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973.206 'VI. Ij. 

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1913-14 

1788824 



REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECT?ON 



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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 




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HISTORY 

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THE NATIONAL 50C1LTY 



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DAUGHTERS 
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FOR THE FIFTEENTH YEAR 
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1T88824 

OFFICERS. 

(To serve until May 13, 1914.) 

National President: 
Mrs. Wm. Van Zandt Cox (Juliet Hazeltine Emery). 

National Vice-President : 
Mrs. John J. Myers (Mary Hewitt). 

National Recording Secretary: 
Mrs. Thaddeus M. Jones (Emma Culver). 

National Corresponding Secretary: 
Mrs. Noble Newport Potts (Cornelia Ross Potts). 

National Registrar: 
Mrs. Peter Perry Pealer (Ruth M. Griswold). 

National Treasurer: 
Mrs. Wm. M. Hannay (Mary A. Emery). 

National Historian: 
Mrs. Corra Bacon Foster.. 

National Chaplain: 
Mrs. Alexander H. Semmes (Mary Hodges). 

National Color Bearer: 
Mrs. Charles Edwin Brown (Eugenia Washington Moncure). 

National Councillors: 

(To serve until May 13, 1914.) 

Mrs. George W. Baird (Lyle June Prather). 
Mrs. George Marsh (Lucy M. Osgood). 

(To serve until May 13, 1915.) 

Mrs. Charles O. Norton (Lottie Eloise Gove). 
Mrs. John Spencer Bukey (Roberta J. Magruder). 
Mrs. Thomas H. Johnston (Caroline A. Dorsey). 

(To serve until May 13, 1916.) 

Miss Josephine C. Webster. 

Miss Lucy M. Hewitt. 

Mrs. Sara P. Snowden Mitchell. 

Founder: 
Mrs. Henry V. Boynton (Helen Mason). 



NATIONAL COMMITTEES. 

History: 

Mrs. Corra Bacon Foster, Chairman. 

Mrs. Henry V. Boynton 

Mrs. Thaddkus M. Jones. 

Mrs. John J. Myers. 

By-Laws of Chapters: ■ Statute Book: 

Miss Josephine C. Webster, Mrs. Henry V. Boynton,. 

Chairman. ' Chairman. 

Mrs. Thaddeus M. Jones. Mrs. Thomas H. Johnston. 

Miss Lucy Hewitt. Mrs. George M.*iRSh. 

Mrs. John Spencer Bukey. 

Printing: , 

]\Irs. Noble Newport Potts, Chairman. 
Mrs. Peter Perry Pealer. 
Mrs. Thaddeus M. Jones. 

Mrs. Wm. M. Hannay. 
Mrs. Henry V. Boynton. 

Auditing: 

Mrs. John J. Myers, Chairman. 
Miss Lucy Hewitt. 

Restoration of Historic Buildings: 
Mrs. John J. Myers, Cliairinan. 
Miss Josephine C. Webster. Mrs. Noble Newport Potts. 

Miss Lucy Hewitt. Mrs. Francis A. St. Clair. 

Mrs. Charlotte E. Main. Mrs. William E. Callender. 

Conservation of National Resources: 
Mrs. Amos G. Draper, Chairman. 
Mrs. Peter Perry Pealer. ]\Iks. Benjamin A. Fessenden. 

Mrs. Charles H. Armstrong. Mrs. Mary A. C. Beach. 

Mrs. D. Phoenix Incraham. Mrs. I'elix Agnus. 

Mrs. Frank H. Getchell. Miss Mary L. Atwood. 

Mrs. William B. Holmes. INIrs. W.vllace Delafield. 

Mrs. Bertram C. Whitney. Miss Stella Pickett Hardy. 

Mrs. William E. Callender. Mrs. Charles B. Tozier. 

Mrs. John R. Shelton. 

The Flag: 
Mrs. Sara P. Snowden Mitchell, Chairman. 

Mrs. Frank A. Corbin. Mrs. C.vther'ine Burkholder.. 

Mrs. Chandler Smith. Mrs. George S. Roberts. 

Mrs. J. B. Clapp. Mrs. Josiah Shepard. 

■ Miss Marcia Richardson. Mrs. Mason G. Smith. 

Mrs. W. S. Goodwin. Mrs. Frank Tomlinson. 

Miss Elizabeth A. Stocking. Mrs. Arthur W. Barber.. 

Mrs. Wm. S. Goodwin. Mrs. Scott Hopkins. 



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OFFICERS OF STATE CHAPTERS. 

CONNECTICUT. 
(Organized June 4, 1901.) 

President: 
Mrs. Charles H. Armstrong. 

Vice-President: 
Mrs. Claiulnce F. R. Jexne. 

Recording Secretary: 
Mrs. Isaac B. Wakeman. 

Corresponding Secretary: 
Mrs. George B. Bunnell. 

Registrar: 
Miss Lucretia Wright Smith. 

Treasurer : 
Mrs. Clarence B. Bolmer. 

Historian: 
Mrs. Frank A. Corbin. 

Chaplain: 
Miss Jeannette Booth. 

Color Bearer: 
Mrs. Frederick B. Street. 

NEW YORK. 
(Organized February 13, 1902.) 

President: 
Mrs. D. Phoenix Ingraham. 

Vice-President: 
Mrs. Charles Hilton Brown. 

Recording Secretary: 
Mrs. James S. Bradley, Jr. 

Corresponding Secretary: 
Miss Flora Van Loan. 

Registrar: 
Mrs. E. C. Hawks. 

Treasurer: 
Mrs. Charles D. Ward. 

Historian: 
Mrs. Chandler Smith. 

Chaplain: 
Mrs. Charles C. Niebuhr. 

Color Bearer: 
Miss Julia R. Livingston. 



PENNSYLVANIA. 
(Organized March 21, 1902.) 

President: 
Mrs. Frank H. Getchell. 

Vice-President : 
Mrs. Samuel T. Kerr. 

Recording Secretary: 
Mrs. V. Gilpin Robinson. 

Corresponding Secretary: 
Mrs. Thomas H. Fenton. 

Registrar: 
Mrs. John Van Kirk. 

Treasurer: 
Mrs. Nathaniel T. Keay. 

Historian: 

Chaplain : 
Mrs. Charles P. La Lanne. 

Color Bearer: 
Mrs. Israel Johnson. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 
(Organized March 14, 1904.) 

President: 
Mrs. William B. Holmes. 

Vice-President: 

Mrs. Daniel Kent. 

Recording Secretary: 
Mrs. John A. FIeath. 

Corresponding Secretary: 
Mrs. S. C. Ingraham. 

Registrar: 
Mrs. Frank M. Goss. 

Treasurer: 
Mrs. Maurice W. Turner. 

Historian: 
Mrs. J. B. Clapp. 

Chaplain: 
Mrs. Hiram M. Comstock. 

Color Bearer: 
Miss Mary E. White. 



MICHIGAN. 
(Organized November 13, 1906.) 

President: 
Mrs. Bertram C. Whitney. 

Vice-President : 

Recording Secretary: 
'Mrs. Frederick T. Ranney. 

Corresponding Secretary: 
Mrs. David D. Cady. 

Registrar: 
Mrs. Charles H. Metcalf. 

Treasurer : 
Mrs. H. B. Joy. 

Historian: 
Miss Marcia AI. Richardson-. 

Chaplain: 
Mrs. William H. H. Smith. 

Color Bearer: 
Mrs. C. D. Standish. 



VIRGINIA. 
(Organized May 13, 1907.) 

President: 

j\Irs. William E. Callexder. 

Vice-President: 
Mrs. Emily Stiu-lman Fisher. 

Recording Secretary: 
Mrs. Mottram Dulaney. 

Corresponding Secretary: 
Mrs. Sallie Ball Hunton. 

Registrar: 

Mrs. James N. Oden. 

Treasurer : 
Miss Ada Augusta Rhodes. 

Historian: 
Mrs. W. S. Goodwin. 

Chaplain : 
Mrs. Walter B. Richards. 

Color Bearer: 
Aliss Emily B. AIason. 



8 



ILLINOIS. 
(Organized March 24, 1908.) 

President: 
Mrs. Ef.nj.amin A. Fessenden. 

J'lee-Presideiit: 
Mrs. Frances Sedgwick Smith. 

Recording Secretar\<: 
Mrs. George H. Bryant. 

Corresponding Secretary: 
Mrs. Charles Salmon. 

Registrar: 

Mrs. Noble Clemons Shumwav. 

Treasurer: 
Mrs. Wm. Harrison French. 

Ilistorian: 
Miss Elizabeth A. Stocking. 

Cliaplai):: 
Mrs. William E. Sims. 

Color Bearer: 
Mrs. George F. Cook. 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 
(Organized March 24, 1908.) 

President: 
Mrs. Mary A. C. Beach. 

]'ice-Presidcnt: 
]\Irs. Francis A. St. Clair. 

Recording Secretary: 
Mrs. Horace P. McInto.sh. 

Corresponding Secretary : 
Mrs. Stephen J. Murphy. 

Registrar: 
Mrs. Velma Barber. 

Treasurer: 
Mrs. Carrie Kirk. 

Historian : 
Mrs. Catiikkine Burkholder. 

Chaplain : 
Mrs. Jennette Wickham . 

Color Bearer: 
Mrs. Joseph \V. Kinsley. 



^ 



MARYLAND. 
(Organized November 27, 1908.) 

President : 
Mrs. Felix Agnus. 

Vice-President: 

Recording Secretarv: 
Miss Laura Kimberly Fulton. 

Corresfonding Secretarv: 
Miss Ada A. Hadel." 

Registrar: 

Treasurer: 
Miss Glorvina Fulton. 

Historian: 
Mrs. George S. Roberts. 

Chaplain: 
Miss Mary Kimberly. 

Color Bearer: 
Miss Alice M. Kimberly. 



WISCONSIN. 
(Organized December 22, 1910.) 

President: 
Miss Mary L.Atwood. 

Vice-President: 
Mrs. Frank L. V'ance. 

Recording Secretarv: 
Mrs. Robert A. Williams. 

Corresponding Secretary : 
Mrs. Edward P. Vilas. 

Registrar: 
Mrs. William D. Brett. 

Treasurer: 
Mrs. John Joys. 

Plistorian : 
Mrs. Josiah Shepard. 

Chaplain: 
Mrs. Edwin Van Ostrand. 

Color Bearer: 
Mrs Thomas W. Spence. 



10 



MISSOURI. 
(Organized December 22, 1910.) 

Presidctit: 
Mrs. Wallace Delafield. 

Vice-President : 
Mrs. H. M. IMeriwether. 

Recording Secretary: 
Mrs. a. F. Brookmire. 

Corresponding Secretary: 
Mrs. George D. Fisher. 

Registrar: 
Mrs. E. M. Nelson. 

Treasurer: 
Mrs. Theodore Shelton. 

Historian : 
Mrs. Mason G. Smith. 

Chaplain: 
Mrs. W. D. Parrish. 

Color Bearer: 
Mrs. a. W. Southward. 



ARKANSAS. 
(Organized April 15, 1912.) 

President: 
Miss Stella Pickett Hardy. 

Vice-President : 
I\Irs. Benjamin C. Hamilton, Jr. 

Recording Secretary: 
Mrs. M. F. Sloan. 

Corresponding Secretary: 
yi-RS. John W. Ferrill. 

Registrar: 
Miss Lula M. Hardy. 

Trsastirer: 
Miss Amy C. Ferrill. 

Historian: 
Mrs. Frank Tomlinson. 

Chaplain: 
Mrs. Elizabeth B. P. Hardy. 

Color Bearer: 
Mrs. Dillard Saunders. 



I 11 

OHIO. 
(Organized October 5, 1912.) 

President: 
Mrs. Charles B. Tozier. 

Vice-President: 
Mrs. C. H. Smith. 

Recording Secretary: 
Miss Mary Loughead. 

Corresponding Secretary: 
Mrs. John J. Wood. 

Registrar: 
Mrs. Charles R. jMorgan. 

Treasurer: 
Miss Effie Serena Wagar. 

Historian: 
Mrs. Arthur W. Barber. 

Chaplain: 
Mrs. E. a. West. 

Color Bearer: 
Mrs. H. D. Rankin. 

Just as the History was going to press, zve received votiee of the 
organization of the Kansas Chapter ivith its list of officers. We 
send our welcome, greetings, and congratulations. 

KANSAS. 
(Organized November 12, 1913.) 

President: 
Mrs. John R. Shelton. 

Vicc-Presidc)it: 
Mrs. Julia Farnsworth Soper. 

Recording Secretary: 
Mrs. Cyrus D. Lloyd. 

Corresponding Secretary: 
Mrs. Effie Hiatt Van Tuyl. 

Registrar: 
Mrs. Edward B. Purcell. 

Treasurer: 
Mrs. David Hill. 

f Historian : 

Mrs. Scott Hopkins. 

Chaplain: 
Mrs. Nathan F. Handy. 

Color Bearer: 
Mrs. Frederick A. Wilcox. 



MINUTES OF THE GENERAL COURT 

MAY 13, 1913. 

HE Fifteenth General Court Avas opened 
by the National President, Mrs. Wm. 
Van Zandt Cox, at eleven o'clock A.M., 
in the Cabinet Room of the New Wil- 
lard. The national officers, and repre- 
sentatives of State Chapters in Con- 
necticut, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Mary- 
land, New York, and the District of Columbia were present. 
The roll call, with Salutation to the Flag, was followed by 
the Lord's Prayer in concert. 




PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS OF WELCOME. 

Daughters of Founders and Patriots: 

Another year of activity has passed with its joys and sor- 
rows, and we greet you this lovely spring day with a wel- 
come from our hearts and a steady, warm clasp of the hand. 

Our Society is fifteen years old today, the thirteenth of 
May — a most fitting birthday for such a Society. We are 
growing in numbers and in strength, and are looked upon 
as one of the influential Patriotic Societies of America. 

In the reports of the various Committees which follow^ 
I feel you may well be proud of the work of the year. I 
congratulate the new Chapters for the energy displayed by 
their Presidents in forming them and the quick response 
by the members. I congratulate the older Chapters for the 
continued interest and help given the National Executive 
Committee in all things pertaining to the work of the So- 
ciety. We have tried to do our duty and to serve you well 
and faithfully. To quote a former President, "Encourage- 



13 

mcnt is good," and that encouragement has been given us 
without stint. I thank you also for the loyal support given 
your President during the entire year. 

CONFERENCE REPORT. 

Annual Conference of the D. F. P. A. Held April 12, 
1913, AT 8 P.M., IN THE Cabinet Room of the New 

WiLLARD. 

The Conference was called to order by the National 
President, Mrs. William Van Zandt Cox, who welcomed the 
members most cordially in her opening address. 

After a general discussion as to omitting the singing of 
"The Star-Spangled Banner" at the General Court, when 
it was impossible to obtain satisfactory music, it was moved 
by Mrs. Getchell of Pennsylvania that whenever it was im- 
possible to have music, the National Anthem should be 
read. This motion was seconded and unanimously carried. 

The next question under discussion was that of the resi- 
d'ence of the- officers of the State Chapters. Miss Rhodes 
of Virginia, Mrs. Norton of Nebraska, Miss Hardv of 
Arkansas, and others all spoke in favor of allowing the of- 
ficers of a State Chapter to reside in an adjoining State. 
Mrs. Armstrong of Connecticut asked about the law on the 
subject, and was told it was in the Statute Book, but not in 
the Constitution. Mrs. Armstrong then moved that "We, the 
Conference, recommend to the Executive Committee that the 
statutes read so that each Chapter be allowed to have its 
members and officers reside in an adjoining district." Mrs. 
Norton amended "That the selection of officers be left to 
the discretion of the Chapters irrespective of residence." 
This was passed by the unanimous vote of the General 
Court. 

Mrs. Myers, Chairman of the Restoration Committee, 
read her splendid report in which she set forth that the en- 
tire sum for the restoration of the chancel of the Colonial 
church at Falls Church had been donated, lacking fifty dol- 



14, 

lars only. The nearness of completion of the great work 
undertaken some years ago, made those present so enthu- 
siastic that in a moment Mrs. W. H. AUine of Massachu- 
setts was on her feet and pledged $5.00 toward the small 
sum now needed. Mrs. Armstrong of Connecticut immedi- 
ately followed with $5.00; Mrs. Tozier of Ohio with $5.00; 
Miss Hardy of Arkansas, $5.00; Mrs. Frank Callan of New 
York, $5.00; Mrs. Getchell of Pennsylvania, $5.00; Mrs. 
Theodore Shelton of Missouri, $5.00; Mrs. Van Ostrand 
and Mrs. Carrol Towne of Wisconsin, $5.00; Mrs. Bushnell 
of Iowa, $2.00; Mrs. Stubbs of Nebraska, $1.00, and Mrs. 
Norton of Nebraska, $2.00. The Maryland Chapter com- 
pleted the sum desired by giving $5.00, and so it is recorded 
that in a very few moments the Chairman was assured of 
the necessary amount to complete the work which the So- 
ciety assumed nine years ago. Mrs. Armstrong asked 
whether the donations were to be credited to States, Chap- 
ters or individuals. After a short discussion it was passed 
to have the question decided at the General Court. 

Mrs. Cox spoke of the magnificent work which Mrs. 
Draper and Mrs. Pealer had done, and the difficulty they 
had encountered while verifying the work of early days, 
since much that is required now, was not then, making it 
necessary for Mrs. Pealer to do many hours of research 
work before the lineage books could go to press. 

The Society is constantly appealed to by the most prom- 
inent libraries for copies of the lineage books, proving the 
value of our work. It was here mentioned in connection 
with the achievements of the Society that we were the very 
first Patriotic Society to answer the call for money or sup- 
plies at the breaking out of the Spanish War, and the first 
Society to incorporate the order for retaining money in the 
treasury for war purposes. 

At this Conference were representatives from the States 
of Maryland, Virginia, Arkansas, Connecticut, Massachu- 
setts, Pennsylvania, New York, Ohio, Missouri, Nebraska, 
Wisconsin, and the District of Columbia. 



15 

The question of admitting ineligible daughters of eligible 
mothers was discussed, but it was defeated at the General 
Court. 
The Conference here adjourned. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Emma Culver Jones, 
National Recording Secretary. 

RECORDING SECRETARY'S REPORT. 

During the past year there have been eleven meetings 
of the Executive Committee. These meetings are very en- 
joyable, since we all have one object in view — the welfare 
of the Society that chose us to serve it. There have been 
three resignations of National officers. In January Mrs. 
Boynton asked that Mrs. Thaddeus M. Jones be appointed 
to assist her, as she could not give the time required in that 
department. At the February meeting Mrs. Boynton re- 
signed, requesting that Mrs. Jones be appointed in her place. 
The President made the appointment, which was immedi- 
ately confirmed by the Committee. 

On account of ill health Mrs. Draper resigned, causing 
the sincere regret of the Committee, and a rising vote of 
thanks was offered in appreciation of her untiring work as 
Treasurer. Mrs. Hannay was appointed in her place and 
confirmed. 

At the meeting of May 9th our Chaplain, Mrs. Noble, 
tendered her resignation, as she was not able to attend 
the meetings. This resignation, also, was accepted with deep 
regret. 

Mrs. Draper requested that Miss Sallie McHenry and 
Miss Lucy Meriwether, sister and cousin of Mrs. Brackett, 
our late President, be made Honorary Life Members in 
her memory. In April the name of Mrs. Caroline C. A. 
Sherman of Virginia was added to this list. 

During the year many of our members have received the 
last summons, and passed on to that "bourne from which 



16 

no traveler returns." The Maryland Chapter has suffered 
a triple loss through the death of its honored Presi- 
dent, Mrs. R. C. Potts, Vice-President, Miss Mary 
Greenway, and Registrar, Mrs. Albert K. Fulton. 
The Connecticut Chapter has lost its beloved Vice-President, 
Mrs. Charles H. Pinney. The Executive Committee has 
lost a valued member in Mrs. Thomas W. Aldrich, Council- 
lor. Not forgetting these, we still look forward to the 
coming year with the hope that our work will go steadily on 
so long as there are records to be preserved and eligible ap- 
pHcants to present them. 



CORRESPONDING SECRETARY'S REPORT. 
(November 13, 1912, to May 13, 1913.) 

Letters written, 230. Alembership cards issued, 41. Pre- 
liminary blanks, instruction leaflets, postals, including 
notices to Executive Committee, 330. Constitutions sent, 
53. Histories and lineage books to all members. Copies 
of proposed amendments to the Constitution to .all State 
Presidents, members of Executive Committee and members- 
at-large. Invitation to annual Conference in April sent to 
State Presidents and all members-at-large. Cost, not in- 
cluding mailing of histories, 1912, and Lineage No. 3, 
$12.50. 

Cornelia Ross Potts. 

REGISTRAR'S REPORT. 

Letters received, 214; letters written, 219; permits issued, 
29 ; applications received, 49. 

During the year forty-four members have been admitted, 
eighteen of these were members-at-large, six entered the 
Ohio Chapter recently organized. Of the remainder, three 
were from New York, two each from Kansas and Iowa, one 
each from Maryland, Texas, Missouri, Oklahoma and the 



17 

District of Columbia. Of those in Chapters, Connecticut 
loads with eight new members; lUinois, four; New York, 
four; Virginia, four; Maryland, two; Michigan, two; Mas- 
sachusetts, one, and Wisconsin, one. 

Virginia, New York and Maryland are the only States 
!-howing an increase over the number admitted last year, 
X'irginia leading with an increase of three. 

Chapter Registrars are urged to insist upon complete pre- 
liminary papers with all references and proofs, and that no 
final blanks be issued until the line and service as given in 
the preliminary papers are verified. 

As genealogists are well aware, the records of the 
Founders of this country are very clearly given in histories, 
town and county records, etc., and the line from the appli- 
cant back to the Patriot of the Revolution is, in general, 
easily established ; but the intermediate generations between 
the history of the early settlers and the Revolutionary period 
are the danger points where so many genealogists err and 
make claims that cannot be established. This is the rock 
on which so many fine genealogical structures are wrecked. 
Xo "suppositions" should be taken by Registrars, especially 
in proving these intermediate generations. 

The membership of this Society has now reached the 
number 706. We have six volumes of the records bound, 
100 in each volume, and another reailv for the binder. 

The records of the first 100 mcml^ers have been compiled 
and printed and this summer we hope to issue the records 
up to and including 200. The work is well under way by 
the Compilation Committee. We look forward to the time 
when the records will be published up to date and when this 
i.s accomplished it will be easy to issue each year the records 
verified during the previous twelve months. 

There is already a gratifying demand for these records 
from librarians throughout the country and we, the mem- 
bers of this Society, Daughters of Founders and Patriots 
of America, owe a debt of gratitude to its Founders, who 



18 

"builded better than they knew" and made possible the 
placing before the world an enduring record of the grand 
achievements and heroic deeds of our noble ancestors. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Ruth M. Griswold Pealer, ^ 

National Registrar, N. S., D. F. P. A. 



19 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE NATIONAL TREAS- 
URER. D. F. P. A. 

(May 14, 1912. to May 13, 1913.) 

Current Fund. 

Cash on hand at last report, May 13, 1912 «r. .. $140.32 

Received from fees and dues $548.60 

Received from one Life Membership 20.00 

: 568.60 

Total receipts for the year $708.92 

Expenditures. 

Printing Histories, application blanks, etc $375.84 

Use of room for General Court, 1912. and Conference 

1913 10.00 

Stationery and postage for National Officers 49.70 

Fees and dues returned 6.00 

Moving Records to home of custodian 1.50 

Transfer to Restoration Fund 20.00 

Total expenditures $463.04 

Balance cash on hand May 13, 1913 $245.88 

Restoration Fund. 

On hand May 13, 1912 *. $370.10 

Received by appropriation from General Fund 20.00 

Contributions received 235.90 

$626.00 
Disbursements. 
By check to Treasurer of Falls Church $400.00 

On hand May 13, 1913 $226.00 

Total cash balance on hand May 13, 1913 $471.88 

One outstanding check. Ark. Chapter 1.50 

$473.38 
HISTORIAN'S REPORT. 

It is with great regret that I must acknowledge my in- 
ability to present you with a report of results achieved in 
my department. 

In accordance with the resolution passed at the last Gen- 
eral Court I have corresponded with the Chapter Historians 
relative to a reciprocal exchange of historic papers between 



20 



the Chapters and the privilege of copying such as the His- 
tory Committee should select for the National Archives of 
the Society. The Massachusetts Historian responded 
promptly, cordially tendering a wealth of papers ; the Michi- 
gan Historian offered some genealogical and general papers 
of her own collecting; others have regretted to have kept 
none of the papers read at their meetings; sonie of the 
Chapters have not required papers; from three Historians 
1 have received no replies, possibly my letters have not 
reached them. As there developed a slight misunderstand- 
ing on the part of some of the members of the Executive 
Committee as to the scope of this reciprocity among the 
Chapters and National Society I have not proceeded farther 
with the work. I have also written many letters to new 
members. 

As this is primarily a genealogical society, would it not 
be advisable to accept family data of allied lines? This is 
material little if any less valuable than that of the lineal 
paternal line, and of great interest. 

The pretty little fireside stories for which we have sought 
have been so industriously gleaned from different localities 
by writers of general and local histories that very few 
sheaves remain for the new investigator. ■ Parkman, Haw- 
thorne, Abbot, Mrs. Stowe, Mrs. Freeland, Mrs. Gardiner, 
Miss Johnston and a host of lesser note have enriched our 
literature with these side lights upon events of national de- 
velopment. In fact, many of the papers in our present col- 
■ lection may be found in print. To be personal, my own 
family history leads me from Dedham to Woburn, to Bed- 
ford, to Oxford and Dudley in Massachusetts ; each of these 
small towns has had two or three local historians, not to 
mention the reports of their historical societies ; these bulky 
volumes indicate that little can have escaped their search 
or imaginations. For the writer with the instinct and pa- 
tience for research, however, there yet remains much to be 
brought to light in our domestic history; but, believe me. 
the surface has been carefully skimmed. 



21 

I have to suggest that each member of the Society be 
requested to send to the National Historian such unpub- 
Hshed family historic data, not genealogical, as in her opin- 
ion would be of interest to other members. (See Section 3 
of Article 2 of the Constitution.) 

Respectfully submitted, 

CoRRA Bacon-Foster, 
National Historian. 

RESTORATION COMMITTEE. 

The Restoration Committee is pleased to report the com- 
pletion of the chancel of the old historic church in Falls 
Church, Va. 

The work was undertaken by this Society in 1905, when 
restoration of the entire church was being urged by the 
rector, Rev. G. S. Somerville. 

The church, built in 1768 in pure Colonial style, had fal- 
len into a dilapidated condition for lack of means to keep 
it in repair. The efforts of Mr. Somerville were directed 
toward restoration, retaining all the simplicity of the orig- 
inal and substituting new for old only where necessity com- 
pelled. 

Our Society at first undertook only the altar, but later, 
although the entire chancef was finished in 1906 through 
Mr. Somerville's efforts, we were given the privilege of 
paying for it gradually, and incorporating it with the altar 
as the complete gift of the Society. Toward that end we 
■ have been working, and by special effort of the Committee 
we were able to report at the Conference in April that we 
lacked but $50 of the entire amount, and pledges were 
quickly made for the remainder. 

Of the $1,400 expended for the chancel, Chapters and 
members-at-large contributed the greater part — twenty- 
seven States being represented by their gifts. Friends of 
our members made generous contributions, and appropria- 
tions from the treasury have been made from time to time 
by the Executive Committee. 



22 

The Restoration Committee was designated by our Presi- 
dent as a committee to decide upon a suitable tablet to be 
placed on the chancel. This committee reported to the 
National Executive Committee its recommendation of a 
simple marker, suitably inscribed, to be placed on the chan- 
cel rail, of silver or brass as the National Executive Com- 
mittee should elect. The choice was for silver.'and a beau- 
tiful rectangular plate was ordered, engraved as follows i 

THIS CHANCEL 

WAS 

RESTORED BY NATIONAL SOCIETY 

DAUGHTERS OF FOUNDERS AND 

PATRIOTS OF AMERICA, 

1906. 

The engraving was done in most exquisite manner and 
the plate was ready for inspection at the meeting on Oct. 
13th, and received hearty approval. 

On November 8th it was placed on the chancel rail, and 
on the following day — Sunday, November 9th — a service 
was held at four o'clock, consisting of evening prayer and 
the reading, by a vestryman of the church ; of a history of 
the church from the first buikiing, about 1734, and the re- 
building as now in the year 1768, down to the present time. 

The service, which was beautiful and appropriate, was 
attended by members of the church and a delegation from 
our Society, our only regret being that very inclement 
weather prevented a fuller attendance. 

Let me, for the Restoration Committee and the National 
Executive Committee, congratulate the Society on the com- 
pletion of this work, and thank the Chapters for their splen- 
did co-operation, without which it could not have been ac- 
complished. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary H. Myers, 
Chairman Restoration Committee. 



23. 



CONSERVATION COMMITTEE. 

Madam President, and Members of the General Court: 

I have the honor to report that while no great deeds have 
been accomplished by your committee, as such, this year ; 
yet that the individual members have been at work in their 
own way upon the various Conservation problems. 

The passage of tlie bill for the increase of the force in 
the Forest service, thereby diminishing greatly the danger 
from forest fires, was a great step in advance. 

During the session of the International Congress of Hy- 
giene, a recommendation was made and strongly urged by 
many members to have more care used in disinfecting the 
air of public places, like public schools, post-offices, etc., and 
it is hoped that very soon a hill will be introduced calling 
upon the U. S. Government to see to it that all post-offices 
throughout the country be cleaned as often as need to be, to 
prevent the spread of disease. When such a bill is intro- 
duced, I hope it will meet with the hearty, unanimous sup- 
port of this committee, and the entire membership of the 
Society. 

Believing that the conservation of the child is one of the 
important branches of this committee, your chairman visited 
the Museum of Safety while in New York last week, and 
was very much interested in the pamphlets issued, and the 
lectures given, by authority of the Board of Education in 
the city to protect children and others from preventable acci- 
dents ; and with your permission will ask that each member 
of the Committee be sent the Bulletins, and be urged to use 
her influence with the Board of Education in her city and 
State, to have similar lectures established there. 
Respectfully submitted. 

Bell Merrill Draper, 
(Mrs. Amos G. Draper), Chairman. 

May 13, 1913. 

It was moved and carried that the appointment of Mrs. 
Hannay as Treasurer and Mrs. Jones as Recording Secre- 



24 



tary to fill the unexpired terms of Mrs. Boynton and Mrs. 
Draper be confirmed by the General Court. 

The President stated that the amendments to the consti- 
tution had been put into the hands of a special committee 
to be tabulated and reported, but just as she called on the 
chairman for the reports it had been discovered that the 
paper was not in its place as it should have been. The chair- 
man with keen regret for her mistake offered an apology to 
the Court for the delay caused, which was further increased 
by her inability to attend the meeting of the Executive Com- 
mittee on June 4th. On June 24th the President called a 
special meeting to receive the report, which here follows : 

Total number of votes cast, 540. 

On Art. 2, Section 5 88 ayes. 2 nays. 

On Art. 3, Section 2 87 ayes. 3 nays. 

On Art. 4, Section 4 86 ayes. 4 nays. 

On Art. 7, Section 2 85 ayes. 5 nays. 

On Art. 8, Section 2 12 ayes. 18 nays. 

On Art. 9 84 ayes. 6 nays. 

Each amendment carried by more than a three-fourths 
vote. 

Helen M. Boynton, Chairman. 

Mary H. Myers, 

Caroline Dorsey Johnston. 

• 

The President stated that two motions recommended to 
the General Court by the annual Conference must be voted 
•upon by the Court before being adopted. The first, that 
"Chapters shall elect their officers from outside States at 
their own discretion;" the second, that "When music is not 
available, the 'Star Spangled Banner' shall be read at the 
General Court." Both motions were presented and carried. 

CONNECTICUT REPORT. 

The eleventh Annual Meeting of the Connecticut Chapter, 
D. F. P. A., was held in Bridgeport at the Hotel Stratfield, 



25 



oil the 29th of February, 1912, and thirty members answered 
to the roll-call. 

During the year the Chapter has held its three regular 
meetings preceded by a meeting of the Executive Board; 
and one Special Board meeting has been held at the call of 
the President. 

Our Chapter now numbers ninety-nine members, twelve 
of whom have been added since our last report. It is with 
keen sorrow that we record the death of two of our dear 
members, Miss Elizabeth B. Bullard, who died June 15, and 
our Vice-President, Mrs. Charles H. Pinney, December 4, 
1912. Their passing leaves a vacancy and a shadow and 
our heartfelt sympathy goes out to the families and friends 
who mourn the loss of their dear ones. 

The morning session of the meeting was devoted to the 
hearing of reports, election of officers and new members 
and other routine business, and at one o'clock luncheon was 
served in the breakfast-room of the hotel. 

The President's address, the dominant note of which was 
"Patriotism," and the introduction of new officers opened 
the afternoon session. Miss Maynard of New Haven 
talked most interestingly of the "Italian Women of Yester- 
day and Today." The musical program consisted of pleas- 
ing vocal and whistling solos by Miss Topping and Miss 
DuBois. accompanied by i\Irs. Frederic i\I. Card. 

In June we were delightfully entertained in Bridgeport at 
the home of our President, Mrs. Armstrong. Detailed re- 
'ports of the Business Conference of the National Society 
held in Washington in April and of the General Court held 
in May, 1912, were given by our delegates, Mrs. Chas. H. 
Pinney and Mrs. Robert S. Goodwin. A most enjoyable 
musical program rendered by the Damozel quartette fol- 
lowed the business session. 

Our Fall meeting was held in New Haven at the Hotel 
Taft on October 25, when we were the guests of the New 
Haven ladies, whose charming hospitality always speaks 
loudly for itself and for them. 



26 

Mrs. Eugene Underwood gave a very interesting paper 
on the "History of American Coins." Trays containing 
coins of every denomination and period were shown at the 
close of the meeting. Indian songs of Cadman's group by 
Mrs. Grace W. Nichols were highly appreciated. 

Refreshments and a social hour satisfactorily closed each 
of these attractive meetings. 

Money to the amount of $25.00 was donated to Old Falls 
church. Thanks for efficient service were given to Mrs. 
Draper and greetings to her successor. 

Altogether the year has been prosperous and, as always, 
harmonious, and it is our earnest desire that the one upon 
which we are now entering may be even more full of in- 
terest, growth, and patriotism than those which have gone 
before. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Florence A. Wakeman, 

Secretary. 
Feb. 26, 1913. 

NEW YORK REPORT. 

The New York State Chapter "Daughters of Founders 
and Patriots of America," respectfully presents the follow- 
ing annual report: Our full membership list records the 
names of ninety-five, with others coming. Eight regular 
meetings have been held, and the usual active interest mani- 
fested in the Society. There has been one meeting of the 
• Council, and one card party at the Hotel Vanderbilt for the 
benefit of our Contingent Fund. This fund has been found 
useful in many ways, and has enabled us to hold most of our 
meetings at the "Waldorf-Astoria." 

The Chapter has contributed fifty dollars more to the Res- 
toration Fund of Old Falls Church, Va., making the New 
York donation to this work $125 in all. When this work 
is completed I hope the Chapter will take up some suitable 
commemorative work in their own State, and bring more 



27 . 

prominently before the people this distinguished American 
Society. 

We record with sorrow since our last report, the pass- 
ing frOm our midst, into the life eternal of Mrs. Benjamin 
F. Quackenbush, Mrs. Frederick Hasbrouck, Mrs. E. B. 
Plinsdale, all valued and much beloved members of our State 
Chapter. "There is no death. What seems so is transi- 
tion." 

Our annual outing and luncheon on Founders' Day, May 
16th, will be held this year at the summer home of the New 
York Athletic Club, Travers Island, on Long Island Sound. 
This privilege was obtained through friends of our members 
and the courtesy of the club-house was extended. We hope 
the sun will shine, and add its part to the efforts of the 
committee in making this day one long to be remembered. 

With peace, harmony and unity among us we hope to do 
good work and accomplish much in the year before us. 
Respectfully submitted, 

F. Adelaide Ingraham, 
President New York State Chapter. 



PENNSYLVANIA REPORT. 

Madam President and Members of the General Court: 

I have the honor of announcing that the Pennsylvania 
Chapter has raised $600.00 for a door in the Memorial 
Church at Valley Forge. Our insignia and motto will be 
carved upon it, and it will bear this inscription, "Presented 
by the Pennsylvania Chapter D. F. P. of America." We 
will pay for the door and have in addition a handsome sum 
for the presentation ceremonies at which time we hope to 
have all, if possible, certainly some, of our National officers 
with us. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frederica C. T. Getchell, 

President. 



28 



MASSACHUSETTS REPORT. 

"Commonwealth of Massachusetts" Chapter, Daughters 
of Founders and Patriots of America, respectfully submits 
its annual report : — 

During the past year, there have been held five regular 
meetings of the Chapter and eight of the Council. The 
meetings have been most interesting and inspiring, and have 
given us an opportunity not only for visits to historic spots, 
but have brought us in touch with some of the patriotic 
work being done for the foreign-born races in America. 

Papers on historical subjects have been given, music by 
our own members and their guests has added not a little to 
our enjoyment, and the social hour which closes each meet- 
ing gives us opportunity to become better acquainted with 
new and older members. 

The attendance is creditable and means much, as the mem- 
bership is scattered through the State. New members have 
been added and other names are awaiting approval of their 
credentials. 

The Chapter has given fifty dollars ($50.00) to the Mas- 
sachusetts Historical Genealogical Society ; fifty dollars 
($50.00) to the Restoration of the old Church, Virginia, 
and has printed leaflets giving historical significance of dates 
of meetings, and the Committee on Suggestions for Patriotic 
Work is still at work. A deep sense of harmony and loy- 
alty pervades the Chapter and we hope the coming year may 
only add to the measure of good work done in the past. 

Adeline C. Gowdy, 
Corresponding Secretary, 
Massachusetts Chapter D. F. P. A. 

MICHIGAN REPORT. 

The Michigan Chapter begs leave to submit the following 
report : 

Two regular meetings have been held during the year, and 
Flag Day observed by a public celebration at the Opera 



29 



House, in which seventeen other patriotic organizations co- 
operated. Plans are now being made for a similar celebra- 
tion on June 14th of this year. 

The seventh annual meeting was held in March at the 
home of the President, Mrs. B. C. Whitney, at Grosse 
Pointe, and the members were entertained at luncheon. 

The proposed national amendments were passed upon 
unanimously. 

Thirteen members have been appointed on a Flag com- 
mittee of the American Flag Association and the President 
made a member of their executive committee. 

The membership of the Michigan Chapter is twenty-seven. 

The past year two members have been transferred to 
other Chapters and two valued members have died. The 
Vice-President, Mrs. Katherine Rainey of Detroit, on Au- 
gust 10, 1912, was called home after a long illness. She was 
a faithful officer, and a loyal member, and the highest type 
of Christian womanhood. On February 22, 1913, Mrs. 
Henry B. Rogers of Plancock, died. She was a charter 
member of the Michigan Chapter. 

With every assurance of loyalty and co-operation from 
our Chapter, 

Respectfully submitted, 

Beatrice Larned Whitney, 

President. 



A/IRGINIA REPORT. 

The Virginia Chapter, Daughters of Founders and Pa- 
triots of America, has just closed a successful year. 

Our work has been the placing of solid concrete steps on 
the side entrance of The Old Falls Church, Falls Church, 
Virginia. 

Last year we had larger steps put at the front door. Our 
members being so scattered it is impossible to have large 
attendance at the meetings, which are held each month. We 
have four new members this year. 



30 



Our State President attended every meeting last year of 
The Executive Committee and Restoration Committee, from 
Mdiicli our Chapter derived much inspiration. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ESTELLE V. CaLLENDER, 

President Virginia Chapter of Daughters 
of Founders and Patriots of America. 

ILLINOIS REPORT. 

The Illinois Chapter of the National Society Daughters 
of Founders and Patriots of America have during the past 
year held but two meetings. One at the Hotel Blackstone 
in the late winter, on which occasion the President read a 
paper on the "Vocation of Motherhood," and a most attrac- 
tive musical program followed. Tea was served at the con- 
clusion of the literary and musical part of the afternoon. 

In June on "Bunker Hill Day" the yearly luncheon was 
served at the La Salle Hotel. There was a large attendance 
of attractive and charming women, and Illinois has every 
reason to be proud of the Founders and Patriots member- 
ship. The Society now numbers forty-six. Two of our 
members have answered to their names and gone on, Mrs. 
Charles H. Deere and Mrs. Seymour Coleman. 

When the opportunity offers the Daughters of Founders 
and Patriots of Illinois will be found eagerly ready to do 
able service for all good, and for all civic up-lifting. 

Laura Dayton Fessenden, 
President of the Illinois Chapter. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA REPORT. 

My report will be brief as I was elected President only 
two months ago. The annual election of officers was held 
March 7th, at which time the Delegate to the General Court 
of 1914 was also elected. 

On April 4th we met at the home of our Corresponding 
Secretary, Mrs. Kirk, who gave us a charming paper on 



31 

"The French in Colonial Days." Deeply interesting family 
records were read by the Chaplain, Mrs. Wickham. 

At our last meeting, May 2d, the National Registrar, Mrs. 
Pealer, gave an account of her "Forefathers" which was 
both interesting and instructive. The colonial paper which 
is a feature of our meetings was given by Mrs. Mcintosh. 
It was a graphic description of the early struggles of the 
Colonists, and of Spanish misrule. 

Mrs. Kinsley, the Historian, was our hostess and the 
afternoon was much enjoyed. 

Mary C. Beach, 

President. 

MARYLAND REPORT. 

The Maryland report is lacking owing to the fact that the 
Chapter has lost three of its principal officers since last 
year. Two of these passed away within two months. Presi- 
dent and Vice-President. Maryland paid the last five dol- 
lars due on the chancel of the old church at Falls Church, 
\'a. 

WISCONSIN REPORT. 

It is with sincere regret that the President of the Wis- 
consin Chapter is obliged to forego the pleasure of being 
present at the session of the General Court this year. The 
Chapter is now in its third year, and the attendance at the 
meetings shows a decided interest on the part of members. 
There are twenty-two names on the roll, and several others 
whose preliminary papers have been examined by the Regis- 
trar, but not yet presented to the National Executive Com- 
mittee. A small year book containing By-Laws and lists of 
members has been issued. 

With cordial greeting to the officers and members of the 
General Court. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary L, At wood. 

President. 



32 



MISSOURI REPORT. 

The Missouri Chapter has suffered a severe loss during 
the past year in the death of one of its charter memhers, 
Mrs. E. C. Robbins, who entered life eternal July 13, 1912, 
and Mrs. George H. Shields, who followed her in Septem- 
ber, 1913. Mrs. Shields was one of the early members of 
the National Society and was very dear to us. 

There has been no change in our officers. Several mem- 
bers of the Chapter attended the Conference in Washington 
on the 12th of April last. Four applications -for member- 
ship are being prepared, so we expect four new members 
during the present year. 

We very much regret that Alissouri was not represented 
at the last General Court. The chapter sends cordial greet- 
ings and thanks to the national officers for their courtesy 
to us. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Elizabeth H. Delafield, 

President. 

ARKANSAS REPORT. 

The first annual meeting of the Arkansas Chapter of the 
Daughters of Founders, and Patriots of America, was held 
at the residence of our Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. John 
W. Ferrill, on April 3, 1913, and officers for the year were 
elected. 

Since our report of last year, we gave gained in number; 
we are now ''a round dozen." In the year we have added 
three new members, and lost one. It is with great sorrow 
that we record our loss, in the death of Mrs. David L. 
Trimble (nee Ella Lee Withers), of "Elmhurst," Pine 
Bluff, which occurred March 3, 1913. She Avas our Re- 
cording Secretary, and one who took an active interest in 
the Society. We shall ever miss her greatly. 

The Arkansas Chapter has not been overburdened with 
wealth; however our dues are all paid, and we have con- 



33 



tributed to the restoration of the "Old Church," at Falls 
Church, Va. 

We hope in the coming year, to be able to report substan- 
tial growth in every way. A't present a number who have 
been invited to join our Chapter, are very busy perfecting 
tlieir data. 

As President of the Arkansas Chapter, it was my pleas- 
ure to attend the Conference in Washington, April 12th, and 
also a meeting of the Executive Committee. And it is in- 
deed a regret to myself, and every member of our Chapter, 
that Arkansas will not be represented at the General Court. 

With cordial greeting from the Arkansas Chapter, and 
thanks to the National Officers for their unvarying kindness 
to us. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Stella Pickett Hardy, 
President Arkansas Chapter, D. F. P. A. 

OHIO REPORT. 

The first meeting called in the interest of forming an 
Ohio Chapter of the National Society of Daughters of 
Founders and Patriots of America, was held on Saturday,. 
October 5, 1912, at noon, at the Woman-s Club, Cleveland. 

Mrs. Charles Burt Tozier was hostess at a beautifully ap- 
pointed luncheon. It being requisite to the forming of a new 
Chapter that the names of prospective officers be submitted 
to the Executive Committee of the National Society at the 
time of the formal application for the forming of a new 
Chapter, the meeting of said Committee being set for Oct. 
12th, 1912, the President, having been empowered by the 
proper National officers so to do, appointed the officers of 
the new Ohio Chapter. 

These appointments were subsequently ratified by the 
members. The forming of the new Chapter was informally 
discussed, but no further action could be taken until after 
favorable hearing from the Executive Committee. 



34 

The second meeting was held at the Women's Ch;b, at 
Tioon, on February 6th, 1913, Mrs. C. B. Tozier being again 
the charming hostess. Silken flags decorated the center of 
the table and were given the members as souvenirs of the 
occasion. 

After the luncheon was enjoyed, the meeting was resolved 
into a business session and the following actions taken, the 
President acting as Chairman. 

It was moved that there be sixteen charter members and 
that the charter membership be closed ; also that member- 
ship to the Chapter be entirely by invitation, names of new 
members to be submitted to a membership committee for 
favorable action before any invitations are given to friends. 
A motion was made that this committee consist of the regis- 
trar as chairman and two other members, to be appointed 
by the President. Mrs. B. B. Longhead and Mrs. Fred S. 
Dunham were appointed. 

The society having voted to have a charter, Mrs. J. J. 
Wood, as Corresponding Secretary, was asked to write to 
the secretaries of other State Chapters to obtain informa- 
tion regarding charters, and after obtaining such informa- 
tion, to draft the charter for the Ohio Chapter. Mrs. Wood 
was also asked to continue to act as the Committee on By- 
Laws. 

Mrs. Fred S. Dunham upon invitation of the President, 
read the proposed amendments to the Constitution of the 
National Society D. F. P. A. 

Motion was made to have the Corresponding Secretary 
send letters to absent members, reporting the meetings held. 

The Historian was asked to have a report ready for the 
Annual Conference, to be held in Washington, April 12th. 

The last but very interesting feature of the meeting was 
the practice of the official naval salute to the Flag, in 
which all present participated. 

Before closing this report, the Historian would like to 
add that the aim of the Ohio Chapter will be especially di- 
rected toward congeniality in its membership ; and would 



35 



1788824 



call attention to the interesting fact that in a number of 
cases mothers and daughters are associated as members, 
Mrs. R. M. Holbrook being the mother of Mrs. J. J. Wood; 
Mrs. West the mother of Mrs. C. R. Morgan and Mrs. H. 
D. Rankin; Mrs. B. B. Longhead the mother of Miss Mary 
Longhead, and Mrs. F. H. Wagar the mother of Miss Effie 
S. Wagar and Mrs. A. W. Barber. 

Mrs. Arthur Wellesley Barber, 
Historian Ohio Chapter Nat. Soc. D. F. P. A. 
Mrs. Charles Burt Tozier, 

President Ohio Chapter. 

The National President requested Mrs. Myers, the Vice- 
President, to take the chair for the rest of the session. 
Ballots were distributed for the councillors to be elected. 
Mrs. Main moved, seconded by Mrs. Marsh and Mrs. 
Pealer, "that the three names receiving the three highest 
number of votes be declared elected for the three year 
terms, and the name receiving the next highest number be 
declared elected to fill the unexpired term caused by the 
death of Mrs. Aldrich." Motion carried. 

Mrs. Boynton and Mrs. St. Clair were appointed tellers. 
Mrs. Boynton, chairman, read the result of the balloting as 
follows : Thirty-seven ballots received. 

One hundred and forty votes cast. 

Miss Webster, 35 votes; Mrs. Mitchell of Pennsylvania, 
30 votes; Miss Hewitt, 29 votes; Mrs. Johnston, 15 votes; 
Mrs. Martin, 12 votes ; Mrs. Willis, 8 votes ; Mrs. Barber, 7 
votes; Miss Barlow, 4 votes. 

The resignation of the chaplain was offered too late to 
notify the Chapters. Therefore this vacancy will be filled 
by the President's appointment. 

Mrs. Pealer asked as a special privilege to be permitted 
to present for the first time the names of Mrs. Denblaken, 
through the Michigan Chapter and Mrs. Whitney through 
the District Chapter. It was granted. 

On account of the great demand for extra copies of his- 



36 

tories and lineage records, a motion was passed that "after 
the General Court of 1913, there would he a charge of 25 
cents for each additional copy. One copy is sent to each 
member of the society to the last address furnished us. 

In response to a request from members-at-large, and 
guests of the General Court, it was decided to ask all these, 
just after the roll-call, to rise and join with the members of 
the Court in the salute to the Flag. 

The Committee was favored at the April meeting by a 
visit from Miss Hardy, President of the Arkansas Chapter, 
who told of the delightful meetings and splendid work in her 
State. 

The Ohio Chapter, Mrs. Tozier, President, was formed 
on May 5, 1912, and began regular work this fall. It was 
pleasant to hear direct from Mrs. Tozier at the annual Con- 
ference this year. 

Mrs. Potts sang most impressively the Star Spangled Ban- 
ner, and the General Court adjourned. 

Members and guests gathered at the charming home of 
the President, where a dainty luncheon was served by the 
hostess and her sister, Mrs. Hannay, under the fine old trees, 
surrounded by flowers, and distant views of blue skies. The 
gracious hospitality of Mrs. Cox and Mrs. Hannay finished 
the day in perfect fashion, their guests carrying with them 
when they made their adieux, pleasant memories that do not 
fade. 

Respectfully submitted, . 

Emma Culver Jones, 
■ National Recording Secretary. 

INFORMATION FOR MEMBERS. 

The Recording Secretary has charge of correspondence re- 
lating to Chapters ; their authorization, formation, elections, 
and by-laws. Also, notices to members of the General 
Court, i.e., National Officers, Councillors, Chapter Presi- 
dents, Vice-Presidents, and Delegates, ex-nationaj Presi- 



37 



dents, and ex-national Vice-Presidents, and the remaining 
Founder of the Society ; and the sending histories to H- 
braries. 

The Corresponding Secretary has charge of all letters of 
general inquiry, complimentary notices, letters of condolence, 
notices to all guests of the General Court, i. e., members-at- 
large, in the District, and any special notices ordered by the 
Executive Committee. Also, sending of histories (except 
to the libraries), constitutions, and membership cards, 
notices of committee meetings, of election to membership, 
of appointment on committees, and any special letters turned 
over to her by the Executive Committee. 

The Registrar has charge of all correspondence connected 
with applications for membership, for insignia, credential 
cards, and endorsement blanks. 

The Treasurer has charge of correspondence relating to 
dues, rebates, transfers, and notices of resignation and death. 

The Historian has charge of correspondence relating to 
traditional records or stories, her other duties being stated 
in the constitution. 



38 

STATUTES RELATING TO CHAPTERS 

1st. The salutation to the Flag shall be the official salute of the 
Navy. Each member, rising and responding to her name at roll- 
call, shall turn towards the Flag, raising the right hand and laying 
it above the heart. All shall remain standing while the Lord's 
Prayer is repeated in concert. 

2d. The General Court, held annually on the 13th of Ma}', is 
open to all members of the Society. 

3d. No bars or pins can be added to the insignia, nor can it be 
marked with any name but that of the original owner. Society 
ribbon can be purchased from Caldwell & Co., of Philadelphia, also 
stationery, with illuminated die, octavo, cream white linen. Plain 
stationery lettered in blue with the name of the Society can be 
purchased from any stationer. 

4th. When proofs referred to by applicants are not obtainable 
by the National Registrar, a certified copy by a competent genealo- 
gist is required. Or, if that is not obtainable, a certified letter 
from any of the Chapter genealogists signing our papers will be 
sufficient; provided: That the references by which the proofs were 
determined are given therewith. 

5th. Chapters needing a supply of blanks for applicants will 
apply to the National Registrar, but blanks must not be distributed 
until the Chapter Registrar has examined the data and believes the 
applicant ehgible. Extra blanks will be furnished to members who 
apply, upon the payment of ten cents. 

6th. Endorsement blanks will be furnished to Chapter Registrars 
when application papers have been sent to the National Treasurer, 
and when endorsed and returned to these officers, must be for- 
warded to the National Registrar. 

7th. No member of the Society can hold two offices at the same 
time. 

8th. Chapters cannot increase the annual dues, but must adhere 
to Section 1, Article 7, of the Constitution. Chapters may raise a 
contingent fund but it shall not constitute part of the annual dues. 

9th. Half the life membership and half the annual dues of those 
joining through an organized Chapter are retained in the Chapter 
treasury, but dues paid previous to such organization remain in the 
National Treasury, also all initiation fees. No rebates will be sent 
to Chapters for members at large who may join the Chapter during 
the fiscal year. 

10th. The treasurer of every Chapter shall send to the National 
Treasurer on or before May 1st, 50 cents for each active member 
of the Chapter, together with a full list of its members with correct 
addresses and Chapter numbers in numerical order, every member 
being given, and life members and deceased members plainly in- 
dicated. 

11th. Members admitted after February 13th and before the 
annual meeting of the General Court in Maj' shall not be required 
to pay dues for the months intervening. 

12th. Chapter By-Laws must be approved by the National Ex- 
ecutive Committee, and any subsequent changes must also be re- 
ported before being adopted. 

13th. Members having resigned can be reinstated by paying back 
dues. 

14th. Chapter officers cannot sign application papers until they 
have been presented to the Chapter. 



■H 



3ln Ht^mnriam 

[October, 1912— October, 1913.] 

National 
Number. 

454. Mrs. Anna Morrison Aldrich. 

608. Mrs. Lucy A. Dwight Coleman. 

162. Mrs. Mary Little Dickinson Deere. 

323. Mrs. Emily L. Bostwick Fay. 

405. Mrs. Laura Kimberly Fulton. 

492. Miss Mary Virginia Greenway. 

76. Mrs. Melinda Harriet Van Vorst Hasbrouck. 

53. Mrs. Lydia R. Smith Hinsdale. 

142. Mrs. Alice Moore Martin. 

110. Mrs. Maria Watson Pinney. 

60. Mrs. Katherine Smith Rainey. 

70. Mrs. Mary Frances Russell Rogers. 

11. Mrs. Mary Harrison Leighton Shields. 

638. Mrs. Ella Lee Withers Trimble. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 

National 
Number. 

366. Agnus, Ann.\ Elizabeth Fulton (Mrs. Felix), 

Stevenson, Baltimore Co., Md. 
277. Aldrich, Clara Harvey (Mrs. Thomas W.) 

181 Broadway, Providence, R. I. 
129. Alexander, Mary Corlinua Batchklli:r (Mrs. Robert), 

5500 Wayne Ave.. Germantown, Pa. 
177. Allen, Julia T. Camp (Mrs.), 

309 York St., New Haven, Conn. 
199. Alline, Mary Ella Clapp (Mrs. W. H.), 

113 Gainsboro St., Boston, Mass. 
506. Allyn, H. Emeline, Miner (Mrs.), 

R. F. D., Stonington, Conn. 
598. Allyn, Emily Fenner Maxson (^vIrs. Louis P.), 

28 New London Road, Mystic, Conn. 
351. Ambler, Jennie Beardsley (Mrs.), 

Rocky Beach, West Haven, Conn. 
544. Ames, Helen Van Wyck Dodge (Mrs. Charles T.), 

3212 Newark St., Cleveland Park, Washington, 
D. C. 
303. Andrews, Frances E. (Mrs. David A.), 

104 State St., Newburyport, Mass. 
704. Andrews, Jennie Whipple (Mrs. Frederick F.), 

170 Dwight St., New Haven, Conn. 
396. Andrews, Nettie Louise Ricgs (Mrs. Jas. Courtney), 

92 Randolph St., Springfield, Mass. 
386. Armes, Theodosia Culver (Mrs. Henry Beard), 

2446 Grand Ave., S., Minneapolis, Minn. 
264. Armstrong, Laura Lee (Mrs. Charles Henry), 

20 Brooklawn Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 
697. Ashby, Ruth Farnsworth (Mrs. Hi:>fuv Conde), 

1421 Boulder Ave., Tulsa, Okla. 
217. Atwater, Harriet Barnes (Mrs. W. J.), 

1086 Iranistan Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 
109. Atwood, Mary Louis (Miss), 

396 Kane Place, Milwaukee, Wis. 
672. Auerbach, Matilda Rice (Mrs. Maurice), 

The Sherman, Washington, D. C. 
609. Austin, Louise Hammond (Mrs. Wm. B.), 

25 Scott St., Chicago, 111. 
449. Babbitt, Grace E. (Miss), 

1666 Park Road, Washington, D. C. 
627. Babcock, Ella Stanley Butler (Mrs. James L.), 

208 N. Division St., Ann Arbor, Mich. 
74. Backus, Margaret E. Brown (Mrs. Jabez), 

Elizabethtown, N. Y. 
160. Baird, Lyle June Prather (Mrs. George W.), 

1505 Rhode Island Ave., Washington, D. C. 
122. Baldwin, Julia Adele Strong (Mrs. Lyman Hayden), 

209 East Sixth St., Sedalia, Mo. 

149. Baldwin, Myrtle Clark (Mrs. Noyes Darling), 
34 Anson St., Derby, Conn. 



41 



National 
Number. 

2Z2. Ball, Sallie Lewis (Mrs. Mottrom Dulaney), 

"Killarney," Lewinsville, Fairfax Co., Va. 
564. Ballard, Alice Burton Griswold (Mrs. Smith Sabin), 

20 Bailey Ave., Montpelier, Vt. 
557. Bamford, Lillie Church Hubbard (Mrs. Henry), 

625 Collins St., Plymouth, Wis. 
667. Barber, Harriet May Wagar (Mrs. Arthur W.), 

1503 Warren Road, Lakewood, Ohio. 
592. Barber, Velma Sylvester (I\Irs. A. W.), 

703 East Capitol St., Washington, D. C. 
6S<^. Barker, Josephine Wait (Mrs. Frank), 

503 Seventh Ave., Rochelle, 111. 
37S. Barker^ Julia Shumway (Mrs. Frank W.), 

4633 Greenwood Ave., Chicago, III. 
88. Barlow, Alice Stanton Turner (Mrs. John Whitney), 

127 Federal St., New London, Conn. 

299. Barlow, Catherine Brittin (Miss), 

The Royal, Washington, D. C. 

300. Barlow, Mary Elizabeth (Miss). 

The Royal, Washington, D. C. 
656. Barnes, Ann Adelia Stickney (Mrs. Joseph H.), 

191 Trenton St., East Boston, Mass. 
57. Barnes, Anne Hampton (Miss), 

1727 Spruce St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
216. Barnes, Carrie Ellen Richardson (Mrs. Lewis Edgar), 

30 River St., Methuen, Mass. 
538. Barrow, Katherine Braddock (Mrs. John). 

1309 Arch St.. Little Rock, Ark. 
658. Bartlett, Cora E. McDowell (Mrs. Edward C), 

536 Jordan St., Shreveport, La. 
191. Barltett, Nettie Spooner (Mrs. Lester M.), 

133 St. Botolph St., Boston, Mass. 
225. Beach, Martha Edwards (Miss), 

1027 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 
453. Beach, Mary A. Campbei.l (ATrs.), 

The Ashley, Washington. D. C. 
280. Beardsley, Lucy J. Fayerwf.ather (Mrs. Morris B.), 

230 Park Place, Bridgeport, Conn. 
372. Bechtel, Nellie Agnew (Miss), 

830 Dayton St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
113. Bedle, Althea Randolph (Mrs. Joseph D.), 

The Fairmount, Jersey City. N. J. 
104. Bell, Viola Adele Hooker (Mrs. Harry D.), 

Waupun, Wis. 
101. Benjamin, Fanny Nichols (Mrs. S. G. W.) , 

326 College St., Burlington. Vt. 
124. Berg, Helen Morse (Mrs. Albert W.). 

356 West Twentieth St., New York City. 
205. Berry, Margaret Benson (Mrs. John F.), 

140 St. Johns Place. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
687. Blackman, Jessie Mitchell (Mrs. J. Percy), 

235 Paulison Ave., Passaic, N. J. 



42 



National 
Number. 

420. Blakslee, Henrietta Bunting (Mrs. J. Irwin), 

Mauch Chunk, Pa. 
474. Blauvelt, Mary (]\Iiss), 

336 West 95th St., New York City. 
535. Blow, Jennie Goodell (IMrs. Albert Allmand), 

Belleville, Ware Neck P. O., Gloucester Co., Va. 
551. Bloomingstok, Frances Drake (Mrs. John S.), 

6132 Monroe Ave., Chicago, 111. 
464. Bolmer, Gertrude Sanford (Mrs. Clarence B.), 

19 Lynwood Place, New Haven, Conn. 
529. Bonsack, Helen K. F. (Mrs. Arthur A.), 

4531 Westminster Place, St. Louis, Mo. 
452. Booth, Hattie Perkins Coan (Mrs. Clifford H.), 

220 Orchard St., New Hn.ven, Conn. 
151. BootHj Jeannette (Miss), 

King St., Stratford, Conn. 
545. Booth, Mary Alice Garrison (Mrs. John N.), 

4012 Delmar Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 
456. Bostick, Mary Hart (Mrs. Smith Mott), 

210 Comstock Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 
389. Booton, Gertrude V. Vermilye (Mrs. John Griffiths), 

Fort Hancock, N. J. 
93 Boucher, Sophie Holland (Mrs. Pierre L.), 

237 Central Park West, New York City. 
2. Boynton, Helen Mason (Mrs. Henry V.), 
"The Octavia," Washington, D. C. 
179. Bradbury, Evta Kileski (Mrs. Wm. PL), 

369 Harvard St., Cambridge, Mass. 
178. Bradbury, Margaret Jones (Mrs. Wm. F.), 

369 Harvard St., Cambridge, Mass. 
537. Braddock, Margaret Burson (Mrs. John S.), 

3225 High St., Little Rock, Ark. 
256. Bradley, Ella E. Browne (Mrs. James S., Jr.), 

43 Bleecker St., Newark, N. J. 
IRO. Brayton, Emma Sanford (Mrs. James M.), 

328 South College Ave., Grand Rapids, Mich. 
518. Brett, Frances Conwell (Mrs. William Delos), 

2104 Grand Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 
623. Briggs, Phoebe Amelia Oliver (Mrs. John Story), 

Troy, Kan., and South Dansville, N. Y. 
269. Brill, Mary Comstock (Mrs.), 

167 West Main St., Ilion, N. Y. 
565. Brookmire, Anna Forbes (Mrs. James H.),-, 

4934 Berlin Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 
306 Broughton, Cora Anna Baldwin (Mrs. Chas. Henry), 

307 Twin Road, Rome, N. Y. 
112 Brown, Anna Lawrence (Mrs. Charles Hilton), 

167th St., New York City. 
728. Brown, Emma Frances (IMrs.), 

668 Washington St., Brighton, Mass. 
10 Brown, Eugenia Washington Moncure (Mrs. Chas. E.), 
121 12th St., S. E., Washington, D. C. 



43 



National 

Number. 

186. Brown, Fanny Pomeroy (Miss), 

10 Library Place, Danbury, Conn. 

513. Brown, Mary Eleanor Elliott (Mrs. Charles W.), 

1411 K St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

514. Brumbaugh, Catherin E. Brown (Mrs. Gaius ]\I.), 

905 Massachusetts Ave., Washington, D. C. 
279. Bryant, Carrie M. Putney (Mrs. George Horace), 
4514 Hermitage Ave., Chicago, 111. 

596. Buell, Augusta Pettibone Burnett (Mrs. Clarence), 

107 South 3d St., Louisiana, Mo. 
602. Buist, Elizabeth Kimberly (Mrs. FIenry Rutledge), 

43 Legare St., Charleston, S. C. 
343. BuKEY, Roberta J. Magruder (Mrs. John Spencer), 

Vienna, Fairfax Co., Va. 
584. Bullock, Cordelia Elizabeth Sexton (Mrs.), 

Howell, Mich. 
158. Bunnell, Caroline Beardsley (Mrs. George B.), 

Southport, Conn. 
723. Bunting, Helen Romavne Seybolt (Mrs. Douglas), 

26 W. Ross St., Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

597. BURKHOLDER, CATHERINE LEAVENWORTH (MrS. ArTHUR R.), 

1820 M St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 
692. Burpee, Mattie Lillian Batchelder (Mrs. Wm. Byron), 
1028 Union St., Manchester, N. H. 

460. Burroughs, Elizabeth Fen.ner (Mrs. John), 

1023 Clinton St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

461. Burroughs, Mary Stewart (Miss"), 

1023 Clinton St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
582. Burton, Helen Ward (Mrs. Edwin S.), 

Shirley Hill House, Manchester, N. H. 
314. Burton, Lucina Carpenter (Mrs. Fred H.), 

Broadfield Farm, North Raynham, Mass., R. F. 
D. No. 8. 
619. BusHNELL, Esther Morgan (Mrs. Asa Carroll), 

319 Chapel St., New Haven, Conn. 
673. Bushnell, Sophie Walker Hyndshaw (Mrs. D. W.), 

127 Bluff St., Council Bluffs, Iowa. 
423. Butler, Della Chace (Mrs. Edward), 

Elm St., Dighton, Mass. 
572. Butler, Eloisk Rand (Miss), 

821 Warren St., Hudson, N. Y. 
91. Butler, Lucy Palmer (Miss), 

11 Meridian St., New London, Conn. 
293. Butterworth, Katherine Deere (Mrs.), 

Moline, 111, 
283. Cady, Elizabeth Brewster (Mrs. David D.), 

57 Watson St., Detroit, Mich. 
722. Caley, Mary Allen (Mrs. Joseph M.), 

1513 Green St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
.134. Callan, Estella Foltz (Mrs. Frank D.), 

Tlion, N. Y. 
587. Callender, Estelle Victoria LTitdgjns (Mrs. Wm. E.), 

The New Berne, Washington, D. C. 



44 



National 
Number. 

683. Cameron, Mabel Ward (Mrs. Charles Ernest), 

200 S. Main St., Middletown, Conn. 
41. Campbell, Sara M. Myndf.rtzf. (Mrs. John C.), 

2 West 83d St., New York City. 
647. Carpenter, Sarah Billings (Mrs. Henr\0, 

230 East King St., Lancaster, Pa. 
472. Carr, M.\rc.aret Bl.vuvelt (Mrs. David C), 

2 East 127th St., New York City. 
515. Carter, Mary Whitney (Mrs. Chas. Crawford), 

1817 Sixth Ave., Rock Island, 111. 
202. Casler, Nellie M. Horton (]\Irs. \Ym. Austin), 

Cape Vincent, N. Y. 
615. Catlin, Laura Wood (Mrs. Charles), 

343 Farwell Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 
703. Chandler, Anna Sophia Buckingham (Mrs. Frank Ran- 
dolph), 

744 Rush St., Chicago. III. 
328. Chapman, Maky Ann Wright (Mrs. James Levi), 

The Gables, 15 Babcock St., Brookline, Mass. 
563. Chappell, Carrie Garrison (Mrs. Winthrop G.), 

Buckingham Hotel, St. Louis, Mo. 
459. Chase, Jessie Clara (Miss), 

491 Second Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
249. Church, M.\rie Waterbury (Mrs. AV. F.), 

Marshall, Mich. 
317. Clapp, Susan Ida Dudley (Mrs. J. B.), 

52 Hartford St., Dorchester, Mass. 
358. Clarke, Martha Cilley Bouton Cilley (Mrs. Arthur 
Eastman), 

Stark Place, Manchester, N. H. 
562. Cobb, Mary Wright (Mrs. Charles li.), 

28 Tudor St., Lynn, Mass. 
411. Colville, Edtth Wilbur Cole (Mrs. Robert Weir), 

445 Monmouth Boulevard. Galesburg, 111. 

370. Comstock, Betsey J. (Mrs. Hiram M.), 

367 Harvard St., Cambridge, ]\Iass. 
408. Constantine, Clar.\ Elizabeth Hadel (Mrs. Christo- 
dulo), 

Hampton Court, Dolphin St., Baltimore, Md. 
549. Cook, Addie M. Richardson (Mrs. Frank D.), 

66 Concord St., Nashua. N. H. 
194. Cook, Annie Elizabeth Hoxsie (Mrs. Geo. F.), 

341 Wisconsin Ave., Oak Park, 111. 
650. Cope, Fannie Ophelia Ames (Mrs. Israel C), 

Kenilworth, 111. 
488. CoRBiN, Frances Harrison (Mrs. Frank Addison), 

"The Hill," Orange, Conn. 

371. CoRNWELL, Sarah Evelina Marsh (Mrs. Sam'l G.). 

2140 Wyoming Ave., Washington, D. C. 
352. CoRSA, Elsie Tibbitts (Mrs. George B.), 

526 West 113th St., New York City. 
102. CowLES, Ella Hotchkiss (Mrs. Edmund B.), 

Hotel Somerset, Boston, Mass. 



45 



Nalinnal 
Number. 

M6. CowLEs, Ljzzie B. (Miss), 

403 Seymour St., Lansing-, Mich. 
(•■J5. CowLEs, Lucie D. (Miss), 

403 Seymour St., Lansing, Mich. 
4i7. Cox, Juliet Hazeltine Emery (Mrs. Wm. Van Zandt), 

Emery Place, Brightwood, D. C. 
M7. Cleveland, Gazie J. Barnes (]Mrs. George A.), 

381 Oak St., New Haven, Conn. 
136. Crandall, Alice Green (Mrs. Herbert Lewis), 

69 Granite St., New London, Conn. 
719. Crane, Bertha Whilldin (Mrs. Chas. Augustus), 

233 Pennsylvania Ave., S. E., Washington, D. C. 
470. Crocker, Julia Anna Farnham (Mrs.), 

12 University Place, New Haven, Conn. 
42. Crombie, Hattie A. Slade (Mrs. Wm. Murr.vy), 

Bretton Hall, 86th St. and Broadway, New York 
City. 
63. Crosman, Ellen Hall (Mrs. J. Heron), 

95 Elm St., New Rochelle, N. Y. 
511. Cummings, Mary Augusta INIarston (Mrs. Robert 
Fowler), 

5135 Madison Ave., Chicago, 111. 
398. Curtis, Clarissa Baldwin (I\Irs. Melville J.), 

Main St., Stratford, Conn. 
198. Cushman, M. Delight (jNIiss), 

19 Oak St., Taunton, Mass. 
543. Dannenberg, Elizabeth Lindsley (Mrs. N. B.), 

Chelsea, Okla. 
481. Davenport, Sarah Lyon (Mrs. John), 

"Eight Acres," Bath, Steuben Co., N. Y. 
364. Davis, Katherine Huguenin (Miss), 

702 St. Nicholas Ave., New York City. 
105. Davis, Lillian Kate Hooper (Mrs. Burr W.), 

Waupan, Wis. 
663. Dawson, Sophie Pierpo.xt Pierce (Mrs. Sidney Holt), 

OO Wlialloy Ave.. New Haven, Conn. 
94. Day, Fkancics Steve.xs (Mrs. Loren T.), 

Westport, Conn. 
.80. Day, Lydia (Miss), 

52 East 72d St., New York City. 
222. Dean, Evelina Benbridge (Miss), 

151 West 70th St., New York City. 
611. de Bonand Anne Harrison (Mme Rene). 

74 Ave. du Bois du Bologne, Paris, France. 
437. Delafield, Elizabeth Hanenkamp (Mrs. Wallace), 

5028 Westminster Place, St. Louis, Mo. 
707. den Bleyker, Hannah .\nna Balch, (Mrs. John), 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 
235. Denison, Carrie M. Burrows (Mrs. Chas. PL), 

27 Gravel St., Mystic, Conn. 
22. Denison, Eliza A. Miner (Mrs. Hiram C), 

27 Gravel St., Mystic, Conn. 
595. De Witt, Lillian Hale Garrison (Mrs, Chas. H ), 

1207 W. 3rd St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



46 

National 

Number. 

380. Dexter, Ellen Katiierine Crittenden (Mr.s.), 

704 South Pleasant St., Princeton, 111. 
363. Dickinson, Mary Elizaheth Moredock (Mrs. S. Frank), 

11 Denison Ave., Mystic, Conn. 
530. Dillon, Florence Weston (Mrs. Tohn Robert), 

162 Myrtle St., Atlanta, Ga. 
106. Doane, Marguerite Treat (Mrs. Geo. White), 

Watch Hill, R. I. 

381. DoBVNS, Maria 15errv (Mrs. Thomas Abner), 

1957 Biltmore St., Washington, D. C. 
473. Dodge, Abua Sanders (Mrs. Isaac L.), 

79 Euclid Ave., Springfield, Mass. 
685. Doolittle, Hattii-: Grace Phfxps (Mrs. H. Phelps), 

343 Elm St., New Haven, Conn. 
312. Dorr, Hannah Trevella Meriwether (Mrs. Samuel), 

1213 South Second St., Louisville, Kv. 
387. Dowell, Cynthia Noyes (Mrs. Julian C), 

3162 Mt. Pleasant St., Washington, D. C. 
247. Downer, ]\Iauy E. Buckingham CNIrs. M. Moody), 

387 Clinton Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 
523. Downs, Martha Grace Holbrook (Mrs. Thomas Merwin), 

47 Franklin St., Ansonia, Conn. 
276. Draper, Bell Merrill (i\lRs. Amos G.), 

Kendall Green, D. C. 
675. Dunham, Elizabeth Reed (Mrs. Fred Sylvester) 

9318 Talbot Ave., Cleveland. Ohio. 
552. Dunham, Frances Augusta L.uvton (Mrs. Jeremiah S ) 

De Pere, Wis. 
267. Dunning, Sarah C. Potter (Mrs.), 

211 Belmont Ave., Springfield, Mass. 

715. Eastman, Amy Mead (Mrs. Charles D.), 

Plymouth, Wis. 
467. Ellis, Hattie Tikkham (Mrs. Harry C), 

4802 North Hermitage Ave., Chicago, 111. 
305. Ellis. ]Mary J. Buell (Mrs. John D.). 

Antwerp, Jefferson Co., N. Y. 
215. *Emerson, Adaline Elizabeth Talcott (Mrs. Ralph), 

427 North Church St., Rockford, 111. 
.531. Emerson, Mary Elizabeth Shute (Mrs. H. P.), 

5917 Florence Building, Omaha, Neb. 
229. Enegren, Nina Olds (Mrs. Robert), 

4741 Seventh Ave., Seattle, Wash. 
450. Ensign, Martha Stratton (Mrs. Dwigtit W.), 

6 Bigelow St., Cambridge. Mass. 
695. Evans Bernice (Thurchill Hedges (Mrs. David Edward). 

337 Sherman Ave., Denver, Col. 
17. Evans, Carolyn Beard (Mrs. John O.), 

1219 Sixteenth St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 
250. Evans, Lucy D. (Miss), 

Moline. III. 

