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HISTORY 



The Military Company of the Massachusetts 



NOW CALLED 



The Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company 

of Massachusetts. 



16^7-1888. 



By OLIVER AYER ROBERTS, 

« 1 

HISTORIAN OF THE COMPANY. 



VOLUME II. — 1738-1821. 



BOSTON: 

ALFRED MUDGE & SON, PRINTERS, 

24 Franklin Street. 

,897. 






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JP 1 ? 



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THIS VOLUME 
30 <S>tbxc<xUb to tt>i. (JYUmoty 

OF 

MAJOR-GENERAL WILLIAM HEATH (1765), 
MAJOR-GENERAL JOHN BROOKS (1786), 
MAJOR-GENERAL BENJAMIN LINCOLN (1786), 
MAJOR-GENERAL JOHN HULL (1788), 

OFFICERS IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 

AND MEMBERS OF 

THE ANCIENT AND HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY, 
WHO, WITH THEIR COMRADES IN ARMS, 

"... Shook the feudal tower, 
And shattered slavery's chain as well; 
On the sky's dome, as on a bell, 
Its echo struck the world's great hour." 



ARMORY OF THE ANCIENT AND HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY 

of massachusetts. 

Faneuil Hall, Boston, 
December 25, 1896. 

To the Members of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts : 

The Committee on Military Museum and Library have now the pleasure of 

presenting the second volume of the History, from June 1, 1738, to June 1, 1822. 
The third volume is now well under way, and it is hoped will be in print 

before the end of the present year, and that the close of 1898 will find the fourth 

and last volume completed. 

EDWARD WYMAN, Chairman. 
ALBERT ALONZO FOLSOM. 
GEORGE HENRY ALLEN. 
WILLIAM PARKER JONES. 
HENRY WALKER. 

WILLIAM LITHGOW WILLEY, Secretary. 



PRE FACE 



r pHE kind reception accorded the first volume of the History of the Ancient and 
Honorable Artillery Company was extremely gratifying to the Committee on 
Publication and to the historian of the Company, and has been helpful in the preparation 
of this second volume. 

It was originally intended that this volume should cover the entire period of the 
second century of the Company's existence ; but the large number of members of 
the Company active in the Revolutionary War, and the prominent parts they took in the 
stirring events in and around Boston during that period, defeated the original intention. 
This volume, therefore, ends with the town government of Boston (1821), and the third 
volume will commence with the year 1822, when the city government of Boston was 
inaugurated. 

In 1783, just after the declaration of peace, the population of Boston numbered 
about ten thousand; in 1821, forty-five thousand. Young men from various parts of 
New England rushed to its metropolis and established themselves in trade or mechanical 
pursuits. Many of them became members of the Artillery Company, some of whom, 
after a short residence in Boston, removed to other localities. It has been impossible 
to learn whence some of them came or whither they went. The facts recorded 
concerning these members are therefore comparatively few. 

The arbitrary system adopted in the former volume is continued in this. Each 
year, from 1738 to 182 1, is complete in itself. The records of the Ancient and 
Honorable Artillery Company are given in full in this and the preceding volume, from 
the earliest preserved record (1698) until the year 1800. Subsequent to the last 
mentioned date, those portions of the records which are of value in presenting a correct 
account of the Company are inserted in the text. During the present century, the 
records have been kept with much care, and enter largely into the details of Company 
affairs. Such matters as reports of committees on arrangements for anniversaries, names 
and number of guests invited, names of members admitted or discharged, and minor 
details of Company business are omitted, while the essential facts, constituting a portion 
of the history of the Company, have been recorded in their appropriate places. 

The index of this volume is constructed on the same principle as that in the 
preceding volume. Every student of local history, or searcher after genealogical facts, 



VIII PREFACE. 

has probably had his patience tried in looking up a large number of references, many 
simply trivial, with no clew as to which reference would afford knowledge of the subject. 
To obviate this perplexity, the first reference under each name in the index refers to a 
biographical ske.tch or to the fullest information regarding that subject in this volume. 
Other references are incidental. The great value of this method is a sufficient reason 
for a departure from the common style. 

The compiler is under increased obligations to many persons who have furnished 
biographical data. The names of those persons, near and far, who have rendered 
this valuable service, are too many for enumeration. A part of them, however, are 
mentioned in the notes. 

His special indebtedness for valuable assistance rendered is to Mr. John Ward 
Dean, editor of the "New England Historical and Genealogical Register," Boston, 
and librarian of the New England Historic Genealogical Society ; also to Mr. William 
Prescott Greenlaw, of Cambridge, assistant librarian of the above-named society, who 
has cheerfully rendered every assistance sought by the author in the preparation of this 
volume. 

With a knowledge of its imperfections, but trusting in their fraternal forbearance, 
this volume is respectfully submitted to the members of the Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery Company. 

If it is believed that on these pages justice has been done to the memory of 
those members of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company who fought for the 
independence of the colonies, and of those who, holding high civil or military authority, 
fashioned the state, then the patient toil of years will be amply rewarded. 



OLIVER A. ROBERTS. 
Christmas Day, 1896, 

Melrose, Mass. 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Frontispiece — Faneuil Hall, 1805, before Enlargement. 

Portrait — Daniel Henchman (1712) facing page 2 

Portrait — Joseph Dwight (1734) " " 25 

Portrait — John Carnes (1733) " " 49 

Portrait — Ebenezer Storer (1732) " " 51 

Portrait — Joseph Jackson (1738) " " 60 

Portrait — William Taylor (17385 " " 99 

Portrait — Thomas Marshall (1761) .... u g / 

Portrait — John Winslow (1764) " " 121 

Portrait — Thomas Dawes (1754) .... ,38 

Portrait — James Cunningham (1761) .... I ^ 4 

Portrait — Williaw Heath (1765) " " 162 

Portrait — Samuel Barrett (1755) " " 165 

Portrait — Martin Gay (1761) .... : gg 

Old Flag of the Artillery Company .... x ^ 2 

Portrait — John Brooks (1786) .... 22 ^ 

Portrait — Benjamin Lincoln (1786) .... 22 g 

Portrait — William Hull (1788) .... 2 ^ 

Portrait — Andrew Cunningham (1786) .... 2 y 

Portrait — Amasa Davis (1786) .... 2 g 

Punch Bowl .... 2 g6 

Portrait — Robert Gardner (1794) " " 304 

Portrait — Benjamin Russell (1788) .... 312 

Portrait — James Phillips (1790) " "319 

Portrait — Daniel Messinger (1792) .... j 22 

F'aneuii. Hall, 1806, after Enlargement .... ^29 

Old Flag of the Artillery Company " " 331 

Portrait — Peter Osgood (1797) .... ^42 f 

Meeting-house of First Church, on Summer Street ... . . . " "351 

Portrait — Arnold Welles (181 1) .... ^55 

Old Flag of the Artillery Company 360, 361 

Portrait — John Roulstone (1812) facing page 383 

Portrait — Henry A. S. Dearborn (1816) .... ^gg 

Portrait — Ebenezer Mattoon (1817) .... ^ 2 

Portrait — Zachariah G. Whitman (1810) " "401 

Portrait — Benjamin Loring (1810) .... 402 

Certificate of Membership, 1819 _ " "411 

Portrait — George Welles (1807) " " 418 

Portrait — William H. Sumner (1819) " " 436 



HISTORY 

OF THE 

Military Company of the Massachusetts 



NOW CALLED 



The Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company 

of Massachusetts. 



I^HE Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts had but a moderate 
degree of prosperity during the closing years of its first century and the opening 
years of its second century. Immigration had comparatively ceased, currency was 
inflated, commerce restricted, industries were crippled, natural rights and chartered 
privileges threatened. 

The first enumeration of the inhabitants of the town of Boston now known was in 
1722, during the prevalence of the small-pox, when the selectmen ordered a "perlus- 
tration of the town." It was then reported that the number of inhabitants was 10,567, 
"besides those who had died or removed out of town." The same year Mr. Bonner 
estimated the population to be 12,000. This was probably nearly the correct number 
just prior to the appearance of the small-pox in 1722. In 1738, the population was' 
estimated at 16,000. From the latter year until the Revolution the population of the 
town remained nearly stationary. In 1776, it numbered 2,719 white inhabitants only. 
During the period from 1738 to 1774 the people poured out their treasure and blood in 
various Indian and French wars, seeking to maintain the integrity of the British posses- 
sions, and to add to their area and value. The town and the Artillery Company lost 
many of its volunteer soldiery in these conflicts, and their places were not more than 
supplied, as to numbers, by the new-comers. 

There were heavy and discouraging burdens placed upon the people by the British 
government, and the small-pox, in 1738, again showed its fatal presence among the 
people. The province and the town of Boston labored "under the greatest hardships, 
difficulties, and distresses upon many accounts," which appeared to be daily increasing, 
without any prospect of relief. 

Notwithstanding these discouraging conditions, the Artillery Company pursued the 
even tenor of its ways, held its meetings and drills regularly, and experienced a healthy 
growth. Its members continued to exercise their former influence in town affairs, and 
were prominent in all public matters. A majority of the overseers of the poor, assessors, 
constables, clerks of the market, and also many of those citizens who held minor ofKces 
in the town government, were members of the Company. Joseph Marion, nephew of John 
(1691), was untiring in his proposal to the town to reduce its annual expenses, and 
Capt. Nathaniel Cunningham (1720) presented a valuable paper to the town as instruc- 



2 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [ I73 g 

tions for its representatives in the General Court, which is given in full in the Boston 
Town Records, as printed by the Record Commissioners, 1729-1742, pp. 197-201. 

The history of the British Empire in America, by Mr. John Oldmixon, "which 
was reprinted, with amendments and corrections by the author, in 1741, gives a vivid 
description of Boston as it was when the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company 
entered upon the second century of its existence. "The capital of New England," says 
Mr. Oldmixon, " is Boston, and the biggest city in America, except two or three on the 
Spanish continent. . . . The bay of Boston is spacious enough to' contain in a manner 
the navy royal of England." Castle Inland is well described, and the defences of 
Boston are clearly outlined. The Castle protected the town vvith one hundred cannon, 
and five hundred men were exempted from military duty in time of war, " to be ready to 
attend the service at the Castle at an hour's warning." "There is a large pier at the 
bottom of the bay, eighteen hiiiidred or two thousand feet long, with a row of warehouses 
on the north side. The chief street of the town comes down to the head of the pier ; at 
the upper end of it is the' Town-house, or Exchange, a fine building, containing besides 
the walk for the merchants, the Council Chamber, the House of Commons, and a spacious 
room for the courts of justice.' The Exchange is surrounded with booksellers'-shops. 
There are five printing-houses, .between three and four thousand houses, eight military 
companies, and one troop of horse, twenty-four thousand population and ten churches 
in Boston. . . . 

" Trie conversation in this town is as polite as in most of the cities and towns of 
England; many of their merchants having traded into Europe, and those that staid at 
home having the advantage of society with travellers ;- so that a gentleman from London 
would almost think himself at home .at Boston, when- he. observes the number of people, 
their houses, their furniture, their tables, their dress and conversation, which perhaps is 
as splendid and showy as that of the most considerable tradesman in London. Upon 
the whole, Boston- is the most flourishing town for trade and commerce in the English 
America.' Near six hundred sail of ships have been laden here in a year for Europe 
and the British plantations. The streets; are -large and the- buildings beautiful. The 
goodness of the pavement may-, compare with most in London; to gallop a horse on 
it is three shillings and fourpence forfeit. . . .' 

"The neck of land between -the town and the country is about forty yards broad, 
and. so low that the spring tides sometimes, wash the road. The town is near two miles 
in length, and in some places three quarters of a mile broad." ' 



q The officers elected were : Daniel Henchman (1712), captain ; Ebenezer 

I V ^O. Bridge (1 7 17), lieutenant ; Jeremiah Belknap (1724), ensign. Joseph Gold- 
' *J thwait (1732) was first sergeant ; William Warner (1733), second sergeant; 
John Wendell, Jr. (1735), third sergeant; Habijah Savage (1733), fourth sergeant, and 
Thomas Simpkins (1727), clerk. ' . 

The gentlemen selected to visit and examine the public schools, June 26, 1738, 
besides Rev. Messrs. Sewall, Chauncy, Hooper, Mather, and Byles, were Hon. Thomas 

1 The British Empire in America, containing the history of the discovery, settlement, progress, and 
state of the British Colonies of America. By John Oldmixon. Vol. I., p. 193 et seq.' London, 1741. 







'aflJtttizA/? 



1 738] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 3 

Hutchinson (1694), Hon. Adam Winthrop (1694), Hon. Ezekiel Lewis (1707), and 
Hon. Jacob Wendell (1733). 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1738 were : John Daniel, Joseph 
Edwards, Jacob Emmons, Samuel Haley, Joseph Jackson, Arthur Savage, William Taylor, 
and Sendall Williams. 

John Daniel (1738), a tanner, son of William and Dorothy Daniel, was born in 

Boston, Nov. 6, 1700. He married, (1) Elizabeth , in 1726; (2) Mary, "the only 

daughter of Thomas Clark," (published) Oct. 26, 1728. 

He was a member of the First Church in Boston, but on the organization of the 
West Church, Jan. 3, 1736-7, he became one of the seventeen original members. He 
was an owner of real estate in Charlestown. Mr. Wyman, in " Genealogies and Estates 
of Charlestown," gives Mr. Daniel's (1738) residence as in Boston. 

Joseph Edwards (1738), goldsmith, of Boston, son of John (1699) and Civell 
(Sibell) (Sivill) Edwards, and brother of Capt. Thomas Edwards (1724), was born in 
Boston, June n, 1707. His nephew, John, Jr., joined the Artillery Company in 1747. 
He probably lived in or near his father's house on Cornhill, as, in 1733, April 18, he was 
assessed eight shillings for repairing the pump in Cornhill. He held town office from 
1746 to 1752 inclusive, and was second sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1742, and 
ensign in 1754. In the provincial militia he attained the rank of captain. 

Jacob Emmons (1738), probably son of "Jacob Emms and Mary, his wife," was 
born in Boston, May 16, 1701. He married Mary — — in 1727. 

He held office in the town of Boston in 1740, 1743, and 1745. At a meeting of the 
selectmen, June 6, 1744, "Voted, that Mr. Jacob Emmons [1738] be prosecuted for 
receiving one Eliza Wormwood into his house from Lynn and not informing thereof as 
the law directs." He was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1742. 

Samuel Haley (1738), son of "William and Sarah Healey [Haley]," was born 
.in Boston, Sept. n, 17 15. 

He served as a constable of Boston in 1753, and resided at "the South End," on 
"Orange Street." He was a member of the Boston militia, and was promoted to the 
rank of lieutenant. 

Joseph Jackson (1738), distiller, of Boston, was born in 1707, and married, May 1, 
1732, Susannah Gray. They were the parents of Col. Henry Jackson. Joseph Jackson 
(1738) was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1742, ensign in 1746, lieutenant 
in 1749, and captain in 1752. He succeeded Col. Phillips (1725) as treasurer of the 
Artillery Company in 1763, and continued in that office until the Revolution. He was a 
member of the Masonic Fraternity ; he attended the installation ceremony at Concert 
Hall, Oct. 1, 1755, when Jeremy Gridley, Esq., was installed as grand master of Masons 
in North America, and walked in the Masonic procession, as grand treasurer, at the 
interment of the remains of M. W. Jeremy Gridley, Sept. 12, 1767. 

Joseph Edwards (1738). Authority: Bos- ords of Bjston Selectmen, 1 752-1 772; Hill's Hist, 

ton Records. of Old South Church; Drake's Hist, of the Society 

Jacob Emmons (1738). Authority: Bos- of the Cincinnati; New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 

ton Records. 1892; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, 

Joseph Jackson (1738). Authorities : Rec- Ed. 1842. 



4 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 73 S 

He was prominently identified with the militia, being captain for several years 
(1752-8) of a Boston company; became major of the Boston regiment in 1758, and 
was its colonel from 1761 to 1766. He served as selectman of Boston from 1752 to 
1760, when, in March, 1761, he was excused from serving at his own request, but was 
elected again in 1764, and continued to serve until 1773, when he declined the office. 
He was a fireward from 1748 to 1765, when he declined, and was on the committee, 
from 1749 to 1777, for the purchasing of grain, the care of the granary, and for giving all 
needful directions to the keeper regarding the quantity of grain to be sold and the price 
thereof. He served on very many special committees, and stood side by side with 
Hancock, Adams, Molineaux, etc., during the stirring events of his time. 

In 1756, an act was passed by the General Court authorizing the town of Boston to 
have a series of lotteries, " for raising monies to pave and repair the Neck." ■ Col. Jackson 
(1738) was one of the managers named in the act. Nine drawings were made prior 
to March, 1760, the board of managers remaining the same. 

He became a member of the Old South Church, Aug. 18, 1754, and was very 
active in its affairs. He was appointed a justice of the peace, Sept. 14, 1756. 

Col. Jackson (1738) was one of a committee of the town which waited on Lord 
Colvil in 1752, Gov. Pownall in 1760, and Gov. Bernard in 1768, presenting con- 
gratulatory addresses from the town of Boston. In 1766, at a critical time, he was on 
the important committee concerning the secret depositions accusing prominent men and 
injuring the town. James Otis was chairman; Col. Jackson's (1738^ name stands next, 
and John Hancock's third. In 1768, the regiments arrived in Boston from Halifax and 
Ireland, and troubles multiplied. The invasion of the town, the seizing and impressment 
of inhabitants of Boston, the obstruction of navigation, and the menace of famine, incited 
the people to address the governor and ask that the war-ship " Romney " leave the 
harbor. A true statement of affairs was likewise sent to the London agent. In these 
patriotic offices Col. Jackson (1738) shared. 

Oct. 4, 1769, with the Messrs. Cushing, Samuel and John Adams, Otis, Warren, 
etc., Col. Jackson (1738) was appointed to vindicate the character of the town from 
false representations contained in memorials to the king ; and a little later he was one 
of the committee which transmitted the town's vote of thanks to Col. Barre" for waiting 
upon the sovereign in person and presenting their petition. He was one of the select- 
men of Boston, March 6, 1770, the day after the Massacre, and was one of a committee 
to wait on the lieutenant-governor and inform him that " it is the opinion of the town that 
the inhabitants and the soldiery can no longer dwell together in safety." "The imme- 
diate removal of troops was demanded." Col. Jackson (1738) set and maintained a 
military watch while the meeting of March 6 was in session. 

June 24, 1771, he was moderator of the town meeting, and was thanked for his 
prompt despatch of business. He was also, March 5, 1772, one of a committee "to 
return the thanks of the town to Joseph Warren, Esq., for the oration delivered by him at 
their request, in commemoration of the horrid massacre perpetrated on the evening of 
the 5th of March, 1770, by a party of soldiers of the Twenty-Ninth Regiment, and to 
desire a copy thereof for the press." 

He was about seventy-five years of age when he ceased to hold public office. His 
continuance therein, his military promotions, and the committees of " the true and the 
tried" upon which he served, evince his personal ability and worth, and the esteem and 
confidence in which he was held by his countrymen. He died at Boston, April 10, 1790, 



, 73 8] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 5 

aged eighty-three years. He was buried under arms, by the Artillery Company, in the 
King's Chapel Burial-Ground, though he was not in commission at the time. A band 
of music, the first in Boston on such an occasion, accompanied the funeral procession. 
His property inventoried over three thousand pounds. 

Arthur Savage (1738), son of Habijah (1699) and Hannah (Phillips) (Anderson) 
Savage, was born July 19, 17 15. Thomas (1739) and Capt. Habijah (1733) were 
brothers of Capt. Arthur (1738). His marriage does not appear to be recorded in 
Boston records. He held minor town offices in 1738, 1750-2. He was active in the 
militia, and rose to the grade of captain, serving in that capacity at Fort Frederick from 
Nov. zi, 1740, to May 20, 1742. 

Capt. Arthur Savage (1738) died Jan. 25, 1765.' 

William Taylor (1738), of Boston, son of John and Ann (Winslow) Taylor, of 
Milton, was born in Milton in 1714. He married (1) Faith, daughter of Knelem and 
Abigail (Waterman) Winslow, and (2) Nov. 30, 1749, Sarah Cheever, widow of Capt. 
Habijah Savage, Jr. (1733), son of Lieut -Col. Habijah Savage (1699). He was iden- 
tified with the militia, and rose to the rank of colonel. He was a member of the 
Masonic Fraternity. 

He was clerk of the Artillery Company in 1741 and 1742, second sergeant in 1743, 
ensign in 1756, lieutenant in 1757, and captain in 1760. He died at Milton, Mass., 2 
Feb. 16, 1789, aged seventy-five years, and was buried in King's Chapel Burial-Ground. 

Sendall Williams (1738), cooper, of Boston, was a son of Dea. Jonathan Williams 
(1711), of the First Church, and grandson of Dea. Robert Williams. His mother was 
Mary (Hunlock) Williams, granddaughter of Samuel Sendall. Dea. Jonathan (1711) 
and Mary Williams had two sons, Jonathan, Jr. (1729), and Sendall (1738). The latter 
was born Feb. 26, 1705, and married, Feb. 14, 1739-40, Elizabeth Smart, widow of John 
Smart, of Boston. 

Sendall Williams (1738) was appointed by the selectmen, Dec. 4, 1734, one of three 
persons to take care of the Old and South burying places. One of the said persons, 
with one assistant, was obliged " to attend the funeral of every white person at the gate 
of the burying-place, to conduct the corpse to the grave, and to see the same covered 
up," and also to lock and unlock the gates at proper times. The price for digging a 
grave was from five to ten shillings. July 14, 1736, being summoned before the select- 
men, Sendall Williams (1738) was informed by them "That Complaints were Exhibited 
him for his Uncertain and Irregular Ringing the Bell at 9, 5, and 11 O'clock. He 
offered some Reasons for Excusing the same ; and withal Signified his readiness to 
resign that Office, when his Quarter is up." Upon the 30th of August following, Mr. 
Williams (1738) resigned the care and ringing, daily, of the South Church bell. 3 

Sendall Williams (1738). Authority: Bos- the governor's letter-book, which he secured. • Col. 

ton Records. William Taylor [1738] removed from the house 

1 "Boston, Monday 28'h 1765. Friday after- several trunks and retained them for safe keeping, 
noon last died, very suddenly, Capt Arthur Savage, A part of his goods were sold at auction, at the barn 
in the 50'h year of his age. His Remains are to be of Col. Taylor [1738], standing where the town- 
interred tomorrow afternoon." — Boston Newspaper. house [in Mdton] is now located." — Teele's Hist. 

2 "After the battle of Lexington the town of of Milton, p. 143. 

Milton removed the furniture from Gov. Hutchin- J Oct. 2, 1731, "they hang'd their new great 

son's house, to save it from utter ruin. Mr. Samuel bell" at the South Meeting-house. "Weighs 1000." 

Henshaw afterwards visited the house and found in This bell was first used for town purposes in 1736. 

the garret a trunk full of papers, among which was — Hill's Hist, of Old South, Church, Vol. I., p. 457. 



6 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 73 8 

Sendall Williams (1738) served as constable in 1741, and was elected culler of 
staves in 1745, 1746, and 1747, but in the last year was excused from serving. Aug. 24, 
1737, he was licensed to keep a retail shop in Cold Lane (now Portland Street), but 
in 1744 he carried on the same business in School Street. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1738 is as follows : — 

"April 3, 1738. The Company being under arms, made choice of the Rev'd John 
Cotton of Newtown, to preach the next Artillery Election sermon, and that the present 
commission officers, with Mr. Henry Gibbs [1726], be a committee to request it of him. 
Voted, also, that Mr. Samuel Holyoke [1714], one of the former Clerks, be paid the sum 
of ten pounds eight shillings & seven pence out of the publick stock in the hands of the 
committee ; it being so much due to him to balance accounts for monies expended for 
the Company, as by the report of the Committee appointed to examine the Clerks 
accounts. Voted, also, at the same time, that the sum of eight pounds be paid to 
Thomas Johnson out of their publick stock in full of his account for painting of drums 
for the Company's use. 

"May 1, 1738. Under arms. The committee appointed to acquaint the Rev'd 
Mr. John Cotton of the choice the Company made of him to preach the next Artillery 
Election sermon, returned answer that it was against his conscience to preach a sermon 
on that occasion ; and therefore desired to be excused. Upon which the Company 
made choice of Rev'd Mr. Ebenezer Turell, of Mystick, for that service and, voted, that 
the commission officers of the Company, with Col Jacob Wendell [1733], be a com- 
mittee to request it of him. Voted, also, in the evening, that the Company would choose 
a Treasurer for the service of the Company ; and then made choice of Capt William 
Downe [1716] for that service until another should be chosen in his room. Also, 
voted, that Mr. Samuel Holyoke [1714] should deliver what papers he has, belonging to 
the Company in his hands to Capt William Downe [17 16], Treasurer of the Company. 
Voted also that Capt Daniel Henchman's [1712] account of what monies he has received 
of the Company was accepted by them, and that the sum of forty shillings due from him 
to the Company, to balance his account exhibited to the Company, should be by him 
paid unto Capt. William Downe [1716], Treasurer of said Company. Also the Company 
voted thanks to Mr. Samuel Holyoke [17 14] for the extraordinary services he had done 
the Company, whilst in his Clerkship and at all other times. 

" Memo. Oct. 2. This day being the day appointed by Charter for the exercise of 
the Honorable Artillery Company, it, proving unseasonable weather, was put by accord- 
ing to said Charter, till the next Friday, and then met, it being the 6"' of October, 1738." 

Rev. John Cotton, of Newton, was invited to preach the Artillery election sermon 
in 1738, but, as "it was against his conscience to preach a sermon on that occasion," he 
declined. He was a son of Rev. Rowland Cotton (who preached the Artillery sermon 
in 1706), and great-grandson of Rev. John Cotton, of Boston (who preached the Artillery 
sermon in 1651), and was born in 1693. He graduated at Harvard College in 1710. 
He married, Feb. 19, 17 19, Mary, daughter of Robert Gibbs (1692), of Boston, who 
resided in Gibbs' Lane, afterward (1845) called Belmont Street. She was a sister of 
Henry Gibbs (1726). Mr. Cotton preached in Newton as a candidate, and subsequently, 
March 22, 1714, the town voted to invite him to become its minister at a salary of eighty 

Rev. John Cotton. Authority: Smith's Hist, of Newton, pp. 217, 218. 



?3 8] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 7 

pounds per annum. He was ordained Nov. 3, 17 14. His ministry extended over a 
period of forty-two and a half years. A Latin epitaph is supposed to describe the man : 
" Here is deposited all that was mortal of the reverend and truly venerable John 
Cotton, the most faithful, prudent, and learned pastor of the church of Newton, renowned 
for his ability in preaching and in prayer, distinguished for his purity, honored of all for 
his holy life, and deeply lamented, especially by his congregation, to whom ' being dead 
he yet speaketh.' Fame will proclaim his beloved name far and wide with a louder and 
more lasting voice than the most enduring marble. Broken, but not by age, he died 
May 17, 1757, in the sixty-fourth year of his age and the forty- third of his ministry." 

Rev. Ebenezer Turell, of Mystic (Medford), who also declined the invitation of 
the Company to deliver the anniversary sermon in 1738, son of Samuel and Lydia 
(Stoddard) Turell, was born in Medford, Feb. 5, 1702. He was a grandson of Capt. 
Daniel Turell (1660), and his mother was a daughter of Anthony Stoddard, son of 
Simeon (1675). R ev - Ebenezer Turell married, (1) Aug. n, 1726, Jane Colman, who 
died March 26, 1735 ; (2) Oct. 23, 1735, Lucy, daughter of Addington Davenport (1692), 
who died May 17, 1759, aged forty-five, and, (3) Aug. 21, 1760, Jane Pepperell, of 
Kittery. He graduated at Harvard College in 1721, and studied with Rev. Benjamin 
Colman, whose daughter, Jane, was Rev. Ebenezer's first wife. June 17, 1724, the 
church at Medford unanimously elected Rev. Ebenezer Turell as its pastor, at a salary of 
one hundred pounds per year, and Aug. 31, 1724, he accepted it, which the church and 
town considered and accepted, Sept. 19, 1724. He was installed Nov. 25, 1724, the 
sermon being delivered by Rev. Benjamin Colman. During his pastorate he printed 
several pamphlets, which called out earnest replies. He was one of the many ministers 
opposed to Rev. George Whitefield. On the death of the latter, he delivered a sermon 
concerning him from the text, " Verily every man, at his best estate, is altogether vanity." 
In 1772, too infirm to perform all the duties of his position, assistance was furnished by 
the town, and, in 1774, a colleague was provided. He died Dec. 5, 1778, and was 
buried at Medford. 

Rev. Benjamin Colman, D. D., of Boston, who was preacher before the Artillery 
Company in 1702, delivered the Artillery election sermon in 1738. It was nearly the 
middle of May, 1738, when Mr. Colman was invited to deliver the centennial Artillery 
sermon, 1 but, as in the case of Rev. Cotton Mather, in 1707, a short notice was sufficient. 

Rev. Ebenezer Turell. Authority : Brooks's Captain Lyman [1732], with two or three more 

Hisl. of Medford. Volunteers in his Youth, who penetrated far into 

1 Extracts from the "Sermon preached to the our Woods to seek out the Enemy; and by cutting 

Honourable and Ancient Artillery Company in Bos- off a single Family (as I am told) they struck such 

ton, June 5, 1738 ": — a Terror into a Clan who were advantageously post- 

" Forgive me this Excursion in the begining of ing themselves for a ready and easy Decent upon 

my Discourse, my Reverend Hearers ; and You our several Provinces, by our three grand Rivers; 

Gentlemen in Arms, who have on a sudden press'd that finding the English had got so nigh to the fine 

me to speak my last to you, when others have fail'd Interval Land they had chosen, they were intimi- 

you." dated and hasted away." 

" It is now almost forty Years that I spake to "As also it must be acknowledged to the glory 

your Fathers in this Place." of God, that not a few of our present Commanders 

" Your Earthly Captain General [Governor do at this Day : [awe their families and frighten 

Belcher] is here present to go before you." their enemies] being bright Examples of Virtue and 

"Our Scarlet and Crimson can boast no proved Devotion, Generosity, Gravity and Wisdom, and 

Valour equal to their hardy Buff." justly esteem'd by all that know them." 

"Nor ought I to omit the proved Valour of 



8 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 739 

The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1739 were : Caleb Lyman 

17^0. ('73 2 )> captain; Erasmus Stevens (1720). lieutenant; William Nichols 

' *J * (1727), ensign. Ebenezer Storer(i732) was first sergeant; Edward Vail 

(1733), second sergeant; John Symmes (1733), third sergeant ; Samuel Pratt (1734), 

fourth sergeant; Nathaniel Thayer (1734), clerk, and Bartholomew Gedney (1726), 

clerk's assistant. 

The committee of six persons who had charge of the erection of the workhouse 
(four of whom, Edward Hutchinson [1702], Jacob Wendell [1733], Samuel Sewall 
[1720], Daniel Henchman [17 12], were members of the Company) reported to the 
town, July 27, 1739, tnat tne workhouse begun in 1737 was completed and ready to be 
occupied. Hon. Jacob Wendell (1733), for the overseers of the poor, presented for the 
town's approval a body of orders for the regulation of the workhouse, which, after 
amendment as proposed by Hon. Edward Hutchinson (1702), were adopted by the 
town. 

Sept. 14, 1739, a committee of five persons, three of whom — Nathaniel Cunning- 
ham (1720), chairman, Edward Winslow (1700), and Samuel Sewall (1720) — were 
members of the Company, was chosen to memorialize "the Great and General Court" 
in regard to the prospect of a war, and the defenceless condition of the town. Sept. 18 
the memorial was presented to the town by Capt. Cunningham (1720), and was 
accepted. The committee was so painstaking as to be tendered the thanks of the town. 

Mr. Christopher Kilby, representative to the General Court, having been chosen 
agent for the House of Representatives to the court of Great Britain, an election was 
held, Dec. 10, 1739, t0 ^" me vacancy in the Boston delegation in the House. Capt. 
Nathaniel Cunningham (1720), "by a great majority of votes," was chosen to take Mr. 
Kilby's place. 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1739 were: James Butler, 
Thomas Edes, John Franklin, Samuel Goodwin, Ralph Hartt, Samuel Salter, Jr., Thomas 
Savage, William Simpkins, John Storer, John Waldo. 

James Butler (1739), °f Boston, goldsmith, son of James and Abigail Butler, was 
born in Boston, Dec. 4, 17 13, and married, (1) May 17, 1739, Elizabeth Davie, and (2) 

Wakefield. He was chosen a constable of Boston in 1743, but, refusing to serve, 

paid the fine. He was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1743, and held the 
office of captain in the militia. About 1750, he moved from Boston to Halifax, N. S., 
but his enterprise proving unfortunate he soon returned to Boston. He afterward lived 
for a while in Sutton, Mass., but died in Boston, in 1776, aged sixty-three years, and 
was buried in the Granary Burial-Ground. 

Thomas Edes (1739), °* Boston, a baker, son of Edmund and Susanna Edes, of 
Boston, was born in Boston, April n, 17 15. He married, Dec. 21, 1738, Sarah Larabee, 
born July 12, 1719, whose father, Capt. John Larabee, was for fifty years, 1712-62, 
commander of Castle William. 

Ensign Thomas Edes 1 (1739) was elected a clerk of the market in 1742-3, but 
declined to serve, and paid the fine. In 1747, he was elected town constable. 

Aug. 26, 1765, during the Stamp Act troubles, a mob attacked and destroyed the 

' Whitman says, " Ensign Thomas Edes was a printer." Thomas Edes, leather-dresser, of Charles- 
town, brother of Benjamin (1760), printer, of Boston, was born in 1737. SeeWyman'sCharlestown, Vol. I. 



1 739 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 9 

mansion of Gov. Thomas Hutchinson. The governor's family escaped, and took refuge 
"with his sister, at the house of Dr. Samuel Mather in Moon Street." "The mob, how- 
ever, demanded his person, and he was compelled to retreat by a back way to the house 
of Thomas Edes [1739], a baker, guided by little Hannah Mather, as she herself relates. 
Here he remained during the night, returning to his brother's house to breakfast." ' 

He was second sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1744, and ensign in 1762. 

Ensign Thomas Edes (1739) died in September, 1794, aged seventy-nine years, and 
was buried from the house of his son, Edward, " near the North Grammar School." 

John Franklin (1739), tallow-chandler, of Boston, son of Josiah and Abiah (Folger) 
Franklin, and eldest brother of Benjamin Franklin, was born in Boston (baptized), Dec. 
7, 1690. He learned his trade in his father's shop, and afterward pursued the same busi- 
ness in Newport, R. I., and Boston. He married (about 1716) Elizabeth Gooch, and 
" had but one son, John, lost at sea, a young man grown." Benjamin was apprenticed 
to his brother James, a printer, in 17 18. The two years previous he had assisted his 
father. This assistance became more important because, in 1 7 17, John Franklin (1739) 
" married and removed to Rhode Island, where he set up for himself as a soap and candle 
maker." How long he femained in Newport is not stated, but, in 1724, the sloop in 
which Benjamin Franklin left Boston touched at Newport, "where then lived his 
brother John, who had been his shopmate while he had helped his father at candle- 
making, six or seven years before. His brother, who had always loved him, received 
him very affectionately." In 1722-3, James Franklin, brother of John and Benjamin, 
was forbidden by the General Court to print or publish the New England Courant, or 
any pamphlet or paper of a like nature, except it be first supervised by the secretary of 
the province. It was claimed that the tendency of his newspaper, the Courant, was to 
make light of religion. James, therefore, moved to Newport, R. I., and established the 
first printing-press in that plantation. Probably the fact that John (1739) lived there 
was the reason that James selected Newport as his home. 

John Franklin (1739) was in Boston in 1729-30, when he was sworn as constable. 
May 14, 1 75 1, he was elected an overseer of the poor, and Feb. 5, 1752, made the 
annual visitation of the town with the justices, selectmen, and others. When Benjamin 
Franklin became postmaster-general in 1753, he appointed his brother John (1739) 
postmaster of Boston, a position which he held until his decease, Jan. 30, 1756. When he 
died, Benjamin Franklin wrote to one who mourned him : " He who plucks out a tooth, 
parts with it freely, since the pain goes with it : and he who quits the whole body, parts 
at once with all pains and possibilities of pains and diseases which it was liable to, or 
capable of making him suffer. Our friend and we were invited abroad on a party of 
pleasure, which is to last forever. His chair was ready first, and he is gone before us. 
We could not all conveniently start together, and why should you and I be grieved at 
this, since we are soon to follow, and know where to find him? " 

\ 

John Franklin (1739). Authorities: New he was working there as a journeyman printer; and, 

Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., January, 1857, and April, on his return to America, he gave it to his brother 

1880; Parton's Life and Times of Benjamin Frank- John [1739], of Rhode Island, the companion of 

lin, Vol. I., pp. 51, 53; Bridgman's Pilgrims of his candle-making days." — Parton's Life and Times 

Boston, p. 323. of Benjamin Franklin, Vol. I,, p. 212. 

"The earliest portrait we have of [Benjamin] "Elizabeth Franklin stlls at the Post Office in 

Franklin exhibits him attired in the extreme of the Boston, Genuine Crown Soap, Candles, Cheese, &c." 

fashion of that day, except that he wears no sword — Advertisement in Boston Papers, May 7, 1764. 
at his side. It was taken in London in 1726, when ' Drake's Old Landmarks of Boston, p. 166. 



IO HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 739 

Samuel Goodwin (1739), cooper, of Charlestown, son of John and Lydia (Sprague) 
Goodwin, was born in Boston, March 16, 17 16-7. He married, (1) Feb. 15, 1738-9, 
in Boston, Elizabeth Willard, who died May 1, 1764; (2) Sept. 25, 1765, Mary Birch, 
and, (3) Nov. 13, 1800, Rebecca Jepson. He had seven children, and, dying in 
November, 1802, aged eighty-six years, was buried the 2d of December following. His 
will, dated June 4, 1801, was probated May 3, 1803. From 1741 to 1773, ne was taxed 
in Charlestown. His father left him, by will, in 1753, a lot forty by one hundred feet, 
on Southac (Howard) Street, Boston, which in 1736 cost seventy pounds. 

May 10, 1738, he was chosen a viewer and culler of staves in Boston, and was 
re-elected March 15, 1742, but was not sworn the latter year. During most of his life 
he resided in Charlestown, in the records of which he is given the title of " Major." 

Ralph Hartt (1739), mast maker, of Boston, son of Samuel and Abigail Hartt, of 
Lynn, was born in Lynn, June 12, 1699. He married, (1) Nov. 27, 1722, Mary Hudson, 
who died Aug. 2, 1733, and, (2) Jan. 8, 1733-4, Lois Rowland (Boston records) or 
Rowling (Lynn records). He had settled in Boston prior to his second marriage, as 
he took out, at the town clerk's office in Boston, marriage papers on Dec. 12, 1733. 
His wife, Lois, died Nov. 5, 1751. 

Ralph Hartt (1739) was elected a constable in Boston, March 10, 1735-6, which 
seems to be the only town office he ever held. In 1754 he commanded the Ancient 
and Honorable Artillery Company. His son, Zephaniah, joined the Artillery Company 
in 1765. Mr. Hartt (1739) lived, as also his son, on Charter Street. 

Feb. 28, 1742, Gov. William Shirley commissioned Ralph Hartt (,1739) as "lieuten- 
ant in the foot company in the town of Boston, under the command of Capt. Samuel 
Rand [1720], in the regiment of militia wilhin the county of Suffolk whereof Jacob 
Wendell, Esq. [1733], is colonel." He was captain of a militia company, the same 
regiment, in Boston, in 1750. He made "the general walk or visitation " of the town, 
with the justices and others, Feb. n, 1756, Feb. 16, 1762, and Feb. 21, 1763. 

Capt. Edmund Hartt, who built the famous frigates "Constitution" and "Boston," 
and many of the best ships of his day, was a nephew of Capt. Ralph (1739). The Hartt 
family were the first widely known shipwrights. For several generations they were iden- 
tified with the ship-building interests of the country. At one time, seven members of 
the family were naval constructors at different ship-yards in the United States. The 
descendants of Edmund bought and occupied the " Hartt House," so called, Nos. 24 
and 26 Hull Street. 

He died March 14, 1776, aged seventy-seven years, and was buried in Copp's Hill 
Burial-Ground. 

Samuel Salter, Jr. (1739), of Boston, son of Samuel and Sarah Salter, was born in 
Boston, April 25, 17 10. He does not appear to have held any town office. 

Samuel Goodwin (1739). Authorities : Porter; New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 1848, 

Wyman's Charlestown Genealogies and Estates, p. 391. 

Vol. I., p. 422; Boston Records. A copy of the commission of Ralph Hartt 

Ralph Hartt (1739). Authorities: Boston (1739) as lieutenant in the militia is printed in 

Records; Rambles in Old Boston, N. E., by E. G. Bridgman's Copp's Hill Burial-Ground, pp. 204,205. 



1 739 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. I I 

Thomas Savage (1739), merchant, of Boston, second son of Lieut. -Col. Habijah 
Savage (1699), was born in Boston, Jan. 5, 1710. He married, June 26, 1735, Deborah 
Briggs, and died Dec. 19, 1760. 

He served the town as constable in 1735, clerk of the market in 1737, purchaser of 
grain in 1748-9 and as fireward in 1756, 1757, and 17158. He made the general visita- 
tion of the town in 1754, 1755, ar >d 1756. Under the date of July 12, 1758, in the 
" account of beds earned to sundry places in the town for the use of the King's troops 
now in the town," it is recorded in the town books, "To Capt. Savage's house, 50." He 
was a member of the Boston militia, and was promoted to be captain in 1756. "He was 
the grandfather of the learned antiquary of New England." He served as first sergeant 
of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company in 1744, ensign in 1752, lieutenant in 
1755, and captain in 1757. The inventory of his estate was more than seven thousand 
pounds, lawful currency, his real estate at the North End and Long Wharf being valued 
at more than two thousand pounds. 

William Simpkins (1739), goldsmith, of Boston, married, May 14 or 16, 1726, 
Elizabeth, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Langdon) Symmes. His son, John, 
joined the Artillery Company in 1769. He was elected a constable March 15, 1742-3, 
but declined to serve, and paid the fine. He was third sergeant of the Artillery Com- 
pany in 1743, and its ensign in 1757. 

John Storer (1739), of Charlestown, son of Col. Joseph and Hannah (Hill) Storer, 
was born at Wells, District of Maine, Sept. 6, 1694. He was the eldest brother of Eben- 
ezer Storer (1732), who was born June 4, 1699, in the fort at Saco. Capt. John (1739) 
married Mary Bassett, widow of Nehemiah, of Charlestown, Nov. 8, 1736. They resided 
in Charlestown, where she joined the First Church, April 9, 1738, and in that town, prior 
to 1739, two children were born to them. He was captain of the Third Company, 
First Massachusetts Regiment, in the expedition against Louisburg. He is not men- 
tioned in the records of the town of Boston. 

John Waldo (1739), merchant, of Boston, was published to marry Elizabeth Waldo, 
March 17, 1729, and to marry Hannah Gold, Sept. 12, 1732. 

He was a constable of Boston in 1738, and was re-elected in 1749, but declined to 
serve. He signed the memorial to the General Court, Dec. 19, 1760. "This petition," 
says Drake, " signed by the principal business men, shows the head and front of the 
opposition to the crown officials." It hastened the crisis of which President Adams 
said, "Here began the Revolution." 

In 1720, a division occurred in the New North Church which resulted in the with- 
drawal of a number of its members and the formation of another church, called the 
"New Brick," which, in May, 1779, united with the Second Church in Boston. A John 
Waldo was a member of the New North Church, but active in the formation of the Old 
Brick Church. 

Thomas Savage (1739). Authorities: Bos- Charlestown Genealogies and Estates, Vol. II.; New- 
ton Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Ci m- Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 1870 and 1 87 1 . 
pany, Ed. 1842. John Waldo (1739). authorities: Boston 

John Storer (1739). Authorities: Wyman's Records; Drake's Hist, of Boston. 



12 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 739 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1739 ' s as follows : — 

" 1739, Memo. April 2d. This day being appointed by Charter for the exercise of 
the Honorable Artillery Company, it proving unseasonable weather was put by according 
to said Charter till the next Friday, and then met, it being the 6th of April, 1739. The 
Company being under arms made choice of the Rev. Mr. Samuel Mather to preach the 
next Artillery sermon ; and that the present commission officers, with the field officers, 
be a committee to request it of him ; returned that it was accepted by him. 

" May 7th, 1739. Voted, that the present commission officers be desired to wait on 
Capt. Wm. Downe [1716] and desire him to prepare the account relating to what 
he has received and paid, and lay it before the Company on the election evening. 

"June 4th, 1739. The Company being under arms, voted that the present com- 
mission officers of the Company, with those to be now elected, and the field officers of 
the Regiment of the town of Boston, be a committee to wait on the Rev. Mr. Samuel 
Mather, and give him the thanks of this Company for the sermon preached to them this 
day ; and in the evening after lodging the Colours, voted that the above committee ask 
of Mr. Mather a copy of his sermon for the press ; and. that it be printed at the charge 
of the Company ; and that his Excellency, the Governour, with every member of the 
General Assembly, have each a sermon given to them, and that two sermons be printed 
for each member of the Company, and that Capt. Daniel Henchman [1712] have the 
care of printing the same. Voted, that the commission officers, elected this day, with 
those of the last year, with the clerks of the same, be a committee to consider the state 
of the Rules and Orders, whereby the Company regulates themselves ; and also of the 
Company's Books, and lay their sentiment before the Company at the training in 
September next for their consideration." 

Rev. Samuel Mather, of Boston, delivered the Artillery election sermon in 1739. 1 
He was the son of Rev. Cotton Mather and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Dr. 
John Clark and widow of Richard Hubbard. He was born Oct. 30, 1706. He gradu- 
ated at Harvard College in 1723, and in 1732 was called to be colleague with Rev. Mr. 
Gee at the Second Church. After colaboring for nine years, differences arose between 
the ministers and between Mr. Mather and a majority of the church. They resulted in 
the dismissal of Mr. Mather and the division of the church. Ninety-three members 
followed him, and organized the Tenth Congregational Church in Boston. A meeting- 
house was erected on the corner of North Bennet and Hanover streets, and the admirers 
of Mr. Samuel Mather worshipped there until his decease in 1785. The meeting-house 

Rev. Samuel Mather. Authorities: Mass. And it is doubted by some, who have made it their 

Hist. Collection, Vol. III.; Sprague's Annals of Business to enquire into such Things whether it be 

American Pulpit, Vol. I., p. 371 ; Robbins' Hist, of so old; For about the Year fifteen hundred and sixty 

Second Church, Boston. some Muskets and but a very few of them were 

' Extracts from sermon by Rev. Samuel Mather, mix'd with Harquebusses : So that, according to 
M. A., "preached to the Ancient and Honourable this, it must have bin forty Years before the Hand- 
Artillery Company on June 4, 1739 " : — Gun had learned to speak. 

"Fire Arms have now superseded many of the "These Hand-Guns or Muskets have from the 

Ancient Weapons, and obtain'd the Preeminence Time of their first Invention bin of various Lengths 

before the Lance and Pike, the Bow and Arrow, the and Bores : But it is proper to observe here, that it 

Dart, Javelin, Sling and other offensive Weapons. is always fit the Muskets of our Army and of our 

"The first Inventor of Guns in Europe was a State or Kingdom should be exactly of one Bore. 
Monk, named Berthold Schuvart, a considerable " Besides these Muskets, there are now other 
Alchymist, who liv'd in the Year of our Lord thirteen Weapons for the Foot, such as Touks, Shables, two 
hundred and eighty. Tho' some affirm the Hand- handed Swords, Hangmen's Swords, Javelins, Morn- 
Gun or Musket was never used until the Siege of ing Stars, Rapiers; most of which are rather for the 
Rhegium in the year fifteen hundred and twenty. Defence of Batteries, Forts and Towns than for 



i 739 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 1 3 

was then sold to the First Universalist Society of Boston, Rev. John Murray, " the father 
of American Universalism," being the first pastor. After ninety-six years of service, this 
house was succeeded by the brick edifice built in 1838, now a Baptist Seamen's Bethel. 
After Mr. Mather's decease, in accordance with his request, most of his followers 
united with the Second Church. 

He married Sarah (Foster) Hutchinson, daughter of Col. Thomas Hutchinson 
(1694) and sister of.Gov. Thomas Hutchinson, " the historian of Massachusetts." They 
had three children, one of whom, Samuel, married Margaret, daughter of Benjamin 
Gerrish (1714). He died June 27, 1785, and was buried in the tomb of his family at 
Copp's Hill. 

The following-named members of the Company are given in a list as " Artillery 
Soldiers under fine of \2ti. per diem for non-appearance " : — 

Matthew Barnard (1734), Daniel Bell (1733), John Bennett (1734), Joseph Blanch- 
ard (1737), John Chandler, Jr. (1734), Nathan Cheever (1733), Thomas Clark (1733), 
William Cock (1733), John Daniel (1738), Moses Deshon (1737), Thomas Downe 
(1733), Joseph Dwight (1734), Jacob Emmons (1738), Daniel Epes, Jr. (1734), Joseph 
Fitch (1733), Zechariah Fitch (1733), Samuel Haley (1738), Ralph Hartt (1739), 
Elnathan Jones (1734), John Pecker (1733), Thomas Pratt (1733), Andrew Symmes 
(1734), Nathaniel Thwing (1736), Daniel Tucker (1733), William Warner (1733), Samuel 
Watts (1733), Jacob Wendell (1733). 

The following-named members of the Company are given in the record book as 
"Artillery Soldiers under fine of 6/ per diem for non-appearance" : — 

Ephraim Baker (1733), Abraham Belknap (1735), Aaron Bordman (1736), Geyer 
(Gear) Coffin (1734), Thomas Drowne (1737), Joseph Dyar (1733), Joseph Edwards 
(1738), Joseph Goldthwait (1732), Joseph Jackson (1738), Joseph Pomeroy (1733), 
Samuel Pratt (1734), Samuel Salter, Jr. (1739), Arthur Savage (1738), Thomas Savage 
(1739), Ebenezer Storer (1732), William Taylor (1738), Nathaniel Thayer (1734), Daniel 
Watts (1736), John Welch (1736), John Wendell, Jr. (1735), Sendall Williams (1738), 
James Wright (1736). 

The above lists were made out, probably, in 1739-40. 

the Field. As for the light-arm'd Foot, They for the " Nor may we omit to mention here great Guns, 

most Part are now arm'd with Musket and Sword which by the English are accurately divided into 

or Rapier. the Cannon, the Culverin, the Pierior and the Mor- 

" As to the Cavalry or Horse, They have now tar. Each of which are sub-divided into several 

their peculiar Weapons : as the Pistol, which was Sorts according to their various Bores : The three 

invented by Camillo Vitelli, an Italian, in the Time former are generally made of Iron Brass and Cop- 

of Henry, the Eighth of England, the Harquebuss, per : The latter, I think, is generally of Iron : And, 

which is of older Date and the Carabine. The Cara- under the Mortar may be comprehended Pot-Pieces, 

bine is usually carried about the Soldier's Neck in a Square Murtherers, Tortles and Petards. . . . 

Bandileer of Leather, which is a far easier Way of "Thus I have cursorily called over the most 

carrying them than the former one of hanging them used and approved Arms of . . . the Moderns, and 

at their Saddles. Some, instead of these Carabines, rank'd them in the best Order I could. And, altho' 

carry Blunderbusses, which are short Hand-Guns of what I have thus done might appear very strangely 

great Bore. Broad Swords were constantly used by on any other Occasion; yet, in such an Auditory as 

the English and Scots. As for the Rapier, that is This, there cannot, I think, be any sufficient Reason 

not over forty Years old; altho' the long Sort of to blame me for it." 
hem was used in the Times of the Civil War in 
England for a while, and afterwards laid aside. 



14 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 740 

The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1740 were: John 

[ /AQ, Wendell (1733), captain; James Fosdick (1722), lieutenant; John Phillips 

' ' (1725), ensign. Josiah Carter (1732) was first sergeant; John Bennett 

(1734), second sergeant; Matthew Barnard (1734), third sergeant; John Welch (1736), 

fourth sergeant; Nathaniel Thayer (1736), clerk, and Bartholomew Gedney (1726), 

clerk's assistant. 

Notwithstanding the former failures to provide market houses, the friends of the 
measure persisted. In 1734, a convenient building was erected on the town's ground 
at the town dock, called " Dock Square," which was used for a time, but was soon 
" demolished and pulled down." It obliged the " people to go out upon the Neck and 
spend a great part of the day in providing necessaries for their families." Peter Faneuil, 
of Boston, having been pleased to offer to build, at his own expense, an edifice for a 
market for the sole "use of the town, Thomas Palmer (1702), Edward Hutchinson 
(1702), John Osborn, father of Capt. John, Jr. (1764), and three hundred and forty 
others, presented a petition to the town, July 2, 1740, asking for a special town 
meeting that the desire of the people in regard thereto might be expressed. At the 
town meeting, held in the afternoon of July 14, the matter was considered, and, upon 
the question of the acceptance of the proposal of Peter Faneuil, the yea and nay ballot 
was announced. " Number of yeas, 367 ; number of nays, 360." Such was the slender 
majority that gave Faneuil Market to Boston and the Cradle of Liberty to the country. 
Mr. Faneuil was immediately notified that his proposal had been accepted by the town, 
and the thanks of the town were expressed to him by the selectmen. 

A manuscript description of New England, by Mr. Joseph Bennett, contains his 
impressions of the Castle. He says : " The entrance to the harbor is defended by a 
strong castle, which they call ' Fort William,' on which there are mounted a hundred 
guns, twenty of which lie on a platform level with the water, to prevent an enemy passing 
the castle ; which is a quarry, surrounded by a covered way, joined with two lines of 
communication to the main battery. This battery is situated so near the channel that 
all ships going up to the town must sail within musket-shot of it. They have always one 
company of soldiers doing duty in the castle even in time of peace, but in time of war 
they are said to have five hundred ; and, as I was taught to believe, they had now till I 
saw the contrary; but there is such a number of men who are excused all other military 
duty on purpose to attend the service of the castle if need require it, whom they say 
they can call together in an hour's time." 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1740 were: John Adams, 
Thomas Baxter, Joseph Bradford, Jonathan Carey, Benjamin Goldthwait, Newman 
Greenough, John Hyland, John Nichols. 

John Adams (1740), son of John and Mary Adams, was born in Boston, Oct. 10, 
1 7 10. He married Mary Clough, July 20, 1732. 

There were two citizens in Boston named John Adams, both mentioned in the town 
records. Ensign John (1740) is distinguished as "living at the North End." He was a 
fence-viewer from 1740 to 1744 inclusive, and viewer of boards and shingles in 1745. 
He is probably the John Adams of the Third Company, First Massachusetts' Regiment, 
on the Cape Breton expedition. In the military he rose to the rank of ensign. His will 
was proved in 1761. 



i 74 o] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMTANY. 1 5 

Thomas Baxter (1740), of Braintree, son of Samuel and Mary Baxter, of Braintree, 
was born Feb. 25, 1702. He married, Nov. 12, 1724, Deliverance Marshall, of Brain- 
tree, by whom he had children in 1726, 1733, and their last, born in Braintree, was 
Thomas, Jan. 23, 1737-8. He was a surveyor of highways of Braintree in 1735, and a 
tithing-man in 1738. Soon after, he removed to Boston and opened a cabinet-maker's 
shop. Nov. 2, 1 74 1, he was paid by Mr. Price, rector of King's Chapel, sixteen pounds 
thirteen shillings and eleven pence, " for a new chair for the Gov. Seat." He was third 
sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1744. 

Joseph Bradford (1740), glazier, of Boston, son of Moses and Elizabeth Bradford, 
was born in Boston, May 14, 1705. He married, July 17, 1729, Ruth Baker, of Boston. 
He held minor town offices in 1742 and 1743; was clerk of the market in 1744 and 
1745, and re-elected in 1746, but declined to serve. March 12, 1743, he was appointed 
on two committees of the town, — one to devise means to prevent fraud in the measure- 
ment of wood, and the other to prevent the firing of chimneys. Both committees 
reported -May 4, 1744. He was elected assessor in 1749 and collector in 1751, but 
declined both offices. He rose to the grade of ensign in- the Boston militia. 

Under date of Sept. 22, 1746, the town records state, "Whereas it is suggested that 
there are several persons, Roman Catholicks, that now dwell and reside in this town, 
and that it may be very dangerous to permit such persons to reside here in case we 
should be attacked by an enemy, Therefore voted that Mr. Jeremiah Allen, Mr. Nathaniel 
Gardner, and Mr. Joseph Bradford [1740] " be a committee to prevent danger from 
their residing here. He was elected assessor in 1759, 1760, 1761, and 1762, and though 
he declined in 1762, he was elected again the next year. His will was proved in 1787. 

Jonathan Carey (1740), shipwright, of Boston, son of James (1723) and Sarah 
Carey, was born in Boston, April 30, 17 17. He was published May 16, 1744, to marry 
Elizabeth Proctor. He was a constable of Boston in 1747, and, Jan. 13, 1747-8, made 
with the principal citizens the annual visitation. He was chosen a culler of staves in 
1758. He was identified with the Boston militia and became a captain. March 14, 
1768, " Capt. Jonathan Carey [1740] " was chosen one of a committee "to obtain sub- 
scriptions to an Agreement not to purchase any Lamb untill the First Day of July next." 
He was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1759, an d its lieutenant in 1762. 
He died at his residence in Fish Street, Dec. 29, 1801, aged eighty-five years. His 
gravestone on Copp's Hill says "he was a Universalist," and Mr. Whitman (1810) adds, 
" Probably one of the first converts of the Rev. Mr. John Murray, and a founder of the 
First Universalist Church." His son, Capt. Jonathan Carey, joined the Artillery Com- 
pany in 1756. 

Benjamin Goldthwait (1740), merchant, of Boston, son of John (1720) and Sarah 
(Hopkins) Goldthwait, was born Nov. 25, 1704. He married, (1) Oct. 10, 1726, 
Charity Edwards, and, (2) Aug. 9, 1759, Sarah Dawes, daughter of Story Dawes and a 
niece pf William Dawes (1760). Their youngest child, Susanna, married James Lanman, 
who joined the Artillery Company in 1786. 

Thomas Baxter (1740). Authorities: An- ton Records; Wyman's Charlestown Genealogies 

nals of King's Chapel; Braintree Town Records. and Estates. 

Joseph Bradford (1740). Authority : Bos- Benjamin Goldthwait (1740). Authorities: 

ton Records. Boston Records; New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 

Jonathan Carey (1740). Authorities : Bos- 1870; MS. of Mr. Joseph C. Whitney, Boston. 



1 6 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[1740 



He was a constable of the town of Boston in 1736, and was a clerk of the market 
in 1743, who, for his extraordinary care in attending to his duty, was given a special 
allowance by the selectmen. March 4, 1736-7, in company with the selectmen and 
others, he made the annual visitation of the town. He was captain of the fourth com- 
pany, Second Massachusetts Regiment in the Cape Breton expedition, and was commis- 
sioned Feb. 9, 1744- May 20, 1746, the agents of the various regiments held a meeting 
at Capt. Peter Prescott's. Capt. Goldthwait (1740) was agent for Col. Waldo's regi- 
ment. Capt. Benjamin (1740) was a brother of Joseph Goldthwait (1732). The latter 
died at Weston, March 1, 1780, and hence was not "living in 1784," as Mr. Whitman 
(1810) states in his history of the Artillery Company. Benjamin Goldthwait (1740) died 
in March, 1782, and his estate was advertised by the administrator April 4, 1782. 

Newman Greenough (1740), sailmaker, of Boston, third son of Capt. John (1712), 
grandson of Capt. William Greenough (1675), and brother of Thomas (1744), was born 
in Boston,. May 6, 1708, and married Elizabeth Montfort, Sept. 6, 1730. Their son, 
Samuel, joined the Artillery Company in 1786. Major Newman Greenough (1740) 
lived on Charter Street, was active in military matters and in all that concerned the 
well-being of his native town. He held the offices of fourth sergeant of the Artillery 
Company in 1744, ensign in 1755, lieutenant in 1757, and captain in 1758. He was 
elected clerk of the market in 1736 and constable in 1 74 !, but declined the latter office. 
In August, 1752, he was chosen fireward, and was annually re-elected for twenty-five 
years. In the town records, he is called "Captain" in 1756, "Esquire" in 1762, and 
" Major " in 1764. He held office in the Boston regiment. 

Dec. 28, 1738, Mr. Newman Greenough (1740) became a member of the company 
having charge of the "copper engine by the North Meeting-house." Oct. 29, 1740, 
" the master of the copper engine " reported to the selectmen that Newman Greenough 
(1740) had left them. 

July 1, 1767, with other gentlemen, Major Greenough (1740) made the annual 
visitation to the public schools. May n, 1773, the town voted to apply to the General 
Court for an act empowering the town to erect, support, and defend lamps in the public 
streets. Newman Greenough, Esq. (1740), and Capt. Fortesque Vernon were appointed 
a committee to locate the lamps in Ward 2. 

At a meeting of the inhabitants of Boston, Dec. 7, 1774, Jonathan Williams, Esq. 
(1729), being moderator, a committee was chosen "for carrying the resolutions of 
the late Continental Congress into execution," of which committee Major Newman 
Greenough (1740) was a member, and, July 26, 1776, he was appointed by the committee 
of correspondence to take charge of the inhabitants of Boston residing in Ward 2, both 
on the alarm and train-band lists. 

His will, proved Feb. 23, 1781, speaks of " his advanced age." 

John Hyland (1740). His name does not appear on the town records. 

John Nichols (1740), of Boston, son of John (who was admitted an inhabitant of 
Boston, July 27, 1702) and Rebecca Nichols, was born March 17, 1714-5. He married 
Mary Laughton, Jan. 5, 1737. He was first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1746. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1740 is as follows : — 

"April nth, 1740. The Company, being under arms, made choice of the Rev. 

Newman Greenough (1740). Authority: Boston Records. 



1 74 i] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. I 7 

Mr. Mather Byles to preach the next Artillery sermon, and that the present commis- 
sion officers, with the field officers, be a committee to request it of him. Returned 
answer that it was accepted by him. 

"June 2d, 1740. The Company, being under arms, voted, that the present com- 
mission officers of the Company, with those to be now elected, and the field officers of 
the Regiment of the town of Boston, be a committee to give the thanks of the Company 
to the Rev. Mr. Mather Byles for his sermon preached to them this day, and desire a 
copy thereof for the press. And in the evening, after lodging the Colours, Voted, that 
the sermon be printed at the charge of the Company, and that each member of the 
General Assembly have one sermon, and that each member of this Company have two 
sermons, and that Mr. Thomas Fleet [1727] and Mr. Joseph Edwards [1738] have the 
care of the same. 

" Oct. 6th. Voted, that the Company would have a new flight of Colours, made of 
red taffety ; and that Ensign Phillips [1725] should provide the same against the next 
training day, and dispose of the old ones for the most they will fetch for the use of the 
Company. Also, Voted, at the same time, that the Company on the next training day 
would exercise after the new method, and that the Company in the meantime would 
endeavour to get the members compleat in said exercise." 

Rev. Mather Byles, of Boston, delivered the Artillery election sermon in 1740. 
He was a son of Josiah and Elizabeth Byles, was born in Boston, March 26, 1706, and 
graduated at Harvard College in 1725. The degree of doctor of divinity was conferred 
upon him by Aberdeen College in 1765. He married, (1) Feb. 14, 1733, Anna Gale, a 
niece of Gov. Belcher, and, (2) June 11, 1747, Rebekah, daughter of Lieut.-Gov. Tailer 
(1712). He received a call from Hollis Street Church, Boston, to become its first pastor. 
He accepted, and was ordained Dec. 30, 1733 He remained with this church until 1776, 
when his sympathy with the Royalists caused the relation to be dissolved. In May, 1777, 
he was denounced in town meeting as an enemy to his country; was afterwards tried 
before a special court, and was sentenced to be sent to England. The sentence, how- 
ever, was never executed. He never afterward assumed any pastoral charge, but lived 
in retirement. In 1783 he had a stroke of paralysis, and, gradually declining, died July 
5, ,788. 

He became especially known for his exhaustless wit, and had considerable reputa- 
tion as a preacher. He was tall, well-proportioned, and commanding in appearance. 
His voice was powerful and melodious, and his manner of address popular. He delivered 
the funeral sermon at the burial of Hon. William Dummer (1702), lieutenant-governor. 



The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1741 were: Joshua 

I j A J t Cheever (1732), captain; Joseph Fitch (1733), lieutenant; Hugh McDaniel 

• ' (1729), ensign. Andrew Symmes (1734) was first sergeant; Aaron Bord- 

man (1736), second sergeant; Moses Deshon (1737), third sergeant; Thomas Drowne 

(1737), fourth sergeant, and William Taylor (1738), clerk. 

Rev. Mather Byles. Authorities: Sprague's American Literature, Vol. H., p. 192; Tudor's Life 

Annals of American Pulpit, Vol. I., p. 376; Drake's of Otis; Allen's Biog. Diet.; Polyanthos, IV. ; Mem. 

Landmarks of Boston, p. 412; Chaney's Hist. Dis- Hist, of Bjston, Vols. II. and III.; Sabine's Ameri- 

courses on Hollis Street Church; Tyler's Hist, of can Loyalists. 



18 



HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[i 741 



The fortifying of the town — a subject which had constantly been brought up in the 
town meetings, and ever received the support of the prominent members of the Artillery 
Company — was again brought up in March, 1741. It was desired to reduce the width 
of the channel below Castle William, to remove the encroachments on Fort Hill, and 
to repair the North and South batteries. The expense of the first was estimated at 
eighteen thousand two hundred pounds. The matter was kept before the town and the 
Legislature until the general government took charge of it, when the town was put in a 
good condition for defence, in 174 1-4, by the combined efforts of the town and the 
province. Dea. Jonathan Williams (1711) was prominent in the above-mentioned work. 

May 22, 1741, Hon. Jacob Wendell (1733), Abiel Walley, Esq. (1710), and Hugh 
Hall, Esq., were appointed a committee " to protect such Coasters as may bring Provis- 
ions, Wood, &c. [to Boston] from being Impressed on board His Majesties Ships of 
War, lying in the Harbour." 

A company of Cadets was organized, Oct. 16, 1741, 1 of which Lieut. -Col. Benjamin 
Pollard (1726) was commissioned commander by Gov. William Shirley. The first mili- 



1 In November, 1776, a petition was presented 
to the " Honorable Council and the Honorable the 
House of Representatives of said State [Massachu- 
setts Bay] in General Court assembled," by a com- 
mittee of the Boston Independent Military Company, 
consisting of John "Barrett, William Gale, Henry 
Bromfield, Joseph Coolidge, and Benjamin Ham- 
mett, Jr., praying for an act of incorporation, " agree- 
ably to the spirit and intention of the articles" or 
regulations submitted with the petition. The prayer 
of the petitioners was granted by the General Court, 
Dec. 7, 1776, so far as to authorize the granting of 
commissions " to the gentlemen chosen by said 
Company," viz. : John Hancock, first officer; Henry 
Jackson, second officer; Benjamin Hichborn, third 
officer; Perez Morton, fourth officer, and John 
Steel Tyler, fifth officer. 

The regulations presented to the court were 
signed by sixty-eight persons, of whom the following 
were, or became, members of the Ancient and 
Honorable Artillery Company; viz., Samuel Gore 
(1786), William Cunningham (1786), Benjamin 
Edes (1760), John Boyle (1769), Elisha Sigourney 
(1788), Thomas Newell, Jr. (1786), John Wheel- 
wright (1794). 

In 1777, the above-named company, under 
command of its second officer, Lieut. -Col. Henry 
Jackson, went to Rhode Island, but soon returned, 
and was discharged from public service May 5, 1777. 
The company says in its original petition that it 
expects " to be marched into the field and ordered 
to such posts and stations as they may be most 
likely to answer the end of their association." The 
" usefulness of the design is the strongest argument 
for granting the prayer." Probably this company 
disbanded when the necessity of actual service 
ceased. 

"Every friend in America will hear with pleas- 
ure that the spirit of emulation for perfection in 
military exercise which, prior to the late revolution, 
so nobly displayed itself throughout this State, and 
which gave the line of the army belonging to this 
Commonwealth a deserved prominence, begins to 
break forth. A company of Independent Cadels, 
composed principally of young gentlemen in the 
mercantile line, has been formed within these few 



days in this town, and which is now in great for- 
wardness." — Muss. Centincl, Aug. 3, 1785. 

It is said that the above-mentioned organiza- 
tion was suggested in the month of July, 1785, when 
a number of young men formed a volunteer caval- 
cade to escort Gov. Bowdoin to Cambridge on com- 
mencement day, and to Boston on his return. While 
on this duty, it was suggested that a new company 
be organized which should serve as an escort to the 
governors or commanders-in-chief on public occa- 
sions. 

"The committee for approbating members for 
the Corps of Cadets now raising will meet for that 
purpose at the Green Dragon to-morrow evening at 
seven o'clock." — Mass. Centinel, Oct. 5, 1785. 

Nearly a year passed, when the following ap- 
peared : — 

"Boston, Wednesday, Sept. 27, 1786. On 
Saturday morning last, the new raised company of 
Cadets went through the exercises and performed a 
number of military evolutions on the Common in 
this town. We are told that this Company intend 
honoring the 17th of October with their first public 
appearance in uniform." — Boston Newspaper. 

In answer to the petition of Lieut.-Col. Samuel 
Bradford and his associates, the Legislature, on the 
1 8lh of October, 1786, passed resolves authcrizing 
and empowering the governor to commission the 
officers of the Independent Company of Cadets. On 
the following day the company had its first parade 
under this organization. The corps has continued 
until the present time. Its records from 1786 to 
1795 were destroyed by fire, but it is supposed the 
corps did escort duty to the governors during those 
nine years. From 1795 to 1831, except in 1822, 
and from 1832 to 1872 inclusive, the corps per- 
formed that duty on the first Wednesday in January 
each year. It performed the same service in 1S74, 
but it was omitted in 1873 and 1875. 

It therefore appears that the original company 
of Cadets, chartered in 1741, disbanded in 1774; 
the Independent Company, chartered in 1776, dis- 
banded when active service in the Revolution 
ceased; and the present corps of Cadets was char- 
tered Oct. 18, 1786. 



i 74I ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 19 

tary duty performed by this company was in 1741, when it escorted Gov. Shirley to the 
boundaries of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, being on his way to Rhode Island 
for the purpose of adjusting the boundary line between that colony and the colony of 
Plymouth, which had been annexed to Massachusetts. It is said that from 1 74 1 until 
the summer of 1 774 this company was recognized as the body-guard of the successive 
governors, and was detailed to perform escort duty. 

Gov. Thomas Gage arrived in Boston and landed at Long Wharf, May 19, 1774, 
and was escorted to the Old State House by the Cadets, then under the command of 
Col. John Hancock. 1 It was the custom for each successive governor to present to the 
company a standard having on one side the arms of the province and on the other the 
coat of arms of the donor. With this usage Gov. Gage complied. Col. Hancock was, 
a few months later, dismissed from his command by the governor in accordance with 
the following order : — 

"Sir, —I am directed by his Excellency, the captain-general, to acquaint you that 
he has no further service for you, as captain of the governor's company of Cadets, and 
you are hereby dismissed from that command. 

" I am, sir, your most obedient humble servant, 

"(Signed) Jno. Flucker, Sec'y." 

The Cadets were incensed at this summary proceeding, and a committee of the 
corps waited on the governor. The standard which he presented was returned, and 
they informed Gov. Gage that they considered the dismissal of their commander equiv- 
alent to the disbandment of the company. The governor received the standard, and 
merely remarked that had he known their intention he would have disbanded the corps 
himself. The removal was without doubt caused by Col. Hancock's refusal to concur in 
the political views and purposes of the governor. " On the dismissal of Col. Hancock, 
the company of Cadets was voluntarily disbanded." 3 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1741 were : John Dixwell, John 
Milliken, Thomas Snow. 

John Dixwell (1741), hardware dealer, of Boston, son of John and Mary (Prout) 
Dixwell, and grandson of John Dixwell, alias James Davids, one of the regicides who 
settled in New Haven, was born in 171S. John Dixwell, the grandfather, flying from 
prosecution as one of the regicides, came to America in 1664, and some time after 
settled in New Haven, where he was known as James Davids. He confessed his true 
name at the time of his decease, March 18, i68g. 3 His son John took his father's 
true name, removed to Boston, was a goldsmith, also ruling elder of the new North 
Church. He died April 2, 1725, leaving three children, John (1741) being seven 
years of age. 

John Dixwell (1741) was elected scavenger in 1746, clerk of the market in 1747 

John Dixwell (1741). AUTHORITY: New to be second Major of llie said Company." — Boston 

l'.ng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 1861, 1S7S. Gazette. 

1 "Boston, Monday, June 6 [176S]. His Ex- % Constitution and I5y Laws of the Independent 

cellency the Governor hath appointed John Han- Company of Cadets, 1S54, p. 4. 
cock, Esq., to be the first Major of the Independent ' Savage's Gen. Diet., Vol. II., p. 55. 

Company of Cadets, and William Coffin, Jr., Esq.. 



20 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 74I 

and 174S, and was elected constable in 1747, but declined to serve. He was clerk of 
the Artillery Company in 1743 and 1744, and he died May 14, 1749.' 

John Millike 11 (1741), merchant, of Boston, was the son of John and Elizabeth 
Milliken, of Boston. 

John Melecan, Jr., was elected clerk of the market in 1731, and John Milliken 
( 1 74 1 ), doubtless the same person, was constable in 1735. 

June 19, 1727, John Milliken, Sr., "in Hanover Street," advertised in the New Eng- 
land Weekly Journal " a young negro woman " for sale. 

Thomas Snow (1741), of Boston. Susanna, daughter of Thomas (1741) and 
Susanna Snow, was born in Boston, June 23, 1741. 

Mr. Snow (1741) was elected a constable of Boston, May 19, 1742, and scavenger in 
1753. He served as second sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1746. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1741 is as follows : — 

"April 10th, 1741. The Company, being under arms, made choice of the Rev. 
Mr. Samuel Phillips to preach the next Artillery sermon, and the present commission 
officers, with the field officers, be a committee to request it of him. Returned answer 
that it was accepted by him. 

"June 1st. In the evening, after lodging the Colours ; voted, that the present com- 
mission officers, with those of the last year, and the field officers of the Regiment of the 
town of Boston, be a committee to give the thanks of this Company to the Rev. Mr. 
Samuel Phillips for his sermon preached to them this day. 

"Oct. 5th, 1 74 1. Voted, that the report of the committee appointed by this Company 
to examine the accounts of the late Clerks be received and recorded by the present 
Clerk in the book of accounts, belonging to the Company. Voted, that the balance due 
from Mr. Bartholomew Gedney [1726] being fifty shillings and one pence, and from Mr. 
Thomas Simpkins [1727], five pounds, nineteen shillings, two former Clerks, be paid to 
the Treasurer of this Company. Voted, that the balance due to Mr. Nathaniel Thayer 
[1734] of fifty-four shillings and four pence, a former Clerk, be paid by the Treasurer of 
this Company. Voted, as there is a list, taken by the present Clerk, from the several 
former Clerks' lists, of what fines that are now due to the Company from the members, 
who now belong to the same, to the amount of ^24. 7. 6/1. it's desired that the present 
Clerk collect those fines ; and he has full power to demand, or to excuse any that are in 
debt, as per this list, if there has been any mistake committed by the former Clerks, 
it appearing to the present Clerk's satisfaction ; and to make report in April next. 
Voted, that the Treasurer's account be received ; balance due the Company ,£96. 
3. and be recorded by the Clerk in the Company's book of accounts. Also it is desired 
that the Treasurer, as soon as he has got as much of the Company's money as will make 
this sum ;£ioo. to let it out at interest for the use of the Company, and to take good 
security. Voted, that there be paid by the Treasurer to the present commission officers, 

1 "On the 141I1 inst [May, 1749] died here by all his acquaintance. He was son to Mr. John 

much lamented, and on the i6lh was decently in- Dixwell, late of this place, and grandson of John 

terred, (the Gentlemen Cadets among whom he was Dixwell of the Priory of Folkstone in the County of 

an officer, attending the funeral), Mr. John Dixwell Kent, England, who came over into New England 

[1741] aged 31 years, a considerable dealer in the about the year 1660 and settled at New Haven, 

ironmongery way, a young gentleman exceedingly Connecticut. He left one son and one daughter." 

beloved and esteemed for his many good qualities — Independent Advertiser, May 22, 1749. 



i 74 2l HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 2 1 

the sum of thirty pounds, in order to help them to defray the extraordinary charge they 
will be at in the entertaining the Company on the Election day, and the same to be 
paid yearly by the Treasurer to the commission officers, that shall be hereafter chosen to 
serve this Company, it being for the same end, and this to continue till it is revoked by 
the Company. 

Rev. Samuel Phillips, of Andover, delivered the Artillery election sermon in 1741. 
He was the eldest child of Samuel and Mary (Emerson) Phillips, of Salem, and was born 
in that town Feb. 17, 1690. His paternal grandfather was Rev. Samuel Phillips, of 
Rowley, and his maternal grandfather Rev. John Emerson, of Gloucester. He graduated 
at Harvard College in 1708, taught school the following year at Chebacco, and the 
next year he began his theological study. He was invited to become the pastor of 
the South Parish Church, Andover, and began to preach there in April, 17 10. He was 
ordained Oct. 17, 171 1, on which occasion he preached the ordination sermon. He 
continued as pastor of this church for sixty-one years, and died June 5, 1771, in the 
eighty-second year of his age. 

Mr. Phillips married, Jan. 7, 1712, Hannah White, of Haverhill. She died Jan. 11, 
1773, aged eighty-two years. They had five children, — three sons and two daughters. 
Their sons, John and Samuel, were noted for their liberality in educational work. 
Together they founded Phillips Academy in Andover, and John, in addition, established 
a professorship of divinity at Dartmouth College, and founded and endowed Phillips 
Academy of Exeter, N. H. 

Rev. Samuel Phillips, of Andover, was a brother of Col. John Phillips, of Boston, 
who commanded the Artillery Company in 1747 and 1759. 



The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1742 were: Samuel 

[ 742. Watts ( I 733)> captain; Henry Berry (1733), lieutenant; Jonathan Williams, 

• ' Jr. (1729), ensign. Nathaniel Thayer (1734) was first sergeant; Joseph 

Edwards (1738), second sergeant; Jacob Emmons (1738), third sergeant; Joseph 

Jackson (1738), fourth sergeant, and William Taylor (1738), clerk. 

The erection of the market-house, donated to the town by Peter Faneuil, was begun 
Sept. 8, 1740, and completed Sept. 10, 1742. A meeting of the town was held Sept. 13, 
1742, when Hon. Adam Winthrop (1692), Thomas Hutchinson, Esq. (1694), Hon. 
Edward Hutchinson (1702), Samuel Waldo, and Hon. Ezekiel Lewis (1707) were chosen 
a committee to draw up a vote of thanks to be given Peter Faneuil, Esq., " for his noble 
and generous benefaction." The committee reported at that meeting, concluding their 
report as follows : That " Hon. Thomas Cushing [1691], Hon. Adam Winthrop [1692], 
Edward Hutchinson [1702], Ezekiel Lewis [1707], Samuel Waldo, Thomas Hutchinson 
[1694], Esqs. ; the selectmen and representatives of the town of Boston, Hon. Jacob 
Wendell [1733], James Bowdoin, Andrew Oliver, Esqs.; Capt. Nathaniel Cunningham 
[1720], Peter Chardon, Esq., and Mr.-Charles Apthorp wait upon Peter Faneuil, Esq., 
in the name of the town, to render him their most hearty thanks for so bountiful a gift," 
etc. Thomas Hutchinson, Esq. (1694), then moved that, "in testimony of the town's 

Rev. Samuel Phillips. Authorities: Abbot's Hist, of Andover; Sprague's Annals of American 
Pulpit, Vol. L, p. 273; Wisner's Sermon on the death of Hon. William Phillips, son of Rev. Samuel. 



22 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 74 2 

gratitude to the said Peter Faneuil, Esq., and to perpetuate his memory, the town would 
now pass a vote that the hall over the market-place be named ' Faneuil Hall,' and at all 
times hereafter be called and known by that name" ; which motion was passed unani- 
mously in the affirmative. 

Sept. 17, 1742, Mr. Faneuil was requested by the town to nominate a clerk of the 
market, and he named Mr. Thomas Jackson (1716), merchant, who was unanimously 
chosen by the town. 

His Excellency the Governor notified the selectmen that he had received from " my 
Lord Chamberlain " his Majesty's picture, a present to the town of Boston, to be hung 
up in Faneuil Hall. The town selected Hon. Adam Winthrop (1692), Samuel Waldo, 
and Ezekiel Lewis (1707), Esqs., to express its thanks to the governor for the present.. 
The building, erected in 1740-2, was of brick, one hundred by forty feet. It was 
injured by fire in 1761, repaired by a lottery fund in 1763, and enlarged and completed 
in its present form March 10, 1806. Mr. Faneuil died March 3, 1742-3, aged forty years 
and about nine months. March 14, 1744, the town "voted to purchase the Faneuil 
Arms, elegantly carved and gilt by Moses Deshon [1737], to be fixed in the hall." 

The journal of Benjamin Walker, Jr., thus refers to the death and burial of Peter 
Faneuil, the donor to Boston of Faneuil Hall, where the Ancient and Honorable Artillery 
Company has for so many years had its headquarters : — 

"Thursday 3 [March, 1743]. Peter Faneuil Esq', between 2 & 3 a clock in 
y e afternoon dyed of a dropsical complyca [tion], he was a fat, squat, Lame [man] hip 
short, went with high heeld shoe (In my opinion a great loss too This Town aged 42. 
8 m.) & I think by what I have hear'd has done more Charitable deeds than any man 
y' ever liv'd in this Town & for whom I am very sorry. 

"March 10. Peter Faneuil, Esq r buried. Bearers, Mess™ Tom. Lechmere, Josh 
Winslow, Jn° Wheelwright, And. Oliver, Jn° Gooch, Jn° Wendall went round y e Town 
house. 

"Thursda 10. Burried Peter Faneuil, Esq r in 43" year of age, a fatt, corpulen, 
brown, squat man, hip short, lame fro childhood." 

A manuscript note in William Nadir's almanac, under date of March 10, 1743, says : 
"Mr. Peter Faneuil, Esq r burried. a very large funeral went round y e Town house, 
gave us gloves at y e funeral but sent y c gloves on y e n day. his Cofin cover[ed] w ,h black 
velvet, & plated with yellow plates." 

The first meeting of the citizens of Boston held in Faneuil Hall, other than a town 
meeting, was held on Monday, March 14, 1742-3, when Mr. John Lovell, master of the 
South Grammar School, " made an handsome Oration on the Death of Peter Faneuil, 
Esq., to the great acceptance of the Town." l 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1742 were: Joseph Belknap, 
Nathan Blodgett, Joseph Butler, Benjamin Church, Thomas Johnson, Jr., Caleb Phillips. 

Joseph Belknap (1742), leather dresser, of Boston, son of Jeremiah (1711), grand- 
son of Joseph (1692), and great-grandson of Joseph (1658), was born in Boston, Feb. 
22, 1716. His brother, Jeremiah, Jr., joined the Artillery Company in 1745. Lieut. 
Joseph (1742) married, July 31, 1741, Sarah, daughter of Rev. Mather Byles. Jeremy 

Joseph Belknap (1742). AUTHORITY: Bos- port of the Record Commissioners, Boston Records, 
ton Records. 1742-1757. PP- >4-i°- 

1 The oration is printed in the Fourteenth Re- 



i 7 42] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 23 

Belknap, who wrote the history of New Hampshire and several volumes of American 
biography, born June 4, 1744, and graduated at Harvard College in 1762, was a son of 
Joseph (1742) and Sarah (Byles) Belknap. 

Lieut. Joseph (1742) was elected constable of Boston in 1745, but, declining to 
serve, paid the fine. He served as scavenger in 1748 and 1749, and as " informer of 
deer" from 1755 to 1762 inclusive. He was a clerk of the market in 1763. Feb. n, 
1756, a committee representing the various trades was appointed by the town to make 
inquiry and report as to the decline of their respective trades in Boston since 1746, and 
reduce the same to writing. Joseph Belknap (1742) was one of that committee. He 
was then called "leather dresser." He was a member of the Boston militia, and became 
a lieutenant. In 1746 he served as third sergeant of the Artillery Company. He joined 
the Old South Church, Nov. 16, 1735, and died at Dover, N. H., August, 1797, aged 
eighty^one years. 

Nathan Blodgett (1742), of Woburn, son of Samuel and Huldah (Simonds) Blodgett, 
and uncle of Seth (1756), was born in Woburn, March 15, 1704. 
He was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1745. 

Joseph Butler (1742), carpenter, of Boston, son of Matthew and Sarah Butler, was 
born in Boston, Dec. 28, 17 13. He married, June 1, 1738, Sarah Hunt, of Boston. 

He was elected constable of Boston, March 15, 1742, and was a viewer of boards 
and shingles from 1753 to 1756; was excused the latter year, but was re-elected from 
1769 to 1777 inclusive. He had charge of the scavenger work in Ward 4 during 1776 
and 1777. In 1746 he served as third sergeant of the Artillery Company. His brother 
John joined the Artillery Company in 1745. He lived in Salutation Alley, and died 
there, March n, 1793, aged seventy-nine years. 

Benjamin Church (1742), vendue-master, of Boston, was the only son of Edward 
and Elizabeth Church, and grandson of Col. Benjamin Church, of Little Compton, R. I. 
Benjamin Church (1742), recorded as of Newport, married Hannah Dyer, of Boston, 
March 6, 1731. "Hannah Church, widow of Deacon Benjamin Church," died March 24, 
1794, aged seventy-nine years. Their dwelling-house was on Newbury (Washington) 
Street. He graduated at Harvard College in 1727. 

May 4, 1743, Mr. Benjamin Church (1742) petitioned the town for "the grant of 
Wheeler's Pond and the land thereunto belonging." Pond Street ran from Wheeler's 
Corner (Bedford and Washington streets) by Wheeler's Pond toward Wheeler's Point, 
near the foot of Summer Street. Dea. Church (1742) lived near this pond. In 1739, 
the town contemplated filling it up ; in 1743, Mr. Church (1742) asked the town to give 
it to him, and, in 1753, a piece of land, less than fifty by one hundred feet, including 
the pond, was sold by the town at auction to Mr. David Wheeler, father of Lieut. Wheeler, 
Jr. (1765), for fifty-one pounds. 

Benjamin Church (1742) served as a constable of Boston in 1745, and was an 
assessor from 1752 to 1777 inclusive. In 1764, he was chosen a warden, and May n, 
1773, was one of the committee chosen to locate the street lamps. He then represented 
Ward 12. April 13, 1763, a memorial of Benjamin Church (1742), setting forth that 

Joseph Butler (1742). Authority : Boston Benjamin Church (1742). Authority: New 

Records. Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 1857, p. 155. 



24 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 742 

" he had the misfortune of having a house burnt in the late fire, and another, occupied 
by Hanners and Smith, valued at one hundred and twenty pounds, pulled down to the 
ground in order to prevent the spreading of the fire, and praying satisfaction may be 
made," was presented to the town. It was unanimously voted that no allowance be made 
Benjamin Church (1742) died Oct. 10, 1781. 1 

Thomas Johnson, Jr. (1742), escutcheon maker, of Boston, was the son of Thomas. 
He was published May 2, 1739, to marry "Susanna Mackmillion." 

He built the first organ of American manufacture used in. Boston. March 16, 1747, 
he petitioned the town for permission to build a shop on the north side of Faneuil Hall, 
"on the town's land at the head of the dock," which was disallowed by the town. He 
died in 1765, and was buried in King's Chapel Burial-Ground. 

Caleb Phillips (1742), of Roxbury, son of Caleb and Hannah Phillips, was born in 
Roxbury, Oct. 5, 1705. He married, 2 Dec. 31, 1730, Elizabeth Wentworth, daughter of 
Samuel Wentworth (1693). He was first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1747, 
its clerk in 1747 and 1748, and a member of the Masonic Fraternity. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1742 is as follows : — 

"April 5th, 1742. The Company, being under arms, made choice of the Rev. 
Mr. Seth Storer, of Watertown, to preach the Artillery sermon in June next, and 
voted, that the commission officers of this Company, with Mr. Ebenezer Storer [1732], 
be a committee to wait on him and request the same. 

"May 7th, 1742. The committee appointed to wait on the Rev. Mr. Seth Storer 
to desire him to preach the Election sermon, returned that it was Mr. Storer's desire 
he might be excused for several considerations and prayed that we might have the 
smiles of Heaven that day. The Company, being under arms, made choice of the Rev. 
Mr. John Taylor, of Milton, to preach the Election sermon, on Mr. Storer's refusal ; and 
voted that the field officers, with the commission officers of this Company and Mr. 
William Taylor [1738], Clerk of the Company, be a committee to wait on him and 
request the same ; and in case of his refusing, the above committee were voted to get a 
minister for to preach on that day. 

"June 7th. The Company being underarms; voted, that the present commission 
officers, with those to be chosen this day be a committee to return the Rev. Mr. John 
Taylor thanks for preaching the Election Sermon." 

Rev. Seth Storer, of Watertown, was invited to deliver the Artillery election sermon 
in 1742, but "he desired to be excused." He was the youngest son of Col. Joseph and 
Hannah (Hill) Storer, of Wells, Me., a brother of Capt. Ebenezer Storer (1732) and of 
Capt. John Storer (1739), and was born May 26, 1702. He graduated at Harvard 
College in 1720; was called Feb. 3, and ordained in Watertown, July 22, 1724. He 
died Nov. 27, 1774, after a ministry of more than fifty years. 

Rev. Seth Storer. Authority: Bond's Hist. son, Benjamin (1742), also vendue-master and 

of Watertown. deacon of Dr. Byles's church. This Benjamin (1742) 

' Col. Benjamin Church, the warrior, who was the father of Dr. Benjamin Church, a distin- 

vesided in Little Compton and Bristol, R. I., had, guished patriot at the commencement of the Revolu- 

by Alice (Southworth) Church, Edward Church, tion, but a traitor at its close. 

of Boston, vendue-master. The latter married Eliza- 2 " Caleb Phillips was published to marry Mary 

beth , who died April 18, 1766. They had one Henkley, Sept. 19,1739." — Boston Records. 




./ 




LaM 




i 743 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 25 

Rev. John Taylor, of Milton, delivered the Artillery election sermon in 1742. He 
was a son of John and Ann (Winslovv) Taylor, and brother of Col. William Taylor ( 1 738) 
clerk of the Artillery Company in 1742 and its captain in 1760. 

Rev. John Taylor was born in 1704, graduated at Harvard College in 1721, and 
settled in Milton, Nov. 13, 1728, as pastor of the church. He held this relation for 
twenty-one years, and died Jan. 26, 1750. Dr. Chauncy said of Mr. Taylor : " Few men 
were more universally loved while they lived, and lamented when dead." Rev. Thomas 
Thacher spoke of him " as remarkable for his high rank in the republic of letters, for his 
uniform virtues and elegant social manners." His residence stood where the town hall 
in Milton now stands. There he lived and died. 



The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1 743 were : Joseph 

[7A'2. Dwight (1734), captain; Jabez Hunt (1727), lieutenant ; John Salter (1727), 

' !«-' ensign. Daniel Watts (1736) was first sergeant; William Taylor (1738), 

second sergeant; William Simpkins (1739), third sergeant; James Butler (1739), fourth 

sergeant, and John Dixwell (1741), clerk. 

Capt. Nathaniel Cunningham (1720), Thomas Hutchinson (1694), and Joseph 
Marion, appointed in May, 1742, reported to the town, March 16, 1742-3, upon the 
distressed state of the town of Boston. It was presented to get a reduction of the prov- 
ince tax. The committee compares the state of the town in 1735 and 1742. During 
these seven years the general trade of the town diminished one half; distilling business 
one third ; cod-fishery became very small; trade to the West Indies "almost nothing"; 
trade to London " altered for the worse " ; town expenses, on account of the poor, 
increased from ^2,069 in 1735 to ^4,800 in 1740; whole town rate increased from 
^8,600 in 1738 to ;£i 1,000 in 1742, and the polls decreased 423 in four years, being, 
in 1738, 3,395, and in 1741, 2,972. Provisions greatly increased in price, and the 
support of the ministry of Boston, which was ,£8,000 in 1735, was ^12,000 in 1742. 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1 743 were : John Gore, Jacob 
Hurd, Kenelm Winslow, Jr. 

John Gore (1743), painter, of Boston, son of Obadiah and Sarah (Kilby) Gore, of 
Boston, was born Dec. 29, 1718. He married, May 5, 1743, Frances, daughter of John 
Pinckney. She was born Sept. 20, 1726. They had thirteen or more children, nine of 
whom lived to be married. Capt. John (1743) was a great-grandson of John Gore 
(1638), and the father of Samuel Gore (1786) and of Christopher Gore, governor of 
Massachusetts. He was also grandfather of Lieut. Christopher Gore (1814). 

Capt. John (1743) was second sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1747, also in 
1755, and lieutenant in 1758. He was elected constable of Boston, March 13, 1743, but 
declined to serve and paid the fine. He was clerk of the market in 1752 and 1753; 
warden in 1764 and 1 77 1, and overseer of the poor from 1767 to 1774 inclusive. He 
was a member of the Masonic Fraternity, and, in 1759, was senior warden of the First 
Lodge in Boston, of which, at that time, Adino Paddock (1762) was master and Joseph 
Webb (1761) junior warden. 

Rev. John Taylor. Authority: Teele's John Gore (1743). Authorities: Boston 

Hist, of Milton, 1640 to 1887, pp. 255-257. Records; Sabine's American Loyalists. 



26 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



['743 



"He was an addresser of Gage, went to Halifax in 1776, was banished in 1778, and 
pardoned by the Legislature in 1787." ' He died Jan. 15, 1796, and his will is in the 
Suffolk Registry, Lib. 94, f. 1.82. His tomb is No. 2 in the Granary Burial-Ground. 2 

Jacob Hurd (1743), goldsmith, of Boston, son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Tufts) Hurd, 
of Charlestown, was born Feb. 12, 1702-3, and married, May 20, 1725, Elizabeth Mason. 
He was elected a constable of Boston in 1731, but declined and paid the fine. 
Nov. 1, 1733, he resided in Pudding Lane (Devonshire Street, between State and 
Water), when he was allowed to dig up the pavement to lay a drain ; also in June, 1734. 
May 2*5, 1735, he gave five pounds towards the erection of the workhouse. Having 
permitted John Bradshaw, with his family, from Medford, to move into his tenement, 
Mr. Hurd (1743) was ordered to appear before the selectmen, by whom he was fined 
forty shillings, "for not informing the selectmen according to law." He was prominent 
in the militia, and rose to the grade of captain of a Boston company. 

He was first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1 745, soon after which he removed, 
and became one of the first settlers at Halifax, N. S. He died there about 1773. 

Kenelm Winslow, Jr. (1743). merchant, of Boston, son of Kenelm and Abigail 
(Waterman) Winslow, was born in Marshfield, Nov. 5, 1717. He married, March 14, 
1754, Abigail Bourne, of Barnstable, and died Aug. 13, 1780, aged sixty-three years. 
His wife, Abigail, died June 21, 1761, aged thirty-two years. He and his brother Joseph 
(born in October, 1724) became merchants in Boston. The latter became involved and 
failed, which ruined the financial prospects of Kenelm, Jr. (1743), and the ancestral 
estate was lost. 3 Mr. Winslow (1743) was elected a constable of Boston, March 15, 
'742-3, but refused to serve, and paid the usual fine. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1743 is as follows : — 
"April 4th, 1 743. The Company being under arms, a motion was made by the Captain 
to reconsider a vote passed October, 1742 [1740], which obliged the Company to exer- 
cise according to Col. Blakeney's method, which passed in the affirmative ; and then 
voted for the future to exercise according to Col. Bland. Voted, that the Rev. Mr. 
William Hooper, of Boston, be desired to preach the next Election sermon ; and that 
the field officers of the Regiment of the town of Boston, with the present commission 
officers of this Company, be a committee to wait on him and desire the same. The 
evening being spent at Sergt Nathaniel Thayer's [1734], voted to receive the Treasurer's 
account ; and that the Clerk copy the same. The Company proceeded to the choice of 
a committee, viz : Col. Jacob Wendell [1733], Lt.-Col. William Downe [1716], Major 
Daniel Henchman [1712], Capt. Samuel Watts [1733], and Mr. Samuel Holyoke [1714], 
for the following reasons:— To consider what allowance further shall be made to the 
commission officers of this Company, to ease them of the entertainment to be made next 
election ; to settle the Clerk's account and to see what shall be proper to allow him for 
his trouble the past & future, and to any Clerk that shall be chosen hereafter ; & to 
report what shall be done with the money now in the hands of the Treasurer, balance 

Jacob Hurd (1743)- Authorities: Boston Hunnevvell, on South Street, Monday, Jan. iS, 

Records; New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg, 1865. 1 796." — Boston Newspaper. 

' William H. Whitmore, in "Brief Genealogy ■> See New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., for gen- 

of the Gore Family." ealogy of Winslow Family, 1863, p. 160. 

2 " He was buried from the house of Jonathan 



i 74 3] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 2J 

being £54. 3/: & what he shall have in his hands for the future; & to consult what 
shall be done, as to the raising of the fines for their not appearing, & to take into 
consideration what shall be further for "the advantage of the Company, & make report 
next May meeting. 

"May 6th, 1743, Friday. The weather proving bad last Monday, we were obliged 
to appear this day as per Charter, and, being under arms, the Captain being one of the 
committee appointed to wait on the Rev. William Hooper to desire him to preach the 
Election sermon, informed the Company he had accepted the same. After reading 
the report of the committee chosen in April last, to consider of several things relating 
to the Company, they voted one by one, and ordered that the Clerk copy the same. 
Voted, that the Sergeants hereafter chosen shall be obliged to return the Halberts to 
those that shall be chosen in their room ; or be accountable to the Company in case 
either of them loose their Halberts. 

"A motion being made by Maj. Daniel Henchman [17 12], to have a duplicate of 
their book of Records and accounts, 1 and to encourage the same, he promised to give a 
handsome book for that purpose, that they might repair these in case of any accident 
happening to the original books ; which was voted ; & that Mr. Samuel Holyoke 
[17 14], a former Clerk, be desired to transcribe the books, and when it's finished, the 
original is always to be in the possession of the Treasurer for the time being. Voted, 
that the time appointed hereafter, on the half days, shall be at three o'clock in the after- 
noon ; & that the members not appearing at that time ready to march, shall be liable 
to a fine of six pence new tenour. 

"1743, May 6th. The report of the committee as follows : — We the subscribers, 
being appointed by the Honorable Artillery Company, at their meeting on the fourth 
April instant, to consider of several things for the benefit of the Company, agreeable to 
their votes as recorded in their Book, report on the several articles as follows : — 

1 As will be seen by the preceding record, Major corner (south corner of State and Washington 

Daniel Henchman (1712) introduced a motion to streets), "and that the place of parade hereafter be 

have a duplicate of the records of the Company at the town-house." The lower floor of the " old 

made, and gave a book for that purpose. The tran- town-house " served " for a covered walk for any of 

script was not completed until 1750. Through a the inhabitants," implying there was considerable 

similar foresight, as Mr. Whitman (1810) in his open area. The custom of placing the standard 

history of the Company states, Major Thomas Sav- there in the morning, to be a notification for the 

age (1637) in 1680 ordered Nathaniel Barnes training until the Company was formed, was long 

(1676), clerk, to make "a list of all the officers' adhered to. After Faneuil Hall armory was estab- 

names of this Company, which have been since their lished, — "which -Boston was obliged to furnish 

first settlement, as far as any account is to be found for the Company, having received Capt. Robert 

thereof," etc., which list was completed in Septem- Keayne's [1637] donation for that purpose," — the 

ber, 1681. To the foresight of Major Savage (1637) Artillery Company met and formed there, though 

the Company is indebted for the preservation of the colors were displayed at Henchman's (1712) 

the roll of its members and officers during the first corner. After the formation of the line, the lieuten- 

fifty years of the Company, and no less to Major ant with the color-guard proceeded to bring the 

Henchman (1712) for the preservation of the former standard to its place in the line. This ceremony 

lists, completed in 1750. The lists of officers and was annually repeated from 1743 to 1795, except 

members of the Company as given, prior to 1750, in during the Revolutionary War. Monday, June 2, 

this work, are an exact copy of the Savage and 1795, was a stormy day, and the colors were then 

Henchman lists and records. These two books are brought from Henchman's (1712) corner, for the 

now in the possession of the Company. last time, by Capt. Joseph Eaton (1773), then 

By the third article, adopted May 6, 1743, the lieutenant of the Company. "Gen. Arnold Welles 

sergeants were provided with halberds. This was [181 1], who commanded the Artillery Company in 

their first appearance so armed. 1811, when a boy served his time in the corner 

" Finally," it was proposed, for the greater con- store, and had charge of the colors, and from him 

venience of the Company, that on training days the the account was received." — Whitman's Hist. A. 

colors be displayed at Major Henchman's (1712) and H. A. Company, zd Ed., p. 294. 



28 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND r,- 43 

" i st. That an allowance of ten pounds more than what was before voted, be granted 
to the commission officers towards defraying their charge on the day of Election, to 
make up in the whole the sum of forty pounds, old tenor, to be paid them by the Com- 
pany's Treasurer. 

" 2d. That there be allowed to Mr. William Taylor [1738], the present Clerk, the 
sum of six pounds, old tenor, for his extraordinary trouble in collecting the fines due 
to the Company from the lists of former Clerks, &c. to be deducted out of the fines. 

"3d. That there be provided for the use of the Company a Half-Pike for the 
Lieutenant, and also two Halberts for the Sergeants to compleat the Company's badges, 
the cost of which to be paid by the Treasurer. 

" 4th. And whereas upon examining the Clerk's account, we find in his hand a 
balance of fourteen pounds six shillings & seven pence, and by a list of outstanding 
debts to" be collected the sum of twenty-seven pounds, fifteen shillings and six pence ; 
we therefore propose that the whole amount of what is at present in hand, and what he 
shall be able to collect, after the six pounds allowed him to be deducted, be paid towards 
the Dinner on the Election day, for the benefit and ease of the members of the Com- 
pany. And that all the Clerks for the future pay their respective balances yearly towards 
the Election Dinner, as aforesaid, until the Company shall vote to the contrary. 

" 5th. As to the Article of fines, we are of opinion, that as they were stated & 
determined upon, & subscribed unto from so long a date as the year 1700, therefore 
think it not convenient to make any other report than this, viz : — That the Company's 
Clerks for the time being do receive all the fines & forfeitures for the delinquents as 
they are fixed & recorded in the Company's book in lawful money of this Province ; 
and if the Company concur with the foregoing Article of the Clerk's paying the yearly 
balance for the use and benefit of the members at the day of Election, we apprehend 
such fines can be no hardship upon us, considering also, that every man through the 
Province liable to train being a delinquent, must pay his fine as stated by the act in 
lawful money. Finally, we would propose for a greater conveniency to the Company, 
that their Colours for the future be hung out upon our Training Days, at Maj. Hench- 
man's [1712] corner and that the place of parade hereafter be at the Town House. All 
which is submitted by 

"Jacob Wendell, 
" William Downe, 
" Dan'l Henchman, 
" Samuel Watts, 
"Samuel Holyoke, 

"Boston, April 30th, 1743. "Committee. 

"June 6th, 1743. The Company, being under arms, voted, that the commission 
officers of this Company be ,a committee to wait on the Rev. Mr. William Hooper, & 
give the thanks of this Company for preaching the Election sermon. 

"September 5th. The Company, being under arms, and upon a motion made & 
consented to, the letters from the R't Hon. Lord Carteret to his Grace the Duke of New 
Castle, published in the Boston Evening Post, the same day, giving an account of His 
Majesty's success against the French on the river Main, was read at the head of the 
Company, which was followed by three huzzas and the discharge of three volleys." 



i 744 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 29 

Rev. William Hooper, of Boston, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1743. 
He was born in 1702 in Edenham, Scotland, and, having emigrated to America, married 
the daughter of Mr. John Dennie, a merchant of Boston. Their son William read law 
with James Otis, settled in North Carolina, was a member of the Congress of 1776, and 
a signer of the Declaration of Independence. 

The West Church, in Boston, was organized Jan. 3, 1737, and, on May 18 next 
following, Rev. Mr. Hooper was ordained over it. He preached his own ordination 
sermon. He continued in this relation for nine years, when he suddenly left the church 
and went to England. Mr. Sabine names him in his "Biographical Sketches of American 
Loyalists." He was reordained in England, and soon after returned to Boston and 
became minister of Trinity Church, the third Episcopal church in Boston. The house 
of worship stood on Summer Street, at the corner of Hawley. He held the office of 
minister to this church until his decease in 1767, at the age of sixty-five years. 



The officers elected were: William Downe (1716), captain; John 

\/ 1 A . Phillips (1725), lieutenant; Ebenezer Storer (1732), ensign. Thomas 

• I ' Savage (1739) was first sergeant; Thomas Edes (1739), second sergeant; 

Thomas Baxter (1740), third sergeant; Newman Greenough (1740), fourth sergeant, and 

John Dixwell (1741), clerk. 

March 12, 1743-4, the memorial of Moses Deshon (1737), "Setting forth, That he 
by the Encouragement of Several Gentlemen about Fourteen Months since began to Cut 
the Arms of their Late Generous Benefactor, Peter Faneuil, Esq., and soon after his 
Death the same was Compleatly Finished & Gilt," asked that it be accepted and 
placed in Faneuil Hall at the expense of the town. It was thereupon voted that the 
selectmen purchase the said arms at the expense of the town. This was done, Mr. 
Deshon (1737) being paid forty pounds, old tenor, for the same. 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1744 were : Isaac Cazneau, 
John Comrin, Joseph Gale, Thomas Greenough, and Thomas Stoddard. 

Isaac Cazneau (1744), saddler, of Boston, was born in 1696. He married, Sept. 
22, 1726, Hannah Johnson, who died April 8, 1784, aged seventy-eight years. She was 
buried from Mrs. Winslow's, on Hanover Street. His name is variously spelled in the 
town records, — Casno, Casneau, and Cazneau. Isaac Cazneau (1744) was chosen a 
constable March 8, 1730, but was excused. Being re-chosen, March 14, 1736, he 
declined to serve and paid the fine. He was clerk of the market in 1746, 1753, 1754, 
and 1777, and sealer of leather in 1762. He belonged to the military, and rose to the 
grade of captain. 

Feb. 18, 1729, the selectmen executed a lease to "Isaac Casno, sadler," of a shop 
or tenement, No. 7, fronting on Dock Square, for twenty pounds per annum, and, Oct. 
19, 1739, it was re-leased to him for five years at thirty pounds per annum. This lease 
was again renewed Sept. 1, 1744. He resided on Water Street in 1744, for at a meeting 
of the selectmen, April 4, 1744, "Mr. Isaac Casno [1744] appeared and desired liberty 
to erect a sign-post before his house in Water Street." His untenanted house "in the 
upper part of Water Street" was destroyed in the great fire of 1760. 

Isaac Cazneau (1744). Authority: Boston Records. 



30 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 744 

Ja-n. 4, 1757, Mr. Cazneau (1744) was employed by the selectmen to "make a good 
serviceable sedan, at the charge of the town," for removing the sick at Rainsford Island. 
He was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1747, and third sergeant in 1755. 
He died in May, 1774, aged seventy-eight years. 

John Comrin (1744), trader, of Boston, married, Feb. 1, 1732, in Boston, "Sarah 
Lorthorn [Lawton]." He served as a constable of Boston in 1743, and, Dec. 8, 1749, 
was elected a collector of taxes, but was excused. July 2, 1742, liberty was granted to 
Capt. John Comrin (1744) to dig up the pavement in Shrimpton's Lane (Exchange 
Street) to repair his drain ; and, Feb. 23, 1742-3, he was granted liberty to put down a 
post before his store door in Cornhill (Washington Street). April 20, 1748, the select- 
men sold a piece of property at auction, on Water Street, to Capt. John Comrin (1744) 
for one thousand and seventy-five pounds, old tenor. He is mentioned in the records of 
the Old South Church as a member, July 16, 1744, and Oct. 31, 1757. He was first 
sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1750; was identified with the militia, and held the 
position of captain. He died in 1762. 

Joseph Gale (1744), upholsterer, of Boston, married, April 29, 1 735, Mary Alden, 
of Boston. He was first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1749, fourth sergeant in 
1755, and ensign in 1758. His son, Ensign Joseph, Jr., joined the Artillery Company 
in 1759. 

Joseph Gale (1744) was clerk of the market in 1737, and a constable of Boston in 
1738. His will was proved in 1774. 

Thomas Greenough (1744), mathematical instrument maker, of Boston, son of 
Capt. John (1712) and Elizabeth (Gross) Greenough, grandson of Capt. William 
Greenough (1675), and brother of Major Newman Greenough (1740), was born in 
Boston, May 6, 1710. He married, (1) May 9, 1734, Martha, daughter of William 
Clarke (1703), and (2) Sarah, daughter of David Stoddard, who, with her sisters, the 
wives of Rev. Charles Chauncy and William Hyslop (1755), were the devisees of Shute 
Shrimpton Yeamans, and thus the owners of Noddle's Island. 

His parents were members of the Second Church, but he was one of the founders of 
the New Brick Church, and a deacon from 1755 until its union with the Second Church 
in 1779, and was continued in the same office in the latter church until his decease, 
May 1, 1785. He was for several years treasurer of the New Brick Church, and was 
very prominent in church matters. 

His father and grandfather were ship-builders, having their ship-yard at the North 
End, near the present Chelsea Ferry. 

Mr. Greenough (1744) made the annual visitation to the families in the town of 
Boston, with its most prominent citizens, seven times, — 1750-6. He was clerk of the 
market in 1735 > was elected constable March jo, 1739, t> ut declined to serve, and held 
other town offices as late as 1777. March 10 of the last-named year he was elected a 
selectman of Boston. 

John Comrin (1744). Authority: Boston Court Street and Bell Alley, at the North End, was 

Records. occupied at one time by Thomas Greenough (1744). 

Thomas Greenough (1744). Authorities: He bought it Jan. 6, 1746-7, of the heirs of William 

Sumner's Hist, of East Boston; Boston Records. Clarke, and afterwards sold it to Sir Charles Henry 

The famous Frankland House, on Garden- Frankland. 



, 744 j HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 3 I 

July 26, 1774, he was chosen one of the committee to receive donations for the relief 
of the inhabitants of Boston, suffering on account of the shutting up of the harbor of 
Boston, and, Nov. 8, 1776, he was one of those employed by the town " to determine the 
damage sustained since the Boston Port Bill." 

Thomas Greenough (1744) was a member of various town committees both before 
and during the occupation of Boston by the British ; and throughout the entire contest, 
whose triumphant close he was permitted to see, he adhered with unflinching firmness to 
the cause of the colonies. He was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1747. 

Thomas Stoddard (1744), shopkeeper, of Boston, son of Daniel and Elizabeth 
Stoddard, of Boston, was born July 13, 1699. He married, (1) April 2, 1723, Tabitha 
Hodgdon, born Jan. 4, 1702, daughter of Nathaniel (1727) and Susanna Hodgdon, of 
Boston; and (2), (published) April 2, 1735, Abigail Barker, of Andover. 

Thomas Stoddard (1744) was chosen a constable of Boston in 1733, but was excused 
from serving. He was re-elected and sworn in 1734. He was elected clerk of the 
market in 1739, but refused to serve and paid the fine. He served in that office in 1744 
and 1745, and was re-elected in March, 1745-6, but refused. He was thanked by vote 
of the town for past services. He was elected purchaser of grain, March 12, 1749-50, 
and hog-reeve in 1761. 

June 17, 1734, he was one of the petitioners, with William Parkroan (1711), John 
Greenough (1712), and Newman Greenough (1740), for permission " to lay down and 
maintain for twenty or thirty years, good and sufficient ways for the landing of passengers 
from Winnisimmet, at the town's slip, at the lower end of North Street," which was granted 
by the town. He commanded a company against the Indians, and there is extant a 
•printed sermon on the occasion of their departure, by Rev. Samuel Checkley. In the 
Artillery Company he held the rank of sergeant, and was captain in the militia, serving 
as such at Crown Point in 1755. He died, April 12, 1763, aged sixty-four years. His 
gravestone stands on Copp's Hill. 

In his will there was set off to his daughter, Susannah, who married William Bord- 
man (1758), a dwelling-house and land bounded southeast by Clark's Square (Suffolk 
County Probate Record) ; his mansion house on Union Street, six hundred pounds; 
house " two houses below said house," and house and land in Roxbury, are mentioned. 
Also, four small arms, one pair of pistols, and seven swords, four pounds four shillings ; 
one old negro, one negro boy, and one negro girl. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1744 is as follows : — 
"April 2d, 1744. The Company being under arms, voted, that the Rev. Mr. Joseph 
Parsons of Bradford be desired to preach the next Election sermon ; and that the field 
officers of the Regiment of the town of Boston, and the present commission officers of 
this Company, with the Hon Richard SaltonstaJl, Esq. [1733], be a committee to wait 
on him and desire the same. 

"May nth. The weather not proving suitable on Monday, we, by our Charter 
were obliged to appear this day, and being under arms, the Lieutenant, who led the 
Company, and being one of the committee appointed to wait on the Rev. Mr. Joseph 

Thomas Stoddard (1744). Authorities: Mr. Joseph C. Whitney, of Boston, has in bis 

Palfrey's History; Records of Boston; MS. of Mr. possession a christening bag imported by Thomas 
Joseph C.Whitney. Stoddard (1744), in which William Bordman (1786) 

was baptized in 1760. 



32 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 744 

Parsons to desire him to preach the next Election sermon, reported that he accepted the 
same. The evening being spent at Sergeant Taylers [1738], the four following votes 
were there passed. 1st. That there be a committee chosen to take the affair under their 
consideration respecting the monies belonging to the Company, being the produce of 
what their land sold for, and now under the care of their Treasurer, how they shall be 
appropriated for the future, and make report thereon the next training day. 2d. That 
the committee consist of five, viz: Col. Jacob Wendell [1733], Lt. Col. William Downe 
[1716], Maj. Daniel Henchman [1712], Capt. John Wendell [1733], and Capt. John 
Phillips [1725]. 3d. That an allowance of twenty pounds, old tenor, more than what 
was before allowed, be paid by the Treasurer to the commission officers, towards defray- 
ing their charge on the next Election day, to make up in the whole the sum of fifty 
pounds, old tenor. 4th. That an allowance of twenty pounds, old tenor, be paid by the 
Treasurer for the benefit of the private soldiers dinners on the next Election day. The 
Treasurers account being read, it was voted to accept the same. 

"June 4th. The Company being under arms, it was voted, the old commissioned 
officers of this Company, with the new ones elected this day, be a committee to wait on 
the Rev. Mr. Joseph Parsons and give him the thanks of this Company for his sermon 
preached to them this day. The evening being spent at Col. Wm. Downes [17 16], 
the following report from the committee chosen the last Training Day was read & the 
Company voted to accept the same, viz : The committee appointed by the Honorable 
Artillery Company, the nth of May 1744, to take under their consideration the affair 
respecting the money belonging to the Company, being the produce of what their land 
sold for, now under the care of the Treasurer, have met accordingly, and are of opinion, 
that as most of it is let on real security, and the value of the money therein stated, and 
the remainder, the value of the money is settled by Act of the Geueral Court ; Therefore 
it will be most for the interest of the said Company for the present to continue the whole 
at interest, until some favorable opportunity offers for the laying out the same in a real 
estate, agreeable to the order of the General Court, dated June 16, 1731. 

"Jacob Wendell, 
" William Downe, 
" Daniel Henchman, 
" John Wendell, 
"Boston, May 29th, 1744." "John Phillips." 

Rev. Joseph Parsons, of Bradford, Mass., delivered the Artillery election sermon 
of 1744. He was the successor, as pastor of the Bradford church, of Rev. Zachariah 
Symmes, whose father, Rev. Thomas Symmes, also a pastor of the Bradford Church, 
delivered the Artillery election sermon in 1729. 

Rev. Joseph Parsons was born at Brookfield, Mass., in 1701, graduated at Harvard 
College in 1720, and was ordained at Bradford in 1726. During his pastorate the Brad- 
ford church was divided by the formation of the East Precinct, June 17, 1726, and a 
new church was organized June 7, 1727. One hundred and one members, including the 
two deacons, withdrew to form the second church in what is now Groveland. Rev. Mr. 
Parsons also delivered the annual election sermon before the General Court. He was 
opposed to Mr. Whitefield's preaching, and was one of the ten ministers in Essex County 
who protested to the Boston ministers against his being admitted to the pulpit. After an 
able, conservative, and zealous pastorate of nearly forty years, he died in Bradford in 1765. 

