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Full text of "A history of the Michael Brown family of Rowan County, North Carolina : tracing its line of posterity from the original Michael Brown to the present generation and giving something of the times one hundred and fifty years ago together with many historic facts of local and national interest"

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BiS A HIS TORY 

OF THE 



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Michael Brown Family 



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OF 



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ROWAN COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA 



TRACING ITS LINE OF POSTERITY FROM THE 
ORIGINAL MICHAEL BROWN TO THE PRESENl' 
GENERATION AND GIVING SOMETHING OF 
THE TIMES ONE HUNDRED AND FIFl^Y YEARS 
AGO TOGETHER WITH MANY HISTORIC FACTS 
OF LOCAL AND NATIONAL INTEREST 

By 
The Reverend RICHARD L. BROWN 




PUBLISHED UNDER THE AUSPICES 

OF THE 

MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY ASSOCIATION 






HA:-. 



AflY 
GITY 





Kkv. Richard L. DroWxV 



TO Tiie DESCENDANTS OF THE 

SAINTED MICHAEL BROWN 

IN THIS DAY AND 

GENERATION 

THIS BOOK IS AFFECTION ATEI.Y 

DEDICATED 



PREFACE 

I This history may be considered accidental or 

I of a spontaneous character. On one occasion 

I Rev. N. D. Body and the writer were in conver- 

I sation relative to the " Old Stone House." The 

I former suggested that the Browns should keep 

I the house in their possession as a sacred relic. 

I Out of this interview grew the idea of organizing 

I a Michael Brown Family Association which later 

I was effected, having as its main object the bring- 

ing together annually the descendants of Michael 
Brown and their friends in a social way, caring 
for the old family graveyard and if possible 
purchasing the Old Stone House which had by 
this time passed into the hands of those outside 
of the Brown family. 

It occurred to us that a history of the original 
Michael Braun (Brown) and his posterity would 
prove of interest not only to the immediate 
Brown family, but also to their many friends. 
We set ourselves to the task but it was soon dis- 
covered, to our great sorrow, that much of this 
family tree, one of the oldest and largest in the 
• State, had been lost because not taken up sooner. 

Notwithstanding this great loss there is still an 
astonishing cluster of branches which have sprung 
from the original trunk. We have endeavored to 



6 PREFACE 

trace these family limbs as far as possible and 
thus give the descendents of our illustrious an- 
cestor something of their line of descent, also 
noted something of the times, customs of the 
people and conditions of the country in those 
days. 

It is to be remembered that many things in this 
book were on the verge of oblivion. Much of the 
material was gathered from personal interviews 
with some of our oldest kindred and citizens, 
some of whom will not live much longer; the 
writer could not reproduce it, some was gleaned 
from scattered records, hence, many things in 
connection with the history of the Old Stone 
House family will be preserved only through this 
publication. It picks up and throws light on 
many things which we believe will be relished by 
both the old and young of our day and of the 
generations to come. 

The Jews are able to trace their line of descent 
for thousands of years. For instance, Christ was 
a descendent of David, and David a descendent 
of Abraham, etc. Thus our Bible history would 
be much impaired if this lineage could not be 
traced. 

A history of our ancestors is sometimes worth 
something to the young in selecting a consort or 
life-companion. Sometimes the sins and habits 
of the parents are visited upon the children unto 
the third or fourth generation, and he or she who 



I PREFACE 



ffr is seeking a partner for life should know some- 

thing about these facts. Rev. Dr. Samuel John- 
f son said to his prospective wife previous to their 

'f marriage that he very much desired to marry her 

I but there were three obstacles in the way. First, 

* he was very humble in origin ; second, he had no 

I money ; and third, he had an uncle who had been 

I hanged. To this she replied that, first, she was 

f not governed by his parentage; second, she had 

f no money herself ; and third, although she had no 

relatives who had been hanged, she had twenty 
who deserved to be. They married and lived a 
happy life for many years. 

This book is an attempt to connect the present 
with the past in the hope that from this time forth 
descendents of Michael Brown, of the Old Stone 
House, will not only cherish the best in their fam- 
ily's history and traditions but will also hold 
sacred the old family graveyard containing the 
ashes of their original ancestors, see to its upkeep, 
and if possible purchase and preserve the " Stone 
House," still standing, one of North Carolina's 
landmarks, antedating Revolutionary times; also 
that they will keep ample records of the line of 
descent from now on and with their own lives 
emulate the virtues of their forefathers and 
rightly use the rich heritage which has been 
handed down to them from generation to 
generation. 

It is to be regretted that so little is known of 



8 PREFACE 

the original Michael Brown prior to his migration 
to North Carolina. However, some light is 
thrown on this period in his life in two chapters 
in this history. 

We, therefore, commit this little book to its 
readers with a motive of honor, respect and 
Christian duty. May it serve as a solemn re- 
minder of our departed relatives and a constant 
evidence that we too are passing away. While 
the young will find something to their interest, the 
old will refer to it as a book of sacred references. 

Richard L. Brown. 



Contents 

PART ONE 

Page 
Chapter 1 — Valuable Information Recently Sup- 
plied 11 

Chapter 2— The Michael Brown Family Associ- 
ation 16 

Chapter 3— Michael Brown's Will 19 

Chapter 4— The Country and Its Early Settlers. 23 
Chapter 5— Belief in Witchcraft and Other Su- 
perstitions 27 

Chapter 6 — Michael Braun (Brown) and the 

Dunns 34 

Chapter 7 — Michael Braun (Brown) and Min- 
isters Descended from Him 38 

Chapter 8 — Names of Michael Brown's Sons... 46 
Chapter 9— Integrity and Patriotism of Michael 

Brown's Posterity 53 

Chapter 10 — The Stone House and Incidents in 

Connection Therewith 58 

Chapter n — The Lands of Michael Brown 67 

Chapter 12— The Graveyard 76 

PART TWO 

Chapter 1— Michael Brown— The Trunk of the 

Tree 84 

Chapter 2— The Branches 86 

Chapter 3 — David Brown, the First Branch of 

the Brown Tree 88 

Section 1 — Michad L. Brown, a Son of David Brown. 

Section 2 — Jacob Brown, a Son of David Brown. 

Section 3 — Solomon Brown, a Son of David Brown. 

Section 4 — David Brown, Jr., a Son of David Brown, Sr. 

Section 5 — Daniel Brown, a Son of David Brown. 

Section 6 — Henry Brown, a Son of David Brown. 

Section 7— Jeremiah Brown, a Son of David Brown. 

Section 8 — Andrew Brown, a Son of David Brown. 

9 



10 CONTENTS 

PsETC 
Section 9 — Georg-e Brown, a Son of David Brown, and 

Isabella Brown, His Wife's Sister. 

Section 10 — Mary Brown, a Daughter of David Brown. 

Section 11 — Christina Brown, a Daughter of David Brown. 

Chapter 4 — James Brown, the Second Branch of 

the Brown Tree 147 

Section 1 — Jeremiah Brown, a Son of James Brown. 
Section 2 — James Brown, Jr., a Son of James Brown. 
Section 3 — Alexander Brown, a Son of James Brown. 
Section 4 — Allen Brown, a Son of James Brown, 
Section 5 — William Brown, a Son of James Brown. 
Section 6 — Lisa E. Brown, a Daughter of James Brown. 
Section 7 — Sally Brown, a Daughter of James Brown. 

Chapter 5— Moses Brown, the Third Branch of 

the Brown Tree 159 

Section 1 — Moses L. Brown, Son of Moses Brown. 
Section 2 — Michael Brown, Son of Moses Brown. 
Section 3 — Peter Brown, Son of Moses Brown. 
Section 4 — Alfred Brown, Son of Moses Brown. 

Chapter 6 — Peter Brown, the Fourth Branch of 

the Brown Tree 168 

Chapter 7— Jeremiah Brown, the Fifth Branch 

of the Brown Tree 169 

Chapter 8 — The Sixth Branch of the Brown 

Tree 173 

Chapter 9 — Clementine Brown, the Seventh 

Branch of the Brown Tree 174 

Chapter 10— A Resume of the Michael Brown 

Family History 175 

Chapter 11 — Memorabilia and Musings — By Rev. 

B. S. Brown. Sr 183 

Chapter 12 — Some Suggestions 189 



A History of the 

Michael Brown Family of Rowan County 

North Carolina 



CHAPTER I 

Vi*LUABLE INFORMATION RECENTLY SUPPLIED 

About the time this history was ready for the 
press the Rev. M. Luther Canup, of New York 
City, a descendent of Michael Brown, became 
interested in that part of his ancestor's history 
which antedates his migration to North Carolina. 
In this chapter we shall give some interesting and 
important information as supplied by Rev. Canup. 

Tradition says Michael Brown migrated from 
Pennsylvania to North Carohna about the middle 
of the eighteenth century, coming in that long 
train of pioneers which wound its way slowly 
through the picturesque Cumberland and Shenan- 
doah Valleys, every able-bodied person walking, 
women and children in wagons, and cattle, sheep 
and hogs driven before them, until they reached 
their destination, — Rowan and adjoining counties. 
This kj^end is substantiated by the fact that the 
records in the office of the Register of Deeds at 
Sahsbury indicate that the first purchase of land 

11 



12 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

by Michael Brown (from John Dunn) was made 
in 1758. There is also a tradition that he origi- 
nally came from Germany. The architecture of 
his house, the furnishings of the same, the lang- 
uage he spoke, the inscriptions found chiseled in 
the walls of his building and trade marks stamped 
on his cooking utensils lend proof to this view. 

In July, 1920, we communicated with the His- 
torical Society of Pennsylvania, located at Phila- 
delphia, relative to the ship records of those 
landing in this country from Germany via the 
Philadelphia port. A prompt reply brought the 
information that a Michael Brown (Braun) came 
•ver on the ship St. Andrew Gaily, John Sted- 
man. Master, from Rotterdam but last from 
Cowes, September 26, 1737. The communication 
further stated that the original ship lists are pre- 
j; served in the archives of the State Library at 

IJ Harrisburg, Pa., and suggested that these might 

'! be of further assistance in identifying our an- 

I cestor. Upon visiting the above library the origi- 

f nal list was produced which shows that Michael 

Brown was one among one hundred and forty 
immigrant passengers on board the above named 
ship, and that he, along with the others, took the 
oath of allegiance to their newly adopted country, 
signing the oath then and there. This act the 
authorities called qualifying. The following is an 
exact copy of what the new comers set their 
hand and seal to : 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 13 

" We stibscribers natives and late inhabitants of 
the Palatinate upon the Rhine and places ad- 
jacent having transported ourselves and fafnilies 
into the Province of Pennsylvania a colony sub- 
ject to the crozim of Great Britain in hopes and 
expectation of finding a retreat & peaceable set- 
tlement therein DO solemnly promise and engage 
that we will be faithful & bear true allegiatue to 
his present Majesty King George the Second and 
his successors kings of Great Britain and zvill be 
faithful to the proprietor of this province and that 
we will demean ourselves peaceably to all his said 
Majesty subjects and strictly observe and con- 
form to the lazvs of England and of this province 
to the utmost of our power and best of our 
understanding/' 



Palatines imported in the ship St. Andrew- 
Gaily, John Stedman, Master, from Rotterdam 
but last from Coives as by clearance thence. 
Qualified the 26th day of September, 1737. 

Then follows the signatures of each of the im- 
migrants. Thus it seems with absolute certainty 
we have traced our distinguished forefather from 
his grave in the old Brown family graveyard back 
to his parental home on the banks of the Rhine. 
Industrial, political and religious conditions in 
Europe at this time caused a very large number 
of its inhabitants to seek an asylum in America. 



14 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Many came from all parts of Germany, in order 
to escape the demands of their country upon them 
for military service. Michael Brown, who was 
doubtless in his early teens at this time, severed 
himself forever from all that he once held dear in 
the Old World to make his home in the New. 
Granting that this chapter in his distinctive life is 
true, the memory of him becomes the more 
sacred. He was among those courageous hearts 
whose conscientious convictions of duty led them 
to venture upon the dangerous and tedious voyage 
across the Atlantic and to endure the perils and 
hardships of an inhospitable wilderness in the 
Western World. 

Supposing Michael was a boy of sixteen when 
he landed in 1737, he would be a man of thirty- 
seven when he made his first purchase of land in 
Rowan County in 1758, and eighty-six when he 
wrote his last will and testament in 1807. From 
another ship list bearing almost the same date, 
which gives the ages of those on board, we learn 
that most of them were under twenty years of 
age. We know that Michael Brown lived to be a 
pretty old man, hence, the above dates seem to fit 
into his life admirably and lend force to the argu- 
ment that he is the Brown from whom we sprang. 

Just where and how he spent the interval be- 
tween his landing in Philadelphia and his coming 
to North Carolina no one has as yet been able to 
ascertain. However, it is not improbable that in 



i 

5 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 15 

f future generations light will be thrown on these 

I years in his life. In the writer's own mind the 

I sturdy, brave lad who arrived via Philadelphia 

i Sept. 26th, 1737, is the person who afterwards 

i migrated to the " Old North State " and who 
built the " Old Stone House.'* Granting this, we, 

I his descendents, have in our veins something of 
the thrift, frugality, honor and fervent religious 

I spirit which characterized those simple folk who 

I came from the Rhine provinces which character- 

1 istics are an asset to any family and for which 

I we Browns must eternally feel indebted. 
\ 
i 

r 

I 



CHAPTER II 

THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMII^Y ASSOCIATION 

The first meeting of the Michael Brown Family 
Association was held at Granite Quarry on July 
28th, 1914. Although the weather was unfavor- 
able about two hundred were present, meeting in 
a hall near by, Rev. C. A. Brown acting as chair- 
man pro tem. After devotional service by Rev. 
M. Luther Canup the following officers were 
elected for one year: President, Rev. R. L. 
Brown; Vice-President, Rev. C. A. Brown; vSec- 
retary, Charles F. Brown, and Treasurer, Nathan 
Brown. The afternoon was spent in the grove, 
and we were favored with speeches by Revs. G. 
H. Cox, D.D., B. S. Brown, M. Luther Canup, 
and others. The organization was much encour- 
aged, and steps were taken to meet again the fol- 
lowing year. 

A second meeting was held on Aug. 26th, 1915, 
on the same grounds. At that time the following 
officers were elected: President, Rev. C. A. 
BrowTi; Vice-President, Rev. R. L. BrowTi; Sec- 
retary, John R. Brown; Treasurer, Nathan 
Brown, and Historian, Rev. J. H. C. Fisher. 
Messrs. W. Henry Canup, Robert M. Brown and 
Paul Barnhart were appointed a committee to 

16 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 17 

look after the old family cemetery near the Stone 
House. It was upon this occasion the Brown de- 
scendents began to show marked interest in their 
ancestors. The Vice-President saw there was a 
bright future for this Association, and began to 
pick up bits of histor>' and statistics for the 
Brown family, little by little, until later these 
things grew into a history. 

On Aug. 24th, 1916, a third meeting was called 
to meet on the same grounds. All the old officers 
were re-elected, and considerable business was 
transacted; steps were taken to look after our 
claims to the plot of the graveyard, and it was 
found that one of the heirs to the land, Mrs. 
Martha Earnhardt, in disposing of her share of 
the estate, had in her wisdom excepted the grave- 
yard, hence later made a deed of the plot to the 
Brown Family Association for as long as it re- 
mains an Association. The great World War 
had begun and the Association did not meet again 
until 1919, but the work was moving along nicely, 
and in the meantime the original will of Michael 
Brown was found, dated 1807. This gave us 
some insight into his family, their names, etc., and 
the writer of the book could see more clearly than 
ever that there was a great treasure of informa- 
tion buried beneath bygone days and places made 
sacred by the sainted Michael Brown. 

The fourth meeting was called for July 30, 
1919, at the same place, and the following officers 



18 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

were elected : President, Rev. P. D. Brown ; Vice- 
President, Rev. R. L. Brown ; Secretary', Mr. 
Robert M. Brown; Treasurer, Mr. M. G. M. 
Fisher, and Rev. J. H. C. Fisher was re-elected 
Historian. At this meeting the history that had 
been growing was mentioned, a synopsis of its 
contents was read, and the publication of the 
same became the leading thought. About this 
time Rev. M. Luther Canup, of New York, and 
others, became much interested in the project. 

The fifth meeting was held August 4, 1920, on 
the same grounds. x\ll the old officers were re- 
elected. A large audience was present, among 
them being ten ministers, and a number of en- 
thusiastic speeches were made in favor of print- 
ing the book and thus put into permanent form 
that which was on the verge of being forever 
lost. It was at this meeting that the publication 
of this history was unanimously authorized. Ten 
men present showed their interest in the matter 
, by assuming the financial responsibility of the 

i book and a committee of twenty was appointed 

j by the President to sell copies of the same. Revs. 

I Richard L. Brown, M. Luther Canup and Mr. M. 

4 G. M. Fisher were appointed a committee on 

} publication. 



CHAPTER III 

MICHAEI. brown's WILI. 

A copy of the original will of Michael Brown 
of the Stone House. 

In the Name of God, Amen. 

I, Michael Brown, of Rowan County, in the 
State of North CaroHna, do make and ordain this 
my last will and testament in manner and form 
following, to wit : 

1st. My will and desire is that all my just 
debts shall be paid out of my estate as soon as 
may be after my decease. 

2nd. I leave to my beloved wife, Eleanor 
Brown, the Stone House with the out-houses and 
plantation, and one-third of the land where I now 
live, during her natural life ; and the use for five 
years after my decease of the bottom land which 
I cleared on the tract willed to my son James 
Brown. I also give to my said wife the bed and 
furniture called my bed ; and one bay mare, sad- 
dle and bridle, for her own use, and as her own 
property, and I lend to my said wife the mulatto 
girl, Betsy, for ten years after my decease ; at the 
expiration of which time the said girl, Betsy, is to 
be sold, and the money to be divided among my 
lawful heirs. 

19 



20 HISTORY OF THE) MICHAEIv BROWN FAMILY 

3rd. I give and bequeath unto my son David 
Brown the tract of land on which the Stone 
House stands where I now live, and another tract 
of thirty acres adjoining the same, to him and his 
heirs forever ; subject to the life estate in part of 
said land already given to my wife. 

4th. I give and bequeath unto my son James 
Brown one-half of my tract of land called Dunn's 
place, whereon he now lives, to him and his heirs 
forever. 

5th. I give and bequeath unto my son Jere- 
miah Brown the house and lot of land in Salis- 
bury where I formerly lived, after his paying to 
my beloved wife the sum of one hundred silver 
dollars for her own use. Then the said house and 
lot to be the property of the said Jeremiah Brown 
and his heirs forever. 

6th. I give and bequeath unto my son Moses 
Brown the one other half of my tract of land 
called Dunn's place whereon he now lives, to be 
his and his heirs' forever. 

7th. I give and bequeath unto my wife's two 
daughters, Sally Reeves and Nancy Reeves, in 
consideration of their dutiful conduct to me, my 
two lots and houses in Salisbury, now occupied 
by Mrs. Balfour and John H. Pitchey, called 
Dayton's lots ; to these said Sally Reeves and 
Nancy Reeves, their heirs and assigns forever, to 
be held by them as tenants in common, and not as 
joint tenants. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 21 

8th. If my wife Eleanor Brown shall be deliv- 
ered of a lawful child to me, of which she may 
now be enceinte, my will is, and I give and be- 
queath unto the said child, the mulatto girl called 
Emily, child of Betsy, and also the sum of five 
hundred silver dollars to be paid out of my estate. 
And I hereby nominate and appoint my friend 
Montfort Stokes to be guardian of the said child 
which may be born to me hereafter, and to super- 
intend the education thereof after my decease. 

9th. My will and desire is that all the rest and 
residue of my estate shall be sold by my executor 
after my death, and the money arising therefrom 
to be equally divided amongst all my children and 
my wife, Eleanor, share and share equal and 
alike. 

And I hereby authorize my executor to execute 
good and efficient deeds of conveyance for the 
property so to be sold ; and to vest the purchasers 
in a fee simple estate in the same: hereby be- 
queathing to my said executor the said residuary 
real estate for the purpose expressed in this claim 
of my will. 

10th and lastly, I hereby nominate and appoint 
my sons, Peter Brown, Moses Brown and James 
Brown and W. Joseph Pearson to be the execu- 
tors of this my last will and testament; hereby 
revoking all, and every other will by me hereto- 
fore made. 

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my 



22 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEIv BROWN FAMILY 

hand and seal this 12th day of October in the 
year of our Lord 1807. 

Michael Braun. 

Signed, sealed, published and declared to be the 
last will and testament of Michael Brown, in the 
presence of us who have severally attested the 
same as witnesses. 

David Griffith, 
M. Stokes. 
Michael Brown's Will 

John Gardiner. 

Registered in Book D. 
Copied by A. L. O. A. L. O. 

1807 



CHAPTER IV 

THE COUNTRY AND ITS EARLY SETTLERS 

Strange that our imaginations of the past are 
often far different from the actual facts in the 
case. 

It would be natural to suppose that two hun- 
dred years ago the hills of this county of ours 
were covered with an abundance of timber, with 
a thicket of undergrowth and an unbounded for- 
est; but history tells us differently. It says that 
much of the country was nearly barren, with scat- 
tering timber of moderate size, except along the 
streams and lowlands, and here the timber was 
scattered, but some of the trees were very large, 
and so tall that the guns of the hunter could not 
reach the game in the topmost branches. These 
were, one after another, uprooted by the storms 
of summer and winter. The banks of dirt from 
the roots of these trees are still visible in many 
places. Many changes have taken place in the 
last two centuries. 

In 1750 the settlement of Sandy Ridge was 
very scarce in timber, and logs for building had 
to be hauled for miles. The high lands between 
the Third and Fourth Creeks were once an o[>en 

93 



24 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

prairie, with a building here and there, and neigh- 
bors widely scattered. Prior to this Indians in- 
habited this section. They composed several wild 
tribes, known as the Catawba, the Waccon, and 
the Sapona. These roving, hunting and war par- 
ties had their paths all over this country, and es- 
pecially up and down the Yadkin River. Some of 
these paths were still very clear when Michael 
Brown and the Dunns settled southeast of Salis- 
bury, near Crane Creek on the north, and now 
Granite Quarry on the south. 

At Trading Ford these Indians had a fort or 
village called Sapona, and this seemed to be the 
headquarters for this Sapona tribe. Trading 
Ford is still remembered as an Indian settlement, 
and on an island in the river near there they had 
a burying ground ; and on this island, which is 
still there and now under cultivation, many 
human bones have been unearthed ; and pieces of 
old Indian pots, dishes and arrows have been 
found in abundance. 

When Michael Brown and the Dunns settled 
here the county was full of wild animals and 
game, such as wolves, panthers and bears, who 
had their homes in the thickets of the low lands, 
and in the rocks of the Granite Ridge. When 
Solomon lirown was a small boy he followed his 
sisters (contrary to orders), who were carrying 
some fresh meat to the family in the Stone House. 
As the girls passed through the thicket near the 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 25 

house, the boy heard something trotting through 
the bushes, and looking, saw seven large wolves 
cross the path between himself and the girls. The 
wolves smelled the fresh meat, and did not molest 
the disobedient boy, who found his way back 
home without losing much time. 

Wild turkeys, squirrels and opossums abounded, 
and the hogs got much of their living from the 
forests ; while the pigs had to be protected from 
the foxes and panthers. 

From the swamps around the Stone House 
were often seen strange lights which were then 
called " Tack-o'-lantern," or "Will-o'-the-wisp." 
These lights appeared as streaks of fire, appearing 
and disappearing at intervals, for an hour or 
more. 

At the " Two Rocks " on the public road from 
Salisbury to Gold Hill, at what is now Granite 
Quarry, is a place noted for its apparitions. Tra- 
dition tells us that a light was often seen to go 
across the road, or dance up and down in it ; that 
a big black dog would come out to disturb those 
passing along ; and a man without a head would 
come out from behind these rocks, unhitch the 
horses, and go on to a place where a Tory had 
been killed, and buried, during the Revolutionary 
War, and then disappear. 

The writer well remembers hearing his father 
say, when he was coming across there one dark 
night on horseback, he heard something in the 



26 HISTORY OF THE MICH.\EL BROWN FAMILY 

bushes before him hke a loose horse with har- 
ness on. He w^ould have supposed this to be 
a fact, and nothing more than a loose horse, but 
his dog, which was in front of him, came running 
back and crouched under his horse. He could 
feel the throbs of his horse's heart, and the animal 
refused to go forward, but after considerable ef- 
fort he succeeded in getting by. Then his dog left 
him, and the horse would have done the same 
thing if he had not been an expert rider. He was 
never able to say what it was, but thought his dog 
and horse understood it better than he. 

The " Two Rocks " have been broken and most 
of the pieces have been hauled away. Part of 
one remains in front of the McCombs and Ley- 
erly store across the road; the other w^s near 
where that store stands. 



CHAPTER V . 

BELIEF IN WITCHCRAFT AND OTHER SUPERSTITIONS 

Under this heading, we purpose referring to 
some of the superstitions our early settlers had 
to contend with, but it is to be particularly under- 
stood that we are not advocating, encouraging or 
teaching anything of such obnoxious character. 
However we refer to them as things of the past, 
which the early settlers of Rowan did actually 
encounter, and our reference to them is intended 
as a reproof of those foolish notions. As we 
relate some of the beliefs that were in common 
use in those days, you will see in every case that 
there is nothing complimentary to those who be- 
lieved in these evil practices. 

A witch was generally supposed to be an old 
woman in league with something bad, or the great 
evil spirit, and able to do wonderful things 
through Satanic agency. Hence these believers 
feared and shunned the witch women as we 
would fear a rattlesnake or a mad dog. 

The usual way to become a witch was to go 
down to the spring at the dawn of day, and look- 
ing down into the water at the image dimly out- 
lined there, pledge the soul to the devil, on 
conditions that he would render the help needed, 
and after this compact with the infernal spirits 

27 



2S HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

such a woman was supposed to be able to do 
almost anything bad, and nothing good, hence the 
name of a witch signified something evil. 

A witch was supposed to be able to ride 
through the air on a broomstick, or to transform 
herself into a black cat, a rabbit, or other animals. 

Walking along the road late one evening a man 
alleged that he saw three women sitting on a log 
by the side of the road. As he looked at them the 
women suddenly melted away, or from view, and 
three antelopes galloped oft in their stead. The 
witch was supposed to have power to transfer the 
corn from one neighbor's horse trough to that of 
another without touching it with his hands. The 
result was, that while the one farmer's horse 
would grow poor and lean, the other man's horse 
would grow sleek and fat. 

