wabash, Indiana, 
and when his father moved to Chicago to prac- 
tice, continued his schooling there. Some years 
intervened before Dr. Bradley took up his medi- 
cal studies. He served in the army in World 
War I, being assigned to Company A, 132nd In- 
fantry Regiment, 33rd Division, as a private. He 
served overseas one year, and received his honor- 
able discharge in May 1919. 

In the early 1930s, he began his study of 
medicine and attended the University of Illinois 
Medical School in Chicago. There, in 1935, he 
received his degree of Doctor of Medicine. While 
completing his courses, be interned at Milwau- 
kee County Hospital, from 1934 to 1936, and in 
the latter year went to Washington, D. C, where 
he served as physician with the Veterans Ad- 
ministration. He came to Hampton later the 
same year, also with the Veterans Administration. 
In 1941 Dr. Bradley began his private practice 
in that city. He moved to Newport News in 
1945 and, since his arrival there, has specialized 
in obstetrics. He is a member of the American 
College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the 
Virginia Obstetrical and Gynecological Society, 
the American Medical Association, Virginia Medi- 
cal Society, Virginia Peninsula Academy of Medi- 
cine, and the Warwick-Newport News Medical 
Society. 

In 1951 Dr. Bradley assisted Colonel Paul R. 
Goode, deputy post commander at Fort Monroe, 
Virginia, in founding the Jefferson Davis Case- 
mate, which subsequently became the Historical 
Museum of Fort Monroe. He is a communicant 
of the Methodist Church. 

On September 25, 1942, in Hampton, Dr. 
Chester Dale Bradley married Miriam Katherine 
Decker of Chicago, Illinois, daughter of Homer 
and Christina (Pratt) Decker. Dr. and Mrs. 
Bradlev have no children. 



CHESTER DALE BRADLEY, M.D. has 

practiced in the Lower Tidewater area from the 
early years of his career. At the present time 
he specializes in obstetrics and has his offices 
at 2914 West Avenue, Newport News. 

Born at Wabash, Indiana, on December II, 



LEOPOLD MARSHALL von SCHILLING 

was born in Washington, D. C. on March I, 1874. 
His mother was Molly Booker of Sherwood, a 
plantation which was located near the present 
entrance to the Langley Air Force Base. His 
father was Major Franz von Schilling of the 
United States Array, formerly of the army of the 
Grand Duke of Baden, a member of an old German 
family known there as Schilling von Canstatt. 
Marshall, as he was popularly known in Hamp- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



'35 



ton, Virginia, where he spent most of his life, 
lost his mother when he was a small boy. He was 
reared by his father in Washington until the age 
of fifteen years when he came to Hampton to live 
with his uncle. Hunter R. Booker, while his 
father went back to Germany to spend his last 
days, being in ill health. 

On February 10, 1890, he went to work at the 
Bank of Newport News (now the First National 
Bank of Newport News) as a runner, and was 
employed in the banking business most of his life. 

Alter leaving the Newport News Bank he was 
employed as a teller by the Bank of Hampton 
until June 1903, when he and his Uncle organized 
the Merchants National Bank of Hampton with 
which he was connected for the remainder of 
his life. 

He was married in 1904 to Miss Martha Wynne 
Howard, and there were two sons and a daughter. 

In addition to the banking business, he was also 
in the automobile business from 191 1 to 1943. 

Prior to the first world war he held a commis- 
sion as Imperial German Vice Consul, and during 
the 1920's he was consular representative at the 
Port of Hampton Roads for the German Repub- 
lic. During this war, being restricted from mili- 
tary service by the Federal Banking Authorities, 
he nevertheless held a commission in the United 
States Secret Service. 

In the period after World War I he was in- 
strumental in the organization of a number o r . 
banks in the community, including the Bank of 
Fox Hill, the Old Point National Bank at Phoe- 
bus, The Citizens Bank at Poquoson and one in 
Gloucester County. It was also during this time 
that the local chapter of the American Institute 
of Banking was formed, and having been self- 
educated he was very conscious of the need for 
an educational program in the field of banking. 
Therefore he was an ardent supporter of this or- 
ganization for the proper education of young 
bankers. This was also the formative period of 
the Air Force at Langley Field, and he became 
banker to, and fast friend of, many of the young 
Air Force Officers who later became the leaders 
of the nation's Air Force in World War II. 

Early in the 1920s he was instrumental in 
bringing the trawl fishing industry to Hampton, 
having financed the first locally owned deep sea 
fishing vessel operating from this port. His hobby 
was his own boat, and one of his greatest interests 
was the promotion of the various phases of the 
sea food industry that offered a means of livelihood 
to the people of this community. 

In 1928 he succeeded his Uncle, H. R. Booker, 
as president of The Merchants National Bank 
of Hampton and of the Elizabeth City County 
Retail Merchants Association. 



It was also during the 1920s that he was a 
member of the Hampton School Board. 

His idea of running a bank was that the bank's 
primary object was to serve the community whose 
money made the bank's operation possible. He there- 
fore gave preference to local loans which would 
promote the best interests of the community, and 
when the bank trouble in 1933 occurred, the invest- 
ments of his bank included very few of the de- 
faulted foreign bonds which had been sold to 
some bankers on the lure of their high yield. On 
the contrary, his portfolio of local loans proved 
sound, and the confidence of the local people in- 
dicated that they were aware of his sound bank- 
ing policy. The result was that his bank opened 
promptly with no trouble nor government aid 
after the banking holiday of 1933. 

He was quick to realize the value, as a way 
out of the depression, of the Federal Housing 
Program. He made the second Federal Housing 
Insured mortgage loan in the United States. He 
became chairman of the Board of the bank in 
K144, and continued in that office until his death 
on his 50th Wedding Anniversary, October 18, 
1954, at age eighty years. He was a member of the 
Hampton Rotary Club and served as its president 
during the year 1933-1934. He was a 32nd degree 
Mason, an Elk and a member of St. John's 
Episcopal Church. 

He was well known in his community and State 
Banking group for his frankness, wisdom, honesty, 
integrity, fearlessness and civic mindedness. While 
never known for his diplomacy, one always knew 
where he stood, and he was eminently fair to 
friend and foe alike. 



LUCIEN HOWARD von SCHILLING— For 

over two decades, Lucien Howard von Schilling 
has been active in the banking profession at Hamp- 
ton, and he is now president of The Merchants 
National Bank there. He is a native of that city, 
born on June I", 1907, son of Leopold Marshall 
ami Martha (Howard) von Schilling. His father 
too was a banker, active in business for sixty-four 
years. 

After completing his public school education 
locally, Lufcien H. von Schilling attended Virginia 
Military Institute, where he graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Science. He went on to 
advanced studies at Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, where he received his Master of 
Science degree. At this time he was interested in 
an engineering career; but when he was later at- 
tracted to the banking field, he took courses with 
the American Institute of Banking, and received 
both the Pre-Standard and the Standard certifi- 
cates. 

He began his career in 1928 as design and test 



. 3 6 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



engineer with the Wright Aeronautical Corpora- 
tion, remained through 1929, and in 1930 accepted 
a position as airplane designer and stress analyst 
tor Bellanca Aircraft Corporation. He joined the 
staff of Autogiro Specialties Company of Phila- 
delphia. Pennsylvania, in 193 1, as design engineer 
and mathematician. 

When the depression struck and aircraft man- 
ufacturers were forced to cut their staffs, Mr. von 
Schilling held temporary positions selling auto- 
mobiles and working in a Bermuda hotel. 

In 1933 he turned his attention to banking, join- 
ing the staff of the Bank of Fox Hill as cashier. 
He remained with that institution until 1936, when 
he came to Hampton to assume duties as secre- 
tary of The Merchants National Bank. Between 
that time and 1944, he successively held the offices 
of vice president and executive vice president; and 
in 1944 ' ie was elevated to the presidency of The 
Merchants National Bank, a position he has since 
held. 

Mr. von Schilling was a reserve officer in the 
United States Corps of Engineers and the Coast 
Artillery Corps between 1929 and World War II. 
but he was not accepted for active wartime duties 
because of inability to pass the physical examina- 
tion. 

He is a member of the Rotary Club of Hamp- 
ton, Hampton Yacht Club and the Engineers Club 
of the Virginia Peninsula, Inc. In his religious 
faith he is Protestant Episcopal. 

At Hampton, on June 12, 1936, Lucien Howard 
von Schilling married Ruth Evelyn Andrews, 
daughter of Elton Beecher and Kate Allen (Bir- 
chell) Andrews. Mr. and Mrs. von Schilling have 
one daughter, Ruth Virginia, who was born on 
July 22, 1940. 



JOHN BRACKSTON HUNDLEY— After 
early experience in the construction and ship- 
building fielis, John Brackston Hundley entered 
the real estate business at Hampton several years 
ago, and he now heads his own agency, with offices 
a t 3507 Victoria Boulevard. He is active in busi- 
nessmen's groups and in civic causes. 

Born in Floyd County, Virginia, on December 
28, 1912, he is a son of George \V. and Cora 
Belle (Reynolds) Hundley. Both of his parents 
were born in Patrick County, Virginia. His father, 
who died in 1944, was a farmer. John B. Hundley 
attended the public schools of Roanoke County, 
and graduated from the Roanoke County High 
School in 1930. 

He began his business career with the Virginia 
Bridge and Iron Company at Roanoke, entering 
the company's employ as a stock clerk and re- 
maining with the organization for three years. 
At the end of that time he came to the Lower 



Tidewater city of Newport News, where for 
nine years he was employed by the Newport 
News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, work- 
ing in the shipfitters' department. 

He left this industrial connection in I94<> to 
enter the real estate business, and since October 
15, 1952, has headed his own firm with offices on 
Victoria Boulevard, under the name of Hundley- 
Real Estate. 



SAMUEL ROLAND BUXTON, JR.— Since his 
admittance to the bar in December 1935, Samuel 
Roland Buxton, Jr., has practiced at Newport 
News, and he has also served as judge of the 
municipal court for the City of Warwick. He 
has banking interests, and takes a considerable 
interest in fraternal affairs. 

He is a native of Newport News, born on 
August 4, 1912, son of Samuel R. and Elizabeth 
Lewis (Dimmock) Buxton. His father, who was 
born in Northampton County, North Carolina, 
was also a lawyer, and practiced at Newport News 
from 1900 to 1948. He died in November 1951. 
Miss Dimmock, whom he married, was a native of 
Baltimore, Maryland, and died in May 1941. The 
younger Samuel R. Buxton attended the public 
schools of his native city and in 1930 received 
his diploma from Newport News High School. 
He then enrolled at Wake Forest College in 
North Carolina, was a student there until 1933, 
and completed his formal education, including his 
law courses, at the University of Richmond. 

After being admitted to the bar of his state, 
Mr. Buxton practiced at Newport News. He first 
joined his father, becoming an associate in the 
firm of Buxton and Buxton, and they continued 
their professional association until the elder man's 
retirement in 1948. Since that time Samuel R. 
Buxton, Jr., has practiced independently. With 
offices in the Law Building, he conducts a gen- 
eral practice. 

In November 1952, he was appointed judge of 
the municipal court for the City of Warwick. He 
is a member of the Newport News-Warwick Bar 
Association, the Virginia State Bar Association 
and the American Bar Association. Mr. Buxton 
serves on the advisory board of the Bank of 
Virginia, Newport News Branch. He is a Demo- 
crat in his politics, and a member of Kappa Alpha 
and Omega Delta Kappa fraternities. He also 
holds membership in the James River Country- 
Club and attends St. Andrew's Episcopal Church. 

On August 17, 1938, at Newport News, Samuel 
Poland Buxton, Jr., married Ann Goodwin Parker 
of that city, daughter of Harvey T. and Mollie 
(Goodwin) Parker. The couple are the parents 
of three children: 1. Mollie Garnett, who was 
born on July 5, 1940. 2. Elizabzeth Peele, born 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



'37 



January 30, 1942. 3. Samuel Roland, 3rd, born 
January 23, 1948. 



JOSEPH ELLIOTT CARPENTER— Partner 
in the general insurance and real estate firm of 
Carpenter Brothers, at Newport News, Joseph 
Elliott Carpenter entered the realty field after his 
return from service as an army officer in World 
War II. He is a native of Brunswick County and 
was born on January 14, 1914, son of William Ruf- 
fin, Sr., and Henrietta (Elliott) Carpenter. His 
father, who was born in Brunswick County in 1859, 
was also a realtor, buying and selling such ex- 
tensive properties as farms and timberlands. He 
died on April 1, 1944, and Mrs. Carpenter died on 
May 23, 1954. She too was a native Virginian, born 
in York County. 

Joseph Elliott Carpenter attended public school 
at Alberta, and he was later a student in the 
schools of Newport News, completing his high- 
school education in that city in 1933. He was a 
student at the University of Virginia for a year 
and one-half. 

Mr. Carpenter's first job was with the Newport 
News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, where 
he worked before attending the state university. 
After completing his advanced courses, he entered 
the insurance business in the same city, as a sales- 
man representing the People's Life Insurance 
Company and Northwestern Mutual Life Insur- 
ance Company. He later became a broker. 

His career was interrupted by service in World 
War II, and for five years he was in the United 
States Army, in which he earned a captain's com- 
mission in the Transportation Corps. He spent 
some time in the Pacific Theater of Operations and 
was separated from the service in March 1946. 

He resumed his career with the Abbitt Realty 
Company in Newport News and after a year and 
one-half as salesman with that firm, joined his 
brother, William R. Carpenter, Jr., in establishing 
their own organization, Carpenter Brothers, in 
October 1947. They deal in real estate and also 
write general insurance. Offices of the firm are 
in their own building (completed in October 1957), 
which is located at 105 Thirtieth Street, Newport 
News. 

Mr. Carpenter is a member of the Peninsula 
Industrial Committee. He is also a member of 
the National Association of Real Estate Boards, 
regional vice president of the Virginia Real Estate 
Association, and past president of the Newport 
News-Warwick Real Estate Association. He was 
nominated Realtor Man of the Year in 1956. Apart 
from his professional and industrial connections, 
he belongs to the James River Country Club. He 
is serving as vestryman and as chairman of the 
finance committee for the construction of St. 



Stephen's Mission Church, which is now being 
built. In his politics he is a Democrat. 

At Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on February 16, 
1946, Joseph Elliott Carpenter married Carolyn 
Ivy Ford of Newport News, daughter of Charles 
E. Ford, whose biography appears in this work, 
and his wife, the former Mildred Ivy Creasy. Mr. 
and Mrs. Carpenter have three children: 1. Cynthia 
Lee, born January 30, 1947. 2. Joseph Elliott, Jr., 
born January 17, 1950. 3. Nancy Carolyn, born 
September 20, 1955. 



J. JAMES DAVIS— Over the past thirty-five 
years, J. James Davis has become one of the 
most widely known and respected lawyers of South 
Norfolk and the Lower Tidewater area. He has 
made substantial contributions toward the progress 
of his city, and was its mayor from 1936 to 1947. 
His administration was noteworthy for improve- 
ments and long-range planning which will continue 
to produce benefits for the citizens of South 
Norfolk. Long active in public affairs, Mr. Davis 
has also held other important positions of public 
trust. 

A native of Norfolk County, he was born near 
South Norfolk on March 22, 1896. son of the late 
Thomas and Mellie (Morgan) Davis. His paternal 
grandparents were Wilson and Elizabeth (Hal- 
stead) Davis, who were both born in Pasquotank 
County, North Carolina, but lived almost all their 
lives in Norfolk County, Virginia. Wilson Davis 
was a substantial farmer. Their son Thomas was 
born in Pasquotank County, North Carolina, on 
July 23, 1863, and in 1882, settled in the Elbow 
Community of Norfolk County, where he contin- 
ued farming. He died on May 11, 1933. His wife, 
the former Mellie Morgan, was born in Pasquo- 
tank County on March 12, 1866, and died at the 
Davis family home in Norfolk County on January 
25, 1946. She was the daughter of Abner and Anne 
Morgan, both natives of Pasquotank County and 
lifelong residents there. 

After attending Great Bridge High School (the 
site of a celebrated conflict of the American Re- 
volution), J. James Davis entered the University 
of Richmond. He attended for two years, and later 
passed his Virginia state bar examination, being 
admitted to practice in 1921. Shortly afterwards 
he began private practice in South Norfolk, where 
he has since conducted an extensive general prac- 
tice of law. With varied experience to his credit, 
he is recognized as one of the most learned and 
astute lawyers of Tidewater Virginia. 

Since early manhood he has taken a deep inter- 
est in civic and public affairs. He served as chair- 
man of the South Norfolk school board from 
1927 to 1930, and it was during his tenure that 



i 3 8 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



the South Norfolk High School was erected and 
plan- set in motion for the building of a school 
system commensurate with the needs of the city. 
On August 29, 1934, Mr. Davis was appointed 
conciliation commissioner for Norfolk County by 
the Honorable Luther B. Way, Judge of the United 
States District Court, and on October 1, 1936, he 
was appointed chairman of the group of South 
Norfolk electors pledged to the support of Frank- 
lin D. Roosevelt in the 1 'residential campaign. The 
following year he was appointed chairman of the 
James H. Price Campaign Committee for South 
Norfolk, and saw his candidate win the election 
for governor. 

Meantime, on December 9, 1936, J. James Davis 
had been appointed mayor of South Norfolk, and 
on September 1, 1937, was elected to succeed him- 
self. Successively re-elected over the next decade, 
he held office until 1947. During his tenure he 
gave full support to every movement for the bene- 
fit of South Norfolk. He inaugurated and brought 
to successful completion many projects, including 
the construction of a new city hall, a civic center 
and two overpasses, and a comprehensive system 
of -treet improvements. 

Although in recent years Mr. Davis has devoted 
his time to his extensive practice of law, he re- 
mains interested in the affairs of the Democratic 
party on the county, state and national levels. 
In the service of his own city, he is now a mem- 
ber of the board of directors and vice president 
of the South Norfolk Bridge Commission, Inc. He 
was head of Civil Defense for the City of South 
Norfolk during World War II. Mr. Davis is a 
director of the Chesapeake Building Association 
of Berkley, in Norfolk. 

He is past president of the Kiwanis Club of 
South Norfolk, and a member of the Lions Club, 
the Cavalier Yacht and Country Club, and South 
Norfolk Lodge No. 339, Ancient Free and Accep- 
ted Masons. He is also a member of Ionic Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons, of which he is a past high priest. 
Mr. Davis's favorite outdoor sport is golf. He is a 
member of the South Norfolk Baptist Church. 

\- a lawyer, he is a member of the Norfolk 
County Bar Association and the Virginia State 
Bar Association. His law office is in the Mer- 
chants and Planters Bank Building. 

By his first marriage, Mr. Davis was the father 
of two children: 1. Joseph James, Jr. 2. Ann Mae 
(Davis) Ott. J. James Davis, Sr., married, second, 
Margaret B. Bozeman, and they are the parents 
of one son, James Morgan Davis. Mr. Davis has 
four grandchildren: Joseph James, III, and Kath- 
leen Sharon Davis: and Lance M., and Donna 
Lynn Ott. The residence of Mr. and Mrs. Davis is 
at Linkhorn Park, Virginia Beach. 



HARRY A. KEITZ— Throughout the greater 

part of his career, Harry A. Keitz has headed the 
freight forwarding and customs brokerage house, 
Wilfred Schade and Company, which has its head- 
quarters at Newport News. It is an old organiza- 
tion, founded before the turn of the century, and 
Mr. Keitz incorporated it in 1951, since which time 
he has been its president. Over the years he has 
become one of bis city's more influential business 
leaders, identified with banking and with the 
management of such groups as the Virginia Port 
Authority. 

Born at St. Louis, Missouri, on August 28, 
1890, he is a son of Henry and Rose (Schulte) 
Keitz, both of whom are now deceased. His fa- 
ther was a merchant in St. Louis. In that city 
Harry A. Keitz received his education, attending 
the public schools and graduating from high school 
and from Perkins College. While taking his ad- 
vanced courses, he had already formed his con- 
nection with Wilfred Schade and Company at its 
St. Louis office, having gone on the payroll there 
in 1908, sixteen years after the firm was organized. 

Mr. Keitz came to Newport News in 1913, trans- 
ferred there by his company to manage its office 
in that city. Five years later, in his twenty-eighth 
year, he purchased the entire interests of the com- 
pany and has since been its sole owner. Since that 
time he has played a conspicuous part in the indus- 
try centered in forwarding freight shipments to 
foreign countries. In the period directly following 
World War II. he took the lead in making New- 
port News, and particularly Pier No. 8, a vital and 
busy center in transferring food supplies and 
other necessities to the near-starving millions 
of war-ravaged Europe. While directing a full 
flow of business through company channels, he 
also took the responsibility of forwarding many 
cargoes for UNRRA, including food-stuffs, cattle, 
horses and poultry, and such other requisites as 
were needed to place European economy on its 
feet. 

He has demonstrated the same quality of self- 
less endeavor in his relations to his community. 
For about five years he served on the board of 
the Virginia Port Authority and was at one 
time its chairman. He is currently a member 
of the board of directors of the First National 
Hank of Newport News. He has been president 
of both the old Newport News Chamber of Com- 
merce and the Virginia Peninsula Association of 
Commerce, and has been active in the programs 
of the American Red Cross and the Boy Scouts 
of America. 

He is a member of the James River Country 
Club, and is a Roman Catholic in his religious 
faith. 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



39 



On August 19, 1950, Harry A. Keitz married 
Bessie Channel of Smithfield, (laughter of Otis 
and Bessie (Morris) Channel. 



WILLIAM FRANCIS JORDAN is president 
and general manager of the Moon Engineering 
Company, Inc., a Norfolk firm engaged in general 
marine and industrial plant repairs. Its manage- 
ment has represented his major career effort over 
the past thirty-five years. 

A native of Isle of Wight County, Mr. Jordan 
was born on September 22, 1890, son of William 
Francis, Sr., and Sarah Elizabeth (Johnson) Jor- 
dan, and a descendant of Samuel Jordan, who 
came to the Virginia Colony in 1609 from Eng- 
land. The elder William F. Jordan was a son of 
Josiah W. Jordan, a planter of Isle of Wight 
County. All five of Josiah's sons served in the 
Confederate States Army. William F. Jordan, Sr., 
was only a lad of fifteen when he left home to 
join the forces, in the last phases of the war. In 
the reconstruction period, he became a general 
merchant, and his later years were spent at Rescue, 
Virginia, where he died in 1902. His wife, the for- 
mer Sarah Elizabeth Johnson, a native of Prin- 
cess Anne County, survived him until 1940. The 
couple are buried in St. Luke's Episcopal Church 
Cemetery near Smithfield. which has been in 
existence since 1632. The couple were the parents 
of three daughters and a son: Ella I., Sarah Eliza- 
beth and Susan Darley; and William Francis, Jr., 
who was the third in order of birth. The sisters 
are residents of Old Fort Boykins on the James 
River, and they have taken active roles in the 
restoration of historic old St. Luke's Episcopal 
Church. 

William F. Jordan received his early education 
in the public schools of Isle of Wight County. His 
father's death occurred in 1902, when he was 
eleven years of age, and necessitated his assuming 
many of the responsibilities of manhood, includ- 
ing assisting his mother in managing the general 
store at Rescue. It was not until later years that 
he was able to resume his education, attending 
the College of William and Mary at Williamsburg 
for three years. From 1907 to 1910 he taught 
school in Isle of Wight County, and he later 
operated an oyster house at Battery Park, Vir- 
ginia. There he became interested in public af- 
fairs, and served as the first recorder of births 
and deaths for Isle of Wight County. He was also 
tax adjuster until 1917, when he enlisted in the 
United States Navy for service in World War I. 
He served on patrol duty along the Atlantic Sea- 
board, and rose to the rank of chief master of 
arms. He received his honorable discharge at Nor- 
folk on December 11, 1918. 

While he was in naval service, his mother and 



sisters had established the family home in Nor- 
folk, and there, after the war, he secured a posi- 
tion with the old United States Shipping Board, 
with which he continued until August 1920. 

At that time he joined Guy H. Moon and P. N. 
Gibbings in the founding of the Moon Engineer- 
ing Company. Inc. Mr. Moon was its first presi- 
dent, Mr. Jordan at that time held the office of 
vice president, and Mr. Gibbings was secretary 
and treasurer. From a modest beginning, the firm 
has grown to an organization serving a variety 
of needs of industrial and shipping interests 
throughout the Lower Tidewater area. Mr. Moon 
sold his interest in 1928, although out of loyalty 
to him as a founder, the company still carries his 
name. Mr. Jordan has since been president and 
general manager. Mr. Gibbings has continued to 
serve through the years as secretary-treasurer. 
Oliver X. May served as vice president from 1945 
until his death in 1955, and he was succeeded in 
that office by T. J. Johnson. Main offices are at 
545 Front Street. 

The scope of the company's work covers a wide 
field in general marine and industrial repairs. A 
compact and highly skilled organization, its equip- 
ment includes portable machinery of every des- 
cription utilized in repair work, which are most 
generally put into use when ships are unloading 
and loading. A four-hundred-foot pier operated by 
the company extends along the waterfront border- 
ing the plant, and there the most modern equip- 
ment is housed, for the repair and overhaul of 
ships' boilers and machinery. The firm's machin- 
ists and technicians are skilled in all phases of 
industrial plant repairs as well. Their cumulative 
training and experience makes the company a 
leader in its field, and it justly takes considerable 
pride in its workmanlike service, and the efficient 
and conscientious manner in which it carries 01 t 
all assignments. 

A master mechanic, devoted to the technical 
as well as the managerial aspects of his business. 
Mr. Jordan finds little time for outside activities. 
His firm belongs to the Norfolk Chamber of Com- 
merce and the Virginia State Chamber of Com- 
merce. Mr. Jordan himself is a communicant of 
the Meadowbrook Episcopal Church. His favorite 
sport is fishing. 

At McKenney, Virginia, on December 31, 1944. 
William Francis Jordan married Sarah Louise 
(Ferguson) Rives of Dinwiddie County. A gradu- 
ate of Farmville State Teachers College, she for- 
merly taught in the public schools of her native 
county. She is active in the cultural and religious 
affairs of Norfolk, and is a member of the Great 
Bridge Chapter of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution, the Women's Club, Larchmont Gar- 
den Club and Larchmont Methodist Church. By 



i 4 o 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



her previous marriage, to the late Aubrey T. 
Rives of Dinwiddie County, she is the mother of 
three children: I. Virgil A. Rives of Norfolk, 
who married Ruth Hard of Pittsfield, Massachu- 
setts. Their two children are Susan Ann and Char- 
lotte Rives. _'. Aubrey T. Rives. Jr.. D.D.S., of 
Norfolk. He married Katherine Maddox of Dan- 
ville, and they have two children: Sarah Louise 
and William Francis. 3. Talmadge Rives of Nor- 
folk. Mr. and Mrs. Jordan make their home at 
m_'5 Manchester Avenue. Norfolk. 



JAMES W. POWELL, SR.— Co-founder of the 
Powell-McClellan Lumber Company, Inc., of Nor- 
folk, James W. Powell, Sr., now holds office as 
its president and treasurer. His career has been 
characterized by determination and hard work in 
the face of trials, and ultimate success, and he is 
respected for his achievements as well as for his 
qualities of character. His judgment is respected 
by all who know him. 

Beginning bis life with no initial advantages, 
and orphaned at an early age, he was early thrown 
on his own resources. He w-as born September 16, 
1891, near Hertford. Perquimans County, North 
Carolina, son of James Richard and Althea (Jack- 
son) Powell. His father was a native of Isle of 
Wight County, and was engaged in farming in 
Perquimans County when his untimely deatli oc- 
curred in 1895. Miss Jackson, whom he married, 
was a native of that county. Left an orphan when 
he was quite young, James W. Powell went to live 
with relatives for a time, working on the farm for 
his board and attending a nearby country school. 
In 1907, during the Jamestown Exposition, he made 
his first trip to Norfolk to visit a married sister. 
The city stimulated him, and although he returned 
to his relatives' farm, he carried with him a resolve 
to find his career in some other field than agricul- 
ture. 

The following year he returned to Norfolk to 
live with his sister. His first employment was as 
delivery boy for a retail grocery store on Chestnut 
Street, at a wage of two dollars per week, which 
he paid to his sister as board. He next secured a 
position delivering ice from four until six each 
morning, at five dollars per week. This work lasted 
throughout the summer season, and the next fall he 
began his career in the lumber industry as an em- 
ployee of the Surry Lumber Company at a wage 
of twelve dollars for a seventy-two-hour week. 
From 1910 to 1914 he was employed in various 
phases of the industry with the old Forsberg Lum- 
ber Company of Berkley, now a part of Norfolk. 
Leaving this employment, he went to Baltimore, 
Maryland, where he joined the Dixie Box Company 



as a saw filer in charge of saw maintenance at 
wage of eighteen dollars per week. As that firm 
afforded him only part-time employment, he left 
in 1915 to go on the payroll of the du Pont Power 
Company at Hopewell, Virginia. He began his 
connection there as a painter, but was soon placed 
in charge of the electric motors maintenance de- 
partment. He remained until 191 7, when with the 
entrance of this country into World War I, he 
became a machinist at the United States Navy 
Yard in Portsmouth. In 1919 he left to begin a 
sixteen-year tenure with the M. T. Blassingham 
Lumber Company in Norfolk. 

He began work there as a saw filer, and was 
later promoted to foreman of the planing mill. 
While with this firm, until the mid-i930S, he also 
operated a private enterprise of his own, maintain- 
ing a saw-filing and lawn-mower repair shop on 
Hampton Boulevard. 

In 1935, in the midst of the difficult days of the 
economic depression, he joined Harry A. McClellan 
in forming the Powell-McClellan Lumber Company 
of Norfolk. His partner, who had resigned from a 
position as shipping clerk with the Blassingham 
Lumber Company, became the first president of 
the firm and was in charge of office operations, 
while Mr. Powell, as vice president, took charge 
of procedures in the field and was responsible for 
delivery service. With the death of Mr. McClellan 
in 1941, Mr. Powell acquired bis interests, and 
has since been directing head of the enterprise. 

At the present site of the company, 3200 Lafay- 
ette Boulevard, is a plant which covers three city 
blocks, and has several hundred thousand square 
feet of floor space. It was at this same location that 
the firm first began operations in a sixteen-by- 
forty building. The two partners had two employees, 
and a delivery truck valued at a hundred and 
twenty-five dollars. The span between these two 
conditions of industrial prosperity was built largely 
through Mr. Powell's efforts. A man of high ideals, 
vision, faith and determination, be concentrated 
tirelessly on building one of Norfolk's most com- 
plete lumber and building materials supply houses. 
Today the Powell-McClellan Lumber Company is 
a "one-stop yard," where one can buy one foot, 
or a million feet, of a wide variety of lumber. The 
slogan of the company is, "Big Enough to Serve 
You, Small Enough to Know You." It carries 
a complete line of Grade A building materials, 
from brick and concrete for foundations to shingles 
for the roof, and a full stock of builders' hardware. 
Fifty-five employees are on the payroll on a full- 
time basis, in the conduct of the various operations 
which include one of the most modern and best- 
equipped millwork plants in the Tidewater area. 
Expanding its operations to meet demands, the 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



141 



company established branches at 762 Little Creek 
Road, Norfolk, and at 3200 George Washington 
Highway in Portsmouth. It owes much of its suc- 
cess to friendly customer relations. Besides Mr. 
Powell, the president and treasurer, the officers 
are: Roy J. Allen, vice prsident and general man- 
ager; James W. Powell, Jr., executive vice presi- 
dent; Bernard M. Dixon, secretary; and Henry J. 
Wrigley, assistant secretary. 

Besides his major business connection, Mr. Pow- 
ell is chairman of the board of directors of Ma- 
terials Distributors, Inc., of Norfolk, founded in 
1956. As jobbers and wholesalers, this firm serves 
the entire Tidewater Virginia area. Its other of- 
ficers are Roy J. Allen, president and manager; 
James W. Powell, Jr., vice president; Henry J. 
Wrigley, vice president; Peter K. Babalas, vice 
president and attorney; and Bernard M. Dixon, 
secretary. 

The Powell-McClellan Lumber Company is a 
member of the Virginia Building Materials Associa- 
tion, Virginia Retail Lumber and Supply Dealers 
Association and the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce. 

Mr. Powell is an active member of the Kiwanis 
Club of Norfolk, the Colonial Avenue Methodist 
Church, which he serves as a member of the board 
of stewards. He generously supports, both financial- 
ly and through his personal efforts, every project 
for civic betterment. He is a member of the Lake- 
wood Civic Club and the Izaak Walton League of 
Norfolk. His favorite outdoor sport is deep-sea 
fishing. 

On October 26, 1915, at Norfolk, James W. Pow- 
ell, Sr., married Bernice Ruddick of Norfolk, daugh- 
ter of the late Charles and Naomi (Mail) Ruddick 
of that city. Airs. Powell is a graduate of Maury 
High School, and is active in civic and religious 
affairs. She is a member of the Colonial Avenue 
Methodist Church and teaches in its Sunday school. 
She is a member of the Lakewood Garden Club. 
In the assistance she has rendered to her husband 
in his career, Mr. Powell has called her his "great- 
est asset." The couple are the parents of two chil- 
dren: 1. James William, Jr., born November 18, 
1917 in Norfolk. He graduated from Maury High 
School and completed a two-year course in busi- 
ness administration at Norfolk Business College. 
He is now executive vice president of Powell-Mc- 
Clellan Lumber Company, in charge of retail sales. 
He married Christina Wood of Washington, D. C, 
and they are the parents of a daughter, Patricia 
Faye. James Powell, Jr., is a member of the Hoo- 
Hoo Lumbermen's Association, the Loyal Order 
of Moose, the Knights of Pythias and the Colonial 
Avenue Methodist Church. 2. Jean Marie, born 
October 18, 1926. She is a graduate of Maury High 
School, and is married to Willis Allen of Norfolk. 



The couple are the parents of two children: i. Rich- 
ard Charles Allen, ii. Barbara Jean Allen. Mr. and 
Mrs. James W. Powell, Sr., live at 1470 Sweetbriar 
Avenue, Norfolk. 



GEORGE RUST ABBOTT— A prominent fig- 
ure in the insurance and real estate fields in Nor- 
folk, George R. Abbott is head of the firm which 
bears his name. He has been a member of the 
City Council since December 1, 1942, and is now 
serving his second term as vice mayor, having held 
these offices during the most significant period 
of the development of Greater Norfolk. His de- 
votion to the city and its government is unques- 
tioned, and his experience has been of great value 
in helping carry out the important programs of 
expansion, annexation, redevelopment, the build- 
ing of the port, and the encouragement of the 
region's economy. In addition, his human approach 
has brought him a reputation of being "the little 
man's friend." 

George R. Abbott was born June 28, 1888, at 
Brandy Station, Culpepper County, Virginia, son 
of George Rust, Sr., and Mollie (Green) Abbott, 
both of whom were likewise natives of that coun- 
ty. His father was a carpenter by trade, and 
brought his family to Charlottesville in 1893, and 
later, in September 1900, to Newport News, where 
he continued in his trade until his death, in Febru- 
ary 1907. Mollie (Green) Abbott died at Newport 
News in August 1906. The couple were the parents 
of seven children, of whom George R. was the 
fourth. 