Rev. Joseph Parsons. Authority : Hurd's Hist, of Essex County, Art., Bradford. 



i 7 45] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 33 

The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1745 were: Jacob 

IV/lC, Wendell (1733), captain; John Carnes (1733), lieutenant; John Codrnan 

' ■»-' (i733). ensign. Jacob Hurd (1743) was first sergeant ; Thomas Stoddard 

(1744), second sergeant; Nathan Blodgett (1742), third sergeant; Ephraim Copeland 

( x 733) j fourth sergeant, and John West (1745), clerk. 

Thomas Hutchinson, Esq. (1694), at the town meeting March 25, 1745, "informed 
the Town that he was much Obliged to them for the Honour Done him in choosing him 
a Selectman for several years past, that he found his own private affairs would not permit 
him to Serve the Town in that office any longer." 

March 26, 1745, the selectmen informed the town that the "Two hundred & Fifteen 
Fire Arms given to the Town by the hon We Colo Thomas Fitch [1700] dec'd, were lately 
Impressed by the Government for the Service of the Expedition against Cape Breton." 
They were ordered to apply to the government for the full value of said arms. 1 

The fifth war between Great Britain and France was declared in March, 1744, and 
proclamation thereof was made in Boston two months later. " Europe rocked like the 
ocean on the lulling of a long storm, when the opposite wind has just sprung up, throwing 
the heaving billows into tumultuous conflict." 2 

In May, 1744, the French surprised the little English garrison at Canseau, and its 
defenders were carried as prisoners to Louisburg. Near the close of the summer of 1 744 
they were released, and came to .Boston on parole. After hearing their story, Gov. 
Shirley determined upon an expedition to reduce Louisburg, the French stronghold in 
America. The Legislature approved of the proposed expedition by a majority of only 
one vote ; but the people seemed to be enthusiastic in its favor, and the expedition gave 
promise of success. The rendezvous of the army was Boston, and two thousand and 
seventy men assembled here, who sailed for Louisburg March 24, 1745. Gov. Shirley 
commissioned as officers for the expedition, William Pepperrell, lieutenant-general and 
commander-in-chief ; Roger Wolcott, major-general ; Samuel Waldo, brigadier-general, 
and Joseph Dwight (1734), brigadier-general. 

The following-named members of the Artillery Company were officers in the expedi- 
tion against Louisburg in 1745 ; Joseph Dwight (1734) was commissioned colonel of the 
train of artillery, Feb. 20, 1744, brigadier-general, Feb. 20, 1745, and judge of the court 
of admiralty, June 20, 1745. According to the lists given in the New England Historical 
and Genealogical Register, October, 1870, by Hon. Charles Hudson, Joseph Dwight 
(1734) was commissioned colonel and captain of the First Company of the Ninth Regi- 
ment of Massachusetts Volunteers on the Louisburg expedition, June 18, 1744, and 
brigadier-general, Feb. 20, 1745. In the First Massachusetts Regiment, Capt. John 
Storer (1739) was lieutenant-colonel and captain of the Third Company, commissioned 
Feb. 5, 1744; William Warner (1733) was captain-lieutenant of the Ninth Company, 
commissioned Feb. 5, 1744; John Butler (1745) was lieutenant of the Second Com- 
pany, commissioned Feb. 16, 1744; John Bridge (1751) was ensign of the Ninth 
Company, commissioned March 5, 1744; Joseph Goldthwait (1732) was adjutant of 
the First Regiment, commissioned March 12, 1744 The latter was promoted to brevet- 
captain March 20, 1744. In the Second Massachusetts Regiment, Benjamin Goldthwait 
(1740) was captain of the Fourth Company, commissioned Feb. 9, 1744. In the Third 
Massachusetts Regiment, Christopher Marshall (1724) was captain of the Third Com- 

1 See Vol. I., p. 433, of this history, in regard to these lire-arms. 

2 Bancroft's Hist, of the United States, Vol. III., p 451. 



34 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



['745 



pany, commissioned Feb. 15, 1744, and Estes Hatch (171 1) was captain of the Tenth 
Company, commissioned Feb. 4, 1744. In the Fifth Massachusetts Regiment, Benjamin 
White (1722) was adjutant, commissioned March 16, 1744. In the Seventh Massachu- 
setts Regiment, Jonathan Carey (1740) was captain of the Ninth Company, commis- 
sioned Feb. 14, 1744. In the Eighth Massachusetts Regiment, William Williams (1733) 
was lieutenant-colonel and captain of the Second Company, commissioned June 1, 1745, 
and Nathaniel Thwing (1736 and 1761) was major and captain of the Third Company, 
commissioned June 1, 1745. In the Ninth Massachusetts Regiment, Samuel Jackson 
(1733) was ensign, commissioned July 5, 1745. In the train of artillery, Joseph 
Dwight (1734) was colonel, Joseph Sherburne (1745), who was commissioned as captain 
of a company in the New Hampshire Regiment, June 6, 1744, was commissioned store- 
keeper of his Majesty's ordnance Dec. 1, 1745. Dr - William Rand (1732) was one of 
the surgeons of the expedition, and was commissioned March 9, 1744. Under the head 
of "House Carpenters," Matthew Barnard (1734) is given as commissioned captain, 
March 16, 1744. Benjamin Goldthwait (1740) was agent for Col. Waldo's regiment, 
May 20, 1746 ; John Adams (1740) was a member of the Third Company, First Massa- 
chusetts Regiment ; William Moor (1749) was a sergeant of the Fifth Company. 

July 2, 1745, a messenger arrived in Boston announcing the capture of Louisburg. 
On the morning of July 3 the news was announced to the people of the town by three 
discharges of musketry by the militia of Boston. In the evening the people held a 
carnival of joy, bonfires were built, and the town was illuminated. July 18 was observed 
as a day of thanksgiving. 

Gov. Shirley landed at the Castle at 4 p. m., Nov. 8, and was received with 
a salute of twenty-one guns. He passed the night there, and on the next morning pro- 
ceeded in the Castle barge to the town. He was accompanied by several officers who 
came with him from Louisburg, being saluted all the way by the ships in the harbor and 
the town battery. At twelve o'clock at noon he landed at Long Wharf, amidst a great 
crowd of people, and was welcomed by the officers of the province and the town. He 
was formally received by the Boston regiment, under command of Col. Jacob Wendell 
( : 733). a tro0 P °f tne regiment of horse, commanded by Col. Estes Hatch (1711), and 
the company of Cadets, under command of Col. Benjamin Pollard (1726). 

This expedition, which contained many members of the Artillery Company, was 
pre-eminently a colonial enterprise. The expense was finally borne by the British gov- 
ernment, which, Sept. 18, 1749, delivered to the province at Boston two hundred and 
fifteen chests and one hundred casks, containing one hundred and eighty-three thousand 
six hundred and forty-nine pounds two shillings and seven and a half pence as the 
expense of the expedition. For the adjustment of accounts, the rolls were sent to Eng- 
land and were never returned. 

In addition to the loss in the land forces, the town complained, March n, 1745-6, 
that the seamen impressed for his Majesty's ships, and those who had fled for protection 
from impressment, added to those who went in the sea service to Cape Breton, amounted 
to more than three thousand men. The committee also added, " Boston is the metropo- 
lis of that province who has been the principal in the reduction of Cape Breton, which, 
added to her former military achievements for loyalty, justly sets her at the head of his 
Majesty's provinces; that those other provinces, New Hampshire .and Connecticut 
excepted, have borne no part of the burthen of the war." ' . . 

1 Report of Boston Rec. Com., No. 14, pp. 84, 85. 



'745J HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 35 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1745 were: William Baker, 
Jeremiah Belknap, Jr., John Butler, Eneas Mackay, Benjamin Russell, Joseph Sherburne, 
Benjamin Walcott, John Wendell, 3d, John West, John Wilson. 

William Baker (1745). tobacconist, of Marshfield and Boston, was published to 
marry Sarah Perkins, Nov. 29, 1739. She was the widow of Isaac Perkins, goldsmith, of 
Boston. Mr. Perkins died prior to Nov. 1, 1737, and William Baker (1745) was 
appointed administrator of his estate, May 31, 1746. 

Nov. 13, 1764, William Baker (1745) became a member of the engine company of 
which Joseph Putnam was master, and, March 27, 1765, he was assessed six shillings as 
his proportion for the repairing of the pump standing on the town's land in Cornhill 
(corner Court and Washington streets). He was chosen constable in 1743-4, but paid 
the fine; clerk of the market in 1746, and scavenger in 1749. He died Dec. 9, 1785, 
aged eighty-one years. 

Jeremiah Belknap, Jr. (1745), 0I Boston, son of Jeremiah (1711), grandson of 
Joseph (1692), and great-grandson of Joseph (1658), was born in Boston, Feb. 10, 1720. 
His brother Joseph joined the Artillery Company in 1742. Jeremiah (1745) married, 
June 30, 1748, Mary Rand. He was first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1748 and 
1754, and ensign in 1763. He joined the Old South Church Nov. 8, 1741. Nov. 27, 
1 765, he was chosen by the selectmen of the town for usher of the North Latin School. 

Jeremiah Belknap, Jr. (1745), was chosen constable in 1751, but was excused; 
scavenger in 1763 and 1770, and clerk of the market in 1764; was one of the census 
takers in August, 1776. Feb. 6, 1777, a committee of thirty-six persons, "not in trade," 
was selected by the town, " to aid and assist the selectmen and committees of corre- 
spondence, inspection, and safety, by information," etc., to carry into effect certain acts, 
— of which committee Mr. Belknap (1745), representing Ward -8, was one. Capt. 
Thomas Adams (1765), Russell Sturgis (1786), and Job Wheelwright (1759), were also 
members of this committee. May 22, 1777, he was the first drawn juror "for a special 
court for the trial of such persons as the town has represented to be inimical to these 
States and dangerous to the public safety." He was devoted to the interests of the 
colonies during the Revolutionary War, and died April 17, 1796, at his residence on 
Cornhill, in Boston. 

John Butler (1745), cooper, of Boston, son of Matthew and Sarah Butler, was born 
in Boston, Dec. 29, 1710. His brother Joseph joined the Artillery Company in 1742. 
John Butler (1745) was lieutenant of the Second Company, First Massachusetts Regi- 
ment, on the Cape Breton expedition. He died in June, 1748. 

Eneas Mackay (1745) was published, Oct. 21, 1743, to marry Elizabeth Bon- 
garden. March 25, 1745, he was elected constable, but was excused, and March 9, 
1746, was elected scavenger. He is called " Captain " in the records of the selectmen of 
Boston, Nov. 27, 1765. ' He resided in that part of the town called "New Boston," 
which included Cambridge and Green streets and vicinity. Jan. 13, 1747-8, he became 
a member of the First Lodge, A. F. and A. M., in Boston, and subsequently was accepted 
in the Master's Lodge. 

William Baker (1745). Authority: Boston Jeremiah Belknap, Jr. (1745). Authority: 

Records. ■ Boston Records. 



36 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



['745 



Benjamin Russell (1745)) housewright, of Boston, son of Joseph (1722) and Susan- 
nah Russell, was born March 10, 1697. He was published to marry Elizabeth Belknap, 
Oct. 26, 1727. He was elected constable in 1731, but was excused ; was re-elected, and 
served in 1732. He served as fence-viewer in 1731, 1732, 1733, and : 734» from 1747 to 
1750 inclusive, and from 1755 to 1759 inclusive. He estimated the cost of the new 
market houses in 1733, and was elected a viewer of shingles, etc., in 1743, 1744, and 
1754, but was excused the latter year. 

His father, Joseph Russell (1722), hired a part of the gun-house on the Common, 
March 1, 1725-6, which was afterward occupied by Benjamin (1745). The latter was 
warned out by the selectmen, May 26, 1736, as they esteemed the gun-house large 
enough to store the guns in, and also serve as a barn for the town bulls and for the hay 
with which to feed them. June 23, 1736, Benjamin Russell (1745) petitioned the select- 
men for permission "to set up the Old Bull House, near the South School-house, for a 
shop." He appears, however, to have retained possession of the gun-house, and, July 
28, 1742, he notified the selectmen "that he had no further occasion to improve the gun- 
house on the Common." 

Nov. 10, 1730, he resided on Milk Street. Feb. 25, 1735, he purchased of the 
selectmen the breastwork of the North Battery for seventeen pounds. May 4, 1737, he 
erected for the town a pound, " in the northeast corner of a pasture belonging to the 
heirs of the late Hon. Thomas Fitch [1700]," and March 12, 1738-9, he asked liberty 
of the town " to fill up Wheeler's Pond, in Pond Street." This so-called pond was in 
the vicinity of the present Bedford Street. 

His son Thomas joined the Artillery Company in 1769. Capt. Benjamin (1745) 
died in Boston, July 9, 1760, aged sixty-three years. He was buried in the Granary 
Burial-Ground. 

Joseph Sherburne (i745)> storekeeper, of Boston, was probably from Portsmouth, 
N. H. A Joseph Sherburne was published to marry Mary Watson, of Boston, Feb. 21, 
1733 ; and Joseph Sherburne married Eunice Hubbard, Feb. 2, 1737. Joseph Sherburne 
was published Nov. 21, 1750, to marry Mary Plaisted, of Salem. 

March 25, 1735, he subscribed fifteen pounds, "to be paid in goods at money 
price," towards the erection of the new workhouse. He was chosen clerk of the market 
in 1736 and 1737, and constable in 1742. He visited the public schools, with the jus- 
tices, June 28, 1748, and June 29, 1753. He was chosen, June 3, 1746, one of a com- 
mittee " to raise a subscription for building or purchasing a house for the reception of 
distracted persons"; was an overseer of the poor in 1751 and 1753-5, and, May 15, 
1764, was chosen "to consider what measures may be proper for the preservation of 
Beacon Hill." In 1773, Paddy's Alley, running from Ann Street to Middle, was widened 
(now North Centre Street, between North and Hanover streets), and Joseph Sher- 
burne (1745) was paid seven pounds for his "loss of land and damage" thereby. 1 
March 30, 1757, Mr. Joseph Sherburne (1745). having let a tenement to John Corny 
and family, from Marblehead, without informing the selectmen, was fined forty shillings 

Benjamin Russell (1745). Authority : Bos- erty on this alley were : Jacob Emmons (1738), who 

ton Records. was awarded thirty-five pounds; William Simpkins 

Joseph Sherburne (1745)- Authority: (1739), five pounds; Asa Stoddard (1765 ), who was 

Boston Records. assessed two pounds, and Joseph Jackson (1738), 

' Other members of the Company owning prop- one pound. 



I745 j HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 17 

for the breach of the law. He was appointed a justice of the peace May 23, 1760, and 
reappointed Nov. 5, 1761. 

Nov. 12, 1746, he received Masonic degrees in the First Lodge in Boston, now 
called "St. John's Lodge." He served as second sergeant of the Artillery Company 
in 1749. 

Benjamin Walcott (1745), blacksmith, of Boston, was clerk of the market in 
Boston in 1732 and 1741, and constable in 1733. 

John Wendell, 3d (1745), ship-chandler, son of Isaac and Catalyna (Van Dyck) 
Wendell, of Albany, N. Y., nephew of Abraham Wendell, who died in Boston in 1734, 
and of Col. Jacob Wendell (1733), and a cousin of Col. John Wendell ( 1*733) ar >d of 
Major John Wendell, Jr. (1735), was baptized Nov. 15, 17 18. He was brought up in 
the counting-room of Jacob (1733) and John (1733) Wendell, and became a merchant 
and importer, doing an extensive business with the West Indies. 

John Wendell, "Tertius" (1745), was chosen a constable of Boston for the year 
1753, which seems to be the only town office he ever held. He was interested in the 
militia, and rose to the grade of lieutenant. He was buried in Boston, Nov. 12, 1755. 

John West (1745), retailer, of Boston, was a son of John and Mary West, and 

married Elizabeth . He was constable in 1733, and was sworn; was re-elected in 

1748, but declined to serve and paid the fine. "Oct. 13, 1740, he was approved and 
recommended by the selectmen as a retailer of beer, cider, etc., at his shop on Middle 
Street, now Hanover. Two years later, the license for the same shop was granted to 
Mary West. John West (1745) was clerk of the Artillery Company in 1745 and 1746, 
and second sergeant in 1748. Administration was granted on. his estate in 1750. 

John Wilson (1745), son of John and Mary Wilson, was born Jan 21, 1707. He 
is not mentioned on the records of the town of Boston. He was second sergeant of the 
Artillery Company in 1750. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1745 is as follows : — 
"April 5th, 1745, Friday. The weather proving unsuitable on Monday, we, by our 
Charter, were obliged to appear this day, and, being under arms, Voted that the Rev. 
Mr. Thomas Prentice of Charlestown be desired to preach the next Election sermon, 
and that the field officers of the Regiment of the town of Boston, with the present com- 
mission officers of the Company, be a committee to wait on him and desire the same. 

" May 7th. Being under arms, the Captain being one of the committee appointed 
to wait on the Rev. Mr. Thomas Prentice to desire him to preach the next Election 
sermon, made report to the Company, that he had accepted the same. The evening 
being spent at Serg't Greenoughs [1740], the four following votes were passed. 1st. That 
an allowance of twenty pounds be added to the standing sum of thirty pounds, to make up 
in the whole the sum of fifty pounds, old tenor, be paid out of the Treasury to the com- 
mission officers towards defraying their charge on the next Election day. 2dly. That 
the charge of every member's dinner on the next Election day be defrayed by the Com- 

John Wendell, 3d (1745). Authorities: John West (17-45). Authority: Boston 

Boston Records; Talcott's Gen. Notes of New York Records. 
andNewEng.; New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 1882. 



38 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [1746 

pany, and that the Treasurer pay for the same. 3<ily. That the field officers of the 
Regiment of this town of Boston, with the commission officers of this Company, be a 
committee to provide a dinner on the next Election day for the Company. 4thly. That 
the time appointed hereafter, on the whole days in May & September only, shall be at 
ten o'clock, a. m. and the members not appearing at that time ready to march, shall be 
liable to a fine of sixpence, new tenor. 

"June 3d. The Company being under arms, it was voted, that the old commission 
officers with the new ones elected this day, and the field officers of the Regiment of 
Boston, be a committee to wait on the Rev. Mr. Thomas Prentice, and return the thanks 
of this Company to him for his sermon preached to them this day. 

"October 7th. The Company being at the house of Lieut. John Carnes [1733], 
it was there voted, that the sum of five pounds, old tenor, be given to Mr. John Dixwell 
[1741], the former Clerk, for his services done for the Company." 

Rev. Thomas Prentice, of Charlestown, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 
1 745. 1 He was a son of Thomas and Mary (Batson) Prentice, and was born in Cam- 
bridge, Mass., Dec. 9, 1702. He graduated at Harvard College in 1726, became 
minister at Arundel, Me., in 1730, and was installed over the First Church in Charles- 
town, Oct. 3, 1739. He married (1) Irene Emery, of Wells; she died in 1745, and he 
married (2) Rebecca Austin, of Charlestown, Oct. 16, 1746; she died in 1748, and 
he married (3) Mary Butman, of York, Me , who survived him. On the destruction of 
Charlestown in 1775, Rev. Mr. Prentice moved to Cambridge, occupied the house in 
which he was born, and resided there until his death. 

After an interval of three years, — 1775-8, — the people to a considerable number 
having returned, public worship was re-established in Charlestown, " under the minis- 
try of the now aged Prentice," in a block house " erected by the enemy." He continued 
in this service with this people until infirmity of body and mind obliged him to desist. 
He died, June 17, 1782, at Cambridge, but the people of his parish bore his remains to 
Charlestown and buried them. 



, The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1746 were: Daniel 

I / /If). Henchman (1712), captain; Ebenezer Storer (1732), lieutenant; Joseph 

' * Jackson (1738), ensign. John Nichols (1740) was first sergeant; Thomas 

Snow (1741), second sergeant; Joseph Butler (1742), third sergeant; Joseph Belknap 

(1742), fourth sergeant, and John West (1745), clerk. 

March 31, 1746, Gillam Phillips (17 14) proposed to the town to straighten Pudding 
Lane, near the town-house, by taking part of his land on the westerly side of his lane, 
which he was willing to give to the town. His proposal was accepted. 

The collectors of taxes for this year were Capt. John Goldthwait (1720), Joseph 

Rev. Thomas Prentice. Authorities: Bud- before His Excellency, His Majesty's Council, and 

ington's Hist, of First Church, Charlestown; Paige's the said Company, after which the Company made 

Hist, of Cambridge; Mem. Hist, of Boston, Vol. III. Choice of the Hon. Jacob Wendell Esq [1733] 

1 "Monday last [June 3, 1745], being the an- Colonel of the Regiment in Boston, Capt; John 

niversary Day for electing the officers of the ancient Carnes [1733] for their Lieutenant and Capt John 

and honourable Artillery Company of the Province, Codman [1733] their Ensign." — The Boston Even- 

the Rev, Mr, Prentice, pf Charlestown preach'd ing Post, June 10, 1745. 



1746J HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 39 

White (1722), Capt. Andrew Cunningham (1720), Benjamin Edwards, Elias Dupee, 
father of Elias (1763), and William Larrabee. 

April 8, 1746, it was determined by the town to place a battery of eight guns on 
Long Wharf, and one of four guns on Clarke's Wharf. May 14, 1746, Col. Jacob Wen- 
dell (1733)) Samuel Welles, Col. John Hill, Col. William Downe (1716), John Fayer- 
weather, and Isaac White (1733) were appointed a committee to have the twelve gun 
carriages "made and finished." 

There was a project for reducing Canada, in 1746, by Great Britain and the colonies. 
Men were liberally voted by the colonies: Massachusetts voted, May 31, 1746, to raise 
three thousand men, and actually enlisted two thousand. Great Britain did not send 
the promised fleet and army, and the levies for Canada were kept on foot until October, 
1747, when they were dismissed. This proposed expedition cost Massachusetts sixty- 
eight thousand pounds before May, 1747, and much additional afterward. The troops 
were used in defending the frontiers. 

There was much excitement in the colony, in the fall of 1746, caused by the intelli- 
gence that a large French fleet, having an army on board, all under the command of the 
Duke d'Anville, was on its way to attack Boston. The Essex regiments were ordered to 
Salem for the defence of that place. Within three days, from eight to ten thousand men 
assembled in Boston armed for its defence. One company, from Brookfield, made the 
march of seventy miles in two days, with provisions upon the back of each member 
estimated at the weight of a bushel of corn. William Prescott, of immortal fame, was 
clerk of the Groton company, which arrived in Boston in September, 1746. The alarm, 
however, proved to be false. The French expedition failed on account of the loss of 
vessels by tempests, and of men by a " pestilential fever." No roster of volunteers in 
this colonial army is known to exist; but, doubtless, as on every other occasion of alarm 
or war, the members of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company were prompt to 
respond to duty's call, and ready for any emergency. 

The members of the Artillery Comjjany recruited in 1746 were : John Austin, Samuel 
Hendley, Alexander Hill, Thomas LawlOTpSamuel Livermore, and Samuel Swift. 

John Austin (1746), carver, of Charlestown, son of James and Mary (Tufts) Austin, 
was born in that town Nov. 28, 1722. He married Susanna Schreech, Sept. 27, 1750. 
His parents died when he was young, and he was therefore compelled to care for him- 
self. He Jearned the carver's trade, and became an expert workman. Oct. 1, 1770, he 
removed to Boston, and resided there until his decease, which occurred about 1786, in 
which year the property he left was divided among his children. 

His son, John, born April 17, 1756, was a soldier in the Revolution. He was a con- 
ductor of military stores from Jan. 1, 1777, and was commissioned second lieutenant in 
Col. Crane's regiment of artillery, May 17, 1780. In 1800 he was a tailor, on Lynn 
Street, Boston. John Austin (1746) was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1753. 

Samuel Hendley (1746), distiller, of Charlestown, son of Samuel Hendley, Esq., of 
Charlestown, was born in 1718. He married, (1) Oct. 29, 1741, Elizabeth Cheever, 
daughter of Ezekiel (1733) ; (2) Oct. 4, 1762, Katharine Russell, who died Aug. 19, 

John Austin (1746). Authorities : Wyman's Samuel Hendley (1746). Authority: Wy- 

Charlestown Genealogies and Estates; Memorials man's Charlestown Genealogies and Estates, 
of the Mass. Society of the Cincinnati. 



4-0 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 74D 

1812, aged seventy-one years. He died Aug. 29, 1795, aged seventy-seven years. His 
daughter, Rebecca Tyng, married Hon. John Soley, son of John Soley (1757). 

Col. Samuel (1746) became a member of the church at Charlestown, Aug. n, 1751. 
He was treasurer of that town for many years, and was very wealthy. He was a soldier 
prior to the Revolution, and during the war rose to the rank of colonel. In Frothing- 
ham's "Siege of Boston," pages 287 and 288, he speaks of the attempt of the Americans 
to burn the houses remaining in Charlestown, used by the British. The enterprise was 
undertaken one evening, Jan. 8, 1776, when Gen. Howe was present at a theatrical 
entertainment in Boston, which presented "The Blockade of Boston." The effort on 
the part of the Americans proved successful, and Major Hendley (1746), with the other 
commanders, was " much praised for his good conduct on this occasion, and was thanked 
in the general orders of the next day." His will, dated Dec. 28, 1789, was probated 
Sept. 5, 1795. The inventory amounted to ten thousand five hundred and sixty-six 
pounds. 

Alexander Hill (1746), merchant, of Boston, son of Arthur and Rebekah Hill, was 
born in Boston, Aug. 23, 1722. He was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1749. 
Mr. Hill (1746) was chosen clerk of the market in 1748, and scavenger in 1752 and 
1755. March 5, 1774, he was one of a committee chosen " to look into the law relative 
to scavengers, and get such amendment made as is necessary." He was chosen to visit 
the schools with the justices and prominent gentlemen of the town. He performed that 
service July 1, 1761, June 29, 1762, June 26, 1765, and July 7, 1773. He was warden in 
1764, and one of the firewards from 1769 to 1773 inclusive. He was doubtless a good 
accountant, since, from 1769 to 1775, he was quite often chosen to audit accounts; viz., 
accounts of the town treasurer, of the manager of the granary, and of the overseers of 
the poor. 

March 13, 1770, an article in the town warrant relative to the "non-importation of 
tea, etc.," came up for action, when Mr. Hill (U46) was chosen one of the committee 
to draw up an agreement for the shopkeeperslfiPi dealt in tea to sign, which provided 
that they would " not dispose of any more tea until the revenue acts were repealed." 
Nov. 2, 1772, when the town and Gov. Hutchinson were holding correspondence, Mr. 
Samuel Adams moved, in town meeting, " that a Committee of Correspondence be 
appointed, to consist of twenty-one persons, to state the rights of the colonists and of 
this province in particular, as men, as Christians, and as subjects ; to communicate and 
publish the same to the several towns of this province and to the world as the sense of 
this town," etc. Alexander Hill (1746), Major Nathaniel Barber, Jr. (1758), Major 
Richard Boynton (1759), with Otis, Adams, Warren, and others, were members of this 
committee. 

The town records clearly show that Mr. Hill (1746) was an earnest patriot, and 
sought to make successful the colonial cause. His residence was on Clark Street, back 
of the New North Meeting-house, and opposite Oliver Everett's, 1 " No. 23." Mr. Hill's 
(1746) house is still standing. 

Alexander Hill (1746). Authority : Boston and a granddaughter of Alexander Hill (1746). 

Records. Alexander Sears Hill graduated at Harvard College 

1 "Hon. Edward Everett was a son of Rev. in 1764, and died in 1771. Lucy Hill was, after his 

Oliver and Lucy (Hill,) Everett. She was a daugh- death, placed under the care of her grandfather." — 

ter of Alexander Sears and Mary (Richey) Hill, Boston Advertiser, Jan. 16, 1865. 



i 74 6] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 41 

Thomas Lawlor (1746), shopkeeper, of Boston, son of Thomas and Elizabeth 
Lawlor, was born March 28, 1720. He married, Dec. 21, 1742, Susanna Martin. He 
held minor town offices in 1747 and 1750. He was approved and recommended by the 
selectmen as a retailer of beer and cider, Oct. 13, r740. His shop was on Ship, now 
North, Street. March, 1 741-2, he was approbated by the selectmen, and he became a 
member of John Earl's engine company, located near " the New North Meeting-house, 
in Mr. Hutchinson's building." He was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 
1749, and second sergeant in 1754. 

Samuel Livermore (1746), yeoman, of Watertown, son of Jonathan and Rebecca 
(Barns) Livermore, was born in that part of Watertown now called Waltham, March 14, 
1701-2, and he died Aug. 7, 1773. He married, (1) Nov. 10, 1726, Hannah Brown, 
daughter of Dea. William Brown, of Cambridge; (2) Jan. 22, 1765, Hannah, widow of 
Daniel Harrington. She died Dec. 31, 1765. (3) May 7, 1767, Joanna Felton, of Water- 
town, who died Sept. 5, 1767, aged forty-six years; (4) March 5, 1770, Thankful, widow 
of Richard Cutting. She died Nov. 4, 1772. He had nine children by his first wife, 
and none by the others. Of these children, Samuel was an officer of the crown for some 
years ; was several times delegate to the Continental Congress ; chief justice of New 
Hampshire in 1782; representative to Congress, and was a United States senator for 
nine years, or until the year 1800, when he resigned. 

Major Samuel Livermore (1746) inherited a considerable estate from his grand- 
uncle, Nathaniel Livermore, of Watertown, including the now so-called " Lyman " farm 
in Waltham. By industry and frugality he added largely to his inherited estate. For 
many years he was the most prominent citizen in the town. He was a selectman of 
Watertown twenty- two years, 1743-64; representative to the General Court from 1745 
to 1765, except in 1748; assessor twelve years, 1738-56; town clerk and treasurer 
twenty-six years, 1738-63 ; moderator of town meetings twenty-two years, 1740-64, and 
was a deacon of the church. He was also identified with the militia, and, passing 
through the regular promotion, became major of the First Regiment of Massachusetts 
militia. He was a thorough patriot, and active in supporting the cause of the colonies. 

Samuel Swift (1746), lawyer, of Boston, son of Col. Samuel (1724) and Ann (Hol- 
man) Swift, of Milton, was "born at the homestead on Milton Hill," July 9, 1715. He 
married (1) Sarah Tyler, and (2) Ann Foster, of Dorchester. By the first, he had one 
daughter ; by the last, two sons and four daughters. One of his sons, Foster, became a 
physician in Taunton, and was the father of Gen. Joseph G. Swift, U. S. A., one of the 
first cadets at West Point, who presided at the banquet given in Boston in July, 1817, 
in honor of President Monroe ; and the other, Jonathan, a merchant, who settled in 
Virginia. President Adams often speaks of Samuel Swift (1746) in his diary. He says, 
1766 : "Spent the evening at Sam. Adams very socially with brother Swift." In a letter 
to William Wirt, who was writing the life of Patrick Henry, he says: "Among the illus- 
trious men who were agents in the Revolution must be remembered the name of Samuel 
Swift [1746]." He was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1748, and its clerk 
from 1749 to 1751. 

Thomas Lawlor (1746). Authority: Bos- Samuel Swift (1746). Authorities : Teele's 

ton Records. Hist, of Milton; Boston Records. 

Samuel Livermore (1746). Authority: 
Bond's Hist, of Watertown, pp. 345, 346. 



42 HISTORY OF THE- ANCIENT AND [ I74 6 

When Gen. Gage offered the freedom of the town to Bostonians who would deposit 
their arms in the British arsenal, Mr. Swift (1746) opposed the movement. He presided 
at a meeting where it was covertly agreed to use their concealed arms, also pitchforks 
and axes, to assail the soldiers on Boston Common. This scheme was revealed to Gen. 
Gage, and Mr. Swift (1746) was arrested. He was permitted to visit his family, then at 
Newton, upon his parole to return at a given time. At the appointed time he returned, 
against the remonstrance of his friends, and so high an opinion of his character was 
entertained by Gen. Gage that he was permitted to occupy his own house under sur- 
veillance. From disease induced by confinement, he died a prisoner in his own house, 
a martyr to freedom's cause, Aug. 31, 1775. He was interred in his tomb, which had 
formerly belonged to the father of his first wife, Mr. Samuel Tyler. 

Samuel Swift (1746) graduated at Harvard College in 1735, settled in Boston, and 
studied law in the office of the distinguished counsellor, Jeremiah Gridley. He was 
prominent in the town affairs of Boston. In 1759, x 7 6l > and 1770, he visited, with 
others, and examined the schools of the town. In 1759, he was chosen on a committee 
to regulate the quantity, etc., of wood brought by carriage into town, which resulted in a 
legislative act that wood brought by land carriage must be four feet in length, the same 
as if brought by water. In 1765, he, with others, was authorized to consider the selling 
of the town's interest in Boston Neck. He served on other committees, but the one of 
greatest interest, chosen March 19, 177 1, consisted of Col. Swift (1746), Hancock, Samuel 
Adams, Dr. Church, Joseph Warren, etc., to wait upon Mr. James Lovel and notify him 
that the town had chosen him to deliver an oration, April 2, at 10 a. m., "to com- 
memorate the barbarous murder of five of our fellow-citizens," etc., on the 5th of March, 
1770. In 1773, with Adams, Warren, Church, etc., he was "to consider what is best to 
be done to vindicate the town from the gross misrepresentations and groundless charges 
in his Excellency's messages to both Houses," etc. The report of the committee was 
unanimously accepted, recorded in the town books, printed, and sent far and near. 

Mr. Swift (1746) was a Freemason, and from July 10, 1752, when he sat in Grand 
Lodge as senior warden of the First Lodge, until 1774, he was often present at the com- 
munications of St. John's Grand Lodge. At the installation of John Rowe as grand 
master, Nov. 23, 1768, Bro. Samuel Swift (1746) carried in the procession the "Golden 
Level." 

Monday, April 3, 1775, an adjourned town meeting assembled in Faneuil Hall. The 
record is : "Mr. Samuel Adams, Moderator of this Meeting being at the Congress now 
sitting at Concord, Samuel Swift, Esq. [1746], was chosen Moderator, Pro Tempore," 
which concluded his public service to the town. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1746 is as follows : — 
"April 7th, 1746. The Company being under arms at Faneuil Hall, being rainy 
weather, voted, that the Rev. Mr. Nathaniel Walter be desired to preach the next Elec- 
tion Sermon ; and that the field officers of the Regiment of the town of Boston, with the 
present commission officers of this Company, be a committee to wait on him and desire 
the same. The evening being spent at Serg't Hurds [1743], li wa s voted, that the 
following gentlemen should be a committee to take care of and manage the Company's 
money; Col. Jacob Wendell [1733], Lieut.-Col. William Downe [1716], Maj. Daniel 
Henchman [1712], Capt. John Wendell [1733], Capt. John Phillips [1725]. 

"May 5th. The Company being at the house of Ensign John Codman [1733] oi 



, 74 6] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 43 

Charlestown, the following votes were passed, viz : 1st. That the charge of each member's 
dinner, on the next Election day, be defrayed by the Company, and the Treasurer to pay 
the same. 2d. That an allowance of forty pounds be added to the standing sum of thirty 
pounds to make up the sum of seventy pounds, old tenor, to be paid by the Treasurer 
to the commission officers towards defraying their charges next Election day. 3d. That 
the committee lately chosen have power to let out the five hundred pounds, received for 
Rutland lands, upon interest till the rest of the money be received. 

"The Captain being one of the committee appointed to wait on the Rev. Mr. 
Nathaniel Walter to desire him to preach the next Election Sermon, made report to 
the Company, that he had accepted the same. 

"June 2d. The Company being under arms in Faneuil Hall, being rainy weather, 
it was voted, that the old commission officers of this Company, and the new commission 
officers this day chosen, with L't Col. Downe [17 16], be a committee to wait on the 
Rev. Mr. Nathaniel Walter & return the thanks of this Company to him for his sermon 
preached this day. The evening being spent at Maj. Daniel Henchmans [1712], it 
was there voted, that the committee lately chosen by the Company, for managing the 
Company's stock, have power to let the money out at interest and are to take care that 
there is good personal and real security given, and that the money is fixed that it may be 
made good as when it was lent." 

Rev. Nathaniel Walter, of Roxbury, minister of the Second Parish, delivered the 
Artillery election sermon of 1746. 1 He was the son of Rev. Nehemiah Walter, who 
delivered the Artillery sermon in 171 1, and Sarah (Mather) Walter, daughter of Rev. 
Increase Mather. Rev. Nathaniel Walter was born Aug. 15, 171 1, and graduated at 
Harvard College in 1729. He married, in 1735, Rebecca Abbott, of Brookline, who 
died in 1 790. 

Mr. Francis S. Drake says, in his history of Roxbury, "When Dr. Boylston intro- 
duced the practice of inoculation for small-pox into Boston, Rev. Cotton Mather, who 
was its powerful advocate, was violently assailed. ' His nephew, Mr. Walter,' says a 

1 Extracts from Rev. Mr. Walter's sermon, Army shall be applauded while Time and Days 

preached before the Ancient and Honorable Ai til- endure. . . . 
lery Company June 2, 1746: — "To You, Gentlemen, of the ancient and hon- 

" In the first place then, —Your Excellency will ourable Artillery- Company, let me next address 
permit me on this joyful Day, the Monument of myself. As you, Gentlemen, have seen fit to pitch 
ancient, British Liberty, to congratulate your Excel- upon me, the least of all my Brethren in the Minis- 
lency upon the Smiles of Heaven on your mild, your try, to stand this Day in the Desk, that so you might 
just, and your wise Government: Where's a Ruler do Honour to that Gallant Army of your country- 
happier in his People, where 's a People happier in men, who reduced Louisbourg under the British 
their Ruler, than SHIRLEY and his Province? Government; and to whom there can scarcely be 
When their Captain-General gives forth the Com- too much Honour done : I assure you it is no small 
mand, cheerfully they obey, and thus the feeble Motive to me to appear here this Day, that I might 
Fortress of Annapolis- Royal is saved from the mention to you their manly Piety and their English 
Hands of her Enemies, and the now-impregnable Bravery, of which I myself was an Eye-witness: 
Fortress of Louisburg is put into our Possession : Piety and Bravery, which you, Gentlemen, will copy 
Shirley's Troops know how to Pray, and Shirley's after, whenever God shall call you to play the Men 
Troops know how to Fight, so as perpetually to in the Cause of Liberty and Virtue. From You 
engage the God of Armies on their Side, who crowns there went forth the Great and the Good in the late 
their noble Attempts with Success and Victory: . . . Campaign at Louisbourg : And from Whom, Gen- 
Let one then, whose Eyes beheld the charming tlemen, can we more justly expect Heroes than from 
Virtue and the undaunted Courage of a New-Eng- You, the Flower of our Land, the Glory of our 
land Army, raised by your Excellency's Command Country? . . . Wherefore now, Gentlemen, to your 
and Vigilance, congratulate You on the Reduction Posts, and carry this Truth along with you, He that 
of Cape-Breton: Happy Conquest! . . . Future would fight courageously, and die happily must live 
Ages shall bless your Memory and your gallant virtuously." 



44 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [ l;47 

writer of the day, ' one of the ministers of Roxbury, having been privately inoculated in 
the doctor's house in Boston, a villain, about three o'clock in the morning, set fire to the 
fuse of a grenade shell filled with combustibles, and threw it into the chamber where he 
was lying. The fuse was fortunately displaced by the passing of the shell through the 
window, and the wildfire spent itself upon the floor. It was generally supposed that 
the bursting of the shell was by that means prevented.' " 

Walter Street was named for Rev. Nathaniel Walter. Once the church, the burial- 
ground, and the parsonage were upon it, but now only the burial-place remains. His 
son, Rev. William Walter, in whose house in Charter Street the British Major Pitcairn, 
wounded at Bunker Hill, expired, was pastor of Christ Church, Boston. 

Rev. Mr. Nathaniel Walter served as chaplain of Col. Richmond's regiment in the 
Louisburg expedition. He was ordained July 10, 1734, and, after a pastorate of forty- 
two years, died March n, 1776. 



The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1 747 were : John Phillips 

I 7 A7 - ( ' 725), captain; Hugh McUaniel (1729), lieutenant; Thomas Edwards 

' '' (1724), ensign. Caleb Phillips (1742) was first sergeant ; John Gore (1743), 

second sergeant; Thomas Greenough (1744), third sergeant; Isaac Cazneau (1744), 

fourth sergeant, and Caleb Phillips (1742), clerk. 

Dec. 9, 1747, the town-house was injured by fire. The records, books, papers, 
furniture, pictures of the kings and queens, etc., which were in the council chamber, the 
chamber of the House of Representatives and the apartments thereof, in that story 
(second), were consumed; and in the cellars, which were hired by several persons, a 
great quantity of wines and other liquors were lost. The fire was supposed to have 
caught from the wood-work under the hearth taking fire. The General Court, then in 
session, completed their meetings at the Royal Exchange tavern, kept by Luke Vardy. 
The town-house was immediately and thoroughly repaired. 

On account of the ill- advised action of Commodore Charles Knowles, there was a riot 
in Boston, Nov. 17, 1747. Resulting therefrom, two letters from the governor appeared 
in the Boston press. Dec. 24, 1747, Thomas Hubbard (1732), Thomas Hutchinson, 
Edward Bromfield (173 2 ). Andrew Oliver, and Josiah Quincy were chosen to petition 
his Excellency that he would endeavor to remove the disadvantageous light he had set 
Boston in before the world by his letters. 1 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1747 were : Josiah Edson, Jr., 
John Edwards, Jr., William Homes, Jonathan Lowder, Thomas March, Thomas Ray- 
mond, Onesiphorus Tilestone, Josiah Waters. 

Josiah Edson, Jr. (i747). yeoman, resided in Bridgewater. He was appointed a 
justice of the peace June 27, 1747, and was reappointed Jan. 28, 1762, and coroner for 
Plymouth County March 6, 1773. He was also a selectman in his native town, and a 
representative to the General Court for many years. 

He commanded the Bridgewater regiment in 1772, and was one of the king's 

Josiah Edson, Jr. (1747)- Authorities: ' See Boston Weekly News-Lctter, Dec. 10, 1747, 

Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 1842; and Boston Evening Post, Dec. 14, 1747. 
Sabine's Loyalists. 



i 7 47] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 45 

mandamus council at the Revolution; Doubting the propriety and ability of resisting 
the mother country, he was stigmatized as a Tory. The people of Bridgewater, being 
nearly all Whigs, assembled to tar and feather the old man, and the mob collected in the 
evening and began their tumultuous march. The veneration they had always borne him 
served to curb their passions as they approached, and it was found, when within half a 
mile of his house, that the mob had imperceptibly dwindled to ten persons, who 
stopped to consider what was to be done, and, awed by his amiable character and 
dignity, concluded to quietly return to their homes, leaving the old gentleman to enjoy 
his opinions without molestation. He was judge of the Court of Common Pleas, 
Plymouth County. Jan. 6, 1746, Capt. Josiah Edson, Jr. (1747), was elected by the 
General Court one of the guardians of the Plymouth and Middleboro Indians, and was 
re-elected to that office in 1758. 

Somewhat different from the foregoing is the account given of him in " Biographical 
Sketches of American Loyalists," by Lorenzo Sabine, who says of Col. Edson (1747) : 
" He was a noted politician of the time, and was known by the two most odious appel- 
lations which prevailed; namely, as a 'rescinder' and a 'mandamus councillor.' 
Hutchinson speaks of him in 1 77 1, when he was a member of the House of Representa- 
tives, as one of the several gentlemen of that body who, in common times, would have 
had great weight, but who, then discouraged by the great superiority of numbers against 
them, were inactive. In 1774, Col. Edson [1747] was driven from his home by a 
mob, and was compelled to reside in Boston under protection of the British troops, and, 
at the evacuation in 1776, he accompanied the army to Halifax. He went from Halifax 
to New York, and died in that city, or on Long Island, not long after his arrival [in 
1778]. He was a graduate of Harvard University [Class of 1730], a colonel in the 
militia, a deacon in the church, and a respectable, virtuous man. He is alluded to in 
McFingal as ' that old simplicity of Edson.' " 

John Edwards, Jr. (1747), bookseller, of Boston, son of John, grandson of John 
(1699), nephew of Thomas (1724) and of Capt. Joseph Edwards (1738), was born in 
Boston, June 15, 1725. He was a member of the Lodge of St. Andrew, of Boston. 

He held town office in 1747 and 1748, and was elected a constable in 1752, 1753, 
and 1754, but was excused from serving each year by the town. He visited the public 
schools, with the justices and selectmen, July 1, 1767, and July 6, 1768. He was second 
sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1751, and its clerk from 1758 to 1764 inclusive. 

William Homes (1747), silversmith, of Boston, son of Capt. Robert and Mary 
(Franklin) Homes, was born March 9, 17 17, and died in 1783. His mother, Mary 
Franklin, born in Boston, Sept. 26, 1694, was a sister of Benjamin Franklin, and of John 
(1739). Capt. William (1747) married, April 24, 1740, Rebecca Dawes, sister of 
William (1760). She was born March 9, 1718, and died in 1788. He united with the 
Old South Church, Jan. 29, 1748, his wife Rebecca having joined the same church Feb. 
8, 1735. He was first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1752, fourth sergeant in 
1754, lieutenant in 1761, and captain in 1765. He served as clerk of the marketin 1753 
and 1754, and, when elected to that office in 1763, he is called "William Homes, Esq." 

John Edwards, Jr. '1747). Authority: John Edwards as "a proper person to be appointed 

Boston Records. a measurer of wheat for this port." 

May 22, 1763, the selectmen directed the town William Homes (1747). Authorities: Bos- 
clerk to give in to the Court of Sessions the name of ton Records; Glover Memorial. 



46 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 747 

He was warden in 1764, and a fire ward from 1764 to 1770 inclusive. March 19, 1771, 
on declining to serve longer, the town, by formal vote, thanked him for his past faithful 
service as a fireward. He was one of the purchasers of grain from 1766 to 1769 inclu- 
sive, and visited the public schools, with the justices and others, July 6, 1768. He was 
appointed, May 22, 1769, one of a committee of twelve, "to draw up and procure sub- 
scriptions to an agreement not to purchase any lamb for family consumption till the 
first of July next." He made the general walk, or visitation, of the town, representing 
Ward 5, Feb. 16, 1762; Feb. 21, 1763; Feb. 10, 1764; Feb. 15, 1765, and Feb. 13, 
1766. His residence and place of business were in Ann Street. 

Jonathan Lowder (1747), barber, of Boston, son of William (1708) and Mary 
Lowder, of Boston, was born in Boston, Oct. 26, 17 13. He married, in 1736, Ann, 
daughter of Brattle and Ann (Gillam) Oliver, who was born Nov. 18, 1715. He was 
elected constable in 1738, but was excused from serving. He was re-elected to that 
office in 1 741. He united with the Old South Church, June 30, 1734, and served as 
third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1750. He resided on Atkinson Street. 

Administration was granted on his estate Dec. 1, 1769. Inventory, five hundred 
and thirty-two pounds. 

Thomas March (1747) was a stone mason, and lived in Boston as, early as May 26, 
1745, when his first child, by his wife, Dorcas, was born. He was elected constable 
in 1745, but paid the fine, and held the office of fence-viewer in 1750, 175 r, and 1752. 
June 7, 1749, the selectmen agreed with Thomas March (1747) to build a wharf at 
Rainsford's Island, according to the vote of the General Court, passed April 26, 1749. 
He held the office of first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1751. 

Thomas Raymond (1747), of Boston, was born in 1724, and married, April 13, 
1743, Margaret, daughter of Abraham Ireland. Thomas Raymond (1747) was probably 
not born in America, as it is recorded on the father's gravestone at Cambridge that 
" God brought him [Abraham] from a distant land." 

Thomas Raymond (1747) was elected constable in 1745 and 1754, but was excused 
from service both years. He served in that office in 1757, and was fourth sergeant of 
the Artillery Company in 1750. He died in Boston, June 7, 1809. 

Onesiphorus Tilestone (1747), housewright, of Boston, son of Timothy and Hannah 
Tilestone, of Dorchester, was born in that town Oct. 4, 1710. He married, March 21, 
1733-4, Judith Pierce, and died Nov. 27, 1771, aged sixty-one years. He was buried 
in Tomb No. 5, Granary Burial Ground. 

He was ensign of the Artillery Company in 1759, lieutenant in 1760, and its captain 
in 1762. He held the office of hog-reeve in 1741 ; was elected constable in 1744, but 
declined to serve, and paid the fine; was fence-viewer for sixteen years, between 1743 
and 1765; surveyor of boards in 1755; warden in 1764 and 1 77 1, and visited the 
schools with the justices, selectmen, etc., July 4, 1770. 

Jonathan Lowder (1747). Authorities: Thoma9 Raymond (1747). Authorities: 

Boston Records; Descendants of Capt. Thomas Boston Records; W'yman's Charlestown Genealogies 

Brattle, by Edward Doubleday Harris. and Estates. 

Thoma9 March (1747). Authority : Boston Onesiphorus Tilestone (1747). Authority: 

Records. Boston Records. 



i 7 47] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 47 

"The petition of Capt. Onesiphorus Tileston [1747] and other tradesmen employed 
in repairing Faneuil Hall, praying that the town would grant them some relief on account 
of the length of time" their bills remained unpaid, was presented in town meeting Sept. 
12, 1765. A committee was appointed, which reported that the petitioners contracted 
" to wait until the money is raised by lottery." In the schedule of demands for said 
repairs, as given in town books, Capt. Tilestone's (1747) bill is one thousand two hun- 
dred and eighty-seven pounds six shillings and two pence. His mansion was in Purchase 
Street, opposite his wharf, which still bears his name. The inventory of his property 
includes his mansion, six hundred and thirty-three pounds six shillings and eight pence ; 
wharf and flats, etc , two thousand five hundred and thirty-three pounds six shillings and 
eight pence ; other real estate, tools, etc., making a total of four thousand one hundred 
and thirteen pounds and four shillings, lawful money. 

His son, Thomas Tilestone, a carpenter, was one of the guard over the tea ships on 
the night of Nov. 30, 1773. 

Josiah Waters (1747), painter, of Boston, son of Josiah and Mary Waters, of 
Woburn, was born July 2'6, 1721, and married, Aug. 25, 1743, Abigail Dawes, daughter 
of Dea. Thomas Dawes, and sister of William (1760) and Rebecca, who married William 
Homes (1747). She was an aunt of Sarah Dawes, who married Benjamin Goldthwait 
(1740). Capt. Josiah (1747) and Abigail (Dawes) Waters had three children, one of 
whom, Col. Josiah Waters, Jr., joined the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company 
in 1769. 

Capt. Waters (1747) joined the Old South Church July 19, 1741. Abigail, his wife, 
with her sister Rebecca and her brother William (1760), joined the Old South Church 
Feb. 8, 1735. Josiah (1747) an d his wife continued in active membership in that church 
until their decease. Both were active in church work, and were held in the highest 
esteem. Capt. Waters (1747) died suddenly, of apoplexy, Sept. 30, 1784, 1 and Mrs. 
Waters, born Jan. 13, 1721, died Nov. 22, 1816. The residence and place of business 
of Capt. Waters (1747) were in Ann Street. 

Capt. Waters (1747) was somewhat active in town matters, and, prior to his 
becoming engrossed in military affairs, held town office. He was a constable of Boston 
in 1740 and 1751, viewer of boards and shingles in 1746 and 1747, clerk of the market 
in 1753, i754> and 1763, and warden in 1772. He made a "general visitation" of the 
town, Feb. 18, 1766, and visited the public schools (when he is first called " Captain " 
in the Boston records) July 5, 1770. In 1776, he received one hundred and seventy 
pounds for repairs which he made on Faneuil Hall. 

He was also identified with the military. He was captain of a Boston company at 
the beginning of the Revolution, and Gen. Heath (1765), in his memoirs, names Capt. 
Josiah Waters (1747) as one of the officers who assisted Col. Richard Gridley in deter- 
mining and erecting the works about Boston in 1775. Capt. Waters (1747) was third 
sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1751 and 1754, ensign in 1760, lieutenant in 1763, 
and its captain in 1769. 

Josiah Waters (1747). Authorities: Hill's a kind father, an inflexible friend, a good member 

Hist, of Old South Church; Massachusetts Centinel, of society, and a worthy, honest man. A good 

1784; Boston Records. character after death is common enough: but the 

1 "Last Thursday [Sept. 30, 1784] evening propriety of this will not be disputed. Funeral Mon- 

died of an apoplectic fit, Josiah Waters, Esq., the day next from his dwelling house in Ann Street." — 

elder, of this town, aged 63. Six hours before his Massachusetts Centinel. 
death he was in good health. A tender husband, 



48 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 747 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1747 is as follows : — 

"1747. April 6th. The Company being under arms, voted, that the Rev. Mr. 
William Hobby be desired to preach the next Election Sermon, and that the field officers 
of the Regiment of the town of Boston, with the present commission officers of this 
Company be a committee to wait on him and desire the same. 

" May 8th. Friday. Last Monday proving foul weather, we by our Charter were 
obliged to appear this day, and being under arms, the Captain being one of the Com- 
mittee appointed to wait on the Rev. Mr. Hobby to desire him to preach the next 
Election Sermon, reported that he accepted the same. In the evening, it was voted, 
that what money is due for interest, that shall be received by the Treasurer, together 
with what shall be in the Clerk's hands, shall be applied for defraying the charge of the 
members dinner next Election day, and the balance that shall be left, shall be for the 
benefit of the commission officers, towards defraying the rest of the charge. 

"June 1st. The evening being spent at Capt. John Phillips' [1725], it was voted, 
That the old commission officers of this Company, and the new commission officers this 
day chosen, be a committee to wait on the Rev. Mr. Hobby, and return the thanks of 
this Company to him for his sermon preached this day. 

"September 7th. The evening being spent at Lieut Hugh McDaniels [1729], it 
was there voted, that the five hundred and thirty pounds, old tenor, in Col. Downe's 
[17 16] hands belonging to this Company be let out for the benefit thereof at the dis- 
cretion of the committee formerly appointed for that purpose. 

"October. At Lt. Thomas Edwards' [1724], the evening being spent there, voted, 
that it is the desire of this Company that every member of it appear upon training days 
with a gold laced hat on. Also, that the Standing Committee be impowered, if Mr. 
Holyoke [17 14] is not like soon to finish transcribing the Company's Books, to get it 
otherwise done." 

Rev. William Hobby, of Reading, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1747. 1 
He was a son of John Hobby, who was a brother of Sir Charles Hobby (1702), and was 
born Aug. 17, 1707. He graduated at Harvard College in 1725. In 1733, the town of 
Reading invited him to settle as minister of the First Parish at a salary of one hundred 
and twenty pounds. Mr. Hobby was ordained in that town in September, 1733. The 
bill of expenses of ordination (sixty-five pounds six shillings and one penny) includes 
one barrel of wine, — thirteen pounds and eight shillings. In 1741, Rev. Mr. Whitefield 
preached on Reading Common. Rev. Mr. Hobby went to hear him, and it is said he 
afterwards remarked, " that he went to pick a hole in Whitefield's coat, but that White- 
field picked a hole in his (Hobby's) heart." 

Tradition says he was a learned and pious man, an able writer and forceful speaker. 
He wore a big wig, large knee buckles, and other showy sacerdotal vestments, " espe- 
cially on the Sabbath, when he entered the temple of the Lord and ascended to the pulpit 
with dignity and majesty." He died, June 18, 1765, in Reading, after a ministry of 
thirty-two years. 

Rev. William Hobby. Authority: Eaton's ing from Psal. 78, 9, 10, and in the afternoon they 

Hist, of Reading. made choice of John Phillips Esq [1725] for their 

1 " Monday last [June I, 1747], being the An- Captain, Mr Hugh McDaniel [1729] Lieutenant 

niversary Day for electing of officers in the ancient and Mr. Thomas Edwards [1724] Ensign for the 

and honorable Company of this Province, they had ensuing year." — The Boston Evening Post, June 

a Sermon preach'd by the Rev. Mr. Hobby of Read- 8, 1747. 



1748] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 49 

q The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1748 were: John 

I 7A,Q, Carnes 1 (1733), captain; Jonathan Williams, Jr. (1729), lieutenant, and 

' I Samuel Pratt (1734), ensign. Jeremiah Belknap, Jr. (1745), was first 

sergeant; John West (1745), second sergeant; John Wendell, "Tertius" (1745), third 

sergeant; Samuel Swift (1746), fourth sergeant, and Caleb Phillips (1742), clerk. 

The first Bibles printed in America were printed about this time. It was a violation 
of law for any one to print Bibles in the colonies. It was therefore done secretly, and 
a false imprint was inserted. They were, however, printed by Kneeland & Green for 
Daniel Henchman (1712), who soon after issued a Testament. Col. Henchman (1712), 
in January, 1728, effected the organization of a company for paper making. His 
partners in the enterprise were Gillam Phillips (1714), Benjamin Faneuil, Thomas 
Hancock, and Henry Deering, son of Henry (1682). They were granted the exclusive 
right, by an act of the General Court, to this manufacture in the province for a term of 
fifteen years. Their paper mill, "believed to have been the first paper mill in this 
country," was situated in Milton, "below the bridge, on the Milton side of the river." 

So tenacious had the Artillery Company been of their privileges, that few instances 
are found of interference. April 1, 1748, was appointed for a town meeting in Boston; 
but, it appearing that that day was one of the charter field days, " the meeting was 
declared null and void, as being contrary to the Artillery charter." A similar instance 
" like to have occurred during the mayoralty of President Quincy, the warrant having 
been made out; but that efficient officer, discovering the coincidence," immediately 
countermanded it." 2 

The member of the Artillery Company recruited in 1748 was Edward Cowell, Jr. 

Edward Cowell, Jr. (1748), cooper, of Boston, son of Edward, married, (1) 
Dec. 5, 1 745, Hannah Martin, and, (2) Jan. 8, 1746-7, Susanna Gedney. 

He was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1751, and second sergeant in 
1753. He was chosen scavenger in 1749, and culler of staves, hoops, etc., in 1750 and 
1751, from 1755 to 1757 inclusive, 1760, and from 1763 to 1777 inclusive, — a service of 
more than twenty years. April 2, 1771, he was drawn as a juryman in town meeting, 
to serve at the April court. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1748 is as follows : — 

"April 1st, 1748. In the field, the Company being under arms, chose the Rev. 

Mr. Samuel Dunbar, of Stoughton, to preach the next Artillery Election Sermon ; & 

voted, the commission officers of this Company and the field of the Regiment, a 

committee to wait upon him and desire the same. 

" N. B. There was a Town Meeting called at Boston upon this day, which being 

contrary to the Artillery Charter was declared null and void. 

1 "To be Sold, for the Benefit of the Heirs, North Meeting-House. Also a young Negro Man 

having obtained Leave from the Great and General capable of any Business, a Marble Table, and a 

Court for that End, The Real Estate of John Carnes Mahogany ditto. Inquire of Arthur Savage in Ann- 

[1733], late of Boston, Esq; deceased; Consisting Street. 

of a Stone-House, with a good Garden; Two Brick " N. B. All that are indebted to said Estate, are 

Tenements and a large Shop, fronting Ann-Street, desired to make speedy Payment; and all to whom 

with a Blacksmith's Shop and several Stores back, the Estate is indebted, are desired to come and 

two good Wells of Water with Pumps, very con- receive their money." — Boston Gazette, July 21, 

venient for a Merchant or Shop keeper; also two 1 760. 

Tenements in Sun-Court, so called, near the Old 2 Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company. 



50 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 74 8 

"May 2d. At Sergeant Greenough's [1744], Voted, that seventy pounds, old tenor, 
be allowed the present commission officers next Artillery Election Day ; and seventy 
pounds to go towards defraying the soldiers' dinner on same day. The whole to be paid 
out of the interest money in the Treasurers hands & the money which shall be in the 
Clerk's hands next October. 

"June 6th. At Capt John Carnes's [1733], the evening being spent there, Voted, 
That the old commission officers of this Company, with the new commission officers this 
day chosen, be a committee to wait on the Rev. Mr. Samuel Dunbar, and return the 
thanks of this Company to him for his sermon preached this day. 

"September. The Artillery Company trained at Chelsea; the Ensign living there." 

Rev. Samuel Dunbar, of Stoughton, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1748. 
He was a son of John and Margaret (Holmes) Dunbar, and was born in Boston, Oct. 2, 
1704. He graduated at Harvard College in 1723, and was ordained pastor of the 
church in Stoughton (Canton), Nov. 15, 1727. He continued in this work until his 
decease, which occurred June 15, 1783, aged seventy-nine years. He" was a true patriot. 
In 1755, he was chaplain in the expedition to Crown Point, and he supported the 
colonial cause during the war of the Revolution. He lived to see the war close trium- 
phantly, and the return of peace. At the celebration held in Stoughton in honor of 
that event, June 2, 1783, he was present, and offered a public prayer. This was his last 
public service. 

" Mr. Bancroft speaks of his prayer at the Doty Tavern, in Canton, where the first 
Suffolk County Congress was held, in 1774. When the British fleet, under Lord Howe, 
was reported off the coast, meditating a descent on Boston, Mr. Dunbar prayed that 
God would ' put a bit in their mouths and jerk them about, send a strong northeast gale, 
and dash them to pieces on Cohasset Rock.' Again, in a season of great anxiety, he 
prayed that God would let the Redcoats return to the land whence they came, ' for Thou 
knowest, O God, that their room is better than their company.' " 

The following-named members of the Company are given in the record book as 
" Artillery soldiers under the fine of 6/ per diem for non-appearance " : — 

John Adams (r74o)," John Austin (1746), Thomas Baxter (1740), James Butler 
( 1 739)i Jonathan Cary (1740), Isaac Cazneau (1744), John Comrin (1744), Edward 
Cowell, Jr. (1748), John Dixwell (1741), Thomas Edes (1739), John Edwards (1747), 
John Franklin (1739), Joseph Gale (1744), Newman Greenough (1740), Thomas 
Greenough (1744), Alexander Hill (1746), John Hyland (1740), Thomas Johnson, Jr. 
(1742), Eneas Mackay (1745), John Nichols (1740), Caleb Phillips (1742), Joseph 
Sherburne (1745), William Simpkins (1739), Thomas Snow (1741), Samuel Swift 
(1746), John Wendell, Terts. (1745). John West (1745), John Wilson (1745), Kenelm 
Winslow, Jr. (1743). 

The above list was prepared probably in 1748-9. 

Rev. Samuel Dunbar, Authority: Huntoon's Hist, of Canton. 





&^f^uc^^°a / f^?^ ") 



i 7 49] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 5 1 

The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1749 were: Ebenezer 

I 7/1Q. Storer ( 1732), captain ; Joseph Jackson (1738), lieutenant; John Symmes 

' J C 1 733)) ensign. Joseph Gale (1744) was first sergeant; Joseph Sherburne 

(1745), second sergeant; Alexander Hill (1746), third sergeant; Thomas Lawlor 

(1746), fourth sergeant, and Samuel Swift (1746), clerk. 

The Artillery Company found themselves embarrassed by the assessors of Boston 
taxing the Company funds. Having reluctantly paid taxes for three years, they, by their 
committee, all venerable past commanders, petitioned the Legislature to direct their 
taxes to be refunded, and that in future their property should not be subject to taxation. 
This petition expresses much spirit in claiming their rights, and much patriotism in the 
public service. It was thereupon, "in Council, June 15, 1749, read and ordered, that 
the prayer of this petition be granted and that the aforesaid taxes, imposed on the 
Treasurer of the Artilleiy Company aforesaid, be remitted; and it is hereby declared 
that the donations made, or to be made, to said Company, shall be exempt from all 
taxes whatsoever, until this Court shall order otherwise." 

The member of the Artillery Company recruited in 1749 was William Moor. 

William Moor (1749), son of William and Mary (Dawes) Moor, of Boston, who 
were married March 28, 1728, was born in Boston, May 9, 1730. Mary Dawes (born 
Dec. 10, 1709) was a sister of William Dawes (1760). Mr. Moor (1749) married, 1 
July 10, 1759, Sarah Williston, of Boston. His mother, Mary (Dawes) Moor, united 
with the Old South Church April 16, 1727, and his father joined it Aug. 12, 1759. 
William, Jr. (1749), became a member of it Dec. 21, 1760. 

Dec. 14, 1764, William Moor (1749) became a member of Engine Company 
No. 8, Capt. Obadiah Curtis. He served as sergeant of the Fifth Company, First 
Massachusetts Regiment, in the Cape Breton expedition, under Sir William Pepperell. He 
was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and a member of the Society of the Cincinnati 
of Massachusetts. He was commissioned a second lieutenant in Col. Crane's regiment, 
Sept. 9, 1778, and served to the end of the war. Re-entering the service, he was 
commissioned a lieutenant May 1, 1787, and a lieutenant of artillery Sept. 29, 1789. 
He died in 1791, at the River St. Mary's, in Georgia, leaving no descendants. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1749 is as follows : — 
"April 3d, 1749. The Company being under arms, made choice of the Rev. Mr. 
Ellis Gray, of Boston, to preach the next Artillery Election Sermon ; and it was then 
Voted, that the commission officers of this Company, and the field officers of the Regi- 
ment, be a committee to wait on him and desire the same. 

"May 1st, 1749. The Company being under arms and the Capt. viz: Captain 
John Carnes [1733] being one of the committee appointed to wait on the Rev. Mr. 
Gray to desire him to preach the next Election Sermon, reported that he accepted the 
same. And, in the evening of said day, being at the house of Mr. John Wendell, Tertius 
[1745], it was then and there voted, that seventy pounds, in old tenor bills, so called, 
be allowed to the Captain and other officers to help defray the Artillery Election charges 
of dinner &c, said money to be paid out of the first interest and fines. 

William Moor (1749). Authorities: Boston 'A William More, of Boston, married Jane 

Records; Drake's Biog. Notices of the Cincinnati McCastleen, April 20, 4753. 
of Massachusetts. 



52 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 749 

"Province of 
" Massachusetts Bay. 
" To His Excellency William Shirley Esq. Captain General Governor and Commander 

in Chief in and over said Province : To the Honorable, His Majesty's Council & 

Hon'ble House of Representatives in General Court assembled at Boston on the 

last Wednesday in May 1749. 

"The petition of Jacob Wendell [1733], William Downe [1716], Daniel Hench- 
man [1712], John Wendell [1733] and John Phillips [1725], in behalf of the Artillery 
Company of the Massachusetts Bay Humbly sheweth That on the 24th day of April, 
A. D. 1638, the then General Assembly did incorporate the Military or Artillery Company 
of said Province, and did then grant unto said Company certain priviledges & immunities 
as per their Charter, and for their further encouragement the General Assembly have, at 
sundry times, made liberal donations unto them, as per Record may fully appear ; the 
main end and design of said Company being to advance and excel in Art Military, and 
to be a Nursery of good soldiers ; of all which this Province have had experience for 
more than a century of years, and from their first incorporation down to this day, strict 
military orders have always been duly observed and complied with, and the great charge 
attending the same has been, from time to time, cheerfully bourne by the respective 
officers and soldiers of the said Company, who are now ready upon any emergency, at 
the command of their Captain General. 

"Now, May it please Your Excellency & Honors; In consequence of those dona- 
tions, &c, and of the prudent management of said Company, they have a small annual 
income, but not amounting to near half of the publick and other necessary charges, which 
they are annually at : but so it is, May it please your Excellency and Honors, that the 
assessors of the town of Boston, in the conscientious discharge of the trust reposed in 
them, have for these three years past continued to tax the Treasurer of said Company to 
the amount of forty-five pounds, thirteen shillings and four pence, old tenor ; which your 
petitioners considering the great and heavy charge annually borne by said Company, 
look upon to be burthensome ; Wherefore, as this Company have ever been so happy as 
to have the countenance, aid & assistance of this Hon'ble Court, upon all occasions 
when applied to, & hope they have done nothing to incur their displeasure, are embol- 
dened humbly to pray your Excellency & Honors, who have a great sense of the absolute 
necessity of the Military Art being upheld and encouraged, that you would be pleased 
to direct & order the Assessors of the town of Boston to remit the taxes imposed as afore- 
said, the time of abatements for this year being lapsed notwithstanding, &c, that for the 
future, no tax be imposed on said Company ; or otherwise to relieve them in the premises 
as your Excellency and Honors shall deem meet ; and as in duty bound shall ever 
pray, &c. "Jacob Wendell, 

"William Downe, 
" Daniel Henchman 
"John Wendell 
" John Phillips 

" Committee for said Company. 

"In Council, June 15th, 1749. Read and ordered that the prayer of this petition 
be granted ; and that the aforementioned taxes, imposed on the Treasurer of the Artillery 
Company aforesaid be remitted. And it is hereby declared, that the donations made or 



, 749 j HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 53 

to be made to said Company, shall be exempt from all taxes whatsoever, until this court 
shall order otherwise. Sent down for concurrence. J. Willard, Secretary. 

" In the House of Representatives June 15, 1749. Read and Concurred. 

"J. Dwight, Speaker. 
"Consented to S Phips 
" Copy examined by Thomas Clark, Deputy Secretary. 

"June 5th. Voted, that the committee aforesaid, who waited on the Rev. Mr. Gray 
to desire him to preach on this anniversary, be also a committee to return him thanks 
in the name of this Company for his sermon this day preached: — this being done 
under arms. Attest. Samuel Swift, Clerk. 

" October 2d, 1749.' Capt. John Phillips [1725] was chosen Treasurer in the room 
of Col. William Downe [1716], who resigned that trust, and desired the Company would 
excuse him. They then voted, that the thanks of the Company be returned to Col. 
Downe [17 16] for his extraordinary trouble during the time of his being Treasurer. 
Also, voted, that the money paid by Mr. Collector White [1722], being about eight 
pounds, old tenor, be repaid by the Treasurer. Attest Sam'l Swift, Clerk." 

Rev. Ellis Gray, of Boston, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1749. His 
father was Edward Gray, of Boston, who came to America from Lancastershire, and in 
1686, a youth, was an apprentice as a rope-maker in Boston. Edward married, (1) in 
1699, Susanna Harrison, by whom he had several children, one being Harrison Gray, 
the distinguished loyalist and treasurer of the province. Edward married, (2) in 1714, 
Hannah Ellis, by whom he had, with others, Ellis Gray, born Sept. 7, 1715, who gradu- 
ated at Harvard College in 1734, and was ordained as colleague pastor at the New 
Brick Church, Sept. 27, 1738. He married, Sept. 20, 1739, Sarah Tyler, by whom he 
had one daughter and two sons. Mr. Gray retained this relation with the New Brick 
Church until his death, which occurred very suddenly, on Sunday, Jan. 7, 1753, in the 
thirty-seventh year of his age and the fifteenth of his ministry. His senior colleague, 
Rev. William Welsteed, who delivered the Artillery election sermon in 1729, survived 
Mr. Gray but four months. 

For Mr. Gray's funeral expenses eight hundred and sixty-eight pounds were 
subscribed j six hundred and fifty-three pounds were expended. Some of the items 
were: "Wine, rum, pipes, tobacco, ten pounds. Shoes and cloggs. Hose and gloves. 
Necklace for the' negro. A large beaver hat for Mr. Welsteed. Three ditto for Mr. 
Gray's two sons and negro. Fifteen candles. Black shoe buckles. A light gray bob 
wig for Mr. Welsteed. Tolling six bells," etc. 

Rev. Chandler Robbins, in the history of the Second Church, Boston, says of Mr. 
Gray, " He was honest and firm in his principles, kind and obliging to all, and univer- 
sally respected by the friends of piety and virtue." 

' As. evidence that the record written in 1680, erased, and, as there was not room enough left on 

and the transcript written in 1743, are still in the that page for the correction, he wrote it out in full 

possession of the Company, it may be stated that in the transcript. 

this record of 1749 is given in the original book The original book, subsequent to 1680, was 

(1680), except that part referring to Oct. 2, 1749, continued as an original record book until its pages 

which is given in the transcript (1743) in Mr. were full, and the transcript was also continued. 

Swift's (1 746) handwriting. He evidently made an The transcript of 1743, when first written, ended 

error in the original, as the last two lines have been with June, 1749. 



54 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7S o 

The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1750 were: Hugh 
[ 7 CQ. McDaniel (1729), captain ; Thomas Edwards (1724), lieutenant ; John Ben- 
* ^ nett (1734), ensign. John Comrin (1744) was first sergeant; John Wilson 
(1745), second sergeant; Jonathan Lovvder (1747), third sergeant; Thomas Ray- 
mond (1747), fourth sergeant, and Samuel Swift (1746), clerk. 

May 15, 1750, "the town entered upon the consideration of the petitions of 
Messrs. Joseph White [1722], John Staniford, and William Larrabee, praying they may 
be abated the taxes they had paid for Harvard College and the Artillery Company, as 
the same were remitted by the General Court," etc. The taxes were abated by the town. 
At the same meeting, Abiel Walley (1710) was chosen chairman of a committee to 
memorialize the Great and General Court, praying them to repeal the law lately passed 
laying a duty on " tea, coffee, coaches, chaires," etc. 

Joseph Wadsworth, Esq., for many years town treasurer, having declined to serve 
longer, his accounts were settled by Capt. John Wheelwright (1714). The town there- 
fore voted, " that the thanks of the town be, and hereby is, given to the Hon. John 
Wheelwright [ 1 714] for his great Pains, Care and Labour in Settling the Accompts of 
the late Treasurer Wadsworth and transferring them into new Books." 

In 1750, the colonial troops returned in triumph from the capture of Louisburg, 
which was, in fact, an anti-Catholic crusade. The French had failed to restore Charles 
Edward to the British throne, and the supremacy of the Church of Rome upon British 
soil was at an end. The struggle was then transferred to America, and the Protestant 
troops went to capture the stronghold of France under a flag for which the Rev. George 
Whitefield had furnished the motto : "Nil desperandum Chris to duce." The French, 
whose possessions extended from Louisburg around by the banks of the St. Lawrence, 
the Great Lakes, and the Mississippi to New Orleans, had to retire in defeat. It was in 
these French wars, as they are called, that the Massachusetts officers became trained 
soldiers, displaying their indomitable bravery, unfaltering energy, personal courage and 
ability, and were prepared, a few years later, to enter upon the task of securing the 
independence of the colonies. 

The journal of Capt. Francis Goelet' contains an account of his travels and voyages 
from 1746 to 1758. During his second voyage from New York to London in 1750, in 
the ship "Tartar Galley," he encountered a severe storm, which so disabled the ship that 
he was compelled to put into the port of Boston for repairs. Here he remained from 
Sept. 29 to Nov. 7, 1750, in the meanwhile visiting Salem and Marblehead. In the 
extract printed in the "New England Historical and Genealogical Register" for January, 
1870, there are, as given by him, minute accounts of his business and pleasure. He 
reveals a phase of Boston life not generally associated with our Puritan fathers. The 
society in which he became intimate seems to have been principally composed of mem- 
bers of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company. He repeatedly mentions Jacob 
Wendell (1733), Abraham and John (1733) Wendell, and "Nat." Cunningham (1720). 
The following is one military allusion : — 

"Boston, October n, 1750. After breakfast, went with Mr. Nat. Cunningham 
[1720] to the Commons to see the training, which consisted of twelve companies of foot, 
and three companies of horse ; from thence they marched into King Street, exercised 
their Horse and Foot, firing several vollies. We went in the Towne House facing the 

1 "The Voyages and Travels of Francis Goelel, of the City of New York, Merch't." 



I7SO] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 55 

street and in the Council Chamber where was the President, Governor and Council, from 
thence to Capt Wendell's [1733] entertainment, where dynd," etc. 

This part of his journal is concluded with a short description of Boston, " the 
metropolis of North America," in which Mr. Goelet describes Faneuil Hall and the Old 
State House as follows : — 

"They have but One Markett [Faneuil Hall] which is all Built of Brick about 
Eighty Foot Long and Arch'd on Both Sides being Two Stories heigh the upper part 
Sashd which Comprehends Several [of] The Publick Offices [of] the Towne, at the 
Southermost End is the Naval Office, the Middle the Surveyars the Marketts offices. 
They have Also a Town House [Old State House] Built of Brick, Situated in Kings 
Street, Its a very Grand Brick Building Arch'd all Round and Two Storie Heigh, Sash'd 
above, its Lower Part is always Open Designd as a Change, tho the Merchants in Fair 
Weather make their Change in the Open Street at the Eastermost End, in the upper 
Story are the Councill and Assembly Chambers, &c, it has a Neat Cupulo, Sashd all round 
and which on rejoicing days is Elluminated." 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1750 were: John Leverett, 
Thomas Newman, and Isaac Royall. 

John Leverett (1750), merchant, of Boston, son of Knight Leverett (1729) and 
grandson of Thomas Leverett (1703), was born Jan. 28, 1726-7. His grandfather was a 
brother of Hon. John Leverett (1704), president of Harvard College. Thomas (1703) 
and John (1704) were sons of Hudson Leverett (1658) and grandsons of Gov. John 
Leverett (1639). The last-named was an only son of Thomas Leverett, the emigrant, 
and ruling elder of the First Church, Boston. 

John Leverett (1750) was chosen clerk of the market of Boston in 1752, 1753, an d 
1757; scavenger from' 1 761 to 1763 inclusive; warden in 1766; purchaser of grain in 
1764 and from 1771 to 1776 inclusive, and overseer of the poor from 1767 to 1776 
inclusive. Nov. 8, 1776, it was unanimously voted by the town, " that the thanks of the 
town be and hereby are given to John Leverett, Esq. [1750], for his faithful services as 
overseer of the poor, a number of years past." In the town records he is called "Cap- 
tain" in 1761, "Esquire" in 1762, and "Colonel" in 1768. The last public service he 
rendered was during the days of suffering in the town, in 1776, when he was chosen, 
Nov. 8, one of a committee of seven, " to purchase necessary articles and dispose of the 
same for the relief of the poor inhabitants." 

John Leverett (1750) became a member of the First Lodge, A. F. and A. M., in 
Boston, Oct. n, 1749, and in 1758 was master of that lodge. He received the master's 
degree in the Masters' Lodge, Boston, in 1750. He appeared in St. John's Grand Lodge 
as junior warden of the First Lodge, July 13, 1750; as senior warden in 1 75 1, and the 
same year as junior warden of the Masters' Lodge. In 1752 he was grand secretary of 
St. John's Grand Lodge, and held that office for nine years. 

He was lieutenant-colonel of the Boston regiment in 1772, afterwards colonel, and 
resigned in 1773. He served as second sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1752, clerk 
from 1752 to 1754 inclusive, and first sergeant in 1753. 

Col. John Leverett (1750) married Mary Greenleaf. He died, June 10, 1777, at 
Middletown, Conn., "where there is a stone inscribed to his memory." 

John Leverett (1750). Authorities: Boston Records; New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 1850; 
Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 1842. 



56 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [ I75 o 

Thomas Newman (175°). of Boston, son of Thomas and Hannah Newman, was 
born in Boston, Sept. 30, 1724. He held town office in 1745 and 1746 ; also was a clerk 
of the market in 1747, 1749, and 1750. His name does not appear afterward on the 
town records. 

There was a Thomas Newman in Boston who in 1732 married Mary, daughter of 
Peter Thomas, of Boston. Whether Thomas, senior, was twice married, is uncertain. 
Thomas and Hannah Newman, so far as appears by the Boston Records, had but one 
child, as above. Thomas Newman, the husband of Mary Thomas, was lost at sea about 
1754. They were the parents of Thomas C. Newman, who went to England in 1747 to 
finish his education ; of John, who became the organist of Christ Church, Boston, and of 
Robert, who became the sexton of the same church, and to whom is attributed the 
exploit of giving the signal of the lanterns from the church steeple to Paul Revere, 
April 18, 1775. 

Thomas Newman (1750)— without doubt the same person who joined the Artillery 
Company in 1750 — appears prominent in Masonic affairs from 1750 to 1752. He was 
junior warden of the Third Lodge in Boston in 1751, and senior warden in 1752. He 
held the office of grand steward in December, 1750; was one of the petitioners in 1751 
for the extension of Grand Master Oxnard's authority over all North America, and was a 
member of the Master's Lodge. His name does not occur in the records after 1752. 

Isaac Royall (175°). merchant, of Medford, son of Isaac and Elizabeth (Eliot) 
Royall, was born in Antiqua in 17 19. His father returned to Medford in 1737, having 
purchased of the widow of Lieut.-Gov. John Usher (1673) a tract of more than five 
hundred acres of land in that town, and he died June 7, 1739. The son inherited the 
father's title, and also fixed his residence in the house now standing in Medford, and 
which is yet called the " Royall House." It was originally the mansion of John Usher 
(1673), but was enlarged and altered into its present form by Gen. Royall (1750), who 
married, March 27, 1738, Elizabeth Mcintosh, and had four children, the first of whom 
was born in 1741. The third child, Elizabeth, married William Pepperell Sparhawk, 
whose mother was the only daughter of Sir William Pepperell, and who took his grand- 
father's name on succeeding to his title and estate. The residence of Gen. Royall 
(1750) was at first within the limits of Charlestown, and he was chosen representative 
of that town in the General Court from 1743 to 1752. In the latter year, he became a 
member of the Council, and held that office for twenty-two years. 

" Hon. Isaac Royall [1750], of Medford, was remarked by every one for his timidity. 
He halted between two opinions respecting the Revolution until the cannonading at 
Lexington drove him to Newburyport, and thence to Halifax, and, after living some time 
in retirement, he embarked for Europe. He was a proscribed refugee, and his estate, 
since that of Jacob Tidd, Esq., was confiscated. He died of small-pox, in England, 
October, 1781. His bounty laid the first professorship of law at Cambridge, and a 
legacy of plate to the first church in Medford shows that his regard for his country was 
not weakened by distance nor seared by proscription. He bequeathed more than two 
thousand acres of land in Granby and Royalston, in Worcester County, for the establish- 

Thomas Newman (1750). Authorities: Isaac Royall (1750). Authorities: Cur- 

Boston Records; Porter's Rambles in Old Boston, wen's Journal and Letters; Histories of Medford 
New England; Records of St. John's Grand Lodge. by Mr. Brooks and Mr. Usher; Sabine's American 

Loyalists. 



i 75 o] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 57 

ment of the aforesaid professorship. He was for twenty-two years a member of the 
Council. His virtues and popularity at first saved his estate, and his name was not 
included with those of his sons-in-law — Sir William Pepperell and George Erving — in 
the Conspirators Act; but, on the representation of the selectmen of Medford 'that 
he went voluntarily to our enemies,' his property was forfeited and taken under the Con- 
fiscation Act. In 1805-6, the Legislature released the estates to the heirs for sixteen 
thousand pounds sterling. He made bequests to Medford and Worcester, and legacies 
to the clergymen. While a member of the House of Representatives he presented the 
chandelier which adorns its hall." 

In 1743, he gave Charlestown one hundred pounds, which was used to build a 
parsonage. While representative, he returned to the town treasury his salary, and in 
1745 gave eighty pounds to the school on Charlestown Neck. He gave to Medford one 
hundred acres of land in Granby, "for the use and better support" of the common 
schools of that town. 

The Royall Professorship of Law was established at Harvard College in 1815, the 
Royall Fund having been accumulating for that purpose for thirty-five years. Jan. 24, 
1764, when Harvard Hall and the college library were destroyed by fire, he contributed 
liberally for the restoration of both. The history of Medford contains a full and admi- 
rable sketch of Gen. Royall (1750) : — 

"Generosity was native with him, and shone the salient feature of his character. 
He loved to give, and loved to speak of it, and loved the reputation of it. Hospitality, 
too, was almost a passion with him. No house in the colony was more open to friends; 
no gentleman gave better dinners, or drank costlier wines. As a master, he was kind to 
his slaves, charitable to the poor, and friendly to everybody. He kept a daily journal, 
minutely descriptive of every visitor, topic, and incident, and even descending to record- 
ing what slippers he wore, how much tar-water he drank, and when he went to bed. He 
was a strict observer of religious forms, and a generous supporter of Christian institutions. 
He was a Tory against his will. It was the frailty of his blood more than the fault of his 
judgment : not that he loved the colonies less, but that he feared England more. He 
wanted that unbending hickory toughness which the times required." 

He was appointed a brigadier-general in 1761, "being the first of that title among 
Americans." He never held any office in the Artillery Company. His wife, Elizabeth, 
died at Medford, July 14, 1770, and was buried in Dorchester, Mass. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1750 is as follows: — 

"April 2d, 1750. The Company, being under Arrhs, made choice of the Rev. Mr. 
Andrew Eliot of Boston to preach the next Artillery Election Sermon, and it was then 
voted, that the present Commission officers of this Company, together with the Field 
officers of the Regiment of the town of Boston, be a Committee to wait on him and 
request the same. It was there voted, that all fines for the future arising in the Com- 
pany be in lawful money. Also voted, that the Clerk of this Company be paid the sum 
of four pounds lawful money for transcribing this Book, 1 and for his preferring a Petition 
to the Great and General Court of this Province for the removing or abating certain taxes 
heretofore imposed on this Company, and that they should be exempted from all taxes 
for the future ; the prayer of which Petition was granted. 

"N.B. At Lt. Joseph Jackson's [1738]. Attest Samuel Swiff, Clerk. 

1 "This book" can mean none but the original book of 1680. 



58 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7S , 

" May 7th, 1750. It was Voted that the sum of nine pounds, six shillings and eight 
pence, lawful money, be allowed to the Captain and other officers towards defraying the 
charges of the dinner &c, upon the ensuing Artillery Election day. Capt Ebenezer 
Storer [1732], being one of the committee to wait on the Rev. Mr. Andrew Eliot, to 
desire him to preach the next Artillery Election Sermon reported to the Company that 
he had accepted the same. 

"June. For which he had the usual thanks. 

"Attest Samuel Swift, Clerk." 

Rev. Andrew Eliot, of Boston, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1750. He 
was a son of Andrew and Ruth (Symonds) Eliot, of Boston, and was born Dec. 25, 1719. 
He attended the Boston Latin School, and graduated at Harvard College in 1737. He 
studied for the ministry, and, in August, 1741, began preaching at the New North 
Church as a candidate for settlement with Rev. Mr. Webb. The church, in January, 
1742, gave him a call to settle as colleague, which he accepted, and was ordained the 
14th of April following. He held this position until the decease of Mr. Webb, April, 
1750, when Mr. Eliot had the sole pastoral charge. In 1765, he was chosen a member 
of the Corporation of Harvard College; in 1769, he was solicited to be a candidate for 
the presidency of that institution, but he declined. In 1773, he was chosen to that 
office, but also declined. Though a devoted friend of the colonial cause, he remained in 
Boston during the siege, and cared for that portion of his congregation which remained 
in the city. He died Sept. 13, 1778, aged fifty-nine years. 



The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1751 were: Jonathan 

I 7 C I . Williams (Jr.) (1729), captain ; John Salter (1727), lieutenant ; John Welch 

( I 73 6 )> ensign. Thomas March (1747) was first sergeant; John Edwards 

(1747), second sergeant; Josiah Waters (1747),' third sergeant; Edward Cowell, Jr. 

(1748), fourth sergeant, and Samuel Swift (1746), clerk. 

By an act of the province, a lottery was authorized " for supplying the Treasury with 
26,700 milled dollars." The Hon. Samuel Watts (1733) was the chief manager of it. 
He had his office in Faneuil Hall, where the lottery was drawn. 

Fourtee7ith Foot. — The uniform of this regiment at this period was black, three- 
cornered cocked hats, bound With white lace ; scarlet coats, faced with yellow, yellow 
cuffs, and white lace ; scarlet waistcoats and breeches ; white gaiters and white cravats ; 
buff belts and buff pouches. The drummers wore buff-coats, faced with scarlet. The 
grenadiers wore cloth caps with a king's cipher and crown in front, the " white horse " 
with the motto, "Nee aspera terrent" on the flap, and the number of the regiment 
behind. 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1 75 1 were: Nathaniel Baker, 
John Bridge, John Coburn, Daniel Gookin, Thomas Hubbard. 

Rev. Andrew Eliot. Authorities: Sprague's " Last Thursday evening [Oct. 17, 175 1] Major 

Annals; Hist. Notices of the New North Church; John Wendell [1735] was married to Mrs. Mary 
Eliot's and Allen's Biog. Diets.; Thacher's Funeral Skinner, a widow gentlewoman of great merit with 
Sermon; Mem. Hist, of Boston. a very large fortune." — Boston Evening Post, Oct. 

21, I75 1 - 



i 7S i] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 59 

Nathaniel Baker ( 175 1 ), of Boston, son of John and Mary Baker, was born Feb. 7, 

1722, and was published, June 12, 1745, to marry Susanna Dorr. 

He was chosen scavenger from Ward 1, March 14, 1768, which seems to be the 
only town office he ever held, and was first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1756. 

John Bridge (1751), blacksmith, of Boston, son of Ebenezer (1717) and Mary 
(Roberts) Bridge, and nephew of Benjamin Bridge (17 11), was born in Boston, July 21, 

1723. He was a brother of Rev. Ebenezer Bridge, who delivered the anniversary sermon 
before the Company in 1752. 

John Bridge (1751) was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1752. He 
was ensign of the Ninth Company of the First Massachusetts Regiment in the Cape 
Breton expedition under Sir William Pepperell. He served as constable of Boston in 
1752 ; was re-elected March 12, 1753, but excused, and was elected again March 23, 
1753, and sworn. 

John Coburn (1751), goldsmith, of Boston, was born in 1725. He was elected a 
constable of Boston, March 12, 1753, but refused to serve, and paid the fine. March 9, 
1772, he was chosen a warden, and, Aug. 26, 1776, he was one of the thirty-six persons 
selected to take a census of the town. 

John Coburn ( 175 1 ) advertised in the Boston Gazette of August, 1776, "that he 
had removed into Boston again and carries on the goldsmith's business at his shop on 
King Street opposite to the American Coffee House." Mr. Coburn (1751) was third 
sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1752. He died Jan. 21, 1803, aged seventy-eight 
years, and was buried from his home, No. 29 Federal Street. 

Daniel Gookin (1751) was a bookseller in Boston. His place of business was "over 
against the Old South." He was a descendant of Gen. Daniel Gookin (1645), one of 
the first appointed licensers of the press, viz., in the year 1662. Mr. Gookin (1751) 
was not largely engaged in trade. His shop was "the next door north of the house built 
for the residence of the royal governors, and now belonging to the state." ' He died 
Jan. 3, 1752, after an illness of only two days. 

Thomas Hubbard (1751), of Boston, was probably the same Thomas Hubbard who 
joined the Artillery Company in 1732. 2 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1751 is as follows : — 
"April 1st, 1751. The Company being under Arms, made choice of the Rev. 
Samuel Cooper of Boston, by a unanimous vote, to preach the next Artillery Election 
Sermon, and it was then voted, that the present Commission Officers of the Artillery 
Company, and the Field officers of the Regiment of the town of Boston, together with 
John Phillips, Esq. [1725] Treasurer of said Company, be a committee to wait on him 
and request the same. Attest Samuel Swift, Clerk. 

"May 6th, 1751. Capt Hugh McDaniel [1729], being one of the committee to 
wait on the Rev. Mr. Samuel Cooper to desire him to preach the next Artillery Election 
Sermon, reported to the Company that he had accepted the same. And in the evening 

Nathaniel Baker (1751). Authority: Bos- ' Thomas's Hist, of Printing, 

ton Records. 2 See obituary of Hon. Thomas Hubbard (1751) 

John Bridge (1751). Authorities: Boston in New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 1893, p. 480, 

Records; New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 1870. taken from the Massachusetts Gazette, July 26, 1773. 



60 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 752 

of the same day, it was voted, that the sum of nine pounds six shillings and eight pence, 
lawful money be allowed the Captain and other the Commission Officers, towards defray- 
ing the charges of the dinner, &c, upon the ensuing Artillery Election day, and the 
further sum of four pounds, like money, was then voted toward defraying the charges of 
the Company's dinner, &c. : the said evening being spent at the house of Sergt Ray- 
mond [1747]- Attest Samuel Swift, Clerk. 

"June 4th. Voted, that the committee, who waited upon the Rev. Mr. Samuel 
Cooper to desire him to preach on this Anniversary, return the thanks of this Company 
to him for his Sermon this day preached : this being done under Arms. 

"Attest Samuel Swift, Clerk." 

Rev. Samuel Cooper, of Boston, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1751. 1 
He was the second son of Rev. William Cooper, of Boston, who delivered the Artillery 
election sermon in 1722. Rev. Samuel Cooper was born March 25, 1725. He attended 
the Boston Latin School, and graduated at Harvard College in 1743. He pursued the 
study of theology, and was invited, Dec. 31, 1744, to settle over Brattle Street Church 
(where his father had preached) as colleague with Rev. Dr. Colman, who delivered the 
Artillery election sermons in 1702 and 1738. Mr. Cooper accepted the invitation, but 
was not ordained until May 21, 1746. The University of Edinburgh presented him with 
a diploma of doctor of divinity in 1767. "He was wellnigh unrivalled in the pulpit 
during the period in which he lived." 

In 1774, he was elected president of Harvard College, but declined. He was a 
devoted patriot, and contributed many effective articles to the Boston Gazette. The 
celebrated letters of Hutchinson, which caused so much excitement when printed, were 
first transmitted to him that he might read them himself. He left Boston before the 
battle of Lexington, and his meeting-house, from April, 1775, to March, 1776, was used 
as barracks by the British. He was active in the Society for the Propagation of the 
Gospel among the Indians ; was vice-president of the American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences, and, " in everything that promised to bless his country or his race, he was ready 
to enlist with others in a cordial co-operation." He died Dec. 23, 1783. 



The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1752 were: Joseph 

I7C2. Jackson (1738), captain; John Symmes (1733), lieutenant ; Thomas Sav- 

■ ^ age (1739)) ensign. William Homes (1747) was first sergeant; John Lev- 

erett (1750), second sergeant; John Coburn (1751), third sergeant; John Bridge 

(1751), fourth sergeant, and John Leverett (1750), clerk. 

Rev. Samuel Cooper. Authorities: Pal- yourselves to the Service of your Country, and to be 

frey's Hist, of Brattle Street Church; Sprague's industrious in acquiring those military Accomplish- 

Annals, Vol. I., p. 440; Clarke's Funeral Sermon; ments, by which, without any View of raising your 

Mem. Hist, of Boston, Vols. II. and III. private Fortunes in this Way, you may be qualified 

"' Extract from the sermon of Rev. Samuel to act, as Guardians of the Community to which you 

Cooper, " preached to the Ancient and Honourable belong. 

Artillery Company in Boston, New-England, June "Such an Institution is truly noble, and a 

3, 1751": — standing Proof of the Heroic Ardor, and public 

" I must . . . draw to a Close, Yet not without Spirit, which warmed the Breasts of our Ancestors, 
addressing myself to you Gentlemen of the Artillery, the first Settlers of this Country. You will there- 
at whose Invitation we are now assembled in the fore think yourselves obliged to observe ihe original 
House of Worship. Design of your Institution; and cultivate that gen- 

" Your ancient Company justly bears the Title erous Fortitude you profess." 
of Honorable, inasmuch as you profess to devote 




w 





^ 



<7?V> 



, 75 2] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 6 1 

The anticipated outbreaks of the Indians were quieted by pacific measures. Com- 
missioners to treat with the Indians were appointed in 1752 and 1753. The first board 
was composed of Jacob Wendell (1733), Samuel Watts (1733), Thomas Hubbard (1732), 
and Chambers Russell. The commissioners in 1753 were, Sir William Pepperell, Jacob 
Wendell (1733), Thomas Hubbard (1732), John Winslow (1764), and James Bowdoin. 
These commissioners met the chiefs of the Eastern Indians at Fort St. George, Me. 

In 1752 there was but one addition to the ranks of the Artillery Company. The 
Company felt the depressed condition of affairs as they are represented by the town to 
the governor, May 22, 1752. They said, "There is at present a prevailing, contagious 
and mortal sickness" ; "expense of sickness, one hundred thousand pounds old tenor" ; 
" one thousand people moved out of town " ; " ship-building at a stand-still " ; " six still- 
houses wholly unoccupied, and not any steadily employed " ; " European trade gone to 
Marblehead and elsewhere," and other circumstances, had a harmful effect upon the 
foreign and domestic business of Boston. The Atrillery Company shared the depression. 

The calendar was changed this year from the Julian to the Gregorian system of 
computation by act of parliament, which ordained that, after the last day of December, 
1751, the year should cease to be counted as beginning on the 21st of March, but the 
first day of January should be taken to be the first day of the year of our Lord 1752, and 
so on, " and that all acts, deeds, writings, notes, and other instruments of what nature or 
kind soever, which should be made, executed, or signed upon or after the said 1st of 
January, 1752, should bear date according to the new method of computation." This 
change did away with the double style of designation employed in the dates of events 
happening in January, February, and March of preceding years. The rectification was 
made in the calendar by taking eleven days from it, calling the 3d of September the 
14th, so that month, in 1752, had only nineteen days in it. The king's birthday was, 
therefore, placed forward from Oct. 30 to Nov. 9. The dates in this work, previous to 
the year 1752, have been intended to be in accordance with the old style. 

The member of the Artillery Company recruited in 1752 was Samuel Torrey, Jr. 

Samuel Torrey, Jr. (1752), merchant, of Boston, son of Samuel and Abigail Torrey, 
of Boston, was born May 24, 1731. He married, (1) July 12, 1753, Abigail Cowell ; 
and, (2) Oct. 3, 1765, Mehitable Kneeland. He was fourth sergeant of the Artillery 
Company in 1753, clerk from 1755 to 1757 inclusive, and ensign in 1765 He united 
with the Old South Church, Feb. 23, 1755. He was of the fourth generation from Capt. 
William Torrey (1641), of Weymouth. He died Nov. 18, 1768, and administration on 
his estate was granted on the seventh day of December next following. His widow (born 
March 23, 1737) married Capt. John Simpkins (1769), of Boston. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1752 is as follows : — 
"May 6 th 1752. The Company being under Arms, made choice of the Rev. Mr. 
Ebenezer Bridge, of Chelmsford to preach the next Artillery Election Sermon ; and it 
was then voted, that the commission officers of this Company, together with John 
Phillips Esq. [1725], the Treasurer of said Company, be a committee to wait on him 
and request the same. 

"May — 1752. Capt Jonathan Williams, Jr [1729], being one of the committee 
to wait on the Rev. Mr. Ebenezer Bridge to desire him to preach the next Artillery Elec- 

Samuel Torrey, Jr. (1752). Authority: Boston Records. 



62 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [1752 

tion Sermon, reported to the Company that he accepted. Also voted, that the sum of 
thirteen pounds, six shillings and eight pence, lawful money, be allowed out of the Com- 
pany's interest money, towards defraying the charges of the dinner &c of said Company 
on the ensuing Artillery Election. Attest. Samuel Swift, Clerk. 

"June ist 1752. Voted, that Capt Jonathan Williams, Jr [1729] Lt John Salter 
[1727], En. John Welch [1736] and the Treasurer, John Phillips Esq. [1725], be a 
committee to settle the Clerks accounts. Attest, Samuel Swift, Clerk. 

"June ist, 1752. The Company being under Arms, it was Voted, that the old com- 
mission officers, and the new commission officers this day chosen, together with the Field 
Officers of the Regiment of the town of Boston, be a committee to wait on the Rev. Mr. 
Ebenezer Bridge, and return the thanks of this Company for his sermon preached this 
day. The Company being under Arms, it was Voted, that the above committee return 
the thanks of this Company to Mr. Samuel Swift [1746] the former Clerk for his past 
services. Attest, John Leverett, Clerk. 

"October 2'd 1752. The evening being spent at Lt John Symmes [1733] ; Voted, 
that the present commission officers of the Company, viz : Capt. Joseph Jackson [173S] ; 
Lt John Symmes [1733], & En. Thomas Savage [1739], together with Mr Samuel Swift 
[1746], the former Clerk, and John Leverett [1750], the present Clerk, be a committee 
to do what they shall think proper with regard to the fines due to the Company, and, if 
need be, to sue for and recover the same and to regulate the list. 

"Attest, John Leverett, Clerk" 

Rev. Ebenezer Bridge, of Chelmsford, delivered the Artillery election sermon in 
1752. He was a son of Ebenezer ( 1 7 1 7) and Mary (Roberts) Bridge, a nephew of 
Benjamin (1711), a brother of John (1751), and was born in Boston in 1714. He 
attended the Boston public schools, graduated at Harvard College in 1736, and the 
following year taught school in Plymouth, Mass. Subsequently, he pursued theological 
studies under the direction of Rev. Mr. Welstead, of Boston, and was called, Dec. 30, 
1740, to minister to the church at Chelmsford, Mass. The invitation was accepted, and 
he was ordained over that parish May 20, 1741. In October next following, he married 
(1) Miss Sarah Stoddard, and, after her decease, he married, (2) in 1791, Mrs. Joanna 
Abbot, widow of Rev. Nehemiah Abbot. Rev. Mr. Bridge delivered the general election 
sermon, May 27, 1767. His son, Ebenezer Bridge, born April 29, 1744 (H. C, 1764), 
was colonel of the Twenty-Seventh Regiment of Minute-Men, which he commanded at 
the battle of Bunker Hill. 

"The altar, and he that ministered at it, grew old together, and were ready to be 
dissolved. The second meeting-house had stood eighty years, when it was taken down. 
So the clayey tabernacle of him who officiated in it more than fifty-one years was dis- 
solved, Oct. 1, 1792." 

Rev. Ebenezer Bridge. Authorities: Allen's Hist, of Chelmsford; Sprague's Annals of American 
Pulpit. 



: 753 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 63 

The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1753 were: Thomas 

[ V C9 Edwards (1724), captain ; Samuel Pratt ( 1734), lieutenant ; Thomas Drowne 

I U U (1737), ensign. John Leverett (1750) was first sergeant; Edward Co we 11, 

Jr. (1748), second sergeant; John Austin (1746), third sergeant; Samuel Torrey, Jr. 

(1752), fourth sergeant, and John Leverett (1750), clerk. 

Feb. 7, 1753, a destructive fire occurred near Marlborough (now Washington) Street. 
It consumed several dwellings and a blacksmith shop, the latter the property of Capt. 
Samuel Sellon (1765). 

May 15, 1753, a committee appointed March 23 to petition the General Court for 
relief from various burdens said, in summing up their report: "The Removal of ship- 
building, sinking of the distillery & Sugar Works here, the killing the Meat and Manu- 
facturing the Hides and Skins out of Town, have thinned Our Numbers above a Thousand 
Rateable Men, carried from us many of Our most Industrious, frugal, and provident 
Inhabitants, who have left us a number of thoughtless, Idle and Sottish Persons, who 
have come to be the charge and burthen of the Town, Insomuch, that the Poor's Tax 
has risen, in a few Years, from about a Thousand or Fifteen hundred Pounds Old Tenor 
to above Ten Thousand Pounds a year." This condition of things necessarily affected 
the prosperity of the Artillery Company. 

There were no admissions to the Artillery Company in 1753. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1753 is as follows : — 

"April 2d 1753. The Company being under Arms, Voted unanimously, That the 
Rev. Mr. Samuel Cooke of Anotomy be desired to preach the next Artillery Election 
Sermon, and that the present commission officers of the Company, Capt Joseph Jackson 
[1738], Lt John Symmes [1733], & Ens. Thomas Savage [1739] an ^ J onn Phillips, Esq. 
[1725], Treasurer of the Company, together with the field officers of the Regiment of 
the Town of Boston, be a committee to wait on him and desire the same. 

"Attest, John Leverett, Clerk. 

"May 7th 1753. The Company being under Arms, Lt John Symmes [1733], being 
one of the committee to wait upon the Rev. Mr. Samuel Cooke, to desire him to preach 
the next Artillery Election Sermon, reported to the Company, that he had accepted the 
same. The evening being spent at Sergt Bridges [175 1], it was Voted, That thirteen 
pounds, six shillings and eight pence, lawful money, be paid by the Treasurer of the 
Company to the Commission Officers towards defraying the charges of the dinner upon 
the ensuing Election day, and the Company to dine with them. 

"Attest John Leverett, Clerk. 

" June 4th. The Company being under Arms, it was Voted, That the old Commis- 
sion Officers, and the new Commission Officers this day chosen, with the Field Officers 
of the Regiment of the Town of Boston, be a committee to wait on the Rev. Mr. Samuel 
Cooke and return him the thanks of this Company for his sermon preached this day. 

"Attest, John Leverett, Clerk." 

Rev. Samuel Cooke, of Cambridge, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1753. 
He was a grandson of Aaron Cooke, of Hadley, and was born iu that town in 1708. He 
graduated at Harvard College in 1735, ar *d was ordained at Menotomy, Sept. 12, 1739, 

Rev. Samuel Cooke. Authority: Paige's Hist, of Cambridge. 



6 4 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [-,« 

where he died, June 4, 1783. He married (1) Sarah Porter, of Hadley (published Aug. 
29, 1740), who died Aug. 22, 1741 ; he married (2) Anna Cotton (published Sept. 5, 
1742), daughter of Rev. John Cotton, of Newton, who was invited to deliver the Artillery 
election sermon in 1738, but declined; he married (3) Lucy (Hancock) Bowes (pub- 
lished Oct. 14, 1762), daughter of Rev. John Hancock, of Lexington, who delivered the 
Artillery election sermon in 1730. Mr. Cooke was an ardent patriot in the Revolution, 
and chaplain of the General Court at Watertown in the summer of 1776. In 1775 his 
house at Menotomy was used as a hospital for colonial soldiers. His pastoral service 
was earnest and conscientious, and, after a pastorate of forty-five years, greatly to the 
sorrow of his people, his work was terminated by his decease. 



The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1754 were : Ralph Hartt 
I7^Zl. ( r 739)> captain; John Welch (1736), lieutenant; Joseph Edwards (1738), 

J I ensign. Jeremiah Belknap, Jr. (1745), was first sergeant; Thomas Lawlor 
(1746), second sergeant; Josiah Waters (1747), third sergeant; William Homes (1747), 
fourth sergeant, and John Leverett (1750), clerk. 

The following petition was presented to the Legislature in March, 1 754 : 

" Province of the Massachusetts Bav. 

"To His Excellency William Shirley, Esqr. Captain General & Commander-in-chief ; 
The Honourable, the Council, & Hon'ble House of Representatives of the Province 
aforesaid, in General Court assembled, at Boston, the 27th day of March, 1754. 

"Thomas Edwards [1724], Captain of the Artillery Company in said Province for 
himself and in behalf of said Company, — Humbly Shews — That the said Artillery Com- 
pany was incorporated by Charter from this Government more than one hundred years 
past, and have been a considerable advantage to the Province, in training up gentlemen 
in military exercises, and thereby qualifying them for publick service. That your 
memorialist has been informed, that Col. Pollard [1726], in behalf of the Company of 
Cadets in Boston, have preferred a petition to this Hon'ble Court, praying to be incor- 
porated into a body politick, with certain priviledges and exemptions from duty, as 
set forth in their petition, and have preferred a Bill for that purpose. And as your 
memorialist humbly conceives the said Bill, should it pass into an Act, would have a 
tendency wholly to break up the said Artillery Company, and thereby frustrate the good 
intent of the Legislature in first incorporating them and prevent the great and many 
advantages that have and will accrue to the Province in General by their subsisting. 

" Your memorialist therefore humbly prays, that the said Bill preferred by the Com- 
pany of Cadets may not be passed into an Act, till such time as your petitioners, said 
Company, by their committee, may be heard upon said Bill, or that the said Artillery 
Company may have the same priviledges and exemptions granted them, as the said 
Company of Cadets. 1 And as in duty bound, &c. Thomas Edwards, Capt." 

1 The Records of the Town of Boston, under General Court, to prevent a Bill now depending 

date of May 15, 1754, contain the following vote : — there, for granting certain Liberties and Immunities 

" Voted, that the Gentlemen the Representa- to the Company of Cadets, under the Command of 

lives of the Town be and hereby they are desired to Colo Pollard [1726] being pass'd into a Law." 
Use their utmost Endeavours and Influence in the 



1754] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 65 

In December, 1745, a number of gentlemen of Boston waited upon Gov. Shirley, 
"upon his safe arrival from Louisburg," presented him an address of congratulation and 
requested him " to permit them to have his picture drawn at their expense, with a design 
to preserve it in this Town as a Memorial of his Excellencys public services." The 
governor consented, and Aug. 7, 1754, the portrait was presented to the town, "to be 
hung up in Faneuil Hall." The picture was unanimously accepted by the town. It was 
ordered to be hung up in Faneuil Hall, and thanks were returned therefor. 

In 1754, "the post-office was opened in Cornhill, at Mr. John Franklin's [1739]." 

The sixth war was commenced in 1754, and in 1755 an expedition was undertaken 
against Crown Point, a French fortress on the west side of Lake Champlain. It was 
unsuccessful, as were the succeeding campaigns of 1756, 1757, and 1758 in the same 
quarter, owing principally to the incapacity of the British commanders. In 1759, the 
French evacuated Ticonderoga and Crown Point, and Quebec surrendered. In 1760, 
Montreal and the rest of Canada were taken. The war continued until 1763. For each 
of these six Crown Point and Canada expeditions, Massachusetts voted to raise from four 
thousand to seven thousand men, excepting a less number in 1757, and in each of them 
the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company was represented by some of its members. 
Men were also raised yearly to defend the frontier of Massachusetts, and others were 
sent during these years to Nova Scotia, Louisburg, and other points. The treasurer's 
book for 1759 records the payment of wages to "eight companies up the river St. Law- 
rence at the 'reduction of Quebec." The province raised about three thousand men 
in 1 76 1, and nearly as many in 1762. Some hundreds from Massachusetts joined a 
British expedition to the West Indies in 1762, and nearly all perished. In 1762 there 
were men from this province at Crown Point, Halifax, Newfoundland, and "beyond 
Niagara." 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1754 were : Benjamin Andrews, 
Thomas Cames, Thomas Dawes, Jr., William Heath, Daniel Jones, Joseph Mann, David 
Mason. 

Benjamin Andrews (1754), carpenter, of Boston, son of Benjamin and Hannah 
(Capen) Andrews, was bom in Boston, April 7, 17 15. He married, Nov. 20, 1739, 
Hannah Holland, of Boston. He was first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1758. 

He served the town as a constable in 1747; a viewer of boards and shingles in 
1753 ; a viewer of fences from 1763 to 1765 ; a warden in 1764, and clerk of the market 
in 1769. He made the general walk or visitation of the town, Feb. 10, 1764, and Feb. 
18, 1766. July 14, 1 76 1, " Mr. Andrews [1754], the carpenter," was consulted in regard 
to repairing the hospital at New Boston. March 9, 1773, a number of inhabitants 
petitioned the town " that a new street may be laid out from the end of Union Street 
across Friend Street, and through the lands of Capt. Andrews [1754] and others, laid 
waste by the late fire, so as to strike upon Sudbury Street." He is called " Captain " in 
the town records in 1764. Capt. Andrews (1754) died very suddenly, Dec. 9, 1778. 

Thomas Cames (1754), shopkeeper, of Boston, son of Col. John (1733) and Sarah 
Carnes, was born in Boston, Sept. 16, 1731. He was published, Oct. 14, 1755, to marry 
Elizabeth Weekes. He was elected a constable of the town of Boston in 1754 and 1755, 

Benjamin Andrews (1754). Authority: Thomas Carnes (1754). Authority: Bos- 

Boston Records. ton Records. 



66 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 754 

but was excused both years from serving. He was chosen to no other town office. Mr. 
Carnes (1754) served as second sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1757 ; also was a 
member of the militia, and rose to the grade of captain. His petition for a retailer's 
license was disapproved by the selectmen, Aug. 13, 1767. He was in business in Boston 
in 1775, in which year, Aug. 7, he yielded to the trying times, and Joseph Jackson 
(1738) was appointed one of the trustees to settle his affairs. At this time Mr. Carnes 
( 1754) is designated in court papers as a " trader." A Thomas Carnes became a member 
of St. John's Lodge, A. F. and A. M., in 1780. 

The Columbian Centinel of Oct. 2, 1793, contains the following: "Died at Gov- 
ernor's Island (N.Y ), Mr. Thomas Carnes of this town, on his journey from Philadelphia, 
of the yellow fever." 

Thomas Dawes, Jr. (1754), bricklayer, of Boston, son of Thomas and Elizabeth 
(Underwood) Dawes, was born in Boston, Aug. 5, 1731, and was baptized three days 
after. He joined the Old South Church, Nov. 26, 1749. 1 Though called a "bricklayer," 
which probably he was by trade, he was a mason, architect, and patriot. He was the 
architect of the Brattle Street meeting-house. In 1772, John Hancock proposed to con- 
tribute generously towards the erection of a new meeting-house for Brattle Street Church, 
of which he was a member. "A plan for a meeting-house, drawn by John S. Copley, 
the artist, was rejected because of the expense ; but another, drawn by Major Thomas 
Dawes [1754], was adopted." Col. Dawes (1754) also assisted in the erection, for Gov. 
Shirley, of what was afterwards known as the celebrated Eustis mansion in Roxbury. 

Col. Dawes (1754) "was a high patriot, and the caucuses were sometimes held in 
his garret, where they smoked tobacco, drank flip, and discussed the state of the coun- 
try. . . . The tories gave him the nickname of 'Jonathan Smoothing Plane.' " He was a 
conspicuous figure in the early scenes of the Revolution, and was beloved by federalists 
but hated by royalists. His large and comfortable house on Purchase Street was sacked 
by the British troops before they left Boston. He was adjutant of the Boston regiment, 
and commanded the Central Militia Company, whose place of parade was behind the 
First Church on Cornhill Square. During his command of that company he introduced 
an improvement in music. Before that time, no martial music was used on training days 
but the drum. He employed a man with one eye, who played the clarionet, and he 
caused him to march about eight paces in front. Marigolds were then used as cockades. 
He was major of the Boston regiment in 1771, under Col. Erving ; lieutenant-colonel 
under Col. Leverett (1750), and in 1773 was commissioned colonel, which office he held 
until the provisional government was abolished. Col. Dawes (1754) was fourth sergeant 
of the Artillery Company in 1756; ensign in 1761 ; lieutenant in 1765, and captain in 
1766 and 1773. Upon the adoption of the State constitution, he became an intimate 
friend of John Hancock, and began to figure in public life, for which his talents, industry, 
wealth, and patriotism well qualified him. He was representative, senator, and councillor. 
" In private, he was active, firm, charitable, and affable. He was one of the deacons of 

Thomas Dawes, Jr. (1754). Authorities: founders of the church, and his great-grandfather, 

Hundred Boston Orators; Boston Records; Hill's Ambrose [1674], his grandfather, Thomas, and his 

Hist, of Old South Church, Vol. II., pp. 336-338; father, Thomas, were members before him. When 

Drake's Hist, of Roxbury, which contains a picture he joined, in 1749, his grandfather and father were 

and sketch of the Eustis mansion; William Dawes, living, so that there were three of the same name, 

by Henry W. Holland, p. 60 el seq. representing three generations, in the membership 

1 "Col. Dawes, Jr. [1754], was fourth in the together." — Hill's Hist, of Old South Church, Vol. 

line of descent from William Dawes, one of the //., /. 233. 



i 7 54] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 6] 

the Old South Church in 1786 [and until his decease]. I shall never forget his venerable 
appearance, grave deportment, rich dress, and silver locks, when constantly on the Sab- 
bath he walked up the broad aisle. Early impressions identified him with true piety." 

The author of "William Dawes" (1768), cousin of Col. Thomas (1754), says 
concerning the latter: "In 1787, he defended Job Shattuck in his memorable trial for 
treason in that year. He was moderator of the town meeting, July 25, 1793, to prevent 
the fitting out of privateers. About this time he was one of the directors of the Massa- 
chusetts National Bank. In 1795 and 1796 he was a member of the committees author- 
ized to sell the various town lands, including the Province House and Gov. Hancock's 
pasture, on which the State House was built, and other lands. His mansion was on 
Purchase Street, next door to Samuel Adams." 

He was the owner of considerable real estate in Boston. July 31, 1794, at a great 
fire in Boston, one of his houses on Purchase Street, and the stores, barns, etc., on his 
wharf, opposite his residence, were consumed. He was very prominent in town affairs, 
and held many offices during his active career. At one time he was the first acting 
magistrate in the Commonwealth, and was an elector at the three first elections of Presi- 
dent of the United States. He is recorded as present at Massachusetts Grand Lodge, 
A. F. and A. M , in Concert Hall, at the installation of Joseph Webb (1761), grand 
master elect, June 24, 1783. 