716. Fagan, Ida Meacham (Mrs. Maurice W.), 

Glenside, Pa. 
401. Fairchild, Eliza M. Tomlinson (Mrs. Alfred Beach), 
1222 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 

*Life Member. 



47 

National 
Number. 

203. Farmer, Nellie M. (Mrs. Elbridge), 

53 Appleton St., Arlington Heights, Mass. 
391. Farnsworth, Gertrude (Miss), 

1126 East Capitol St., Washington, D. C. 
98. Faxon, Nellie A. White (Mrs. Walter C), 

29 Huntington St., Hartford, Conn. 
185. Fenton, Lizzie Remak (Mrs. Thomas H.). 

1319 Spruce St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
621. Ferguson, Marcia Bryant Brown (Mrs. Edward"), 

644 Astor St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
705. Fernald, Natalie Richmond (Mrs. Frederick Ather- 
ton), 

550 Shephard St., Washington, D. C. 
569. Ferrill, Amy Collier (Miss), 

Batesville, Ark. 
568. Ferrill, Ida Pickett (Mrs. John W.), 

Batesville, Ark. 
463. Fessenden, Laura Dayton (Mrs. Benjamin A.), 

Highland Park, 111. 
462. Fisher, Anna Dunnell (Mrs. Bernardo Franklin), 

250 West 82d St., New York City. 
533. *FisHER, Emily Steelman (Mrs. James C), 

Reedville, Va. 
527. Fisher, Isabella Kingsland (Mrs. Geo. Dunlop), 

4531 Westminster Place, St. Louis, Mo. 
631. FiTzwiLLiAM, Sarah E. Raymond (Mrs. Francis J.), 

4824 Vincennes Ave., Chicago, III. 
73. Flint, Katherine McGeoch (Mrs. John Wyman), 

Wood Brae, Bellows Falls, Vt. 
600. *FoRAKER, Julia Ann Paine Bundy (Mrs. Jos. Benson), 

Grandin Road, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
561. *FoRESTER, Harriet Coleman (]Mrs. J. J.), 

St. James, Mo. 
294. Foster, Corra Bacon (Mrs.), 

The Marlborough, Washington, D. C. 
S73. Foster, Viot.ict Bacon (Miss), 

The Marlborough, Washington, D. C. 
657. Frees, Ethel Saljion (Mrs. Herman Edw.), 

6826 Perry Ave., Chicago, 111. 
227. French, Jennie Bowen (Mrs. Wm. Harrison), 

5342 Cornell Ave., Chicago, 111. 
674. Frink, Louise (Miss"), 

735 Gorsuch Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
272. Fuller, Lucy E. Emery (Mrs. George F.), 

155 Car'ew St., Springfield, Mass. 
362. Fulton, Dollie Glorvina (Miss). 

2 East Preston St., Baltimore, Aid. 
361. Fulton, Emma Ware (Mrs.), 

Hotel Gramaton, Bronxville, N. Y. 
406. Fulton, Laura Kimberly (Miss), 

2 East Preston St., Baltimore, Md. 

*Life Member. 



48 



National 
Number. 

632. Gallup, Delta Sus.\nn.\ Hulburd (Mrs. Benj. E.), 

4616 Ellis Ave., Chicago, 111. 
56. *Galpin, Agnes Porter Smith (Mrs. Fred E.), 

4343 Schenley Farms Terrace, Pittsburg, Pa. 
589. Gardner, Lydl\ Stocking (Mrs. Fred E.), 

Rochelle, 111. 
260. Garland, Cecile Leffingwell Enegren (Mrs. W. D.), 

4741 Seventh Ave., N. E., Seattle, Wash. 
439. Gauger, Helen S. Pierce (Mrs. John A.), 

4608 Dre.xel Boulevard, Chicago, 111. 
559. Gaulden, Helen Erwin Stevens (Mrs. Druery Le 
Sueur), 

De Land, Fla. 
85. Gerard, Je?sie FIonor Bryant (Mrs. Franklin Ward), 

44 Bay View Ave., South Norwalk, Conn. 
245. Gerry, Lizzie G. Corey (Mrs. Frederick), 

"The Belgravia," Philadelphia, Pa. 
44. *Getchell, Frederica G. Twiggs (Mrs. Frank Hor\ce), 

1432 Spruce St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
67. Gibson, Mary Frances (Mrs. Charles Clifton), 

2512 Wisconsin Ave., Washington, D. C. 
651. Gilbert, Agnes Hodgson (]\1iss), 

1427 Chapel St., New Haven, Conn. 
6S9. Gilchrist, Fredericka Raymond Beardsley (Mrs. Rob- 
ert), 

695 Clifton Ave., Newark, N. J. 
532. Goddard, Elizabeth Cass Ledyard (Mrs. F. W.), 

808 Cascade Ave., Colorado Springs, Colo. 
599. Goodman, Grace Hastings Griswold (Mrs. W. Austin), 

6 The Ortiz, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
319. Goodwin, Sara Cooke (Mrs. Robert Sti;eet), 

R. F. D. No. 2, Torrington, Conn. 
6-61. Goodwyn, Dora Lee Hedges (Mrs. W.m. Samuel), 

Emporia, Va. 
288. Goss, Abigail Daniels Symonds (Mrs. Frank M.), 

20 High St.. Melrose, Mass. 
347. GowDY, Sarah Adeline Currier (Mrs. Clinton), 

58 Locust St. Springfield, Mass. 
475. Graham, Helen Judson Whiting (]\Irs. Andrew B.), 

Stratford, Conn. 
534. Grant, Mary :\L\tteson Goodell (Mrs. Jas. Benton), 

770 Pennsylvania St., Denver, Colo. 
416. Graves, Mary Sed(;wick (Mrs. Dwight Webster), 

550 Surf Ave., Chicago, 111. 
581. Green, Anna D. Van Reyten (Mrs. Philip Kip), 

311 Academy St., Jersey City Heights, N. J. 
493. Greenway, Elizabeth Willtajis (Miss), 

2322 North Charles St., Baltimore, Md. 
36. Gregory, Ella Kneeland (Mrs. Arnold"), 

1035 Grand Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 
60S. Griffith, Fannie Bradley Lyford (Mrs. John W.), 

3825 Gumming St., Omaha, Neb. 
404. Hadel, Ada Amelia (Miss), 

Hampton Court, Baltimore, Md. 

*Life Member. 



49 



National 
.Niimlicr. 

oh'2. IIale, Elizabeth Prescott (Miss), 

106 Locust Hill Ave., Yonkers, N. Y. 
2i>\. Halucan, Anna Roselle (Mrs. Wm. Edwarh), 

210 Elmwood Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 
(>62. Hall, Harriet Eleanor Redell Stevens (Mrs. Alonzo 
Benton), 

54 Linden St., New Haven, Conn. 
571. Hamilton, Ida Pickett Ferkill (AIrs. Benj. C, Jr.), 

Batesville, Ark. 
2i)7. I-Iamlin, Georgia Coe (Mrs. T. Malvin), 

722 North Washington St., Rome, N. Y. 
(A9. Handy, Elizabeth Paterson Smith (Mrs.), 

1275 Topeka Ave., Topeka, Kansas. 

418. Hannay, Mary A. Emery (Mrs. Wm. M.) , 

207 I St., Washington, D. C. 
Ml. ETansen, Mary Hunt Catlin (Mrs. Otto Reinhardt), 

102 Wisconsin St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
349. Harding, Adelia Caroline (Miss), 

1340 Pacific St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
348. Harding, Adelia Chamberlain (Mrs. Wm. T ), 

1340 Pacific St., Brookhn. N. Y. " 
567. Hardy, Elizabeth Bouldin Pickett (Mrs.), 

Batesville, Ark. 
570. Hardy, Lula Margaret (Miss), 

Batesville, Ark. 
706. E[ardy, Mary Adams Soule (Mrs. Charles M.), 

822 Oakwood Boulevard, Chicago, III. 
553. Hardy, Stella Pickett (Miss), 

Batesville, Ark. 
458. Harnet, Fanny (Miss), 

P. O. Box 556, Toledo, Ohio. 
478. Harnet, Mary Ann Sheldon, 

13 First St., N. E., Washington, D. C. 
286. Harris, Sarah Elizabeth Hovey (Mrs. Charles), 

3 Acacia St., Cambridge, Mass. 
522. Harrison, Gertrude Chandler Harrison (Ms. .Vrtiiur 
Kenvon), 

8 Allen St., Amherst, Mass. 

419. Hatch, Eunice Morton Lameie (Mrs. Wm. Bell), 

Ypsilanti, Mich. 
497. Hauthaway, Caroline Willis (Mrs. Edwin Dyer), 

1702 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 
164. Hawks, Amanda Smith (Mrs. Edward Clinton) 

265 W. 72d St., New York City. 
320. He.\th, Caroline Putnam Newhall (Mrs. John A.), 

Beach BlufT, Swampscott, Mass. 
476. Heath, Pamelia Pr.\v (Mrs. Ho>rER H.), 

923 Prospect Ave., Toledo, Ohio. 
421. Heberling, Laura Whitney Bunting (Mrs. Jas. Struth- 

ERS), 

Easton, Pa., R. F. D., No. 3. 
607. Heller, Blanche Benton (Mrs. Wm. S."), 
116 North 33d St., Omaha, Neb. 



50 



National 
Number. 

560. Helmick, Elizabeth A. Clarke (Mrs. Eli A.), 

4837 Kenmore Ave., Chicago, 111. 
517. Heminway, Edla Ruana Hinman (Mrs. Merritt), 

Watertown, Conn. 
694. Henry, Nannie Claiborne, (Mrs. R. P.), 

Fairfax Court House, Va. 
586. Hewitt, Catherine Harrison (Mrs. \Vm. Henry H.), 

273 Norton St., New Haven, Conn. 
16. Hewitt, Lucy Maria (Miss), 

403 Stoneleigh Court, Washington, D. C. 
721. Hill, Gladys Evarts (Mrs. David), 

544 S. Ninth St., Salina, Kansas. 
626. Hills, Martha Sophia (Miss), 

12(M Hill St., Ann Arbor, Mich. 
117. HiNKLEY, Elizabeth A. W. (Mrs. L. D.), 

Waupun, Wis. 
59. Hinsdale, Catherine Hutchinson (Miss), 

c/o First National Bank, Kenosha, Wis. 
334. Hitchcock, Julia Fitch (Mrs. Frederick), 

Fenton, Mich. 
403. Hodgkins, Marie Wilkinson (Mrs. Howard L.), 

1830 T St., N. W., Washington, D. C 
714. Hoffman, Gabrielle Brooks (Mrs. Edward M ), 

681 W. Clinton St., Elmira, N. Y. 
356. Hogg, Clara Hyde Dewey (Mrs. Chas. Mather), 

Cadiz, Ohio. 
138. Holbrook, Harriette Eliza Chichester (Mr-^ Dwight 
B.), 

Ossining, N. Y. 
676. Holland, Ida Virginia Carver (Mrs. Edw. Alexander), 

121 Cedar Ave., San Antonio, Texas. 
579. Holman, Annie Louise, 

5413 Bartmer Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 
431. Holman, Mary Campbell Loverixg (Mrs. Geo. Ulysses 
Grant), 

60 Wcstland Ave., Boston, Mass. 
443. Holmes, Fannie Df.nison (Miss), 

53 Elms St., Westerly, R. I. 
188. HoLiMES, Florence E. Jerauld (INIrs. Wm. Boyd~>, 

60 Heath St., Winter Hill, Somerville, Mass. 
259. Holmes, Thankful Alletta Clift (Mrs. Beni. L.), 

Gravel and Clift Sts., Mystic, Conn. 
713. Hopkins, Cora Pierso.n (Mrs. Scott). 

1177 Fillmore St., Topeka. Kansas. 
20. Hopkins, Jennie C. White (Mrs. Franklin W.), 

210 Columbia Heights, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
156. Horn, Sallie M. (Miss), 

The Aldine, Philadelphia, Pa. 
484. FIoRN, jMary Douglas Buntinm- (Mrs. Geo. Brinton), 

East Mauch Chunk, Pa. 
169. Horton, Kathertne Pratt (Mrs. Tohn Miller), 

477 Delaware Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 



51 



Nitinnal 
Number. 

313. HoTCHKiN, Julia Pratt (Mrs. Wm. H.), 

200 Riverside Drive, New York City. 
234. HoTCHKiss, Anna Maria Smith (Mrs. Ciias. Albert), 

528 Clinton Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 
2(j6. Hough, Cora Belle Shattuck (Mus. Clinton Wallace), 

Boonville, Oneida Co., N. Y. 
093. Howell, Anna Frances Cami' Smith (Mrs. Henry Budd), 

158 Magnolia Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 
275. IIoxiE, LuciEBELLE Ward (Mks. Ira C), 

P. O. Box 331, Mystic, Conn. 
574. PIuBBARD, Mary B. (Miss), 

625 Collins St., Plymouth, Wis. 
81. HuBBELL, Helena (Miss), 

224 South 20th' St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
698. HuGHEY, Fannie E. McKinney (Mrs, Albert S.), 

5714 Etzel Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 
2U\ HuMASON, Jessie Kittredge (Mrs. Virgil P.), 

North Bennington, Vt. 
(>60. Humes, Ellelee Chapman (Mrs. INIilton), 

Huntsville, Ala. 
7.7. Hunt, Cor.\ Baker (Mrs.), 

Antrim, N. H. 
324. HuNTON, Sallie Ball (Mrs.), 

Falls Church, Va. 
54. HusTis, Josephine L. (Miss), 

757 jNIarshall St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
637. PIusTON, Alice Mindwell Gkiswold (Mrs. .Vlex. B.), 

5932 Oak Ave., College Hill, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
6%. Hyndsiiaw Elizabeth Walker (Mrs.), 

Council Bluffs, Iowa. 
182. Ingraham, F. Adelaide (Mrs. D. Phoenix), 

Hotel St. Andrew, 72d and Broadway, New York 
City. 
(i03. Ingraham, Gracie Greenwood (Mrs. S. C), 

^i^iZ Washington St., Brookline, Mass. 
2'^'2. luviN'K, Helen Ciuttknukx (Mrs. Wm. A.), 

54 Longfellow Ave., Detroit, Alich. 
395. Jackson, LIelene Eliza Dunn (Mrs. Wm. A.), 

50 Dexter St., Maiden, Mass. 
M3. *Jaynes, Minnie Lawrence (Mrs. Fre:.[ont Nathan), 

Washburn Park, Minneapolis, Minn. 
159. Jenne, Ida Sherman (Mrs. Clarnce Fremont Rubens), 

94 Ashley St., Hartford, Conn. 
644. Jenison, Alice Cowles (Mrs. Nelson F.), 

403 Seymour St., Lansing, Mich. 
270. Jerome, E. Ellen Batcheller (Mrs. Frank), 

1835 Sherman St., Denver, Col. 
576. Johnson, Emeline Stanley Chapman (Mrs. Jas. Wm.), 

912 Westlake Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 
239. Johnson, Laura R. Woodruff (Mrs. Lsrael, Jr.), 

117 South 42d St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

•Life Member. 



52 



National 
Number. 

271. Johnston, Caroline A. Dorsey (Mrs. Thomas H.), 

The Melrose, 1343 Clifton St., Washington, D. C. 
233. Johnston, Mary Hannah Stoddard (Mrs. Robert), 

Humboldt, Iowa. 
708. Jones, Carrie Grinnell (Mrs. Richard), 

Concord and Follen Sts., Cambridge, Mass. 
385. Jones, Emma Culver (Mrs. Thaddeus M.), 

1606 K St., Washington, D. C. 
427. *JoNES, Lottie Lee (Mrs. Edwin Preble), 

1465 Rhode Island Ave., Washington, D. C. 
390. Jordan, Adelaide E. (Miss), 

3167 Pine Grove Ave., Chicago, 111. 
224. Joy, Helen Hall Newberry (Mrs. H. B.), 

Grosse Pointe Farms, Wayne Co., Mich. 
228. Joys, Alma Merwix (Mrs. Andrew M.), 

419 Lake Drive, Milwaukee, Wis. 
539. Joys, Mabel Eastman (Mrs. John, Jr.), 

East Milwaukee, Wis. 
208. Keay, Louise Kent (Mrs. Nathaniel Seaver), 

Clifton Heights, Pa. 
507. Keeler, Villeroy E. Burrill (]\Irs.), 

12 University Place, New Haven, Conn. 
643. Kehoe, Frances Valentine (Mrs. John Edw.), 

675 Sheridan Road. Chicago, 111. 
489. Kellogg, Harriett Lucella (Miss), 

426 Williams St., Bridgeport, Conn. 
594. Kelly, Addie Maria Todd (Mrs. J. C), 

53 Shelton Ave., New Haven, Conn. 

724. Kennedy, Charlotte Clark (Mrs. David A.), 

245 Dwight St., New Haven, Conn. 

725. Kennedy, Katherine Clark (Mrs. John Baldwin), 

251 Dwight St., New Haven, Conm 
243. Kent, Georgia Tyler (]\Irs. Daniel), 

14 Germain St., Worcester, Mass. 
111. Kerr, Caroline M. Damon (Mrs. Samuel T.), 

1907 Spruce St.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
466. Keyes, Clara Stevens (Mrs. De Forest), 

9 West St., Oneonta, N. Y. 
720. Kidder, Ella de Gabrielle (Mrs. Hobart Starr), 

118 Hemenway St., Boston, Mass. 
679. Kimberly, Alice Maud (Miss), 

1015 W. Lanvale St., Baltimore, Md. 
678. Kimberly, Mary Wilson (Miss), 

1015 W. Lanvale St., Baltimore, Md. 
482. Kinsley, Caroline Amelia Peck (Mrs. Joseph W.), 

1632 Fifteenth St., Washington, D. C. 
610. Kirk, Caroline Freeman (Mrs,), 

2015 G St., Washington, D. C. 
471. KiRKLAND, Mary Clark (Mrs. Charles P.), 

"The Obliston," Utica, N. Y. 
285. Knous, Mary Amelia Cooke (Mrs. Franklin Furman), 

265 Bassett St., New Haven, Conn. 

•Life Member. 



S3 



.'•uxbcr. 

VK) Knowlton, Ida Mann (Mrs. Chas. D.), 

309 Stephenson St., Freeport, 111. 
^■;i. Kress, Idabelle Sparks (Mrs.), 

60 East 179th St., New York City. 
I(i7 L\ Lann'e, Ellen Damon (Mrs. Charles P.), 

2013 Pine St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
J-iv** Lane, Elizabeth Selden (Mrs. Alexander H[amilton), 

241 South 23d St., Philadelphia. Pa. 
yi\ Larkix, Frances Hubbard (Mrs. John D.), 

237 North St., Buffalo, N. Y. 
■14-5 Larkin, Jessie Chesebrougii (Mrs. Frank), 

98 Beach St., Westerly, R. I. 
4_U Latimer, Clara Louise Rockwell (Mrs. Franklin A.), 
36 Beechwood Ave., Springfield, Mass. 
tV). Law, Dorothy Norton (Mrs. David H.), 
Dixon, 111. 
fi,V). Law, Isabella Henrietta Durand (Mrs. Richard Wm.), 

New Haven, Conn. 
riS. Lawrence, Ella Park (Mrs. George A.), 

590 N. Prairie St., Galesburg, 111. 
355. Le Brun, I^Iaria Olivia (Mrs.), 

8 Mountain Ave., South, Montclair, N. J. 
2■V^. Lee, Mary Sibley (Mrs. Horace M.), 

3800 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
•JoQ. Lee, Susie Evelyn Greeley (Mrs. John Henry), 

995 Noble Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 
593. Lixdley, Mary Shumway (Mrs. Fred. W.), 
4010 Waveland Ave., Chicago, 111. 
167. Litpitt, Ida St. Clair Jerome (Mrs. Charles C), 

"The Maples," Vauxhall St., New London, Conn. 
163. Livingston, Julia Raymond (Miss), 

Nutley, N. J. 
702. Lloyd, Mary Eleanor Hiatt (Mrs. Cyrus D.), 
310 Fifth Ave., Leanvcnworth, Kansas. 
^32. Logan, Grace Redfield Boynton CMrs. Ellis), 

1253 Irving St., Washington, D. C. 
377. Lord, Sarah Eveline Kennedy (Mrs. Loren Bixby), 

Burlington, Vt. 
670. Loughhead, Mary Jane Alvord (Mrs. Byron B.), 

537 East 118th St., Cleveland, Ohio. 
669. Loughhead, IMary Alvord (Miss), 

537 East 118th St., Cleveland, Ohio. 
•134. Ludlow, Drury Conway (Mrs. John R.), 

"The Concord," Washington, D. C. 
126. Lupton, Caroline FIttchcock (Miss), 

80 Poplar St., Bridgeport, Conn. 
659. McCormack, Lollie Maud McDowell (iMrs. Allen). 

536 Jordan St., Shreveport, La. 
298. **McHenry. Sallie Davies (Miss). 

Lebanon, Ky. 
577. McIntosh. Ella Belle Chaffee (Mrs. Horace P.). 

The Oakland. 2006 Columbia Road, Washington, 
D. C. 



"Honorary Life Member. 



54 

National 
Number. 

5. Main, Charlotte Emerson Bradbury (Mrs. Herschel), 

The Wellington, Washington, D. C. 
236. Marsh, Lucy M. Osgood (Mrs. George), 

Hotel Richmond, Washington, D. C. 
297. Marsh, Pam Noble (Mrs. Charles D.), 

1820 Asbury Ave., Evanston, III. 
8. Martin, Mary E. Van Sinderen Lawrence (Mrs. 
Geo. G.), 

The Wyoming, Washington, D. C. 
566. Mason, Emily B. (Miss), 

7 South Adams St., Petersburg, Va. 
664. Mason, Mary Cook (Mrs. Louis Irving), 

121 Fairview St., Willimantic, Conn. 
304. **Merriwethf.r. Lucy Emma (Miss), 

937 South 5th St., Louisville, Ky. 
345. IMerriwether, Lucy Underwood Western (Mrs Hunter 
M.), ■ ■ ' 

3616 Gladstone Boulevard, Kansas City Mo. 
519. Messinger, Helen Martha Beecher (Mrs. Chas. Fred.), 

82 Whalley Ave., New Haven, Conn. 
309. Metcalf, Mattie Kitchell Wooderidge (Mrs. Chas. H.), 

Grosse Pointe Farms, Wayne Co., Mich. 
556. Miller, Lenora Sarah Fowler (AIrs. Harry T.), 

522 Freedom Ave., Alliance, Ohio. 
628. Minor, Anne Rogers (Mrs. Geo. Maynard), 

Waterford, Conn. 
176. Mitchell, Sara Patterson Snowden (Mrs. John Stev- 
enson), 

"The Gladstone," Philadelphia, Pa. 
455. Mix, Mary Elizabeth Taft (Mrs. Eli), 

600 George St., New Haven, Conn. 
480. Monroe, Cynthia Rebecca Harrison (Mrs. Francis Henry) 

355 Crown St., New Haven, Conn. 
485. Monroe, Ida Estella (Miss), 

355 Crown St., New Haven, Conn. 
712. Moody, S. Virginia Barclay (]\Irs. George W.), 

Huron, South Dakota. 
614. Moore, Alice Rogers (Mrs. Fred. Porter, Sr.), 

132 Winsor Ave., Watertown, Mass. 
170. Moore, Anna B. W. Taylor (I\Irs. Russell W.), 

Duxbury, Mass. 
165. Moore, Elizabeth Waterman Lewis (Mrs. Jam.es PL ' 

1691 Stratford Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 
409. Moore, Margaret Ballard (Mrs.), 

1869 Columbia Road, Washington, D. C. 
612. Morgan, Lucy Irena West (Mrs. Chas. Rees), 

1553 East 55th St., Cleveland, Ohio. 
187. *Mortimer, Sara White Lee (Mrs. George), 

Box 3, Boulevard Station, Brookline, Mass. 
143. Moseley, Florence Chamberlain (Mrs. Wm. Hamilton), 

Southern Hotel, Columbus, Ohio. 

* Life Member. 
**Honorary Life Member. 



Nuiiilicr. 

^7{. Mo.sKLEV, Louise Jones (Mrs. Douglas), 

1310 South Main St., Princeton, 111. 
40; MosKLtY, Martha Alger Hawes (Mrs. Frank), 
36 Everett Ave., Winchester, Mass. 
.{" Mott, Alice Wright (Mrs. John T.), 

40 West Sixth St., Oswego, N. Y. 
501 MuNSON, Susan Babcock Hopkins (Mrs. Sam'l Lyman), 

84 Lancaster St., Albany, N. Y. 
JK^ MuuriiY, Daisy Kinsley (Mrs. Stephen J.), 

1632 Fifteenth St., Washington, D. C. 
500. ]\Iurrell, Cornelia Randolph (Mrs. David Gamble), 

707 Broadway, Paducah, Ky. 
AM) MussEY, Ellen Spencer (Mrs.), 

1327 New York Ave., Washington, D. C. 
!■; *Myers, Mary Hewitt (INIrs. John J.), 

403 Stoneleigh Court, Washington, D. C. 
^8 Myrick, Harriet A. Pierce (Mrs. Frederick), 

446 Marshall St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
547 Nelson, Emily A. (Mrs. Edwin M.), 

965 Hamilton Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 
f.S6 Nelson, Emma Reed (Mrs. Edwin J.), 
428 Genesee St., Utica, N. Y. 
616 Nesbit, Emma L. Barnes (Mrs. James L.), 
381 Temple St., New Haven, Conn. 
''8'' Nesmith, Leonora S. Pendleton (Mrs. Benj. Ingersoll), 

508 Third St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
384. Newton, Belinda Jane Shattuck (Mrs. Jos. Dickenson), 

Westport, Fairfield Co., Conn. 
613. Newton, Caroline Gaylord Newton (Mrs. Henry Hunt- 
ington), 

P. O. Box 10, Durham, Conn. 
P8 NiEEUHR, Susan Ridley Watson (Mrs. Chas. C), 

209 West 81st St., New York City, N. Y. 
501 Nixon-Miller, Helen MacGregor (Mrs.), 
Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Pa. 
14 Noble, Esther Frothingham Bradburv (J^Irs. Tnos. K.), 

1855 Mintwood Place, Washington, D. C. 
296. Noble, May (Miss), 

1820 Asbury Ave., Evanston, 111. 
550 NoRRis, Hattie Bronson Holbrook (Mrs. Edw. A.), 

304 Moffett Ave., Joplin, Mo. 
412. North, Anne Bascom (Mrs. Clayton Nelson), 

Shoreham, Vermont. 
634 North, Mary Carpenter Spring (Mrs. Ralph H ), 
7301 Boyer St., Mt. Airy, Philadelphia, Pa. 
498 *NoRTON, Lottie Eloise Gove (Mrs. Chas. O.), 

"The Elms," Kearney, Neb. 
321 Oden, Rosa Ball (Mrs. James D.), 

Falls Church, Va. 
64 O'Donoghue, Marian Adele Longfellow (Mrs.), 
5 Park Vale, Brookline. Mass. 

•Life Member. 



56 



Number. 
National 

6*31. Ohler, Cl.a>ra M.\y Paine (Mrs. Jame.s Oswell), 

559 W. Market St., Lima, Ohio. 
365. O'LouGiiLiN, Laura Ada Ward (Mrs. Gerald Stuart), 

601 W. 149th St., New York City. 
265. Oldfield, Emma Charlotte Sh.\ttuck; (Mrs. Eva.v), 

Boonville, Oneida Co., N. Y. 
267. Oler, Elizaueth Kimberly (Mrs. Wesley Mario.\), 

Larchmont Manor, New York. 
442. OsTRON, Aui'.usta Babcock (Mrs. Jas. Augustus), 

5039 Washington Ave., Chicago, III. 
635. Paine, Cordelia Ayer (IMiss), 

Stone Croft, Carlton, Minn. 
254. Palmer, Amanda J. Read (Mrs.), 

189 Otsego St., Ilion, N. Y. 
262. Palmer, INIary Tilton (Miss), 

25 Autumn St., Fenway Station, Boston, Mass. 
350. Pardee, Florence Amelia (Miss), 

83 Grove St., New Haven, Conn. 
726. Parker, Alice Rosalia Carpenter (Mrs. Rodney), 

827 East 21st St., Los Angeles, Cal. 
353. Parkhurst, Esther M. Talcott (^Irs. Wm. Dexter), 

4549 Kingswell Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 
524. Parrisii, Sarah Elizabeth Kingsland (Mrs. Wm. Dud- 
ley), 

6135 Kingsbury Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 
508. Patton, Constance Saltonstall (Mrs. Wm. Ludlow), 

114 Pierrepont St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
173. Pealer, Rutti M. Griswold (Mrs. Peter P.), 

1004 Mass. Ave., N. W., Washington, D. C. 
226. Peck, Maria Purdy (Mrs.), . 

Davenport, Iowa. 
62. Peets, Ella Myers (Mrs. Cyrus Berry"), 

396 Orange St., New Haven, Conn. 
89. Perry, Isahkl Douglas (Mrs. Henry H.), 

Box 256, Southport, Conn. 
690. Perry, Mary Shixn (Mrs. Charles N.), 

3228 South Park Ave., Chicago, III. 
33. Peters, IMargaretta Andrus (Mrs. Malcolm), 

3675 Seventh St., San Diego, Cal. 
397: Phillips, Abbik Lathrop Babcock (IMrs. Wallace A.), 

27 Jane St., Bridgeport, Conn. 
201. Pierce, Charlotte Converse (Mrs. Harold), 

Haverford, Pa. 
618. Pii^RCE, Mary Cor.nelia Francis (Mrs. Frank H.), 

10 Beers St., New Ha\'en, Conn. 
338. Portman, Adeline McD. Elwell (Mrs. Arthur F. B.), 

Melrose St., Chevy Chase, Md. 
150. Potter, Lily .Vi.f.xiena Wilson (Mrs. Thomas. Jr.). 

Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Pa. 
315. Potts, Cornelia Ross Potts (Mrs. Noble Newport), 
1002 Twenty-second St., N. W., Wash., D. C. 
402. Pratt, Mary Gordon Landon (Mrs. Dallas Bache). 
24 West 4Sth St., New York City. 



57 



Nalicnal 
Niiuiljcr. 

!')_'. Pray, Nellie Chamberlin (Mrs. Arthur H.), 

lOSO Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 
261. Prince, IMary C. Beardsley (Mrs. L. Bradford), 

111 Palace Ave., Sante Fe, N. M. 
2<i4. Puixdle, Katiiryn Carpenter (Mrs. Frank M.), 

Douglaston, L. I. 
71U. Purcell, Eliz.vretii Hoyt (Mrs. E. B.), 

218 South Juliette Ave., Manhattan, Kansas. 
63V Rankin, Florence West (Mrs. Horner Day), 
715 South McKinley Ave., Canton, O. 
,V11. Ranney, Elizabeth Balch (Mrs. Fred T.), 

130 Alfred St., Detroit, Mich. 
505. R.\tiieun, Isabelle Murdock (Mrs.), 

Mvstic, Conn. 
3)9. Raymond, Susan A. (Mrs. H. E.), 

Hotel Vendome, Boston, Mass. 
213. Reid, Anna May Odlin (Mrs. Robt. Allan), 

The Strathmore, Harrison, St., Seattle, Wash. 
340. Rhodes, Ada Augusta (Miss), 

Falls Church, Va. 
629. Rice, Lillian McKee (Mrs.), 

47 Loring St., Cambridge, Mass. 
374. Rich, Anna Ingersoll (Mrs. Nellis ]\L), 

512 James St., Syracuse, N. Y. 
548. Richards, Mary Monro Cocke (Miss), 

Riverton, Warren Co., Va. 
34. Richardson, Lucy Cushing (Mrs. James B.), 

231 Newberry St., Boston, Mass. 
278. Richardson, Marcia Maria (Miss), 

42 Washington St., Pontiac, Mich. 
G54. Richardson, Mildred Baker (Mrs.), 

966 Woodycrest Ave., New York City. 
677. Roberts, Esther L. Moss (Mrs. John L.), 

159 Linwood Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 
407. Roberts, Olivia Stansbury Kimbfrly C^Mrs. Geo. Scott), 

2946 Clifton Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
671. RoBBiNS, Louisa BARNU^[ (Mrs. Richard B.), 

25 Broad St., Adrian, Mich. 
237. Robinson, Amoret McCall (Mrs. Nelson D.), 

Norwich Town, Conn. 
331. Robinson, Mary Augusta Kent (Mrs. V. Gilpin), 

Clifton Heights, Pa. 
58. Robinson, Sarah Elizabeth (Miss), 

159 State St., New London, Conn. 
75. Rockwell, Mary Everest (Mrs. Chas. Lee), 

309 Colony St., Meriden, Conn. 
413. Rogers, Flora Sage Chapin (Mrs. Knight E.), 

11 Prospect St., South Manchester, Conn. 
684. Rogers, Mary Heuch Beall (Mrs. James Farnsworth), 

1011 College St., Bowling Green, Ky. 
575. Ronimus, Helen Florence Starr (Mrs. Jas. D.), 

1359 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 



58 



National 
Number. 

302. RouNTREE, Pardee Gibbons (Mrs. James T.), 

Hotel Herald, San Francisco, Cal. 
344. RuLAND, Leo Mabel Shattuck Van Deusen (Mrs. F. D.), 

Westport, Conn. 
326. Russell, Maria Sinclair (iMrs. John Collins), 

184 Juneau Ave., Mijwaukee, Wis. 
441. Salmon, Blanche Virginia Ogden (ISIrs. Chas.), 

6S26 Perry Ave., Chicago, 111. 
648. Saunders, Mildred Taylor Bradford (Mrs. D. Hous- 
ton), 

1021 North 13th St., Pine Bluff, Ark. 
580. Sawyer, Fannie Hoyt (Mrs.), 

1690 Elm St.. Manchester, N. H. 
479. SciiARF, Madaleine Preble (Mrs. Paul), 

5009 14th St., Washington, D. C. 
95. Schuyler, Katherine B. Livington (Mrs. Montgomery), 

250 Winyah Ave., New Rochelle, N. Y. 
590. Semmes, Mary Hodges (Mrs. Alex. H.), 

2208 Q St., Washington, D. C. 
494. Sharps, Helen Sherman Turney (j\'Irs. Henry Everett), 

Fairfield, Conn. 
279. *Shaw, Helen Louise (Miss), 

Anamosa, Iowa. 
424. Shelton, PIarriet Handy' (Mrs. John Reynolds), 

1275 Topeka Ave., Topeka, Kansas. 
457. Shelton, Jane Redd Gentry (Mrs. Theodore), 

4467 Linden Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 
82. Shelton, Rosalie Tomlinson (Mrs. Chas. W.), 

94 East Ave., Norwalk, Conn. 
540. Shepard, Jennie Yale (Mrs. Josiah), 

. "Hillcrest," Beloit, Wis. 
709. Shephard, Martha P. (Mrs.), 

127 Bluff St., Council Bluffs, Iowa. 
311. **Sherman, Caroline Clapp Alvord (Mrs. Franklin), 

"Ash Grove," McLean, Route 1, Va. 
368. Sherwood, Mary Jane (Mis.s). 

534 East Washington St., Bridgeport, Conn. 
253. Shipman, Mary Frances Whiton (Mrs. Leander Kkart^y), 

160 Hempstead St., New London, Conn. 

183. Shortridge, Fanny Augusta (Miss), 

1714 Pine St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

184. Shortridge, Lydia Ellen (Miss), 

1714 Pine St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
189. Shumway, Grace E. McFarland (?\Irs. Noble Clemons), 

4436 North Robey St., Chicago, 111. 
536. Shumway, Lavinia S. B. (Mrs. Ed. (}ould), 

190 E Chestnut St., Chicago, 111. 
433. Simms, Adaline Louise Drake (Mrs. Wm. Edw.), 

7407 Baldwin Ave., Chicago, 111. 
49. Sinclair, Judith Parkiiurst (Miss), 
2249 W. Monroe St., Chicago, 111. 

* Life Member. 
**Honorary Life Member. 



59 

National 
Number. 

29 *Slade, Emma Hardy (Mrs. Wm. Gerry) 

332 West 87th St., New York City; 
6S0. Sloan, Elsie Maria Watrous (Mrs. John L.), 

38 High St., New Haven, Conn. 
639. Sloan, Frances Andrews (Mrs. Millard Fillmore), 

Imboden, Ark. 
161. Smith, Alice Weldon (Miss), 

Sycamore Farm, Paoli, Chester Co., Pa. 
316. Smith, Alla Halcyone Doughty (Mrs. Chandler), 

237 Tompkins Ave., New Brighton, L. I., N. Y. 
717. Smith, Caroline Dewey Lathrop (Mrs. Ford), 

4130 Westminster Place, St. Louis, Mo.' 
•496. Smith, Catherine Tryon Shepherd (Mrs. Albert Edward), 

26 N. Northampton Ave., Springfield, Mass. 
3.)D. Smith, Frances Sedgwick (Mrs.), 

550 Surf St., Chicago, 111. 
604. *Smith, Jacqueline Harrison (AIrs. \\'m Hinkie) 

2025 Locust St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
422. Smith, Julia W. Griswold (Mrs. W^^. Henry Harrison), 

The Belvedere, Toledo, Ohio. 
333. Smith, Louisa Johnson (j\Irs, Chas. H.), 

11803 Kinsman Road, Cleveland, Ohio. 
525. Smith, Louise Durkee Larkin (Mrs. Mason Gould), 

The Buckingham, St. Louis, Mo. 
87. Smith, Lucretia Wright (Miss), 

35 West St., New London, Conn. 
119. *Smith, Mary Eleanor Diehl (Mrs. Edw. ].), 

1615 Spruce St., Philadelphia, Pa.' 
251. Smith, Sarah Weld (Mrs. Geo. E.), 

75 Atlantic Ave., Swampscott, Mass. 
212. Snowden, Louise Hortense (Miss), 
^„ ^ "The Gladstone," Philadelphia, Pa. 

653. Soper, Julia Farnsworth (Mrs.). 
.„_ „ • 627 Topeka Ave., Topeka, Kansas. 

528. Southward, Eliza Kingsland (Mrs. .Arthur W.), 

6135 Kingsbury Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 
502. Squier, Cora May Bigelow (Mrs. Angelo Orin), 

26 Northampton Ave.. Springfield, Mas<:. ' 
291. Standish, Grace Mack (Mrs. Charles D.), 

1022 Cass Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
246. Stansfield, Mary Thompson Snowden (Mrs. Wm.), 

The Drexel, Overbrook, Pa. 
375. St. Clair, Mary Emma Keyes (Mrs. Francis A "» 

1319 T St., Washington, D. C. 
354. Sterling, Harriet Elizabeth Peck (Mrs. John T.), 
.-, „ 771 Myrtle Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 

491. Steele, Ella Pratt (Mrs. Frederick Morgan^ 
.,- ^ S51 Sheridan Road, N. E., Highland Park, III 

465. Stevens, Harriet J. Pearce (Mrs. T. Waldo;), 

25 Watkins Ave., Oneonta, N. Y. 

•Life Member. 



60 



National 
Number. 

438. Stivers, Mabel Prouty Osborne (Mrs. F. E.), 

43 Mott St., Ansonia, Conn. 
588. Stocking, Eliz.abetii Aurora (Miss), 

Rochelle, 111. 

554. Stocking, Heleni; St.\nton (Mrs. George E.), 

Rochelle, 111. 
231. Street, Alice Newton (Mrs. S.-wiuel H.), 

207 Bishop St., New Haven, Conn. 
223. Street, Eveline Jones (RIrs. Frederick B.), 

629 Chapel St., New Haven, Conn. 
700. Strong, May Warner Grannis (Mrs. Frederick), 

2211 Main St., Bridgeport, Conn. 
516. Stubbs, Gertrude Irene Gear (Mrs. John J.), 

108 S. 25th Ave., Omaha, Neb. 
152. Talcott, Mary Kingsbury (Miss), 

135 Sigourney St., Hartford, Conn. 

555. Taylor, Eleleda A. (Mrs. Charles F.), 

State St., Westport, Conn. 
488. Taylor, Mary Alward (Mrs. Wm. Johnston), 

346 Central Ave., Orange, N. J. 
606. Thatcher, Amelia Elizabeth West (Mrs. J. Sturtevant), 

415 Commonwealth Ave., Detroit, Alich. 
4. Thomas, Mary Sawyer (Mrs. Austin), 

Unity, Waldo Co., Maine. 
n. Thompson, Anna We.\therburn Hinsdale (Mrs. Hugh 
Miller), 

127 Gardenhurst Ave., Upper Montclair, N. J. 
195. Thompson, Ellen Louise Sanford (Mrs. Sherwood S.'), 

153 York St., New Haven, Conn. 
504. Thompson, Glorvina Lindsley (Mrs.), 

304 McKinley Ave., Kewanee, 111. 
168. Thompson, Ruth Noyes (Mrs. Ci-ias. FIoward), 

14 Main St., Brattleboro, Vermont. 
440. Thurber, Mary Carter (Miss), 

258 State St., Mobile, Alabama. 
99. *Tiiurman, Sarah (Miss), 

46 Fourth St., Troy, N. Y. 
432. TiBBiTS, Marietta J. (Miss), 

14 Morningside Ave., New York City. 
130. Tillinghast. Florence Morgan (Mrs. Charles B.), 

The Knickerbocker, Jay St., Albany, N. Y. 
530. Tilton, Lizzie R. Page (INIrs. George W.), 

6765 Sheridan Road, Chicago, 111. 
655. Tomlinson, Minnie Roane (Mrs. Frank), 

Box 584 Pinehurst, Pine Bluff, Ark. 
622. Towne, Annie L. Burnham (Mrs. Carroll M.), 

264 Ogden Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 
46. Townsend, Katherine Durant (Mrs. Edwin Franklin), 

The Knickerbocker, Washington, D. C. 
337. ToziER, Kathleen B. Seaman (Mrs. Chas. B.), 

2062 East 77th St., Cleveland, Ohio. 



*Life Member. 



61 



National 
Niiinber. 

394. Tracy, Alice Salisbury (Mrs. Frederick Knai'p), 

1522 Jackson Blvd., Chicago, 111. 
171. Treat, Gail A. (j\Iiss), 

6 Gulf St., Milford, Conn. 
o99. Trottman, Frances Margaret Smith (Mrs. James), 

508 La Fayette Place, Alihvaukee, Wis. 
3.K). Turner, Abey R. Corliss (Mrs. Maurice W.), 

127 Harvard St., Brookline, Mass. 
139. Turner, Nellie Darrow (Mrs. Elisha), 

190 Hempstead St., New London, Conn. 
546. TuTT, Margaret Annie Garrison (Mrs. Edw. G.), 

3741 Washington Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 
451. Tuttle, Carrie M. Baldwin (J^Irs. Wm. P.), 

362 Elm St., New Haven, Conn. 
3(»0. Tuttle, Isidora Cheni;y (Mrs. Edw. Austin), 

131 Lexington Ave., New York City. 
230. Tuttle, Jane (Miss), 

"Handyside," 16 Lorraine St., Hartford, Conn. 
68! Van Buren, Louise Aymer (Mrs. Robert), 

58 West Ave., Norwalk, Conn. 
31. Vance, Anna Lydia Russell (Mrs. Frank L.), 

91 Prospect Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 
257. Vanderveer, Margaret Masterson Levericii (Mrs. Da- 
vid N.), 

6 West 123d St., New York City. 
503. Van Dyke, M. Evelyn Quackenbush (Mrs. J. E.), 

87 Chestnut St., East Orange, N. J. 
383. Van Evera, Ella Farr (Mrs. Dewitt), 

4537 North Hermitage Ave., Chicago, III. 
118. Van Kirk, Maria Louise Moseley (Mrs. John), 

1333 Pine St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
591. Van Loan, Flora (Miss), 

22 Mt. Morris Park, West, New York City. 
500. Van Ness, Sarah Bowman (Mrs. Jos.), 

Fieldstone, Lexington, ^lass. 
196. Van Ostrand, J^Iattie Amorette Culver (IMrs. E. H.), 

405 Clermont St., Antigo, Wis. 
341. Van Sinderkn, Mary Brinsmade (Mrs. Wm. Leslie), 

133 Henry St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
691. Van Tuyl, Effie Hiatt (Mrs. Russell), 

310 Fifth Ave., Leavenworth, Kansas. 
410. Veerhoff, Amy Warn (j\Irs. Otto L.), 

"The Oakland," 2019 Columbia Rd., Wash., D. C. 
388. Vermilye, Susan Gertrude Veddf.r (Mrs. Thos. E.), 

463 West 144th St., New York City. ' 
329. ViALL, Ada Eliza Osborn (Mrs. Christopher Colsen), 

554 Mentor Ave., Painesville, Ohio. 
701. Victor, Eva Gary Woodbridge (Mrs. Winthrop Fuller), 

Addison Apts., Woodward Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
430. Viele, Katiilyne Knickerbocker (Miss), 

357 Park Ave., Yonkers, N. Y. 
135. Viets, Mary Ella Comstock (Mrs. Carl Jay), 

47 Granite St., New London, Conn. 



62 



National 
Number. 

108. Vilas, Elizabeth Atwood (Mrs. Edward P.), 

396 Kane Place, Milwaukee, Wis. 
490. Waddell, Maisel Brown (Mrs. Frank J.), 

2 Duncan Place, Jacksonville, III. 
625. Wagar, Effie SkkI'.na (Miss), 

14719 Detroit Ave., Lakewood, Ohio. 
630. Wagar, Serena Tucker (Mrs. Francis H.), 

14719 Detroit Ave., Lakewood, Ohio. 
100. Wakeman, Florence Almvra Fyfe (Mrs. Isaac Banks), 

Riverside Ave., Saugatuck, Conn. 
214. Ward, Ada Davis (Mrs. Ciias. D.), 

702 St. Nicholas Ave., New York City. 
642. *Watson, Martha Seaver (Mrs.), 

103 Elm St., Montpelier, Vt. 

51. Webster, Josephine C. (Miss), 

"The Concord," Washington, D. C. 
23. Weed, Helena C. Hill (Mrs. Walter Harvey), 

"Kalorama," Norwalk, Conn. 
318. Welch, Sarah E. Bradley (Mrs. D. T.), 

53 Main St., West Haven, Conn. 
633. Werner, Grace Harrington (Mrs. Joseph G.), 

914 Church St., Princeton, 'ill. 
666. West, Mary Adaline Kelly (Mrs. Elmer Adams), 

1553 East 55th St., Cleveland, Ohio. 
392. Weyant, Helen Julia Carpenter (Mrs. John P.), 

2738 Parkwood Ave., Toledo, Ohio. 
729. Whilldin, Ella (Miss), 

129 Jefferson St., Weehawken, N. J. 
583. White, Ellen Danforth Tewksbury (Mrs. Jos. H.), 

"Elmhurst," Brookline, ]\Iass. 
436. White, Laura Jane (Miss), 

Starkville, Miss. 
190. White, Lida Twiss (Mrs. Wm. R.), 

25 Grant St.. Springfield, Mass. 
369. White, ]\Iarv E. (Miss), 

P. O. Box 3, Boulevard Station, Brookline, Mass. 
238. Whiting, Fanny Siifrwood (Mrs.), 

403 State St., Bridgeport, Conn. 
197. Whitney, Beatrice Earned (Mrs. Bertram Cecil), 

Grosse Point, Mich. 
181. Whitney, Elmina Folts (INIrs.), 

Ilion, N. Y. 
711. Whitney, Florence Carter (Mrs. Edson), 

1234 Euclid St., Washington, D. C. 
541. Whitney, Kate Jane Harrison (Mrs. Henry D.), 

74 Oxford St., Hartford, Conn. 
578. WicKHAM, Tf.xnette .^oams (Mrs. Wm.), 

2956 Thayer St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 
268. Wilcox, Minnie Lydia Walker (Mrs. Frederick Aener), 

819 West Third St., Abilene, .Kansas. 

52. Wiles, Alice Bradford (Mrs. Rodekt Hall), 

Hotel del Prado, Chicago, 111. 



"Life Member. 



63 



National 
Niniibcr. 



5iS5. WiLHELM, Mary Eugenia Stocking (Mrs. C M) 
401 South 38th St., Omaha, Neb. 

284. WiLLARD, Julia Helen Colton (.Mrs. Garry A.), 
Boonville, Oneida Co., N. Y. 

542. Williams, Annie Randolph (Mrs. S. Miller), 
2821 Charlotte St., Kansas City, Mo. 

326. Williams, Cornelia I^artow (Miss). 

1362 Astor St., Chicago, ill. 
147. Williams, Sarah A. Barnes (Mrs. Robt. Alfred), 

929 Cambridge Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 
640. Williamson. Mary Robinson (2\Irs. Chalmers Meek) 

714 North State St., Jackson, Miss. 
393. Willis, Mary Carter Hawley (Mrs. S. A) 

1814 19th St., Washington, D. c' 
681. Wilson, Christine Carrington (Mrs. Charles H.), 

358 Crown St., New Haven, Conn. 
78. ^Winchester, Fanny Ramsay Wilder (Mrs. W. F.), 

2051 N. Illinois St., Indianapolis, Ind. 
308. Wolff, Mary Bunting (IMrs.), 

153 Highland Ave., Chestnut Hill, Phila.', Pa 
668. Wood, Alaiena Holerook (Mrs. John J.), 

8213 Carnegie Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 
468. Woodruff, Frances Eugenia Godfrey (Mrs. Timotht 
Dewey) , 

329 North Eighth St., Quincy, III. 
652. Woodruff, Isabel Douclas Bishop (Mrs.), 

Windsor Heights, Windsor, Conn. 
255. Worcester, Sarah .Alice (}i1iss), 

47 Irving St., Cambridge, Mass. 

327. Youngs, Florence Evelyn Pr.\tt (Mrs. Clarence E) 

80 West 92d St., New York City. 



*Life Member. 



COMMITTEE ON COMPILATION. 

Mrs. Ruth M. Griswold Pealer. 
Mrs. Amos G. Draper. 



67 



Fanny Nichols (Mrs. S. G. Wheeler Benjamin). 101 

Born in Quechee, Vermont. 

Descendant of John Boynton of Massachusetts, through 
tlio Revolutionary ancestor, Col. John Boynton of Vermont, 
a.s follows : 

2. Francis K. Nichols (1805-Julv 1878) and 
I'^anny Boynton (18.. Mch. 18..). 

3. Capt. Cyrus Boynton (17S0-Jan. 7, 1844) and 
Hannah Graves (m. 1804 d. Jan. 6, 1844). 

4. Col. John Boynton (Sept. 8, 1736-1825) and 
Mrs. Phcbe (Jewett) Graves, his third wife. 

5. Kphraim Boynton (1707- ) and 

Sarah Stewart (1712-.... m. May 2, 1732. y. ch. b 1753) 

6. Joseph Boynton (1669-Mch. 25, 1755) and 
Bridget Harris (Nov. 26, 1672-Oct. 14, 1757). 

7. Capt. Joseph Boynton (1644-Dec. 16, 1730) and 
Sarah Swan (1646-1717/8), his first wife. 

8. John Boynton (1614 -Feb. 18, 1670) and 
Helen Pell. 

John Boynton (1614-1670) was born in Yorkshire, Eng- 
land. With his brother WilHam he came to America and 
settled in Rowley, Mass., in 1638; was assigned land there 
in 1640. He married Helen Pell of Boston. 

Col. John Boynton (1736-1825) was a Lieutenant in the 
Seventh Regiment of Foot of Mass. in 1773 ; commissioned 
Captain in 1776 and promoted to Colonel in 1781. His 
three commissions are still in the possession of his descend- 
ants. 

He died in Weathersfield, Vermont, leaving eleven chil- 
dren, sixty-four grandchildren and one hundred and twenty 
great-grandchildren. 



68 

Ella Hotchkiss (Mrs. Edmund B. Cowles). 102 

Born in West Hartford, Connecticut. 

Descendant of Samuel Hotchkiss, throug'h the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Joseph Hotchkiss, both of Connecticut, as 
follows. 

2. Lyman Hotchkiss (Apr. 4, 1816-Nov. 14, 1888) and 
Sarah Ann Beklen (Mch. 15, 1821-....), 

3. Lyman Hotchkiss (Mch. 20, 1784-1861) and 
Sybil Bradley (Nov. 7, 1784-1855). 

4. Joseph Hotchkiss (July 31, 1756-1825) and 
Temperance Andrews (Nov. 28, 1760- ). 

5. Joseph Hotchkiss (Feb. 15, 1725-1776) and 
Esther Russell (1729-Sept. 14, 1788). 

6. Samuel Hotchkiss (Mch. 6, 1683-Dec. 22, 1740) and 
Hannah Russell (Jan. 19, 16 -Jan. 1713) his second wife. 

7. Lieut. Samuel Hotchkiss (1645-1705) and 
Sarah Talmadgc (1652-.... m. 1678). 

8. Samuel Hotchkiss (b. England-Dec. 28, 1653) and 
Elizabeth Clovery (b. England-d. 1681). 

Samuel Hotchkiss (Eng.-1653) is supposed to have come 
from Essex, England, and is found in New Haven, Conn., 
in 1641. In 1652 he bought a house and lot there which 
"was passed at Court the same year." He died Dec. 28, 
1653, leaving a widow and six children, all born in New 
England. 

Joseph Hotchkiss (1756-1825) was a private at the siege 
of Boston and in 1781 served in the Conn. State Guards 
under Capt. William Van Deusen. He was born and died 
in East Haven, Conn. 



69 

Marie Clinton Spencer (Mrs. Janvier LeDuc). 103 

Born in Greenbush, New York. 

Descendant of William Spencer of Massachusetts and 
Connecticut, through the Revolutionary ancestor, Philip 
Spencer of New York, as follows: 

2. Alexander Orville Spencer (Feb. 27, 1799-Sept. 12, 1859) and 
-Mary Elizabeth Norton (Nov. 12. 1801-Oct. 15, 1887) 

3. Alexander Spencer (June 16, 1769-Mch. 18, 1802) and 
Olive Harrison (Aug. 9, 1774-Jan. 5, 1818) 

4. Philip Spencer (Apr. 30, 1724-May 8. 1815) and 
Abigail Moore (d.. Sept. 18, 1787, a?ed S3 yrs.) 

5. Samuel Spencer (166S-Mch. 26, 1748) and 
Hepzibah Church (m. 1696-Sept. 13, 1745). 

6. Samuel Spencer ( -about 1716) and 

Sarah Richards ( -Apr. 24, 1706). 

7. William Spencer (b. Eng. Will proved Mch. 4, 1641) and 
Agnes (b. Eng- ). 

She m. 2nd William Edwards. 

William Spencer (Eng.-1641) was in Cambridge, Mass., 
in 1631; freeman March 4, 1633; member of the First 
House of Representatives in 1634 and served until 1638; 
Lieutenant of the Militia and one of the founders of the 
Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, his name ap- 
pearing fourth on the Charter in 1639. He removed to 
Hartford, Conn., in 1639 and represented that town in the 
General Court in 1639-1640. 

Philip Spencer (1724-1815) of Salisbury, Conn., settled 
in Dutchess Co., N. Y.. before 1769. He was a "worker 
and dealer in iron" ; an ardent patriot and during the Revo- 
lution supplied the Americans with cannon and arms. 



70 

Viola Adele Hooker (Mrs. Harry L. Bell). 104 

Born in Waupun, Wisconsin. 

Descendant of Rev. Thomas Hooker of Connecticut, 
through the Revolutionary ancestors, Hezekiah Hooker of 
Connecticut and Jesse Hooker of Massachusetts, as fol- 
lows : 

2. Eli Hooker (Sept. 17, 1820-Dec. 13, 1889) and 
Catherine Richardson Sharp (Ian. 6, 1832-Jan. 10, 1890) 

3. Hezekiah Hooker (May 19, 1778-Jan. 13, 1853) and 
Lovice Roe (Dec 27, 17S3-Sept. 20, 1852). 

4. Jesse Hooker (April 23, 1752-1791) and 
Sabrina Smith (m. 1769). 

5. Hezekiah Hooker, Jr. (Oct. 30, 1717-1796) and 
Elizabeth Stone (Mch 20, 1773-....). 

6. Hezekiah Hooker (Oct. 14, 1688-Feb. 20, 1756) and 
Abigail Curtis (1695-....). 

7. John Hooker (Feb. 20, 1665-Feb.^ 21, 1745) and 
Abigail Standlev ( Tulv 25, 1669-Feb. 21, 1742). 

8. Rev. Samuel Hooker (1633-Nnv. 6, 1697) and 
Mary Willct (m. Sept. 22, 1658). 

9. Rev. Thomas Hooker (1585-July 7, 1647) 
Susannah , his second wife (d. after 1647). 

Rev. Thomas Hooker (1585-1647) was born in England. 
He came to America in the "Griffin" with John Cotton and 
Rev. Samuel Stone and settled in Cambridge, Mass. ; free- 
man May 14, 1634. He was one of the founders of Hart- 
ford, Conn., and in June, 1636, settled there with a majority 
of his parishioners. He died in Hartford. July 7, 1647, 
leaving a widow, Susanna, a second wife. 

Hezekiah Hooker (1717-1796) served as a private in the 
Connecticut troops during the Revolutionary War. He was 
born in Farmington, Conn., and died in Bethlehem Parish, 
Woodbury, Conn. 

Jesse Hooker (1752-1791) was a private from Sheffield, 
Mass., in 1775 and 1777. He was born in Woodbury, Conn., 
and died in Sheffield, Mass. 



71 



Lillian Kate Hooker (Mrs. Burr W. Davis). 105 

Born Waupun, Wisconsin. 

Descendant of Rev. Thomas Hooker of Connecticut, 
ihrough the Revolutionary ancestors, Hezekiah Hooker of 

Connecticut and Jesse Hooker of Massachusetts, as fol- 
lows : 



2. Eli Hooker (Sept. 17, lS20-Dec. 13, 1889) and 
Catherine Richardson Sharp (Jan. 6, 1832-Jan. 10, 1890C 

3. Hezekiah Hooker (May 19, 177S-Jan. 13, 1853) and 
Lovice Roe (Dec. 27. 1783-Sept. 20, 1852). 

4. Jesse Hooker (Apr. 23, 1752-1791) and 
Sabrina Smith (m. 1769). 

5. Hezekiah Hooker, Jr. (Oct. 30, 1717-1796) and 
Elizabeth Stone (Mch. 20, 1773-....). 

6. Hezekiah Hooker (Oct. 14, 1688-Feb. 20, 1756) and 
Abitrail Curtis (1695-....). 

7. John Hooker (Feb. 20, 1664-Feb. 21, 1745) and 
Abigail Standlev (Julv 25, 1669-Feb. 21. 1742). 

8. Rev. Samuel Flooker (1633-Nov. 6, 1697) and 
Mary Willet (m. Sept. 22, 1658). 

9. Rev. Thomas Hooker (1585-July 7, 1647). 
Susannah ■ , his second wife (d. after 1647). 

For services of Founder and Patriot ancestors see 
National Number 104, page 70. 



n 

Marguerite Treat Doane (Mrs. Geo.White Doane). 106 

Born in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Descendant of Richard Treat, through the Revokitionary 
ancestor, James Treat, both of Connecticut, as follows: 

2. William H. Doane (Feb. 3, 1832-....) and 
Frances Mary Treat (Apr. 15, 1832- ). 

3. James Stanton Treat (Aug. 27, 1806-Apr. 17, 1855) and 
Frances A. Witter (1810-Ian. 16, 1836), his iirst wife. 

4. James Treat (Mch. 3, 1763-Apr. 17, 1852) and 

Mary Stanton (May 1, 1767-Mch. 11, 1837), his first wife 

5. Rev. Samuel Treat (July 21, 1712-Sept. 16, 1773) and 
Elizabeth Stark (Dec. 23, 1730-Sept. 19, 1772). 

6. Rev. Salmon Treat (1673-Jan. 6, 1762) and 
Dorothy Noyes (1675/6-Dec. 6, 1714), his first wife. 

7. Lieut. James Treat (bapt. Eng. July 20, 1634-Feb. 12, 1708/9) and 
Rebecca Lattimer (Oct. 6, 1646- Apr. 2, 1734). 

8. Richard Treat (bapt. Eng. Aug. 28, 1584-1669/70) and 
Ahce Gaylord (bapt. Eng. May 10, 1594-after 1670). 

Richard Treat (1584-1669/70), born in Somerset, Eng- 
land, is first found on record in Wethersfield, Conn., in 
1643. when he was chosen Grand Juror. He was Deputy 
in 1644, and annually elected for fourteen years ; Assist- 
ant or Magistrate, 1657 to 1665 ; Selectman, 1660 ; was also 
on many committees of trust, and was a meml)er of Gov. 
Winthrop's Council, 1663 and 1664. His name ai)pears on 
the Charter of the Colony of Connecticut, granted by 
Charles H, i\pril 23, 1662. He died in \A'ethersncld. Conn. 

James Treat (1763-1852) served many tours of duty in 
the Connecticut militia during the Revolution under Capts. 
Baldwin, Wright and Lieut. Francis, for which service he 
was pensioned. He was born and died in Preston, Conn. 



n 

Ellen Constance Damon (Mrs. Charles P. 

LaLanne). 107 

lioni in riiiladelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Do.scendant of Thomas Damon, 1st, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestors, Thomas and Isaac Damon, all of }^Iassa- 
cliu setts, as follows: 

2. Albert Forster Damon (June 21, 1818-Mch. 23, 1887) and 
Carlota Matlmes (Apr. 1, 1829-Oct. 13, 1889) 

3. Juseph Damon (Dec. 10, 1790-Dec. 21, 1820) and 
Rebecca Forster (May 23, 1792-Apr. 12, 1873). 

■». Isaac Damon (May 22, 1767-Mav 8, 1851) and 

i'ersis Stone (Dec. 4, 1770-July 12, 1795). 
5. Isaac Damon (July 10, 1739-Mch. 1, 1829) and 

Lucy Cutting (Nov. 16, 1746-June 7, 1805). 
0. Thomas Damon, 3rd (Dec. 25, 1703-Mch. 6, 1796) and 

Abigail Rice (Mch. 28, 1709-Feb. 1806). 

7. Thomas Damon (Nov. 31, 16S8-Oct. 20, 1723) and 
l.ucy Ann Emerson (Oct. 2, 1667-Tan. 17, 1740). 

8. Thomas Damon (....-Oct. 20, 1723). 

Ihomas Damon (Eng.-after 1712) came from the north 
of luigland and is first found on record in Reading, Mass., 
in 1681. He lived in what is now Stoneham and his eleven 
children were born between 1684 and 1713. 

Thomas Damon (1703-1796) with his son Thomas. Jr., 
belonged to a train band under Capt. John W'alton of 
Mass., May 13. 1775. He settled in East Sudbury, now 
East W'ayland, and died there ^larch. 6, 1790. 

Isaac Damon (1739-1829) went out on the alarm of 
April 19, 1775. under Capt. Joseph Smith of Sudbury. He 
died in Wayland, Mass., March 1, 1829. 



74 

Elizabeth Atwood (Mrs. Edward P. Vilas). 108 

Born in Madison, Wisconsin. 

Descendant of John Wood or Atwood, through the Revo- 
lutionary ancestor, Isaac Atwood, both of Massachusetts, 
as follows : 

2. David Atwood- (Dec. 15, 1815-Dec. 11, 1889) and 
Mary Ann (Sweeney) Poe (May 3, 1819- ). 

3. David Atwood (May 24, 1779-Oct. 12, 1869) and 
Mary Bell (Apr. 12, 1781-Oct. 12, 1857). 

4. Isaac Atwood (lune 28, 1747-Mch. 15, 1836) and 
Hannah CInibbuck (1750-Aug. 10, 1798). 

5. Isaac Atwood (1719- ) and 

Lydia Wait (Jan. 25, 1725-m. 1740). 

6. John Atwood (1684- ) and 

Sarah Lcavitt (l'"eb. 9, 16S9-m. 1709). 

7. Nathaniel Wood or Atwood (1652- ) and 

Mary 

8. John Wood or Atwood 
Sarah Masterson 

John Wood (alias Atwood) was in Plymouth, Mass., in 
1643. He had nine children, the youngest of whom, Mary, 
married Maj. William Bradford. 

Isaac Atwood (1747-1836) went from Plymouth, Mass., 
at the Lexington Alarm under Capt. Abraham Hammatt; 
served seven days. 



75 



Mary Louise Atwood. 109 

Jjorn in Madison, Wisconsin. 

Descendant of John Wood or Atwood through the Revo- 
huionary ancestor, Isaac Atwood, both of Massachusetts, 
as follows: 

2. David Atwood (Dec. 15, 1815-Dec. 11. 1889) and 
Mary Ann (Sweeney) Poe (May 3, 1819-....). 

0. David Atwood (May 24, 1779-Oct. 12, 1869) and 
Mary Bell (Apr. 12, lS71-0ct. 12, 1857). 

4. Isaac Atwood (June 28, 1747-Mch. 15, 1836) and 
Hannah Chubbiick (1750- Aug. 10, 1798). 

5. Isaac Atwood (1719-....) and 
l.ydia Wait (Jan. 25, 1725-m. 1740). 

6. John Atwood (1684- ) and 

Sarah Leavitt (Feb. 9, 1689-m. 1709). 

7. Nathaniel Wood or Atwood (1652- ) and 

Mary . 

8. John Wood or Atwood 
Sarah Masterson. 

For services of Founder and Patriot ancestors, see 

Xational Number 108, page 74. 



76 

Maria Watson (Mrs. Charles H. Pinney). 110 

Born in New Hartford, Connecticut. 

Descendant of Richard Seymour through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor. Capt. Uriah Seymour, both of Coimecti- 
cut, as follows : 

2. Royal Isaac Watson (Jan. 17, 1799-Dec. 12, 1853) and 
Sally Seymour (Feb. 27, lS04-Jan. 30, 1844) his second wife 

3. Chauncey Seymour (Dec. 14, 1762-luly 12, 1839) and 
Isabel Sedgwick (Oct. 18, 176S-May 8, 1823). 

4. Capt. Uriah Seymour (Sept. 7, 1733-June 25, 1800) and 

Mrs. j\Iary (Andrews) Hopkins (..-Nov. 1, 1811, aged 7S vrs ) 

5. John Seymour (Dec. 25, 1694-....) and 

Hannah Ensign (Jan. 30, 1698- ), his second wife. 

6. John Seymour (June 12, 1666-May 17, 1748) and 
Elizabeth Webster (....-May 15, 1754). 

7. John Seymour ( -1713) and 

Mary Watson (m. ab. 1664). 

8. Richard Seymour (b. Eng.-Nov. 25, 1655) and 
Mercy Rashleigh. 

Richard Seymour (Eng.-1655) was in Hartford. Conn., 
in 1639. He was one of the founders of Norwalk, June 19, 
1650, and was townsman there in 1655. He died tlie same 
year, leaving a widow Mercy. 

Uriah Seymour (1733-1800) was a Lieutenant at the 
Lexington Alarm from New Hartford, Conn. In 1776 he 
was serving as Captain in the Conn. Militia and commanded 
a company at the Danbury Alarm. 

Descendant also of John Watson, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Levi V/atson, both of Connecticut, as 
follows : 

2. Royal Isaac Watson (Jan. 17, 1799-Dec. 12, 1853) and 
Sally Seymour (Feb. 27, 1804- Ian. 30, lS44j, his second wife.' 

3. Isaac Watson (Dec. 30, 1764-Feb. 25, 1826) and 
Sarah Phelps (1764 or 1769-1827 or 47). 

4. Levi Watson (bapt. Sept. 11, 1726-Mav 27, 1798) and 
Abigail Ensign (Mch. 17, 1730-Mch. 22, 1819). 

5. Cyprian Watson (Jan. 12, 1689/90-Dec. 30, 1753) and 
EHzabeth Steele (m. Jan. 27, 1715-....). 

6. John Watson (1646-1730) and 
Anna , his first wife. 

7. John Watson (. . . .-betw. Mch. 26, 1650-Tune 4, 1650 Will. Prob.) 
Margaret Smith ( -1683). 



n 

John Watson (....-1650), born in England, is first 
found on the records of Hartford, Conn., in 1644, when he 
.»>crvcd as juror; he was surveyor of highways in 1646. 
He (Hcd in Hartford, leaving a widow Margaret, who died 
in 16S3. 

Levi \\'atson (1726-1798) was a member of the Legis- 
lature of Conn., from New Hartford in 1780, and served 
M,-\cral years. 

CAKfiLiNE Matilda Damon (Mrs. Samuel T. Kerr.) Ill 

r.orn in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Descendant of Thomas Damon, 1st, through the Revolu- 
tiniiary ancestor, Thomas Damon. 3rd, both of Massachu- 
setts, as follows : 



2. Albert Forster Damon (June 21, 1818-Mch. 23, 1887) and 
Carlota Mathues (Apr. 1, 1829-Oct. 13, 1889). 

3. Joseph Damon (Dec. 10. 1790-Dec. 27, 1820) and 
Rebecca Forster (May 23, 1792- Apr. 12, 1873). 

4. Isaac Damon (May 22, 1767-May 8, 1851) and 
Persis Stone (Dec. 4, 1770- Tnlv 12, 1795). 

5. Lsaac Damon (luly 10, 1739- Mch. 1, 1829) and 
Lucy Cutting (iSlov. 16, 1746-June 7, 1805). 

6. Thomas Damon, 3rd (Dec. 25, 1703-Mch. 6. 1796) and 
Abigail Rice (Mch. 28, 1709-Februarv, 1806). 

7. Thomas Damon (Nov.- 31, 1658-Oct. 20, 1723) and 
Lucv Ann Emerson (Oct. 2, 1667-Tan. 17, 1740). 

8. Thomas Damon (....-Oct. 20, 1723). 

For services of Founder and Patriot ancestors, see 
National Number 107, page 7Z. 



78 

Anna Lawrence (Mrs. Cpiarles Hilton Brown). 112 

Born in Smithtown, Long Island. 

Descendant of Richard Smith, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Capt. Joshua Smith, both of New York, as fol- 
lows : 

2. William Lawrence (Mch. 28, 1827-Feb. 5, 1888) and 
Elizabeth H. Smith (May 25, 1833- ). 

3. Ebenezer Smith (Jan. 30, 1795-Mch. 17, 1879) and 
Sarah C. Smith (Apr. 24, 1795-Mch. 22, 1879) 

4. Joshua Smith (July 27, 1764-Tuly 4, 1845) and 
Ruth Smith (1769-1797). 

5. Capt. loshua Smith (1731-1814) and 
Hannah Smith (June 26, 1733-1793). 

6. Daniel Smith (1690-Jan. 13, 1763) and 
Hannah Brewster (1697-1761), his first wife 

7. Daniel Smith (1656-abt. 1713) and 
Ruth Tooker, his first wife. 

8. Richard Smith ( -Mch. 7, 1692) and 

Sarah Folger (....-d. 1708). 

Richard Smith (....-1692), a patentee of Smithtown, 
Long Island, is first on record in Southampton, Long Is- 
land, Oct. 26, 1643, and was a leader in the settlement ; was 
freeman and held many town offices. He lived for a time 
in Setauket and died in Smithtown in 1692 "at an ad- 
vanced age." 

Joshua Smith (1731-1814) of Smithtown, Suffolk Co., 
New York, signed. May 25, 1775, the Articles of Associa- 
tion adopted by the Continental Congress. 
. There is a tradition in the family that he was a Captain 
during the Revolution and the sword he is said to have car- 
ried is still in the possession of his descendants. His tomb- 
stone is inscribed "To the memory of Capt. Joshua Smith 
Patriot." 



79 

Altiiea Randolph (Mrs. Joseph D. Bedle). 113 

Born in Freehold, New Jersey. 

Descendant of Robert Forman of Long Island, through 
the Revolutionary ancestor, David Forman of New Jersey, 
as follows: 

2. Bennington Fitz Randolph (Dec. 13, 1817-Mch. 7, 1890) and 
!'".liza Henderson Forman (Nov. 6. 1819- ). 

3 lolm Burrowes Forman (July 7, 1786-Mch. 22, 1853) and 
Hope Henderson (Nov. 11, 1786-Apr. 23, 1823). 

4 lonathan Forman (Apr. 16, 1758-Jan. 29, 1803) and 
Hope Tavlor Burrowes (Dec. 26, 17S9-May 11, 1806). 

5. Oavid Forman (Oct. 1. 1733-Mch. 30, 1812) and 

Ann Denise (June 16, 1736-Sept. 9, 1798), his first wife. 

6 Jonathan Forman (1688-Dec. 28. 1762) and 
Margaret Wyckoff (1693-Dec. 21, 1765). 

7 Samuel Forman (1663-Oct. 13, 1740) and 
Mary Wilbore (1667-Mch. 18, 1728). 

8. Aaron Forman (1633/5-after 1693) and 
Dorothy ■ 

9. Robert Forman (abt. 1605-1671) and 
Johanna ( -after 1671). 

Robert Forman (abt. 1605-1671) was driven from Eng- 
land by the persecution of his Archbishop (Laud), and took 
refuge in Holland. He came to America and was one of 
the incorporators of the town of Flushing, Long Island, 
in 1645. He removed to Hempstead, Long Island, and was 
appointed a magistrate there by Gov. Stuyvesant, Dec. 9, 
1()4S. In 1664 he was appointed one of the two magis- 
trates of Oyster Bay. His will is on record in Oyster Bay, 
Long Island, bearing date, Feb. 7, 1670. 

David Forman (1733-1812) served as guide to Washing- 
ton at the battle of Monmouth. He was sheriff of Mon- 
mouth Co., N. J., in 1780, and his commission is in the 
possession of the New. Jersey Historical Society. 



so 



Anne Law Hubbell. 114 

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Descendant of Richard Johnson, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor. Hon. Robert Johnson, both of New Jer- 
sey, as follows : 

2. Ferdinand W. Hubbell (May 4, 1801-Julv 15, 1852) and 
Anna Gibbon Johnson (Dec 28, lS07-Feb. 2, 1895) 

3. Col. Robert Gibbon Johnson (July 23, 177i-Oct. 2, 1850) and 
Hannah Carney (July 27, 1780-Sept. 29, 1811), his first wife 

4. Hon. Robert Johnson, Jr. (Tan. 26, 1727/2S-Dec. 28 1796) and 
Jane Gibbon (1738- Aug. 16, 1815 or 16), his second wife 

5. Robert Johnson. Senr. (Feb. IS, 1694-Dec. 15, 1728) and 
Mrs. Margaret Sayres (1693-.\ug. 28, 1730). 

6. Hon. Richard Johnson (abt. 1649- Tan. 19, 1719) and 
Mary Grover (m. 1682-Apr. 21, 1714). 

Richard Johnson (1649-1719) emigrated from the 
County of Surrey, England, in 1674, and settled in Elsen- 
borough, now Salem, N. J., afterwards uniting with Fen- 
wick's Colony. He was a member of the General Free As- 
sembly in 1685 and 1716; Burgess of Salem, 1699; member 
of Provincial Assembly, 1707-1709: Justice in 1714. 