Orphaned at an early age, he attended the pub- 
lic schools of Newport News, where as a young 
lad he began his business career clerking in a 
grocery store. There he learned the various phases 
of food retailing. He came to Norfolk in 1907, the 
year of his father's death, and there became clerk 
of the Pure Food Store at Market Street and 
Monticello Avenue. From September 1907, to Oc- 
tober 1909, he was identified with the Machen 
Grocery Company, 27th and Granby streets, and 
later with Morris and Company, meat packers of 
Chicago, as assistant bookkeeper in that firm's 
Norfolk office. He was later transferred to this 
firm's Newport News location, where he was in 
charge of the office. In October 1913, he returned 
to Norfolk, and took charge of the office opera- 
tions of R. D. Holloway and Company, at its 
wholesale feed and grain branch, continuing this 
association until 1918. 

In that year, Mr. Abbott founded his own firm, 
the Abbott Gwaltney Company, Inc., doing a re- 
tail and wholesale business in groceries, feed and 
grain. From this original store, he ultimately de- 
developed a chain of thirty-two outlets, operating 
in Virginia and North Carolina, and he continued 



'4- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



as president of the corporation and as manager 
until October [931, when he sold the chain to 
the David Pender Grocery Company, which still 
later became a part of Colonial Stores, Inc. 

It was in October 1031, that Mr. Abbott entered 
the general insurance business as vice president 
of the Old Dominion Corporation, which had its 
offices in the National Bank of Commerce Build- 
ing- He continued in his executive capacity with 
this organization until October 1938, when he 
left to form his own insurance business as George 
R. Abbott, with offices at 2_'3-_'_>5 Monticello 
Arcade. In the intervening years, he has met with 
gratifying success as general agent for the Aetna 
Fire Group, Pacific Fire Insurance Company, the 
Agriculture Insurance Company, and the West- 
chester Fire Insurance Company. Also active in 
the real estate field, he is engaged in rentals and 
sales transactions. 

His interest in the principles of sound govern- 
ment led to Mr. Abbott's being appointed a mem- 
ber of the Norfolk City Council in December 1942, 
to fill out an unexpired term. He was elected to 
succeed himself in 1944, 1948, 1952 and 1956, and 
is now serving his seccond term as vice mayor. 
Adhering to the standards of a Christian gentle- 
man, he has followed the precept of the Golden 
Rule in business as w : ell as in the administration 
of city affairs. He has taken a vital interest in the 
welfare of people in all walks of life, and is one 
of Tidewater Virginia's best-informed citizens on 
economic trends and problems involving the wel- 
fare of its citizens. He holds the devotion and 
confidence of his fellows because of his capacity 
for friendship and his loyalty. Long active in the 
good work of the Park Place Methodist Church, 
which lie helped to build, he is past chairman of 
its board of stewards, past president of the men's 
Bible class, and assistant church treasurer. 

Mr. Abbott is active in the Norfolk Chamber 
of Commerce, and is a member of Norfolk Lodge 
No. 1, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Cava- 
lier Lodge No. 80; Norfolk United Royal Arch 
Chapter No. 1; Grice Commandery No. t6, Knights 
Templar; and Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is also 
a member of Norfolk Lodge No. 38, Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, and the Lafayette 
Yacht Club. 

On June 28, 191 1, at Norfolk, George Rust Ab- 
bott married Louise Nash Small, daughter of the 
late Benjamin T. and Levaia (Whitehurst) Small 
of that city. The couple are the parents of one 
daughter, Louise Elizabeth, who married Dan- 
dridge C. Payne of Norfolk, now associated with 
the George R. Abbott Insurance and Real Estate 
Agency. Mr. and Mrs. Payne have two children: 
i. George Garland, ii. David Christopher. The 



George R. Abbott residence is at 7323 Colony 
Point Road, Norfolk. 



CHARLES TODD WHITEHEAD— After 
early beginnings in the seafood and lumber indus- 
tries, Charles Todd Whitehead of Virginia Beach 
effectively turned his attention to hotel manage- 
ment, and he became one of the pioneer motel 
owners of the Beach. A senior businessman uni- 
versally respected in his area, he had held posts of 
public trust in municipal government, and was ac- 
tive in political affairs and in work on behalf of 
his church and his community. 

Born at Peoria. Illinois, on May 25, 1876, he 
was a son of Virginius and Virginia (Belote") White- 
head. His father was a bandmaster who had served 
the Confederate cause. Charles T. Whitehead re- 
reived his education in the schools of Portsmouth. 
His first business interest was dealing in oysters 
and fish, an occupation which he follow-ed until 
1919. He then entered the lumber business, being 
identified with the C. T. Whitehead Lumber Com- 
pany until HJ44. 

Mr. Whitehead first entered the hotel business 
in 1932. He was one of the first men in the area 
to recognize the importance of the motel in serv- 
ing our increasingly mobile population. He estab- 
lished his first hostelry of the kind, the Tourist 
Haven Motel, at 15th Street, Virginia Beach, in 
11132. and owned and operated it until his death. 

Among his other business interests he served 
as vice president and director of the Bank of Vir- 
ginia Beach. He also engaged in construction work. 
He built the first bridge and causeway over Long 
Creek which connected the upper end of Great 
Neck with Lynnhaven Inlet and Ocean Park section 
in Princess Anne County, and several other bridges 
in Princess Anne County. After the complete de- 
struction by fire of the historic London Bridge 
Baptist Church in 1946, he supervised the rebuild- 
ing of the church without remuneration for his 
time; the church was completed and dedicated in 
the Fall of 1947. 

Long active in public affairs, Mr. Whitehead 
had served as a member of the Virginia Beach 
Erosion Commission, and he was chairman of 
the Princess Anne Zoning Board of Appeals. He 
held these positions until the end of his life. Active 
in Democratic politics, he was formerly chairman 
of the Democratic Committee of Princess Anne 
County. He was a loyal worker in his church, 
the London Bridge Baptist, and in his later years 
held office as chairman of its board of deacons. 
A devout man and a firm believer in Christian 
doctrine and ethics, he was ordained a lay minister 
of the Gospel on July 14, 1935. 

At Norfolk, on June 30, 1895, Charles Todd 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



'43 



Whitehead married Cenie Yarbrough Wade, daugh- 
ter of John Yarbrough and Rebecca (Sterling) 
Wade. The couple became the parents of four 
children: i. Charles Clinton, who was born on 
.May jo, 1896. 2. Margaret May, born January 17, 
1898. She married George W. Lawrence of Oceana 
in 1922. 3. Ruby Virginia, born on August 19, 
1910. She married Sam Harris of Charlottesville, 
Virginia. 4. Milford Clyde, born April 28, 1917. He 
succeeded his father as president of Tourist Haven 
Corporation, a family-owned business, consisting 
of Prince Charles Hotel, Tourist Haven Motel, 
and other real estate in Virginia Beach. 

At the time of Mr. Whitehead's death he had 
seven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. 
His death occurred on August 1, 1954. 



EUGENE PERKINS FITZHUGH— The New- 
port News real estate and insurance firm of 
Murray and Padgett, Inc., which has been oper- 
ating successfully since 1918, is now capably 
headed by Eugene Perkins Fitzhugh, who joined 
the organization on his return from Air Corps 
service in World War II. 

Baltimore, Maryland, is Mr. Fitzhugh's native 
city. He was born there on November 17, 1919, 
son of Eugene P. and Corrinne (Perkins) Fitz- 
hugh, both natives of Middlesex County, Virginia. 
His father is deceased, but his mother is still 
living. Eugene Perkins Fitzhugh received his edu- 
cation in the schools of New York State, and 
came to Newport News in 1941. He was first 
employed by the Newport News Shipbuilding 
and Drydock Company, but a short time after 
this country had become involved in World War 
II, he left to join the United States Army Air 
Corps. Assigned to the Fifteenth Air Force as 
gunner with a flight crew, he served in Italy, 
and was overseas about ten months. He received 
his honorable discharge in October 1945. 

Mr. Fitzhugh then returned to Newport News, 
and in 1946 began his career in the real estate 
and general insurance field with the firm of 
Murray and Padgett, Inc. He worked as a sales- 
man, and in that capacity his leadership abilities 
were quickly recognized. In 1948 he was named 
vice president of the firm; and following the 
death of founding partner A. A. Padgett in 195 1, 
he was chosen to succeed him as president, a 
position he has held since. Offices of Murray 
and Padgett, Inc., are at 131 28th Street, New- 
port News. The firm holds an organizational 
membership in the Newport News-Warwick Real 
Estate Board, and Mr. Fitzhugh himself is ac- 
tive in the Newport News Real Estate and In- 
su r ance Exchange, which he formerly served as 
1 resident. He is a member of the board of the 
Peninsula Association of Insurance Agents. 



Interested in community life, he serves as a 
director of the Peninsula Memorial Park Cor- 
poration, and is a member and past president of 
the Lions Club, and a member of the James 
River Country Club. He attends the First Pres- 
byterian Church, and serves on its board of dea- 
cons. Golf and boating are Mr. Fitzhugh's favorite 
outdoor sports. 

In Newport News, on May 5, 1945, Eugene 
Perkins Fitzhugh married Emma E. Padgett of 
that city, daughter of Ambrose A. and Ellen 
(Parker) Pad-ett. Her father was a realtor and 
founder of the firm of Murray and Padgett, Inc. 
He died in January 1951. Mr. and Mrs. Fitzhugh 
have three children: 1. Anne Parker, born Janu- 
ary 17, -J47. 2. Virginia Eaton, born December 
29, 1948. 3. Eugene Perkins, Jr., born April 17, 
1953- 



BEVERLEY RHEA LAWLER— Virginia's 
first public relations agency, the Public Relations 
Institute, was founded in Norfolk by Beverley 
Rhea Lawler. It has grown far beyond its ori- 
ginal concept and its founder is now president 
of both the Public Relations Institute and its 
affiliate agency — the Atlantic National Advertis- 
ing Agency. 

The public relations organization has won a 
number of awards, including international recog- 
nition for its creation of "The Norfolk Plan." 
This "Plan," so named in editorials in newspapers 
and magazines, is a public relations program de- 
signed to effect the smooth transition from coun- 
ty to city government as a result of annexation. 

The advertising agency has also won many 
awards, both regional and national, and is recog- 
nized by the various national media. It operates 
primarily in Virginia and North Carolina. 

Offices of these two organizations are in the 
Prudential Building at 248 West Bute Street. 

Mr. Lawler was born in Norfolk, the son of 
Frank Porter and Virginia (Rhea') Lawler, both 
also natives of that city. Frank Porter Lawler 
is a senior vice president of the National Bank 
of Commerce of Norfolk, an institution with 
which he has served thirty-five years. 

Reared in the Roman Catholic faith. Beverley 
Rhea Lawler attended and in 1943 was graduated 
from Holy Trinity High School, Norfolk. For a 
short period thereafter, he was a student at the 
University of Florida in Gainesville. He left the 
university to enter the United States Army for 
World War II service. Attached to the Infantry, 
he was a sergeant in a platoon which saw much 
action, having been a participant in various Euro- 
pean engagements. He received a Bronze Star 
for his part in one particular battle. 

Subsequently, he served as an Army corres- 



■44 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



pondent in the Philippines. In 1114(1, he was re- 
leased to inactive status with a commission in 
the United States Army Reserve. To continue his 
education, Mr. Lawler now entered William and 
Mar\ College, Norfolk. After receiving an As- 
of Arts degree there, with honors, he 
went to the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill, where he was awarded the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts in Journalism in 1950. While 
at the University he won an Atlantic Monthly 
award for his non-fiction writing. 

Alter graduation he became a public informa- 
tion specialist (Civil Service) on the staff of the 
Chief of Army Field Forces. For four years he 
served in all phases of the Army's public rela- 
tion- activities and became the ranking civilian 
in the Public Information Division. 

In 1954 he founded the Public Relations In- 
stitute, Incorporated, and that organization and 
the Atlantic National Advertising Agency are 
now regional agencies. 

He is a member of the Norfolk Chamber of 
Commerce and the chairman of the Civic Affairs 
Committee of the Chamber. He is a member 
of the board of directors of Merchants Bakery, 
[ncorporated, a Norfolk firm which produces 
Holsum Bread and allied products. He is also 
a member of the board of directors of United 
Cerebral Palsy of Norfolk. 

He is a member of the Norfolk Yacht and 
Country Club and the Lafayette Yacht Club. In 
politics, he maintains an independent status. 

Mr. Lawler married Ann Fitzpatrick in Nor- 
folk on June 14, 1952. Like her parents, Andrew 
and Mae (Forrest) Fitzpatrick, Mrs. Lawler is 
a native of Norfolk. Her late father was a cotton 
broker for many years. Mr. and Mrs. Lawler 
have two daughters: Ann Lynn, who was born 
in Norfolk on January 30. 1955- and Susan Rhea, 
who m;is born in Norfolk July 26, 1957. Their 
home is at 904 Spotswood Avenue. Norfolk. 



JULIUS DIXON RAWLES recently com- 
pleted a half-century in the banking profession, 
and is now the president of Farmers Bank of 
Holland, with which he has been identified since 
1919. He has other interests as well, being active 
in the management of the Holland Supply Com- 
pany, and operating valuable farm properties. He 
has taken a full part in political affairs, in the 
work of his church, and in Masonic and other 
groups. 

A native of Nansemond County, he was born 
on May 5, 1888, and is a son of Julius T. Rawles, 
who was also born in that county, in 1853, and 
who was a farmer. He later became a partner in 
the Holland Supply Company. Julius T. Rawles 
married Marx- Dixon, likewise a native of Nanse- 



mond County. She died in 1933 and he five years 
later. 

Receiving bis entire education in the public 
schools of Nansemond County, Julius D. Rawles 
began his banking career in 1906, joining the 
staff of the Bank of Holland. He was later with 
the National Bank of Suffolk and Fanners Bank 
of Nansemond, also at Suffolk. In 1919, he joined 
Farmers Bank of Holland, and has been a member 
of its board of directors since that year. In 1953 
he was elected president of the bank. Mr. Rawles 
is also a partner in the Holland Supply Company. 
His considerable farm properties are in Nanse- 
mond County. 

A Democrat, he has served as secretary of the 
Nansemond County electoral board since 1925. He- 
is an earnest worker in the Holland Christian 
Church, having been its treasurer since 1930, and 
at the present time a deacon as well. In 1928 he 
became a charter member of the Holland Ruritan 
Club, and was its first treasurer. He is still a 
member of that club, and of the Suffolk Lions 
Club. Affiliated with the Free and Accepted 
Masons, he is a member of McAlister Lodge at 
Whaleyville. 

Julius Dixon Rawles married Miss Louise Perry, 
daughter of Edward and Mary (Goodwin) Perry, 
in a ceremony at Elizabeth City, North Carolina, 
on June 24, 1944. The couple are the parents of 
one daughter, Mary Dixon Rawles, who was burn 
on July 10, 1945. 



ARTHUR KONIKOFF— As an architect, Ar- 
thur Konikoff of Norfolk is a splendid craftsman 
with an excellent background of training and ex- 
perience. A native of Buffalo, New York, he was 
horn on March 16, 1916, son of Solomon Louis 
and Mary (Kalish) Konikoff. His parents still 
reside in that city, where his father is the owner 
and manager of apartment buildings. 

Arthur Konikoff was educated in the public 
schools of Buffalo, and graduated from Lafayette 
High School there in 1934. He then entered New 
York University, continuing his studies there from 
September 1934, until January 1936. He then trans- 
ferred to the University of Illinois to continue 
his study of architecture, and was graduated from 
that university with the degree of Bachelor of 
Architecture in 1941. 

In May 1942, Mr. Konikoff enlisted for duty 
with the United States Army, and was assigned 
to an Engineers Combat Group. He was later 
transferred to the 2826th Engineer Combat Bat- 
talion, and with this unit served in England, 
France, and Germany. He participated in the 
Normandy invasion of June 6, 1944, and other 
major offensives against the Axis, including the 





«B-, (J^su^&^_^ 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



'45 



campaigns in northern France and the Ardennes, 
and the battle of the Rhineland. He was separated 
from active service on October 2, 1945, at Fort 
Dix, New Jersey. At that time lie held the rank 
of technical sergeant. 

Resuming his civilian status, Mr. Konikoff be- 
gan his professional career as a draftsman with 
the firm of Foit and Baschnagel, architects, of 
Buffalo. He was later associated with Paul Hyde 
Harbach, also of Buffalo. In August 1951, he 
came to Norfolk, Virginia, where he first joined 
the firm of Alfred M. Lublin, architect. 

In October 1952, he started his own practice 
of architecture, with offices in both Portsmouth 
and Norfolk. His offices are now in the Flatiron 
Building in Norfolk. Eminently successful in the 
general practice of architecture, he has designed 
a variety of commercial and residential buildings 
in the greater Norfolk and Portsmouth and New- 
port News areas. 

He is a member of the Virginia Chapter, Ameri- 
can Institute of Architects, the Lions Club of 
Portsmouth, and Beth El Temple in Norfolk. 

On March 3, 1946, in Norfolk, Arthur Konikoff 
married Hannah Robbins, daughter of A. Robbins 
and Rose (Stein) Robbins of that city. Mr. and 
Mrs. Konikoff are the parents of four children: 
1. Albert Benjamin, born March 15, 1947. 2. Ste- 
phen Earl, born February 24, 1950. 3. David B., 
born February 3. 1952. 4. Sharon Gail, born De- 
cember 6, 1956. The family's residence is at 1123 
Graydon Avenue, Norfolk. 



ISAAC TALBOT WALKE, JR.— An insurance 
executive whose career has been centered in Nor- 
folk for many years, Isaac Talbot Walke, Jr., is 
president and treasurer of Walke and Son, which 
was established in 1869. The name of Walke has 
long been honored in Norfolk and the state of 
Virginia, and for several generations its bearers 
have been prominent in the field of insurance. 
Through his useful career, Isaac Talbot Walke, 
Jr., has made his contribution to the family's long 
and continuing record of achievement. 

The Walkes are of English ancestry, and trace 
their descent from Thomas Walke, who was born 
in England and first went to the Barbados in 
1622. He was among the early colonial settlers 
when he came to Virginia shortly afterwards. He 
settled at Fairfield in Princess Anne County. He 
had held the rank of colonel of militia under 
King Charles II, and was a vestryman in Lynn- 
haven Parish Church. Thomas Walke married 
Mary Lawson, whose father was one of the emi- 
nent lawyers of the Virginia Colony. Their son, 
Anthony Walke, married Anna Lee Armistead, 
granddaughter of Captain Hancock Lee and Mary 



(Kendell) Lee. Mary Kendell was a daughter of 
Colonel William Kendell, who was collector of 
revenues at Accomac, Virginia, in 1660. Captain 
Hancock Lee was a son of Colonel Richard Lee, 
ancestor of Richard Henry Lee, American states- 
man (1732-1794). He was prominent in defending 
the rights of the colonies against England and 
was a delegate to the Continental Congress from 
1774 to 1779. On June 7, 1776, he moved a resolu- 
tion which ultimately gave rise to the Declaration 
of Independence, of which he was later a signer. 

In William Forest's "Sketches of Norfolk" the 
statement is made that Anthony Walke purchased 
one hundred and fifty acres of land on which, 
at a later date, the city of Norfolk was laid out, 
the first plat of the city being made in 1680. 
Anthony and Anna (Armistead) Walke had as 
one of their children Anthony Walke, who mar- 
ried Jane Randolph. They became the parents of 
William Walke, who married Mary Calvert. The 
next generation was represented by William 
Walke, who married Elizabeth Nash. They in 
turn were the parents of Richard Walke, who 
married Diana Talbot. Richard and Diana (Tal- 
bot) Walke became the parents of William Tal- 
bot Walke, who was a native of Norfolk, and 
lived his entire life in that city. He served the 
Confederate government during the Civil War, 
and in 1869 formed the Walke insurance business, 
which was the predecessor of the present firm of 
Walke and Son. He continued active in insurance 
sales until his death. He married Sally Gary, who 
was born at Garysburg, North Carolina, and 
among their children was a son, Isaac Talbot 
Walke, Sr. 

He was born in Norfolk and received his educa- 
tion at Norfolk Academy and Eastman's Business 
College at Poughkeepsie. He then became associa- 
ted with his father in the insurance business, and 
in later years became its owner and manager. He 
remained active for many years in the civic and 
social life of Norfolk, where he lived his entire 
life. The elder Isaac Talbot Walke married Linda 
Harrell, who was born at Murfreesboro, North 
Carolina. They became the parents of three child- 
ren: Isaac Talbot, Jr., Linda Harrell and Gertrude 
Willoughby. 

Born at Norfolk on August 27, 1901, Isaac Tal- 
bot Walke, Jr., was educated in St. George's 
School, a private institution, and Norfolk Academy, 
Robert E. Lee Elementary School, and Maury 
High School, all of Norfolk. He then transferred 
to Episcopal High School in Alexandria, Virginia. 
In 1917. he became associated with his father in 
the insurance business in Norfolk, as a member 
of the firm of Walke and Son, General Insurance 
and Surety Bonds. This has remained his major 



146 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



business interest since that time. He succeeded 
his father as managing head of the firm, at the 
latter's death in 1952, and is now president and 
treasurer with offices in the Royster Building. 

Besides this major business connection. Mr. 
Walke is vice president and treasurer of the Nor- 
folk Taxicab Corporation. Active in civic and 
social affairs, he is a member of the Norfolk 
Chamber of Commerce, Norfolk Yacht and Coun- 
try Club and the Virginia Club. He serves on the 
Virginia State Commission of Game and Inland 
Fisheries, and has also been appointed to Gover- 
nor Stanley's staff as aide-de-camp. He is a com- 
municant of Christ and St. Luke's Episcopal 
Church of Norfolk. 

As a member of the United States Navy Of- 
ficers' Reserve, Mr. Walke was called to active 
duty in June 1941, and served with the rank of 
commander, United States Navy Intelligence. He 
was separated from active duty in 1945. 

On February 20, 1934, Isaac Talbot Walke, Jr., 
married Dorothy Brooks of Williamsburg, Vir- 
ginia. They make their home at 1100 Hampton 
Boulevard, Lynnhaven. 



FRANK A. DUSCH— A lifelong resident of the 
Norfolk area, Frank A. Dusch has long been en- 
gaged in the real estate business there. In fact, he 
chose this occupation shortly after his return from 
a World War I connection with the United States 
Customs Service. Making his home at Virginia 
Beach, he has served as mayor and member of the 
city council there. 

Born in Norfolk on February 10, 1898, he is a 
son of Walter F. and Mamie (Amiss) Dusch. His 
father, also a native of Norfolk and likewise a real 
estate man, is now decceased, as is Mrs. Dusch, 
a native of Cambridge, Maryland. Frank A. Dusch 
completed his public school studies in Norfolk, and 
his preparatory studies at Randolph-Macon Acade- 
my at Bedford City. He went on to his advanced 
studies at Randolph-Macon College at Ashland, but 
later transferred from there to Washington and Lee 
University at Lexington. 

\\ hen this country became involved in World 
War I. Mr. Dusch entered the United States Cus- 
toms Service, in which he remained for a year and 
one-half, as long as the United States was involved 
in that conflict. In the course of the years since, 
he has joined the United States Navy Reserve 
Corps, in which he currently holds the rank of 
commander. 

Since 1930 Mr. Dusch has engaged in real estate, 
handling his own holdings. He has played a promi- 
nent part in property transfers and the development 
of real estate in the greater Norfolk region. 

Mr. Dusch was elected to the city council of 



Virginia Beach in 1952. and became mayor in 1954. 
He holds the latter office at the present time, and 
has provided this oceanside Tidewater community 
with a sound and clean municipal administration. 

He is a member of Ruth Lodge No. 89, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, and belongs to the 
higher bodies of the Masonic order including United 
Chapter No. 1, Royal Arch Masons; Grice Com- 
mandery No. 16, Knights Templar; Auld Consistory 
of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite; and 
Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of the 
Princess Anne Country Club, Princess Anne Post 
No. 113 of the American Legion, the Sojourners, 
and the Heroes of '76. His religious affiliation is 
with the Methodist Church of Virginia Beach. 

Frank A. Dusch married Elizabeth P. Grow of 
Maryland. Mr. Dusch is the father of two children: 
I. Frank A., Jr., who is now associated with Cannon 
Mills at Kannapolis, North Carolina. He married 
Martha Hughes, and they have two sons, Frank 
A., Ill, and William Coltrane. 2. Mary Winslow. 
She is the wife of Charles A. Brewer, and they 
make their home in Miami, Florida. They have two 
daughters, Sandra and Debbie. 



PAUL W. ACKISS — A lawyer practicing in his 
native Princess Anne County, Paul W. Ackiss has 
his offices at Virginia Beach. He has to his credit 
a record of twenty-four years' service as common- 
wealth's attorney, and has been a dynamic force 
in the Democratic organization. 

Born at Back Bay, Virginia, on August 17, 1901, 
he is a son of Paul Whitehead and Josephine 
(Sykes) Ackiss. His father was a farmer, and for 
twenty years served as sheriff of Princess Anne 
County. He is now deceased, as is Mrs. Ackiss. 
The Ackiss family has lived in the county for many 
generations. The commonwealth's former attorney 
attended local public schools and graduated from 
Creeds High School in 1918. He then entered the 
College of William and Mary, where he was a 
student until 1923, taking the degrees of Bachelor 
of Arts and Bachelor of Laws there. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar of his state in 1924. However, he 
began his career as an educator, and was principal 
of the Montross Agricultural High School for two 
years. 

At the end of that time he commenced his pri- 
vate practice of law at Virginia Beach, and his 
offices have been in that city ever since. He first 
became commonwealth's attorney in 1932, and was 
re-elected to that office, on the Democratic ticket, 
serving continuously until 1955. He has long been 
an influential leader in the councils of the Demo- 
cratic party, and is currently chairman of the 
Princess Anne Countv Democratic Executive Com- 



TWVa. 15 




•fr^-*~-^ 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



•47 



mittee. He has been active in the Commonwealth's 
Attorneys Association of Virginia, and served as 
its president in 1949. 

Apart from his professional and public service 
connections, Mr. Ackiss is a member of the Sons 
of the American Revolution, and was a charter 
member and past president of the Virginia Beach 
Rotary Club. He has been interested in welfare work 
and particularly in programs for the benefit of 
youth and of servicemen. He has served as counse- 
loi of the Boy Scouts of America, and as co-chair- 
man of the Princess Anne County United Service 
Organizations. He is a member of the Princess 
Anne Country Club, and the lodge of Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons. 

On October 29, 1927, in Norfolk, Paul W. Ackiss 
married Hazel Virginia Malbon of that city, daugh- 
ter of R. J. and Virginia (Cromwell) Malbon. Mr. 
and Mrs. Ackiss are the parents of two daughters: 
1. Mary Paul, who was born on August II, 1933. 
She is the wife of Lieutenant Blair M. Webb, M. 
D., of the United States Medical Corps. 2. Ellen 
Benson, born on June 9, 1940. 



ROBERT L. HANCOCK, 3rd— The raising, 
p-ocessing and distribution of peanuts constitute 
a distinctive industry of the Lower Tidewater area 
of Virginia. While the Hancock Peanut Company 
of Courtland is one of the more recent entries in 
this field, its progress has been rapid, and within a 
few years of its formation, it was able to erect a 
spacious and modern plant on Highway 58. Its 
successful operations there have made the firm a 
major competitor in the prosperous and growing 
market for this product. It is a family enterprise, 
in which Robert L. Hancock, 3rd, holds partner- 
ship status. He is a capable young businessman 
who is making a noteworthy contribution to the 
industrial and community life of Courtland. 

Born at Suffolk on December 21, 1915, he is 
a son of Robert L., Jr., and the late Mary Ernie 
(Johnson) Hancock. His father's entry into the 
peanut industry was sparked by inventive as well 
as managerial abilities, and he and his sons formed 
the present organization in 1944. Robert L. Han- 
cock, 3rd, had attended the public schools of Suf- 
folk, and began his career in the trades of electri- 
cian, millwright and machinist, gaining broad ex- 
perience which has been useful to him in the in- 
dustry in which he soon found his true life work. 

He joined his father in the cleaning and pro- 
cessing of peanuts for commercial and seed pur- 
poses when the firm was established in 1944. It 
was known from the first as Hancock Peanut 
Company. In 1947, the partners completed their 
present modern plant near Courtland, and now 
have as many as seventy-five people on their pay- 
roll. Also active in the family enterprise are the 



other sons of Robert L., Jr.: Garth S. and H. L. 
Hancock. The father gave impetus to the indus- 
try, and to their own enterprise in particular, by- 
inventing and building the first seed peanut shelter. 
It forms an important basis for their firm's opera- 
tions. 

R. L. Hancock, 3rd, is a member of the Cy- 
press Cove Country Club in Franklin, and attends 
the Baptist Church. He is a Democrat in his poli- 
tics. 

At Suffolk, on October 13, 1934, Robert L. 
Hancock, 3rd, married Lillian Elizabeth Pope of 
Newsoms, Virginia, daughter of William Grove 
Pope. To their marriage five children have been 
born: 1. Mary Elizabeth, on January 11, 1936. 2. 
Patricia Ann, born October 26, 1937. 3. Vivian 
Leigh, born September 14, 1940. 4. Robert Larry, 
born April 29, 1944. 5. Charles Eugene, born Au- 
gust 29, IJ46. 



ROBERT LAFAYETTE HANCOCK, Jr., 

has brought both inventive and management talents 
to the Lower Tidewater's important industry, the 
processing of peanuts. He is now a partner with 
his sons in the Hai.cock Peanut Company at 
Courtland. 

Born near Sedley in Southampton County, Vir- 
ginia, Mr. Hancock is a son of Robert Lemuel 
and Mollie (Joynerj Hancock. He was born on 
May 16, 1890. Rural public schools of the Vicks- 
ville area provided him with his formal education. 
Upcn completion of his education he began his 
business career with the Surry Lumber Company 
at Dendron, Virginia. He remained with that firm 
for two years, then in 191 1 went to Suffolk, where he 
joined the Benthall Machine Company. After near- 
ly two decades in responsible posts with this firm, 
he formed a connection with the Ramsey Pack- 
ing Company, Inc., at Driver, Virginia, in 1930, 
and was with that organization for six years. In 
1936 he came to Courtland to build a peanut pro- 
cersing pLnt for the Birdsong Storage Compam . 
When that plant burned in 1939, he was sent by 
the same company to Suffolk to build a larger 
plant there. 

He continued in his connection with Birdsong 
Storage Company until 1944, and meantime, in 
1943, he had invented and perfected a device of 
considerable importance to the peanut industry. 
This was the Hancock Seed Peanut Sheller. The 
inventor and his sons have built a number of the 
units, which they lease to firms in the Virginia- 
Carolina peanut belt. With this invention to his 
credit, Mr. Hancock was convinced that he might 
best use it to his own benefit by entering the pea- 
nut processing industry in his own right. Accord- 
ingly, in December 1944, he formed the Hancock 
Peanut Company, in which his sons, Robert L., 



'4 s 



LOWI.R TIDFWATFR VIRGINIA 



3rd, Garth >-, and H. L. Hancock are partners. 
The firm engages in the cleaning and processing 
of peanuts for commercial and seed purposes. The 
undertaking prospered from the first, and within 
two years' time the need for more extensive pro- 
cessing facilities was indicated. In 1947 a new- 
plant was completed n.'ar Courtland, where seven- 
ty-five people are now employed. 

Mr. Hancock is an honorary member of the 
Ruritan Club, in Courtland, and a member of the 
Davis Ridley Hunt Club. He is a communicant of 
the Courtland Baptist Church. 

On February 4. 1912, Robert Lafayette Han- 
cock, Jr., married Mary Ernie Johnson of South- 
ampton Cour.ty, Virginia, daughter of John and 
Mar\ Eliza (Branch) Johnson. )Irs Hancock died 
or December 29, 1954. The couple became the 
parents of the following children: 1. Mary Lucille, 
who was born on January 4, 1913. She is the wife 
of C. H. Dilday. 2. Robert L., 3rd. 3. Harry Lee. 

4. Garth S. These three sons are subjects of sepa- 
rate biographical sketches. 5. Muriel Jacqueline, 
born on December 29, 1928. She married James 

5. Johnson. 



HARRY LEE HANCOCK— Partner in a pros- 
perous family enterprise at Courtland, Harry Lee 
Hancock is playing his part in the important Tide- 
water industry of peanut processing. Since his re- 
turn from military service in World War II, he 
has been active in the management of the Han- 
cock Peanut Company. 

A native of Courtland, be was born on March 
6, 1918, third child and second son of Robert 
Lafayette, Jr., and Mary Ernie (Johnson) Han- 
cock. His father, inventor of the Hancock Seed 
Peanut Sheller, was also founder of the firm which 
he and hi. son-, now manage. He is the subject 
of an accompanying biographical sketch, as are 
his other sons, Robert L., 3rd, and Garth S. 

Harry Lee Hancock attended the public schools 
of Suffolk. In the early years of his career he 
was employed by the Blair Motor Company in 
Suffolk and the Walters Peanut Company at Wal- 
ters, and was later associated with his father in 
building the Birdsong Storage Company's plant 
at Suffolk. 

He was one 01 the early contingent to enter 
military service when world conditions dictated 
preparedness for this country, and entered the 
army in March 1940. He remained in uniform 
until July 1945. He was at Pearl Harbor on Dec- 
ember 7, 1 94 1, "the day which will live in infamy" 
[sequence of the Japanese sneak attack which 
drew this country into World War II. He con- 
tinued with the army overseas during most of 
the ensuing conflict. 

Shortly before he had completed his tour of 



military duty, his father formed the Hancock Pea- 
nut Company, and when he returned to civilian 
life, he became a partner in the enterprise, with 
which he has been identified since, together with 
his two brothers. 

Mr. Hancock is interested in the program of 
the Boy Scouts of America, and he is assistant 
scoutmaster of Troop No. 11 at Courtland. As 
a veteran of World War II, he is a member of 
Courtland Post No. 275 of the American Legion, 
and he also belongs to the Ruritan Club. He is 
a communicant of the Courtland Baptist Church. 

On July 19, 1947, Harry Lee Hancock married 
Mary Margaret Magda of Cleveland, Ohio. They 
are the parents of four children: 1. Harry Lee, 
Jr., born on February 11, 1949. 2. James Calvin, 
born March 30, 1950. 3. Margaret Rose, born 
September 22, 1951. 4. Amana Magda, born Octo- 
ber 7, 1953. 



GARTH S. HANCOCK— Since his return from 
military service in World War II, Garth S. Han- 
cock has been associated with his father and 
brothers in the Hancock Peanut Company at 
Courtland. He has taken a leading role in com- 
munity affairs there, has headed the Courtland 
Community Center, Inc., and is currently presi- 
dent of the city's Ruritan Club. 

Born in Suffolk on April 19, 1921, he is the 
fourth of the five children born to Robert Lafa- 
yette, Jr., and Mary Ernie (Johnson) Hancock. 
The father, as well as two older sons, Robert 
L., 3rd, and Harry Lee, are partners in the pea- 
nut processing firm, which was founded in 1944. 

Beginning his education in the public schools 
of Suffolk, Garth S. Hancock completed his se- 
condary studies at Courtland High School. He 
gained early business experience with the Bird- 
song Storage Company- in Suffolk, at a plant 
which his father had built for the firm at that 
location. He was employed there until June 1942, 
and then entered the wartime service of the Uni- 
ted States Army. He remained in military service 
for three years. 

Returning to civilian life in 1945, he joined 
his father and brothers in the Hancock Peanut 
Company. They are partners in this enterprise. 
In addition to processing and distributing pea- 
nuts, as an important unit of a major industry 
of the region, they have assembled a number of 
units of the Hancock Seed Peanut Sheller, which 
Robert L. Hancock, Jr., invented. These they 
have leased to firms in the Virginia-Carolina 
peanut belt. 