Col. Dawes (1754) married, in July, 1752, Hannah, daughter of Increase and Ann 
(Gray) Blake, by whom he had seven children. Their daughter, Ann, married Capt. 
Joseph Pierce (1769), and their son, Thomas Dawes, was a judge of the supreme court 
of Massachusetts from 1792 to 1802, and of the municipal court of Boston from 1802 to 
1822. Col. Dawes (1754) died Jan. 2, 1809, disposing of his property by will. The 
following is the epitaph on his monument in King's Chapel Burial-Ground : — 

" Of his taste for the Grecian simplicity 
In architecture there are many monuments 
Which he raised when that art was new to us. 
The records of Massachusetts shew 
That he was one of her active legislators 
From ye year 1776 until he was 70 years old, 
When he retired with faculties unimpaired. 
To the fiscal concerns of the Metropolis, 
To its literary and other Institutions, 
He was a zealous friend. He was an elector 
At the three first elections of president 
Of the U. S. and discharged various trusts 
To his own honor and the public weal." 

William Heath (1754), "sailmaker," of Boston. He is not mentioned in the records 
of the town of Boston. He was identified with the local militia, and, prior to the break- 
ing out of the Revolutionary War, rose to the position of captain. He held the office of 
second sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1756. In 1776, he embarked at Boston 
with the British army for Halifax. 

William Heath (1754). Authority : Sabine's Company in 1754, was Gen. William Heath. Gen. 

American Loyalists. Heath in 1754 was but seventeen years of age, and 

Mr. Whitman (1810), in his history of the in his Memoirs he says that he joined the Artillery 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, errs in Company in 1765. 
saying that William Heath, who joined the Artillery 



68 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



['754 



Daniel Jones (1754), " housewright," was married, Oct. 5, 1748, to Sarah Kilby, of 
Boston. He was clerk of the market in 1 75 1 ; scavenger in 1755 and 1756, and, Aug. 
24, 1770, he was selected as one of the eighteen jurors for the August court. He was a 
deacon of the West Church; third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1756, and 
a lieutenant in the Boston regiment from 1761 to 1766, and subsequently held the posi- 
tion of captain. Daniel Jones (1754) was present at the communications of the St. 
John's Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M., in 1767 and 1768. 

Joseph Mann (1754). March 13, 1753, he was elected a constable of Boston, and 
paid the fine for not serving; was chosen scavenger in 1763, and the following year was 
a surveyor of wheat. He was first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1757. 

David Mason (1754), painter, of Boston and Salem, son of David and Susanna 
Mason, of Boston, was born in Boston, March 19, 1726. He married, (2) Sept. 5, 1750, 
Hannah, daughter of Andrew Symmes (1734). His first wife, Miss Goldthwait, lived 
less than a year after her marriage. He was apprenticed to John Gore, father of Samuel 
(1786), to learn the trade of painting, and afterward was a pupil of Greenwood in por- 
trait painting, in which profession he gained an enviable reputation. 

Possessing a strong military spirit, he was early engaged in military service, and was 
a lieutenant in the French war, commanding a battery of cannon at Fort William Henry. 
He was afterwards taken prisoner by the French, but was soon released. In 1756, he 
had charge of the powder-house which stood on Fort Hill. In April, 1763, he organ- 
ized an artillery company, which paraded in Boston, with only one cannon, at the 
funeral of Col. John Phillips (1725). This artillery company was formed soon after the 
Cadets, and the South End Artillery Company of Boston was its successor. Soon after, 
he removed to Salem, where he was engaged at his trade. " Painter, 1770, David Mason 
[1754] from Boston. ' His shop in the lane leading to North Bridge ; does all kinds of* 
painting, japanning, varnishing and gilding. He also papers rooms and glazes windows. 
He paints chaises and coaches.' " ' 

" 1 77 1. Jan. 1. Notice is given, that two lectures on Electricity [then little under- 
stood], will be delivered by David Mason [1754], at his house, near North Bridge." The 
price was one pistareen a lecture. In 1774, he had charge of two chests of tea which 
had been smuggled into Salem. They were deposited in his chamber closet. The next 
day it was committed to the school-boys, who had a grand time in burning it upon the 
common. 

In 1775, Capt. David Mason (1754) committed seventeen cannon to John Foster, 
for the purpose of having them fitted with carriages. Mr. Foster had at work for him 
a "foreign journeyman," who, having obtained leave to visit Boston, got word to Gov. 
Gage in regard to the cannon. The governor ordered Col. Leslie to embark with three 
hundred men of the Sixty- Fourth Regiment, from Castle William, to proceed to Salem 
and capture the ordnance. At 2 p.m., on Sunday, Feb. 26, 1775, the force landed at 
Homan's Cove, Marblehead, and took up the line of march for Salem. The word of 
alarm outstripped the British. Salem was awake, drums beating, bells ringing, and guns 
firing. Capt. Mason (1754) immediately began to remove the cannon. He concealed 

Daniel Jones (1754). Authorities: Boston 1794; Allen's American Biography; Boston Globe, 

Records; Mass. Archives. Dec. 25, 1889. 

David Mason (1754). Authorities: Felt's ' Felt's Annals of Salein, Vol. II., p. 185. 

Annals of Salem; Massachusetts Centinel, Sept. 24, 



, 7S4 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 69 

them in an oak thicket back of Devereux's Hill, three quarters of a mile from Foster's 
shop. Meanwhile, the British were approaching Salem, but were delayed by a broken 
bridge and hoisted draw. After considerable parleying, Col. Leslie promised that if 
" the draw were lowered, and he permitted to lead his men thirty rods beyond, he would 
then countermarch, and leave the premises." Rev. Thomas Barnard — who delivered 
the Artillery election sermon in 1789 — advised the colonists to comply with his propo- 
sition, which they did ; and Col. Leslie, with his command, returned to Marblehead and 
thence to Boston without capturing Capt. David Mason's (1754) cannon. In April, 
1775, he marched, with about five hundred men, to Medford. He immediately entered 
the artillery service, and was prominent with Col. Richard Gridley in organizing a regi- 
ment or train of artillery. June 21 the Provincial Congress issued commissions to Gridley, 
Mason (1754), and others. Upon the reorganization of the army in 1776, the officers 
of the artillery were : Henry Knox, colonel ; William Burbank, first lieutenant-colonel, 
and David Mason (1754), second lieutenant-colonel. 

On the nights of the 2d, 3d, and 4th of March, 1776; a vigorous cannonading was 
kept up by the colonial artillery, to divert the enemy's attention while Dorchester Heights 
were being occupied. On the third night, while Washington himself was present, a brass 
gun exploded, and Lieut.-Col. Mason (1754) was wounded. April 3, 1776, the artillery, 
ammunition, etc., were ordered to New York, whither also Col. Mason (1754) proceeded 
as soon as possible. He was soon after promoted for gallant service. Dec. 20, 1776, 
Col. Knox submitted to Congress a detailed plan for the establishment and maintenance 
of a continental artillery, including arsenals, magazines, etc. The matter having already 
received the attention of Congress, it determined, Dec. 24, to establish three arsenals or 
magazines, — one in Virginia, one in Pennsylvania, and one at Brookfield, Mass. Gen. 
Knox, who was appointed brigadier-general of artillery, Dec. 23, 1776, did not approve 
of the selection of Brookfield, and Springfield was finally determined upon by Congress. 
To Col. David Mason (1754) was given charge of the establishment and erection of these 
works at Springfield. They were at first, in 1778, located on Main Street, but were 
subsequently removed to their present location on training- field hill. He remained at 
Springfield for several years. In 1786, Col. Mason (1754) became lame, and continued 
so until his death, which occurred in Boston, Sept. 21, 1794. 

Died "in this town, Sunday morning last [Sept. 21], in the sixty-eighth year of his 
age, after a long and painful illness, which he maintained with that fortitude and resigna- 
tion characteristic of a true disciple of Jesus Christ, Col. David Mason [1754], a worthy 
and useful citizen, and an early and active defender of the liberties of his country. At an 
early period in life he discovered a genius for tactics and the art of gunnery, and his 
extensive knowledge in each of these sciences made him eminently useful, throughout 
every period of the Revolution. So early as the year 1763, by permission of our govern- 
ment, he raised and organized the present artillery company of this town, now com- 
manded by Capt. Samuel Bradlee [1765]. In the beginning of the contest between 
Great Britain and America, he was appointed by the Committee of Supplies, as the most 
proper person to collect materials and military stores for the defence of the country, 
and ever after proved himself a zealous and warm advocate for its liberties. 

" ' Alas ! tho' 't is an awful thing to die, 

Yet after the dread path thou once hast trod, 
Heav'n lifts its everlasting portals high, 

And bids the pure in heart behold their God.' 



70 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [ I7S4 

" His funeral will proceed from the house of his son-in-law, Mr. Daniel Tuttle, in 
Back Street, this afternoon at four o'clock, at which time his friends and acquaintances are 
requested to attend without more particular invitation." ' 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1754 is as follows : — 

"April i.st. 1754. The Company being under Arms, it was unanimously Voted, That 
the Rev. Mr Samuel Porter, of Sherburne, be desired to preach the next Artillery Elec- 
tion Sermon, and that the present commission officers of the Company, Capt Thomas 
Edwards [1724], Lt Samuel Pratt [1734], & En. Thomas Drowne [1737] and John 
Phillips, Esq. [1725], Treasurer, be a committee to wait on him and desire the same. 

" Attest : John Leverett, Clerk. 

"April 1st 1754. The evening being spent at Capt Thomas Edwards [1724], it 
was Voted, That the Field Officers of the Militia of the town of Boston, together with Col. 
John Chandler [Jr. (1734)], Capt Samuel Watts [1733] and Col Isaac Royall [1750], be 
a committee to reply to any petition that may be preferred to the General Court by the 
Company of Cadets, under the command of Col. Benjamin Pollard [1726], that may be 
detrimental to this Company. Voted, That the present Commission Officers of the Com- 
pany be a committee to examine the list, &c. and make report to the Company in May 
next, for their approbation, of what persons they think are proper to be excused of the 
fines due from them to the Company. Attest : John Leverett, Clerk. 

"May 6th. The Company being under Arms, Capt Thomas Edwards [1724], being 
one of the Committee, to wait upon the Rev Mr. Samuel Porter to desire him to preach 
the next Artillery Election Sermon, reported to the Company, that he had accepted the 
same. The evening being spent at Sergt Torrey's [1752], it was Voted, That thirteen 
pounds, six shillings and eight pence, lawful money, be paid by the Treasurer of the 
Company to the Commission Officers, towards defraying the charges of the dinner upon 
the ensuing Election day, and the Company to dine with them. Voted That Mr. John 
Wendell, tertius [1745], be excused from paying what fines are due from him to the 
Company to this time. Attest : John Leverett, Clerk. 

"June 3'd 1754. The Company being under Arms, it was Voted, That the commis- 
sion officers, 2 Capt Thomas Edwards [1724], & En. Thomas Drowne [1737], with the 
Treasurer John Phillips, Esq. [1725], be a committee to wait upon the Rev. Mr. Samuel 
Porter and return him the thanks of this Company for his sermon this day preached. 3 

"Attest: John Leverett, Clerk. 

"Sept. 2'd. The evening being spent at Lt. John Welch's [1736], it was unani- 
mously Voted, that every member of this Company shall for the future appear upon 
training days in white hose. Attest : John Leverett, Clerk." 

Rev. Samuel Porter, of Sherbom, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1754. 
He was originally from Hadley ; was born Dec. 2, 1709 ; graduated at Harvard College 
in 1730, and was ordained at Sherbom soon after. He married, Oct. 20, 1735, Mary 
Coolidge, of Cambridge, and died Sept. 17, 1758, aged forty-nine years. 

1 Columbian Centinel, Sept. 24, 1 794. ancient and honorable Artillery Company, after a 

2 Lieut. Samuel Pratt (1734) is omitted in ihis sermon suitable to the Occasion, preach'd by the 
sentence as one of the commissioned officers. He Rev. Mr. Porter, of Sherburne, the Company made 
is believed to have died while in office, and between choice of Capt Ralph Hartt [1739] for their Cap- 
April I and June 3, 1754. tain; Mr. John Welch [1736], Lieutenant, and Mr. 

3 " Monday last [June 3, 1754] being the An- Joseph Edwards [1738], Ensign, for the ensuing 
niversary for the Election of the Officers of the year." — Boston Evening Post, June 10, 1754. 



I 755 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 7 1 

The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1755 were : John Symmes 

[7CC (i733)> captain; Thomas Savage (1739), lieutenant; Newman Greenough 

• \J>J (1740), ensign. Moses Deshon 1 (1737) was first sergeant; John Gore 

(1743), second sergeant; Isaac Cazneau (1744), third sergeant; Joseph Gale (1744), 

fourth sergeant, and Samuel Torrey, Jr. (1752), clerk. 

Capt. Benjamin Edes (1760), in company with John Gill, began, April 7, 1755, the 
publication of the Boston Gazette or Country Journal. Their office was in King Street, 
near the east end of the town-house. This paper was issued until the Revolution, April, 
1775, when it suspended; but Mr Edes (1760) revived it at Watertown, returned with 
it to Boston in November, 1776, and there continued its publication until 1798. 

Gov. Shirley was active in military affairs ; Braddock was defeated, and the people 
of Boston were alive to the situation. Two thousand stand of arms, purchased by the 
town of Boston, arrived from England, and a regiment was raised in Boston for the war. 
May 28, Rev. Mr. Checkley preached a sermon to the company under Capt. Thomas 
Stoddard (1744), about to proceed to the seat of war. 

Capt. Moses Deshon's (1737) company in Col. Richard Gridley's regiment, 2 on its 
return from Crown Point, was fourteen days in marching from Albany to Boston, two 
hundred and five miles. The following-named officers of that company were members 
of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company: Moses Deshon (1737), captain; 
Samuel Sellon (1765), corporal. 

The families, forced from their homes in Nova Scotia, began to arrive. Two hun- 
dred of them were allotted to Massachusetts, to be dispersed over the State by a legisla- 
tive committee, whose chairman was Samuel Watts, Esq. (1733). 

The unjustifiable claims of France on certain portions of North America, the forcible 
expulsion of a company of British settlers from a tract of land beyond the Alleghany 
Mountains and near the Ohio River, by a body of French troops, and the building of a 
fort to command the entrance into the country on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, thus 
excluding the English from a valuable portion of their possessions, gave indications of a 
long-continued struggle. 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1755 were: Samuel Ballard, 
Samuel Barrett, Edward Cames, Barnabas Clarke, Isaac Decoster, Samuel Dyer, John 
Forsyth, William Hyslop, John Joy, Henry Perkins, Benjamin Phillips, Francis Whitman, 
Samuel Whitwell. 

Samuel Ballard (1755) was born in 1719. He married, June 4, 1741, Elizabeth 
Pickering. He was elected constable March 9, 1746. His name is also mentioned in 
the selectmen's minutes, May 4, 1763, when complaint was made that the chimneys of 
a house owned by Mr. Samuel Ballard (1755) were unsafe. He was a member of the 

Samuel Ballard (1755). Authorities: Bos- ! " In Col. Richard Gridley's regiment at Crown 

ton Records; Procs. St. John's Grand Lodge, A. F. Point in September, 1755, Capt. Nathaniel Thwing 

and A. M. ['736] was captain of the Lieut. -Colonel's Company; 

1 "Fort Edward Sept. 23, 1756 These may Capt. Thomas Stoddard [1744] was captain of the 
Certify that Major Moses Deshon [1737] of Colo. First Company; John Wendtll [1745] was its lieu- 
Thatchers Reg' is unlit for duty by reason of Indis- tenant; Moses Deshon [1737] was captain of the 
position of body. Joseph Bridgham. Fourth Company. The regiment marched from 

"Major Deshon [1737] has Liberty to go down Boston, Sept. 24, 1755." — Mass. Archives. 
to Albany for the Recovery of his health. 

" P. Lyman. 

"Sept 23, 1756." 

— Mass. Archives, Vol. XCIV., p. 429. 



72 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [r 755 

militia in Boston, rose to the grade of captain, and was second sergeant of the Artillery 
Company in 1759. He was a Freemason, and walked in the Masonic procession, Sept. 
12, 1767, when the remains of Jeremy Gridley, grand master of Masons in North America, 
were buried. Samuel Ballard (1755) died March 5, 1793, aged seventy-four years. 

Samuel Barrett (1755), merchant and barrister, of Boston, son of Thornton and 
Hepzibah (Williams) Barrett, was born in Boston, June 28, 1722. He married, July 28, 
1743, Mary Shedd. Mr. Whitman (1810) says Samuel Barrett (1755) was probably a 
grandson of Samuel (17 1 7). 

Mr. Barrett (1755) was a constable of Boston in 1755 ; clerk of the market in 1759, 
1760, and 1763 ; warden in 1768 and 1772; fireward in 1776, and overseer of the poor 
in 1777, and subsequently. Aug. 26, 1776, he was chosen one of the census-takers from 
Ward 6, and Nov. 1 1 of that year was one of the committee to collect an account of the 
damage since the Boston Port Bill. He visited the public schools with the justices and 
others, July 10, 1772; was appointed on committees to petition the General Court on 
various matters, and served on other and important committees of the town. He became 
a captain in the militia, and was appointed a justice of the peace, March 4, 1774. He 
was a member of the Masonic Fraternity ; also of the New North Church, and for several 
years held the office of deacon. 

July 26, 1776, he was appointed by the Committee of Correspondence, Inspection, 
and Safety, to take charge of the inhabitants of Boston residing in Ward 12, both on the 
alarm and train-band lists. He was second sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1760, 
lieutenant in 1766, and its captain in 177 1. On the first field-day after his election as 
captain of the Artillery Company, Sept. 2, 1771, he presented a new stand of colors to 
the Company. Monday, Sept. 3, 1798, the Artillery Company completed the field duty 
of the day by attending his funeral, with side arms, in uniform. His wife, Elizabeth, 
sister of Josiah Salisbury (1759), died Nov. 5, 1798, aged fifty-three years. 

"On Saturday last [Aug. 25, 1798], this town and his numerous friends, -as well as 
his own family, suffered a heavy loss in the death of Samuel Barrett, Esq., LL. D. [1755]. 
This gentleman, in the early part of his life, having received a liberal education, followed 
the honorable profession of merchant, and evinced integrity and ability to all who were 
connected with him. In the period of our late Revolution, which his patriotism led him 
warmly to support, he was employed in procuring supplies of clothing, etc., for the 
American army, which was much indebted to his care and diligence. After the peace, 
quitting his mercantile pursuits, he went into the study of the law, for which his classical 
taste and love of literature well qualified him. For several years he acted as a justice of 
the peace with unimpeached honor and impartiality, and at the time of his death was a 
judge of the Court of Common Pleas for the County of Suffolk, and a notary public for 
the port of Boston. The many who employed him in this capacity will bear witness to 
his accuracy, punctuality, and despatch in doing their business, as well as to his open 
and honorable conduct in every department of life. Their esteem and confidence 
attended him in life, and their regret and sorrow for his death embalm his memory. 
Mild and amiable in his disposition, sensible and well-informed in his mind, and con- 
ciliating in his manners, he was universally beloved. His death was very sudden, and 
took place in the 60th year of his age." l 

Samuel Barrett (1755). Authorities: Bos- ' Columbian Centinel, Wednesday, Aug. 29, 

ton Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Com- 1798. 
pany, Ed. 1842. 



i 755 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 73 

Edward Carnes (.1755). rope-maker, of Boston, son of Lieut. -Col. John (1733) and 
Sarah Carnes, was born in Boston, Sept. 8, 1730. He married, (1) March 1, 1753, 
Joanna Jenner, who died in Boston, July 2, 1772 ; (2) Sarah Cheever; and he died Aug. 
19, 1782, aged fifty-three years. He was a brother of Capt. Thomas Carnes, who joined 
the Artillery Company in 1754. 

Edward Carnes (1755) was elected by the town a scavenger in 1762 and 1763, and 
was one of the visitors to the public schools, July 5, 1769. He was chosen, Aug. 26, 

1776, to take 'the census, etc., of Ward 7, in Boston, and Aug. 28, 1776, was drawn a 
juryman for the trial and condemnation of vessels ; was elected a surveyor of hemp in 

1777, also from 1779 to 1782 inclusive, and, May 22, 1777, served as a juryman in the 
trial of such persons as the town represented " to be inimical to these states and dangerous 
to the public safety." In the " Records of the Town of Boston," Edward Carnes (1755) 
was called "Captain" in 1778, and "Major" in 1779. Sept. 4, 1778, he was "drawn 
out of the box " for a juryman in a maritime court. He was fourth sergeant of the Artil- 
lery Company in 1758; ensign in 1766, and lieutenant in 1769. He was active in the 
Boston militia, passed through the several grades, and was the last major of the Boston 
regiment prior to the Revolution. He was drafted for service in the Continental Army, 
Dec. 19, 1776. 

Major Carnes (1755) was a member of the Masonic Fraternity. He belonged both 
to the Second and Masters' lodges in Boston, and first appears as a member of the St. 
John's Grand Lodge in 1767. His attendance upon the meetings of this grand body 
was quite regular until 1774. In 1773, he was recorded as junior grand warden. 

At the completion of Bunker Hill monument, the last stone was raised to its place 
in the presence of the government of the association, July 23, 1842, the American flag 
being waved from the stone during its ascent by Edward Carnes, Jr., grandson of Major 
Edward Carnes (1755). 

Barnabas Clarke (1755), of Boston, married Hepzibah Barrett, May 19, 1748. The 
only town office to which he was elected was that of constable, in 1756, from which 
service he was excused. 

Isaac Decoster (1755), of Boston, son of John and Elizabeth Decoster, was born in 
Boston, April 2, 1728. He married (published), Oct. 25, 1750, Martha Hart, of Boston. 
He was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1757, and was sworn as a constable 
of Boston, March 11, 1754. He was at Louisburg in 1755-6, and at Halifax in 1760. 
In his letter from the latter place, June 23, 1760, he speaks of belonging to a lodge there, 
which implies that Halifax was his residence. Feb. 3, 1761, Mr. Decoster (1755) was 
master of Lodge No. 2, at Halifax. He is the first named in the charter of the Lodge 
of St. Andrew, of Boston, and was master of that lodge from 1756 to 1760. He was in 
Scotland pending the proceedings for that charter, and was designated as the first master. 
Mr. Decoster (1755) was probably made a Mason in Halifax, but was refused recognition 
by the First Lodge, of Boston. His Masonic relations in Boston alone give us the prin- 
cipal information in regard to him. 

Edward Carnes (1755). Authorities: Bos- Isaac Decoster (1755). Authorities : Bos- 

ton Records; Early Masonic Records; Wyman's ton Records; Early Masonic Records. 
Charlestown Genealogies and Estates. 



74 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 755 

Samuel Dyer (1755), son of Jonathan and Hannah Dyer, was born April 3, 1729. 
Capt. Dyer (1755) was elected warden in 1768 and 1778, and fence-viewer from 1764 to 
1774 inclusive, and from 1778 to 1781 inclusive; also, was an assessor in Boston from 
1778 to 1781 inclusive. In 1780 he is called in the records "Deacon." He was first 
sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1760, and rose to the grade of captain in the militia. 

John Forsyth (1755), of Boston, son of Alexander and Deborah Forsyth, was born 
Nov. 5, 1731, and was baptized two days after, at the Second Church in Boston. 

John Forsyth (1755) was elected a scavenger from 1755 to 1760 inclusive, and clerk 
of the market in 1763. He became a captain in the local militia. 

William Hyslop (1755), merchant, of Boston, son of James Hyslop, came from 
Humly Parish, East Lowden, Haddington County, Scotland. He was baptized Sept. 20, 
j 714. He came to America about 1740, beginning his life here "as a peddler with a 
pack on his back," and six years later he was engaged in Boston as an importer of Scotch 
goods from Glasgow, particularly Bibles, of which he sold very many. His store was on 
Codman's Wharf, which was sold to the city of Boston for the Quincy market-house by 
the heirs of John Codman, to whom Mr. Hyslop (1755) had previously conveyed his 
part of it, and it was burned down in the great fire of 1760. The site is now covered by 
the granite stores of South Market Street. In 1760, Mr. Hyslop's (1755) store was in 
Quaker Lane, and in the list of the persons burnt out by the great fire of that year, 
in Quaker Lane, William Hyslop (17551 is mentioned first in the Ncws-Letter. His 
early residence was next east of Concert Hall. 1 

March n, 1750, he was elected a constable of Boston, but declined to serve, and 
paid the usual fine. He was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1758. 

On his retirement from active business, he resided on the farm in Brookline owned 
for many years by the Boylston family. Dec. 15, 1766, the selectmen of Boston notified 
the assessors that William Hyslop (1755) ought to be taxed for the property he owned 
in Boston, though living in another town. 

On the division of Mr. Hyslop's (1755) estate between his son and daughter, the 
homestead fell to his son David, who occupied it for several years. He devised it to his 
wife during her life, and after her death to his sister Sumner's children. Thirteen acres 
were sold to the city of Boston for the water reservoir, and the remainder to Mr. Morti- 
mer C. Ferris. 

William Hyslop (1755) married, Oct. 25, 1750, Mehitable, daughter of David and 
Elizabeth Stoddard. She was born June 5, 1719, and died Nov. 19, 1792. Her husband 
survived her about four years, dying Aug. 11, 1796, in the eighty-third year of his age. 
They had five children, of whom David, Elizabeth, and William lived to be married. 
David and William had no children. Elizabeth married, Sept. 30, 1779, Increase 
Sumner, governor of Massachusetts. She was first betrothed to Rev. John Hunt, asso- 
ciate pastor of the Old South Church, who was invited to deliver the Artillery election 
sermon in 1774. He declined to accept on account of ill health, and died Dec. 30, 1775. 

Samuel Dyer (1755). Authority: Boston etc.; Hist. Sketches of Brookline, p. 301; Pilgrims 

Records. of Boston. 

John Forsyth (1755). Authority: Boston ' In a deed of the Concert Hall property, dated 

Records. Sept. 30, 1754, that property is bounded on the east 

William Hyslop (1755). Authorities: Sum- " by the house and land of W>» Hyslop [1755] now 

ner's Hist, of East Boston, p. 274 el seq.; Boston occupied by Mrs Steele, 49 ft." It was here that 

Records, Selectmen's Minutes, 1767, pp. 244, 245, Mr. Hyslop (1755) first lived in Boston. 



, 755 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 75 

Mr. Hyslop (1755) was a member of Brattle Street Church, and a strong Scotch 
Presbyterian. On the introduction of an organ into that meeting-house, Mr. Hyslop 
(1755) discontinued his attendance there, and became a regular worshipper at the 
church of Rev. Mr. Jackson, in Brookline. He was generous to the poor, and universally 
kind ; was a member of various benevolent societies, and left a large legacy for mission- 
ary work among the Indians. 

"Saturday, 13"' August. Mr Hyslop [1755], one of the owners of this Island 
[Noddle's] was buried this afternoon, it is said he has left eighty thousand pounds worth 
of property, and only two children." 

His grandson, Gen. William Hyslop Sumner, joined the Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery Company in 1819, and was its captain in 1821. 

John Joy (1755) was a housewright in Boston. He was published, Oct. 4, 1750, to 
marry Sarah Homer, of Boston. His residence was on Leverett Street, but owned other 
property on Water Street. He was elected constable of Boston in 1756 and 1757, but 
was excused from serving; fence-viewer from 1766 to 1774 inclusive, and visited the 
schools July 1, 1767, and July 1, 1772. He was town warden in 1769. March 5, 1774, 
he was elected on a committee to consider measures for providing a suitable place for 
the carts and sleds, with hay, firewood, etc., and " the Inhabitants of Corn-Hill thereby 
eased of that Incumbrance." 

Capt. Joy (1755) was an addresser of Hutchinson in 1774, and of Gen. Gage in 
1775. In 1776, he went with other royalists to Halifax; was proscribed and banished 
in 1778. He was in England in 1779. Mr. Joy (17^5) was a member of the Boston 
militia, and, after several years of service, attained the grade of captain. 

He received the Masonic degrees in the First Lodge, in Boston, and became a 
member thereof in 1760. He was junior warden of that lodge in 1762-3, senior warden 
in 1764, and master from 1769 to 1771 ; junior warden of the Masters' Lodge in 1765, 
senior warden in 1766, and master in 1772. Jan. 27, 1775, John Joy (1755) was con- 
stituted junior grand warden of St. John's Grand Lodge. He died in England in 1798. 

Henry Perkins (1755), son °f Edmund and Mary Perkins, was born in Boston 
Aug. 20, 1 7 10. He was elected constable in 1743, but refused to serve, and paid the 
fine; was scavenger in 1752 and 1760. In 1757 he was third sergeant of the Artillery 
Company. 

Benjamin Phillips (1755), of Boston, son of Benjamin and Hannah Phillips, was 
born in Boston, June 3, 1715. He was published, Aug. 20, 1752, to marry Elizabeth 
Bourne, of Marshfield ; and, (2) March 17, 1757, he married Margaret Cunningham, of 
Boston. He was elected, March 10, 1766, a warden of the town, which seems to have 
been the only town office he ever held. He was third sergeant of the Artillery Company 
in 1760. He was a loyalist, and a protester against the Whigs in 1774. 

May 19, 1777, Benjamin Phillips (1755) is named by the town as one of those 
persons "inimical to these states, and should be apprehended and confined." He died 
at Lincoln in May, 1792, aged seventy-six years. 

John Joy (1755)- Authorities: Boston Henry Perkins (1755). Authority : Boston 

Records; Sabine's American Loyalists; Records Records. 

of St. John's Grand Lodge. Benjamin Phillips (1755). Authorities: 

Boston Records; Sabine's American Loyalists. 



76 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7SS 

Francis Whitman (1755), shipwright, of Boston, son of Francis and Elizabeth Whit- 
man, of Boston, was born Dec. 24, 1716. He married, Oct. 27, 1743, Sarah Pain. He 
was second sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1758. He never held any office in the 
town of Boston. Elizabeth Whitman, a widow, who made her will in Boston in 1760, 
mentions Francis Whitman (1755) as her son. The latter was, doubtless, an only child, 
and "it is not ascertained that he left any posterity." "With him, probably, ended the 
descendants in the male line of the first Francis," — grandfather of Francis (1755). 

Samuel Whitwell (1755), merchant, of Boston, son of Samuel and Elizabeth Whit- 
well, was born Dec. 30, 17 17. He married, June 13, 1749, Elizabeth Kelsey. He was 
a very prominent member of the Old South Church ; was a deacon, served on important 
committees, and often represented the church, with others, in church councils. At the 
sign of the Golden Candlestick, corner of Ann and Union streets, near the market of 
Boston, he kept a hardware store, and his residence was in Wing's Lane (Elm Street). 
His nieces, daughters of his brother William, named Elizabeth and Mary, married respec- 
tively, William Homes, Jr. (1766), and Col. Josiah Waters, Jr. (1769). He was fourth 
sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1759. 

Samuel Whitwell (1755) was clerk of the market in 1763, warden in 1765, and 
informer of deer from 1764 to 1769 inclusive. He was an overseer of the poor from 
1769 to 1783 inclusive. At the town meeting held March 6, 1770, occasioned by the 
massacre in King Street by the soldiery the preceding night, information was given 
by several persons as to what they had heard the British soldiers say, and what they had 
seen them do. The number of these persons being so great, the town selected a com- 
mittee, of which Samuel Whitwell (1755) was one > to ta ^ e tne i r depositions. Dec. 7, 
1774, he was one of a committee chosen to carry into execution the resolutions of the 
Continental Congress, and Oct. 16, 1776, he was chosen to consider the grievances of 
certain petitioners in regard to the forestalling of provisions and the necessaries of life 
in the Boston markets. He was identified with the militia, and was an officer in the 
Continental Army. 

Dr. Samuel Whitwell, son of Samuel Whitwell (1755), a physician by profession, 
was an army surgeon in Col. James Jackson's regiment, and died at Newton, November, 
1 791, aged thirty-eight years. He delivered the oration, July 4, 1789, before the Massa- 
chusetts Society of Cincinnati, of which he was a member. 

Samuel Whitwell (1755) died June 8, 1801, aged eighty-four years, and was "buried 
from his late house in Cornhill." 

The Record of the Artillery Company for 1755 is as follows : — 
"April nth. 1755. The Company being under Arms, it was unanimously Voted, 
That the Rev. Mr. Thaddeus Maccarty of Worcester be desired to preach the next Artil- 
lery Election Sermon, and that the present Commission Officers of the Company, Capt 
Ralph Hartt [1739], Lt John Welch [1736] & En. Joseph Edwards [1738], and John 
Phillips, Esq. [1725], the Treasurer, be a Committee to wait on him and desire the same. 

" Attest : John Levereit, Clerk. 
"May 4th. The Company being under arms, Capt Ralph Hartt [1739], one of the 
committee to wait upon the Rev. Mr. Thaddeus Maccarty to desire him to preach the 

Francis Whitman (1755). Authority : Bos- Samuel Whitwell (1755). Authorities: 

ton Records. Boston Records; Hill's Hist. Old South Church. 



1?5 6J HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 7 7 

next Artillery Election Sermon, reported to the Company that he had accepted the same. 
The evening being spent at Ensign Edwards' [1738], it was Voted, That thirteen pounds 
six shillings and eight pence, lawful money, be paid by the Treasurer of this Company 
to the Commission Officers towards defraying the charges of the dinner upon the ensuing 
Election day, and the Company to dine with them. Attest : John Leverett, Clerk. 

"June 2'd 1755. The Company being under Arms, it was Voted, That the Com- 
mission Officers, Capt Ralph Ha'rtt [1739], Lt John Welch [1736], & Ensign Joseph 
Edwards [1738], with the Treasurer, John Phillips, Esq. [1725], be a committee to wait 
upon the Rev. Mr. Thaddeus Maccarty, and return him the thanks of this Company, for 
his Sermon this day preached. Attest : Samuel Torrey, Jun., Clerk. 

"The Company being under Arms, it was Voted, That the above committee return 
the thanks of this Company, to Mr. John Leverett [1750], the former Clerk, for his past 
service. Attest : Samuel Torrey, Jun. Clerk." 

Rev. Thaddeus Maccarty, of Worcester, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 
1755. He was a son of Capt. Thaddeus and Mary Maccarty, and was born in Boston, 
July 18, 1721. He sailed with his father on several voyages, but being unable to endure 
the hardships of a sailor's life, he earnestly turned to studying, and graduated from 
Harvard College in 1739. He afterwards pursued the study of theology, and, Nov. 3, 
1742, was ordained as pastor of the church in Kingston, Mass. On account of difficulty 
arising from his invitation to Mr. Whitefield to occupy his pulpit, the meeting-house 
being forcibly closed against him, he resigned that pastorate, Nov. 3, 1745. 

The church in Worcester invited Mr. Maccarty to preach as a candidate, as it also 
did Rev. Jonathan Mayhew. They both preached, but the church gave Rev. Mr. 
Maccarty a unanimous call to become its pastor. He accepted, was installed June 
10, 1747, and preached his own installation sermon. He was a decided Whig during 
the Revolution, and worked earnestly in the colonial cause. He died July 20, 1784, 
aged sixty-three years, and in the thirty-seventh year of his ministry at Worcester. Sept. 
8, 1743, he married Mary Gatcomb, of Boston, who died Dec. 8, 1783. 



, The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1756 were : John Welch 

[ 7 CQ. (1736), captain; Thomas Drowne (1737), lieutenant ; William Taylor (1738), 

' *-* ensign. Nathaniel Baker (1751) was first sergeant ; William Heath (1754), 

second sergeant ; Daniel Jones (1754), third sergeant ; Thomas Dawes, Jr. (1754), fourth 

sergeant, and Samuel Torrey, Jr. (1752), clerk. 

The board of overseers of the poor for 1756 illustrates the influence and standing 
of prominent members of the Artillery Company in the town. The board consisted of 
twelve members, of whom five were members of the Artillery Company, viz., Jacob 
Wendell (1733), Daniel Henchman (1712), Edward Bromfield (1732), John Phillips 
(1725), and Ebenezer Storer (1732). 

Mr. Drake makes special mention of the death of Edward Bromfield (1732), who 
died April 10, 1756. His father joined the Artillery Company in 1679, and rejoined it 
in 1707. Edward, Jr. (1732), "was a gentlemen of great benevolence, and was much 

Rev. Thaddeus Maccarty. Authority: Sprague's Annals of American Pulpit. 



78 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7S 6 

beloved by the people for his public spirit and upright dealing." His oldest son, Edward 
(Harvard College, 1738), died Aug. 18, 1746, aged twenty-three years. 

The following-named officers enlisted for Crown Point before April 15, 1756 : Col. 
Nathaniel Thwing (1736), in Col. Wendell's (1733) company; Major Moses Deshon 
(1737), in Lieut.-Col. Henchman's (1712) company; Capt. Carnes (1755), Capt. Phil- 
lips (i7S5)< CaP 1 - Russell (1745), Capt. Jackson (1738), Capt. Hartt (1739), Capt. 
Symmes (1734), Capt. Savage (1738), Capt. Greenough (1740), commanded companies. 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1756 were : William Bell, James 
Bennett, Seth Blodgett, Daniel Boyer, Benjamin Brown, Jr., Jonathan Cary, Jonas Clark, 
John Deming, Benjamin Dolbeare, Robert Jenkins, 3d, Edward Proctor, Nathaniel 
Ridgeway, Samuel Ridgeway, Jr., John Wood. 

William Bell (1756), bricklayer, of Boston, son of Daniel and Abigail (Cunnabill) 
Bell, was born in Boston, April 7, 1731. He married, Aug. 9, 1767, Martha, daughter of 
Abraham and Prudence (Hancock) Hill, of Cambridge. She was a sister of the mother 
of Gov. William Eustis. 

Mr. Whitman (1810) says Mr. Bell (1756) "resided in Hawkins Street," but in 
1788-9 he lived in Cold Lane, now Portland Street. He united with the Second Church, 
Sept. 8, 1782, and became a deacon. He was second sergeant of the Artillery Company 
in 1762, ensign in 1767, lieutenant in 1 771, and captain in 1774, continuing in office 
until the election of his successor in 1786. He presented the Artillery Company with 
two espontons, which, after the Revolution, were adopted as the badge of office for the 
commander and lieutenant instead of the pike and half pike. A senior captain of a 
regiment before the war ranked as major. It was thus Capt. Bell (1756) gained his 
rank. He was a strict disciplinarian, and tenacious of adhering to the most ancient 
ceremonies. The Artillery Company is indebted principally to him for its revival ; 
and, being advanced in years, he was elected an honorary member, and continued such 
until his death. Deacon Bell (1756) was admired for his firmness and integrity in 
private life. The services he rendered to the Artillery Company place him among its 
most distinguished patrons. 

The first time William Bell (1756) is mentioned in the town recerrds is under the 
date of Feb. 25, 1765, when he and Daniel Bell (1733) were selected to examine a 
chimney on Prince Street. July 10, 1 77 1, he visited the public schools with the justices 
and others, and Nov. n, 1776, he was chosen one of the committee from Ward 6 to 
collect the account of the damage since the Boston Port Bill. He was elected a warden 
May 26, 1777. He is first called "Captain" in the records in 1776. 

William Bell (1756) is said to have received the Masonic degrees in Seconeto, 
Nova Scotia. Dec. 27, 1760, he was invited to the Feast of St. John "at Ballard's," in 
Boston, and in 1763 he became a member of the Lodge of St. Andrew. He continued 
his membership in that body until his decease, which occurred Nov. 21, 1804. 

The following anecdote, "related by a bystander," says Mr. Whitman (1810), in 
his history of the Artillery Company, exhibits not only " the feelings and conduct of the 
people," just after the battle of Lexington, but reveals the loyalty to the cause of the 
colonies possessed by some prominent members of the Artillery Company : — 

William Bell (1756). Authorities: Boston Ed. 1842; Early Records of Grand Lodges in Mass. 
Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, 



i 75 6] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 79 

" In 1775, before the Artillery Company suspended its meetings, the Common was 
occupied by the British army, and the Artillery Company were refused admittance. 
Capt. Bell [1756], therefore, marched to Copp's Hill. Soon after the bridge over 
Charles River was built, there was a complaint against the street at the foot of this hill. 
It was supposed the proprietors of that part of the hill enclosed from Snowhill Street 
ought to repair the wharf and street at their own expense. This led to inquiry, in town 
meeting, to whom it belonged ; some one said it belonged to this Company. Col. Jack- 
son [1738], their treasurer, was sent for, and declared that he considered it their prop- 
erty, a mortgage upon it to them having long since run out, and that Capt. Bell [1756] 
with the Company, had taken possession of it in 1775. Capt. Bell [1756] was then 
interrogated by Col. Dawes [1754], the moderator : ' Why did you march your Company 
to Copp's Hill ? ' Answer : ' I was prohibited from entering the Common ; conceiving 
this hill to be the property of the Company, I marched them there as a place no one had 
a right to exclude them from.' Question by moderator : ' Supposing a party of British 
troops should have been in possession of it, and should have forbidden you entrance, 
what would you have done? ' Answer : ' I would have charged bayonets, and forced my 
way as surely as I would force my way into my dwelling-house if taken possession of by 
a gang of thieves.' The late Col. William Tudor, who was then present, said : ' Mr. 
Moderator, the hill clearly belongs to that Company, and I wish they would execute a 
quitclaim deed of it to me for a fair price.' The mortgage was discharged afterwards, 
and the street repaired by the town." 

James Bennett (1756), of Boston, son of James and Abigail Bennett, was born in 
Boston, Aug. 18, 1734. A James Bennett was published in Boston, Jan. 9, 1775, to 
marry Susannah Storer. He is not mentioned in the town records, printed by the record 
commissioners of Boston. 

Seth Blodgett (1756), innkeeper, of Boston, son of Caleb and Sarah (Wyman) 
Blodgett, was born in Woburn, and married Elizabeth Harding, who died April 16, 1808, 
"in her 78th year." They had one son, Edward, baptized March 17, 1 77 1 . Caleb 
Blodgett was an innkeeper in Woburn. Seth Wyman, an uncle of Seth Blodgett (1756)) 
and for whom the latter was named, was killed in the " Lovewell Fight," in 1725. 

In 1767, St. John's Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M., "ordered the Grand Treasurer 
to pay to Bro. Seth Blodgett [1756] the sum of £1. j,s. 2p. if. for sundry Expenses at 
his House," etc. Mr. Blodgett (1756) attended the funeral obsequies, conducted by the 
Grand Lodge, in honor of R. W. Jeremy Gridley, Sept. 12, 1767. 

Royal Exchange tavern was on the southwest corner of Exchange and State streets. 
This inn gave the name to the street on the east side of it. The tavern dates back to 
1727, when it was kept by Luke Vardy. The trouble between Henry Phillips and Benja- 
min Woodbridge, which resulted in a duel and a death upon the Common, and death in 
a foreign land, began in this tavern. On the opposite corner of Exchange and State 
streets stood the custom-house, where the first act of the State Street Massacre was 
committed. 

Sept. 26, 1764, at a meeting of the selectmen, Mr. Seth Blodgett (1756) "was 
approbated by the selectmen to keep a tavern at the Royal Exchange near the town- 
house, he having lately hired the same." Oct. 14, 1767, Mr. Robert Stone applied to 

Seth Blodgett (1756). Authority: Boston Records. 



8o HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[1756 



the selectmen for "a license to keep a tavern at their house in King Street lately 
improved by Mr. Blodgett [1756]," but the license was not then granted. Mr. Stone 
was, however, its landlord at the time of the massacre, March 5, 1770. 

Dec. 28, 1768, the selectmen of Boston notified the assessors that Seth Blodgett 
(1756), an inhabitant of another town in this province, ought to be taxed here for the 
real estate he occupies, and the business he does here. 

Daniel Boyer (1756), of Boston, son of James and Mary Boyer, was born June 14, 
172- (imperfectly recorded). He was published, Jan. 18, 1749, to marry Elizabeth 
Bulfinch. He served the town as one of the clerks of the market from 1754 to 1758 
inclusive, and was again elected in 1763, but declined to serve. He united with the Old 
South Church, Nov. 7, 1770, and was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1762. 

Benjamin Brown, Jr. (1756), tanner, of Boston and Reading, son of Dea. Benjamin 
and Mary Brown, was born in Boston, April 5, 1728. His first wife was Hannah Swain. 
She died in 1771, and his second wife was Elizabeth Wiley, widow of Ebenezer, and 
daughter of Elias Bryant, of Stoneham. His parents removed to Reading some years 
prior to the Revolution. His father bought and resided on what is now known as the 
"Lucius Beebe farm." Benjamin Brown, Jr. (1756), was by trade a tanner. He was a 
member of the Reading infantry company, and by successive promotions became its 
captain. He was a colonel in the Continental Army, and, in 1776, served at Ticon- 
deroga. Subsequently, he was promoted, and, in 1784, held the position of brigadier- 
general in the militia. He was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1760. 

Benjamin Brown, Jr. (1756), was town clerk of Reading from 1775 to 1777 ; select- 
man from 1772 to 1776, and in 1778-9, 1781, 1783, 1788, 1791, and 1792; representative 
to the General Court in 1778 and 1809, and a delegate to the first provincial congress 
in 1774. He also was a justice of the peace, and for many years (1779-1801) was a 
deacon of the First Church in Reading. 

Gen. Brown (1756) sold his farm not long before his death, and removed to the 
house owned in 1875 by Mrs. Fred B. Eaton, where he died in 1801, aged seventy- 
three years. It is recorded on his gravestone : "Justice and benevolence sat governing 
upon his brow; while his generous soul was an alleviating source to the distressed. 
Judgment and information completed every sentence in his conversation ; conjugal 
affection and parental care added a laurel to his magnanimity ; and in every station of 
life he was a rich blessing to society, a friend to the community, a prudent and pious 
counsellor, and a humble member of that religion which now completes his eternal 
peace." 

Jonathan Cary (1756), keg-maker, of Boston, son of Capt. Jonathan (1740) and 
Sarah Roy [Ray] Cary, was born July 9, 1725. He resided in Henchman's Lane. 

Jonathan, Sr. (1740), was quite prominent in town affairs, but Jonathan, Jr. (1756), 
is mentioned in the records only as taking the census of the town in 1776, when he was 
selected as a census taker from Ward 5. In the militia he attained the grade of captain. 
A Jonathan Cary was published to marry Sarah Putnam, June 17, 1771. 

Daniel Boyer 1,1756). Authority: Boston to his wife, from Ticonderoga, dated Aug. 31, 1776, 

Records. may be read in the Appendix, pp. 1711-1712 of 

Benjamin Brown, Jr. (1756). Authorities: Mr. Eaton's "History of Reading." 
Boston Records; Eaton's Hist, of Reading. Jonathan Cary (1756). Authority : Boston 

A copy of a letter written by Mr. Brown ( 1 756) Records. 



1756] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 8 I 

Jonas Clark (1756), brazier, of Boston, son of Joseph and Margaret Clark, was born 
in Boston, Aug. 1, 1726. He married, (1) Oct. 2, 1749, Elizabeth Lillie, daughter of 

William and Mary Lillie, born May 8, 1723; (2) Prudence , who died Dec. 13, 

1789, aged sixty-seven years. He resided in Black-horse Lane (Prince Street), where 
he died Nov. 30, 1790, aged sixty-four years. 

He was first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1762, and ensign in 1770. Ensign 
Jonas (1756) was a nephew of Capt. Timothy Clarke (1702). He was clerk of the 
market in 1766, and, July 14, 1761, was appointed by the selectmen one of the town 
watch. 

John Deming (1756) was a merchant in Boston. He was published, (1) Jan. 30, 
1745, to marry Mary Howell. He married (published), (2) Feb. 13, 1752, Sarah West. 
She died June 16, 1783, and he marrie_d (3) Sarah How, Sept. 19, 1783. Elizabeth 
Deming, wife of John (1756), died Oct. 3, 1793, aged sixty years, and was buried from his 
dwelling on Newbury (Washington) Street. 

Capt. Deming (1756) was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1762, and 
ensign in 1 77 1 . He served as one of the clerks of the market from 1754 to 1757 inclu- 
sive; made the general walk or visitation of the town Feb. 21, 1763, being appointed 
from Ward 12, and, July 10, 1771, visited officially the public schools. He united with 
the Old South Church, June 21, 1741, and was an active member for more than half a 
century. In 1779-80, he was appointed on a committee to "methodize" the State 
accounts, and also to settle with the Continental soldiers of the State. 

Benjamin Dolbeare (1756), merchant, of Boston, son of John and Sarah Dolbeare, 
was born July 24, 1711. He married, (1) June 18, 1741, Hannah Vincent, who died 
June 2, 1763 ; and, (2) March 29, 1764, Elizabeth Dowding, who died in May, 1789. 
Benjamin Dolbeare (1756) died Jan. 26, 1787. He resided in Wing's Lane, now Elm 
Street. ' 

Edmund Dolbeare, and his sons John and Joseph, came to America from Ashburton, 
County Devon, England, about 1664. The sons learned the trade of their father, who 
was a pewterer. Benjamin Dolbeare (1756), son of John, carried on the pewterer's and 
ironmonger's trades in the same shop in Dock Square which his father occupied. John 
Dolbeare died June 20, 1740, when the business was taken charge of by Benjamin (1756). 

March 13, 1748, the town proceeded to consider "what it is best to do with their 
lands and buildings at the head of dock formerly leased to Mr. John Dolbeare, deceased." 
Mr. Benjamin Dolbeare (1756), "son of the aforesaid Mr. John Dolbeare," showing that 
his late father's lease had not expired, that article in the warrant was dismissed. 

Benjamin Dolbeare (1756) was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1761. 
He was prominent in town affairs. He was elected constable in 1738, but paid the fine 
rather than serve; tithing-man in 1752, and served as overseer of the poor for twenty 
consecutive years, — from 1757 to 1776, — and, declining to serve longer in that office, 
the town voted, March n, 1777, "that the thanks of the Town be & hereby are given 

Jonas Clark (1756). Authority: Boston Deming called here [Stoughton], on his way to Col. 

Records. Gridley's." 

John Deming (1756). Authorities : Boston Benjamin Dolbeare (1756). Authorities: 

Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Boston Records; Hill's Hist, of Old South Church, 

Ed. 1842. Vol. II., pp. 53, 54; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. 

Under date of Nov. 24, 1775, Ezekiel Price Company, Ed. 1842; New Eng. Hist, and Gen. 

wrote in his diary: "In the afternoon, uncle John Reg., 1893. 



82 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND ■ [i 75 6 

to Mr Benjamin Dolbeare [1756] for his faithful services as an Overseer of the Poor for 
many years past." He visited the public schools in 1759, and during eleven years — 
between 1750 and 1767 — made the general walk or visitation of the town with the prin- 
cipal citizens of the place, according to the custom of those times. 

Benjamin Dolbeare (1756) owned the covenant, Feb. 21, 1741-2. A month later, 
his son, Benjamin (Harv. Coll., 1763), was baptized. The latter was lost overboard in 
the spring of 1767, when returning from London to Boston. A stone has recently been 
uncovered on the building 16 and 17 Dock Square, with the inscription : "Rebuilt 1746 
by B. Dolbeare." 

John Dolbeare's tomb, erected in 1725, was No. 50 in the Common Burial-Ground. 
Benjamin Dolbeare (1756), his two wives, and daughter Sarah, were buried there. 

Robert Jenkins, 3d (1756), merchant, of Boston, son of Robert and Elizabeth 
Jenkins, was born in Boston, April 6, 1725. He was published to marry Persis Kent, 
March 22, 1760. He was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1761, clerk from 
1765 to 1767, ensign in 1769, lieutenant in 1772, and its captain in 1790. He served 
as clerk of the market in 1766. He was a member of Trinity Church, Boston, and was 
clerk of the parish. ' 

In the early Masonic records, the names "Robert Jenkins" and "Robert Jenkins, 
Jun.," frequently occur, and it is difficult to distinguish between them, as the word 
" junior " is sometimes omitted. 

Capt. Jenkins (1756) died Aug. 20, 1797, aged seventy-three years, and was buried 
from his home in Summer Street, the Artillery Company, in uniform and with side arms, 
preceding the corpse. His widow married Dea. Moses Grant. 

Edward Proctor (1756), merchant, of Boston, son of John and Hannah Proctor, 
was born in Boston, Aug. 28, 1733, and died Nov. 1, 181 1, aged seventy-eight years. 
He was published to marry Judith Clark, Sept. 26, 1754. She died March 15, 1790, 
aged fifty-eight years. He married, Aug. 22, 1790, Mary Adams, and the Centinel 
announced "Mary Proctor, consort of Col. Edward Proctor [1756], died November [1], 
1790, aged 44 years." He married, June 16, 1791, Hannah Atkins, who died Oct. 31, 
1832, aged eighty-seven years. His grandfather, Edward, joined the Artillery Company 
in 1699. 

Col. Edward (1756) was an importer of West India goods, at the sign of the 
" Schooner," in Fish (North) Street, at the North End, before the Revolutionary War, 
after which he was in the auction business at No. 1 Union Street. He was a prominent 
citizen of Boston, an officer in the local military, an ardent patriot, a member of the 
Tea Party, was one of the committee selected by the town to obtain the resignations of 
the consignees of the tea, and commanded the guard detailed to watch the tea ship 
"Dartmouth" on the night of Nov. 29, 1773. 

The proclamation of the " King of the Mohawks," of which a facsimile is given on 
the next two pages, appears to be in Col. Proctor's (1756) handwriting. The original 
was in the possession of the late Mr. Jeremiah Colburn, of Boston. 

In connection with his West India goods store, it would seem that for a time he 
kept a tavern. In the selectmen's minutes, under date of Jan. 31, 1764, we are informed 

Edward Proctor (1756). Authorities : Bos- Rambles in Old Boston ; Early Masonic Records, 
ton Records; Crane's Tea Leaves of 1773; Porter's 



1 75 6 J 'HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 83 

that "Mr. Proctor [1756], who keeps the Schooner tavern in Fish Street, acquainted the 
selectmen that a maid in his house was supposed to have the small-pox." He was urged 
by the selectmen to consent to her removal, but his answer was deferred until the after- 



. HK^ut*/ d£i^4«yvts/ U / l/6977y, im4£*U£ S&y: /Ztt-u^J 



84 . HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[1756 




noon, when the selectmen received the following : " I have thought upon the affair, and 
am determined, not to have my children moved upon any account. Your most obed' Hum. 
Serv 1 Edward Proctor." The selectmen put out a flag, and stationed a guard at the 
house. 

He was a warden of the town in 1773 ; overseer of the poor from 1775 to 1783, etc. ; 

^f^ft-^rr'^ulJ t-P/mr/iZridui/ fy^m/uusrvw. ot^xk^s^uZ? 

*■/-*- u£rrnJ,A*D ~tffc£7tffi Jlr-t?SU4^ *f^%U0ASj£> 

ti -tfci, <&*Llj ^feSy «^^^ ^ fe ^- 
iff* J OV7Z&&2WZC&. 



1756] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 85 

fireward from 1774 to 1789, and served on many important committees, — the most 
important of which, perhaps, was the Committee of Correspondence, Safety, and Inspec- 
tion of 1776, when he was associated with Samuel Adams, John Hancock, Paul Revere, 
and other patriots. Two persons were chosen from each ward, in 1773, to petition the 
General Court for a"n act empowering the town to erect, support, and defend street lamps. 
Capt. Edward Proctor (1756) and Paul Revere were chosen from Ward 4. Capt. Proc- 
tor (1756) was long connected with the military, becoming captain in 1763. He was in 
active service during the Revolutionary War, and rose to the rank of colonel of the 
Boston regiment. 

Col. Proctor (1756) was one of the stalwart men of Boston. He was full of energy, 
activity, and work. The colonial cause had in him a devoted servant, who gave to that 
cause untiring effort. In town meeting, on important committees, or at the head of his 
command, he was prompt, efficient, and thoroughly loyal. 

Col. Proctor (1756) became a member of the Masonic Fraternity in 1765, when he 
joined the Lodge of St. Andrew, of Boston. He was worshipful master of that lodge 
from 1774 to 1776, and, after holding various offices in the Massachusetts Grand Lodge, 
A. F. and A. M., he was unanimously chosen junior grand warden, March 1, 1782. 

In 1 79 1 Col. Edward Proctor (1756) purchased the mansion house on North Ben- 
net Street, which John Steele bought of Thomas Lee, Sr., in 1734. The colonel's heirs 
sold it in 1815 to Isaac Harris, who resided there until 1869. Col. Proctor (1756) 
resided there from 1791 until his decease. The Centinel of Nov. 2, 1811, said, after 
announcing his death : " Funeral from his mansion house in North Bennet Street, Mon- 
day p. m., Nov. 4." His tomb was No. 16, Copp's Hill Burial-Ground. 

Nathaniel Ridgeway (1756), " taylor," of Boston, son of Samuel and Naomi Ridge- 
way, was born in Boston, May 10, 1729. His brother, Samuel, Jr., joined the Artillery 
Company in 1756. Nathaniel (1756) was by trade a tailor, and in 1761 lived near Clark's 
Wharf. His family was afflicted by the epidemic of that year, and his child was removed 
to the hospital. In 1756 he was elected constable, but was excused from serving. 

Samuel Ridgeway, Jr. (1756), of Boston, son of Samuel and Naomi Ridgeway, was 
born in Boston, Jan. 2, 1726. His brother, Nathaniel, joined the Artillery Company 
in 1756. 

Capt. Samuel, Jr. (1756), was first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1761. He 
served as a constable of Boston in 1753, was drawn as a juror, Aug. 24, 1770, and 
"Capt." Samuel Ridgeway (1756) was elected a warden from 1775 to 1777 inclusive. 

John Wood (1756), of Boston, son of Richard and Hannah Wood, was born Oct. 
16, 1 7 19. He is not mentioned in the Record Commissioners' Reports. 1 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1756 is as follows : — 
"April 5th. 1756. The Company being under Arms, it was unanimously Voted, 
That the Rev. Mr. Ebenezer Pemberton of Boston be desired to preach the next Artillery 

Nathaniel Ridgeway (1756). Authority: 'See Sewall's Woburn, p. 348, for interesting 

Boston Records. account of John Wood, son of JoTin (1756). 

Samuel Ridgeway, Jr. (1756). Authority: 
Boston Records. 



86 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



['756 



Election Sermon, and that the present Commission Officers of the Company, Capt John 
Symmes [1733], Lt Thomas Savage [1739], & En. Newman Greenough [1740], & 
John Phillips, Esqr. [1725] Treasurer, be a committee to wait on him and desire the 
same. Attest : Samuel Torrey, Jun. Clerk. 

"May 3'd. The C mpany being under Arms, Capt John Symmes [1733], being 
one of the committee to wait on the Rev. Mr. Ebenezer Pemberton, to desire him 
to preach the next Artillery Election Sermon, reported to the Company that he had 
accepted the same. 

"The Evening being spent at Ensign Greenough's [1740] house, It was there 
Voted, That thirteen pounds, six shillings & eight pence, lawful money, be paid by the 
Treasurer of the Company to the Commission Officers towards defraying the charges of 
the dinner upon the ensuing Election Day, and the Company to dine with them. Voted, 
that there be a Committee chosen, of two members of the Company, to go as soon as 
may be to Col. Blanchard [1737] & others at Dunstable, and press them for payment of 
the money due from them to the Company. Voted, that John Phillips, Esqr [1725], 
and Capt Joseph Jackson [1738] be the persons to go to Dunstable, and in case the said 
John Phillips Esqr [1725], cannot attend to go/that Mr. William Taylor [1738] proceed 
with Capt Jackson [1738], in his room. Voted, That Maj. John Wendell [1735], Capt 
Thomas Savage [1739], and Mr. John Leverett [1750] be a committee to take the 
advice of some able lawyer about Col. Blanchard [1737] & others' bond, and get the 
same calculated by Mr. Samuel Winthrop, Clerk of the Superiour Court, and then draw 
up such instructions as they may think proper to give the committee that are going to 
Dunstable. The charges of both Committees to be borne by the Company. 

"Attest: Samuel Torrey, Jun. Clerk. 

"June 7th. The Evening being spent at Capt. John Welch's [1736], it was Voted, 
That the old Commission Officers, Capt John Symmes [1733], Lt Thomas Savage [1739], 
& En. Newman Greenough [1740], with the Treasurer, John Phillips, Esqr. [1725] be a 
committee to wait on the Rev. Mr. Ebenezer Pemberton and return him the thanks of 
this Company for his Sermon preached before them this day. 1 

"Attest: Samuel Torrey, Jun. Clerk, 

"September 6th. The Evening being spent at Lt Thomas Drowne's [1737], the 
following Votes were there passed, viz : Voted, That every member of this Company 
have a bayonett fitted to their firelocks as soon as may be. Voted, That every person 
admitted into this Company for the future shall provide for them selves, and appear on 
each of our training days, with a Blue Coat and a gold-laced hat. 

"Attest, Samuel Torrey, Jun. Clerk." 

Rev. Ebenezer Pemberton, of Boston, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 
1756. He was a son of Rev. Ebenezer Pemberton, pastor of the Old South Church, who 
delivered the Artillery election sermon in 1701 and 1709. Rev. Ebenezer Pemberton, 
Jr., was born Feb. 6, 1704-5, and was baptized Feb. n. He graduated at Harvard 
College in 1721, and became a member of the Old South Church, April 25, 1725. In 

Rev. Ebenezer Pemberton. Authorities: the Occasion, preached by the Rev. Mr. Pemberton 

Robbins's Hist, of Second Church; Hill's Hist, of of this Town, the said Company made choice of Mr. 

Old South Church. John Welch [1736] for their Captain, Mr. Thomas 

1 " Monday last being the Anniversary for the Drowne [1737] Lieutenant, and Capt. William Tay- 

Election of the Officers of the ancient and honour- lor [1738] for the present year." — Boston Evening 

able Artillery Company, after a Sermon suitable to Post, June 14, 1756. 



, 757 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 87 

the earlier part of his life he was a chaplain at Castle William. In April, 1727, he 
received an invitation to settle as pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in New York 
City, which he accepted, and was ordained Aug. 9 of that year. He continued as pastor 
of this church for twenty-two years. At the end of that term, when Mr. Pemberton 
requested his dismission, the presbytery testified, by letter, to Mr. Pemberton's "minis- 
terial dignity, abilities, and success, and their cheerful recommendation of him as an 
eminently endowed and highly esteemed preacher." He soon after (in 1754) settled 
as the fourth and last pastor of the New Brick Church. 

He was a sympathizer with Gov. Hutchinson, and was suspected of attachment to 
the Tory interest. As the war of the Revolution approached, Dr. Pemberton's health 
declined, and his parish became small. The house was closed in April, 1775, and 
Mr. Pemberton retired to Andover. He died Tuesday, Sept. 9, 1779, after a long 
confinement. 



The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1757 were: Thomas 

J 7 Cy < Savage (1739), captain; Newman Greenough (1740), lieutenant; William 

' ^ ' Simpkins (1739), ensign. Joseph Mann (1754) was first sergeant; Thomas 

Carnes (1754), second sergeant; Henry Perkins (1755), third sergeant; Isaac Decoster 

(1755), fourth sergeant, and Samuel Torrey, Jr. (1752), clerk. 

At the town meeting in March, 1757, it was voted that " the Thanks of the Town be 
& hereby is given to Hon. Jacob Wendell Esq. [1733 |, for faithful service as an over- 
seer of the poor for twenty years past." 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1757 were : Samuel Emmes, 
John Head, John Soley. 

Samuel Emmes (1757), of Boston, was a constable in 1744, and hog-reeve in 1748. 
From 1740 to 1744 he was a member of the fire company which had charge of the 
"copper engine " at the westerly part of the town. The engine-house was on Hancock 
Street. The engine was called the " West Boston engine," but was later named " Hero, 
No. 6." He was re-elected to town office in 1763, and was appointed to office in 1768. 
He was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1759. 

John Head (1757), merchant, of Boston, resided in Cornhill in 1762, and in Rox- 
bury in 1763. Mr. Drake thinks that Mr. Head (1757) succeeded Mr. James Smith, on 
his decease in 1769, in the business of sugar-refining. June 23, 1742, the " Hon. John 
Head [1757]," with the governor and others, visited the public schools. He was first 
sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1763. He attended the festival of St. John the 
Baptist, at the King's Arms tavern on Boston Neck, June 24, 1769. May 14, 1782, 
Joseph Head administered on the estate of his father, John Head, Esq. (1757), deceased. 

John Soley (1757), merchant, of Charlestown, son of John and Dorcas (Coffin) 
Soley, of Charlestown, was born in that town June 5, 1722. He married, Oct. n, 1759, 
Hannah Cary, daughter of Samuel Cary, of Charlestown, by whom he had eight children, 

Samuel Emmes (1757). Authority : Boston Records; John Rowe's Diary; Drake's Hist, of 
Records. Boston ; Suffolk County Probate Records. 

John Head (1757)- Authorities: Boston John Soley (1757)- Authority: Wyman's 

Charlestown Genealogies and Estates. 



88 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [ l?57 

of whom one was Hon. John Soley, who married, in 1804, Rebecca Tyng Hendley, 
daughter of Col. Samuel Hendley (1746). 

Jan. 13, 1762, and each year thereafter until Feb. 10, 1768, John Soley (1757) was 
included in the list, annually reported by the selectmen to the assessors of the town, of 
persons, " inhabitants of other towns in this province, who ought to be taxed here for 
the real estate they occupy and the business they do here, it being agreeable to law." 

John Soley (1757) moved from Charlestown to Boston about 1768, thence to 
Billerica about 1772 ; and there he died, Nov. 18, 1801. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1757 is as follows : — 

"April 8. 1757. The Company being under Arms, it was Voted, That the Rev. 
Mr. Samuel Checkley, Jun. of Boston, be desired to preach the next Artillery Election 
Sermon ; and that the present Commission Officers, with the Treasurer John Phillips, 
Esq. [1725] be a committee to wait on him and desire the same. The evening being 
spent at Sergeant Bakers [1751], it was there Voted unanimously, That the Company 
march to Roxbury on their training day in May next & that each person pay their pro- 
portion of the extraordinary expenses. 

" May 2'd. The Company being under Arms, Capt John Welch [1736], being one 
of the Committee to wait on the Rev. Mr. Samuel Checkley, Jun. to desire him to preach 
the next Artillery Election Sermon, reported to the Company, that he had accepted the 
same. The Evening being spent at Sergt Jones' [1754], it was there Voted, That there 
be a committee chosen to take care to get the money due to the Company from Col. 
Blanchard [1737] and others at Dunstable as soon as may be. Voted, That this com- 
mittee consist of three members of this Company, viz. Capt John Welch [1736], Lieut 
Thomas Drowne [1737], Capt Thomas Savage [1739]. Voted, That the above named 
Committee be fully empowered to take the most prudent & proper measures they think 
fit, in order to procure the money of the above-named Col. Blanchard [1737] and others. 

" Voted, That thirteen pounds, six shillings and eight pence, lawful money, be paid by 
the Treasurer of the Company to the Commission Officers towards defraying the charges 
of the dinner upon the ensuing Election Day, and the Company to dine with them. 

"Attest, Samuel Torrey, Jun. Clerk. 

"June 6th. 1757. The Company being under Arms, it was Voted, That the old 
Commission Officers, with the Treasurer, be a Committee to wait on the Rev. Mr. Samuel 
Checkley, Jun. and return him the thanks of this Company, for his Sermon preached 
before them this day. Attest Samuel Torrey, Jun. Clerk." 

Rev. Samuel Checkley, Jr., of Boston, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 
1757. He was a son of Rev. Samuel Checkley, of Boston, who delivered the Artillery 
election sermon in 1725, and was born Dec. 27, 1723. He graduated at Harvard Col- 
lege in 1743, and settled, Sept. 5, 1747, as the minister of the Old North Church, Boston, 
being the " successor of three reverend doctors named Mather," and a colleague with 
Rev. Joshua Gee. The latter died May 22, 1748, when Mr. Checkley became pastor of 
the church. " He is said to have been distinguished for a peculiar sort of eloquence, 
and an uncommon felicity in the devotional service of public worship." He died March 
19, 1768. 

Rev. Samuel Checkley, Jr. Authority: Sprague's Annals of American Pulpit. 



17S 8] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 89 

Rev. Samuel Checkley, Jr., was a grandson of Col. Samuel Checkley (1678), and a 
relative of Anthony Checkley, Jr. (1695), whose father, Col. Anthony (1662), was a half 
brother of Col. Samuel (1678). 



f1 The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1758 were: Newman 

[ V CO. Greenough (1740), captain; John Gore (1743), lieutenant; Joseph Gale 
• «-' (1744), ensign. Benjamin Andrews (1754) was first sergeant ; Francis Whit- 
man (1755), second sergeant; William Hyslop (1755), third sergeant; Edward Carnes 
(1755), fourth sergeant, and John Edwards, Jr. (1747), clerk. 

May 16, 1758, Hugh McDaniel (1729) petitioned the town of Boston to abate him 
part of the rent of a house and land on the Neck he hired of the town March 25, 1752, 
for reasons therein mentioned. A committee was appointed to consider the petition, 
view the premises, and report. The committee reported to the town that the piece of 
land "falls short in measure about one quarter part" of what was stated in the lease, and 
that Hugh McDaniel (1729) should be granted sixteen pounds, which was accepted by 
the town. 

Sept. 13, 1758, Gen. Amherst, who had been appointed to take command of the 
British Army in America, landed at Boston. The harbor was full of transports and war 
ships, and the town was full of soldiers. Sept. 16, Gen. Amherst, by whose vigorous 
efforts nearly the whole of Canada fell into the hands of the British before a twelvemonth, 
at the head of nearly five thousand men, started for Albany. 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1758 were : Nathaniel Barber, 
Jr., William Bordman, Richard Boylston, James Cunningham, Thomas Deering, John 
Downe, Edward Jackson, David Jenkins, Nathaniel Loring, Edward Lyde, William 
Murray, Moses Peck, David Spear, Thomas Symmes. 

Nathaniel Barber, Jr. (1758), merchant, of Boston, son of Nathaniel and Dorothy 
Barber, was born in Boston, March 18, 1728. He married, May 3, 1750, Elizabeth 
Maxwell. He was " a prominent merchant and patriot of Boston, — one of the famous 
' Whig Club ' of ante-revolutionary days, in which were James Otis, Dr. Church, Dr. 
Warren, and other leaders of the popular party. In it civil rights and the British con- 
stitution were standing topics for discussion. He was one of the Committee of Corre- 
spondence, Inspection, and Safety, from its creation in 1772 to 1783, and was naval 
officer of the port of Boston in 1774 and until his decease. 1 Prior to the Revolution he 
kept an insurance office in Fish (now North) Street." 2 

In 1780 and 1782, he was one of a town committee to raise the town's quotas of 
soldiers for the Continental Army. He is called, in the Boston Records, "Captain" in 

Nathaniel Barber, Jr. '1758). Authorities: charge of the Duties of it a large portion of his time 

Boston Records; New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., has been taken up, and he in the begining of our 

igijo. troubles exposed to much Personal danger — that 

1 The following certificate was given Col. Barber he is well qualified for the Post he sustains, has 

(1758) by the Committee on Correspondence, In- given universal Satisfaction in it, and depends upon 

spection, and Safety, Nov. 6, 1 776 : — his continuance on it, for the support of himself and 

"This may Certifie that Nathaniel Barber Esq a numerous Family too young to provide for them- 

[175S] officer for the Port of Boston, has ever in selves. 

the most public manner taken the part of his injured " By Order of the Committee, 

Country : that he has suffered greatly in the general " Ellis Gray, Chairman." 

Calamity, that he has been a faithful member of this 2 Crane's Tea Leaves, p. 95. 
Committee from its first Institution; that in dis- 



90 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 75 s 

1778, "Major" in 1779, and "Colonel" in 1780. He was present at the meeting of the 
inhabitants of Boston in Watertown, March 5, 1776, and was prominent in the com- 
memorative services of that day, serving on three separate committees. June 24, 1773, 
he attended the festival of St. John the Baptist, at the King's Arms tavern, on Boston 
Neck, and became a member of St. John's Lodge, of Boston, in 1780. 

He died at his house in Beer Lane, now Richmond Street, Oct. 13, 1787, aged 
fifty-nine years. 

The following appeared in the Massachusetts Centinel on Wednesday, Oct. 17, 1787 : 

"On Saturday night last, departed this life Nathaniel Barber, Esq. [1758], in the 
fifty-ninth year of his age. His funeral will be from his house in Beer Lane, Richmond 
Street, to-morrow afternoon at four o'clock." 

Also, in the same, on Saturday, Oct. 20, 1787 : — 

"On the 13th instant died, very suddenly, in the fifty-ninth year of his age, and on 
Thursday last were respectfully deposited in the tomb of his ancestors, attended by the 
honorable members of the Senate and House of Representatives, and many of his fellow- 
townsmen, the remains of Nathaniel Barber, Esq. [1758], naval officer of the port of 
Boston. A numerous family mourn their loss, the public regret their being deprived 
of a faithful and approved servant, and the friends of liberty could but drop a tear over 
the grave of so known and tried a patriot. His attendance and integrity in the cause of 
his country, expressed in the most dangerous and trying moments, more especially as 
one of the Committee of Correspondence, of which he was always a member, marked 
his character; and it may be justly said, that the honest fervor which distinguished the 
friends of liberty in 1775 was retained by Col. Barber [1758], in its full warmth, to the 
moment of his death." 

William Bordman (1758), hatter, of Boston, son of Andrew and Sarah Bordman, 
of Roxbury, was born Nov. 6, 1724. He married, Nov. 9, 1749, Susanna, daughter of 
Capt. Thomas Stoddard (1744). William Bordman (1758) was probably a cousin of 
Aaron (1736). He was extensively engaged in the manufacture and sale of hats, and 
in the fur trade. His place of business was near the head of Ann Street. His son, 
Thomas Stoddard, at one time partner in business with him, joined the Artillery Com- 
pany in 1774, and another son, William, Jr., joined in 1786. 

Capt. William (1758) was chosen constable in 1753, but refused to serve. In 1772, 
Dea. William Bordman (1758) was chosen a warden, and, in 1774, one of the committee 
on "ways and means for supplying the poor." He was first sergeant of the Artillery 
Company in 1764. He was a deacon of the Second Church as early as 1771, and as late 
as 1788. He was active, Feb. 9, 1788, with Paul Revere and others, in the ratification 
of the Federal Constitution by a public procession in Boston. He contributed toward 
the purchase of the new bell, cast by Paul Revere for the New Brick Church in 1792. 
The Second Church was the Old North until 1779, when it was united with the New 
Brick. 

William Bordman (1758) died Feb. 19, 1806. His will, proved in 1806, speaks of 
his workshop and land, situated back of his mansion house in Ann Street, which he 
bequeathed to his son, Thomas Stoddard Bordman (1774). 

William Bordman (1758). Authorities: Boston Records; MS. of Mr. Joseph C. Whitney, 
of Boston. 



, 75 8] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 91 

Richard Boylston (1758), brazier, of Charlestown, son of Richard and Mary (Smith) 
Boylston, of Charlestown, was born in that town July 7, 1722. He married, (1) Mary 
Abraham, April 16, 1747, and (2) Parnel Foster, Oct. 13, 1763. He died June 30, 
1807, aged eighty-five years. His residence, which he bought of his father in 1743-4, 
was on Main Street. He was possessed of considerable real estate, detailed by Mr. 
Wyman, including one and a half acres he sold to the United States for the navy yard. 

Richard Boylston (1758) was a great-grandson of Thomas Boylston, who came from 
London in the "Defence" in 1635, and settled at Watertown, Mass.; and, probably, a 
cousin of Ward Nicholas Boylston, the philanthropist, for whom Boylston Market, for- 
merly corner of Washington and Boylston streets, was named. 

James Cunningham (1758), painter, of Boston, son of William and Elizabeth 
(Wheeler) Cunningham, was born in Boston, April 24, 172 1. He married, June 3, 1742, 
Elizabeth Boylston. Her sister. Susanna, married, Nov. 23, 1734, Dea. John Adams, of 
Braintree, and was the mother of President John Adams. 

Nov. 3, 1756, he appears as captain of the South Engine Company, a position in 
which he was reconfirmed by the selectmen in April, 1758. At this time, his excellency 
the governor, upon application made to him, excused one hundred men from military 
duty for the service of the several engines in the town. Capt. Cunningham (1758) 
being at the head of Engine Company No. 8, and thereby excused from military duty, 
did not probably retain his membership in the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Com- 
pany. He was captain or master of the engine company until July 22, 1761, when he 
declined to serve longer in that capacity, and, Sept. 7, 1761, he rejoined the Artillery 
Company. He seems to have been proficient as a fireman, and several times during the 
five years of service as a fireman his company obtained the premium for being first at 
the fire. He pursued his trade, in 1778, in company with his brother William (1765). 

James Cunningham (1758) was active in the militia, and rose to the grade of major. 
He was lieutenant of the Artillery Company in 1764, and its captain in 1768. 

Major Cunningham (1758) died June 5, 1795, leaving a numerous family of chil- 
dren, and was buried at Dedham. 

Thomas Deering (1758), son of Henry and Elizabeth Deering, was born in Boston, 
May 16, 1720. He was a grandson of Henry Deering (1682). He made the general 
walk or visitation of the town in 1753, but does not appear to have held any town office. 

John Downe (1758), distiller, of Boston, son of William ( 1 7 16) and Sarah (Dan- 
forth) Downe, was born in Boston, Sept. 2, 1732. He married, about 1759, Ann, daugh- 
ter of George and Anna Holmes. John (1758) was a relative of Thomas Downe (1733). 
He was chosen constable of Boston in 1756 and 1765. 

Aug. 27, 1766, "Mr John Downes [1758] appointed by the Sessions a measurer of 
grain &c in this port, applied [to the selectmen] for scales but as they had before recom- 
mended three persons to the sessions as suitable & sufficient for that trust who were 
accordingly appointed & supplied by the Selectmen with measures and scales," Mr. 
Downe's (1758) request was declined. 

Richard Boylston (175S). Authority : Wy- John Downe (1758). Authorities: Boston 

man's Charlestown Genealogies and Estates. Records; Early Masonic Records; Suffolk County 

James Cunningham (1758). Authority: Probate Records. 
Records of Boston and Dedham. 



92 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND r_, 7jg 

Mr. Downe (1758) received the Masonic degrees in St. John's Lodge, of Boston, 
March 27, 1754. He attended the feasts of St. John the Baptist in 1754, 1755, 1757, 
and 1759, and was present at the installation of Jeremy Gridley as grand master, Oct. 1, 
1755. He was present in Grand Lodge as junior warden of St. John's Lodge in 1756, and 
junior warden of the Masters' Lodge in 1757, 1758, and 1759. 

His son, Nathaniel Holmes Downe, who entered the service as a marine, Jan. 26, 
1780, on the ship "Protector," commanded by Capt. John Foster Williams, was captured 
May 5, 1781, and taken to Mill Prison, England. He was exchanged in July, 1782, 
and returned to Boston, Aug. 14 next following. 

April 16, 1773, John Downe (1758) was appointed guardian of Mary Ann and 
Nathaniel Holmes Downe. As Willis Hall, of Medford, was appointed guardian of the 
same children, May 7, 1779, it is probable that John Downe (1758) died not long prior 
to the latter date. 

Edward Jackson (1758), innkeeper, of Boston, son of Joseph (1738) and Susanna 
Jackson, was born March 1, 1735. He married, May 29, 1755, Susanna Dana, by whom 
he had a son, Samuel, born Sept. 2, 1759, ar >d a daughter, Mary, baptized Aug. 30, 1761. 
He kept a tavern in the centre of Brighton. He never held any town office in Boston. 
He rose to the grade of captain in the Revolutionary War. 

Edward Jackson (1758) was a brother of Rev. Joseph Jackson, who was invited to 
deliver the Artillery sermon in 1761, but declined. They were brothers of Col. Henry 
Jackson, of Boston. 

David Jenkins (i75 8 )> of Boston, son of David and Sarah Jenkins, of Boston, was 
born Feb. 14, 1720, and married Rebekah Atkins, Feb. 18, 1747. He was elected to 
office in the town in 1746, and was continued for several years. He also made several 
of the annual visitations or walks about the town for purposes of inspection, etc., the last 
time being in 1 761 . He was a member of the local militia, and rose to the rank of 
captain in the Boston regiment. 

Nathaniel Loring (1758), merchant, of Boston, son of Nathaniel and Susanna (But- 
ler) Loring, was born June n, 1713. He married, (1) June 7, 1739, Mary, daughter of 
Edward Gray, of Boston, who was the owner of the rope-walks where occurred the differ- 
ences which originated the Boston Massacre; (2), June 18, 1749. Mary Gyles, of Rox- 
bury. He held a town office in 1752, and subsequently, prior to 1765, he made the 
general and annual walk or visitation of the town on several occasions. His father was 
one of the early and prominent members of the New Brick Church, joining it May 23, 
1722. Nathaniel (1758) was baptized in the Second Church, June 14, 1713. 

Mr. Loring (1758) was a merchant, and his place of business was near Faneuil Hall. 
In 1750, he was on the grand jury. He was appointed guardian for his daughter Hannah, 
for property bequeathed to her by her uncle, Joseph Heath, of Roxbury, who gave his 
sister, Mrs. Loring, five hundred acres of land in Shrewsbury. He also officiated as a 
visitor of the public schools during several years prior to 1768. He died in 1770. 

Edward Jackson (1758). Authority : Bos- Nathaniel Loring (1758). Authorities: 

ton Records. Boston Records; New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 

David Jenkins ( 1 75S). Authority: Boston 1853. 
Records. 



, 7S 8] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 93 

Edward Lyde (1758), merchant, of Boston, son of Edward Lyde (1702), was born 
Dec. 29, 1725, and married Katherine Gouch (Gooch), Jan. 15, 1765. He served as 
clerk of the market in 1768. 

Capt. Lyde (1758) was proscribed and banished by the State in 1778. 

William Murray (1758) became a member of St. John's Lodge, of Boston, in 1773. 
He attended the installation of Jeremy Gridley as grand master, Oct. 1, 1755, and of 
John Rowe as grand master, Nov. 28, 1768. He was present in Grand Lodge on several 
occasions between 1756 and 1768. 

William Murray (1758) never held any office in the town of Boston. He was 
second sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1 761. He embarked for Halifax with the 
royal army in 1776. 

Moses Peck (1758), watchmaker, of Boston, married, Jan. 17, 1758, Elizabeth 
Townsend, who died at Boston, June 25, 1793, aged sixty-two years. Capt. Moses Peck 
(1758) died in Boston, March 27, 1801, aged eighty-three years, at No. 63 Cornhill, 
where the funeral services took place March 30. 

He became a member of the Old South Church, May 23, 1742. He served as one 
of the clerks of the market four years, — from 1755 to 1758, — and was elected constable 
in 1756, but declined. Aug. 24, 1770, he was drawn as a juror for the August court. 
He was drafted, Dec. 18, 1776, as one of the quota of Boston ordered by the General 
Court to reinforce the Continental Army at or near New York. June 9, 1779, he con- 
tracted with the town to keep the North Church clock in good repair, according to the 
vote of the town, which contract was continued for two years. 

David Spear (1758), cooper, of Boston, son of Joseph and Mary (Collier) 
Spear, of Braintree and Hull, was born in 1726, in Hull, Mass. He was published (1) 
Jan. 25, 1749, to marry Elizabeth Oliver, of Annapolis, N. B. ; (2) Feb. 27, 1755, to 
marry Sarah, daughter of Thomas Stoddard (1744)- She died Jan. 17, i79i,and he 
married, (3) May 2, 1791, Mrs. Mary (Hammett) Holland. She died June 17, 1799, 
and he married, (4) Aug. 7, 1800, Sarah Loring, daughter of Samuel, of Hull, Mass. 
She died March 12, 1828. Mr. Spear (1758I died in Boston, July 8, 1803. 

The Columbian Centinal, of Jan. 19, 1791, says: "Patience Capen, wife of Hope- 
still [1763], who died Jan. 19, 1791, aged 57, was a sister of Sarah, wife of Capt. David 
Spear [1758], who died Jan. 17, 1791, aged 58 years." 

Capt. Spear (1758) was chosen by the town a culler of staves and hoops from 
1754 to 1774 inclusive, also, in 1781, 1782, and 1783 ; a juryman for the April term of 
the Inferior Court in 177 1, and for a Maritime Court, Aug. 9, 1786. Aug. 9, 1779, he 
was appointed one of a committee for the purpose of procuring subscriptions to fortify 
the harbor. 

There was a great fire in Boston, on Spear's Wharf, March 10, 1802, which 
consumed ten stores. The fire extended to the stores on Long Wharf, and Nos. 2 to 8 
inclusive were entirely destroyed, with their contents. Nos. 9 and 10, Long Wharf, 

Edward Lyde (1758). Authorities : Boston Moses Peck (1758). Authority: Boston 

Records; Sabine's American Loyalists. Records. 

William Murray (1758). Authorities: Early David Spear (1758). Authorities: Boston 

Masonic Records; Sabine's American Loyalists. ' Records; MS. of William G. Spear, of Quincy, Mass. 



94 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [ I75 8 

were pulled down to arrest the flames. John Osborn, Jr. (1764), and others, inserted in 
the newspapers of March 13, 1802, cards of thanks to the firemen. 

David Spear (1758) was second sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1763, and 
ensign in 1768. He is called "Captain " in 1779, in the Boston Records. 

Thomas Symmes (1758), of Boston, only son of Col. John (1733) and Martha 
Symmes, and cousin of Col. Andrew, Jr. (1760), was born in Boston, Sept. 8, 1729. He 
married (published), Feb. 22, 1753, Rebecca Marshall, of Boston. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1758 is as follows : — 

"April 3'd, 1758. The Company being under Arms in Faneuil Hall, Voted, That 
the Rev. Mr. Thomas Barnard of Salem be desired to preach the next Artillery Election 
Sermon, and that the present Commission Officers with the Treasurer, John Phillips, 
Esq. [1725] be a committee to wait on him and desire the same. 

"Attest: Samuel Torrey, Jun. Clerk. 

"May 1st. The Company being under Arms, Capt Thomas Savage [1739], being 
one of the committee to wait on the Rev. Mr. Thomas Barnard to desire him to preach 
the next Artillery Election Sermon, reported that he had accepted the same. The 
Evening being spent at Sergt Perkins [1755], '' was the re Voted, That Capt Thomas 
Savage [1739], Capt Newman Greenough [1740] and Mr. John Leverett [1750] be a 
committee to take the most prudent and proper measures to get the money due to the 
Company from the heirs of Col. Joseph Blanchard [1737], deceased. Voted, That 
thirteen pounds, six shillings and eight pence, lawful money, be paid by the Treasurer 
of the Company, Col. John Phillips [1725], to the present commission officers towards 
defraying the charges of the dinner upon the ensuing Election day ; and the Company 
to dine with them. Attest : Samuel Torrey, Jun. Clerk, 

"June 5th. The Company being under Arms, it was Voted, That the old Com- 
mission Officers with the Treasurer, be a committee to wait on the Rev. Mr. Thomas 
Barnard, and return him the thanks of this Company for his Sermon preached before 
them this day. The Evening being spent at Capt Greenough's [1740], it was Voted, 
That the committee's account of charge in going to Dunstable, being three pounds, four 
shillings and one penny, lawful money, be allowed and paid by the Treasurer, John 
Phillips, Esqr. [1725]. Voted, That Col. John Phillips [1725], Maj. Joseph Jackson 
[1738] and Mr. Samuel Swift [1746] be a committee to settle and adjust with the heirs 
of Col. Joseph Blanchard [1737] & others, who are by bond and mortgage in arrears to 
the Company, and in order thereto, to consult all such counsel-in-the-law as they shall 
think fit, and to make return as soon as may be ; and what shall be done by said com- 
mittee to be final, touching the premises ; and the charge arising thereby to be borne by 
the Company. Attest : Samuel Torrey, Jun. Clerk. 

"June 5th. 1758. The Company being under Arms, it was unanimously Voted, 
That the thanks of this Company be given to Mr. Samuel Torrey, Jun. [1752] for his 
good services as Clerk to this Company for three years last past. 

• " Attest : John Edwards, Clerk. 
"Sept 4th. The Evening being spent at Lieut Gore's [1743], it was there Voted, 
That Mr. William Hyslop [1755] should serve as Sergeant in the Company the present 
year. Voted, That every person should learn the present exercise before they are 
admitted into this Company. Attest : John Edwards, Clerk." 



1 7 59] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 95 

Rev. Thomas Barnard, of Salem, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 
1758. He was the son of Rev. John Barnard, of Andover, and was born in that place, 
Aug. 16, 17 16, graduated at Harvard College in 1732, and was ordained at Newbury 
Jan. 31, 1739 (according' to Joshua Coffin, " History of Newbury"), as pastor of the 
Second Church. He resigned this pastoral office, Oct. 29, 1749, and, for a time, applied 
himself to the study and practice of law. He re-entered the ministry, however, and was 
installed as minister of the First Church, in Salem, Sept. 17, 1755. He continued 
actively engaged in church work until he was disabled by paralysis, in 1770. He died 
Aug. 5, 1776. 

Mr. Barnard is spoken of as " a man of solid excellencies, both of mind and 
character, not brilliant but strong and rightly balanced, ' much beloved by his society 
and esteemed by the public' " ' 

His son, Rev. Thomas Barnard, of Salem, delivered the Artillery election sermon 
in 1789. 

The following named members of the Company are given in the Record Book as 
" Artillery soldiers under the fine of 1/ per diem for non-appearance " : — 

Benjamin Andrews (1754), Nathaniel Baker (1 751), William Baker (1745), Samuel 
Ballard (1755), Samuel Barrett (1755), Jeremiah Belknap, Jr. (1745), Joseph Belknap 
(1742), William Bell (1756), Nathan Blodgett (1742), Joseph Bradford (1740), John 
Bridge (1751), John Butler (1745), Joseph Butler (1742), Jonathan Cary (1756), 
Benjamin Church (1742), Barnabas Clark (1755), John Coburn (1751), Thomas 
Dawes, Jr. (1754), Isaac Decoster (1755), Josiah Edson, Jr. (1747), Samuel Emmes 
(1757), Benjamin Goldthwait (1740), Samuel Goodwin (1739), John Gore (1743), 
William Heath (1754), Samuel Hendley (1746), William Homes (1747), Jacob Hurd 
(1743), Daniel Jones (1754), John' Joy (1755), Thomas Lawlor (1746), Samuel Liver- 
more (1746), Jonathan Lowder (1747), Joseph Mann (1754), Thomas March (1747), 
David Mason (1754), John Milliken (1741), William Moor (1749), William Murray 
(1758), Benjamin Phillips (1755), Thomas Raymond (1747), Nathaniel Ridgeway 
(1756), Samuel Ridgeway, Jr. (1756), Isaac Royall (1750), Benjamin Russell (1745), 
Thomas Stoddard (1744), John Storer (1739), Onesiphorus Tilestone (1747), Benjamin 
Walcott (1745), John Waldo (1739), Josiah Waters (1747), Samuel Whitwell (1755), 
John Wood (1756). 

The above list was made out probably in 1758-9. 



The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1759 were : John 

T y CC\ Phillips (1725), captain; William Taylor, (1738), lieutenant ; Onesiphorus 

I J? Tilestone (1747), ensign. Jonathan Cary (1740) was first sergeant ; Samuel 

Ballard (1755), secon d sergeant; Samuel Emmes (1757), third sergeant; Samuel 

Whitwell (1755), fourth sergeant, and John Edwards (1747), clerk. 

The war was vigorously prosecuted by Lord Amherst, and by the end of the summer 
of 1759 nearly the whole of Canada had fallen into the hands of the English. But the 
victory was obtained at a high cost to the colony, and the distress brought upon the 

1 Rev. Edmund B. Willson, in Hurd's Hist, of Essex County. 



96 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 759 

people was very great. In 1758 the Assembly made its greatest effort, raised an army 
for public service, and greatly reduced the arms-bearing population of the colony. The 
expense of the regiments raised for that service was one hundred and twenty thousand 
pounds sterling ; towns in the Province paid sixty thousand more to procure men, and 
the defence of the colony's frontier cost thirty thousand more. Seven thousand men 
were put into the field in 1758, and nearly as many called for in 1759. 

Many inhabitants left the colony, " removed to other Governments to live more free 
from taxes"; four towns revolted from the jurisdiction of Massachusetts; five thousand 
men had been raised, and a double bounty was offered for fifteen hundred additional. 
Gov. Pownall found difficulty in obtaining officers for these regiments. As nearly all the 
members of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company had been in active service, 
and some of them continuously so, the years 1758 and 1759 show that a majority of its 
membership, liable to bear arms, were in the path of war, and largely shared in the great 
victory obtained in the summer of 1759. 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1759, were : Richard Boynton, 
Christopher Clark, Joseph Gale, Jr., Josiah Salisbury, Samuel Simpson, John Skinner, 
Peter Verstile, Job Wheelwright. 

Richard Boynton (1759) married, Sept. 19, 1745, Sarah Peirce, and was published 
to marry Ann Andrews, Jan. 2, 1755. He was chosen, Nov. 2, 1772, a member of the 
Committee of Correspondence " to state the rights of the Colonists," etc. This com- 
mittee consisted of twenty-one persons, — the most prominent men of the town. In 
1774 he was one of the committee selected to carry the resolutions of the Continental 
Congress into execution, and in 1776 was again elected on the Committee of Corre- 
spondence and Safety. He was ensign of the Artillery Company in 1764, lieutenant in 
1767, and rose to the grade of major in the militia. His residence during the Revolu- 
tion was on Court Street, Boston. He held the office of deputy sheriff in 1789, and 
resided on Marlboro Street. 

He died March 27, 1795, a g e d seventy-four years. 

Christopher Clark (1759), caulker, of Boston, son of Benjamin (1733) and 
Miriam Clark, was born Feb. 2, 1737. He married, Oct. 11, 1763, Rebecca Cobourn, 
and resided on Unity Street. He served many years in the militia, and became first 
lieutenant in Col. Paddock's (1762) train of artillery. In 1767 and 1768 he was one of 
the bondsmen of Abraham Savage, tax collector. July 5, 1782, the town, by vote, 
expressed its thanks to Mr. Christopher Clark (1759) "for his generous donation of a 
bell for the use of one of the publick schools in this town." He held the office of 
inspector of police in Boston in 1788. 

Joseph Gale, Jr. (1759), tin-plate worker, of Boston, son of Joseph and Mary 
(Alden) Gale, was born in Boston, March 1, 1736. He married, June 13, 1765, Sarah 
Huntington. Mr. Gale (1759) never held office in the town of Boston. 

Not long prior to the Revolution, he moved from Boston to Norwich, Conn., where, 
according to a deed dated 1785, he had pursued his trade. He enlisted as a Continental 

Richard Boynton (1759). Authority: Bos- Joseph Gale, Jr. (1759)- Authorities: 

ton Records. Boston Records; New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 

Christopher Clark (1759). Authorities: 1864; Gale Family Records. 
Boston Records; Mass. Archives. 



i 7S9 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 97 

soldier, and was made captain of a Connecticut company in Col. Parsons' regiment, the 
Sixth, in Gen. Putnam's brigade, and was at the siege of Boston in 1775. After the war, 
President Washington appointed him collector of customs in Connecticut, which office 
he held for several years. He was a brave soldier, and an honest man, whose character 
was above reproach. His wife, Sarah, died in 1787, aged forty-four years and seven 
months; he died at Norwich, Conn., in December, 1799, aged sixty-three years. 1 

Josiah Salisbury (1759), merchant, of Boston, son of Nicholas and Martha 
(Saunders) Salisbury, was born in Boston, March 10, 1734. 

Samuel Salisbury, a deacon of the Old South Church, was a brother of Josiah 
(1759), and Deacon Josiah, of the Old South, was a son of Deacon Samuel. 

Mr. Whitman (1810), in his history of the Artillery Company, Ed. 1842, p. 308, 
says, Mr. Salisbury (1759) " was one °* tne ^ ast wno wore tne old cocked hats. It was 
always known if he had money to let, without asking him ; for if he had, he always wore 
the front peak of his hat high up when he walked down to the Exchange, and low down 
was always sad foreboding to borrowers." 

Josiah Salisbury (1759) died May 2, 1818. 

Samuel Simpson (1759), °f Boston, son of John and Mary Simpson, was born July 

«j '73>- 

March 8, 1756, he was elected constable of Boston, and was excused. At the same 
meeting the town voted that any person chosen to serve as a constable might be excused 
by paying to the town treasurer four pounds, lawful money. He was fourth sergeant of 
the Artillery Company in 1764, and in the local militia rose to the grade of captain. 

John Skinner (1759), pewterer, Newbury Street, Boston. He married (published), 
Jan. 22, 1752, Edith Edeston, and, (2) June 26, 1754, Mary Tuttle. He held the town 
office of assay master from 1765 to 1783 inclusive. He was fourth sergeant of the 
Artillery Company in 1763, and ensign in 1772. 

Ensign Skinner (1759) died Feb. 12, 1792, aged seventy-two years. His dwelling 
was near Winnissimet Ferry. 

Peter Verstile (1759), merchant, of Boston. He was chosen a warden in Boston 
for the years beginning March 13, 1775, and March 29, 1776. 

Job Wheelwright (1759), cooper, of Boston. He was married to Abigail Barnard, 
March 13, 1756, by Rev. Thomas Foxcroft. He served as a culler of staves and hoops 
from 1762 to 1779 inclusive, and, Feb. 6, 1777, was chosen from Ward 10 one of a 
committee to prevent monopolies and oppression. He was third sergeant of the Artillery 
Company in 1763, and rose to the grade of captain in active service. 

Mr. Wheelwright (1759) became a member of the First Lodge, A. F. and A. M., in 
Boston, in 1762, and retained his membership until his decease. He held the office of 
senior warden in 1765. He was senior warden of the Masters' Lodge in 1769 and 1773. 

Josiah Salisbury (1759). Authorities: Job Wheelwright (1759). Authority: Bos- 

Boston Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. ton Records. 
Company, Ed. 1842. ' Columbian Cenlinel, December, 1799. 

John Skinner (1759)- Authority: Boston 
Records. 



98 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



['759 



The last meeting of St. John's Grand Lodge which he attended was Dec. 27, 1774, at 
the Bunch of Grapes Tavern, and the last meeting of the Massachusetts Grand Lodge 
which he attended was June 24, 1777. 

His place of business was near Oliver's Dock, Liberty Square, and his residence on 
that part of Atkinson Street, originally called f Green's Lane." He died Wednesday 
evening, Sept. 12, 1798, aged sixty-five years. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1759 ' s as follows : — 

"April 2'd 1759. The Company being under Arms, in Faneuil Hall, Voted, That 
the Rev. Mr. Amos Adams of Roxbury be desired to preach the next Artillery Election 
Sermon ; and that the present Commission Officers, with the Treasurer, John Phillips, 
Esq. [1725], & Capt Thomas Savage [1739]. be a Committee to wait on him and desire 
the same. The Evening being spent at my House Voted, That Mr. William Hyslop 
[ I 7SS] be discarded the Company and have his name erased out of the Company's Books. 

" Voted, That the expense of this evening be paid out of the Company's money. 

" Attest : John Edwards, Clerk. ' 

"May 7th. 1759. The Evening being spent at Sergt Edward Carnes [1755], ar| d 
Capt Newman Greenough [1740], being one of the Committee to wait on the Rev. Mr. 
Amos Adams, to desire him to preach the next Artillery Election Sermon, reported, that 
he had accepted the same. Voted, That thirteen pounds, six shillings and eight pence, 
lawful money, be paid by the Treasurer of the Company to the present Commission 
Officers towards defraying the charge of the Election Dinner, & the Company to dine 
with them. Voted, that Mr. Benjamin Andrews [1754] be discarded the Company, and 
have his name erased out of the Company's Books. Voted, That there be a committee 
to revise and examine the list and settle the same. Voted, that the Committee" consist 
of the following persons, viz: Capt. Thomas Savage [1739], Messrs John Gore [1743] 
John Leverett [1750] & John Edwards [1747], the present Clerk, to settle the Com- 
pany's list. Attest John Edwards, Clerk. 

" June 4th. The Company being under Arms, it was then Voted, That the old 
commission officers, with the new ones, be a Committee to wait on the Rev. Mr. Amos 
Adams, and return him the thanks of this Company for his Sermon preached this day. 

" Attest : John Edwards, Clerk. 

"October i 6t . 1759. The evening being spent at Ensign Tilestone's [1747], it was 
there Voted, That John Edwards [1747], the present Clerk, have one quarter part of the 
fines he shall collect from the delinquent members of the Company. Voted, That the 
members of the Company meet at Faneuil Hall, for to perfect themselves in the military 
exercise on the Tuesday next following the next March meeting for the choice of Town 
Officers, and that the delinquent members pay a fine of eight pence, lawful money. 
Voted, That the Committee chosen in May last to revise and examine the list, relating 
to the members of the Company, meet and settle the same. 

"Attest: John Edwards, Clerk" 

Rev. Amos Adams, of Roxbury, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1759. 
He was a son of Henry and Jemima (Morse) Adams, and was born in Medfield, Sept. 1, 
1728. He graduated at Harvard College in 1752, and was ordained as the sixth pastor 
of the First Church in Roxbury, Sept. 12, 1753. He married, Oct. 18, 1753, Elizabeth, 



i 7 6o] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 99 

daughter of Deacon Henry Prentice. He resided in the parsonage, opposite to the 
church, "now owned and occupied by Charles K. Dillaway, Esq." 1 The headquarters 
of the army, during the siege of Boston, were on Meeting-house Hill, and Rev. Mr. 
Adams and his family were obliged to temporarily leave the parsonage. It became the 
headquarters of Gen. John Thomas. Mr. Adams was a very energetic man — a true 
patriot ; could both pray and preside at meetings of the town and the militia, and was 
scribe of the convention of ministers, which, in May, 1775, recommended the people to 
take up arms in defence of their liberties. He was pastor of the First Church from the 
time of his ordination until his decease — a period of twenty-three years. One Sunday, 
after preaching his usual time to his own people, he addressed a regiment in the open 
air, which resulted in his death, from extra exertion and exposure, at Dorchester, Oct. 5, 
1775. "At the time," says the Boston Gazette, "he was seized with his last sickness, he 
was engaged as chaplain to a regiment in the Continental Army, who paid the funeral 
honors to his remains on the following Saturday." 

The following-named members of the Company are given in the Record Book as 
" Artillery soldiers under the fine of 6/ per diem for non-appearance " : — 

Nathaniel Barber, Jr. (1758), James Bennett (1756), Seth Blodgett (1756), Daniel 
Boyer (1756), Richard Boylston (1758), Benjamin Brown, Jr. (1756), Edward Carnes 
(1755), Thomas Carnes (1754), Christopher Clark (1759), Jonas Clark (1756), Thomas 
Deering (1758), John Deming (1756), Benjamin Dolbeare (1756), John Downe (1758), 
Samuel Dyer (1755), John Forsyth (1755), Joseph Gale, Jr. (1759), Daniel Gookin 
(1751), John Head (1757), Thomas Hubbard (1751), William Hyslop (1755), Edward 
Jackson (1758), Robert Jenkins, 3d (1756), John Leverett (1750), Nathaniel Loring 
(1758), Edward Lyde (1758), Thomas Newman (1750), Moses Peck C1758), Henry 
Perkins (1755), Samuel Simpson (1759), John Soley (1757), Thomas Symmes (1758), 
Samuel Torrey, Jr. (1752), Francis Whitman (1755). 

The above list was made out probably in 1759-60. 



.- The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1760 were: William 

J VQQ # Taylor (1738), captain ; Onesiphorus Tilestone (1747), lieutenant; Josiah 

• Waters (1747), ensign. Samuel Dyer (1755) was first sergeant; Samuel 

Barrett (1755), second sergeant; Benjamin Phillips (1755), third sergeant; Benjamin 

Brown, Jr. (1756), fourth sergeant, and John Edwards (1747), clerk. 

The 20th day of March, 1760, is memorable in the annals of Boston. On that day, 
about two o'clock in the morning, a fire broke out in the dwelling-house of Mrs. Mary 
Jackson and son, "at the sign of the Brazen Head, in Cornhill," now Washington 
Street, about opposite the present Williams Court. The fire extended to the wharves, 
consuming nearly four hundred buildings, half of them dwelling-houses, and turning a 
thousand people from their homes. The loss was about one hundred thousand pounds 
sterling. In the News-Letter is given a list of the persons burnt out, in which appear 
the names of the following members of the Artillery Company : Upper part of Water 
Street — dwelling-house of Isaac Cazneau (1744). In Quaker Lane — William Hyslop 

1 Drake's Hist, of Roxbury, 1878. 



100 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[1760 



(1755). Sampson Salter (1729). Towards Oliver's Dock — David Spear (1758), 
William Baker (1745), Daniel Henchman (1712).. In Mackerel Lane (Kilby Street) — 
Benjamin Phillips' store (1755), John Osborn, Jr. (1764). The lower part of Water Street 
— William Torrey (1765), Col. Thwing (1761), John Fullerton (1768), Joseph Webb, 
Jr. (1761). Milk Street and Batterymarch — Benj. Cobb, father of Benj., Jr. (1787), 
Benj. Hallowell (1733), and all the buildings on Col. Wendell's (1733) Wharf. A large 
amount of donations was received from both Europe and America, and Col. John Phillips 
(1725) was chairman of the committee for their distribution. At the time of this fire 
there were twelve firewards, of whom three were members of the Artillery Company, 
viz., John Phillips (1725), Joseph Jackson (1738), and Newman Greenough (1740). 

At the May session of the General Court, an Act was passed for " the better 
rebuilding of Boston," and the Court enacted " that no house or other building whatso- 
ever more than seven feet in height shall be erected in Boston, otherwise than of stone 
or brick, and covered with slate or tiles." 

Francis Bernard, the newly-appointed governor, successor of Gov. Pownall, arrived 
in Boston, Aug. 3, 1760. He was received with great parade by the militia, under com- 
mand of Brig.-Gen. Isaac Royall (1750), and by prominent gentlemen of the town. 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1760 were: William Dawes, 
Benjamin Edes, Jacob Holland, Moses Pitcher, Andrew Symmes, Jr. 

William Dawes (1760), tailor, of Boston, son of Thomas and Sarah (Story) Dawes 
and grandson of Lieut Ambrose Dawes (1674), was born in Boston, Oct. 2, 17 19. 
Thomas Dawes lived on Sudbury Street, and was by trade a mason and builder, a trade 
which his nephew, Col. Thomas (1754), followed. Lieut. William Dawes (1760) resided 
on Ann Street, corner of Scottow's Alley, and his tailor's shop was on Salt Lane, which 
ran "from Bowes' corner, in Union Street, east to Mill Creek." March 16, 1747, he 
petitioned the town for liberty to build a shop on the town's land at the head of the 
dock, and a committee was appointed to consider the request. On March 28, the com- 
mittee reported denying the request, " the persons in general that live thereabout object- 
ing to the same." 

He married, (1) about 1742, Lydia Boone, daughter of Nicholas, the noted book- 
seller of Boston. She died in 1760, having borne nine children, and Aug. 27, 1764, 
Lieut. William (1760) married (2) Hannah Gair, a widow, and daughter of Samuel 
Jackson (1733). She died June 13, 1810. 

Soon after the death of his first wife, having disposed of some of his property, he 
moved to Marlboro and settled on a farm which he had purchased. After a few years' 
absence he returned to Boston, and at first kept a grocer's store, but afterward, in part- 
nership with his nephew, William Homes, Jr. (1766), he was engaged as a goldsmith. 
Their place of business was on Ann (now North) Street, where Oak Hall stands. At this 
time his family lived in the rooms over their shop. We are told that " his apprentices 
were among the party who threw the tea overboard in Boston Harbor. The daughters of 
the family sat up for them ; and when they came in, the rims of their hats, which were 
turned up a little, were loaded with tea, which the young women vigorously shook into 
the fire." 

William Dawes (1760) remained in Boston during the siege. His silver and valu- 

William Dawes (1760). Authorities: Bos- Paul Revere, by Henry W. Holland; Hill's Hist, of 
ton Records; William Dawes, Jr., and his ride with Old South Church. 



i 7 6o] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. IOI 

ables were concealed in the cellar, and they remained there until after the evacuation. 
During the last two years of his life he was totally blind. He was first sergeant of the 
Artillery Company in 1766, and served as a juryman for the Inferior Court, Sept. 29, 1770. 
He joined the Old South Church Feb. 8, 1735, his sisters Rebecca and Abigail joining 
also upon the same day. 

He died Nov. 14, 1802, and was buried in the " Chapel Ground," "three years after 
the death of his patriot son," William, Jr. (1768), leaving his wife Hannah and several 
children. The house on Ann Street, valued at six thousand pounds, he gave to his wife 
during her life, and after her decease to his daughters Ruth and Sarah. The rest of his 
property, real and personal, he gave to his children. He had by his first wife, Hannah, 
who married John Lucas (1786), Lydia, who married Lieut. John Coolidge (1786), and 
William (1768), "who rode with Paul Revere," and six other children. Besides the 
above-named son and sons-in-law, the following-named relatives of William (1760) were 
members of the Artillery Company: Benjamin Goldthwait (1740), who married his 
(William's) niece, Sarah Dawes, and their son Benjamin (1793), who married William's 
(1760) granddaughter; William Homes (1747), who married William's (1760) sister 
Rebecca, and their son, William, Jr. ( 1766) ; Josiah Waters ( 1747), who married William's 
([760") sister Abigail, and their son, Col. Josiah Waters, Jr. ^769) ; William Moor (1749), 
son of William's (1760) sister Mary; Col. Thomas Dawes (1754), son of Thomas, who 
was a brother of William (1760), and Capt. Joseph Pierce (1769), who married Ann 
Dawes, sister of Col. Thomas (1754). 

Benjamin Edes (1760), printer, of Boston, son of Peter and Esther (Hall) Edes, 
of Charlestown, was born Oct. 14, 1732. He moved to Boston, and married in 1754 
Martha Starr, by whom he had ten children. He learned the printer's trade, and in 1755 
associated himself with John Gill in the publication of the Boston Gazette, of which Mr. 
Edes (1760) was editor for forty-three years. They began the printing business in "the 
second house west of the Court House," and later occupied the printing house of Samuel 
Kneeland. They printed pamphlets, and for several years were the printers for the 
General Court. Benjamin Edes ( 1760) was always to be found associated with the lead- 
ing spirits of the Revolution in all measures taken by the people of Boston against the 
oppressive acts of Parliament, and those sent hither to enforce them. When Boston was 
being closed by the British, Mr. Edes (1760) made his escape in the night, taking with 
him in a boat both press and type. He settled in Watertown, continued to issue the 
Gazette, and was printer for the Provincial Congress of Massachusetts. In 1776, on the 
evacuation of Boston by the British, he returned to Boston, the former partnership was 
dissolved, and he continued in business alone. In 1779, he formed a partnership with 
his two sons, Benjamin and Peter, which continued for three years, when Peter set up 
in business for himself, and Benjamin, Jr., established a newspaper in Haverhill. Ben- 
jamin Edes (1760), on his return to Boston in 1776, occupied a house in Cornhill 
(Washington Street), and some years before his death he moved into his own house on 
Temple Street, having obtained a room "over a tin-plate worker's shop in Kilby Street," 
for a printing office. 

Over the printing office, etc., of Edes and Gill, on the south side of Court Street, was 

Benjamin Edes (1760). Authorities: Bos- Old Landmarks of Boston; New Eng. Hist, and 
ton Records; Thomas's Hist, of Printing; Drake's Gen. Reg., 1862, 1865. 



102 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[ 1 760 



the meeting-place of the Long-Room Club, of which Samuel Adams was the head, and 
the leading patriots of the Revolution were members. 

March 16, 1757, the selectmen agreed that Edes (1760) and Gill should have the 
printing of the town votes, a large share of which fell to their lot for many years. At the 
same time the selectmen informed him that it has been their disposition " to encourage 
persons industrious in their business, and you in particular, by giving you a full share of 
the Town's printing, we now deliver you this vote of the town to print, but at the same 
time inform you, that you have printed such pamphlets and such things in your news- 
papers as grossly reflect upon the received religious principles of this people, which 
is very offensive, and complaints have been made to us by some of the inhabitants con- 
cerning said pamphlets and papers, we therefore now inform you if you go on priming 
things of this nature you must expect no more favours from us." 

To which Mr. Edes (1760) answered to the following effect: "That he was sorry 
he had given occasion to any persons to be offended at what he had printed, but that he 
would take more care for the future, and publish nothing that shall give any uneasiness 
to any persons whatever." 

Benjamin Edes (1760) was first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1765, and 
served as a captain in the militia. 

He died in Boston, Dec. n, 1803. An obituary notice of him appeared in the 
columns of the Indcpende7it Chronicle on the 19th of the same month Gordon, in his 
"History of the American Revolution" (Vol. I., p. 175, London Ed., 1788), mentions 
Benjamin Edes (1760) in his list of persons, who, on the 14th of August, 1765, sus- 
pended from the branches of Liberty Tree an effigy, representing Andrew Oliver, the 
stamp distributor, and a huge boot (typical of the Earl of Bute), with the devil emerging 
from it, holding the Stamp Act in his hand. 

Jacob Holland (1760), currier, of Boston. He was chosen a sealer of leather at 
Boston in 1775, 1776, and 1777, and warden in 1781. His name is not given in the 
Directory of Boston for 1789. He was a lieutenant in the militia. 

Moses Pitcher (1760), glazier, of Boston. In 1757, ne had wife, Mary. He united 
with the Old South Church, June 8, 1760, and was third sergeant of the Artillery Com- 
pany in 1764.- The selectmen directed Mr. Nath. Brown, Oct. 28, 1761, to deliver unto 
Mr. Moses Pitcher (1760) "all the sashes saved from Faneuil Hall Market at the late 
fire," and April 27, 1767, the selectmen agreed that Mr. Pitcher (1760) should have the 
glaziers' work in repairing the school-house on the Common. 

Moses Pitcher (1760) received Masonic degrees in the First Lodge, in Boston, 
May 3, 1762, and is recorded several times as present in the St. John's Grand Lodge. 
He attended the installation of M. W. John Rowe as grand master, Nov. 23, 1768. 

In 1776, William Cooper, clerk, entered a complaint against " Moses Pitcher [1760], 
glazier," for breach of a resolve of the General Court of Massachusetts, passed July 10, of 
that year. The resolve warned all soldiers of the training band and alarm lists to 
appear on the Common for the purpose of raising there from by enlistment or draft " one 
out of every twenty-five." Moses Pitcher (1760), a soldier in the train-band, failed to 
appear and was fined ten pounds. 

Mose9 Pitcher (1760). Authorities: Boston Records; Early Masonic Records; New Eng. Hist, 
and Gen. Reg., 1880. 



, 7 6o] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 103 

He was a loyalist, and sailed from Boston with the English in 1776, and died in 
Halifax in 1817. 

Andrew Symmes, Jr. (1760), merchant, of Boston, son of Andrew (1734) and 
Hannah Symmes, was born in Boston, March 19, 1735. He married Lydia . 

Andrew Symmes, Jr. (1760), was chosen a warden in Boston, April 8, 1774, and was 
elected one of the census takers in 1776. He was very active in town affairs : serving as 
fireward, 1778-82 ; a member of the Committee on Correspondence, Safety, and Inspec- 
tion, 1779-80; was on committees in 1780 and 1782 to superintend the filling of Boston's 
quota in the Continental Army, by draft or otherwise, and to see that the patriotic 
resolves of the Assembly were carried into effect. 

Mr. Symmes (1760) was long identified with the militia, and, prior to the close of 
the Revolution, had attained the grade of colonel. In 1784, he was appointed aid-de- 
camp, with the rank of colonel, on the staff of Gov. John Hancock. He was reappointed 
from 1787 to 1790 inclusive. He was second sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1764. 

Andrew Symmes, Jr. (1760), died on Sunday, April 9, 1797, aged sixty-two years, 
" a man of strict honor and integrity, and a lover of God and his country." > 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1760 is as follows : — 
"April nth. 1760. Friday. (Last Monday being foul weather). The Company 
being under Arms, it was Voted, That the Rev. Mr. Josiah Sherman of Woburn be 
desired to preach the next Artillery Election Sermon ; and that the present commission 
officers, with Capt Newman Greenough [1740], be a committee to wait on him and 
desire the same. Attest : John Edwards. Clerk. 

"May 5th. 1760 The Company being under Arms, Col John Phillips [1725], 
being one of the Committee to wait on the Rev. Mr. Josiah Sherman, to desire him to 
preach the next Artillery Election Sermon, reported that he had accepted. The Evening 
being spent at Sergt Emmes [1757] ; Voted, That twenty pounds, lawful money, be 
paid by the Treasurer to the Commission Officers towards defraying the charge of the 
Election Dinner, & the Company to dine with them. Voted, That the Commission 
Officers wait on Brigadier Brattle [1729] to inform him that the Company desires 
he would lead the Company the ensuing year. Voted, That Capt Newman Greenough 
[1740] and Mr. Daniel Jones [1754] be joined to the committee for examining the list 
of the Company, & to talk with the delinquent members relating to their absence. 
Voted, That if any member break off from the Company without leave from the Com- 
manding Officer, he shall pay a fine of twelve shillings. 