Hon. Robert Johnson, Jr. (1727-1796) was appointed 
Judge of the County Court of Salem, N. J., by Gov. Wil- 
liam Franklin in 1774; reappointed by Gov. Livingston in 
Sept., 1776, retaining the office until 1792. In 1774 he was 
Chairman of a Committee to nominate delegates to the Pro- 
vincial Congress; and was a member of the Provincial 
Congress in 1775. 



81 

Olive Elrica Stroat (Mrs. Charles Wurts 

SparhaW'K). 115 

Corn in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Descendant of Robert Sproat of Massachusetts, through 
the Revolutionary ancestors, Rev. James and William 
Sproat of Pennsylvania, as follows: 

2. Harris Lindsay Sproat (Aug. 7, 1813-Jan. 19, 1872) and 

Mrs. Caroline Hutchins (Sheepshanks) Spencer (May 21, 1821- 
Sept. 2(3, 1876). 

3. Tames William Sproat (July 3, 1793-Aug. 15, 1821) and 
.Mars^'aret Statira Lindsay (1797-Apr. 30, 1828). 

4. William Sproat (1757-Oct. 11, 1793) and 

Maria Thompson (....-Oct. 17, 1793, aged 26 vrs.). 

5. Rev. James Sproat, D.D. (Apr. 11, 1722-Oct. 18, 1793) and 
Snrnli Smith (....-Nov. 14, 1793, aged 72 vrs.). 

6. Ebenezer Sproat (1675/6-Sept. 20, 1726) and 
Experience (1684/5-Nov. 9, 1758). 

7. Robert Sproat ( -1690) and 

Elizabeth Sampson (....-1712). 

Robert Sproat (.,..-1690) was in Scituate, Mass., in 
1660. Pie died at the taking of Port Royal in the Expedi- 
tion to Canada under Sir William Phipps in 1690. 

Rev. James Sproat (1721/2-1793) was born in Scituate, 
Mass.; Yale graduate in 1741; entered the ministry of the 
Presbyterian Church in New Plaven, Conn., and in 1768 
was called to the church in Philadelphia. In 1778 he was 
elected by Congress a Chaplain for the hospitals in the 
Middle Department located in Philadelphia, Northampton, 
Berks, Lancaster and Chester Cos., Penna., and served 
until 1781. He died in Philadelphia Oct. 18, 1793, of yel- 
low fever. 

William Sproat, m.ember of the Society of the Cincin- 
nati (1757-1793), served as sergeant in Kent Co., Md., 
associators in 1775 ; Capt. Lieut, in 1779, and in 1781 was 
Brevet Major on retirement (under Act of Congress grant- 
ing retiring officers J3ne brevet grade above rank last held). 
In the journal of Rev. James Sproat, under date Apr. 28, 
1778, occurs the following: "Rode to camp at Valley 
Forge. * * '''- Met my son Capt. Wm. Sproat, 4th Penna. 
Line, in health." 



82 

Josephine Treat VanVorst (Mrs. Henry A. Davis). 116 

Born in Utica, New York. 

Descendant of Benjamin Butterfield of Massachusetts, 
through the RevoKitionary ancestor, Timothy Butterfield 
of New Hampshire, as follows : 

2. James Baker VanVorst (Mar. 5, 1813-Apr. 28, 1883) and 
Elizabeth Livinoston Butterfield (Nov. 7, 1822-Mar. 14, 1893). 

3. John lUittcrlick! (Nov. 18. 1801-Nov. 14, 1869) and 
Malinda Harriet Baker (Oct. 23, 1799-Aug-. 20, 1883). 

4. Daniel Butterfield (Feb. 13, 1776-Apr. 18, 1849) and 
Catharine Ebcrt (Nov. 9, 1777-Aug. 16, 1843). 

5. Timothy Butterfield (June 26, 1730-Apr. 10, 1819) and 
Lucrctia Adams ( m. 1757-1813). 

6. Benjamin Butterfield (May 25, 1702-Sept. 13, 1747) and 
Kezia Patterson (Feb. 5, 1705-....). 

7. Benjamin Butterfield (Feb. 24, 1679-1714/15) and 
Elizabeth Fletcher (m. 1701). 

8. Joseph Butterfield (Aug. 15, 1649-1720) and 
Lydia Ballard (b. 1657-....). 

9. Benjamin Butterfield (b. Eng.-Mar. 2. 1688) and 
Ann (b. Eng.-1660), his first wife. 

Benjamin Butterfield ( -1688) was in Charlestown, 

Mass., in 1638. He was one of the founders of Woburn, 
Mass., in 1640; freeman in 1643. In 1653 his name headed 
the list of twenty-nine petitioners for a tract of land later 
incorporated as Chelmsford. His wife Anne died in 
Chelmsford in 1660, and in 1663 he married the widow of 
Thomas W'hittemore of Maiden. Ide is probably tlie an- 
cestor of all who bear the name in Middlesex Co., Mass. 

Timothy Butterfield (1730-1819) served as sergeant 
under Capt. Daniel Carlisle, Col. Timothy Bedel's regi- 
ment of New Hampshire militia, that reinforced the north- 
ern army in 1776. He was born in Westfield, Mass.. died 
in Westmoreland, N. H. 



83 

Elizabeth A. Weed (Mrs. Lucius Dwight 

Hinkley). 117 

Born in Fox Lake, Wisconsin. 

Descendant of Edward Garfield, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Nathaniel Garfield, both of Massachu- 
setts, as follows: 

2 -Smith Weed (Dec. 20, 1811-Dec. 6, 1873) and 
Mary Garfield (Nov. 29, 1818-Sept. 8. 1886). 

3. Nathaniel Garfield, Ir. (July 14, 1793-Sept. 22, 1853) and 
Polly Cook (Apr. 17, 1796-Dec. 22, 1818). 

4. Nathaniel Garfield (Oct. 26, 1760-Feb. 9. 1839) and 
luinice Woodward (Nov. 16, 1762-May 3, 1855). 

5. FJiakim Garfield (Oct. 3, 1732-....) and 
Lucy Chase. 

6. Samuel Garfield (Sept. 3, 1690-....) and 
i\Iary Bowman (Dec. 22, 1693-m. ah. 1714). 

7. Benjamin Garfield (1643-Nov. 28, 1717) and 
Elizabeth Bridge (Aug. 17, 1659-d. after 1720). 

8. Edward Garfield, Jr. (Will Prob. June 14, 1672) and 
Rebecca (1606-Apr. 16, 1661), his first wife. 

9. Edward Garfield (1575-June 14, 1672). 

(Hist. Watertown, Alass., mentions his son Edward.) 

Edward Garfield (1575-1672) is on record in Water- 
town, Mass., in 1637, when he was one of eleven freemen 
appointed to "order the affairs of the town." He died in 
Watertown, June 14, 1672. 

Nathaniel Garfield (1760-1839) served several tours in 
the iSIass. Militia between 1776 and 1782 from Sutton, 
Grafton, Barre and Rutland, Mass. ; was in the battle of 
Newport and within a few feet of Gen. Lafayette when his 
horse was wounded by grape shot. In 1781 he served ten 
months o-uarding British prisoners at Rutland, Mass. In 
1832 he received a pension for his Revolutionary services. 
He was born in Leicester, Mass., and died in Hague, N. Y. 
On the tombstone erected to his memory in Hague on Lake 
George, N. Y., is engraved the following: "Nathaniel 
Garfield died in the year 1839. He fought in the War of 
the Revolution.'' 



'I 

Marie Louise Moseley (Mrs. John Van Kirk). 118 i 

Born in Springfield, Massachusetts. i 

Descendant of John Moseley, of Massachusetts, through 
the Revolutionary ancestor Col. Nathaniel Moseley, Con- 
necticut, as follows : 

2. James Albert Mosely (Apr. IS, 1810- July 2, 1899) and 
Louisa Saunders (Mar. 9, 1812-Jan. 28, 1891). 

3. Nathaniel Moseley (June 20, 1771-Sept. 26, 1854) and Y 
Electa Buckland (Dec. 18, 1778-Mar. 23, 1848). ■ : 

4. Col. Nathaniel Moseley (Dec. 22, 1743-1815) and 
Roxanna AUworth. 

5. Col. Nathaniel Moseley (Dec. 1, 1715-Mar. 7, 1788) and 
Sarah Capen (July 21, 1725-....). 

6. Ebenezer Moseley (Sept. 4, 1673-Sept. 19, 1740) and ■ ^; 
Hannah Weeks (1677-Mar. 27, 1747), his second wife. 

7. Thomas Moseley (....-Oct. 22, 1706) and 
Mary Lawrence (m. 1658- Apr. 1723). 

8. John Moseley (....-Oct. 27, 1661) and 
Cicely (....-Dec. 3, 1661). 

John Moseley (Maudsley) (,...-1661) came from Lan- 
cashire, England, to Dorchester, Mass., in 1630, where he ^ 
was freeman in 1638 and granted land in 1656. A brown 
freestone slab on a brick foundation marks his last resting ■ 
place in the Dorchester graveyard. The will of his widow 
Cicely mentions a son, Thomas. 

Col. Nathaniel Moseley (1743-1815) commanded a regi- 
ment of Conn. Militia at the Danbury Raid in 1777. He 
was born in Dorchester, Mass., and died in Windham, Conn. 



85 

Makv Eleanor Diehl (Mrs. Edward I. Smith). 119 

Horn in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 

Descendant of Christopher Wetherill of New Jersey, 
throuii^h the Revolutionary ancestor, Samuel Wetherill of 
Now Jersey and Pennsylvania, as follows: 

2. Thomas Jacoby Diehl (Jan. 27, 1831-Oct. 13, 1887) and 
Alargaretta Mayer Wetherill (Jan. 17, 1834- ). 

3. Charles Wetherill (Dec. 17, 1798-Nov. 2, 1838) and 
I^laraaretta Sybilla Mayer (Aug. 31, 1804-Jan. 16, 1882) 

4 Samuel Wetherill (Apr. 27, 1764-Sept. 29, 1829) and 
l^achael Price (Ian. 28, 1766-Feb. 9, 1844). 

5 Samuel Wetherill (Apr. 12, 1736-Sept. 24, 1816) and 
Sarah Yarnall (Aug. 27, 1734-July 25, 1785). 

6. Christopher Wetherill (Dec. 24, 1710-1786) and 
Mary Stockton (abt. 1715-July 25, 1745). 

7. Thomas Wetherill (Sept. 3, 1674-1758) and 
Ann Fearon 

8 Christopher Wetherill (abt. 1646- Jan. 26, 1711) and 
Mary Hornby (....-1680). 

Christopher Wetherill (abt. 1646-1711) settled in New 
Jersey about 1679. 

Samuel Wetherill (1736-1816) supplied clothing gratui- 
touslv to the army at Valley Forge. He served in the de- 
fense of Philadelphia and was disowned by the Friends 
for bearing arms. 



86 

Elizabeth Warren Moseley. 120 

Born in West Springfield, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of John Moseley, through the Revolutionary- 
ancestor, Col. Nathaniel Moseley, both of Massachusetts, 
as follows: 



2. James Albert Mosely (Apr. 15, 1810-July 2, 1899) and 
Louisa Saunders (Mar. 9, 1812-Jan. 28, 1891) 

3. Nathaniel Moseley (lune 20, 1771-Sept. 26, 1854) and 
Electa Buckland (Dec. 18, 1778-Mar. 23, 1848). 

4. Col. Nathaniel Moseley (Dec. 22, 1743-1815) and 
Roxanna Allworth. 

5. Nathaniel Moseley (Dec. 1, 1715-Mar. 7, 1788) and 
Sarah Capen (July 21, 1725-....). 

6. Ebenezer Moseley (Sept. 4, 1673-Sept. 19, 1740) and 
Hannah Weeks (1677-March 27, 1747). 

7. Thomas Moseley (....-Oct. 22, 1706) and 
Mary (m. 1658- Apr., 1723). 

8. John Moselev (....-Aug. 29, 1661) and 
Cicely (....-Dec. 3, 1661). 

For services of Founder and Patriot ancestors, see 
National Number 118, page 84. 



Emily Eckfeldt Levering (Mrs. Theodore Pidjeon). 

121 

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Descendant of Wigard Levering, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, John Levering, both of Pennsylvania, as 
follows : 



2. George Armitage Levering (Apr. 12, 1813-....) and 
Anna Rcinboth (May 7, 182S-May 7, 1881). 

3. Jonathan Hager Levering (Nov. 7, 1778-Feb. 25, 1834) and 
Elizabeth Rhoads (Sept. 15, 1784-Feb. 5, 1850). 



S7 



A. Tohn Levering (Apr. 25, 1750-July 28, 1832) and 
Hannah Howell (Dec. 30, 1752-Oct. 28, 1820). 

5. Abraham Levering (May, 1717-Oct. 31, 1804) and 
Anna Thomas (1726-Aiig. 1, 1799). 

6. Jacob Levering (Jan. 21, 1693-Oct. 1753) and 

.Mice Tunes (....-bet. Jan. 15, 1750 and Mar. 24, 1753). 

7. Wigard Levering (b. in Germany 1648/9-Feb. 2, 1745) and 
Magdalena Bokers (1657-1717). 

Wigard Levering (1648-1745) was born in Germany and 
came to America in 1685, with wife and four children, land- 
ing in Philadelphia. In August of the same year he re- 
ceived a lot in Germantown of fifty acres which he sold in 
1692 and removed to Roxborough on the Schuylkill River. 
He was naturalized March 7, 1691. His remains rest in 
the family burying ground on his farm which was used as 
such before 1744. 

The deed for the fifty acres at Germantown closes as 
follows: "So done in Germantown on the 10th day of the 
6th month (Augustus) in the year of Christ 1685, in the 
16th year of the reign of King James the Second of Eng- 
land and in the 5th year of the reign of William Penn." 

John Levering (1750-1832) served as a private in the 
Penna. militia during the early years of the war; was pro- 
moted to Ensign in 1777; Capt. in 1783 in the Philadelphia 
Co. Militia. Lie assisted in bearing dispatches and keeping 
Gen. Washington advised as to the movements of the enemy 
in and around Philadelphia. Pie and his brothers Jacob 
and Anthony gave valuable service to the army at Valley 
Forge. Llis commissions as an Ensign in 1777, as Capt. in 
1783, and as Major in 1788 and 1800 were in the possession 
of the family in 1862. He died in Roxborough township, 
Philadelphia Co., Penna. 



88 

Julia Adele Strong (I\Irs. Lyman Havden Baldwin). 

122 

Born in Detroit, Michigan. 

Descendant of John Strong of Massachusetts and Con- 
necticut, through the Revolutionary ancestor, Elisha 
Strong of Connecticut, as follows : 

2. Jolm Wareliam Strong (June 22, 1819-Mar. 27, 1884) and 
Cornelia Alger Howard (Feb. 10, 1825- Aug. 18, 1889). 

3. John Warcham Strong (Jnly 21, 1785-Aug. 10. 1853) and 
Marv Banks Root (Sept. 16. 1791-Apr. 19, 1824), his first \vife. 

4. F.lisha Strong (Dec. 1, 1747/8-1826) and 
Mary Boebe (....-1834). 

5. John Wareham Strong (Sept., 1706-Sept., 1752) and 
Azubah Griswold (Aug., 1710-m., 1734), his second wife. 

6. John Strong (Dec, 1665-May, 1749) and 
Hannah Trumbull (m. 16S6, d. after 1707). 

7. John Strong (b. Eng. 1626-Feb., 1697) and 
Eli:^abeth Warriner (m. 1664, d. 1684) his second wife. 

8. John Strong (l^ Eng. i605-Apr. 14, 1699) and 
His first wife, ..ame unknown. 

Elder John Strong (1605-1699) was born in Taunton, 
England ; removed to London, thence to Plymouth, from 
which place he sailed in the ship "Mary and John," March 
20, 1630, and arrived at Nantasket, Mass., on May 30, 
1630. Lie was one of the founders of Dorchester. Lling- 
ham and Taunton, Mass., and settled in Taunton in 153S. 
Lie was Deputy to the General Court in 1641-16-1-3-1644 
from Taunton ; was appointed with four others to super- 
intend the settlement at Windsor, Conn. ]n 1639 he re- 
moved to Northampton, Mass., of which he v/as one of the 
founders. In 1663 he was ordained ruling Elder in the 
Church. He died in Northampton, Mass., leaving one h.un- 
dred and sixty descendants. 

Elisha Strong (1747/8-1826) was a resident of \\''indsor. 
Conn., and during the Revolution was appointed agent for' 
Windsor to procure clothing for the Conn, troops. 



S9 

^Iav Severance (Mrs. George B. Kirkbride). 123 

Born in Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands. 
Descendant of John Child through the Revolutionary an- 
cestor, Moses Child, both of Massachusetts, as follows : 

2. Henry Weld Severance (July 12, 1828- ) and 

Hannah Swan Child (Oct. 2, 1836- ). 

.3. James Loring Child (May 31, 1792-Aug. 16, 186^) and 

Jane Hale (Jan. 12, 1804-Dec. 14, 1873)'. 

4. James Child (Apr. 4, 1762-Mch. 23. 1840) and 
Haimah dishing (Apr. 10, 1762-Nov. 20, 1842) 

5. Moses Child (Apr. 6, 1731-Feb. 8, 1793) and 
Sarah Styles (June 13, 1734-June 3, 1818). 

6. Isaac Child (Mch. 24, 1706-Feb. 16, 1788) and 

Anna Adams (m. Dec. 7. 1727-Feb. 16, 1746). his first wife 

7. John Child (Apr. 25, 1669-1743) and 
Hannah French (l676-Tan. 2, 1766) 

8. John Child (1636-Oct. 15, 1676) and 

„ ^\^,^,7 ^Vai-ren (Nov. 29, 1651-May 12, 1734), his second wife. 

9. William Child. 

It is Stated in the Child Genealogy that William Child 
was an early emigrant from England to the Massachusetts 
Colony. His son John Child (16j6-1676) was in Water- 
town, Mass., in 1662, where he is mentioned in the will of 
his uncle. Deacon Ephraim Child. He died in Watertown, 
Oct. 15, 1676, and his widow married Nathaniel Fiske. 

Moses Child (1731-1793) was selected by Washington 
in 1775 to visit Nova Scotia and report the state of the col- 
ony, to inspect the defences, the warlike stores, the number 
of its soldiers, sailors and ships of war, and make a de- 
tailed report at once to him. He was born in Waltham. 
Mass.. and died in Temple, N. H. 



90 

Helen Morse (Mrs. Albert W. Berg). 124 

Born in Piermont, New Hampshire. 

Descendant of Anthony Morse of Massachusetts, through 
the Revolutionary ancestor, Anthony Morse of Connecti- 
cut and Vermont, as follows : 

2. Anthony Wooster Morse (Mar. 29, 1788- Aug. 6, 1843) and 
Electa Russell Wellman (Aug. 29, 1798-Apr. 23, 1867). 

3. Anthony Morse (Dec. 22, 1753-Mch. 22, 1803) and 
Huldah Taylor (1758-Jan. 27, 1826). 

4. Nathaniel Morse (Oct. 20, 1728-June 9, 1781) and 
Marv Moro-an (m. Oct. 11, 1749). 

5. Daniel Morse (Apr. 26, 1697-....) and 
Elizabeth Witter 

6. William Morse (Jan. 23. 1673-May 10, 1749) and 
Sarah Merrill (Oct. IS, 1677-m. 1696). 

7. Benjamin Morse (Mar. 28, 1640-d. after 1707) and 
Ruth Sawyer (Sept. 10, 1648-m. Aug. 27, 1667). 

8. Anthony Morse (b. Eng. May 9, 1606-Oct. 12, 1686) and 
Mary 

Anthony Morse (1606-1686) was of Marlborough, Wilt- 
shire, England. He came to America in the "James" from 
Southampton and arrived in Boston June 3, 1635. He set- 
tled in Newbury, Mass., where he was admitted freeman, 
May 25, 1636, and received an allotment of land with house 
lot. 

Anthony Morse (1753-1803) was a minute man at the 
Lexington Alarm and sergeant in Capt. Ebenezer W^eb- 
ber's Co., Col. John Fellow's regiment, Mass. troops, at 
the siege of Boston. In 1777 he was an ensign in the ninth 
regiment and resigned in 1778. He was born in Preston, 
Conn., lived in Worthington, Mass., during the Revolution 
and died in Sharon, Vt. 



91 



Sarah Saunders (Mrs. David Smith). 125 

r.orn in Salem, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of John Saunders, through the Revohition- 
ary ancestor, Capt. Daniel Saunders, both of Massachu- 
setts, as follows : 

2. Philip Henry Saunders (June 23, 1800-Feb. 8, 1886) and 
Nancy True Cl80S-Aug. 7, 1857), his second wife. 

3. l apt. Henrv Saunders (June 21, 1770-May 13, 1835) and 
Sallie Shillaber (1773-Oct. 20, 1826). 

4. Capt. Daniel Saunders (Sept. 8, 1744-Dec. 31, 1824) and 
S:irah Peele (July 15, 1751-Jan. 16, 1810). 

5. Philip Saunders (1692/3-1768) and 

Mary Elkins (bapt. Apr. 20, 1710-Jan. 13, 1795) 

6. Capt. John Saunders (Oct. 22, 1665- ) and 

Return Shattuck (Aug. 16, 1662-m. 1688). 

7. Capt. John Saunders (bapt. Sept. 1, 1640-June 9, 1694) and 
Hannah Pickman (1642-Mch. 18, 1706). 

S. Jolm Saunders (bapt. Eng. Mch. 23, 1613-Oct. 1643) and 
Priscilla Grafton. 

John Saunders (Eng.-1643) was a proprietor of Salem, 
Mass. Bay Colony, May 25, 1636. He was of Marblehead 
in 1639; Deputy in 1642. He had a son John, baptized in 
Salem in 1640. His will was dated Oct. 28, 1643, and 
mentions son John under age, wife and father, Joseph 
Grafton. 

Daniel Saunders (1744-1824) was appointed commander 
of the privateer "Two Brothers" in 1781. He ser\-ed until 
the close of the war and captured many prizes. He was 
born in Salem, Mass., where he died. 



Caroline Hitchcock Lupton. 126 

Born in Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Descendant of Matthias Hitchcock, through the Revohi- 
tionary ancestor, Samuel Hitchcock, both of Connecticut, 
as follows : 

2. Brant Schuyler Lupton (Oct. 11, 1815-May 30, 1895) and 
Caroline Hitchcock (July 16, 1823-....). 

3. Lent Munson Hitchcock (Mav 2, 1783-Apr. 19, 1855) and 
Martha Newhall (Jan. 2, 1782-Dec. 6, 1856). 

4. Samuel Hitchcock (Feb. 27, 1757-Oct. 25, 1841) and 
Mary iMnnson (Sept. 29, 1756-Oct. 23, 1826). 

5. Samuel Hitchcock (Apr. 1, 1730-Mav 8. 1798) and 
Tamar Saltonstall (Dec. 17, 1736-Dec. 7, 1816). 

6. Benjamin Hitchcock (Mar. 24, 1696-Feb. 12, 1767) and 
Elizabeth Ives (Sept. 6, 1700- Aug. 8, 1762). 

7. John Hitchcock (Oct. 8, 1650-July 6, 1716) and 

Abigail Merriman (Apr. 18, 1654-Sept. 15, 1675), his first wife. 

8. Matthias Hitchcock (July 5, 1609-Nov. 16, 1669) and 
Elizabeth Rogers (Aug. 4, 1621-June 6, 1676). 

Matthias Hitchcock (1(>09-1669) came from London to 
Boston in the "Susan and Ellen" in 1635 and received land 
in the "Great Dividends" in 1636. He was one of the 
founders of New Haven, Conn. His will bears date No\-., 
1669. He died in New Haven the same year. 

Samuel Hitchcock (1757-1S41) served several enlist- 
ments in the Connecticut militia. He was in Ro.xbury. 
Alass., in 1775; in the retreat from Long Island in 1776; 
in Peekskill and the Highlands, New York. 1777. and in 
1779 was serving in the Connecticut cavalry. In 1832 he 
was pensioned for his Revolutionary service. He was born 
and died in Southington., Conn. 



93 

K Li: AX OR Howard Howe (Mrs. Frank Bailey Nimick). 

127 
Horn in Allegheny, Pennsylvania. 

Descendant of John HoAve, through the Revolutionary 
aiK-osior, Abner Howe, both of Massachusetts, as follows: 

.'. Thomas M. Howe (....-Tuly 20, 1877) and 
^rary Paimer (1815-1901). 

3. Thomas Howe (1779-1863) and 
Clarissa Howard (1781-1864). 

4. .-M.ner Howe (1731-1781) and 
-Mchctabel Holton (1736-1759). 

5. Xchemiah Howe (1093-1747) and 
Margaret Willard (1708-1758). 

C. Samuel Howe (1642-1713) and 

Mrs. Sarah (Leavitt) Clapp (1659-1684), his second wife. 
7. lohn Howe ( 1602-1 CSO) and 

'Mary (....-1698). 

John Howe (1602-1680) is first found on the Sudbury, 
Mass., records in 1639, when he received the grant of a 
house lot. He was one of the founders of Marlborough, 
Mass., in 1656; removed there in 1657, and opened a tavr 
ern in 1661. He was Selectman in Sudbury and Tdarlbor- 
ough, and with Edmund Rice was appointed by the Mass. 
Government to lay out the Framingham lands to George 
Danforth in 1662. 

Abner Howe (1731-1781) was born in Framingham, 
Mass. With his father he was one of the grantees of West- 
moreland, N. H.. and removed to Amherst. N. H.. in 1752, 
and settled in Westmoreland in 1760. He was a soldier 
in the French and Indian War. and in 1776 was one of the 
Signers of the Association Test in Westmoreland. 



94 

Susan Ridley Watson (Mrs. Charles C. Niebuhr). 128 

Born in New York City. 

Descendent of John Watson, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Ebenezer Watson, both of Connecticut, as follows: 

2. Ebenezer Henry Watson (Jan. 20, 1804-Sept. 28, 1850) and 
Elizabeth Jane Knapp (Dec. 16, 1807-July 6, 1866). 

3. Ebenezer Watson (Feb. 12, 1777-Tan. 12, 1848) and 
Frances Pamela Sedgwick (May 6, 1778-June 20, 1842). 

4. Ebenezer Watson (1744-Sept. 16, 1777) and 

Hannah Bunce (Dec. 28, 1749-Sept. 27, 1807), his second wife. 

5. John Watson (Jan. 8, 1709-d. Norfolk, Conn.) and 
llcthia Tyler of Wallinoford, Conn. 

6. John Watson (Dec. 14,1680-1724) and 
Sarah Steele, dau. of James Steele. 

7. John Watson (1646-1730) and 
Anna , his first wife. 

8. John Watson (,...-1650) and 
Margaret Smith (....-1683). 

For service of Founder Ancestor, See National Number, 
110, page 77. 

Ebenezer Watson (1744-1777) was serving- as a corporal 
in Capt. Joel Loomis' Co., Maj. Backus' Regiment of Conn. 
Light Horse and was in service near New York, Sept., 1776. 



95 



Mary Corlinda Batcheller (Mrs. Robert Alexander). 

129 

r.orn in Clayton, New York. 

Dcsccndent of Joseph Batcheller, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Jacob Batcheller, both of Massachusetts, 
as follows : 

1. ScweW Barney Batcheller (1815-1879) and 
.Marv Lampher (....-1847), his first wife. 

3. Scwell Batcheller (1784-1866) and 
Delilah Barney. 

4. lacob Batcheller (1752-1831) and 

Luis Rice (Oct. 12, 1753-Jan. 5, 1831). 

5. lienjamin Batcheller (1714-Scpt. 1761) and 
Hannah Hale (1719-Sept. 22, 1762). 

t, Ir.i-in Batcheller (1666-Jan. 10, 1754) and 
Hannah Tarbox (in. 1702), his first wife. 

7. John Batcheller (bapt. 1638- IMch. 22, 1698) and 
Sarah Goodale (....-1729), his second wife. 

8. Joseph Batcheller (b. in Eng.-Mch. 1647) and 
Elizabeth . 

Joseph Batcheller (before 1615-1647) was born in Can- 
terbury, England. He came to America in 1636 with wife 
Elizabeth, one child, and his brothers Henry and John. He 
.'^cltlcd first in Salem, Mass., where he was freeman in 1638. 
Me removed to Wenham, Mass., and in 1644 was sent as 
the first Deputy from that town to the General Court con- 
vened in Boston. Ele died in Wenham, March, 1647. 

Jacob Batcheller (1752-1S31) served during the Revolu- 
tion as a private in Capt. Knowlton's Company. Col. Dyke's 
Regiment, Mass. Militia from Brookfield. Mass. He re- 
moved to Arlington, Vt., about 1800 where he died, Dec. 
10. 1827. 



96 

130 

Alice Quitman Lovell. ' 131 

Born in Natchez, Mississippi. 

Descendant of James Lovell, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, James Lovell, both of Massachusetts, as follows: 

2. Joseph Lovell (June 11, 1824-Nov. 28, 1869) and 
i^ouisa (Juitman Chadbourne (Jan. 28, 1826-April 2, 1884). 

3. Surg. Gen. Joseph Lovell (Dec. 22, 1788-Oct. 17, 1836) and 
Mars^aret Mansfield (Jan. 16, 1795-Sept., 1836). 

4. James Smith Lovell (June 19, 1762-.Dec. 13, 1825) and 
Deborah Gorham (May 12, 1769-Feb. 9, 1793). 

5. James Lovell (Oct. 31, 1737-July 14, 1814) and 
Mary Middleton (1736-Nov. 7, 1817). 

6. John Lovell (June 16, 1710-1778) and 
Abigail Greene of Bradford. 

7. Capt. John Lovell (1683- ) and 

Lnscilla Gardiner. 

8. James Lovell (Oct. 23, 1662-....) and 
Mary Lumbert (Lombard, m. May, 1680). 

James Lovell (1662-after 1699) was an early settler of 
Barnstable, Mass. He married Mary Lumbert (Lombard) 
in IGSO. They had a family of ten children born in Barn- 
stable between 1680 and 1700. 

James Lovell (1737-1814) for his patriotic zeal was im- 
prisoned by the British in 1775 and conveyed to Llalifax. 
Lie was exchanged and from 1776 to 1782 was a delegate 
from Massachusetts to the Continental Congress. 

He was born in Boston, Mass., and died in Windham, 
Maine. 



97 

May Holland (Mrs. John H. Gutterson). 132 

Born in Willimantic, Connecticut. 

1 descendant of Thomas Dimock of Massachusetts, through 
the Revolutionary ancestor, Shubael Dimock of Connecti- 
cut, as follows : 

2. Goodrich Holland (Sept 20, 1831-Mar. 4, 1870) and 
lane Dimock (June 1834-....). 

3. Otis Dimock (Aug. 1, 1791-Oct., 1869) and 
Wealthy Kinne (Aug., 1790-Iuly 8, 1886). 

4. Shnhaei Dimock (Oct. 4, 1757-1828) and 
Klizaheth Wright (m. Jan. 22, 1789, Mansfield, O.) 

5. Shubael Dimock (1715-....) and 
l^sther Pierce (m. Jan. 25, 1739). 

6. Benjamin Dimock (1680-....) and 
Mary 

7. Shubael Dimock (1644-Oct. 29, 1732) and 
Joanna Bursley (1644/5-1727). 

8. 'ihomns Dimock ( -1658) and 

Anne Hammond (....-before 1686). 

Thomas Dimock ( 1658) first appears on record in 

Dorchester, Mass., in 1635 as selectman. He removed to 
Hingham, A^ass., in 1638, to Scituate in 1639 and the same 
year was one of the founders of Barnstable, Mass. He 
was one of the leaders in the new settlement ; appointed by 
the Colony Court in 1639 to "exercise the Barnstable men 
in their arms;" magistrate in the first Court established in 
Barnstable County and in 1640 was its first representative 
in the General Court. In 1642 he was appointed by the 
Colony Court one of the Council of War; in 1650 was one 
of the Commissioners of the Plymouth Colony and was con- 
stantly in public life until his death in 1658. 

Shubael Dimock (1757-1828) enlisted Jan. 8, 1778 and 
served as a private in Capt. Clarke's Company of Con- 
necticut militia. In Ang. and Sept., 1778, he was in service 
under Capt. Rudd. He was born and died in Mansfield^ 
Conn. 



98 

Emma Kneeland (Mrs. A. D. Smith). 133 

Born in Ogden, New York. 

Descendant of Edward Kneeland of Massachusetts, 
through the Revolutionary ancestor. Dr. Hezekiah Knee- 
land of Connecticut, as follows : 

2. Timothy Kneeland (May 6, 1802- April 22, 1846) and 
Anna Austin (Jan. 3, 1801-Oct. IS, 1876). 

3. Timothy P. Kneehmd (Mch., 1770-Dec. 22, 1826) and 

Nabby Griswold Tracy (abt. 1775-Mch. 1, 1819), his first wife. 

4. Dr. Hc;!ekiah Kneeland (1une 26, 1722-1779) and 
Mercy Pepoon (Sept. 25, 1727-....). 

5. Benjamin Kneeland (July 7, 1679-Feb. 18, 1744) and 
Abigail . 

6. Edward Kneeland (1640-1711) and 
Martha Fowler. 

7. Edward Kneeland (b. ab. 1580-Came to Colonies in 1630). 

Edward Kneeland (ab. 1580-....), son of Capt. John 
Kneeland of Lanarkshire, Scotland, came with his brother 
John to America in one of his father's vessels about 1630, 
and settled in Ipswich, Mass. His descendants constitute 
about nine-tenths of the Kneelands in this country. 

Hezekiah Kneeland (1722-1779) was the iirst physician 
in Marlboro, Conn., and during- the Revolution served 
without pay, as a private surgeon and was most assiduous 
in caring for the sick and wounded patriots. 



99 

EsTELLA FoLTS (Mrs. Frank D. Callan). 134 

Horn in Herkimer County, New York. 

Descendant of William Tanner, through the Revolution- 
ar\ ancestors, Isaac and Francis Tanner, all of Rhode Is- 
laii'l. as follows: 

2. Warner Folts (Oct. 10, 1830-....) and 
i^Iargaret Tanner (Feb. 7, 1832-....). 

3. Ichahod Tanner (Nov. 20. 1791-Jan. 11, 1892) and 
Nancy Clappsaddle (1803-1863), his first wife. 

4. I'rancis Tanner (1762-1847) and 
Elizabeth S. Peterson (1766-1839). 

5. Isaac 'J'anner (Sept. 9, 1736-Sept. 10. 1822) and 
Lydia Sherman (1739-1763), his first wife. 

0. brancis Tanner (1/08-1777) and 

Marv Tc^h ( m. 1728-1745), his first wife. 
7. WilHam Tanner (1660-1740) and 

FJizabeth Cottrill (1666- ), his third wife. 

William Tanner (1660-1740) was born in England and is 
first on record in New England May 12, 1682, when he wit- 
nessed a deed in South Kingston, R. I. In 1708 he was one 
of the organizers of the Seventh Day Baptist Society in 
Westerly, R. I. His remains lie in the burial place of the 
Tanner family on the original farm deeded to him. in July, 
1693 in South Kingston, R. I. The farm is still in the pos- 
session of his family. 

Isaac Tanner (1736-1822) served as ensign in the Sec- 
ouil Company of Rhode Island Militia, 1776, and on some 
01 his lours was accompanied by his sons Francis and Ben- 
jamin. Many prisoners captured by the Americans were 
taken to his house in South Kingston for safe keeping. He 
was born in South Kingston, R. I., and died in Flerkimer 
County, N. Y. 

Francis Tanner (1762-1847) enlisted at the age of fifteen 
in Capt. Stephen Babcock's Company of Minute Men. He 
served in the militia at various times guarding the shores, 
and was in Gen. Sullivan's Rhode Island Expedition. He 
was born in South Kingston, R. I., removed to Herkimer 
Co., N. Y., where in 1832 he was placed upon the Pension 
rolls, and died in Cook County, 111. 



100 



Mary Ella Comstock (Mrs. Carl J. Viets). 135 

Born in East Lyme, Connecticut. 

Descendant of William Comstock, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Peter Comstock, both of Connecticut, as 
follows : 

2. William H. Comstock (Mch. 20, 1819-Feb. 24, 1895) and 
Eliza Ann Smith (Feb. 22, 1821-Dec. 4, 1876). 

3. I'uier Comstock (Dec. 5, 1779-Oct. 29, 1862) and 
Sally Warren (1785-Aug. 20, 1830). 

4. Peter Comstock (1731-April 3, 1803) and 

Sarah Myrick (1754-Aug. 9, 1826), his second wife. 

5. Peter Comstock (Mch. 4, 1702-1742) and 
Martha Avery (1707-....). 

6. Daniel Comstock (1669-Apr. 25, 1746) and 

Elizabeth Prentis (m. May 3, 1700). • • 

7. Daniel Comstock (abt. 1630-1683) and 
Paltiah Elderkin 

8. William Comstock (abt. 1590-after 1662). 
Elizabeth Daniel. 

William Comstock (abt. 1590-aft. 1662) a native of Eng- 
land settled in Wethersfield, Conn., before 1641. He was 
granted a lot in Pequot (New London) in 1647 and built a 
corn mill there in 1650. In 1662 he is mentioned as an 
"old man" and chosen sexton to "order the youth in the 
meeting." 

Peter Comstock (1731-1803) served as Captain in the 
Continental Army and was at Fort Trumbull when New 
London was burned. He was born and died in Montville, 
Conn. j 



101 

Alice Greene (Mrs. Herbert L. Crandall). 136 

Born in New London, Connecticut. 

Descendant of John Greene of Rhode Island, through the 
Revolutionary ancestor, Benjamin Greene of Connecticut, as 
follows : 

2. Samuel Greene (Nov. 11, 1815-May 6, 1898) and 
Mary Ann Crandall (May 23, 1821-....). 

3. Samuel Greene (Dec. 30, 1784-Jan. 17, 1860) and 
Betsey Holmes (abt. 1784-Apr. 28, 1827). 

4. Benjamin Greene (Apr., 1750-Aug. 14, 1839) and 
Abigail Dodge (Aug. 18, 1759-Sept. 9, 1834). 

5. Benjamin Greene (m. after 1740). 

Margaret Strickland (Feb. 21, 1720-....), his second wife. 

6. Samuel Greene (Jan. 30, 1671-....) and 
(History Montville, Conn., mentions son Benjamin.) 

7. John Greene (1620-Nov. 27, 1708) and 
Ann Almy (1627-Mav 17, 1709). 

8. John Greene (abt. 1597-1658) and 

Joan Tattersall (m. 1619) his first wife. 

John Greene (abt. 1597-1658) was a surgeon in Salisbury, 
England. In 1635 he sailed in the ship "James" from 
Southampton, England and arrived in Boston June 3, 1635. 
He first settled in Salem, Mass., but in August, 1637, he 
appears in Providence, R. I., where he was one of the twelve 
persons to whom Roger Williams deeded land purchased 
from the Narragansett Indians. Ele was also one of the 
twelve original members of the First Baptist Church of 
Rhode Island. 

Benjamin Greene (1750-1839) was appointed by the Con- 
necticut Assembly, Oct., 1776, an Ensign in the 8th Com- 
pany or train band. Ninth Regiment of Connecticut Militia; 
promoted to Captain of the same company in August, 1777. 



r 



102 

Mary Adams (Mrs. James F. Magee, Jr.). 137 

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Descendant of Henry Adams, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Thomas Adams, both of Massachusetts, as follows : 

2. Thomas Mayland Adams (Nov. 2, 1830-:Mch. 7, 1886) and 
Myra Barclay Kennedy (Mch. 2, 1839-living in 1902) 

3. Thomas Adams (Oct. 30, 1791-Apr. 22, 1867) and 
Mary Mayland (Nov. 22, 1803-Oct. 28, 1835). 

4. Capt. Thomas Adams (bapt. Sept. 18. 1757-Mav 10, 1799'* and 
Marv Bright (abt. 1759-Dec. 1. 1801). 

5. Abijah Adams (May 11, 1702-Feb. 9, 1768) and 
Mary Lamson (Aug. 12, 1719- ), his fourth wife. 

6. Capt. John Adams (Dec. 3, 1661-Nov. 2, 1702) and 
Mannah Checkley (Dec. 19, 1674-1712). 

7. Joseph Adams (b. Eng. 1626-Dec. 6, 1694) and 
Abigail Baxter (Sept., 163-1-Aug. 27, 1692). 

8. Henry Adams fb. Eng.-Oct. 6, 1646) and 
(b. Eng.-d. after 1646). 

Henry Adams (15 1646), according to tradition, came 

from England in 1632 and was allotted land for ten persons 
in his family, Feb. 24, 1639, in that part of Massachusetts 
Bay Colony called Mt. Wollaston, now Braintree, l^.Tass., be- 
ing an original proprietor. He was the ancestor of John 
Adams, second President of the United States, who erected 
a monument to his memory. He died in Braintree, Oct. 6, 
1646. 

Thomas Adams (1757-1799) enlisted July IS. 1779 in 
Col. Wesson's ninth Mass. regiment and was discharged 
April 18, 1780. 



f 



103 
liAUKlETTE ElzA ChICHESTER NoRTHROP (MrS. DwIGIIT 

B. Holcrook). 138 

Ikirn in Saxonville, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of Joseph Northrup, through the Revokition- 
ary ancestor, Amos Northrup, both of Connecticut, as fol- 
lows: 

' Birchey Grant Northrop (July, 1817-Apri], 1898) and 

Harriet Chichester (1817-1892). 
3. Tliomas Grant Northrop (1771-1850) and 

Anrclia Curtis (1784-1839). 
4 Amos Northrup (1742-1779) and 

Anne Grant (1750-after 1780). 

5. Amos Northrup (1713-1790) and 
Ann Baldwin (m. Dec. 16, 1741). 

6. Amos Northrup (Sept. 1689-1726) and 
Marv Gunn (m. Jan. 6, 1713). 

7. Samuel Northrup (,1651-1712) and 
Sarah 

8. Joseph Northrup (....-1669). ^ 
Mary Norton (Will dated Jan. 24, 1683; inventory Feb. 28, 16S3). 

Joseph Northrup ( -1669) was one of "Eaton and 

Davenport's Company of good character and fortune" who 
came from England in 1637, landed in Boston July 26, 1637, 
and settled in New Haven, Conn,, in 1638. He removed to 
Milford, Conn, with the early settlers and united with the 
First Church, Jan. 9, 1642. He died in Milford, Sept. 11, 

l('->69. 

Amos Northrup (1642-1779) who graduated from Yale 
in 1765 was a Lieutenant in Capt. Dan Towner's Co., First 
Battalion, Conn. Troops, during the Revolution. He also 
served as Commissary. 



104 

Nellie Darrow (Mrs. Elisha Turner). 139 

Born in New London, Connecticut. 

Descendant of Thomas Miner of Massachusetts, through 
the Revolutionary ancestor, Christopher Miner of Connecti- 
cut, as follows : 

2. Moses Darrow (Nov. 19, 1823-....) and 
Jane Miner (Tune 7, 1831-Mar. 8, 1896). 

3. Isaac W. Miner (Feb. 11, 1799-Feb. 14, 1888) and 
Eliza Green (July 1805- Aug. 10, 1870). 

4. Isaac ]Miner (Mch. 2, 1773-Dec. 31, 1836) and 
Katurah Brown (Jan. 28, 1774-m. 1795; d. after 1809). 

5. Chrislopher Miner (Mch. 7, 1745-Jan. 12, 1813 or 1803) and 
Mary Randal (July 13, 1746-m. 1765; d. after 1786). 

6. Charles Miner (Nov. 19, 1709-Nov. 6, 1786) and 

Mrs. Mary Wheeler (July 19, 1720-m. 1740; d. after 1756). 

7. James Miner (Nov., 1682- ) and 

Abigail Eldredge (1688-m. 1705; d. after 1715). 

8. Ephraim Miner (May 1, 1642-May 16, 1724) and 
Hannah Avery (Oct. 11, 1644-m. 1666; d. after 1687). 

9. Thomas Miner (Apr. 23, 1608-Oct. 23, 1690) and 
Grace Palmer (1608-....). 

Thomas Miner (1608-1690) was born in England; came 
to America in 1630 ; in Charlestown, Mass., in 1632 and 
about 1646-7 settled in the Pequot country in Connecticut 
with John Winthrop's Co. and became one of the leaders 
in the new settlement. In 1649 he was appointed Assistant 
to the Court and "Military Sergeant." In 1650 he was 
Deputy to the General Court from Pequot later known as 
New London, Conn. 

Christopher Miner (1745-1803) served during the Revo- 
lution as Sergeant in Capt. Eleazer Prentice's Co. from .Sept. 
28th to Nov. 30, 1782. He was born in Stonington, Conn., 
where he died. 



105 

Grace Turner (Mrs. Frank H. Arms). 140 

r.urn in New London, Connecticut. 

Descendant of Major John Mason of Massachusetts, 
throiij^h the Revolutionary ancestors, Henry Mason and 
Ilohart Mason of Connecticut and Rhode Island, as fol- 
lows : 

2. Peter C. Turner (June, 15, 1804-Aug. 10, 1883) and 
Mary A. Mason (July 27, 1815-....). 

3. I'Vcdcrick Mason (Mch. 5, 17S7-Feb. 24, 1860) and 
Frances Eldredge Billings (Oct. 6, 1787-Nov. 23, 1853). 

4. Henry Mason (Apr. 3, 1758-Apr. 24, 1836) and 

Ania (or Amey) Williams (Oct. 8, 1763-June 28, 1840). 

5. llol)art Mason (Oct. 6, 1722-1790) and 
Margaret Copp (May 29, 1727-Tuly 26, 1772). 

6. Xchcmiah Mason (Nov. 24, 1693-May 13, 1768) and 
Zerviah Stanton (Sept. 24, 1704-Oct. 12, 1771). 

7. Daniel Mason (Apr. 1652-Dec. 28, 1736) and 

Rebecca Hobart (Apr. 9. 1654-Apr. 8, 1727), his second wife. 

8. Major John Mason (1600-Jan. 30, 1672) and 
Anna Peck (bapt. 1619-....), his second wife. 

Capt. John Mason (1600-1672) was born in England and 
came early to Dorchester, Mass. He first appears on record 
in llic winter of 1632-3 when he went out as a Lieutenant 
against a company of pirates. He was freeman March 4, 
1635; same year represented Dorchester in the General 
Court. In 1636 he removed to W^indsor, Conn., where he 
became active in civil and military life. His early military 
cxiterience in the Netherlands was of great value to the 
colonists in the Pequot War, in which he was one of the 
commanders. From 1637 to 1641 he was a representative 
from Windsor, and was Deputy Governor for eight years, 
and Commissioner from Connecticut to the Colonial Con- 
gress 1647, 1654-7, 1661. In 1647 he removed to Saybrook 
and in 1659 to Norwich, where he was Chief Judge of the 
County Court from its organization in 1664 to 1670. He 
died at Norwich, Conn., about 1672 in his 73rd year. 

Henry Mason (1759-1836) served as a sergeant in Capt. 
Latham's Co., Connecticut artillery, 1781 ; wounded at 
Groton Heights, Sept. 6, 1781. In 1833 he received a pen- 
sion as Sergeant of Artillery. He was born in Groton and 
died in New London, Conn. 



106 

Annie Comstock (Mrs. Thomas Porter). 141 

Born in New London, Connecticut. 

Descendant of William Comstock, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Peter Comstock, both of Connecticut, as 
follows : 



2. Maro Mattarosa Comstock (Nov. 9, 1807-Nov. 22, 1894) and 
Ellen Culver (ISlZ-Apr. 6, 1854). 

3. Jonathan Comstock (June 8, 1781-June 4, 1868) and 
Nancy Turner (Sept. 11, 1788-Mch. 26, 1865). 

4. Peter Comstock (1731-Apr. 3, 1803) and 

Sarah :\Iirick (,1754-Aug. 9, 1826), ,his second wife. 

5. Peter Gomstocl: (Mch. 4, 1702-1742) and 
Martha Avery (1707- ). 

6. Daniel Comstock (bapt. 1669-1746) and 
Elizabeth Prentis (1674-m. Mny 3, 1700). 

7. Daniel Comstock (1630-1683) and 
Paltiah Elderkin. 

8. William Comstock 
Elizabeth Daniels. 

For services of Founder and Patriot ancestors, see 
National Number 135, page 100. 



107 

Ar.icK Stanley Moore (Mrs. Frederick Stanley). 142 

Kuril ill New Britain, Connecticut. 

Doscciulnnt of Thomas and John Moore, tlirough the 
K. vnkitionary ancestor, Abijah ]\[oore, all of Connecticut, 
as follows : 

:. Henry W. Moore (Feb. 27, 1830-Oct. 13, 1886) and 
Alice Doming Eaker (Sept.. 7, lS30-living in 1902) 

3. Pericles Moore (Apr. 23, 1791-Feb. 12, 1885) and 
Lovisa Seymour (May 23, 1794-Apr. 5, 1872). 

•{. Aliijah Moore (1749-Apr. 26, 1826) and 
Al.i.uaii Drake (May 3, 1752-Aug. 7, 1822). 

5. Juseph Moore (Aug. 11, 1712-May S, 179^) and 
Hli/.abelh Allyn (Nov. 22, 1712-Mav 11, 1790). 

6. ju.^^eph Moore (July 5, 1679-Aug. 15, 1713) and 
Sarah Brown (Aug. 20, 1681-....). 

7. John Moore (Dec. 5, 1645-....) and 

Hannal]^ Goffe (m. Sept. 21, 1664- Apr. 4, 1697), his first wife. 
S. John Moore (....-Sept. 18, 1677) and 

(Probably) Abigail (m. 1639-living 167/). 
9. Thomas Moore (....-1645). and 

Wife, who died 1639. 

'i'homas Moore ( 1645) was in the firsr emig-ration 

from Dorchester, Mass., to Windsor, Conn., and a iot was 
granted him in 1639 on what is now Broad St. He died 
there in 1645. 

John Moore ( 1677) was, with his father, one of the 

founders of Windsor, Conn. He became prominent in the 
business affairs of the new Colony — scr\-ed frequently as 
Juror and w^as Deputy to the General Court in 1643. He 
dealt largely in real estate, was ordained deacon Jan. 11, 
1651, and died in Windsor, Sept. 18, 1677. 

Abijah Moore (1749-1826) served as a private in Capt. 
Abner Prior's Co. Connecticut Miltia at Boston in 1776. 



108 

Florence Chamberlain (Mrs. William Hamilton 

Moseley). 143 

Born in West Winsted, Connecticut. 
Descendant of Edward Camp, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Moses Camp, both of Connecticut, as follows: 

2. William Anson Chamberlain (Feb. 24, 1827-Jan. 18, 1864) and 
Harriette Mallory Camp (Tune 13, 1834-Apr. 12, 1893). 

3. Samuel Sheldon Camp (Dec. 13, 1800-Mch. 16, 1881) and 
Elizabeth Mallory (Feb. 18, 1804-Dec. 2, 1886). 

4. Samuel Camp (Mch. 4, 1778 or 73-May 10, 1850) and 
Mercy Sheldon (Dec. 16, 1774- Aug. 21, 1854). 

5. Moses Camp (Aug. 26, 1747-Jul- 13, :828) and 
Thankful Gaylord (Oct. 1742-Jan. 26, 1809). 

6. Abraham Camp (Apr. 10, 1720-July 29, 1805) and 
Martha Parsons (Oct. 5, 1716-May 27, 1768). 

7. Tohn Camp (1686-Tan. 6, 1767) and 

Phebe Canfield (bapt. May 29, 1687-Oct. 18, 1774). 

8. Edward Camp (1650-Mch. 25, 1721) and 
Mehitable Smith (Mch. 25, 1655-1721). 

9. Edward Camp (b. in Eng.-1659) and 
Mary . 

Edward Camp (Eng.-1659) took the oath in New Haven, 
Conn., July 1, 1644. He had land allotted him in 1650. In 
1662, Mary, widow of Edward Camp, married John Lane 
of Milford and the family removed there. 

Moses Camp (1747-1828) was a private in Capt. Bost- 
wick's Co., Col. Charles Webb's Regiment of Conn., which 
crossed the Delaware with Washington on Christmas night 
before the battle of Trenton, 1776. 



109 



Klizai!eth Burr H\T)e (Mrs. Melville E. Mead). 144 

Horn in Auburn, New York. 

ncscciulant of William Hyde, through the Revolutionary 
aivcsior, James Hyde, both of Connecticut, as follows: 

1 Joscpli E. Hvde (July 27, 1807-Apr. 10, 1847) and 

Eli/.ibcth Burr (Aug. 28, 1809-Jan. 29, 1871). 
.V Erastus Hyde (Feb. 17, 1775-Oct. 13, 1849) and 

l"aniiy Bell (Jan. 7, 1776-Mch. 12, 1841). 

4. Capt. James Hyde (1752-1809) and 
Martha Nevins (1756- ). 

5. lames Hyde (1707-1793) and 

Sarali Marshall (Apr. 12, 1720-Nov. 3, 1773). 
0. lohn Hyde (1667-1727) and 

Experience Abel (Dec., 1674-Oct. 24, 1763). 
7. Samuel Hyde (1637-1677) and 

fane Lee (m. Saybrook, Conn., June, 1659). 
8 Wilh'am Hyde (....-1681). 

William Hyde ( 1681) is first on record in Hartford, 

Conn., in 1636. His name appears on the monument erected 
in Plartford in memory of the first settlers. He removed 
10 Saybrook about 1639. With his son Samuel he was one 
of the original proprietors of Norwich, Conn., in 1660; was 
frequently elected Selectman of Norwich, where he died 
Jan. 6, 1681. 

James Hyde (1752-1809) was a Sergeant in the Conn. 
Continental line in 1777; promoted to Lieutenant in 1781 
and served to close of war. He fought in the battles of 
Germantown, Stony Point, Yorktown and was at Valley 
Forge. He was born and died in Norwich, Conn. 



no 

Christine Louise Shelton Boweix (Mrs. Otto 

Grouse). I45 

Born in Jersey City, New Jersey. 

Descendant of Richard Bowen, through the Revolution- 
ary ancestor, Elcazer Bowen, both of Massachusetts, as fol- 
lows : 

2. Horace Bowen (Sept. 10- July 12, 1892) and 

Mary Augusta Shelton (Nov. 18, -living in 1902) 

3. Philemon Bowen (June 2, 1790-Apr. 23, 1874) and 
Mary Butterworth Healey (1799-Apr. 23, 1880). 

4. Elcazer Bowen (June 10, 1753-m. Apr. 26, 1785) and 
Olive Sha^v'. 

5. Simeon Bowen (Jan. 2, 1730-m. Oct. 18, 1/50) and 
Mary Newman (Dec. 4-1726-June 11, 1783). 

6. Ichabod Bowen (Apr. 4, 1693-Mch. 20, 1760) and 
Martha Walker (Sept. 8, 1696-June 9, 1747). 

7. Richard Bowen, 3rd (Jan. 17, 1662-July 11, 1706) and 
Patience Peck (Oct. 11, 1669-m. Feb. 28, 1690). 

8. Richard Bowen, 2nd (m. Mch. 4, 1646) and 
Esther Sutton ( -Nov. 6, 1688). 

9. Richard Bowen ( -Feb. 1674 or 5) and 

Anne (....-1675). 

Richard Bowen ( 1674) was in Rehoboth, Mass., in 

1643, when he made return of the value of his estate. In 
1655 he was chosen tov/nsman (Selectman) and in 1660 
was chosen by the town to clear evidence of ownership of 
lands and authorized to have the town records transcribed 
in a new book. He was in office almost continuously and 
had much influence in town affairs. He represented Re- 
hoboth in the General Court in 1651. 

■Eleazer Bowen (1753-aft. 1790) served as a private and 
corporal at the Rhode Island Alarms. He was born and 
died in Rehoboth, Mass. 



Ill 



Eva Carleton (Mrs. Edwin King Moore). 146 

iJorn in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. 

Descendant of Edward Carleton, through the Revolution- 
.irv ancestors, Jonathan Carleton and John Carleton, all of 
M;!<sacliusetts, as follows: 

2. lanics Henry Carleton (Dec. 25, 1814-lan. 7, 1S73) and 

Suphia Wolfe (May 5, 1830-Aug. 16, 1880). 
X Inliti Carleton (1786-abt. 1840) and 

.Mrs. Abigail (Phelps) Hallowell (Aug. 20, 1794-Apr. 28, 1869). 

4. .K'lm Carleton (1759-1834) and 
l.lizaboth Littlefield, his first wife. 

5. Jonathan Carleton (1731-1785) and 
.Miss Mainard. 

6 Inhn Carleton (Feb. 27, 1690-....) and "• 

Hannah Barker (Jan. 13, 1714-Jan. 22, 1734), his first wife. 

7. I'llin Carleton (b. in Eng. 1658-1745) and 
Hannah Osgood (Oct. 19, 1668-....). 

8. John Carleton (bef. 1630 in Eng.-Jan. 22, 1668) and 
'ilannah Jewett (June 15, 1640-Nov. 21, 1679). 

'J. Edward Carleton (b. in Eng. 1610-before 1661) and 
Eleanor Denton. 

Edward Carleton (1610-bef. 1661) is supposed to have 
come to New England in the company of Mr. Ezekiel Rog- 
ers in 1638. He was one of the founders of Rowley. Mass. 
Cay Colony in 1639. He was freeman there in 1642 and 
representative to the General Court 1644-1647. 

Jonathan Carleton (1731-1785) served as a private in 
[he Mass. Militia as did also his son, John. 



112 

Sarah A. Barnes (Mrs. Robert A. Williams). 147 

Born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Descendant of William Barnes of Long Island, N. Y., 
through the Revolutionary ancestor, Stephen Barnes, Jr., of 
Connecticut, as follows : 

2. Henry Augustus Barnes (June 5, 1834, living in 1902) and 
Mary T. Woodward (Apr. 16 -Feb. 25, 1871). 

3. William Barnes (I-eb. 8, 1802-Dec. 23, 1872) and 

Maria Holkins (Aug. 28, 1804-June 6, 1851), his first wife. 

4. Jonatiian Barnes, Jr. (Mch. 13, 1763-Sept. 24, 1829) and 
Rachel Steele (Aug. 12, 1764-July 24, 1847). 

5. Jonathan Barnes, Sr. (Feb. 21, 1731-Tan. 7, 1807) and 
Elizabeth Woodruff (....-Feb. 8, 181'). 

6. Stephen Barnes, Jr. (1704 or 5-Mch. 27, 1777) and 
Martha Wheadon (1707-Mch. 18, 1773). 

7. Stephen Barnes, Sr., 1673 
Mary Barnes. 

8. William Barnes (b. Eng.-Dec. 1, 1697 or 9) and 
Elizabeth (1643-1723 or 4). 

William Barnes (Eng.-1697) according to some author- 
ities is first found on record in I_.ynn, Mass., in 1639. 
He was in Southampton, Long Island, in 1644. In 1652 he 
sold his homestead and apparently removed from the town. 

Stephen Barnes (1704-1777) of Southington, Conn., 
served on a committee of inspection and on a committee to 
report violations of the orders of the Continental Congress. 



113 

CoKDKLlA BUTTERFIELD (MrS. ChARLES HeNRY ChILDS). 

148 

Born in Utica, New York. 

1 )cscendant of Benjamin Butterfield of Massachusetts, 
ihrough the Revolutionary ancestor, Timothy Butterfield of 
New Hampshire, as follows : 

2. Theodore Faxon Butterfield (June 2, 1826-Feb. 21, 1891) and 
Harriet Huntley (Nov. 23, 1830-Aug. 7, 1902). 

3. John Butterfield (Nov. 18, 1801-Nov. 14, 1869) and 
iMalinda Harriet Baker (Oct. 23, 1799-Aug. 20, 1833). 

4. Daniel Butterfield (Feb. 13, 1776-Apr. 18, 1849) and 
Catharine Ebert (Nov. 9, 1777-Aug. 16, 1843). 

5. Timothy Butterfield (June 26, 1730-Ai/r. 10, 1819) and 
Lucretia Adams (m. 1757-1813). 

6. Benjamin Butterfield (May 25, 1702-Sept. 13, 1747) and 
Kczia Patterson (Feb. 5, 1705- ). 

7. Benjamin Butterfield (Feb. 24, 1679-1714) and 
Elizabeth Fletcher (m. 1701) 

8. Joseph Butterfield (Aug. 15, 1649-1720) and 
Lydia Ballard (Apr. 13, 1657-....). 

9. Benjamin Butterfield (b. Eng.-Mar. 2, 1688) and 
Ann (b. Eng.-May 19, 1660), his first wife. 

For services of Founder and Patriot ancestors, see 
National Number 116, page 82. 



114 

Myrtie Clark (Mrs. Noyes D. Baldwin). 149 

Born in Orange, Connecticut. 

Descendant of George Clark, through the Revolutionary 
ancestors, Hezekiah and Aaron Clark, all of Connecticut, 
as follows: 

2. Joseph M. Clark (Sept. 11, 1831-....) and 
Julia A. Riggs (Dec. 18, 1833-....). 

3. Aaron Clark, Jr. (Nov. 10, 1796-Apr. 1886) and 
Lovisa Merrick (1795-Tan. 6, 1873). 

4. Aaron Clark, Sr. (Sept. 30, 1758-May 7, 1848) and 
Elizal)cth Fowler (Feb. 1765 or 1776-May 11, 1862). 

5. Hezekiah Clark (1723-177?) and 
Marv Peck (m. 1746). 

6. George Clark, 3d. (bapt. Sept 25, 1686-1762) and 
Mary . 

7. George Clark, 2d. (bapt. Apr. 30, 1648-1734) and 
Deborah Gold. 

8. George Clark, 1st. (- — • d. 1690). 
Sarah . 

George Clark ( 1690) was in Milford, Conri., in 1639 

with one son George, and six daughters. He died in ]\lil- 
ford, August, 1690. 

Hezekiah Clark (1723-1776) went out from Bethany in 
1776 in the Conn. Militia ; became ill and died the same year. 
He was born in Milford, Conn. 

Aaron Clark (1758-1848) was on guard at Boston in 
1776 tuKlor Col. F,ra^;tus Wolcott. In the same year he was 
in Capt. Higgin's Co. at New York and took part in the re- 
treat. In 1779 he served as a Corporal at the New Haven 
Alarm. 



115 
LiLv Alexina Wilson (Mrs. Thomas Potter, Jr.). 150 

l^.orn in Vanclalia, Michigan. 

Descendant of David Thompson, 1st. of New Hampshire, 
through the Revolutionary ancestor, David Thompson, 4th 
of !\lassachusetts, as follows: 

2. Seth Wylie Wilson (Sept. 6, 1827-....) and 
Martha Amelia Thompson (Nov. 29, 1829- ). 

3. Georse Colson Thompson (Oct. 19, lS06-Sept. 29, 1890) and 
Martha Ann Neil (Aug. 25, 1813-....). 

4. Willis Alder Thompson (Feb. 19, 1779-Oct. 27, 1864) and 
ArmiUe Aldrich (Oct. 23, 1787-Jan. 9, 1859). 

5. David Thompson (July 1, 1750-1838, and 
Abigail White (Feb. 9, 1752-after 1784). 

6. David Thompson (Dec. 2, 1711-....) and 
Susannah Darling. 

7. David Thompson (May 24, 1687-....) and 
Mercy Thayer (m. Jan. 11, 1711, d. after 1719). 

8. John Thompson, 
Tiiankful . 

9. John Thompson (abt. 1627-Nov. 9, 1685) and 
Sarah . 

10. David Thompson (....-1628). 

David Thompson ( 1628), a Scotchman, was selected 

by an English Company to establish a permanent settlement 
in New England. With his wife and servants he came in 
1623 at the head of a colony "to found a plantation on the 
Piscataqua River, to cultivate the vine, discover mines, 
carry on the fisheries aiul trade willi the Indians."" A manor 
house, the first in New Hampshire, was erected in what is 
now NcAv Castle, N. H. Pie was attorney for Sir PY'rdi- 
nando Gorges. In 1626 he removed to an island in Boston 
Harbor which has ever since borne his name. Pie died 
there in 1628 leaving a widow and one child John, to whom 
in 1648 the ownership of Thompson's Island was confirmed 
by the General Court. 

David Thompson (1750-1838) of Douglas, Mass., served 
as Lieutenant in Capt. Job Knap's Co. in 1780 and 1781 ; 
service in Rhode Island. 



116 



Jeannette Booth. 151 

Born in Stratford, Connecticut. 

Descendant of Richard Boothe, through the Revolution- 
ary ancestor, James Booth, both of Connecticut, as follows: 

2. Albert Booth (Dec. 2, 1808-Dec. 12, 1886) and 
Caroline Beardslev (Aug. 24, 1811-Feb. 9, 1896) 

3. Abel Booth (Apr. 8, 1780-Jan. 13, 1868) and 

EHzaheth Beardslej^ (J\Ich. 2, 17S3-Dec. 5, 1867). 

4. Capt. James Booth (Oct. 1, 1734-Mch. 19, 1809) and 
Abigail Anne Patterson (Apr. 6, 1739-Ang. 10, 1817) 

5. James Booth (1685 or 98- Aug. 20, 1765 or 76) and 

Mr.?. Martha (Clarke) Peck (May 26, 169S-Dcc. 3, 1747) 

6. Joseph Boothe (Mch. 8, 16S6-Sept. 1, 1703) and 

Hannah Willcoxson (Feb. 14, 1645-July 10, 1701), his second 
wife. 

7. Richard Boothe (1607-abt. 1689) and 
Elizabeth Hawley, his first wife. 

Richard Boothe (1607-abt. 1689) from England is found 
in Stratford, Connecticut Colony in 1640. He was Select- 
man in 1669 and his name appears often on the town rec- 
ords as an officer of trust, surveyor of highways, treasurer, 
commissioner of land purchasers and lister of estates. 

James Booth (1734-1809) was serving in 1775 as a pri- 
vate in Col. Wooster's Regiment of Conn, troops in the 
Northern Department. In March, 1777, he had risen to 
the rank of Captain and with his company was detached 
from the fourth regiment of militia and placed on guard at 
Fairfield and Stratford to oppose Tryon's invasion of the 
Colony. He was Selectman in Stratford, 1778-1782. 



117 

Mary Kingsbury Talcott 152 

r.orn in Hartford, Connecticut. 

Descendant of John Talcott of Massachusetts and Con- 
in-clicut, through the Revohitionary ancestors, Col. Elizur 
Talcott and George Talcott, both of Connecticut, as fol- 

Idws: 

2. Russell Goodrich Talcott (Aug. 15, 1818-Mch. 3, 1863) and 
Marv Scvmoiu- (Nov. 1, 1820-Apr. 18, 1883). 

3. Russell Talcott (Sept. 22, 1788-Sept. 26, 1818) and 
Harriet Kingsbury (Dec. 23, 1792-Oct. 23, 1831). 

4. Coorge Talcott (Sept. 30, 17S5-June 13, 1813) and 
.Abigail Goodrich (m. 1786-June 22, 1854), his second wife. 

5. Col. Elizur Talcott (Dec. 31, 1709-Nov. 24, 1797) and 
Ruth Wright (June 5, 1711-Sept. 12, l'/91). 

0. luisign Benjamin Talcott (Mch. 1, 1764-Nov. 12, 1727) and 
Sarah Hollister (Oct. 25, 1676-Oct. 15, 1715). 

7. Capt. Samuel Talcott (1635-Nov. 10. 1691 ■) and 
Hannah Holyoke (June 7, 1644-Fel). 2, 1677/8). 

8. lohn Talcott (....-Mcb., 1660) and 
Dorothy Mott ( -1670). 

John Talcott ( 1660) was born in Braintree Co., Es- 
sex. England. He came to America in the '"Lion" and ar- 
rived in Boston, Sept. 16, 1632. He was admitted a free- 
man of Newtown (now Cambridge), Mass., in 1632; Rep- 
resentative to the General Court in 1634 and the same year 
was chosen Selectman of Newtown. 

In 1636 he joined the Rev. Mr. Hooker's Co. and was one 
of the Founders of Hartford, Conn. He took an active 
part in the affairs of the town ; represented it at the General 
■ Court in 1637 and until 1654. He was one of the Chief 
Magistrates of the Colony until his death. He was buried 
in Hartford and his name appears on the monument erected 
in Hartford in memory of the Founders of the Colony of 
Connecticut. The last will of the "Worshipful John Tal- 
cott, Senior," was dated, Jan. 17, 1659-60. 

Elizur Talcott (1709-1797) was Colonel of the Sixth 
Regiment, Connecticut Militia, and resigned on account of 
age. He was born in Glastonbury, Conn., where he died. 

George Talcott (1755-1813) with his father and two 



118 



brothers served for a short time in the War of the Revoki- 
tion and was present at the retreat of the American forces 
on Long Island. He was born and died in Ghislonbury, 
Conn. 



Anna Jackson Belden (Mrs. James Wells RaxXdell). 

153 
Born in New York City. v 

Descendant of WilHam Belden, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Azor Belden (or Eelding), both of Connecticut, as 
follows : 

2. Lewis Belden (May 14, 1787-1832) and 

Anna Maria Frelinghuysen (Jan. 7, 1807-Apr. 28, 1891) 

3. Azor Belden (1749-Nov. 27, 1828) and 
Hannah Couch Smith (1755-1801), his first wife. 

4. Azor Belden (Dec. 10, 1723-....) and 
Mary . 

5. Wilham Belden (Dec. 26, 1671-Aug. 14, 1731) and 
Margaret Arms (1683-m. 1700). 

6. Daniel Belden (Nov. 20, 1648-1732) and 
Elizabeth Foote (1654-Sept. 16, 1696), his first wife 

7. William Belden (b. Eng. ab. 1622-1660 or 5) and 
Tomasin . 

William Belden (1623-1660) born in Staffordshire, Eng- 
land was in Wethersfield, Conn., in 1646 and in 1648 was 
one of the men hired to keep the "Towne Heard." 

Azor Belden (1749-1828) served as a Sergeant in Capt. 
Samuel Comstock's Company, Lieut. Col. John Mead's regi- 
ment of Connecticut militia at New York in 1776. 



119 



Helen Melinda Fisher. 154 

Horn in New York City. 

Descendant of Capt. Derick Janse Amerman, through the 
I\(.'\nInlionary ancestors, Albert Amerman and Derick Ani- 
crnian of New York and New Jersey, as follows: 

2. I'ishcr Ames Fisher (Julv 19, lS14-Mch. 25, 1893) and 
Cliarlesetta Miller Amerman (Feb. 19, 1820-july 14, 1902). 

3. Isaac Amerman (Jan. 17, 1783-Mch. 24, 1829) and 
.Mary Caroline Dodge (Oct. 1, 1787-Mch. 16, 1858). 

4. Derick x'Kmerman (Sept. 28, 1759-Mch. 4, 1826) and 
Marv Belknap (Oct. 4, 1763-Feb. 24, 1835). 

5. Albert Amerman (Feb. 9, 1733-Sept. 1, 1818) and 
.-Vppolonia De la Montagne (Sept. 3, 1741- Aug. 23, 1815). 

6. Derick Amerman (Sept. 11, 1705-Aug. 15, 1799) and 
Helena Mace (Apr. 9, 1715-June 4, 1807:.. 

7. .'Mbert Derckse Amerman (b. Flolland-d. after 1723) and 
Greitje . 

8. Capt. Derick Janse Amerman (b. Holland- Will prob. Feb. 1, 

1723) and 
Altje Paulus Van der Eeeck (b. Holland-Flatlands, N. Y.). 

Derick Janse Amerman (Holland-abt. 1723) came from 
Holland in 1650 and settled in Flatlands, Long Island. He 
was deacon in the Dutch Church in 16S2 and Elder in 1703 ; 
Captain of the militia in 1690. His will bears date, 1709; 
probated 1723. 

Albert Amerman (1733-1818) served as a private in Capt. 
Jacob TenEyck's company of New York State troops. He 
was born in Sourland, N. J., and died in Somerset Co., N. J. 

Derick Amerman (1759-1826) served as a soldier in the 
New York line. He was born in New York City and died 
in Newburgh, N. Y. 



120 



Caroline Sproat (Mrs. Henry Darrach). 155 

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Descendant of Robert Sproat of Masachusetts, through 
the Revolutionary ancestors, Rev. James and William 
Sproat of Pennsylvania, as follows : 

2. Harris Lindsay Sproat (Aug. 7, 1813-Jan. 19, 1872) and 
Mrs. Caroline Hutchins (Sheepshanks) Spencer (May 1, 1821- 

Sept. 20, 1876). 

3. Col. James William Sproat (July 3, 1793-Ang. 15, 1821) and 
Margaret Statira Lindsay ( -Apr. 30, 1828 aged 31 years). 

4. William Sproat (1757-Oct. 11, 1793) and 

Maria Thompson ( -Oct. 17, 1793, accd 26 vears). 

5. Rev. James Sproat, D.D. (Apr. 11, 1722-6ct. 18, 1793) and 
Sarah Smith (....-Nov. 14, 1793, aged 72 years). 

6. Ebenezer Sproat (1676-Sept. 20, 1726) -and 
Experience ( -Nov. 9, 1758, aged 74 years). 

7. Robert Sproat (....1712-) and 
Elizabeth Sampson ( -Dec. 24, 1684). 

For services of Founder and Patriot ancestors, see 
National Number 115, page 81. 



121 

Sallie M. Horn. 156 

llwri) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

descendant of Thomas Dewey, through the Revolution- 
aiy aiiccsior, Solomon Dewey, both of Massachusetts, as fol- 
ii'Ws : 

: j. Im Horn (Sept. 9, 1803-Dec. 26, 1870) and 
Sarali Ann Dewey (Aug. 26, 1813-Aug., 1852). 

.= lames Dewey (July 17, 1776-Sept. 19, 1826) and 
-M.'.ry Clark (Feb. 27, 1787-June 18, 1871). 

4. .S,.!omon Dewey (Mch. 1, 1743-Dec. 22, 1818) and 
Olive Otis (....-before 1791). 

.=^ Israel Dewey (Mch. 3, 1713-Nov. 23, 1773) and 

I.ydia Moseley (Feb. 19, 1716-Iune 19, 1787). 
(. i'homas Dewey (June 29, 1682-Mch. 15, 1758) and 

Aliigail (Dewey) Ashley (Feb. 14, 1681 or'7-Dec. 20, 1747) 
7. Jidcdiah Dewey (Dec. IS, 1647-May, 1718) and 

Sarah Orton (1652-Nov. 20, 1711). 

5. Tliomas Dewey (b. Eng. 1597-1648 Conn.) and 
i'rances Clarke (b. Eng.-Scpt. 27, 1690). 

'I'homas Dewey (1597-1648) emigrated to America from 
."Sandwich, Co. Kent, England, and received land in Dor- 
chester. Mass., in 1634. He was one of the original proprie- 
tnrs of Windsor, Conn., where he received land in February, 
If'-iO. He appears as a juror from 1642 to 1645. He died 
inic-tate and an inventory of his estate was taken May 19. 
164S. 