To see a rabbit hopping about the barn sug- 
gested the presence of a witch making arrange- 
ments to abstract the corn from the horses or the 
milk from the cows. An old fashioned shilling 
wuth its pillars of Hercules nailed in the horse 
trough was supposed to break the spell and keep 
the corn in the trough. It was thought the only 
way to kill a witch was by using a silver bullet ; 
supposing that the witch could turn a lead ball. 
A bewitched cat or rabbit shot with a silver ball 
would suddenly disappear, and it would soon be 
heard that some old woman at home had suddenly 
died of heart trouble or apoplexy. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 29 

At the same time witches had a peculiar kind 
of gun, which was simply a glass phial, open at 
both ends, and the bullet used was made of 
twisted and knotted hair; and this bullet pos- 
sessed the wonderful quahty of entering the flesh 
of animals without making a hole in the skin. It 
was alleged that such bullets were found, and 
animals after being skinned would show the hole 
through which the bullet went. 

There are people to this day who believe that 
the foot of a rabbit caught in a graveyard has 
wonderful power in it, and the man who has one 
in his pocket is to be feared. It was believed that 
witches rode on the necks of horses at night, and 
the knots in the mane were used as stirrups ; and 
in these instances the witch assumed the form of 
a rabbit. 

Conjuring was a close neighbor to witchcraft, 
and people feared one as well as the other. A 
neighbor of ours who carried his grinding to mill 
on his back was seen to have a cedar brush tied to 
his clothes, dragging it behind him to cover up 
his tracks, supposing a neighbor of his could and 
would put a spell on him if he saw his tracks. 

It was also believed that if witch rabbits sucked 
the cows it would cause them to give bloody milk, 
and that was the reason that cows at times did 
give such milk. The remedy for this was to milk 
the cow through a knot hole in a rich pine plank. 
It was no uncommon thing to see rich pieces of 



30 HISTORY OF THE illCHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

pine plank with a knot in it hanging up outside of 
the old log kitchen ready for use when needed. 
If the cow gave thick milk, or the milk thickened 
before it was soured, it was an evidence that 
somebody had put a spell on the cow. 

We have such things as these to contend with 
at the present day, but most people have better 
sense than to believe that a witch is the cause of 
it. In those days, a worn horse shoe nailed over 
the door was regarded as a spell against witch 
power, and would cause the inmates to have good 
luck; but that belief has so far passed away that 
at present it is the fashion to make many orna- 
ments in the shape of a horse shoe and wear them 
as a symbol of good luck. The luck part has 
passed away, and the ornament has taken its 
place. 

Some people are still superstitious about a rab- 
bit or black cat running across the road before 
them, as a token of good or bad luck, depending, 
I believe, on the direction the animal is going. 
To see the new moon clear or through obstruc- 
tions was another thing to give either trouble or 
consolation. Then there were the signs in the 
moon ; the little moon up or down was claimed to 
have much to do with covering buildings, laying 
the bottom rail of a fence, or in hauling out 
manure. To this day some people say, that in 
order to keep bean leaves from getting full of 
holes you must plant the beans in the scales 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 31 

because that is the only thing in the zodiac that 
has no mouth. 

There were so many superstitions that gave 
trouble and concern in days gone by that we can- 
not refer to them all, for fear the reader will con- 
sider them monotonous; but please allow the 
WTiter, before closing this part of the subject, to 
tell one of his experiences along this line. 

In one of his pastorates he had occasion to 
visit a parishioner who was sick, and pecu- 
liarly sick, too. Here he performed his minis- 
terial duties in a very satisfactory way, and re- 
turned home with the consolation of a duty well 
performed. Some time after, he was informed 
that a certain witch doctor had heard of this case 
of peculiar sickness, and had made it his business 
to visit this family also, and informed them that 
it was a case of witchcraft, and that if they 
wanted to know who the witch was he would 
place a horseshoe or something else over the door 
in that room. This would bring up the witch, and 
the first one that came into that room under that 
something placed over the door was the one who 
was causing this trouble. Now, would you be- 
lieve that this poor preacher, as innocent as a 
lamb, and as harmless as a dove, was the first one 
to enter that door under the trickery that was 
over it. But we are sure this event had its salu- 
tary eflfect, not only on the immediate family, but 



32 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

all who heard of it were convinced that witch- 
craft was a failure. 

The foregoing are some of the troubles and dis- 
advantages under which the early settlers had to 
labor; but even down to the present day, in this 
Christian, civilized and educated land of ours, 
there are, comparatively, a large percent of our 
people who believe in some signs, or forebodings, 
of good or evil. Itching hands, nose or eyes are 
considered signs of something to come. Dreams 
are also forebodings of good or evil in the near or 
distant future. 

Where all these superstitions came from, or 
how they ever got into so many people, we are 
unable to say. We know that in olden times there 
were persons called witches. For instance, King 
Saul in his great trouble with the Philistines, went 
to the Witch of Endor, and had her call up Sam- 
uel from the dead so that he might know the out- 
come with his enemies. We also read of Paul, 
while at Paphos, finding a certain sorcerer whose 
name was Barjesus. Then another by the name 
of Elymas, who withstood Paul and Barnabas to 
their faces. 

The Saviour said concerning signs : " When 
it is evening ye say it will be fair weather for 
the sky is red; and in tlie morning, it will be 
foul weather to-day, for the sky is red and low- 
ering." " A wicked and an adulterous gener- 
ation socket h after a sign, and there shall no sign 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMIL? 33 

be given it but the sign of the prophet Jonah." 
Also hear what the Apostle Paul says in regard to 
such evil things : " Even him, whose coming is 
after the working of Satan with all power and 
signs and lying wonders, and with all deceivable- 
ness of unrighteousness in them that perish, be- 
cause they receive not the love of the truth, that 
they might be saved, and for this cause God shall 
send them strong delusions, that they should be- 
lieve a lie, that they all might be damned who 
believed not the truth, but had pleasure in un- 
righteousness." — II Thess. 2:9-12. 

It is the business of Satan to always have some- 
thing to draw human minds from the truth, and 
he, with the men of the world, are sometimes 
wiser in their plans than the men of God. He 
often transforms himself into an angel of light 
to make men believe a thing is right when it is 
evil. 

While Michael Brown had to contend with the 
superstitions of his time, we believe, however, he 
was too much of a Christian, and too well in- 
formed, to be led astray by such foolish and 
ignorant ideas. 



CHAPTER VI 

MICHAEL BRAUN (bROWN) AND THE DUNNS 

We refer to the Dunns in this connection be- 
cause they and the Browns were neighbors and 
great friends, and in order to give further infor- 
mation about the Dunn graveyard. 

Tradition says there was an agreement between 
these two friends that if one died childless before 
the other, and the living one had children, the 
lands of the heirless one should go to the living, 
and his heirs. Whether this is true or not, we 
know that Michael Brown was the father of nine 
children, and in his will he mentions the Dunn 
plots two or three times as being bequeathed to 
his different heirs. 

On the north side of the Stone House farm, 
and adjoining it, was the Dunn farm and coun- 
try home. The house was built of wood, and has 
long since disappeared, but the depression in the 
ground still marks the spot where the lawyer's 
cellars once were. Not far from this place is 
a cluster of graves, known in the neighborhood as 
" The Dunns' Graves." The plow of the farmer 
has long been going over the spot, and the wheat 
and the corn have grown rankly over it, and the 
eye of the stranger would never detect the place. 
Our imaginations run inquisitively as to who has 

84 



HISTORY OF the; MICHAEIy BROWN FAMILY 35 

eaten these ashes, or the substance that came 
from them. 

A few aged citizens, who may not linger long 
to hand down the information, are still able to 
point out with accuracy to the very spot w^here 
their forefathers said John Dunn and others were 
sleeping their last sleep and waiting for the 
Resurrection Morning. As a general guide to the 
locality of the place, it may be stated that the 
spot is a short distance, say, a half mile, from the 
old Asa Ribelin House in the direction of Salis- 
bury, or near there, slightly to the right of where 
Lewis G. Ribelin now lives. 

It is to be regretted that so many of these old 
family graveyards have not been kept up and that 
they have fallen into the hands of strangers, leav- 
ing no traces of the last resting place of our 
pioneer ancestors. One of the objects of this 
history is to remind the present generation of 
these places, and to preserve a record of them as 
far as can be done. 

I.ATER INFORMATION 

In addition to the foregoing information, we 
have gathered the following from Mr. Lewis J. 
Ribelin, who is now seventy years old, and lives 
near the place where these bodies lie. 

He says he can point out the very spot where 
the Dunn graves are, that he has been there many 
times, and although the place has been plowed 



36 HISTORY OF THE MICIL-^EIv BROWN FAMILY 

over very often, the depressions in the ground 
are still visible. 

In addition to being a half mile from the old 
Asa Ribelin farm (his father's place) it is be- 
tween a half and a quarter of a mile east, or a 
little northeast from where he now lives, and a 
quarter of a mile on the north side of the Stokes 
Ferry public road, and about midway between 
this road and the old Wendle Kluttz, or the late 
Henry Peeler place, now owned by George W. 
Miller. Mr. Ribelin says a number of the Alulls— , 
are also buried there. In all, there must be some 
twelve or fifteen graves, and probably more, at 
that place. 

The writer's mother-in-law, whose maiden 
name was MulL (known as " Graney Agner"), 
who frequently went to the Stone House to spin 
for the family of Michael Brown, said she had 
two sisters buried at this place and had Mr. 
Ribelin take her over to the graveyard. While it 
was evidently the place, she was not able to locate 
the graves of her sisters. At that day marble 
yards were very scarce and tomb stones not com- 
mon, hence no marks to indicate the resting place 
of the departed. 

Mr. Ribelin said that his father, Asa RiWin, 
and his grandfather, Jacob Ribelin, told him there 
was an old house near there, built of logs, having 
port holes in it, through which the inmates would 
shoot at the Indians that came to the spring for 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY S7 

water. (This must have been early in 1700.) 

These facts have been handed down from the 
time of the Dunns to this generation and we take 
this opportunity to record them as a part of this 
history. 



CHAPTER VII 

MICHAEL BRAUN (bROWN) AND MINISTERS 
DESCENDED FROM HIM 

We now come more directly to the life and 
character of this old pioneer and our great- 
grandfather. 

Michael Brown was an emigrant from Pennsyl- 
vania, and probably came originally from Ger- 
many. It is said that he and his brother Jacob 
Brown left Pennsylvania together and startecP' 
south in pursuit of lands and permanent homes. 
As they came through Virginia in their private 
vehicles (for that was the only way to travel in 
those days), with their property and associates, 
Jacob Brown concluded to stop in that State, and 
it is now supposed that the Browns of Virginia 
are near relatives of the Browns of Rowan and 
surrounding counties. 

Michael Brown came on to Salisbury. How 
long he lived there we do not know, but it is well 
known that he owned considerable property in 
that place. His first wife's name was Margareta 
(her maiden name is lost), but we are not able to 
say whether she was a Pennsylvanian or North 
Carolinian. After living in Salisbury for a time, 
he settled near the Granite Ridge, and near what 
is now Granite Quarr>', which is on the Gold Hill 

38 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 39 

public road from Salisbury. Here he and the 
Dunns were among the first settlers of this sec- 
tion. The Dunns settled north of Mr. Brown, but 
their farms joined each other, and the Dunns' 
land must have extended across the Stokes Ferry 
road and embraced the mountain on that road, 
still known as Dunn's mountain. 

When they settled here the country was, com- 
paratively, in a crude state, and infested with 
many wild and dangerous animals, wolves, 
panthers, bears, rattle snakes ; also deer, turkeys 
and plenty of palatable game. As the settlers 
were scattered, very likely Mr. Brown and the 
Dunns settled near each other, associated with 
each other, and often had their sports in the for- 
ests together. 

There were also many paths, called Indian 
trails, through the country, along which the Indi- 
ans would travel from one section to another, 
to visit their tribes up and down the river, and 
from some of the western camps, especially to the 
village called the Sapona Town, on the Yadkin 
River, at Trading Ford. The place is still known 
as Trading Ford on the Yadkin River about four 
miles east of Salisbury. 

These early settlers were men of principle, in- 
dustry and friendships. With these characteris- 
tics they soon had for themselves comfortable 
domiciles, the land in part cleared up, and reaped 
abundant harvests from the same. Having plenty 



40 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWxN FAMILY 

of elbow room, and the wealth of the soil to their 
choice, their lines must have been pleasant and 
their places prosperous. 

Mr. Brown was a man of morals and a church- 
man. From the following it is evident that he 
took a part in the church work and gave his ser- 
vices and influence in that direction. It has been 
said that he, and one Frederick Fisher, donated 
the one hundred and more acres of land to the 
Lutheran Church on the Bringle Ferry road from 
Salisbury, which is still known as Union Lutheran 
Church, about five miles from the county seat. 
Others say they were only the trustees of said 
church for said land. Thus, it is evident, that 
our great-grandfather was interested in, and took 
upon himself a part of the church's work. 

This church at that time was called the Dutch 
Piney Meeting House, now known as the Union 
Evangelical Lutheran Church, but the original 
deed was made to Michael Brown and Frederic 
Fisher. 

We should feel proud of this and try to live up 
to his good example. History shows that from 
his day down to the present time, his posterity has 
been, as a rule, of a moral character ; progressive 
in business and interested in the progress of the 
church. Few of his descendents have been vio- 
lators of the civil or religious laws; few are in 
the lower class as to finance, culture, respect or 
education, and few of them outside the pales of 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 41 

the church. The name carries with it the thought 
of integrity and respect. 

The young man who marries into this family 
may be considered fortunate, and as having struck 
a streak of good luck. This is not intended, how- 
ever, to reflect on any other name, but simply to 
speak of these good family qualities, and to en- 
courage all the members to strive in holding up 
this enviable reputation. The Browns have gone 
into business ; into the various occupations of life, 
and hold themselves on a level with other names 
in the world. 

MINISTERS AMONG HIS DESCENDENTS 

As to those who entered the Gospel ministry, 
we can call to memory the following from Rowan 
County. How many may be in the ministry in 
other sections we are unable to say. We give the 
following of this County, according to age or 
dates of their ordination: 

Rev. R. L. Brown, ordained 1868; 
Rev. H. M. Brown, ordained 1873; 
Rev. C. L. T. Fisher, ordained 1884; 
Rev. C. A. Brown, ordained 1889; 
Rev. J. H. C. Fisher, ordained 1890; 
Rev. S. J. M. Brown, (ordination not 
known) ; 

Rev. W. W. J. Ritchie, ordained 1899; 
Rev. M. L. Canup, ordained 1907; 
Rev. P. D. Brown, ordained 1913. 



42 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

We know these have, or are giving their best 
days, time and talents to the ministry of the 
Word; to the services of the same Lord and 
Master whom our great-grandfather, Michael 
Brown, served. 

In the above list we find authors, professors, 
pastors and ecclesiastical officers : 

Rev. R. L. Brown married Miss Nancy E. 
Agner, of Rowan County, and has been in the 
Gospel ministry for more than fift>' years. He 
is one of the foremost church builders in the 
North Carolina Synod, and is the author of " The 
Mission Work Illustrated." Of this publication 

Rev. R said, " the Spirit of God must have 

directed him in this important work." He is now 
writing a history of Michael Brown of the Stone 
House and his posterity. 

Rev. H. M. Brown, who married Miss Rosetta 
Fisher, of Stanley County, was also a church 
builder and a good pastor ; the author of " The 
Scriptural Mode of Baptism " and the " Seven 
Sermons on Creation." He was a strong preacher 
and splendid church worker. 

Rev. C. L. T. Fisher, who married Miss Mary 
C. Homer, of Pennsylvania, served for a time as 
a pastor and teacher at Mt. Pleasant, N. C, but 
has since moved north beyond our information. 

Rev. C. A. Brown, who married Miss Emma 
Propst, of Rowan County, has been in the work 
for thirty years, has made a success in the min- 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 43 

istry and pastoral work ever since his ordination, 
and at different times has been President of the 
Southern Lutheran Conference, and is now 
(1919) serving his fourth year in the presidential 
chair of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of 
North Carolina. 

Rev. J. H. C. Fisher, who married Miss Leah 
Blackwelder, of Mt. Pleasant, has been serving 
neighboring pastorates and at the same time 
teaching in Mt. Amoena Female Seminary, at Mt. 
Pleasant, N. C. His ability in the pulpit and 
educational world is recognized at home and in 
the wider circles of the Church. 

Rev. S. J. I\L Brown married Miss Sarah Kirk, 
of Rowan County. He became associated with 
the Episcopal Church and is highly esteemed by 
his parishioners and the Episcopacy. 

Rev. W. W. J. Ritchie married Miss Anna 
Mariah Hinkle, of Virginia. He acquired a good 
education, both literary and theological, and was 
ordained to the Gospel ministry in 1899. He 
served several churches in North Carolina, mar- 
ried a Virginia lady, moved to the valley of the 
same State, and is doing a good work in his min- 
isterial calling. 

Rev. M. L. Canup, who married Miss Inez Bol- 
linger, of Lancaster, Pa., served for a time as pas- 
tor of the church at High Point, and while there 
received a call to the Evangelical Lutheran 
Church of the Epiphany, New York City. Here 



44 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

he is serving- the Master with a credit to himself 
and his people. 

Rev, P. D. Brown, who married Miss Florence 
Bodenhimer, of Philadelphia, Pa., is yet a young 
man. He has a post-graduate education, has al- 
ready done much good work, and stands high in 
the estimation of his people and the North Caro- 
lina Synod. He has a bright future before him. 
He is serving his first and only parish at Hgih 
Point. 

All these were at one time boys on the farm, 
and without any special wealth, but by that ener- 
getic and persevering spirit of the Brown blood 
they made themselves what they are. 

But returning to the subject of Michael Brown. 
Some say that he was married several times, but 
we cannot find any record of more than two mar- 
riages. The Christian name of his first wife was 
Margareta, and that of his second was Eleanor. 
He had a large family, six sons and three daugh- 
ters by his first wife, and a fourth daughter by 
his second wife. 

As his descendents in this County, State and 
other States are numerous, the reader may not 
object to some of their names, location and rela- 
tions, as far as can now be ascertained. Hence, 
we are here giving a list of his children, that is, 
of the boys. We have no record of the one son 
or of any of the girls, except the youngest, (by 
his last wife). Later on wc will give some ac- 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 45 

count of this one and follow her posterity as far 
as information can be obtained. 

Much of this history has been lost, and much of 
what we herewith give must be credited to the 
memor>' of aged friends. It is not certain that 
we can give the names of his sons in the order of 
their seniority. There is a difference of opinion 
as to these names and their posterity. 



CHAPTER VIII 

NAMES OF MICHAEL BROWN's SONS 

We give the names of the five sons mentioned 
in his will: David, Peter, Moses, James and 
Jeremiah. 

1. David: Some give John as the oldest and 
omit David, but we are certain that David was 
one of the boys, as Michael Brown, in his will, 
mentions " my son David." He also must have 
been the oldest, being first mentioned in the will, 
and according to dates, the first children of 
David Brown seem to be the oldest grandchildren 
that Michael Brown had. As David was a 
farmer who settled and died in the country, he 
and his children may not have obtained as much 
publicity as those who moved to Salisbury. How- 
ever, David was a prominent man in his day, and 
had a large family, which will be referred to 
more definitely later on. 

2. Peter: We have two accounts of Peter 
Brown. The first record mentions him as the 
second son with a large family of children, many 
of whom, in the recollection of the writer, are not 
regarded as near relation to the Brown family; 
the other gives Peter Brown as a third son of 
Michael Brown with only a small family. This 
last account is based on data taken from the toml>- 

40 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEIr BROWN FAMILY 47 

Stone in the old Lutheran graveyard in Salis- 
bury near the railroad depot, and we are rather 
inclined to hold to the facts given elsewhere in 
this history. 

Peter Brown married Miss Susanna Bruner, 
a daughter of Mr. George Bruner, who lived at 
the place which has for a long time been called 
the Dr. Albert Powe Home. This couple was 
blessed with a number of children. Their daugh- 
ter, Elizabeth, married Thomas L. Cowan, of 
Salisbury, who was the mother of the late Mrs. 
Charlotte Jenkins and Mrs. Mary Hall. Mary, 
another daughter, married Barney Bowers. 
Susan married a Mr. Thompson, of Randolph. 
Margaret married Joseph Chambers, of Iredell 
County, and was the mother of Major P. B. 
Chambers, of Statesville. Sally married Dr. 
Satterwhite. 

Besides these daughters, Peter and Susanna 
had two sons; the late Michael and George 
Brown, of Salisbury. These two sons married 
daughters of Alexander Long, of Yadkin Ferry, 
and sisters of the late Alexander Long, of 
Salisbury. 

Peter Brown first settled about two or three 
miles east of Salisbury, but soon moved into town. 
He purchased the building on the west corner of 
Main and Ennis Streets, where he conducted a 
store for many years. The place was afterward 
occupied by his son until about 1860. It is com- 



48 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

monly known as the McNealy Corner, which was 
later occupied by Ross & Green, and now by the 
Davis & Wiley Bank. 

3. Moses: This son was born February 24th, 
1773, and married Catharine Swink. The oldest 
son of Moses and Catharine Brown was named 
Michael S., and was born December 28th, 1797. 
He lived near his birthplace and had several chil- 
dren. He died November 28th, 1849. 

A second son of Moses Brown, and a grandson 
of Michael Brown, was the late Moses L. Brown, 
of Salisbury, who lived in the Martin Richwine 
residence, and his daughters, IMrs. Richwine and 
Mrs. Johnson, made their homes in Salisbury. 

Another son of Moses Brown (son of Mich- 
ael), was the late Peter Brown, of Charlotte. 
Peter M. Brown was first married to Elizabeth 
Poole, of Salisbury, by whom he had two chil- 
dren, — John L. Brown, of Charlotte, and Mar- 
garet C. Brown, who was married to Dr. John R. 
Dillard, of Virginia. John L. Brown, of Char- 
lotte, married Miss Nancy J., daughter of the late 
Jennings R. Kerr, of Charlotte. He represented 
his County, Mecklinburg, three sessions in the 
Legislature, each time being almost unanimously 
elected. 

Moses Brown (son of Michael Brown) also 
had another son, Alfred Brown, who settled in 
Concord, and had two daughters, Sophia and 
Sally. 



HISTORY OF THK MICHAKL BROWN FAMILY 49 

4. James: The fourth son of Michael Brown 
of the Stone House was named James. He set- 
tled, and spent his days, in the old neighborhood, 
and his descendents settled not far from the place 
of their nativity. 

5. Jeremiah: The youngest son of Michael 
Brown of the Stone House was Jeremiah. He 
married the widow of Tobias Furr. Mrs, Furr 
was the mother of several children by her first 
husband. Mary Furr married John Murphy; 
Ehzabeth Furr married Samuel Lemby; and 
Louise Furr married William H. Horah, all of 
Salisbury. 

By her marriage with Jeremiah Brown she had 
three children. Margaret married Thomas Dick- 
son, Delia married John Cougenhour; and the 
late Col. Jeremiah M. Brown, whose widow and 
children made their homes in SaHsbury, Miss 
Bessie Brandt Brown, a descendent, has fur- 
nished us with a complete history of this branch 
of the Michael Brown family, which appears else- 
where in this history. 

6. We shall have something to say about the 
sixth son when we come to the Sixth Branch of 
the Brown Family. When we come to the chap- 
ter on the family graveyard we will show evidence 
that the three girls by his first wife died single, 
likely in infancy. 

The second wife of Michael Brown of the 
Stone House was Mrs. Eleanor Reeves. Mrs. 



50 HISTORY OF THE) MICHAEI. BROWN FAMILY 

Reeves was a Maryland lady ; her maiden name 
was Wakefield. She was first married to William 
Reeves when quite young, by whom she had four 
children, viz. : Thomas, Samuel, Sally and Nancy. 
Samuel was the late Samuel Reeves, who was the 
father of Dr. Samuel Reeves, and Mrs. Sarah 
Johnson. Nancy and Sally were with her when 
she married Michael Brown of the Stone House. 
Nancy Reeves married a Mr. Kiestler, and was 
the mother of Mrs. Jane Price, and the grand- 
mother of Robert Wakefield Price, and others of 
Salisbury. 

By her marriage with Michael Brown, she 
(Mrs. Reeves) had one child, whose name was 
Clementine, who afterward married Charles 
Verble ; and Mr. Verble's daughter, Eleanor, mar- 
ried Mr. Thomas E. Brown, and was the mother 
of Lewis V. Brown, of Texas, and Frank Brown, 
of Salisbury. 

Of the three daughters of Michael Brown re- 
ferred to on the tombstone in the graveyard, the 
writer has not been able to find any trace. They 
may have died young, or single, consequently left 
no family of children to be traced. If they had 
left any posterity, undoubtedly some one would 
have known something of them. 

We may here remark that the German name, 
or word " Braun " signifies dark, or brown in 
color, and is pronounced in German exactly as our 
English word brown. Therefore the descendcnts 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 51 

of old Michael Braun discarded the German 
spelling and signed themselves " Brown," a name 
and not a color. Although the original name and 
spelling signified a hue of the skin, we are abun- 
dantly sustained in saying that this generation is 
as fair in complexion as any other name, and by 
a glance over the foregoing, and a comparison 
with others at this day, you will find that they 
not only compare favorably in fairness of face, 
but that they also stand in the front rank in in- 
dustry, honesty, prosperity and success. In real- 
ity, the name signifies much. While many of the 
family have married into different names, they 
have, as a rule, carried v/ith them the reputation 
of honesty, sobriety and economy. This seems to 
have been deep-seated in our great-grandfather. 

Some one has said that " a man is an omnibus 
in which all his ancestors are seated." This 
seems to be true of the Brown family. A Greek 
maid, being asked what fortune she would bring 
her husband, answered, " I will bring him what 
is more valuable than any treasure; a heart un- 
spotted and a virtue without a stain, which is all 
that has been descended to me from my par- 
ents. Such a dowry in a woman is a valuable 
inheritance. 

Have we then not cause to be proud of the 
name "Brown" and its posterity? We should 
certainly do all we can to hold up the morals, hon- 



52 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

esty and reputation of our family. We should 
now, and we believe our posterity will give special 
care and attention to the memory of their dead as 
long as time lasts. 



CHAPTER IX . 

INTEGRITY AND PATRIOTISM OF MICHAEL BROWN's 
POSTERITY 

Something has already been said of the moral 
soundness of this generation of citizens, but a 
few more lines in this connection may not be out 
of place. 

We find that the original Michael Brown was a 
church worker, at one time a trustee of the lands 
now belonging to the Union Evangelical Luth- 
eran Church, hence he must have been a member 
of that church and faith, and doubtless was a 
strong arm in the support of the same. We also 
know that the majority of his posterity are 
staunch Christians, many of them still adhering 
to the Lutheran faith. 

We are also positive that he was honest, be- 
cause the very first provision made in his last will 
and testament was that his just and lawful debts 
be paid before any other claims could come in. 
This trait of character runs through his succeed- 
ing families to the present day. As a rule, you 
will find them a law-abiding people. Honesty is 
their standpoint ; uprightness is one of their in- 
delible marks ; virtue their ensign ; goodness their 
associate; and a good moral principle the sign 
board to their success. 