" Attest : John Edwards. Clerk. 

" June 2'd. 1 760. The Company being under Arms, it was Voted, That the present 
Commission Officers wait on the Rev. Mr. Josiah Sherman and return him the thanks of 
' this Company for his Sermon preached this day. 2 

" Attest : John Edwards, Clerk. 

Andrew Symmes, Jr. (1760). Authority: of Woburn; the said Company made choice of 

Boston Records. William Taylor Esq; [1738] for their Captain; 

1 Columbian Centinel, April 12, 1797. Captain Onesiphorus Tileston [1747] Lieutenant; 

2 " Monday last being the Anniversary for the and Lieutenant Josiah Waters [1747]' Ensign, 
Election of Officers of the Ancient and Honourable for the present year." — Boston Newspaper, June 
Artillery Company; after a Sermon suitable to the 9, 1760. 

Occasion, preached by the Rev. Mr. Josiah Sherman 



104 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 7 6i 

"September ist. 1760. The evening being spent at Lieut Tilestone's [1747] it 
was there Voted, That those Gentlemen, who have had the honour to receive the badges 
as Captain of this Company, may continue their names on the Clerk's book, and be 
called every muster day, if they think fit, and not be subject to a fine for non-appearance. 

"October 6th. 1760. The Evening being spent at Ensign Waters' [1747], it was 
then Voted, That there be a Committee, consisting of five members, to consider of some 
method for the advantage and unity of the Company. Voted, That John Phillips, Esq. 
[1725], Mr. Nathaniel Loring [1758], Mr. John Deming [1756], Capt Thomas Savage 
[1739], & Capt Newman Greenough [1740] be of this committee. Voted, That every 
member of the Company shall come on every training day, for the future, with his 
Cartouch Box filled with cartridges full of powder ; and for neglect of the same shall pay 
to the Clerk a fine of one shilling. Attest : John Edwards, Clerk." 

Rev. Josiah Sherman, of Woburn, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1760. 
He was a son of William Sherman; was born at Watertown, April 2, 1729 ; graduated 
at Nassau Hall, Princeton, N. J., in 1754; studied theology with Rev. Dr. Bellamy, of 
Bethlehem, Conn., and with Rev. Mr. Graham, of Southbury, and was ordained at Woburn, 
Jan. 28, 1756. He was a brother of Hon. Roger Sherman, a signer of the Declaration of 
Independence in 1776, and of Rev. Nathaniel Sherman, of Bedford, Mass. 

He married, Jan. 24, 1757, Martha, daughter of Hon. James Minot, of Concord, and 
they had five children, of whom the eldest, Roger Minot (Yale Col., 1794), became a 
judge on the Supreme Bench of Connecticut. 

After a pastorate in Woburn of about twenty years, Mr. Sherman was dismissed at 
his own request, April n, 1775. From Woburn he went to Milford, Conn., and in 1781 
removed to, and was installed at, Goshen, Conn. He remained there seven years, then 
resided for a time in Sheffield, Mass., but having received an invitation to settle over the 
church and society in Woodbridge, Conn., he accepted, but died shortly after his arrival 
there, Nov. 24, 1789. 

Rev. Mr. Sherman was considered a very eloquent preacher. " His elocution was 
very distinct, tho' fluent and rapid. His voice was excellent. His mind was discrim- 
inating. His eloquence was often pathetic, sometimes very powerful, and always of such 
a character as to command the respect and attention of his audience." 



f The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1761 were: John 

[ i\\ \ Symmes (1733), captain; William Homes (1747), lieutenant; Thomas 

• Dawes (1754), ensign. Samuel Ridgeway, Jr. (1756), was first sergeant; 

William Murray (1758), second sergeant; Benjamin Dolbeare (1756), third sergeant; 

Robert Jenkins, tertius (1756), fourth sergeant, and John Edwards (1747), clerk. 

In 1761, a committee reported to the town that it was necessary that Faneuil Hall 
should be repaired, and suggested that the roof be slated, the window-frames of stone, 
and the ornaments, with as little wood-work as possible, the expense to be paid by a 
lottery. Proposals were received from masons, carpenters, and others, and the repairing 

Rev. Josiah Sherman. Authorities: Sewall's Hist, of Woburn; Sprague's Annals of American 
Pulpit. 



i 7 6i] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 105 

was begun before the summer ended. The hall was reopened, with an address by James 
Otis, Jr., March 14, 1763. In 1766, the contractors complained that they had not been 
paid. A committee, appointed Sept. 18, 1765, gathered the bills of indebtedness on 
account of said repairs, and reported in March, 1766. The following-named members 
of the Company were engaged in this work, and the amounts due them are given : — 
Onesiphorus Tilestone [1747] .... ^1,287 6s. 2d. 

Thomas Dawes [1754] 337 14 9 

Josiah Waters [1747] .....; 170 o 7 

Moses Pitcher [1760] . . . . . . 130 10 4 

Timothy Thornton [1765] ...... 32 14 8 

being about two thirds of the total indebtedness for repairs. - 

In 1761, the officers of the Boston regiment were: John Phillips (1725), colonel; 
Joseph Jackson (1738), lieut.-colonel, and John Symmes (1733), major. Of the eleven 
captains, there were : Newman Greenough (1740), David Jenkins (1758), William Taylor 
(1738), Thomas Marshall (1761), Onesiphorus Tilestone (1747), James Cunningham 
(1758), William Homes (1747), Jonathan Cary (1740), John Leverett (1750); John 
Gore (1743), captain-lieutenant ; Thomas Dawes (1754), captain-lieutenant and adjutant. 
Of the thirteen lieutenants, there were : Benjamin Andrews (1754), Daniel Jones (1754), 
Richard Boynton (1759), Daniel Bell (1733), William Phillips (1762), Jeremiah Stimp- 
son (1761), Josiah Waters (1747), Martin Gay (1761), Samuel Ballard (1755). Of the 
ensigns, there were : William Bordman (1758), William Murray (1758), Samuel Ridge- 
way, Jr. (1756), John Haskins (1768), Samuel Barrett (1755), Benjamin Phillips (1755), 
Sanderson West (1761), Thomas Adams (1765), Zephaniah Hartt (1765). 

Soon after the establishment of the Cadets, and "Train of Artillery," a company 
was formed among the students in Harvard College. They applied to Gov. Hutchinson 
for arms, but, as they were mostly opposed to the mother country, he reluctantly yielded 
to their request, and avoided, as long as possible, to sign an order for their delivery. 
These young heroes, not discouraged, procured wooden guns, and were reviewed (using 
them) while the Superior Court was in session at Cambridge, by the judges, etc. This 
corps was suspended during the Revolution, revived during the administration of Gov. 
Gerry, and abolished by President Quincy. 

The institution of the Cadets and "Train Artillery" probably served to lessen 
admissions into the Artillery Company, and as the latter had been declining — a com- 
mittee was chosen, which reported on the April field-day of 1 761, two resolutions, given 
on page no. These resolutions produced the desired effect; for upon comparing the 
roster of the Boston regiment in 1770 with the roll, we find that of the forty-four com- 
missioned officers of the regiment, including the " Train of Artillery," every officer, field, 
platoon, or staff, excepting one lieutenant and five ensigns, were members of the 
Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company: l 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1761 were: James Cunning- 
ham, Martin Gay, Thomas Marshall, Jeremiah Stimpson, Nathaniel Thwing, John Webb, 
Jr., Joseph Webb, Jr., Sanderson West. 

James Cunningham (1761), painter, of Boston, son of William and Elizabeth 
(Wheeler) Cunningham, was born in Boston, April 24, 1721. He married, June 4, 

James Cunningham (1761). Authority: l Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 

Boston Records. 1842, p. 310. 



106 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 7 6i 

1742, Elizabeth Boylston, daughter of Peter Boylston. Their sons, Capt. William and 
Major Andrew Cunningham, joined the Artillery Company in 1786. Mr. Cunningham 
(1761) married, (2) Jan. 19, 1773, Martha Challoner, who shared his home in Dedham, 
and died a few months before her husband. 

Major James Cunningham (1761) was identified with the Boston militia for many 
years, and, passing through the various offices, became major of the Boston regiment in 
1767, and held that office until 1772. He was lieutenant of the Artillery Company in 
1764, and its captain in 1768. He was one of the firewards of the town four years, 
1765-8, and, with the selectmen and justices, visited the public schools, July 6, 176S, 
and July 5, 1769. The town records seem to prove that at about the opening of the 
Revolutionary War he moved to Dedham, and there spent the remainder of his life. 

He died at Dedham June 5, 1795, aged seventy-four years, and his wife, Martha, 
died at the same place April 1, 1794. 

Andrew Cunningham, who came to Boston from Scotland in 1684, had four sons, 
Andrew 2 , William 2 , David 2 , and Nathaniel 2 . Andrew 2 joined the Artillery Company in 
1720, and his brother, Nathaniel, joined the same year. Major James 3 ( 1 761 ) and Capt. 
William 3 (1765) were sons of William 2 , and nephews of Capt. Andrew 2 (1720) and of 
Capt. Nathaniel 2 (1720). James 3 (1761), who first joined the Artillery Company in 
1758, was the father of William 4 (1786) and Major Andrew 4 (1786). 

Martin Gay (1761), brass founder, of Boston, son of Rev. Ebenezer Gay, D. D., of 
Hingham, who delivered the Artillery election sermon in 1728, was born in Hingham, 
Dec. 29, 1726. He married, (1) Dec. 13, 1750, Mary Pinckney, and, (2) about 1770, 
Ruth Atkins, who died Sept. io, 1810. Mr. Whitman (1810) says, in his History of the 
Artillery Company, 2d ed., p. 310, "I had frequent opportunities to hear him converse. 
It was not for want of love for his country that he became a Tory, but, having large 
property and fearing the ability to resist with success the power of the mother country, 
were the causes of his adopting that side, as many of the most considerate men in the 
country did from like motives. The period has arrived when we can look back, and with 
candor attribute, to many of that class, good motives for their conduct. He secretly 
wished for his country's success. His latter days were spent in retirement, and the 
pleasures of the family circle, in which he appeared amiable and happy." He was 
lieutenant of the Artillery Company in 1770, and its captain in 1772. 

Martin Gay (1761) was admitted to be a member of the North Fire Engine 
Company, No. 2, Jan. 17, 1749-50, and was one of the one hundred firemen exempted 
from military duty by the governor, April 7, 1758. He was elected assay-master from 
1758 to 1774 inclusive, warden in 1771, fireward in 1767, 1768, 1772-4, and visited 
the public schools, July 1, 1772. He was identified with the Boston militia for many 
years, and in 1767 became captain of a company in the Boston regiment. He was an 
addresser of Gov. Hutchinson in 1774, and of Gen. Gage in 1775. He went to Halifax 
in 1776, when the British evacuated Boston, and was proscribed and banished by the 
State in 1778. He returned to Boston in November, 1792, having, during his absence, 
resided in Nova Scotia and England. Of his nine children, Samuel was the most dis- 
tinguished, having been chief justice of the Court of Common Pleas, in New Brunswick. 

Martin Gay (1761). Authorities: Boston Records; New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 1879; Whit- 
man's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 1842. 



, 7 6i] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 107 

Martin Gay's (1761) brass foundry was in Union Street. He was a member of the 
West Church, and for some years a deacon. He died Jan. 30, 1809, aged eighty-two 
years, and was buried in his tomb, No 6, Granary Burial-Ground. 

Thomas Marshall (1761), tailor, of Boston, son of Capt. Christopher (1724) and 
Elizabeth Marshall, was born in Boston, July 21, 17 19, and was published to Margaret 
Maccarty, Jan. 7, 1746. He was a brother of Capt. Christopher Marshall, who joined 
the Artillery Company in 1765. He married, (2) Dec. 6, 1794, widow of Rev. Samuel 
Woodward, of Weston. She died June 4, 1805. 

Capt. Marshall (1761) lived in 1764 in Cow Lane, now High Street, and in 1763 
owned land in Mackerel Lane, now Devonshire Street, between State and Water, the 
lines of which he disputed with Mrs. Amory. 1 He served the town as a fireward from 
1762 until 1776 inclusive; was a warden in 1771, and selectman for five years, 1772-6. 
He made a visitation of the town, June 29, 1768, and visited the public schools, 
July 6, 1768, and July 5, 1769. 

On the evening of the 5th of March, 1770, a Mr. John Green, hearing the cry of fire, 
ran up Leveret's Lane, now Congress Street, and just as he turned Amory's Corner the 
soldiers fired, and he was dangerously wounded. Having applied to the town for relief, 
the case was referred to a committee, of which Col. Marshall (1761) was chairman. For 
the next few years Col. Marshall (1761) is constantly prominent in town and colony 
matters. Several times his name was affixed to petitions, letters, and remonstrances to 
Gov. Hutchinson, with those of other patriots. He was one on each of the committees 
delegated by the town to thank Benjamin Church, in 1773, and Joseph Warren, in 1775, 
for their " elegant and spirited" orations on the 5th of March. 

Nov. 18, 1773, he was one of the committee selected by the town to again visit the 
consignees of the tea, and request an immediate and direct answer to this question : 
" Whether they would resign their appointments as Tea Consignees?" The committee 
proceeded to the Province House, waited upon the tea consignees, asked the question, 
and left an attested copy of the town vote. A formal answer was returned in town meet- 
ing that day, at 3 p. m., but the town voted the answer was not satisfactory. 

In the fall of 1774, the people were apprehensive of more trouble on account of the 
soldiers being quartered in town. Col. Marshall (1761) was authorized, with others, to 
wait on the governor in the interest of peace and good order, and likewise to report to 
the town the best ways and means of securing the best interests of the town. 

Dec. 7, 1774, a committee composed of the principal citizens of Boston was chosen 
" to carry the resolutions of the Continental Congress into execution." Col. Marshall's 
(1761) name is the fifth on the list, being preceded by the names of Gushing, Hancock, 
Samuel Adams, and William Phillips, but yet he was first on that committee of those who 
executed Continental resolutions by service in the Revolutionary Army. Col. Marshall 
(176 1) joined the Old South Church, July 19, 1741. He is mentioned in the records of 
that church, Oct. 31, 1768, when he and Capt. Thomas Dawes, father of Col. Thomas, 
Jr. (1754), were appointed a committee to notify Hon. Thomas Hubbard (1751) of his 
election as treasurer of the church. 

Col. Marshall (1761) was captain of the Artillery Company in 1763 and 1767. 

Thomas Marshall (1761). Authorities: Company, Ed. 1842; Hurd's Hist, of Middlesex 
Boston Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. County, Art., Everett. 

1 See Records of Boston, 1763, 1764. 



108 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7 6i 

Col. Marshall (1761) was early identified with the militia Having served for years 
in minor military offices, he was promoted to be major of the Boston regiment in 1765, 
and held the position of lieutenant-colonel from 1767 to 1771. He was commissioned 
colonel of the Tenth Massachusetts Regiment, in the Revolutionary War, Nov. 19, 1776, 
having been commissioned colonel of the Boston regiment on the 10th of April next 
preceding. 

March 8, 1776, General Howe having assured the selectmen that he did not intend 
to destroy the town, Thomas Marshall ( 1 761 ) addressed a letter to Gen. Washington, 
asking him to assure them that the town would be spared. A few months later the select- 
men, of whom Thomas Marshall (1761) was one, addressed a congratulatory letter to 
Gen. Washington, to which he replied. 1 

Col. Marshall (1761) died at Weston, Mass., Nov. 18, 1800. Upon the twenty-sixth 
of that month the following obituary concerning him appeared in the public press : — 

" His unblemished morals, even from early youth, have done honor to the Christian 
religion, which he firmly believed and publicly professed. The first and principal part 
of his life was spent in Boston, where he was a worthy and useful citizen, fair in his deal- 
ings ; to the needy, helpful ; to his friends, generous ; to strangers, hospitable ; to all, 
courteous ; in his municipal offices, faithful ; in his military character, distinguished. 
In the Revolution, Col. Marshall [1761] commanded a regiment, displaying his love to 
his country by his zeal in her cause, and personal bravery. He settled in Weston, 
where, retired from the bustle of the world, he has uniformly practised the social and 
relative duties ; and his numerous friends and relatives, particularly his very respectable 
widow, can testify with great sensibility, that his path of life has resembled ' the rising 
light, that shines more and more unto the perfect day.' " 

Jeremiah Stimpson (1761). In 1758, he was a member of Engine Company No. 8, 
of which James Cunningham (1758) was master. Capt. Stimpson (1761) was elected a 
warden of Boston in 1766; March 29, 1776, was appointed one of the committee to 
look after the cleansing of the town, and Aug. 26, of the same year, was one of a com- 
mittee of thirty-six persons to take a census of Boston. In the Town Records, Aug. 26, 
1776, Jeremiah Stimpson is called "Captain." 

Nathaniel Thwing (1761), baker, of Boston, son of John and Mary (Drew) Thwing, 
was born in Boston, Aug. 17, 1703, and married, in 1727, Joanna, daughter of Thomas 
and Lydia Davis, of Boston. Col. Thwing (,1761) became a member of the Ancient and 
Honorable Artillery Company in 1736,' 2 and rejoined it in 1761. His second wife, 
Martha Clap, died in Boston, Sept. 5, 1794, and was buried "from her late home near 
Oliver's Dock." 

John Webb, Jr. (1761), merchant, of Boston, son of John and Elizabeth Webb, of 
Boston, was born Jan. 30, 1 73 1. He never held any town office, and does not appear 
to be mentioned in the town records, nor is his name found in the lists of the 
militia. 



Jeremiah Stimpson (1761). Authority: in Frothingham's History of the Siege of Boston, 
Boston Records. pp. 303, 304, and 316, 317. 

1 This letter, and Washington's reply, are given 2 See Vol. I., p. 475, of this History. 



, 7 6i] _HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. I09 

Joseph Webb, Jr. (1761), ship-chandler, son of Joseph and Abigail Webb, was 
born in Boston Oct. 28, 1734. He married (published, Oct. 11, 1759), m Nov., 1759, 
Penelope Phillips, of Marshfield, Mass. He became one of the leaders, with Warren, 
Revere, Otis, and others, in asserting the rights of the colonists, and in early life began 
the military exercise. He was a member of the Boston regiment, and passing through 
the various grades, was commissioned ensign, April 17, 1767, and captain of the tenth 
company in this regiment, Nov. 26, 1776. At that time Henry Bromfield was colonel, 
and Jabez Hatch was lieutenant-colonel. Capt. Webb (1761) was commissioned major, 
April 25, 1778, and lieutenant-colonel of the same regiment in May, 1780. In August, 
1784, he is recorded as its colonel In 1781 ' the Boston regiment was called out for 
active duty, and under the command of Lieut.-Col. Webb (1761), it marched to New 
York State, and did important service at Peekskill as a reinforcement of the American 
army. It was thus engaged for about six months. He was second sergeant of the 
Artillery Company in 1765, and its ensign in 1773. 

In 1 760, his place of business was at the lower end of Water Street. He is recorded 
in the list of sufferers by the great conflagration in Boston, of that year. He recovered, 
however, from his loss and recommenced business in Long Lane, now Federal Street, 
where he also had his residence, which he erected in 1767. He acquired considerable 
property by his foresight and energy, and took rank among the first citizens of the town 
of Boston. 

He served the town as scavenger in' 1760, clerk of the market in 1766 and 1767, 
and warden in 1775 and 1776. Sept. 9, 1776, when a plan was adopted by the- town 
that all the inhabitants might be provided with fire-arms, according to law, Joseph Webb, 
Jr. (1761), was chosen one of the committee to carry the plan into effect. Mr. Webb 
(1761) was a fireward from 1777 to 1783 inclusive. He was a member of the Committee 
of Correspondence, Inspection, and Safety, in 1779, an d an overseer of the poor from 
1781 to 1784 ; besides he served on several important committees in regard to the filling 
of the quota of Boston during the Revolutionary War. His last place of business was at 
the head of Oliver's Dock. 

Joseph Webb, Jr. (1761), received the Masonic degrees in the Lodge of St. Andrew, 
A. F. and A. M., about 1756, and was master of that lodge in 1765-6. Joseph Warren, 
grand master of the Massachusetts Grand Lodge, nominated Joseph Webb, Jr. (1761), 
grand marshal, Dec. 27, 1769. He was unanimously elected. May 1, 1771, he was 
appointed by Grand Master Joseph Warren senior grand warden, and, Dec. 6, 1771, 
deputy grand master. R. W. Joseph Webb, Jr. (1761), held this last-named office at the 
time of Gen. Warren's death. The Massachusetts Grand Lodge met, being presided over 
by the deputy grand master until March 8, 1777, when R. W. Joseph Webb, Jr. (1761), 
was elected most worshipful grand master. He presided in that office from March 8, 
1777, to June 24, 1783, and from June 24, 1784, to his decease, April 26, 1787. He 
died on Thursday, April 26, 1787, aged fifty-three years. "The burial occurred on Mon- 
day, the 30, from his late dwelling in Long Lane." 

"The funeral of Joseph Webb, Esq. [1761], late Colonel of the Boston Regiment 

Joseph Webb, Jr. (1761)' Authorities: Dec. 7, 1781, the regular election of officers was 

Boston Records; Massachusetts Archives; Hist, of deferred by reason of the M. W. Grand Master, 

Joseph Webb Lodge, A. F. and A. M., of Boston; Joseph Webb [1761], being absent at present in the 

Early Masonic Records. service of the United States." — Grand Lodqe Rec- 

1 " At a meeting of the Grand Lodge, A. F. and ords. 
A. M., Paul Revere, Esq., presiding as G. M., held 



110 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[1761 



and Grand Master of Ancient Masons, was on the 30th ult. The corpse followed by a 
large and respectable number of the Brethren from the different Lodges in town, orna- 
mented with their Jewels and arrayed in all the insignia of Masonry, attended with 
military musick, and several officers of the Grand Lodge bearing lighted tapers. Colonel 
Webb [1761], besides the offices above mentioned had sustained several important 
town offices ; and all which he discharged with credit to himself and to the approbation 
of his fellow citizens. He died in the fifty-third year of his age, sincerely regretted by 
all who were acquainted with his worth and abilities." ] 

Sanderson West (1761). The only town office he seems to have held was that of 
constable, to which he was elected March 23, 1753, and, Feb. 13 following, he accom- 
panied the justices and others in their general walk or visitation of Ward 11. His will 
was proved in 1770. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1761 is as follows : — 

"April 6th. 1761. The above Committee 2 met and agreed on the following pro- 
posals and reported accordingly, Viz: — The evening being spent at Sergt Barretts 
[ J 7SS]- Voted 1st. That when any person offers himself for admittance, he shall be 
publickly proposed and stand Candidate one term ; that so, none may be admitted but 
persons of good repute, who are able and willing to attend on training days and bear 
their part of the expense. 

"Voted. 2'd. That the members of the Company duly attend their duty on training 
days, study for peace, unity and good order among themselves, that so, they may 
encourage the Officers of the Militia & other suitable persons to join them, & support 
the credit & usefulness of the Company ; always keeping to those good and wholesome 
Rules, by which the Company has subsisted for one hundred and twenty-three years. 
Signed by the committee. — 

" Voted, That the Rev. Mr. Joseph Jackson of Brookline be desired to preach on 
the next anniversary Artillery Election of officers in June next; and that the present 
Commission Officers, with the Treasurer be a Committee to wait on him and desire the 
same. Attest : John Edwards. Clerk. 

"May 8th. 1761. Monday being unsuitable weather, the Company being under 
arms this day, viz : Friday, Voted, That the Rev. Mr. Jason Haven of Dedham be desired 
to preach on the next anniversary Election of officers in June next ; in the room of the 
Rev. Mr. Joseph Jackson who refused. And that the present Commission Officers, with 
the Treasurer, John Phillips, Esqr. [1725] be a Committee to wait on him to desire the 
same. Who accordingly waited upon him, & reported that he had accepted. The 
Evening being-spent at Sergt Browns [1756], Voted, That twenty-four pounds be paid 
by the Treasurer to the Commission Officers towards defraying the charges of the Elec- 
tion dinner, and the Company to dine with them. 

"Voted, That whoever may be Captain of this Company, a Captain in the militia 
shall not be obliged to serve otherwise than Lieutenant, and a Lieutenant in the militia 
otherwise than as Ensign, and an Ensign in the militia shall not serve as a Sergeant unless 
a Field Officer leads the Company. 

Sanderson West (1761). Authority: Bos- ' Massachusetts Centinel, May 9, 1787. 

ton Records. 2 See p. 104. 



I 7 6 2 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. I I I 

"June ist. 1 761. The Company being under arms, it was then Voted, That the 
present Commission Officers, with the Treasurer, be a committee to wait on the Rev. 
Mr. Jason Haven and return him the thanks of this Company for his sermon preached 
this day. The evening being spent at Maj. Symmes [1733], Voted. That Col. Brattle 
[1729J, Col Phillips [1725], & Col. Jackson [1738] be a committee to settle the affairs 
of the moneys due from Col. Blanchard's [1737] heirs to this Company for lands sold 
them, to said Blanchard [1737], according to their best skill and judgment. 

Rev. Joseph Jackson, of Brookline, was invited, at the meeting of the Artillery 
Company on the first Monday in April, 1761, to deliver the Artillery election sermon of 
that year. He " refused " to accept. He was a son of Joseph (1738) and Susanna Jack- 
son, and was born in Boston, Dec. 22, 1734. 

Rev. Mr. Jackson, who had previously been a tutor at Cambridge, was ordained 
fourth minister of the church in Brookline, April 9, 1760. He married Hannah, sister of 
John Avery, Jr., of Boston. In 1790, Mr. Jackson lost his only son, an affliction from 
which he never fully recovered. His health failing, he prayed that his life and his use- 
fulness might terminate together. His prayer was answered. He preached on the last 
Sabbath of his earth life, and died, July 22, 1796, aged sixty-two years, having been pastor 
of the Brookline church thirty-six years. His remains were deposited in the family tomb 
in Boston. 

Rev. Jason Haven, of Dedham, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1761. 
He was the youngest son of Moses Haven, of Framingham, Mass., and was born March 
2, 1733. He graduated at Harvard College in 1754, and was ordained as pastor of the 
First Church in Dedham, Feb. 5, 1756. He continued in this relation until his decease, 
May 17, 1803. He married Catherine Dexter, daughter of his immediate predecessor, 
Rev. Samuel Dexter, and had five children. 

In 1769, he delivered the General Election Sermon; in 1789, the Dudleian Lecture, 
and, in 1791, the Convention Sermon. He was a delegate to the convention which 
framed and adopted the constitution of this State. In 1783, he delivered a sermon at 
the funeral of Rev. Samuel Dunbar, who preached before the Artillery Company in 1748. 
" He was not only the shepherd of his own flock, but he trained up the youthful shep- 
herds of other flocks. His house was a divinity school, in which several students were 
educated for the pastoral office." 



j- The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1762 were : Onesiphorus 

[ 702. Tilestone (1747), captain; Jonathan Cary (1740), lieutenant; Thomas Edes 

(1739), ensign. Jonas Clark (1756) was first sergeant ; William Bell (1756), 

second sergeant; John Deming (1756), third sergeant; Daniel Boyer (1756), fourth 

sergeant, and John Edwards (1747), clerk. 

Feb. 11, 1762, an Act was passed by the General Assembly of the Province, 
entitled, "An Act to incorporate certain persons by the name of the Society for propa- 
gating Christian Knowledge among the Indians of North America." The Act was 

Rev. Jason Haven. Authorities: Sprague's Lamson's Hist, of First Church and Parish in Ded- 
Annals, Vol. I., p. 557; Dr. Prentiss's Discourse, on ham. 
the Sunday succeeding Mr. Haven's interment; 



1 12 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[1762 



disallowed by the Privy Council, May 20, 1763, but the preamble portrays the grateful 
spirit of our fathers. It declares, "The signal success, with which it has pleased 
Almighty God to crown his majesty's arms, calls upon us to express our grateful acknowl- 
edgements to the author of it and to demonstrate our gratitude, by endeavoring to spread 
a Knowledge of his religion ; a favorable opportunity of doing this among the Indians of 
America seems now to present itself, as the French of Canada, being subject to his 
majesty's dominion have it less in their power to obstruct so good a work," etc. There 
were eighty persons, besides several clergymen, named in the act of incorporation, and 
among them the following-named members of the Artillery Company, to wit : — 

William Brattle (1729), Benjamin Church (1742), Benjamin Clark (1733), Christo- 
pher Clark (1759), Benjamin Dolbeare (1756), Alexander Hill (1746), William Homes 
(1747), Thomas Hubbard (1751), William Hyslop (1755), Joseph Jackson (1738), 
Thomas Marshall (1761), Moses Peck (1758), John Phillips (1725), William Phillips 
(1762), Isaac Royall (1750), Joseph Sherburne (1745), Ebenezer Storer (1732), John 
Symmes (1733), Onesiphorus Tilestone (1747), and Jonathan Williams (1729). 

" Boston, June 7, 1762. Friday last being the 4 th instant, his present Majesty King 
George the 3 d , our most gracious and lawful sovereign, entered the 25 th year of his age ; 
on which occasion his Excellency's troop of Life-Guards, commanded by the Hon. 
Brigadier General Royall [1750] were mustered on the Common, and performed their 
exercise in the morning ; from whence, at noon, they proceeded into King Street, went 
through their exercise, and also performed their firings : at which time the guns of his 
Majesty's Castle-William, and the batteries of this town and Charlestown were dis- 
charged. 

" In the afternoon his Excellency's Company of Cadets, commanded by Col. Jarvis, 
were mustered ; which towards evening conducted his Excellency, the Governor, the 
gentlemen of his Majesty's Council, and the honorable House of Representatives, 
together with a number of gentlemen, civil and military, from the Court House to the 
Assembly, where his Majesty's and other loyal healths were drank : and the evening was 
concluded with illuminations " ' &c. 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1762 were : Caleb Champney, 
Adino Paddock, William Phillips, Thomas Stevenson. 

Caleb Champney (1762), of Dorchester and Boston, son of John and Sarah Champ- 
ney, was born in Dorchester, Nov. 23, 1740. He was active in the militia, and served 
as captain therein. Dec. 18, 1776, Capt. Caleb Champney (1762) was drafted in Boston 
for service in the Continental Army. He did not pay the fine, but performed the ser- 
vice. In 1777, he was one of the searchers after blankets. He died in Dorchester, 
June 6, 1803, aged sixty-three years. His wife Sarah died Oct. 13, 1800. 

Adino Paddock (1762), chair-maker, of Boston, was born in 1728, and married 
(published June 22), 1749, Lydia (born Oct. 20, 1729), daughter of Robert and Lydia 
Snelling of Boston. 

He is called " chair-maker " by Mr. Whitman (1810) in his history of the Company. 
Mr. Paddock (1762) was a builder of "chairs," as the light one-horse vehicles, which are 

Adino Paddock (1762). Authorities: Bos- Boston; Drake's Biog. Sketches of the Cincinnati; 
ton Records; Shurtleff's Des. of Boston; Drake's Early Masonic Records. 
Landmarks; Sabine's Loyalists; Mem. Hist, of ' Boston Newspaper. 



i 7 6 2 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. I I 3 

now called chaises, were then called. He was also a coach-builder, for he "set up " the 
" Burling Coach," so called, in Boston, in 1762. Mr. Drake calls Mr. Paddock (1762) 
" a coach-maker by trade." Between Winter and School streets, on Tremont Street, but 
much nearer to Winter than to School, about opposite the Park Street Church, the town 
granted a lot of land to Daniel Maud, the school-master, in 1637. He sold it in 1643 to 
Edmund Jacklin. The shop of Major Adino Paddock (1762), coach-maker, was upon 
this lot. The street in London, on which were the principal coach manufactories, was 
"Long Acre," which name Major Paddock (1762) gave to that portion of (what is now) 
Tremont Street between School and Winter. The name continued for years after its 
author had left the town. His residence was on the same street. 

Mr. Paddock (1762) is gratefully remembered on account of the English elms he set 
out opposite the Granary Burial-Ground. In 1734, or shortly after that date, 1 English 
elms were brought from Brompton Park, England, by Mr. James Smith, and were 
planted on his estate in Milton. About 1762, some of these trees were transplanted. 
It seems to be settled that the most prominent person in this work was Major Adino 
Paddock (1762), and that he was assisted by John Crane, afterward an artilleryman, a 
member of the Tea-party in 1773, and the first colonel of Massachusetts Artillery in 1777, 
under Gen. Knox. The trees, transplanted in 1762, extended from the present Park 
Street Meeting-house, northerly, probably skirting the whole front of the Granary Burial- 
Ground. The row contained about sixteen trees, eleven of which were standing in 1869. 
In 1873 these were removed to the great regret of many citizens. 

•Major Paddock (1762) was much interested in military matters. He became a 
member of the artillery company, organized in April, 1763, by Col. David Mason (1754). 
This company was attached to the Boston regiment. It was commonly known as "The 
Train." In 1768, Lieut. Paddock (1762) succeeded Capt. Mason (1754) as its captain. 
The former was an excellent drill-master, strict disciplinarian, and received instruction 
himself from the artillery officers at the Castle. The company became distinguished for 
its drill, efficiency, and material. Col. John Crane and Gen. Ebenezer Stevens, artillery 
officers of the Revolution and early members of this company, gained well-deserved 
praise for their skill and patriotism. Many members of the company were Federal 
military officers in the Revolutionary War. 

Col. Paddock (1762) received two light brass field-pieces, and uniformed a number 
of German emigrants with white frocks, hair caps, and broad-swords, to drag the cannon. 
These pieces were first used June 4, 1768, when the King's birthday was celebrated. At 
the outbreak of the war, these guns were kept in a gun-house on the corner of West 
Street. As Col. Paddock (1762) adhered to the royal cause, and might surrender these 
guns to Gen. Gage, they were stealthily removed by certain young patriots, as related in 
the sketch of Samuel Gore (1786), who was one of the patriotic party. 

In the Records o'f the Town of Boston, Mr. Paddock (1762) is called "Capt" 
first in 1764, "Major" in 1772, and "Esq" in 1773. He was prominent in town 
matters, being chosen sealer of leather from 1759 to 1763 inclusive; fireward from 1764 
to 1774 inclusive, and warden in 1772. He was one of the visitors to the public schools, 
July 1, 1772, and May n, 1773, and one of the two persons chosen from Ward 10 to 
superintend the location of the new street lamps. 

Mr. Paddock (1762) was a member of the Masonic Fraternity. He joined St. John's 
Lodge, and was frequently present in St. John's Grand Lodge between June 24, 1756, 
1 Mr. George H. Allan, in Boston Transcript, Oct. 4, 1883. 



114 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7 6 2 

and Sept. 12, 1767. He was appointed by M. W. Jeremy Gridley, G. M., one of the 
stewards for the Feast of St. John the Baptist, June 24, 1762. Col. Paddock (1762) is 
recorded as junior warden of St. John's Lodge in 1758; senior warden and master in 
1759; junior warden of the Masters' Lodge in 1760, and senior warden in 1761 and 1762. 
He was an ardent Tory, and joined his fortunes with the British. In March, 1776, 
he embarked for Halifax with the royal army, accompanied by his wife and his three 
surviving children, — Adino, Jr., Elizabeth, and Rebecca. In June, 1776, the whole 
family, Adino, Jr., excepted, sailed from Halifax to England. Major Paddock (1762) 
was a loyal addresser of Gov. Gage, Oct. 6, 1775, ar >d he was proscribed by the State in 
September, 1778. He settled in 1781, with his family, on the Isle of Jersey, where for 
several years he held the office of inspector of artillery stores, with the rank of captain. 
He died there, March 25, 1804, aged seventy-six years. Lydia, his wife, died at the Isle 
of Jersey in 1781, aged fifty-one years. He received partial compensation for his losses 
as a loyalist. 

William Phillips (1762), merchant, of Boston, son of Col. John (1725) and Mary 
(Buttolph) Phillips, was born in Boston Aug. 29, 1737. Lieut. William (1762) was a 
cousin of Samuel, John, and William Phillips, of Boston, sons of Rev. Samuel Phillips, of 
Andover. William Phillips, son of Rev. Samuel, had a son William. These are the two 
William Phillipses prominent for many years in the Old South Church. Lieut. William 
Phillips (1762) married (published), May 1, 1760, Margaret, daughter of Hon. Jacob 
Wendell (1733), an d their son was John, president of the Massachusetts Senate, and the 
first mayor of Boston. Their grandson was Wendell Phillips, the celebrated anti-slavery 
orator, of Boston. 

William Phillips (1762) did business in Cornhill, now Washington Street, and, as 
his father before him, kept a store for the sale of English goods, including books and 
stationery. He died June 4, 1772. 

Thomas Stevenson (1762), shopkeeper, of Boston. He was from Scotland, accord- 
ing to "A Ruff Copy of a List of the [St. Andrew's] Lodge, 1763," where he received the 
Masonic degrees. He united with that Lodge in 1757. 

He was elected constable in Boston Sept. 16, 1776, for " the remainder of the year," 
and was re-elected in 1777. He was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1765. 
" After failing in trade, he was long a constable and lived to a venerable age, being one 
of the last who kept up the ancient dignity of that office." Dec. 12, 1781, he was 
licensed to sell tea in Boston, under a bond of one hundred pounds. In 1789, he is 
recorded as " boarding-house and retailer " on " Ship Street." In 1 796, he was a constable, 
residing on the same street. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1762 is as follows : — 
"May 3'd 1762. The Company being under Arms, Maj. John Symmes [1733], 
being of the Committee to wait on the Rev. Mr. Locke to desire him to preach the next 
Artillery Election Sermon, reported that he had accepted the same. The evening being 
spent at Sergt Dolbeares [1756], Voted, That the Treasurer pay twenty-four pounds to the 
Commission Officers towards defraying the charge of the Election dinner, and the Com- 
pany to dine with them. 

William Phillips (1762). Authorities: Bos- Thomas Stevenson (1762). Authorities: 

ton Records; The Pilgrims of Boston, p. 277. Boston Records; Early Masonic Records; Whit- 

man's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 1842. 



1762] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 115 

" Proposals made to the Company by some of the members of said Company : 

" Gentlemen : Unanimity & harmony, as well as regularity in the conduct of our 
military affairs, is a becoming character, and serves to make us reputable in the eyes of 
men. It 's a piece of eminent wisdom to appoint seasons and Rules for the various 
affairs relative to the Military Company, whereof we are members. The dignity of the 
Ancient & Honourable Artillery Company has been supported by the members of it in a 
succession of years in such a manner as to deserve the title that the Legislative Body 
was pleased to confer on it, and it seems to be the concern of the present mem- 
bers, that the dignity and honor of the Company should be supported and kept up in 
such a manner, as to preserve to us that reputation that would be agreeable to all ; and, 
at the same time, a saving in expense made in such a way & manner as would undoubt- 
edly invite a number to join us. That unless something of the above sort be done, we 
should lose the benefit of, and perhaps ourselves dwindle away, so as it would be difficult 
for us to maintain the reputation, we have so long deserved. All seem to agree in this, 
that a saving in expense would be agreeable could the dignity and honour of the Com- 
pany be preserved. In consequence of which, your humble servants propose the follow- 
ing scheme, vizt : 1st. That the Company for the future break up at Faneuil Hall, 
should leave be obtained of the Selectmen for said purpose. 2dly. That the Governour, 
Council &c be invited on the anniversary Election of officers as formerly, to dine at 
Faneuil Hall. The expense to be paid as usual. 3dly. The Governour, Council, &c, 
after the Election of officers, to be invited and entertained as usual (at Faneuil Hall), 
the expense to be equally paid by the commission officers for the year ensuing. 4thly. 
That the eldest Sergeant provide for and entertain the Company at Faneuil Hall on their 
muster in September, as follows ; with punch and wine and bread, and nothing more. 
No one to be invited unless they belong to the Company. Pipes and Tobacco entirely 
excluded ; and it is recommended that the Company dismiss themselves so seasonable 
as to prevent the unnecessary expense of candles. Sthly. That the 2'd Sergeant provide 
for and entertain the Company on their muster in October agreeable to Article 4th in 
every tittle. 6thly. That the 3'd Sergeant provide for and entertain the Company on 
their muster in April next agreeable to Article 4th in every tittle. 7thly. That the 4th 
Sergt provide for and entertain the Company on their muster in May, agreeable to 
Article 4th in every tittle. 

" Should the above scheme be approbated by the Company, a considerable saving 
may be made ; at the same time the honour and dignity of the Company be preserved, 
many inconveniences removed, that have prevented the growth of it and a prospect of 
our increasing, arising from the saving in expense, and in particular the trouble in our 
family's. The above voted & to stand during the pleasure of the Company. 

"June 7th, 1762. The Company being under arms, it was then Voted, That the 
present Commission Officers, with the Treasurer, be a committee to wait on the Rev. 
Mr. Samuel Locke, and return him the thanks of this Company for his Sermon preached 
this day. Attest : John Edwards, Clerk." 

Rev. Samuel Locke, of Sherburne, 1 delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1762. 

'"Boston, June 6, 1762. Monday being the before been previously agreed upon) was unani- 

anniversary of the election of officers for the An- mously chosen to be their Captain; Mr. Jonathan 

cient Artillery company, when a sermon, as had Cary [1740], Lieutenant; and Mr. Thomas Edes 

been customary on such occasions, was preached by [ I 739j> Ensign for the ensuing year." — Boston 

the Rev. Mr. Locke of Sherburne; and in the after- Newspaper. 
noon Mr. Onesiphorus Tilestone [1747 ] (as had 



H6 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[>763 



x The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1763 were: Thomas 

I 70 2 . Marshall (1761), captain; Josiah Waters (1747), lieutenant; Jeremiah 

J Belknap, Jr. (1745), ensign. John Head (1757) was first sergeant; David 

Spear (1758), second sergeant; Job Wheelwright (1759), third sergeant; John Skinner 

(1759), fourth sergeant, and John Edwards (1747), clerk. 

Aug- 15, 1763, His Excellency the Captain-General commissioned the following 
gentlemen field officers of the regiment of militia in the town of Boston, viz. : — 

Joseph Jackson, Esq. (1738), colonel; John Symmes, Esq. (1733), lieutenant- 
colonel; William Taylor, Esq. (1738), major; Ephraim May (1765) was promoted to 
be ensign. 

The officers of the train of artillery in Boston were : David Mason (1754), captain- 
lieutenant; Adino Paddock (1762), lieutenant; Christopher Clark (1759), lieutenant, 
and Samuel Dyer (1755), adjutant. 

In 1763, in the Boston regiment, William Murray (1758) was lieutenant, and David 
Spear (1758) was ensign of the colonel's company; Richard Boynton (1759), was first 
lieutenant; Josiah Waters (1747), second lieutenant; Thomas Adams (1765), ensign of 
the lieutenant-colonel's company ; Daniel Bell (1733) was first lieutenant; John Haskins 
(1768), second lieutenant, and Moses Pitcher (1760), ensign of the major's company. 
The following-named were captains: Thomas Marshall (1761), Onesiphorus Tile- 
stone (1747), James Cunningham (1758), William Homes (1747), Jonathan Cary (1740), 
John Leverett (1750), John Gore (1743), Thomas Dawes (1754), and Benjamin Andrews 
(1754). The following-named were lieutenants: Samuel Barrett (1755), Benjamin 
Phillips (1755), Jeremiah Stimpson (1761), Samuel Ballard (1755), Martin Gay (1761), 
and Daniel Jones (1754). The following-named were ensigns : Benjamin Eustis (1763), 
Hopestill Capen (1763), Ephraim May (1765), William Bordman (1758), Zephaniah 
Hartt (1765), and Samuel Ridgeway, Jr. (1756). 

The birthday of George III., in June, was observed, as usual, by a military display, 
banquet at Faneuil Hall, illuminations, fireworks, etc. 

" Boston, October 31, 1763. Tuesday last our most gracious Sovereign, King George 
the Third entered the fourth year of his reign. Upon the anniversary of his Majesty's 
accession to the throne, the guns at Castle William and the batteries in this town were 
fired at one o'clock. The Troop of Guards, commanded by Brigadier General Royall 
(1750), the Company of Cadets, commanded by Colonel Jarvis, were mustered, and after 
firing three volleys in King-street, the troops proceeded to the Greyhound Tavern in 
Roxbury, where an elegant dinner was provided at the expense of the Brigadier General, 
and the other officers of the Troop ; to which entertainment his Excellency the Governor 
and several of the principal gentlemen were invited." 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1763 were: Hopestill Capen, 
Elias Dupee, Benjamin Eustis, John Perkins, Jr. 

Hopestill Capen (1763), shopkeeper, of Boston, son of John and Elizabeth Capen, 

was born in Dorchester March 4, 1731. He married Patience , who died, Jan.19, 

1 791, aged fifty-seven years. She was buried from their house on Union Street. 

He was elected by the town of Boston fence-viewer in 1764, warden in 1768, and 
scavenger in 1770. May 17, 1770, a list of persons judged " to be inimical to the United 

Hopestill Capen (1762). Authorities: Boston Records; Sewall's Hist, of Woburn; Porter's 
Rambles in Old Boston, N. E. 



■ 



r 



^ 



<***** 










THOMAS MARSHALL. 



1763] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 117 

States " was presented in town meeting, and a committee was selected to apprehend and 
confine the persons named. In this list is given the name of " Hopestill Capen " (1763), 
He was an addresser of Gov. Hutchinson in 1774, and, the same year, a protestor against 
the Whigs. In religious matters he was a Sandemanian, and tenaciously followed the 
tenets of Sandeman. 

" At the end of Marshall's Lane, now Marshall Street, on the corner of Union Street, 
stands a low-studded, three-story brick building, worn and wrinkled with age, evidently 
the oldest house on the street. This has been for several generations the property of 
the Capen family. Mr. Atwood has occupied it as an oyster-house since 1826. It was 
previously the well-known dry-goods store of Thomas Capen. Here, in the autumn of 
1769, 'at the sign of the cornfields,' young Benjamin Thompson, of Woburn, after- 
wards famous as Count Rumford, was apprenticed as a clerk to Hopestill Capen [1763], 
the father of Thomas." In this same building, " at the south corner of Marshall's 
Lane, leading from Mill Bridge into Union Street," the Massachusetts Spy was published 
by Isaiah Thomas, from 1771 to the commencement of hostilities. Hopestill Capen 
(1763) was connected with the Boston militia, became ensign, and afterward lieutenant. 
He was first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1768. It wan he who was so incensed 
against Gen. Heath (1765) in 1768, when, by order of a British officer, Gen. Heath 
(1765) led the Artillery from the Common without beat of drum or salute of the colors. 

He died, March 2, 1807, aged seventy-six years, and was buried on Copp's Hill. 

Elias Dupee (1763), schoolmaster, of Boston, son of Daniel Dupee, and Lydia, his 
wife, was born in Boston Dec. 31, 17 18, according to the town records. He was con- 
stable of Boston from 1770 to 1774 inclusive, was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Com- 
pany in 1765, and its clerk in 1768. An Elias Dupee married, in Boston, Aug. 17, 1796, 
Abigail Folley. 

Mr. Whitman (1810), in his history of the Artillery Company, page 312, says, Mr. 
Dupee (1763) "kept a school in Boston during the siege, gratuitously." Oct. 5, 1785, the 
selectmen appointed a committee " to treat with Mr. Winslow respecting a Schoolhouse 
lately improved by Mr. Dupee (1763) known by the name of Sandeman's Meeting 
house," etc. Mr. Dupee (1763) was a member of the Masonic Fraternity, and is 
recorded as present at St. John's Grand Lodge, Oct. 28, 1763. He walked in the Masonic 
procession at the burial of the remains of M.W. Jeremy Gridley, Sept. 12, 1767, and was 
at the installation of M. W. John Rowe, Nov. 23, 1768. " 1800. Dec. 24, Mr. Elias 
Dupee, of Boston, boarding at Mr. Danl Baker's, JE 76, of old age," is probably the 
only record of his death. 

Benjamin Eustis (1763), housewright, of Boston, son of Benjamin and Katharine 
(Ingersoll) Eustis, was born April 16, 1720, and married (1) in Cambridge, May n, 
1749, Elizabeth, daughter of Abraham and Prudence (Hancock) Hill. She died, May 
3°> 1775, and perhaps he married, (2) June 7, 1781, widow Elizabeth Brown. William 
Eustis, who studied medicine under Dr. Joseph Warren, dressed the wounds of the 
militia at Lexington, became surgeon of Col. Gridley's regiment in 1775, secretary of 

Elias Dupee (1763). Authorities: Records Memorials of the Mass. Soc. of the Cincinnati, 1895, 
of Boston and Dedhara; Early Masonic Records. p. 187, says, "Benjamin Eustis [1763] was a lieu- 
Benjamin Eustis (1763). Authorities: Bos- tenant in the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Corn- 
ton Records; New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 1878. pany"; which is an error. 



Il8 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 7 6 3 

war in 1809, minister to Holland in 1815, and governor of Massachusetts from 1823 to 
1825, was his son, born June 10, 1753. 

Lieut. Eustis (1763) was a fence-viewer in 1759 and 1762 ; visited the schools, July 
4, 1770; Nov. 8, 1776, was one of a committee to make an account of the town's dam- 
age since the Boston Port Bill, and surveyor of boards in 1778. He was second sergeant 
of the Artillery Company in 1768. Feb. 19, 1766, and April 11, 1785, he is called 
" Captain " in the town records, and his residence is located near Distil-house Square 
in 1766, and in Sudbury Street in 1785. 

Benjamin Eustis (1763) died, May 4, 1804, aged eighty-four years, and his remains 
were buried on Copp's Hill. 

John Perkins, Jr. (1763), son of John and Abigail Perkins, of Boston, was born July 
6, 1739. He does not appear on the records of Boston as ever holding town office. John 
Perkins (1763) appears on the early Masonic records as present at the Feast of St. John 
the Evangelist, Dec. 27, 1762, at the Bunch of Grapes tavern, Boston, in company with 
Thomas Fleet (1727), Christopher Clark (1759), Moses Pitcher (1760), Adino Pad- 
dock (1762), William Murray (1758), John Joy (1755), and other members of the 
Artillery Company, who received the Masonic degrees in the First Lodge, in Boston. 
Dec. 27, 1770, he was present at Grand Lodge for the last time. Probably service in the 
Revolution and subsequent removal from Boston prevented further attendance. He 
attained the grade of major in military service. A John Perkins was a charter member 
of Columbian Lodge. It is difficult, as Mr. Marvin (1865) suggests in the "Centenary 
of Columbian Lodge," to distinguish between the two men of the above name who resided 
in Boston between 1762 and 1800. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1763 is as follows : — 

"April 8th, 1763. The Company being under Arms in Faneuil Hall, Voted Unani- 
mously, That the Rev. Mr. Thomas Balch of Dedham be desired to preach the next 
Artillery Election Sermon, and that the present Commission Officers, with Capt William 
Homes [1747], be a Committee to wait on him and desire the same. 

" Voted, Unanimously That Col. Joseph Jackson [1738] be Treasurer of this Com- 
pany, in the room of Col. John Phillips [1725], who resigns that trust. Voted, That the 
present Commission Officers and the new Treasurer, Col. Joseph Jackson [1738] be a 
committee to wait on Col. Phillips [1725] and return him the thanks of this Company 
for his past good services as Treasurer &c to this Company. 

" May 2'd 1763. The above Committee, waited on the Rev. Mr. Thomas Balch, to 
desire him to preach the next Artillery Election Sermon. Reported that he had accepted 
the same. Voted, the Company being at Faneuil Hall, That the Treasurer pay twenty 
four pounds to the Commission Officers towards defreying the charge of the next Election 
Dinner &c and the Company to dine with them. Voted, That an addition be made to 
the Vote passed in May, 1762, of cheese, & the respective Officers to invite their friends 
as they think fit. 

" Voted, that Col. William Brattle [1729] and Col. Joseph Jackson [1738] have the 
same power to settle with Col. Blanchard [1737] as when Col. Phillips [1725] was joined 
with them. 

John Perkins, Jr. (1763). Authority: Early Masonic Records, — Centenary of Columbian 
Lodge. 



1763] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. I 19 

"June 6th, 1763. The Company being under Arms, it was then Voted, That the 
present Commission Officers, with the Treasurer, be a Committee to wait on the Rev. 
Mr. Thomas Balch & return him the thanks of this Company for his sermon preached 
this day. 1 

" Copy of letter sent to Mrs. Blanchard (widow of Col. Blanchard [1737]) by the 
committee of this Company: — 

"Boston, May 16th, 1763. 

" Madam, The Honorable, the Artillery Company have made choice of us, the 
Subscribers, a Committee to settle the Bond & mortgage given by Col. Blanchard [1737] 
& others, to a Committee of said Company, formerly appointed for that purpose. We 
should be glad the same might be done immediately ; & the rather, as your son, when he 
was in Boston, expressed so great a desire of the same ; mentioning, that until the mort- 
gage was discharged, Mr. Gordon was not holden to pay that money, which for some 
time hath been really yours, & would, as Mr. Gordon says, have been paid you ere this 
time had it not been for the incumbrance aforesaid. We are, at the next Artillery Election 
to make report of our doings to the Company, & therefore we are persuaded it would be 
much best for you, that Mrs Blanchard should come to Boston before that time, and treat 
with us upon the Premises ; least, if nothing should be done before, the Company should 
pass a vote ordering us, or another Committee, to bring an ejectment for the possession 
of the mortgaged premises ; which, as it would be a great Damage to you, so it will give 
us great pleasure to prevent. We are quite desirous to do every thing we can, & as soon 
as may be, to serve Col. Blanchard's [1737] interest, touching the premises consistent 
with justice to said Company ; & your putting it in our power so to do, will greatly 
oblige, Madam, Your Most Obedient Servants, 

" William Brattle 
"Joseph Jackson. 

"June 6th, 1763. The Committee appointed by the Ancient & Honorable Artillery 
Company, to settle a Bond & Mortgage with the Heirs of Col. Blanchard [1737] have 
attended that service, and beg leave to report the above & foregoing letter ; & further, 
that Mr. Blanchard, the son of the late Col. Blanchard [1737], at tne request of Mrs 
Blanchard, his mother and administratrix on his estate, in consequence of said Letter, came 
to Boston, and attended your committee, paid Col. Jackson [1738] eighty dollars; and 
that the Balance now due from said estate to said Company, as settled by us, & the 

'"Monday, June 6th [1763]. Agreeable to "Monday, June 6th' [1763] being the Anni- 
custom, the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Com- vetsary of the election of officers for the Old Artil- 
pany of this Province appeared under arms, being lery Company, when a sermon, as has been custom- 
the anniversary of the election of officers for the ary on such occasions, was preached before them 
Company. A sermon was preached by the Rev. Mr. by the Rev. Mr. Balch of Dedham, and prayers 
Balch of Oedham, at the Old Brick Meeting House, offered up to the Great Governor and Director of 
where his Excellency the Governor, the members of the Universe, for his aid and guidance in the choice 
his Majesty's Council and House of Representatives, of suitable persons to parade that literally small 
with a number of other gentlemen attended; after company four or rive times the ensuing year : and 
which they proceeded to Faneuil Hall, where an in the afternoon the following officers were chosen 
elegant dinner was provided; and in the afternoon for that purpose, viz: Thomas Marshall, Esq. 
the following gentlemen were chosen for the ensuing Q 1 761 J Captain; Mr. Josiah Waters [1747] Lieu- 
year, viz: Thomas Marshall, Esq. [1761], Captain, tenant; Mr. Jeremiah Belknap [1745] Ensign; Mr. 
Mr. Josiah Waters [1747], Lieutenant, Mr. Jere- John Head [1757]; Mr. David Spear [1758], Mr 
miah Belknap C 1 745 J Ensign. In the evening a Job Wheelwright [1759], Mr John Skinner [1759], 
plentiful repast was given by the officers newly Sergeants and Mr. John Edwards [1747] Clerk, 
elected, at Faneuil Hall, where many loyal healths The drummers we hear are to be the same as last 
were drank." — Boston Newspaper. year." — Boston Newspaper. 



120 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [,-g, 

said Jona' Blanchard is .£365.7.9, which the said Jonathan gives your committee the 
fullest assurance of discharging in the following manner & time : — To pay in one month 
five hundred dollars, part of said debt, and in the Fall make another payment in cash ; — 
the residue of said debt then give undoubted personal security on interest for, to the 
satisfaction of your Committee. All which is submitted. 

" William Brattle, 
"Joseph Jackson, 

" Committee. 

" Voted, That William Brattle [1729], Joseph Jackson [1738] and John Symmes 
[1733], Esqrs,or the major part of them, be and hereby are empowered to take such personal 
security as they shall judge sufficient, providing the security are (persons) Freeholders 
& Inhabitants of this Province, as may be tendered & given for the discharge of the sums 
due to the Antient & Honorable Artillery Company of this Province, from the Estate of 
Col. Blanchard [1737] & others, late of Dunstable, deceased, and that upon such security 
given, said committee are hereby fully empowered to discharge the Bond & Mortgage 
given by said Blanchard [1737] to said Company. 

" Attest : — John Edwards, Clerk. 

"September 5th. 1763. Voted, That the Clerk settle with Messrs Edes [1760] & 
Gill for the last Artillery Election Sermons which was preached by the Rev'd Mr. Thomas 
Balch, & pay them for the remainder of the 300 Sermons, that were not subscribed for ; 
& also that the Clerk sell them to they [sic'] of the Company at eight pence each." 

Rev. Thomas Balch, of Dedham, preached the Artillery election sermon l of 1763. 
He was an only son of Benjamin and Mary (Prentice) Balch, and was born in Charles- 
town Oct. 17, 171 1. He graduated at Harvard College in 1733, and was ordained to 
the gospel ministry, June 30, 1736, in the South Parish of Dedham, where he died, Jan. 
8, 1774. In 1 74 1 he received the degree of A. M. from Yale College. In 1744 he was 
appointed by the committee of war to attend the army on the Cape Breton expedition, 
as chaplain, and was absent on this duty sixteen months. He prepared several students 
for college or the ministry, among them being his son Rev. Benjamin (Harv. Coll , 1763), a 
chaplain in Paul Jones's squadron ; his nephew, Moses Brown (Harv. Coll., 1768), of 
Beverly ; his son-in-law, Rev. Manasseh Cutler, D. D. (Yale Coll., 1765), and probably his 
other sons-in-law, Rev. Moses Everett (Harv. Coll., 1771) and Rev. Jabez Chickering 
(Harv. Coll., 1774). 

Mr. Balch married, Oct. u, 1737, Mary Sumner, of Roxbury. She died March 31, 
1798. The oldest and youngest of their eight children were boys. Both were named 
Thomas, and both died in the service of their country ; one, at the age of eighteen years, 
died in 1756, at Albany, N. Y., on his return from an expedition during the French War, 
and the other, at the age of nineteen, died in 1780, off Halifax, as is supposed, on a 
British prison-ship. 

'John Phillips, Esq. (1725), died April 19, merit to the Artillery Company, as well as a great 

1763. The preacher of the Artillery sermon in 1763 Blessing in the other various public Stations which 

made the following reference to him : — he filled with Honor, Fidelity and acceptance. But 

"Altho' the peculiar Smiles of Providence which he is gone 1 Gone to be here no more ! His Piety 

attend this anniversary Solemnity, inspire Joy and Integrity Benevolence, and extensive Kindness and 

Gratitude into all our Hearts, yet we feel our Sorrow Goodness, afforded him solid Comfort at the Ap- 

and Mourning renewed for the Decease of the late proach of the last Enemy, and Victory over him. 

worthy Colonel Phillips, who was so long an Orna- He quitted the Field of Battle with Honor." 



i 7 6 4 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 121 

, The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1764 were : John Wins- 

[ 704. ' ow ( I76 4)' ca P tam J James Cunningham (1761), lieutenant; Richard 

• I Boynton (1759), ensign. William Bordman (1758), was first sergeant; 

Andrew Symmes, Jr. (1760), second sergeant; Moses Pitcher (1760), third sergeant; 

Samuel Simpson (1759), fourth sergeant, and John Edwards (1747), clerk. 

The year 1764 is memorable on account of the great depression in Boston, occa- 
sioned by the prevalence of the small-pox. Many of the merchants and traders moved, 
with their goods, into the country. It afflicted fourteen families on Fish Street, among 
which were Richard Bulkley (1722), Benjamin Eustis (1763), who "lived near the Mill 
Ponds" ; Edward Proctor (1756), " Schooner Tavern in Fish Street" ; Paul Revere, Capt. 
Levi Jennings (1764), John Coburn (1 751), William Dawes (1760). June 30, 1764, 
the selectmen reported that during the preceding six months, of the six hundred and 
forty-four white persons who had the small-pox " the Natural way," one hundred and 
two died, and of four thousand six hundred and ninety whites who had it by inoculation, 
forty-three died. One thousand five hundred and thirty-seven persons removed into the 
country. 

The birth and coronation days of George the Third were celebrated, as usual, in 
1764, but the Artillery Company, as a body, very seldom participated in those festivities. 
This year, as the election anniversary of the Artillery Company, and the twenty-seventh 
anniversary of the birth of the king, both occurred on Monday, June 4, the latter was 
celebrated at Concord, where the branches of the colonial government were then 
sitting. 

Dec. 3, 1764, the governor made the following promotions in the regiment of 
militia in Boston, of which Joseph Jackson, Esq. (1738), was colonel; William Taylor, 
Esq. (1738), lieutenant-colonel; Thomas Marshall, Esq. (1761), major; Richard Boyn- 
ton, Esq. (1759), captain; Daniel Bell (1733), captain-lieutenant; Adino Paddock 
(1762), captain-lieutenant of the train of artillery; Christopher Clark (1759), first 
lieutenant. 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1764 were John Brocas, Thomas 
Bumstead, William Hickling, Jr., Levi Jennings, John Osborn, Jr., John Winslow. 

John Brocas (1764), sailmaker, of Boston, was probably a son of John and Ann 
Broccus (Brocas) and was born in 1704 

Oct. 17, 1764, the selectmen passed upon Mr. John Brocas' (1764) Province 
Account, amounting to four pounds nineteen shillings and ten pence half penny. He 
was second sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1766 and became ensign in the militia. 
He died in 1770, aged sixty-seven years, when administration was granted on his estate. 

Thomas Bumstead ( 1 764^, coach-maker, of Boston. 

Thomas Bumstead (1647), the emigrant, died in 1697. He had a son, Jeremiah, 
born Oct. 14, 1678, who married, (1) June 16, 1700, Sarah Abraham, and, (2) March 8, 
1704, Elizabeth Bridges Jeremiah and Elizabeth (Bridges) Bumstead had Jeremiah, 
born March 26, 1708, who married, (1) Bethia Sherwin, Feb. 2, 1726, and, (2) Sarah 
Howard, March 18, 1729. He was a glazier, and died about Nov. 1, 1747. 

John Brocas (1764). Authority: Boston New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 1864; Boston 
Records. , Records. 

Thomas Bumstead (1764). Authorities: 



122 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [1764 

Thomas Bumstead (1764) joined the Old South Church, July 3, 1763. His resi- 
dence was at the corner of Bromfield's Lane and Common Street. In 1766, he was 
fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company, and in the militia became a major. 

After Adino Paddock (1762) had left the country, his estate, it is said, fell into the 
hands of Thomas Bumstead (1764), from whom Bumstead Place, opposite the Granary 
Burial-Ground, on Tremont Street, took its name. Mr. Bumstead (1764) continued the 
manufacture of coaches, etc., at the old stand of Major Paddock (1762). 

After the evacuation of Boston, it was desired to cleanse the town. .A committee 
was therefore appointed, of which Thomas Bumstead (1764) was one, authorized to go 
through the several wards and have such houses smoked and cleansed as needed it; and 
also to make a return of the inhabitants of their respective wards. Mr. Bumstead's 
(1764) ward was No. 11. He died May 8, 1828, aged eighty-eight years. 

William Hickling, Jr. (1764), mast-maker, of Boston, son of William and Sarah 
(Sales) Hickling, was born May 21, 1742. 

His father was a noted distiller; joined the Old South Church, Jan. 17, 1730-1 ; 
became a founder of the Eleventh Congregational Church, Feb. 17, 1747-8, and died 

Dec. 10, 1774- 

William, Jr. (1764), was a mast-maker by trade, and his yard was on Purchase 
Street. He never held any office in the town of Boston. He died June 1, 1790, aged 
forty-eight years. 

Levi Jennings (1764), hatter, of Boston. He married Bethia . His place of 

business was No. 75 Newbury (Washington) Street. He was chosen a scavenger in 
1765, and August 28, 1776, was chosen a juryman for a court to be held at Boston, 
Sept. 5, Timothy Pickering, Esq., judge, for the trial and condemnation of vessels, and 
Jan. 11, 1778, was selected as juryman for a Maritime Court. He was third sergeant of 
the Artillery Company in 1766, and a captain in the militia. 

Levi Jennings (1764) received the Masonic degrees in the First Lodge, in Boston, 
May 3, 1762. He was present in St. John's Grand Lodge several times between 1762 
and 1774. At the installation of M. W. John Rowe, Nov. 23, 1768, he walked in the 
procession, carrying the Bible " on a blue velvet cushion, fringed and tasselled with gold." 

John Osborn, Jr. (1764). John Osborn (1764) was first sergeant of the Artil- 
lery Company in 1767, and he rose to the grade of captain in military service. 

Hon. John Osborn, a member of the Old South Church, Feb. 25, 1721, died Aug. 
27, 1768, aged eighty years. John Osborn, son of John and Ruth Osborn, was born 
May 16, 17 16. Another John Osborn died in September, 1791, aged fifty-one years, 
and was buried from his dwelling-house in Eliot Street. Hon. John Osborn did busi- 
ness on Milk Street; also, in 1760, on Long Wharf, and a John Osborn kept the Red- 
Cross tavern in 1 746. 

John Winslow (1764), husbandman, of Marshfield, son of Isaac and Sarah 
(Hensley) Winslow, of Marshfield, was born May 27, 1702; married, Feb. 16, 1726, 

William Hickling, Jr. (1764). Authorities: John Winslow (1764). Authorities: New 

Hill's Hist, of Old South Church; Boston Records. Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 1863; Whitman's Hist. 

Levi Jennings (1764). Authorities: Bos- A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 1842. 
ton Records; Early Masonic Records. 



1764] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. I 23 

Mary Little, and succeeded to the Careswell estate. After her decease, he married a 
widow Johnson (born Barker), of Hingham. He had three sons: Josiah, Pelham, 
and Isaac. Pelham was a major in the British army, on Long Island, in 1776, and 
died there. 

John Winslow (1764) was a colonel in the expedition to Nova Scotia in 1755, and 
was compelled to be a participator in the exile of the Acadians. He has been blamed 
for the cruel removal of seven thousand people from their native country, for the ruining 
of their homes and farms, and for their being scattered throughout the English 
colonies. He acted under orders emanating from "reasons of state," for Gen. Winslow 
(1764) was eminently a generous and kind-hearted man. He was a grandson of Gov. 
Josiah Winslow, of Plymouth Colony, and very early exhibited a liking for military 
exercise. In 1740 he held a command in the regiment that was sent to Cuba. He 
became a major-general in the British line ; had chief command of several expeditions 
into the Kennebec country; participated in the conflict in Nova Scotia in 1755, and was 
commander-in-chief at Fort William Henry, on Lake Erie, in 1756. 

Mr. Hutchinson says, "He was younger brother to Capt. Josiah and possessed the 
same martial Spirit." " Capt. Josiah," eldest son of Isaac and Sarah Winslow, graduated 
at Harvard College in 172 1, and was killed by French and Indians at St. George's River, 
Me., May 1, 1724. Edward, another brother of John (1764), for some years was judge 
of probate, became a royalist, and fled to Halifax, where he died in 1784, aged seventy 
years. 

John Winslow (1764) died at Hingham, April 17, 1774, aged seventy-two years. 
His portrait, with the portraits of his ancestors, is in the Library of the Massachusetts 
Historical Society. Mr. Whitman (18 10) says, "His sword is now transmitted in the 
family. His bravery was proverbial and his reputation as an officer excellent." 

He was captain of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company in 1764. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1764 is as follows : — 
"April 6th. 1764. Monday being foul weather; being under Arms the Friday 
following, Voted, That the Rev. Mr. Woodward of Weston be desired to preach the 
next Artillery Election Sermon, and that the present Commission Officers with the 
Treasurer be a Committee to wait on him & desire the same. 

"May 7th. 1764. The above Committee waited on the Rev. Mr. Woodward of 
Weston to desire him to preach the next Artillery Election Sermon ; Reported that he 
had accepted the same. The Company being at Faneuil Hall, Voted, That the Treas- 
urer pay twenty-four pounds, & the Clerk four pounds to the Commission Officers, 
towards defreying the charge of the next Election Dinner, and the Company to dine 
with them. Voted, That the Clerk, for the future, settle his accounts in May annually. 

"Attest: John Edwards, Clerk. 

"June 4th. 1764. The Company being under Arms, It was then Voted, That the 
present Commission Officers, with the Treasurer be a Committee to wait on the Rev. 
Mr. Samuel Woodward & return him the thanks of this Company for his sermon preached 
this day. Attest : John Edwards, Clerk. 

"September 3d, 1764. The Company being at Faneuil Hall, Voted, That Col. 
Jackson [1738], the Treasurer of the Ancient & Honorable Artillery Company, be 
desired to let out the Monies that is or may be in his hands belonging to said Company, 



124 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[1765 



taking good and sufficient landed security for the same. Voted, That Capt William 
Homes [1747]. Mr. John Deming [1756] and Mr. Samuel Torrey, Junr. [1752] be a 
Committee to examine the former Clerk's Accounts, and to look over the List and to 
settle with those that are in arrears. Attest. Robert Jenkins, Ten's, Clerk." 

Rev. Samuel Woodward, of Weston, delivered the Artillery election sermon ' of 
1764. He was a son of Ebenezer Woodward, and was born at Newton, Mass., in 1726. 
He graduated at Harvard College in 1748, and was ordained as pastor of the church in 
Weston, Mass., Dec. 25, 1751. He continued in this relation until his decease, which 
occurred Oct. 5, 1782, at the age of fifty-six years. "He died greatly beloved and 
lamented by the people of his charge, by his brethren in office, and by an extensive circle 
of acquaintance." 



S The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1765 were: William 

I VQ ^\. Homes (1747), captain; Thomas Dawes (1754), lieutenant; Samuel Torrey, 

^ Jr. (i7S 2 ). ensign. Benjamin Edes (1760) was first sergeant ; Joseph Webb, 

Jr. (1761), second sergeant; Thomas Stevenson (1762), third sergeant; Elias Dupee 

(1763), fourth sergeant, and Robert Jenkins, tertius (1756), clerk. 

The world-renowned Stamp Act passed the British Parliament, March 22, 1765. 
A copy of the Act soon arrived in Boston, and it was reprinted by Edes (1760) and 
Gill for the information of the public, in a folio pamphlet of twenty-four pages. The town 
took immediate action, instructed its representatives, and sent letters to Gen. Conway, 
Secretary of State, London, and to Col. Isaac Barre, M. P. On the 14th of August, 
1765, the popular indignation was manifested. At Hanover Square, at the junction of 
Essex, Orange, and Newbury Streets, stood a number of elms, one of which became 
known as the "Liberty Tree." Upon one of these trees two effigies were suspended, 
one of which represented a stamp officer. Toward evening the effigies were taken dow-n, 
placed on a bier, supported by six men, and were carried in procession along Orange and 
Marlborough Streets and Cornhill, passed the town-house, and down King Street, turning 
through Kilby Street. A new building, supposed to be erected for a stamp-office, was 
demolished. Thence the procession proceeded to Fort Hill, where the effigies were 
burned. They attacked the property of Andrew Oliver, father of Andrew, Jr. (1786), 
and marching to the Province House, dispersed. 

The persons who prepared and suspended the effigies were John Avery, Jr. (1786), 
Thomas Crafts (1765), John Smith, Henry Wells, Thomas Chase, Stephen Cleverly, Henry 
Bass, and Benjamin Edes 2 (1760). 

After the Stamp-Act riot, it was resolved at a town meeting to preserve order. 

Rev. Samuel Woodward. Authority: Woodward of Weston; after which they went in 

Sprague's Annals, Vol. I., p. 619, note. procession to Faneuil Hall, where was a very ele- 

1 " Monday, June 4, being the anniversary of gant dinner provided by the company. In the 

the election of officers for the Ancient and Honour- afternoon, the following gentlemen were elected 

able Artillery Company, His Excellency the Gov- officers for the ensuing year; viz: General Winslow 

ernor, with as many of the Honorable his Majesty's f 1 764J Captain, James Cunningham Esq [1761] 

Council, and House of Representatives as were in Lieutenant Colonel, Mr. Richard Boynton [1759J 

town, and a number of other gentlemen, together Ensign. In the evening there was a genteel enter- 

with the Company attended divine seivice at the old tainment at Faneuil Hall, provided by the newly 

Brick Meeting House, where a sermon adapted to elected officers." — Boston Gazette, June 11, 1764. 
the occasion was preached by the Rev. Mr. Samuel 2 Drake's Hist, of Boston, p. 695. 



i 7 6 5 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 1 25 

In consequence of the above resolve, the selectmen, magistrates, and other gentle- 
men of the town, together with the cadet company, several companies of the militia, and 
the company of the train of artillery, kept night-watch to prevent any such further pro- 
ceedings. 

In April, 1765, the field officers of the Boston regiment were as in 1764. Among 
officers of the line: Jeremiah Stimpson ( 1 7 6 1 ) became captain-lieutenant of Col. 
Jackson's (1738) company, and Edward Jackson (1758), lieutenant; Josiah Waters 
(1747), first lieutenant; Elisha Eaton (1768), ensign; Samuel Ballard (1755), first lieu- 
tenant; Ephraim May (1765), lieutenant ; William Bordman (1758), lieutenant ; Nath- 
aniel Ridgeway (1756), ensign; Edward Proctor (1756), ensign; Thomas Adams 
(1765), lieutenant ; Daniel Bell (1733), captain; Zephaniah Hartt (1765), lieutenant, 
and Timothy Thornton (1765), ensign. 

In the train of artillery: Adino Paddock (1762) continued as captain-lieutenant; 
Christopher Clark (1759), first-lieutenant; Samuel Sellon (1765), second lieutenant; 
Thomas Crafts, Jr. (1765), lieutenant and fire worker. 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1765 were: Thomas Adams, 
Sarson Belcher, Samuel Bradlee, Clement Collins, Jr., Thomas Crafts, Jr., William Cun- 
ningham, Samuel Gridley, Zephaniah Hartt, Nathaniel Heath, William Heath, John 
Leighton, Christopher Marshall, Ephraim May, Dimond Morton, William Perkins, William 
Rogers, Samuel Searle, Samuel Sellon, Asa Stoddard, Jonathan Stoddard, John Stutson, 
Timothy Thornton, Ebenezer Torrey, William Torrey, George Trott, Edward Tucker- 
man, John Wells, David Wheeler, Jr. 

Thomas Adams (1765), of Boston, was born in 1743. He was published to Diana 
Paine, Sept. 7, 1768. She died Jan. 10, 1803, aged fifty-eight years. 

Nov. 6, 1776, he was chosen one of a committee to ascertain the damage to the 
town since the Boston Port Bill, and, Feb. 6, 1777, he was selected from Ward 1 as one of 
a committee to prevent monopolies. He rose to the grade of captain in the militia, 
being ensign of the Fusileers in 1787-8, first lieutenant in 1792, and captain of that com- 
pany in 1793, 1794, and 1795. His residence was near Charles River Bridge. He died 
Sept. 9, 1796, aged fifty-three years. 

Sarson Belcher (1765), hatter, in 1786, on Newbury (now Washington) Street, son 
of Moses, Jr., and Eunice Belcher, was born in Braintree, June 21, 1741. Mr. Belcher 
(1765) was a member of the Committee of Correspondence, Inspection, and Safety 
in 1779, and in 1780 was one of a committee to raise the town's quota for the Continental 
Army. He was active in the militia, and in 1782 held the position of captain in the 
Boston regiment. 

Aug. 20, 1788, Sarson Belcher (1765) with five others, all appointed by the trades- 
men and manufacturers of Boston, issued a circular letter to the manufacturers of the 
country, setting forth the necessity of protection to home industries. 1 

He never held any office in the town of Boston. He died Dec. 24, 1794, aged fifty. 
two years, and "was buried from his late dwelling-house on Newbury (Washington) 
Street, opposite the White Horse Tavern." His wife, Fanny, died Aug. 25, 1793, 
aged fifty years. 

Thomas Adams (1765V Authority: Bos- ' Mem. Hist, of Boston, Vol. IV., p. 75, et seq. 

ton Records. 



126 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[1765 



Samuel Bradlee, Jr. (1765), was elected constable of Boston in 1760. He was 
very prominent in the militia, being second lieutenant and adjutant of a company of 
artillery, in Boston, in 1787-8, and was chosen captain of the same company Oct. 15, 
1791. He held that position until Oct. 10, 1797, when he was elected lieutenant-colonel 
of the Boston regiment. He died 1 July 30, 1798, in commission, and was buried under 
arms. 

Four companies of the First Regiment and Capt. Wild's Artillery formed the escort 
at the burial. Every civic and military demonstration, possible, was made out of respect 
to the memory of a very worthy citizen and soldier. 

Clement Collins, Jr. (1765), carpenter, of Boston, son of Clement and Sarah Collins, 
of Boston, was born March 5, 1732. He was published Oct. 4, 1764, to marry Hannah 
Jenkins, of Boston. He married, (2) Elizabeth Currier, published Dec. 7, 1780. He 
was chosen a surveyor of boards and viewer of shingles from 1771 to 1774 inclusive. 
In 1786, he resided on Fish (now North) Street. After service in the war, he was 
re-elected, in 1778, surveyor of boards, also from 1779 to 1783 inclusive. 

He died Sept. 10, 1798, aged sixty-five years, "an honest worthy man." 

Thomas Crafts, Jr. (1765), japanner and painter, also carpenter, of Boston, son of 
Thomas and Ann Crafts, was born in Boston July 13, 1740. He was published May 12, 
1763, to marry Frances Gore, daughter of Capt. John (1743) and Frances (Pinckney) 
Gore. Col. Crafts (1765) died Jan. 14, 1799, aged fifty-nine years, his wife Frances 
having died Sept. 4, 1788. His son Thomas, Jr., born April 9, 1767, delivered the oration 
before the town authorities July 4, 1791, and died Aug. 25, 1798. July 9 , I7 66, he 
applied to the selectmen for leave to frame the new jail, near Mr. Holbrook's school. 
In the. same year, a gallery was erected on the westerly side of the Representatives' 
Chamber, in what is now called the " Old State House," for the accommodation of the 
public "Thomas Crafts, Housewright" did the work, and was paid therefor fifteen 
pounds six shillings and five pence. 

John Adams, in his diary, under date of Jan. 15, 1766, says : " I spent the evening 
with the Sons of Liberty, at their own apartment, in Hanover Square, near the Tree of 
Liberty. It is a counting room in Chase & Speakman's distillery; a very small room it 
is. There were present, John Avery, a distiller of liberal education ; John Smith, a 
brazier; Thomas Crafts, the painter; Benjamin Edes, the printer; Stephen Cleverly, 
brazier ; Thomas Chase, distiller ; Joseph Fields, master of a vessel ; Henry Bass, George 
Trott, jeweller, and Henry Welles," etc. Hanover Square was the corner of Washington 
and Essex streets. Of the above mentioned, John Avery, Jr., joined the Artillery Corn- 
Thomas Crafts Ci 765). Authorities: Bos- ' "Died yesterday, Lieut Col. Samuel Bradlee 
ton Records; Early Masonic Records; Craft's Me- [1765], Commandant of the ist Regiment. A gen- 
morial; New Eng. Chronicle, July 22, 1776; Mass. tleman highly esteemed for every social virtue. In 
Archives; The Hundred Boston Orators, p. 231 ; this untimely stroke of death his bereaved family 
Sumner's Hist, of East Boston, p. 396; Mem. Hist. bewail the loss of the kind husband, the tender 
of Boston, Vol. HI., p. 183. parent, and the affectionate brother. As an active 
The " Orderly Book of the Regiment of Artil- and useful citizen, a kind benefactor, and a generous 
lery raised for the defence of the town of Boston, friend, Col. Bradlee [1765] shone distinguished and 
commanded by Col Thomas Crafts [1765] from June will long, very long, be lamented. On account of 
1777 to Dec. 1778, also called the ' Massachusetts the weather, his remains will be interred this after- 
State's Train,'" is printed in the Historical Collec- noon from his late house in Dock Square at c 
tions of the Essex Institute, Vol. XIII., Salem, o'clock." — Columbian CentineL Auz 1.1708 
Mass., 1876. * ' /y 



1765] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 127 

pany in 1786; Thomas Crafts, Jr., joined the Artillery Company in 1765; Benjamin 
Edes, in 1760; and George Trott, in 1765. Col. Craft's (1765) shop was "opposite the 
Great Tree." 

Thomas Crafts, Jr. (1765), received the Masonic degrees in the Lodge of St. Andrew 
in 1762. He was unanimously elected grand treasurer of the Massachusetts Grand Lodge, 
A. F. and A. M., at its institution Dec. 27, 1769, by M. W. Joseph Warren, and served 
one year. Dec. 27, 1776, Col. Thomas Crafts appears as grand treasurer, and in 1777 as 
junior grand warden, p. t. Dec. 4, 1778, he was elected senior grand deacon; Dec. 3, 
1779, junior grand warden. 

Col. Thomas Crafts (1765) was appointed July 19, 1774, one of a committee of 
twenty-four to select a proper list of persons to be added to the Committee on Ways and 
Means. The committee reported the names of fourteen persons, one of whom was Mr. 
Thomas Crafts, Jr. (1765). At the same meeting he was chosen on a committee selected 
to receive donations for such in town as are sufferers by means of an Act of the British 
Parliament for shutting up the harbor of Boston, and to distribute the same. Dec. 7, 
1774, he was selected, with six others, to bring in the names of a proper committee " to 
carry the Resolutions of the late Continental Congress into Execution." He served as 
fireward in 1775 an d 1778, and in 1776 was selected as one from Ward 4 to "collect an 
account of the damages sustained since the Boston Port Bill." May 3, 1777, an article 
in the town warrant was " To take the mind of the town with respect to the best method 
of preparation and defence at this important crisis." After some debate a committee of 
nine was appointed, of which Col. Thomas Crafts (1765) was one, to report later in the 
day. It did report in favor of sinking hulks in the channels of the harbor, and of calling 
for volunteers to do duty " in this town and harbor," to be under command of Col. 
Crafts (1765). 

July 18, 1776, the Declaration of Independence was publicly read for the first time 
in Boston. The council, representatives, magistrates, selectmen, clergy, the militia, and 
a great throng of people were present. The regiments and artillery were drawn up in 
King Street, at one o'clock p. m., when, from the balcony on the east end of the Old 
State House, the Declaration was proclaimed by Col. Thomas Crafts (1765). It was 
received with great joy by the people, who cheered ; the guns of the harbor and of the 
fortifications answered, and the artillery fired their cannon thirteen times, the regiments 
fired volleys in thirteen divisions, thus indicating the number of American States united. 
The evening was spent in festivity. 

Col. Crafts (1765) in 1779 was again appointed on a committee by the town to 
fortify the harbor, and on another to determine what it is necessary to do to protect the 
town in case of an invasion by the enemy, and in November of that year was called upon 
to devise means for the procuring of clothing for the Continental Army. He served the 
town of Boston as selectman for several years immediately succeeding the Revolution, 
also in 1793 an d l T9&> ar >d was county treasurer from 1788 to 1795 inclusive. He was 
for many years a justice of the peace, and during the latter part of his life acting justice. 

Col. Crafts (1765) was the subject of the following pithy sarcasm, supposed to have 
been written by his nephew, Thomas Crafts, United States Consul to France : — 

" Dear Justice Crafts, fair, factious partisan ! 
I like thee much, thou fiery-visaged man. 
I love to hear tbee charm the listening throng 
Thy head and wig still moving with thy tongue ! 



128 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [1765. 

Thus Jove of old, the heathen's highest God, 

Their minor Godships governed with his nod; 

In this you differ from that great divine, — 

Once from his head came wisdom, ne'er from thine. 

The mind of Justice Crafts no subject balks, 

Of King-craft, Priest-craft, craftily he talks, 

Oft have we heard his crafty tales and laughed, 

But never knew him mention justice-craft." 

The Columbian Centinel notices his decease, and adds : " Funeral from his dwelling 
house, north side of the Old Brick Meeting house," Jan. 16, 1799. 

William Cunningham (1765), painter, of Boston, son of William and Elizabeth 
Cunningham, was born Sept 28, 1722. He was published, March 18, 1744,10 marry 
Abigail Downes. His place of business was No. 9 Newbury (now Washington), Street. 
He was a brother of Major James Cunningham, who joined the Artillery Company in 1761. 
William Cunningham, Sen., was one of the founders of Hollis Street Church in 1731. 
Capt. William Cunningham, Jr. (1765), was elected constable of Boston in March, 
1750-1, but declined to serve, and paid the fine. In 1779 William (1765) and James 
(1761) were in business together. In 1781 William Cunningham (1765), when proposed 
by an auctioneer as his bondsman, is called in the records, " Gentleman." He was 
identified with the militia, and rose to the grade of captain. 

Samuel Gridley (1765), of Boston, probably son of Col. Richard and Hannah 
(Deming) Gridley, was born in Boston June 14, 1734, and died in October, 1801, aged 
sixty-seven years. 

Another Samuel Gridley, son of Jeremiah and Abigail Gridley, was born Aug. 8. 
1734, and died in Dec, 1799, aged sixty-six years. Samuel Gridley was published Jan, 
10, 1759, to marry Susanna Hill. He was third sergeant in the Artillery Company in 1767. 

Samuel Gridley (1765) is not mentioned in the Records of the Town of Boston. 

Zephaniah Hartt (1765), shipwright, of Boston, son of Ralph (1739) and Mary 
Hartt, was born in Boston Dec. 19, 1724. He married, Nov. 24, 1748, Sarah Copp, of 
Boston. He lived on Charter Street, and in his day acquired great distinction as a ship- 
builder. He shares the honor which makes " Hartt's shipyard" forever famous in our 
naval history as the place where the frigates "Constitution" and "Boston" and the brig 
"Argus" were built. In the militia, he attained the rank of lieutenant. Nov. 8, 1776, 
he was selected from Ward 1 to ascertain the damage to the town " since the Boston 

Port Bill." 

He died in September, 1791, aged sixty-seven years, and was buried from his 

dwelling-house in Charter Street. 

Nathaniel Heath (1765), mason, of Boston, son of Samuel and Mary Heath, was 
born in Boston July 4, 1732. He was published, March 13, 1754, to marry Mary Adams, 
of Boston. He was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1768. 

Oct. 28, 1767, he was voted forty pounds, due him, for taking down and repairing 
the remainder of the Widow Crosby's house, near the Salutation Tavern, in order to 

William Cunningham (1765). Authority: Nathaniel Heat* (1765). Authority: Bos- 

Boston Records. ton Records. 



1765] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 1 29 

widen the street there, and Nov. 8, 1776, he was selected from Ward 1 to ascertain the 
damage "since the Boston Port Bill." Feb. 4, 1777, while holding the rank of cap- 
tain, he was selected by the selectmen as a committee to search the houses in Ward 1 
for the purpose of obtaining blankets for the use of the Continental Army. Capt. Heath 
(1765) was probably in the army several years, where he attained the rank of major, as 
his name does not again appear in Boston Records until Aug. 4, 1783, when he was 
employed to repair the wall of the North Burial-Ground. In 1796 he resided on Charter 
Street. 

Major Nathaniel Heath (1765) died in Boston, May 5, 1812, aged eighty years, and 
his wife, Mary, died Oct. 12, 1809, aged seventy-two years. Both were buried in Copp's 
Hill Burial-Ground. 

William Heath (1765), yeoman, of Roxbury, son of Ensign Samuel and Elizabeth 
(Payson) Heath, was born in Roxbury, March 2, 1737. 1 He was of the fifth generation of 
that family who inherited the same real estate in that town. The old homestead of the 
family was situated at the corner of Heath Street and Bickford Avenue. It was taken down 
in 1843. William Heath (1765) was brought up a farmer, was fond of military exercises, 
and read and studied every military treatise obtainable. He thus became acquainted 
with the theory of war in all its branches and duties. He was, when quite young, ^ 
a member of the local militia, " but/' he says, " through the inactive state of the military 
company to which he belonged,' in the spring of the year 1765" (it was May 6), "he 
went over to Boston and entered a member of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Com- 
pany." This immediately recommended him to the notice of the colonel of the first 
regiment of militia, in the county of Suffolk, who sent for him, and importuned him to 
take command of a company. He was commissioned by Gov. Bernard as captain of 
the Roxbury company. The governor was so much pleased with Capt. Heath (1765) 
that he publicly declared, " he would not only make him colonel of the regiment, but, if 
it were in his power, a general officer also." Capt. Heath (1765), and other members 
in Roxbury and Dorchester, used to walk into Boston, carrying their guns, to attend the 
drill meetings of the Artillery Company. He was lieutenant of the Artillery Company 
in 1768, and its captain in 1770. 

In the beginning of 1770, Capt. Heath (1765) wrote addresses to the public, which 
were signed " A Military Countryman," and were printed in the Boston Gazette, in which 
he urged "the importance of military discipline and skill in the use of arms, as the only 
means that could save our country from falling a prey to any daring invader."^- 

During Gov. Hutchinson's term, Capt. Heath (1765) had no command, but when, 
in 1774, the people selected officers, he was rechosen captain of the Roxbury company, 
and the same year was elected, unanimously, by the officers of First Suffolk Regiment, 
colonel. He was prominent in town matters, frequently moderator of the town meet- 
ings ; in 1761, represented Roxbury in the General Court, also from 1771 to 1774; was 
a delegate to the Provincial Congresses of 1774 and 1775; an active member of the Com- 
mittee of Correspondence, Safety, and Inspection ; delegate to the Convention that 
adopted the Federal Constitution, in 1788 ; State senator in 179 1-2 ; judge of probate for 
Norfolk County, from 1793 until his decease, Jan. 24, 1814. Several times he was un- 
successfully proposed for governor, but in 1806 he was elected lieutenant-governor. He, 

1 See Memoirs of Major-Gen. Heath (1765), containing anecdotes, details of skirmishes, battles, and 
other military events during the American War, written by himself, and printed at Boston, August, 1798. 



13° HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



['765 



however, declined to accept, and refused to be qualified. He was chosen by the people, 
in 18 1 2, a presidential elector, and was president of the College of Electors, the whole of 
whom voted for DeWitt Clinton. His opponent, for presidential elector, was Ex-Presi- 
dent Adams, whom he defeated. 

In 1768, several regiments of British troops were in- Boston. On a field-day, under 
command of Capt. Heath (1765), then lieutenant, 1 it appearing probable that the Artil- 
lery Company would not leave the Common until after the roll-call of the troops, their 
v commanding officer sent orders that the Artillery Company must retire without beat of 
drum, and that there must be no firing at the deposit of the standard. The Company 
opposed a compliance therewith, but Lieut. Heath (1765) conceiving it his duty to 
comply with the order of a superior officer in his Majesty's service, marched to Faneuil 
Hall in silence, and without firing. This appeared to some of the members an infringe- 
ment of their privileges. The first sergeant, or orderly, Hopestill Capen (1763), resented 
it so highly that, after the Company was dismissed, he went to the top of his house and 
fired his musket three times, and subsequently would not vote for Gen. Heath (1765). 

Feb. 2, 1775, Capt. Heath (1765) was chosen one of the five general officers 
authorized by Congress " to oppose the execution of certain' acts of the British Parlia- 
ment/y In June, 1775, he was made a provincial major-general, and in August follow- 
ingfthe Continental Congress conferred the same rank upon him. He was the only 
general officer on the ground on the 19th of April, 1775, organizing and directing the 
armed husbandmen in their first conflict with British regulars. 2 On that day he went to 
Lexington, accompanied by Dr. Joseph Warren, afterward major-general, at which time 
the latter came very near being killed. Gen. Heath (1675) w as in command of a 
brigade near Boston until the spring of 1776, when, in command of six regiments of the 
American Army, he started for New York. He remained in active service in the Hudson 
Valley until Feb. 10, 1777, when he obtained leave of the commander-in-chief to make a 
short visit to New England. March 14, 1777, he started from Roxbury on his way back 
to his command, but before he reached Worcester an express-messenger overtook him 
with orders from Gen. Washington, assigning him to take command of the Eastern 
Department, Gen. Ward having applied for leave to rejoin his command. Gen. Heath 
(1765) returned to Boston, and took command. 

June 4, 1779, Gen. Washington ordered him to join the main army. Polite and 
affectionate addresses were received by him, on his leaving this department, from officers 
of the line, staff, and department, and of the Boston regiment. On the nth of June he 
left Boston, accompanied by a number of officers and citizens on horseback or in car- 
riages, who attended Gen. Heath (1765) as far as Worcester, where the gentlemen had 
ordered an elegant dinner. After dinner he took his leave amidst a shout of hearty 
wishes for his health and prosperity. On the 22d of June he greeted Washington at 
West Point, and was assigned the command of the troops on the east side of the Hudson. 
Upon the discovery of Arnold's treason, it was to Gen. Heath (1765) that Gen. Wash- 
ington intrusted the command at West Point. May 22, 1779, Major-Gen. William 
Heath (1765) was elected by Congress a Commissioner for the Board of War, — an 
honorable appointment, with a salary of four thousand dollars a year, — but Gen. Heath 
(1765) declined to accept it, choosing "rather to participate in the more active opera- 

1 It was customary before the Revolution, and so continued until recently, to give the lieutenant the 
honor of commanding the Company one field-day during the year. 

2 Drake's Hist, of Roxbury, p. 388. 



1765] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. -131 

tions in the field." Gen. Washington granted him another furlough, and, April 21, 1780, 
he set out for Roxbury, where he arrived on the 29th. June 2, 1780, the commander- 
in-chief ordered him to Providence, R. I., to advise and assist the French on their arrival. 
Oct. 14, 1780, the French having previously arrived at Newport, R. I., Gen. Heath 
(1765) was ordered to proceed to West Point and take command of that post, where he 
remained until May 9, 1781, when he was sent by Gen. Washington to the governors of 
the Eastern States to present the distressed situation of the army in regard to provision, 
and seek relief. Having performed the mission assigned him, he left Roxbury for the 
seat of war, July 12, 1781, where he arrived July 29, and Aug. 18, Gen. Washington 
being about to start for Virginia with the larger part of the army, Gen. Heath (1765) was 
placed in command of the Department of New York, which position he held until April 
4, 1782, when the commander-in-chief returned and resumed command of the main army. 

June 10, 1783, Gen. Heath (1765) was general of the day. " It is a little remark- 
able," says Gen. Heath (1765), "that the general by whose orders and under whose 
direction the first guard in the American Army was mounted at the foot of Prospect 
Hill, on the evening of the 19th of April, 1775, after the battle of that day, should 
happen, in the course of service, to be the last general of the day in the American main 
army, on the iofh of June, 1783, to inspect, turn off, and visit the guards." 

June 23, 1783, Gen. Heath (1765) started homeward, but not before Gen. Wash- 
ington had placed in his hands a sealed letter, " to be read at his leisure." The letter 
was written throughout by Gen. Washington, and was expressive of his gratitude to, and 
affection for, Gen. Heath (1765). "This letter," said he to Brissot de Warville, in 1788, 
" is a jewel which in my eyes surpasses all the eagles and all the ribbons in the world." 

Gen. Heath (1765) arrived at his farm, in Roxbury, July 1, 1783. From this time 
until his decease, except from 1783 to 1790, he held public office. He died Monday, 
Jan. 24, 1814, and was buried on the Friday following from Rev. Mr. Porter's church. 

Soon after the House of Representatives of Massachusetts was called to order, 
Jan. 26, 1814, Mr. Otis rose and announced, "The venerable Heath [1765] — the com- 
panion of Washington — the honest patriot — the Christian soldier — has paid the debt 
of nature. He was, before his decease, probably, the only surviving major-general of 
that army which gave us Independence ; and his memory is dear to his country." 

An order then passed that " the Legislature will adjourn on Friday, at one o'clock, 
to attend his funeral, and that the members will wear a suitable badge of mourning, as a 
token of respect for his memory." The Senate concurred in this order. His funeral was 
also attended by the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, from respect to his 
amiable character and patriotism. He was a genuine republican, affable in his manners 
and firm in his principles. So plebeian was he in his convictions that rather than allow 
his name " to stand affixed to an institution, or wear a device which is construed by many 
of our fellow-citizens the indication of an order and distinction in society," he renounced 
the Society of the Cincinnati, and withdrew therefrom. 

He married, April 19, 1759, Sarah Lockwood, of Cambridge. They had four sons 
and one daughter. His widow, Sarah, died Oct. 16, 1814, aged seventy-eight years, eight 
months, and seven days. 

Gen. William Heath's (1765) sword, epaulettes, and military sash, "worn during his 
service in the war of the Revolution," belong to the New England Historic Genealogical 
Society. They were exhibited by James S. Loring, Nov. 4, 1857, with the rapier of 
Warren, "wielded as it was on the field of Lexington and in skirmishes around Boston." 



x 32 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7 6 5 

John Leighton (1765), of Boston. His birth is not recorded in Boston. Elizabeth, 
daughter of John Leighton (1765) and Elizabeth his wife, was born in Boston Sept. 22, 
1776. It seems that Mr. Leighton was absent from Boston from 1766 to 1775. 

In 175S John Laughton joined Engine Company, No. 7. Jan. 22, 1766, Mr. William 
Sutton, master of engine No. 7, presented to the selectmen Thomas Bolster in place of 
John Loughton, " who has left the Province." There being no John Leighton on the town 
book, there is a possibility that John " Leighton " and " Laughton," also " Loughton," 
were different spellings of the same name. 

Christopher Marshall (1765), of Boston, son of Christopher (1724) and Elizabeth 
Marshall, was born Nov. 19, 1728. He was a brother of Col. Thomas Marshall who 
joined the Artillery Company in 1761. Christopher (1765) never held any office in the 
town of Boston. 

Christopher Marshall (1765) was a minute-man at the battle of Bunker Hill, and was 
captain of a company in Col. Thomas Marshall's (1761) regiment (10th), March 3, 1777. 
Capt. Marshall (1765) was present at the execution of Major Andre', and afterward said, 
" There was not a dry eye in the throng of brave men who gathered around the fatal 
tree." He was also present at the surrender of Gen. Burgoyne and Lord Cornwallis. 
Although never wounded in the many battles in which he was engaged, his coat and hat 
bore marks of bullets. 

When Capt. Marshall (1765) joined the Continental Army, in which he served seven 
years, he removed his family to Connecticut. After the war he returned to the town of 
Boston, and resided on State Street. 

Ephraim May (1765), of Boston, son of Ebenezer and Abigail May, of Roxbury, 
was born in that town Jan. 23, 1727-8. His wife's given name was Zabiah. 

Sept. 9, 1776, the town clerk informed the inhabitants of the town that, agreeable 
to their recommendation, signified to the General Assembly, they had appointed Henry 
Bromfield, colonel; Thomas Dawes (1754), lieutenant-colonel; Ephraim May (1765), 
major, and William Dawes, Jr. (1768), second major of the Boston regiment of militia. 
Aug. 26, 1776, Capt. Ephraim May (1755) was one of the thirty-six persons selected to 
take the census of the town. He represented Ward 12. Aug. 28, 1776, he was elected a 
warden, but was excused. He served as lieutenant of the Artillery Company in 1773. 

He died in May, 1797, aged sixty-nine years, and was buried in tomb No. 124, on 
the Common Burial-Ground. 

Dimond Morton (1765), of Boston, son of Joseph Morton, Jr., and his wife Amiah, 
or Annah, Bullock, of Plymouth, was born in Plymouth about 1741. The birth date is 
not recorded in Plymouth or Boston. Mr Morton (1765) married Margaret Johonnot, 
of Boston. She died, July 9, 1787, aged forty-five years. His father kept the White 
Horse tavern (site of the Adams House, Washington Street) from 1760 to 1764. Capt. 
Dimond (1765) lived in Sheaff's Lane, now Avery Street. He was identified with the 
militia, and rose to the grade of captain. 

John Leighton (1765). Authority: Boston Dimond Morton (1765). Authority : Bos- 

Records. _ ton Records _ 

Christopher Marshall (1765). Authority: 
Hurd's Hist, of Middlesex County, Vol. I., p. 508. 



, 7 6 5 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. I 33 

William Perkins (1765), son of William and Elizabeth (Palfrey) Perkins, of Boston, 
was born in 1742. He married, Dec. 20, 1763, Abigail Cox, by whom he had eight 
children. The second, Samuel, joined the Artillery Company in 1791. Mr. Perkins(i76s) 
was elected scavenger for Ward 8, in Boston, in 177 1 and 1772. 

William Perkins (1765) was a member of Col. Paddock's (1762) regiment of 
artillery, prior to the Revolution. At the battle of Bunker Hill he was a lieutenant in 
Capt. Callender's company, and afterward its captain. He was commissioned a captain 
in Col. Knox's regiment of artillery, Jan. 1, 1776; in Col. Crane's, Jan. 1, 1777; was 
promoted to major, Sept. 12, 1778, and served through the war. He followed the fortunes 
of the American Army, and was at Grenadier's Battery, N. Y., in June, 1776 ; at Harlem 
Heights, in October, 1776 ; at Fish Hill, in December, 1776 ; at White Hall, in November, 
1777; at Valley Forge, in 1777-8; also was engaged in Sullivan's Rhode Island Cam- 
paign, in 1778, having charge of the artillery and military stores at Providence from 
November, 1779, to the fall of 1781, and afterward at West Point. Nov. 9, 1785, he was 
appointed to the command ' of Castle William, in Boston Harbor, and continued in com- 
mand, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, until the island was ceded by the State to the 
United States, in 1798. Subsequently, and until his decease, he held the position of an 
inspector in the Boston Custom House. 

William Perkins (1765) was a member of the Masonic Fraternity. He united with 
the First Lodge, in Boston, in 1763. He is recorded as present at the St. John's Grand 
Lodge, in 1760 and 1 76 1. 

Col. Perkins (1765) died at Boston of yellow fever, Oct. 23, 1802. The Palladium 
of Oct. 26, i8oz, says, concerning him, that he was " a worthy citizen, a good man, whose 
engaging manners endeared him to all who knew him." 

William Rogers (1765), cooper, of Boston. He was a culler of staves in 1772, 1773 
and 1774, and was first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1769. In the militia he 
attained the grade of lieutenant. 

Samuel Searle (1765), tailor, of Boston, son of George Searle and Katherine his 
wife, was born in 1741. He never held any office in the town of Boston. He was a 
Revolutionary officer, and a lieutenant in Col. Craft's (1765) regiment. He died at his 
dwelling on Orange Street, Boston, April 27, 1790, aged forty-nine years. 

Samuel Sellon (1765), farrier, of Boston, married (published, Oct. 7, 1756) Sarah 
Butler, of Boston. He was a native of England, and was engaged in mercantile pursuits 
before he came to America. He was not bred to any mechanical trade, but when he 
settled in Boston he took up the business of a farrier, which he carried on for some years 
in connection with other branches of the trade of a blacksmith. His shop was in Brom- 
field Street, on the spot afterward occupied by Washingtonian Hall, and his dwelling- 
house was on the opposite side of the street. He was the owner of both of these estates. 

William Perkin9 (1765). Authorities: Bos- ' "Boston, Wednesday, November 9, 1785. 

ton Records; Memorials of the Society of the Cin- William Perkins Esq. [1765] late Major in the 

cinnati; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, corps of artillery raised in tbis state for the Conti- 

Ed. 1842. nental army, is appointed by His Excellency the 

Samuel Sellon (1765). Authorities: An- Governor, and the Hon. Council, Captain-Lieutenant 

nals of Mass. Char. Mech. Association; Drake's of Castle William (so called) vacant by the death 

Hist, of Boston. of Colonel William Burbeck." — Boston Newspaper. 



134 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 7 6 5 

He was shrewd, intelligent, and upright. He was one of the founders of the Massachu- 
setts Charitable Mechanic Association. 

March n, 1745-6, Samuel Sellon (1765) was elected a constable of Boston, and in 
1774, one of the five wardens of the town. Feb. 7, 1752, a destructive fire "near Marl- 
borough Street " destroyed Mr. Sellon's blacksmith shop. He was identified with the 
militia, and held the position of captain. 

Samuel Sellon (1765) advertised, May 26, 1790, in the Columbian Centinel, that 
" he now carries on the business of Smith and Farrier, in Bromfield's Lane ; ... as he 
has had about thirty years practice in Farriery, he flatters himself to be well acquainted 
with that art." 

He removed to Weston, Mass., about 1800, where he died, and was buried in the 
Chapel Burial-Ground, Boston. 

Asa Stoddard (1765), bricklayer, of Boston. Just after the fire of Feb. 3, 1767, 
Paddy's Alley was widened and straightened from Ann to Middle (now Hanover) Street. 
It became North Centre Street. Asa Stoddard (1765) was one of the owners on that alley, 
near the corner of Middle Street. He was one of the representatives of Ward 5 on the 
committee selected Nov. 8, 1776, to aggregate the damage done the town "since the 
Boston Port Bill." He was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1769, and ensign 
in 1774. Mr. Stoddard (1765) was drawn as a juror in a maritime court, Aug. 15, 1781. 
He became a member of the Lodge of St. Andrew in 1765, and was chosen senior 
deacon thereof, Nov. 30, 1770, held the office of steward in 1772, and, Nov. 6, 1772, 
M. W. Grand Master Joseph Warren appointed him as grand sword bearer of the 
Massachusetts Grand Lodge. March 4, 1774, he is recorded at Grand Lodge as senior 
warden of St. Andrew's Lodge. 

Administration on his estate was granted in 1787. 

Jonathan Stoddard (1765), housewright, of Boston, was born in 1739. His wife's 
given name was Sibylla. June 1, 1768, he was engaged by the selectmen to widen the 
ferry ways near Winnisimmet seven feet, and to make all necessary repairs there. He 
was elected a scavenger, in charge of Ward 5, in 1775, 1776, and 1777, and, Nov. 8, 
1776, was one of the committee, selected from Ward 5, to collect the account of damage 
since the Boston Port Bill. A committee was appointed by the town to consider "what is 
necessary to be done to prevent danger from those persons in Boston inimical to the 
United States." March 14, 1777, it reported, and a committee of one from each ward 
was appointed to take the names of refugees and other disaffected persons, etc., and 
report to the Committee on Correspondence. Capt. Jonathan Stoddard (1765) repre- 
sented Ward 5 on that committee. He was active in the Revolution, served in the 
army, became captain, and was intrusted with important duties. He was a member of 
the guard over the tea-ships, under command of Edward Proctor (1756), on the night of 
Nov. 29, 1773. He was drafted, Dec. 18, 1776, for service in the Continental Army, and 
not paying his fine, performed the service. Feb. 4, 1777, he was one of the committee 
from Ward 5 to collect blankets for the Continental soldiers. Capt. Stoddard (1765) 
was drawn as a juror in a maritime court, Nov. 14, 1781, and was elected surveyor of 
boards for the years 1780-4, and a viewer of fences in 1783. 

Asa Stoddard (1765). Authorities: Boston Jonathan Stoddard (1765). Authorities: 

Records; Early Masonic Records; Whitman's Hist. Boston Records; Early Masonic Records; Whit- 
A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 1842. man's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 1842. 



i 7 6 5 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 1 35 

Jonathan Stoddard (1765) became a member of the Lodge of St. Andrew in 1779, 
but was present at the Massachusetts Grand Lodge, Dec. 28, 1778 ; was proxy for Tyrian 
Lodge of Gloucester in 1783; senior warden of St. Andrew's Lodge in 1784; and in 
1784 and 1785 filled minor positions in the Massachusetts Grand Lodge, being then a 
member of Rising States Lodge, of which he was one of the founders in 1784. 

Capt. Stoddard (1765) was a prominent founder of the First Universalist Church of 
Boston, and Dec. 25, 1785, was one of the five persons who purchased for the use of 
that church the building erected in 1741, in which Rev. Samuel Mather preached from 
that time until his decease. It was situated on the corner of Hanover and North 
Bennet streets. He died, Jan. 18, 1790, aged fifty-one years, and was buried "from 
his late dwelling at the bottom of Cross Street." 

John Stutson (1765), housewright, of Boston, was born in 1741. He was one of 
the founders of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association ; was second sergeant 
of the Artillery Company in 1769, and lieutenant in 1774. He was in military service, 
and became a captain. 

Capt. Stutson (1765), at his decease an honorary member of the Ancient and 
Honorable Artillery Company, died Aug. 8, 1799, aged fifty-eight years. 

Timothy Thornton (1765), paver, of Boston, son of Ebenezer and Elizabeth Thorn- 
ton, and grandson of Timothy (1691), was born in Boston, Feb. 2, 1726. 

He probably lived on " Copp's Hill," as April 20, 1763, the foreman of an engine 
company applied for the premium allowed by the town for bringing the engine to work 
first at the fire "at Mr. Thornton's house, Copp's Hill." He seems to have been in 
partnership with a Mr. Fosdick, and together they did the principal paving in the streets 
of Boston for several years. The price paid was generally twelve pence per yard, they 
finding everything but gravel and stones. In 1766, Mr. Thornton (1765) assisted in the 
repairs upon Faneuil Hall, and his bill was nearly thirty-three pounds. He was second 
sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1767. His will was proved in 1770. 

Ebenezer Torrey (1765), baker, of Boston, son of William and Bethiah (Bass) 
Torrey, was born in Boston, Jan. 31, 1741. He does not appear to have held town office. 

Capt. Ebenezer (1765) became a member of Engine Company No. 7, Jan. 19, 
1763. William Torrey, brother of Capt. Ebenezer (1765), joined the Artillery Company 
in 1765. 

Mr. Whitman (1810), in his history of the Artillery Company, says Mr. Torrey 
(1765), " in 181 1, presented the Company with a new Standard. 1 He made a will about 
that time in which he gave them $750 in bank stock, his children having all deceased 
and grandchildren being well off, but some young members of that day made remarks 
relative to the old members who attended the drill meetings regularly, to see the younger 
members exercise, enjoying the scene, and hovering about the Company in the field 
also. These remarks hurt their feelings, broke up the custom, and coming to his ears, 
he made a new will and gave the legacy to others. A solemn warning to those who 
make themselves too officious, before they have, by long service, become acquainted with 
the customs." 

Timothy Thornton (1765). Authority: Boston Records; MS. of Mr. Herbert A. Newton, 
Boston Records. of Weymouth. 

Ebenezer Torrey (1765). Authorities: l See Columbian Cenlinel, June 5, 1811. 



136 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7 6 5 

He was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1769, and its ensign in 1 787. 

At the time of the siege of Boston he removed to Lancaster, Mass., where he died 
March 14, 1818, leaving an estate of over one hundred thousand dollars. His remains 
were brought to Boston and deposited in his tomb, No. 4, Granary Burial-Ground. His 
funeral was attended by the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, at No. 110 
Orange Street. 

William Torrey (1765), baker, of Boston, son of William and Bethiah (Bass) Torrey, 
of Boston, was born in Boston, June 7, 1729. He married, Sept. 17, 1750, Abigail 
Nichols. His bakehouse, in 1760, was at "the lower end of Water Street," and was 
destroyed in the great fire of that year. In company with the justices, selectmen, and 
others, he made the general visitations of the town, Feb. 16, 1762, Feb. 15, 1765, and 
Feb. 18, 1766. He was a scavenger in 1759, an assessor of the town of Boston from 
1760 to 1768 inclusive, and a surveyor of highways in 1764. Ebenezer Torrey, brother 
of William (1765), joined the Artillery Company in 1765. His father, William Torrey, 
was a great grandson of Capt. William Torrey, who joined the Artillery Company in 1641. 
Mr. Torrey (1765) died in Boston, Aug. 4, 1769. 

George Trott (1765), jeweller, son of Thomas and Waitstill (Payson) Trott, of 
Boston. 

John Adams, in his diary, under date of Jan. 15, 1766, mentions meeting Lieut. 
Trott (1765) at the headquarters of the Sons of Liberty, Hanover Square. Sabbath Day, 
Sept. 6, 1795, the Brethren of the Old South Society, "Voted, That the Treasurer, 
Deacon Jonathan Mason, be requested until further directions to pay Mr. George Trott 
[1765] annually, the sum of Fifty dollars, for his weekly services in conducting the 
musick of the Society." 

Aug. 24, 1770, Lieut. Trott (1765) was chosen a petit juror for the August court, 
served as fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1767, and was lieutenant in the 
militia. He was living in Boston in 1772. 

Edward Tuckerman (1765), baker, of Boston, son of Edward and Dorothy (Kidder) 
Tuckerman, was born in Boston, Dec. 27, 1740. He. served his apprenticeship with 
William Harris, baker, whose daughter he married. He carried on the business of a 
baker, at the South End, for about fifty years. Some years before Mr. Tuckerman 
(1765) " relinquished business, he called together his delinquent customers on a New 
Year's Day and gave up his claim to every one who acknowledged his inability to pay ; 
and this generous system he continued afterward to practice during his business years." 

By the town records of May 25, 1767, it appears he owned a lot on the road to the 
fortification, and very near it. Aug. 29, 1776, he was chosen a juryman for a court held 
in Boston Sept. 5 of that year, "for the trial arid condemnation of vessels." He 
was one of the organizers of the Charitable Mechanic Association, was its first vice- 
president, and held the office three years. The first successful effort to protect the 
property of the citizens of Boston against loss by fire was made in 1798 by the Massa- 

William Torrey (1765). Authorities : Bos- Records; Hill's Hist, of Old South Church; New 

ton Records; MS. of Mr. Herbert A. Newton, of Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 1889. 
Weymouth; Report of Boston Rec. Com., No. 19, Edward Tuckerman (1765). Authorities: 

p. 1 33- Boston Records; Annals Mass. Char. Mech. Asso- 

George Trott (1765). Authorities; Boston ciation; Memorial Hist, of Boston, Vol. IV. 



1765] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 1 37 

chusetts Mutual Company, of which Edward Tuckerman (1765) was a charter member. 
He represented Boston in the General Court. In 1789 and 1796 his place of business 
was on Orange (now Washington) Street. He died, July 17, 1818, aged seventy-eight 
years. 

John Wells (1765), coppersmith, of Boston, son of John and Hannah Wells, was 
born in Boston Feb. 3, 1737. "John [1792], son of John Wells, Jun. [1765], and 
Betty, his wife, was born Dec. 3, 1763," in Boston. 

Mr. Wells (1765) lived in the mansion of his ancestors in Back (now Salem) Street, 
at the North End. He was one of the founders of the Charitable Mechanic Association, 
and did an extensive business. Under the pastorate of Rev. John Eliot, Mr. Wells 
(1765) was a deacon of the New North Church, of which, for many years, he was a 
member. He was, proverbially, an honest and kind-hearted man. 1 His son John joined 
the Artillery Company in 1792. 

Capt. Wells (1765) was a constable of Boston from 1767 to 1777 inclusive, and, 
Nov. 6, 1776, he was one of the persons selected in Ward 3 to prepare "an account of 
the damages sustained since the Boston Port Bill." Aug. 15, 1781, he was drawn for a 
juror. He was a captain in the militia in 1783. He died in Boston, June 14, 1789. 

David Wheeler, Jr. (1765). Messrs. John Green and David Wheeler, Sr., built 
a fire-engine, and presented it to the town, March 19, 1766. It was accepted by the 
town. The engine was called the "Green Engine, No. 10." A new company was 
formed ; David Wheeler was chosen captain of the company, and David Wheeler, Jr. 
(1765), was a member of it. The engine was placed on Pond's Lane (Bedford Street), 
near the house of David Wheeler. The corner of Bedford and Washington streets was 
called "Wheeler's Corner." They left the engine company, Aug. 31, 1768. David, Jr. 
(1765), was a scavenger in Boston in 1770, and a lieutenant in the militia. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1765 is as follows : — 
"April 5th, 1765. Monday being unsuitable weather; the Company under Arms 
this day, viz Friday, Voted, That the Rev. Mr. Gad Hitchcock of Pembroke be desired 
to preach on the anniversary Artillery Election of Officers in June next, and that the 
present Commission Officers with the Treasurer be a committee to wait on him and 
desire the same. Attest : Robert Jenkins, Tert's, Clerk. 

" May 6th, 1765. The Company being under Arms, the above Committee waited 
on the Rev. Mr. Gad Hitchcock of Pembroke, to desire him to preach the next Artillery 
Election Sermon, reported that he had accepted the same. Voted, to repeal a vote 
passed the sixth of April, 1761, viz: — That when any person offers himself for admit- 
tance, he shall be publickly proposed and stand a candidate one term. Voted, That the 
Treasurer pay twenty-four pounds to the Commission Officers towards defraying the 
charge of the next Election dinner, and the Company to dine with them. Voted, That 
the Clerk pay four pounds to the Commission Officers towards defraying the charges of 
the next Election dinner. Voted, That Robert Jenkins [1756], the present Clerk, have 

John Wells (1765). Authority: Boston ' Annals Mass. Char. Mech. Association, pp. 