Active in the Ruritan Club at Courtland for 
some years, Garth S. Hancock was elected to 
serve as its president during its 1957 term. A 
past president of the Courtland Community Cen- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



'49 



ter, Inc., he continues to serve on its board of 
directors. As a veteran of World War II, he be- 
longs to Cojrtland's Post No. 275 of the Ameri- 
can Legion, and he is also a member of the 
Cypress Cove Country Club. He attends Court- 
land Baptist Church, and serves as custodian 
there. 

On July 5, 1 94 1, Garth S. Hancock married 
Josephine Estelle Hedgepeth of Handsom, Vir- 
ginia, daughter of George Dewey and Annie Mary 
(Porter) Hedgepeth. The couple are the parents 
of five children: 1. June Jeanette, born June 10, 
1942. 2. Martha Jean, who was born on May 21, 
1943- 3- Garth S., Jr., born on July 29, 1947. 4. 
Susan Brice, born December 18, 1950. 5. Jo Ann, 
born February 27, 1954. 



NELSON CHILCOAT OVERTON— A law- 
yer who after more than a decade of practice 
took over the management of an outstanding real- 
ty and insurance firm, J. F. Tilghman, Inc., Nel- 
son Chilcoat Overton of Newport News is today 
well known not only in these two fields but also 
in home financing and in veterans' and military 
affairs. For many years lie has been an impor- 
tant figure in the American Legion — on local, 
state and national levels. At one time he was 
in the top echelon in the Virginia State Guard 
and he is a veteran of World War 1, with a 
record on the home front in World War II. 
His headquarters are at 122 Twenty-sixth Street, 
Newport News. 

Mr. Overton was born in Baltimore, Maryland, 
on October 15, 1890, the son of Miles Nelson 
and Flora Mae (Chilcoat) Overton. His father, 
a native of South Mills, North Carolina, served 
as cashier for the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad 
in Newport News for many years. He died in 
1941. The mother, born in Baltimore, died in 

'939- 

Nelson C. Overton received his early edu- 
cation in Newport News. He was graduated from 
high school there in 1910 and four years later 
took the degree of Bachelor of Laws at the Uni- 
versity of Virginia. Admitted to the bars of Vir- 
ginia and Florida that year, 1914, he engaged in 
a general practice in Jacksonville for the next 
three years. 

In May 1917, less than a month after the Uni- 
ted States declared war on the Central Powers, 
Mr. Overton enlisted in the Army and was first 
attached to the 82nd Division as a first lieu- 
tenant. He rose to captain. Transferred to the 
20th Division, he served with that "outfit" until 
August 1919. Later, he served as captain of the 
Newport News Company of the Virginia Pro- 
tective Force and in the World War II period. 



I 943~ I 946, was a lieutenant colonel and battalion 
commander in the Virginia State Guard. 

From 1919 to 1926, Mr. Overton practiced law 
in Newport News. When his father-in-law. J. F. 
Tilghman, died in the latter year, Mr. Overton 
took over management of Mr. Tilghman's real 
estate and insurance business, known as J. F. 
Tilghman, Inc. This firm had been established 
by Mr. Tilghman and Howard Bowen in 1917, 
under the name of Tilghman and Bowen, Inc. 
The first office was in the basement of the Finch 
Building, at the corner of Thirtieth Street ana 
Washington Avenue, Newport News. A few years 
later the partners moved their headquarters to 
138 Twenty-eighth Street, but soon afterward the 
partnership was dissolved and the name was 
changed to J. F. Tilghman, Inc., Mr. Bowen 
having retired from the firm altogether. In 1926, 
the year Mr. Overton joined the firm, the office 
was moved to the Tilghman Building, 3023 Wash- 
ington Avenue. In March 1939, the firm moved 
to its new building on Twenty-sixth Street. 

In addition to operating this business, Mr. 
Overton serves as treasurer and a director of the 
Mutual Home and Savings Association of New- 
port News. Through the years he has been most 
active in the American Legion. A past com- 
mander of the Newport News Post, he served 
as commander of the Department of Virginia in 
1928 and 1929 and then was elected to the nation- 
al executive committee for the years 1929 and 
1930. He is also a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon 
and Phi Alpha Delta fraternities and of the 
Methodist Church. 

Mr. Overton married Lucile Tilghman. who was 
horn in Newport News, in that city on Febru- 
ary 25, 1925. Her father was one of the city's 
outstanding citizens. Her mother was the former 
Christine Virginia Mitchell. Mr. and Mrs. Over- 
ton have three children: Nelson, Lucile. and 
James. 



WILLIAM HENRY SHEFFIELD— It was 

less than two decades ago that William Henry 
Sheffield entered the lumber industry on a small 
s ale in Suffolk. Under his capable management 
the enterprise has grown into one of the city's 
major industries. Mr. Sheffield has become an 
influential figure in the organizational and civic 
life of the community as well as in industrial 
affairs. 

He was born March 26, 1918, in Southampton 
County, son of Henry T. and Rosa L. (Coun- 
cill) Sheffield. His father, a native of Sussex 
County, was a lumberman before him, and died 
on March 28, 1947. Mrs. Sheffield is still living. 
She is a native of Southampton County. Attend- 
ing the public schools of Sussex County and the 



i 5 o 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



city of Suffolk, William H. Sheffield graduated 
from Suffolk High School in 1936. For three 
years he was a student at the University of Vir- 
ginia. 

In 1939 he entered the lumber business in his 
own name, beginning operations in a small way 
by cutting rough timber with a portable sawmill, 
and marketing it. The volume of production grew 
steadily, and about 1945, he started his present 
expansion program. Today, his plant and office 
on Newport Street Extension occupies twenty- 
three acres. His firm, operating under the name 
of W. H. Sheffield, Lumber, gives employment 
to about a hundred and twenty-five people. Its 
primary product is finished lumber. 

Mr. Sheffield is a Democrat in his politics. 
He is a member of the lodges of the Knights 
of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and the Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons. In Masonry, he is a member of 
Hiram Lodge; the consistory of the Ancient and 
Accepted Scottish Rite; and Khedive Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. He is also a member of the Cosmopolitan 
Club, and his fraternity is Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 
He attend.; the Baptist Church at Suffolk. Hunt- 
ing and fishing are his favorite outdoor sports. 
Mr. Sheffield is unmarried. 



CHARLES DOUGLAS PITT— With over thirty 
years' experience in the insurance field in the 
city of Newport News to his credit, Charles 
Douglas Pitt heads his own organization, Douglas 
Pitt, Inc., which also deals in real estate and 
has its offices at 125 Twenty-sixth Street. 

He is a native of Newport News, born there on 
July 31, 1905, and is a son of Charles Faris and 
Priscilla (Knowles) Pitt. His father, who was 
born in Middlesex County, was an executive of 
the Mason Body Company of Newport News, 
advancing to the position of vice president and 
general manager of that firm, which manufactures 
truck bodies. He died on July 15, 1949, surviving 
by three years his wife, the former Priscilla 
Knowles. 

Attending the public schools in his native city, 
Douglas Pitt graduated from Newport News High 
School in 1924. While attending high school, he 
developed his long-time interest in athletics and 
played on the baseball team. Following his gradua- 
tion, he began his business career with the Granby 
Manufacturing Company, at the corner of Virginia 
Avenue and Twenty-seventh Street. A short time 
afterwards he left to accept a position as sales- 
man with the National Cash Register Company. 

Soon realizing that such positions did not bring 
him the satisfaction one feels on finding his true 
career, he turned his attention to the insurance 



business in 1925, joining the George C. Chapin In- 
surance Company, which had its office in the one- 
hundred block on Twenty-sixth Street. He re- 
mained with that agency for two and one-half 
years, and at the end of that time the oragnization 
consolidated on a five-year plan with Murray 
and Padgett, Inc., which operated a real estate in- 
surance business. Shortly after the merger, Dou- 
glas Pitt was named manager of the firm's in- 
surance department, a position he held for sixteen 
years. At the close of the "five-year plan," George 
C. Chapin had resumed his private insurance busi- 
ness, and Mr. Pitt spent the remaining eleven 
years with Murray and Padgett. In the early 
days of World War II, while still with this firm, 
he accepted a temporary position with the United 
States Government as housing expediter on the 
Camp Patrick Henry project. This involved the 
construction of a military base which was to serve 
as a point of embarkation for millions of troops 
going overseas. He afterwards accepted the man- 
agership of the Newport News War Housing 
Center under the National Housing Agency and 
continued in that position for about a year and 
one-half. 

Also when the war was about at mid-course, 
he purchased George C. Chapin's ageny, and this 
formed the basis of his present general insurance 
and real estate firm, Douglas Pitt, Inc. Offices 
are in the Phillips Building. His firm is a member 
of the Newport News Real Estate and Insurance 
Exchange, the Virginia Association of Insurance 
Agents, Inc., the National Association of Real 
Estate Boards, and the National Association of 
Insurance Agents. 

Mr. Pitt has taken a consistent and vital in- 
terest in civic affairs and every program for 
community betterment. He is a member of Bre- 
mond Lodge No. 241, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, and St. John's Chapter No. 57, Royal 
Arch Masons. He attends the First Baptist Church 
and is an independent in his politics. He retains 
his interest in baseball and other sports and is 
particulary fond of boating. Mr. Pitt served in 
the United States Naval Reserve from 1923 to 
1927. 

At Williamsburg, on September 25, 1942, Dou- 
glas Pitt married Violet Grubbs of Clifton Forge, 
daughter of James R. and Agnes Leona (Morrison) 
Grubbs. The couple are the parents of one son: 
Douglas, Jr., who was born on February 20, 1944. 



LOUIS BERNARD FINE— A native and life- 
long resident of the Lower Tidewater, Louis Ber- 
nard Fine has been practicing law in Norfolk 
since completing his professional studies in 1925. 
A student editor in his law school days, he is now 
one of the editors for the National Association of 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



>5» 



Compensation Claimants' Attorneys, as well as 
parliamentarian for that organization. He is a for- 
mer teacher of Constitutional law and is currently 
serving as commissioner in chancery for the Cir- 
cuit Courts of the City of Norfolk and the County 
of Norfolk. He is a stockholder, official or counsel 
for twelve large business corporations, chiefly in 
the realty field. 

Born in Norfolk on October 3, 1904, Mr. Fine is 
the son of Morris Fine, a hardware merchant, and 
Mamie Fine. He is a graduate of a Norfolk elemen- 
tary school and Maury High School and in 1925 
took the degree of Bachelor of Laws at George- 
town University Law School in Washington, D. C. 
Admitted to the Virginia Bar in 1924, he has been 
in practice in Norfolk, with offices at 1102-1113 
National Bank of Commerce Building, since upon 
obtaining his law degree in 1925. 

He was appointed commissioner in chancery of 
the Circuit Court of Norfolk in 1943 and of the 
Circuit Court of the county in 1945. In 1946, he 
taught Constitutional law at the Norfolk College of 
Law. He served as an editor of the Georgetown 
Law Journal in the year 1924-1925 and has been as- 
sociate editor of the NACCA Law Journal since 
1951. He was elected parlimentarian of the NACCA 
in 1954. He is also a member of the American Bar 
Association, Virginia State Bar Association and the 
Norfolk and Portsmouth Bar Association. 

Mr. Fine's business interests are in Marc Prop- 
erties, Incorporated; Fine Investment Company, 
Inc.; Mamie Properties, Inc.; F. Properties, Inc.: 
LMM and A Company, Inc.; Alexander Properties, 
Inc.; Morris Properties, Inc.; Snug Harbor Prop- 
erties, Inc.; City and County Holding Company, 
Inc.; Cook Realty Corporation; Dinner Key Manor, 
Inc., and Selma Properties, Inc. 

Besides his professional organizations, Mr. Fine 
belongs to various Masonic bodies, including the 
Consistory, Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, 
and Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; the Knights of 
Pythias, Royal Arcanum, Loyal Order of Moose 
and The Hague Club. He is a former national 
officer of the Phi Alpha fraternity. He and his 
family worship in Ohef Sholom Temple, Norfolk. 

Mr. Fine married Minnie Snyder, daughter of 
Louis and Kate Snyder, in Norfolk on November 
12, 1929. They have two sons: 1. Morris Heller, 
born on October 13, 1930. 2. Andrew Snyder, born 
on December 7, 1936. The older son, Morris Heller 
Fine, is now practicing law with his father. 



JOHN MAURICE BRATTEN, president and 
general manager of Ames and Webb, Inc., held 
responsible executive posts with this Norfolk firm 
of paving contractors before his recent elevation 



to the presidency. He is also general manager of 
the organization, which has its headquarters at 
3145 Broad Creek Road. 

Born December 14, 191 1, at Princess Anne, he 
is a son of George Whittington and Marie (Ether- 
edge) Bratten. His father was a native of Snow 
Hill, Maryland, where he first engaged in the 
lumber business. In 191 1, the year of his son's 
birth, he established the G. W. Bratten Lumber 
Company at Princess Anne. He continued as presi- 
dent and manager of this firm until 1928 when 
he retired, and his death occurred at his Princess 
Anne home a quarter-century later, on August 3, 
!953- He was a member of the Methodist Church, 
and of the lodges of the Ancient Free and Accep- 
ted Masons and the commandery of the Knights 
Templar. George W. Bratten was a son of Joseph 
Maurice Bratten, also a lumberman, first active 
at Snow Hill and later at Princess Anne. The 
Bratten family is of Scottish and Dutch descent. 
Marie (Etheredge) Bratten, the mother of John 
-Maurice Bratten, was born in Norfolk, a des- 
cendant of early settlers in that city. She now 
resides in Virginia Beach. She and her husband 
were the parents of two sons: 1. John Maurice, of 
whom further. 2. George Whittington, Jr., who 
is president of the Bratten Pontiac Corporation 
of Norfolk. 

John M. Bratten received his early education 
in the public schools of Princess Anne, but com- 
pleted his secondary studies at Norfolk, graduating 
from Maury High School in 1928. He continued 
his education at Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 
where he majored in agricultural engineering and 
graduated with the Class of 1932. 

He began his career with the United States 
Department of Agriculture in Tidewater Virginia, 
continuing in government service until 1936. There- 
after until 1939 he was with the United States 
Bureau of Public Roads, with headquarters at 
Roanoke. From 1939 to 1941 he was a member 
of the firm of Bratten Brothers, used car dealers 
of Norfolk, leaving to become associated with the 
Virginia Engineering Company of Newport News 
for three years. He then became identified with 
Ames and Webb of Norfolk at that time in the 
capacity of field engineer. In that position he 
superintended a number of important projects. He 
became vice president of the firm in 1951, and 
on the death of St. Clair Webb (one of the founders 
of the firm and its president), on November 5, 
1955. be succeeded him as president. 

The firm of Ames and Webb had its beginning 
at Raleigh, North Carolina, in 1933. The other 
co-founder was the late Leslie R. Ames of Ral- 
eigh, who died on November 3, 1947. It was in 
1937 that headquarters of the contracting firm 
were moved to Norfolk, although offices were re- 



1^2 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



tained at Raleigh. Ames and Webb, Inc., lias been 
growing continuously through the intervening 
3'ears, and is now one of the largest firms in 
Virginia devoted exclusively to paving contracting. 
Among the major contracts it has completed in 
recent years has been the paving of Virginia 
Beach Boulevard, a dual-pavement highway eigh- 
teen miles in length extending from Park Avenue 
in Norfolk to the Virginia Beach city line. Another 
major project is the Tidewater Drive in Norfolk, 
extending from City Hall Avenue to Rugby Street. 
The firm also paved the approaches to the Eliza- 
beth River Tunnel, as well as the tube itself, and 
Hampton Boulevard from the College of William 
and Mary to the Naval Base; Granby Street from 
the bridge to Taussig Boulevard; and a number 
of Air Force, Army and Navy installations. In 
io 55. Ames and Webb, Inc., erected on its twenty- 
acre site an electronically controlled asphalt manu- 
facturing plant. Its cost was one hundred and 
fifty thousand dollars, but it will save many times 
that figure, since it requires the attention of only 
a single operator and turns out one hundred tons 
of plant-mix asphalt per hour. Besides its contract- 
ing, Ames and Webb now sells plant-mixed as- 
phalt, concrete and macadam to other contractors, 
and also operates an equipment rental service. In 
its overall operations, the firm employs about two 
hundred. Besides Mr. Bratten as president, the 
officers are Harold N. Webb, vice president, and 
George N. Turner, secretary and treasurer. 

The firm holds membership in the American 
Road Builders Association, the Association of 
General Contractors of America, the Virginia As- 
phalt Association, the Virginia Road Builders As- 
sociation, Norfolk Chamber of Commerce, Virginia 
Beach Chamber of Commerce and the United 
States Chamber of Commerce; and in each of 
these organizations, Mr. Bratten also holds an 
individual membership. Apart from his trade con- 
nections, he is a member of the Princess Anne 
Country Club, and is a communicant of the First 
Presbyterian Church of Virginia Beach. An oc- 
casional round of golf comprises his outdoor rec- 
reation. 

At Princess Anne, on August 22, 1036, John M. 
Bratten married Alma Georgia Darden of London 
Bridge, Virginia, daughter of the late Louis C. 
and Georgia (Bramble) Darden of that town. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bratten are the parents of two 
children: I. Eleanor Faye, born February 23, 1947. 
2. Delmar Ray, born September 6, 1048. The fami- 
ly resides at 104 Linkhorn Drive, Virginia Beach. 



ALEXANDER LUTHER BIVINS— Since his 
admittance to the Virginia bar four decades ago, 
Alexander Luther Bivins has practiced at New- 



port News and in the course of that time has 
distinguished himself in public office as state sena- 
tor and commonwealth attorney. 

He is a native of Newport News and was born 
on June 10, 1894, son of Frederic Canfield and 
Margaret Matilda (MacKnight) Bivins. His father 
had come to the state from New York, having been 
born in Ontario County in the Empire State on 
July 6, 1869. He was a foreman for some years in 
the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock 
Company. His wife, the former Margaret Matilda 
MacKnight, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, on February 12, 1871. She died on March 
30, 1924, and Mr. Bivins died on January 1, 1945- 

Attending the public schools of Newport News, 
Alexander L. Bivins graduated from high school 
there in 1913. He then entered the University of 
Virginia, where he prepared for his professional 
career at the Law School. In 1917 he was admitted 
to the bar of the state of Virginia, and conducted 
a general practice of law at Newport News under 
his own name, until January 1, 1957, when the 
present law firm of Bivins, Jacobs and Bivins was 
formed, the offices being located at 130 Twenty- 
fifth Street. Associated with Mr. Bivins in this 
firm are Ben Jacobs, former municipal judge of 
the city of Newport News and Mr. Bivins' son, 
A. Jeffery Bivins. He is a member of the Newport 
News-Warwick Bar Association and the Virginia 
State Bar Association. 

A Democrat in his politics, Mr. Bivins was elected 
state senator on his party's ticket, serving the 
Thirty-third Senatorial District of the state in 
I 937" I 938. When he concluded his term in 1938, 
he began his tenure as commonwealth attorney at 
Newport News, serving until 1943. 

He is a member of Sigma Nu fraternity and of 
the local Kiwanis Club, which he served as presi- 
dent in 1927. In 1926 he was exalted ruler of the 
local lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. He retains membership in this lodge and 
is also a member of Peninsula Lodge No. 278 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. Mr. Bivins 
is also a member of the Virginia Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution. He and Mrs. 
Bivins attend St. Paul's Episcopal Church. Mr. 
Bivins has served on the Newport News school 
board and as its chairman. 

Mrs. Bivins, the former Miss Virginia Jefifery of 
Newport News, is the daughter of Aaron and Mary 
(Luck) Jefifery. She became the wife of Alexander 
Luther Bivins in a ceremony at St. Paul's Church 
in Newport News on September 11, 1918. Mrs. 
Bivins is a member of the Society of Colonial 
Dames. The couple are the parents of the follow- 
ing children: I. Alexander Jeffery, who was born 
on July 15, 1919. He married Mary Winston. 2. 
Mary Jefifery, who is the wife of Wayne D. Hal- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



'53 



perty. 3. Virginia Spottswood. She is now Mrs. 
Robert Douglas Clayton. 4. Anne Gardner, who is 
the wife of John Drummond Chamblin. 5. Richard 
Randolph, who is attending the College of William 
and Mary, Norfolk Division. Mr. and Mrs. Bivins 
also have ten grandchildren. 



JOSEPH C. GREENE— A certified public ac- 
countant with thirty-five years' experience in his 
profession, Joseph C. Greene is new senior part- 
ner in the firm of Frederick B. Hill and Company 
of Norfolk. He was born in Halifax County on 
June 29, 1899, son of the late Walter Granville 
and Margaret (Mebane) Greene. Both parents 
were natives of Halifax County, and of early Vir- 
ginia ancestry. Walter Granville Greene, who died 
in 1938, was chief special agent for the Southern 
Railway Company. His wife, the former Margaret 
Mebane, died in 1919 at the age of forty-one. 

Receiving his education in the public schools 
of Richmond, Joseph C. Greene then entered the 
business world. His entire career since has been 
identified with the accounting profession. He be- 
gan in 1920 with the nationally known accounting 
firm of Ernst and Ernst, at its Richmond office, 
remaining in this connection until 1926. At the 
time the Naval Air Station was built at Norfolk, 
he was with the chief financial officer of the Vir- 
ginia Engineering Company of Newport News, 
a contractor on that project, engaged in compiling 
a manual of cost-plus-fixed-fee contract. He work- 
ed with the firm while it was engaged in govern- 
ment work, 1940-1944. and it was awarded the 
Navy "E" and the L'nited States Treasury Award 
for outstanding service to the cause of defense 
in the course of that time. 

In 1930, Mr. Greene had passed his examination 
for certification as a public accountant before the 
North Carolina State Board of Accountancy, and 
was licensed to practice both in that state ami in 
Virginia. He was engaged in private practice at 
Raleigh from 1930 to 1935, being associated with 
the accounting firms of Dixon, Russ and Carter 
and R. C. Carter & Co., at various times. From 
IQ35 to 1940, he was district project auditor for 
the Public Works Administrator of a region com- 
prising seven Southern states, supervising seventy- 
six projects. Among the other important positions 
he has held has been that of comptroller for the 
Marydand Sanitary Manufacturing Company of 
Baltimore (1944-1946); and secretary and treas- 
urer of the Gary Steel Products Corporation of 
Richmond ( 1946-1948). 

Since 1940 he has been active in the private 
practice of accounting in Norfolk, and from 1950 
to date, senior partner in the public accounting 
firm of Frederick B. Hill and Company, with of- 
fices in the Flatiron Building. He is licensed to 



practice before the Treasury Department and the 
Board of Tax Appeals (now the United States 
Tax Court). He is a member of the American 
Institute of Accountants, the Virginia Society of 
Public Accountants, the American Institute of 
Management and the Southern Institute of Man- 
agement. 

Active in civic and community affairs, Mr. 
Greene is a member of the Kiwanis Club of Nor- 
folk and the Norfolk Yacht and Country Club. 
He attends the Episcopal Church. 

On October 2, 1933, at Raleigh, North Carolina, 
Joseph C. Greene married Lucille (Wilder) Gantt 
of that city. By her previous marriage, Mrs. Greene 
is the mother of a daughter, Betty Sue Gantt, who 
was born on November 13, 1925. On July 5, 1952, 
Miss Gantt became the wife of Robert B. Pond, 
now a lieutenant commander in the United States 
Navy and stationed at San Diego, California. The 
Greene family residence is at 1042 Jamestown 
Crescent, Norfolk. 



CLARENCE H. LUMSDEN, SR., and CLAR- 
ENCE H. LUMSDEN, JR., are co-founders and 
partners in the Sheet Metal Specialty Company 
of Norfolk. This firm of engineers, and manufac- 
turers and distributors of sheet metal products 
was founded in 1946, and has experienced continu- 
ous growth since that time. It is now recognized 
as the best-equipped light sheet metal plant in 
the Tidewater area. It specializes in contracting 
for and manufacturing sheet metal products, in 
primary air-conditioning and heating work, and 
in engineering assignments in which such instal- 
lations are used. The firm supplies local dealers 
in Norfolk, South Norfolk, Portsmouth and Vir- 
ginia Beach, and throughout Norfolk and Prin- 
cess Anne counties. Its plant is located at 3319 
lait Terrace, Norfolk, and embraces about five 
thousand square feet of floor space. It is more 
than double in size with the erection of an annex 
with six thousand square feet of floor space, 
completed in the autumn of 195b. When it was 
founded in 194b, the firm occupied a site at York 
and Duke streets. It was later moved to 207 
East Charlotte Street, and subsequently to 605 
West 25th Street. Each move was part of an 
expansion program necessitated by its growing 
volume of business. When the two Clarence II. 
Lumsdens tounded their enterprise, they did all 
the work themselves. Today the plant has twenty- 
three employees, highly trained in their respec- 
tive lines of work, who share the management's 
pride in a superior finished product. The com- 
pany has enjoyed excellent employee relations. 
Nine of its employees have been with the organi- 
zation since shortly after its founding. Its growth 



54 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



has been in large measure the outcome of a policy 
of giving its customers the best of service and 
workmanship, at an economical price. 

The 'senior partner, Clarence H. Lumsden, Sr., 
has been in the sheet-metal business for more 
than half a century, and followed in the footsteps 
of his grandfather, James Lewis Steadman Lums- 
den, a native of Scotland, who was among the 
pioneer tinsmiths of Raleigh, North Carolina. 
There he made canteens for soldiers of the Con- 
federate States Army. He operated a tinsmith 
shop and hardware store in Raleigh in the years 
following the war, and lived out his life there. 

Born in Raleigh on September 10, 1886, Clarence 
H. Lumsden, Sr., was a son of Robert Edward 
and Minnie (Horton) Lumsden. Both parents 
were natives of Wake County, North Carolina, 
who lived all their lives in Raleigh. The elder 
Clarence Lumsden received his education in the 
public schools of Raleigh and began his apprentice- 
ship in the sheet metal trade at the age of nine, 
working during after-school hours, Saturdays and 
during vacation periods. At the age of nineteen 
he entered the trade full-time, and in 191 2 came 
to Norfolk. There he has followed the trade con- 
tinuously since. From 1920 to 1927 he operated a 
sheet-metal shop in his own name, at Virginia 
Beach. Later he opened a shop in Norfolk, and 
in 1946, joined his son, Clarence H., Jr., in found- 
ing the Sheet Metal Specialty Company, in which 
he continues as a partner. A fine craftsman in 
the trade, he has worked with his son in manag- 
ing the present enterprise, and directing it to its 
present level of production and recognition. 

On December 7, 1918, at Norfolk, Clarence H. 
Lumsden, Sr., married Ruth Hall of that city, 
who died in 1950. They were the parents of two 
children: 1. Shirlie Margaret, who married George 
W. Butcher of Norfolk. 2. Clarence Hall, Jr. He 
was born on April 2, 1924, at Virginia Beach, 
and graduated from Maury High School, Norfolk, 
in 1940. From 1940 to 1942 he was employed by- 
Norfolk Newspapers, Inc., and at the Norfolk 
Naval Operating Base. On December 2, 1942, he 
enlisted in the United States Army Air Corps for 
duty in World War II, and was separated from 
active service on November 30, 1945. His tour of 
duty included two years overseas witli the Ninth 
Air Force, based in England and later in France 
and Germany, where he was in charge of a supply 
and maintenance unit with the rank of staff ser- 
geant. 

Resuming civilian status, he first sought Lis 
old job at Naval Operating Base, but when offered 
a reduced rating, declined employment. It was at 
this time that he made the decision to enter the 
sheet-metal manufacturing business at Norfolk. 
Greatly handicapped in securing the necessary 



machinery for an expanded manufacturing opera- 
tion with his father, he went to Richmond, and 
there secured the indispensable minimum of equip- 
ment, and a consignment of sheet metal. The com- 
bination of his father's ability as a sheet-metal 
craftsman, and the progressive spirit of the young- 
er Lumsden soon had the enterprise progressing 
rapidly. To keep pace with developments in his 
industry, Clarence H. Lumsden, Jr., has taken 
correspondence courses in engineering, and, under 
the guidance of his father, he has become a fine 
craftsman in his own right. 

Clarence H. Lumsden, Jr., is a member of the 
Hampton Roads Executives Club, the Norfolk 
Chamber of Commerce, the National Warm Air 
and Air Conditioning Association, and the Lafay- 
ette Yacht Club. He is a member and past grand 
of Lafayette Lodge No. 9, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. A communicant of Norview Baptist 
Church, he is active on its building committee. 
He enjoys boating and hunting. 

On December 23, 1945, Clarence H. Lumsden, 
Jr., married Ethelyn Butler Taylor of Bangor, 
Maine, daughter of LeRoy F. and Mae (Butler) 
Taylor. Mrs. Lumsden is active in civic and 
church affairs, being a member of the Norview 
Baptist Church. She is past noble grand of Re- 
bekah Lodge No. 13, International Order of Odd 
Fellows, and first vice president of the Norview 
Elementary School's Parent-Teacher Association. 
The couple are the parents of two children: 1. 
Curtis Hall, born September 21, 1948. 2. Lois Mae, 
born April 29, 1952. The family resides at 1324 
Norview Avenue, Norfolk, and they have a sum- 
mer home at Chesapeake Beach, Virginia. 



RICHARD TWISDELL YATES— Practicing 
law at Newport News since his return from service 
in World War II, Richard Twisdell Yates is 
a partner in the firm of Ferguson, Yates and 
Stephens, which has its offices in the First Na- 
tional Bank Building. 

He is one of the city's younger professional 
men, having been born on December 31, 1921, at 
Buffalo, New York, son of Edward Sears and 
Katherine (Basler) Yates. His father, who was 
born in Fauquier County, Virginia, served as an 
officer in the United States Marines, and was 
also a professor of languages at preparatory 
schools and colleges. He died on October 10, 
1943. Katherine Basler, whom he married, was 
born in Indianapolis, Indiana, and she is still 
living. Beginning his public school education at 
Staunton, Virginia, Richard T. Yates later at- 
tended schools in Washington, D. C, and Char- 
lottesville, Virginia, and he graduated from high 
school in the latter city in 1940. He attended 
the University of Virginia for two years. At the 




(at^<F^K~ 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



'55 



time of World War II, he served in the United 
States Army. After receiving his honorable dis- 
charge in 1943, he reentered the University of 
Virginia, where he completed his requirements for 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1946. He served 
on the board of editors of the "University of 
Virginia Law Review" in 1945-1946, and was a 
member of Sigma Nu Phi fraternity and The 
Raven. 

Admitted to the bar of the State of Virginia 
on June 28, 1945, Mr. Yates commenced his gen- 
eral practice at Newport News as soon as he 
had completed his courses in the University of 
Virginia Law School. He joined the firm of Monta- 
gue, Ferguson and Holt and later became a mem- 
ber of this partnership. This partnership was later 
dissolved and two firms emerged, one of which 
is now known as Ferguson, Yates and Stephens. 
The organization conducts a general practice in 
all courts, taking admiralty, insurance, corporation 
and probate law cases. Among the firms which it 
represents are the Newport News Shipbuilding 
and Dry Dock Company, Virginia Electric and 
Power Company, Home Federal Savings and Loan 
Association of Norfolk, Prudential Insurance Com- 
pany, Arkell Safety Bag Company, Hiden Storage 
and Forwarding Company, Inc., Peninsula Broad- 
casting Corporation, Railway Express Agency, The 
Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United 
States, Newport News Automobile Exchange, 
and a number of nationally known insurance 
firms. 

Mr. Yates is a member of the Newport News - 
Warwick Bar Association, the Virginia State 
Bar Association and the American Bar Association. 
He is a Democrat in his politics, and a member 
o f Sigma Nu Phi and Sigma Nu fraternities, the 
Lions Club of Newport News, and Peninsula 
Lodge No. 278, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 
He attends the Episcopal Church. He is interested 
in floriculture and in outdoor sports. 

At the University of Virginia Chapel in Char- 
lottesville, on February 20, 1946, Richard Twis- 
dell Yates married Mary Jane Sneed, a native of 
Charlottesville and a graduate of the LTniversity 
of Virginia, who received her degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Education in 1946. She is a 
daughter of John L. T. and Margaret (Marshall) 
Sneed. Mr. and Mrs. Yates have three children: 
I. Edward Sears, 3rd, who was born on December 
27, 1948. 2. Richard Marshall, born June 9, 1951. 
3. William Stephen, born February 23, 1954. 



WILLIAM HUNTER SCOTT— While his 

business experience has been chiefly in the field 
of highway contracting, W. Hunter Scott has 
recently turned his attention most effectively to 
residential community development. In fact, Hun- 



terdale, his outstanding contribution in the build- 
ing of suburbs, had its beginning eighteen years 
ago, and it has continued to grow until it now re- 
presents one of the most attractive communities of 
fine homes to be found anywhere. It is located 
near Franklin, where his firm, W. H. Scott, Inc., 
has its headquarters. 

Mr. Scott was born in Southampton County, 
near the present village of Hunterdale, on April 
30, 1903, and is a son of Andrew Jackson and 
Nellie Rebecca (Turner) Scott. His father too was 
a native of Southampton County, and is now 
deceased. He was a farmer. Nellie Rebecca Turner, 
whom he married, survives her husband, and is 
now seventy-five years of age. She was also born 
in Southampton County. Reared on his father's 
small farm, W. Hunter Scott attended the public 
schools of his native county, including Bethel 
School, and concluded his formal education with 
two years at Richmond High School in Richmond, 
Virginia. 

The fact that he had an opportunity for work 
in the construction industry, while most youth of 
his age were still in the classroom, determined the 
course of his future career. His first position was 
in the capacity of "dinkey skinner" with the All- 
port Construction Company, which was then 
building a section of concrete road on Route 
Thirty-five near Courtland. The temporary rail 
lines for bringing up supplies were traversed by 
small engines known as dinkeys, and Mr. Scott 
derived his job classification from operating one 
of these. He later advanced to master mechanic 
with the same firm, and from this connection he 
went with the engineering firm of Allen J. Saville, 
Inc., of Richmond. While working in the old 
Confederate capital he took evening courses at 
John Marshall High School. With the Saville or- 
ganization, he advanced to the position of super- 
intendent in charge of heavy construction. He 
became thoroughly familiar with the details of 
bridge engineering and highway construction, valu- 
able experience when he later entered business for 
himself. 

He began taking his own contracts in 1931, be- 
ginning in a small way. The following year he 
first contracted with the Virginia Department of 
Highways and it was at that time that he estab- 
lished his first permanent organization at Franklin. 
During the late thirties, when the war clouds began 
to gather, the type of construction in which he was 
engaged became increasingly important. Not only 
were there defense highways to be built, but also 
airports and military bases. His larger-scale oper- 
ations brought the need to incorporate his business. 
In 1940 W. H. Scott, Inc., was formed and char- 
tered. W. Hunter Scott was its president; a cousin, 
E. M. Scott, vice president; and the founder's 



TWVa. 16 



, 5 6 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



brother, Vernard H. Scott, secretary and general 
manager of field operations. Descriptive of the 
work his firm carried out is this passage from an 
article in an early 1953 issue of the magazine 
"Virginia Road Builder": 

This fine firm of road builders has made a lasting con- 
tribution to the highways of Virginia which are paved with 
concrete. In almost every section of eastern Virginia, where 
concrete is the usual type of paving for Class 1 roads, 
there is a job which W. H. Scott, Inc., has built and 
to which the firm can point with pride. . . In addition 
to these highways, Hunter Scott and his firm, also con- 
tributed a great deal to the defense effort. Airfield pav- 
ing was one of the classes of construction on which they 
worked. The U. S. Naval Air Station has a lot of con- 
crete yardage which the Scott organization built. Airfield 
pavements also were laid at Franklin, Emporia, and on 
the municipal airport at Camp Patrick Henry which serves 
Newport News and that section of the Virginia Peninsula. 