53 



54 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

As to education, wealth and religious training 
you will find them in the first ranks. Their origi- 
nal name Braun (German) implies a tanned or 
sunburnt complexion. This may be true be- 
cause they were, origfinally, farmers. The idea 
of earning their bread by the sweat of their face 
seems to have been born in them, even their 
ministers were at one time field hands and farm- 
ers, but they had that determinative spirit that 
led them from the plowhandles to the Gospel 
ministry. 

If we were to represent the Brown posterity 
in military terms, we would have a platoon of 
ministers, teachers, professors, lawyers and doc- 
tors; and many other useful offices success- 
fully filled from the same family; and all of 
them backed up by a corps of farmers, garden- 
ers, truckers, etc. In short, the Browns stand in 
the first line with any other name in this country. 
The family has so much of the Brown blood in 
it, of tenacity, perseverance, push and pull, that 
they have been brought to this high standing, and 
we believe will be able to maintain that spirit until 
the end of time. 

As to the patriotism of these Browns, we must 
say that it was in the blood of our great- 
grandfather, and seems to have been transmitted 
from one generation to another until it has come 
down to the present day. The Stone House built 
by Grandpa Brown must have been constructed 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 55 

with the idea in mind that a war was brewing, 
hence presents a face and spirit of defence. We 
know he lived in the days of the Revolutionary 
struggles; that his wife had trouble with the 
Tories ; that his sons were of the right age to be 
good soldiers ; and we know that one of the 
Browns was called ** Continental John Brown," 
probably so called because he took some note- 
worthy steps, or performed some commendable 
deeds in defence of the Continental troops. 
Hence the spirit of patriotism is evident. 

In the Civil War the Browns held their posi- 
tion with such bravery that we never knew of one 
of them to be shot in the back. The writer spent 
three years of his life in this service as a soldier, 
went through many fearful battles, faced some of 
the most dangerous places and hardships, but 
never knew of a Brown to desert his post. 

In the World War they were equally numbered 
with other names, and stood side by side with 
their fellow soldiers. 

The Brown family was originally Lutheran, 
and the Reformer after whom the Lutheran 
Church was named was a native of Germany, 
hence, it was thought for a time that the Luth- 
erans were Teutonic in principle. Let those 
thoughts run as they may, most Lutherans have 
as much American patriotism in them as any 
other people and perhaps more so; and when it 
comes to loyalty the Browns are as true as the 



56 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

truest. When it comes to standing by their flag 
in their native country, and in the defence of the 
same, they are there. The Stars and Stripes is 
the flag of the United States, made here and 
made for us, and we may venture to say that the 
whole Brown family will stand by the Stars and 
Stripes in defence of our country to the bitter 
end. They glory in the Red, White and Blue, and 
are always ready to rest securely under its pro- 
tection. From the Adjutant General's ofHce, in 
Washington, D. C, we learn that soldiers by the 
name of David and James Brown, from North 
Carolina, served in the Continental Army and in 
all probability these were sons of Michael Brown. 

To shoulder a gun, and start out with an am- 
bition to face an enemy is not the only, and some- 
times not any sign of patriotism. Love and kind- 
ness to each other, care for the poor, the sick and 
suffering; love for the church and right; sacri- 
fices for the spread of the Gospel, and the wel- 
fare of others stand as high in the line of the 
characteristics of patriotism as the man with a 
gun on his shoulder and always yearning for war. 

Then we find another line of patriotism in this 
family. They are law-abiding citizens. Conten- 
tion and strife are almost strangers to the Brown 
family, and courts and prisons are almost super- 
fluous as far as this name goes. They are patri- 
otic enough to attend to their own business, and 
expect the other fellow to do the same. At the 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 57 

present day it requires a good deal of patriotism 
to do this. To stand by their own constitution is 
one of their leading mottoes. Something of 
Michael Brown's citizenship is seen in the fact 
that he is on the records as having served on jury 
duty March 7, 1777. In the first Federal Census 
ever taken in Rowan, 1790, his family (repre- 
sented as consisting of " 5 free white males of 16 
years and upward and 2 free white females ") are 
mentioned. He at that time possessed 15 slaves. 
A copy of these records can be seen in any State 
Historical Society library. 



CHAPTER X 



THE STONE HOUSE AND INCIDENTS IN CONNECTION 
THEREWITH 

About three miles south of Sahsbury, and near 
the supposed Indian path, or trail, from other 
sections to the town of Sapona at Trading- Ford, 
stands a remarkable relic of the early settlers of 
Rowan County. It is known far and wide as the 
Old Stone House. 

A large smooth stone over the front door tells 
the visitor that Michael Braun (Brown) erected 
this house in the year 1766, and contains the fol- 
lowing lettering : 



MICHAEL. BRAUN. MRICHREDA 

BRAUN. io. PE WE- BE 

MI. CH. DA- M'i766 



The house is built of native granite stones, well 
shaped, but unhewed. The walls are started 
some twelve or fifteen feet in the ground and 
finished with the same native, picked up stone or 

58 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 59 

blocks to the top of the gables, laid in cement so 
durable that it still stands out in ridges between 
the rock. 

In the gables are port holes perhaps made with 
a view of defence against the Indians. Mr. 
Brown must have had some knowledge of the 
nearness of the Revolutionary War. The lower 
floor contained five rooms, all of which were well 
finished with plaster. At one end of the house 
there is a double chimney with fire places in the 
corners of two adjoining rooms, so that one 
chimney answered for both rooms and these 
chimneys were built in the wall so as not to show 
their appearance at the top of the gables or top of 
the building. At the other end there is a huge 
chimney facing outward around which was built a 
wooden kitchen. This chimney is eight feet in the 
clear and four feet deep. 

Michael Brown not only provided a substantial 
house to live in, but also had large ideas in regard 
to cooking facilities, and no doubt many big din- 
ners were cooked there in the olden times. The 
most curious part of the arrangements was a 
wonderful fire box, stove or oven in the east end, 
or room of the house that was fed through an 
opening in the back of this huge chimney. It 
probably was used as an oven and not as a stove 
as it had no other outlet but this chimney ; heated 
by fire, and fuel put in it through this opening, 
and after it was fully heated the fire v/as drawn 



60 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

out into this fireplace and the baking done from 
the heat that remained in this huge fire-box. It 
was something similar to our former family ovens 
built of brick out in the yard, heated in like man- 
ner, and the housewife could bake a supply for 
the family at one time or from one heating. 
These old bake ovens are still fresh in the mem- 
ory of nearly all of our older people to this day. 
It may be that succeeding settlers got their ideas 
of the dirt oven from this arrangement, intro- 
duced in this County by our great-grandfather, 
Michael Brown. 

The plates of this ancient fire-box, stove or 
oven are still lying there, massive in form, and 
highly ornamented with curious figures, circular, 
oval and diamond shaped, with flowers and vases 
filled with lilies and lanceolate leaves. 

On one plate is this inscription : 

C O M. B A N. N9 
1766 

Another plate contains the following: 

GEORGE ROSS.ANN (AND) MARY ANN 
FURNACE 

It appears that George Ross and Mary Ann's 
combination (company), wherever it was located, 
had some original methods of spelling, and 
" Mary Ann " had practical ideas about woman's 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 61 

rights, and had succeeded in transmitting her own 
name along with George's to posterity. 

The north side of the building was covered with 
cypress or cedar shingles. They were probably 
put there in 1766 or before, and remained for one 
hundred fifteen or twenty years, were well cov- 
ered with lichen and moss, and had turned the 
rains for many summers and upheld the snows of 
many winters. But after serving their purpose so 
long and faithfully, time made marks upon them 
and they had to be removed and pine shingles put 
in their place; but the old building still stands, 
built one hundred and fifty-five years ago. The 
first shingles were fastened with shop nails, that 
is, nails made in the blacksmith shop by hand, 
one at a time. This would now seem to be almost 
impossible, but the patience and conscientiousness 
of the people of that day are evident, and the nails 
are there to show for themselves. Many of the 
nails used in other parts of the building were 
made in the same way, comparatively rust-proof, 
good and sound. 

Tradition says that the main part of the Brit- 
ish Army passed by this Stone House on the 
evening of February 2. 1781, on its way to the 
Trading Ford crossing of the Yadkin River, 
headed for the Alamance battlefield, and from 
there to Yorktown. It has been constantly re- 
ported that when the army was passing the Stone 
House, an American officer, who was probably on 



62 HISTORY OF THE MICH.\EI. BROWN FAMILY 

a reconnoitering expedition, was nearly overtaken 
by the British dragoons near this house. He 
seemed to have but one way of escape; although 
hazardous, it was better to risk it than be cap- 
tured, consequently when he saw these dragoons 
coming thundering down the hill in front of the 
house the American turned his horse and fled for 
his life. The only way of escape seemed through 
the house, so he rode in full speed through the 
front door, about level with the ground, (as the 
house stands on a slope the other side is some 
eight or ten feet high) leaped his horse out of the 
back door, and made his way to the thickets and 
branch bottom, about one hundred and fifty yards 
away, thence proceeded on towards Salisbury in 
safety. 

Another local tradition tells of a furious hand 
to hand encounter between an American and a 
British soldier in the front door of this same 
building. There is a deep gash in the old walnut 
facing of the door, which has been there for one 
hundred and twenty years as a living testimony 
to the event referred to, seen by many visitors 
and said to have been made by the swords of these 
parties in a struggle for mastery. There can be 
but little doubt but what some such conflict took 
place. These cuts and gashes could have been 
made with some other instrument, but the de- 
scendents of old Michael Brown who have occu- 
pied the house from his day until several years 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 63 

ago have substantiated these statements. In time 
new facings took the place of the old ones. 

Another tradition relates a similar incident, 
that at one time this house was used as a prison 
where the British kept prisoners of the Colonies 
for safety, and while in this prison one of the 
Americans made a plunge for his liberty, and as 
he leaped through the window a British guard 
struck at him with his saber, but missing his 
object made a severe gash in the window facing. 
This also remained there with the marks in the 
door facing. These things and facts have not 
only been handed down from one generation of 
Browns to another, substantially the same, but 
the writer was a playmate of the family and saw 
them himself. 

(Very recent information.) We are told that 
the door facing was never removed but was boxed 
over by Thomas Brown and that the gash in the 
door facing remains there to this day but behind 
the boxing. Tear that away and you can see the 
saber mark with your own eyes. We are also 
told that there is a pit or depression in the ground 
about one-half mile northwest of the Stone House 
that is said to be the place where dead soldiers 
were thrown in from a battle fought somewhere 
not far from that place. The ground had sunk 
so much as to prevent ploughing through it. This 
all goes to prove that there evidently was consid- 



64 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

erable struggling between the British and the 
Colonists around the Stone House. 

At that day there were Tories in the country' 
who made it a business to pilfer, rob and steal at 
every opportunity, anything they could find, and 
in the absence of ample protection, innocent 
women often had to resort to strategy to save 
what they had. These Tories would go right into 
the houses and seize anything they could lay their 
hands on. We are told that when Mrs. Brown 
would see the Tories coming, if there was any 
money in the house, she would get it, pick up the 
half bushel, put the money under it and sit upon 
it while the Tories were looting the house, and 
would sit there until all were gone. Mrs. Brown 
must have been a Bible reader and known what 
Rachel did when her father Laban was in pursuit 
of Jacob and his family, looking for some prop- 
erty he claimed had been stolen (see Genesis 
31:34). 

The writer has been told by his cousin, who 
was then living in the house, that there were 
various departments under the floor, (the house 
is on a steep slope) where meat, flour and valu- 
ables were stored away, having secret doors or 
entrances that no one knew or could detect but 
those who had the proper instructions. We have 
often played around this old Stone House, ran 
over the hills and across the gullies ; many times 
sat by the hre in the eight-foot chimney, and ate 



HISTORY OF THEMICHAEIy BROWN FAMIL'? 60 

many meals that were cooked by that fire. We 
also rambled around in that house from room to 
room, and up and down stairs, but we have never 
been able to detect any of the secret doors, or 
departments under the floor, referred to by our 
cousin, but we do know that the stairs wind 
around a large box instead of a post. This box 
is open at the upper end, and is large enough to 
receive a good chunk of meat, flour or other eat- 
ables, so large that it is reported a negro slave 
boy slid down into it to hide and avoid punish- 
ment. Where and how the bottom end is we do 
not know. Perhaps it opens into some of those 
secret departments under the floor. 

(Later.) Since the house is not occupied, and 
has been left to the weather and time, the floor 
in some way, and by somebody has been torn up, 
and the truth of the statement made by our cousin 
has been verified. The ground under the floor is 
full of pits, trenches and passages from one side 
of the house to the other. These were, of course, 
built for a purpose, but the opening into them 
from above may still be a secret, and no doubt 
will remain so for some time. We are of the 
opinion that there is no man now living who is 
better able to testify to the events referred to 
above than we are, as we have known the house 
from childhood. 

We are not able to understand why our great- 
grandfather, with so much land, and so wise in 



66 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Other things, would select such an unsightly place, 
so near a marshy branch, and on quicksand 
ground, to build such a nice, large and substantial 
domicile. In all probability it was the abundant 
flow of clear and healthy spring water that came 
gushing from among the great granite stones near 
the place. It is very likely that at the time of the 
erection of this building that part of the country 
was a massive forest with swamps on one side and 
granite mountains on the other ; a diversified wil- 
derness. Perhaps, also, as the Revolutionary 
War was brewing, he did not care to locate on any 
public road or any conspicuous place. Then his 
great chums, the Dunns, were joining him on this 
side, and as neighbors were scarce, very likely 
some of these things had their influence to draw 
him to this, in our opinion, very unattractive 
place. Notwithstanding these disadvantages the 
house has been standing and been occupied nearly 
all the time for one hundred and fifty years, as a 
living monument and witness to the events that 
transpired there. 

Note — Since the above criticism of the loca- 
tion was written, we have been informed that the 
public highway formerly ran just in front of the 
old home. This, together with the close proxim- 
ity of pure spring water and stone from the 
quarry belt, doubtless had weight in bringing 
about this decision. 



CHAPTER XI 

THE LANDS OF MICHAEL BROWN 

Michael Brown must have been an extensive 
freeholder, perhaps he owned several hundred or 
a thousand acres of land, and built near the east- 
ern line and comparatively in the swamps. This 
line on the east side must have been somewhere 
between the Stone House and Dunn's Mountain, 
which is not a mile away, and must have been 
owned by the Dunns and so got its name. This 
line runs north and south, or nearly so, crossing 
Crane Creek about midway between Stokes Ferry 
and Gold Hill roads, and crosses the Gold Hill 
road about two miles from Salisbury near what 
is known as Tar Kiln Branch, and continues that 
direction to, or near to the road from Salisbury 
to Concord, then runs south, or southeast to near 
where the Mt. Pleasant Road crosses Crane 
Creek, leading on across the country west of 
Granite Quarry, and then east to the eastern line, 
crossing back over the Gold Hill public road near 
the " Five Mile Post." This plot would embrace 
the land owned by several of his children, such as 
David, James and Moses ; or his grandchildren, 
perhaps better known as Michael, Henry, Peter, 
Moses, James, Alexander, Jacob and William. 

67 



68 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEIv BROWN FAMILY 

The last named were all grandchildren of old 
Michael Brown, and probably settled on the land 
that was willed to their fathers by their grand- 
father, Michael. Some of the land still remains 
in the hands of the family, but much of it has 
gone to others. We are still able to hold our 
meetings on the land that was once owned by our 
great-grandfather whose memory is so dear to us. 

LAND GRANTED TO MICHAEL BROWN 

While this history was in preparation Rev. 
Canup communicated with the Secretary of State, 
at Raleigh, N. C, relative to lands granted to 
Michael Brown. The records in the Department 
of State, at Raleigh, show that four grants were 
issued to Michael Brown himself, that two others 
were issued to him and John Dunn jointly and a 
seventh was issued to Michael Brown and Fred- 
erick Fisher in trust of the congregation of the 
Dutch Pine Meeting House. We herewith pub- 
lish these grants, copies of which were furnished 
from the office of the Secretary of State. Sup- 
posing that he and John Dunn equally shared in 
the grants issued to them jointly, these grants 
alone make him the possessor of more than one 
thousand acres. This does not include property 
which he purchased, records of which are to be 
found in the office of the Register of Deeds at 
Salisbury. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 69 

From the boundary lines given in these grants 
many of our older citizens may be able yet to-day 
to trace the original possessions of our rich 
ancestor. 

Book 80, page 482.' 
File 3022. 

State of North Carolina. 
No. 2202. 

Know Ye That We have granted unto Michael 
Brown and Frederick Fisher in trust of the con- 
gregation of the Dutch Pine Meeting House One 
hundred and eighteen acres of land in our County 
of Rowan On the West side of the South fork of 
Crane creek beginning at a large White Oak near 
the meeting house Conrad Breams corner and 
running South sixty-two degrees West fifty 
chains to a black jack oak thence South twenty- 
two degrees East fifteen chains to a white oak 
thence East thirty-seven chains to a black oak 
then North twenty-one chains to a hickory then 
East ten chains and fifty links to an oak then 
eight chains and seventy-five links to a post oak 
then to the Beginning. To hold to the said Brown 
and Fisher and their survivors and successors 
forever dated 26th of November, 1773. 

Richard Dobbs Spaight. 
J. Glasgow, Secretary. 



70 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Book 67, page 113. 
File 2155. 

State of North Carolina. 
No. 1370. 

Know Ye That We have given and granted 
unto John Dunn & Michael Brown a Tract of 
Land in our County of Rowan containing Three 
hundred Acres on the South side of Dunns 
Mountain and on the Waters of Crane creek and 
Beginning at a post oak South of a branch runs 
North fifteen chains to a small hickory East fif- 
teen chains to a small red oak thence North 
thirty-five chains to a post oak thence West 
sixty-five chains to a hickory South fifty chains 
to a small red oak thence East to the Beginning. 
To Hold unto the said John Dunn & Michael 
Brown their Heirs and Assigns forever dated the 
25th of October, 1786. 

R. Caswell. 
J. Glasgow, Secretary. 

Book 67. page 191. 
File 2359. 

State of North Carolina. 
No. 1574. 

Know ye that We have given and granted unto 
Michael Brown a Tract of land Containing Thirty 
Acres lying and being in our County of Rowan 
On the East side of Crane creek — Beginning at a 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 71 

black oak on the line of said Browns of another 
Tract and corner to another Tract that said 
Brown bought of John Dunn and runs North 
fifteen chains to a black oak by the head of a 
spring his Corner then along his line East twenty 
chains to a Maple then South fifteen chains to a 
stake on Jacob Browns line then along his line 
West to the Beginning. To hold to the said 
Michael Brown his Heirs and Assigns forever 
dated the 9th day of August, 1787. 

R. Caswell. 
J. Glasgow, Secretary. 

Book 67, page 146. 
File 2246. 

State of North Carolina. 
No. 1461. 

Know ye that We have given and granted unto 
Michael Brown a Tract of land in Our County of 
Rowan containing Three hundred and seventy- 
four Acres On the Waters of the middle fork of 
Crane creek and the waters of the South fork of 
said Creek including a part of Dunns Mountain. 
Beginning at a black oak Charles Dunns corner 
and runs West thirty-five chains to a Lightwood 
stake in Jacob Browns field and on said Brown 
line thence along his line South fifty-three chains 
to the centre between the black oak in an old road 
then West twenty-eight chains to a hickory said 



72 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Browns corner then South along Michael Browns 
line thirty chains to a stake on the line of an- 
other tract then along that line East sixty-three 
chains to a stake Charles Dunns corner thence 
along his line North to the Beginning. To Hold 
unto the said Michael Brown His Heirs and As- 
signs forever dated the 9th day of August, 1787. 

R. Caswell. 
J. Glasgow, Secretary. 

Book 114, page 32. 
File 3594. 

State of North Carolina. 
No. 2764. 

Know ye that We have granted unto Michael 
Brown & John Dunn Five hundred and forty- 
seven Acres of Land in Rowan County lying on 
the Waters of Crane Creek Beginning at a White 
Oak in their West line of another tract, and nms 
South fifteen chains to a black Oak Sapling, 
thence West thirty chains to a black oak Sapling, 
South twenty-five chains to a Post Oak, West 
thirty-five chains to a black oak on William Mc- 
Brides line, North four and a half chains to a 
White Oak said Mc Brides corner West forty 
chains to a post oak said McBrides corner North 
forty chains to a post Oak on Michael Brown's 
line. East twelve and a half chains to a black 
oak. North forty-five chains to a black jack on 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 73 

Jacob Browns line and Michael Brown's corner, 
East fifty chains to a Hickory corner to their 
former survey. South forty-nine chains and fifty 
links to a small red Oak said Dunn's & Brown's 
corner, thence East to the Beginning. To Hold 
to the said Michael Brown & John Dunn their 
Heirs and Assigns forever. Dated the 12th of 
December, 1801. 

B. Williams. 
Will White, Secretary. 

Book 121, Page 104. 
File 3699. 

State of North Carolina. 
No. 2877. 

Know Ye, that we, have granted unto Michael 
Brown eighty acres of land in Rowan County ly- 
ing on the branches of Crane Creek. Beginning 
at a black oak bush John Brown's corner in the 
said Michael Browns old line on the East side of 
the Pee dee road and running thence with Johns 
line South thirty-four chains to a black oak David 
Garners Corner on the top of a hill, thence with 
his line East twenty-three chains and fifty links 
crossing the road to a black jack in said Brown's 
old line, thence with the same North thirty- four 
chains to a stake his corner, thence with the same 
again West to the Beginning. Entered 19th 
Januar>', 1802. To Hold to the said Michael 



74 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Brown his heirs and assigns forever, dated 28th 
November, 1805. 

J. Turner. 
Will White, Secretary. 

Book 121, page 102. 
File 3696. 

State of North Carolina. 
No. 2874. 

Know Ye, that we, have granted unto Michael 
Brown Senr. one hundred and three acres of land 
in Rowan County on the Waters of Crane creek, 
Beginning at a hockry formerly supposed to be 
the North East corner of his old tract and is a 
comer of a tract of three hundred and seventy- 
four acres of which includes Dunns Mountain, 
thence with the line of the said tract South three 
degrees East one hundred and twenty poles to a 
stake its corner, thence with its line East thirty- 
six poles to a black Jack a corner to a tract of 
five hundred and forty-seven acres, thence with 
its line South one hundred and ninety-eight poles 
to a Small black Tack, thence West fifty pole to a 
small dead post oak On the line of an eighty acre 
tract thence North twenty-two pole to a black 
Jack, thence West nine pole to a dead black oak a 
corner of the old tract thence North three de- 
grees West two hundred and ninety-six pole to a 
small black oak and white oak thence East thirty- 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 75 

four pole to the beginning. Entered 14th March, 
1804. To Hold to the said Michad Brown his 
heirs and assigns forever dated 28th November, 
1805. 

J. Turner. 

Will White, Secretary. 



CHAPTER XII 

THE GRAVlvYARD 

Just a few hundred yards southwest of the 
Stone House is a burying ground known as the 
" Stone House Graveyard " or family cemetery. 
These family burying places were very common 
among the early settlers. Churches Vv^ere not so 
plentiful, and a considerable distance from some 
sections, hence each section would select some 
suitable place on a farm and a number of families 
would bury their dead together at these selected 
places. After churches, and church cemeteries, 
became more numerous, many of these farm plots 
were neglected; some of them have passed into 
oblivion and the places are known to us no more. 
Rich harvests have been reaped from such soil 
and very likely we are to-day being fed from the 
ashes of our forefathers. Children and posterity 
should have cared for and held these places in 
sacred memory, instead some of them may be 
feasting on the substance that gave them birth. 
This is unfortunate for a civilized, educated and 
religious country. More fortunate, however, for 
the bodies of the early Brown settlers; they were, 
and are still, being cared for, and their last rest- 
ing place is in a fair way of being preserved for 
ages to come. 

76 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 77 

It seems that Grandpa Brown, or some of his 
near successors, had a wall of round, or rough 
stones put around the grave of Mr. Brown's first 
wife, inclosing a plot of several yards square. At 
the entrance there are two large granite posts 
marking the gateway into this ground. If there 
ever was a gate there it must have been of wood, 
for we are not now able to find any traces of it. 
A mulberry snag still stands there, the sprout of 
which may have been planted to shade the grave 
of Margareta, the first wife of Michael Brown. 
At one time it was a large tree, and the writer 
remembers when its cooling branches spread out 
over this grave. This burying-ground, like many 
others, had to a certain extent been neglected for 
many years, much of the wall had fallen down, 
thickets had grown up around and in it, hence 
it could scarcely be found. At the second meet- 
ing of the Brown Family Association, held at 
Granite Quarry on August 26, 1915, a reso- 
lution was passed to re-build this wall; a com- 
mittee was appointed to look after the place, keep 
the walls in good condition, and the ground 
cleared. Part of this work was done without 
delay, the wall is now replaced and the thickets 
cleared away. It is now under the supervision of 
this Committee and the Brown Family Associ- 
ation. A deed has been secured, and made to 
the present officers and their successors, as long 
as this Organization shall exist. If it ever ceases 



78 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

to be, the plot goes back to the original owner, 
Mrs. Martha Brown Barnhart, her heirs and pos- 
terity. Mrs. Barnhart, in her wisdom and Chris- 
tian affection for the dead, excepted the grave- 
yard when she sold her part of the homestead, 
hence she had a right to make this deed as she 
thought best. 

Just inside of the two large stone posts referred 
to above, is a large marble slab, 12 or more inches 
wide, 4 or more inches thick, and from 3 to 4 
feet out of the ground, seemingly as steady 
and erect as when first put there; standing, 
as a sentinel on post, watching over the ashes of 
Margareta, now more than one hundred and fifty 
years, and we hope will stand there for all time, 
and show to all passersby that it is still respecting 
the ashes of our dear grandmother. On its face 
it bears the following inscription : 

1771 

" Gestorban Julius 20, 
Heir lieght der leib 
Marcareda Brown des 
Ml. Braun's ehe weibe 
Hat 9 kinder, 6 Sons 
3 d.— alt. Z7 Jahr 2 mo." 

The above inscription is in the dialect known 
in North Carolina as the Pennsylvania Dutch. 
The following is, perhaps, a correct interpreta- 
tion of the epitaph: 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 79 
1771 

" Here lies the body of Margareta Brown, the 
wife of Michael Brown. Died July 20, 1771, 
Age 37 years and two months. She had nine 
children, six sons and three daughters." 