Records. 45, 46. 

David Wheeler, Jr. (1765). Authority: 
Boston Records. 



138 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [ I? 66 

one quarter part of the fines he shall collect the present year from the delinquent mem- 
bers of the Company. Attest : Robert Jenkins, Tert's, Clerk. 

"June 3d. 1765. The Company being under Arms, it was then Voted, That the 
present Commission Officers, with the Treasurer, be a committee to wait on the Rev. 
Mr. Gad Hitchcock and return him the thanks of this Company for his Sermon preached 
this day. 1 Attest : Robert Jenkins, Tert's, Clerk." 

Rev. Gad Hitchcock, of Pembroke, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1765. 
He was a son of Capt. Ebenezer and Mary (Sheldon) Hitchcock, and was born Feb. 12, 
1719, at Springfield, Mass. He graduated at Harvard College in 1743. Dec. 22, 1748, 
he married Dorothy Angier, of Cambridge. She was a granddaughter of Rev. Urian 
Oakes who delivered the anniversary sermon before the Artillery Company in 1672. 
Mr. Hitchcock was invited, Feb. 29, 1747, to settle with the parish at Pembroke. He 
accepted the invitation, and was ordained on the "first Wednesday in October, 1748." 
In December, 1749, Mr. Hitchcock bought in Pembroke a house that is still standing, 
and seventeen acres of land. There he passed his days ; there he died, full of years and 
honors. 

In 1758 he was chaplain of Col. Doty's regiment, and followed the fortunes of war. 
In May, 1774, he delivered the election sermon in the Old South Church. Gov. Gage 
was present. Mr. Hitchcock chose as his text, " When the righteous are in authority, 
the people rejoice; when the wicked beareth rule, the people mourn." Prov. xxix. 2. 
Dr. Hitchcock, in after years, said it was a moving discourse, inasmuch as it moved many 
of the congregation out of the house, — referring to the loyalists, who left the church in 
their indignation. He was elected, July 12, 1779, a member of the convention to frame 
a constitution for Massachusetts. He died, Aug. 3, 1803, after an illness of four years. 
He was in the eighty-fifth year of his age, and the fifty-eighth of his ministry. 



, s The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1766 were: Thomas 

[ TuQ, Dawes (1754), captain; Samuel Barrett (1755), lieutenant; Edward Carnes 

( 1755), ensign. William Dawes (1760) was first sergeant; John Brocas 

(1764), second sergeant; Levi Jennings (1764), third sergeant; Thomas Bumstead 

(1764), fourth sergeant, and Robert Jenkins, tertius (1756), clerk. 

The Stamp Act was repealed March 18, 1766, and May 16 a copy of the Act of 
Repeal was received in Boston. It was an occasion of great joy in the town and through- 
out the province. Anticipating the expression of this joy, the town voted, April 21, 1766, 
" That for the Security of the Powder House on the Night of general Rejoicings, the 
Selectmen be desired to Order two of the Fire Engines into the Common to be placed 

Rev. Gad Hitchcock. Authority: Hitch- Majesty's Council, etc. to the Old Brick Meeting 

cock Genealogy. House, where a Sermon suitable to the Occasion 

1 " Monday last being the anniversary of the was preached by the Rev. Mr. Gad Hitchcock of 

Election of Officers for the antient and honorable Hanover. After which they proceeded to Faneuil 

Artillery Company, the following Gentlemen were Hall, where an elegant Dinner was provided by the 

chosen for the ensuing year, viz : William Homes, Company; and in the Evening the new elected 

Esq [1747] Captain, Thomas Dawes Esq [1754] Officers made a generous Entertainment when many 

Lieutenant, Mr. Samuel Torrey Jr. [1752] Ensign. loyal Healths were drank." — Boston Gazette, June 

Previous to the Choice the Company waited on 10, 1765. 
his Excellency the Governor, the Honorable his 






/ZZfOf 



i 7 66] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 1 39 

near said Magazine : and that the Roof thereof be well wet : and that the Air Holes be 
stop't with Mortar and Brick." May 19 was the day of rejoicing. In early morning and 
during the day cannon were fired and bells rung. In the evening there was a general 
illumination, and also a display of fireworks. In the front windows of Capt. Dawes' 
(1754) and Thomas Symmes' (1758) houses appeared the portrait of Mr. Pitt, "as large 
as life," with this inscription : — 

"Hail, Pitt! Hail, patrons! pride of George's days! 
How round the globe expand your patriot rays ! 
And the New World is brightened with the blaze." 

The following-named were officers in Col. Jackson's (1738) regiment, commissioned 
May 17, 1766, viz.: Jeremiah Stimpson (1761), captain; Josiah Waters (1747), captain; 
Samuel Ballard (1755), captain-lieutenant of the colonel's company; Martin Gay (1761), 
first lieutenant of the lieutenant-colonel's company; Daniel Jones (1754), first lieutenant 
of the major's company ; Ephraim Copeland (1733), lieutenant of Capt. Gore's (1743) 
company; John Adams (1740), ensign; Samuel Simpson (1759), adjutant. Adino Pad- 
dock (1762) was captain of the Boston train of artillery. 

Feb. 17, 1767, Thomas Marshall (1761) was prqmoted to be lieutenant-colonel of 
the Boston regiment, and James Cunningham (1758) to be major; April 17, 1767, 
Martin Gay (1761), captain-lieutenant; Daniel Jones (1754), Benjamin Phillips (1755), 
captains; Hopestill Capen (1763) was promoted to be lieutenant, and Joseph Webb, 
Jr. (1761), and Nathaniel Heath (1765) were commissioned ensigns. 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1766 were : Jonathan Farnum, 
Jr., Benjamin Homans, William Homes, Jr., John Popkin, Jr. 

Jonathan Farnum, Jr. (1766), hairdresser, of Boston, son of Jonathan and Elizabeth 
(Road) Farnum (published Aug. 4, 1737), was born in 1744. He was elected scavenger 
in 1775, 1776, 1777, and 1781. He resided on Back Street. 

Benjamin Homans (1766) was born in 174 1. He was published, Feb. 3, 1780, to 
marry Hannah Colman, and in July, 1791, married Mrs. Martha Newell. He lived on 
Dorsets or Dassetts Alley, and served the town as scavenger in 1766. He received the 
Masonic degrees at the First Lodge, in Boston, about 1767. He was frequently present 
in St. John's Grand Lodge in 1768 and 1769, and Jan. 26, 1770, he was appointed "Tyler 
to the Grand Lodge and other Lodges in Boston." He was reappointed in 177 1, and 
annually until 1776. June 7, 1782, he is recorded as present in Massachusetts Grand 
Lodge, and he held office in that body nearly all the time until 1792. 

Mr. Homans (1766) was appointed deputy sheriff for Suffolk County, in 1784. He 
became crier for the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts, for Suffolk County, in 
1787, and crier of all the courts in that county in 1795, a position which he held at his 
decease. He died in 1802, aged sixty-one years. 

William Homes, Jr. (1766), silversmith, for Boston, son of William (1747) and 
Rebecca (Dawes) Homes, was born in Boston, May 7, 1742. He married Elizabeth 
Whitwell, daughter of William. Her sister Mary married Col. Josiah Waters, Jr. (1769). 

Jonathan Farnum, Jp. (1766). Authority: William Homes, Jr. (1766). Authorities: 

Boston Records. Boston Records; Hill's Hist, of Old South Church. 

Benjamin Homans (1766). Authorities: 
Boston Records; Early Masonic Records. 



H° HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, ? 66 

They were nieces of Samuel (i 75S>- He joined the Old South Church Nov. 17, 1765, 
and from 1798 until his decease was very prominent in church matters. 1 He followed 
the trade of his father, and at the old stand in Ann Street. Mr. Whitman (18 10) says 
of him, he was " a man of small stature, pious, amiable, and much beloved. A few days 
before his death he was a witness in the Supreme Court, on the trial of the Price will 
controversy, between Trinity Church and King's Chapel. It was a severe, cold day and 
Lieut. Homes [1766] never went out of his house afterward." He died Jan. 13, 1825, 
aged eighty-three years. He was first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1771, and 
lieutenant in the militia. 

John Popkin, Jr. (1766), tailor, of Boston and Maiden, was of Welsh ancestry. He 
married, (1) Rebecca Snelling, who died about 1794, and, (2) Mrs. Sarah Sargent, a 
niece of Rev. Eliakim Willis, of Maiden. He was the father of Rev. John Snelling 
Popkin, D. D., the learned tutor (1795-8) and professor (1815-33) oi Greek and Greek 
literature in Harvard College, who was also pastor of the Federal Street Church, Boston, 
from 1799 to 1802, and of the First Church in Newbury, from 1804 to 1815. 

John Popkin, Jr. (1766), before the Revolutionary War followed the trade of a 
tailor, and was a member of Major Paddock's (1762) artillery. June 10, 1762, he was 
one of the sufferers by a fire which broke out " at the upper end of Williams Court, Corn- 
hill." He entered the Continental service in Cambridge, in 1775, as a captain of 
artillery in Col. Gridley's regiment, and served until the close of the war, in 1783. He 
was in the battle of Bunker Hill, and participated in the siege of Boston. He was com- 
missioned captain in Knox's artillery, Jan. 4, 1776, and was in the battle of White Plains ; 
was commissioned major in Col. Greaton's (3d) Massachusetts regiment, Jan. 1, 1777 ; 
was aid to Gen. Lincoln (1786) at Saratoga; and was commissioned lieutenant-colonel 
of Col. Crane's regiment of artillery, July 15, 1777, in which he continued until it was 
discharged in 1783. 

After the war he removed to Bolton, in Worcester County, and invested his money, 
consisting of public securities, in a country store, and afterwards in a farm, — both of 
which proved unsuccessful ventures. 

In 1789, he removed to Maiden, and Aug. 10 of that year he was appointed an 
officer in the Custom House of the port of Boston, and held that position until his 
decease. He was remarkably strong and well in his old age, for, until he was more than 
eighty-four years of age, he walked from Maiden to Boston, four miles, and back, every 
day except Sundays. He died at Maiden, May 8, 1827, aged eighty-five years. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1766 is as follows : — 
"April nth, 1766. Monday being unsuitable Weather, The Company under Arms 
this day, viz : Fryday, 

John Popkin, Jr. (1766). Authorities: school three years (1686-9), and returned to Ire- 
Boston Records; Memorials of the Massachusetts land. In 1715 he came back to Chilmark. His son 
Cincinnati; Muzzey's Reminiscences and Memori- Robert, born July 23, 1694, was married, April 3, 
als; Hurd's Hist, of Middlesex County, Vol. III., 1716, to Mrs. Mary Franklin, in Boston, by Rev. 
p. 581; New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 1871. Ebenezer Pemberton. Their son, William (1747), 

1 From the diary of " Rev. William Homes, of was born Jan. 9, 1 7 1 7, and was baptized in the Old 

Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard, 1 689-1 746," in the North Church, by Dr. Increase Mather, on the 

Maine Historical Library, it appears Rev. William thirteenth day of the same month. William (1747) 

Homes, the Diarist, a native of the north of Ireland, was the father of William, Jr. (1766). 
was born in 1663. He came to America, taught 



1767] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 141 

"Voted, The Rev. Mr. John Brown of Hingham be desired to preach on the next 
Anniversary Artillery Election of Officers in June next ; and that the present Commission 
Officers, with the Treasurer, be a committee to wait on him and desire the same service. 

" Attest : Robert Jenkins, Tert's, Clerk. 

" May 9th, 1766. Monday being unsuitable weather, The Company under Arms 
this day, viz. Friday, The Committee waited on the Rev. Mr. John Brown of Hingham 
to desire him to preach the next Artillery Election Sermon, reported that he had accepted 
the same. Voted, That Col. Joseph Jackson [1738], the Treasurer of the Ancient and 
Honorable Artillery Company be desired to let what monies he has in his hands to the 
Province Treasurer at five per cent, provided he cannot let it at six per cent upon good 
security in this Country. Voted, That the Treasurer pay twenty-four pounds to the 
present Commission Officers towards defraying the charges of the next Election dinner ; 
& the Company to dine with them. Voted, That the Clerk pay to the present Commis- 
sion Officers what fines may be due to the Company this day, after his Commissions are 
deducted, towards defraying the charges of the next Election Dinner. Voted, That 
Robert Jenkins [1756], the present Clerk, have one quarter part of the fines he shall 
collect the present year from the delinquent members of the Company. 

" Attest : Robert Jenkins, Tert's, Clerk. 

"June 2d, 1766. The Company being under Arms, it was then Voted, That the 
the present Commission Officers, with the Treasurer, be a committee to wait on the Rev. 
Mr. John Brown, and return him the thanks of this Company for his sermon preached 
this day. 1 Attest : Robert Jenkins, Tert's, Clerk." 

Rev. John Brown, of Hingham, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1766. 
He was a son of Rev. John and Joanna (Cotton) Brown, and was born in Haverhill, 
Mass., March 9, 1724. He graduated at Harvard College in 1741, and was ordained 
pastor over the Second Parish in Hingham, Sept. 2, 1747. The Second Parish became 
Cohasset in 1770. He married, (1) Dec. 22, 1764, Mrs. Jane Doane, (2) Hepzibah 
Ames, (3) Oct. 15, 1788, Mrs. Honour Fitzgerald, who, with one son, survived him. 

Mr. Brown served in one campaign as chaplain to a Colonial regiment in Nova 
Scotia, and, by his word and example during the Revolutionary period, encouraged his 
fellow-citizens to maintain the struggle for liberty. Mr. Brown died, Oct. 22, 1791, 
aged sixty-seven years, after a pastorate of forty-four years. 



s The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1767 were: Thomas 

I 707. Marshal1 (1761), captain; Richard Boynton (1759), lieutenant ; William Bell 

• ' (1756), ensign. John Osborn, Jr. (1764), was first sergeant; Timothy 

Thornton (1765), second sergeant; Samuel Gridley (1765), third sergeant; George 

Trott (1765), fourth sergeant, and Robert Jenkins, tertius (1756), clerk. 

Rev. John Brown. Authorities: Chase's the Honorable his Majesty's Council, &c. to the Old 

Hist, of Haverhill; Lincoln's Hist, of Hingham. Brick Meeting House, wheie a sermon suitable to. 

"'Boston, June 4, 1766. Monday last being the occasion was preached by the Rev. Mr. John 
the anniversary of the election of officers for the Brown of Hingham. After which, they proceeded 
Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, the fol- to Faneuil Hall, where an elegant dinner was pro- 
lowing gentlemen were chosen for the year ensuing, vided by the Company, and in the evening the new- 
viz: Thomas Dawes Esq. [1754] Captain, Mr. elected officers made a generous entertainment, 
Samuel Barrett [1755] Lieutenant, Mr. Edward when many loyal healths were drank." — Boston 
Carnes [1755] Ensign. Previous to the choice the Gazette. 
company waited on his Excellency the Governor, 



142 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [ I7 6 7 

Oct. 15, 1673, trie Artillery Company received by re-confirmation of the General 
Court the grant of land made by the colony when the charter of the Company was 
granted in 1638. The tract became known as the Artillery Farm, at Dunstable, N. H. 
In 1715-6, the farm was leased for eleven years to a housewright, in Dunstable, who 
was to do, as rent, certain things, and " pay one barrel of cyder annually to the Company 
in the month of October." Soon after the expiration of this lease, Sept. 20, 1727, a 
committee of the Artillery Company visited the property, and recommended that it be 
again leased. Failing to succeed in this, the Company preferred a petition to the Gen- 
eral Court for permission to sell the Artillery Farm at Dunstable. June 16, 1731, the 
General Court granted said permission, empowering the Artillery Company to make and 
execute a good deed or deeds of the above-mentioned tract of land. The following 
spring, advertisements of " Land of the Artillery Company for Sale" were inserted in the 
newspapers, and the farm was finally sold to Col. Joseph Blanchard (1737), of Dunstable, 
about 1737. Col. Blanchard (1737) paid some cash, and gave the Company a mortgage 
and bond for the balance. For fifty years the matter remained unsettled. Several com- 
mittees of the Company visited the property, urged upon the heirs the necessity of a 
settlement, and received small sums of money, but hardly enough to pay the interest, 
until at last the law was resorted to. In 1756 the Company determined "to take the 
advice of some able lawyer about Col. Blanchard's (1737) bond, and get the same com- 
puted by Mr. Samuel Winthrop, clerk of the Superior Court." From 1756 to 1769 inclu- 
sive the Artillery Company annually passed urgent votes in regard to the matter, but 
decisive action was not taken. 

The original computation of Mr. Winthrop is in the archives of the Artillery Com- 
pany. From that it appears that the amount due on the bond, that is, the "principal 
sum," March 17, 1743-4, was ,£1,250. The interest for the following seven years was 
^450, but the total credits on the note were but #212, leaving a balance due, in 1750, 
when reduced to its coin value, of ,£308.12.10. Mr. Winthrop computes the amount 
due each year, and the last, April 4, 1769, it was ^276.14.4. Later additions by other 
accountants give the amounts due May 18, 1773,^272.4.10; March 19, 1787,^490.3.1, 
and May 18, 1794, ^615.4.10, the latter being probably the amount for which suit was 
entered. 

Col. Blanchard (1737) died in 1758, and then the responsibility fell upon his widow, 
Mrs. Rebecca Blanchard, the administratrix. The Company showed her great consider- 
ation, as the following quotations from original letters prove : — 

"April, 1789. . . . The Company does not wish to distress Mrs. B. 

" J no. Winslow." 

"May 6, 1790. . . . The ancient and honorable Company of Artillery have appointed 
me their attorney. ... I should be happy, madam, to have the matter accommodated 
agreeably to your wishes and without giving you any unnecessary trouble. 

"William Hull." 

"June 5, 1765. . . . My Mother thanks the Company for their Merciful Treatment. 

"Jon'a Blanchard." 

"May 20, 1767, . . . My Mother desires to Remember with Gratitude the Kind 
Treatment she has not only received from the Company but from you in particular as 
their Treasurer [Col. Jackson (1738)]. Jona' Blanchard." 



i 7 6 7 j HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 1 43 

"April 25, 1768. ... I Rejoyce that I have fallen Into so Good hands & Esteem 
myself very much Obliged. ... I beg that you would inform the Company of my situa- 
tion & that I drive every Nail in my power. Rebecca Blanchard." 

June 6, 1763, William Brattle (1729) and Joseph Jackson (1738) were appointed a 
committee to settle with the heirs of Col. Blanchard (1737), and they obtained from 
Mrs. Blanchard the sum of eighty dollars. Dec. 3, 1790, Gen. Benjamin Lincoln (1786), 
Gen. John Brooks (1786), Col. John Winslow (1786), and John Johnston (1786), were 
authorized to constitute and appoint William Hull (1788), of Newton, to be the attorney 
of the Artillery Company, and commence»a suit for the recovery of the amount due said 
Company from the heirs of Col. Blanchard (1737)- In August, 1790, Mr. Hull (1788) 
visited Mrs. Blanchard, at Dunstable, at an expense of six pounds. He went to Amherst, 
N. H., and attended two hearings before the judge of probate, at an expense of nine 
pounds. In 1791, the case came up in the Superior Court at Exeter, N. H., and Mr. 
Samuel Dana appeared as attorney for the Company. 

June 4, 1792, another committee, consisting of Col. Waters (1 769), Col. Winslow 
(1786), Capt. Robert Jenkins (1756), Major Andrew Cunningham (1786), and Mr. 
Thomas Clark (1786) was appointed to carry the matter to a conclusion. They re- 
appointed or continued William Hull (1788) as attorney. He charged in his bill : — 

" 1792, May, To attending and arguing the cause at the Supreme Court at 
Exeter ^9. 

"1792, October, To instituting a suit at the Federal Court at Exeter and attending 
said Court £10. 10. 

" And in May, 1773, To attending the Court at Portsmouth £6" 

His total bill in the case was forty-seven pounds, twelve shillings. 

Mr. Dana charged, " May 1792, To my attendance at Supreme Court and preparing 
the cause in conjunction with Judge Lincoln and Gen Hull [1788], ,£1.16.0." 

His total bill in the case was nine pounds. 

The final paper in the archives of the Artillery Company, referring to this matter, 
reads as follows : — 

"Boston, February 23, 1795. Received of Robert Fletcher Fourteen hundred & 
one dollars & thirty five cents & Robert Fletcher's note of hand of this date with Mrs 
Gordons obligation for seven hundred & twenty five dollars & sixty-five cents payable in 
one year, which when paid will be in full of an execution recovered at a late Cur'. Court 
in y c State of New Hampshire in favor of ye Artillery Company, so called, against Mrs 
Rebecca Blanchard, Administratrix of Joseph Blanchard, deceased, provided the above 
sums should exceed or fall short of the execution they are to be rectified, — 

" 2068.65 Judgment 
58.35 damage 
2127.00 Treasurer. 

UOi-35 P' d 
725.65 note Fletcher." 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1767 is as follows : — 
"April 6th. 1767. The Company being under Arms, it was then Voted, The Rev. 
Mr. Daniel Shute of Hingham be desired to preach on the next anniversary Artillery 



144 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, ? 68 

Election of Officers in June next, and that the present Commission Officers, with the 
Treasurer, be a Committee to wait on him and desire the same. 

" Attest : Robert Jenkins, Tert's, Clerk. 

"May 4th. 1767. The Company being under Arms, The Committee waited on the 
Rev. Mr. Daniel Shute of Hingham to desire him to preach the next Artillery Election 
Sermon, reported that he had accepted the same. Voted, That the Treasurer pay thirty 
pounds to the Commission Officers towards defraying the charges of the next Election 
Dinner and the Company to dine with them. 

"Attest Robert Jenkins, Tert's, Clerk. 

"June i 8 '. 1767. The Company being under Arms, it was then Voted, That the 
present Commission Officers, with the Treasurer, be a Committee to wait on the Rev. 
Mr. Daniel Shute of Hingham & return him the thanks of this Company for his sermon 
preached this day. 1 Attest Robert Jenkins, Tert's, Clerk. 

"September 7th. 1767. The Company being under Arms, it was then Voted, That 
Mr. Thomas Snow [ 1 74 1 ] be erased out of the books. Voted, That a Committee of eleven 
be chose to consult what measures will be most beneficial for the increase of the Company, 
and the following persons were chosen, viz : Mr. Samuel Torrey, Jr. [1752], Col. Thomas 
Marshall [1761], Capt. Thomas Dawes [1754], Mr. John Deming [1756], Capt. William 
Homes [1747], Mr. John Skinner [1759], Capt. Richard Boynton [1759], Mr. Jonas 
Clark [1756], Mr. Benjamin Edes [1760], Capt. Josiah Waters [1747], Mr. Edward 
Carnes [1755]. Attest: Robert Jenkins, Tert's, Clerk" 

Rev. Daniel Shute, of Hingham, son of John and Mary (Wayte) Shute, who 
delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1767, was born in Maiden, July 19, 1722, and 
graduated at Harvard College in 1743. He commenced his professional career as a 
candidate in April, 1 746, at Maiden. He was ordained over the Third Church, Hingham, 
Dec. 10, 1746. In consequence of the failure of his eyesight, Rev. Mr. Whitney was 
ordained as his colleague, Jan. 1, 1800. He is said to have been serene and patient 
under the infirmities of age, and died, Aug. 30, 1802, aged eighty years. 

He was a member of the convention, in 1780, which framed the State Constitution, 
and in 1788, of the Convention of Massachusetts which ratified the Constitution of the 
United States. He delivered, beside the Artillery election sermon in 1767, the election 
sermon in 1768. He was extensively known and respected as a minister of great strength 
of mind and of high attainments. 



s r>) The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1768 were: James 

[ 7QO. Cunningham (1761), captain; William Heath (1765), lieutenant; and David 

• Spear (1758), ensign. Hopestill Capen (1763) was first sergeant ; Benjamin 

Eustis (1763), second sergeant; Nathaniel Heath (1765), third sergeant; Charles 

Williams (1768), fourth sergeant, and Elias Dupee (1763), clerk. 

'"Boston, Monday June 8, 1767. Monday to the Old Brick Meeting House where a sermon 

last [June 1], being the Anniversary of the Election suitable to the occasion was preached by the Rev. 

of officers for the Ancient and Hon >rable Artillery Mr. Shute of Hingham, from those words in Eccl 

Company, the following gentlemen were chosen for JX, 18, ' Wisdom is better than weapons of war.' 

the ensuing year, viz : Thomas Marshall Esq [ 1 761] After which they proceeded to Faneuil Hall, where 

Captain. Richard Boynton, Esq [1759] Lieutenant an elegant dinner was provided by the Company; 

Mr. William Bell [1756], Ensign. Previous to the and in the evening the new elected officers made a 

choice the Company waited on his Excellency the generous entertainment, when many loyal healths 

Governor, the Honorable, his Majesty's Council, &c. were drank." — Boston Newspaper. 







a/m_x^ i^im/vvt^^Wi^i^ 



1768] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 1 45 

March 18, 1768, the repeal of the Stamp Act was celebrated " by a large company at 
the British Coffee-house, and Col. IngersoM's in King Street." Rejoicings were heard on 
every hand, and though a projected bonfire was not lighted, yet the next morning two 
effigies were found hanging on Liberty Tree. 

The King's birthday was observed, June 4, the governor's troop, the town regiment 
under command of Col. Jackson (1738), and the train of artillery, commanded by Capt. 
Paddock (1762), being mustered in King Street, when the "new pieces," afterward 
called " Hancock" and " Adams," were used for the first time. 

Events calculated to produce trouble between America and the Mother Country 
followed one another swiftly. Seamen were impressed in the streets of Boston ; John 
Hancock's sloop, " The Liberty," was seized and anchored under the guns of the frigate 
" Romney," and the people manifested their disapproval by the destruction of property, 
•and the making a bonfire on the Common of Collector Hallowell's pleasure-boat. The 
populace was upon the eve of revolution in defence of their liberties. The royal officers 
sought safety within the Castle. Liberty Hall 1 was filled with "Sons of Liberty." The 
General Court was prorogued July 1, amid much confusion, and the governor waited the 
arrival of force. The British ministry ordered two Irish regiments from Ireland to 
Boston, also soldiers from Halifax. The former, the 14th and 29th regiments, of five 
hundred men each, arrived in Boston harbor in six ships of war, having " cannons loaded 
and tompkins out," Sept. 30, 1768. The next day the soldiers were landed on Long Wharf, 
and soon after came the 59th regiment and a train of artillery from Halifax. Boston 
became a garrison. Faneuil Hall was filled with armed mercenaries. The storm was 
gathering. The clouds thicken, darken — thunders roll, lightnings illume sky and earth, 
and a deluge drenches the Atlantic coast. The storm expends itself, the clouds flee, 
and the sun of victory and independence illumines wood and vale, and brings to the 
victorious yeomanry the blessings of peace, freedom, and progress. 

" In the brigantine ' Abigail,' Capt. Stevens, from London, came, in the month of 
February, 1768, two beautiful field-pieces, three-pounders, with the Province arms 
thereon, for the use of the train of artillery of the regiment of this town. They were cast 
from two old pieces which were purchased some time since by the General Court of this 
Province." 2 

A gun-house stood at the corner of West Street at the beginning of the Revolution, 
separated by a yard from the school-house. In this gun-house were kept two brass 
three-pounders (mentioned above) belonging to Capt. Adino Paddock's (1762) train. 
These pieces had been recast from two old guns sent by the town to London for that 
purpose, and had the arms of the province engraved upon them. They arrived in Boston 
in 1768, and were first used at the celebration of the King's birthday, June 4, when a 
salute was fired in King Street. Both school and gun-house are connected with a cele- 
brated event. 

Major Paddock (1762) had expressed an intention of surrendering these guns to 
Gov. Gage. The mechanics, who composed this company, resolved that it should not 
be so. The British general had begun to seize the military stores of the province and 
disarm the inhabitants. Accordingly, the persons engaged in the plot met in the school- 
room, and when the attention of the sentinel, stationed at the dpor of the gun-house, 
was taken off, by roll-call, they crossed the yard, entered the building, and, removing the 

1 The ground under and around Liberty Tree was called " Liberty Hall," 

2 Boston Gazette, Feb. 15, 1768. 



146 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7 68 

guns from their carriages, carried them to the school-room, where they were concealed 
in a box in which fuel was kept. 

The loss of the guns was soon discovered, and search made, in which the school- 
house did not escape. The master placed his lame foot upon the box, and it was not 
disturbed. Several of the boys were privy to the affair, but made no sign. Besides the 
school-master, Abraham Holbrook, Nathaniel Balch, father of Jonathan (1786), Samuel 

Gore (1786), William Dawes, Jr. (1768), Moses Grant, Jeremiah Gridley, Whiston, 

and some others, executed this coup de main. The guns remained in the school-room 
about a fortnight. They were then, in the night-time, taken in a wheelbarrow, and 
carried to Whiston's blacksmith-shop, at the South End, and deposited under the coal. 
From here they were taken to the American lines in a boat. The guns were in actual 
service during the whole war. After the peace, the State of Massachusetts applied to 
Congress for their restoration, which was granted by a resolve passed May 19, 1788, in ■ 
which Gen. Knox, secretary of war, was directed to place a suitable inscription upon 
them. The two guns were called the " Hancock " and " Adams," and the inscription was 
as follows (the name only being different) : — 

" The Hancock | Sacred to Liberty. | This is one of four cannon | which constituted 
the whole train | of Field Artillery | possessed by the British Colonies of | North 
America | at the commencement of the war | on the 19 of April 1775. | This cannon 
and its fellow | belonging to a number of citizens of | Boston | were used in many 
Engagements | during the War. | The other two, the property of the | Government of 
Massachusetts | were taken by the enemy. | By order of the United States | in Congress 
assembled | May 19, 1788. | " 

The guns were in the possession of the State until 1817, when, in answer to a peti- 
tion from the Artillery Company that the State would furnish them cannon, the Executive 
Council voted " That His Excellency be advised to direct the Quarter Master General 
to loan to the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company a pair of brass six pound 
Cannon completely equipped for field service, and to supply said Company for the use 
of said cannon, the usual quantity of ammunition as is directed by law for other Com- 
panies of Artillery within the Commonwealth." This report was accepted and approved 
by the governor, July 5, 1817, and a general order, carrying the vote into effect, was 
issued by him, July 12, 1817. The guns remained in the possession of the Artillery 
Company, and were used on anniversary and field days until 1821. The following paper 
is in the archives of the Company : — 

"Council Chamber February 2 j 1821. 

" The committee to whom was committed a communication from the Quarter Master 
General of the 16" 1 ult, relative to the bursting of a piece of cannon while employed in 
experimental gunnery in the service of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, 
and a letter from the Commander of said Company stating the circumstances unto 
[under] which the accident happened — beg leave respectfully to represent that the 
said cannon was one of the two pieces which were designated by the names of Hancock 
& Adams and which have engraven thereon the following inscription ' Sacred to Liberty.' " 
(Then follows the inscription as heretofore given.) The committee continues : — 

" It is desirable -to perpetuate two pieces of ordnance to which a memorial so 
interesting to the people of this Commonwealth is attached, they therefore recommend 
that his Excellency be advised to instruct the Quarter Master General to cause the Adams 
gun to be recast and the inscription to be restored thereon and that it be made to con- 
form in all respects to the other piece. 



i 7 68] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 1 47 

" And it appears by the representation of the Quarter Master General that from the 
defective state of said gun when loaned to said Company, no blame is imputable to them 
for the injury it has sustained. The Committee therefore further recommend that the 
Quarter Master General be directed to re-deliver the cannon when completed to said 
Company on loan for field service and experimental gunnery, until the further order of 
thee Executive. Silas Holman per Order. 

"In Council Feb'y 2, 1821. 

"This report is accepted and by the Governor approved. 

" A. Bradford, 

" Sec'y of Commonwealth." 

The " Adams " gun was not recast, but soon after, with the " Hancock," was pre- 
sented by the Commonwealth to the Bunker Hill Monument Association. The guns are 
now to be seen in the chamber at the top of the monument. 

There is a tradition that the two guns, referred to as captured by the enemy, were 
concealed in a stable belonging to a house on the south side of Court Street, near the 
Court House. They were taken out over the Neck in a cart loaded with manure, driven 
by a negro servant of George Minot, a Dorchester farmer. Thus the four guns belonging 
to the province escaped the clutches of Gage. The two last referred to were sometime 
in possession of the Dorchester Artillery. 

At a town meeting, held March 29, 1776, it was voted that Thomas Crafts, Esq. 
(1765), Col. Thomas Marshall (1761), and Major Paul Revere "be a committee to wait 
on Gen. Washington, and to acquaint him that it is the desire of the town that the four 
pieces of cannon which are in the Continental Train of Artillery, and belonging to the 
town of Boston, may not be carried out of this colony, if his Excellency should appre- 
hend the general interest of the colony will permit their remaining here." The guns were 
a necessity in the Continental service, and were in use throughout the Revolution. 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1768 were : Seth Adams, Samuel 
Condon, William Dawes, Jr., Elisha Eaton, John Fullerton, John Greenleaf, John Haskins, 
Michael Homer, William Hoogs, Israel Loring, John Newell, John Skillin, Jr., Nath- 
aniel Waterman, Charles Williams, Jacob Williams. 

Seth Adams (1768), printer, of Boston. Seth Adams (1768) served his appren- 
ticeship with Samuel Kneeland. He began printing in Queen Street with John Kneeland. 
They afterward occupied a printing-house in Milk Street, at the corner of Board Alley, 
now Hawley Street. They were in business together for three or four years, and printed 
chiefly for the booksellers. Subsequently he kept a shop at No. 57 Cornhill. 

Mr. Adams's (1768) father-in-law was the first post-rider between Boston and Hart- 
ford. When he died, Seth Adams (1768) gave up the printing business, and continued 
in the occupation of his father-in-law. He united with the Old South Church, April 7, 
1765. He lived, in 1796, at No. 15 Franklin Place. 

Samuel Condon (1768), probably son of Edmund and Jane Condon, who came to 
Boston about 1740. He is not mentioned in the Records of the Town of Boston. He 
was second sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1771, and its clerk from 1771 to 1774 
inclusive. He died March 12, 1775, aged twenty-eight years. 

Seth Adams (1768). Authority: Thomas's Hist, of Printing, Vol. I., p. 366. 



148 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [ i? 68 

William Dawes, Jr. (1768), tanner, of Boston, son of William (1760) and Lydia 
(Boone) Dawes, and great-grandson of Ambrose Dawes (1674), was born in Boston 
April 6, 1745, and died Feb. 25, 1799. He married, May 3, 1768, Mehitable, daughter 
of Samuel and Catherine (Mears) May. She died Oct. 28, 1793, aged forty-two years, 
two months, and twenty-two days. William (1768) married, (2) Nov. 18, 1795, Lydia 
Gendall, who survived her husband nearly ten years, dying Aug. n, 1809. By his first 
wife he had seven children, and by the second, one child, of whom the eldest, Hannah, 
married Benjamin Goldthwait (1793), son of Benjamin (1740) and Sarah (Dawes) 
Goldthwait. 1 

The principal facts in the life of William Dawes, Jr. (1768), and others relating to 
the Dawes family, are taken, by permission, from an essay by Henry W. Holland, Esq., 
entitled "William Dawes and his Ride with Paul Revere." Without enlarging upon the 
disputed points therein discussed, the simple story of William Dawes, Jr. (1768), is as 
follows : — 

- He passed his early years in his father's home on Ann Street, a home religiously 
strict, after the manner of that time. Little is known of his youth, except that he 
learned the trade of a tanner, which he followed for some years, having his tanyard on 
what is now the corner of Sudbury and Friend streets. Feb. 5, 1769, he and his wife, 
Mehitable, united with the Old South Church. 2 For six or eight years they lived at No. 
64 Ann, now North, Street, nearly opposite to his father, in a house previously owned by 
Josiah Waters ( 1747). April 8, 1768, Major William Dawes, Jr. (1768), joined the 
Artillery Company, and was its second sergeant in 1770. In 1786, at the revival of the 
Artillery Company, Mr. Dawes held the position of clerk. He was an ardent supporter 
of the colonial cause, was annoyed by the presence of the British soldiers in Boston, with 
whom, on sundry occasions, he had collisions. He scoured the country, organizing and 
aiding the birth of the Revolution. His granddaughter wrote : " During these rides, he 
sometimes borrowed a friendly miller's hat and clothes and sometimes he borrowed a 
dress of a farmer, and had a bag of meal behind his back on the horse. At one such time 
a British soldier tried to take away his meal, but grandfather presented arms and rushed 
on. The meal was for his family. But in trying to stir up recruits, he was often in great 
danger." In 1775, he was in correspondence with the Salem Committee of Safety, to 
obtain powder for the Boston patriots. 

The two leading spirits in the purloining the guns from the gun-house were William 
Dawes, Jr. (1768), and Samuel Gore (1786). They planned and executed the daring 
deed. These men forced their way into the gun-house while the guard was at roll-call, 
the guns were taken off their carriages, carried into the school-house, and placed in a 
large box under the master's desk, in which wood was kept. When the carriages were 
found without the guns, by a lieutenant and sergeant, who came to look at them 
previous to removing them, the sergeant exclaimed, in the presence of Samuel Gore 
(1786), then captain of the governor's troop of horse, "They are gone. These fellows 

William Dawes, Jr. (1768). Authorities: 2 His ancestor, William Dawes, was one of 

Holland's "William Dawes, and bis ride with Paul the founders of the Old South Church in 1669; 

Revere"; Drake's Old Landmarks of Boston; Lor- his great-grandfather, Ambrose [1674], became a 

ing's One Hundred Boston Orators; Boston Re- member in 1670, his grandfather, Thomas, in 1705, 

cords; Hill's Hist, of Old South Church. and bis father, William [1760], in 1735. Major 

1 Henry Ware Holland, author of "William Thomas Dawes [1754], who was chosen deacon 

Dawes [176S] and his Ride with Paul Revere," is a in 17S6, was his second cousin, 
grandson of Benjamin (1793) and Hannah (Dawes) 
Goldthwait. 



I7&8] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 149 

will steal the teeth out of your head while you are keeping guard." The yard, gun- 
house, and school-house were examined over and over again, except the box. The 
guns remained under the master's feet for a fortnight. During the removal into the 
school-house, William Dawes (1768) injured his wrist, making the surgical aid of Dr. 
Joseph Warren necessary. From the school-house, the guns were carried to Whiston's 
blacksmith shop, and hidden under the coal. The Committee of Safety, Jan. 5, 1775, 
voted " that Mr. William Dawes [1768] be directed to deliver to said Cheever [Deacon 
Cheever] one pair of brass cannon and that the said Cheever procure carriages for said 
cannon or any other cannon that require them ; that the battering cannon carriages be 
carried to the cannon at Waltham and that the cannon and carriages remain there 
until further orders." Under this order the guns were sent by boat to Waltham, and 
were in active service during the war. 

After the Peace, the State of Massachusetts applied to Congress for their restora- 
tion, which was granted, May 19, 1788, when Congress " Resolved, that the Secretary of 
War cause a suitable inscription to be placed on said cannon ; and that he deliver the 
same to the order of his Excellency, the Governor of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts." 

Gen. Knox, a native of Boston, then Secretary of War, well knew the history of the 
guns, and caused the arms of Massachusetts, with an inscription, to be chiselled upon 
them in bold relief. This work was done by Joseph Callender, of Boston. The guns 
were in seventeen engagements during the Revolutionary War, and one was taken by the 
enemy, and retaken, several times. 1 

William Dawes, Jr. (1768), was chosen by the town of Boston an informer of deer 
from 1770 to 1773 inclusive, warden in 1774, and, Sept. 9, 1776, the town clerk informed 
the inhabitants that, agreeably to their recommendation, signified to the General 
Assembly, William Dawes, Jr. (1768), had been appointed second major of the regi- 
ment of militia in the town of Boston. He held other minor town offices prior to the 
Revolution. 

Not long after the affair of the cannon occurred the ever-memorable ride to Lexing- 
ton and Concord. For some days before the 19th of April, 1775, it had been known the 
British were preparing to move. It was suspected that the destination of the troops 
would be Concord, where stores of war material were gathered, and in the vicinity of 
which were Hancock, Adams, and other Revolutionary leaders. On the afternoon of the 
day before the attack, Gen. Warren learned that the British were about to start. He 
waited until they had begun to move to their boats, and then he sent out William Dawes, 
Jr. (1768), by the land route, 2 over the Neck, and across the river at the Brighton Bridge 
to Cambridge and Lexington ; and directly after, " about ten o'clock," he " sent in great 
haste" for Paul Revere, and sent him by the water route through Charlestown to Lexington 
to arouse the country, and warn Hancock and Adams. About midnight Paul Revere 
arrived at Parson Clark's, where he found the leaders of the Revolution. A half hour 
later, Revere met Dawes (1768) on the Green in Lexington. The latter started from 

^Columbian Centinel, June 4, 1788. Waters [Capt. Waters (1747), not Col. (1769)], of 
8 " Intelligence of the intended expedition to Boston, a staunch Whig, and who afterwards, as 
Lexington on the 19th of April was conveyed over engineer, assisted in building the forts at Roxbury, 
the Neck by William Dawes [1768], who was followed on foot on the sidewalk at a short dis- 
mounted on a slow-jogging horse, with saddle-bags tance from him until he saw him safely past all 
behind him, and a large flapped hat upon his head the sentinels." — Drake's Hist, of Roxbury, p. 74. 
to resemble a countryman on a journey. Col. Josiah 



t5° HISTORY OF THF, ANCIENT ANt> 



[1768 



Boston, without going home, eluded the guard at the Neck, and going by the longer route 
of Brighton Bridge and the Cambridge road, aroused the families on the way. After a little 
delay for refreshment, Revere and Dawes (1768), accompanied by Dr. Prescott, rode on 
towards Concord. About half way between the two towns, near Hartwell's Tavern, they 
met British officers. Prescott and Dawes (1768) were a hundred rods behind, alarming 
a house, when Revere discovered them. Prescott escaped ; Dawes (1768), chased by the 
British, dashed up to an empty farm-house, flapping his leather breeches, and shouting, 
" Helloo, boys, I 've got two of 'em ! " and his pursuers were frightened, and made off. In 
the excitement of the chase, Dawes (1768) pulled up so suddenly that he was thrown from 
his horse, and lost his watch, and did not get it again until some days later, when he 
returned to search for it. Revere did not escape so easily. In fleeing from those 
soldiers, he rode into the midst of another party, to whom he was forced to surrender. 
They proceeded with him, as a prisoner, to Lexington, where, in the excitement which 
preceded Pitcairn's arrival, Revere escaped, with the loss of his horse, and joined the 
party at Parson Clark's about three o'clock in the morning. The further movements of 
William Dawes (1768) during that memorable night are not known, but it is probable he 
continued his ride, as he intended, to Concord, and aroused the people on the way. 

Paul Revere, in his statement of that night's transactions, says : " About ten o'clock, 
Dr. Warren sent in great haste for me. . . . When I got to Dr. Warren's house, I found 
he had sent an express by land to Lexington — a Mr. William Dawes [1768]. ... I 
arrived at Rev. Mr. Clark's, at Lexington, where Hancock and Adams were, about a half 
hour before Mr. Dawes [1768] and having refreshed ourselves started off for Concord." 
His capture and escape are related as above by himself. 

William Dawes (1768) at once joined the Continental troops at Cambridge, and, it 
is said, fought at Bunker Hill. When Boston became unsafe, he moved his family to 
Worcester, and, soon after the evacuation of Boston, he was appointed by Congress 
commissary at Worcester. The following story is told in regard to his (Mr. Dawes') 
treatment of those British soldiers captured at Saratoga : — 

" While upon their march to the neighborhood of Boston, the British behaved with 
such insolence as confirmed the country in their determination never to submit, for the 
people said : ' If they are thus insolent now they are prisoners, what would they be were 
they our Masters?' The Germans stole and robbed the houses, as they came along, of 
clothing and everything on which they could lay their hands to a large amount. When 
at Worcester, indeed, they themselves were robbed, though in another way. One Dawes 
[1768] the issuing commissary, upon the first company coming to draw their rations, 
balanced the scales by putting into that which contained the weight a large stone. 
When that company was gone (unobserved by the Germans, but not by all present), the 
stone was taken away before the next came ; and all the other companies except the first 
had short allowance." 

Mr. Dawes (1768) probably knew that the Hessians had already supplied themselves 
pretty freely. While in Worcester he went into partnership with his brother-in-law, Mr. 
Coolidge (1786), in the grocery business. At the close of the war, he returned to 
Boston, resided in Distill House Square, and carried on the same business in Dock 
Square. Near the close of 1796, his health having failed, he, with his family, removed 
to Marlboro, to the farm presumably once occupied by his father. There he died, 
Feb. 25, 1799. His remains were brought to Boston and buried in the King's Chapel 
Burial-Ground. 



l 7 68] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 151 

Elisha Eaton (1768). He was elected a clerk of the market in 1766, but was 
excused from serving; was elected scavenger for Ward 10, in 1 77 1, and attained the 
grade of captain in the militia. 

John Fuller-ton (1768), distiller, of Boston. He served the town as scavenger for 
Ward 10, in 1773 and 1774, as constable in 1779 and 1780. He was first sergeant of the 
Artillery Company in 1772, and lived on Milk Street. Administration on his estate was 
granted in 1793. 

John Greenleaf (1768) was a member of the Old South Church in 1766. May n, 
1768, Mr. Franklyn, master of Engine No. 9, presented the name of a fireman to take 
the place of John Greenleaf, " who left the service." July 1, 1772, John Greenleaf 
(1768) made a visit to the public schools with the justices, selectmen, and others. 

John Haskins (1768), cooper and distiller, of Boston, son of Robert and Sarah 
(Cook) Haskins, was born in Boston March 12, 1729. His father came to Boston from 
England, and died during the infancy of his son. John (1768) married, in Maiden, 
March 12, 1752, Hannah Upham, of Boston. 

John Haskins (1768) was a culler of staves, in Boston, from 1759 to 1774, at which 
time he was a cooper, in company with his stepfather, Thomas Hake. He lived in 
Rainsford's Lane, now Harrison Avenue, and his estate extended through to Washington 
Street, opposite Boylston Market. He was a protester against the Whigs in 1774. Mr. 
Haskins (1768) was commissioned by Gov. Hutchinson captain of a company in Col. John 
Erving's Boston regiment, and, Feb. 20, 1772, he took the appointed oath before Col. 
Erving, John Leverett (1750), and Thomas Dawes (1754), field-officers. He was a 
worshipper at King's Chapel, and in 1785 was on a committee appointed to amend the 
prayer-book. He was a Royalist, and took no part in the Revolutionary struggle. He 
remained, however, in Boston, and immediately after the evacuation of the town by the 
British, took the oath of allegiance to the State. A characteristic anecdote has been 
preserved concerning Capt. Haskins (1768). He was of a deeply religious character. 
One day while the family were at dinner, the distillery which adjoined his house was dis- 
covered to be on fire. The children started eagerly from their places, but were instantly 
checked by their father. Calling them back to the table, he returned thanks, according 
to his custom, "The Lord be praised for this and all his mercies." " Now," he added, 
"you may go." He died in Boston, Oct. 27, 18 14. 

Michael Homer (1768) was a "bricklayer and Mason, near Oliver's dock: chimnies 
and cabbusses for vessels, built at the shortest notice." He was a son of Michael and 
Sarah Homer, who first appear in Boston Records in 1727, and was published, Sept. 
29, 1767, to marry Hannah Allen. 

At a meeting of the selectmen, June 8, 1768, the master of Engine Company No. 
6 presented the name of a person to take the place in the company of "Michael 

Elisha Eaton (1768). Authority: Boston kins; Memoir of Ralph Haskins, by David G. 

Records. Haskins, Jr., 1 880; New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 

John Fullerton (1768). Authority: Boston 1873, p. 56. 
Recorc j s . Michael Homer (1768). Authorities: Bos- 
John Greenleaf (1768). Authority: Bos- ton Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Corn- 
ton Records. pany, Ed. 1842; Bridgman's Hist. King's Chapel 

John Haskins (1768). Authorities: "Ralph Burial-Ground, p. 200. 
Waldo Emerson, his Maternal Ancestors," by Has- 



*$2 HISfORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[1768 



Homer, who has lately entred into the Artillery Company." July 7, 1773, he visited 
the public schools of Boston, with the justices and others. He was third sergeant of the 
Artillery Company in 1770, and lived in Cold Lane. In 1787-8, he was second lieuten- 
ant of the Republican Volunteers, and in 1 791 became a captain in the Boston regiment. 
He held the latter position several years. " He died at Hopkinton, Mass., aged sixty- 
nine years." 

William Hoogs (1768), of Newton. He was published, Oct. 3, 1763, to marry 
Elizabeth Stoddard, and became a captain in the military service. In a list of the free- 
holders, in Newton, it is recorded, "William Hoogs [1768] owned a house valued at 
nine hundred dollars and had seventy-four acres of land valued at fifteen hundred dol- 
lars." He was a selectman of Newton. 

"Capt. Hoogs [1768] removed to Canada and in crossing the lakes was drowned 
with his whole family." 

Israel Loring (1768), housewright, of Boston, son of Caleb and Rebecca (Lobdell) 
Loring, of Hingham, was born Aug. 30, 1741. He married (published) Mary Homer, 
of Boston, Oct. 17, 1765. 

His brother, Joshua Loring, joined the Artillery Company in 1769. Capt. Israel 
(1768) was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 177 1, its ensign in 1790, and a 
captain in the militia. May 14, 1766, the selectmen approbated Israel Loring (1768) 
as a member of Engine Company No. 6. He resided on Water Street. His place of 
business was on Loring's Wharf. 

Capt. Loring (1768) died at Dover, Mass., in December, 1820, aged seventy-nine 
years. 

John Newell (1768), cooper, of Boston, son of Andrew and Martha (Ivory) Newell, 
of Charlestown, was born (baptized) May 14, 1738. He followed the trade of his father, 
who was a cooper, and lived in a " house of H. Gowen's estate," in Charlestown, in 1770. 
He married, May 27, 1760, Elizabeth Skillings, of Boston, and, in 1782, married Mary 

. He had two sons, Andrew and John, who were baptized at the New North 

Church, March 29, 1761. Capt. Newell (1768) removed to Boston, and in 1780 was an 
inn-holder. June 5, 1782, the selectmen approbated a Mr. Cooper to keep a tavern in 
the house lately improved by Mr. Newell (1768), situated in Way's Lane, but he was 
succeeded by John Newell (1768), June n, 1783. Mr. Newell (1768) was, April 27, 

1785, appointed an inspector of pickled barreled fish, pork, and beef, and, April 13, 

1786, Capt. John Newell (1768) was appointed an inspector of oil. In 1771 he was 
third sergeant of the Artillery Company. 

Capt. Newell (1768) died June 13, 1792, aged fifty-four years, and was buried in 
the King's Chapel Burial-Ground. 

John Skillin, Jr. (1768), shipwright, of Boston. The Boston Directory, of 1789, 
names "John Skillen, carver, the wharf north of governor Hancocks ; house, Fish Street." 
He was a captain in the militia. He died in July, 1801, aged sixty-three years. 

William Hoogs (1768). Authorities: Whit- John Newell (1768). Authorities: Boston 

man's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 1842; Records; Wyman's Charlestown Genealogies and 
Smith's Hist, of Newton. Estates. 

Israel Loring (1768). Authority: Lincoln's 
Hist, of Hingham. 



1768] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 1§3 

Nathaniel Waterman (1768), cooper, of Boston, was chosen a culler of hoops, 
staves, etc., March 25, 1764, and was annually re-elected until 1775. He was first ser- 
geant of the Artillery Company in 1770, and was a captain in the militia. 

Charles Williams (1768), merchant "gentleman." Nov. 11, 1776, he was chosen 
from Ward 8 " for collecting an account of damages sustained since the Boston Port 
Bill," but July 9 was excused from serving. Mr. Charles Williams (1768) was a collector 
of taxes, in Boston, from 1782 to 1786 inclusive. His bond was ten thousand pounds. 
Two of his bondsmen were Daniel Bell (1733) and Benjamin Edes (1760). He was 
fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1768. 

Lieut. Williams (1768) died in Boston, June 28, 1793, aged sixty-one years, and was 
buried from his residence, on Sudbury Street. "He was a man of unspotted integrity 
and universal benevolence." 

Jacob Williams (1768), cooper, of Boston, son of Sendall (1738) and Elizabeth 
Williams, was born in Boston, March 21, 1 741 . He was a nephew of Jonathan Williams, 
•Jr. (1729). He was a culler of staves, hoops, etc., from 1766 to 1777 inclusive, warden 
in 1778, and the same year was one of a committee to purchase good fire-arms for the 
militia of Boston. Capt. Williams (1768) was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company 
in 1770. 

Mr. Whitman (1810) says of Capt. Williams (1768), he "was shipwrecked on the 
coast of Africa, and was one of the survivors, who, after great suffering, reached Macao, 
as related in 'Saunders Journal.' He went to Vermont, where he died, at an advanced 
age, in 1821 or 2." 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1768 is as follows : — 
" April 8th, 1768. Monday being unsuitable Weather, the Company under Arms this 
day, viz : Friday, it was then Voted, That the Rev. Mr. Aaron Smith of Marlborough 
be desired to preach on the anniversary Artillery Election of Officers in June next, and 
that the present Commission Officers, with the Treasurer, be a committee to wait on him 
& desire the same. The Committee chosen (Sept 7th. 1767) to consult what measures 
would be most beneficial for the increase of the Company, made the following report, 
which was accepted. 

"The Report of the Committee appointed by the Ancient & Honorable Artillery 
Company, at their meeting in Sept. 1767, to consider what plan may be most expedient 
to raise the reputation, secure the interest, and save the expence of said Company — The 
Committee have several times met and taken the state of the Company into considera- 
tion, and beg leave to Report as follows : It appears to the Committee, that the extraor- 
dinary expenses attending the Officers of said Company have been very discouraging 
to its members, as well as to many who have discovered an inclination to join it; it also 
appears, that a very great saving may be made in the expences ; so great as to take off 
any objections of this sort for the future ; if the interest of the Company be carefully 
attended to. And as a preliminary to the above, the Committee think it highly neces- 
sary, that we ascertain the exact amount of the principal (monies), in hand, or otherways, 
in order to know the bottom on which we propose to delineate the plan, and that an addi- 

Charles Williams (1768). Authority : Bos- Jacob Williams (1768). Authorities: Bos- 

ton Records. ton Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. 

Company, Ed. 1842. 



154 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7 6S 

tion of one or more be made to the Committee now existing to expedite this matter as 
soon as may be ; and till that be done, we can only go upon supposition, that our Capital 
Stock will amount to five hundred pounds ; and if so, we propose the whole interest of 
said capital stock, amounting to one hundred dollars per annum be allowed to the Com- 
mission Officers to provide the dinner on the anniversary Election of Officers ; and that 
it be recommended that they do not exceed said [amount]. That the Expence of the 
Evening be paid by the new elected officers in the following proportions, viz : the Cap- 
tain, three-sixths : the Lieutenant, two and the Ensign, one. That the Sergeants enter- 
tain the Company in their respective turns as formerly, and to make no other provision 
than is proposed by the plan annexed, which is thought to be fully sufficient, viz : 

" 9 Bottles, 2 Gallons Wine ..... £o 9 4 
"8 Gallons Punch, — half hundred Lemons . . 10 8 

" Rum & Sugar 6 8 

" Biscuit . 28 

" 10 lb Cheese 6 8 

£1 16 o 

If souring is scarce & dear, then the Sergeant to provide Wine only, that the sum of one 
pound, sixteen shillings, be not exceeded. And it is further recommended, in order to 
save unnecessary trouble to the Sergeants, that there be provided a large Military Chest, 
sufficient to hold the aforesaid stores ; said Chest to be kept in the upper chamber of the 
Market, the Key to be lodged with the Clerk. That the Sergeant whose turn it is to 
entertain the Company, by applying to him may have such key and the Chest be put in 
the Hall, with the aforesaid stores, not to be taken out until the Company is all seated 
at the tables ; and furthermore, it is recommended that the door of the Hall be shut as 
soon as the Company is all seated at the tables, as aforesaid. The Committee are also 
of opinion, that if the members of the Company were a little industrious, & would com- 
municate to such as they are connected with, who may be likely to joyn us, how trifling 
the expense is like to be now, to what it was formerly, we should soon have as sufficient 
number as desired. 

"Voted, That Col. Thomas Marshall [1761], Capt William Homes [1747], be joined 
the Committee to settle the affairs of the monies due from Col. Blanchards [1737] 
heirs to the Company. Attest : Robert Jenkins, Ten's, Clerk. 

"May 2d, 1768. The Company being under Arms, That Committee chosen to 
wait on the Rev. Mr. Aaron Smith of Marlborough to desire him to preach the next 
Artillery Election sermon, reported that he desired to be excused : they then Voted, that 
the Rev. Mr. Jonas Clark of Lexington be desired to preach the next Artillery Election 
Sermon ; and that the present Commission Officers, with the Treasurer, be a Committee 
to wait on him and desire the same ; and in case of his refusing, the said Committee is 
to provide a Minister to preach on that day. Voted, That the Treasurer pay thirty 
pounds to the present Commission Officers towards defraying the charge of the next 
Election Dinner in June next, and the Company to dine with them. Voted, that Robert 
Jenkins (1756), the present Clerk, have one quarter of the fines he shall collect from 
the delinquent members. Attest : Robert Jenkins, Tert's, Clerk. 

"June 6, 1768. The Company being under Arms, it was then Voted, That the 
present Commission Officers, with the Treasurer, be a Committee to wait on the Rev. 



, 7 68] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. I 55 

Mr. Jonas Clark and return him the thanks of this Company for his Sermon preached 
this day. 1 Attest: Robert Jenkins, Tert's, Clerk." 

" Boston, Saturday June 4, 1768. This being the Anniversary of his Majesty's birth, 
when he entered upon the 31 st year of his age ; at sunrise, flags were displayed at Castle 
William and at each of the town batteries : at twelve o'clock the guns of the Castle and 
batteries were fired, and at one his Majesty's ship, the Romney of 50 guns, fired a royal 
salute. His Excellency, the Governor's troop of guards, under the command of Colonel 
Phipps, the regiment of militia of this town, commanded by Colonel Jackson [1738J, 
with the train of Artillery under Capt. Paddock [1762] mustered in King Street, where 
the troop and regiment fired three vollies, and the train several discharges of their new 
field pieces, after which the troop and regiment marched off. Then the train performed 
the exercise of a mock fight, during which their soldier-like behavior, their management 
of the artillery, and the good order observed, gave general satisfaction to a numerous 
crowd of spectators. His Majesty's Council, the House of Representatives and the 
officers of the militia, attended his Excellency at the Council Chamber, where a number 
of loyal toasts were drank, viz : The King, Queen, Royal Family, Union between Great 
Britain and her Colonies, the Province, &c &c. Then the Captains marched their respec- 
tive companies to their own houses, where genteel dinners were prepared, for their 
officers and other gentlemen of the town." 2 

Rev. Jonas Clark, of Lexington, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1768. 
He was born at Newton, Mass., Dec. 25, 1730, graduated at Harvard College in 1752, 
and was ordained over the church in Lexington, Nov. 5, 1755. He died Nov. 15, 
1805, after a ministry of a little more than half a century. " His sermons were rarely less 
than an hour long, often more. There is a tradition that, on a certain occasion, he was 
known to have prayed two hours." He was a true son of liberty, and the militia of 
Lexington, who, on the morning of April 19, met the British regulars, only carried into 
practice the teachings of their venerated pastor. 

" Mr. Clark," says Mr. Everett, " was of a class of citizens who rendered services 
second to no others in enlightening and animating the popular mind on the great ques- 
tion at issue — I mean the patriotic clergy of New England." It was at his house, in 
Lexington, that Samuel Adams and John Hancock, while under proscription, tarried ; 
there Paul Revere and William Dawes, Jr. (1768), found them on the morning of April 
ig, 1775, — and thence they escaped, before the arrival of the British, into the town 
of Billerica. 

Rev. Jonas Clark. Authorities: Sprague's Chronicles, chapter 17, verse 16: 'And next him was 

Annals of American Pulpit, containing an interesting Amasiah, the son of Zichri, who willingly offered 

account of Mr. Clark by his son-in-law, Dr. William himself unto the Lord; and with him two hundred 

Ware, Hollis Professor in the University in Cam- thousand mighty men of valour.' After which the 

bridge; Eliot's and Allen's Biog. Diets. following gentlemen were chosen for the ensuing 

1 "Boston, Monday, June 6, 1768. This being year: James Cunningham Esq. [ 1 761] Captain, Mr. 

the Anniversary of the election of officers for the William Heath [1765], Lieutenant Mr. David Spear 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, his Ex- [1758] Ensign. They then marched to the British 

cellency, the Governor, his Majesty's Council, and Coffee House, where the company gave an elegant 

several other gentlemen attended by the C mpany, dinner, and the new elected officers treated in the 

went in procession to the Old Brick Meeting House, evening." — Boston Gazette. 

where a sermon was preached by the Rev. Mr. 2 Boston Gazette. 
Jonas Clark of Lexington, from these words, 2d 



l 56 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [,y6 9 

s The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1769 were: Josiah 

I/OQ. Waters (1747), captain ; Edward Carnes (1755), lieutenant; Robert Jen- 

S kins (1756), ensign. William Rogers (1765) was first sergeant; John Stutson 

(1765), second sergeant ; Asa Stoddard (1765), third sergeant; Ebenezer Torrey (1765), 

fourth sergeant, and Joseph Pierce (1769), clerk. 

March 22, 1769, Major Cunningham (1761) applied to the selectmen of Boston for 
"the favor of Faneuil Hall to exercise the Artillery men — for some Time before their 
appearance, which was granted him accordingly." 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1769 were : John Arnold, John 
Bartlett, John Boyle, Joseph Croswell, John Grant, Jr., Joshua Loring, Manasseh Mars- 
ton, John Fisk Osgood, Joseph Pierce, Thomas Russell, Thomas Sherburne, Jr., John 
Simpkins, Josiah Waters, Jr. 

John Arnold (1769), a cabinetmaker, of Boston, was published to marry Abigail 
Foster, March 10, 1763. He was elected a constable of Boston, March 13, 1769, and a 
surveyor of boards for the year 1782. He enlisted for service in the Continental Army, 
M ay 3, 1775, was mustered Aug. 1, 1775, and served three months and six days. Admin- 
istration on his estate was granted in 1784. 

John Bartlett (1769), physician, of Boston and Roxbury, had a son, Thomas, born 
in Boston May 14, 1767, by wife Tabitha. Thomas became a druggist, and joined the 
Artillery Company in 1793. 

Nov. 11, 1767, Mr. John Bartlett (1769) prayed of the selectmen "leave to break 
ground in order to carry a drain from his house, near the sign of the Lamb," into the 
common sewer. He therefore lived near the present Adams House, on Washington 
Street, Boston. He was chosen a scavenger for Ward 11, March 14, 1768 ; a constable, 
Sept. 16, 1776, and March n, 1777. He was second sergeant of the Artillery Company 
in 1772. Mr. Drake locates and describes the residence of Dr. John Bartlett (1769) in 
his '• History of the Town of Roxbury." He was drafted for service in the Continental 
Army, Dec. 19, 1776, and hired a substitute. Aug. ir, 1783, Dr. Bartlett (1769) and Dr. 
John Warren petitioned the town of Boston " for Liberty to carry on the Business of 
Innoculation upon Apple Island it being a very Safe and convenient situation." The 
petition was granted. Oct. 25, 1786, Capt. Bartlett (1769) applied to the selectmen for 
"the use of the [Faneuil] Hall to exercise his Company," called the " Volunteer Re- 
publican Company," on Thursday evenings. 

After an affliction of blindness for several years, he died in 1823-4. 

John Boyle (1769), bookseller, of Boston, at No. 18 Marlborough Street, "the 
sign of the Three Doves," was born in the town of Marblehead, Mass., on the sixth 
day of March, 1746. He was published, Feb. 21, 1772, to marry Celia Gray, and, (2) 
Jan. 10, 1777, Betsey Cazneau. He was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 
1773, and commanded a regiment in the Revolutionary War. He was a warden of 
the town of Boston in 1780, and June 10 of that year, Capt. Boyle (1769) was selected 
from Ward 10 to collect the sums subscribed in that ward for carrying on the war. 

John Bartlett (1769). Authorities: Boston John Boyle (1769). Authorities : Boston 

Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Records; One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Anniver- 
Ed. 1842. sary of the Massachusetts Lodge, A. F. and A. M., 

1896; Moore's Monthly Magazine, Vol. XVIII. 



1769] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 157 

He served an apprenticeship with Green & Russell, printers. He began business 
in Boston as a printer and bookseller on Marlborough Street, having purchased types, 
etc., of a Mr. Fletcher at Halifax, and printed a few books on his own account. In 
May, 1774, Mr. loyle (1769) formed a partnership with Richard Draper, publisher of the 
Massachusetts Gazette and Boston Mws-Letter. Mr. Draper died the following month 
June 6, 1774, and his widow fornud a partnership with John Boyle (1769) in the 
publication of the News-Letter. In August following, the partnership was dissolved, and 
Mr. Boyle (1769) returned to his former stand In 1775, he sold his printing materials, 
but retained his book-store, which he kept for many years. His place of business was 
No. 18 Marlborough, now Washington, Street. He was a commander of the Cadets, 
active in military matters, and was aide-de-camp for nine years on Gov. Hancock's 
staff, with the rank of colonel. 

Col. Boyle (1769) received the Masonic degrees in the Massachusetts Lodge during 
the first months of 1785. He became a member of that Lodge April 4, 1785, and was 
worshipful master in 1798, 1800, and 1803. In the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, he 
was steward in 1794-5, deacon in 1796-7, junior grand warden in 1799, senior grand 
warden in 1800, 1801, and 1802. He was the first district deputy grand master of the 
First Masonic District, having been appointed in 1802 ; he served until 1808. 

Col. Boyle (1769) died Nov. 18, 1819, aged seventy-three years. 

Joseph Croswell (1769), probably of Charlestown. He was published, Oct. 29, 1772, 
to marry Lucy Allen, of Boston, and is not elsewhere mentioned in the records of Boston. 

John Grant, Jr. (1769), of Boston, son of John (1733) and Elizabeth Grant, was 
born Sept. 1, 1746. 

In 1769, the town of Boston received from Joanna Brooker a bequest for poor 
widows. The original bequest was eight hundred and twenty-one pounds. This amount 
was loaned by the selectmen to responsible citizens of the town; the interest being 
collected annually and distributed to .the poor. March 22, 1769, John Grant (1733) & 
Son (1769) obtained a loan from this fund of sixty-six pounds, thirteen shillings and four 
pence. The interest, paid March 23, 1770, for one year, was fourteen pounds, probably 
an error for four pounds, the amount paid the next year. The interest was regularly 
paid by them until Feb. 24, 1779, when Deacon Simpkins (1769) paid the interest for 
Mrs. Grant, and July 29, 1782, the bond of John Grant (1733) & Son (1769), being 
paid, was discharged. This implies that just prior to 1779, John Grant (1733) died, his 
son John (1769) does not afterward appear in the records. 

Other members of the Artillery Company who borrowed from the Brooker bequest 
were John Fullerton (1768) and Mr. Tilestone (1747). 

Joshua Loring (1769), of Boston. There were three persons in Boston and vicinity, 
in 1769, named Joshua Loring. 

(1) Joshua Loring, of Boston, Dorchester, and Roxbury. He learned the tanner's 
trade with James Mears, on Roxbury Street, but when of age went to sea, rose to the 
command of a privateer, and having been taken prisoner by the French, in August, 1744, 

Joshua Loring (1769). Authorities: Cur- Company, Ed. 1842; Lincoln's Hist, of Hirigham; 
wen's Letters; Drake's Hist, of Roxbury; Sabine's Frothingham's Siege of Boston. 
American Loyalists; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. 



l 5& HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND r_, 7 6 g 

was for some months a prisoner in Louisburg. Dec. 19, 1757, he was commissioned a 
captain in the British navy, was commodore of the naval forces on lakes Champlain and 
Ontario, and participated in the capture of Quebec, under Gen. Wolfe, and in the con- 
quest of Canada, in the succeeding campaign of Gen. Amherst. He was severely 
wounded while in command on Lake Ontario, and at the close of the war retired on 
half pay, at which time he settled down at Jamaica Plain. Gov. Gage appointed Com- 
modore Loring a member of the governor's council. March 30, 1775, the Provincial 
Congress denounced Joshua Loring as an implacable enemy to their country. On the 
morning of the Lexington battle, he mounted his horse, left his home, and everything 
belonging to it, and, pistol in hand, rode at full speed to Boston, stopping on the way 
only to answer an old friend who asked, "Are you going, Commodore?" "Yes," he 
replied ; " I have always eaten the king's bread, and always intend to." He received a 
pension from the Crown until his decease, at Highgate, England, in October, 1781, at 
the age of sixty-five years. 

(2) Joshua Loring, Jr., was a son of Commodore Joshua and Mary (Curtis) 
Loring. Joshua, Jr., was sheriff of Suffolk County in 1775, and was " Town Major," 
under Gen. Gage, during the siege of Boston. Oct. 7, 1775, Gen. Gage issued a proc- 
lamation appointing "Joshua Loring, Jr., Esq., to be sole vendue master and auctioneer, 
in and for the town of Boston," and-strictly prohibited any other person from doing that 
business. He is the one who, as deputy commissioner of prisoners at New York, made 
himself so detested by his brutal indifference to the comfort of his unfortunate country- 
men who were prisoners. He was an addresser of Hutchinson in 1774, of Gov. Gage 
in 1775, went to Halifax in 1776, and was proscribed in. 1778. He married, in 1769, 
Elizabeth Lloyd, of Boston. It is this Joshua whom Mr. Whitman (18 10), in his history 
of the Artillery Company, cites as being a member of the Company. 

In the Columbian Centinel of Nov. 21, 1789, it is stated that Joshua Loring, Esq., 
commissary of prisoners during the late war, died in England, aged forty-five years. 

(3) Joshua Loring, of Boston, was a son of Caleb and Rebecca (Lobdell) Loring, 
of Hingham, and was born Oct. 31, 1737. He married, Oct. 8, 1760, Margaret Tid- 
marsh. He was by trade a cooper. His brother, Israel Loring, joined the Artillery 
Company in 1768. It is more probable that this Joshua, son of Caleb, joined the Artil- 
lery Company in 1769. Prior to 1769, he had risen to the grade of captain in the local 
militia. Joshua Loring (1769) died soon after joining the Artillery Company, for, in 
1770, his brother, Caleb, a distiller (Loring & Snelling), of Boston, married Margaret 
(Tidmarsh) Loring, the widow of Joshua (1769). The Joshua who joined the Old South 
Church, Jan. 31, 1741, was a son of Joseph, of Hingham, and joined the Artillery Com- 
pany in 1722. 

Manasseh Marston (1769), cooper, of Boston. He married a Miss Ingalls, Jan. 
2 7> 1 1^S- The Columbian Centinel announces the event in these words: "On 
Thursday evening last [Jan. 27, 1785] the hymeneal torch was light[ed] between Capt. 
Manasseh Marston and Miss Ingalls — When a refin'd sensibility is added to the most 
superlative worth, we cannot but presage that the alliance will do honor to the 
Institution." 

He was chosen a culler of staves, hoops, etc., from 1769 to 1777 inclusive. The 

Manasseh Marston (1769)- Authorities: Boston Records; Early Masonic Records. 



i 7 6 9 J HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 159 

town records often give the name "Masters" for " Marston." July 14, 1768, he lived 
near the New Brick Meeting- House. Capt. Manasseh Marston (1769) was elected 
culler of staves in 1783, was approved as a surveyor of "pork, beef and barrel'd fish for 
this town," in 1784. He was identified with the militia, and rose to the grade of captain. 
He was a member of the Masonic Fraternity, becoming a member of the Lodge of St. 
Andrew in 1781. He was present in Grand Lodge at the installation of M. W. Joseph 
Webb, Jr. (1761), June 24, 1783, and attended the Special Communication, Jan. 8, 1784, 
in Charlestown, when King Solomon's Lodge was constituted. 
His will was proved in 1791. 

John Fisk Osgood (1769). Sarah, daughter of John Fisk and Lucy Osgood, was 
born in Boston, Oct. 25, 1771. She died in infancy, and their second child, Sarah, was 
born April 7, 1773. He was drafted, Dec. 18, 1776, to serve in the Continental Army. 
He therefore enlisted, and rose to the grade of ensign, in active service. 

Administration was granted on his estate in 1792. 

Joseph Pierce (1769), merchant, of Boston, son of Isaac and Mary (Hardy) Pierce, 
was born Dec. 25, 1745. He married Ann Dawes, daughter of Thomas (1754) and 
Hannah (Blake) Dawes, and sister of Judge Thomas Dawes, April 4, 1771, by whom he 
had twelve children. He was a graduate of the Boston Latin School in 1756, a prom- 
inent merchant of Boston, and from his store, on the north side of State Street, witnessed 
the massacre of March 5, 1770. Mr. Whitman (1810), in his history of the Artillery 
Company, says that his name appears on a sign, over his store-door, in an old picture of 
the State House, taken before the Revolution. 

He was a founder of the Provincial Grenadier Corps, and its second captain. He 
commanded the company on the occasion of its first parade, June 8, 1772, Henry 
Knox, his intimate friend, afterward major-general and secretary of war, being second in 
command. His only son, Major Joseph Hardy Pierce, who married, in 1791, Frances 
Temple, daughter of Joseph Cordis, was a man of " most elegant presence, lieutenant 
with the rank of major in the Independent Corps of Cadets, aide-de-camp to several 
governors, secretary to the board of war, and clerk of the municipal court of Boston." 
His eldest daughter, Ann, born Aug. n, 1774, married, April 25, 1792, John, son of Rev. 
lohn Lathrop, who delivered the Artillery election sermon in 1774. Hon. John Lothrop 
Motley was the grandson of John and Ann (Pierce) Lathrop. 

Capt. Joseph (1769) and his wife, Ann, joined the Old South Church Feb. 26, 1775. 
For more than fifty years he was an active member of that church, served it as secretary 
at different times, a member of the standing committee for many years, and was promi- 
nent in the management of the business matters of the Old South Church. 

He belonged to a military and patriotic family, — his father and brothers serving 
with distinction in the Continental Army. He was a representative to the General 
Court, and served on important committees during the Revolutionary War. He was 
clerk of the Artillery Company in 1769 and 1770, and first sergeant in 1773, and in the 
militia became captain. He died in Boston, Jan. 1, 1828, aged eighty-two years. 

Joseph Pierce (1769). Authorities : Whit- Hist, of Old South Church; Holland's "William 
man's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 1842; Hill's Dawes and his Ride with Paul Revere." 



l6o HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [1769 

Thomas Russell (1769), brazier, of Boston, son of Capt. Benjamin (1745) and 
Elizabeth Russell, was born May 10, 1738. He had a wife, Onner, and their first child 
was born in Boston, April 16, 1757. He was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 
1773, and was chosen scavenger for Ward 6, in 1771 ; one of the committee, in 1776, to 
collect an account of the damages since the Boston Port Bill, and also a scavenger in 
1777 for Ward 9. Mr. Russell (1769) was chosen one of a committee of twelve persons 
to borrow money to purchase flour, etc., for the people of Boston. A Thomas Russell 
was present at the festival of St. John the Evangelist, held by the Massachusetts Grand 
Lodge, Dec. 28, 1778. 

Thomas Sherburne, Jr. (1769), merchant, of Boston, son of Thomas and Margaret 
Sherburne, was born Jan. 26, 1741. He was clerk of the market from 1775 to 1777 
inclusive, and Feb. 6, 1777, was chosen one of the three from Ward 5 " to aid and assist 
the selectmen and Committee of Correspondence in carrying into effect a late act to pre- 
vent monopolies." He was drawn for a juror in a maritime court, Jan. n, 1778, and 
again, July 19, 1780. Sept. 8, 1784, a Mr. Parker, collector of taxes, presented several 
persons as bondsmen not acceptable to the selectmen, but at a later meeting, Mr. Thomas 
Sherburne (1769) was presented and accepted. His residence and place of business 
were on Back, now Salem, Street. 

John Simpkins (1769), upholsterer, of Boston, son of William (1739) and Elizabeth 
Simpkins, grandson of Thomas (1727), and a descendant of Capt. Nicholas (1650), was 
born in Boston Nov. 12, 1740. Previous to 1780 he occupied a "Town's Shop" near 
the dock (rental, ,£666 per year), but later his store was No. 51 Cornhill, now Wash- 
ington Street. He was elected a clerk of the market, March 24, 1766, and March 9, 1767. 
In March, 1770, he was added, by vote of the town, to the committee authorized "to 
procure subscriptions to an agreement not to dispose of foreign tea until the revenue acts 
shall be repealed." In 1777, he was chosen one of the Committee of Correspondence, 
Inspection, and Safety; and in 1777, also in 1778, 1780, one of the twelve wardens of 
the town. In the militia he rose to the grade of captain. 

In 1778, the town of Boston voted to raise four thousand pounds for the purpose of 
supplying " the families of the Non-Commissioned Officers & Soldiers in Town, who 
have enlisted in the Continental army," with provisions. A commissary, Capt. John 
Simpkins (1769), was elected to dispose of said provisions to the families. In 1780, he 
was intrusted, as commissary, with the expenditure of twenty thousand pounds for the 
same purpose. He was treasurer of the Massachusetts Charitable Society in 1784 and 
subsequently. Capt. Simpkins (1769) was a deacon of the New North Church for 
many years. 

He died Dec. 11, 1831, aged ninety-one years, leaving a handsome estate. His 
dwelling-house, in Boston, was near the Brattle Street Church. 

Thomas Russell (1769). Authorities: Bos- John Simpkins (1769). Authorities: Bos- 
ton Records; Early Masonic Records. ton Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Com- 

Thomas Sherburne, Jr. (1769)- Author- pany, Ed. 1842. 
1TY: Boston Records. 



1769] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. l6l 

Josiah Waters, Jr. (1769), merchant, of Boston, son of Capt. Josiah (1747) and 
Abigail (Dawes) Waters, was born Sept. 28, 1747, in Boston. He married, March 14, 
1 77 1, Mary, daughter of William and Elizabeth Whitwell, of Boston. He resided on 
Newbury, now Washington, Street, betwee-n Summer Street and Rowe's Lane. He' 
became a member of the Old South Church, Jan. 5, 1772. In 1 782 his place of business 
was in "Auchmuty's Lane," now Essex Street. 

He was second sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1773 ; first sergeant in 1793 ; 
lieutenant in 1787 ;' its captain in 1791, and was the treasurer of the Company for 
several years. He was appointed inspector of police Dec. 29, 1792, and held that 
office for several years. 

Mr. Whitman (1810) says Col. Waters (1769) "collected many facts for a history, 
but never published them. The manuscript is lost. The older members used to speak 
of it as containing important facts, as well as anecdotes of members, now preserved 
in the imperfect recollection of survivors. In 1804, Col. Waters [1769] proposed to 
establish a military library, but it was never carried into effect " He was greatly inter- 
ested in the militia, and, after passing through the various grades, he became colonel of 
the Boston regiment. 

Josiah Waters, Jr. (1769), received the Masonic degrees in the Lodge of St. Andrew 
in 1770, and was chosen steward of that lodge Nov. 30 of that year. June 24, 1782, 
he was present at the Massachusetts Grand Lodge, and was the first named on a com- 
mittee " to wait on Rev. Mr. John Eliot & Dr. John Warren and Return the Thanks of 
the Grand Lodge for the Elegant Sermon & Charge delivered by them," on that day, 
before the Grand Lodge. He was grand marshal of that Grand Lodge in 1788 and 
1789, and previously held other positions pro tempore. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1769 is as follows : — 
"April 3d. 1769. The Company being under Arms, it was then Voted, That the 
Rev. Mr. Phillips Payson, of Chelsea, be desired to preach on the Anniversary Artillery 
Election of Officers in June next, and the present Commission Officers, with the Treas- 
urer, be a Committee to wait on him and desire the same. Voted, That the Clerk pay 
to Mr. Lunisby eight shillings for a new bench, in lieu of that which was broke in the 
Common last Election Day. Attest : Elias Dupee, Clerk. 

"May 1st. 1769. The Company being under Arms, the Committee chosen to wait 
on the Rev. Mr. Phillips Payson of Chelsea, to desire him to preach the next Artillery 
Election Sermon, reported that he had accepted the same. Voted, That the Treasurer 
pay thirty pounds to the present Commission Officers towards defreying the charge of 
the Election Dinner, in June next, and the Company to dine with them. Voted, that 
Elias Dupee [1763], the present Clerk, have one quarter part of the fines he shall collect 
the present year from the delinquent members of the Company. Voted, That Capt. 
Thomas Dawes [1754], Mr. John Deming [1756] and Mr. Robert Jenkins [1756] be a 
Committee to examine into the state of Mrs Rebecca Blanchards Bond & Mortgage and 

Josiah Waters, Jr. (1769). Authorities: pose wants lo introduce something new into the 

Boston Records; Early Masonic Records. Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company before 

1 " My friend and neighbor, Waters [1769], has he goes out of office, which will be the first Monday 

given me a memorandum for a book of military ex- in June." — Belknap lo Hazard, May 15, 1788, 

ercises, which he wishes you would get for him as quoted by Mr. Hill in Hist, of Old South Church, 

soon as possible, and let him know the price. He Boston, Vol. II., p. 254. 
is an ardent lover of military matters; and I sup- 



I 62 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



['770 



see what may be due thereon. Voted, That Capt Thomas Dawes [1754], Mr. John 
Deming [1756] and Mr Robert Jenkins [1756] be a Committee to examine the List of 
Members & settle with those in arrears. Attest : Elias Dupee, Clerk. 

"June 5 th , 1769. The Company being under Arms, it was then Voted, That the 
present Commission Officers, with the Treasurer, be a committee to wait on the Rev. 
Mr. Phillips Payson, & return him the thanks of this Company for his Sermon preached 
this day. 1 Attest : Elias Dupee, Clerk." 

Rev. Phillips Payson, of Chelsea, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1769. 
He was a son of Rev. Phillips and Ann (Smith) Payson, and was born at Walpole, Mass., 
Jan. 18, 1735-6. He married, Aug. 17, 1758, Elizabeth Stone, daughter of Rev. James 
Stone, of Holliston. He graduated at Harvard College in 1754, and received from that 
institution the degrees of A. M. and D. D. Mr. Payson was ordained at Chelsea, Oct. 
2 5> T 7S7> an d remained there as pastor of the First Church in Chelsea for forty-four 
years. He rose to distinction as a classical scholar, and was well versed in astronomy 
and natural philosophy. He delivered the election sermon in 1778, which was printed, 
and a sermon on the death of George Washington, also printed. 

Mr. Payson died at Chelsea, Jan. n, 1801, aged sixty-four years. 



The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1770 were: William 

\ 7 VQ, Heath (1765), captain ; Martin Gay (1761), lieutenant; Jonas Clark (1756), 

' ' ensign. Nathaniel Waterman (1768) was first sergeant ; William Dawes, Jr. 

(1768), second sergeant; Michael Homer (1768), third sergeant; Jacob Williams 

(1768), fourth sergeant, and Joseph Pierce (1769), clerk. 

Feb. 22, 1770, "some boys set up a large wooden head, with a board faced with 
paper, on which were painted the figures of four of the [proscribed] importers, who had 
violated the merchants agreement, in the middle of the street before Theophilus Lille's 
door." An informer, conspicuous by his intermeddling, was driven by the boys to his 
home. Chagrined, and seeking revenge, he opened a window, and fired a gun into the 
crowd, severely wounding Samuel Gore (1786), son of Capt. John Gore (1743), and 
mortally wounding another lad. 

Soon after, the trouble between the ropemakers and the soldiers took place, 
which resulted in the massacre of March 5, 1770. No members of the Ancient and 
Honorable Artillery Company were prominent in that conflict between the people and 
the soldiers, but some were active in demanding and obtaining the removal of the 
soldiers from the town. In the list of merchants who preferred private emolument to 
the public good, as entered March 19, 1770, upon the books of the town, the name of a 
member of the Artillery Company does not occur. 

Rev. Phillips Payson. Authority: MS. Phillips Payson of Chelsea, from Psalm cxliv. i, 

Genealogy of Payson Family, in the possession of ' Which teaeheth my Hands to war & my Fingers 

New Eng. Hist and Gen. Society. to Fight,' and in the Afternoon the following Offi- 

'"The same Day [June 5, 1769] being the cers were chosen, viz : Capt. Josiah Waters [1747]. 

Anniversary of the Election of the Officers of the Captain Mr. Edward Carnes [1755] Lieutenant, 

Antient Artillery Company, an excellent Sermon Mr. Robert Jenkins 3d [1756], Ensign." — Boston 

was preached on the Occasion by the Rev'd Mr. Gazette. 



1770] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 163 

June, 1770, at a meeting of the selectmen, it was voted that a visitation to the 
public schools be made on the fourth day of July next ensuing, and that the following- 
named gentlemen be invited to accompany the selectmen. Then follows a list of twenty- 
four names of guests, besides the representatives of the town and overseers of the poor. 
In this are included, "Capt. Heath [1765], Lieut. Martin Gay [1761], Ensign Clark 
[1756], Artillery Co." 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1770 were : William Miller and 
Daniel Rea, Jr. 

William Miller (1770). At a meeting of the selectmen, held Jan. 20, 1762, "Mr. 
William Miller [1770] from Europe attended the Selectmen and acquainted them, that 
with their consent he purposed to open a Book Sellers Shop in Kings street, having 
imported a large Quantity of Books for that purpose" "Voted that he be permitted 
accordingly." 

Capt. William Miller (1770) was present at the Massachusetts Grand Lodge, Dec. 
27; 1776, and June 24, 1777. He lived on Milk Street in 1774, when he petitioned the 
selectmen for liberty to run a "Wharf from his Land across the Bottom of Milk Street," 
etc. Capt. Miller (1770) was drawn as a juror, Aug. 7, 1776, and Aug. 18, 1779. He 
was identified with the militia, and held the position of captain. 

Daniel Rea, Jr. (1770), painter, of Boston, son of Daniel, was born in 1743, and 
died Jan. 13, 1803, aged sixty years. Daniel Rea, Sr., died Nov. 31, 1798, at his resi- 
dence in Quaker Lane, now Congress Street, aged eighty-seven years. 

Daniel Rea, 3d, son of Daniel, Jr. (1770), joined the Artillery Company in 17S9. 
Daniel Rea, Jr. (1770), was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1772, and in the 
militia became a lieutenant. He received the Masonic degrees in the Lodge of St. 
Andrew in 1779. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1770 is as follows : — 
"April 2 d . 1770. Monday the weather being unsuitable, the Company did not turn 
out till the Friday following, being then under Arms, it was Voted, That the Rev. Mr. 
Samuel Stillman of Boston be desired to preach on the Anniversary Artillery Election of 
Officers in June next, and that the present Commission Officers, with the Treasurer, be 
a Committee to wait on him & desire the same. Voted, That each Member of this 
Company furnish himself with a black Leather Pouch against the next Artillery Election 
Day, and that the Commission Officers, with the Treasurer, be a Committee to enquire, 
who will make the whole of them the best and the Cheapest ; also to judge what 
fashioned ones will be the most handy, as well as serviceable, and report to the Company 
accordingly at their next meeting. Voted, That every member of this Company furnish 
himself with a pair of white Linnen Spatterdashes against the next Artillery Election 
day : and as to buttons & straps for the same, it be referred to the Committee mentioned 
in the foregoing Vote, to determine of what kind they shall be. Voted, That Capt 
Thomas Dawes [1754] be joined to the Committee appointed to settle the affairs of the 
Monies due from Col. Blanchards [1737] heirs to this Company. 

" Attest : Joseph Pierce, Clerk. 

William Miller (1770). Authorities: Bos- Daniel Rea, Jr. (1770). Authorities: Bos- 

ton Records; Early Masonic Records. ton Records; Records of Lodge of St. Andrew. 



164 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [1770 

"May 7th. 1770. Monday the weather being unsuitable, the Company did not 
turn out till the Friday following, being then under Arms, the Committee appointed to 
wait on the Rev. Mr. Samuel Stillman, of Boston, to invite him to preach on the anni- 
versary Artillery Election of Officers in June next, reported that he had accepted the 
invitation. Voted, That the Treasurer pay thirty pounds to the present Commission 
Officers towards the defreying the charges of the Election Dinner in June next ; and 
furthermore that the Company dine with them. Voted, That Joseph Pierce [1769], the 
present Clerk have one quarter part of the fines he shall collect the present year from 
the delinquent members of the Company. Voted, That the overplus money remaining 
in the Clerk's hands in June next (if any there be) together with what fines may be due 
to the Company after all Charges of the Company together with the Clerk's Commissions 
are deducted, be paid by the Clerk to the present Commission Officers towards defrey- 
ing the charges of the Election Dinner in June next. The Committee appointed in 
April last to enquire who would makes the Pouches the cheapest, &c, this day reported, 
That Mr. William Hawes would make them for 7/3* lawful money, apiece. The 
Company accordingly agreed to purchase them of him. The foregoing Committee being 
appointed in April last to determine of what kind the buttons & straps for the Spatter- 
dashes should be, reported, that white buttons and black Leather Straps were by them 
judged to be the most proper ; in which the Company did concur. The Treasurer's 
account being read, it was Voted to accept the same. 

" Attest : Joseph Pierce, Clerk. 
"June 4th. 1770. The Company being under Arms in the field, it was then Voted, 
That the present Commission Officers, with the Treasurer, be a Committee to wait on the 
Rev. Mr. Samuel Stillman and return him the thanks of this Company for his sermon 
preached this day. 1 Attest : Joseph Pierce, Clerk. 

"September 3'd 1770. The Company being under Arms, it was then Voted, That 
the Clerk pay to Mr. Lasinby the sum of six shillings for a form which was broke in the 
Common last Election Day. Voted, That the Clerk pay to Capt Thomas Dawes [1754] 
- nine shillings & four pence, it being so much he advanced for a Military Chest, by desire 
of the Company some time since, for the use and benefit of the Company, as will more 
fully appear in a report made by a committee and accepted April 8th, 1768 and at the 
same time recorded in this Book. Attest : Joseph Pierce, Clerk." 

"'Boston, Thursday, June 7,1770. Monday week, was made for drinking his Majesty's health, 

last was the Anniversary of his Majesty's birthday, At drinking the ' King' and other loyal toasts, the 

when he entered the 33d year of his age. The same guns at Castle William and at the batteries in this 

day, being also the anniversary of the election of town were fired, also three vollies by the Artillery 

officers of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Com- Company, which then paraded in King Street. The 

pany, who appeared under arms in the morning. Company having provided a dinner at Faneuil Hall, 

At Eleven o'clock, his Honor, the Lieut. Governor, his Honor, the Council, &c, preceded by the Com- 

the Honorable, his Majesty's Council, and as many pany, went in procession to the Hall. After an 

of the Honorable House of Representatives as were elegant entertainment, and drinking a number of 

in town, with a great number of the Clergy and loyal toasts, the Company marched to the Common, 

other gentlemen, attended at the Old Brick Meeting where the officers for the last year, returned their 

House, where a sermon, at the request of the Artil- badges to his Honor, the Commander-in-chief, who 

lery Company, was preached by the Rev. Mr. Samuel was pleased to deliver them to the newly elected 

Stillman of this town, from 2d Tim II. 3, 'Thou officers for the year ensuing, as follows, viz : Capt 

therefore endure hardness, as a good soldier of Jesus William Heath [1765] Captain Capt Martin Gay 

Christ,' — a discourse well adapted to the occasion. ['761] Lieutenant Mr. Jonas Clark [1756] En- 

" After divine service, about I o'clock the Lieut. sign. This being finished, the Company returned 
Governor, the Council, the Clergy, and a number of to the Hall, a cold repast being provided by the 
officers, civil and military, proceeded to the Council new commissioned officers, where a number of toasts 
Chamber, where provision by direction of his Honor, were again drank. The Company was then dis- 
agreeable to a unanimous vote of the Council last missed." — Boston Gazette. 




Jcmt^^rr^^r 



i 77 i] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 165 

Rev. Samuel Stillman, of Boston, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1770. 
He was born in the city of Philadelphia. At the age of eleven years he moved, with his 
parents, to Charleston, S. C, where he received the rudiments of an education at an 
academy. After completing his classic studies there, he studied divinity one year under 
the instruction of Rev. Mr. Hart. Mr. Stillman preached his first sermon Feb. 17, 1758, 
and was ordained, Feb. 26, 1759, in the city of Charleston, S. C, to the work of an evan- 
gelist. Soon after he settled with a church at James Island, opposite the city. Visiting 
his native town in 1759, he married, on the 23d of May, Hannah, daughter of Mr. Evin 
Morgan, by whom he had fourteen children. He took his degree at the university in 
Philadelphia, and returned to his society on James Island. A pulmonary attack com- 
pelled him, about two years after, to seek a different climate, and he removed to Borden- 
town, N. J., where he remained two years. 

On visiting New England, for his health, in 1763, at the request of the Second Bap- 
tist Church, he moved to Boston, and after preaching one year as an assistant to Rev. Mr. 
Bovvnd, Mr. Stillman received and accepted an invitation to settle with the First Baptist 
Church in Boston, and was installed over it, Jan. 9, 1765. He continued as its pastor 
until his decease,' March 12, 1807. The University of Cambridge conferred upon him 
the honorary degree of master of arts, in 1 76 1, and Brown University, of which he was a 
trustee and fellow, in 1788, gave him a diploma of doctor of divinity. He was elected 
a member of the Federal Convention, for the town of Boston, the same year, and dis- 
tinguished himself there by an eloquent speech in its defence. He delivered the anni- 
versary oration on Independence Day in 1789; was one of the first members of the 
Humane Society of Massachusetts ; an officer of the Massachusetts Charitable Fire 
Society ; a member at its beginning, and president at his death, of the Boston Dis- 
pensary. 

Rev. Samuel Stillman, D. D., was one of the strongest and most popular preachers 
of the revolutionary period. He was greatly beloved by his people, and was universally 
respected. At his funeral, "all the members of the society appeared with badges of 
mourning, the women with black bonnets and handkerchiefs." 



The officers of the Artillery Company in 1771 were: Samuel Barrett 

[//] , (1755); captain; William Bell (1756), lieutenant; John Deming (1756), 

' ' ensign. William Homes, Jr. (1766), was first sergeant; Samuel Condon 

(1768), second sergeant; John Newell (1768), third sergeant; Israel Loring (1768), 

fourth sergeant, and Samuel Condon (1768), clerk. 

In June, 1771, the following-named were officers of the Boston regiment : Thomas Mar- 
shall (1761), lieutenant-colonel (resigned) ; James Cunningham (1761), (resigned) ; John 
Leverett (1750), lieutenant-colonel; Thomas Dawes, Jr. (1754), major; Richard Boyn- 
ton (1759), captain, with rank of major; Jeremiah Stimpson (1761), captain; Joseph 
Webb (1761), lieutenant; Jacob Williams (1768), ensign, in May, 1773, promoted to 
be lieutenant; Josiah Waters (1747), captain; Josiah Waters, Jr. (1769), lieutenant; 
Levi Jennings (1764), ensign; Martin Gay (1761), captain; John Osborn, Jr. (1764), 
ensign; Samuel Ridgeway, Jr. (1756), captain ; Thomas Russell (1769), ensign ; Samuel 
Barrett (1755), captain; William Bell (1756), lieutenant; John Haskins (1768), 'cap- 



l66 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7 -, 

tain; William Cunningham (1765), lieutenant; William Bordman (1758), captain 
(resigned); Ephraim May (1765), captain; William Miller (1770), lieutenant; John 
Boyle (1769), ensign; David Spear (1758), captain; Charles Williams (1768), lieuten- 
ant; John Stutson (1765), ensign; Edward Kneeland (1772), commissioned ensign in 
August, 1773 ; Andrew Symmes (1734), captain; Thomas Sherburne, Jr. (1769), ensign; 
Edward Proctor (1756), captain ; Joseph Bradford (1740), lieutenant (resigned) ; Caleb 
Champney (1762), promoted to ensign in October, 1773, and was promoted to lieuten- 
ant in Capt. Proctor's (1756) company; Job Wheelwright (1759), captain ; Nathaniel 
Heath (1765), lieutenant; Thomas Dawes, Jr. (1754), captain of the company of grena- 
diers; Joseph Pierce (1769), lieutenant of same, and in June, 1773, held the rank of 
major; Henry Knox was ensign of the grenadier company, and John Fisk Osgood 
(1769) was commissioned lieutenant in Capt. Gay's (1761) company. 

Hon. William Brattle, Esq. (1729), was announced in the Boston Gazette, July 29, 

1771, as having been commissioned major-general of the militia throughout this province. 
In June, 1771, Ebenezer Battelle (1786) was ensign in the fourth company in Ded- 

ham. In the Second Suffolk Regiment, Benjamin Lincoln (1786) was commissioned 
colonel, July 1, 17715 Ebenezer Thayer, Jr. (1788), major, with rank of lieutenant- 
colonel. In the Third Suffolk Regiment, Lemuel Robinson (1774) was captain of the 
train of artillery. 

In November, 1771, the officers of the train of artillery in Boston were: Adino 
Paddock (1762), captain, with rank of major; Samuel Sellon (1765), captain-lieutenant 
(resigned) ; Thomas Crafts, Jr. (1765), first lieutenant ; George Trott (1765), second 
lieutenant; Edward Tuckerman (1765), lieutenant and fireworker (resigned). In April, 

1772, Jonathan Stoddard (1765) was commissioned lieutenant and fireworker. 

Col. John Erving, Jr., of Boston, a merchant of high standing, and colonel of the 
Boston regiment, was son-in-law of Gov. William Shirley. The funeral of the latter took 
place at the house of his relative, Col. Erving, April 1,1771. A long procession followed 
the remains to King's Chapel, beneath which they were deposited. The Ancient and 
Honorable Artillery Company, commanded by Capt. Heath (1765), the officers of the 
Boston regiment, in full regimentals, with the usual mourning of black crape, attended. 
On the coffin were placed the two swords of the deceased, crossed. The pall was sup- 
ported by Gov. Hutchinson, Lieut.-Gov. Oliver, two judges of the Superior Court, and 
two of the Honorable Council. A funeral discourse was delivered, after which the 
remains were interred, the military firing three volleys, and a detachment of the train of 
artillery as many rounds as the deceased had lived years, namely, sixty-five. The 
governor had been a patron of King's Chapel. 

The reformation of military tactics in England was undertaken in 1757 in the 
county of Norfolk, and, being brought into a system, was adopted by the government ; 
hence the popular military treatise, "The Norfolk Discipline," was the standard work of 
the British army at the breaking out of the Revolution. 

An "abstract of the 'Norfolk Discipline ' " was published in 1774, an octavo of over 
one hundred pages. That "abstract" was authorized by Gov. Hutchinson, in 177 1, in 
these words : — 

" Province of Massachusetts Bay By the Captain General. 

" The following exercise, originally designed for the Norfolk militia, having been 
found to be more concise and easy, and thereby better adapted to militia than any other, 
and having been used in this province for several years past, I do hereby direct and 



i 77 i] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 167 

order that it be continued by the officers of all the regiments of foot, in training the 
soldiers under their several commands. T. Hutchinson. 

" Boston, April 20, 1 77 1." 

This occupied one page in the printed abstract, at the top of which, as usual with 
papers of authority at that time, were placed the arms of England. 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1771 were: Martin Bicker, 
Cuthbert Inglesby. 

Martin Bicker ( 1 77 1 ), merchant, of Boston. In July, 1773, he was chosen a 
"vendue master" for Boston, rechosen in 1774, clerk of the market in 1776, and Aug. 
29, 1781, he was licensed in Boston as an auctioneer. 

He was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1772, and lived on Ann, now 
North, Street. In the directory of 1789, he is called "storekeeper, on Ann Street," 
and in that of 1796, " Martin Bicker & Son, shopkeepers, No. 3, Ann Street." 

Cuthbert Inglesby (1771). He had a wife, Abigail, Jan. 24, 1769, when a child 
was born to them in Boston. His name does not otherwise appear on the records of 
Boston. He was first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1774, and Mr. Whitman 
(1810) says of him, " Removed to Vermont." 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1771 is as follows : — 

"April 1st 1 77 1. The Company being under Arms, it was then Voted, That the 
Rev. Mr. Eli Forbes of Brookfield be desired to preach on the anniversary Artillery 
Election of Officers in June next, and that the present Commission Officers, with the 
Treasurer, be a Committee to wait on him and desire the same. Voted, That the Com- 
pany meet twice a week of evenings at Faneuil Hall, preceeding the training in May 
next, and that the Commission Officers appoint the evenings ; & furthermore, every 
member that is abseut on the Evenings so appointed shall pay a fine of one shilling, 
lawful money, for each evening they are absent. Attest : Joseph Pierce, Clerk. 

" May 6th. 177 1. The Company being under Arms, The Committee appointed to 
wait on. the Rev. Mr. Eli Forbes of Brookfield, to invite him to preach on the Anniver- 
sary Election of Officers, reported that he had accepted the invitation. 

"May 6th, 1771. Voted, That the Treasurer pay thirty pounds to the present 
Commission Officers towards defreying the expenses of the Election Dinner in June 
next ; and furthermore that the Company dine with them. Voted, That the Company 
meet at Faneuil Hall every Friday & Tuesday Evening precisely at eight o'clock, pre- 
ceeding the training in June next ; and any member absent at that hour shall pay a fine 
of eight pence for the use of the Company. Attest : Joseph Pierce, Clerk. 

"June 3'd. 1 77 1. The Company being under Arms in the field, it was then Voted, 
That the present Commission Officers, with the Treasurer, be a Committee to wait on 
the Rev. Mr. Eli Forbes, and return him the thanks of this Company for his Sermon 
preached this day. 1 Attest : Joseph Pierce, Clerk. 

Martin Bicker (1771)- Authority: Boston waited on his Excellency, the Governor, his Honour 

Records. the Lieut. Governor, the Honourable His Majesty's 

1 "Boston, June 3, 1 77 1. This being the Anni- Council and those of the Honourable House of 

versary of the election of officers of the Ancient and Representatives that were in town, with a number 

Honorable Artillery Company; in the morning the of the Clergy and other gentlemen, to the Old Brick 

Company appeared underarms, and at eleven o'clock Meeting House, where a sermon on this occasion 



1 68 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[1772 



"September 2'd, 177 1. The Company being under Arms, it was then Voted, That 
the thanks of the Company be given to Capt Samuel Barrett [1755] for his Gift of a new 
Stand of Colours for the use of the Company. Voted, That the Company meet to exer- 
cise at Faneuil Hall every evening in the week preceeding their Training in October 
next, precisely at seven o'clock ; & every member that is absent the whole evening shall 
pay a fine of two shillings, lawful money, and if absent at calling the roll at half-past 
seven o'clock, one shilling. Attest : Samuel Condon, Clerk. 

"October 7th, 1771. The Company being under Arms, it was then Voted, That 
the Treasurer be desired to demand payment of Nathaniel Allen for his bond, and if said 
Allen refuses or neglects payment, to put the same in suit at next January Court. 

"Attest: Samuel Condon, Clerk." 

Rev. Eli Forbes, of Brookfield, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 177 1. He 
was the youngest son of Jonathan Forbes, of Westboro, Mass., where he was born 
in October, 1726. In October, 1744, he began his studies, preparatory to entering 
college, but, in July, 1745, in obedience to an injunction that was made upon him, he 
laid aside his books, shouldered his musket, and marched more than one hundred miles 
for the defence of his country against the French and Indians. 

On his release, he pursued his studies, entered Harvard College in 1747, and 
graduated in 1751. Immediately he began the study of theology under the tuition of 
Rev. Ebenezer Parkman, the minister of his native place, and June 3, 1752, he was 
ordained the first minister of the Second Parish in Brookfield, Mass. In 1758 and 
1759 he twice accompanied the provincial regiments, under Col. Ruggles, in the capacity 
of chaplain. June 1, 1762, at the request of the board of commissioners, at Boston, he 
undertook a mission to the Oneida Indians, and returned Sept. 1, 1762. 

In the winter of 1775-6, having been unjustly charged by some of his people with 
being a Tory, he requested and obtained a dismission in March, 1776. On the 5th of 
June following, he was installed as pastor of the church in Gloucester. Here he remained 
and toiled until death put an end to his earthly labors, Dec. 15, 1804. 



The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1772 were: Martin" 
[/ / 2 . Gay (1761), captain; Robert Jenkins (1756), lieutenant; John Skinner 
( I 7S9)> ensign. John Fullerton (1768) was first sergeant; John Bartlett 
(1769), second sergeant; Daniel Rea, Jr. (1770), third sergeant; Martin Bicker 
(177 1), fourth sergeant, and Samuel Condon (1768), clerk. 

was preached by the Rev'd Mr. Eli Forbes, of Samuel Barrett [1755J Captain, Lieut. William 

Brookfield, from those words in Exod. XV. 3, 'The Bell [1756], Lieutenant Mr. John Deming [1756] 

Lord is a man of war : the Lord is his name.' Ensign. The new-elected Sergeants having their 

"After divine service, his Excellency the Gov- halberds delivered to them, the Company returned 

ernor, with the other gentlemen went in procession to the Hall, where a cold repast was provided by 

to Faneuil Hall, where an elegant dinner was pro- the new- commissioned officers, and when the Com- 

vided by the Company; after dinner a number of pany was dismissed, went into the Hall and partook 

loyal toasts were drank : and at about 3 o'clock, of the same. The evening concluded with again 

the Company marched into the Common, where drinking a number of loyal toasts." — Boston Gazette. 
they performed a military exercise to the great satis- Rev. Eli Forbes. Authorities: Sprague's 

faction of a vast concourse of people. The officers Annals of American Pulpit, Vol. I., p. 493; Whit- 

ol the last year then returned their badges to the ney's Hist, of Worcester County, 
new elected officers for the year ensuing, viz : Capt 




i^£a?^-< 




1772] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 169 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1772 were: John Hinkley, 
Abraham Hunt, Edward Kneeland, Daniel Neal, John Spear, Stephen Whiting, Jr., 
Obadiah Witherell. 

John Hinkley (1772), auctioneer, of Boston, was born in 1746, and was published, 
Aug. 27, 1779, to marry Abigail Kneeland. Aug. 17, 1768, he became a member of 
Engine Company No. 8. He held the office of third sergeant of the Artillery Company 
in 1774. 

Capt. John Hinkley (1772) represented Ward 6, Jan. 13, 1779, on a committee 
" to make thorough inquiry as to the quantity of flour and other necessaries of life " then 
in Boston. In 1 781, " Hinkley [1772] and Parkman" were in partnership as auctioneers. 
The same year they were authorized by,the selectmen to sell at public auction the men's 
shoes and stockings remaining on hand, which were procured for the army. Mr. Hink- 
ley (1772) continued in this business until his decease. 

He was an officer in Col. Thomas Craft's (1765) train of artillery in the Revolu- 
tionary War. June 17, 1777, Lieut. John Hinkley (1772) and Capt. Jonathan Stoddard 
(1765), of the same train of artillery, were appointed members of a court martial by 
Col. Crafts (1765L In 1778, Capt. Hinkley (1772), at the head of a light infantry 
company, from Boston, marched to Newport to take part in the expedition under Major- 
Gen. Sullivan. He attained the rank of major. 

He died, after a long illness, Feb. 16, 1787, aged forty-one years. 

Abraham Hunt (1772), merchant, of Boston, son of Benjamin 1 and Sarah (Arnold) 
Hunt, was born in Braintree, Mass., June 2, 1748, and died Dec. 5, 1793. He married, 
Oct. 15, 1771, Mary St. Leger, born June 15, 175 r, daughter of Garrick St. Leger, of 
Halifax, N. S. She died Aug. 29, 1824, aged seventy-three years. They had ten chil- 
dren, all born in Boston. 

In 1763 he was apprenticed to Edmund Quincy, who kept a wine store, and was 
afterward connected with him in that trade. June 24, 1788, the firm of Hunt (Abra- 
ham) & Bradlee (David), wine merchants, was dissolved. 1'hey did business on State 
Street. Jan. 23, 1790, the advertisement of Abraham Hunt (1772), in the Centinel, 
said : "He makes hats for Sale at his house in Middle Street, the corner of Center Street, 
also refines wines Cyder, Porter &c. & bottles the same." The directory of 1789 calls 
him " wine broker & cork cutter, Middle Street." 

Mr. Hunt (1772) received the Masonic degrees in 1777, in the Lodge of St. Andrew, 
and was proxy in Massachusetts Grand Lodge for King Hiram's Lodge in 1783. 

In 1789, his place of business was on Middle, now Hanover, Street, and his residence 
on Federal Street. He served as second lieutenant and adjutant at Prospect Hill, in 
1775 and 1776, and at the siege of Boston; was a captain in Vose's regiment in the 
Ticonderoga campaign, remaining some years in the service, which he quitted with the 
rank of captain. He was a member of the Tea Party, and was second sergeant of the 
Artillery Company in 1774. June 24, 1781, he was agent for the privateer " Buckaneer," 
Capt. Hoysted Hacker. For a time, he was inspector at the custom house of the ports 
of Boston and Charlestown. 

John Hinkley (1772). Authorities: BdSton . ' Benjamin Hunt was a son of John, who was 

Records; Mass. Archives. a brother of Capt. Thomas (1685). 

Abraham Hunt (17721. Authorities: Bos- 
ton Records; Early Masonic Records. 



'70 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [,-„ 

Edward Kneeland (1772), of Boston, son of John and Abigail Kneeland, was born 
Oct. 20, 1747, and was published, Feb. 14, 1775, to marry Sarah Baxter. June 29, 1780, 
Mr. Kneeland (1772) was appointed from Ward 8 one of a committee to collect sub- 
scriptions made for the army. He was identified with the Continental Army, and in 
1780 is called "Captain" in the records of Boston. 

Daniel Neal (1772). He does not appear to be mentioned in the records of 
Boston. 

John Spear (1772), blacksmith, of Boston, son of Thomas and Susanna (Blake) 
Spear, was born May 13, 1749. He married, June 22, 1777, Abigail Arnold. He did 
business on Purchase Street, and Spear Place was named for him or his father. He 
never held any office in the town of Boston. He was a Revolutionary officer. 

He died April 14, 1824, aged seventy-five years. 

Stephen Whiting, Jr. (1772), Boston, son of Stephen and Mary Whiting, was born 
May 23, 1747, at Barton's Point, where his father died, June 4, 1789. He does not 
appear as otherwise mentioned in the records of Boston. 

Obadiah Witherell (1772), miller, of Boston, was a Revolutionary soldier, and 
attained the grade of major. In 1825 he was living in Kennebec County, Me. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1772 is as follows : — 

"April 6th. 1772. Monday, the weather being unsuitable, the Company did not 
turn out till the Friday following, being under Arms, it was Voted, That the Rev. Mr. 
Nathaniel Robbins of Milton be desired to preach on the Anniversary Election of 
Officers in June next, and the present Commission Officers, with the Treasurer, be a 
Committee to wait on him and desire the same. Voted, That the Company meet at 
Faneuil Hall every Monday Evening in the weeks preceeding the Training in May next. 

" Attest : Samuel Condon, Clerk. 
" May 4th. 1772. The Company being under Arms, the Committee appointed to 
wait on the Rev. Mr. Nathaniel Robbins, of Milton, to invite him to preach on the 
anniversary Artillery Election of Officers in June next, reported that he had accepted the 
invitation. Voted, That the Treasurer pay thirty pounds to the present Commission 
Officers towards defraying the charges of the Election Dinner ; and furthermore that the 
Company dine with them. Voted, That Samuel Condon, the present Clerk, have one 
quarter part of the fines he shall collect from y c delinquent members of y e Company, 
Voted, That the Company meet 'at Faneuil Hall every Wednesday Evening in the weeks 
preceeding the Training in June next, precisely at eight o'clock; and any member 
absent at that hour shall pay a fine of six pence : & if absent the Evening, one shilling, 
for the use of the Company. The Treasurer reported, he had demanded payment of 
Nathaniel Allen's bond, agreeable to a Vote of y c Company ; but on said Allen's paying 
the interest due thereon, he deferred putting said Bond in suit. The Treasurer's account 
being read, it was Voted, to accept the same. Attest : Samuel Condon, Clerk. 

Edward Kneeland (1772). Authority: Boston Records. 



i 77 2] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 171 

" June 1st. 1772. ' The Company being under Arms in the field, it was then Voted, 
That the present Commission Officers, with the Treasurer, be a Committee to wait on 
the Rev. Mr. Nathaniel Robbins and return him the thanks of this Company for the 
Sermon preached this day. Attest : Samuel Condon, Clerk. 

" July 28th. 1772. At a meeting of the Ancient & Honorable Artillery Company at 
the Royall Exchange Tavern, by a special Notification from the Commission Officers of 
said Company for that purpose, Capt Gay [1761] was chosen Moderator for the Even- 
ing, & opened the design of the Company's being notified as aforesaid ; which was to 
consider of some method to raise the Spirit & reputation of the Company, & keep up 
that Honour they have so long sustained. Whereupon it was unanimously Voted, That 
Capt Martin Gay [1761], Mr. John Deming [1756], Thomas Dawes, Esq. [1754], Mr. 
Robert Jenkins [1756] and Mr. John Skinner [1759] De a committee to draw up some 
proposals & report for the Company to consider of. The said Committee met & made 
the following proposals, which were unanimously accepted : 

" i"'. That the Company do come into a Uniform, viz' : Blue Lapells with Yellow 
Buttons ; the Cock of the Hat to be the uniform of the present Commission Officers of 
the Militia; Wiggs or Hair to be Club'd. 2 d . That every member have Iron Ramrods 
& Leather Slings to his Firelock. 3 d . That they agree to meet on Wednesday Evenings, 
at seven o'clock in every week to the first Monday in October next, in order to com- 
pleat themselves in the Manual Exercise ; & upon non-appearance at half past seven 
o'clock, to pay a fine of six pence, lawful • money ; & one shilling if absent the whole 
Evening ; & upon non-payment when demanded by the Clerk, (unless they make an 
excuse to ye Commission Officers in a seasonable time, to their satisfaction) shall no 
longer be considered a Member of said Company. 4th. That such Members, who do 
often neglect the General Musters agreeable to Charter, (although they pay their fines 
when demanded by y e Clerk) shall be looked upon as no longer Members of said Com- 
pany. 5th. That there be a Committee now chosen, further to consider of some other 
regulations that may be advantageous to the Company & report at the next Muster day. 
6th. That great Attention be paid to the admission of Members. 

1 " [Monday, June I, 1772.] Monday being Occasion was preached by the Rev'd Mr. Nathaniel 

Artillery Election I went to see the hall; din'd at Robbins of Milton from those Words in Psalm 

aunt Storer's [Capt. Ebenezer Storer (1732) was cxxii. 6, Pray for the peace of Jerusalem, etc. 

her uncle], took a walk in the p. M. Unkle [the "After Divine Service, his Excellency the 

uncle who laid down the commission was John Governor with the other Gentlemen went in Pro- 

Deming (1756), ensign in 1771-2] laid down the cession to Faneuil Hall, where an elegant Dinner 

commission he took up last year. Mr Handcock was provided by the Company. — After Dinner a 

invited the whole company into his house in the number of Loyal Toasts, were drank ; and at about 

afternoon & treated them very genteelly & gener- 3 o'clock the Company marched into the Common 

ously, with cake, wine, &c. There were 10 corn where they performed the Military Exercises to the 

baskets of the feast, (at the Hall) sent to the prison great Satisfaction of a vast Concourse of People. 

& alms-house. [John Winslow (1786) was a cousin The Officers for the Last Year then returned their 

of Anna G. Winslow.]" — Diary of Anna Green Badges to his Excellency the Governor, who was 

Window {aged twelve years), p. 66. pleased to deliver them to the new-elected Officers 

" Monday last [June 1, 1772] being the Anni- for the Year ensuing, viz. Capt. Martin Gay [1761], 
versary of the Election of Officers of the ancient and Captain. Mr Robert Jenkins [1756], Lieutenant 
honourable Artillery Company; In the morning Mr. John Skinner [1759], Ensign, 
the Company appeared under Arms, and at Eleven "The new-elected Sergeants having their Hal- 
o'Clock waited on His Excellency the Governor, his berds delivered to them, the Company returned to 
Honor the Lieutenant-Governor, the Honorable the Hall, where a Cold Repast was provided by the 
his Majesties Council, and those of the Honorable new-commissioned Officers, and when the Company 
House of Representatives that were in Town, with was dismissed, went into the Hall, and partook of 
a number of the Clergy and other Gentlemen, to the the same : The Evening concluded with again drink- 
Old Brick Meeting-I louse where a Sermon on this ing a number of Loyal Toasts." — Boston Gazette. 