Solomon Dewey (1743-1818) served as corporal and ser- 
pc.mt in the Massachusetts militia and marched to rein- 
fiuce the army at Stillwater. He was born in Westfield, 
Mass.: died in Whitesboro, N. Y. 



122 



Mary Cecil Hall Crosman. 15/ 

Born in liarrisburg, Pennsylvania. 

Descendant of Robert Crosman, through the Revolution- 
ary ancestor, Robert Crosman, both of Massachusetts, as 
follows : 

2. J. Heron Crosman (Dec. 6, 1848- ) and 

Ellen Williams Hall (Nat. No. 63 m. Apr. 25, 1872). 

3. George Hampden Crosman (Nov. 2, 1799-May 2S, 1883) and 
Hannah Blair Foster (Apr. 15, 1810-Dec. 28, 1898). 

4. George Cro--.man (Nov. 26, 1761 or 2-Apr. 28, 1814) and 
Amelia S. D. W. Keith (1767-Nov. 28, 1853). 

5. Dr. George Crosman (1737-Sept. 25, 1805) and 
Sarah Andrews (1738-Oct. 2, 1802). 

6. Robert Crosman (1707-Julv 6, 1799) an ' 
Martha Gaskett (1710-Oct'., 1762). 

7. Nathaniel Crosman (Mch. 10, 1680-1757) and 
Sarah Marick (m. Oct. 21, 1703). 

8. Robert Crosman, Jr. (Aug. 30, 1657-1738) and 
Hannah Brooks (m. July 21, 1679). 

9. Robert Crosman (b. Eng.-1692) and 

Sarah Kingsbury (m. 1652-1685), his first wife. 

Robert Crosman (Eng. 1692), born in England, was 

one of the original proprietors of Dedham, Mass., in 1636. 
He was admitted townsman in 1642 and granted land in 
1642, 1644, 1645 and 1652. He was one of the early "tweh'c 
shilling" purchasers of Taunton, Mass., and settled in that 
town about 1653. He was a skilled mechanic largely em- 
ployed in making and repairing arms, and was called the 
"drum maker of New England." In 1644 he became a 
member of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company 
of Massachusetts. 

Robert Crosman (1707-1799) w^s a patriot of Taunton, 
Mass., where he was born and where he died. 



123 

c"\RoLixE Eeardsley (Mrs. George H. Bunnell). 158 

r.drn ill Trumbull, Connecticut. 

iH'scondant of William Bearclsley, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestors, David Bearclsley and Stephen Beardsley, 
.'J! of Connecticut, as follows: 

:. Orville Hall Eeardsley (Nov. 14, 1816-Dec. 23, 1851) and 
Nancy Hungerford (Jan. 19, 1817-Aug. 8, 1870). 

3. Samuel Beardsley (Mch. 13, 1792-May 13, 1860) and 
.•\sscnath Gregory (1778-Feb. 5, 1863). 

■i. Stephen Beardsley (Mch. 20, 1763-Feh. 8, 1849) and 
C.-itliarine Beardsley (Mch. 2, 1770-July 22, 1850) 

5. David Beardsley (1728-May 11, 1802) and 
Mary (1725-Feb. 20, 1822). 

6. I'.nyamin Beardsley (Apr. 24, 1698-1760) -^nd 
(History Stratford mentions son David.) 

7. Daniel Beardsley (Apr., 1671- ) and 

Roliccca Jackson, his first wife. 

8. Samuel Beardsley (1638-Dec. 24, 1706) and 
Abigail • (bef. 1644-ab. 1727). 

9. William Beardsley (1604-1660) and 

Mary (1608-....), his first wife. 

William Beardsley (1604-1660) came to America in the 
"Planter" from London in 1635 with wife, Mary, aged 26, 
and three children. He was admitted freeman in Massa- 
chusetts, Dec. 7, 1636. In 1639 he appears as one of the 
original proprietors of Stratford, Conn. He was Deputy to 
the General Court in 1645 and from 1649 for several an- 
nual sessions; in 1651 appointed Assistant to the Magis- 
trates. He Avas an extensive land owner and planter. He 
died in Stratford, Conn. 

It is family tradition that he gave the name of the new 
Connecticut town in memory of his English home, Stratford- 
on-Avon and the town of Avon in western New York was 
named by one of his descendants in honor of the English 
river. 

David Beardsley (1728-1802) served as private in 1775 
in Capt. Samuel Whiting's Co. on duty in the Northern De- 
partment. He was born in Stratford, Conn., and died in 
Trumbull, Conn. 

Stephen Beardsley (1763-1840) served as corporal at the 
New Haven Alarm. He died in Trumbull, Conn. 



124 



Ida Sherman (Mrs. Clarence Freemont Rubens 

Jenne). 159 

Born in East Dover, Vermont. 

Descendant of Capt. John Sherman, tlirongh the RevoUi- 
tionary ancestor, Joseph Sherman, Jr., both of Massachu- 
setts, as follows : 

2. Sidney Harvey Sherman (May 11, lS28-Mch. 9, 1898) and 
Mary Elizabeth Farnsworth (Apr. 21, 1833-living in 1903). 

3. Joseph Sherman (June 12, 1794-Feb. 24 ) and 

Chloe Havward (Apr. 4, 1804-July 7, 1883). 

4. Natlian Sherman (Dec. 6, 1767-July 16, 1839) and 
Mary Stearns (Oct. 1, 1768-Nov. 6, 1865). 

5. Joseph Sherman, Jr. (July, 1742-\vinter of 1777-8), and 
Abagail Muzzy. 

6. Joseph Sherman (May 9, 1703-....) and 
Sarah Perham (m. 172S-Mch. 2, 1772). 

7. John Sherman (Jan. 11, 1674-....) and 
Mary BuUen. 

8. Josepli Sherman (May 14, 1650- ) and 

Elizabeth Winship. 

9. Capt. John Sherman (1613-Jan. 25, 1691) and 
Martha Palmer (or Porter). 

John Sherman (1615-1691) was a freeman in Watertown, 
Mass., May 17, 1637; selectman in 1637 and often after- 
wards; town clerk many years from 1648; representative, 
1651, 1653, 1663. 

Joseph Sherman (1742-1777) was a soldier in the Con- 
tinental service and died at jMorristown, N. J. in the winter 
of 1777. 



125 



Additional Paper. 159 

nc-scciidant also of Matthias Farnsworth of Massachu- 
'•;!-. through the Revolutionary ancestor, Thomas Farns- 
v.ofih ut }\Iassachusetts and Vermont, as follows: 

J Sidney Harvey Sherman (May 11, 1828-Mch. 9, 1898) and 
M.iry Elizabeth Farnworth (Apr. 21, 1833 -living, 1903) 

J. .K.^cl)h Farnsworth (Nov. 26. 1782-July 20, 1853) and 
.\nnit; Nichols (Sept., 1788-Nov. 22, 1880). 

4 Thomas Farnsworth (Oct. 23, 1752-1839) and 
.\iina Estabrook (Sept. 15, 1758- ). 

5 .K.r.aihan Farnsworth (1725 or 6-June 26, 1759) and 
ivachcl Nutting. 

(>. Jonathan Farnsworth (Mch. 17, 1701-Aug. 1, 1775) and 
Mary Burt (1701-June 30, 1765), his fi.st wife. 

7 Jonathan Farnsworth (June 1, 1675-June 16, 1748) and 
Ruth Shattuck (June 24, 1668-m. 1698). 

?;. .Matthias Farnsworth (1611-1689) and 
Mary Farr (....-1717). 

.Matthias Farnsworth (1611-1689) was born in Lancaster- 
-liiri-. England, and first appears on record at Lynn, Alass., 
in 1657. He was proprietor in Groton, Mass. in 1661-2 and 
was there in 1676 v.'hen the town was burned by the Indians, 
a:id with his family fled to Concord. Two years later he 
returned to Groton and began life anew. JTe filled many 
olhccs in the town: Constable, Selectman and Collector of 
rates. He died in Groton, Mass., Jan. 21, 1688-9. 

Thomas Farnsworth (1752-1839) went out on the Lex- 
ington Alarm from Westminster, Mass., in Capt. Noah 
Miles' Co. In 1777 he served as a private in Capt. Manas- 
sch Sawyers Co., Col. Dike's Regiment. 



126 

Lyle Jane Prather (Mrs. George W. Baird). 160 

Born in Washington, D. C. 

Descendant of Jonatlian Prather, through the Revohition- 
ary ancestor, James Prather, both of Maryland, as follows : 

2. Joseph Prather (Mch. 3, 1823-Aug. 6, 1901) and 
Martha Jane Belt (Nov. 27, 1825-....). 

3. Josiah Turner Prather (Dec. 8, 1777-Nov. 4, 1849) and 
Elizabeth Cadle Drummond (July 31, 1787-Nov. 12, 1858) 

4. James Prather (1740-1791) and 
Ann Turner. 

5. William Prather (Sept. 12, 1712- Aug., 1780) and 
Ruth Edmonston. 

6. Jonathan Prather, 3rd (1683-1734 or 5) and 
Susannah Aldridge, his second wife; 

7. Jonathan Prather, 2nd (1660-1735) and 
Elizabeth Bigger (m. 1680). 

S.Jonathan Prather (....-1682) and 
Jane Mackay ( -1715). 

Jonathan Prather ( 1682) was in the Colony of 

Maryland in 1658 when he sold land to George Read. lie 
later took up 100 acres, a deed for which was issued to his 
widow, Jane, on Oct. 12, 1682, and granted again to his 
eldest son Jonathan, March 22, 1683. 

James Prather (1740-1791) served on the Committee of 
Safety in 1775. He was commissioned Lieiftenant of j\liH- 
tia from Frederick Co. in 1776. Pie was born in Prince 
George Co., Md., where he died. 



127 



Alice Weldon Smith. 161 

liorn in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Descendant of Thomas Barnes, through the Revolution- 
ary ancestor, Moses Barnes, both of Massachusetts, as fol- 
lows : 

2. Edmund Smith (Apr. 5, lS29-Jub' 31, 1895) and 
Arabella Barnes (Jan. 25, 1827-Aug. 18, 1898). 

J. llcnt-v Barnes (Nov. 25, 1790-June 30, 1844) and 
.Marilla Weldon (Apr. 12, 1797-Sept. IS, 1886). 

4. I.ovcwell Barnes (Dec. 26, 1764-Aug. 4, 1831) and 
Kcbecca Eager (Dec. 29, 1764-Jan. 23, 1830), his first wife 

5. Moses Barnes (Dec. 14, 1740-Mch. 2, 1781) and 
Sarah Banister (July 14, 1739-Jan. 18, 1826). 

6. [ohn Barnes (Mch. 25, 1716-Tulv 5, 1794) and • 
EHzabeth Cranston (m. 1738-Aug. 25. 1749), his first wife. 

7. Tohn Barnes (Dec. 25, 1666-Apr. 5, 1752) and 
Hannah Howe (1676-Mch. 8, 1742). 

8. Tiiomas Barnes (1636-1679) and 
Abigail Goodnow (Mch. 11, 1642- ). 

Thomas Barnes (1636-1679) came to America in the 
"Speedwell" in 1656 "aged twenty years." He bought land 
in Marlborough, Mass., in 1663 and lived there until his 
death in 1679. ■ 

Moses Barnes (1740-1781) was Sergeant at the Lexing- 
ton Alarm. In 1776 he was Captain of the Middlesex Co., 
Mass. Militia, served until wounded in 1779 from the effects 
of which he died, INIarch 2, 1781. He was born and died in 
Marlborough, IMass. 



128 

Mary Little Dickinson (Mrs. Charles H. Deere). 1o2 

Born in Newbury, Vermont. 

Descendant of Nathaniel Dickinson of Conneclicui. 
through the Revolutionary ancestor, Gideon Dickinson of 
Massachusetts, as follows: 

2. Gideon Dana Dickinson (Dec. 21, lS07-Mch. 17, 1891) and 
Judith Toppan Atkinson (Jmie 25, lS17-Dec. 17, 1877). 

3. Gideon Dickinson (July 31, 1781-Aug. 10, 1866) and 
Hannah Weed (Apr. 18, 1786-Sept. 4, 1864). 

4. Gideon Dickinson (bapt. Dec. 1, 1745-aft. 1787). 
Abigail Fiekl (Jan. 5, 1748-....). 

5. Gideon Dickinson (Dec. 1, 1720-....) and 
Hannah Edwards (m. 1745). 

6. Ebenezcr Dickinson (Sept. 17, 1696-1780) and 

Sarah Kellogg (Mch. 12, 1701-McIi. 22, 1743), his first wiu. 

7. Nehemiah Dickinson (1644-Sept. 9, 1723) and 
Mary Cowles (1649- ). 

8. Nathaniel Dickinson (1600-June 16, 1676) and 
Anna Gull. 

Nathaniel Dickinson (lGOO-1676) came in 1634 with Iii.s 
wife and three children from Cambridge, England, lie 
was first in Watertown, Mass., but settled in vA'ethersfK'lil, 
Conn., 1636-7 and speedily became a prominent citizen, lie 
was town clerk in 1645 and the earliest town vote recorded 
is in his handwriting; townsman, 1647-S ; Deputy to the 
General Court from 1646 to 1656. With his sons Nathaniel 
and John he was among the founders of Iladley, ]\Ias5., 
where he was first town clerk ; Commissioner and Magis- 
trate. He was a member at its formation of the Hampshire 
Troop under Capt. Pyncheon and was one of the first trus- 
tees of Hopkins' Academy. He lost three sons in the In- 
dian Wars. He died in Hadley, June 16, 1676. 

Gideon Dickinson (1745-aft. 1787) of Amherst, Mass., 
served as a Minute Man at the Lexington Alarm under 
Lieut. Eli Parker and marched to Cambridge. He was born 
in Amherst. Mass., and rerrioved after the Revolution to 
Washington County, Vt. 



129 



Julia Raymond Livingston. 163 

I'.orii in Carmel, New York. 

Descendant of Robert Livingston, tlirough the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Robert Gilbert Livingston, both of New 
\'()rk, as follows : 

2. Rev. Henry Gilbert Livinoston (Feb. 3, lS21-Jan. 27, 1855) and 

Sarah Raymond (Nov. 4, 1823-Aug. 11, 1867). 
.\ Kcv. Gilbert Robert Livingston (Oct. 8, 1786-Mch. 9, 1834) and 

l-:iiza Tliompsbn Bnrrill (May 24, 1792-Aug. 7, 1870). 
4. Gilbert Robert Livingston (bapt. Sept. 27, 1758-Jnne 6, 1816) and 

-Manha Kane (Mch. 21, 175S-Apr. 17, 1843). 
5 Robert Gilbert Livingston (Jan. 11, 1713-Oct. 27, 1789) and 

Catherine McPhaedres (m. 1740-Feb. 9, 1792). 

6. Gilbert Livingston (Apr. 3, 1690-Apr. 25, 1746) and 
Cornelia Brenman (Tune 18, 1092-Jrnc 24, 1742). 

7. Robert Livingston (Dec. 13, 1654-1728) and 
Alida Schuyler (Feb. 28, 1656-Mch. 27, 1729). 

Robert Livingston (1654-1728) came to America in the 
"Catherine" in 1673 and landed at Charlestown, Nev/ Eng- 
lantl. Tlie following year he arrived in tlie Province of 
New York and settled at Albany, where his knov>/ledge of 
the Dutch language obtained for him the post of Secretary 
to the Commissaries, who then superintended the aiTairs of 
Albany and adjacent districts. He soon received the addi- 
tional appointments of Town Clerk, Collector, and I'ieceiver 
of Customs and Secretary for Lidian Affairs. lie was the 
first Lord of the ]\Ianor of Livingston, which was conferred 
on him, "his heirs and assigns," July 26, 1687. 

Gilbert R. Livingston (1758-1816), third son of Robert 
Gilbert Livingston, was ensign in the Third regiment, Ul- 
ster Co., N. Y., militia in 1776; 2d Lieut, the same year, 
and recomincnded for Brigade Major in 1779. 



130 



Amanda Smith (Mrs. Edward Clinton Hawks). 164 

Born in Buffalo, New York. 

Descendant of Richard Smith through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Othniel Smith, both of Long Island as follows: 



2. Eli Botsford Smith (May 24, 1809-Sept. 21, 1888) and 
.Maria Wiley (Mch. 26, lS21-Duc. 29, 1893). 

3. Abiiah Smith (Nov. 25, 1762-Oct. 9, 1848) and 
Keziah Botsford (Mch. 18, 1767-Oct. 29, 1823). 

4. Othniel Smith (abt. 1732-....) and 
Deliverance Longbothum (Dec. 7, 1723-....). 

5. Aaron Smith (abt. 1700-1747) and 
Zerviah Sands. 

6. Job Smith ( -abt. 1719) and 

Elizabetli Thompson (abt. 1658-....). 

7. Richard Smith (....-1693) and , 
Sarah Folger (....-1708). 

For service of Founder Ancestor, see national number 
112, page 78. 

Othniel Smith (abt. 1732 ) was commissioned ensign 

in 1776 in the Jamaica Company commanded by Capt. 
Ephraim Baylies of the Queens County, New York Militia. 
He was born in Smithtown, Long Island. 



131 



Klizauktu Waterman Lewis (Mrs. James H. Moore). 

165 

Horn in Stratford, Connecticut. 

Dosccndant of Robert Wntcrman of Massachusetts, 
;!u'.)iii,di the Revolutionary ancestor, Nehemiah Waterman, 
of Connecticut, as follows: 

2. Alaii.Min Frecmund Lewis (Aug. 30, 179S-May 22, 1859) and 

hilia Waterman (Ian. 12, 1799-Aiig. 17, 1884). 
J. l^lijah Waterman "(Nov. 28, 1769-Ocl. 11, 1825) and 

Lucy Abbe (May 19, 1778-Mch. 17, 1822). 
4. Cap't. Nehemiah Waterman (1736-1802) and 

.'^nsamia Isliam (Feb. 14. 1737-....). 
>. Nehemiah Waterman (1708-Oct. 26, 1796) and 

Sarali Gifford. 

6. Tliomas Waterman (1671-Oct. 27, 1755 \ and 
Elizalicth Allyn (1671-1755). 

7. 'r!u)mas Waterman (1644-....) and 
Miriam Tracv (1650-m. 1668). 

8. Robert Waterman (1607/8-Dcc. 10, 1652) and 
Ehzabeth Bourne (....-1663). 

Robert Waterman (1607/8-1652) came to Pl3'mouth Col- 
Diiy in 1635. He was in Salem in 1636; Plymouth in 1638; 
freeman in 16-1-2; was one of the Founders of Marshlield 
and Deputy to the General Court, 1644-1649. His son, 
Thomas was born in New England in 1644. Robert Water- 
man died in Sept., 1652. 

Nehemiah Waterman (1736-1802) commanded a com- 
pany of niilili;! under Col. Nathan Gallup to co-operate with 
Count d'Estaing in 1779. He was born in Bozrah. Coiui. 



132 

Katherine Bissell Bogert (Mrs. Charles Fi^ncis 

Roe). 1(3(3 

Born in Brooklyn, New York. 

Descendant of John Bissell, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Zehulon Bissell, both of Connecticut, as follows : ' 

2. John Banta Bogert (Sept. 13, 1813-Oct. 24, 1895) and 
Ehzabctli Caroline Bissell (Feb. 18, 1808-May 9 187^) 

3. John Bissell (Feb. 10, 1776-Mch. 22, 1855) and' 
Katherine Marsh (July 18, 1778-Mch. 7, 1837 or 1856) 

4. Zehulon Bissell ,Oct. 30, 1751-1824) and 
.Sarah Watkins (m. Jan. 13, 1774) 

5. Zebulon Bissell (1724-1777) and 
Abigail Smith (July, 1730-....). 

6. Lieut. Isaac Bissell (Sept. 22, 1682-Nov. 6, 174-1) and 
Klizabeth Osborn (Dec. 19, 168^1-June 1., 1761) 

7. Ihomas Bissell (b. Eng.-July 31, 1689) and 
Abigail Moore (m. Oct. 11, 1655). 

8. John Bissell (b. Eng. 1591-Oct. 3, 1677) and 
(....-May 21, 1641). 

John Bissell (1591-1677) came from England and set- 
tled in Windsor, Conn., before 1640. In 1648-9 he received 
the grant of a ferry from the Colony Court. During King 
Philip's War his house was fortified and garrisoned as a 
place of refuge for his neighbors. His son Thomas Bissell 
(Eng.-1689) was bom in England, came to America, mar- 
ried in 1655 Abigail A'loore and settled on the east side of 
the river. ■ In 1685 "Mr. Thomas Bissell. Sr." was one of 
those chosen to take out the Patent of Windsor. 

Zebulon Bissell (1724-1777) was a private in Capt. Beza- 
leel Beebe's Co., Col. Philip Burr Bradley's Conn. State 
Regiment. He was taken prisoner at Fort Washington, 
Nov. 16, 1776, confined in the Sugar House and died from 
poisoned food in March, 1777, while on his way home after 
exchange. He was born in Litchfield, Conn. 



133 



liu St. Clair Jerome (Mrs. Charles C. Lippitt). 167 

Horn ill New London, Connecticut. 

Dc.'^cendant of James Morgan of Massachusetts and Con- 
nect icut, through the Revohitionary ancestor, Capt. James 
Morgan of Connecticut, as follows: 

2. Richard Milford Jerome (Jan. 18, 1821-June 27, 1900) and 
I'anny Teroine Morgan (Nov. 12, 1828-....). 

3. lamus Mor£?an (June 21, 1789-Nov. 20, 1834) and 
Abbv H. Brown (Apr. 7, 1785-Apr. 5, 1868). 

A. lames Morgan (Apr. 20, 1759-Sept. 14, 1824) and 
I-.unice Turner (1766-May 1, 1838). 

5. Capt. Tames Morgan (1730-May 16, 1792) and 
Catharine Street (m. 1758-Nov. 25, 1774), his first wife. 

6. James Morgan (1693-Aug. 25, 1770) and 

Mary Morgan (Dec. 18, 1698-Sept. 5, 1776j, his second v/ife. 

7. James Morgan (Feb. 6, 1667-May 4, 1748) and 
Hannah (....-abt. 1720), his first wife. 

8. lames Morgan (Mch. 3, 1644-Dec. 8, 1711) and 
Mary Vine (b. Eng. 1641-1689). 

9. James Morgan (b. Wales 1607-1685) and 
Margery Hill. 

James Morgan (1607-1685) born in Wales, sailed from 
Bristol, England, in 1636 wMth two younger brothers landing 
in lioston. He settled in Roxbury, Mass., and was made 
■ freeman in 1643. In 1650 he had land granted him in Pe- 
quot, now New London, Conn., and in 1656 became one of 
the founders of Groton, Conn. He was one of the first 
Deputies to the General Court at Hartford and was chosen 
nine times a member of that important body, the last time in 
1670. He was always active in town affairs, serving on 
committees and settling controversies. He died in Groton, 
Conn., in 1685, aged 78 years. 

Capt. James Morgan (1730-1792) enlisted in the eighth 
regiment of Connecticut militia in 1776 and was in the cam- 
paign around New York. He was born and died in South 
Groton, Conn. 



134 



Ruth Noyes (Mrs. Charles Howard Thompson). 16S 

Born in Brattleboro, Vermont. 

Descendant of Rev. James Noyes of Massachusetts, 
through the Revolutionary ancestor, John Noyes of Con- 
necticut and Vermont, as follows: 

2. Charles^ Dennison Noyes (Nov. 28, 1844-livIng 1902) and 
Leha Wmira Fletcher (Dec. 10, lS50-Aug. 31, 1894) 

3. Jerem:ah Taylor Noyes (Aug. 24, 1820-.. ) and 

Sarah Ann Dennison (1823-AIch. 18, 1845), his first wife 

4. James Noyes (1780-June 18, 1864) and 
Mary Taylor (1782-Jan. 18, 1805). 

5. John Noyes (Aug. 28, 1745-Oct. 16, 1827) and 
Elizabeth Rogers (1748-Oct. 13, 1827) 

6. John Noyes (May 22, 1718-m. 1744) and 
Mercy Breed (Aug. 3, 1727- Aug. 5, 1811). 

7. John Noyes (Jan. 13, 1695-Sept. 17, 1751) and 

Mary Gallup (bapt. Apr. 7, 1695-Mch. 13, 1736), his first wife 

8. Rev. James Noyes (Mch. 11, 1640-Dec. 30, 1719) and 
Dorothy Stanton (1652-Jan. 19, 1743) 

9. Rev. James Noyes (1608-Oct. 22, 1656) and 
Sarah Brown (....-Sept. 13, 1691). 

Rev. James Noyes (1608-1656) born in Wiltshire, Eng- 
land came to New England in 1634 with his wife Sarah and 
was called to preach at Mistick (Mcdford), Mass. He 
. was made freeman in 1634 and in 1635 removed to New- 
bury, Mass., where he was pastor of the church for mor. 
than twenty years. I-fe was much esteemed in the ministry 
and was the author of many religious works. The house 
built by him between 1640-1650 is the oldest house in New- 
bury, its proudest show place, and has always been occupied 
by one of the Noyes family; one of the sixth generation 
from Rev. James Noyes being its tenant in 1904. 

John Noyes (1745-1827) was a member of a committee to 
determme the price of labor, provisions, etc., in the town of 
Guilford, Vt., in 1777. He was also on the County Com- 
mittee and a surveyor of highways during the Revolution. 
He was born in Groton, Conn., and died in Guilford, Vt. 



e 



135 

Katiiakine Pkatt (Mrs. John Millek Hortok). 169 

Muni in Buffalo, New York. 

Descendant of Capt. John Pratt of MassachuseUs and 
Connecticut, through the Revolutionary ancestor, Samuel 
I'ratt of Connecticut, as follows: 

: rascal Paoli Pratt (Sept. 15, 1819-....) and 

i'hebe Lorenz (May 3, 1824-Uay 26, 1S87). 
.?. .Saimicl Pratt, Jr. (1787- Aug. 20, 1822) and 

Soiiliia Fletcher (Feb. 8, 1788-Mch. 19, 1862). 
•}. .tannic-! Pratt (July 29, 1764-Aug. 31, 1812) and 

ICstlier Wells (Apr. 20, 1766-....). 
3. .\aron Pratt (1726-Feb. 9. 1807) and 

.Mary Clark (1744-Nov. 20, 1809). 
0. (uiiathan Prjitt (1683-Dec. 6, 1755) and 

.Mary Benton (1690-Feb. 8. 1781), his- second wife. 
7. John Pratt (1638-Nov. 23, 1689) and 

Mannah Boosev (1641- ), his first v.ife. 

8 John Pratt (Nov. 9, 1620, Eng.-July 15, 1655) and 

Elizabeth . 

John Pratt (1620-1655) was born in Hertfordshire, Eng- 
land, came to America and in 1634 was granted land in Cam- 
bridge, Mass. ; freeman in 1654. He was an original pro- 
prietor of Plartford, Conn., in 1639 and was elected Deputy 
10 ihe General Court the same year. lie was prominent in 
town affairs, often holding office and serving on Commit- 
tees. He died in Hartford, Conn., July 15, 1655. 

Samuel Pratt of the fifth generation (1764-1812) was 
born in East Plartford, Conn. Pie was one of the pioneers 
of Buffalo, New York, and in 1804 opened a store and with 
his sons Asa and Pascal P. carried on an extensive fur trade 
with the Indians. He died in Buffalo, Augu'st 30, 1812. 



136 



Anna Buckiiam Wright (Mrs. Russell W. Moore). 170 

Born in New York City. 

Married first, Van Campen Taylor. 

Descendant of Samuel Wright of Massacliuscits, throu^di 
the Revolutionary ancestors, Capt. Moses and Ebenezcr 
Wright of Massachusetts and Vermont, as follows: 

2. George Wellman Wright (Aug. 22, 1824-Mch. 6, 1897) and 
Georgianna Buckham (July 10, 1836-....). 

3. Tohn Stratton Wright (June 30, 1788-June 29, 1874) and 
Mary RusseU Welhnan (Dec. 13, 1792-Dec. 22. 1828). 

4. Dr. Ebenezcr Wright (Apr. 11, 17S6-Oct. 2S, 1798) and 

. Martha Wellman (Aug. 11, 1763-Nov. 5, 1839), his first wife. 

5. Capt. Moses Wright (Jan. 10, 1727-after 1783) and 
Hannah Knights (Nov. 24, 1729-....). 

6. Benoni Wright (Nov. 26, 1702-Oct. 15, 1767) and 
Hannah Severance (Apr. 1, 1706-m. 1724). 

7. Lieut. Eleazer Wright (Oct. 20, 1668-May 12, 1753) and 
Mary Pardee ( -Aug. 16, 1746). 

8. Lieut. Samuel Wright (b. Eng. 1629-Sept. 2, 1675) and 
Elizabeth Burt (1630-Feb. 5. 1691). 

9 Samuel Wright (b. Eng. 1614-Oct. 17, 1665) and 
Margaret (b. iing.-July 24, 1681). 

Samuel Wright (Eng. 1665) came from England 

with his wife Margaret and children and settled in Spring- 
field, Mass., in 1641. He was appointed deacon in 1648 and 
authorized to "dispense the Word of God for the present." 
In 1656 he removed to Northampton, Mass., where he died 
"in his chair," Oct. 16, 1665. 

Moses Wright (1727-aft. 1783) was one of the first set- 
tlers in Rockingham, Vt. In 1776 he commanded a com- 
pany from Rockingham under Col. Eleazer Patterson. He 
was born in Northfield, Mass., and died in Rockingham, Vt. 

Dr. Ebenezcr Wright (1756-1798) was a private in Ca])t. 
Joseph Esterbrook's Co., Col. Bedell's regiment of New 
Hampshire troops for service in the Northern army. 



137 



Gail A. Treat. 171 

Horn in Winterport, Maine. 

Descendant of Hon. Richard and Hon. Robert Treat of 
r.nnccticut, through the Revolutionary ancestor, Lieut. 

J.'-hiia Treat of Massachusetts, as follows: 

2. Charles Henry Treat (July 15, 1841-....) and 
IVauccs Emily Huxford (Sept. 22, 1841-....). 

;>. Capt. Henry Treat (Sept. 22, lS17-Sept. 2, 1887) and 
.\l)igail Treat (Feb. 7, 1821-Aug. 13, 1843), his first wife. 

4. lonathan Treat (Jan. 22, 1787-May 16, 1867) and 
Deborah Parker (Mch. 2, 1795-May 12, 1887). 

5. loshua Treat, Jr. (Sept. 16, 1756-Oct. 22, 1826) and 
Lvdia Buck (Oct. 22, 1761-Nov. 18, 1842). 

6. Lieut. Joshua Treat (Sept. 22, 1729-Aug. 12, 1802) and 
Catherine James (....-May 4, 1790), his first wife. 

7. loseph Treat (Nov. 19, 1696-Feb., 1756) and 

ilary Larkin (Sept. 7, 1693-May 12, 1742), his first wife. 

8. Ix'ev. Samuel Treat (1648-Mch. 18, 17i6/7) and 
Elizabeth Uayo (m. 1674-Dec. 4, 1696), his first wife. 

9. Gov. Robert Treat (1624-July 12, 1710) and 
Tane Tapp (abt. 1628-Oct., 1703), his first wife. 

10. Hon. Richard Treat (bapt. Aug. 28, 1584-1669) and 
Alice Gaylard (bapt. May 10, 1596-after 1669). 

Richard Treat (1584-1669) born in England is first on rec- 
ord in Wethersfield, Conn., in 1639 when land was granted 
•him. In 1643 he was a juror and grand juror; Deputy to 
the General Court in 1644 and annually elected for fourteen 
years; Assistant or Magistrate from 1657 to 1662. His 
nnnic appears as one of the patentees on the Charter granted 
the Colony of Connecticut from King Charles II in 1662; 
member of Gov. Winthrop's Council 1663-4. He died in 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

Robert Treat (1624-1710) born in Pitminster, England, 
came with his father to New England. He was one of the 
early settlers of Milford, Conn., and at the first meeting of 
the planters in 1639, although very young, was appointed 
one of nine to survey and lay of? the lands. Town Clerk, 
1640-1648; Deputy to the General Court, 1653-1659; As- 
sistant of the New Haven Colony, 1659; Commander-in- 
Chief of the forces in King Philip's War ; Deputy Gover- 



138 



nor of Connecticut, 1676-1683. He was often ;i commis- 
sioner of the United Colony of New England and after tlic 
death of Gov. Leete succeeded him as Governor. 

Joshua Treat (1729-1802) a soldier in the Colonial Wars 
served as an "Armourer" during the Revolution. Me was 
born in Boston and died in Prospect, Maine. 



Lydia W. Bolles (Mrs. George Newco-mb). 172 

Born in Litchfield, Connecticut. 

Descendant of John Bailey (Bayley) of Massachusetts, 
and his son, John Bailey, through the Revolutionary an- 
cestor, Samuel Bailey of Connecticut, as follows: 

2. Ebenezer Williams Bolles (Feb. 2, 1793-Oct. S, 1854) and 
Mrs. Lvdia Ann (Bailey) Strong (Sept. 11, 1798-Oct. 9, 1878). 

3. Samuel Bailey, Jr. (Jan. 27, 1764-....) and 
Lydia Crocker (1761-1830) his second wife. 

4. Samuel Bailey (Julv 18, 1739-1824) and 
Abigail Gay (m. 1763-1826). 

5. Joseph Bailey (bapt. 1703-Sept., 1765) and 
Abigail Ingraham, 1700-after 1739). 

6. Isaac Bailey (Oct. 22, 1681-1710/11) and ■ 
IMcrcv Sa.xton ( -after 170S\ 

7. Rev. James Bailey (Sept. 12. 1650-Jan. 18, 1706/7) and 
Marv Carr (m. 1672-1717), his second wife. 

8. John Bailey (1613-1691) and 
Eleanor Emery (b. Eng.- ). 

9. John Bailey (....-1651) and 
Elizabeth . 

John Bailey (Eng. 1651) from County Wilts, Eng- 
land, is first on record in America August 15, 1635, when he 
was shipwrecked at Pemaquid, Maine, having been "cast 
away in the great storm." He settled first in Newbury, 
but in 1637 went farther into the forest and made his home 
near the Powow river. His homestead lot extended from 
the Powow to the Merrimac and he was given the sole 



139 

ri^'lu of fishing in the former river. In 1639 he was one 
of the founders of Colchester, now SaHsbury, Mass. He 
icfl in England a wife, son, Robert and several daughters. 

John Dailey (1613-1691) came with his father and was 
<Mie of the early settlers in Salisbury, Mass. About 1650 
he removed to Newbury where he was made freeman in 
\t<(.>9 and where he died in 1691. 

.Samuel Bailey (1739-1S24) was a private during the Rev- 
nhiiion in Capt. Hyde's independent company of Connecti- 
cut troops. This company was attached to Col. Erastus 
W'olcott's regiment, and saw service in the Northern de- 
jiariment. He v/as born in Stonington and died in Lebanon, 
Conn. 



Ruth M. Griswold (]\Irs. Peter Perry Pealer). 173 

JJorn in South Dansville, Steuben Co., New York. 

Married first, November 30, 1869, Philip John Greene, 
who d. Dec. 16, 1SS3. 

Descendant of lohn Woodcock of Massachusetts, throuo-h 
the Revolutionar}' ancestor, Nathan \\'oodcock of New 
Hampshire, as follows : 

2 Hubbard Griswold (Jan. 1798, Walpole, N. H.-]\Iay 17, 1S94, 
Dansville, N. Y.) and 
Sarah M. Woodcock (Nov. 14. 1827, Swanzcy, N. H. -living, 
1913"), his second wife. 

3. Nathan Woodcock (Mch. 19, 1786, Swanzev, N. K.-Tuly 27, 

1870, Allegany Co., N. Y.) and 
Abigail Crossett (June 8, 1784, New Salem, Mass.-Oct. 27, 
1852, Port Allegany, Penna.). 

4. Nathan Woodcock (Jan. 9, 1737, Attleboro, jMass.-May 17, 

1817, Swanzey, N. H.) and 
Lavina Goodcnow (Mch. 2, 1749, Marlboro, Mass.-Sept., 1836, 
Swanzey, N. H.). 

5. Benjamin Woodcock (June 12, 1707, Attleboro, Mass.-Oct. 25, 

1791, Attleboro, Mass) and 



140 



Margaret White (Apr. 18, 1715, Norton, Mass.-m. Mch. 20. 
1734/5, Attlcboro, Mass. 

6. Jonathan Woodcock, (ab. 1653, Mass. -1736, Attleboro, Mass.) 

and 
Mary Williams (m. ab. l09S-d. 1724, Attlcboro, Mass), his sec- 
ond wife. 

7. John Woodcock (abt. 1615, Eng.-Jan. 20, 1700, Altleboro, 

Mass.) and 
Sarah (Eng.-1676-Attleboro, }>lass.), his firsl wife. 

John Woodcock (abt. 1615-1700) of Roxbttry, Rehobolh 
and Attleboro. Mass., is on record in Rehoboth in 1647; 
took the oath of fidelity in 1658. In 1666 with his sons and 
their families he made the first settlement in the present 
town of Attleboro, where on the "old Bay Road" he built 
a pubHc house and fortified it against the Indians. "Wood- 
cock's Garrison" was one of a chain of fortifications ex- 
tending from Boston to Rhode Island and in King Philip's 
War was a noted place of rendezvous for the Colonial 
troops. His service as commander of this garrison entitles 
his descendants to membership in the Society of Colonial 
Wars. John Woodcock was active in town afifairs as se- 
lectman and member of Committees and served several 
terms as Deputy to the General Court. According to some 
authorities he is identical with the John Woodcock men- 
tioned in Hotten's emigration list in 1635 who went front 
the Bay to the Connecticut Valley in 1638 and with John 
Cabell built the first house on the present site of Springfield, 
Mass. Pie was later at Dedham and Roxbury and the fact 
that John of Rehoboth sold land in Roxbury in 1651 would 
seem to indicate his identity with the emigrant mentioned 
by Hotten. John Woodcock was an inveterate and implac- 
able foe of the Indians and they in turn often sought liis 
life. After his death the scars of seven bullet wounds were 
found on his body. His remains rest in the ancient burial 
place on his farm, which in a deed was reserved by him as 
"a burying place for his kindred and friends, forever." 

Nathan Woodcock (1737-1817) a resident of Swanzey, 
N. K., advanced money during the Revolution to hire sol- 
diers for the army. 



141 



Additional Paper. 



Descendant also of Edward Griswold of Connecticut, 
tl,rnu,i,di the Revolutionary ancestor, Josiah Griswold of 
New Hampshire, as follows: 

J. Hubbard Griswold (Jan. 10, 1798, Walpole, N. H -Mav 17 
1894, Dansville, N. Y.) and ' ' 

Sarah AI. Woodcock (Nov. 14, 1827, Swanzcv, N. H.-still liv- 
ing), his second wife. 
.V jnviah Griswold (abt. 1752, Killingworth, Conn -Tan 1 18^1 
Walpole, N. H.) and j . . - , 

Susannah Simonds (July 31, 1752, Charlestown, N. H -Oct 9 
1821, Dansville, N. Y.), his second wife. 

4. l)anicl Griswold (Aug. 10, 1728, Killingworth, Conn.-before 

June 21, 1774, Conn.) and 
I.ydia Hull (m. Apr. 26, 1751, in Killingworth, Conn.). 

5. Joseph Griswold (Sept. 26, 1690, Killingworth, Conn-\pr 18 

1771) and 
Temperance Lay (m. Dec. 29, 1714-d. Sept. IS, 1773). 

6. John ^Griswold (Aug. 1, 1652, Windsor, Conn.-Aus". 7, 1717, 

Killingworth, Conn.) and 
r.aUisheba North (New Havenr Conn-Mch. 19, 1736), his sec- 
ond wife. 

7. lulward Griswold (b. Eng. abt. 1607-1691, Killingworth, Conn.) 

and 
.Alargaret (m. Eng., 1630-Aug. 23, 1670), his first wife. 

lulward Griswold (abt. 1607-1691) came from Kenil- 
worth Co. Warwick, England, in 1639 as attorney for one 
of the Warwick patentees and settled in Windsor, Conn. 
The Colonial Records show him to have been an active and 
iiiiluential mcm])cr of the legislature. Jn 1658 he was the 
first Deputy to the General Court from Windsor and served 
until 1662. He was the principal promoter of the new set- 
tlement at Hammonoscett, later named for his old home in 
England and corrupted to Killing-worth, now Clinton, Conn, 
where he settled about 1663. He was the first Deputy from 
Killingworth; continued its Chief Magistrate and Repre- 
sentative for more than twenty years and was succeeded 
by his son John. He was the first deacon of the Killing- 
worth church. The tombstone of his first wife, Margaret, 
is known as the oldest monument in the Conereeational 
churchyard in Clinton. 



14: 



Josiah Griswold (abt. 1750-1821) went from Walpole, 
N. H., to Ticonderoga, N. Y., in 1777 as a corporal in Capi. 
Christopher Webber's Co., Col. Benjamin Bellow's Regi- 
ment, N. H. Militia. He was born in Connecticut and died 
in Walpole, N. H. 



Ida Mae Stone (Mrs. Richard V\'allace Goode). 174 

Born in Lima, New York. 

Descendant of V\'illiani Stone, through the Revolution- 
ary ancestor, Levi Stone, both of Connecticut, as follows: 

I 

2. John James Stone (.Sept. 30, ]839-i\rch. 2, 1874) nnd 
Caroline Amelia Yorke (Feb. 7, 1838-....). 

3. Horace Stone (Aug. 25, 1799-Ocl. 9, 1873) and 
Philinda Richardson (Feb. 9, lS05-Jiily 26, 1851). 

4. Ira Stone 
Rhoda Chapman. 

5. Levi Stone (July 1, 1753-after 1832) and 

Bettie Clark. 

6. Beriah Stone (Sept. 13, 1726-....) and 
Diadema Smidi (Jan. 1, 1732-....). 

7. Josiah Stone (May 22, 1685-Dec. 24. 1735) and 
Temperance O-sborne (m. June 9, 1705). 

8. WilHam Stone (1642-Sept. 25, 1730) and 
Hannah Wolfe (....-Mch. 28, 1712), his first wife. 

9. William Stone (b. Eng.-Nov. 1683) and 

Hannah (b. Eng.-before 1659), his lirst wife. 

William Stone (Eng.-1683) was the eighth signer of the 
"Plantation Covenant" drawn up on board ship by the 
settlers bound for Oninnipiack, Conn, (now Guilford), 
June 1, 1639. In 1664-1665 he was Town Auditor; 1681 
keeper of the "Ordinary" ; 1665 authorized to procure 
powder and lead for the guard. 

Levi Stone (1753-aft. 1832) served several tours as pri- 
vate in the Conn, militia. He was born in Litchfield. Conn., 
and died in Chatham, N. Y. 



143 



l\\.\n\ Elizabeth Wiltbank (Mrs. Willia.m Goodell 

Clark). 175 

Horn in liolmesburg, Pennsylvania. 

Descendant of liermanus Frederic Wiltbank, through 
tlu- Revolutionary ancestor, Honorable John AVikbank, 
liotli of Delaware, as follows: 

J. .^Miiiucl Paynter Wiltbank (Apr. 19, 1820-....) and 

Kachd Roberts Tones (Mav 7, 1824-....). 
.\ lolin Wiltl)ank, Jr. (Jan. 28, 1795-L'eb. 13, 1S30) and ■ 

J'li/a Paynter (Dec. 8, 1798-Nov. 14, 1857). 

4. Cornelius Wiltbank (1762-Nov. 9, 1813) and 
.•\nn Burton (Apr. 15, 1762-Apr. 9, 1801). 

5. Cliicf Justice John Wiltbank (1731-July 10. 1792) aiid 
Mary Stockclcy (....-abt. Mch. 10, 1795). 

(i. t'ornclius Wiltbank (....-Feb. 7, 1741) and 

Comfort Waplcs. 
7. Isaac Wiltbank (....-abt. 170S) and 

T*-Iizabeth Gray. 
.^. Hermanns Frederic Wiltbank ( -abt. Oct. 15, 1693) nad 

Johnaken . 

Hermanus Frederic Wiltbank (....-abt. 1695) was 
granted the first deed for land in the lower part of the 
State of Delaware, July 2, 1672, "for all that piece of land 
at the Horekill, signed and called 'Lewes' in Delaware 
Bay, which piece of land is called 'Ye West Indian Fort.' " 
In 1672 he was appointed "Schout" of the Whorekill. 

John Wiltbank (1731-1792) of .Sussex Co.. Delaware, 
served as a member of the Convention in 1776 and of the 
Council of Safety in 1777. He was appointed Justice of 
the Court of Common Pleas and was Chief Justice of Sus- 
sex Co., Delaware, during the Revolutionary War. He 
was born in Lewes and died in Dover, Delaware. 



144 

Sara Patterson Snowden (Mrs. John S. Mitch i;ll). 

17o 

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Descendant of John Snowden of New Jersey, ihrou-li 
the Revolutionary ancestor, Isaac Snowden of Pennsyl- 
vania, as follows : 

2. James Ross Snowden (Dec. 9, 1809- Alch. 21, 1878) and 
Susan EnKle Patterson (Oct. 19, 1823-Feb. 11, 18971. 

3. Nathaniel Randolph Snowden (Jan. 17, 1770-Nov., 1851) and 
Sarah Gnstine (June 2, 1775-Apr. 2. 1856). 

4. Isaac Snowden (Apr. 14, 1732-Dec. 20, 1809) and 
Mrs. Mary Cox McCall (1735-Tune 30, 1806). 

5. John Snowden, Jr. (1685-Mch. 24, 1751) and 
Ruth FitzRandolph (Apr. 8, 1695-Sept. 25, 1780). 

6. John Snowden. Sr. (1632-May, 1736) and 
Ann Barrett (....-1688). 

John Snowden (1632-1736) signed the "Laws, Conces- 
sions and Agreements" jJi Burlington in 1677 as one of ilii' 
proprietors of New Jerse}-. 

Isaac Snowden (1732-1809) was quartermaster of tin- 
Philadelphia Associators 1775-77; was commissioned le 
sign the Continental Currency, 1777-79, and was treas- 
urer of the city, 1780-82. He Avas born in Philadelphia 
and died in Chester Co., Pa. 



145 

Julie Tiffany Camp (Mrs. George W. Allen). 177 

Born in Hartford, Connecticut. 

Descendant of William Lewis of Massachusetts, throuo-h 
the Revolutionary ancestors, Capt. Eldad Lewis and Ensign 
William Lewis, both of Connecticut, as follows: 

2. Chauncey Welles Camp (July, 1817- ) and 

Marie Louise Lewis. 
:>. Capt. Charles Lewis (Nov., 1771-Apr. 19, 1868) and 

Sarah Crocker (Mch. 31, 1777-Oct. 11, 1841). 
4. Ensign William Lewis (bapt. Dec. 1, 1737-Apr 9 182^) and 

Elizabeth Scott (....-Dec. 26, 1824, aged 90) 
?. Capt. Eldad Lewis (Feb. IS, 1711-Jan. 29. 1784) and 

Sarah Wiard (....-Aug. 10, 1742), his first wife 
6. Ensign Isaac Lewis (Apr. 26, 1685-Apr., 1761) and 

Abigail Curtiss (....-Aug. 3, 1727), his first wife. 
/. William Lewis (bapt. Mch. IS, 17S6/7....) and 

Phebe Moore (....-Aug. 19, 1725). 
,8. William Lewis (b. Eng.-Aug. 18, 1690) and 

Alary Hopkins, his first wife. 
9. William Lewis (b. Eng.-/.,ug. 2, 1683) and 

Felix (....-Apr. 17, 1671). 

William Lewis (Eng.-16S3) came in the ship "Lion" to 
Boston in 1632, joined the company which settled in New- 
town (Cambridge) in 1633. He was one of the original 
proprietors of Llartford, Conn., in 1636, and in 1659 one 
of the founders of Hadley, Mass. Li 1662 he represented 
Hadley in the General Court, and in 1664 was Deput\- from 
Northampton. Mass. He moved to Farmington, Conn., 
before 1677 and died there at "an advanced age" in 1683, 
leaving one son, William. 

Eldad Lewis (1711-1784) ser\''ed on the Committee of 
Inspection of Farmington, Conn. He was born at Farm- 
ington and died at Southington, Conn. 

Williain Lewis (1737-1822) was commissioned ensign 
of the seventh company or train band in the fifteenth Con- 
necticut regiment, 1777. 



146 

Margaret Jones (Mrs. William F. Bradbury). 178 

Born in Templeton, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of Lewis Jones, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Benjamin Jones, both of Massachusetts, as fol- 
lows: 

2. Abijah Jones (Jan. 19, 1797-Mch. 28, 1879) and 
Phoebe Cutting (May 1, 1797-Apr. 1, 1872). 

3. Benjamin Jones (1748-after 1799) and 
Mercy Wilder. 

4. Benjamin Jones (1720- ) and 

Sarah Smith (m., 1747). 

5. John Jones (1686-1768) and 
Mehitable Garfield (m. 1714). 

6. Capt Josiah Jones (1643-1714) and 
Lydia Treadway (m. Oct. 2, 1667-1743). 

7. Lewis Jones ( -Apr. 11, 1684) and 

Ann (....-May 1, 1680, aged 72 or 78). 

Lewis Jones ( 1684) with his wife, Ann, was a 

member of the church in Roxbury, Mass., about 1640. In 
1650 he removed to Watertown, where he died April 11, 
1684. 

Benjamin Jones (1748-aft. 1799) marched to Cambridge 
on the Lexington Alarm under Capt. Ezekiel Knowlton, 
Col. Nathan Sparhawk. He was born in Weston, removed 
to Templeton, thence to Ipswich, Mass., where he died. 



147 



EvTA KiLESKi (Mrs. W. H. Braddury). 179 

Born in Lowell, Mass. 

Descendant of Robert Fletcher, throug-h the Revolution- 
ary ancestor, Ezekiel Fletcher, both of Massachusetts, as 
follows : 



2. Mcnry Kileski (Tan. 21, 1818-Mch., 1899) and 
Susan R. Fletcher (Dec. 10, 1833-Feb. 18, 1897). 

3. Pliineas Fletcher (Dec. 1, 1792-Oct. 23, 1833) and 
Eliza Woods (Mch. 23, 1806- Tan. 21, 1888). 

4. Vrvling- Fletcher (Jan. 28, 1770-Jidy 13, 1829) and 
Relief Parker. 

5. Ezekiel Fletcher (Apr. 3, 1741-July 7, 1806) and 
Bridget Parker. 

6. Capt. Samuel Fletcher (1707-Alch. 11, 1780) and 
Mary Laurence (m. 1729-Dec. 4, 1780). 

7. William Fletcher (Jan. 1, 1671-abt. 1743) and 
IMary . 

8. Samuel Fletcher (b. Eng. bef. 1630-Dec. 9. 1697) and 
Margaret Hailstone. 

9. Robert Fletcher (b. Eng. lS92-Apr. 3, 1677) and 



Robert Fletcher (1592-1677) came from England with 
his wife and three sons in 1630. He settled in Concord, 
Mass., and his name appears often on the town records as 
petitioner, juryman, etc. He became a wealthy and influ- 
ential man and died in Concord, April 3, 1677. 

Samuel Fletcher (bef. 1630-1697) came with his parents 
to Now Enq-land. He settled in Chelmsford, Mass., and 
died there Dec. 9, 1697. 

■ Ezekiel Fletcher (1741-1806) went out on the Lexington 
Alarm as second lieutenant In Capt. Asa Lawrence's Co. of 
Minute Men. He was born in Westford and died in 
Groton, Mass. 



148 

Emma Sanford (Mrs. James H. Brayton). 180 

Born in Akron, Ohio. 

Descendant of Thomas Sandford, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, James Sanford, both of Connecticut, as 
follows : 

2. Isaac Piatt Sanford (Nov. 22, 1811-Mch. 10, 1887) and 
Marv Rovall (Dec. 1, 1814-Oct. 6, 1883). 

3. Lemuel Sanford (Nov. 20, 1781-Apr. 26, 1826) and 
Charlotte Piatt (1785-Jan. 14. 1846). 

4. James Sanford (1758- Apr. 14, 1842) and 
Sarah Beach (Nov. 19, 1764-May 10, 1828). 

5. John Sanford (1739-Apr. 18, 1784) and 
Anna Wheeler (m. 1757-1791). 

6. Ephraini Sanford (Mch. 27, 1709-Feb. 6. 1761) and 
Elizabetli Mix (Nov. 9, 1713-Jan. 22, 1777). 

7. Ezekiel Sanford (Mch. 6, 1668-Mch. 2, 1729) and 
Rebecca Gregory. 

8. Ezekiel Sanford (1635-1683) and 
Rebecca (m. 1665-after 1683). 

9. Thomas Sandford (16U5-Oct., 1681) and 
Dorothy Meadows, his hrst wife. 

Thomas Sandford (1605-1681) married Dorothy Meadows 
of Stowe, England, and came soon afterwards with the John 
Winthrop Colony to Boston, Mass. He received land in 
Dorchester in 1634 and 1635 ; freeman in the Colony in 
1637. In 1639 he was one of the Founders of M.ilford, 
Conn., and his name with that of his second wife, Sarah, 
appears on one of the tablets on the Memorial Bridge 
erected in Milford, Conn., in honor of the early settlers of 
the town. His wiie Dorothy died, leaving two children, 
Sarah and Ezekiel. By a second marriage he had several 
children, and died in Milford in 1681. 

James Sanford (1758-1842) was first in the team serv- 
ice in 1778 and later served as Coast Guard in the Conn. 
Mihtia. He performed his duties acceptably and received 
a pension which he continued to draw until his death in 
1842. He died in Redding, Conn. 



149 

Elmina Folts (Mrs. Henry G. Whitney). 181 

]>orn in Herkimer County, New York. 

Descendant of William Tanner, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Francis Tanner, both of Rhode Island, as 
follows : 

2. Warner Folts (Oct. 10, 1830-....) and 
Margaret Tanner (Feb. 7, 1832-....). 

3. Ichabod Tanner (Nov. 20. 1791-Jan. 11, 1892) and 
Nancy Clapsaddlc 0803-1863) his first wife. 

4. ITancis Tanner (1762-1847) and 
Elizabeth Peterson (1766-1839). 

5. Isaac Tanner (Sept. 9, 1736-Sept. 10, 1822) and 
Lydia Sherman (1739-1763), his first wife. 

6. Francis Tanner (1708-Jan., 1777) and 
JMary Tosh, his first wife. 

7. William Tanner (1660-1740) and 
Elizabeth Cottrill (1666- ), his third wife. 

For services of Founder and Patriot ancestors, see 
National Number 134, page 99. 



150 



Frances Adelaide Leverich (Mrs. D. Phoenix 

Ingraham). 182 

Born in Brooklyn, New York. 

Descendant of Henclrick Jochensc Schoonmakcr, through 
the Revolutionary ancestor, Rev. Martinus Schoonmaker, 
both of New York, as follows : 

2. Richard Berrien Leverich (Mav 23, 1809-Nov. 3. 1869) and 
Margaret Maria Schoonmaker (Oct. 4, 1817- Aug. 16, 1889). 

3. Dr. Nicholas Schoonmaker (Apr. 9, 1781-Aug. 31, 1807) and 
Margaret Masterton (Dec. 25, 1783-July 10, 1861). 

4. Rev. Martinus Schoonmaker (May 1, 1737-May 20, 1824) and 
Mary Bassett (Feb. 23, 1739-Apr. 27, 1819). 

5. Joachem Schoonmaker (bapt. Oct. 12, 1710-1789 or 90) and 
Lydia Rosekrans (bapt. May 3, 1713-m. 1730). 

6. Jochem Hendrixse Schoonmaker (abt. 1658-bet. 1713-30) and 
Anna Hussey (bapt. June 22, 1670-m. 1689), his second wife. 

7. Lieut. Hendrick Jochense Schoonmaker (bef. 165S-abt. 1681) 

and 
Elsie Janse vanBreestede (wid. of Andrisen Petersen). 

Hendrick Jochense Schoonmakcr (bef. 1655-abt. IGSl), 
the progenitor of... the family in this country, was a native 
of Hamburg, Germany. He came to America in the mili- 
tary service of Holland and settled at Albany before 1655, 
where he was an inn keeper. He was a man of consider- 
able social and financial standing, active in military duty, a 
Lieutenant "in the Company of his Noble Honor, the Di- 
rector General." In 1659 the company was ordered to 
Esopus (Kingston) against the Indians, and attracted by 
the beauty and fertility of the place he sold his property 
in Albany and settled in the new community. He became 
prominent in the struggle against the Indians, his military 
experience making him a leader. He died in Kingston 
about 1681. 

Rev. Martinus Schoonmaker (1737-1824) was a patriot 
preacher and an ardent Whig during the Revolution. He 
was born and died in Ulster Co., N. Y. 



151 



Fanny Augusta Suortkidgh. 183 

]jorn in Trenton, New Jersey. 

Descendant of Richard Shortridge, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Capt. Richard Shortridge, both of New 
IJainpshire, as follows: 

Z.John Henry Shortridge (Mch. 18, 1814-....) and 
Mary Ellen Hanson (Dec. 23, ISlS-Nov. 28, 1847). 

3. [olni Hart Sliortridge (Oct. 30, 178S-Tune 8, 1845) and 
Mars-aret Tredick (Jan. 3, 1792-I''cb. 21, 1885). 

4. Richard Shortridge (bapt. Dec. 13, 17C2-Junc 5, 1811) and 
Lois Ham (Jan. 19, 1764-Dec. 25, 1851). 

5. Ricliard_ Sliortridge (bapt. Oct. 20, 1734-Jniy 8, 1776) and 
Mary Pitman. 

6. Richard Shortridge ( -Sept. 29, 1756) and 

Abigail French (Feb. 27, 1699-....). 

7. Richard Shortridge (abt. 1665-m. 1687) and 
Alice Creeber. 

8. Richard Shortridge (abt. 1638-m. 1661) and 
Esther Dearborn. 

9. Richard Shortridge (abt. 1610-m. bef. 1636). 

Richard Shortridge (abt. 1610-m. bef. 1636) came from 
England between 1631 and 1639 and settled at Little Har- 
bor, Portsmouth, N. H. His son Richard was made free- 
man in 1672. r.nd married Esther, daughter of Godfrey 
Dearbo/n of Hampton. 

Capt. Richard Shortridge (1734-1776) raised the first 
company in Portsmouth, N. H., for the War of tlic Revo- 
lution. He was Captain of the tenth Company. Second 
New Hampshire regiment, June IS, 1775. March, 1776, his 
company went on the Expedition to Canada, and Capt. 
Shortridge died in the service at Crown Point, July 8, 1776. 



152 



Lydia Ellen Shortridge. 18-^ 

Born in Dover, New Hampshire. 

Descendant of Richard Shortridge, through the Revoki- 
tionary ancestor, Capt. Richard Shortridge, both of New 
Hampshire, as follows : 

2. John Henry Shortridge (Mch. 18, 1814-....) and 
Mary Ellen Hanson (Dec. 23, 1818-Nov. 28, 1847 V 

3. John Hart Shortridge (Oct. 30, 1788-June 8, 1845) and 
Margaret Tradick (Jan. 3, 1792-Feb. 21, 1885). 

4. Richard Shortridge (bapt. Dec. 13, 1762- June 5, 1811) and 
Lois Ham (Jan. 19. 1764-Dec. 25, 185n. 

5. Richard Shortridge (bapt. Oct. 20, 1734-Jnly 8, 1776) and 
Mary Pitman. 

6. Richard Shortridge (....-Sept. 29, 1756) and 
Abigail French (Feb. 27, 1699-....). 

7. Richard Shortridge (abt. 1665-m. 1687) and 
Alice Crceber (m. 1687). 

8. Richard Shortridge (abt. 1638-m. 1661) and 
Esther Dearborn 

9. Richard Shortridge (abt. 1610-m. 1636). 

For services of Founder and Patriot ancestors, see 
National Number 183, page 151. 



153 



LizziK Remak (Mrs. Thomas H. Fenton). 185 

I'.orn ill Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Dcsccnd.'int of Edmund Scott, through the Revolutionary 
jiu-csior, W'oolsey Scott, both of Connecticut, as follows: 

2. (•.u>t;ivus Remak (Aus:. 1, 1817 in Poland-Sept 20, 1886) and 

.Sue U. Scott (Jan. 8, 1832-living in 1903). 
.1 l"rccman Scott (Nov. 6, 1801-lune 18, 1878) and 

-Mary Justice (July 12, 1810-Nov. 20, 1875). 
•4. Isnac Scott (AIcli. 28, 1764-Apr. 1, 1842) and 

.Miiijail Strickland (1768-Nov. 16, 1831). 

5. Woolsev Scott (Apr. 13, 1741-Dec., 1794) and 
Margaret Edwards (1738-Mch., 1812). 

6. Stepiien Scott (Mch. 12, 1711-1747). and 
Rebecka Woolsev (m. 1734). 

7. David Scott (abt. 1680-1727) and 
Sarali Richards (m. 1698-Aug. 27, 1747). 

8. Edmund Scott (b. Eng.-1691). 

Fjlmund Scott (Eng.-1691) was one of twenty-six men 
of Farmington, Conn., who petitioned the General Court 
for permission to plant a Colony at "Mattatuck," now 
\\\'ilerbury. Conn. Fie had seven sons and one daughter. 
File first deed recorded in Mattatuck was from Edmund 
Scott, Sen., to his son Edmund, Feb. 7, 1682. He died in 
W^uerbury in 1690. 

Woolsey Scott (1741-1794) served as a private at the 
siege of Boston in 1775. 



154 



Fanny Pomeroy Brown. 166 

Born in Wrentham, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of John Whittlesey, through the RevoUition- 
ary ancestor, David Whittlesey, both of Connecticui, as 
follows : 

2. Orlando Brown, M.D. (Apr. 13, 1827-....) and 
Martha Pomeroy Whittlesey (Aug. 11, 1827- ). 

3. David Chester Whittlesey (Mch. 29, 1803-Oct. 13, 1883) and 
Alary Cogswell (Mch. 27, 1802- Apr. 13, 1880). 

4. David Whittlesey (Aug. 18, 1750-Jan. 31, 1825) and 
Martha Pomeroy (Feb. 15, 1768-Sept. 8, 1827), his second wifo. 

5. Eliphalet Whittlesey (May 10, 1714-Tuly 12, 1786) and 
Dorothv Kellogg (Dec. 24, 1716-Apr. 14, 1772), his first wife. 

6. Eliphalet Whittlesey (July 4, 1679-Sept. 14, 1757) and 
Mary Pratt (May 24, 1677-Mch. 22, 1758). 

7. John Whittlesev (July 4, 1623-Apr. 15, 1704) and 
Ruth Dudley (Apr. 20, 1645-Sept. 27, 1714). 

John Whittlesey (1623-1704) was born in Cambridge- 
shire, England, and came to America with the "Lords Say 
and Seal'' Company in 1635. He settled in Saybrook, 
Conn., where he kept a ferry; was representative to the 
General Court from Saybrook, 1644-1685; 1696-1699 and 
1703 ; attorney 1684, and was often on town committees. 
He died in Saybrook, Conn., April 15. 1704. 

David Whittlesey (1750-1825) was a Minute Man from 
Woodbury, Conn., during the Revolution. He was born in 
Newington and died in Washington, Conn. 



155 



Sara White (Mrs. George Mortimer). 187 

Horn in Hillsdale, New York. 

Married first, William Lee. 

Descendant of Elder John White of Massachusetts and 
(.'onnccticut, through the Revolutionary ancestors, Joel 
While. Lemuel White and Lemuel White, Jr., all of 
Connecticut, as follows : 

2. Tames Welles White (Sept. 21, ISOO-Dec. 30/31. 1885) and 
Catherine Reed Garner (Dec. 21, 1808-Sept. 3, 1894). 

3. Lemuel White (Nov. 1, 1762-Dec. 8, 1843) and 

Marv Welles (Feb. 13. 1765-Sept. 1. 1845) his second wife. 

4. Lemuel White (Nov. 6, 1736-May 4, 1780) and 
.Martha Loomis (Mch. 2, 1740-Tan. 28. 1803). 

5. \nd White (Apr. 6, 1705-June 28, 1789) and 

Ruth Dart (Aus?. 26. 1711-Aug. 29, 1760), his second wife. 

6. Capt. Daniel White (July 4, 1671- Tune 23, 1726) and 

.'Vnn Eissell (Apr. 28, 1675-Apr. 21, 1709) his second wife. 

7. Lieut. Daniel White (1639-July 27, 1713) and 
Sarah Crow (Mch. 1, 1647-June 26, 1719). 

8. Elder John White (1600-1683) and 
Mary Levit ( -after 1671). 

Elder John White came from England in the ship "Lion" 
and arrived in Boston Sept. 16, 1632; was grafted land in 
Cambridge, Mass., in 1633, and was a selectman in 1635. 
He was one of the original proprietors of Hartford, Conn., 
and was a selectman there in 1642, 46, 51 and 56. In 1659 
he was one of the leaders to found a new settlement in 
Hadley, Mass.; in 1669 he represented the town as Deputy 
to the General Court. About 1670 he returned to Hartford, 
Conn., and until his death was prominent in the affairs of 
the South Church as Ruling Elder, Referee and Counsellor 
in Ecclesiastical matters. 

Joel White (1705-1789) held civil office in the Colonial 
days, and was chosen member of the Committee of Corre- 
spondence of Connecticut. In 1777 he was elected Chair- 
man of that Committee. He loaned over £3,000 to the State 
and to the United States for carrying on the war. He was 
born in Windsor, Conn., and died in Bolton, Conn. 

Lemuel White (1736-1780) was born in Bolton, Conn., 
and died in East Hartford, Conn. The inventory of his 



156 



estate in 1780 shows that he loaned nearly $2,000 for carry- 
ing on the war. 

Lemuel White (1762-1843) was captured by the British 
and suffered on the "Jersey" prison ship. He was born aiiii 
died in East Hartford, Coun. 



Florence E. Jerauld (Mrs. WillL'VM Boyd Holmes). 188 

Born in Boston, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of Dr. James Jerauld of MasLachuscits, 
through the Revolutionary ancestor, James Jerauld of 
Rhode Island, as follows : 

2. Horace D. Jerauld (June 26, 1832-....) and 
Mary F. Cooper (Nov. 14, 1836-Apr. 23, 1903). 

3. Stephen Jerauld' (June 4, 1785-Mav 19, 1857) and 
Elizabeth Arnold (July 10, 1791-Oct. 1876/7). 

4. James Jerauld (Feb. 2, 1746-1813) and' 
i\Iarj' Rice. 

5. Dr. Dutcc Jerauld (Mch. 5, 1725-July 13, 1813) and 
Freelove Gorton. 

6. Dr. James Jerauld (abt. 1660- ) and 

Martha Dupee (abt. 1685-1763). 

James (Jacques) Jerauld, a Huguenot (abt. 1660- ) 

was born in the province of Languedoc, France, and came 
to America shortly after the revocation of the Edict of 
Nantes. He was a physician and practised his profession 
for many years at Medfield, Mass. 

James Jerauld (1746-1813) served as ensign and lieuien- 
ant in the Rhode Island militia during the Revolution. Ik- 
held many town offices of trust in Warwick, R. I., where 
he died in 1S13. 



157 



y<K.\a: E. McFarland (Mrs. Noble Clemons Shumway). 

189 

lirirn in liopkinton, Massachusetts. 

1 )(.-.sccndant of John Weston (Wesson), through the Rev- 
uliilioiiary ancestors, Levi Weston (Wesson) and John 
\'.\>ion (Wesson), all of Massachusetts, as follows: 

J Charles McFarland (Sept. 8, 1834-Sept. 18, 1885) and 

Olive Locke Weston (Aug. 29, 1831-Apr. 15, 1880). 
J Jtil>al Weston (Feb. 19, 1786-Mav 27, 1868) and 

Clarissa Mellen (Jan. 3, 1794-March 20, 1880). 
■5 I.^-vi Weston (Wesson) (May 27, 17S3-Tune 9, 1852) and 

nlivc Locke (Mav 1, 17S3-March 5, 1826). 
; I..hn Weston (Wesson) (Dec. 1, 1711-Sept. 30, 1786) and 

Iviilli Death (April 20, 1721-between 1753 and 1757), his first 
wife. 

.<amuel Weston (Wesson) (1690-1713) and 

Martha Haven (l690-Oct. 21, 1746/7). 
7. .^aniucl Weston (Wesson) (1665-after 1690) and 

Ahii^ail ■ (m. 1688). 

>•". Irim Weston (Wesson) (Eng. 1630/31-1723) and 

-•,:rah Fitch (m. Apr. 18, 1653). 

John Weston (Wesson) (1630-abt. 1723), Lorn in Buck- 
ini^liainshire, England, settled in Salem, Mass., where in 
1()-1S ho was a member of the First Church. About 1652 
ho removed to Reading- and was one of the organizers of 
the l-'irst Church in Reading, and his marriage to Sarah, 
daughter of Zachariah Fitch, is the first recorded in that 
town. 

Jolin Weston was a soldier in King Philip's War. He 
accumulated a large estate and died in Reading, Mass., 
about 1723. 

John Weston (Wesson) (1711-1786) served as a pri- 
vate in Capt. Joseph Winch's Co., Col. Bullard's ]\Iass. 
Regiment in 1777. 

His son, Levi Weston (Wesson) (1753-1852) enlisted 
from Grafton, Mass., and served with the Northern Army 
in Capt. Edmund Brigham's Co., Col. Job Cushing's Regi- 
ment, in 1777 and 1778. 



15S 

LiDA Twiss (Mrs. William R. White.) 190 

Born in Chester, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of John Bigelow, through the Revokitionary 
ancestor, Daniel Bigelow, both of Massachusetts, as fol- 
lows : 

2. William Twiss (Aug. 11, 1810-Oct. 10, 1888) and 
Lois Eastman Bigelow (Jmie 5, 182U-Dec. 19, 1893). 

3. Amos Bigelow (abt. 1790-....) and 

Amanda Dickinson (Jan. 25, 1795-July 28, 1839). 

4. Amos Bigelow (Sept. 15, 1755-abt. 1812) and 
Annie Brown. 

5. Daniel Bigelow (Julv 16, 1732-after 1799) and 
Martha Pratt (Dec. 15, 1728-Nov. i, 1820). 

6. Daniel Bigelow (Nov. 24, 1691-abt. 1752) and 
Rebecca Eames (July 25, 1697-July 7, 1738) his first wife. 

7. Daniel Bigelow (Dec. 1, 1650-abt. 1715) and 
Abigail Pratt. 

8. John Bigelow (b. Eng.-July 14, 1703-aged 86) and 
Mary Warren (b. Eng.-Oct. 19, 1691), his first wife. 

John Bigelow (1617-1703) of Wrentham, County Suf- 
folk, England, is first on record in Watertown, Mass., m 
1642, when his marriage to Mary, daughter of John \\ ;ir- 
ren, was the first marriage recorded in Watertown. He 
was in military service in 1663; Selectman, 1665-1670-lo71. 
He died in Watertown July 14, 1703. 

Daniel Bigelow (1732-aft. 1799) was in Capt. Dnn-y's 
Co. at Cambridge, Mass., in 1775. In 1776 he was in Capu 
Caleb Brook's Company, Col. Dike's Mass. Regt., and 
served until March, 1777, guarding stores at Boston. 



159 



Nettie Spooner (Mrs. Lester M. Bartlett). 191 

Worn in Natick, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of William Spooner, through the Revolu- 
lionary ancestor, Charles Spooner, both of Massachusetts, 
as follows: 

2. Langdon P. Spooner (Dec. 10, lS26-Jan. 24, 1869) and 
Susan Taylor (Nov. 5, 1831-....). 

3. Creigliton Spooner (June 9, 1804-May 26, 1870) and 
Rowena Jones. 

4. Charles Spooner (Oct. 10, 1764-Nov. 14, 1847) and 
Cliaritv Curtis (m. 1795-Auo-. 23, 1823). 

5. Amaziah Spooner (Mch. 9,^1726-July 8, 1798) and 
Lydia Fay (1730-Aug. 10, 1817). 

6. Samuel Spooner (Feb. 4, 1693-1781) and 
Rebecca Weston (m. 1717-Jan. 20, 1729). 

7. Samuel Spooner (Jan. 14, 1655-1739) and 
Experience Wing (Aug. 4, 1668-....). 

S.William Spooner ( -1684) and 

Hannah Pratt (m. 1652), his second wife. 

William Spooner ( 1684) arrived in the New Ply- 
mouth settlement early in 1637; freeman in 1654; surveyor 
and grand juror. In 1670 he was living' in Dartmouth, 
Mass., and died there in 1684. 

Charles Spooner (1764-1847) enlisted from Hardwick, 
Mass., at the age of sixteen and served in the Worcester 
Co. Militia under Capt. Joseph Bates. His three older 
brothers were also in the service. 



160 



Nellie AI. Chamberlin (Mrs. Arthur H. Pray). 192 

Born in Boston, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of William Chamberlain of Massachusetts, 
through the Revolutionary ancestor, William Chamberlain 
of New Hampshire, as follows : 

2. Daniel Chamberlin (Apr. 19, 1810-July 14, 1879) and 
Abbie Chapman (Feb. 20, 1825-Apr., 1894). 

3. Dudley Chamberlin (Feb. 9, 1778-Oct. 26, 1861) and 
Abigail Goldsmith (1780-1862). 

4. John Chamberlain (Sept. 20, 1751-Jan. 9, 1826) and 
Mary Jackson (1755-1792). 

5. William Chamberlain (Julv 6, 1725-Dec. 13, 1815) and 
Eleanor Home (1726-179i). 

6. Lieut. William Chamberlain (1697-1753) and 
Mary Tibbetts (1700-....). 

7. Jacob Chamberlain (Jan. 18, 1657/8-.\pr. 11, 1712) and 
Experience (1666-1749). 

8. William Chamberlain (1620-May 31, 1706) and 
Rebecca Shelley (....-1692). 

William Chamberlain (1620-1706), born in England, is 
first on record in Boston in 1647. He was admitted an in- 
habitant of Woburn, Mass., in 1648. He died in Billerica, 
Mass., May 31, 1706. 

William Chamberlain (1725-1815) signed the Associa- 
tion Test in Rochester, New Hampshire, in 1776. From 
1778 to 1783 he was deacon in the First Church in Roches- 
ter. He was born in Newton, Mass., and died in Lebanon, 
Maine. 



161 

Ida Mann (Mrs. Charles D. Knovvlton). 193 

])urn in Randolph, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of Richard Man, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Seth Mann, both of Massachusetts, as follows: 

2. Scth Mann (Feb. 4, 1820-June 18, 1899) and 

Minora Adelia Tower (Feb. 19, 1831- ), his second wife. 