To the above facts this remarkable slab has 
been testifying for a century and a half. Part of 
the time, yes, for many years, it was shaded by 
the large old mulberry tree, which has of late 
given way, and fallen into decay, but the stone 
still stands unflinchingly testifying to the truth 
as given above. But there is something strange 
about the singleness of this stone, and the Michael 
Brown family. While the plot is about full of 
graves, and other tombstones stand in different 
places, we cannot find any further testimony to 
the ashes of any other of the immediate family of 
Michael Brown. In 1807, after he had been mar- 
ried for some time to Eleanor (the widow 
Reeves), his second wife, he made his will in her 
interest and that of the children of his first wife, 
but there are no further records about him. All 
history, posterity and tradition testify to the fact 
that Michael Brown was buried there, but nothing 
on this slab indicates it. From the environment 
we may form some very reasonable conclusions. 
There is a space fifteen or more feet to the right 
of this grave that is said to be filled, but no one 
now living can tell whose ashes lie there. It may 



80 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEI. BROWN FAMILY 

very reasonably be assumed that Mr. Brown had 
this slab put at the head of his first wife's grave, 
had it enclosed, the mulberry tree planted, etc., 
with the intention of having similar slabs put to 
all the other graves of the family; but wooden 
slabs may have been put there for a time only, 
and for some unaccounted reason they were never 
replaced by anything more lasting, hence nothing 
remains to show just whose ashes occupy that 
space. 

There was a family graveyard on the Tvloses 
Brown Farm (the Haines place), but we have no 
evidence that any of Michael Brown's immediate 
family was buried there, or anywhere else but in 
the old Stone House graveyard. As to the three 
daughters by his first wife, w^e have no record. 
Perhaps they died young. Tradition says that 
there are some graves outside of the original w^all 
of this cemetery. One is a Mr. Earnhart's, a 
white man, while another is that of George 
Brown, a slave of Michael Brown, who in some 
way was killed while the Stone House was being 
built. He was buried just outside of the gateway, 
and near the old mulberry tree. 

It is hoped that the land around the graveyard 
will some day fall into the hands of the Michael 
Brown Family Association, so that there will be 
plenty of room for our annual associations, pic- 
nics, etc. The old Stone House is in a neglected 
condition, and in the hands of strangers, and if 



HISTORY OF THE MICHA^Iv BROWN FAMILY 81 

something is not done for its care and restoration 
it will soon be a thing of the past. It is to be 
regretted that nothing has been done sooner. 

At one time it was thought that if the old house 
was in the hands of this Association, it might be 
repaired and used as an archive for our minutes, 
records, histor\', etc. ; but as it has gone so far 
towards demolition as to be almost beyond re- 
pairs, it may be wiser in the end to build some 
kind of a monument or archives on the ground of 
the graveyard that will be substantial and mod- 
ern. We hope these Hnes will suggest some 
thought, and conclusion, that in time will ma- 
terialize in something substantial to the sacred 
memory of the dead, and in everlasting memory 
to the posterity of Michael Brown. Those who 
read these lines should think and devise some 
plan for some structure at this graveyard that 
will be a living and everlasting protection to these 
sacred grounds. We do not know what the 
growth of Granite Quarry may be ; or how soon 
and near this place a large cotton plant, or some 
other machinery may be located, and the grounds 
and graves overrun. Where there is a will there 
is a way. There is wealth enough in Michael 
Brown's posterity to build any monument desired. 
This, also, would help to hold the ties or affections 
of his children more closely together, and to the 
sacred place. Some one to lead, and make a sug- 
gestion, is an important part of this work. If 



82 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

the movement is once started, a large sum of 
money could be raised, and a little from each one 
would help to make up the amount. 

The writer has gone to much trouble in com- 
posing this history in the hope it will hold the 
Brown family together, and make them better 
acquainted with each other, and we trust this 
object will be accomplished; but the monument 
at the graveyard is beyond his reach. Therefore, 
he insists that the younger and more able of the 
Brown family take up this matter at an early day, 
and never rest till something substantial is placed 
on the grounds or in the graveyard. If it can be 
done during our time, we would be happy, but if 
it is not done until after we are gone, it will still 
be a monument to their credit, and to their pos- 
terity for all time to come. 

We leave this part of the work in the hands of 
those who read this book. It is for them to prove 
how much they love and respect the memory of 
their ancestors. 



PART II 

In the first part of this Httle history, we have 
given a sketch of the times and customs of the 
early settlers, with some reference to the life of 
Michael Braun (Brown), the Stone House, the 
graveyard, etc. It is now our intention to enter 
more specifically into the family and posterity of 
this great-grandfather, giving the names, births, 
deaths and place of burial, as near as we can, and 
as far as obtainable. We are very sorry that 
much of the desired information has been lost 
through the lapse of time, the deaths of the older 
ones, and the separation of these families into 
different parts of the country. Sorry that we 
cannot begin at the trunk and give the first limb 
of the tree, then the second, third, and so on, until 
every limb from the original trunk, Michael 
Brown, is traced to the farthest branches. Some 
of these we may be able to follow with consider- 
able success, while it is impossible to trace the 
records of others. We hope our readers will re- 
member these things, and bear with us in the im- 
perfect parts, and appreciate what we are still 
able to present and preserve. 



83 



CHAPTER I 

MICHAEL BROWN — THE TRUNK OF THE TREE 

Michael Brown migrated from Pennsylvania. 
He had two waves ; the first must have been from 
his native state and of German type. Her name, 
Margareta, instead of Margaret, signifies German 
origin. She did not live to be old, only 37 years 
and 2 months. She had nine children, of whom 
six were boys, and three were girls. She died 
July 20, 1771, and was buried in the family ceme- 
tery, within a few hundred yards of the old stone 
building in which she lived. 

His second wife was a widow, named Reeves. 
Her first husband was Mr. Samuel Reeves, and 
by him she had a large family of children. Two 
of them, Nancy and Sally Reeves, she brought 
with her into the family of Michael Brown. Mrs. 
Reeves was a native of Maryland and her maiden 
name was Wakefield. 

After her marriage to Michael Brown she gave 
birth to one daughter, whose name was Clemen- 
tine (Brown). This gives the trunk of the origi- 
nal tree that first settled in the Stone House. Of 
these three we are not able to give the dates of 
birth of any of them, nor the dates of death of 
any save that of Margareta, as stated before. 

SI 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 85 

We have no positive statement as to where he, 
and Eleanor, his second wife, were buried, but 
circumstantial evidence, as well as tradition, 
testify to the fact that they, too, died in the Stone 
House, and were buried by the side of Margareta 
in the family cemetery. 



CHAPTER II 

THK BRANCHES 

Now we come to the first branches of the 
trunk, and here opinions begin to differ, and 
owing to the lapse of time it is very difficult to 
give the facts exactly as they were. We cannot 
dispute what is on the tombstone of Margareta, 
six sons and three daughters; but one record 
gives the boys as John, Peter, James, Moses and 
Jeremiah ; the other, taken from his last will and 
testament, gives the following names: David, 
James, Jeremiah, Moses and Peter. These were 
living at the time of the making of his will, 1807, 
but no reference is made in the will to the three 
daughters referred to on the tombstone, either by 
name or otherwise. Five of his sons are men- 
tioned and his last daughter, Clementine, (by his 
second wife) who was yet unborn. One of his 
sons was doubtless dead at that time. 

These children branched from the old trunk, 
and we believe most of them, if not all, first set- 
tled around and near the old homestead, and prob- 
ably on a part of the father's large tract of land. 
As time passed on they began to go from the 
country to town, and went into business of differ- 
ent kinds. Soon these branches begin to grow 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 87 

beyond record, but we will try to follow them as 
far as we can, and to follow the line as given in 
the will, we take up David first. He was born at 
the Stone House and is buried there. We are not 
able to tell how Michael Brown's children stood 
as to seniority, but he mentions David first in his 
will, hence we take him to be the first one in age. 



CHAPTER III 

DAVID BROWN, THE FIRST BRANCH OF THE 
BROWN TREE 

David settled in about three and one-half miles 
of Salisbury on what was then known as the 
Cheraw and Fayetteville Road, but now known as 
the road from Salisbury to Gold Hill, and near 
where Granite Quarry now stands. At the pres- 
ent day the house part of the place belongs to Eli 
Kerns. He married a Miss Sarah Miller, who 
was also from Pennsylvania, and spoke the Dutch 
language. David was a successful farmer, owned 
a large tract of land, and while he may not have 
become as prominent as those who moved to Sal- 
isbury, he was a man of high standing in the 
neighborhood and considered wealthy. To them 
were born nine sons, Michael, Jacob, David, Solo- 
mon, Daniel, Henry, Jeremiah, Andrew and 
George ; and two daughters, Christina and Mary. 

(section i) — MICHAEL L. BROWN, A SON OE DAVID 
BROWN 

Michael L. Brown, son of David Brown, and a 
grandson of old Michael Brown of the Stone 
House, settled on the road from Salisbury to 
Cheraw and Favetteville, now known as the road 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 69 

from Salisbury to Gold Hill, about four miles 
from Salisbury. Here he owned about one hun- 
dred acres of land, in all probability a part of 
the original Stone House tract. He was a farmer, 
a church-man, and a Bible reader, and raised a 
family of respectable children. One son, Rev. S. 
G. M. Brown, and four grandsons. Revs. C. A. 
Brown, C. L. T. Fisher, J. H. C. Fisher and 
Wiley W. J. Ritchie, entered the Gospel ministry. 
Michael L. Brown was married twice, first to 
Miss Elizabeth Miller, and the second time to 
Mrs. Susan A. Wiley. He was born July 12, 
1802, died March 29, 1879, and was buried at 
St. Paul's. His first wife, Elizabeth Miller, was 
born September 27, 1810, (time of death un- 
known), buried at St. Paul's. To this first union 
were born six children : 

Elizabeth C. Brown, born November 28, 1833, 
buried at St. Paul's. 

Mary A. L. Brown, born January 11, 1837, buried 
at St. Paul's. 

John D. A. Brown, born October 10, 1838, buried 
at St. Paul's. 

Sophia Mariah Brown, born October 16, 1839, 
buried at St. Paul's. 

Isabell C. Brown, born February 25, 1844, bur- 
ied at St. Paul's. 

Simeon Jeremiah Michael, born April 29, 1846, 
buried at Chestnut Hill. 



90 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

By his second marriage to Mrs. Susan Wiley 
(born June 30, 1839, buried at St. Paul's), was 
born one child, Magdalena Brown, bom May 
2, 1866. 

The first child of Michael L. Brown was Elisa- 
beth Commiila. From this limb we have many 
branches, as she was married three times. First 
marriage to Peter Alexander Fisher, July 26, 
1852. Second marriage to Wiley A. Shuping, 
February 4, 1861. Third marriage to Peter A. 
Ritchie, May 30, 1865. 

To her union with Mr. Fisher were born four 
sons: 

John D. A. Fisher, born July 16, 1853. 
M. G. M. Fisher, born February 20, 1855. 
Rev. C. L. T. Fisher, born April 4, 1857. 
Rev. J. Henry C. Fisher, bom March 30, 1859. 

John D. A. Fisher, first son of Commiila 
Fisher (Brown), was married twice: First to 
Miss Jane J. Gardner, Oct. 23, 1873; second to 
Mrs. Ellen S. Eller, Feb. 18, 1912. 

His first wife died May 19, 1911, buried at 
Faith. To this union were born two sons and 
two daughters : 
Theodore J. L. Fisher, born August 26, 1874, 

died February 9, 1876. 
Dovie L. Bell Fisher, bom December 11, 1876. 
Charles Samuel Fisher, born April 27, 1879, died 

(buried at Faith). 
Rejina Josephine Fisher, born July 9, 1881, died. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 91 

Dovie Louise Bell Fisher married William M. 
McCombs October 27, 1892. To this union were 
born ten children : 

Leona S. J. McCombs, born September 12, 1893. 
Ila May McCombs, born July 14, 1895. 
Junius David McCombs, bom September 14, 

1896; died July 9, 1897; buried at Faith. 
Cora Irene McCombs, born June 26, 1898. 
Clarance Harben McCombs, born August 3, 1900. 
Luther Craven McCombs, born February 7, 1903. 
John William McCombs, bom June 10, 1905. 
Charles Heller McCombs, born November 11, 

1907. 
Loy Macon McCombs, born February 25, 1910. 
Kathleen Jane McCombs, born January 27, 1913. 

Leona S. G. McCombs, first daughter of Wil- 
liam M. McCombs, married Paul J. Lyerly. To 
this union was born one child, Paul, Jr. 

Thus runs the genealogy of the first-born child 
of Michael Brown down to the eighth generation, 
viz.: Michael Braun, David Brown, Michael L. 
Brown, Commilla Brown, J. D. A. Fisher, Dovie 
McCombs, Leona Lyerly and Paul, Jr. 

Now we will go back to Commilla Brown and 
take the first line of Commilla's second son, M. 
G. M. Fisher. He married Miss Margaret Ma- 
riah Peeler, March 16, 1879. 

To this union were born six children : 
Henry L. Junius Fisher, bom October 2, 1887; 
died ^lay 14, 1901 ; buried at St. Paul's. 



92 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Luther Vastine Fisher, born February 28, 1881. 
Myron Charley IMelanthon Fisher, born July 29, 

1887. 
Hilbert Adam Henderson Fisher, born January 

14, 1892. 
Edgar Walton Eugene Fisher, born May 2, 1896. 
Pearle Anna Commilla Fisher, born March 22, 

1903. 
As Henry L. Junius died single, we will take 
the next, Luther Vastine. Luther Vastine mar- 
ried Cora A. Brown on March 10, 1904. Cora 
A. Brown is a daughter of Rev. R. L. Brown. 
To this union were bom seven children : 
Junius V. Fisher, born January- 16, 1905. 
Herman George Fisher, born March 25, 1906 : 
Ray Richard Fisher, born March 25, 1906. 
Marcus Henry Fisher, born August 14, 1907. 
Rosco Brown Fisher, born November 21, 1909. 
Carle Hilbert Fisher, born November 19, 1910. 
Earle Hugo Fisher, born March 24, 1913. 

This ends the first line of Commilla's second 
son. We go back to her again, and take her third 
son. 

Rev. C. L. T. Fisher was married to Miss Mary 
C. Homer, September 28, 1886. To this union 
was born one daughter, Pauline Tyrone Fisher 
(April 8, 1890) and one son, Homer Charles 
Henry Fisher (born November 1, 1895). As 
there are no grandchildren, we go to the next 
son of Commilla Brown and Peter Alex. Fisher, 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 93 

which is Rev. James Henry Cornelius Fisher. 
He was married to Leah J. Blaqkwelder on 
August 3, 1897 (Mrs. Fisher was bom June 1, 
1870). To this union were born three daughters 
and one son : 

Katharine Brown Fisher, born February 10, 1899. 
Amy Louise Fisher, born April 30, 1900. 
Mary Virginia Fisher, born July 5, 1903. 
Henry Lee Fisher, bom December 22, 1909. 

Katharine B. Fisher married Bowman Barrier 
December 24, 1917. 

We will now go back to Commilla Brown, her 
first marriage to ]\Ir. Fisher, and take the remain- 
ing famihes of her four sons as they come. Her 
first son was John D. A. Fisher, married twice. 
The first child with his first wife was Theodore J. 
L. Fisher. He died without issue, hence we go 
to her second child, Dovie Louise Bell Fisher. 
She had ten children, as previously given. 
Leonia's line has been traced. 

Then we go back to the other children of John 
D. A. Fisher, son of Commilla Fisher by her first 
marriage. His first son died young, and his sec- 
ond son, Charles Samuel Fisher, was married to 
Florence Martha Jane Lyerly, July 20, 1902. To 
this union was born one son and one daughter. 
Of the son we have no record; supposed to have 
died September 2, 1903. The daughter of Charles 
Fisher is Mable Fisher, born February 11, 1904. 
This ends the family of Charles Fisher. 



94 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

The fourth child of J. D. A. Fisher was Rejina 
Josephine Fisher. She married Stephen D. 
Davis, July 4th, 1908. (He was born June 5, 
1878.) To this union were born two children: 
Marion Fisher Davis, born May 2, 1909. 
Allen Sarah Isabel Davis, born October 17, 1911. 

This completes the family of Rejina, and all 
the children of J. D. A. Fisher by his first wife. 
He was married to his second wife, Mrs. Ellen 
Susan EUer, February 18, 1912. By this union 
there are no children. 

We now go back to the second son of Com- 
milla Fisher (Brown), who was M. G. M. Fisher, 
and take his second living- son, Myron Charley 
Melanthon Fisher. He married Cora Bell Mis- 
enheimer, May 7, 1911. (Miss Cora Bell was 
born April 19, 1890.) To this union were bom 
the following: 

George Alexander Fisher, born January 10, 1914. 
John Hughes Fisher, born June 17, 1916. 

The fourth son of M. G. M. Fisher was Hilbert 
Adam Henderson Fisher. He was married to 
Miss Ethel May Cobb, June 27, 1916. To this 
union there are no children. The fifth son of M. 
G. M. Fisher is Edgar Walton Eugene Fisher, 
who was married to Miss Margareta McAnally, 
June 6, 1918. The sixth child of M. G. M. 
Fisher is Pearle Anna Commilla, born March 22, 
1903. As we have no grandchildren from Rev. 
C. L- T. Fisher and Rev. J. H. C. Fisher this 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 95 

will end the posterity of Commilla Fisher 
(Brown) by her first husband. 

We will now take up her children by her sec- 
ond husband, Wiley A. Shuping. To this union 
was born one son, Jeremiah L. Shuping (May 1, 
1862). His father was killed in the Civil War, 
at Gettysburg, and buried on the ground. Jere- 
miah L. Shuping was married to Miss Ellen Lud- 
wick, August 12, 1882. To this union were bom 
three sons and one daughter: 
Charley Michael Shuping, born April 19, 1884. 
Joseph Shuping, born August 5, 1886 ; died Aug- 
ust 7, 1886. 
Claudus Ross Shuping, born June 2, 1888. 
Mary Maggie Commilla Shuping, born Decem- 
ber 2, 1890. 
Charley Michael Shuping, son of Jeremiah, 
married Ada Irene Ribelin (born January 11, 
1883). To this union were bom two sons and 
three daughters: 
One son, not named, born May 2, 1905 ; died May 

2, 1905. 
Grady Michael Shuping, born April 3, 1906. 
Sarah Alice Grace Shuping, born September 18, 

1907. 
Jessie Maie Shuping, born August 16, 1913; died 

October 17, 1913. 
One daughter, not named, born May 18, 1915; 
died May 18, 1915. 



96 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEI, BROWN FAMILY 

Claud Ross Shuping married Beulah Lee Can- 
non, July 4, 1906 (born February 8, 1886). To 
this union were bom four sons and one daughter : 
Jessie Luther Shuping, born June 29, 1907. 
Jackson Emmette Shuping, born December 29, 

1909. 
Pauline Jennette Shuping, born January 7, 1912. 
Claude Richard Shuping, born January 23, 1914. 
Sherman Bates Shuping, bom July 22, 1915. 

Mary Maggie Commilla Shuping married Wil- 
liam Washington Gill, May 27, 1908. To this 
union were bom three sons and two daughters : 
Jeremiah Gifford Gill, bom February 25, 1909. 
James Washington Gill, born February 2, 1911. 
Irmer Eleanora Gill, bom November 9, 1913; 

died September 13, 1916. 
Thomas Lourina Gardner Gill, born November 

12, 1915. 
Sarah Mean IMildred Gill, bom June 17, 1914. 

This ends Commilla's family by her second 
husband, Wiley A. Shuping. 

She was married to her third husband, Peter 
A. Ritchie, May 30, 1865. To this union were 
bom two sons and one daughter : 
Wiley W. J. Ritchie, born September 24, 1867. 
William R. Ritchie, born June 23, 1869. 
Mary J. C. Ritchie, born March 7, 1871. 

Rev. Wiley W. J. Ritchie, first son of Com- 
milla Brown by her third husband, was married 
to Annie Mariah Henkel, October 25, 1899. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 97 

(Mrs. Ritchie was born November 2, 1871.) To 
this union were born three sons : . 
Charles Matthias Ritchie, born September 1, 1900. 
Fred Henr>' Ritchie, born November 27, 1902, 
WilHam Alfred Franklin Ritchie, born July 24, 
1909. 

William Richard Ritchie married Mary Eliza- 
beth Jones, May 19, 1889. To this union were 
born three sons and one daughter: 
Charley Ritchie. 

Edgar Ritchie, born November 27, 1893. 
William Junius Ritchie, born August 2, 1896. 
Annie M. Commilla Ritchie, born June 26, 1897. 

Ernest Ritchie married Helen C. Ritchie. (The 
date of this marriage not ascertained.) To this 
union were born one son and one daughter : 
Ray William Ritchie. 
Reta Maria Ritchie. 

Edgar Ritchie married Beulah Agnes Hols- 
houser, December 24, 1911. (She was bom July 
28, 1891.) To this union were born one daugh- 
ter and three sons : 

Elma Hazihne Ritchie, born April 21, 1912. 
Earle Haden Ritchie, born December 22, 1914. 
William Ray Ritchie, born April 16, 1916. 
Fisher Ritchie. 

William J. Ritchie married Grace Beck, No- 
vember 29, 1917. 

Annie M. Commilla Ritchie married Jason 



98 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Spurgeon Washington. To this union one son 

was born : 

William Garlen Washington, born May 26, 1915. 

Mary Isabell Commilla Ritchie married Daniel 
Peeler, September 20, 1893. To this union were 
born two daughters : 

Eve Ann Commilla Peeler, born July 11, 1894. 
Abbie Pauline Henrietta Peeler, born April 4, 
1896. 

These are the names and dates of the posterity 
of Commilla Brown as they come down through 
three husbands, being given me by Maggie Fisher 
and J. D. A. Fisher on January 24, 1918. 

Having finished the descendents of Elizabeth 
Commilla Brown, the first child of Michael L. 
Brown, we now take up her first sister, Mary A. 
L. Brown. 

Mary A. L. Brown, second child of Michael L. 
Brown, and granddaughter of Michael Braun of 
the Stone House, was born January 11th, 1837. 
She married Jacob Barger, had one child, and 
died some time after. We believe the child also 
died in infancy. 

John David Alexander Brown, third child of 
Michael L. Brown, born October 10, 1838, died 
December 6, 1890, buried at St. Paul's. He mar- 
ried Sarah Cladora Fisher on February 10, 1859, 
(born December 4, 1835, died March 5, 1911, 
buried at St. Paul's). To this union were born 
six children : 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEI. BROWN FAMILY 99 

Rev. Chrisenberry A. Brown, born December 6, 

1859. 
Charles H. Brown, born April 29, 1860. 
Dolphus M. Brown, born October 10, 1866. 
Sally E. Brown, born June 22, 1871. 
Mary C. C. Brown,, born October 28, 1873. 
Alice L. Brown, born March 4, 1877. 

The above is the family of J. D. A. Brown and 
wife, and we will take up the children, with their 
families, as they come. 

Rev. C. A. Brown was married to Miss Emily 
A. Propst, September 10, 1890. (She was bom 
February 14, 1868.) To this union were bom 
six children : 

Lala C. Brown, born July 3, 1892. 
Edna P. Brown, born March 10, 1894. 
Infant son, born April 19, 1895. 
Thelma Ruth Brown, born March 26, 1897. 
Armand C. Brown, born January 23, 1900; died 

June 14, 1901 ; buried at Frieden. 
Herman A. Brown, bom April 16, 1904. 

Lala C. Brown, daughter of Rev. C. A. Brown, 
and granddaughter of J. D. A. Brown, married 
Henry C. Dale, of Bolten, N. C, on May 28, 1916. 
The other children of Rev. C. A. Brown not mar- 
ried at the time of this writing. 

The second son of John D. A. Brown, Charles 
H. Brown, is not married at this date (August 
2, 1916). 

The third son of John D. A. Brown was 



100 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Dolphus M. Brown. From him springs out a 
limb with many branches. Each Hmb has Hmbs 
and some of them many branches. He married 
Miss Lottie S. McCombs on March 11, 1886. 
(She was born September 25, 1867.) To this 
union were born the following: 
Grace D. Brown, born January 10, 1888. 
Nora M. Brown, born September 30, 1889. 
Fannie Maud Brown, born August 16, 1891. 
Ila C. C. Brown, born November 25, 1893. 
Maggie L. Brown, born June 24, 1896. 
Hoke D. Brown, born February 20, 1899. 
Lottie Thelma Brown, born December 30, 1901. 
Katie M. Brown, born November 12, 1904. 

The first child of Dolphus M. Brown, Grace D. 
Brown, married Ernest D. Wilhelm on December 
22, 1904. To this union were born the following: 
Claud B. Wilhelm, born ^larch 28, 1906. 
Margie E. Wilhelm, born April 7, 1907. 
Lottie Pearle Wilhelm, born January 3, 1909. 
Robert L.-W'ilhelm, born September 30, 1910. 
Duke M. Wilhehn, born October 16, 1914. 

Nora M. Brown, second daughter of Dolphus 
M. Brown, and granddaughter of J. D. A. Brown, 
married Sidney E. Misenheimer on December 4, 
1910. To this union were born the following: 
Opal L. Misenheimer, born August 13, 1911. 
Zada L. Misenheimer, born July 12, 1913. 
Lottie Lucile Misenheimer, born December 14, 
1914. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 101 

Fannie JMaud Brown, third daughter of Dol- 
phus M. Brown, and granddaughter of J. D. A. 
Brown, married Harvey B. Frick on September 
18, 1907. To this union were born the following: 
Harry T. Frick, born May 4, 1908. 
Zelia lone Frick, born June 5, 1910. 
Cletus Hoke Frick, born April 15, 1911. 
Harvey Brown Frick, born December 4, 1912. 
Loyd Hurbert Frick, born July 9, 1915. 

Ila C. C. Brown, fourth daughter of Dolphus 
M. Brown, and granddaughter of J. D. A. Brown, 
married Gilbert H. Ritchie on February 25, 1912. 
To this union was born George Brown Ritchie on 
August 13, 1913. 

This ends the family of Dolphus M. Brown, 
third son of J. D. A. Brown, and grandson of 
Michael L. Brown. 

The fourth child of John D. A. Brown, Sally 
E. Brown, and granddaughter of Michael L. 
Brown, married Luther C. Trexler on August 
2, 1888. (He was born September 19, 1867.) To 
this union were born the following: 
William L. Trexler, born March 31, 1889. 
Pearle V. Trexler, born March 26, 1890. 
Rosa G. C. Trexler, born March 19, 1892. 
George H. A. Trexler, born August 31, 1894. 
Edgar C. Ray Trexler, born May 29, 1896. 

William L. Trexler, son of Luther C. Trexler, 
and grandson of J. D. A. Brown, married Ina 



102 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

May Sloop, April 30, 1911. To this union was 
born Gladys Trexler on February 20, 1912. 

Pearle V. Trexler, second child of Luther C. 
Trexler, and grandchild of J. D. A. Brown, mar- 
ried John B. Park on December 25, 1910. To 
this union was born Hurber V. Park, December 
29, 1911. 

This ends the posterity of Sally E. Brown. 