172 



HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[1772 



"We the subscribers do agree to the foregoing Regulations, & will punctually attend 
our duty in every respect as Members concerned for the honor and reputation of the 
Company : — 



Martin Gay [1761]. 
Samuel Barrett [1755]. 
William Homes, Jr. [1766]. 
John Newell [1 768]. 
John Bartlett [1769]. 
Josiah Waters, Jr. [1769]. 
Stephen Whiting, Jr. [1772]. 
Abraham Hunt [1772]. 
Josiah Waters [1747]. 
John Deming [1756]. 
Ebenezer Torrey [1765]. 



John Boyle [1769]. 
Thomas Russell [1769]. 
Joshua Loring [1769]. 
John Fullerton [1768]. 
Joseph Croswell [1769]. 
Robert Jenkins [1756]. 
Elisha Eaton [1768]. 
William Dawes, Jr. [1768]. 
Daniel Rea, Jr. [1770]. 
Levi Jennings [1764]. 
John Hinkley [1772]. 



Jacob Williams [1768]. 
William Rogers [1765]. 
John Skinner [1759]. 
Asa Stoddard [1765]. 
Cuthbert Inglesby [1771J. 
John Haskins [1768]. 
Israel Loring [1768]. 
Edward Kneeland [1772]. 
Joseph Pierce [1769]. 
John Fisk Osgood [1769]. 



"Voted, Unanimously, that Thomas Dawes, Esq. [1754], Capt Martin Gay [1761] 
and Mr. John Deming [1756] be a Committee to consider what other Regulations may 
be advantageous to the Company and report at the next muster day. 

" Attest : Samuel Condon, Clerk. 

"October, 1772. The Company being under Arms, it was Voted, That the Com- 
pany meet to exercise at Faneuil Hall, -the first Wednesday Evening in November, 
December, January & February next at six o'clock : &, any Member being absent, at that 
hour, shall pay a fine of six pence, & if absent the evening, one shilling, for the use of 
the Company." 

"Boston, May 7. 1772 His Excellency the Captain General, has been pleased to 
commission, John Hancock, Esq., to be Captain of the company of Cadets, with the rank 
of Colonel. 

"William Coffin Jun. Esq., to be Lieutenant with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. 

" Daniel Hubbard Esq. to be Ensign, with the rank of Major. 

" The company having desired that the arms of the Governor's family might be the 
distinguishing device or mark of their colors, his Excellency has given orders to prepare 
the same accordingly. 

" Last Monday the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company appeared with an 
addition to their colors of the King's arms, decorated with military trophies, &c. 

"Captain Jabez Hatch is commissioned Captain Lieutenant in Major Paddocks 
[1762] Boston Artillery Company in the room of Captain Lieutenant Sellon [1765] who 
had resigned." ' 

"Boston, Monday Sept 21. 1772. Monday last the Boston Regiment of militia, 
under the command of Col. Erving, had their third training for the present year. The 
Grenadier with the other companies, after going through the Manual exercise respec- 
tively, formed in battalion, and performed as many evolutions and platoon firings as the 
time would allow, to great acceptance. The Company of Artillery under Major Paddock 
[1762], having first been exercised, as usual, performed another mock battle, as follows; 
— a detachment of the Company under Capt Hatch and Lieut. Trott [1765] drew off 



' Boston Newspaper. 



i 772 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 1 73 

with two cannon and a morter and marched to Fox-hill, so-called, at the bottom of the 
Common, and encamped with French colours flying; upon which Major Paddock [1762] 
with Lieuts. Craft [1765] Tuckerman [1765], and the remainder of the company 
marched and took post on a hill opposite ; from thence began to cannonade and bom- 
bard with artificial bombs, which was answered from those in the encampment. At this 
station it was supposed no advantage could be had, the Major therefore marched off by 
the right between the powder house and a ridge of hills and formed on the right of the 
ridge, which brought him on the left of Fox-hill, where he again began the engagement. 
After firing a few shot, he ordered Lieut Craft [1765] with one cannon and a party with 
firelocks to pass a defile in front, at the same time Capt Hatch and Lieut. Trott [1765] 
[advanced] to a redoubt below his post to oppose him, which Lieut Craft [1765] forced 
and obliged Lieut Trott [1765] to give way and run up to the encampment. As soon as 
the assailants mounted the breastworks, a parley was beat by Capt Hatch and a flag sent 
out offering to surrender on condition of being allowed the honors of war, which being 
refused, a brisk firing began again from the encampment. Whereupon the remainder 
of the company were ordered to join Lieut. Craft [1765], who ascended the hill briskly 
and forced the encampment, with charged bayonets ; flaming hand-granadoes flying all 
the time amidst the contending parties : on which Capt Hatch with his party retired 
precipitantly down the opposite side of the hill. The French colours were struck and 
the encampment represented to be on fire. Both parties joined and marched with their 
cannon in regular order to their parade and after going through several firings, retired. 
The whole was executed in a manner that did honour to the officers and privates." ' 

Artillery soldiers under the fine of one shilling per diem for non-appearance : — 
Seth Adams (1768), Thomas Adams (1765), John Arnold (1769), John Bartlett 
(1769), Sarson Belcher (1765), William Bordman (1758), John Boyle (1769), Richard 
Boynton (1759), Samuel Bradlee (1765), John Brocas (1764), Hopestill Capen (1763), 
Caleb Champney (1762), CLement Collins, Jr. (1765), Thomas Crafts, Jr. (1765), James 
Cunningham (1761), William Cunningham (1765), William Dawes, Jr. (1768), Elisha 
Eaton (1768), Benjamin Edes (1760), Benjamin Eustis (1763), Jonathan Farnum, Jr. 
(1766), John Fullerton (1768), Martin Gay (1761), John Greenleaf (1768), Samuel 
Gridley (1765), Zephaniah Hartt (1765), John Haskins (1768), Nathanial Heath (1765), 
Jacob Holland (1760), Benjamin Homans (1766), William Hoogs (1768), Cuthbert 
Inglesby (1771), David Jenkins (1758), John Laughton (1765), Christopher Marshall 
(1765), Thomas Marshall (1761), Manasseh Marston (1769), Ephraim May (1765), 
William Miller (1770), Dimond Morton (1765), John F.Osgood (1769), Adino Pad- 
dock (1762), William Perkins (1765), William Phillips (1762), Moses Pitcher (1760), 
John Popkin, Jr. (1766), William Rogers (1765), Thomas Russell (1769), Samuel 
Searle (1765), Samuel Sellon (1765), Thomas Sherburne, Jr. (1769), John Skillin, Jr. 
(1768), John Skinner (1759), David Spear (1758), Jeremiah Stimpson (1761), Jonathan 
Stoddard (1765), John Stutson (1765), Andrew Symmes, Jr. (1760), Timothy Thornton 
(1765), George Trott (1765), Edward Tuckerman (1765), Nathaniel Waterman (1768), 
Joseph Webb, Jr. (1761), John Wells (1765), Sanderson West (1761), David Wheeler, 
Jr. (1765), Job Wheelwright (1759), Charles Williams (1768), Jacob Williams (1768), 
John Winslow (1764). 

The above list was probably prepared in 1772. 

' Boston Newspaper. 



174 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 773 

Rev. Nathaniel Robbins, of Milton, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 
1772. He was a son of Thomas and Ruth Robbins, of West Cambridge, and was born 
there April 17, 1726. He graduated at Harvard College in 1747, completed his theo- 
logical studies at Cambridge, and was ordained Feb. 13, 175 1, as pastor of the church in 
Milton. He died among the people of his first and only charge, May 19, 1795, after a 
pastorate of forty-five years. 

In 1775, he married Elizabeth, daughter of Edward Hutchinson (1702). They had 
two sons and one daughter, the eldest of whom was Lieut. -Gov. Edward H. Robbins. In 
1752, he purchased an estate on Canton Avenue, which, in 1884, was owned by Col. 
H. S. Russell. Rev. Mr. Robbins was a member of the State convention which 
adopted the Federal Constitution in 1788. He was an ardent patriot. Two of his 
brothers were in Capt. Parker's company, at Lexington, April 19, 1775. At his funeral, 
Rev. Mr. Haven, of Dedham, delivered a funeral sermon. Rev. Thomas Thacher 
preached a memorial discourse, in Milton, on the Sabbath following the burial. This 
sermon was printed. 



The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1773 were: Thomas 

[ / / 2 . Dawes (1754), captain; Ephraim May (1765), lieutenant ; Joseph Webb, Jr. 

' ' *-* (1761), ensign. Joseph Pierce (1769) was first sergeant; Josiah Waters, 

Jr. (1769), second sergeant; Thomas Russell (1769), third sergeant ; John Boyle (1769), 

fourth sergeant, and Samuel Condon (1768), clerk. 

Members of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company were prominent in the 
"Tea" transaction of 1773. 

The tea ships having arrived, a public meeting was called by a hand-bill, distributed 
throughout the town, dated Nov. 29, 1773. Five thousand people gathered in and 
around Faneuil Hall at 9 a. m. of that day, and Jonathan Williams (1729), "a citizen 
of wealth and character," was chosen moderator. A guard was placed over the ships 
from Nov. 29 to Dec. t6. The names of the guard for Nov. 29 and 30 have been 
preserved. That of the 29th was under the command of Capt. Edward Proctor (1756). 
There were twenty-four men in the guard, of whom John Greenleaf (1768), Joseph 
Edwards (1738), Jonathan Stoddard (1765), Benjamin Edes (1760), Joseph Pierce 
(1769), were members of the Artillery Company. The commander of the guard, Nov. 
30, was Ezekiel Cheever, son of Ezekiel (1733). Joseph Lovering, Jr. (1788), "held 
the light by which his father, Mr. Joseph Lovering, Sr., Lieut. John Crane and others 
disguised themselves in Crane's carpenter's shop, on the evening of Dec. 16." ' 
The Committee of Correspondence, which consisted of twenty-one members, and held a 
very prominent place in the tea affair, had upon it the following members of the Artillery 
Company: Richard Boynton (1759), Nathaniel Barber, Jr. (1758), Caleb Davis (1786), 
and Alexander Hill (1746). In the " Long Room Club," the North End Caucus, 
among the Sons of Liberty, and in the society which met at Mason's Arms, the Artillery 
Company was permanently represented. 

In the lists of the Tea Party, as given in the "Tea Leaves of 1773," the following 
members of the Artillery Company are included: Edward Proctor (1756), Nathaniel 

Rev. Nathaniel Robbing Authority: Teele's Hist, of Milton. 
1 Crane's Tea Leaves of 1773. 



i 7 73] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. I 75 

Barber, Jr. (1758), Samuel Gore (1786), Joseph Eaton (1773), Robert Davis (1786), 
Abraham Hunt (1772), John May (1786), Henry Prentiss (1787), and Jeremiah 
Williams (1787). 

Others, too young to participate in the historic event, not then members of the 
Artillery Company but who joined later, were knowing to the transaction before it tran- 
spired, as Major Benjamin Russell (1788), who, " though only a school-boy at the time, 
remembered seeing through the window of the wood-house, his father and Mr. Thomas 
Moore, his neighbor, besmearing each other's faces with lampblack and red ochre." ' 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1773 were: Samuel Belknap, 
Jeremiah Bumstead, Joseph Eaton, Stephen Gore, John Howe, Ephraim May, Samuel 
Ridgeway, Jr., William Todd, Jr., William Walker, and Samuel Wild. 

Samuel Belknap (1773), shopkeeper, of Boston, son of Jeremiah, Jr. (1745), and 
Mary Belknap, and nephew of Joseph (1742), was born in Boston, May 28, 1751. He 
was interested in the militia, and held office therein. 

He died June 30, 1821, aged seventy years. 

Jeremiah Bumstead [Jr.] (1773), merchant, of Boston, was a son of Jeremiah and 
Phebe (Heath) Bumstead. 

Mr. Ezekiel Price, in his diary, says, Aug. 3, 1777: "Capt. Bumstead's [1773] 
Company marched yesterday " against the British, at Newport, R. I. 

In 1789 his store was No. 8 Long Wharf; in 1796 it was No. 48 State Street, and 
his residence was on Cambridge Street. He united with the Old South Church, Sept. 
12, 1784. 

Joseph Eaton (1773) was a hatter, of Boston. "He claimed the honor of hauling 
down the first British colors, at the commencement of the Revolution. He was a Repub- 
lican, his annual toast on election day being, ' May the Medford Brooks be swelled 
higher by fifty per cent.' He expressed the wish to never live beyond the age of seventy- 
five years, and his desire was granted." - 

He was a member of the Tea Party, first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1791, 
and lieutenant in 1795. He died Feb. 1, 1825, and the Ancient and Honorable Artil- 
lery Company, in citizens' dress, attended the funeral. 

The Boston News-Letter of April 1, 1826, says of him : " All recollect an old 
gentleman who died last year, an honorary member of the Ancient and Honorable Artil- 
lery, whose arm, on parade days, was completely covered with strips of lace. This same 
man once loaded a cannon in State Street to keep the regulars from landing ; was one 
of the ' unknown Indians ' who threw the Tea overboard ; took an oath, forty years 
before his death, never to taste a drop of ardent spirits, which, it is said, he never 
violated ; wore a cocked hat, and was a hatter by trade. He styled himself ' General.' " 

Mr. Whitman (1810) adds, concerning Capt. Eaton (1773) : — 

" Some further anecdotes of this eccentric man may be amusing. He was small in 
stature and lean in flesh as well as in purse. In the latter part of his life, he would buy 

Joseph Eaton (1773I. Authorities: Boston 2 "Died Capt Joseph Eaton [1773] aged 75. 

Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Funeral on Friday at 3 o'clock P. M. from the Meth- 

2d Ed., p. 321. odist Chapel, Bromfield Lane." — Columbian Cenli- 

1 Crane's Tea Leaves of 1773. net, Feb. 2, 1825. 



176 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 773 

his fore quarter of poor lamb out of a butcher's cart, and start from his shop. The 
police court lay in his way home. He would hitch it on to some nail on the brick wall 
of the old Court House, if he saw the constables bringing up a lot of vagabonds for 
trial, walk in, and sit till the boys would tell him his lamb was roasted by the sun and 
basted by the flies, when he would start in a jerk, as if from a dream, and travel home- 
ward. 

" In his early days, he was a rogue. To repeat his own story, he once set his little 
furnace with coal in the street, to heat his hat iron, on April fool day; a coal-cart 
passed by, a sturdy yeoman crying, ' Charcoal,' whose face was equally as black. Mr. 
Eaton [1773] caught a live coal from his furnace and threw it into the coal-cart. The 
man drove on, crying loudly. The boys soon began to gather, and bawl out, 'Mister, 
your coal-cart is on fire ! ' ' Darn it,' said he ; ' you ain't going to make an April fool of 
me. Gee up, Elder — who — haw — Deacon — Charcoal!' Thus he went on through 
the principal streets, and would not look behind, amidst the shouts of laughter of Eaton 
[ : 773] ar) d the rest of the urchins; his cart, in full blaze, at last was arrested by the 
police officers and firewards." 

Stephen Gore (1773), leather-dresser, of Boston, married (published April 21, 
1774) Zebiah May, daughter of Ephraim May (1765). She died Feb. 12, 1803, aged 
forty-seven years, and was buried from their dwelling-house, No. 28 Orange, now Wash- 
ington, Street. The ancestors of Stephen Gore (1773) were among the early settlers 
of Roxbury. It is presumed that he learned his trade in that town, but he followed it 
in Boston, at the South End, near the entrance to Pleasant Street. 1 He was one of the 
early members of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association. He died 
in 1 8 1 1 . 

John Howe (1773), turner, of Boston, lived on Back Street. He was an officer in 
the Revolution, belonging to the corps of artificers. He died Oct. 31, 1823. 

Ephraim May (1773) rejoined the Artillery Company in 1773. He first joined it in 
1765. See page 132. 

Samuel Ridgeway, Jr. (1773), rejoined the Artillery Company in 1773. He first 
joined it in 1756. See page 85. 

William Todd, Jr. (1773), housewright, of Boston, was an officer in Col. Craft's 
(1765) train of artillery, and was president of a regimental court martial, Sept. 28, 
1778. He held the office of first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1787, and was a 
constable of Boston in 1774. He died Aug. 18, 1822, aged seventy-five years, and his 
remains were placed in tomb No. 101, on the Common. 

William Walker (1773), son of Thomas and Mary Walker, is recorded on the 
Boston Records as born May 23, 1741. He is recorded as living in Milton, whither he 
probably moved his family prior to the Revolution. He began his military service as a 

William Todd, Jr. (1773). Authority: ton Records; Teele's Hist, of Milton; New Eng. 
Orderly Book of Craft's Regiment of Artillery. Magazine, 1831. 

William Walker (1773). Authorities: Bos- ' Annals of the Mass. Char. Mech. Association, 

p. 25. 



1773] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 177 

private, being in Capt. Josiah Vose's company of the militia, of Milton, guarding the 
stores and fortifying the harbor of Boston in April, 1776. Mr. Walker (1773) does not 
again appear on the books of Boston or Milton. He probably removed to Lenox, 
where for nearly a half century he was the principal inhabitant. He was a member of 
the convention that framed the constitution, and of the General Court of Massachusetts. 
He was extensively known throughout the commonwealth, and as universally respected. 
He died in 1831. 

Samuel Wild (1773), innholder, of Boston, son of Samuel and Susannah Wild, of 
Braintree, was born Nov. 1, 1741. He married Betsey Cox, March 26, 1783. In 1796, 
Samuel Wild (1773) is call ed "Innholder, sign of the Green Dragon, Union Street." 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1773 is as follows : — 
"January 6th. 1773. At a meeting of the Company at Faneuil Hall, it was then 
Voted, That the Company meet to exercise in this place every Friday evening in the 
weeks preceeding their training in April next, at seven o'clock : and every Member, being 
absent, shall pay fines as above for the use as above. 

"April 5th. 1773. The Company being under Arms, in the field, it was then Voted, 
That the Rev. Simeon Howard, of Boston, be desired to preach on the anniversary Artil- 
lery Election of Officers in June next ; and the present Commission Officers, with the 
Treasurer, be a Committee to wait on him and desire the same. Voted, To meet as 
usual to exercise. Voted, That if any member is absent at half past seven o'clock or 
the whole evening, to pay a fine as usual. Voted, The present Commission Officers, 
with Mr. Joseph Pierce [1769] & Mr. Josiah Waters Jun. [1769] be a Committee to 
consider what uniform may be most proper for the drummers & Fifers : also the cost of 
the materials and report next Friday evening. 

" Attest : Samuel Condon, Clerk. 

"April 9th. 1773. At a meeting of the Company at Faneuil Hall, the Committee 
appointed to consider what uniform might be most proper for the drummers & Fifers, 
report, a white cloth coat, with blue lappels, trimmed with blue & white cloth trimmed 
with gold binding. Also propose an assessment of five shillings on each member for the 
expense of the same ; which was unanimously agreed to by the Company, And Voted, 
That the aforesaid Committee be desired to procure the materials and get the above uni- 
form completely by next muster day. Attest : Samuel Condon, Clerk. 

" May, 1773. The Company being under Arms, the Committee appointed to wait on 
the Rev. Mr. Simeon Howard, to invite him to preach on the anniversary Artillery Elec- 
tion of Officers in June next, reported he had accepted the invitation. Voted, The 
Treasurer pay thirty pounds to the present Commission Officers towards defreying the 
expenses of Election Dinner in June next, and that the Company dine with them. The 
Treasurers accounts being read, it was Voted, To accept the same. Voted That Samuel 
Condon [1768], the present Clerk have one quarter part of the fines he shall collect the 
present year from the delinquent members of the Company. Voted, To meet as usual, 
fines as usual. Voted, The thanks of the Company be given to Messrs Bartlett [1769], 
Fullerton [1768], Russell [1769] & Inglesby [1771], for their gift to the Company of 
making Drummers & Fifers clothes : also to the Committee for their care & trouble pro- 
curing & ordering the same. Voted, The present Commission Officers be a Committee 
to examine the Clerks Accounts for the two last years past. Voted, The present Com- 



178 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 773 

mission Officers, Col. Joseph Jackson [1738], Capt Samuel Barrett [1755], and Capt 
Josiah Waters [1747], be a Committee to wait on the Field Officers, to know if either of 
them will take the command of the Company the ensuing year. 

" Attest : Samuel Condon, Clerk. 

"June 7th. 1773. The Company being under Arms, in the field, it was then Voted, 
That the present Commission Officers, with the Treasurer, be a Committee to wait on 
the Rev. Mr. Simeon Howard and return the thanks of this Company for his Sermon 
preached this day. Attest : Samuel Condon, Clerk. 

"October, 1773. The Company being under Arms in the field, it was then Voted, 
That Mr. Joseph Pierce [1769] and Mr. Josiah Waters, Jun. [1769], be a Committee, 
with the Clerk, to wait on the delinquent members of this Company & demand payment 
of their arrearages. , Attest : Samuel Condon, Clerk." 

"Boston, Monday, June 7, 1773. Friday last being the Anniversary of his Majesty's 
birth-day, when he entered the 36th year of his age, the same was observed here in the 
following order. In the forenoon, the troop commanded by Colonel Phipps ; the com- 
pany of Cadets, commanded by Colonel Hancock, with their band of music ; the militia 
of the town, commanded by Col. Erving, with the Train of Artillery, commanded by 
Major Paddock [1762], and the company of Grenadiers commanded by Major Dawes 
[1754], belonging to the Regiment, with their band of music, mustered and formed into 
a regiment in the Common, when the militia went through their exercise to admiration ! 
From thence, at one o'clock, the regiment marched into King [now State] Street, when 
they again went through the exercise and firings to the approbation of many thousand 
spectators ; and about three o'clock were dismissed. The officers of the regiment, with 
the non-commissioned officers, dined at the Royal Exchange Tavern ; the company 
of cadets at the Bunch of Grapes ; the Artillery Company at the British Coffee House 
and the Grenadier Company at Major Dawes's [1754], at which several places many 
loyal toasts were drank. The band of music belonging to the regiment of Cadets and 
Major Paddocks [1762] fifes and drums, after dinner were in the balconies in King- 
Street, and alternately played a great variety of tunes before a vast number of spectators. 
After which the Train of Artillery went with their canon into the Common to fire at a 
target and made many excellent shots. The regiment was reviewed in the Common, 
before thousands of spectators." ' 

" Boston, September 23, 1773. Yesterday being the anniversary of his Majesty's 
coronation, the guns at Castle William and at the batteries in this town as also on board 
his Majesty's ships of war in this harbor, were fired at one o'clock on the occasion. The 
same day being designed as the fourth training for the Boston militia for this year ; in 
the morning his Excellency's company of Cadets, commanded by the Hon. Col. Hancock, 
appeared under arms, in the training fields, and marched into King street, with a band 
of music, where, after going through their exercises and manceuvers, fired their volleys. 
In the forenoon the troop of guards commanded by Lieutenant Snelling, in the absence 
of Colonel Phips, were mustered, as also the several companies of the Boston militia 
under the command of Colonel Erving and marched to the training field under their 
respective captains, viz : The Artillery under Major Paddock [1762]; the company of 
Grenadiers under Lieutenant Pierce [1769], with a band of music; 1st [company], 

1 Boston Newspaper. 



i 7 74] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 1 79 

Major Boynton [1759] ; 2d, Captain Stimpson [1761] ; 3d, Captain Waters [1747] ; 4th, 
Captain Gay [1761]; 5th, Captain Ridgevvay [1756]; 6th, Lieutenant Bell [1756], 
(Captain Barrett [1755], being absent); 7 th, Captain Haskins [1768] ; 8th, Captain 
May [1765] ; 9th, Captain Spear [1774] ; 10th, Captain Symmes [1760] ; nth, Captain 
Proctor [1756] ; 12th, Captain Wheelwright [1759]. After forming into battalion and 
performing military exercises, they marched into King [now State] Street, preceeded by 
the troop of guards, where three volleys were fired by the troop and battalion, and a 
discharge of the Artillery. After which the officers and company of the troop dined at 
Mr. Brackets, on Boston Neck. The field officers and the officers of the militia com- 
panies dined at Capt Jones's [1754], the Exchange tavern. The officers and company 
of Cadets at Col. Ingersols, the Bunch of Grapes. 

".The military exercises and manoeuvres of each corps respectively were performed 
to the universal satisfaction of a numerous company of spectators both of town and 
country. In the evening was a grand concert of music at Concert Hall, and a number 
of fireworks were played off in King street." ' 

" Artillery Soldiers under the fine of 6/ per diem for non-appearance " : — 
Martin Ricker ( 1 77 1 ), Thomas Bumstead (1764), Samuel Condon (1768), William 
Dawes (1760), Elias Dupee (1763), John Grant, Jr. (1769), William Heath (1765), 
William Hickling, Jr. (1764), John Hinkley (1772), William Homes, Jr. (1766), Michael 
Homer (1768), Abraham Hunt (1772), Levi Jennings (1764), Edward Kneeland 
(1772), Israel Loring (1768), Joshua Loring (1769), John Newell (1768), John Osborn, 
Jr. (1764), John Popkin, Jr. (1766), Joseph Pierce (1769), Daniel Rea, Jr. (1770), Josiah 
Salisbury (1759), John Simpkins (1769), Thomas Stevenson (1762), Asa Stoddard (1765), 
Nathaniel Thwing (1761), Ebenezer Torrey (1765), Josiah Waters, Jr. (1769). 
The above list was probably prepared in 1773. 

Rev. Simeon Howard, of Boston, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1773. 
He was born in Bridgewater, May 10, 1733. He graduated at Harvard College in 1753, 
after which he remained at the university as a tutor until he was invited, on the death 
of the Rev. Dr. Mayhew, to take charge of the West Church, Boston. He accepted the 
invitation, and was ordained May 6, 1767. By his faithful ministry he won the esteem 
of all. He was a member of many societies organized for the promotion of humane 
interests; was a fellow of Harvard College from 1780 to 1804, and secretary of the 
board of overseers. He died Aug. 12, 1804, after a pastorate of thirty-six years. 
President Willard, of Harvard College, delivered the funeral discourse. 



The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1774 were: William 

I 77 A . Bel1 (1756), captain ; John Stutson (1765), lieutenant ; Asa Stoddard (1765), 

• ' ensign. Cuthbert Inglesby (1771) was first sergeant; Abraham Hunt 

(1772), second sergeant; John Hinkley (1772), third sergeant; Stephen Whiting, Jr. 

(1772), fourth sergeant, and Samuel Condon (1768), clerk. 

This year the Boston Port Bill was passed, the harbor closed, and the people 
" cruelly deprived " of the means they had used to support their families. "Boston 

1 Boston Newspaper. 



180 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



['774 



became the most striking monument of ministerial tyranny and barbarity." Its people 
suffered for the necessaries of life, and other colonies contributed largely to their support 
during their great distress. Such a condition could not but operate strongly and 
adversely upon the welfare of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company. Its meet- 
ings were suspended after the June anniversary of 1774, 1 probably on account of the 
depression of the town, and the general sorrow and apprehension which burdened all 
classes, and were not resumed until 1782, on account of the absence of so many 
members in the country's service. The school of the soldier was temporarily closed, 
and most of the pupils took lessons in active warfare upon the various battle-fields of the 
Revolution. 

Gov. Hutchinson prorogued the General Court early in 1774, and it never assembled 
again under the charter. The official dispatches of Gov. Hutchinson, Chief-Justice 
Oliver, and the other royal officials, addressed to the King's ministers in London, and 
not only giving them incorrect accounts of the state of affairs in the colonies, but 
advising extreme measures for subjugating the rebellious spirits, were obtained posses- 
sion of by Benjamin Franklin, who sent them back to Boston, and they were publicly 
read in Faneuil Hall, at a large town meeting. They were the spark necessary to kindle 
revolutionary flames, and the struggle for independence was commenced. 

Gov. Hutchinson, who had been superseded by Thos. Gage, Esq., sailed for 
London on the 1st of June, 1774; the port of Boston was closed by order of the British 
Parliament, and three transports, with troops on board, had arrived at Nantasket. On 
Wednesday, the 15th, the Forty-Third Regiment landed at the Long Wharf, marched to 
the Common, and there encamped. On the 1st of July, Admiral Graves arrived with his 
fleet from London, and more transports arrived from Ireland, with the Fifth and Thirty- 
Eighth regiments, which, with the artillery from Castle William, encamped on the Com- 
mon. Early in August, the Welsh Fusileers came by water from New York, landed at 
Long Wharf, and encamped on Fort Hill. The Fifty-Ninth Regiment, from Halifax, 
landed at Salem, and remained there until the 12th of September, when it marched to 
Boston, and encamped on the Neck, where it entrenched itself. 

Gov. Hutchinson, son of Col. Thomas (1694), was constantly in dispute, during his 
term of office, — from March, 1771, to May, 1774, — with the council and assembly. 
Those persons, however, who favored the Crown, sympathized with him, and, just previous 
to his departure for England, addressed to him letters expressive of sympathy and good- 
will. They testify "to the entire satisfaction they feel in the wise, zealous, and faithful 
administration " of Gov. Hutchinson ; lament the loss of so good a /governor; deplore 
the calamities impending over Boston and the province, and wish him a pleasant voyage 
to England. 

There were one hundred and twenty-four " merchants and others," and twenty-four 
"barristers and attorneys," of Boston, who thus addressed Gov. Hutchinson. Among 
them were the following-named members of the Artillery Company: Hopestill Capen 
(1763), Martin Gay (1761), Joseph Goldthwait (1732),. John Gore (1743), John Joy 
(1755), and Adino Paddock (1762). 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1774 were: Thomas S. Bord- 
man, Nathaniel Call, Jacob Gill, Lemuel Robinson, Joseph Spear, Jr., John Wise. 

1 While this is true, so far as the record of the Company shows, yet a letter of John Andrews, Esq., 
given in note on page 185, contains an account of a parade Oct. 3, 1774. 



i 774 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. I 8 I 

Thomas S. Bordman (1774), hatter, of Boston, son of Capt. William Bordman 
(1758) and Susanna, was bom March 23, 1752. He married (published July 16, 1781) 
Thankful Higgins, of Eastham. 

Having served an apprenticeship in the hatting business with his father, he was 
admitted into partnership, under the firm name of William Bordman & Son. They did 
an extensive business in the manufacture and sale of hats, and were engaged in the pur- 
chase and exporting of furs. Their place of business was near the head of Ann Street. 
On the death of the senior partner, about 1809, the business was continued by the son 
until within three years of his decease, which occurred April 26, 1828. 'An upright, 
useful, and worthy man." 

His brother, William, Jr., joined the Artillery Company in 1786. Thomas S. Bord- 
man (1774) resided on North Square. 

Nathaniel Call (1774), housewright, of Boston, son of Richard and Mary (King) 
Call, was born in Charlestown in November (baptized, 17th), 1745. He was a brother 
of Capt. William (1787). Nathaniel (1774) was taxed in Ward 7 in 1780 and 1782, and 
"probably married Elizabeth Green, Oct. 18, 1770." 

He was captain of a company of artificers in the Revolution. He served as second 
sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1788, and its ensign in 179 1. He lived on Green 
Street, and died very much regretted, Aug. 18, 1827, aged eighty-two years. His 
remains were placed in tomb No. 64, in the burying-ground on the Common. 

Jacob Gill (1774), hatter, of Milton, son of Samuel and Hannah Gill, was born Jan. 
1, 1745-6. He was lieutenant in Capt. Robinson's company of Col. Ezra Badlam's regi- 
ment, in January and February, 1787, actively engaged to quell the insurrection of 
Daniel Shays ; colonel of the Third Regiment, First Brigade, First Division, Massachu- 
setts Militia, from 1794 to 1798, and in 1799 was commissioned brigadier-general of 
that brigade. 

In 1795, Gen. Gill (1774) bought in Milton the westerly half of what was once 
called the Hutchinson estate, which he owned at the time of his decease. He lived 
previously in a house that stood where the building of Mr. S. W. Johnson now stands, 
and his workshop was on the location now occupied by the provision store of George 
Everett. He died in Milton, Sept. 20, 1820. 

Lemuel Robinson (1774), tavernkeeper, of Dorchester. In May and September, 
1774, Capt. Lemuel Robinson (1774) was chosen to represent the town in the General 
Court to be held at Salem. Gen. Gage having recalled the writs for the latter meeting, 
Capt. Robinson (1774) was authorized to meet the representatives of the other towns in 
" General Provincial Congress.'-' On the 5th of October, ninety representatives assembled 
at Salem, but, no governor appearing, they resolved themselves into a " Provincial Con- 
gress," and was the first regularly organized legislative body assuming revolutionary 
powers in America. 

Thomas S. Bordman (1774). Authorities : man's Charlestown Genealogies and Estates, Vol. I. 

Boston Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. p. 168. 

Company, Ed. 1842; MS. of Mr. Joseph C. Whit- Jacob Gill (1774)- Authorities: Teele's 

ney, of Boston. Hist of Milton; Mass. Archives. 
'Nathaniel Call (1774). Authority: Wy- 



1 82 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



['774 



The following extracts are from the diary of Col. Samuel Pierce, of Dorchester : — 

" 1763, April 31. I grafted for Mr. Lemuel Robinson [1774] : he and I grafted 
245 heads in one day. 

" 1769, Aug. 14. Was a very grand entertainment at Mr Lemuel Robinsons [1774]. 
All the Sons of Liberty met; there was 124 carriages there. 1 

" 1774, May 18. Mr Lemuel Robinson [1774] was chosen to represent the town. 

" 1774, Nov 17. The officers of this regiment met at Stouton to choose their field 
Officers. Chosen for the same- — Lemuel Robinson [1774], Deacon Gill and Joseph 
Vose. 

" 1775, Feb. 27. The field officers resigned. 

" 1775, March 7. They met again and [the same field officers] were rechosen." 

Joseph Spear, Jr. (1774), cooper, of Boston, son of Joseph and Mary (Collier) 
Spear, was born April 7, 1722, at Hull, Mass., and he died in Boston in February, 1791. 
He married, (1) Oct. 25, 1743, Elizabeth Phebe Binney, who died in 1757 or 1758, 
daughter of John and Hannah (Paine) Binney, of Hull, and, (2) June 14, 1759, Mary 
Dawson. 

He was identified with the militia, and became a captain in Col. Craft's regiment. 
In 1778, Joseph Spear, Jr. (1774), and his brother, Lieut. David (1758), were captured 
by the British, and were carried to Pembroke, England. They were released Oct. 14, 
1780. 

He never held any town office in Boston. In 1785, he became a member of the 
Lodge of St. Andrew, A. F. and A. M. In 1788, he was fourth sergeant of the Artillery 
Company. He resided on Leverett Street, also called Quaker Lane. 

From 1789 until his decease he was an officer of customs, "a useful member of 
society and one whose death is lamented by all who were acquainted with him." 

John Wise (1774), tailor, of Boston, married Mary . She died Sept. 12, 1795, 

aged thirty-nine years. He was interested in the militia, and was second lieutenant in 
the Boston regiment in 1779, ar "d captain in 1784. Capt. John Wise (1774) and his 
wife, after lingering sickness, aged fifty-five and thirty-nine years respectively, died 
in 1795. They resided in West Boston, near the meeting-house. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1774 is as follows : — 
" 1774. April 4th. The Company being under Arms in the field, it was then Voted, 
That a Committee be appointed to confer with Blanchard [1737] respecting his Bonds 
due to the Company. Voted, That Col. Jackson [1738], Maj. Dawes [1754], Capt 
Waters [1747] and Capt Gay [1761] be a committee for the purpose aforesaid. Voted, 
The Company meet to exercise at Faneuil Hall every Friday evening in the weeks pre- 
ceding the training in May next, at half past seven o'clock ; and any Member being 

Joseph Spear, Jr. (1774). Authorities: dined at two o'clock p. m. About three hundred sat 

Boston Records; MS. of W. G. Spear, of Quincy. clown to tables spread in the field under a tent. 

'The entertainment of Aug. 14, 1769, was a Toasts were drank, songs sung, etc., and at five o'clock 

celebration of " the Union and Association of the P. M. Mr. Hancock in his chariot led off for Boston. 

Sons of Liberty in this Province." The "Sons" John Adams, who was present, vouches for the per- 

assembled at Liberty Tree in Boston and thence feet sobriety of the " Sons of Liberty." — See Diary 

proceeded to Liberty Tree tavern, known as "Rob- of John Adams, 1769. 
inson's [1774] " tavern, in Dorchester, where they 



, 774 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 183 

absent at that time shall pay a fine of six pence, and if absent the whole evening one 
shilling; and for neglect of gun & bayonet one shilling for the use of the Company. 

" Voted, That the Rev. Mr. John Hunt of Boston be desired to preach on the 
Anniversary Artillery Election of Officers in June next, and the present Commission 
Officers with the Treasurer be a committee to wait on him and desire the same. 

" Attest : Samuel Condon, Clerk. 

" May 2d 1774. Monday, the weather being unsuitable, the Company did not turn 
out till the Friday following : being then under Arms in the field, the Committee 
appointed to wait on the Rev. Mr. John Hunt of Boston, report they had waited on him 
with the requests of the Company, but that he had declined on account of his health not 
admitting. Voted, That the same Committee be a Committee to wait on the Rev. Mr 
John Lathrop and desire him to preach on the Anniversary Artillery Election of Officers 
in June next. The Treasurer's accounts being read it was Voted That the same be 
accepted. Voted, The Treasurer pay the present Commission officers thirty pounds, 
lawful money, towards defraying the expenses of the Election Dinner in June next ; and 
further more that the Company dine with them. Voted, That the Clerk borrow of the 
Treasurer ten pounds, lawful money, on account of the balance due to him from the 
Company, and that Mr. Joseph Pierce [1769], & Mr Josiah Waters Jun. [1769] be a 
Committee to adjust the Clerks accounts and assess the Members of the Company for 
the balance that may be due him ; and that the said Sum of ten pounds be repaid to the 
Treasurer when received of the Members. Voted, The Company meet to exercise at 
Faneuil Hall every Friday evening preceding the training in June next precisely at eight 
o'clock. Fines as Voted April last. Attest : Samuel Condon, Clerk. 

"June 6th. 1774. The Company being under Arms, in the field, it was then Voted, 
That the present Commission Officers, with the Treasurer, be a Committee to wait on 
the Rev. Mr. John Lathrop, and return him the thanks of this Company for his Sermon 
preached this day. 1 Attest Samuel Condon, Clerk." 

Rev. John Hunt, of Boston, was invited to deliver the Artillery election sermon of 
1774, but he declined on account of ill health. He was the son of Capt. John and 
Esther (Wells) Hunt, and was born in Northampton, Nov. 20, 1744. He graduated at 
Harvard College in 1764, and taught school in his native town from October, 1765, until 
March, 1769. In connection with his teaching, he pursued a course of theological 
studies, and was licensed to preach in 1769. 

Rev. John Hunt. Authorities: Sprague's suitable to the occasion was delivered by Rev. John 

Annals of American Pulpit; Hooker's Mem. Dis., Lathrop. After which they proceeded as usual to 

Northampton, 1775; Hill's Hist, of Old South Faneuil Hall, where an elegant dinner was provided 

Church. for the aforesaid gentlemen, and in the evening an 

1 " Last Monday, being the anniversary of the entertainment was made by the new elected officers, 
election of officers for the Ancient and Honorable "The officers of the Company are chosen an- 

Artillery Company, the following gentlemen were nually, and it has always been customary for the 

chosen for the ensuing year : — Lieut. William Bell Governor of the Province to receive the badges of 

[1756], Captain; Mr. John Stutson [1765], Lieu- their commission from the old officers and deliver 

tenant; Mr. Asa Stoddard [1765], Ensign. them to the new. As his Excellency, Governor 

"Previous to the choice the Company waited Gage, was at Salem on that day, he authorized Major 

on Major General Brattle [1729], the members of General Brattle [1729J to act in his stead." — Bos- 

his Majestys Council, several of the Honorable ton Newspaper. 

House of Assembly, and a number of the Reverend "June 6 [1774], Monday, warm, Artillery Elec- 

Clergy, and other persons of distinction, to the Old tion. Rev. John Lathrop preached a very suitable 

Brick Meeting-house, where a learned discourse, sermon." — Thomas Newell' s Journal. 



1 84 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7 „ 

Rev. Joseph Sewall, who delivered the Artillery election sermon in 1714, died in 
1769. Two years after, Sept. 25, 1771, Rev. John Hunt became his successor, and was 
ordained on that day. Mr. Hunt was a genial and affectionate man, of winning and per- 
suasive manners. He died, deeply lamented, Dec. 30, 1775, at the age of thirty-one 
years, after a pastorate of but four years' duration. 

Rev. John Lathrop, of Boston, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1774. 
He was born May 17, 1740, in Norwich, Conn. He graduated at Princeton College in 
1763, and pursued the study of medicine. For a short time he was an assistant in 
Moors' Indian School, then kept at Lebanon. On the death of Rev. Mr. Checkley, who 
delivered the Artillery election sermon in 1757, Mr. John I athrop was engaged to supply 
the pulpit. After a trial of several months, the Second Church and Society unanimously 
invited him to become its pastor. He accepted, and was installed May 18, 1768. He 
was pastor of the church during the Revolution, when the Old North Meeting-House, 
erected in 1677, was tor n down for fuel by the British. After the Evacuation, the Old 
North, or Second, Church and the New Brick Church united in public worship, and 
May 6, 1779, they formed a perpetual union. 

Mr. Pemberton died Sept. 9, 1779, and Rev. Mr. Lathrop continued as pastor of 
the new Second Church. His ministry covered the long period of fifty years, and he 
died Jan. 4, 1816. The sermon, at his interment, was delivered by Rev. Mr. Parkman, 
of Boston. He was buried in the Granary Burial-Ground. 



It was upon March 6, 1775, that Gen. Joseph Warren delivered the 

I yy C. oration " to perpetuate the memory of the horrid massacre perpetrated on the 

' ' J evening of the 5th of March, 1770, by a party of soldiers" under Capt. 

Thomas Preston. Thanks were voted to the orator, and a committee, of which Col. 

Thomas Marshall (1761) was one, was appointed to wait upon him, and request a copy 

for the press. 

Samuel Adams, moderator of the adjourned town meeting, April 3, 1775, being at 
the Congress then sitting in Concord, Samuel Swift (1746) was chosen moderator 
pro tempore. 

From the last-mentioned date until March 29, 1776, nearly one year, no meeting of 
the inhabitants is recorded, except the inhabitants of Boston were warned to meet March 
5, 1776, at the meeting-house in Watertown, to listen to an oration by Rev. Peter 
Thacher, commemorative of "the horrid massacre of the 5th of March, 1770." Nath- 
aniel Barber, Jr. (i75 8 )» was present on that occasion, and was assigned a place on each 
of the three committees appointed at that meeting. 

William Copp was the early proprietor of that portion of the hill which has subse- 
quently borne his name. Copp's Hill was at one time in possession of the Ancient and 
Honorable Artillery Company. In 1775, tne Common was occupied by the British 
troops, and the Artillery Company was refused admittance to perform its usual exercise 

Rev. John Lathrop. Authorities: Robbins's Hist, of Second Church; Funeral Sermon, by Rev 
Mr. Parkman; Sprague's Annals of American Pulpit. 



I775 j HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 1 85 

and evolutions. 1 Major Bell, the commander, therefore marched the Company to Copp's 
Hill, as has been fully related in the sketch of Major Bell (1756). 2 

In the introduction to the above-mentioned " Letters of John Andrews, Esq., of 
Boston," there are certain explanatory paragraphs. It was Samuel Breck, Esq., who 
recognized these letters as productions of his uncle, John Andrews. Mr. Breck adds : 
"Benjamin Andrews [1754] ■ • • was the elder brother of John. Shortly after this 
date [April 11, 1776] my uncle Benjamin [1754] was writing in his parlor on some 
business, preparatory to a journey into the country the next day. His friend, Benjamin 
Hitchborn, a lawyer of eminence, sat near the chimney, preparing for use a pair of 
pistols, — without which in those days no one ventured to travel, — when, by some 
awkward turn, the pistol which he held in his hand exploded and killed Andrews [1754] 
on the spot. The very melancholy event was supposed to be accidental; and Hitch- 
born, who married his [Mr. Breck's] widowed aunt, took the best possible care of her 
children by Andrews [1754], whom he educated and established in life with true 
parental affection." 

Samuel Bixby, a private in Capt. Bolster's company, of Sutton, in Col. Learned's 
regiment, then encamped before Boston, wrote in his journal : — 

"June 5th [1775] Monday.. This day is 'Artillery Election' : but it is not much 
thought of by the soldiers. About 12 o. c. the regulars fired from the fortifications; and 
they fired from the Castle at a party of our men on shore digging clams but did no 
damage. Our men picked up one of the balls, a 24 pounder, and carried it to the Gen- 
eral, who gave them two gallons of rum. A party of our men out towards Noddles Island 
captured a barge and four men belonging to a man of war and carried it ashore at Cam- 
bridge ; and this day brought the barge to Roxbury in a cart, with the sails up and three 
men in it. It was marched round the meeting house, while the engineer fired the 
cannon for joy." 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1775 is as follows : — 
"April 3d, 1775. The Company being under Arms, it was then Voted, That the 
Rev. Mr. William Gordon of Roxbury be desired to preach on the anniversary Artillery 
Election of Officers in June next, and the present Commission Officers, with the 
Treasurer, be a committee to wait on him and request the same. Voted, That the 
Company meet to exercise at Faneuil Hall every Tuesday evening preceding the train- 
ing in May next, precisely at half past seven o'clock, on penalty of six pence for non- 

1 It is possible this event occurred twice. There merly us'd to. Their fifes and drums, when near 

is no record of a public parade of the Artillery Com- Ihe hill, alarmed the Lively, which lays near the 

pany either Oct. 3, 1774, or in April, 1775, but Mr. ferry; and when ihey had got upon the hill, in sight 

Whitman (1810) repeats the story of a " bystander," of the ship, the Boatswain's w histle call'd all hands 

who said the event occurred in 1775, "before the upon deck, the marines with their firelocks were 

meetings were suspended," and Mr. Andrews recites fix'd upon the quarter, the ports opened with a 

a similar event as occurring Oct. 3, 1774. spring upon their cables, the round tops manned, 

2 "Monday, October 3 [1774], the wind North- and a boat manned and sent out upon each side to 

East, and the weather cold but fair. Artillery train- reconnoitre. Such was the terror they were in, 

ing for the last time this year." — Thomas NnveWs from the appearance of about fifty pompions in 

Journal. arms. At about five o'clock they remarched into 

"October 4th [1774]. Yesterday afternoon our King street, where they perform'd their evolutions 

honorable and ancient Artillery turned out, and for with the greatest propriety and exactness; much 

want of a better place, they march'd down to Cop's more so, in my opinion, than any performances of 

hill, where they went through their several manoeu- the troops since they've been here." — From Letters 

vres to the satisfaction of every one, and really made of John Andrews, Esq., of Boston, compiled and 

a much more respectable appearance than they for- edited by Mr. Wmthrop Sargent. 



1 86 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



['775 



attendance at roll-call, and one shilling if absent the whole evening, and any Member 
appearing without his firelock & bayonett shall pay a fine of one shilling. 

" Attest : Samuel Condon, Clerk." 

The " Loyal Address from the Gentlemen and Principal Inhabitants of Boston to 
Gov. Gage, on his departure for England, Oct. 6, 1775," was signed by ninety-seven 
persons, of whom the following-named were members of the Artillery Company : 

William Brattle (1729), Martin Gay ( 1761), John Gore (1743), John Joy (1755), 
Adino Paddock (1762). 

The editor of the "Memorial History of Boston," in Vol. III., pages 175-177, 
gives the names of five hundred and thirty-four loyalists who resided in Boston or its 
vicinity. Among them are found the following names of members of the Artillery 
Company : — 

William Brattle (1729), James Butler (1739), Hopestill Capen (1763), Josiah 
Edson, Jr. (1747), Martin Gay (1 761), John Gore (1743), William Heath (1754), John 
J°y ( J 7S5). Edward Lyde (1758), William Murray (1758), Adino Paddock (1762), 
Benjamin Phillips (1755), Moses Pitcher (1760), Isaac Royall (1750), Job Wheel- 
wright (1759)- 

In contradistinction to the above lists of "addressers" and "loyalists," the great 
majority, probably more than nine tenths, of the active membership of the Artillery Com- 
pany at the beginning of the Revolutionary War were loyal to the cause of the colonies, 
and, without exception, were more or less active in the stirring events of those days. 
Some members were alert at home, answering alarm calls, guarding the harbor and coasts, 
collecting materials for the war ; while others enlisted for the war, and, on land or sea, 
bore their share of the privations and sacrifices necessitated by the sanguinary struggle. 
Their training in the military art previous to the war prepared them to command, hence 
the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company was represented by commissioned officers 
on every battle-field where the banner of Massachusetts waved. Having assisted to drive 
the British from Massachusetts Bay, they hastened to other American colonies to drive 
the British thence. They endured the sorrows of the midwinter camp ; they shared in the 
successes at Saratoga and Yorktown. The loyalty, sacrifice, and service of members of 
the Artillery Company in the War of the Revolution give an immortal lustre to those 
pages in its history. 

George William Curtis, in his oration at Concord in 1873, sai d, "Such was the 
opening battle of the Revolution, a conflict which, so far as we can see, saved civil 
liberty in two hemispheres, — saved England as well as America, and whose magnificent 
results shine through the world as the beacon light of free popular government. And 
who won this victory? The minute-men and militia, who, in the history of our English 
race, have been always the vanguard of freedom. The minute-man of the American 
Revolution !— who was he? He was the husband and father, who, bred to love liberty 
and to know that lawful liberty is the sole guaranty of peace and progress, left the plow 
in the furrow and the hammer on the bench, and, kissing wife and children, marched to 
die or to be free. He was the son and lover, the plain, shy youth of the singing-school 
and the village choir, whose heart beat to arms for his country, and who felt, though he 
could not say, with the old English cavalier, — 

'■' ' I could not love thee, dear, so much, 
Loved I not honour more.' 



1776] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 1 87 

The minute-man of the Revolution ! He was the old, the middle-aged, and the young. 
This was the minute-man of the Revolution, — the rural citizen trained in the common 
school, the church, and the town meeting, who carried a bayonet that thought, and whose 
gun, loaded with a principle, brought down, not a man but a system." 

Rev. William Gordon, of Roxbury, was invited to deliver the Artillery election 
sermon in 1775, but, Boston being in a state of siege, the June anniversary was 
unobserved. 

Rev. William Gordon, D. D., was a native of Hitchin, England, and, prior to his 
coming to Boston, was settled in Ipswich, England, and in Old Gravel Lane, Wapping, 
England. He emigrated to America in 1770, began to preach to the Third Parish 
Church in Roxbury in 1771, and, July 6, 1772, was installed as its pastor. He held this 
relation for fourteen years. He was elected chaplain to the Provincial Congress, May 4, 
1775, an d tnat b°dy voted him a horse to use in the service, and gave him free access to 
all the prisoners of war. It also commissioned him to procure the letter-books of Gov. 
Hutchinson, then in the possession of Capt. McLane, of Milton. Mr. Gordon was a 
thorough patriot, but blunt, harsh, and injudicious. April 2, 1778, he was dismissed from 
the office of provincial chaplain for his violent expressions in regard to a part of the 
proposed constitution of Massachusetts. John Adams said of him, " He is an eternal 
talker, and somewhat vain, and not accurate or judicious." 

He left America for London, March 17, 1786, that he might publish his history of 
the American Revolution on more favorable terms than in this country. The work was 
issued in London in 1788. He died at Ipswich, England, Oct. 19, 1807, aged seventy- 
seven years. 



, Aug. 26 a committee of thirty-six persons was chosen to take a census of 

[ l ~7'~7\), the people of the town. Eleven of this committee were members of the 
' ' Artillery Company, and one third of the jury selected for the trial and con- 

demnation of vessels, Sept. 5, were members of the Company, Timothy Pickering, Esq., 
being the judge. Sept. 9 the town clerk announced to the inhabitants that, agreeably 
to their recommendation, the General Assembly had appointed Henry Bromfield colonel, 
Thomas Dawes (1754) lieutenant-colonel, Ephraim May (1765) major, William Dawes, 
Jr. (1768), second major of the regiment of militia in the town of Boston. 

At this time, according to the report of the committee chosen Aug. 26, there were 
" 535 of tne Inhabitants . . . now in the Continental Service, 206 in the Colony, and 
166 in the Sea Service, making in all 907 persons in the service of their Country." 

Upon all the working committees of this eventful period the Artillery Company was 
constantly represented, and its members were active in the affairs of the town and the 
colony. 

The General Court having ordered a draft, as a reinforcement for the Continental 
Army, at or near New York, the selectmen of Boston executed the order, Dec. 18 and 19, 
1776. Two hundred and sixty-nine persons were drafted, of whom the following-named 
were members of the Artillery Company (those with a * prefixed paid the fine) : — 

•Benjamin Andrews (1754), Samuel Ballard (1755), Capt. Samuel Barrett (1755), 
*Daniel Bell (1733), Capt. William Bell (1756), "Daniel Boyer (1756), Joseph Bradford 
(1740), Capt. Edward Carnes (1755), Capt. Caleb Champney (1762), *John Coburn 
(1751), *Amasa Davis (1786), Major William Dawes, Jr. (1768), "Benjamin 



1 88 • HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [■ 777-8 

Edes (1760), Joshua Farrington (1786), *Stephen Gore (1773), Thomas Greenough 
(1744), John Haskins (1768), *John Head (1757), *William Homes (1747), Gol. 
Joseph Jackson (1738), *John Lucas (1786), *Ephraim May (1765), John May (1786), 
Moses Peck (1758), Benjamin Phillips (1755), Joseph Pierce (1769), Edward Proctor 
(1756), *William Shattuck (1787), Capt. John Simpkins (1769), Capt. Jonathan Stod- 
dard (1765), Andrew Symmes (1734), *Edward Tuckerman (1765), John Waldo 
('739). J ohn Welch (i73 6 )> *Samuel Whitwell (1755), Charles Williams (1768), 
*Jonathan Williams, Esq. (1729). 

Under the act passed Nov. 14, 1776, no station in life, place, employment or office, 
exempted any person from serving in arms for the defence of the country, except 
those persons who had, before April 19, 1775, been by law deemed to be of the denomi- 
nation of Christians called Quakers, clergymen, teachers, and undergraduates of Harvard 
College, Indians, negroes, and mulattoes, should not be held to take up arms or procure 
any person to do it in their room. One quarter of the able-bodied male persons within 
the State, not in actual military service, from sixteen years old and upwards, were to be 
drafted, to march at a moment's notice, and to serve for a term not exceeding three 
months. The fine for non-service was ten pounds. 



T h-,1-,1-, Capt. Jonathan Williams (1729) was chairman of the committee to 

1 ///• express the thanks of the town to Benjamin Hitchbume, Esq., for his 
"spirited oration," delivered March 5, 1777, "to commemorate the horrid 
massacre perpetrated March 5, 1770, by a party of soldiers of the Twenty-Ninth Regi- 
ment," and was also chairman of the committee authorized to select a person to deliver 
an oration March 5, 1778. Capt. Williams (1729) was also moderator of the meeting, 
and received the thanks of the town for "his good services." 

April 2, a committee was appointed to take the names of such persons in Boston 
as "are suspected as being inimical to the States of America." May 19 the list was 
made public. It contains twenty-nine names ; among them are those of the following 
members of the Artillery Company : Benjamin Phillips (1755) an d Hopestill Capen 
(1763). A jury was drawn, May 22, for the trial of these suspected persons in a 
special court. It consisted of six persons, of whom Jeremiah Belknap joined the 
Artillery Company in 1745, Edward Carnes in 1755, and John Newell in 1768. 

The people of Boston suffered greatly in 1777. Five hundred persons in Boston, 
of the families of such as were in the Continental Army, were in suffering circumstances. 
Donations were gladly received. Hon. Viscount Demauroy, brigadier-general of the 
French army, gave one hundred dollars for the soldiers' wives and children. Col. 
Nathaniel Barber (1758), Thomas Dawes (1754), and Ezekiel Price were appointed to 
express to Gen. Demauroy the thanks of the town for his donation. 



q Oct. 16, 1778, the Assembly passed an act " to prevent the return to this 

[ / / O. State of certain persons named therein, and others who have left this State, 

* * or either of the United States, and joined the enemy." A hundred and fifty 

residents of Boston are named in the act, and about the same number from other towns 

in the State. Among them are the following-named members of the Artillery Company : 



i 77g _8i] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 189 

Martin Gay ( 1 761), founder ; Edward Lyde (1758), merchant ; John Gore, Esq. (1743) ; 
Adino Paddock, Esq. (1762) ; John Joy (1755), housewright ; also, Isaac Royall, Esq. 
(1750), of Medford ; Josiah Edson, Jr., Esq. (1747), of Bridgewater. Few indeed 
were the members of the Artillery Company who deserted the colonial cause and sought 
protection under the British ensign. 



In 1779, tne following-named officers of Col. Craft's (1765) train of 
[ VVQ. artillery were members of the Artillery Company: captain, Turner Phillips 
1 ' y (1786); lieutenants, John Grant, Jr. (1769), Daniel Bell (1733), Benjamin 
Edes (1760). 

The line officers in the regiment of militia in Boston were, in that year : captains, 
Nathaniel Heath (1765), Caleb Champney (1762), John Stutson (1765), Robert Davis 
(1786), Sarson Belcher (1765), Jacob Williams (1768), Edward Kneeland (1772), Levi 
Jennings (1764) ; lieutenants, John Wells (1765), 'William Todd, Jr. (1773), Russell 
Sturgis (1786), Israel Loring (1768), Alexander Hodgdon (1786), Mannasseh Marston 
(1769-), Joseph Ford (1786), and John Wise (1774). 

The officers of the Light Infantry Company in Boston in 1779 were : John Hinkley 
(1772), captain; John Coolidge (1786), second lieutenant ; Zechariah Hicks (1786), 
third lieutenant, and Capt. John May (1786), adjutant. 

Of the Brigade Train of Artillery in 1779, Thomas Bumstead (1764) was captain, 
with the rank of major, and William Miller (1770) was first lieutenant, with the rank 

of captain. 

■• 

n " Boston, November 8, 1 78 1. The late important and pleasing account 

J yX J < of the victory of the allied forces over the British army commanded by 
• Earl Cornwallis in Virginia, induced the inhabitants of Boston to devote 

last Monday to demonstrations of gratitude and joy. 

"The day was ushered in by discharges of cannon from the Castle, the other forts 
in the harbour, the ships of his most Christian Majesty and other armed vessels in the 
road ; and a general ringing of the bells in the town. 

" In the forenoon several churches were opened for public worship in prayer and 
thanksgiving, which were expressed in the presence of crowded audiences ; a generous 
collection was then made for the families of those soldiers of this town, who were 
engaged in the Continental army for three years or during the war. 

" At noon the Council and a great number of other gentlemen, French and Amer- 
icans, met at the Council Chamber, and drank to healths and sentiments becoming the 
happy occasion, when the forts and ships again repeated their salutes. 

" At three o'clock his Excellency, the Governor, gave an elegant dinner at the Bunch 
of Grapes tavern in State Street, at which were present the Hon. gentlemen of the 
Council, the Hon. the Consul of France, the Hon. the Commander of the French ships 
and the French officers, many gentlemen of the Town and strangers of distinction. 

"After dinner toasts were drank, each accompanied with 13 discharges of cannon, 
by the train of artillery commanded by Major Miller [1770]. 

" The greater part of the gentlemen after dinner attended at the Seat of his Excel- 
lency, the Governor's, to pay their compliments to his Excellency's Lady, where they 



19° HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[1782 



found a brilliant assembly of Ladies, and preperations for a Ball in the most beautiful 
economy. 

"After tea the evening was pass'd in the most innocent, graceful and pleasing 
amusements. 

" His Excellency the Governor's [house] his Honor the Lieutenant Governor's, the 
State House, and other public buildings were beautifully illuminated in the evening. In 
the front of his Excellency's house, fireworks were display'd as usual on all events which 
promise happiness and prosperity to the country." ' 

"Boston, November 19, 1781. Upon the glorious and memorable occasion of the 
complete conquest and capture of the British army, under Lord Cornwallis, by the allied 
forces in Virginia, the Hon. Consul General of France, gave a ball last Monday night to 
the Governor and Council, the Commodore and officers of His Most Christian Majesty's 
ships in this harbor, the American officers, and a great number of the principal ladies 
and gentlemen of the town. The Consul opened the ball with the Lady of his Excel- 
lency the Governor. Everything was conducted with the greatest decorum ; and the 
whole appearance was brilliant. The joy of the evening was particularly heightened by 
the mutual glow of friendship between the two nations, which sparkled in every coun- 
tenance on this happy occasion." ' 

Monday afternoon, Dec. 12, 1781, the Honorable Major-General, the Marquis de la 
Fayette, with his suite arrived in Boston from the southward. The arrival of this illus- 
trious commander was announced by the ringing of the several bells in town and every 
other demonstration of joy. 



q "Boston, September 21, 1782. The Colonel of the Boston Regiment of 

I 7(52. Militia, would notify the inhabitants that the alarm list will be called upon in 
a short time and whoever is then found deficient will be prosecuted without 
discrimination, (except those who are unable — ). The articles according to the militia 
Act are now inserted, that none may plead ignorance, viz : A good Fire-arm with steel or 
iron ramrod and a spring to retain the same : A worm, priming wire and brush : A 
bayonet fitted to the gun, a scabbard and a belt: A pouch holding not less than 15 
pounds cartrages : 6 flints : One pound powder : 40 lead balls fitted to his gun : A 
knapsack and blanket : A canteen or wooden bottle sufficient to hold one quart. 

"Edward Proctor Esq. [1756], Colonel. Joseph Webb Esq. [1761] Lieutenant 
Colonel. John May, Esq. [1786], Major." 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1782, in the Transcript made by Mr. 
Whitman (1810), is preceded by the following note : — 

" N. B. The following was never recorded in the Company's Book, and was recently 
discovered in a bundle of old papers, supposed to belong to Deacon Samuel Barrett 
[i755]> deceased. The original is placed as well as can be in the old transcript Record 
Book, and now transcribed in its proper chronological order. 

" Boston, Oct. 14th, 1826. Attest : Z. G. Whitman, Clerk." 

' Boston Newspaper. 



i 7 8 2 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 191 

The record referred to in the above note is as follows : — 

" At a Meeting of the Members of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Com- 
pany at Deacon Jones [1754], May 30TH 1782. 

"Present. Captain William Bell [1756], Chairman, Joseph Jackson Esq. [1738], 
Jonathan Williams [1729], John Welch [1736], Samuel Barrett [1755], Asa Stoddard 
[1765], John Stutson [1765], Daniel Rea [1770], Abraham Hunt [1772], William Rogers 
[1765], Benjamin Edes [1760], Ephraim May [1765], William Dawes [1760], Ebenezer 
Torrey [1765], Stephen Gore [1773], Samuel Belknap [1773], John Fullerton [1768], 
Joseph Spear [(Jr.) 1774], Edward Kneeland [1772], Daniel Jones [1754], Manasseh 
Marston [1769], John Hinkley [1772], Josiah Waters [1747], Jacob Williams [1768J, 
Israel Loring [1768]. 

" Voted, That Benjamin Edes [1760] officiate as Clerk this Evening. 

" Voted, That a Committee be appointed to wait on the Secretary to obtain a copy 
of the Charter of this Company. 

" Voted, That the committee consist of three. 

"Voted, That Capt. Samuel Barrett [1755], Capt William Bell [1756] and Mr. 
Benjamin Edes [1760] be the Committee. 

"Voted, That the same Committee wait on the Treasurer of this Company, examine 
his accounts, and make report at the Adjournment. 

" Voted, That this Meeting be adjourned to Monday the 17th day of June next, 
then to meet at this Place ; and that the above Committee give Notice thereof in the 
publick prints. The Meeting was adjourned accordingly. 

" At the Adjournment of the Meeting of the Ancient & Honorable Artillery Company 
at Deacon Jones' June 17th 1782. Present, Capt William Bell [1756], Chairman, Joseph 
Jackson [1738], John Welch [1736], Samuel Barrett [1755], Samuel Belknap [1773], 
John Deming [1756], Daniel Jones [1754], Benjamin Edes [1760], Jacob Gill [1774], 
Thomas Russell [1769], Joseph Eaton [1773], Joseph Spear Jr. [1774], Josiah Waters 
[1747], Josiah Waters, Jr [1769], John Stutson [1765], Daniel [Stephen] Gore [1773]. 

" The Committee appointed at the meeting on the 30th of May last, to obtain a 
Copy of the Charter and examine the Treasurer's accounts, made Report, that they had 
performed said service and laid before the Company a Copy of said Charter -attested by 
the Secretary : and an Account current between the Treasurer and the Company, as fol- 
lows, viz : (See the Copy of the Charter & then the Treasurer's Account to follow here to 
save transcribing). On motion made and seconded, Voted unanimously That the Report 
of the Committee be accepted. On motion made by Col. Josiah Waters, Jun. [1769] 
and seconded, That a Committee be appointed to take up the Affairs of the Company, 
at large, from its first institution to the present Time ; to be particular in enquiring into 
the state of the Company's Debts, and in what manner the Securities stand ; to obtain 
a correct list of the Company ; and to report to the Company, as soon as may be, the 
State of their Affairs ; and recommend what it may be best for them further to do, as to 
its further establishment and prosperity. 

"Voted, That Capt Samuel Barrett [1755], Col Thomas Dawes [1754], Capt. 
William Bell [1756], Mr. Robert Jenkins [1756] and Col Joseph Jackson [1738] be 
the Committee. 

" Voted, That the necessary expenses which may arise in procuring any papers or 
advice which may be necessary, be defreyed by the Company from the Monies now in 
the hands of the Treasurer. 



192 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7 8 5 

" Voted, That as soon as the Committee are ready to report, they give Notice 
to the Company by advertizing in the public Papers, or otherwise as to them may 
seem best. 

"Voted, That the Books and Papers of the Company, together with the Report of 
the Committee made this evening be delivered to the Committee appointed to take up 
the Affairs of the Company at large, for their use and aid in the Prosecution of their 
appointment. Benj. Edes, Clerk, pro-tem. 

"Boston June 21 st 1782. To Capt Samuel Barrett [1755], chairman of the Com- 
mittee of the Anc. & Hon. Artillery Company. 

" N. B. No copy is taken of this : therefore be pleased to be very careful of it, till 
recorded. 1 B. Edes, Clerk. 

" The Charter & Treasurer's Accounts accompanies this. 

" B — E — Clerk, pro- tern." 

The committee, according to the last vote passed May 30, 1782, inserted the fol- 
lowing " Notice " in the public prints, June 10 and 17, to wit : — 

" Monday, June 3, 1782. The Surviving Members of the ancient and honorable 
Artillery Company are hereby notified that their Meeting stands adjourned to Monday 
the 17th of June, at 5 o'clock p. m., then to meet at the American Coffee House —at 
which Time and Place, the members are requested to give their punctual attendance, to 
receive the Report of their Committee on Matters of Importance to the Company." 



q In 1785, Col. Andrew Symmes (1760) and Major John Boyle (1769) 

[ 7() v were on the staff of Gov. Hancock. Robert Davis (1786) was captain- 
' *J lieutenant, with rank of captain, of the train of artillery in Boston ; Edward 
Curtis (1786) was second lieutenant, and William Bird (1787) was adjutant. Joseph 
Webb, Jr. (1761), was colonel of the Boston regiment, and John May (1786), lieu- 
tenant-colonel; John Wise (1774) was promoted to be captain. 

In 1785, the military spirit in and around Boston began to show itself, and that 
emulation for perfection in military exercise which existed before the Revolution dis- 
played itself throughout the State. 

June 15, 1785, " His Excellency, the minister of war," at New York, was pleased to 
direct that the uniform of the troops raised, and to be raised, for the frontier service " be 
blue, faced and lined with white, for the infantry; and blue, faced and lined with red, for 
the artillery ; the cockade to be black." Discarding the union cockade did not seem to 
meet with general approbation. 

It was announced, Aug 3, 1785, that " a company of Independent Cadets, composed 
principally of young gentlemen in the mercantile line," had been lately formed in Boston, 
and several other companies and troops of horse were being formed in various parts 
of the country. 

Aug. 25, 1785, a company of grenadiers and a troop of light dragoons were formed 
at the American Coffee House, Boston. 

1 The original minutes of these meetings, as written by Benjamin Edes (1760), are in the archives of 
the Artillery Company; but the copy of the chatter and the treasurer's accounts are presumably lost. 




y 



OLD FLAG OF THE ARTILLERY COMPANY 



1786] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 193 

qs Oct. 10, 1786, the Independent Light Infantry met, and began their drill 

[ VoO. w ' 1 ^ S reat spirit. This company became known as the "Independent Boston 
' Fusileers," which was incorporated May n, 1787; its first regular parade 

taking place July 4, 1787, when the adoption of the new Federal Constitution was cele- 
brated. It paraded in the escort and reception of Gen. Washington in Boston in 1789; 
was the body-guard of Gen. Hancock during the greater part of his administration ; sole 
escort to the governor at the laying of the corner-stone of the State House in 1795, and 
has been prominent in the military displays of Boston for a century. Motto, "Aui 
vificere, aut mori." 

In 1786, the people were suffering from the results of an eight years' war. The 
country had been drained by taxation ; public credit was nearly extinct ; trade depressed ; 
manufactures ceased ; paper money was well-nigh worthless ; debts, great and many, 
rested on the country, the commonwealth, the town, and the people. There was wide- 
spread disaffection. The complaints of the people were stated as "grievances" in a 
convention which met at Hatfield, Aug. 22, 1786. 

Inconsequence of this state of affairs, in the fall of 1786 bodies of armed men 
interfered with the sitting of the county courts. This was the origin of the rebellion 
against the constituted government in Massachusetts, called " Shays' Rebellion." His fol- 
lowers claimed that the salary of the governor was too high, the State senate was aristo- 
cratic, the lawyers extortionate, taxes burdensome, and money scarce. They demanded 
paper money a legal tender, and that the General Court should be moved from Boston. 
In December, 1786, Daniel Shays appeared at Worcester with an armed force, also at 
Springfield, and prevented the holding of the courts at those places. The State forces, 
under Capt. Shepard and Gen Lincoln (1786), made short work of the rebellion, and 
scattered the rebels. 

It was in this "emergency of publick affairs" that the Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery Company volunteered its service for the maintenance of law and order. They 
were ready for field service. The necessary arrangements were made. Col. Waters 
(1769) was appointed adjutant, and John Warren, M. D., a celebrated surgeon, was 
appointed surgeon to the Company. No detailed account of their service exists, but 
they did all that the State asked of them. The rebellion was crushed before it had 
gathered sufficient unity or strength to seriously endanger the public welfare. 

The following newspaper items throw some light on the part taken by the Ancient 
and Honorable Artillery Company in the stirring events of that time : — 

" Boston, Saturday October 28, 1786. The Ancient and Honorable Artillery Com- 
pany, under Major Bell [1760], the Independent Light Infantry under Capt Otis, have 
offered their services as volunteers. To them and to the Independent Cadets much credit 
is due for the alacrity with which, at their own expense, they have furnished themselves 
with the necessary equipage, and the zeal they discover for endeavoring to secure to the 
good people of this Commonwealth the quiet enjoyment of their constitutional rights." 

"Boston, Wednesday Nov. r, 1786. We are told, that his Excellency, the Captain 
General, has acquainted Major Gen Brooks [1786] that he will this day at twelve oclock, 
at Cambridge, review the troops under his command, now assembled at that place, which 
we are told amount to about 1300, composing two regiments of Infantry, three companies 
of artillery and a troop of horse. We are likewise told that the Independent Cadets, 
Light Infantry, &c, from this town, will attend the review." 



194 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [ I? 86 

"Boston, Wednesday, Nov. i, 1786. Of Tuesday, — of Cambridge — and the 
Supreme Court — and the Insurgents — and the military of every description — the 
Cadets — the Artillery — the Light Infantry — and the camp equipage &c. &c. &c, — 
which have engrossed the attention of all orders, degrees and conditions, from Thursday 
morning until Monday night — what must we say? — That Tuesday came — that the 
Court sat — that the military, to the amount of 1300, like Caesar, veni, vidi, via, — came, 
saw (nothing) and overcame all opposition — that everything wore the appearance of a 
brilliant parade — and that the Insurgents were not to be found." 

" Boston, Saturday, November 4, 1786. This being the week for the Supreme Court 
to sit at Cambridge, his Excellency the Governor thought fit to order a military force of 
three regiments of Middlesex militia, and several companies of artillery to march to that 
place to protect them. On Wednesday morning, the General having given the proper 
orders, sent an invitation to the Supreme Court, requesting their company at the review 
of the troops, there assembled for their defence. By noon the line was formed, extend- 
ing from the church in Cambridge, across the Common, near a mile, and composed, 
besides the several corps already mentioned, of the following from the first division, who 
were ordered by the Captain General to march to Cambridge, in order for a review with 
the troops there assembled, viz : The Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, under 
Major Bell [1756]; Lieut Col Bradfords Independent Cadets; Captain Otis's Light 
Infantry ; and Major Gibb's Light Horse ; Major Spooners Company of Artillery from 
Roxbury and Colonel Bedlams Artillery from Dorchester. 

" About half past twelve o'clock General Jackson, who, we are told, is appointed 
Adjutant General of the State, arrived at Cambridge to acquaint the General of the 
approach of his Excellency, who arrived about one o'clock at the University, accom- 
panied by the Hon. Council, the French and Dutch Consuls, Major North, and several 
other gentlemen in the civil and military line. The Captain General being informed by 
Col Hull [1788], who cheerfully undertook, and with great skill, executed the office of 
Adjutant- General, that the troops were in readiness, proceeded to the review. 

" On his Excellency's arrival on the right of the line, he received a federal salute 
from Major Spooner's artillery : after which he reviewed the troops in the following 
order : — 

"Major Gibb's horse ; on the right of which were the Major General, his aids, &c : 
Lieutenant Colonel Bradfords Independent Cadets and Volunteers ; Captain Otis's Light 
Infantry ; Artillery ; Capt Kents new raised corps ; Ancient and Honorable ; Major 
Spooners ; Major Badlams ; Charlestown company under Major Calder ; Major Browns 
Infantry; Colonel Grants regiment (the 1") ; Colonel Lamson's (the 3 d ) and Colonel 
Bryants (the 2 ni ) which formed the left of the line. 

" After this review, his Excellency and suite went to the Court House, and again 
reviewed the troops on their march into town, from whence they immediately returned 
to the parade." 

"Boston, Wednesday, November 29. 1786. The following division orders, we are 
told, were issued by Major General Lincoln [1786] on Monday last : — 

" The Major General directs that at the moment, authentic information shall be 
received (which will be announced by the discharge of three cannon on Fort Hill) that 
the insurgents are embodying themselves at Cambridge, the Independent Cadets, Inde- 
pendent Light Infantry, and the Republican volunteers are to take post at the south end 



i 7 86] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 1 95 

of Charles River Bridge : These corps are to be relieved as soon as possible by the 
regiment in this town. The Company of Artillery will take post with them at the Bridge ; 
the corps relieved will advance to Charlestown neck. The Horse are to be in advance, 
one division of them is to take post on the road leading from Cambridge to Medford. 
The Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company will take post at the fortification." 

On Saturday, Dec. 2, 1786, it was announced in the Boston press that the corps of 
Volunteer horse, under the command of Col. Hitchborn, had safely returned, after 
having achieved the object of their expedition by the capture of Shattuck, Parker, and 
Page, " who have been indefatigable fomenters of sedition in the county of Middlesex." 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1786 were: John Avery, Jr., 
Jonathan Balch, Ebenezer Battelle, William Bordman, Jr., Joseph Coffin Boyd, John 
Brazer, John Brooks, William Brown, Thomas Clark, John Coolidge, Andrew Cunning- 
ham, William Cunningham, Edward Curtis, Isaac Davenport, Amasa Davis, Caleb Davis, 
Robert Davis, Samuel Emery, Joshua Farrington, Joseph Ford, Richard Gardner, Samuel 
Gore, Francis Green, Samuel Greenough, Samuel Hastings, Zechariah Hicks, Alexander 
Hodgdon, John Johnston, James Lanman, Benjamin Lincoln, John Lucas, John May, 
Jonas Clark Minot, Thomas Newell, Jr., Andrew Oliver, Turner Phillips, Henry Prentiss, 
Russell Sturgis, Samuel Todd, Pepperell Tyler, Thomas Wells, John Winslow. 

John Avery, Jr. (1786), of Boston, son of John and Mary Avery, was born Sept. 2, 
1739. His father was a justice in Boston. John, Jr. (1786), graduated at Harvard 
College in 1759. He was published to marry (1) Miss Mary Cushing, March 23, 1769, 
ajid-(^_HarrietAV-illiamv'March-2^-i-7-99C He was a member of the West Church, and 
held the office of deacon. Oct. 25, 1774, he was one of the ten persons added to the 
committee " to consider of Ways & Means for employing the poor Sufferers by the 
operation of the Boston Port Bill, so called." In 1780, he succeeded Samuel Adams as 
secretary of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and held that office until his decease. 
He was also secretary of the Massachusetts Humane Society, and was buried on the day 
of its semi-annual meeting. Their orator, in the midst of his discourse, alluded to the 
funeral knell which called them to pay their respects to their worthy officer, " an early, 
active, and important member of the society." Sept. 21, 1793, he was recording secre- 
tary of the Massachusetts Society for the Promotion of Agriculture. He resided on 
" Newbury Street, corner Sheaf's lane," now corner Washington and Avery streets. He 
died at Boston, June 7, 1806, aged sixty-seven years. 

"Died on Saturday last, John Avery Esq. [1786] Secretary of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts aged 67 years. 

" The two Houses of the Legislature, after an expression of their grief for the loss 
which the public has sustained in the recent demise of the late Secretary of the Com- 
monwealth, Voted unanimously to attend his funeral and to invite Gov. Strong, Lieut 
Gov. Robbins and the Honorable Council to attend the same." 

The formation of the funeral procession is then given in detail, and the article con- 
cludes as follows : — 

" In all the political changes which have taken place in Massachusetts since the 
adoption of the present constitution in 1780, such has been the sense of all parties of the 
rectitude and ability with which Mr. Avery [1786] has discharged all the duties of Secre- 

John Avery, Jr. (1786). Authority: Boston Records. 



l 9& HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND j-, 7 g 6 



tary of State that, if our memory serves us, in all that period he has been annually unani- 
mously elected to that office. In all the social and domestic duties, he was a man of 
superior excellence." ' 

Jonathan Balch (1786) was a pump and block maker in Boston. He "was the 
proprietor of a large establishment, as pump and block maker, at the head of Balch's 
Wharf, at the north part of the town. For a long time he stood at the head of all that fol- 
lowed the same business. He was a man of considerable wealth, and (what was rare for 
a mechanic of those days) owned and occasionally occupied a mansion-house and garden 
in the country. [This estate was in Dorchester, and was afterward owned by Mr. 
Marshall P. Wilder (1828).] He was one of the most substantial of citizens and main- 
tained through life a character for honesty and integrity. He lived liberally, and con- 
tributed much to the elevation and standing of the mechanics by his promptness in 
business and gentlemanly deportment." 

His place of business was on Balch's Wharf, and he lived in Hawkins Street. A 
Jonathan Balch joined the Old South Church April 7, 1765; Jonathan (1786) was 
second sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1792. 

Ebenezer Battelle (1786), — the name is spelled Battle in the early Dedham records, 
— of Dedham, son of Col. Ebenezer and Prudence (Draper) Battelle, was born in that 
town, Feb. 4, 1754, and was baptized "in private, the child being sick," in the First 
Church, by Rev. Samuel Dexter, Feb. 15 next following. Dec. 25, 1774, it is recorded in 
the admissions to that church, " Ebenezer Battle, Jr., student of Harvard College." He 
graduated from that institution in 1775, and married Anna Durant, of Boston. "Ebenezer, 
son of Ebenezer Battle, Esq. [1786], and Anna his wife," was born in Dedham, Aug. 9, 
1778, nearly two years after the death of Col. Ebenezer Battelle. At that time, though 
but twenty-four years of age, Ebenezer Battelle (1786) must have been a man of prom- 
inence and ability to have been called " Esquire " in the town records. The father and 
son served in the Revolutionary War. Ebenezer, Sr., was captain of a Dedham company 
which marched in answer to the alarm of April 19, 1775, and Ebenezer, Jr. (1786), was 
a volunteer at the battle of Lexington. Subsequent to the death of the father, Nov. 6, 
1776, Ebenezer, Jr. (1786), served nineteen days at Castle Island, Dec. 11 to Dec. 30, 
1776; went on the expedition to Providence, R. I., May 8 to July 8, 1777 ; re-enlisted, 
and served from March 23 to April 5, 1778, and was commissioned captain of the Eighth 
Company in the Suffolk Regiment, July 2, 1778. He was promoted to be major, April 1, 

1780, and became colonel of the Boston regiment in 1784. 

The time of his removal to Boston is unknown. Feb. 1, 1785, it is announced in the 
Columbian Centinel that "Ebenezer Battelle [1786] has removed his book-store from 
State Street to No. 10 Marlborough Street," and March 9, 1785, that newspaper adver- 
tises, " Now selling at the Boston book-store, opposite the southeast corner of the State 
House, from where E. Battelle, Esq. [1786], has lately removed, an assortment of books," 
etc. He probably removed to Boston soon after the birth of his son Thomas, March 18, 

1781, as the birth-dates of his children born afterward are not recorded in Dedham. 

Jonalhan Balch (17861. Authorities: Bos- Ebenezer Battelle (1786). Authorities: 

ton Records; Annals of Mass. Char. Mech. Asso- Boston Records; Mass. Rev. Archives; Battelle 
ciation. Gen. Record, 1889. 

1 Columbian Centinel, June 11, 1806. 



1786] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 1 97 

The following receipt, on file in Boston, is printed in the Record Commissioner's 
Report, No. 25 :— • _ "Boston Sept. 18. 1781. 

" Received of the Selectmen of Boston four hundred & forty Shirts, 440 pr Hose, 
440 pr. Shoes — 220 Blankets on behalf of said Town, agreable to a Resolve of the 
General Court passed June 22 d , 1781. Ebenezer Battelle, ' Agent." 

Jan. 10, 1786, Gens. Rufus Putnam and Benjamin Tupper issued a public notice 
in the Boston press, for the formation of "The Ohio Company," and in that year 
Gen. Putnam made the first survey of lands northwest of the Ohio River. In November, 
1787, he was appointed superintendent of the affairs of the Ohio Company, and active 
measures were taken for the settlement of these distant lands. In April, 1788, the 
westward movement began, when, under the direction of the Ohio Company, a party of 
forty emigrants, with their families, chiefly from Massachusetts, established the first per- 
manent white settlement in Ohio. Col. Ebenezer Battelle (1786), a member of the 
Ohio Company, and family, were of this pioneer party, and were among the founders of 
Marietta in May, 1788. He died at Newport, Ohio, in 1815, at the home of his son 
Ebenezer. His remains were buried in the village churchyard, at Newport, where lie the 
remains of many of his descendants of three generations. Anna (Durant) Battelle was 
buried at sea. 

William Bordman, Jr. (1786), merchant, of Boston, son of Capt. William Bord- 
man (1758) and Susanna, his wife, was born May 1, 1760. He married, June 2, 1785, 
Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Caleb Davis (1786). She died Dec. 14, 1790. In 1789, 
his store was on the north side of the market, and he lived on Sudbury Street; in 1796, 
he was in business on Merchants Row, and he lived on Hanover Street. He also was 
identified with the militia, and rose to the grade of captain in the Boston regiment in 
1784. His brother, Thomas Stoddard Bordman, joined the Artillery Company in 1774. 

Capt. Bordman (1786) became a member of the Massachusetts Lodge, A. F. and 
A. M., of Boston, Feb. 8, 1790. 

Joseph Coffin Boyd (1786), merchant, of Boston, was captain of a company in the 
Boston regiment in 1791. He removed to Portland, where he became captain of a 
company of volunteers, and died in May, 1823, aged sixty-three years, while holding the 
office of treasurer of the State of Maine. 

Mr. Boyd (1786) was admitted a member of Portland Lodge, A. F. and A. M., of 
Portland, Feb. 10, 1795, at the time of its reorganization. He was then elected secretary, 
and served until Jan. 20, 1802, when a memorandum on the records states "the secretary 
will be absent for awhile." He was present, however, March 17, 1802, and very soon 
after sailed for France. 

John Brazer (1786), shopkeeper, of Boston, son of Benjamin and Alice (Phillips) 
Brazer, was born in Charlestown, April 8, 1753. He married (published Sept. 20, 1774) 
Mary Grubb. In early life he learned the trade of ship carpentry, but after the Revolu- 

William Bordman, Jr. (1786). Authority: Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, gives 

Boston Records. this name as Ebenezer Brattle. It has occasioned 

John Brazer (1786). Authorities: Wy- great inconvenience and misunderstanding. In the 

man's Charlestown Genealogies and Estates; Whit- original record book of the Artillery Company for 

man's Hist. A. and H. A. Company; Early Masonic 1786 may be seen the autographs of those persons 

Records. who joined the Company that year, and among 

1 Mr. Whitman (1810), in his history of the them is plainly written, " Eben' Battelle." 



198 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 7 86 

tion he kept store. From 1775 until the close of the war he resided in Cambridge ; after- 
ward in Boston. His place of business was, in 1789 at No. 3, and in 1796 at No. 1, Dock 
Square. He lived over the last-named store. He was third sergeant of the Artillery 
Company in 1789, ensign in 1794, the third captain of the Independent Fusileers, 
serving in 1797-9, also in 1802-3, a "d was captain of the sublegion of light infantry in 
1800, 1804, and 1805. "He was an eccentric character, a violent partisan, wealthy, and 
a great patron of the drama." He was the principal originator of the Second Universa- 
list Church in Boston, which was incorporated Dec. 13, 18 16, and held its first public 
meeting Jan. 25, 1817. In the latter year, a meeting house was erected by it in School 
Street, where the School Street Block now stands, nearly opposite City Hall Capt. 
Brazer (1786) was identified with the church until his decease, which occurred May 7, 
1828, aged seventy-five years. He was a member of the Masonic Fraternity. Jan. 8, 
1784, he attended the constitution of King Solomon's Lodge, A. F. and A. M.,at Charles- 
town, and June 2, 1791, he is given, in the return of officers of Rising States Lodge, as 
treasurer of that Lodge. His son-in-law, Lieut. Ezra Davis, joined the Artillery Company 
in 1801, and his grandson, John Brazer Davis, in 1821. 

John Brooks (1786), physician, of Medford, son of Caleb and Ruth (Albree) 
Brooks, was born in Medford in May, 1752. He married, in 1774, Lucy Smith, of Read- 
ing, who died Sept. 26, 1791, aged thirty-eight years. He died March 1, 1825. They 
had three children, two of whom were boys, viz., Alexander S, born Oct. 19, 1781, who 
was killed by the explosion of a steamboat in 1836, and John, born May 20, 1783, who fell 
at the battle of Lake Erie, Sept. 10, 1813. 

John Brooks (1786), son of a farmer, attended the town school, and such was his 
proficiency that Dr. Simon Tufts, a practitioner in Medford, took him, at the age of 
fourteen years, into his family, to educate him for the medical profession. He continued 
until he was twenty-one years old under the tuition of Dr. Tufts, showing meantime a 
a taste for military exercises, with a disposition remarkably gentle and attractive. 

In 1772-3, he settled in the town of Reading, and began the practice of medicine. 
He was married soon after, and set out in life surrounded by flattering circumstances. 
Nevertheless he was quick to hear the mutterings of the approaching storm. A company 
of minute-men was raised in Reading, and he was chosen to command it. On the morn- 
ing of the 19th of April, 1775, Rev. Mr. Foster asked Capt. Brooks (1786), "at sun- 
rise," if he were going to Concord, and when. " Immediately," was the answer. He 
ordered out his company, proceeded to Concord, and, arriving there, met the British on 
their retreat. He hung on their rear and flanks, and followed them until their arrival at 
Charlestown. Col. Phinney says, the British, "a little to the eastward of the village, 
received a heavy fire from the Reading minute-men, under Capt. John Brooks [1786]." 
June 16, 1775, he was active during the night in throwing up entrenchments, and on 
the morrow he was absent from the battle, having been sent, on foot, — as a horse could 
not be had, — by Col. Prescott, to inform Gen. Ward of the expected movement, and the 
need of reinforcements. "The corps he commanded were distinguished during the 
whole war for the superiority of their discipline, evinced by their gallant conduct in 

John Brooks (1786). Authorities: Colum- and Mr. Usher; Memorials of the Mass. Society of 

bian Centinel, March 5, 1825; Quarterly Review, the Cincinnati; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Com- 

Vol. XIV., 1842; New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., pany, Ed. 1842. 
1865; Hists. of Medford, by Mr. Charles Brooks 



1786J HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 1 99 

battle, and by their regular movements in retreat. He was second only to the cele- 
brated Baron Steuben in his knowledge of tactics. After this officer joined our army, 
and was appointed inspector-general, we find that Gen. Brooks [1786] was associated 
with him in the arduous duty of introducing a uniform system of exercise and manoeuvres 
into the army." After the battle of Lexington, he was appointed major in a regiment of 
minute-men, and at the age of twenty-two, a field officer in the Continental line, and rose 
to the rank of lieutenant-colonel. At the close of the war he was discharged with the 
brevet commission of colonel. The regiment was first called "Jackson's Regiment," 
after its colonel, and gained the camp name of the " Bloody Eighth, — the first in, and 
the last out, of battle." This regiment took a distinguished part in the battle of Sara- 
toga, and was then, and during most of the war, commanded by Col. Brooks (1786). 
On the surrender of Burgoyne, Col. Brooks (1786) joined the army under Gen. Washing- 
ton, and suffered all the privations and hardships of Valley Forge. He was actively 
engaged in the battle of White Plains, and, in the memorable battle of Monmouth, he 
was adjutant-general of the advanced column of the army. At the termination of the 
war, Col. Brooks (1786) returned to private life, rich in honor and glory, and universally 
respected and loved. 

Col. Brooks (1786) was a member of the Masonic Fraternity. He was present at 
the quarterly communication of the Massachusetts Grand Lodge, at Freemason's Hall, in 
Boston, March 2, 1781, when he "laid before the Grand Lodge a List of the Officers and 
Members of Washington Lodge for this Year." In that list Col. John Brooks (1786) 
is recorded as master. Washington Lodge was in the American army during the Revo- 
lution, and was, therefore, what is termed " a Travelling Lodge." That Lodge was char- 
tered Oct. 6, 1779, and Gen. William Hull (1788) was its first junior warden. It was 
borne upon the Grand Lodge roll until Dec. 8, 1785, when it was reported as extinct. 
In 1780, Col. Brooks (1786) delivered a Masonic oration at West Point, in the presence 
of Gen. Washington, who, with many officers of the army, were members of the 
Fraternity. 

Upon the organization of the militia, after the war, he was appointed major-general 
of the Middlesex Division, which office he held during ten years. He was the successor 
of Gen. Hull (1788) in the command of that division, a great number of the companies of 
which he assembled on Cambridge Common to be reviewed by the President of the 
United States in 1789. Gen. Washington, after passing, the line, and observing their 
military conduct and appearance, made the complimentary remark to Gen. Brooks 
(1786), in allusion to our final success in the Revolutionary War, "Ah! General, if 
we had had such troops as these, we should have made short work of it." 

In the suppression of Shays' Rebellion he was actively engaged. During the 
War of 1812-4, Gen. Brooks (1786) sustained the arduous and important office of 
adjutant-general of Massachusetts, which office he held until 1816, when he was elected 
governor of Massachusetts. Seven years, successively, he filled this honorable office with 
dignity, impartiality, and energy, at the end of which time he voluntarily declined another 
term. 

Soon after his return from the Revolutionary War, he recommenced the practice of 
medicine in Medford and the adjoining towns. He became interested in the Massachu- 
setts Medical Society in the year 1803, when he was elected counsellor, and in 1808 he 
delivered an anniversary discourse before that society. After his service as governor of 
this commonwealth, he was elected president of the Massachusetts Medical Society. He 



200 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7 86 

was also a representative, senator, councillor, and elector of president and vice-presi- 
dent. He was a delegate to the convention which framed and adopted the federal 
constitution of Massachusetts. He was appointed, by Washington, marshal for this 
district, and subsequently was inspector of revenue. Yale College conferred upon him 
the honorary degree of A. M., in 1781, and Harvard did likewise in 1787. The latter 
also conferred upon him the degree of M. D., in 1810, and of LL. D. in 18 17. He was 
prominent in the Society of the Cincinnati, was elected to deliver the first oration before 
it, July 4, 1787, and on the death of its first president, Gen. Lincoln (1786), Gen. Brooks 
(1786) was elected to that highly honorable office. He was also a member of the 
Academy of Arts and Sciences, president of the Washington Monument Association, of 
the Bunker Hill Monument Association, and of the Bible Society of Massachusetts. 

Major-Gen. Brooks (1786) was the first member admitted into the Artillery Com- 
pany after its revival in 1786, and he was twice elected as commander, namely, in 1787 
and 1794- In the language of Rev. Mr. Deane, in his Artillery sermon in 1816, the first 
public appearance of Gen. Brooks (1786) as governor: "Here we behold the wise and 
virtuous ruler in the midst of his subjects ; like the father of a family, inspiring love and 
respect by his presence, deriving the strength of his government from his sacred regard 
to their happiness, and receiving from them the homage of the heart, and not of com- 
pulsion." 

His final illness was neither long nor painful. He probably caught a severe cold 
while attending the funeral of his successor, Gov. Eustis, whom he survived but a few 
days. He bore his illness calmly, and said, " My case is beyond physicians. I have 
received my orders : I am ready to march." He died at Medford, March 1, 1825, aged 
seventy-three years, and was buried March 3. Medford appeared clad in mourning ; all 
business was suspended ; the shops were closed. His body was carried into the meeting- 
house, which was filled by his townsfolk, of all ages and both sexes, with strangers of 
distinction. Above ninety members of the Artillery Company, in citizens' dress, under 
command of Col. Gibbens (1810), attended the funeral. 

In Gov. Brooks's (1786) family are several commemorative swords. One, called the 
" straight, gilt, scabbard sword," has the following inscription : — 

"To His Excellency John Brooks, commander in chief of the Militia of Massachu- 
setts, and twice Commander of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company : This 
sword is most respectfully presented by that ancient corps, in full confidence that it will 
be wielded with glory and success in war, and be preserved untarnished in peace." 
On the other side is the following : — 

" Presented on the field, in Boston, June 2, 1817, and on the 180th Anniversary of 
the Institution." 

The sword worn by Col. Brooks (1786) in the battle at Saratoga, Oct. 7, 1777, has 
been presented by A. S. Rawson, Esq., to the Massachusetts Historical Society. The 
sword carried by Col. Alexander S. Brooks, through the War of 18 12-4, is preserved. 
The one he wore at the time of his death was captured by his father from a Hessian 
officer in one of the battles of the Revolution. Another sword, belonging to Col. 
Alexander S. Brooks, was given to his son George by his mother. George Brooks was 
a lieutenant in the Second Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, in 1862, at Newbern, N. C. 

John, the son of Gov. Brooks (1786), had a "long, curved sabre" presented to him 
by Lafayette, in Paris. It had a rich sash attached to it. This sabre and sash were on 
his person when killed in the naval battle on Lake Erie. 



i 7 86] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 201 

The granite pyramid which stands in the old burial-ground in Medford bears the 
following inscription : — 

"Sacred to the memory of John Brooks [1786], who was born in Medford, in the 
month of May, 1752, and educated at the town school. He took up arms for his country 
on the 19th of April, 1775. He commanded the regiment which first entered the 
enemies' lines at Saratoga, and served with honor to the end of the war. He was 
appointed Marshal of the District of Massachusetts by President Washington ; and, after 
filling several important civil and military offices, he was, in the year 1816, chosen 
Governor of the Commonwealth, and discharged the duties of that station for seven 
successive years to general acceptance. He was a kind and skilful physician ; a brave 
and prudent officer ; a wise, firm, and impartial magistrate ; a true patriot, a good citizen, 
and a faithful friend. In his manner he was a gentlemen ; in morals, pure ; and in pro- 
fession and practice, a consistent Christian. He departed this life in peace, on the 
1st of March, 1825, aged seventy-three. This monument to his memory was erected by 
several of his fellow-citizens and friends, in the year 1838." 

William Brown (1786), merchant, of Boston, son of William and Mary Brown, was 
born in Boston, Oct. 26, 1763. He resided at the famous " Green Stores," once a place 
of extensive business. They stood on the site of the Williams Market. " In July, 1775, 
when the siege had fairly begun, the work nearest the town mounted eight twenty-four-, 
six twelve-, two nine-, and seven six-pound guns, and was called during the siege, 'The 
Green Store Battery,' from the warehouse of Deacon Brown [1786], painted that color, 
which stood on the site of the Williams Market." 

Lieut. Brown (1786) was a member of Hollis Street Church, and held the office of 
deacon. He was representative for Boston in the General Court, also a senator. " A 
man of common education but of strong mind ; popular and much respected. Although 
not a frequent or elegant speaker, yet his mild manner and perfect knowledge of human 
nature rendered him a powerful legislator. He long prevented the erection of the 
South Boston Free Bridge, while his ingenuity circumvented his adversaries, and 
obtained the bridge above, near his own property, and originated the building of Front 
Street" in 1806-7, which, in 1841, was called Harrison Avenue in honor of Gen. 
Harrison. __ 

Thomas Clark (1786), merchant, of Boston, son of Rev. Jonas Clark, of Lexington, 
who delivered the Artillery election sermon in 1768, was born in Lexington, Sept. 27, 
1 759. 1 He married, in 1782, Sarah Conant, of Charlestown. She died April 16, 1822. 
Mr. Whitman (1810) says, in his history of the Artillery Company, "The first time Capt. 
Clark put on a military coat was to join with the Cadets in firing a salute on the news of 
the surrender of Burgoyne's army." His store, in 1789, was No. 22 Cornhill, now 
Washington Street. 

The Cadets disbanded on the discharge of Col. John Hancock by Gov. Gage, in 
1774. Subsequently, a new company of volunteers was raised; Col. Henry Jackson was 
captain; Benjamin Hichborn, lieutenant, and Perez Morton, ensign. It was called the 
" Independent Company," and went to Newport, R. I., on public service. Capt. Clark 

William Brown (1786). Authorities : Whit- Genealogy; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Com- 

man's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 1842; pany, Ed. 1842; Boston Records. 
Drake's Old Landmarks of Boston. ' Clark Genealogy gives July 6, 1758, as the 

Thomas Clark (1786). Authorities: Clark date. 



202 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7 86 

(1786) was a member of this new company. He also joined the Artillery Company on 
its revival; was its second sergeant in 1787 ; clerk in 1790, 1793-5, 1801-9; lieutenant 
in 1792, and captain in 1796. 

Upon the death of the venerable William Cooper, who had been town clerk of Bos- 
ton for half a century, there were numerous popular candidates of both parties. This 
created a warm struggle. Capt. Clark (1786) had become infirm, and realized little from 
his business of auctioneer to support his large family. Just before election, a few friends 
suggested him as a candidate, with little hope of success ; but no sooner was his name 
announced than the Artillery Company, members and past members, rallied to his sup- 
port, from all parties, and elected him by a decided majority over all. After that he was 
elected without opposition until the organization of the city government, when he was 
assistant city clerk and clerk of the common council. He had a salary of seven hun- 
dred and fifty dollars, and the perquisite of marriage-publishment fees, said to amount to 
one thousand dollars annually. He died at Boston, May 29, 1832, aged seventy-two 
years. 

John Coolidge (1786), tailor, of Boston. During a part of the Revolutionary War 
he was in business in Worcester with his brother-in-law, William Dawes, Jr. (1768). His 
place of business, in 1789, was on Market Square. He became lieutenant in the militia 
in 1779, and was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1791. 

John Coolidge (1786) was a member of the Masonic Fraternity, receiving the 
degrees in the Lodge of St. Andrew in 1779. He attended the festival of St. John the 
Evangelist, in 1778, 1779, and 1780; was present at Grand Lodge on other occasions, 
and, June 2, 1785, was returned to the Grand Body as junior warden of Rising States 
Lodge. 

Andrew Cunningham (1786), merchant, of Boston, son of Major James (1761) and 
Elizabeth (Boylston) Cunningham, was born in Boston, Feb. 16, 1760. He married,' 
Oct. 2, 1783, Polly Lewis, sister of Mary, who married Alexander Hodgdon (1786). He 
was active in town affairs, and served as fireward for several years. He resided at No. 
90 Newbury, now Washington, Street. He was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 
1788, first sergeant in 1795, lieutenant in 1789, and captain in 1793. He was adjutant 
of the Boston regiment from 1787 to 1789 ; quartermaster of the First Division, Massa- 
chusetts Volunteer Militia, from 1789 to 1793, and deputy quartermaster-general from 
1794 to 1801. The latter part of his life he was engaged in the insurance business, being 
secretary and treasurer of the Massachusetts Mutual Fire and Marine Insurance Company 
from its organization, March 2, 1798, until his decease. He died at Elm Hill, Roxbury, 
in August, 1829, aged sixty-nine years. 

William Cunningham (1786), merchant, of Boston, son of Capt. James (1761) and 
Elizabeth (Boylston) Cunningham, was born in Boston. He married Miss Lois May, 
March 1, 1790. His brother, Major Andrew, joined the Artillery Company the same year 
(1786). 

William Cunningham (1786) died in September, 1794, aged forty-seven years. 

John Coolidge (1786). Authorities: Bos- Boston Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. 
ton Records; Early Masonic Records. Company, Ed. 1842. 

Andrew Cunningham (1786). authorities: 



i 7 86] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 203 

Edward Curtis (1786), leather-dresser, of Boston. He married in July, 1787, Polly 
Marshall, of Boston. He lived on Washington Street in 1796. 

Isaac Davenport (1786), merchant, of Boston, son of Samuel Davenport, Jr., of 
Milton, was born in that town Nov. 12, 1753. Samuel, Jr., the father, was on the jury 
that tried Capt. Preston in the case of the Boston Massacre, Nov. 27, 1770. Isaac (1786) 
was published, July 7, 1787, to marry Mary, daughter of Samuel May, of Boston. Mr. 
Davenport (1786) was a partner of John McLean, in Boston, and was an enterprising 
man. He left two children, both daughters. He lived on Orange, now Washington, 
Street. He died in Milton, April 20, 1828. 

Amasa Davis (1786), merchant, of Boston, son of Joshua and Sarah (Pierpont) 
Davis, was born in 1743, and died Jan. 30, 1825, aged eighty-two years. 

Hon. Caleb Davis (1786) and Major Robert Davis (1786) were brothers of Gen. 
Amasa Davis (1786). The last named resided on Orange, now Washington, Street. 
In 1796, his store, house, and lumber-yard were on Orange Street. He was captain of 
the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company in 1795. On the anniversary which closed 
his year of service as captain, he presented to the Artillery Company, by the hands of 
his daughter, Miss Catherine Davis, an elegant standard, that presented by Capt. Barrett 
(1755) having been in constant service since 1771. 

Mr. Davis (1786) was much interested in the militia, and an intimate friend of 
Gov. Hancock. In 1787, he became quartermaster-general of this commonwealth, and 
held that office until his decease, in 1825. His wife, Sarah, died in August, 1794. 

" In this city, Gen. Amasa Davis, at an advanced age. In his death we have 
lost one of our most useful, patriotic, and eminent citizens : and the State an officer 
who sustained the important station of quartermaster-general with distinguished integrity 
and success nearly forty years." ' 

Caleb Davis (1786), merchant, of Boston, son of Joshua and Sarah (Pierpont) 
Davis, was born in 1738, and died July 6, 1797, aged fifty-nine years. His tomb is 
No. 123 on the Common. He married (published Sept. 10, 1760) Hannah Ruggles; 
and was published July 16, 1783, to marry (2) Mary Ann Bant, of Groton, who died 
Jan n, 1787. 

Gen. Amasa Davis (1786) and Major Robert Davis (1786) were brothers of Hon. 
Caleb Davis (1786). His store was 37 State Street, and his dwelling-house on Orange, 
now Washington, Street. He was a member of the Legislature for several years, being 
speaker of the House in 1780-1, and was selected in 1781-2, but resigned; director in 
the Boston branch of the United States Bank in 1793. 

The Columbian Centinel said of him, July 8, 1797 : " It may be said with strict truth, 
that he was a good man ; exemplified the Christian character in the numerous stations 
which he sustained ; served his generation according to the will of God ; rests from his 
labors." 

Isaac Davenport (1786). Authorities: Caleb Davis (1786). Authorities: Boston 

Teele's Hist, of Milton; N. E. Hist, and Gen. Reg., Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, 

1879. Ed. 1842. 

Amasa Davis (1786). Authorities: Boston ' Columbian Centinel, Feb. 2, 1825. 

Records; Whitman's Hist. A. & H. A. Co., Ed. 1842. 



204 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7 S6 

Robert Davis (1786), merchant, "importer of groceries, wines, and liquors," of 
Boston, son of Joshua and Sarah (Pierpont) Davis, was born Jan. 24, 1747, and died 
Nov. 8, 1798. He married (published Oct. 13, 1768) (1) Anna Cotes; and, (2) Oct. 9, 
1776, Mary Farrington, of Dedham. He was a Son of Liberty, a member of the Tea 
Party, and an officer in Col. Crafts's (1765) artillery regiment, taking an active part in 
the expulsion of the' British fleet from the harbor of Boston, and attained the position of 
captain, with the rank of major, of the Suffolk County Brigade of Artillery in 1784. He 
received Lafayette on his arrival in Boston, Oct. 15, 1784, with military honors, and, with 
his command, took part in the procession, Oct. 20, in honor of Lafayette. 

Mr. Davis (1786) received the Masonic degrees in the Lodge of St. Andrew, of 
Boston, in 1777, and attended the festival of St. John the Baptist on June 24 of that 
year. He was a brother of Gen. Amasa (1786) and of Caleb (1786). Robert (1786) 
and Josiah Davis were store-keepers, in partnership, on what is now Washington Street. 
Robert Davis (1786) resided on the same street. 

Samuel Emery (1786). His name does not appear on the Boston Records. He 
never held office in the Artillery Company. 

Joshua Farrington (1786), merchant, son of Jonathan and Prudence Farrington, of 
Dedham, was born (baptized) in that town, Nov. 19, 1749, and was published to marry 
Hannah Jefferds, of Boston, May 13, 1779. He kept a general assortment of West India 
goods, at No. 47 Long Wharf. Robert Davis (1786) married his sister. 

He was identified with the militia of Boston for several years, and rose to the rank 
of lieutenant-colonel. Under general orders of the captain-general, dated Dec. 13, 1787, 
a general court-martial was convened at the Bunch of Grapes tavern, Boston, to inquire 
into the conduct of Lieut.-Col. Farrington (1786), of the Boston regiment, on charges 
exhibited against him by Col. John May (1786), of the First Regiment. In the following 
spring, Lieut.-Col. Farrington (1786) was "displaced," and Col. Winslow (1786) was 
commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the First Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

Col. Farrington (1786) died at Trinidad in February, -1792. 

Joseph Ford (1786) was a shop-keeper in Boston, at No. 65 Cornhill, in 1789, but 
in 1796 had retired, and lived on Eliot Street. He was a son of "Joseph and Perslla 
[Priscilla] Ford," and was born in Braintree, Sept. 18, 1740. Aug. 14, 1772, he had, in 
Boston, a wife named Hannah. He was active in the militia, and rose to the grade of 
captain. 

Capt. Ford (1786) died suddenly, in Boston, Nov. 17, 1797, aged fifty-six years. 

The Columbian Centinel said of him : " He was an irreproachable professor of the 
Christian religion, a sincere friend to his country, and a uniform example of conscien- 
tious, kind, and inoffensive behavior, in all the relations of domestic and public life." 

Richard Gardner (1786), yeoman, of Cambridge, son of Thomas and Joanna (Spar- 
hawk) Gardner, was born about 1757. He married Hannah Goldthwait (published 
March 1, 1780). Richard (1786) was born at his father's residence, "near Union 

Robert Davis (17S6). Authorities: Boston Joseph Ford (17S6). Authorities: Brain- 
Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, tree and Boston Records. 
Ed. 1842; Crane's Tea Leaves of 1 77J. Richard Gardner (1786). Authorities: 

Joshua Farrington (1786). Authority: Swett's Bunker Hill Battle, pp. 40-55; Paige's Hist. 

Dedham Records. of Cambridge, p. 419. 



i 7 86] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 205 

Square, in the southerly parish of Cambridge, which afterwards was the town of 
Brighton." 

Thomas Gardner was commissioned, June 2, 1775, colonel of a regiment which he 
had raised for the Continental Army. He led this regiment into the battle of Bunker 
Hill, where he received a mortal wound. He gave his last injunction upon the field, 
exhorting his men to do bravely, and was carried from the place of danger to one of 
safety. On the way, he was met by his son, a second lieutenant in Capt. Trevett's com- 
pany, of Col. Gridley's battalion of artillery, a youth of nineteen years, who was anxious 
to assist in bearing his father from the field. His heroic father prohibited it, and told 
him to " march on and do his duty." Col. Gardner, a few days after the battle, being 
asked if he was well enough to see his son, "Yes," answered the hero ; " if he has done 
his duty ! " He had the satisfaction to see him, and learn that he bravely distinguished 
himself. 

Col. Gardner lingered until July 3, when he died. On the 5th of July he was buried 
with the honors of war. Gen. Washington took command of the army at Cambridge, 
July 3, and July 4 issued an order in regard to Col. Gardner's burial. Richard's (1786) 
brother, Thomas, was slain in the battle of the 19th of April, 1775. 

Mr. Paige remarks that " no trace is found on the Cambridge records of Col. 
Gardner's parentage, nor the birih-dates of his children, nor do the probate records 
refer to the settlement of his estates." 

Samuel Gore (1786), painter, of Boston, son of John (1743) and Frances (Pink- 
ney) Gore, was born in Boston, Jan. 26, 1750-1. He married, March 10, 1774, Mary 
Pierce, born June 3, 1756, daughter of Joseph (1769) and Sarah Pierce. She died Oct. 
5, 1784, and he married Mrs. Susanna Seaver, widow of Nathaniel, by whom he had no 
issue. By his first wife he had nine children, of whom was Christopher (1814). Samuel 
Gore (1786) died Nov. 23, 1831. 1 

Samuel (1786) was an elder brother of Christopher, governor of Massachusetts. 
He was one of the actors in throwing the tea into Boston Harbor. His father, being a 
Tory, left Boston with the British Army in 1776, but afterwards returned. The son was an 
excellent example of a loyal, vigorous North End mechanic, and a true "son of liberty." 
His shop was in Court Street, at the corner of Gore's Alley, now Brattle Street. 

He was also one of the party who took the guns from the gun-house on West Street, 
and secreted them in the school-house, when Major Paddock (1762) intended to turn 
them over to Gen. Gage. The narration of that event, given in the " Hundred Boston 
Orators," page 90, purports to have been received from Mr. Gore (1786). He was a 
member of Brattle Street Church, and for years one of its deacons. When the Brattle 
Street meeting-house was taken by the British as barracks, Deacons Gore (1786) and 
Newell were permitted to encase the pulpit and columns and remove the body pews, 
which were conveyed to the paint loft of the former. 

Samuel Gore (17S6). Authorities: Whit- of the Revolution, the only two pieces of cannon 

more's Genealogy of the Gore Family; Loring's then in the town, except those which may. have been 

One Hundred Boston Orators; New Eng. Mag., brought by the British troops. He was also one of 

1832. that number (and, so far as we know, has left but 

1 "In this city, on Wednesday, Samuel Gore three survivors) who on the 16th of Dec. 1773 pro- 

Esq. [17S6], aged 81. Mr. G. was one of the very ceeded to the tea ships, (which were at the wharf 

small number of mechanics who obtained, secured now called Liverpool Wharf, then Griffin's) and 

and sent out of the town of Boston, when it was in destroyed their cargoes." — Columbian Centinel, 

the hands of British power, at the commencement Saturday, Nov. 26, 1831. 



206 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [-, 786 

The first glass-works in Boston were located in what is now Edinboro' Street, and 
were established in 1787. After many embarrassments the company began the manu- 
facture of window-glass in November, 1793. Mr - Gore (1786) was one of the originators 
of this enterprise. It proved a speculation in which he lost all the accumulations of 
many years of untiring industry. He became a member of the Lodge of St Andrew in 
1778, and was the first treasurer of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association. 
He was ^considered a valuable and influential member of this association, but withdrew 
from it about the time of the failure of the glass company. He was a man of superior 
intelligence, kindness of heart, and courtesy of manner. 

Francis Green (1786), glazier, of Boston, son of William and Elizabeth Green, of 
Charlestown, was born Jan. 18, 1750. He married (1) (published April 29, 1773) Eliza- 
beth Brown, and (2) (published Oct. 1, 1795) Mary, daughter of Benj. Henderson. 
His place of business was on Ann Street, and his dwelling-house on Sheafe's Lane, now 
Avery Street. He was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1787. 

He was commissioned a second lieutenant in Col. Paterson's regiment, March 27, 
1777; first lieutenant in Col. Vose's (first) regiment; commissioned captain, Aug. 30, 
1780; deputy muster-master, in Rhode Island, Feb. 12, 1778, to Jan. T2, 1780, and left 
the army Nov. 3, 1783. He was vice-president of the Massachusetts Society of the Cin- 
cinnati, 1829-31. His son, Ellis B. Green, was a captain of a company in the Mexican 
War. Francis Green (1786) died Sept. 2, 183 1, aged eighty-one years. 

Samuel Greenough (1786), shop-keeper, of Boston, son of Major Newman (1740) 
•and Elizabeth (Montfort) Greenough, was born in Boston in 1748. His shop was 
No. 69 Cornhill, now Washington Street. He was clerk of the Artillery Company in 
1789, and its first sergeant in 1792. He died at Dorchester, Aug. 22, 1796, aged forty- 
eight years, and on " the following day he was buried from his late home in Dorchester." 
The CVwA'w/adds, "A highly valued citizen ... a worthy, honest man." 

Samuel Hastings (1786), store-keeper, of Boston. He was lieutenant of the Ward 
n military company, Boston, in 1787-8, and was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Com- 
pany in 1791. He was a store-keeper in December, 1781, when he paid the "duties 
of excise for the county of Boston," and was relicensed for the year next following. 
The Boston directory of 1789 calls. Samuel Hastings a shop-keeper, on Newbury Street, 
and of 1796 calls him a grocer, Orange Street, house Rainsford Lane. 

Zechariah Hicks (1786), saddler, of Boston, son of John and Elizabeth (Nutting) 
Hicks, was born in Cambridge, Feb. 28, 1755. His fath er was one of the first martyrs 
to American liberty, having been slain near the junction of North Avenue and Spruce 
Street by the retreating British troops, April 19, 1775. Lieut. Hicks (1786) married 
his wife in 1779, by whom he had fourteen children, seven of whom were living at the 
time of his death. 

Francis Green (1786). Authorities: Wy- Zechariah Hicks (1786). Authorities- 

man's Charlestown Genealogies and Estates; Boston Paige's Hist, of Cambridge; Whitman's Hist A and 

Records; Memorials of Mass. Society of the Cin- H. A. Company, Ed. 1842; Annals of Mass Char 

cinnati; New Eng. Mag., 1831, p. 366. Mech. Association. 

Samuel Greenough (1786). Authority: 
Boston Records. 



1786] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 207 

He served an apprenticeship with Thomas Patten, a saddler, of Watertown. At the 
age of twenty-one years he moved to Boston, and opened a saddler's shop in Corn- 
hill, now Washington Street, where he continued for thirty-one years. The march of 
improvement, the widening of the street, compelled his removal, and he relocated and 
continued his business in Court Street until he was eighty years of age. He was one of 
the marshals of the grand civic procession which escorted Gen. Washington into Boston 
in 1789. In the war of the Revolution, he enlisted as a volunteer, and was ordered to 
Newport, but was not actively engaged in any battle with the enemy. He was one of the 
body-guard of Gen. Heath (1765) when that officer had his headquarters in Boston. He 
was first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1789, and its lieutenant in 1791. He 
served two terms as a member of the House of Representatives. Lieut. Hicks (1786) 
was recognized " as an upright, prudent, industrious mechanic." He was a disciple of 
the Rev. John Murray, and was ardently attached to him from the beginning to the end 
of his ministry in Boston. 

After the death of Mr. Murray, Mr. Hicks (1786) withdrew from the Universalists, 
supposing they had departed from the principles of the original apostle of the sect. He 
died May 10, 1842, aged eighty-seven years, being universally regarded as "an honest 
and a good man." 