3. Elisha Mann (Oct. 4, 1795-Mch. 16, 1835) and 
Ruth Smith (Mav 13, ISOl-July 17, 1882). 

4. Scth Mann (Dec. 3, 1747-July 20, 1822) and 
Deborah Dyer (b. 1746-....), his second wife. 

5. Scth Mann (1724-Jan. 28, 1815) and 

Rachel Spear (m. Oct. 14, 1745-ab. 1749), his first wife. 

6. Joseph Man (Dec. 27, 1694-1747) and 
Mary Niles. 

7. Thomas Man (Aug. 15, 1650-1732) and 
Sarah . 

8. Richard Man (b. Eng.-1655) and 

Kebecca (b. Eng.-m. there bef. 1644). 

Richard Man (Eng.-1655) came with wife, Rebecca, 
from England during the reign of King Charles I. He took 
the oath of fidelity in Scituate, Mass., Jan. 15, 1644. In 
1646 his name appears with twenty-five others in the "Coni- 
liassct Grant" deed. He was drowned in Feb., 1655. 

Scth Mann (1747-1822) served as a private in Capt.. 
Abijah Bangs' Company of Mass. Militia in 1776. He was, 
born in Randolph, Mass., and died in Braintrce, Vermont. 



16: 



Annie Elizabeth Hoxie (Mrs. Geo. F. Cook). 194 

Born in West Greenwich, Rhode Island. 

Descendant of Lodowick Hoxie of Massachusetts, 
through the Revolutionary ancestor, Benjamin Hoxie, Jr., 
of Rhode Island, as follows: 

2. Benjamin R. Hoxie (Apr. 24, 1809-Tuly 5, 1878) and 
Betsey Ann ElliS' (Jan. 24, 1818-June 28, 1902). 

3. Joseph Hoxie (Oct. 11, 1781-Tune 16, 1838) and 
Elizabeth Spencer (May 28, 1780-IVich. 27, 1849). 

4. Benjamin Hoxie, Jr. (Mch. 14, 1742-aft. 1783) and 
Mercy Wells (Oct. 11, 1756-m. 1774). 

5. Benjamin Hoxie 

Sarah Knowles (May 9, 1722-July 11, 1750), his first wife. 

6. John Hoxie (Feb. 25, 1669-1707) and 
Mary Hull (1677-1767). 

7. Lodowick Hoxie ( -after 1702) and 

Mary Presbrey. 

Lodowick Hoxie ( aft. 1702) came from England in 

1650. He was in Sandwich, Mass., in 1657 when he was 
paid for service done the town. Land was laid out to him 
in 1658; chosen "Rater" in 1669; freeman in 1675, and was 
still living in Sandwich in 1702. 

Benjamin Hoxie. Jr. (1742-after' 1783) represented 
Charlestown, R. I., in the State Legislature many years. 
From 1781 to 1783 he was a memher of the Town Council. 



163 



Ellen Louise Sanford (Mrs. Sherwood Stratton 

Thompson). 195 

Born in Newtown, Connecticut. 

Descendant of Philip Parsons, through the Revolution- 
ary ancestor, William Parsons, both of Connecticut, as fol- 
lows : 

2. Julius Sanford (Aug. 27, 1819-Nov. 1, 1S79) and 
Marv Parsons (May 15, 1826- ). 

3. Moses Parsons (Mav 19, 1794-Sept. 15, 1875) and 
Huldah Adams (lS62-Sept. 16, 1839). 

4. William Parsons (Mch. 13, 1750-May 29, 1819) and 
Abigail Wright (Aug. 4, 1753-Jan. 18, 1837). 

5. Nathaniel Parsons (Mar. 11, 1710- "I and 

Alice Collins (Mch. 14, 1716-Feb. 19, 1755). 

6. Philip Parsons ( -1747) and 

Anne . 

7. Philip Parsons (abt. 1625-bef. 1697) and 
Sarah Fairfield Needham. 

Philip Parsons (abt. 1625 ) came early to America, 

where he died before 1697, when his son Philip settled in 
Enfield, Conn., land having been granted to him. 

William Parsons (1750-1819) was a volunteer at the 
Lexington Alarm from Windsor, Conn. He was also with 
the main armv on the Hudson under Cols. Eno and Webb. 



164 

Mattie Amorette Culver (Mrs. E. H. Van Ostrand). 

196 

Born in Berlin, Wisconsin. 

Descendant of Edward Chapman, through the RevoUi- 
tionary ancestor, Simon Chapman, both of Connecticut, as 
follows: 

2. John Franklin Culver (Mch. 25, 1841-....) and 
Amorette Rose'le Chapman (Nov. 22, 1840- ). 

3. Simon Converse Chapman (Dec. 6, 1796-July 14, 1848) and 
Jerusha AIcKnight (June 24, 1802-Mch. 5, 1886), his second 

wife. 

4. Simon Chapman (Feb. 12, 1768-Feb. 14, 1812) and 
Anna Johnson (m. 1792-after 1810). 

5. Simon Chapman (Dec. 23, 1736-July 26, 1823) and 
Eunice Preston ( -May 13, 1774), his first wife. 

6. Capt. Samuel Chapman (Mch. 2, 1696-killed in French war) and 
Hannah Strong (May 8, 1692-m. 1717). 

7. Simon Chapman (Apr. 30, 1669-Oct. 12, 1749), and 
Sarah (1675-May 21, 1735). 

S.Edward Chapman (....-Dec. 19, 1675) and 
Elizabeth Fox, who m. (2) 1677 Samuel Cross. 

Edward Chapman ( 1675) was made freeman in 

Windsor, Conn., in 1667. He was killed in the great Nar- 
ragansett fight called the "Swamp" fighe, Dec. 19, 1675. 

Simon Chapman (1736-1823) was a member of the relief 
committee of Tolland Co., Conn., where he was born and 
where he died. 

Descendant also of Edward Culver of Massachusetts, 
through the Revolutionary ancestor, Moses Culver of Con- 
necticut, as follows : 

2. John Franklin Culver (Mch. 25, 1841- Tan. 18, 1910) and 
Amorette Roselle Chapman (Nov. 22, 1840-Mch. 2, 1907). 

3. William Lothrup Culver (Apr. 22, 1811-June 15, 1886) and 
Mari-Amne Champlin (July 19, 1813-1897). 

4. Moses Culver (1786-Mch. 9, 1863) and 
Hannah Newton (1787-Nov. 13, 1849). 

5. Moses Culver (Apr. 11, 1747-1795) and 
Lucy Turner (Dec. 20, 1757-Feb. 2, 1831). 

6. Moses Culver (Dec. 30, 1712-....) and 
Susannah (m. 1735). 

7. Joseph Culver (1680-....) and 
Mary Stark (m. Jan. 29. 1707). 

8. Joseph Culver (bapt. Sept. 20, 1646-....) and 
Margaret Gallup (or Mercy Winthrop). 



165 



Edward Colver (Culver) (abt. 1600-1685), the Puritan, 
a native of England, came to this country with John Win- 
Ihrop, and was a member of the Mass. Bay Colony at Bos- 
t<ni in 1635. Soon after he joined a company that founded 
the new settlement of "Contentment" now Dedham, Mass. 
He was a man of affairs in the new town; and in 1637 was 
noted as an Indian scout in the Pequot War. During King 
Ehilip's War, although an old man, he with four of his 
sons, Edward, Jr., Ephraim, Joseph and Samuel took part 
in the "Swamp Fight" Dec. 19, 1675. lie removed to Rox- 
bury, Mass., before 1648, in which year his son, Gershom 
was baptized in Roxbury. In 1653 he was in Pequot (now 
New London), Conn., and died in Mystic, Conn., in 1685, 
"full of years and honor." 

Moses Culver (1747-1795) enlisted April 13, 1777, as a 
private in the First Conn. Regiment Continental Line; was 
promoted to Corporal in Capt. Richard Douglas' Co., Fifth 
Regiment Conn., Continental Line, and served in Virginia 
from April to November, 1781. 



166 

Beatrice Larned (Mrs. Bertram Cecil Whitney). 197 

Born in Detroit, Michioan. 

Descendant of William Learned of Massachusetts, 
through the Revolutionary ancestor, Simon Larned of Con- 
necticut, as follows : 

2. Col. Sylvester Larned (Sept. 23, 1820-Nov. 25, 1893) and 
Ellen Salisbury Lester (Sept. 21, 1840- ), his second wife. 

3. Gen. Charles Larned (Sept. 28, 1791-Aug. 13, 1834) and 
Sylvia Hasten Colt (of Pittsfield, Mass.) 

4. Capt. Simon Larned (Aug. 13, 1753-Nov. 16, 1817) and 
Ruth Bull (of Hartford, Conn.). 

5. Simon Larned (Feb. 10, 1721-Sept. 1, 1807) and 
Rebekah Merrils (1718-1812). 

6. William Larned (Feb. 12, 1688-June 11, 1747) and 
Hannah Bryant of Thompson, Conn. (1697-1781). 

7. Capt. Isaac Larned (Sept. 16, 1655-Sept. 15, 1737) and 
Sarah Bigclow (of Watertown, Mass., m. 1679). 

8. Isaac Learned (Feb. 1623-Nov. 27, 1657) and 
Mary Stearns (of Watertown, Mass., m. 1646). 

9. WilHam Learned (1590-Mch. 1, 1646) and 
Judith . 

William Learned (LS90-1G46) was admitted freeman in 
Charlestown, Mass., May 14, 1634. His name and that of 
his wife are the first two on the list of original members 
of the First Church. "Admitted 1632, 10 mo., day 6." In 
1638 he was on a committee to consider "a body of laws." 
In 1642 he was one of the Founders of Woburn, Mass., 
and on the first Board of Selectmen in 1644 and held 
many other town offices. He died in Woburn, March 1, 
1646. 

Simon Larned (1753-1817) served during the Revolu- 
tion as an Ensign, Lieut., Adjutant, Captain and Brigade 
Major. He was an original member of the Society of the 
Cincinnati. He was born in Thompson. Conn., and died 
in Pittsfield, Mass. 



167 

Mary Delight Cushman. 198 

I'.orn in Taunton, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of Robert Cushman and his son, Elder 
Thomas Cushman, through the Revolutionary ancestor, 
jamcs Cushman, both of Massachusetts, as follows: 

1. James Alartyn Cushman (July 4, 1839-living 1904) and 
Louise Maria Croff (Dec. 8. 1837-living 1904). 

3. Rev. Martyn Cushman' (Oct. 8, 1800-Apr. 24, 1875) and 
Mary Ann Reed (May 20, 18(J5-living 1904). 

4. James Cushman (Dec. 22, 1756-Nov. 15, 1832) and 
Mercy Morton (Apr. 19, 1762-Jan. 15, 1827). 

5. Thomas Cushman (Feb. 14, 17b6-Tune 13, 1768) and 
Mchitable Faunce (Apr. 11, 1722-June 19, 1761). 

6. Robert Cushman (Oct. 4, 1664-Sept. 7. 1757) and 
Porsis (1671-Jan. 14, 1744), his first wife. 

7. Thomas Cushman (Sept. 16, 1637- Aug. 23, 1726) and 
Ruth Rowland (....-before 1679), his first wife. 

8. Elder Thomas Cushman (1608-Dec. 11, 1691) and 
-Mary AUerton (1609-1699). 

9. Robert Cushman (b. Eng. abt. 1580-1626 Eng.) and 
Sarah (....-before 1617). 

Robert Cushman (1580-1626) of County Kent, England, 
was a leader of the exiles at Leyden and a'^sisted in organ- 
izing the Expedition of 1620. He sailed in the Mayflower 
in company with the Speedwell and on that vessel proving 
unseaworthy returned in it to England. In 1621 he came 
to America in the Fortune, landing at Plymouth ; preached 
the first sermon printed in .America ; returned to England 
on business for the Colonies and died there in 1626. 
. Elder Thomas Cushman (1608-1691) came with his 
father in the "Fortune" in 1621. On his father's return to 
England he left him in the care of his friend. Gov. Brad- 
ford, under whose tuition he arrived at manhood. He was 
made freeman at Plymouth in 1633; served on the jury in 
1635. About 1637 he removed to Kingston, Mass.. and in 
1649 was appointed a ruling- elder in the church, which of- 
fice he held until his death. His wife, Mary Allerton. was 
the last survivor of those who left England in the May- 
flower. 



168 



James Cushman (1756-1832) went out on the Lexington 
Alarm under Capt. Jesse Harlow. In 1777 he was a cor- 
poral in Capt. Goodwin's Company on a secret expedition 
to Rhode Island. He was born in Kingston and died in 
Plymouth, Mass. 



Mary Ella Clapp (Mrs. W. H. Alline). 199 

Born in Boston, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of Nicholas Clapp, through the Revolution- 
ary ancestors, Roger and Ezekiel Clapp, all of Massachu- 
setts, as follows : 

2. Henry Barnard Clapp (Oct. 21, 1821-....) and 
Mary Clapp Beals (Sept. 3, 1825- Feb. 16, 1885). 

3. Stephen Clapp (Dec. 22, 1778-]\Ich. 23, 1850) and 
Hannah Humphreys (Mav 13, 1780-Oct. 18, 1865). 

4. Ezekiel Clapp (Mch. 14, 1756-Nov. 4, 1823) and 
Lydia Pratt (....-d. 1837). 

5. Roger Clapp (Apr. 28, 1721- Aug. 1, 18^7) and 
Susannah Wales (m. 1748). 

6. Ebenezer Clapp (Oct. 25. 1678-Mav 20, 1750) and 
Hannah Clapp (1681-Aug. 9. 1747). 

7. Nathaniel Clapp (Sept. 15, 1640-Mav 16, 1707) and 
Elizabeth Smith (....-Sept. 19, 1722). 

8. Nicholas Clapp (16i2-Nov. 24, 1679) and 
Sarah Clapp, his first wife. 

Nicholas Clapp (1612-1679), born in England, came to 
New England in 1633 with his brother Thomas. He 
settled in Dorchester, Mass.. in 1634. He held many re- 
sponsible positions in the town and was a deacon in the 
church. In 1849 his descendants erected a memorial in 
his honor in the ancient cemetery in Dorchester, Mass. 

Roger Clapp (1721-1S07) was a Minute IMan at the Lex- 
ington x\larm from Dorchester, Mass., wh.ere he was born 
and died. 

Ezekiel Clapp (1756-1823) was also out on the Lexing- 
ton Alarm. He performed several tours of service in the 
militia as'private until 1779, when he was promoted to cor- 
poral. He was born and died in Dorchester. Mass. 



169 



Aiiiiv K. Corliss (Mrs. Maurice Worcester Turner). 

200 
Horn in Brighton, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of George CorHss of Massachusetts, through 
the Revohitionary ancestor, Joshua Corhss of Massachu- 
setts and New Hampshire, as follows : 

2. Charles Corliss (Tan. 25, 1812-Nov. 25, 1890) and 
Rebekah Wing Collins (Feb. 17, 1816- July 9, 1861). 

3. Tohn Corliss (Nov. 6, 176S-Nov. 1, 1815) and 
'Mehitable Jewett (Feb. 21, 1774-Nov. 18, 1S31). 

4. Joshua Corliss (Jan. 19, 1733- Tan. 29, 1819) and 

Molly (\yells) Colby (....-June 8, 1825) his second wife. 
^Irs. Abigail March, his first wife, d. 1763, and is buried in 
Weare, N. I-I. 

5. John Corliss (Mch. 4, 1686-Xov. 1766) and 
Rudi Havnes (Feb. 7, 1691-1787). 

6. John Corliss (Mch. 4, 1648-Feb. 17, 1698) and 
Mary Wilford (Nov. 18, 1667-m. 1684). 

7. George Corliss (abt. 1617-Oct. 19. 1686) and 
Joanna Davis (m. Oct. 26, 1645, Haverhill, Mass.). 

Georg-e Corliss (abt. 1617-1686), born near Exeter, 
England, came to New England about 1639 at the age of 
22; was first in Newbury, then settled in .Haverhill, Mass. 
He was an enterprising and industrious man, well qualified 
to be a leader in the new settlement. In 1861 the land 
granted him in Haverhill was still in the possession of his 
descendants. 

Joshua Corliss (1733-1S19) of Hampstead. N. H., who 
had served in the earlier wars, was a Minute Man in 1775 
in the company of Capt. Benjamin Emerson. 



170 



Adams. Nat. No. 137. 



Amerman. Nat. No. 154. 



Axwoon. Nat. Nos. 108 & 
109 (Wood.) 

Bailey. Nat. No. 172. 
(Eayley.) 



Barnes. Nat. No. 147. 
(of N.Y. &Conn.) 



Barnes. Nat. No. 161. 
(of Mass.) 

Batcheller. Nat. No. 129. 

Bayley. 

Beardsley. Nat. No. 158. 

Belden. Nat. No. 153. 



Bigelow. Nat. No. 190. 



Bissell. Nat. No. 166. 

Booth. Nat. No. 151. 
( Booth E.) 



REFERENCES 

Savage's Genealogical Dictionary. 
Adams Genealogy, by A. N. Adams. 
Mass. Soldiers and Sailors, in Revo- 
lution. 
D. F. P. A. Nat. No. 79. 

American Ancestry, Vol. XII. 

D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XVIII. 

Eager's History Orange Co., N. Y. 

Davis' History of Plymouth, Mass. 
Mass. Soldiers and Sailors in Rev. 

Savage's Genealogical Dictionary. 
Bailey Genealogy by H. R. Bailey. 
Conn. Hist. Soc. Collections, Vol. 
VIII. 

Howell's History Southampton, L. I. 
History Southampton, Conn. 
Wynkoop-Barnes Genealogy. 
Stiles' History, Windsor, Conn. 

Hudson's History, Marlborough, 

Mass. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol.' VI. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 
Batchelder Genea'ogy. 
Mass. Soldiers and Sailors in Rev. 
D. A.R. Lineage Book. Vol. XXVIII. 

See Bailey. 

Orcutt's History Stratford, Conn. 

Beardslev Genealogv. 

D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXXIV, 

Savage's Genealogical Dictionary. 

Belden Genealogj'. 

Stiles' Hist. Wetherstield, Conn. 

Foote Genealogy. 

Conn. Men in the Rev. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Bigelow Genealogy. 

Mass. Soldiers and Sailors in Rev. 

Stiles' I-Iist. Ancient Windsor, Conn. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXIIL 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Booth Genealog)'. 

Conn. Men in the Rev. 

Conn. Hist. Soc. Coll., Vol. VIII. 

Orcutt's History Stratford, Conn. 



171 



ilowLN. Nat. No. 145. 



Ik.v.NTOX. Nat. No. 101. 



BuTTHRFiELD. Nat. Nos. 116 
.V 1-^8. 



Ca.mp. Nat. No. 143. 



Carleton. Nat. No. 146. 



Chamberlain. Nat. No. 192. 



Chapman. Nat. No. 196. 



Child. Nat. No. 123. 



CuM'P. Nat. No. 199. 



Clark. Nat. No. 149. 



CoLVER. (See Culver.) 

CoMSTOCK. Nat. Nos. 135 
&141 



Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 
Bliss' History Rehoboth, Mass. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXIX. 
Mass. Soldiers and Sailors in Rev. 
Vital Records of Rehoboth, Mass. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Mass. Soldiers and Sailors in Rev. 

Boynton Genealogy. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 
History Cheshire, N. H. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XVIIL 
D. F. P. A. Nat. Nos. 76 & 93. 

Atwater's Hist. New Haven, Conn. 
Original Wills and Deeds, copied by 

Charles L. N. Camp. 
Conn. Men in Rev. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. VI. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXIX. 
Gage's History Rowley, Mass. 
Mass. Soldiers and Sailors in Rev. 
Vital Records of Andover, Mass. 

Secretary Chamberlain Association. 
N. H. State Papers, Vol. XXX. 
Sewall's History Woburn, Mass. 
McDuffey's Plistory Rochester, N. H. 

Stiles' Hist. Ancient Windsor. Conn. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXIII. 

Bond's History Watertown, Mass. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary 

Child Gcncalugy. 

D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XVIH. 

Clapp JMemorial. 

Mass. Soldiers and Sailors in Rev. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XV. 
Humphrey Gcnealogoy. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Conn. Men in the Rev. 

D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXV. 

Milford (Conn.) Church Records. 

JMerrick Genealogy. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 
Comstock Genealogy. 
Hoadley's Records of Conn. 
Baker's History Montville, Conn. 



172 



Corxiss. Nat. No. 200. 



Crosman. Nat. No. 157. 



Culver. Nat. No. 196. 

(COLVER.) 

CusHMAN. Nat. No. 198. 



Damon. Nat. Nos. 107 & 111. 



Dewey. Nat. No. 156. 



Dickinson. Nat. No. 162. 



DiMOCK. Nat. No. 132. 



Farnsworth. Nat. No. 159. 



Fletcher. Nat. No. 179. 



Form AN. Nat. No. 113. 



Chase's History Haverhill, Mass. 
History VVeare, N. H. 
History Hampstcad, N. H. 
Corliss Genealogy. 

Emery's History Taunton, Mass. 
Robert's History of the Ancient and 

Honorable Artillery Company of 

Mass. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXHI. 
Vital Records Dedham, Mass. 

Vital Records Dedliam, Mass. 
Colver — Culver Genealogy. 
Wheeler's History Stonington, Conn, 

American x\ncestrj', Vol. X. 
Vital Records Kingston, Mass. 
Cushman Genealogy. 
Mass. Soldiers and Sailors in Rev. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, 'Vol. XVI. 

Vital Records Sudbury, Mass. 

Vital Records Wayland, Mass. 

History Reading, Mass. 

Damon Genealogy. 

Emerson Genealogy. 

Mass. Soldiers and Sailors in Rev. 

Stiles' Hist. Ancient Windsor, Conn. 
Dewey Genealog,,.. 
Mass. Soldiers and Sailors in Rev. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXVUl. 

Stiles' History Wethersfield, Conn. 
Judd's History Hadley, Mass. 
iMass. Soldiers and Sailors in Rev. 

Otis' History Barnstable, Mass. 
Vital Recorils Mansfield, Conn. 
Conn. Men in the Revolution. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XIV. 

Farnsworth Genealogv. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXVII. 
Mass. Soldiers and Sailors in Rev. 
Vital Records Westminster, Mass. 

American Ancestry, Vol. VI. 
Fletcher Genealogy. 
Mass. Soldiers and Sailors in Rev. 
Vital Records Concord, Mass. 
Vital Records Westford, Mass. 

Forman Genealogv. 

D. A. R. Lineage 'Book, Vol. XIV. 



173 



GARriEt-D. Nat. No. 117. 

GrKOLLD. 

GKr.r.xE. Nat. No. 136. 
CiuswoLD. Nat. No. 173. 



Hitchcock. Nat. No. 126. 



Hooker. . Nat. Nos. 104 & 105. 



HoTCHKiss. Nat. No. 102. 



Howe. Nat. No. 127. 



HoxiK. Nat. No. 194. 



Hyde. Nat. No. 144. 



Jerauld. Nat. No. 18S. 
(Gerould.) 

ToHNSON. Nat. No. 114. 



Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Bond's History Watertown, Mass. 

Original Pension Application. 

See Jerauld. 

Hoadley's Public Records of Conn. 
Baker's History ^lontville, Conn. 
Conn. Men in the Rev. 

Stiles' Hist. Ancient Windsor, Conn. 
Nash's Fifty Puritan Families. 
Aldrich's History Walpole, N. H. 
N. H. Rev. Rolls, Vol. II. 
Historv Rockingham, Vt. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXIV. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Hitclicock Genealogy. 

Original Pension Application, S. F. 

^13.404. 
Atwatcr's History New Haven, Conn. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Hooker Genealogy. 

Conn. Men in Rev. 

Mass. Soldiers and Sailors in Rev. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Tuttle Genealogy. 

Dodd's History East Haven, Conn. 

Conn. Men in Rev. 

D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XIV. 

Temple's History Framingham, Mass. 
History Northlield, Mass. 
Force's American Archives. 

Austin's 160 Allied Families. 
Town Records Charlcstown, R. I. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Flyde Genealogy. 

Caulkin's Llistory Norwich, Conn. 

Conn. Men in Rev. 

D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXIV. 

Jerauld Genealogv. 

D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vok XIX. 

Shonrd's Hist. Fenwick Colony, N. J. 
History Gloucester, Salem and Cum- 
berland Counties, N. J. 
Tohn son's Historv, Salem, N. J. 
b. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. III. 
D. F. P. A. Nat. No. 81. 



174 



Jones. Nat. No. 178. 



Kneeland. Nat. No. 111. 



Larned. Nat. No. 197. 
(Learned.) 



Levering. Nat. No. 121. 



Lewis. Nat. No. 177. 



Livingston. Nat. No. 163. 



LovF-LL. Nat. No. 13 L 



Mann. Nat. No. 193. 
(Man.) 

Mason. Nat. No. 140. 



Maudsley. (See Moseley.) 
Miner. Nat. No. 139. 



Moore. Nat. No. 142. 



Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 
Jones Genealogy by Alary E. R. Jones. 
Vital Records Weston, Mass. 
Mass. Soldiers and Sailors in Rev. 

Kneeland Genealogy. 
Vital Records Ipswich, jNIass. 
History Colchester, Conn. 
D. F. P. A. Nat. No. 30. 

Bond's History Watertown, Mass 
Biographical Notices of the Society 

of the Cincinnati of Mass. 
Learned Genealogy. 

Levering Genealogy. 

Penna. Archives, Fifth Series, Vol. 

HT. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. IX. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 
History Sonthington, Conn. 
Hoadlev's Conn. State Records. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XVI. 

Schuyler's Colonial New York. 

Livingston Genealogy by B. Living- 
ston. 

N. Y. Colonial Documents. 

American Archives, Fifth Series. 

Calendar Historical MSS. War of 
Revolution. 

D. F. P. A. Nat. No. 95. 

N. E. Hist, and Gen. RegisterVol.il. 
Biog. Cong. Directory, 1774-1903. 
Memoirs of Miss. 

Mann INlemorial. 

D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXX. 

Spark's American Biography. 
Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 
Conn. Pension Rolls. 
D. F. P. A. Nat. No. 88. 



Wheeler's History Stonington, Conn. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Conn. Men in the Rev. 

D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXVII. 

D. F. P. A. Nat. No. 22. 

Stiles' Hist. Ancient W^indsor, Conn. 
Conn. Men in the Rev. 
Member Mayflower Society. 



175 



Morgan. Nat. No. 167. 



^roRSE. Nat. No. 124. 



MosF.LEY. Nat. Nos. 118& 
120. 
(Maudsley.) 

Northrop. Nat. No. 138. 

(NORTHRUP.) 



NoYES. Nat. No. 168. 



Parsons. Nat. No. 195. 

Pr.\ther. Nat. No. 160. 
Pratt. Nat. No. 169. 



Sanford. Nat. No. ISO. 
(Sandford.) 



Saunders. Nat. No. 125. 



ScHOONitAKER. Nat. No. 182. 



Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Morgan Genealog}'- by N. H. Morgan. 

Conn. Men in the Rev. 

Savage's Genealogical Dictionary. 
Currier's History, Newbury, Mass. 
Mass. Soldiers and Sailors in Rev. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XVII. , 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 
History Hingham, Mass. 
History Dorchester, Mass. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XX. 

Northrup — Northrop Genealogy. 

Baldwin Genealogy. 

Grant Genealogy. 

Orcutt's History New Milford. Conn. 

Conn. Men in the Rev. 

D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. III. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 
Noyes Genealogy. 
Wheeler's Hist. Stonington, Conn. 
Hemenway's Vt. Hist. Gazetteer, Vol. 
V. 

History Enfield, Conn. 

Parsons Genealogy. 

Conn. Men in the Rev. 

D. A. R. Lineage Book. Vol. XIV. 

Records at Annapolis, Md. 

D. A. R. Lineage Book. Vol. XXIX. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Pratt Genealogy. 

Ketcham's History, Buffalo. N. Y. 

Paige's History, Cambridge, Mass. 

Todd's Histor}', Redding, Conn. 
Sanford Genealogv. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXIII. 
Conn. Men in the Rev. 

Pope's Pioneers of Mass. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XVIII. 
Felt's History, Salem, Mass. 
Shattuck Genealogy. 

N. Y. Biog. & Gen. Record. Vol. 

XIX. 
Sylvester's History Ulster Co., 

N. Y. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book. Vol. XXVI. 
Ulster Co. (N. Y.) Wills. 



17'.6 



Scott. Nat. No. 185. 



Seymour. Nat. No. 110. 



Sherman. Nat. No. 159. 



Shortridge. Nat. Nos. 183 
& 184. 



Smith. Nat. Nos. 112 & 164. 



Snowden. Nat. No. 176. 



Spencer. Nat. No. 103. 



SrooNER. Nat. No. 191. 



Sproat. Nat. Nos. lis & 155. 



Stone. Nat. No. 174. 



Anderson's History, Waterbury, 

Conn. 
Conn. Men in the Rev. 
History, Watertown, Conn. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 
Seymour Genealogy. 
Memorial History, Hartford, Conn. 
D. A. R. Lineage Books, Vols. V and 

XVI. 
D. F. P. A. Nat. No. 68. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Bond's History, Watertown, Mass. 

Ward's History, Shrewsbury, Mass. 

The American Genealogist. 

Shortridge Genealogy, 

N. H. Rev. Rolls. 

N. E. Hist, and Gen. Register, Vol. 

vn. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Force's Am. Archives, Fourth Series, 

Vol. HI. 
Pelletreau's Records, Smithtown, 

L. I. 
Thompson's Historv, L. I., Vol. IT, 
D. A. R. Lineage Boole, Vol. XIII. 

New Jersey Archives, Vol. I. 
Records First and Second Pres. Ch., 

Phila. 
D. A.' R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXIV. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Smith's History, Dutchess Co., N. Y. 

D. A. R. Lineage Book. Vol. VIII. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Spoon er Genealogy. 

Mass. Soldiers and Sailors in Rev. 

D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXIV. 

Vital Records, Scituate, Mass. 
Weston's Flistory, Middleboro, Mass. 
Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 
Pcnna. Magazine, Vol. XXVII. 
History of Guilford and Madison, 

Conn. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. III. 

Steiner's History, Guilford and 

Madison, Conn. 
Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXIII. 



177 



SiioNO. Nat. No. 122. Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Strong Genealogj'. 
Emery's History, Taunton, Mass. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXI. 

Tai.cott. Nat. No. 152. Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Talcott Genealogv. 
D. A. R. Lineage' Book, Vol. XXX. 

Tannku. Nat. Nos. 134 & 181. Tanner Genealogy. 

Fones Record, Vol. L 

Original Pension Application S F. 

23018. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXVI. 

Tiro.MrsoN. Nat. No. 150. Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Rambles about Portsmouth, N. H. 
Mass. Soldiers and Sailors in Rev. 
Memorial Hist. Boston, Alass. 
Tiiaycr Genealogy. 
Vital Records of Douglass, Mass. 
Annals of Mendon, Mass. 

Tkkat. Nat. Nos. 106 & 171. Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Treat Genealogy. 
U. S. Pension Rolls. 
Conn. Men in the Rev. 
Mass. Soldiers and Sailors in Rev. 

Waterman. Nat. No. 165. Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Conn. Men. in the Rev. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XIX. 
Caulkins History, Norwich, Conn. 

Watson. Nat. Nos. 110 & 128. Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Phelps Genealogy.' 
Watson Genealogy. 
Memorial History, Hartford, Conn. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XIV. 
Conn. Men in the Rev. 

WrsTON. Nat. No. 189. Crane's History, Worcester Co., 

(Wesson.) Mass. 

Mass. Soldiers and Sailors in Ivev. 

Wktiiebill. Nat. No. 119. Barnes' History, N. J. 

N. J. Archives, First Series, Vol. I. 

Stockton Genealogy. 

Mayer Genealogy. 

D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXIX. 

White. Nat. No. 187. Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

Kellowg's Memorial of Elder John 

White. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXVII. 
D. F. P. A. Nat. Nos. 38 and 98. 



178 



Whittlesey. Nat. No. 186. 
WiLTBANK. Nat. No. 175. 



Wood. 
Woodcock. 



Nat. No. 173. 



Wright. Nat. No. 170. 



Whittlesey Genealogy. 

D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXXIl. 

Scharf's History, Delaware, Vol. II. 
Penna. Archives, Second Series, Vol. 

V. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XVI 1. 

See Atwood. 

Dedham Historical Register, Vol. IV. 
Daggett's History, Attleboro, Mass. 
Records from John L. V^'^oodcock, 

Chicago, 111. 
History, Swanzey, N. H. 
D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XXIV. 

Savage's Gen. Dictionary. 

D. A. R. Lineage Book, Vol. XV. 

Mass. Soldiers and Sailors in Rev. 

Burt Genealogy. 

Hist. Northfield, Mass. 

Hist. Rockingham, Vt. 



HISTORY 



OF 



THE NATIONAL SOCIETY 



OF 



DAUGHTERS 
OF FOUNDERS 
AND PATRIOTS 
OF AMERICA 




FOR THE SIXTEENTH YEAR 
ENDING MAY 13, 1914 



♦J \ V 



OFFICERS. 

(To serve until May 13, 1916.) 

National President: 
Mrs. Wm. Van Zandt Cox (Jui.ict HAzr.i/riNK Emkry), 

Emery Place, Brightwood, D. C. 
National Vice-President: 
Mrs. H. V. Boynton (Helen Mason), 

The Octavia, Washington, D. C. 

National Recording Secretary: 
Mrs. Thaddeus Milton Jones (Emma Kendall Culver), 

1606 K St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

National Corresponding Secretary: 
Mrs. Noble Newport Poits (Cornelia Ross Potts), 

1002 Twenty-Second St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

National Registrar: 
Mrs. Peter Perry Pealer (Ruth M. Griswold), 

1004 Mass. Ave., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

National Treasurer: 
Mrs. Wm. M. Hannay (Mary A. Emery), 

207 I St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

National Historian: 
Mrs. Arthur R. Burkholdcr (Catherine Leavenworth), 

1S20 M St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

National Chaplain: 
Mrs. Alexander H. Semmes (Mary Hodges), 

2208 Q St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

National Color Bearer: 
Mrs. Charles Edwin Brown (Eugenia Washington Moncuke), 

121 Twelfth St., S. E., Washington, D. C. 
National Councillors: 
(To serve until May la, 191.J.) 
Mrs. Charles O. Norton (Lottie Eloise Govi;), 

"The Elms," Kearney, Neb. 
Mrs. John Spencer Bukey (Roberta J. M.vgruder), 

475 Pa. Ave., N. W., Washington, D. C. 
Mrs. Thomas H. Johnston (Caroline A. Dorsev), 

i;;4;^ Clifton St., Washington, D. C. 
(To serve until May 13, 1916.) 
Mrs. George H. Martin (Mary E. Van Sinderen Lawrence), 

The Wyoming, Washington, D. C. 
Miss Lucy M. Hewitt, 403 Stoneleigh Court, Washington, D. C. 
Mrs. Julian C. Dowell (Cynthia Noyes), 

3162 Mt. Pleasant St., Washington, D. C. 

(To serve until May 13, 1917.) 
Mrs. John J. Myers (Mary Hi{witt), 

403 Stoneleigh Court, Washington, D. C. 
Mrs. Corra Bacon Foster, The Marlljorough, Washington, D. C. 
Mrs. Horace P. McIntosh (Ell.-v Bi;i,le Chaeeke), 

The Oakland, Washington, D. C. 

Founders: 
Miss Eugenia Washington, 
Mrs. Henry V. Boynton, 
Mrs. William L. Mason. 



NATIONAL COMMITTEES. 

History : 

Mrs. Arthur R. Burkholder, Chairman. 
Mrs. Hknry V. Boynton. 
A'Irs. Thaddeus Milton Jones. 
Mrs. John J. Myers. 



By-Laws of Chapters: 

Mrs. George G. Martin, 

Chairman. 
Mrs. Thaddeus Milton Jones. 
Miss Lucy M. Hewitt. 



Statute Book: 

Mrs. Henry V. Boynton, 

Chairman. 
Mrs. Thomas H. Johnston. 
Mrs. John S. Bukey. 



Printing : 

Mrs. Noble Newport Potts, Chairman. 
Mrs. Peter Perry Pealer. 
Mrs. Thaddeus Milton Jones. 
Mrs. Wm. M. Hannay. 
Mrs. Henry V. Boynton. 



Auditing : 

Mrs. John J. Myers, Chairman. 
Miss Lucy M. HEWirr. 



Conservation of National Resources: 
Mrs. Amos G. Draper. Chairman. 



Mrs. Peter Perry Pealer. 
AIrs. Ciiakt,es H. Armstrong. 
Mrs. D. Phoenix Lvoraham. 
Mrs. John Stevenson Mitche.ll. 
Mrs. William B. Holmes. 
Mrs. Bertram C. Whitney. 
Mrs. William E. CallEnder. 
Mrs. Benjamin A. Fessenden. 



Mrs. Maky A. C. Beach. 
Alus. Fi'.i.ix Agnus. 
Miss Mary L. Atwood. 
Mrs. Wallace Delaeield. 
Miss Stella Pickett Hardy. 
Mrs. Charles B. Tozier. 
AIrs. John R. Shelton. 



Protection 

AIrs. Frank A. 
Mrs. Chandler Smith. 
Mrs. Joseph A1. Caley. 
Mrs. J. B. Clapp. 
AIiss AIarcia A'I. Richardson. 
A'Irs. W. S. Goodwyn. 
AIiss ELizARirni A. Stocking. 



of the ]'lag: 

CoRBiN, Chairman. 

AIrs. Stephen J. Murphy. 
Mrs. Josiah Shepard. 
AIrs. AIason G. Smith. 
AIrs. Frank Tomlinson. 
Mrs. Arthur W. Barber. 
Mrs. Scott Hopkins. 



OFFICERS OF STATE CHAPTERS. 

CONNECTICUT. 
(Organized June 4, 1901.) 

President: 

Mrs. Charles H. Armstrong, 
20 Brooklawn Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Corresponding Secretary: 

Mrs. Gi-.OKGE B. Bunneli,. 
Southport, Conn. 

Treasurer: 

Mrs. Clarence B. Bolmer, 
19 Lynwood Place, New Haven, Conn. 



NEW YORK. 
(Organized February 13, 1902.) 

President: 

Mrs. D. Phoenix Ingraham, 

Hotel St. Andrew, 72d and Broadway, New York City. 

Corresponding Secretary: 

Miss Flora Van Loan, 

22 Mt. Morris Park, West, New York City. 

Treasurer : 

Mrs. Charles D. Ward, 
702 St. Nicholas Ave., New York City. 



PENNSYLVANIA. 
(Organized March 21, 1902.) 

President: 

Mrs. Sara P. Snowden Mitchell, 
The "Lincoln," Philadelphia, Pa. 

Corresponding Secretary: 

Mrs. Thomas H. Fenton, 

1319 Spruce St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Treasurer : 

Mrs. Nathaniel S. Keay, 
CHfton Heights, Pa. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 
(Organized March 14, 1904.) 

President: 

Mrs. William B. Holmes, 
(50 Heath St., Winter Hill, Somerville, Mass. 

Corresponding Secretary: 

Mrs. S. C. Ingraham, 

333 Washington St., Brookline, Mass. 

l^easurer: 

Mrs. Maurice W. Turner, 
127 Harvard St., Brookline, Mass. 



MICHIGAN. 
(Organized November 13, 1906.) 

President: 

Mrs. Bertram C. Whitney, 
Grosse Point, Mich. 

Corresponding Secretary: 

Mrs. David D. Cady, 
57 Watson St., Detroit, Mich. 

Treasurer: 

Mrs. H. B. Joy. 

Grosse Pointe Farms, Wayne Co., Mich. 



VIRGINIA. 
(Organized May 13, 1907.) 

President: 

Mrs. William E. Callender, 
The New Berne, Washington, D. C. 

Corresponding Secretary: 

Mrs. James D. Oden, 

Falls Church, Va. 

Treasurer: 

Miss Ada Augusta Rhodes, 
Falls Church, Va. 



ILLINOIS. 
(Organized March 24, 1908.) 

Honorary President: 
Miss Judith P. Sinclair. 

President: 

Mrs. Benjamin A. FessEnden, 
Highland Park, 111. 

Corresponding Secretary: 

Mrs. Charles Salmon, 

6826 Perry Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Treasurer: 

Mrs. Wm. Harrison French, 

5342 Cornell Ave., Chicago, 111. 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 
(Organized March 24, 1908.) 

President: 

Mrs. Mary A. C. Beach, 
The Ashley, Washington, D. C. 

Corresponding Secretary : 

Mrs. C. W. Brown, 

1411 K St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Treasurer: 

Mrs.. Caroline Freeman Kirk, 

2015 G St., Washington, D. C. 



MARYLAND. 
(Organized November 27, 1908.) 

President: 

Mrs. Felix Agnus, 
Stevenson, Baltimore Co., Md. 

Corresponding Secretary: 

Miss Ada A. Hadel, 

Hampton Court, Baltimore, Md. 

Treasurer: 

Miss Dollie Glorvina Fulton, 
2 East Preston St., Baltimore, Md. 



8 

WISCONSIN. 
(Organized December 22, 1910.) 

President: 

Miss Mary L. Atwood, 

396 Kane Place, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Corresponding Secretary: 

Mrs. Edward P. Vii.as, 

396 Kane Place, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Treasurer: 

Mrs. John Joys, Jr., 

East Milwaukee, Wis. 



MISSOURI. 
(Organized December 22, 1910.) 

President: 

Mrs. Wau.acp; DFXAFir:i<D, 
5028 Westminster Place, St. Louis, Mo. 

Corresponding Secretary: 

Mrs. George D. Fisher, 

4531 Westminster Place, St. Louis, Mo. 

Treasitrer: 

Mrs. Theodore Sheeton, 

4467 Linden Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 



ARKANSAS. 
■ (Organized April 15, 1912.) 

President: 

Miss Stella Picke.tt Hardy, 
Batesvillc, Ark. 

Corresp ending Se ere ia ry : 

Mrs. John W. Fekuill, 
Batesvillc, Ark. 

Treasurer: 

Miss Amy C. Ferrill, 
Batesvillc, Ark. 



OHIO. ^ 

(Organized Octo1)cr 5, 11)12.) 

Preside lit: 

Mrs. Charles B. Tozii:r, 

2062 East 77th St., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Corresponding Secretary: 

Mrs. John J. Wood, 

8210 Carnegie Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Treasurer: 

Miss Effif. Serena Wagar, 

14719 Detroit Ave., Lakewood, Ohio. 



KANSAS. 
(Organized November 12, 1913.) 

President : 

Mrs. John R. Shelton, 

1275 Topeka Ave., Topeka, Kansas. 

Corresponding Secretary : 

Mrs. Effie Hiatt Van Tuyi,, 

310 Fifth Ave., Leavenworth, Kansas. 

Treasurer: 

Mrs. David Hill, 

544 S. Ninth St., Salina, Kansas. 




MINUTES OF THE GENERAb COURT 
MAY 13, 1914. 

HE Sixteenth General Court of the Na- 
tional Society of the Daughters of 
Founders and Patriots of America was 
called to order by the National President, 
Mrs. William Van Zandt Cox, in the 
Oak Room of the Raleigh Hotel at 11 
o'clock a. m., May 13, 1914. 
The National Officers and representatives of State chaj)- 
ters in Connecticut, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, 
District of Columbia and Maryland were present. The 
roll call, with salutation to the flag, in which all joined, was 
followed by the Lord's Prayer in concert. 

THE PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS OF WELCOME. 

The year 1914 has found us with many names added to the 
list of membership and several new and enthusiastic Chap- 
ters pledging support to the National Society. It has been 
our pleasure to welcome these members and to extend a 
cordial greeting and good wishes for success to the new 
Chapters. The several special and standing committees 
have performed their duties faithfully and well. I wish 
to thank the Chairman and members of these committees 
for the work accomplished in such splendid manner. 

To those of the Executive Committee, individually and 
collectively, I wish to express my gratitude for the loyal sup- 
port so sincerely and unreservedly extended. Each member 
has given her time and strength and thought to the work 
of the Society, and has been ever ready to respond to the 
call of the President, with no remuneration but the knowl- 
edge that "she has done what she could" in behalf of the 
Society dear to her heart. 



11 

During the year many members have passed away. The 
list contains the names of those who have met wVth us year 
after year, and whose famihar faces we miss today. Those 
called come from the North, the South, the East, the West 
and the home of our National Society. Tributes of af- 
fection and letters of sympathy were sent from the Execu- 
tive Committee, showing in part the esteem in which we 
held these associates and the great loss sustained by the 
National Society of the Daughters of Founders and Pa- 
triots. The reports of Committees and those from Chap- 
ters will tell most clearly what has been accomplished dur- 
ing the year, and we can congratulate ourselves upon the 
result. Our History and Lineage Book speaks for itself, 
but the letters of praise and requests for extra copies show 
the appreciation of the value of the work by our members 
and the public, which is most gratifying. 

Our Society is essentially a genealogical society, though 
the love of country and of home is as true today as in the 
centuries past, when men founded their homes in the wilder- 
ness and fought to save them. 



'to' 



"Such is the patriots' boast 
Where e'er we roam ; 
His first, best country 
Ever is his own." 

Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America, we wel- 
come you most cordially to the Sixteenth Session of the 
General Court. 

This date commemorates the landing at Jamestown on 
the 13th day of May, 1007, of those whom some of us call 
"Our Ancestors." 

A telegram was read from i\Irs. Norton, of Nebraska, 
regretting that she could not be present at the General Court 
this year, but stating that she hoped to be with us in 191 ">, 
representing a Nebraska Chapter which she was about to 
form, with a nucleus of 11 members. Letters of greeting 



12 

were also read from Mrs. Thomas, of Maine; Mrs. Dcla- 
field, of Missouri; Mrs. Ingraham, of>^ New York; Mrs. 
Shelton, of Kansas; Miss Hardy, of Arkansas, and Mrs. 
Holmes, of Massachusetts. 

The minutes of the Fifteenth General Court were road 
and approved. 

CONFERENCE REPORT. 
Annual Conference; of the D. F. P. A., Heed Ai-rie 18, 

1914, AT 8 p. M., AT THE RaEEIGH HoTEE. 

The Conference was called to order by the National 
President, Mrs. William Van' Zandt Cox, who welcomed 
the members present most graciously. Most of the natioiud 
officers and representatives from Connecticut, Nebraska, 
Wisconsin, Michigan, Arkansas, New York, Illinois, Vir- 
ginia, Ohio, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Maryland, Mis- 
souri, Iowa and the District of Columbia were present. 

Minutes of the conference of 1913 read and approved. 

After a general discussion as to the hour of holding the 
conference in future, it was decided to continue the pres- 
ent hour of 8 p. m., since it seemed to be the most conven- 
ient for the greatest number. 

Mrs. Boynton spoke to the motion of last year concern- 
ing the residence of officers of chapters. One chapter asked 
that it be rescinded. After a general discussion, Mrs. 
Myers moved, and it was seconded and carried unanimously, 
that the ruling of last year be not rescinded. The motion 
of last year as amended by Mrs. Norton is as follows: 
"That the selection of officers be left to the discretion of 
the chapters irrespective of residence." 

After discussion, Mrs. Tozier, of Ohio, seconded by 
Mrs. Myers, of the District, moved that invitations to the 
conference and General Court be printed in the Year Book 
as well as sent by card. 

After a general discussion regarding the expenses of the 
Year Book, a suggestion was made by Mrs. Foster that the 



13 

;inmial dues be increased. This did not meet with favor 
and was not further considered. Another member sug- 
j::i.-sted that each person pay for the book, whicli is our great- 
est cxi^ense. This was not carried. Finally it was moved 
and seconded and unanimously carried, "That the chapters 
and members at large send to the National Treasurer money 
for the printing of the Year Book as they see fit." Mrs. 
vSherman, of Virginia, honorary life member, was the first 
to send a contribution for this purpose. The Missouri 
chapter followed with a contribution of $5.00. 

The Chairman of the Nominating Committee read the 
nominating slate as presented by the Nominating Com- 
mittee, composed of Mrs. Boynton, Chairman ; Mrs. Myers, 
Mrs. Johnson, and Mrs. St. Clair. Nominations for active 
officers, 1914-1916: 

President — Mrs. Cox. 

Vice-President — Mrs. Boynton. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. Jones, Miss Babbitt. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. Potts, Mrs. St. Clair. 

Registrar — Mrs. Pealer. 

Treasurer — Mrs. Hannay. 

Historian — Mrs. Burkholder, Mrs. Goodwin. 

Chaplain — Mrs. Semmes, Mrs. Baird.' 

Color Bearer — Mrs. Brown, Mrs. Johnston. 

^Irs. Johnston withdrew her name. 

Councillors for three years, 1914-1917: Mrs. Myers, Mrs. 
Murphy, Mrs. Mcintosh, Mrs. Dowell, Mrs. Foster, Mrs. 
Cornwell. 

Mrs. Murphy withdrew her name. 

To fill the unexpired term of Miss Webster (1915), Mrs. 
Martin. 

As no States had responded to the call for nominations, 
the members of the conference were asked for names, but 
none were given. 

Mrs. Boynton spoke of the constant growth of the Society 
and urged upon those present to be interested in that growth 



14 

in order that the Society might in that way come into pus- 
session of valuable records which might otherwise be lost. 
Mrs. Callender, President of the Virginia Chapter, spoke 
to the conference of her ability (by reason of her nearness 
to the District) to attend all meetings of the Executive Com- 
mittee and of her consequent knowledge of the excellent 
and faithful work of each of the present national officers 
and for that reason she commended them to the conference. 
The business being completed, the conference stood ad- 
journed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Emma Cui^ver Jones, 

Recording Secretary. 

RECORDING SECRETARY'S REPORT. 

General Court, May 13, ]01o. 

During the past year there have been twelve meetings of 
the Executive Committee, at which most of the officers 
were present. Five of these meetings were specially called 
by the President in order to attend to some pressing busi- 
ness caused by the natural growth and varied interests of 
our Society. 

Kansas, under Mrs. Shelton, has formed an enthusiastic 
Chapter, and we hear rumors of others. 

Tlie growth of the Society is especially desired by all, as 
each new member brings with her valuable family records 
which we are so desirous of preserving. 

Speaking of records, lam glad to announce that Mrs. 
Draper has consented to continue in her position on the 
Compilation Committee, where she renders the most valua- 
ble assistance. 

In June of last year our President received a letter from 
the Secretary of the Navy, asking for the aid of our Society 
in his endeavor to collect all available names and data of 
the sailors of the Revolutionary "War. Mrs. Cox was glad 
to offer any assistance we could render. Our Society also 



15 

sent its endorsement of the centennial of the writing of the 
Star Spangled Banner, to be held in Baltimore in September, 
and received a very courteous answer from the Mayor of 
that city. \ 

Two of our national officers have resigned during the 
\car and one has passed away. Mrs. iMain, councillor, and 
Mrs. Foster, historian, both desired to give more time to 
other duties which demanded their attention. Miss Web- 
ster, councillor, died in Washington on the 2d day of Feb- 
ruary. It is hard to realize that one so long associated with 
the work will meet with us no more. The President ap- 
pointed Mrs. Martin to fill the unexpired term. 

The President called a special meeting to hear tlie fin- 
ished report of the Restoration Committee, and to plan 
for the placing of the handsome silver plate, whicli now 
adorns the chancel rail, where it was dedicated during a 
beautiful service in the church on the afternoon of Novem- 
ber 9th, 1913. 

There is much more that I could say, and would like to 
say, concerning the many interesting things I have recorded 
during the past year, but I will refrain and leave that 
pleasant task to the different officers and to the Chairmen 
of our several committees. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Emma Culver Jones, 
Natioial Recording Secretary. 

CORRESPONDING SECRETARY'S REPORT. 

Washington, D. C, May ISth, 1914. 

Madam President, National Officers, and Members of the 
General Court: 

During the year beginning May 13, 19113, and ending 
today, the Corresponding Secretary has written 319 let- 
ters; of these 8 were to bear the sympathy of the Executive 
Committee to those members who had suffered affliction, 



16 

or to those families that had sustained the loss of a mcni 
ber who had rendered us loyal service in the work of thv 
Society. She has sent out 661 Histories, 657 Constitutions, 
443 Postal Cards, 67 Membership^ Cards, 23 Infornialion 
Leaflets, and 19 Preliminary Blanks. In all 2,189 pieces 
of mail sent. 

She has received 120 letters and has endeavored to kecji 
all correspondence up to date. 

In June of last year the Membership Cards were all 
issued and it seemed advisable to defer the ordering of niori; 
until Fall, hence those members entering the Society in 
June were notified of their election to membership by let- 
ter, and the cards were issued in November following, wlien 
the new supply was received. 

Of the 67 Membership Cards issued, two were duplicates, 
the originals having been broken in the mails on account 
of the Christmas rush. 

Membership Cards issued during the year were as fol- 
lows : Connecticut, 10; Illinois, 8; Kansas, 7; Pennsylvania, 
6 ; District of Columbia, 6 ; Massachusetts, 5 ; New York, 
4 ; Wisconsin, 4 ; Missouri, 3 ; Michigan, 3 ; New Jersey, 3 ; 
Colorado, 1 ; California, 1 ; Iowa, 1 ; South Dakota, 1 ; Dela- 
ware, 1 ; New Hampshire, 1. 

Every member at large was sent an invitation to the 
Conference of April 18th and the General Court May ll'i, 
1914. 

The 1913 History and Lineage Book, with a Constitution, 
was sent to each member. In many cases the History has 
been returned by the Post Office Department, after trans- 
mission of the necessary postage by the Society. This was 
caused by the neglect of the members to properly notify the 
Society promptly of the change of their address. 

The National Corresponding Secretary has attended every 
regular meeting during the past year, and has endeavored 
always to bear in mind that the Corresponding Secretary 
is a connecting link between the National Society and its 
members. 



17 

It has been a pleasure to have served the Society under 
the able management of our President, who has been con- 
siderate, sympathetic and always just. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Cornelia Ross Potts, 
National Corresponding Secretary. 



REGISTRAR'S REPORT. 

Madam President, Members of the General Court and of the 
National Society, Daughters of Founders and Patriots 
of America: 

I have the honor to report, as follows, the work of the 
National Registrar since the session of the General Court, 
May 13, 1913: 

Letters received 209 

Letters written 231 

Postals received 31 

Permits issued 35 

Applications received -18 

Notification cards sent 45 

One hundred and ten application, 130 endorsement, and 
GO preliminary blanks sent to Chapter Registrars ; 35 appli- 
cation, 36 endorsement, and 73 preliminary blanks sent to 
applicants at large ; also 45 circulars. 

Since the last session of the General Court, 56 members 
have been admitted to the National Society; 16 of these 
were members-at-large, three of whom have entered the 
Kansas State Chapter, rcccntlv organized. The remaining 
forty enlcrctl through State cha|»lcrs. as follows: 



18 

Connecticut 9 

District of Columbia 7 

Pennsylvania G 

Massachusetts .") 

Illinois, Kansas and Wisconsin '■) each. 

Missouri 2 

Michigan 1 

Ohio 1 

Of the members-at-large 5 were from New York, ;; 
from Kansas, 2 from Illinois, 2 from the District of Colum- 
bia, and 1 each from Colorado, Iowa, Massachusetts ami 
Michigan. 

Several names are before the Executive Committee whose 
final applications have not been received. 

General interest in the Society is increasing. Its beautiful 
insignia commands attention wherever it is worn, and the 
limitation of the eligibility for membership acts as an in- 
centive to women interested in hereditary societies to look 
up their family history and prove, if possible, that they also 
"are to the manor born." While this increasing interest 
is gratifying, a danger arises that should be carefully 
watched, and I must again warn Chapter Registrars of the 
danger point in tracing family lines : the few generations 
between the early Colonial and Revolutionary periods. 

No claim should be accepted on "supposition" or on family 
tradition, and Registrars should insist on complete prelimi- 
nary papers, with proofs for each generation from reput- 
able published histories, genealogies, church, probate or town 
records, etc. If proof is furnished from family Bibles, or 
unpublished records, certified copies should accompany the 
preliminary application. 

The regular application blanks should not be issued until 
the Registrar has examined the line and service, with proofs, 
and found all correct. This obviates the necessity for re- 
turn of fee and dues, as no money should be sent with a 
preliminary paper. 



19 

With fourteen State Chapters already organized and 
others under way, we can point with pride to the prosperity 
of our Society. 

My service of ten years has been a labor of love and in- 
terest, and my association with all the members of the 
Executive Committee and with the Chapter Registrars has 
been one of harmony. I wish to thank each and every one 
for her encouragement and assistance to me in my work 
of bringing into the Society the 589 members who have 
entered since my first election as National Registrar. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Ruth M. Griswold Pealkr, 
National Registrar, N. S. D. F. P. A. 

The Auditing Committee, Mrs. Myers, Chairman, reported 
that the Treasurer's books were correct to date. 



20 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE NATIONAL TREAS- 
URER, D. F. P. A. 

(May 14, 1013, to May 13, 1014.) 

Cash on hand at last report May 13, 1913 $471.8S 

Received from fees and dues $442.00 

To eight Life Memberships 93.00 

Sale of extra Histories and ribbon 5.80 

Donation from Mrs. Franklin Sherman to Printing 

Fund 1.00 

Received for Restoration Fund 33.00 

Total $574.80 

Total receipts for the year $1,040.08 

Expenditures. 
Partial payment on Histories, application blanks, 

etc $273.25 

Use of room at New Willard for General Court, 

May, 1913 5.00 

Stationery and postage for National Officers 97.88 

Fees and dues returned ^ 2.50 

To Miss Merwin, copying application papers 24.00 

To Mr. S. D. Tripp, final payment Restoration of 

Church at Falls Church, Va 250.00 

To silver plate placed on chancel rail at Falls 

Church 30.00 

Total $G82.G3 

Total cash balance on hand May 13, 1914 $3G4.05 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. A. Hannay, 
National Treasurer, D. F. P. A. 

HISTORIAN'S REPORT. 

Madam National President and Members of tJie General 
Court: 

I have to report very few family papers received during 
the past year. These, however, have been interesting and 
valuable. 

It was planned to have one or two read at the Annual 
Conference, but the hour proved all too short for the other 
matters discussed. 

As inquiry is frequently made why these contributions 
are not printed and distributed as anticipated, I suggest that 



21 

a selected paper be added to each year's histoiy ; the cost 

would be small and the effect I am sure would be good. 

Many letters have been written during the year. My 

postage record gives 49 ; generally replies have been received. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CoRRA Bacon-Foster, 
National Historian, N. S. D. F. P. A. 

It was moved and seconded and passed that the report 
of the Historian be accepted, but that the recommendations 
be sent to the Executive Committee to be discussed and 
passed upon. 

The President, Mrs. Cox, requested the Vice-President, 
Mrs. Myers, to take the chair, as the election of officers 
was in order. The voters were asked to sit on one side of 
the room and the non-voters on the other. Mrs. Boynton, 
Chairman of the Nominating Committee, read the nominat- 
ing slate. The election followed. 

The tellers, Mrs. Mitchell, of Pennsylvania, Mrs. Good- 
win, of Connecticut; and Mrs. Fernald, of New York, de- 
clared the following officers elected : 

To serve until May 13, 191G : 

National President, Mrs. William Van Zandt Cox ; 

National Vice-President, Mrs. Henry V. Boynton ; 

National Recording Secretary, Mrs. Thaddeus I\I. Jones ; 

National Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Noble Newport 
Potts ; 

National Registrar, Mrs. Peter Perry Pealer ; 

National Treasurer, Mrs. William M. Plannay ; 

National Historian, Mrs. Arthur R. Burkholder ; 

National Chaplain, Mrs. Alexander H. Semmes ; 

National Color Bearer, Mrs. Charles E. Brown; 

National Councillors, to fill out the unexpired term of 
Miss Webster, deceased, Mrs. George G. Martin; to serve 
until May 13, 1917, Mrs. John J. Myers, Mrs. Corra Bacon- 
Foster, Mrs. Horace P. Mcintosh. 

Mrs. Foster moved, and it was seconded and carried, that 



22 

the General Court confirm the appointment by the Presi- 
dent of Mrs. Martin as Councillor to fill the unexpired 
term of Miss Webster. 



REPORT OF THE CONSERVATION COMMITTEE. 

In trying to plan something for this committee which 
would be worth while, and at the same time not encroach 
on the duties of other similar committees, my attention was 
called to an article written by J. T. Ainslee-Walker, and 
read before the Hygiene Congress last year, in regard to 
the proper disinfection of public schools. 

After correspondence with him on the matter, and with 
the consent of our National President, a letter was sent to 
each member of the Society, followed later by a letter to the 
Chapter Regents of the National Society D. A. R., urging 
their co-operation and influence in this reform. A number 
of most encouraging letters were received from all parts 
of the country; and, while I can not at this moment of writ- 
ing mention any one tangible evidence of good accomplished, 
I know that public opinion has been stirred, and the way 
made more easy for some future worker along the same 
lines. 

These letters were followed by a more limited cam- 
paign in the interest of supervised laundries, a more active 
interest being taken possibly when I learned (after the 
danger was over) that my own family laundry was done 
next to a house where there were two cases of smallpox, and 
that there has been constant visiting between the families. 

I am happy to report that this has been actively taken up 
in Montclair, N. J., by the Board of Plealth ; and an active 
campaign has been started by the Housewives League Maga- 
zine, and I have almost a promise that Miss Tarbell, Editor 
of The American, will also take the matter up, thus insuring 
wide circulation to the matter. 

In November, 1913, the National Conservation Congress 
held its annual meeting here, and your Chairman was hon- 



23 

orcd by being a member. The names of all the officers of 
Ihc National Society were sent to the Secretary, at the re- 
quest of the officials of the Congress, but I 'nave been ad- 
vised that through a combination of unfortunate mishaps, 
the invitations which the officials wished so much to send 
out were never received by our officers. 

This is greatly to be regretted, for, while the matters 
discussed were mostly in regard to the control of water- 
power, the persons speaking were of national renown, and 
the Congress itself, at times, was most exciting. 

In closing I would bespeak for my successor the same 
kind, helpful assistance that I have received, and hope 
that she may be able to reap in large measure where I have 
been only able to sow. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Bell Merrill Draper, 
May 13, 1913. ^ Chairman. 

Mrs. Draper spoke of the wonderful work which Mrs. 
Pealer had done on the Lineage Book and of her unceas- 
ing labor in the Library of Congress every evening all dur- 
ing the summer. A vote of thanks was extended Mrs. 
Pealer in appreciation of her work for the Society. 

The Committee on Resolutions, Mrs. Eoynton and Mrs. 
Myors, read the rcsolutioi\ on the deatli of the lovetl Presi- 
dent of the Pennsylvania Chapter and requested that a 
copy of the same be sent to her chapter. 

After a discussion as to the advisability of separating the 
History and the Lineage Book, it was decided that the books 
should continue as usual. 

REPORT OF THE FLAG COMMITTEE. 

As Chairman of the Flag Committee of the National So- 
ciety of Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America, 
I have the honor of reporting that our Committee is com- 
posed of the historians from the State Chapters. 



24 

In this widely-spread Committee we can and do watch 
with zealous care to guard our flag from all desecration. 

The work of our Committee is to arouse and preserve 
patriotic sentiment in honoring our flag. 

"One flag, one land, 
One heart, one hand. 
One nation evermore — " 

"We pledge allegiance to our flag and the Re- 
public for which it stands ; one Nation, indivisible ; 
with liberty and justice for all." 

Respectfully submitted, 
Sara Patterson Snowdkn Mitchell, 

Cliairman. 

Mrs. Draper asked that a letter of sympathy be sent to 
the Connecticut Chapter on the^ death of Mrs. Sterling. 

CONNECTICUT REPORT. 

Madam President, Daughters of Founders and Patriots of 
America: 

Connecticut sends greeting. Our Chapter is growing. We 
number more than one hundred at present. 

We hold but three meetings each year, for, although Con- 
necticut is small, it takes three days to go from its north- 
west corner to most of the places of meeting — one day to 
go, one at the sessions, and one to return home. 

Our first meeting was at the Golf Club in Hartford. 
After luncheon we were called to order and reports from 
Washington were read. Then we had singing and whistling 
solos. 

The October meeting was held in New Haven at the 
Race Brook Country Club. When luncheon had been 
served our Historian, Mrs. Corbin, read a paper on "Heroic 
Women of Modern Times." Singing and violin solos fol- 
lowed. 



25 

In February we met as usual at Bridgeport. The order 
for the day was election of officers. All were re-elected. 
In the afternoon we listened to a delightful musicale by 
Dr. Carl Dufft and Madam Mihe-Hardi, of New York. 
This treat was given to the Chapter by our Recording Sec- 
retary, Mrs. Wakeman, of Saugatuck. 

I have to report the death of our beloved Mrs. John T. 
.Sterling. 

This is the third year I have represented Connecticut, 
and I hope the experience may be chronic. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Sara Cooke Goodwin. 

REPORT OF NEW YORK. 

Madam President, Officers and Daughters of Founders 
and Patriots of America: 

On behalf of the New York State Chapter I beg leave to 
report a very prosperous and successful year. 

Our regular meetings have been held at the Waldorf- 
Astoria, with good attendance. We have had three social 
afternoon meetings — one in November, when we were the 
guests of our gracious member. Miss Day. The Rever- 
end George R. Van de Water, D. D., gave us a most bril- 
liant and interesting lecture on "The Founding of James- 
town, Virginia," which was followed by exquisite music 
and a social hour. The second social meeting was held 
in March, when our highly-esteemed member, Mrs. L. 
Bradford Prince, read a most charming paper on the 
"Manor Houses of New York." In April we were enter- 
tained at Mrs. Prince's colonial home in Flushing, Long 
Island, where we were enchanted with the wonderful col- 
lection of colonial furniture and china gathered through the 
many generations occupying this historic house. We en- 
joyed the hospitality of Mrs. Prince later, partaking refresh- 
ments from cups and saucers, plates and old silver, his- 
torically valuable beyond calculation, in age and beauty. 



26 

On May 16th we are to enjoy our annual outing on 
"Founders' Day" at the New Gedney Farms Hotel, White 
Plains, N. Y., when an informal luncheon and day together 
are always greatly enjoyed hy the membcs. 

The State Chapter is much interested in searching for a suit- 
able memorial for our Society to erect to our early founders, 
but so far no event previous to 1687 has met with the appro- 
bation of the Committee or the approval of the Chapter, 
but we hope in the near future to select some date worthy 
of our distinguished Society, and one that will appeal to tlic 
members and call forth their united interest and effort 
toward this patriotic memorial work that we are pledged by 
our Constitution to remember. 

F. Adelaidiv Ingraham, 
(Mrs. D. Phoenix Ingraham), Nezv York State 

Chapter President. 
N. Y., May 11. 1914. ^ 

PENNSYLVANIA REPORT. 

Madam President and Members of the General Court: 

Pennsylvania has sustained a sad loss in the death of our 
beloved President, Mrs. Frank H. GetchcU, who died yVpril 
17, 1914. Mrs. Getchell was the organizer of the Penn- 
sylvania Chai)ter of Daughters of Founders and Patriots 
of America and our first and only President. She was 
faithful and untiring in her devotion to our Chapter and 
to the work of the National Society. Nearly all our meet- 
ings were held in her house. She was deeply interested in 
our last work, the door that the Chapter will erect in the 
Chapel at Valley Forge. The report for last year, given 
by Mrs. Getchell, makes mention of this work. As Mrs. 
Getchell did not describe the door, it may be well to tell 
you that it is in honor of the Foreign Allies who came to 
the aid of Washington and our Continental Army at a time 
when their help was very much needed. It will be placed 
in the Memorial Chapel at Valley Forge at the entrance to 



27 

the Porch of the Allies. This Memorial Chapel stands, as 
you know, on the exact spot where George Washington 
knelt in prayer during the darkest and almost hopeless time 
of our War for Independence. 

It will contain the heraldic shields of len of the dis- 
tinguished Allies, together with the shields of Washington, 
of France, of the United States, and the Insignia of our 
Society of Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America. 
A member of our Committee has furnished the correct 
description of the Escutcheons of these brave Allies who 
came to our rescue. 

We have added several new members during the year, 
and our meetings have been well attended. Our Historian 
has given us historical papers and recently has devoted 
some time to the lives of the foreign Allies whose services 
we wish to commemorate. 

Our Vice-President, Mrs. Samuel T. Kerr, paid a loving 
tribute to the memory of okt beloved President, Mrs. 
Getchell, at a special meeting held April 24th. 

Our Recording Secretary is ill and the writer was re- 
quested to make out this report. 

With apologies for this incomplete record of a prosperous 
year. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Sara Patterson Snowden Mitchell, 

Secretary pro tein. 

MASSACHUSETTS REPORT. 

Five regular meetings of the Chapter, and eight of the 
Council, have been held during the past year, with an aver- 
age attendance gratifying, alike, to both the social and 
executive needs of the organization. A spirit of good fel- 
lowship prevailed, and for each Chapter gathering an inter- 
esting programme, with an attractive tea, was arranged by 
a committee chosen for that purpose. 

Council meetings are held monthly; those of the Chapter 



28 

on dates commemorative of historical significance, so that 
we may bear in mind special events whereby the early pa- 
triots became the founders of our splendid nation. 

The annual meeting in March, held in the Boston Art 
Club House, proved a "Red Letter Day" on the Chapter's 
calendar, for, after a most satisfactory business session, 
devoted to reports of officers and biennial election, the 
Chapter celebrated its tenth anniversary with a lunclieon 
for members and guests. Distinctly a social and artislfc 
success, it remains one of memory's milestones, marking tlic 
close of ten years' faithful service, and the beginning of a 
new decade, rich in promise and inspiration, fertile in aim 
and opportunity, to maintain the noble principles of our 
hero ancestors, in honor of whose courage and self sacrifice 
our Society stands. 

Four new members have been added to the Chapter, and 
two more are to be adfriitted at the next meeting. The 
sudden death of Mrs. Helen M. Burton, the Recording 
Secretary, occurred very shortly after her election. Mrs. 
Burton was a loyal, active member of the Society for sev- 
eral years, and her loss is mourned by many friends. 

At the Council Meeting, in April, the undersigned was 
appointed to fill the vacancy. 

Caroline P. Heath, 
Recording Secretary, Massachusetts Chapter, 
Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America. 



MICHIGAN REPORT. 
Madam President, Officers and Members: 

Our annual meeting was held at the Woman's Indoor 
Athletic Club, Detroit, Mrs. B. L. Whitney presiding. The 
officers of last year were all re-elected. 

The usual celebration of Flag Day was waived, in favor 
of the Society of Elks, which desired us to co-operate with 
its members. 



29 

One other meeting has been held during the year, and 
two new members were admitted to the Chapter. We now 
have twenty-six names on our rolL 

Respectfully submitted, 

Elizabeth B. Ranney, 
Recording Secretary, Michigan Chapter. 

VIRCxINIA REPORT. 
Madam President and Ladies of the Court: 

The Virginia Chapter is forging ahead, regardless of the 
distance which separates most of its members. 

We have had monthly meetings during the year and now 
have papers with the National Registrar for four new 
members. 

I will give a resume of our work for the past two years : 
Through the efforts of our President (Mrs. Callender) a 
pair of magnificent brass vases, on which the coat of arms 
of the Washington fam-fly is exquisitely done in colored 
enamel, were placed on the Altar of The Old Falls Church 
by Mrs. Bellamy in memory of her brother, the Hon. Hugh 
V. Washington. Other memorials solicited for the Church 
were a brass book rest, two beautiful Tiffany silver alms 
basins, and a Litany Desk. Our former President, Mrs. 
Oden. gave a beautiful brass Altar Cross. This makes the 
beautiful chancel, restored by the National Society, com- 
plete in its furnishings through the efforts of the Virginia 
Society. Other work has been the placing of handsome 
colonial steps of solid concrete at the front and side doors 
of the Church. 

A generous donation was given by our Society, to have 
the grounds properly fixed. They are now beautiful and in 
keeping with the dignity of this grand old colonial church. 

On the outside wall is a tablet our President had placed 
there (when she was Regent of the Falls Church Chapter, 
D. A. R.), commemorating the fact that George Washing- 
ton was a Vestryman of that parish. 



30 

Our President has attended all the Board and Restora- 
tion Committee meetings during the past two years. This 
has given her the opportunity of seeing the splendid work 
accomplished by our national officers. It is the hope of the 
Virginia Chapter that they may be continued in office. 
Respectfully submitted, 

EsTELLE V. CalEENDER, 
President of the Virginia Society of the Daughters 

of Founders and Patriots of America. 

ILLINOIS REPORT. 

The Illinois Chapter has spent one of those profitable 
years of rest that organizations as well as human beings are 
the better for indulging in now and then. We have had 
a number of board meetings, and in the spring held our 
yearly election which was followed by a most delightful 
luncheon. The majority of the officers of the past year 
were unanimously re-elected, and they are one and all deeply 
sensible of the honor conferred upon them and their desire 
is to serve Illinois faithfully and well. The Board are 
planning for a large reception in November, and during the 
coming winter and spring social and literary meetings will 
be arranged for. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Laura Dayton Fessenden, 
President of the Illinois Society. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA REPORT. 

I have the honor to report thirty-one members, five of 
whom have been admitted during the last year; one is a 
life member. 

We have held eight meetings during the year, and two 
papers (a colonial and family) have been read at each 
meeting. We have had a full attendance. Interest has 
never lagged. It is more than gratifying to me, as its Presi- 
dent, to speak of the thorough work of our officers, who 



31 

have aided me in every way and have made their reports 
interesting. 

On April 20th we had the pleasure of receiving the Society 
and welcoming its members from many States. 

We all' greatly enjoy this reunion of the D. F. P. A. We 
arc making a special study of colonial history and hope to be 
of great aid to historical societies of our country. 
Respectfully submitted, 

(Mrs.) Mary C. Beach, 

President. 

WISCONSIN REPORT. 
Madam President and Members of tlic General Court, Na- 
tional Society Daughters of Founders and Patriots of 
Anierica, Ladies: 
I sincerely regret that again the Wisconsin Chapter of 
the Society must present its report in writing instead of 
through a personal representative. Though remote from 
the home city of the National Society, we are pleased to find 
a rapidly growing interest in our objects and attainments. 
I lardly a day passes without bringing inquiries regarding 
qualifications for membership. We have two regular meet- 
ings of the Chapter each year and have a membershij-) of 
twenty-eight, having increased more than one hundred per 
cent in our four years of existence. No work of impor- 
tance or general interest has been yet undertaken. With 
cordial greetings to the officers and meiiibers of the Gen- 
eral Court and hoping for a successful meeting this report is 
Respectfully submitted, 

Mary L. Atwood, 
President lVisco7isin Chap- 
ter N. S. D. F. P. A. 

MISSOURI REPORT. 
Madam President and Members of the General Court: 

The third annual meeting of the Missouri Chapter was 
held at the St. Louis Woman's Club on May 22nd, 3 914, 



32 

with ten members present. The President, Mrs. Delafield, 
being obhged to leave town unexpectedly, appointed the 
Recording Secretary to preside. The same officers were 
re-elected for another year. We have two new members, 
one application pending in Washington, and Several still 
preparing their data. Our dues are all paid and five dol- 
lars contributed by the Chapter toward the expense of 
printing the Lineage Books. Two of our members at- 
tended the conference in Washington in April. Our ranks 
have been broken by the death of Mrs. George D. Fisher. 
The Missouri Chapter sends cordial greetings and thanks 
to the national officers for many courtesies. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Anna Forbes Brookmire, 

Recording Secretary. 