The fifth child of John D. A. Brown, Mary C. 
Brown, and granddaughter of Michael L. Brown, 
married Charles V. McCombs on April 19, 1891. 
(He was born January 23, 1870.) To this union 
were born the following: 
May E. McCombs, born March 5, 1892. 
John William McCombs, born July 17, 1893. 
Luther Osco McCombs, bom April 6, 1897. 
Ina C. C. McCombs, born September 3, 1898. 
Alice Hope McCombs, born March 4, 1900. 
Versie Lee McCombs, born December 26, 1901. 
Aleene Pearle McCombs, born ^larch 7, 1904. 
Nora McCombs, born January 6, 1906. 
Charley Clifford McCombs, born July 4, 1908. 
Marvin F. IMcCombs, born July 30, 1910. 
Robert Earle McCombs, born August 16, 1912. 
Grady Eugene McCombs, bom January 2, 1915. 
Harold Burdette McCombs, born April 12, 1916. 

Mary E. McCombs, daughter of Mary C. 
Brown, and granddaughter of J. D. A. Brown, 
married George Goodman on August 28, 1910. 
To this union were born the following: 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 103 

Lala Nora Goodman, born July 4, 1911. 
Charles B. Goodman, born October 6, 1913. 
J. W. Goodman, born November 19, 1915. 

Ina C. C. McCombs, daughter of Mary C. 
Brown, and granddaughter of J. D. A. Brown, 
married Charles C. Wagoner on April 1, 1916. 

The sixth child of John D. A. Brown, Alice L. 
Brown, and granddaughter of Michael L. Brown, 
married George W. Bruce on October 4, 1894. 
(He was born June 1, 1861.) To this union were 
born the following: 

Zeld May Bruce, born November 5, 1896. 
Myron B. Bruce, born May 10, 1902. 
Dora Ruth Bruce, born February 2, 1904. 
Pearle C. Bruce, born November 16, 1906. 
Armond Glena Bruce, born August 3, 1909. 
Elmer Paul Bruce, born October 5, 1915. 

Tht fourth child of Michael L. Brown was 
Sophia Mariah, born October 16, 1839. She 
grew to maturity, but died unmarried ; is buried 
at St. Paul's. The f^fth child of Michael L. 
Brown, Isabella C. Brown, died young. 

The sixth child of Michael L. Brown, Rev. 
Simeon Jeremiah Michael Brown, born April 29, 
1847, died March 31, 1920, buried in Chestnut 
Hill. He married Sarah Ann Kirk on Novem- 
ber 14, 1866. (She was born July 24, 1840.) To 
this union were bom the following : 
Taswell Jackson Brown, bom August 8, 1867. 
Sarah Jane Rcjina Brown, bom October 9, 1869. 



104 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Daisie Leon Fortunate Brown, bom October 13, 

1876. 
Baxter Eusebious Brown, born October 17, 1880; 

died November 7, 1880. 
Ola Londe\y Aurelia Brown, born February 13, 
1885. 

The first child of Rev. S. J. M. Brown, Taswell 
J. Brown, was married twice. The first time to 
Miss Etta Steward on March 4, 1888. To this 
union was born one child, Ola Estella BrowTi, on 
March 29, 1889. 

Ola Estella Brown married A. B. Johnson. To 
this union were born three children : 
Win ford Johnson. 
Margie Johnson. 
Obie Jackson Brown Johnson. 

Taswell J. Brown was married the second time 
on July 23, 1903, to Sadie Sweenee. To this 
union there are no children. 

The second child of Rev. S. J. M. Brown, 
Sarah Jane Rejina, was born October 9, 1869. 
She was married twice ; first time to James Wil- 
liam Washington Fisher on December 20, 1888. 
To this union was bom one son, Claud Jeremiah 
Whitehead Fisher, on December 21, 1890. 

Claud J. W. Fisher married Ella L. Seamons 
on June 30, 1915. To this union was bom one 
child, Jennie Lillie Fisher, bom August 7, 1916. 

Sarah J. R. Bi'own was married the second 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 105 

time on June 24, 1896, to James Bright Wiley. 

To this union were born four children : 

Vara Irene Eudara Wiley, born December 15, 

1897. 
Sarah Londare Wiley, born May 27, 1900. 
Bright Wiley, bom February 2, 1902; died Feb- 
ruary 2, 1910. 
James Michael Wiley, born August 15, 1905. 

Vara Irene Eudara Wiley married Charles 
Thomas jNIorgan on June 20, 1916. To this union 
was born one son, Charles Thomas Morgan, on 
October 17, 1917. 

The third child of Rev. S. J. M. Brown, Daisie 
Lou Fortunate Brown, was bom October 13, 
1876. She married Elisha Baldin Melton on 
August 26, 1896. To this union were born eight 
children : 

Claudie Rosco Melton, born July 4, 1897. 
James Ray Melton, born February 27, 1901. 
Lillian Relaline Melton, born March 4, 1903. 
Burtis Jeremiah Melton, bom May 5, 1905. 
Sarah Jane Margie Melton, born September 17, 

1907. 
Daisie Ruth Melton, born May 2, 1909. 
Hazel Marie Melton, born April 30, 1911. 
Ehsha Brown Melton, born July 23, 1915. 

Claude Rosco ^lelton married Lena Rivers 
Wagoner on October 8, 1918. James Ray Melton 
married Myrtle Brooks on September 22, 1918. 
Lillian Relaline Melton married Thomas Houstin 



106 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEI. BROWN FAMILY 

Kesler on August 18, 1918. The other five chil- 
dren are not married (April 3, 1919). 

The fourth child of Rev. S. J. M. Brown, Bax- 
ter Eusebius, died young. (See first list of Rev. 
wS. J. M. Brown's family.) 

The fifth and last child of Rev. S. J. M. Brown, 
Ola Londary Aurelia, was born February 13, 
1885. This ends the posterity of Michael h. 
Brown by his first wife. 

We now take up his second marriage and fol- 
low the branch from that relation. His second 
wife was Mrs. Susan A. Youst, bom June 30, 
1839. To this union one child was bom, Magda- 
lina Brown, on May 2, 1866. 

Magdalina Brown married William T. Peeler 
on August 2, 1891. To this union three children 
were bom : 

Cleo Hyacinth Peeler, bora October 19, 1892. 
Elsie Elisabeth Peeler, born April 12, 1894; died 
December 17, 1918; buried at Union Church. 
Beatrice Lonclara Peeler, born January 11, 1895. 

Cleo Hyacinth Peeler married Walter C. Smith 
on May 17, 1914. This ends the family of Mich- 
ael L. Brown, son of David Brown, and grandson 
of old ^Michael Braun of the Stone House. 

(section II ) — JACOB BROWN, A SON OF DAVID 
BROWN 

Jacob Brown, son of David Brown, and a 
grandson of Michael Brown, was born in 1810 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 107 

and died in 1853, buried Stone House. He not 
only lived on part of the original tract of land, 
but settled in the old Stone House. He was a 
farmer, cultivated much of the soil cleared up by 
his grandfather, and made a successful living. 
He was also a man of morals and a church-man, 
one of his grandsons, Rev. M. L. Canup, entered 
the ministry, and is now laboring in New York 
City. He married Miss Annie Edieman, born 
1813, died 1876, buried at Stone House. To this 
union were born eleven children : 
Sarah L. Brown, born 1831 ; died 1857 ; buried at 

Stone House. 
Mary Clementine Brown, born 1833; died 1889; 

buried at St. Paul's. 
David Brown, born 1835; died 1844; buried at 

Stone House. 
Margaret Brown, born 1836; died 1867; buried 

at Stone House. 
Theophilus Brown, born 1838. 
Jeremiah Brown, born 1840; died 1861 ; buried at 

Stone House. 
Julia Ann Brown, born 1842. 
Joseph Brown, born 1844,; died 1846; buried at 

Stone House. 
Jacob C. Brown, born 1847; died; buried at 

Christian. 
Thomas L. Brown, born 1849; died; buried at 

Christiana. 
Martha J. Brown, born 1853. 



lOS HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Sarah L. Brown, oldest daughter of Jacob and 
Annie Brown, never married. Lived at home in 
the old Stone House, died there, and was buried 
in the old Stone House cemetery. 

Mary Clementine, daughter of Jacob and x\nnie 
BrowTi, also never married. Spent her last days 
with her sister, Julia Ann Canup; died there 
and was buried at St. Paul's Lutheran Church. 

David, son of Jacob and Annie Brown, died 
young, and was buried in the family cemetery 
near the old Stone House. 

Margaret, daughter of Jacob and Annie Brown, 
married William Beck in 1866. To this union one 
child was bom, Margaret Beck, born in January 
and died in June of the same year. Buried at 
the Stone House cemetery. The mother died 
before the child, in 1867, and is also buried at the 
Stone House cemetery. 

Theophilus, son of Jacob and Annie Brown, 
volunteered in the Confederate Army, died as a 
soldier and was buried on the battlefield, prob- 
ably Gettysburg. 

Jeremiah, son of Jacob and Annie Brown, died 
before marrying, in the old Stone House and was 
buried in the family cemetery near the same place. 

Julia Ann Brown, daughter of Jacob and Annie 
Brown, married Caleb Canup (born June 17, 
1845; died 1915, buried at St. Paul's). They were 
married November 26, 1868. To this union were 
born seven cliildren : 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 109 

Nancy Jane Canup, bom 1869. 

Annie Loucettie Canup, born 1870. 

David E. Lee Canup, born 1872. 

William Henry Canup, born 1873. 

Mary Rebecca Canup, bom 1875; died 1875; 

buried at Union Church. 
Martin Luther Canup, born 1879. 
Sarah Louvina Canup, born 1880; died 1915; 
buried at St. Paul's. 

Nancy Jane, daughter of Caleb and Julia Ann 
Canup, married Thomas Webb in 1891. (He was 
born in 1871.) To this union were born four 
children : 

Charley Lee W^cbb, born 1893. 
John Taswell Webb, born 1895. 
Julia May Webb, born 1908. 
Marvin Edward Webb, born 1911. 

Annie Loucettie, daughter of Caleb and Julia 
Ann Canup, married Bruner T. Propst in 1904. 
(He was born in 1874.) To this union was bora 
one child, Mary Lillian Propst, in 1912. 

David E. Lee, son of Caleb and Julia Ann 
Canup, married Ida Julian on October 14, 1909. 
(She was born in 1880.) To this union were 
born five children : 
Arnold Julian, born 1910. 
Harley Lee, born 1912. 
Ruth Elizabeth, born 1914. 
Carl Ray, born 1918. 
Luther Paul, bora 1920. 



no HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Mary Rebecca Canup, daughter of Caleb and 
Julia Ann Canup, died when six weeks old. 

William Henry Harrison, son of Caleb and 
Julia Ann Canup, married Maggie Julian on Oc- 
tober 28, 1915. (She was born in 1886.) To 
this union was boni one daughter, Bessie Pearl, 
on September 17, 1917. 

Rev. M. Luther Canup, son of Caleb and Julia 
Ann Canup, was married to Inez Bollinger on 
June 19, 1918. 

Sarah Louvina, daughter of Caleb and Julia 
Ann Canup, died before marriage. She was born 
in 1880 and died November 17, 1915; buried in 
St. Paul's. 

Joseph Brown, son of Jacob and Annie Brown, 
died young and was buried at the Stone House 
cemetery. 

Jacob C. Brown, Jr., son of Jacob and Annie 
Brown, married Chrissey Kepley on February 
23, 1871. (He was bom December 29, 1847; 
died September 26, 1906; buried at Christiana.) 
Mrs. Brown was born September 2, 1836, and 
died December 2, 1904; buried at Christiana 
Church. To this union were born three children : 
Joseph L. Brown, born May 6, 1873. 
Martin L. Brown, bom March 28, 1876. 
Mary Brown, born July 7, 1880. 

Joseph L. Brown, son of Jacob Brown, Jr., and 
grandson of Jacob Brown, Sr., married Susan 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 111 

Youst on May 7, 1903. (She was born January 
26, 1879.) To this union there are no children. 

Martin L. Brown, son of Jacob C. Brown, and 
grandson of Jacob Brown, Sr., is not married at 
the time of this writing. 

Mary C. Brovm, daughter of Jacob C. Brown, 
and granddaughter of Jacob Brown, Sr., married 
John Hinceman on July 31, 1902. (He was bom 
September 11, 1880.) To this union were born 
four children : 

Eula Hinceman, born July 10, 1903. 
Viola Hinceman, bom July 1, 1907. 
Grady Hinceman, bom October 20, 1909. 
Margie Hinceman, born November 29, 1913. 

Thomas L. Brown, son of Jacob and Annie 
Brown, married Charlotte Kluttz. To this union 
were born four children : 
John Brown. 
Adolphus Brown. 
Lewis Brown. 
Mary Brown. 

Adolphus Brown, son of Thomas and Char- 
lotte Brown, not married at the time of this 
writing. 

Mary Brown, daughter of Thomas and Char- 
lotte Brown, married John Lyerly on Februar)' 
22. To this union were born six children : 
(Names and births of children not given.) 

Martha J. Brown, daughter of Jacob and 
Annie Brown, married Crawford Barnhart on 



112 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

December 6, 1883. (He was born October 3, 
1836; died October 29, 1912; buried at St. 
Paul's.) To this union were born four children: 
Annie Laura Barnhart, born April 27, 1885. 
Paul Crawford Barnhart, born August 5, 1888. 
Ida Pearl Barnhart, born July 29, 1890. 
Ira Leo Barnhart, born October 21, 1894. 

Annie Laura Barnhart, daughter of Martha 
and Crawford Barnhart, married Frank Jackson 
on December 24, 1904. (He was bora January 
8, 1883.) To this union were born the following: 
Martha Levona Jackson, born October 28, 1908; 

died January 6, 1909. 
John Crawford Jackson, born January 21, 1910. 
Margie Pearle Jackson, born October 19, 1911. 

Paul Crawford Barnhart, son of Martha J. and 
Crawford Barnhart, Sr., married Minnie K. 
Propst on February 2, 1913. She was born July 
19, 1882. 

Ida Pearle Barnhart was born October 21, 
1894; died young, only eleven months old. 

Ira Leo Barnhart was born October 21, 1894; 
married Maggie Elizabeth Parks on April 12, 
1914. (She was born August 30, 1890.) To this 
union were born the following children : 
Myron Leo Barnhart, born February 15, 1915. 
William Crawford Barnhart, born February 8, 

1917. 
Howard Parks Barnhart, bom September 14, 
1918. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 113 

Ruth Brown Barnhart, born March 30, 1920. 

To J. C. Barnhart and his wife, Martha J., were 
born two children that died in infancy. The first 
was born May 16 and died June 1 of the same 
year. Not named. 
Ida Pearle Barnhart, born July 20, 1890; died 

June 15, 1891. 
Myron Leo, a grandson of Martha J. Banihart, 
was bom February 15, 1915. 

This ends the family of Jacob Brown (Sec. 2), 
a son of David Brown, and grandson of Michael 
Brown of the Stone House. 

(section hi) — SOLOMON BROWN, A SON OF DAVID 
BROWN 

Solomon Brown was the third son of David 
P>rown and grandson of Michael Brown of the 
Stone House. He lived at diflerent places for a 
number of years, but in 1850 settled down on the 
Gold Hill Road, six miles from Salisbury. This 
road was formerly called the Cheraw and Fay- 
etteville Road, the same one on which his brother 
Michael settled. 

Solomon was a successful farmer, successful 
without many of the present day improvements. 
He was also known as the Ginger-cake and 
Ginger-bread Peddler, was expected at all nearby 
public gatherings, and was looked to for some- 
thing to eat on such occasions. From this he 
gathered considerable revenue. He was a good 



114 HISTORY OF THE XIICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

moral man, a church worker, and a man of pub- 
lic prayer. Two of his sons entered the Gospel 
ministry, Revs. Richard L. and Henry M. Brown, 
and one grandson, Rev. P. D. Brown. 

Solomon Brown was born in February, 1811, 
died April 3, 1863, buried at Stone House. On 
December 20, 1836, he married Aliss Amy Miller. 
(She was born November 20, 1815, died October 
9, 1900, buried Christiana.) To this union were 
born the following : 

Nathan Brown, born November 6, 1837. 
Sarah L. Brown, born 1839, died 1857; buried 

Stone House. 
Calvin L. Brown, born January 2, 1841 ; died 

December 25, 1914; buried Organ Church. 
Rev. Richard L. Brown, born March 18, 1842. 
Karamiah B. Brown, died young; buried at Stone 

House. 
Rev. H. Maxwell Brown, born April 2, 1845; 

died July 23, 1913 ; buried at Organ Church. 
David L. Brown, born April 25, 1849; died Aug- 
ust 22, 1878; buried at Christiana. 
Rebecca Brown, died young; buried at Stone 

House. 
Martha Ann Brown, died in her teens; buried at 

Stone House. 

Nathan Brown, oldest son of Solomon Brown, 

grandson of David Brown and great-grandson of 

Michael Braun of the Stone House, settled on 

the Gold Hill Road at the old homestead. After 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 115 

serving in the Confederate Army, he became a 

successful farmer and a staunch member of the 

church. He has one son in the ministry. He 

was married twice, first to Miss Martha J. Peeler 

(who was born November 20, 1851 ; died March 

3, 1882; buried Christiana). To this union were 

bom: 

Mary Lelia Brown, born April 7, 1871. 

Luther Henry Brown, born November 28, 1874. 

George Franklin Brown, born May 27, 1879. 

He was married the second time to Miss Rosa 
Sophia Agner (who was born October 16, 1858). 
To this union were bom four children : 
Amy Loucritia, born August 25, 1884. 
Rev. Pleasant David Brown, born November 26, 

1886. 
Andrew Jackson Brown, born November 29, 

1888. 
Fannie Sophrona Brown, born June 30, 1890. 

Mary Lelia Brown, first child of Nathan 
Brown, married Thomas Lyerly, April 1, 1888. 
(He was born January 15, 1863.) To this union 
were born the following: 
Junius Melanthon, born May 11, 1889. 
Sophia Virginia, born May 13, 1891. 
James Gilbert, born March 2, 1895. 
William Herbert, born July 11, 1896. 
Pearle Roxana, born September 7, 1897; died 

August 26, 1913 ; buried at Christiana. 
Amy Lula, born March 29, 1900. 



U6 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEI. BROWN FAMILY 

Edgar Ray, born August 11, 1902; died August 

9, 1904; buried at Christiana. 
Marian Naoma, born September 23, 1908. 
Jessie Pauline, born May 31, 1910. 

Junius Melanthon, son of Thomas J. and Mary 
LeHa Lyerly, married Winnie May Johnson on 
April 7, 1912. (She was born August 23, 1891.) 
To this union was born one child, Sarah Louise, 
February 7, 1912. 

Sophia Virginia Lyerly was married to Robert 
Paul Sea ford on July 21, 1914. (He was born 
June 13, 1892.) To this union one child was 
born, Mary Virginia, June 10, 1915. The re- 
mainder of Thomas J. Lyerly's children are not 
married. 

Luther Henr)\ second child of Nathan Brown, 
married Rosa Daisy Kluttz on June 6, 1900. 
(She was born February 18, 1876.) To this 
union were born three children : 
Thurman Lamer, born May 9, 1904; died June 

11, 1904. 
Oneda Maybelle, born May 11, 1908. 
Theron L., born December 7, 1913. 

George Franklin, third child of Nathan Brown, 
was married to Roxie A. Cauble. (She was born 
March 18, 1880.) To this union were born the 
following : 

Georgian, born May 4, 1904. 
Willie N. F., born April 13, 1910. 
Jennis Emma, born September 30, 1918. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 117 

Amy Loucretia Brown, first child of Nathan 
Brown by his second wife, was married to Seba 
Rowe Fry on February 10, 1906. (He was born 
October 23, 1811.) To this union were born the 
following : 

Paul Brown Fry, born August 1, 1907. 
Glen Ansel Fr>-, born September 10, 1908. 
Rosa Elisabeth Fry, born September 5, 1913. 

Rev. Pleasant David, second child of Nathan 
Brown by his second wife, married Florence 
Bodenhorn on August 20, 1913. (She was born 
April 21, 1888.) To this union were born the 
following : 

Robert Meredith, born October 13, 1914. 
Janice Adelle, born May 17, 1916. 

Andrew Jackson, third child by his second 
wife, is not married at this writing, April 17, 
1919. 

Fannie Sophronia, fourth child of Nathan 
Brown by his second wife, married Rev. Luther 
Alex. Thomas on August 6, 1914. (He was born 
August 8, 1888.) To this union were born the 
following : • 
Grace Brown. 
Luther A. Brown, Jr. 

This ends the posterity of Nathan Brown, the 
first son of Solomon Brown. 

Sarah Louise, second child of Solomon Brown, 
grew to years of maturity but died before 



niarrymg. 



lis HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Calvin Brown, son of Solomon Brown, was also 
in the Confederate Army for three years. After 
the close of the war he married Loutitia Ribelin 
on January 30, 1866, settled dowTi on a farm near 
Gold Hill, and became a successful farmer. He 
was an active member of the church, full of life 
and sociability. His wife is buried at Organ 
Church. To this union were born the following : 
Ellen A. Brown, bom November 22, 1866. 
Dovie Brown. 
George L. Brown. 
John L. C. Brown. 

Ellen A. Brown married Caleb L. Kluttz. To 
this union were born the following : 
Charles A., born December 1, 1893. 
William M., born April 8, 1897. 
Katie, born April 25, 1888. 

Katie Kluttz married a Mr. Harkey. To this 
union were born the following : 
Vera M. Harkey, born April 17, 1907. 
James F. Harkey, born June 4, 1911. 
Clara B. Harkey, born Februar}- 15, 1886. 

Dovie Brown, second daughter of Calvin L. 
Brown, married H. A. Holshouser. To this 
union was born one child, Beulah Holshouser, on 
November 15, 1886. 

Beulah Holshouser married George Fink. (He 
was born March 18, 1880.) To this union were 
bom the following : 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 119 

Dwight Fink, bom August 20, 1911. 
Robert Fink. 

George L. Brown, son of Calvin L. Brown, was 
born June 16, 1873. He married Mary Elizabeth 
Trexler, (She was born January 25, 1874.) To 
this union were bom the following : 
Duke Alexander Brown, born January 31, 1895. 
William Lee Brown, born December 26, 1896. 
Reid Calvin Brown, born December 11, 1900. 
Gilmer Ray Brown, born September 24, 1902. 
Georgia Brown, born March 25, 1904. 
Rosa Matetia Brown, born May 17, 1906. 
Glen Clifford Brown, born October 1, 1908. 
Luther Linn Brown, bom May 11, 1910. 
Elisabeth Brown, born October 7, 1915. 

John Littleton Calvin Brown, son of Calvin L. 
Brown, was born September 22, 1875. He mar- 
ried Mable Lucretia Finley. To this union v/as 
born one child, Clarion Alberta Brown, on Janu- 
ary 20, 1905. This ends Calvin Brown's family. 

Rev. Richard L. Brown, another son of Solo- 
mon Brown, spent three years of his school days 
in the Confederate Army. This, to a certain ex- 
tent, crippled his education. After returning 
home hestudied theology and entered the ministry 
in 1868. He was a successful worker in this 
sphere of life for some fifteen or twenty years, 
but at this time he became afflicted with partial 
paralysis and his work as a minister was very 
much hindered from this time on. However, he 



120 HISTORY OF THE MICHAKL BROWN FAMILY 

lived and remained in the ministry for more than 
fifty years, and still did much church work. He 
married Miss Nancy E. Agner on January 31, 
1866. (She was born July 23, 1844.) To this 
union were born the following : 
Mary L. R. Brown, born January 14, 1867. 
David Solomon Brown, born October 27, 1868. 
Lewis D. Henry Brown, born January 30, 1872. 
John Richard Brown, born April 12, 1875. 
Maxwell Melanthon Brown, born June 17, 1879. 
Cora Ann Brown, bom May 13, 1882. 
Marcus Calvin Brown, born January 10, 1884; 
died January 25, 1885 ; buried at Christiana. 

Mary L. R. Brown married P. Alexander 
Peeler. .To this union were born the following: 
Jennie Peeler, born May 13, 1888. 
Mamie Peeler, bom August 18, 1889. 
Mary Naoma Peeler, born November 28, 1890. 
Burtie Maie Peeler, born July 10, 1892. 
Pearle Irene Peeler, born September 29, 1901. 

Jennie Peeler, daughter of P. A. Peeler, mar- 
ried James Jones on February 4, 1904. To this 
union were born the following : 
Naoma Jones, born May 13, 1904; died March 

8, 1906. 
Harold Jones, born March 25, 1907. 
Helen Jones, born March 26, 1909. 
Hazel Jones, born January 1, 1913. 
Norman P. Jones, born May 30, 1919. 

Mamie Peeler married William Barger on Sep- 



HISTORY OF THi: MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 121 

tember 25, 1911. (He was born February 12, 
1886.) To this union were bom the following: 
VVillette Barger, born August 10, 1914. 
P. A. Barger. 

Burtie M. Peeler married Gideon C. Miller on 
August 31, 1910. To this union were born the 
following : 

Cecil Mark Miller, born June 6, 1911; died 
August 6, 1912; buried at Faith. 

Mary Alice Miller, born September 8, 1913; died 
August 25, 1918; buried at Faith. 

Estelle Miller, born January 25, 1916. 

Mary N. Peeler married Rev. Harvey A. 

Fesperman on May 22, 1916. (He was bom 

October 11,1 892.) To this union was born Mary 

Brown Fesperman on March 7, 1917. 

Pearle Peeler, not married at the time of this 

writing. 

David S. Brown, second child of Rev. R. L. 
Brown, married E. Emma Fisher on February 25, 
1892. (She was bom May 8, 1871.) To this 
union were born the following: 
Laura Eleanora Brown, born January 31, 1893. 
Marcus Richard David Brown, born March 22, 

1894. 
Luther C. Brown, born December 2, 1897. 
Cora Maic Brown, born September 19, 1900. 
Myrtle Irene Brown, born October 14, 1902. 
Junius Calvin Brown, born January 10, 1906. 



122 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Earle Jacob Brown, bom September 14, 1907; 
died December 28, 1911 ; buried at Christiana. 
Wilferd Orman Brown, born June 10, 1914. 

Marcus Richard David Brown, son of David S. 
Brown, married Edith Koch on April 29, 1917. 

Lewis D. H. Brown, another son of Rev. R. L. 
Brown, married Ida Ritchie. (She was bom 
September 22, 1877.) To this union were bom 
the following: 

Beulah Virginia Brown, born March 18, 1896. 
Pearle Aletic Brown, born March 19, 1898. 
Glide Rosco Brown, born January 19, 1900. 
Essie Nancy C. Brown, born July 14, 1903. 
Lena G. P. Brown, born October 14, 1905. 
Gora Ruth Brown, born January 14, 1908. 
James R. Brown, born March 13, 1910. 
Ralph E. Brown, born August 11, 1912. 
Cecil Caldwell Brown, born May 13, 1918. 

John R. Brown, another son of Rev. R. L. 
Brown, married Lottie G. Bostian. (She was 
born August 24, 1884.) To this union were born 
the following: 

Kathar>'n Elane Brown, born November 5, 1907. 
Mary Louise Brown, bora May 15, 1913. 