"The intelligence of his death surprised and startled many, for during the week ■ 
preceding he was seen walking in the public places of the city, with his well-known firm 
and manly step, and exhibiting on his countenance the complacent smile which, for half 
a century, had appeared as the surest indication of a light heart, a clear conscience, and 
a mild and generous disposition." 

Alexander Hodgdon (1786), of Boston, son of Benjamin and Rebecca (Marshall) 
Hodgdon, was born in 1741. He married (1) Mary Carrel, 1 who died very suddenly, 
Jan. 27, 1791. He married, (2) Oct. 6, 1793, Nancy Lewis, of Dedham, sister of Polly, 
wife of Andrew Cunningham (1786). Nancy (Lewis) Hodgdon married, Jan. 13, 1803, 
William Stackpole. Gen. Stevens, who married Mr. Hodgdon's (1786) sister, related to 
his son, in regard to the throwing of the tea overboard : — 

" I went from the Old South meeting-house just after dark. The party was seventy 
or eighty. At the head of the wharf we met the detachment of our company, Adino 
Paddock's [1762] company of artillery, on guard, who joined us. I commenced with a 
party on board the vessel of which Hodgdon [1786] was mate (the ' Dartmouth '), and 
as he knew me, I left that vessel, with some of my comrades, and went aboard another 
vessel, which lay at the opposite side of the wharf. Numbers of others took our places 
on Hodgdon's [1786] vessel," etc. 

In May, 1775, Alexander Hodgdon (1786) was clerk of the committee chosen in 
Boston to receive and distribute the donations made in behalf of the suffering. He was 
secretary of the Massachusetts Charitable Society, and treasurer of the Marine Society. 
He was elected treasurer of the county of Suffolk, and took the oath of office before the 
Honorable Court of Sessions, Feb. 14, 1785, and was re-elected by the almost unanimous 
vote of the county. He was State treasurer from 1787 a to 1792, when the treasurer's 

Alexander Hodgdon (1786). Authorities: 2 April 27, 1787, he succeeded Thomas Ivers, 

Boston Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and II. A. treasurer and receiver-general of the commonwealth, 

Company, Ed. 1842; Crane's Tea Leaves, 1773. who died April io, 1787, aged fifty-seven years, and 

1 His mother-in-law, Jane Carrel, died Dec. 31, was buried from the Province House. 
1786, aged seventy-six years, and was buried from 
his house in Summer Street. 



208 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 7 86 

office was in the room under the council chamber in the Province House, after which 
from October, 1792, to July, 1795, he was cashier of the Union Bank, Boston, now the 
National Union Bank, No. 40 State Street. The Columbian Centinel remarked, July 
28, 1792, "Mr. Hodgdon [1786] need not be particularly recommended as cashier of 
the Union Bank. His abilities, integrity and industry, all speak loudly in his behalf." 

March 20, 1795, he purchased the estate in Dedham, corner of Court and Highland 
streets, now the estate of Mrs. Edward M. Richards. Aug. 12, 1797, Mr. Hodgdon 
( 1 786) died in Dedham of a complication of diseases, aged fifty-six years, and his widow 
married, Jan 13, 1803, William Stackpole, Jr., of Boston. The Dedham estate was 
sold by Nancy Hodgdon, Dec. 18, 1802, to Samuel Richards, father of Edward M. 
Richards. 

John Johnston (1786), portrait painter, — Water Street, Boston, 1789, and Harvard 
Street in 1796, — of Boston, son of Thomas 1 and Bathsheba (Thwing) Johnston, was 
born in 1753, an d died June 28, 1818. He married (published Dec. 21, 1773) Susanna 

Overlake. Mr. Drake says he married Spear, by whom he had several children, 

only two of whom were married and had children. He was second sergeant of the 
Artillery Company in 1787, ensign in 1788, and lieutenant in 1790. 

John Johnston (1786) was in his youth apprenticed to learn the painter's business, 
to John Gore (1743), father of Samuel (1786). Before the war began, he joined the 
Artillery Company commanded by Col. Adino Paddock (1762). In April, 1775, he 
joined Col Gridley's regiment of artillery as lieutenant, was captain-lieutenant in Col. 
Knox's regiment in 1776, and was wounded and taken prisoner on Long Island, Aug. 
27, 1776. He was discharged from the service, on account of wounds, in October, 1777. 
He returned to Boston, and again pursued his chosen profession, opening a shop "on 
Court Street, near the head of Gore's Alley." He was captain of an independent com- 
pany of artillery in 1787 and 1792. 

Mr. Drake mentions, among the portraits painted by John Johnston (1786), "those 
of Gov. Increase Sumner, in the Massachusetts Senate Chamber ; Gov. William Phillips 
and family; Major Samuel Shaw; Gov. Samuel Adams, and of Mrs. Adams." One of 
his pictures was the sign of the Good Samaritan, kept by Thomas Bartlett (1793), 
apothecary, originally painted with a priest passing by on the other side. This was soon 
erased, the portrait and costume of the Rev. Dr. Walter, of Christ Church, with his full 
wig, being so exactly represented that the likeness was easily recognized. 

James Lanman (1786) was a baker in Boston He married (1) Susanna Dawes, 
daughter of Story and Sarah (Paine) Dawes. Story Dawes was a brother of William 
(1760). Mr. Lanman (178O) married (2) Susanna Goldthwait, daughter of Benjamin 
(1740) and Sarah (Dawes) Goldthwait, and granddaughter of Story Dawes. His 
dwelling-house was on Temple Street. Oct. 14, 1785, he bought of William Dawes 
(1760) the Temple Street estate (so called). 

John Johnston (1786). Authorities: Gene- also omitted in the father's name in the Boston 

alogy of Thwing Family; Drake's Biog. Notices of Records. This relationship is confirmed in the 

the Mass. Soc. of the Cincinnati. Memorials of the Mass. Soc. of the Cincinnati, p. 

1 This is the Thomas Johnson who joined the 293. Mr. Bridgman, in Memorials of King's Chapel 

Artillery Company in 1742. In the original roll, Burial-Ground, says Thomas Johnston died in 1776, 

the "t" in Johnston is omitted, though Mr. Whit- not in 1765, as before stated. 
man ( 1810) , in his history, inserted it. The " t " is 



i 7 86j HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 209 

Benjamin Lincoln (1786), yeoman, of Hingham, son of Col. Benjamin and Mrs. 
Elizabeth (Thaxter) (Norton) Lincoln, was bora in Hingham, Jan 24, 1732-3, in the 
house in which he died. His father was a farmer, which occupation Gen. Lincoln 
(1786) followed until more than forty years of age. He enjoyed no advantages of early 
education proportionate to the eminence he attained. He owed something to culture, 
much to circumstances. He was town clerk for many years, selectman from 1765 to 
1 77 1 inclusive, also a magistrate, and was a representative in 1773, 1774, 1775, 1788, and 
1789. His first military office was that of adjutant of the Third Regiment, in Suffolk 
County, in July, 1755 ; was promoted to be major in 1763, and lieutenant-colonel in Jan- 
uary, 1 772, when the war broke out. He was a member of the Provincial Congress, which 
assembled in 1774 and 1775 at Concord, Cambridge, and Watertown, and a sincere, 
determined, though temperate, Whig. 

Upon the news of the battles of Lexington and Concord, he summoned the military 
under his command, with a view of repairing to the scene of action. The return of the 
royal troops to Boston, the same night, prevented his marching. He was appointed a 
brigadier-general in February, 1776, a major-general in May next following, and was 
much employed in disciplining the militia. On the 2d of August, 1776, he was appointed 
to command the troops of the State doing duty at and near the harbor of Boston. The 
impression entertained of his military talents, and of his influence with the militia, 
caused the General Court, in September, 1776, to give him the command of the regi- 
ments to be raised by the State to reinforce the army under the commander-in-chief in 
New York and New Jersey, which had now become the seat of the war. Feb. n, 1777, 
he arrived at Gen. Washington's camp. The commander-in-chief, while at Cambridge 
and Boston, had become acquainted with him, and recommended him to Congress as 
an excellent officer, whom it was desirable to place in the Continental line. Accord- 
ingly, soon after he joined the army in February, 1777, he was created by Congress a 
major-general. The calm courage and good judgment of Gen. Lincoln (1786) were 
always evident. He was first attached to the Northern Army, under Gen. Schuyler, and 
afterwards under Gen. Gates. He was severely wounded in the leg, Oct. 8, 1777, which 
caused his removal, first to Albany and afterwards to Hingham. He was not able to 
take the field till Aug. 7, 1778, and his restoration was not complete until long after- 
wards. 

No inconsiderable share in the success of the Northern Army, in the capture of 
Burgoyne, has been always ascribed to Gen. Lincoln (1786). His excellent character as 
a man, and his military reputation, induced the delegates from South Carolina to request 
Congress to appoint him to the chief command in the Southern Department. He 
arrived at Charleston, S. C, early in December, 1778. His campaigns in the Southern 
Department were meritorious but unsuccessful, and ended in the surrender of Charles- 
ton, May 12, 1780, when he was taken prisoner. He was admitted to parole, and in the 
summer returned to Hingham. In November following, he was, to his great joy, 
exchanged. 

On the commencement of the campaign of 1781, Gen. Lincoln (1786) joined the 
army under Washington, occupying the high grounds on the North River, with a view to 
operations against New York. Before the end of the summer, the plan of the campaign 
was changed, and the movements of the army were directed against Lord Cornwallis, in 

Benjamin Lincoln (1786). Authorities: Lincoln's Hist, of Hingham; Whitman's Hist. A. and 
H. A. Company, Ed. 1S42; Memorials of the Mass. Soc. of the Cincinnati. 



2IO HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 7 86 

Virginia. Gen. Lincoln (1786) commanded the central division at the siege of York- 
town, and had his full share of the honor of that brilliant and auspicious event. The 
articles of capitulation stipulated for the same honors in favor of the surrendering army 
as had been granted to the garrison at Charleston. Gen. Lincoln (1786) was appointed 
to conduct them to the field where the arms were deposited, and receive the customary 
submission. 

Oct. 31, 1 781, he was chosen secretary of war, with power to retain his rank in the 
army. He resided at Philadelphia until October, 1783, when he resigned the secretary- 
ship. Having thus laid down the load of public cares, he retired with heartfelt pleasure 
to the repose of private life. His military service had not increased his property, and 
he resumed his farm. Neither his circumstances nor his disposition would permit him 
to be idle. Although he had intended to avoid public employments, he was persuaded 
to take command of the first division of the militia of the State. He was willing, with 
other distinguished officers of the late army, to make a considerable sacrifice to preserve 
to the community the benefit of the military knowledge acquired by the experience 
of the war. 

In 1786-7, an insurrection took place in Massachusetts. Gen. Lincoln (1786) was 
appointed to command the militia, between four and five thousand, detached to restore 
order. He was selected as commissioner, with others, to negotiate with the different 
Indian tribes ; and, while on a similar duty with the Creeks, in 1789, he had the pleasure 
of meeting Gen. Washington for the first time since 1783, and on his return stopped at 
Mount Vernon. His aid was solicited in framing the first militia law of the United 
States, and when the committee had the subject under consideration he introduced a 
clause to preserve the ancient privileges and customs of such independent corps as 
were then created by charter or otherwise. Gen. Blount, of Carolina, one of the com- 
mittee, was vehemently opposed to any such clause, when Gen. Lincoln (1786) stated 
the origin and claims of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company. Blount, in a 
passion and with a sneer, exclaimed, " And, pray, who in h — 1 commands this Ancient 
and Honorable Company?" Gen. Lincoln (1786) calmly replied, " Your very humble 
servant." This put Blount and his adherents to silence, and the clause was included in 
the act. Thus the original charter, usages, and privileges of the Artillery Company 
are confirmed by Congress. 

In April, 1787, Gen. Lincoln (1786) had a plurality of votes for lieutenant-governor, 
and was elected by the Legislature. He was a member of the convention for ratifying 
the new constitution, and, in 1789, was made collector of the port of Boston, which 
office he held until March 1, 1809, when his earnest desire to resign was complied with 
by Mr. Jefferson. In this station he acquitted himself with judgment, fidelity, and 
success, never forgetting his allegiance to the government, and never giving cause to any 
to complain of the insolence of office. 

Harvard University gave him, in 1780, the honorary degree of A. M. He was one 
of the first members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and of the Massa- 
chusetts Historical Society. The latter has an elegant portrait of Gen. Lincoln (1786) 
in military costume. He was president of the Society of the Cincinnati from its founda- 
tion until his decease, and was commander of the Artillery Company in 1 788. 

Gen. Lincoln (1786) married, at Pembroke, Mass., Jan. 15, 1756, Mary, daughter 
of Elijah and Elizabeth (Barker) Cushing. He died May 9, 1810. His widow died in 
Hingham, Jan. 23, 1816, aged eighty-two years. 



i 7 86] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 211 

"The person and air of Gen. Lincoln [1786] betokened his military vocation. He 
was of middle height, erect, muscular, with open, intelligent features, a venerable and 
benign aspect. His manners were easy and unaffected, but courteous and polite." 

John Lucas (1786), baker, of Boston, was born in 1738. The minutes of the 
selectmen's records of Boston for July 21, 1765, contain the following: "Mr. John 
Hunt, of Boston, informs that he has let a house, near Dock Square, to John Lucas, who 
has a wife and several children. They have not been long in town ; came last from 
Plymouth, but had before that lived in Connecticut." 

A John Lucas married, March 8, 1764, in Boston, Abigail Bowers. John Lucas 
(1786) married, Nov. 3, 1765, Hannah, daughter of William Dawes (1760), and sister of 
William Dawes, Jr. (1768). She was born Sept. 19, 1743, joined the Old South Church 
April 7, 1765, and died April 11, 1803. They had no children. Mr. Lucas (1786) 
subsequently married the widow of Ebenezer Dawes, " a lady of very pleasing personal 
accomplishments." It is to this lady, Mrs. Elizabeth Dawes, that Mr. Whitman (1810), 
in his history of the Artillery Company, refers: "In old age [about 1805], Mr. Lucas 
[1786] married a celebrated preceptress of Hingham Academy; but, with all her 
accomplishments, she failed to render him happy." She held the position of preceptress 
from 1796 to 1804. After the death of Mr. Lucas (1786) she married Dr. Williams, of 
Deerfield, whom she survived. 

Mr. Lucas (1786) was prominent among the tradesmen in town, very wealthy, 
active in public matters, and a commissary of Continental pensioners. Lucas Street, in 
Boston, was named for him. In 1784, a change came over the Common. Two persons 
were especially active in obtaining subscriptions and improving the Common. One of 
them was John Lucas (1786), whose office as commissary of pensioners was in Orange, 
now Washington, Street. Having raised two hundred and eighty-five pounds fourteen 
shillings and seven pence, he expended it in setting out trees and raising the low portions 
of the ground. Jan. 7, 1788, Mr. Lucas (1786) was moderator of a meeting of trades- 
men in Boston, who met to protest against the report, industriously circulated, that the 
tradesmen of Boston were opposed to the adoption of the Constitution of the United 
States, as proposed Sept. 17, 1787. He was identified with the military, and held the 
grade of captain, and united with the Old South Church, Dec. 18, 1763. 

Aug. 7, 1776, Mr. Lucas (1786) was drawn as a juror for a maritime court; Dec. 
19, 1776, he was drafted for service in the Continental Army, but paid the fine rather 
than serve ; in 1782, when paying his excise tax, he is called " Esquire," and held the 
office of selectman of Boston in 1784. He was chosen a surveyor of wheat from 1769 to 
1780 inclusive, and in 1784 ; warden in 1779 ; was appointed, Nov. 8, 1776, to ascertain 
the damage to Boston since the Boston Port Bill went into effect ; was one of the com- 
mittee selected March 5, 1782, to thank George Richards Minot, Esq., "for his spirited 
and eloquent oration ... in commemoration of the horrid massacre, March 5, 1770." 
He also served on many other committees, and was active in filling the various quotas of 
Boston for the Continental Army. 

John Lucas (1786) died in Brookline, Sept. 12, 1812, aged seventy-four years. He 
gave, in his will, to Judge Dawes, whose father was a cousin to Mr. Lucas's (1786) wife, 

John Lucas (1786). Authorities: Boston Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, 
Ed. 1842; Shurtleff's Des. of Boston. 



212 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7 86 

Hannah Dawes, an estate in Court Street worth ten thousand dollars, " for his early 
friendship." 

" Newspaper eulogy seldom deserves much notice ; for mankind are so prone to 
deify departed friends, that sober and discreet men turn aside from praises of the dead, 
often not merited, and are unwilling that those should be sent to Heaven, whose claims 
on it were somewhat doubtful on earth. Still, we cannot behold age, worth, virtue, piety, 
eccentricity, and vice, sink promiscuously into the tomb undistinguished. 

"Mr. Lucas [1786] was an instance of successful industry as a mechanic, and an 
example to others that assiduity, patience, and good character ensure a competency of 
fortune, respectability, and influence. With the imperfections incident to human nature, 
Mr. Lucas [1786] possessed many valuable traits of character, and, with considerable 
eccentricity, a kind and feeling heart. His good deeds, his active life, his useful career, 
demand honorable mention ; are calculated to stimulate the enterprising and cheer the 
industrious, and leave a memorial of gratitude and respect in the memory of many 
friends." ' 

John May (1786) was a descendant of an ancestor of the same name (born in 
England in 1590, admitted a freeman in i64i,and died in 1670) who migrated to 
America about 1640, with wife and two sons, John and Samuel, and settled in Roxbury. 
The younger members of the family went soon after to Connecticut. From one of these, 
who lived in Pomfret, Conn., Col. John May (1786) descended. He was born Nov. 24, 
1748. He did not long remain in his native home, but when quite young came to 
Boston, and, tradition says, served his apprenticeship with a relative, Col. Ephraim May 
(1765). Becoming established in business for himself, he married, in 1773, Abigail 
May. His place of business was on Fish, now North, Street. The latter, between Fleet 
Street and Sun Court, on the west side of North Street, and near the head of Hancock's 
Wharf, a three-story brick building, was built and first occupied by Edward Hutchinson 
(1702). At the close of the Revolution it was known as the North End Coffee-House, 
kept by Capt. David Porter, grandfather of Admiral Porter, U. S N. It next became 
the residence of Jonathan Amory, who was succeeded by Col. John May (1786). The 
building subsequently became the Mariners' House, under the direction of the Boston 
Port Society. On the day of the battle of Bunker Hill, the house was used as a hospital, 
and many of the wounded were placed for amputation on the long dining-room table. 
As long as the house stood, the blood-stains were distinctly seen on the floor. 

Col. May's (1786) life was mostly passed in Boston, though he lived some years 
in Portland, Me , where two or three of his children were born. Oct. n, 1778, he was 
commissioned adjutant of the Boston regiment, and was afterward regularly promoted to 
major, lieutenant-colonel, and colonel. The date of the last commission was Jan. 19, 
1787. In a letter from Gov. Bowdoin to Gen. Washington, dated April 2, 1788, 
apparently one of introduction, the former writes of Col. May (1786) : " He distinguished 
himself in the service of the United States at Rhode Island, under the Count de 
Rochambeau," and remarks further : " By his exertions the Boston regiment of militia, 
of which he is colonel, is esteemed in regard to appearance and discipline at least equal 
to any regiment of militia on the continent." 

John May (1786). Authorities: Boston Journal of Col. John May (1786), in the New Eng. 
Records; Porter's Rambles in Old Boston; Colum- Hist, and Gen. Keg , 1873. 
Man Centinel of Oct. I, 1788; the Letters and ' Columbian Centinel, Sept. 23, 1812. 



i 7 86] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 21 3 

"On the afternoon of Dec. 16, 1773, Mr. May [1786] went in haste to his home, 
on North Square, and said to his young wife, ' Nabby, let me have a beefsteak as quickly 
as possible.' While he was eating it, a rap was heard on the window, and he rose at 
once from the unfinished meal and departed. He returned late, tired and uncommuni- 
cative. In the morning, there was found in his shoes, and scattered upon the floor, a 
quantity of tea. The inevitable inference from these circumstances is strengthened by 
evidence of a very different character. Near the close of Major Melville's life, he 
gave, while dining with a few friends, some anecdotes of the Tea Party, and turning to 
Henry Knox May, the son of Col. May [1786], he said, ' Harry, there was one John 
there.' The son, who knew the family tradition, was eager to learn more. 'Not now, 
Harry,' said the major; 'come and see me, and I will tell you all about it.' Mr. May 
called repeatedly upon him but could never obtain any further satisfaction respecting 
the object of his inquiry. Col. May [1786] was a man of great energy and courage, 
an ardent patriot, and one not likely to be overlooked in the making up of a company of 
picked men for such an enterprise." ' 

Col. May (1786) was one of the Ohio Company in 1790, and is said to have erected 
the first frame house near the present site of Marietta, Ohio. Maysville, on the opposite 
shore of the Ohio, was named in honor of Col. May (1786). He informed the Ohio 
Company, at its meeting in Boston, July 2, 1788, that Mr. Joseph May, of Boston, had 
presented a bell to the company, for the first public building erected in the territory of 
the company. 

Col. May (1786) was selectman of Boston from 1803 to 1812 inclusive, and also a 
member of the General Court. He was active in public matters, and held many positions 
of responsibility' and honor in the town. 

He died on Thursday morning, July 16, 181 2, aged sixty- three years. His widow 
died in i824. a "By the death of Col. May [1786]," says the Columbian Centinel of 
July 18, "this town is deprived of a judicious and faithful officer, and the public of an 
active, useful, and benevolent citizen ; to his family the loss is irreparable. His funeral 
took place yesterday, attended by the selectmen, the Ancient and Honorable Artillery 
Company," etc. 

Jonas Clark Minot (1786), inspector of customs, No. 17 State Street, Boston, son 
of Stephen and Sarah (Clark) Minot, was born in Boston, Aug. 20, 1738, and married 
Hannah Speakman. His mother was the only daughter of Jonas Clark (1756). His 
brother, Hon. George Richard Minot, judge of the first municipal court in Boston, 
married Hannah Speakman's sister Mary. He was inspector in the custom-house from 
1789 to 1802. 

Thomas Newell, Jr. (1786). His name does not appear in the Boston Records. 
He never held office in the Artillery Company. 

Andrew Oliver, Jr. (1786), hatter, of Boston, son of Andrew and Susanna (Boyer) 
Oliver, of Boston, was born June 2, 1748, and was baptized in the Old South Church, 

Jonas Clark Minot (1786). Authority: 2 Extract from the journal of Mrs. John May: 

New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 1847. "Monday June is' [1788, Artillery election day] 

Andrew Oliver (1786). Authorities: Bos- Sent Hannah to carry the little girls to the Common, 

ton Records; Hill's Hist, of the Old South Church. They returned safe but tired out, and that we all 

'Tea Leaves of 1773, p. 128, -communicated are." 
by John Joseph May, Esq., of Dorchester. 



2 14 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 786 

June 5. His paternal grandfather was Anthoine Oliver ; his maternal grandfather was 
Daniel Johonnot. Both of these grandparents were Huguenots, or French Protestants, 
who, fleeing from France, arrived in America about 1686. 

Andrew Oliver, Jr. (1786), married, April 29, 1773, Abigail Boardman, daughter 
of William (1758), and sister of William, Jr. (1786). He united with the Old 
South Church, probably May 16, 1756, and his wife, Abigail, did likewise, Aug. 14, 
1774. In 1796, he was employed at the hatter's trade, and his place of business 
was at No. 35 Cornhill, now Washington Street. He never held office in the Artillery 
Company. 

Turner Phillips (1786), merchant, of Boston, son of Isaac and Preseler (Priscilla) 
Phillips, was born in Boston, Sept. 12, 1755. He married, April 5, 1780, Abigail Church. 
He was a brother of Major James Phillips, who joined the Artillery Company in 1790. 
In 1794, he was a bookkeeper in the United States Bank, a position which he held for 
many years, and resided on Leverett Street. He was ensign of the Artillery Company 
in 1789; rose to the grade of captain in the militia; was treasurer of the town of Bos- 
ton from Aug. 2, 1820, until the adoption of the city charter in 1822, when he became 
the first treasurer of the city of Boston. He held the office of selectman for four years, 
1816-9. He died Sept. 13, 1836, aged eighty-one years, and his wife, Abigail, died 
Dec. 6, 1837, aged eighty-one years. Their remains were buried in the King's Chapel 
Burial-Ground, over which a marble column was erected to their memory. 

Henry Prentiss (1786), merchant, of Boston, son of Rev. Joshua and Mary Prentiss, 
was born March 7, 1749, in Holliston, Mass., where his father was pastor of the church 
for forty-five years. He married, in 1775, Ruth, daughter of Jonathan Freeman, of 
Boston. Henry Prentiss (1786) was a spectator of the scene in State Street, March 
5, 1770, when the British soldiers killed five persons and wounded several others. On 
the 7th of March, Henry Prentiss (1786) wrote a long letter to his father describing the 
scene, and the events which followed it. The letter is printed entire in Mr. Drake's 
"History of Middlesex County," Vol.1., pages 472,473 Henry Prentiss (1786) is 
recorded in the traditional number of those who took part in the "tea" episode of 
1773. He was a member of the Masonic Fraternity, having been initiated in The Massa- 
chusetts Lodge, of Boston, Feb. 19, 1789. 

Mr. Prentiss (1786) was a captain in the Revolutionary War, serving under Gen. 
Washington at Cambridge and Long Island ; also, was at the crossing of the Delaware, and 
at the battle of Trenton. On his return from active service he was an overseer of the 
poor, in Boston, three years, 1784-7, a sea-captain in 1789, and afterward a merchant 
in Boston. Henry Prentiss (1786), with his brother, Appleton, was the first to introduce 
the art of printing calico in New England, producing a coarse blue and red article on 
India cotton A specimen of it was exhibited by the late Abbot Lawrence at a fair in 
the city of Washington, many years ago, as a contrast to the improved prints of later 
days. The print manufactory was on the corner of Cambridge and Buttolph streets. 
He was largely interested in the West Boston Bridge, sometimes called " Cambridge 

Turner Phillips (1786). Authority: Boston ton Records; Crane's Tea Leaves of 1773; Shurt- 
Records. left's Des. of Boston ; Bridgman's King's Chapel 

Henry Prentiss (1786). Authorities: Bos- Burial-Ground. 



, 7 86] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 2 15 

Bridge," and, with Mungo Mackay, superintended the construction of it. He died in 
Medfield, Mass., Aug. 31, 182 1, and his remains were placed in King's Chapel Burial- 
Ground. 

He resided for many years in a stone house on the south side of Hanover Street, 
near Elm Street, the former residence of Benjamin Hallowell, comptroller of customs, 
which was ransacked by the patriots at the time Gov. Hutchinson's house was visited by 
them. 

Russell Sturgis (1786), merchant, of Boston, son of Thomas and Sarah (Payne) 
Sturgis, was born in Barnstable, Mass., Aug. 27, 1750. At the age of sixteen years, he 
left his home and came to Boston. He entered the mercantile establishment of Thomas 
Handasyd Peck, a furrier. This business was very largely increased, and the firm became, 
in company with John Jacob Astor, of New York, one of the pioneers in opening a very 
extensive fur trade on the northwest coast of America. Mr. Sturgis (1786) learned the 
hatter's trade, did business in Merchants Row, and resided on Atkinson Street. Later, 
he had a brick mansion on Pearl Street, where now is Sturgis Place, or avenue. He 
married Elizabeth Perkins, daughter of James and Elizabeth (Peck) Perkins. Elizabeth 
Peck was a daughter of Thomas H. Peck, Mr. Sturgis's (1786) early business associate. 
Russell Sturgis (1786) and his wife were the parents of sixteen children, all born before 
the close of the eighteenth century, one of whom, the youngest daughter, is living (this 
25th of April, 1890), at the age of ninety-three years, and dictated this sketch of her 
honored father. The name of " Russell Sturgis " has been continued from father to son 
for six successive generations. 

Mr. Sturgis (1786) was interested in the militia, and from 1787 to 1792 was first 
lieutenant of a company of light artillery in Boston, of which John Johnston (1786) was 
captain. He filled, at various times, many public offices in Boston. He held the 
position of selectman from 1796 to 1802 inclusive, except in 1798, and represented 
Boston in the State Senate and House of Representatives. He took an active part in 
public affairs generally, and was a member of various benevolent societies. 

Lieut. Russell Sturgis (1786) died Sept. 7, 1826, and his remains were placed in the 
Granary Burial-Ground. A cotemporary newspaper, in an obituary notice of Mr. 
Sturgis (1786), says, "On Thursday last [Sept. 7, 1826], Russell Sturgis, Esq., aged 
seventy-six years. Mr. Sturgis [1786] was a native of Barnstable and of an ancient and 
respectable family. He came to Boston when young. He was a respectable merchant, 
an honest man, an ardent patriot, an affectionate friend." 

Samuel Todd (1786), housewright, of Boston. In the militia he rose to the grade 
of captain. He was first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1790, lieutenant in 1793, 
captain in 1797, and armorer from 1806 to 18 14. He was the first armorer who took 
charge of the Company equipments in Faneuil Hall. He resided in Cold Lane, now 
Portland Street, and died March 31, 1815. His remains were placed in tomb No. 101 
in the burial-ground on the Common. The Artillery Company, in citizens' dress, 
attended his funeral. 

Russell Sturgis (1786). Authorities : Bos- Samuel Todd (1786). Authorities : Boston 

ton Records; MS. of George Sturgis Paine, Wor- Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, 
cester, Mass. Ed. 1842. 



2l6 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [i 7 86 

Pepperell Tyler (1786), merchant, son of Andrew and Miriam Tyler, was born in 
Boston, April 12, 173 1. In 1781, he was chosen a clerk of the market. In 1782, he 
was a shop- or store-keeper, paying his excise tax, and was licensed to sell tea. The same 
year he was approbated by the selectmen to be a " retailer of strong drink " at his store 
in Haymarket. He never held any office in the Artillery Company. 

Thomas Wells (1786), wine merchant, of Boston, son of Francis and Susannah 
(Allen) (Welsh) Wells, was born at Cambridge Farms, May 23, 1754. He married, 
June i, 1773, Hannah Adams. 

" His father," according to Mr. Drake, "came to Boston in the ship ' Hampstead 
Gaily,' of which he was owner and master, arriving at Boston Aug. 12, 1723. Elizabeth, 
daughter by his first wife, born in England, married Gov. Samuel Adams. Their 
daughter, Hannah, was married to Capt. Thomas Wells [1786]." 

Mr. Wells (1786) was a member of Paddock's (1762) regiment of artillery, was 
commissioned second lieutenant in Knox's artillery regiment, Jan. 1, 1776 captain in 
Crane's artillery regiment in 1778, and was discharged in 1780, after a service of five 
years and three months. He subsequently became a wine merchant, and in 1789 
occupied the cellar under the Old South Church, and in 1796 he kept a wine cellar in 
Milk Street and lived in Leverett's (or Quaker) Lane, now Congress Street. He was 
fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1787. His son, Thomas, joined the Artillery 
Company in 1 8 1 1 . 

He died, in Boston, Oct. 30, 1799, "a faithful friend and servant in his country's 
cause during the revolutionary struggle." 

John Winslow (1786), merchant, of Boston, son of John and Elizabeth (Mason) 
Winslow, of Boston, and great-grandson of John (1692), was born in Boston, Sept. 29, 
1753, and died Nov. 29, 1819. He married, May 18, 1782, Ann Gardner. 

Mr. Whitman (1810), in his history of the Artillery Company, says, concerning 
Gen. Winslow (1786) : — 

" His father died before he arrived of age, and left him to launch forth on the world 
to seek his fortune. Before the war, he was a clerk in the hardware store of his uncle; 
Jonathan Mason, who kept on the east side of Washington Street, No. 12, opposite 
Williams Court. Mr. Mason lived over his store, and was a deacon in the Old South 
Church. Mr. Winslow [1786] was in Boston during its occupation by the British in 
1775, was the one who recognized Gen. Warren's body after the battle of Bunker Hill, 
and he buried the communion plate of the Old South Church in the cellar of his uncle's 
home to prevent its falling into the hands of the British. Being desirous of getting away 
from Boston, he shipped on a British vessel for Newport, R. I., at which place he 
deserted. At the age of twenty-two, he was appointed by Gov. Trumbull deputy pay- 
master-general, in the Northern Department, with the rank of lieutenant. He joined 
the army at Quebec, under Gen. Montgomery, and was in the battle. June 8, 1777, he 
received a commission as captain of artillery, and was placed under the command of 
Major Ebenezer Stevens, who was subsequently a major-general in New York. He was 

Pepperell Tyler 0786). Authority: Bos- John Winslow (1786). Authorities: Hill's 

ton Records. Hist, of Old South Church; Drake's Old Land- 

Thoma9 Wells (1786). Authorities: Bos- marks of Boston, p. 87; Memorials of the Mass. 

ton Records; Drake's Biog. Notices of Mass. Society of the Cincinnati; Whitman's Hist. A. and 

Society of the Cincinnati. H. A. Company, Ed. 1842. 



1786] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 217 

in the battle which resulted in the capture of Burgoyne, and was one of those who took 
the account of the stores, etc., found in his camp, and also had charge of many prisoners. 
He was afterwards stationed at West Point and White Plains. When the American Army 
was retreating from Quebec, under Gen. Wooster, and the enemy close upon their heels, 
he saved the public chest, and lost his own baggage and wardrobe, as valuable as any 
officer's in the line. He was thus left destitute of clothing, not having sufficient to 
change his linen for thirty-five days. He received, on the settlement of his accounts as 
paymaster, — the total of which was $865,700.81, — a certificate from the paymaster- 
general, wherein his conduct was highly approved, and, it is said, he was almost the only 
paymaster who had faithfully accounted for the public moneys. He was at the battle of 
Ticonderoga, and, when the army, under Gen. Sinclair, retreated from that place, he 
again saved the books and property intrusted to his care, and lost most of his own. He 
was soon after relieved, having settled his second accounts, amounting to $104, 5 18. 

" Nov. 5, 1778, he was honorably discharged, at his own request. When the militia 
of Boston was reorganized he was elected a major, and, soon after, a colonel. 1 March 
21, 1799, he was elected brigadier-general of the Legionary Brigade. In 1809, he was 
chosen major-general, but did not accept, and immediately resigned his office of 
brigadier-general. He was clerk of the Artillery Company in 1787 ; lieutenant in 1788 ; 
its captain in 1792 and 1798, and its treasurer from 1798 to 1810. He was for many 
years a fireward, and president of the board of health, assistant treasurer of the Cincin- 
nati from 1794 to 1809, and treasurer from 1809 to 181 1, and often representative to' 
the General Court. In 18 10, he lost his property by an unexpected failure, and his 
embarrassments continued during life. His integrity and honor were never questioned, 
and the people placed him, seven years successively, in the responsible office of county 
treasurer, until his decease, Nov. 29, 1819. The fidelity with which he discharged its 
duties induced his constituents to pronounce him the best treasurer that had ever filled 
the office. 

" As a neighbor and friend, he was zealous and charitable, frequently employed by 
the rich to bestow their secret alms upon the virtuous poor. He was not, by talent or 
education, a great man, but formed by nature an upright one. The numerous instances 
of being guardian, referee, etc., prove his integrity. He was prompt, but prudent; 
rigid, but not austere; independent, yet popular; shrinking from public honors, yet 
deserving them ; fearless in discharge of public, social, and moral duties, yet amiable and 
beloved by all. The composure with which he met his troubles, and even saw the 
approach of death, show the sterling value of his heart and mind. He never communi- 
cated his troubles, because it might disturb others ; but rather suffered them to grow 
upon him in secret, while the world supposed him cheerful In his family, he was spot- 
less, kind, and affectionate ; his fireside was the seat of hospitality ; his home, the 
mansion of happiness. He was buried in the family tomb, near the centre of the Chapel 
Burial-Ground." 

At his funeral, the Society of the Cincinnati, the Ancient and Honorable Artillery 
Company, the light infantry company (called, in his honor, the " Winslow Blues"), 
were present to pay respect to his memory. His daughter, Mary Ann, who died in 1882, 
was buried in the same tomb. 

1 " Major John Winslow [ 1 786J was appointed Bird [1787] was appointed major, vice Winslow 
Lieut.-Col. of the Boston regiment, vice Lieut.-Col. [ 1 786J promoted." — Massachusetts Centinel, March 
Farrington [1786] displaced, and Capt. William 12, 1788. 



2 I 8 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[1786 



The record of the Artillery Company for 1786 is as follows : — 

" After an Intermission of the Artillery Company's Assembling during the War of 
the United States with Great Britain, in which many of its members were engaged, and 
subsequent thereto were in a dispersed situation, until the year seventeen hundred & 
eighty-six, 1 when they again Assembled under the Command of their last elected Officers 
and had the honor of leading in the Military duties of the then particularly important 
day [that is, the insurrection under Daniel Shays] under which Command they continued 
until the return of their anniversary Election in June, 1787, at which time, Maj. Gen. 
John Brooks [1786], Col. Josiah Waters [1769], and Capt. Ebenezer Torrey [1765] were 
elected officers, and His Excellency John Hancock, Esq., Governor and Commander-in- 
Chief of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts was pleased, agreeable to ancient and 
usual form, to deliver the respective badges to the officers. 

" Boston, 4th August 1 786. The Committee appointed by the members of the 
Ancient & Honorable Artillery Company at their last meeting, in Faneuil Hall, take leave 
to report by recommending the following votes, vizt : 

" 1st. Voted, That the Officers elected in June 1774, take charge of ye said Com- 
pany and continue therein until the Election in June next. 

"2d. Voted, That Capt William Bell [1756] assemble the Members of the said 
Company at some convenient time & place, at least once every week, in order to learn 
ye Manual Exercise & evolution as directed by ye Captain General previously to turning 
out on ye Muster day in September next. 

" 3d. Voted, That the Company turn out to do Military duty on the first Monday 
in September next, & the Capt. is requested to order provision to be made at Faneuil 
Hall on ye evening as usual. 

"4th. Voted, That the Expenses on ye evening for Exercise previous to ye Muster 
days of this year be paid out of ye Company Chest ; as also for the provision mentioned 
in ye preceding Vote. 

"5th. Voted, That the Commission Officers provide such Military appendages as 
may be found wanting for the said Company, & ye Treasurer is hereby authorized & 
empowered to pay the same & lay the account so paid before the Company on ye even- 
ing of September, when ye Company will be assembled. 

" 6th. Voted, That the Treasurer be requested to settle the Bond & Mortgage due 
from Mr Brown upon the best possible terms, and report his doings thereon to the said 
Company as soon as may be. 

" 7th. Voted, That the Treasurer, with a Committee, wait upon His Excellency, 
Gov. Bowdoin with the Charter of the Company, & acquaint him with such of our pro- 
ceedings as may be judged necessary. 

" 8th. Voted, That the Treasurer be requested to exchange what monies he shall 
have on hand (after paying the aforementioned Expenses, & reserving one hundred 
Dollars for the use of the Company in June next) for the consolidated Securities of this 
Commonwealth, and report his doings thereon as soon as may be. 

" 9th & lastly, it is recommended that as soon as convenient the Members of the 
said Company will furnish themselves with, & come into the following Uniform, vizt : a 
plain Hatt & Cockade, Blue Coat, white Waistcoat & Breeches & White Stockings. All 
which is submitted. Voted, that the Foregoing Votes be recorded in ye Company's 
Book. Attest : William Dawes, Jr. Clerk. 

1 There seems to be no knowledge of the meetings of the Company in 1782. 



1786] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 219 

"Friday evening, 1st Sept. [1786] Voted, to have ye Band of Musick to play on our 
Military Muster on ye 4th inst and ye expense of the same to be paid by ye Treasurer, 
Col. Josiah Waters [1769], Mr Daniel Rea [Jr., 1770], William Dawes Jr. [1768] 
Committee to agree with them. Attest : William Dawes, Jr. Clerk. 

" Monday, 4th September [1786]. ' Voted, the Clerk be directed to wait on ye gentle- 
men who have this day been admitted members of this Company in order that they may 
sign the Company's Book, & also to request their attendance with their firelocks & 
Bayonetts at Faneuil Hall, on Wednesday Evening next, & so from time to time as ye 
Company may meet for discipline. Voted, the Clerk be directed to inform all ye Mem- 
bers of ye foregoing, that they may govern themselves accordingly. 

"Attest: Wm Dawes, Jr. Clerk. 

" Wednesday Evening, 27th Sept. [ 1 786] Voted, to have the Band of Musick on our 
next Muster day, being ye first Monday in October next, & ye expense be paid out of ye 
Company's stock. Attest. Wm Dawes, Jr. Clerk, 

"Monday, Muster day. 2d Oct. 1786. Voted, there be a Committee to join the 
Treasurer to settle with the debtors to ye Ancient & Honorable Artillery Company upon 
ye best possible manner ; & also, to Revise the list of ye members & report their doings 
as soon as may be. Committee, Capt Wm Bell [1756], Col Thomas Dawes [1754], 
Col Josiah Waters [1769], Maj. Wm Dawes, Jun [1768], Capt John Winslow [1786 |, 
Capt J. Stutson [1765], Capt Amasa Davis [1786] 

" Attest. Wm Dawes, Jun. Clerk. 

"October nth, 1786. At Faneuil Hall, 

"Voted, the Company continue its Military exercise on Wednesday Evening; the 
Roll to be called at seven o'clock. Those members then absent to pay a fine of six 
pence ; if absent the evening [to pay] one shilling, unless sick or out of town. Such 
members as attend without arms be considered as Absent & pay a fine of 1/. 

" Voted That the Clerk be directed to notify the Company of the above vote, & to call 
the Company together on Wednesday Evening next with their Arms & Accoutrements. 

"Voted, Col Josiah Waters [1769], Capt John Winslow [1786], & Mr. Thomas S. 
Boardman [1774] be a Committee to light the Hall for duty as above. 

" Attest, William Dawes, Jun. Clerk. 

"October 19th, 1786. The Committee appointed Oct. 2d, 1786, for the purpose of 
Revising the list of the Ancient & Honorable Artillery Company, and for the purpose 
of Enquiring into the state of their finances beg leave to report so far as respects the 
Revision of the list, that the following Persons be considered as Members, & the Clerk 
be directed to enter their Names on the Book. That no Person be considered as a 
Member, whose name is not entered in the Company's New Book opened August 
4th, 1786. Attest William Dawes, Jr. Clerk. 

1 "On Monday last [Sept. 4, 1786] for the first " It was gratifying to the real friends of this 

time, since the commencement of the late Revolu- country, to see our aged citizens, some of whom were 

tion, the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, near seventy years of age, equipped in the accoutre- 

commanded by Major Bell, paraded at the State ments of soldiers and setting an example to the 

house in this town, and, preceded by a band of younger part of the community, that should their 

musick, marched into the common, where they country require their aid in the field, they might be 

performed a number of military exercises — after found ready disciplined and fit for immediate ser- 

which they marched to Faneuil Hall, discharged a vice." — Massachusetts Centinel, Sept. 6, 1786. 
volley of small arms and finished the day much to 
their honour, and the credit of the town. 



220 



HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[1786 



Members Voted on the Honorary List. 



Capt. Samuel Barratt [1755]- 
John Deming [1756]. 
John Bartlett [1769] 



Capt. William Bell [1756]. 
Col. Thomas Dawes [1754]. 
John Stutson [1765]. 



List of Members, 1786. 



Col. Joseph Jackson [1738]. 
Capt. Daniel Jones [1754]. 
Col. Thomas Dawes [1754]. 
Capt. William Bell [1756]. 
Robert Jenkins [1756]. 
Col. Edward Proctor [1756]. 
Benjamin Edes [1760]. 
Col.. Thomas Marshall [1761]. 
Capt. Caleb Champney [1762]. 
Capt. John Wells [1765]. 
Maj.-Gen. William Heath [1765]. 
Capt. Christopher Marshall [1765]. 
Maj. Ephraim May [1765]. 
Capt. John Stutson [1765]. 
Ebenezer Torrey [1765]. 
William Homes [Jr., 1766]. 
Maj. William Dawes, Jr. [1768]. 
Capt. Jacob Williams [1768]. 
Capt. Israel Loring [1768]. 
John Fullerton [1768]. 
Capt. Joseph Pierce [1769]. 
Col Josiah Waters [Jr., 1769]. 
Capt. Manasseh Marston [1769]. 
John Bartlett [1769]. 
Daniel Rea [Jr:, 1770]. 
Capt. John Hinkley»[i772j. 
Jeremiah Bumstead [1773]. 
Capt. Joseph Eaton [1773]. 
William Walker [1773]. 
Stephen Gore [1773]. 
William Todd, Jr. [1773]. 
Samuel Belknap [1773]. 
Samuel Wild [1773]. 
John Howe [1773]. 
Nathaniel Call [1774]. 
Joseph Spear [Jr., 1774]. 
Thomas S. Bordman [1774]. 
Jacob Gill [1774]. 
Maj.-Gen. John Brooks [1786]. 
Hon. Caleb Davis [1786]. 



John Lucas, Esq. [1786]. 

CoLJohn May [1786]. 

Maj. Robert Davis [1786]. 

Capt. John Winslow [1786]. 

Capt. William Cunningham [1786]. 

Capt. Joshua Farrington [1786]. 

Capt. Alexander Hodgdon [1786]. 

Isaac Davenport [1786]. 

William Brown [1786]. 

Capt. Amasa Davis [1786]. 

John Coolidge [1786]. 

Samuel Emery [1786]. 

Richard Gardner [1786]. 

Capt. William Bordman, Jr. [1786]. 

Andrew Oliver [1786].' 

Zechariah Hicks [1786]. 

Thomas Newell, Jr. [1786]. 

Samuel Greenough [1786]. 

James Lanman [1786]. 

Jonathan Balch [1786]. 

Capt. Henry Prentiss [1786]. 

Joseph Coffin Boyd [1786]. 

Pepperell Tyler [1786]. 

Russell Sturgis [1786]. 

Samuel Todd [1786]. 

Capt. Thomas Wells [1786]. 

Capt. John Johnston [1786]. 

Jonas Clark Minot [1786]. 

Maj.-Gen. Benjamin Lincoln [1786]. 

John Avery, Jr. [1786J. 

Col. Ebenezer Battelle [1786]. 

Capt. Francis Green [1786]. 

Capt. T. Phillips [1786]. 

Capt. Joseph Ford [1786]. 

Samuel Gore [1786]. 

Edward Curtis [1786]. 

Andrew Cunningham [1786]. 

John Brazer [1786]. 

Samuel Hastings [1786]. 

Thomas Clark [1786]. 



i 7 S6] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 221 

"At a Meeting at Faneuil Hall, 19th October, 1786. Your Committee report the 
following members, who now stand on the Company's old Book, delinquent as neglecting 
their duty, viz: Capt Hopestill Capen [1763], Mr. Thomas Sherburne [1769], Maj. 
John Boyle [1769], Mr. Levi Jennings [1764], Mr. Thomas Russell [1769], Mr. Martin 
Bicker [1771], Mr Samuel Searle [1765] ; also, your Committee recommend that you 
reconsider your Vote of the 4th August 1786, giving direction to your Treasurer to invest 
the Company Monies in Government Securities, and order that he retain the same in his 
own hand until further orders. N. B. The above accepted. 

" Attest, William Dawes Jr. Clerk. 

" At a meeting of the Ancient & Honorable Artillery Company, 25th October, 1786. 
Wednesday Evening. 

"His Excellency, Capt General, by the Gentlemen Selectmen of the Town of 
Boston applied to the Company for their aid in the present emergency of Public Affairs. 
The Company immediately unanimously Voted, their readiness to exert themselves in 
everything in their power in support of the Government of the Commonwealth, and to 
hold themselves in readiness on the shortest notice to turn out in defence of the same. 
Voted, unanimously, that the Company be reviewed at Faneuil Hall on Saturday 5 o'clock, 
28th inst : and that it be strictly enjoined on every member to appear compleat, with 
twenty-five rounds of powder & Ball, with every equipment necessary to compleat a 
soldier for immediate service, & agreeable to His Excellency's request, the Company 
appoint a Committee consisting of five members of the Company, viz : Maj. Ephraim 
May [1773], Capt Henry Prentiss [1786], Col Josiah Waters [1769], Col John May 
[1786], Capt Caleb Champney [1762] to find gentlemen, who, upon the present emer- 
gency of publick affairs, to accept of the command of the several companies of Militia 
of the Town of Boston. The Committee appointed on this Business, & the gentlemen 
who were recommended accepted their appointments. 

"At a Meeting at Faneuil Hall, 26th Oct. 1786. Voted, Col. Josiah Waters [1769], 
act as Adjutant of the Ancient & Honorable Artillery Company until the Muster day in 
April 1787. Attest; William Dawes Jr. Clerk. 

" At a Meeting, Saturday Evening 28th inst. Voted, Doctor John Warren, Esq, be 
Surgeon of the Ancient & Honorable Artillery Company — Unanimous in said vote. 
Voted, the Company meet on Monday Evening for exercise at six o'clock instead of 
Wednesday Evening as was Voted nth inst. 

"Saturday, The Company met agreeable to orders, when the members were com- 
pleat according to orders, and again declared their readiness to comply with the orders 
of the Commander in Chief on the shortest Notice, and adjourned to Monday evening 
the 30th inst. when William Dawes Jr. [1768] was appointed Commissary of ye Com- 
pany & John Lucas Esq. [1786] Qr. Master. Oct 30th. Voted, the Clerk be directed 
to procure black 6° white balls for the admission of Members, & that persons be pro- 
posed for admission on next Monday evening. Those persons who are admitted, to 
comply with all the Rules & Regulations of the Company. & to be legally admitted as 
members on the first Field day, if the Company approve their conduct through the 
winter. 

" Nov. 6th. Voted, no Member of the Company be put on the Honorary List 
except on Muster days. Voted, That no person be admitted a Member of this Company 
unless he has the Yeas of three-quarters of the Members present." 



222 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[1786 



The newspapers of Boston announced on Saturday, Oct. 21, 1786, that, the Thurs- 
day previous being "the anniversary of the capture of Lord Cornwallis and a British 
army, the new company of Independent Cadets, commanded by Col. Bradford, made 
their first public parade " in Boston. On this occasion, the governor presented the 
company with a standard, "bearing on one side his Excellency's arms, and, on the 
reverse, those of the company, with the thirteen stripes on each, upon a ground of 
white." 

Dr. John Warren was the first recorded surgeon of the Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery Company. He was a son of Joseph Warren, Jr., of Roxbury, a brother of Gen. 
Joseph Warren, and was born July 27, 1753. The homestead was on Warren Street, on 
Warren Place, opposite St. James Street. An elegant stone building, with a suitable 
inscription, now occupies this site. He married, Nov. 2, 1777, Abigail Collins, of New- 
port, R. I. He attended the Roxbury Grammar School, entered Harvard College in 
July, 1767, and graduated four years later. After graduation he began the study of 
medicine under his brother, Dr. Joseph Warren. In 1773, Dr. John Warren established 
himself at Salem, and practised his profession On the 19th of April, 1775, the regiment 
of that town marched to Lexington, and Dr. Warren accompanied it as its surgeon. He 
kept a journal, especially interesting in its record of events in and around Boston during 
the early part of the Revolutionary War. Dr. John Warren had a portion of the care in 
administering to the wounded in the battle of Bunker Hill, and was appointed a hospital 
surgeon by Washington, during the siege of Boston. He took part in the campaign on 
Long Island, and was in the battles of Trenton and Princeton. In 1777, he was 
appointed superintending surgeon of the military hospitals in Boston, — a position which 
he occupied until peace was declared. In 1780 and 1 781, he delivered, by request, 
medical lectures in a military hospital then situated on the corner of the present Milton 
and Spring streets, and a third course, in 1782, was delivered at the Molineux House, 
on Beacon Street. Dr. Warren drew up, in the summer of 1782, a plan for a medical 
institution, to be connected with Harvard University, which was adopted by the corpora- 
tion, Sept. 19, 1782, and Dr. Warren was elected, Nov. 22, 1782, professor of anatomy 
and surgery in that institution. He was, therefore, the founder of the medical school, 
which forms one of the present departments of Harvard University. 

In 1784, he established the hospital at Point Shirley. In the same year, he was 
elected president of the Massachusetts Medical Society, and was also president of the 
Massachusetts Humane and Agricultural Societies. He delivered the first Fourth of 
July oration before the citizens of the town of Boston, July 4, 1783. 

May 2, 1780, Dr. John Warren became a member of The Massachusetts Lodge, 
A. F. and A. M. Having held minor offices in that Lodge, he became its master, and, 
after faithful service in the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, was elected in that body 
Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts. He held this office in 1783, 1784, and 1787, 
and was re-elected in 1794, but declined to accept it. He died April 4, 1815, at his 
residence on School Street. 

Dr, John Warren. Authorities: Life of John fore the Grand Lodge of Mass. ; Loring's One 

Warren, by his son, Edward Warren; Eulogies en Hundred Boston Orators; Medical Men of the 

John Warren, by Dr. James Jackson, before the Revolution, p. 30. 
Mass. Med. Society, and by Dr. Josiah Bartlett, be- 



1787] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 223 

p. The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1787 were : John Brooks 

[7(j7 , (1786), captain; Josiah Waters (1769), lieutenant, and Ebenezer Torrey 

(1765), ensign. William Todd, Jr. (1773), was first sergeant ; John Johnston 

(1786), second sergeant; Francis Green (1786), third sergeant; Thomas Wells (1786), 

fourth sergeant, and John Winslow (1786), clerk. 

About sunset, on Friday evening, April 20, 1787, a fire broke out in a malt-house, 
near the Liberty Pole, at the South End. ft was the greatest that had occurred in the 
town since 1760. About one hundred buildings were destroyed, including one meeting- 
house and fifty dwellings. ft burned on both sides of Orange, now Washington, Street, 
and the houses of several members of the Artillery Company were consumed. 

fn 1787, and for some years afterward, Benjamin Lincoln (1786) was major-general 
in command of the First Division, of Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, and John Brooks 
(1786) was major-general in command of the Third Division. 

April 7, 1787, an independent company of cavalry, called the Governor's Horse 
Guard was formed, Col. James Swan being elected commander. They made their first 
public appearance in uniform (red, faced with blue), June 21, 1787. 

May 25, 1787, the Republican Volunteers, under the command of Major Bartlett 
(1769), appeared in complete uniform for the first time. This company was instituted 
the 17th of November preceding. Their uniform was red, faced with black. June 16, 
the governor presented the Volunteers with a standard. Their second commander was 
Capt. Lemuel Gardner (1787), who was unanimously chosen in August, 1787. 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1787 were: William Bird, 
William Call, Benjamin Cobb, Jr., William Dall, Phineas Dana, John Fenno, Lemuel 
Gardner, John Green, David Hatch, Peter Parker, William Shattuck, Ezra Whitney, 
Jeremiah Williams. 

William Bird (1787), innkeeper, of Boston. He was published to marry Polly 
Bayley, Nov. 24, 1784. Mr. Bird (1787) was adjutant of the Suffolk County Brigade 
Train of Artillery in 1784, captain of Ward 12 military company, in Boston, in 1787, was 
commissioned major in the Boston regiment, in March, 1788, and was first sergeant 6f 
the Artillery Company in 1788. 

The directory of Boston for 1796 gives "William Bird, innkeeper, Washington 
Street." "Bird's Tavern, so called in 1796, known in Revolutionary times as Edward 
Richardson's, and afterward as Bellow's, still stands in the angle formed by the intersec- 
tion of Belmont Street with the old Watertown road. It was the hiding-place where the 
colony cannon and intrenching tools were concealed. It was also a favorite resort for 
Burgoyne's officers on account of the cockpit on the other side of the road. The 
faculty of Harvard College ate their annual dinner there for many years." 1 

William Call (1787), baker, of Charlestown, son of Richard and Mary (King) Call, 
of Charlestown, was born Feb. 27, 1732-3. He followed the trade of his father. In 
1760 he bought of Jonathan Bradish the bakehouse in which his father, who died in 
i 756, had done his business, but he subsequently moved to Boston. He was a brother 
of Capt. Nathaniel Call (1774). Capt. William Call (1787) was living in Boston in 1782. 

William Bird (1787). AUTHORITY: Boston ' Saturday Evening Gazette, 1886, "Taverns in 

Records. Olden Times, N •. 5." 

William Call (1787). Authority: Wyman's 
Genealogies and Estates of Charlestown. 



224 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND j-,^ 

Benjamin Cobb, Jr. (1787), distiller, of Boston, son of Benjamin and Bethia 
(Homer) Cobb, was born in Yarmouth, Mass., and was published, November, 1780, to 
marry Lucy Jackson. His distillery was on "Orange Street ; house, Washington Street." 
Benjamin Cobb, Jr.'s (1787), mother was a niece of Michael Homer (1768). 

Mr. Whitman (1810) says of Mr. Cobb (1787), he was "admitted a member of 
the church while young, and was a worthy, industrious, and respectable man, having a 
large family." He never held any office in the Artillery Company. 

William Dall (1787), merchant, of Boston, son of William and Elizabeth Dall, was 
born in Boston, Dec. 22, 1753, and he died Sept. 18, 1829. He was published, Jan. 17, 
1781, to marry Mary Parker, of Boston. He is given in the Boston Directory of 1796 
as " shop-keeper, Orange Street; house, Washington Street." He never held any office 
in the Artillery Company. He was identified with the militia, and held the grade of 
captain. 

Phineas Dana (1787). 

John Fenno (1787), " cordwainer, leather-bucket maker, and maker of hose for 
engines and West India use," on Orange Street, son of John and Hannah, his wife, was 
born in Boston, May 4, 1732. He was clerk of the Artillery Company in 1788. 

John Fenno (1787) joined the Old South Church, Jan. 5, 1772, and became a mem- 
ber of The Massachusetts Lodge, A. F. and A. M., May 2, 1774. He visited Massachu- 
setts Grand Lodge in 1773 and 1779. 

Lemuel Gardner (1787), cooper, of Boston, was published to marry Deborah Hum- 
phreys, of Weymouth, July 9, 1777. He became a member of the Old South Church, 
April 7, 1782. Capt. Gardner (1787) was second sergeant of the Artillery Company in 
1790, ensign in 1792, lieutenant in 1799, and its captain in 1803. In 1789, his 
cooper's shop was on Garaner's Wharf, and his residence on Fish, now North, Street. 
He was one of the contributors, June 18, 1792, towards purchasing a new bell for the 
New Brick Society. The bell bore this inscription, "The First Church Bell cast in 
Boston, 1792, by P. Revere." 

" He lived at a time of prosperity among mechanics in Boston, who, earning their 
money easy, lived generously. He belonged to a set, very hospitable, whose sideboards 
were loaded with plate, and who brought up their families in expensive style. They 
were enterprising, ready to promote all public improvements, firm friends, carried a great 
sway in public, sung good songs, and seldom had a heavy heart or felt want." 

He was elected captain of the Independent Corps of Republican Volunteers in 
August, 1787. His brother, Joshua, Jr., joined the Artillery Company in 1798. 

John Green ( 1787) was born in 1759. He was published to marry Rebecca Gorden, 
"forbid by her mother," Dec. 16, 1777. He died at Cambridgeport, Mass., June 24, 
1826, aged sixty-seven years. 

Benjamin Cobb, Jr. (1787). Authorities: John Fenno (1787). Authorities : Boston 
Boston Records; Bridgman's Mem. of King's Chapel Records; Early Masonic Records. 
Burial-Ground. Lemuel Gardner (1787). Authorities : Bos- 
William Dall (1787). Authority: Boston ton Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Corn- 
Records, pany, 2d Ed. 



1787] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 225 

David Hatch (1787), broker, of Boston. His office was No. 28 Marlborough, now 
Washington, Street. He was captain of the Ward 10 military company in Boston, in 

1787-8. 

Peter Parker (1787), son of John and Experience (Cloyes) Parker, was born in 
Framingham, Oct. 3, 1738. He married, Dec. 8, 1761, Ruth Eaton. He became a 
leading citizen of Framingham : was one of the Committee of Correspondence, Inspec- 
tion, and Safety during the Revolutionary War, and one of the committee of the town 
appointed to provide for the families of the soldiers who enlisted in the Continental 
Army. He was active in the church of which he became a member May 22, 1763; 
was selectmen in 1777, and from 1779 t0 1782 inclusive; town treasurer from 1783 to 
1786 inclusive, and was one of a committee of fifty persons to examine the new constitu- 
tion of Massachusetts, in 1780. He was also town collector and a member of the com- 
pany of alarm soldiers, under Capt. Kmmes. He was a member of the militia for many 
years, and rose to the grade of captain. 

Capt. Parker (1787) died Nov. 5, 1803, aged sixty-five years. 

William Shattuck (1787), merchant, of Boston, son of John and Martha (Ham- 
mond) Shattuck, of Roxbury, was born in Newton, Dec. 24, 1749, and died in New York, 
April 2, 1807, aged fifty-eight years. His place of business was No. 41 Long Wharf, and 
his residence, in 1796, was on Milk Street, just below the Old South. Mr. Shattuck 
(1787) received the Masonic degrees in the Lodge of St. Andrew, of Boston, in 1777, at 
the same time that Edward Tuckerman (1765) did. During the Revolution, and for a 
short time before and after, he was one of the most prominent and wealthy merchants 
of Boston. He became involved to a very large amount by indorsements for other 
parties, and, it is said, lost thereby over one hundred thousand dollars. He applied his 
wealth to the payment of these debts, and afterward was employed in the custom-house 
in Boston. He held that position from 1789 until his decease. He married Martha, 
daughter of Peter and Sarah Payson. She died March 26, 1807. 

Ezra Whitney (1787), merchant, of Boston, son of James and Martha (Rice) 
Whitney, was born Feb. 22, 1730. He married, (1) Feb. 14, 1754, Mary Morse, (2) 

Elizabeth , (3) in 1760, Agnes Ross. For a short time he resided in Boston. His 

store, where he sold West India goods, and his residence, were on Orange, now Washing- 
ton, Street. He was lieutenant in the Ward 12 military company of Boston in 1787-8. 
He died Sept. 24, 1804, aged seventy-four years. 

Jeremiah Williams (1787), blacksmith, of Roxbury, son of Jeremiah and Katherine, 
was born in that town, Nov. 10, 1762. He married, in August, 1787, Matilda, the 
youngest daughter of Hon. Caleb Davis (1786). He was active in the militia, and rose 
to the grade of captain. He resided in the old mansion, yet standing, on the corner 
of Amory Street, near the railroad bridge, in Roxbury, known as the "John Curtis 

Peter Parker (1787). Authorities: Barry's Ezra Whitney (1787). Authority: Whit- 

Hist. of Framingham; Parker Genealogy. ney Genealogy. 

William Shattuck (1787). Authority: Bos- Jeremiah Williams (1787). Authorities: 

ton Records. Crane's Tea Leaves of 1773, p. 170; Roxbury Rec- 

ords; Drake's Hist, of Roxbury, p. 398. 



2 26 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[1787 



House." He was a nephew of Col. Joseph, a distinguished citizen, and a brother of 
Major Edward Payson Williams, an officer of the Revolutionary Army, who died in 
the service. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1787 is as follows : — 

"January, 1787. The Committee appointed to consider what, in their opinion 
would be the most proper uniform for the Ancient & Honorable Artillery Company, 
having attended that duty, beg leave to Report : — 1st. The Coats be made of deep blue 
cloth, & faced with buff, lappelled, & straps on the shoulders to secure the belts, with 
hooks & eyes at the skirts; the Buttons plain yellow, double-washed. 2d Buff Vest & 
Breeches, buttons uniform with the Coats. 3d A plain black hatt, with a black button 
loop & cockade, cocked soldier like & uniform as possible. 4th. White linen spatter- 
dashes, to fasten under the foot & come part up the thigh, with black buttons & black 
Garters to buckle below the knee. 5th. White Stocks. 6th Bayonett & Pouch Belts — 
white — two & half inches wide, to be worn over the Shoulders. 7th. The pouches to 
be uniform. 8th. The Hair to be Clubbed. 9th. The Guns to be as nigh uniform as 
possible. 10th. White Ruffled Shirts, at Wrist & Bosom, nth. Your Committee 
recommend that our Standard have a device and motto, & that a Committee be 
appointed for that purpose. 12th. That the drums & fifes uniform be the same as the 
Company Coats reversed. — The above Report read by paragraphs & accepted by a 
large majority of the Company. The Committee appointed to attend to the motto & 
device on the Standard consist of five. The Company made choice of the following 
gentlemen, Samuel Gore [1786], John Johnston [1786], Capt. Bell [1756], Josiah 
Waters [1769], John May [1786]. The Company Voted, That the musick Clothing 
shall be paid for out of the Company's funds by a draft on the Treasurer. Voted, that 
Col. Josiah Waters [1769] shall get a complete uniform made & appear with the same 
before the Company as a pattern. Attest ; William Dawes, Jun. Clerk. 

"Friday, May nth. 1787. Voted, that Capt W™ Bell [1756], Capt John Stutson 
[1765] Maj. William Dawes [1768], Col. Josiah Waters [1769], & Col. Amasa Davis 
[1786] be a Committee to provide a Dinner for the Ancient & Honorable Company of 
Artillery at Faneuil Hall on Monday the fourth day of June next. Voted, as the Com- 
pany have passed a vote to allow thirty pounds out of the Funds of said Company, that 
every member bear an equal Proportion of the sum necessary to complete the expenses 
of the day, that may arise over & above the thirty pounds. The Committee appointed 
to wait on the Rev. Mr. John Clarke to preach the Artillery Election Sermon, have waited 
on him, and report to the Company that he complies with their request. 

"Attest; William Dawes, Jun. Clerk. 

"Monday, June 4th. 1787. The weather being bad, the Company met at the Old 
South Meeting House, waited on the Governor, Lt Governor, & Council from the Council 
Chamber to the Brick Meeting House. The Rev. Mr. John Clarke preached a Sermon 
adapted to the occasion. The Company proceeded to Faneuil Hall, where a dinner was 
provided. At four o'clock they marched into the Common, where, under arms, they 
unanimously made choice of the following Gentlemen as Officers to the Company for the 
present year, viz : — 

"Major General John Brooks [1786], Captain. Col. Josiah Waters [1769], Lieuten- 
ant. Mr. Ebenezer Torrey [1765], Ensign. Capt. William Todd, Jun [1773], Capt, 
John Johnston [1786], Capt Francis Green [1786] & Capt. Thomas Wells [1786] as 



1787] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 227 

Sergeants; John Winslow [1786] as Clerk; Col. Joseph Jackson [1738] as Treasurer. 
The Company then adjourned to the Hall. Voted, that Capt Bell [1756], Capt. Stut- 
son [1765], Gen Brooks [1786], Col. Waters [1769] & Mr. Torrey [1765] be a Com- 
mittee to wait on Mr. Clarke & return him the Company's thanks, and desire a copy of 
his Sermon for the press. Voted that the Company meet on Monday evening next, at 
the Hall, at seven o'clock. Attest ; John Winslow, Clerk. 

"Monday, June nth. The Company met at Faneuil Hall at seven o'clock for 
exercise. Voted, The Thanks of the Company be given to Maj. William Dawes Jun. 
[1768] for his faithful services as Clerk. Voted, That Mr. Robert Jenkins [1756] & Mr. 
Thomas Clark [1786] be a Committee to examine the Clerk's accounts. Voted, That Gen. 
John Brooks [1786], Col. Josiah Waters [1769], Mr Ebenezer Torrey [1765] & Col. Joseph 
Jackson [1738] be a Committee to take up the finances of the Company at large, in such 
way & manner as they may judge necessary— to take such counsel of whatever kind they 
may think expedient, and in all respects conduct for the Company as though they were 
acting for themselves, and make report of their doings as soon as may be. Voted, That 
the Company meet once a fortnight for exercise 'till the first of August next. 

" Monday, September. — , Capt William Bell [1756] presented the Company with 
two Espontoons & desired their acceptance. Voted, The thanks of the Company be 
given to Capt Bell [1756] for the compliment made them. Voted, Unanimously, that 
Capt. Bell [1756] be on the Honorary List agreeable to his request 

" Monday, October. Faneuil Hall. Voted, The Company meet for exercise the first 
Monday evening in Feb'y next, at 6 o'clock." 

On Monday, April 2, 1787, the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massa- 
chusetts, commanded by Major Bell (1756), paraded in State Street, and marched into 
the Common, where they went through their usual manoeuvres and evolutions. The 
Company was in uniform, and made a fine appearance. 

June 4, 1787, being the first Monday in June, agreeably to their charter, and accord- 
ing to ancient custom, the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company held their annual 
election. 

The corps, escorting his Excellency the governor, his Honor the lieutenant-governor, 
and several other distinguished characters, accompanied by the officers of the regiment 
of militia, and those of the Independent Cadets, Light Infantry, Republican Volunteers, 
and Fusileers, proceeded from the council chamber to the Old Brick Meeting-House, 
where the Rev. John Clarke delivered the anniversary discourse. After divine service, the 
procession was joined by the officers of the troop of horse, selectmen, and other gentle- 
men, and proceeded to Faneuil Hall, where the whole participated in an elegant enter- 
tainment provided by the corps, which concluded with a number of patriotic toasts. 

In the afternoon, by invitation of the governor, the gentlemen of the procession 
repaired to his Excellency's house, where they partook of a cold collation, tea, coffee, 
etc. The Artillery, having marched into the Common, elected their officers for the 
current year, viz.: Hon. Major-Gen. John Brooks (1786), captain ; Col Josiah Waters 
(1769), lieutenant ; Mr. Ebenezer Torrey (1765), ensign. The Artillery Company then 
proceeded to the mansion of his Excellency Gov. John Hancock, where, having partaken 
of refreshments, they paraded on the ground marked out for the purpose. His 
Excellency the governor, the lieutenant-governor, with other gentlemen, repaired thither, 
and, being seated, the corps performed their several manoeuvres and firings. His Excel- 



228 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[1787 



lency then, agreeably to ancient usage, received their badges from the officers of the 
past year, and delivered the same to the newly elected. The business of the day being 
concluded, the corps, escorting a number of gentlemen of the procession, returned to 
Faneuil Hall, and finished the day with those pleasing sensations which friendship, good 
humor, and conviviality inspire. At dinner the corps were honored with the company 
of the honorable French and Dutch consuls, several of the reverend clergy, and a large 
number of respectable gentlemen. 

Sept. 3, 1787, the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company made their first 
autumnal parade on the Common, under the command of Hon. Major-Gen. Brooks 
(1786), the captain. The exercise, evolutions, and firings, were performed in a manner 
that was honorable to the officers and Company, and obtained the approbation of 
numerous spectators. 

Monday, Oct. 1, 1787, the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, of this 
Commonwealth, commanded by Major-Gen. Brooks (1786), "made their second autumnal 
appearance, agreeably to charter. The Company marched from State Street at twelve 
o'clock, for Medford. At Charlestown they were received by the Medford Independent 
Light Infantry, under the command of Capt. Hall, who escorted them to the place of 
destination. 

The Artillery there performed the requisite firings and evolutions, after which they 
dined at Blanchard's tavern, and returned to Boston at eight o'clock in the evening. 
Among the extemporaneous toasts drank on this occasion were the following : first, " Gen. 
Washington and the Federal Constitution " ; second, "The Constitution of the United 
States, reported by that honorable body" ; third, "As old Massachusetts took the lead in 
the late glorious Revolution, may she be the first to give a sanction to the American Con- 
stitution of Government"; ninth, "May the man who wantonly opposes the American 
Constitution, framed by the late convention, be marked as an enemy to the liberties of 
America." 

April 19, 1787, the Independent Light Infantry, commanded by Major Otis, made 
its first public appearance in complete uniform. 

July 24, 1787, a corps, newly formed, composed of the non-commissioned officers of 
the Boston regiment, made its first public appearance in uniform. 

The Independent Corps of Republican Volunteers celebrated its birthday on Satur- 
day, Nov. 17, 1787. On Thursday, May 15, 1788, the corps "dissolved," on which 
occasion the Company dined at Mr. Tant's coffee-house. After dinner, toasts were drank. 
Among them were : " (9) May the Republican Volunteer Corps, now dissolved, ever 
remain united as friends and citizens"; and " (10) The Ancient and Honorable Artil- 
lery, — may it ever be a nursery for the soldier, and may every succeeding officer 
possess the virtues of the present commander." 

Rev. John Clarke delivered the Artillery election sermon in 1787. He was a son of 
John and Sarah Clarke, and was born in Portsmouth, N. H., April 13, 1755. After a long 
residence at Portsmouth, his father's family moved to Salem, Mass., where his father, a 
sea-captain by occupation, received an appointment as clerk in a public office. The son 
entered the public Latin School in 1761, and graduated at Harvard College in 1774. He 
received the 'degree of A. M. in 1777. After his graduation he taught a few pupils for a 

Rev. John Clarke. Authority: Ellis's Hist, of First Church. 











.&- 



6l 



1788] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 229 

short time, but devoted his leisure hours to the study of divinity. He soon began to 
preach, and acquired a good reputation as a preacher. The First Church in Boston 
invited him to be the colleague of Dr. Chauncy. That venerable preacher welcomed 
Mr. Clarke with great kindness. After Dr. Chauncy's death, Mr. Clarke remained as 
sole pastor and teacher until his earthly labors were ended. As he was preaching in his 
own pulpit, April 1, 1798, he was attacked by apoplexy, and fell backward. He expired 
the next morning, April 2, at the age of forty-two years. Dr. Thacher preached the 
funeral sermon. Two volumes of Dr. Clarke's sermons were published after his decease. 



qq The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1788 were: Benjamin 

[ VOL). Lincoln ( : 7 86 )> captain; Lieut.-Col. John Winslow (1786), lieutenant ; Capt. 

' John Johnston (1786), ensign. Major William Bird (1787) was first sergeant ; 

Capt. Nathaniel Call (1774), second sergeant; Major Andrew Cunningham (1786), 

third sergeant; Joseph Spear, Jr. (1774), fourth sergeant, and John Fenno (1787), clerk. 

In 1788-9, Col. Andrew Symmes, Jr. (1760), and Col. John Boyle (1769) were aides- 
de-camp on Gov. Hancock's staff; Gen. Lincoln (1786) commanded the First Division, 
Massachusetts Volunteer Militia; Joseph Hall, Jr. (1788), was aide-de-camp on the staff 
of Major-Gen. Brooks (1786), commander of the Third Division, Massachusetts Volunteer 
Militia. John May (1786) was colonel of the Boston regiment; John Winslow (1786), 
major, and Andrew Cunningham (1786), adjutant. Among the line officers were : Peter 
Green (1788), captain of company in Wards 1 and 2 ; Lemuel Gardner (1787), captain 
of company in Wards 3 and 4; Samuel Prince (1788), lieutenant of the same; David 
Hatch (1787), captain of company in Ward 10; Benjamin Russell (1788), ensign of 
company in Ward n ; William Bird (1787), captain of company in Ward 12 ; Ezra Whit- 
ney (1787) was lieutenant of the same. 

Russell Sturgis (1786) was first lieutenant of the Company of Artillery, and Samuel 
Bradlee (1765) adjutant of the same. 

Feb. 12, 1788, agreeably to the orders of Major-Gen. Lincoln (1786), appointed to 
the command of the First Division of Massachusetts Militia in December, 1785, the 
several detached military corps in Boston and vicinity formed into one battalion for the 
purpose of celebrating the ratification of the Federal Constitution by the convention of 
this State. This was their first battalion formation. The corps comprised the following 
companies, and are named in order as they were formed in battalion line, from right to 
left, viz. : (1) Capt. Tyler's Horse, from Roxbury ; (2) Independent Light Infantry; 
(3) Capt. Spooner's Artillery, from Roxbury; (4) Independent Cadets ; (5) Boston 
Fusileers; (6) Republican Volunteers; (7) Boston Artillery; (8) Boston Light 
Infantry ; the whole commanded by Lieut.-Col. Bradford. 

During 1788, the formation of companies, regiments, brigades, and divisions had 
become so perfected throughout the State that reviews were held in the various counties, 
and military interest prevailed in Massachusetts as never before. 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1788 were : John Bray, Thomas 
Curtis, Josiah Eliot, Peter Green, Joseph Hall, Jr., William Hull, Joseph Loring, Joseph 
Lovering, Jr., Samuel Prince, Benjamin Russell, Elisha Sigourney, Samuel Swan, Eben- 
ezer Thayer, Jr., Abraham Wild, Elijah Williams. 



230 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7 g 8 

John Bray (1788), cooper, of Boston, was born in Boston, Aug. 4, 1761. He 
married Sally Chapman, 1 Nov. 10, 1785, by whom he had twelve children, one of whom 
married Zachariah G. Whitman (1810), the former historian of the Artillery Company. 

Mr. Whitman (1810) says of Major Bray (1788), that he served his apprenticeship 
in Boston and Charlestown. " Commencing life poor, he acquired by his industry an 
independence. He was a culler and packer of fish, having at one time eighteen journey- 
men and apprentices, on Spear's Wharf, which he owned. As one of three weighers and 
gaugers in the custom-house, who were then paid by fees, I have heard him say that his 
share, on one occasion, was seven hundred and fifty dollars for a month. After Gen. 
Lincoln [1786] resigned, he was removed by his successor for his political opinions, and 
lived at ease on his income. Having had small advantages of education, which he 
always lamented, he balanced it by providing the best education for his children. He 
was passionate, but never vindictive, and his sudden transitions were peculiar. His 
house was the hospitable resort of old and young, whose enjoyment he delighted to wit- 
ness, and he was charitable and kind to his poor neighbors. 

" In August, 182 1, he, attended by his wife, was robbed on the Medford Turnpike, by 
the notorious Martin, of fourteen dollars and a gold watch. The thief was apprehended. 
Martin rode up to his chaise, on horseback, presented a pistol to his breast, and 
demanded his money and watch, which he gave him. Mrs. Bray wore a gold watch, also, 
and she asked him if he wanted her's, when he answered, ' he robbed gentlemen only.' 
Major Bray [1788] became anxious to have Martin reprieved, his sentence commuted, or 
have him pardoned, and was much distressed at the idea of his testimony being the 
means of taking life. On the day of the execution, he had determined to visit him ; his 
family remonstrated, and watched him ; yet he eluded their vigilance, and was prevented 
by some acquaintance from rushing into the crowd around the scaffold. He had, up to 
this time, been corpulent, but, before his death, he became extremely emaciated. His 
mind also was greatly shaken. Conviviality was no longer agreeable to him, and the 
pleasures of company were so irksome that his festive board was less frequently spread, 
until it was wholly laid aside." 

The only civil office he ever held was that of selectman. He was a founder of the 
North End Artillery, called the " Columbian Artillery," and was elected its senior lieu- 
tenant. He succeeded Col. Robert Gardner (1794) as its captain in 1801, and was pro- 
moted to be major of the Sublegion of Artillery in 1803. He was third sergeant of the 
Artillery Company in 1790, ensign in 1793, lieutenant in 1798, and continued an active 
member until his death. 

He became a member of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association, June 
2, 1795. Mr. Bray (1788) was a member of Rising States Lodge, A. F. and A. M., and 
at one time its master, and was admitted a member of St. Andrew's Royal Arch Chapter, 
Dec. 24, 1800. He left a valuable property, and died Aug. 12, 1829, aged sixty- 
eight years. 

Rev. Mr. Porter, in " Rambles in Old Boston, New England," says : — 

" Adjoining the Newman house, on Salem Street, is a large brick dwelling, facing 
the south, and once connected with extensive gardens reaching through to Margaret 
Street. This was the residence of Major John Bray (1788), a custom-house officer for 

John Bray (1788). Authorities: Whit- ' Boston Records say Sally Cheeseinan, (pub- 

man's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 1842; lished) Oct. 20, 1785. 
Mass. Military Rolls; Early Masonic Records. 



i 7 88j HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 23 1 

many years, and the owner of Bray's Wharf, where Chatham Street now is. Major Bray 
(1788) was a cooper by trade, and a large packer of fish. He was a selectman, a mem- 
ber of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, and a founder of the Columbian 
Artillery Company, a favorite organization, composed mostly of North End mechanics, 
whose gun-house was on Copp's Hill. 

" Every day, precisely at eleven, he would throw down his tools, put on his coat, and 
start for Walsh's lemon-stand, on Dock Square. The only foreign fruit to be had at that 
time, in Boston, was sold in the street from small stands, at three or four central points. 
When lemons were very expensive, the major would take out a handful of change, and 
tell Walsh to help himself, as he did not wish to know the cost. He would then go home 
with his lemon, prepare his punch, and take his dinner, and by half past one he was 
always back at work again at his wharf." 

Thomas Curtis (1788), merchant, of Boston. He was brigade quartermaster of 
the First Brigade, Third Division, Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, from 1788 to 1796, 
on the staff of Brig.-Gen. William Hull (1788). He resided, in 1796, in Rainsford's 
Lane, now Front Street. He died Nov. 26, 1823, aged fifty-nine years. 

Josiah Eliot (1788), ship-chandler, of Boston, son of Rev. Andrew, Jr., and Eliza- 
beth (Langdon) Eliot, was born Jan. 31, 1745. When he joined the Artillery Company 
he kept a ship-chandler's store on Market Square, now Faneuil Hall Square. 

Mr. Whitmore, in "New England Genealogical and Historical Register," Vol. 
XXIII., page 338, says Josiah Eliot " went to Georgia." 

Peter Green (1788), was an auctioneer in Boston. He came from the State of 
Rhode Island, and was published to marry Polly Webb, of Boston, Aug. 7, 1780. In 
1789, his place of business was on Market Square, and in 1796 he lived on Back, now 
Salem, Street. 

He was greatly interested in military matters. After some years of service he 
became, in 1787, captain of the Ward 1 and 2 military company, in Boston, was pro- 
moted to be major of the First Regiment, First Brigade, First Division, Massachusetts 
Volunteer Militia, in 1790, and lieutenant-colonel in 179 1-2. 

Joseph Hall, Jr. (1788), lawyer, of Boston, son of Joseph and Abigail Hall, was 
born in Boston, April 26, 1761. He graduated at Harvard College in 1781, and studied 
law in the office of Col. Benjamin Hichborn. He married, May 22, 1787, Ann Adams, 
and, after her decease, married Sarah, daughter of Rev. Ellis Gray. Mr. Gray delivered 
the Artillery election sermon in 1749. 

On the evening of the march of the British regulars upon Lexington and Concord, 
he was dispatched by his father to Roxbury, in order to carry intelligence to Gen. 
Warren of the intended attack. His father had learned, at that early period, the purpose 
for which the troops were mustering, through a domestic in the family, who was intimate 
with one of the nurses employed in the military hospital, near the family residence in 
Portland Street. 1 Major Hall (1788) was a member of Gen Brooks's (1786) staff from 

Peter Green (1788). Authority: State Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 1842; 
Militia Rolls. Boston Records. 

Joseph Hall, Jr. (1788). Authorities: l Loring's One Hundred Boston Orators, p. 307. 



232 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7 8g 

1788 to 1796, and during Shays' insurrection; was a representative in the General 
Court; high sheriff of Suffolk County from 1818 to 1825, when he succeeded Judge 
Dawes, son of Col. Thomas, Jr. (1754), as judge of probate for Suffolk County. He 
held this office until 1836, when he resigned. He delivered the oration before the town 
authorities and citizens of Boston, July 4, 1800. He became conspicuous in Boston in 
1795, by his fearless advocacy of the treaty which Mr. John Jay negotiated with Great 
Britain. At first he stood alone ; in a twelve-month the town stood with him. 1 He 
died April 15, 1848. 

William Hull (1788), lawyer, of Newton, was born at Derby, Conn., June 24, 1753, 
and died at Newton, Mass., Nov. 25, 1825, aged seventy-two years. He graduated at 
Yale College in 1772, subsequently taught school, and then studied law at Litchfield, 
Conn, being admitted to' the bar in 1775. He married, in 1781, Sarah, only daughter 
of Hon. Abraham Fuller, of Newton. They had seven daughters and one son, the 
latter, Capt. A. F. Hull, was killed at the battle of Lundy's Lane, in July, 1814, aged 
twenty-eight years. Rev. James Freeman Clarke, of Boston, was a grandson of Gen. 
Hull (1788). In April, 1775, Mr. Hull (1788) was chosen captain of a military com- 
pany raised in Derby, Conn., with which he marched to Cambridge, and remained in 
the vicinity until the siege of Boston was raised and the army ordered into New York 
State. 

He was in active service throughout the Revolutionary War, and proved himself to 
be an able, reliable, and brave officer. He rose to the rank of colonel, and was intrusted 
by Washington with many and important duties. He commanded the troops which 
escorted Washington into New York, Nov. 25, 1783, and when the Revolutionary army 
was disbanded, with the exception of one regiment and a corps of artillery, Washington 
selected Col. Hull (1788) to be the lieutenant-colonel of the regiment. In 1784, the 
government sent him to Quebec to demand possession of the forts at Niagara, Detroit, 
and Mackinah. After his discharge from military service he settled in Newton, practised 
law successfully, and acquired wealth. 

He was a member of the Masonic Fraternity, and was " nominated and appointed " 
junior warden of a Travelling Lodge in the American army, Oct. 6,- 1779. Dec. 11, 
1797, he was first on the petition presented to the Grand Lodge, praying for a charter to 
hold a Lodge in Watertown. The prayer was granted, and William Hull (1788) became 
a charter member, and the first worshipful master of Meridian Lodge, A. F. and A. M. 
(1798), of Watertown, now (1896) of Natick, Mass. 

He became identified with politics, and was a member of the House of Representa- 
tives, and afterward of the Senate of Massachusetts. He was in France during the 
revolution of 1798, and on his return home was appointed by the governor a judge of 
the Court of Common Pleas, and was elected major-general of the Third Division of 
State militia. In 1805, he was appointed by the President governor of the Michigan 
Territory. He made important treaties with the Indians, which added to the public 
domain. Tecumseh, at the head of disaffected Indians, made war upon the whites, and 
Gov. Hull (1788) was offered the position of brigadier-general of the American forces, 
which he declined. Circumstances, however, made his final acceptance necessary, and 

William Hull (1788). Authorities: Military nati; New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 1855, 1857, 

and Civil Life of Gen. Hull, by his daughter, Mrs. 1871, 1893. 

Campbell, and his grandson, James Freeman Clarke; ' One Hundred Boston Orators, p. 307, 

Drake's Mem. of the Mass. Society of the Cincin- 



i 7 88] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 233 

war was declared by the United States. The conflict was carried on during the summer 
of 181 2, and on Aug. 16, 1812, "cutoff from supplies," with inferior numbers, and to save 
the lives of the soldiers and frontiersmen, he surrendered to the enemy. A court-martial 
was held Jan. 3, 1814, Gen. Dearborn (1816) being appointed president. The court, which 
was notoriously an unfair one, found Gen. Hull (1788) guilty of the charges preferred, 
and sentenced him to be shot. President Madison approved the sentence, and then 
pardoned the convicted officer. He returned to Newton, and spent the remainder of 
his days in retirement. He published a series of letters before his death, in vindication 
of his conduct. These restored, in a great measure, his former fame, and he was very 
generally accounted a sacrifice to political intrigue. "In delicacy to the feelings of a 
valuable member, hereafter appearing on the roll, and whose own political life and 
character have ever been marked by a high sense of probity and honor, we forbear to 
rake open the ashes of the dead, which a further illustration of the facts might warrant, 
but leave posterity to judge impartially for themselves." ' In 1825, the leading men of 
Boston expressed their sympathy for and confidence in Gen. Hull (1788) by a public 
dinner. The same year he undertook a journey to his native town, in Connecticut, but 
exerting himself beyond his strength he was taken ill and died. 

He was commander of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company in 1789, and 
a distinguished member of the Society of the Cincinnati. He was counsel for the 
Artillery Company in its suit to recover the Dunstable lands. Gen. Hull (1788) was 
of fine personal appearance, of polished manners, and amiable disposition. 

Joseph Loring (1788), jeweller and goldsmith, of Boston, son of Joshua and 
Rebecca (Lobdell) Loring, was born July 21, 1743, an d married (published) (3) Sally 
Pratt, Oct. 12, 1786. He was a brother of Joshua (1769) and Israel (1768) Loring, 
originally of Hingham. He was second sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1791. In 
1788-96, his store was at No. 3 Union Street, his house being on Court Street. His son, 
Col. Joseph Loring, Jr., joined the Artillery Company in 1793. 

When Joseph Loring (1788) was captain-lieutenant, or first lieutenant of artillery, 
perhaps in Crane's regiment, probably in Capt. Perkins's company, he was made a prisoner 
on Long Island, and held as such some nine months, but returned to Boston, July, 1777. 
He was married in July following, in a new suit of regimentals. 2 He was promoted to "be 
captain. 

Joseph Lovering, Jr. (1788), tallow-chandler, of Boston, son of Joseph and Sarah 
(Ellis) Lovering, was born Sept. 19, 1758. He married (published Aug. 23, 1780) 
Esther Martin, of Boston. She died June 7, 1788, and was buried "from her late home 
on Holyoke Street." He married, (2) Jan. 13, 1789, Ann Phillips, who died Feb. 25, 
1829, and, (3) in October, 1829, Mary Langdon Bowland, widow of Nathaniel Wales. 
She died June 23, 1849. 

He followed the trade of his father, and was for some years of the firm of Joseph 
Lovering & Sons, manufacturers of " Spermaceti and Tallow Candles, Hard and Soft 

Joseph Lovering, Jr. (1788). Authorities: 2 Letter of Henry Loring, Nov. 29, 1836, to 

Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 1842; Major Judah Allen, in New Eng. Hist, and -Gen. 
Boston Records. Reg., 1885, p. 186. 

1 Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 
1842. 



234 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7 g 8 

Soap, Poland Starch, and Hair-powder, No. 49 State Street." His dwelling-house was 
on Nassau Street in 1796. The manufactory of the firm was on South Bennet Street. 
Later he resided on the northeast corner of Hollis and Tremont streets, afterward on 
Washington Street, on the corner of the present Lovering Place, where he died. 

Mr. Lovering (1788) related to reliable persons, several years before his decease, 
that on the evening of Dec. 16, 1773, when he was fifteen years of age, he held the light 
in Mr. Crane's carpenter's shop while Mr. Crane and other young men, fifteen in num- 
ber, disguised themselves for the occasion. (His father then lived on the corner of 
Hollis and Tremont streets, opposite the Cranes and Bradlees ) Mr. Lovering (1788) 
"appears to have been the youngest person connected with this affair of whom we have 
any knowledge. His boyish curiosity led him to accompany the party to the scene of 
operations at Griffin's Wharf, and on the following morning he was closely questioned 
and severely reprimanded by his parents, for being out after nine o'clock at night, as 
they were strict in their requirement that he should be in bed at that hour." ' 

Mr. Lovering (1788) was a member of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic 
Association, and its treasurer nineteen years (1808-26) ; member of the Massachusetts 
Humane Society ; selectman of Boston from 1812 to 1819 ; alderman in the first city 
council of Boston in 1822 ; representative to the General Court, and member of Hollis 
Street and South Congregational churches. His portrait, of which a reproduction is 
given in the "Tea Leaves," is now in the possession of his granddaughter, Mrs. Mary 
L. Smith. Ensign Lovering's (1788) second wife, Ann Phillips, was a descendant of 
Major William Phillips (1644). 

He was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1792, and ensign in 1797. He 
died June 13, 1848, aged eighty-nine years and nine months, — the senior member on 
the Company roll. 

Samuel Prince (1788), tailor, of Boston, son of John and Esther, his wife, was 
born in Boston, Dec. 13, 1760. He resided on Back Street, now Salem Street. He was 
fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1789, and lieutenant in 1794. In 1787-8, 
he held the position of lieutenant of the military company in Boston recruited in Wards 
3 and 4. 

• Mr. Prince (1788) received the Masonic degrees in The Massachusetts Lodge in 
May and July, 1789, and became a member of that Lodge, Sept. 14, 1789. 

Benjamin Russell (1788), printer, of Boston, son of John Russell, and nephew of 
Joseph Russell, so long the town treasurer of Boston, was born in Boston, Sept. 13, 1762. 
His father, grandfather, and great-grandfather were born, lived, and died in Boston. His 
English ancestor was John Russell, who settled in Woburn in 1635, whose son was Rev. 
John Russell, pastor of the First Baptist Church in Boston. 

On the 19th of April, 1775, Benjamin was nearly thirteen years of age, and attended 
Master Carter's school. He says, in a statement written by himself : — 

" In the morning, soon after the opening of the town school (which was kept in 

Samuel Prince (1788). Authorities: Hist. 10, 1845; Annals of Mass. Char. Mech. Association; 

of Massachusetts Lodge, A. F. and A. M. ; Mass. Moore's Masonic Magazine, Vol. IV.; Boston Rec- 

Military Rolls. ords; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, 

Benjamin Russell (1788). Authorities: Ed. 1842. 
Specimens of Newspaper Literature, Vol. II., Little ' Crane's Tea Leaves of 1773, p. 183. 

& Brown, 1850; Eulogy by Francis Baylies, March 



i 7 88] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 235 

Scollay's Buildings), martial music was heard, and the Regulars were seen in motion. 
They were soon paraded in Long Acre [Tremont Street], and the line extended from 
the head of the Mall [Park Street] to the head of Queen [Court] Street, facing which 
was the school-house. Lord Percy, mounted on a white horse, was busy in arranging 
the column. When these movements were seen, Master Carter sent out one of the boys 
for information. It came full soon. The British had fallen on the Americans at Lexing- 
ton, killed several, and sent for a reinforcement. Master Carter then said, ' Boys, war 
has begun; the school is broken up.' This announcement was received with three 
cheers, and the boys, having gained their own freedom, sallied forth to see whether the 
men would gain theirs. They followed in the rear of the column when the British took 
up the line of march, and followed as far as the colleges in Cambridge. The boys, being 
wearied, rested on the Common, and remained in that vicinity until near sunset, when a 
Mr. Hastings gave them some supper, and they slept in one of the college buildings. 
They could not return to Boston, which was in a state of close siege, but they had quarters in 
the colleges, which had been converted into barracks, and drew their rations as soldiers." 
"In these good quarters," continues the major ( 1788), " partaking of public and private 
bounty, we remained some weeks, with nothing to regret except that, owing to the close- 
ness of the siege, we could not inform our parents of our situation." 

On the morning of the 17th of June, cannon were heard in the direction of Boston 
and Charlestown, and the boys went down the Charlestown road to learn the cause, and 
to see the contest. The principal events of that day, as they transpired on Bunker Hill, 
were within the vision and understanding of Benjamin Russell (1788), though so young 
in years. Several of the boys crossed and recrossed to the Neck during the battle, — 
that same Neck over which an American officer told Gen. Putnam no one could cross 
and live. Gen. Putnam, on his " long-tailed Connecticut horse, often came near us," 
says Major Russell (1788), "and then we cheered him with an huzza for Old Put." 

After the battle, the boys returned to the colleges. Willing to do what they could 
to help the cause, they became useful by serving as -clerks of the companies. " It fell to 
my lot," says Major Russell (1788), " to become the clerk of the company of Connecticut 
troops commanded by Capt. Putnam, a nephew, or son, of the general. We were 
stationed, with other troops, on Prospect Hill, where the general was in command. I 
did duty as clerk until the ensuing August. One day I was returning from the commis- 
sary's depot with the weekly provisions of the company, having four men with me, and I 
met my father and uncle, who had just escaped from Boston. My father had not seen or 
heard of me since the 19th of April. He was so rejoiced to see me that he was about to 
shake me for not writing to him. One of the soldiers took fire, ' Don't shake that 
boy, sir,' said he; 'he is our clerk.'" An explanation took place; the father and son 
repaired to Gen. Putnam's tent, when, upon the application of the father, the son 
was honorably discharged from his first service as a Revolutionary soldier. On the next 
day, the father took him to Worcester, and apprenticed him to Isaiah Thomas, the cele- 
brated printer, founder of the Massachusetts Spy. 

In 1780, Mr. Thomas was drafted as a Continental soldier, and was obliged either 
to join the army or procure a substitute. Mr. Russell (1788) volunteered to stand in the 
place of his employer, and July 17, 1780, he started from Worcester for the seat of war. 
He joined the army at West Point. " I have heard Major Russell say," says Mr. 
Francis Baylies, in his eulogy on Hon. Benjamin Russell (1788), March 10, 1845, "that 
he was one of the guard of Major Andre" on the day of his execution." 



236 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND j-, 7 gg 

At the expiration of his enlistment he returned to Worcester, was released from his 
indenture by reason of his military service in the place of Mr. Thomas, and soon after 
removed to Boston. March 24, 1784, in company with William Warden, he began the 
publication of the Massachusetts Centinel. His partner died the next year, and he 
became the sole proprietor and editor of the paper which was afterwards called the 
Columbian Centinel. He continued the publication of the Centinel, as editor and 
proprietor, more than forty years, until November, 1828, when he retired from all con- 
nection with the press. In view of this service, and his fighting in behalf of the Adams 
cause for the presidency, a complimentary dinner was given him by his brother editors 
and printers. The course of Mr. Russell (1788), as editor of the Centinel, was wise, 
patriotic, and influential. He was a co-worker with the truest and best men of his time 
and commonwealth. He was firm for the adoption of the Constitution of the United 
States, and, largely through the influence of the Centinel, the mechanics of Boston were 
almost unanimous in the same opinion. He zealously supported Washington's adminis- 
tration in every particular and measure. 

In early life he also printed almanacs, pamphlets, etc., but his peculiar talents as 
editor gained him much celebrity, and gave his paper extensive circulation. His was, 
indeed, a busy life. From the beginning of his soldier life until his decease, the years 
seemed filled with humane, useful, and "practical work. He was one of the founders 
of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association, in 1795; was elected its vice- 
president, 1 798-1 806, and its president, 1807-21, when the association unanimously 
thanked him " for his able, successful, and unceasing exertions to promote the interest 
honor, and happiness of this association, during the fourteen years which he, with honor 
to himself and pride to the association, had presided over it." 

He was president of the board of health of the town of Boston five years ; a member 
of the school board five years, by election, and for four years by virtue of his office as 
alderman ; a delegate to the convention of 1820 ; a member of the common council from 
the organization of the city government in 1822 till 1825; a member of the board of 
aldermen in 1829, and was re-elected three successive years; a member of the House of 
Representatives from Boston from 1805 till 182 1, and from 1828 till 1835; a member 
of the State Senate in 1822 and 1825. In 1836 and 1837 he was a member of the 
executive council, which was his last public service. 

The gallant major was a very outspoken man, and did not hesitate to express his 
views at times and places where most other men would have hesitated to speak. On 
one occasion, at the New South Church, the minister read the governor's proclamation 
for Thanksgiving, concluding, as usual, "God save the Commonwealth of Massachusetts." 
Major Benjamin Russell (1788) arose in his seat, and exclaimed, "That was saved last 
Monday," — referring to the success of his candidate in the election. Mr. Benjamin 
Russell (1788) was the author of that remark concerning a certain prayer in church by 
the minister : " It was the most eloquent prayer ever addressed to a Boston audience " 
He was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1790, lieutenant in 1796 and 181 1, 
and its captain in 1801 and 1812. 

After the Revolutionary War he continued his military career. Joining one of the 
Boston military companies soon after his return, he was commissioned ensign in 1787. 
By regular steps, he became lieutenant of the Ward 6 military company in 1790, captain 
of the same from 1794 to 1798, and in 1799 was promoted to be major of the Boston regi- 
ment.. He was major of the First Sublegion in 1800. For a half century, nearly, he was 



I? 88] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 237 

generally spoken of as "Major Ben Russell." Mr. Benjamin Russell (1788) was a mem- 
ber of the Masonic Fraternity. Dec. 27, 1813, he was elected Grand Master of Masons 
in Massachusetts, and held that office three successive years. He was also a member 
of St. Andrew's Royal Arch Chapter, and of the Grand Chapter of Massachusetts. 

The decay of his faculties was gradual. He had no sickness. On the morning of 
Jan. 4, 1845, he lay down, and in an hour ceased to breathe. He suffered no painful 
struggle. The affectionate watcher noted not the transition from life to death. Thus 
died Major Benjamin Russell (1788), in the eighty-fourth year of his age. His funeral 
was attended by great numbers from those bodies with which Mr. Benjamin Russell 
(1788) had been identified, and a long procession of those who had been connected with 
him in friendly and social relations attended his remains to their resting-place in the Old 
Granary Burial-Ground. 

Elisha Sigourney (1788), merchant, of Boston, son of Daniel and Mary (Varney) 
Sigourney, of Boston, was born April 14, 1753. He married Ann ■ — — , who died in Bos- 
ton, June, 1818, aged seventy-three years. His place of business in 1790 was at No. 1 
Spear's Wharf, and his dwelling-house was in Southac Court, afterwards called Howard 
Street. He was a great-grandson of Andrew Sigourney, a French Protestant refugee, or 
Huguenot, who, from devotion to the cause of religious freedom, emigrated to Boston 
about 1686. Elisha Sigourney (1788) was "a man of strong mind, high sense of honor, 
scrupulously honest, indefatigable in business. Many of his acts of kindness were so 
abruptly communicated as to be unthankfully received." He was much relied upon for 
his sound judgment in every-day life, and, at his decease, was sincerely mourned by the 
business and social circles of Boston. Andrew Sigourney (1806) was his nephew. 

Mr. Elisha Sigourney (1788) became a member of St. Andrew's Lodge in 1778, and 
► of St. Andrew's Royal Arch Chapter, May 28, 1789. He died, highly esteemed, Oct. 
10, 181 1, and, it is said, "was buried on one of the islands" in Boston Harbor. 

Samuel Swan (1788), of Medford, son of Samuel and Joanna (Richardson) Swan, 
was born in Medford, Jan. 17, 1749-50. He married, March 5, 1778, Hannah Lawson, 
by whom he had seven children. She died Nov. 18, 1826, aged seventy years, and he 
died in November, 1825. 

March 4, 1776, after several years of military service, he appears as a member of 
Capt. William Adams's company, in Col. Thatcher's regiment, at Dorchester. He 
became assistant quartermaster of the Northern Army, under Gen. Lincoln (1786), in 
1776, also quartermaster and commissary, under Gen. Devens, at Ticonderoga, in 1777, 
and went several times with supplies for the troops at that place in 1776 and 1777. He 
was a purchasing agent for the Revolutionary Army from 1778 to 1783. The Revolu- 
tionary War Minutes of 1778 state " that he paid for beef, etc., down to the close of the 
war." A letter from the war office, dated December, 1779,10 the collectors of war taxes 
in Charlestown, Chelsea, Stoneham, and Reading, orders them " to pay the money col- 
lected to Samuel [1788] and Daniel Swan, to purchase beef for public use." 

At one time, while on his way to Ticonderoga, in 1776, with funds he had in charge 
for the troops, he came near being robbed. He was travelling on foot, with a knapsack 

Elisha Sigourney (17S8). Authorities: man's Charlestown Genealogies and Estates; Early 

Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 1842; Masonic Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. 

St. Andrew's Lodge and Chapter Records. Company, Ed. 1842; Usher's Hist, of Medford; 

Samuel Swan (1788). -Authorities: Wy- New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg, 1856. 



238 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7 88 

and a camp kettle on his back, and stopped early one morning to get a little rest at a 
log tavern, near a forest twelve miles in length, with only a cow-path through it. The 
landlord asked him some questions about his business, which he evaded as well as he 
could, as then there was sitting in the room a stranger, a tall, stout man, whose looks 
Mr. Swan (1788) did not like, and who, from his manner, he believed had an evil design. 
The man soon after left the room, and went off. Mr. Swan (1788) also soon left, with- 
out breakfast, and continued on his journey alone. He had not gone far, but two or 
three miles, when he saw the same man at some distance ahead of him sitting on a stump 
by the wayside. There was no other path to follow, and Mr. Swan (1788) could not 
avoid him, except by turning back ; but he was on urgent public business, and must go 
forward. Mr. Swan (1788), seeing the stranger was a strong man, and that he must 
escape by management, walked steadily on, all the time turning in his mind what strata- 
gem he could use to encounter and pass him. As he came up to the man, he spoke 
civilly to him, told him he was about taking his breakfast, and asked the man if he 
would take breakfast with him. He said he would, no doubt thinking this would give 
him the opportunity he wished. Mr. Swan (1788) asked him to assist and get some 
sticks for fuel while he got ready the provision which he had in his knapsack. The man, 
not knowing he was suspected, was thrown entirely off his guard, and went for the sticks. 
As soon as he had gone a little distance, Mr. Swan (1788) started off on his way, keep- 
ing constantly an eye over his shoulder upon the man, who soon turned around as if to 
watch him, and called out loudly to stop, to which Mr. Swan (1788) paid no attention, 
but ran at the top of his speed. The man pursued him. They both ran for some time, 
when the man got o,ut of breath and walked. Then he ran again, and Mr. Swan (1788) 
also ran. The stranger at last became satisfied he could not overtake him. Mr. Swan 
(1788) came at last to a settlement, and was safe. In due time he arrived safely at his 
destination, with the funds he had in charge for the troops. 1 

In January, 1786, Mr. Swan (1788) was appointed deputy quartermaster-general, 
with the rank of major, under Gen. Lincoln (1786), and served during Shays' Rebellion, 
and held the same position under Gens. Brooks (1786) and Hull (1788) from 1787 to 
1802. Gov. Bowdoin wrote to Major Swan (1788), Feb. 7, 1787, "The governor very 
much approves of your spirited exertions in the cause of your country. The several 
expeditions in- which you have been engaged reflect honor upon the parties and the 
individuals who composed them." He was appointed a justice of the peace by Gov. 
Bowdoin in 1787 ; was first treasurer of the Maiden Bridge Corporation, then paymaster 
and treasure!: of the Middlesex Canal Corporation until the canal was completed in 1804. 

On Friday, Oct. 19, 1787, the artillery company in Charlestown, commanded by 
Capt. William Calder, paraded in that town, when a detachment of the company, headed 
by Capt.-Lieut. Phillips, proceeded to Warren Hall, in order to receive an elegant 
standard, provided by subscription among the gentlemen of the town. Upon the presen- 
tation of the standard, Samuel Swan, Esq. (1788), deputy quartermaster for the Third 
Division, made the address, which is given in full in the Massachusetts Centind of Nov. 
7, 1787. When Gen. Brooks (1786) was appointed collector of the port of Boston, 
Samuel Swan, Esq. (1788), was appointed deputy collector, a position which he 
retained until his decease. 

He was present at the Massachusetts Grand Lodge, June 6, 1788, and June 4, 1789. 

1 MS. of Caleb Swan, son of Samuel (1788). 



, 7 88] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 239 

Ebenezer Thayer, Jr. (1788), yeoman, of Braintree, son of Hon. Ebenezer and 
Susanna Thayer, was born in Braintree, Aug. 21, 1746. He married, Dec. 19, 1772, 
Rachel, daughter of Gideon and Rachel Thayer, of Boston, Mass. They had seven sons. 
Rachel Thayer died Aug. 29, 1795. Gen. Thayer (1788) served the town of Braintree 
many years as selectman, town clerk, and treasurer; was chosen repeatedly as represen- 
tative j served as senator and councillor, and was appointed the first sheriff of Norfolk 
County, Mass. He was prominent in the administration of town affairs, serving on com- 
mittees to oppose the division of the town and county in 1791, and he wrote the long 
report, printed in the Braintree records, on erecting a dam across Ironwork River, April 
4, 1 79 1. He was also a justice of the peace. All the offices which he held he filled 
with fidelity, and discharged his official duties with promptness and efficiency. 

He was early interested in military matters, and rose from grade to grade, until, in 
1784, he became colonel of the Fifth Regiment, and, April 12, 1788, he was appointed 
brigadier-general of the First Brigade, First Division, of the militia of Massachusetts. 1 
He was promoted, Feb. 21, 1792, to be major-general. During the Revolutionary War 
he was active in recruiting men in his native town, and in leading them in the war. 

Col. Thayer (1788) died May 30, 1809, aged sixty- three years. 

Abraham Wild (1788), merchant, of Boston. In 1796, Abraham Wild (1788) was 
a dealer in West India goods, on the north side of the market, and his residence was on 
South School Street. He was a member of the Old South Church, and from 1805 to his 
decease, in 1820, a member of its standing committee. 

Elijah Williams (1788), of Roxbury, probably a son of Dr. Thomas and Abigail 
(Williams) Williams, of that town, was born about 1766. He was a brother of " Lawyer 
Tom," who, until his decease in 1823, occupied the family mansion, the first brick man- 
sion erected in Roxbury. This family descended from Robert Williams, who joined the 
Artillery Company in 1644. Elijah Williams (1788) was named for his grandfather, Col. 
Elijah Williams, of Deerfield. Elijah Williams (1788) was lieutenant of the Ward 10 
military company, in Boston, in 1787-8. 

The record of Artillery Company for 1788 is as follows : — 

" Monday, 31st March, 1788. Voted, We meet on Monday next at the Town House, 
complete in uniform if fair & suitable weather, at three o'clock, if not, the Friday follow- 
ing. Voted, The Clerk make provision for the Company at the Hall, and that every 
member pay his proportion of ye expence. Voted, The Musick be furnished with uniform 
Hatts by the Company, & that their clothing be deposited after training with the Officer 
present in town commanding. 

" Monday Evening, April 21st. 1788. The Company met at Faneuil Hall, at seven 
o'clock for Exercise. The Committee appointed to take into consideration the finances 
of the Company, have, as far as circumstances would permit, attended that service and 
report : — 

" That there appears due from the heirs of the late Mr. Blanchard [1737], includ- 
ing interest, & charging the same according to schedule herewith exhibited, to March, 
1787 ^499-o.2 

1 The military review under Brig.-Gen. Thayer "Gen. T with twice five hundred men, 

<I7&8), at Milton, in 1791, is thus described in the Formed a long line, and broke it up again." 

Centinel : — 



2 40 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



['738 



" There appears still to be due from Mr. Brown ' including interest to 

the ist of May, 1788, about £316.8.8 

" There appears to be a Balance in the hands of the Treasurer as pr 

his Acc't settled 2 ist day of April, 1788 . . . . . 112. 6.1 

" Respecting the monies due from Mr. Blanchard [1737], the committee beg leave 
verbally to report : — 

" Respecting the monies due from Mr. Brown the Committee wish the directions of 
the Company, as to the expediency of Real or Personal security under circumstances 
offered. 

" Respecting the Balance in the hands of ye Treasurer, the same is at the disposal 
of the Company. 

"Thus far your committee have proceeded & desire the direction of the Company 
as to ye further Completion of the Commission & beg leave to sit again ! 

"Monday Evening, April 28th, 1788. The Company met at Faneuil Hall at 7 
o'clock. The foregoing report having been laid before ye Company with such observa- 
tions as the Committee had to communicate ; Voted, That the same be accepted, and 
that ye Committee be requested to sit again for the completion of the business. Voted, 
That the Committee, or any three of them, proceed to settle the business of Mr. Brown's 
debt due to the Company, — that they give up the bond and cancel the Mortgage ; and 
that they receive as payment therefor in cash, sixteen pounds, eight shillings and eight 
pence, lawful money, & a Bond or Note for 1'hree hundred pounds from the Committee 
of the town of Charlestown duly authorized in behalf of the Town for that purpose. 
Voted, That the Balance in the hands of the Treasurer be further attended to on the 
next Muster day of ye Company. Voted, The Company appear on Monday next at three 
o'clock in the afternoon at Faneuil Hall complete in uniform with 20 rounds of blank 
Cartridges. Voted, The Clerk make provision for the Company as usual & every mem- 
ber to pay his Club. 

"Monday, May 5th. 1788. The Company met agreeable to Charter and marched 
into the Common ; in the evening were at Faneuil Hall as usual. Voted That the sum 
of sixteen pounds, Eight shillings and eight pence, which is to be received from the Com- 
mittee of Charlestown, and the sum of twelve pounds in the hands of the Treasurer be 
appropriated towards the expences of Election day. Voted, The Company meet for 
exercise on Monday evenings till June ; the Roll to be called precisely at 8 o'clock ; the 
members not present at roll-call to pay one shilling, — if absent the evening to pay two 
shillings. Voted, The Clerk be requested to notify the Absent members hereof. Voted, 
The Ensign of the Company provide a socket & belt for the Standard, and that he draw 
on the Treasurer for the payment thereof. Voted, That the monies in the hands of the 
Treasurer be forthcoming the 25th of this month, then to be at the disposal of the Com- 

1 From original papers in the archives of the The Brown estate was one of those injured or re- 
Artillery Company, it appears that the Artillery duced in area by the improvement. 
Company loaned to Mr. Nathaniel Brown, of Charles- Oct. 23, 1782,8 committee was appointed by 
town, on the nineteenth day of May, 1766, £1 72, and the town to settle with those injured by the altera- 
took therefor a note secured by mortgage on real tton, giving mortgages on the training-field, Corn- 
estate, on the main street, in that town. On the mon, town-farm, etc. The town of Charlestown 
first day of May, 1788, the principal and interest seems to have assumed Mr. Brown's debt to the 
due amounted to /316.8.8. Company. In the summer of 1788, the matter was 

Another paper rehearses that, Sept. 29, 1780, settled by the town of Charlestown, which paid the 

the inhabitants of Charlestown, in town meeting Artillery Company in cash ^16.8.8, and gave a note 

assembled, proposed to widen the main street " from for ,£300, secured by a mortgage on property of the 

the ferry to the causeway," at an expense of ^2,600. town. 



i 7 88] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 24I 

pany ; but if it is not convenient for the Treasurer to pay the money on that 
day, he shall produce to the Company a Bond or Mortgage of a good Estate in 
the Town of Boston worth three hundred pounds, lawful money, free from any 
incumbrance. 

"The Company met at Faneuil Hall, the 30th May, where Maj. Gen. Brooks [1786] 
read the following billet from His Excellency, the Captain General. 'The Governor 
presents his respectful compliments to Maj. Gen. Brooks [1786] & the other Officers and 
the Gentlemen who compose the Ancient & Honorable Artillery Company, & requests 
the honor & pleasure of their company at his house on the afternoon of Monday next to 
take a glass of wine* with him. 

"Thursday, 29th May, 1788. 

" True Copy, Attest : John Winslow, Clerk. 

"Monday, June 2'd 1788. This day being the Anniversary or day of Election of 
Officers for ye Company, ye business was attended to in the following manner : — At ten 
o'clock a. m. the Company assembled at ye Old South Meeting-house, from thence they 
marched to escort ye Supreme Executive from ye Council Chamber to ye Old Brick 
Meeting-house, where they attended Divine Service, an excellent discourse being 
delivered by the Rev. David Osgood of Medford ; after which they escorted as before 
the Governor, Lt Governor, Council & a numerous procession of other publick and 
private respectable Characters to Faneuil Hall, where an elegant Entertainment was 
provided at the expense of the Company, at which two hundred persons were present 
and partook. The Hall upon this festive occasion, was decorated and ornamented 
in ye highest stile of elegance & taste, with Arches & festoons formed of all the 
Flowers of ye Season. At four o'clock, p. m. the Company marched into ye Common, 
where they unanimously elected the following gentlemen as officers for the Current 
Year, viz : 

" Hon. MajorGeneral Benjamin Lincoln [1786], Captain. Col. JohnWinslow [1786], 
Lieutenant. Capt John Johnston [1786], Ensign. Maj. William Bird [1787], 1st Sergt; 
Capt Nathaniel Call [1774], 2d Sergt; Maj. Andrew Cunningham [1786], 3'd Sergt; 
Mr. Joseph Spear Jr [1774], 4th Sergt; Mr. John Fenno [1787], Clerk; Col. Joseph 
Jackson [1738], Treasurer. 

" After performing a variety of maneuvers & firings, ye Company returned to the 
Hall and concluded this highly pleasing day with sensations adapted to ye Occasion. 

" Attest : John Fenno, Clerk. 

"The Company met at Faneuil Hall, Monday, June 9. 1788. Voted That the 
Commission Officers of the past and those of the present year be a Committee to wait 
on the Rev. Mr. Osgood with the thanks of this Company for the excellent Discourse 
delivered by him on the 2'd inst, & to request a copy thereof for the press. Voted, 
That the same committee procure two hundred Copies thereof for the Company. Voted, 
The Committee appointed the last, with the commissioned officers for the present year, 
viz : Hon Benjamin Lincoln [1786] Lt. Col. John Winslow [1786] & Capt John John- 
ston [1786] be a Committee to superintend the Finances of the Company. Voted, That 
the next meeting of this Company be at Faneuil Hall on the Second Monday Evening of 
August next at seven o'clock. 



242 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7 ss 

" Monday evening, August nth 1788. The Company met according to adjourn- 
ment for Exercise. Col. Winslow [1786] proposed Maj. Samuel Swan [1788] of Charles- 
town as a member. 

"August 18th 1788. Met for Exercise. Maj. Swan [1788] being balloted for was 
admitted. Mr. John Fenno proposed Mr. Thomas Curtis as a member. Voted, that the 
roll be called at half past 7 o'clock next Monday evening. 

"August 25th 1788. Mr. Thomas Curtis [1788J, being balloted for this Evening, 
was admitted. 