Mr. Scott keeps in personal touch with his var- 
ious projects by airplane and takes a close per- 
sonal interest in all aspects of construction. He has 
been a licensed pilot for many years,' and this 
trait has won him the epithet, "the flying con- 
tractor." His organization has on its payroll about 
two hundred and sixty persons — engineers, ar- 
chitects, clerical help, construction workers. 

He began the development of the attractive 
community at Hunterdale in 1938, purchasing 
acreage adjacent to the farm on which he had been 
reared, and where he had long envisioned a 
burgeoning and pleasant residential area. He began 
the concrete realization of this vision by building 
his own home there, a rambling, one-story, ranch- 
type house which remains a showplace. Other 
homes were subsequently built on contract, set well 
back from the paved road which connects the 
village with Highway 58. The section is iso- 
lated by a section of densely wooded land which 
assures retention of its exclusive quality. The early 
homes were built at amazingly reasonable prices 
for an inflationary era, many for less than ten 
thousand dollars; but present valuation of the 
properties now is of course well in excess of that 
figure. There are now well over seventy residen- 
ces, spaciously laid out over an area of fifteen 
acres, and part of the old Scott farm is included 
in the town site, where Hunterdale Farms gives 
a pleasant rural touch. This has become a major 
dairying enterprise, with wide demand for its 
products. 

Mr. Scott held the rank of first lieutenant in 
the militia during World War II. He has been 
active in industrial groups and was president of 
the Virginia Road Builders Association in 1955. 
He is a member of the Ruritan Club and the 
Lions Club, both of Franklin, the Cypress Cove 
Country Club, Princess Anne Country Club, and 



the Cavalier Ciub. Attending Hunterdale Chris- 
tian Church, he serves on its board of trustees. 
He is a Democrat in his politics. 

At Virginia Beach on June 9, 1947, W. Hunter 
Scott married Gertrude Whitley of Franklin, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher Whitley. Mr. 
and Mrs. Scott have two children: I. Hunter Dale, 
born October 9, 1950. 2. William Hunter, Jr., 
born September 18, 1952. 



EARL R. HATTEN— As president of Handy 
Oil Corporation, Earl R. Hatten heads an organi- 
zation which operates twenty-three retail stations, 
and a sizable fuel-oil business, in the Newport 
Xews area. This firm was organized in July 1932, 
by Mr. Handy in association with Charles K. 
Hutchens and Latham B. Hewlett. Shortly after- 
wards, it purchased the interests of Phillips, The 
Oil Man, Inc.. at Small Boat Harbor. In March 
1936, Mr. Hatten and the late Charles A. Parker, 
purchased the entire stock of Handy Oil Corpo- 
ration. At that time, its holdings consisted of two 
retail gasoline filling stations, a small bulk plant, 
and a few consumer fuel oil accounts served by one 
truck and one driver. By the mid-i940s there 
were twenty-two retail gasoline stations, a number 
of commercial gasoline accounts, and over five 
thousand fuel-oil accounts. The bulk plant has 
greatly increased in size over the intervening 
years. Although its volume of business has in- 
creased with sufficient rapidity, without the con- 
tinued acquisition of new filling stations, one more 
has been added over the past decade, bringing the 
total to twenty-three. Handy Oil Corporation is 
distributor for Socony Mobil Oil products. Charles 
A. Parker, partner in the firm until he end of his 
life, died in May 1955. Since that time, Mr. Hatten 
has been sole owner, and president of the corpo- 
ration. 

A native of Tyler, Texas, Earl R. Hatten was 
born on October 27, 1893, son of Robert R. and 
Erah (Sligh) Hatten. His father, who was a mer- 
chant at Waco, Texas, is now deceased, although 
Mrs. Hatten is still living. Attending the public 
elementary and high schools of Waco, Earl R. 
Hatten went east for his advanced studies, en- 
rolling at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, 
New York, and later transferring to Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts. He trained as an engineer, and followed 
that profession during the early years of his career. 

He first came to Newport News in 1929 as 
production manager for the H. E. Dodge Boat 
and Plane Corporation. Several years later he 
joined Mr. Parker and they purchased the Handy 
Oil Corporation, as outlined above. 

Mr. Hatten is a veteran of World War I, having 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



'57 



served in the United States Navy. In the course 
of three years in the service, he attained the rank 
of lieutenant. He is a director of the Citizen's 
Marine Jefferson Bank, and a member of the 
Rotary Club at Newport News, the Propeller 
Club, the James River Country Club, and the 
lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. Be- 
ing a member of the higher bodies of Masonry, 
he belongs also to the Ancient Arabic Order of 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He attends the 
Methodist Church, and was formerly a member of 
the church of that denomination at Waco, Texas. 
Golf and gardening are Mr. Hatten's favorite out- 
door pastimes. 

At Schaghticoke, New York, on October 15, 
1921, E=.rl R. Hatten married Leone Quackenbush, 
daughter of John and Nellie (Newland) Quacken- 
bush. Mr. and Mrs. Hatten have two children: 1. 
John Q. Hatten, M.D., who was born on April 
30, 1924. He practices in Newport News. Married, 
he is the father of three children: Robert R., 
Mary Beth, and John Q., Jr. 2. Erah, who was 
born on June 14, 1925. She became the wife of 
Lawrence W. Kliewer of Warwick, and they have 
two children: Lawrence \\\, Jr., and Linda Eliza- 
beth. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hatten reside at 1205 Chesapeake 
Avenue, Newport News. 



HENRY DUNCAN GARNETT— After his re- 
turn from army service in World War II, Henry 
Duncan Garnett was admitted to the bar, and be- 
gan practice at Newport News. He is now at 
Warwick, where he is serving as commonwealth 
attorney. 

Born in Fredericksburg, Virginia, on April 11, 
1915, he is a son of Henry Garnett and Mary S. 
(Merchant) Garnett. His father, a native of West- 
moreland County, was a retail merchant in Freder- 
icksburgh, and died April 11, 1954. Mrs. Garnett 
was born in that city, and died on September 1, 
!937- Receiving his public school education in 
Fredericksburg, Henry D. Garnett graduated from 
high school there in 1933. He was employed by 
Sylvania Industrial Corporation in Fredericksburg 
until he entered the University of Richmond in 
1938. He volunteered for military service in Jan- 
uary 1942. Enlisting in the United States Army, 
he remained in uniform until March 10, 1946, and 
served overseas for a considerable time, first in 
the Mediterranean area and later in the Pacific. 
He enlisted as a private, and at the time of his 
discharge held a captain's commission. 

On returning to civilian life, Mr. Garnett com- 
pleted courses which he had begun before joining 
the army. He had taken his undergraduate work 
at the University of Richmond, and in 1946 he 
completed his requirements for the degree of 



Bachelor of Laws there. Admitted to the bar of 
the State of Virginia on July 9, 1946, he practiced 
in Newport News, as an associate in law firms in 
that city, until December 20, 1952. At that time 
he was appointed commonwealth attorney for 
Warwick City, and has held that position to the 
present time, being re-elected in 1955. He has 
offices for the private practice of law in the Court 
House at Denbeigh, Virginia. Mr. Garnett is a 
member of the Newport News-Warwick Bar Asso- 
ciation, the Virginia State Bar and the Virginia 
State Bar Association. 

He is also a member of the McNeil Law Society, 
Omicron Delta Kappa fraternity, the Kiwanis 
Club at Warwick, the Warwick Ruritan Club, 
and American Legion Post No. 255 in that city. 
He is a Democrat in his politics, and attends the 
Episcopal Church. Woodworking is his hobby. 

At Richmond, on July 15, 1942, Henry Duncan 
Garnett married Frances Susette Williams of that 
city, daughter of Thomas J. and Minna (Ray) Wil- 
liams. The couple are the parents of three children: 
1. Henry Duncan, Jr., who was born on July 24, 
1944. 2. Robert Jefferson, born October 25, [947. 
3. Lloyd Moss, born January 24, 1952. 



VIRGINIUS H. NUSBAUM, JR.— Three 

generations of the Nusbaum family have been 
serving the Lower Tidewater region through 
operations in the real estate and insurance business. 
Virginius H. Nusbaum, Jr., is a member of the 
third generation and as executive vice president 
of the old-established realty-insurance firm of 
S. L. Nusbaum and Company, Inc., is virtually 
the operating head of that business. Colleagues 
in his field have recognized his place in it by 
making him vice president of the Norfolk- Ports- 
mouth Board of Realtors. 

Mr. Nusbnum was born in Norfolk on Novem- 
ber 21, 1927, the son of Virginius and Justine 
(Lowenberg) Nusbaum. Both his parents are also 
natives of Norfolk. The senior Virginius H. Nus- 
baum, associated with S. L. Nusbaum and Company, 
Inc., all of his working life, is president of that 
concern, but is semi-retired. He served in the Uni- 
ted States Navy in World War I and in one 
of the fund-raising drives of the Norfolk Chap- 
ter of the American National Red Cross served 
as campaign chairman. He is also a member of 
the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce, the Nortolk- 
Portsmouth Board of Realtors, and the Masonic 
faternity. It was his father, Sidney L. Nusbaum, 
who in 191 1 established S. L. Nusbaum and Com- 
pany, Inc., and who remained as head of the 
firm until 1937, two years before his death. 

The younger Virginius H. Nusbaum received 
his early education in Norfolk's public schools. 



i 5 8 



I.OW'KR TIDEWATER \ IRC 1 IMA 



Following his gaduation from Maury Higli School 
in 1045, he spent two and one-hall years at the 
University of Virginia. In 1947 he joined his 
father in the family real estate and insurance busi- 
ness and in 1953 became executive vice president. 
Forty persons are employed under his supervision. 
Besides his activity as an official of the Norfolk- 
Portsmouth Board of Realtors. Mr. Nusbaum is 
a member of the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce, 
the Saints and Sinners Club, and the Democratic 
party. Like others of his family, he is prominent 
in Jewish circles. In 1055 his mother received 
the B'nai B'rith Distinguished Service Award for 
her leadership in civic and charitable projects. 
Mr. Nusbaum's favorite sports are boating and 
fishing. His home is at 1026 Manchester Avenue, 
Norfolk. His business headquarters are at 148 
Granby Street. 

Mr. Nusbaum married Nancy Nordlinger in 
Norfolk on April 23, 1949. She is the daughter 
of Alan and Rose (Kan) Nordlinger. the former 
a native of Washington, D. C, the latter of Nor- 
folk. Mr. Nordlinger, who died in 1955, was in 
charge of the ladies' ready-to-wear department 
at Rice's Department Store, Norfolk. He also 
served with the armed forces in World War I. 
Mr. and Mrs. Nusbaum have one son: Alan Bee. 
who was born in Norfolk on November 11, 1950. 



CLARENCE DAY— A certified public accoun- 
tant, Clarence Day heads his own firm which 
has offices in the Helena Building in Norfolk. 

He was born October 28, 1896, at New Bern, 
North Carolina, son of David John and Mary 
F. (Day) Day. both natives of North Carolina 
and both now deceased. His father was an elec- 
trical engineer for the city of New Bern, where 
he lived out his life, and where he died in 1950 
at the age of seventy-five. Mrs. Day died in 1910 
at the age of thirty-three. 

Clarence Day received his elementary education 
in the public schools of New Bern, and graduated 
from Portsmouth High School, Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, in the Class of 1914. He then attended 
Eastman Business College at Poughkeepsie, New 
York, and Pace and Pace Institute in New York 
City. 

In 1917 he enlisted in the United States Coast 
Guard for duty in World War 1 and was honor- 
ably discharged at the end of the war as chief 
radio electrician, leaving the service in February 
1919. In May of that year, he enlisted in the 
United States Navy and was stationed at Norfolk, 
Virginia, until his honorable discharge from that 
branch of the service on February 2, 1920. 

Thereafter until September 1924, Mr. Day was 
engaged in the private practice of accounting in 



the city of New Bern, North Carolina, and he 
then entered the employ of the Farmer's Manu- 
facturing Company. Inc., in Norfolk, Virginia, in 
the capacity of chief accountant. He became a 
Certified Public Accountant in 1931, having passed 
the examination given by the Virginia State Board 
of Accountancy. 

From 1931 until the fall of 1936, Mr. Day was 
again in private practice as a certified Public Ac- 
countant in Norfolk. In the fall of 1936, he was 
engaged as an auditor with the State Auditor of 
Public Accounts at Richmond, Virginia, investi- 
gating the now abolished fee system under which 
certain state employees were compensated. Later 
leaving state employ to re-enter private business, 
he accepted a position as senior accountant with 
A. Lee Rawlings and Company in Norfolk, with 
which he continued until the spring of 1940. 

In that year Mr. Day established his accounting 
firm, as Clarence Day, Certified Public Account- 
ant, with offices in the Portlock Building, where 
be remained until January 1, 1957, at which time 
he organized a partnership, along with one of his 
sons, under the firm name of Clarence Day and 
Son, moving their office to 200-12 Helena Build- 
ing. He is licensed to practice before the United 
States Treasury Department and the United States 
Tax Court. He has an excellent professional re- 
putation throughout the Tidewater area. His firm 
serves a large clientele, with numerous commer- 
cial and industrial accounts throughout that region. 

Mr. Day is a member of the American Institute 
of Accountants, Virginia Society of Public Ac- 
countants and other professional organizations. He 
is a member of the Masonic bodies, including 
Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine, at Norfolk, and Dare Coun- 
ty Shrine Club at Nags Head, North Carolina. 
He is also a member of the Cavalier Beach Club 
and the Cabana Club of Virginia Beach. 

On March 17, 191 7, at New Bern, North Caro- 
lina, Clarence Day married Sarah Emma Morton, 
daughter of William J. and Charlotte Morton of 
New Bern. The couple are the parents of five 
children: 1. Clarence, Jr., of Virginia Beach. 2. 
Robert Lee, who is a member of his father's ac- 
counting firm. 3. John Lewis, who is with the 
Curtis Publishing Company of Philadelphia. 4. Day 
James Day, who is a partner of his father's ac- 
counting firm. 5. Walter Bryant, who is with the 
Harris Music Company at Virginia Beach. The 
family residence is at 211 Oriole Drive, Bird Neck 
Point. Virginia Beach. 



JEROME PENDLETON CARR, 2nd— Ports- 
mouth's attorney-at-law and civic leader Jerome 
Pendleton Carr was born in that city on March 



LOWER TIDKWATER VIRGINIA 



'59 



14, 1912, son of the late Dr. George Hopkins Carr, 
prominent physician of Portsmouth, who died Oc- 
tober 10, 1954, and Lucille (Allen) Carr, also of 
that city. 

Receiving his early education in the public 
schools of his native city, Jerome P. Carr gradu- 
ated from Woodrow Wilson High School in the 
Class of 1928. He received his degree of Bachelor 
of Arts from the College of William and Mary 
in Williamsburg, where he graduated in 193 1, and 
his degree of Bachelor of Laws from the Law 
School of the University of Virginia in 1934. 

Following his graduation from law school, he 
began his professional career as an attorney on 
the staff of the Tax Division of the United States 
Department of Justice. He continued with this 
government agency until February 1939, and from 
that time until November 1943, was an associate 
in the law firm of Brown, Jackson, and Knight, of 
Charleston, West Virginia. 

He left this connection to enter the United 
States Army as a private for service in World 
War II, and, after receiving training in several 
army schools, was sent overseas and assigned to 
criminal investigation as liaison agent with the 
French Police, stationed in Paris. He was separa- 
ted from active service at Fort Dix, New Jersey, 
in April 1946, holding at that time the rank of 
staff sergeant. 

Returning to civilian life, Mr. Carr began the 
private practice of law in Portsmouth, in Septem- 
ber 1946. In September 1947, lie became associa- 
ted in practice with H. W. MacKenzie, who is 
now serving as associate judge of the Twenty- 
eighth Judicial Circuit of Virginia, and with John 
A. MacKenzie, in the law firm of Mackenzie, Carr, 
and MacKenzie. This was the predecessor of the 
present firm of MacKenzie and Carr. Engaged in 
the general practice of law, the firm is one of the 
more prominent in the Portsmouth and Tidewater 
Virginia areas. 

In professional affiliation, Mr. Carr is a mem- 
ber of the Portsmouth-Norfolk County Bar As- 
sociation. He is also a member of the Virginia 
State Bar Association; the American Bar Associa- 
tion; Phi Beta Kappa, national scholastic honor 
society: and Kappa Alpha, social fraternity. 

Active in community affairs, Mr. Carr has serv- 
ed as president of the Portsmouth Council of 
Social Agencies and since January 1955, as 
chairman of the board of the Portsmouth Area 
Counselling and Guidance Clinic. 

Since 1948 he has served as president of the 
board of trustees of the Portsmouth Public Lib- 
rary. He is a member of the Kiwanis Club of 
Portsmouth, the Portsmouth Chamber of Com- 
merce, the Elizabeth Manor Golf and Country 



Club, and American Legion Post No. 37 of Ports- 
mouth. His favorite sport is tennis. 

On June 22, 1938, in Warrenton, North Caro- 
lina, Jerome Pendleton Carr, 2nd, married Caroline 
Ward, daughter of V. F. and Carrie (Chalmers) 
Ward of Warrenton. The couple reside at 402 
Acres Road, Portsmouth. 



GEORGE F. WILKINSON and LAMAR S. 
WILKINSON — As president and treasurer of G. 
F. Wilkinson Company, Inc., Lamar S. Wilkinson 
guides the operations of a real estate and insurance 
firm which has been serving the Lower Tidewater 
region for six decades. It was founded by his 
father George F. Wilkinson, whose name it bears, 
and whose biography is also a part of this record. 
From his headquarters in Suite 309-310 Monticello 
Arcade in Norfolk, the firm's present head over- 
sees activities which extend into many parts of the 
Old Dominion. He has many interests outside of 
his field of business, and is a veteran of both World 
War II and the Korean conflict. 

George F. Wilkinson was born at Norfolk on 
July 10, 1871, son of William S. and Elizabeth 
(Farant) Wilkinson. He completed his education 
at Davis Military Academy and 1888 began his 
career in the real estate field, thereafter winning 
recognition as an appraiser. He founded the G. 
F. Wilkinson Company, Inc., in 1898, and served as 
its president until his death on July 20, 1938. He 
was prominent in many other affairs in the Lower 
Tidewater area. He was a director of the Seaboard 
Citizens National Bank; was secretary-treasurer 
of the Farant Investment Company of Norfolk; and 
was vice president of the Norfolk Federal Savings 
and Loan Association. For a time he served on 
the Norfolk board of aldermen. Active in the Nor- 
folk-Portsmouth Board of Realtors, he was elected 
its vice president in 1924 and its president in 1927. 
He served on the vestry of Christ and St. Luke's 
Church; was for twenty-five years secretary of the 
Norfolk German Club; and served for a like period 
as secretary of the Chesapeake Club. He was also 
active in the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce. 

On November 19, 1908, George F. Wilkinson 
married Loulie Sharp, a native of Baltimore, Mary- 
land, who was born in 1877. She survives him, 
and is one of Norfolk's most highly regarded citi- 
zens. The couple became the parents of three chil- 
dren: 1. George F., Jr., who was born in Norfolk 
on January 4, 1911. He owns and operates Dixie- 
land Products Company, Inc., in that city. Married 
to the former Miss Margaret Guy of Norfolk, he 
is the father of one son: George F., III. 2. Lamar 
S., of whom further. 3. Elizabeth, born on May 18, 
1917. She is the wife of James E. Hendry, III, 



i6o 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



and they make their home in Fort Myers, Florida. 
They are the parents of three children: Susan, 
Peggy and Molly Hendry. 

Mrs. Loulie (Sharp) Wilkinson is a charter mem- 
ber of the Norfolk Country Club, and a longtime 
member of the Garden Club of Norfolk. A mem- 
ber of the Norfolk Society of the Arts, she for- 
merly served as its treasurer; and she also holds 
membership in the Norfolk Museum of Arts and 
Sciences. She is a communicant of Christ and St. 
Luke's Church. 

In his early years, Lamar S. Wilkinson attended 
Virginia Episcopal School and Norfolk Academy, 
and entered Maury High School to complete his 
secondary studies, graduating there in 103.2. In 
that year he went to Washington, D. C, where he 
joined the staff of the United States Geological 
Survey, but he returned to Norfolk in 1935 to 
become associated with his father in the operation 
of the G. F. Wilkinson Company, Inc. Their as- 
sociation ended with his father's death in 1938. 
As Lamar Wilkinson's uncle then took over the 
business, the founder's son entered the employ of 
the Department of Water Supply of the City of 
Norfolk. 

In February 1941, he enlisted in the Virginia 
National Guard and was attached to Battery B 
of the tilth Field Artillery Regiment. In October 
1942, he transferred to the United States Army, 
and after training at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsyl- 
vania, was commissioned a second lieutenant in 
the Medical Service Corps. The date of his com- 
mission was December 23, 1942. His service in the 
corps kept Mr. Wilkinson in the states, chiefly at 
Camp Polk, Louisiana, until February 1945, when 
he was sent overseas with the 93rd Field Hospital. 
He arrived in the Philippines on April 13, and 
until December 1945, was stationed outside Manila. 
He then returned to the United States and was re- 
leased to Active Reserve status as a captain. 

Until 1948, Mr. Wilkinson was associated with 
the Fidelity and Guarantee Insurance Company at 
Baltimore. For the next three years he was in the 
real estate business in Norfolk. In March 1951, the 
army recalled him to active duty, assigning him 
to Fort Lewis, Washington. After a year there, 
he was sent to Japan, where he spent an equal 
period of time. He later spent seven months in 
Korea, where he participated in battle action with 
the Seventh Division. In January 1954, Mr. Wil- 
kinson resigned from the service, and he and Mrs. 
Wilkinson went to Europe for a vacation. 

Upon his return in March 1954, he became presi- 
dent and treasurer of the firm which had been 
founded by his father fifty-six years before. He 
has since managed the affairs of G. F. Wilkinson 
Company, Inc., and has continued to build its 



volume of business and its favorable reputation. 
An active member of the Norfolk- Portsmouth 
Board of Realtors, Mr. Wilkinson has served on 
various of its committees. He is a member of the 
Norfolk Assembly and the Norfolk Chamber of 
Commerce, and he attends Christ and St. Luke's 
Church. In politics he is a Democrat. 

Lamar S. Wilkinson has been married and is 
the father of one child: Lamar Hollyday, born in 
Baltimore on July 1, 1947. He makes his home at 
616 Boissevain Avenue, Norfolk. 



CLIFFORD E. CRAVER— After experience 
in agriculture, government service and private in- 
dustry, Clifford E. Craver put his specialized 
training in accounting to effective use as senior 
partner in the firm of Craver, Green and Com- 
pany, Certified Public Accountants, which has its 
offices in the National Bank of Commerce Build- 
ing in Norfolk. 

A native of Lexington, North Carolina. Mr. 
Craver was born on November 26, 1909, son of 
William L. and Lelia (Craver) Craver, both na- 
tives of North Carolina. His father was born in 
Lexington, on July 20, 1879, and died there on 
August 8, 1928. He was a prominent dairy farmer. 
His wife, the- former Lelia Craver, was born on 
April 5, 1889, at Lexington, where she continues 
to reside. 

Clifford E. Craver graduated from Arcadia High 
School in Lexington, North Carolina, in 1925, and 
attended North Carolina State College at Raleigh 
from 1925 to 1929. Thereafter until 193 1 he was 
engaged by the Virginia Polytechnic Institute Ex- 
tension Service, with headquarters at Warrenton, 
Virginia. In 1931-1932, he did graduate work at 
North Carolina State College, studying statistics, 
and during 1932-1933 he was associated with his 
father's farming interests at Lexington. 

In 1933 Mr. Craver joined the United States 
Department of Agriculture, working as an auditor, 
engaged in both office and field w-ork, with the Agri- 
cultural Adjustment Administration. From 194 1 to 
1943 he was employed as assistant plant manager 
in charge of records for the Pepsi-Cola Bottling 
Company of Norfolk. 

Air. Craver then entered the United States Ar- 
my, and served as a technical sergeant at Camp 
Grant, Illinois. He was later transferred to Walter 
Reed Hospital in Washington, D. C, after which 
he was assigned to overseas service in the Italian 
theater. 

Following his separation from army service in 
1946, Mr. Craver became staff accountant with 
J. A. D. Parrish, Certified Public Accountant of 
Norfolk. Following the death of Mr. Parrish in 
November 195 1, he purchased the accounting bust- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



161 



ness from the Parrish estate, and conducted the 
business as his own enterprise until July I, 1954. 
It was at that time that he formed his present 
partnership with Melvin R. Green, in the firm 
now known as Craver, Green and Company, Cer- 
tified Public Accountants. 

Mr. Craver completed his professional training 
in accounting through correspondence courses with 
the International Accounting Society of Chicago, 
and the LaSalle Extension University in that city. 
On July 25, 195 1, he became a Certified Public 
Accountant, having passed the examination given 
by the Virginia State Board of Accountancy. He 
is licensed to practice before the United States 
Treasury Department. 

Professionally he is affiliated with the Virginia 
Society of Certified Public Accountants, the Ameri- 
can Institute of Accountants, the National Associa- 
tion of Cost Accountants. Apart from these con- 
tacts with his colleagues, he is a member of the 
Lions Club of Norfolk and the Norfolk Executives 
Club. He attends the First Lutheran Church of 
Norfolk, which he serves as deacon and treasurer. 

On July 12, 1939, Clifford E. Craver married 
Mrs. Kathryn (Holmes) Smith of Lexington, 
daughter of E. H. and Corinna Holmes. Mr. and 
Mrs. Craver are the parents of a son, Clifford E., 
Jr. The family resides at 7430 Muirfield Road, 
Norfolk. 



CHARLES ARMISTEAD BAYNE— The re- 
putation of Charles Armistead Bayne lies in two 
fields — the business world and the cultural affairs 
of the Lower Tidewater. As a business man, he 
is president and treasurer of C. M. Bayne and 
Company, Inc., dealers in building materials. One 
of his major roles in cultural activities is that of 
chairman of the Norfolk Public Library Board. 

Mr. Bayne was born in Norfolk on June 29, 
1902, the son of Charles Meredith and Harriet 
Emory (Beazley) Bayne. His father, born in Es- 
sex County, Virginia, died in 1933, was a promi- 
nent business man and founded C. M. Bayne and 
Company, Inc. From 1896 to 1902 he was a mem- 
ber of the Norfolk Light Artillery Blues. Charles 
A. Bayne began his education in Norfolk's public 
schools. Later he attended the University of Vir- 
ginia and finally Columbia University in New 
York City. From the latter he received, in 1928, 
the degree of Bachelor of Literature. 

He has been associated with the building ma- 
terials concern, one of the largest in its field in 
the Lower Tidewater, his entire working life. The 
firm's plant and offices are along the Norfolk and 
Western Railway right-of-way at Llewellyn Street. 
Active in civic affairs, Mr. Bayne became chair- 
man of the Norfolk Public Library Board in 1953. 



He is also active in the Church of the Good Shep- 
herd (Episcopal). At college (University of Vir- 
ginia), he was elected to Zeta Psi fraternity. 

On October 21, 1931, at Scarsdale, New York, 
Mr. Bayne married Margaret Henry Williams, 
daughter of Oscar and Loula (Wood) Williams. 
They have two children: 1. Charles Armistead, 
Jr., born on June 1, 1934. 2. Margaret Cotten, born 
on November 22, 1936. Mr. and Mrs. Bayne and 
their two children live at 7901 North Shore Road, 
Norfolk. 



WILLIAM HENRY RAWLS— The name of 
Rawls has been synonymous with fine furniture in 
South Norfolk for many years. As manager of 
the South Norfolk Furniture Company, William 
Henry Rawls is carrying on a tradition established 
by his father, Lennie Dean Rawls, who founded 
the firm in 1910. Mrs. Virginia Ethel Rawls, wife 
of the founder, also remains active in its man- 
agement. 

Lennie Dean Rawls was born October 27, 1877, 
in Arapahoe, Pamlico County, North Carolina, 
descended from Scotch-Irish colonial settlers in 
Virginia and North Carolina. His parents were 
William Henry and Sarah Elizabeth (Jordan) 
Rawls, residents of Pamlico County wdiere Wil- 
liam H. Rawls was a planter. Lennie Dean Rawls 
passed his boyhood in the vicinity of his birth and 
attended country schools, walking five miles each 
way to attend classes. This was the extent of his 
formal education. He served in the Spanish-Amer- 
ican War in Cuba, and in his early youth came to 
South Norfolk, where he worked for a time for 
the Ambrose Feed and Coal Company and later 
with the E. H. Barnes Company. In 1910 he entered 
the furniture business in a small way, in that 
city, first dealing in second-hand furniture with two 
partners. Later he bought out their interests, and 
formed a partnership with his brother-in-law, J. 
B. Flora, who continued as a partner in the firm 
until 1927. At that time Lennie D. Rawls acquired 
sole ownership of the business. Since 1915, the 
South Norfolk Furniture Company has been locat- 
ed at 519 Liberty Street, and with the years it has 
grown to one of the largest in the Tidewater 
region. Lennie D. Rawls continued active in its 
management, with his wife, Virginia Ethel Rawls, 
until his death on January 1, 1946. She is a capable 
business woman, and takes her share of the man- 
agement responsibilities along with her son, Wil- 
liam Henry Rawls, who became active in executive 
capacities in 1936. In keeping with the policies laid 
down by the founder, the South Norfolk Furniture 
Company emphasizes friendly dealings, fair prices 
and quality merchandise. It carries a complete line 



i6i 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



of home furnishings and household appliances pro- 
duced by nationally known manufacturers. 

Lennie D. Rawls was active in the civic and fra- 
ternal as well as the business life of his city. He 
was a member of the Better Business and Profes- 
sional Club, and for twenty-six years served as 
financial secretary of Woodmen of the World, 
Berkley Camp No. 46. He was also for some time 
auditor of the Woodmen of the World's Jurisdic- 
tion of Virginia. A member of the Chesapeake 
Wenue Methodist Church, he served on the board 
of stewards at the time the present church was 
built, and for a time was president of the Bible 
class. He found a profitable avocation in dealing in 
livestock and was particularly iuteresed in horses. 
In Norfolk County, on August 20, 1904, Lennie 
Dean Rawls married Virginia Ethel Flora, daugh- 
ter of John and Martha Flora, both natives of 
North Carolina. In addition to her role in the 
management of the company, Mrs. Rawls is active 
in community affairs. She is a member of the 
Chesapeake Avenue Methodist Church and of its 
Women's Society of Christian Service, and also a 
member of the Woodmen Circle Grove Xo. 37, 
National Council, Daughters of America, and the 
Women's Benefit Society. Mr. and Mrs. Rawls 
became the parents of nine children: 1. Flora Vir- 
ginia, who married Chester Garland Leggette of 
South Norfolk. 2. William Henry, of whom 
further. 3. Leonard Dean, who died at Marysville, 
California, on March 15, 1956. He was married to 
Bessie Sue Foster of Norfolk County. 4. Sarah 
Elizabeth (Rawls I Birch of Hampton. 5. Ashburn 
LeRoy, who married Mildred Wilder. They reside 
in New-port News. 6. Eleanor Lucile, who married 
Willoughby H. Black. They reside at Little Cedar 
Lane, Princes> Anne County. 7. Alfred Junior, 
who died in childhood on August 30, 1931. 8. Shir- 
ley Hope, who married Harold E. Sayles, Jr., of 
Norfolk County. 9. Raymond Leigh, unmarried, 
who lives in Jackson Heights, a community of 
greater Xew York City. 

William Henry Rawls was born in South Nor- 
folk on March 31, 1907. He graduated from the 
South Norfolk High School in 1928. For a year and 
a half, early in his career, he was associated with 
his iather in the operation of the furniture com- 
pany, and from 1930 to 1936, was in the insurance 
business as an employee of Pilot Life Insurance 
Company, which has its headquarters at Norfolk. 
Since 1936, he has been actively associated with 
the management of the South Norfolk Furniture 
Company and that continues to be his major busi- 
ness activity. A progressive executive, he has 
greatly expanded the business to include the re- 
tailing of representative top brands of furniture 
and household appliances. The firm markets its 



goods throughout the South Norfolk trade area, 
and has accounts in Norfolk and Princess Anne 
counties as far south as the North Carolina state 
line. The company holds organizational member- 
ship in the Southern Retail Furniture Association. 

A veteran of naval service in World War II, 
William Henry Rawls entered the navy in April 
1943, and held a rating of pharmacist's mate, sec- 
ond class, at the time of his separation from active 
service in September 1945. Active in the Woodmen 
of the World, he is a member of Berkley Camp 
No. 40 and is currently serving as its secretary. He 
has held every office of the lodge in the Jurisdic- 
tion of Virginia, and attended the Woodmen's 
national convention in Washington, D. C, in 1953, 
and the convention in Los Angeles, California, in 
1955- He is also a member of the Willie Lee Lodge 
No. 119, Knights of Pythias, and of Berkley Lodge 
No. 167, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. He 
serves on the board of stewards of the Memorial 
Methodist Church, and is also a member of its 
finance committee. His favorite outdoor sport is 
fishing. 

At Norfolk, on February 20, 1929, William Henry 
Rawls married Margaret Eugenia Coffield, daugh- 
ter of William Capart and Sudie Beaslie (Cooper) 
Coffield. both of Norfolk and both now deceased. 
Mr. and Mrs. Rawls are the parents of two chil- 
dren: I. Margaret Eugenia, a graduate of Maury 
High School and of Mary Watson College. Major- 
ing in mathematics there, she graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. She is now a member 
of the faculty- of Granby High School. She mar- 
ried William E. Bachtell, who is with the Standard 
Oil Company at Norfolk. 2. William Henry, Jr., a 
graduate of Maury High School who received his 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engi- 
neering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute. He is 
now serving in the United States Air Force and 
is stationed at Dayton, Ohio. He holds the rank of 
lieutenant. He is married to the former Miss Mira 
Bassa, a native of Pennsylvania. 



CARL MOORE JORDAN— So closely is the 
Norfolk-Portsmouth Bridge linked with the name 
of Carl Moore Jordan, in the minds of area resi- 
dent-, that it is in fact more familiarly known as 
the Jordan Bridge. When recently Mr. Jordan's 
distinguished career came to a close, his official 
position was that of executive vice president and 
general manager of the South Norfolk Bridge 
Commission, Inc. But he will be primarily known, 
throughout the years to come, as the man whose 
faith and business abilities made possible the main- 
tenance and successful operation of the structure 
which, more than any other, has changed the face 
of this section of Tidewater Virginia. 