Maxwell M. Brown, another son of Rev. R. L. 
Brown, married Annie Lentz. (She was born on 
February 26, 1875.) To this union were born 
four children : 

Lillie N. E. Brown, bom April 28, 1905. 
Ray R. J. Brown, born March 20, 1909. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 123 

Kyle M. Brown, born November 21, 1911. 
John Hilbert Brown, born Novernber 6, 1915. 

Cora Ann Brown, daughter of Rev. R. L. 
Brown, married A. L. V. Fisher on March 10, 
1904.. To this union were born the following: 
Junius V. Fisher, born January 16, 1905. 
Herman G. Fisher, born March 25, 1906. 
Ray R. Fisher, born March 25, 1906. 
Marcus H. Fisher, born August 14, 1907. 
Rosco B. Fisher, born November 21, 1909. 
Carl H. Fisher, born November 19, 1910. 
Earle H. Fisher, bom March 24, 1913. 

Rev. Henry Maxwell Brown, son of Solomon 
Brown, and brother of Rev. R. L. Brown, was 
born April 2, 1845 ; died July 23, 1913 ; buried at 
Organ. He was also in the Confederate Army, 
served as a private till the surrender of General 
Robert E. Lee; was taken prisoner and carried 
to Point Lookout ; remained there until the close 
of the war; released from prison in July, 1865. 
Our country was in a devastated condition until 
the Reconstruction Period, but he was determined 
to prepare for the ministry. His father died dur- 
ing the war, and his financial circumstances were 
very unfavorable, but he managed to attend the 
Reformed School at Newton, N. C, for several 
sessions, and then took a further course in liter- 
ary training in connection with theology at N. C. 
College at Mt. Pleasant. Theology was then 
taught there, and was a part of the school curricu- 



124 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

lum. He graduated and was ordained to the Gos- 
pel ministry May 4, 1873, by the Evangehcal 
Lutheran Synod of North CaroHna at a meeting 
of the same in St. Paul's Lutheran Church of 
Rowan County. He was called to the Bethel 
pastorate near Salisbury and proved to be a suc- 
cessful minister. He was married to IMiss Lou- 
setta Fisher, who was born April 21, 1856. To 
this union were born the following: 
Dora Brown, born; died; buried at Bethel. 
Lula Rosa Brown, born April 10, 1877. 
Mary Lousetta Brown, born October 28, 1878. 
Bachman H. Brown, bom October 14, 1880. 
Lillie Endera Brown, born January 4, 1884. 
Nathan Maxwell Brown, born July 13, 1886. 
Myrtle Maie Brown, born November 1, 1887. 
Jason Solomon Brown, born May 1, 1891. 
Clarence Evert Brown, born March 2, 1893. 
Clyde Gilbert Brown, born July 28, 1896. 
Dora, and two other children, died in infancy. 

Lula Rosa Brown, daughter of Rev. H. M. 
Brown, married Adolphus Henry Fogleman. 
(He was born April 1, 1870.) To this union 
were born the following: 
Adolphus Brown Fogleman, bom November 25, 

1905. 
Paul Faust Fogleman, born February 26, 1908. 
Mary Lon Fogleman, born October 2. 1909. 
Joseph Harold Fogleman, born July 16, 1914. 

Mary Loucetta Brown, daughter of Rev. H. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 125 

M. Brown, married Rev. Robert Reaves Sowers. 
(He was born October 9, 1869.)- To this union 
were born the following : 
Harry Brown Sowers, born March 23, 1913. 
Jack Rayboum Sowers, born April 5, 1915. 

Bachman H. Brown, son of Rev. H. M. Brown, 
married Bessie Anderson. (She was born Sep- 
tember 27, 1885.) To this union were born the 
following : 

Robert Brown, born May 10, 1907. 
Hattie Brown, born June 8, 1909. 
Raymond Holt Brown, bom June 29, 1913. 

Lillie Endora Brown, daughter of Rev. H. M. 
Brown, married William Titus Efird. (He was 
born June 11, 1880.) To this union were born 
the following: 

Bessie Lee Hfird, born I\Iay 2, 1904. 
Lillian Brown Efird, born April 12, 1908. 
William Louis Efird, born January 20, 1910. 
William Titus Efird, born October 24, 1912. 
John Maxwell Efird, born June 9, 1914. 
Dorothy Bittle Efird, born December 24, 1915. 

The maiden name of Nathan Maxwell Brown's 
wife, son of Rev. H. M. Brown, could not be 
ascertained. (She was born July 21, 1890.) To 
this union was born Edna Laura Brown on Oc- 
tober 14, 1914. 

Myrtle Maie Brown, daughter of Rev. H. M. 
Brown, married Thomas Benjamin Ross. (He 
was born June 15, 1882.) To this union was 



126 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEIv BROWN FAMILY 

bom Thomas Benjamin Ross, Jr., on February 
11, 1913. 

The remaining three sons of Rev. H. M. 
Brown, Jason Solomon, Clarence Evert and Clyde 
Gilbert, are not married at the time of this writ- 
ing, July 7, 1916. 

David L. Brown, son of Solomon Brown, was 
bom July 25, 1849. He was a farmer by occupa- 
tion, but also taught school and was an energetic 
worker in the church, Sunday School and prayer 
meetings. He contracted tuberculosis when com- 
paratively young, died in the faith, and went to 
sleep in the Lord with a bright vision before him. 
Some of his last expressions were, *' Is this 
death, if so, how sweet it is to die." He married 
Miss Londo Moose, and to this union was bom 
one child, Lizzie E. Brown, on Febmary 18, 1876. 

Lizzie E. Brown married George O. Kluttz. 
(He was born March 13, 1871.) To this union 
were born the following : 
Oma Thelma, born December 18, 1895. 
Beulah Maie, bom July 25, 1897. 
Vera Lelan, born August 19, 1899. 
Mary Varda, born April 16, 1901. 
Theda Brown, born April 8, 1903. 
Katharine West, born June 27, 1907. 

This ends the posterity of Solomon Brown, son 
of David Brown, and grandson of Michael Braun 
of the Stone House. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 127 

(section IV) — ^DAVID BROWN, JR., SON OF DAVID 
BROWN, SR. 

David Brown was a son of David Brown, Sr., 
who lived on the Gold Hill Road near Crane 
Creek, brother of Solomon Brown and grandson 
of Michael Braun of the Stone House. He was 
a farmer and miller; settled on the Baties-Ford 
Road near Organ Lutheran Church, and was 
a man of good morals. He did not live to a great 
age. He was born January 8, 1813; married 
Margaret Eddleman. (She was born May 8, 
1819.) Both are buried at Organ Church. To 
this union were born the following: 
Peter A. Brown, born June 11, 1834; buried at 

Organ Church. 
Eliza Mariah Brown, born March 14, 1837. 
Henry Monroe Brown, born March 29, 1840. 
Rosa Ann Brown, born January 29, 1843. 
Lawrance Brown, born March 4, 1845 ; buried at 

Faith. 
David Wilson Brown, born March 21, 1848. 
Mary Jane Brown, born May 27, 1851. 

Peter Brown, son of David Brown, Jr., mar- 
ried Eliza S. Lippard. To this union were born 
three children : 
John David, born August 9, 1857; buried at 

Organ Church. 
Sarah Ann Jennette, born August 12, 1859. 
Laura Alice Cladora, born April 12, 1S64. 



12S HISTORY OF THE) MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

John David L. Brown, son of David Brown, 
Jr., married Laura A. Harris. To this union 
eight children were born : 
Florence M. Brown, born October 30, 1883. 
William Everette Brown, born March 28, 1887. 
Myrtle A. Brown, born September 1, 1888. 
Annie V. Brown, born October 24, 1890. 
Walter A. Brown, born August 25, 1895. 
Maie Brown, born November 29, 1896. 
George Henry Brown, bom October 19, 1898. 
Effie V. Brown, born November 15, 1901. 
Florence M. Brown, daughter of John D. L. 
Brown, married N. T. Deaton. To this union five 
children were bom. (The names of the children 
have not been ascertained.) 

W. Everet Brown married Katie Smith. To 
this union one child was born. (Name not given.) 

Sarah A. Jenette Brown married George A. 
Barger. To this union eight children were born : 
Curtis jMcCarthy Barger, who had one child. 
Burlin Barger, who had three children. 
Myrtle Barger, who had one child. 
Ada Barger. 
Lizzie Barger. 

Floyed Barger, who had one child. 
Louise Barger. 
Elreca Barger. 

(The above statement is very meagre, but fur- 
ther information is not obtainable. You will un- 
derstand that Sarah Ann Jenette Brown had 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 129 

eight children, and that some of them had chil- 
dren as given above.) 

Laura A. C. Brown married A. M. Boger; to 
this union one child was born ; Burlie Boger. 

Eliza Maria Brown, daughter of David Brown, 
Jr., married a Tvliss Edleman and lived some- 
where between the old homestead and Enochs- 
ville, but we have never been able to trace the 
family. 

Henry M. Brown was a son of David Brown, 
Jr., and of his family we have the following : He 
was born March 29, 1840, died February 5, 1872. 
On January 1, 1866, he married Mary L. Youst. 
She was born October 3, 1843, and died Septem- 
ber 1, 1906. From the information we have we 
gather that he had the following children : 
James J. Brown, born November 20, 1866. 
Amanda S. Brown, bora IMarch 16, 1868. 
Julia Evelin Brown, born November 17, 1870. 

James J. Brown married Etta Co wens on De- 
cember 6, 1888. She was born December 12, 
1860. To this union were born the following: 
Lelia Brown, born October 1, 1889. 
Earnest Brown, born September 29, 1891. 
Ray Brown, bom January 7, 1894. 
Lester Brown, born May 18, 1899. 
Evel}!! Brown, born April 15, 1902. 

Earnest Brown married Henrietta Humphreys 
on Januar>' 30, 1915. 

Amanda S. Brown, daughter of Henry Brown, 



130 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

married David A. Earnhardt on January 30, 1890. 
He was born March 25, 1866. To this union 
were born the following: 
Clyde S. Earnhardt, born January 10, 1891. 
Uza jM. Earnhardt, bom January 13, 1893. 
Very B. Earnhardt, bom August 3, 1894. 
Cleopatra Earnhardt, born August 15, 1895. 
Olga Welock Earnhardt, born November 10, 

1903. 
Claudio Alfonso Earnhardt, born February 22, 
1907. 

Julia Evelyn Brown, third child of Henry M. 
Brown, and a great-granddaughter of Michael 
Braun of the Stone House, w^as bom November 
17, 1870, and married Samuel Henry Welock. 
He was born October 9, 1865. Soon after their 
marriage they moved to Providence, R. I. To 
this union were born three children : 
Eula Katharine Welock, born April 3, 1891. 
Samuel Henry Welock, Jr., bora September 27, 

1892. 
Mary Ella Welock, born March 30, 1895. 

The father, Samuel Welock, Jr., and Mary 
Ella, did not live long after moving to Provi- 
dence. Julia married well, and she and one child 
are still living. 

We have but little history of the foUownig 
children of David Brown, Jr. : 
Eliza Mariah Brown, born IMarch 14, 1837. 
Rosa Ann Brown, born January 29, 1843. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 131 

David Wilson Brown, born March 21, 1848. 
Mary Jane Brown, born May 27, 1851. 

Laurance Brown, son of David Brown, Jr., and 
great-grandson of Michael Braun of the Stone 
House, was born March 4, 1845 ; died February 
18, 1919; buried at Faith. He married Margaret 
Frances Lippard on December 25, 1885. (She 
was born May 1, 1868; died November 5, 1911 ; 
buried at Faith.) To this union were born the 
following : 
Walter Monroe Brown, born August 1, 1886; 

died March 3, 1886; buried at St. Paul's. 
Robert Luther Brown, born April 15, 1890; died 

October 5, 1890; buried at St. Paul's. 
Myrtie Joana Brown, bom August 20, 1892 ; died. 
Adam Littleton Brown, born January 27, 1894; 

died. 
David Eli Brown, born July 11, 1899. 
Clarance Alexander Brown, born July 7, 1900. 
John Boyden Brown, born March 27, 1903. 
Lelia Lucile Brown, born September 6, 1908. 
Mary Elisa Brown. 

Mary Elisa Brown, daughter of Laurance 
Brown, married Charlie Wilbert Deal on Decem- 
ber 4, 1904. (He was bom January 18, 1882.) 
To this union the following children were born: 
Murtie Lucela Deal, born October 6, 1905. 
Walter Leroy Deal, bom May 11, 1909 ; died July 

24. 1909; buried at Faith. 
Adam Littleton Brown was married to Bessie 



132 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Maie Kluttz on June 4, 1916. (She was born 
February 23, 1898.) To this union one child 
was born, Clifford Alexander Brown, on June 
12, 1917. 

This ends the family of David Brown, Jr., as 
far as we have been able to ascertain the facts. 

(section v) — ^DANIEL BROWN, A SON OF DAVID 
BROWN 

Daniel Brown was another son of David 
Brown, Sr., and grandson of Michael Braun of 
the Stone House. He settled in the southwestern 
part of Rowan County, west of Organ Church. 
His occupation was farming. He had much sick- 
ness and many adversities ; did not live to be old, 
but was married three times. First to ^Miss Ly- 
erly, second to IMiss Leah Troutman and third to 
Miss Rimer. To the first union were born three 
children : 
Allen Brown, born ; died in the Confederate 

Army. 
Joseph Brown, born November 12, 1864; buried 

at St. Peter's. 
Margaret Brown, born November 22, 1866. 

Margaret married and moved West, and a fur- 
ther history of her life is not obtainable. 

Joseph Brown married Margaret Holshouser. 
(She was born July 18, 1848.) To this union 
were born seven children : 
John D. Brown, born January 7, 1868. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEIv BROWN FAMILY 133 

Gusta Brown, born May 8, 1870. 

Lottie Brown, born December 26, 1873. 

Martha G. Brown, born June 20, 1877; died 

April 10, 1878 ; buried at St. Peter's. 
Daisy Brown, bom February 4, 1880. 
Flora Brown, born May 18, 1882. 
Roxie Brown, born October 8, 1885. 

John D. Brown, son of Joseph and Margaret 
Brown, was married twice. First to Laura 
Linker on January 10, 1888. To this union was 
born one child, Beulah Brown, November 16, 
1888. The second time to Laura Lingle on 
March 23, 1897. To this union were born four 
children : 
Olna Brown. 
Stailey Brown. 
Clement Brown. 
Kenneth Brown. 

Gusta Brown married John Linker on January 
10, 1889. To this union were born two children : 
Laura M. Linker. 
Burtie M. Linker. 

Lottie Brown married George Peeler on Feb- 
ruary 23, 1896. To this union were born six 
children : 

Roy D. Peeler, born February 11. 1897. 
Banks J. Peeler, born February 11, 1897. 
Ina Maie Peeler, bom September 6, 1902. 
Raymond H. Peeler, born September 12, 1905. 
Herman B. Peeler, born August 19, 1908. 



1S4 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Mitchel A. Peeler, born April 12, 1914. 

Daisey Brown married H. W. Earnhardt on 
October 16, 1904. To this union were bom two 
children : 

Roy M. Earnhardt, bom January 10, 1906. 
Margaret Earnhardt, bom July 23, 1915. 

Flora Erown married George A. Lyerly on 
October 16, 1904. To this union were born six 
children : 

Margie Lyerly, born January 2, 1906. 
Eeulah Lyerly, bom January 17, 1908. 
Leon Lyerly, born December 31, 1910. 
Dortha Maie Lyerly, born May 1, 1914. 
George J. Lyerly, born March 26, 1916. 
Lyerly, born March 17, 1918. 

Roxie Brown married Henry Trexler on No- 
vember 5, 1903. To this union were born five 
children : 

Reed Trexler, born August 28, 1904, 
Jessie P. Trexler, born November 12, 1908. 
Margaret Trexler, born December 22, 1911. 
Harold Trexler, born September 3, 1912. 
Ida D. Trexler, born July 23, 1917. 

Concerning Margaret, daughter of Daniel 
Brown, we have learned the following facts : That 
she married Monroe Poole, and soon after moved 
West. We do not know the date of their mar- 
riage. They had two children, one daughter and 
one son. Dates of birth not given. Margaret 
died some time in February, 1917. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 135 

(section VI) — HENRY BROWN, A SON OF DAVID 
BROWN 

Henry Brown was a son of David Brown and 
a grandson of Michael Braun of the Stone House. 
He settled on the Gold Hill Public Road about 
four and one-half miles from Salisbury; was a 
successful farmer, and a man of good Chris- 
tian character. He had a large family, but 
had much sickness and but few of his children 
lived to marry. He was bom November 22, 
1814; died November 12, 1887; buried at Christ- 
iana. In 1844 he married Magdalena Barger. 
(She was bom March 11, 1825; died November 
9, 1879; buried at Christiana. His wife also 
joined him in the work of the church, and they 
were noted for their piety and activity. To the 
above union were born seven children : 
Peter Monroe, born March 12, 1846; died July 

22, 1860; buried at St. Paul's. 
Crawford Luther, bom July 14, 1848; died April 

21, 1863; buried at St. Paul's. 
Manda Currena, born July 17, 1850; died August 

26, 1886 ; buried at Christiana. 
Carson Alexander, bom November 9, 1852 ; died 

May 10, 1910; buried at St. Peter's. 
Caleb Husten, born November 16, 1854; died 

August 25, 1856; buried at St. Paul's. 
Andrew Lewis, born June 2, 1857; died June 14, 

1860; buried at St. Paul's. 



136 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Margaret Catharine, born January 15, 1860. 

Margaret Catharine Brown, daughter of Henry 
Brown and great-granddaughter of Michael 
Braun, married Martin I^uther Lyerly on Janu- 
ar>' 27, 1881. (He was born January 3, 1855.) 
To this union were born five children : 
Carrie Magdalena Roxana, born January 16, 1882. 
Cora Lillie Eleanora, born August 9, 188^1-. 
Mary Ida Beaulah, born January 12, 1890. 
Paul Jacob Luther, born February 13, 1893. 
Ivy Nathan Chrissenbery, born October 30, 1894. 

Carrie M. R. Lyerly, daughter of M. Luther 
Lyerly, married Liither Cauble on December 26, 
1900. (He was born June 26, 1878.) To this 
union were born five children : 
Guy Herman, born September 22, 1901. 
Luther Rang, born September 15, 1904. 
Mar\-en Glen, born February 1, 1911. 
Ralph Paul, born October 2, 1915. 
Claud Nathan, born January 29, 1918. 

Paul Jacob Lyerly, son of Luther and Margaret 
C. Lyerly, was born February 14, 1893. He mar- 
ried Leona Sarah McCombs on June 4, 1917. 
(She was born September 12, 1893.) They have 
one child, Paul Lyerly, Jr., born February 24, 
1918. 

Ivy Nathan Chrissenbery, another son of 
Luther and Margaret C. Lyerly, married Allene 
Glover on May 26, 1918. 

]Manda Currena, daughter of Henry Brown, 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 137 

married Manelis Safrit, September, 1873. To 
this union were born three children : 
Margaret Ellen, born February 1, 1874. 
Moses Alexander, born April 26, 1875. 
Charley Henry Nelson, born December 6, 1877. 

Margaret Ellen Safrit married Maxwell Trout- 
man in June, 1895. To this union were born 
seven children: 

Quincy Ernest Walter, born 1895. 
Ethel Londary, born 1897. 
Beulah Viola, born 1898. 
Harvey Eugene, born 1902. 
Mary Currena, born 1904. 
Benjamin Maxwell, born 1908. 
Alma Margaret, born 1915. 

Ethel Londary, daughter of Ellen Troutman, 
married Walter Hobson Kirk in the year 1919. 
To this union was born one daughter, Ruth Kirk, 
in 1920. 

Beulah Viola, second daughter of Ellen Trout- 
man, was married to Leslie Godwin in 1920. 

Charley Henry Safrit, son of Manda Safrit, 
was born December 6, 1877. He married Rhoda 
Kestler on June 5, 1903. (She was born April 
30, 1877.) 

Moses Alexander, son of Manelis Safrit, mar- 
ried Ellen Heilig on June 2, 1895. (She was 
born November 24, 1865.) To this union were 
born two children: 



13S HISTORY. OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Arthur Odell, born August 22, 1901 ; died July 28, 

1902; buried at St. Paul's. 
Ivy Richard, born July 8, 1903. 

Carson Alexander Brown, son of Henry 
Brown, married Martha M. Lyerly on February 
24, 1881. (She was born September 9, 1860.) 
To this union were born five children: 
Annie Josephine, born July 8, 1882. 
Harvey Jeremiah, born January 14, 1884. 
Clarence Alexander, bom June 23, 1887. 
Irvin J., born July 5, 1892. 
Lewis Luther, born July 22, 1894. 

Annie Brown, daughter of Carson Brown, mar- 
ried David Brady. To this union were born six 
children. 

Harvey Jeremiah Brown, who married a Miss 
Brady. 

Clarence Brown, who married Fannie Bost. 

Irvin Brown, son of Carson Brown, who mar- 
ried Ester Trexler. 

Lewis Brown, who married Beulah Peeler. 

(section VII) — JEREMIAH BROWN, A SON OF 
DAVID BROWN 

Jeremiah Brown was a son of David Brown, 
Sr., and a grandson of Michael Braun. He died 
young, and was buried at the Stone House. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 139 

(section VIII) — ANDREW BROWN, A SON OF DAVID 
BROWN 

Andrew Brown was a son of David Brown, and 
a grandson of Michael Braun. He married and 
had two children, but died in a few years after 
marriage, some sixty or seventy years ago, and 
was buried at the Stone House. Further history 
of that family is lost. We think the children 
were boys but are not able to tell what has become 
of them. 

(section IX) — GEORGE BROWN, A SON OF DAVID 

brown, and isabella brown, his 
wife's sister 

George Brown, son of David Brown, and 
grandson of Michael Brown of the Stone House, 
lived on the old home place of his father, David 
Brown, and we believe died there. He was a 
farmer and had made a successful start in the 
world, but after a few years of married life, he 
was called away by death and buried at the Stone 
House. He married Mariah Brown, and to this 
union were born two children: 
Nathanuel Boyden. 
Mary Jane. 

Nathanuel Boyden married Louretta Beaver. 
To this union were bom two children : 
Albert BrowTi. 
Edward Brown. 



140 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Edward Brown married Cora Holobough. To 
this union were born the following children : 
Ethel Brown. 
Lula Brown. 
Hirum Brown. 

Albert Brown was married twice ; his first wife 
was Molly Holobough. To this union were born 
three children. His second wife was Miss Lula 
Stirewalt. To this union was born one child. 

Mary Jane Brown, daughter of Mariah Brown, 
married Calvin Cruse. To this union were born 
four children : 
John Cruse. 
Alice Cruse. 
George Cruse. 
Henry Cruse. 

John Cruse married Jane Ritchie. To this 
union were born five children : 
Omer Cruse. 
Karle Cruse. 
Marven Cruse. 
Ethel Cruse. 
Hazel Cruse. 

Alice Cruse married Lawne Kluttz. To this 
union was born one child, who died young. 

George Cruse married Pearle Ritchie. To this 
union were born five children: 
Delma Ritchie. 
Roy Ritchie. 
Pauline Ritchie. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 141 

Lillian Ritchie. 
Sada Ritchie. 
Loucile Ritchie. 

This ends the family of George Brown, but his 
widow was of the Brown family, and she was 
married again to Paul Misenheimer. To this 
union were born three children : 
Margaret Misenheimer. 
John Misenheimer. 
George Misenheimer. 

Margaret Misenheimer married first David 
Bostian. To this union were born three children : 
Effie Bostian. 
Ida Bostian. 
Bessie Bostian. 

Effie Bostian married Charles Stirewalt. To 
this union were born six children: 
Roy Stirewalt. 
Harry Stirewalt. 
Pauline Stirewalt. 
Price Stirewalt. 
Ralph Stirewalt. 
Reubin Stirewalt. 

Ida Bostian married a Mr. Stirewalt. To this 
union were born five children : 
Opal Stirewalt. 
John Lewis Stirewalt. 
Walter Stirewalt. 
Welden Stirewalt. 
Amelia Stirewalt. 



142 HISTORY OF THE MICH.\EL BROWN FAMILY 

Bessie Bostian married William Cline. To this 
union were bom four children : 
Howard Cline. 
Margaret Cline. 
W. A. Cline. 
Annie Cline. 

George Misenheimer, son of Alariah Brown, 
was married twice ; first to Celia Peeler. To this 
union were born four children: 
Charley Misenheimer. 
Sidney Hisenheimer. 
Roy Misenheimer. 
Beulah Misenheimer. 

George Misenheimer's second wife was Mrs. 
Minnie Rendleman; to this union there are no 
children. 

Sidney Misenheimer, son of George Misen- 
heimer, married Nora Brown. To this union 
were born three children. (Their names are not 
given.) 

Charley Misenheimer, son of George Misen- 
heimer, married Bessie Peeler. To this union 
were born six children : 
Fannie Misenheimer. 
Roy Misenheimer. 
(The names of the others are not given.) 

John ^lisenheimer, son of Mariah Brown, mar- 
ried Sarah Peeler. To this union were bom 
seven children: 
Cappie Misenheimer. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 143 

Rosco Misenheimer. 
Fannie JMisenheimer, 
Maggie Misenheimer. 
Daisy Misenheimer. 
Pearle Misenheimer. 
Charley Misenheimer. 

This ends the history of the George Brown 
family through Mariah Brown and her posterity 
through George Brown ; and her second husband, 
Paul Misenheimer. This family of Misenheim- 
ers and their children come into the family of 
the Browns because their mother was a Brown, 
and a cousin to her first husband, George. She 
came through the family of Moses Brown, a son 
of Michael Braun of the Stone House. 

In this connection, although a little out of the 
regular line, we refer to her sister, Isabella 
Brown, who was bom August 20, 1843, and was 
married to David Lawson IMiller on November 
29, 1865, by Rev. Butler. They lived in Rowan 
a short tim.e, and then moved West, travelling 
from place to place for a number of years, finally 
settling down in Arkansas. To this union were 
born eight children: 
David William ^liller, bom February 3, 1867; 

died March 15, 1867. 
George Simeon Miller, born April 29, 1868. 
Laura Anna Catharine Miller, born September 

14, 1870. 
Bertha Mosella Miller, born December 28. 1872. 



144 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEI. BROWN FAMILY 

Albert Zebedee Miller, born June 14, 1876. 
Ira Welker Miller, born December 14, 1878. 
David Lee Miller, born May 13, 1882. 
Anna Bell Miller, bom February 3, 1887. 
David Lawson died some time in 1919. 