ARKANSAS REPORT. 

The Arkansas Chapter extends cordial greeting to our 
national officers, members of the Court and friends as- 
sembled. 

The end of the second year of the Arkansas Chapter finds 
us on a firm basis. We are greatly interested in genealogi- 
cal and historical research, conservation and patriotic edu- 
cation. 

We have contributed "our mite" to the Helen Dunlap 
Memorial School, at Winslow, Ark., a most excellent in- 
stitution for mountain children. 

• We held our annual meeting on April 3d, and unanimously 
re-elected our officers. 

It was the pleasure of several of our members to attend 
the annual conference in Washington on April ]8th, and 
we greatly regret that we cannot be represented at the 
General Court. 

With every assurance of loyalty and co-operation of the 
Arkansas Daughters for the welfare of the D. F. P. A. 

Stella Pickett Hardy, 
President Arkansas D. P. P. A. 



33 
KANSAS REPORT. 

Madam President and Members of the General Court: 

The Kansas Chapter has not passed its first birthday, 
hut we feel that we are here to stay, and we hope to make 
ourselves known to you. 

Wt organized November 13, 1913, at a luncheon given 
by the Topeka members, at the residence of Mrs. Handy 
and Mrs. Shelton. We started with ten members and have 
added two during the year. Already we have had sorrow 
and are mourning over the passing on of our Historian, 
Mrs. Scott Hopkins. 

The Chapter has held three board meetings. As we have 
no colonial history we have taken up the Indian history, tra- 
ditions, etc., of our State. In this work the State Historical 
Society is giving us all the assistance in its power. 

The Kansas Chapter sends greetings. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Harriet Handy ShEIvTon, 

President Kaiisas Chapter. 

The Court here )ook a recess for a social hour, during 
which time Mrs. Myers, the retiring Vice-President, and her 
sister, Miss Hewitt, one of our Councillors, were the gra- 
cious hostesses to the General Court and its visitors at a de- 
lightful luncheon served in one of the parlors of the 
Raleigh Hotel, which had been beautifully furnished and 
decorated for the occasion. 

After this most enjoyable interlude we again met in the 
Oak Room to listen to a paper by Mrs. Boynton on "Nathan 
Hale," a fitting tribute to a noble hero and a happy ending 
of a very pleasant day. 

Mrs. Sherman, one of our honorary members, brought 
from her home in Virginia a magnificent bouquet of red, 
white and blue flowers (a patriotic bouquet), wh.ich 
adorned the desk of our President during the General Court. 



34 

Mrs. Potts sang most pleasingly the "Star Spangled Ban- 
ner," after which the General Court adjourned. 
Respectfully submitted, 

(Mrs.) Emma Culver Jones, 
National Recording Secretary. 

INFORMATION FOR MEMBERS. 

The Recording Secretary has charge of correspondence 
relating to chapters, their authorization, formation, elections, 
and by-laws. Also notices to members of the General Court, 
i. e., National Officers, Councillors, Chapter Presidents, 
Vice-Presidents and Delegates, ex-National Presidents, ex- 
National Vice-Presidents, and the remaining Founder of 
the Society, and sending histories to libraries. 

The Corresponding Secretary has charge of letters of 
general inquiry, complimentary notices, letters of condolence, 
notices to all guests of the General Court, i. e., District 
members-at-large, and special notices ordered by the Execu- 
tive Committee. Also sending of histories (except to the 
libraries), constitutions and membership cards, notices of 
committee meetings, of election to membership, of appoint- 
ment on committees, and any special letters turned over to 
her by the Executive Committee. 

The Registrar has charge of all correspondence relat- 
ing to applications for membership, for insignia, credential 
cards, and endorsement blanks. 

The Treasurer has charge of correspondence relating to 
dues, rebates, transfers, and notices of resignation and 
death. 

The Historian has charge of correspondence relating to 
traditional records or stories, her other duties being stated 
in the Constitution. 



35 

STATUTES RELATING TO CHAPTERS. 

1st. The salutation to the Flag shall be the official salute 
of the Navy. Each member, rising and responding to her 
name at roll-call, shall turn towards the Flag, raising the 
right hand and laying it above the heart. All shall remain 
standing while the Lord's Prayer is repeated in concert. 

2d. The General Court, held annually on the 13th of 
May, is open to all members of the Society. 

3d. No bars or pins can be added to the insignia, nor can 
it be marked with any name but that of the original owner. 
Society ribbon can be purchased from Caldwell & Co., of 
Philadelphia, also stationery, with illuminated die, octavo, 
cream white linen. Plain stationery lettered in blue with 
the name of the Society can be purchased from any sta- 
tioner. 

4th. When proofs referred to by applicants are not ob- 
tainable by the National Registrar, a certified copy by a 
competent genealogist is required. Or, if that is not ob- 
tainable, a certified letter from any of the Chapter genealo- 
gists signing our papers will be sufficient ; provided : That 
the references by which the proofs were determined are 
given therewith. 

oth. Chapters needing a supply of blanks for applicants 
will apply to the National Registrar, but blanks must not be 
distributed until the Chapter Registrar has examined the 
data and believes the applicant eligible. Extra blanks will 
be furnished to members who apply, upon the payment of 
ten cents. 

Gth. Endorsement blanks will be furnished to Chapter 
Registrars when application papers have been sent to the 
National Treasurer, and when endorsed and returned to 
these officers, must be forwarded to the National Registrar. 

7th. No member of the Society can hold two offices at 
the same time. 

8th. Chapters cannot increase the annual dues, but must 
adhere to Section 1, Article 7, of the Constitution. Chap- 
ters may raise a contingent fund but it shall not constitute 
part of the annual dues. 



36 

9th. Half the life membership and half the annual dues 
of those joining through an organized Chapter are retained 
in the Chapter treasury, but dues paid previous to such 
organization remain in the National Treasury, also all initia- 
tion fees. No rebates will be sent to Chapters for members- 
at-large who may join the Chapter during the fiscal year. 

10th. The treasurer of every Chapter shall send to the 
National Treasurer on or before May 1st, 50 cents for each 
active member of the Chapter, together with a full list of 
its members with correct addresses and Chapter numbers 
in numerical order, every member being given, and life 
members and deceased members plainly indicated. 

11th. Members admitted after February 13th and before 
the annual meeting of the General Court in May shall not be 
required to pay dues for the months intervening. 

12th. Chapter By-Laws must be approved by the National 
Executive Committee, and any subsequent changes must 
also be reported before being adopted. 

13th. Members having resigned can be reinstated by pay- 
ing back dues. 

14th. Chapter ofificers cannot sign application papers un- 
til they have been presented to the Chapter. 




3ln m^mortam 

(October, 1913-October, 1914.) 

National 
Number. 

22G. Mrs. Maria Purdy Peck 

51. Miss Josephine C. Webster 
.'554. Mrs. Harriet Elizabeth Peck Sterung 

44. Mrs. Frederica C. Twiggs Getcheix 
331. Mrs. Mary Augusta Kent Robinson 
243. Mrs. Georgia Tyler Kent 
525. Mrs. Louise Durkre Larkin Smith 






LIST OF MEMBERS. 
(Members elected from Dec. 13, 1913, to May 2g, 1914.) 

National 
Number. 

730. MARiErrA Arvilla Howe Ervin (Mrs. Robert Edward), 

490 North Broad St., Galesburg, 111. 

731. Elizabeth Stafford Doueleday (Mrs. Franklin T.), 

44 Port Wats-n St., Cortland, N. Y. " 

732. Grace Lii.lie Merwin (Mrs. Chas. Foster), 

24 Eld St., New Haven, Conn. 

733. Bertha Whii.ldin Meyster (Mrs. F. J.), 

824 Hudson St., Hoboken, N. J. 

734. Eleanore Whieldin Huntley (Mrs. F. H.), 

1810 Sherman Ave., Evanston, 111. 

735. Harriet A. Freeman Holbrook (Mrs. Robert M.), 

2410 North 17th St., Phila., Pa. 

736. Clara Blanche Eddy McGuire (Mrs. Clarence A.), 

1008 Topeka Ave., Topeka, Kansas. 

737. Hattie Spencer Colton Corn well (Mrs. L. F.), 

1041 Lake Ave., Pueblo, Colo. 

738. IvANiLLA Dunham Ball (Mrs. Fred.), 

319 S. Madison St., Clinton, 111. 

739. Elizabeth Jane Evarts Lusaddar (Mrs. Daniel S.), 

544 S. Ninth St., Salina, Kan. 

740. Emma Erskine Crosby (Mrs. Wm. Howard), 

1042 Main St., Racine, Wis. 

741. Mary Eleanor Maris Hiatt (Mrs. Oliver Smith), 

310 Fifth Ave., Leavenworth, Kan. 

742. Harriet Adeli.a Kilborn Bailey (Mrs. Chester A.), 

216 Campbell Ave., West Haven, Conn. 

743. Mrs. Nellie Blair Thompson Pardee, 

348 Crown St., New Haven, Conn. 

744. Charlotte Sayre Boorman (Widow of Thos. Hugh), 

522 W. 148th St., New York, N. Y. 

745. Margaret Goodrich DeWolf (Mrs. George S.), 

The Valois, 1330 Mass. Ave., N. W., Wash'n, D. C. 
74G. Frances Maria Ney Dana (Mrs. Wm.), 

R. F. D. No. 25, Box 30, Utica, 111. 

747. Alice M. Kell.\r Danforth (Mrs. Henry J.), 

170 Queen Ann Place, Milwaukee, Wis. 

748. Amelia Carter Kennedy (Mrs. Wm. DeWitt), 

1717 Washington Ave., Scranton, Pa. 

749. Mabel Platt Frickey (Mrs. Irving), 

The Portner, Washington, D. C. 

750. Elizabeth C. Wood (Miss), 

44 Cypress St., Brookline, Mass. 

NOTICE. — Owing to the cost of printing the History, the Execu- 
tive Committee voted to print the full list of members but once in 
five 3'ears. Names of new members will be printed each year. 
We, therefore, request each member to send any change of address 
immediately to both the Corresponding Secretary and the Treas- 
urer, since the histories will be sent as usual. 



i, 



f 39 

National 
Number. 

751. Louise Eames Mather (Mrs.), 

2258 Lincoln Park West, Chicago, 111. 
'::,2. Rosalie Amelia Buckingham Selfridge (Mrs. Harry 
Gordon), 

744 Rush St., Chicago, 111. 
i:,2. F. May Sayre Welles (Mrs. Nelson Ackley), 

8G1 College Ave., Elmira, N. Y. 
751. Bessie Louise Lamport Harrison (Mrs. Henry Lincoln), 

Gil Orange St., New Haven, Conn. 
7.55. Lora Altine Woodbury Underhill (Mrs.), 

le Beals St., Brookline, Mass. 
750. Emma Abigail Woodworth Burton (Mrs. George 
Lorenzo), 

434 George St., New Haven, Conn. 
757. Fanny AdelE Johnson Hayward (Mrs.), 

Paddock Ave., Meriden, Conn. 
j,. 758. Carrie Boutwell Barre (Mrs.), 

GO Manning St., Hillsdale, Mich. 
759. Blanche Allen Smith (Widow of Arthur H.), 

613 Washington St., Wilmington, Del. 
7r.O. Annie Lee Willet (Mrs. Wm.), 

St. Martins, Philadelphia, Pa. 
7G1. Katharine Twining Moody (Miss), 

Webster Groves. Mo. 
7C2. Julia Hayman Cooke Lang (Mrs.), 

528 7th St., N. E., Washington, D. C. 
7G3. Nancy A. Morse Foote (Mrs.), 

158 York St., New Haven, Conn. 
764. Lucy Bettie Josephine Lockwood Gould (Mrs.), 

123 Mansfield St., New Haven, Conn. 



ICtttrag]? 'Back 



COMMITTEE ON COMPILATION. 

Mrs. Ruth M. Griswold Peai^er. 
Mrs. Amos G. Draper. 



43 

CiiARi^oTTE Converse (Mrs. I-Iarold Pi'jrce). 201 

Born in Boston, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of Edward Convers througji the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Joseph Converse, both of Massaciiusetts, as fol- 
lows : 

2. Edmund Winchester Converse (June 12, 1825-Jan. 6, 18D4) and 
Charlotte Augusta Shepherd Albree (Mch. 14, 18:J6-June 4, 1881). 

3. Rev. James Converse (July 2G, 1772-Jan. 14, 1839) and 
Charlotte White (Mch. 30, 1787-June 16, 1851). 

4. Joseph Converse (Nov. 13, 1739-Feb. 16, 1828) and 
Elizabeth Davis (1742-Aug. 10, 1817). 

5. Joshua Convers (Jan. 3, 1704-1744) and 
Rachel Blanchard (Mch. 23, 1712-1801). 

6. John Convers (Aug. 22, 1673-Jan. 6, 1708) and 
Abigail Sawyer (Mch. 17, 1769- ). 

7. Major James Convers (Nov. 16, 1645-July 8, 1706) and 
Hannah Carter (Jan. 19, 16.J0-Aug. 10, 1691)/ 

8. Lieut. James Convers (1620-May 10, 1715) and 
Anna Long (....-Aug. 10, 1691), his first wife. 

9. Deacon Edward Convers (Jan. 30, 1590-Aug. 10, 1662) and 
Sarah (....-Jan. 14, 16G2), his second wife. 

Deacon Edward Convers (1590-1662) Avas one of the 
select company of Puritans that left England in Winthrop's 
fleet and arrived in Salem, Mass., June 12, 1630. With 
him came his wife Sarah and three children, Josiah, James 
and Mary, his first wife, Jane Clark, having died in Eng- 
land. He settled first in Charlestown, Mass., where he was 
freeman in 1631, and selectman from 1634 to 1640. He 
established the first ferry between Charle.^town and Bos- 
ton. His name headed the list of commissioners appointed 
in 1640 to found the new town of Woburn, Mass., and to 
his energy and zeal is attributed much of the success of its 
settlement. He was continually in public life, one of the 
first selectmen of Woburn, which place he filled until his 
death, and Deputy to the General Court in 1660. He died 
in Woburn Aug. 10, 1662. 

James Convers (1620-1715) came from England with his 
parents, married Anna, daughter of Robert Long, of 
Charlestown, and settled in Woburn. He was Sergeant 
1658-1672; Ensign, 1672-1688; Lieutenant, 1688. He 



\ 



44 



served in the Woburn Company during King Philip's War, 
and died in Woburn, May 10, 1715, 

Joseph Converse (1739-1828) went out on the Alarm of 
April 19, 1775, as a sergeant in the company of Capt. John 
Moore. He was born in Bedford, Mass., and died in 
Chesterfield, N. H. 



Nellie M. Horton (Mrs. W. R. Casler). 202 
Born in Dexter, New York. 
. Descendant of Barnabas and Joseph Horton, through the 
Revolutionary ancestor, William Horton, all of New York, 
as follows : 

2. James White Horton (Mch. 6, 1834-June 5, 1870) and 
Mary J. Marks (Aug. 8, 1838-June 12. l'J03). 

3. George Horton (Mch. 31, 1804-Dec. 20, 1884) and 
Sabra Mills (May 29, 1804-June 14. 1875). 

4. James Horton (Jan. 23, 1773-Nov. 5, 1833) and 
Martha White (Mch. 17, 1775-July IG, 1862). 

5. William Horton (Jan. 10, 1743-Jan. 19, 1831) and 
Elizabeth Covert (Jan. 9, 1843-Jan. 31, 1831). 

6. Daniel Horton (Apr. 23, 1692-Dec. 10, 1777) and 
Hester Lane (May 24, 1704-Apr. IS, 17G9). 

7. John Horton (ab. 1G55-1717) and 
Rachel Hoit (m. bef. Aug. 29, 1G84). 

8. Joseph Horton (Eng., lG25-bef. June 13, 1696) and 
Jane Budd (m. ab. 1654). 

9. Barnabas Horton (July 13, 1600 O. S.-July 13, 1680) and 
Ann Smith (d. Eng.), his first wife. 

Barnabas Horton (] GOO-1680), born in Mowsley, Lei- 
cestershire, England; came to America before 1640 with 
his second wife Mary, and two sons, Joseph and Benja- 
min, children of his first wife, Ann Smith. He is first 
found on record in Hampton, N. H., in 1640, when land 
was granted him. He was in Southold, Long Lsland, be- 
fore 1651, where he resided until his death. He held many 
public offices; was Deputy to the General Court of the New 
Haven Colony in 1654, 56, 58, 59 and 61, and Commis- 
sioner for Southold in 1663 and 4. 

Joseph Horton (1625-1696), eldest child of Barnabas, 
married Jane, daughter of Lieut. John Budd, and settled 



45 

ill Southold, whe^ he was admitted freeman in 16()3.. In 
IGC..") he removed to Rye, Westchester Co., N. Y., at that 
time a part of the Connecticut Colony. He was a Lieut, 
in the Alihtia ; Selectman in 1671; Deputy to the General 
Court in 1G72 ; one of the Commissioners to determine the 
houndary between New York and Connecticut in 1674; 
authorized by the General Court in 1678 to issue warrants 
and perform marriage ceremonies ; Commissioner for Rye 
1680-3; and in 1675 was chosen vestryman and licensed 
to keep a Public House. 

William Horton (17-43-1831) served as a private in the 
Westchester Co. Militia of New York State. He was born 
in Yorktown, and died in Colchester, N. Y. 

NeIwLiE Baldwin (Mrs. Elbridge; Farmer). 203 

Born in Windham, New Hampshire. 

Descendant of John Baldwin, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Capt. Joshua Baldwin, both of Massachusetts, 
as follows : 

2. Artcmus Baldwin (Feb. 2, 1806-Jan., 1877) and 
Betsey Travis (May, 1803-Mch. G. 1850). 

3. Davis Baldwin (Jan. 22, 17GG-1831) and 
Annah Stickney (17GG-1815). 

4. Joshua Baldwin (Sept. 14, 1733-Feb. 15, 1807) and 
Sarah, an Indian maiden. 

5. Josiah Baldwin (May 22, 170S-bcfore Jan. IS, 17G2) and 
Susannah Davis (m. Dec. 2, 17ol-aft. 17G2). 

G. Jonathan Baldwin (Jan. 28, 1GG7-Feb. 17, 1735/G) and 

Mary French (m. Dec. 13, 1G95). 
7. John Baldwin (h. Eng.-Sept. 25, 1G87) and 

Mary Richardson (bapt. Nov. 17, lG38-m. May 15, 1G55). 

John Baldwin (Eng.-1687) came from Herts, England, 
and appears in Billerica, Mass., as early as 1655. He was 
made freeman in 1670; and had nine children, all born in 
Billerica, between 1659 and 1679. He died in Billerica, and 
his will, dated Nov. 11, 1686, and sealed with an anchor, 
was probated May 28, 1688. 

Joshua Baldwin (1733-1807) was a Lieutenant in Capt. 
Jonathan Brown's company at the Lexington Alarm. May 



31, 1776, Tie was commissioned Captain in Col. Simeon 
Spalding's regiment of Massachusetts Militia, and served 
until 1780. He was born and died in Tewksbury, Mass. 

Kate Carpenter (Mrs. Frank M. Prindle). 204: 

Born in River Falls, Wisconsin. 

Descendant of John and Nathaniel White, through the 
Revolutionary ancestor, Isaac White, all of Connecticut, 
as follows : 

2. Lyman Carpenter (1829-July 21, 1902) and 
Eunice White (Sept. 15, 1831-June 12, 1903). 

3. Moses White (1784- ) and 

Sallv Cheny ( -d. 1854) his second wife. 

4. Isaac White (1752-1822) and 
Thankful Clark (1760-1S3C). 

5. Moses White (1727-1796) and 

Huldah Knowles (m. Oct. 12. 1749-d. aft. 1796). 
G. Isaac White (1696-1768) and 

Sibbil Butler (1702-1781). 
7. Daniel White (16G1-1739) and 

Susannah Mould (1663-1754). 
a. Capt. Nathaniel White (1629-1711) and 

Elizabeth (who d. 1690, aged 65) his first wife. 
9. Elder John White (ab. 1600-1683) and 

Mary (d. bet. 1671-33). 

Elder John White (lGOO-1683) came from England in 
the ship "Lion" and arrived in Boston Sept. 16, 1732 ; was 
granted land in Cambridge, Mass., in 1633, and was a Select- . 
man there in IG35. He was one of the original proprie- 
tors of Hartford, Conn., and was a Selectman there in 
1642, 46, 51 and 56. In 1659 he was one of the leaders of 
the movement to found a new settlement in Hadley, Mass. ; 
was a selectman there for several years, and in 1664 and 
69 represented the town as Deputy to the General Court. 
About 1670 he returned to Hartford, Conn., and until his 
death was prominent in the aflfairs of the South Church as 
Ruling Elder, Referee, and Counsellor in Ecclesiastical 
matters. 

Nathaniel White (1629-1711) came from England with 
his parents ; took an active part in the great Indian war, and 



47 

was promoted from Ensign to Lieutenant and later to Cap- 
tain. HerA'as one of the original proprietors of Middle- 
town, Conf^ where he settled in 1650-1 ; was chosen Dep- 
uty to the General Court in 1G59, and between 1661 and 
1710 was elected representative eighty-five times; the last 
when he was eighty-one years of age. He was also a 
magistrate and Commissioner for Middletown, Meriden 
and Haddam. 

Isaac White (1753-1822) was a private in the Connecti- 
cut line in 1781. He also furnished supplies for the Pa- 
triot army, and, according to family tradition, spent his 
entire fortune for its relief. He was born in Guilford, 
Conn., and died in Springfield, Erie County, New York. 



Margaret Benson (Mrs. John F. Berry). 205 

Born in New Utrecht, New York. 

Descendant of Steven Coerte and Lucas Stevense Van 
voor Hees. through the Revolutionary ancestor, Abraham 
Voorhees, both of New York, as follows : 

2. George Martense Benson (July 31, lS26-Dec. 22, 18G7) and 
Margaret Jane Voorhees (May 29, 1833-Mcli. 23, 1881). 

3. Peter A. Voorhees (June 14, 1806-Oct. 17, 1874) and 
Afargaret Ann Duryea (Feb. 21, 1812-June G, 1875). 

4. Abraham Voorhees (July 3, 17(33-Aug. IS, 1827) and 
Maria Lott (Apr. 5, 1769-Sept. 12, 1831). 

5. Abraham Voorhees (June S, 1725-Nov. 15, 1807) and 
Adrianna Lefferts (m. May 9, 1747-Nov. 28, ISOO). 

6. Jan Lucasse Van Voorhees (bapt. Feb. 19, 1G75-1747) and 
Mayke R. Schenck (m. Mch. 5, 1704-173G), his second wife. 

7. Lucas Stevense Van Voorhees (1G50-1713) and 
Catherine Hansen Van Noortstrand, his first wife. 

8. Steven Coerte Van voor Hees (IGOO-Feb. IG, 1GS9) and 
(Holland .... bet. 1662-1667), his first wife. 

Steven Coerte (Courte) Van voor Hees (1600-16S9) 
emigrated from the village of Hees, province of Drenthe, 
Holland, in 1660 in the ship "Bontekoe" (spotted cow) 
with his wife and eight children. He settled in Flatlands, 
Long Island, where he became a large land owner. He 
was a Magistrate in 1G64 and in 1677 his name, with that 



48 

of his second wife, Willempie Roelosse Senbering, appears 
on t^ membership roll of the. Dutch Church in Flatlands. 

Li^s Stevense (1650-1713) emigrated with his father 
in 1660 to America; married first Catharine Hansen Van 
Noortstrand; married second, Jan. 26, 1689, Jannetjc 
Minnes, daughter of Minne Johannis ; and married third, 
in 1703, Catharine Van Dyck. He was a member of the 
church in Flatlands in 1677; a Magistrate in 1680; resident 
of Hackensack in 1685, but returned to Flatlands, where he 
died, in 1713. He signed his name Luichas Stevensen. 

Abraham Voorhees (1725-1801) pledged money for the 
relief of the American prisoners on Long Island in 1780. 
At the close of the Revolution a celebration was held by 
the Whigs at Flatbush, Long Island, and Abraham Voorhees 
was one of the patriots honored on this occasion. 

Laura A. Wentworth (Mrs. Fowlkr). 206 

Born in Somersworth, New Hampshire. 

Descendant of William Went worth, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Amaziah W'entworth, both of New Hami^- 
shire, as follows : . 

2. Amasa Wentworth (Oct. IS, 1812-May 1, 1894) and 
Susan W. Nowcll (June 1, 1812-Mch. 27, 1887). 

3. Timothy Wentworth (Oct., 17S0-Dcc. 31, 1835) and 
Betsey Roberts (ab. lTS5-m. 1800). 

4. Amaziah Wentworth (Mch. LIO, 17G0-181o) and 
Sally Davis (bef. 1765-1815). 

5. Samuel Wentworth (ab. 1712-Alch. 4, 1789) and 
Patience Downs (Apr. 3, 1721-Sept. 10, 1776). 

6. Ephraim Wentworth (m. 1697-1750) and 
Mary Miller ( -bef. 1735), his first wife. 

7. William Wentworth (ab. 1G17-1G97) and 

Elizabeth (bef. 1660-aft. 1G97), his second wife. 

William Wentworth (about 1.617-1696/7) is first found 
on record in 1639, when the inhabitants of Exeter, N. H., 
pledged themselves to set up a government under the laws 
of England. The name of their pastor, Rev. John Wheel- 
wright, heads the list. In 1642 William Wentworth went 
with Wheelwright to Wells, Province of Maine, where he 



49 

was Juror in 1642, 47 and 49, and Constable in 1G48. About 
IGoO he removed to Dover, N. H., where he became active 
in toVn affairs, selectman for six years between 1G51-1G70; 
Commissioner in 1GG3, and was engaged by the town to 
arbitrate conflicting land claims and to settle church diffi- 
culties. He often officiated as preacher, and in 1G93 was 
engaged to "supply the pulpit the whole year, if able." 

Amaziah Wentworth (17G0-1813), with his brother, 
Jonathan, was a soldier in the Revolution from New Hamp- 
shire. He was born in Somersworth, N. H., and died in 
Lebanon, Maine. 



Sue Marii- Scott (Mrs. Gustavus Remak). 207 

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Descendant of Edmund Scott, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Woolsey Scott, both of Connecticut, as follows: 

2. Freeman Scott (Nov. 6, ISOl-June 18, 1878) and 
Mary Justice (July 12, ISlO-Nov. 20, 1875). 

3. Isaac Scott (Mch. 28, 1764-1842) and 
Abigail Strickland (17G8-Nov. 16, 1831). 

4. Woolsey Scott (Apr. 13, 1741-1794) and 
Margaret Edwards (1738-Mch. 1812). 

5. Stephen Scotf (Mch. 12, 1711-1747)' and 
Rebecka Woolsey (m. Apr., 1734). 

6. David Scott ( -1776) and 

Sarah Richards (m. 1698-Aug. 27, 1747). 

7. Edmund Scott (b. Eng.-lG9i) and 

Mrs. Elizabeth (Fuller) Upson (wid. of Thomas). 

Edmund Scott (Eng.-1G91) was one of twenty-six 
men from Farmington, Conn., who petitioned the General 
Court for permission to plant a colony at "Mattatuck," 
now Waterbury, Conn. He had seven sons and one daugh- 
ter. The first deed recorded at Mattatuck was from Ed- 
mund Scott, Senior, to his son, Edmund, Feb. 7, 1G82. He 
died in Waterbury in 1690. 

Woolsey Scott (1741-1794) served as a private at the 
siege of Boston in 1775. 



50 

Louise Kent (Mrs. Nathaniel Seaver Kkay). 208 

Born in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania. 
I Descendant of Solomon Leonard, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Simeon Leonard, both of Massachusetts, 
as follows : 

2. Thomas Kent (Mch. 27, 18i;!-0ct. 5, 1887) and 
Fanny Leonard (Mch. 19, 1821-Tuly 29, 1891). 

3. Simeon Leonard (Feb. 10, 1785-June 24, 18.57) and 
Boadicea Thompson (Feb. 17, 17s9-Dec. 20, 1871). 

4. Simeon Leonard (Nov. 24, 17:!7-Sept. 20, 1793) and 
Anna Smith (Mch. 31, lS43-Nov. 5. 1810). 

5. Joseph Leonard (1696-Apr. 28, 1786) and 
Mary Packard (1G9G-Mch. 29, 1770). 

G. Joseph Leonard (1670-Jan. 29, 1749) and 
Martlia Orcutt (1671-Sept. 30, 1752). 

7. Jacob Leonard (lG47-will prob. 171(5) and 
Phoebe Chandler, his first wife. 

8. Solomon Leonard (1G10-1()S6) and 
Mary — . 

Solomon Leonard (iniO-lGSG) was born near Mon- 
mouthshire, England. He was admitted freeman in Ply- 
mouth, Alass., in 1633. In 1643 his name appears among 
those "males that are able to beare armes from XVI yearcs 
old to GO yeares within the Township of Duxborrow." In 
1645 he was one of the founders of Bridgewater, with Miles 
Standish, John Alden, William Bradford and others. A 
house lot was granted him near the center of the town. 
He had six children, and died in 1686, leaving a widow 
Mary. 

Simeon Leonard (1737-1793) was a private in the Bridge- 
water, Mass., Militia, under Capt. Abram Washburn; 
marched on an alarm to Bristol, R. I., Dec. 8, 1770. 



Susan Antoinette Murdock (Mrs. H. E. Ray- 
mond). 209 

Born in Natick, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of John Murdock, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Lieut. John Murdock, both of Massachusetts, as 
follows : 



51 

2. James Madison Murdock (Jan. 36, 1814-Jime G, 18G9) and 
Antoinette Adams (May 13, 1825-Sept. 8, 1847). 

3. Calvin Murdock (Oct. 11, 1775-Sept. 8, 1857) and 
Mary Leonard (June 13, 1780-Apr. .5, 1859). 

4. Lieut. John Murdock (June 6, 1742-Sept. 17, 1817) and 
Sarm Sampson (Jan. 31, 1742-Feb. 11, 1810). 

5. Jam% Murdock (b. ab. 1720- ) and 

Hanifeh (bef. 1727-aft. 1742). 

6. John Murdock, 2d (ICOl- ) and 

Ruth Bartlett (ab. 1700- ). 

7. John Murdock (ab. 1060-1750) and 

Lydia Young (m. lG86-aft. 1701), his first wife. 

John Murdock (about 1660-1750) came from Scotland 
and settled in Plymouth, Mass., "a wealthy and respectable 
merchant." Two of the oldest wharves in Plymouth were 
built by him. In his will, dated Feb. 7, 1756, he gave to the 
town of Plymouth one hundred pounds for the use of the 
poor ; one hundred pounds for the schools, and a like amount 
to the Third Parish, provided the capital of each sum should 
not be lessened. Pie died in Plymouth in 1750. 

John Murdock (1742-1817) served as a Lieutenant in 
Capt. William Tupper's company, Col. Sproat's regiment, 
on an alarm at Rhode Island Dec. 8, 177(5, and again in 
Aug., 1780. He was born in Plympton, and died in Mid- 
dleborough, Mass. 



Jessie Kittredge (INIrs. Virgil Pf.ttibone 

Humason). 310 

Born in Hartford, Connecticut. 

Descendant of John Kittredge, of Massachusetts, through 
the Revolutionary ancestor. Dr. Francis Kittredge, of Massa- 
chusetts and New Hampshire, as follows : 

2. Thomas Bond Kittredge (Feb. 17, lS02-Dec. S, 1881) and 
Caroline Adams Smith (Feb. 22, 1812-Feb. 20, 1884). 

3. Dr. Jesseniah Kittredge (Mch. 1, 17G4-Aug. S, 1S2'J) and 
<- Lvdia Newton Bond (Mch. 22, 1772-Sept. 4, 1837). 

4. Dr. Francis Kittredge (July 1, 172S-Apr. 17, 1808) and 
Abigail Jefts Richardson (Mch. 6, 1726-Feb. 15, 1812). 

5. Dr. Francis Kittredge (Oct. 27. 1706- ) and 

Lydia ( -Aug. 1, 1736), his first wife. 



52 

6. Dr. John Kittredge (Jan. 24, 1666-Apr. 27, 1714) and 
Hafinah Burrage French (lG64-Oct. 9, 1745). 

7. John Kittredge (b. Eng.-Oct. IS, 1G7G) and 
Mary Hill Littlefield (Dec. 14, lG46-Oct. 7, 1719). 

tjohn Kittredge (Eng.-1676) came in his youth with 
widowed mother from Lowestoft, County Suffolk, Eng- 
land, and settled in Billerica, Mass. He was a soldier in 
King Philip's War, under Capt. Thomas Wheeler. He died 
Oct. 18, 1676, leaving five children. Twenty-two of his 
descendants have graduated from New England colleges. 
Dr. Francis Kittredge (1728-1808) was a surgeon of 
more than local fame. In 1775, he, then of Tewksbury, 
was appointed surgeon of an army hospital by the Provin- 
cial Congress of Massachusetts. He was born in Massa- 
chusetts and died in Walpole, N. H. 



Irene Williams (Mrs. William J. Chittenden). 211 

Born in Detroit, Michigan. 

Descendant of William Learned, of Massachusetts, 
through the Revolutionary ancestor, Simon Larned, of 
Connecticut, as follows : 

2. Gen. Alpheus S. Williams (1810-1878) and 
Jane Hereford Larned (181S-1848). 

3. Gen. Charles Larned (1791-1834) and 
Sylvia Easton Colt, of Pittsfield, Mass. 

4. Simon Larned (175:>-1817) and 
Ruth Bull, of Hartford, Conn. 

5. Simon Larned (1721-1S07) and 
• Rebekah Merrils (1718-1802). 

6. Wilham Lamed (1G88-1747) and ■ 
Hannah Bryant (1G97-1781). 

7. Isaac Larned (1G55-1737) and 
Sarah Bigelow (1659-m. 1679). 

8. Isaace Learned (1G23-1G57) and 
Mary Stearns (1G26-1GG3). 

9. William Learned (Mch. 1, 1500-1646) and 
Goodith (Judith) . 

William Learned (1590-1646) was admitted freeman in 
Charlestown, Mass., May 14, 1634. His name and that of 
his wife are the first two on the list of original members of 



53 

the First Church. "Admitted 1632, 10 mo., day 6." In 
1G38 he was on a committee to consider "a body of laws." 
In 1642 he was one of the Founders of Woburn, Mass. ; 
was on the first board of selectmen in 1644, and held many 
other town offices. He died in Woburn, March 1, 1646. 

Sim^'.n Lamed (1753-1817) served during the Revolu- 
tion ak. an Ensign, Lieutenant-Adjutant, Captain, and Bri- 
gade Major. He was an original member of the Society 
of the Cincinnati. He was born in Thompson, Conn., and 
died in Pittsfield, Mass. 



Louise Hortense Snowden. 212 

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Descendant of John Snowden, of New Jersey, through 
the Revolutionary ancestor, Isaac Snowden, of Pennsylvania, 
as follows: 



2. James Ross Snowden (Dec. 9, 1809-Mch. 21, 1878) and 
Susan Engle Patterson (Oct. 19, 1823-Feb. 11, 1897). 

3. Nathaniel Randolph Snowden (Jan. 17, 1770-Nov. 21, 1851) and 
Sarah Gustine (June 2, 1775-Apr. 2, 1856). 

4. Isaac Snowden (Apr. 14, 1732-Dec. 20, 1809) and 
Mary (Cox) McCall (1735-June 30, ISOG). 

5. John Snowden, Jr. (1685-Mch. 24, 1751) and 

Ruth (Fitz Randolph) Harrison (Apr. 8, lC95-Sept. 25, 1780). 

6. John Snowden, Sr. (1632-May, 173G) and 
Ann Barrett (m. Feb. 13, 1682-1688). 



John Snowden (1632-1736) signed the "Laws, Conces- 
sions and Agreements" at Burlington in 1677 as one of the 
Proprietors of New Jersey. 

Isaac Snowden (1732-1809) was Quartermaster of the 
Philadelphia Associators in 1775-77 ; was commissioned 
to sign the Continental Currency 1777-79, and Treasurer 
of the city 1780-82. He was born in Philadelphia and died 
in Chester County, Pennsylvania. 



54 

Anna May Odun (Mrs. Robert Ai^lan Reid). 213 

Born in Exeter, New Hampshire. 

Descendant of John Odhn of Massachusetts, through the 
Revolutionary ancestor, Wilham OdHn, of New Hampshire, 
as follows : 

2. James William Odlin (Nov. 3, 1817-Mar. 9. 1891) and 
Harriet Newell Warren (Mar. 27, 1820-Nov 25 1901) 

3. James Odlin (Jan. 9, 1792-July 30, 1850) and 
Martha Hale Osborne (Aug. 25, 1792-Oct. 27, 18C8) 

4. William Odlin (Feb. 16, 1767-Mar. 1, 1825) and 
Elizabeth Leavitt (Dec. 21, 17G5-Aug. IS, 18G0). 

5. William Odlin (Feb. 17, 1738-Sept. 6, 1787) and 
Judith Wilson (1743-July 2, 1795). 

6. Rev. Elisha Odlin (Nov. 10, 1709-Jan. 21, 1752) and 
Judith (Hilton) Pike (m. Nov. 1, 1731). 

7. John Odlin (Nov. 18, 1681-Nov. 20, 1754) and 

Elizabeth (Woodbridge) Clark (Apr. 30, 1763-Dec G 1729) 
his first wife. ' 

8. Elisha Odlin (July 1, 1640-Sept. 13, 1724) and 
Abigail Bright (Oct. 12, 1037-1705). 

9. John Odlin (1G02-Dec. 18, 1685) and 
Margaret (d. bef. 1685). 

John Odlin, or AudHn (lG02-lGSo) was one of the early 
settlers of Boston, Mass., where he was freeman in 1G34, 
and subscribed to the free school in UuHi. In 1G38 he be- 
came a member of the Ancient and Honorable x\rtillery 
Company of Boston. His will, dated March G, 1G85, was 
probated in January, IGSG! 

William Odlin (1738-1787) was a resident of Exeter, 
N. H., during the Revolution, and enlisted for guard duty 
at the Exeter jail in 1777. He was born and died in Exeter 
N. H. 



Ada Davis (Mrs. Charles Dod Ward). 2U 

Born in Oswego, New York. 

Descendant of William Davis, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Edward Davis, Jr., both of Massachusetts, as 
follows : 



55 

2. Henry Lewis Davis (Sept. 21, 1817-Mch. 16, 1891) and 
Jane Moore Sprong (Dec. 21, 1810-Nov. 27, 1891^). 

:). Joseph Davis, Jr. (Jan. 14, 1793-Mch. 28, 1842) and 
Catherine Huguenin (Nov. 6, 1793-Jnly 8, 1879). 

4. Joseph Davis, Sr. (Oct. 24, 176.')/5-May 17, 1821) and 
Sylvia Treat (Nov. 19, 176G-Feb. 2, 1836). 

5. Edward Davis, Jr. (Sept. 5, 1739-Oct. 3, 1796) and 
EHzabeth Davis (May, 1743-Oct. 16, 1775), his first wife. 

6. Edward Davis, Sr. (Jan. 23, 1714-Aug. 30, 1784) and 
Abigail Learned (Apr. 7, 1719-Aug. 11, 1805). 

7. Samuel Davis (June 23, 1681-April 8, 1760) and 

Mary Chamberlain (Aug. 1, 1687-Feb. 11, 1730), his first wife. 

8. John Davis (Oct. 1, 1643-Mch. 16, 1705) and 
Mary Devotion ( -Feb. 15, 1683). 

9. William Davis (1617-Dec. 9, 1683) and 

Elizabeth (buried May 4, 1658), his first wife. 

William Davis (1G17-1G83), born in Wales, came to 
New England and was in Roxbury, Mass., in 1642. He 
married three times (Elizabeth, Alice Thorpe and Jane), 
and had nine children, all born in Roxbury, where he died 
Dec. 9, 1683. 

Edward Davis (1714-1784) married in 1735 and settled 
in the southwest part of Oxford, Mass. He was long 
prominent and influential in town affairs. During the Revo- 
lution he was constantly on committees and holding town 
office and was a representative to the General Court from 
Oxford in 1775, 77, 79 and 80. He was born in Roxbury 
and died in Oxford, Mass. 



Adalinii; Elizabeth Talcott (Mrs. Ralph 

Emerson). 215 

Born in Vernon, New York. 

Descendant of John Talcott of Massachusetts, through 
the Revolutionary ancestor, Lieut. William Talcott, Sr., 
of Connecticut and New York, as follows : 

2. Wait Talcott (Oct. 17, 1807-Nov., 1800) and 
Elizabeth Ann Norton (Nov. 16, 1813-Aug. 7, 1873). 

3. William Talcott (Mch. 6, 1784-Sept. 2, 1804) and 
Dorothy Blish (Apr. 8, 1789-Aug. 7, 1873). 

4. Lieut. William Talcott, Sr. (June 8, 1742-Mch. 28, 1807) and 
Mary Carter (Aug. 9, 1745-Mch. 27, 1812). 



56 

5. Samuel Talcott (Feb. 12, 1708-Sept. 26, 17G8) and 
Hannah Moseley (Jan. 12, ITIO-Sept. 10, 1800). 

6. Benjamin Talcott (Mch. 1, 1674-Nov. 12, 1727) and 
Sarah Hollister (Oct. 25, 16S0-Oct. 15, 1715). 

7. Samuel Talcott (ab. lG34/5-Nov. 10, 1691) and 
Hannah Holyoke (June 9, 1644-Feb. 2, 1G77/8). 

8. Hon. John Talcott (bef. IGOO-Mch., IGGO) and 
Dorothy Mott ( -Feb., 1G70). 

John Talcott (before 1G00-16(]0) was born in Brain- 
tree, County Essex, England, and, with his wife and three 
children, emigrated to America on the "Lion," arriving in 
Boston Sept. 16, 1632. He was admitted a freeman of 
Newtown (now Cambridge), Mass., in 1632; Representa- 
tive to the General Court in 1634, and the same year was 
chosen selectman of Newtown. In 1636 he joined Rev. 
Mr. Hooker's company and was one of the founders of 
Hartford, Conn. He took an active part in the affairs of 
the town; represented it at the General Court from 1637 
to 1654. He was one of the Chief Magistrates of the 
Colony until his death. He was buried at Hartford, and 
his name appears on the monument erected in Hartford in 
memory of the Founders of the Colony of Connecticut. 
The "last will of the Worsliipful John Talcott, Senior," 
was dated Jan. 17, 1629/70. 

William Talcott (1742-1807) was a sergeant under Capt. 
Worthy Waters at the Lexington Alarm from Hebron, 
Conn. ; Ensign in Capt. Daniel Dewey's company in Rhode 
Island in 1778; and Lieutenant for coast defense in 1780. 



Carrie Ellen Richardson (Mrs. Lewis Edgar 

Barnes). 216 

Born in Lawrence, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of William Richardson, through the Revo- 
lutionary ancestor, Samuel Richardson, both of Massachu- 
setts, as follows : 

2. Samuel M. Richardson (Apr. 10, 182,VOct. 9, 1SG8) and 
Almeda Caroline Kimball (Oct. 17, is:;i- ). 



57 

:i. William Richardson (Apr. 26, 1794-Aug. 2, 183G) and 
Abiah Whittier (Apr. 1, 1798-July 20, 1878). 

4. Samuel Richardson (Feb. 22, 174'J-July 15, 18:J6) and 
Lucy Parker (1754-Mch. 2G, 1818). 

5. Caleb Richardson (June 9, 1704- ) and 

Tryphena Bodvvell (bef. 1721-aft. 1759). 

6. Joseph Richardson (May 18, 1655-will dated Apr. 7, 1724) and 
Margaret Godfry (Oct. 9, 1663-m. July 12, 1681). 

7. William Richardson (ab. 1620-Mch. 25, 1657) and 
Elizabeth Wiseman (m. Aug. 23, 1654). 

William Richardson (about 1620-1657) was born in 
England ; came to America and settled in Newbury, Mass., 
about 1640. He married Elizabeth Wiseman Aug. 33, 1654, 
and died three years later in Newbury. 

Samuel Richardson (1749-1818) was a Minute Man 
from Methuen, Mass., serving at the Lexington Alarm un- 
der Major Samuel Bodwell. He was born and died in 
Methuen, Mass. 



Harriet Barnes (Mrs. W. J. Atwater). 217 

Born in New Haven, Connecticut. 

Descendant of Anthony Thompson, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Samuel Thompson, both of Connecticut, 

as follows : 

2. Horace Barnes (Mch. 10, 1802-Dec. 28, 1808) and 
Lorinda Thompson (Dec. 13. 1802-Oct. 15, 1899). 

3. Joel Thompson (Mch. 1763-1851) and 
Lois Chidsey (Sept. 25, 1765-m. 1782). 

4. Samuel Thompson (Aug. 1, 1737-Feb. 14, 1817) and 
Desire MouUhrop (Apr. 13, 1737-Dcc. 31, 1814). 

5. Samuel Thompson (Sept. 30, 1704-Jan. 13, 1780) and 
Hannah Hemingway (Dec. 11, 1709-....). 

6. John Thompson (Aug. 6, lG67-Nov. 3, 1742) and 
Mercy Mansfield (Apr. 2, 1667-Jan. 9, 1744). 

7. John Thompson (April, 1646-Fcb. 13, 1693) and 
Priscilla Powel (m. Mch. 29, lOGG-Apr. 18, 1726). 

8. John Thompson (bef. 1626-Dec. 11, 1674) and 
Eleanor ( -Apr. 8, 1690). 

9. Anthony Thompson (b. Eng.-1G4S) and 
, his first wife, who came with him from Eng. 

Anthony Thompson (Eng.-1G48) was one of the planters 
at Quinnipiac, New Haven Colony, in 1638 (name changed in 



58 

164-0 to New Haven). His name appears in the division 
of land in 1641, with four persons in his family. He died 
in 1648, and in 1652 his widow Kattern (a second wife) 
married Nicholas Camp of Milford, Conn. 

Samuel Thompson (1737-1817) was among those who 
volunteered and met the British when they invaded New 
Haven. He was born and died in East Haven, Conn. 



Mary Bull (Mrs. W. H. Hoyt). 218 

Born in Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Descendant of Capt. Thomas Bull and Asa Bull, both of 
Connecticut, as follows : 

2. Ezra Dibble Bull (Sept. 11. lS03-Nov. 10, 186-1) and 
Sarah Maria White (Sept. 2, lS13-Feb. 18, 18T7). 

3. Horace Bull (Mch. G, 1783-Jan. 7, 1857) and 
Polly Dibble (Mch. 27, 1790-Feb. 4, 1852). 

4. Asa Bull (Sept. 4, 1752-1805) and 
Tamar Little (1756-1802). 

5. Isaac Bull (Oct. 9, 1714-1774) and 
Eunice Gillette (Feb. 21, 1716-1808). 

6. Daniel Bull (Nov. 9, 1677-1721) and 
Mary Mygatt. 

7. Joseph Bull (m. Apr. 11, 1671-Mch. 22, 1711/12) and 
Sarah Manning, his first wife. 

8. Capt. Thomas Bull (ab. 1605-1684) and 
Susannah — (....-1680, aged 70). 

Thomas Bull (about 100.")-1GS4) came from London in 
the "llopewell" in 1635. He settled hrst in Boston or 
Cambridge, but accompanied Hooker to Hartford, Conn. 
In 1675 he was in command at Saybrook and successfully 
resisted Andros in his attempt tO" gain the place for his 
master, the Duke of York. He is buried in the ancient 
burying ground in Hartford, and his tomb bears this in- 
scription : Here lyeth the body of Capt. Thomas Bull who 
died Oct., 1684, one of the first settlers of Blartford, Lieut. 
in the great and decisive battle with the Pequots at Mystic 
May 26, 1637, Commander of the fort at Saybrook in July, 
1675, when its surrender was demanded by Major Andros. 

Asa Bull (1752-1805) was a private in Capt. Nathaniel 



59 

Tuttle's company, Col. Charles Webb's regiment, in 1775. 
He was born and died in Litchfield, Conn. 



Lucy Abigail Brainard. 219 

Born in Westchester, Connecticut. 

Descendant of Daniel Brainerd, .through the Revolution- 
ary ancestor, William Brainard, both of Connecticut, as 
follows : 

2. Amaziah Brainard (June 12, irsO-Apr. 1, 1841) and 
Huldah Foote (Dec. 4, 1791-Aug. 0, 1881). 

3. William Brainard (Aug. 27, 174G-Jan. 2G, 1830) and 
Lucy Day (May 14, 17.52-May 20, 1823). 

4. Stephen Brainerd (Feb. 27, 1699-Mch. 30, 1794) and 
Susannah Gates (Sept. 21, 170,-)-Apr. 29. 1793). 

5. Daniel Brainerd (Mch. 2, 16G,5-Jan. 23, 1742/3) and 
Susannah Ventres (ab. 16G9-Jan. 2G, 1754). 

6. Daniel Brainerd (ab. 1G41-Apr. 1, 1715) and 
Hannah Spencer (ab. 1641-bef. 1G91), his first wife. 

Daniel Brainerd (about 1G41-1715) born in England, was 
brought to America when about eight years old and placed 
under the care of the Wadsworth family in Connecticut. He 
was one of the founders of Haddam, Conn., in 1GG2, and 
held many public ofiices ; was Constable, Fence Viewer, 
Assessor, Collector and Justice of the Peace. He was 
Deputy to the General Court for many sessions ; and in 
ICilil) was appointed Commissioner by them. He died in 
Haddam April 1, Vilo. 

William Brainard (17-16-1820) served as Ensign in the 
Connecticut Militia in 1780; and in 1783 was appointed 
Captain of the Fifth Company or "Train Band" in the 25th 
regiment. 



Jane Elizabeth Sterling (Mrs. SeelEy). 220 

Born in Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Descendant of Joseph Hawley, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Major Aaron Hawley, both of Connecticut, as 
follows : 



60 



2. Sherwood Sterling (May 23, lS03-Oct. 31, 1869) and 
Jane Elizabeth Hawley (Sept. 27, 1805-Oct. 28, 1881). 

3. Aaron Hawley (June 15, ITT-i-June 28, 1810) and 
Grizzell Summers (May 15, 1773-Sept. 5, 1853). 

4. Major Aaron Hawley (1739-July 21, 1803) and 

Elizabeth Hawley (Nov. 12, 1747-May 31, 178G), his first wife. 

5. James Hawley (Jan. 29, 1713-Oct. 7, 1746) and 
Eunice Jackson (1714-Sept. 6, 1796). 

6. Gideon Hawley (Jan. 30, 1687-Feb. 16, 1730) and 
Hannah Bennett (1692-Nov. 14, 1727). 

7. Ephraim Hawley (Aug. 7, 1659-Apr. 18, 1690) and 
Sarah Wells (Sept. 29, 1664-June 29, 1694). 

8. Joseph Hawley (b. Eng. 1603-May 20, 1690) and 
Katherine Birdsey (b. Eng.-June 25, 1692). 



Joseph Hawley (1603-1690) came from Derbyshire, 
England, to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1629/30, then 
to Wethersfield, Conn. ; and in 1G46 settled in Stratford, 
Conn. The oldest existing land records of Stratford were 
recorded by him, as were also the vital records and town 
acts. The charter of the town of Stratford was also drafted 
by him. His public services were almost continuous from 
his settlement in Stratford until his decease, May 20, 1690. 
He was the town clerk or recorder for sixteen years, town 
treasurer, on committees to survey land and purchase land 
from the Indians; deputy to the General Assembly of Con- 
necticut twenty-nine sessions ; and commissioner for Strat- 
ford for eight years. He was a large land owner in Strat- 
ford, and portions of his lands were in the possession of his 
descendants for more than 200 years. 

Aaron Hawley (1739-1803) was appointed Lieutenant 
in 1776 and promoted to Brigade Major in the Fourth Con- 
necticut Regiment under Gen. Silliman. In 1779 Gov. 
Trumbull requested Major Hawley to look up a vessel to 
cruise the Sound. He married first Elizabeth (daughter 
of Capt. Ezra Hawley) ; second, Sarah Pickett; and, third, 
Rachel Comstock, and left numerous descendants in the 
town of Bridgeport, Conn., where he was born and died. 



61 

HeIvE;n Louise King. 221 

Born in Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Descendant of Richard Boothe, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor Daniel Booth, both of Connecticut, as follows: 

2. Nelson King (Feb. 12, 1833-Dec. 0, 1892) and 
Harriett Cornelia Booth (July 4, 1838-Aug. IS, 1879). 

3. Otis Booth (ab. 1814-1841) and 

Cornelia Whiting (Apr. 14, lS15-Dec., 1S8G). 

4. Daniel Booth (July, 17G8-aft. 1823) and 

Betsy Booth, dau. of James Booth (July 20, 17G3-Jan. 16, 1825). 

5. Daniel Booth (Feb. G, 1724-May 8, 1801) and 
Polly Judson (bapt. Sept. 4, 1737-bef. 1801). 

6. Zachariah Booth (1694-1762) and 

Ann Curtis (1G97-May 18, 1733), his first wife. 

7. Joseph Boothe (Mch. 8, 165G-Sept. 1, 1703) and 

Hannah Willcoxson (Feb. 14, 1G45-July 10, 1701), his second 
wife. 

8. Richard Boothe (b. Eng. lG07-aft. 1689) and 
Elizabeth Hawley (b. Eng.-aft. IGGl), Ins first wife. 

Richard Boothe (1607-after 1689), from England, is 
found in Stratford, Connecticut Colony, in 16-10. He was 
selectman in 1669, and his name appears often on the town 
records as an officer of trust, surveyor of highways, treas- 
urer, commissioner of land purchasers, and lister of estates. 

Daniel Booth (1721-1801) was a sea-faring man, but 
when Tryon invaded the colony he served in a mounted 
company for its defense. He was born in Stratford, Conn., 
where he died. 



Evelina Benbridge Dean. . 222 

Born in Boston, Massachusetts. 
r Descendant of Walter Dean, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Edward Dean, both of Massachusetts, as follows: 

2. Edward Williams Dean (Jan. 29, 1829-Dcc. 8, 1900) and 
Sally Benbridge Emerson (May 20, 183G-Dec. 31, 1893). 

3. Christopher Columbus Dean (Apr. 22, 1801-June 17, 18r)4) and 
Martha Washington Peck (Apr. 7, 1809-Aug. 23, 1S57), his sec- 
ond wife. 

4. James Dean (Feb. 15, 1761-Aug. 18, 1816) and 
Hannah Williams (Jan. 22, 17G1-Feb. 24, 184G). 



62 

5. Edward Dean (1717-Apr. 9, 1791) and 
Mercy Pratt (1719-Apr. 19, 1754). 

6. Seth Dean (June 3, 1683- ) and 

Mary Cobb (m. ab. 1712). 

7. Ezra Dean ( -bet. Oct. 28, 1727 and Feb. 15, 1732) and 

Bethiah Edson (ni. Dec. 17, lG7r,), his first wife. 

8. Walter Dean (b. Eng. bcf. l()20-aft. 1693) and 
Eleanor , his second wife. 

Walter Dean (before lG20-after 1G93) came from Chard, 
County Somerset, England, and settled with his brother 
John in Dorchester, Mass. He removed with him to Taun- 
ton in 1639, where he was a Representative to the General 
Court in 1640, and selectman for many years. He and his 
wife, Eleanor, were living in 1693 in Taunton, Mass. 

Edward Dean (1717-1791) of Taimton, Mass., served as 
a private in Capt. Matthew Randall's company in 1776; 
as a matross in Capt. Fales' company in December, 1776, 
on the alarm at Rhode Island ; and in 1779 was promoted to 
Corporal in Capt. Jacob Haskin's company, which office 
he held in 1781. 



Eveline Jones (Mrs. Frederick B. Street). 223 

Born in Danielson, Connecticut. 

Descendant of William and Nathaniel Jones, through the 
Revolutionary ancestor, Benjamin Jones, all of Connecti- 
cut, as follows : 



2. Daniel Albion Jones (Mch. 2, 18'33-June 1, 1864) and 
Emeline Roberts (July 26, 1836- ). 

3. Orville Jones (1804-Feb. 18, 1880) and 
Rhoda Woodruff (1807-Dec. 31, 18S3). 

4. Benjamin Jones (Feb. 5, 1757-June 29, 1821) and 
Esther Woodruff (1762-Aug. 19, 1840). 

5. Nathaniel Jones (Mch. 30, 1717-m. Jan. 8, 1743) and 
vSarah Merriman (Nov. 18, 1723-m. June 8, 1743). 

6. Theophilus Jones (Mch. 18, 1600- ) and 

Hannah Mix (m. Dec. 26, 1711-Nov. 26, 1754), his first wife. 

7. Nathaniel Jones (b. Eng. ab. 1654-Aug. 21, 1691) and 
Abigail Atwater (Mch. 3, 1660-m. Oct. 7, 1684). 

8. William Jones (1624-Oct. 17, 1706) and 
(d. in Eng.), his first wife. 



63 

William Jones (1624-1706) (according to family tradi- 
tion, the son of John Jones and his wife, Catherine, sister of 
Oliver Cromwell), with his sons William and Nathaniel, 
children of his first wife, who had died in England, came 
to this country in 1660 on the same ship that bore the fam- 
ous regicides, Whalley and Goft'e. He married Hannah, 
daughter of Gov. Theophilus Eaton, and settled in New 
Haven, Conn. ; was a lawyer of talent ; Judge of New- 
Haven Colony Court in 169S ; Deputy Governor of New 
Haven Colony for many years; and in 1678 was assistant 
of the United Colony of Connecticut. He died in New 
Haven, Oct. 17, 1706, in his eighty-second year. 

Nathaniel Jones (1654-1691) emigrated to this country 
with his father in 1660 ; married Oct. 7, 1684, Abigail, daugh- 
ter of David Atwater, in New Haven, where he lived until 
his death, Aug. 20, 1G91. 

Benjamin Jones (1757-1821) of Barkhamstead, Conn., 
served as a private in Col. Jonathan Latimer's regiment 
which re-enforced Gen. Gates at Saratoga, and was called 
by him "one of the two excellent militia regiments from 
Connecticut." 



Helkn Hall Newbicrrv (Mrs. H. B. Jov). 224 

Born in Detroit, Michigan. 

Descendant of Thomas Newberry of Massachusetts and 
Benjamin Newberry of Connecticut, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Amasa Newberry of New York, as fol- 
lows : 

2. John Stoughton Newberry (Nov. 18, 1826-Jan. 2, 1887) and 
Helen Parmelee Handy (Nov. 15, 1835-....), his second wife. 

3.'EHhu Newberry (Feb. 3, 17S8-Mch. 13, 18G0) and 
Rhoda Phelps (Aug. IG, 1793-Dec. 19, 1872). 

4. Amasa Newberry (Oct. 27, 1752-Jan. 25, 1835) and 
Ruth Warner (Oct. 17. 175S-Apr. 1, 1815). 

5. Benjamin Newberry (May 20, 1721-Jan. 23, 1804) and 
Jerusha Stoughton (Apr. 12, 1725-Nov. 19, 1780). 

6. Joseph Newberry (Oct. 24, 1684-Aug. 30, 1751) and 
Sarah Loomis (Sept. 13, ieS9-I)uried July 31, 1771). 



64 

7. Thomas Newberry (Sept. 1, 1657-Apr. 30, 1688) and 
Ann Ford (1657-Jan. 6, 1690). 

8. Benjamin Newberry (b. Eng.-Sept. 11, 1689) and 
Mary Allyn (m. 1646 in Windsor, Conn.-July 29, 1689). 

9. Thomas Newberry (b. Eng.-d. 1635/6) and 
Jane ( Norwalk, Conn. ) . 

Thomas Newberry (Eng.-lGSo/G) was one of the earUcst 
settlers of Dorchester, Mass., and received a grant of land 
in March, 1G34 ; was freeman and selectman there and one 
of the promoters of the new settlement at Windsor, Conn., 
but his death occurred before the removal. Thirty years 
later his heirs were allowed two hundred acres "in the west 
land of Windsor." His widow married Rev. John War- 
ham, of Windsor, as his second wife. 

Benjamin Newberry (Eng.-1G89) was one of the seven 
proprietors of Windsor, Conn., to whom the patent of the 
town was granted. He commanded the military depart- 
ment of the colony ; represented Windsor in the General 
Court for twenty-two sessions, and was an assistant in 1G85. 
During King Philip's War he served as Captain and was a 
member of the Council of W^ar. He died in Windsor, Sept. 
11, 1689. 

Amasa Newberry (1752-1835) enlisted from Windsor, 
Conn., in Col. Jedediah Huntington's regiment ; was on 
guard at Boston after the evacuation and served as Ser- 
geant in Capt. Roswell Grant's company in the Rhode Island 
expedition of 1778. He was born in East Windsor, Conn., 
and lived there until 1805, when he moved to Sangerfield, 
Oneida County, N. Y., from which place he applied for a 
pension in 1832, and where he died June 25, 1835. 



Martha Edwards Bkach. 225 

Born in Trumbull, Connecticut. 

Descendant of John Beach, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Eliakim Beach, both of Connecticut, as follows: 

2. Sheldon Beach (Jan. 1, 1808-Oct. 15, 1887) and 

Miranda Emeline Summers (Aug. 13, 1810-Aug. 13, 1883). 



65 

3. Alfred Beach (Dec. 11, 1776-Dec. 9, 1849) and 
Sibvl Beach (bapt. Mch. 16, 1776-Apr. 23, 1829). 

4. Eliakim Beach (July 13, 1751-June 16, 1821) and 
Abiah Summers (Oct. 7, 1756-Oct. 31, 1842). 

5. Samuel Beach (June 24, 1723-aft. 1756) and 
Sarah Sherman (Mch., 1725-aft. 1757). 

6. Lieut. Tosiah Beach (Aug. 18, 1694-Apr. 17, 1759) and 
Patience Nichols (m. Jan. 25, 1721-2). his first wife. 

7. Nathaniel Beach (Mch., 1662-1747) and 
Sarah Porter (1667-1734). 

8. John Beach (b. Eng., 1623-1579/80) and 
Mary (m. 1650-aft. 1668). 

John Beach (1G23-1679) took the oath of fideHty in 
New Haven, Conn., July 1, 1644. He was one of the first 
inhabitants of the town of Stratford, Conn., and in KiOO 
received a "home lot." In January, 167], he was made the 
town auctioneer. Soon thereafter he removed to WaUing- 
ford, Conn., where he was one of the founders of the First 
Church and held numerous town offices. He died in Wal- 
lingford in 1679/80. 

Eliakim Beach (1751-1821) gave liberally to the cause 
of the colonists and made his house a refuge at the burn- 
ing of the town of Fairfield, Conn. He was on committees 
to provide for soldiers' families in Trumbull, Conn., and 
continued his patriotic work throughout the Revolution. 



Maria Bissfxl Purdy (Mrs. Peck). 226 

Born in Wayne County, New York. 

Descendant of Richard Sears, through the Revolutionary 
ancestors, Silas and Richard Sears, all of Massachusetts, as 
follows : 

2. Merritt Purdy (Dec. 23, lS08-Feb., 1873) and 
Amanda Scars (Mch. 1, 1815-Oct. 12, 1869). 

3. Orange Sears (Dec. 4, 1776-1854) and 

f Annis Bissell Silliman (July 29, 1782-Sept. 17, 1841). 

4. Richard Sears (1748-Aug., 1814) and 
Mary Lee (1748-1792), his first wife. 

5. Silas Sears (Feb. 11, 1719-Feb. 29, 1780) and 
Deborah Buck (m. June 9, 1743). 

6. Joseph Sears (ab. 1675-May 7, 1750) and 
Hannah Hall (1680-July 28, 1753). 



66 



7. Silas Sears (ab. 1637-Jan. 13, 1697) and 
Anna Bursell ( -Mch. 24, 1723). 

8. Richard Sears ( -d. Yarmouth, Aug. 2G, 1(>76) and 

Dorothy ( -buried Mch. 19, 1G78). 

Richard Sears (Eng.-167G) is first found of record in 
New England March 25, lG;i;-!, when his name appears on 
the tax list of Plymouth Colony. January 1, 1037, his 
name is found on the tax list of Marblehead, Mass., Bay 
Colony, where he was granted land. In 1639 he was one 
of tlie founders of Yarmouth, previously called by the 
Indians ''Matta Keese." His daughter, Deborah, was the 
first white girl born in Yarmouth. He took the oath of 
fidelity at "Plimouth" June 7, 1G53 ; was grand juryman 
in 1G52; constable in IGGO; representative to the General 
Court at Plymouth in 1GG2. He died in Yarmouth in 167(5. 

Silas Sears (1719-1780), who had fought in the early 
wars, served from Greenwich, Mass., in 1776. He was 
born in Yarmouth, and died in Greenwich, Mass. 

Richard Sears (1748-1814) served as Corporal and Ser- 
geant. He was at Bunker Hill, and the powder horn he 
carried is in possession of his descendants. He was born 
in Hardwick, Mass., and died in Hoosic, New York. 



JiCNNiE Bown:N (Mrs. William Harrison 

French). 227 

Born in Antwerp, New York. 

Descendant of Richard Bowen, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Hezekiah Bowen, both of Massachusetts, as fol- 
lows : 

2. Col. James H. Bowen (Mch. 7, lS22-May 1, 1S81) and 
Caroline A. Smith (June 15, 1821- ). 

3. Stephen Bowen (Oct. 6, 1792-May 3, 1857) and 
Lucinda Bates (Feb. 8, 1798-Aug. 2G, 18(55). 

4. Asa Bowen (Nov. 11, 1768-Sept. 14, ISGl) and 
Mary Remington (June 30, 17G8-1802). 

5. Hezekiah Bowen (bef. 174S-May IG, 17S5) and 
Zerviah ( -d. aft. 1785). 

G. Hezekiah Bowen (June 20, 1715-Feb. 6, 1823) and 
Mary Ormsby (m. Nov. 12, 1740). 



67 

7. Elisha Bowen (July 6, 1693- ) and 

Susanna Simons. 

8. Joseph Bowen (June 17, lCC3-Dec. 28, 1727) and 
Elizabeth Round. 

9. Obediah Bowen (1C27-1710) and 
Marj' Clifton. 

10. Richard Bowen (b. Wales IGOO-Feb. 4, 1674/5) and 
Anna — (b. Wales-....), his first wife. 

Richard Bowen (....-1074/5) was in Rehoboth, Mass., 
in 1643, when he niade return of the value of his estate. 
In 1655 he was chosen "townsman" (selectman) and in 
1600 was chosen by the town to clear evidence of owner- 
ship of lands and authorized to have the town records tran- 
scribed in a new book. He was in office almost continu- 
ously and had much influence in town afTairs. He repre- 
sented Rehoboth in the General Court in 1051, and died 
February 4, 1674/5, leaving a widow, Elizabeth (second 
wife), who died the following year. 

Hezekiah Bowen (before 1748-1785) served as a private 
during the Revolution in the Militia of Berkshire County, 
Mass. He was born in Rehoboth, Mass., and died in 
Scituate, R. I. 



Alma Mkrwin (Mrs. Andrf.w M. Toys). 238 

Born in Erie, Pennsylvania. 

Descendant of Miles Mcrwin, through the Revolutionary 
ancestors, John and David Mcrwin, all of Connecticut, as 
follows : 

2. Isaac Merwin (Feb. 7, 1780-Sept. 1, 1860) and 

Maria Salmon (June 1, lS06-May 5. 1885), liis second wife. 

3. David Merwin (Jan. 30, 1743-Aug. 13, 1810) and 
Eunice Perry (1749-Oct. 23, 1S36). 

4. John Merwin (Apr. 3, 1707-Feb. 19, 1793) and 
Elizabeth Nettleton (Jan. 13, 170S-m. Dec. 2, 1730). 

5. John Merwin (Nov. 23, 1G84-Feb. 17, 1782) and 
Hannah Piatt (Nov. 13, 1675-1720). 

6. John Merwin (Jan. 13, 1650-Jan. 13, 1728) and 

Mary (Welch) Holbrook (Aug. 14, 1655-Oct. 30, 1703). 

7. Miles Merwin (1633-Apr. 23, 1697) and 

Elizabeth (Baldwin) Canfield ( -July 10, 1664), his second 

wife. 



68 

Miles Merwin (1633-1697) settled in Milford, Colony of 
New Haven, in 1645. He was a tanner and his works were 
in the possession of a descendant and namesake, Miles Mer- 
win, nearly two hundred years later. He had eleven chil- 
dren born between the years 1G48 and 1670. 

John Merwin, Senior (1707-1792) served as a Minute 
Man during the Revolution. In the same company was his 
son, John. He was born and died in Milford, Conn. 

David Merwin (1743-1816) was a private in Col. Samuel 
Canfield's regiment, Connecticut State Militia, in 1781 at 
West Point, New York. He also was born and died in 
Milford, Conn. 



Nina Olds (Mrs. Robert Enegren). 229 

Born in Muscatine, Iowa. 

Descendant of Robert Olds of Connecticut, through the 
Revolutionary ancestor, Benjamin Olds, of Massachusetts, 
as follows : 

2. Gamaliel Whitney Olds (Aug. 3, 1836- ) and 

Hannah Lcffingwell Tracy (Nov. G, 1841-m. 1S58). 

3. Gamaliel Olds (Nov. 28, 1803-Jan. 26, 1804) and 
Minerva Howe (m. 1826-Jan. 26, 1876). 

4. Joseph Olds (Aug. 26, 1769-1843) and 
Sally Whitney (Aug. 10, 1774-bef. 1850). 

5. Benjamin Olds (bcf. 1738-aft. 1777, Granville, Mass.) and 
Via Smith (m. 1758). 

6. John Olds (Jan. 11, 1691-aft. 1749) and 
Elizabeth Denslow (Mch. 9, 1692- ). 

7. Robert Olds (bef. 1649-Jan. 16, 1728) and 
Dorothy Granger (m. Apr. 1, 1689), his second wife. 

Robert Olds (before 1649-1728) sold his estate in Wind- 
sor, Conn., in 1673 and removed to Suffield, Conn. His 
slaughter, Mindwell, was the first white child born in Suf- 
field. In 1694 Robert Olds was appointed town agent to 
represent the people of Suffield before the General Assem- 
bly in regard to their "burdensome rates." He married 
first Susanna Hoxford, Dec. 31, 1669, and twenty years 
later married, second, Dorothy Granger. 



69 

Benjamin Olds (before 1738-aftcr 1777) lived in Gran- 
ville, Mass., dnring the Revolution. In 1770 he was a ]:)riv- 
ate in Capt. William Cooley's company of Hampshire Coun- 
ty, Massachusetts, Militia, and died in Granville, leaving 
three children, Thaddeus (born, July 11, 1703) ; Joseph 
(born, Apr. 2G, 1769) ; and Gamaliel (born. Feb. 11, 1777). 

Jane Tuttle. 230 

Born in Hartford, Connecticut. 

Descendant of William Tuttle, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Samuel Tuttle, both of Connecticut, as follows : 

3. William Frederick Tuttle (Apr. 8, 1812-Feb. 22, 1395) and 
Sarah Ramsey (Dec. 3, 1817-Tune 9, 1895). 

3. Samuel Tuttle (June 23, 1773-July 5, 1850) and 
Betsey Hotchkiss (May 2, 1779-Aug. 2, 1831). 

4. Samuel Tuttle (1741-May 20, 1817) and 
Bethia Miles (m. Sept. 6, 17G1-1824). 

5. Joseph Tuttle (Nov. 10, 1692-Jan. 16, 1761) and 

Mercy Thompson (Feb. 21, 169G-Sept. 6, 1743), his first wife. 

6. Joseph Tuttle (Mch. 18, 1663-aft. 1721) and 
Elizabeth Sanford (1671-m. 1691). 

7. Joseph Tuttle (bapt. Nov. 22, 1640-Sept., 1690) and 
Hannah Munson (June 11, 1648-Nov. 30, 1695). 
(She m. (2) Aug. 21, 1694, Nathan Bradley.) 

8. WiUiam Tuttle (b. Eng. ab. 1609-June, 1673) and 
Elizabeth (d. Dec. 30, 1GS4, aged 72). 

William Tuttle (about 1G09-1G73) from County North- 
ampton, England, embarked, with his wife and three chil- 
dren, on tlie "Planter," arriving in Boston about the first 
of July, 1635. His wife joined the church in Boston July 
24, 1636 ; but in 1639 William became one of the planters 
of "Quinnipiac" (now New Haven, Conn.), where he 
signed the Church Covenant June fourth of the same year. 
He held many town offices ; was commissioner in 1640 ; fence 
viewer in 1644; constable in 1666-7 ; and also road commis- 
sioner and referee in various disputes in regard to bound- 
ary lines. He was a large landed proprietor in New Haven and 
East Haven. The first building erected for Yale College, 
and the only land owned by the college for thirty years, 
was the homestead of William Tuttle ; so that on the very 



70 

spot where William Tuttle lived bis great grand-son, Jona- 
than Edwards, studied and taught. William Tuttle died 
in New Haven, and his dust lies under the sod of "the old 
Green," although the exact spot is not known. 

Samuel Tuttle (1741-1817) was taken prisoner while 
opposing the raid on New Haven and was carried to New 
York. His house was ransacked and set on fire, but his 
wife and children escaped. His family Bible, printed in 
KUio, was carried off, but was restored to the family ten 
years later, and is still in possession of his descendants. 
He was born and died in New Haven. 



AijcE NiivvTON (Mrs. Samukl H. Strket). 2'M 

Born in Woodbridge, Connecticut. 

Descendant of Rev. Roger Newton, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Samuel Newton, both of Connecticut, as 
follows : 

2. Samuel Peck Newton (Mch. 5, lSt4-May 8, 1807) and 
Harriet Beecher (June 2, lsl8-Feb. 10, 1807). 

3. Camp Newton (Sept. 7, 177C)-Apr. :!. 1847) and 
Elizabeth Peck (Aug. 2,-), 1774-July 28, 18,^8). 

4. Lieut. Samuel Newton (Dec. 7, 17;$7-Dec. 31, 1814) and 
Mary Camp (Feb. 1'.), 1742-Feb. 20, ISO'J). 

5. Samuel Newton (Aug. 1, 1710-Oct. 21, 17(39) and 
Deboraii Baldwin (Jan. 25, 171G-Aug. G, 17r)C or 8). • 

6. Sanuiol Newton (.Tune 2(1, 1G7T-Dec. 20, 1728) and 
Pbebe PlaU (U'.SG-Nov. 27, 1727). 

7. Samuel Newton (Oct. 20, 1G4G-1708) and 
Martha I'enn (lG;")0-m. Mch., 1GG9). 

8. Rev. Roger Newton ( -June 7, 1GS;5) and 

Mary Hooker ( -Feb. 4, 1G76). 