<f*-X TY\ 




LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



163 



His work is commemorated, along with that of 
W. P. Jordan and other associates, on a bronze 
tablet conspicuously placed on the bridge. The 
span is located just south of the Norfolk Navy 
Yard, and connects with Virginia Route 337 across 
the southern branch of the Elizabeth River. It was 
C. M. and W. 1'. Jordan who were leaders in secur- 
ing permission of Congress to build the bridge, 
which was granted in Public Bill No. 272, ap- 
proved by the 69th Congress on May 23, 1926. 
They also took the lead in its financing, the original 
cost being one million, one hundred and twenty- 
five thousand dollars. Bonds were sold through 
Wall Street brokers. The bridge was opened for 
traffic on August 24, 1928, and was dedicated by 
Harry F. Byrd. C. M. Jordan was the first presi- 
dent of the Norfolk-Portsmouth Bridge Corpora- 
tion responsible for its operation, but he and his 
brother sold their entire holdings to New York in- 
terests in June 1929, severing all connections with 
the project. The adverse economic conditions which 
followed forced the bridge into receivership in 1931, 
and Charles R. Welton was named receiver. An 
appeal was made to C. M. Jordan to return and 
show his faith in the importance of the project by 
buying bonds and casting his lot with the bond- 
holders in an effort to put the bridge back on its 
feet. So successful was the effort that a basis for 
reorganization was reached in December 1932, and 
refinancing arranged on a second mortgage basis 
with Philadelphia and Baltimore bankers. The 
bridge was taken out of receivership on August 
l> 1933. and Charles R. Welton was made president 
of a new corporation. In July 1938, following the 
deatli of Mr. Welton, C. M. Jordan was requested 
by the bankers representing the security holders 
to take charge of the bridge and try to extricate 
it from its difficulties. To promote increased usage, 
a slogan was adopted: "Don't Fool Yourself — Save 
Seven Miles," and as the truth of this slogan 
gained acceptance, traffic across the span increased. 
When gas rationing was put into effect at the time 
of World War II, the public came to realize fully 
the importance of the miles saved. 

The significance of the Norfolk-Portsmouth 
Bridge lies in the fact that Norfolk, being virtually 
on an island, had been connected with Portsmouth 
only by ferries since colonial days. Its construction 
made possible the first direct route between the 
cities, and from Richmond to the sea. Since 1938 
the span has been operated by the South Norfolk 
Bridge Commission, Inc., with C. M. Jordan as 
executive vice president and general manager until 
his death. Jesse J. Parkerson, whose biography is 
in this volume, was made president. Capably man- 
aged, the bridge is now as sound a structure from 
the financial as from the engineering viewpoint, 



and has become an indispensable asset to the people 
of Tidewater Virginia. 

Carl Moore Jordan, whose vision and courage 
were the prime forces in making it possible, was 
born near Sussex Court House, Virginia, on Jan- 
uary 22, 1880, son of the Rev. William P. and 
Alice (Moore) Jordan. His paternal grandparents 
were the Rev. Costen and Ann (Pell) Jordan of 
Gates County, North Carolina, while His maternal 
grandparents, John Holt and Elizabeth (Parsons) 
Moore, lived in Sussex County, Virginia. The son 
of a Methodist clergyman, the Rev. William P. 
Jordan was licensed to preach at the age of twenty 
years. He married Miss Alice Moore of Sussex 
County in 1876, and for many years they labored 
together side by side for their church, he preaching 
and attending to parish duties, and she leading the 
choir and teaching Sunday school. After retirement 
they lived in Chase City, Virginia, but in 1901 they 
moved to Norfolk to make their home with their 
sons. For many years the Rev. William P. Jordan 
was a teacher of a men's Bible class in the Park 
Place Methodist Church, and he was a member 
of the Virginia Conference for over fifty years, 
at the time of his death in Norfolk on December 
5, 1919. His wife died in that city in 1942, at the 
age of ninety-six. 

The couple were the parents of two sons, Wal- 
lace Pell and Carl Moore Jordan. The former 
came to Norfolk in 1897, and was soon joined by 
his brother. When C. M. Jordan arrived, about 
1900, he first took a traveling position with the 
Richmond Cedar Works, in which he continued 
until 1907, when lie and his brother organized the 
Jordan Brothers Lumber Company of South Nor- 
folk. The business started in a small way, and 
was organized under the above name in 1907. It 
carried on a successful lumbering operation in the 
Dismal Swamp. In the years which followed, the 
brothers constructed over two hundred miles of 
logging railroad on the south end of the George 
Washington Grant in Dismal Swamp, totaling 
about forty-six thousand acres. From this region 
they took out vast amounts of cedar timber. With 
peak operations during World War I, Jordan 
Brothers Lumber Company sold millions of feet 
of lumber to the United States government. In 
the course of making frequent trips into the Dis- 
mal Swamp area, Carl Moore Jordan came to real- 
ize the need for a bridge to replace the ferry con- 
necting Norfolk and Portsmouth. He immediately 
went to work to bring this plan to reality, but 
about five years were required to get the consent 
of Congress to bridge the river. In September 1930, 
Carl M. Jordan lost the companionship of a brother 
to whom he was deeply devoted, with the death of 
Wallace Pell Jordan. The Jordan Brothers Lum- 



164 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



ber Company was continued by C. M. Jordan as 
owner. He operated it until 1937, at which time it 
was liquidated. 

The bridge which is most often called the Jor- 
dan Bridge is not the only distinctive contribution 
made by Mr. Jordan to the Tidewater area. He 
had long realized the need for a tunnel also to 
connect Norfolk with Portsmouth, and this too 
became a reality in 1952. He also long advocated 
a tunnel to connect the Ocean View section of 
Norfolk with Old Point Comfort, advocating a 
bridge to extend from the end of Willoughby Beach 
to Old Rip Raps Fort, and a tunnel down the fort 
to the Old Point Comfort area. The state of Vir- 
ginia finally came through with a bond issue of 
eighty million dollars to carry out this project 
and other obligations, and the bridge and tunnel 
are now rapidly nearing completion. The Virginia 
Legislature has also authorized construction of a 
second tunnel from Old Fort Norfolk under the 
river to Hospital Point on the Portsmouth side, 
and a fourteen-mile tunnel-and-bridge are planned 
between Cape Henry and Cape Charles. 

Mr. Jordan was always a devoted church worker. 
From 1900 he was a member of the Epworth Metho- 
dist Church of Norfolk, where he placed the Jor- 
dan Memorial windows in memory of his brother, 
his parents, and grandparents. He was a member 
of the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce. 

On June 30, 1930, at South Norfolk, Carl Moore 
Jordan married Mary Louise Baker, who was born 
on the Ravenswood Plantation, Assumption Parish, 
Louisiana, daughter of Robert Lee and Mary 
Louise (Whittington) Baker. Her father was a 
prominent sugar planter. Mrs. Jordan is active in 
cultural affairs, and is a member of the Great 
Bridge Chapter of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution. She attends Epworth Methodist Church. 
She and Mr. Jordan were the parents of four 
children: 1. Alice Louise, born July 25, 1934. She 
graduated from the College of William and Mary, 
Williamsburg, in 1956, taking the degree of Bache- 
lor of Arts, and is a member of Chi Omega sorority. 
She married June 15, 1957, Ensign Bruce Hanson 
Purvis of Vale, Oregon. 2. Frances Ivy, born 
December 10, 1937. She was a member of the 
Class of 1956 at Maury High School. 3. Carl Moore, 
Jr., born February 20, 1941; attending Maury High 
School. 4. Robert Lucius, born January 18, 1944. 
All the children are members of the Old Cannon 
Ball Society, Children of the American Revolution, 
and Frances Ivy Jordan is Virginia State Presi- 
dent of the Children of the American Revolution. 
The Jordan family residence is at 301 West 29th 
Street, one of the fine old homes of Norfolk. 

In the death of Carl Moore Jordan, on May 7, 
1957, the Tidewater area lost the leader who had 



been the most responsible for the many changes in 
its physical aspect. His influence as a community- 
builder will continue throughout the coming years. 



EARLE ASHLAND CADMUS— Portsmouth 
attorney-at-law Earle Ashland Cadmus has to his 
credit a noteworthy record of service as member 
of the Virginia House of Delegates and is cur- 
rently serving as secretary of the Portsmouth-Nor- 
folk County Bar Association. In his private prac- 
tice as well as in public service, he has proved 
himself an outstanding member of the legal pro- 
fession. 

A native of Portsmouth, he was born on Decem- 
ber 12, 1901, son of Charles Linwood and Rose 
Virginia (CalverO Cadmus. His father was long 
active in the public affairs of Portsmouth, where 
for a number of years he was lieutenant of police. 
The Portsmouth attorney is descended from early 
colonial families of Maryland and Virginia. In 
the maternal line, the Calvert family, of English 
descent, played a historic part in the colonization 
of Maryland. 

Earle A. Cadmus received his early education 
in the public schools of Portsmouth and graduated 
from that city's Woodrow Wilson High School in 
1921. He attended the College of William and 
Mary for one year, then entered Washington and 
Lee University, Lexington, where he received his 
degree of Bachelor of Laws in the Class of 1926. 
Admitted to the Virginia State Bar in that year, 
he began his general practice of law in Portsmouth, 
where he has continued to enjoy a successful 
practice since. He established offices in the New- 
Kirn Building. 

In addition to his private practice, Earle A. 
Cadmus serves as substitute judge for the Norfolk 
County Circuit Court, having been appointed in 
1953. Since his young manhood, he has taken a 
deep interest in public affairs. Following his gradu- 
ation from law school in 1926, he became a candi- 
date from Portsmouth for the Virginia House of 
Delegates and was elected. He served the three 
terms beginning in the years 1928, 1930, and 1932 
and in the special session of 1933, and in the course 
of his tenure of office, he has made a distinguished 
record as legislator. A member of the Portsmouth- 
Norfolk Bar Association, Mr. Cadmus served as 
its secretary in 1956-1957. He is also a member of 
the Virginia State Bar Association and has been 
elected to a three year term as a member of the 
Council of the integrated bar of Virginia. Apart 
from his profssional connections, he is a member 
of the Portsmouth Lions Club. His fraternity is 
Sigma Delta Kappa (legal), and he attends the 
Broad Street Methodist Church. 

At Portsmouth, on July 8, 1941, Earle A. Cad- 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



165 



mus married Elsie Mayson Hinman, daughter of 
the late John J. and Lili Mason (Baughen) Hin- 
man of Portsmouth. Mr. and Mrs. Cadmus re- 
side at 103 Colony Road, in that city. 



parents of three children: 1. William Ruffin, III, 
who was born on January 2, 1943. 2. Martha 
Gay, born January 19, 1946. 3. Donald Winthrop, 
born April 26, 1953. Mr. Carpenter's home address 
is 26 Jacobs Lane, Warwick. 



WILLIAM RUFFIN CARPENTER, Jr.— A 
short time after he had returned from wartime 
service in the army, William Ruffin Carpenter, 
Jr., returned to Newport News from Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania, and entered the real estate and in- 
surance business with his brother. They operate 
an agency under the name of Carpenter Brothers. 

A native Virginian, William R. Carpenter, Jr., 
was born at Cochran on November 23, 1915, son 
of William Ruffin, Sr., and Henrietta (Elliott) 
Carpenter. His father was born in Brunswick 
County, Virginia, in 1859, while his mother was 
a native of York County. The elder William R. 
Carpenter dealt in large property holdings, such 
as timberlands and farms. His death occurred on 
April 1, 1944, and his wife, the former Henrietta 
Elliott, survived him until May 23, 1954. 

William R. Carpenter, Jr., attended public 
schools in Alberta and graduated from Newport 
News High School in June 1933. Attracted to the 
shipbuilding industry, he served his apprenticeship 
in the trade and for four years was on the pay- 
roll of the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry 
Dock Company. He left to serve in World War 
II — in fact, his entry into military service pre- 
dated this country's participation in the conflict, 
for he enlisted on February 3, 1941. Commissioned 
a second lieutenant, he had risen to the rank of 
lieutenant colonel by the time of his separation 
from the service on February 9, 1946. He served 
with the 176th Infantry Regiment, a component 
of the 29th Division. 

When he returned to civilian life, Mr. Car- 
penter located at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, where 
he operated a retail and wholesale hobby and 
handicraft supplies business under the name of 
Veterans Handicraft Company. In September 1947, 
he disposed of this business and returned to 
Virginia, joining his brother Joseph E. Carpenter 
in the insurance and real estate business in New- 
port News. Their address is Carpenter Building, 
105 Thirtieth Street, Newport News. His brother 
is also the subject of a biographical sketch in 
this volume. 

William R. Carpenter, Jr., is a member of the 
James River Country Club. He is a Democrat in 
his politics and attends Hidenwood Presbyterian 
Church in Warwick. A charter member of this 
congregation, he serves on its board of deacons. 

In Newport News, on December 20, 1941, Wil- 
liam Ruffin Carpenter, Jr., married Millicent Gay 
of that city, daughter of Donald and Martha 
(Land) Gay. Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter are the 



LOUIS LESLIE WASSERMAN— A certified 
public accountant whose offices are in the Royster 
Building, Norfolk, Louis L. Wasserman has con- 
tinuously practiced in that city since he passed the 
examination of the Virginia State Board of Account- 
ancy in 1942. He has consistently adhered to a 
high standard in his profession. 

He is a native of Norfolk and was born on 
September 4, 1914, son of Samuel Louis and Mary 
Vivian (King) Wasserman of Norfolk. His father, 
who died in 1920, was for a number of years the 
proprietor of a retail meat market in Norfolk. Re- 
ceiving his early education in the public schools 
of that city, Louis L. Wasserman attended the 
Walter H. Taylor Elementary School, Blair Junior 
High School, and Maury High School where he 
graduated in 1932. 

He began his career in the accounting profession 
with the firm of Waller and Woodhouse, and con- 
tinued his studies by attending evening classes at 
the College of William and Mary (Norfolk Divi- 
sion), where he majored in business administration 
and accounting. In 1942 he became a Certified 
Public Accountant, and from 1943 to 1947, was a 
partner in the firm of Walker Rogers and Com- 
pany, a Norfolk public accounting firm. 

In the latter year he left to organize his own 
accounting firm. As Louis L. Wasserman, Certified 
Public Accountant, he now occupies quarters in 
the Royster Building. The firm has prospered, and 
has attracted a large clientele among the com- 
mercial and industrial organizations of Norfolk 
and Tidewater Virginia. 

Mr. Wasserman is a member of the American 
Institute of Accountants, the Virginia Society of 
Certified Public Accountants, and is licensed to 
practice before the United States Treasury Depart- 
ment. 

Active in civic and community affairs, he is 
a member of the Wards Corner Business and Pro- 
fessional Association, and is currently serving as 
its secretary-treasurer. He is a member of the 
Wards Corner Lions Club of Norfolk, the Nor- 
folk Torch Club and the Knights of Pythias lodge. 
A communicant of Royster Memorial Presbyterian 
Church, he serves his congregation as an elder and 
is also superintendent of the Sunday school. 

On April 18, 1938, in Norfolk, Louis L. Was- 
serman married Edith Verena Cole of Norfolk. The 
couple are the parents of three children: 1. Louis 
Leslie, Jr., born in that city on October 28, 1939. 



1 66 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



2. Jessie Cole, born in Norfolk on January 18, 1942. 

3. Susan Anne, born in Norfolk on March 9. 1947. 
The family resides at 209 Carlisle Way, Norfolk. 



FRANK W. KELLAM— In the city of Princess 
Anne, Frank W. Kellam lias a creditable record of 
over a quarter of a century of executive leader- 
ship in the building supply industry. He is one of 
the original founders of Kellam and Eaton, Inc., 
and is now president, treasurer, and manager. In 
addition he is treasurer of two other corporations 
in the city; and he has been very active in com- 
munity and organizational affairs. 

A native of Princess Anne, he was born on Oc- 
tober 11, 1905, son of Abel E. and Clara O. 
(Eaton) Kellam, and has been a resident of the 
city practically his entire life. He received his public 
school education there, and graduated from its high 
school in 1925. His first employment was in the 
city's post office, where he worked until a few years 
ago, carrying along many other enterprises during 
these years. 

During this time Kellam & Eaton Inc. was 
formed as a general merchandise business, finally 
leading into the present building supply business, 
which at this time carries everything necessary for 
construction of a building. Besides this major busi- 
ness connection, Mr. Kellam is treasurer of Princess 
Anne Plumbing and Electrical Suppliers. Inc., and 
treasurer of Court House Service Station, Inc. As 
a leader in his chosen field of commerce, in this 
region, he serves on the board of directors of the 
Virginia Building Materials Dealers. 

In the course of his community activities, he 
has served as president of the Boy Scouts of 
America's organization in Princess Anne, and is 
past chairman of the Blood Bank there. Since 1941, 
he has been a member of the Virginia Beach Ro- 
tary Club, and has served as its president. He is 
also past district governor of District 277, Rotary 
International. A member of the Princess Anne 
Ruritan Club since 1936, he has likewise served 
as its president. He has been governor of Holland 
District of Ruritan National: and national president 
of the nationwide organization, and now serves as 
a member of its board of directors. 

Affiliated with the Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, Mr. Kellam is a member and past master of 
Princess Anne Lodge No. 25. He is also past district 
deputy grand master. He belongs to the Consistory 
of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, Khedive 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine, and the Princess Anne Shrine Club, 
serving as its president during the year of 1956- 

1957- 

A communicant of the Nimmo Methodist Church, 



Mr. Kellam has served about twenty years as a 
teacher and superintendent of its Sunday school, 
and is also a member of its board of stewards. 

In 1928, Frank W. Kellam married Mary Bate- 
man of Princess Anne, daughter of Lorenzo D. 
and Annie L. (Miller) Bateman. The couple are 
the parents of the following children: 1. Frank 
W., Jr. He is a graduate of Duke University, 
from which he received his degree of Bachelor of 
Arts; serving four years in the United States Navy's 
Air Force, he won a lieutenant's commission. He 
is now an executive of Princess Anne Plumbing 
and Electrical Suppliers, Inc. He married Bessie 
L. Salmons of Princess Anne, and they have one 
daughter, Mary Susan. 2. Jacqueline C. a graduate 
of William and Mary College, and now a teacher 
at Oceana, Virginia. 3. David E. 



FITZ ORMON CLARKE— As an executive 
of Farmers Nut Corporation at Suffolk over the 
past decade, Fitz Ormon Clarke is now in charge 
of plant operations of this peanut processing firm, 
which is owned by the Atlantic and Pacific Tea 
Company. He has also taken an active part in the 
political life of Nansemond County, and is cur- 
rently serving on the board of supervisors. 

He was born in Dinwiddie County, Virginia, on 
July 8, 1905, son of Thomas Percy and Lula (Ro- 
bertson) Clarke. His father, also a native of that 
county, has spent most of his life in the insurance 
business at Church Road. Mrs. Clarke is also still 
living. Their son attended the public schools of 
Dinwiddie County, and in 1922 graduated from 
Midway High School. He later entered the College 
of William and Mary, and graduated there in 1928 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

For ten years, Mr. Clarke taught school at 
Whaleyville, being a member of the high school 
faculty and athletic director. He has made his 
home in that city since, although for the past 
decade his business interests have been centered 
in Suffolk. He became associated with the Farmers 
Nut Corporation in that city in 1946, and served 
for eight years as secretary and treasurer under 
the former management. In 1954, the peanut process- 
ing plant, its holdings and facilities were sold to 
the Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company. Mr. Clarke 
has remained with the new management as per- 
sonnel director and plant superintendent, both of 
which positions he holds at the present time. The 
plant of Farmers Nut Corporation is located on 
Newport Street in Suffolk. 

A Democrat in his politics, Mr. Clarke is now 
serving his third term as a member of the Nanse- 
mond County Board of Supervisors. A Kiwanian, 
he is a member of the club at Suffolk, and in his 
home city of Whaleyville, belongs to the Ruritan 




TWYa. 17 



(jfac>4t U) l%ld&*~^ 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



167 



Club. He attends the Methodist Church in that 
city, and serves on its board of stewards. 

It was there, on June 29, 1933, that Fitz Ormon 
Clarke married Patty Riddick Hunter, a resident 
of Whaleyville and daughter of Dr. H. H. and 
Brownley (Odoni) Hunter. Her father, for many 
years a physician there, is now deceased. Mr. and 
Mrs. Clarke have two children: 1. Henry Holmes 
Hunter, wdio was born on May 15, 1937- 2. Fitz 
Ormon, Jr., born February 28, 1941. 



He married Willie Virginia Tyree of Newport 
News in that city on November 4, 1927, Mrs. 

Williams is the daughter of Willie and Carrie 
Virginia (Hicks) Tyree. 



WALTER BERNARD WILLIAMS— The 
eletrical contracting business operated by Walter 
Bernard Williams, the Perry Electric Company, 
maintains offices and plant at 247 Twenty-eighth 
Street, Newport News. Once an employee of this 
concern, Mr. Williams is now its president. He 
has developed a statewide reputation among his 
colleagues in this field of business and in church 
and fraternal circles on the Virginia Peninsula. 

Mr. Williams was born in Newport News on 
October 13, 1904, the son of Walter T. and 
Margaret Ada (Gwynn) Williams. His father, who 
was born in Eagle Rock, North Carolina, on 
December 22, 1881, was a shipfitters' foreman 
at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock 
Company for many years until his death on Feb- 
ruary 22, 1914. Margaret Gwynn Williams, born 
in Norfolk County on January 7, 1880, survives 
her husband. She is living in Newport News. 

Walter B. Williams is a graduate of one of 
the Newport News' elementary schools. He at- 
tended Newport News High School for two years. 
When he left school, he apprenticed himself in 
the electricians' trade at the Perry Electric Com- 
pany, which was founded in 1918 by W. B. 
Perry. In 1938 Mr. Williams became vice presi- 
dent of the company and in 1953, after Mr. 
Perry's death, succeeded him in the presidency. 
The company specializes in electrical contract- 
ing, but also deals in electrical supplies on both 
a wholesale and retail basis. It employs forty 
persons. 

Mr. Williams is a director of the Virginia Chap- 
ter of the National Electrical Contractors Associa- 
tion, being active also in the national organiza- 
tion. In addition, he is a member of the Penin- 
sula Engineers Club, the Cosmopolitan Club of 
Newport News, and such Masonic bodies as Pe- 
ninsula Lodge No. 278, Ancient Free and Accept- 
ed Masons; St. John's Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons; Hampton Commandery, Knights Tem- 
plar; and Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, Norfolk. He serves 
on the Official Board of the First Congregational 
Church of Newport News. In politics he is an 
independent. For a hobby, Mr. Williams likes 
to take and show motion pictures. 



ROY G. BROWN — An appropriate and con- 
vincing advertisement for the business of The 
Brown and Grist Company, Inc., is its attractive 
all-aluminum plant at 25 Tyler Avenue, in War- 
wick. This company, of which Roy G. Brown 
is president, manufactures aluminum windows and 
panels widely used in the construction industry. 
Besides heading Brown and Grist, Mr. Brown 
is president of the Technical Service Corporation 
of Newport News and is a leading figure in the 
Peninsula Association of Commerce and other 
groups. 

He was born in Portageville, Missouri, on 
June 20, 1914, the son of Howard E. and Mar- 
tha (Gerber) Brown. His father, an electrical en- 
gineer, was a native of Kincardine, Ontario, Can- 
ada, his mother of Mount Olive, Illinois. How- 
ard E. Brown set up and operated electric 
power stations in various Midwestern cities. 

Roy G. Brown began his education in the 
public schools of his native Portageville. He con- 
tinued in those of Mount Olive, Illinois, and in 
1932 was graduated from the Mount Olive High 
School. In 1939, he was awarded the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 
at the Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy, 
University of Missouri, at Rolla. After taking 
the degree, Mr. Brown came to the Lower Tide- 
water and from 1939 to 1946 was a supervisor 
with the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry 
Dock Company. 

In 1946 he and Arthur W. Grist founded their 
present firm as a partnership. They incorporated 
the business in 1953, with Mr. Brown as presi- 
dent; R. F. Flaxington as secretary-treasurer; 
L. E. Woldridge, R. A. Cassidy and B. J. Utley, 
Sr., as vice presidents. About one hundred-fifty 
persons are employed in various phases of office, 
sales, distribution and production operations. Un- 
der Mr. Brown's supervision, the company erect- 
ed its all-aluminum plant in 1954. As president 
of the Technical Service Corporation of Newport 
News, Air. Brown has further opportunity to 
serve the Lower Tidewater region. He is a mem- 
ber of the board of directors of the Peninsula 
Association of Commerce and also is active in 
the James River Country Club and the Metho- 
dist Church. For diversion he likes fishing and 
golf. 

On June 9, 1940, in St. Louis, Missouri, Mr. 
Brown married Marjorie M. Felchlin of that city, 
the daughter of Jess and Irene Felchlin. They 



[68 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



have two daughters: l. Janice Irene, born on Au- 
gust .; i . 1942. 2. Pamela Martha, horn on August 
i". 1949- 



GEORGE WILLIAM COLEMAN— A- the 
head of a lumber, millwork and building supply 
business which has been active in the Lower Tide- 
water for a third of a century, George William 
Coleman is participating in the present-day expan- 
sion and prosperity of Newport New--. His linn is 
the Peninsula Supply Company, with main plant 
and offices at Thirty-fourth Street and Virginia 
\ venue. 

Born in Newport News on October 14, 1902, Mr. 
Coleman is the son of the founder of the Peninsula 
Supply Company, the late Henry Dick Coleman, 
and of Katherine (Moore) Coleman. The father 
was born in Gaithersburg, Maryland, the mother 
in Fairfax County, Virginia. Henry D. Coleman 
came to the Lower Tidewater with a fellow Mary- 
lander, Tom Peddicord, in 1882 and they engaged 
in the building and contracting business in New- 
port News, erecting many homes and other struc- 
tures in the city and surrounding territory for the 
next ten years. 

In 1802 Henry D. Coleman became manager of 
the old Acme Supply Company. Late in 1902 or 
early in 1903 he resigned that position to become 
purchasing agent for the Jamestown Exposition. 
He was working in that capacity until just before 
the Exposition opened. At that time his health 
failed and he was obliged to leave Newport News. 
With his family he went to Charlottesville, where 
he was engaged in the building supply business 
for several years. Later, he went into contracting 
again, this time for the Federal Government, as a 
builder of post offices in various states 

In 1923 Mr. Coleman returned to Newport News, 
where he established the Peninsula Supply Com- 
pany. Four years later he bought the firm he had 
once worked for, Acme Supply Company, and 
merged it with Peninsula. He actively managed 
the business until his death in 1938. Throughout 
the many years he was in business, Henry Cole- 
man was active in civic affairs. He was a member 
of the Methodist Church and particularly inter- 
ested in the work of the Young Men's Christian 
Association. Mrs. Coleman died in 1957. 

George William Coleman was five years old when 
the family moved from his native city to the uni- 
versity community. He went through elementary 
school in Charlottesville but attended high school 
in Newport News. In 1918 he was graduated from 
the Randolph-Macon Academy. For about a decade 
he operated as a building contractor in Baltimore. 
Then he returned to Newport News to join his 
father in the management of the Peninsula Supply 
Company. When the elder Mr. Coleman died in 



1938, the son succeeded to the presidency and he 
has since guided the business to its present im- 
portant place in the commerce and industry of the 
Lower Tidewater. He is also chairman of the board 
of the Duncan and Dale Appliance Corporation. 

In World War 1, Mr. Coleman worked in the 
New sport .Wws Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Com- 
pany's yards and afterward was associated with 
F. F Piland, contractor, in the construction of 
several buildings in Newport News and on the 
Peninsula. He is a member of the Newport News 
Lodge, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; 
the Kiwanis Club of Newport News, the James 
River Country Club and Chestnut Avenue Method- 
ist Church. He is a Democrat. His chief diversions 
are hunting and fishing. 

In February 1930, in Newport News. Mr. Cole- 
man married Eleanor Eames, also a native of that 
city. She is the daughter of William Wendell and 
Anne (Christian) Eames. Mr. and Mrs. Coleman 
have two children: 1. George William, Jr., born 
in 1032, who is associated witli his father in the 
business. 2. Anne Christian, horn in August 1936, 
a student at Mary Baldwin College. 



WILLIAM GAINES WOMACK— Active in the 
public transportation field at Norfolk for a number 
of years, William Gaines Womack lias advanced 
to executive posts with the Virginia Transit Com- 
pany, as vice president and manager of its Norfolk 
Division, and vice president and general manager 
of its Portsmouth Division. He is eminently quali- 
fied for the responsible positions he holds, and is 
a recognized business and civic leader of the Nor- 
folk-Portsmouth area. He combines the traits of 
thorough technical training, a talent for the ef- 
ficient conduct of business, and the happy faculty 
of getting along well with people. 

He was born May 11, 1010. in Keysville, Vir- 
ginia, son of William T. and Maude (McGehee) 
Womack. His boyhood was passed in the com- 
munity of his birth, where he received his public 
elementary and high school education. He went 
on to the Randolph-Macon College, where he gradu- 
ated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1932. 
While at college, he was a member of Sigma Phi 
Epsilon fraternity. 

He began his career in the transit field working 
in the bus garage of the Virginia Electric and 
Power Company, but later transferred to its elec- 
trical department, in which he served as a meter 
reader and later as meter tester. In 1944 he was 
promoted to the position of secretary to the general 
manager of the Virginia Electric and Power Com- 
pany's transit operations, and this position he still 
held when the Virginia Transit Company took 
over the other corporation's transit properties in 
Richmond and Norfolk. 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



169 



In April 1945, Mr. Womack was named assistant 
to the vice president and general manager of the 
Virginia Transit Company, and in April 1951, he 
was promoted to assistant manager of its Rich- 
mond Division. He left this post to assume the 
duties of vice prseident and manager of the Nor- 
folk Division, and vice president and general man- 
ager of the Portsmouth Division, in February 1952. 
In the course of the steady advancement which 
has identified his career, he has won wide respect 
for his co-operative and progressive attitudes, and 
his sense of civic responsibility. His contributions 
to community improvement have been varied. He 
has worked diligently in various solicitation jobs 
for both the Richmond Community Fund (while 
he was in that city) and the American Red Cross. 
Formerly active in the Richmond Chamber of 
Commerce, he is now a valued member of the 
Norfolk Chamber, and serves on several of its com- 
mittees. He is also a member of the Portsmouth 
Chamber of Commerce, and of the Rotary Club, 
the Virginia Club, and Princess Anne Country Club. 
He has frequently appeared as a speaker on trans- 
portation and traffic problems, and recently filled 
a request to appear before the Virginia Citizens 
Planning Association Conference at Lynchburg. 

On December 14, 1935, at Richmond, William 
Gaines Womack married Miss Nellie Hudson of 
Richmond. The couple are the parents of one 
daughter, Susan Gaines Womack. They reside at 
10 Surry Lane, Virginia Beach, and Mr. Womack's 
business address is 509 East 18th Street, Norfolk. 



J. CLIFTON COUNCILL— As president and 
manager of J. C. Councill, Inc., Real Estate, 
Rental and Insurance Agents, of Norfolk, J. Clif- 
ton Councill has built up a successful business, 
and his reputation is widely known in the Tide- 
water region. His agency has its offices in the 
Monticello Arcade, 208 East Plume Street. 

A native of Nansemond County, he was born 
on August 16, 1888, son of Catullus and Rosa Matil- 
da (Holland) Councill. Among his forebears were 
early settlers in colonial Virginia. One of these, 
Hodges Frank Councill, came to the colony in 
1640, and the real estate and insurance executive 
represents the ninth generation of the family in 
this country. John Yates Councill, his grandfather, 
gave his life defending the Southern cause with 
the Confederate States Army, which he joined 
from Nansemond County. Catullus Councill was 
born in that county, and farmed there until 1907, 
when he settled in Portsmouth. There he entered 
the insurance business in which he continued for 
a number of years. He died in that city in 1933, at 
the age of seventy-three. His wife, the former Rosa 



Matilda Holland, was born on July 11, 1866, in 
Nansemond County. She has now reached the age 
of ninety and continues to reside in Portsmouth. 
Her father was Dixon Holland, a farmer in Nan- 
semond County, and a veteran of service in the 
Confederate States Army. 

One of eleven children born to his parents, J. 
Clifton Councill passed his boyhood on the home 
farm in Nansemond County, and attended the one- 
room school nearby. From 1905 to 1909 he was 
employed by Ellenor and Armentrout, ship's chand- 
lers, of Portsmouth, working days and attending 
Snaps Business College evenings to advance his 
education. From 1909 to 1917 he was engaged in 
business in Portsmouth as J. C. Councill, Fancy 
Groceries, and he closed out this business to enter 
military service at the time of World War I. En- 
tering the United States Army, he was assigned 
to the 29th Division, and later transferred to the 
Supply Depot at Camp Lee, Virginia. Following 
his honorable discharge, he located in Norfolk, and 
in April 1919, entered the real estate and insurance 
business in his own name. 

This organization was the predecessor of the 
present firm of J. C. Councill and Company, Inc., 
which was incorporated in 1950 with Mr. Councill 
as president and manager and his son, J. Clifton 
Councill, Jr., as secretary and treasurer, and also 
as head of the firm's insurance department. 

Through his outstanding position in the realty, 
rental and insurance field, Mr. Councill has made 
a conspicuous contribution to the development of 
his city over the past forty years. His firm has 
bought and remodeled thousands of homes, and 
has sponsored the platting of a number of sub- 
divisions, including the Hardy Tract on Virginia 
Beach Boulevard in 1938: the Chesapeake Beach 
development; the Tucker Tract on Engleside Road; 
Suburban Acres at Ward's Corner in 1943; the 
Maple Hill subdivision on Virginia Beach Boule- 
vard; and other such developments. Recognized as 
a foremost realtor, Mr. Councill has exercised a 
wholesome and constructive influence in promoting 
the growth of pleasant home areas. For many years 
his firm has maintained its offices on the second 
floor of the Monticello Arcade Building in the 
center of Norfolk's downtown business area. 

A member of the Norfolk-Portsmouth Real Es- 
tate Board, Mr. Councill served as its president in 
!943-i944- His firm is a member of the Norfolk 
Real Estate Board, the Virginia Real Estate As- 
sociation, the National Association of Real Estate 
Boards and the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce. 

Aside from professional connections, the real- 
tor is a member of the Cosmopolitan Club of Nor- 
folk, of which he served as president in 1954, and 
of the Norfolk Yacht and Countrv Club and Cava- 



'"< 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



Her Beach Club. His favorite outdoor pastime is 
deep-sea fishing. 

Twice married, J. Clifton Councill chose as his 
first wife, Miss Lucile Hoggard of Norfolk. They 
were married on April 16. 1912, and she died in 
1916. They were the parents of one daughter. Ruth 
Hoggard Councill. She is married to Carl Miller 
of Norfolk, and they are the parents of two chil- 
dren: Randolph and Joan Miller. On September 
27, 1919. Mr. Councill married, second. Ethleen 
Hoggard, a M>ter of his first wife. They are the 
parents of a son, John Clifton Councill, Jr., born 
January 11, 1921. He is now associated with his 
father as secretary and treasurer of J. C. Councill 
and Company, Inc.. in which he is also in charge 
of tlie insurance department. He served in the 
United States Navy in World War II. being in 
the Pacific. Xow active in the civic affairs of Nor- 
folk, he is a charter member and past president of 
the Exchange Club, and was recipient of it-, annual 
plaque for outstanding service in 1956. John Clif- 
ton Councill, Jr.. married Louise Daughtrey of 
Norfolk and they have two children: John Clifton, 
II I, and Loretta. 



WESLEY RANDOLPH COFER, JR— En- 
gaged in the general practice of law at Phoebus, 
Wesley Randolph Cofer. Jr., completed his pro- 
fessional training after his return from service 
in Air Transport Command in World War II. 
He has taken a leading role in American Legion 
activities, and is currently department commander 
of the Department of Virginia. 

A native of Newport News, he was born on 
October 10, 1920, son of Wesley Randolph, Sr., 
and Glenna Wyatt (Williams) Cofer. His father, 
who was born in Smithfield on March 6, 1895, 
owned and operated Cofer Motor Sales in New- 
port News from 1919 to 195 1, when he retired. 
This is a DeSoto and Plymouth agency, and its 
present management still operate it under the same 
name. Mrs. Cofer, the former Glenna W. Williams, 
is a native of Gloucester. 