(section X) MARY BROWN, A DAUGHTER OF 

DAVID BROWN 

We now return to David Brown's family, and 
his daughter Mary Ann. She was a grand- 
daughter of Michael Braun of the Stone House ; 
was born August 14, 1825 ; lived to a good old 
age ; was much thought of by all, and was known 
by the familiar name of "Aunt Mary." She 
married John J. Miller. (He was born January 
15, 1819.) To this union were born three 
children : 

Boyden A. R. Miller, born December 18, 1847. 
Luther E. Miller, born May 1, 1849; died young; 

buried at Organ Church. 
Carson C. Miller, born February 26, 1852; died 

young; buried at Organ Church. 
Boyden A. R. Miller, son of John J. and Mary 
Ann Miller, was married twice. First to Annie 
L. Bost, who was born August 30, 1848. To this 
union were bom two children : 
John L. C. Miller, born October 20, 1870. 
Carry R. Miller, born September 27, 1872; died 

and is buried at St. Luke's. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 145 

He was married the second time to Frances B. 
Shives. To this union three children were born : 
Lizzie J. Miller, born July 30, 1880. 
Charlie A. Miller, born April 18, 1882. 
Martha L. Miller, born October 24, 1883. 

John L. C. Miller, son of Boyden A. R. Miller, 
married Minnie Fisher. To this union one child 
was bom, Arthur Miller. 

Carrie A. Miller, daughter of Boyden A. R. 
Miller, married George D. Peeler. To this union 
ten children were born : 
lUirley S. Peeler. 
Eula May Peeler. 
II oy A. Peeler. 
Annie Lee Peeler. 
Pcarle Peeler. 
Sadie L. Peeler. 
Mary Ray Peeler. 
Lcthid M. Peeler. 
Addie Ruth Peeler. 
Helen Elizabeth Peeler. 

Lizzie J. Miller, daughter of Boyden A. R. 
Miller (by his second wife), married George 
Holshouser. To this union two children were 
l>orn : 

Harry Holshouser. 
CIco Holshouser. 

Charley A. Miller, son of Boyden A. R. Miller 
< by his second wife), married Esther Fisher. To 
tl'.H union no children are born. 



146 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEI, BROWN FAMILY 

Martha L. Miller, daughter of Boyden A. R. 
Miller (by his second wife), married Clarence 
Kluttz. To this union one child was bom, Gladis 
Kluttz. 

(Si:CTlON Xl) — CHRISTINA BROWN, A DAUGHTER 
OF DAVID BROWN 

This ends the posterity of Michael Brown, of 
the Stone House, through his son David Brown, 
with the exception of one daughter, Christina 
BrowTi, who married a Mr. Kluttz, and moved to 
Dongola, 111. So far we have not been able to 
find any further trace of the family other than 
that they had children, but we have not learned 
their names nor their addresses. Christina was 
one of the oldest children of David Brown's 
family. We have now covered the ground of but 
one of old Michael Brown's children, viz., David. 
There are four other boys to refer to, but con- 
cerning some of them our history is limited. 



CHAPTER IV 

JAMES BROWN, the: SECOND BRANCH OF THE 
BROWN TREE 

James Brown was a son of Michael Braun of 
the Stone House. He settled on a part of his 
father's land, near Crane Creek, not more than a 
mile from his birthplace. At this time the coun- 
try was still wild, and httle cleared, hence he had 
to build and settle in the woods, but he soon had 
a comfortable home, built of logs, and the cracks 
plastered with mortar as was common in that 
day. He cleared up considerable land and culti- 
vated it successfully; raised a large family of 
children, nearly all of whom settled near him and 
westward. Nearly all of David's children settled 
southward and near the public road from Salis- 
bury. Hence, for a time there was no other name 
known on this road from Salisbury to near the 
Hampton Creek, about six miles. At one time 
one-half of the population of Salisbury was com- 
posed of Browns. Much of his history has been 
lost. We do not know when he was born, when 
he died or where he was buried (but believe it 
was at the Stone House). We are also without 
any information concerning his wife, but know 
that they had a large family of children: 

1-17 



148 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

James Brown, Jr. 

Allen Brown. 

Alexander Brown. 

William Brown, who married Caroline Fisher. 

Jeremiah Brown. 

George Brown, who died single. 

Polly Brown, who married Felty Pence. 

Lisa Brown, who married Paul Miller; born 

January 4, 1812; died May 26, 1895; buried 

at Organ Church. 
Suchy Brown, who married Noah Reaves. 
Sally Brown, who married IMichael Heilig. 
Margaret Brown, who married George Holo- 

bough. 
In all six sons and five daughters ; as to many 
of them the dates of births and deaths have been 
lost. 

(section i) JEREMIAH BROWN, A SON OF JAMES 

BROWN 

Jeremiah Brown was a son of James Brown 
and grandson of ^Michael Brown of the Stone 
House. He married a Miss Mary Brown, and 
settled near the Gold Hill Road eight miles south- 
east of Salisbury. His occupation was farming, 
at which he made a comfortable Hving. All his 
children were girls : 
Margaret Brown, buried at Christiana. 
Sarah Brown, buried at St. Peter's. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 149 

Clementine Brawn. 

Elizabeth Brown, buried at St. Peter's. 

Mary Brown, buried at Lower Stone. 

Margaret Brown married Edward Bame. They 
settled near the Rimer Mine, adjoining the lands 
of Solomon Brown. To this union three children 
were bom : 
Rosa Ann Bame, born May 2, 1847; buried at 

Rockwell. 
Polly Bame, born May 23, 1850. 
Rev. Richard L. Bame, born March 28, 1862; 
died and buried in the West. 

Rosa Ann, daughter of Edward and Margaret 
Bame, married a Mr. Cazort. To this union four 
children were bom : 
Edgar Cazort. 
Jessee Cazort. 
Thomas Cazort. 
Paul Cazort. 

Edgar Cazort married a Miss Cauble. 

Polly Brown, daughter of Edward and Marga- 
ret Bame, married William Parker. To this 
union five children were bom : 
Dovie Parker, buried at Christiana. 
John Parker, buried at Christiana. 
Martin Parker. 
Maggie Parker. 
George Parker. 

Martin Parker married a Miss Aery. To this 
union three children w^ere born : 



150 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

May Parker, bom May 30, 1905. 
Hoy Parker. 
Luther Parker. 

Maggie Parker married John Aery. To this 
union five children were born : 
Ila Aery. 
Emma Aery. 
Carrie Aery. 
Molley Aery. 
Mary Aery. 

George Parker married a Miss Misenheimer. 
To this union three children were born : 
Money Parker. 
Harold Parker. 
Clifford Parker. 

Sarah Brown, daughter of Jeremiah and Mary 
Brown, lived with her sister, Elizabeth, and died 
unmarried. 

Elizabeth Brown married Andrew Barger (this 
being his second marriage). To this union two 
children were bom : 
Paul Barger. 
Thomas Barger. 

Paul Barger married a Miss Phillips. To this 
union one child was born, who died young. 

Thomas Barger married a Miss Kluttz. To 
this union seven children were bom, whose names 
and dates of births cannot be ascertained. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 151 

(section II) — JAMES BROWN, JR., A SON OF 
JAMES BROWN 

James Brown, Jr., was a brother of Jeremiah 
Brown, and grandson of Michael Braun of the 
Stone House. He was married twice; first to 
Miss Sarah Rendleman, by whom he had one 
child, Laura Mariah Brown (bom August 22, 
1837; died July 10, 1916; buried Chestnut Hill). 
He lived on the west side of the Gold Hill Road, 
joining the old Moses Brown land or Haynes tan 
yard. His second wife was Miss Celey Riden- 
hour, by whom he had no children. 

Laura M. Brown was first married to Otho 
Holshouser, a native of Rowan County, on March 
10, 1864. This union was of short duration. She 
was married the second time to Miles M. Bailey. 
(He was born July 23, 1841.) To this last union 
four children were born : 
Carrie M. Bailey, born November 8, 1867. 
Sarah Bailey, born January 2, 1870. 
Thomas McClelen Bailey, born July 23, 1871. 
Margaret May Bailey, born May 30, 1878. 

Carrie Minnie Bailey married William Arthur 
Fries, of Mt. Pleasant, N. C, on August 14, 1889. 
To this union four children were born : 
Verona Eulala Fries, born October 15, 1890. 
Mabel Leone Fries, born June 15, 1894. 
Harold Fries, born May 11, 1899. 
Richard Edison Fries, born June 25, 1901. 



152 HISTORY OF THE MICHx\EIv BROWN FAMILY 

Verona Eulala Fries married Lacy Dayvault 
Hines, of Brown Summit, N. C, on October 26, 
1909. To this union one son was bom, Edward 
Dayvault Hines, on December 19, 1910, who is 
also a great-grandson of Miles M. and Laura M. 
Bailey. She was married the second time to Wil- 
liam Washington Cruse, of Oxford, N. C, on 
July 26, 1914. 

Mabel Leone Fries married Frederic Marven 
Dick, of Greensboro, N. C, on August 10, 1915. 

Margaret May Bailey married Samuel Clark 
Peacock, of Davidson County, N. C, on June 29, 
1904. To this union three children were born : 
Walter Bailey Peacock, born May 2, 1907. 
Helen Elizabeth Peacock, bom May 3, 1911. 
Margaret Clark Peacock, born July 16, 1913. 

This brings the family of James Brown, a 
grandson of old Michael Brown, down to 1915. 

(section hi) — ALEXANDER BROWN, A SON OF 
JAMES BROWN 

Alexander Brown was a brother of the James 
Brown above mentioned, and a grandson of Mich- 
ael Braun of the Stone House. He also located 
on the Gold Hill Road two and one-half miles 
from Salisbury. His occupation was that of a 
farmer, at which he made a successful living; 
owned a number of slaves and accumulated con- 
siderable property. He was born in 1804, died in 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 153 

1892, and buried at St. Paul's. His first wife 
was Betty Walton, whom he married in 1835. 
To this union three children were born : 
Adam Brown, born 1839; died 1887; buried at 

St. Paul's. 
Henry Brown, born May 10, 1851. 
Mariah Brown, born 1839. 

He was married the second time to Miss Sophia 
Miller. To this union three children were born:. 
Jennie Brown, born November 4, 1853. 
Catharine Brown, born December 29, 1855. 
Laura S. Brown. 

Adam Brown, son of Alexander Brown, died 
while a young man, and unmarried. 

Mariah Brown married John Bringle. (He 
was born in 1865.) To this union six children 
were bom : 
W. A. Bringle. 
Robert Bringle. 
Hattie Bringle. 
Margaret Bringle. 
Thomas Bringle. 

Jennie Brown, daughter of Alexander Brown 
(by his second wife), married John Crosset. To 
this union four children were born : 
Cora Lee Crosset, born September 23, 1871. 
Mary J. Crosset, born March 5, 1873. 
John T. Crosset, born May 22, 1875. 
Bessie H. Crosset, born July 7, 1889. 



IM HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Catharine R. Brown, daughter of Alexander 
Brown (by his second wire), married J. J. Sloop 
on December 12, 1878. To this union six children 
were born : 

Lon Leyburn Sloop, born October 6, 1879. 
Lila Caroline Sloop, born July 19, 1881. 
Marga Bell Sloop, born September 1, 1884. 
Wilburn Eddie Sloop, born August 8, 1888. 
Harry Alexander Sloop, born May 15, 1891. 
Clifton Brown Sloop, born June 16, 1893. 

Lon Leyburn Sloop, son of J. J. and Cath- 
arine Sloop, married Carry Carlyle Tuttle on 
August 31, 1911. To this union no children were 
born. 

Lila Caroline Sloop, daughter of J. J. and 
Catharine Sloop, married George F. Seyfert on 
May 1, 1902. To this union four sons were born : 
George F. Seyfert, Jr., born January 13, 1903. 
Charles King Seyfert, bom April 23, 1904. 
William Paton Seyfert, born September 21, 1907. 

Wilburn Eddie Sloop, daughter of J. J. and 
Catharine Sloop, was inarried to Daniel Worth 
Plyler on October 12, 1910. To this union no 
children have been born. 

Laura Sally BrowTi, daughter of Alexander 
Brown (by his second wife), and a sister of 
Catharine Brown, was married. This ends the 
family history of Alexander Brown. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 153 

(section rv) — ^ALLEN BROWN, A SON OF JAMES 
BROWN 

Allen Brown was another son of James Brown 
and a grandson of Michael Braun of the Stone 
House. Beyond the fact that he married Polly 
Smithdeal we have no further record of this 
family. 

(section v) — WILLIAM BROWN, A SON OF JAMES 
BROWN 

William Brown (born in 1815; died in 1867) 
was another son of James Brown, St., and a 
grandson of old Michael Braun of the Stone 
House. He settled near his father ; probably on 
a part of his land, and engaged in farming, at 
which he was very successful. He was of a good 
moral character, a trait inherited by all the mem- 
bers of the Brown family. He married Carolina 
Fisher and to this union were born : 
Alice Brown. 
James Brown. 
William Sylvester Brown. 
Margaretta Brown. 
Thornton Brown. 

Several other children died young, of whom 
we have no record. 
Alice Brown married Henry Kirk. 
Margaretta Brown married Stephen Kirk. 



156 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

William Sylvester Brown married a Miss 
Bailey. 

All those who grew to maturity married and 
had large families. As far as known, all of 
William Brown's children are dead with the ex- 
ception of Alice Kirk, of Salisbury, N. C, and 
William Sylvester Brown, of Granite Quarry, 
who was bom about three-quarters of a mile from 
the Stone House, January 7, 1852. On Decem- 
ber 18, 1872, he married Martha Maria Bailey, a 
native of Iredell County, who was born Septem- 
ber 8, 1849. To this union were born seven 
children : 

Agnes Josephine, born October 7, 1873. 
Robert Maxwell, born August 23, 1875. 
Mamie Puella, born July 22, 1877; died October 

29, 1887. 
Josy Sylvester, bora January 8, 1881. 
James Aaron, born June 14, 1884. 
Celia Zulema, born March 31, 1887. 
Charlie Ferley, born June 5, 1890. 

Agnes Josephine married James Pinkney Trex- 
ler, of Salisbury, N. C. They have no children. 

Sylvester married Angie Thompson, of 
Chester, S. C. Their children are : 
Sarah Agnes. 
Grace Augusta. 
Ivey Sylvester, Jr. 
Robert Maxwell, Jr. 

James Aaron married Ai^nes Pauline Tucker 



HISTORY OF the; MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 157 

on December 23, 1908. To this anion were born 
Catharine Mariah, Alma Marie, Agnes Gertrude 
and ]Mary Elizabeth Brown. 

Ceha Zulema married D. Green Witt, of Mt. 
Airy, N. C. They have two children, Charley 
Franklin and Louise Brown Witt. 

At the time of this writing, Robert M. Brown 
and Charley F. Brown are unmarried, and living 
with their parents at Granite Quarry, N. C. 

(section VI) — IvISA E. BROWN, A DAUGHTER OE 
JAMES BROWN 

Lisa E. Brown (born January 4, 1812; died 
May 26, 1896, and buried at Organ Church) was 
a daughter of James Brown and a granddaughter 
of old Michael Braun of the Stone House. She 
married Paul Miller (he was born December 23, 
1811; died February 24, 1859; buried at Organ 
Church), and to this union were born the fol- 
lowing children: 
George A. Miller, born in 1835 ; died December 

12, 1861 ; buried at Organ Church. 
Henry Miller, date of birth unknown. He was a 

Confederate soldier, killed on the battlefield 

of Sharpsburg, and buried at same place. 
Laura C. Miller, born November 8, 1838; died 

February 26, 1902 ; buried at Organ Church. 
Mary L. Miller, born September 20, 1840; at the 

time of this writing is living at Blowing 

Rock. 



158 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEI< BROWN FAMILV 

John R. Miller, bom in 1874. He married a Miss 
Holshauser, had a family of children, suf- 
fered a fracture of the skull, died at Mor- 
gantovvn and was buried at the same place. 
The date of his death cannot be ascertained. 

J. Allen Miller, born November 28, 1847. At the 
time of writing living near the old homestead 
not far from the village of Rockwell, N. C. 

(section VII ) — SALLY BROWN, A DAUGHTER OF 
JAMES BROWN 

Sally Brown married Michael Heilig and lived 
near St. Paul's Church. To this union the fol- 
lowing children were born : 
Mary Ann, married Miles Rusher. 
Henry, married Caroline Julian. 
Richard, married Louretta Miller. 
Elizabeth, married Jacob Peeler. 
Margaret, married Moses Peeler. 
George, married Julia Holshouser. 
Allen, married Mary Julian. 
Amanda Jane, married John F. Heilig. 

Most of these children are dead and buried in 
the cemetery of St. Paul's Lutheran Church. 

As far as our present information goes this 
ends the posterity of Michael Braun of the Stone 
House through his son James Brown. 

We know the remaining children of James 
Brown, both boys and girls, had large famihes, 
but their line could not be traced. 



CHAPTER V 

MOSES BROWN, THE THIRD BRANCH OF THE 
BROWN TREE 

We will now go back to Michael Braun of the 
Stone House, and take up his third son, Moses 
Brown. The foregoing statistics or dates all refer 
to Michael Brown's posterity of two of his sons, 
David and James. We regret not having as much 
histor>' of Mr. Brown's other children as of the 
first two already mentioned. 

Moses Brown settled on a part of his father's 
tract of land near Crane Creek, three miles from 
Salisbur>', near, or on what is now known as the 
public road from Salisbury to Gold Hill. He 
was a successful farmer and tanner. The tan 
yard was in existence up to the time of Thomas 
Haynes and known to many as the Ha>'nes 
Tanyard. 

Moses Brown married Catherine Swink. To 
this union were born nine children : 
Michael Brown, born December 28, 1797; died 

Nov. 28, 1849. 
David Brown. 
Peter Brown, born ; died October 31, 1812; buried 

in Salisbury. 
Moses L. Brown, bom November 11, 1800. 

159 



160 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Alfred Brown. 

Henry W. Brown, born July 27, 1814; died April 

19, 1852. 
Mumford Brown. 
Sarah Brow^n. 
Sophia Brown. 

SECTION I 

Moses L. Brown, son of iMoses Brown, and 
grandson of Michael Braun of the Stone House, 
was married to (name is not known). To this 
union eight children were born : 
Maria Brown. 
Harriet Brown. 

Laura L. Brown, born February 18, 1832. 
Rebecca C. Brown, born April 9, 1834. 
Henrietta Brown. 

Sarah A. Brown, born October 7, 1840. 
Lawson W. Brown. 
Julia A. Brown, born November 27, 1842. 

The following marriages of the children of 
Moses Brown are obtainable : 
Laura L. Brown, married Thomas W. Haynes. 
Rebecca C. Brown, married IMartin Richwine. 
Julia A. Brown, married Thomas P. Johnson. 

From Rebecca C. Brown's marriage with Mar- 
tin Richwine seven children were bom : 
Margaret Lotitia Richwine, born August 2, 1856. 
Moses L. Brown Richwine, born September 6, 
1859. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEI, BROWN FAMII.Y 161 

Eva Mebane Richwine, born December 17, 1865. 
Hannah Brown Richwine, born June 17, 1868. 
Lillie Martin Richwine, born January 10, 1874. 
Daisy Rebecca Richwine, born January 10, 1874. 
Carrie Holms Richwine, bom January 4, 1876. 

Eva M. Richwine married a Mr. Nicholas. To 
this union eleven children were born : 
Millie Bernard Nicholas, born January 1, 1885. 
Robert Sumneral Nicholas, born January 15, 1887. 
Joseph Martin Nicholas, born October 29, 1888. 
John Russell Nicholas, born August 18, 1890. 
Val Richwine Nicholas, born March 10, 1893. 
Henry Benson Nicholas, born October 27, 1895. 
Eva Rebecca Nicholas, born April 27, 1898. 
Cyrus Barnhill Nicholas, born October 22, 1900. 
Moses Brown Nicholas, born November 27, 1902. 
Dan Miller Nicholas, born March 6, 1905. 
Adelaide Huburt Nicholas, born March 5, 1907. 

SECTION II 

We will now take up Michael Brown's family. 
This Michael was a son of Moses Brown and 
settled near the old home on the road leading 
from Salisbury to Mt. Pleasant by Organ Church. 
He was a good farmer, had considerable land on 
Crane Creek and was successful. This was a 
part of the land owned by old Michael Braun 
of the Stone House, and probably a part of his 
father's estate owned by Moses Brown. He 
married Lizzie Rusher, and though the dates of 



162 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

death are not obtainable, they are both buried 

at St. Paul's. To this union eight children were 

bom: 

Richard C. Brown, born in October, 1830; buried 

at Lower Stone Church. 
Mariah Brown ; buried at St. Paul's. 
Isabella Brown, born August 20, 1843. 

(Isabella's family is recorded elsewhere.) 
Sarah Brown married Wilson Fisher; buried at 

St. Paul's. 
Maxwell Brown died young ; buried at St. Paul's. 
Jane Brown married Lawson Fisher; buried at 
Lower Stone Church. 

Richard C. Brown, son of Michael Brown, Jr., 
married Mary Cladora Miller. (She was born 
July 6, 1837.) Mary Cladora was married the 
third time to Alexander Peeler and was buried 
at St. Luke's Reformed Church. To Richard C. 
Brown's union with Claroda Miller were bom six 
children : 

John A. M. Brown, born March 1, 1857. 
Martha Jane Brown, born March 16, 1859. 
Alfred W. Brown, born July 7, 1861. 
George V. Brown, bom July 21, 1863. 
Lillie J. C. Brown, born June 15, 1866. 
George E. Brown, born May 22, 1869. 

John A. M. Brown, son of Richard C. Brown 
and great-grandson of old Michael Braun of the 
Stone House, married Martha J. Bostion. (She 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 163 

was born March 4, 1864.) To this union twelve 

children were born : 

George F. Brown, born March 2, 1880. 

Bessie C. Brown, born January 24, 1883. 

Charley M. Brown, born February 25, 1885. 

Richard C. Brown, Jr., born Februarys 23, 1887. 

Jacob H. Brown, born January 19, 1889. 

Lelia J. Brown, born June 26, 1891. 

Nora Brown, born May 20, 1894. 

James Brown, born April 25, 1896. 

Paul A. Brown, born May 20, 1899. 

Zola Brown, born i\Iay 1, 1902. 

Theodore R. Brown, bom October 13, 1905. 

Mable Lee Brown, born January 16, 1910. 

George F. Brown, son of John A. M. Brown, 
married S. A. Josey. (She was born December 
18, 1879.) To this union three children were 
born: 

Ethel Maie Brown, born March 2, 1902. 
Ray V. W. Brown, born April 11, 1903. 
Yerm A. Brown, born July 5, 1905. 

Richard C. Brown, Jr., son of John A. M. 
Brown, married Maggie Greene. (She was bom 
July 14, 1890.) To this union two children were 
bom: 

Craige A. C. Brown, born March 26, 1912. 
Thayer J. L. Brown, born August 29, 1913. 

Jacob H. Brown, son of John A. M. Brown, 
married Annie h. Kluttz. (She was bom March 
27, 1891.) To this union two children were born : 



164 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Sidney Floid Brown, born May 19, 1912. 
Peami i\L J. Brown, bom August 16, 1914. 

Charley M. Brown, son of John A. M. Brown, 
married Mittie J. Lefler. (She was born Sep- 
tember 2, 1883.) To this union four children 
were born : 

Raman P. Brown, bom November 19, 1906. 
Lola G. Brown, bom September 20, 1910. 
Anna M. J. Brown, bom September 24, 1914. 
Annia L. L. Brown, born September 24, 1914. 

Bessie Brown, daughter of John A. M. Brown, 
married George J. Bost. (He was born Septem- 
ber 10, 1880.) To this union three children were 
born: 

Essie Maie Bost, bom March 4, 1903. 
John A. L. Bost, born March 30, 1910. 
Lenie B. Bost, bom April 16, 1913. 

LeUa J. Brown (born March 26, 1891) was a 
daughter of John A. M. Brown and married 
Charley B. Fisher. (He was bom November 26, 
1891.) To this union two children were born: 
Hazel J. Lee Fisher, bom August 31, 1913. 
Thealma A. Fisher, born September 7, 1915. 

Lawson W. Brown, son of Richard C. Brown 
and grandson of Michael Brown, Jr., married 
Frances M. Rinehart. (She was born May 1, 
1869.) To this union three children were born: 
Clarance E. Brown, born November 13, 1892. 
Rowal R. Brown, born May 12, 1900. 
George H. Brown, born November 10, 1905. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 1C5 

George E. Brown, son of Richard C. Brown 
and grandson of Michael Brown, Jr., married 
Clara R. Kluttz. (She was born May 9, 1873.) 
To this union four children were born : 
Lester L. Brown, born November 30, 1893. 
Rodell C. Brown, born October 25, 1895. 
Lucious W. Brown, born July 29, 1900. 
Myrtle M. L. Brown, born September 22, 1902. 

Lillie S. C. Brown, daughter of Richard C. 
Brown and granddaughter of Michael Brown, Jr., 
married H. W. Bost. (He was bom July 14, 
1861.) To this union five children were born : 
Richard G. Bost, born January 9, 1885. 
Martha D. Bost, born June 26, 1887. 
Clarance A. Bost, born August 26, 1891. 
Trula M. Bost, born August 24, 1900. 
Minnie L. Bost, born September 11, 1904. 

Richard G. Bost married Lizzie M. Goodman. 
To this union one child was born, Zelma B. Bost. 

Martha D. Bost married Wilburn R. Riden- 
hour. To this union one child was born, Ralph 
R. Ridenhour, on April 17, 1907. 

Clarance A. Bost married Pearle H. Fisher. 
To this union one child was born, Myron Koons 
Bost, on September 21, 1913. 

As Moses Brown's posterity seems to be the 
most complicated of all the Stone House family, 
we will give the following history gathered from 
John Bass Brown, of Charlotte : 

2vIoses Brown, a son of ISIichael Brown, mar- 



166 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

ried Catharine Swink. Of this union there were 
nine children: Michael S.,- David, Moses L., Peter, 
Sophia, Mumford, Sarah, Alfred and Henry W. 

SECTION III 

Peter Brown, son of Moses Brown, was born 
November 21, 1802. On January 3, 1828, he 
married Elizabeth Poole. (She was born June 
1, 1807.) They had three children: John Lewis 
Brown, Margaret C. Brown and Mary Elizabeth 
Brown. Mary probably died in childhood, or re- 
mained unmarried, as there is no further account 
of her. All three of these children were by his 
first wife; although he was married three times, 
he had no children except by his first wife. 

John Lewis Brown, son of Peter Brown, was 
born January 8, 1829. On August 23, 1853, he 
married Nannie Jane Kerr. They had two chil- 
dren. One died when a boy, and the other, Peter 
Marshall Brown (born November 12, 1859) mar- 
ried Jennie Beacher Bass, of Columbus, Ga. Jen- 
nie was born June 27, 1864. They were married 
May 14, 1884, and had four children: Carrie 
Marshall Brown, born July 11, 1885. She is now 
Mrs. Gastin Gilbert Gallaway. They were mar- 
ried October 30, 1905, but have no children. 

The second child is John Bass Brown, boni 
November 27, 1886. He married Mildred Suth- 
erland, of Cohoes, N. Y. They were married 
September 29, 1910. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 167 

The third child is Nancy Kerr Brown, born 
October 10, 1888. On April 17, 1912, she mar- 
ried D. M. Young. They have one child, a 
daughter, Carrie Marshall Young, bom Decem- 
ber 3, 1913. 