Rev. Roger Newton (Eng.-HiS;]) was the first minister 
of the Gospel at Hartford, Conn. He removed to Mil ford, 
Conn., where he was installed as minister of the First 
Church Aug. 22, KidO, which position he filled until his 
death in 1()88. He married Mary, daughter of Rev. Thomas 
Hooker, of Hartford, Conn. 

Samuel Newton (1737-1814) was a Lieutenant in the 
Connecticut line on duty in New York during the Revolu- 



71 

tion. According to family tradition, he walked to Mil ford, 
Conn., after his discharge, where he horrowed a horse from 
a friend, to complete his journey home. His grave in 
Woodbridge, Conn., his native town, is decorated every 
year by the Grand Army of the Republic as that of a Revo- 
lutionary soldier. 



Myra Robbins (Mrs. James McNabb). 232 

Born in Solon, Ohio. 

Descendant of John Robbins of Connecticut, through the 
Revolutionary ancestors, Joshua and Jason Robbins, of 
Massachusetts, as follows : 

2. Archibald Robbins (Nov. 19, 1792-Dec. 27, 1859) and 
Elizabeth Tolman WilHams (Dec. 3, lS08-Aug. :?, 1883). 

3. Jason Roljbins (May 12, 1762-Feh. 21, 1852) and 
Honor Riley (Aug. 16, 17G7-Apr. 9, 1800). 

4. Joshua Robbins (Feb. 9, 1740-1792) and 

Elizabeth Hubbard (Mch. 29, 1739-bef. June 30, 1785). 

5. Nathaniel Robbins (Sept. 7, 1708-Oct. 5, 1783) and 

Mary Robbins (dan. of Richard Robbins) (Mch. 10, 1713~Nov. 
7, 1781). 

6. Joshua Robbins, Jr. (Oct. 21, 1G81-1733) and 
Sarah Bidwell (Aug. 19, 1681-Dec. 3, 1744). 

7. Capt. Joshua Robbins (Oct. 21, 1651-Dec. 15, 1738) and 
Elizabeth Butler (d. Apr. 24, 1736, aged 71). 

8. John Robbins ( -June 27, 1660) and 

Mary Wells ( -Sept., 1659). 

John Robbins, "Gentleman" (Eng.-IGGO), was in Weth^ 
ersfield. Conn., as early as 1G38. He was evidently a man 
of means and of good social standing, as vouched for by 
the term "gentleman'' in all the early records. He was 
townsman (selectman) in 1652, and representative to the 
General Court, lGo3, 56, 57 and 59. He married Mary, 
daughter of Thomas and Hannah Wells, at Wethersfield, 
Conn., and died there in 16G0. 

Joshua Robbins (1740-1792) was a member of the Com- 
mittee of Correspondence of Pittsfield, Mass., in 1777 ; of a 
committee to procure men for the army in J 780 ; and select- 



72 

man in 1781. He was born in Wethersfield, Conn., and 
died in Pittsfield, Mass. 

Jason Robbins (1763-1852) was a private in Capt. Wil- 
liam Ford's company, Berkshire County, Mass., Militia, 
from 1777 to 1780. He was born in Pittsfield, Mass., and 
a bronze marker has been placed over his grave in Solon, 
Ohio, by the Sons of the American Revolution. 



Mary Hannah Stoddard (Mrs. Robert J. John- 
ston). 233 

Born in Red Wing, Minnesota. 

Descendant of John Stoddard, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Mark Stoddard, both of Connecticut, as follows: 

2. James Gallup Stoddard (Jan. 9, lS26-Oct. IG, 1871) and 
Margaret Barr (July 8, 1844-living 1904). 

3. Jonathan Stoddard (Mch. IC, 1783-Sept. 29, 1S59) and 
Hannah Morgan (May 18, 17S7-Sept. 9, 1S67). 

4. Mark Stoddard (Oct. 10, 1743-Mch. 8, 1829) and 
Lucy Allyn (1748-JuIy 29, 1831). 

5. Robert Stoddard (1700-Mch., 1771) and 

Bathsheba Rogers (Mch. 1, 1708-Feb. 17, 1753), his first wife. 
G. Robert Stoddard (1652-Sept. 5, 1749) and 

Mary Mortimer (m. ab. 1684). 
7. John Stoddard (1012-1G7G) and 

Catharine . 

John Stoddard, or Stodder (1612-1G7G), was in New 
London, Conn., in 1G50, and shortly thereafter received a 
grant of a house and lot in New London, and also of land 
at Stoddard's Landing, on the Thames River. He died in 
New London in 1G7G, leaving a widow, Catharine, who mar- 
ried, second, John Sampson. 

Mark Stoddard (1743-182!)) served as sergeant in Capt. 
Abel Spicer's company, raised on the first call for troops in 
Connecticut, and took part in the Battle of Bunker Hill. 
He was born and died in what is now Ledyard, Conn. 



73 

Anna Maria Smith (Mrs. Ci-iarles Albert 

hotckkiss). 234 

Born at Northbridge, Massachusetts. 
Descendant of Thomas Wood, through the Revokitionary 
ancestor, Ezekiel Wood, both of Massachusetts, as follows: 

2. Seymour Smith (Mch. 29, 1715-living 1904) and 
Elizabeth Emily Wood (Feb. 22, lS17-Apr. 25, 1884). 

3. Ezekiel Wood (Mch. 6, 178S-June 21, 1871) and 
Hannah Wood (May 5, 1784-Feb. 21, 1861). 

4. Ezekiel Wood (Feb. 5, 1744-Dec. 15, 1811) and 

Mrs. Sarah Albee (Jan. 13, 175S-Sept. 29, 1798), his second wife. 

5. Ezekiel Wood (Nov. 11, 1706-May 16, 1772) and 
Mary Brown (m. 1732-Oct., 177S). 

6. Solomon Wood (May 17, 1669-Jan. 13, 1752) and 
Mary Hazeltine (Dec. 11, 1671-Feb. 21, 1749). 

7. Thomas Wood (b. Eng.-Sept. 12, 1687) and 
Ann Hunt (....-Dec. 29, 1714). 

Thomas Wood (Eng.-1687) settled for a time at See- 
konk (Rehoboth), Mass. In 1G55 he was a resident of 
Rowley, w-here seven sons and four daughters were born 
between 165G and 1674 to him and his wife, Ann Hunt. 

Ezekiel Wood (1744-1811) was an inn-keeper at Men- 
don, Mass., and was chairman of a number of patriotic 
meetings held in his inn during the Revolution. In 1776 
he was one of the petitioners to reconstruct the Rowley 
.and Mendon companies that they might be able to render 
more effective service in the cause of the colonists. He 
married, first, Martha Whitney; and, second, Mrs. Sarah 
Albee, outliving both of them for many years. 



Carrie M. Burrows (Mrs. Charles H. 

Denison). 235 

Born at Old Mystic, Connecticut. 

Descendant of Robert Burrows, through the Revolution- 
ary ancestor, Capt. Hubbard Burrows, both of Connecticut, 
as follows : 

2. John Wheeler Burrows (Jan. 4. 1839- ) and 

Almira B. Fenner (Sept. 7, 1847-....). 



74 

3. Charles Burrows (Oct. 29, 1805-Jan. 30. 1856) and 
Emily A. Wheeler (Feb. 26, 1814-Oct. 20, 1879). 

4. John B. Burrows (Feb. 2, 1768- ) and 

Betsey Haley (Sept. 14, 1767-June 30, 1847). 

5. Capt. Hubbard Burrows (June 20, 1730-Sept. 6, 1781) and 
Priscilla Baldwin (May 20, 1743-m. Dec. 24, 1761), his first wife. 

6. Hubbard Burrows (Feb. 10, 1707-Apr., 1753) and 
Mercy Denison (June 25, 1711-m. May 28, 1730). 

7. John Burrows (1671-1752) and 

Lydia Hubbard (m. Oct. 14, 1700-aft. 1714). 

8. John Burrows (1642-Feb. 12, 1716) and 
Hannah Culver (Apr. 11, lG51-m. Dec. 14, 1670). 

9. Robert Burrows (b. Eng., -Aug., 1682) and 

Mrs. Mary Ireland ( -Oct. 2, 1672). 

Robert Burrows (Eng.-i682) settled first in Boston, 
Mass., but is found in Wethersfield, Conn., in 1(141, wbere he 
married Mary, widow of Samuel Ireland. About JG50 he 
removed to New London, settling at "Poquonnock," wliere 
he established the first ferry on the Mystic River. 

Hubbard Burrows (IToD-lTSl) commanded a company 
of Connecticut Militia in the New York campaign. He was 
at home in Groton, Conn., when Fort Griswold was at- 
tacked, and fell in the massacre. He is buried in the old 
ground at Burnett's Corners in Groton, and his epitaph 
reads : "In memory of Capt. Hubbard Burrows who was 
killed at Fort Griswold Sept. G, 1781, in the forty-second 
year of his age." He was born in Stonington, Conn. 



Lucy Maria Osgoou (Mrs. Gicorge Marsh). 33(! 

Born in Verona, New York. 

Descendant of John Osgood, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Josiah Osgood, both of Massachusetts, 
as follows : - 

2. Luther P. Osgood (Sept. 20, isi8-0ct. 4, 1889) and 
Catharine M. Toll (Apr. 14, 1821-Oct. 20, ISdO). 

3. Luther Osgood (June 20, 1780-May 30, 1850) and 

Lucy Osgood (dau. of Jonathan) (Oct. 5, 1775-May 23, 1857). 

4. Josiah Osgood (Oct. 1, 1740-Aug. 17, 1830) and 
Jane Byington ( -Oct. 22, 1822). 

5. David Osgood (Oct. 8, 1098-1771) and 
Eunice Carter (m. Nov. 3, 1724). 



75 

6. Hooker Osgood (Aug. 24, 1668-Jan. 29, 1748) and 
Dorothy Wood (m. Apr. 26, 1692). 

7. Stephen Osgood (1638-Jan. 15, 1600) and 
Mary Hooker (m. Oct. 24, 1663). 

8. John Osgood (July 23, ISOo-Oct. 24, 1651) and 
Sarah ( -Apr. 8, 1667). 

John Osgood (loO.VKiDl) was born in the parish of 
Wherwell, Hampshire, England, July 23, 1595. He 
emigrated to America, with his wife, Sarah, about 1(539, 
settling first in Ipswich, Mass. ; removed to Newbury, and 
about l()-45 to Andover, Mass., where he was one of the 
original members of the First Church. He was the first 
representative from Andover to the General Court, but 
only attended one session, owing to his failing health. He 
died in Andover Oct. 2i, IGol, "honored by his townsmen, 
and a man of great usefulness." 

Josiah Osgood (1710-1830) served as a Lieutenant at 
the Lexington Alarm in Capt. Ebenezer Goodale's company 
of Massachusetts troops. In 1779 he was in Capt. Samuel 
Merriman's company. He was born in Sterling, Mass., and 
died in Verona, New York. 

23(1 
Descendant also of Karel Hansen Toll, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Daniel Toll, both of New York, as follows: 

2. Luther P. Osgood (Sept. 20, 181S-0ct. 4, 1889) and 
Catliarine M. Toll (Apr. 14, lS21-0ct. 29, 1S90). 

3. Simon DeWitt Toll (Apr. 14, 1780-June 15, 1S5G) and 
Susan Condc (July 2, 1781-Sept. 2, 1865). 

4. Daniel Toll (Oct. 27, 1751-1832) and 
Susanna Swits (m. Julv 2, 1775-Jan. 3, 1831). 

5. Simon Toll (May 8, 1698-1777) and 
Hester DeGraff (1711-1793). 

6. Karel Hansen Toll (1658-Mch., 1738) and 
Elizabeth Rinckhout. 

Karel Hansen Toll (1G58-173S) was born in Sweden 
and emigrated to Schenectady, N. Y., in 1G85, where he be- 
came a large landed proprietor. He was a member of the 
Provincial Assembly from 171-i to 172(5, and married in 
1685 Elizabeth, daughter of Daniel Rinckhout, of Albany. 



76 

The Indians gave him the name of "Kingego" on account 
of a daring feat in swimming from Algiers, where he had 
heen captured, to a British ship which lay off the coast in 
the harbor. 

Daniel Toll (1751-1832) was Ensign and Lieutenant in 
the Albany, N. Y., Company of Militia under Capt. John 
Van Petten. He was born and died in Schenectady, New 
York. 

Amorct McCall (Mrs. Nei^son D. Robinson). 2o7 

Born in Bozrah, Connecticut. 

Descendant of James Macall, of Massachusetts, througli 
the Revolutionary ancestor, Ozias McCall, of Connecticut, 
as follows : 

2. Stephen Titus McCall (Feb. 11, 1807-May 21, 1878) and 
Judith Ann Spinck (Dec. 22, ISOS-Mav IS, 1888). 

3. John McCall (May 25, 1782-May 7, 1831) and 
Mercy Bartlett (Oct. 11, 17S2-July 10, 1811). 

4. Ozias McCall (1758-July C, 1826) and 
Elizabeth Williams (Mch. 20, 1759-Oct. 8, 1839). 

5. Achippus McCal! (Aug. 9, 1723-Dec. 3, 1798) and 
Deborah Marsh (Nov. 9, 172C-Feb. 15. 1820). 

6. James Macall (Oct. 30, 1G90-Dec. 2, 1778) and 

Hannah Greene (m. Jan., 1718-Mch. 30, 1755), his second wife. 

7. James Macall ( -May 9, 1693) and 

Anna . 

James Macall ( -1G93) was made freeman in Marsh- 
field, in March, 1684, by the General Court of Plymouth 
Colony. 1-le was a leading citizen, a large land owner and 
held many town offices, being one of the first freemen of 
the town, and constable in 1690. According to well-estab- 
lished family tradition (handed down in all three branches 
of the family, but as yet unproven) the family was engaged 
in commercial pursuits in Glasgow, but, being Presbyterians, 
became involved in the religious troubles of 1068, escaped to 
Ulster, Ireland, and six months later sailed, with other 
persecuted covenanters, to New Jersey, where a Scotcli 
colony had obtained a grant of land from the Duke of York. 
On reaching this country they found that the Dutch claimed 
the territory, and broke up the colony, James Macall drift- 



I 77 

ing to Massachusetts, his brother, WiUiam, to Philadelphia, 
and a third brother to Virginia. 

Ozias McCall (1758-1S2G) served as a private in Col. 
Sage's regiment of Connecticut troops, raised to re-enforce 
Washington's army at New York in 177C. He died in 
Lebanon, Connecticut, his native town, leaving a widow, 
whom he had married in 1780, and who moved later to 
Clinton, N. Y., where she died in 1839. 



Fannie Sherwood (Mrs. Whiting). 238 

Born in Fairfield, Connecticut. 

Descendant of Thomas Sherwood, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Jehiel Sherwood, both of Connecticut, 
as follows: 

2. Oran Sherwood (Jan. 18, 1804-Jan. 2, 1848) and 
Fanny Wakeman (June 27, 1804-Mch. 21, 1SS,3). 

3. Stephen Sherwood (Apr. 20, 17~5-July 3, 1835) and 
Eulilla Goodsell (Feb. 8, 1T76-Mch. 4, 1814). 

4. Jehiel Sherwood (Mch. 1, 1739-ab. 180G) and 
Sarah Squire (m. 176o-aft. 1786). 

5. Joseph Sherwood (Dec. 1, 1702-aft. 1752) and 
Sarah Osborne (June, 1711-m. Feb. 17, 1730/1). 

6. Benjamin Sherwood (b. Fairfield-ab. 1737) and 
Sarah (m. 1691-aft. 1711). 

7. Thomas Sherwood, 2d (l62-t-1697) and 
Ann Turney (1627-....), his second wife. 

8' Thomas Sherwood, 1st (1586-1655) and 
Ahce Seabrook (15S7-aft. 1634). 

Thomas Sherwood (lo8i)-1655) sailed in the ship "Fran- 
cis" in l()3-± from Ipswich, County Suffolk, England, with 
wife, Alice, and several children, landing at Boston. About 
1635 he settled in Wethersfield, Conn. ; moved to Stam- 
ford, Conn., in 164-0, and in 16-18 was a resident of Fair- 
field, Conn., where in 1650 he was Assistant General of the 
Court. He died in Fairfield in 1655, leaving thirteen chil- 
dren. 

Jehiel Sherwood (1739-1806) was a sergeant in the 
Fairfield, Conn., Militia in 1775 and 1777. He was born in 
Fairfield, and died in Putnam, Connecticut. 



78 

Laura R. Woodruff (Mrs. IsRAiiL Johnson). 339 

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Descendant of Garret Stoffelszen (Vansant), of New 
York, through the Revolutionary ancestor, Garrett Van- 
sant, of Pennsylvania, as follows : 

2. Edward D. Woodruff (Mch. 14, ISlo-Nov. 14, 1886) and 
Anna E. Vansant (Nov. 28, 1817-Mch. 11, 1895). 

3. Sylas Vansant (Jan. 19, 1795-Dec. ;;, 1841) and 
Claudine Raguet (1794-Dec. 1, 1843). 

4. Garrett Vansant (1743-Apr. 13, 1797) and 
Elizabeth Larue (living 1797). 

5. Garret Vansant (b. ab. 1695-17.'j5) and 
Mary (m. bef. 1734). 

6. Harman Vansant (bapt. June 10, 1G74-May, 1759) and 
Elizabeth Brewers, his first wife. 

7. Garret Stoffelszen (Vansant) ( -bef. June, 170G) and 

Lysbet Gerrits ( -aft. 1690). 

Garret Stoffelse (Stoffelzen) Vansant (....-nOG) came 
from Holland about IGol and settled in New Utrecht, Long 
Island. His name frequently appears on the town records 
as Gerrit Stofdesee. He was one of the fourteen patentees 
for the Commons of New Utrecht, May 13, IGSl). In July, 
1G95, he removed to Bucks County, Penna., and died in 
Bensalem township, leaving his estate to be divided, in U'OG, 
between his ten children. In the Reformed Dutch Church 
of New York and Flatbush, Long Island, are recorded the 
baptisms of six children of Garret and Lysbet, viz: Herman, 
June 10, lG7-i; Josias, Oct. 29, IGTG; Albert, Mch. 13, IGSl ; 
jacobus, Feb. 15, IGSj ; Jois (Dutch for George), April 
2-1, 1G87, and Josyntje, Oct. 20, 1G90. 

Garrett Vansant (1743-1797) was an associator of the 
Second Company from Bensalem, Bucks County. Penna., 
during the Revolution. 



May Florence Sibley (Mrs. Horace H. Lee). 210 

Descendant of John Sibley, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Col. Timothy Sibley, both of Massachusetts, as 
follows : 



79 

2. James Whitelaw Sibley. (Feb. 20, 1816-Apr. 6, 1893) and 
Mary A. Hastings (Mch. 11, ISIS- ). 

3. Derick Sibley (May 22, 1788- ) and 

Abby Rislev. 

4. Asa Sibley' (Mch. 29, 1704-Feb. 26, 1829) and 
Irene Carpenter (m. Jan. 10, l~87-Oct. 5, 1846). 

5. Timothy Sibley (Nov. 2. 1727-Dec. G, 1818) and 
Anne Waite (Oct. 14, 1733-Mch. 12, 1794), his first wife. 

6. John Sibley (Sept. 18, 1687-1740) and 
Zerviah Gould (Apr. 21, 1694-m. Nov. 21, 1713). 

7. Joseph Sibley (lG53-aft. 1717) and 
Susannah Follet (June 1, lG62-m. Feb. 4, 1683). 

8. John Sibley (b. Eng -1G61, Manchester, Mass.) and 

Rachel , his second wife. 

John Sibley (Eng.-lfiCil ) emigrated from England in 
3 629, settling first at Salem, where he took the freeman's 
oath May 6, 1G31. He was selectman from Salem, and a 
representative to the General Court at Boston. Later he 
moved to Manchester, where he died in IGGl, leaving a 
widow, Rachel (his second wife) and nine children. 

"Col. Timothy Sibley" (1727-1818) was an active mem- 
ber- of the Committee of Safety and Correspondence for 
the town of Sutton, Mass., throughout the entire Revolu- 
tionary War. He had been a colonial officer from Sut- 
ton, his native town, and continued in active public serv- 
ice almost to the date of his death. 



IdabI'LLic Sparks (Mrs. Kricss). 241 

Born in New York City. 

Descendant of William Dye, of Rhode Island, through 
the Revolutionary ancestor, Peter Dye, of Connecticut and 
New York, as follows : 

2. Charles Jennings Sparks (Oct. 6, 1840-Apr. 17, 1873) and 
Elizabeth McLean Dye (m. Jan. 2, 1802). 

3. Clarkson Dye (Mch. 9, lS09-June 1, 1865) and 
Margaret McLean (Nov. 28, ISIG-Feb. 26, 18G7). 

4. Amos Dye (m. June 14, 1805-1828) and 
Magdalen Heroy (Mch. 4, 1787-Aug. 5. 1868). 

5. Peter Dye (1737-Apr. 21, ISll) and 

(Church and Bible records give Amos as son of Peter). 



80 

6. William Dye, 3d (Jan. 19, 1708- ) and 

Lucy Lamphear (July 3, 1718-m. Dec. 30, 1735). 

7. William Dye, Jr. (1CS2- ) and 

Elizabeth Rider (m. Dec. 6, 1703). 

8. William Dye, "the Elder" (165^Mch. 3, 1729/30) and 
Sarah (IGGO-m. 1G81). 

William Dye (1654-1729/30) was in Rhode Island prior 
to 1681, when he married Sarah in Little Compton. His 
sons, William and John, were born there in 1682 and 1684. 
He died intestate, and his estate was settled in South Kings- 
ton, R. I., in 1730. 

Peter Dye (1737-1811) was with the New York troops 
during the colonial wars and served during the Revolution 
as a private in the militia of Albany County, New York. 
He was born in Stonington, Conn., and died in Floyd, New 
York. 

EivizABETH Hastings (Mrs. John 

McCandusii). 242 

Born in Boston, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of Thomas Hastings, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestors, Samuel Hastings, Sr. and Jr., all of 
Massachusetts, as follows : 

2. Samuel Nelson Hastings (June 24, 1816-Aug. 14, 1871) and 
Elizabeth Ann Parmelee (Sept. 9, 1823-June 20, 1852). 

3. Jonathan Hastings (Aug. 17, 17S3-Dec. 8, 1864) and 
Nancy Adams (June 13, 17S8-Dcc. 31, 1857). 

4. Samuel Hastings, Jr. (July 11, 1757-Jan. 8, 1834) and 
Lydia Nelson (175S-Apr. 5, 1829). 

5. Samuel Hastings, Sr. (Mch. 30, 1721-Feb. 8, 1820) and 
Lydia Tidd (July 6, 1732-Nov. 10, 1802). 

6. Samuel Hastings (lG95-aft. 1735) and 
Bethia HoHoway (1G94-June 1, 1774). 

7. John Hastings (Mdi. 4, lC54-Mch. 28, 1718) and 
Abigail Hammond (June 21, 1C5G-Apr. 7, 1718). 

8. Thomas Hastings (1605-1685) and 

Margaret Cheney (m. April, lG51-aft. 1683), his second wife. 

Thomas Hastings (1605-1685), with wife, Susanna, cm- 
barked at Ipswich, England, in the "Elizabeth" for New 
England. He settled in Watertown, Massachusetts 
Bay Colony, where he was admitted a freeman in 1635, 



81 

and served as selectman for 20 years, town clerk 
three years. He was representative to the General Court in 
1673, and held the office of deacon in the church until his 
death. His wife, Susanna, died in April, 1051, and he 
married Margaret Cheney, who was the mother of his 
children, and who was living when he died in Watertown, 
in 1G85, aged 80 years. 

Samuel Hastings (1731-1820) was a Minute Man at the 
Battle of Lexington. He held many offices of trust at Lex- 
ington, Mass., and his home is still standing. He was born 
in Waltham and died in Lexington. 

Samuel Hastings, Jr. (1757-1834) was placed on the 
pension roll of Middlesex County, Mass., in 1831 for the 
service of a private in the Massachusetts Continental line. 
He was born in Lexington, and died in Lincoln, Mass. 



242 

Descendant also of John Parmelee, Sr. and Jr., of Con- 
necticut, through the Revolutionary ancestor, Jeremiah Par- 
melee, of Connecticut and Vermont, as follows: 

2. Samuel Hastings (June 24, 1816-Aug. 14, 1871) and 
Elizabeth Ann Parmelee (Sept. 0, 182r^-June 20, 1852). 

3. Asaph Parmelee (Jan. 8, 1794-June 12, 1868) and 
Althea Lamb (Apr. 18, 1708-Aug. 16, 18.30). 

4. Gilbert Pannclcc (Jan. 23, 17tU-Jan. 23, 1830) and 
Zipporah Williams (Apr. 26, 1769-June 19, 1823). 

5. Jeremiah Parmelee (Mch. 1730-Jan. 0, 1797) and 
Temperance Blatchley (July 30, 1733- ). 

6. Lemuel Parmelee (1704-....) and 
Sarah Kelsey (Jan. 10, 1695/6- ). 

7. Nathaniel Parmelee (Mch. 23, 1671-Jan. 26, 1718) and 
Esther Kelsey (Sept. 14, 1675-May 2, 1712). 

8. Nathaniel Parmelee (1645-1676) and 
Sarah French (Aug. 25, 1650-May 19, 1717). 

9. John Parmelee (1618-Jan., 1688) and 
Rebecca , his first wife. 

10. John Parmelee (1580-Nov. 8, 1659) and 

John Parmelee (1580-1G59) was the fifteenth signer of 
the Plantation Covenant June 1, 1639, and one of the origi- 
nal proprietors of Guilford, Connecticut, where he was free- 



82 

man in IGSO. He died in New Haven Nov. 8, 1659, leav- 
ing numerous descendants in Guilford, among them a son, 
John, and a grandson, Nathaniel. 

John Parmelee, Jr. (1618-1(588) emigrated with his father 
to this country, and settled in Guilford, Conn., where he 
lived and died, living a long and industrious life, and leav- 
ing many descendants. 

Jeremiah Parmelee (1730-1797) was a soldier in the 
regiment called "Congress' Own," commanded hy Col. 
Moses Hazen, serving to the end of the Revolution. He was 
born in Killingworth, Connecticut, and died in Wilming- 
ton, Vermont. 

Georgia Tyler (Mrs. Daniel Kent). 213 

Born in LaGrange, Georgia. 

Descendant of Peter Tyler, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Titus Tyler, both of Connecticut, as follows: 

2. Nelson Franklin Tyler (Dec. 27, 182<)-Jan. 23, 1892) and 
Henrietta Snowden (July 24, 1832- ). 

3. George Tyler (l?95-Dcc. 13, 18fi8) and 

Aurelia Trowbridge Stevens (June 29, 1802-Mch. 19, 18G-1). 

4. Amasa Tyler (17G9-Mch. 13, 1852) and 
Hannah White (Sept. 8, 1770-Apr. 27, 1849). 

5. Titus Tyler (bapt. Aug. 10, 1730-aft. 1781) and 
Susanna Berry (m. Jan. 11, 1759). 

G. Ebenezer Tyler (May 9, 1CS4-17G7) and 

Anna Benedict. 
7.Peter Tyler ( -1712) and 

Del)orah Swain (Apr. 24. ir.54-bef. 1688), his first wife. 

Peter Tyler (Eng.-1713) was one of four men by name 
of Tyler, presumably brothers, who were in Branford, Conn., 
in 1668 — Peter, George, Francis, and Charles. He was 
made freeman in 1673, and married first Deborah, daughter 
of Daniel Swain and his wife, Dorcas Rose. After her 
death Peter married second, in 1688, Hannah, daughter of 
John Whitehead, another of the early settlers of Branford, 
and died in 1713 in his adopted town, Branford, Conn. 

Titus Tyler (1730-aft. 1781) was unable to perform mili- 
tary duty during the Revolution on accotmt of wounds re- 



S3 

ceived during the French and Indian War. He was, how- 
ever, an ardent Whig, and true Patriot, giving his means and 
influence to the cause of the Colonists ; and his two sons, 
John and Levi Tyler, were in active service. 

He was born in Bran ford, and was living in Woodbury, 
Conn., in 1781. 



Annie Fisher (Mrs. Cahoon). 244 

Born in Dover, Delaware. 

Descendant of John Fisher, of Pennsylvania, through the 
Revolutionary ancestor, Thomas Fisher, of Delaware, as 
follows : 

2. George Purnell Fisher (Oct. 13, lS17-Feb. 10, 1899) and 
Elise MacCauley (Sept. 20, 1820- ). 

3. Thomas Fisher (June 14, 1763-Dec. 2, 1835) and 

Nancy (Owens) Ricards (Feb. 27, 177G-May 9, 1844), his third 
wife. 

4. Jabez Maud Fisher (Mch. 1, 1733-Feb. 21, 1786) and 
EHzabeth (Purnell) Wright (Mch. 20, 1730-Apr. 9, 1776). 

5. John Fisher, 3d ( -ab. 1735) and 

Catherine ( -Mch. 8, 1744). 

(She m. (2) Mr. Gilpin.) 

6. John Fisher, 2d (b. Eng.-1702) and 
EHzabeth Light ( -living 1702). 

7. John Fisher, 1st (Eng -bet. 1685 and 86) and 

Margaret — ■ (b. Eng.-living 10S9). 

(She m. (2) Dr. Thomas Wynne.) 

John iMsher (Rng.-bct. ,UiS.")/(i) came to reiinsylvania 
with William Penn in lt)82 on the "Clood ship Welcome," 
and was associated with Penn in the founding of the col- 
ony. He purchased 500 acres of land near Philadelphia 
in what was known as "the Horekill tract," now Sussex 
County, Delaware. His will, dated Feb. C>, 1GS5, and pro- 
bated Apr. 30, 1G8G, mentions wife, Margaret, and children, 
Thomas, John, James, Rachel, Sarah and Alis. 

Thomas Fisher (1763-1835) was a member of Capt. 
Hall's Delaware regiment, enlisting at the age of fourteen. 
He was captured by a press gang from the British ship 
"Roebuck" ; carried by them on board that war ship, and 



84 

conscripted as a sailor. Through the influence of members 
of his family at Lewes, Delaware, who were members of 
the Society of Friends, he was released on the ground that 
he was under eighteen years of age. His parole prevented 
him from again taking up arms against the British, but when 
a Tory denounced in his presence the actions of those whom 
he called "rebels," the boy of eighteen years immediately 
grappled with him, and his victory over the bully made him 
a great pet with the patriots of his town. He married first, 
in 1792, Elizabeth Evans; married second, in 1810, Sarah 
Polk; and married third Nancy (Owens) Ricards (daughter 
of Robert and Sally Owens), who survived him. In the 
War of 1813 he was made Brigadier General of Sussex 
County, Delaware, Militia, and died in 1835, leaving an 
only child, Hon. George P. Fisher. 



Lizzie G. Corey (Mrs. Frederick R. Gerry). 245 

Born in Brookline, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of Thomas Corey, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Capt. Timothy Corey, both of Massachusetts, as 
follows : 

2. Timothy Corey (Mch. 4, 1822-Oct. 24, 1887) and 
Sarah E. Stroiit (Jan. 21, 1834-Nov. 22, 1904). 

3. Timothy Corey (Apr. 2, 1782-Aug. 10, 1844) and 
Mary Gardner (Sept. 2, 1782- ). 

4. Capt. Timothy Corey (Oct. 27, 1741-Sept. 19, 1811) and 
Elizabeth Griggs (m. 1766). 

5. Isaac Corey (bapt. Dec. 29, 1723- ) and 

Abigail Priest (July 3, 1719-m. Apr. 2, 1739). 

6. Thomas Corey (bef. 1G67-Mch. 22, 173S/9) and 
Hannah Page (Feb. 10, 1667/8- ). 

7. Thomas Corey (Eng -aft. 1607). 

(Bond's History of Watertown ments. son, Thomas.) 

Thomas Corey (Eng.-aft. 1G67) was an inhabitant of 
Watertown, Mass., in 1G58 and in 1GG7 was living there 
with his son, Thomas. 

Timothy Corey (17'4]-1811), of Brookline, Mass., served 
as a Captain in the Militia during the Revolution. He was 



85 

also active in procuring men for the patriot army, and was 
a member of the Committee of Correspondence, Inspection 
and Safety. He was born in Weston, and died in Brook- 
line, Mass. 



Mary Thompson Snowden (Mrs. William 

Stansfield). 2-1 G 

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Descendant of John Snowden, of New Jersey, through the 
Revolutionary ancestor, Isaac Snowden, of Pennsylvania, as 
follows : 

2. James Ross Snowden (Dec. 9, 1809-Mch. 21, 1878) and 
Susan Engle Patterson (Oct. 19, lS23-Feb. 11, 1897). 

3. Nathaniel Randolph Snowden (Jan. 17, 1770-Noy. 1851) and 
Sarah Gustine (June 2, 1775-Apr. 2, 1856). 

4. Isaac Snowden (Apr. 14, 1732-Dec. 20, 1809) and 
Mary (Co.xe) McCall (1735-June 30, 180G). 

5. John Snowden, Jr. (16S5-Mch. 24, 1751) and 

Ruth (FitzRandolph) Harrison (Apr. 8, 1695-Sept. 25, 1780). 

6. John Snowden, Sr. (1632-May, 173G) and 
Ann Barrett (m. Feb. 13, 1682-1CS8). 

For services of Founder and Patriot ancestors, sec Na- 
^tional Number 212, page 53. 



Mauv C. Buckingham (^fus. M. Moony 

Down lis). 317 

Born in Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Descendant of Thomas Buckingham, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, John Buckingham, both of Connecticut, as 
follows : 

2. Nathan Buckingham (Dec. 29, 1813-June 16, 1885) and 
Mary Ann Booth (Sept. 12, 1815-living in 1905). 

3. John Buckingham (Mch. 28, 1779-1835) and 

Elizabeth Newton (Dec. 28, 1782-Aug. 31, 1838), his second wife. 

4. John Buckingham (Sept. 27, 1744-Mch. 3, 1788) and 
Sarah Green (m. ab. 17G8). 

5. John Buckingham (Aug. 14, 1707- ) and 

Keziah Clark. 



86 

6. Gideon Buckingham (Oct. 3, 1675-Sept., 1719) and 
Sarah Hunt (m. Feb. 3, 1703-aft. 1733). 

7. Daniel Buckingham (Eng., 1G36-May 2, 1712) and 
Mrs. AHce Newton (b. Eng.-aft. 1G79), his second wife. 

8. Thomas Buckingham (ab. lGlO-1657) and 

Hannah (b. Eng -June 28, 1646), his first wife. 

Thomas Buckingham (ab. lClO-1657) emigrated from 
London with his wife and two children in 1G37 in the com- 
pany of Eaton and Davenport. March 30, 1638, the com- 
pany sailed from Boston to "Quinnipiac" (New Haven) 
and Buckingham's name stands fifth in the list of planters 
in that place Nov. 29, 1639. In 1643 he was given land in 
Milford, Conn., where he became one of the '"seven pillars 
of the church." He was Deputy to the General Court in 
1657 and in the fall of that year died in Boston, whither he 
had gone on business. 

John Buckingham (1744-1788) was a private in Col. 
Joseph Thompson's regiment of Connecticut Militia, sent 
to reinforce the army at Peekskill, New York. 

Descendants also of Richard Boothe, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Capt. James Booth, both of Connecti- 
cut, as follows : 

2. Nathan Buckingham (Dec. 29, 181.3-June ]G, 1885) and 
Mary Ann Booth (Sept. 12, 1815-Hving 1905). 

3. Abel Booth (Apr. 8, 17S0-Jan. 13, 18GS) and 
Ehzabctli Beardsley (J»[cli. :?, 17S3-Dec. 5, 1SG7). 

4. Capt. James Booth (Oct. 1, 1734-Mch. 19, 1809) and 
Abigail Anne Patterson (Apr. 6, 1739-Aug. 10, 1817). 

5. James Booth (1G85-Aug. 20, 1765) and 

Martha (Clarke) Peck (May 26, 1G95-Dec. 3, 1747). 

6. Joseph Boothe (Mch. 8, 165G-Sept. 1, 1703) and 

Hannah VVillcoxson (Feb. 14, 1645-July 10, 1701), his second wife. 

7. Richard Boothe (Eng., 1607-aft. 1689) and 
Elizabeth Hawley (Eng -aft. 16G1). 

For service of Founder ancestor, see National Number 
221, page 61. 

James Booth (1734-1809) served as a private in 1775 
in Col. Wooster's regiment of Connecticut troops in the 
Northern Department. In March, 1777, he had risen to 



87 



the rank of Captain and with his company was detached 
from the Fourth regiment of militia and placed on guard 
at Fairfield and Stratford to oppose Tryon's invasion of the 
Colony. He was selectman in Stratford, 1778-1782. 



EuzABETH SeivDUn (Mrs. J. Alijxander Hrnry 

Lane). 248 

Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Descendant of Thomas Selden, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Col. Samuel Selden, both of Connecticut, as fol- 
lows : 

2. George Shattuck Selden (Dec. 3, 1822-Sept. 27, 1894) and 
Elizabeth Wright Clark (Jan. 19, 1824-Nov. 19, 1894). 

3. George Selden (Aug. 17, 179G-Apr. 28, 1835) and 
Louise Sophie Shattuck (Apr. 24, 1801-Aug. 18, 18G8). 

4. Dr. George Selden (Feb. 27, 1763-May 27, 1817) and 
Olive West (July 11, 1775-June 10, 1831). 

5. Col. Samuel Selden (Jan. 11, 1723-Oct. 11, 1776) and 
Elizabeth Ely (Oct. 11, 1724-Feb. 12, 1802). 

6. Samuel Selden (May 17, 1G95-Feb. 28, 1745) and 
Deborah Dudley. 

7. Joseph Selden (bapt. Nov. 2, 1651-JuIy 14, 1724) and 
Rebeckah Church (lOGl-June 9, 1726). 

8. Thomas Selden (bef. 1620-1C55) and 

h Hester Wakeman (lupt. June 15, lG17-ab. 1693). 

Thomas Selden (bef. 1620-lGr)r)) emigrated from Eng- 
land before 1(!39 and settled in Hartford, Conn., where lie 
was a freeman in 1G40, and Constable in 1G50. In his will 
he mentions his wife, Hester, who married second, Andrew 
Warner, and removed to Hadley, Mass., with Thomas Sel- 
den's five children. 

Samuel Selden (1723-177G) was Colonel of the Fourth 
Battalion of Wadsworth's Brigade at Long Island, and was 
captured in the retreat. He died a prisoner in New York- 
City and was buried in the old brick church-yard where 
the building of the New York Times now stands. He was 
born in Hadlyme, Connecticut. 



88 

Marie Watercury (Mrs. W. F. Church). 249 

Born in Kalamazoo, Michigan. 

Descendant of Richard Hubbell, of Connecticut, through 
the Revokitionary ancestor, Nehemiah Hubbell, of New 
York, as follows: 

2. Aaron Marvin Waterbury (Sept. 19, 1830-Sept. 16, 1806) and 
Frances Sophia Hubbell (Oct. 28, lS36-Oct. 21, 1899). 

3. William Spring Hubbell (Jan. 17, 1801-Nov. 8, 1873) and 
Maria McCall (1801-Mch. 18, 1856). 

4. Nehemiah Hubbell (Apr. 7, 1764-June 21, 1835) and 
Jemima (Hayden) Patterson (Dec. 20, 1761-May 27, 1842). 

5. Nehemiah Hubbell, Sr. (May 19, 1722-bef. 1792) and 
Hannah Treadwell (m. ab. 1744). 

6. Stephen Hubbell (Feb. 16, 1G95-1792) and 
Abigail Squire (1693-Oct. 1, 1777), his first wife. 

7. Samuel Hubbell (Nov. 6, 1657-Sept. 18, 1713) and 
Temperance Preston (d. aft. June 5, 1714), his second wife. 

8. Richard Hubbell (1627/8-Oct. 23, 1699) and 
Elizabeth Meigs (m. 1650-1664/5), his first wife. ■ 

Richard Hubbell (1627/8-1699) came from England be- 
tween 1645 and 1647; took oath of fidelity to New Haven 
Colony May 4, 1654; was made freeman Oct. 10, 1664, in 
Fairfield, Conn., where he is recorded as a surveyor and an 
extensive land owner. He was one of the original members 
of the First Congregational Church in Stratford in 1688, 
and died there Oct. 23, 1699. 

Nehemiah Hubbell (1764-18ol) went out as a drummer 
during the Revolution, although only a boy. His older 
brother, Isaac, also served in the Revolution, as a soldier, 
and their father, Stephen Hubbell, is said to have been an 
ardent patriot, although prevented by the infirmities of age 
from rendering active service. Nehemiah Hubbell was born 
in Connecticut; married Jemima Hayden, widow of Ichabod 
Patterson, and died in Steuben County, New York. 

Lucy D. Evans. 250 

Born in Port Byron, Illinois. 

Descendant of Kenelm Winslow, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Stephen Winslow, both of Massachusetts, 
as follows : 



89 

2. William C. Evans (June 24, 1822-....) and 
Marianne Winslow (May 9, 1830-....). 

3. John Winslow (Sept. 3, 1782-1850) and 
Keziah Nye (July 1, 1786-Sept. 30, 1848). 

4. Stephen Winslow (Aug. 21, 1747-Feb. 14, 1833) and 
Elizabeth West (Apr. 24, 1744-Oct. 14, 181G). 

5. John Winslow (Oct. 31, 1722-aft. 1770) and 
Bethiah Sherman (m. Aug. 2, 1745). 

6. John Winslow (ab. 1701-ab. 1755) and 
Bethiah Andrews (May 2G, 1699-m. 1722). 

7. Kenelm Winslow (lG36-Nov. 11, 1715) and 
Damaris (m. 1667), his second wife. 

8. Kenelm Winslow (Apr. 29, 1599-Scpt. 13, 1G72) and 
Mrs. Eleanor (Newton) Adams (1598-1681). 

Kenelm Winslow (1599-1G72) was born in Worcester- 
shire, England, emigrated to Plymouth, Mass., about 1629, 
where he was admitted freeman Jan. 1, 1G32/3, and sur- 
veyor of highways in 1640. Soon after he removed to 
Marshfield, and in 1612 was appointed to represent the lat- 
ter town, as deputy, an office which he held consecutively 
for eight years. He was one of the original proprietors of 
Freetown, Mass., in 1659, and a portion of the land he re- 
ceived remained in the possession of his descendants for 
more than 200 years. He died Sept., 1672, while on a 
visit in Salem, Mass. 

Stephen Winslow (1717-1838) was a resident of Dor- 
chester, Mass., during the Revolution. He enlisted first 
^s an armorer on the cruiser "Fairfield" ; cruised off the 
coast of the West Indies and took two prizes. He served 
several tours of duty in the Militia of Rochester, both in 
Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New York and New Jersey. 
In 1832 he was living in Windsor, Ohio, and received a 
pension for his Revolutionary service. 



Sarah Weld (Mrs. Gkorge E. Smith). 251 

Born in West Buxton, Maine. 

Descendant of Rev. Thomas Weld and Thomas Weld, 
through the Revolutionary ancestor. Rev. Ezra Weld, all 
of Massachusetts, as follows: 



90 

2. Charles Elias Weld (Oct. 21, 1815-July 17, 1900) and 
Eliza Allen (Feb. 11, 1820-Nov. 4, 1896). 

3. Samuel Weld (1770-1857) and 
Sarah Hayden (1772- ). 

4. Rev. Ezra Weld (June 13, 1736-Jan. 13, 1816) and 
Anna Weld (1743-July 10, 1774). 

5. John Weld (1700-July, 1763) and 

Esther Waldo (Jan. 3, 1698-Jan. 11, 1777). 

6. Edmund Weld (Aug., 1659- ) and 

Elizabeth White (dau. of John White, Brookline, Mass.). 

7. Thomas Weld (1626-1682) and 
Dorothy Whiting (1628-July 31, 1694). 

8. Rev. Thomas Weld (1590-Mch. 23, 1661) and 
Margaret Doreslye ( -Nov., 1671). 

The Reverend Thomas Weld (1590-10(31), born in Ter- 
ling, England, was graduated from Trinity College, Univer- 
sity of Cambridge in 1613. In 1624 he was settled as min- 
ister of the church in his native place ; but, becoming a non- 
conformist, and thereby incurring the penalties of the church, 
he fled for safety to New England, embarking on the "Wil- 
liam and Frances" March 9, 1632, with his wife and three 
sons. He settled in Roxbury, Mass., and was made freeman 
and called as pastor of the church in Roxbury the same 
year. In 1039 he assisted in arranging the New England 
version of the Psalms used in the service of the churches 
for many years. He was a valiant defender of the trutli 
(as he saw it) and of the church, both in the pulpit and with 
his pen, and had great influence with the magistrates of the 
colony. In August, 1641, he was sent by the General Court 
as a Commissioner to England, and remained there until 
his death, March 23, 1661. 

Thomas Weld (1626-1682) was born in his father's parish 
in England, and brought by him to New England ; was made 
freeman in 1654, and represented Roxbury in the General 
Court in 1676 and 77. He was greatly esteemed by his 
townsmen and his death, Jan. 17, 1682, was sincerely 
mourned by them. 

The Reverend Ezra Weld (1736-1816) a patriot of the 
Revolution, was pastor of the Second Congregational Church 
in Braintree from 1762 to 1807. He was born in Pomfret, 
Conn., and died in Braintree, Massachusetts. 



91 

JuuA Clementine Schoonmaker (Mrs. H. A. 

Grant). 252 

Born in Hartford, Connecticut. 

Descendant of Lieut. Hendrick Jochense Schoonmaker, 
through the Revolutionary ancestor, Rev. Martinus Schoon- 
maker, both of New York, as follows : 

2. Henry Schoonmaker (Dec. 27, 1813-July 29, 1877) and 
Julia Elizabeth Thompson ( -Dec. 8, 1S46). 

3. Dr. Nicholas Schoonmaker (Apr. 9, 1781-Aug. 31, 1817) and 
Margaret Masterton (Dec. 25, 1783-July 10, 1861). 

4. Rev. Martinus Schoonmaker (Mch. 1, 1737-May 20, 1824) and 
Mary Bassett (Feb. 23, 1739-Apr. 27, 1819). 

5. Joachim Schoonmaker (bapt. Oct. 12, 1710-1789 or 90) and 
Lydia Rosekrans (bapt. May 3, 1713-m. 1730). 

6. Jochem Hendrixse Schoonmaker (ab. 1658-bet. 1729-30) and 
Anna Hussey (bapt. June 22, 1670~m. 1G89), his second wife. 

7. Lieut. Hendrick Jochense Schoonmaker (bef. 1655-ab. 1681) and 
Elsie Janse von Breestede (widow of Andrisen Peterson). 



Hendrick Jochense Schoonmaker (bef. 16.5.j-ab. KJSl), 
the progenitor of the family in this country, was a native of 
Hamburg, Germany. He came to America in the military 
service of Holland and settled at Albany before 1G55, where 
he was an inn-keeper. 

He was a man of considerable social and financial stand- 
ing, active in military duty, a Lieutenant "'in the company 
c^f his Noble Honor, the Director General." In IGoO the 
company was ordered to Esopus (Kingston) against the 
Indians, and, attracted by the beauty and fertility of the 
place, he sold his property in Albany and settled in the new 
community. He became prominent in the struggle against 
the Lidians, his military experience making him a leader. 
He died in Kingston about 1681. 

The Reverend Martinus Schoonmaker (1737-18'M) was 
a patriot preacher and an ardent Whig during the Revolu- 
tion. He was born and died in Ulster County, New York. 



92 

Mary Francis Whiton (Mrs. Leander K. 

Siiipman). 253 

Born in Stafford, Connecticut. 

Descendant of James VVhiton, of Massachusetts, through 
the Revolutionary ancestor, Elijah Whiton, of Connecticut, 
as follows : 

2. David Erskine Whiton (Oct. 13, 1825-Sept. 11, 1904) and 
Asenath Francis (June 12, lS33-Sept. 25, 1902). 

3. Heber Whiton (Feb. 11, 1782-May 11, 1828) and 
Marcia Gav (Nov. 15, 1784-June 13, 1848). 

4. Joseph Whiton (1745-June G, 1817) and 
Joanna Chaffee (Jan. 3, 1749/50-Aug. 11, 1820). 

5. Elijah Whiton (July 7, 1714-Aug. 20, 1784) and 
Priscilla Russ ( -1755). 

6. Joseph Whiton (Mch. 23, 1687-May 8, 1777) and 
Martha Tower (July 20, 1G93-Sept. 19, 1719). 

7. James Whiton (IGol-Feb. 20, 1725) and 
Abigail (1655-May 4, 1740). 

8. James Whiton (m. Dec. 30, 1G47-Apr. 2G, 1710) and 
Mary Beal (Hingham, Eng., 1G22-Dec. 12, 1G9G). 

James Whiton (bef. 162T-1710) was in Hingham, Mass., 
in 1G47, in which year he married Mary Beal, daughter of 
John Beal, the First. He was a farmer and one of the 
large tax payers in Hingham; w^as made freeman in 1060. 
In 1G66 his house was destroyed by the Indians, but he 
continued to live in Hingham until his death, April 2G, 1710. 

Deacon Elijah Whiton (1714—1784) was appointed by 
the General Assembly of Connecticut in 1778 and 1779 as a 
Justice of Windham County. He was born in Hingham, 
Mass., and died in Westford, Connecticut. 



Amanda J. Read (Mrs. Palmer). 254 

Born in Stafford, Connecticut. 

Descendant of William Heath, of Massachusetts, through 
the Revolutionary ancestor, Peleg Heath, of Rhode Island, 
as follows : 

2. Garner Read (July 22, 1793-Nov. 17, 1878) and 
Lucretia Heath (Mch. 4, 1803-July 20, 1879). 

3. Peleg Heath (Mch. 31, 1771-May 6, 1857) and 
Abigail Kelley (....-July 13, 1825). 



93 

4. Major Peleg Heath (Apr. 8, 1747-July 4, 1786) and 
Annie Kent (Sept., 174G-Mch. 2, 1842). 

5. Rev. Peleg Heath (July 26, 1700-1748) and 

Jerusha Peck (m. Nov. 18, 1742-Dec. 14, 17G3), his third wife. 
She in. (2) Joshua Bicknell. 

6. William Heath (lG64-Nov. 3, 1738) and 
Hannah Weld (Sept. 5, 1666- ). 

7. Peleg Heath (ab. 1631- ) and 

Susanna King (m. ab. 1653). 

8. William Heath ( -May 29, 1652) and 

Mary Spear ( -Dec. 15, 1659). 

William Heath (Eng.-1G52), of Nazing, England, came 
to America from London, arriving on ship "Lion" Sept. 16, 
1632, with his wife, Mary, and five children. He settled in 
Roxbury, where he was made freeman March 4, 1633 ; 
and Representative to the General Assembly in 1637, 1639, 
1642. "An able. Godly and faithful brother," is the entry 
made by the Apostle Eliot, after his name on the records 
of his church. He died intestate in Roxbury, and his estate 
was settled in 1652. 

Peleg Heath (1747-1786) served as Ensign, Lieutenant 
and Major in the Rhode Island Militia. He represented 
Barrington in the General Assembly in 1777 and in J 778 
was appointed recruiting officer for Bristol County, his 
brother, Jabez, continuing in active service. He was born 
and died in Barrington, Rhode Island. In 1836 his widow 
obtained a pension of $229.17 per annum, for his services in 
the Revolution. 



Sarah Alice Worcester. 255 

Born in Hollis, New Hampshire. 

Descendant of Rev. William and Samuel Worcester, of 
Massachusetts, through the Revolutionary ancestors, Capt. 
Noah and Jesse Worcester, of New Hampshire, as follows : 

2. Taylor Oilman Worcester (Apr. 6, 1799-Sept. 7, 1879) and 
Lucy Spooner Bell (Apr. 6, 1804-May 10, 1877). 

3. Jesse Worcester (Apr. 30, 1761-Jan. 20, 1834) and 
Sarah Parker (Apr. 24, 1762-Apr. 1, 1847). 

4. Noah Worcester (Oct. 4, 1735-Aug. 13, 1817) and 
Lydia Taylor (Oct. 11, 1733-July 6, 1772), his first wife. 



94 

5. Rev. Francis Worcester (June 7, lG9S-0ct. 14, 1783) and 
Abigail Carlton (T(i9G-July 25, 1774), his first wife. 

6. Deacon Francis Worcester (ab. 1665 -Dec. 17, 1717) and 

Mary Cheney (Sept. 2, 1671-m. Jan. 29, 1691). 

(She m. (2) 1726, Joseph Eaton). 

7. Samuel Worcester (Eng., ab. 1635-Feb. 22, 1681) and 
Elizabeth Parrott (May 1, 1640-m. Nov. 29, 1659). 

8. Rev. William Worcester (Eng -Oct. 28, 1662) and 

Sarah (Eng.-Apr. 23, 1050), his first v/ife. 

The Reverend William Worcester (Eng.-1GG2) came 
from England with his wife, Sarah, two sons and two 
daughters, and settled in Salisbury, Mass., where he was 
admitted freeman May 13, 1640, and the same year shared 
in the division of the town lands. He was the first pastor 
of the church in Salisbury and his name has been enrolled 
by Cotton Mather in the ""Magnolia" as one of the "re- 
nowned, learned and holy divines by whose evangelical min- 
istry the churches in America have been illuminated." He 
died in Salisbury Oct. 28, 1(;G2, and his will is on file in the 
probate oftice at Salem, Mass. 

Samuel Worcester (ab. 1G35-1G81), eldest son of Rev. 
William Worcester, was freeman at Rowley, Mass., in ] 070 ; 
Constable and Representative 1679 and 81, and died Feb. 
20, 1(58], in Lynn, Mass., while on his way to attend the 
General Court at Boston. 

Noah Worcester. (1735-1817) raised a company from 
Hollis, N. H., to reinforce the army at Cambridge, Mass. 
He was a member of the convention that formed the State 
Constitution; was born in Sandwich, Mass., and died in 
HolHs, N. H. 

Jes.se Worcester (1761-183-1), when fourteen years of 
age, substituted for two weeks or more for his brother, Rev. 
Dr. Worcester, of Brighton, Mass., in Capt. Reuben Dow's 
company. The following year he enlisted in the expedition 
to Ticonderoga under Capt. Daniel Emerson, and also served 
in 1778, 79 and 80. In 1832 he applied for a pension from 
Hollis, N. H., his native town, which was granted him, and 
later continued to his widow, Sarah (Parker) Worcester, 
sister of Josiah and Isaac Parker, after his death in 1834. 



95 

ElIvA E. Browne (Mrs. Jamrs S. BradlKv, Jr.)- 25fi 

Born in New York City. 

Descendant of William Davis, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Edward Davis, Jr., both of Massachusetts, as 
follows : 

2. Jacob S. Browne, Jr. (Feb. 8, 1827-Jan. 11, 1897) and 
Marie Cornelia Davis (Feb. 17, 1832-living 1905). 

3. Joseph Davis, Jr. (Jan. 14, 1793-Mch. 28, 1842) and 
Catherine Huguenin (Nov. 6, 1793-July 8, 1879). 

4. Joseph Davis, Sr. (Oct. 24, 17G3/5-May 17, 1821) and 
Sylvia Treat (Nov. 19, 176G-Feb. 2, 1830). 

5. Edward Davis, Jr. (Sept. 5, 1739-Oct. 3, 179G) and 

Elizabeth Davis (dan. of Ebenezer Davis) (May, 1743-Oct. 16, 
1775). 

6. Edward Davis, Sr. (Jan. 23, 1714-Aug. 30, 1784) and 
Abigail Larned (Apr. 7, 1719-Aug. 11, 1805). 

7. Samuel Davis (June 23, 1681-Apr. 8, 1760) and 

Mary Chamberlain (Aug. 1, 1G87-Feb. 11, 1730), his first wife. 

8. John Davis (Oct. 1, 1643-Mch. 16, 1705) and 
Marv Devotion ( -Feb. 15, 1GS3). 

9. William Davis (l6G7-Dec. 9, 1G83) and 

Elizabeth ( -bur. May 4, 1658), his first wife. 

For services of Founder and Patriot ancestors, see Na- 
tional Number 214, page 5-i. 



Margaret Masterton Lkvicrich (Mrs. David N. 

Vaxderveer). 257 

Born in Brooklyn, Long Island. 

Descendant of Lieitt. Hendrick Jochense Schoonmaker, 
through the Revolutionary ancestor, Rev. Martinus vSchoon- 
maker, both of New York, as follows: 

2. Richard Berrien Leverich (May 24, ia09-Nov. 3, 1SG9) and 
Margaret Maria Schoonmaker (Oct. 4, 1817-Aug IG, 1889). 

3. Dr. Nicholas Schoonmaker (Apr. 9, 1781-Aug. 31, 1817) and 
]\Iargaret Masterton (Dec. 25, 1783-July 10, 1861). 

4. Rev. Martinus Schoonmaker (May 1, 1737-May 20, 1824) and 
Mary Bassett (Feb. 23, 1739-Apr. 27, 1819). 

5. Joachim Schoonmaker (bapt. Oct. 12, 1710-1789 or 90) and 
Lvdia Ro?ekrans (bapt. May 3, 1713-m. 1730). 

6. Jochem Hendrixse Schoonmaker (ab. 165S-ab. 1729/30) and 
Anna Hussey (bapt. June 27, 1670-m. 1G89), his second wife. 



96 

7. Lieut. Hendrick Jochense Schoonmaker (bef. 1655-ab. 1681) and 
Elsie Jans van Breestede (wid. of Andrisen Petersen). 

For services of Founder and Patriot ancestors, see Na- 
tional Number 252, page 91. 



Elizabeth M. Failing (Mrs. Jones). 258 

Born in Lyons, New York. 

Descendant of Daniel Perrin, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, William Perrine, both of New Jersey, as follows: 

2. Daniel Failing (Mch. 14, 1792-June 20, 1864) and 
Lydia Perrine (June 14, 1799-June 21, 1S50). 

3. Peter Perrine (Feb. 9, 1777-Feb. 26, 1845) and 
Ann Duncan (Mch. 30, 17S0-May 31, 1859). 

4. William Perrine (Nov. 28, 1743-1820) and 
Hannah Mount (Feb. 11, 1749-Apr. 8, 1824). 

5. Peter Perrine (1706-ab. 1783) and 
Margaret Dey (1712-Nov. 27, 1797). 

6. Peter Perrine (1667-1730) and 

Ann Holmes (Dec. 26, 1670-m. Oct. 16, 1704). 

7. Daniel Perrin (164.. -aft. 1719) and 

Marie Thorel (m. Feb. 18, 1665-bef. 1687), his first wife. 



Daniel Perrin (Ferine) (164.. -aft. 1719), "The Hugue- 
not," was of French descent, emigrated to America on the 
ship "Philip," which sailed from a port in the Isle of Jer- 
sey, and arrived in New York Harbor July 29, 1G65. In 
Feb.,.16G(!, he mai-ried Marie Thorel, a fellow passenger on 
the "Philip," and this is said to have been the first marriage 
solemnized under the government of Philip Carteret. He 
settled on Staten Island and last appears of record Sept. 
6, 1719, when, with his second wife, Elizabeth, he was 
sponsor at the baptism of their grandchildren, William and 
Daniel Stillwell. 

William Perrine (1743-1820) served as a private in Capt. 
Peter Perrine's company, Middlesex County, New Jersey 
Militia; also in the Continental Line. 



97 

Thankful Alletta Cuft (Mrs. Benjamin L. 

Holmes). 259 

Born in Mystic, Connecticut. 

Descendant of William Clift, of Massachusetts, through 
the Revolutionary ancestor, Amos Clift, of Connecticut, as 
follows : 

2. Waterman Clift (Sept. 17, 1809-Jan. 2, 1890) and 
Esther Hazard (May 30, 1817-Oct. 18, 1890). 

3. Amos Clift. Jr. (May 37, 17G9-Nov. 15, 1818) and 

Thankful Denison (May 20, 1780-Jan. 22, 1861), his second wife. 

4. Amos Clift, Sr. (Sept. 20, 1737-July 29, 1806) and 
Mary Coit (1739-1790), his first wife. 

5. Samuel Clift (Oct. 22, 1709-Aug. 22, 1794) and 
Lydia Daggett (1713-1790). 

6. William Clift (1606-Oct. 17, 1722) and 
Lydia Wills (Nov. 26, 1676-July 1, 1761). 

William Clift (166G-1722) was born in England and came 
to Scituate, Mass., in his youth. He married Lydia, daugh- 
ter of Samuel Wills, of Scituate, and settled in Marshfield, 
Mass., where he died Oct. 17, 1722. 

Amos Clift (1737-1800) was a selectman of the town of 
Preston, Conn., and served on committees to hire soldiers 
for the patriot army throughout the Revolution. He was 
born in Preston and died in Griswold, Connecticut. 

Cecile Leffingwele Enegren (Mrs. W. D. 

Garland). 2(-)0 

Born in Moorehead, Minnesota. 

Descendant of Robert Old, of Connecticut, through the 
Revolutionary ancestor, Benjamin Olds, of Massachusetts, 
as follows : 

2. Robert Enegren (June 26, 1854- ) and 

Nina Olds (Dec. 4, 1861- ). 

3. Gamaliel Whitney Olds (Aug. 3, 1836- ) and 

Hannah Leffingwell Tracy (Nov. 6, 1841-Mch. 18, 1905). 

4. Gamaliel Olds (Nov. 28, lS03-Jan. 26, 1894) and 
Minerva Howe (m. 1826-Jan. 26, 1876). 

5. Joseph Olds (Aug. 26, 1769-1843) and 

Sallie Whitney (Aug. 10, 1774-bet. 1840 and 50). 

6. Benjamin Olds (bef. 173S-aft. 1777) and 
Via Smith (m. 1758). 



98 

7. John Olds (Jan. 11, 1691-aft. 1749) and 
Elizabeth Denslow (Mch. 9, 1G92- ). 

8. Robert Old or Olds (bef. lC-19-Jan. 10, 1728) and 
Dorothy Granger (m. April 1, 10H9), his second wife. 

For services of Founder and Patriot ancestors, see Na- 
tional Number 229, page 68. 



Mary Catharinh: BuRCKLii; BeardsIvEy (Mrs. L. 

BradI'Okd Prince). 2G1 

Born in Oswego, New York. 

Descendant of William Beardsley, of Connecticut, through 
the Revolutionary ancestor, Obadiah Beardsley, of New 
York, as follows : 

2. Samuel Raymond Beardsley (Dec. 31, 1814-Dec. 28, 1863) and 
Charlotte Elizabeth Biirckle (Mch. 10, 1821-Sept. 27, 18S9). 

3. Levi Beardsley (Nov. 13, 17S5-Mch. 19, 1857) and 
Elizabeth Raymond (Sept. 6, 1790-June 7, 1864). 

4. Obadiah Beardsley (June 18, 1763-Nov. 15, 1841) and 
Eunice Moore (Jan. 22, 1765-Dec. 7, 1811). 

5. Obadiah Beardsley (Oct. G, 1728-1807) and 
Amy Calkins ( -l!<14). 

6. John Beardsley, Jr. (Mch. 9, 1701- ) and 

Keziah Wheeler (m. Dec. 29, 172.j). 

7. John Beardsley (Nov. 1, 1008-\vill proved 1735/6) and 
Abigail Wakelyn (1GG5-1753). 

8. Joseph Beardsley (l(i3'^l:-1712) and 
Abigail (or Phebe Dayton). 

9. William Beardsley (Eng. ...."-1659/60) and 
Mary ( -aft. 1662). 

William Beardsley (KiO-L-KKJO) came to America in the 
"Planter" from London in 1035 with wife, Mary, aged 26 
years, and three children. Pie was admitted freeman in 
Massachusetts Dec. 7, 1636. In 1639 he was one of the 
proprietors of Stratford, Conn., and was Deputy from there 
to the General Court in 1645 and from 1619 for several 
annual sessions. In 1651 he was appointed Assistant to 
the Magistrates. He was an extensive land owner and 
planter, and died in Stratford, Conn. It is family tradition 
that he gave the name of the new Connecticut town in mem- 
■ ory of his English home, Stratford on Avon, and that the 



99 

town of Avon, New York, was named by one of his descend- 
ants in honor of the Enghsh river. 

Obadiah Beardsley (17G3-1S41) was living with his 
parents near the Bennington Battleground, and a few days 
before the Battle of Bennington was taken prisoner by a 
party of Indians, the advance guard of the Hessians on 
that expedition. He was born in Dutchess County, N. Y., 
and died in Richfield Springs, New York. 



Mary Tilton Palmer. 262 

Born in Salem, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of William Tilton, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Nathaniel Tilton, both of Massachusetts, as fol- 
lows: 

2. William Webster Palmer (July 12, 1823-Feb. 2, 1874) and 
Mary Elizabeth Tilton (Aug. 27, 182-1-Dec. 31, 1892). 

3. John Goodhue Tilton (Aug. 1709-1890) and 
•Mary Ann Hanson (July, 1802-Nov., 1885). 

4. Stephen Tilton (Jan. 17()7-July, 1799) and 
Elizabeth Patten (1776-May, I'sGO). 

5. Nathaniel Tilton (bapt. Feb. 3, 1744-in service 1778) and 
Ann Safford (m. 1766-Sept., 1820). 

C. Capt. Daniel Tilton (Apr. 2, 1697-1759) and 
Sarah Dutch (1708-1770). 

7. Lieut. Abraham Tilton (1GG6-175G) and 
Mary Jacobs (lG74-m. Dec. 11, 1693). 

8. Abr.iliani Tilton (1638-1728) and 
Marv Cram 

9. Willuim Tilton (bef. 1618-1G53/4) and 
Susanna (who m. (2) Roger Shaw). 

William Tilton (bef. 3 618-1653) was an early settler of 
Lynn, Mass. He died about 1653, leaving a widow, Su- 
sanna, who married second, Roger Shaw. 

Nathaniel Tilton (ITM-aft. 1777) was a Corporal in Capt. 
Moses Newell's company of Minute Men from Newbury- 
port, Mass., at the Lexington Alarm, and was later in a 
company raised for defense of the sea coast, and stationed 
at Newburyport. He died in the service. 



100 

Mauy Worcester (Mrs. Bill). 263 

Born in HoUis, New Hampshire. 

Descendant of Rev. William and Samuel Worcester, of 
Massachusetts, through the Revolutionary ancestors, Capt. 
Noah and Jesse Worcester, of New Hampshire, as follows : 

2. Taylor Gilman Worcester (Apr. 6, 1799-Sept. 7, 1879) and 
Lucy Spooner Bell (Apr. 6, 1804-May 10, 1877). 

3. Jesse Worcester (Apr. 30, 17G1-Jan. 20, 1834) and 
Sarah Parker (Apr. 24, 17G2-Apr. 1, 1847). 

4. Capt. Noah Worcester (Oct. 4, 1735-Aug. 13, 1817) and 
Lydia Taylor (Oct. 11, 1733-July 6, 1772), his first wife. 

5. Rev. Francis Worcester (June 7, 169S-Oct. 14, 1783) and 
Abigail Carlton (1G9G-July 23, 1774), his first wife. 

6. Deacon Francis Worcester (ab. 1GG5-Dec. 17, 1717) and 
Mary Cheney (Sept. 2, 1671-m. Jan. 29, 1G91). 

(She m. (2), 172G, Joseph Eaton). 

7. Samuel Worcester (Eng., ab. lG3o-Feb. 22, 1681) and 
Elizabeth Parrott (May 1, lG40-m. Nov. 29, 1659). 

8. Rev. William Worcester (Eng -Oct. 28, 1G62) and 

Sarah (Eng -Apr. 23, 1650), his first wife. 

For services of Founder and Patriot ancestors, see Na- 
tional Number 255, page 94. 

1 



Laura Lee (Mrs. Charles Henry Arm.strong). 264 

Born in Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Descendant of Capt. John Gorham, of Massachusetts, 
through the Revolutionary ancestors, Isaac Gorham, Sen. 
and jr., both of Connecticut, as follows: 

2. Gurdon Bartram Lee (Nov. 29, 1831-July 9, 1903) and 
Caroline Eulina Gorham (Feb. 18, 1829-living 1905). 

3. Joseph Wakeman Gorham (Mch. 19, 1788-Aug., 18GG) and 
Eliza vjoodrich (Meh. 4, 1791-Aug., 1879). 

4. Lsaac Gorham (Nov. 15, 1761-May 14, 1813) and 
Sarah Morgan (Oct. 11. 1763-Jan. 17, 1S3G). 

5. Isaac Gorham (Oct. 14, 1730-July 4, 1798) and 
Ann Wakeman (Oct. 24, 172S-June 11, 180S). 

6. Joseph Gorham (Aug. 22, 1G92-Dec., 1759) and 
Deborah Barlow (Jan. 15, 1705-aft. 17G0), his second wife. 

7. Jabez Gorham (Aug. 3, 1G56-May, 1725) and 
Mrs. Hannah (Sturgis) Grey ( -Oct. 17, 1736). 

8. Capt. John Gorham (Jan. 28, 1621-Feb. 5, 1675/G) and 
Desire Howland (ab. 1G23-July, 1683). 



101 

John Gorham (1621-1675), son of Ralph Gorhani, was 
baptized at Benefield, Northamptonshire, En^t,dan(l, Jan. 
28, 1621. He emigrated to New England and married De- 
sire, daughter of John Howland, the Mayflower pilgrim, 
and settled in Marshfield, Mass. About 1G.j2 he removed to 
Yarmouth and later to Barnstable. He was Captain in 
King Philip's War, and died in service, at Swanzey, Feb. 
5, 1675-6. His son, Jabez, was wounded in the same war. 

Isaac Gorham, Sen. (1730-1798) served as assessor of 
a tax levied for recruiting purposes in Redding, Connecti- 
cut, under vote of the town, Feb. 19, 1781. The same year 
he was appointed to provide for the family of a soldier who 
was in active service in the field. 

Isaac Gorham, Jr. (1761-1813) was a private in the 
Fishkill campaign, Oct. 5 to 10, 1777. He was born and died 
in Redding, Conn. 



Emma CiiARioTTii; Shattuck (Mrs. Evan 

Oldfield). 265 

Born in Westmoreland, New York. 

Descendant of William Shattuck, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Jeremiah Shattuck, both of Massachusetts, 
as follows : 



2. Lewis Horace Shattuck (July 17, 1834-Sept. 22, 1884) and 
Jane Ann Wilson (Mch. 17, 1838-July 14, 1884). 

a. Amaziah Shattuck (Oct. 17, 1799- ) and 

Almira Root (d. Nov. 5, 1834, in 32d year). 

4. Amaziah Shattuck (May 17, 1774-Jan. 15, 1833) and 
Nancy Lovejoy (Mch. 4, 1781-Dcc. 25, 1821). 

5. Jeremiah Shattuck (Apr. 11, 1726-Mch. 2G, 1815) and 

Kezia Shattuck, (dau. of Jonathan Shattuck) (Feb. 4, 1745-Sept. 
8, 1832), his second wife. 

6. Jeremiah Shattuck (June 11, 1703-Aug. 2, 1798) and 
Sarah Parker (Apr. 12, 1705-June 8, 17R9), his first wife. 

7. Samuel Shattuck (1673-July 22, 17r.8) and 

■ EHzabeth Blood (Apr. 27, io75-Oct. 20. 1759). 

8. John Shattuck (Feb. 11, lC47-Sept. 14, 1075) and 
Ruth Whitney (Apr. 15, lG45-m. June 20, 1664). 

9. William Shattuck (....-Aug. 14, 1G72, aged 50) and 
Su.sanna (bef. 1G25-Dec. 11, IGSG). 



102 

William Shattuck (ab. 1622-1672) was a proprietor in 
Watertown, Mass., in 1642, when he received a grant of 
land. He became eventually a large land owner and his 
remains lie in the ancient burying ground leading from 
Cambridge to Watertown. A simple but substantial 
marble tablet marks the spot. 

Jeremiah Shattuck (1726-1815) went out from Pep- 
perell, Mass., on the Alarm of April 19, 1775. In 1778 
he was a Corporal in service at Cambridge. He was born 
in Groton, and died in Pepperell, Mass. 



Cora Belle Shattuck (Mrs. Clinton Wal- 
lace Hough). 266 

Born in Utica, New York. 

Descendant of William Shattuck, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Jeremiah Shatluck, both of Massachu- 
setts, as follows : 



2. Lewis Horace Shattuck (July 17, 1834-Sept. 22, 1884) and 
Jane Ann Wilson (Mch. 17, 1838-July 14, 1884). 

3. Amaziah ShaUuck (Oct. 17, 1799- ) and 

Almira Root (d. Nov. 5. 1834. in 32d year). 

4. Amaziali Sliattuck (May 17, 1774-Jan. 15, 1S33) and 
Nancy Lovcjoy (Mch. 4, 1781-Dec. 25, 1S21). 

5. Jeremiali Shattuck (Apr. 11, 172G-Mch. 2G, 1S15) and 

Kezia Shattuck (dau. of Jonathan Shattuck) (Feh. 4, 1745- 
Sept. 8. 1832), his -second wife. 

6. Jeremiah Shattuck (June 11, 1703-Aug. 2, 1798) and 
Sarah Parker (Apr. 12, 1705-June 8, 1789), his first wife. 

7. Samuel Shattuck (1673-July 22, 1758) and 
Elizabeth Blood (Apr. 27, lG75-Oct. 20, 1759). 

8. Tohn Shattuck (Feb. 11, 1647-Sept 14. 1675) and 
Ruth Whitney (Apr. 15, 1645-m. June 20, 16G4). 

9. William Shattuck ( -Aug. 14. 1672, aged 50) and 

Susanna (bef. 1625-Dec. 11, 1686). 



For services of Founder and Patriot ancestors, see Na- 
tional Number 265, page 101. 



103 

Sarah L. Potter (Mrs. James G. Dunning). 2G7 

Born in Bath, Maine. 

Descendant of Anthony Potter, of Massachusetts, through 
the Revokitionary ancestor, John Potter, of Maine, as fol- 
lows : 

2. William Potter (Jan. 17, 1805-July 22, 1879) and 
Pamelia Gilmore (Dec. 24, 1818-Apr. 1, 1901). 

3. William Potter (July 16, 1763-May 30, 1831) and 
Mary Pattee (Mch. 17, 17G7-1832). 

4. John Potter (Apr. 28, 1736-Feb. 11, 1792) and 
Sarah Snipe (173G-1818). 

5. William Potter (1713-Mch. 9, 1747) and 
Catherine Mustard (bef. 1718-aft. 1748). 
(m. (2) Edward Cunningham). 

6. David Potter (Mch 27, 1685-aft. 1731) and 
Mary Merriam (m. 1711-aft. 1731). 

7. Samuel Potter (1656-1714) and 

Joanna Wood (Dec. 14, 1661-1691), his first wife. 

8. Anthony Potter (1628-Jan. 22, 1-690) and 
Elizabeth Whipple (1629-Mch. 10, 1712). 

Anthony Potter (1628-1690) was in Ipswich, Mass., in 
1648. He married Elizabeth Whipple, and died in Ipswich 
in 1690, leaving a widow and seven children. 