The younger Wesley R. Cofer received his early 
education in the public schools of Newport News. 
and graduated from high school there. His ad- 
vanced education in engineering was interrupted 
by wartime service. Volunteering for service in 
the United States Army Air Corps as a private 
on February 7. 1942, he wa> assigned to the 26th 
Special Air Transport Group, in which he won his 
rating of first lieutenant as a navigator. He re- 
ceived his training at Pan American World Air- 
ways Aviation School at the University of Miami, 
and served until November 18, 1945, when he re- 
ceived his honorable discharge. He then resumed 
his studies in preparation for a civilian career, 



entering the College of Willam and Mary. There- 
he received his degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
1947, having majored in government. He received 
his degree of Bachelor of Civil Law there in 1949, 
and also holds the Master of Arts degree, which 
lie received after completing a course in taxation 
at the same university. Prior to entering practice 
Mr. Cofer taught a course in constitutional law 
at the College of William and Mary's Law School. 

In 1950 he began his general practice at Phoebus, 
and is now senior member of the firm of Kearney, 
Cofer and Jordan, with offices at 1 Mellen Street. 
Mr. Cofer is a member of the Hampton Bar Asso- 
ciation, the Virginia State Bar and Virginia State 
Bar Association, and the American Bar Associa- 
tion. He serves as attorney for the Old Point 
National Bank of Phoebus. 

Municipal service receives its share of his at- 
tention. A member of the Hampton Planning 
Commission, he is currently serving as its vice 
chairman, and he is also a member of the Hampton 
Zoning Commission. He is a member of the Hamp- 
ton Rotary Club, The Chesapeake Club, Hampton 
Yacht Club, and the lodge of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. He is a past president 
of tin- William and Mary Law Alumni Association, 
and is currently the president of the Phoebus 
Civic Association. Mr. Cofer has served on the 
board of directors of the Hampton Bar Asso- 
ciation, the Community Chest, and the Junior 
Chamber of Commerce. Mr. Cofer, as chairman 
of the Hampton Jamestown Festival Committee, 
a committee appointed by the Council of the City 
of Hampton, furthered Hampton's participation 
in the event. 

After his return from World War II he became 
active in the American Legion, and held offices 
at the local, district, and department levels. In 
addition he has served as vice chairman of the 
Membership Committee and as chairman of a 
special committee to study convention reorgani- 
zation. He played a useful part in a recent mem- 
bership drive throughout the state and lie served as 
director of the department fund campaign for the 
election of Dan Daniel for National Commander, 
which campaign concluded on September 7, 1956, 
with the election of Mr. Daniel as National Com- 
mander. Mr. Cofer is also serving on the Gov- 
ernor's Committee on Employment of the Physi- 
cally Handicapped. 

Mr. Cofer is a communicant of the Baptist 
Church. 

At St. Joseph. Missouri, on February 7, 104.?. 
Wesley R. Cofer, Jr.. married Mary Jane Wright 
of that city, daughter of Dr. Gordon D. and Ida 
J. (Nelson) Wright. Her father, a physician, is 
now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Cofer have two chil- 
dren: 1. Wesley Randolph. 3rd, who was born on 





UsdsU^i 




LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



'7' 



November 18, 1943. 2. Glemia Jo, born October 
1, 1948. 



WILLIAM PIERCE BALLARD— The sea- 
food industry has played an important part in the 
history of the Lower Tidewater; and with the 
development of this industry the name of Ballard 
has long been prominently identified. As president 
of Ballard Fish and Oyster Company, Inc., at Nor- 
folk. William Pierce Ballard has brought to his 
office extensive practical experience and a spirit of 
service, and he continues to make a significant in- 
dividual contribution to the business. 

The region's seafood industry has been in ex- 
istence since early colonial days, for its pioneer 
settlers depended largely on seafood for their sus- 
tenance. However, the Ballard Fish and Oyster 
Company is one of the oldest in continuous ex- 
istence at the present time, and it had its begin- 
nings in 1896, when J. T. White established a plant 
at the west end of Southampton Avenue in Nor- 
folk. In 1909, I. T. Ballard, who had come from 
the vicinity of Champ, Maryland, bought an inter- 
est in the business, which within a few years 
amounted to a half ownership. In 1924 the com- 
pany was incorporated as the Ballard Fish and 
Oyster Company, and following the death of Mr. 
White, five of Mr. Ballard's brothers, who had 
had long experience in the seafood industry at 
Willis Wharf, Virginia, as Ballard Brothers, ac- 
quired the deceased founder's interest, making it a 
family-owned enterprise. Indeed, the first president 
of the business as at present organized was one 
of the brothers, Warren, who served until his 
death in 1933. He was succeeded in the presidency 
by Isaac T. Ballard, who held the office until he 
too died in 1949. At that time, William P. Ballard, 
who had been serving as vice president, was elected 
to the presidency, taking office in April 1950. He 
continues as directing head of the enterprise today. 
As oyster packers, the Ballard Fish and Oyster 
Company plants, produces, shucks, packs and ships 
oysters in very large quantities, as wholesale dis- 
tributors, to all parts of the United States and 
Canada, with major outlets east of the Mississippi 
River. In October 1954, the company moved into a 
new plant, modern and completely mechanized, 
with the latest equipment for the processing of 
seafoods under the most rigid standards of sanita- 
tion. The firm also engages in fish packing, and 
as wholesalers distributes to outlets all along the 
Atlantic seaboard. It has between four and five 
hundred employees on its payroll at the time of the 
seasonal peak of operations. Its reputation is that 
of a firm which keeps abreast of the times, and in 
many instances, pioneers in new developments. 



Besides William P. Ballard, the president, its of- 
ficers are Charles M. Ballard, vice president, Carroll 
C. Ballard, treasurer, James S. Barnhardt, secre- 
tary, and James A. Ballard, assistant secretary. 

William P. Ballard was born October 21, 1909, in 
Baltimore, Maryland, son of William Walter and 
Mary Elizabeth (Curley) Ballard. His father was 
long active in the seafood industry at Willis Wharf. 
His wife, the former Mary Elizabeth Curley, died 
at Willis Wharf in 1940. 

It was in that community that William P. Ballard 
passed his boyhood, and he graduated from high 
school there in 1929. He then entered Washington 
and Lee University in Lexington, taking his degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Commerce and Business 
Administration in 1931. In that year he began his 
connection with Ballard Fish and Oyster Company, 
Inc., at Norfolk, and familiarized himself with all 
aspects of operations. He served as vice president 
for some time before his election to the presidency. 
Apart from this major business connection, he is 
a member of the board of directors of the Southern 
Bank of Norfolk. 

A loyal and progressive citizen, he has taken a 
vital interest in civic matters. Since October 1952, 
he has served on the Norfolk school board, and he 
is also a member of the board of directors of the 
Norfolk Chamber of Commerce, a member of the 
board of Leigh Memorial Hospital, and a member 
of the Tidewater Council of Boy Scouts of Amer- 
ica. He is a recognized leader in his industry, and, 
in the year 1956, was serving as president of the 
Oyster Institute of North America. He is a mem- 
ber of the board of administration of the Virginia 
Fisheries Laboratory. 

As regards local organization, he is a Kiwanian, 
and served as president of the Norfolk Club in 
IQ 53- He is also a past president of the Toast- 
masters Club of that city, the Downtown Club, 
Norfolk Yacht and Country Club, and Ruth Lodge 
No. 89, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. In 
Masonry, he belongs to the higher bodies, in- 
cluding the Royal Arch chapter, Grice Command- 
ery No. 16 of the Knights Templar, and Khedive 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine. His favorite outdoor pastimes are 
hunting and fishing. An earnest advocate of the 
conservation of natural resources, he serves on the 
Legislative Advisory Committee on Seafoods. He is 
a communicant of Ghent Methodist Church, is vice 
chairman of its board of stewards, and formerly 
served as president of the Ghentmen's Bible Class. 

On September 7, 1940, at Norfolk, William P. 
Ballard married Helen Caulfield of that city, daugh- 
ter of the late Robert and Christine (Amory) Caul- 
field. Mrs. Ballard is a graduate of Westhampton 
College (University of Virginia") and taught in the 



"7 2 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



public schools of Norfolk prior to her marriage. Slit- 
is active in civic and church circles, taking a part- 
icular interest in the program of the Parent-Teacher 
Association. She was the president of the Norfolk 
Chapter of the American Association of University 
Women, and is a teacher at the Ghent Methodist 
Church's Sunday school. Mr. and Mrs. Ballard 
are the parents of three children: I. Ann Caulfield, 
l>orn March 8. 1943. 2. Elizabeth Alan, born Sep- 
tember 1, 1946. 3. William Pierce, Jr.. born Febru- 
ary 23, 1949. The family resides at 4002 Columbus 
Avenue. Norfolk. 



JOHN EARLE WHITE, JR.— As president of 
White and Dashiell, Inc., of Norfolk, John Earle 
White, Jr., heads one of Tidewater Virginia's oldest 
and largest retail fuel dealers. It is situated at 
East Berkley Avenue and Appomattox Street, in 
the Berkley section of Norfolk, its seat of oper- 
ations for many years. This business was organized 
by Harry W. Dashiell, who was joined in partner- 
ship by Harry T. White in 1901. Later this partner- 
ship was dissolved, and for a time was continued 
as the Dashiell Fuel Company. In 1915, John Earle 
White, Sr.. who had been a partner in the retail 
fuel firm of C. B. White and Brother, joined H. 
W. Dashiell in forming the present corporation of 
White and Dashiell, Inc. Of this firm. Mr. White 
was the president, and H. W. Dashiell secretary 
and treasurer. With the outbreak of World War I, 
Mr. Dashiell entered the army, selling his interest 
in the firm to Mr. White, who continued as the 
directing head of the corporation until his death 
on April 7, 1941. He was succeeded in the presi- 
dency by his son, John Earle, Jr., who still holds 
that office. The firm has grown steadily into one 
of the major distributorships of the region. It re- 
tails coal, Mobilheat fuel oil. kerosene, and Ferti- 
lene liquid fertilizer throughout a territory com- 
prising Tidewater Virginia and eastern North Caro- 
lina. Conducting its business on a friendly and 
highly ethical basis, in the tradition of its founders, 
it can pride itself on excellent customer relation- 
ships. Its officers, in addition to Mr. White, are 
John Earle White, III. vice president; R. G. 
Dashiell, manager; Walker A. Nesbitt, asistant 
manager; and Bessie D. White, secretary and treas- 
urer. 

Identified with the management of White and 
Dashiell, Inc., since 1924, John Earle White, Jr.. 
was born in Norfolk on July 18, 1001, son of John 
Earle, Sr., and Rebecca Frances (Dashiell) White. 
His father was born in Maryland, and came to 
Norfolk as a young man. As mentioned, he was 
formerly associated with his brother, C. B. White, 
in the Norfolk fuel firm of C. B. White and Brother. 
For a time he was engaged in the grocery business 



as a partner in the firm of White and Horton of 
Norfolk. The two also operated a livery stable in 
Norfolk for a time. From 1915, when the present 
firm of White and Dashiell was incorporated, he 
became its president and served until his death in 
1941. Rebecca Frances Dashiell, whom he married, 
was the daughter of George V. and Ella (Graves) 
Dashiell of Norfolk. She died on December 5, 
1954. To this union six children were born: I. 
John Earle. Jr. 2. Grace Armistead, who married 
J. Paul Smith, executive vice president and cashier 
of the Merchants and Planters Bank of Norfolk, 
and in charge of its South Norfolk branch. 3. Fran- 
ces Dashiell. who married William C. Everett, a 
businessman of Virginia Beach. 4. Claude B., M.D., 
who took his degree from Medical College of Vir- 
ginia. As a career officer in the United States Air 
Force Medical Corps, he now holds the rank of 
colonel. He married Margaret Ferratt of Norfolk, 
and they live at Greenville, South Carolina, where 
he is now stationed. 5. George Corbin, who holds 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
from the Medical College of Virginia. He is now 
owner of Preston's Pharmacy, South Norfolk. He 
married Rita Price Jones of Richmond. 6. Fred 
Dashiell, M.D., who took his medical courses at the 
University of Virginia. He is now a specialist in 
treatment of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and 
throat at Bluefield. West Virginia. He married 
Eloise Colonna of Norfolk. 

John Earle White, Jr., attended Maury High 
School and graduated from Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute in 1922 with the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Mechanical Engineering. He began hi~ 
career as a teacher of mathematics in Norfolk city 
schools and in 1924 entered the firm of White and 
Dashiell, Inc., becoming general manager, later 
vice president, and. since his father's death a decade 
and half ago, president. Prominent in retail coal 
associations, he is vice president of the Coal Mer- 
chants Service Bureau; a member and past director 
of the Virginia State Coal Merchants Association; 
and a member of the National Coal Dealer- Asso- 
ciation. 

A Kiwanian, Mr. White served as president of 
the Southside Club in 193 1. He is a member and 
past master (1927) of Doric Lodge No. 44, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons; and a member of Ionic 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Grice Commandery 
No. 16, Knights Templar; and Khedive Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine, and the Tall Cedars of Lebanon. He is a 
member of the lodges of the Knights of Pythias, 
the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Improved Order 
of Red Men, and the Charles H. Consolvo Tent, 
Circus Saints and Sinners, the Norfolk Yacht and 
Country Club, the Downtown Club, the Engineers 





&^-rZ-£^<L 



^j^O-^cX— 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



'73 



Club of Hampton Roads, the Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute Alumni Association, the Norfolk Cham- 
ber of Commerce and the Norfolk Sports Club. 

Mr. White has one other major business connec- 
tion besides White and Dashiell, Inc. Since 1936 
he has served on the board of directors of the 
Home Federal Savings and Loan Association, and 
is an associate member of the Society of Residential 
Appraisers. A communicant of St. Bride's Epis- 
copal Church, he formerly served on its vestry. 

For recreation, he enjoys swimming, fishing and 
bridge. He has consistently cooperated with pro- 
jects for civic betterment. From 1922 through 1932, 
he was in the United States Army Engineers Re- 
serve Corps. 

At Washington, D.C., on October 16, 1926, John 
Earle White, Jr., married Bessie Virginia Dodson 
of Portsmouth, Virginia, daughter of John A. and 
Nellie Mae Dodson of that city. She is active in 
St. Bride's Episcopal Church and a member of the 
King's Daughters. Mr. and Mrs. White are the 
parents of one son, John Earle, III. Born March 
28, 1928, in Norfolk, he graduated from Maury 
High School in 1946. He attended Hampden- 
Sydney College, where he majored in business 
administration, and is now vice president of White 
and Dashiell, Inc. He is a member of Doric Lodge 
No. 44, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Ionic 
Chapter No. 46, Royal Arch Masons; Grice Com- 
mandery No. 16, Knights Templar; the Khedive 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of the South 
Norfolk Junior Chamber of Commerce, and is fond 
of fishing and golf. On June 18, 1949, in Washing- 
ton, D.C., John Earle White, III, married Mar- 
garet Lee Greene of Norfolk, daughter of Winfield 
Scott and Grace (Church) Greene. Mrs. White is 
a graduate of Granby High School, attended the 
College of William and Mary, Norfolk Division, 
and graduated from Mary Washington College of 
the University of Virginia. The couple have two 
children: i. Laura Lee, born June 22, 1951. ii. 
Deborah Ann, born October 7, 1952. This family 
attends St. Bride's Episcopal Church, where John 
Earle White, III, is a member of the vestry. 



PAUL R. BICKFORD— In addition to his 
long-time connection with the well-known Hamp- 
ton building supplies firm which bears the Bick- 
ford name, Paul R. Bickford has taken a role 
of leadership in home construction in his area 
of the Lower Tidewater. He has distinguished 
himself in civic posts, and is a veteran of service 
with the Army Engineers in World War II. 

Born at Baltimore, Maryland, on March 31, 
1919, Mr. Bickford is a son of a former mayor 
of Hampton, the late James V. Bickford. It 



was also he who founded J. V. Bickford, Inc., 
He was born at Hampton on December 31, 1876, 
son of Selwyn E. and Carrie (Van Allen) Bick- 
ford. He attended local private schools and the 
College of William and" Mary, and graduated in 
1896 from Virginia Military Institute. The same 
year James V. Bickford entered the sand and 
gravel business in Hampton, and left to serve 
in the Spanish-American War, in the course of 
which he was adjutant on Colonel Vaughan's 
staff. On his return from military service, he 
married Miss Katherine West Tabb, who died 
in 1904. In 1906 he married her first cousin, 
Miss Helen West Rutherford. In the World War 
I period, Mr. Bickford was active in the con- 
struction of Langley Field, and he served on the 
Selective Service Board of Appeals for the Hamp- 
ton Roads area in World War II. Active in the 
Virginia League of Municipalities, he served as 
its president and in other offices; and he was 
a charter member of the Rotary Club, a mem- 
ber of the Chamber of Commerce and a mem- 
ber and past director of the Peninsula Association 
of Commerce. James V. Bickford was a member 
of the city council at Hampton before his elec- 
tion as mayor in 1919; and he continued to fill 
the city's chief executive office most capably and 
with distinction until 1945. About 1918, he foun- 
ded the Bickford Sand and Gravel Company, and 
the name of this firm was later changed to J. V. 
Bickford, Inc. He remained at its head until 
his death on April 14, 1947. 

His son, Paul R., who has succeeded him as 
head of that organization, was reared in Hamp- 
ton and received his public school education there. 
He attended the Symes Eaton School, was a 
student at the Hampton High School for three 
years, then went to St. Paul's School in Balti- 
more, Maryland, to complete his preparatory stud- 
ies. From there he entered Virginia Military 
Institute, where he graduated in 1939 with the 
degree of Bachelor of Science, being only twenty 
years old at the time. 

He immediately began his connection with his 
father's organization, and was well qualified to 
assume management at the time of the elder 
man's death in 1947. He has since been the presi- 
dent of the corporation, and is also president of 
Hampton Homes, Inc., a firm which constructs 
prefabricated houses in the Hampton area, and 
president of Tidewater Homes, Inc., which also 
contracts for the building of residences. In addi- 
tion, he is an official in other construction firms. 

Mr. Bickford was absent at the time of World 
War II, serving in the Corps of Engineers, Uni- 
ted States Army. He entered with a second lieu- 
tenant's commission and advanced to the rank 
of major. He has been a member of the Penin- 



I_ 4 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



sula Airport Commission ever since it was foun- 
ded. Active in the Virginia Peninsula Cham- 
ber of Commerce, he serves on its board of di- 
rectors, and he is currently the president of the 
Hampton Fire Company. As a prominent figure 
in the Lower Tidewater's construction industry, 
Mr. Bickford is president of the Home Builders 
Association of the Peninsula, and a director of 
the Virginia Building Materials Dealers Associa- 
tion. 

He is a Rotarian, and a member of Post No. 
3, of the American Legion at Hampton and of 
St. John's Episcopal Church. In his political af- 
filiation, he is a Democrat. 

At Newport News on January 3, 1942, Paul 
R. Bickford married Betty Lee Downing of 
Hampton, (laughter of Dorsey L. and Gladys 
(Kcrnegay) Downing. The couple are the parents 
of three children: 1. Betty Lee, who was born 
in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on June 9, 1943. 2. 
Carolyn Rutherford, horn August 10, 1947. 3. Paul 
Rutherford, J.\, born September 28, 1950. 



GEORGE GARLINGTON PHILLIPS was 
born in Dallas, Texas, on November 13, 1903, 
the son of Alexander Roy and Anna (Garlington) 
Phillips. His father, who died on November 6, 
1945, was president of the Great American Group 
of Insurance Companies, with headquarters in 
New York City. 

George G. Phillips began his education in the 
public schools of Dallas, but at an early age 
when the family moved into the New York City 
area, he transferred to an elementary school in 
Montclair, New Jersey. He was graduated from the 
Montclair High School. He then returned to the 
South to matriculate at Virginia Military Insti- 
tute, where he received his degree in Electrical 
Engineering in 1925. 

In 1925 Mr. Phillips followed his father into 
the insurance business. His first post was with 
the Niagara Insurance Company in New York 
City. From 1926 to 1928 he was with the Home 
Insurance Company, also in New York. In 1928 
he transferred to the branch office at Raleigh, 
North Carolina, of the Great American Insurance 
Company of New York and remained there until 
he was made the company's State Agent for Vir- 
ginia, with headquarters in Richmond, in 1929. 
In 1945 he resigned that office to become a part- 
ner in Dobie, Bell & Henderson, Inc. Some few 
years later the firm's name was changed to Hen- 
derson & Phillips, Inc. In January 1955, Mr. Phil- 
lips was elected president, the position which he 
now holds. This firm has specialized in insurance 
since 1896, writing all forms and thereby con- 
tributing to economic and community progress. 
Henderson & Phillips, Inc. has headquarters in 



Suite 1220, National Bank of Commerce Budd- 
ing, Norfolk. 

Mr. Phillips is also active in banking, being 
a director of the Bank of Cradock at Portsmouth, 
in fraternal life, in college alumni work, in the 
civic and cultural growth of Norfolk, and is a 
member of numerous social and recreational clubs. 
Mr. Phillips has served as the president of the 
Norfolk Symphony and Choral Association. At 
the present time he is national president of the 
Virginia Military Institute Sportsman's Club and 
a member of the executive committee of the Alumni 
Association. 

From 1925 to 1930 Mr. Phillips served in the 
LInited States Army Reserve, having been com- 
missioned at the time of his graduation from 
Virginia Military Institute. He also served with 
the Essex Troop of the New Jersey National 
Guard from 1926 to 1929. He is a member of 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons Corinthian 
Lodge No. 266; Auld Consistory of the Scottish 
Rite; Khedive Temple Shrine and Royal Order 
of Jesters. His clubs are: Norfolk Yacht and 
Country Club, Downtown Club, Virginia Club, 
Norfolk; Princess Anne Country Club, Cavalier 
Beach and Cabana Club, Virginia Beach; Rotunda 
Club. Richmond; and the Farmington Country 
Club, Charlottesville, Virginia. Hi' is a member 
of the First Presbyterian Church of Virginia 
Beach. 

George Garlington Phillips is married to Thel- 
ma M. Richardson, daughter of Charles Lewis 
and Bertha Elizabeth (Landrum) Richardson, and 
is the father of one son, George Garlington 
Phillips, Jr., wdio was born on December 14, 1937, 
in Richmond, Virginia. The Phillips home is 
"Garlington" at London Bridge, Virginia. 



HYMAN BERNARD SWARTZ— Since his 
admittance to practice as a certified public ac- 
countant, nearly a decade ago, Hyman Bernard 
Swartz has centered his professional activities in 
the Lower Tidewater area, and is now engaged in 
private practice with offices in the Western Union 
Building at Norfolk. 

He is a prominent representative of the younger 
generation of professional men in Norfolk, where 
he was born on July 4, 1913, son of Abraham Isaac 
and Fannie (Postove) Swartz. Both parents were 
natives of Russia who came to the United States 
in early youth, and from that time made their home 
in Norfolk. Abraham Isaac Swartz, who died in 
1954, conducted a retail grocery business at 800 
East Princess Anne Road. Mrs. Swartz died in 
Norfolk in 1936, at the age of forty-four. 

Beginning his education at Henry Clay Element- 
ary School, Hyman Bernard Swartz later attended 
Ruffner Junior High School, and graduated from 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



•75 



Maury High School in June 1931. He continued his 
education at the College of William and Mary, 
where he graduated in 1935 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 

He began his business career with the Southern 
Packing Company in the capacity of office man- 
ager, and remained with that firm from June 1935, 
until January 1938. For a decade thereafter, until 
March 1948, he served as internal revenue agent for 
the United States Department of the Treasury. In 
November 1947, Mr. Swartz passed his examination 
as Certified Public Accountant, before the Virginia 
State Board of Accountancy, and the following 
March, became associated in practice with Joseph 
Morris of Suffolk. They continued their association 
until March 1950, and at that time Mr. Swartz 
left to form his own accounting firm. He practices 
under the firm name of H. B. Swartz, Certified 
Public Accountant and Tax Adviser. His organiza- 
tion has built up a large clientele among the region's 
manufacturers and merchants. Mr. Swartz is licens- 
ed to practice before the United States Tax Court 
and the United States Department of the Treasury. 
He is a member of the American Institute of Ac- 
countants, the Virginia Society of Public Account- 
ants, the National Association of Cost Accountants 
and the International Accountants Society. 

Active in civic affairs, he is a member of the 
Norfolk Chamber of Commerce and the Lodge 
No. 38 of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. His fraternity is Beta Alpha Psi. His religious 
affiliation is with Temple Israel Congregation of 
Norfolk, which he served as president from 1953 
to 1956. He is a member of the local chapter of 
B'nai Brith. 

On March 9, 1938, at Norfolk, Hyman Bernard 
Swartz married Miss Beulah Virginia Tonelson of 
that city. The couple are the parents of two chil- 
dren: 1. Franklin Alex, who was born on Decem- 
ber 11, 1938. 2. Bette Lou, born February 19, 1945. 
The family residence is at 208 Burleigh Avenue, 
Norfolk. 



WALTER WORTH MARTIN— Since a decade 
ago, when he centered his law practice in New- 
port News, Walter Worth Martin has been a 
partner in the firm of Hall, Martin and Smith, 
and predecessor firms. He has been active in 
the Elks and other local organizations. 

Born at Cresskill, New Jersey, on July 18, 
1907, he is a son of Frederick W. E. and Mary 
Louise (Zentz) Martin. Both of his parents were 
natives of Baltimore, Maryland. His father be- 
came vice president of Aspegren and Company 
in New York City, and died in September 1928. 
Mrs. Martin is still living. While his father was 
identified with the cotton-seed oil firm in New 



York City, the family lived at Sodus, New York, 
and there W. Worth Martin received his public 
school education and graduated from high school 
in 1925. He then entered Colgate University, which 
is in New York State, and was a student there 
for three years. He completed his professional 
studies at the University of Maryland Law School 
in Baltimore, where he graduated in 1932 with 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

Admitted to the bar of the State of Maryland 
i" 1933. Mr. Martin first joined the staff of the 
Home Owners Loan Corporation and worked with 
this government agency for one year. He left to 
accept a position in the claim department of the 
Employers Liability Assurance Corporation, Ltd., 
and worked in that firm's various branch offices 
until 1946. 

In that year Mr. Martin came to Newport News 
and began his private practice of law. Ho had 
been admitted to the bar of the State of Virginia 
in 1940. He became a member of the firm of 
Hall and Martin, which recently became Hall, 
Martin and Smith and has its offices in the Law 
Building. The. firm conducts a general practice in 
all courts, with especial emphasis on insurance 
and admiralty law. Among its clients are Public 
Service Mutual, American-Association Insurance 
Companies, Employers Mutuals of Wausau, Wis- 
consin, Ohio Casualty Insurance Company, State 
Farm Mutual Companies, Hartford Accident and 
Indemnity Company, London and Lancashire In- 
demni*y Company, Bruce Dodson and Company 
and T. H. Mastin and Company. Mr. Martin's 
partners are Lewis H. Hall, Jr., and Douglas H. 
Smith. 

He is a member and president of the Newport 
News Bar Association, a member of the Virginia 
State and the American bar associations, and the 
Virginia State Bar. In his politics he is a Demo- 
crat. His fraternity is Sigma Nu, and he is also 
a member of Peninsula Lodge No. 72, Knights of 
Pythias, and Newport News Lodge No. 315, Bene- 
volent and Protective Order of Elks. He is past 
exalted ruler of this lodge, is now a member of 
the board of trustees, is state chairman of the 
Elks National Foundation Committee, and is Dis- 
trict Deputy Grand Exalted Ruler, Virginia South- 
east. He is past chancellor commander of his 
lodge of the Knights of Pythias. Fond of golf, 
Mr. Martin is a member of the James River 
Country Club, and he also finds a refreshing out- 
door pastime in boating. He is of Protestant faith. 
Mr. Martin serves on the Fort Eustis Army Ad- 
visory Council, and is a member of the Newport 
News Planning Commission. 

At Baltimore, on July 4, 1936, W. Worth Martin 
married Frances Louise Keech of Hughesville, 
Maryland, daughter of William W. and Anne 



i-6 



LOWF.R TIDKWATl R VIRGINIA 



(Dyer) Ketch. The couple are the parents of one 
son, Terrence Keech, who was horn on April 21, 
MM'), at Lynchburg, Virginia 



HUBARD STANLEY CULPEPPER— Asso- 
ciated with the management of Acme Photo Com- 
pany, Inc., of Norfolk, since 1942, Hubard Stanley 
Culpepper is now president and manager of this 
firm, which has its offices and plant at 248 W. 
Tozewell Street. 

He was born in Norfolk on March 27, 1906, son 
of the late Claude E. and Bertie Irene (Roper) 
Culpepper, both deceased, who spent their entire 
lives in that city. There Hubard S. Culpepper 
passed his boyhood, and attended private schools, 
Monroe Elementary School, and Maury High 
School. 

In 1922 he began his career as a draftsman with 
the Makenson Marble Works of Norfolk, and was 
later associated with the Morrie Company of that 
city, working in its various departments, and gain- 
ing experience in blueprint manufacture, drafting 
and commercial art. He remained with the organ- 
ization until 1928. He left to enter business for 
himself as a designer and builder of homes, and 
continued in this occupation until 1930, when he 
entered the employ of the City of Norfolk as a 
draftsman. There he continued until 1952. 

Meantime, in 1942, Mr. Culpepper had accepted 
a position as manager of the Acme Photo Company, 
Inc., of Norfolk. Following the death of its founder 
and owner, Henry W. Gillen, in 1952. he assumed 
duties as president of the firm, to which he has 
since devoted his full time. Mr. Gillen founded the 
Acme Photo Company in 1918. A man of wide ex- 
perience in business, he did much through his work- 
to advertise and publicize the Norfolk area. Before 
establishing his own organization, he had been 
a motion-picture machine operator in the early days 
of the "flickers," working for Pathe, Paramount 
and other theatrical interests. 

With thorough experience in the business, and 
a firm grasp of business management procedures, 
Mr. Culpepper is carrying on the work of this long- 
established Norfolk firm with gratifying success. 
The company has the most modern equipment, and 
well-trained personnel with a responsible attitude 
toward their work. Acme Photo Company. Inc., 
engages in a wide variety of work, including the 
produc'ion of blueprints, photostating, offset print- 
ing, aerial photography, and conducting advertising 
campaigns under contract with some of the region's 
foremost industrial and commercial firms. 

Mr. Culpepper is a member of the International 
Association of Blueprint Manufacturers and Allied 
Industries, and in his own city, belongs to the 
Chamber of Commerce, and the Downtown Club of 



Norfolk. He and his family attend the Church of 
the Advent at Oceanview. 

On June 5. 1926, Hubard S. Culpepper married 
Gladys Lucille McTague of Norfolk. They are the 
parents of two children: 1. Carol Lynn, who was 
born on June 5, 1938. Graduating from Maury 
High School in the Class of 1956, she is now attend- 
ing Mary Washington College at Fredericksburg. 
2. Claudia Lea, born on March 27, 1945; a student 
at Bayvievv Elementary School. The family's home 
is at 1 61 1 East Ocean View Avenue, Norfolk. 



ALEXANDER PINKHAM GRICE— A pro- 
minent figure in the real estate business in Nor- 
folk and Tidewater Virginia, Alexander P. Grice, 
is senior partner of the well-known firm of A. P. 
Grice and Son, with offices at 20 Selden Arcade, 
Norfolk. His activities have embraced a wide range 
of interests, and through them he has made a vital 
contribution to his home area. 

Mr. Grice was born at Portsmouth on July 5, 
1886, son of Alexander Pinkham and Susan Thoro- 
good (Brooks) Grice. In both paternal and maternal 
lines, the Norfolk realtor is descended from early 
settlers in Portsmouth or Norfolk County. His 
father was an accountant and businessman at Ports- 
mouth until his death in 1890. Mrs. Grice survived 
her husband by a half-century, and died in 1940 
at the age of ninety-two. 

After completing his formal education at Ports- 
mouth Academy and Norfolk Academy, Alexander 
P. Grice began his career as a runner with the 
Citizens National Bank of Norfolk, where he con- 
tinued for two years. From 1906 to 191 5 he was 
employed by the Virginia Bank and Trust Com- 
pany of that city, which was nationalized in 1907 as 
the Virginia National Bank, working in various 
departments, and advancing from bookkeeper to 
paying teller. 

In 1915 he became president and general man- 
ager of the Guaranty Title and Trust Corporation 
of Norfolk, remaining in that office until 1929. He 
formerly served as president of the Virginia- Caro- 
lina Joint Stock Land Bank, and was a director of 
the Citizens Bank of Norfolk. 

Since 1930 Mr. Grice has devoted his business 
career to the real estate field. His firm, known for 
many years as A. P. Grice and Company, became 
A. 1'. Grice and Son in January 1953. when he was 
joined by his son, .Alexander Pinkham, III. The 
firm is particularly prominent in commercial and 
industrial property transactions, and acts as ap- 
praisers and real estate consultants. Its founder's 
long experience with real estate values in Norfolk 
and the greater Norfolk area has brought him wide 
recognition as an authority on commercial and 
industrial property appraisal. His firm is a member 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



'77 



of the National Association of Real Estate Boards, 
the Norfolk-Portsmouth Real Estate Board, and 
the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce. 

A conspicuous influence in the civic affairs of 
Norfolk, Mr. Grice has been honored upon many 
occasions for his contributions to the progress of 
his city. He served as a member of the Norfolk 
City Council from 1920 to 1925. A member of the 
Rotary Club of that city, he formerly served as its 
president. He helped to organize the Virginia Beach 
Chamber of Commerce and served as it first presi- 
dent. Throughout his career he has given freely of 
his time and talents in supporting many worth- 
while projects, and his efforts have extended over 
the period coincident with Tidewater Virginia's 
most rapid development, in which he has had a 
prominent part. 

Mr. Grice is a member of the Virginia Club. 
For recreation, he is fond of gardening and fishing. 
A former communicant of St. John's Episcopal 
Church in Portsmouth, he formerly served on its 
vestry, and is now a member of Christ and St. 
Lukes Episcopal Church in Norfolk. 

In Richmond, on April 26, 1913, Alexander Pink- 
ham Grice married Louie Brown Crenshaw, daugh- 
ter of the late Merritt W. and Louie (Brown) Cren- 
shaw of that city. Mr. and Mrs. Grice became the 
parents of three children: I. Louie Brown, a daugh- 
ter, who was born on August 27, 1915, and died 
May 22, 1923. 2. Mary Hart, born June 7, 1920; 
graduated from Maury High School in the Class 
of 1938. 3. Alexander Pinkham, III, born January 
17, 1925. He graduated from Woodbury High 
School in 1943, after which he attended the Col- 
lege of William and Mary for two years, majoring 
in engineering. From 1945 to 1953, he was a civilian 
employee at the Naval Air Station in Norfolk, 
working in the Aviation Division as radar and 
electronics specialist. In January 1953, he joined 
his father in the real estate firm of A. P. Grice and 
Son, which adopted its present name at that time. 
As a progressive young business leader of Norfolk, 
he is a member of the American Society of Real 
Estate Appraisers, the Norfolk Chamber of Com- 
merce and the Lions Club, Owens Lodge No. 
164, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, United 
Chapter of the Royal Arch Masons, and Grice 
Commandery No. 16, Knights Templar. That com- 
mandery was named in honor of his great-grand- 
father, Charles Alexander Grice. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Virginia Club, the Princess Anne Coun- 
try Club, and Norfolk Yacht and Country Club, 
and is currently serving as senior warden of Christ 
and St. Luke's Episcopal Church, where he be- 
came a member of the vestry at the age of twenty- 
two. 