The fourth child was William Jennings Brown, 
born July 21, 1892. On October 29, 1914, he 
married Mary Wriston Durham. 

John Bass Brown has two children, John Bass 
Brown, Jr., born September 4, 1911, and Millard 
Sutherland, born August 7, 1914. 

William J. Brown has no children. 

Margaret C. Brown, daughter of Peter Brown, 
married Dr. Billiard. (We have made several 
efforts to hear from IMargaret's family through 
Mrs. Penn Watson and others, but have never 
been able to gather any information as to the 
posterity of the same. We regret that part of 
this family must be left out of this history.) 

SECTION rv 

Alfred Brown, another son of Moses Brown, 
settled in Concord and had two daughters, Sophia 
and Sally. He and his brother, Moses L. Brown, 
of Salisbury, were both tanners by trade, and 
through their energy and skill, and large patron- 
age, laid a foundation of wealth for their children. 



CHAPTER VI 

PETER BROWN, THE FOURTH BRANCH OF THE 
BROWN TREE 

Peter Brown, the fourth son of Michael Brown 
of the Stone House, has not left us a long line of 
children. Peter Brown's wife's first name was 
Susannah; he died October 31, 1812, aged 56 
years. She died November 14, 1816, aged 56 
years. To them was born one daughter, Sarah 
M., who married Horace B. Satterwhite ; she died 
July 10, 1832, aged 40 years, 11 months and 23 
days, and is buried with her parents in the Old 
Lutheran Cemetery at Salisbury. The above in- 
formation was given by Mrs. Rebecca C. Rich- 
wine and was obtained from the tombstones in 
the above named cemeter}\ 



168 



CHAPTER VII ' 

JEREMIAH BROWN, THE FIFTH BRANCH OF THE 
BROWN TREE 

The youngest son of Michael Brown (Braun) 
of the Stone House was Jeremiah, who married 
the widow of Tobias Furr. By this union three 
children were born: Margaret, who married 
Thomas 'Dickson ; Delia, who married John 
Coughenour, and Col. Jeremiah Michael Brown. 

Col. Jeremiah Michael Brown was born in Sal- 
isbury, N. C, May 18, 1808, and died March 22, 
1868. He is buried in the Lutheran cemetery at 
Salisbury. Col. Brown was married four times : 

1. His first wife, Margaret (family name un- 
known), was born January 8, 1813; died May 2, 
1833, and is buried in the Lutheran cemetery at 
Salisbury. By this union one child was born, 
Margaret Ann, who died in infancy. 

2. His second wife, Margaret Laura Fraley, 
was born November 2, 1814; died April 23, 1842, 
and is buried in the Lutheran cemetery at Salis- 
bury. By this union four children were born: 

a. William Tobias Brown, the first child, was 
bom December 6, 1834, died, and is buried in the 
Lutheran cemetery. He married Elizabeth Allen 
and by this union six children were born. 

IGO 



170 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

( 1 ) Annie, who is buried in the Lutheran ceme- 
tery, (unmarried). 

(2) John, who now lives in Charlotte, N. C, 
(unmarried). 

(3) Charhe, who is buried in the Lutheran 
cemetery, ( unmarried ) . 

(4) Jefferson, who is buried in the Lutheran 
cemetery, (unmarried). 

(5) Fannie, who is buried in the Lutheran 
cemetery, (unmarried). 

(6) Thomas, who now lives in Salisbury, 
(married). 

b. Mary Ann Brown, the second child, was 
bom November 8, 1836, died August 10, 1908, 
and is buried in the Lutheran cemetery (un- 
married). 

c. Amanda F. Brown, the third child, was born 
October 17, 1838, died Januar>^ 11, 1901, and is 
buried in the Lutheran cemetery. She married 
Frank D. Irvin and by this union two children 
were born: (1) Walter, who is buried in the 
Lutheran cemetery, and (2) Frank B. Irvin, of 
Salisbury, N. C. 

d. Henryetta Louisa Brown, the fourth child, 
was born September 9, 1840, died August 11, 
1904, and is buried at Chester, S. C. She mar- 
ried Moses Murr and by this union three children 
were bom : William, Magp:ie and Thomas, who 
now reside in Chester, S. C. 

3. His third wife, Mary Elisa Lucas, was born 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 171 

February 22, 1824, died March 4, 1846, and is 
buried in the Lutheran cemetery at Salisbury, 
N. C. 

4. His fourth wife, Charlotte Verble, was born 
February 1, 1823, died December 9, 1891, and is 
buried in the Lutheran cemetery at SaHsbury. By 
this union six boys were born: Charles IMichael, 
Jeremiah IMoses, John Lillington, Joseph Pink- 
ney, Thomas Franklin and Robert Lee. 

a. Charles Michael Brown, the first son, was 
born in Salisbury, October 15, 1848, and died in 
Washington, N. C, March 3, 1919. When quite 
a young man Charles moved to Washington, N. 
C, where he became one of her most sterling and 
worthy citizens. In 1871 he married Mary Mar- 
tin, daughter of Edwin ]Martin, of the same city. 
By this union there were three children : Dr. E. 
M. Brown, Charlotte Brown (^Irs. F. C. Kug- 
ler) and Charles M. Brown, Jr. These three now 
live in Washington, N. C. 

h. Jeremiah Moses Brown, the second son, was 
bom in Salisbury, August 7, 1850, and is the only 
surviving child of this union. Jeremiah has been 
twice married : 

First, on November 1, 1876, to Virginia Alex- 
andria James, daughter of Thomas S. James, of 
Virginia. By this union two children were born: 
Lucy Virginia (Mrs. Walter A. Goodman, of 
Salisbury) and Jeremiah Alexander Brown, who 
died in infancy. 



1T2 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Second, on March 25, 1885, to Catherine Clem- 
entine Krider, daughter of the late Charles C. 
Krider. By this union five children were bom: 
Marguerite McKinnon and Charles Krider, who 
died in infancy, and Francis Kenneth, Bessie 
Brandt and Charlotte McNair, who now reside in 
Salisbury, N. C. 

c. John Lillington, the third son, was bom July 
16, 1852, died September 13, 1898, and is buried 
in the Chestnut Hill cemetery at Salisbury. He 
married Mary Susan Hauser. One child was 
bom, the late D. S. Brown, of Salisbur>% who 
died September 9, 1914. 

d. Joseph Pinkney, the fourth son, was born 
July 30, 1854, at Salisbury, N. C, and died No- 
vember 19, 1897, at Washington, N. C. In 1884 
he married Lydia Bonner, of Washington, N. C, 
who lived only a few years after their marriage. 

e. Thomas Franklin, the fifth son, was bom 
May 23, 1857, and died January 9, 1902. In 1872 
he also moved to Washington, where he lived 
until his death. 

/. Robert Lee, the sixth son, was born Septem- 
ber 19, 1866, and died April 2, 1892. He is buried 
in the Lutheran cemetery at Salisbury, N. C. 



CHAPTER VIII 

THE SIXTH BRANCH 01? THE BROWN TREE 

Michael Brown does not mention his sixth son 
in his will ; in all probability he was dead at that 
time. It is generally conceded that the three 
daughters, children by his first wife, died in in- 
fancy and there is a strong possibility that one 
son also died early in life. That Michael and 
Margareta Brown had six sons is indicated from 
his wife's tombstone in the old family graveyard, 
but their names are not given. In his will he 
gives the names of five. Some say that his sixth 
son was named John, and that he was called 
" Continental John," because of his heroic service 
in the Continental Army during the Revolution- 
ary War. This may be, and possibly he lost his 
life in battle or died while in the service of his 
country. In either case this would account for 
his name being omitted from his father's will, 
dated 1807. 



173 



;:."i 



CHAPTER IX 

CLKMKNTINE BROWN, THE) SEVENTH BRANCH OF 
THE BROWN TREE (DAUGHTER BY SECOND WIFE) 

Grandpa Braun's second wife was a widow, 
Mrs. Reaves, a Maryland lady, whose maiden 
name was Wakefield. By her first husband she 
had four children : Thomas, Samuel, Sally and 
Nancy. Samuel was the late Samuel Reaves, 
who was the father of Dr. Samuel Reaves and 
Mrs, Sarah Johnson. Nancy and Sally were with 
her when she married Michael Braun of the 
Stone House. For these two girls he made ample 
provision in his last will. Nancy Reaves married 
a Mr. Kestler, and was the mother of Mrs. Jane 
Price, and the grandmother of Robert Wakefield 
Price, and others of Salisbury. 

One child, named Clementine, was bom to 
Michael Braun by his second wife. She married 
Charles Verble. They had a daughter, Eleanora, 
who married Thomas E. Brown, and was the 
mother of Lewis V. Brown, of Texas, and Frank 
Brown, of Salisbury. 



174 



CHAPTER X 

A RESUME OF THE MICHAEI^ BROWN FAMII^Y 
HISTORY 

As the genealogy of the sons of Michael Braun 
of the Stone House is more or less confusing, we 
give a brief history in order to bring out more 
clearly the branches of the original tree, and here- 
with give the limbs by number. 

Michael Braun was a native of Pennsylvania 
who first settled in Salisbury. After living there 
for a time, and accumulating considerable prop- 
erty, he built a substantial house in the country 
about three miles from Salisbury, which has been 
known for more than one hundred and fifty years 
as the *' Old Stone House." His first wife was 
Margareta, her maiden name is lost. She had 
nine children, six sons and three daughters, and 
died when about thirty-seven years of age. The 
names of the sons as given in his last will and 
testament are David, Jeremiah, Moses, Peter and 
James. We have no record of the three daugh- 
ters and one son. His second wife was a Mrs. 
Reaves, a native of Maryland ; her maiden name 
was Wakefield. To this last union one daughter 
was born, her name was Clementine. 

The children by his first wife are referred to 
as follows: 

175 



176 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMIIvY 



David Brown and his children, viz.: Michael, 
Jacob, SolomonJDavid, Daniel, Henry, Jeremiah, 
Andrew, George, Mary Ann and Christina, 

Christina Brown married a Mr. Kluttz and 
moved to Illinois, in the neighborhood of Don- 
gola, but we have never been able to get any trace 
of her or her posterity. Jeremiah died young. 
Andrew married and had two sons, but of these 
two boys no information is obtainable. Of the 
remaining children we have a line of their poster- 
ity down to the great-grandchildren of old Mich- 
ael Braun. We could go further, but think this 
is a fair description in this brief history. 

Michael Brown, son of David Brown ^nd 
grandson of Michael Braun of the Stone House, 
had the following children : Elizabeth Commilla 
Brown, Mary A. L. Brown, John D. A. Brown, 
Sophia Mariah Brown, Isabella C. Brown and 
Simeon Jeremiah M. Brown. Jeremiah is a min- 
ister of the Gospel, and Isabella and Sophia 
Mariah died unmarried. 

Jacob Brown, son of David Brown and grand- 
son of Michael Braun of the Stone House, had 
the following children: Sarah L. Brown, Mary 
Clementine Brown, David Brown, Margaret 
Brown, Jeremiah Brown, Julia Ann Brown, 
Joseph Brown, Jacob C. Brown, Jr., Thomas L. 
Brown, Martha J. Brown, and Theophilus Brown. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 177 

Of these, Sarah L., Mary Clementine, David, 
Jeremiah, Joseph and Theophilus died unmarried. 

David Brown, Jr., son of David Brown, Sr., 
and grandson of Michael Brown of the Stone 
House, had the following children : Peter Brown, 
Elizabeth Mariah Brown, Henry Monroe Brown, 
Rosa Ann Brown, Laurance Brown, David Wil- 
son Brown, and Mary Jane Brown. Of Rosa 
Ann, David Wilson and Mary Jane we have been 
unable to get a full history because of death or 
removal. 

Solomon_Brown, son of David Brown and 
grandson of old Michael Braun of the Stone 
House, had the following children: Nathan 
Brown, Sarah Louise Brown, Calvin L. Brown, 
Richard L. Brown, Karamiah Brown, Henry 
Maxwell Brown, David L. Brown, Rebecca 
Brown, and Martha Ann Brown. Of these, 
Sarah Louise, Rebecca, Karamiah and Martha 
Ann died young or unmarried. Richard L. 
Brown and Henry Maxwell entered the Gospel 
ministry; P. D. Brown, a son of Nathan 
Brown, also entered the ministry and is at pres- 
ent the President of the Michael Brown Family 
Association. 

Daniel Brown, a son of David Brown and 
grandson of old ^Michael Braun, had the follow- 
ing children: Allen Brown, Joseph Brown, and 
Margaret Brown. Allen Brown died in the Con- 
federate Army, leaving no family. 



178 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEI, BROWN FAMILY 

Mary Ann Brown, daughter of David Brown, 
and granddaughter of old Michael Braun, mar- 
ried J. J. Miller and had the following children : 
Boyden A. R. Miller, Luther E. Miller, Carson C. 
Miller. Luther E. Miller and Carson C. Miller 
died while young. 

Henry Brown, son of David Brown and grand- 
son of Michael Braun, had the following chil- 
dren: Crawford Luther Brown, Peter Brown, 
Manda Currena Brown, Carson Alexander 
Brown, Caleb Huston Brown, Andrew Lewis 
Brown and Margaret Catharine Brown. Of these 
Peter, Crawford, Caleb and Andrew died young, 
some of them while children, 

George Brown, son of David Brown and grand- 
son of old Michael Braun of the Stone House, 
had the following children: Nathaniel Boyden 
Brown, Mary Jane Brown. This ends the chil- 
dren and grandchildren of David Brown, the first 
son of Michael Braun of the Stone House. 



II 

The second limb from the original trunk is 
James Brown. His children are as follows: 
James Brown, Allen Brown, Alexander Brown, 
Jeremiah Brown, William Brown, George Brown, 
Polly Brown, Lisa Brown, Euchey Brown, Sally 
Brown and Margaret Brown; eleven in all. 

James Brown, Jr., son of James Brown, Sr., 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 179 

and grandson of Michael Brown of the Stone 
House, had but one child, Laura Mariah Brown. 

Alexander Brown, son of James Brown, Sr., 
and grandson of IMichael Braun, had the follow- 
ing children: Adam Brown, Henry M. Brown, 
Mariah Brown, Jennie Brown, Catharine Brown 
and Laura S. Brown. 

Jeremiah Brown, son of James Brown, Sr., and 
grandson of Michael Braun, had five children: 
Margaret Brown, Sarah Brown, Clementine 
Brown, Elizabeth Brown and Mary Brown. 

William Brown, son of James Brown, Sr., and 
grandson of Michael Braun, had several children, 
but their names are not obtainable. 

Elisa Brown, daughter of James BrowTi, Sr., 
and granddaughter of T^Iichael Braun, married 
Paul Miller and had the following children: 
George A. ^Miller, Henr>^ Miller, Laura C. Miller, 
Mary L. :Miller, John R. Miller and J. Allen Mil- 
ler. We have but little information of the re- 
maining children of James Brown, Sr., but give 
the following: George Brown, of this family, 
never married. Polly married Felty Pence. 
Suchey Brown married Noah Reaves. Sally 
Brown married Michael Heilig. Margaret Brown 
married George HoUobough. 

Ill 

The third limb from the original trunk is 
Moses Brown, who had the following children: 



ISO HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Michael S. Brown, Moses L. Brown, David 
Brown, Peter Brown, Sophia Brown, Mumford 
Brown, Sarah Brown, Alfred Brown and Henry 
W. Brown. About his children we have the fol- 
lowing: Peter Brown had three children — John 
Lewis BrowTi, Margaret C. Brown and Mary 
Elizabeth Brown. Mary must have died in child- 
hood, or unmarried, because we cannot find any 
further trace of her. John Lewis Brown, son of 
Peter Brown and great-grandson of old Michael 
Braun, had two children. One died when a child, 
the other was Peter Marshall Brown. 

While Peter Brown moved to Charlotte, his 
brother Alfred moved to Concord and went into 
the tanning business. His children are John 
Brown, Rufus Brown, George W. Brown, Mon- 
roe Brown and Moses Luther Brown. 

Michael S. Brown, son of Moses Brown, and 
grandson of Michael Brown, Sr., had the fol- 
lowing children: Richard C. Brown, Mariah 
Brown, Isabella Brown, Moses Brown, Sarah 
Brown, Maxwell Brown, William Brown and 
Jane Brown. 

Moses L. Brown, Jr., son of Moses Brown, Sr., 
and a grandson of old Michael Brown, had the 
following children: Mariah Brown, Harriet 
Brown, Laura L. Brown, Rebecca C. Brown, 
Henrietta Brown, Sarah A. Brown, Laura A. 
Brown and JuHa A. Brown. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 181 
IV 

Peter Brown, the fourth son of Michael Braun 
of the Stone House, has not left us a long line of 
children. The most we can gather about him is 
that his wife's name was Susanna, w^ho died No- 
vember 14, 1816, aged 55 years, and buried in the 
Lutheran graveyard in Salisbury, N. C. He died 
October 31, 1812, and was buried in the same 
graveyard. They had one daughter, Sarah 
Brown, who married Horace Satterwhite, but 
after a few years of married life, died July 10, 
1832, and was buried in the same plot with her 
parents. 

The reason that the family history of this 
Peter Brown, son of Michael Braun, is so compli- 
cated is due to the fact that there were several 
Peter Browns, and a nephew of his, a son of 
Moses Brown, who was also called Peter, moved 
to Charlotte, and supposed by some to be the old 
Peter Brown of the Stone House ; but the Char- 
lotte Peter Brown is a grandson of Michael 
Braun instead of being his son. 



The fifth son of old Michael Braun was Jere- 
miah Brown, who had the following children: 
Margaret Brown, Delia Brown and Jeremiah M. 
Brown, who was known as CoL Jeremiah Brown. 



182 HISTORY OF THE MlCHAEIy BROWN FAMILY 
VI 

The name of the sixth son is not given. Two 
theories have been advanced concerning him ; one 
is that he died in infancy and the other is that his 
name was John, who became known later as 
" Continental John," and that he probably lost 
his life in the Revolutionary War. Either theory 
would account for his name being omitted from 
his father's will, written in 1807. Perhaps like 
that of his three sisters, who doubtless died in 
infancy, his life will forever remain a closed 
chapter. 

VII 

The seventh branch of Michael Brown of the 
Stone House is his daughter Clementine, by his 
second wife, born after his will was written. She 
married Charles Verble and was the mother of 
Eleanor, who married Thomas E. Brown. 



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CHAPTER XI 

The following statements recently received 
from Rev. B. S. Brown, are given in full as re- 
ceived from him, as we think they will be valu- 
able information to many readers of this history. 
It does us good to know that we are so nearly 
related, and it brings into the Brown relation 
many other names not thought of as being a part 
of our family. We are so interwoven by mar- 
riage and kindred relation that the great majority 
of native born citizens of this County and nearby 
Counties, are, in some way, related to this great 
Brown Family of the Stone House. 

SOME EXTRACTS FROM MEMORABILIA AND MUSINGS 

By B. S. Brozvfi 

I was bom and raised in the County of Rowan, 
State of North Carolina. My great-grandfather, 
Abraham Brown, came from Pennsylvania to 
Rowan County, N. C, not far from the begin- 
ning of the Revolutionary War. He settled seven 
miles nearly east of Salisbury. He had a farm, 
and on it, near the dwelling, was a custom grain- 
mill, on a small creek, running towards the Yad- 
kin River, only a few miles away. His son Jacob 
lived and died at this place. Also a son of Jacob 

1S3 



184 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEI< BROWN FAMILY 

Brown, namely, Jacob Brown, Jr., lived and died 
here. Both the Jacob Brown, Sr., and Jacob 
Brown, Jr., were buried in the graveyard of 
Union Lutheran Church, six miles nearly east of 
Salisbury. 

Other sons of Jacob Brown, Sr., were : George 
Henry, Alexander, and Lewis Tobias. Names of 
daughters were: Elizabeth, Nancy, Maria, Cath- 
erine and Rachel. 

Elizabeth became the first wife of John Rendle- 
man, and Nancy was his second wife. A daughter 
of this John Rendleman, Maria, became the wife 
of a son of Rev. Henry Graeber. Rev. Graeber 
was a minister in the Lutheran Synod of North 
Carolina from 1828 to 1843. 

Maria Brown became the wife of Henry Bar- 
ringer. Catherine Brown was married to Moses 
Barringer. I think these brothers-in-law were of 
little relation to each other, if any. Rachel 
Brown's husband was Jacob Holshouser. The 
above aunts of myself all lived and died in Rowan 
County, North Carolina. 

Of my father's brothers, Lewis Tobias was the 
youngest. He lived and died in Iredell County, 
N. C. One of his daughters, Susan, was mar- 
ried to Robert Brown (not a relative). She be- 
came the mother of Rev. C. L. Brown, D.D., Dean 
of Kyushu Gakuin, the college of the United 
Synod South, in the empire of Japan. {Note — 
Dr. Brown is now, 1920, a Secretary of the For- 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 185 

eign Missions Board of The United Lutheran 
Church in America.) 

The remaining one of my father's brothers, 
Rev. George Henry Brown, received full educa- 
tion for the Lutheran ministry. Most of his min- 
isterial labors were in the State of Mississippi. 

Alexander Brown married a daughter of John 
Kistler, To them were bom five sons and two 
daughters who lived to maturity. I was the 
youngest of tlieir offspring. My birth was No- 
vember 19, 1854. The parental home was four- 
teen miles west of Salisbury, N. C. 

My wife, Mary Catherine Brown, was bom and 
raised in the southwestern part of the State of 
Virginia, County of Wythe. My wife's ancestors, 
both paternal and maternal, were immigrants 
from Germany to Pennsylvania in the eighteenth 
century. In the latter part of the same century 
her great-grandfather, Christopher Brown, came 
from Pennsylvania to Wythe County, Virginia. 

My wife's grandfather was Michael Brown. 
Her father was Josiah Brown. Her mother was 
the sister of Rev. L. C. Groseclose, a Lutheran 
minister who labored in the Synod of North 
Carolina for a period of years. Among near rela- 
tives of my wife's father were a number of Luth- 
eran ministers: as Rev. James A. Brown, Rev. 
John C. Repass, Rev. Stephen A. Repass, D.D., 
Rev. W. R. Brown, and a number of others. 



186 HISTO'RY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Prof. Floyd B. Brown, living at Enochville, N. 
C, is first cousin to my wife. 

A tradition among- some of the Brown family 
of Wythe County, Virginia, is to the effect that a 
brother of Christopher Brown, who migrated 
with him from Pennsylvania, journeyed on to 
North Carolina and made his home in the latter 
State. It may be that this was a Michael Brown, 
known to have settled southeast from SaHsbury, 
and to have built and occupied a large stone resi- 
dence before the Revolutionary War. And this 
North Carolina Michael Brown may have been an 
uncle to the Virginia Michael Brown, the latter 
having been my wife's grandfather. 

The above mentioned North Carolina Michael 
Brown was a relative to my great-grandfather, 
Abraham Brown. These two relatives settled in 
the same vicinity, in the eastern part of Rowan 
County. 

{Note — The above are extracts from records 
made by myself several years ago. Present date 
is A. D. 1920.) 

Bachman S. Brown, Sr. 
Brountville, Tennessee, 
July 23, 1920. 

The foregoing historical facts given by Rev. B. 
S. Brown throws considerable light on some of 
the data recorded in another part of this history. 



HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 187 

It has been generally agreed that a brother of the 
Michael Braun of the Stone House came with 
him from Pennsylvania as far as Virginia, and 
settled there, and in Rowan it was thought that 
this brother^s name was Jacob, but the recorded 
history of Virginia is that his name was Christ- 
opher Brown, and this must be correct. It has 
also been the opinion of the Carolina Browns that 
they were in some way intimately related to the 
Browns of Virginia. This historical information 
connects the ancestors of Mrs. B. S. Brown, of 
Virginia, and the descendants of Michael Braun 
of the Stone House. We wish we had the whole 
line of ancestry of this family back to Christopher 
Brown, IVIichael Brown's brother. That would 
make this book as interesting to the Browns of 
Virginia as it is to us in North Carolina. While 
Abraham Brown, the great-grandfather of Rev. 
B. S. Brown, came from Pennsylvania about the 
same time or a little later, he must have been a 
relative of these Browns in Pennsylvania or Ger- 
many, so there is a place back there where all 
these Browns originally came from the same 
family. 

The Jacob Brown, of Rowan, referred to as 
having a custom mill was well known here in past 
years, and it was thought that mill was renewed 
and finally became the Kistler mill, but we are 
told that is not correct ; that some parts of the 
Jacob Brown mill still remain, as also the Jacob 



188 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

Brown house. These houses, with one or two 
near there, were built with shop, or hand-made 
nails, as those used in the Stone House. This 
httle information makes clear the family relation- 
ship of this old Jacob Brown, an ancestor of Rev. 
B. S. Brown, and shows that we all come together 
somewhere in our ancestry. 



CHAPTER XII ' 

SOME SUGGESTIONS 

The writer has experienced much trouble and 
expense in getting up this history of the Brown 
Family, and yet it is not perfect, because the 
records of our forefathers, and that of the 
present generation, are ver>' much hmited, and 
the children not posted as to the line of their 
descent. Some are hardly able to tell who their 
grandparents w^ere, and but few, as a rule, are 
able to name their great-grandparents, or tell 
where they lived. We would therefore suggest 
that all who read this book keep a record of their 
family relations. For instance, the writer is a 
son of Solomon Brown, who was a son of David 
Brown, Sr., and David Brown was a son of 
Michael Braun of the Stone House. To illus- 
trate, the writer is the father of seven children, 
their names should be given, the names and dates 
of their marriage, names and dates of birth of 
their children, and so on as posterity increases. 
Such a record would not only be interesting but 
valuable. Nearly all of the Brown families can 
now take this history and trace their line of 
lineage back to the Stone House, and if made a 
practice can be easily kept from now on, from one 
generation to another. 

1S9 



190 HISTORY OF THE MICHAEL BROWN FAMILY 

A copy of this history should be kept by each 
family, together with the records of the Brown 
Family Association, as sacred relics and refer- 
ences. Many of the old landmarks have already 
fallen, and for that reason considerable informa- 
tion was unobtainable at this time; the few that 
remain are rapidly passing away, even the writer 
would never be able to reproduce all the infor- 
mation this book contains. 

With these things in mind, the book becomes 
almost of incalculable value, and those who fail 
to keep a book, or a line of their posterity from 
now on, will soon lose their line of connection 
with the Stone House family and be Hke lost 
sheep from this fold. 

We make these suggestions for the benefit of 
the coming generations. Then it is Biblical, when 
the captives came back from Babylon some of 
them were put to great inconvenience because 
they could not trace their line of descent. iVIay 
we ever rejoice in our blessed ancestors, strive to 
emulate them in their virtues, build upon their 
eternal principles, and never forget the rock from 
whence we were hewn. 



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3 1197 01135 0557 



Do Not 

Circulate