"September 1st. The Company made their publick appearance commanded by 
Col. Winslow [1786]. Voted, that the Company meet every Monday evening till first 
Monday in October next : Roll to be called at half past seven o'clock. 

" Sept. 8th. Met for Exercise. Voted, That each Member shall pay one shilling 
and sixpence for two sermons preached by Rev. D. Osgood at the Anniversary, and 
sixpence apiece for as many more as they may see proper to take ! 

" Sept. 29th. Met for Exercise. Voted, That the Company will meet on Monday 
next at Faneuil Hall, 3 o'clock p. m. Voted, That every Member shall bring his Cart- 
ridge Box filled with blank cartridges for the above occasion. Voted, That the Clerk 
shall make provision at the Hall as usual for the Refreshment of the Company after the 
parade. 

"Monday, October 6th, 1788. The Company made their last publick appearance 
for the Year under the command of Gen. Lincoln [1786]. 

" Attest : John Fenno, Clerk." 

On Monday, April 7, 1788, agreeably to their charter, the Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery Company of this Commonwealth, commanded by Major-Gen. Brooks (1786), 
made their first public appearance for the year, and performed the military manoeuvres, 
evolutions, and firings with great exactness. 

On Monday, June 2, 1788, the Artillery election was held with the usual cere- 
monies. His Excellency the governor, John Hancock, with other guests, was received 
at the council chamber and escorted to the Old Brick Meeting-house, where a sermon 
was delivered by Rev. Mr. Osgood, of Medford. The Company was seated at four 
large tables, and the hall was beautifully decorated. After the election, in the usual 
form, on the Common, the Company, on invitation from his Excellency the governor, 
repaired to his Excellency's house and partook of refreshments The governor was 
then escortedin to the square, where the Chair of State provided for his Excellency was. 
The Company passed in review, and performed evolutions and firings with exactness. 
Major-Gen. Brooks (1786), and the other officers of the Company, resigned to his Excel- 
lency the insignias of their stations and the commands they held, and Major-Gen. 
Lincoln (1786) was invested as captain, Col. Winslow (1786), lieutenant, and Capt. 
Johnston (1786), ensign. The ceremonies being finished, the Company escorted the 
gentlemen of the General Court, clergy, and military to the Hall, where another elegant 
entertainment was provided, and, in festivity and good humor, closed the pleasing and 
brilliant anniversary. 

"Ancient Artillery Election. — Our venerable and praiseworthy ancestors, in the 
first settlement of this empire, laid the foundation of such institutions as they thought 
would best promote the interest, happiness, and safety of their posterity. Among other 



i 7 88] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 243 

laudable and patriotic institutions, in 1638, by an act of assembly, they incorporated, 
with certain privileges, an Artillery Company, as a nursery in which the officer should 
practice the duties of the private soldier, and the first Monday of June is fixed by the 
charter for the election of such members of the corps as they should think fit to lead 
and command them for a year. On Monday last [June 2] the Company exercised this 
privilege. At ten o'clock they marched to the council chamber, from whence they 
escorted his Excellency the governor, his Honor the lieutenant-governor, the honorable 
council, and the officers of the several independent corps in this town, who are not mem- 
bers of the Company, to the Old Brick Meeting-House, where, at the request of the 
Company, the Rev. Mr. Osgood, of Medford, delivered a sensible and well-adapted 
sermon. After divine service was performed, the Company escorted the Supreme 
Executive, several members of the honorable Senate, the honorable speaker, and several 
members of the House of Representatives, the secretary and treasurer of the State, the 
Hon. Mr. King, the president of Harvard College, the reverend clergy of the town, and 
such of the clergy, belonging to other places, as were in town ; the board of selectmen, 
officers of cavalry, the artillery, cadet, light infantry, and fusileer companies, and officers 
of the various departments, gentlemen and foreigners of distinction, etc., to Faneuil 
Hall, where they were previously invited by the Company to dine, and where they par- 
took of a sumptuous and elegant entertainment. The whole company were seated at four 
large tables. The hall was most beautifully decorated on the occasion ; at the entrance was 
a large arch, hung with fragrant flowers, bearing on the key-stone the words, ' Incorporated 
1638.' From the wall hung eleven large festoons of flowers, of every dye and odor. At 
the head of the hall were seven pillars of wreaths, decorated with flowers, emblematic of 
the seven States that have adopted the Federal Constitution, on the key-stones of the 
arches of which were painted, in large characters, the names of the States, and behind 
them were fixed figures, almost as large as life, of their Excellencies, the presidents of the 
Federal and Massachusetts conventions. The beautiful arrangement and symmetry of 
these decorations excited the astonishment and admiration of the Company, as well as 
numerous spectators, and the fragrance of the flowers, and the music of an excellent 
band, added great zest to the entertainment. After dinner, the following toasts were 
drank : — 

" 1. The Governor and Commonwealth. 

" 2. The United States. 

" 3. The States which have adopted the Constitution. 

" 4. Speedy completion of the federal edifice. 

"5. Louis XVI., our illustrious ally, and the friendly powers of Europe. 

" 6. The Day. 

"7. Gen. Washington. 

" 8. The Militia of Massachusetts. 

" 9. May our citizens prize the honor of being soldiers, and our soldiers never for- 
get that they are citizens. 

" 10. Our illustrious ancestor, who first laid the foundation of military knowledge 
in America, by the institution of this Company. 

"11. May benevolence and peace so far influence the citizens of the world that 
the implements of war may with safety be converted into tools of husbandry. 

" 12. The President and University in Cambridge. 

" 13. Freedom and peace to all mankind. 



244 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND r_, 7 g 8 

"When the seventh toast was drank, Mr. Rea [1789] sung 'God save great Wash- 
ington,' l in his usual style of excellence. 

" After dinner, the Company marched into the Common, to a large square, and 
having elected their officers for the ensuing year, the Company, on invitation from his 
Excellency the governor, repaired to his Excellency's house, and partook of a delicate 
repast provided for them. The Company then escorted his Excellency, and other dis- 
tinguished characters, into the square, where the Chair of State was provided for his 
Excellency, and seats for the other gentlemen of the procession. The whole being 
seated, the Company passed the commander-in-chief in review, and afterwards per- 
formed several evolutions and firings, with exactness ; after which, Major-Gen. Brooks 
[1786], and the other officers of the Company, resigned to his Excellency the insignias of 
their stations, and the commands they held, who, having invested the officers elected to 
serve the ensuing year with their other badges, the latter received from the commander- 
in-chief the insignias and command resigned to him, — Major-Gen. Lincoln [1786] that 
of captain, Col. Winslow [1786] that of lieutenant, and Capt. Johnston [1786] that of 
ensign. 

"The ceremonies being finished, the Company escorted a number of gentlemen of 
the General Court, clergy and military, to the hall, where another elegant entertainment 
was provided, and, in festivity and good humor, closed this pleasing and brilliant anni- 
versary." 2 

On Monday, Sept. 1, 1788, agreeably to its charter, the Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery Company of this Commonwealth paraded at Faneuil Hall, from whence they 
marched into the Common and performed their usual manoeuvres, evolutions, and firings 
with soldier-like exactness. 

1 Song. 

God save Columbia's son ! 
God bless great Washington ! 

Crown him with bays ! 
Shout, shout, America, — ■ 
Wide over earth and sea, 
Shout in full harmony, 

Washington's praise ! 

When Britain took the field, 
Then his strong arm repelled, 

Fought and subdued. 
Now, all victorious, 
Mighty and glorious, 
He presides over us, 

Great, just, and good! 

Raise, then, to heaven the song ! 
Pour in full tides along, 

Gratitude's strains ! — 
Say thou'rt our strength and stay — 
Still we'll confess thy sway — 
Whilst over America 

Washington reigns. 

2 Boston Newspaper. 








T^ ?uo£L 



, 7 8g] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 245 

On Monday, Oct. 6, 1788, agreeably to its charter, the Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery Company, commanded by Major-Gen. Lincoln (1786), made its last parade 
for the year. The Company made a fine appearance, and performed several evolutions, 
firings, and manoeuvres to the entire satisfaction of a large number of spectators. 

Rev. David Osgood, of Medford, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1788 
in " the Old Brick Meeting-house." He was the fourth son of Capt. Isaac Osgood, who 
lived in the southwest part of Andover, and was born Oct. 25, 1747. David Osgood 
married Hannah Breed, Nov. 1, 1786; they had four children. 

Mr. Osgood worked during his boyhood upon his father's farm, but improved every 
opportunity for studying. At the age of nineteen years he taught school, and at twenty 
entered Harvard College. After graduation, he continued the study of divinity at Cam- 
bridge. March 10, 1774, the town of Medford invited him to preach there, as a candi- 
date for settlement, as colleague with Rev. Ebenezer Turell, who was a grandson of 
Daniel Turell (1656), and a nephew of Daniel, Jr. (1674). Having preached before the 
town, he was invited to settle, but as six persons were opposed to his settlement, he hesi- 
tated to accept the invitation. June 9, 1774, the invitation was renewed. It was 
accepted, and arrangements for the ordination service were made. The dissentients pro- 
tested to the council, but after hearing Mr. Osgood's views, as stated by him, the council 
expressed its unanimous approval of them. 

Mr. Osgood " was a true patriot, as well as a learned man, and effective preacher. 
. . . His appearance in the sacred desk was singularly imposing, especially after age had 
whitened his locks. He had a well-developed frame, a strongly-marked face, a powerful 
voice, and sometimes a very animated delivery." 

He died Dec. 12, 1822, at the age of seventy-five years, after a pastorate of more 
than forty-eight years. 



n The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1789 were : Brig. -Gen. 

J 7oQ. Hul1 ('788), captain; Major Andrew Cunningham (1786), lieutenant; Capt. 

1 y' Turner Phillips (1786), ensign. Zechariah Hicks (1786) was first sergeant; 

Thomas Clark (1786), second sergeant; John Brazer (1786), third sergeant; Samuel 

Prince (1788), fourth sergeant, and Samuel Greenough (1786), clerk. 

The entertainment intended to be given June 12, 1789, by Capt. Linzee, on board 
the British frigate "Penelope," in return for courtesies received, was, on account of the 
weather, given by him on that day at the American Coffee-House, at which were present, 
his Honor the lieutenant-governor, the Hon. Mr. Bowdoin, several of the honorable 
council, the adjutant-general, the officers of his Excellency's suite, the officers of the 
Ancient and Honorable Artillery of the years 1788 and 1789, the officers of the Inde- 
pendent Cadets and artillery, in their several uniforms, and a large number of citizens. 
The entertainment was served in the best style, during which a band of music performed, 
and concluded with every mark of convivial propriety, mutual attention, and reciprocal 

good office. 

In October, 1789, President George Washington visited Boston and vicinity. He 
was met at Marlboro by Major Joseph Hall, Jr. (1788), aide-de-camp to Gen. Brooks 
(1786), and accepted an invitation from him to review the Third Division of State troops 

Rev. David Osgood. Authorities: Histories of Medford, by Mr. Usher and Mr. Brooks. 



246 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 7 8 g 

on Cambridge Common, on his way to Boston. When Washington arrived at the Vassal 
House, —"the tent of Mars and the haunt of the Muses," — in Cambridge, which had 
been his headquarters in 1776, he found Gen. Brooks's senior aide, Col. Hall, at the gate, 
and was informed by him that the hour of twelve, which had been fixed for the review, had 
arrived, and that the line was formed. Taken somewhat by surprise that time had passed 
so rapidly, and still unwilling to be outdone in punctuality, a prominent trait in his own 
character, the general, without alighting, immediately directed Col. Hall to conduct him 
to the field. Fearing he had been too hasty in telling Washington that the line was 
actually formed and ready to receive him, and seeing him remount, Col. Hall left his 
co-aide, Major Joseph Hall, Jr. (1788), who had accompanied the general from 
Marlboro, to perform the remainder of his duty, and putting spurs to his horse galloped 
with the greatest rapidity to the Common, and informed Gen. Brooks (1786) that Wash- 
ington was on his way, and close at hand. Col. Hall had ventured to tell Washington 
that the line was formed, as he saw him actually dismounting, and naturally supposed that 
the general would occupy a few minutes in refreshing himself after his morning's 
long ride. 

Nothing could have surprised Gen. Brooks (1786) more than Col. Hall's announce- 
ment. His troops were scattered over the field ; but, glancing at his watch, and finding 
that the appointed time had in truth arrived, although noted for his great deliberation in 
times of great moment, he lost no time in bringing his troops into line, which was done 
while the artillery was firing the national salute. This was scarcely accomplished when 
Washington appeared on the right of the line, and immediately heard from the lips of 
his old friend and companion-in-arms all through the Revolutionary War, the command, 
never before so thrillingly given, " Present arms ! " It is easy to imagine that no ordinary 
emotions filled the breast of " the Father of his Country," as, under the wide-spreading 
branches of the noble tree, standing at the corner of the street, now familiarly called 
"the Washington Elm," he viewed the scene before him, and recalled to mind the time 
when, on the same ground, he, with his undisciplined army, commenced the seven years' 
struggle. 

Gen. Brooks (1786), who was an elegant horseman, and sat as proudly erect as a 
martinet, rode down the line in company with Washington, who most particularly 
noticed and mentioned its beautiful appearance. Riding back with rapidity to the rear, 
and observing that not a single man looked around, but that all (although excited with 
the greatest possible curiosity) kept their faces steadily to the front, he remarked to 
Gen. Brooks (1786), in allusion to the seven years' war in which they both had been 
engaged, "Ah ! General, if we had had such troops as these, we should have made short 
work of it." 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1789 were : Jonas S. Bass, 
John Baxter, John Bonner, Bela Clapp, Joseph Clark, Michael Homer, Daniel Rea, 3d, 
William Whittemore, William Williams. 

Jonas S. Bass (1789), tanner, of Boston, son of Samuel, Jr., and Deborah Bass, 
was born in Boston, Sept. 10, 1762. His tannery (ten thousand square feet) was on the 
south side of Water Street, and he lived in Williams Court, Cornhill. He was third 
sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1793, lieutenant in 1797, and captain in 1800. 

Jonas Stone Bass (1789) is named in the roll of enlisted men in Capt. Brailsford's 
company, Col. Edward Proctor's (1756) regiment, July 22, 1780, at which time he was 



I? 8 9 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 247 

" seventeen years old ; in stature, five feet nine inches ; complexion, light ; residence, 
Boston." He enlisted for three months, and marched under Brig.- Gen. John Fellows. 
He was transferred, July 26, to Capt. Alexander Hodgdon's (1786) company, Col. Eben- 
ezer Thayer's (1788) regiment, and was discharged Oct. 30, 1780. His service was a 
campaign in Rhode Island, occasioned by an " alarm." The company was raised to 
reinforce the Continental Army. He continued in the militia, and rose to the grade of 
captain after the war. He died in Boston in September, 1834, aged seventy- two years. 

John Baxter (1789), merchant. In 1789 he kept a boot and shoe store at No. 14 
State Street. He married, Sept. 26, 1790, Elizabeth Marshall. His residence was at 
the " Corner Branch Bank," State Street, and, under the firm name of John Baxter & 
Co., did business at No. 59 Long Wharf in 1796. 

John Bonner (1789), probably a son of Capt. John Bonner, who lived in Mackerel 
Lane in 1743, was a wood-wharfinger, Battery march Street. He was first lieutenant of 
the Republican Volunteer Company in 1787-8, and captain of artillery in 1809 He 
resided on Federal Street. 

Bela Clapp (1789), contractor and builder, of Boston, son of Joshua and Lydia 
Clapp, was born in Scituate, July 2, 1760. He married, (1) Jan. 23, 1783, Sarah War- 
land, — who died Feb. 2, 1804, — and, (2) Feb. 16, 1805, Elizabeth Gilbert, of Littleton, 
Mass. He was a builder, and erected many fine buildings in Boston. During Shays' 
Rebellion he was chosen to command a company of drafted men, and marched them 
to Worcester, where the news of the dispersion of Shays' forces was received, and he 
returned with his company to Boston. With his wife, Sarah, he joined the Old South 
Church, Sept. 14, 1783. April 5, 1802, he became a member of The Massachusetts 
Lodge, A. F. and A. M. 

He was a member of the State militia, and served as captain of a military company 
in Boston from 1790 to 1794. He retired to a farm in Claremont, N. H., where he died 
July 12, 1812. His son, William W., joined the Artillery Company in 1820, and his 
grandson, William W., Jr., in 185 1 . 

Joseph Clark (1789), shipwright, "Clark's Street, North End, near the Rev. Mr. 
Elliot's meeting-house," was born in 1750. He was fourth sergeant of the Artillery 
Company in 1792, ensign in First Regiment from 1809 to 181 1, and became captain. 

Mr. Clark (1789) "was a sincere and open friend ; a peaceable and obliging neigh- 
bor; a worthy member of the community, industrious, honest, punctual, and public 
spirited, constant and diffusive in offices of kindness." > He died in Boston, June 9, 
1 794, aged forty-four years, and was buried from his house, " near Rev. Mr. Elliot's 
meeting-house." 

Michael Homer (1789), bricklayer, of Boston, was the second son of Michael (1768) 
and Hannah (Allen) Homer, and was born in 1762. He was the father of Rev. Jona- 
than Homer, D. D., of Newton, who delivered the Artillery election sermon in 1790. 

It was Michael Homer, Jr. (1789), who was second lieutenant of the Republican 
Volunteer Company in 1787-8, — but the record omits the " Jr.," — and was captain in the 
Boston regiment from 1790 to 1795. He died Oct. 28, 1828, aged sixty-six years. 

John Bonner (1789). Authority: New Bela Clapp (1789). Authorities: Clapp 

Eng Hist, and Gen. Reg., 1851 and 1S60. Memorial; Boston Records. 

> Columbian Centinel, June II, 1794. 



248 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [ I7 8 g 

Daniel Rea, 3d (1789), of Boston, was a son of Daniel Rea, Jr. (1770). He 
married, in April, 1789, Sally Bangs. They resided on Liberty Square. 

Mr. Rea (1789) was very proficient as a singer. For several years he was a soloist 
at the anniversary dinner of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, the entire 
company joining in the choruses. It is said that at one time, by request, he sung in the 
presence of President George Washington. 

William Whittemore (1789), manufacturer, of West Cambridge, son of Thomas 
and Anna (Cutter) Whittemore, was born in Menotomy, and baptized Feb. 1, 1761. 
He married, Nov. 2, 1783, Elizabeth, daughter of Nehemiah Cutter, 1 and had ten 
children. John Hancock Whittemore, their youngest son, served in the Mexican War, 
and died in Oregon in 1 850-1. Thomas Whittemore was a farmer, and his son William 
(1789) received such an education only as the district school provided. He was of an 
active business turn, and had a taste for manufacturing. He continued to reside in 
Menotomy, and introduced the manufacture of cards, which became a profitable business, 
and also dealt in merchandise. He acquired a patent for sticking the teeth for factory 
cards, and thereby accumulated a large property. He was a selectman of Cambridge 
from 1803 to 1805, representative from 1804 to 1806, senator in 1820 and 1821, and a 
delegate to the State convention of 1820. He died Nov. 2, 1842, aged eighty-one years. 
He never held office in the Artillery Company. 

William Williams (1789) was a hatter in Boston. He married, (1) in August, 
1789, Betsy Blake, and, (2) May 10, 1801, Margaret Atwood. In 1789 his place of 
business was on Ann Street. About 1810 he removed to the State of Maine. He is said 
to have been a man of fine personal appearance and elegant manners. He was a mem- 
ber of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association, and Mr. Buckingham, in 
the "Annals of the Association," says of him : "He was an excellent singer, and was 
chorister at the Second Church. His fine voice and musical talent introduced him to 
much company and many social and festive gatherings, and made him an agreeable 
companion and favorite, but contributed nothing to his pecuniary prosperity." He was 
captain of a company in the Boston regiment from 1796 to 1798, and a captain in the 
Legionary Brigade in 1799 ; also second sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1794. 

Mr. Williams (1789) received the Masonic degrees in The Massachusetts Lodge 
in 1771, and became a member Jan. 6, 1772. He became a member of St. Andrew's 
Chapter in 1792. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1789 is as follows : — 
" At a meeting of the Antient Artillery Company at Faneuil Hall, Friday Evening, 
6th March, 1789, Voted, Unanimously for Mr. Samuel Greenough [1786] to serve as 
Clerk pro-tem until June next. Voted, to meet on Wednesday Evening next at the Hall 
for Exercise : the roll to be called half past seven o'clock. Voted, a fine of one shilling 
to be paid by any member absent the whole Evening, and six pence if absent at roll-call. 
Voted, that any member that shall attend without his Gun & Bayonet shall be subject to 
pay the same fine as if absent the whole Evening. 

William Williams (1789). Authorities: ' See Cutter Genealogy, pp. 164, 165, 250. 

Boston Records; By-Laws of The Massachusetts 
Lodge. 



1789] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 249 

"Wednesday evening, nth March. Met for Exercise agreeable to the above vote. 

"Monday evening 1 6th March. Met for Exercise, at the Hall. 

" Monday evening 23d March. Met at the Hall for Exercise. 

" Monday evening, 30th March. Met at the Hall. Voted, the Company to meet 
at the Town House floor on Monday next at three o'clock p. m. being the first Monday in 
April, with their Cartridge Boxes filled with Blank Cartridges. Voted, That the Clerk 
shall make provisions at the Hall as usual for the refreshment of the Company after the 
parade. 

" Monday, 6th April. The Company paraded at the Town House floor agreeable 
to the above vote — marched into the Common — performed firings &c, commanded by 
His Honor the Lieut. Governor, Gen. Lincoln [1786]. Voted, that the three Com- 
missioned officers & the Treasurer be a Committee to wait on the Rev. Mr. Barnard 
of Salem, & request him to preach a sermon to the Company on their Election in June 
next. Attest Samuel Greenough, Clerk. 

" Monday evening, 20th April, Company met at Faneuil Hall for Exercise. 

" Monday evening, 27th April. Company met at the Hall for Exercise. Voted, 
that the Company parade at Faneuil Hall on Monday next at three o'clock p. m. in uni- 
form, with Arms, accoutrements &c. Voted, That the Clerk notify the absent members 
of the time & place of parade on Monday next, and provide for the refreshment of the 
Company as usual. 

" Monday, 4th May. The Company paraded at the Hall, — marched into the Com- 
mon, — performed various evolutions and firings commanded by Col. John Winslow 
[1786], — returned to the Hall. The Committee report the Rev. Mr. Barnard accepted 
of the invitation of the Company to preach a Sermon to them at their Election in June 
next. Voted, To meet at the Hall on Monday evening of the 18th inst, at half after 
Seven o'clock, on business, without Arms. Attest : Samuel Greenough, Clerk. 

. " Monday evening, 18th May. Agreeable to the above vote the Company met at 
Faneuil Hall this Evening. Voted, That a Dinner be provided at Faneuil Hall for the 
Company and such Gentlemen as they shall invite to dine with them the first Monday in 
June next. Voted, That the three Commissioned Officers, Col. Amasa Davis [1786], 
Col Josiah Waters [1769] and Mr. William Shattuck [1787] be a Committee to provide 
and give a bill of fare for the Intertainment of that day. Voted, That the Treasurer 
pay twenty-four pounds lawful money from the funds towards defraying ye Expense of the 
Entertainment on Election in June next : and the said Committee as before appointed 
engage ye Band for said day. 

" May 23d. Voted, That the Company parade at the Old South Meeting, & the Roll 
be called at ten o'clock. Voted, That fifteen pounds, in addition to the twenty-four 
pounds, for ye expences of the Dinner on Election day, to be borrowed on Interest & 
repaid out of ye first money collected from ye funds of the Company. 

"June 5th, Monday. The Company paraded at the Old South Meeting House & at 
eleven o'clock escorted His Excellency, ye Governor, Lieut Governor, & Council to the 
old Brick Meeting House, where a sermon was delivered by the Rev. Mr. Barnard of 
Salem. After service, ye Company escorted the Governor &c. &c. to Faneuil Hall, where 
an elegant entertainment was prepared by the Company. At 4 o'clock, ye Company 
proceeded into ye Common & made choice of Brig. General William Hull [1788], Cap- 
tain, Major Andrew Cunningham [1786], Lieutenant, and Captain Turner Phillips [1786], 



250 



HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[1789 



Ensign, for ye year ensuing. The Company was then led to the Hall by their new 
Officers, where they finished the day very agreeably. 

"June 15th. The Company met at Faneuil Hall. Voted, to print the Rev. Mr. 
Barnard's Sermon by Subscription, and the Officers were the Committee to superintend 
the same. 

" September 7 th The Company met agreeable to their Charter & were led into the 
Common by Maj. Gen. Hull [1788], where they went through the firings & evolutions 
with great exactness, & returned to the Hall and partook of refreshments as usual. 

"October 5th. The Company met agreeable to their Charter and were led into the 
Common by Lieut Andrew Cunningham [1786], where they went through the firings, &c. 
& then returned to the Hall and partook of refreshment. Voted, That the Company 
meet the third Monday Evening in March next at 7 o'clock, unless sooner called together 
by ye Officers." 

The Artillery election was held on Monday, June 1, 1789, agreeably to their charter. 
The Company assembled at the Old South Meeting-house at high noon, marched to the 
council chamber, received the lieutenant-governor, the council, officers of the several 
independent military organizations in town, and thence proceeded to the Old Brick 
Meeting-house, where services were held and a sermon preached by Rev. Mr. Barnard, 
of Salem. After service, a procession was formed and the Company escorted Lieut.-Gov. 
Adams, Hon. Mr. Bowdoin, the council, senators, judges, members of the House, select- 
men of Boston, clergy, consul of France, officers of the Cadets, Castle William, light 
infantry, artillery, fusileers, all in uniform ; Capt. Linzee, and five other officers of the 
British frigate " Penelope," etc., numbering two hundred persons, to Faneuil Hall, where 
a sumptuous dinner was served. 

After dinner, the usual toasts were offered, and addresses made. After the first 
toast, — "The illustrious, the President of the United States," — Mr. Rea (1789), Col. 
Waters (1769), Capt. Wells (1786), and others, sung the following ode : — 



" From Britain's sea-girt isle, 
Where Flora's richest smile 

Luxuriant glows — 
To this then desert waste, 
By savages possest, 
To be with Freedom blest 

In calm repose : 

" Our enterprising sires, 
Warm'd with fair Freedom's fires, 

Advent'rous came. 

Here they their dwelling made, 

Their standard here displayed 

Beneath the wild woods' shade 

Set up their claim. 

" By faithless foes compell'd 
To tread the ensanguine field, 

Unskill'd in war, 
This Institution made 
To teach its martial trade 
To wield the shining blade 
The foe to dare. 



" While the same martial fire 
That did their breasts inspire, 

Our bosoms warm, 
May we with equal zeal 
Pursue the public weal, 
Nor feel the bloody steel 

If call'd to arms. 

" Illustrious Founders, hail ! 
This day your patriot zeal 

Your sons proclaim. 
Your names we venerate, 
Your glory emulate, 
And tell our sons how great 

Their grandsires' fame. 

" Hark ! The loud trumps proclaim 
Washington's glorious name. 

Charge! Fill again, 
Fill the bowl— fill it high, — 
First-born son of the sky, 
May he never, never die, 

Heaven shout Amln!" 



I7 8 9 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 25 I 

After the banquet, the Company repaired to the Common and elected officers for 
the ensuing year, viz.: Brig.-Gen. Hull (1788), captain; Major Andrew Cunningham 
(1786), lieutenant, and Capt. Turner Phillips (1786), ensign. 

His Excellency the governor, from indisposition of body, not being able to take his 
seat on the Common, the old officers, and those just elected, proceeded to his Excel- 
lency's house, where the old officers resigned the insignia of their offices, and the new 
officers were invested therewith by the commander-in-chief. 1 

Gen. Hull (1788), having returned with his officers to the Common, invited the 
guests to an entertainment provided for them at Faneuil Hall, to which all repaired, and 
completed the exercises of the Artillery election. The Hall was elegantly decorated. 
At the entrance was a bower, and at the upper end, eleven connected pillars, probably 
denoting the eleven States that had ratified the Constitution of the United States ; 
between the centre pillars was placed a full-length portrait of the illustrious President of 
the United States, over which was an obelisk eight feet in length, designed and finely 
executed by Johnston (1786), representing at the top the All-Seeing Eye, diffusing its 
influence on "our Fabius," with the words "Fideles Protego" over it. The Hall was 
profusely decorated with flowers, streamers, flags, etc., and there was but one opinion 
expressed by the thousands who visited the Hall, viz., that it was an artistic and beautiful 
decoration. 

Rev. Thomas Barnard, Jr., of Salem, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 
1789. He was a son of Rev. Thomas Barnard, who delivered the Artillery election ser- 
mon in 1758, and was born in Newbury, Mass., Feb. 5, 1748. He graduated at Harvard 
College in 1766, and studied theology with Dr. Williams, of Bradford. At first he leaned 
to the side of the loyalists, probably through the influence of his parishioners, but event- 
ually he was a stalwart on the Whig side. He was present and prominent in the first 
clash of the Revolution, when Col. Leslie, the British officer, came to Salem at the head of 
three hundred men, for guns which were in Salem, secreted by Col. David Mason (1754). 
It is said that the counsel of Mr. Barnard, that day, prevented bloodshed, and turned 
back the King's troops, leaving the object of the expedition unaccomplished. When his 
father, in 1770, became disabled by paralysis, the First Church became divided as to a 
colleague. Some wanted Thomas Barnard, Jr. ; a small majority preferred Asa Dunbar. 
This disagreement resulted in the formation of the North Church of Salem, and the 
settlement, as pastor, of Thomas Barnard, Jr., who was ordained Jan. 13, 1773, and con- 
tinued in that relation until his death, Oct. 1, 1814. The society was united and prosper- 
ous throughout his long ministry. He was very kind and genial, and held in the highest 
respect by all classes and churches. A picture of him is given in the " History of Essex 
County," compiled by D. Hamilton Hurd, Philadelphia, 1888, page 49, from which work 
this sketch is abbreviated. 

1 Letter from Jeremy Belknap to Ebenezer appear on the Common, the usual place where the 

Hazard at New York, dated old officers resign and the new ones are invested. 

"Boston, June 2, 1789. However, Lincoln proved himself an older general 

"My dear Sir, — I have received no letter by insisting on a personal interview, and actually 

from you for several posts. I suppose you are very entering the bed-chamber, where the ceremonies 

much engaged, as it must be about the time for you were performed under the inspection of the phy- 

to be reappointed, as I hope and trust you will be. sician and nurse. Much risibility was thereby occa- 

We had, yesterday, the artillery election, an account sioned among those who know the real character 

of which you will see in the papers. Washington's of the popular idol. 

picture was exhibited, and his praises sung in "We are all well, through mercy; and I am, 

Faneuil Hall with great ardor and sincerity. The " Your affectionate friend, 

most extraordinary part of the story is that Governor " J. Belknap." 

H. had a convenient fit of the gout, and could not 



252 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 790 

The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1790 were: Robert 

[ 7Q0. Jenkins (1756), captain; John Johnston (1786), lieutenant; Israel Loring 

' ' (1768), ensign. Samuel Todd (1786) was first sergeant ; Lemuel Gardner 

(1787), second sergeant; John Bray (1788), third sergeant; Benjamin Russell (1788), 

fourth sergeant, and Thomas Clark (1786), clerk. 

" The following lines were written by a young Miss of only 11 years of age, 

" On seeing Faneuil Hall on the Day of Election, 
"June 7, 1790. 

" See here the tables with good things abound, 
While joy and mirth fill all the seats around; 
High on a stage bright CERES doth appear, 
With fruits of every kind that bless the year. 
The graceful arches bend with blooming flowers, 
But much lov'd WASHINGTON above them towers. 
See there he's plac'd, while numerous objects gaze, 
And at him look with wonder and amaze. 
Kind heaven with peace and plenty doth them bless, 
And may heav'n's blessing always on them rest ; 
Then let them close the joyous day in peace, 
And e'er be thankful for the bounteous feast." ' 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1790 were: Ebenezer Little 
Boyd, Joseph Cowdin, John G. Doubleday, Asa Fuller, Jeremiah Kahler, James Phiilips. 

Ebenezer Little Boyd (1790), merchant, of Boston, was a brother of Capt. Joseph 
Coffin Boyd (1786). His place of business was No. 5 on David Spear's wharf, and his 
residence was on Friend Street. He became a Baptist, and was ordained to the ministry 
of that sect, and removed from Boston. He received the Masonic degrees in The 
Massachusetts Lodge in 1792-3, and became a member of that Lodge, June 3, 1793. 

Joseph Cowdin (1790) had a wife, Mary, in 1793-4. She was a daughter of Gen. 
Amasa Davis (1786). He was first lieutenant in the militia in 1 791-2, and captain in 
1793-4. At the time of his decease, in 1794, he held the positions of first sergeant of 
the Artillery Company and of captain in the Boston regiment. 

Died "in this town [Boston], Capt. Joseph Cowdin [1790], aged twenty-nine years. 
His remains were entombed on Monday, July 28, 1794, with military honors. The com- 
pany of the First Regiment which he commanded at the time of his decease paraded 
under the command of Lieut. Lathrop, and performed the military honors of the day. 
The commissioned and non-commissioned officers preceded the corpse, and the pall 
was supported by six captains, the whole in complete uniform. After the mourning 
relatives, the members of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery, and of the new Relief 
Fire Society, paid that respect to the deceased which was due to his many virtues 
and usefulness." 2 

John G. Doubleday (1790), grocer, of Boston, son of John and Elizabeth Double- 
day, was born in Boston, June 12, 1 764. His store was No. 30 Marlborough Street, and 
he resided on Orange Street. He was clerk of the Artillery Company in 1792, second 
sergeant in 1793, and ensign in 1796. 

John G. Doubleday (1790). Authority: > Columbian Centinel, June 16, 1790. 

Boston Records. 2 Columbian Centinel, July 30, 1794. 



, 79 o] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 253 

Asa Fuller (1790), tallow-chandler, of Boston, lived on Chambers Street. The firm 
of Asa Fuller & Co. had their chandlery works on Washington Street, and their store was 
No. 6 Green's Wharf. He was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1794, and 
first lieutenant in the Boston regiment from 1791 to 1793. He removed soon after to 
Portland, Me., where he married, Jan. 20, 1807, Nancy Locke. 

Jeremiah Kahler (1790), merchant, of Boston, was a native of Germany, and was 
born in the year 1743. He came to America when he was a young man, established 
himself in Boston, and became a prominent merchant. " He was always charitable, 
while he had the means, and ever ready to do acts of friendship. Editors were often 
indebted to him for translations from the gazettes of his native country. Reverses of 
fortune did not impair his habits of industry nor his power of being useful, though they 
limited his sphere of employment. He enjoyed the esteem of,a numerous acquaintance, 
and his memory is respected." 

He was ensign of the Artillery Company in 1795, and died in Boston, Feb. 2, 1829, 
aged eighty-six years. He remained an honorary associate of the Artillery Company 
until his decease. 

James Phillips (1790), rope-maker, of Boston, son of Isaac and Preseler (Pris- 
cilla) Phillips, was born in Boston, May 14, 1767. In his youth he was employed in a 
rope-walk owned by a maternal uncle, and afterwards was superintendent of rope-walks 
owned by Isaac P. Davis. He held this relation from 1795 to 1818, when the rope- 
walk was destroyed by fire. He then (in 1820) became overseer, or master, of the 
almshouse, by the appointment of the selectmen, and when it was transformed into a 
house of industry, and removed from Barton's Point to South Boston, he also had charge 
of it. Mr. Phillips (1790) received the appointment of secretary to the overseers of 
the poor in 1825, a situation he retained until his decease. 

He was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1793, clerk in 1797, ensign 
in 1798, and captain in 1802. For fifty years he enlivened the social meetings of the 
Company. His peculiar eccentric songs of "Contentment," "Barrel of Beer," "The 
Parson Who 'd a Remarkable Foible," " Gaffer Gray," etc., were always enthusiastically 
received. He possessed an amiable disposition, frank manners, great benevolence and 
purity. He was a fireward in Boston for several years, and a surveyor of hemp, under 
the town government, from 1808 to 1820. He obtained his title of "Major" by being 
brigade quartermaster under Gen. Winslow (1786). He was in the military escort which 
conducted Gen. Washington into Boston in October, 1789, and was probably the last 
survivor of those engaged in that loyal parade. He was secretary of the Charitable 
Mechanic Association in 1800 and 1801, and a trustee from 1802 to 1804. 

He died March 30, 1853, nearly eighty-seven years of age. His tomb, No. 94, 
on the Common, was built and owned jointly by him and his friend, Col. Daniel 
Messinger (1792). His brother, Capt. Turner Phillips, joined the Artillery Company 
in 1786. 

Asa Fuller (1790). Authorities: Boston James Phillips (1790). Authorities: Bos- 
Directory Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, ton Records; Annals of the Mass. Char. Mecb. 
Ed 1842.' Association; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Com- 

' Jeremiah Kahler (1790). Authority : Whit- pany, Ed. i B - 
man's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 1842. 



12. 



254 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [ I?9 o 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1790 is as follows : — 

"April 5th 1790. The Company met agreeable to Charter, — were led into ye 
Common by Brig. Gen. Hull [1788], performed firings, &c. Voted, The Commissioned 
Officers & Treasurer be a Committee to request of the Rev. Mr. Homer of Newtown to 
preach the Sermon on their next Election — then returned to the Hall & partook of 
refreshment as usual. Voted, That Col. John May [1786], by his request, be dismissed 
the Company and his name be put on the Honorary List. 

"April 13th The Company met at Faneuil Hall on account of the death of Col. 
Joseph Jackson [1738], Treasurer of the Company, Voted, the Company will attend 
ye Funeral of their late Treasurer under Arms. Voted, to have ye Band of Musick & 
they with the drums & fifes of said Company be put into mourning ; the expence of 
which was defrayed by the Heirs of the late Treasurer by their particular request : after 
which the Company received the Thanks of the family for the Honour done them & the 
deceased. Through the Clerk their Compliments were conveyed to ye Company. 

" May 3d. Monday. The Company met agreeable to Charter : most of ye members 
being sick with the Influenza, the Company did not proceed to the Common, but per- 
formed their exercise at the Hall. The Commissioned Officers acquainted the Company 
that ye Rev. Mr. Homer had accepted their invitation to preach their next Election 
Sermon. Voted, That the Treasurer pay thirty pounds out of the principal & interest 
due the Company from ye town of Charlestown towards defraying the dinner on Election 
in June next. 

" May 24th. Voted, That the Commissioned Officers, with the Treasurer, & Clerk 
be a Committee to make arrangements and provide for the public Dinner in June next. 

" May 26th. The list of Gentlemen presented by the Committee to be invited to 
dine at the Hall with the Company the first Monday in June next was accepted by the 
Company in whole. Voted, That the same Committee that arranged the list of persons 
to be invited to dine, be ye Committee to compleat & provide all ye necessaries for 
Election. Voted, That Capt. John Stutson [1765] be dismissed the Company agreeable 
to his request, and that his name be put on the Honourary List. 

"Attest, Samuel Greenough, Clerk. 

" Monday, June 7th 1790. The Company paraded at the Old South Meeting House, 
commanded by Brig. Gen. William Hull [1788]; escorted His Honor the Lieut. 
Governour and Council (His Excellency the Commander in chief being Indisposed) to 
the Old Brick Meeting House, where an Excellent & well adapted discourse was delivered 
by the Rev. Mr. Homer of Newtown. The Company then proceeded to Faneuil Hall & 
partook (with their guests) of an elegant entertainment. The weather being excessive 
Stormy, the Company proceeded to the Choice of their Officers for the year ensuing in 
the Hall, when the following gentlemen were unanimously chosen. Mr. Robert Jenkins 
[1756], Captain ; Capt John Johnston [1786], Lieutenant ; Capt Israel Loring [1768], 
Ensign; Col. John Winslow [1786], Treasurer; Mr. Thomas Clark [1786], Clerk; Mr. 
Samuel Todd [1786], Mr. Benjamin Russell [1788], Capt Lemuel Gardner [1787], 
Mr. John Bray [1788], Sergeants. After which the Commissioned Officers repaired t'o 
the house of the Commander-in-chief, with the Officers elect, where the former resigned 
the badges & the latter received them from His Excellency. Voted That the Commis- 
sioned Officers with the Treasurer be a Committee to wait on the Rev. Mr. Homer, 
return him the Thanks of the Company for his Services this day delivered, and request 
a copy for the press. The meeting was then adjourned to the 14th inst. 



i 79 o] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 255 

"Monday Evening, June 14th 1790. Voted, That the Clerk procure & present the 
Rev. Mr. Homer with fifty printed copies of his Sermon and assess the Company for 
their amount in September next. Voted, That Gen. Lincoln [1786], Col. Waters 
[1769], Gen. Hull [1788], Col. Winslow [1786] and Capt Jenkins [1756] be a Com- 
mittee to collect & report a state of facts respecting the exchanging the badges between 
the old & new officers the past and present year. 

"Monday, Sept 6th 1790. The Company made their publick appearance com- 
manded by Capt. Jenkins [1756]. 

"Monday, Oct 4th 1790. The Company being under Arms commanded by Capt. 
Jenkins [1756], Voted, That the Clerk purchase four Swords for the use of the Sergeants 
& assess each member of the Company three shillings, & every new member the same 
sum on his Admission. 

" And your committee further report, that on Wednesday the 2d day of June A. D. 
1790, the Officers of the said Company waited on His Excellency, Governor Hancock, 
Lieut Gov. Adams and the Hon. Council with the respectful compliments of the Com- 
pany, and requested the honor of escorting them on the day of Election to the Meeting 
House to attend Divine service : and likewise requested the honor of their company to 
dine at Faneuil Hall on that day. His Excellency replied, that if his health would 
admit, he would do himself the pleasure to dine with the Company and should be ready 
at the Council Chamber to be escorted as proposed. His Honor, the Lieut. Governor 
and the Hon. Council accepted the invitation without any qualification. That on the 
morning of the 7th of June A. D. 1790, the day of Election, the Commanding Officer 
of the Company received a message from His Excellency, the Governor, that his state of 
health was such, that he should not be able to attend Divine Service, or dine with the 
Company, but, if possible, he would attend on the Common, there to receive the badges 
from the old officers and invest those who were to be elected with them. But if his health 
was such as to be unable to attend on the Common, he had directed his Honor, the 
Lieut. Governor to receive and deliver the badges. The Commanding Officer observed 
to the Adjutant General that as the Lieut. Governor held no military rank, he conceived 
it was improper to pay him military honors : that as the chair of Governor was not vacant 
by reason of his death or absence from the Commonwealth, or otherwise, the Lieut 
Governor had no right to perform the duties of Governor or exercise the powers and 
authorities which, by the Constitution the Governor is vested with, when personally 
present. The Adjutant General made no other reply, than that he was not directed to 
return any message to His Excellency, the Governor. The Company proceeded at the 
usual hour and escorted His Honor, the Lieut. Governor, and the Hon. Council to the 
place of Divine service and afterwards to Faneuil Hall. 

" While at dinner His Honor, the Lieut. Governor, observed to the Commanding 
Officer, that if the Governor's health would not permit him to attend on the Common, 
His Excellency had ordered him to perform the duties incumbent on him, and particu- 
larly to receive the badges from the old officers and invest those who were to be elected 
with them. The Commanding officer made the same reply to His Honor, as to the 
Adjutant General, with this addition, that he hoped His Honor would not consider it as 
a personal, but merely an official objection. That was Mr Adams — Governor, or had a 
right to exercise the powers of Governor, the Company would pay him the honors with 
the same pleasure as they would Mr. Hancock, but that under the existing circumstances, 
it was improper, unprecedented, and contrary to military propriety. His Honor replied, 



256 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 790 

that it seemed to be a Constitutional question, and asked what tribunal should decide it? 
That his orders from the Governor were positive and he could see no other alternative 
than performing the duties. The Commanding officer replied, that he could not consent 
to a measure unauthorized by custom, by the Constitution, or by military propriety. 
Much more was said on the subject, but these were the general principles advanced on 
the occasion. 

" After dinner, His Honor and the Hon. Council withdrew, and the Commanding 
officer ordered Major Cunningham [1786], the Lieutenant of the Company, to wait 
on His Excellency the Governor, and to inform him that the Company was then at the 
Hall, and although the rain was severe, yet, if His Excellency's health was such that he 
could meet them, he would march them to the Common according to ancient custom, 
there to elect their officers and perform the ceremonies usual on the day of their election. 
If that mode was not convenient, that the Company would proceed to the choice of their 
officers, at the Hall, and the old and new officers would wait on His Excellency at such 
place as he should appoint to exchange the badges ; or, that the Company would proceed 
to the choice of their officers, and send their names to His Excellency for his approba- 
tion, and when approved would exchange the badges between themselves in presence of 
the Company ; or, if His Excellency would appoint the eldest Major General present to 
perform the duties, that mode would not be unprecedented. His Excellency returned 
for answer that his health was such, and the storm being severe, that he could not meet 
the Company on the Common. That if the Company would proceed to the election 
of the officers, he would be happy to receive the old and new officers at his house, and 
there receive the badges and deliver them to the new elected officers. The Company 
proceeded accordingly to the election of their officers at the Hall, and the old and new- 
elected officers waited on His Excellency the Governor, at his house, where the cere- 
monies were performed, the badges delivered, and the new officers invested with them." 

On the first Monday in June, 1790, the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company 
paraded at ten o'clock, in the Old South Meeting-house ; at twelve o'clock, it marched to 
the council chamber, from whence it escorted his Honor the lieutenant-governor (his 
Excellency the governor being indisposed), the honorable council, and several military 
officers, to the Old Brick Meeting-house, where a sermon was delivered by the Rev. Mr. 
Homer, of Newton. After the religious ceremonies of the day were over, a procession 
was formed, viz. : — 

Lieut -Gov. Adams, Hon. Mr. Bowdoin, honorable council and senators, speaker 
and members of the House, president of the university, clergy, — among whom were 
Abbe" Rousselet and Mr. Thayer ; consuls of France, Holland, and Sweden ; selectmen 
of Boston, gentlemen, and strangers of distinction ; adjutant-general, officers of Cadets, 
Castle William, Artillery, and Fusileers, in uniform ; honorary members, etc., who were 
escorted by the Company to Faneuil Hall, where a sumptuous dinner was provided. 
After which the following toasts were drank : — 

1. "The President of the United States" (three cheers). 2. "The Vice-President 
and Congress of America." 3. "The Governor and Commonwealth of Massachusetts" 
4. "The Powers of Europe, in Alliance with the United States." 5. "Agriculture, 
Manufactures, Fisheries, and Commerce." (His Honor the lieutenant-governor then 
gave the following toast : " Prosperity to the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Com- 
pany.") 6. "The King of France" (clapping of hands). 7. " The Marquis de La.fay- 



1790] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 257 

ette." 8. "The National Assembly of France: may they rightly distinguish between 
the evils of licentiousness and the blessings of good government." 9. "Chief-Justice 
Jay." 10. "Gen. Knox." n. "Mr. Hamilton." 12. " Mr. Jefferson." 13. "May the 
inhabitants of America exercise the same wisdom in preserving as they have in erecting 
the Federal Dome." 

The Hall was beautifully decorated. The entrance formed an arch, supporting the 
orchestra where the band performed during the dinner. At the head of the Hall was a 
grand arch, from the key-stones of which hung a golden fleur-de-lis. In the rear of this, 
in the front window, was placed an obelisk, finely executed by Mr. Johnston (1786). The 
base was formed by a bust of the President of the United States, encircled with a glory, 
and the inscription, " The lustre of his actions shines with triumphant brightness, and 
spreads a glory around him." Over this, at the top of the obelisk, was the All-Seeing 
Eye, with an inscription, "Fideks Protego" (I protect the faithful) over it. In the 
centre, a winged cherub was represented as crowning the President with a chaplet of 
laurel. Thousands of people visited the Hall to see the elaborate decorations. 

After dinner, the Company proceeded to the choice of their officers, and unani- 
mously elected Robert Jenkins (1756), captain; John Johnston (1786), lieutenant, and 
Israel Loring (1768), ensign, for the ensuing year. The heavy rain preventing the 
Company from parading as usual on the Common, the old officers and the officers-elect 
went in carriages to the house of his Excellency the governor, where the former resigned 
the insignias of their offices, and the latter were invested therewith. 

At sundown, his Honor the lieutenant-governor and council, on invitation of Capt. 
Jenkins (1756), went down to the Hall and partook, with many other guests, of the 
second entertainment usually given on that anniversary, which concluded with thirteen 
sentimental, political, and philanthropic toasts, with which the anniversary exercises were 
closed. 

Rev. Jonathan Homer, D. D., of Newton, delivered the Artillery election sermon 
of 1790. He was a son of Michael Homer, Jr. (1789), a grandson of Michael Homer 
(1768), and was born in Boston, April 15, 1759. He married Anna, a daughter of 
Obadiah Curtis, of Boston, by whom he had an only child, Jonathan, who died Sept. 4, 
1804, aged twenty-one years. Mr. Homer graduated at Harvard College in 1777, at the 
age of eighteen years. He received the honorary degree of D. D. from Brown Univer- 
sity in 1826. He was ordained pastor of the church in Newton, Feb. 13, 1782, and in 
that relation he spent his life. His ministry covered a period of sixty-one years. He 
was sole pastor forty-five years, till November, 1827, and then had a colleague. 

Mr. Homer was very scrupulous in the performance of his official duties. At the 
funeral service of Gen. Hull (1788), having accidentally omitted to mention in his prayei 
one of the relatives of the family, he prayed a second time, lest he should be deemed 
guilty of a failure, or give occasion for grief or offence. Dr. Homer died Aug. n, 1843, 
in the eighty-fifth year of his age, and the sixty-second of his ministry. He published 
a history of Newton, "The Columbian Bible," "Reports of the Middlesex County Bible 
Society," and six sermons delivered on various occasions. 

Jonathan Homer. Authority: Smith's Hist, of Newton. 



258 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 79I 

The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1791 were: Josiah 
[ VQ I . Waters (1769), captain; Zechariah Hicks (1786), lieutenant; Nathaniel 
• ' Call (1774), ensign. Joseph Eaton (1773) was first sergeant; Joseph 

Loring (1788), second sergeant; John Coolidge (1786), third sergeant; Samuel Hast- 
ings (1786), fourth sergeant, and Thomas Clark (1786), clerk. 

At the services held by the Legislature in May, 1791, the officers of the Ancient and 
Honorable Artillery Company had the post of honor, among the military guests, in the 
procession which was escorted by the Independent Fusileers. The governor and Legis- 
lature were conducted from the State House to the Old South Meeting-House, where a 
sermon was delivered by Rev. Chandler Robbins, and thence to Faneuil Hall, where 
a sumptuous entertainment was provided by the State. 

In October, 1791, Lieut. Samuel Bradlee (1765) was chosen captain, and Lieut. 
Wild (1773) captain-lieutenant, of the Boston artillery, vice Capt. Johnston (1786) and 
Capt.-Lieut. Sturgis (1786) resigned. 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1791 were: Robert Ball, 
Shubael Bell, John Gardiner, John Peck, Samuel Perkins, William Walter. 

Robert Ball (1791) was probably a grandson of Robert Ball, of Charlestown in 1728, 
and of Concord in 1746. His father, Robert, was a sea-captain, and married, (2) or (3) 
Aug. 6, 1767, Melicent Harris. 

Robert Ball (1791) was born Sept. 17, 1769. He was first lieutenant of the Ward 4 
company in the Boston regiment from 1794 to 1796, and fourth sergeant of the Artillery 
Company in 1794. He became a member of The Massachusetts Lodge, A. F. and 
A. M., Feb. 12, 1795. 

Shubael Bell (1791), housewright, of Boston, was born in 1766. He was twice 
married : (1) July 26, 1789, to Joanna Smith Masters, and, (2) Oct. 6, 1808, to Anne 
Hewes, but died without issue. 

For some years he worked at his trade in Boston, but as other fields of toil and 
usefulness opened to him, he entered them. April 19, 1797, the Columbian Centind 
announces that "Capt. Shubael Bell [1791] is appointed deputy sheriff of the county of 
Suffolk," and adds : "A gentleman, whose suavity of manners, humanity of disposition, 
and integrity of heart, will render him a valuable acquisition to the executive depart- 
partment." He was afterwards appointed sheriff, and, in 1810, jailer of Suffolk County. 
" Here," says Mr. Knapp, " he had full exercise for all his patience, forbearance, and 
good feelings. I have seen him when he visited the cells of crime and wretchedness, 
and at his approach, profaneness was dumb, and despair grew calm. I have seen him 
with the broken-hearted debtor, who was weeping at the recollection of his disheartened 
wife and helpless, suffering children, and as he came nigh the prisoner he seemed a sort 
of electrical conductor, to convey away the agonies of the wounded soul." 

He was a very zealous Episcopalian, and was senior warden of Christ Church from 
1812 to 1819. He was a pillar of that church during its state of feebleness after the 
death of Dr. Walter. Mr. Bell (1791) was the principal agent in the establishment of 
St. Matthew's Chapel, South Boston. His subscriptions for the assistance of the Epis- 
copal church were liberal in the extreme. 

Robert Ball ( 1 79 1 ) . Authorities : Wyman's Shubael Bell (1791). Authorities: Whit- 

Charlestown Genealogies and Estates; By-Laws of man's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 1842; Hist. 
The Massachusetts Lodge. of St. Andrew's R. A. Chapter. 



l 79 i] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 259 

He was very prominent in the Masonic Fraternity, and held various offices in 
Lodge, Chapter, and Commandery. A eulogy was delivered in Christ Church, June 8, 
18 19, by Samuel L. Knapp, before St. John's Lodge, A. F. and A. M., "on the character 
of their brother and past master, Shubael Bell, Esq. [1791]." He died May 30, 18 19, 
"at the age of fifty-three," says Mr. Samuel L. Knapp, "in the midst of business, 
unbroken and untired, and at the moment of his death had the strongest hold on the 
confidence of men, and a deep interest in their affections. The silver cord of life was 
loosed before it was chafed, the golden bowl was broken before it was tarnished, and 
the pitcher at the fountain while it held the water to the brim." He was an officer of a 
Boston militia company from 1790 to 1798, but never held any office in the Artillery 
Company. 

" His mind was cultivated by study, his heart enlarged by practical benevolence, his 
whole life a scene of active usefulness, and his death was universally lamented." ' 

John Gardiner (1791), lawyer, of Boston, son of Dr. Sylvester and Ann Gardiner, 
was born in Boston, Dec. 4, 1737. In early life he went to England and studied law at 
the Inner Temple. He was admitted to practice in the courts of Westminster Hall, 
receiving the patronage of Lord Mansfield. He lost this, however, by appearing as 
counsel in the famous case of John Wilkes, the reformer. He also practised for a time 
in South Wales, Haverford West, where he married, in 1764, Margaret Harris. In 1766, 
Mr. Gardiner (1 791) was appointed chief-justice of the province of New York, which he 
declined. Having been appointed attorney-general in the island of St. Christopher, 
he removed his family to the West Indies, where he remained until the close of the 
American Revolution. 

He returned to Boston in 1783, became eminent as a lawyer, and, July 4, 1785, 
delivered the oration for the town authorities. In 1786, he settled in Pownalboro, Me., 
where he was elected to the Massachusetts Legislature. He was prominent and active 
in its proceedings. While a resident of Boston, he attended King's Chapel. In 1785 
he took an active part in the alteration of the liturgy in the Book of Common Prayer with 
Perez Morton and others, of King's Chapel, striking out the doctrine of the Trinity. He 
held the position of captain in the militia. In October, 1793, when on his passage to the 
General Court at Boston, in the packet " Londoner," which was wrecked off Cape Ann 
in a storm, he was drowned. His chest of clothing floated ashore. His son, Rev. 
John Sylvester John Gardiner, D. D., delivered the sermon before the Artillery Company 
in June, 1823. 

John Peck (1791), merchant, of Boston, son of Thomas Handside Peck, was born 
in Boston, Aug. 24, 1743. He was adjutant of the First Regiment, First Brigade, First 
Division, Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, from 1791 to 1794. 

"He devised the plan of filling up the Mill-Pond [where the Boston & Maine Rail- 
road Station, Haymarket Square, now stands], and owned largely therein; but not 
realizing his sanguine expectations in a ready sale, he became involved, and removed to 
Kentucky." 

John Gardiner (1791)- Authority: Lor- Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, 
ing's One Hundred Boston Orators. Ed. 1842. 

John Peck ( 1791). Authorities: Boston ' Columbian Centinel, June 2, 1819. 



260 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [ I79 i 

Samuel Perkins (1791), painter, of Roxbury, son of Lieut. -Col. William (1765) 
and Abigail (Cox) Perkins, was born in Boston, Sept. 2, 1770. He married, Feb. 8, 
1795, Barbary C. Higginson, of Boston. 

When about thirteen years old, Mr. Perkins (1791) went as an apprentice to Capt. 
John Johnston (1786), a portrait-painter, who kept in Court Street, near the head of 
Gore's Alley. At the age of nineteen he began the general painting business, chiefly on 
houses and ships, and continued it until about 1815, when he undertook the painting of 
carpets. This business he continued until it so increased that he built a large factory in 
Roxbury. His carpets were in great demand till rival factories created a strong com- 
petition, which, together with his age, induced him to retire from active business. He 
was representative from Boston to the State Legislature, was third sergeant of the 
Artillery Company in 1796, and first lieutenant of a cavalry company in Boston in 1799. 

" He was universally esteemed." He died in Roxbury, Aug. 2, 1846. 

William Walter (1791), merchant, of Boston, son of Rev. William Walter, D. D., 
rector of Trinity, and afterward of Christ Church, Boston, was born Feb. 14, 177 1. 
His mother was Lydia, daughter of Hon Benjamin Lynde, Jr , chief-justice, of Salem. 
William Walter (1791) was in business on Codman's Wharf with his brother, Thomas, 
and he lived on Salem Street. He was first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 
1797, and clerk in 1798-9. 

He married, April 23, 1794, Sarah, daughter of Martin Bicker (1771), of Madeira, 
by whom he had six children. She died June n, i8n,andwas buried under Christ 
Church. He was a representative in the General Court. He died April 23, 1814, and 
was buried in a tomb under Christ Church. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1791 is as follows : — 
"Monday, April 4 1791. The Company paraded at three o'clock commanded by 
Capt Jenkins [1756]. The Rev. Doct. Samuel Parker was chosen to preach the Election 
Sermon in June next. Voted, That the Commissioned Officers with the Treasurer be a 
Committee to wait on and inform him of their choice. Voted, That Capt. Joseph Coffin 
Boyd [1786] be furnished with a certificate of his being a member of this Company 
signed by the Captain and attested by the Clerk. Attest T. Clark, Clerk. 

"Monday, May 2d, 1791. The Company being under Arms commanded by Capt 
Jenkins [1756] the Committee appointed to wait on the Rev. Doct. Parker reported that 
he accepted the invitation of the Company, and would preach the Election Sermon in 
June next. Voted, That the further business of the meeting be referred to next Mon- 
day Evening. 

"Monday evening, May 9th 1791. Voted, That the Commissioned Officers, Col. 
Winslow [1786], Maj. Cunningham [1786], Col Waters [1769], Capt William Bordman 
[1758]) w ' tn the Clerk, be a committee to make arrangements for the Election in June 
next, and report on Thursday evening next. 

"Thursday Evening, May 12th 1791. The Committee reported that there be 
.assessed nine shillings on each member of the Company — that twenty- two pounds, four 
shillings interest now due, & a Sum not exceeding thirty pounds of the Principal due 

Samuel Perkins (1791). Authorities: Boston Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Com- 
pany, Ed. 1842. 



1 791] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 26 1 

from the town of Charlestown be appropriated to defray the Expences of Election day ; 
and to enable our attorney to prosecute the suit commenced against the Estate of the 
late Col. Blanchard[i737]. Voted, That the above report be accepted. 

" Attest. T. Clark, Clerk. 

"Monday, June 6th 1791. This being the Anniversary of the Election of Officers, 
the Company attended Divine Service at the Old Brick Meeting House, dined at Faneuil 
Hall, marched into the Common, and went through the usual Exercises under Capt 
Jenkins [1756], after which they made choice of the following gentlemen to serve as 
Officers the ensuing year : — Col. Josiah Waters [1769], Captain ; Mr. Zechariah Hicks 
[1786], Lieutenant; Capt Nathaniel Call [1774], Ensign; Col. John Winslow [1786] 
Treasurer; Mr. Thomas Clark [1786], Clerk; Capt Joseph Eaton [1773], Capt Joseph 
Loring [1788], Mr. John Coolidge [1786], Mr. Samuel Hastings [1786], sergeants. 

" Voted, That the late Commissioned Officers, with the Treasurer, be a Committee to 
wait on the Rev. Doctor Parker, giving him the Thanks of the Company for his Sermon 
this day delivered and request a copy thereof for the press. Doctor Parker declined 
publishing his sermon. Attest T. Clark Clerk. 

"Friday Evening, Sept 9th 1791. Monday last being disagreeable weather, the 
Company paraded this day at Faneuil Hall, — marched into the Common commanded 
by Col. Waters [1769]. 

"Friday, October 7th 1791. The Company paraded on the floor of the State 
House, marched into the Common, commanded by Lieut. Hicks [1786]." 

The Artillery election on June 6, 1791, was conducted in the usual manner. The 
Company paraded at 10 o'clock a. m., proceeded to the council chamber at 12 m., and 
thence escorted his Honor the lieutenant-governor (his Excellency the governor 
having proceeded in his carriage), the honorable council and military gentlemen, to the 
Old Brick Meeting-House. The sermon was delivered by Rev. Dr. Parker. 

After service, the Company escorted its guests to Faneuil Hall, where his Excel- 
lency had previously repaired. Besides those above mentioned, there were present : 
Hon. Mr. Ames, State officers, president of Harvard College, foreign consuls, the Right 
Rev.- Bishop Carroll, etc., who, with the Company, sat down to a sumptuous repast. The 
blessing was craved by Rev. Dr. Parker, an Episcopalian, and thanks returned by Right 
Rev. Bishop Carroll, a Roman Catholic. 

Fourteen toasts were offered, which were of the usual form. After the invited guests 
had retired, the Company marched into the square laid out on the Common, where a 
detachment of the Castle' troops did duty, and officers for the ensuing year were elected, 
viz. : Col. Josiah Waters (1769), captain; Mr. Zechariah Hicks (1786), lieutenant; Capt. 
Nathaniel Call (1774), ensign; Col. John Winslow (1786), treasurer, and Mr. Thomas 
Clark (1786), clerk. 

The Company then, on invitation of his Excellency the governor, proceeded to his 
house, and in company with a great number of officers and gentlemen, partook of a 
delicate and liberal repast. Having refreshed, the Company escorted his Excellency 
and Honor, and others, into the square, the governor taking the chair of State. After the 
formalities of election and investiture of the officers, his Excellency was given a stand- 
ing salute, and all returned to the Hall. A collation was provided, and after it additional 
sentiments were offered ; the last being : " May we never oblique from the centre of 



262 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [ I?92 

prosperity; but, by advancing in right steps, be promoted in the day of universal 
review." 

The Hall was elaborately and beautifully decorated for the occasion. Notwithstand- 
ing the ill-health of the governor, he paid every possible attention to the Company. The 
day was exceedingly fine, and everything seemed to combine to make it universally 
agreeable. 

Rev. Samuel Parker, D. D., delivered the Artillery election sermon of 1791. He 
was a son of Hon. William Parker, and was born in Portsmouth, N. H., in August, 1744. 
He received his education at Harvard College, where he graduated in 1764. Imme- 
diately after graduation he taught school in Roxbury, and subsequently pursued the study 
of theology. After the death of William Hooper, rector of Trinity Church, in Boston, 
Dr. Walter, the assistant minister of Trinity parish, became the rector. Mr. Parker, 
then residing in Portsmouth, N. H , was elected in October, 1773, to fill the place vacated 
by the promotion of Dr. Walter. Mr. Parker accepted the position, and proceeded to 
England for ordination. Feb. 24, 1774, the Lord Bishop of London admitted him to 
deacon's orders, and three days after ordained him a priest. Mr. Parker returned 
to Boston, and Nov. 2, 1774, subscribed to the rules governing an assistant minister at 
Trinity Church. He remained at his post throughout the Revolution. After the Decla- 
ration of Independence was proclaimed, July 18, 1776, he caused that part of the liturgy 
that had reference to the king and royal family to be omitted. 

In 1779 he was elected rector of the parish. In 1789 the degree of D. D. was 
conferred upon him by the University of Pennsylvania. In 1792 he was partially relieved 
of parochial duties by the election of Reverend afterward Dr. J. S. J. Gardiner, to the 
office of assistant minister, who also succeeded to the rectorship. Upon the death of 
Bishop Bass, in 1803, Dr. Parker was unanimously elected bishop of the eastern diocese. 
He accepted, and was consecrated in New York, Sept. 16, 1804. He returned to his 
family in Boston, but was immediately prostrated by the illness of which he died, Dec. 
6, 1804, aged fifty-nine years. 



The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1792 were : John Wins- 

I/Q2. low ( : 7 86 )> captain; Thomas Clark (1786), lieutenant; Lemuel Gardner 

• ' (1787), ensign. Samuel Greenough (1786) was first sergeant; Jonathan 

Balch (1786), second sergeant; Joseph Lovering, Jr. (1788), third sergeant; Joseph 

Clark (1789), fourth sergeant, and John G. Doubleday (1790), clerk. 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1792 were: Richard Austin, 
William Bass, Humphrey Clark, William Coolidge, Oliver Gridley, Robert Homes, John 
Howe, Jr., Jonathan Loring, Jr ., John S. Lowell, George Makepeace, Jr., Daniel Messin- 
ger, George Singleton, Jr., Thomas Waldron Sumner, Joshua Thomas. 

Richard Austin (1792), pewterer, No. 16 Marlborough Street, Boston, son of 
Thomas and Sarah (Parker) Austin, of Charlestown, was born (baptized) Dec. 23, 1764. 
He married, but had no children. 

Rev. Samuel Parker. Authority: Sprague's man's Charlestown Genealogies and Estates; Annals 
Annals of American Pulpit. of Mass. Char. Mech. Association; Whitman's 

Riohard Austin (1792). Authorities: Wy- Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 1842. 



i 79 2] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 263 

Mr. Whitman (1810), in his history of the Company, says : "The trade of pewterer 
had been a lucrative branch of manufactures, but about this time began to go out of 
fashion. The better sort of people used pewter platters, spoons, plates, porringers, etc., 
and it was a mark of poverty not to see a dresser abundantly furnished with pewter ware. 
New England housewives considered it a display of luxury. Capt. Austin [1792] was 
a man of strict honesty and honor as well as liberality. When his trade declined, he 
entered into copartnership with George Blanchard [1794] and followed the business of 
a broker. Disaster followed, and Mr. Austin [1792], deeply in debt, suffered much 
depression during the latter part of his life. . . . Although the lack of offspring, the mis- 
fortunes of business, the treachery of his partner, and the severity of bodily pain, cast a 
secret gloom over his warm heart, yet he always wore the same cheerful countenance, 
and died with great fortitude and resignation." 

He was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1795, and its ensign in 1800. 
In the militia, he rose to the grade of captain, and was brigade quartermaster in the 
Legionary Brigade from 1801 to 1806. He died, after an ineffectual surgical operation, 
in 1 81 7, and was privately buried, according to his request. 

Mr. Whitman (1810) adds, and it should be preserved as a testimonial of his own 
forgiving spirit : " If this [the above quotation] be a tribute of respect, it is impartial, 
since in his failure the compiler [Mr. Whitman (1810)] lost all his property." 

William Bass (1792), of Boston, son of Philip and Mary Bass, was born in Boston, 
May 31, 1734. In the Revolution, he was a private in Lieut. -Col. Jabez Hatch's regi- 
ment, and served, with a detachment commanded by Major Andrew Symmes (1760), 
in guarding stores at and about Boston under Major-Gen. Heath (1765), by order of 
council, May 12, 1777. Subsequently, he rose to the grade of captain in the militia. 

Humphrey Clark (1792), tailor, of Boston, son of Elijah and Ann (Rhodes) Clark, 

was born in Topsfield, Mass., Nov. 10, 1761. He married Mary , "an aristocratic 

foreigner." When quite young, he was apprenticed to J. Lefavour, of Salem, to learn 
the tailor's trade. He afterward went South, and spent several years, but returned and 
settled in Boston. For many years he carried on the business of merchant tailor, near 
the head of State Street, north of the State House. " He acquired a handsome property 
by honest industry, but lost it by the fluctuation of business, and with it his energy. 
One of his sons, an accomplished merchant, received a present from the insurance com- 
panies for his intrepidity in saving a ship and cargo from England, at sea." Mr. Clark 
(1792) could not seem to rise above his misfortunes, and for a few years was messenger 
to the Board of Health. In 1796 his place of business was on Court Street, and he 
resided at No. 30 Marlborough Street. The last years of his life were spent in retire- 
ment at Danvers, where he died May 7, 1829, aged sixty-seven years. 

William Coolidge (1792), machinist, of Boston, son of John and Hannah Coolidge, 
was born in Boston, Jan. 5, 1730. He resided, in 1796, on Common Street. 

Oliver Gridley (1792), of Boston, son of William and Lidia Gridley, of Roxbury, 
was born in that town, Dec. 5, 1767. He died at Providence, R. I., in 1831. 

William Bass (.1792). Authorities: Boston Boston Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. 
Records; Mass. Rev. Rolls. Company, Ed. 1842; Annals of Mass. Char. Mech. 

Humphrey Clark (1792). Authorities: Association. 



264 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[1792 



Robert Homes (1792), brass-founder, No. 33 Union Street, Boston, son of William 
Homes, Jr. (1766), grandson of William (1747) and father of Josiah W. (1822), was 
born in Boston. He was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1797. He received 
the Masonic degrees in Columbian Lodge, A. F. and A. M., in June and July, 1796. 

John Howe, Jr. (1792), turner, of Boston, was a son of John (1773), and was born 
in 1764. His residence was No. 43 Charter Street. He learned the trade of a turner 
with his father, and later formed a partnership, under the name, " John Howe & Son." 
Their place of business was on Back, now Salem, Street. He was fourth sergeant of the 
Artillery Company in 1797, and ensign in 1802. The original pillars of the State House, 
Boston, were turned under the direction of this firm. John, Jr. (1792), resided on the 
northerly corner of Hanover and Centre streets. His sister Harriet married Peter 
Conant, Jr. (1807). 

Mr. Howe (1792) was a member of the city council of Boston from Ward 12 in 
1822. For some years he held the office of surveyor of mahogany, etc. He died 
March 28, 1828, aged sixty-four years, after a lingering illness. 

Jonathan Loring, Jr. (1792), housewright, of Boston, son of Jonathan and Susanna 
(Pierce) Loring, was born in 1767, probably in Marlboro, Mass. He was a nephew of 
Joseph (1788), and a cousin of Joseph Loring, Jr. (1793). His military service began 
in his youth, and was rewarded by promotion to a captaincy in the Boston regiment. 
He also served as fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1796, ensign in 1801, and 
lieutenant in 1807. His place of business was on Burditt's Wharf, and his residence in 
Sheafe's Lane. He was selectman of Boston in 1820 and 1821, and a member of the 
common council of that city in 1827. He represented Boston in the State Legislature, 
and joined the Lodge of St. Andrew, A. F. and A. M., in 1796. 

He died at Boston, Aug. 29, 1834, aged sixty-seven years. His first wife, Polly 
Loring, died Oct. 4, 1792, in her twenty-fourth year, and was buried in King's Chapel 
Burial-Ground. 

John S. Lowell (1792), merchant, of Boston. He never held any office in the 
Artillery Company. He became a member of The Massachusetts Lodge, A. F. and 
A. M., June 3, 1793. He died at Bombay in December, 1796, aged twenty-seven years. 

George Makepeace, Jr. (1792), merchant, of Boston, only son of George Make- 
peace, of Boston, was born Aug. 26, 1767. He was a young man of great promise, and, 
being intended by his father for a mercantile life, his education "was pursued to that end. 
He went on several voyages as supercargo in his father's vessels, and was very successful. 
About the time he joined the Artillery Company he was taken into partnership by his 
father, who was largely engaged in commercial business, trading principally with the 
West Indies. 

In the summer of 1793, having made a voyage in one of their vessels to the West 
Indies, and was returning, he went into Philadelphia, where the yellow fever was raging 
with so great virulence that more than four thousand persons were carried off by it in the 

John Howo, Jr. (1792). Authorities: Bos- Jonathan Loring, Jr. (1792). Authority: 

ton Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Com- Boston Records, 
pany, Ed. 1842; Columbian Cenlinel, March, 1828. 



, 792 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 265 

months of August, September, and October of that year. He also fell a victim to this 
fatal disease, and died at Philadelphia, Sept. 22, 1793, aged twenty-six years and twenty- 
six days. He was never married. 

Daniel Messinger (1792), hatter, of Boston, son of Daniel and Mary Messinger, of 
Wrentham, Norfolk County, Mass., was born in that town June 17, 1768. His brother. 
Henry joined the Artillery Company in 1800. Daniel Messinger (1792), after leaving 
school, assisted his father on the farm until his fourteenth year, when he was apprenticed 
with his uncle, David Brastow, in his native town, to learn the hatter's trade. His uncle 
being unsuccessful in business, he was sent to Boston when about fifteen years of age, 
and was apprenticed to Nathaniel Balch, hatter, No. 72 Cornhill, now Washington Street, 
opposite the head of Water Street. Shortly after he completed his apprenticeship he 
began business for himself, and opened a store on Newbury, now Washington, Street, 
near the Lamb Tavern, now the site of the Adams House. In the twenty-fifth year of 
his age he married Susanna Hinckley, daughter of Capt. Thomas Hinckley by his wife 
Susanna, daughter of Rev. Daniel Hewes, of Foxboro. Susanna (Hinckley) Messinger 
died in 1843. I n l 191> by the advice of his friend, Mr. John Avery, Jr. (1786), then 
secretary of the Commonwealth, he purchased the estate No. 15 Newbury Street, corner of 
Sheafe's Lane, now Avery Street, for one thousand pounds. Mr. Secretary Avery (1786) 
lived on the opposite corner. Here Mr. Messinger (1792) resided and kept his hat store. 
The latter was in the front of the house, and his parlor was in the rear of it, entered from 
Avery Street, until his business became so large that he built a brick factory in the rear 
of his dwelling-house. He resided here and carried on business until the decease of 
his wife. 

In military affairs he took a great interest, and was a good officer and disciplinarian. 
In 1779 he raised the well-known infantry company, the Winslow Blues, named for his 
friend, Gen. John Winslow (1786), and was its first commander. He held this office for 
several years. Upon the organization of the infantry companies of Boston into a sub- 
legion, in 1806, he was elected first major. He was afterwards lieutenant-colonel, and, 
later, colonel of the Third Regiment, and was senior colonel of the Boston brigade 
during the war of 181 2. He was chosen a brigadier-general, but declined accepting the 
office. For years he was very active in all matters pertaining to the Ancient and Hon- 
orable Artillery Company. He was its first sergeant in 1796, lieutenant in 1800, and its 
captain in 1804 and 1810. His last military parade was on the two hundredth anniver- 
sary of the Company (1838), when he marched in the ranks as an artilleryman. 

He was an original member of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association 
in 1795, was for several years a trustee and vice-president, and for two years was its 
president. He filled various offices in the municipal and State governments, was a fire- 
ward for many years, and a member of the city council ; often a member of the House 
of Representatives, in 1820 a member of the Massachusetts Constitutional Conven- 
tion, and in 1835 a senator from Suffolk County. In politics, he belonged to the old 
Federal party, and often presided at public meetings. Afterwards he became attached 
to the National Republican, or Whig, party. His last appearance at a public meeting 
was in Faneuil Hall in 1845, when Daniel Webster, of whom he was a great admirer, 

Daniel Messinger (1792). Authorities: pany, Ed. 1842; New Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 
Boston Records; Annals of Mass. Char. Mech. 1862. 
Association; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Com- 



266 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND 



[1792 



spoke. Mr. Webster, on seeing him on the platform, came forward and greeted him so 
cordially as his "old friend, Col. Messinger [1792]," as to attract the attention and 
elicit the applause of the citizens in that part of the Hall. 

Mr. Messinger (1792) first attended the First Baptist Church, Rev. Dr. Stillman, 
pastor, but afterwards became a member of the First Congregational Church, with which 
he was connected until his decease. For many years he was the leader of the choir in 
the Congregational church. " He had a fine musical ear and as fine a voice, and could 
sound the highest notes on the treble staff with remarkable strength and clearness." He 
was often invited to sing on public festive occasions, and Faneuil Hall has many a time 
been filled with the melody of his notes. His favorite songs were : " My friend and 
Pitcher," " Green grow the Rushes, Oh ! " " Bright Phoebus," "To-morrow, to-morrow," 
and "The Downhill of Life." When over seventy years of age, he sang without any 
apparent diminution of strength, clearness, or sweetness. An amusing incident occurred 
at a dinner given Prince Jerome Bonaparte in 1804. After dinner, Col. Messinger 
(1792) sang the favorite old song, "To-morrow." As the audience joined in the chorus 
of "To-morrow, to-morrow," a cloud came over the face of the prince, and taking his 
next neighbor by the arm, he exclaimed : " To Moreau, to Moreau ! Is it a song in 
honor of Gen. Moreau?" He was quickly undeceived, and smiled when he found no 
one but himself was thinking of the great rival of his brother. 

Mr. Messinger (1792) was, by nature, of a very strong constitution. His death was 
hastened by being accidentally knocked down by an express wagon while he was crossing 
the street. From the effects of this shock he never recovered, it being followed by a 
sickness of seven months, ending in a severe attack of erysipelas and dropsy. He died 
June 21, 1846, being seventy-eight years and four days old. His funeral, from his former 
residence in Purchase Street, was private. He was buried in the family lot at Mount 
Auburn. 

George Singleton, Jr. (1792), cooper, of Boston, son of George Singleton and 
Mary, his wife, was born in Boston, Aug. 28, 1766. His place of business was on How- 
ard's Wharf, Ann Street, and his residence in Salutation Alley. He was deeply interested 
in the artillery service. He was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1795. In 
1 799-1800, he was second lieutenant of the Columbian Artillery, and in 1801-2, lieu- 
tenant in the Sublegionary Brigade of Artillery. When John Bray (1788) was pro- 
moted to be major, Mr. Singleton (1792) — a good officer, and thriving mechanic — 
was superseded, which so mortified him that he became reckless, and soon died, leaving 
a large family. 

Thomas Waldron Sumner (1792), housewright, of Boston, was second sergeant 
of the Artillery Company in 1795, and ensign in 1799, an d > n tne militia became a 
captain. His residence was then on Cambridge Street. Mr. Sumner (1792) became 
wealthy, and retired to Brookline, where he cultivated a small but good farm. He was 
employed as a draftsman, superintendent of construction, and referee respecting building 
contracts, and for several years was a Boston representative in the General Court. 
When the Artillery Company was embarrassed in its finances, he gave the largest sum, 
fifty dollars, towards its relief. 

George Singleton, Jr. (1792)- Authori- Thomas Waldron Sumner (1792). Author- 

ties: Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. ity: Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 
1842; Boston Records. 1842. 



, 79 2] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 267 

Joshua Thomas (1792), physician, of Boston. In 1796, he kept an apothecary 
store at No. 34 Marlborough, now Washington, Street, and became a member of St. 
John's Lodge, A. F. and A. M., in 1793. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1792 is as follows : — 
"Monday evening, March 26th 1792. Voted, That the Commissioned Officers, 
Capt Jenkins [1756], Col. Winslow [1786], Maj. Cunningham [1786] and Mr. Thomas 
Clark [1786], be a Committee to report such regulations, as in their opinion will be for 
the honor and interest of the Company. 

" Monday, April 2d 1792. The Company paraded at Faneuil Hall, & marched into 
the Common, commanded by Col. Waters. The Rev. Mr. Eckley was chosen to preach 
the Election Sermon in June next. Voted, That the Commissioned Officers with the 
Treasurer be a Committee to wait on & inform him of the choice. The Committee 
appointed the 27th ult. to consider what regulations it may be necessary to adopt, have 
attended that Service and beg leave to report the following Votes : — 1st That in future 
all fines arising from neglect of duty, together with the Assessment of three shillings 
heretofore voted to be paid by each new member on his admission, shall be appropriated 
to purchase Badges for the use of the Company; and after the Company is furnished 
therewith, the fines & Assessments aforesaid shall be appropriated to other uses of the 
Company. 2d That the fine for absence on Muster days be six shillings to be paid 
by every member without distinction, except that such members as are Militia Officers 
be exempted, when their duty to the publick calls their attention to the Militia. 3d 
That when a meeting of the Company for exercise, or otherwise, is notified, the Roll 
shall be called, & every member absent at roll-call shall pay a fine of nine pence, & if 
absent the whole meeting, one shilling & six pence, to be paid if present without Arms, 
when ordered for Exercise. 4th The fines may be remitted by the Commanding Officer, 
in case of bodily indisposition, or the members being out of Town on business, (not 
pleasure ;) provided such member make his excuse in person or by writing, within six 
days after the meeting, if in Town ; and if out of Town ; the same term of time after 
his return. 5th That when any Gentlemen are admitted members of the Company, it 
shall be the duty of the Sergeants to instruct them in the manual Exercise, until, in the 
opinion of the Commanding Officer, they are qualified to appear with reputation on 
Muster days ; that they be excluded [from] turning out with the Company until they 
are thus qualified, & that a fine of three shillings be laid upon each Sergeant for 
neglect of the above duty. 6th Any member not complying with these Regulations, & so 
continuing for the space of one year shall no longer be considered a member ; & his 
name shall be returned by the Clerk to the Commanding Officer of the Militia in the 
district or ward to which he may belong, that no one may escape military duty. 7th 
Every member shall be served by the Clerk with a copy of these Regulations. 

"The Committee conceive the foregoing Regulations, strictly adhered to, will be for 
the honour & interest of the Company, & that no Gentleman would wish to make a 
frivilous excuse answer for neglect of duty, when a fine appropriated as above, will tend 
to relieve the Company from the disagreeable necessity of borrowing badges on every 
public appearance. 

"All which is respectfully submitted, April 2d 1792. 

"J. Waters [1769]. per Order. 
" Voted unanimously, forty-one members present, that the above report be accepted. 

"Attest T. Clark, Clerk. 



268 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 792 

" Monday, May 7th 1792. The Company paraded agreeable to Charter, marched 
into the Common — went through a variety of Evolutions & firings commanded by Col. 
Waters [1769]. The Committee appointed to wait on the Rev Mr. Eckley reported, 
that he accepted the invitation to preach the Election sermon in June next. Voted, 
That this meeting be adjourned to Wednesday evening. 

"Wednesday Evening, May 9th 1792. Voted, That the Commissioned officers, 
Col. Winslow [1786], Capt Jenkins [1756], Major Cunningham [1786], Mr Samuel 
Greenough [1786] and the Clerk be a Committee to make the arrangements for the 
Election in June next & report. 

" Wednesday Evening, May 16th 1792. The Treasurer reported, that the Com- 
mittee of Charlestown had paid eight hundred dollars, being all the principal, also the 
interest due to the Company £13. 17. 6. Voted, That a Committee of Finance be 
chosen next Friday evening by ballot, consisting of three members, & that they, with the 
Treasurer, dispose of the monies in the way they shall judge most for the interest of the 
Company. The committee chosen the 9th inst. being ready to report; Voted, That 
they be requested to report next Friday evening. 

"Friday Evening, May 18th 1792. The Committee of Arrangements reported 
that there be twelve shillings assessed on each member towards the Expences of the 
Election in June next, & that the deficiency be paid by the Treasurer out of the Com- 
pany funds. Voted, That the above report be accepted. Capt Robert Jenkins [1756], 
Major Andrew Cunningham [1786] and Mr. Thomas Clark [1786] were elected a Com- 
mittee of Finance to serve till the Election of Officers in June 1793. 

"Attest T. Clark, Clerk. 

"Monday, June 4th 1792. On this Anniversary of the Election of Officers, the 
Company as usual, escorted the supreme Executive from the Council Chamber to the Old 
Brick Meeting House, where a well-adapted discourse was delivered by the Rev. Mr. 
Eckley. After which they escorted His Excellency, the Commander-in-chief & other 
Gentlemen to Faneuil Hall, where an elegant entertainment was provided : at four 
o'clock the Company marched into the Common under the command of Col. Waters 
[1769], where they went through the usual exercises, evolutions & firings with great 
exactness. The following gentlemen were elected officers for the year ensuing, viz : — 
Col. John Winslow [1786], Captain; Mr. Thomas Clark [1786], Lieutenant; Capt 
Lemuel Gardner [1787], Ensign; Mr. Samuel Greenough [1786], Mr. Jonathan Balch 
[1786], Mr. Joseph Lovering Jr. [1788] Capt Joseph Clark [1789], Sergeants. Col. 
John Winslow [1786], Treasurer; Mr. John G. Doubleday [1790], Clerk. 

"Voted, that Col. Josiah Waters [1769], Col. John Winslow [1786], Capt Robert 
Jenkins [1756], Major Andrew Cunningham [1786] and Mr. Thomas Clark [1786], or a 
major part of them be a Committee fully authorized & impowered to institute a suit 
against the estate of Joseph Blanchard [1737] on a bond executed to Trustees for the 
use & benefit of the said Company, by said Blanchard [1737] and others in his life time, 
and pursue the same to final judgment and execution with power of substituting one or 
more Attorneys for the same purpose. Voted, That the late Commissioned Officers, with 
the Treasurer, wait on the Rev. Mr. Eckley, return him the thanks of the Company for 
his Sermon this day delivered and request a copy thereof for the press. 

"Attest. Thomas Clark, Clerk. 



, 792 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 269 

"Monday, September 3d 1792. The Company paraded agreeable to Charter, 
marched into the Common — went through a variety of Evolutions & Firings commanded 
by Col. Winslow [1786]. 

" Friday, October 6th 1792. The Company paraded agreeable to charter; Marched 
into the Common, went through various evolutions and firings, commanded by Col. 
Winslow [1786]." 

Monday, April 2, 1792, agreeable to its charter, the Ancient and Honorable Artil- 
lery Company, commanded by Col. Waters (1769), made its first appearance for the 
season, and went through the usual manoeuvres, evolutions, and firings. The attention 
of this corps to their duty, when almost the embers of military fire seemed expiring, 
entitled them to the thanks of their fellow-citizens. 1 

The Artillery election exercises, on Monday, June 4, 1792, were in accordance with 
the ancient custom. The Vice-President of the United States was present. On account 
of his illness, the governor, John Hancock, rode in the procession in his carriage. A 
considerable number of federal, State, municipal, and military officers participated in 
the services of the day. Fifteen toasts were offered, and a song, composed for the occa- 
sion, was sung. The election of officers on the Common having been completed, the 
officers and officers-elect proceeded to the mansion of Gov. Hancock, where the officers 
resigned their insignia, and officers-elect were duly invested therewith. The Company 
and guests returned to Faneuil Hall, where, on invitation of the commander, a collation 
was enjoyed. The Hall was elaborately decorated with flowers and pines, " The Temple 
of Honor," the " Adams " and " Hancock " pieces of artillery, and a large cage (con- 
cealed by flowers, and suspended from the centre of the ceiling), from which issued the 
harmonious notes of a " real American singing-bird." 

The conduct of the corps gave universal satisfaction ; their discipline and exactness 
spoke the merit of their officers, and their attention showed how zealously they guarded 
the fame of the corps. 2 

Rev. Joseph Eckley, D. D., delivered the Artillery election sermon in 1792. He 
was a son of Thomas Eckley, of the city of London, England, where he was born Oct. 
11, 1750, O. S. Thomas Eckley, with his family, came to America in 1767, and settled 
at Morristown, N. J. When Joseph Eckley left England he had nearly completed his 
preparation for college, and, therefore, soon after his arrival, he entered the college of 
New Jersey, where he graduated in 1772. 

Mr. Eckley remained at Princeton after he graduated, and pursued his theological 
studies. He was licensed to preach on the 7th of May, 1776, by the presbytery of New 
York, and for a time preached as a supply at Albany. He travelled in New England, 
and the Old South Church, of Boston, which, for nearly three years, from 1775 t0 i m, 
had been " without a pastor, without a sanctuary, few in numbers, and greatly impover- 
ished, their strong men in the armies of the nation, and the future full of uncertainties," 
invited him to take charge of the parish. Sept. 9, 1778, he was chosen pastor, to succeed 
Rev. John Hunt. He accepted, and was ordained in King's Chapel, Oct. 27, 1779, the 

Rev. Joseph Eckley, D. D. Authorities: ' Columbian Ce ntine I, April 4, 1 792. 

Sprague's Annals of American Pulpit; Hill's Hist. 2 Columbian Centinel, June 6, 1792. 
of Old South Church; Columbian Centinel, May 
4, 181 1. 



270 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 793 

Old South Meeting-House being in a dilapidated condition, as a result of the war. That 
meeting-house was not re-occupied by the church until March 2, 1783. In 1808, Mr. 
Eckley was provided with a colleague, — Rev. Joshua Huntington. Dr. Eckley died 
April 30, 181 1, aged sixty-one years. His remains were interred in the Granary Burial- 
Ground, tomb No. 163. The heavy slab which covers it is incised with his coat of arms, 
and with his name, " Rev Joseph Eckley." 



The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1793 were: Andrew 
[ 7Q3. Cunningham (1786), captain; Samuel Todd (1786), lieutenant; John Bray 
* s \J (1788), ensign. Josiah Waters (1769) was first sergeant ; John G. Double- 
day (1790), second sergeant; Jonas S. Bass (1789), third sergeant; James Phillips 
(1790), fourth sergeant, and Thomas Clark (1786), clerk. 

Aug. 19, 1793, the military company recruited in Wards 1 and 2, commanded by Capt. 
Robert Gardner (1794), made its first public appearance in complete and elegant uniform. 

The interment of the remains of Gov. John Hancock, who died Oct. 7, 1793, took 
place on Monday, Oct. 14, 1793. Every mark of respect and honor which affection and 
gratitude could inspire was apparent. The bells of the town began to toll at sunrise, 
and continued tolling for one hour ; flags in the town, on the shipping, and at the 
Castle, were at half-mast ; stores and shops were closed, all business being suspended. 
The militia of Boston, with that from neighboring towns, assembled on the Common. 
The Legislature, judicial, military, and municipal officers joined in the funeral proces- 
sion. In the procession, a detachment of the Boston artillery, under Capt. Bradlee 
(1765), had charge of the "Hancock" piece of artillery reversed, with a pall of black 
velvet over it. Various separate military bodies, with the First and Second Battalions, 
Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, all under the command of Brig.-Gen Hull (1788), com- 
posed the military part of the procession. Major-Gen. Brooks (1786), with his aids, 
were present in uniform, with side arms. Col. Josiah Waters (1769) was marshal of the 
procession which followed the corpse, in which were the Vice-President of the United 
States, members of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery in uniform, with their side arms, 
State and town officers, etc. During the movement of the procession, minute guns were 
fired at the Castle and by a detachment of Capt. Bradlee's (1765) artillery, stationed on 
Beacon Hill. 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1793 were : Thomas Bartlett, 
Gideon Batey, Edmund Bowman, Nehemiah Freeman, Benjamin Goldthwait, Thomas 
Greene, Asa (changed to Samuel) Hammond, Joseph Loring, Jr., John Osborn, Samuel 
Thwing, Dudley Walker, John Wells. 

Thomas Bartlett (1793), apothecary, of Boston, son of Capt. John Bartlett (1769) 
and Tabitha, his wife, was born in Boston, May 14, 1767. 

" He long kept the sign of the Good Samaritan, in old Cornhill, which originally 
was painted with 'a priest passing by on the other side.' This was soon erased, because 
the painter had copied the portrait and costume of Rev. Dr. Walter, of Christ Church, 
with his full wig, so exactly that travellers were wont to recognize the likeness, probably 
too near a resemblance in another point of view." * He resided on Hanover Street. 

1 Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 1842. 



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Tf/£ 









f?x>*<S V* ,4^?^*?i^P r? <&?ri--' 




i 793 ] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 2JI 

Gideon Batey (1793), merchant, of Boston. 

Edmund Bowman (1793), cordvvainer, of Boston, son of Samuel Bowman, of 
Lincoln, Mass., was born in that town in 1771. He came to Boston a poor boy, with 
Samuel Hammond (1793), of Lincoln, as a companion. He was a jovial cordwainer, 
fond of the social circle, and never accumulated property, while his friend Samuel (1793) 
became very wealthy. He was a proficient singer, and for some years was at the head 
of the Boston Singing Society. 

Mr. Bowman (1793) was second sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1797, lieuten- 
ant in 1803, and captain in 1807. Mr. Whitman (1810) says of him, in his history of 
the Artillery Company, edition 1842 : " He was an excellent drill-officer, and during his 
command of the Artillery Company it was better instructed than it had been for years. 
His display on election day [June 6, 1808], when he resigned, was accurate and brilliant, 
prepared and executed with the most perfect ease. He was so poor when chosen that 
he declined the office. The expenses of a commander then exceeded one hundred 
dollars. Yet his friends insisted on his acceptance, agreed to pay all his expenses, and 
gave him the most liberal support." During the embargo, he was master of a special 
revenue cutter, in Boston Harbor, and soon after died. 

He united with St. Andrew's Chapter, R. A. M., Aug. 30, 1797 ; a charter member 
thereof, Feb. 14, 1800; was principal sojourner in 1797, and Royal Arch captain 
in 1804 and 1805. 

Nehemiah Freeman (1793), son of Constant and Lois Freeman, was born in Boston, 
June 25, 1769. He never held office in the Artillery Company, and was a member 
of it but a short time. Mr. Freeman (1793) was appointed lieutenant of artillery in 
the United States Army, June 2, 1794, and was promoted to captain Aug. 6, ^98. He 
was appointed as captain commanding at Fort Independence, Jan. 1, 1805, and held 
that position for several years. In 1812-3 he was promoted to brevet major, and was 
paymaster in the United States Army for the eastern district. Subsequently, he was pro- 
moted to colonel, but resigned his commission, and, coming to Boston, became a keeper 
at the prison. He died while holding this position. 

Benjamin Goldthwait (1793) was a shopkeeper, No. 18 Cornhill, Boston. He 
never held office in the Artillery Company. He died in Boston, Dec. n, 1796, aged 
twenty-seven years. 

" The decease of this truly amiable young man interests the finest feelings of the 
human heart ; the inconsolable distress of conjugal affection, the tear of undissembled 
friendship, and the grief of those whose hours were enriched by his society, are the best 
eulogy of a character who has borne with him the deepest regrets of all who could plead 
the happiness of his acquaintance. 

"The remains of Mr. Goldthwait [1793] were preceded to the tomb, on Tuesday, 
Dec. 13, by the Independent Corps of Cadets, under the command of Capt. Chapman, 
with side arms and crapes, and attended by a full corps of music." l 

Edmund Bowman (1793). Authorities: ' Columbian Centinel, Dec. 14, 1796. 

Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 1842 ; 
By-Laws of St. Andrew's Chapter. 



272 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [ I?93 

Thomas Greene (1793) was a merchant at No. 14 Greene's Wharf, Boston. He 
was a son of William and Elizabeth Greene, of Charlestown, and was born Sept. 28, 1757. 
His brother- Francis joined the Artillery Company in 1786. He married Anna Knight, 
and resided for a time in Stoneham, where he died in 1842. 

Samuel Hammond (1793), cordwainer, of Boston, son of Samuel and Mary (Fiske) 
Hammond, of Waltham or Lincoln, was born in Lincoln, July 12, 1766. When he first 
came to Boston his given name was Asa. He married in Boston, June 4, 1794, Sarah 
Dawes. Their daughter Mary Ann married, March 11, 1823, Hon. John G. Palfrey, 
D. D., LL. D. 

Asa Hammond (1793), on the death of his brother Samuel in 1780, changed his 
given name to Samuel, and as such was known in Boston. By trade, he was a shoe- 
maker, but became a merchant, and was extensively engaged in the East India trade. 
In 1796 his boot and shoe store was at the sign of the Golden Key, on Ann Street, and 
his residence in Cold Lane. He died Nov. 4, 1838, aged seventy-one years. 

Joseph Loring, Jr. (1793), merchant, of Boston, son of Capt. Joseph (1788) and 
Mary Loring, was born in Boston, Oct. 20, 1767. He married, in 1797, Susan Hall, 
daughter of Nathaniel Hall, of Boston. She died Nov. 6, 184 1, aged sixty-nine years. 

Mr. Whitman (1810) calls him "a dashing Cornhill shopkeeper." "Having failed 
in business, and changed his politics, disappointed in not sustaining a commissioned 
office, he became a violent partisan, and the first captain of the Washington Light 
Infantry. By his temper he kept the whole brigade in a continual ferment. At a 
brigade muster he marched on to the parade ground with two subalterns, four sergeants, 
and music, without a single private. For this he was tried by a court-martial, but 
acquitted, the proceedings of the court not being approved by Gen. Elliot, who ordered 
it." In the fall of 1806 he was again court-martialled on charges preferred by Capt. 
Davis, of the Legionary Brigade, in which Mr. Loring (1793) hdd the position of 
captain. The court was in session from the 28th of October to the 5th of November, 
and, on the latter date, announced Capt. Loring (1793) "guilty," and adjudged him 
incapable of holding any military commission under this commonwealth for the term of 
three years. The major-general approved the sentence. His military ardor was not 
abated. He commanded the Winslow Blues from 1807 to 181 1, and was major of the 
First Regiment, Third Brigade, Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, in 1812. He received 
a colonel's commission in the United States Army (Fortieth Regiment), July 31, 1813, 
and continued in the position during the war. On the return of peace, he left the army 
and became an officer in the custom-house. He held this office until his decease, which 
occurred Oct. 3, 1838. He was first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1800. 

John Osborn (1793) in 1796 had a shop on Orange Street, a store at No. 1 Long 
Wharf, and resided on Atkinson Street. He died Aug. 7, 1819, aged forty-eight years. 

Samuel Thwing (1793), baker, of Boston, son of James and Martha (Clapp) 
Thwing, was born in Boston, Jan. 19, 1769. He was a grandson of Col. Nathaniel Thwing 

Thomas Greene (1793)- Authority: Wy- Boston Records; Wyman's Charlestown Genealogies 
man's Charlestown Genealogies and Estates. and Estates; U. S. Army Reg. 

Joseph Loring, Jr. (1793). Authorities: Samuel Thwing (1793). Authorities: By- 

Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 1842; Laws of The Massachusetts Lodge; Thwing Family, 

by Walter Eliot Thwing, 1883, p. 48. 



i 7 93] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 273 

(1736). Samuel (1793) followed the trade of his father and grandfather, and maintained 
the quality and popularity of their products. He was admitted a member of The Massa- 
chusetts Lodge, March 12, 1795. He married, Nov. 19, 1795, Sarah Homans, of Boston, 
born Jan. 16, 1770, daughter of Benjamin Homans (1766). She died in Roxbury, 
Aug. 20, 1833. Capt. Samuel (1793) died in Boston, Aug. 4, 1810. They had five 
children, one of whom, the eldest, a midshipman in the United States Navy, served with 
honor in the battle of Lake Champlain. 

Dudley Walker (1793), shopkeeper, No. 61 Cornhill, Boston. 

John Wells (1793), coppersmith, of Boston, son of Capt. John Wells (1765) and 
Betty, his wife, was born in Boston, Dec. 3, 1763. He lived in the mansion of his 
ancestors in Back Street, at the North End, and carried on an extensive business. He 
became a member of the New North Church, served in the office of deacon, and repre- 
sented Boston in the General Court. He died, having lived " an honest man in the 
truest sense," Oct. 14, 1832, aged sixty-nine years. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1793 is as follows : — 
"Wednesday Evening, March 20th 1793. The Committee of Finance reported, 
that they have procured the following badges for the use of the Company, viz : Three 
Swords, Three Epauletts, Three Sashes, Three Belts, for the Commissioned Officers; 
and four sashes for the Sergeants. Voted, That the report be accepted ; that the Badges 
be delivered to the present Officers of the Company to be worn by them and their 
successors in office, and that they put to no other use. 

"Monday, April 1st 1793. The Company paraded on the town house floor, and 
marched into the Common, commanded by Col. Winslow (1786). The Rev. Doct. 
Thacher was chosen to preach the Election Sermon in June next. Voted, That the 
Commissioned Officers be a Committee to wait on Doctor Thacher and inform him of 
the choice. 

"Monday, May 6th 1793, The Company paraded in Faneuil Hall and marched 
into the Common, went through a variety of evolutions, commanded by Col. Winslow 
[1786]. The Committee appointed to wait on the Rev. Doctor Thacher reported, that 
he accepted the invitation to preach the Election Sermon in June next. 

"Wednesday evening, May 22d 1793. Voted, That the Commissioned Officers, Col. 
Waters [1769], S. Greenough [1786], A. Cunningham [1786], Capt Jenkins [1756] 
with the Clerk, be a Committee to make arrangements for the Election in June next, 
and report. Voted, that the Company meet on Friday evening, to hear the report of the 
Committee, at the Court House. 

" Friday evening, May 24th 1793. The Committee of Arrangements reported that 
there be twelve shillings assessed on each member, towards the expenses of Election in 
June next. 

"Monday, June 3d 1793. On this Anniversary of the Election of Officers, the 
Company, as usual, escorted the Supreme Executive from the Council Chamber to the 
Old Brick Meeting House, where a well adapted Discourse was delivered by the Rev. 
Doctor Thacher. After which they escorted the Lieut. Governor and the other Gentle- 
John Wells (1793)- Authorities: Boston Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, 
Ed. 1842. 



274 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [1793 

men (His Excellency's health not permitting him to attend) to Faneuil Hall, where an 
elegant Entertainment was provided. At four o'clock, the Company marched into the 
Common, under the command of Col. Winslow [1786], where they went through the 
usual evolutions & firings with great exactness. The following Gentlemen were elected 
officers for the year ensuing, viz: Major Andrew Cunningham [1786], Captain; Mr 
Samuel Todd [1786], Lieutenant ; Mr. John Bray [1788], Ensign; Col. Josiah Waters 
[1769], John G. Doubleday [1790], Jonas S. Bass [1789], James Phillips [1790], Ser- 
geants; Col. John Winslow [1786], Treasurer ; Mr. Thomas Clark [1786], Clerk. Voted, 
that Major Andrew Cunningham [1786], Capt. Robert Jenkins [1756], & Mr. Thomas 
Clark [1786], with the Treasurer, be the Committee of Finance for the year ensuing. 
Voted, That the Commissioned Officers wait on the Rev. Doctor Thacher and return him 
the thanks of the Company for the Sermon this day delivered, and request a copy for the 
press. Attest J. G. Doubleday, Clerk. 

"Monday, September — 1793. The Company paraded agreeable to Charter, 
marched into the Common, commanded by Major Cunningham [1786]. 

" Monday October 7th 1793. The Company performed the duties of the day as 
usual, commanded by Major Cunningham [1786]. 

" Friday evening, nth October. The Company met at the Court House & adjourned 
to Saturday evening, 12th Oct. 1793, when the Company Voted to attend the funeral of 
the late Commander-in-chief, His Excellency, John Hancock, Esq., on Monday next, in 
Compleat Uniform, with their side Arms and a weed of black Crape around the arm." 

On Monday, April 1, 1793, the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company paraded 
for the first time that year, and by their perfect discipline and soldierlike appearance, 
gave much pleasure to their fellow-citizens. At the collation, always provided for the 
Company, after the duties of the day are performed, the chiefs of the Wabash and 
Illinois tribes of Indians, — Duguoin, or the Little Bearskin; Como, or Drowning Man; 
Oeosto, or Whirlwind ; Amequah, or Little Beaver; Sevekainah, or Three Legs; Che- 
mankir, or Soldier, — then in town, accepted the invitation of the commander to drink a 
glass of wine with them, and appeared very happy on the occasion. 

The anniversary election was held June 3, 1793, with the usual ceremonies. The 
sermon was delivered in the Old Brick Meeting-House. The exercises passed off with 
great satisfaction. The governor, however, was still indisposed, and the newly-elected 
officers were invested by him at his house, "with much politeness and attention." 

On Monday, Sept. 2, 1793, the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company made its 
first autumnal appearance agreeably to charter, and the citizen soldiers thereof, as usual, 
did themselves, and the military character of Americans, honor. 

On Monday, October 7, the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company paraded, 
and, as usual, "performed their military evolutions with soldierly grandeur." 

Rev. Peter Thacher, D. D., of Boston, delivered the Artillery election sermon of 
1793. His great-grandfather, Rev. Peter Thacher, of Milton, delivered the Artillery 
election sermon in 1695. His father was Oxenbridge Thacher, who appeared as col- 
league with James Otis in the great case of " Writs of Assistance." Rev. Peter Thacher, 
the younger, was born in Milton, March 21, 1752. He graduated at Harvard College in 
1769, and Sept. 9, 1770, was ordained minister at Maiden. Whitfield called Mr. Thacher 
the "Young Elijah." He remained in Maiden for fifteen years, until Dec. 14, 1785, 



i 7 94] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 275 

when he accepted the pastorate of the Brattle Street Church, in Boston. His brother, 
Thomas, was also a clergyman, and preached in West Dedham. He wag an eccentric, 
but able, man. He use to say, " I can preach the best sermons, but brother Peter will 
beat me praying." 

Rev. Peter Thacher died at Savannah, Ga., Dec. 16, 1802, aged fifty years. 



The officers of the Artillery Company elected in 1794 were: John 

I yOZL. Brooks ('786), captain; Samuel Prince (1788), lieutenant; John Brazer 

* 7\ (1786), ensign. Joseph Cowdin (1790) was first sergeant ; William Williams 

(1789), second sergeant; Asa Fuller (1790), third sergeant; Robert Ball (1791), fourth 

sergeant, and Thomas Clark (1786), clerk. 

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1794 were : Joseph Baxter, Jr., 
George Blanchard, Daniel Cowdin, Robert Gardner, John Hayward, Samuel Hill, Oliver 
Holden, Jonathan Kilton, John S. Lillie, Thomas Neil, Nahum Piper, Zechariah Seaver, 
Samuel Watts, John Wheelwright, John Winneck. 

Joseph Baxter, Jr. (1794), of Boston, kept a shoe store at No. 5 Marlborough 
Street, and resided on Winter Street. He died at Fayette, Me., in September, 1828, 
aged fifty-nine years. 

George Blanchard (1794) was a truckman in Boston, and lived in Cow Lane, now 
High Street. 

"About 1810, he entered into copartnership with Capt. Austin [1792] as a broker. 
His acquaintances placed large sums in their hands on their single security as bankers, 
and they gained general confidence. Suddenly they failed, and his real estate, 
valued at fifty thousand dollars, which had been free of incumbrance, was attached. 
Very little personal property was ever found, and no explanation given. Mr. Blanchard 
[ 1 794] was suspected, and committed to prison, but, after severe examination, was per- 
mitted to take the poor debtor's oath. The Artillery Company lost nothing by him as 
treasurer, by the vigilance of his successor, but the Washington Benevolent Society lost 
the whole of their large funds." 

" He was rough in speech and haughty in manners, but accumulated a valuable 
property, principally in real estate, and lived in a degree of splendor." 

He was brigade-major of the Legionary Brigade, Gen. Winslow (1786) commander, 
from 1799 to J 8o4 inclusive, clerk of the Artillery Company in 1796, first sergeant in 
1798, ensign in 1811, lieutenant in 1801, captain in 1805, and treasurer from 1811 
to 1 8 14. He represented Boston in the State Legislature. He lived in retirement 
during his latter years, and died very suddenly, Dec. 17, 1820, aged forty-nine years. 
He was.privately buried in tomb No. 127 on the Common. 

Daniel Cowdin (1794) kept a West India goods store in Boston, and resided on 
Orange Street. 

George Blanchard (1794). Authorities: Mass. Military Lists; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. 
Company, Ed. 1842. 



276 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 794 

Robert Gardner (1794), merchant, of Boston, son of Robert Gardner and Hannah, 
his wife, was born in Boston, Nov. 15, 1763. He married Sarah, daughter of Gilbert 
Dench, of Hopkinton, Mass. He lived in the Vernon House, on Charter Street. He 
was captain of the Ward 8 military company froirTi792 to 1796, the founder and first 
captain of the Columbian Artillery in 1799, ar >d lieutenant-colonel in the Legionary 
Brigade, First Division, Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, at its formation in 1802. 
Having had a family difficulty with Gen. Winslow (1786), who married his cousin, he 
changed his politics from violent Federalist, and joined with Capt. Joseph Loring, Jr. 
(1793), in his military quarrels. He was cashiered by court-martial, and deprived of the 
privilege of holding office in the militia. He was then appointed an officer in the United 
States Army, and became commissary of prisoners of war ; but having failed as a mer- 
chant and auctioneer, being displaced from the commissary department and the office of 
the board of health, he removed with his family to Washington, D. C, where he died 
suddenly in the street, March 10, 1 818. He was captain of the Artillery Company in 
1799. He became a member of The Massachusetts Lodge, A. F. and A. M., Feb. 12, 
1795, and demitted, Dec. 29, 1806. 

Lieut. Whitman's (1810) mother was a sister of Col. Gardner (1794). The imme- 
diate predecessor of Major Anderson, United States Army, in command at Fort Sum- 
ter, Charleston (S. C.) Harbor, was John Lane Gardner, colonel of the First United 
States Artillery, son of Col. Robert Gardner (1794). 

John Hayward (1794) was a cabinet-maker in Boston. His shop was on Ann 
Street, and his residence on Charter Street. 

Samuel Hill (1794) was an engraver, of Boston, who resided in Rawson's Lane, 
now Bromfield Street. He was a son of Alexander Hill (1746) and Thankful, his wife, 
and was born in Boston, July 27, 1750. He died in 1796, in the forty-seventh year of 
his age, at which time he was second sergeant of the Artillery Company. 

Oliver Holden (1794), of Charlestown, son of Nehemiah and- Elizabeth (Stevens) 
Holden, of Shirley and Charlestown, was born in the first-named town, Sept. 18, 1765. 
He married, May 12, 1791, Nancy Rand, daughter of Nathaniel Rand, the ferryman. 
He spent his early years in his native town, but took up a residence in Charlestown in 
1788. Mr. Wyman calls Mr. Holden (1794) a "Baptist minister." He was by trade a 
carpenter, and it was while thus engaged that he published, in 1793, his first book of 
sacred music, " The American Harmony." Nearly all the music in this publication was 
original. He gave up his trade, and applied himself to the composition of sacred music. 
He had a music-store in Charlestown, and was active in church work. For some years 
he maintained, at his own expense, a Baptist chapel, in Charlestown, occupying the 
pulpit himself, and May 12, 1801, he gave the land near the head of Salem Street for 
the erection of a Baptist church. His wooden mansion, forty-two feet by forty, still 
stands at the head of that street. He continued his work in the writing of mu?ic and 

Robert Gardner (1794). Authorities: Bos- Oliver Holden (1794). Authorities: Chand- 

ton Records; Mass. Lodge By-Laws, etc.; Whit- Ier's Hist, of Shirley; A Century of Town Life 

man's Hist A. and H. A. Company, Ed. 1842. in Charlestown; Appleton's American Encyc. of 

Samuel Hill (1794). Authorities: Boston Biography. ^^ 
Records; Whitman's Hist. A. and H. A. Company, 
Ed. 1842. 



1 7 94] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 277 

publication of music-books for some years, when he became an extensive operator in 
real estate. His transactions in real estate are enumerated by Mr. Wyman in his 
"Genealogies and Estates of Charlestown." He was a representative in the General 
Court. He became a member of King Solomon's Lodge, A. F. and A. M., of Charles- 
town, in July, 1795, and was elected to honorary membership in July, 1808. In the 
militia he attained the rank of ensign. 

Mr. Holden (1794) wrote one musical composition which alone renders his name 
immortal, and his fame co-extensive with the use of the English tongue, viz., " Corona- 
tion." He died in Charlestown, Sept. 4, 1844. 

Jonathan Kilton (1794), baker, of Boston, was born in Holliston, orSherborn, Mass., 
in February, 1755. He served his country three years as a soldier during the Revolu- 
tionary War, after he had served John Lucas (1786) several years as an apprentice. He 
carried on the business of a baker on Orange, now Washington, Street, from the close of 
the war until his death, which occurred Dec. 19, 1816. He was esteemed as an upright, 
honorable man. He never held any office in the Artillery Company. 

John S. Lillie (1794), shopkeeper, No. 21 Marlborough Street, his residence being 
on Milk Street in 1796. In December, 1810, his house — the old Franklin house on 
Milk Street — was consumed in a serious conflagration, which threatened the destruction 
of the Old South Church. He was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1798, 
clerk in 1800, and a lieutenant in the Second Regiment of the Legionary Brigade from 
1809 to 18 1 1. 

John Sweetser Lillie (1794) was a constant attendant, though not a member, with 
his family, at the Old South Church until his death in 1842. 

Thomas Neil (1794) was a merchant in Boston, and resided on Hanover Street 
in 1796. 

Nahum Piper (1794) was originally from Sterling, Mass. He was engaged in the 
crockery-ware and goldsmith business at No. 6 Marlborough Street, Boston, and resided 
on Pond, now Bedford, Street. He was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 
1800, and ensign in 1805. 

Zechariah Seaver (1794), of Boston, son of Ebenezer and Sarah (Johonnot) Seaver, 
was born Feb. 4, 1767, and died Jan. 5, 1809. 

Samuel Watts (1794), sail-maker, of Boston, resided in Proctor's Lane. He was 
second sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1798. 

John Wheelwright (1794) was a merchant, of Boston, on Woodward's Wharf. He 
was for some years an efficient officer in the custom-house. When Gen. Jackson became 
President, Mr. Wheelwright (1794) was removed, and the citizens immediately elected 
him as a representative to the General Court. He was admitted a member of The 
Massachusetts Lodge, Feb. 12, 1795. He was ensign of a Boston rifle corps in 1814, 
and became lieutenant. 

Jonathan Kilton (1794). Authority: An- Zechariah Seaver (1794). Authority : New 

nals Mass. Char. Mech. Association. Eng. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 1872. 

John S. Lillie (1794). Authorities: Hill's 
Hist. Old South Church; Shurtleff's Des. of Boston. 



278 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND [, 794 

John Winneck (1794) was a saddler, in Boston, and he lived at No. 50 Cornhill, 
now Washington Street. 

The record of the Artillery Company for 1794 is as follows : — 

"Monday, April 5th 1794. The Company agreeable to Charter made their public 
Appearance commanded by Major Cunningham [1786]. The Rev. Samuel West was 
chosen to preach the Election Sermon in June next ; and the Commissioned Officers 
were appointed a Committee to wait on him and inform him of the choice. 

"Friday May 1794. Monday being a stormy day, the Company paraded this day, 
& performed the duties required by their Charter. The Committee appointed to wait 
on Rev. Mr. West reported that he accepted the invitation of the Company, & would 
preach their Anniversary Sermon at the next Election of Officers. 

"Monday, June 2d 1794. This being the Anniversary of the Election of Officers, 
the Company paraded, and at twelve o'clock marched to the Council Chamber, where 
they received the Commander-in-chief, the Lieut. Gov., Council & Gentlemen invited to 
dine with the Company, & escorted them to the Old Brick Meeting House, where a 
judicious & well adapted Discourse was delivered by the Rev. Mr. West of this town. 
Divine Service being over, the Company escorted the Supreme Executive &c &c, to 
Faneuil Hall, where they sat down to an elegant Entertainment, after which a number of 
patriotic toasts were drank. At four o'clock, the Company marched to the Square alloted 
them in the Common where they made choice of the Honorable Major General John 
Brooks [1786], Captain; Mr. Samuel Prince [1788], Lieutenant; Mr. John Brazer 
[1786], Ensign; Capt Joseph Cowdin [1790], Mr. Asa Fuller [1790], Mr William 
Williams [1789] and Mr. Robert Ball [1791], Sergeants; Col. John Winslow [1786] 
Treasurer; Mr. Thomas Clark [1786], Clerk for the ensuing year. The Commander- 
in-chief having taken his seat in the Square, Major Cunningham [1786] went through 
the usual evolutions, firings, &c ; after which the Governor received the Badges from the 
old Officers and invested those newly elected with them. The Company then returned 
to the Hall, where a collation concluded the entertainment of the day. Maj. Andrew 
Cunningham [1786], Capt Robert Jenkins [1756] and Mr. Thomas Clark [1786] were 
chosen a Committee, by ballot, who, with the Treasurer, are to have the direction of the 
Finances of the Company for one year. Voted, That the late Commissioned Officers, 
with the Treasurer, be a Committee to wait on the Rev. Mr. West, return him the thanks 
of the Company for his Sermon this day delivered and request a'copy for the press. 

"Attest Thomas Clark, Clerk. 

"Monday, Septem