On September 14, 1947, Alexander Pinkham 



Grice, III, married Barbara Ann Speace of Beverly, 
New Jersey. They are the parents of three children: 
i. Alexander Pinkham, IV, born November 2, 1949. 
ii. Joseph Gardner, born November 2, 1953. iii. 
Dudley Colkett, born December 8, 1955. 



JOHN ROGER NEAL— Over the past decade, 
John Roger Neal has headed his own real estate 
firm in Suffolk. He has taken a constructive role 
in the commercial and organizational life of his 
city, and is currently serving on the Suffolk- 
Nansemond Real Estate Board and Suffolk In- 
dustrial Committee. 

A native of New Jersey, Mr. Neal was born 
in the town of Lakewood on January 15, 1904, 
son of Henry Joseph and Grace (Schuchman) 
Neal. His father, a native of Lincoln, Pennsyl- 
vania, who died in 1922, was superintendent of 
schools in New Jersey. Mrs. Neal survived her 
husband and died in 1951. She was a native of 
Carlisle, Pennsylvania. 

Receiving his public school education in New 
Jersey, John R. Neal completed his secondary 
studies at Collingswood and graduated from 
high school there in 1922. For one year he was 
a student at Wharton School of Finance of the 
University of Pennsylvania. At the outset of his 
career, he joined the S. S. Kresge organization, 
and held responsible positions in its stores for 
about five years. He entered the insurance busi- 
ness as a salesman, working in several Virginia 
cities. 

With this background of experience, he came 
to Suffolk in 1946, and has since engaged in the 
real estate business there under his own name. 
His offce is in the Andrews Building. 

Mr. Neal is a member of the National Associa- 
tion of Real Estate Boards and the Virginia Real 
Estate Association. He serves on the Suffolk- 
Nansemond Real Estate Board. Through his work 
with the Suffolk Industrial Committee, he took 
a constructive part in stimulating the commercial 
and economic life of the community, and holds 
membership in the Suffolk and Nansemond Cham- 
ber of Commerce. Mr. Neal also serves on the 
board of directors of the Salvation Army. 

He is a member of the Kiwanis Club, and the 
lodge of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 
A member of the higher bodies of the Masonic 
order, he belongs to Mi unt Nebo Chapter of 
the Royal Arch Masons, the Portsmouth Com- 
mandery of the Knights Templar, Khedive Tem- 
ple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mys- 
tic Shrine, in Norfolk, and the Suffolk Shrine 
Club. He is fond of the outdoor sports of fish- 
ing and hunting and is a member of the Izaak 
Walton League. He and his family attend the 
West End Baptist Church. 



i 7 8 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



On October ->8. 1929, at Norfolk, John Roger 
Neal married Louise Epps of Surry Court House, 
Virginia, daughter of Robert and Irene (Hunni- 
cutt) Epps. Her parents are both living; her father 
is now retired from his occupation of farming. 
Mr. and Mrs. Neal are the parents of two chil- 
dren: 1. Donald Allen, born September 8, 1930. 
2. Robert Joseph, born February 12, 1933. 



THOMAS BUTT JOHNSON, JR.— Prominent 
in the general insurance field at Norfolk for over 
ten years, Thomas Butt Johnson is owner and 
directing head of the W. \\ . Johnson Company. 
With offices in the Royster Building, this firm 
has built up a large volume of business in the 
sale of fire, liability and other types of general 
insurance and of surety bonds. It represents the 
Aetna Casualty and Surety Company of Hartford, 
Connecticut, Hartford Steam Boiler Insurance and 
Inspection Company (the largest in its field), 
South Carolina Fire Insurance Company of Colum- 
bia, the Jersey Fire Insurance Company of New 
York, the American Liberty Fire Insurance Com- 
pany of Birmingham, Alabama, and the Union 
Assurance Society, Ltd., of London, England. 

A native of Norfolk County, Mr. Johnson was 
born at Gilmerton on September 6, 1907, son of 
the late Thomas Butt, Sr., and Emma Maehew 
(Higgins) Johnson. His father, who died on March 
13. '935. was a general merchant and farmer, who 
also served for twenty-five years as postmaster 
of Gilmerton. His wife died September 21, 1908. 
The younger Thomas B. Johnson attended the 
public schools of Elizabeth City, North Carolina, 
and graduated from high school there in 1924. 
He attended the College of William and Mary, 
majoring in education, history and English, and 
began his career as a teacher and athletic coach. 
He taught and coached at Wytheville, Virginia, 
Higli School, after which he served as principal 
of the Oriskany Junior High School in Botetourt 
County, Virginia. In 1930 he returned to the Col- 
lege of William and Mary to continue his educa- 
tion. Specializing in the same subjects as before, 
he received his degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
1931, and also received the Collegiate Professional 
Teacher's Certificate. 

Resuming bis career as educator, Mr. Johnson 
accepted appointment as principal of the Burrows- 
ville Junior High School, where he remained until 
1936. He left to join the faculty of Windsor High 
School as teacher and coach, and held that posi- 
tion until he entered the service of the United 
States Army in December 1942. He trained at 
Camp Lee, Virginia, but on October 5, 1943, re- 
ceived a medical discharge. 

On resuming civilian life, Mr. Johnson entered 



the employ of the Virginia State Division of Motor 
Vehicles at Richmond, but remained in this public 
service post only until 1944. It was at this time 
that he came to Norfolk and joined his brother, 
W. W. Johnson, in acquiring the insurance agency 
which had been owned by W. L. Pierce, Jr. On 
July 13, 1944. the agency became known as the 
W, W. Johnson Company. In September 1946, 
Thomas B. Johnson acquired his brother's interest 
in the firm, but has continued to operate it under its 
original name. 

Active in community affairs, Mr. Johnson is a 
member of the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce. He 
attends the Baptist Church, where he is superin- 
tendent of the Sunday school. He holds member- 
ship in two fraternities, Kappa Alpha and Kappa 
Phi Kappa. 

On December 21, 1946, Thomas Butt Johnson, 
Jr., married Hilda Faith Shelton, daughter of 
Grover C. and Nancy (Crawley) Shelton of Chat- 
ham. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have a son, Cleve- 
land Thomas, born November 3, 1955. The family 
resides at 6243 Sedgefield Drive, Norfolk. 



DAVID RAYMOND LEVIN— Lawyer and 

civic leader David Raymond Levin is engaged in 
a general practice, with offices in the New Kirn 
Building in Portsmouth. A past president of the 
Portsmouth-Norfolk County Bar Association, Mr. 
Levin possesses a background of experience and 
ability which has won him a prominent place at 
the Portsmouth and Tidewater Virginia bar. His 
career has been distinguished by a fine public 
spirit and progressive attitudes, combined with 
humanitarian interests — traits evidenced in his ef- 
fective cooperation with community projects and 
organizations. 

A native of Portsmouth. Mr. Levin was born 
on June 4, 1910, son of Louis Levin, a retired 
businessman of Portsmouth and his wife, the for- 
mer Mary Stein, who died in 1936. The lawyer 
obtained his early education in the public schools 
of Portsmouth, graduating from Woodrow Wilson 
High School in 1927. He continued his studies at 
the University of Virginia and took his profes- 
sional courses at the University of Richmond, 
where he received his degree of Bachelor of Laws 
in 1932. Prior to his graduation, on December 15, 
193 1, he had passed his examination for admittance 
to the Virginia State Bar. 

Mr. Levin began his general practice of law 
in Portsmouth in 1932 and continues to carry on 
an extensive individual practice with offices in the 
New Kirn Building. A member of the Portsmouth- 
Norfolk County Bar Association, he served as 
secretary of the organization in 1954 and was its 
president for 1955-1956. He is also a member of 



LOWER TIDFWATER VIRGINIA 



'79 



the Virginia State Bar Association and, while a 
student at the University of Virginia, joined Alpha 
Epsilon Pi fraternity. 

Central among his civic activities is his mem- 
bership in the Portsmouth Chamber of Commerce. 
He serves on the board of directors of the Ports- 
mouth Travelers Aid Society. In 1954 he served 
as chairman of the fund raising campaign of the 
Norfolk County Cerebral Palsy organization. He 
is a member of Portsmouth Naval Lodge No. 100, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. His religious 
affiliation is with Gomley Chesed Synagogue of 
Portsmouth, and he is a member of its Men's Club. 

On January 30, 1938, at Uniontown, Pennsyl- 
vania, David Raymond Levin married Rachel Sher 
of that city. They are the parents of two children: 
I. Linda Mary, born July 5, 1939. 2. Richard Na- 
than, born May 6, 1943. The family resides at 
208 East Road, Glenshellah, Portsmouth. 



SEAB EDGAR DuVALL, JR.— One of the 
younger leaders in his profession in the city of 
Norfolk, Seal) Edgar DuVall is a member of the 
accounting firm of Frederick B. Hill and Com- 
pany which lias its offices in the Flatiron Building. 

He was born on July 15, 1924, at Van Buren, 
Arkansas, son of the late Seab Edgar and Nora 
Lee (Leathers) DuYall. She is now a resident of 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The elder S. E. DuVall, 
who was identified for many years with the St. 
Louis and San Francisco Railroad Company, died 

in 1933- 

After beginning his education in the public 
schools of Van Buren, S. E. DuVall, Jr., graduated 
from high school at Fort Smith, Arkansas, in 
1942. In that year he enlisted in the LTnitcd States 
Naval Air Corps, and was later commissioned an 
ensign following his cadet training as a pilot. His 
tour of duty, 1944-1945, included operations with 
the U. S. S. "Bunker Hill," U. S. S. "Essex," and 
LI. S. S. "Wasp," in the South Pacific. He was 
separated from the service at Norfolk in 1940. His 
present status is lieutenant commander, LInited 
States Naval Air Corps Reserve, Operations Offi- 
cer. VF-Jet-861 Squadron, U. S. Naval Air Corps 
Reserve Training Unit, Naval Air Station, Norfolk. 

Following his separation from active service in 
1946, Mr. DuVall began his preparations for his 
career in accounting. He took business adminis- 
tration courses through St. Helena Extension Di- 
vision of the College of William and Mary in 
Norfolk, and then entered the College of William 
and Mary at Williamsburg, where he graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Science, in Busi- 
ness Administration, in February 1950. 

In that year he became associated with the ac- 
counting firm of Frederick B. Hill and Company 



of Norfolk, and since August 1953, has been a 
partner in this well-established firm. He became 
a Certified Public Accountant on passing his ex- 
amination given by the Virginia State Board of 
Accountancy in May 1952. 

Mr. DuVall is a member of the American Insti- 
tute of Accountants and the Virginia Society of 
Public Accountants. He is a communicant of the 
Talbot Park Baptist Church. 

On September 9, 1947, in Norfolk, Seab Edgar 
DuVall, Jr., married Doris Elizabeth Raper, 
daughter of Paul Spence and Mary (Leyburn) 
Raper. The couple are the parents of a son, Ran- 
dolph Courtland DuVall, who was born June 18, 
1953. 



CHARLES MELVILLE RAMSEY— Farming 
has been Charles M. Ramsey's major occupation, 
although he also has banking and other commer- 
cial interests, centered in his home city of Ivor. 
He has acquired considerable real estate hold- 
ings there and at Smithfield, the most impor- 
tant single unit being the Ramsey Block. 

Born at McClelland Post Office in Isle of Wight 
County, on February 15, 1907, he is a son of 
John Albert and Edna Roxie (White) Ramsey. 
Both of his parents were also natives of Isle 
of Wight County. His father, who was born there 
in January 1870, owned extensive acreage known 
as the McClelland Farm, and he also operated a 
general store under his own name. He died in 
January 1926. His wife, the former Edna R. 
White, survived him until April 13, 1953. 

Charles M. Ramsey attended the public schools 
of Isle of Wight County and graduated from 
Smithfield High School in 1925. He then began 
farming on the Ramsey property and, following 
his father's death in 1926, was in charge of opera- 
tions there until 1939, capably managing the more 
than four hundred acres, on which he also made 
his home. In 1939 he purchased five farms which 
had previously been owned by his paternal grand- 
father, J. F. Ramsey, and later by his uncle, Dr. 
E. B. Ramsey. They comprised a total of eleven 
hundred and twenty acres, which he continued 
to manage profitably in addition to his own ori- 
ginal holdings. He later acquired still another 
property known as the Cook i-arm. The major 
crops raised on his farmlands are peanuts and 
corn, and he also devotes some attention to live- 
stock production, particularly hogs. 

Since January 1946, Mr. Ramsey has lived at 
Ivor, where he had built an attractive brick 
home for his mother. After her death in 1953 
he moved into this home. In the course of the 
past decade he has exerted a constructive influ- 
ence in the affairs of Ivor. In 1946-1947 he erec- 
ted the row of modern commercial buildings 



i8o 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



known as the Ramsey Block, situated on Route 
460 in the center of town. Among the tenants 
there are eleven stores, a number of offices, and 
a service station. Mr. Ramsey "s own office is 
located in the block. He also owns and operates 
rental property — stores, homes, and apartments — at 
Smithfield. He serves on the boards of directors 
of the Bank of Sussex, Ivor Branch, and the Tide- 
water Mutual Insurance Company. Mr. Ramsey 
also served on the Tidewater Industrial Develop- 
ment Commission, representing the Ivor-Berlin 
District of Southampton County. 

He is interested in all civic activities at Ivor 
and throughout Isle of Wight County, and is 
a member of the Federal Farm Bureau, the Far- 
mers Union, and the Ruritan Club. He is a Bap- 
tist in his religious faith, currently a communi- 
cant of Ivor Baptist Church where he serves as 
a deacon. Previously, for a period of eleven years, 
he served as deacon and superintendent of the 
Sunday school at the Mills Swamp Baptist Church 
in Isle of Wight County, from which lie trans- 
ferred membership when he moved to Ivor. Mr. 
Ramsey's favorite sport is baseball. 

At Richmond, on September 7, 1929, Charles 
Melville Ramsey married Nellie Breu Hearn of 
Smithfield, daughter of John T. and Plummie 
Novella (Whitley) Hearn. Her father operated 
a retail furniture store in Smithfield for a num- 
ber of years and is now deceased. His wife sur- 
vives him. Mr. and Mrs. Ramsey have two chil- 
dren: I. Nancy, who married Joseph M. Boush. 
They have a daughter, Katherine. 2. Marjorie 
Lee, a student in Ivor schools. 



GROVER LEE WHITE, JR.— As president 
and manager of Grover L. White, Inc., with head- 
quarters at 730 Boush Street in Norfolk, Grover 
Lee White, Jr., heads an organization which has 
been "serving Tidewater since 1915." It is Nor- 
folk's oldest firm contracting for the installation 
of ceramic wall and floor tile, and also specializes 
in lighting fixtures, medicine cabinets, fireplace 
furnishings, linoleum, and tile products of cork, 
vinyl, rubber and asphalt. Besides serving home- 
owners and commercial interests, the firm has 
completed many major projects for the govern- 
ment, including the United States Marine Hos- 
pital, the Anti-Submarine Warfare Building, and 
the six-hundred-man barracks at Little Creek. 
Other important contracts completed through the 
years, have included the Leigh Memorial Hospital, 
the Cavalier Hotel, the Muscle Shoals Power 
Plant in Alabama, and the new Virginia Electric 
Power Company building, besides many schools 
and churches in the Tidewater area. The firm was 
founded in 1915 by Grover Lee White, Sr., and 



its first location was in the Withers Building at 
207 Granby Street. There it remained until Mr. 
White, Sr., acquired the Vicks Tile Corporation 
at 121 College Place. He made this plant its 
headquarters until 1940. At that time the firm 
moved to its present location at 730 Boush Street. 
There its retail store, display rooms, warehouse 
and offices are maintained. Grover Lee White, 
Sr., continued active in the management of the 
firm until ill health forced his retirement in 1950. 
He died on January 10, 1952, and was succeeded 
by his son, Grover Lee White, Jr., who capably 
directs the operations of the firm today. Other 
officers are Mrs. Grover L. White, Sr., vice presi- 
dent, and Mrs. Grover L. White, Jr., secretary. 

The founder of the firm was born December 
22, 1885, at Winfall, North Carolina, son of Joseph 
and Sarah (White) White, both natives of North 
Carolina, who lived for many years in Portsmouth, 
Virginia. There Joseph White died on December 
7, 1939, and his wife had died on December 5, 
1910. Josiah H. White, grandfather of Joseph, was 
a planter in Perquimans County, North Carolina, 
and served in the Confederate States Army. He 
married Elizabeth Saunders of Nansemond Coun- 
ty, Virginia. 

The elder Grover L. White was educated in 
the public schools of Portsmouth, and early in 
his career was employed by the Seaboard Air 
Line Railroad, and later by the Norfolk Building 
Supplies Company. He left the latter firm to es- 
tablish, in 1915, the firm which is now known as 
Grover L. White, Inc., and which was incorpora- 
ted in 1932. He was active in the civic and fra- 
ternal affairs of Norfolk, being a member of Nor- 
folk Lodge No. 1, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, the Scottish Rite bodies including the 
consistory, and Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He was 
also a member of the lodge of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, the Virginia Club, 
the Lions Club and the Methodist Church. In 
Norfolk, on October 20, 1908, he married Myra 
Virginia Jordan, daughter of Charles Wesley and 
Emma Alice (Milan) Jordan, both natives of Nor- 
folk County. Mrs. White was active in the cul- 
tural and civic affairs of Norfolk, being a mem- 
ber of the Women's Club and the Larchmont 
Garden Club, and participating in the program of 
the Young Women's Christian Association. She 
continues active membership in the Ghent Metho- 
dist Church, and has proved herself a capable 
business woman as vice president of Grover L. 
White, Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grover L. White, Sr., had only 
one son, Grover Lee, Jr., who was born in Nor- 
folk on November 16, 1909. He received his early 
education in that city and graduated from Maury 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



1S1 



High School in 1927. From the University of Vir- 
ginia, he received his degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Electrical Engineering at his graduation in 
1931. With the exception of time spent in naval 
service in World War II, he has since been active 
in the management of the contracting firm, in 
which he has succeeded his father as president. 

Mr. White was commissioned a lieutenant, jun- 
ior grade, in 1942, and was assigned to the Uni- 
ted States Naval Air Force. He was first stationed 
at the Naval Base in Norfolk. Following special 
work in radar at Princeton University and Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology, he was assigned 
to duty in the Panama Canal Zone in anti-sub- 
marine work. He won promotion to lieutenant 
commander, and was separated from active serv- 
ice following the close of the war. With the 
outbreak of the Korean War in 1950, he was re- 
called to active duty and assigned to radar and 
electronics work at Port Lyautey, French Moroc- 
co. He again resumed civilian life in December 
1951, and now holds the rank of commander in 
the Inactive Reserve. 

He is a Rotarian, and a member of Ruth Lodge 
No. 89, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, the 
consistory of the Scottish Rite, and Khedive Tem- 
ple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. He is also a member of the Norfolk Cham- 
ber of Commerce and the Lafayette Yacht Club. 
He attends the Methodist Church. 

On April 6, 1940, Grover Lee White, Jr., mar- 
ried Ellen Walston Griffin, daughter of the late 
D. J. and Stella (Duke) Griffin of Norfolk. Her 
father was superintendent of Smith and Welton, 
Inc., for many years. Mrs. Grover L. White, Jr., 
is a member of the Epworth Methodist Church, 
a member of The Woman's Club, and active in 
Parent-Teacher Association and social service 
work. The couple have two children: 1. Donald 
Lee. 2. Grover Lee, III. 



CHARLES BAILEY POND— In the early 
years of the century, Charles Bailey Pond came 
to Suffolk, and after gaining ample experience in 
the peanut industry there and elsewhere, joined 
his brothers, Wayland T. Pond, Sr., and L. L. 
Pond, in the purchase of the Pope Peanut Company. 
From this they formed their own successful or- 
ganization, still known as the Pond Brothers 
Peanut Company. C. B. Pond is president of this 
organization, and of the Producers Peanut Com- 
pany, which he founded with Wayland T. Pond 
in 1924. He has held other corporate connections, 
and has distinguished himself in the service of 
his city as councilman. 

The son of Thomas Richard Pond, a Southamp- 
ton farmer, and his wife, the former Anna Finch 



Bailey, who was born in Sussex County, Charles 
B. Pond was reared on the Southampton County 
farm where he was born on August 8, 1882. He 
received his early education under the tutelage 
of his mother, who was a school teacher in the 
county's public schools for twenty-one years, and 
he completed his formal studies at Massey Busi- 
ness College in Richmond. 

In the fall of 1902, at the age of twenty, he 
came to Suffolk, where he first joined the Pope 
Peanut Company, and worked for that firm as a 
bookkeeper for six years. He moved to Woodland, 
North Carolina, late in 1909, and there occupied 
himself with the purchase of farmers' stocks of 
peanuts for a number of the large peanut-shelling 
plants in Virginia. He returned to Suffolk in the 
fall of 1914, and was placed in charge of the oper- 
ation of the shelling plant of the Suffolk Peanut 
Company, a position in which he continued for 
eleven months. 

In October 1915, he and his brothers entered 
business for themselves, as described above. A 
record of the career of the elder Wayland T. Pond, 
and of the second-generation members of the 
family interested in the business, accompany this 
sketch. Besides heading Pond Brothers Peanut 
Company and later the Producers Peanut Com- 
pany, Charles B. Pond also became president of 
the Ferguson Manufacturing Company, which 
produces farm machinery. He still holds the posi- 
tion of president of all three companies, located 
in Suffolk. 

He was for twelve years a member of the Suf- 
folk City Council, and as a loyal and active Dem- 
ocrat, served for sixteen years on the city Dem- 
ocratic committee of Suffolk. He is a member of 
the local lodge of the Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, Mount Nebo Chapter of the Royal Arch 
Masons, Portsmouth Commandery of the Knights 
Templar, and Khedive Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, in Norfolk. 
He is also a member of the lodge of the Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks at Suffolk. 
He was a charter member of the Lions Club 
there, where he still holds a membership. 

In 1928, a group of devoted communicants of 
the Baptist Church met at Mr. Pond's home to 
decide on steps to fill the need for another church 
of their denomination in the city. The result of 
their efforts was the West End Baptist Church, 
which was organized on March 11, 1929, in the 
auditorium of the First Baptist Church. With a 
list of one hundred and thirty-eight charter mem- 
bers, the congregation erected its own church 
building in 1937, and Mr. Pond served as chairman 
of the building committee. 

At Woodland, North Carolina, on June 15, 
1909, Charles Bailey Pond, Sr., married Clara 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



Esther Outland of that city, daughter of Dr. John 
Lewter and Delia (.Copeland) Outland. Her 
father was a physician. Mr. and Mrs. Pond be- 
came the parents of four sons: I. Richard L., whose 
sketch accompanies. 2. Charles Bailey, Jr., whose 
sketch accompanies. 3. Frederick Outland, gen- 
eral manager of Producers Peanut Company. 4. 
James R., secretary and treasurer of Producers 
Peanut Company. 



WAYLAND THOMAS POND, SR.— A leader 
in Suffolk's industrial life, the late Wayland 
Thomas Pond, Sr., devoted his attention primari- 
ly to the peanut industry, on which the economic 
welfare of the city so heavily depends. He was a 
founder of Pond Brothers Peanut Company, Inc., 
and Producers Peanut Company of Suffolk, and 
of an affiliated firm in Georgia, and he was active 
in banking connections as well. 

Born and reared in a farm family in Southamp- 
ton County, he was a son of Thomas R. and 
Anna F. (Bailey) Pond. His birth date was Sep- 
tember 5, 1875. He received his education in the 
public schools of this region, and early in his 
career, entered the lumber business at Freeman, 
Virginia, where he remained for seventeen years. 
In 191 5 he came to Suffolk, where he and his two 
brothers, C. B. and L. L. Pond, purchased the 
Pope Peanut Company. From this the Pond Bro- 
thers Peanut Company Inc. was later organized. 
In 1924, he and C. B. Pond founded the Producers 
Peanut Company; and two years later all three 
brothers joined forces again to bring the Pond 
Brothers Peanut Company of Georgia into exist- 
ence. This affiliate had its headquarters at Cordele. 
Georgia. Besides retaining executive positions in 
the management of these three companies, W. T. 
Pond, Sr., was also president of the Suffolk Insur- 
ance and Finance Corporation, and a director of 
the National Bank of Suffolk. 

He was a leader in the civic and religious as 
well as the business life of his city. A charter 
member of the West End Baptist Church, he 
served on its board of deacons. He had been one 
of the founders of this church, and was most 
generous in its support. He did not belong to 
many other organizations, but placed his support 
squarely behind every movement for the better- 
ment of his community. 

On November 14, 1906, Wayland T. Pond mar- 
ried Nonie Lee Hammond, who was born in Bruns- 
wick County on June 14, 1883, and died April 7, 
1930. The couple were the parents of a daughter, 
Ethel Lee, who married Alton L. Brinkley, and a 
son, W. T., Jr., who is the subject of an accom- 
panying sketch. Mr. Pond's death occurred on 
October 11, 1943. Commenting on the loss of this 



community leader, an editorial writer on the staff 
of the Suffolk "News-Herald" wrote: 

The death of Wayland Thomas Pond, Sr., was a distinct 
loss, not only to Suffolk but to the entire Tidewater Region 
of Virginia and Xorth Carolina and to the peanut industry as 
a whole. Unlike some who gain much of this world's goods 
he did not become a hoarder of his wealth, but was free 
in spending his earnings in the religious and charitable work 
of his community and state . . . When a citizen thus unselfishly 
puts himself and his means at the service of his community 
his influence lives on and on although his physical presence is 
immeasurably missed. 



RICHARD L. POND— Identified with Pond 
Brothers Peanut Company of Suffolk for over 
twenty years, Richard L. Pond is now treasurer 
of the corporation, and a member of its board of 
directors. He is also an official of Producers 
Peanut Corporation and of Ferguson Manufac- 
turing Company, and he is active in lodge and 
church affairs. 

Born at Woodland, North Carolina, on July 
10, 191 1, he is a son of Charles Bailey, Sr., and 
Clara Esther (Outland) Pond. His father, one of 
the founders of Pond Brothers Peanut Company 
and its president, is the subject of an individual 
biographical sketch in this work. In Richard L. 
Pond's earlj- childhood, the family moved to Suf- 
folk, and he attended the schools of that city, 
graduating from its high school in 1930. For 
three years he was a student at Randolph-Macon 
College, and he then began his business career with 
Pond Brothers Peanut Company, Inc., with which 
he has since remained. He became treasurer in 
I94T. Mr. Pond holds the offices of vice president 
and director of Ferguson Manufacturing Company 
of Suffolk, and serves on the board of directors of 
Producers Peanut Corporation of that city. 

Like other members of his family, he has been 
a consistent and devoted worker for West End 
Baptist Church. A charter member of the congre- 
gation, he has served on its board of trustees and 
as chairman of its finance committee. He is a 
member of Hiram Lodge No. 340, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, at Suffolk, Mount Nebo 
Chapter of the Royal Arch Masons, and Ports- 
mouth Commandery No. 5, Knights Templar. He 
is also a member of Khedive Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, and 
is a member and past president of the Suffolk Shrine 
Club. His fraternity is Phi Kappa Sigma. Mr. 
Pond's avocation is flying, and he holds a private 
pilot's license. 

In Suffolk, on June 15, 1935, Richard L. Pond 
married Margaret Elizabeth Parker of that city, 
daughter of Bauldie Edward and Julia (Brett) 
Parker. Mr. and Mrs. Pond have three children: 1. 
Richard L., Jr., who was born on December 25, 




TWVa. 19 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



183 



1937. 2. Julia Margaret, born May II, 1941. 3 
Jeft're}' Genin, born June 28, 1947. 



WAYLAND THOMAS POND, JR.— During 
two generations, and two score years, the name 
of Pond has been consistently identified with 
Suffolk's important peanut industry. Wayland T. 
Pond, Jr., joined Pond Brothers Peanut Company 
at the ouset of his career, and during most of his 
connection, has been its secretary and sales man- 
ager. He also holds office in other corporations. 

Born at Freeman, Virginia, on February 17, 1912, 
he is a son of Wayland T., Sr., and Nonie Lee 
(Hammond) Pond. His father is the subject ol 
an accompanying sketch. When he was about three 
years old, the family moved to Suffolk, where the 
father joined in the purchase of the Pope Peanut 
Company, from which the present Pond Brothers 
Peanut Company was formed. Reared in Suffolk, 
the younger Wayland T. Pond attended its public 
schools and graduated from Suffolk High School 
in 1930. He then entered Randolph-Macon Col- 
lege at Ashland, was a student there for one year, 
and at the end of that time, transferred to Georgia 
School of Technology, where he remained for two 
years. 

In June 1933, he formed his connection with 
Pond Brothers Peanut Company, and became 
secretary of the corporation, and sales manager 
in 1935. He has held both positions to date, and 
is also a member of the board of directors. In ad- 
dition, he is president and director of the Suffolk 
Gas Corporation, secretary and director of the 
Ferguson Manufacturing Company, and director 
of the Farm Chemical Company, Inc., of Lynch- 
burg, Virginia. He was formerly president of the 
Suffolk Insurance and Finance Corporation. 

A recognized leader in his industry, Mr. Pond 
served as chairman of the board of the National 
Peanut Council in 1951-1952, and is still a director. 
He is president and director of the Virginia-Caro- 
lina Peanut Association. He at one time served as 
secretary and director of the Producers Peanut 
Company of Suffolk. Mr. Pond is currently a 
member of the recreation board in his city. For- 
merly active in the Lions Club, he was its presi- 
dent in 1942-1943. He is a member of the Princess 
Anne Country Club at Virginia Beach, and his 
college fraternity is Kappa Phi Sigma. He is 
fond of golf and fishing, and floriculture is a hob- 
by. Attending the West End Baptist Church, he 
has been one of its devoted and consistent lay 
workers. He is a charter member of the church, 
is serving on its board of deacons and has served 
as Sunday school superintendent. At various times 
he has been chairman of the finance committee, 
the temple committee, and the planning and build- 



ing committee in charge of the construction of 
the church's educational building. 

At the Presbyterian Church in Wilson, North 
Carolina, on October 5, 1940, Wayland Thomas 
Pond, Jr., married Mary Ernestine Herring of 
that city. She is the daughter of Dr. L. J. and the 
late Mary (Carter) Herring. The couple have 
four children: 1. Mary Lawrence, born May 30, 
1942. 2. Katherine Carter, and 3. Wayland Thomas, 
twins, born September 4, 1943. 4. Eliza Lee, born 
July 14, 1947. 



CHARLES BAILEY POND, JR., has been with 
Pond Brothers Peanut Company for two decades, 
and is now its vice president. He has other inter- 
ests as well, holding offices in corporations, and 
engaging in farming and in real estate transactions. 

He was born at Woodland, North Carolina, on 
May 12, 1914, son of Charles Bailey, Sr., and Clara 
Esther (Outland) Pond, his father being presi- 
dent of Pond Brothers Peanut Corporation which 
he and his brothers formed in 1915. The family 
moved to Suffolk when the younger Charles B. 
Pond was only a few months old. He was reared 
in the city and attended its public schools. Gradu- 
ating from Suffolk High School, he entered the 
University of Richmond, where he was a student 
for three years. 

In 1936 he began his connection with Pond 
Brothers Peanut Company, and became vice presi- 
dent in 1941. He is a member of its board of 
directors, and also serves on the boards of the 
Ferguson Manufacturing Company, and of Pro- 
ducers Peanut Company of which he is vice presi- 
dent. He conducts a real estate business, and has 
farming interests in Nansemond and Suffolk 
counties. 

Air. Pond was formerly a member of the Lions 
Club. He is a charter member of the West End 
Baptist Church. His favorite sport is fishing. 

On March 13, 1937, in Suffolk, Charles Bailey 
Pond, Jr., married Sarah Gresham Parker, daugh- 
ter of Bauldie Edward and Julia (Brett) Parker. 
Mr. and Mrs. Pond have three children: 1. Charles 
Bailey, 3rd, who was born on October 26, 1941. 
2. Sara Caroline, born May 5, 1944. 3. Frances 
Anne, born August 20, 1948. 



ARTHUR WILLIAM SEELEY, JR.— As Nor- 
folk's largest grower of cut flowers and potted 
plants, Arthur William Seeley, Jr., is sole owner 
of the business which bears his name, situated in 
the 2600 block of Tidewater Drive. He is follow- 
ing in a family tradition established by his grand- 
father, the late John S. Seeley, and continued by 
his father, Arthur William, Sr., who retired in 
1946. John Seeley was a native of New Jersey who 



■ 8 4 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



came to the Norfolk area as a young man in the 
late 1870s. He acquired farming land at Lambert's 
Point, which now borders on the great Lambert's 
Point Coal Piers, and where a commercial and 
residential section of Norfolk is now located. On 
this -ite he continued farming until 1890 when he 
acquired a tract of land known as the Gowrie Farm, 
bordering on Cottage Toll Road (now Tidewater 
Drive) and extending from Hancock Avenue to 
Tanner's Creek (now Lafayette River), ft was 
on this site that John S. Seeley launched an experi- 
ment, insofar as the Xorfolk area was concerned — 
hotbed cultivation under glass. He built two green- 
houses, and raised vegetables, and vegetable-pro- 
ducing plants, which were later set out on his 
farmlands. His son, A. W. Seeley, Sr., became 
associated with him in these operations and suc- 
ceeded to the business in 1918. He continued in 
hotbed farming for a time, and early in his ca- 
reer he was especially successful in raising beet 
plants, which he transplanted to his regular acreage. 
With changing conditions and markets, A. W. 
Seeley, Sr., gradually devoted more and more at- 
tention to the growing of cut flowers, and con- 
tinued to expand this business until he had seven- 
teen greenhouses, with approximately thirty-seven 
thousand square feet under glass before his retire- 
ment. 

In January 1946. A. W. Seeley, Jr., who from 
his early boyhood had been associated with his 
father in the operation of the greenhouses, bought 
the site and the greenhouses from the elder man. 
and since 1947 has conducted the enterprise as A. 
W. Seeley, Jr. In the course of the intervening 
years he has expanded the business until it is now 
Norfolk's largest grower of cut flowers and potted 
plants. 

Born in Xorfolk on December 6, 1009, A. W. 
Seeley, Jr.. is a son of A. \\\, Sr., and Florence C. 
(Schmitt) Seeley. He was educated in the public 
schools of Xorfolk. Having been fascinated by plant 
life and flowers since early childhood and taking 
a practical interest in floriculture and botany at 
the age of twelve, he learned the business under 
the guidance of his father and at the age of six- 
teen became associated with him on a full-time 
basis. Since acquiring the business in 1946, he has 
increased the number of greenhouses to twenty-six, 
with approximately sixty-five thousand square feet 
under glass. He is considered by members of his 
profession to be the largest producer of cut flowers 
and potted plants in the entire state of Virginia. 
He excells in quality as well as in quantity of 
production, and puts or. the market a wide variety 
of species. Wholesale outlets in Xorfolk and the 
rest of the Tidewater area, and in eastern North 
Carolina, take about ninety per cent of his output, 



and the balance is sold through the firm's retail 
outlet at 1809 Hancock Avenue. In the past decade, 
A. W. Seeley's delivery equipment has increased 
from one panel truck to five, and employs from 
seven to twenty-three. The greenhouses and of- 
fices are located on the original three-and-one- 
half-acre site at Hancock Avenue and Tidewater 
Drive, about a ten-minute drive from the central 
business section of Norfolk. 

In 1955 A. W. Seeley, Jr., acquired a homesite 
on the old Adam Thorogood Farm. Another prop- 
erty consisting of seventy-three acres located in the 
Washington district of Norfolk County is uti- 
lized for soil supply, and for extensive growing of 
azaleas. A number of acres are also devoted to 
growing peonies, and a series of other floricultural 
operations are planned for this farm in the near 
future. 