John Potter (1736-1792) was a Lieutenant in Capt. John 
White's company. Col. McCobb's regiment, Massachusetts 
troops. In 1779 he was a Lieutenant in Capt. Benjamin 
Lemont's company at Georgetown, Maine. He was born in 
Topsham, and died in Georgetown, Maine. 



Minnie Lydia Walker (Mrs. Frederick 

.Abner WiLCO.x). 268 

Born in Clarendon, Vermont. 

Descendant of Philip Walker, of Rhode Island, through 
the Revolutionary ancestor, Lewis Walker, of Massachu- 
setts and Vermont, as follows : 

2. Noah Shepardson Walker (May 29, 1842-....) and 
Sarah Almy Phillips (Nov. 29, 1838-....). 

3. Lewis Merritt Walker (Feb. 24, lS08-Jan. 16, 1892) and 
Adah Shepardson (Dec. 29, 1808-Jan. 17, 1901). 



104 

4. Lewis Walker (Jan. 24, 1781-Aug. 20, 18G:?) and 
Sarah Gates (June 2, 1780-May 20, 1841). 

5. Lieut. Lewis Walker (Dec. 13, 1745-May 21, 1813) and 
Hannah Cooper (1746-Nov. 18, 1821). 

6. Nathaniel Walker (Jan. 13, 1703-Apr. 20, 1783) and 
Anna Sweeting (May 1, 1707-Mch. 23, 1772). 

7. Philip Walker (Mch. 16, 16G1-Feb. 17, 1739) and 
Sarah (1G71-Feb. 6, 1739), his second wife. 

8. Philip Walker (ab. lC27-Aug. 21, 1C79) and 
Jane Butterworth (ab. 1631-1702). 

(m. (2) in 1684, John Polly). 

Philip Walker (1627-1G79) was in Rehoboth, Mass., in 
1653, where he soon became one of the wealthiest men in 
the town and held many positions of trust and honor. He 
was surveyor in 1G57 ; constable, 1658; selectman for many 
years, and deputy to the General Court at Plymouth in 1GG9. 
His contribution toward carrying on the war against King 
Philip was the largest given in Rehoboth. He was a deacon 
in the church and active in its support, and when he died 
in Rehoboth in August, 1679, his townsmen mourned a 
"Patriot and a Christian." 

Lewis Walker (1745-1813) served during the Revolution 
in the Berkshire County Militia, known as "The Silver 
Grays," first as a private, but later promoted to a Lieu- 
tenant. He was born in Rehoboth, and died in Clarendon, 
Mass. 



Mary Comstock (Mrs. Addison Brill). 269 

Born in Western, New York. 

Descendant of Lieut. Edward Morris, of Massachusetts, 
through the Revolutionary ancestor, Isaac Morris, of Con- 
necticut, as follows : 

2. Arnon Comstock (Nov. 15, 1779-Mch. 8, 1850) and 
Irene Morris (May 13, 1793-Dec. 7, 1881). 

3. Isaac Morris (Sept. 10, 1753-June 26, 1805) and 
Irene Johnson (....-Aug. 14, 1842). 

4. Isaac Morris (Mch. 26, 1725-Jan. 10, 1778) and 
Sarah ChafiFee (Jan. 18, 1729-Apr. 27, 1818). 

5. Edward Morris (Nov. 9, 1688-Aug. 12, 1769) and 
Bethiah Peake (Feb. 20, 1697/8-m. Jan. 12, 1715). 



105 

6. Dea. Edward Morris (Mch. 10, 1658-Aug. 29, 1727) and 
Elizabeth Bowen (Jan. 26, 1661-Nov. 20, 1743). 

7. Lieut. Edward Morris (Aug., 16:;0-Sept. 14, 1C90) and 
Grace Bett (m. Nov. 20, 1655-June G, 1705). 

Edward Morris (1630-1690), born in County Essex, 
England, emigrated early in life to New England and re- 
ceived land in Roxbury, Mass., Feb. 23, 1052. In 1G61 
he was Chairman of a committee to survey the common 
land of the town; was constable in 1664; selectman in 3 674, 
and for twelve successive years thereafter; juror in 1675; 
deputy to the General Court from 1678 to 1686. "It was 
his fortune to sit in the House of Deputies during the long 
contest of Massachusetts with King Charles II for the 
preservation of the charter." The name of Edward Morris 
heads the list of founders of the town of "Wappaquassett" 
(now Woodstock, Conn.). He settled there in Sept., 1686; 
was chosen selectman in 16S9 ; re-elected in May, 1690, and 
died the following September, "full of years and honors." 

Isaac Morris (1753-1805) was a Minute Man, serving 
on difTerent alarms in the Massachusetts Militia. He was 
born in Woodstock, Conn., and died in Longmeadow, Mass. 



ExA Ella Batciielleu (AIrs. Fkank Jerome). 270 

Born in Fredonia, New York. 

Descendant of Joseph Batcheller, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestors, Abraham Batcheller, Sr. and Jr., all of 
Massachusetts, as follows : 

2. Charles Batcheller (Apr. 23, 1802-Dec. 25, 1,SS2) and 
Eliza Ann Johnson (Sept. 25, ISlO-June 28, 1859). 

3. Abraham Batcheller, Jr. (Mch. 26, 1752-Aug. 13. 1832) and 
Rebecca Dwight (May 19, 1754-Apr. 5, 1852). 

4. Abraham Batcheller (June 5, 1722-Jan. 3, 1813) and 
Sarah Newton (Westboro ....-1816). 

5. David Batcheller (Apr. 5, 1073-June 13, 1706) and 
Susannah Whipple (Feb. 13, 1G75-Jan. 20, 176G). 

6. John Batcheller (bapt. Jan. 20, 16:i8-Nov. 17, 1698) and 

Sarah Goodale (m. May 4, 16GG-Mar. 22, 1729), his second wife. 

7. Joseph Batcheller (Eng -Mch., 1G47) and 

Elizabeth (Eng -1G50). 



106 

Joseph Batcheller (bef. 1G15-1G4'(') was born in Canter- 
bury, England; emigrated to America in 3 63G with wife, 
EHzabeth' one child, and his brothers, Henry and John. 
He settled first at Salem, Mass., where he was freeman 
in 1()38. He removed to Wenham, Mass., and in liJit 
was the first deputy from that town to the General Court 
convened at Boston. He died in Wenham, March, 16-17. 

Abram (Abraham) Batchellor (n22-1813) served as 
Captain of Minute Men from Sutton, Mass., and was also 
on a committee to raise troops for the army. He was born 
in Wenham, and died in. Sutton, Mass. 

Abraham Batcheller (17o2-1832) was a Corporal at the 
Lexington Alarm from Sutton. In 1780 he served as Lieu- 
tenant oh an alarm to Rhode Island. He was born in Sut- 
ton, Mass., and died in Stockton, Chataqua County, New 
York. 



Caroline Anna Dorsey (Mrs. Thomas H. 

Johnston). 271 

Born in San Francisco, California. 

Descendant of Edward and Hon. John Dorsey, through 
the Revolutionary ancestor, John Dorsey, all of Maryland, 
as follows: 



2. Baker Johnson Dorsey (July 30, lS32-July 12, 1S77) and 
Caroline Anna Jackson (June 12, lS23-Feb. 27, 1895). 

3. John Robert Dorsey (Oct. 3, 1801-Feb. 18, 1858) and 
Mary Catherine Johnson (ISll-May 8, 1896). 

4. Judge Walter Dorsey (Mch. 20, 1771-1823) and 
Hopewell Hebb (ab. 1765-Apr. 3, 1853). 

5. John Dorsey (172G-Jan. 1, 1810) and 
Mary Hammond (1738-June 22, 1783). 

6. Edward Dorsey, Jr. (ab. 1695-bef. Nov., 17G7) and 
Sarah Todd (i705-aft. 1767). 

7. Edward Dorsey (ab. 1675-bef. Nov. 25, 1701) and 
Ruth Howard (1674-aft. 1708/9). 

8. Hon. John Dorsey (Eng., 1641-bef. Mch. 22, 1715) and 
Pleasance Ely (bet. 1640-1650-aft. 1722). 

(m. (2) Thomas Wainwright). 

9. Edward Dorsey (Eng., -IGSl) and 

Ann (b. Eng ). 



107 

Edward Darcy, now Dorscy (Eng.-KiSl), "Gcntleinan," 
received his first warrant for land in Maryland from tlic 
Lord Proprietor in 1(;50, and settled in Anne Arundel 
County. In IGGl he was granted a valuable estate in tliat 
part of St. Mary's County which later became Calvert 
County. "Hockley in the Hole," originally taken up by 
Edward Dorsey, was in lGfi4 patented to his sons. The 
original patent, bearing date Aug. 20, IfiG-i, is still in the 
possession of one of the lineal descendants of all three of 
the original patentees. 

Hon. John Dorsey (1641-bef. 1715) came to this coun- 
try with his father, Edward, and settled with him in Anne 
Arundel County. He served for years as Burgess, and 
was on many important committees. In 1G94 he was one 
of the Commissioners for the development of Annapolis ; 
was a member of the Governor's Council in 1711, which 
appointment he held until his death, in 1714. 

"Col. John Dorsey" (172G-1810), an officer in Colonial 
Wars, subscribed a large sum during the Revolution to 
purchase salt for the public use to be sold to them at cost 
price. In 1781 he agreed to take Continental money at 
face value, thereby aiding the Government in its hour of 
need. He was the owner of many ships that aided in con- 
veying Lafayette and his army to Virginia for the York- 
town campaign. 



• Lucy E. Emery (Mrs. George F. Fuller)- 272 

Born in Lowell, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of vVnthony and James Emery, through the 
'Revolutionary ancestors, Zachariah and John Emery, all of 
Massachusetts, as follows : 

2. Hiram Emery (Mch. 23, lS25-Jime 26, 1874) and 
Eliza Ann Gay (Mch. 23, 1830-Feb. 19, 1859). 

3. Darius Emery (May 17, 1800-Jan. 27, 1881) and 
Lydia Longley (May 26, 1803-Jiily 31, 18G3). 

4. John Emery (Sept. 21, 1753-Mch. 13, 1828) and 
Ruth Sanders (1TG5-Feb. 1, 1857). 



lOS 

5. Zachariah Emery (Aug. 20, 171G-May .3, 1804) and 

Esther Stevens (or Stephens) (Nov. 27, 1718-June 17, 1804). 

6. Zachariah Emery (Oct. 5, 1690-aft. 1745) and 
Sarah ( -Oct. 8, 1732), his first wife. 

7. Zachariah Emery (ab. ir>cn-ab. 1C90) and 
Ehzabeth Goodwin (ab. 16(U")-aft. Jan. 2.^, 1705). 
(m. (2) Dec. 22, 1692, Phiihp Hubl)ard). 

8. James Emery (ab. lG30-aft. 1713) and 
Ehzabeth ( -aft. 1G87), his first wife. 

9. Anthony Emery (ab. 1600-aft. 1080) and 
Frances (Eng -aft. May 12, 1G60). 

Anthony Emery (ab. lGOO-1680) was born in England, 
and emigrated to this country on the ship "J^'''^^^s," willi 
his wife, Frances, and son, James, landing in Boston June 
3, 1635. He was first in Ipswich, but later settled in New- 
bury, Mass. About 1640 he removed to Dover, N. H., and 
in October of the same year signed the "Dover Combina- 
tion." He was an inn keeper; selectman in IG-to and -18; 
and a Grand Juror in 1649. He removed to "Pischataqua" 
(afterwards Kittery, now Eliot, Maine) in 1649, where he 
was selectman, constable and Grand Juror. In IbiiO he was 
received as a free inhabitant of Portsmouth, R. 1., where 
he removed "to gain a greater freedom of speech and action." 
He served Portsmouth as juryman and constable; and in 
1672 as deputy to the General Court. He was a capable 
business man, "energetic, independent, resolute of will, bold 
in action, and willing to suffer for conscience's sake." He 
died in Portsmouth after ]GSO. 

James Emery (ab. 1630-1695) came to America with 
his father. Pie settled in Dedham, Mass., after his mar- 
riage, and represented that town in the General Court. 
Before 1674 he removed to Kittery, Maine, where he had 
large grants of land, and represented that town in the Gen- 
eral Court from 1693 to 1695. He was selectman in Kwl 
and for many years thereafter; grand juror and constable; 
and died in Kittery after 1713, his signature appearing on 
a deed in that year. 

Zachariah Emery (1710-1804), of Townsend, Mass., 
served on a committee to forward supplies to the Boston 



109 

sufferers. In 1777 he was selectman of the town, lie was 
born in Chelmsford, and died in Townsend, Mass. 



Eunice Comstock. 273 

Born in Western, New York. 

Descendant of Lieut. Edward Morris, of Massachusetts, 
through the Revolutionary ancestor, Isaac Morris, of Con- 
necticut, as follows : 

2. Arnon Comstock (Nov. 15, 1779-Mch. 8, 1850) and 
Irene Morris (May 13, 1793-Dec. 7, 1881). 

3. Isaac Morris (Sept. 10, 1753-June 26, 1805) and 
Irene Johnson (....-Aug. 14, 1842). 

4. Isaac Morris (Mch. 20, 1725-Jan. 10, 1778) and 
Sarah Chaffee (Jan. 18, 1729-Apr. 27, 1818). 

5. Edward Morris (Nov. 9, lC88-Aug .12, 1769) and 
Bethiah Peake (Feb. 20, 1697/8-iti. Jan. 12, 1715). 

6. Dea. Edward Morris (Mch. 10, 1058-Aug. 29, 1727) and 
Elisabeth Bowen (Jan. 26, 1661-Nov. 20, 1743). 

7. Lieut. Edward Morris (Aug. 1030-Sept. 14, 1690) and 
Grace Bett (m. Nov. 20, 1655-June 0, 1705). 

For services of Founder and Patriot ancestors, see Na- 
tional Number 269, page 105. 



PiioiiBic Strong (Mrs. Cowen). 274 

P.orn in Lcc, New York. 

Descendant of John Strong, of Massachusetts, through 
the Revolutionary ancestor, John Strong, of Connecticut, 
as follows : 

2. George Strong (Jan. 7, 1803-Mch., 1839) and 
Julia Anne Dingman (Nov. 23, 1804-Dec. 17, 1878). 

3. Elijah Strong (177G-1812) and 
Catherine Herkimer (Oct., 1780-July, 1847). 

4. John Strong (1743-aft. 1790) and 
Rachel Curtis (m. Sept. 26, 1765). 
(m. (2) in Pawlet, Vt., Mr. Stevens). 

5. Ezra Strong (1702-Mch. 7, 1785) and 
Abigail Caverly (1715-1788). 

6. Jedediah Strong (1667-1709) and 
Abiah Ingersoll (Aug. 24, 1663-1732). 



110 

7. Jedediah Strong, Sr. (1637-1733) and 

Freedom Woodward (m. Nov. 18, 1663-1679), his first wife. 

8. John Strong (1605-1099) and 

Abigail Ford (1614-1688), his second wife. 

Elder John Strong (1G05-1G1)9) was born in Taunton, 
England; removed to London, thence to Plymouth, from 
which place he sailed in the ship "Mary and John," March 
20, 1630, and arrived at Nantasket, Mass., May 30 of the 
same year. He was one of the founders of Dorchester, 
Hingham and Taunton, Mass., and settled in the latter 
place in 1638. He was deputy to the General Court in 1611, 
43 and 44 from Taunton ; was appointed with four others 
to superintend the settlement at Windsor, Conn. In 1651) 
he removed to Northampton, Mass., of which place he was 
one of the founders. In 1663 he was ordained Ruling Elder 
in the Church. He died in Northampton, Mass., leaving 
one hundred and sixty descendants. 

John Strong (1743-aft. 1790) served in 1777 as a private 
in the Connecticut Militia under Capt. David Smith. He 
was born in Lebanon, Conn., and in 1790 was living in 
Glastonbury, Conn. 



LuciECF.LLE Ward (Mrs. Ira C. Hoxtk). 27.") 

Born in Stonington, Connecticut. 

Descendant of William Ward, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor. Col. Jonathan Ward, both of Massachuselt-^, as 
follows : 



2. Winthrop Ward (Mch. 2, 1814-Jan. 17, 1899) and 
Lucy L. Spicer Ward (June 3, 1331-living 1906). 

3. Jonathan Ward (Oct. 25, 1774-Dec. 9, 1848) and 
Zeruiah Cheesebro (Mch. 17, 1777-Sept. 15, 1858). 

4. Col. Jonathan Ward (Feb. 3, 1727-July 7, 1791) and 
Susannah Stone (1743-1790). 

5. Hezekiah Ward (June 28, 170.3-Mch. 6, 1777) and 

Abigail Perry (m. Nov. 20, 1724-Mch. 30, 1735), his first wife. 
C. Col. William Ward (Mch. 27, lC80-Jan. 8, n07) and 
Jane Cleveland (1681-Apr. 12, 1745), his first wife. 



in 

7. William Ward (Jan. 22, 1640-Nov. 25, 1()97) and 

Mrs. Hannah (Johnson) Eames (Apr. 27, 16,")G-Dec. S, 1720). 

8. William Ward (al). 1597-y\ug. 10, 1G87) and 

Elizabeth (b. Eng -Dec. 9, 1700), his second wife. 

William Ward (159r-l(;87) shared in the division of land 
in Sudbury, Mass., in 1G39. Tradition transmitted from 
his early descendants states that he came from Derbyshire, 
England. He was made freeman in K)!;!; Representative 
to the General Court in 1641-, and was selectman for many 
years. In 16G2 he was one of the incorporators of Marl- 
borough, Mass., and was chosen deacon of the iirst church 
organized there. He suffered great loss during King 
Philip's War, "buildings burned, cattle destroyed, and one 
son slain by the enemy." He died in Marlborough, August 
10, 1G87. 

Jonathan Ward (1727-1791) was a Lieutenant-Colonel 
in 177,5, and was promoted to the Colonelcy in tlie same 
year. He was in command of a regiment in Camjjridge 
when the Battle of Bunker Hill was fought. "He was a 
vigilant officer and efficient in discipline." 



L. Bell Merrill (Mrs. AxMos G. Draper). 270 

Born in Haverhill, New Hampshire. 

Descendant of Nathaniel Merrill, of Massachusetts, 
through the Revolutionary ancestors, James and P'ord Mer- 
rill, of New Hampshire, as follows : 

2. Daniel Ford Merrill (Nov. 2, 1812, Stratham, N. H.-May 1, 

• 1904, Washington, D. C.) and 

L. Luella B. Bell (June IS, 1823, Haverhill, N. H.-Dec. U, 1910, 
Washington, D. C). 

3. Rev. Asa Merrill (Mch. 10, 1783, Stratham, N. H.-Nov. 13, ISGO, 

Stratham, N. PI.) and 
Esther Fowler (May 16, 1780, Epsom, N. H.-Julv 28, 1831, Strat- 
ham,, N. H.). 

4. Ford Merrill (Sept. 2, 1753, Stratham, N. H.-Nov. 12, 1826, Strat- 

ham, N. H.) and 
Elizabeth Merrill (dau. of Daniel Merrill) (Aug. 11, 1752, Scar- 
boro, Me.-Oct. 28, 1832, Stratham, N. H.). 



112 

5. James Merrill (July 18, 1729, Stratham, N. H.-Mch. 2, 1784, Strat- 

ham, N. H.) and 
Sarah Ford (17:i3-June, 1800. Stratham, N. H.). 

6. Joseph Merrill (May 28, 1G94, Newbury, Mass.-Mch. 17, 1771, 

Stratham, N. H.) and 
Mary Palmer (m. Stratham, N. H., Dec. 16, 1718). 

7. Daniel Merrill (Mch. 8, 1671-est. admin. Sept. 29, 1725, Newbury, 

Mass.) and 
Esther Chase (Nov. 18, 1674, Newbury-17ol). 

8. Daniel Merrill (Aug. 20, 1642, Newbury, Mass.-Jan. 27, 1717, 

Newbury, Mass.) and 
Sarah Clough (m. May 14, 1667, Salisbury, Mass.-Mch. 18, 
1706, Newbury, Mass), his first wife. 

9. Nathaniel Merrill (ab. 1610, Eng.-Mch. 16, 1655, Newbury, Mass.) 

and 
Susanna Wilterton (....-Jan. 25, 1672), Newbury, Mass.). 
(m. (2) Stephen Jordan). 



Nathaniel Merrill (Eng.-l(io5) emigrated to this country 
with his brother John, and it is supposed his wife, Su'sanna, 
also, and settled first in Ipswich, Mass., soon removing to 
Newbury, Mass., where they are mentioned as proprietors, 
and where he died March 16, 1655, leaving a widow, Su- 
sanna, and six children, all of whom married and left many 
descendants. The house, built on the original grant of 
land in Newburyport, was retained in the possession of 
the family until 1882, when, after the death of Capt. Samuel 
Merrill, it passed into other hands. After the death of her 
husband, Susanna Merrill married Stephen Jordan, a fellow 
passenger on the "Mary and John." 

America Hcraldica states that the family is of French 
origin, being descended from the Huguenot Family of De 
Merle, who escaped to England after the Massacre of St. 
Bartholomew in August, 15?2 ; and belonged to the Auvergne 
nobility, having its ancestral estate near Place de Dombcs 
in that province. It is certain that the arms used by a 
grandson of Nathaniel to seal a deed are different from 
the Merrill coat-of-arms as given by English works of 
heraldry. 

James Merrill (1729-1784) and his son. Ford Merrill 
1753-1826) signed the Association Test in Stratham, N. IL, 
where they were living at the time. A "Genealogy,'" 



113 



started by Ford Merrill, and beginning with his grandfather, 
Joseph, born in 1694, and continued to the present genera- 
tion is in the possession of one of his descendants. 



Clara Harvey (Mrs. Thomas W. Aujrich). 277 

Born in Providence, Rhode Island. 

Descendant of Thomas Harvey, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Josiah Harvey, both of Massachusetts, 
as follows : 

2. Edwin Bates Harvey (Feb. 3, 1H14-Feb. 12, 18G5) and 
Abigail Hastings Whiting (Aug. 6, 1827-Nov. 24, 1898). 

3. Rufus Harvev (Dec. 7, 1768-Sept. 15, 1817) and 
Cynthia Buckhn (Feb. 5, 1769-May 23, 18G5). 

4. Capt. Josiah Harvey (Oct. 19, 1745-1807) and 
Elizabeth Bates (1752-1806). 

5. Thomas Harvey (Feb. 27, 1700-June, 1780) and 
Jane Hungerford (Jan. 27, 1707-1780). 

6. Thomas Harvev (1G78-Mch. 1725) and 
Abigail Smith (1680-Feb. 2, 1762). 

7. John Harvey (1647-Jan. 18, 1705) and 
Elizabeth (m. 1675-Jan. 9, 1705). 

8. Thomas Harvey (Eng. 1617-1651) and 
Elizabeth Andrews (Eng., 1G14-1717). 

Thomas Harvey (lC17-l(i51), born in Somersetshire, 
England, emigrated with his brother, William, to Dorchester, 
Mass., in 1G3G. Two years later he was a resident of 
"Cohannet" (Taunton), where he was admitted as pro- 
prietor between tlic years KiUH and 1()12, and where he 
died in 1051, at the early age of 34 years. His widow 
married, second, Francis Street ; and, third, Thomas Lin- 
coln, whom she outlived, dying at Taunton in 1717, aged 
103 years. 

Josiah Harvey (1745-1808) served as Surgeon's mate 
in- Col. John Fellows' regiment of Massachusetts Militia. 
He was also Capt. of a Berkshire Company of Militia; and 
in 1778 was appointed Surgeon of the Fourth Massachu- 
setts regiment. In 1780 he represented Granville, Mass., 
in the General Assembly. He was born in East Haddam, 
Conn., and died in West Granville, Massachusetts. 



114 

Marcia Maria Riciiarivon. 278 

Born in St. Albans, Vermont. 

Descendant of Thomas Richardson, through the Revo- 
lutionary ancestor, Capt. Israel Richardson, both of Massa- 
chusetts, as follows : 

2. Israel Putnam Richardson (Feb. 6. 1785-Aug. 16, 1879) and 
Susannah Richardson (June 6, 1785-June 14, 1871), his cousin. 

3. Israel Richardson (Nov. 14, 1759-May 14, 1840) and 
Hannah Kellogg ( -Apr. 14, 1846). 

4. Capt. Israel Richardson (Jan, 24, 1736-May 8, 1800) and 
Susanna Forbush (Aug. 14, 173,j-Sept. 1, 1806). 

5. Israel Richardson (Aug. IG, 1710-1740) 
(Richardson Memorial mentions his son, Israel). 

C. Nathaniel Richardson (Aug. 27, 1673-ab. 1728) and 
Abigail Reed (Jan. 2, 1678-1759). 

7. Nathaniel Richardson (Jan. 2, 1650-Dec. 4, 1714) and 
Mary Richardson ( -Dec. 22, 1719). 

8. Thomas Richardson (Eng -Aug. 28, 1651) and 

Mary . 

Thomas Richardson (Eng.-Kiol) emigrated with Win- 
throp in 1G30 ; united with the church in Charlestown in 
1635, and his wife, Mary, became a member in ItJo? ; was 
made freeman May 2, 1G38. He was one of the Commis- 
sioners chosen by the church in Charlestown, Mass., Nov. 
5, 1640, to commence the settlement of Woburn, Mass., and 
died in Woburn, August 28, 1651. 

Capt. Israel Richardson (1736-1800) commanded a com- 
pany in the Hampshire County, Massachusetts, Militia. 
After the close of the Revolution he moved to Woodstock, 
Vermont, to which town he gave six hundred acres for a 
park and a site for a courthouse. He was born in Brook- 
field, Mass. (one of the youngest of the children of h.is 
father, Israel Richardson, Sen., whose children were Ijorn 
between 1710 and 1740), and died in Woodstock, Vermont. 

HiiLEN Louise Shaw. 27!) 

Born in Jones County, Iowa. 

Descendant of Hon. Jasper Crane, of Connecticut and 
New Jersey, through the Revolutionary ancestor, Capt. 
Ezekiel Crane, of New Jersey and New York, as follows: 



115 

2. William Tuckerman Shaw (Sept. 22, 1822- ) and 

Helen Amelia Crane (Feb. 19, 1831-May 4, ISC.G). 

3. Roswell Crane (Sept. 12, 180(j-May 25, 1888) and 
Pauline Newman (Dec. 27, 1800-1902). 

4. Shadrack Crane (May 24, 1773-Oct. 28, 1848) and 
Hannah Palmer (July 16, 1773-Junc 22, 1841). 

5. Capt. Ezekiel Crane (Oct. 29, 1747-Mch. 15, 1813) and 
Eunice Hayward (Apr. 1, 1754-IvIay 28, 1810). 

6. Edmund Crane (1092-1701) and 

Abigail Kitchell (Nov. 1717-Aug. 20, 1801). 

7. John Crane (1G71-Feb. 22, 1739) and 
Mary . 

8. John Crane (1635-1G94) and 
Elizabeth Foote. 

9. Jasper Crane (1G05-1GS1) and 
Alice (b. Eng ). 

Jasper Crane (ab. 1605-1(381) was one of the original 
settlers of the New Haven Colony in 1()39. He removed 
to Branford in 1()52 and represented the General Court 
from 1653 to 1657; elected Magistrate in 1658, having 
previously held the office of deputy. Jan. 20, 1667, he headed 
the list of members of the first church in Newark, N. J., 
and became one of the most active and influential members 
in the colony. In 1668 he was chosen magistrate at Newark 
and a deputy to the General Assembly. He was constantly 
in public life until his death in 1681. 

Ezekiel Crane (1747-1813) served as Captain in the 
Western Battalion, Morris County, N. J., Militia and was 
at Valley Forge. He was born in ^\'hippany, N. J.; was 
one of the tirst settlers of Cayuga County, N. Y., wlu-re he 
held many important civil offices, and, with his wile, lies 
buried on their former farm near Auburn, New York. 



Lucy J. Fayerweather (Mrs. Morris B. 

BeardslEy). 380 

Born in Stratford, Connecticut. 

Descendant of Thomas Fayerweather, of Massachusetts, 
through the Revolutionary ancestor, Samuel Fayerweather, 
of Connecticut, as follows : 



116 

2. William Fayerweather (May 4, 1818-1882) and 
Polly Botsford (1819-Apr. 1, 1861). 

3. Lucius Fayerweather (Jan. 17, 1792-June 30, 1828) and 
Amelia Beardsley (Nov. 23, 1794-18S0). 

4. Samuel Fayerweather (1761-Apr. 29, 1848) and 
Charity Burton (Apr. 12, 1760-Apr. 16, 1847). 

5. John Fayerweather (bapt. 173G-May 10, 1777) and 
Abigail Curtis (1734-m. Feb. 14, 1760). 

6. John Fayerweather (Dec. 28, 1703-aft. 1662) and 
Anne (Apr. 27, 1712-Sept. 24, 1773). 

7. Benjamin Fayerweather (Apr. 28, 1672-Dec. 6, 1725) and 
Mrs. Sarah (Sherwood) Wheeler (1676-May 25, 1743). 

8. John Fayerweather (bapt. Sept. 21, 1634-Apr. 13, 1712) and 
Sarah Turner (Jan. 11, 1640-bef. 1674). 

9. Thomas Fayerweather (Eng -1638) and 

Mary (Eng. ....-ab. June 8, 1682). 

Thomas Fayerweather (Eng.-1G38) was made freeman in 
Boston, Mass., May 14, 1()34. His name appears among 
the list of members of Winthrop's church at Boston, and he 
died there late in 1638. 

Samuel Fayerweather (1761-1848) was placed on the 
pension roll of Franklin County, Conn., in 1818 for service 
as Corporal in the Connecticut Continental Line. He fought 
in the battles of Monmouth and Germantown ; wintered at 
Valley Forge; and was one of those men who were chosen 
from a number of regiments to engage in storming Stony 
Point. He was born in Stratford, and died in Weston, 
Conn. 



Anna Roselle Camp (Mrs. W. E. Halugan). 281 

Born in Winsted, Connecticut. 

Descendant of Edward Camp, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Abel Camp, Jr., both of Connecticut, as follows: 

2. Joseph Camp (Jan. 21, 1830-living 1906) and 
Nancy M. Munn (Sept. 26, lS27-Aug. 5, 1901). 

3. George Camp (Jan. 11, 1808-Oct. 6, 1898) and 
Julia A. Sheffield (May 19, 1812-Jan. 19, 1895). 

4. John Camp (Mch. 19, 1773-Oct. 17, 1828) and 
Esther Potter (Apr. 4, 1775-Oct. 10, 1823). 

5. Abel Camp, Jr. (July 11. 174S-May 8, 1825) and 
Sabra Marsh (Feb. 2, 1749-May 19, 1807). 

6. Abel Camp (Dec. 10, 1717-aft. 1762) and 
Rachel Welton (Dec. 10, 1722-m. Apr. 14, 1741). 



117 

7. Samuel Camp (1677-Apr. 22, 1741) and 

Mrs. Dorothy Whittemore (m. July 17, 1712-Sept. 2, 1749). 

8. Edward Camp (July 8, 1650-bef. Mch. 27, 1721) and 
Mehitable Smith (1655-1721). 

9. Edward Camp (Eng -1059) and 

Mary . 

Edward Camp (Eng.-1659) took the oath of Fidelity 
in New Haven, Conn., July 1, 1644. He had land allotted 
him in 1650, on which he lived until his death in 1659. In 
1662, his widow, Mary, married, second, John Lane, of 
Milford, and the family removed to that place. 

Abel Camp, Jr. (1748-1825) was a private in Capt. James 
Stoddard's company, Waterbury's Brigade, in 1781. He 
was born in Waterbury and died at South Farms, Connecti- 
cut. 



Leonora S. Pendleton (Mrs. Benjamin Inger- 

soLL Nesmith). 282 

Born in Belfast, Maine. 

Descendant of Major Brian Pendleton, of Massachusetts, 
through the Revolutionary ancestors, William and Lieut. 
Peleg Pendleton, of Rhode Island, as follows : 

2. Nathan Pendleton (Dec. 2, 1808-Sept. 23. 1857) and 
Lydia Gilkey (Apr. 15, l815-Dec. 24, 1880). 

3. Phineas Pendleton (Sept. 20, 17sn-Fel). 26, 1S73) and 
Agnes Gilmore (Nov. 1, 1788-May 7, 1871). 

4. Lieut. Peleg Pendleton (July 9, 1733-May 7, 1810) and 
Ann Park (Oct. 28, 1739-Mch. 20, 1817). 

5. Wm. Pendleton (Mch. 23, 1704-Aug. 26, 1780) and 

Lydia Burroughs (Apr. 19, 1703-Aug. 18, 1750), his first wife. 

6. Joseph Pendleton (Dec. 29, 1G61-Sept. 18, 1706) and 

Patience Potts (Aug. 12, 1683- ), his second wife. 

(m. (2) Apr. 28, 1707). 

7. James Pendleton (1628-Nov. 29, 1709) and 

Hannah Goodnow (Nov. 28, 1639-m. Apr. 29, 1656), his second 
wife. 

8. Major Brian Pendleton (1599-Aug. 7, 1681) and 
Eleanor . 

Major Brian Pendleton (1599-1681) emigrated to 
America with his wife, Eleanor, and two children, and was 



118 

admitted freeman at Watertown, Mass., Sept. 31, 1G32. 
He was selectman of Watertown, 1635-7 ; representative, 
1036-8 and 1647. In 1646 he was a member of the An- 
cient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts. 
About 1648 he removed to Sudbury, and thence to Ports- 
mouth, N. H., which town he represented in the General 
Assembly for many years. In 1654 he was commissioned 
Captain of a military company at Portsmouth, and later 
promoted to Major. He was appointed by the King one 
of the eight councillors to govern New Hampshire, which 
position he held until his death at Portsmouth, Aug. 7, 1681. 

"Col. William Pendleton" (1701-1786), an officer in the 
Colonial Wars, was a member of a committee in Westerly, 
Rhode Island, "to report upon what means will be proper 
for the town to take in the present alarming crisis" ; and, 
with his three sons, served in a civil capacity throughout 
the Revolution. He was born and died in Westerly, Rliode 
Island. 

Pelog Pendleton (1733-1810) was Lieutenant of Rhode 
Island Artillery under Col. James Babcock. lie also was 
born and died in Westerly, Rhode Island. 



EuzABETH Brewster (Mrs. David B. Cady). 283 

Born in Westmoreland, New Hampshire. 

Descendant of Elder William and Love Brewster, of 
Massachusetts, through the Revolutionary ancestor, Asa 
Brewster, of Connecticut, as follows : 

2. George Edmund Brewster (Sept. 25, 1800-Mch. 17, 1867) and 
Caroline Walker (June 28, 180o-May 9, 1887). 

3. Edmund Brewster (Jan. 12, 17(37-July 16, 1845) and 
Eunice Snow (June 9, 17C9-Apr. 9, 1833). 

4. Asa Brewster (Oct. 11, 1739-Mch. 10, 1811) and 
Ruth Badger (m. May 28, 17GG). 

5. William Brewster (Sept. IG, 1714-Sept. 7, 1751) and 
Damaris Gates (Dec. IS, 1718-Scpt. 7, 1751), his first wife. 

6. Benjamin Brewster (1688-est. admin. Nov. 7, 1752) and 
Elizabeth Witter (m. Oct. IG, 1713-Feb. 21, 1740/1), his first wife. 

7. William Brewster (ab. 164G-Nov. 3, 1723) and 
Lydia Partridge (m. Jan. 2, 1G72-Feb. 2, 1742/3). 



119 

8. Love Brewster (b. Eng -will proved Mch. 4, 1G50/1) and 

Sarah Collier (m. May 16, 1034-Apr. 26, 1691). 

(m. (2) Richard Parke). 

9. William Brewster (1566/67-Apr. 10, 1C44) and 
Mary (....-Apr. 17, 1627). 



"mr. William Brewster, Mary his wife with 3 soils, 
whose names were Love & Wrasling" appears in "The names 
of those which came over first, in ye year 1030. and were 
(by the blessing of God) the first beginers, and (in a sort) 
the foundation of all the plantations, and Colonies, in New 
England. (And their families.)" as compiled by Gov. Wil- 
liam Bradford, and printed in his "History of Plimouth 
Plantation." William Brewster (15GG/7-1G44), of vScrooby, 
England, educated at Cambridge, a member of the English 
Embassy to Holland, when scarcely twenty years of age, 
freely offered the use of his house at Scrooby for the 
organization of the Separatist or Congregational Church, 
became its First Ruling Elder, removed with his flocl-; in 
1608 to Amsterdam, in 1609 to Leyden, and in 1630 to 
Plymouth; later moved to Duxbury, where he died A]iril 
10, 1641, leaving a library of four hundred volumes, the 
contents of which he had imbibed and imparted to his fol- 
lowers every week. This man, the transplanter of the first 
New England Meeting House, the suggester of the first 
New England town meeting, has often been called the "Chief 
of the Pilgrims." 

Love Brewster (Eng.-1650/l) emigrated v^'ith his father; 
was admitted a freeman of the Plymouth Colony March 2, 
1635/6) ; removed soon thereafter to Duxbury, where he 
devoted himself to the cultivation of the land granted to his 
father; served in the Pequot War in 1(!;57; was a member 
of Capt. Myles Standish's Duxbury company in 1643; and 
in 1645 was one of the proprietors of the extension to Dux- 
bury, later known as Bridgewater. He married Sarah, 
daughter of William Collier, of Duxbury, and died in 1650 
or 51. 

Asa Brewster (1739-1811) served in Capt. Jonathan 



120 

Brewster's company, which lost so many of its men at the 
Battle of Long Island. He served with the main army until 
after the Battle of White Plains, and was honorably dis- 
charged at Peekskill, N. Y., Dec. 31, 177G. He was born 
and died in Windham County, Connecticut. 



Julia Helen Colton (Mrs. Garry A. Wileard). 28-1 

Born in Turin, New York. 

Descendant of Quartermaster George Colton, through 
the Revolutionary ancestors, Benjamin and John Gunn Col- 
ton, all of Massachusetts, as follows : 

2. Chauncey Wayne Colton (Nov. 22, 1832-Mch. 18, 1905) and 
Louise Maria Riggs (Oct. 25, 1841- ). 

3. Leonard Colton (Aug. 20, lS04-Sept. 18, 1881) and 
Eliza Phelps (Apr. 25, 1807-Aug. 22, 1877). 

4. Chauncey Colton (May IS, 1775- Aug. 12, 1809) and 
Sibyl Taylor (Jan. Ki, 1777-Oct. 30, 18C1). 

5. John Gunn Colton (Oct. 22, 1747-Tan. 16, 1822) and 
Martha Warriner (Nov. 25, 1749-Feb. 26, 1806). 

6. Benjamin Colton, Jr. (Feb. 1, 1722-June 20, 1808) and 
Abiah Cooley (Mch. 8, 1723/4-Apr. 30, 1778), his first wife. 

7. Benjamin Colton, Sr. (June 18, 1695-May 6, 1770) and 
Elizabeth Pynchon (Dec. 27, 1702-Sept. 26, 1776). 

8. Lsaac Colton (Nov. 21, 1646-Sept. 3, 1700) and 
Mary Cooper (Oct. 15. 1651-Aug. 30, 1742). 
(m. (2) Edward Stebbins, Oct. 18, 1701). 

9. "Quartermaster" George Colton (Eng -Dec. 17, 169'.)) and 

Dclwrah Gardner (Hartford, Conn -Sept. 5, 1GS9), his first 

wife. 

Quartermaster George Colton (Eng.-1699) came to this 
country before IGM and located in "Masacksick" (Long- 
meadow, Springfield, Mass.). In 1G77 he was representa- 
tive to the General Court; in 1G70 he was appointed by the 
General Court with two other inen to lay out and sell lots 
for the new settlement of Suffield, Conn. In 1G77 he was 
made representative to the General Court. After his death 
in Longmeadow, Dec. 17, IGO!), his heirs received fifty 
acres of land in recognition of his public services. He was 
a prominent, trusted and public-spirited inember of the com- 
munity in which he lived. 



121 



Benjamin Colton (1722-1808), a resident of Wilbraham, 
Mass., marched on the Alarm of April 19, 1775. He was 
born in Springfield, and died in Wilbraham, Massachusetts. 

John Gunn Colton (1747-1822) served as sergeant at 
the Lexington Alarm; in 1778 he was second Lieutenant in 
Hampshire County Militia; in 1780 was promoted to the 
ofifiice of first Lieutenant, and served on various alarms 
until 1782. He was born in Springfield, Mass., and died 
in Butternuts, Delaware County, New York. 



Mary Amelia Cooke (Mrs. Franklin Fur- 
man Knous). 285 

Born in Washington, Connecticut. 

Descendant of Aaron Cooke, of Massachusetts and Con- 
necticut, through the Revolutionary ancestor, Joseph Cooke, 
of Connecticut, as follows : 



2. Charles Ward Cooke (Oct. 31, 1825-Feb. 18. 1896) and 
Susan Louisa Beardsley (Feb. 23, 1830-....). 

3. Augustus Cooke (Dec. S, 1799, Litchfield, Conn.-Apr. G, 18G4, 
Litchfield) and 

Mary Negus Cooper (Oct. 23, 1797, Litclifield-Dec. 28, 1851, 
Litchfield). 

4. Nathan Cooke (Mch. 19, 1777, Harwinton, Conn.-Mch. 17. 1K20, 
Litchfield) and 

Aliigail Beckwith (June 12, 177:), Southington, Conn.-Apr. 18, 
1S40, Rochester, N. V.). 

5. Joseph Cooke (bapt. Feb. 3, 1735, Harwinton-AIay 5, 1821, Har- 
winton) and 

Lucretia Post (Jan. 13, 1739, Norwich, Conn.-Sept. 17, 1777, Har- 
winton). 

6. Aaron Cooke (Sept. 23, 1G89, Hartford, Conn.-July 15, 1759, Har- 
winton) and 

Hannah Wadsworth (1G89, Hartford-Aug. 2, 1786, Harwinto'.i). 

7. Aaron Cooke (1GG3/4, Hadley, Mass.-Apr. 15, 1725, Hartford, 
Conn.) and 

Martha Allyn (July 27, 1GG7, Hartford-Sept. 13, 1732, Hartford). 

8. Aaron Cooke (Feb. 21, 1G40/41, Windsor, Conn.-Sept. 16, 1715, 
Hadley, Mass.) and 

Sarah Westwood (b. Essex, Eng. m. May 30, 1661-Mch. 24, 1730, 
aged 8()). 

9. Aaron Cooke (Eng. ab. 1610-Sept. 5, 1G90), and 

Ford (Eng.-bef. 1650) his first wife (dou. of Thomas). 



122 

Aaron Cooke (ab. Ifil0-1(!00) emigrated from England 
to this country and was a resident of Dorchester, Mass., in 
1630. He removed in IG06 to Windsor, Conn., and in 1G5;? 
was granted lands at "Massacoe" (Simsbury) and the same 
year was appointed by the General Court of Connecticut 
"Commander in Chieffe" of the Connecticut troops, raised 
for the expected war against the Dutch. In 1G5-") he was 
chosen Captain at Windsor by 87 votes to 19 votes for 
all his opponents, and in 1G87 was appointed Major by 
Gen. Andros, from Northampton, Mass., to which place he 
had removed. In 1G61 he was a proprietor of WestheUi, 
Alass., and represented that town at the General Court in 
16G8. He was a man of great energy and a devoted friend 
of Wlialley and Goffe. He married four times : Miss Ford. 
a daughter of Thomas Ford ; Joanna Denslow, Elizal)cth 
Nash, and Mrs. Rebecca (Foote) Smith — but had no cliil- 
dren by his third or fourth wives. He died in Northampton, 
Mass., Sept. 5, 1G90, and a monument was erected to his 
memory in 1881 by one of his descendants, Josiah Parsons 
Cooke. 

Joseph Cooke (1735-1821) was a selectman of Harwin- 
ton, Coim., during the Revolution and a Representative in 
the Connecticut General Assembly from 1778 to 1780. 



Sarah Elizabi',tii 1Io\'F,y (Mrs. Ciiaki.ivS 

Harris). 28G 

Born in Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of Joseph Cooke, throtigh the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Benjamin Cooke, both of Massachusetts, as fol- 
lows : 

2. Phineas B. Hovcv, Jr. (Sept. ?>, 1803-Junc 3, 1885) and 
Mary L. Cooke (Dec. 10, 18()6-Tuly 11, ]S97). 

3. John Cooke (Dec. 10, 1775-Aug. 9, 1840) and 

Elizabeth Cheevcr (Oct. 31, 1778-May 20, 1810) his first wife. 

4. Benjamin Cooke (Aug. 16, 1742-Dec. 3, 1700) and 
Lydia Hammond (Apr. 4, 174C-m. 17fi5). 

5. Joseph Cooke (Mch. .5, 1717-aft. 1770) and 
Elizabeth Stratton (Feb. 12, 1719-m. June 7, 1739). 



123 

6. Joseph Cooke (Dec. 16, 1671-May 28, 1739) and 
Eunice .... (1674-Mav 9, 1718). 

7. Joseph Cooke (Dec. 2'7, 1643-Feb., 1G90) and 
Martha Stedman (June 3, lG4C-m. Dec. 4, KifjS). 

8. Joseph Cooke (ab. 1008-aft. 1665) and 
Elizabeth 

Joseph Cooke (ab. 1608-aft. 1G65) emigrated from Eng- 
land with his brother, George, in 1G35 and settled in Cam- 
bridge, Mass., where he became a prominent citizen. He 
was selectman seven years ; town clerk five years ; Com- 
missioner from 104<S to 57; and Representative from 1G3G 
to 41. In lGo8 he returned to England and in 1GG5 con- 
veyed his homestead in Cambridge to his only son, Joseph, 
who continued the family line in New England. The father 
probably died in England. 

Benjamin Cooke (1742-1790) was a private in Capt. 
John Walton's company in 1777 and 78. In 1779 he was 
in Capt. Nathaniel Heath's company on guard at Boston. 
He was born and died in Cambridge, Massachusetts. 



LusANNA Wadswokth Round.s (Mrs. Herbert 

W. Gleason). 287 

Born in Maiden, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of Christopher Wadsworth, of Massachu- 
setts, through the Revolutionary ancestor, General Pele^<^ 
Wadsworth, of Maine, as follows: 

2. John C. Rounds (Nov. 6, 1829-Feb. 1, 1887) and 
Louise Wadsworth (Oct. 27, 1832-....). 

3. Pelcg Wadsworth (Oct. 10, 1793-Jan. 17, 1875) and 
Lusanna Wadsworth (dau. of Dura Wadsworth) (Dec. n, 1797- 
1878). 

4. Gen. Peleg Wadsworth (May C, 1748-1829) and 
Elizabeth Bartlett (Aug. 9, 1753-July 20, 1825). 

5. Dea. Peleg Wadsworth (Aug. 29, 1715-1774) and 
Susanna .Sampson (1720-....). 

6. John Wadsworth (Mch. 12, 1G71-May 3, 1750) and 
Mercy Wiswcll (1680-1710). 

7. John Wadsworth (1638-1700) and 
Abigail Andrews (July 25, 1647-1723). 

8. Christopher Wadsworth (....-1678) and 
Grace Cole. 



124 

Christopher Wadsworth (Eng.-1678) was an inhabitant 
of Duxbury, ]\Iass., before 1G32. He was a Representative 
to the General Court from that town in 1666 and 67. His 
will, dated July 31, 1677, was probated in 1678. 

Gen. Peleg Wadsworth (1748-1829) was Captain of a 
company from Kingston, Mass., which marched on the Lex- 
ington Alarm. In 1778 he was appointed Adjutant General 
and in 1779 commanded the ill-fated Penobscot Expedition, 
as Brigadier General. In 1781 he was placed in charge of 
the District of Maine, and died in Hiram, Maine, in 1829. 
He was born in Duxbury, Mass., and married Elizabeth 
Bartlett, a Mayflower descendant. 



Abigaii, Daniels Symonds (Mrs. Frank M. 

Goss). 288 

Born in Peabody, Massachusetts. 

Descendant of John Ham, through the Revolutionary an- 
cestor, Moses Ham, both of New Hampshire, as follows; 

2. Robert Shillaber Daniels Symonds (Aug. 30, 1826-Jan. 3, 1903) and 
Joanna Stetson Ham (Oct. 28, 1828-Jan. 21, 189G). 

3. Samuel Ham (Feb. 22, 1802-Sept. 24, 1864) and 
Frances Lcavitt (Oct. 9, 1799-Apr. 18, 1880). 

4. Jotham Ham (Apr. 5, 1762-Sept. 1, 1817) and 
Mary Randall (....-....). 

5. Moses Ham (July 19, 1733-May 11, 1817) and 
Anna Grafton, of Dover, N. H. 

6. Ephriam Ham (1701-1752) and 
Anna Wentworth (m. ab. 1728). 

7. John Ham, Jr. (Jan. 29, 17Cl-Jan. 11, 1754) and 
Elizabeth Knight (1C77-1739). 

8. John Ham (1(549-1727) and 

Mary Heard (Jan. 26, 1050-Dec. 7, 1706). 

John Ham (1649-1727) was in Dover, N. H., as early as 
1665; was a Lieutenant in the Militia; constable in 167G; 
juryman in 1688, and town clerk from 1693 to 94. He died 
in Dover, N. H., in 1727. 

Moses liam (1733-1817) was selectman of the town of 
Wolfborough, N. H., in 1776. In 1778 he was a Corporal 
in a company of Militia stationed in Rhode Island, and re- 



125 

ceived pay from the selectmen of Dover for his services. 
He served a short tour of duty as a Lieutenant ; and in 1780 
was collector of the taxes. He was born and died in Dover, 
New Hampshire. 



Louise; Sluyter (Mrs. John H. Abeel). 289 

Born in New York City. 

Descendant of Johannes VanZandt, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Peter Praa VanZandt, both of New York, 
as follows : 

2. William R. Sluyter (Apr. 11, 1825-Oct. 12, 1894) and 
Louisa Van Zandt (Feb. 12, lS27-Mch. 23, 1903). 

3. Peter Van Zandt (Nov. 31, 1791-Aug. 9, 1855) and 
Joanna Dc Pcyster Kuypers (1799-1832) his first wife. 

4. Peter Van Zandt (May 29, 17G5-Junc 17, 1845) and 
> Sarah Jancway (Mch. 17, 1771-Jan. 28, 1841). 

5. Peter Praa Van Zandt (1708-Aug. 12, 1812) and 
Sarah Marschalk (Nov. 22, 1733-Dcc. 21, 1817). 

6. Wvnant Van Zandt (Dec. 17, 1683-Oct., 175G) and 
Maria Praa (lG88-Oct. 17, 1709) his first wife. 

7. Johannes Van Zandt (bef. 1663-Oct. IG, 1724) and 
Margaret Vanderpoel (m. Oct. 20, 1681). 

8. Jan Van Zandt (....-1729) and 
Jannetjc ( -1728). 

Johannes VanZandt (bef. 1603-1724) emigrated from the 
city of Anheim, Holland, in 1682; and was in Albany, New 
York, in liJSo, when his son, \\'y"ant, was baptized. From 
161)5 to 1703 he was a resident of New York City, and died 
in Queens County, New York, Oct. 16, 1721. 

Peter Praa VanZandt (1708-1812) was a member of the 
New York Committee of Safety and of the Provincial Con- 
gresses of 1776 and 1783. Pie was also a member of the 
Council for the temporary government of the city of New 
York in 1783 and 84. Plis brother, Jacobus, was surgeon in 
the army under Washington at Valley Forge and Trenton, 
and his four other brothers are said to have served. His 
niece, Catherine (later Mrs. James H. Maxwell) was one 
of the leading belles at the Inaugural ball of Washington. 



126 

FrancEvS Hubbard (Mrs. John Durrant 

Larkin). 290 

Born in Buffalo, New York. 

Descendant of George Hubbard, through the Revolu- 
tionary ancestor, Daniel Hubbard, both of Connecticut, as 
follows : 

2. Silas Hubbard (May 9, 1821-living 1906) and 
Julia Frances Read (Nov. IG, 1829-living 1906). 

3. Solomon Hubbard (Maj'-, 17G8-May, lS2a) and 
Hannah Willard (1774-Aug. 13, 1834). 

4. Daniel Hubbard (Mch. 1, 1729-1822) and 
Eunice Clark (May 17, 1736-....). 

5. Daniel Hubbard (1701-Mch. 11, 1755) and 
Temperance Slialcr (July 25, 1704-...., Haddam, Conn.). 

6. Daniel Hubbard (Dec. 16, 1673-wilI prob. Jan. 14, 175C) and 
Susannah Bailey (m. Dec. 8, 1697) his first wife. 

7. Daniel Hubbard' (bapt. Dec. 7, 1645-Nov. 9, 1704) and 
Mary Clark (m. Feb. 24, 1669-Dcc. 8, 1673) his first wife. 

8. George Hubbard (1601-Mch. 18, 1684) and 
Elizabeth Watts (m. 1640-1702). 

George Hubbard (1601-](;S4) was born in England, emi- 
grated to this country, and settled in Hartford, Conn., where 
his name appears in 1635 as one of the early settlers of that 
place. In March, 1650/1 he removed to "Mattabeseft" 
(Middletown, Conn.), where he held a commission from 
the Colonial Government as Indian Agent and Trader for 
the Mattabesett District. He owned large tracts of land, 
and the ancient records say of him that "he was highly re- 
spected and of marked integrity and fairness." He mar- 
ried in Hi JO Elizabeth Watts, daughter of Richard Watts, 
and died March 18, IfiSd. His original will is on file in the 
Hall of Records at Hartford, Connecticut. 

Daniel Hubbard (1729-1822) served as a private in Capt. 
Martin Kirtland's company of Connecticut troops in 17T9. 
He was born in Haddam, Conn., and died in Schoharie 
County, New York. 

Grace Mack (Mrs. Charles D. Standish). 291 
Born in Edwardsburg, Michigan. 

Descendant of John Mack, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Orlando Mack, both of Connecticut, as follows: 



127 

2. Francis A. Mack (Jan. 16, 182-1-June 15, 1884) and 
Matilda Thompson (Apr. 27, 1827-Junc 4, l'J03). 

3. Orlando Mack (179G-1880) and 
Clarissa Bonnev (1800-183.'!). 

4. Orlando Mack (Oct. 10, 1747-ab. 1813) and 

Lucy Baldwin (m. Mch. 8, 1792-aft. 1807) his second wife. 

5. Orlando Mack (May 24, 1724-aft. 17(33) and 
Abigail Adams (m. Nov. 8, 1744-June 20, 1709). 

6. Orlando Alack (16'.)3/97-Jan. 28, 1768) and 
Demaris Button (1702-Jan. 17, 1774). 

7. John Mack (Scotland-1734) and 

Sarah Bagley (m. 1681-bcf. Alay 4, 1733) his first wife. 

John Mack (Scotland-lT3-J) emigrated from Scotland 
to this country about 1680, and settled in Salisbury, Conn., 
where he married his first wife, Sarah Bagley, April 5, 
1G81. In 1691 he moved to Lyme, Conn., where he died 
in 1734, leaving a widow, Abigail (second wife) and a 
large family of children, all l^orn of his first wife. 

Lieut. Orlando Mack (1T4T-1813) was commissioned 
Second Lieutenant Jan. 1, 17 T 7, and First Lieutenant Feb. 
16 of the same year. He enlisted from Hebron, Conn., 
his native town, and served in the Connecticut line until 
Nov. 1-", 1778. After the Revolution he moved to New 
Marlborough, Mass., and thence to Tompkins County, N. Y. 
He married first Mehitable Chapman, Dec. 21, 1769, 
and in 1792 married Lucy Baldwin, of New Marlborough. 
During the War of 1812 he transported supplies to the 
American troops on the Niagara frontier, and died while 
in service at Black Rock, near Buffalo, New York, leaving 
his widow, Lucy, and several children, in Tompkins County, 
Ne\y York. 

Helen Crittendkn (Mrs. Loveland). 292 

Born in San Jose, California. 

Descendant of Hon. Abraham Crittenden, through the 
Revolutionary ancestor, Samuel Crittenden, both of Con- 
necticut, as follows : 

2. Charles P. Crittenden (Feb. 10, 1829-Aug. 29, 1S02) and 
Deborah Kathcrine Scott (Julv 14, 1825-living 1906). 

3. William Crittenden (Dec. 20,*1788-Dec. 23, 1862) and 
Fanny Peck (Tan. 10, 1700-Apr. 3, 1847). 



128 

4. John Crittenden (Oct. 16, 1761-Mch. 16, 1852) and 
Submit Dickcrson (Aug. 14, 1707-1841). 

5. Samuel Crittenden (Sept. 11, 1712-Jan. 4, 1802) and 
Sarah Eaton (Aug., 1714-Apr., 178!)). 

6. Samuel Crittenden (Nov. 1, 1675-Dec. 12, 1745) and 
Mindvvell Meigs (al). 1687-Mch. 31, 17G2). 

7. Lsaac Crittenden (1643-Tuly 13, 1G85) and 
Lydia Thompson (July 24, 1G47-Dec., 1729). 
(She m. (2) Dea. John Meigs.) 

8. Hon. Abraham Crittenden (Eng. IGIO-Tan., 1G83) and 
Mary ( -1G64) his first wife. 

Abraham Crittenden, or Cruttenden (1(>10-1(jS3), came 
from County Kent, England, and was one of the twenty- 
five signers of the plantation covenant settlement of Guil- 
ford, Connecticut, in 1G39. In 1646 he was appointed 
"Overseer of the mill bay dams or flood gates" ; was asses- 
sor in 1651; and townsman .(selectman) in 1653. He mar- 
ried Mary, who was the mother of all his children, and 
after her death married Johanna Chittenden, and died in 
Guilford, Conn., in January, 1683. 

Samuel Crittenden (1712-1802) was etilisted for service 
in the "New York Expedition" in 1776, under Capt. Daniel 
Hand, of Guilford. He was born and died in Guilford. 
Connecticut. 



Katherine Deere (Mrs. Wieliam Butter- 
worth). 293 

Born in Moline, Illinois. 

Descendant of Nathaniel Dickinson, of Connecticut, 
through the Revolutionary ancestor, Gideon Dickinson, of 
Massachusetts, as follows : 

2. Charles Henry Deere (Mch. 28, 1837-Oct. 29, 1907) and ' 
Mary Little Dickinson (Aug. 9, 1841-Apr. 28, 1913). 

3. Gideon Dana Dickinson (Dec. 21, 1807-Mch. 17, 1891) and 
Judith Toppan Atkinson (June 25, 1817-Dec. 17, 1877). 

4. Gideon Dickinson (July 31, 1781-Aug. 10, 1866) and 
Hannah Weed (Apr. 18, 178G-Scpt. 4, 1864). 

5. Gideon Dickinson (bapt. Dec. 1, 1745-aft. 1787) and 
Abigail Field (Jan. 5, 1748- ) his first wife. 

6. Gideon Dickinson (Dec. 1, 1720-1780) and 
Hannah Edwards (m. 1745). 

7. Ebenezer Dickinson (Sept. I'S? 1G96-1780) and 

Sarah Kellogg (Mch. 12, 1701-Mch. 22, 1743) his first wife. 



129 

8. Nehemiah Dickinson (1644-Sept. 8, 1723) and 
Mary Cowlcs (1G49-....)- 

9. Nathaniel Dickinson (1600-Jime IG, 1G76) and 
Anna Gall (or Gull). 

Nathaniel Dickinson (1600-1676) came in 1634 with his 
wife and three children from Cambridge, England. He 
was first in Watertown, Mass., but settled in Wethersfield, 
Conn., 163G-7 and speedily became a prominent citizen. 
He was town clerk in 1645 and the earliest town vote re- 
corded is in his handwriting; townsman, 1647-S ; deputy 
to the General Court from K)46 to 1656. With his sons 
Nathaniel and John he was among the founders of Hadley, 
Mass., where he was first town clerk ; Commissioner and 
Magistrate. He was a member at its formation of the 
Hampshire Troop under Capt. Pyncheon and was one of 
the first trustees of Hopkins' Academy. He lost three sons 
in the Indian wars. He died in Hadley, June 16, 1676. 

Gideon Dickinson (1745-aft. 1787), of Amherst, Mass., 
served as a Minute Man at the Lexington Alarm under 
Lieut. Eli Parker and marched to Cambridge. He was 
born in Amherst, Mass., and removed after the Revolution 
to Washington County, Vt. 



CoRRA Bacon (Mrs. Fostkr). 294 

Born in Trenton, New York. 

Descendant of Michael Bacon, Sr. and Jr., through the 
Revolutionary ancestors, Jonathan Bacon, Sen. and Jr., all 
of Massachusetts, as follows : 

2. Edward Davis Bacon (Aug. 14, 1814, Greenfield, Mass.-Jan. 9, 
1871) and 

Jane Jenkins (Nov. 29, 1816-Jan. 9, 1854). 

3. Jonathan Bacon (June 29, 1784, Auburn, Mass.-Oct., 1835) and 
Huldah Davis (Jan. 9, 1789, Dudley, Mass.-vVpr. 3, 1871). 

4. Jonathan Bacon (Apr. 4, 1759-Nov., 1845) and 

Mollie Adams ( -Apr. 18, 1836, Oppenheim, N. Y.). 

5. Jonathan Bacon (1732-1815, Dudley, Mass.) and 

Martha Wood (Uxbridge, Jan. 12, 1729-Dudley, Dec. 17, 1783). 

6. Jonathan Bacon (Dec. 12, 1700, Bedford-Oct. 14, 1750, Sutton, 
Mass.) and 

Ruth (....-Oct. 25, 177?, Sutton, Mass.). 



130 

7. Jonathan Bacon (July 14, 1673, Wohurn, Mass.-Jan. 12, 1754, 
Billerica, Mass.) and 

Elizabeth Giles (....-Mch. 3, 1738) his first wife. 

8. Michael Bacon (Feb. 16, lG39/40-Aug. 13, 1707) and 
Sarah Richardson (Nov. 6, 1640, Woburn-Aug. 15, 1694). 

9. Michael Bacon (Eng -July 4, 168S, Woburn) and 

Mary (m. Aug. 31, 1634-Aug. 26. 1655, Woburn) his first 

wife. 

10. Alichael Bacon (Dec. 6, 1579-Apr. 2, 1648, Dedham, Mass.) and 
Ehzabeth ( . . . .-1647, Dedham, Mass.). 

Michael Bacon (15T!)-lGi8), born in County Suffolk, 
England, emigrated to this country in 1040 and was one of 
the early settlers of Dedham, Mass. In lG4-i he was one of 
the signers of the Church Covenant and the same year 
granted land to the town for a highway. He died in Ded- 
ham, April 18, 1648. 

Michael Bacon, Jr. (Eng.-1688) was born in his father's 
native place, Winston, County of Suffolk, England, and 
emigrated with his father to America and became one 
of the founders of Woburn, Mass. In 1644 he was ap- 
pointed surveyor of highways for the town of Woburn. 
He married first, Aug. 31, 1624, Mary, who died Aug. 26, 
l(i55 ; married second, Oct. 2(i, 16r)5, Mary Richardson, 
who died May 1!), 16T0 ; married third, Nov. 28, 1670, Mary 
Noyes, and died July 4, 1688. 

Jonathan Bacon (1732-1815) served three terms in the 
General Court of Massachusetts during the Revolution, and 
is said to have served as moderator of every town meeting in 
Southbridge. from its organization as a town in 1772, until 
his removal to Dudley, Mass., where he died in 1785. 

Jonathan Bacon (175!)-1845) enhsted from Northbridge, 
Mass., in Capt. David Batchellor's company, serving in 
1776 and 77. In 1832 he was placed on the pension roll of 
Oppenheim, N. Y., for service as a i)rivate in the Massa- 
chusetts Line. 

DoTiiA Stonf; Pinneo. 295 

Descendant of Francis Linsley, of New Jersey and Con- 
necticut, through the Revolutionary ancestor, Abicl Linds- 
ley, of Connecticut, as foll(?\vs : 



131 

S.Timothy Stone Pinneo (Feb. 18, lS04-Aug. 2, 1893) and 
Jeannette Linsley (....-Jan. 23, 1887). 

3. Joel Harvey Linsley (July 15, 1790-Mch. 22, 1868) and 

Mrs. Phebe (Henderson) Smith (June 19, 1784-Jan. 20, 1858). 

4. Hon. Joel Linsley (Feb. 7, 175G-....) and 
Lavinia Gilbert (Dec. 28, 1758- ). 

5. Abiel Linsley, Jr. (1730-1800) and 
Thankful Pond (Apr. 27, 1733-Mch. 20, 1777). 

6. Abicl Linsley, Sr. (Mch. 22, 1700- ) and 

(Litchfield records mention his sons, Abiel, Solomon 

and Joseph). 

7. Benjamin Linsley (bet. 1667-167G-1750) and 
Mary , his first wife. 

8. Francis Linsley (IGOO-ab. 1704) and 

Susanna Culpepper (m. June 24, 1655) his second wife. 

Francis Linsley (Eng.-1704) emigrated to this country 
prior to 16-lG, in which year he was appointed "to keep 
the heard of cows and heifers" in Branford, Conn. He 
married Susannah Culpepper, June 24, 1655, and in IGGG 
removed to Newark, N. J., of which town he was one of 
the founders. Before his death in 1704 he gave land to his 
sons, Benjamin, Ebenezer, Joseph, and Jonathan. 

Abiel Linsley (1730-1800) enlisted for the war in 1777; 
and from 1780 to 82 served as Quartermaster Sergeant in 
the Continental Line. He was born in Litchfield, Conn., 
and died in Cornwall, Vermont. 



May Noble. 29 G 

Born in Houston, Texas. 

Descendant of Thomas Noble, of Massachusetts, through 
the Revolutionary ancestor, Capt. Thaddeus Noble, of Con- 
necticut, as follows : 

2. La Rov Charles Noble (July 24, 1842- ) and 

Maria Elizabeth Campbell {Aug. 29, 1843- ). 

3. Sylvester Drake Noble (Mch. 24, 1794-Tan. 28, 1879) and 
Mrs. Luropa Ann (Taylor) Goodrich (Mch. 28, 1804-Nov. 23, 
1847) his second wife. 

4. Daniel Noble (Mch. 16, 1763-Jan. 22, 1837) and 
Lucinda Drake ( Tuly 21, 1765-Jan. 18, 1829). 

5. Capt. Thaddeus Noble (Jan. 9, 1734-June 14, 1809) and 
Sarah Pact (Mch. 27, 1733-Apr. 5, 1812). 

6. Solomon Noble (Dec. 23, 1700-Dec. 17, 1757) and 
Hepzibah Betts (Oct. 29, 1703JSept. 4, 1745) his first wife. 



132 

7. Matthew Noble (ab. lGG8-ab. 174-1) and 
Hannah Dewey (Feb. 21, lG72-aft. July 9, 1745). 

8. Thomas Noble (ab. 1632-Jan. 20, 1704) and 
Hannah Warriner (Aug. 17, 1043-bef. May 12, 1721) 
(m. (2) Jan. 24, 1705, Deacon Mcdad Pomcroy). 

Thomas Noble (ab. 1632-1704) was a resident of Bos- 
ton in 1653, and moved to Springfield, Mass., the same 
year. In 1664 he, with others, was granted permission to 
erect a saw mill on the west side of the Connecticut River. 
He was at "Warronoco" (Westfield) in 1669, when he was 
appointed on a committee. He was constable of Westfield 
and took the oath of allegiance to the King Jan. 23, 1678; 
and the freeman's oath in the Hampshire Court Sept. 26, 
1682; v^^as county surveyor in 1696 and often a member 
of committees in the interests of the town in whose affairs 
he took an active part. He died in Westfield, Jan. 20, 1694. 

Capt. Thaddeus Noble (1734^1809) raised a volunteer 
company during the Revolution and was commissioned Cap- 
tain. In 1776 the Kings District (N. Y.) Committee of 
Safety recommended him to the New York Committee of 
Safety as an able workman and gunsmith, and the colony 
entered into a contract with him to make muskets for the 
army. 



Pam Nop.Liv (Mrs. Charles D. Marsh). 297 

Born in Houston, Texas. 

Descendant of Thomas Noble, of Massachusetts, through 
the Revolutionary ancestor, Capt. Thaddeus Noble, of Con- 
necticut, as follows : 

2. La Roy Charles Noble (July 24, 1842- )and 

Maria Elizabeth Campbell (Aug. 29, 1843-....). 

3. Sylvester Drake Noble (Mch. 24, 1794-Tan. 28, 1879)' and 
Mrs. Europa Ann (Taylor) Goodrich (Mch. 28, 1804-Nov. 23, 
1847) his second wife. 

4. Daniel Noble (Mch. IG, 17G3-Jan. 22, 1837) and 
Lucinda Drake (July 21, 17G5-Jan. 18, 1829). 

5. Capt. Thaddeus Noble (Jan. 9, 1734-rune 14, 1809) and 
Sarah Peet (Mch. 27, 1733-Apr. 5, 1812). 

6. Solomon Noble (Dec. 23, 1700-Dec. 17, 1757) and 
Hepzibah Betts (Oct. 29, 1^3-Sept. 4, 1745) his first wife. 



133 

7. Matthew Noble (ab. lC68-ab. 1744) and 
Hannah Dewey (Feb 21, 1672-aft. July 9, 1745). 

8. Thomas Noble (ab. 1632-Jan. 20, 1704) and 
Hannah Warriner (Aug. 17, 1643-bef. May 12, 1721). 
(m. (2) Jan. 24, 1705, Deacon Medad Pomeroy.) 

For services of Founder and Patriot ancestors, see Na- 
tional Number 296, page 132. 



Sally Davis McHunry. 298 

Born in Shelby County, Kentucky. 

Descendant of Nicholas Meriwether, through the Revo- 
lutionary ancestor, William Meriwether, both of Virginia, 
as follows : 

2. Martin D. McHenry (Sept. 21, IBOG-Dec. 12, 189.3) and 
Mildred Meriwether (Nov. 7, 1820-1910). 

3. Tames Beverly Meriwether (1796-1823) and 
Anne Lynch Smith (1801-Oct. 10, 1884). 

4. William Meriwether (17G0-Fcb. 10, 1842) and 
Elizabeth Winslow. 

5. James Meriwether (June 1, 1729-1798) and 
Tudith Hardenia Burnley, his first wife. 

6. David Meriwether (bef. 1G94-Dec. 25, 1744) and 
Anne Holmes ( -Mch. 11, 1735/6). 

7. Nicholas Meriwether (Oct. 26, 1647-1744) and 
Elizabeth Crawford. 

8. Nicholas Meriwether (.. ..-1678) of Wales or England. 

Nicholas Meriwether (1647-1744) emigrated to America 
with his father, and settled in New Kent County, Va., 
where he was a vestryman in St. Peter's Church from 1685 
to 1G98. 

William Meriwether (1760-1842) was a cadet in Capt. 
Benjamin Pollard's company, Virginia State Line, in 1776 ; 
in 1777 he joined the Continental Army and was at Valley 
Forge, and also in the battle of Monmouth, after which he 
returned to Charlottesville, Va., his home, as a member of 
a guard to the prisoners. In 1779 he was appointed First 
Sergeant of a company of Illinois Light Dragoons, in which 
his brother was Lieutenant, and together they went to the 
Falls of Ohio, headquarters of the troops under George 



134 

Rogers Clarke. His brother, James, returning to Virginia 
the next year, he took his pkice, and was ordered to march 
with his company to Logan's Fort, and remain there in com- 
mand, which he did until after the surrender of Cornwallis. 
A full and interesting account of the expedition is given in 
his application for the half -pay, given Virginia of^cers, 
which he filed Jan. 15, 1833, when he was living at Shclby- 
ville, Kentucky, where he died in 1842. 



Catherine Brittin Barlow. 299 

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Descendant of George Barlow, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Jesse Barlow, both of Massachusetts, as follows : 

2. Thomas Arnold Barlow (Mch. 24, 1817-1888) and 
Elizabeth Bennett (1S20-187G). 

3. Arnold Barlow (July 9, 1779-1835) and 
Ann Brittin (m. Dec. 11, 1811-aft. 1832). 

4. Jesse Barlow (Sept. 12, 1749-Dec. 10, 1815) and 
Sarah Nye (Oct. 24, 1750-m. Dec. 12, 1769). 

5. Thomas Barlow (May 17, 1718-wiIl prov. May 11, 1768) and 
Mehitable Wing (m. Feb. 14, 1744). 

6. Peleg Barlow (m. July 25, 1717) and 
Hlizabclh Perry (July 15, 1690-....). 

7. Nathan Barlow (bef. 1684-Dec. 15, 1744) and 
Mary . 

8. George Barlow (Eng.-1G84) and 
Mrs. Jane Bcsse (m. aft. 1667-1693). 

George Barlow (Eng.-1G84) was in Boston in l(i3? and 
in Exeter, N. H., in 1G39, where he received grants of land 
in 1G41 and 1650. In the latter year leave was granted him 
with others to set up a saw mill. In 1G52 he was in Saco, 
Maine, and was made freeman of Massachusetts at Wells, 
July 5, 1G53. Pie was a preacher at Exeter and at Saco; 
and soon after 1653 he removed to Newbury, Mass., and 
in 1657 was at Sandwich, where in 1G5S he \vas appointed 
Marshal of Sandwich, Barnstable and Yarmouth. In 1G59 
his authority as Marshal was extended to all places in the 
colony. 

Jesse Barlow (1749-1815) was a Minute Man at the 



135 

Lexington Alarm. In 1778 he was Sergeant in Capt. Swift's 
company of Massachusetts State troops, stationed at Dart- 
mouth and Falmouth. He was also engaged in the shipping 
trade; one of his vessels .was captured by a British cruiser 
and retaken by a schooner from Dartmouth, causing him 
great loss. He was born in Sandwich, Mass., and died in 
Newport, Rhode Island. 



Mary Elizabeth Barlow. 300 

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Descendant of George Barlow, through the Revolutionary 
ancestor, Jesse Barlow, both of Massachusetts, as follows: 

2. Thomas Arnold Barlow (Mch. 24, 1817-1888) and 
Elizabeth Bennett (1S20-187C). 

3. Arnold Barlow (Tuly 9, 1779-1835) and 
Ann Brittin (m. Dec. 11, 1811-aft. 1832). 

4. Jesse Barlow (Sept. 12, 1749-Dec. 10, 1815) and 
Sarah Nye (Oct. 24, 1750-m. Dec. 12, 17G9). 

5. Thomas Barlow (May 17, 1718-will. prov. May 11, 1768) and 
Mchitablc Wing (m. Feb. 14, 1744). 

6. Peleg Barlow (m. July 25, 1717) and 
Elizabeth Perry (July 15, 1090- ). 

7. Nathan Barlow (bef. 1684-Dec. 15, 1744) and 
Mary . 

8. George Barlow (Eng -1684) and 

Mrs. Jane Bcsse (m. aft. 1GG7-1G93). 

For services of Founder and Patriot ancestors, see Na- 
tional Number 2ity, page J 34. 



136 



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137 



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138 



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139 



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140 



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141 



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142 



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143 



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144 

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2G117. 



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