Mr. Seeley is a charter member of Allied Flor- 
ists and has served on its board of directors. He 
is a member of the Society of American Florists 
and an associate member of the Florist Telegraph 
Delivery Association, Inc. He is a member of 
the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce and the Lafa- 
yette Yacht Club. 

As a member of the Tidewater Motor Boat and 
Racing Association, he served as commodore in 
1954, and as an outstanding boat owner and driver 
he has won many honors in the sport of boat 
racing. He won the WNOR Grand Championship 
'n 1953: the Jamestown-to-Richmond Marathon in 
the same year; the WNOR Trophy again in 1954; 
and the Division Championship for the Eastern 
United States in 1955. During the past six years 
he has won fifty trophies in all. He has also con- 
ferred an award: the A. W. Seeley, Jr.. Perpetual 
< (utboard High Point Trophy, which is awarded 
annually by the Tidewater Motor Boat and Racing 
Association. 

On April 20, 1934, at Norfolk, Arthur William 
Seeley, Jr., married Bessie Anderson of Norfolk, 
and they are the parents of two daughters: 1. 
Brenda Kay, born on April 22, 10,41. 2. Dorothy 
Ann, born on September 28, 1945. 



HARRY SILAS SEELEY— Member of Nor- 
folk's prominent family of florists, Harry Silas 
Seeley is owner and operator of A. W. Seeley 
and Son, Florists, Designers and Decorators, at 
1910 Colley Avenue. In past years he has been 
associated both with his father, the elder A. W. 
Seeley, now retired, and with A. W. Seeley, Jr., 
whose sketch accompanies. Harry S. Seeley has 
concerned himself with the retail operations, and 
in this connection manages his own organization. 

Much of the history of the family, which has 
been identified with floriculture in the Norfolk area 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



1 8," 



since the 1890s, is to be found in the record of A. 
W. Seeley, Jr. Their father was horn in Norfolk 
on March 10, 1887, son of John S. and Eliza J. 
(Wood) Seeley. He joined his father in floriculture 
in his early years, and carried on in building up a 
larger establishment, taking over management when 
John Seeley retired in 1018. He continued hotbed 
farming, and was especially successful in raising 
beets and a variety of other vegetables, until the 
demand for plants and flowers made it worthwhile 
to engage exclusively in their production. To the 
first greenhouse which John Seeley had built, A. 
W. Seeley, Sr., added seventeen more, giving his 
establishment a total of thirty-seven thousand square 
feet under glass. This was located on the same 
site on which operations had been begun by his fa- 
ther, wdio died in 1923. Retired for the past decade, 
A. W. Seeley, Sr., now enjoys his leisure in a com- 
fortable home at the corner of Tidewater Drive 
and Hancock Avenue, with his wife, the former 
Florence C. Schmitt, of Baltimore, Maryland. They 
were married on November 25, 1908. They became 
the parents of five children: 1. Arthur William. Jr. 
(q.v.). 2. Bessie, and 3. Jessie, twins. Bessie is 
married to LeRoy Hogshire of Norfolk, and their 
two children are Milton and Edna Hogshire. Jessie 
Seeley married Barney Lee Donison of Norfolk, 
and they too have two children: William and Lee 
Donison. 4. Harry Silas, of whom further. 5. Mar- 
garet, who married George P. Miller of Norfolk. 
They have two children: Caroline and Philip Mil- 
ler. 

Harry Silas Seeley was born in Norfolk on May 
25, 1913. He received his education in the Lafayette 
Elementary School, Ruffner Junior High School 
and Maury High School. In his vacation periods 
from his early youth, he worked witli his father 
and brother in greenhouse operations. As the sons 
entered the business on a full-time basis, the firm 
was named A. W. Seeley and Sons: and it con- 
tinued to be operated with the father and two sons 
as partners until January 15, 1946, when A. W. 
Seeley, Sr., retired. At this time, A. W., Jr., who 
had worked closely with his father in greenhouse 
management, took over their direction under his 
own name; and Harry S. Seeley, whose experience 
had been more closely tied with retailing operations, 
acquired that part of the business, which he has 
continued to operate under the old name of A. W. 
Seeley and Son, Florist. He has devoted his at- 
tention to the retail sale of flowers since he was 
eighteen years old. and for a time managed the 
firm's retail outlet at the Norfolk Farm Market at 
Tazewell, Monticello and Brewer streets, and later 
at the City Market, wdiere he continued operations 
until January 1954. In the meantime, in August 
1953. the beautiful A. W. Seeley and Son florist 



shop was opened at 1910 Colley Avenue, and this 
he and Mrs. Seeley, the former Ellen M. Goodwin, 
have expanded into one of the largest retail florist 
establishments in the city. Supplying greenhouse- 
fresh flowers for every need, and acting as designers 
and decorators as well, they are continuing in the 
fine tradition long associated with the family name. 

A veteran of World War II, Harry Silas Seeley 
served with the United States Army amphibious 
forces in the South Pacific Theater of Operations 
from 1943 and with eighteen months' overseas 
service in his military record, was separated from 
the service with the rank of corporal. Throughout 
his period in uniform, Mrs. Seeley carried on the 
business in a very capable maimer, and remains 
closely associated with her husband in the work 
at the present time. They were married at Norfolk 
on September 10, 1938. She is a daughter of the 
late James A. Goodwin, a native of Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, who for many years prior to his 
death in 1931, owned and operated the Arcade 
Restaurant in Norfolk. Her mother, now the wife 
of Dr. Radford Royal, resides in Norfolk. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Seeley are active in the work 
of the Epworth Methodist Church, where he serves 
as a member of the board of stewards. She is a 
member of Soroptimist International of Norfolk 
and Virginia Beach. 

Mr. Seeley is a charter member of Allied Flor- 
ists, Inc., and he served as it> president in 1953. 
He is a member of the Florist Telegraph Delivery 
Association. In his own city he belongs to the 
Chamber of Commerce, is a charter member of 
the Exchange Club, and a member of Lodge No. 
38, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and 
the Lafayette Yacht and Country Club. His hob- 
bies are golf, deep-sea fishing, and boating. 



JAMES ALLEN CARNEY— A general con- 
tractor in the building construction field, James 
Allen Carney formed his own organization at 
Norfolk nearly a decade ago, and since that time 
has erected a large number of the Tidewater 
area's important new buildings. His headquarters 
are at 522 West Twenty-fifth Street. 

Born at Elizabeth City, North Carolina, on 
April 2, 1907, lie is a son of the late Judge A. B. 
Carney, who married Miss Nan Allen. Judge 
Carney was born at Churchland, Norfolk County, 
son of Wright Bruce Carney, a planter at that 
place, and a descendant of forebears settled in 
the county since colonial times. The original Car- 
ney land grant remained in the family until re- 
cent years. Reared on the ancestral farm, Judge 
Carney graduated from the University of Virginia 
and practiced law at Norfolk from 1900 to 1940. 
From 1940 to 1945 he served as judge of the 



1 86 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



First Judicial District of Virginia. Throughout 
his life he was a member of the Churchland Bap- 
tist Church. He died in 1950 at the age of seventy- 
two years. His wife, the former Nan Allen, con- 
tinues to reside at 940 Gates Avenue, Norfolk. 
She is a daughter of Charles C. Allen, who was 
a prominent grain merchant of Elizabeth City, 
North Carolina, and whose wife was the former 
Ada Summer. Both are now deceased. 

The only child of his parents, James A. Carney 
graduated from Lawrenceville School in New 
Jersey in 1926. While there he was captain of 
the track team. He went on to Yale University, 
where he graduated in 1930 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering. 

From 1930 to 1932 he was employed in the 
engineering department of the Newport News 
Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company and for 
several years following was with the Virginia 
State Highway Department. From 1936 to 1947 
he was associated with the R. R. Richardson and 
Company, general contracting firm of Norfolk, 
and during that period worked on a number of 
important projects in the Tidewater area, includ- 
ing the Norfolk Museum of Arts, the Science 
Building, the Naval Hospital at Portsmouth, and 
the Leigh Memorial Hospital. 

In 1947 Mr. Carney formed his own organiza- 
tion, the construction firm known as James A. 
Carney, General Contractor. In recent years it 
has played a large part in the physical upbuilding 
of the Tidewater area, and among its major pro- 
jects have been the United States Post Office 
Building at South Norfolk, the Epworth Metho- 
dist Church, the Green-Gifford Chrysler-Plymouth 
automobile agency building, the Virginia Beverage 
Company building, the Baker Drug Corporation 
warehouse and office building, the Watters and 
Martin, Inc., wholesale hardware building, and 
other commercial and industrial projects. 

Active in civic affairs, Mr. Carney formerly 
served on the Norfolk school board and as a 
member of the board of directors of the Boys 
Club of Norfolk. He is a member of the Chamber 
of Commerce, the Norfolk Yacht and Country 
Club, and the First Presbyterian Church. Fond 
of all outdoor sports, he has special preference 
for track events and also enjoys riding horses. 
At Yale University, he was a member of Theta 
Ni fraternity and Franklin Hall. 

On July 7, 1937, at Norfolk, James A. Carney 
married Frances Ferguson of Norfolk, daughter 
of the late Finlay F. and Helen (Evans) Ferguson. 
Her father, a prominent Norfolk architect, died 
in 1936. Mrs. Carney, a graduate of Vassar Col- 
lege, is active in civic and cultural affairs. She 
is a member of the First Presbyterian Church, is 
a member and past president of the Norfolk Jun- 



ior League, and takes a constructive part in hu- 
manitarian work. Mr. and Mrs. Carney are the 
parents of three children: 1. James Allen, Jr., 
born July 15, 1938. He is a member of the Class 
of 1956 at Lawrenceville School in New Jersey 
and has been awarded the English-Speaking Union 
Exchange Scholarship for one year's study in an 
English school, Stowe. Before entering Lawrence- 
ville, he attended Walter Herron Taylor School 
and Norfolk Academy. At Lawrenceville he was 
captain of the track team, a member of the stu- 
dent council, and active in dramatics. 2. Jane Fer- 
guson, born March 6, 1943. 3. Frances Ferguson, 
born March 14, 1946. The family resides at 1344 
Mallorv Court. Norfolk. 



THOMAS NELMS DOWNING— Coming to 
Newport News to practice law in the late 1940s, 
Thomas Nelms Downing is a member of the 
firm of Downing and Andrews, with offices in 
Warwick and Hampton. He has served on the 
bench of Warwick's municipal court and on the 
board of public welfare and has held a number 
of other offices in posts of public trust or in 
welfare and civic connections. 

A native of Newport News, Mr. Downing was 
born on February 1, 1919, and is a son of Samuel 
and Lucille (Nelms) Downing. His father, who 
held the degree of Doctor of Medicine, practiced 
in Newport News, where he died on August 4, 
1937. He was a native of Lancaster County, 
while the subject's mother, the former Lucille 
Nelms, was born in Isle of Wight County. 

Attending the public schools of Newport News, 
Thomas N. Downing graduated from high school 
in that city in 1936. He then enrolled at Vir- 
ginia Military Institute, where he received his 
degree of Bachelor of Science in 1940. He did 
not complete his law courses until after his par- 
ticipation in World War II. Entering the army 
in February 1942, he was assigned to the Third 
Cavalry and served overseas from July 1944, to 
November 1945, holding the rank of major at 
that time. 

After the war Mr. Downing completed his pro- 
fessional studies at the University of Virginia, 
which conferred on him the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws in 1947. Meantime, in 1946, he had been 
admitted to the bar of the state of Virginia. 
For one year after completing his law courses, 
he practiced in Lancaster County, in association 
with R. O. Norris, Jr. In 1948 he came to the 
Peninsula, where he has since made his home 
and centered his practice. He was formerly a 
member of the firm of Newman, Allaun and 
Downing and now is the senior member of the 
firm of Downing and Andrews. This firm, en- 




Copyright Photographers Association of America 



^oVoojxm K\^*uVuaa>* 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



187 



gaged in the general practice of law, has its 
offices in the Warwick National Bank Building 
in Warwick and the Citizens National Bank 
Building in Hampton. 

A member of the Newport News-Warwick Bar 
Association, Mr. Downing served as its president 
during the 1956-1957 term. He is also a member of 
the Virginia State Bar Association and the 
American Bar Association. He has served capa- 
bly on the bench as a substitute judge of the 
municipal court at Warwick, in addition to serv- 
ing on that municipality's board of public wel- 
fare. He is a member of a study committee for 
the overall consolidation of the Peninsula's in- 
dustrial and commercial life. He also serves 
0.1 Selective Service Board Number 122 in the 
Peninsula area. 

Mr. Downing is interested in the program 
of the Girl Scouts of America and serves on 
its local board of directors at Newport News. 
He is also a member of the board of that city's 
chapter of the American Red Cross. As a law- 
yer, he is a member of Sigma Nu Phi fraternity 
and, as a veteran of World War II, a member 
of Braxton Perkins Post Number 225, American 
Legion. His other memberships include the Lions 
Club at Wrrwick and the James River Country 
Club. He is fond of golf and aquatic sports. He 
and his family attend St. Stephen's Episcopal 
Church in Warwick, where he serves as a trus- 
tee and vestryman. 

Mrs. Downing is the former Miss Virginia 
Dickerson Martin of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
daughter of J. Dickerson and Florence (Raney) 
Martin. She became the wife of Thomas Nelms 
Downing in a ceremony in Philadelphia on 
February 18, 1947. The couple have two chil- 
dren: 1. Susan Nelms, who was born on May 
1, 1948. 2. Samuel Dickerson Martin, born on 
June 6, 1952. 



CALVIN H. DALBY— For the past decade 
Calvin H. Dalby has served as Norfolk's Director 
of Public Safety. He was previously a Coast Guard 
Reserve officer, after which he held a responsible 
post with a steamship company. He is active in 
a number of local groups. 

A native of Norfolk, he was born on April 15, 
1899, son of John Calvin and Georgie G. (Holmes) 
Dalby. His father, who was born in Northampton 
County, was a commission merchant at Norfolk 
throughout his active career, having arrived in the 
city at the age of sixteen. He remained active in 
business there until his death in 1948 at the age of 
eighty-four. Miss Holmes, whom he married, was 
a native of Norfolk. She was seventy-eight years 
of age when she died in 1942. 

Reared and educated in his native city, Calvin 



H. Dalby graduated from Maury High School in 
1916, and entered the University of Virginia, where 
he was a student at the time of his enlistment in 
the United States Army in 1918. He served in 
World War I, and received his honorable discharge 
in 1919. He spent the years between the two world 
wars with the Merchants and Miners Steamship 
Company, and in 1942 took military leave and was 
commissioned lieutenant commander, serving in 
that rank throughout the conflict. He holds the 
permanent rank of captain in the United States 
Coast Guard Reserve Corps. 

On first returning to civilian life, Mr. Dalby 
resumed his connection with the Merchants and 
Miners Steamship Company, but remained only a 
short time, holding the position of general agent 
when he left in December 1946, to assume the 
duties of his present position, that of Director of 
Public Safety for the City of Norfolk. 

Mr. Dalby is a member of the National Defense 
Transportation Association, the International As- 
sociation of Fire Chiefs, the International Associa- 
tion of Chiefs of Police, and the Norfolk Police- 
Fire Square Club, Inc. He is also a member of 
the American Society for Public Administration, 
and the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police. 
Besides these groups, whose field of interest is 
related to his work, he holds membership in the 
posts of the Forty and Eight and the American 
Legion, the Rotary Club, the Norfolk Yacht and 
Country Club, and Atlantic Lodge No. 2, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons. Mr. Dalby's hobby 
is gardening. He is a Democrat in his politics, and 
attends the Baptist Church. 

On October 7, 1925, Calvin H. Dalby married 
Alice Bass Vicar, daughter of Willis W. and Alice 
(Bass) Vicar. Her father, who was born in Nor- 
folk County, was for many years vice president 
of the Norfolk Bank for Savings and Trusts. He 
died in 1919 and Mrs. Vicar in 1922. She was a 
native of Danville, Virginia. Mrs. Dalby died June 
5. 3956, at the age of fifty-five. The couple were 
the parents of one child: Anne Vicar, born in Nor- 
folk on July 30, 1930. Mr. Dalby makes his home 
at 1516 Trouville Avenue. 



WILLIAM JOSEPH LEWIS— Most of Wil- 
liam Joseph Lewis' career has been spent with the 
Norfolk Fire Department, of which he is now the 
chief. This capable public official is also active in 
business affairs, and takes a prominent role in or- 
ganizational activities. 

Born at Annapolis, Maryland, on May 28, 1896, 
he is a son of James A. and Jessie C. (Saboury) 
Lewis, both of whom were also natives of that 
city. His father was an officer in the LTnited States 
Navy throughout his career. He served in the 



1 88 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



Spanish-American War, and at the time of the 
difficulty with Mexico in 1916, and thereafter 
throughout World War I. He later retired, but 
was recalled to service at the time of World War 
II, serving as boatswain on shore duty at Fort 
Lauderdale, Florida. He left the service permanent- 
ly in 1946, and died the following year, at the 
age of seventy-two. Mrs. Lewis had died in 1928, in 
her fifty-third year. 

From his early boyhood, William J. Lewis lived 
in Norfolk. He attended elementary school there, 
and later attended Punahon Preparatory School 
in Honolulu, Hawaii. Returning to Annapolis, he 
graduated from high school there, and began his 
career as an apprentice machinist in the Navy Yard 
School at Norfolk Navy Yard, where he remained 
for six years. He left to enter the employ of the 
Old Dominion Railway, and remained with that line 
and with Norfolk and Southern Railway for about 
five and one-half years. 

On January 1, 1923, he joined the Norfolk Fire 
Department as a fireman witli the rank of private 
in No. 1 Truck Company. He was promoted to 
captain on January 1, 1929, and to deputy chief 
on January 27, 1942. He became chief deputy on 
January 1. 1950. and assumed his present duties 
as chief of the Norfolk Fire Department on Octo- 
ber 1. 1953. Mr. Lewis is half owner of the L. and 
M. Auto and Furniture Upholstery Company, and 
he serves on the board of directors of the City 
Employment Retirement System of Norfolk. 

Mr. Lewis has taken a vital interest in welfare 
work in his home city. He serves on the board of 
the Norfolk Chapter of the American Red Cross, 
the Salvation Army, and the Norfolk Chapter of 
the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. He 
is chairman of the Safety Service for the Red Cross. 
A member of the local lodge of the Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, he also belongs to the high- 
er bodies of the order, including the chapter of the 
Royal Arch Masons, the Grice Commandery of 
the Knights Templar, and Khedive Temple, An- 
cient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 
He is also a member of the Shrine Club and the 
Sports Club, and he attends the Congregational 
Christian Church. Mr. Lewis is a Democrat in 
his politics. He is fond of fishing and golf. 

On June 20, 1916, William Joseph Lewis mar- 
ried Margaret Lena Morgan, daughter of the late 
Benjamin F. and Emma Jane (Ruggles) Morgan. 
Her mother still lives in Norfolk. Her father, who 
was a grocer in that city for many years and at 
one time president of the Retail Grocers Associa- 
tion, died in September 1953, at the age of eighty- 
two. Mr. and Mrs. Lewis became the parents of 
three children: 1. Margaret Morgan, who was born 
on April 9, 1918. She is now the wife of Ernest 



Jordan, who is with the Pepsi-Cola Bottling Com- 
pany. 2. Josephine Esterbrook, born on August 
11, 1920. She married L. C. Melchor, who is the 
head of the L. and M. Auto and Furniture Up- 
holstery Company. 3. Barbara Jane, born on Jan- 
uary 12, 1922. She married Walter Elton Trafton. 
There are six grandchildren. Mr. and Mrs. Lewis 
make their home at 1315 Colonial Avenue, Norfolk. 



WILLIAM GLOVER SAUNDERS, JR.— Two 

decades ago, William Glover Saunders, Jr., founded 
his lumber and building supplies firm at Chucka- 
tuck, which he operated for twelve years. Since 
1947 it has been a partnership in which Mr. 
Saunders holds the controlling interest. He is an 
effective and devoted worker for his community 
and his church. 

The son of farming people of the Lower Tide- 
water region, Mr. Saunders was born at Everett, 
near Chuckatuck, on September 30, 1905. His 
father, William Glover Saunders, Sr., was a native 
of Nansemond County, and was a merchant as 
well as a farmer. He died in February 1946. He 
was the son of Thomas Jefferson Saunders, a 
native and life-long resident of Nansemond County, 
and one of the men who organized what is now 
Oakland Christian Church of Chuckatuck. Young 
Mr. Saunders' mother was the former Alice Chap- 
man, a native of Isle of Wight County and a 
daughter of George D. Chapman, who served as 
a member of the Virginia House of Delegates, and 
was with the forces of General Robert E. Lee at 
the time of the surrender of Appomattox. 

The young William G. Saunders attended the 
public schools of Chuckatuck. He began his career 
in the employ of a lumber company at Everett, 
remaining with that organization for one year. 
At the end of that time, he began contracting for 
the hauling of lumber in his own name, and he 
also engaged in transactions in two of the region's 
foremost agricultural crops, peanuts and cotton. 
In 1936, he established his present firm as W. 
G. Saunders, Jr., and in 1947 founded the Saunders 
Supply Company, of which he has since been 
the president. It deals in lumber at retail, and also 
stocks a complete line of supplies required by 
builders. Its yard and offices are at Chuckatuck. 

Mr. Saunders has retained his interest in farm- 
ing. Today he devotes his considerable acreage 
chiefly to raising peanuts, corn, beans and flowers 
on a commercial basis. He also has a dairy and a 
considerable herd of beef cows. His business connec- 
tions, apart from his own firm, include membership 
on the Board of Directors of the Home Telephone 
Company of Smithfield, and the First Federal 
Building and Loan Association in Suffolk, of 
which he is vice president. He serves as a board 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



.89 



member of the Suffolk-Nansemond County Cham- 
ber of Commerce. In local politics, Mr. Saunders 
is a Democrat, and he is a member and past 
president of the Ruritan Club of Chuckatuck and 
the Executives Club of Portsmouth. Floriculture 
and building are his avocational interests. 

Mr. Saunders is particularly active in the work 
of the Methodst Church. He is a communicant of 
Wesley Chapel at Chuckatuck, a member of its 
official board, and one of its trustees. He is the 
district lay leader of the Portsmouth District, and 
is chairman of the Town and Country Commis- 
sion of the Virginia Conference. He was a dele- 
gate to the General Conference of the Methodist 
Church, and member and delegate to the World 
Council of Methodist Churches held at Minnea- 
polis. At the present time he serves the Board of 
Lay Activities of the Virginia Conference as its 
treasurer. He also serves on the board of trustees 
and executive committee of Ferrum College, a 
Methodist-controlled institution. 

For the past twenty years, Mr. Saunders has 
been active in Boy Scout work. He is a member 
of the executive committee of the Old Dominion 
Area Council and for a number of years served 
as its chairman. He is now serving his second 
year as president of his Council and is the National 
Council representative. He served as sectional 
commissary officer at the Boy Scout Jamborees 
at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, and at the Irvine 
Ranch in California. He was the recipient of the 
Silver Beaver award in 1950. He is a charter 
member in the Order of the Arrow in his Council. 
For many years, Mr. Saunders served as his Com- 
munity Representative on the Suffolk-Nansemond 
County American Red Cross Board. During World 
War II, he served his County as a member of 
the Rationing Board, and Committee for War 
Fund and War Bond drives. 

In Bruton Parish Church at Williamsburg, on 
June 18, 1936, William Glover Saunders, Jr., mar- 
ried Edna Earl Brooks of Norfolk, formerly of 
Mathews, Virginia, daughter of Captain James 
Landon and Lillie (Davis) Brooks. Her father died 
in April 1943, but her mother still survives and 
lives in Norfolk. Mr. and Mrs. Saunders are the 
parents of four children: 1. Jaira Randolph, born 
July 24, 1939. 2. William Glover, 3rd, born June 
29, 1942. 3. Edna Brooks, born December 31, 1944. 
4. Alice Davis, born September 10, 1948. 



EUGENE KELSEY WILSON, SR-— Operat- 
ing throughout the Tidewater area, E. K. Wilson 
and Sons, Inc., of Norfolk, is now one of the 
largest firms in its field in Virginia, handling 
numerous major contracts of an industrial, com- 
mercial, and residental character in plumbing, heat- 



ing, and air conditioniing and serving as an auth- 
orized dealer of General Electric air-conditioning 
equipment. Founded in 1903 by Eugene Kelsey 
Wilson, Sr., it is now largely managed by his 
sons, Eugene Kelsey, Jr., Everette Knapp and 
Guy Rathbone, who, like their father, are promi- 
nent both in their field of business and in 
civic and social circles in the Lower Tidewater. 
The senior Mr. Wilson, who retains the presidency 
of the company he founded, gives his sons coun- 
sel in its management, while at the same time he 
looks after his extensive realty holdings. He has 
held high office in the organizations of his trade 
and is influential in those organizations and in 
other circles. 

Eugene Kelsey Wilson, Sr., was born at Suf- 
folk on March 10, 1884, the son of Henry and 
Elizabeth (Kelsey) Wilson. His father, a native 
of New York State, settled in Suffolk in the early 
1880s. There he became a successful farmer, mer- 
chant, and real estate operator. He died at Suffolk 
in 1890. Elizabeth Kelsey Wilson was also born 
in New York State. Following the death of Hen- 
ry Wilson, she became the wife of Edward Byrd 
of Suffolk, now deceased. She died in 1935, at 
the age of eighty-two. 

The youngest of the five children born to his 
parents, Eugene Kelsey Wilson, Sr., grew up in 
Suffolk. He received his education in that city's 
elementary and high schools. He was only nine- 
teen when, in 1903, he moved to Norfolk and foun- 
ded what has became E. K. Wilson and Sons, 
Inc. He had learned the plumber's trade, but he 
soon expanded his business into the related trades. 
However, it was not until 1947 that his firm be- 
gan including air conditioning in the scope of its 
operations. The activities of Mr. Wilson and the 
growth of his firm have closely paralleled the 
growth of Norfolk and the entire Tidewater in 
the more than half century that has elapsed since 
he went into business on his own. 

Mr. Wilson first established the firm on Church 
Street, near Holt, with five employees and a 
horse and wagon used to haul equipment. The 
firm moved often in its early years in its constant 
search for larger quarters as required by the de- 
mand for its services. The second location was 450 
Granby Street. Other locations included 710 Boush 
Street and a site on Olney Road, where temporary 
quarters were occupied until in 1933 the present 
plant at 3314 DeBree Avenue was completed and 
occupied. Even this plant has undergone many 
changes and additions since those days. The 
growth of the Wilson firm must be attributed to 
the quality of its service and the economy of its 
prices, as well as to the personal characters first 
of its founder and then of the three sons who are 



i go 



LOWER TIDF.WATER VIRGINIA 



managing the business for him. Each phase of 
the firm's work is handled by experts, and more 
than seventy-five trained mechanics are constantly 
engaged. The firm has a long list of completed 
projects in plumbing, heating, air conditioning, and 
mechanical engineering. Besides the numerous 
corporations and individuals whom it has served 
through the years, it has handled a variety of 
government contracts. 

E. K. Wilson, Sr., continued active in the man- 
agement of the business until 1942, when he dele- 
gated responsibility to his three sons, all of whom 
grew up in the business. Since then Mr. Wilson 
has given most of his time to the management of 
his realty holdings. He is a charter member and 
past president of the Norfolk Chapter of the Na- 
tional Association of Master Plumbers. He also 
belongs to the Izaak Walton League of America 
and as a hunter and fisherman maintains a lodge 
on Back Bay. His religious affiliation is with the 
Park Place Methodist Church of Norfolk. 

In 1907 Mr. Wilson married Nellie Elizabeth 
Price of Norfolk, who died in 1918. To this mar- 
riage were born two sons: 1. Eugene Kelsey Wil- 
son, Jr. 2. Everette Knapp Wilson. In 1920 Mr. 
Wilson married Martha Valleau Rathbone of 
Parksburg, West Virginia, and to them were born 
two children: 3. Guy Rathbone. 4. Martha Valleau, 
now Mrs. William T. Linderman and living in 
Norfolk. Her husband is a graduate in mechanical 
engineering and is a member of the engineering 
staff of the Tidewater Construction Company of 
Norfolk. Mr. and Mrs. Linderman are the parents 
of Martha Valleau, Mary Ann, and Susie Ann. 

The oldest of Mr. Wilson's sons, Eugene Kelsey 
Wilson, Jr., is secretary and manager of E. K. 
Wilson and Sons, Inc. He was born in Norfolk 
on April 1, 191 1, and was graduated from Maury 
High School in 1929. He began his experience in 
his father's business in his school vacation periods, 
entering on a full-time basis after his graduation 
from high school. He served his apprenticeship 
under the guidance of his father and eacli year 
assumed more and more responsibility. In 1956 he 
served as president of the Norfolk Chapter of the 
National Association of Master Plumbers. He is 
also a member of the Lambert's Point Lodge No. 
106, Knights of Pythias, and of the Masonic order. 
He worships in the Episcopal Church. Hunting 
and fishing arc his favorite sports. 

E. K. Wilson, Jr., married, in 1935, Marie Eve- 
lyn Solomon of Norfolk. They have two sons: i. 
Eugene Kelsey, III. ii. Timothy Barry. 

The second of the founder's sons, Everette 
Knapp Wilson, is treasurer of the company. Born 
in Norfolk on July 31, 191 7, he was graduated 
from Maury High School in 1935 and then entered 



the firm on a full-time basis, but he, too, had a 
good acquaintanceship with operations through 
apprenticeships served in vacation periods. He is 
active in the National Plumbing and Heating Con- 
tractors Association; the Norfolk Chamber of 
Commerce; Ocean View Lodge No. 335, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, and Lambert's Point 
Lodge No. 106, Knights of Pythias. A charter 
member of Norfolk Chapter of Sertoma Interna- 
tional, he was the chapter's vice president in 1956. 
He worships in the Congregational Christian Tem- 
ple of Norfolk. Through his favorite sports, boat- 
ing, fishing, and hunting, he belongs to the Lafay- 
ette Yacht Club and the Cavalier Beach Club. 

Everette Knapp Wilson married, in Norfolk 
on August 5, 1938, Virginia W. Whitehurst, daugh- 
ter of the late William C. and Ada (Curling) 
Whitehurst of Norfolk. His wife is president of 
the Norfolk Chapter of La Sertoma International 
and a director of the Chesapeake District of the 
Girl Scouts of America and also active in the 
Cape Henry Woman's Club. Mr. and Mrs. Ever- 
ette K. Wilson have one daughter, Claudia Nellie, 
born on April 15, 1940. 

The youngest of the sons is Guy Rathbone Wil- 
son, vice president of the company. Born in Nor- 
folk in 1924, he was graduated from Maury High 
School in 1943. He began learning the business 
"from the ground up" in boyhood and by the 
time he assumed a full-time place in it, was well 
versed in all phases of operation. 

Guy R. Wilson married Marian Kea of Norfolk 
and is the father of two boys: i. Guy Rathbone, 
Jr. ii. Raymond Eugene. 



ROBERT RIDDICK HARRELL— Since the 

beginning of his business career, Robert Riddick 
Harrell has been identified with the same firm. 
Suffolk Iron Works, and is now its owner and 
executive head. He has also been a loyal and 
effective worker in civic causes, and holds mem- 
bership in a large number of worthwhile organ- 
izations. 

He is a native of Suffolk, where he was born 
011 April 11, 1899, son of Riddick R. and Eugenia 
(Vertley) Harrell. His father was born in Nanse- 
111. in 1 1 County as was his mother. Both are now 
deceased. Riddick R. Harrell founded the machine 
shop now known as Suffolk Iron Works. After 
he had completed his studies in Suffolk's public 
schools and at Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 
where he took his degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Mechanical Engineering in 1921, Robert R. 
Harrell joined his father, and thoroughly learned 
the techniques of machine shop management before 
the elder man's death. When the founder died 
March 1929, he succeeded him as owner of the 



LOWER TIDEWATER VIRGINIA 



191 



business, which he has capably managed since. 
The shop is located at 418 East Washington Street. 

Mr. Harrell interrupted his studies at the time 
of World War I to serve in the United States 
Army. He was in uniform only a few months. 
Since the World War II period he has served on 
the local draft board, and is now its chairman. 
Formerly a member of the Chamber of Commerce, 
he served for six years on its board of directors. 
He has taken a constructive role in the programs 
of the Red Cross and the Boy Scouts of America. 
Apart from his major buisness interest, Mr. Har- 
rell serves on the board of directors of the Amer- 
ican Bank and Trust Company at Suffolk. 

He is secretary and treasurer of the Birdsong 
Trust Fund, a past president of the Lions Club, 
in which he still retains membership, and is af- 
filiated with the Ancient Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons. He is a member and past master of Hiram 
Lodge No. 340; member and past high priest of • 
Mount Nebo Chapter No. 20 of the Royal Arch 
Masons; member of Portsmouth Commandery No. 
5, Knights Templar; and member of Khedive 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine in Norfolk. He is also vice president 
of the Suffolk Shrine Club. 

A communicant of the Baptist Church, Mr. Har- 
rell served for a decade as chairman of its finance 
committee. He is a Democrat in his politics. 

At Suffolk, on December 16, 1923, Robert Rid- 
dick Harrell married Virgie Adeline Eley of that 
city, who is a daughter of John Mills and Addle 
Clifton (Lewis) Eley, both natives of Southamp- 
ton County and both now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. 
Harrell are the parents of three children: 1. Betty 
Anne, born September 1, 1927. She married A. 
S. Kyle, 3rd, and they have two children: i. A. 
S. Kyle, 4th. ii. Virginia Margaret. 2. Robert 
Riddick, born August 29, 1937. 3. John Clifton, 
born December 21, 1938. 



GEORGE CARTER COLEMAN— The presi- 
dent of Birtcherd Dairy, Inc., George Carter Cole- 
man has, in the course of his thirty-five years 
as its executive head, built this concern from 
modest beginnings into the leading dairy of Nor- 
folk. It is in a very real sense his personal crea- 
tion; and his achievement is reflected in his posi- 
tion in the business and civic life of the Lower 
Tidewater region. 

Born May 23, 1883, near Danville in Pittsyl- 
vania County, Mr. Coleman is one of six children 
born to James Augustus and Mary (Shackelford) 
Coleman. Both of his parents were also natives 
of Pittsylvania County. His paternal grandfather 
was a substantial planter in antebellum days; and 
although he opposed war with the North, sup- 



ported the Southern cause when the conflict came. 
Of English descent, George C. Coleman can claim 
among his ancestors colonial settlers in Virginia, 
who have taken a prominent part in the state's 
affairs down to the present time. His father was 
a successful tobacco planter in Pittsylvania Coun- 
ty, and at the age of seventy-five, he and his wife 
moved to Danville, where they spent the rest 
of their lives. He died in his ninetieth year. His 
wife, the former Mary Shackelford, died at Dan- 
ville at the age of eighty-two. She was a daughter 
of Robert Shackelford, a planter and Confederate 
veteran. 

The youngest but one of the six children born 
to his parents, George C. Coleman passed his 
boyhood on the family farm, and received his 
early education in the one-room schoolhouse near- 
by. As a boy he worked on the farm and learned 
about tobacco planting. At the age of sixteen, 
however, he learned from sad experience that 
tobacco raising can be a precarious business. On 
the farm of a brother-in-law, Thomas Wills, who 
had died, he raised a tobacco crop totaling about 
thirty thousand pounds of leaf, cured it with the 
assistance of his father —